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COMMUNITY: Tulalip Tribes hand out $5.48 million. Page 3

Volunteers turn out for estuary project BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

MARYSVILLE — Between Sept. 23 and 24, close to 100 volunteers showed up at Harborview Park in southern Marysville to help get the local ecosystem going again, even though most of them don’t live or work in town. The nearly 60 volunteers from Philips Healthcare, the Everett YMCA and the Sno-Isle Libraries who turned out on Friday, Sept. 23, represented the start of the Qwuloolt Estuary Restoration Project. They and their fellow volunteers on Saturday, Sept. 24, planted more than 850 native trees and shrubs on eight-tenths of an acre on the eastern side of the Qwuloolt Estuary, but over the course of the next 15 months the restoration project plans to conduct such plantings on 10 acres of territory around the marsh. Sound Salmon Solutions, formerly known as the Stilly-Snohomish Fisheries Enhancement Task Force, is working with the Tulalip Tribes to get the restoration site ready for the breaching of the levy in 2013. “This was the first time we really got our SEE ESTUARY, PAGE 2

SPORTS: Tomahawks fall to Arlington 45-28. Page 8

INDEX

SPORTS: Chargers win game, lose match to Everett. Page 8

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Lamdouane Keoamphay, an employee of Philips Healthcare, joins nearly 60 other volunteers in planting native trees and shrubs in the Qwuloolt Estuary at Harborview Park on Sept. 23.

Forum focuses on human trafficking BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

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Dusty Olson, advocate and volunteer coordinator for the Providence Intervention Center for Assault and Abuse, speaks about human trafficking.

MARYSVILLE — “When we talk about human trafficking, we hear people say that it doesn’t happen here,” said Dusty Olson, advocate and volunteer coordinator for the Providence Intervention Center for Assault and Abuse. “But these are girls from Marysville, Lake Stevens and Everett who are being recruited and exploited.” Olson joined FBI Special Agent Derik Stone and Sarah Sweeney, director of “Not For Sale” of Washington, in addressing the Marysville Chapter of Soroptimist

International on Sept. 22 to discuss domestic minor sex trafficking, the commercial sexual exploitation of underage children in America. Olson became aware of the problem of local human trafficking through years of working with sexual assault victims, and as she addressed an audience that included Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Marysville School District Superintendent Dr. Larry Nyland, she noted the unique difficulties of trying to aid such exploited children. “We don’t refer to them as juvenile prostitutes, because that implies the false idea that they have a choice,”

Olson said. “They’re prostituted children, because it’s what’s happened to them, not who they are.” At the same time, Olson and Stone acknowledged that such children are conditioned by their exploiters to see themselves as having chosen their lives, to the point that they’ll often lie to protect their exploiters and remain with them. “A pimp senses what a child is vulnerable to — what they need that they’re not getting, whether it’s a father figure or a romantic relationship — and then sells them the dream,” Olson said. “They genuSEE FORUM, PAGE 2


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September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

FORUM FROM PAGE 1 inely believe they have free will and will do anything to keep the dependency that their pimps have established. It’s similar to domestic violence relationships.” Young girls tend to be exploited much more than young boys in this fashion, with most exploited girls entering a life of prostitution between the ages of 12 and 14, and only living to an average age of 20 due to the violence they experience. Stone works as part of the Bureau’s “Innocence Lost” Task Force, and he echoed Olson’s rebuke to those who think human trafficking only happens in foreign countries

by recalling how he’s found homework assignments from Everett schools in the backseats of cars from which exploited girls have been recovered. “We rely heavily on our local patrol officers,” Stone said. “They’re our eyes and ears. We also know we can turn to Dusty, so if it’s 2 a.m., we can call her and have a meal and a bed waiting for one of these girls.” Sweeney became involved in combating human trafficking after witnessing the underage sex trade overseas and realizing that it’s gotten worse over the decades. While she touted a number of positive steps that have been taken in that fight here in Washington, including the

state’s pioneering anti-human trafficking laws and highly rated anti-trafficking task forces, she also pointed to the need for more shelter beds for exploited children, which has led some police officers to arrest prostituted children simply to provide them with a place to sleep away from their pimps for a few days. Although economic conditions have made budgets tight, Sweeney urged those in attendance to call upon their legislators to maintain their support for programs designed with exploited children in mind. Olson likewise warned parents and other adults who know children to be watchful of warning signs that those children could fall into lives of exploitation. Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

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Debbie Campbell of Mill Creek, left, and Chris Cabatit of Lynnwood came all the way to Marysville to help start the restoration of the Qwuloolt Estuary by planting native trees and shrubs on Sept. 23.

ESTUARY FROM PAGE 1 hands dirty on this project,” said Kristin Marshall, habitat restoration ecologist for Sound Salmon Solutions. Marshall explained that restoring this estuary contributes to the salmon population of Puget Sound as a whole, since salmon recovery efforts have been limited due to extensive diking and tide gates. She added that restricting the watershed’s rivers from reaching wetland areas in the floodplain has created a bottleneck in salmon recovery efforts. Josh Meidav, restoration ecologist for the Tulalip Tribes, explained that the plantings will contribute to jumpstarting the ecosystem’s natural regeneration. “Restoring the tidal processes to the 360 acres of estuary will also allow river flows to deposit nutrientrich sediments,” said Meidav, who described the restoration of the estuary’s channel connectivity and ecological

processes as critical for the development of habitat in which salmon and other wildlife can be reared. While this multifaceted project will ultimately also include the placement of engineered logjams and the re-contouring of the Allen and Jones creeks, the volunteers on Sept. 23 and 24 had plenty of work cut out for them just on their stage of the project, as they dug into tough reed canary grass to plant their trees and shrubs, applying mulch around the planting areas and wrapping protective cuffs around the plants themselves to prevent voles from munching on them. “The mulch helps the soil retain moisture in dry seasons and acts as a weed suppressant,” Marshall said on Sept. 23. “All our plants are already flagged pink, so we can check up on them again. The Department of Corrections will be doing a site walk-through on Tuesday (Sept. 27) to water the plants, but we’ll be com-

ing back later this fall and in the spring of next year for site maintenance and to cut back the reed canary grass.” Gayle Bennett, a senior marketing manager with Philips Healthcare, came all the way from Kenmore to spend her day digging in the dirt on Sept. 23. “It’s great to be able to spend time with the folks you know from work in different ways,” Bennett said. “It’s important to be part of the community and it’s great when we can do something to give back.” “It’s always important to help the health of the environment,” said Beth Benson, a Philips Healthcare employee from Woodinville. “What we’re really doing is helping the kids who will come after us.” “Without volunteer help, a lot of these things just wouldn’t get done,” said fellow Philips Healthcare employee Barbara Bannister, a Bothell resident. “This is sweat equity for a worthwhile cause.”

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Tulalip Tribes hand out $5.48 million BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

TULALIP — The Tulalip Tribes hit a new high-water mark by “raising their hands” to 300 community and non-profit groups to the tune of a record-setting $5.48 million this year. The 18th annual “Raising Hands Celebration of Community” recognition dinner, in the Orca Ballroom of the Tulalip Resort on Sept. 24, dispensed funds to organizations both locally and throughout the state, as Tulalip Tribal Board Chair Mel Sheldon Jr. credited those in attendance with benefiting not only the Tribes, but also the broader communities beyond. “You’ve all stepped up to the plate to try and make a better life for others,” Sheldon said. “You’re doing the best you can to make a difference.” Sheldon was joined by Tulalip Tribal Board Vice Chair and Business Committee Chair Glen Gobin in reflecting on how the Tribes’ own economic progress has allowed it to help others. “This was just dirt and trees and dreams, before those dreams became a reality,” Sheldon said of Quil Ceda Village, which is expanding the Seattle Premium Outlets by an additional 100,000 square feet of retail space and has already broken ground on a Cabela’s store that’s set to open on the Tulalip Reservation next year. “Every journey begins with a small step, and you extend goodwill and hope to those who don’t have it.” Michele Heiderer, library director for the Stillaguamish Valley Genealogical Society in Arlington, gushed over the $10,000-plus donation that they received from the Tribes, which will allow them to stay up-to-date with the present in order to preserve the past into the future. “This allows us to stay open for another year,” said Heiderer, who noted that the Society is exploring its rent and housing options at the moment. “We serve 700 visitors a year, and this lets us purchase new computers that won’t crash all the time, so that we can keep track of and access the records that we have.

We are so grateful to the Tribes and the community for their support.” “Without the Tulalip Tribes’ funding, all we’d be doing is handing out potatoes,” said Michael Brewer, director of the food bank for the Victory Foursquare Gospel Church in Marysville. “We serve about 65,000 meals a year and the Tribes account for 40 to 60 percent of our funding. I don’t know of a better way to say ‘thank you’ to them.” The Tribes’ funds will help the church repair its delivery truck, purchase basic maintenance items that aren’t donated and help children through the

church’s “Learn & Play” program. “Pennies for Puppies & Ponies” is based in Marysville, but it serves all of Snohomish County by providing patrol and search-and-rescue K-9s. Like the Victory Foursquare Gospel Church, Pennies for Puppies & Ponies received funds in the range of $2,501 to $5,000 this year, which Snohomish County Sheriff John Lovick noted helps cover the K-9s that are not in the budget for the Sheriff ’s Office. “The Sheriff ’s Office badly needs a K-9 during the day,” said Carole Flynn White, president and founder of Pennies for Puppies &

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Ponies. “They have two K-9 patrols that are on all night, which is traditional, but with Snohomish County’s growth, those dogs are increasingly called out during the day, which decreases the deputies’ safety and adds up to expensive overtime.” “In the Tulalip Tribes tradition, we raise our hands to show appreciation to the organizations that work so hard to provide services to our community,” Sheldon said. “Our efforts stem back thousands of years to the potlatch gathering, a ceremony practiced by Coast Salish and other tribal cultures in the Pacific Northwest. The word ‘pot-

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latch’ means ‘gift.’ At potlatch gatherings, a family or leader hosts guests, holds a feast and shares resources.” “We’ve come through adversity,” Gobin said of the Tulalip Tribes. “We agreed to do this because we know what it’s like to need.” Nonprofits and community groups may apply for the Tribes’ quarterly awards. For more information, visit the Tulalip Tribes’ charitable funds website at www.tulalipcares.org.

