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‘White Christmas’ comes to Arlington Arlington High School students perform Irving Berlin musical BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

SPORTS: Eagles get the Royal treatment in 69-61 loss. Page 9

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

From left, Arlington High School students Jordan Tanguay, Caroline Rensel, Nate Braaten, Kelsey Ghirardo, Josiah Miller, Matt Miller and Reilly McVay perform the closing song of the AHS Drama Department’s production of “White Christmas” during a rehearsal.

ARLINGTON — It’s a show that’s been nearly a year in the making, and the student performers and faculty supervisors alike consider it the Arlington High School Drama Department’s biggest production yet. “White Christmas” concludes its two-week run Dec. 10 and 11, starting at 7 p.m. both nights, in the Linda M. Byrnes Performing Arts Center, located at 18821 Crown Ridge Blvd. in Arlington. For AHS Drama teacher Scott Moberly, staging the Irving Berlin musical at the PAC represents the culmination of plans he began developing as far back as SEE PLAY, PAGE 13

Students bag 12 tons of spuds for food banks BY KIRK BOXLEITNER

SPORTS: Cougars fall to Bellingham 42-39 in season opener. Page 9

INDEX BIRTHS 7 CLASSIFIED ADS 15-18 7 LEGAL NOTICES 6 OPINION 7 PUZZLES 9-11 SPORTS 14-15 WORSHIP

Vol. 122, No. 22

kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

LAKEWOOD — The generosity of a local potato farmer allowed the student body of Lakewood High School to help round out the holiday meals of area food bank customers. LHS freshman Molly Stuller and senior Cameron Howard coordinated the bagging of an estimated 12 tons of potatoes, which eventually saw each student at the school filling an average of 15 bags of potatoes for Marysville and Arlington food banks. Before they were bagged, the potatoes filled a 20-foot by 30-foot enclosure that added up to a mountain that, at its height, stretched taller than the students who worked on it. “A truck backed up and just dumped all these pota-

toes on us,” Stuller said. “Our greenhouse teacher has so many connections with local farmers,” said Howard, who noted that both the teacher and the farmer wished to remain anonymous to ensure that the students received the majority of attention for this good deed. “We did a lot of cleaning of potatoes. I stayed there to finish bagging potatoes for 10 evenings.” Howard and Stuller were quick to share credit with their fellow students, which Stuller helped recruit by submitting letters to each teacher’s classroom requesting that they allow their classes to take part in bagging the potatoes. Howard added a bit of incentive by suggesting to the teachers SEE SPUDS, PAGE 3

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

From left, Lakewood High School freshman Molly Stuller and senior Cameron Howard show off the potatoes they still have left over from their two-week bagging effort for area food banks.


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December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

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Santa Run returns to collect for food bank SPECIAL TO THE ARLINGTON TIMES

ARLINGTON — The city of Arlington continues an annual tradition this December, as Santa Claus comes to town. Santa will be in town Dec.

4-9 and Dec. 11-16, and the Arlington Fire Department, city of Arlington employees and Santa’s helpers will again be escorting the jolly old elf through the streets of the city on a decorated fire truck. Santa’s helpers will accept non-perishable

food items and monetary donations for the Arlington Food Bank. Arlington firefighters, city employees and Santa’s helpers volunteer their time to work this event each year. While the Santa Run volunteers are pleased to help

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the local community with donations to the Arlington Food Bank, no donations are required. When you hear the siren and music from Santa’s fire truck, simply come outside and say hello. Santa’s schedule and routes are posted at www. santarun.net. All routes are set to start at or around 6 p.m. and are subject to weather conditions. For more information, call 360403-3600 or e-mail firedepartment@arlingtonwa.gov.

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Santa will be riding on an Arlington Fire Department truck when he is in town to participate in the annual Santa Run.

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Local pharmacies help each other after fire BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

SMOKEY POINT — Although a Nov. 22 fire has temporarily closed the Quilceda Pharmacy in Marysville, Cory Duskin has promised his customers that they can still obtain their same medications, from the same staff members, at the Cumulus Pharmacy in Smokey Point. Duskin owns the Quilceda, Cumulus and Arlington pharmacies, and while he acknowledged that the fire damage to his building at the 9500 block of State Avenue in Marysville represents an estimated loss of approximately $1 million, he feels strongly that his own difficulties should not be passed onto his customers. “When people call the phone number for the

SPUDS FROM PAGE 1 to participate. “Class after class came by to help,” Stuller said. “It was like a party,” laughed Kristi Lentz, a Spanish teacher at the school who helped oversee the two-week-long bagging effort. “No one person wound up being in charge.” “A conductor can’t really

Quilceda Pharmacy, their calls are automatically picked up at the Cumulus Pharmacy,” Duskin said. “We tentatively expect to have the Quilceda Pharmacy building repaired and cleaned up like new within a couple of weeks, after which time we plan to move back in.” Duskin assured his customers that none of their records were lost, damaged or compromised, and added that they’re accessible at both the Cumulus and Arlington pharmacies. “All of our Quilceda Pharmacy staff have been relocated to the Cumulus Pharmacy,” said Duskin, who noted that the Quilceda Pharmacy’s Walk-In Clinic had already been consolidated into the Arlington Pharmacy last February. “Our customers might have to drive a few extra

miles, but we still have all their insurance data and we can still handle their refills. We’re still here to take care of them as seamlessly as possible.” Duskin admitted that the magnitude of the fire losses hasn’t fully sunk in yet, but he remains focused on addressing those issues as they come up. “I’m probably still in shock and haven’t wrapped my brain around it entirely yet,” Duskin said. “It’s like the old saying about eating an elephant, where you have to do it one bite at a time. I’m just checking off everything that’s on my list of things that I have to do right now. Our recovery is secondary to minimizing the inconvenience to our customers. Don’t think that this fire has shut us down. We’re just moving forward, is all.”

take credit for the work of their orchestra,” Howard said. Although a number of the potatoes that remain were sorted out because they’d gone bad or had been damaged, many more stayed in excellent shape, were bagged and are waiting to be taken to their food banks in the area. “We called all the food banks to see which ones needed potatoes,” Howard said. “The one in Marysville

was so low that they were only giving out two potatoes to each family of six. They needed more, especially for holiday meals. You could tell it meant a lot to them.” “That was one of the best parts,” Stuller said. “It left some of them speechless.” Howard noted that the potato-bagging effort was initiated by a freshman and a senior, which he feels shows how pervasive the school’s community spirit is throughout its grade levels.

The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

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Firefighters demolish Station 46 Special to The Arlington Times

ARLINGTON — The Arlington Fire Department bid farewell to a familiar landmark on the morning of Nov. 30, as part of their transition into new lodgings next year. “Arlington firefighters were allowed to do something they’ve wanted to do for years — tear apart Arlington Fire Station 46,” Arlington Community Emergency Management Coordinator Christine Badger said. Firefighters began demolishing the old structure at 11 a.m., putting into practice the same skills they’ve developed in breaking through buildings while fighting fires. They employed equipment ranging from hand and power

“Rebuilding Station 46 has been a long time coming.” Tom Cooper Deputy Fire Chief tools to a backhoe, the latter of which they used to knock down the station’s remaining roof system, masonry and interior walls. “Rebuilding Station 46 has been a long time coming,” Arlington Deputy Fire Chief Tom Cooper said. “We’re grateful for the opportunity to start the demolition, because that means a new building will be going up soon.” Cooper explained that the portion of the structure that was removed had served the Arlington Fire Department and community for decades, and was “a cornerstone of much of

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the community’s history.” Nonetheless, he noted that its structural deterioration, instability and lack of workable area for staff were key factors in the decision to rebuild. The station’s existing truck bays will remain intact, since they’re not part of the rebuild, and they’ll continue to house fire apparatus during the construction phase. Arlington fire and EMS staff have been moved to other stations and adjacent offices until the new station is completed, which Badger estimated would happen by June of next year.

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December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

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Calendar features ‘Men of Aviation’

BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

Marysville Globe, Arlington Times, SVR Photo courtesy of Cathy Mighell

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ARLINGTON — Paul Nyenhuis has worked as an aircraft mechanic at the Arlington Municipal Airport for more than 35 years and Cathy Mighell hopes to shine a spotlight on him and a number of his fellow aviators from around the area for a good cause. “Paul has been known to come out after hours to help pilots that need assistance, and is also dedicated to prison ministry work for young people,” said Mighell, owner of Out of the Blue Aviation at the Arlington Airport. “Our calendar shows him with his twin-engine Cessna 310 and one of the custom flutes that he makes.” Out of the Blue has produced a “Men of Aviation” calendar for 2011, and Nyenhuis is one of the men featured. All proceeds from sales of the calendars will go toward promoting aviation for area youth through “Young Aviator” scholarships and other young pilot programs, but Mighell also wants to showcase a few of the faces that she feels have helped make the Arlington Airport community so special. “I wanted to pay tribute

“So many people here have such fascinating backgrounds. I could have filled this calendar three times over with interesting details.” Cathy Mighell, owner Out of the Blue Aviation

to their stories,” Mighell said. “So many people here have such fascinating backgrounds. I could have filled this calendar three times over with interesting details.” Mighell acknowledged that many of the prospective subjects of the calendar were shy about receiving so much attention at first, but once they realized that the calendars would help support youth aviation they became eager to participate. Mighell’s goal is to raise at least $2,000 for Young Aviator scholarships. “There are so many really unique people right here in Arlington that it was a struggle just to highlight the most significant details,” Mighell said. “Hans von der Hofen, one of our pilots, restores Navy jets and has trained other pilots including Pete Pettigrew, the retired instructor who was the inspiration for the character of ‘Viper’ in the movie ‘Top Gun.’”

