Page 1

Pre-Session Session I Mid-Season Session II M.B.A. Session I M.B.A. Session II Nursing Session

J une 1 8-22 J u ne 25-July 20 July 23-27 July 30-August 24 June 4-July 12 July 16-August 23 J u ne 4-August 24

PACIFIC

lUTHERAN

UNIVERSITY Tacoma,

(206)

WA

98447

535-71 4 3


A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT As you peruse the 1984 Summer Session catalog, I hope you wiII be pleased at the comprehensive range and variety of academic classes of­ fered at Pacific Lutheran University. The same values that are part of our regular academic year hold true for summer: commitment to excellent curriculum and personalized teaching. If you are not already familiar with the campus, you will find that it is ideal for study. In addition to contin­ uing full service of the extensive li­ brary, the bookstore, cafeteria and coffee shops, there is opportunity for use of the fine recreational facilities: tenni courts, golf course, swim ming pool, handball courts, physical fitness equipment, jogging trails. Summer Session at PLU is meant to b an enri hing educational and per­ son I experience. I invite you to join us. Cordially,

W�

6,

Tf�

William O. Rieke, M.D.

Course Numbers

USING YOUR SUMMER SESSION CATALOG This catalog is published yearly in March to assist prospective students in planning their summer study at Pacific lutheran Universi y. While every effort has been made to avoid mistakes, the catalog is nonetheless a tentative schedule. The University re­ serves the right to withdraw classes, change dates, times and staff, or modify requirements as necessary. Connie Bates

Editor, 1984 Summer Session

a a/og

Symbols and Codes Classes will meet during the times and days indicated in the ourse de­ scription following the listing of the course. A System Code Number (SC ) fol­ lows each course title. Please indi­ cate thi number on each course registration. I ndica tes an Experimental Course t I n di ca tes an Evening Course

HA IN

President

E MG

Hauge Admini tration B uildi ng Ingram Hall Eastvold Memorial Gym East Campus

Ivy

L M X

Ivy Hall Library Math Building Xavier Hall

a

Olson Auditorium

O-FH

Olson Field House

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 5 Su - Sund y M

-

T W R F

-

-

Courses numbered 101-299 are considered lower division subjects. Courses numbered 500 or above are graduate courses. Courses numbered in the 3OO's and 400's are open to both graduate and upper division under­ graduates. Such courses may be a part of the graduate program provided they are not specific requirements in preparation for graduate study. Upper division students may be enrolled in a SOO-Ievel course, if at the time of registration they provide writ­ ten permission from the Chairper­ son, Director or Dean of the academ­ ic unit thai offers the course. It is un­ derstood tha any student giv n such permission will have met all assumed or specifically indicated prerequisites and will have an above average aca­ demic record. Independent study, thesis or studio projects may be authorized in certain specific cases if arranged by the de­ partment and approved by the Chair­ person, Dire or or Dean conc rned. An independent tudy registration ard is available in the Registrar's Office. As with other summer session classes, register for independent tudy before the session begins.


ART

BIOLOGY

Phone: (206) 535-7573

Phone: (206) 535-7561

232/332

RAKU WORKSHOP (4) SCNs: 804232/804332

Sessi on II: July 3O-August 24 Explores Raku, a 16th-century Japanese pottery technique, using a contemporary format. No prior ceramic experience nec­ essary. Materials fee: $30.

9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, MTWRF. IN-144. Instructor: D. Ke ye s.

267/367

WATERCOLOR/BRUSH & AIR (4) SCNs: 804267/804367

Session I: June 25-,uly 20 Works developed using nature as subject (naturalistic and abstract), water-based igments as media. Covers use of both traditional brush and airbrush techniques - with room for independent concentra­ tion in either. I mage gathering expedi­ tions using camera and/or drawing, as well as at leas two direct field painting excursions. No prior experience neces­ sary. Materials fee: $30.

p

8:00-11:00a.m., MTWRF. IN-126. Instruc­ tor: D. Cox.

322

PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE FIELD (4) SCN: 804322

Session I: 'une 25-July 20 Emphasis on 35mm color slides made un­ der field conditions. Color and black & white prints will be permitted. Instruc­ tion In pre-visualization, camera te h­ nique, natural lighting and color slide processing. Discover the picture possibil­ ities all around you. Beginners to advanced. Materials fee: $35.

9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, MTWRF. IN-134A. Instructor: M. Lacey.

t235/335

FIBERS (4) SCNs: 804235/804335

112

HUMANISTIC BOTANY (4) seN: 8061 1 2

Session I : June 25-,uly 20 An introduction to the basic principles of biology with an emphasis on plants and their i mpact on people. Major topics in­ clude: useful plants; poisonous plants; medicinal plants, including narcotic and h allucinogenic plants; food plants and organic gardening; and plant propagation. In ludes laboratory. Satisfies general uni­ versity requirements. No prerequisites.

8:25 a.m.-12:30 p.m., MTWRF. R-210. In­ structor: M. Crayton.

201

INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (4) seN: 806201

Session I: June 25-,uly 20 The growth, control, physiology, isolation and identification of microorgani ms, es­ pecially those which affect humans. In­ cludes laboratory. I ntended primarily for nursing or other non-scien e majors. Pre-requisites: Chem 103 or consent of . instructor.

8:25 a.m .-12:30 p.m., MTWRF. R-207. In­ structor: A. Gee.

Session I-II: June 25-August 24

205

Introduction to and experiments in fiber arts; includes felting, paper-making and off-loom construction. Materials fee: $30. 6:30-9:30p.m., TR. IN-126. Instructor: G. Morrison.

Session I: June 25-July 20

ART EDUCATION AS ART APPRECIATION (4) SeN: 804342 Session II: ,u ly 3O-August 24 Art as a visual aid and appreciation in teaching other disciplines (such as sci­ ence, history, geography, etc.). Of spe­ cial interest to teachers desiring new and creative ideas for enriching their teach­ ing in the elementary classroom.

9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, MTWRF. IN-134B. Instructor: B. Minas.

3

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (4) SeN: 806205

I dentical in content to the Fall Semester Bio 205 class. Lecture topics include : matter; cells and tissues; nervous, endo­ crine, sk eletal, and m uscular syste ms. Laboratory includes: human skeletal sys­ tem, cat dissection; experim nts in mus­ cle physiology and human re flexes; spe­ cial senses. Requ ired for nu rsing and phys­ ical education curricula. Can be u ed to satisfy PLU biology major require ments, PLU general u niversity science require­ ment, or a PLU College of Arts and Sci­ ences language alternative requirement (option I I I). No prerequisitE. For further information, contact Jerrold E. lerum, Dept. of Biology, (206) 535-7586.

8:00-10:45 a.m., MTWR./-111. Lab: 12:303:15 p.m., TWR. /-107B. Instructors: }. Lerum, T. Car/son. continued on page 4


continued from page]

206

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (4) SCN: 806206

Session II: July 3G-August 24

Conti n uing class from Bio 205, or can be taken independently if prerequisite is met. Identical in content to the Spring Semester Bio 206 class. Lecture topics in­ clude: circu latory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reprod u ctive systems; metabolism; temperature regulation; stress, human development. Laboratory incl udes: cat d issection; physiology ex­ periments; study of deve l oping organ­ isms. Prerequisite : successful completion of Bio 205 or its equivalent. For further information, conta ct Jerrol d E. Lerum, Dept. of Biology, (206) 535-7566.