September 28, 2011

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Tulalip Tribal Board Chair Mel Sheldon Jr. speaks at the Sept. 24 ‘Raising Hands Celebration of Community’ recognition dinner.

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Salmon habitat is important I

’ve been talking a lot lately about the connection between salmon, habitat and treaty rights. That connection is pretty simple. No habitat equals no salmon, no salmon equals no treaty rights, and no treaty rights equals a breach of contract between the tribes and U.S. government. It is the U.S. government — not the state of Washington — that has the responsibility to recover salmon in western Washington. It’s also up to the federal government to protect and uphold our treaty rights. We believe that one of the best ways to do that is by coordinating federal agencies and programs designed to protect salmon and their habitat. A good place to start is with the dikes and levees that allow construction in floodplains that really shouldn’t be developed. They call them floodplains for a reason. When you build in a floodplain, you are going to get flooded. It’s only a question of how often and how bad the flooding will be. Dikes and levees lead to straight rivers with high-speed flows and little to no salmon habitat. They destroy a river’s ability to spread out and move naturally along its path, which makes flooding worse, leading to even more damage. Dikes and levees may be good for development, but they are bad for salmon habitat. I’m not saying that all dikes and levees should be removed. Floodplain management that is good for salmon can also be good for flood control. In fact,

BILLY FRANK JR. with the proper vegetation, levees could make a small contribution to salmon recovery. Salmon need cool, clean water to survive. In healthy river systems, trees and shrubs along the banks help keep temperatures low. But when dikes or levees line a river, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says most of that vegetation must be cut down. The corps has started enforcing that rule all over the country. It’s a one-size-fits-all approach that might work on the Mississippi River, but is out of place here in western Washington. Some people say the corps is simply trying to cover its bases following Hurricane Katrina, which wiped out much of New Orleans a few years ago. Despite the huge cost of clear-cutting trees and plants on levees, there hasn’t been any kind of study to find out whether vegetation actually weakens them. In fact, many scientists believe the root systems help make levees stronger. Meanwhile, tribes have been finding creative solutions that help protect property and restore salmon. The Nisqually SEE FRANK, PAGE 5 THE MARYSVILLE

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Support Muller for Marysville City Council For 12 years I had the pleasure of sitting next to Steve Muller while he chaired the Marysville Planning Commission. How lucky we were to have a man with his integrity and well-rounded knowledge of our city. He was always prepared for the multitude of decisions that came before us. He put in countless hours on his own so he would have a grasp on the issues. He understands the city’s relationship to development as well as concern for the citizens. He is a lifelong resident with a deep love for our area. We have the opportunity to have him seated on the Marysville City Council this fall. As residents in the Smokey Point area of Marysville my husband and I strongly urge the voters to elect Steve Muller. His ideas are fresh and well thought out. Many of us call him Mr. Marysville. He has earned the name by donating his time selflessly to countless boards and committees. We could not find a finer man to represent the city. Becky Foster Marysville

Clearing up some confusion There’s been some confusion on the part of my neighbors regarding the mayor’s race in Marysville. While Jon Nehring is the current mayor, he is not running for reelection. It appears rather odd that the timing of Dennis Kendall’s resigning and the city council’s appointing our current mayor has the appear-

ance of a “Backroom Deal” for the purpose of giving Jon a leg up in this race. Being retained means keeping an appointee and voiding our vote. This will be the very first time since Dennis Kendall was reelected that we voters have a say in who will be our mayor. While I haven’t seen the current mayor, I have seen what he and his council have done to our community and I’m not very impressed. I am also not impressed with the hand-me-down policy of Kendall and his council members. I met Kelly Wright recently when he came to my door. We talked for the better part of three hours and he impressed me with his background. He has worked all over the world building local governments. He also impressed me with his commonsense ideas to improve our daily lives in Marysville. I believe he will be a great leader for our city. I won’t be voting to retain an appointed mayor. I believe it’s time for new leadership and new ideas. I hope my Marysville neighbors will join me in voting for Kelly Wright. Contact him before you make your line on the ballot. Rick Bleasdale Marysville

Nehring good for Marysville This letter is written in support for Marysville’s current Mayor Jon Nehring. I have known Jon and his family for many years, we have worked in the community together, our children go to school together and we have coached our boys in baseball together. In short, he is a man who not only works hard for the

residents of the city of Marysville; he is an active resident of the city of Marysville. He knows what our children are facing in local schools; his children attend there. He understands the needs of hard-working families because he interacts with many of those parents on a personal level through the community each week. I had the opportunity to work with Jon coaching a team for Marysville Little League. In that atmosphere we had the opportunity to work with other coaches, umpires, the league and many parents. Jon always exhibited talents of organization, tact, competitiveness, was always kind and knew how to handle every situation while carefully considering all parties concerned. These attributes are extremely important not only on the little league field but also in the field of government and the political process. It is the only way work gets done in that atmosphere. I am a small-businessman in the city of Marysville. I have no reservations supporting Jon as our Mayor. He has shown us that he can make the difficult decisions when they need to be made. Making cuts, balancing budgets and providing a means for steady, sustainable growth for our city. I have resided in the city of Marysville for 27 years now. This town has grown up during those years and we have been fortunate so far to retain a sense of community. Jon has shown that he knows how to maintain that atmosphere where families want to live and businesses can grow — it can be done and Jon is the man to lead Marysville into the future. Brian Duce Marysville SEE LETTERS, PAGE 5


September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

LETTERS FROM PAGE 4 Clear difference between candidates I read with interest your op-eds in The Globe recently. There is a clear difference between you in the story of the sale of the old CocaCola building. Mr. Wright points out that the city commissioned a study after the property’s purchase, and then sold the main part of the property for a considerably lesser amount than that for which it was purchased. Mr. Nehring states that the property has been sold to Parr Lumber and that the price “recaptures the city’s purchase price for the building.” Which is it? While I too welcome Parr Lumber to our community, the double-speak in Mayor Nehring’s account of the purchase bothers me. One question is: why weren’t the city’s actual needs considered before spending almost $4 million of the city’s (a/k/a, taxpayers’) funds? Is our city so awash in taxpayer money that we can spend four million taxpayer dollars without first determining our actual need? Mr. Nehring, could you please give a clear accounting of this purchase and sale, including how much money the taxpayers lost as a result? As Mr. Wright predicted, I was surprised to read that the Walmart planned for the intersection of State Route 9 and Highway 528 will soon begin construction. One doesn’t have to think too hard to imagine the traffic impact. I support any new business, including Walmart, even though I live less than two miles from this planned store. No doubt there will be road construction sometime after the store’s opening and delays will be much worse due to the increased traffic. The city’s rule exempting big-box retailers from paying traffic impact fees is ridiculous. The taxpayers do not need to support this burden. I also agree with Mr. Wright’s additional comments regarding the traffic flow in Marysville. There are some afternoons when you just can’t get out of this town in any timely manner. If we had an emergency evacuation, forget about getting out at all. Thank you for the opportunity to read your opinions. I do not know either of you, but after reading these, my vote is for Mr. Wright. Linda Reeves Marysville

Is ‘Job Creation’ really just ‘Job Destruction?’ Hypocrisy is “the practice of professing standards, beliefs, etc., contrary to one’s real character or actual behavior.” There doesn’t seem a more clear example of exactly this when one hears Pres. Obama’s words about “job creation” and then reads that under his administration, the EPA, in this case, will actually destroy 1.44 million jobs. So, is “job creation” just another word for “job destruction?” Besides destroying jobs, these proposed EPA regulations will also increase the costs of electricity as much as 23 percent in some areas, average of 11.5 percent nationwide and would have a substantial impact on raising prices of natural gas as well. This statistic is from the federal government’s own data which was discovered when an analysis was completed for the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity and is the result of primarily two new regulations being proposed by the EPA. One is the “Maximum Achievable Control Technology” and the other is the “Cross-State Air Pollution Rule.” And, the EPA’s air pollution rules may even extend to your own backyard as you “disturb” your own soil to plant a garden which may result in soil particles becoming air borne and “contaminating” something, someplace else. So, in addition, to potentially losing your job, paying a lot more for electricity and heat, you may have the additional burden of paying high fines to the EPA for air, water, dirt, plant and finally people pollution. Senator Maria Cantwell supports these measures as does Senator Patty Murray, but Cantwell has gone a step further by calling for the EPA to preemptively prohibit resource development in a huge area of Alaska — an area rich with copper, gold and other valuable metals. She wants the EPA to deny the permit before it has even been applied for. If this

occurs, the precedent could potentially lock up lands throughout the U.S. So, while “job creation” is the buzz word for the moment, the truth is that this administration and our own elected officials actually prefer job destruction as evidenced by their actions. Catherine Paxton Arlington

A closer examination In a recent editorial, I outlined the rationale for change in city leadership. My opponent, appointed to the mayoral position last year, has made some statements in response that bear closer examination. The 156th Street overpass will be paid for entirely with tax dollars. Any ‘partnership’ extended simply to the city charging property taxes to pay for the overpass. To the extent those taxes were paid by private entities and used by the city to build the overpass, it could loosely be defined as a ‘partnership’ — though I believe most would classify it as a tax. The only entity to not pay Local Improvement District (LID) fees to the project was Costco. As my opponent pointed out, Costco was allowed to apply a previously negotiated tax break to pay its share while other businesses ponied up the funds needed to build the overpass. Businesses like ACRO Machining INC., which employees over 50 people in Marysville, have had their property taxes increased to pay for the 156th Street overpass, even though they will see no benefit and did not get a development fee giveback like Costco received. I also said it was important that such overpasses connect to I-5. I appreciate my opponent acknowledging this point in his response. It’s good to hear he will retroactively attempt to add freeway on-ramps. Any new overpasses will connect to I-5 from the beginning when I’m mayor. My opponent also acknowledges the new Walmart at 64th and SR 9 is going ahead, a fact which

continues to surprise many local residents. In fact, this project seems to be the bestkept secret in Marysville. While Mr. Nehring recounted the minimal fees Walmart has paid, he did not deny they will benefit from a new city ordinance giving bigbox retailers a 50 percent exemption on traffic mitigation fees. The Walmart project had been on hold since 2007. Perhaps it’s just a coincidence that Walmart applied for new permits just days after the new ordinance became law. The fact remains that this property should never have been zoned for commercial use. SR 9 and 64th are simply not prepared to handle the traffic impacts from our area’s planned third Walmart. The former Coca-Cola bottling plant was purchased for $3.75 million in taxpayer funds, with a vague plan to build some sort of government campus on the land. The property’s assessed market value was $3.3 million at the time of sale and its value continues to fall. As my opponent acknowledges, plans fell through and the city sold off some of the land to Parr Lumber for $2.3 million. The 2012 valuation of the total 10.2 acre parcel of land is $2,014,200 with the building valued at an additional $864,800. At that rate, each acre is worth about $200,000,

