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An earnest message to the independent pizzeria owner:

“NNever before has your business depended more on the quality of the product you serve.’’ JOHN CANDELA, CHAIRMAN


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FEATURES • MAR./APR. 2005

INCREDIBLE PIZZA

54

PMQ FEATURES

88

PEST CONTROL

40

36

Picasso’s Pizza: Operating in a High-Crime Area

38

Windmill Pizza Paradise

40

Vincenzo’s Pizzeria

42

Cheers: Raising Bar Sales in your Pizzeria

46

Serving Up Salads

54

Incredible Pizza

64

Brother’s Railroad Inn

72

Speak Easy

84

Who will be the $10,000 Winner?

88

What’s Bugging You?

PIZZA BREAD SUB SANDWICHES

42

BAR MARKETING

After Andrew Albert’s brother was killed while delivering pizzas for his shop, Andrew could have easily packed up and left Highland, Texas. Instead, he fought back. See how one operator in a high-crime area prospers. Once you’ve identified who your customer base is, half of the battle is over..now you have to find the best way to target your marketing towards them. Rodney and Darren Maller, two pizzeria owners from Brisbane, Australia, tell how they market to the tourists and backpackers in the area. Learn how Giovanni Graziosi of Ste. Julienne, Quebec, turned his business around with a few key marketing skills. Learn about his pizza dough sub rolls, lunch strategy and how he has found success in the Canadian pizza market. Sure, you know how to run your pizzeria, but what about the bar. In this series, Amanda Johnson tells you ways to increase your bar sales by at least 25 to 35 percent with tips from Robert Plotkin, president of Bar Media. PMQ’s latest installment of the Info Center tells you everything you need to know about salads and how to add them to your menu. Learn about different styles, salad bars and pick up salad recipes at www.pmq.com in the Recipe Bank. See how Rick Barsness of Incredible Pizza is set to take on the big guys with a pizza and arcade, family-oriented fun house. He dominates his market with go-karts, video games, party rooms and oh yes…pizza. From lock-ins to the 150 or so birthday parties each week, his pizzeria is really challenging those guys with the big mouse who sell pizza. Owner Mike Conway serves up a slice of history in his Independence, Kansas, pizzeria. Mike tells you how he turns mistakes into marketing, discusses advertising and how he spends smarter. It’s no so much what you say, but how you say it. Pam Simos shares the rules of effective employee/customer communication. For the second year, the Food Network will be running a onehour special with U.S. Pizza Team member (past and present) as the focus. In the Food Network Challenge: Pizza Battle, someone will walk away with $10,000, but who will it be? Summer is creeping up on us and so are the critters. Learn how to combat creepy-crawlies in your pizzeria with these pest control tips.


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DEPARTMENTS • MAR./APR. 2005

PMQ DEPARTMENTS

16

CATASTROPHES: WHAT TO DO

18 SPECIAL PRICING

86

PIZZA ON A STICK?!!

10

From the Publisher

12

The Pizza Press

14

From the Horse’s Mouth

16

Ask Joey

18

Streetfighter Marketing

20

In Lehmann’s Terms

22

The Pizza Doctor

26

Catering Corner

28

Kamron’s Komments

32

PMQ’s Pizzeria Internationale

74

PMQ’s Idea Forum

76

Insurance Issues

80

Legal Eagles

86

Chef Bruno

94

PMQ’S Pizza Industry Resource Guide

106

Steve Green tells you what’s in store for this issue.

Actual headline news from the world of pizza.

Each issue, PMQ poses different questions to pizza operators and you get it just the way they tell it.

Joey Todaro of La Nova Wings, America’s busiest pizzeria, offers advice and tips. This issue: Catastrophes—How to Prepare and React. Jeff and Marc Slutsky of Streetfighter Marketing, share ways to promote, market and increase sales without spending a lot of money. This issue: Special Pricing.

Tom Lehmann, The Dough Doctor, explains the nuances of dough.

Big Dave Ostrander, one of the pizza industry’s leading consultants, shares his years of knowledge. This issue: Promotions— Step-by-Step. Michael Attias covers catering from A to Z. This issue: Catering Menu Makeover in 9 Easy Steps.

Kamron Karington shares the secrets to increasing your bottom line. This issue: Generate Instant Cash with Upselling. Sample internationally flavored pizzas in PMQ’s recipe department.

More products and ideas and how they can benefit you

PJ Giannini talks about insurance issues important to every pizzeria owner. This issue: Property Issues.

Walter Davis sheds some light on how to handle your legal questions. This issue: When and how to Hire an Attorney.

Chef Bruno shares pizza knowledge and recipes from his pizzeria and travels. This issue: Pizza on a Stick?!!

PMQ’s listing of the best pizza resources and products.

Advertiser Index A quick guide to find the specific advertisers you’re looking for.


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From the Publisher By Steve Green Don’t be confused… REMEMBER NOVEMBER! PMQ’s New York Pizza Show is now established as the most successful of all East Coast Pizza Shows as it debuted last November with over 3,200 registered attendees despite a very distracting election day. This is the only trade show that PMQ does and it is the home of the America’s Plate International Pizza Competition and the U.S. Pizza Team trials. Our New York Pizza Show is promoted by PMQ Magazine (Circ 40,000), PMQ Australia (circ 7,000), PMQ Canada (Circ 8,000), and PMQ.com, which is the most heavily visited website of all restaurant publications. (Alexa.com Internet Ratings) Now if you happen to be going to Vegas this month and someone tries to sign you up for a New York Pizza Show that’s not being held in November, then it’s not our show. Remember November! November 12, 2005.

PMQ’s New York Pizza Show Open House

PMQ AUSTRALIA

Although we won’t be able to join you inside the Las Vegas convention center, PMQ will be in Vegas March 30th through April 1st from 12 noon until 8 p.m. Come visit us across the street at the Renaissance Hotel. We’ll be in reception suite 839 to visit our readers and advertisers. Select a booth for the New York Pizza Show, sign up for the U.S. Pizza Team or just tell us what you think of PMQ. See you there. Our mobile Vegas working phone numbers will be 662-801-0801 and 662801-5495.

Visit us on the web at www.pmq.com The PMQ Staff

Editor-in-Chief

Creative Director

Steve Green

Linda Green

Tom Boyles

Eric Summers

sg@pmq.com EXT. 123

linda@pmq.com EXT. 121

tom@pmq.com EXT. 122

eric@pmq.com EXT. 124

Associate Editor

Ad Sales Director

Graphic Designer

Francie Brown

Michelle Smith

Krista Hinman

Publisher

Co-Publisher

Managing Editor

Amanda Johnson

krista@pmq.com

francie@pmq.com michelle@pmq.com EXT. 129 EXT. 127

amanda@pmq.com EXT. 126

Executive Asst.

PMQ Webmaster

Shawn Brown

Sherlyn Clark

John Ferguson

Caroline Felker

shawn@pmq.com

sherlyn@pmq.com EXT. 120

john@pmq.com

caroline@pmq.com EXT. 125

PMQ China

Australia Co-Publisher

Italian Liason

Weihua Xiao

Stephen Millar

Enrico Fama

Accounting

Resource Guide Sales

Chris Green chris@pmq.com EXT. 130

USPT Coordination

weihua@pmq.com smillar@pmq.com.au enrico@pmq.com

Advertising Information: 662-234-5481 x.121 Food Network/U.S. Pizza Team For the second year, the Food Network has created a one-hour special including past and present members of the U.S. Pizza Team, which will air March 20th. Someone will win $10,000, but you’ll have to watch the show to find out who it is. Out of the 10 pizza makers and dough tossers featured in this program, seven were U.S. Pizza Team members, you you can see why this is another reason you’ll want to try out for the U.S. Pizza Team. See page 84 for details and air dates.

PMQ CANADA

Winner of 2 GAMMA Awards: Best Single Issue Best Web site

Earn Your Spot on the USPT Come to Wisconsin on March 14-16 for the Wisconsin Restaurant Expo and you can win a spot on the 2006 U.S. Pizza Team. We will holding tryouts in individual acrobatic dough tossing and the winner joins the 2006 team and earns a trip to Italy. See page 91.

CONTACT US PMQ 605 Edison Street • Oxford, MS 38655 Voice (662) 234-5481 • Fax (662) 234-0665 linda@pmq.com

EDITORIAL ADVISORS John Correll

Ed Zimmerman

Correll Concepts LP

Success Foods Marketing

Tom Lehmann

Dave Ostrander

American Institute of Baking

Big Dave Consulting

Joey Todaro

Chef Santo Bruno

La Nova Pizzeria

Exec. Chef Marsal & Sons

CONTRIBUTORS

PMQ U.S.

10 PMQ

We're off to Italy

Mike Roberts

Dino Ciccone

The U.S. Pizza Team is making its 6th annual trip to Salsomaggiore, Italy, to compete in the World Pizza Championship. There are still a few spots left on our U.S. Pizza Team Fan Van. Call Caroline Felker 662234-5481 x125. Thank You U.S. Pizza Team sponsors for allowing the US Pizza Team to compete on the world stage. Without you, none of this would be possible.

The Horne Group

Eastown Pizza

Jeff & Marc Slutsky

Theo Kalogeracos

Authors/Consultants

Little Caesar’s

Joey Todaro

Dominic Tedesco

La Nova Pizzeria

The Sicilian

Kamron Karington

Robert Plotkin

The Black Book

BarMedia

Tom Lehmann

Pam Simos

American Institute of Baking

Five Star Training

Big Dave Ostrander

Walt Davis

Big Dave Consulting

Dunbar & Associates

P.J. Giannini

Chef Bruno

Pizzasure.com

Marsal & Sons

Michael Attias

Salimeh Shamaly

ezrestaurantmarketing.com

PMQ Magazine

PMQ is published bimonthly in the months of January, March, May, July, September and November. Cost of U.S. subscription is $25 per year. International $35. Opinions expressed by the editors and writers are strictly their own, and are not necessarily those of the advertisers. All rights reserved. No portion of Pizza Marketing Quarterly may be reproduced in whole or part without written consent.


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12 PMQ

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FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH Everyone does business a different way. In this department, PMQ poses two to three questions each issue to a group of owners/operators from across the country so you can see what others think about certain topics. In this department, you get the word straight from the horse’s mouth. If you have a question you would like to have asked or would like to volunteer and voice your opinions, email Tom Boyles at tom@pmq.com.

Demitra Georgopoulos North Beach Pizza San Francisco Bay Area, California

HOW MUCH DO YOU PAY YOUR DELIVERY DRIVERS? PER RUN? Demitra Georgopoulos - We pay our delivery drivers starting at $8.50 (starting at $8.62 in San Francisco) with the addition of their tips. Since we continue to provide our customers with free delivery, we do not pay our drivers per run, but instead they are paid at a rate higher than the state's minimum wage. Richard Young - We started delivery just before the first of the year. Our drivers are inside employees and are paid their regular wage. We do however, charge for delivery. That fee runs between one to three dollars depending on the distance from our store. The driver gets the entire delivery charge and any tips that he receives. Dennis Sheil - We pay them minimum wage plus a delivery fee per pizza, based on the delivery zone. This fee varies from one to four dollars (we have a very large delivery area). We have eight drivers between the two stores, but only two at a time working at each store. Mike Garibaldi - Our pay varies with experience, but we pay our drivers between six and seven an hour and 21 cents per mile driven, though my drivers have been telling me that it isn’t quite enough, so we may be going up on that soon. There is a 75 cent charge for delivery that we get and they get the mileage reimbursement. DO YOU OFFER SPECIAL BENEFITS TO EMPLOYEES? Demitra Georgopoulos - Yes! We offer health care benefits and a 401K/profit-sharing plan to our employees. Other benefits we offer include: educational opportunities for managers, family discounts and participation in corporate events and conferences. Richard Young - Because we are just short of being a year old, we do not offer any benefits so to speak. However, we are very concerned with the well being of our employees. So we are very accommodating as far as 14 PMQ

Richard Young RicCo's Pizza and Pasta Martinsville, Indiana

Dennis Sheil Rio Vista Pizza Factory and Pizza Factory of Fountain Rio Vista, California and Fountain, Colorado

allowing time off for family concerns, doctors appointments and such. This seems to keep them very happy and loyal. Dennis Sheil - We have two stores and about 30 employees. We have no formal benefits, but overall are very generous with our employees. Since one store is in Rio Vista, California and the other is in Fountain, Colorado, we will occasionally send employees to the other store for a week so they can have a little change of pace. We also do a lot of little things like match tips for them dollar for dollar and matching their (most) charitable contributions they make to organizations of their choice. Employees can get time off pretty much whenever they want time off also. We make up our schedule a week in advance and as long as they ask before the schedule is made, we can almost always accommodate it. Once the schedule is made, we ask that they work with us finding someone to take their shift.

Mike Garibaldi Garibaldi’s Pizza Memphis, Tennessee

Mike Garibaldi - We really haven’t been able to put together a benefit package that makes any kind of sense. We do try to negotiate some deals with the places around us for things like oil changes. We’ve got a couple of preferred providers that help our employees with maintenance on their vehicles. We’re actually talking with our restaurant association to allow pooling of several restaurants to get some affordable healthcare. HOW DO YOU HANDLE EMPLOYEE MEALS? Demitra Georgopoulos - All menu items are available to all employees at a nominal fee, ranging from the price of 50 cents to $4.00. Richard Young - We allow our employees to eat free while they are on shift. They can have anything on the menu as long as it is a regular size portion that we normally sell. Pizzas are different. If it is a personal size, we will provide it at no charge. Larger ones are charged the regular price, less 10 percent. Once in a while, we do have a pizza or other item that was not picked up or made incorrectly and we do allow them to take those home at no charge. I will say that wrongly made pizzas happen rarely. Dennis Sheil - We offer pizza, pasta, calzones, breadsticks, wings, wraps, sandwiches and salads. Most of our employees usually don't eat pizza: they usually take a sandwich or salad. The number of hours they work determines what they're entitled to. They are entitled to a certain dollar amount and then a 50 percent discount above that dollar amount. They can have as many drinks as they want. Mike Garibaldi - We don’t charge them for drinks—they can have whatever they need. For meals, our employees pay half price for their food on the days they work. We have a luncheon buffet, and once that’s over, we let them finish up the leftovers for free. – PMQ –


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Ask Joey Catastrophes: How to Prepare and React • By Joey Todaro - La Nova Visit www.pmq.com and look under PMQ Column Contributors to see previous articles by Joey, or click Ask the Experts to ask Joey a question.

First, I want to briefly note what a terrible situation a location fire or any catastrophic event can be for an operator. As prepared as you think you might be, you are never prepared for the fallout and the lessons you will learn through the process of rebuilding. If you decide to rebuild, there are some very difficult issues that need to be dealt with. Hopefully through our tragedy, I will be able to insulate you against some of the pains we at La Nova went through this fall with our situation. I personally hope no one has to go through this, but as we know, situations like this do occur. Here are what I hope to be some pitfalls to avoid and some direction to take if this circumstance befalls your business. PREPARE FOR THE WORST It is so easy to be caught up in the daily operations and all of the issues we deal with as pizza makers and totally overlook potential disaster. As many times as we have heard others having like circumstances, we never thought it would happen to us. When it did, our insurance relationship came under a microscope and luckily we had some foresight. You need to be prepared with both traditional insurance and lost business insurance. One will help in the process of rebuilding the location; the other will, hopefully, allow you to maintain some of the vendor and employee relationships you have developed throughout your business tenure. Understand though that this is NEVER enough. Without constant revenues and with the delays in benefits and relief from carriers, the flow of money in and the banking relationship you have is going to be under stress.

16 PMQ

When times are good, you need to SAVE. That means you need to have not burned through all of the profits when things are going well and market conditions are beneficial. Without those savings, most operators have to go through bankruptcy if a fire, flood, or any other catastrophic event makes them cease doing business for any amount of time. It will be difficult, if not impossible to go through a rebuilding process without some personal savings to be leveraged or used during the situation. Week to week operators should proceed with great caution. Small amounts of sacrifice now will save you a lifetime of pain later. KEEP KEY EMPLOYEES IN THE PROCESS One of the hard lessons we learned was that people are not going to be able to sit around and wait for you to reopen. Your best employees will have no problem finding work, and your marginal employees will sit back and wait for you to come back. Not a good equation for the future. What we did, and it was a luxury to have it, was to have management and key employees get time in at our other location. We also had many of our own employees work with us in the tear down and build process. If there was a way to keep a key employee on the payroll, we found it. Sadly, there is going to be some loss there. We also were very aggressive in trying to find new staff almost four weeks before our scheduled reopening. It allowed us to be well ahead of the game when it came time to reopen. It also allowed for us to trim some of the weaker staff we had prior to the fire. UNDERSTAND AND BE INVOLVED IN THE PROCESS As store owners, many of us have been in building, remodel and repair situations. The most important lesson that we knew was if you are not there, things won’t get done. We had a member of owner-


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ship or management at the location, involved in the process, and monitoring the contractors every single day! If you are not there, you might as well kiss money goodbye. Timeframes are already going to be delayed, goals will be pushed back, and costs will increase without question regardless of the time spent and level of involvement. If you allow the process to go unchecked, these situations will multiply fast. Just like if you are in your stores when they are in operation, your stores run well, the same rings true for the rebuild; at least as well as possible. BE PREPARED FOR THE OPENING: Estimate your reopening timeframe and then add three to four weeks as a realistic point. Unfortunately, there will be costs, outside factors and issues that will inevitably set the opening back. Hopefully, you have a system that keeps records of your customers. If you do, you need to stimulate those customers to come back. Make them feel part of the celebration of reopening. Remember, there is great competition out there. Every time a customer tried to order from you and you weren’t open, they tried another pizzeria’s goods. Sometimes you might lose them, especially if they don’t know when you are back in business. Phone and mailing notices are the best avenues to let them know how much you value their business. There is no good way to prevent the situation, but there are ways to be prepared. Again, make sure your insurance package prepares you for a loss of business. Be frugal during great times and good profits. Create environments that make your good people want to stay or return in a gap situation. Manage your banking relationships professionally. Communicate at all levels and be involved in the process. Let your customers know what is going on as far as your brand is concerned. These tips are a lot of the same things that you should be doing to separate yourself from the competition. Hopefully, you’ll never have to be put in the position La Nova was and have to use these systems. A note of thanks to PMQ and all of the other supporters of La Nova that helped us during our time of need. – PMQ –

When times are good, you need to SAVE. That means you need to have not burned through all of the profits when things are going well and market conditions are beneficial. Without that savings, most operators have to go through bankruptcy if a fire, flood, or any other catastrophic event makes them cease doing business for any amount of time. -Joey Todaro

See us at Las Vegas Pizza Expo, Booth 1338

www.pmq.com 17


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Streetfighter Marketing Special Pricing • By Jeff & Marc Slutsky Visit www.pmq.com and look under PMQ Column Contributors to see previous articles by Jeff and Marc, or click Ask the Experts to ask Jeff and Marc a question.

A while ago, I called one of the national pizza chains to have a pizza delivered. They asked for my phone number, and I heard the person working her keyboard. I order the pizza and then she asks me, “Do you have any coupons today?” Since I didn’t, I feel like everybody else in the world is paying less money for that pizza than me, which makes me feel real “special.”

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That’s one of the dangers of offering special discounts via the mass media to only a segment of your marketplace. You end up alienating some customers because they were first informed of the special pricing but then denied it because they didn’t have the coupon. While this can be very helpful in generating short-term sales, it can be a problem for you down the road. If you should continue to offer deals for any protracted length of time, the danger is that you’ll condition your customers to wait for the deal before they will buy from you. Many of our clients have expressed concerns about shrinking profit margins as a result of a loss of pricing credibility. Coupons and sales are effective. When you use any type of off-price tactics be sure you protect your price credibility in the process. One way to protect your price credibility and still attract buying customers is to use a cross promotion. TRANSFER RESPONSIBILITY OF THE DISCOUNT When you run a coupon, the consumer knows you paid money to offer a deal on your product or service. However, if you were able to get another organization to distribute your offer to its customers or members on your behalf, it helps to transfer the responsibility of that offer to your cross promotion partner. Make sure on your promotional piece you say, “compliments of” the organization handing them out. FREE COVERAGE Another advantage of this cross promotion approach is that you get your advertising piece distributed to your customer, free. This is a great way to supplement your existing advertising budget without adding additional cost. Even the actual printed piece doesn’t have to be that expensive. Since it is being handed out at the register with a purchase or as a bag stuffer, you don’t need fullcolor to get the customer’s attention like you would with a direct mail campaign.

TARGETED COVERAGE Another advantage is that you can target the types of customers you want by demographics. In the example given, both the grocery store and the appliance store wanted to reach the same target audience. It made sense for them to promote each other. GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE Most retail businesses get their customers within a certain area surrounding their business, perhaps two to five miles. So, if you want to focus you efforts to a certain part of the city, you simply set up a cross promotion with a partner located in the area where you want the concentration of your effort. This also comes into play when you have multiple locations in a market but want to get more aggressive with one of them. – PMQ –

Jeff and Marc Slutsky are co-authors of five books including StreetFighting. They are executives of StreetFighter Marketing in Columbus, Ohio, which specializes in teaching how to promote, market and increase sales without spending a lot of money. Jeff and his brother, Marc, have a variety of audio and video tapes. For further information contact Jeff or Marc at: 800 (SLUTSKY) 758-8759 • 614-337-2233 fax 467 Waterbury Court • Columbus, OH 43230


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For International calls dial 00111-905-889-8745


lehmannmarapr

2/17/05

5:06 PM

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In Lehmann’s Terms By Tom Lehmann • “The Dough Doctor” Visit www.pmq.com and look under PMQ Column Contributors to see previous articles by Tom, or click Ask the Experts to ask Tom a question.

Question: We are presently purchasing an ingredient bag that we add to our flour to make our dough from. We would like to make this ourselves to save some money. What's the best way to do it? Answer: Making an ingredient bag, or "goodie-bag" (as it is better known as) is pretty straightforward. 1. Begin by putting a small amount (one or two pounds) of flour into the suitably sized plastic bags or containers. This will serve to disperse the rest of the ingredients preventing possible lumping of any water-absorbing ingredients that you might be putting into the bag. 2. Then weigh and add each of your other dry ingredients (salt, sugar, herbs/spices, dough conditioners, gluten and instant dry yeast) to the bag/container. Lightly stir the ingredients into the flour, or shake the ingredients together for a few seconds to blend them. 3. The goodie-bag can now be sealed closed and appropriately labeled. It is always a good idea to write-up a formula card for each type of dough made from a goodiebag. This can be done on an index card and posted by the mixer or ingredient scaling area. Typically, it will look something like this: Add XX pounds of water at XX degrees to the mixing bowl. Then add XX pounds of flour and one goodie-bag (be sure to identify the goodie-bag) and mix at low speed for X-minutes. Add the oil and mix an additional two minutes at low speed. Then mix at second speed for X-minutes. Some things to remember about your goodie-bags: Use only instant dry yeast (IDY) in your goodie-bags because it is designed to be added to the flour without pre-hydration. Technically, you could also use protected active dry yeast (PADY) in making goodie-bags, but this type of

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If you make both thick crust pizza and thin crust pizza and you're using two different types of flour (high protein/gluten for the thin crust and a lower protein/gluten for the thick crust) you might be able to save some money and inventory space using goodie-bags. -Tom Lehmann

yeast will be more expensive. Also, it is not as readily available through our distributors as IDY. If you were to make goodie-bags that had an intended shelf life of several months, there might be some advantage to using PADY, but for most of us, we're only looking at a shelf life of a week or two at the most, and for this, IDY will work just fine. • It is not uncommon to have goodie-bags for different types of pizzas, for example, one for thin crust pizzas and one for thick crust pizzas. As the contents of the bags may be different, be sure to plainly label or identify the bags so it's obvious which bag is to be used for making which type of dough. • If you make both thick crust pizza and thin crust pizza and you're using two different types of flour (high protein/gluten for the thin crust and a lower protein/gluten for the thick crust) you might be able to save some money and inventory space using goodie-bags. First, you will need to purchase a bag of vital wheat gluten, which is available from any bakery ingredient supplier. Your goodiebag for the thick crust pizzas will remain unchanged.


