Page 1

MAY 2016 | WWW.PMQ.COM

Brews Summertime

Brighten your sales forecast with ice-cold craft beers and pizza pairings PAGE 52

PLUS: 7 ways to spice up your recipes PAGE 62 How to prevent credit card fraud PAGE 70


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FIND US!

Now On PMQ’s Pizza Kitchen: The Southwestern Bestern PMQ test chef Brian Hernandez developed this recipe to add a little fiber to his pizza diet, and the result is muy bueno. It features key lime cilantro sauce, fresh sweet corn straight off the cob, black beans, shredded chicken breast, green chiles, diced onions and a mozzarella/cheddar blend. Topped off with minced lime and diced avocado, it’s a fresh and flavorful twist on the standard Mexican pizza.

Now On PMQ.com WEBSITE EXCLUSIVES: The Rise of the Robots Domino’s Australia has begun testing a pizza delivery robot in Brisbane. Developed by a company that specializes in robotic targets for livefire military drills, the Domino’s Robotic Unit can navigate footpaths, trails and bike paths to make neighborhood deliveries. What does this mean for flesh-and-blood drivers? Find out at PMQ.com.

Did the Mafia Bomb This Little Pizza Shop—Twice? The sign in front of Little Italy Pizzeria reads, “Explosion-Free Since ’83.” There’s a juicy story behind that motto, a mystery that has gone unsolved for decades (actually, since the mid-1970s). Did the Mafia target this Pottstown, Pennsylvania, shop? If so, why? Read the strange tale for yourself at PMQ.com.

Random Acts of Pizza Kindness

Getting Weird With the Japanese To compete in Japan, restaurateurs have to “astonish” their customers. From offbeat promotions (such as discounts for customers with pigtails) to a smartphone app that conjures up dancing girls on your pizza box, these innovators seldom disappoint. See how weird they can get at PMQ.com. 6

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

It started when a guest handed employee Jerry Livengood a $100 bill and told him to “randomly help people out” with the money. The random act of kindness had a snowball effect, eventually inspiring employees at Elkhart, Indiana’s Enzo Pizza to donate all of their March tips to cancer research. Read the touching story at PMQ.com.


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PMQ PIZZA MAGAZIN Volume 2016 | E | May

OM

4 The Pizza

with ice-cold sales forecast Brighten your pizza pairings PAGE 52 craft beers and

’s Busines Industry s Monthly

Summertime Brews

Brews e Summertim

ON THE COVER

52

| WWW.PMQ.C

20, Issue

Contents

MAY 2016

m | PMQ.co

PLUS: up 7 ways to spicePAGE 62 your recipes nt credit How to preve 70 card fraud PAGE

Warmer weather brings beer lovers out in droves. Will you be ready for them? Here’s how to ignite blazing-hot sales with seasonal IPAs, sours, lagers and pilsners. By Tracy Morin

30

FEATURES

30

Marketing Marvels: The Roman Candle

ROMAN CANDLE

Good Neighbor Discounts and Monday Fundays are just two ways this Wisconsin chain has built up slow nights and endeared itself to locals. By Liz Barrett

36

Second Chances With A Slice of Hope Week scheduled for June 19 to 25 at shelters around the country, a Slice volunteer shares her inspiring story of survival. By Andy Knef

42 RED TRACTOR

42

Pizza On the Prairie With the heart of a farmer and the tastes of a city slicker, Adam Paccione steers Red Tractor Pizza to success—and national acclaim—in Bozeman, Montana. By Rick Hynum

62

7 Ways to Spice Up Your Pizza Knowing how to balance spices and herbs in your recipes can yield a huge flavor boost and attract customers seeking a unique culinary experience. By Liz Barrett

70

Card Sharks Under new rules, credit card fraud could put you out of business. Our experts explain how to protect yourself and stay ahead of the PCI compliance curve. By Tracy Morin

78

The Top 100 Pizzeria Websites - Updated! Has your website finally cracked the PMQ Top 100? As promised, we revisit our Top 100 Pizzeria Websites to see who’s moved up and who’s dropped off entirely.

80 LEE HUNZINGER

62 8

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

The Best of NAPICS 2016 Members of the PMQ sales team report on their favorite products and services from this year’s North America Pizza & Ice Cream Show in Columbus, Ohio.


DEPARTMENTS

16

In Lehmann’s Terms: How to Add Yeast to Your Dough The Dough Doctor explains how to avoid the common mistakes of yeast management.

18

New York’s Finest: Broiled Salmon With Fennel Chef Bruno combines salmon with fennel to create an entrée that customers will swim upstream for!

18

20

Accounting for Your Money: Tracking Your Nickels and Dimes With another tax season behind you, it’s time to start looking for a good expense management tool and take control of your food costs.

26

The Think Tank: Developing a Bundle Deal Think Tank members offer tips for creating, naming and pricing meal deals for your pizzeria.

28

Recipe of the Month: Strombolini With NeapolitanStyle Flour Add this scrumptious recipe from Bay State Milling to your menu, and you can stake a claim to stromboli fame in your market.

22

94

Pizza Without Borders As Italy seeks special UNESCO recognition for authentic Neapolitan pizza, Domino’s flourishes in Milan using Italian flour and DOP ingredients.

114

Pizza Hall of Fame: Vince’s Italian Pizzeria In an area of Seattle known as “Garlic Gulch,” Vince and Ada Mottolo built a pizza enterprise that has since grown into multiple locations and concepts.

SPONSORED CONTENT CAFÉ GRAZIE

92 Check out our digital and tablet editions for bonus video content, including Chef Brian Hernandez’s video recipe for the Southwestern Bestern. Visit PMQ.com/ digital to view the digital edition, or download our tablet app at iTunes, Google Play and Amazon.com.

10

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

86

SmartMarket: Shake It Your Way Today CustomCheeseShakers.com and ForeverLids.com have teamed up to turn the ordinary cheese shaker into a must-have moneymaker.

89

Idea Zone: The ProVac FS 6 ProVac’s backpack vacuum makes a time-saving difference for pizzerias.

90

Idea Zone: NoteAds Double your marketing power with double-adhesive NoteAds.

IN EVERY ISSUE 6

Online at PMQ.com

12

From the Editor

14

From the Inbox

22

Moneymakers

91

Product Spotlight

92

Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going

99

Advertiser Index

100

Industry Resource Guide


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FROM THE EDITOR

Winner of 5 ASBPE Awards Winner of 4 GAMMA Awards ISSN 1937-5263

A PUBLICATION OF PMQ, INC. | 662-234-5481

Dodo Pizza’s Bold Experiment

W

hen Fedor Ovchinnikov, founder of the Russian chain Dodo Pizza, told us he planned to open his first American store here in Oxford, Mississippi, I thought it was a gutsy move. I also wondered if he was, perhaps, slightly crazy. Oxford has an outsized culinary reputation for a small college town. It’s a foodie town, with restaurants operated by James Beard Award winners and finalists. It’s the kind of place that could turn even a lowbred philistine like me into something of a food snob. Before I moved to Oxford in 1993, my favorite meal was Beanee Weenees and barbecue potato chips. Now I use terms like “prosciutto” and “garlic aioli.” I get irritated when the supermarket runs out of fresh basil. Undeterred, Ovchinnikov’s team opened Dodo’s doors earlier this month, with little fanfare but widespread acclaim. Even riskier was its marketing strategy—no advertising, door hangers or direct mail. Just a Facebook page that solicited 500 “beta tasters” to receive free pizzas two weeks prior to the store’s opening. That’s a lot of free food and, if it wasn’t up to par, potentially a lot of negative buzz. But Ovchinnikov’s confidence in his product was not misplaced. We’ll explain the rollout in more detail in an upcoming issue, but suffice it to say that 266 beta tasters actually ordered free pizzas, and 116 wrote reviews (not required, by the way, for the free pizza) on Dodo’s Facebook page by the end of the trial period. Of those reviews, 109 were 5 stars, and seven were 4 stars. Dodo’s overall rating was 4.9 out 5 stars. As of today (a little over a week after Dodo’s actual opening), the 4.9 rating still holds with 135 reviews, including my own 5-star write-up—the meat lovers pie blew me away. (For the record, I declined to be a beta taster.) The moral of this story: Quality pizza with fresh ingredients really can be a powerful marketing strategy in its own right. Whether Dodo Pizza can thrive over the long term without more traditional marketing, I won’t venture to guess. But we at PMQ continue to be impressed with Ovchinnikov’s team, its commitment to excellence and its willingness to innovate and take risks. Dodo Pizza is turning into a fascinating case study from which every American operator can learn.

PMQ PIZZA MAGAZINE | May 2016 | Volume 20, Issue 4

Rick Hynum Editor-in-chief PMQ Pizza Magazine

MAY 2016 | WWW.PMQ.COM

Brews Summertime

The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly | PMQ.com

Brighten your sales forecast with ice-cold craft beers and pizza pairings PAGE 52

PLUS: 7 ways to spice up your recipes PAGE 62 How to prevent credit card fraud PAGE 70

12

ON THE COVER: Summer beers and pizza make the perfect warmweather match in 2016.

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

VOLUME 20, ISSUE 4 MAY 2016 PUBLISHER

Steve Green, sg@pmq.com ext. 123

CO-PUBLISHER

Linda Green, linda.pmq@gmail com ext. 121 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Rick Hynum, rick@pmq.com ext. 130 ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Andy Knef, andy@pmq.com ext. 136

EDITOR AT LARGE

Liz Barrett, liz@pmq.com SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Tracy Morin, tracy@pmq.com

INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT

Missy Green, missy@pmq.com

ART DIRECTOR

Eric Summers, eric@pmq.com ext. 134

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sarah Beth Wiley, sarahbeth@pmq.com ext. 135 SENIOR MEDIA PRODUCER

Daniel Lee Perea, dperea@pmq.com ext. 139 MEDIA PRODUCER

Chris Green, chris@pmq.com ext. 133 MEDIA PRODUCER

Erin Toffler, erin@pmq.com ext. 124

IT SPECIALIST

Aaron Harris, aaron@pmq.com ext. 137 CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Shawn Brown, shawn@pmq.com CIRCULATION MANAGER

Sherlyn Clark, sherlyn@pmq.com ext. 120 TEST CHEF/EVENT COORDINATOR

Brian Hernandez, brian@pmq.com ext. 129

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR

Linda Green, linda@pmq.com ext. 121 SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Clifton Moody, clifton@pmq.com ext. 138 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Tom Boyles, tom@pmq.com ext. 122

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Anna Zemek, anna@pmq.com ext. 140

SALES ASSISTANT

Brandy Pinion, brandy@pmq.com ext. 127

PMQ INTERNATIONAL PMQ CHINA

Yvonne Liu, yvonne@pmq.com PMQ AUSTRALIA-NZ

Tom Boyles, tom@pmqaustralia.com

PMQ RUSSIA

Vladimir Davydov, vladimir@pmq.com CONTRIBUTORS

Chef Santo Bruno, Tom Lehmann, Michael Rassmussen

PMQ PIZZA MAGAZINE

605 Edison St. • Oxford, MS 38655 662.234.5481 • 662.234.0665 Fax PMQ Pizza Magazine (ISSN #1937-5263) is published 10 times per year. Cost of U.S. subscription is $25 per year. International $35. Periodical postage pricing paid at Oxford, MS. Additional mailing offices at Bolingbrook, IL. Postmaster: Send address changes to: PMQ Pizza Magazine, PO Box 2015, Langhorne, PA 19047. Opinions expressed by the editors and contributing writers are strictly their own, and are not necessarily those of the advertisers. All rights reserved. No portion of PMQ may be reproduced in whole or part without written consent.


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FROM THE INBOX

NOT THE USUAL PIZZERIA I’m the owner of Sindaco’s in Luzerne, Pennsylvania. We’re not the usual pizzeria because not only do we have awesome pizza, we serve awesome food of all types. My background is in fine dining—I’m a classically trained chef, from my first Swiss apprenticeship in the Poconos to my second one in Gstaad, Switzerland, as well as a French apprenticeship in New York. I returned home after 38 years and opened Sindaco’s. We’ve been open for 18 months and have built a great reputation. I do a lot of marketing through Facebook, and we are regulars on our local NBC affiliate. I also write a recipe column in our local newspaper, the Times Leader. I’ve been featured in a lot of national magazines in the past, and I would love to get an article in your awesome magazine. Tony Sindaco Sindaco’s Luzerne, PA Thank you, Tony, for reaching out to us. Your credentials are impressive, as is your track record in the restaurant industry. You will hear back from us soon about editorial possibilities!

FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: 14

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

QUALITY JOURNALISM I met PMQ publishers Steve and Linda Green a couple of years ago in Columbus, Ohio. Since then, I’ve subscribed to your magazine. I just wanted to drop you a note to share my positive impressions of the quality of your magazine and journalism. PMQ really stands above the industry trade journals, and I felt it appropriate to express that to you. Keep up the great work! David Karam Chairman and CEO, Sbarro Columbus, OH Your kind words are appreciated by the entire PMQ staff, David. We will do our best to continue to impress you!

E W F F U T S

for good ll never be at a loss u’ Yo t: ar he ke ta s, World traveler ndon-based t Pizza, edited by Lo Ea to re he W to ks pizza, than by Phaidon. A ung and published Yo el ni Da r ee on pi pop-up itor at large Liz —including PM Q ed rts pe ex of l ne pa al of 1,705 glob ustive compendium ha ex is th te ea cr ed Barrett—help in 48 countries. outstanding pizzerias


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IN LEHMANN’S TERMS

How to Add Yeast to Your Dough Tom “The Dough Doctor” corrects some common mistakes in managing yeast for pizza dough. By Tom Lehmann Tom Lehmann recently retired as the longtime director of bakery assistance for the American Institute of Baking (AIB). He is now an industry consultant dedicated to helping pizzeria operators make more money. Need more dough advice? Visit the Dough Information Center at PMQ.com/ dough.

16

Q A

Can you offer some tips for mixing and handling yeast prior to adding it to dough?

I’ve seen many cases of improper yeast management. One pizza maker mixed his instant dry yeast (IDY) in cold water and let it stand for 10 minutes before adding it to the dough. Big mistake! The best way to add IDY is to just place it right on top of the flour when you’re ready to begin mixing. If you want to hydrate it, remember that IDY is very sensitive to water temperature. Place it in an amount of water that’s five times its weight at 95°F. This temperature is important—a variation of as few as 5°F can result in some loss of yeast and fermentative activity. Once the IDY is hydrated in the 95°F water, it can be poured into cold water without any harm. Active dry yeast (ADY) needs to be prehydrated for the best performance. Place it in about five times its weight of water at 100°F, stir until thoroughly suspended and wait 10 minutes for activation to begin. Then add it to your regular dough water or right on top of the flour.

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

Finally, there’s compressed yeast, which is also called brick yeast, fresh yeast or wet yeast—it’s all the same yeast. Some put the yeast into water and stir it to achieve suspension; this doesn’t hurt anything as long as the water temperature is between 45°F and 100°F, but it’s pointless unless you’re using a VCM mixer. (For VCMs, all yeast, regardless of the type, must be suspended in water prior to adding it to the mixing bowl.) The best way to add compressed yeast to dough is to crumble it on top of the flour just before you start mixing. Don’t worry— it will get completely distributed throughout the dough during a normal mixing process of between eight and 10 minutes (or more). I don’t recommend mixing this type of yeast into the water in the mixing bowl with salt and sugar. If you get sidetracked and forget to start the mixer for several minutes, the yeast may be damaged due to extended contact with the salt and sugar.


Be Inspired. Be Creative. Be Original.

People in more than 200 countries around the world enjoy Nutella®, the original hazelnut spread®. 1 Be creative by adding Nutella® to your menu and offer your customers the brand they love. Nutella® menu mentions on dessert pizzas have increased 52.6% over the last 3 years.2 Use Nutella® to create unique and delicious pizzas and other creative items your customers are sure to love. ✓ Gluten free ✓ No artificial colors or preservatives ✓ Certified Kosher ✓ Contains no peanuts ✓ Non-GMO ingredients ✓ 12-month shelf life from manufacturing date

For more exciting recipe ideas and to learn more about Nutella®, visit www.ferrerofoodservice.com Ferrero S.p.A. MenuMonitor Q4, 2012 to Q4 ,2015

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NEW YORK’S FINEST

Broiled Salmon With Fennel This light, healthy seafood entrée from Chef Bruno makes a perfect addition to your summertime menu.

H

ello, my readers! For this month’s recipe, I’m bringing you a classic seafood dish from Italy. You can’t go wrong with the combination of salmon and fennel—talk about an entrée that customers will swim upstream for! And it’s good for you, too, so you can market it to all of those health-conscious customers looking for something besides pizza in the warmer months. It’s a perfect, low-fat meal for your summertime menu!

Chef Bruno is PMQ’s culinary advisor, with more than 50 years of international pizza experience. He is the corporate chef for Marsal & Sons and the culinary coach of the U.S. Pizza Team.