Mighell describes herself as passionate about supporting youth aviation training because she believes that teaching young people about aviation is valuable even if they never enter the field of aviation themselves. “Not all of the kids that get this training will choose to become pilots, but a lot of them will still be inspired to study aeronautics or engineering,” Mighell said. “It can still serve as a confidence-builder for them, though. Aviation is empowering. Kids often don’t feel like they’re in control, but as a pilot you’re in charge of your own life.” This year marks Out of the Blue’s first “Men of Aviation” calendar, and Mighell is already considering a “Women of Aviation” calendar for 2012. For more information, call 360-474-1060, visit 18306 59th Dr. NE at the Arlington Airport or log onto www.outoftheblueaviation.com.


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The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

5

Rotary honors November students of the month SPECIAL TO THE ARLINGTON TIMES

ARLINGTON — The Rotary Club of Arlington announced and recognized its Students of the Month for November at its Nov. 18 meeting.

Rotary Students of the Month were awarded a voucher for a $50 donation to a non-profit group at their school or a non-profit organization in their community Arlington Superintendent and Rotarian, Dr. Kris

McDuffy presented certificates to Abigail Barnett, Sam Kiefer and Hailey Wales from the three school districts in the club’s service area which includes Arlington, Darrington and Lakewood. Abigail Barnett, an eight

grader at Haller Middle School in Arlington, serves on the Executive Council of Haller Middle School’s student government. She was an ASB senator in the sixth and seventh grades, where she developed her leadership style of quiet strength and quick organization. In addition to being an excellent student and leader, she competes in cross country and volleyball, and plays in the Haller Middle School band. Barnett is very active in church events and often volunteers to watch younger children during Sunday morning and evening activities.

Sam Kiefer, a senior at Lakewood High School, is always looking to help and serve others. According to a school staff member, he is always doing the right thing whether you are looking or not looking. He runs cross country and is an excellent student, as well, taking the most challenging classes available. A Darrington High School senior, Hailey Wales is a student athlete who maintains a 3.4 grade point average. She is preparing herself for college with her choice of Advanced Placement high

school classes. Wales is a member of the Key Club and was the President of her junior class. In addition to lettering in every sport she’s played — volleyball, basketball, tennis and softball — she was named league MVP for basketball her sophomore year, league Co-MVP for volleyball her senior year, and was named 1st team All-League for three years in both basketball and volleyball. The Rotary Club of Arlington recognizes excellent students that demonstrate a commitment to community.

NORTH SNOHOMISH COUNTY CHRISTMAS TREE FARM GUIDE Courtesy Photo

From left, Hailey Wales, Abigail Barnett and Sam Kiefer were named the Students of the Month for November by the Rotary Club of Arlington at its Nov. 18 meeting.

Savoy joins staff at The Arlington Times BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

MARYSVILLE — Erika Savoy, the newest advertising sales consultant for The Arlington Times and The Marysville Globe, is a local native who brings a diversity of time-tested skills to the table for her clients, but what she enjoys most is making new connections for her clients. “I once joked that my ideal job would be if someone paid me to network with others,” said Savoy, a 1993 graduate of MarysvillePilchuck High School. “It turns out that networking is about 80 percent of my job here.” Savoy still maintains her own graphic design firm as a part-time sideline, but she’s eager to set up new markets for Sound Publishing not only in Everett, but also Edmonds, Mukilteo and

Whidbey Island. “I have eight years of experience in graphic design, but I put myself through college with my sales work,” said Savoy, whose previous employers have included Comcast, Qwest and Group Health. “I have a lot of contacts in Everett. I’ll be looking for package deals for coverage. I like meeting new people, I’m from here and I know the area. My family’s based here, so I’m not going anywhere.” With her dual qualifications in graphic design and sales, Savoy expressed confidence that she can help clients develop the right ads for their target markets. “Getting people shopping out in their local areas is vital to our economy,” Savoy said. “It’s exciting to be here and help make that happen. I’m looking forward to stepping up to that challenge, and I plan on being here for

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

Erika Savoy, the newest advertising sales consultant for The Marysville Globe and The Arlington Times, comes to her new role with experience in both sales and graphic design. a long time.” You may contact Savoy by phone at 360-659-1300, ext. 3056, or via e-mail at esavoy@marysvilleglobe.com.

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Wednesday, December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

Tips to keep children safe

A

s we head into the holiday season, Safe Kids Snohomish GUEST County and Marysville Fire District want to help you keep your OPINION family safe. Kids are often injured at KRISTEN THORSTENSON home, where they should feel safest. There are even more dangers lurkMARYSVILLE FIRE DISTRICT ing this time of year, injuries range from burns and scalds, poisonings and home fires. Keep this in mind: Nothing is as important as parental supervision for children. As they develop through life, they will need different levels of supervision as they come up against different dangers. Here are just a few suggestions: While in the kitchen turn pan handles inward to prevent accidental burns to yourself and children. “Keep children away from cooking and heating appliances. Never leave the kitchen while you are cooking,” adds Shawneri Guzman, Safe Kids Snohomish County Coordinator. Keep medications and cleaners out of reach of children. Many medications look appealing to children they have bright colors and can look like candy. With out of town guests this holiday season, they might be out of the habit of having young children around, keep medications out of reach. While shopping for toys for children, pay close attention to the suggested ages and stages. Remember, anything that will fit in a toilet paper roll is too small and can be a hazard for a child under three to choke on. Never leave a burning candle unattended. Place candles in a safe location away from combustible materials and where children or pets cannot tip them over. Keep lighters and matches out of reach of children. Kids are naturally curious about fire, but it is not natural for them to experiment with fire. If you are unsure about your child’s curiosity about fire, contact your local fire department or Safe Kids at 360-363-8507. Never overload extension cords. It is easy to get caught in the excitement of holiday lights. It doesn’t take much to overload an extension cord. Close bedroom doors. A closed door can act as a barrier, providing valuable time for a rescue from outside the home. Only working smoke alarms save lives! Smoke and fire spread quickly – you may only have minutes to escape! Make sure you have smoke alarms in every room where someone might sleep and on every level of your home. Many local fire departments have smoke alarms available and would be more than happy to install them in your home. Have and practice your home fire escape plan. There is no time like the present to determine if your children will awaken to a smoke alarm. It has been determined many children do not wake to traditional smoke alarm sounds. We would rather you find out during a drill if your family may need to purchase a smoke alarm with voice recording capability. Chances are higher they would wake to your voice. Call 9-1-1! Get out – Stay out! Once you are out do not go back into your house for anything. Consider a home sprinkler system. The combination of smoke alarms and sprinklers can reduce your chances of dying in a fire by 82 percent. Remember nothing is as important as you when it comes to keeping your child safe, keep an eye on the children in your life. Have a safe & happy holiday season. For more information visit www. snosafekids.org. Kristen Thorstenson is the Public Information Officer/Education Specialist for the Marysville Fire District.

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Marysville ready for severe weather

W

hen the recent preThanksgiving holiday ice and snowstorm blanketed our region and brought daily life to a snail’s pace for a few days, the City of Marysville was ready. Our Public Works crews mobilized earlier this year by readying snow removal equipment, stockpiling supplies, training, and updating the City’s snow routes map. If the major snow and ice events during the past two winters taught us anything, it is that we would rather be over-prepared than underprepared. Public safety is a priority year-round, and no less so during a winter storm. We want to reassure citizens that the City of Marysville is committed to maintaining quality service during severe weather events, and doing what is necessary to protect lives and property. Snow and ice removal are one of the city’s biggest unscheduled events. I commend our employees for their swift, well-orchestrated response to the recent storm. Our first concern is safety on local roads, and keeping traffic moving throughout Marysville as efficiently as possible. The City maintains 411 lane miles of streets (196 miles of streets), which is roughly equivalent to the distance from Marysville to the California border. A general plowing operation includes a half-dozen vehicles covering 66 routes around the City. Street crews provide round-theclock coverage, conducting periodic sanding and snow-ice removal to mitigate conditions during a severe weather event. Work is ideally performed during overnight hours when traffic is light, but a plowing operation can commence at a moment’s notice, such as our immediate response to SR 528 and 67th Avenue when vehicles were unable to get up the hill. Marysville’s fleet consists of two five-yard trucks, two 10-yard trucks and one 3-yard truck each with plow and sanding capability. The City earlier this year