8:00- 10:45 a.m., MTWR./-11 1 . Lab: 12:]0]:15 p.m., TWR. l-l07B. /nstruclors: J. Lerum, T. Carlson.

591

FIELD BIOLOGY WORKSHOP : INTRODUCTION TO FLOWERING PLANT IDENTIFICATION (2) SeN: 806591

Pre-Session: lune 18-22

A practical introd uction to the taxonomy and identification of flowering plants. Workshop held at the PLU Biology Fiel d Station at Manchester State Park. Topics indude : collection and mounting of plants for herbaria; structu re, identification and aspects of the ecology of flowering pla nts. Following introdu tory materials on cam­ pus Monday, Ju ne 18 at 9:00 a . m . in Ivy 106, transportation provided to the fie ld station. Return tra.nsportation provided June ll. Bring sleeping bag, towels, toi let­ ries, etc. Additional fee of $20 charged for food. For fu rther details, contact Dr.David Hansen, Dept. of Biology, (206) 535-7565. See Special feature on this page.

593 FIELD BIOLOGY WORKSHOP : ECOLOGY OF NORTHWEST BEACHES (4) SeN: 806593 June 16-17. lune 3G-luly 1.luly 14-15, and July 23-28

A comprehensive introduction to the ecology of Wash ington's intertidal com­ munities. Required cou rsewor k includes two weekends at PlU Manchester Park Field Station, a weekend s urvey of South Puget Sound beaches using PlU boat, a th ree-day field trip to the Olympic pel1in­ sula, q u i zzes, take-home exam, and final exam. Meet in Ivy 106 a19:00 a.m. the first day of class. Bring sleeping bag, field clothes, etc. Additional fee of $50 charged for food and transportation. For itinerary and details, contact Dr. Richard McGin­ nis, Dept. of Biology, (206) 535-7570. See Spedal feature on this page. For unique su mmer experiences at the PlU Biology Field Station, see Bio 591 and 5931

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MBA: (206) 535-7250 Phone: (206) 535-7252 ELIGIBILITY CARD REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT. t230

LAW & SOCIETY (4)

282

SCN: 808230

SeN: 808282

June 4-July 12

The legal system in the United States and the regu lations of relat.ionships between i ndivid ual citizens, groups and govern­ mental agencies and branches. Review of the rights and obligations of individ ual citizens and corpo rations, administrative law, and the procedu res and practices of the cou rts in a modern society. 6:00-1 0:00 p. m., MR. HA-21]. Inslruclor: B. Burke.

281

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING (4)

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (4) SeN: 808281

Session I: June 25-July 20

Introduction to accounting concepts and princi ples. Preparation and anal ysis of fi­ nancial reports.

8:45 a.m.-12:00 noon, MTWR. HA-21Z In­ slruclor: C. Purdy.

Session II: July 3G-August 24

Introduction to management accounting information systems. Emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of accou nting and economic data and their use in plan­ ning, control and decision making. Pre­ requisite: BA 281.

8:45 a.m..12:00 noon, MTWR. HA-21Z In­ slruclor: D. Zulauf.

350

MANAGEMENT (4) SeN: 808350

Session I: June 25-July 20

C ritical examination of the principles and processes of admin istration. Management techniques and the fundions of planning, o rganizing , direction and control from both the classical and the behavioral points of view. Concepts and characte ristics of the production function. Introd uction to case analysis and problem-so lvi n g tech­ niques. Prerequisites : Econ 150, Stat 231 (may be concurrent) and BA 281; j unior standing.

8:00-1 1 :15 a.m., MTWR. HA-213. Inslruc­ lor: E. Berniker.

4

continued on page 5


continued from page 4

t354

455

PERSONNEL & INDUSTRIAL RELA TIONS (4) SeN: 808354

July 16-August 23

Detai led exam ination of behavioral pro­ cesses of individ uals and groups in busi­ ness organizations. Emp hasis on pol i cy issue!> and specific problems i n manag i n g h u man resources with focus o n modern practices of industrial relations and per­ sonnel management in i nd u trial and other organizations . Prerequisites : BA 350; ju nior sta n d i n g . 6:00-10:00 p.m., M R . HA -2 15. Instructor: M. Wood. 364

MANAGERIAL FINANCE (4) SeN: 808364

Session I: June 25-July 21J

Concentrated study of the tools of fi nan­ cial analysis : F unds and cash flows, critical analysis of fi nancial statements and other fi nancial information, techniques of finan­ cial planning and budgeting, and the con­ c pts related to capital expenditure bud­ geting, and the cost of capital. An intro­ duction to fi nancial strategies and deci­ sion-making for finan ing, expansion and dividend poli cies. Prereq u i sites: CS 220 (or equivalent), Econ 150, Math 1 28 (or q uivalent), Stat 231 and BA 281 ; j u n i or standing. 1 :00-4:15 p.m. , MT W R HA-217. Instruc­ t or : J. Wahlen. .

370

MARKETING SYSTEMS (4) SeN: 808370

Session I: June 25-July 21J

Flows of good and services in the econo­ my, economic and behavioral approaches to the analysis of demand; the role of mar­ ket i n g fu nctions in a bus i n ess firm. Deter­ mi nation of a marketi n g mix - product pol icy, pricin g, channels of distri bution and marketing com m u n i cations. Prereq­ uisites: Econ 150, Math 1 28 (or equiva­ l ent) , Stat 231 and BA 281; j u n ior stan d i n g . 8:45 a. m. 1 2 : 00 noon, MTWR. HA-221. -

Instructor: D. McNabb.

BUSINESS POLICY (4)

t550

SeN: 808455

SeN: 808550

Session II: July 30-August 24

Organ i zational adm i nist ration from top management perspective. Formu l ation and execution of strategies and policies to integrate all management and business fu nctions in su pport of organizational ob­ jectives. Implications of resou rce avai l ­ ability, tech nology and t h e economy; ed ucation, relig ion, et h i cs and personal val ues; social respons i b i l ity; public pol i ­ cy; a n d i n ternational relations for top management decisions. Includes compre­ hensive case analyses. Prerequ isites : BA 282, 350, 364, 370; senior stan d i n g. 8:45 a.m. -12:00 noon, MTWR. HA-2 1 1 . Instructor: R . Nibler.

t501

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING & FINANCE (4) SeN: 808501

June 4-July 12

F u ndamental assu mptions, prin ciples and proced ures underlying accounti ng; trans­ action analysis and the f u ndamental ac­ cou n tin g mod e l ; matc h i n g of expenses with revenue; measu rement and report­ i n g of income statement and balance sheet accou nts; consolidated statements; and using and interpreting financial state­ ments. Theoretical framework for fi nan­ cial decisi ons; decision t heory relative to working capital management, short and intermed iate-term financing, capital i n ­ vestments and valuation, capital structure and dividend policy and long-term finan­ c i n g . Tuition: $177 per semster hour. 6:00-10:00 p.m., MR. HA-217. Instructor: J. Wahlen.

t535

LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE MANAGEMENT PROCESS (4) SeN: 808535

July 16-August 23

Su rvey of federal and state laws, ru les and regulations that d i rectly impi nge on t h e manager's decision -making in t h e modern business enterprise. Incl udes legal i m p l i ­ cations for t h e individual manager a n d his/her corporation that follow from busi­ ness deci sions in areas such as employee relations, consumer protection , security and exchange regu latio ns, rights of cor­ porate sharehol ders and creditors, anti­ trust laws, and environmental protection. Tuition : $177 per semester hour. 6:00- 10:00 p.m., MR. HA-221. Instructor: B. Burke.