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• When making the goodie-bags for the thin crust pizza, you will include some of the vital wheat gluten. The exact amount of gluten will need to be determined, but if you know the protein content of the two flours that you're presently using it is easy to calculate the exact amount needed. For example, the high protein (thin crust) flour averages 13.5 percent protein content. The lower protein (thick crust) flour averages 12.2 percent protein content. The difference is 1.3 percent protein. By dividing 1.3 percent by 0.6 you will have the amount of gluten that will need to be added to the thick crust flour to bring it up to then thin crust flour’s 13.5 percent protein content. In this example, 2.2 percent (based on the total flour weight in your dough) of vital wheat gluten will be needed. This amount of gluten should be added to the thin crust goodie-bag and the flour type used should now be the same (lower protein) as used for making the thick crust pizzas. With the added gluten in the goodie-bag, the total protein content of the flour will be increased to 13.5 percent to give the same finished crust characteristics as were had using just the 13.5 percent protein flour. • In cases where you don't know the protein content of the two flours, you will need to use good old trial and error to find the correct amount of gluten to use. For starters, I would begin with 3 percent gluten added to the thin crust goodie-bag. If the finished thin crust is too chewy or the dough exhibits too much memory or snapback during the forming procedure, reduce the amount of added gluten to 2 percent or less. If the finished crust is too tender, increase the gluten 4 percent or more. • A word of caution when using vital wheat gluten is in order. Be sure to disperse the gluten into the other ingredients in the goodie-bag, and remember to close the bag or container tightly. The bag in which the gluten is stored should also be folded down firmly and secured with a piece of tape to keep the bag closed when not in use. Failure to do so may result in the gluten absorbing moisture from the air leading to pilling or lumping of the gluten, rendering it unsuitable for use. Question: We make all of our pizzas on parbaked crusts that we make ourselves during slow time during the day and in the evenings. Depending upon business, we may keep our par-baked crusts for up to a week or more in the cooler

before we use them. Occasionally, we notice a little mold growing on one of the crusts in the bag, and we discard the entire bag of 10 crusts. Is there anything that we can do to prevent the mold growth on our crusts? Answer: Bread type items will usually begin to show some indication of mold growth between five and seven days after baking. Refrigeration may or may not have a significant affect upon retarding the mold growth as a lot will depend upon the initial level of contamination with mold spores, moisture content/water activity of the crust, and pH (acidity) of the crust. The most effective means of controlling mold growth is to use a mold inhibitor such as calcium propionate in the dough formulation. Calcium propionate is available from any bakery ingredient supplier. It is commonly sold under trade names such as Mycoban or Guard. No matter what the name, as long as it is food grade calcium propionate, it will work for you at inhibiting mold growth in your pizza crust. While some products might have specific recommendations as to the amount to use, calcium propionate is usually used in yeast leavened bread type products at levels of between 0.25 and 0.375 percent of the flour weight in your dough formula. This is equal to 2 to 3-ounces per 50-pounds of flour weight. When using calcium propionate, one must keep in mind that it is most effective when the ph (acidity) of the pizza crust is at or below 5.5. Remember that a pH of 7 is neutral and anything above that is basic (alkaline)

and anything below 7 is acid. It is a simple matter to check your pizza crust to determine what the approximate pH is. Purchase a roll of litmus paper/tape from your local pharmacy. The litmus paper should have a pH range of 4.5 to 7.5 and a color comparison chart on the side of the container. Rinse out a blender with distilled water, then fill it about half full of distilled water and put about 1/4 of a 12-inch diameter crust into the blender and puree it until smooth. Let the pureed crust-water mix set for a minute or so, and pour off several ounces into a plastic cup. Dip the litmus paper into the mixture in the cup and compare the color of the tape to the chart on the side of the tape container. Determine which color stripe most closely matches with the color of the litmus tape and read the pH for that color stripe. Ideally, you want your crust to have a pH of 5.7 or lower. A pH of 5.0 to 5.25 is considered ideal. And if it is lower than this, so much the better. If the pH indicated is higher than 5.7 you will need to add an acid. The suggested acid is regular, household, white vinegar. This is added to the dough to lower the pH of the finished (baked) crust. When adding vinegar, add it in increments of 2 percent based on the total flour weight (one pound per 50 pounds of flour) in your dough to replace an equal weight of water. Check the pH of the finished crust and make further changes if needed. With the correct finished crust pH and calcium propionate in your dough formulation you can expect to get at least 7 to 10 days of mold free shelf life on crusts that are stored in the cooler. –PMQ–

The Perfect Frying Solution The Ventless, Odorless Countertop Deep Fryer

1-800-265-7711 www.perfectfry.com For International calls dial 00111-403-255-7712

www.pmq.com 21


bigdavemarch2k5

2/17/05

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The Pizza Doctor Promotions: Step-by-Step • By Big Dave Ostrander Visit www.pmq.com and look under PMQ Column Contributors to see previous articles by Big Dave, or click Ask the Experts to ask Big Dave a question.

Every year the cost of doing business goes up. Every year you lose customers. Every year you need to create a marketing plan that adds to your customer base and increases your gross sales and net profit. This year is no different.

Here are the steps for launching a successful promotion. After you’ve decided on the strategy and promotion you’re going to use, it’s a good idea to print out a calendar and place the small steps on it. I always try to visualize the promotion with the end in mind. What is the end goal? Why am I dong this? What is the timeline I’m working with? Will I need to hold an employee briefing to explain the promotion? For an example, I’m going to highlight a strategy I used many times. I call it Employee Bounce Back Certificates. I chose this old reliable because it always brought in a lot of new customers and the investment was very low. My goal was to increase sales $100,000 over the previous year’s sales. I set this goal to offset new government laws that would seriously put a crimp on my income and lifestyle. The timeline was aggressive. I wanted to gain—no, steal—several hundred of my competitor’s regular customers. The first step is to design and order any printed material you’ll need. Working closely with a speedy print shop or designing it on your computer can save a lot of money and time. In this case I needed

Since this promotion would be executed primarily by my staff, I needed to call a meeting to explain how the strategy worked. I held monthly staff meetings on the first Saturday of each month, 10 am. Be there or be square. I created handouts for all of my employees that explained how the promotion worked with the rules. Printing up a one or two paragraph explanation of the promotion eliminates a lot of questions and you’ll run a consistent promo. -Big Dave Ostrander

Big Dave recommends offering a tactile reward for your promotions. For one successful promotion, he had employees hand out bounce-back certificates to all their friends and families. The employee with the most certificates given won a crisp $100 bill.

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several hundred printed cards. I designed them and had my printer run them. Since this promotion would be executed primarily by my staff, I needed to call a meeting to explain how the strategy worked. I held monthly staff meetings on the first Saturday of each month, 10 a.m. Be there or be square. I created handouts for all of my employees that explained how the promotion


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worked with the rules. Printing up a one or two paragraph explanation of the promotion eliminates a lot of questions and you’ll run a consistent promo. This promotion had a grand prize of a $100 bill. Have one of those. You are much more likely to have an emotional buy-in when they can see, feel and touch the pieces of the puzzle. Rehearsing the presentation to your staff is next. I never deliver a presentation before I rehearse it a few times in front of a mirror and anticipate all of the questions I might answer. The best lawyers in the world never ask a question they don’t have an answer for. During this preparation time, you’ll discover the message you want to deliver has a few holes in it. This is the time to fill the holes with thought out responses in advance of the questions that are likely to follow. Now, comes the execution and implementation part. The company wide meeting has started. Your staff has gathered and you explain the goals and objectives of the upcoming promotion. They get the handout and follow along as you explain how you want it to go. They ask a few questions. You have your answers ready. Then you hand out any printed pieces that you’ll be using. You then may want to do a role-play. One employee plays a customer and another plays order taker in front of the group. They

practice until they give the right responses and can control the dialog. You are the movie director. When and if they stumble you say, “cut” and demonstrate the right way to play out the scene. Almost every great promotion ever implemented was turned into an employee contest. This particular one was designed to gain and track new customers for a month. The employee that had the most bounce back certificates redeemed won a crisp $100 dollar bill. I also provided for additional spiffs of $20 to weekly leaders. This works wonders in getting emotional buy in. Otherwise the crew thinks, “This is one more thing the boss want me to do.” Rather than, “All I have to do is give away cards to my friends and maybe I’ll win the $100.” Once the promotion is launched you need to develop a measurement tool to quantify the results. Promotions must be measured to determine if they were brilliant or a dud. Hard data is necessary to make that call. Otherwise you’ll never be able to quantify and justify the marketing money you’ll be spending. By tracking the results you’ll know for sure what the ROI (return on investment) was. Finally, you must analyze the promotion when it has finished. During this step you’ll know if it was successful and how much it cost, and how much it brought in. You’ll also

learn how to improve it if you run it again. Gather all of the data and put it in a three ring binder so it will be available the next time you need it. These are the steps of what goes on behind the scenes before, during and after a marketing program is implemented. Some of your plans will be brilliant and some will be so-so. By practicing these accountabilities and tracking marketing promotions, you’ll get to be a master Pizza Guerilla Marketer. To read all about this promotion go to http://www.pmq.com/bigdave_spring98.shtml and see how I turned $400 into $90,000. Darn, I missed my goal by a little, but still received a 248:1 return on investment. So can you. – PMQ –

In 1990, two years after Big Dave’s Pizza was ranked the 25th busiest pizzeria in the USA, Big Dave Ostrander started his consulting, speaking and training career. As a consultant and trainer, Dave is responsible for some of the independent pizzeria market’s most successful sales forces. Dave is a regular columnist in PMQ, and author of Big Bucks with Big Dave.

For International calls dial 00111-708-841-0959

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bigdavemarch2k5

2/18/05

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attiasmarapr2k5

2/17/05

5:15 PM

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Catering Corner Catering Menu Makeover In 9 Easy Steps • By Michael Attias

Whether you’ve been catering for years and consider yourself a pro or are just venturing into the world of catering from your pizzeria, a catering menu makeover can make the difference between getting the job or not. A well-planned and designed catering menu can automatically add extra catering profits to your till. Before you even start to design your catering menu, you must answer the following question: “What is the purpose of my catering menu and how will it be used?” Is it a fancy brochure or a simple price sheet to fax to inquiries? Though you may have multiple uses for your catering menu, it must always be designed to be a piece that sells customers and prospects on choosing you for their catered events. A great catering menu gets the phone ringing with prospects disposed to giving orders, not shopping price.

HERE ARE THE NINE STEPS TO YOUR CATERING MENU MAKEOVER: 1. Conduct Catering Recon: Just like all great commanders do their homework before heading to battle, you must know what your competition is up to. Collect catering menus from your pizza and nonpizza catering competitors. You must know what

Just like all great commanders do their homework before heading to battle, you must know what your competition is up to. Collect catering menus from your pizza and non-pizza catering competitors. - Michael Attias

prices, menus and packages you are being compared to. Understanding your catering marketplace allows you to attack niches not being pursued. 2. Pick A Pricing Policy: If you’ve read some of my previous PMQ articles, you know I’m a big advocate of per-person pricing. There is nothing more difficult for a secretary than having to calculate how many pans of salad to get when it feeds 10 and she has 15 guests. Make it easy to pick packages at the low, middle and high end of the pricing scale to appeal to the different buying styles. 3. Know Where Your Logo Goes: Nine out of ten catering menus that my consulting clients send me for critique have a large logo plastered on the top. Your customers care about what you can do for them, not who you are. Put the logo at the bottom and save the top for a headline that communicates the “big benefit” they’ll receive. One caterer touts, “Last Minute Orders Never A Problem.” Identify your

Step 6: Pictures sell. Use color photography in your marketing materials to help push your catering.

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attiasmarapr2k5

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strengths and communicate it with a powerful headline on top of your catering menu. 4. Image Counts: Make sure the graphic artist you use to design your menu has been to your restaurant and seen your other marketing pieces. Your menu must match your image and positioning in the marketplace. A gourmet pizza operator is going to want to invest in nicer papers and capture an upscale look. A catering menu designed on Microsoft Word and printed on cheap copy paper will not properly communicate customer expectations, resulting in lower sales. 5. Different Formats For Different Jobs: You may decide to print full color catering menus to use on deliveries to corporate offices for lunch or for your dine-in crowd to take with them. That same format will make for a solid black sheet on the other end of a fax machine. Have your artist design a different catering menu for the different uses. If you’ll be mailing your catering menu, you may want a tri-fold brochure that will fit into a #10 envelope or act as a self mailer. You may decide to put an abbreviated catering menu on the back of all your box toppers. The second side of the paper is cheap to print.

6. Use Pictures: Color food photography sells. Use it to sell your catering. Table shots, catering action shots and platters of your delectable specialties will get the phone to ring. Use captions under your photos to communicate the benefit your customer will receive: “Imagine you and your co-workers being able to actually enjoy your catered lunch when Leonardo’s handles set-up, serving and all the clean up.” 7. Include Extras To Upsell: I like to create packages with the basics and upsell drinks, desserts, wings, paper products and other items. Make sure and put your “extras” section at the bottom for your customers to consider. 8. Use Testimonials: What you say about yourself is self-serving. What your customers say about you is the gospel truth. You may use a testimonial as your headline, place a lot of them on the back and even include photos of your customers to go alongside. Testimonials are the single most powerful selling tool in your arsenal. 9. Guarantee Your Way To Success: Caterers are chosen more for avoiding embarrassment than for the quality of their food. A well-crafted guarantee lets them know you put

your money where your mouth is. On more than one occasion our “120 percent Guarantee” was the deciding factor in closing catering jobs for over a thousand guests. Each year the race starts anew. The slate is clean and your profit and loss statement starts at zero. A little pressure on yourself to outdo your best keeps this business fun and exciting. I hope these ideas inspire you and guide you to the best year ever! You now have the tools to create or recreate a catering menu that will get you sales. Make sure everyone involved in the menu creation process has read this article. It’s a great checklist for your catering menu makeover. – PMQ –

Michael Attias operates a restaurant in Nashville, Tennessee, and helps restaurant owners add or expand a catering profit center through his company The Results Group. You can download his FREE Report: Tapping Into Your Hidden Catering Profit$ at www.ezRestaurantMarketing.com.

For International calls dial 00111-360-650-1111

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kamronmar2k5

2/17/05

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Kamron’s Komments Generate Instant Cash With Upselling • By Kamron Karington Visit www.pmq.com and look under PMQ Column Contributors to see this article by Kamron, or click Ask the Experts to ask Kamron a question.

127,500,000 million gallons of water "leak" right through Hoover Dam every year. That’s enough to fill 8,395 swimming pools. This water seeps unnoticed, silently, invisibly, through 7 million tons of concrete. Yet, this gusher is invisible to the naked eye. Your pizza business also has a leak. It’s leaking cash, and lots of it! I'm going to show you how to harvest the hidden cash that doesn't appear on any balance sheet…that not even the best-trained accountants could ever find. Every business has it, even yours. Where is this mountain of money hiding? Right there in your customers’ wallet, and they are eager to spend it! They just need a little help. And, you’re going to provide that help through precise, proven, scientific means. Complicated? Not at all. Upselling is the easiest way to generate more cash in your pizza business because it is practically effortless. It’s done after the customer has already decided to buy from you. Most pizza shops can easily generate an extra $7,000-$37,000 every year just from upselling. The truth is, it is a clinical and statistically proven fact that 30 to 67 percent of all people can be upsold at the time of purchase. Of those, ticket increases of 15 to 25 percent are commonplace. They have already picked you. Their money is on the table. They are in “buying mode.” They are HOT! But many people either offend customers by being too pushy, or leave money on the table that customers would have willingly spent. Both options are costly. Here’s the secret…buying mode takes place in the emotional right half of the brain. Pondering questions is a left-brain activity. Why is this important? Because saying something like, “would you like the extra large?” will kill the upsell because you are asking a question.

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You have interrupted their pattern – as they switch over to a different “state” of mind to process the question and answer you. You have unintentionally snapped them out of “buying mode.” Any chance at up selling has been greatly diminished. Buying mode is similar to that trance you get into on the drive home. You arrive home fairly unaware of the details of the drive unless someone honks or swerves in front of you. So, avoid asking “upselling” questions. It’s the same as honking your horn during the buying process. But be suggestive. When people are in buying mode, they are very “suggestible.” In fact, people like to BUY. It’s fun for them. They are in control. People DO NOT like to be sold because they are not in control. The minute a person perceives that they are being sold to, they put up the defenses. So, sneak past those defenses by avoiding words that raise the caution flag. Here’s the exact technique. The customer calls and says: I’d like to order a pizza with pepperoni, mushrooms and green peppers. Right there is the time to say: “Extra cheese on that?” Raise the pitch of your voice on the word “cheese.” And say the sentence as an assumption that they want extra cheese. Again, if you were to say: “Do you want extra cheese on that?” You cause the customer to stop and make a decision. This “interrupts” the buying sequence. And their thought process will be: Do I want extra cheese? What will it cost me? Is it worth it? A confused mind always says NO. “Extra cheese on that?” With the higher inflection at the end makes the phrase sound like everybody gets extra cheese. And, it flows without causing a pause in the order taking. Also note that this customer did not specify a size. So, let’s take the conversation further. Customer: I’d like to order a pizza with pepperoni, mushrooms, and green peppers. You: Extra cheese on that? Customer: Sure. You: That’s a large? After the order has been placed and the upselling has been done you may now ask a very profitable question. It is: “What else can I get for you?”


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This question causes an automatic “mental movie” to play. The customer visualizes the experience they are about to have and searches their mind for any “missing” items. You’ll find people blurting out things like, “Do you have any root beer?” or, “What kind of salads do you have?” “What else can I get for you?” will generate more sales. “Is that everything?” will generate no sales. THREE RULES FOR UPSELLING SUCCESS 1. “Tell, then sell.” Do not attempt to upsell until you have the main sell. Many people start talking about the add-ons before the customer has even made a commitment to the original purchase. Don’t make that mistake. Let them get into full buying mode, and then do your upselling. 2. Upselling should not increase the original purchase by more than 25 percent. If they’re ordering a $15.00 pizza, you can bump it to $18.75 before you run into resistance. People do have a mental limit as to how much they will spend. So, just because they are in “buying mode” doesn’t mean they’ve gone insane. 3. The upsell item must have a direct correlation to the item being bought. Some shops have a pretty extensive menu. If the customer is ordering pizza – don’t try to up sell a hamburger. Keep it to pizza related items.

Start upselling today! Even modest results will pay for a nice vacation. Let’s say you average 300 orders per week. And, let’s say you only up sell 20 percent of them. Remember, you should be able to hit at least 30 percent. Anyway, 30 extra cheese pizzas at $1.50 = $45.00. Thirty up sells from a medium to a large at $2.00 = $60.00. $60.00 + $45.00 = $105.00 per week. Not a big deal – yet.

But, a measly $105.00 per week adds up to, $5,460.00 per year. Of that you should expect at least $4,095.00 to drop to the bottom line after food cost. Here’s the proof below. And,this is just “extra cheese” – nothing else. See you in Maui. – PMQ –

What do your guests really think? GMA RESEARCH offers an affordable way to find out! Now you can increase return visits and discover what guests really think about your operation.

I won’t recommend this place I’d recommend this place

What great service What terrible service

Fun atmosphere Boring atmosphere

Nice menu Poor menu

It’s quick, accurate, and affordable web survey research, brought to you by GMA Research. Our team of experts has specialized in foodservice and hospitality research since 1970. Call Don Morgan today

(425) 827-1251 donmgma@aol.com for a FREE no-obligation consultation. For International calls dial 00111-425-827-1251

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pizzainternational

2/17/05

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PMQ PIZZERIA INTERNATIONALE

THE LOADED POTATO PIZZA DOMINIC TEDESCO • THE SICILIAN THE LOADED POTATO PIZZA Serves – 4 to 6 First, Start by making the two main ingredients: 1) Garlic Mashed Potatoes 2) Basic Pizza Dough INGREDIENTS: Garlic Mashed Potatoes 15 medium WASHINGTON STATE Potatoes© 14.5 oz. can of chicken broth 6 cloves of large garlic 4 tsp. butter or margarine 3/4 c. heavy whipping cream 2 tsp. salt 1 tsp. black pepper

DIRECTIONS: Garlic Mashed Potatoes -Combine WASHINGTON STATE Potatoes©, broth, and garlic in a large saucepan. -Add additional water if necessary in order to keep all potatoes completely submerged. -Bring to boil then reduce heat to LOW. -Continue to cook until potatoes are tender (25-30 minutes). -Drain potatoes and garlic. -Mash the potatoes & garlic. -Add butter, salt, pepper, and whipping cream. -Whip until it has a creamy texture. INGREDIENTS: Basic Pizza Dough 3 c. bread flour 1 pkg. active dry yeast 1 tsp. salt 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1 c. warm water

DIRECTIONS: Basic Pizza Dough -Combine flour, salt, and yeast and mix well in a large bowl (12 qt. will work fine) -Mix in the oil and warm water -Cover the bowl and let the dough rise for 30 minutes INGREDIENTS FOR OUR FINAL PRODUCT: The Loaded Potato Pizza 1-16 oz. dough ball 2 c. garlic mashed potatoes (SEE RECIPE ABOVE) 3 oz. sauteed onions 4 oz. shredded provolone 4 oz. shredded fontina 3 small tomatoes sliced thin 4 oz. real bacon crumbled 1 tsp. cracked pepper 1 tsp. onion salt

DIRECTIONS FOR FINAL PRODUCT: The Loaded Potato Pizza -Sheet the dough -Spread on the garlic mashed potatoes -Evenly sprinkle the sauteed onions -Layer the sliced tomatoes -Evenly sprinkle the cheeses, bacon crumbles, cracked black pepper, and onion salt -Bake at 45 degrees for 10-12 minutes

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I started cooking at the age of nine. Barely able to see over the counter top, I stood happily alongside my mother as she prepared meals for my father and seven brothers. She took great pride in the traditions of her Italian heritage, but also stressed that the most authentic ingredient in any dish came from the feelings in my heart. With that in mind, I looked to my Sicilian roots, but also allowed my heartfelt creativity to lead the way. Although I enjoy cooking all types of foods, I have always had the most fun creating new pizza recipes using…well…less than traditional ingredients. The Loaded Potato Pizza was born four years ago when a friend insisted I must be running out of ideas…not a chance. I knew when I started that similar potato “tarts” have been created by a great many Sicilians before me, however, I know in my heart that the one described below is truly unique to any region of the world. Mangia tuti! Dominic Tedesco

The Loaded Potato Pizza recipe and photos can be found online at pmq.com in the Recipe Bank.


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PMQ PIZZERIA INTERNATIONALE

MUDHONEY PIZZA THEO KALOGERACOS • LITTLE CAESAR’S MUDHONEY 2/3 c. 2 c. 1/3 c. 3 2 tsp. 1/2 c. 1 1/2 c. 1/2 tsp. 1 tsp.