GUEST OPINION JON NEHRING MARYSVILLE MAYOR

purchased a third 10-yard truck, slightly used and winter-tested in Colorado. Street crews also use slide-in anti/de-icing liquid dispensing tanks and a motor grader. During this snow event, Public Works crews dumped 180 tons of sand, and applied 35 tons of thawing agents and 50 gallons of anti-icing solution on local roads. The Public Works yard was amply stockpiled, with some materials reallocated to a new north satellite storage area near 156th Street to provide quicker response to Marysville’s north end and Lakewood neighborhoods. Crews chalked up 385 hours of worker time directly responding to the snow and ice event, including 181 hours of plowing. Total costs ran more than $30,000, excluding cleanup. The question we get asked most often by residents during winter snowstorms is why the City doesn’t plow their own neighborhood road. The City attempts to make local roads as accessible as possible for the public and commuters heading to and from work and schools, but simply doesn’t have the resources to plow or sand every residential neighborhood street and cul de sac. The City’s Snow and Ice Removal Plan updated in 2010 designates snow and ice routes for sanding and plowing using a zoned system. Within each zone, a system of priority has been established taking into consideration topography, traffic volumes and special usage. The Street Department focuses removal efforts based on arterials leading in and out of Marysville, hillside arterials, fire and police access, and all other

primary and secondary city routes. To view the Snow Routes map, visit the City website at http://marysvillewa.gov. Marysville is a hilly city, so some roads may be closed by City personnel due to safety concerns. The City has crews that drive sanitation trucks and other heavy Public Works vehicles on a daily basis, in addition to police vehicles. We won’t jeopardize the safety of City employees by putting them in dangerous winter driving situations, for example, in inaccessible hilly areas. Sanitation crews, it should be mentioned, performed admirably under the circumstances to complete all garbage collection routes on time and on schedule. The City recently unveiled new user-friendly options to provide citizens and businesses with the latest emergency alerts and updates on winter storm conditions. Our website offers a new “Emergency Alert” system that you can access. Click on the “Emergency Alert” icon in the lower left-hand corner of our website. A Red Emergency Alert light means emergency conditions exist in the City. The remodeled website next year will expand this service by sending emergency updates automatically to you via e-mail. You can also call Marysville’s Emergency Alert Hotline at 360363-8118, though water and sewer emergencies still must call 360363-8100 during business hours, or 911 after hours. Information is also posted on our cable access stations, TV21 (Comcast) and TV25 (Frontier). In my estimation, the pre-planning that occurred well before this first winter blast got our community through the storm relatively unscathed, and it bodes well that we will be ready for the next storm that this forecasted cold, wet and snowy winter is sure to deliver. Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring can be reached at mayor@marysvillewa.gov.


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LEGAL NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE Public Hospital District No. 3, Snohomish County (Cascade Valley Hospital and Clinics) Board of Commissioners has canceled the First Monthly Board Meeting scheduled for Tuesday, December 14, 2010 at 7:00 a.m. Published: December 1 and 8, 2010. #436645

Births

(Through November 17, 2010)

November 15 A girl was born to Jennifer and Carsten Mullin of Arlington.

November 17 A boy was born to Jessica Saunders and Jeremy Tellesbo of Arlington.

The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

Deaths (Through November 21, 2010) Betty Wagner, 63, of Marysville, 9/28/47-11/16/10 Carrie L. Davis, 60, of Marysville, 9/18/50-11/17/10 Raymond E. Wilks, 65, of Marysville, 10/25/45-11/14/10 Phylene B. Timm, 67, of Arlington, 3/27/43-11/17/10 Virginia G. Chambers, 87, of Marysville, 3/4/23-11/21/10 Geraldine A. Moran, 77, of Marysville, 9/4/33-11/16/10 Frances L. Gaines, 88, of Marysville, 2/4/22-11/18/10

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COMMUNITY

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City offers classes Basic First Aid Classes Participants learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of injuries and sudden illness. Crucial information about how to deal with emergencies. Certified Instructor. Renew your existing certification or become First Aid Certified. OSHA, WISHA, L&I, and DSHS approved. For adults and youth ages 12 and older. Instructor: Sheila Davis. Location: Community Room at the Boys and Girls Club, 18513 59th Avenue NE, Arlington. Date: Monday, Dec. 20. Time: 6-9 p.m. Fee: $30 reduced to $25 if taking CPR class. Preregister 360-403-3448. CPR and AED for the Community and Workplace This course teaches the chain of survival, activation of 911, emergency response, airway obstruction and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Also discusses childhood injury prevention and information on adult heart attacks and strokes. AED discussion. Renew your existing certification or become CPR Certified. OSHA, WISHA, L&I, and DSHS approved. For adults and youth 12 & older. Instructor: Sheila Davis. Location: Community Room at the Boys and Girls Club, 18513 59th Avenue NE, Arlington. Date: Tuesday, Dec. 21. Time: 6-9 p.m. Fee: $30 reduced to $25 if taking First Aid class. Preregister 360-403-3448.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

ARLINGTON — Reading with Rover is an exciting new program being used at Eagle Creek Elementary School. The community-based volunteer program brings certified therapy dogs and their handlers into schools, libraries and bookstores allowing children an opportunity to practice reading aloud. The Reading for Rover program and its affiliates throughout the country have had great success using the program to become more confident in their reading skills. The trainers and dogs working at Eagle Creek Elementary have been trained in the Redmond-Woodinville area and go to several schools in Snohomish and King coun-

ties. The training certification is good for two years and then the dogs need to be recertified. Cory Timm, an Arlington school teacher, learned about the program through her graduate work in literacy at Western Washington University. She was excited about the prospects of offering this opportunity to the district’s elementary students. When asked, third-grader K.C. Green said, “I feel special being part of the program since there aren’t very many kids in it yet. I makes me want to read more and buy more books at the book fair.” Several of the children are now reading to their pets at home as well. Timm hopes the program will expand to additional schools in the district next year.

Courtesy Photo

Volunteer Annemarie Kaighin, left, and Hank, center, read with student Jordan Montgomery.

Church prepares meals for ‘Children of Nations’ BY KIRK BOXLEITNER kboxleitner@marysvilleglobe.com

ARLINGTON — They expected to put assemble between 12,000 and 16,000 meals for families in thirdworld countries. Instead, the 60 volunteers who showed up at the Arlington Free Methodist Youth Center at 10 a.m. on Nov. 13 had already assembled 11,500 such meals for the “Children of the Nations”

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by noon that day, and put together 18,000 meals by the time they finished that afternoon. Even in the midst of being interviewed, Pastor Chuck Shocki repeatedly revised up the estimated number of meals that would be put together that day, he received word of more and more financial donations that had come in at the last minute. Each meal package feeds six people and costs 25 cents each. “It’s amazing,” Shocki said. “We began the day with video

footage of families in need eating the meals and, after a week, you could see their nutrition visibly improving. We’d love to do this as an ongoing thing. We’ve just been a well-oiled machine,” he laughed. Jeanne Wessel noted that the Arlington Free Methodist Church has requested that the meals assembled at their youth center be directed to those in need in Haiti, especially since many church members are already involved in relief efforts on the Haitians’ behalf.

Dave Spoon northwest feeding coordinator for the Children of the Nations, explained that the meals are “rescue food,” including dry-packed staples such as beans, lentils and rice, plus powered chicken broth that’s been infused with proteins

and multivitamins. “It allows them to recover from malnourishment within a week or two,” Spoon said. “It can be hard to duplicate this kind of meal in the countries we serve. They’ll last as long as they’re kept sealed and dry.”

Read Online. Anywhere. Anytime.

News updated Daily Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

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From left, Cindy Egbert and Aaron Sass fill ingredient bags at the Arlington Free Methodist Youth Center Nov. 13, for the meals that the ‘Children of the Nations’ will send to families in need overseas.


THE SPORTS PAGE

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SPORTS SCAN

WEDNESDAY, December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

Eagles get the Royal treatment Lynnwood’s Edwards scores 31 in Arlington’s conference loss BY TRAVIS SHERER sports@marysvilleglobe.com

Arlington hoops vs. M-P Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m. Boys at M-P Girls at Arlington As far as the boys are concerned, Marysville-Pilchuck and Arlington are the two teams most coaches have said improved over last season. The first matchup between the two will show just how much better each has become. The girls matchup will be a contrast in styles, as M-P’s guards try to outrun Arlington’s posts.

Lakewood boys hoops vs. King’s Dec. 14, 7 p.m. at Lakewood Coach Matt Hart’s boys have a couple of games remaining before facing one of the better teams in the Cascade Conference, King’s. Last season, the 2A Cougars played catchup with the 1A Knights, but eventually competed with them. Hart is hoping for a quicker start than last year, and a home game against King’s will tell how quickly his youngsters are adjusting. Contact sports reporter Travis Sherer at tsherer@ marysvilleglobe.com or 360.659.1300.

LYNNWOOD — The Eagles showed they have to figure out how to play when the tempo slows down. In a 69-61 loss to Lynnwood, Dec.2, Arlington boy’s hoops came out fast and furious, but couldn’t maintain the pace. “We got a little tired, and you have to hand it to Lynnwood, they played a great game,” said Arlington coach Nick Brown. A combination of free throws and layups helped Arlington score 26 points in the first quarter. The Eagles made just one jumper in the first eight minutes to own a 26-14 lead. The second quarter, however, brought an entirely different speed of play, and Arlington’s defense frequently found themselves in the wrong spot. “We stopped getting turnovers on defense,”

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

Lynnwood’s Anthony Edwards, 32, pressures Blake Petersen. Brown said. “And once that stopped, the game really slowed down.”

And Lynnwood took advantage, although it seemed like only senior

Anthony Edwards would benefit from the slower pace. The senior small forward showed off a deadly mid-range game to pour in 21 first-half points. “He’s a great player,” said Brown of Edwards. “We had a hard time staying in front of him and finding him.” The Eagles spent the second half following Edwards around, but often leaving other shooters open, and paid for it, as six Royals combined to make 11 treys. “We definitely didn’t do a very good job of finding their shooters on the floor,” said Brown. The defensive highlight for the Eagles was senior Connor Cummings who seemed to be the only player able to slow down Edwards, who ended up with 31 points. “Connor did a fantastic job for us,” said Brown of Cummings’ effort in the third quarter. Leading the Eagles in scoring was Eric Carlson with 15 points while Griffin Ginnis added 11. Frustration took over the Eagles in the second quarSEE HOOPS, PAGE 10

Cougars fall in season opener Haslom scores 20, but Lakewood boys hoops can’t recover from 26 turnovers BY TRAVIS SHERER sports@marysvilleglobe.com

BELLINGHAM — For the most part, the Cougars looked like a team playing its first varsity basketball game. There were highs and lows, but in the end, Lakewood lost a Nov. 30 nonconference matchup with Bellingham, 42-39, in the final minute. “We only had one guy that had stepped on the floor of a varsity game before tonight,” said coach Matt Hart, who was also shorthanded due to injuries and snow-related absences. “We played well at times, but ended up giving it up down the stretch with turnovers.”