18

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

INGREDIENTS: 2 tbsp. lemon juice 3 tbsp. fresh fennel bulbs, chopped 1 tsp. fennel seeds 3 tbsp. olive oil 4 pieces salmon steak (about 1” to 1½” thick) 1 lemon, cut into wedges Salt and pepper to taste

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ACCOUNTING FOR YOUR MONEY

Tracking Your Nickels and Dimes Take advantage of new technologies for managing and tracking your pizzeria’s expenses. By Mike Rasmussen

Q A

What’s the best way to keep track of my expenses?

You need to be able to track expenses as they’re incurred. Before tax season rolls around again, you should find a good expense management tool and establish a system, documented in the employee manual, that covers this subject all the way through to determining how tax data will be provided to your accountant at the end of the year. This expense management tool should be easy for anyone to use and customizable to fit your company’s needs. It should be accessible online, allowing you to process expenses at your convenience. It should have the ability to import expense data into your accounting software, saving time on data entry and improving accuracy. It should create expense reports automatically, pulling numbers from airline, car and hotel itineraries; credit card transactions; checking accounts; and receipts. Some tools even remember common transactions to save time and convert transactions for international travelers into the appropriate currency based on the travel date. This tool should also have a mobile interface so you can review and approve expenses on your phone or tablet. You 20

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

should be able to quickly scroll through to review, approve or deny submitted expenses. With some tools, you can take a picture of each receipt with your phone and upload it for attachment to an expense report at a later time. Most importantly, a good expense management tool lets you compare daily expenses incurred to your budget in near real-time, keeping track of those all-important nickels and dimes so you don’t have to wait 30 days before receiving and reviewing important expense reports. Finally, you can use this tool to automate and streamline your back-office tasks for expense reimbursement, minimizing errors and freeing up accountants for more critical tasks. Your employees will get paid faster, and your accountant can directly import credit card transactions and click to pay approved expense reports by check or direct deposit, saving hours of manual entry. Make it a policy to never mess with your employees’ paychecks or expense reimbursements, or trust in your brand will erode quickly! Michael J. Rasmussen is the owner of Rasmussen Tax Group (rasmussentaxgroup.com) in Conway, Arkansas. He is also the co-owner of Eyenalyze (eyenalyze.com), a company that provides real-time profit analysis for restaurant owners.


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MONEYMAKERS

The Good Kind of Parking Violation

Anger turned to delight for car owners in Roanoke, Virginia, on April 1 when they discovered that the “parking tickets” on their vehicle windshields earned them free food at Benny Marconi’s. The pizzeria’s general manager, Chase Young, prowled the city’s streets on April Fools’ Day, distributing ticket-like cards that read, “Penalty Charge Notice: Do Not Ignore!” When recipients flipped over the cards, they saw certificates for free slices. The ruse caught the attention of local TV station WDBJ and landed Benny’s on the 6 p.m. news report.

Benny Marconi’s in Roanoke bills itself as the home of the oversized “Virginia slice.”

A Slice of The Donald

Donald Trump may have caught flak for eating pizza with a fork and knife, but that hasn’t stopped Joe’s World Famous Pizzeria in Athens, Alabama, from honoring the Republican presidential candidate. Owner Joe Carlucci and local artist Morgan Griess crafted The Donald, an artistic pizza bearing Trump’s likeness. The stunt made news on local TV stations WHNT and WVTM. “Trump has taken a bite out of everyone so far, so maybe somebody will take a bite out of the pizza,” Carlucci joked to WHNT. Joe Carlucci, owner of Joe’s World Famous Pizzeria, has crafted pies in honor of several celebrities, including Donald Trump (pictured below), Tim Tebow, Nick Saban and Bear Bryant. The Donald has to be ordered at least 48 hours in advance and costs $59.

Quick Tip 1: Act Presidential You don’t have to be a pizza artist to create specialty pizzas inspired by 2016 presidential candidates. Develop original signature recipes that reflect the candidates’ personalities with clever names that link the pies to the candidates. Just don’t show favoritism unless you’re prepared to upset partisan customers! 22

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


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MONEYMAKERS

Cane Rosso: Dog’s Best Friend

After a fire wrecked the Humane Society of Southeast Texas and killed 67 dogs, Jay Jerrier, owner of Cane Rosso in the Dallas area, moved quickly to help. Within five days he’d organized a fundraiser from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. on a Monday night, with 100% of sales at Cane Rosso’s Deep Ellum location going to the organization. “In five hours we raised $17,500, and later we rounded that up to $20,000,” Jerrier says. Numerous local media outlets, including the Dallas Observer and Eater.com, helped promote the effort. One highlight: the online delivery service Caviar bought a bottle of ranch dressing for $1,000, in a nod to Jerrier’s well-publicized aversion to using the dressing as a dipping sauce for pizza. As a joke, Cane Rosso has been offering ranch dressing for sale at $1,000 per bottle for several years. Josh Tipton finally took the offer on behalf of his company, Caviar, as part of a fundraiser for the Humane Society of Southeast Texas.

Quick Tip 2: Promote Your Social Media Channels Make sure to tout your social media channels on all materials, including your website, box toppers, menus and direct mail coupons. There’s no point in having an Instagram or Pinterest account if your customers don’t know how to find it.

Sodo Hits the Ground Running for Charity

U.K. pizzeria Sodo made a dash for glory in a oneday promotion in which members of a local running club delivered pizza for charity. With three locations around London, Sodo is an eco-conscious pizzeria that doesn’t usually offer delivery because it requires using cars. But the company changed its policy for one day, as fleet-footed runners hit the streets while Periscope, the live-streaming app, tracked their progress. The stunt raised funds for a local running charity called Run Dem Crew and was named Ad of the Day by AdWeek.com. 24

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

In a Periscope promo featuring delivery by members of a local running club, Sodo sold out of pizza in three hours and now plans to make it a monthly event.


THE THINK TANK

Chains like Papa John’s have mastered the art of the bundle deal, and independent operators need to come up with their own to compete.

A

lly38562: My only competitor sells a bundle with pizza, breadsticks and a drink and calls it the Party Pack. Everybody is asking me when I’m going to sell one, but I need a name for it. Please help! brad randall: We call our bundle the Crazy Aver’s Deal. It used to be called the Crazy 8 Deal back when our competitor called theirs the Big 10 Bargain. Ours was $8, and theirs was $10. Pretty clever, except inflation makes sticking to a price difficult. The Crazy Aver’s Deal is $12.99 with no mention of the price in the name. So my suggestion from experience is to not tie yourself to or brand your deal with a price. Set a discount/price you can live with and raise it a little bit every year. 314: Single Meal Deal. We offer bundles with two pizzas, bread and a 2-liter drink and call them Family Deals. We used to have names for each size—Dinner Pak (medium), Sweet Deal (large, with dessert bread instead of cheesebread) and Mega Pak (extra-large).

26

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

PAPAJOHNS.COM

Developing a Bundle Deal Forum members offer tips for creating and naming a meal deal that boosts sales without hurting the bottom line.

Home Town Pizza: I just call mine the Family Meal Deal. It’s a large 1-topping pizza, breadsticks, tossed salad and a 2-liter bottle of soda for $22. It’s basically a $4 discount, so they can add toppings or whatever add-ons they like. Bodegahwy: I’ve never had great success with bundles, but it sure seems like a lot of you do. It has been some time since I tried one, so maybe it’s time to give it a shot again. I’m thinking of a 14” one-topping pizza, family-sized salad and two pints of ice cream for $30. They can upgrade to 16” for $2.50. That would be $6 off our menu price. Ally38562: I ended up calling it the Bundle. I rolled it out this weekend, and we have sold a ton! I’m doing a large 1-topping pizza, small cheesesticks and a gallon of sweet tea or a 2-liter of pop for $15. About half of the buyers were new customers that hadn’t been in yet! Get answers to your most perplexing problems and swap tips and ideas with the experts in PMQ’s Think Tank, the pizza industry’s oldest and most popular online forum. Register for free at thinktank.pmq.com. (Member posts have been edited here for clarity.)




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RECIPE MONTH of the

Strombolini With Neapolitan-Style Flour

INGREDIENTS: 453.59g Neapolitan-style pizza flour 9.07g salt 2.72g active dry yeast 294.84g water, 90°F 180g fresh buffalo mozzarella 22g fresh basil leaves, whole 135g Genoa salami 135g pepperoni 22g prosciutto 15g Parmesan cheese, finely shredded Sponsored by Bay State Milling

DIRECTIONS: To make the dough, add the water to a mixing bowl fitted with a dough hook, then add dry ingredients. Mix on low for 5 minutes, just bringing ingredients together. Remove dough from the bowl, cover and allow it to ferment at room temperature for 18 hours. Gently divide and round dough into 3 equal balls. Cover dough balls and allow them to rest at room temperature for 1 hour. Gently hand-stretch the dough to a 12”-long rectangle. Layer mozzarella, basil, salami, pepperoni and prosciutto onto ⅔ of the rectangle. Gently roll the dough to seal in the fillings. Roll the Strombolini baguette-style, tapering at the ends. Make five diagonal slits in the top of the roll and top with finely shredded Parmesan. Place the Strombolini onto a pizza peel dusted with coarse cornmeal and place onto a preheated hearth or pizza stone. Bake at 600°F for 8 to 10 minutes. Remove the Strombolini from oven and allow it to cool approximately 5 minutes. Slice and serve with a dipping cup of marinara sauce.

The Mysterious Origin of Stromboli It’s one of those controversies that people love to argue about—who invented stromboli? Some attribute it to Mike Aquino, a Spokane, Washington, man who supposedly invented it in 1964 to kindle the thirst of beer drinkers at his brother-in-law’s tavern. The family of Nazzareno Romano, who owned Ramono’s Pizzeria in Essington, Pennsylvania, begs to differ. They say he created the first stromboli

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in 1950. Everyone agrees on one point: The sandwich’s name comes from Stromboli, an Ingrid Bergman film that takes place on a volcanic island off Sicily called (you guessed it) Stromboli. Never heard of it? Never mind. Add this delicious recipe from Bay State Milling to your menu, and you can stake your own claim to stromboli fame!


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Because exceptional pizza starts with exceptional flour. At Bay State Milling we know flour – no matter how you slice it. Whether traditional, thick crust, thin crust, Neapolitan-style, artisan, whole-grain or gluten-free — we’ve got the products, expert advice and unmatched service that help you delight your customers. To learn more about how we can help make your pizza perfect, call 1-800-553-5687 or visit www.baystatemilling.com


Back when Brewer Stouffer was producing commercials and rock videos, he never considered opening a restaurant. Now he runs five successful pizzerias and is opening his first franchise location.

M A R K E T I N G

M A R V E L S :

The Roman Candle With Good Neighbor Discounts, Monday Fundays and a strong family focus, owner Brewer Stouffer has found success with a community-centered marketing strategy. By Liz Barrett | Photos provided by The Roman Candle

O

n the cusp of opening his first franchise after 10 years in business and five company-owned stores in Wisconsin, Brewer Stouffer, founder and owner of Wisconsin-based The Roman Candle, has a pretty busy schedule these days. But he still took the time to talk to PMQ about what makes his pizzeria unique and how he hopes to bring his love for local ingredients and the community to the rest of the country. PMQ: HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE ROMAN CANDLE TO SOMEONE WHO HAS NEVER EATEN THERE BEFORE? Stouffer: We’re an East Coast-style pizzeria that features open kitchens and a hand-tossed pizza that uses a lot of farm-fresh ingredients. We’re very proud of our dough, which takes us 36 hours to make from scratch. We press out and hand-toss every pizza to order.

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PMQ: WHO IS YOUR TYPICAL CUSTOMER? Stouffer: Primarily, our full-time customer would be a middle-class to upper-middle-class family where mom either works or stays home with the kids and cares about the food she feeds the kids. That’s kind of our bulls-eye demographic. Secondly, it would be young professionals. We have a lot of craft beers on tap and wines by the glass; we offer delivery and takeout, and we have advanced online ordering capabilities. I wouldn’t say we’re expensive, but we’re definitely not competing with $5.99 pizza. PMQ: WHERE DID THE NAME THE ROMAN CANDLE ORIGINATE? Stouffer: At the time, I was making commercials and rock videos, and that’s how I made my daily bread. I was shooting a video for a band, and we were playing with a lot of fireworks. As I was transitioning into this next


“Online ordering accounted for about 1% of our sales in 2012. Now they account for a shocking 30% of our delivery and takeout sales. Increasingly, those orders are placed on mobile phones.” — B R E W E R S TO U F F E R , T H E RO M A N C A N D L E

phase of my life, those fireworks were going off at night in slow motion, juxtaposed with the pizza enterprise, and the name just exploded quite literally into the collective imagination of the people I was building the store with at the time. It’s also vaguely Italian and playful. It was obvious from the beginning that, with a name like The Roman Candle, your brand could have a fun and retro feel with firework iconography. We have a very playful, yet refined, brand. PMQ: HOW DID YOU GO FROM PRODUCING ROCK VIDEOS TO MAKING PIZZA? Stouffer: I’ve always been interested in setting the stage. I never thought I’d own a restaurant, but I’ve always been a people person. I loved going out to eat and always loved pizza. I saw a need for a sit-down, family-friendly pizzeria in the neighborhood where I was spending a lot of time. We now have five locations and we’re starting to franchise. It’s been an amazing ride. PMQ: WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR MOST POPULAR PROMOTIONS? Stouffer: Our entire marketing focus is local and on the community. We do things that are great for our neighbors. We have a saying, “Good neighbors make great pizza,” and we really believe that. Over time, we’ve invested in the neighborhood schools, community centers, fun runs, cleanup efforts, etc. We’ve always donated to good causes and tried to sponsor events whenever we can. I’ve slowly realized that investing in our community has become our marketing plan. It’s one of the foundations of our

brand. We’ve formalized it now, and we do what’s called Community Days, where we partner with a local school or nonprofit organization and they send out emails and social media posts saying to come to The Roman Candle and the organization will get a portion of the proceeds. PMQ: WHEN DO YOU HOLD COMMUNITY DAYS, AND HOW SUCCESSFUL HAVE THEY BEEN? Stouffer: We usually hold Community Days on a Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday, which are slower nights. It’s a great way to introduce your brand to new people and to give back to your neighbors. Through Community Days and other direct donations, we were able to give back more than $50,000 this past year alone through more than 50 unique events. PMQ: IN WHAT OTHER WAYS ARE YOU REACHING OUT TO THE COMMUNITY? Stouffer: We also provide a Good Neighbor Discount to all first responders, veterans, active service members and teachers every day, not just on special holidays. We try to actively promote the discount and train our staff to recognize someone in uniform. Or if someone mentions something about a school, our staff will ask them if they know about the Good Neighbor Discount. PMQ: TELL US ABOUT THE CANDLE CLUB. Stouffer: We have thousands of members in our Candle Club, who receive email offers ranging from our “Day After” special, which is a discount after a major holiday, to online-only specials and flash sales. We use Constant

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The Roman Candle has a generous free food policy for its staff, which helps them become more knowledgeable and passionate about the food.

Contact and email to tell members about current offers, upcoming Community Days and other things we’re doing. Over the past two years, we’ve figured out that emailing once or twice a week is the ideal frequency to achieve the fewest opt-outs and best offer redemption rates. PMQ: WHAT IS MONDAY FUNDAY? Stouffer: On Mondays during the winter we offer a BOGO half-off-anything deal where you buy one of anything at full price and get anything else on the menu for half-price. It’s just a way to get people to dine in on Mondays. We definitely see a bump in sales from running the promo, but it’s still hard to change human nature. It’s hard to get people to come out on a Monday in January. So we still do the most promotions for Friday and Saturday nights, which are our busiest. People naturally want to eat out on those nights, and no matter what you do to pretty up Mondays, it will always be hard to get people in on that day. That’s why we enjoy hosting our Community Days on Mondays and Tuesdays, so we can help the community during those slow times. PMQ: HOW HAS ONLINE ORDERING HELPED YOU LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR CUSTOMERS? Stouffer: We’ve been offering online ordering for almost four years. At the time we started it, there weren’t a lot of people doing it, and it was a differentiator for us. Online ordering accounted for about 1% of our sales in 2012. Now, online orders account for a shocking 30% of our delivery and takeout sales. Increasingly, those orders are placed on mobile phones. Investing in the community has become the marketing plan of The Roman Candle, according to Stouffer.

