Page 1


WHY PLU FOR SUMMER STUDY?

A Unique Academic Environment. Pacific Lutheran University Ie an Integrated Christian community dedicated to providing a high quality liberal education.

It offers each person the opportunity to acquire the perspective, Insight and disclpllne that give added purpose and direction to life.

It offers encounters with mankind's intellectual, artistic, cultural and natural heritage, through which the Individual

can

affirm

self-worth and develop potential for self-realization and service. Practically speaking. a liberal education stimulates development of mature personal characteristics, competence In research, clarity In thought, and creativity In action. it alae Inspires . sensitivity and awareness of the Individual 's relallonshlps with God and humanity.

Vacation Studies. it Is easy to combine a vacation whh summer study at PLU. Northwest nallve and visitor alike can enjoy the proximity of the area's natural wonders -lakes, streams, salt water beaches, mountain trails and campgrounds. The PlU summer program offers weekend adventures, Including mountain climbIng, nature hikes, salmon and trout fishing, sightseeing and many other•. Railroads, buses and highways make the campus easily accessible to outlying areas. Sea-Tac International Airport, a 3(}. minute drive from PLU on Interstate 5, Is convenient for out-<lf­ state students and visiting faculty. University Accreditations. Pacific Lutheran University Is the only degree-grantlng Lutheran Institution In the Pacific Northw est. It is fully accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. Professional accreditations are held by the School of Business Administration with the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the School of Nursing with th e National League for Nursing, the Music Department with the National Association of Schools of Music, and the School of Education with the National Council for the Accteditatlon of Teacher Education. The latter Is for the preparation of elemen­ tary and secondary teachers, principals, and guidance counsel­ ors through the master's degree level. The undergraduate program in Social Work ia accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The University is also approved by the Am erican Ch e mical Soci ety.

(L-R) President Rieke gets some computing tips from

Cedric Kim and Lennie Sutton.

GREETING FROM THE PRESIDENT Welcome to Pacific Lutheran Univ ersity and to the 1989 Summer Session I The tempo of summer school Is a wonderful combination of Int ense , concentrated study and relaxed, enjoyable surround­ Ings. To enhance your classroom responSibil ities, you will find muslo and food festivals In Eastvold Square, a lively student body of all ages, professors who are eager to give you personal attention and assistance, and the beauty of Northwest scen ery and climate at its peak.

I invite you to study the catalog, and consider enrolling in those courses which are of interest to you. My office is always op en for a visit or to help you in any way. Best wishes for a productive and rewarding summer . Cordially,

W�O,\f� William O. Rieke, M.D. President

Enrollments. Summer School 1988 enrollment totaled 2006. Fa ll and Spring semester enrollments exceeded 4,000, with

3225 full -tim e students. If you have any questions about this catalog, please call the (206) 535-7143, or stop by Ingram Hall, room 101, Monday through Friday, 8 am-5 pm. Summer Sessiona Office

Illustrations: Martin Banke Design: Paul Porter Editor: Marti Dyer-Al lison

HOW TO USE THIS CATALOG Quick Refer ence. Turn directly to the Schedule of Classes on page 22 for courses offered, times, days, rooms and the like. You need this information to complete the re g istrati on form. Note an y *, ref er ring you to the course description. Colored bars Indicate late afternoon or even ing classes.

Course Descriptions. Course descriptions begin on page 8, including prerequisites, dates , times , l ocations and instructors.

General �atioo . The first aectlon of the catal og contains campus resources and services, ho usi ng and parking informa­

Volume LXIX No.1 February, 1989 Pacific Lutheran UnlverBrty Catalog USPS 417-660 Published quarte rly in February, May, August and November by Pacific Lutheran University, South 121st and Park Avenue, Tacoma, WA 98447-0003. Second class postage paid at Tacoma

WA. Postmaster: Send address changes to Pacific lutheran University Catalog, Offi ce of Admissions, PLU, P.O. Box 2068, Tacoma , WA 98447-0003.

tion, and registration policies and procedures. Registration and Housing Reservation. Inside the back cover are two postage-paid forma - one for r egistration and one for

h o using reservations. You may also reg ister by te lephone. See page 12 for details. Received two catalogs ? Because we use multiple mail ing lists, you may have received more than one copy of the catal og. If you did, please pass the extra copy on to a frie nd !


1 CONTENTS

ADMINISTRATIVE REGISTER

PAGE

OFFI C E O F THE PRESIDENT William O. Rieke, M.D. Presideni's ExecUlive Associale Lucille Giroux Assistant to Ihe Presidenl . . . . . ..... John Adix University Pastors . . Susan Briehl, Daniel Erlander, Martin Wells

Presidelll

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OFFIC E OF THE PROVOST ................... J. Robert Wills ...... David Yagow Assoc Dean. Special Academic Programs Judith W. Carr

Provosl ......................... , Deputy

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Provost ...............

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Dean.

Graduale SlUdies and

Dean. COnlinuing

EducOlion

Prog ram COOl'dinator.

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David Atkinson

GraduOie SlUdies

. ......... ............. . Kay Balston and Dean. Division of Humanities .......... . Janet E. Rasmussen Dean, Division of NalUral Sciences ... .. .. . John O. Herzog Dean, Division of Social Sciences ........... ... John Schiller Director, Social Science Grad Programs ..... Richard Jobst Conlinuing

EduCaiion ..

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Dean.

Summer Siudies.

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and

Dean, School of the Am ..

. . . .. . ....... Richard D. Moe Assis/anl 10 the Dean . . . . . . . . . Elodie Vandevert Dean, School of Business Adminislralion .. Gundar J. King Direclor, M.B.A. Program .. . .. . . . .. . Laura J. Polcyn Undergraduale Advisor : ............................ Jan Dempsey Dean. School of Educalion . . .. ... . Robert L. Mulder .

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Director, Teacher Placemenl and 5th Year; Director; . . . .. Grad Programs & Assl to Ihe Dean

. . .. Nan Nokleberg . Dorothy Kelmer Administrative Assistanl .. .. ..... ... . . . . Barbara Phillips Dean, School of Physical Educalion . . ... . . David M. Olson Dean. Admissions & Financial Aid . . James Van Beek .. ... Cynthia Michael Associale Dean . . . .. . .. .. . ...... David Gunovich Assislanl Dean . . .. . . ... .. . . ... Direclor, Financial Aid .. .. .. . . . . .. . .. . A l bert W. Perry Assoc Directors. Financial Aid . Debra Brackman, Mark Duris, Kay Soltis, Lewis Dibble Registrar . .. . . . . . .. . . . ............. Charles T. Nelson Assoc Regislrarllnst Research . . Larry W. Nelson Transfer CoordinalOr . ... .. .. . . . . .. .. .. Cam ille Eliason Administrative AssiSlant . .. .. .. . ... . . . . . . .. .. . Mary Allen Director of Advising . . . . . . ... . . . . ....... .. Richard Seeger Director. Academic Assistance .. . ... .. . . .. Wanda Wentworth Direclor. AURA .. ............. ....... . .. .. .. .......... Pat Roundy Director, Library ................ . .. . .. ... John W. Heussman Reference Librarian ..... ,........ ,Susan McDonald Assislanl Reference Librarian . .. . ... ... .... Nancy Kendall . . .

Dean, School of Nursing . . . .. .. . .. . . . . .

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OFFICE OF STUDENT LIFE . ...... .. S. Erving Severtson .. .. .... Elizabeth A hlstrom DireClor, Counseling & Testing Services ... Gary M inetti Acting DireClor, Health Services ..................... Ann Miller

Vice Presidenl for SlUdenl Life

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Director, Career Services

DireClor, Minority, Inlernational, Commuter and Adult

. ... . .... .. . ... ....... C hristina del Rosario .. . . .... . .. .... Lauralee Hagen Director, University Center ........... Rick Eastman Administrative Assistanl .................... Anne C hristianson Programs (MICA)

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For other administrative offices, please see the PLU catalog.

Administrative

Register ... . .... . . .... . .. 1

Tuition & Payment Information .... . 2 Admission ... . ... . . ..... . ... . . ......... . ...... . .. 2 Registration ..... . ... . .... . . ... . . ... . . .... . . ... . 3 Campus Services ......... . .......... . .... . . 4 University

Facilities ... . . . .. . . .... . .... . . ... 5

Recreational

Facilities .... . . ... . ..... . . ... 5

Degree Programs .... . . .. .. . . .. .. ..... . . ... . 6 Special

Programs .... .. ... . .. .. . . .... . ... . . . 7

Office Directory Course

. ................ ... .. . .. ... . . 7

Descriptions . . . ....... ...... ...... 8

Schedule of Courses . . . .... . .... . . ... .. 22 Registration & Housing Forms ................. Inside Back Cover


2

TUITION, ROOM AND BOA RD

COURSE NUMBERS

Tu ition. per semester hou r $175.00 $175.00 Audit, per semester hour MBA, Social Sciences Graduate, &Nursing per semester hour 275.00 Private Music Lessons (13 half-hou r lessons 1 semester hour credit) - 1 semester hour credit in addition to tuition $100.00 - 2 semester hours credit in addition to tu ition $175.00 Residence Hall rooms' Doub le occupancy ,one term $210.00 Terms l l&1I1 $400.00 1, 11&111 $550.00 Single occupancy, one term $250.00 Terms l l&111 $450.00 1, 11&111 $625.00 Term l and Interim,per day $7.00 Board, Monday-Friday, per term' Breakfast, lunch, dinner $16500 Lunchonly $55.00 Lu nch&dinner $13000

Courses a t PLU use the following number system:

=

*

Room and b oard rates subject to change.

PAYMENT INFOR M ATION Tuition and fees are due on or before the first day of the term in which the classes fall. Mail or deliver tuition to the PLU Business Office, P.O. Box 1356, Tacoma, WA 98401. Payment may be made by check, payable to "Pacific Lutheran University" or by VISA or MasterCard. The student's full name and Social Security Number should be written on the check to insure proper credit. Students using bank cards should complete the appropriate spaces on the front of the registration form.

101-299 Lower division level. 301-499 Open to both graduate and upper division undergraduates. Such courses may be a part of the graduate program provided they are not specific requirements in preparation for graduate study. 500-599 Graduate courses. Upper division students may be enrolled in a 500-level course, if at the time of registration they provide written permission from the chairperson or dean of the academic unit that offers the course. It is understood that any student given such permission will have met all assumed or specifically indicated prerequisites and will have an above average academic record. Independent study, thesis or studio projects may be authorized in certain specific cases if approved by the chairperson or dean concerned. An independent study registration card is available in the Registrar's Office. As with other summer session classes, register for independent study before the session begins.

SYMBOLS AND CODES ยง ADMN EAUD

Eastvold

ECAM

East Campus

INGR LlBR MATH

Math Building

OGYM

Olson

RAMS

Ramstad Rieke Science Center

RCTR XAVR

p_ublished deadlines. Contact the Business Office for current

M

Non-degree students. Non-degree students planning to enroll for the summer session only, without intention of working

Library Memorial Gym

Registration is not finalized until tuition and fees are paid.

ADMISSION

Ingram

MGYM

Unpaid balances are subject to late charges if not paid by charges if a complete statement has not been received.

Experimental Course Hauge Administration Building

T

Xavier Monday Tuesday

W

Wednesday

R

Thursday

F Sat Su

Friday Saturday Sunday

toward a degree from PLU or for a teaching certificate, need not

0800

8 am

file a formal application or submit transcripts from other schools

0900

9 am

attended. They may enroll in any course for which they have the

1000

10 am

necessary prerequisites.

1100

11 am

1200

12 noon

Degree students. Students who plan to work toward an undergraduate degree from PLU must complete a formal application for admission. The necessary forms may be obtained by contacting the Admissions Office, (206) 535-7151. Students who have done acceptable work in another accredited college will be granted advanced standing for previous work.

Master's degree students. Students seeking admission to the master's degree program should contact the Office of Graduate Studies at (206) 535-7141.

1300

1 pm

1400

2 pm

1500

3 pm

1600

4 pm

1700

5 pm

1800

6 pm

1900

7 pm

2000

8 pm

2100

9 pm

2200

10 pm

Certification students. Students seeking certification should contact the School of Education at (206) 535-7272.

Continuing students. Current PLU students who wish to enroll for the summer session should simply return the registration form inside the back cover of this catalog by mail or in person to the Registrar's Office.

GRADUATION/COM M ENCEMENT Students who plan to complete requirements for a degree during the summer should fill out an Application for Graduation. These forms are available in front 01 the Registrar's Office.

Undergraduates should return the completed form ,to the Registrar's Office, and graduate students should return the completed form to the Graduate Office, no later than July 5. Commencement ceremonies will be held on Friday, August 18, in Eastvold Auditorium at 7 pm.


3 Changes and Withdrawals. Please notify the Registrar's Office of

INSURANCE

any adds or drops from a course. There is no processing charge

Accident and health insurance may be purchased at low cost

to substitute courses. The last day to add a class or register is

from the University Business Office at the time of registration.

May 25 for Term I, June 22 for Term II and July 27 for Term III.

Students in any of the following categories or activities are required to purchase this insurance or provide evidence to the University of similar coverage from another source: foreign students; nursing students; students participating in off-campus overnight tours; and students participating in the following courses:

Students registering for the first term only who later decide to enroll for the second or third terms may do so by adding the desired courses on a drop/add form. The balance of tuition can be paid on the first day of the subsequent term. Students who register for multiple terms and decide not to continue in the subsequent term must make an official withdrawal from

ANTH 465

Archaeology: The Field Experience

ARTD275

Art-Archetype and Nature

BIOL 351

Natural History of the Pacific NW Introduction to Chile

BUSA490

Theatre Northwest

COMA 447 ESCI202

Oceanography

ESCI 425

Geological Field Mapping

subsequent term courses. Official withdrawals, with a grade of "W," may be given any time during a term, but there will be no refund if the withdrawal is made after the third (second day for workshops) day of the class. Unofficial withdrawals will result in grades of "EW" and will count as fail hours in the G.P.A. Courses may be changed from audit to credit or credit to audit through the third day of class.

REGISTRATION Registration for all Summer Sessions begin April 3, 1989. By mail. Mail registrations must reach the University no later than ten days before the first day of the class(es) for which the

Pass/Fail Option. Students wishing to take a class pass/fail must file a pass/fail form with the Registrar's Office by the end of the second week of class. Forms are available at the Registrar's Office.

student is registering. If the completed registration form is

10 Cards. Students need a valid ID Card in order to use the

mailed with a check, money order, VISA or MasterCard number

library, cash checks on campus, and to obtain other University

and expiration date, students will not need to stop at the PLU

services and privileges. Continuing students may have cards

Business Office first, but may go directly to the first meeting of

validated in the Business Office. Those here for the summer

their class.

only should request their ID Cards at the Registrar's Office.

Mail your registration to: Registrar, Pacific Lutheran University,

Course Load and Waivers. The maximum course load for each

Tacoma, Washington 98447

summer term is six semester hours. Permission to register for

The following information should be included:

1. Bank card number (VISA or MasterCard) and its expiration date (if paying by VISA or MasterCard). 2. Student's Social Security Number. 3. Name of student. 4. Name of cardholder (if different from student). By telephone. Students registering by telephone should have the following information available when placing the call to (206) 535-7331 : 1.

Bank card number, expiration date, and name of card holder (if paying by VISA or MasterCard).

2.

Student's full name.

3.

Student's Social Security Number.

4.

Address while at PLU (if known).

5.

Permanent address (if different from above).

6.

Telephone number.

7.

Date of birth.

8.

Ethnic origin (optional).

9.

Religious preference (optional).

10. Department code and course number for each course for which the student is registering.

Courses requiring tally cards, independent study cards, or eligibility forms are excluded from telephone registration. On-campus. Advanced registration by mail is encouraged. A summer registration form is attached as part of the inside back cover of this catalog. On-campus registration begins April 3. Registration for Term II must be completed by June 22, registration for Term III must be completed by July 27. Students who plan to attend more than one summer term should complete registration for all terms at the time of the initial registration. Students who need a trans足 cript to be evaluated and a progress chart created or brought up to date should make their requests to the Registrar's Office by mail or by personal appointment, preferably before June 13.

more than six hours per term must be obtained from the Dean of Summer School, Ingram 101. Graduate students may not take more than 12 semester hours during the summer to count toward the master's degree at Pacific Lutheran University. Transcripts. Students needing transcripts of summer work may submit a written request to the Registrar's Office. Term III grades will be processed and transcripted approximately five working days after being submitted by the faculty (August 22). Please take this into consideration when requesting transcripts for school districts. Transcripts cannot be sent for students with unpaid accounts at the University.


4 CAMPUS SERVICES AND FACILITIES Most PLU offices close at noon on Fridays during the summer months, thus providing extended weekends to PLU staff. However, the University Center Information Desk is open on a regular basis Friday afternoons. The University Center building also is open weekends, as is the Columbia Center Coffee Shop; the Swimming Pool is open Saturdays (see Recreational Facilities for hours.

Friday. There is a waiting list; full-time care only is available. The staff is trained in Early Childhood Education with PLU work­ study and practicum students involved; support staff includes a social worker, nurse consultant, cook, and bookkeeper. The program is comprehensive, with developmentally appropriate activities for all ages, including indoor/outdoor play and group/ free-activity times. Staffing ratio is 1 adult to 5 children. Meals and snacks are included. For more information, write Becky Fontaine, Program Supervisor, University Child Care, P.O. Box 44 082, Tacoma WA 98444, or phone (206) 531-2009. Many PLU students, faculty and staff use the Trinity Lutheran Child Care

Academic Advising Office

Center at 12115 Park Avenue South. Located close to the

The Academic Advising Office provides general academic

no drop-in care is available. Children from one month of age

advising services for PLU undergraduate students during

through kindergarten receive excellent supervision and

University, Trinity Lutheran accepts children on a full-time basis;

Summer School. Students with questions about academic

nutritious meals and snacks. Although there is no summer pre­

programs, policies or procedures may make use of the office

school program, there are educational activities scheduled for

Monday through Thursday from 9 am to 5 pm and Friday from 9

all ages. Fees are assessed on a sliding scale. Feel free to drop

am to 12 noon. The Academic Advising Office is located in

in and observe at any time, or call (206) 535-2699 for further

Ramstad 1 12. Phone number is 535-8786.

information.

Academic Assistance Center

The Computer Center

The goal of the center is to assist students attending PLU to

The Computer Center's offices are entered through the south­

become effective and efficient in their academic pursuits. During

east corner of Mortvedt Library. The facility houses DEC VAX

the fall and spring terms, one-to-one academic tutoring is

62 10 and DEC VAX 6220 computers. A large academic user

available for most undergraduate courses; study skills and self­

room I'ocated in the east wing of the Memorial Gym building

management techniques are taught on an individual basis, in

provides student access to the VAX systems, IBM, and Apple lie

group sessions, or in one-credit course offerings.

personal computers throughollt the summer.

During summer sessions, tutoring coverage is varied and often

A variety of software programs is available for the VAX and IBM

limited. Please check with the center regarding your specific

systems. Well known programming languages can be used on

needs.

the hardware.

Our services are extended without charge to all registered PLU

PC software for word processing, spread sheets, data bases and

Pacific Lutheran University has adopted standard

students. The office is located in Ramstad 112. Summer hours

statistics.

are Monday-Thursday from 9 am to 5 pm and Friday from 9 am

students with operational problems.

to 12 noon.

There is a charge (billed monthly) for student use of computer

Bookstore The PLU Bookstore is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran University for the benefit of students, faculty and staff. The bookstore sells the textbooks and supplies that are required or suggested by faculty members for their courses. Additional books, supplies, gifts, greeting cards, clothing, film processing, toiletries and other items are available for your convenience. Summer hours: 8 am-4:30 pm, MTWR 8 am-12 noon, Friday Extra hours: Open until 6:30 pm the first evening of each Summer Term. (May 22, May 30, June 19, July 10 and July 24.) If you have specific textbook needs at other times, please phone (206) 5357665 during regular bookstore hours and arrangements will be made to serve you.

Consultants are on duty in the user room to help

systems at Pacific Lutheran University. The Computer Center offers a wide range of services, including free "how to" wor,kshops. Check with the computer center for information about the user rooms operating hours, a list of the workshops, the current software standards, the current charging schedule and any other questions you might have regarding the use of computer facilities at PLU. The Computer Center's main offices are open 8 am until 5 pm during normal University operating hours. FoodServices The Food Service Department endeavors to meet the needs of all and make a student's stay here a pleasurable and satisfying experience. The University Center cafeteria is open to all. Meals are also available at the University Center Coffee Shop and at Columbia Center Coffee Shop. The University Center Coffee Shop is open Monday through Thursday from 7 am-6 pm and Friday from 7 am-2 pm (unless posted otherwise). One popular

Campus Ministry

item offered is a $20 coupon book sold for $18 that is good for

Pacific Lutheran University is, by design and intent, a place for

food purchases. The book is purchased through the Business

the interaction of academic study and the Christian gospel.

Office or the Coffee Shop. Also, a variety 01 meal plans are

Opportunities for the expression of faith and worship are

available through the Food Services office located in the

provided for the community. Weekly chapel services are held in

University Center. A snack wagon is available from 9 am-2 pm

Eastvold Tower Chapel, 10-10:30 am each Wednesday.

Monday through Friday during the summer. It serves a variety of

The University pastors are available for conversation and

items including sandwiches, hot dogs, coffee, juice, pop,

counsel in the Campus Ministry office located in the University

donuts, fruit and individual salads. The wagon is located at the

Center, or call (206) 535-7464.

south entrance to the Administration Building just north of Red

University Child Care

please feel free to call the Food Services Office at (206) 535-

University Child Care, operating in PLU's East Campus location, is an independent non-profit center established to serve families

Square. If you have any questions about the services offered, 7472.

in the Parkland-Spanaway area. Clients are served on a first­

Residentiall Life and Housing

come, first-served basis; priority is for low-income, working

Campus living conti flues to grow in popularity as an economi­

clients, and costs are based on gross monthly income. Licensed

cal, convenient answer to housing needs during summer school.

for 56 children from 12 months through 5 years, the center

Rates remain well below the standard monthly rental for an

operates year-round, from 6:30 am to 6 pm Monday through

apartment, and new, flexible summer meal plans enhance


5 economy and convenience. Campus living also facilitates out-of­

studios, offices and olassrooms for the School of The Arts, the

class interaction with faculty and other students.

Art Department, Communication Arts Department, University

Both single and double occupancy rooms are available. Single

Gallery for outside exhibitors and Wekell Gallery for student

rooms are limited and are assigned on a space-available basis

works.

according to the order in which the Residential Life Ollice receives your request. Students and stall initiate and coordinate residence hall programs. Many programs take advantage of the natural resources of the Puget Sound area: mountains, lakes, recreation areas, and the ocean. All programs are designed to enhance your summer school experience. You may obtain campus housing by contacting the Residential Life Ollice at (206) 535-7200, or by completing the pre-registration form inside the back cover of this catalog. See page XX for specific costs.

William O. Rieke Science Building (1 985) provides administra­ tive offices, laboratories, and classroom, along with a 200-seat lecture hall for Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science and Physics Departments. The building was dedicated in January 1 985

PLU East Campus ( 1 908, acquired 1 982, remodeled 1 984) houses classrooms, a gymnasium, and offices for Social Work! Marriage & Family Therapy, the Nisqually Plains Room,

Executive Development, Special Education, and the Family &

Children's Center. The Center's low-cost community outreach programs such as family counseling, child care, classes for adults over 50, a wellness clinic, Head Start, and an after school

Student Life The Student Life Ollice is the administrative umbrella for PLU's Student Life organization. It gives overall direction to a variety of

program for elementary children provide services to the general public and operate with East Campus as a base.

student services and acts as a central resource for student information and assistance.

Departments within Student Life

include: Career Services; Counseling and Testing Services; Health Services; Minority, International, Commuter and Adult Student Services (MICA); Residential Life; and the University Center. Student Life, through its services and programs, promotes a campus environment wherein students may explore, develop and learn in both academic and co-curricular contexts. Stop by Administration 1 30 or call X71 9 1 and get acquainted.

R ECREATIONAL FACILITIES PLU offers a broad variety of recreational opportunities for summer students. Exceptional facilities are available for most popular sports and pastimes! Free use of the Names Fitness Center, Olson Auditorium, and the Swimming Pool is available by presenting your student 10 card (available from Registrar's

Office). Reservation of racketball/squash courts is made by calling X7365. Schedules for use of all recreational facilities are available in the School of Physical Education office in Olson

UNIVERSITY FACILITIES

Auditorium.

University Center (1 970) has been celebrated as the "College

Names Fitness Center was dedicated in 1 984. This 5,500 sq. ft.

Union to suit aiL" Strategically located, the Center's four levels

facility contains the latest in weight training and other condition­

unite lower with upper campus. Designed of rustic Northwest

ing/litness equipment, including an indoor jogging track. Hours:

timber, the Center environmentally complements surrounding

8 am-9 pm, MTWRF, 8 am- 1 2 pm, S.

scenery and houses the information desk, meeting rooms, cafeteria, collee shop, games room (six-lane bowling alley, billiards, cards, etc.), practice rooms, and bookstore.

Olson Auditorium is a multipurpose facility featuring a Sport Tred gymnasium floor and an AstroTurf fieldhouse. Activities include basketball, volleyball, badminton, handball, racketball,

Hauge Administration Building ( 1 960) houses University

squash, and weight training. Hours: 8 am-6 pm, MTWR, 8 am -

administrative offices, classrooms, faculty offices, studios and

12 noon, F.

master control for closed circuit television.

Swimming Pool offers a swimming area, diving pool, sunbath­

The Robert A. L. Mortvedt Library (1966, expanded 1987) is an

ing area, locker and dressing rooms. Hours: 6:30-8:50 am and 5-

air-conditioned multi-media learning resource center containing

5:50 pm, MTWRF (adults only); 1 -2:50 pm, MTWRF and 7-8:50

over three hundred thousand books, periodicals, microfilm, and

pm, MTWRFS (all ages); 3-4:50 pm, MTWRF (PLU students,

audio-visual aids, and on-line computer record-search capabili­

faculty, staff only), MTWRF. Swim lessons are available for ages

ties. The building also houses the Computer Center, University

4 through adult.

Archives, and Photo Services. A student 10 card is required to

check out materials from the library, see "10 Cards" on page XX.

Xavier Hall (1937, remodeled 1 966) houses classrooms, and offices for faculty of the Division of Social Sciences.

Ramstad Hall ( 1 947, remodeled 1 959 and 1985) houses the School of Nursing, the Writing Center, International and Adult Student Services, Academic Advising, and Career Services.