5

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND ENVIRONMENT (4)

July 16-August 23

Study of open sociotech nical systems with i n which a manager must operate. Encompasses t h ree major perspectives : The external organization environment, i n c l u d i n g legal, eth i cal, social, econom i c a n d pol itical infl uences; t h e organi zation itself as an entity; and the i n ternal orga­ nization environment. Prereq u isite : BA 350 (or 502). Tuition: $177 per semester hour. 6: 00-10:00 p. m. , MR. HA-213. Instructor: C. Hugh es .

t582

ACCOUNTING INFORMATION & CONTROL (4) SeN: 808582

July 16-August 23

Applications of accounting i n formation, services and systems to management problems. Prereq u i sites : BA SOl and 503. Tuition: $177 per semester hour. 6:00-1 0:00 p.m., MR. HA-217. Instructor: Staff.

t590

RESEARCH FOR MARKETING DECISIONS (4) SeN: 808590

June 4-July 12

Techniq ues and uses of marketing re­ search i n the busi ness deCision-making process. Prereq u i sites : BA 502, Econ 504. Tuition : $177 p er semester hour. 6:00-10:00 p.m., MW. HA-22 1. Instr uctor: D. McNabb.


CHEMISTRY Phone: (206) 535-7530 104

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (4)

COMMUNICATION ARTS Phone: (206) 535-7762 359

ACTING FOR THE NON-ACTOR (4)

seN: 810104

seN: 812359

Session I: June 25-July 20

Session II: June 25-July 20

Basic principles of chemical structures and reactions and practical applications; ov rview of chem istry and its impact on society; scientific meth od ; problem solv­ ing skil ls; cu rrent topics i n environmental and consum r chemis ry (e.g., pol ymers, toxic materials, radioactivity, pol l u tion, food additives, cosmetics and d rugs). Pre­ paratory to Chem 103 or Chem 115 for those lacking high school chemistry. Meets general university core requi rements.

StUdy of the actor's craft an mplemen­ tation of theory for (hose witho ut prior theatrical experience. Emphasis placed on individual awaren ss and interest; you are not compared against another stud nt in terms of in nate talent. Wi l l meet u n i ­ versity Fine Arts requiremen ; may not be taken by Theatre majors/minors. No prereq uisite.

8:00-10:45 a.m., MTWRF. R-103. Lab: 12:30-3 : 15 p.m., TR. R-320. Instructor: W. Giddings.

1 05

CHEMISTRY OF LIFE (4) SeN: 810105

Session II: July 3O-August 24

General , organic, and biochemistry per­ tinent to chemica l processes in the hu­ man orga nism; suitable for liberal arts students. and prospecti e teachers. Stu­ dents who have not co mp leted high school chem istry are encouraged to take 104 before taking 105.

9:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. , MTWR. R-103. Lab: 1 :00-3:30 p. m., TR. R·320. Instructor: C. Anderson.

321

ANAL YTICAL CHEMISTRY (4) eN: 810321

Session II: July 3O-August 24

Chemical methods of q u a ntitative ana ly­ sis, i ncl uding vol u metric, gravimetric, and selected inst ru menta l methods. Pre­ requisites : Chem 116, Math 1 33. 8:00·10:45 a.m., MTWR. R-110. Lab: 72:003:15 p.m., MTWR. R-317. Instructor: L.

9:30 a.m.-12:1S p.m., MTWRF. MG-202. Ins/ructor : W. Bec var .

-t447 THEA TRf NORTHWEST (2) SeN: 812447 Mid-Session: July 23-27

Desi gned to acquaint you with the Pro­ fessional Theatre scene in he Northwest and in the Seattle area in particu lar. Cl ass attends plays and da nce programs; to urs Seattle Theatre in the evening. Student should be prepared to buy five Theatre tickets. 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, MTWRF. HA-21'. Off-campus : 7:00-10:00 p.m. Instructor: W. Parker.

450

WORKSHOP IN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC SPEAKING (2) SeN: 812450

Pre-Session: June 18-22

Designed to enhance your speaking skills. Covers audience ana lysis, topic selection, organization of ideas, types of speeches, using visual aids, and delivery. Designed for both novices and those with public speaking experience. 9:00 .m.-12:00 noon & 1:00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-213. Instr u ct o r : W. Parker.

Huestis.

6


EARTH SCIENCES

ECONOMICS

Phone: (206) 535-7563

Phone: (206) 535-7597

351

NATURAL HISTORY OF THE PACifiC NORTHWEST (6) SCN: 818351

Session II: July �August 24 Enviro n men tal study from the Pac ific to the Columbia Basi n; field trips, laboratory studies, l ectures. Course study includes ecological prin ciples, habitats, plant and animal life , geo logy and m a n's interac­ tion with the environment. Especia l ly for science teache rs at elementary a n d junior hi gh levels. Fiel d based; camping and day . tnps. Prerequisite: at least one scie nce course. Sch o l a rships may be availa b l e to Wash ington teachers. Travel fee: $25. For more information, cOnlact Dr. B. Oste n ­ s o n , (206) 535-7563.

9:00 a . m . -1 2 : 00 no on & 1:00-3 : 15 p.m. MTWRF. 1-105 & off-campus sites. Instruc­ tors: B. Ostenson, j. Scearce.

425/525

GEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL (5) SCNs: 818425/818525

Mid, Session II: July 23-August 24

�earn

mapping technique s , basic survey­ Ing methods, const ruction of geologic cross sections, aerial photograph a n a l ysis . Field studies include Puget Sound/ O lym­ pic Peninsula, Cascade Mountains and C olumbia River Basalt P l ateau. Designed for undergraduate Earth Science majors; graduate students without prior summer field camp experience welcome (ES 525). Bring sleeping bag, towels, toil etries, etc. Non-refundable registration fee of $'100 is ful l y applicable toward tuition ; food and lodging costs for five weeks are $520. For itinerary and further details, write: Pacific Lutheran Un iversity, Dept. of Earth Sci­ ences, Tacoma, WA 96447.

231

INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (4)

Session I: June 25-July 20 See Statistics 231 on page 7 for course desc riptio n .

361

MONEY AND BANKING (4) SCN: 820367

Session II: JuJy 30-August 24 Nature a n d role of money; commerci a l banking syst m; Federal Reserve System; theory of credit and money supply con­ trol; Keynesian a n d Monetarist theo ries of monetary impacts on i nf l a t ion, in terest rates and natio n al income. Pre requisite: Econ 1 50.