Lakewood had to figure out how to beat Bellingham’s defense in the first quarter, as the shots came few and far between, aside from senior Tre Haslom, that is. The rest of the team, however, took turns rotating the ball without looking for a shot, which resulted in the Cougars trailing 6-4 at the end of the first frame. The second quarter saw the Cougars settle down and find shots, as they took the lead 15-14 by halftime. While Lakewood scored with more frequency in the quarter, it was a 14-6 rebounding advantage that kept Bellingham off the scoreboard and kept Cougar SEE COUGARS, PAGE 11

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

Caleb Graves, middle, fights with a Bellingham player for possession during a nonconference game.

Eagle grapplers ready at all ages Arlington hoping for contributions from freshmen through seniors BY TRAVIS SHERER sports@marysvilleglobe.com

ARLINGTON — The Eagles are entering a new era of wrestling. The first class of younger wrestlers that have been around the program since elementary school are surfacing in coach Shaun Williams’ program. “We’ve only got like 50 kids, but they are 50 kids that love wrestling — and know wrestling,” Williams said. “And that is more than last year.” Williams says he expects big things from his 20 incoming freshmen, although it may not be right away. But that isn’t a problem as the Eagles field a pair of returning state participants and a number of varsity grapplers. Leading the way will be senior Nathan Shortt, who finished seventh in state at 145. Shortt made waves before the season began, finishing in seventh place at the New Wave Nationals in Nevada a month ago at 143 pounds. He’ll jump up to 152 this season. “I think he’s starting to come on,” said Williams. “He can beat anybody, but at the same time, he can lose to anybody.” Shortt will be joined by fellow state qualifier Brady Quinton, who bowed out of last year’s Mat Classic after two matches. Quinton might take a few weeks to get his endurance up after suffering a knee injury during the summer that forced him to sit out his senior football season. “He’s back and on the mat,” said Williams. “But it’s going to take time.” Arlington finished tied for fourth place with Snohomish in the Wesco North at 5-3, and sent five wrestlers to SEE EAGLES, PAGE 11


10

December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

WWW.ARLINGTONTIMES.COM

A water carol

Anaya & Taft Wedding

potency of estrogen and other carcinogens that cause longterm tissue damage. ■ Water forms the makeup of synovial fluid (the lubricatANGIE GOODING ing fluid between joints) and cerebrospinal fluid (fluid Image-wise, water is the in between vertebrae and Ebenezer Scrooge of beverages. Without considering its around the brain). If your health benefits, many people body is even slightly dehymay view water as miserly, drated, less fluid is available boring, plain, unromantic in these areas to protect your and bland. Among all the joints, spine and brain. ■ Drinking water is good other more colorful, sweet, for your brain. According to fruity, chocolaty or bubbly a recent study, a fluid loss options, water simply is ... simple. However, the health of only 2 percent of body benefits of drinking water weight caused reductions in (yes — plain, filtered water) arithmetic ability, short-term are extraordinarily remark- memory, and the ability to able. Before you say, “Bah visually track an object. ■ Water helps to reguHumbug,” consider these late your body temperature. facts about water: If you are dehydrated, you ■ A recent study reported can’t sweat enough to lower that the odds of developing your body’s core temperabreast cancer were reduced ture, which can lead to heat by 79 percent, on average, stroke or nausea during among water drinkers. One exercise. ■ Water serves as a solpossible explanation is that vent for minerals, vitamins, maintaining a dilute soluamino acids, glucose and tion within cells reduces the other nutrients. Without water your body can’t digest these nutrients, let alone absorb or transport them.

GOODING’S GUIDE TO FITNESS

The brides parents, Richard and Rhonda Anaya of Arlington and the grooms parents Edgar and Darlene Taft of Arlington would like to announce the marriage of Rachelle (Anaya) and Benjamin Taft. The couple were married on August 21, 2010 in Arlington with approximately 300 friends and family to celebrate with them. Rachelle is employed by The Everett Clinic as a Certified Medical Assistant and Ben is employed as co-owner of Bull of the Woods Dozing. The couple honeymooned in Maui, and now reside in Arlington.

Read Online. twitter.com/ ArlTimes

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

Zach Cooper penetrates the Lynnwood defense.

HOOPS FROM PAGE 9 ter as the Royals went on runs of 10-0 and 10-4 to tie the score at 34-34 by halftime. “We definitely got frustrated because we want to be a really good team —and we’ll get there — but we still

have some work to do to get there,” said Brown. “But we want to beat everybody by 20 when we should be concentrating on beating them by one.” Arlington opened its season with a 77-49 victory over Everett Nov. 30. The Eagles play at MarysvillePilchuck Dec. 10.

WINTER SPORTS 2010 Schedules subject to change due to weather. For most current schedules contact the high school.

DECEMBER 8

ARLINGTON

THROUGH

DECEMBER 14, 2010

LAKEWOOD

So, how much water should you drink? The recommended amount is eight eight-ounces glasses of water per day. If you exercise you should

drink 16 ounces of water two hours before exercise, 7-10 ounces every 10-20 minutes during exercise and 16-20 ounces after exercise. It’s important to drink water before you feel thirsty to avoid dehydration. The early, mild signs of dehydration are fatigue, loss of appetite, flushed skin, heat intolerance, lightheadedness, dark urine, dry cough, burning in stomach, headache, dry mouth, hoarse voice and muscle cramps. Dickens describes Ebenezer Scrooge: “The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, made his eyes red, his thin lips blue, and he spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice ...” Sounds like Ebenezer Scrooge may have been dehydrated. Happy Holidays everyone. Angie Gooding is an educator and a personal trainer certified through ACE (American Council on Exercise), an IFPA professional figure competitor, and owner of Inspire Fitness & Training. She lives locally, and trains clients in a private location in Marysville. She can be reached at AngieGooding@ comcast.net or www.inspirefitnessandtraining.com, or you can find “Inspire Fitness and Training” on Facebook.u, you will forgive yourself and recommit, because your health is worth it.

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The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

EAGLES FROM PAGE 9 state last year, coming away with a couple of placers and Williams thinks that his boys have the ability to achieve the same, if not improve. “If we can just improve on what we did last year,”

Williams said. “Having five guys or more go to state will be progress. We had success last year — with a little bit of luck we could have done a little better.” Also returning will be seniors Matt Badgley and Hunter Amundson, who wrestled at 145 and 125, respectively.

While seniors and freshmen highlight the preseason discussion about the Eagles, Williams also expects a lot out of his large junior class. “A couple of my juniors can step up and when the freshmen start rolling, we’ll be on our way,” Williams said. A few of the juniors, most notably Riley Cobb and Blake McPherson, will be nursing injuries at the beginning of the season, but Shawn Berg and Jesse Driscoll could make a difference.

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

Lakewood senior Tre Haslom goes in for a layup during the second half. He finished with 20 points.

COUGARS FROM PAGE 9 possessions alive. “We work our tails off. I mean, these guys get after it,” said Hart. “That’s something that’s going to be a big part of our team and some guys like Dillan Knott did a great job on the glass.” Meanwhile, Haslom took care of the Cougars on offense, scoring 20 points despite being in foul trouble that limited his playing time near halftime. “We told Tre to be aggressive tonight and that’s what he did,” said Hart. “And you’ve got to hand it to

him, he showed a lot of leadership out there. Last year he was a little hesitant to take on that role, but it looks like he’s grown into it.” A run of Bellingham turnovers helped Lakewood earn the largest lead of the game, with a 27-18 advantage midway through the third quarter, but Bellingham charged back with a 15-3 run over the next eight minutes to retake the lead, 35-30. Lakewood scored five straight to tie the score at 35-35 with less than three minutes remaining, but missed a few shots down the stretch to let the game

slip away as time ran out. Lakewood outrebounded Bellingham 45-30, but 26 turnovers are what did the young Cougars. Junior guard Caleb Graves finished the game with six points and nine rebounds.

W

Travis Sherer/Staff Photo

Hunter Amundson is one of a number of senior returners.

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e will take the time to explain your diagnosis to you and develop a personalized treatment plan. The care and maintenance of the spine and nervous system is a necessary component of any natural approach to healthcare. Why suffer needlessly when safe and gentle chiropractic could put a smile back on your face. We’re located at 20218 77th Ave., NE, Suite A, where we are specially trained and skilled in analyzing the spinal column to determine any type of problem. Please call ARLINGTON FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC at 360.435.3900 to schedule an appointment. Chiropractic works! Doctor is available 24 hours. Early morning, late evening, and weekend appointments are available. Most insurance accepted. Be sure to visit our web site for more information.