Memorial Gymnasium (1947, remodeled 1984) provides classroom and activity areas for the School of Physical Educa­ tion and the Theatre program.

University Center Games Room features modern six-lane bowling alley, pool tables, table tennis, shuffleboard, and coin­ operated table games. Hours: 11 am-10 pm, MTWRF.

University Golf Course is a 2, 770-yard, nine-hole, par 35 layout with a reduced fee schedule for students. Hours: daylight.

Tennis Courts Six lighted courts are available on lower campus. PLU students, faculty, staff and summer/convention guests have use priority.

Off-Campus Recreation Numerous recreational opportunities exist close to the campus. Spanaway Park, located by a lake two

Eastvold Auditorium (1952)accommodates concerts, special

miles south of campus, features canoe, rowboat and paddleboat

events and plays. It also contains classrooms, stage and radio

rentals in addition to swimming, horseshoes, picnic facilities,

studios, ensemble practice rooms and individual practice rooms

gall and fishing. The public Spanaway Golf Course is a beautiful

for the Music Department and the Communication Arts

championship course with well-kept fairways, greens and traps.

Department as well as the KPLU-FM radio studio.

Sprinker Recreation Center, also located two miles south of

Olson Physical Education Auditorium (1969)contains a3,200

campus, has excellent facilities for tennis, track and field,

seat auditorium and complete indoor facilities for most sport!

softball, baseball, basketball, broom hockey and racketball.

recreation activities.

Sprinker also has a sunbathing area, locker and dressing rooms

Aida Ingram Hall (1955, remodeled 1971 and 1986) houses

reservations, phone (206) 537-2600.

and an ice skating arena. For program days and times or court


6 RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Upon registration, the student and his or her parents or legal guardian, as the case may be, agree to accept the responsibility and legal obligation to pay all tuition costs, room and board fees, and other special fees incurred or to be incurred for the student's education. The University, in turn, agrees to make available to the student certain educational programs and the use of certain University facilities, as applicable and as de足 scribed in the catalog. A failure to pay all Ur:liversity bills shall' release the University of any obligation to continue to provide the applicable educational benefits and services, to include statements of honorable dismissal, grade reports, transcript of records, diplomas, or pre-registrations. The student shall also be denied admittance to classes and the use of University facilities. Under certain circumstances student paychecks may be applied to unpaid balances. All accounts 60 days delinquent are routinely reported to a credit bureau. Pacific Lutheran University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, creed, color, national origin, age, or handicapped condition in the education programs or activities which it operates and is required by Title IX of the Education Amend足 ments of 1972 and tfle regulations adopted pursuant thereto, by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1974, and by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 not to discriminate in such manr;1er. The requirement not to discriminate in educational programs and activities extends to employment therein and to admission thereto. Inquiries concerning the application of said acts and published regulations to this University may be referred to: 1. The Director of Personnel, Room 107, Hauge Administration Building, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (206) 5357185, for matters relating to employment policies and grievance procedures for personnel employed by the university. 2. The Deputy Provost, Room 104, Hauge Administration Building, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (206) 5357125, for matters relating to student admissions, curriculum, and financial aid. 3. The Director of Counseling and Testing Services, Room 106, Ramstad Hall, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (206)

DEGREE PROGRAMS BACHELOR'S A n th ropo l o gy Art B iology B u siness Admin istration C h e m i stry Classics Communication AI1S Computer Engineering Computer Science Earth Sc iences Econo m i c s Engineering Physics Engineering Sc ience English French German G lobal Studies H istory Legal Studies Mathematics M u sic Norweg i a n N ursing P h i l o s op h y P h y s i c a l Ed ucation/Recreation Physics Political Science Psycho logy Religion Scand inav ian Area Studi(;s Soc i a l Science Social Work Soc i o logy Spa n i s h

535-7191, for matters regarding administrative policies

MASTER'S

relating to students, student services, and the student admin足

Master uf Arts in Educatiul1

istrative grievance procedure. 4. The Director of Counseling and Testing Services, Room 106, Ramstad Hall, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (206) 535-7191, for matters relating to the application of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. 5. The Director of the Academic Advising and Assistance Center, Ramstad Hall, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone (206) 535-7519, for matters relating to the academic grievance procedure. 6. Or the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Switzer Building, 330 C Street SW, Washington, D.C. 20202. Pacific Lutheran University complies with the Family Education

Educational Administration Classroom Teach i ng Counseling and Guidance Ed ucational Psychology Read i n g Spec i a l Ed ucation Master of Arts in Social Sciellles

Organizational System s Marriage & Family Therapy Individual izcd Study Mastl'!' of Business Administration Master of Arts in Music

Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Inquiries concerning the application of this act and published regulations to this university may be referred to the Executive Secretary to the Vice President and Dean for Student Life, Room 130, Hauge Administration Building, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone 206 535-7191, or the Family Education Rights and Privacy Office, Department of Education, 330 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20201, telephone (202) 245-0233.

Master of Science in Computer Scil'lICI' Master of Arts in COll1puter Science


7

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Eld erhostel Four one week sessions are planned for PLU's tenth Elderhostel program. Academic offerings in music, art, Scandinavian crafts,

Summer Scholars Program The Summer Scholars program, a three-week study program for academically gifted high school juniors and seniors, is being held at PLU July 10 through July 28. Sponsored by PLU and assisted by funds from the Tacoma Area Council on Giftedness, the program offers scholarly projects in such areas as advanced writing and in sciences (combined biology/chemistry). Projects feature combinations of lectures, laboratory work and field experience, along with exposure to residential campus life. Participants will be selected by mid-April from among nomina­ tions received from high schools, parents, and community groups.

religion, geography, and journalism will join university faculty with Elderhostel learners. Elderhostel is an international program especially for persons at least 60 years of age (or spouse/companion of a participant).

Elderhostelers reside on

campus, eat at the university cafeteria, and enjoy the special activities that make up a PLU summer. 1989 Elderhostel weeks are June 11-17; June 25-July 1; July 9-15; and July 16-22. For more information, please write: Elderhostel, University Center, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447. National Elderhostel catalogs are available by writing: Elderhostel, 80 Boylston Street, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02116.

For detailed information, contact Dr. Judith Carr, Director of

Summer Conferences at PLU

Special Academic Programs, at (206) 535-7130.

Among the noteworthy conference offerings at PLU in 1989 are

PLU Middle College Middle College provides a great opportunity for high school juniors and seniors. High School juniors and seniors-'89 graduates-can get an early start on a successful college career this summer at PLUI Called Middle College, a six-week summer program (June 17 to July 28) helps students sharpen learning skills while earning eight to ten regular, transferable semester hours of college credit.

the Great Northwest Evangelism Workshop, the 34th Annual Pacific Northwest Writers Conference, and Youth Alive. Sports camps including basketball, football, wrestling and tennis a re combined with camps for cheerleaders, drill teams, academic programs for international students and youth activities that bring thousands of young people to the campus each summer. For further information, please contact PLU Conference Office, Tacoma, WA 98447.

Middle College helps to make college level study easier! Within a framework of interesting, contemporary topics, it emphasizes basic skills so important in college - written and oral communi­ cation, study skills, and mathematics. Each Middle College student will work closely with PLU professors and college student tutors on the personal, individual basis so important to effective learning. There are six professors on the faculty, from social sciences, mathematics, English, earth science, and music, plus a full-time counselor.

DIRECTORY

EXT

bEPARTMENT

ROOM

�nthropology

XAVR-200

7662

INGR-104

7573

Each student will receive individual counseling and aptitude or

Nt

skills testing. And each will learn how to find and use informa­

Biology

RCTR-155

7561

tion at the University.

Business Administration

ADMN-227

7244

Classes are small, flexible, and informal, giving each student an

Chemistry

RCTR-240

7530

opportunity to get well acquainted with both instructors and

INGR-133

fellow students.

Communication Arts Computer Science

7762 7400

Middle College isn't just work. There is plenty of opportunity for

Earth Sciences

RCTR-141

7563

play, taking advantage of PLU's excellent recreational facilities­

Economics

XAVR-105

7597 7272

MA1Ji.89

swimming pool, tennis courts, golf course, bowling alley, games

Education

ADMN-121

room, jogging-fitness course, and handball, racketball, and

English

ADMN-220K

7210

squash courts. Or one can simply enjoy sunbathing or frisbee

Graduate Studies

ADMN-104

7141

on PLU's spacious, green campus lawns.

/-iistory

XAVR-111

7595

Students may live on campus or commute, although on-campus

Languages

7120

housing is strongly recommended for this program. Tuition cost

Math

ADMN-220 MA1Ji.89

for the program is $1,400, and financial aid, based primarily on

Music

EAUD-232

need, is available. Tuition

Room & board (if desired) Textbooks Total Cost Estimate

$1400.00 $626.00 $60-100.00 $2086-2126

The deadline for Middle College applications is May 31, 1989. For more information, write or call Dr. Judith Carr, Middle College, Office of Special Academic Programs, PLU, Tacoma WA 98447, or phone (206) 535-7130.

7400 7601 7674

Nursing

RAMS

physical Education

OAUD

7350

Political Science

XAVR-109

7595

Psychology

XAVR-210

eligion

7294

7321

Social Sciences

KNOR XAVR-120

Social Work

EAUD-24

7394

Sociology

XAVR-208

7397

7670


t

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8

Anthropology

Art

(2) ANTH 220 Peoples of the World Term I: May 22-June 1 4 W h y d o other people often strike us a s ' weird' or ' e v i l ' o r at least a little bit odd'> Why don ' t we non-judgmentally view o thers as just "different'>" This workshop focuses on how we learn to understand (or misunderstand) peoples of other countries and/or ways of l i fe. Through films, guest speakers, discussions and readings, we explore other cultures, exam­ ine our reactions to them , and develop our own guidelines for dealings with global cultural diversity. $ 1 0 fi lm fee. 1 800-2 1 30, MW. XAVR- I I 2 . G. Guldin

A RTD 230/330/430 Ceramic Techniques and Materials (4) Term II: June 1 9-July 1 4 A multi-level course in ceramics, of interest to beginners, teachers, and those with experience. Traditional methods of c lay work including wheel throwing and hand building, as well as gLaze formation, air brushing, and firing techniques covered . Includes a survey of the history of contemporary ceramics. No prerequisites, 230 must be taken before 3 30 ; 330 before 430. Materials fee: $30. 1 230- 1 64S, MTWRF. INGR- 1 44 . L. Peterson

(2) ANTH 230 Peoples of the Northwest Coast Term I : May 23-June I S Survey the original inhabitants o f the Northwest coast from Oregon through Southeastern Alaska, from pre-contact to the present time. Examine ( I ) the traditional l ife of these native Americans. including their art, exogamy, bel ief sys­ tems and po l i t ical systems; (2) the changes that occurred due to early contacts with foreign governments, missionar­ ies, and business people; and (3) these societies today, as well as sovereignty fights, A l aska land claims, British Colum­ bian laws, and the Boldt decision in their native contexts. $ 1 0 film fee.

A RTD 255/355 Jewelry (4) May 22-July L 4 A study o f form and technique in the design and execution o f jewelry objects. Includes stone setting, fabrication, and cast­ ing. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $30 1 830-2 1 30, MT. INGR- 1 34 B . C. DeGroot

1 800-21 30, TR. XAVR-1 1 2. L. Klein

§ANTH 333* Archaeology and the Classroom (2) July 1 2-August 9 Archaeology seems rcmote and romantic; in fact, it is a scientific diSCipline focusing on art i facts as the c lues to extinct behavior. I! enables anthropologists to view thc l i ves of ancient people as systems of cul tural knowledge not unlike our own. This class covers the practice of archaeol­ ogy: its goals, theories, methods and ethics. The course is oriented toward the use of archaeology in the elementary school classroom and in other areas dealing with the pUbl ic. I! explores the applications of a number of learning areas to archaeology, including cross-cultural awareness,s history of c i v i l izations. math and reasoning, and others. Each student develops two-three unit plans suitable for his/her audience (classroom or other). In addition, graduate students work as a team to prepare an archaeological workbook for students. *May also be taken as EDUC S03V 1 9* , see page 1 9. 1 830-2 1 30, MW. XAVR- 1 1 2. J. Rasson §ANTH 465 Archaeology: The Field Experience (4) Term 1 : May 22-Junc 1 6 I n the summer o f Washington ' s Centennial Year, PLU stu­ dents excavate an historic building representing the state 's heritage. The field experience involves excavation of se­ lected portions around the structure. including mapping the area. The courses emphasi zes basic excavation s k i l ls, including not only digging, but also record-keeping, field drafting and field photography. An introduction to laboratory work includes preliminary artifact processing and learning to identi fy h istoric artifacts. Lab fee: $SO covers personal equipment, transportation to and from the site and crew T-shirt. 0900- 1 S 00, MTWR. XAVR- 1 1 2 . J. Rasson

(4) A RTD 267/367 Watercolor/Airbrush Workshop Term I : May 22-J une 1 6 A studio course presenting a variety of traditional and inno­ vative applications of both watercolor and airbrush. Students learn techniques used by professional artists and i l lustrators to produce h ighly sophisticated artwork. They build fam i liar­ ity and skill in each medium and are allowed to develop subject and technical applications that suit their individual needs. There i s room for advanced work under the inde­ pendent study l isting, w i th prior approval. $40 materials fee, covers papers. airbrush colors, painting boards. stencil material. 0800- 1 2 1 S . MTWRF. INGR- 1 26. D. Cox ( 4) §ARTD 275 Art, Archetype and Nature Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 Explores the decp and diverse relationship between an, myth and experience. Designed to wed art historical presen­ tations. drawing exercises, and nature outings into an inte­ grated experience of the power of nature upon our aware­ ness of aesthetics, the practice of art and cultural history. Learn about the relationship of art and nature through a


9 variety of cultures including native American, Asian, Euro­ pean, and American. In addition, through fundamental drawing exercises and various h i king and camping excur­ sions into the beautifu l landscape around Puget Sound, we deepen our personal relationship to nature and art. Includes at least two overnight backpacking trips and several day­ No previous art or camping experience necessary. hikes. An Approximate fee of $50 to cover camping expenses. additional fee for transportation may need to be assessed. 0800- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. INGR- 1 1 6. L. Gold A RTD 328 Landscape Photography (4) Term III: July 24-August 1 8 Landscape photography explores our contemporary envi­ ronment with a focus on the natural envi ronment and the urban landscape. Basic camera and printing techniques are covered, and students work with both 35mm and medium formats. The course is oriented for both the beginner and the more advanced student. Fee: $30 1 230- 1 645, MTWRF. INGR- 1 34A. B . G e ller §ARTD 501 Workshop: Arts Education for ( 4) the Elementary Teacher Interim: July 1 7-2 1 Through lecture, discussions and v isual demonstation, the educator learns procedures to integrate the arts into the elcmentary c lassroom curriculum. Focus is on the concepts of color, l ine, patterns, shape, form and texture. Attention is g iven to developing materials, methods, techniques and procedures. This course is oriented for K-6 classroom teachers with limited arts experience. 0800- 1 600, MTWRF. INGR- 1 26. L. Peterson

Biology BIOL 1 1 1 Biology and the Modern World ( 4) Term II: June 1 9-July 1 4 A n introduction t o biology, primarily designed for non-biol­ ogy majors. Fundamental concepts chosen from all areas of modern biology including the environment, population, human anatomy and physiology, genetics, evolution, and biological controls. Includes laboratory. No prerequisites, satisfies general university requirements. For further information, contact David Hansen (206) 535-7565. 0800- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. RCTR- I 02. D. Hansen BIOL 1 1 2 Humanistic Botany (4) Term I: May 22-June 1 6 A n introduction t o the basic principles o f biology w i th an emphasis on plants and their impact on people. Topics include: basic plant structure and function; poisonous plants; medicinal plants; food plants; propagation of house plants; home care of plants; plant identification. Includes laboratory. No prerequisites; satisfies general university requirements. For further information, contact Mike Crayton (206) 5357547. 0800- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. RCTR- 1 22 . M . Crayton

BIOL 205 Human Anatomy & Physiology (4) Term II: June 1 9-July 1 4 Identical in content to the Fall semester B IOL 205 class. Lecture topics inc l ude: matter; cells and tissues; nervous, endocrine, skeletal, and muscular systems. Laboratory in­ cludes: human skeletal system; cat dissection; experiments i n muscle physiology and human reflexes; special senses. Required for nursing and physical education curricula. Can be used to satisfy PLU biology major requirements or PLU general university science requirement. No prerequisite. For further information, contact Tom Carlson, (206) 535-7549. 0800- 1 045, MTWR* *Lab, TWR, 1 1 30- 1 430 RCTR- 1 1 6. J. Carlsonff. Lerum BIOL 206 Human Anatomy & Physiology (4) Term I I I : J u l y 24-August 1 8 Continuing class from BIOL 205 , Human Anatomy and Physiology, or can be taken independently i f prereqUlsIle is met. Identical i n content to the Spring Semester BIOL 206 class. Lecture topics include: circu latory, respiratory, diges­ tive, excretory, and reproductive systems; metabo li s m ; temperature regulation; stress; human development. Labo­ ratory includes: cat dissection; physiology experiments; study of developing organisms. For further information, contact Tom Carlson (206) 535-7549. Prerequisite: B IOL 205, Human Anatomy and Physiology, or equivalent. 0800- 1 045, MTWR*. *Lab, TWR, 1 1 30- 1 430, RCTR- 1 I 6. 1 . Carlsonff. Lerum BIOL 35 1 Natural History or the Pacific Northwest ( 4 ) Term I : May 22-June 1 6 An introduction to the natural history and literature of the Pac i fic Northwest: geology, c l i matology, oceanography, ecology, common l i fe forms, and human impact from the Continental Shelf to the Columbia Basin. Includes one-day field trips to Puget Sound and the Cascades, as well as three­ day trips to the Olympic Peninsula and to the Columbia Gorge and B asin. Scholarships may be availlable to Wash­ ington State teacheTs. Travel fee: $30. For further information contact Richard McGinnis (206) 535-7570. 0800- 1 2 1 5, MTWRF. RCTR- 1 24 . R. McGinnis B IOL 370 Biotechnology: Principles and Issues (4) Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 An introduction to t h e rapidly developing applied science, biotechnology. Topics range from food fermentation through current developments in gene cloning. Emphasis is on the basic science and on the impact of biotechnologies on civilizations. The course includes lectures, read ings, video tapes, tutorials, laboratory exercises, and demonstrations. Suitable for elementary and secondary teachers. For further information, contact David Kerk (206) 535-7357. Prerequi­ site: One course in general biology. 0800- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. RCTR- 1 36. D. Kerk Biology course descriplions continue on the next page.

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�BIOL 502 Advanced Placement I nstitute:

Biology( 2 )

Interim: July 1 7 -July 2 1 A n institu te designed for high school teachers preparing to offer Advanced

Placement B iology.

Major emphases

in­

BUSA 350 Management MBA Term I: May 30-July6'

(4)

A critical exam ination of the principles and processes o f ad­ m i n i stration

in an

increasingly i nternational

context.

Man­

cl ude content for an advanced placement course, the ad­

agement techniques and the functions of planning, organiz­

vanced placement test, and an overview of typical col lege

ing, leading

general biology courses dcsigned for potential biology majors .

the

Participants also carry out la bora tory exercises su itable for

points of v iew. Includes the study of concepts and character­

Advanced Placemcnt B iology courses.

The institute is con­

and

classic a l ,

d i recting, and

the

behavioral,

controll ing d iscu ssed

and

more

recent

from

integrative

istics related specifi ca l ly to the operations function. Introduc­

ducted by col lege I'aculty with experience teaching general

tion to case analysis and problem solving techniques.

biology, and by high school teachers who currently offer

requisite: ECON

advanced placement course.

I ntroductory Statistics (may be concurrent) and BUS A 2 8 1 ,

For further i n formation, con­

Pre­

I .'i O, Principles of Economics, STAT 2 3 1 ,

tact Tom Carlson (206) 535-7549.

Financial Accounting; Junior standing.

0900- 1 600, MTWRF. RCTR- 1 1 5 . J . Carlson

day. May 30.

*A lso meets Tues­

1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-2 1 5 . J. Daniel

BUSA 354 Human Resource Management

(4)

Term I I : J u n e ] lJ-Ju l y 1 2 Detailed

examination

o f the

behavior o f i nd i v id u a ls

and

groups i n busi ness organizations, with emphasi s on policies and practices for solving hu man resource problcms. Funda­

Busi ness Ad mi nistration

menta ls

Eligibility cards required for all busilless classes.

COlltact

the School of Busilless Admillistration at 535-7244 to obtain one.

of

and

personnel/human

other countries.

BUS A 230 Law and Society

(4)

A study o f the American legal system and the legal rclation­ among

business

the natural

org a n i z a t i ons,

j u di cia l system.

environment, ind i v i duals, governmen t a l

ethics

S op h o m o re

groups, and

the

Cu rrent business and soc ial problems are

addressed form a gl obal business

agenc ies,

and

perspective w i th an emphasis on

soc i a l

respon s i b i l i t y .

Prerequisite:

s t and ing .

managing

fore ign

operat ions.

Junio r

procedurcs aspects

in

the

of human

Prerequisite:

BUSA

350,

standing.

0800- 1 2 1 5 . MTW. ADMN-2 1 3 . S. Cook

BUSA 364 Managerial Finance

(4)

M B A Term I: May 30-July 6 Introduction t o the principal problems, theories and proce­ dures

of

ning.

financi a.i

financial

management:

valuation.

financi a l

p l an ­

statement anal ysis, capital asset acq u i s ition,

cost of capitaL financing strategies ( i nc l uding capital struc­ ture theory and d i v idend po l icy), management o f working capital accounts, and financial

0900- 1 2 1 5 , MTWR . ADMN-2 1 5 . B. Ahna

resource

International

resource management provide insight into the problems o f Management;

Term I : May 22-June 1 5 ships

U.S.

d imcnsions

of international

trade (including foreign exchange risk . country risk, transla­

BUSA 281 Financial Accou nting

(4)

Term I : M a y 22-June 1 5

tion gains and losses).

Prereq u i s i te : CSCI 220. Computer­

ized Information Systems with BASIC or equi valent; ECON

A n introd u c tion to accounting concepts and princ iples. Valu­

1 50 , Principles of Econom ics: MATH 1 2 8, Mathematics for

ation theories in the U.S. compared t o those in other nations.

B u siness and the Behav ioral Sciences or eq u iv a lent; STAT

Preparation (manual and computer) and analysis of financial

23 1 , Introductory Statis tics; BUSA 28 1 , Financ ial Account-

reports.

i.ng; ancl J u nior standing.

Prereq u i site:

Sophomore

stand ing.

0900- 1 2 1 5 , MTWR . ADMN-2 1 7 . J. Ramaglia

1 230- 1 545, TWR. ADMN-2 1 7 . S. Bancroft

BUSA 282 Management Accou n ting

(4)

Term II: J u ne 1 9-July 1 3 I ntroduction

to

the

use

o f accounting

control , and decision making. Topics profit relationships, cost accounting accounting

systems,

and

( 4)

BUSA 370 Marketing Systems Term I I : J u ne 1 9- J u ly 1 3

budgeting;

data

111

planning,

include cost-volume­ methods,

management

international

tions of pelformance evalu ation systems.

applica­

Prerequisite: BA

The

flow

econo m i e s ;

of goods

and

economic

services

and

in

thc

behav ioral

U.S.

and

approaches

global to

the

analysis of domestic and international demand: the role of marketing functions i n bus iness and not- for-profit organiza­ tions.

Determination

mix:

prod uct pol icy,

pricing.

ness and the B ehavioral Sciences; CSCI 220, Computerized

commu nications.

I n formation Systems with

Economics; MATH 1 28 . Mathematics for Business and the

BASIC; Sophomore standing.