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Over the past four years, our sales have gone up, but our sales mix has changed. Our dine-in has gone down a little bit, and our delivery stayed the same. What has gone up is our takeout. So what we’re noticing is that people still want to come to the store. They don’t mind parking and getting out of the car. But they like to walk in, maybe grab a beer, and pick up their food on their time. So we’ve been working on ways to incentivize people to either pick up their orders when it’s not so busy or grab a beer while they wait. PMQ: WHAT’S YOUR TAKE ON COUPONING? Stouffer: It’s kind of a catch-22 if you’re a premium brand that delivers because people want offers and deals, but we can’t discount our product too heavily. The food cost of one of our specialty pizzas is probably triple that of lowcost pizzas out there. But if you deliver, you have to offer coupons. It’s a double-edged sword. We are a premium product—we know the creamery where our cheese comes


Visit us at Booth # 6213


The Roman Candle was able to give back more than $50,000 through Community Days and direct donations last year.

from, our sausage is ground fresh to our specifications, and we know the farmer who grows our basil. If we didn’t offer delivery and takeout, we probably wouldn’t do a lot of offers and discounts, but we have to play that game because we deliver. So anytime we make an offer, we try to make it a value proposition such as “a large for the price of a medium,” or “a free order of breadsticks when you order a pizza and a 2-liter,” as opposed to everything being half off. You’re still rewarding the customer for buying your product, but you aren’t telling them that, if they wait until tomorrow, they can get it for cheaper. PMQ: WHY DO YOU FEEL IT’S IMPORTANT TO FEED YOUR STAFF WELL? Stouffer: We have a very generous food policy with our employees. Whenever someone works, they can have whatever they want, from fresh salads to the slice of the day. From a marketing prospective, it’s wonderful that you share your food with your staff because you want your staff to be knowledgeable and passionate about your food and be able to recommend their favorites to your customers. I also ask staff regularly about their favorite pizzas—both to eat and sell—and remind them about what makes our menu special so they can relay that info to our customers. PMQ: DO YOU USE SOCIAL MEDIA FOR MARKETING? Stouffer: We keep up our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts, but I feel like it’s mostly pay-to-play now. We do our best to have meaningful, interesting content, but we boost certain posts to bring more attention to 34

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

them. We follow the metrics and see what works and how we can do better next time. PMQ: AFTER 10 YEARS, WHY FRANCHISE THE ROMAN CANDLE NOW? Stouffer: I’m franchising so I can grow The Roman Candle and keep it local. I have a real passion for pure food and local food. Franchising is allowing me to share that passion with other communities. When we opened our fourth store in Milwaukee, it was a challenge because I didn’t know the school districts or the community. Through franchising, each store will be able to focus on its own local community. Every one of our current stores reflects the community around it, and that’s the ultimate plan for our franchises. PMQ: WHAT’S YOUR ADVICE FOR THOSE WHO MAY BE STRUGGLING WITH THEIR MARKETING? Stouffer: You don’t have to live and die marketing, but you need to do what feels right to you and come to terms with the fact that you have to market. There’s a lot of competition out there, especially for pizza. You have to let people know what you do. We found out that we love getting involved with the community; that’s our thing. Other pizzerias may find that they like holding pizza eating contests. What’s exciting? What sounds fun to you? How do you think you can get your product into more people’s hands? If you keep asking yourself that question and keep trying different things, you’ll figure out what works for your personality and the culture of your pizzeria. Liz Barrett is PMQ’s editor at large and author of Pizza: A Slice of American History.


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Second Chances A Slice of Hope Week, to be held June 19 to 25 in cities across the U.S., will bring pizza parties to shelters for women and children, the most vulnerable victims of hunger and abuse in the country.

As A Slice of Hope plans a week of pizza parties nationwide for the needy this June, a volunteer and former shelter resident shares her personal story of survival. By Andy Knef | Photos courtesy A Slice of Hope

A

Slice of Hope, the national hunger-awareness advocacy organization, will hold this year’s A Slice of Hope Week from June 19 to 25 in cities around the country, with PMQ Pizza Magazine as a partner in the cause. The nonprofit, founded and led by New York-based Bollywood actor and TV personality Obaid Kadwani, organizes volunteer-led “parties of hope” at homeless shelters and food banks in conjunction with local pizzeria operators who donate pizza and beverages for free or at significantly reduced prices. A Slice of Hope’s mission is to use America’s favorite food to spread joy and hope to people in need of a kind gesture from a warm heart. Pizza restaurants— chains and independents alike—are important partners in the effort, donating food to locations like the Barron Heights Transitional Center, a Memphis, Tennessee, facility for veterans, where PMQ staff joined the fes-

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tivities last year. “Hunger is a national epidemic in this country,” says Kadwani, an Indian immigrant who saw close friends lose their homes and go hungry while he was growing up on the tough inner-city streets of New York. “There but by the grace of God go any of us. So A Slice of Hope feeds the body and the soul by creating a day of uplifting celebration and motivation, offering not just a hot meal, but entertainment, information and emotional support to individuals seeking a better life.” BELINDA’S STORY Kadwani’s primary goal is to inspire and uplift people who are living through difficult circumstances. He believes in the power of pizza—the ultimate sharable “community food”—to do just that, and he knows that shelters are the place to start. He points to one Slice of Hope volunteer in the Philadelphia area who now feeds souls in the same


shelter where she sought refuge in 1998. At the time, Belinda Ashley was a desperate, pregnant 19-year-old with nowhere else to turn. She lived in the Life Center of Eastern Delaware County in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, for a year. Although she miscarried only a month after arriving at the shelter, she credits the hot meals and warm mentorship she found there—particularly from shelter director Jim Shelton—for turning her life around. “I came from a very religious family,” Ashley explains. “I couldn’t tell them where I was because of the pregnancy, and no other relative would take me in. The stress of the whole situation was intense.” The shelter provided a temporary home for people dealing with drug and alcohol addiction and, in many cases, a destructive lack of focus on the future. But Shelton looked into the eyes of the proud young Ashley and saw brightly burning determination. “Jim was a retired Presbyterian minister, and we joked and cried together,” Ashley recalls. “He was never judgmental or harsh. He believed in giving people chances.” FROM DESPERATION TO DETERMINATION After a tough year in the shelter, Ashley got her chance at a real job, working for a food catering company that served meals to students and trustees at an affluent private school. By 1991, she was living in her own apartment. “In the time I was in the shelter, I saw quite a bit,” she says. “For most of that period, I was the youngest person there. I wasn’t interested in being part of a lifestyle that involved drugs or alcohol. My overriding purpose was to find a good job, save money and find a place of my own to live.” Ashley later moved on to a job as a convenience store clerk and was quickly promoted to shift manager. But the forward-thinking woman knew she needed to climb out of the cycle of low-paying jobs to fulfill her dreams. She found an opportunity with a high-end kitchen equipment firm and excelled there, rising through the ranks while earning her associate’s and bachelor’s degrees online. “I loved that job and worked there until 2011,” Ashley says. “Unfortunately, in 2009, I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and started to experience vertigo. When a major corporation bought and closed our store, they offered to relocate me, but I thought the new site, in a sketchy part of town, might be dangerous. Although I wanted, more than anything, to keep working, I was forced to take severance.”

Belinda Ashley credits the late Jim Shelton, then the director of the Life Center in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, with helping her turn her life around when she was a resident of the homeless shelter at 19. Today she hosts A Slice of Hope events at the Life Center.

FOLLOWING IN ROCKY’S FOOSTEPS As her health declined further, Ashley’s only option was to accept disability. Today, she collects about half the income she was earning at her last job. She has struggled during the past five years to make ends meet, keep up with her medical treatments and combat the cognitive loss associated with MS. But this Philly fighter chose to follow in Rocky’s footsteps and put her energy into helping others. “I saw a story on TV about A Slice of Hope in 2010, and when I saw a picture of Obaid, I said, ‘I know who that is—he’s the host of my favorite TV show,’” Ashley recalls. “I emailed him and asked if he would be interested in someone volunteering at the same shelter where she resided at more than 20 years ago. He loved the idea, and I’ve been hosting A Slice of Hope parties at the Life Center ever since.”

“I look at the kids who come to this wonderful A Slice of Hope event and the adults who are dealing with their own demons, and I appreciate how fortunate I am. I was here once for a helping hand, and I’m only coming back for one reason—to offer my hand to those who need a chance for a better life.” — B E L I N DA A S H L E Y, A S L I C E OF HOPE VOLUNTEER

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Siena Tavern burnt pepperoni pizza herp de derp ba burp bunsen burner fruitcake chinny chin chin I’ll blow your house in.

Ashley, who lives around the corner from the Life Center, serves as event host, liaison with A Slice of Hope and volunteer recruiter for the annual event. She says economic hard times translate into greater numbers of hungry children coming to the shelter for the pizza party and other meals. “My goal is to expand A Slice of Hope to women’s and children’s shelters associated with the Life Center,” she adds. “For our first year, we had a band, and now we bring back the same volunteer DJ every year. Since there are so many kids, we target the entertainment toward them.” Ashley empathizes with the people who turn to the shelter for help. “My year in the Life Center wasn’t the first time I’d spent in a shelter,” she says, sadly. “As a young child, I also lived in one for a while. They don’t breed wonderful memories. Even though you’re young, you know enough to understand your family doesn’t have enough food, and you know what it feels like to go to bed at night hungry. I look at the kids who come to this wonderful A Slice of Hope event and the adults who are dealing with their own demons, and I appreciate how fortunate I am. I was here once for a helping hand, and I’m only coming back for one reason—to offer my hand to those who need a chance for a better life.”

Belinda Ashley recalls staying at a shelter as a young child. “They don’t breed wonderful memories,” she says. But today she’s working to make a difference for children in need.

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A Slice of Hope founder Obaid Kadwani, second from right, seeks to inspire people facing hardships with pizza parties and music. He gets help from organization member Rebecca Ruttle (far right) and community-minded pizzerias.

THE OPPORTUNITY TO CHANGE LIVES Pizzeria operators can help people like Ashley— and maybe even change their lives permanently— by joining the A Slice of Hope family in 2016. According to Kadwani, there are two ways to serve:

1

PARTICIPATE IN OR ORGANIZE A PIZZA PARTY AT A LOCAL SHELTER. A Slice of Hope already holds parties in many major cities around the country. View the list of cities and shelters in the “Party Schedule” section of the nonprofit’s website (asliceofhope.org) to find out if there’s already a party scheduled near you. You can donate or offer discounted food to one of those parties, or you can work with A Slice of Hope to create your own party for the shelter of your choice.

2

HOST A SLICE OF HOPE FUNDRAISER IN YOUR PIZZERIA. Proceeds raised for A Slice of Hope help pay for more pizza parties at shelters around the country. A Slice of Hope also seeks volunteers to help organize and manage the parties and musicians to provide live entertainment.

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“A Slice of Hope feeds the body and the soul by creating a day of uplifting celebration and motivation, offering not just a hot meal, but entertainment, information and emotional support to individuals seeking a better life.” — O B A I D K A D WA N I , FOUNDER, A SLICE OF HOPE As a sponsor of A Slice of Hope pizza party, pizzeria operators help start a process in which despair gradually gives way to optimism and desperation transforms into goaldriven purpose, Kadwani says. To join this cause, visit asliceofhope.org or contact Rebecca Ruttle at rebecca@ asliceofhope.org. You can also call 937-219-8618. Andy Knef is PMQ’s associate editor.


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PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


A self-described “ex-ski bum and lover of the mountains,” Red Tractor Pizza co-owner Adam Paccione has a deeply personal commitment to sustainability.

Pizza Prairie on the

With an intense focus on locally grown food and community values, Adam Paccione steers Red Tractor Pizza to success in the heart of the West. By Rick Hynum | Photos provided by Red Tractor Pizza

F

olks in Montana have lived off the land for centuries. Crow and Blackfeet warriors once roamed these frozen plains, hunting buffalo and fishing the teeming rivers. Later came the pioneers, who tilled the hardscrabble soil to grow potatoes and beans, and the ranchers, with their vast herds of cattle that still graze the far-ranging prairies. Admittedly, Eastern-bred pizzaioli like Adam Paccione, co-owner of Red Tractor Pizza in Bozeman, arrived late to the scene. But once you’ve moved into Big Sky Country—even if you’re a native New Yorker—the land tells you how to live, and you listen. You grow out your beard, you raise your own vegetables, and you make the best pizza you can make with locally grown, organic ingredients. “It’s basically the way [co-owner Tiffany Lach] and I eat, and we believe that’s the way everyone should eat,” says Paccione, who opened the farm-to-table restaurant with Lach in early 2015. “When you work with organic ingredients, food tastes the way it should. Our goal is to educate people on why it’s important to eat locally and sustainably—because it’s an investment in yourself and your community.”

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The red tractor parked in front of Red Tractor Pizza symbolizes the pizzeria owners’ belief in locally grown food and support for the area’s farmers. Paccione creates artisanal masterpieces using as many local ingredients as possible.

OLD-SCHOOL ORGANICS The big red tractor parked out front is the first sign that this is not your ordinary artisanal pizzeria. Make no mistake—Paccione has big-city tastes, using ingredients like roasted Brussels sprouts, salted capers and white truffle oil to make his wood-fired pies. But Paccione, who grew up working in his father’s pizzeria, is no snob. He likes to get his hands dirty, volunteering at local farms and helping to grow some of the very food he serves to his customers. “My dad was also a great gardener, and I’ve been by his side, learning about growing things, as long as I’ve been cooking,” Paccione says. He’s a firm believer in organic farming, not just because he cares about sustainability, but because organic food tastes better, he says. “Modifying a crop to increase yields and size and to be more resistant to disease and pests also sacrifices flavor,” he notes. “That’s really important to me from a chef ’s standpoint.”

“When you work with organic ingredients, food tastes the way it should. Our goal is to educate people on why it’s important to eat locally and sustainably—because it’s an investment in yourself and your community.” — A DA M PAC C I O N E , R E D T R AC TO R P I Z Z A 44

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

Paccione and Lach became partners in Red Tractor almost by accident. Paccione was planning to start his own restaurant when he applied for a short-term job at Lach’s other Bozeman eatery, Sola Café. “Tiffany’s application was more personal than most, and she asked what some of my passions are,” he says. “I explained in detail how I was in love with ’za!” Once they met in person, he adds, “We immediately hit it off. We were on the same page with everything—lifestyle, community, food, values—everything.” Before long, they had forged a partnership to start a new restaurant with pizza as the focus. “Honestly, I was


See us at NRA! —BOOTH #4200— May 21-24, Chicago


This photo, originally posted on Red Tractor Pizza’s Facebook and Instagram pages, caught PMQ’s attention last year and ultimately led to this feature story.

“Social media has been great for us. It’s basically our marketing strategy. It even got the attention of the Cooking Channel, which was how we ended up on Pizza Masters.” — A DA M PAC C I O N E , R E D T R AC TO R P I Z Z A

expecting a 10% to 15% stake in the company,” Paccione recalls. “She must have seen the fire in my eyes and the passion in my heart, because she offered to let me buy in for 50%. We opened seven days later!” When Lach chanced upon a big red tractor—an Allis-Chalmers model, circa 1938-1948—at a nearby farm, the name for the new pizzeria seemed obvious. With Paccione seeking out as many local ingredients as he can find, the tractor serves as a powerful symbol of the company’s dedication to the community and the area farmers 46

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who fuel Red Tractor’s menu. “We try to keep our dollars in Bozeman as much as possible,” he says. “It’s hard in the winter. We’re in the Northern Rockies and have one of the shorter growing seasons in the country. But there are some awesome local organic farms that do a really good job. My meats are local all year-round. Earlier this winter, I managed to keep a local root veggie salad going, and then I started getting local hoop-house spinach. I think it’s cool to have at least a little local produce all year.” SPROUTED GRAINS AND BILL MURRAY And what Paccione does with that produce is pretty cool, too. He describes his traditional crust as “New York-style with a Bozeman twist.” Made with organic Montana flours and a dough starter, “it’s quite a bit airier and more developed than a traditional New York style,” he says. He also offers a sprouted grain crust that he describes as “a really hearty, whole-wheat crust. We germinate three types of grain berries—kamut, oat and rye—and mix them in the dough. It has Neapolitan qualities, such as a chewier crust, which I love.” Paccione can barely contain his enthusiasm when he talks about these sprouted grains. “There’s a story behind


“We germinate three types of grain berries—kamut, oat and rye—and mix them in our [sprouted grain] dough. It has Neapolitan qualities, such as a chewier crust, which I love.” — A DA M PAC C I O N E , R E D T R AC TO R P I Z Z A the kamut berry,” he continues. “Some Montana grain farmers took a trip to the pyramids [in Egypt] and somehow acquired some ancient kamut berries from one of the tombs. They brought them back to Montana and germinated them, and it worked. At the time, it was the only kamut farm in the world—right here in Montana!” Red Tractor’s menu could be the stuff of legend, too. Gourmet ingredients abound in Paccione’s signature recipes, such as the Terra Firma, featuring roasted garlic sauce, mushrooms braised in red wine, organic baby spinach, salted capers, white truffle oil, chopped tomatoes, and mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses. The Squashage features basil pesto, baby spinach, rosemary-roasted butternut squash, housemade Italian sausage, roasted beets, chevre, fresh basil and mozzarella cheese. There’s also a story behind a signature pizza called the Bill Murray. “We came up with this special one day— garlic sauce, dates, bacon and Gorgonzola, finished with a sherry-honey reduction,” Paccione says. “We had no idea what to call it, and an employee suggested ‘the Bill Murray.’ He figured that, if it didn’t sound appealing to folks, they would still buy it because of the name. It’s one of our bestsellers now. I have made it a goal for 2016 to get Bill Murray in here to try the Bill Murray!” 48

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THE FAMILY WAY If Murray watches the Cooking Channel, he may already know about Red Tractor. Thanks to its uniquely tantalizing farm-to-pizza menu, the little shop was featured in an episode of the Cooking Channel’s Pizza Masters in 2015. It also doesn’t hurt that Paccione is a fun and charismatic character in his own right, which shows in the customer experience at the family-friendly pizzeria. If the kids get bored waiting for pizza, servers bring them a game of Hungry Hungry Hippos or a pair of Rock ’em Sock ’em Robots. Talented musicians can always land a gig there, while local artists exhibit their works for sale without having to pay a commission. The pizzeria’s perks, plus digital platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, have helped create powerful word-of-mouth around Bozeman. “Social media has been great for us,” Paccione says. “It’s basically our marketing strategy. It enables us to do what we want and present ourselves to our audience in the way we want. It even got the attention of the Cooking Channel, which is how we ended up on Pizza Masters.” After just a year and a half in business, Red Tractor has become deeply embedded in Bozeman, supporting fundraisers for school and civic groups and the local arts.