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December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com

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The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

13

PLAY FROM PAGE 1 last Christmas. “‘White Christmas’ has always been one of my favorites, and when Seattle’s Roosevelt High School presented it last December I was curious to see if a high school cast and crew could pull it off,” said Moberly, who’s directing “White Christmas” at AHS. “I was impressed by what they were able to do, which led me to wonder if we could do it here in Arlington.” After applying for the rights to “White Christmas,” AHS Drama conducted auditions in June and issued copies of the script and music to the cast to study over the summer. “It’s a very complex piece, so they needed as much time as we could give them to study it,” Moberly said. “We hit the ground running with set design and construction in September.” Moberly estimated that every performance requires 12 costume changes for each of the cast’s leads and an average of three to four costume changes for each of the chorus members, a feat that senior Caroline Rensel, who plays Judy Haynes, and junior Nathan Braaten, who plays Bob Wallace, agreed was one of their tougher challenges. “It’s my first time acting at all,” said fellow lead senior Jordan Tanguay, who plays Phil Davis. “Usually, I’m just singing. There’s a lot more going on this year, but you can never treat it like it’s just a high school production. You have to ask yourself, if

Kirk Boxleitner/Staff Photo

The Arlington High School Drama Department chorus performs one of the final song-and-dance numbers for the Irving Berlin musical “White Christmas.” you were performing this at the Paramount in Seattle, what would it sound like?” “Otherwise, it’ll be substandard,” said Rensel, who deemed this year’s production 60 percent bigger than last year’s. “Everything has to work. You have to keep the pressure on yourselves.” Lead junior Kelsey Ghirardo, who plays Betty Haynes, described the difficulty of the three-part harmonies in a few of the songs, but was quick to point out that Haller Middle School teacher Jeff Swanson was faced with an even more complicated juggling act since he’s directing both the orchestra and the choir for

this production. “You have to treat everything as equally important,” Ghirardo said. “You can’t shirk on the singing or the dancing.” Ghirardo also praised the choreography work of Arlington School of Dance owner Becky Oesch, while Braaten agreed with Tanguay and Rensel that the chorus had provided the leads with essential and cohesive support. Rensel likewise echoed Moberly’s thanks to the community for their backing. “We have parents who have been coming in at 6 p.m. every night to help us finish the set and address

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our remaining technical issues,” Moberly said. “I’ve been taken aback by how incredible this community is. When you need them, they’re there.” Tanguay and Ghirardo echoed Moberly’s hope that the community would be pleased by the production, given the number of contributions the community

has made to help make it happen, while Moberly also emphasized what he sees as the positive holiday message behind “White Christmas.” “It’s about extending yourself to help out and care for others,” Moberly said. “This is the most ambitious show I’ve ever done and it’s our Christmas present to Arlington, giving back

to them for all that they’ve given to us.” A matinee is scheduled for 1 p.m. on Dec. 11. Tickets are $9 for seniors and students, and $12 for adults. Reserved seating tickets may be purchased in advance on-line at www. byrnesperformingarts.org, or at the door 45 minutes before show time.


14

December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com

military briefs

Mark D. Crist Army Pvt. Mark D. Crist has graduated from the Fire Support Specialist Advanced Individual Training course at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. The field artillery specialists serve in intelligence activities including target processing in field artillery, cannon battalions, division artillery, artillery and maneuver brigade and headquarters and fire support elements. The course is designed to train students to establish, maintain, and operate radio and wire communications and speech security equipment, including encoding and decoding messages. They also must prepare and maintain daily staff journals, fire support situation maps, charts and other fire support and target processing procedures, records, and documents. In addition, students assist in initiating requests for field artillery, mortar, naval gunfire, and aerial delivered munitions, and emplace, maintain, and assist in the operation of laser range finders, target designation, and night observation devices.

Crist is the son of David A. Crist of Vista Drive, Arlington, Wash., and Stacey M. Crist of Everett, Va. The private is 2009 graduate of Arlington High School.

Sean A. Gregory Army Pfc. Sean A. Gregory has graduated from the Fire Support Specialist Advanced Individual Training course at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla. The field artillery specialists serve in intelligence activities including target processing in field artillery, cannon battalions, division artillery, artillery and maneuver brigade and headquarters and fire support elements. The course is designed to train students to establish, maintain, and operate radio and wire communications and speech security equipment, including encoding and decoding messages. They also must prepare and maintain daily staff journals, fire support situation maps, charts and

other fire support and target processing procedures, records, and documents. In addition, students assist in initiating requests for field artillery, mortar, naval gunfire, and aerial delivered munitions, and emplace, maintain, and assist in the operation of laser range finders, target designation, and night observation devices. He is the foster son of Naomi Olson of 172nd St. N.E., Arlington, Wash. The private is a 2009 graduate of Arlington High School

James S. Maddox Army Pvt. James S. Maddox has graduated from the Automated Logistical Specialist Advanced Individual Training (AIT) course at the U.S. Army Quartermaster Center and School, Fort Lee, Petersburg, Va. The course is designed to train soldiers to establish and maintain stock records and other documents such as inventory, materiel

control, accounting and support reports, automated and manual accounting records; perform stock record/warehouse functions pertaining to receipt, storage, distribution and issue and maintain equipment records and parts; review and verify bills of lading, contracts, and purchase orders; repair and construct shipping crates for equipment and supplies, and perform prescribed loads and shop stock lists in manual and automated supply applications. Maddox is the son of Robin L. and stepson of Rick J. Gaynor of Joann Lane, Arlington.He is a 2008 graduate of Arlington High School.

Nicholas A. O’Kelly Army Pfc. Nicholas A. O’Kelly has graduated from the Special Forces Candidate One-Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. During the first fourteen weeks of basic infantry training, the private first class received training in drill and ceremony,

weapons employment, map reading, tactics, military customs and courtesies, military justice, physical fitness, road marches, first aid skills, and Army history, core values and traditions. After completing basic infantry training, the soldier will complete airborne school with a subsequent assignment to Fort Bragg, Fayetteville, N.C., to prepare for and attend the Special Forces Qualification Course as a weapons sergeant or engineer sergeant. During the 20-25 month training period, the soldier will have graduated from airborne school, the Primary Leadership Development Course; the Basic Noncommissioned Officer Course; survival, evacuation, resistance and escape training; and language school. Upon graduation from all phases of training, the soldier will be assigned and promoted to a Special Forces weapons sergeant or engineer sergeant. He is the son of Brian and Barbara O’Kelly of 70th Street N.E., Marysville, Wash. O’Kelly is a 2007 graduate of Grace Academy.

Worship in Arlington To be included in this Directory call 360-659-1300 or email mrabel@MarysvilleGlobe.com BAPTIST

First Baptist Church

Join us…building Faith, Hope and Love

5th and French, Arlington • 435-3040 • www.Fbcarlington.com Worship Service ............................................................ 10:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages .................................................. 9 a.m. Nursery provided: Infants - 3 years old for both services Sunday Evening 6:00 p.m. • Thursday Sunday Evening 6:00 Senior p.m. High Youth Wednesday: Awana Visitation Wednesday: Awana and and Senior High Youth

www.siscoheights.com • 360.435.4384

CATHOLIC

CTK Lake Stevens – 10:00am Sundays Team Fitness - 1109 Frontier Circle East Pastor Cary Peterson 1-888-421-4285 x811

OTHER

immaculate conception catholic church

ARLINGTON COMMUNITY CHURCH

1200 East 5th, Arlington • 435-8565

in Darrington at St. John Vianney

CTK Arlington – 10:00am Sundays Presidents Elementary - 505 E. Third Street Pastor Rick Schranck 1-888-421-4285 x813

Sundays 10:30am & Wednesday 7:00pm

Pastor Bill Walker • Assoc. Pastor Jim Poyner Youth Pastor Mark Rittersbach

pastor: Fr. Jim Dalton Reconciliation ................................ Saturday 4:30 Vigil Mass ...................................... Saturday 5:30 Sunday Morning Mass .................................. 9:00 Sunday Mass .............................................. 12:00

Bible teaching, upbeat music, friendly and casual atmosphere

p.m. p.m. a.m. p.m.

Meeting in Seventh Day Adventist Church 713 Talcott • Arlington

FOURSQUARE

Sunday Worship 11a.m. - Noon

A new and unique Christian Church designed with you in mind.

at Kent-Prairie Elementary

www.lifewayfoursquare.com info@lifewayfoursquare.com

360-548-4038

LUTHERAN Pastor Rick Long & Pastor Luke Long

Let’s talk about it. Dave Hallman 360-939-2080

The Smokey Point Church Of Christ Simply Christians

Pastor G.W. O’Neil • 360-445-2636 • 360-421-0954

8526 – 35th Ave. NE, Arlington, WA, 98223 (7/10 mile north of Smokey Point off of Smokey Pt. Blvd.) Sunday morning classes for all ages .......... 9:30 a.m. Sunday morning worship ........................... 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening worship ............................. 5:00 p.m. Wednesday night classes for all ages ......... 7:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN

METHODIST

S ENIORS

Sunday’s 10 a.m.

Pleasing your spouse requires that you first learn what pleases your spouse, is it any different with God? Sometimes the things we do “for God” are really just things we do because we enjoy them, like the fellow who got his wife a new fishing pole for her birthday when what she really wanted was jewelry.

ARE

L OVED

AND

W ELCOME !

 



Sunday Worship - 8:30 and 11:00 am Weekly Bible Studies Youth Ministry

 

      



NON DENOMINATIONAL Engaging Worship...Encouraging Message

Sundays 10:00 10:30am am 360-474-8888

You Are Welcome Here www.falconridgefellowship.com

Now meeting at theLutheran old Arlington•HS auditorium on French Meeting at Peace 1717 Larson Rd in Street Silvana

201 N. Stillaguamish Avenue

www.arlingtonassembly.com

Life Points 9:30AM Sunday

Arlington Free Methodist Church

Celebration Service 10:30AM Sunday

Early Sermon …………………………………… 8:15 a.m. Sunday School for all ages ……………………… 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship Service ……………………… 10:30 a.m.