9:30 a . m.-12 : 15 p.m., MTWRF. HA-212. Instructor: E. Ankrim.

t500 APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (4) SCN: 820500 June 4-July 13 I ntensive introduction to statistical meth­ ods for graduate students who have pre ­ viously taken I n t r oductory Statistics. Em­ phasis o n application of inferential statis­ tics to concrete situations. Topics include measures of location and variation, prob­ ability, estimation, hypothesis tests, a n d reg ression . Wil l n o t count for Statistics

Minor. Tuition : $177 per semester hour. 6:00-10:00 p.m., TR. HA-210. Instructor: R. J ens en .

501A

ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS (2) SeN: 820507

Pre-Session: June 1&-22

MTWRf. MG-Om and off-campus sites. Instructors : S. Benham, B. Lowes.

See Educat ion 501 E on page 9 for course d escription .

490

5018

WORKSHOP IN NATURAL HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (2-4) SCNs: 818002 (2 crs)/818003 (3 crs)/818004 (4 crs)

Natural history workshop for those w h o h a v e taken Bio/Earth S c i 351 o r equiva­ l ent. Development of your in dividualized p l a n for special phases/more extensive detail involvi ng field co l lections, class­ room applications or other extension of Bio/Earth Sci 35'1. Credits granted individ­ ually acco rding to time and effort involved . Prerequisites: Bio/Earth Sci 351 and per­ mission of instructor . Independent study card requi red; see department. Scholar­ ships may be available to Washington teachers.

TBA. Instructor: B. Ostenson.

7

ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS (2) SCN: 820502

Pre-Session: June 18-22 See Education 50lF on page 9 for course description.

t504

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS AND POLICY DECISION (4) SCN: 820504

June 4-July 13 Basic economic co ncepts appl ied to poli­ cy formation and operating decisio ns. Tuition: $177 per semester hour.

6 :00-10:00 p.m., TR. HA-212. Instructor: G. Holman.


I f

EDUCATION Phone : (206) 535-7272

c

(Note: Educational Psychology and Special Education have a separate course numbering system, and are found after the Education courses listed below.) READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4)

GENERAL METHODS SECONDARY (2)

467

SCN: 824325

SCN: 824425

Session II: July 30-August 24

Session I: June 25-July 20

Session I: June 25-July 20

Teaching reading in elementary grades, including modern approaches, materials. Ed 32213/4 or teaching Prerequisite: experience. 9:30 a.m.-12:15p.m., MTWRF. f. Campus16. Inst ruct or: A. Lawr enc e.

Curriculum, materials and methods of secondary teaching. Prerequisites: Ed 251, EdPsy 368, and G.P.A. of 2.50.

325

408

SCN: 824451

The functional teaching of communica­ tion skills, grades K-6; areas include oral and written expression, listening, reading literature, dramatization, spelling, gram­ mar, handwriting, children's language study, vocabulary development and lexi­ cography. Prerequisite: Ed 322/3/4 or teaching experience. 8 : 00-9 : 15 a.m., MTWRF. HA-214. Instruc tor: /. Hays. ­

SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) SCN: 824410

Session II: July 30-August 24 A humanistic approach with emphasis on those kinds of materials and "hands on" activities needed to achieve the objec­ tives f science. Prerequisite: Ed 322/3/4 or teaching experi nce. 9:30-10:45 a. m., MTWRF. 1- 1 06. Instruc ­ tor: L. Stein.

Library organization and administration in elementary and secondary schools. 9:30- 1 0 : 45 a. m., MTWRF. L-106. Instruc­ tors: C. Yea r, K. Lemmer.

452

BASIC REFERENCE MATERIALS (2) SCN: 824452

Session II: July 30-August 24 Materials and procedures which support reference services in elementary and sec­ ondary school libraries. Special investiga­ tion of reference services in Puget Sound nd computer data bases.

1 1 :00 a.m.- 1 2 : 1 5 p.m., MTWRF. L-106. In­ structor: C. Yetter.

453

PROCESSING SCHOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS (2) SCN: 824453

Session I: June 25-July 20 ClaSSification, cataloging and technical processing of materials.

9:30-10:45 a.m., MTWRF. L-106. Instruc­

SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2)

tor: C. Yelter.

SCN: 824412

454

Session I: June 25-July 20 Objectives, materials and methods of teaching the social studi s; recommend­ ed to student teachers and experienced teachers. Prerequisite: Ed 322/3/4 or teaching experience.

8:00-9: 15 a.m., MTWRF. HA-204A. Instruc­ t or: J. Ram ey.

420

ADMINISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY (2)

Evaluation of school experiences; prob­ I ms in development, organization and administration of tests {standardized and teacher-made}. Required of fifth-year stu­ Ed 425, General dents. Prerequisites: Methods.

9: 30-10:45 a.m., MTWRF. HA-200. Instruc­ tor: W. Hunt.

473

Session II: July 30-August 24

Session II: July 30-August 24

412

12:30-3 :45 p. m., MW. HA-204A. Instruc­

451

PROBLEMS OF READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) SCN: 824420

Session II: July 3G-August 24 Teaching secondary rea ing in content are s; attention to developmental read­ ing problems; materials, methods, tech­ niques and procedures. Prerequisite: Ed 251.

9:30- 10:45 a . m., MTWRF. HA-214. Instruc­ tor: /. Hays.

SEUCTION OF LEARNING RESOURCE MA TERIAiS (2)

Session I: June 25-July 20 Criteri ,professional literature and tech­ niques of evaluation of library materials (print and non-print); the librarian's re­ s onsibility to faculty, students and the general public. 1 1:00 a. m.-12 : 1 5 p.m., MTWRF. L 1 06. ln­ s t ructor: C. Yetter. -

PREPARATION AND UTILIZATION OF MEDIA (3-4) SCNs: 824457 (3 crs)/824458 (4 crs)

Mid and Session II: July 23-August 24 The production and use of a variety of in­ structional materials, flat pictures, charts, maps and the 35mm camera; you produce items useful in instruction. lab fee: $10.

PARENT TEACHER RELATIONSHIPS (2) SCN: 824473

Session I: June 25-July 6 An examination of the philosophy and implem ntation of parent-teacher con­ ferencing. Related issues such as the par­ ental role in education, home visits, the role of the student in the conferencing process, and listening and ommunica­ tion skills useful in conferencing. Special Ed program students study provisions for the n eds of the parents of the handi­ capped. Prerequisite: Student teaching or teaching experience.

12:30-3:1 5 p.m., MTWRF . HA-204B. In­ stru ct or: M. Hanson.

483

PRIMARY READING (2) SCN: 824483

Session II: June 25-July 20 Material and methods of the primary read­ ing program and its relation to other ac­ tivities. Prerequisite: Teaching experience. 1 2 : 30-1:45 p.m., MTWRF. E Campus-16.

CIVIL LIBERTIES WORKSHOP (3-4) SCN: 824002 (3 crs)/824003 (4 crs)

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May 21,23, 24, 29, 30, 31; June 4,6, 7, 11, 13,14 Workshop on civil liberties and their role in the public schools; an overview of civil rights and liberties in the U.S. with em­ phasis on heir constitutional status; and an examination of civil rights and liberties in the public schools setting, both ele­ mentary and secondary levels, with a par­ ticular focus on the rights of teachers and students. Meets the school law require­ ment for the initial certificate for teach­ ers, principals and program administra­ tors. To receive 4 hours credit, you must complete a related project approved by your instructor.

6:30-9:45 p.m., MWR. HA-117. Instruc­ tors: D. Atkinson, C. DeBower.