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FRANK FROM PAGE 4 Tribe has spent the last few years building logjams on the Mashel River, a vital salmon tributary to the Nisqually. The logjams replaced a levee made of riprap and are doing an excellent job of protecting two city parks and a home. The old riprap levee made flooding worse by increasing the speed of the river. Now, the river moves more slowly and is a much friendlier place for salmon and people. The tribe and community volunteers have planted hundreds of trees and shrubs along and on top of the logjams, providing important shade for salmon in the Mashel. Salmon recovery is not easy. It never has been. Unfortunately some federal agencies and programs make it harder than it needs to be. It’s sad that salmon habitat in our rivers has declined to the point that levee vegetation is something to fight about, but we have to do everything we can to protect what little habitat we have left. Billy Frank Jr. is Chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

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but the mayor wants you to believe that 2.8 acres is worth $800,000. The most disingenuous thing that the mayor said in his response was that the city “also has a purchase agreement for Parcel 2.” Parr has an option to purchase more of the property later. Parr Lumber may or may not exercise that option sometime in the next six years. The city paid over $450,000 too much for the property in 2010. After the initial sale to Parr, the city is still $1.45 million in the red no matter how you spin it. Finally, at no time did I claim the city paid for a consultant to explore impacts of a new Whatcom County coal terminal. I said the city relied on a consultant’s report, a fact which my opponent confirmed in his response. I also said we didn’t need a consultant to tell us that nearly doubling the amount of train traffic would have negative impacts on Marysville commutes. In any case, the point isn’t about the consultant. The point is we need to find efficient ways of getting us over the tracks, and that’s why I am committed to securing funds for overpasses connecting to I-5. That’s just common sense — no consultant needed. Kelly Wright Candidate for Marysville Mayor

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September 28, 2011

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6715 Grove St., Marysville • 360-659-7117 Hillside Christian Preschool 360-659-8957 Classic Worship Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:15 a.m. Kidz’ Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00a.m. Casual Worship Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00a.m. Oasis Service, Family Style (Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00p.m. Student Ministries (Jr . High-Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00 p.m. Student Ministries (Sr . High-Thursday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. Groups for Children, Youth, College/Career, Young Marrieds, Families and Seniors

CHURCH

92 Street

CHRIST

Church of (Non-Denominational Christ & Non-instrumental) 4226 92nd Street NE, Marysville • 360-653-2578 Sunday Morning Worship Services 10:30 am Dennis Niva, Minister

Hear the Sunday Morning sermon on the web 92ndstchurchofchrist.org OTHER

Word of Fire Christian Center “Is Not My Word Like A Fire” (Jeremiah 23:29) Meeting at 1059 State St, Suite G Next to Golden Corral Restaurant Sunday School 10:30 -11:15 am Tuesday Night Bible Study 5 pm Pastors: Lee & Flora Rush 360-840-3755

marysvillefmc.org

BAPTIST

SUNDAY SERVICE — 11:30am

First Baptist Church of Marysville 81st & State Ave.

Sunday Services Sunday School ................. 9:45 A.M. Morning Worship ................ 11A.M. Evening Service .................... 6 P.M. Youth Group spring fall winter ..... 6 P.M. Youth-on-the-Run summer ... 5:30 P.M. Tuesday Prayer & Bible Study ........... 10 A.M. Wednesday Awana Clubs Sept-April ....... 6:30 P.M. Thursday 24-7 Ministry Sept-April ...... 6:30 P.M.

OF

nd

SHOULTES GOSPEL HALL 5202-116th St. NE, Marysville • 658-9822

Sunday

Monday Wednesday

www.fbcmarysville.org A CBA Church

360-659-1242

James L. Eldred Jr., Associate Pastor of Youth & Family Ministries Daniel J. Wolff, Director of Music and Worship

Remembrance Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 a.m. Bible Teaching & Sunday School . . . . . . . . . .11 a .m . Evening Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 p .m . Family Bible Hour (Sept .-May) . . . . . . . . . . . 7 p .m . Prayer and Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 p .m .

Non-Denominational • All Welcome

M OUNTAINSIDE F ELLOWSHIP

C OWBOY 360-386-8703 C HURCH

4411 76th Street NE • Marysville

msfcc@comcast.net • www.msfcc.org

Wednesday 7 p.m. and Sunday 10:30 a.m.

PASTOR F RED M OORE

BAPTIST

First Baptist Church

Bible teaching, upbeat music, friendly and casual atmosphere

5th and French, Arlington • 435-3040 • www.Fbcarlington.com Worship Service ............................................................ 10:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages .................................................. 9 a.m. Nursery provided: Infants - 3 years old for both services Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m. • Wednesday Senior High Youth Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m. Wednesday: Awana Visitation Wednesday: Awana and and Senior High Youth

CTK Arlington – 10:00am Sundays Presidents Elementary - 505 E. Third Street Pastor Rick Schranck 1-888-421-4285 x813 CTK Lake Stevens – 10:00am Sundays Team Fitness - 1109 Frontier Circle East Pastor Cary Peterson 1-888-421-4285 x811

Pastor Bill Walker • Assoc. Pastor Jim Poyner Youth Pastor Mark Rittersbach CATHOLIC

immaculate conception catholic church 1200 East 5th, Arlington • 435-8565

pastor: Fr. Jim Dalton Reconciliation ................................ Saturday 4:30 Vigil Mass ...................................... Saturday 5:30 Sunday Morning Mass .................................. 9:00 Sunday Mass .............................................. 12:00 in Darrington at St. John Vianney

p.m. p.m. a.m. p.m.

FOURSQUARE

Join us…building Faith, Hope and Love Sundays 10:30am & Wednesday 7:00pm www.siscoheights.com • 360.435.4384 OTHER

ARLINGTON COMMUNITY CHURCH

LUTHERAN Pastor Rick Long & Pastor Luke Long

Sunday Worship - 8:30 and 11:00 am Weekly Bible Studies Youth Ministry

Meeting in Seventh Day Adventist Church 713 Talcott • Arlington

Sunday Worship 11a.m. - Noon

It really is not important that you are happy with your religion, what is important is that God is happy with your religion. Are you tired of all the hype and materialism found in so many religious groups these days? God has already shown us what true religion is. At the Smokey Point church of Christ we are committed to the open study and honest application of God’s word. It may not be entertaining but it sure brings a rest from the burden of sin. Isn’t that the whole point of religion? Let’s talk about it. 360-939-2080

The Smokey Point Church Of Christ Simply Christians

8526 – 35th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA, 98223 (7/10 mile north of Smokey Point off of Smokey Pt. Blvd.) Sunday morning classes for all ages .......... 9:30 a.m. Sunday morning worship ........................... 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening worship ............................. 5:00 p.m. Wednesday night classes for all ages ......... 7:00 p.m. METHODIST

A new and unique Christian Church designed with you in mind. S ENIORS

ARE

L OVED

AND

W ELCOME !

Pastor G.W. O’Neil • 360-445-2636 • 360-421-0954 NON DENOMINATIONAL Engaging Worship...Encouraging Message

Sundays 10:00 10:30am am 360-474-8888

You Are Welcome Here www.falconridgefellowship.com

Now meeting at theLutheran old Arlington•HS auditorium on French Meeting at Peace 1717 Larson Rd in Street Silvana

201 N. Stillaguamish Avenue

www.arlingtonassembly.com

Life Points 9:30AM Sunday

Arlington Free Methodist Church

Celebration Service 10:30AM Sunday

Early Sermon …………………………………… 8:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages ……………………… 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship Service ……………………… 10:30 a.m.

Family Focus 7:00PM Wednesday

360.435.8981

730 E. Highland Dr., Arlington, 360-435-8986

(Signing for the hearing impaired. Nursery Provided.)

Wednesday Dinner ……………………………… 5:00 p.m. Wednesday AWANA ……………………………… 6:10 p.m. Wednesday Youth Group ………………………… 6:15 p.m.


September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

PUZZLE ANSWERS From 9/21

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(Through September 10, 2011)

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September 3 A boy was born to Jennifer and Aaron Shosky of Marysville.

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Difficulty Level: 10 of 20

September 6 A girl was born to Serah Tilfas and Manny Wakuk of Marysville.

ACROSS 1. Small drinks of. 5. Fishing vessel. 10. Beguile. 14. Venetian traveler Marco _. 15. Was consumed. 16. Moved fast. 17. White crystalline alicyclic hydrocarbon. 19. Objective case of “thou.” 20. Vertical pipe. 21. Other than. 22. To a smaller degree. 23. Repeated. 25. Magicians Penn & _. 27. Object-centered representation language. 29. Ascend. 32. Storage cellar. 35. Medical. 39. Hut. 40. Elaborate lyric poem. 41. So soon. 42. High mountain. 43. Wild animal shelter. 44. Blues-influenced Cajun dance music. 45. Dramatic composition. 46. Greek personification of peace. 48. L-shaped extensions. 50. Replenishes. 54. Secluded. 58. Become less reserved. 60. To such an extent. 62. Fissile rock. 63. Array. 64. Homopterous insect. 66. Hostilities. 67. Leave without permission. 68. Butterfly catchers.