Family Focus 7:00PM Wednesday

360.435.8981

730 E. Highland Dr., Arlington, 360-435-8986

(Signing for the hearing impaired. Nursery Provided.)

Wednesday Dinner ……………………………… 5:00 p.m. Wednesday AWANA ……………………………… 6:10 p.m. Wednesday Youth Group ………………………… 6:15 p.m.


www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com

The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

Methodist

Baptist

Worship in Marysville

First Baptist Church of Marysville

instrumental)

nion...10:30 a.m.

81st & State Ave.

Sunday Services Sunday School ................. 9:45 A.M. Morning Worship ................ 11A.M. Evening Service .................... 6 P.M. Youth Group spring fall winter ..... 6 P.M. Youth-on-the-Run summer ... 5:30 P.M. Tuesday Prayer & Bible Study ........... 10 A.M. Wednesday Awana Clubs Sept-April ....... 6:30 P.M. Thursday 24-7 Ministry Sept-April ...... 6:30 P.M.

“Family Oriented — Bible Centered�

6715 Grove St., Marysville • 360-659-7117 Hillside Christian Preschool 360-659-8957 Classic Worship Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:15 a.m. Kidz’ Zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00a.m. Casual Worship Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00a.m. Oasis Service, Family Style (Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00p.m. Student Ministries (Jr . High-Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00 p.m. Student Ministries (Sr . High-Thursday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 p.m. Groups for Children, Youth, College/Career, Young Marrieds, Families and Seniors

ChurCh

92

nd

Street

of

www.fbcmarysville.org

EVERGREEN UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP

A CBA Church

360-659-1242

Christ

(non-denominational and non-instrumental)

Sunday

Monday Wednesday

See Web site for other programs: 92ndstchurchofchrist.org

Preaching the Bible in a positive Format

Christian

M OUNTAINSIDE F ELLOWSHIP

C OWBOY 360-386-8703 C HURCH

4411 76th Street NE • Marysville

msfcc@comcast.net • www.msfcc.org

Wednesday 7 p.m. and Sunday 10:30 a.m.

PASTOR F RED M OORE

www.MarysvilleGlobe.com

.

Remembrance Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 a.m. Bible Teaching & Sunday School . . . . . . . . . .11 a .m . Evening Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 p .m . Family Bible Hour (Sept .-May) . . . . . . . . . . . 7 p .m . Prayer and Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 p .m .

Non-Denominational • All Welcome

This Space is available!

Call 360-659-1300

360-659-1300 or email mrabel@MarysvilleGlobe.com www.ArlingtonTimes.com

To have your place of worship included in this Directory Call

click! www.nw-ads.com email! classified@soundpublishing.com call toll free! 1.888.399.3999 or 1.800.388.2527

Sunday Service 10:30 A.M. + Program for Children & Youth Rev. Bruce Davis, Minister 1607 4th St., Marysville 360-659-6621 www.evergreenuu.org

5202-116th St. NE, Marysville • 658-9822

4226 92nd Street NE, Marysville • 360-653-2578 Dennis E. Niva, Minister Bible Classes ...............................................9:30 a.m. Worship & Communion ..........................10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening Service .............................6:00 p.m.

www.flfmarysville.com

“A Liberal Religious Community�

SHOULTES GOSPEL HALL

Church of Christ

360-386-9937 • Sundays 10 a.m. www.flfmarysville.com

marysvillefmc.org

other

James L. Eldred Jr., Associate Pastor of Youth & Family Ministries Daniel J. Wolff, Director of Music and Worship

PNW MarketPlace!

hrist.org

Marysville Free Methodist Church

Real Estate for Sale Island County

      

OAK HARBOR

real estate for sale - WA Real Estate for Sale Island County LANGLEY

W H E E L E S TAT E S , 4976 Carlie Drive. Large corner lot with 2 bedroom home. Kitchen appliances, front deck, carpor t and garden shed! Nicely landscaped lot with flowers in front & 2 garden beds in the rear. $45,900. Contact Gary Kay 360-341-2008. pnwCareers.com We’ll search for you.

$342,000!! LOCATED In quiet area close to beach, beautiful view of Mt. Baker, Hope Island and the Cascades. Open floor plan, updated throughout. N ew Oak kitchen, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, large 2 car garage with storage, 1,000 SF shop with separate entrance off Troxell Road. Pa r k i n g fo r b o a t , RV. Decks on front with hot tub and back. Community water system. 360679-6428, 360-672-0531 fo r s a l e byo w n e r. c o m Listing 22799196 Real Estate for Sale Snohomish County ARLINGTON

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FULLY RENOVATED 3 bedroom, 2 bath rambler www.pnwCareers.com and detached apartment Local jobs. Local people. in Jordan River Trails Community. One bedFind it. Buy it. Sell it. room, one bath dewww.pnwAutos.com tached apar tment; hot t u b a n d w o o d s t o ve . ClassiďŹ eds. We’ve got you N e w a p p l i a n c e s a n d covered. 800-388-2527 kitchen cabinets! Wood shed, parking space for 4 cars and securely Free, fast and easy! www.pnwCareers.com fenced on 0.4 acre lot. Beach access to Stilly! Ar lington School Bus Find what you need 24 hours a day. s t o p s o n t h e c o r n e r. Move in ready! Get the ball rolling... $179,000. 360-435-0310 Call 800-388-2527 today. or 360-722-6521

real estate for sale

real estate for rent - WA

Real Estate for Sale Other Areas

Real Estate for Rent Snohomish County

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ARIZONA big beautiful lots $89/mo. $0 down, $0 interest. Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hours from Tu c s o n I n t l ’ t A i r p o r t . Guaranteed Financing. No credit check Pre-recorded 9OURüNEWüJOBüISüWAITINGüATüü

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ARLINGTON

3 BEDROOM, 2 Bath Home on 5 private acres! 10 min. to town! Energy-efficent heater & woodstove! All appliance s, d o u bl e g a r a g e & well. NS. $1,275. $1,000 deposit. 509-962-4281.

        

MARYSVILLE, 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath 2 story home, 1900 sq.ft. 2 story, gas heat, fireplace, 2 car g a r a g e , fe n c e d y a r d $1,295/mo 425-3481013 or 425-348-1837*

A zesty bowl of pasta, a distinctive Chianti, the spirited discussion of family around a table — our guests don’t have to cross the Atlantic to experience the magic of Italy. In fact, it’s right here at our brand new restaurant in Tulalip. Not only do we demand the best and freshest products cooked expertly, but we need talented people like you to help create an environment where food, family and fun come together to make something magical.

MARYSVILLE, newer 4 bdrm, 3 bath mid-entry home, 2200 sq.ft., gas heat, fireplace, 2 car g a r a g e , fe n c e d y a r d $1,395/mo 425-3481013*

       

Find what you need 24 hours a day.

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15


A N D Y M A N

A W D U S T

FIR ISLAND TRUCKING COMPANY

. SAWDUST & SHAVINGS . HOG FUEL .

S PLAYGROUND CHIPS

H A V I N G S

Deliveries from 45 yards to 125 yards

Phone: 360-659-6223 Fax: 360-659-4383

Handyman Dad “DAD CAN FIX IT�

If in doubt, call to see if Dad can do it ! t'JYBOE3FQBJS*OTJEF0VUTJEF t'JYUIPTF#SPLFO)PVTFIPME*UFNT t3FCVJMEPS3FQBJS ,JUDIFOT #BUIT FUD t$BSQFOUSZ'JOJTI 'SBNJOH %PPST FUD t1PSDIFT %FDLT 'FODFT 3BJMJOH FUD

No Job Too Small

425-327-9733

handymandad@comcast.net

-JDFOTFEt*OTVSFEt#POEFE0/$&"" -(

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TIMMERMANS LANDSCAPE SERVICE

3&4*%&/5*"-$0..&3$*"-t-*$&/4&%#0/%&%*/463&%

P

Why put your dog in “jail� while you go on vacation?

A R E

Commercial Rentals Office/Commercial

t505"-."*/5&/"/$& YARD CARE t-"8/:"3%*/45"--4 t5)"5$)*/( "&3"5*/(

t$-&"/614 t136/*/( t/0:"3%*4500  #*(035004."--

425-308-1753

Camano Canine Resort has houselike conditions on a secluded 10 acre property with huge fenced runs, individual covered patio runs, and personalized attention to your loved pets. Comfort, NOT concrete is our motto! Our facility is worth the drive; check out our website. We have a few spots left for the holidays.

5*..&-4$

360-926-8690

www.CamanoCanine.com

Still waiting for your ship to come in... Thousands of subscribers could be reading your ad in the Classified Service Directory. Call 800-388-2527 or Go online to www.nw-ads.com to place your ad today.

financing

announcements

Money to Loan/Borrow

Announcements

REAL ESTATE MARKET home is located at the end of a cul-de-sac and is close to freeways, bus lines and stores.

$1,100 mo.

Great 3 bedroom 2.5 home on over 1/2 and acre. This rental features a formal living room, family room dining room and good size kitchen with a pantry. Upstairs you'll find 3 bedrooms and two full baths. Master bedroom is large with a big walk in closet. There is a two car garage and fenced backyard.