0900-121 5, MlWR. ADMN-21 7. M. Hulen

chan n e ls and

of a marketing

28 1 , Financ ial Accounting; Math 1 28 . Mathematics for Busi­

physical d i stribution. and marketing

Prerequ isite:

ECON

1 50,

Principles

of

Behavioral Sciences o r equi valent; STAT 23 1 , I ntroductory

Statistics; BUSA 28 1 , Financial Accounting; and J u n io r standing. 0900- 1 2 1 5 , MTWR . ADMN-2 1 5 . D . McNabb


11 (4) BUSA 455 01 Business Policy Term I: May 22-June I S S tudy of organ izational admi n i s tration from top manage­ ment perspective. Formulation and execution of strategies and policies to i n tegrate al l management and business functions in support of organizational objectives. Impl ica­ tions of resource avai labil i ty, technology and the economy; education, rel igion, ethics and pcrsonal values; social re­ sponsibility; public policy; and international relations for lOp m a n a g e m e n t dec i s i o n s . I n c l u d c s c o m prehe n s i v e c a s e analyses. Prerequisite: B L S A 2 8 2 , Management Account­ ing; BUSA 350, Management; BUSA 354, Human Resource Management: BUSA 364, Managerial Finance; B SA 370, Systems; and Senior standing. 0900- 1 3 1 5 , MTR. A DMN-22 3 . W. Yager BUSA 455 02 Business Policy M B A Term I I : July 1 0-August 1 7 See description under BUSA 455 0 1 , above. 1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-2 1 5 . J. Daniel

(4)

BUSA 483 Income Taxation (4) Term I : May 22-June I S Com prehcnsive study of i ncome tax concepts, regulations, and tax planning principles. Emphasis on individual and busi ncss income taxation. Prerequisite: BUSA 28 1 , Finan­ cial Accounting. J .100- 1 6 1 5 , tvITWR. ADMN-22 1 . M . H u len BCSA 490

A Business

and Cultural

J ntroduction to Chile

(4) July 30-August 1 9 This 2 I -day educational experience o f Chile begins a t the shores of the Paci fic Ocean at Valaparaiso and Vina del Mar and ends w i th a ful l week in the Andes Mountains at one of this South American country's newest ski a nd mountaineer­ ing centers. Along the way we visit attractions which help tell the pre-h istoric, colon ial, and modern geological, cultural and economic history of the nation. Included are lectures and on-site v isits to museums. univers ities. cathedrals, Span­ ish forts. wineries. business enterprises. public markets, volcanoes. lakes. islands. and mountain peaks. We travel by air. bus, railroad, and boat. Both credit and non-credit tuition include all travel and lodging, most meals. taxes and trans­ fers. Families are welcome at the non-cred it tuition rate. Cost: $2898 includes 4 semester hours of cred it; 2598 for non-credit participants. For further i n formation. contact the Office of Cont inuing Education. 535-8 3 1 2. D. McNabb B l S A 520 Programming for Managers (4 ) M B A Term I I : J u ly 1 0-August 1 7 Computer programming including branching, looping, sub­ scr i p ts, input/ou tput. character manipu lation. su broutines, file manipu lations, data s torage and retrieval. Advanced work w ith software packagcs . Prercquisite: B U S A 503, Management Use of Computers. Tu ition: 5275 per semester hour. I SOO-2200, M R . ADMN-2 1 7. E . Harter

BUSA 550 Organizational Behavior & Environment(4 ) M B A Term I I : July 1 0-August 1 7 Study o f open sociotechnical systems within which a man­ ager must operate. Three major perspectives are encom­ passed: The external organization env ironment. including legal, ethical, social, economic and pol itical influences; the organization i tself as an entity; and the internal organization environment. Comparisons w ith administrative practices in other countries and cul turcs . Prcrequisite: BUSA 502, Fun­ damentals of Managemcnt and Marketing. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. 1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-2 1 3 . C. Schultz BUSA 555 Business Strategy and Policy (4) MBA Term I: May 30-July 6* A n in tegrated management approach based o n decision­ making analysis in complex cases and comprehensive field situations. Advanced readings and library research i ntegrate concepts of management and business functions including consideration of leg a l , social, and international aspects of the business environment. Prerequ isite: B U S A 55 I , Operations Management and Systems Seminar; BUSA 564, Financial M anage m e nt Seminar and 570, Marketing M a n a gement Seminar any one of which may be taken concurrently with 555. "'Also meets Tuesday, May 30. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. 1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-22 1 . S . Barndt BUSA 582 Accounting I n formation and Control (4) MBA Term II: July 1 0-August 1 7 Applications o f accounting information. services and sys­ tems to management problems. I m pact on decision mak ing by international accounting practices. Prerequ isite: B USA 5 0 1 , Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance and B US A 503, Management Use of Computers. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. 1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-22 L . S taff BUSA 590 Financial Sources and Strategies for Small (4) B u s i n es s M B A Term I : May 30-July 6'" This course provides opportunities to examine the problems inherent in financing c l osely held businesses. as wcll as th options for overcoming them. In addition to regular rcading assignments. students are expected to actively participate in a varielY of casc studics involving business executives and a variety of financiers. Prerequisite: BUSA 50 1 , Fundamentals for Accounting and Finance. "Also meets Tuesday, May 30. Tu ition: S275 per semester hour. 1 800-2200. MR. ADMN-2 1 7. S . Bancroft

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Chemistry

Commun ication Arts (4)

CHEM 104 Environmental Chemistry Term I: May 22-June 1 5

COMA 1 62 American Film History

structures a n d reactions and

Concentrates o n the development and growth o f the motion

practical applications; overview of chemi stry and its impact

picture in the United States from 1 895 to the present. Empha­

on society; scientific method; problem solving s k i l ls ; current

sis on the fi l m d i rector, whose implementation of fi lm tech­

Basic principles of chemical

topics i n environmental and consumer chemistry (e. g . , poly­

nique and theory serves as the formative artistic force i n the

mers, toxic materials, radioactivity, po ll ution, food additives).

cin ema.

Preparatory to Chern 1 05 , Chemistry o f Li fe , or Chern 1 1 5 ,

public attitudes and mores, and political positions reflected

Societal

economic

in the United

0800- 1 04 5 , MTWR * , RCTR-224. *Lab TR, 1 230- 1 5 I 5 , RCTR-

provides

20 1 . W. Gidd ings

place on the modem film-maker as a cult ural hero.

C H E M 105 Chemistry of Life

(4)

Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 3 General,

organic,

and

the

States throughout the past 75

film

parallel

media

with

shape

and

factors,

years, which

thematic

focus,

points o f reference. Additional emphasis

1 8 30-2 1 30, TR. INGR- I OO. W. Becvar

COMA 324 Workshop in Nonverbal Communication( 2)

biochemistry

pertinent

t o chemical

Interim: July 1 7-July 2 1

processes i n the human organ ism; su itable for l i beral arts

Focus

students, and prospective teac hers. Meets general u n iversity

s igned to increase sens i t iv i ty to messages sent and received

on

requirements. Students w ho have not completed high school

through the many nonverbal

chemis try are encouraged to take 104 before taking 1 05.

How does the room arrangement e ffect mood, does color real l y

woman)?

.-

CHEM 32 1 Analytical Chemistry

() --

as

provide

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWR*, RCTR-220. "Lab TR, 1 300- 1 53 0 , RCTR-

(J) ..c

such

Meets general university core requirements.

20 I . C. Anderson

E

influences

General Chemistry for those lacking h i g h school chemistry.

+-'

en

(4)

May 23-July 20

(4)

the

make

nonverbal

aspects o f communication. elements

other related

COMA 326 Group Communication May 22-Ju l y 1 9

m e tric,

This

and

selected

instrumental

method s .

1 1 6, General Chemistry; MATH

1 33 ,

course

focuses

group structures.

College Algebra and Trigonometry .

the

0800- 1 04 5 , MTWR * , RCTR-224. *Lab MTWR, 1 23 0- 1 5 1 5 ,

communication

RCTR-20 I .

esses.

L . Huestis

(or

0900- 1 600, MTWRF. INGR - 1 09 . E. Inch

Chemical methods o f quantitative analysis, includ ing volu­ gravimetric,

man

questions.

Term I I I : J u ly 24-August 1 7

Prereq u i s i te: CHEM

in the environment.

a d i fference, can clothes make the

and

De­

dynam ics

on

the

nature o f communication

in

Examine how communication i n fluences

of group

organ ization,

can shape,

alter,

or

Examine the role played

communication

(4)

method s

for

and

consider

improve

group

how proc­

by conflict, and discuss

managing

group

prob l e m s .

Students i n this course participate in theoretical d i scussion and practical application. explaining theories in

group

Read and d i scuss CUITent research

processes and

practical

contexts

dynamics,

to a

and

variety

apply

the

of group case

studies. 1 830-2 1 30, MW. INGR-l 09. E . Inch

(4)

COMA 328 A rgumentation

Term I: May 22-.1 une 1 6

People argue about many things i n many contexts. arguments

in

personal

and

public

W e use

decision-making.

We

argue in a variety of ways ranging from formal debate to i n formal wrang l i ng about sports.

Argumentation examines

the theories, methods, and contexts of arguing. combines

lecture, discussion and

practical

This cou rse

appJ.ications

of

argument, and is a n appropriate c l a s s for anyone wishing to know more about arguing and how to be a better consumer of argument. 1 400- 1 64 5 , MTWRF. INGR- l 09 . M. Bartanen


13 COMA 447 Theatre Northwest Interim: July 1 7-July 2 1

CSCI 220 Computer Informations Systems with BASIC

The Northwest and Seattle i n particular has an abundance of

MBA Tenn I I : July 1 0-August 1 8

rich

--

(4)

semi-profes足

Introduction to compu ters and computer systems and the i r

Become more aware of these opportuni ties

u s e . Programming i n t h e B A S I C language using branching,

experience

sional theater.

( 2)

avai lable

in

professional

and

and more knowledgeable theater goers - where to go, what

s u blooping,

to expect, and how to v iew the wide variety of plays to be

tion, subroutines.

file

o

d iscovered. Attend and d iscuss five plays, tour a theater and

management using existing software packages on IBM PCs.

hold

Students may not take both CSC! 220 and either CSCI 1 1 0 or

(j)

d i scussions

with

actors

and

theater

staff.

Students

subscripts,

input/output,

Word

processing,

character

manipula足

Q) o c Q) -

spreadsheets, and

review one o f the plays v iewed and compare their critiques

CSC! 2 1 0 for cred it.

with those of professional reviewers.

for Business and the Behavioral Sciences; or MATH

Class members should

Prerequisite: MATH 1 2 8, Mathematics

be prepared to buy five play tickets and share in the cost of

College Algebra and Trigonometry; or equivalent.

van

1 300- 1 445, MTWRF. RCTR-22 1 .

transportation.

Tickets are

at

reduced

group rate;

transportation fee will not exceed $ 1 5 for all perfonnances. 1 4 00- 1 645 , M ; 1400-2300, W; 1 800-2300, TRF. MGYM-202. W . Parker

1 33 ,

M . Imbruglio

CSCI 270 Data Structu res

( 4)

M B A Tenn I I : July 1 0-August 1 8 Workshop: Continuation of Pascal programming techniques,

COMA 458 C reative Dramatics

(4)

and a study of basic data structure s including l i nked lists,

Term II: J u ne 1 9-July 1 4

tree, queues, stacks and graphs. Applications of these fonns

Designed t o acquaint the student with materials, tech n iques,

to sorting, searching and data storage i s made.

and theories of creative d ramatics. creative dramatics. schoo l

teachers

re l ig ious

or

leaders,

Students participate in

Intended for elementary and ju nior high prospective

youth

and

teachers,

camp

theater

counselors,

majors,

day

care

workers, social and psychological workers, and community theater leaders i n terested i n working with children.

CSCI

Prereq u isite:

1 44, Introduction to Computer Science

CSCI 490/590 Fault Tolerant Computing

(4 )

May 22-June 23 The course surveys both hardware and software approaches include:

Topics

application of fault tolerant systems, fault detection

and isolation, fau l t tolerant architecture and design of fau l t tolerant software.

Prerequ i site: CSCI 270, Data S tructures;

CSCI 362, Digital Logic; and MATH 1 52, Calculus II. 08 1 5- 1 04 5 , MTWRF. RCTR-222. R. Spil lman

CSCI 502 01* A ppleworks for Teachers

Computer Science (See also Math) CSCI 1 1 0 BASIC

( 2)

Term II: June 1 9-July 1 4 Introduction subscripts,

to

i n teractive

functions,

computing,

input/output,

branching,

subroutines

looping,

and

simple

fi le techniques i n the context o f the BASIC language. CSCI 1 1 0 and 220 may not both be taken for c redi t.

Prerequisite:

High School Algebra.

to

structured

applications

and

language is used.

computer o f data

science

including

algorithm

numerical/non-numerical

fi les.

Pascal

programming

Prerequisite : Either MATH 1 3 3 , College

A lgebra and Trigonometry; or MATH 1 2 8, Mathematics for Business and

the

used in educational introduced spreadsheet

settings.

. . Appleworks. Teachers are

to the concepts and use of a word processor, and

database

with

the

Appleworks

integrated

software package. Two major areas of emphasis are stressed: the use of Appleworks as a teacher too l , for example, class足 room record keeping, gradebook and educational materials

17.

Does not count toward Computer Science degrees.

0900- 1 200, MTWRF. R A MS-202. J. Beaul ieu

programming, use

w ith one of the most popular computer software packages

is necessary. * May also be taken as EDUC 502 0 1 * , see page

( 4)

MBA Term I : May 30-J u ly 7 introduction

Des igned to help teachers develop a h igh level of proficiency

o f the classroom curriculum. No prior computer experience

CSCI 144 Introduction to Computer Science (Pascal)

design,

( 2)

1 9-June 30

production, and the use of the Appleworks program as part

0930- 1 045, MTWRF. RCTR-22 1 . C. Domer

An

June

Behavioral Sciences; or equivalent.

0830- 1 0 1 5 , MTWRF. MGY M - I 02. J. B rink

CSCI 502 02* Appleworks ror Teachers

( 2)

July 3-July 1 4 See description above. 0 1 *, see page 1 7 .

* May also be taken as EDUC 502

Does not count toward Computer Science

d eg re e s . 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-2D2. J. Beau l ieu

Computer Science course descriptions continue on the next page.

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0830- 1 0 1 5 , MTWRF. MGYM- I 02. G. Hauser

to the design of highly reliable computer systems.

0930- 1 230, MTWRF. MGYM -20S . W . Parker

.

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§CSCI 504* A d vanced Appleworks (2) J u ly 24-August 4 Topics include a n extensive study o f the database package, mail merge, transfer of data between a database, spread­ sheet and word processor. Other topics i nc lude Macros, printer codes, printer drivers, and interface card setti ngs. Does not count toward Computer Science degrees. * May also be taken as EDUC 503R I 5 *, see page 1 8. Prereq uisite: CSCI 502/EDUC 502, Appleworks for Teachers; or a good knowledge of Appleworks Word Processing and S pread­ sheet programs (with instructor's perm ission). 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-202. J . Turner §CSCI 505* Theories of Teaching Keyboarding and Word Processing (2) July 3 -J u ly 1 4 A study o f the impact o f computer technology o n the school curriculum as it relates to the i ntroduction of keyboarding skills and the use of word processing. Topics i nc lude: the impact o f compu ter technology on trad i t ional methods of teaching writing skills, d i fferent approaches to introducing keyboarding skills into the curriculum, methods of teaching word processing, the impact of spe lling checkers on trad i­ tional approaches to the teaching of spe l l ing. " ' May also be taken as EDUC 503S 1 6* , see page 1 9. Does not coun! toward Computer Science degrees. Prerequisite: CSCI 502/ EDUC 502, Appleworks for Teachers; or EDUC 503, Micro­ computers in the Classroom; or equivalent experience and perm ission of i nstructor. 1 730-2030, MTWRF. RAMS-202. T. Lamas §CSCI 506* Data Base and Telecommunications in the Classroom (2) August 7-August 1 8 Examines the u s e of database packages t o teach some aspects of problem solv ing strategies and student research s k i l l s in the K- 1 2 curriculum. Topics include: principles or database programs, learning to use two d i fferent database programs, AppleWorks and Fredbase; sources of educa­ tional d a tabases which can be used in the curriculum; strate­ gies o f teaching database and research skills to students; the use of telecommunications to access professional educa­ tional databas s; and the potential of telecommunications for new curricular d i rcctions in the classroom. ':' May also be taken as EDUC 503T 1 Y , see page 1 9. Does not cou n t toward Computer Science degrees. Prerequisite: CSCI 502/ EDUC 502, Appleworks for Teachers; or ED C 503, M icro­ computers in the Classroom; or equ ivalent experience and permissIOn of instructor. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-202. 1. Beaulieu

§CSCI 507* Computer Technology and the Teaching of Problem Solving (2) J u l y 24-August 4 This course examines the use of the computer to present new approaches to the teaching of problem solving skills through­ out the curriculum. Topics incl ude theories of teac hing problem solving, i ntegrating the computer into the teaching of problem solving, software designed to promote problem solving ski l ls, curricula which i ncorporate the computer i nto the teaching of problem solv ing and methods of evaluation. " ' May also be taken as EDUC 503W20 * , see page 1 9. Does not count toward Computer Sc ience degrees. Prerequ isite : CSCI 502/EDUC 502, Appleworks for Teachers; or EDUC 503, Microcomputers i n the Classroom; or eq u iva lent expe­ rience and permission of instructor. 1 300-1 600, MTWRF. RAMS-202.J. Beau lieu

§CSCI 508* A d vanced Computers in Special Ed ucation (2) July 7-August 1 8 A detai led exam inat ion o f using computers t o manage IEPs, test results and requ ired compl iance data. The first part of the course is a detailed examination of the AWARE program, a special education data management system designed around the Appleworks word processor and database programs. The course also includes the examination of adaptive de­ v i ces for the handicapped. Emphasis is on the Adapt ive firmware Card, the Unicorn expanded keyboard and talking word processors. * May also be taken as SPED 50 I AO l * , see page3 1 . Does not count toward Computer Science degrees. Prerequ i s i te: SPED 494, Computer Applications for the Handicapped ; or ED UC502/CSCI 502, Appleworks for Teach­ ers . EDUC 504, Advanced AppleWorks is strongly recom­ mended. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. RAi'iIS-202. J . B aulieu §CSCI 509* LOGO/LOGO Writer (2) JuJy 3 -July 14 An introd uction to LOGO programming l anguage and i ts impact on teaching math concepts and problem solv ing i n t h e curricul u m . Topics include: procedures, parameters, a n introduction t o recursi v e procedures a n d list processing. Using LOGO to enhance the creative writing process with LOGO Writer is also explored. *May also be taken as EDUC 503X2 1 *, see page 1 9. Does not count toward Computer Science degrees. Prerequisite: EDUC 503, Microcomputers in thc Classroom; or equivalent experience and permission of instructor. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. RAMS-202. J . Turner


15 *CSCI 55 1 Advanced Placement I nstitute: Computer Science (Pascal) I n teri m : J u l y 1 7-Ju ly 2 1

(2)

The Advanced Placement Computer Science su mmer insti­ tute is a one-week i ntensive workshop for high school teach­ ers of A P computer science courses. The institute consists o f general sesjons for a l l participants and special sections for a d v a nc ed AP te a c h er s and beg i n n ing AP teachers. The general sessions cover the fol l o w i ng top ics: I ) t e a c h ing Pasc a l , problem s o l v i ng

s

and

program

design

with

system

a n a l y i s and software engi neering te chn i qu e s ; 2) an exami­ nation of the new AP c u rri c u lum; 3) a brief introduction to other structured languages, C and Modulo 2; 4) a l tern a tive to Apple Pascal ; 5) a brainstomling and sharing session with other teaehcrs of AP courses. Thc advanced section exam­ ines s t rategics for teac h i n g recursion and analysis of algo­ rithm

complex ity.

sion,

pointers,

tures

taug ht

The

trees,

beg i n n i ng

stacks,

Computer Science degrees.

Pascal

course

queues

the AP course.

in

or

section and

Does

introduces ot h er data not

count

ESCI 425 Geological Field Mapping (5) 1 7-A u g u s t 1 8 Learn mapping techniques, basic surveying methods, con­ s tru c t i on of geologic cross sections, aerial photograph analysis.

July

*Field

stud ies

experience

w i th

graduate

Earth

Sound,

Cascade

Mounta i n s

Science

majors;

graduate

students

w i thout

B ri ng sleep­ ing bag, tow e l s , toiletries, etc. Non-refundable regis t ra t i on feel of $25 is fu l l y a pp l ic a b le toward tuition; food and lodging costs for five weeks are $450. For i tinera ry and further details, write: Pacific Lutheran Un iv e rsity De pt o f Earth Sciences, Tacoma WA 98447. 0800- 1 600, MTWRFS. RCTR- 1 08* B. Lowes

,

.

Q) U C . Q) U (f) ..c t::: CO W

--

Q) U C . Q) U (f)

recur­ struc­ toward

consent

Puget

prior s u mmer field camp experience welcome.

Prereq u i s i t e : One col lege - le v e l

co m p a ra ble

i n c l ude

and Co lumbia R i ver B a s a l t Pl ateau, Designed for under­

--

of

i n s t r u c to r.

0900- 1 600, MTWRF. L1BR-Comp Ctr. J. Beau l ieu

Q) :::J a.

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o

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(4) ESCI 131 Physical Geology Te rm I : May 22-June 1 6 A n i ntroduc tory course d e a l ing w ith the human geologic habitat, both at prcsent and as i t has developed through time; m a te r i a l of car th (and l unar) crusts, their derivation through

s

-

major earth processes and formation of su rface features w ith

e m p h as i s on t h c i r s i g n i ficance to c u l tural development

and

c i v i l izat ion;

l aboratory

s t udy

of rocks,

m i nera l s ,

and

geologic mapping; fi c l d tr i ps arc arranged. Open lab afternoons.

0800- 1 045, MTWRF. RCTR- 1 09. S . B enham ESC I 202 Oceanography J4

(4)

Term II: J u ne 1 9-July

Occanogr<lphy <Ind i t s rel a t ionship t o other fields; ph y s i c a l , chcmical, biological, c limatic and geological a s pec t s o f the sea. Pacific Northwcst coastal processes are stressed . Field trips, w ith one wcckcnd fic l d trip req u ired. Labs inc l uded. 0800- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. RCTR- 1 09. S . Benham

ESCI 222 Conservation of Natural Resources Ma y 22-July 2 1

(4)

Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of our resourccs w ith spec i a l reference to

the Pacific Northwest. 1 800-2030, TR. RCTR- 1 09. S , Benham/D. Foley

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16

Econom ics ECON 150PrincipiesofEconomics

Education (4)

June 26-August 1 7 Introduction to the scope of economics, includ ing Macro and Micro Economics; analysis of U.S. economic system; emphasis on current economic policy. 1 8 30-2 1 50, MR. ADMN-200. N. Peterson STAT 231 Statistics (4) Term I : M a y 22-June 1 6 Avai lable for STAT credit only, l istcd here for convenience of s tudents. See page 43 for course description. 0800- 1 045, MTWRF. A DMN-2 1 2 . R . Jensen

- -

E

o c o () w --.

ECON 331 International Economics (4) Term I: May 22-June 1 6 Regional a n d i n ternational specialization, comparative costs, international payments and exchange rates; national poli­ cies which promote or restrict trade. Prerequisite: ECON 1 50, Principles of Economics 0800- 1 045, MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 1 . D. Vinje ECON 361 Money and Banking (4) Term I: May 22-June 1 6 Nature and role of money; commerc ial banking system; Federal Reserve System; theory of credit and money supply control; Keynes ian and Monetarist theories of monetary impacts on inflation, i nterest rates and national income. Prerequ i site: ECON 1 50, Principles of Economics. 0930- 1 2 1 5, MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 3 . E. Ankrim ECON 500 Applied Statistical Analysis (4) M B A Tcrm I: May 30-Ju ly 6* Intensive introd uction t o statistical methods for graduate students who have not previously taken I ntroductory Statis­ tics. Emphasis on application of inferential statistics to con­ crete situations. Topics include measures of location and variation, probability, estimation, hypothesis tests, and re­ gression. W i l l not count for Statistics M inor. Tally card required, contact the School of B usiness Administration a t 535-7244 t o obtain one. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. *AIso meets Tuesday, May 30. 1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-2 1 2. R. Jensen §ECON 502 Ad vanced Placement Institute: Economics (2) J u ly 1 7 - 2 1 Designed to a i d new o r continuing teachers of AP Econom­ ics in their courses. I nc l udes both micro- and macro-eco­ nomics. Covers content, pacing; teacher student , and institutional responsibilities; strategies, methods and materi­ als; s k i l ls (teacher and student); and preparing for and taking the A P exam. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. XAVR-204. D. Wentworth ECON 504 Economic Analysis and Policy Decisions( 4 ) M B A Term I : May 30-Ju ly 6* Basic economic concepts applied to policy formation and operating dec isions. Tally card required, contact the School of Business Administration at 535-7244 to obtain one. Tui­ tion: $275 per semester hour. *Also meets Tuesday, May 30. 1 800-2200, MR. ADMN-2 1 0 . G. Sigrnen

EDUC 420 Problems of Reading in the Secon dary School (2) Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 Teaching secondary read ing in content areas; attention to developmental reading problems; materials, methods, tech­ niques and procedures. Prerequisite: EDUC 25 1 , Learner and Society: Growth and Development (Secondary). 1 230-1 345, MTWRF. A DMN-2 1 3 . J. Hays EDUC 421 Teachers and the Law (1) June 1 9-June 29 A brief study o f students' parents' and teachers ' rights and re­ sponsibilities with some emphasis on the question of liabil ity. 1 800-2000, MTWR. ADMN- 1 1 7. C. DeB ower EDUC 451 Administration of the School Library (2) Term II: June 1 9-July 1 4 Library organization and administration i n elementary and second ary schools. 1 1 00- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. LIBR- 1 06. M . Baldwin EDUC 452 Basic Reference Materials (2) Term III: July 24-August 1 8 Materials and procedures which support reference services in elementary and secondary school l i braries. Special inves­ tigation of reference services in Puget Sound and computer data bases . 0930- 1 045, MTWRF. LIBR- I 06. C. Yetter EDUC 453 Processing School Library Materials (2) Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 Classification, cataloging, and technical processing of mate­ rials. 0800-09 1 5 , MTWRF. L l BR- I 06 . R. Sherman-Peterson EDUC 454 Selection of Learning Resource Materials( 2 ) Term I I I : J u l y 24-August 1 8 Criteria, professional literature and techniques of evaluation of l ibrary materials (print and non-print); the l ibrarian's re­ sponsibility to faculty, students, and the general public. 1 1 00- 1 2 1 5, MTWRF. LIBR- I 06. C. Yetter EDUC 456 Storytelling (2) Term III: July 24-August 1 6 Exploration o f the art of storytell ing, from find ing the right story to u sing storytell ing to en l iven classroom instruction. Examination of the k i nds of stories most appropriate for telling. Practice in learning and tel ling a variety of stories. Imagination-stretching exercises for use both by teachers and students. Appropriate for elementary and secondary teachers. 1 230- 1 545, MW. ADMN-202. C. Wellner


17 EDUC 457 The Arts, Media and Technology Telm I I : June 1 9-July 1 4

§EDUC 503AOI * Social Work Interventions with School-age Children and Their Families

Students use a variety o f techniques, equipment, and mate­

June 1 9-Jul y 1 4

(2)

(2)

rials to explore ways of seeing and expressing how they see

Methods for working with d i fficult-to-motivate children i n the

and experience their environment and explore ways of incor­

schools,

porat ing

Emphasis is given to interventions with fa m i l ies, including ap­

these

techniques

v ideo

cameras,

toons,

photography,

i n to

the

book-prod uction , and

classroom.

models,

posters

along

Computers,

animation,

w i th

the

car­

standard

and

creating

therapeutic

classroom

proaches to working with d i fficult parents. for

ing in a school environment.

overheads are manipu lated as media to creatively express a

402*, see page 42.

v iew of the world. K - 1 2. $20 supply/eq u i pment fee.

0930- 1 34 5 , MTWRF. ECAM-22. G. H iam

EDUC 473 Parent-Teacher Relationships

(2)

Term I: May 22-June 1 4 Issues

and

sk i l ls

t i on skills. relevant

conferencing

and

parent­

Emphasis on effective communica­

Special education majors and teachers examine

placement

*May also be taken as SOCW

processes

and

parent

Development

and

methods

a

for

eval uation

(2)

o f program,

developmentally

normal chi ldren.

Prerequ isite:

based PSYC

strategi e s

ECE

program

and for

1 0 1 , Introduction to

Psychology; c h i ld development course; upper class or gradu­

needs.

ate level standing.

1 8 00-2 100, MW, ECAM- I. l . K . Gcrlach

EDUC 479 Special Techniques in Reading

(4)

Term I I : June 1 9 -July 1 4

0930- 1 045, MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 9 . S taff

Individual d i agnostic assessment of reading problems using

EDUC 503C03 Teaching Math Successrully in the 90s (K-8)

both formal and informal testing teChniques. S pecial instruc­

Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4

tional

Thi s workshop focuses on SPI G u idel ines for Elementary

methods for remed iation

d i fficu l t ies.