1 2:30-3 : 15 p. m., MTWRF. L-/ab. Instruc­ tor: L Stein.

8

SI

Instructor: A. Lawrence.

t501A

SCN: 824454

457

EVALUATION (2) SCN: 824467

tor: M. Ba ugh ma n.

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) SCN: 824408

410

425

5'

continued on page 9

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EDUCATION Phone: (206)

continued from page 8

5018

535-7272

SPANISH FOR THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM (4)

sion m ak i ng . Parti a l s cho l ar ships available for 20 teachers; f or applic ation forms c a ll Dr. D. Wentworth, (206) 535-7597.

8.30 a.m.-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-215. In­ structor: R. Reinke.

501F

(2)

SeN: 824019 Session

I:

June 25-July 20

A p ra ct ic al course in the introduction of Spanish in grades 1 t h rough 6; methods, materials and proced ures. Also an inten­ sive review of the Spanish s pecif ica lly needed for preparation of units appropri­ ate for the several grade lev els . Labo rato ry facilities avail ab le outside of class hours. Students teach Span ish units to p upils from a nearby ele me ntary school during the second half of the session. Recom­ mended for both student teachers and to experi enced teachers. Prerequisite : Prior knowledge of Spanish equivalent to one year's study. 9:00 a.m.-"/2:00 noon, MTWRF. HA-216. Instructor: L. Faye.

t501C

CALCULATORS AND COMPUTERS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (1) SCN: 824001

Pre-Session: June 18-22

HoW and when the hand calculator and microcomputer may be used in the ele­ mentary mathematics classroom; how to evaluate ava i labl e software. Bring hand calculator and/or microcomputer w it h software to w o rk shop; some h ands-on computer activity available. No computer science skills req u i red.

6:30-9:30 p.m., MTWRF. HA-117. Instruc­

tor: C. DeBower.

5010

DISCIPLINE IN THE CLASSROOM (2) SeN: 824005

Pre-Session: June 18-22 Major workshop themes: Using Dr. Wil­ l iam G l a sser's "Reality Ther apy " as an ap­ proach to discipline; comparing and co n­ t rast ing Cantor's Assertive Discipline and Dobson ' s Dare CO Discipline . Prerequisite: Read G lasser' s Schools Without Failure and Identity Society pr i or to the workshop.

9:00 a.m.-72:00 noon & 1:00-4:00 p.m.,

MTWRF. HA-117. Instructor: M. Hanson.

SOlE

ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS (2) SCN: 824008

Pre-Session: June 18-22

Workshop for elem enta ry teachers to im­ prove economic u nderstanding and in­ stru ctional skill. Examines a w i de variety of curricu l um materials, provided with­ out ch arge to the parti cipants. I ncl ud ed : Book Comp any ; Cl as s r oo m Marketp la ce; and Tradeoffs, a series of audio visual pro­ grams de si gned to improve eleme nt ar y student economic knowledge and deci-

ECONOMIC EDUCATION FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS SeN: 824009

Pre-Session: June 18-22 Workshop for s eco n dary teachers inter­

ested in improving consumer economics instruction ; s tu dy economics, analyze teac hing strategies and evaluate new cur­ ricu l u m materials. Special attention given to two new cur riculum projects: Choices

in the Marketplace and Give and Take.

Choices is a one-week curriculum unit on econom ic reasoning and consumer choices; Give and Take is a series of twelve audio visual programs des i gne d to im­ prove student decision m ak i ng . Both may be used by teachers of Social Studies, Business Education, H ome Economics and Consumer Education. Partial scholar­ ships available for 20 teachers; for appli­ cation forms call Dr. D. Wentw o rth , (206)

535-7597. 8:30 a.m.- 4 : 00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-200. In­

structor: D. Wentworth.

501G

TEACHING STUDENTS BASIC PROGRAMMING (1) SeN: 824013

Session I: June 25-29

For 3rd-8th grade teachers who want to teach their students how to program a micro computer in the BASIC language . Learn th e elements of BASIC through a t eache r -written curriculu m desig ned to t ea ch elementary and m i ddle school stu­ dents; also learn how to teach students to program gra p h ics in BASIC. Apple micro­ computers are used; curriculum also avai l­ able for PET an d Atar; microcomput ers . Prerequisite: Ed 5m, O rienting Classroom Teachers to the World of t he Microcom­ p u ter, or prior k nowledge of microcom­ puter applications and op erati on (no pri­ or programming experi enc e n eed ed ) . User and material fee: $15. 12:30-3:30 p.m., MTWRF. E Campus-35. Instructor: S. Boren.

SOlH

ORIENTING CLASSROOM TEACHERS TO THE WORLD OF THE MICROCOMPUTER (2) SeN: 824018

Session I: Jun e 25-July 6

A begi nning computer class for elemen­ tary or middle sc h ool teachers. An intro­ duction to the application s, cap ab il it ies and li m it at i ons of microcomputers and the selection of high-quality computer program s. No prerequ isites. User and m ter i a l fee: $25.

8:30-11:30 a.m., MTWRF. E Campus-35. Instructor: S. Boren.

9

5011

UNDERSTANDING CHILDREN (2) SeN: 824020

Session

I:

June 25-July 6

A w orksh op for parents, social wo rkers, teachers, child care w o rk ers nd others, profes sion a ls and non-pr fessionals, to in crease e ffect i ve ness in work in g with children. S kills for communication and management; practical i mplications and applicat ions of con epts s uch as temper ­ ament ty pes, Erikson's stages , l earni ng styles, Dreikur's approach to misbehav­ i or . F ol l ow - u p observation assignments due in fall. 9:30 a.m.-"12:15 p.m., MTWRF. HA-21'. Instructor: M. Hans on.

501J

COGNITIVE STRATEGIES TEACHING THINKING (2) SeN: 824004

Session I: 'une 25-July 21

A cognitive approach to education with an emphas is on teaching students to take responsibility for learning. Theoretic al bac k gr ound, discussion of issues, and t eac hi ng strat egi es a re i nclu d ed .

12:30-7 : 45 p.m., MTWRF. HA-212. In­ structors: F. Olson, L. Siegelman.

501K

THE WORLD OF LOGO (1) SeN: 824015

Session I: July 2-6 An in t rod uction to a computer lang u age created es pecial ly for chil d re n and avail­

able for a l l major mi crocomputers. Logo introd uces students to comp uter pro­ gramming and the w orl d f mathem ati cs through the rea t i o n of colorful graphics. Students learn geometry con epts as we ll as structured pro grammi n g and problem solving skills. Logo is appropriate for stu­ dents in grades K-8. Participants will learn Apple Logo a nd how to present any type of Logo t o students in t he i r classr om. Prerequisite: Prior know ledge of micro­ computer applications and op ration or Ed 501, Orienting C lassr o om Teachers to (he World of the Micr compu ter. User and mat e ri al s fee: $15. 72:30-4:30 p.m., MTWRF. E Campus-35. Instructor: S. Boren.

SOU

MATHEMATICS THEIR WAY

(2) SeN: 824011 Mid-Session: ,uly 23-27

Activities for teachi n g pre-school through secon d grade students, designed to de­ velop understanding and i n sight into the patterns of mathematics through the use of concrete mater ia l s . Piaget observations translated into l each i ng strategies using lessons from Mathematics Their Way.