Vegetable oil Sugar Cornstarch Eggs Vanilla extract Cocoa Plain flour Salt Baking powder

Method: -Add all your liquids all in one bowl and whisk together. -Add all your dry ingredients in another bowl and mix together. -Combine the dry ingredients to the wet ones and using a whisk, mix together until smooth like velvet. -Then, spread the mixture evenly over your pizza base then cook at 250˚C or 555˚F for 7 minutes. -When ready, dust with icing sugar and sprinkle with chocolate drops, drizzle with chocolate sauce and honey.

Hi, my name is Theo Kalogeracos, winner of the Caboolture Dairy Farmers Best of the Best Pizza Challenge in Sydney, Australia, in 2003. Tom Boyles asked me to submit my winning recipe as part of the new International Recipes section in PMQ. This pizza first started as just a name, which is after a rock band from Seattle called MUDHONEY. I deconstructed the name into a brownie-type pizza. The recipe that makes the base of this pizza is the “mud” and the “honey” is drizzled over the finished product. This pizza was part of my selection of pizzas made at The New York Pizza Show’s Australian Pizza Making Demonstrations. As I mentioned, it also helped me win the Australian title in Sydney at the Caboolture Dairy Farmers Best of the Best in 2003. Enjoy. Cheers, Theo Kalogeracos

Now, it’s ready to serve.

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PMQ PIZZERIA INTERNATIONALE

GOURMET DOLE® PINEAPPLE PIZZA DINO CICCONE • EASTOWN PIZZA GOURMET PINEAPPLE PIZZA 1- 14” 1 c. 1 1/2 c. 1/4 c.

2 c. 6 1/4 lb. 1/4 lb.

1/3 c.

1/4 c. 1/4 c.

Whole Grain Organic crust or substitute with your preference fresh tomato sauce grated 20 percent MF Mozzarella crumbled Stilton or choose any sharp cheese i.e.: Asiago, feta, sharp Provolone Dole® pizza cut pineapple strips of Smokey Canadian bacon of sliced quality ham like Proscuitto or Pancetta of quality Italian Salami like Sopressata piccante or Capicollo picante of sautéed broccoli rabe (sauté with olive oil and garlic and pinch of sea salt) small slivers red sweet peppers julienne radicchio

Generous sprinkle of red chili peppers and generous drizzle of olive oil Here is a recipe for a dessert pizza that is a favourite of mine. I didn’t have the opportunity to have my photographer shoot this one, but believe me, it is not only delicious, but beautiful as well.

DESSERT PINEAPPLE PIZZA 1 - 14” 1 1/4 c. 2 c. 1 c. 1/2 c. 1/3 c. 1/3 c. 1 tbsp.

regular pizza dough 1/2 Mascarpone / 1/2 Ricotta mixture Dole® pineapple (pizza cut) tidbits 1/4 strawberries blueberries Jack Daniels or for an Italian flavour Amaretto chopped mint leaves

Procedure: -Take your pizza shell (well risen) -Spread your cheese mixture and leave 1/2” border. -Take your lightly squeezed pineapple and spread evenly across cheese. -Evenly spread your strawberries and blueberries. -Drizzle your sauce evenly over top. -Cook at 500˚F or 260˚C for approx. 15 min. -Remove and spread mint over top. •You can serve warm and add ice cream if you like, otherwise, it is great on its own and even at room temperature.

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The pineapple has served both as food and symbol throughout the human history of the Americas. Originally unique to the Western Hemisphere, the fruit was a culinary favourite of the fierce Carib Indians who lived on islands in the sea that still bears their name. This pizza is designed to accentuate the pineapple and you cannot put too much pineapple on this pizza. This pizza is assembled with the intent of getting specific overwhelming tastes in the different bites. So when you bite where the bacon is, you get a lot of bacon, the pineapple a lot of pineapple. Building a pizza this way gives you a lot of height, which makes for an awesome presentation and value. The flavour profile in this pizza is awesome, the sweet juicy pineapple, the sour, bitter broccoli rabe, the smoky, salty bacon, the hot, spicy chili flakes and garlic, the freshness of the sweet red pepper, the pungent radicchio. The extra virgin olive oil and meat juices with the mixture of all ingredients and along with gooey mozzarella and explosive Stilton. WOW, what a pizza! Thanks Dole®. Procedure: Take your well-risen crust and spread your sauce to 1/2 inch from edge. Next, spread your mozzarella evenly and sporadically spread the Stilton. Next, take your meats and roll them up and push into cheese to hold them up and place evenly around pizza. Then take five to eight pieces of pineapple and place between every piece of meat in a mounded fashion. In the centre of the pizza, make a mound that is three to four times bigger than the other pineapple mounds. This is your centrepiece. Now take the sautéed broccoli rabe and make it into a ball and place in approximately five points on pizza. Spread your red sweet pepper and julienne radicchio evenly. Sprinkle your herbs, chili flakes and extra virgin olive oil when pizza comes out of the oven. Cook for 15 minutes at 500525. Do not cut pizza until customer has viewed it because it will be difficult to cut and maintain its appearance. Enjoy!

The Dole® Pineapple Pizza recipe can be found online at pmq.com in the Recipe Bank.

Yours in pizza, Dino Ciccone


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highcrimearea

2/17/05

5:18 PM

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I have the responsibility here at the magazine of posting the day’s pizza news to our website. Each day when I am searching for interesting headlines, I come across a lot of robberies and injuries of pizza drivers. These everyday news stories made me wonder how common these crimes are and what it’s like to operate in a high-crime area. Here is the story of one brave operator. Andrew Albert is taking a stand against crime in Lake Highlands, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. Andrew opened his pizzeria, Picasso’s Pizza, ten years ago in an area unique to large cities, Section 8 government funded apartments also known as “the projects,” located right next door to $400,000 homes. “We’ve got a lot of government housing that is not well monitored,” Andrew says. “The government is not keeping them up, running background checks or upgrading the housing. The crime is increasing.” So, what is keeping him here? “We basically have three choices when it comes to business,” Andrew says. “We can stay and hope the crime goes away or we can move or we can stay and fight back.” FIGHTING BACK Fighting back has become his weapon of choice. Andrew grew up in this area. When it was time to settle down, he was working part-time for the former owner of Picasso’s as a delivery driver and manager on the weekends while he was a traveling musician. The pinnacle of the crime came after several years of two or three drivers being robbed each year. On February 25, 2000, Andrew’s brother, David, was making two deliveries. After completing the first delivery, David returned to his truck. Police determined that someone tapped on his window and demanded either money or the vehicle. David tried to drive away. He was shot through the back of the truck through two sheets of metal with a sawed off shotgun. He died on the scene. After all these events, you would think no businessman in his right mind would stay in 36 PMQ

an area with such a high crime rate, but Andrew has and flourished. Andrew has started a community initiative to get the crime off the street. He told his story to The Dallas Morning News, went on local television shows and is working to get his story to other local media. Andrew has also tackled the crime issue on the business front by creating rules for the individual complexes in the area, and changing his marketing strategy. “We’ve started marketing to homes,” Andrew says. “We’ll stay in business, but not flourish if we don’t deliver to the complexes.” “We’ve partnered with complexes. Some places we won’t deliver to after dark, and some we have meet us at the gate. We’ll give discounts for carryout. We won’t risk the safety of our drivers. We don’t go out of our way to advertise to apartments that are not maintained.” Seventy to 80 percent of deliveries made are to homes, and 20 to 30 percent are made to apartments. Andrew says that the areas around the homes have been problematic for his drivers because many of them back right up to these under-maintained complexes. “The drivers have free reign whether or not to deliver an order,” Andrew says. “If they have a fear, it doesn’t have to be tangible. We call the customer and explain. It’s not a problem.” “We’re working very hard to make it in this neighborhood,” Andrew says. “We’ve seen many good restaurants move out of the neighborhood because of the crime. We’ve had a very large decline in business chains.” How bad is the crime in this area around these Section 8 projects? Andrew sent me a report detailing the incidents that have happened over the past ten years. Some of these incidents were rather scary. Only two weeks after he opened in 1993, Andrew was robbed at gunpoint. The perpetrator was caught and convicted. SECURITY MEASURES The restaurant has been robbed many times, and Andrew has made improvements each time in the security system. He has spent about $20,000 on securing his location. The most drastic thing Andrew did to curb crime in and around his store was to move his location up the street about 50 yards to a higher trafficked area. Some of the other security improvements

included building a bulletproof glass wall, installation of cameras and monitors, limited access doors, panic buttons and computers to track check and credit card fraud, which became another problem for the store. STOPPING CHECK & CREDIT CARD FRAUD They were getting almost $1,000 per month in stolen and closed accounts on top of the normal NSF checks. Andrew filled us in on how he has been able to lower his out-ofpocket expense for bad credit cards and checks. “The first thing you can do is call the credit card company to verify the identity,” Andrew says. “We do this by demanding that the delivery address and the billing address


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match. Also, the person’s whose name appears on the credit card must be present. If we have any doubts we just don’t accept the card, and we call the credit card company to report fraud.” As for checks, he has developed a stern acceptance policy. “We’ve stopped taking checks over $40,” Andrew says. “We’re up front with our customers on the phone about taking checks. The person whose name appears on the check must appear at the door with a driver’s license. Usually if the checkbook is stolen the person will hang up or not pick up the order. “We’ve gotten our NSF amounts down to as low as $10 to $12 a day, but we’ve seen

a recent climb,” Andrew says. “If you develop ways to stop scammers, they come up with new ways to scam you. It’s basically a matter of staying on top of the problem.” MARKETING STRATEGIES Andrew has to have a variety of marketing tools to cater to everyone in his unique suburban area. “We want to provide a deal for anyone to afford it,” Andrew says. “For a buck or two more, customers can get a better product than they can at one of the high volume/low price places.” Andrew has a detailed marketing plan that encompasses his idea to “market to everybody.” His main tool is the door-to-door hanger. The hanger is two-sided in four colors. All the photographs used on the hanger are taken in the restaurant with waitstaff and original food. They use a thick card stock with mini-menus and their website as the featured advertisement. “Our hangers are way more eye-catching than the competitions’,” Andrew says. “Ours makes us look more like a corporation. Since we can’t compete price-wise, we have coupons that feature offers such as two pizzas for a particular price. We also try to feature something free like two free drinks. We recently started offering a package deal with two pizzas, two salads and two drinks for one price.” He also takes out small ads in local newspapers and magazines, and he does an occasional mailer. New customers get a dose of marketing with their first order. They get a full menu and a Picasso’s magnet for their fridge. A major way Andrew markets to his customers is when mistakes are made. “We turn mistakes into marketing,” he says. “We deal with problems in three ways: we do it quickly, we apologize and shock the customer with a quick delivery of the messed up order plus something else like a couple of free dressings or an order of breadsticks, and we give them coupons for $5 off their next order or we take a couple of sodas with the left out item. Our drivers get there in 10 minutes instead of 30.” Delivery is one of the most important areas of focus at Picasso’s. Andrew says they put an emphasis on getting the food out fast. The average delivery time for a Picasso’s order is 25-35 minutes during the week, and 40 minutes at the most on a Friday night. “I have to give credit to Rockland POS and how we know our neighborhoods,” Andrew says.

“This is important because we have a huge delivery area.” POS ADDS EASE TO THE OPERATION Andrew added a POS system from Rockland Technologies about four years ago. “When we were at $700,000 in sales a year, handwriting the tickets became a nightmare,” Andrew says. “We literally had to have five to six tickets to deliver to the different sections of the kitchen area. The investment in the system is as well spent as advertising dollars. The system decreased delivery times and made us look more professional.” The POS system is used to recognize customers, store credit card numbers, and customers’ likes/dislikes. Another plus, Andrew says, is there are no arguments about discounts. “The POS system is a marketing tool in reverse,” Andrew says. “We are not able to use it to figure out which areas to market to because of the high turnover in residents. The product of the POS is customer satisfaction. We have a 99.9 percent customer satisfaction rate.” LOOKING TO THE FUTURE Andrew knows expansion to more than one locations is in his future, but not immediate. “We are thinking about expansion,” Andrew says. “The main thing with that is to get the main store to full potential. We want to make sure the second store starts on a firm foundation. The second one either establishes you or puts you out of business. We want to stay in business.” – PMQ –

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windmillmarapr

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The secret to successful marketing is knowing who your customers are. It seems like such an obvious statement, but often is forgotten in the process of determining where your advertising dollars will be spent. Windmill Pizza Paradise in Brisbane, Australia, offers a good lesson in knowing whom your market base is and how to market to them. With a majority of their customers being young backpackers and tourists, they have focused their concept and marketing around this fact and are seeing quite a bit of success. Through selling slices, which isn’t that popular in Australia, out-ofthe-ordinary operating hours and creative marketing, they have found their market and are doing good business. Rodney and Darren Maller opened Windmill Pizza Paradise three years ago in an area of Brisbane known for its many hostels and backpackers. In all, there are six hostels

BY TOM BOYLES

within walking distance of the pizza shop. Young backpackers are known for being careful with money because many have only a set amount with which they try to get as much entertainment and travel as possible. It’s no secret that pizza is probably the most popular fast food amongst this young group. Knowing that backpackers and travelers in the area would be looking for a good deal, Rodney decided to sell slices. “These guys (backpackers) are looking for a lot of food at a small price,” Rodney says. “We decided that slices would be a great idea for a pizza shop with this kind of market. Many of these backpackers tell others about good places to eat as they travel and because we have late hours, filling slices and good food, word has spread about us in their circles. We have slices in the hot box any time our doors are open. We are open 4 p.m. to 4 a.m. Monday through Wednesday and 11:30 a.m. to 4 a.m on Thursdays. On Fridays we open at 11:30 a.m. and don’t close until 4 a.m. on Sunday. . Our customers are usually the type that stays out late and when they get hungry there aren’t too many places open to eat except us, so we get all of the business. On weekends we’re open until 6 a.m. We just don’t get enough traffic by here to justify opening in the daytime. “We usually try to keep four or five pizzas in the hot box,” he says. “The pizzas are made half-and-half, meaning half will be

meat lovers and half vegetarian along with others. We rotate through about five different pizzas and the meat lovers and supreme are the most popular, but you can never go wrong with pepperoni. All of our slices are $4 (Australian). I don’t see a need for combo meals when they will usually order a drink anyway. The great thing about it is we only have to sell three slices to get our money back. Our pizzas are 16” and if we sell the whole thing, that’s $32 (Australian). “To keep the pizzas from drying out, we keep water in the hot box. There is no need to reheat them because the display case holds them at an optimal temperature.” A lot of their business is takeaway. At night, they roll up the front doors opening the counter and display cases up to passing traffic and those walking back to hostels. Rodney and Darren are looking into remodeling some of their space and opening up more dine-in business. “There is a shift in the inner city here to and people are dining out seven nights a week,” Rodney says. “To keep up with the times and this market, we are changing with them.” MARKETING Knowing their customer base is coming from travelers, Rodney and Darren keep their marketing very localized. One of the newer forms of advertising they use is a television advertising strategy by VidEx. What they have is a television monitor in local service stations that constantly play ads for

Logoed vehicles turn an everyday drive into mobile advertising.

Windmill Pizza Paradise owner Rodney Maller 38 PMQ


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local businesses. As customers are standing in line, they watch the constant streams that are displayed. Windmill pays $200 (Australian) per month for a 30 second ad that runs every ten minutes. The ad uses food photos and images of the pizza shop, which the company helped put together for them. “The station is just around the corner and we noticed when we started using it that people were coming in saying they had just seen up on the screen in the station,” Rodney said. Windmill Pizza Paradise allocates 5 percent of sales to advertising. Of this, they also do some advertising in a circular aimed at the local community and business. They run a 1/4 page ad for $750 (Australian) per month. “Advertising is expensive here in Australia and New Zealand,” Rodney says. “But I don’t look at it as a cost, I look at it as an investment. McDonald’s spends millions on advertising, but look at how much food they sell. I also do flier drops in the neighborhood every three weeks to capture the local business, but I have other ideas too.” One of those other ideas is a plan to launch his own four-page newsletter. “Rather than me pay for my advertising, I have decided to put out a small newsletter for backpackers and include information about the area and places to see along with some ads for local businesses that would interest them. This way, other businesses pay for the advertising, and I get mine for free. When advertising is expensive, you have to come up with creative ways to get the most for your money. Another thing I am doing is a gift certificate program with local real estate companies. A lot of people are starting to move in here, and I want to be the first place they go.” It is no doubt that the backpackers and tourists in Rodney’s and Darren’s area are their bread and butter. To maximize their advertising impact, they have focused on marketing to their immediate area. Knowing their customers’ habits, such as looking for good food, and lots of it at a good price, knowing that they are nocturnal and stay out late and providing services like the newsletter, they have found a perfect formula for capturing the customers that are not familiar with the area. This can be a good lesson for any area, whether it is an industrial area, office area, strip mall or suburban area. When you know who your customers are, or should be, target your efforts on getting them and leave the rest to someone else. – PMQ – For International calls dial 011 61 2 66875400

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vincenzos

2/17/05

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VINCENZO’S

PIZZERIA By amanda johnson

Giovanni Graziosi bought Vincenzo’s Pizzeria last year when he was building his home in the small town of Ste. Julienne, Quebec. The little two person pizza operation had the potential to pull in bigger business, and Giovanni saw this because the village of 15,000 doubles in the summer months with the opening of summer homes, camps and nearby lakes. The village is also growing with 120 new building permits issued this year. The city expects the number of permits to double in the next year. Giovanni said knew the place needed work. “Compared to the other restaurants around here it was good, but the guy that owned it before was just getting by,” he said. “I bought the restaurant for $150,000, but Giovanni Graziosi brought Vincenzo’s Pizzeria last March. He is using his 17 years in the industry to expand the store as the small town of Ste. Julianne grows.

40 PMQ

what I really bought potential of the place. We’re one of two pizzerias, and three or four other restaurants. The other restaurants are only open for lunch. By being open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., we aren’t really competing against them.” By adding to the menu, raising prices and adding drivers, Giovanni has readied his pizzeria for the growth the area is seeing. He says he’s about to start expanding the place beginning with the kitchen. He also wants to add some additional seating in the dining area. EXPANDING DELIVERY Eighty percent of the business Vincenzo’s Pizzeria does in the winter months is delivery. This falls to 65 percent in the summer. With delivery being the basis of the profits, Giovanni knew he had to start here. He has gone from the one driver to five drivers. “Even if I didn’t use all the drivers at first, I knew I had to get the product out fast so that it arrived hot and fresh,” he says. CHANGING THE MENU When he bought the place, the former owner had everything paid for and didn’t need to turn a huge profit, so the prices were quite low. Giovanni came in and increased the prices of everything on the menu after evaluating the cost of the food. A large pizza was selling for $13.95. Giovanni raised the price of his large pizza to $17.95. He also took what he calls “ridiculous” specials off the menu. “The guy was giving away chicken wings, drinks and fries with a large pizza,” he says. “When there’s only two pizzerias in the town you shouldn’t be giving anything away for free.” Giovanni created two menus for his restaurant: a dine-in and a delivery menu. Since his business is mostly delivery, he decided to put four specials on the delivery menu. The first special is for two small pizzas and two orders of fries. His second special is for a medium “all dressed” pizza with an order of fries for $14.95. His third special is for a seven-inch sub sandwich with a drink and order of fries for $7.95. The best selling

special is an extra-large pizza “all dressed” with a family fry for $19.95. Giovanni says this special gives customers the fries for free. “The regular price for a extra-large “all dressed” is $19.95,” he says. “The fries are a way to say thank you.” The food cost is only 95 cents for the family size fry. GETTING THE WORD OUT To get the word out about his delivery, Giovanni has sent fliers out three times since he opened last year. His flier lists his delivery menu and specials. He distributes these through a service offered by Canada Post. They will place the fliers in all the mailboxes in his delivery area. The current list has 3,615 houses on it, he says. “My fliers go to those 3,615 houses,” he says. “It’s an expensive way of getting our name out there, but until I expand my restaurant and get a POS to track customers, I have to concentrate on making sure I reach everyone.” Each time he mails it costs him $122 to print the fliers and $388 to mail them. LUNCH SPECIALS Right now, Giovanni offers specials each day of the week to get people coming in for lunch. The $8.95 special is usually for pasta such as veal Parmesan. The special includes a cup of soup, dessert and coffee. Dine-in


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Giovanni recently added “pizza dough” subs to his menu. He says people are buying them because they cost more, but they cost him less than the sub bread he buys from a local baker.

accounts for about 5 percent of Giovanni’s business, mostly because his dining area is so small. He says that his lunch business will get better once he expands the dining room. He plans to expand to 60 seats. Giovanni’s menu is wide ranging with about 15 pizzas and 15 subs plus salads, hamburgers, hotdogs and assorted salads and sandwiches. For the pizzas, which account for about 60 percent of his sales, there are set recipes. He says that this is something unique to Quebec. “All the restaurants I’ve owned and eaten at have done it that way,” he says. “The only people who

build the pizzas per topping are the American chains like Domino’s, Little Caesars and Pizza Hut.” “PIZZA DOUGH” SUBS Something else Giovanni says is unique to Quebec is the way they cook their subs. “We sauté the pepperoni, the onions and green peppers on the subs,” he says. “Then we add the cheese and bread and grill. The subs are served open-faced with lettuce and tomato.” Giovanni recently added a new type of sub bread made from pizza dough that customers love. “With the pizza dough, I make a wider

skin and cut it in half,” he says. The two pieces of dough are grilled and prepared just the same as his other subs. The interesting thing is he charges more for the pizza dough subs, even though they cost less than the bread he gets from a local baker. “People started buying them because they cost more,” he says. “They said it must be better if it cost more.” To promote the new subs, he put a line on his menu calling attention to the fact that they were new. He also trained his waitresses to ask if they want pizza dough or sub bread when taking orders. He sells the “pizza dough” subs for one to two dollars more. For the seven-inch, he charges $1 more; for the 10-inch sub he charges $1.50 more and for the 14-inch sub he charges $2 more. VINCENZO’S FUTURE Giovanni is working on a low-fat menu to combat the little competition he does have from Subway. He wants to do this to retain the more health conscious customers of today. As the town of Ste. Julienne grows, Giovanni is focusing on “being in the right place at the right time.” He knows that more restaurants will come as the village grows, but “customers will be used to your taste, your pizza and your service. The marketing point of view comes down to that: give good service and quality products.” – PMQ –

For International calls dial 00111-989-739-3660

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barmarketingmarapr

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H S E E C R

raising bar sales in your pizzeria By Amanda Johnson

Some of you probably offer some sort of alcohol in your store. We’ve got a two part series to help you better market your bar offerings and to help you with inventory. In this first installment, Robert Plotkin, president of Bar Media, will offer six tips that can help you increase your alcohol sales 25 to 35 percent. Let’s get started. BEHIND THE BAR There are three key areas you need to focus on from an operations standpoint if you want to increase your bar sales: the back bar, house recipes and glassware. Here are some simple ways to make these basic parts of your bar more marketable. YOUR BACK BAR The back bar is the primary marketing device a restaurant or bar owner has, according to Robert. “It sends out so many marketing messages,” he says. “The operator needs to understand that appreciate its importance operationally and as a marketing device.” There are three things you need to do to maximize your back bar: 1. Delete dead stock. Anything you have back there that has been sitting for six to nine months needs to leave, Robert says. If you have a product that’s not popular or just isn’t hitting, such as blackberry brandy or root beer schnapps, take it down.