Practicum required.

for c h i ldren

with

Prerequi site:

reading

EDUC 325,

(2)

School Mathematics in Washington State. All six strands are

Reading in the Elementary School, or equivalent.

studies with special emphasis on computation s k i l l develop­

0800- 1 045, MTWRF. ADM N-208. J . Hays

ment through the M U M S (Mathematics Unit

EDUC 483 Primary Reading

( 2)

Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 Materials and methods of the primary read ing program and its relation to other activities.

Prerequisite: teaching experi­

ence o r concurrent with student teach ing. 1 1 00- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-200.

(2)

1 9-June 30

Designed to help teachers develop a high level of proficiency w i th one of the most popular computer software packages used in educational settings. . . Appleworks. Teachers are introduced to the concepts and use o f a word processor, spreadsheet

and

d a tabase

with

the

Appleworks

elsewhere. The workshop may be substituted for EDUC 326 necessary.

Pass/fa i l

only.

1 230- 1 420, MTWRF. ADMN- 1 1 7. C. DeBower

EDUC 503004 C lassroom Management/ Discipline Techniques

Staff

EDUC 502 0 1 * Appleworks ror Teachers June

Management

System) project used in selected Clover Park Schools and when

i n tegrated

(2)

Term I I : June 20-July 1 3 A workshop for elementary teachers interested i n developing strategies

for creating a classroom c l imate

learning and social development. on

school

mod e l ing,

e ffe c t i v en e s s , and

c l assroom

conducive for

Topics include research

teacher

e x pecta t i o n s ,

management

teacher

systems.

1 5 30- 1 800, TWR. ADMN - 1 1 7 . D. Sydnor

software package. Two major areas of emphasis are stressed:

EDUC 503E05 Microcomputers in the Classroom ( 2 )

the use o f Appl'eworks as a teacher tool, for example, class­

June

room

Introduction

record keeping, gradebook and educational materials

prod uction, and the use 01 the Appleworks program as pan

1 9 -June 30

settings.

to the use of microcompu ters

The course examines:

in

educational

I ) The computer as a

of the c l assroom curricu l u m . No prior computer experience

teacher tool using word proces sing, spreadsheet, and grad­

1 3.

evaluation, 4) Integrating software into the curriculum, 5)

0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-202. J. Beaul ieu

Copyright laws and public domain software, and 7) Software

is necessary. *May also be taken as CSCI 502 0 I * , see page

EDUC 502 02* Appleworks ror Teachers

(2)

J u ly 3-July 1 4

See EDUC 502 0 I , above for course description.

be taken as CSCI 502 02 * , see page 1 3 .

*May also

ing programs, 2) Computer assisted instruction, 3) Software

currently used in educational settings.

Prereq u isite:

EDUC

25 1 , Learner and Society or EDUC 253, Child Development and

......, -

ct1 U � "'C W

--

EDUC 503B02 Instructional Methods in Early Child hood Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4

i mportant i n

teacher relationships.

Equally applicable

teachers, social workers, or st udents interested in work­

fare of tape recorders, slide shows, movies, fi lm strips, and

1 230- 1 500, MTWRF. L1B R-Medi a . M . Churney

environments.

C o .

Schoo l s .

1 7 30-2030, MTWRF. RAMS-202. J. Beaulieu

0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-202 J . Beaulieu

Education course descriptions continue on the next page.


18 --

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EDUC S03F06 Teaching Math: Cooperative Learning, Manipulatives and Problem Solving K-8 (2) Term III: J u l y 24-August 1 8 Three major thrusts in improving the teaching of mathemat­ ics, integrated through practical examples from grades one through n ine. Pass/fail only. 1 230- 1 345, MTWRF. ADMN- 1 1 7 . C. DeBower EDUC S03G07* Multicultural Issues and Skills for the Human Services and Education (2) Term III: July 24-August 4 Examines several different approaches t o multicul tural edu ­ cation from national and global perspectives. Students are expected to present substantive material in both contexts as well as to participate in an awareness section. Material to support various c lassroom units are provided or developed; focus is on the practical application of multicu ltural education methods and materials. Requires significant student partici­ pation. * May a lso be taken as SOCI 403 * , see page 42. 0930- 1 345, MTWRF. ECAM-23. T. Johnstone EDUC S03H08 Child ren's Literature in K-8 Curriculum (2) Term 1II : July 25-August 1 7 Read and d iscuss contemporary c h i ldren's l i terature i n a variety of genres and gain an understanding of the bibliogra­ phics resources in the field. Expl ore techniques for integrat­ ing children's literature into the K-S instructional program through research in current educational l i terature and hear from teachers who are effectively using children's l iterature in their instructional program. 1 400- 1 645, TR. ADMN-202. C. Yetter EDUC S03J09 Experiencing Primary Mathematics ( 2) Term I I I : July 24-August 4 Experience the methodology expressed in the texts Mathe­ matics Their Way by Mary Baratta-Lorton, and Developing Number Concepts by Kathy Richardson. The findings of Piaget are translated into meaningful situations for primary age children. A c lassroom model is experienced by partici­ pants as they becomc invol ved in a hands-on program which uses a variety of manipulative materials to build understand­ i ng in the area of mathematics. 1 230- 1 5 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-20S. J . Fu lkerson

EDUC S03KIO School Librarians' Workshop: Information Skills in the Elementary School (2) Interim: July 1 7-July 2 1 Learn how to plan, prepare and evaluate library and informa­ tion skills instruction for K-6 students. Examine a variety of curricu lar objectives and teaching methods. The course is deisgned as an i n tense workshop with demonstrations, gucst speakers, and hands-on exploration o f resources available to school l ibrarians. Students w i l l design and produce l ibrary instructional materials for use in elementary schools. OSOO- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-206. C . Starr EDUC S03Ll l Gifted Workshop (2) Interim: July 1 7 -July 2 1 A study o f the gifted child, characteristics and problems, and school proccdures designed to further development. OSOO- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-20S. M. Churney EDUC S03 M 1 2 Primary Activities Workshop (2) Interim: July 1 7-July 2 1 This course is des igned as a fun and enlightening "how-to" c l ass for practicality, enjoyment and creativity in teaching Read i ness K i ndergarten t hrough second grade. S trong emphasis on early child hood development, c lass manage­ ment and inventive monthly ideas. OSOO- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-200. B. He l seth/M. Dorgan EDUC S03N13 Sex-Role Stereotyping in Schools ( 2 ) Interim: J u ly 1 7-July 2 1 Explore aspects of sex-role stereotyping in schoo l s . Sex-role stereotyping is defined, and the impl ications for teaching ex­ teacher expectations based on amined. Topics include: student gender, l im itations imposed by those expectations, an exam ination of sex-biased language and its impact on students, an assessment of children ' s texts and l i terature in terms of sex-role perpetuation, and suggestions ror mod i ry­ ing/eliminating sex-role stereotyping within the individual c l a s sroom . OSOO- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-20S. L. Hancock EDUC S03Pl4 Creative Materials for Teaching and Learning (2) Interim: July I 7-July 2 1 Th is workshop offers teachers the opportunity t o deve lop creative materials that enhance their teaching, and make learning more exciting for learners. Participants are encour­ aged to bring objectives for l earning activitics. 0800- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-209. D. Sydnor §EDUC S03RlS* Advanced Appleworks (2) July 24-August 4 May also be taken as CSCI 504*, see description on page 1 4 . 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-202. 1 . Turner


19 §EDUC S03S 16* Theories of Teaching Keyboarding and Word Processing (2)

EDUC 408/508 Cu rrent Trends for Language Arts in the Elementary School ( 2)

J u l y 3-J u l y 1 4

Term III: July 24-August 1 8

May a l so be taken as CSCI 505 * , see description o n page 1 4.

Students actively participate i n the study o f ch ildren ' s lan­

1 6 00- 1 900, MTWRF. RAMS-202.

guage exploring both oral and written expression.

T. Lamas

§EDUC S03T 17* Data Base and Telecommunications (2) in the C lassroo m J u l y 24-August 4 May also be taken as CSC! 506*', see description on page 1 4. 1 3 00- 1 600, MTWRF. RAMS -202. J. Bea u l ieu

Term I I I : J u l y 25-August 1 7 education in Washi ngton

is a po l i tical enterprise.

Pol itics determines how much money you make and what your class s izes are.

The Governor, the state legislature, the

state Superintendent of Public rcprescnting

teachers,

Instruction, the associations

administrators

and

school

d i rectors,

and

other ins iders as

and the business community are all significant players.

course

fea t ures Icgisl ators,

guest

speakers.

lobbyists

th inking, l i stening, speaking, reading

c h i ldren ' s l i terature, dramati zation, the writing process, spell­ ing, handwri t i n g , and creative writing.

Spec ial emphasis is

given to the current trend toward use of whole language and cooperative

learning.

Prereq ui site:

teaching experience or

consent of the instructor.

(2)

E DUC S03U18 Politics of Ed ucation Public

areas covered inc l ude:

Spcc i fic

This

They give insights i n to how it rea l l y works

in Olympia and how you can i n fl u ence the process.

Brian

Ebersole, Chairman of the House of Reprcsentatives Educa­

0800-09 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-202.

Staff

EDUC 410/510 Cu rrent Issues in Science and Health K-8

( 2)

Term II: Junc 1 9-July 1 4 Assists teachers in exploring current activities a n d approaches to science and health in thei r elementary classrooms.

Pre­

req uisite: Teaching experience or consent of the instructor. 1 5 30-1730, MTWRF. RCTR- 1 02 . M . Chu rney

EDUC 412/5 12 Cu rrent Issues in Social Studies K-8( 2)

Term II: June 20-J u l y 13

This course assists teachers in reclarifying the content and

tion Committee, is the i nstructor.

processes approach for elementary soc ial studies programs.

1 5 00- 1 800, TR.

Emphasis is on the integration of social studies into other

ADMN-2 1 9 .

B . Ebersole

§EDUC S03V19* Archaeology and the C lassroom ( 2 ) J u l y 1 2 -Augus t 9 May also be taken as ANTH 3 3 3 * , see description on page 8.

areas of curric u l u m .

Prerequisite:

0930- 1 200, TWR. ADMN - 1 1 7 . D . Sydnor

EDUC S I S Seminar:

1 8 30-2 1 3 0, M W . XAVR - 1 1 2 . 1 . Rasson

teaching experience or

consent of the i nstructor.

Continuing Level Teachers

(2)

Interi m : J u ne 1 7-J u l y 20

§EDUC S03W20* Computer Technology and the Teaching of Problem Solving

The preparation and sharing of selected top ics related to the

(2)

August 7-August 1 8

May a l so be taken as CSCI SOY, see description on page 14.

0900- 1 200, MTWRF. RAMS-202. 1. Beau l ieu

minim um generic standards needs o f the ind i v id u a l partici­ pants.

(2)

§EDUC S03X21 * LOGO/LOGO Writer

May a l so be taken a s CSC! 509;', see description o n page 1 4. 1 3 00- 1 600, MTWRF. RAMS-202. J . Turner

for the continuing

Pass/Fa i l

level

certification of

only.

* Meets Saturday June 2200.

J u ly 3-J u l y 1 4

Req u i red

teachers.

1 7 , 0900- 1 5 00 and J u l y 1 7 -20 1 830-

ADMN- 1 1 7. C. DeBower

EDUC 325/524 Reading in the 90s K-8

( 4)

Term f l I : J u l y 24-August 1 8 Develop

a

deeper

underslanding

o f the

read ing

process.

Special foc u s is on the most recent research and practices in

EDUC S03Y22 Stress in Children and Adolescents( 2)

the teaching for elementary school

J u ly 24-J u l y 28

instruction enha nced with whole language methods i s a key

An

overview

i nc l ude

o f c h i ld hood

i ntervention

and

stratcgies,

adolescent stress.

sel f-esteem,

Topics

adoJescent

sui­

com ponent

of

the

course.

read i ng.

Cu rre n t

reading abi l i t y are examined.

Basal read ing

methods

to

assess

The l atcst theories on vocabu­

cide, eating disorders, re l axation techniques, v isual imagery,

lary development read ing comprehcns ion are studied.

problem solving teChniques, goal setting and

the

prevention.

tional

1 2 30- 1 900, MTWRF. ECAI\tI- 1 3 . K . Gerlach

EDUC S03Z23* Foreign Language Methods Practicum June

( 2)

May also be taken as FREN 492B02*, see description on page

35.

the

techniques,

and

activ ilies

serve

as

All

instruc­

models for any reading program at any elementary

grade lev e l .

1 9-June 30

TBA. J . O l l iphant

strategies,

Prerequ isite:

teaching e x perience o r consent o f

instructor.

Education

course

descriptions continue

011

the next page.

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20 EDUC 525 Current Practices a n d Issues in Reading( 2 ) Term Ill: J u ly 24-August 1 8 Examine current practices and issues in t h e field of read ing as described t hrough educational research. Research find­ ings applies to c lassroom practices. Students encouraged to pursue specific areas of i nterest within the broad area of read ing instruction. Prerequisite: EDUC 325, Read ing in the Elementary School or equivalent and teaching experience. 1 230- 1 345, MTWRF. ADMN-206. A . Mallon EDUC 527 Psychology of Reading (2) Term III: J u l y 24-August 1 8 Principles of reading, perception, word recogOltIOn, concept development, and meaning in read ing. The psychological and physiological aspects of the reading act examined in relationship to successful reading achievement. Prerequi­ site: EDUC 325, Reading in the Elementary School or eq uiva­ lent and teaching experience. 1 400- 1 5 1 5, MTWRF. ADMN-206. A. Mallon EDUC 544 01 Research and Program Evaluation ( 2 ) Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 Knowledge o f student and case evaluation techniques; the ability to select and interpret tests; knowledge of research design; the abil ity to interpret educational research; the ability to identify, locate and acquire topical research and related l i terature; and the abi l ity to use the results of research or evaluation to propose program changes. Graduate stu­ dents on ly; may be taken in l ieu of EDUC 467. Tally cards requ ired. 0930- 1 045, MTWRF. ADMN-200. F. Olson EDUC 544 02 Research and Program Evaluation Tenn I I I : J u ly 24-August l 8 For eourse description, see EDUC 544 0 1 above. 0930- 1 045 , MTWRF. ADMN-208. S taff

(2)

EDUC 545 01 Methods and Techniques of Research( 2 ) Tenn II: June 1 9-July 1 4 Research methods and techniques in education with empha­ s is on designing a research project in the student ' s area of interest. Required for M . A . Prerequisite: Consultation with student's adviser and adm i ttance to the graduate program. Tal ly card required. 0800-09 I 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-200. F. O lson EDUC 545 02 Methods and Techniques of Research( 2 ) Term III: July 24-August 1 8 For course description, see EDUC 545 0 I above. 0800-09 1 5, MTWRF. ADMN-206. Staff EDUC 550 School Finance ( 2) Tenn II: June 1 9-July 1 4 Local, state and federal contributors to school finance, its philosophy and development; the development and admini­ stration of a school budget. 1 230- 1 345, MTWRF. ADMN-208. R. Hamlin

EDUC 551 Educational Law (2) Tenn III: July 24-August 1 7 Study o f contemporary federal, state and local statutes, regu­ lations and case law and their application to public and private schools. 1 530-1 800, MWR. ADMN- 1 1 7 . L . Carney EDUC 552 Educational Administration ( 3) Tenn III: July 24-August 1 7 Administration and supervision of school personne l, facili­ ties, and programs; w ith emphasis on the human relation­ ships in that setting. Prerequisite : Teaching experience or consent of the dean. 1 8 30-2200, MWR. ADMN- 1 1 7 . C. DeBower EDUC 554 Seminar in Educational Administration ( 2 ) Interim: June 1 7-July 2 0 The preparation and sharing of selected presentations re­ lated to needs of i nd i v idual participants. Required for con­ tinuing certification of principals and program admin istra­ tors. *Meets Saturday June 1 7, 0900- 1 500 and July 1 7-20, 1 8302200. ADMN- 1 1 7 . C. DeBower EDUC 555 Administration & Supervision Workshop( 2 ) Tenn I I : June 1 9-July 1 3 Projects detennined by the class; typical projects i nclude cur­ riculum planning and adjustment, public relations programs, personnel employment and inservice training; financing building and educational programs. Prerequ isite: One course in administration or supervision. 1 530- 1 800, MWR. ADMN-2 1 1 . B . Eliason EDUC 580 Curriculum Development ( 2) J u n e 1 9-July 6 Types of curriculum organizations, programs and techniques of curriculum development. 1 800-2 1 30, MWR. ADMN-2 1 9 . D. Haugen

The following courses are offered through the Washington Education Association. For informa­ tion regarding dates and costs of the summer 1989 W.E.A. Workshops, contact W.E.A. at (206 ) 9416700. THE COMPUTER AS A CLASSROOM TOOL Developed by Washington State educators and designed to bring K- 1 2 education into the world created by the "micro­ chip." Hands-on experience with microcomputers. Modules of instruction include knowledge of computers, controlling the computer, using computers in teaching, and otheredu­ cational issues.

LEAST LEAST is a complete approach to disci pine in the classroom and originally designed by the W .E.A. This is a positive discipline program with the teacher as the "authority." It helps the teacherto become more effective in the classroom and with those around it, such as parents, admin istrators, and fellow teachers.


21 EDUC 585 Comparative Education

( 2)

EPSY 501 C03 Alchohol and Drug Abuse

( 2)

Term III: July 24-August 1 7

Term III: July 24-August 4

Comparison and i nvestigation o f certain materials and cul­

Provides information for counselors and other helping pro­

tural systems of education throughout the world.

fessionals on the myths and realities of alcoholism and drug

0930- 1 200, MTW R . ADMN-209. M. Baughman

abuse

(3 )

EDUC 589 Philosophy of Education

and

Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 3 Philosophical and

theoretical

foundations o f education.

Instructor ' s

signature

on

and

the

dean.

independent

study

Prereq u is i te: card

prior to

reg istration.

(4)

The focus i s o n developing a n understanding o f the services and processes avai lable to assist individuals in making plans and decisions accord ing to their own l i fe pattern. Practicum to be carried out in the Fall in the public schools. 1 230- 1 5 1 5 , MTWRF. RAMS-206. A . Leighty

EPSY 536 A ffective Classroom Techniques

EDUC 598 Studies in Education

Explores techniques designed to faci l i tate understanding of

A research paper o r project o f a n educational issue selected by

the

student

and

the graduate

adv i ser;

reviewed by the student ' s Graduate Committee.

( 2)

Term Interim: J u ly 1 7-July 2 1

( 2)

May 22-August 1 8 will be

Independ­

ent study card req u i red.

self and

others; methods for working w ith students.

experience to be completed i n the Fal l semester.

EDUC 599 Thesis

s i te: Student teaching or graduate status. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. RAM S-206.

A. Leighty

A study of careers, theories of choice, and guidance tech­

May 22-August 1 8 For Master of Arts candidates who elect to write a thesis. The thesis problem is chosen from the candidate ' s major field of concentration

and

must

be

approved

by

the

(4)

Term J : M a y 22-June 1 6

(3-4)

Lab

Prerequi­

EPSY 569 Career Guidance

TBA. Staff

gra d u a te

resources and

candidate's

niques. 1 5 30- 1 8 1 5 , MTWRF. RAMS-206. A. Carey

EPSY 578 Behavior Problems

( 4)

Term II: June 1 9-July 14

a d v i ser.

A lderian concepts provide the basis for observation, motiva­

TBA. Staff

tion, modification, and l i fe style assessment.

S k i l l s ,for assist­

ing people in developing responsibility for their own behav­ ior.

Laboratory experience as arranged.

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. RAMS-206. A. Carey

Education course descriptions continue on page 3 / .

Ed ucational Psychology EPSY 501AOl Violence in the Family

( 2)

Term Interim: July 1 7-July 2 1 Designed

to

increase

Workshop participants

awareness learn

to

of

the

identify

scope the

of

abuse.

symptoms

of

psychosoc ial and physical abuse, become aware of possible treatment, and learn to support the abused and the abuser. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. R A M S -204.

L. Kucklick

EPSY 501 802 Crisis Intervention

(2)

J u l y 24-August 4 A workshop designed to assist the helping professional to identi fy

the

characteristics

of a crisis,

develop abil ity

to

communicate effectively with those in crisis and to help them during and fo l lowing a crisis situation. ers,

>. 0> o o ..c u >. en a..

counselors

and

others

who

work

Applicable to teach­ with

people

stress or those attempting to cope with transition. in add ition. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF RAMS-206. M . Kralick

under

Practicum

ctS c o -

+-'

.

TBA. Staff

jOintly

referral

Term II: June 1 9-July 14

concerns of the individual participant and approved by an member

community

for prevention.

EPSY 535 Foundations o f Guidance

( 1 - 4)

May 22-August 1 8

facu l ty

depend­

1 300- 1 700, MTWRF. RAM S-206. W. Coffey

Projects o f varying length related t o educational issues or appropriate

the disease concept of chemical

treatment methods,

strategies

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWR. ADM N-209. M . B a ughman

EDUC 597 Independent Study

inc luding

ency, the alcohol family system and overview of diagnostic

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22

SCHEDULE TERM I: May 22-June 16 TERM II : June 19-July 14 TERM III: July 24-A ugust 18

Course ID

T i tl e

Ti m e

D a tes

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

Instructor

Anthropology I RO()-2 1 30

lay 22-J une 1 4

I XOO-:! 1 10

MW

2

X AV R 1 1 2

Guld i n

May 23-June 1 5

TR

2

XAVR- 1 1 2

K lein

1 8 30-2 1 30

Ju l y 1 2-Augllst 9

MW

XA. R- 1 1 2

Ras 'on

0900- 1 500

May 22-June 1 6

MTWR

4

XAVR- 1 12

Rasson

1 230- 1 645

J une 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

INGR- 1 44

Peterson

ARTD 2 5 ."> /3 - :i Jewe l ry

1 8�O-2 1 3U

May 12-J u l y 1 4

MT

4

!NGR- ! '4B

DeG r

ARTD 2 6 7/ 3 6 7 Watercolor/A i rbrush Workshop

0800- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

I NGR- 1 26

Cox

MRTD 275

Art, Archetype and Nature

0800- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

I NGR- 1 1 6

Gold

ARTD 3 2 8

Landscape

1 2 30- 1 645

J u ly 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

4

I NGR- 1 34A

G c l ler

ANTH 22 0 NTI I 2 3 0

H �33*

M

MNTH 465

PeO l les I1r I h� World Peoplc� of Ihe Archueology

orthweSI

lind

the

on:!

Cla�sroom

Archaeology: The Field Experience

-

-

Art ARTD 230/330/430

Ceramic Techniques and Materials

Photography

01

Biology BIOL

1 11

Biology and the Modern World

08 00- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-Ju ly 1 4

MTWRF

4

RCTR- I 02

H ansen

BIOL

1 12

Humanistic

Botany

0800- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

RCTR- I 22

Crayton

mOL 205

Human Anatomy & Physiology

0800- 1 045

June 19-July 1 4

MTWR'"

4

RCTR- I I 6

Carlson

BIOL 206

Human Anatomy & Phys iology

0800- 1 045

July 24-August 1 8

MTWR'"

4

RCTR- 1 1 6

C a rl son

BIOL 3 5 1

Natural History of the Pacific Northwest

0800- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

RCTR- 1 24

McG innis

BIOL 3 7 0

B i otechnology: Principles and Issues

0800- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

RCTR- 1 36

Kerk

� B IOL 5 0 2

Advanced Placement Institute:

0900- 1 600

J u ly 1 7-Ju ly 2 1

MTWRF

2

RCTR- 1 1 5

Carlson

Biology

Busi ness Ad m i n istration BUSA 230

Law and Society

0900- 1 2 1 5

Nlay 22-June 1 5

MTWR

4

ADMN-2 1 5

A h na

B USA 2 8 1

Financial Accounting

0900- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

MTWR

4

ADMN-2 1 7

R am a g l i a

J3USA 2 8 2

M a n agement Acco u n t i n g

0900- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-Ju ly 1 3

MTWR

4

ADMN-2 1 7

H u len

B USA 3 5 0

M a n ag e m e n t

1 800-2200

May 30-July 6*

!'vIR

4

A DM

Dan i e l

B USA 3 5 4

H uman Resource

0800- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-Ju l y 1 2

MTW

4

A DM N -2 1 3

Cook

BUSA 3 6 4

Managerial

1 230- 1 545

M ay 30-July 6*

TWR

4

ADMN-2 1 7

B ancroft

I3USA 3 7 0

Marketing Systems

0900- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 3

MTWR

4

ADMN-2 1 5

McNabb

BUSA 455 0 1

Business Policy

0900- 1 3 1 5

M a y 22-June 1 5

MTR

4

ADMN-223

Ya g e r

B U ' A 455 02

B usinc�s

P licy

1 1'100-1 200

July I (J-August 1 7

MR

4

ADMN-2 I S

Da.niel

I3USA 4 8 3

Income Taxation

1 3 00- 1 6 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

MTWR

4

ADMN-22 1

H u len

BUSA 490*

B usiness & Cultural Introduction to Chile

TBA

J u ly 30 -August 1 9

MTWR FSSu 4

1 1'100-1 200

Ju ly I (J-

MR

R

S

520

M anagement

Finance

Programming

nlr

Manager,

ugUM 1 7

4

"'Contact department o r call Office of S ummer S tudies a t 535-7 1 43 for more information.

I

Shaded areas ind icate late afternoon or evening c l a:;se.s.

See page 2 for explanation of codes

& abbrev iations.

-2 1 5

Off-Camp u s M c N a bb DM

-2 1 7

Harter

I


23 Cou rse 1 0

Title

B L! S A 5 5 ( \

OrganizaLional

BlJSA 5 5 5 BUSA 5!Q Bl'S

5';l()

Time

D a te s

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

Instructor

I � OO-2200

July I O - A u g us t 1 7

MR

4

ADMN-2 1 3

Sc h u l t 7

Blhine-�s St rategy and Pl)licy

1 8 00-220n

May 30·July (i*

MR

4

ADM "i-22 I

B a rn d t

Accounting I nfonuation and Control

I �WO-nOo

J uly I O-August 1 7

MR

4

ADMN-12 I

Slaff

M<lY 30-July 6*

MR

4

ADM

B :mc rorl

0800- J 045

May 22-J u ne 1 5

MTWR*

4

RCTR-224

G i d d i ngs

MTW R*

4

RCTR-220

And erson

Behav ior and

( u r 'e<; &.