Sharing space in a 6,000-square-foot building with co-owner Tiffany Lach’s bakery, Red Tractor’s dining room seats 32 people, while the patio has room for 20 more. The pizzeria draws a family crowd as well as college students from Montana State University.

In keeping with its farm-to-pizza mission, the pizzeria also partners with Gallatin Valley Farm’s Farm-to-School program to get more locally grown food into school cafeterias. “If we teach kids, at an early age, about eating and purchasing locally—and seasonally as well—it becomes the normal way of life by the time they’re teenagers,” Paccione says. In fact, Paccione has more ideas for helping the community—and encouraging local food consumption—

than time to implement them. “I also hope to get a grant to fund an environmentally controlled indoor grow room to produce our own food but, more importantly, I want to incorporate it into an after-school program, where I would teach students the basics of gardening and then flow that into the basics of foodservice.” Meanwhile, Red Tractor’s reputation for great food and a fun customer experience continues to spread. “We hit our one-year mark on January 6, 2016, and our sales more than tripled what it cost us to open our first year,” Paccione says. “We hope to stay on that track for year two.” The competition for the pizza dollar may be fierce in Bozeman—it’s home to Montana State University, for starters, and growing rapidly—but it’s not half as fierce as Paccione’s passion for Red Tractor and his adopted hometown. “I could talk for hours about this place,” he says. “They say, ‘Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.’ Well, I haven’t worked in 13 months, because I’m in love with this place, with my staff and my community, and with everything else that surrounds me.” Rick Hynum is PMQ’s editor in chief.

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MY PIZZA

VIDEO

CONTEST


If you have an existing video about your pizzeria, or just want to use this contest as an excuse to break out the camera, we want to hear from you. We will accept videos of any length under 30 minutes—you could even submit a 6-second Vine video shot with your phone. We are looking for creative and interesting entries. Even if you don’t win, your video could be featured on PizzaTV. • Go to pmq.com/mypizzavideo to complete your entry form by June 1, 2016 • Email a link to your video to mypizzavideo@pmq.com by July 1, 2016 • Winner will be announced by August 1, 2016


Brews SUMMERTIME

From blonde ales and fruit-infused IPAs to lip-puckering sours, these seasonal beers—and pizza pairing suggestions—can ignite blazing-hot sales. By Tracy Morin

T

urns out there is a cure for those famous summertime blues—and you have just the ingredients at your operation: the classic combo of cold brews and piping-hot pizzas. There’s even a bit of science behind this magical medicine, according to Jennifer Glanville, brewer and director of brewery programs for Samuel Adams in Boston. “Rich, malty flavors develop and deepen the flavors of toppings like meat and cheese, while a beer’s hop character cuts through some of the richness of pizza,” she explains. “Cheese reflects and enhances the earthy, nutty and smoky flavors of beer, which, in turn, has the carbonation and bitterness to lift the creaminess of the cheese from the palate.” Today’s craft beer lovers pay attention to these subtleties—and, as the seasons change, their tastes change, too. Summer, in particular, brings them out in droves. In fact, when evaluating the top beer trends of 2016, Bart Watson, chief economist for the Brewers Association in Boulder, Colorado, noted that many pundits predicted summery styles as leading the charge: sessionable styles (pilsners, session IPAs and blonde/golden ales); sours (particularly sessionable sours like gose and Berliner weisse); and fruit or other infused brews (think grapefruit IPAs). Watson believes the actual trends will prove more diverse— due to the proliferation of both craft beer brewers and drinkers—but, no matter what, summertime suds-sippin’ should be a no-brainer at your pizzeria.

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A lager’s yeast and colder fermentation temperatures typically yield a cleaner, easy-to-drink finished product that’s perfect for summer.

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“The many beer styles and combinations of styles are endless, which gives beer almost double the food pairing ability vs. wine,” says Michael Miller, owner of Stick + Stone.

STICK + STONE PIZZA

“As the weather gets hotter, most people want a lager or an ale that is a little lighter on the alcohol and heavy on the citrus notes, from either added fruit or citrusy hop profiles.” — M I C H A E L M I L L E R , S T I C K + S TO N E P I Z Z A

MOVING AWAY FROM THE “DARK SIDE” Experts agree that summer seasonals move away from the “dark side” of winter—so, while certain customers will always choose a stout or porter, most will opt for lighter choices. “Above all, summer beers need to be refreshing and drinkable,” notes Mark Lewis, area sales manager at Specialty Beverage of Virginia in Rockville, Virginia. “Consumers want to be able to enjoy several beers outside when it’s hot. Generally, summer beers include pilsners, lagers or wheat beers.” He points to some popular national and regional varieties, all light in color and flavor profile: pilsner-style Sierra Nevada Summerfest; Bell’s Oberon, a wheat ale; golden Schlafly Summer Lager; and Otter Creek Fresh Slice, a white IPA. Other popular options, Lewis adds, may feature citrus flavor profiles, with notes of grapefruit, orange or lemon. 54

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At Stick + Stone Pizza in Richland, Washington, owner Michael Miller finds that his Neapolitan pies are often paired with fruitier pale ales or shandy styles, such as Elysian Brewing Superfuzz Blood Orange Pale Ale and Widmer Brothers Brewing Hefe Shandy, a traditional wheat beer brewed with lemonade and served with a lemon wedge. “The zest of citrus in these two beers adds to the ‘summeriness’ of the beers, but it’s also their easy drinking and finish that make them so popular as seasonals,” Miller says. He notes common threads among the top five most popular beers in both his region and nationally: “As the weather gets hotter, most people want a lager or an ale that is a little lighter on the alcohol and heavy on the citrus notes, from either added fruit or citrusy hop profiles.” Of course, some operators aren’t afraid to venture off the beaten path by brewing their own special styles—a


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“We notice that hefeweizen and cider styles on draft do really well in summer. But there is also increasing interest in sours, which a lot of breweries are doing now.” — D AV I D T I E M A N , FIVE POINTS PIZZA

surefire way to excite even the most jaded craft beer lovers. “One of the styles my husband, Tom Baker, loves to brew is called a gruit,” says Peggy Zwerver, co-owner of Earth Bread + Brewery in Philadelphia. “It’s a medieval style that was made before brewers discovered hops, so they added whatever herbs were available to them—primarily medicinal types of herbs. In the past, he has used herbs such as wild rosemary, yarrow and bog myrtle. They yield a very interesting flavor and nose.” If that sounds a little “out there,” keep in mind that customers are often happy to forgo the predictable in summertime. “A lot of regional and local brewers offer seasonal summertime beers, and we notice that hefeweizen and cider styles on draft do really well in summer. But there is also increasing interest in sours, which a lot of breweries are doing now,” notes David Tieman, co-owner of Five Points Pizza in Nashville, Tennessee. “Another popular style is Stiegl-Radler’s German beer brewed with grapefruit; with lower alcohol (3.2%) and a nice tartness, people can have a couple, and it appeals to those who aren’t usually big beer drinkers. Founder’s Brewing Co. Rubaeus, a raspberry beer, also sells well in summer.” In other words, don’t underestimate the consumer demand for new and interesting styles, particularly if you’re in a hop-heavy ’hood. Brewer Stouffer, founder and owner of The Roman Candle, with four locations in Milwaukee and Madison, Wisconsin, is doubling and tripling taps at his outposts thanks to a growing base of beer buffs. “In summer, we sell more wheats—bringing in a lot more oranges for Blue Moon sales—and traditional drinkers love light pilsners, but customers are also 56

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drinking those hop-forward IPAs and pale ales,” Stouffer explains. “Now sour beers (both traditional and modern interpretations) are popular as well—and our state favorite, Spotted Cow (a farmhouse ale), is a popular summer choice because it’s a little lighter.” The takeaway: Offer something for everyone! “The best beers will have enough flavor that you can enjoy them cold, and they’ll offer a hint of sourness or be bitter enough to be refreshing,” concludes Shelby Schneider, marketing director at Shmaltz Brewing Company in Clifton Park, New York. “If you appeal to those sensibilities, your beer will be a summer success.” FORECAST: SUNNY SALES Now that you’ve assembled an awesome array of warmweather staples, how do you make your sunny sales forecast a reality? First, consider what beer types might pair best with the lighter pies (think Margheritas or salad-topped) on your menu. Customers needn’t be pressured to pair with a specific beer style, but recommendations can help guide the less-knowledgeable toward the right selection. “Since summer beers are typically light, it’s best not to pair them with overpoweringly flavorful pizzas,” Lewis recommends. “Almost any summer beer should pair well with a classic Margherita, while some of the more robust, flavorful pizzas would pair well with a wheat beer or session IPA, which have a little more flavor and a fuller body that can stand up to the bigger flavors.” Operators agree that spicy pies are perfect for flavorforward styles. At Earth Bread + Brewery, Zwerver pairs a hoppy IPA with the refreshing and spicy summertime


GROWLERUSA

A server at Growler USA, with locations in seven states, pours a craft beer for a guest. The company’s founder and CEO, Dan White, says operators should worry less about technical questions of beer styles and focus on customers’ tastes.


THE ROMAN CANDLE

If your restaurant offers chicken wings, consider a summertime special pairing of BBQ wings and premium beer.

“Almost any summer beer should pair well with a classic Margherita, while some of the more robust, flavorful pizzas would pair well with a wheat beer or session IPA.” — M A R K L E W I S , S P E C I A LT Y B E V E R AG E O F V I RG I N I A

favorite Vietnam Veggie flatbread (with spicy peanut sauce, cellophane noodles, shredded carrots, bell peppers and cucumbers, then finished with chili vinaigrette, cilantro, basil and a lime wedge). The Roman Candle has paired its “sweet heat” Hot-wa-ii Pizza—featuring chipotle-infused tomato sauce, Canadian bacon and a pineapple-chipotle drizzle—with Bell’s Oberon; its fruitier bouquet complements the powerful flavors. “We always talk to beer vendors to find out what’s new, then see if we can pair it with a pizza already on our menu to give it new life,” Stouffer says. “Or we’ll take an already popular beer and craft a new pizza to pair with it.” Stick + Stone has also mastered the art of the coupling, teaming its Margherita pizza with 10 Barrel Brewing Swill, which boasts a lemon zest flavor that pairs well with the pizza’s fresh basil, cuts through the mozzarella’s mellowness and refreshes the palate. Its vegetarian pie goes well with Elysian Brewing Superfuzz Blood Orange Pale Ale—both taste-wise and in sensibility. “Elysian uses a centrifuge filtration process, as opposed to animal-based 58

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filtration processes, and Elysian beers are vegan—something the vegetarian diner will appreciate,” Miller notes. “But the pizza’s robust flavors, with peppers and onions, also intertwine with the light-drinking, fruity pale ale in a perfect braid of flavor.” Finally, another popular Stick + Stone pairing matches the signature Honey Badger pie (topped with a garlic confit spread, basil, pepperoni, soppressata, ParmigianoReggiano, fresh mozzarella and housemade honey-habanero sauce) with Iron Horse High Five Hefe; the wheat in the beer enhances the bright, sweet flavors of the honey-habanero. Most successful brew-centric pizzerias also boost their beer programs by building relationships with local brewers. Both The Roman Candle and Stick + Stone promote their favorite regional breweries through Tap Takeover nights. “A brewmaster or representative from the visiting brewery will bring old favorites, along with a few new or limited-production beers, for Stick + Stone customers, plus a suggested pairing—and maybe even a few giveaways for beer aficionados,” Miller explains. “They have been a huge success and differentiate Stick + Stone from larger franchises.” Finally, remember this: Your staff members facilitate guest contact, so you want to make sure they’re on board with your summertime beer menu. “When you get your staff excited about what you’re serving, they share with customers, so educate them and encourage team members to come up with new combos for pairing,” Stouffer says. “Experiment with different flavors and get excited—that will spread to your staff. And when staff is excited, your customers will follow suit.” Tracy Morin is PMQ’s senior copy editor.

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Beer Styles and Flavor Profiles Confused by all of the beer types on the market today? Our experts offer some insights. By Tracy Morin

A

ll beers are either lagers or ales, but those two types encompass a myriad of styles, says Jennifer Glanville, brewer and director of brewery programs for Samuel Adams in Boston. Glanville and other experts explain some key points:

IT STARTS WITH YEAST “Yeast defines a beer as either a lager, a style brewed at colder temperatures (44° to 55°F) with a bottom-fermenting yeast, or an ale, brewed at warmer temperatures (60° to 70°F) with a top-fermenting yeast. Lagers are known for their crisp, smooth flavor profiles and range in flavors, colors and aromas. Ale yeast can impart more flavor than lager yeast (like fruity, ester, banana or clove flavors) and also range in flavors, colors, aromas and alcohol strength.” —Jennifer Glanville, brewer and director of brewery programs, Samuel Adams, Boston, MA A MATTER OF INGREDIENTS “The differences between beer styles depends on the ingredients. A hefeweizen uses a German wheat ale yeast with very few hops and a large portion of wheat in the grain bill—ingredients used for fermentation in the brewing process. An IPA, by contrast, uses a lot of hops and little to no wheat in the grain bill, which is what gives IPAs their hoppy or bitter flavor. The yeast in hefeweizens creates their banana and clove flavors.” —Mark Lewis, area sales manager, Specialty Beverage of Virginia, Rockville, VA TRENDING STYLES “Within the different styles, none are more popular right now than IPA, an ale that has added hops for flavor. A pilsner is a lager that’s been hopped to amplify the hop flavors. Hefeweizens are ales that are brewed by using at least 50% wheat in the malting process, as opposed to all barley, like most other ales. Lagers tend to be more malt-forward and less hoppy compared to ales, which usually showcase hoppy bitterness.” —Michael Miller, owner, Stick + Stone Pizza, Richland, WA

Beer’s primary ingredients are water, malt, hops and yeast, but it’s the type of yeast— along with brewing temperature—that makes the difference between an ale and a lager.

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STYLE VS. FLAVOR PROFILE “Style is less important than flavor profile. For example, the textbook statement might be, ‘An ale is heavier and more bitter than a lager.’ While that’s categorically true, IPAs have a broad range of bitterness, and a lager can be brewed to taste just as hoppy as an IPA. Hefeweizens, or wheat beers, get popular during the summer because they’re light and crisp. And most of the beers on the U.S. mass market are light lagers. You can get really technical really quickly, but we’d rather talk about what the customer likes!” —Dan White, founder and CEO, Growler USA, Centennial, CO

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


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7

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To Spice Up Your

PIZZA

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

Discover how herbs and spices can enhance the flavor of your pizza—and help you create new signature pies for your menu. By Liz Barrett


F

or most pizzerias, herbs and spices such as oregano, basil and thyme have always had a prominent place on the menu. But as the restaurant industry incorporates a growing list of spices in response to increased consumer demand, pizzerias are getting in on the game, too. Understanding how to successfully balance spices and herbs in order to make them shine can result in a noticeable flavor boost. The following seven tips will set you on the right track:

1

START WITH YOUR DOUGH. There are a lot of ways to create a flavored crust, according to Tom “The Dough Doctor” Lehmann, beginning with the preparation of your dough. “You can start with onion and garlic powder,” Lehmann says. “However, a little goes a long way; use a max of ¼ of 1% of your flour weight of these spices, since they both exert a reducing effect on the dough, meaning they will make the dough softer.” Other ingredients that can be added into the dough include dried oregano, dried basil and sundried tomatoes, Lehmann says. “Mixing these three ingredients into the dough gives the dough an Italian-herb flavor. Sometimes I just get packages of dried Italian seasoning or dried Italian salad mix and add olive oil to it,” Lehmann adds. “Then I add that to the dough, and it really gives a nice flavor to the crust.”

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LEE HUNZINGER

Lee Hunzinger, former chef at Zoli’s NY Pizza Tavern in Dallas and currently a chef at Cane Rosso, says fresh herbs make a big difference in flavor, but he does sprinkle a little dried oregano over his sauce prior to adding cheese and toppings.