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It’s just taking up valuable space. You only have a limited amount of space to merchandise products, so only devote it to what people are buying. “For the last ten years, Americans have been drinking less because of concerns over DWIs, health issues and general tendencies away from alcohol,” Robert says. That leads us to the next tip. 2. Offer the “good stuff.” You need to go through your liquors on your back bar and make a list of what you are serving. “Americans are saying, ‘Let’s drink the good stuff,’” Robert says. “Consumption of distilled spirits is on a five-year upward trend. Beer is flat. Wine is creeping forward. Life’s too short to drink cheap tequila.” Robert recommends dropping the cheap items off your shelves, and make sure you are offering the best of each type of spirit. “When somebody sits down and says, ‘I love vodkas, what do you have?’ you want to offer them the best,” he says. “If you’re going to play the game, you have to have the good stuff.” 3. Put good liquors in your well. Robert says the guideline here should be, if the owner or the manager wouldn’t drink it, why would you serve it to your guests. He recommends at least pouring the Jim Beams, Bacardis and Smirnoffs and charge an extra 25 to 50 cents to cover costs. “You’re going to make more money per drink and take care of your guests,” he says. “You’re going to serve them a legitimate drink: a Bacardi and Coke as opposed to a Walgreen’s rum and Coke.” HOUSE RECIPES Next, you need to focus on your house recipes. Robert says the best thing you can do is go up to your customers and say, “I’m the owner of this place. Let me buy you a couple of drinks and ask you what it is that you like.” You can’t get any better ideas for your recipes than from listening to your customers. The most popular drink in

America is the margarita, Robert says. “If you look at the margarita as an example of drinking tendencies and how operators should approach specialty drinks, it would be my advice to offer the very best margarita as the house margarita that you can.” There are two areas to look at when it comes to making a great house drink such as a margarita: 1. Liquor—As said before, use the good stuff. For a margarita, use something like 1800 or Sauza Hornitos. Instead of using triple sec, Robert recommends using something like Grand Marnier or Cointreau. 2. Mixers—Sweet ‘n’ Sour mix is the most used mixer in alcoholic drinks. Yours should taste good on its own. There shouldn’t be a chemical taste to it. GLASSWARE The last thing you need to look at behind the bar is your glassware. What you want to avoid is only buying thin glasswares that break easily. “They do nothing to enhance the look of a drink,” Robert says. “One of the biggest marketing advantages a bar has is spending a little extra to get glasses that have a little heft, some weight to them, that look good, that are heat tempered and are durable enough to last more than two nights.” Think about it, the better the glass looks, the better the drink is going to look. You have two options when it comes to portraying your drink. You can raise your price a little to cover


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specialty drinks. your best or second bestseller in the house. the cost of a great 3. While you are You also want the servers and bartenders to glass give the working out which make these the recommendations they tell drink a look of drinks are to be your customers about. That leads to another term quality worth every specialties on those you need to know, “signature drink.” red cent, or you can three menus, it’s imporRobert recommends taking one or two of stick to your current tant to list your wines and your specialty drinks and making them your pricing structure and beers and sizes you offer. signature offering. “A signature drink requires portray it as a great deal 4. If you are planning on offering a higher degree of commitment, more proby making it look better. “Either food in your bar area, you need to make duction value,” he says. “The house is saying tactic is market-worthy,” Robert says. that part of your menu. The back cover or ‘We do a lot of things well, but this is unique “That 50 cents extra a drink you charge covside of the menu is a good place to put to us. This is as unique to us as our signaers the cost of the enhanced glass after two these dishes. ture. We have a lot at stake in this, invested a drinks. You’ve got heat-tempered glasses that 5. You want your menu to be as visual as lot of ourselves in this and this is our personlasts forever; it’s just strong management.” possible. Once you’ve decided on your specialal commitment to you.’ Today, I think conIN FRONT OF THE BAR ty drinks you will want to take pictures of them sumers are looking for and responding to There are three things you need to do and incorporate them into the menu. Robert personal commitments.” from a marketing standpoint to increase your says this can be done on an amateur basis to Once you’ve established your signature bar sales. They are create a bar menu, put cut costs. Take your own photos, take it to a drink or drinks, you need to shout it from the your best sellers on table tents and use wipeplace such as Kinko’s and have them done up rooftops on your bar, tables and from your off boards to display specials. in color. Most often, places like Kinko’s can servers. Here’s an example: Somebody sits BAR MENU help you with the design. down. The bartender says, “So, what would “Everyone from bowling centers to pizze6. Make sure your staff is trained to make you like this evening.” The customer says, rias to Italian restaurants should have a bar the drinks as they appear in the picture. You “Well, umm…” That is the moment of menu,” Robert says. “It’s easy to do. The want to live up to your promise. action, Robert says. “That hesitation is the basics are easily achieved. You don’t have to TABLE TENTS sales window. The bartender says, ‘Well, spend a ton of money to create it. Just insti“Whatever sales you want to drive, put it while you’re thinking about it, you can look tuting it will drive your sales up 25 to 35 peron a table tent,” Robert says, “and that will be at our menu, but let me just recommend, cent.” A menu gives you the opportunity to money-back guarantee, our make a recommendation to your two signature drinks: the customers when you or your staff Napoli Bellini and the pizano can’t have face time with them. margarita. Fabulous drinks.’ Robert says the average American The guy comes back and what will spend 20 seconds looking at with Pizzamatic Portion Control Equipment do you think they are probably the menu, and he offered these going to buy?” tips for creating your menu: 1. Create your menu on light colWIPE-OFF BOARDS Save time and labor ored paper, and laminate it for These are everywhere Multi-slice Ensure consistency extra durability. from delis to bars. Robert says Pizza Cutter User friendly 2. Put no more than six specialty you should have daily specials drinks on your menu. How do you in your bar like you see at Quick, easy clean-up! do that? First, we need to define lunchtime. “They’re not passé; *Traditional Wedge or “specialty” drink. A specialty drink they’re good point of purSquare slice cutters is offered everywhere, Robert chase,” he says. Specials on a available says. “Almost every beverage wipe-off board give the idea operation now offers specialty that you are willing to give your drinks. They’re ubiquitous.” What patrons a good deal. Plus, it’s you need to do is identify six just another place to get what drinks that are good sellers in you want to sell a lot of into the your restaurant. You’ll want to minds of customers. have some variety as well. You If you follow the three probably want to offer a margaripoints behind the bar and the ta, a frozen drink and something three points in front of the bar, for after dinner. The best way to you’re going to increase your define your specialty drinks is to sales, Robert says. “You can’t REDUCE COSTS AND ADD PROFITS! experiment with three different help it; you just can’t help it,” CALL TODAY! 1-888-749-9279 menus over six months. Put one he says. “How much? I’m saymenu out for the first two months, ing minimally 25 to 35 percent. 130 E. 168th St. For International calls dial 00111-888-749-9279 South Holland, IL 60473 the second out for the next two You have to be in a coma not to Tel: 708-331-0660 months and the third the last two get those results.” Fax: 708-331-0663 – PMQ – months. Track what your two or www.pizzamaticusa.com three bestsellers are for those info@pizzamaticusa.com three menus. These become your

Perfect Pizzas Every Time!

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barmarketingmarapr

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saladrevision

2/17/05

5:25 PM

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BY FRANCIE BROWN

We’ve discussed adding additional entrees, appetizers and desserts to a traditional pizza menu, but this is PMQ’s comprehensive report on salads. You’ll learn things to take into consideration for controlling the food cost, how to clean them and how to position them on your menu. Salads, like appetizers and additional entrees are a great revenue booster. Salads give adults a healthy alternative to the less calorie-friendly pizza. First things first: you have to decide what kind(s) of salad you’re going to sell. If it’s a green-based salad, the next logical step is to decide between buying the whole veggie or buying already-cut and bagged veggies (also known as “fresh cut” produce). The pros and cons for both sides are fairly obvious. You can buy head lettuce wholesale and cut it yourself for fairly cheap. Fresh-cut lettuce, while a little bit more expensive, also cuts out several other steps. Kikkoman’s Chicken Soba Salad Photo courtesy of Kikkoman

46 PMQ

SALADS

“Fresh cut lettuce is a labor saving product as well as a sanitary alternative,” Jerry Welcome, president of the International Fresh-cut Produce Association, said. “It really does minimize labor cost and heightens overall safety. Not only are you not having to wash and dry it, but you’re taking knives out of the hands of your employees, cutting back on the risk of an on-the-job injury.” FOOD COST Figuring out food cost on salads can be a bit tricky. It’s not as cut and dry as measuring out products for pizza. For one, you have to take into account the cost of all of your ingredients. Are you using whole veggies or fresh cut produce? For fresh cut, expect to pay a bit more, but it just about evens out because you’re not having to pay for the labor it would take to slice, clean and dry the lettuce. Jerry said that the cost of fresh cut lettuce is less than it once was. “It’s so prevalent now that the cost has come down a bit,” Jerry said. CLEANING SALADS If you buy fresh produce, you’ll need to wash it to remove any dirt or unwanted contaminants from the produce. Once your salads are clean, you then have the problem of drying your lettuce. I can almost hear the question going through your heads: “What? Dry lettuce? Whatever for??” Well, you should simply because it extends the shelf life. According to Jerry, if dried and kept in the right environment (read more about this under Buffets), your lettuce can last up to 14 days. An added bonus is that drying can enhance your salad dressing. Wet lettuce dilutes your salad dressing: rather than thick, creamy ranch dressing or zesty Italian, the dressing is diluted and can’t stick to your lettuce.

SALAD SPINNERS To dry salad, you can do one of several things. First, you can hand dry with a paper towel. This, however, is a very labor-intensive method, besides being impractical for drying large quantities. Another, more practical way is to invest in something called a salad spinner, which allows you to dry lettuce using centrifugal force. The lettuce is “spun” to throw the water from the leaves. If you’re not planning on producing many salads in a day, you can go with a home version, which is slightly smaller and usually hand propelled. The manual spinners range in size from one gallon to nine gallons. Hand propelled methods include a crank spinner, pull cord spinner and pump spinner. A crank spinner is the oldest and probably cheapest method. The lid has a crank that attaches to the basket. When you turn the crank, the basket turns, throwing out water. The second method, a pull cord spinner, works like your child’s pull-string toys. When you pull the string, it spins. The third and newest version works like a top. You push the pump and it spins. When you want it to stop, you push a break button.

Using a salad spinner, such as this crankstyle, is a quick, effective way to dry lettuce.


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TYPES OF LETTUCE Lettuce comes in four main types of leaves. A fifth one, called stem lettuce, is gaining in popularity. BUTTERHEAD—(Includes Boston and Bibb lettuce) Lettuce with relatively soft leaves in a loose head; easily broken or bruised.

CRISPHEAD—(Includes Iceberg and Cabbage lettuce) Lettuce with crisp tightly packed light-green leaves in a firm head. LOOSE-LEAF—(Includes Leaf lettuce) Lettuce with loosely curled leaves that do not form a compact head.

COS—(includes Romaine lettuce) Lettuce with long dark-green leaves in a loosely packed elongated head.

STEM—Lettuce valued especially for its edible stems.

If you feel that you’ll be producing too much salad to use a smaller salad spinner, industrial spinners do exist, about the size of a washing machine. However, depending on the popularity of your salads, they may not be priced right to justify buying one. BUFFETS Buffets can be a demon to deal with. Like the common pizza buffet question, “should you or should you not,” you have to cross that river when it comes. Yes, buffets draw a crowd, but how do you control your food costs? Since salads are not very filling and people that order one in a pizzeria usually do so as an appetizer or side item, the food cost on a buffet probably wouldn’t skyrocket like a pizza buffet might.

Your biggest problem with a salad buffet will be preventing spoilage. Jerry said that to ensure the maximum life span (12-14 days), you need to make sure that the cold chain is never broken. The cold chain begins within a couple of hours after the product has been picked or cut. The processor/distributor refrigerates it down to between 34˚F and 38˚F. If handled correctly, the temperature of the lettuce never gets above 38˚F. Once it comes to you, whether you wash and cut it yourself or buy fresh cut, you’ll refrigerate it as well. Closed in refrigerators have no problem maintaining this temperature; however, depending on your equipment, you might have a few issues keeping the salad at the optimal temperature while on display in your dining area.

Since salads are not very filling and people that order one in a pizzeria usually do so as an appetizer or side item, the food cost on a buffet probably wouldn’t skyrocket like a pizza buffet might.

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TYPES OF SALADS The following is a quick reference to fairly common salads. As with salad dressings, we recommend that you play with the recipe and come up with something unique to your restaurant. You can also check out the salad recipes posted on PMQ at http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/ pizzacookbook/recipe.cgi?action=view_ category&category=Soups+and+Salads.

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad Photo courtesy of My Pizza Promo

CAESAR SALAD—Romaine lettuce with a garlic vinaigrette dressing. COBB SALAD—Chicken or turkey, bacon, hard cooked eggs, tomatoes, avocado, cheddar cheese and lettuce. Served with crumbled blue cheese and vinaigrette dressing. CRAB LOUIE/LOUIS SALAD—Crab legs, tomatoes, hard-cooked eggs, cucumber, avocado, olives and lettuce, though the recipe varies from region to region. COLESLAW—Shredded cabbage mixed with mayonnaise and a variety of ingredients. PANZANELLA—Bread, tomatoes, vegetables, including peppers, cucumbers and onions. Garlic, capers, black olives and anchovies are added to the salad.

Be sure to check out PMQ’s Recipe Bank online for these salad recipes and many others.

MENU POSITION Salads are such a great healthy alternative to pizza that you should handle how they’re positioned on your menu carefully. You can offer it as a meal, a side item, an appetizer or any combination of the three. Gregg Rapp, menu consultant, said that placing the salad correctly is important so as not to hurt sales of your entrees. “Most people like to see salads to the left side of the menu,” Gregg said. “Sometimes a restaurant will go in and put the appetizer section on the right side, but that’s the best spot for your entrees. Just keep it where it’s noticeable but also towards the beginning of the menu.” Soups can add a punch to your salad menu by offering a soup/salad combo.

SALAD NICOISE—Potatoes, green beans, mixed greens, garlic, tomatoes, anchovies, black olives, capers and lemon juice.

To speed up to-go orders, you can prepackage basic salads like this and add any extras as needed.

SALAD OLIVIER—Potatoes with chicken, pickles, green peas, carrots and mayonnaise. WALDORF SALAD—Fruit salad that usually consists of apples, lemon juice, celery, walnuts and mayonnaise. POTATO SALAD—Potatoes flavored with mayonnaise, mustard, salt and pepper— occasionally adds celery and onions.

Salads can include more than traditional lettuce-based mixtures. Antipasto, beans, potatoes and pasta salads are other options, too. Black Bean Salad Photo courtesy of United Soybean Board

BEAN SALAD—Different kinds of beans and garden vegetables. PASTA SALAD—Pastas, pickles, mayonnaise, occasionally vegetables. Recipes vary from restaurant to restaurant, but are actually the easiest to add and integrate to a pizzeria’s menu, given that many pizzerias already offer some sort of pasta dish. TUNA SALAD—Tuna, mayonnaise and seasoned with various herbs. 48 PMQ

You also need to think carefully about the description of the salad you include in your menu. “The more you say in the salad section, the more important it seems to the customer,” Gregg said. “So don’t just list a house salad. Tell them what’s in the salad. The more you tell about it in the description, the more value you’re giving it and the more you’ll sell.” Even if you’re going to offer a salad as an entrée, it should still be positioned on the left of the menu. If priced right, you can make more money per person on an entrée salad than you will per person on a pizza (the salad will be eaten by one person, whereas the pizza is usually split between several people). An entrée salad is a great way to add to your takeout business and profit to an individual order. SOUP UP YOUR SALAD Make your normal, everyday salad great just by adding in some “extras.” Look into things like lettuce mixes and adding chicken


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For International calls dial 00111-937-312-1277


saladrevision

2/18/05

2:13 AM

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or ham cubes. Lettuce mixes give customers a little bit of and adding meat ups the stomach-filling quality of the salad as well as allowing you to up the price on the item. Other things that are fairly easy to add— and add up—are bacon and cheese for extra flavor and chowmein and sunflower seeds for a little extra crunch. Chopped, boiled eggs and shredded carrots, while not hard to do are that little extra effort on your part that customers love. SALAD DRESSING AND TOMATOES Owner’s need to remember additional costs that go with salads, namely dressings. There are a wide variety of kinds and brands

of dressings, each with a loyal following. You’re going to want a few different dressings for your customers’ choice. The most common are ranch, Thousand Island, blue cheese, honey mustard and Italian dressings. But take it one step further. Rather than just offering a straight version, personalize it for your store and add some spices or other flavors so that customers can only get your dressing at your restaurant. If you offer to deliver your salads or offer them “to-go,” you also have to look into prepackaging salad dressings. You can personally fill a container with dressing or take a look at bought prepackaged salad dressing.

You wouldn’t want to just put a blob of salad dressing because it shortens the shelf life of your salad. The easiest way to do this is to buy the salad dressing already in individualized packets. McDonalds does this with Newman’s Own dressing for their salads. It can just sit in the same container as the salad without doing any harm to the overall quality. You can also use small sauce cups with lids to package your bulk dressings. There are a few other things to keep in mind. One is the addition of tomatoes. Should you decide to offer pre-prepared salads instead of a buffet, Jerry recommends not putting cut tomatoes on the salad. “Tomatoes have a different life span than lettuce,” Jerry said. “If there’s the possibility of them being on the salad longer than two hours, I wouldn’t put them on.” One thing that you can do is to use cherry tomatoes instead of regular slice tomatoes. As you can see, there are quite a few choices to consider. Take your time and do your homework: ask your local distributor what problems you’d have to overcome on that side and do some research on what types would work best for you. – PMQ –

OTHER TYPES OF INGREDIENTS ARUGULA—(also known as rocket, roquette, rugula and rucola) Leaf-like, peppery plant. CHICORY—(Also known as endive or curly endive) A loose bunch of ragged-edged leaves on long stems. ESCAROLE—Loose, elongated heads and broad wavy leaves with smooth edges. MACHE—(Also known as lamb's lettuce, field salad and corn salad) Leaves are fingerlike and velvety. MESCLUN—(typically baby spinach, radicchio, arugula, mache and mizuni) A variable mixture of greens. RADICCHIO—Resembles a small head of red cabbage with leaves in shades of green, red and white—usually used to garnish the salad. For International calls dial 00111-480-497-4004

SPINACH—Dark green leaves; eaten cooked or raw. WATERCRESS—Masses of pungent darkgreen sprigs.

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SALAD Resources Company

Type of Product

Phone

Fax

Website

Email

A. Camacho, Inc.

olives, olive oil, pepperoncini, jalapeno peppers, banana peppers, capers, etc. olive oil, salad/cooking oils salad bars, sneeze guards meats, oils, salad dressings, vegetables, peppers, tomatoes, vinegar, fruits, croutons fruits, vegetables, mushrooms, tomatoes meats potatoes, carrots, beans, spinach, other processed/ grilled/fully-cooked vegetables salad oils, olive oils fresh avocados peaches, tomatoes

813-305-4534

813-305-4546

www.acamacho-usa.com

info@acamacho-usa.com

800-691-1106 800-762-7565 925-472-8700

901-381-3067 305-623-0475 925-472-8709

www.achfood.com/ www.atlasfoodserv.com www.bellissimofoods.com

information@achfood.com sales@atlasfoodserv.com info@bellissimofoods.com

212-837-9423

212-797-1291

n/a

n/a

866-824-6403 908-604-2100

631-454-4896 908-604-0757

n/a www.bonduelle.com

lmaples@bmwmeats.com bond.inc@bonduelle.com

800-828-0800 949-341-1955 209-869-9300

815-929-8081 949-341-1970 209-869-9060

www.bungefoods.com www.avocado.org www.calfruittom.com

BNA.comm@bunge.com segcom@ix.netcom.com mporetti@calfruittom.com

201-587-0101 858-558-9662

201-587-2040 858-597-4282

n/a www.chickenofthesea.com

riapoce@camerican-foods.com n/a

610-268-3033 800-423-9487

610-268-0479 214-303-3499

www.countryfreshmushrooms.com www.deanfoods.com

mreed@countryfreshmushrooms.com www.deanfoods.com/contact/contact.asp

800-723-9868

818-874-4535

www.dolefoodservice.com

www.dolefoodservice.com/contact.html

800-578-9524 800-267-7794

320-968-6490 877-668-6623

www.dmeats.com www.dynamicmixers.com

info@dmeats.com info@dynamicmixers.com

800-651-2711 800-486-2201 773-890-0600

916-638-9961 724-335-2216 773-890-1680

www.englishmfg.com www.emberfarms.com www.fontanini.com

Sales@englishmfg.com customerservice@northsidefoods.com ericd@fontanini.com

800-348-2255 800-330-5715 800-622-3055 410-732-8488

805-240-1932 610-926-7012 502-636-3904 410-563-4372

www.gillsonions.com www.giorgiofoods.com www.gfgb.com www.imperofoods.com

petershore@gillsonions.com lbortz@giorgiofoods.com shirleym@gfgb.com imperofoods@imperofoods.com

800-892-3622

800-838-6902

www.instawares.com

www.instawares.com/ContactUsForm.asp

703-299-6282

703-299-6288

www.fresh-cuts.org

jwelcome@fresh-cuts.org

888-556-BRAT 800-944-0600

330-342-0080 415-956-7760

www.johnsonville.com www.kikkoman-usa.com

cresnick@johnsonville.com www.kikkoman-usa.com/general/feedback.asp

ACH Food Companies, Inc. Atlas Metal Industries Bellissimo Foods

Berns and Koppenstien BMW Meat Company Bonduelle Group

Bunge Oils, Inc. California Avocado Commission California Fruit And Tomato Kitchens Camerican International fruits, vegetables, meats Chicken of the Sea International packed tuna, salmon, shrimp, crab, other seafood Country Fresh Mushrooms Co. fresh mushrooms Dean Foods Company dressings, sauces, pickles, sour cream, etc. Dole Food Company, Inc. fresh/packaged fruits, fresh vegetables, salad mixes Dombrovski Meats Co. meats Dynamic International, Ltd. salad spinners, manual vegetable cutters English Mfg., Inc. sneeze guards Ember Farms sausages Fontanini/Capitol Italian meats and sausage Wholesale Meats Company Gills Onions fresh red and yellow onions Giorgio Foods, Inc. mushrooms Golden Foods/Golden Brands soybean and cottonseed oils Impero Foods and Meats, Inc. beans, canned fruits, pickles, olives, mushrooms, pasta, dressings, meats, seafood, etc. Instawares salad spinners, manual vegetable cutters International Fresh-Cut freshcut lettuce Produce Association Johnsonville Sausage sausages Kikkoman International Inc. soy sauce, asain sauces/bases

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SALAD Resources Company

Type of Product

Phone

Fax

Website

Email

Knouse Foods Co-op, Inc.

applesauce, apple cider vinegar, apples, cherry topping soy products, meatless products, sauces, dressings olives, capers, cocktail onions, pimientos dressings, dips, sauces salad bars packaged broccoli, carrots, snow peas, romaine hearts, vegetable mixes fresh/processed mushrooms olives fresh onions condiments, fruit toppings, garlic sauce, oils, salad dressings, vinegar, sauce canned fruits,artichokes dressings, sauces, toppings, dips pears, plums, cherries

717-677-8181

717-677-7069

www.knouse.com

www.knouse.com/index.cfm?do=contactform

800-835-5006

620-663-7195

www.pmsfoods.com

sales@legacyfoods.com

800-252-3557

925-284-1954

www.lindsayolives.com

contactus@bellcarter.com

800-669-3169 770-478-8803 831-783-1200

208-263-7821 770-471-3715 831-422-5171

www.litehousefoods.com www.lowtempind.com www.mannpacking.com

www.litehousefoods.com/html/contact_email.asp

831-763-5336 800-523-9828 970-353-5895 800-765-1950

831-763-0700 209-836-0518 970-353-5897 404-765-9016

www.montmush.com www.olives.com www.onions-usa.org www.naturallyfresh.com

carlfields@montmush.com Sales@olives.com info@onions-usa.org www.naturallyfresh.com/Contactus.htm

800-291-3862

360-696-3411

www.neiljonesfoodcompanies.com sales@nwpacking.com

sausages

301-927-5388

301-927-8750

n/a

wendyhenson@nickssausage.com

pickles, peppers, relishes, sauces bacon, meats olives, olive oils, pasta, artichokes, pepperoncini, giardiniera, balsamic vinegar, etc. meats, pasta sausages, meats Italian beef and sausage olives vegetables and blends, pasta blends, potatoes, avocados, fruit oils pork meats mushrooms, sauces dressings, dips, sauces, croutons soy products, meatless products pineapples, mushrooms sauces, spices, dressings soybean products salad kits/mixes, onions, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots, etc bacon/canadian bacon, olives, salad dressing, sauces

866-521-3380 800-486-6900 800-909-OLIVE

413-665-7153 414-744-4213 n/a

www.oxfordfoods.com www.patrickcudahy.com www.ronsonfoods.com

www.oxfordfoods.com/contact.html www.patrickcudahy.com/contact-us.html jim@ronsonfoods.com

888-767-4621 800-352-7224 312-944.3567 262-970-0301 800-572-7783

716-668-1132 510-352-4100 312-988-9483 262-970-0307 208-384-8016

www.rosina.com www.saags.com www.scalasbeef.com www.sevilleimports.com www.simplotfoods.com

www.rosina.com/Corporate.htm www.saags.com/contact/ www.scalasbeef.com/contact_us.html info@sevilleimports.com traci.odonnell@simplot.com

61 03 9898 8370 800-860-6777 610-444-5820 614-846-2232 800-325-7108 949-975-9900 774-313-0096 206-285-2222 800-968-2203

61 03 9899 0318 330-430-5658 610-444-8477 614-842-4187 314-982-2461 949-975-9907 508-743-0941 206-270-4656 405-895-6596

n/a www.sugardalefoods.com www.sunnydell.com www.marzetti.com www.solae.com/ www.greatgiantpineapple.com www.unifine.com www.talksoy.com www.vaughanfoods.com

sparr@optushome.com.au amontague@freshmark.com gary@sunnydell.com www.marzetti.com/contactus/index.cfm www.solae.com/company/contactusform.html n/a information@unifine.com info@talksoy.com sales@vaughanfoods.com

800-293-9783

402-691-8800

www.westinfoods.com

betty@westinfoods.com

Legacy Foods LLC Lindsay Olive Compay/ Bell-Carter Litehouse Low Temp Industries, Inc. Mann's Sunny Shores

Monterey Mushrooms, Inc. Musco Family Olive Co. National Onion Association Naturally Fresh, Inc.