9:00 a.m.-72:00 noon & 1:00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-204B. /n true/or: j. Scott.

PLU ummer ession ndudes over 200 cour in 22 fields 01 stud •

continued on page 10


EDUCATION Phone : (206)

501Q

535-7272

continued from page 9

501M

MULTI ETHNIC SCHOOL ISSUES FOR ADMINIS­ TRA TORS/TEACHERS (2)

SCN: 82401 6 Mid-Session: July 23-27 Examines the changing increasing ly multi­ eth nic co mpositio n of stu dent popu la­ tions and the implications of such changes for school administrators. Studies t h e role culture plays in t he edu cational process; examines all aspects of the learning envi­ ronment created by school st rategies and techn i q u es to make the resources and ser ices o f schools accessible to students from a l l cu l t u ral backgrou nds. 9:00 a. m. - 12: oo noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-206A. In tructor: M. Migdal.

501N

MUMS : MATHEMATI CS UNIT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (2)

SCN : 82401 7 Mid-Session: ,uly 23-27 Work shop: A u n ique mathematics in­ structio nal system i n whic h you ngsters are d iag n os t ical l y tested and grouped on the basis of achievement i n a topic, i.e., addition, su btraction, mu ltiplication or division o f w h o l e n u m bers, fractions and decimals; study t o p i cs in time-blo cks us­ ing teacher-written lessons including concept development, practice-related games, puzzles a n d d r i l l s . Identifying and meeting indi idual needs in t he basic operations in a gro u p setting. S tudy ma­ terials devel oped by instructor and others for use in Clover Park Elementary Schools. May be c om p le te d as a s u bstitute fo r Ed 326. Pass/Fail only. 9: 00 a.m. -12:00 noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA -117. Instructor: C. DeBower.

SUBSTITUTE TEACHER (2)

A workshop to provide substit ute teach­ ers with ideas and materials t hat will be useful in short-term s ubstitute positions. You prepare activit y kits and work with activiti es and ex pectations applicable to a particular grade l eve l .

. 9:00 a . m. -1 2:00 noon, M TWRF. HA-221. Instructor: B. Eliason.

501R

TEACHING WITH STYLE (2)

SCN : 824014 Session II: July 3D-August 10 Focuses on defining, identifying and uti­ lizing teaching and learning style. Ac­ q uaints educators with a variety of learn­ ing style th eories and models; examines the relationship of teaching methods to style; and int roduces specific classroom strategies and materials t h at respond to the individual student. Designed for teadl­ ers, counselors and administrators. 9 : 00 a.m.-12:00 noon, M TWRF. HA-21O. Ins t ructor: C. Gac/wa.

516

TEACHER SUPERVISION (1)

SeN: 824021 Mid-Session: July 23-27 Proj ects determined by t h e class; t y pical projects include c u r riculum planning and adju stment, public relations programs, personnel emplo yment and in-service train i ng; financing building a nd educa­ one tional programs. Prereq uisite : cou rse in administration or s u pervision. 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., M TWRF. HA-204A. In­ structor: M. Baughma n.

544

RESEARCH AND PROGRAM EVALUA TlON (2)

S ee Philosop h y SOl on page 16 for course descr iption.

SCN: 824022 Session I: June 25-July 21 Knowled ge of student and case eva l ua­ tion tech niques ; t h e ability to select and interpret tests; knowledge of research design; the ability to interpret ed ucation­ al researc h ; the ability to ident ify, l ocate and acq uire to pical research and related literatu re ; and the ability to use the re­ su lts of research or eva luation to propose program changes. Graduate students only; may be taken in lieu of Ed 467, Eva l u ation. 2 :00-3 :15 p . m . , M TWRF. HA-212. Inst ruc­ tor: F. Olson.

50l P

545A

501 0

WORKSHOP : TEACHING PHILOSOPHY TO CHILDREN (2-3) SCNs : 824006 (2 crs)/824007

(3 crs) Session II: July 23-August 3

ITIP: INSTRUCTIONAL THEORY INTO PRACTICE (2)

SCN: 82401 0 Session II: July 3O-August 10 The elements of teach ing th eory as ex­ pressed in adual pract ice. Develop your own I T I P proced ures for use in your own classrooms. 3 :30-6:30 p.m., M TWR F. structor: B. Jones.

HA-204B. In­

545B

SCN: 824012 Session II: July 3O-August 10

METHODS & TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH (2)

SCN: 824023 Session I : June 25-July 20 Seminar in research met h ods and tech­ niques i n education with emph asis on designing a research p roject in the s t u ­ dent's area of interest . Required f o r M.A. Prereq u i site : Consultation with student's adviser and admittance to the graduate program. 8 : 00- 9 : 15 a. m., M TWRF. HA- 1 1 7. Instruc­ tors : F. Olson, L. Siegelma n.

10

METHODS & TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH (2) SeN: 824024

See Ed 545, Sec A. Limited to Project Con ­ cept master's ca ndidates on I y . 9:30-10:45 a . m . , M TWRF. HA-1 1 7. Instruc­ tor: L. Siegelman .

t550

SCHOOL FINANCE (2)

SeN : 824550 Session II: July 3O-August 24 Local, state and federal contribut ors to school finance, its p h i losophy and devel­ opment ; the deve l opment and adminis­ tration o f a school budget. 5 : 00-8:30 p.m., MW. HA-1 1 7. Instructor: F. Warner.

t552

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRA TlON (3)

SCN: 824552 Session I: June 25-July 20 Administration and su pervision of s hool personnel, p lant and program; t h e st ruc ­ t u re and o rganization of th e school sys­ tem. Prerequ isite : Teac hing credential or permission of the Dean. 6:30-9:45 p.m., MTR. HA- 1 1 7. Instructor: C. DeBower.

580

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3)

SeN: 824580 Session II: July 3O-August 24 Types of curric u l u m organizations, pro­ grams a n d techniques of curricu l u m development. 8:00-1O:00 a. m., M TWRF. HA- 1 1 7. Inst ruc­ tor: E. Goldenstein.

587

HISTORY OF EDUCATION (2)

SCN: 824587 Session I I : July JO-Augusf 24 Great educa tors , educational theo ries, and educational systems from antiq u i t y to ,he present. 1 1 :00 a . m . - 12 .· 15 p.m., M TWRF. HA- 1 1 7. Instructor: E . Goldenstein.

t589

PHILOSOPHY OF mUCATION (3)

SCN: 824589 Session I: June 25-July 20 Philosophical and theoretical foundations of ed ucation. 6:00-9: 00 p.m., TWR. HA-214. Instructor: M. Baughman.

596

RESEARCH STUDlES ( 1)

SCN: 824596 Se ssion I, Mid, II: June 25-August 24 See y o u r Major adv iser. Final original cop y of your paper(s) must be submitte to the Graduale Office no later than fwo weeks before co mmencement . I ndepen ­ dent study card required. TBA.

continued on page 1 1


EDUCATION Phone : (206) continued from pag

597

501B

535-7272

10

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4) SCNs: To Be Assigned

Session I, Mid, II: June 25-August 24 Directed study, reading and research on selected topics approved and supervised by instructor. Prerequisite: I nstructo r's signature on i ndepende n t study card pri­ or to registratio n.