2

CONSIDER THE SAUCE. Lehmann says that we generally see garlic and onions in a pizza sauce, but both have a thickening effect on tomato pectin. “If you add garlic and onions to a can of tomatoes, it will look like jelly the next morning,” he notes. “The problem happens when operators start adding water to the sauce to thin it out; then the water dilutes the flavor, and you end up making a less-than-ideal sauce.” A better way to add garlic and onions to the sauce, according to Lehmann, is to enlist the help of your trusty microwave. “Put a little water in a microwave-safe bowl, along with your onion and garlic—fresh or powdered—and nuke it until it comes to a full boil. Once it boils, take it out, let it cool and add it to your sauce. This can be achieved in a saute pan as well, as long as the onions and garlic reach an internal temperature of 185°.” Lee Hunzinger, a chef at Cane Rosso in Dallas, has his own ideas for pizza sauce. Rather than mixing seasoning into the sauce, Hunzinger, the former head pizzaiolo and manager at Zoli’s NY Pizza Tavern, sprinkles dried oregano over the sauce prior to adding cheese and toppings. “Oregano is a very strong spice, so just a hint of it goes a long way,” he says. “We choose not to add any seasonings, except sea salt, to our sauce, since dried herbs can change the color of your sauce as the herbs hydrate.”

3

USE FRESH HERBS WHEN POSSIBLE. Over the years, Lehmann has found that many consumers associate pizza with heartburn, but after testing various pizza ingredients, he found it was actually the dried basil and dried oregano that had customers feeling the burn. “It’s not that expensive to use fresh herbs,” Lehmann says. “Besides that, consumers are better able to taste the other ingredients when we remove the dried herbs. I think that, over time, pizzeria operators keep adding more and more dried herbs to make their sauce more flavorful, and that’s becoming the flavor of the pizza. You can’t taste anything else, including the cheese. When you get away from using the dried herbs, the fresh herb flavor becomes much more aromatic and less pungent.” “I like to use fresh herbs as opposed to dried herbs,” agrees Hunzinger. “I just think the flavor is a lot better with fresh.” Which herbs he uses depends on the pizza. “If I’m using chicken on a pizza, I’ll have fresh rosemary and thyme in the marinade,” he says. “When I can, I’ll also use fresh rosemary in our toppings when we’re roasting mushrooms; rosemary grows right in front of my apartment, so I can just pick it off the bush.”

“I know it costs a little more, but when given the option, always try to use fresh herbs and keep things simple. The flavor is just better when you use fresh and use less.” — L E E H U N Z I N G E R , C A N E RO S S O 64

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DON’T FORGET THE BASIL. Throughout pizza history, basil has been a mainstay. This simple, fresh herb is essential for a Margherita pizza and a wonderful addition to many others, including those without sauce, such as white pies. “We use fresh basil on a regular basis,” says Debbie Taggart Gainor, co-owner of Pizza Zone in Spring, Texas. “On our build-your-ownpizza option, many of our customers choose basil as one of their six ingredients.”

5

OFFER A SEASONED OUTER CRUST. Want an easy solution to those picky eaters who refuse to eat plain crust? Try offering a seasoned option. For an upcharge of 50 cents, Pizza Zone has offered its customers an optional seasoned crust for the past 12 years, according to Gainor. “We brush the outer crust with garlic butter and shake on a 50-50 mix of Italian seasoning and Parmesan cheese,” she says. “We got the idea from another pizzeria, and now 20% to 30% of our customers order the crust; some even order it on the entire base of their thin crust.” Lehmann says he mixes Parmesan and Romano cheeses with dried Italian herbs for his seasoning (it’s called “dirty crust” by some in the industry). “Before putting the toppings on, take a brush dampened with some water and brush the full outer edge,” says Lehmann. “Then just sprinkle the mixture around the edge.” Lehmann says that using water instead of butter or olive oil will allow the seasoning to adhere to

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PIZZA ZONE

“Pizzeria operators keep adding more dried herbs to make their sauce more flavorful, and that’s becoming the flavor of the pizza. You can’t taste anything else, including the cheese.”

Better Knots Garlic knots are as popular as ever, thanks to their typical glorious bath of melted butter and garlic. But what if you let the knots shine on their own—with a sidecar of select seasonings? At Pizza Zone in Spring, Texas, toasty garlic knots are served alongside two dipping sauces, according to co-owner Debbie Taggart Gainor. “We thought it would be nice if customers could dip their garlic knots like the bread at Italian restaurants,” she says. “So we serve them with two soufflé cups—one with olive oil and garlic, and the other with Italian seasoning, crushed red pepper, Parmesan, salt and pepper.”

the crust better. “After baking, if you want to add butter or olive oil to the outer crust for flavor or shine, that’s the better time to do it—not before.” “What I did at Zoli’s with the specialty pies is similar to a Stella D’oro breadstick, with fennel seeds, salt, pepper and oregano,” Hunzinger says. “That way, when customers get to the crust, if they want to dip it in something, it’s like a breadstick.” Hunzinger says he’s also made crusts with poppy seeds, creating an “everything bagel” effect. “I like to have fun with pizza,” he says. “When it comes to New York-style pizza, anything goes.”


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The Sweet Stuff Certain pizza sauces, such as New York-style and Chicago-style, need a bit of sugar to achieve their slightly sweet flavor, according to Tom “The Dough Doctor” Lehmann. However, when you’re looking to sugar to solve a problem, it’s usually time to look elsewhere. “If you or your customers think that your sauce is too acidic, sugar is not the solution,” he advises. “We found that you can neutralize some of the acidity from the tomato with an inexpensive grated Parmesan cheese—about two ounces per #10 can of sauce.”

6

EXPAND YOUR SPICE RACK. You never know when you’ll want to experiment, so keep a selection of spices on hand for testing on specialty pizzas. “We have salt and pepper, oregano, crushed red pepper, cayenne pepper, fresh rosemary, thyme, chives and dill,” Hunzinger says. “I like to be open-minded and creative, within reason; anything that can be a dish can be a pizza.”

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DON’T OVERDO IT. Remember, more is not always better. “My advice to the industry would be to tone down the use of the dried oregano and basil and increase the use of the fresh green-leaf versions,” Lehmann says. “You’ll find that you can use less cheese when you use fresh herbs, because the flavors stand out more.” Hunzinger agrees, adding, “I know it costs a little more, but when given the option, always try to use fresh herbs and keep things simple,” he says. “The flavor is just better when you use fresh and use less.”

Liz Barrett is PMQ’s editor at large and author of Pizza: A Slice of History.


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Card Sharks Under new industry rules, credit card fraud could put you out of business. Learn how to work with your POS provider to get serious about PCI compliance. By Tracy Morin

T

he topic may be considerably less thrilling than dreaming up your next lobster-topped specialty pie or social media campaign, but failing to protect your customers—and your business—from credit card fraud can be downright disastrous for an independent pizzeria. Not only will it destroy your restaurant’s reputation among your most loyal customers, it could put you out of business through exorbitant fines related to PCI compliance. You could also be held responsible for absorbing costs associated with fraudulent credit card use if you don’t accept the chip-enabled EMV credit cards that have been rolling out in recent years. Sounds serious, right? Fear not—we asked experts in the field of payment technologies to help us sort through the quagmire of compliance in layman’s terms. With a little help from your POS provider and with the right equipment in place, you can stay ahead of the PCI curve. PCI PROTECTION The Payment Card Industry (PCI) Security Standards Council was founded in 2006 by American Express, Discover, JCB International, MasterCard and Visa. The cornerstone of the organization is the PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), a system of processes and rules to protect cardholders and businesses from credit card fraud—a major yet often overlooked problem among 70

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ING EN IC O G ROU P INGENICO GROUP

Accepting chip-enabled credit cards protects payment data and helps you verify that the card is legitimate, not counterfeit.

small operations, according to Robert Martin, vice president, security solutions, of Ingenico Group, based in Alpharetta, Georgia. “The DSS has requirements regarding the use, storage and transmission of that data, with the intent of keeping cardholder data out of criminal hands,” he notes. “Large merchants having data collected by criminals and resold makes headlines, but small merchants are being breached every day because they’re not adequately protecting data or are using older systems. All of the systems that handle credit card data need to have adequate protection.” Jyothish Varma, director of security solutions at Atlanta-based EarthLink, says small business owners need to get

“One set of criminals captures card data, and another set buys that data to use it personally or resell. EMV protects merchants from the fraud already out there, while PCI protects them from being the source of fraud.” — R O B E RT M A RT I N , I N G E N I C O G RO U P 72

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

caught up on PCI compliance quickly. “If you’re accepting credit cards at your pizzeria, you have to make sure the card data is protected and not out there in the hands of hackers,” Varma explains. “PCI compliance means you have proper protection and safeguards in place that protect the customer information—specifically, the credit card information—and the PCI Council has created guidelines for merchants to follow.” Many pizzerias deal with “card-present transactions,” meaning the customer swipes or inserts the card in person. Standalone terminals that process credit cards often send info directly to credit card companies, helping it remain protected. But there are other requirements for manual entry (phone or fax orders) as well as online ordering. “For these kinds of orders, the info may be stored on your POS system or even in a database through the life of the order, and there’s a whole set of requirements associated with that,” Martin says. “You can’t just throw a fax with credit card information in the trash, for example.” SOLVING THE PCI PUZZLE Unfortunately, experts agree that small business owners, such as pizzeria operators, often don’t protect their customers’ vital information. Making matters more complicated, Varma says the PCI guidelines are updated about every 12 to 18 months based on how technology evolves (indeed, Martin notes that the big breaches of 2013 were due to criminals upping the bar on how they attacked).


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“The network that customers use to connect to WiFi should be different from the network that’s processing credit card transactions.”

I NG EN

— J YOT H I S H VA R M A , E A RT H L I N K

Purchasing a chip-enabled card reader for your pizzeria helps protect you from being held responsible for counterfeit card usage.

ICO GR OU

‚ The Payment Card Industry (PCI): Companies (including Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover and JCB International), that handle credit and debit cards ‚ PCI Security Standards Council (PCI-SSC): Formed in 2006 by the PCI industry to combat credit card fraud ‚ The PCI Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS): A set of rules created by PCI-SSC to better manage cardholder information and reduce fraud ‚ Payment Application Data Security Standard (PA-DSS): Relates to secure payment application software for storing, processing and transmitting cardholder data ‚ EMV: An industry acronym for Europay, Mastercard and Visa ‚ EMV chip-enabled cards: Bank cards embedded with a computer chip that provides increased security compared to magnetic stripe cards. Most of your customers now have these cards, although the cards typically still come with magnetic stripes as well. ‚ EMV card reader: To be fully compliant with PCI requirements and better protected from credit card liability, pizzeria owners should purchase an EMV-enabled card reader to process chip-enabled cards. ‚ PCI compliance: Meeting the PCI requirements for protection of cardholders’ information. This could include a PCI-compliant POS system installed by a certified installer, a PCI-compliant web-hosting plan for online ordering and/or an EMV-enabled reader.

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PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

P

PCI Glossary: Must-Know Terms and Acronyms

The PCI divides merchants into different tiers, from level one to four, depending on how many transactions are completed per year (many mom-and-pop shops will fit into level four). Regardless of your level, however, customer data must be securely stored—with appropriate firewalls when necessary—to keep info out of a thief ’s hands. “For example, the network that customers use to connect to WiFi should be different from the network that’s processing credit card transactions,” Varma says. “Other guidelines require the merchant to scan his network on a quarterly basis to ensure no security vulnerabilities in the system.” Merchants can fill out a self-assessment questionnaire (SAQ) from the PCI Council (pcisecuritystandards.org), but many operators are confused by the complicated technicalities—not surprising, as the organization’s glossary of terms alone fills 23 pages. “The question is, how much does the business owner understand what’s in the SAQ?” Martin asks. “They’re in the business of making pizzas, not securing their networks.” Credit card companies are trying to solve the challenge by requiring the use of payment systems—such as a PCI-compliant POS system in a pizzeria—through a certified installer. This would allow the merchant to have confidence the system has been installed appropriately and up to security standards. Martin also suggests working with your merchant services provider and/or your POS system vendor to determine how to appropriately protect and secure the system.


Sticking with the old-fashioned “swipe and go” payment method makes consumers more susceptible to credit card fraud.

YOU’RE NOT ALONE If it all sounds outside your realm of knowledge or interest, you don’t have to struggle through this alone. Third-party companies like EarthLink, Trustwave and SecureWorks (to name a few) can help merchants become PCI-compliant for a nominal monthly fee, and some even provide insurance in case of breaches. They can also help you set up a PCI-compliant firewall, PCI-compliant Virtual Networking Computing tunneling (for merchants with multiple locations), or routing info directly to payment processors to protect data. These companies can even assist with employee training—such as how to maintain secure transactions if your POS system goes down—so that credit card info is protected. Before you shrug off the need for compliance—and many restaurant operators have been doing just that, at their own risk—keep in mind that penalties for noncom-

(866) 327- 4159 //

pliance with PCI requirements can reach into six figures. That can be catastrophic to a small pizza operation. And there are other risks, such as “destruction of a brand,” says Eric Hyman, vice president of product management for EarthLink. “Your customers are going to be hesitant to do business with you if you’re not secure. You can have a huge drop in revenue or, frankly, be out of business.” EVALUATING EMV Another way to protect yourself from credit card fraud is by using specialized readers to process chip-enabled cards, also called EMV (an acronym that stands for its creators:

www.micromatic.com

May 2016 pmq.com

75


Hackers have stepped up the sophistication for their cyberattacks, leading to ever-evolving rules regarding important measures such as PCI compliance.

Europay, MasterCard and Visa) technology. This technology features payment instruments, such as credit or debit cards, with embedded microprocessor chips that store and protect cardholder data. It’s also called “chip and PIN” or “chip and signature” technology. (In Europe, “chip and PIN” cards, which require PIN entry, have been de rigueur for years, but in the States, “chip and signature” is much more common.) “Payment data is more secure on a chip-enabled payment card than on a magnetic stripe,” notes credit card giant Chase. “Data from a traditional (magnetic stripe) card can be easily copied (skimmed) with a simple and inexpensive card reading device—enabling criminals to reproduce counterfeit cards.” Hence, Martin explains, while PCI compliance is meant to protect credit card info from theft in the first place, the chip-enabled EMV cards offer a better way to prevent credit card fraud by those who have already stolen that information (i.e., by creating fake credit cards). “EMV is all about authenticating the card or cardholder,” Martin says. “One set of criminals captures card data, and another set buys that data to use it personally or resell. So EMV 76

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

protects merchants from the fraud already out there, while PCI protects them from being the source of fraud.” The card’s embedded chip, using cryptographic techniques, demonstrates it’s a valid card. The chip can only be processed by an EMV-enabled card reader (although most bank cards themselves still come with both the chip and the magnetic stripe for swipe-and-sign card readers). Lost and stolen cards remain a possibility, but Martin says these are much less common than counterfeit cards. However, because the chip eliminates much of the fraud in card-present transactions, it’s imperative to protect your online ordering systems as well, because info thieves will now head there instead. “Criminals may not be targeting Joe’s Pizza website today if they can get to its POS system, but if they can’t get to [the POS] tomorrow, they may go after its website,” Martin warns. “Criminals don’t go out of business; they just change the way they attack. You’ll also need to make sure your online ordering system protects consumers’ data.” Accepting EMV offers additional incentives to the merchant, according to Chase: New programs waive a merchant’s annual PCI-DSS audit if 75% of the card’s


Before you shrug off the need for compliance, keep in mind that penalties for noncompliance with PCI requirements can reach into six figures. transactions are processed through an EMV-certified device. On the other hand, the “chip liability shift” states, “Merchants who have not made the investment in chip-enabled technology may be held financially liable for card-present counterfeit and potentially lost and stolen fraud that could have been prevented with the use of a chip-enabled POS system.” Instead of the credit card issuers taking the hit for credit card fraud, as of October 2015, merchants will now be held responsible for covering those costs. In other words, the days of simple card swipes will wane in the years ahead. Merchants should purchase EMV-capable card readers (standalone or integrated with

your POS system) that are loaded with certified software to read the chip and communicate with the card issuer. Ask your provider what EMV readers and terminals it supports and what software upgrades you need to support EMV transactions and an EMV device, Martin suggests. “The requirements of merchant compliance through PCI and EMV are about protecting their consumers and protecting their own businesses,” Martin concludes. “It adds some extra steps for the operator, but you wouldn’t go without fire extinguishers!” Tracy Morin is PMQ’s senior copy editor.