Neil Jones Food Companies (Pacific Breeze) (Perfect Pouch) (Oregon Trail) Nick's Sausage Co./ Ferrante Brothers Oxford Foods Patrick Cudahy Ron Son Foods, Inc.

Rosina Food Products, Inc. Saag's Specialty Meats Scala Packing Co. Inc. Seville Imports, Inc. Simplot Food Group

Sparr Trading Company Pty Ltd Sugardale Foods, Inc. Sunny Dell Foods T. Marzetti Company The Solae Company Transpacific Foods Inc. Unifine United Soybean Board Vaughan Foods Westin Foods

lt@lowtempind.com www.mannpacking.com/contact.asp

For Pasta and Cheese Resource Guides, Go To: Pasta: http://www.pmq.com/pasta_infocenter.shtml Cheese: http://www.pmq.com/cheeseman.html

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incrediblepizza

2/17/05

5:33 PM

Page 1

With Chuck E. Cheese a top 25 pizzeria and current king of the hill of child-targeting pizzerias, you might wonder who could ever dethrone them. There is actually a pizzeria that’s on the edge of taking Chuck E. Cheese by storm. With a combination of incredible ideas and incredible fun, the Incredible Pizza Company just might have what it takes to become king of the hill.

54 PMQ

Through games, food and events, Incredible Pizza uses birthday parties, prizes, “credit cards,” lock-ins and more for some incredible marketing. Never heard of the Incredible Pizza Company? Maybe you haven’t heard of them yet, but they’re coming. Incredible Pizza Company is an all-inclusive, familyoriented pizzeria that incorporates fun and games into its overall theme, all under one roof. Rick Barsness, owner of Incredible Pizza Company said that with their selection of arcade games, gokarts, miniature golf, bumper cars, simulators and bowling they’re shooting for an age group slightly older than Chuck E. Cheese. They renovate old Wal-Marts, K-Marts and grocery stores because the square footage that’s required for the restaurant. “The weather actually helps us,” Rick says, laughing. “If it’s cold or

raining or someone just wants to escape the heat, being indoors gives them a respite from the elements.” Check them out online at www.incrediblepizza.com. GRAND OPENING Once the building is completely renovated, they have a two-night grand opening where they invite members of the community to come try the buffet for free along with free play on the games. On the first night, they bring in construction workers, pastors and families to test their system and work out glitches. On the second night, they invite Chamber of Commerce members, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and other non-profit organizations


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Incredible Pizza founder Rick Barsness

www.pmq.com 55


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This was the scene at the grand opening of the Springfield Incredible Pizza Company. Hundreds of families crowded the entrance, ready to experience the food, games and retro atmosphere of Incredible Pizza. First-year sales on the Springfield IPC topped $5.3 million.

Birthday parties are a big part of business at Incredible Pizza. Each location has between five and 12 private rooms and hosts about 150 parties per week.

to test the equipment again. “By the end of our opening, we have 8,500 people walking around the community and saying good things about our business before we’re even open to the public,” Rick said. PIZZA AND GAMES Incredible Pizza Company centers around one central theme: 1950s fun. Everything in the restaurant is reminiscent of the ‘50s, from the four themed dining areas to the clothes the employees wear. The dining areas include a 1950s diner, a drive-in movie theater-themed area, the kid-favorite gymnasium decorated for a sock hop and the adultfavorite Leave-it-to-Beaver family room dining area. “The gym is a lot of fun, really busy and noisy so the kids like it,” Rick said. “The family room area is a lot quieter. Parents and grandparents inevitably find their way back to that room to sit in peace and quiet.” According to Rick, the most unique thing about Incredible Pizza Company is that most of the people that come in the restaurant are there for the food. While they’re there, the customers are likely to play the games, but half of the sales are in pizza. In true buffet56 PMQ

style, the customer is offered every pizza imaginable. There’s also a bakery that offers deserts and pasta. The pizzas only stay on the buffet about 12 minutes and if a customer wants a pizza that’s not there, it will be made for them and within six minutes, delivered to their table. The percentage of revenues from food versus entertainment is about 50/50, with a food cost of 30 percent and a labor cost of 25 percent. While the games may not be what draws customers, they offer a great chance at additional revenue. Besides a wide variety of arcade-type games and ticket games, Incredible Pizza also has a sampling of family games, including miniature golf, go-karts, bumper cars and even bowling alleys in some of the stores, all designed to add to the store’s revenues. Rick said that they work closely with their insurance company to cover their bases legally. They spend between $200,000 and $300,000 annually on training and a lot of that training has to do with safety. Insurance requires them to have daily inspections on a lot of the riding games

According to founder Rick Barsness, the main attraction at Incredible Pizza is the awesome buffet-style food.

such as the go-karts and bumper cars. A log has to be kept on every car for the maintenance done to each car. BIRTHDAY PARTIES Birthday parties are big business at Incredible Pizza. Depending on the locations, each restaurant has between five and 12 private party rooms and hosts about 150 birthday parties a week. When a child chooses Incredible Pizza as the place for their party, they’re well rewarded. The party deals start at $8 per child for a minimum of 10 children. That $8 includes the buffet, drinks and $5 on their Incredible


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Another of the big attractions at Incredible Pizza is the go-kart track. The go-karts bring in around $10,000 each week.

Credit Card for fairground play. See below for more information on the credit card. Each party also receives invitations, a helium balloon bouquet, and the all-important “I’m Incredible” sticker. “With the party deal, the birthday child gets a huge smiley face sticker that says “It's my birthday and I'm Incredible,” Rick said. “Our employees are trained so that when they see that sticker, they recognize them. A sampling of birthday goodies from Incredible Pizza. Pink stickers for girls, blue for boys, and an Incredible Credit Card. Money is put on the card at the time of purchase and is used to play the games. Barcodes and computer programs within the games track how much money and how many prize tickets a person has.

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They wish them a happy birthday, they bring the child to the front of the line and they get to pick out their own prizes—just all kinds of special treats for that person, because it’s their birthday.” PRIZES AND INCREDIBLE CREDIT CARDS To play the games, customers purchase an Incredible Credit Card when they walk in the door. Customers can put any amount of money on the card. When you get ready to play a game, you scan your card and the amount of the game is deducted. If the game awards tickets redeemable for prizes, customers can store their tickets on the card. The card has two barcodes on it. How much money a customer has is tracked on one; the amount of tickets that have been won is tracked on the other. Customers can choose to cash in tickets

immediately for smaller prizes, or store them for a bigger, better prize. “We offer just about anything you could want as prizes,” Rick said. “Stereos, VCRs, CD players, toys, backpacks and iPods to name a few. You name it, and we probably offer it as a prize.” For more information on how games can help your revenue, read Choo Choo Charlie's: Redemption Games Have A Powerful Pull at www.pmq.com/mag/2002fall/games.shtml. The games mainly come from Brady Distributing out of Charlotte, North Carolina, but have to be altered in order to read the cards for a cost of about $250,000 total. Each game has a computer program that ties it into the main POS system and keeps track of each person’s money and tickets. COMMUNITY EVENTS IPC is very involved in the community. Aside from sponsoring the regular little league teams, soccer teams and the local YMCA, they also invite nonprofit organizations like the Boys and Girls Clubs, foster children and the women’s shelter to come to the restaurant allowing those less fortunate to have an incredible time. Besides the charity events, they also host different


incrediblepizza

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The International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions (IAAPA) named the Incredible Pizza Company in Tulsa, Oklahoma as one of only five companies worldwide to receive the prestigious Top Family Entertainment Center of the World award. Rick and wife Cheryl are seen below accepting this award. The IAAPA’s awards program is designed for the purpose of recognizing the global industry’s best family entertainment centers. Winners are selected through a comprehensive judging process that measures operational efficiency, decor and ambience, marketing savvy and managerial performance.

competitions throughout the week. They also have miniature golf championships and karaoke nights. “The kids are just great to watch with the microphones,” Rick said. “During karaoke, we give away free game play or tickets to everyone that gets up to sing. They can sing anything they want as long as it’s kid friendly— the lyrics have to be clean.” LOCK-INS Aside from parties, lock-ins are the next big money maker at Incredible Pizza. According to Rick, they have two versions of the lock-in: a miniature version and a fulllength version. The shorter one starts at 11 at night and goes until 2 in the morning. For $10 per child, the child gets a $10 game card, access to the buffet and drinks. The children usually bring extra money for once the card is empty. The longer version of the lock-in goes from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. and costs $20 per kid for one game of mini-golf, one time in the bumper cars and one go-kart or simulator experience. For both lengths, Incredible Pizza requires one counselor/chaperone for every 10 students and a 100-person minimum. Outside of the lock-ins, they also regularly host something called Project Graduation where parents and youth groups rent out the entire building for the night to give kids a clean, safe place to go on their graduation night. 60 PMQ


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Interested in opening an Incredible Pizza franchise? Here are some of the costs associated with it. Cost to renovate the building: 3 to $7 million Time required to renovate: Five to seven months Franchise fees: $50,000 initially, 5 percent of sales a month For additional fees, parent company will build and/or bring people in to manage the store Average sales for each of the 35 Incredible Pizza stores already opened: $5-9 million How cool is this? Each Incredible Pizza Company has a full scale bowling alley. Pretty hip.

OTHER MARKETING TECHNIQUES Incredible Speller: grades K-6. Teachers receive free pencils for each student, stickers to place on their graded papers and a chart to follow each student’s progress. If the student gets a perfect score on a spelling test, they’re given five dollars in game play and if they make perfect scores the entire year, they get 100 game tickets to be redeemed for prizes. Math Facts: grades 1-5. Teachers are given a stack of five-dollar free game play certificates to be awarded when the teacher feels that the student has mastered their math facts. Incredible Readers: all grades. According to the number of books that students read, they receive an amount of free game play. For example, if they read five books, they get two dollars in game play, if they read 10 books, they get four dollars in game play and if they finish 15 books, they get six dollars in game play. Perfect Attendance: all grades. For every grading period, each student with perfect attendance receives five dollars of game play, while a student with perfect attendance for the entire school year receives a $10 certificate for free game play plus a free buffet and drinks. Caught Being Good: all grades. The teacher is given a stack of $3 game play certificates to hand out to students once during

the year when they are “caught being good.” Trades for Grades: all grades. Any student that improves their report card is eligible for this one. The student brings in their report card and receives free game time according to their grades. For straight A’s, the student gets four dollars of game play, for A’s and B’s, the student gets two dollars of game play and for any grade improvement at all, the student receives one dollar of game play. Fundraisers: all grades. Incredible Pizza will donate up to five hundred five dollar game cards to any school or organization that requests help with raising money. They have to be sold for face value during a two-month window. At the end of those two months, any remaining cards have to be returned to Incredible Pizza. Also, tracking forms are provided and must be returned with the remaining cards. Each school is allowed only one fundraiser per school year and non-profit organizations are allowed one fundraiser per calendar year. Loyalty program and email marketing: Using a punch card, Incredible Pizza tracks the number of times that someone comes in. After they’ve eaten there five times, they get the sixth buffet free. They also have an email-marketing program set up where they send out coupons and announcements for

Incredible Pizza Company founders (L-R) Larry Abbe, president of Incredible Pizza; Rick Barsness, founder; Cheryl Barsness; Brenda Abbe.

what’s going on in the store that weekend. “Our customers can opt-in for the newsletter on our website,” Rick says. “They can also sign up in the store, but if they do that, they’re still sent an email that asks them to opt-in to the mailer.” Military, Fire and Police Appreciation: To show their appreciation of men and women in service organizations, Incredible Pizza offers a special to their families. With a military ID, children can get a seven-dollar meal that includes the buffet, a drink and a five-dollar game card while adults get the same thing for eight dollars. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS To encourage his employees to aggressively go after email addresses for the newsletter, Rick said that there are weekly drawings for a $25 cash prize. Employees are entered into the drawing every time they get a customer to sign up for the newsletter. Managers are on quite an effective bonus program. The managers and shift leaders split 10 percent of the month’s profits among themselves: this has on occasion been as high as $10,000 going to between 12 and 16 managers. Outside of managers, Incredible Pizza also starts out paying employees 25 cents higher than the local wage, which is usually minimum wage. “This practice coupled with our interview process usually allows us to get the cream of the crop since they realize that they’re getting paid more, right from the start,” Rick said. Through a combination of marketing techniques and old-fashioned fun, Incredible Pizza is attracting some incredible profits. You can see that IPC is truly cruising down the main street to success. So be on the lookout—they’re headed to an old Wal-Mart building near you! – PMQ –

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SERVING UP A SLICE OF HISTORY

BY FRANCIE BROWN

In a small town called Independence in the southeastern corner of Kansas a new family-owned restaurant, called Brother’s Railroad Inn, is serving pizza in the “old way” while surviving in a world of large pizza chains and modern technology. The owner, Mike Conway, told me that the restaurant is both a family tradition and a way for him to educate his neighbors on family restaurants. Mike has lots of experience with familyowned restaurants. He grew up working in a family restaurant, the original Railroad Inn, started by his grandfather and father in Bowie, Maryland in 1950. The original store only served soup, sandwiches, seafood and a few other entreés. The restaurant started offering pizzas in 1961. Although the original restaurant was a large success, Mike said that as a smalltown pizza operation (the town’s population is 9,000), he has to have a quality product or he loses his customers to the larger, chain pizza stores in the area. They make everything in-house as well as offering a wide variety of Italian meals as an alternative to pizza. For the pizza, Mike buys the freshest toppings he can find, the dough is made 64 PMQ

Mike (far left), his brother Patrick, his father Brother, and mother Ellen stop for a picture in front of the original Railroad Inn in 1969.

daily and he is a firm believer that Baker’s Pride deck ovens have a better bake than conveyor ovens. TURNING MISTAKES INTO MARKETING Like any other restaurant, there are occasional “goofs” in the orders. Mike told me that they handle these goofs one way only. “We’re not going to get rich doing this, but we have a policy here that if someone orders something that they don’t like, they won’t have to pay for it,” he told me. “We concentrate on the old way of doing business. If something isn’t right, then we take care of it.”

To demonstrate the “old way of doing business,” and an historical aspect of the restaurant, Mike told me about their menus. “On the wall, we have five menus framed. One of them is the original menu from 1961. If I see someone looking at it and I find out that they have ordered a pizza, I give the pizza to them for the 1961 price.” The 1961 menu is just the first of his “surprise” offers. When children come into the store, he invites them behind the counter to let them watch their pizza being made, and sometimes even lets them make their


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For owner Mike Conway, his Baker’s Pride deck ovens are the only way to cook...

own pizza. “For whatever reason, people, children especially, find the restaurant business fascinating,” Mike told me. “We invite the kids back, have them wash their hands and point them in the right direction. The kids love it—they get to see the ‘back end’ of the operation.” ADVERTISING To jump-start his business, Mike advertised in newspapers, on the menus of local motels and through e-mail. “We ask all of our customers to fill out a card at the waitress

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station that asks them for their information and e-mail addresses,” Mike told me. “At the bottom of the card, we have a check that asks permission to e-mail them the current specials. We won’t send anything out to someone who doesn’t want it.” As a thank you to the customers, Mike also sends out birthday cards and Christmas cards. SPENDING SMARTER However, not all of his advertising ventures turned out well. He doesn’t recommend a radio spot, simply because it doesn’t seem

I told him that I could take the $500 or $600 I was spending on the radio, and give that amount of pizza away, and do just as much good, if not more, for my business.

-Mike Conway


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“In 1950, George and Brother Conway, my great grandfather and grandfather, established the first Railroad Inn. What started as a bar and crab house was eventually expanded to a dine-in restaurant in 1961 where they began serving their famous homemade pizza and lasagna. My grandfather continues the tradition with Brother’s Railroad Inn in Bowie, Maryland. Now, with help from my parents, Mike and Marcia Conway, I’m happy to introduce Brother’s Railroad Inn to Independence, Kansas. We are proud to be the third and fourth generations of the Conway family working side by side to serve you our favorite family recipes that people on the east coast have enjoyed for years. Our philosophy is simple… Our customers are our family.” Becky Ballew Manager Brother’s Railroad Inn

to do anything. “I advertised with the radio station once and didn’t get much response,” Mike told me. “When the guy from the radio called back, I asked him if he could smell, taste, or see my pizza in one of his ads. When he said ‘no,’ I told him that I could take the $500 or $600 I was spending on the radio, and give that amount of pizza away, and do just as much good, if not more, for my business.” Since that radio ad ran, Mike has done just that. Every so often, he sends free pizza out to businesses and events, just to get people to sample his product. GETTING STARTED Before the business opened, however, Mike had several hoops to jump through–not the least of which was financing the business. He ended up approaching two different banks for financing. The banks didn’t want to loan him the money because of the high rate of failure in the restaurant business. Two things finally won one of the banks over— Mike’s business plan and his family’s successful history in the restaurant business. One of the banks even told him that his business plan was one of the most professional business plans that they’d ever seen. Railroad Inn is a family tradition. Here, Mike’s daughter Becky Ballew works in the kitchen with the assistance of his granddaughter, Karson.

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“In our business plan, we didn’t want to over inflate our profits. We wanted to show that the restaurant could support itself,” Mike told me. “We broke everything down—how much was rent, bills, supplies and loan payments for the restaurant. We got it down to the point that we knew how many pizzas and subs we needed to sell on a given day to break even.” Mike went on to say that they don’t always make that break-even point on a given day, but that sales from other days generally make it up. “My wife, Marcia, and I haven’t drawn a check out of it yet,” he told me, laughing. “We’re not in the business to get rich quick.” One of the things that the bank did like about his business plan was some of the innovative ideas Mike had about the restaurant. His plan was to not focus solely on the pizza, but to market a wide range of products, some food, some not. He wants to move into Take and Bake and frozen pizza markets and is currently in the process of creating a trade/service mark to put on tshirts and a line of salad dressings to be sold to the public. He also told me that the bank wanted him to do a few things that he had not wanted to do. “The bank wanted me to serve lunch and deliver pizza. We have just recently started serving lunch, but we chose not to deliver the pizza for quality, insurance and safety issues.” OPENING Mike spread the word of his new restaurant mostly by word of mouth. Long before the renovations on the building began, he was spreading word of the upcoming opening of Brother’s Railroad Inn to family, friends and people with whom he came into contact. In May of 2003, the restaurant was finally complete. Mike staged a soft opening for the three days before the “official” opening. Each night, he invited friends, family and the building contractors that worked on the restaurant to come and sample what they had helped create. “Opening that way allowed us to work the bugs out of the machinery, of which there were several but because everybody was friends, it was no big deal.” On actually opening, Mike said that finding labor and working out labor schedules was the hardest part in getting the pizzeria open and running. “We’d planned for such a long time that the actual business side of the restaurant wasn’t a problem.” In the future, Mike hopes to one day franchise the business. For now though, he Entreés other than pizza help make Brothers Railroad Inn a popular family dinner destination.

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Mike used a soft opening to open Railroad Inn. He invited family and friends to sample his food.

wants to keep the business on the small scale for two reasons. The first is, of course, a money issue, and the second is that he’s content to prove that the business can be run on a less expensive level than the large pizza chains. “I’m trying to prove that a small business can be opened without the enormous fees that go along with the large franchises,” Mike told me. “I know people with these great dreams that have the drive and capability to something great but can’t do it because it’s too expensive. I’m trying to change that, at least a little bit.” Thus far, he’s found that even on a small scale, franchising is expensive; however, he is working on possible alternatives.