3

LEGAL NOTICES CITY OF MARYSVILLE NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Ordinance described below has been enacted by the Mayor and City Council of the City of Marysville. The full text of said Ordinance is available, for a charge, upon written request directed to the City Clerk, Marysville City Hall, 1049 State Avenue, Marysville, Washington 98270. Ordinance Number: 2871 Date of Enactment: S e p t e m b e r 26, 2011 Date Published in The Globe: September 28, 2011 Effective Date: October 3, 2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MARYSVILLE AMENDING MMC 3.51.020 (7), RELATING TO THE AUTHORIZED PETTY CASH/CHANGE FUND FOR THE CITY DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, AN IMPREST FUND OF THE CITY OF MARYSVILLE. Ordinance Number: 2872 Date of Enactment: S e p t e m b e r 26, 2011 Date Published in The Globe: September 28, 2011 Effective Date: October 3, 2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MARYSVILLE AMENDING THE 2011 BUDGET AND PROVIDING FOR THE INCREASE OF CERTAIN EXPENDITURE ITEMS AS BUDGETED FOR IN ORDINANCE NO. 2839 AS AMENDED. Ordinance Number: 2873 Date of Enactment: S e p t e m b e r 26, 2011 Date Published in The Globe: September 28, 2011 Effective Date: October 3, 2011 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MARYSVILLE, WASHINGTON, AMENDING PORTIONS OF MARYSVILE MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4.02 ENTITLED “ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES” AND CHAPTER 6.24 ENTITILED “PUBLIC NUISANCE”; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND EFFECTIVE DATE. April O’Brien, Deputy City Clerk Published: September 28, 2011 #529624

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69. Encounter in opposition. 70. Replanted plant. 71. Oak or pine.

DOWN 1. Save from embarrassment. 2. Containing iodine. 3. Pool or puddle. 4. Some person. 5. 100th part of a yen. 6. Buddy. 7. With inclination. 8. Burn incense near. 9. Rest on knee. 10. Hostler. 11. Globular. 12. Dregs. 13. Hellenic National Democratic army. 18. Combining form meaning “the planet Mars.” 24. Ornamental mat. 26. Male given name. 28. Reddish-brown chalcedony. 30. Alone. 31. Abbreviation for ethyl

pyruvate. 32. Acronym for Certificate of Deposit Index. 33. French engineer Clemente _. 34. Impressive. 36. Starting place in golf. 37. Ginger root. 38. Figments of the mind. 41. Islam call to prayer. 45. Ancient Egyptian kings’ double crown. 47. Most recent. 49. For fear that. 51. The heavens. 52. Undivided. 53. Greek island in the east Aegean. 55. More uncommon. 56. Make happy. 57. Stretched tight. 58. Pursue neutrality. 59. Gap. 61. Small shark. 65. Favorite.

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8

THE SPORTS PAGE The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Chargers win game, lose match to Everett BY TRAVIS SHERER sports@marysvilleglobe.com

EVERETT — The scoreboard facing them wasn’t on but every Marysville Getchell volleyball player knew who was winning. “I just kept looking back (at the scoreboard behind them),” said senior Getchell captain Katherine LaRosa. “Hoping it could come quicker.” At one point trailing 18-14 in the Game 1, the Chargers came roaring back to score 10 of the next 12 points, looking like they’d done it 100 times before. But they hadn’t. In fact, the 25-20 win Sept. 22 against Everett was the first game Getchell won in school history. After an appropriate amount of celebration, the Chargers retook the court but ended up on the losing end of a 3-1 (20-25, 25-12, 25-20, 25-12) result in 3A Western Conference play. After the match was over, the

Chargers embraced each other for taking one large collective step down the path that every new program must take. “I’m super proud of all of us,” said LaRosa. “We have been working so hard so far and improving. This just shows that we will ultimately get to where we want to be.” Despite losing the match, Getchell (0-4) showed positive spurts — especially in the first game — but no other aspect of their game was more promising than their serving, which at times overpowered the Seagulls (2-2). Leading the way in the Chargers’ service was senior Kali Burnside, who recorded three aces. “Kali served phenomenally tonight,” said Getchell coach Mindy Staudinger. “She was able to hit the target players we were going for, making them have a difficult time passing the ball.” Serving eight of the Chargers’ final 10 points in the first game was fresh-

man defensive specialist Kaitlyn Bombach. At times, Bombach showed the skillset of an upperclassman in a variety of areas. The Chargers also excelled on their front line, coming down with a number of blocks, as was evident in the third game where Everett’s lead was just 23-20, but the Seagulls were able to put it away. “I think our blocking was so good,” LaRosa. “We all kind of rose to the challenge and worked together.” Staudinger admitted that a formation mistake might have been the secret to their success, as her middle and outside back line started the first game out of order. “I think that made them concentrate more on where they had to be and not over thinking anything,” she said. LaRosa finished the match with 13 kills and 16 digs while Rian Meader had 26 assists and Mekalani Echevarra recorded six kills and five blocks.

September 28, 2011

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

Getchell freshman Kaitlyn Bombach receives an Everett service.

Tomahawks fall to Arlington 45-28 BY TRAVIS SHERER sports@marysvilleglobe.com

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

A deep M-P throw is just out of the reach of junior Kyle Nobach.

MARYSVILLE — In a matchup that will go far in determining the Wesco North champion this season, Arlington simply had more big plays and came away with a 45-28 win over Marysville-Pilchuck Sept. 23. “I think when both teams have so many talented players, these kinds of games can happen,” said M-P head coach Brandon Carson. “Because you make a mistake and either side can really make you pay for it.” Of course, in a game where the score was 14-7 inside the first three minutes, the fans in the nearly packed stands at Quil Ceda Stadium must have had a few cramps in their necks from watching the ball go so quickly from one side of the field to the other with both teams combining for 15 plays of 20 yards or more. And more of those big plays came from the Tommies’ huddle, as they outgained the Eagles 499 yards to 448 in total offense, but just didn’t have nearly as good of field position when starting their drives as Arlington did. At times, however, that didn’t seem to matter as M-P scored

all four of its touchdowns on plays of more than 25 yards. On the finishing end of two of those touchdowns was senior halfback Andre Pina, who at times was able to cut through Arlington’s defense. Pina posted scores of 80 and 57 yards en route to a staggering 269 yards on 20 carries. But Pina wasn’t the Tommies’ only weapon. Senior back Cody House scored on a 77-yard run in the second quarter and sophomore quarterback Jake Luton connected with Deion Stell for a 26-yard score through the air. House finished with 144 yards on 12 carries. “I think we moved the ball maybe the best all year,” said Carson. “Our offense is starting to get more balanced and that’s what we’re capable of when we’re all on the same page.” The Eagles kept more than a one score advantage for most of the game, but M-P did make it interesting opening the second half with a touchdown to make the score 27-21 and an onside kick recovery. Then Arlington’s Adam Roehl recovered an M-P fumble on the ensuing possession to turn the ball over and let senior halfback Colton Hordyk run out the game.


September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Lakewood senior helps younger sister

BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

SMOKEY POINT — Lakewood High School Principal Dale Leach acknowledged that students can occasionally see senior projects as merely being “a box to check off,” but he was heartened by the example of LHS senior Ashlie Jensen on Sept. 24. Jensen not only celebrated her 18th birthday on Saturday, Sept. 24, but she also did her part to make sure her kid sister Karlie will enjoy many happy birthdays of her own in the years to come. Karlie Jensen, who’s now 12, was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP, when she was only 2 years old. ITP causes its sufferers’ immune systems to attack the platelets in their own blood, and because those platelets help

blood to clot, ITP sufferers like Karlie face expensive and life-threatening challenges every day as a result of their condition. “She’s had to go in for infusion treatments every week,” Ashlie Jensen said. “She had to wear a bike helmet to grade school every day. When your blood won’t clot, not only do you get sick a lot, but you have to be careful about which medications you take to treat it. Karlie can’t take anything that will thin her blood, so aspirin is right out.” “If you have a positive blood type, you get a shot, but if you have a negative blood type, you get a sixhour infusion,” said Tiffany Jensen, Ashlie and Karlie’s mom. “Your platelet count can vary wildly, but if you’re under 50,000, you just can’t do any sports that day. It’s tough for Karlie, having to sit out so many events, espe-

cially as a cheerleader.” Ashlie Jensen has been working with the Platelet Disorder Support Association since May of this year to put together her “Pump It Out For Platelets” 5K walk for Karlie on Sept. 24, starting from and finishing at the Stillaguamish Athletic Club in Arlington. Her efforts inspired an estimated 50 participants to register for the walk online, and close to 40 more to show up that Saturday to take part, boosting her initial take of approximately $1,700 to nearly $2,000. “I’m proud of Ashlie for doing this,” Tiffany said. “There’s only three other people in the community that we know of who have this. Even ambulance drivers aren’t always aware of what ITP is.” “I’m just trying to get the word out through this event,” Ashlie said. “Karlie’s in remission now, but it could always

9

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Karlie Jensen, left, was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP, 10 years ago at the age of two, so her big sister Ashlie started a 5K fundraiser for the Platelet Disorder Support Association to help out Karlie and her fellow ITP sufferers. come back when she’s in her 20s. There’s no cure for it, so through the PDSA, we’re trying to get people connected to the support groups and to make this condition a little easier to live with.” “I hope other kids see what

Ashlie has done and it gives them the idea to do something equally meaningful for their own senior projects,” Leach said. Ashlie Jensen hopes her younger siblings, including Karlie, will carry on what she

intends to become a family tradition of “Pump It Out For Platelets” 5K walks for their own senior projects. To contribute or learn more, log onto http:// pdsa.donorpages.com/ PumpItUpArlingtonWA.

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Della and Mike Sheedy and Virginia Kriehn all received first-place honors at the U.S. Roller Figure Skating Nationals.