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May 2016 pmq.com

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THE

78

TOP 100 PIZZERIA WEBSITES

RANK

PREVIOUS

WEBSITE

COMPANY

PMQSCORE +/-

1

1

www.papajohns.com

PAPA JOHN'S PIZZA

99.997

0

2

2

www.dominos.com

DOMINO'S

97.4

0

3

3

www.pizzahut.com

PIZZA HUT

97.4

0

4

4

www.chuckecheese.com

CHUCK E. CHEESE'S

97.343

0

5

5

www.cpk.com

CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN

97.273

0

6

6

www.mellowmushroom.com

MELLOW MUSHROOM

97.26

0

7

7

www.unos.com

UNO PIZZERIA & GRILL

97.187

0

8

8

www.bertuccis.com

BERTUCCI'S KITCHEN

97.127

0

9

10

www.papamurphys.com

PAPA MURPHY'S TAKE 'N' BAKE PIZZA

94.773

1

é

10

11

www.marcos.com

MARCO'S

94.757

1

é ê

11

9

www.littlecaesars.com

LITTLE CAESAR'S PIZZA

94.757

-2

12

12

www.jetspizza.com

JET'S PIZZA

94.747

0

13

13

www.hungryhowies.com

HUNGRY HOWIE'S PIZZA

94.733

0

14

14

www.roundtablepizza.com

ROUND TABLE PIZZA

94.717

0

15

15

www.donatos.com

DONATOS PIZZA

94.69

0

16

16

www.toppers.com

TOPPERS PIZZA

94.657

0

17

17

www.loumalnatis.com

LOU MALNATI'S

94.617

0

18

18

www.giordanos.com

GIORDANO'S PIZZA

94.597

0

19

19

cottageinn.com

COTTAGE INN PIZZA

94.517

0

20

20

www.pagliacci.com

PAGLIACCI PIZZERIA

94.48

0

21

21

ledopizza.com

LEDO PIZZA

94.457

0

22

25

www.imospizza.com

IMO'S PIZZA

94.433

3

é

23

24

www.godfathers.com

GODFATHER'S

94.417

1

é

24

22

www.pizzaluce.com

PIZZA LUCE

94.383

-2

ê

25

23

www.extremepizza.com

EXTREME PIZZA

94.237

-2

ê

26

27

www.sbarro.com

SBARRO

94.137

1

é

27

26

www.ginoseast.com

GINO'S EAST

94.097

-1

ê

28

34

www.flatbreadcompany.com

FLATBREAD COMPANY

93.907

6

é

29

38

www.gethotboxpizza.com

HOT BOX PIZZA

93.837

9

é

30

28

www.palomino.com

PALOMINO RUSTICO

93.81

-2

ê

31

37

www.pepespizzeria.com

FRANK PEPE'S PIZZERIA NAPOLETANA

93.793

6

é

32

29

www.amicis.com

AMICI'S EAST COAST PIZZERIA

93.633

-3

ê

33

39

www.pizzaexpress.com

PIZZA EXPRESS

93.477

6

é

34

33

pizzeriadelfina.com

PIZZERIA DELFINA

93.447

-1

ê ê

35

32

www.quartinochicago.com

QUARTINO RISTORANTE

93.387

-3

36

36

flourandwater.com

FLOUR + WATER

93.343

0

37

44

www.sammyspizza.com

SAMMY'S PIZZA

93.337

7

é

38

30

www.robertaspizza.com

ROBERTA'S

93.29

-8

ê

39

41

www.pizzeriamozza.com

PIZZERIA MOZZA

93.207

2

é

40

31

www.ottopizzeria.com

OTTO ENOTECA E PIZZERIA

93.17

-9

ê

41

45

www.artichokepizza.com

ARTICHOKE BASILLE'S PIZZA & BREWERY

93.137

4

é

42

52

www.twoboots.com

TWO BOOTS

93.07

10

é

43

40

www.areafour.com

AREA FOUR

93.04

-3

ê

44

43

www.piecechicago.com

PIECE BREWERY & PIZZERIA

92.97

-1

ê

45

63

www.theuppercrustpizzeria.com

THE UPPER CRUST PIZZERIA

92.92

18

é

46

86

www.stellabarra.com

STELLA BARRA PIZZERIA

92.917

40

é

47

56

www.flippinpizza.com

FLIPPIN' PIZZA

92.813

9

é

48

?

www.grimaldis.com

GRIMALDI'S PIZZERIA

92.787

N/A

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


RANK

PREVIOUS

WEBSITE

COMPANY

PMQSCORE +/-

49

35

www.nakedpizza.biz

NAKED PIZZA

92.71

-14

ê

50

101

www.hotlipspizza.com

HOTLIPS PIZZA

92.503

51

é

51

42

www.pizzaiolooakland.com

PIZZAIOLO

92.497

-9

ê

52

104

www.incrediblepizza.com

AMERICA'S INCREDIBLE PIZZA COMPANY

92.487

52

é

53

103

www.planetpizza.com

PLANET PIZZA

92.457

50

é

54

80

www.eatyourpizza.com

PIZZERIA PARADISO

92.39

26

é

55

?

www.conniespizza.com

CONNIE'S PIZZA

92.22

N/A

56

?

www.arizmendibakery.com

ARIZMENDI BAKERY

92.127

N/A

57

48

www.larosas.com

LAROSA'S PIZZERIA

92.007

-9

58

46

www.blazepizza.com

BLAZE PIZZA

91.993

-12

ê

59

51

www.oldchicago.com

OLD CHICAGO

91.953

8

é

60

50

www.papaginos.com

PAPA GINO'S

91.95

-10

ê

ê

61

58

www.modpizza.com

MOD PIZZA

91.947

-3

ê

62

55

www.mountainmikes.com

MOUNTAIN MIKE'S PIZZA

91.937

-7

ê

63

59

www.vocellipizza.com

VOCELLI PIZZA

91.92

4

é

64

53

www.homeruninnpizza.com

HOME RUN INN PIZZA

91.883

-11

ê

65

61

www.mazzios.com

MAZZIO'S PIZZA

91.847

-4

ê

66

57

www.zpizza.com

ZPIZZA

91.84

-9

ê

67

54

www.piefivepizza.com

PIE FIVE PIZZA COMPANY

91.83

-13

ê

68

60

www.patxispizza.com

PATXI'S PIZZA

91.71

-8

ê

69

83

www.markspizzeria.com

MARK'S PIZZERIA

91.677

14

é

70

62

www.grimaldispizzeria.com

GRIMALDI'S PIZZERIA

91.663

-8

ê

71

66

www.blackjackpizza.com

BLACKJACK PIZZA

91.657

-5

ê

72

69

www.myrosatis.com

ROSATI'S PIZZA

91.637

-3

ê

73

68

www.acfp.com

ANTHONY'S COAL FIRED PIZZA

91.617

-5

ê

74

94

www.stonefiregrill.com

STONEFIRE GRILL

91.617

20

é

75

91

www.foxspizza.com

FOX'S PIZZA DEN

91.607

16

é

76

67

www.peterpiperpizza.com

PETER PIPER PIZZA

91.587

-9

ê

77

95

www.johnspizza.com

JOHN'S INCREDIBLE PIZZA

91.583

18

é

78

79

www.seasonspizza.com

SEASONS PIZZA INC

91.573

1

é

79

89

www.greenmill.com

GREEN MILL RESTAURANT & BAR

91.573

10

é

80

85

www.pizzahouse.com

PIZZA HOUSE

91.557

5

é

81

64

www.davannis.com

DAVANNI'S PIZZA & HOT HOAGIES

91.557

-17

ê

82

49

www.looppizzagrill.com

THE LOOP PIZZA GRILL

91.55

-33

ê

83

82

www.glassnickelpizza.com

GLASS NICKEL PIZZA CO.

91.547

-1

ê

84

116

www.monicals.com

MONICAL'S PIZZA

91.52

32

é

85

72

brixxpizza.com

BRIXX WOOD FIRED PIZZA

91.513

-13

ê

86

74

www.pizzamyheart.com

PIZZA MY HEART

91.493

-12

ê é

87

90

www.doubledaves.com

DOUBLEDAVE'S PIZZAWORKS

91.473

3

88

88

www.gattispizza.com

GATTI'S PIZZA

91.427

0

89

70

www.austinspizza.com

AUSTIN'S PIZZA

91.41

-19

ê ê

90

71

lennys.com

LENNY'S PIZZERIA

91.41

-19

91

?

www.valentinos.com

VALENTINO'S

91.403

N/A

92

110

www.shakeys.com

SHAKEY'S PIZZA PARLOR

91.397

18

93

?

www.eastofchicago.com

EAST OF CHICAGO PIZZA

91.38

N/A

77

www.deweyspizza.com

DEWEY'S PIZZA

91.377

-17

ê

95

93

www.aureliospizza.com

AURELIO'S PIZZERIA

91.357

-2

ê

96

81

www.pizzarev.com

PIZZAREV

91.353

-15

ê

97

73

www.pizzainn.com

PIZZA INN

91.34

-24

ê

98

76

www.nypizzeria.com

RUSSO'S NEW YORK PIZZERIA

91.31

-22

ê

99

?

www.pizzafactory.com

PIZZA FACTORY

91.31

N/A

?

www.bottegalouie.com

BOTTEGA LOUIE

91.27

N/A

Is your website helping or hurting your business? Check out your company’s PMQScore at www. pmq.com/ pmq-score!

é

94

100

UP OR DOWN?

May 2016 pmq.com

79


the

BEST

of

NAPICS

2016 The PMQ staff shines the spotlight on the most exciting and innovative products at this year’s North American Pizza & Ice Cream Show in Columbus, Ohio. 80

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


THE CHEESE HOG I always look for different and efficient products when I go to a trade show. At NAPICS, I found Palazzolo’s Cheese Hog. This American-made machine can take a block of cheese, weighing from 25 to 50 pounds, and grate or shred it in a minute. It’s great for pizzerias looking for the convenience of grated cheese without the waxy, prepackaged, shredded food-service options. If you like using freshly grated cheese on your pizzas but need a more efficient way to prepare it, then check out the Cheese Hog. 513-528-7016, thecheesehog.com

Linda GREEN Co-Publisher

CHURCHILL CONTAINER I love a good to-go cup. It’s a walking billboard for your business and often gets used and reused until you can’t read the cup anymore. Churchill Container, a leading American manufacturer of plastic cups, drinkware and containers, has a high-quality printed plastic cup. This one-stop shop offers disposable cups, printed souvenir cups and high-end IML decoration under one roof. With Churchill’s fast lead times, low minimums and award-winning creative services, how could you lose with this promotion? 913-422-6416, churchillcontainer.com PDQ POS PMQ has focused this year on getting the pizza industry “Wired Up and Fired Up” for online ordering and increased sales, so I was excited to see that PDQ has a handy e-book, 7 Essential Ingredients for the Best POS System for Your Business. It’s filled with important, helpful information such as must-have features, payment and network security and full-cost transparency. Anyone who’s looking to buy or upgrade their POS system needs to download a free copy today at pdqpos. com/pizza-pos-buyers-guide. 877-968-6430 VENEZIA BREAD COMPANY I can’t visit a pizza show and not find food to talk about. Venezia offers a delicious par-baked crust that can be either crispy or chewy with a light texture. I found this crust to be very high quality. It could also be a great time-saver for your pizzeria. Have you thought about adding take-and-bakes to your grab-and-go offerings? This crust could hold up to the heartiest of toppings. 330-518-1921, mneely@veneziabread.com FROZEN SOLUTIONS What is the “wow” that sets your pizzeria apart from others? At NAPICS, I found color-changing utensils from Frozen Solutions that might just be the “wow” you are looking for. Kids will love the Magic line of spoons, straws and cups. They change colors—from pink to purple or white to blue, for example—when exposed to cold temperatures. They’re perfect for ice cream and frozen yogurt and can be customized for your shop. 888-698-1711, frozensolutions.com May 2016 pmq.com

81


Tom BOYLES Account Representative

REPEATREWARDS LOYALTY PROGRAMS I see a lot of marketing ideas at trade shows, but RepeatRewards stood out. They are an all-in-one marketing solution and handle everything from getting customers in the door through keeping them coming back. Their services include loyalty programs, gift card and e-gift card programs, custom mobile apps, social media management and online ordering. Best of all, their services can be used independently or together. With their online ordering platform, customers can place orders and earn loyalty points at the same time, which results in a higher check average! 866-877-2737, RepeatRewards.com

CATERING STONE WARMERS AND CHILLERS This new product provides a hot and cold solution for delivery, catering and other uses. The Catering Stone is a block that can be frozen for use as a cold table for catering or boiled in hot water to keep dishes heated without flames. That means no messy melted ice to clean up or open-flame or heat-source smell. I really like the fact that they can be inserted into normal hot bags to keep delivered pizza hot at a fraction of the cost of high-tech thermal bags. 888-546-8786, cateringstone.com

URBAN FARMER GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS Like it or not, people with gluten intolerance are demanding more pizza options. If you don’t get their business, your competitor down the street will. That’s why I chose Urban Farmer as one of my best ideas from NAPICS. They offer premade gluten-free pizza crust as well as frozen dough balls and sundried tomatoes, all gluten-free. Their products have no preservatives, additives, colors, flavors, trans fats or refined sugars, and they’re kosher-certified. 815-468-7200, urbanfarmergf.com

POS EXPRESS While it may not sound glamorous, POS supplies are important to keep your business running smoothly. If you’re out of paper, your kitchen doesn’t get orders, customers don’t get receipts, and drivers have no idea where they are going. At NAPICS, I discovered POS Express, the leading manufacturer of POS receipt rolls. They supply BPA-free thermal, bond and carbonless rolls and are compatible with most POS printers. One thing I liked was that POS Express manufactures its paper rolls and provides fulfillment services to make sure you get what you need fast. As Micros is one of the top POS systems in pizzerias, POS Express provides rolls and ribbons to support Micros equipment and is a suggested supplier on the Oracle/Micros website. Another advantage: their same-day shipping on orders received by 2:30 p.m. (ET) with Midwest and West Coast manufacturing and fulfillment centers, and all orders are tracked through delivery. All online orders receive free shipping. 877-767-4505, posexpress.com 82

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


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SMARTMARKET Industry innovators share their insights and expertise to help you attract more customers and sell more pizza. SHAKE UP YOUR MARKETING! CustomCheeseShakers.com and Forever Lids have turned ordinary cheese shakers into marketing must-haves.

IDEA ZONE: A CLEANER SWEEP WITH BACKPACK VACUUMS Dion’s, one of the country’s top small chains, has cut its cleaning time in half with ProVac backpack vacuums.

IDEA ZONE: NOTE ADS Double your pizzeria’s marketing power with double-adhesive NoteAds.

May 2016 pmq.com

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SMARTMARKET CUSTOMCHEESESHAKERS.COM/FOREVER LIDS

SPONSORED CONTENT

Shake It Your Way Today! CustomCheeseShakers.com and ForeverLids.com are turning ordinary shakers into branding and promotional must-haves for pizzerias.

I

n every pizzeria, you are destined to find a cheese shaker. Whether filled with cheese, crushed red pepper or oregano, it’ll be there.  The shaker has not seen much advancement over the years, although the pizza restaurant industry is ever-changing. Both CustomCheeseShakers.com and ForeverLids.com believe the time for advancement is now. These two companies are teaming up and revolutionizing the once-ordinary pizzeria necessity. With a passion for shaker evolution, they offer signature products manifesting not only sustainability, but also limitless branding and promotional capacity.

CustomCheeseShakers.com CustomCheeseShakers.com introduces a new concept for branding your pizzeria, while changing ordinary cheese shakers into bold, exciting branding statements. The company can produce a onecolor, full-color, or frosted (etched appearance) shaker featuring your pizzeria’s logo. These eight-ounce glass shakers are packed a dozen per box, and each shaker comes with a standard chrome-plated perforated top (although it is suggested that you hop over to foreverlids.com to enhance your custom shaker with a compatible colored shaker top!).

Michael Perri, founder of Perri’s Pizzeria and CustomCheeseShakers.com

The concept behind CustomCheeseShakers.com was birthed in upstate New York through the vision of Michael  Perri, founder of Perri’s Pizzeria, an eight-unit pizzeria chain. Perri recalls, “I was looking for something different, an idea that had multiple branding and marketing avenues. It started as a giveaway on larger orders in addition to traditional tabletop use. The positive feedback was enormous. Customers thought they were the neatest things, and I started retailing them at each of our area locations.” Unlike the standard promotional items in the business that have limitations on branding activity, these shakers offer a variety of uses, making them functional and promotional.

“I was looking for something different, an idea that had multiple branding and marketing avenues. Now we are the go-to source, making custom cheese shakers for pizzerias across the country. The positive feedback has been enormous.” —MICHAEL PERRI, FOUNDER, CUSTOMCHEESESHAKERS.COM AND PERRI’S PIZZERIA 86

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Charles Salamone, co-founder of Franchesco’s Italian Restaurant and ForeverLids.com, with son Frank and daughter Alexandra

Forever Lids

Cheesy Ideas

Forever Lids came into being when Charles Salamone, restaurateur and 38-year pizzeria owner, became frustrated with the quality of the classic metal shaker lids. The denting caused by daily use, coupled with the rusting and corrosion caused by the sodium, lactic acid and citric acid found in Parmesan and Romano cheese, proved to be frequent problems. Over his many years in business, Salamone had to keep purchasing replacement lids in order to maintain upstanding appearance and protect customer health. In 2008, he created his first polypropylene plastic lid: the Forever Lid. This lid is not only dent-, rust- and corrosion-free, but it is also dishwasher-safe and guaranteed to fit any six-, eightor 12-ounce glass or lexan shaker. Manufactured in Rockford, Illinois, Forever Lids are available in multiple colors (including red, orange, yellow, green, blue and black), can be perforated or slotted, and are very inexpensive. To place an order, go to foreverlids.com. You will be glad you did!