Despite future plans for expansion, franchising and marketing, Mike is determined to keep the family atmosphere of Brother’s Railroad Inn intact. As a family business, Railroad Inn spans several generations. Mike is the third generation to be involved with Railroad Inn, Pat Conway and Becky Ballew, his son and daughter, are the fourth, and he looks forward to his grandchildren helping out in the restaurant one day soon, like he did in his father’s store. As it is now, his grandkids and their friends are some of the children that he invites to make their pizzas and “help out” in the back. – PMQ –


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SPEAKEASY THE RULES OF EFFECTIVE EMPLOYEE/CUSTOMER COMMUNICATION

When dining out, how often have you heard restaurant staff members make abrupt, careless statements such as: “We can’t re-make ____ that you have already eaten part of.”“It’s only been a 30 minute wait so far.” “No, we can’t do that.” Training your team to adopt effective communication skills will add to your guests’ overall experience. While we train our teams how to sell menu items, set up and maintain equipment, operate the computer system and practice safety and sanitation procedures, we often forget to teach them how to communicate effectively. Don’t assume that your staff knows how to speak properly to your guests. Most people don’t know and must be trained. Your guests will judge your operation by the degree of “care” that is conveyed in the words and the messages your employees send. Choosing the right words and positively conveying messages can make the difference between repeat business and a onetime stop at your establishment. WHEN TRAINING YOUR STAFF TO COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY, TEACH THEM THESE TIPS: • Speak with an upbeat, well-modulated voice that conveys energy. • Use positive, flowing gestures and open body language. • Maintain effective eye contact. • Use animated facial expressions. • Use team words that build partnerships such as everyone, we, together, our, let’s/let us. Avoid using the word “you” in a scolding or blaming fashion, which places the receiver in a defensive position (see examples below). To illustrate this point, recently, my sister and I visited a nearby Italian restaurant that my neighbor recommended. We were seated promptly by a friendly, upbeat hostess - a pleasant beginning. When the server arrived, we ordered a pizza with extra sauce and light cheese. When the pizza arrived, it had light sauce and extra cheese - the complete opposite of our request. When we realized the mistake, we mentioned it to the server in a very diplomatic way. She placed her hands on her hips, rolled her eyes, and replied in a tense voice, “You didn’t tell me you wanted extra sauce.” We were confident that we had ordered the pizza correctly, but even if we were mistaken, we certainly could have done without the scolding. We held our composure and just ate it since we were on a tight time schedule. The entire situation could have been handled better if the server had said, “I’m sorry for our mistake. Why don’t you go ahead and start eating this one, so you will have something to munch on. In the meantime, we will remake the pizza for you.” – PMQ –

Pam Simos is president of Five Star Training of St. Petersburg, Florida, which offers a full line of employee training services. www.five-startraining.com • contact-us@five-startraining.com 800-385-7827 (STAR) • 727-743-4041 72 PMQ

BY PAM SIMOS FIVE STAR TRAINING Rephrasing sentences and rewording thoughts to convey a positive message may take seconds longer, but the outcome is well worth it. Here are some re-worded phrases you can teach your team:

Don’t Say:

Say:

“We ran out of __.”

“We sold out of _______” (Ran out conveys lack of preparation, while sold out suggests your item was popular)

“I don’t know.”

“That is a great question, I will ask my owner/manager/coworker and let you know.” (The majority of the time, someone will know the answer)

“Your credit card isn’t any good.”

“I am sorry Mr./Mrs. Carrera, we are having some trouble getting authorization on your credit card. Do you have another form of payment?”

“No.”

“I’m sorry we are unable to___, but here is what we can do.” (Always say “I’m sorry” when you are unable to accommodate a guest)

“You forgot to sign.”

“Mr./Mrs. Hsu, would you please provide me with your signature?”

“You need to show me your I.D.”

“We can’t do that.”

“I don’t know, I’m new.”

“I’m sorry for the inconvenience, would you mind showing me your identification?”

“I’m sorry we are unable to accommodate you, but here is what we can do.”

“I want to help you. I’m quite new here, but I will be happy to get you an answer.”

Teach your team to take the time to think before they speak. A little more effort on their part will create a “caring” culture that encourages guest loyalty. As a result, you will stimulate repeat business and add more money to your bottom line.


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MarchApr Idea Forum

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Idea #149

Busting Loose with Barbeque

PMQ’S IDEA FORUM

Has your lunch biz slowed a bit? What about the number of new customers coming in every day? Or the number of your customers coming in and voicing a desire for something besides pizza? The answer: Make changes! Offer your customers additional options for their meals. The big chains, including both Pizza Hut and Domino’s have expanded their traditional menu, including pastas, salads and a variety of chicken entrées, all designed to get the most money out of their customers. What if you already offer those options and still want something more? Try something really different. Think BBQ! Barbeque is one of the fastest growing restaurant segments, according to the National Restaurant Association. Just think: pizza and barbeque are the ultimate combination. The vast popularity of pizza and the growing popularity of pizza would ensure both an increase in your overall ticket sales and an increase in your restaurant’s popularity because of a wider menu selection. Adding barbeque to your menu also lets you cater to the carb-hating dieters. Atkins and South Beach diets focus on eating more protein and fewer carbohydrates. Besides just offering

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barbeque as a meal alternative, you can also use your barbeque ingredients on pizzas for a specialty item not everyone serves. Dixie Southern Foods has the perfect way for you to add barbeque to your menu, without much hassle. They offer a co-branding system, similar to a franchising system, for pizzeria operators that allow them to compete in today’s market. They have an entire line of gourmet-style barbeque products that are slow, hardwood smoked in special, humidity controlled ovens. All the pizzeria operator needs is a stainless steel tray: everything can go into your regular pizza oven, be it deck, conveyor or rotary. They provide you with everything you’d need to make barbeque a working part of your menu: the POS material such as posters, advertising slicks and door clings, all with your restaurant’s name printed on them. They even give you artwork and photos you can use to make your own separate BBQ operation. Imagine, you could now look like the majors with a pizza parlor and BBQ joint in the same location. The product is smoked (precooked) so there’s no waste, no shrinkage and no handling problems. What’s more—it’s easy: you can heat the product in about three minutes.

You can add sandwiches, catering menus and party packs. Not to mention the increase in ticket prices if you sell a combination of a medium pizza, a pound of buffalo wings and a rack of ribs all for one price. You can pick and use just one product or you can have Dixie Southern Foods put together a custom program just for your pizzeria, with 14 products to choose from, including: Baby Back Ribs—St. Louis Ribs—Smoked Beef Ribs—Southern Pulled Pork—Smoked Turkey Legs—BBQ Beef Brisket—BBQ Pork Rib Tips—Buffalo Wings—Smoked Chickens World Class Sauces—Slow Cooked Prime Rib—Smoked Shredded Chicken—Southern Style Meat Loaf. The program was put together by Ronald McDonald, author of Ronald McDonald’s Franchise Buyer’s Guide, The Complete Hamburger and Ronald McDonald International Burger Book. If you’d like more information or to see more of Dixie Southern Foods’ products, check out their website at www.dixiesouthernfoods.com or give them a call at 813-249-0330.


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gianninimarapr

2/17/05

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Insurance Issues Property Issues • By P.J. Giannini Visit www.pmq.com and look under PMQ Column Contributors to see previous articles by PJ, or click Ask the Experts to ask PJ a question. I do my best to present timely and accurate information, but nobody is perfect! This is not legal advice—you must contact an attorney for that.

You just got a new catering job. The income is good the price is right and the job is easy. Your insurance should be “okay” right? Maybe yes, maybe no… If you’re like so many other pizzeria owners, you’ve been thinking about finding new sources of revenue. Some of those may be different from your current business and may take you AWAY from your shop. It could be doing some catering, or taking a mall “kiosk” or doing some school cafeteria work. You might even decide to do a local trade show to get some attention or take a booth at “street fair.” All are good strategies when it comes to increasing revenue, but will your business insurance follow you – or are you “Going Out Naked”? There are three main areas I want to focus on when it comes to doing work off premises: property issues, liability issues and worker’s comp insurance. Now, these are certainly not the only areas you should consider, and you should always consult your lawyer and CPA when you get involved in any new business venture. You can’t rely on this as your only source of insurance information. Whatever I discuss in these articles is always subject to your home state’s insurance regulations. That having been said, let’s take a look. • Property Issues: For the sake of discussion I will refer to your property/business income as a package. These are commonly packaged for insurance purposes and depend on each other for “triggers.” • Liability Issues: These are the exposures you generate from the daily operation of your pizzeria. Not all are insurable and some are a matter of normal “business risk.” • Workers Comp Insurance: This is the allimportant exposure you generate by having someone work for you. It is a heavily regulated area in most states and is NOT dependent on how you classify your workers for tax purposes. PROPERTY ISSUES The first thing you MUST know about property insurance is that it is location specific. Read your policy – you will see that it covers the “described property” at the “described premises.” And, it makes sense. The insurance company prices your insurance based on what you have to insure, where you want it insured and the condition of the place you want it insured in. Example: My pizzeria in a new masonry noncombustible strip mall with sprinklers is less susceptible to property losses that your pizzeria in the oldest frame building in town that’s not even served by fire hydrants. Plus, the location and the character of that location (i.e. security, location, construction, etc.) are known quantities and are priced accordingly.

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So, once you take your property “off premises” there are problems. If your policy is typical – the property you have insurance for “on your premises” will NOT be insured “off your premises.” Now, most policies will include some token coverage for property off premises, BUT this is usually limited by the amount of property covered and what it’s covered for. If you do a catering job, you may have much more “off premises” than you think. Start adding up the cost of disposables, food, equipment and the like and you may find yourself in for a surprise. What if the property is not all yours…if you rented the tableware, the tables, linens and the serving dishes? What does your policy say about “property of others” that is “off premises?” Starting to get the picture? And it’s not just catering – how about taking a table at a street fair or trade show? What could that add up to? And what’s covered and what’s not? What about any cash you generate at the venue, what if it’s stolen? What if the venue itself is damaged and you can’t do your catering job? What about the resultant loss of income? As a general rule – if it isn’t listed on the policy, it isn’t covered. Don’t take this lightly – I know of places that make thousands with a stand at local street fairs. LIABILITY ISSUES Now, things get more complicated. Liability policies typically have a broad coverage grant that includes the entire United States as the covered territory. But – the policy will also rely on your application as the governing document when policy is issued. So, when the application asked something like “do you have any other business locations other than the named location?” And you said “NO” – you were not disclosing the fact that you did one or two off premises street fairs or a few catering jobs, and a trade show. Did that change the nature of the risk the insurance company accepted? Maybe. Can they use that to contest a claim? Yes. Will they? Maybe. Now, before you go ballistic on this one – think about it. As an insurance company you may be per-

What if the property is not all yours…if you rented the tableware, the tables, linens and the serving dishes? What does your policy say about “property of others” that is “off premises?” -P.J. Giannini


gianninimarapr

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A VERY HEARTFELT THANKS TO ALL OF THE 2005 U.S. PIZZA TEAM SPONSORS WITHOUT YOUR SUPPORT THIS FANTASTIC TEAM WOULD NOT BE POSSIBLE


gianninimarapr

2/17/05

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fectly content to insure pizzerias all day long, you just may NOT want to take on the risk of a temporary vending operation at an open air un-controlled street event, or an unknown undisclosed catering location that could be anything from the World Class Yacht Lines to Bubba’s Back Bay Bachelor Beer Hall. Now, catch this one – there’s nasty little form out there that I just plain dislike. It’s called a “designated premises” endorsement. Its about five lines long and is written in “insurance speak,” but the bottom line is that it limits all insurance to the “premises designated” in the policy. So, if the policy says your premises is 123 Main Street, Anytown, USA – that’s the only place you have insurance. What’s the big deal? Well, some insurance companies use this as a “catch all” to close the door on any possible claim that did not happen on your premises. Some Examples: • Your employee walks two doors down to deliver an order to a regular customer. While there he knocks over the soda into your customer’s computer. Sorry, not on your premises. • You go to the Restaurant Depot to pick up a short order on cheese. While there you hit someone with the cart. Sorry, not on your premises. • You go to the Pizza Trade Association meeting and some one trips over your feet during lunch. Sorry, not on your premises. • You go to the New York Pizza Show and while you are there. . . . Sorry, not on your premises. I had a talk with the underwriting manager of a local New York insurance company. We were discussing using his company for some pizzeria accounts. As we got into the details, he dropped into this into the conversation “Of course, we will add a ‘designated premises endorsement.” Acting the innocent, I asked, “Now, why do you think you need that?’” The answer was “ Simple – we don’t want to be involved in anything these guys do outside their four walls.” If you see a “designated premises” endorsement on your policy – get it off there, now! By the way, do you know what the premium reduction is for putting this restriction on your policy? It’s zero. WORKERS COMP ISSUES Let’s get this out of the way now. You have employees – even if you choose to call them something else – you have employees. If you don’t have workers comp insurance – stop reading now and go buy it. Now then, workers comp is a highly regulated form of insurance 78 PMQ

and it is designed to take care of injured workers. It is subject to regulatory bodies in every state as far as I know. This should tell you something, namely, that if a worker is hurt that worker probably has access to benefits – either an insurance company pays or YOU pay – but someone will pay. Now, let’s take a look at your workers comp policy. The main page, the declarations page, in item number one lists your name, and address has a line titled “all other workplaces.” Now, if that line is blank, it means that there are no other work places and it could cause a problem. Clearly, if you have two shops, both locations should be listed on

the policy. But what about those temporary locations, like the catering job, the street fairs and the trade shows? Well, there’s two ways to deal with those. First, Get the company to put in the wording “and various other locations.” I have to tell you its not likely they’ll do it – but it is certainly worth a shot. Second, be sure your application discloses those other workplaces and exposures. If these operations are new to you, insist on having a “change request” filed with the company that specifically says you may do these things “from time to time.” Keep a copy of the request with your policy – this piece of paper can be “gold” if you ever need to prove you told someone about these things. With that in mind, keep decent payroll records and a roster of ALL temporary help you may have had. I’ve seen cases where someone has claimed to be an employee that got hurt on a job and never even worked at the place! So, when you take on temporary help for temporary jobs, strange things can happen. A good safeguard is to keep an individual file for each and every off premises job you do. That file should include the date(s), time(s), personnel list and description of the function. Example: February 14th catered the Valentines Dance at Sadie Hawkins

Memorial. Served 52 dinners from 7 to 10 p.m. with the attached roster of personnel. Now, for the oddball stuff. What if you do some work on a boat, or barge, or pier or near the shoreline. Well my friends, you are in for treat. Welcome to the world of the Long Shoreman & Harbor Workers Act - USL&H for short. If you have any employees that work on, near or around navigable waterways, you may be subject to this little gem. Now, I grant you that things have tightened up and that courts may not be so quick to apply this to your normally land-based workers. But, if this one does apply to you, and you don’t have the coverage extension on your policy, you can responsible for the difference between your states’ workers comp wages and the Federal Harbor Workers Act wages. In some places this amounts to a small fortune. Suppose you do a summer booth at the boardwalk, on the oceanfront, on a pier, or a regular catering job on a sightseeing boat? (One of my customers actually did!) Do you think it’s worth asking about? You can bet your kids’ college tuition money it is, and you’d better ask! How do you know if you are subject? You’ll find out when the plaintiff’s lawyer files for benefits. But to be safe, I’d ask for the coverage if there is any chance at all that your people work on, near or around navigable waters. If the insurance company says you don’t need it – then at least you’ve done your part and they will have to defend their decision not to give you the insurance. Does it cost more? Of course! How much more? Not much. You’ll have to get the exact price from your local agent. Are there other things to worry about when you work off premises? Sure there are, but I think we’ve done about as much as we can in this space. I’ll tell you this, left unchanged; “off the shelf” policies are usually not up to the task at hand. You need to sit down with your insurance agent and hammer these things out. My standing offer – if you have any questions, feel free to call me at 201-945-3100 or e-mail pj@pizasure.com. I’ll do my best to help you or get state specific help where needed. – PMQ –

P.J. Giannini is an author, national seminar speaker, consultant and licensed insurance agent. PJ is founder of Association Agency, Inc. and has spent over 15 years as a commercial insurance niche marketer.


gianninimarapr

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legaleagle

2/17/05

6:01 PM

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LEGAL

EAGLES WHEN AND HOW TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY BY WALTER DAVIS

After practicing law for ten years, it was a welcome surprise to get a telephone call that wasn’t from a client, adjuster, witness or another lawyer. It was Tom Boyles, wanting to know if I could offer advice to restaurant owners and if I would be interested in writing some pieces on general legal topics. I was happy to say yes, hoping I could help shed some light on things like contracts, employment issues and other legal dilemmas that small business owners tend to run into. Over the years, I’ve represented both big and small companies on everything from forming the company to dissolving it - and lots of things in between. The one thing that’s been consistent has been how a little advance planning by clients could have prevented a lot of legal headaches. So, for this first installment, we might as well start at the beginning. Here I will discuss reasons why you should consider an attorney, finding one that fits your needs, costs related to attorneys and information about having others pay for your legal costs. In future articles, I will examine issues relating to employment, contracts and other topics that keep restaurant owners awake at night. So let’s start at the beginning. SHOULD I EVEN GET AN ATTORNEY? Modern business has the potential to generate many legal problems. This brings you to having to decide whether to hire an attorney and which one to get. Yes, lawyers

can be expensive, but the decision to have a lawyer deal with a problem, or whether you should try to handle it yourself, depends in part on how expensive it will be not have a lawyer. Which, of course means you have to find out what it’s going to cost before you can make the decision to hire one at all. Initial consultations aren’t always free, so always ask if there will be a charge when setting an appointment. Once you’re there, ask if you really need a lawyer for this problem. A good attorney will lay out the pros and cons of action and inaction, as well as the expenses associated with each choice so you can decide how to proceed. But, that still brings us back to finding one to talk to. FINDING THE MOUTHPIECE THAT FITS Go on down to the bottom of the article and read the disclaimer. Go ahead. It’s exactly what you’d expect a lawyer to put in a magazine article - that what I’m telling you may not apply to your situation so the answer to your problem could be different. You have to find your own lawyer to advise you on your particular problem. But how do you do that? Word of mouth and referrals are the most common methods, but not the only ones. State bar associations can be easily located on the Internet or in the phone book. Another excellent resource is the Martindale directory (www.martindale.com), where you can search for attorneys by location, areas of practice, biographical information and other factors. An attorney’s listing on Martindale may tell you how long they’ve been out of law school, have links to their firm’s website, list types of cases they handle and even contain “ratings” of some attorneys based upon their reputa-

tion among judges and other attorneys. SECOND OPINIONS After an initial meeting, I commonly tell prospective clients that I wouldn’t trust my health to the opinion of just one doctor and therefore, I’d get a second opinion. It’s no different with a legal problem. Visit with several attorneys to find out what sort of advice they give, the costs involved and how well you think you could work with them. Once you’ve had a chance to compare them, then you’ll be in a much better position to find a lawyer that’s the right fit for you, your business and your particular legal problem. HOW MUCH IS THIS GOING TO COST? Lawyers typically charge fees in three different ways - a contingency fee, a flat rate fee or an hourly rate. Contingency fees involve paying your lawyer “only if you win” and typically are used when trying to collect money from someone else. Flat rate fees are just that - a set amount for a particular service such as drafting a contract. Hourly rates are the norm in business and will likely be different for attorneys even within the same firm as well as hourly rates for paralegals and support staff. In an hourly rate situation, the attorney typically asks for money up front as a “retainer,” which is placed in the attorney’s trust account. That money remains yours until it’s earned by the lawyer and is more or less a deposit toward fees that will be incurred in the future. If the retainer is not used up by the time the matter is resolved, the balance can either come back to you or remain in the trust account for any future representation from that same attorney. In an hourly rate situation, its very difficult

This article is not legal advice and is not intended as legal advice. This article is intended to provide only general, non-specific legal information and is not intended to cover all the issues related to the topics discussed. The specific facts that apply to your matter may make the outcome-different than would be anticipated by you. You should consult with an attorney familiar with the issues and the laws of your country, state and local jurisdiction. This article does not create any attorney-client relationship between you and Walter Davis or you and Dunbar & Associates, PLLC. This article is not a solicitation.

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to predict exactly how much attorney’s fees will total, but your attorney should still be able to give you an estimated range. They should also be able to tell you what factors will affect the fee so you can be forewarned about how changes in your case can increase or decrease how much you’ll spend. Remember that in an hourly rate situation, time is always money. You can expect that when the attorney spends any time on your case, you will be charged, even if it’s just a phone call that you couldn’t take. Regardless of how the attorney’s fees are paid, the client is almost always charged for expenses such as long distance telephone charges, copies and postage. This should be spelled out in an agreement signed by you and the attorney, or at least in a letter from the attorney spelling out the details. If one is not provided to you, ask for a schedule of these expenses and find out how they are going to be charged. MAKE SOMEONE ELSE PAY FOR IT Lots of clients ask me, “Can I get the other side to pay your fees if we win?” The answer is “maybe.” In Great Britain, the “English Rule” states the losing party pays the attorney’s fees and litigation expenses for

both sides. Conversely, the “American Rule” is that each side will pay for their own attorney’s fees and expenses regardless of who wins. However, there are exceptions to both rules. Despite the general rule, your case may present an opportunity to collect your attorney’s fees and expenses from the other side. Don’t forget, thought, that there are also other people who might pay for your legal representation. Insurance policies can cover a broad spectrum of claims and commonly include provisions to provide you with legal representation. Your contracts or agreements with other people or companies might provide that in the event of a dispute, the losing party has to pay attorney’s fees and expenses for both sides - this is also something to consider when entering into contracts and is something to watch out for when signing them. If someone claims that you’re responsible for someone else’s actions, then you might be able to get that person (or their insurance company) to foot the bill. Once you talk to an attorney, don’t forget to ask about how you might get someone else to pay the bills. STAY INFORMED One of the biggest complaints about attorneys is that they don’t return phone calls

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or they don’t keep the client informed. Most large companies require their outside attorneys to submit regular “status reports” of the matters they work on. Ask your lawyer to do the same - a one page letter every so often letting you know where things stand not only keeps you informed, but generates an excellent record of how your case progressed if you ever need it or have to explain what’s going on. Also, when you go to the lawyer’s office, be sure and introduce yourself to their assistant or secretary and get their name. When your lawyer is out of the office or unavailable, the office staff is a great way to stay posted on ongoing developments. Having to get an attorney may not be the most enjoyable part of your business, but a little additional effort on your part at the front end of any legal problem can help ensure that you get the right representation. It also means that you can help yourself get back to making money instead of spending it. If you have a topic that you would like to see discussed in my next installment, please email Tom Boyles at tom@pmq.com or fax (662) 234-0665 and put “Legal Eagles” in the subject line. – PMQ –


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5:14 PM

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PizzaBattle

2/18/05

2:26 AM

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Who will win $10,000 in the Food Network Challenge: Pizza Battle? This event will air March 20, 2005 10 p.m. ET/PT on the Food Network and again on at least four other dates (see pop-out box). The Food Network Challenge: Pizza Battle will feature five pairs of U.S. Pizza Team members (past and present), with one celebrity chef and one acrobatic dough tosser, battling it out to see who has the best combined team. The event took place November 12, 2004, in Cleveland, Ohio, in the Food Network Celebrity Theater and was quite an event. For the second time in two years, the U.S. Pizza Team will be featured on national television as a one-hour special. The publicity opportunities that have emerged since creating the U.S. Pizza Team are seeming endless. The U.S. Pizza Team is traveling to Italy for the sixth year to compete in the World Pizza Championships and the Food Network has timed the showing of the Pizza Battle to coincide with this event. Now we have publicity opportunities and pizza teams coming out of our ears. In those short six years in Italy, we have earned two gold medals in individual acrobatic dough tossing, a gold and a bronze medal in dough stretching, a second-place finish in the culinary event, inspired an independent film (“The Pizza Movie”) and now our second feature on the Food Network. While American Idol launched Kelly Clarkson, Clay Aiken and Fantasia to stardom, the U.S. Pizza Team has spawned a new group of professional acrobats made entirely of former USPT members. Silar

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Chapman, Michael Shepherd, Tony Gemignani, and Joe Carlucci have independently formed The World Pizza Champions and travel to local events tossing dough in addition to creating even more support and interest in the U.S. Pizza Team and as a way to continue creating publicity for their pizzerias. Michael, Joe and Silar got their start by trying out for the U.S. Pizza Team. Through the support of our sponsors and PMQ, they learned how to compete in a much larger arena and in the process, saw publicity and sales for their stores skyrocket. After seeing their humble beginnings and where they are now, we couldn’t be prouder for helping them get there. Now it can be your turn. The U.S. Pizza Team holds its tryouts in individual acrobatic dough tossing, largest dough stretch and fastest pizza making at the New York Pizza Show in New York City on November 1-2, 2005. Remember November! Each year, when winners are announced, they become local and national stars appearing on shows like The Best Damn Sports Show FOOD NETWORK CHALLENGE: PIZZA BATTLE Five teams meet at the Great Big Food Show in Cleveland to show off their tastiest pies and throw some dough. AIR TIMES: March 20, 2005 March 21, 2005 March 24, 2005 March 25, 2005 March 27, 2005