Local skaters compete at nationals MARYSVILLE — Skaters from the Marysville Skating Club, located at the Marysville Skate Inn, placed well at the U.S. Roller Figure Skating Nationals which was held in Fort Wayne, Ind., July 21 through Aug. 7. First-place honors went to Mike and Della Sheedy in the Masters Dance event. Virginia Kriehn was first in the Novice B Ladies Figure Skating event. Second was awarded to the Della Sheedy in the Adult Loop Contest. Northern Dynamics Precision

Team, which is based at Marysville but includes five clubs from the Northwest, took second place in the Senior Precision event. They will be traveling to the World Championships at the end of November which will be held in Brasilia, Brazil. Marysville team members are Lana Dennis, Kyleen Gillette, Virginia Kriehn, Sue Logghe, Aimee Sides and Cheryl Baldwin. Third place went to Lona Dennis in the Premier Gold Solo dance event and she

teamed with John Lehni to take third place in the Premier Gold Team Dance. Mike Sheedy also took a third-place medal in the Masters Dance event. The club made finals in more events than they have ever done before. Making it to the finals were Dan Duffy, Susan Logghe, Kyleen Gillette, Virginia Kriehn, Jim Barrett, Mavis Redman and Joanne Foster. Miranda Heggie, Beverly Boice and Cheryl Baldwin also skated events.

Helping Smokers Quit

If you are a smoker & need help quitting, Call Nadine Carter at 360-716-5719 for your “Free Stop Smoking Tool Kit


10

September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Church hosts ‘Girls Night Out’ ‘Child Safety Day’ will be

MARYSVILLE — The Marysville Church of the Nazarene is set to host the popular “Girls Night Out” Christian program that’s already toured throughout Canada and the United States. “Girls Night Out” is designed to be an inspir-

ing night filled with fun, faith and fellowship, and it comes to Washington state with more than 170 dates and tens of thousands of attendees under its belt. It encourages women from all backgrounds to share in God’s love, engaging and inspiring them with humor

PARENT NOTICE FREE Biometric Fingerprinting & DNA Identification Kits A community service event by Roy Robinson Chevrolet Subaru & RV Center

Saturday, October 1, 2011 9:30 AM – 2:00 PM Roy Robinson RV Center 6616 35th Ave. NE, Marysville (Exit 199 – West of the freeway across from QCC Casino)

Endorsed by

John Walsh

America’s Trusted Name in Fighting Crime

Parents and caregivers are cordially invited to bring your children to this free child safety program.

and hope through comedy, storytelling, fellowship and a time of ministry. The event kicks off at 7 p.m. on Sept. 30 at the Marysville Church of the Nazarene, and will feature author and speaker Sheila Wray Gregoire. “Girls Night Out is intended to bring together women from all walks of life to share a common bond and, in turn, feel a greater sense of belonging within their community,” said Mary Messina, director of “Girls Night Out” for the U.S. “Through our speakers, activities and message, we hope to build lasting relationships with women, starting a Girls Night Out movement across the United States and eventually around the world.” “Girls Night Out” reminds women to take some time for themselves and interact with others within their own community. The event’s organizers are committed to helping each church succeed in planning and presenting an extraordinary event, as well as making it available for all women to attend, which is why it’s designed to be affordable and accessible. For additional details or to purchase tickets, log onto www.gnolive.com. The Marysville Church of the Nazarene is located at 8240 64th St. NE.

at Roy Robinson Oct. 1

TULALIP — Parents will have a chance to help make their children safer at the Roy Robinson Chevrolet, Subaru and RV Center in Tulalip on Oct. 1, as part of a free “Child Safety Day” for the Marysville and Tulalip communities. From 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., families will be able to obtain free “DNA LifePrint” biometric fingerprinting and identification kits that have been certified by the FBI and endorsed by John Walsh, creator of the longrunning “America’s Most Wanted” TV series. Biometrics is the newest and most advanced technology available today for

obtaining fingerprints. When the child’s fingerprints are entered into the FBI database, they become immediately available to all law enforcement agencies throughout the United States. Each kit will consist of a child safety journal to provide law enforcement officials with all the child’s vital information, plus important facts they will need immediately after a child is reported missing. Each journal will contain a 10-digit fingerprint profile and a high-resolution fullcolor digital photograph of the child, and will come with a home DNA identi-

Lakewood schools hold info fair for ballot measures

LAKEWOOD — The Lakewood School District Board of Directors is considering two important propositions for next February’s ballot. Proposition 1 would renew the current maintenance and operations levy, which represents approximately 20 percent of the district’s total

operating budget. Proposition 2 would be a capital levy to pay for critical repairs at some of its schools, by replacing failing roofs and electrical, heating and ventilation systems, as well as to continue funding the district’s investment in technology, to support student learning and address pre-planning

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My focus is truly kid-centric,” she affirms. “I take the time to really listen, gain trust and form strong relationships. Partnering closely with parents to maximize support of the child’s total well-being is central to care, too. When it comes to making a lasting difference in the health of the next generation, it’s all about highly personalized medicine that treats the whole person. Call today for an appointment or further information.

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fication kit, designed to be easy to use and to last for generations. Each DNA kit contains detailed instructions on how to use it at home. The only records of each family’s visit will be handed to them to take home. The event’s sponsors will keep no records on file. Free kits will be available to the first 500 children to attend. Roy Robinson is located at 6616 35th Ave. NE in Marysville off Exit 199, west of I-5 and across from the Quil Ceda Creek Casino. For more information, call Frank Graham at 360-6596236 or log onto www.royrobinson.com/DNA.

Krista Galitsis, M.D., Ph.D., FAAP Pediatrics

P: 360.651.8365 5/25/11 12:03 PM

for a future modernization of its high school. To that end, the district has scheduled a School Finances and Information Fair on Oct. 4, for the community to learn more about these two proposed ballot measures. This will be a casual open house event, where attendees will be able to meet with members of the committee that studied these issues, review their recommendations and weigh in on the proposals before the school board finalizes the measures this November for next year’s ballot. There will be representatives from the Facilities Steering Committee, as well as all the district’s employee groups and board members, on hand to review and respond to questions. The “table topics” will include information on tax rates, the need for local levies to help run the schools, the tasks of the Facilities Steering Committee and its recommendations, the needs at the high school and timelines for a future modernization there, and facility preservation plans for keeping all the schools warm, safe and dry. These “table topics” will also address areas in need of minor modernization and renovation at the middle school, and proposed plans for keeping technology a top priority in the schools. The School Finances and Information Fair will run from 6-8 p.m. on Oct. 4 in the Lakewood Middle School commons area.


September 28, 2011

PNW MarketPlace!

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

real estate for sale

real estate for rent - WA

jobs

home services

stuff

wheels

We make it easy to sell... right in your community

Local readers. Local sellers. Local buyers.

click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527 Announcements

real estate for sale Real Estate for Sale Lots/Acreage

FREELAND

2 ACRE, LEVEL LOT. For sale by owner. Water, power, phone lines to property corner. Site registration (soil supports conventional septic system). Asking $50,000 taking offers. For more info: (360)320-7196 REPOSSESSED ranches only 4 available. 40+ acres from $18,900. One Day -- October 8th. Lender Sacrifice Sale. All must go. Call UTR LLC 1-888-430-8949. Real Estate for Sale Services

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Out of Area Rentals

B I G B E AU T I F U L A Z Land, $99/mo. $0 down, $0 interest, Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tu c s o n I n t ’ l A i r p o r t . Guaranteed Financing, No Credit Checks. Prerecorded msg. (800) 631-8164 code 4001 or visit www.sunsiteslandrush.com Commercial Rentals Office/Commercial

Marysville Prime Retail/Office 1700 - 3300 Sq/Ft Safeway Plaza High Traffic Location from $1.00/SF + NNN 425-971-8053 888-984-5213

financing real estate for rent - WA Apartments for Rent Snohomish County

ARLINGTON

print & online 24/7

real estate rentals

2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, apartment. All appliances including washer, dryer. In town. From $875 month plus deposit. 360435-3171, 360-435-9294

PNWHomeFinder.com is an online real estate community that exposes your profile and listings to two million readers from our many publications in the Pacific Northwest. Log on to join our network today. ARLINGTON

APT FOR RENT 1 Bdrm/1 Bath 800 sf, country setting, all appliances, NS/NP $700/mo. Also, may rent adjacent large warehouse / storage 3000 sq ft., $1200/ mo. Call 360-474-1211

General Financial

ADOPT: Loving, secure fa m i l y ye a r n s fo r 1 s t baby to cherish. Expenses paid. Rose, 1-888449-0803 A DV E R T I S E YO U R product or service nationwide or by region in up to 12 million households in North America’s best suburbs! Place your classified ad in over 815 suburban newspapers just like this one. Call C l a s s i f i e d Ave n u e a t 888-486-2466 or go to www.classifiedavenue.net Affordable Health Insurance for EVERYONE!! Uninsured? Dissatisfied? Been Turned down? Call Now We Can Help. Licensed Agents Standing By 1-800-951-2167

Announcements

ADOPT, Art classes to Zoo Trips, Everything in between, 1st baby will be our King/Queen. Exp e n s e s p a i d . D ave & Robin 1-800-990-7667 ADOPTION- A loving alternative to unplanned pregnancy. You choose the family for your child. Receive pictures/info of waiting/ approved couples. Living expense assistance. 1-866-2367638 ADOPTION: Loving, athletic, financially secure, stable Christian family, stay at home Mom, would love to talk to you if you are considering adoption, expenses paid: 877954-0918; 206-9722580, cell/text. www.shawnlori318.com shawnlori318@comcast.net

DONATE YOUR vehicle receive $1,000 grocery coupon. United breast cancer foundation. Free mammograms, breast cancer info www.ubcf.info free towing, tax deductible, non-runners accepted. 1-877-632-GIFT Local STD/HIV Testing. Did you know you can have an STD and show no symptoms? Early detection and treatment can prevent permanent damage? Highest levels of privacy and discretion. Call 1-888-737-4941 THINK CHRISTMAS, Start Now! Own a Red Hot! Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox or Discount Party Store from $51,900 Worldwide! 100% Turnkey. 1 - 8 0 0 - 5 1 8 - 3 0 6 4 . www.DRSS31.com

ANNOUNCE your festiFound va l fo r o n l y p e n n i e s. Four weeks to 2.7 million FOUND ITEMS: readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this CDs: Two cases of CDs. n e w s p a p e r o r 1 Location: Jensen Park . (206) 634-3838 for more Case # 11-2221 details. Bicycle: Woman’s bike. AT T E N T I O N D I A B E T- L o c a t i o n : D o w n t o w n . ICS with Medicare. Get Case # 11-2246 a FREE Talking Meter and diabetic testing sup- Level: in case. Location: plies at NO COST, plus Centennial Trail. Case# FREE home deliver y! 11-2321 Best of all, this meter Contact eliminates painful finger Arlington Police Dept pricking! Call 888-903Evidence Unit 6658 360-403-3400 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. C a l l To d ay 8 8 8 - 4 5 9 9961 for $25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