$1,400 mo. Wendy Smith

425-319-5036

Homes For RENT

Editor We have an immediate opening for Editor of the North Kitsap Herald weekly community newspapers in beautiful Poulsbo, WA. This is not an entry-level position. Requires a hands-on leader with a minimum of three years newspaper experience including writing, editing, pagination, photography, and InDesign skills. The successful candidate: t)BTBEFNPOTUSBUFEJOUFSFTUJOMPDBMQPMJUJDBMBOEDVMUVSBMBGGBJST t1PTTFTTFTFYDFMMFOUXSJUJOHBOEWFSCBMTLJMMT BOEDBOQSPWJEFSFQSFTFOUBUJWFDMJQT from one or more professional publications. t)BTFYQFSJFODFFEJUJOHSFQPSUFSTDPQZBOETVCNJUUFENBUFSJBMTGPSDPOUFOUBOETUZMF t*TQSPĂĽDJFOUJOEFTJHOJOHBOECVJMEJOHQBHFTXJUI"EPCF*O%FTJHOPS2VBSL&YQSFTT t*TFYQFSJFODFENBOBHJOHB'PSVNQBHF XSJUJOHDPHFOUBOETUZMJTUJDBMMZJOUFSFTUJOH commentaries, and editing a reader letters column. t)BTQSPWFOJOUFSQFSTPOBMTLJMMTSFQSFTFOUJOHBOFXTQBQFSPSPUIFSPSHBOJ[BUJPOBU civic functions and public venues. t6OEFSTUBOETIPXUPMFBE NPUJWBUF BOENFOUPSBTNBMMOFXTTUBGG t.VTUSFMPDBUFUP,JUTBQ$PVOUZBOEEFWFMPQBLOPXMFEHFPGMPDBMBSUT CVTJOFTT  and government. t.VTUCFWJTJCMFJOUIFDPNNVOJUZ 5IJTGVMMUJNFQPTJUJPOPGGFSTFYDFMMFOUCFOFĂĽUTJODMVEJOHNFEJDBM EFOUBM , QBJE vacation and holidays. We are the largest publisher of community newspapers in Washington state. Visit our web site www.soundpublishing.com for more information. 1MFBTFTFOESFTVNFXJUIDPWFSMFUUFSBOEOPOSFUVSOBCMFXPSLTBNQMFTJO1%'PS5FYU format to: NKH/HR Sound Publishing, Inc. 19351 8th Ave. NE, Suite #106 Poulsbo, WA 98370 E-mail to hr@soundpublishing.com Fax: 360-394-5829

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS We Help!

24/ 7 Emergency Service 800-972-7000

DRIVERS -- Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48c/mile CDL Training Available. Regional Locations! (877)369-7105. www.centraldrivingjobs.net Business Opportunities

SET APPOINTMENTS with home owners for Free Estimates on Home Improvement Services. F l ex i bl e H o u r s, Wo r k Outdoors. Training/marketing materials provided. Apply Online at www. TLC4HOMES.com WARM, CARING HOST FAMILIES needed for high school exchange students. Volunteer today! Call 1 (866) GOAFICE or visit afice.org. Schools & Training

AT T E N D C O L L E G E ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-483-4429; www.CenturaOnline.com

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING www.cdstruckschool.com

jobs

(888)558-7120 (253)983-0200

Employment General

DELIVER THE MARYSVILLE GLOBE OR ARLINGTON TIMES Earn extra income working only one day per week delivering the Marsyville Globe or Arlington Times. Call (425) 4534250 or email circulation@marysvilleglobe.com if interested. Please include your name, telephone number, address and best time to call. These are independent contract delivery routes for Sound Publishing, Inc. Employment Transportation/Drivers

D R I V E R - - N e w Pay Plan with Quarterly Bonus Incentive! Lots of freight. Daily or Weekly Pay. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 6 months recent experience. 800414-9569. www.driveknight.com

home services Home Services Handyperson

GEORGE’S HANDYMAN SERVICE Quality work Reasonable rates No job too small I do it all !! 360-436-1787 Office 425-231-0249 Cell Lic. GEORGHS951MR

Be the icing on their cake... Advertise in the Service Directory in The Classifieds.

l

Best For Le nt The ss C a W al u o

Save up to $500 off of new roof replacement www.DayAndNite.net

Marysville/Arlington (360) 653–6464

Employment Transportation/Drivers

Four Generations of Family Ownership & Operation

S&S for Free Estimate Got wind damage?

A+ Rating

ADOPT: Loving couple promises to give your newborn unconditional love, happiness, and fin a n c i a l s e c u r i t y. O u r hearts reach out to you. Expenses paid. Contact Susana and Francisco at 1-800-320-4459 or visit www.wewishtoadopt.net ANNOUNCE your festiva l fo r o n l y p e n n i e s. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,000. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

L O C A L P R I VAT E I N VESTOR loans money Marysville on real estate equity. I l o a n o n h o u s e s, r aw Prime Retail/Office land, commercial proper2500 - 3300 Sq/Ft ty and property developSafeway Plaza ment. Call Eric at High Traffic Location (800) 563-3005. T from 80¢/SF + NNN www.fossmortgage.com ADOPT; ADORING cor425-971-8053 porate VP & successful Submit your resume B u s i n e s s O w n e r ( a t 888-984-5213 pnwCareers.com home parent) yearn for 1 s t b a b y. E x p e n s e s pnwCareers.com Find it. Buy it. Sell it. paid. Kenny & Lisa 1- DIVORCE $135. $165 www.pnwAutos.com with children. No court 800-990-7667 We’ll search for you. appearances. Complete preparation. Includes, custody, support, property division & bills. BBB member. (503)772-5295. Very clean 3 bedroom 2 bath rambler. This home www.paralegal features laminate floors throughout, a nice size alternatives.com kitchen and large back yard fully fenced with Rv divorce@usa.com parking, and 2 car garage and lots of storage. This

Y

C

real estate rentals

QUALITY AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE

A N D S C A P I N G

E T

Announcements

HOMES FOR RENT

H

S

www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com

HOMES FOR RENT

DIRECTORY

To be included in this directory, contact Manny at: 360 659-1300 OR mrabel@marysvilleglobe.com

December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

BUSINESS

16

Visit us at: www.sandsrooďŹ ngllc.com

To be included in this directory, contact Manny at: 360 659-1300 or mrabel@marysvilleglobe.com

Call: (800) 388-2527 e-mail: classified@soundpublishing.com or go online: www.nw-ads.com to get your business in the


www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com Cemetery Plots

The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

EXPERT ADVICE

Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

Bellevue

Are you an Expert in your field? Would you like to share your knowledge with others? Call the Marysville Globe / Arlington Times at 360-659-1300 today, ask for MANNY and you could be one of our EXPERTS!

CHERRY,

Fir/Pine Firewood www.thewoodguys.com

1.800.848.4141

stuff

flea market

Free Fire Starter

Cemetery Plots

1 RARE BURIAL Space left in The Garden of Assurance at Sunset Hills Memorial Park Cemeter y, Bellevue. Space 12, next to Open Book Of Scripture monument. Beautiful view for meditation. Last remaining plot, selling for $24,000 (per cemetery). Av a i l a b l e f o r $11,000/OBO! Don’t miss out on this great o p p o r t u n i t y. C a l l : (772)486-8868

Advertise your garage sale! For just $37 you can advertise in print and on the web for one week with no limits on how much you want to say in the ad. Call 800-388-2527 today

(2) BURIAL Plots in Sunset Hills Memorial Park, in Bellevue. Plots located in “Garden of Gethsemane�, Lot 21, Spaces 1 and 2. Views of Bellevue / Seattle skylines and Olympic Mountains. $22,000 each. Call 509-366-6010 Find your dream home at pnwHomeFinder.com Computers

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ACACIA Memorial Park, “Birch Garden�, (2) adjacent cemetery plots, #3 & #4. Selling $5,000 each or $8,000 both. Located in Shoreline / N. Seattle. Call or email Emmons Johnson, 4254 8 8 - 3 0 0 0 , eaj3000@msn.com

17TH ANNUAL Buffalo Hunt Raffle Troy Lions Club at Whitepine Ranch Guaranteed trophy bull package: hunt, meat, hide, head, horns $5 per ticket. Drawing will be 12/31/10. Hunt 01/01/11 - 02/01/11 Order online: www.buffaloraffle.com By mail PO Box 11 Troy, Idaho 83871

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Applause Applause Shelby Shelby Moen Moen

Marysville Getchell Marysville Getchell School HighHigh School has taken Accounting Business Shelby Shelby has taken Accounting andand IntroIntroto toBusiness and is currently in FBLA Leadership class helpoutout and is currently in FBLA Leadership class to tohelp the school and FBLA projects.SheSheisisinin with thewith school store store and FBLA projects. Start time. part time. Shelby is anoutstanding outstanding RunningRunning Start part Shelby is an trust worthy student. trust worthy student. is currently the FBLA secretaryandandbeen beenaa Shelby Shelby is currently the FBLA secretary godwith sendpaperwork with paperwork comestoto god send this this year.year. SheShecomes whendoesn’t she doesn’t to andis isbecoming becoming school school when she havehave to and pro at priors, requisitions, fundraiserforms formsand and a pro ata priors, requisitions, fundraiser other paperwork we have to have to makethings things any otheranypaperwork we have to have to make for FBLA. goodnessforforher.her.She She happen happen for FBLA. ThankThank goodness 3 conferences being attendedattended 3 conferences last last yearyear withwithoneonebeing state.hasSheplaced has placed at regional’ s andwants wantsthethe state. She at regional’ s and to be strong. chapter chapter to be strong. to attend 4 yearuniversity universityand and Shelby Shelby plans plans to attend a 4 a year a degree in Business.SheShewants wants hopefullyhopefully obtainobtain a degree in Business. to eventually become because of herlove loveforfor to eventually become a CPAa CPA because of her accounting. Herclasses CTE classes taughtherhertotolove love accounting. Her CTE havehave taught that business offerininour our businessbusiness and allandthatall business hashas to tooffer They led alsoher led toherjoin to join FBLAwhich whichshe she society.society. They also FBLA loves greatly and always loves greatly and always will. will.