TBA.

598

STUDIES IN EDUCATION (2) SCN: 824598

Session I, Mid, II: June 25-August 24 A research paper or project of a n educa­ ti onal issue selected jointly by you and your graduate adviser; will be reviewed by your Graduate Committee. Indepen­ dent study card required. TBA.

599

THESIS (3-4) SCNs: 824025 (3 crs)/824026 (4 crs)

Session I, Mid, I I : June 25-August 24 You may register at any time during the summer prior to August 1. I ndependent study card required.

TBA .

CHRISTIAN COUNSELING (2) SCN: 826002

Session I: June 25-July 6 Presents a rationale for making use of cli­ ent's religious faith i n cou nseli n g. Seeks to assi st the stude n t counselor to recog­ n i ze the wholen ss of he person as a psychological, physical and spiritu a l be­ ing. Assi sts in u nderstanding the rel i gi ous person and in using the spirituality of that person in the process of cou nseling. Ad­ dresses love, guilt, loneliness, anxiety, grief a nd similar emotions sugg sted by class participa nts; focus includes the re­ lationships among physica l, emotional and spiritual problems, a n d methods of helping those experiencing depress ion, grief and guilt by making use of their reli­ gious beliefs. Students participate and share client data. 1 :00-5: 00 p.m., M TWRF. HA-21 ' . Instr uc­

tor: }. Fl etch er.

SOlC

VIOLENCE IN THE FAMILY (2) SCN: 826003

SPEC I A L ED UCATI ON

Phone : (206) 535-7277 1 90

seN: 825001 Session I : June 25-July 13 I ntroduction to the needs and character­ istics of exceptional children and adults. Federal and state legislation, current is­ sues, and practices of delivering services to handicapped i ndividuals. Designed as an overview for u ndergraduate students in Special Educati o n , general education, nursing, counseling, and other related fields. Prerequisite for all Special Educa­ tion coursewo r k . 8 : 00-10:45 a . m . , MTWRf. E Campus-15. Instructor: K. G e r lach .

296

Session I I : July 30-August 24 Designed to in crease awareness of the scope of child abuse. Workshop partici­ pants learn to identify the symptoms of psychosocial and physical abuse, become aware of possible treatmen t, and learn to support the abused and the abuser.

1 : 00-4:00 p.m., M TWRF. HA-210. Instruc­ tor: H. Hafer.

536

AFFECTIVE CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES (2)

SCN: 825002 Study of anatomical, physio logical, social, a nd educational problems of those with orthopedic disabilities or health problems. 9 : 00 a.m. - 1 2 : 00 noon & 1 :00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. E Campus-13. Instructor: H. Owens.

SCN: 826004

Student teaching or

1 : 00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-1 1 7. In truc­ lOr: }. Williamson.

Session I I : July 3O-August 10 Current problems and issues as they ap­ ply to the education of chi ldren with be­ havior d i sorders. I ncludes use of behav­ ior modification and classroom manage­ me nt techniques. 12:30-4:20 p.m., M TWRF. E Ca mpus - 15. Instructor: M. Nelson.

399

MENTAL HEALTH (4) SCN: 826005

Phone : (206) 535-7272 SOlA

Basic mental health principles as related to i nterpersonal relationships. u pon self-understanding.

CRISIS INTERVENTION (2)

Sessions 1 & II : June 25-July 21 & July 30August 24 Experience w i th Special Education chil­ dren or adults in a su pervised setting. 1 hour credit given after successfu l com­ pletion of 35 clock hours. Prerequisite : SPED 1 90 or permission of i n stru ctor. TBA. Instructors: K. G e r lac h , H. Owens.

403

Pre-Session : June 18-22 A workshop designed to assist the help­ ing professional to identify the character­ istics of a crisis, develop a bility to com­ mu n i cate effecti v ely Wilh those i n risis and to help them during and following a crisis situation . Applicable to teachers, counselors a n d others who work with people under stress or those attempting to cope with transition . Practicum i n addition.

9:00 iI.m.-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-2 1 7. In­ s truct o r : j. Fletcher.

Focus

4:00-8:00 p.m. (June 18-22), 8 :30 a.m.12:30 p. m. (June 25-July 6), MTWRF. HA206. I ns tru ct o r : }. Fle tch er.

SCN: 826001

PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (1-4) SCNs: To Be Assigned

Pre & Session I: June 18-July 6

ED UCATI ONAl PSYCH O LOGY

INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIOR DISORDERS (3) SCN: 825003

Explores techn iques desig ned to facilitate understanding of self and others; meth­ ods for working wi th stude n ts . Lab expe­ rience to be completed in the Fall semes­

t575

INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH AND PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENTS (2)

Pre-Session: June 18-22

393

Session I : June 2.5-,uly 6

ter. Prerequisite: graduate status.

EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND ADULTS (3)

PARENT/PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (2) SCN: 825004

Session I: July 9-20 Presentation of the techniques for work­ ing with parents of handicapped children. Discussion of the placement committee process and of the rights of parents. 12:30-3: 15 p.m., M TWRF. E Campus-15.

Instructor: K. Gerlach.

11

continued on page 12


Special Education Phone : (206) 535-7277 continued from page 1 1

405

CURRICULUM FOR EXCEPTIONAL STU DE NTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (3)

SCN: 825005 Session I: June 25-July 6 Focus on teach ing academic, soci a l a n d ada ptive behavior s k i l l s to m i l d l y a n d moderatel y hand icapped c h i l d re n . I n ­ clu des writi ng i n d ividua l i zed ed ucation plans, preci sion teach ing, di rect i nstruc­ tion , task analysis a nd lea rning sequences. Prereq u i s i te : Ge neral Methods. 12:30-4:20 p.m., M TWRF. E Campus-15. Instructor: L. Reisberg.

406

CUR RICULU M FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS IN THE SECONDA RY SCHOOL (3)

SCN: 825006 Session I I : August 13-24 C u r ricu l u m co n tent and pla n n ing, i n ­ c l u d i ng academic s u bjects, life adj u st­ ments, and career co u n sel ing for m i l dly to mod erately h a n d i capped adolescents and adults. I nclud es writing i n d i v idu a l ­ ized ed uca t i o n a l plans ( I EPs) a n d behav­ ioral objectives. 12:30-4:20 p.m., M TWRF. E Campus-15. Instructor: L. Siegelma n.

494

533

SEMINAR I N DEVELOP­

E N G LISH

MENTAL DISABILITIES (2)

SCN: 825009 Mid-Session: ,uly 23-27 C u r rent issues and problems related to the education of c h i l d ren and a d u l ts with deve l opmental d i sa b i l i ties. 9:00 a . m . -12 :00 noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p. m., M TWRF. E Campus-13. Instructor: j. Pa tton.

535

SEMINAR IN LEARN I N G DISABILI TIES (2)

SCN: 8250 10 Session II: July 30-August 10 Cu rrent issues and problems related to the ed ucation of c h i l d ren and a d u lts with learning d i sabil ities . 9:30 a . m . - 1 2 : 1 5 p . m . , M TWRF. E Campu513. Instructor: L. Siegelman.