L O C A L P R I VAT E I N VESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I l o a n o n h o u s e s, r aw land, commercial property and property developm e n t . C a l l E r i c a t CASH FOR CARS! Any ( 8 0 0 ) 5 6 3 - 3 0 0 5 . Make, Model or Year. www.fossmortgage.com We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Tr u c k T O D AY. F r e e Towing! Instant Offer: 1888-545-8647

announcements

Announcements

DIVORCE $135. $165 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes, custody, support, proper ty division and bills. B B B m e m b e r . (503) 772-5295. w w w. p a r a l e g a l a l t e r n a tives.com?divorce@usa.com

jobs

Employment Education

ATTEND COLLEGE online from Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal *Accounting *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-4834429. www.CenturaOnline.com 4AKEååSPECIAL !DVERTISEåYOURåVEHICLE å BOAT å26åORåCAMPER å,INES ååWEEKS #ALLå  åTODAY

Employment General

ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT The Whidbey NewsTimes seeks an enthusiastic, motivated Advertising Sales Representative to sell advertising. Successful candidate must be dependable, detail-oriented and possess exceptional customer ser vice skills. Previous sales experience required and media sales a plus! Reliable insured transportation and good driving record required. Straight commission with a draw, excellent health benefits, 401K and a great work environment with opportunity to advance. EOE. Please send resume with cover letter in PDF or Text format to: HR/WNTADSALES Sound Publishing, Inc. 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 106 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Advertising doesn’t have to break the bank. The Classifieds has great deals on everything you need. DELIVER THE MARYSVILLE GLOBE OR ARLINGTON TIMES Earn extra income working only one day per week delivering the Marsyville Globe or Arlington Times. Call 1-888-8383000 or email circulation@marysvilleglobe.com if interested. Please include your name, telephone number, address and best time to call. These are independent contract delivery routes for Sound Publishing, Inc. GREAT PAY, star t today! Travel resort locations across Amer ica with young, successful bu s i n e s s gr o u p. Pa i d training, travel and lodging. 877-646-5050 HOUSEKEEPER desired for 6-8 hours weekly house cleaning in Everett. Must be prompt and willing to take direction. All tools and supplies furnished by owner. Excellent pay and working conditions. R e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . Prefer one person only. Call (425)259-2314

REAL ESTATE MARKET HUD HOMES!!!

Cute 2 bedroom one bath home with mountain views! This home has lots of potential. With a little TLC this home can shine again. Living room is good size, with wood burning stove, laminate floors and opens into a decent size kitchen. There is a huge utility /mud room. The back yard backs to a wooded area for privacy.

$98,000

Employment Marketing

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Sound Publishing is looking for an Advertising Sales Manager on beautiful Whidbey Isl a n d , WA . We h a v e three award-winning community newspapers serving Island communities and Naval Air Station Whidbey. Candidates must have strong leadership and people management skills. This is a working sales position; you will build and maintain local accounts as well as supervise a sales staff of 4. You should have a good understanding of all facets of newspaper operations with emphasis on sales a n d m a r k e t i n g . Yo u should also have strong internet and social media skills and be wellsuited to working with government, community groups and clients in creating effective advertising. Sound Publishing is Washington’s largest p r i va t e , i n d e p e n d e n t newspaper company. If you are creative, customer-driven, successoriented and want to live on beautiful Whidbey Island, we want to hear from you. We offer excellent benefits, paid vacation and holidays and a 401k. Please submit your resume and cover letter with salary requirements to: hr@soundpublishing.com or by mail to: Sound Publishing Inc., 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite 106, Poulsbo, WA 98370, ATTN: HR/ASMW EOE

Employment Media

CREATIVE ARTIST The Journal of the San Juans in Friday Harbor, WA has an opening for a c r e a t i ve a r t i s t . M u s t have a minimum of three years experience with complete mastery in the fo l l ow i n g : M AC O S X , CS3 (InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator), Adobe Acrobat (intermediate level), Inter net, troubleshooting electronic files and project coordination. Duties include performing ad and spec design, designing promotional materials and providing excellent customer service. Requires exceptional communication skills in a deadline environment. Newspaper production experience a plus! E.O.E. This is a 30 hours-per-week position and includes benefits. Please send resume, cover letter and work samples in PDF or Text format to: CAJSJ/HR Sound Publishing, Inc. 19351 8th Ave. NE Suite 106 Poulsbo, WA 98370 E-mail to hr@soundpublishing.com You’ll find everything you need in one website 24 hours a day 7 days a week: nw-ads.com. Employment Transportation/Drivers

DRIVERS: Central Refrigerated IS GROWING! Hir ing Exper ienced & Non-Experienced Drive r s . C D L Tr a i n i n g Available! Employ Today! Average $40,000$70,000! 877-369-7894

EVENTS

To be included in this directory, contact Teri at: (360) 659-1300 or tlemke@ MarysvilleGlobe.com

BAM!

BBQ & More

CATERING To See Our Menu, Visit: www.bbqnmore.com

Located in Marysville Cell: 206.619.0528

MYSTERY SHOPPERS $49,000

Wonderful park like setting!! This property features 2.16 flat acres w/ tall evergreens & garden space. Home has 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. It has a large living room with a wood burning fireplace. Master bedroom has masterbath and walk in closet. You will love to entertain on the oversize front & back deck. Outdoors you'll find a peaceful serene setting with a outbuilding & tree house.

Wendy Smith 425-319-5036 To be included in this Directory call 360-659-1300 or email tlemke@MarysvilleGlobe.com

WANTED

National Market Research company seeks individuals to evaluate customer service at local restaurant in Marysville, WA.

Apply FREE: www.bestmark.com

11


12

September 28, 2011 Employment Transportation/Drivers

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe Cemetery Plots

Cemetery Plots

DRIVERS, Company Lease - Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company dr iver. Lease Operators ear n up to $ 5 1 k . L e a s e Tra i n e r s earn up to $80K (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.net

(1) CEMETERY Plot at Redmond’s beautiful Cedar Lawns and Memorial Park. Take care of all your funeral needs in one location. New Rhodie lot #165D, space #2. $3,200. Seller will pay transfer fee. Call 425753-6773

C R E M AT I O N P L OT S, Greenwood Memorial in Renton. 4 side by side cremation plots, spaces 1, 2, 3 & 4, in Memory Urn Garden. Nice, peaceful, treed location, Beautifully maintained. $6100 current value. Will sell 2 each for $2300 or a ll 4 fo r $ 39 0 0 . C a ll : (425)226-6668

Health Care Employment

SUNSET HILL Memorial Park in Bellevue. Garden of Devotion, lot 186, space 3 & 4, side by s i d e. To p o f t h e h i l l . Beautiful view. Value at $22,000 each. Selling for $20,000 both or $10,000 e a c h . S e l l e r w i l l p ay transfer fee. Please call ACACIA Memorial Park, Jessica for details; 425“Birch Gardenâ€?, (2) adja- 205-8448 cent cemetery plots, #3 & # 4 . S e l l i n g $ 5 , 0 0 0 SUNSET HILLS Memorieach or $8,000 both. Lo- al Park Cemetery. Have cated in Shoreline / N. a serene and peaceful Seattle. Call or email setting in the Lincoln Emmons Johnson, 425- Garden. Adjacent to a 4 8 8 - 3 0 0 0 , Japanese memorial. Beautiful view for your eaj3000@msn.com loved ones. 26B spaces Looking for your 5 & 6. $10,000 each or dream house? Go to $18,000 for the pair. InpnwHomeFinder.com cludes endowment care. Seller will pay transfer to ďŹ nd the perfect fee. Call Daisy (253)365home for sale or rent. 9783

General

Busy Outpatient Whidbey Island Physical Therapy practice needs

• • •

Licensed Physical Therapist AND PT Assistant

Competitive salary Good Benefits Great team environment • Flexible Schedule Fax or email resume to: 360-331-4114 famcare3@whidbey.com Business Opportunities

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTra i n fo r h i g h p ay i n g Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified, Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783 A L L I E D H E A LT H C A REER TRAINING- Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Earn up to $150 per day Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments. Experience Not Required. Call Now 1877-737-7565 MAKE UP to $2,000.00+ Per Week! New Credit Card Ready Drink-Snack Vending Machines. Minimum $3K to $30K+ Investment Required. Locations Available. BBB A c c r e d i t e d B u s i n e s s. (800) 962-9189

Cemetery Plots

SUNSET HILLS Memorial Park in Bellevue, WA. Tw o s p a c e s ( L o t 5 0 , spaces 7/8) available for sale in the sold out Garden Of Heritage, located within the beautiful Sunset Hills Part. This serene, idyllic setting coupled with magnificent mountains views of the Olympic and Cascade Mountain Ranges are further enhanced by the peaceful and well maintained grounds. Take advantage of a once in a lifetime opportunity for $12,500. This offer includes; a 20x30; grave stone marker, 2 granite urn vaults, 2 internment and recording fees , the processing fee, a second inscription fee and the memorial installation and inspection fee. I’ll also pay the transfer of deed cost. This is the complete package and an excellent opportunity. This sale has been preapproved by Sunset Hills. To take advantage of this please call 425338-0745 and ask for Ed

Cemetery Plots

T WO ( 2 ) C E M E T E RY lots, side by side, Cedar Lawns Memorial Park in R e d m o n d . B o t h h ave per petual and endowment care. $4000 each or $7500 for both. Transfer fee will be paid by s e l l e r. C a l l 2 0 6 - 7 1 9 2509 If no answer, leave message Farm Fencing & Equipment

SAWMILLS from only $3997 -- Make Money & Save Money with your own bandmill -- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD: www.Norw o o d S a w mills.com/300N 1-800578-1363 Ext. 300N

STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 – Reg $12,300 Now $9,970; 36x58 – Reg $20,300 Now $16,930; 48x96 – Reg $42,400 Now $36,200; 81x130 – Reg $104,800 Now $89,940. Source# 08U. 509-590-4615

You’ll ďŹ nd everything you need in one website 24 hours a day 7 days a week: nw-ads.com.