Financial

Enviromnem

l Hlltlgies

Small Bu�intl"s I SOO-2200

-2 1 7

Chemistry C H E M 1 04

Environmental

CHEM 1 0 5

Chemistry of L i fe

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-J uly

CHE M 3 2 1

A na lytical Chemistry

0800- 1 045

J u l y 24-August 1 7

MTWR'"

4

RCTR-224

H uestis

1 8 30- ::! 1 3 0

May 23-1uly 20

TR

4

R- I OO

Becvar

0900- J 600

July 1 7 -July 2 1

MTWRF

2

I N GR - I 09

Inch

Mtly 22 - J u l y 1 9

MW

4

NOR- 1 1 5

I nch

1 4 00- 1 645

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

INGR- I 09

Bartanen

TBA*

July 1 7 -Ju ly 2 1

MTWRF

2

MGY M-202

Parker

0930- 1 2 30

June 1 9-J uly

14

MTWRF

4

MGYM -205

Parker

14

MTWRF

2

RCTR-22 I

C Dorner

Chem istry

13

Communication Arts OMA 1 6 _ COM A 3 2 4

COtv

316

American F i l m H i� t ory Workshop

Gr�\llp

in

Nonverbal Com muni cation

C vmmunicat ilm

COMA 3 2 8

Arg u m e n t a t i o n

COMA447

Theatre

COMA4 5 8

Crea t ive

I

Northwest Dramatics

30-2 1 3 0

Com puter Science (See also Math) CSCI

110

BASIC

0930- 1 045

June 1 9-July

CSCI

1 44

In trod uction to Computer Sc ience (Pascal)

0830- 1 0 1 5

May 30-July 7

MTWRF

4

M G Y M- I 02

B ri n k

CSC]

220

Computer Infolmations Systems with BAS I C

1 3 00- 1 445

J u l y ] O-August 1 8

MTWRF

4

RCTR-22 I

Staff

CSCI

270

Data

0830- 1 0 1 5

July 1 0 -August 1 8

MTWRF

4

MGY M - I 02

H a u s er

08 1 5 - 1 045

May 22-J unc 23

MTWRF

4

RCTR-222

S p i l l m an

MTWRF

2

RAMS -202

Beaulieu

MTW R F

2

RAMS -202

Beaul ieu

MTWRF

2

R A MS-202

Turner

S t ructures

C S C I 4 9 0/5 9 0 Fault Tolerant Computing CSCl

502 0 1 * Applcworks for Teachers

0900 - 1 200

Ju ne

CSCI

502 02* Appleworks for Teachers

0900- 1 200

Jul y 3-July 14

0900 - 1 200

July 24-August

1 7 30-:!O30

July :I-J uly 1 4

M1WRF

2

R A M S -20_

Lamas

0900- 1 200

August 7 - 18

MTWRF

2

R A M S -202

Beaulieu

1 3 00- 1 600

July 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

RAMS -202

Beaulieu

1 3 00- 1 600

July 7-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

Beaul ieu

1 3 00- 1 600

July 3-J u ly 1 4

MTWRF

2

RA MS-202

Turner

0900- ] 600

J u l y 1 7-J uly 2 1

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

Beaulicu

0800- 1 045

May 22-Junc 1 6

MTWRF

4

RCTR- I 09

Benham

0800- 1 2 1 5

J u ne 1 9-J uly

14

MTWRF

4

RCTR - 1 09

Benham

*CSCI 5 04 *

Advanced

:CS

1 heorics of Teaching Keyboard ing

1 505 '

and

Applework s

Word

ProC'cssing

KSCI 5 0 6 '"

Data Base & Telecomm in the Classroom

�CSCI 507*

Computer Technology

and

Advanced

§ C S C I 50 l)�'

LOGO/LOGO Writer

§CSC1 55 1

Computers

Advanced

Placement

Computer

Science

in

4

the

Teac h i ng of Prohlem Solving §CSCI 5 0 8 *

1 9-June 30

S pccial Education

I ns t i tute:

(Pascal)

Earth Science ESCI

131

Physical

ESCI

202

O c e a n o g ra p h y

Geology

*Contaet department o r caU Office of Summer Studies a t 535-7 1 4 3 for more information.

Shaded areas indicate late afternoon or evening classes.

See page 2 for e x. p lanation of codes and ab brev iations.

I


24

I

Time

Dates

Conservation of Natural Re ource '

1 800-2030

May 22-July 2 1

TR

4

RCTR- 1 09

Benham

Geological Field Mapping

OSOO- 1 600

July 1 7-August I S

MTWRFS

5

RCTR- 1 08 *

Lowes

Course I D

Title

ESCI 222

I ESCI

425

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

I nstructor

Economics I

I

ECON 1 50

Principles of Economics

1 83 0-2 1 50

June 26-August 1 7

MR

4

ADMN-200

Peterson

STAT 2 3 1

Statistics

OSOO- 1 045

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 2

Jensen

ECON 3 3 l

international

OSOO- 1 045

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 1

Vinje

ECON 3 6 1

Money and Banking

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 3

Ankrim

ECON 500*

Applied Statistical Analysis

1 800-2200

May 3 1 -July 6*

MR

4

ADMN-2 l2

Jensen

§ECON 502

Advanced Placement Institute:

0900- 1 600

July l 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

XAVR-204

Wentworth

ECON 504

Economic Analysis and Policy Decisions

I SOO-2200

May 30-July 6*

MR

4

ADMN-2 1 0

Economics

-

Economics

igmen

Education EDUC 420

Problems of Reading i n Secondary School

1 230- 1 345

June 1 9-Ju[y 1 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 3

H ays

EDUC 42 1

Teachers and the Law

I SOO-2000

June 1 9-June 29

MTWR

I

ADMN- 1 1 7

DeBower

EDUC 45 1

Administration of the School Library

1 1 00- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 14

MTWRF

2

LIBR- I 06

Baldwin

EDUC 4 5 2

Basic Reference Materials

0930- 1 045

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

LIBR- I 06

Yetter

EDUC 4 5 3

Processing School Library Materials

OSOO-09 l 5

June 1 9-Ju l y 14

MTWRF

2

LIBR- I 06

Peterson

Selection of Learning Resource Materials

1 1 00- 1 2 1 5

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

LIBR� I 06

Yetter

EDUC 4 5 6

S toryte l l i ng

1 23 0 - 1 545

July 24-August 1 6

MW

2

ADMN-202

Wellner

EDUC 4 5 7

The Arts,

1 230- 1 500

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

LIBR-Media C h u rney

EDUC 473

Parent-Teacher Relationships

1 23 0 - 1 345

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 9

Hanson

EDUC 479

Special Techniques in Reading

0800- 1 045

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

ADMN-20S

Hays

EDUC 4 S 3

Primary

1 1 00- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN-200

Staff

EDUC 502 0 1 * Appleworks for Teachers

0900- 1 200

June 1 9-June 30

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

Beaulieu

E D U C 5 0 2 02* Appleworks for Teachers

0900- 1 200

July 3-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

B ea u l i e u

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ECAM-22

H iam

I EDUC 454

I

§EDUC

Media and Technology

Reading

Social Work Interventions with School-age Children 503AO I * 0930- 1 345 and Their Families

EDUC 5 0 3 B 0 2 Instructional Methods in Early Chi ldhood

0930- 1 045

June 1 9-July 14

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 9

S taff

EDUC 5 0 3 C03 Teaching Math Successfully in the 90s (K-8)

1 230- 1 420

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN- 1 1 7

DeBower

EDUC 5 03D04 C lassroom

1 530- 1 800

June 20-July 1 3

TWR

2

ADMN- 1 1 7

S ydnor

EDUC 503E05 Microcomputers in the C lassroom

1 7 30 - 2030

June 1 9-June 30

M1WRF

2

RAMS-202

B eaul ieu

EDUC 5 0 3 F06 Teaching Math: Cooperative Learning Manipulatives and Problem Solving K-S

1 230- 1 345

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

ADMN- 1 1 7

DeBower

EDUC 503G07* Multicultural Issues and Skills for the Human Services and Education

0930- 1 345

July 24-August 1 4

MTWRF

2

ECAM-23

J o h n stone

EDUC 503 H08 Children's Literature in K-S Curriculum

1 400- 1 645

July 25-August 1 7

TR

2

ADMN-202

Yetter

EDUC 5 0 3 J 09 Experiencing Primary Mathematics

1 23 0- 1 5 1 5

July 25-August 4

M1WRF

2

ADMN-208

F u l kerson

EDUC 503 K I O School Librarians' Workshop: I n formation Skills in Elementary School

0800- 1 600

July l 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADMN-206

Starr

M an agemen t/Di scipl i ne

*Contact department or call Office of Summer Studies at 535-7 1 43 for more information. Shaded areas indicate late afternoon or evening classes.

See page 2 for explanation of codes

& abbreviations.


25 -

Time

Dates

0800- 1 600

July 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADM N-208

C h u rney

EDUC 503M 1 2 Primary Activi ties Workshop

0800- 1 600

July 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADMN -200

Helseth

EDUC 5 0 3 N I 3 Sex-Role Stereotyping in Schools

0800- 1 600

July 1 7 -July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADMN-209

H an c o c k

Creative Materials for Teaching and Learning 0800- 1 600

July 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 0

Sydnor

0900- 1 200

July 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

R A M S - 202

T u rner

1 730-2030

July 3 -J u ly 14

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

Lamas

0900- 1 200

Au gu st 7- 1 8

MTWRF

2

RA MS-202

Beaulieu

1 5 00 - I SOO

July 25 -August 1 7

TR

2

ADMN-2 1 9

Ebersole

1 83 0-2 1 3 0

J u l y 1 -August 9

MW

2

XAVR- 1 1 2

Rasson

1 3 00- 1 600

July 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

RAM S-202

B ea u l i eu

1 3 00- 1 600

J ul y 3-J u l y 14

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

Turner

1 230- 1 900

July 24-July 28

MTWRF

2

ECAM- 1 3

Gerlach

TBA

June

2

TBA

O l l iphant

Course ID

Title

EDUC 503L l I

G i fted Workshop

EDUC 5 0 3 P I 4

I §EDUC

503R 1 5 *

Advanced Appleworks

§EDUC

503S 1 6 *

Theories of Teaching Keyboarding

and Word §ED

C

503T I 7 *

Processing

Data Base and Telecommunications

i n the Classroom EDUC 5 0 3 U 1 8 Pol i t ics o f Education Archaeology and the CIa

§EDUC

503 V 1 9*

§EDUC

503W20*Computer Technology & Problem Solving

§EDUC 503X2 1 * EDUC 503Y22

Toom

LOGO/LOGO Writer

Stress in Children and Adolescents Language

E D U C 503Z2 3 * Foreign

Methods

Practicum

!

1 9-June 30

Sem. Hrs. Location

I n structor

EDUC 408/508

Current Trends for Language Arts (Elem)

0800-09 1 5

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

ADMN-202

Staff

EDUC 4 1 0{5 1 0

Current Issues in Science and Health K-S

1 5 30- 1 730

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

RCTR- I 02

Chumey

0930- 1 200

June 20-July 1 3

TWR

2

ADMN - I 1 7

Sydnor

*

June 1 7 -Ju ly 20

*

2

ADMN- 1 1 7

DeBower

EDUC 4 1 2/5 1 2 Current Issues in Social Studies K-8

i I

Days

Continuing Level Teachers

EDUC 5 1 5

Sem inar:

E D U C 3 2 5/524

Reading in the 90s K-8

0930- 1 2 1 5

J u ly 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

4

ADMN -206

Mallon

EDUC 5 2 5

Current Practices and Issues In Reading

1 23 0 - 1 3 45

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

ADMN-206

M a l lon

EDUC 5 2 7

Psychol ogy of Read ing

1 400- 1 5 1 5

J u ly 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

ADMN-206

Staff

EDUC 544 0 1

Research

and

Program

Evaluation

0930- 1 04 5

June 1 9-J uly 1 4

MTW RF

2

ADMN-200

O l son

E D U C 544 02

Research

and

Program Evaluation

0930- 1 045

July 24-August 18

MTWRF

2

ADMN-208

S taff

EDUC 545 0 1

Methods and Techniques of Research

0800-09 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN -200

O l son

EDUC 545 0;

Methods

of Research

0800-09 1 5

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

ADMN-206

Staff

EDUC 5 5 0

School

1 2 30- 1 345

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN-208

Hamli n

EDUC 5 5 1

Educational Law

1 5 3 0 - 1 800

June 1 9-J ul y 1 3

MWR

2

ADMN- 1 1 7

Carney

EDUC 5 5 2

Educational

1 8 30-2200

J ul y 24-August 1 7

MWR

3

ADMN- 1 1 7

DeBow r

EDUC 5 5 4

Selninar i n Educational Administration

*

June 1 7-July 20

:;.:

2

ADMN- 1 I 7

DeB ower

EDUC 5 5 5

Admin istration

1 5 3 0 - 1 800

June 1 9-July

MWR

2

ADMN-2 1 1

E l i ason

EDUC 5 8 0

Curriculum

Devel opment

1 8 00-2 1 3 0

June 1 9-July 6

MWR

2

ADMN-2 1 9

H augen

EDUC 585

Comparative

Education

0930- 1 200

July 24-August 1 7

MTWR

2

ADMN -209

Baughman

EDUC 5 8 9

Philosophy of Education

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 3

MTWR

3

ADMN-209

B a u g h m an

EDUC 5 9 7

Independent

TBA

May 22-August 1 8

I A TBA

S taff

EDUC 5 9 8

Studies

TBA

May 22-August 1 8

2

TBA

Staff

EDUC 5 9 9

Thes i s

TBA

May 22-August 1 8

3 A TBA

Staff

and Techniques Finance

Administration

and Supervision

Workshop

S tu d y

in Education

14

*Contact department or c a l l Office of Summer Studies at 535-7 1 4 3 for more information. Shaded areas indicate late afternoon or evening c lasses.

See page 2 for explanation of codes and abbreviations.

I

I ,


26 Time

Dates

0900- 1 600

July J 7-J uly 2 1

MTWRF

2

RAMS-204

K u ck l ic k

E P S Y 50 1 B 0 2 Crisis Intcrvention

0900- 1 200

July 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

RAMS-206

Kralick

EPSY 5 0 l C03 Alchohol and Drug Abuse

1 3 00- 1 700

J u ly 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

RAMS-206

Coffey

EPSY 5 3 5

Foundations of G u idance:

1 23 0- 1 5 1 5

June l 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

RAMS-206

Leighty

EPSY 5 3 6

Affective Classroom Techniques

0900- 1 600

July 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

R A MS-206

Leigh ty

EP Y 569

Career G u idance

1 - 30- 1 8 1 )

M:1Y 22-.June 1(;

f\,ITWRF

-l

R

M -206

ClIrey

EPSY 5 n

Behavior Problems

0930- 1 2 1 5

J une 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

R A MS-206

Carey

Course 10

!

Title

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

Instructor

Educational Psychology EPSY 50 l AO I

Violence: in the Family

Spec ial Education S P E D 1 90

Exceptional Chi Idrcn and Adults

1 5 00- 1 900

May 22-June I S

MTR

3

ECA M- 1 3

G e rl ac h

S PED 2 9 0

Introduction t o Learning Disabi lities

1 230- 1 5 20

J u n e 26-July 1 4

MTWRF

3

ECA M - 1 4

Weller

S PED 3 9 8

Assessment i n Special and Remed i a l Ed

0930- 1 1 40

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

3

ECAM-23

Williams

S PE D 3 9 9

Practicum in Spec i al Education

TBA

May 22-August 1 8

S PED 4 0 3

Parent!Professional Partners n Special Ed

0900- 1 600

July 1 7-July 2 1

SPED 407

Curriculum & lnst

0900- 1 200

S PED 4 7 5

Superv ising Para-Professiona Is & Volunteers 0900- 1 700

S P E D 492

Methods or Teacbing

S P ED 494

Computer Appl ications for the Handicapped

1 -2 TBA

S taff

MTWRF

2

ECAM - 1 3

Gerlach

July 24-August l 8

MTWRF

4

ECAM- 1 3

R e i s berg

June 3 & June 1 7

Sat

1

ECAM- 1 3

Gerlach

1 630-20.� O

May 21-J une 1 4

IVIW

2

ECAM- 1 4

O ", e l\�

l 300- 1 600

June 1 9-June 30

MTWRF

2

RAM S-202

Polsgrove

S PED 5 0 1 AO I * Advanced Computers in Special Education

1 300- I 600

J u ly 7-August 1 8

MTWRF

2

RAMS-202

Beaulieu

S PED 5 20

Handicappped

0900- 1 600

J u ly 1 7-J u ly 2 1

MTWRF

2

ECA M - 1 4

Mehring

S PE D 5 3 0

Current

1 300- l 600

July 3-J u ly 1 4

MTWRF

2

ECA M- 1 3

Williams

S PED 5 3 2

Severely and

0900- 1 600

July 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ECAM-22

Finn

S PED 5 3 7

Current Issues in Languagc D isorders

1 300- 1 600

July 24-August 4

MTW R F

2

ECAM- 1 4

Tiger

SPED 538

Issues i n Early Childhood - Handicapped

1 300- 1 600

August 7 - 1 8

MTWRF

2

ECAM-22

Small

SPED 5 3 9

Administration o f Early Chi ldhood! Special Ed ucation Programs

0900- 1 600

J u ly J7-J u l y 2 l

MTWRF

2

ECAM-23

Owens

S PED 5 4 0

Early Intervention Programs

0900- 1 200

Jum; 1 9-June 30

MTWRF

2

ECAM- 1 4

O we n s

S P ED 5 4 1

Assessmenl of Infants and Preschoolers

1 300- 1 600

July 3 -July 1 4

MTWRF

2

ECAM-2J

Owens

SPED 570

Applied Behav ior Anal)'. is for Teachers

1 63()-:� O30

May 23-Junc 1 5

TR

2

ECAM- 1 4

W i l l i ams

S P ED 5 7 5

Introd to

0900- 1 200

July 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

ECAM- l 4

Friend

SPED 576

Communication Skills

0900- 1 200

August 7 - I �

MTWRF

2

ECAM-22

G oe be l

S PE D 5 8 8

Adminislmlion o f Speci a l Ed

1 600-2030

July 25-Augusl 1 7

TR

3

ECAM-22

P e a rson

S PE D 595

Special

Educalion:

TBA

M a y 22-August l 8

4

TBA

Staff

S PED 5 9 8

Studies

10

TBA

M ay 22-August l 8

2

TBA

Staff

S P ED 5 9 9

The s i s

TBA

May 22-August 1 8

3 -4 TBA

Staff

in

Exceptional Students

Hand icapped Child

Regular Classroom

Issues in Assessment Profoundly H a nd icapped

Consultanl Teacher in Special Ed Consulting Teacher Programs

Internship

Education

*Contact department or call Office of S u m mer SlUdies at 535-7 1 4 3 for more i n formation. Shaded areas ind icate late a fternoon or evening classes.

See page 2 for exp lanation of codes

& abbreviations.


27 COUirse 1 0

Title

D a te s

Time

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

I nstructor

Eng l i s h ENGL 1 0 1

College Engl ish

0930- 1 2 1 5

M ay

22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

RAMS-204

Jansen

ENGL 2 1 7

Short Story

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 ! O

Campbell

ENGL 2 3 2

Women ' s Literature

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 6

Marek

1 830-2200

June 1 3 J u l y _5

T

2

AD MN-2 1 7

Bent ley

1 830-2200

June

I S J u l y 27

R

2

A D M N -2 1 4

ad y

1 23 0- 1 5 1 5

June 1 9-J u l y 1 4

MTWRF

4

ADMN-209

Jenseth Martin

ENOL 327 A() I /52 7AO I or

E -G L 327 B02/52 7B02

I magina tive W ri t ing WQrk�hop: Poelry ENGL 32 7cn3/5_7CO.

E

or

-

GL 327D04/"27 D04

I magi n a t i ve Wri ling Workllhop: Pi ction

Professions

-

ENGL 3 2 S

Advanced Comp: Writing in

ENGL 3 4 3

20th Century A merican Fiction & Drama

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-202

ENGL 3 9 2

Twentieth Century B ritish Literature

0930- 1 2 1 S

July 24-August I S

MTWRF

4

ADMN-204B C a m p b e l l

ENOL 4S2AO I

Seminar:

1 8 30-2 1 30

J u ly 24-August 1 7

MR

2

ADMN-204B M a rek

§ENGL 565

Advanced Placement Institu te:

0900- 1 600

J u ly 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 9

V i rg inia Wool!'

Engl ish

Johnson

Health Educat i o n (See also P hys ical Ed ucation) HEE D 292

Firsl

H EED SO I AO I

Injury Prevention in Athlele,

1 80()-2 1 3 0

May 22 May 26

M TWR F

I

OOY M- 104

ieho l s n

1 830-2 1 3 0

June 5-J u ne 9

MTWRF

I

OG Y M - I 04

N icho l son

HEED S O l B02 Food & Health

0900- 1 200

June 1 9-June 23

MTWRF

I

OG Y M- 1 06

Hoscth

H B ED S O l e03 School

1 030- 1 930

J u n e 1 9-J u ne 23

MTWRF

1

OGYM- I Cl6

H o� e t h

HEED S O l D04 Disease and Wel lnc�s

1 630- 1 9 30

June 26-June ., 0

MTWRF

I

OG Y M - 104

H os � t h

HEED 5 0 l E05 SU'CS!'l Wi thout D istress

l 600- 1 9 3 0

J u l y 3-J u ly 7

MTWRF

I

OG Y M - 1 04

Hoseth

MTWRF

4

XAVR- 1 1 4

N o rd q u i s t

MTWR F

4

XAVR- 1 14

Wu

MTWRF

4

XAVR-1 14

Bermingham

id/ PR

Health

-

H istory H IST

l OS

H i story of Western Civil ization

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-Ju ly 1 4

HJST

.BO

M odern

1 830-2 1 30

June

H I ST

335

Central America and the Caribbean

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 16

HI ST

399

Intern s h i p

TBA

J u ne I -August I S

1 -6 TBA

M a r t i nson

H I ST

46 1

West and Northwest

TBA

May 22-July 2 1

4

TBA

Martinson

§ H 1ST

502

Advanced PlacemGnt Institute :

OSOO- 1 600

J u ly 1 7 -Ju ly 2 1

MTWRF

2

XAVR- 1 14

Carp

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 26-Ju ly 2 1

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 4

McKim

FREN 2 0 2/ 4 9 2 . Intermedi ate French

0930- 1 2 1 5

J u ly 24-August J S

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 4

McKim

FR EN 49 1 B 0 2 * Foreign Language Methods Praericum

TBA

June I S-June 30

2

TBA

O l l iphant

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 2

Webster

1 400- 1 645

July 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 4

S wenson

TBA

June I S-June 30

2

TBA

O l l iphant

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

4

ADMN-20S

DeSheri i a

Chi na

History

1 9-Augw l 1 7

Languages FREN

LANG

20 1 /49 1 A O I

Intermediate French

27 l/47 I Literature and Society in Modern Europe

LANG 4 4 4

Teaching English as Second Language

FREN 49 1 B02* Foreign Language Methods Practicum SIGN 2 0 1

American S ign Language Practicum

MTWRF

*Contact department o r call Office of Summer Stud ies at 5 35-7 1 43 for more informat ion. Shaded areas ind icate late afternoon or evening c lasses.

See page 2 for explanation of codes and abbreviations.


28 Course 1 0

Title

SP AN 2 1 0

Spanish

Conversati on

Time

D a tes

0930- 1 045

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

2

ADMN-2 1 4

Faye

1 3 00- 1 540

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 4

Faye

May 2_-July 20

MR

4

MGYM- 1 0 1

Benk"halti

MR

4

M G Y M- I 02

Pet e rson

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

Instructor

- "

S PA N 40 1

Introduction to Spanish Literature

I Mathemat ics (See also Computer Science) Behav ioral Scien es 1 830-2 1 30

MATH 1 2 8

Malh for Busine. s & th

MATH 1 5 1

An a l ytic Geometry and C�llllUlus I

MATH 2 4 5

Discrete

MATH 3 2 3

M odern Elementary Math

§MATH 5 5 1

Advanced Placement Institute:

S t ructures

Calculus

1 830-1 1 30

June

1 1 00- 1 300

May 30-July 7

MTWRF

4

MGYM - ! 03

Staff

I 1 00- 1 3 1 5

June

MTWRF

4

MGYM- l O I

B at k e r

0900- 1 600

J u l y 1 7 -J uly 2 1

MTWRF

2

R A M S-220

A n d e rs o n

TBA

June

0900- 1 600

July 24-Ju l y 28

M TWRF

0900- 1 600

J u l y 24-J u l y 28

MTWRF

2 or 0

EAUD-227

0900- 1 600

July 24-J u l y 28

MTWRF

2 or 0

EA UD-Stage DeRuyter

0900-2 1 00

J u l y 3 1 -August 4

MTWRF

2

EAUD-227

S pa r k s

0900- 1 200

August 7 - I I

MTWRF

I

EAUD-227

Poulshock

0900- 1 200

Ju'ly 1 7 -July 2 1

MTWRF

I

EAUD-228

Knapp

1 3 00- 1 600

July 1 7 -July 2 1

MTWRF

I

Piano

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-J u ly 24

MTWRF

2

EAU D-227

K racht

1 3 00- 1 5 00

August 7 - 1 8

MTWR

2

EAUD-228

Kracht

1 3 30- 1 5 3 0

June 1 9-July 24

MTR

2

EAUD-227

Kracht

1 9-A ugus t 1 7

1 9-J uly 2 1

Music MUSI 202-2 1 9 or 502-5 I 9

Private Instruction

Master Teachers

MUSI 50 1 AO I /5 0 1 H08

Master Teachers'

Master Teachers'

2 or 0

EAUD-228 P a l m a s o n

Workshop

Teaching World M usic MUS I 5 0 1 C03/50 1 K I 0

Staff

1 -2 TBA

Workshop

Elementary M u s i c Methods and M aterials MUSI 50 I B02/50 J J09

1 6-August 1 8

Jessup

Workshop

M u s i c i n S pecial Education MUSI 5 0 1 D04/5 0 1 L l I Choral

Workshop

MUS! 50 l E05

S o lo Literature for

M U S I 50 l F06

The M u s i c of Robert Schumann

M U S I 5 0 l G 0 7 Piano

Second ary School

Improv isation

House K n a p p

MUS! 5 3 9

Topics i n M u s ic History

MUSI 5 4 5

Seminar in

MUSI 590

Gradu ate

MUS! 5 9 6

Research in Music

TBA

May 28-August 1 8

TBA

1 -4 TBA

Staff

MUSI 5 9 9

Thesis

TBA

May 22-August I S

TBA

1 -4 TBA

Staff

NURS 424

Physiological N u r s i n g I I

0900- 1 200

May 29-August I S

M

4

R A M S -205

H i rsch

NURS 434

Community Health Nursing

1 3 00- 1 600

May 29-August 1 8

M

4

RA MS-205

Fanslow

N U R S 444

C l i n ic a l Practicum I I

0700- 1 5 00*

May 29-August I S

TW

4

TBA

N U R S 464

Leadership in Nursing

0800 - 1 1 1 5 *

May 29-August I S

T

4

R A MS-205

Schultz

NURS 478

Senior

* 32

May 29-August I S

TBA

S

TBA

Schultz

NURS 49 1

I n d e pendent

N U R S 50 1

Advanced Conducting

Seminar

Nursing

Practicum

hrs/wk

A i kin/Hirsch

TBA

May 29-August I S

1 -4 TBA

Staff

School Nurse Prac t i c u m I (School Nurses)

TBA

June 1 9-Ju ly 14

2

TBA

Staff

NURS 5 0 2

School Nurse Practicum II

TBA

June 1 9-July 14

TBA

I

TBA

Staff

NURS 5 2 1

Introd uction to School Nursing

OSOO- 1 1 1 5

June 1 9-J uly 1 3

MTWR

4

R A M S-204

Study

*Contact department o r call Office o f Su mmer Stud ies a t 5 35-7 1 43 for more information. Shaded areas indicate l a te afternoon or evening classes.