10:00 PM ET/PT 2:00 AM ET/PT 9:00 PM ET/PT 1:00 AM ET/PT 3:00 PM ET/PT

Period!, CNN News, Good Morning America, CBS's The Early Show, and the Food Network's World Pizza Challenge, in USA Today and too many local news broadcasts and papers to mention. Want to be the next big story? The next contestant on a Food Network special? This is just part of what happens. Many former U.S. Pizza Team members have experienced so much popularity that they have gone on to open second and third locations (look for the upcoming article on two-time USPT member Sean Brauser in PMQ). For information on how you can tryout for the team, enter U.S. Pizza Team events or be part of the team, call 662-234-5481 ext 125 (www.uspizzateam.com). You can also make the 2006 team at the Wisconsin Restaurant Expo in Milwaukee on March 14-16, 2005. There will be an individual acrobatic dough tossing competition at the show and the winner earns a spot on the 2006 USPT. In addition to the acrobatic trials in NYC, there are other sanctioned events where you can make the team along with opportunities to earn your spot as a culinary team member. Two culinary spots are earned at the Pizza Pizzazz competition each year in Columbus, Ohio. The SOFO Food Show also crowns a winner. Email caroline@pmq.com for details. Who knows where the U.S. Pizza Team can take you. The Food Network Challenge Pizza Battle airs as the 2005 U.S. Pizza Team travels to Salsomaggiore, Italy to take on the world in the official World Pizza Competition. Who will win the $10,000? You’ll have to watch to find out. – PMQ –


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pizzaonastick

2/17/05

6:03 PM

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BY CHEF BRUNO It is always said that the first person to do something is the one who is remembered for it. As restaurant owners, creating new products or ways of presenting them always grabs attention. A great example is the restaurant owner in New York City who created a $50 hamburger. "This is not about price," restaurant owner Marc Sherry said when the restaurant sold nearly 200 of the new burgers in the first four days. "This is an event." This brings me back to the idea. I was grocery shopping one day with my family when my youngest son, James, took me to the ice cream aisle. He picked up a box of ice pops and took me to another aisle where he picked up a box of lollipops. It sparked an idea. I began to think to myself, “How can I make pizza on a stick?” At first, I thought it was impossible. I went to my oldest son, Louis, who is also a chef, and he thought it was strange. He asked how I would make a handle for a pizza. I started doing some research and thought about how doctors use tongue depressors and thought if was good enough for a doctor to stick it in a patient’s mouth, then a pizza handle could be used for this idea. I found a company that made tongue depressors, but they couldn’t make them for me and my idea, but I was able to get some of the wood they used to try and make my own. The first three sticks I made were too small…the second three were too large. Then, I started to think about what would be 86 PMQ

the perfect size that would fit inside someone’s mouth and the process started. I knew the dough had to be firm so it wouldn’t fall off the stick. A lot of changes were made. Finally, after what seemed like a million tries, I got it right. When I did my test run and people saw the pizza on a stick, it confused them and they thought I was crazy. But, I knew I was on to something totally different. I knew I had made history in the pizza industry with this totally new idea that was different from everyone else. I still had to make some adjustments on the dough to improve it, and I had to have it ready in time for the Food Network Challenge: Pizza Battle. At this show I debuted the product and earned a silver medal. The judges also commented that they thought I had made history. So you see, even when the idea may seem strange to some, never give up because there is no telling how far you can go or how much you can achieve. Who would have ever guessed that guy in New York would have sold 200 $50 hamburgers in the first four days…or have the idea in every newspaper and news broadcast in the nation. Here is a photo series that shows how the pizza on a stick idea is created. Try it, play with the idea. If you would like to learn more about this concept or recipe, contact me at 631-226-6688 (phone), 631-226-6890 (fax) or marsalsons@aol.com. Become the first in your area to offer something new…you never know where it will take you. – PMQ –


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2/18/05

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pestcontrolmarapr

2/17/05

6:05 PM

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BY SALIMEH SHAMALY

WHAT’S

BUGGING PEST

As the sweltering summer creeps in, so will an influx of pests, flies and rodents into air-conditioned pizzerias, causing a major health and safety epidemic for you and your customers. Pest elimination is a must for food service facilities, but maintaining a sanitary environment can be challenging. If not controlled, health inspections will be failed, the reputation of your facility will be severely tarnished, and worse yet, the pizzeria you worked so hard to build can be shut down until violations are corrected, meaning lost revenue and costly pest services. Creepy critters that lurk in your pizzeria also carry diseases inside them that can contaminate your products and facility. For example, flies are one of the most common pests and can carry up to six million bacteria on their feet. Most of the diseases are carried and spread as flies touch surfaces with their legs and saliva. Though most of the flies that may swarm your pizzeria are house and fruit flies, there are other more dangerous

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CONTROL

flies like foreign flies that could infect your customers with a number of diseases, some of which have no known cure. Although these bugs are rare in the United States, you should be concerned when any type of fly enters your pizzeria. No customer wants a fly to land in their soup, especially one that could potentially put his health at risk! Another leading pest in commercial restaurant facilities is the cockroach. With nearly 4,000 species of cockroaches around the world, most roaches, like the pesky German cockroach, seem to harbor in dark, damp and humid areas where food supply is abundant. Cockroaches also feed off carbohydrates, and when hungry, they could eat starch-based paints, pastes and soap bars, according to the Beyond Pesticides/National Coalition Against the

YOU?

TIPS

Misuse of Pesticides (NCAMP) website at www.beyondpesticides.org. Cockroaches can easily enter a pizzeria through cracks, crevices, screens, loose-fitted windows and doors, vents, pipes and holes. They spread dozens of bacteria, worms and other viral infections and can even cause allergies and asthma. Large amounts of roach droppings and carcass remains develop a concentration of allergens that can spread to young children. Cockroaches are not the only pests that can easily enter your pizzeria through wall openings. Pests like rats and other large rodents can fit through holes less than half an inch in diameter. Mice, however, can crawl through openings less than a quarter of an inch. Birds, spiders, ants and snakes can enter through small wall cavities as well. CHECK FOR PROBLEMS But before you call a pest service provider, take a few minutes to examine your pizzeria. Many times overlooked areas are the problem. Are there any noticeable cracks or pores in your building? Are cabinets and doors sealed and tight-fitted? Is garbage properly disposed of daily? Are food storage bins on shelves and not on the floor?


pestcontrolmarapr

2/18/05

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Custom Orders Welcomed

1-800-750-1924 Australia 001 1 905 660 0535 or email: sales@crowncookware.ca for a FREE catalogue


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These are just some of the many questions you should ask yourself when inspecting your own pizzeria. By correcting these few problems, your pest troubles should decrease dramatically. However, there are many other ways roaches and rodents can enter your facility, and constant monitoring should be on your daily checklist. According to Jim Tarara, director of research and development pest elimination at Ecolab, pizzeria owners should always do a self-inspection of their restaurants before calling a professional pest elimination company. Doing this will pinpoint exact problem areas and will increase speedy elimination. “Anything they can do to identify a location (is needed) to minimize the amount of product that is used. If there’s a hot spot in a location, that allows the professional to minimize the amount and also take care of the problem as quick as possible,” Tarara says. “That communication is so important. Time is

See us at Pizza Expo, Booths 1105 & 1107

90 PMQ

Cockroaches are not the only pests that can easily enter your pizzeria through wall openings. Pests like rats and other large rodents can fit through holes less than half an inch in diameter. -Salimeh Shamaly

of the essence. If they can inspect, that definitely is a leg up in eliminating the problem.” Even if there are no noticeable pest problems in your facility or you have used a pest control service, pests can still enter and harbor your facility through deliveries made to your pizzeria. Delivery trucks can transport

egg cases in shipped materials, which could create a major epidemic if delivered items are not checked, removed from their boxes, and stored on shelves. Make sure delivery boxes are thrown away before eggs hatch and infestation occurs. COMBAT THE PROBLEM If such problems exist in your pizzeria, you must decide whether you want to fix the dilemmas yourself or hire a professional to do so. There are several ways to combat the pest population and still follow the guidelines set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In most states, self-pest control is permitted, but certain regulations must be followed to ensure correct pesticide management and prevent contamination of food and equipment. Also, many storebought insecticides are not labeled for use in commercial facilities, and contamination problems can increase. If you choose to do your own pest control, make sure toxic chemicals are not used while food is being handled or exposed. Insecticides and other poisons should only be applied after restaurant hours and should not be accessed until all treated areas are dry. If you use a spray, do not drench the areas you are treating. Doing so is unsafe, illegal and unnecessary. Following labels accordingly will ensure accurate and safe results. The National Restaurant Association offers a “How to Control Pests” section on their Web site for restaurant owners and managers to follow while inspecting their pizzerias, hiring an exterminator, and preventing infestation. The forms, available at www.restaurant.org/business/howto/pest.cfm, offer tips on safely handling toxic pesticides as well. The site also includes a pest-inspection checklist for your pizzeria that should be conducted on a regular basis. This is a great way to keep track of your sanitation practices as well as monitor pest infestation. You can find this checklist in the PMQ Manager's Toolbox at www.pmq.com/pizza_managers_ toolbox.shtml. There is a wide variety of methods for pest elimination to choose from that are offered by hundreds of pest control companies. Many agencies have programs designed specifically for full-service restaurants. These programs locate and eliminate pest-breeding sites by using discrete and advanced pest elimination technology. On the other hand, you may also purchase and apply the various traps, baits, sprays, dusts, gels and aerosols yourself. This can cut costs if


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you administer the pesticides correctly and follow-up on your pest checklist. Make sure you keep a list of the used products for your health inspections. However, Tarara says bug infestation could also increase considerably if you do your own pest elimination. “There are certain pests that you can actually make the situation worse,” Tarara says. “It’s hard to tell what a species is unless you are a professional.” The best bet in fighting unwanted pests is to hire a licensed pest control agency. They have the latest advancements in pest control and many guarantee elimination. If you have a professional, you will be able to identify what a species is and go after it the proper way _ meaning you always want to minimize how much insecticide that you put into a facility because there are people in these facilities that work there,” Tarara says. “You always get concerned about any transmission or contamination of any food prod-

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ucts. A pest professional is going to go in, target the pest, and is going to put down the minimal amount to take care of the problem.” Either you or the company you hire can administer the pesticides, but a professional is highly recommended when dealing with industrial-strength chemicals in an environment containing large quantities of food, beverages, and equipment. In some states and communities, a monthly visit from a licensed pest control service is required, and self-pest control is not allowed. Check your state health department for your local regulations by going to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Web site link at http://www.cdc.gov/other.htm. In all, identify pest issues early and address any problems immediately. Delaying elimination could leave you serving cockroaches and other pests instead of customers and patrons! – PMQ –


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PIZZA INDUSTRY

RESOURCE GUIDE Grab a direct weblink to every advertiser in this guide at www.pmq.com

APPETIZERS

CHECK RECOVERY

®

“TABASCO brand Pepper Sauces - Add excitement to Pizza, Pasta and Wing sales by using TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces in your recipes. For more information and recipe ideas, visit our dedicated foodservice website at www.tabascofoodservice.com, or call 1-888-HOT-DASH.” McCAIN SNACK FOODS . . . . . . . . . . .Breaded and Battered Appetizers Cheese Sticks, Poppers® Brand Stuffed Jalapenos, Wrappetizers®, Onion Rings, Olivenos® Brand Olive Bites, Brew City®, Free POS, Menus, and Samples. www.mccainusa.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-800-POPPERS

NSF Recovery Experts 100% return on NSF Truly dedicated customer service Unmatched online reporting CALL (800) 666-5222, ext. 720 WEB www.checkagain.com

BAKING SCHOOLS AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BAKING ...................................Manhattan, KS 785-537-4750 .........................................................Fax: 785-537-1493

CALZONE/PANZAROTTI MAKER AABURCO, INC.....................................................................................Piemaster 13421 Grass Valley Ave., Grass Valley, CA 95945 Phone: 800-533-7437 (PIES)...................................www.piemaster.com SOMERSET INDUSTRIES, INC. ........1 Esquire Rd., North Billerica, MA 01862 978-667-3355....800-772-4404 ..Fax: 978-671-9466......www.smrset.com

CHEESE A & M CHEESE CO. ................................We Specialize in Custom Blends Contact Craig Hawker .........419-476-8369..........Fax: 419-476-3133 CHIANTI CHEESE..........Grated or shredded parmesan/romano. Full Italian Specialty cheese line ........800-220-3503 ....chianticheese.com

CHICKEN WINGS “TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces - Add excitement to Pizza, Pasta and Wing sales by using TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces in your recipes. For more information and recipe ideas, visit our dedicated foodservice website at www.tabascofoodservice.com, or call 1-888-HOT-DASH.” LA NOVA WINGS INC., The Buffalo Wing Co. . . . . . . . . . . .Buffalo, NY 800-652-6682 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax: 716-881-3366 www.lanova.com Let us show you how to Increase Sales and Profits. our World Famous Buffalo Wings are a great treat and Easy to Prepare. Just Heat and Eat! Ask about our Wing Sauces, Chicken Tenders, Bites, and Chicken Nachos.

CLEANING EQUIPMENT

AMERICA’S MOZZARELLA PRODUCER 800-871-3444 SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO www.realcaliforniacheese.com Saputo Cheese USA Inc. Saputo is a leading cheese supplier to the Pizza industry, specializing in mozzarella and provolone in loaves, dice, shreds, and blends. Parmesan, Romano, Asiago, Blue and Gorgonzola are also available. Our cheesemaking expertise and national production assure top-quality, fresh cheese is delivered to your satisfaction. Let Saputo be Your Cheese of Choice! 800-824-3373.....................Fax: 847-267-0224..............www.saputo.com

CHEESE, LOW FAT CASTLE CHEESE, INC...........Rt. 19, Box 378, Portersville, PA 16051 A large variety of healthy alternatives Contact Willy Jacobs .....castlecheese@adelphia.net......1-800-252-4373 GALAXY FOODS .......................................................Orlando, FL 32809 “It’s a healthy day at Galaxy Foods.” 800-441-9419 (x125) ....................................www.galaxyfoods.com 94 PMQ

COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE

FAST. EASY. APPROVED. Loans for your pizza shop No Income/No Asset Verification • FAST = Pre-approval often within 72 hours and quicker closing. EASY = Our loan officers will help you every step of the way. FLEXIBLE = Less paperwork and common-sense decisions.

NORTH PENN FINANCIAL Apply online at www.NorthPennFinancial.com

PIZZA OWNERS Call Toll-Free:

1-866-NOR-PENN

COMPUTER SYSTEMS: POINT OF SALE ABC SUPREME TOUCH SCREEN POS . .................2 Stations, 2 printers, 1 cash drawer, 2 days “on-site” training without monitors ..........$3,995 Star TSP-643 Printer .....................$259 Star SP-216 Printer........$216 15” TFT Touch Screen Monitor ......$649 Printer Ribbons...................$2 Call for Prices: NCR rolled paper, Epson/Citizen/Star printer ribbons AngelSoftware@comcast.net • 800-842-4153 • 253-584-0113 Fax


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE COMPUTER SYSTEMS: POINT OF SALE, CONT

COMPUTER SYSTEMS: POINT OF SALE, CONT.

CUSTOM COMPUTING . . . . . . . . .Affordable, Reliable POS Solutions www.touchexpress.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sales@touchexpress.com 317-579-2525 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317-579-2535 fax VITAL LINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8567 Vinup Road, Lynden , WA 98264 www.vitallinkpos.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .loconnor@vitallinkpos.com 360-318-9946 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .360-318-9025 fax ASI/Restaurant Manager • Touch Screen POS for Pizzerias • One Solution for Table Service, Delivery and Carry-Out • Easy-to-use Pizza Order Screen • Multi-Store Operations • Integrated Caller-ID • Mapping for Driving Directions 800-356-6037.....www.actionsystems.com

Low-Cost, Fast & Reliable-P.O.S. Touch Screen System • “CRASH PROOF” • Fast & Easy To Use • Built-in Credit Card • Delivery Dispatch • Table Service/Bar • Pick-Up/Take-Out • Let Us Upgrade Your Old System! • Installed Everywhere In U.S. • Excellent Service-24 hrs/7 days........................877-713-0300 ...............www.tpos.us

CONSULTING

NOBODY DELIVERS PIZZA BETTER! From easy order entry to tightly integrated delivery management... from innovative security to unsurpassed management tools...

NOBODY does pizza POS Call right now for a free demo. better than DiamondTouch! 800.750.3947

CRUSTS BAKER’S QUALITY PIZZA CRUSTS, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . .Waukesha, WI Par-baked, Live Yeast and Self-Rising Crusts; Dough Balls; Custom Crusts; All sizes. Contact Tom Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-846-6153 K. B. PIZZA CRUST CO. INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Franklin, PA Bakers of Par-baked Crust, dough balls & Sheeted dough Ph 1-888-KBCRUST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax 814-437-2397

Microworks POS Solutions, Inc. FINALLY! A cost effective touchscreen POS solution will handle YOUR COMPLETE OPERATION. Call for your free evaluation copy or download from our web-site today!

800-787-2068 • 585-787-1090 www.microworks.com

MOUNTAIN HARVEST PIZZA CRUST CO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Billings, MT Contact: Eric LeCaptain . . . . .800-342-6205 . . . .Fax: 406-248-7336 Sheeted Dough, Self Rising Crusts, Focaccia, Breadsticks, Prebake Crusts, Dough Balls, Custom Formulations Available. T.N.T. CRUST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Box 8926, Green Bay, WI 54308 Lisa Bartikofsky . . . . . . .920-431-7240 . . . . . . . .Fax 920-431-7249 Large variety of prebaked crusts, Readi-Rise self-rising, live yeast crusts and new self-rising wedges. Experts in customizing formulas.

CUSTOM SPICE FORMULATION & PACKAGING MCCLANCY SEASONING ..................One Spice Road, Fort Mill, SC29715 Contact: Chuck Wiley 800-843-1968 .........................................................Fax: 803-548-2379

DELIVERY VEHICLES

SP-1 doesn’t COST money, it MAKES money! 15-Second Training • Eliminate Mistakes • Reduce Theft Quick and Efficient • Increase Your Orders Call today for a free video and demo • 1-800-454-4434 • www.selbysoft.com

DOUGH PASTA FRESCA . . . . . . . . . . .email: goodeats@pastafrescainc.com 1-888-465-4994 . . . .Dough Balls, Sheeted, Self-Rising, Low-Carb, Gluten-Free, Custom Formulation . . . . . .www.pastafrescainc.com

DOUGH ROLLERS SOMERSET INDUSTRIES, INC. SOMERSET 1 Esquire Rd., North Billerica, MA 01862 978-667-3355 ...800-772-4404 .....Fax: 978-671-9466.....www.smrset.com www.pmq.com 95


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE DOUGH DIVIDERS/ ROUNDERS

DRIVE-THRU WINDOWS, CONT

DOORHANGERS

DOUGH BOXES

EQUIPMENT REBUILDS

DON’T HAVE THE DOUGH TO INVEST IN A NEW LINE?

REBUILD and UPGRADE Investing in a new bakery or pizza line can get into some serious dough! If your line needs an upgrade into 21st century technology, contact AM Manufacturing. Rebuilding and upgrading your line might be the solution to improved production rates and performance. AM engineers have the experience to review your vision and offer solutions, so you can realize your maximum profit potential. Since 1961, AM Manufacturing has the experience to optimize your operation by upgrading, rebuilding or replacing your current equipment. Call us today and weigh your future options.

FINANCING

CONTINENTAL FINANCIAL Finance and Leasing Specialists For the Pizza Industry Phone: 312.230.0088 800.323.4112 Fax: 312.230.0043 800.323.5512 www.continentalfinancial.com steven@continentalfinancial.com

FLOUR NORTH DAKOTA MILL . . . . . . . . . . .Specializing in Pizza & Pasta Flours P.O. Box 13078, Grand Forks, ND 58208-3078 800-538-7721 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.ndmill.com

DOUGH TRAYS/ PROOFING TRAYS MOLDED FIBER GLASS TRAY CO. ..............................www.mfgtray.com 6175 US Highway 6, Linesville, PA 16424 Contact Customer Service .......800-458-6050........Fax: 814-683-4504

DOUGHMATE®by Madan Plastics, Inc.

DOUGHMATE ®

Dough Trays, Covers, Food Trays, Plastic Dough Scrapers, Dollys Dough Storage and Transport Solutions. www.doughmate.com………800-501-2458………Fax: 908-276-9483

DRIVE-THRU WINDOWS READY ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.ready-access.com For all your drive-thruwindow needs. New security pizza passthrough counter slot! . . . . . .Many styles–CALL FOR A FREE CATALOG. Ph 800-621-5045 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FAX 630-876-7767 96 PMQ

FLOUR - SPELT PURITY FOODS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Don Stenchcomb PH517-351-9231 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax 517-351-9391 The Flour for your wheat allergic customers.


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE FOOD DISTRIBUTORS

DOUGH ADDITIVES 800-347-0695 buonamici-intl.com Contact Ross Violi for a distributor near you.

FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTORS

Full-line distributor to pizzerias! We deliver thousands of quality brand pizza ingredients and supplies, including the exclusive Ultimo! line. Contact Vistar today! 800-880-9900.......................................................www.vistarvsa.com

www.krisp-it.com

INSURANCE Property • Liability (Including Delivery) Workers Compensation

FRYERS/ VENTLESS AUTOFRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GARY SANTOS 257 Simarano Drive Marlboro, MA 01752 1-800-348-2976 ext 102 . . 508-460-5090 fax . . . . . www.autofry.com

ventless, hoodless odorless …relentless!

Contact Craig W. Concklin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.concklin.com 1-800-451-1565 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax: 630-629-0486

The Friar’s Temptation the countertop deep fryer

“Your Delivery Driver Insurance Specialists” 1-800-265-7711

(Hired/ Non-Owned Monoline Auto Coverage)

www.perfectfry.com

GIFT CARD

Call Tom Fryer Toll-Free: 877-312-9860 Fax: 312-986-0491 www.hibi.com(Chicago) deliveryinsurance@hibi.com

P.J. Giannini

INTERNET ORDERING

HOT SAUCES “TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces - Add excitement to Pizza, Pasta and Wing sales by using TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces in your recipes. For more information and recipe ideas, visit our dedicated foodservice website at www.tabascofoodservice.com, or call 1-888-HOT-DASH.” www.pmq.com 97


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE KIDS MARKETING

MACHINERY • OVENS • EQUIPMENT

LICENSING

MAILING SERVICES

Blue Grass Mailing Service • Delivery Area Mapping for Carrier Route Mailings • Residential & Business Saturation Mailings • Non-Customer Mailings - Merge/Purge Your Customers with All Households in Your Market Area Bill Nichols

800-928-6245 LABOR SAVING EQUIPMENT FOR THE

PIZZA INDUSTRY LOW CARB PASTA FRESCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-888-465-4994 www.pastafrescainc.com...Sheeted Pizza Dough, Prepared Pizzas, Pasta, Sauces, Prepared Lasagna, Macaroni and Cheese. email: goodeats@pastafrescainc.com 98 PMQ

1-888-749-9279 130 E. 168th St. • South Holland, IL 60473 Tel: 708-331-0660 • Fax: 708-331-0663 www.pizzamaticusa.com


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE MACHINERY • OVENS • EQUIPMENT, CONT.