Custom Cheese Shakers and Forever Lids are sold separately, but putting these two outstanding products together will change the look and life of your shaker! All nine colors of the six- and eight-ounce Forever Lid tops are compatible with CustomCheeseShakers.com shakers, creating endless possibilities to shake it your way! Here are three ways to use Custom Cheese Shakers and Forever Lids to enhance your brand and to make your customers’ experience at your restaurant unforgettable: The Obvious—Replace your ordinary shakers with Custom Cheese Shakers and Forever Lids to make a statement on each one of your tables. The Perk—Give your customers a Custom Cheese Shaker with a qualifying purchase such as: “Buy 2 large two-topping pizzas and receive a free custom shaker!” The Catering Statement—Place a filled Custom Cheese Shaker— branded with your pizza restaurant’s logo—at your catering event next to your product, so everyone will know exactly where that delicious food came from!

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IDEA ZONE PROTEAM

SPONSORED CONTENT

ProVac FS 6 Cuts Floor-Cleaning Time in Half at Dion’s

D

ion’s, a family pizza restaurant with 21 locations in Colorado, New Mexico and Texas, is No. 1 in the nation for average unit sales. General Manager Nick Taylor oversees operations at Dion’s, which lives at the intersection of two main thoroughfares in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and boasts one of the largest dining rooms in the city. The store’s revolving doors mean that dust blows from the Sangre de Cristo foothills right into the dining room, creating the need for a maintenance method that captures fine particles. Routine cleaning used to consist of sweeping both carpet and hard floors, mopping hard floors and bringing in carpet cleaners once a month. But Taylor felt he wasn’t getting the best clean. “Brooms did a good job of getting the larger dirt, but not the fine particles,”

he said. “It’s very important to us to have clean floors. One of our five company values is to keep a ‘clean, comfortable store.’ We want Dion’s to feel like an extension of the home.” To create a more clean and comfortable store, Taylor’s staff switched to using the ProVac FS 6 backpack vacuum from ProTeam. Immediately, the ProVac cut their cleaning time in half, from a full hour of sweeping to just 30 minutes of vacuuming. “It took a good half hour longer to sweep the restaurant, and we were still not getting everything that was there,” Taylor said. “With the ProTeam backpack vacuum, it’s a much more visible transformation, plus it picks up what I can’t see, like fine dust and pollen. Knowing our customers are breathing cleaner air helps us uphold that ‘clean, comfortable store’ value.”

Dion’s employees can now apply that saved time to project work. Whereas Taylor would normally bring in employees a half hour or one hour before their shift to take on projects, now polishing kick plates, dusting lamps and cleaning napkin rings can often be done during the extra half hour of closing time after vacuuming is finished. “We’re getting more of the restaurant cleaned with the efficiency the vacuum provides,” Taylor said. “It’s a really good vacuum. It’s easy to train our employees to use it. I like the curved wand; it reaches under tables without having to bend down.” The ProVac has been a win-win at Dion’s, helping Taylor create a clean and comfortable store while saving time on floor cleaning. Learn more about the ProVac at pro-team.com or call Frank Baldwin at 678-653-7233.

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For more information call 866.888.2168 or visit pro-team.com

May 2016 pmq.com

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IDEA ZONE NOTEADS

SPONSORED CONTENT

NoteAds: Promotions That Double-Stick With Customers

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new double-adhesive technology makes NoteAds strong enough to be used on more surfaces as a repositionable “box topper” or “door hanger.” While the concept of using repositionable sticky note ads was popular from its introduction 15 years ago, this new technology allows shops to affordably and conveniently replace the taped or spot-glued boxtoppers. Also new is the ability to add perforation to the note, which allows the bottom portion to be used as a coupon, receipt or acknowledgment. They can be used as door hangers, direct mail “on-serts” and windshield leaflets. Best of all, unlike other direct marketing products, customers know Post-it Notes can be repositioned on the refrigerator, cupboard or wall as a reminder. Sticky note ads are the most versatile and affordable direct marketing tool available to the savvy pizza marketer. The biggest challenge for many stores has been sourcing the right type of sticky note. Many have purchased notes and been disappointed with the less expensive alternatives. That’s why 3M Post-it Note designed the new Double Adhesive Notes. While the uses as a box topper and door hanger are obvious for current customers, many of the best results for

Post-it

®

gaining new customers have come from the controversial practice of “windshielding” in parking lots. The advantage to the pizza store owner is you can hit a lot more cars than houses in the same amount of time. With NoteAds Advertising, you can get double the coverage. They are currently offering a two-for-one deal on their Standard Adhesive Notes. When you purchase one order of a quantity of 6,250 total notes, you’ll receive a second order of the same quantity for free! As we all know in the pizza industry, time is money, and now there is the option to set your promotion in motion even faster. NoteAds Advertising recently started to offer a 24hour production service for Full Color Post-it Notes. What’s even better than faster? It’s the fact that there is no additional charge for this service. This production service is available in the 3”x4” size as well as the 4”x6” size. This allows you to get your message printed on the most popular sizes and in your client’s hands in less than one week in some cases! To learn more about how NoteAds Advertising can help you draw more traffic and increase your sales, visit noteads. com or call 800-309-7502.

Double Adhesive

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Custom Printed Notes

with MORE staying power! 555-555-8585 Dine

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in • Take out

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Coupons on pizza boxes, food bags and trays - in-store signage door hangers - delivery notices - in-store donation acknowledgments For more information

Call 800-309-7502 Custom Printed Notes N 90

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

www.NoteAds.com


PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT The Toughest Planetary Mixer

World Champion Gluten-Free Dough Wild Flour Bakery creates frozen, living, gluten-free dough with the same bake-up, taste, texture and flexibility of an artisan wheat dough. Jeff Smokevitch used Wild Flour’s traditional dough to win the World Pizza Triathlon in Parma last year. It’s the only gluten-free dough that loves high-heat ovens—temperatures from 800° to 1,000°F are no problem! 720-370-3360, wildflourbakery.biz

Promoted as the toughest planetary mixer on the market, the Precision HD-60 Pizza Mixer costs less than its competitors. It’s backed by an industry-only seven-year unconditional warranty on all gears and shafts. It can handle a 50 lb. bag of flour with ice and water in its 80-quart bowl. Get all your questions answered up-front by purchasing directly from the manufacturer. 877-764-9377, precisionmixers.com

The Italian Hot Sauce Naples Drizzle has introduced “The Italian Hot Sauce.” Naples’ products are made with 100% extra-virgin olive oil and premium red & chipotle peppers. And they’re not just infused oils—there’s real chili inside! Boost revenue by selling .8 oz. (24mL) bottles (enough for a 12” to 14” pizza) and save money by reducing expenses on crushed red pepper and hot sauce. 949340-3787, naplesdrizzle.com

Marketing Through Mascots Ideal for grand openings, parades, festivals, sporting events and more, Waver mascots from Rasta Imposta greet customers with a big smile and open arms—just like you do. Everyone will remember your giant pizza mascot handing out coupons at the Friday night football game or the Little League game on Saturday. Add your logo to “personalize” your pizza! 856939-9599, rastaimposta.com

Designed For Delivery Harbortouch QSR & Delivery offers a full-featured POS system designed to help run your pizzeria faster and more effectively. Delivery-specific features include driver dispatch and advanced mapping. QSR functionality allows you to integrate caller ID and easily add discounts. It even has visual pizza buttons to quickly add toppings and better manage orders. 866-286-8744, iharbortouch.com

For the Love of Heat Paradise’s new line of top-quality, ready-to-go Ragin’ Red Hot Sauces lets you create authentic, on-trend menu items for less than expensive brand-name sauces. Wow your customers and raise your bottom line with Hot Sauce, Buffalo Sauce and Sriracha flavors. Coming soon: Extra Hot Sauce, Chipotle and Mexican Hot Sauce. 502-637-1700, paradisetomato.com May 2016 pmq.com

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ON THE ROAD WITH PMQ

Where We've Been

PMQ’s Pizzamobile is alw ays on a mission to unco ver new moneymaking milestone events in the ideas and document pizza industry. If we ha ve n’t be en to yo ur town yet, it’s only a ma time. Learn more abou t where the PMQ staff tter of has been and look out for where we’re headed next.

In addition to slices, Mikey’s Late Night Slice offers unique and irreverent specialty menu items.

MIKEY’S LATE NIGHT SLICE COLUMBUS, OHIO PizzaTV’s Daniel Lee Perea made a late-night stop at Mikey’s Late Night Slice in Columbus, Ohio, and went away impressed. In addition to five locations around the city, the company has three “PizzaAssault” food trucks, online ordering and a lively atmosphere. Mikey’s irreverent and innovative menu features a pepperoni- and cheese-stuffed hot dog (called the Pizza Dawg), the Cheesus Crust (a cheese-laden sandwich made with two slices of pizza pressed together) and specialty pies with evocative names, including The Garbàge (pepperoni, sausage, banana peppers, mushrooms, onions and extra cheese), The Loverboy (loaded with anchovies) and One Charming MotherF#$%ing Pig, described as “10 times more charming than Arnold from Green Acres.”

TONY’S PLACE VALPARAISO, INDIANA As the writer of PMQ’s Pizza Hall of Fame column, senior copy editor Tracy Morin loves making pilgrimages to the historic pizzerias profiled in those pages. In March, a visit to Valparaiso, Indiana, brought her to Tony’s Place, the hometown hangout that’s been going strong for more than 60 years and was highlighted in our January/February 2016 issue. Manager Tami Charnas chatted about the business’ history, while Morin worked her way through the menu and admired the old-school decor (complete with a menagerie of taxidermied animal heads mounted throughout the bar area). And, thanks to the pizzeria’s recent induction into the Pizza Hall of Fame, the Chicago Tribune ran its own article on the Northwest Indiana institution, calling it “the tastiest time capsule” in town. With a down-home feel and excellent value for the buck, this family-friendly pizzeria continues pleasing pizza lovers of every generation—and keeps its well-cemented legacy alive. PMQ’s Tracy Morin dropped in for a personal visit to Tony’s Place, recently inducted into PMQ’s Pizza Hall of Fame (pizzahalloffame.com).

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Where We're Going

PMQ’s staff never misses the annual National Restaurant Association Show in Chicago.

THE NRA SHOW 2016 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS It’s the restaurant industry’s show of shows, and PMQ will be there to experience—and report on—every delicious minute of it. The National Restaurant Association’s NRA Show 2016 will be held May 21 through May 24 at McCormick Place in Chicago. For this year’s event, the NRA’s Fast Casual Industry Council will host a one-day education and networking event with some of the red-hot segment’s key brands and executives. Making its U.S. debut at the NRA Show will be the co-located Bellavita Italian Pavilion, where badged attendees can sample culinary treats and learn about authentic Italian ingredients from artisan producers. Meanwhile, Sysco will present what’s being described as the trade show’s “first-ever 100% crowdsourced session” with the Food Network’s Robert Irvine, star of Restaurant: Impossible, and SpikeTV’s Jon Taffer, star of Bar Rescue. The two reality TV celebrities will “share musings, anecdotes and insights they’ve collected throughout their many years in the industry.” Additionally, a panel discussion called “Turn the Tables” will feature NRA president and CEO Dawn Sweeney and a group of “change agents” for a discussion about “embracing the future and successfully turning the tables.”

CAFÉ GRAZIE ORANGE BEACH, ALABAMA We’ve heard good things about chef Brian Navarro’s take on Italian seafood, and our editor-in-chief will try it out for himself this June. Nestled on the harbor just a few feet away from the emerald waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Café Grazie has become a can’t-miss destination for pizza loving Southern pilgrims on vacation in coastal Alabama. A repeat winner of TripAdvisor’s Award of Excellence, Café Grazie makes waves with dishes like crab-stuffed portobello mushrooms, the pistachio-crusted grouper and a Sicilian filet served with garlic mashed potatoes and wilted spinach with Gorgonzola. Cafe Grazie in Orange Beach, Alabama, is a consistent winner of TripAdvisor’s Award of Excellence.

May 2016 pmq.com

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PIZZA WITHOUT BORDERS

Reporting international trends, events and cultural etiquette from around the world By Missy Assink Paris, France Seeking UNESCO Status for Neapolitan Pizza Bearing more than 1 million signatures from around the globe, a petition to officially recognize the art of Neapolitan pizza makers has been presented to UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization). The movement is spearheaded by Alfonso Pecoraro Scanio, the president of Univerde, an organization that fights for cultural preservation in Italy. The goal is to get Neapolitan pizza making added to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list, distinguishing it from the New York pizza style. Also attending the submission for candidacy in Paris were Roberto Moncalvo, president of Coldiretti, an Italian farmers association, and Sergio Miccù, the president of the Associazione Pizzaiuoli Napoletani (APN). The decision-making process at UNESCO will involve 200 countries and take about one year.

Cultural Tip Brazil Bribery Is Part of the Process In a country shackled with bureaucracy, it’s normal to be offered the services of a despachante. The Portuguese word, meaning “expediter,” refers to someone who specializes in navigating through administrative red tape and getting things done— whether following the letter of the law or not—and may take only cash.

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Sweden Pizza Salad for Every Customer Where there is pizza in Sweden, there is pizza salad. Consisting of shredded white cabbage tossed in oil, vinegar, salt and pepper, pizza salad traditionally comes free with any pizza. Its origins are unknown, but this side dish can be found in every pizza shop, from low-cost independents to upscale dining.

Italy Domino’s Pizza Italia Expands Since Domino’s opened its first store in Milan, Italy, last October, the franchise, owned by ePizza, has created a new dough using only Italian flour. Domino’s Pizza Italia also offers DOP (denominazione di origine protetta) products like Parma ham and Gorgonzola that are guaranteed to come from Italy. Despite much resistance from social media and mainstream media alike, Domino’s Pizza Italia has flourished and recently opened its third store in Milan. Franchisee Alessandro Lazzaroni says Domino’s provides something that’s normally hard to find in Italy—an easy online ordering experience and quick delivery.

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE BULLETIN BOARD

INTRODUCING THE

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n t he e tio l c b u Dou r od P he t ty e l n b a u ar r Do W t he e l s b n e Dou v

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1-800-548-4514

www.peerlessovens.com

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Keep it CRISP

with

Pow

KRISP-IT is a moisture absorbent topping conditioner conditioner. KRISP-IT is a special formula of all natural ingredients. KRISP-IT does not change the taste, consistency, or appearance of a pizza. KRISP-IT is ready and easy to use. KRISP-IT guarantees to have your customers satised.

Krisp-It keeps your pizza KRISPY from the oven to the last bite. Call us to get a FREE SAMPLE for first-time customers!

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May 2016 pmq.com

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE BULLETIN BOARD

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PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

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ADVERTISER INDEX MAY 2016 Advertiser

Phone Website

Page

Allied Metal Spinning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 718-893-3300 . . . . . . . . alliedmetalusa.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 AM Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219-472-7272 . . . . . . . . . ammfg.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Bacio Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 885-222-4685 . . . . . . . . baciocheese.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Bay State Milling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-553-5687 . . . . . . . . baystatemilling.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Bellissimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-813-2974 . . . . . . . . bellissimofoods.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Custom Cheese Shakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844-424-LOGO . . . . . . . customcheeseshakers.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 DeIorio’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-649-7612 . . . . . . . . deiorios.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Delivery Bags Depot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844-HOT-BAGS . . . . . . . deliverybagsdepot.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Edge Ovens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-480-EDGE . . . . . . . edgeovens.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Fontanini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-331-MEAT . . . . . . . . fontanini.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Forno Bravo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-407-5119 . . . . . . . . fornobravo.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Galbani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-206-9945 . . . . . . . . galbanicheese.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 39 Grain Craft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423-265-2313 . . . . . . . . graincraft.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Grande Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-8-GRANDE . . . . . . . grandecheese.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Harbortouch POS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-286-8744 . . . . . . . . iharbortouch.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Hoshizaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-438-6087 . . . . . . . . hoshizakiamerica.com/stainless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 HTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-321-1850 . . . . . . . . hthsigns.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 IBIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IBIE2016.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Infrared Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-317-5255 . . . . . . . . infradyne.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Italforni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424-364-0075 . . . . . . . . italforniUSA.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Krisp-It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-574-7748 . . . . . . . . . krisp-it.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 La Nova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 716-881-3366 . . . . . . . . lanova.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover Lloyd Pans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-748-6251 . . . . . . . . lloydpans.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 MailShark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-457-4275 . . . . . . . . themailshark.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Marsal & Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631-226-6688 . . . . . . . . marsalsons.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 MicroMatic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-327-4159 . . . . . . . . micromatic.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Microworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-787-2068 . . . . . . . . microworks.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Middleby Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-34-OVENS . . . . . . . wowoven.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 MTI Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844-785-3083 . . . . . . . . mtiprinting.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 My Pizza Protector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-766-1120 . . . . . . . . mypizzaprotector.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Our Town America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-497-8360 . . . . . . . . ourtownamerica.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 PDQ POS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-968-6430 . . . . . . . . pdqpos.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Peerless Ovens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-548-4514 . . . . . . . . peerlessovens.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Pizza Butler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 718 894 1212 . . . . . . . . thepizzabutler.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Pizza Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 855-289-6836 . . . . . . . . pizzasolutions.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Saputo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-824-3373 . . . . . . . . saputousafoodservice.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Speedline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-400-9185 . . . . . . . . speedlinesolutions.com/results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Somerset Industries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978-667-3355 . . . . . . . . smrset.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Sorrento . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SorrentoHoF.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Stanislaus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-327-7201 . . . . . . . . stanislaus.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 5 State Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . st8.fm/bizinsurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 T. Marzetti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . marzettifoodservice.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover Tyson Foodservice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479-290-4000 . . . . . . . . tyson.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover Univex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-258-6358 . . . . . . . . univexcorp.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Winona Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 920-662-2184 . . . . . . . . winonafoods.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 XLT Ovens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-443-2751 . . . . . . . . xltovens.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 PMQ provides this information as a courtesy to our readers and will not be held responsible for errors or omissions. To report an error, call 662-234-5481 x127.