See lPage 2 for explanation of codes

& abbrev iations.

Synoground


29 -

Course 10

Title

N U R S 5 22

School Nursing I I

D a te s

Time

I Philosophy

Days

Instructor

M1WR

3

RAM S-204

M ay 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 9

Cooper

MTWRF

4

L1B R-Comp

Cooper

MR

4

ADMN-206

M yr bo

MTWRF

4

ADMN-206

M y rbo

M TWRF

3

RCTR-205

Cannon

1 2 30- 1 5 00

June

0800- 1 04 5

1 9-Ju l y

13

PHll...

101

Phi losophical

PHIL

233

Logic

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

PHIL

350

Ph ilosophy of Religion

1 830-2 1 30

J une

PHil..

35 1

Value Theory

1 400- 1 64 5

June 1 9- J u ly

PHil..

50 1 *

0900- 1 600

June

Issues

Sem. Hrs. Loca.t i o n

1 9-August

17

14

Synoground

Teaching Critical Thinking Through Philosophy for Children

1 9-June 30

I Physical Education (See al.5o Heallth Education) Per onaHled

Fi lnes '

Prog ram

nOO- 1 8 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

M1WR

I

OOYM-FH

Wes t e ri n g

PHED 1 00B02 Persona lized

FiLne:,s

Program

1 700- 1 8 1 5

June 1 9-J u ly

13

MTWR

I

OGYM-FH

K l uge

Beginning Golf

0800-09 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

M1WR

I

OGYM-FH

Haroldson

PH E D 1 5 1 B 02 B eginning Golf

0800-09 J 5

July 24-August 1 7

MTWR

1

OGYM-FH

M arshall

B egin ning Bowling

1 200- 1 3 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

MTWR

I

UCTR-Bowl

Weste r i n g

Bowling

1 000- 1 1 1 5

July 24-August 1 7

MTWR

I

UCTR-Bowl

M arsh a l l

PH ED I OOAO I

PH ED 1 5 1 AO I

PHED 1 55 A O I

PHED 1 5 5 B 02 Beginning PHED 1 62

Beginning

Tennis

0700-08 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWR

I

OG Y M-Gym B e n s o n

P HE D 1 6 3

Beginning

Badminlon

1 8 3 0- 2 1 00

June 1 9 -J uly 1 3

TR

I

E A M -Gym

Adac hi

PHED 1 7 7

Weight Training

0800-09 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

MTWR

I

FIT-Clr

Westering

PHED 1 82

Low Impact Aerobics

J 200- 1 3 1 5

May 22-June 1 5

MTWR

I

ECAM-Gym

Westering

PHEO 1 8 3

Power Aembics

1 700- 1 8 1 5

May 22-Junc 1 5

MTWR

I

ECAM-Gym

Westeri n g

PHED 1 92

Intermediate Tennis

1 700- 1 8 1 5

JUilC

1 9-J u l y 1 4

MTWR

I

OGY M-Gym B e n s o n

PH EO 207

Basic Sailing

1 900-2 1 30

June 22-1 uly 1 3

R*

J

OGYM - I 06

R i ce

PHED 2 2 2

Jazz

1 400- 1700

June

1 2-June

16

MTWRF

I

ECAM-Gym

McGil l-Seal

PHED 2 3 4

Rel axation

1 400- 1 700

June

1 9-June 23

MTWRF

I

ECAM-Gym

McGill-Seal

PH ED 2 8 8

Teaching Methods i n Weight Trai ning

1 400- 1 5 1 5

May 23-June ,1 5

TWR

I

OGYM- I 06

Westering

PH ED 3 9 9

I n t e rn s h i p

T B A - a.m.

May 22-Augusl 1 8

TBA

4-8 TBA

Olson

PHED 480

Exercise

Physiology-Lab

0800-09 1 5

May 23-June 1 5

TR

2

OG Y M - 1 06

Evans

PHED 4 8 1

Exercise

Physiology

0800-09 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MWF

2

OGYM- I 06

Evans

PH E D 4 9 1

Independ e n t

TBA

May 22-August 1 7

TBA

1 -4 TBA

P H E O 50 l AO I

Substance

Performance

\ 830-2 1 30

June

J 2-June

16

MTWRF

I

OGY M- J 05

N ic h o l so n

PH ED 50 l B 02

Heall h/Fitnes$

Fact!l

1 830-2 1 30

June

1 9 J un e 2.1

MTWRF

I

O G Y M- I 0 2

Evans

1 830-2 1 30

J u ne

26-June 30

MTWRF

1

OG Y M · I 05

Evans

1 830-2 1 30

July I 7-J u l y 2 1

MTWRF

1

ECAM-G ym

Po ppe n

MTWRF

1

ECA M-Gym

Poppe n

MTWRF

J

OGYM - J 04

Mar.' h a l l

PHED 50 1 CO)

II

Dance Tcchniques

Study

A buse and A thle t i c

Hea l t h/Fitness Schoo l

Workshop:

F itness

-

WorkshOp:

Wel l nes� Concepts

and

Principles

PHED 5 0 1 004 E le menlary School Phys Ed Work hop PHED 50 1 E05

Rhy t hm i c Activ itje ' � r Elem & Mid S hool

1 830-2 1 30

August

PHED 50 1 F06

Athletics Ad ministnl1ors' Workshop

1 83(k 1 OO

August 1 4 - J S

7 -

II

I

O l son

*Contact department or c a l l Office o f Summer Studies a t 53 5-7 1 43 for more i n formation. Shaded areas indicate late afternoon or evening classes.

See page 2 for explanation of codes and abbreviations.

I


30 Course I D

Title

Time

Dates

Days

Sem. Hrs. Location

I n structor

Political Science POLS 3 2 5

Poli t ical Thought

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

XAVR-204

F a r m er

POLS 3 5 4

Stale and Local Government

0930- 1 2 1 5

J u ly 24-AuguSI 1 8

MTWRF

4

XAVR- 204

S pe n c e r

POLS 3 8 7

The M id d le East

0900- 1 2 1 5

J u l y 3-July 2 1

MTWRF

4

XAVR-204

Kel leher

Psychology PSYC 3 3 4

Asi.m-American Expe rience

0900- 1 600

J u l y 1 7-July 2 1

MTWRF

2

ADMN-202

Moritsugu

PSYC 3 3 5

Development:

I n fancy to Maturity

0930- 1 2 1 5

June 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

XAVR-203

B rown

PS Y C 450

Psychological

Testing

1 5 30- 1 8 1 5

J u l y 1 4 - A ugus t

MOIWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 O

B a i rd

' PSYC 460

Leaming: Research and Theory

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-206

Nolph

18

Rel igion

I

REU

131

Religions of South Asia

1 23 0 - 1 5 1 5

M ay 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-206

I n g ram

RELl

212

Rel igion and Literature of New Testament

0800- 1 045

J une 1 9-July 1 4

MTWRF

4

ADMN-202

Oakman

RELl

225

Faith and Spiritual ity

1 230- 1 5 1 5

July 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 6

Lundeen

REU

2 26

Christian E lh ie s

0930- I 2 1 5

J une 1 9-Ju l y 1 4

MTWRF

4

ADMN-206

S t one

RELl

332

The Life o f Jesus

0800- 1 04 5

J u ly 24-August 1 8

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 6

Go v ig

RELI

TU 0 1

B i blical

1 530- 1 900

M ay 23-June 1 5

TR

2

ADMN·2 1 6

Pe t er�en

RELI

3 3 3 B fl2

B iblical

Testament Chri.lOlogy 1 5 30- 1 900

June 20·July 1 3

TR

2

ADMN-2 1 6

O u k m <l n

RF...L l

3 3 3C03 B i blica l Studies :

TR

2

ADMN-2 J 6

Gov ig

REtI

369 '"

RELl

390

ttldies: Interpret i ng Old Testament

· IU(Jje.�:

ew

17

1 5 30- 1 900

J u l y 15-Augusl

Gandh i . K ing & S oc i al Change

1 5 3D- I l)O O

J une 20-J uly 1 3

TR

2

ADM N-20!j

S t o ne

History of Rel igions: Judaism

0930- 1 2 1 5

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 6

P e tersen

MTWR

4

XAVR-203

B iblarz

MR

4

ADMN-206

J (l bs I

hrist iun

Revelmion

Studies :

Sociology SOCI :no

The Family

0900- 1 2 1 5

tVlay 22-June 1 5

SO I 4 5 1

J uveni le J u . t ice

1 7 0-2030

J une

1 9- ug u st

17

Social Wo rk and Marriage & Fa m i ly Therapy SOCW402* S OCW403 *

Social Work I nte rv entions with School-Age Children and Their Fam i l ies 0930- 1 345

July 3 -J u l y 14

MTWRF

2

ECAM-22

Hiam

M u lti-Cultu ra l Issues and S k i l l s for the Human Services and Education

0930- 1 345

J u ly 24-August 4

MTWRF

2

ECAM-23

J o h n s to n e

TBA

May 22-July 28

TBA

4 ea TBA

Hiam

1 800- 2 1 20*

May 24-June 28

MTWRF

3

York/Storm

TBA

May 22-August 1 2

TBA

4 ca TBA

MalTiage and Fam i l y Therapy Supervision

0900- 1 220

May 24-June 28

W

:I

ECAM-22

Y o rk/S torm

Introductory Statistics

0800- H)45

May 22-June 1 6

MTWRF

4

ADMN-2 1 2

Jensen

SOCW4 7 5 /4 7 6 Field E xpe rie nce Professional

Ethics

MFT

512

MFT

5 1 9- 5 2 2 Practicum I-IV

*MFT 524*

ECAM-22

Y o rk/S torm

Statistics STAT 2 3 1

;'Contact department o r c a l l Office o f Summer Studies a t 535-7 1 43 for more information. Shaded areas indicate late afternoon or evening classes.

See page 2 for explanation of codes

& abbrev iations.


31

Special Educati o n SPED 1 90 Exceptional Children and Adults (3) Term I: May 22-June 1 5 Introducl ion t o the needs and charncteristics of exceptional Fcdenl l and state legislalion, current children and adu lts. issues, and practices of del ivering services to handicapped i ndividuals. Designed as an overview of the field for students i n special education, nursing, counseling, and other related fields. 1 500- 1 900, MTR. ECAM- 1 3 . K . Gerlach SPED 290 Introduction to Learning Disabilities (3) Term I I : J u ne 26-July 1 4 Overview of the field o f learning disabi lities, inc luding con­ cepts. assessment, and instructional practices. Prerequisite: ED C 25 1 , Learner and Society: Growth and Development (Secondary); or EDUC 253, Child Development and Schools; or consent of instructor. 1 230- 1 520, MTWRF. ECAM- 1 4 . C. Weller SPED 398 Assessment i n Special and Remed ial Education (3) Term I I : June 1 9-J uly 1 4 Study of a variety of informal and formal assessment te. ts and procedures. Curricul urn based assessments. system­ atic c l as s room observation. norm-referenced tests. task analysis, and criterion-referenced tesls and procedu res are examined. Includes the role of assessment in e l igibi lity and program p lanning. 0930- 1 1 40, MTWRF. ECAM-23. G . W i l l i ams SPED 399 Practicum i n Special Education ( 1 -2 ) May 22-August 1 8 Experience w i th special education children or a d u l ts i n a s u pervised setting. I hour cred i t given aftcr successful completion of 45 c lock hours. Prerequis ite: SPED 290, Introduction to Learning D isabilities, or consent of instructor. TBA. Staff SPED 403 Parent/Professional Partnership in Special Education (2) Interi m : July 1 7-Ju l y 2 1 Discussion of the techniques for communicating effectively with parents of c h ildren with spccial needs. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. ECAM- 1 3 . K . Gerlach SPED 407 C u rriculum & Instruction (4) for Exceptional Students Te rm III: July 24-August 1 8 Focus on teaching academ ic. social. and adaptive s k i l ls to mild and moderately handicapped students. includes writing individual education plans. dala based instruction, task analysis, and learning sequences. Prerequisite: General Methods; S PED 290, Introduction to Learning Disabil ities, or consent of i nSI ructor. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. ECA M - 1 3 . L. Reisberg SPED 475 Su pervisi n g Para-Professionals (1 ) and Volunteers J une 3 and J u ne 1 7 only Emphasis on the effective management of para-profcssion­ als and volunteel·s i n the classroom. Saturduy only. 0900- 1 700, Sat. ADM N - 1 1 7 . K. Gerlach

SPED 492 Methods of Teaching Young Hand icapped C h i ld ren (2) Term J : May 22-June 1 4 Early childhood methods. materials, curriculum. and tech­ niques for teaching children with spec ial needs. Pre requisite: SPED 490, Early Learning Experiences for the Handicapped Child. 1 630-2030, MW. ECAM- 1 4 . H. Owens SPED 494 Com puter Application for Hand icapped ( 2 ) June 1 9-J une 3 0 A n introd uction into the application of computer technology with handicapped students. Foc us on c u rrent issues and uses of computer technology including computer assisted instruc t ion. softwarc cvaluation, pupil and data manage­ ment, and computcr aids for the hand icapped. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. LIBR-Comp. L. Polsgrove SPED SO I AOl* Advanced Computers in Special Education (2) J u l y 7-August 1 8 May also be taken as CSCI 508 * , see description o n page 1 4. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. LlBR-Comp Ctr. J. Beau l ieu SPED 520 Teaching Handicapped Children in the Regular Classroom (2) Interi m : J u l y 1 7-July 2 1 An examination of teaching strategies appropriate for excep­ tionul children in regular classrooms. Emphasis on the needs of exceptional chi ldren. program modi fication. and c lass­ room management. Designcd for regular educators. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. ECA M - 1 4. T. Mehring/A. Banikowski SPED 530 Current Issues in Assessment (2) J u l y 3-July 1 4 Current issues in the use of assessment information for making educational decisions. Prerequisite: SPED 39R. Assessment in Special and Remedial Education or co n se n t 0(' instructor. 1 300- 1 600. ivITWRF. ECAM- I 3 . G. Will iams SPED 532 Education and Training of the Severely and Profoundly Handicapped (2) Interim : July 1 7-July 2 1 In-depth study of educational prescription and programming for the severely and profoundly handicapped. Emphasis on teaching strategies and curricu l u m mod i ficat ion as they apply to this population. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. ECAM-22. D. Finn SPED 537 Current Issues in Language Disorders ( 2 ) Term I l l : J u ly 24-Augusl 4 Currclll i ssues and approuches in assessing and remed i­ ating chi ldren w i th l unguage d isorders. Prerequisite : SPED 395, I ntroduction to Language Devclopmelll and Disorders or consent of instructor. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. ECAM - 1 4. R. Tiger

--

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32 �

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-

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-

SPED 538 Current Issues in Early Child hood Hand icapped (2) Term I l l : August 7-August 1 8 Current issues related to the education of pre-school handi­ capped c h i ldren. Prerequisite: SPED 490 or consent of i n structor. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. ECAM-22. K. Small

SPED 588 Administration of Special Education Programs (3) Term I l l : J u l y 2S-August 1 7 Investigation of existing special education administrative units, pupil placement procedures, student staffings, pro­ gram reimbursement procedures, and federal funding models. 1 600-2030, TR. ECAM-22. J. Pearson

SPED 539 Administration of Early C hild hood! Special Education Programs (2) Interi m : July 1 7-July 2 1 In-depth study of the administration of early childhood pro­ grams with emphasis on remediation techniques and inter­ discipl inary approaches. Prerequisite: S PED 490, Early Learning Experiences for the Handicapped Child. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. ECAM-23. H . Owens

SPED 595 Special Education: I n ternship (4) May 22-August 1 8 Internship in special education settings under the direction and supervision of classroom and university faculty. Pre­ requisite: Teaching credential and consent of instructor. TBA. Staff

SPED 540 Early Intervention Programs (2) June 1 9-J une 30 Current practices in medical, therapeutic and educational intervention techniques used in the habilitation of handi­ capped children ages birth through six. Procedures include long and short term objectives, motivational and remedial proced ures. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. ECAM- 1 4. H . Owens SPED 541 Assessment of Infants & Preschoolers ( 2 ) J u l y 3-July 1 4 Course emphasis is o n the use of systematic individual as­ sessment of handicapped chi ldren ages birth through six. Topics include appropriate tests and procedures used to determine developmental progress and relevant educational progra m s . 1 3 00- 1 600, MTWRF. ECAM-23. H. Owens SPED 570 Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers( 2 ) Term I : M a y 23-June I S A survey of the principles and techniques for applied behav­ ior analysis. Includes behavior modification, self-control techniques, cognitive behavior modification, and research design. 1 630-2030, TR. ECAM - 1 4 . G . W i l l iams SPED 575 Introduction to the Consu ltant Teacher in Special Education (2) J u l y 24-August 4 Introduction to the principles and practices of a consu lting teacher model i n speci a l education. Focus on instructional delivery appropriate for providing direct and indirect services to handicapped children in mainstream classrooms. In­ cludes a one-hour practicum. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. ECAM- 1 4. M . Friend SPED 576 Communication Skills for the Consulting Teacher (2) August 7 -August 1 8 Emphasis o n the interpersonal skills necessary for the con­ sulting teacher in special education. Exploration of variables involved i n developing cooperation between cons u l tants and regular classroom teachers. 0900-1 200, MTWRF. ECAM-22. J. Goebel

SPED 598 Studies in Education (2) May 22-August 1 8 A research paper or project o n a n educational issue selected jointly by the student and the graduate adviser. It will be reviewed by the student's graduate committee. TBA. Staff (3-4) SPED 599 Thesis M a y 22-August 1 8 The thesis problem i s chosen from the candidate's major field of concentration and must be approved by the candi­ date ' s graduate committee. Candidates are expected to defend their thesis in a final oral examination conducted by their committee. TBA. Staff

Engl ish ENGL 101 College English (4) Term I: May 22-June 1 6 This workshop course stresses the process of organIzing, developing and presenting papers, and review of grammar and mechanics. Assignments include essays of various lengths, a journal, and class presentation of finished work. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. RAMS-204. S . Jansen ENGL 217 Short Story (4) Term I: May 22-June 1 6 An introduction t o the short story, focusing on 1 9th- and 20th­ century writers - B ritish and American, European and Latin American - from Poe to Phillips, Lawrence to Lessing, Chekov to B orges. Emphasizes discussion of the range of short fiction 's forms, techniques, effects and values, and considers a broad spectrum of critical approaches. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 0. T. Campbell


33 (4)

ENGL 232 Women's Literature Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4

--

ENGL 328 Advanced Composition: Writing in the Professions

(4 )

Are there really some discernible elements that characterize

Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4

women ' s writing?

Here's

A course o f d iscipl ined writing and i n q u i ry about writing. The

a chance to read stories, poetry, and novels by writers you

focus is not on the forms or documents of any one profession

may not have encountered before, extending your know l ­

or disc i p l i ne; rather, we experiment w i th a number of sub­

edge into a special l i terary tradition.

jects, audiences, purposes, and forms.

Who are "Shakespeare ' s sisters?"

S tresses 20th- century

We also do some

women writers in Eng l i sh; i ntroduces rev i s ionary and femi­

serious fussing over sentences and paragraphs, always alert

nist approaches to reading and writing.

to matters of clarity, precision, and v igor of express ion.

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 6 . J. Marek

work together relies on group workshops and class discus­

ENGL 327 A01l527 AOI Imaginative Writing Workshop: (2) Poetry

e s s e nt i a l .

June

1 3 -July 25

In a workshop format, thi s course considers the develop­

Our

sions, so reg ular attendance and focused participation are 1 2 30- 1 5 1 5, MTWRF. ADM N-209. R . Jenseth

ment o f contemporary poetry, from its origins in Emerson to

ENGL 343 Twentieth Century American Fiction and Drama

the work of current poets such as Ashberry, w i th emphasis on

Term I : M a y 22-June 1 6

how these traditions can enhance your own poetry .

A study o f novels and plays by some o f the best writers o f the

Class

(4)

members discuss each othe r ' s work-in-progres s. Beth Bentley

last 80 years.

is one of the Northwes t's best poets and an outstanding

Jazz Age (the Twenties) and more contemporary work o f the

workshop leader.

S i xties

Her work has appeared in more than 1 00

journals and she has published numerous books, including Phone

Calls

from

the

Dead,

Country of Resemblances,

and

The course highlights American writing of the Seventies.

Includes

novelists

l ike

O ' Ne i l l , M i l ler and Shepard.

Requires extensive time for

Ph i losophical Investigations, and The Purely Visi ble.

reading and four short papers.

1 830-2200, T.

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-204A. D . Martin

ADMN-2 1 7 . B. Bentley

Fitzgerald,

Hemingway, Faulkner, Hel ler, and Pynchon, and drama by

ENGL 392 Twentieth Century British Literature

(4)

ENGL 327B02/527B02 Imaginative Writing Workshop: (0) Poetry

Term I I I : July 24-August 1 8

June 1 3-July 25

Surveys the literary landscape o f England, w ith special emphasis

Same

as

327A0 1 /527AO I , but for no cred it.

1 8 30-2200, T.

on authors who have done major work since World War II.

ADM N-2 1 7 . B. Bentley

Considers the persistence of tradition i n tension w ith innova­ tion in the fiction and poetry of Amis, Lark in, Pym, Gunn,

ENGL 327C03/527C03 Imaginative Writing Workshop : Fiction

(2)

June I S -July 27

Spark, Drabble, Carter, S w i ft ,and McEwan. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-202. T. Campbell

Th is course deals with techniques of writing and rewriting

ENGL 452AOI Semina r: Virginia Woolf

fiction. We write stories, then learn how to perfect them,

Term I I I : J u ly 24-August 1 7

uncovering opportu nities missed the first time, and making

A s the most prominent member o f the famous Bloomsbury

stories speak with the fu l l truth of the material.

Inc lu des class

group of " l i terary l i ons" earlier this century, V i rginia Woo l f has

with the instructor.

had profound i n fluence on the world of modem l iterature -

Jack Cady has published five novels and several collections

both for her artistic accomplishments and for her aesthetic

d iscussion and

individual

conferences

of short stories and l i terary essays.

and social ideas.

1 8 30-2200, R .

complex

AD MN-2 1 4 . J. Cady

ENGL 327 004/527004 Imaginative Writing Workshop : Fiction June I S -J uly 27

novels,

(0 )

and

In order to i n troduce ourselves to this

rewarding

essays,

(2)

and

British

letters,

author,

and

we read selected

prepare

a

1 8 30-2 1 30, M R .

l i brary

A D M N-204B. J. Marek

Same as ENGL 327C03/527C03 but for no credit.

§ENGL 565 Advanced Placement Institute:

1 8 30-2200, R .

Interim: July 1 7-July 2 1

ADMN-2 1 4 . J. Cady

short

proj e c t .

English( 2)

An intensive course for high school facu lty involved in AP Engl ish

courses.

Advanced

Based

Placement

on the prem ise

teachers

combine

that

successful

extensive

knowl­

edge o f both l iterature and of advanced composition with an assured command of teaching strategies. edge, obviously even tains.

a

fa scinating

Without knowl­

teacher merely enter­

Without teaching skil ls, of course, even an encyclope­

dic m i nd fai'ls to communicate.

Both knowledge and teach­

ing techniques, therefore, are emphasized in study of AP English. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 9. E. Johnson

this intensive

.£: CJ) . ­ -

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34 --

o

ofoo-J .