Wood pallets for firewood or ? (Does not include 48x40 size)

READERS & MUSIC LOVERS. 100 Greatest Novels (audio books) ONLY $99.00 (plus s h.) Includes MP3 Player & Accessor ies. BONUS: 50 Classical Music Wor ks & Money Back Guarantee. Call Today! 1-888-799-3451

DIRECTV Fall Special! Free HD, 3 mos FREE HBO|Starz|Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET F r e e , C h o i c e Ultimate|Premier - Pkgs f r o m $ 2 9 . 9 9 / m o. T i l l 10/15! 1-866-438-1182

Call Today!

425-355-0717 ext. 1560

Ask for Karen Avis Mail Order

PROFLOWERS. Send Flowers for Every Occasion! Anniversary, Birthd a y, J u s t B e c a u s e . Starting at just $19.99. G o t o w w w. p r o f l o w ers.com/fresh to receive an extra 20% off your order or Call 1-866-6846172

Miscellaneous

GOLD CLAIM Placer, Bluett Pass. $25,000 OBO. 360-474-1211 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

APPLE,

Fir/Pine Firewood www.thewoodguys.com

1.800.848.4141 Free Fire Starter

flea market

SENIOR LIVING Q:

I’m ready for Grandview Village! However, I love my doctor and want to continue going to him. Please tell me I don’t have to give up my doctor.

Jennifer Dennis Executive Director

A: We know that having a doctor that provides great service, is easy to talk with and has a history is priceless. Grandview Village’s Wellness staff work with several area doctors and clinics. The goal of the Wellness Center is to coordinate care between your doctor, our staff and any other medical providers that you may be involved in your care. We’d love to meet your team! Give us a call!

5800 64th Street NE Marysville, WA 98270

360-653-2223

HEATING & COOLING

Call Dave For Estimate

Building Materials & Supplies

FREE!

Mail Order

EXPERT ADVICE

DCW CONCRETE, LLC. 30 Years Experience D Flatwork Specialist (Patios, Garages, Driveways, Walks, Steps ) D All Types of Finish

stuff

AT&T U-Verse for just $29.99/mo! SAVE when you bundle Internet+Phone+TV and get up to $300 BACK! (Select plans). Limited Time Call NOW! 1-866944-0810

DISH NETWORK. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! Save! & Ask About same day Installation! Call 877-992-1237

Home Services Concrete Contractors

Lic# DCWC0CW953LP

Mail Order

Are you an Expert in your field? Would you like to share your knowledge with others? Call the Marysville Globe / Arlington Times at 360-659-1300 today, ask for TERI and you could be one of our EXPERTS!

home services

425-344-2500, Cell 425-334-8831, Msg.

Free Items Recycler

Q:

Have you ever visited Everett Fall Home and Gift Show and truly got a Free Gift Offer?

A: Andgar Heat & AC has been around since 1935 and we are looking forward to servicing your heating Cheri Groves and cooling needs in Snohomish County. For our first Comfort Advisor 100 customers that visit our booth #153 that come to meet us we will be offering Full Service maintenance for $99 and a CO2 Detector for FREE. As we approach the heating season it is important that you have your furnace or heat pump serviced. We will check the thermostat operation, check the indoor blower wheel Lubricate the indoor blower bearings, Inspect the electrical on the indoor unit, replace the throwaway or clean the existing filter, clean the heat exchanger or gas furnace, inspect the heat exchanger for cracks, Test the gas valve operation, test the safety controls. Depending upon if what type of equipment you are servicing.

Name Sakari Animal ID 14084996 Breed Alaskan Malamute Age 6 years Gender Female Color Black/Grey Spayed/Neutered No Size Large

Name Mouser Animal ID 14060453 Breed Domestic Shorthair Age 11 years Gender Female Color Black & Brown Spayed/Neutered Yes Declawed No

All animals adopted from EAS are neutered, microchipped, vaccinated, wormed and treated for fleas. All cats are tested for FIV/FeLV.

See us and other pets at the

333 Smith Island Rd • Everett, WA 98205

425-257-6000

NOTE: If the particular featured pet is not available, we have many great animals to choose from and you are sure to find the perfect pet for you.

DO YOU HAVE A FIRST AID KIT FOR YOUR DOG? A well-stocked first aid kit for dogs includes: t3PMMDPUUPOt4PNFDPUUPOCBMMTt(BV[FQBETt(BV[FUBQF t)ZESPHFOQFSPYJEF DIFDLUIFFYQJSBUJPOEBUF t)ZESPDPSUJTPOF PJOUNFOUt4DJTTPSTt&ZFXBTIt4JMWFSOJUSBUFt5XFF[FST t0SBMTZSJOHFTt1FEJPMZUFÂĽPSPUIFSCBMBODFEFMFDUSPMZUFGMVJE t#BCZGPPEoNFBUGMBWPSTXPSLCFTUt-BSHFUPXFMt&YBNHMPWFT tJODIXIJUFUBQF JOBEEJUJPOUPHBV[FUBQF t3PMMTPGFMBTUJDXSBQ t&NFSHFODZJDFQBDLt5IFSNPNFUFS CPUIPSBMBOESFDUBM UIFSNPNFUFSTDBOCFVTFESFDUBMMZ

Sponsored By:

PO Box 1041 Everett, WA 98206

425-252-5002

MARYSVILLE t 1340 State Avenue t 360-658-7817


September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the s e l l e r ’s a n d b u y e r ’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a c o r d by v i s u a l i z i n g a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To m a k e a f i r e w o o d complaint, call 360-9021857. http://agr.wa.gov/inspection/ weightsMeasures/ Firewoodinformation.aspx

Firewoodinformation.aspxhttp://agr.wa.gov/inspection/weightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Advertise in the Classifieds to reach thousands of readers looking to use your service. Call 1-800288-2527 to place your ad in the Service Directory.

Musical Instruments

Dogs

YAMAHA upright piano for sale. Details: T121; upright, 48” H, 60” W, 24” D. Color : Polished Ebony (black) with matching bench; Condition: excellent. beautiful tone, made in Japan. owned 6 years and only used 3 years. Ask: $5500 or best offer. Please contact: 206- A D O R A B L E A K C French Bulldog Puppies. 715-4235 Born July 3rd, 2011. 1 White with Brindle male, Wanted/Trade 2 B r i n d l e fe m a l e s, 1 WANTED Your diabetes Brindle male. All Brintest strips. Unexpired. dles have White patch We buy Any Kind/Brand. on chest. Ready for ForPay up to $18.00 per eve r H o m e s. Pa r e n t s box. Shipping Paid. Ha- o n - s i t e , fa m i l y p e t s . blamos espanol. Call 1- Champion bloodlines. $2,000. 1 Female Brin800-267-9895 dle sold. Vashon Island. 206-463-2601 or marilyn066@centurytel.net

Dogs

Dogs

GERMAN SHEPHERD

Dogs

AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD purebred p u p s f r o m o u r Ve r y Non-Hyper Lines. Extremely intelligent, great family dogs & they live to please you. All shots & wormings. Both parents on site. A l l c o m e w / p u p py package. $400-$500. 360-793-8559

ENGLISH MASTIFF mix puppies. 75% English Mastiff, 25% Lab. $700. Faw n a n d bl a ck w i t h beautiful markings. Also, solid black. Mother 50% E n g l i s h M a s t i f f, 5 0 % Black Lab. Father is full A K C E n g l i s h M a s t i f f. Born 07/22/11. Puppies will have first shots and deworming. Loving, loyal, fun personalities. For more details, 206-3518196

2005 KIA AMANTI KNALD124X55057661 $9507 (stk#20166U). Skagit Mazda. 360-7572200

Horse Country Farm KIDS 7-14, BEGINNERS WELCOME.

G R E AT P Y R E N E E S puppies. Licensed breeder, health warrant y, s h o t s. Pa r e n t s o n site. Raised with kids and livestock. Excellent AKC German Shepherd family dogs and livepuppies. Bred for intelli- stock guardians. $500 g e n c e a n d t e m p e r a - each. Call 360-652-7173 ment. 3 Beautiful males available. Born 7-8-11 Ready for a family of their own. 1st Shots and w o r m e d r e g u l a r l y. E n u m c l a w. $ 4 5 0 . N o calls after 7:30 please. 253-939-0133

PUGGLE Puppies, licensed breeder, health warranty, shots. Mom and Dad AKC. Fawns and blacks. Males and females. Family raised, parents on site. $400. GREAT DANE Puppies, 360-652-7173 AKC. Males/ females. Every color but Fawns. Two litters of blues fa- U K C R O T T W E I L E R t h e r e d b y T i b e r i o u s . puppies. 10 weeks, 3 $500 & up, health guar- males left. Holland line. antee. Licensed since Bred for temper ment, 2002. Dreyersdanes is looks and intelligence. Oregon state’s largest Pa y m e n t s a c c e p t e d . breeder of Great Danes. $700 to $1800. Shots, Also selling Standard vet checked. Call 206Poodles V i s i t : 251-3842. www.andreschihuahuas.com www.dreyersdanes.com Call 503-556-4190

wheels

JOIN THE WEDNESDAY WRANGLERS OR FRIDAY GAMING CLUB

Automobiles Chevrolet

3 CLASSES.

GORGEOUS ‘82 T-Top Pear l White Cor vette, automatic. Original pristine condition! 8cyl, babied by one owner & never raced! Low miles. A l way s g a r a g e d . Ta n l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r, A / C, power seats, windows & steering. Call me for a drive! You’ll believe it’s a beauty. Ready to sell!!! $ 1 3 , 0 0 0 / o b o. S o u t h Whidbey Island. 360730-1316, 360-420-2461

ONLY $99 IN OCTOBER.