Sponsored Juddand andBlack Black Sponsored by:by: Judd If you aknow a person deserves honorable If you know person that that deserves anan honorable contact Manny at 360.659.1300x1550 x1550 mentionmention pleaseplease contact Manny at 360.659.1300 or mrabel@marysvilleglobe.com or mrabel@marysvilleglobe.com

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the s e l l e r ’s a n d b u y e r ’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a c o r d by v i s u a l i z i n g a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To m a k e a f i r e w o o d complaint, call 360-9021857. http://agr.wa.gov/inspection/ weightsMeasures/ Firewoodinformation.aspx

Firewoodinformation.aspxhttp://agr.wa.gov/inspection/weightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

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TAX SERVICES Q:

I installed energy efficient windows in my home this year and the sales receipt includes sales tax and installation costs. Do I use the entire bill to figure the energy credit?

ext. 1560

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Don’t worry...We’ll worry...We’ll be be up up late, late, too. too. Don’t

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JUDY’S

Enrolled Agent

A: The sales tax is included in the total cost of the windows for calculating the credit, but the installation costs are not. Sales taxes are part of the total property cost for all energy property purchases. However, installation costs may or may not be included, depending on the type of property. For more information about the energy credit, please call or stop by our office.

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17


18

December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com Heavy Equipment

Dogs

Home Furnishings

Automobiles Classics & Collectibles

$140 QUEEN

PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET New in plastic.

pets/animals

Call: (360)551-7220 1991 PETERBILT 227 $5,000 Cummins 505 8.3 L Engine, Diesel Fuel, 6 speed manual transmission, GVW 32,000, Engine has been rebuilt.

Thousands of ClassiďŹ ed readers are looking for a home! Call 800-388-2527 or go online to pnwHomeďŹ nder. com and place your home for sale ad today! Miscellaneous

Contact Karen at 425-355-0717 x1560 kavis@soundpublishing.com

N E W N o r w o o d S AWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34â€? diamet e r, m i l l s b o a r d s 2 8 â€? Extra auto parts bring in wide. Automated quickcycle-sawing increases extra cash when you place efficiency up to 40%! an ad in the ClassiďŹ eds. w w w . N o r w o o d S a w Open 24 hours a day mills.com/300N 1-800661-7746 Ext 300N www.nw-ads.com.

ENGLISH MASTIFF mix Christmas puppies. 75% English Mastiff, 25% Lab $500. Fawn and black with beautiful markings. Also, solid black. Mother 5 0 % E n g l i s h M a s t i f f, 50% Black Lab. Father is full AKC English Mastiff. Born 10/10/10. Puppies will have first shots and deworming. Loving, loyal, fun personalities. For more details, 206AKC BOXER Puppies. 351-8196 Male and female. Fawn Great Dane color with black masks. Ready for adoption, $700 each. Sire has c h a m p i o n bl o o d l i n e s. Call or email, 253-2735039, edmiller19695@ q.com Dogs

GREAT DANE Puppies, AKC. Males/ females. Every color but Fawns. Three litters half Euro, plus other litters. Puppies ready! All puppies $500 & up, health guarnatee. Licensed since 2002. Dreyersdanes is Oregon state’s largest breeder of Great Danes. V i s i t : w w w. d r e y e r s danes.com Call 503-556-4190

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Name Honey Animal ID 11917102 Breed Bulldog, English / Mix Gender Female Color Golden Spayed/Neutered Yes No Dogs Size Small

Name Chewy Animal ID 11947504 Breed Domestic Short Hair / Mix Gender Male Color Black / Grey Spayed/Neutered Yes Declawed Yes

All animals adopted from EAS are neutered, microchipped, vaccinated, wormed and treated for fleas. All cats are tested for FIV/FeLV.

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A negotiable doc fee of $150.00 my apply to sales price. See dealer for details. Photo for illustration purposes only. Vin# posted at dealership. Ally Rebate must be financed with Ally Bank at standard rates to qualify. Ad expires 12/10/10.

Find some sweet deals...

Whether your looking for cars, pets or anything in between, the sweetest place to find them is in the Classifieds.

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MARYSVILLE t 1340 State Avenue t 360-658-7817

wheels

1974 MERCEDES 450 SEL (gas) One owner, excellent in looks and perfor mance. Spent $15,000 in reconditioning. Have receipts. Will now sacrifice for $6,000 OBO. Selling my house and can no longer store it. Call for details. (206) 713-8338 Automobiles Lincoln

1977 LINCOLN TOWN COUPE. Only 13,000 miles on rebuilt engine. 80,000 miles on chassis. Excellent cond! $5,000. Lake Forest Park 206365-5564

Build up your business with our Service Guide Special: Four full weeks of advertising starting at $40. Call 800-388-2527 to place your ad today. Automobiles Mercury

1978 MERCURY Marquis, Classic 4-door. Top running condition. 23,949 miles on newer rebuilt 460 engine. White in color with a rust color vinyl top. Asking $2,500 OBO. Please call Mark 206-824-1713, Des Moines Automobiles Saab

I M M A C U L AT E 2 0 0 4

Automobiles Red Saab 9-3 Linear Classics & Collectibles 2.0t (Only 40,000 Miles).

1929 MODEL A FORD PICKUP, Classic!!! Own one of America’s first trucks! Rebuilt engine and fully restored body! Beatuful Black and green color! Can be seen in Redmond. $14,000. Call John today 425-649-7983! 1972 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass Supreme. V-8, 3 5 0 h o r s e p o w e r, 2 door, white with black vinyl top. Excellent condition. 1 owner. $4,000 or best offer. Car located in Seattle area. Call for appointment: 972-7713149 or email: brkathking@aol.com

$9,000! Available to test drive in the Mill Creek/Bothell area today! This car is stunning, s a fe , g e t s g r e a t g a s mileage (20/30), features 6 airbags, automatic transmission, and has been virtually service-free! The car has n ew b ra ke s, s t u d d e d tires, --it’s a perfect famil y o r t e e n ’s f i r s t c a r. There’ve been only two owners, and we have only put on 20,000 miles in the past four years. We have records of complete maintenance history. Contact Brian in Bothell: 425-241-2627; BOneal1005@aol.com to see the car and to arrange a time to test d r i ve. To c o n t a c t t h e owner directly, please contact Cameron: 541419-9588; cameron@c3events.com

Think Inside the Box Advertise in your local community newspaper, Little Nickel, Nickel Ads and on the web with just one phone call. Call 800-388-2527 or 800-544-0505 for more information.


www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com

The Arlington Times • December 8, 2010

Red Cross honors Real Heroes SPECIAL TO THE ARLINGTON TIMES

TULALIP — Three Tulalip Tribal members are among those being honored Dec. 9 at the Snohomish County Chapter Red Cross Real Heroes breakfast. Glen Gobin, Tony Gobin and Steve Gobin are credited with saving the lives of two fishermen whose boat had sunk near the San Juan Islands. According to the Snohomish Chapter of the Red Cross, “In the early hours of the morning two Tulalip Tribes fisherman clung to a cooler in the frigid waters of the San Juan Islands fighting for their lives as their boat which took on water incredibly fast, had sunk. The two fish-

ermen had only had enough time, before the sinking to get a CB distress call out attempting to provide their location and to put on their survival suits. As the fleet of boats nearby heard the call, they deployed and began the search for the two fishermen. Glen Gobin, who was lying in bed resting on his boat heard the call and decided to take an alternate route to the reported area to help in the search. His boat stalled and during the silence as he and his crew mates, Tony and Steve were trying to fix the problem they heard hollers from the two fishermen who at this point had been in the frigid waters for 40-plus minutes. Glen, Tony and Steve followed the hollers and pulled the men to safety. Thanks to

his quick actions the Gobin’s helped saved the lives of two fellow fishermen. ‘Finding two people in the dark and in the water is like finding a needle in a haystack,’ Glen reported. But he didn’t hesitate for a moment to go out and search.” As one of the largest fundraising events in Snohomish County, attendees get to see and hear amazing stories about the heroes in their community. The doors open at 6:45 a.m. and the program begins at 7:15 a.m. Registration is required. Call 425-740-2324 and leave your name and phone number. The event is being held in the Orca Ballroom of the Tulalip Resort Casino,10200 Quil Ceda Blvd., Tulalip.

19

HOW CAN I AFFORD A SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY? We Can Help You Understand Your Financial Choices and Resources So you, or a loved one, are ready to make a move to a senior community lifestyle. What’s the next step? In these difficult economic times, the financing choices can seem tough to navigate. We can help you discover the many resources you may not realize you have available to you!

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20

December 8, 2010 • The Arlington Times

www.ARLINGTONTIMES.com

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Located 5 minutes north of Everett perfectly situated on I-5. Quil Ceda Village Administration: 8802 27th Ave. NE, Tulalip WA 98271 Phone: 360.716.5000 or www.quilcedavillage.com

Arlington Times 2/16/2011  

This week's Arlington Times

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