C/} -

I -­ c o

� (J.) I --

Health Ed ucation (See a l so Phys i cal Education) H EED 292 First A id/CPR (I) May 22-May 26 This course meets rC4uirements for the American Red Cross S tandard First Aid and Personal Safety. Fee: $5 1 800-2 1 30, MTWRF. OGYM- 1 04 . G . Nicho l son HEED 501AOI I njury Prevention in Athletes (I) J unc 5-J une 9 Designed as a primary course for rhe coach or physical education teacher. The major thrust of rhe course is towards injury prevention and the i m mediate care of most common SPOIts inj uries. Lecture, video and raping techniques are prescnted. \ 830-2 \ 30, MTWRF. OGYM- \ 04. G . Nicholson HEED 501 802 Food & Health (1) June 1 9-J une 23 Topics include nutrients and their metabolism, d ietary guide­ lines, food fad isl11 , l abel ing, additives, vegetarianism, obe­ sity and nutrition for spec ial populations . 0900- \ 200, MTWRF. OGYM- L 06. P. Hoseth H EED SOlC03 School Health ( 1) June 1 9-June 23 Health concepts which relate to the total school heal t h program, including instruction, services and environment; relationships between health and all levels of education. 1 630- 1 930, MTWRF. OGYM - 1 06 P. Hoseth H EED 501 004 Disease and Wellness (1) J une 26-J une 30 An estimated 75 percent of all modern a ilments are sel f­ induced. If we are to reduce disease care costs we must find ways of preventing d isease rather than c uring it. \ 630- 1 930, MTWRF. OGYM - I 04. P. Hoseth HEED SOl E05 Stress Without Distress (1) July 3-July 7 Consideration of stress, what people should know about stress, how to red uce the harm ful e ffects of stress, and the relationship of i ncreased stress to disease problems. 1 600- 1 930, MTWRF. OGYM - I 04. P. Hoseth

History HIST 108 H istory of Western Civilization (4) Term I I : J u ne 1 9-Ju ly 1 4 A history of Western Europe from the Renaissancc t o the m id-twentieth century. Topics i nclude: Renaissance, Refor­ mation, scientifi c revolution, Enl ightenment, French Revolu­ t ion, conservative reaction, national ism and state-bu i lding, Marxism, Modernism, World War r, Bolshevik revolution, Fascism, and World War II. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. XA VR- 1 1 4 . P. Nordquist

HIST 330 Modern China (4) June 1 9-Augusl 1 7 Chinese h istory from 1 800 to the present. Emphasis o n rhe Chinese revolution, why it happened, and what it meant for the people of China. Attention to China ' s relationship w ith the United S tates and the Soviet Union . 1 830-2 1 30, MR. XAVR- 1 1 4 . Q. Wu H IST 335 Central America and the Caribbean (4) Term I : M a y 22-June 1 6 S u rvey o f the major aspects of Central American and Carib­ bean history from colonial to modern times. Use of selec ted ca ·c studies ro illustrate the region's history. S tudy in inter­ American relations. 0930- 1 2 1 5, MTWRF. XAVR- 1 1 4. J . Bermingham HIST 399 I nternship ( 1 - 6) June I -August 1 8 Internship work and study processed through cooperative Education. For further information, c a l l (206) 5 3 5-7648. Prerequisi te: one year of col l ege and evidence of independ­ ent study s k i l ls. Prerequ i s i te: Arrangements made with instructor prior to June I: have com p leted one course i n h istory a n d o n e year in c o llege; t a l ly card signed by instructor m u s t accompany registration. TBA. A. rVlartinson H IST 461 West and Northwest ( 4) May 22-J u ly 2 \ A research and writing project on community h istory, nor­ mal ly one 's hometown. Indi v i d u a l i zed study. C lassroom orientation required. On-site research in c hosen community req u i red. By 1 989 gu idel ines only. Open to upper cl i v ision students and above who have taken at least one history course at the college leve l and show ev idence of indcpend­ ent study skills. Meets teacher certification rClj u i rement. Enrol l ment limit 1 5 . Tally card signed by instructor must accompany registration; students are advised to meet with the i nstructor in early May. Cal l (206) 535-7648 for further i n formation . TBA. A. Martinson § HIST 502 Advanced Placement Institute: H istory ( 2 ) I n terim: J u ly 1 7-July 2 1 The main ieleals and interpretations o f American history from colonial times through th early 1 970s. Mornings arc organ­ ized chronologically with each day devoted to a pcriod of American h istory. Afternoons are used for i n form a l discus­ sions of organizing the Advanced Placement course, teach­ ing methods, read ing loads, written assignments and other issues faced by AP History teachers. Partic ipants who have had some experience teac h i ng AP History are encouraged to bring with them samples of their teaching materials to share with the class. 0800- 1 600, MTWRF. XAVR- 1 1 4 . W. Carp


35

Languages

SIGN 201 A merican Sign Language Practicum

(4)

Term I : May 22-June 1 6

FREN 201l49 1 AOI Intermediate French

Concentrates on spec i fic areas o f American S i gn Languagc,

(4)

J u ne 26-J u ly 2 1

such as extended study o f c l ass i fiers, non-manual markers,

This course uses French i n Action by Pien'e Capretz. the v ide­

deaf i d i o m s , and an expansion of sign vocabu lary.

otaped

spec i a l

telev ision program.

W i th accompany ing books,

it

areas

provides a total language course in the conte x t of l i fe i n

sign ing skills.

France.

community,

Students

master basic

grammar,

vocabu l ary a n d

expressions needed for spontaneous oral a n d written com­ m u n ication.

Laboratory attendance is requ ired.

is for language teachers i n terested

in

the

French 49 1

use o f video in

develop

students '

rcccptive

and

O ffers students special projects w i t h i n the deaf

as

well

as career

i n formation

related to the students ' field of study.

Prereq uisite: S IGN 1 02 , Sign

0930- 1 2 1 5 . MTWRF ADMN-2 1 4. L. Mc K i m

0930- 1 2 1 5, MTWR. ADMN-20S. J. DeSherlia

of FREN

FR EN 20 1 /49 1

20 1 /49 1 .

See

de cri ption

under

S PAN 2 1 0 Spanish Conversation An

intermediatc

designed

above.

(2)

to

level

help

course

students

in

bu i l d

conversational their

Spanish,

knowledge

of the

language i n everyday s i t u ations, such as arranging a trip,

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 4. L. Mc K i m

going shopping, taking care of business at the bank or post

FREN 49 I B02* Foreign Language Methods Practicum June

or equivalent.

Term I: May 22-J une 1 6

Term J I / : J u l y 24-August 1 8 Continuation

resources

incl udes demonstration by the instructor, d r i l ls and rec itals by studcnts, and d iscussion. Languagc,

(4)

and

Classroom procedu re

l anguage teac h i n g , a project is i nc l uded .

FRE1\ 202/492 Intermediate French

These

expressive

(2)

I S-June 30

A two-weck workshop h e l d o n t h e campus o f Charles Wright Academy

in conju nction wah the CWA French Camp for

chi I d ren.

Experience the advantage of teaching i n a stress­

office in a Span is h-speak ing environment.

Prerequ i s i te: Two

semesters of collegc Spanish or the equivalent. 0930- 1 04 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 4 . L. Faye

S PAN 401 Survey of

Spanish Literature

(4)

Term 1: May 22-June 1 6

free environmcnt and learn how to creatc optimum learn ing

A

cond i tions.

Spanish and Span ish-American l i tera t u res from the Golden

May a l so be taken as EDUC 503Z23"', sce page

reading

course s u rveying

types

and

themes

in

19.

Age

TB A . J . O l l iphant

language and c u ltural h istory courscs at the 300 level to the advanced

LANG 271/471 Literature and Society in Modern Europe

(4)

Term II: June 1 9 -July 1 4

Read ing a n d discussion o f works in English translation by authors J i ke Flau bert, Ibsen, and Th. Mann, who exem p l i fy Real i s m

and

Natura l ism

in

various

to

Eu ropean

the prcsent.

typical

l i terature

The course is a transition from the courscs.

Rcadings

inc lude

selections

from such authors as Ccrvantes, Calder6n de la Barca, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Ncruda and Garcia Marques.

Pre­

req u i site: s i x semesters of college Spanish or the equivalent. 1 3 00- 1 540, MTWRF. ADM N-2 1 4 . L. Faye

l i teratures.

Emp hasis on s ocial themes, including l i fe in industrial soc i ­ e t y . t h e c h a n g i n g status o f women, a n d c l ass confl ict. prerequis ite.

No

L A N G 27 1 Satis fies t h e general u n i versity core

requirement in literature.

Students who enro l l for LANG 471

have the option of compl e t i ng a second paper or of doing a project to develop materi a l s for cla ssroom use in the p u b l ic schools.

LANG 47 1

does not meet the general u n iversity

requirement in l i terature.

MATH 128 Math for Busi ness and the Behavioral Sciences

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 2 . P. Webster

LANG 444 Methodology of Teaching English as a Second Language and

techniques

of teaching

English

as

a

(2) second

language with emphasis on developing proficiency for learn­ ers o f English.

An elementary knowledge of l i nguistics is

helpfu l but not requ ired . J 400- 1 64 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 4 . R. Swenson

(4)

May 22-J u l y 20

J u ly 24-August 4 Theory

Math

Review o f algebra, matrix theory and linear programm ing, in­ trod uction to d i ffere n t i a l and integral c a lc u l u s . Concepts are developed i n t u itively w i th applications. Use of m a thematical tools

stressed

years of high

throughout school

the

course.

Prerequisite :

a.lgebra or MATH 9 1 ,

Two

Intermed i a te

A l g e bra. 1 830-2 1 30, MR. M G Y M- I O I . R . Benkhalti

MATH 151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I June

(4)

1 9-August 1 7

Analytic geomctry, functions, l im i t s deriv atives and integrals w i th app l ications. L ' Hospital ' s Rule.

Prereq uisite: Two years

of high school al gebra and trigonomctry; or M ATH Algebra a n d Trigonometry: o r equivalent. I R 30-2 1 30, MR. M G YM - 102 . G . Peterson Math course descriptiolls continue on

the next page.

1 33,


36 MATH 245 Discrete Structures

(4)

Master Teachers in Music Workshops July 24-J uly 28

May 30-July 7 Prov ides the mathematical background necessary d i v ision work in computer science.

for upper

Sets, relations, functions

Intensive week-long study with one master teacher in music as well as a sampling of methods and techniques of other

combinatorics, probabil ity and graph theory and their rela­

master

tion to topics in computer science.

DeRuyter and Lynn

Techniq ues of logical

teachers.

Instructors

incl ude

Jessup;

Ann

Palmason,

Harry

Kate Grieshaber, coordinator.

reasoning i n c luding methods of quantified logic, deduction,

Avai lable for no credit, fee $ 1 7 5.

induction, and contradiction are taught and applied through­

Department of M u s i c , Pac i fic Lutheran University, Tacoma,

out the course. and

Prereq u i site: MATH 1 52 , Analytic Geometry L . Edison

I l OO- 1 300, MTWRF. MGYM- l 03 .

M ATH 323 Modern Elementary Math

(4)

June 1 9-Ju l y 2 1 underlying

traditional

computational

techniques;

a systematic analysis of arithmetic; an intuitive approach to algebra

and

WA 98447. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF.

Calculus.

Concepts

Write for special brochure,

geometry.

Intended

for elementary

teaching

M USI 501A01l50 1 H08 Elementary Music Methods and Materials (2 or 0) July 24-July 2 8 See

course

description

0900- 1 600, MTWRF.

above.

EAUD-228. A . Palmason

majors. Prereq u is i te to EDUC 326, Mathematics i n the Ele­

MUS I 501B02/50LJ09 Teaching World Music (2 or 0)

mentary Schoo l .

July 24-July 2 8

Prerequ isite : Consent of instructor.

1 1 00- 1 3 1 5 , MTWRF. MGYM- I O I . K. Batker

§MATH 55 1 Advanced Placement Institute: (2)

See

Calculus

course

description

above.

0900- 1 600, MTWRF. EAUD-227. L. Jessup

Interim: J u ly 1 7-J u l y 2 1

MUSI 501 C03/501KI0 Music in Special E d u cation

There i s considerable d iscussion under way i n the mathe­

July 24-July 2 8

matics community as to what should be taught in calculus

See

and how i t shoul d be taught.

0900- 1 600, MTWRF. EAUD-S tage. H . DeRuyter

suggests

that

calculus

be

The "lean and l ively" approach made

computational, w ith increased

conceptural

rather

than

geometric reasoning and an

emphasiS on application and approximation.

The Institute

focuses on al l three of the necessary categories:

(1)

(2) pedagogy, and (3) new d i rections in calcu lus.

content,

Designed

for in-service secondary math teachers who are teaching or are planning to teach AP calculus i n high school.

Se lected

topics from sing le-variable calculus which lead to practical appl icatio ns

are

d i sc u sses

al ong

effective teaching o f these topics.

with

strategies

for the

Concentrates on subject

matter and on ideas and materials for effective teaching. 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. RCTR-220. G. Anderson

course

description

(2 or 0)

above.

MUSI 50lD04/50 1 L l l Choral Workshop

(2 or 0)

July 3 I -August 4 Sessions

exploring

rehearsal

tec hniques,

vocal

ment, conducting technique, and musical style. expl ore problems and new ideas fo r all levels:

develop­ Clinic i a ns

j u n ior high,

senior high, col lege, and church. I nc ludes a packet of l i tera­ ture

selected

by

each

Featured

c l inician.

c l i nician

Paul

Salamunovich of Loyola Marymount Col lege explores chant and music influenced by chant, and other topics of interest. the workshop group gives

a short

ducted

and

by

R ichard Sparks

informal

Mr.

concert con­

Salamunovich

in

the

beautiful acoustics of Christ Episcopal Church. Availa ble for no credit, $ 1 7 5 . 0900-2 1 00, MTWRF. EAUD-227. R . Sparks

MUSI 501 E05 Solo Literature for the Secondary School Teacher

(1)

August 7-August I I A n overv iew of vocal l i terature suitable for high school stu­

Music

dent participation i n solo contests.

M US I 202-219

Or 502-5 19 Private Instruction

June

18

1 6-August

( 1 -2 )

The Department o f Music offers private i nstruction i n a variety of media, subject to instructor avai labil ity. Contact the Music Office for lesson, credit and tuition details at (206) 535 -760 I . T B A . S taff

Through lecture, d i scus­

sion and sight reading, music class members become ac­ quainted w i th literature and techniques to develop the young voice and accompanist, and to display those techniques w i th appropriate

stage

presence

use of textual imagery.

and

audience

rapport

making

Write for special brochure, Depart­

ment of Music, Pacific Lu theran University, Tacoma, WA 9 8 447. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. EAUD-227. B . Poulshock


37 MUSI 501F06 The Music of Robert Schumann (1) Interim: J u ly 1 7-July 2 1 A study and analysis o f the piano music o f Robert Schu­ mann. Emphasis i s on the technique of learning and per­ fonning these great works. Some stress on the rich resource of teaching material at the elementary and intennediate of this composer. Open to students, teachers and those desir­ ing to broaden their knowledge of music. 0900- 1 200, MTWRF. EAUD-228. C. Knapp MUSI 501G07 Piano Improvisation (1) Interim : J u l y 1 7-July 2 1 B eginning and advanced improvisation course, i ncluding improvisation in the styles of composers of the common practise period developing short motifs, improvisation on hymn tunes for the church pianist, and blues, jazz and rock . Course is open t o pianists a t a l l levels. 1 300- 1 600, MTWRF. Piano House. C. Knapp MUSI 539 Topics in Music History Term I I : June 1 9-J u l y 24 In depth study of selected topics in music history. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. EAUD-227. J. Kracht

(2)

MUSI 545 Seminar in A d vanced Conducting (2) August 7-August 1 8 Directed study of selected scores for large and small en­ sembles, vocal and instrumental. 1 300- 1 500, MTWR. EAUD-228. J . Kracht MUSI 590 Graduate Seminar Tenn II: June 1 9-July 24 G raduate Seminar. 1 330- 1 530, MTR. EAUD-227. J. Kracht

(2)

MUSI 596 Research in Music ( 1 -4 ) May 28-August 1 8 Independent study card required; see Music Department. TBA. S taff MUSI 599 Thesis ( 1 -4) May 22-August 1 8 Y o u m a y register at any t i m e during t h e summer prior to August I . Independent study card req uired; see Music Department. TBA. S taff

Nursing NURS 424 Physiological Nursing II (4) Nursing Term: May 29-August 1 8 Content focuses on selected complex pathophysiological disorders of children and adults of a l i fe-threatening or chronically disabling nature. Nursing i nterventions based on understanding of the biopsycho-social disruptions and means of restoring balance to an optimal level of functioning. RNs only. Prerequisite: NURS 354, Physiological Nursing; NURS 384, Psychosocial Nursing; NURS 394, Clinical Practicum I; concurrent enrol lment i n NURS 434, Community Health Nursing and NURS 444, Clin ical Practicum. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. 0900- 1 200, M , RAMS-205. Lab: 1 500- 1 700, T. RAMS-3 1 7 . A. H irsch/S . Aikin N URS 434 Community Health Nursing ( 4) Nursing Tenn: May 29-August 1 8 Identification of major public health problems, levels of prevention, and community health nurses' roles. Models and theories for evaluating, reinforcing, or altering health-seeking behaviors of fami lies, groups, and special populations. Intro­ ductions to selected theories, principles, and methods of leadership, and concepts of research in nursing. RNs only. Prerequisite: NURS 354, Physiological Nursing I; NURS 384, Psychosocial Nursing; NURS 394, Cl inical Practicum I; concurrent enroll ment in NURS 424, Physiological Nursing II and NURS 444, Cl inical Practicum II. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. 1 300- 1 600, M, R-205 . Seminar: 1 5 00- 1 700, W, RAMS-205 . J. Fan s low/L. R hoades NURS 444 Clinical Practicum II (4) Nursing Tenn: M a y 29-August 1 8 Clinical application of bio-psycho-social, cultural, and spiri­ tual concepts in acute care hospital and community settings. Use of the nursing process includes i nterpersonal as well as technological skills. Professional responsibi lity and accounta­ bil ity are emphasized. Prerequisite: NURS 354, Physiologi­ cal Nursing I: NURS 384, Psychosocial Nursing; NURS 394, Cl inical Practicum I; concurrent enrol lment in NURS 424, Physiological Nursing II and NURS 434, Community Health Nursing. RNs only. Tuition: $275 per semester hour. Clinical: 0700- 1 400, T and 0800- 1 400, W. Location TBA. S . Aikin/A. H i rsch/L. Rhoades NURS 464 Leadership in Nursing (4) Nursing Term: May 29-August 1 8 Analysis of heal th care delivery systems. Emphasis on lead­ ership and economic aspects affecting health profess ionals and consumers. Prerequisite: NURS 424, Physiological Nursing II; NURS 434, Community Health Nursing; NURS 444, Clinical Practicum II; concurrent enrollment in NURS 478, Senior Practicum. Tui tion: $275 per semester hour. 0800- 1 1 1 5 , T. Discussion: 1 300- 1 5 1 5 , T. RAMS-205. C. Schultz

Nursing course descriptions continue on the next page.


38 --

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Z

--

NURS 478 Senior Practicum

(8)

N u rsing Term: M a y 29-August 1 8

Philosophy

C l i n ical application and synthesis of professional and techni­

PHIL 1 0 1 Philosophical Issues

cal s k i l l s i n hospitals, health agenc ics. or other community

Term I: May 22-June 1 6

settings.

Introduces

Prerequisite : NURS 424, Physiological N u rs i ng I I

and N UR S 434, N U R S 444, Clinical Practicum I I ; concurrent enrollment in N URS 464, Leadership i n N u rsing meets May 29, 8 am-4 pm, R-204. semester

Tuition:

by focusing on

its

most distinctive

characteristic, the form ulating and criticizing of world v iews.

First c l ass

Considers various worldviews and uses critical sk ills to as­

$275 per

sess the m . Devotes time to discussion of such questions as:

hour.

What makes an action right, or a person good� Can miracles

3 2 hours per week, TBA.

C. S c h u l tz

occur, and if so what do they prove�

NURS 491 Independent Study

( 1 - 4)

May 29-August 1 8 Prerequisite: Perm ission of the Dean. semester

philosophy

(4)

Tuition:

$275 per

hou r.

Are any o f our beliefs

certain?

Read i ngs range from the introdu ctory to the sophis­

ticated.

Fulfi l l s Phi losophy general university req u i rement.

0800- 1 1 00, MTWRF. ADM N-2 1 9 . K. Cooper

(4)

PHIL 233 Logic

TBA. Staff

Term 11 : J u ne J 9-July 1 4

NURS 501 School Nurse Practicum I (School Nurses Only)

natural deduction and axiomatic approaches.

A study o f the pri nciples

(2)

June 1 9 -July 1 4 Practicum orienting nurses t o the school nurse fu nctions i n a K - 1 2 setting.

Tuition: $ 1 7 5 per semester hour.

(1)

1 9-Ju ly 1 4 Tuition: $ 1 75 per semester hour.

§NURS 521 Introduction to School Nursing RNs onl y .

(4)

to

accommodate

Includes

Focus on the total

assessment o f school age

tion of the nursing process to problems common to the K- 1 2 age group a n d prevalent in the school environment. Nurses' development

health progra ms.

and

implementation

of school

Tu ition: $ 1 7 5 per semester hour.

needs

and

spec i a l

0930- 1 2 1 5 * , MTWRF.

LIBR-Comp Ctr.

compute r

K . Cooper

( 4)

Classical

and

contemporary v iews

of traditional

§NURS 522 School Nursing II

1 8 30-2 1 30, MR. A DMN-206. G. Myrbo

PHIL 351 Value Theory

(4)

Term II : June 1 9-July 14 Explores and critically examines the sociobiological l itera­ understanding o f

human va lues and for o u r be lie fs i n freedom, moral respon­

(3 )

sibil ity, and basic human dignity. Fulfi l l s Philosophy general un iversity

RNs only .

1 400- 1 64 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-206. G . Myrbo

Application of advanced health assessment i n

care o f school aged students ( K - 1 2 ), consu Itation, a n d school program

religious

lation, im morta l ity and others.

Term I I : J u ne 1 9-July 1 3

development and evaluation.

Emphasis on

applying concepts of management, cvaluation, and research to school nursing based o n the major roles of the school nurse.

intro­

*Class may meet for add itional sessions individual

ture and its impl ication s for our gencral

0800- 1 1 1 5 , MTWR. RAMS -204. G. Synoground

health

an

Does not satisfy phi losophy

problems: the existence of God, religious experience, reve­

children and adolescents, including excepti onal ity. Appl ica­

the

completcness.

Term III: J u ne 1 9-August 1 7

Term 1 1 : June 1 9-J uly 1 3

in

as consistency and

PHIL 350 Philosophy of Religion

TE A . Staff

roles

such

appl i c a t i o n s .

Prac ticum orienting nurses to the school nurse roles in a K1 2 setting.

cognitive disciplines, and to the properties of fo rmal systems

core requi rement.

NURS 502 School Nu rse Practicum II

An introduc­

t ion to the use of first order logic in ordinary reasoning and

duction to induct ive i n ference.

TBA. Staff

June

of argument and proof using both

Tuition: $ 1 75 per semester hour.

1 230- 1 500, MTWR. R A MS-204. G . Synoground

req u i rement.

PHIL 501 * Teaching Critical Thinking Through Philoso­ phy for Children (3 ) June

1 9 -June 30

I n t roduces teachers to the P h i l osophy for Children Program developed by the Institute for the Advancement of Philoso­ phy for C h i l d ren. Devoted primarily ( but not excl usiv ely) to the

middle

school

Stottlemeier's

component

Discovery;

of

this

focuses on

t he

c u rric u l u m ,

H arry

fundamental

rea­

soning skills and pedagogy relevant to the entire curricu l u m . 0900- 1 600, MTWRF. RCTR-248. E . Lye l l


39

Phys i ca l Education PHED 1 00A O I Personalized Fitness Program ( 1) Term I : May 22-June I S To stimu late student interest in functional, personally de­ signed programs of physical activity; assessment of physical condition and skills; recommendation of specific programs for maintaining and improving physical hea lth, Meets gen­ eral un iversity requ i rement for activity class. Required for grad u a t i o n . 1 700- 1 8 1 5 , MTWR. OGYM-FH. S c . Westering PHED 1 00B02 Personalized Fitness Program Term II: J u ne 1 9-July 1 3 Sec course description for PHED I OOAO I , above. 1 700- 1 8 1 5 , MTWR. OGYM-FH. M. Kluge

(1)

PHED 1 5 1 A O I Beginning Golf (1) Term I : May 22-June I S Activity course for men and women. Fee: $5 activi ty fee. 0800-09 1 5 , MTWR. OGYM-FH. B . Haroldson PHED 1 5 1 B02 Beginning Golf ( 1) Term I l l : July 24-A ugust 1 7 Activity course for men and women. Fee: $5 activ ity fee. 0800-09 1 5 , MTWR. OGYM-FH. L. Marshall PHED 1 55AOI Beginning Bowling (1) Term 1 : rvlay 22-June I S Activity coursc for men and women. Fee: $22 activity fee. 1 200- 1 3 1 5 , MTWR. UCTR-Bowl. Sc. Westering PHED 155B02 Beginning Bowl ing (1) Term I I I : July 24-A ugust 1 7 Activity course for men and women. Fee: $22 activity fee. 1 000- 1 1 1 5 , MTWR. UCTR-Bowl. L. Marsha l l PHED 1 62 Begin n ing Tennis (1) Term I : June 1 9-July 1 4 Activity course for men amI women. Fee: $ 5 activity fee. 0700-08 1 5 , MTWR. OGYM-Gym . M. Benson PHED 1 63 Beginning Bad minton (1) Term II: June 1 9-July 1.1 Acti v i ty course for men and women. Fee: $ 5 activity fee. 1 8.'lO-2 1 00, TR. ECAM-Gym. S. Adachi PHED 1 77 Weight Training Tenn I: May 22-June I S Activity course for men and women. 0800-09 1 5 , MTWR. FIT-Ctr. Sc. Westering

(1)

PHED 182 Low Im pact Aerobics Term I: May 22-June I S Activity course for men and women. 1 200- 1 3 1 5 , MTWR. ECAM-Gym. Suo Westering

(1)

PHED 183 Power Aerobics Term I: May 22-June 1 5 Activ ity course for men and women. 1 700- 1 8 1 5 , MTWR. ECAM-Gym. Suo Westering

(1)

PHED 192 I n termediate Tennis (1) Term I : June 1 9-July 14 Activity course for men and women. Fee: $5 activ ity fee. 1 700- 1 8 1 5, MTWR. OGYM-Gym. M. Benson

PHED 207 Basic Sailing Term I I : June 22-Ju ly 1 3 Introductory course in sail ing. Fee: $ 1 00. 1 900-2 1 30, R, plus arranged. OGYM- 1 06. M. R ice

(1)

PHED 222 Jazz Dance ( 1) June 1 2-June 1 6 Explore beginning jazz dance techniques. Work on a set­ wann up and combining di fferent dance combinations to improve your skills. Dance to a wide variety of taped music, explore technique, composi tion and improvisation for a lively week of dance. 1 400- 1 700, MTWRF. ECAM-Gym. M. McG i l l-Seal PHED 234 Relaxation Techniques (1) June 1 9-J une 23 Intensive workshop to introduce series o f relaxation exercise including stretching and movement activities. Breathing and Japanese shiatsu methods i ntrod uced . 1 400- 1 700, MTWRF. ECAM-Gym. M . McGi ll-Seal PHED 288 Teaching Methods in Weight Training ( 1 ) Term I : May 23-June I S Planning, teaching, spotting and safety in teaching weight tra i n i n g . 1 400- 1 5 1 5 , TWR. OGYM- 1 06. S c . Westering PHED 399 Internship ( 4-8) May 22-August 1 8 Expcricnces closely assigned to your career and academic interests. You identify problems to be researched, experi­ ences to be gained and pertinent reading. Approved firm/ organization mutually agreed upon by you and program coordinator. Grade detennined by monthly progress re­ ports, eval uations by supervisor and other meas ures of achievement. Appl ication fonns for internship avai l able from the School of Physical Education office. TBA. D. Olson PH ED 480 Exercise Physiology-Lab (2) Term I: May 23-June 1 5 Emphasis o n practical applications and teaching methods o f materials taught i n the theory course. Taken concurrently w ith 48 1 . 0800-09 1 5 , TR. OGYM- l 06. T. Evans PHED 48 1 Exercise Physiology (2) Term I: May 22-June 1 6 Scientific basis and physiological effect o f exercise o n the human body. Prerequisite: B IOL 205, 206, Human Anatomy and Physiology. 0800-09 1 5 , MWF. OGYM- 1 06. T. Evans PHED 491 Independent Study ( 1 - 4) May 22-August 1 7 D i rected study, reading and research on selected topics approved and supervised by instructor. Prerequisite: In­ s tructor's signature on independent study card prior to reg istration. TBA. D. Olson Physical