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE CHEESE

BAKING SCHOOLS AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BAKING .........................................................Manhattan, KS 785-537-4750 ................................................................................Fax: 785-537-1493

BAKING STONES FIBRAMENT-D BAKING STONE.....................................................www.bakingstone.com 708-478-6032 ......................................NSF approved baking stone for all ovens by AWMCO

Made by us from our own cows’ milk! Mozzarella & More!

BEVERAGES ON TAP

We ship anywhere.. giftboxes, orders, etc. Call- 715-286-4007 www.gingerbreadjerseycheese.com CHEESE

Authentic Flavor for Modern Menus

CALL (800) 824-3373 OR VISIT SAPUTOUSAFOODSERVICE.COM Mozzarella I Provolone I Blue Cheese I Gorgonzola I Asiago I Romano

CHEESE SHAKERS

BREAD Specializing in Hearth-Baked Italian Breads, Hoagies, Buns & Rolls Since 1911. www.cellones.com 800.334.8438

Mark Wutz VP National Accounts MWutz@cellones.com

CHEESE Winona Knows Cheese. Get to Know Winona. Natural | Process | Portions | Specialty

Winona Foods, Inc.

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WinonaFoods.com

920.662.2184

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE COMPUTER SYSTEMS: POINT OF SALE

COMPUTER SYSTEMS: POINT OF SALE, CONT.

WE’RE IN TOUCH WITH YOUR POS NEEDS.

The BEST Pizza POS OS OS

■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Integrated Inventory Management Marketing Systems Result Mapping Online Ordering System and much more!

817.299.4500 sales@BreakawayPOS.com www.BreakawayPOS.com

877-968-6430 PDQpos.com

The Fastest POS on the Planet The Easiest to Learn & Operate Online Ordering / Rewards & Loyalty Mobile Reporting/Enterprise Complete EMV & PCI Compliance

www.posexpress.com

Providing POS paper and supplies to Micros customers for over five years

Pizza Technology that Delivers.

www.granburyrs.com

800.750.3947

1-888-400-9185 speedlinesolutions.com CUTTING BOARDS - EQUAL SLICE

DESSERTS

Be Inspired. Be Creative. Be Original.

For more exciting recipes and tips about Nutella®, visit www.ferrerofoodservice.com

Now Offering Gelato & Tiramisu Cups

908-241-9191 * Tasteitpresents.com Dessert is the last impression you’ll make on a customer

Make it count May 2016 pmq.com

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE DESSERTS, CONT.

DOUGH PRESSES, ROLLERS

Don’t “Settle ” For Less....Get More

PASMO America Soft Serve Machines Less Noise, Low Cost of Ownership and 50% less than our competition.

1-844-52-PASMO

More Loyal Customers.Financing Customers.Financing available

isales@pasmousa.com www.pasmousa.com

DOUGH

DOUGH TRAYS/PROOFING TRAYS

DeIorio Foods

@DeIorios

blog.DeIorios.com

DeIorios.com

• Dough Trays – extremely durable and airtight! Outlasts All Other Dough Trays • Dough Tray Covers – designed to fit! • Plastic Dough Knives – two ergonomic designs! • Dough Tray Dollies – heavy duty! Excellence in Customer service since 1955! The preferred dough tray of the largest pizza companies in the world. Buy direct from the manufacturer with over 25 years manufacturing in dough trays.

Call 800-501-2458 ........... www.doughmate.com ......... fax: 908-276-9483

DELICIOUS MADE-TO-ORDER BREAD AND PIZZA DOUGH Old World Tradition with New World Convenience.

www.mamalarosafoods.com

To locate a distributor near you, call 734-946-7878.

DOUGH DIVIDERS/ROUNDERS

When Dough Matters! Eliminate racks, lids and tins with our stackable, airtight and cost effective Dough Trays. 1-502-969-2305 www.DoughTrays.com COST EFFECTIVE

STACKABLE

AIRTIGHT

DURABLE

ORDER DIRECT

4601 COMMERCE CROSSINGS DR., STE 300, LOUISVILLE, KY 40229 | p: 502-969-2305 | f: 502-810-0907

WWW.DOUGHTRAYS.COM

FLOUR, GLUTEN-FREE Scan for Demo

DOUGH PRESSES, ROLLERS Premium Flours Make Gluten-Free Tasty & Easy! Tel: 310-366-7612 E-mail: sales@authenticfoods.com Web: www.authenticfoods.com

800.835.0606 ext. 205 | www.doughxpress.com

dough presses, dough dividers/divider rounders, dough dockers, carts and accessories

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BAY STATE MILLING GLUTEN-FREE PIZZA MIX ........................................... baystatemilling.com Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour, Custom-blends and Co-Packing Dedicated production area for exceptional purity ..........................................................800-55-FLOUR


THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE FRANCHISING, CONT.

FLOUR

Exceptional pizza starts with exceptional flour. Traditional Pizza Flours, Whole Grain Flours, Pizza Crust Mixes, Private Label Packaging, Proprietary Blending, Custom Development For more information call 1-800-553-5687 or visit www.baystatemilling.com

FRYERS BE THE

KING OF

CHICKEN WINGS

Molino Pasini s.p.a. - Italy

Full line flours for Pizza, Fresh Pasta, Ready Mix for gnocchi Phone: 1-973-454-8534 +39 0376 969015 www.molinopasini.com - info@molinopasini.com

With AutoFry and MultiChef ventless technology you can serve hot delicious appetizers without the need for costly renovations. Fully Automated • Convenient • Reliable • Safe • Affordable • Fully Enclosed For more information call 800-348-2976 or visit us online at MTIproducts.com • AutoFry.com • MultiChef.com Your Source for Ventless Kitchen Solutions for over 25 Years

FUNDRAISERS

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FOOD DISTRIBUTORS

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Full line of Flour: Pizza, Pasta, Bread, Pastries, Gluten Free, & Whole Grains Imported Exclusively by: Manzo Food Sales, Inc. Tel. (305) 406-2747.........www.manzofood.com

AB ‘ N

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Carry-Ou

800-489-0048 www.idcard.com

FURNITURE/FIXTURES

FRANCHISING

Should You Franchise Your Restaurant? Contact us today to receive your free video on “How to Franchise Your Business” and learn ® about one of the most dynamic methods of expanding your business in today’s marketplace. F R A N C H I S E C O N S U LTA N T S 708-957-2300 • www.ifranchisegroup.com • info@ifranchisegroup.com May 2016 pmq.com

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE GLUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS

W H O L E S O M E

&

HOTEL ROOM KEYS

D E L I C I O U S ™ WHOLES

OME & DELICIOUS

HOTEL ROOM KEY ADVERTISING DIAL #600 from your room for In-Room SPEED DIAL Papa John’s ROOM DELIVERY to Your Business

PIZZAROOMKEYS.COM • 866-912-3539 INSURANCE

Scan for Demo

Premium Flours Make Gluten-Free Tasty & Easy! Tel: 310-366-7612 E-mail: sales@authenticfoods.com Web: www.authenticfoods.com

MACHINERY/EQUIPMENT

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PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

ALWAYS WITH YOU.

Come follow us, like us, and engage with us on these social media platforms!


THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE INSURANCE

MAGNETS

PIZZAPRO .............................................................Low cost pizza delivery insurance program Contact Julie Evans (717) 214-7616..............................................................www.pizzapro.amwins.com

MACHINERY/EQUIPMENT MIDDLEBY MARSHALL

OVENS MIXERS

RANDELL

PREP TABLES

AMERICAN RANGE

WALK-INS

SOMERSET

PARTS SMALLWARES

1-800-426-0323

www.northernpizza.com

IMPERIAL

MARKETING IDEAS

MANAGEMENT

keep more of your hard earned dough! 3 money saving programs:

sCheduLing • aTTendanCe • daiLy Log

FAST, PAINLESS SCHEDULING • MONITOR LABOR COSTS • REDUCE TURNOVER • NOTIFY EMPLOYEES • ELIMINATE BUDDY PUNCHING • IMPROVE COMMUNICATIONS • WEB-BASED

save time and increase profits!

www.timeforge.com 866.684.7191

MEAT TOPPINGS

MAGNETS

PRESTIGE FOODS ............................314-567-3648 ........................MEATTRADER@MSN.COM Low Closeout Pricing! Call for this week’s special. For Deals That Go To Your Bottom Line.

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE MIXERS

MUSHROOMS

USED HOBART 60 QT. MIXER FOR SALE AT US $4980.00 PLUS SHIPPING. Call Lynn at 214-552-3218.............................................................................. or e-mail tbfm@tbfm.com

Precision HD-60 Pizza Mixer 7-Year Unconditional Parts Warranty on all gears and shafts in the planetary and transmission!

Holdsbowl! art 80-qundles a Ha . bag 50 lb our! of fl

www.pizzamixers.com • 1-877-R-MIXERS

60 QUART—HEAVY HEAVY DUTY

Pizza Mixer

Handles 50 lb. bag of flour • Direct gear drive transmission Rigid cast iron construction • Best warranty in its class

Globe Food Equipment Co. | www.globefoodequip.com

We don’t take a canned approach to mushrooms.

THE WORLD`S LARGEST OLIVE AND OLIVE OIL PRODUCER ACORSA USA 2200 FLETCHER AVE. SUITE # 702, FORT LEE, NJ 07024 Tel. 201-944-0474 ...... Fax # 201-944-1279 enrique.escudero@dcoop.es ... www.dcoop.es We offer a full line of Green Olives, Ripe Olives and Olive Oil from Spain for private label or branded. OU Kosher and BRC Certified. Inventory stored at 11 warehouses throughout the U.S.

www.univexcorp.com Tel. 800-258-6358 Fax. 603-893-1249

The Original Variable Speed Mixer

ON HOLD MARKETING

800-222-1138

www.varimixer.com V6OP

mixer@varimixer.com • 14240 South Lakes Dr • Charlotte, NC

MOISTURE-ABSORBENT TOPPINGS CONDITIONER/SUPPLIES

ONLINE ORDERING

ALWAYS WITH YOU. Come talk with us on these platforms!

Get the latest and greatest in pizza news, recipes, videos, marketing strategies and technologies at www.pmq.com! 106

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly

Avondale, PA | 610.268.8082 to-jo.com | info@to-jo.com

OLIVES

Mixing, Dividing, Rounding, and Spinning

Varimixer Strong as a Bear.

Mushrooms


THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE ONLINE ORDERING, CONT.

PIZZA BOXES

CUSTOMIZE YOUR PIZZA BOX Doing It The American Way! TAKE YOUR IMAGE TO THE NEXT LEVEL 7” to 36” Custom Boxes and Odd Sizes Available

UP TO 4-COLORS | NO PLATE FEES* *CALL US FOR DETAILS

888.400.3455 ext.107 | www.wpackaging.net 2001 East Cooley Drive, Colton, CA 92324

PIZZA BOX INSERTS

FRESH PIE Pizza Box Liner/ Insert

Carrie Yanke-Customer Service Rep 724-657-3650 • ccd.pop@ccd-pop.com Check our our informational blogs!

www.creativecolordisplay.com PIZZA BOX LINERS

ONLINE ORDERING PROMOTIONAL PROGRAMS

PIZZA BOXES “The Swiss  Army  knife  of  pizza  boxes”  

PIZZA DELIVERY THERMAL BAGS

info@greenboxny.com |  212.874.0748  |  www.greenboxny.com  

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA DELIVERY THERMAL BAGS

Metal is the right choice. Aluminum is lighter and longer lasting that wooden peels. Introducing the ultimate perforated pizza peel to easily sift away excess flour. Tailored to your preferred length, shape and functionality. 100% made in Italy and available in America, close to you with the service you need. Pro fe & r ssion est au al too ran ts, ls for sin piz ce z 19 erias 86 .

GI.METAL USA, INC Phone (630) 553 9134 www. gimetalusa.com info@gimetalusa.com

Be Smart. Wood is over.

MADE IN ITALY

MAY SPECIALS

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA DELIVERY THERMAL BAGS

PIZZA OVENS, CONT.

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA PANS, CONT.

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PRINTING, CONT.

877-604-3111

877-604-3111 May 2016 pmq.com

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THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE PIZZA SUPPLIES, CONT.

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www.marsalsons.com 112

(631) 226-6688

PMQ Pizza Magazine The Pizza Industry’s Business Monthly


THE PIZZA EXCHANGE PIZZA INDUSTRY RESOURCE GUIDE SPICE FORMULATION, BLENDING & PACKAGING

TOMATO PRODUCTS, CONT.

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PIZZA HALL OF FAME www.pizzahalloffame.com

Vince’s Italian Pizzeria A true Pacific Northwest original, this “Garlic Gulch” upstart used TV, radio and “buy three, get one free” deals to grow into multiple locations and concepts. By Tracy Morin

I

n 1957, South Seattle was known as “Garlic Gulch” for its influx of Italian immigrants, but pizzerias hadn’t yet infiltrated the area—until Naples native Vince Mottola Sr. and his wife, Ada, started Vince’s Italian Pizzeria. Vince Sr. had worked in a renowned catering company in Italy, then an Italian bakery in Seattle, so his passion for food was firmly established, while Ada charmed customers with her classic Italian beauty. “He was eager to open an Italian pizzeria, because there wasn’t much pizza in the area; he was one of the first,” recalls Vince Mottola Jr., current owner of Auburn, Washington-based Vince’s Restaurant Family with partner Fred Martichuski (who started as a dishwasher under Vince Sr.). “He created pizza the way he remembered it growing up in Naples: keeping it simple with hand-tossed dough and the freshest, best ingredients.” The Italian community embraced

(Clockwise from left) Vince’s was one of the first pizzerias in the Seattle area; Vince shows off a pie in 1957; Ada and Vince were a solid team when working the pizzeria; Vince shares a Coke with friends at the USS Constitution, circa 1954.

the pizzeria, which moved down the street in the early ’60s to expand into a full-service restaurant and bar that achieved wildfire success with pizza and traditional homemade Italian specialties. Vince Sr. attracted customers by offering “buy three pizzas, get one free”—a promotion remembered fondly and still offered today— and investing in then-pricey TV and radio ads, leading to more locations in the ’70s and ’80s. Ever ahead of his time, Vince Sr. even helped pioneer a software program for accounting in the ’70s (still used at Vince’s). Now the company embraces modern communications through an email club and social media marketing, while passionate staff members like Dave Dorough (a 40-year Vince’s veteran who’s now a partner in some of the restaurants and heads its central kitchen) make customers feel like part of the family. “We have this great opportunity to take care of people at

the best part of the day—when they eat,” Vince Jr. says. “We never want to take that opportunity for granted and try to really make it special every time they come in.” Vince Jr. took over in 1983 and continued expansion: Today, he helms three Vince’s Italian locations, plus the certified-Neapolitan concept Pizzeria Pulcinella (opened in 2008) and Via Marina Wood-Fired Pizza and Italian Cafe (since 2014). He even created a tour company in 2003, ushering groups to Italy for food-focused tours that delve into the roots of Vince’s, while fundraisers throughout the year ensure the business remains an important part of the local community’s fabric. “Pizza is in my DNA, but you have to constantly be looking to improve,” Vince Jr. concludes. “We want to be around for 70, 80, 100 years. There’s a great tradition here, and we want that success to be sustained.”

HAS YOUR PIZZERIA BEEN IN BUSINESS FOR 50 OR MORE YEARS? IF SO, CONTACT US AT TRACY@PMQ.COM. 114

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PMQ Pizza Magazine May 2016  

PMQ Pizza Magazine May 2016