MACHINERY • OVENS • EQUIPMENT, CONT.

MF&B RESTAURANT SYSTEMS, INC.

REMANUFACTURED CONVEYOR PIZZA OVENS All ovens come with a ONE YEAR parts warranty.

1-800-426-0323

We also carry a full line of new, used, and hard to find parts.

Fax: 734-426-5801

Visit our website at:

www.ovenguys.com

ONE STOP SHOPPING

or call us at:

724-628-3050

For High Quality, affordable new and reconditioned equipment, name brand parts, small wares, and much more! MIDDLEBY MARSHALL Oven, Conveyor of Excellence BAKER’S PRIDE OVEN The classic deck oven

NEW AND USED EQUIPMENT Prices to fit your budget, equipment to fit your needs. LINCOLN OVENS Quality and Efficiency

VICTORY REFRIGERATION

1-800-426-0323 Fax: 734-426-5801 PIZZA PREP 96” Pizza Prep 18” marble top $2775. 72” Pizza Prep 18” marble top $2075. 48” Pizza Prep 18” marble top $1575. Deli Case 72” $2675. Deep Fat Fryer $645.

PRECISION PLANETARY MIXER

ROYAL 6-Burner Oven $

1,050

6-Burner Griddle $

Fryer

60/80 qt S/S bowl, 2 Year Warranty

*NSF and Entela Certified

2,150

Hook, Paddle, Whip, #12 Hub

675

$6,355

$

Timer, and Safety guard

MARSAL & SONS DBL. STONE DECK OVENS MOD. SD660 $9100 • SCOTSMAN - WALK-IN COOLERS ROYAL - TRUE - MKE -TRULSEN - GLOBE

We will not be undersold on any Name Brands.

Hudson Refrigeration 800-924-7071 Catalog and Pricing. Manufacturing www.hudsonwholesalers.com www.pmq.com 99


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE MARKETING IDEAS

MARKETING IDEAS, CONT.

MAGNETS

100 PMQ


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE MAGNETS, CONT

MENU BOARDS, CONT

THE LATEST IN

MENU BOARDS!

MEAT TOPPINGS BURKE CORPORATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-654-1152 P.O. Box 209, Nevada, IA 50201-0209 . . . . . . . . .www.burkecorp.com Contact Liz Hertz . . . . . . . .515-382-3575 . . . . . .Fax 515-382-2834 FONTANINI/CAPITOL WHOLESALE MEATS Contact: Gene Fontanini www.fontanini.com . . . .800-331-MEAT Pizza toppings, Italian sausage, meatballs, sliced gyros and sliced beef SUGARDALE FOODS, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Massillon, OH Ham, Bacon & Pepperoni for all applications Contact Mark Slaughter . . . . .800-860-6777 . . . .Fax 330-834-3690

• New & Exciting Designs • All Stainless Steel Construction • One Low Price Includes Everything - Even Graphics • 8 Board Sizes, 16 Face Styles • Quick-Change Strips & Price Digits • Thousands of Stock Graphics • In Stock for Immediate Delivery • Installs in Minutes • No Assembly Required • 5 Year Warranty

Pepperoni, Fully Cooked Bacon & Meat Toppings, Hams and Deli Meats One Sweet Apple-Wood Lane Cudahy, WI 53110 Contact: Dan Kapella 800-486-6900

Home of Sweet Applewood Smoked Flavor

Fax: 414-744-4213

www.patrickcudahy.com

• SYSTEMS AS LOW AS $295

• CALL TODAY FOR A FREE CATALOG WWW.IDSMENUS.COM

MIXERS

IDS MENUS • 1-800-542-9779 • 631-218-1802

UNIVEX CORP. ..........................3 Old Rockingham Rd, Salem, NH 03079 Contact Bill Myers Ph 800-258-6358 ....................................................Fax 800-356-5614

MOISTURE ABSORBENT TOPPINGS CONDITIONER

NEW MOVERS MOVING TARGETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Perkasie, PA New Resident Direct Marketing PH 800-926-2451 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax 215-257-1570

KRISP-IT LTD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-KRISP-IT 15 East Palatine Road, Prospect Heights, IL 60070 Contact: David Pearlman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax: 847-808-8878

MENU BOARDS NATIONAL MENUBOARD..........................www.nationalmenuboard.com Lighted and magnetic menuboards, neon signs, food photos, and sandblasted signs.....1-800-800-5237 ..sales@nationalmenuboard.com

The Art Of

Custom menu boards designed to your specification

Menus

CHALK TALK

The Leading Manufacturer of Chalk Menu Boards in the World! Chalk Talk

1.800.49.CHALK

prices

start as low as

$695

www.chalkmenus.com

PASTA PASTA FRESCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-888-465-4994 www.pastafrescainc.com...flat & filled, gnocchi & specialty items email: goodeats@pastafrescainc.com

PESTO SAUCE PASTA FRESCA ..........1-888-465-4994 . .www.pastafrescainc.com Ask about our Basil and Sun-Dried Tomato Pesto, Pesto Cream Sauce, as well as Special Recipe without nuts. email: goodeats@pastafrescainc.com www.pmq.com 101


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE OLIVES

PIZZA BOX LINERS

SEVILLE IMPORTS, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SPANISH Green & Ripe Olives Superior quality/competitive prices. Buy direct from one of Spain’s largest growers.

888-401-9880....Fax 262-970-0307....e-mail:Dave@Sevilleimports.com

MUSCO FAMILY OLIVE CO. Premium California Ripe Olives, Sicillan-style, Green Olives, Stuffed Olives, Deli Olives®, Zesti OlivesTM, 100% California & Kosher certified. www.olives.com

17950 Via Nicolo, Tracy CA 95377 Contact Judy Cernoia 800-523-9828 LINDSAY® California Ripe, Spanish Green, Sicilian, Green Ripe, Stuffed Olives, and LINDSAY® Olivada Olive Spreads AIB Superior Rated, ISO Certified, OU Kosher Bell-Carter Olive Co. Contact: TJ McGrath, 800-252-3557 3742 Mt. Diablo Blvd., Lafayette, CA 94549, www.lindsayolives.com

A. CAMACHO, INC. 2502 Walden Woods Drive Plant City, FL 33566 800-881-4534 • Fax: 813-305-4545 email: info@acamacho-usa.com

Green Olives, Ripe Olives, Olive Oil, Greek Pepperoncini, Grated Cheeses and more. Proud to be the #1 Importer and your leading single source supplier for Spanish Olives. Private label or branded, National Distribution, OU Kosher, AIB Superior Rating.

PINEAPPLE TIDBITS DOLE PACKAGED FOODS CO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contact: Chris Lock One Dole Drive, Westlake Village, CA 91362 (800)723-9868 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax: 818-874-4535

PIZZA BOXES ARVCO, 845 Gibson St, Kalamazoo, MI 49001 . . . . . . . . . . .Contact: Steve France Pizza boxes circles. ripple sheets. slice boxes. sub boxes•custom print up to 4 colors. Distributors only .....................269-381-0900 . . . . . . . .Fax: 269-381-8370

STAR PIZZA BOX, INC. -Lakeland, FL & Phoenix, AZ-Largest supplier of custom-printed pizza boxes 10 case minimum - 7” thru 28” B&E flute Contact Bob Humberstone ................................................800-626-0828

PIZZA BOX CARRIERS

PIZZA DELIVERY SYSTEMS AcuTemp Pizza Delivery Systems.............866-312-0114 Increase sales and market share by delivering your pizza at the right temperature. Your choice of cordless powered or passive systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.estglobal.com/acutemp.html

PIZZA TOPPINGS “TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces - Add excitement to Pizza, Pasta and Wing sales by using TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces in your recipes. For more information and recipe ideas, visit our dedicated foodservice website at www.tabascofoodservice.com, or call 1-888-HOT-DASH.” 102 PMQ

PIZZA EQUIPMENT


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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA DELIVERY THERMAL BAGS, CONT.

Insulated Pizza Deliver That PieDelivery Hot andBags Dry The Solution To Your Moisture Problems

$14.75

$13.50

Holds 4 -16” or 3 -18”

Holds 4 -12” or 3 -14”

Minimum 4 pcs

Minimum 5 pcs

Or less Plus S/H

Or less Plus S/H

Red, Black, Dk.Green

Don’t Be Fooled by Cheap Imitations - We insulate all 6 sides and use Nylon Lining

NO RISKGUARANTEE - Try our bags for 30 days. If you’re not 100% satisfied, return them and we will refund the purchase price of the bags. 14 Styles Available Most hip s s order24 hours in h wit

TOLL FREE: (866) BAG-TO-GO (224-8646) Online @ www.deliverybags.com

Bag Solutions, PO Box 1170, Sugar Grove IL 60554

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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA DELIVERY THERMAL BAGS, CONT. CARRYHOT USA™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Made in the USA Longer lasting professional delivery transporters. www.carryhot.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-946-8224

PIZZA DELIVERY THERMAL BAGS, CONT. TCB MFG., INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-523-8715 Insulated bags for Catering and Food Delivery www.tcb-bagmfg.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219-326-8445 THERMAL BAGS BY INGRID INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gilberts, IL Thermal Bags, Heaters and Beverage Totes Ph 800-622-5560 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax 847-836-4408

PIZZA OVENS BRAVO SYSTEMS INTL., INC. A. Bisani, President 7347 Atoll Avenue, North Hollywood, CA 91605 PH 800-333-2728 . . . .bravo-systems.com . . . . .FAX 818-982-7396 DOYON EQUIP., INC.1255 Main St., Liniere, CN G0M1J0. www.doyon.qc.ca Marketing Department . . . . . 800-463-4273 . . . . . . . . Fax: 418-685-3948 MARSAL & SON’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contact Richard Ferrara Specializing in brick-lined gas fired pizza ovens. 181 E. Hoffman Ave., Lindenhurst, NY 11757-5014 PH 631-226-6688 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.marsalsons.com

ELECTRIC HOTBAG DELIVERY SYSTEM

CONTINUOUS HEAT = NO MOISTURE No temperature drop from oven to customer

800-927-6787

www.hotbag.com

PIZZAOVENS.COM Your complete source for buying and selling pizza ovens. www.pizzaovens.com or call toll free 1-877-FOR OVEN Q-MATIC TECHNOLOGIES INC . . . . . . . . . . . .www.q-maticovens.com Q-Matic Oven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cooks like a deck. PH 800-880-6836 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FAX 847-263-7367 ROTO-FLEX OVEN CO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Contact Richard Dunfield 135 East Cevallos, San Antonio, TX 78204 PH 800-386-2279 . .www.rotoflexoven.com . . .FAX 210-222-9007

PIZZA PANS

The same quality products you’ve been using for over 50 years. Ask for our new 2004 catalog! 708-345-1177 or 800-333-9133 email: info@amnow.com

PIZZA PAN PERFECTION! Put the perfection of Crown’s professional pans to work for you. Stacking pans, Black steel pans, Traditional pans, Perforated pans, and more. Make your pizza operation better and faster with Crown Custom Metal Spinning Inc. products . . .

www.crowncookware.ca. . . . 800-750-1924

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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA PEELS

SAUCE, CONT

CROWN COOKWARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-750-1924 Pizza Peels designed to perform, and built to last. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.crowncookware.com LILLSUN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PO Box 767, Huntington, IN 46750 Setting the Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Made in the U.S.A. since 1951 PH 260-356-6514 . . . . www.lillsun.com . . . . . . FAX 260-356-8337

The same quality products you’ve been using for over 50 years. Ask for our new 2004 catalog! 708-345-1177 or 800-333-9133 email: info@amnow.com

PIZZA TOPPINGS EQUIPMENT QUANTUM TECHNICAL SERVICES, INC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Frankfort, IL Automatic sauce, cheese, pepperoni and topping application systems (888) 464-1540 . . . . . . . .FAX (815) 464-1541 . . . . . . . .www.q-t-s.com

POULTRY TYSON FOODS Full Line of chicken toppings, wings, tenders, strips & filets Contact: Mike Cicatiello . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ph 800-424-4253 ext. 4551

STANISLAUS FOOD PRODUCTS CO. P.O. Box 3951, 12th & D St., Modesto, CA 95352 800-327-7201 Rick Serpa, John Larsen, Frank Tignanelli, and Kevin Rast Stanislaus Food Products specializes in fresh-packed premium tomato products for traditional Italian restaurants and pizzerias.

SPICES AND SEASONINGS “TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces - Add excitement to Pizza, Pasta and Wing sales by using TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauces in your recipes. For more information and recipe ideas, visit our dedicated foodservice website at www.tabascofoodservice.com, or call 1-888-HOT-DASH.”

TABLE GLIDES SUPERLEVEL . . . . . . . . .self-adjusting table glides from On The Level Frustrated by Wobbly Tables? Not any more! www.onthelevel.net . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-445-4337

TAKEOUT MENUS

PRACTICE DOUGH

The OFFICIAL Practice Dough www.throwdough.com

$20.00 plus S+H to order call 662-234-5481 x 121

PRINTING TOMATO PRODUCTS Pacific Coast Producers - Providing the finest quality Fresh Packed vine-ripened California Tomatoes to quality conscious Foodservice customers. Specializing in custom formulations and private branding. Pete Hansen, Paul Paoli, Marshall Frey: 800-510-3706.....www.pcoastp.com

Red Gold Food Service Sales . . . . . . www.redgold.com 120 E. Oak Street, Orestes, IN 46063 . . . . 877-748-9798 Redpack • Sacramento • Red Gold • Teresa • Glorietta

BEST CHOICE PRINTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-800-783-0990 Full-color flyers, door hangers, postcards and mailing services. Visit us at: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.bestchoiceprinting.com

SAUCE CONROY FOODS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pittsburgh, PA Makers of white pizza sauces, sub dressings and sandwich condiments 412-781-1446 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fax: 412-781-1409 Food Service Specialties . . . . . . . . .“We specialize in custom blends” Contact Sales Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-657-0811 Fax: 888-820-5426 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.fss-sauce.com

STANISLAUS FOOD PRODUCTS CO. P.O. Box 3951, 12th & D St., Modesto, CA 95352 800-327-7201 Rick Serpa, John Larsen, Frank Tignanelli, and Kevin Rast Stanislaus Food Products specializes in fresh-packed premium tomato products for traditional Italian restaurants and pizzerias.

TRUE SUN-DRIED TOMATO PRODUCTS SONO ITALIANO® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CONTACT: DAVID BERNARD 1110 W Harris RD, Ste 102, Arlington, TX 76001. . . . 800-452-5841 Fax: 817-468-2832. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sonoitalianocorp.com

VENDING

PASTA FRESCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-888-465-4994 www.pastafrescainc.com . . . .Your custom commisary for sauces, soups, pesto, RTU, or bases . . . . . . .goodeats@pastafrescainc.com The Brands you trust: 6 IN 1, Bonta, Bella Rossa, Allegro, Christina’s

1-888-Escalon • www.Escalon.net Crafted from 100% Fresh, Vine-Ripened Tomatoes.

1905 McHenry Avenue, Escalon, CA 95320

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PMQ PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE ADVERTISER INDEX

Resource Guide Advertisers Company

AccuForm AcuTemp ADM Milling AM Manufacturing American Institute of Baking ASI Atlantic Marketing AutoFry Motion Technology Baron Consulting Bellissimo Big Dave Consulting Burke Corp. Caputo Cassell Promotions Check Plus Chicago Metalic Conroy Foods Costanzo's Bakery Crown Custom Metal Spinning Custom Computing DiamondTouch, Inc. Dixie Southern Foods Dole Dough Pro Electronic Check Corp. EuroPizza Exact Target Fidelity FireFly Fontanini GMA Research Grande Cheese High Tec Mold Hix Corporation Hothold Solutions, Ltd. HTH Inc. Inedible Art International Food Service Italian Pizza School J Hicks Kamron Karrington Consulting La Nova Lillsun Manufacturing Co., Inc. LFI, Inc. Marsal & Sons Message on Hold MicroWorks Middleby Marshall Moving Targets My Pizza Promo New York Pizza Show OneSystem Paisley Enterprises Perfect Fry PieMaster Pizza Crisp Pizzamatic Point of Success Precision North America Pro Design Pro Team Q-Matic Technologies Red Gold Restaurantchains.net Saputo SelbySoft Signature Systems Stanislaus Stronghaven Takeout Printing Throw Dough US Rack Vesuvio Vistar Vital Link Wisconsin Food Show Wood Stone

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Page 92 49 61 24 81 75 71 53 92 11 41 99 65 79 60 85 57 82 89 90 63 74 35 30,31 73 43 89 66 92 59 29 3 85 63 39 90 89 71 39 79 77 100 85 69 63 79 9 4 13 19 25 45 81 21 47 93 44 50 53 83 17 68 67 92 15 85 87 4,5 71 81 23 82 85 2 60 91 27

Phone 1-800-267-7980 1-937-312-0114 1-800-422-1688 1-800-342-6744 1-785-537-4750 1-800-356-6037 1-877-493-2300 1-800-348-2976 1-480-513-3099 1-800-813-2974 1-888-BIG DAVE 1-800-654-1152 201-368-9197 1-800-729-7769 1-866-400-7200 1-800-323-3966 1-412-781-1446 1-716-656-9093 1-800-750-1924 1-317-579-2525 1-800-750-3947 1-813-249-0330 1-800-723-9868 1-800-624-6717 1-800-322-4667 +33 1 53 36 70 32 1-866-EMAIL-ET 1-800-683-5600 1-866-678-6781 1-800-331-MEAT 1-425-827-1251 1-800-8-GRANDE 1-866-969-0492 1-800-835-0606 02 66875400 1-800-321-1850 1-512-296-4633 1-866-332-0741 (39) 0421-83148 1-888-873-1120 1-888-829-7171 1-800-6LA-NOVA 1-260-356-6514 1-888-882-0551 1-631-226-6688 1-800-392-4664 1-800-787-2068 1-877-346-8367 1-800-926-2451 1-866-889-8745 1-877-281-8134 1-888-311-1110 1-614-299-3550 1-800-265-7711 1-800-533-PIES 1-800-344-0077 1-888-749-9279 1-800-752-3565 1-877-764-9377 1-800-700-1022 x10 1-800-541-1456 1-800-880-OVEN 1-888-REDPACK x33 1-800-850-9574 1-800-824-3373 1-800-454-4434 1-877-968-6430 1-800-327-7201 1-800-222-7919 1-212-252-3846 1-662-234-5481 x125 1-888-USRACKS 1-800-997-0887 1-800-526-7662 1-877-448-5300 1-800-589-3211 1-800-988-8103

Web Address www.accuform.com www.accutemp.com n/a www.ammfg.com www.aibonline.org www.actionsystems.com/pmq.htm www.pizzaispromotion.com www.autofry.com www.bizhub.com www.bellissimofoods.com www.bigdaveostrander.com www.burkecorp.com www.molinocaputo.it www.autosox.com n/a www.bakingpans.com www.conroyfoods.com n/a www.crowncookware.ca www.touchexpress.com www.rocklandtech.com www.dixiesouthernfoods.com www.dolefoodservice.com www.doughpro.com www.profitwithpizza.com www.europizzaexpo.com www.exacttarget.com/pmq www.fidelitycom.com www.fireflypos.com www.fontanini.com n/a www.grande.com www.doughtrays.com www.doughxpress.com n/a www.carsigns.com n/a www.fsehq.com www.pizzaschool.it www.jhicks.com www.profitwithpizza.com www.lanova.com www.lillsun.com n/a www.marsalsons.com www.messageonholdservice.com www.microworks.com www.middleby.com www.movingtargets.com www.mypizzapromo.com www.newyorkpizzashow.com www.onesystem.com n/a www.perfectfry.com www.piemaster.com www.pizzacrisp.com www.pizzamaticusa.com www.pointofsuccess.com www.precisionmixers.com www.bulkvending.com www.proteamvacs.com www.q-maticovens.com www.redgod.com/fs www.restaurantchains.net www.saputo.com www.selbysoft.com www.signaturesystemspos.com www.stanislaus.com www.stronghaven.com www.takeoutprinting.com www.throwdough.com www.usrack.com www.vesuviofoods.com www.romafood.com www.vitallinkpos.com www.wirestaurant.org/expo www.woodstone-corp.com

Page

A. Camacho, Inc 102 AcuTemp Pizza and Delivery Systems 102 AM Manufacturing Co 96 American Metalcraft 104, 105 AMS Enterprises 98 ASI/Restaurant Manager 95 Assal Corporation 95 Atlantic Marketing Group 105 Attias Oven Corp. 98 Bag Solutions 103 Big Dave 95 Blue Grass Mailing Service 98 Buonamici 97 California Milk Advisory Board 94 Cal-Surance Associates 97 Caputo 96 Chalk Talk 101 Check Corp 104 Check Plus 94 CheckAGAIN 94 Cluck U Chicken 94 Concklin Insurance Agency Inc. 97 Continental Financial 96 Cover Tex 104 Crown Cookware 104 Delivery Concepts, Inc. 95 DiamondTouch, Inc. 95 Doorhangers, Etc. 96 Doughmate 96 DoughPro 96, 104 DoughXpress 96 Drake Corp. 102 Dri-Pie 102 Dutchess Bakers' Machinery Co. 96 Escalon 105 Exact Target 100 FireFly Technologies 95 Food Equipment 102 Gordon Foodservice 97 Grande Cheese 94 Gum Fun 105 Heath Insurance Brokers, Inc 97 Hudson Refrigeration 99 IDS Menus 101 Inedible Art 100 International Food Service Equipment & Supply 98 Keeper Thermal Bag Co. 104 Krisp-It 97 Lindsay Olive Company 102 Magnetic Ad Concepts 100 Magnetdog.com 101 Magnets.com 100 Marsal & Sons, Inc. 96 Melissa Data 98 MF & B Restaurant Systems, Inc. 99 Microworks POS 95 Musco Family Olive Co. 102 Nick's Sausage Company 101 North Penn Financial 94 Northern Pizza Equipment 99 Our Town 101 Pacific Coast Producers 105 Patrick Cudahy 101 PeelADeal 100 Perfect Fry 97 Pizza Beacon 100 Pizza Equipment Supply, Inc. 102 Pizza Galaxy 97 Pizza Trio 100 Pizzamaker.com 98 Pizzamatic 98 Pizzasure.com 97 Pizzatools.com 104 Point of Success 95 Presto Foods 97 ProTeam 94 PSI 97 Quikserv 96 Rainbow Magnetics 100 Rainbow Printing 100 Red Gold Food Services 105 Saputo 94 SelbySoft 95 Signature Systems, Inc. 95 Smith and Jones Marketing 98 Somerset Industries 95 SpeedLine Solutions 95 Stanislaus 105 Takeout Printing 105 The Ultimate Pizza Bag Co. 103 Thermal Bags by Ingrid 104 Throw Dough 105 Thunderbird 99 Touch Pro 95 Vesuvio Foods 97 Vision Marketing 100 Vistar 97 Wood Stone 104


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Your reputation, and ours, is in every pizza. It’s what keeps your customers coming back. Burke fully cooked meats are the key ingredients for consistent success, flavor, appearance, convenience and safety.

When you make it with Burke, you always make it your best.

800-654-1152

WWW.BURKECORP.COM Product of USA • Nevada, IA

Hand-pinched style® Toppings

Pepperoni

Italian-style Meatballs

Chicken Strips


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Profile for PMQ Pizza Magazine

PMQ Pizza Magazine March/April 2005  

PMQ Pizza Magazine March/April 2005