Education

next page.

course

descriptions

continue

on

the

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PHED 501A01 Substance A buse and Athletic Performance (1) June 1 2-June 1 6 Provides the student with an imroduction to both the advan­ tages and disadvantages of uSing drugs. Class examines the use of drugs to increase athletic performance . 1 830-2 1 30, MTWRF. OGYM- I 05 . G. Nicholson PHED 501802 Health/Fitness Workshop: (1) Fitness Facts for Life June 1 9-June 23 An examination of the facts and famasies associated with fitness. The purpose of the workshop is to increase individual fitness awareness, knowledge and skills so as to enable individuals to use fitness as a positive force in their lives. The workshop also provides opportunity for discussion of how health and physical activity programs can be implemented successfully in the school, clinic, corporate and other com­ munity settings. 1 8 30-2 1 30, MTWRF. OGYM - 1 02 . T. Evans PHED 501C03 HealthiFitness Workshop: School Wellness Concepts and Principles (1) June 26-June 30 Considers the i nfluence of l i festyle choices on the concept of wel l ness. In particular, we consider the influence of physical activity on health topics associated with wellness, such as weight contro l , diet, blood pressure and stress. Emphasis is placed on considering how physical activity programs can be successfully organized in school, clinic, corporate and other community environments to enhance the well ness concept . 1 830-2 1 30, MTWRF. OGYM- 1 05 . T. Evans

Political Science POLS 325 Political Thought (4 ) Tenn I: May 22-June 1 6 A survey of the origin and evolution of major political con­ cepts in ancient, medieval, and early modern times. S uch ideas as state, obligation, authority, community, law, and freedom are studied developmentally. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. XAVR-204. D. Fanner POLS 354 State and Local Government (4) Term III: July 24-August 1 8 Governmental structures, processes, and policy at the state, local and regional levels of the American system. Special attention to intergovernmental relations and the role of the national government. 0930- 1 2 1 5, MTWRF. XAVR- 204. W. S pencer POLS 387 The Middle East (4) Tenn 1 1 : June 1 9-July 1 4 Contrasts the h istory and aspirations o f the Arab Nation with the reality of European dominance and its legacy, the forma­ tion of the presem Arab states and Israel. Events in the region are explained by examining five separate but overlapping conflicts: superpower rivalry, Arabs v. Israel is, progressive v . traditional Arab states, various interpretations of Islam, and agitation by non-state actors. 1 400- 1 630, MTWRF. XAVR-204. A. Kelleher

PHED 501 D04 Elementary School Physical Edu cation Workshop (1) July 1 7-July 2 1 New and practical activities i n fitness development, move­ mem education, games, and rhythmical activities are empha­ s ized. Activities are appropriate for K-6, both for c lassroom teachers and physical education specialists. Class manage­ mem, organization and evaluation techniques are presented. 1 830-2 1 30, MTWRF. ECAM-Gym. J. Poppen PHED 501E05 R hythmic Activities for Elementary and Middle School Programs (1) August 7-August I I Participation oriented workshop featuring a series of practi­ cal and enjoyable rhythmic experiences for elementary and middle school age chi ldren. Focus is on creative rhythmic themes, folk dance progressions, novelty dances, and use of music to motivate fitness activities. 1 830-2 1 30, MTWRF. ECAM-Gym. J . Poppen PHED 501F06 Athletics Administrators' Workshop( 1 ) August 1 4-August 1 8 Practical consideration of common duties of an athletic ministrator including game management, promotions, --...,.�---ing, objectives and financing. 1 8 30-2 1 00, MTWRF. OGYM- I 04. L. Marshall


41

Psychology

RELI 212 Religion and Literature of the New Testament

PSYC 334 Asian-American Experience

(4)

Term I I : J u ne 1 9-July 1 4

(2)

Term Interim: J u l y 1 7-July 2 1

Literary, h i storica l , and theological dimensions o f the New

Lectures, tours and meals presented to familiarize students

Testament,

with the Asian community in the area. Historical, sociological

0800- 1 04 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-202. D . Oakman

and

psychological

material on

the

Asian experience;

pro­

v i de s students with a perspec tive on one of the more ethni­ cally d i verse minority communities in the Northwest. Cover­ age

incl udes

Japanese,

Chinese,

V i etnamese, and

Filipino

cultura l groups. $50 mea L fee to be paid to instructor on fJrst day of class.

( 4)

PhysicaL, intellectual, social a n d emotional growth from in­ Prereq u is i te: PSYC

10 I , Introduction to Psychology

XA VR-203.

standardiza t i o n ; Prerequisite:

tests :

(4)

l i m i t ation s

PSYC

243,

statistics, or instructor's 1 5 30- 1 8 1 5 , MTWRF.

methods

and

Methods;

of

tests .

a course

in

consent.

ADMN-2 1 0 . B. Baird

Experimental studies and theories o f learning. Lecture, dis­ and

demonstrations.

in psychology.

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF.

Prerequ i s i te :

of commi tment

and

d iscipleship.

(4)

Term I I : June 1 9-July 1 4 A n introduction t o the personal and social ethical d imensions of Christian life and thought with attention to primary theo­

(4)

Term I I I : J u l y 24-August 1 8

/\ study of the l i fe and teachings of Jesus; a historical survey of "Life o f Jesus" research, form and reaction criticism of the Gospel tradition; the religious d i mensions of Jesus' l i fe and

0800- 1 045, MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 6. S . Govig

(4)

Term I: May 22-June 1 6

hours

understanding

thought.

PSYC 460 Learning: Research and Theory

cussion

and

This course centers around the theological question, What

RELI 332 The Life of Jesus

o f development;

interpretations

Scientific

A reflection on various Christian l i fe-styles and their expres­ sion

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADM N-206. R. Stone

PSYC 450 Psychological Testing o f standard ized

Term I l l : J u ly 24-August 1 8

logical positions and specific problem areas.

R. M. Brown

Term I I I : J u l y 24-August 1 8 S u rvey

(4)

RELI 226 Christian Ethics

Term II: J u n e 1 9-July 1 4

0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF.

R ELI 225 Faith and Spirituality

issues.

1 230- 1 5 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-2 1 6 . L . Lundeen

Infancy to Maturity

fancy through adolescence to maturity.

perspectives on contemporary

does it mean to be a fo l lower of Jesus?

0900- 1 600, MTWRF. ADMN-202. J. Moritsugu

PSYC 335 Development:

including

M in i m um

12

RELI 333AOI Biblical Studies: Old Testament

Interpreting the (2)

Term I : May 23-June 1 5 Analysis of leading methods used t o interpret the Hebrew Scriptures. to see how they assist the modern interpreter i n

ADMN -206. 1 . Nolph

understanding the signi ficance of these religious traditions. 1 5 30- 1 900, TR. ADMN-2 1 6. J. Petersen

RELI 333B02 Biblical Studies: New Testament C h r i sto logy

Religion

This course examines types o f early Christian belief about

RELI 131 Religions of South Asia

(4)

Term I: May 22-June 1 6

Hinduism, B u ddhism, Jainism, and S i k i sm - their origins and development,

(2)

Term I I : June 20-July 1 3

expansion,

and

contemporary

issues.

Em­

Jesus.

Modern

christological

discussion

provides

perspec­

tive on the historical and theological issues involved. 1 530- 1 900, TR . ADMN-2 l 6. D. Oakman

RELI 333C03 Biblical Studies:

Revelation

(2)

phasis on primary sources in translation.

Term I I I : J u l y 25-August 1 7

1 230- 1 5 1 5 , MTWRF. ADMN-206. P. Ingram

A survey of interpretations. Terms such as "Armageddon" and "rapture" in the context of Biblical apocalyptic, Christian prophecy

LITE ( Lutheran Institute for Theological Education) S u m mer Ins titute of Theology (I) J u ly 1 0- 1 4 A week of study for laity, lay professi on al workers, c lergy a nd fam i lies.

Dr. Gracia Grindal, Luther

GUt;lst lectureTh:

Northwe'tern Theo l og i ca l

Semi nary:

Dr. Timothy Lu l l .

Lutheran Theo l og i ca l Seminary. Philaddphia; and Pres i ­

dent Jerry al e

Schrnalenberger,

Seminary .

Sessions

Pacific

are

held

Lu th e ra n Theologi each

morn i ng

and

ening. with several illlere. t groups in the afternoon led

by guest lecturers an d

t uition

and fees.

OI h er

.

For in fo rmat i on

gardi ng

re

contact the LITE Office. Pacific Lutheran

University. Tacoma. WA

98447, (206) 53 5-7342.

and human history.

1 5 30- 1 900, TR. ADMN-2 1 6. S. Govig

RELI 369 Christian Studies: Social C hange

Gandhi, King and

Term 1 1 : June 2--July 1 3

(2)

A study i n comparative Christian ethics and religious based social change.

The religious ethics of Hinduism and Chris­

tianity are analyzed and compared in context of the achieve­ ment of Indian independence and the North American c i v i l rights

struggle.

1 5 30- 1 900, TR. ADMN-208. R. Stone

C o 0>

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42

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RELI 390 History of Religions: Judaism (4) Term I : May 22-June 1 6 The h istorical development of Judaism ' s faith and commit­ ment from early biblical times to the present; including i n terpretation of the Hebrew B ible, rabbinic thought, re ligious observance, modern movements and Jewish- Christian dia­ logue. 0930- 1 2 1 5 , MTWRF. ADM N-2 1 6. J . Petersen

Sociology (4) SOCI 330 The Family Term I : May 22-June 1 5 Analysis o f t h e changing nature o f t h e fam i ly a s a system of social positions and roles. Examinat ion of the fam i ly from a soc iohistorical and cross-cultural perspective. Topics in­ clude love relationships, marriage, family positions and roles, fam i ly types, parenthood, social ization, retirement, divorce and remarriage, and the relationship of the family institution to education and work . 0900- 1 2 1 5 , MTWR. XA YR-203 . A. B i b larz SOCI 451 J u venile Justice (4) Term I I : June 1 9-August 1 7 T h i s course examines t h e status o f adolescents w i t h i n con­ temporary society, defin itions of delinquency, estimates of the extent and nature of del inquency, explanations of why young people become delinquent and the social policy and political impl ications of these explanations. Finally, the course examines society 's response to adolescents particu­ larly within the j uvenile j ustice system. The course consists of lectures, discussions and guest speaker presentations. 1 730-2030, MR. ADMN-206. R. Jobst

Social Work SOCW 402 * Social Work Interventions with (2 ) School-Age Children and Their Families Term I I : July 3-July 1 4 Methods for working with d i fficu l t-to-motivate children in the schools, and creating therapeutic classroom environments. Emphasis is given to interventions with fam i lies, including approaches to working w i th d i fficult parents. Equally appli­ cable for teachers, social workers or students i n terestcd in working in a school environment. May also be taken as EDUC S03AO I *. see page 1 7 . 0930- 1 345, MTWRF. ECAM-22. G . H i am

SOCW 403* Multi-Cu ltural Issues and Skills (2 ) for the Human Services and Education Term I I I : J u l y 24-August 4 Examines several different approaches to multicu l tural edu­ cation from national and global perspect ives. Students are expected to present substantive material in both contexts as well as to participate in an awareness section. Matcrial to support various classroom units are provided or developed; focus is on the practical appl ication of mu lticultural education methods and materials. Requires significant student partici­ pation. May also be taken as EDUC S03G07*, see page 1 8 . 0930- 1 345, MTWRF. ECAM-23. T. Johnstone (4 each ) SOCW 475/476 Field Experience May 22-July 2 8 Supervised field work with an agency or institut ion. Appl ica­ t ion/integration of knowledge, theory and understanding. Development of skills common to social work. Prerequisite: Consent of i nstructor and tally card required. TBA. G . H iam


43 --

Marriage and Family Therapy \'IFT 5 1 2 Professional Ethics

en u

(3)

.-

:vIay 24-1une 28 Designed t o augment the professional ide n t i ty and socializa­ tion of marriagc and fam i ly therapists. Profess ional ethics and Washington state laws which affect cl i n ical practice are studied, to inc l ude fam ily law, legal responsibi l ities, rules of confident i a l i ty

and

inter-profess ional

cooperation.

Further

study expl ores l icensure, certification and the role of profes­ s i onal organ izations. 4:30 pm.

Also mects Friday, June 23, 8:30 am-

In add ition, students are requi red to attend court for

1 3 hours. T u i t ion: $275 per semester hour.

(4 ea)

May 22-August 1 2 The four practica are part of a conti nuous process toward de­ ve loping

spec ific

therapeutic

competencies

in

work

with

marriages and fam i l ies. The practica present a competency based program in w h ich each student i s eval uated regard ing casc managcment skill s, relationship skills, perceptua l ski l l s, conceptual. skil l s ,

and

s tructuring skills.

sent of i nstructor and tally card requ i red semcster

Prerequis ite:

Con­

Tuition: $275 per

hour.

TBA . C. York/c. Storm

� M IT 524 Marriage and Family Therapy Supervision ( 3) May 24-June 28 Introduces the experienced malTiage and fami l y therapist to theoretical models of marriage and fami l y therapy supervi­ sion, varying modes of s u perv i s ion sultation,

v ideotaping,

and

l ive

(for

superv ision o f participant 's superv ision. semester

example, case con­

supervision) and Tuition:

.-

(J) -� Cl.. � �

1 800-2 1 20*, MTWRF. ECAM-22. C. York/C. S torm

MIT 519-522 Practicum I-IV

en

.-

incl udes 275 per

hour.

Q) ..c I�

E

rn LL "'0 C ctS Q.) Ol ctS � �

0900- 1 220, W. ECAM-22. C. York/C. Storm

ctS

� -Statistics (4)

STAT 231 Introductory Statistics

Term I: May 22-June 16

Descriptive s tatistics: measures o f central tendency a n d dis­ persion. I n fere n t ia l statistics:

general izations about popu la­

tions from samples by parametric and non parametric tech­ n iq u es.

M e thods

testing,

simple

covered

corre lation

i nclude ana lysis,

esti mation, l inear

hypothesis

regression,

chi

sq u are ana lysis, and ana l ysis of v a.riance. Not applicable to mathematics a

cred i t .

pre-calculus

Prereq u is i t e :

background

course.

0800- 1 045 , MTWRF . A D MN-2 1 2. R. Jensen

eq u i valent

to


44

VISITING FACULTV

Carol Weller, Associate Professor, S pecial Education,

Gary Anderson, Professor of Mathematics, Hamline University, SI. Paul, Mi nnesota

University o f Utah

Cathryn Wellner, Professional Storyteller Quianlong Wu, Teacher o f Engl ish, Zhongshan Univer足

Margaret Baldwin, Library Consultant, Seattle Allison Banikowski, D i rector of Elementary Education, Olathe Unified School D i s trict, Olathe, Kansas

sity, China

Wiley Beatty, Teacher of Mathematics, Lincoln H ig h

BOA RD OF REGENTS

Schoo l ,

Ex-Officio

Tacoma

Beth Bentley, Poet

B ishop Robert Keller

Dale W. Cannon, Associate Professor of H umanities,

B i shop Lowell E . Knutson

Westem Oregon S tate College

B ishop

Wanda Coffey, Case Manager, S tepping Stonesa

Dr. Wi l l iam O. R ieke B i shop

Jack Daniel, B u s iness Training Coordinator, Bates B u s iness

and

Management Training

Department,

Mary Dorgan, Teacher, Tacoma Public Schools State

B i shop David Wold

Rev. M ichael Foss Mrs. Connye Hager

Legislature

Mr. Robert How ard

Marilyn Friend, Professor, S pec ial Education, Northern Il足

M r. Frank Jennings

l inois U niversity

Ms. Christine Larson

June Fulkerson, Consultant, Tacoma Pu blic Schools

Mr. Harry Morgan

John Goebel, Mai nstream Specialis t, Bethel School

Dr. John Oakley

D istrict, Tacoma

Mr. Jon Olson

Dean Haugen, Adminis trator, Tacoma Public Schools Joan Hays, Reading Resource S pecialist, Tacoma Public Schools

Swanson

1 988-91 Term

B rian Ebersole, Chairman, House Education Committee, Washington

Paul

Parsons

B i shop Norman W ick

Bates

Vocational Technical Institute

Donald

Mrs. Jane Russell Dr. Karen V igeland

1987-89 Term

Betty Helseth, Teacher, Clover Park School District

Dr. Ronald D. Grewenow

Lynne Jessup, Leading Authority on Ethnic Music

Mr. Paul Hoglund

Ted Johnstone, Social Service Worker, Tacoma Public

Mr. Wallace G. McK inney

Schools

Rev . R i chard E. Meul ler

Tess Mehring, Associate Professor, Emporia S tate

Mr. Arthur M. Peterson Dr. W i l l iam Ramstad

University, Emporia, Kansas

Mr. Richard Sloan

Jo Ann Olliphant, Second Language Consultant, Western Washington University and Methodology Language

School,

Jnstructor, The

Dr. Christy Ul leland

Seattle

Ann Palmason, National expert on Orff-Schulwerk John Pearson, D i rector, S pecial Education, Tacoma Publ ic

Rev. David S teen Mr. George Wehmann

1987-90 Term

M r . Thomas R . Anderson

Schools

Mr. Jerold Armstrong

Ron Sherman-Peterson, Head Library Cataloguer,

Mrs. Petra Onella Brunner

B e l levue School D i strict

Mr. Neil R . Bryant

Lew Polsgrove, Professor, Institute for the Study of Devel足

Dr. Cynthia Wilson Edwards

opmental D i sabil i ties, Indiana University

Dr. Jeff Probst field

Jerry Poppen, Teacher, Tacoma Public Schools

Rev. B arry Rogge

Michael Rice, Owner and Instructor, Puget Sound Sail ing

Mr. Wayne P. S averud

Inst i tute

Mr. Gary Severson Mr. Donald M. W ick

Gary Sigmen, D i rector, Off-Campus Center and Campus Computer Services, Tacoma Community

College

Advisory

Karen Small, Preschool Fac i l i tator and Interagency

Dr. Jim Unglaube, ELCA

Coord inator, E.S.D. 1 89, Mt Vernon, Washington

Rev. Luther Bekemeier, Mrs. Luci l le G i roux, Rev.

Carol Starr, Former Elementary Librarian, Clover Park

Harvey Neufeld, Dr. S . Erving Severtson, Mr. Donald Sturg i l l , Rev . David Yagow, PLU

School District

Gail Synoground, Assistant Professor, Interco llegiate

Faculty

Center for Nursing Education, Spokane, Washington

Dr. Marlen M i l ler, Dr. Steven Thrasher, Dr. Sheri

James Taylor, Choral D i rector, B e l levue School District

Tonn

R u th Tiger, c.c.c., Communication D isorder Specialist,

Tacoma

S t udents M s . A m y J o Mattheis, M s . J u l i e B rooks


REGISTRATION FORM

MR MISS Your n a m e

MRS.

First

Last

Maiden

MI

PLEASE PRINT SPEC. DESIG

CRS NO.

DEPT. �

SEC.

TERM

I

AUDITING? I N D I CATE "A"

Semester

CREDIT H RS.

AUDITS/ REP EATS

soc. SEC. NUMBER

I

WED

TUE

I MON

THU

SAT

FRI

REPEATING? INDICATE "R"

* I F YOU ARE C U R RE NTLY ATTE N D I N G PLU AND IF Y O U R ADDRESS R E MAINS * UNCHAN G E D YOU N E E D NOT COM PLETE THE R E MAI N D E R OF THIS F O R M . PERMAN ENT ADDRESS

ADD RESS W H I LE AT PLU

S t reet / P . O .

Stree t l P . O . / Dorm

Telephone No. (I nclude area code l

Telephone No.

o Do not print my address information in the student di rectory DATE OF BIRTH

WHEN ?

Ethnic Origin (Optional) (

) White Non-H ispanic

(

I

Black Non·Hispanic

) American Indian or Native Alaskan

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

HA VE YOU TA KEN CLASSES AT

IF YES.

Zip

State

City

Zip

State

City

PLU BEFORE?

) Asian or Pacific Islander ) Hispanic

D

YES

0

NO

(

D

YES

D

NO

Religious Preference (Optional) (If Lutheran. indicate ELCA (formerly A L e. LCA. AELC) LCMS. or other}

) Non-Resident Alien

_ _ _ _

ARE YOU A 4-YEA R COLLEGE GRADUATE?

SUMMER SCHOOL HOUSING APPLICATION

(Please print) M

(First)

( Last name)

(M )

___

_ _ _

( D a te of Birth)

(Zip)

(Permanent Home Address)

F

(Sex)

(55, )

(Area Code) (Phone)

Housing Requested For: (

) Term I. May 2 2-June 1 6

(

) Term II. June 1 9-July 1 4

(

) Term I I I . July 24-August

Do you smoke?

___

) Interim. July 1 7 - 21 only

Would you prefer a single room

& III. June 1 9-August 1 8 1. 11 & III. May 2 2 -August 1 8

) Terms II

18

) Terms

if available?

___

(See page 2 for rates.)

Please return t h i s card and a $ 2 5.00 housing deposit at least three weeks prior to your arrival on campus i n order to reserve PLU housing. If you have questions regarding housing. please call ( 206) 535-7200. When we receive your housing request. we will respond by mailing to you a confirmation card.

(Person to notify i n case of em ergency)

(Signature)

(Phone)

(Address)

(Date)


NO POSTAGE N ECESSARY IF M A I L E D IN THE U N I T E D STATES

B U S I N ESS R E PLY MAI L FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO.

417

TACOMA, WASHI NGTON

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADD RESSEE ,.

Re gi strar's Office Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, WA 98444-9980

1 1 . 1 • • 1 • • 1 • • 1 • • 1 . 1 •• 1 . 1 • • 1 1 . 1 •• 1 . 1 •• 1 •• 1 . 1 1 • • • • 1 . 1 . 1

NO

POSTAGE NECESSARY IF M A I L E D IN T H E U N I T E D STATES

B US I N ESS R E PLY MAI L FI RST CLASS PERMIT NO.

417

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

POSTAGE Wi l l BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Residential Life Paci fi Lu theran University Tac rna, WA 98444-9980

I

I

I

I

I.

, 1 1 1,ILLI,IIIJul.Jt.IIII,I.I

_ _ _ _ _ _ � _


b t CnlJlPUS .... South 1 2 1 st ,::) 1 .

Wheele r St.

arfi�ld 51. So.

.... J5

s:

;;

�!

A

.

South 124th St.

Campus Puking

Rt1\ulOlit VI�dlJ1' PJ rkfn g i ... indlatta on fh� I lhl p RL" �rvctl p<HkU1R s.lotl roJy be u.sed bv vi";ltOni Ju r il1� mm- \"'llrklng hOuri 15 p m.47 11_rn,1, olnd on weeke n d':. b(}m c 24 hr. f!.XC pl tonlJ ;lre ir'\JIC.Ucd bv "Ign"i� If Y(IU nd L-d VI!.I!. you nuy obtain d Ii"mpor..lrv pl. .tnan e XIept!tmU from mpUJ (lfe! 'H'lril�d I I.l ln

South 125th SL

Disabled Access

Soulh 126th fit.

A - r.ukrng B - Curb e lla C R•.,p. 0 - A I,l,I'Om;'\tic Jours E Elev.il ! IJ� F - ;\ · ...:»lble 1t'::.l nXUll ...

_ W�kd.ay VDilut PMldnIl t::=J SblflShodml PorlUng

It CI>UI'R

[I�c=Jo.

· 1· S

South 1271h St.

CAM PUS LOCATIONS Ad min isL rati on Building A l u mn i 3 5

12

Math

Baseball Field 40

Blomquist H o us e 2

C a m pu s Safety (m Harstad) 2 3 C entral S e rv i ce s 29 Chrisi K nu tze n Fe l owship H a l l l i n University C e nt er ) 26 Coffee Shops-

(Uni ersity Ce n te r ] 26 ( C o l u m bi a Center) 4 2 Columbi Ce n te r 4 2 Delta H a l l 44

D nmlre Hous e 4 I East Campus I 5 East-lOld Auditorium 2 2

Evergreen Court 4 5 Faculty H o u s e 3 Family Student Housing 46 nne Arts B U i l d i ng 9 Food S rvice 26, 4 2 Fa s Ha l l 2 4 General Services B u i l ding 2 9 Golf Co urse Haavi k Ho u s e 7 Harstad Hal! 2 3 Hauge Adminlstra ion B l d g . 1

Health Center 5 HlnderUe Hal! 2 I Hong Hall 1 8 Ingram Hall 9 Knorr House 4 KPLU- FM 2 2 Kreidler Hall I 7 Lib rary 1 3

Bllilding 39 Me m o r i a l Gymnasium 32 Microcomputer Resource Center I 5 Mo rtv ed t Library 1 .5 Mu ic Annex I Music (proposed] 1 6 Names Fitness CE'nter 3?A Nesvig A l u m n i Center 35 Olson Auditorium 30 Or dai Hall 1 0 Park Avenue H ou se 6 Pfiueger Hall 3 4 Physical Plant 2 8 Post Office 1 7 P u b l i IMedi a Relations 3 5 Ra msey Ho use 8 Ramstad H a l l 2 5 Restaurants 2 6, 4 2 Rie ke SCience Center 20

Security 23

2

Soccer Fi e l d 36 Speci al Education I 5A Stuen Hall I I Swimming Pool 3 1 Television I 2 Tennis Courts 3 3 , 38 Th eatres 2 2 , 3 2 T ickets 26 Tingelstad H a l l (Alpine, Cascade, Evergreen , Ivy) 4 3 Track 3 7 Tri n i ty Lutheran C h u rch 1 4 Un iversity Center 26 Wa re h o u se 29 Xavier H a l l 1 9

hlt l.__"�

127


Summer 1989 University Catalog v.69 no.1 Feb 1989  
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