Great Dane

pets/animals

Automobiles Kia

Horses

www.horsecountry farm.com

Automobiles Lexus

1992 LEXUS SC400 JT8UZ30CXN0004906 $5587 (stk#20164U). Call today Skagit Mazda. 360-757-2200 Automobiles Toyota

1 9 9 9 Toyo t a S i e n n a Automatic, CD/Cassette p l aye r 1 6 7 k . $ 7 , 9 9 5 . Call Fr e eway Au t o. 360-647-5686 2 0 0 1 Toyo t a S i e n n a Automatic, Gold exterior, biege interior 102k. $7,995. Call Freeway Auto. 360-647-5686 Automobiles Volkswagen

2004 VW BEETLE CON 3VWCM31Y04M314531 Automobiles $8707 (stk#20044U) Call 360-691-7509 Ford today Skagit Ford. 360425-335-4773 2 0 0 2 F O R D E S C A P E 757-2000 A ridin’ good time 1FMCU04122KC19839 since 1977! $ 8 3 8 9 . ( s t k # 2 7 4 9 T ) PNWHomeFinder.com Skagit Subaru. 360-757- is an online real estate community that Sell it for FREE in the 7737

exposes your profile and listings to two million readers from our many publications in the Pacific Northwest. p l ay e r. 1 4 7 k . $ 4 8 9 5 . Log on to join our Fr e e w a y A u t o S a l e s network today. 360-647-5686

Super Flea! Call Automobiles 866-825-9001 or Honda email the Super Flea 2 0 0 2 H O N DA C I V I C at theflea@ Automatic, Blue exterior, soundpublishing.com. sunroof & CD/cassette

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September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Miscellaneous Autos

FOR SALE--BOX from straight truck. $1,000. Outside measurements: 8’ wide x 8’ tall x 23.5’ long (includes 1’ rail lift gate) Call Karen Avis @ Sound Publishing, 425-3550717 ext 1560 Pickup Trucks Ford

1968 FORD 1 ton truck, 4 speed, 352 engine with dump bed, $2,500. 360-659-9457 2002 FORD RANGER 1FTYR14U42PB08787 $6285. (stk#2773T) Call Skagit Subaru. 360-757-7737

A U T O

R E M O V A L

H A N D Y M A N

Pickup Trucks Ford

Pickup Trucks Toyota

1993 FORD F-250 HD XL. Regular Cab, 5.8 V8, Automatic Transmission, A/C, AM/FM Cassette, Knapheide Utility Box. Tires 80%. Spare, Dual Tanks, Bemis Light Duty Series Post Puller. Truck is ready to work. Clean truck, runs very good. All equipment works. Brakes overall c o n d i t i o n ve r y g o o d . Glass all good. Backup alarm, Orange rotating beacon above box. White, Blue vinyl interior. 97,000 miles. Just serviced by local Ford dealer, Washington title, 10 months left on registration. $5,800. 425-6413127, 979-219-8990 (Bellevue)

Vans/Minivans Dodge

2002 Dodge Caravan 135K miles, Blue exterior, Gray interior, $4995. Fr e e w a y A u t o S a l e s 360-647-5686

PNWHomeFinder.com is an online real estate community that exposes your proďŹ le and listings to two million readers from our many publications in the PaciďŹ c Northwest. Log on to join our network today.

Unw Auto R anted emov al

nwanted Auto Removal U s ’ m o T ing Or Not, Dead of Aliv Runn t A Clunker, I’ll For Sure Junk e. -er. You Go mall I’ll Take T h S e m All. Big And Tom @ 360-691-4946

www.unwantedautoremoval.com Fully licensed and Insured A Pro That’s Always Ready to Go

Handyman Dad “DAD CAN FIX IT�

If in doubt, call to see if Dad can do it ! No Job Too Small

425-327-9733

handymandad@comcast.net

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A - JDK Landscaping A N D S C A P I N G

Reach the readers the dailies miss. Call 800-388-2527 today to place your ad in the ClassiďŹ eds.

H A N D Y M A N

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A N D S C A P I N G

Mowing • Sod • Edge Fertilizing • Pruning Trimming • Weeding Aeration • Thatching Bark • Seed • Haul Retaining Walls

and all other landscaping needs 1-Time or Year Round Service Commercial/Residential Licensed/Bonded/Insured

Please Call 360-659-6735 425-232-2662

Lic. # JDKLA**983LEV

Toll Free 800-388-2527 Fax 360-598-6800

email: classified@soundpublishing.com web: www.nw-ads.com

GEORGE’S HANDYMAN SERVICE

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A N D S C A P I N G

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Quality Work, Reasonable Rates “No Job 2 Small, I Do It Allâ€? t3PPĂĽOHt%FDLTBOE'FODFT t1SFTTVSF8BTIJOHt1BJOUJOH t)PNF3FQBJS.BJOUFOBODF t"QQMJBODF3FQBJS

To be included in this

(360) 436-1787 Office (425) 231-0249 Cell

TIMMERMANS LANDSCAPE SERVICE QUALITY AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE

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FREE CONSULT

Adoptions • Injury claims • Wills • Probate • Guardianships Family law mediation • Unusual Matters Welcome

A W D U S T

tlemke@marysvilleglobe.com

Check Us Out!

A N D S C A P I N G

S PLAYGROUND CHIPS Deliveries from 45 yards to 125 yards

Phone: 360-659-6223 Fax: 360-659-4383

Landscaping

SOD, RESEED, WEEDING, PRUNING, HEDGE TRIM, BARK, THATCHING, ROTOTILLING, RETAINING WALL, PAVER INSTALLATION, SIDEWALKS, DRIVEWAYS, FENCES, PRESSURE WASHING & GUTTER CLEANING

FREE ESTIMATES

FAMILY OWNED 21+ YEARS

Licensed • Bonded • Insured Lic. #GDLANC927MG

gishofďŹ ce@gmail.com

FIR ISLAND TRUCKING COMPANY

G&D 360-659-4727 425-346-6413

360.386.8109

. SAWDUST & SHAVINGS . HOG FUEL . H A V I N G S

360 659-1300 x2050 or

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STEVE GISH

Years Experience

directory, contact Teri at:

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425-308-1753

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Free Estimates

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www.greenextremescooters.com

T T O R N E Y

O O F I N G

homes apartments houseboats vacation homes

WHY PAY FOR GAS? Own an electric scoote r / m o t o r c y c l e . E n j oy freedom of commuting to work, college or running errands without stopping for gas! Lithium Powered, quality scooters with warranty. Only $6 to board ferry! Speeds up to 70mph. Distance up to 80 miles/charge. Prices range: $500-$6,000. Call Jen to test r ide. 425-270-1351

A

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Rent It

2003 TOYOTA Tacoma, 6 cylinder, X Cab, 4x2, black. New tires and batter y. 31,000 miles! Includes tool box. Has bed liner. Maintained regularly. $10,200. (425)8687747

g Haulin989 1 Since

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Motorcycles

P A I N T I N G

JOHN’S PAINT SERVICE

Exterior & Interior Painting P r e s s u r e Wa s h i n g

Senior Discounts! Located in Marysville Cell 206-619-0528 Licensed • Bonded • Insured Lic. #JOHNSPS914P6


September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

with 2-year wireless svc agreement on voice and minimum $15/mo data plan required.

with 2-year wireless service agreement on voice and minimum $15/mo data plan required.

with 2-year wireless service agreement on voice and minimum $15/mo data plan required.

Limited-time offer. Subject to wireless customer agrmt. Credit approval req’d. Activ. fee $36/line. Coverage & svcs, including mobile broadband, not avail everywhere. Geographic, usage & other conditions & restrictions (that may result in svc termination) apply. Taxes & other chrgs apply. Prices & equip. vary by mkt & may not be avail. from ind. retailers. See store or visit att.com for details and coverage map. Early Termination Fee (ETF): None if cancelled during first 30 days, but a $35 restocking fee may apply; after 30 days, ETF up to $325, depending on device (details att.com/equipmentETF). Subject to change. Agents may impose add’l fees. Regulatory Cost Recovery Charge up to $1.25/mo. is chrg’d to help defray costs of complying with gov’t obligations & chrgs on AT&T & is not a tax or gov’t req’d chrg. Offer Details: AT&T Impulse 4G with 2-year wireless service agreement on voice & minimum $15/mo data plan required is $29.99. Sony Xperia PLAY 4G with 2-year wireless service agreement on voice & minimum $15/mo data plan required is $49.99. SAMSUNG INFUSE 4G with 2-year wireless svc agreement on voice & minimum $15/mo data plan required is $99.99. Smartphone Data Plan Requirement: Min. $15/mo. DataPlus (200MB) plan required; $15 automatically chrg’d for each additional 200MB provided if initial 200MB is exceeded. All data, including overages, must be used in the billing period in which it is provided or be forfeited. For more details on data plans, go to att.com/dataplans. Sales Tax calculated based on price of unactivated equipment. Screen images simulated. ©2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. Service provided by AT&T Mobility. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

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September 28, 2011

The Arlington Times • The Marysville Globe

Food to Dine for. Experience it Here! The City of Quil Ceda Village is located on the Tulalip Indian Reservation on the I-5 corridor. Take exits 200 or 202. For more information: www.quilcedavillage.com

Please welcome Olive Garden Restaurant, who has joined Quil Ceda Village’s selection of diverse restaurant choices!

OLIVE GARDEN

EAGLES BUFFET

BOBS BURGERS & BREW

BLACKFISH

• 10326 Quil Ceda Blvd Tulalip, WA 98271 • Sunday - Thursday 11:00am - 10:00pm • Friday - Saturday 11:00am - 11:00pm • 360.653.5322

• 8822 Quilceda Pkwy Tulalip, WA 98271 • Monday - Thursday 7:30am - 10:00pm • Friday & Saturday Open ‘til 11:00pm • Sunday 9:00am - 10:00pm • 360.654.3605

• Located inside Tulalip Casino • Monday - Friday Open for breakfast 7:00am • Saturday & Sunday Open for lunch 9:00am • Sunday - Thursday Close at 10:00pm • Friday & Saturday Close at Midnight • 360.716.1462

• Located inside Tulalip Casino • Sunday - Thursday 5:00pm - 11:00pm • Friday & Saturday Open ‘til 12:00am • Lounge everyday 5:00pm - 1:00am • 360.716.1100 • www.tulalipcasino.com

Marysville Globe, September 28, 2011  

September 28, 2011 edition of the Marysville Globe