588

ADMJNI STRA TlON OF SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (2)

SCN: 82501 1 Session I : July 9-21 Investigation of existing Special Education admini strative u n its, pupil placement pro­ ced u res, student staffin gs, program rei m­ b u rseme n t procedu res and federal fund­ ing models. 12:30-3 : 1 5 p. m., M TWRF. E Campus-13. Instructors: D. Cupp, N. Wusterba rth.

Phone : (206) 535-721 0 t101

SCN: 830101 Develops the abil ity to write effectively. Emph asis on short papers a n d guided re­ vision. F u l f i l l s general u n iversity requ ire­ ment in writing. 6:30-9:30 p. m . , TR. HA-216. Instructor: G. Johnson.

217/417

THE SHORT STORY (1 -4)

SCNs: To Be Assigned Session I: June 25-July 20 Traces the development of the short story from its begi n n i ngs to the con te m pora ry period, focu s i n g on tech n i q ues a n d themes o f classic w r i ters. Provides a n i m ­ porta nt base for the s t u d y o f the nove l . Each on e-week u n it m a y b e t a k e n sepa­ rately: 21 7 A, Theory and Devel op ment (Ju ne 25-29); 2178, American Short Stories (July 2-6); Continental Short Stories (J u l y 9-1 3) ; or British Short Stories ( J u l y 1 6 -20). Students opting for u pper di vision cred it (41 7) su pplement thei r read i n g a n d write a critica l pa pe r; i ndepend e n t study ca rd req u i red : see department.

4

p " ir

d b a C p v. 1 51

4,

S4 S4 6: st

9:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m., M TWRF. HA-212. Instructor: R. Klopsch.

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

(4)

FOR THI HA NDI CA PP ED (2)

SCN: 830328

SCN: 825007

Session I I : August 1 3-24

Mid-Session: July 23-27

A study of rhetorical p r i n c i p les used i n writi ng persuasively a n d i magi n atively. Workshop format.

An i n t rod uction to the a p plication of com p u te r tec h n o l ogy with h a n d i ca p ped students. Focus on cu rrent issues a nd uses of com puter tech n o l ogy, i nc l u d i n g com­ puter assisted i nstruction , software eva l ­ uation, p u p i l a n d data m a n agement a n d com pute r aid s f o r the han dicapped. 9:00 a . m . -12:00 noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. E Campus-35. Instructor: L.

12 :30-3 : 00 p.m., with 3 : 30-6: 00 p.m. lab­ oratory, M TWRF. HA-212. Instructor: L. Johnson.

383

SHAKESPEARE (4)

SCN: 830383 Session I I : July 3D-August 24

Reisberg.

521

COLLEGE WRITING (4)

Session I-II: June 18-August 24

328

COMPUTER APPLICATION

c

Choosi n g from Sha kespeare's comed i es, his tories, tragedies and romances, learn to u n dersta nd them i n the context of the Renaissance. Coord inated with the Ore­

TEACH I N G HANDICAPPED ADOLESCENTS IN THE REGU LAR CLASSROOM (2)

gon Sha kespeare Festival from August 1 620. A surcharge of $1 25 covers theatre tick­ ets, lodging & roundtrip transpo rtat ion.

SCN : 825008 Mid-Session: July 23-27

8:00-10:45 a . m . , M TWRF.

An examinat ion of teach i n g strategies app ropriate fo r exception al adolescents, program mod if ication and classroom manage ment. Designed primarily for reg­ u l a r educators. 9:00 a. m. - 1 2:00 noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., M TWRF. E Campus-15. Instructor: S.

HA-216 (plus

Ashland Tour). Instructor: C. Bergman.

388

METAPHYSICAL POETRY (2)

SCN: 830388 August 27-31 The w ri t i n g of H e n ry Vaughan, a poet of the Golden Age of religious poetry i n E n g l a n d a n d a co ntempo rary o f J o h n M i l t o n . lectures o n Vaughan's A n g l i ca n ­ ism, Mysticism, and Plato nism; discus­ sions and a n a lysis of his poetry in com­ parison to other meta physica l poets of that time. A n i ntroduction to Meta physi-

Carlson.

12

continued on page 13

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Ar Eu er R( 011 va M N. sia W


continued from page 12

352

cal Poetry of the 1 7th Ce ntury (part of the regular cou rse offeri ng , Mi lton and His A ge).

Session I: June 25-July 20

1 1 : 00 a.m.-1 :30 p.m. & 2:00-4:30 p.m., MTWRF. HA-216. Instructor: L. Johnson.

434A

INTRODUCTION TO DREAMS (1) SCN: 830434

Pre-Session: June 18-22

Makes some connections between dream images and poetic images. A brief intro­ duction to i nterpreti ng d reams, fol lowed by concentration on poems whose images are d rea m-li ke. A b rief paper is requ i red . Open both to begi nners i n d ream inter­ pretation and to those who desire ad­ vanced work. 1:00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. HA-204A. In­ s tructor: D. Seal.

4348

INTRODUCTION TO DREAMS (1) SCN : 830435

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (4) SCN: 832352

The American Revol ution as a series of essentially poli tica l events stretching from the Seven Years War in 1763 t h rough Thomas Jefferson's defeat of John Adams in the Presidential election of 1800. The Colonists' in itial resistance to the reorga­ nization of the British E m p i re after 1763; the evol ution of active resistance into rev­ ol ution; the decision to declare i ndepen­ dence; the experience of war ; the strug­ gle to establish legiti mate and effective governments; the framing and ratification of the Constitution; and the Federa li st­ Repu b l i ca n battles of the 1 790s. Emphasis on the role of political t hought and ideol­ ogy in the development of repu bl ican government in the United States. 9:30 a . m.-1 2 : 15 p.m., MTWRF. HA -204A . Instru c t or : K. Malone.

399

INTERNSHIP (1-6) SCNs: To Be Assigned

Session I: June 25-29

June 1-August 15

See above for course description.

Off-campus study in connection with work or special fie ld resea rch ; projects usual l y processed t h rough Cooperative Education. Prerequisites: Arrangements made with inst ructor prior to June 1 ; have completed one cou rse in h istory and one year i n college; ta l l y card signed by in­ structor must accompany reg istration. For fu rther information, call (206) 535-7648.

6:30-9:30 p.m., MTWRF. HA-204A . In ­ structor : D. Seal.

TBA. Instructor: A. Martinson.

401

WORKSHOP ON THE 19605 IN AMERICA (2) SCN: 832401

Pre-Session: June 18-22

HISTORY Phone : (206) 535-7595 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION (4) SCN: 832108

1 08

Session I: June 25-20

An introduction to the h istory of Western Europe from the Renaissance to the pres­ ent: Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment, French Rev­ olution, Napoleon, Romanticism, Conser­ vatism, Liberalism, Socialism, Marx and Marxism, Nati onal is m, the rise of the Nation-State, 19th Century Science, Rus­ sia and the Russian Revol ution, the Fi rst World War, Fascism, Nazis m, Problems of ,resent. .

i1 . m.-12 : 15 p.m., M TWRF. X-1 14. In­ r: P. Nordquist.

LI

A d iscussion of the 1 960s in the Un ited States and how various topics from the history of that decade might be integrated in to the classroom in various disci pli nes in seco ndary ed ucati on. Topics i nclude the counter-cu lture, the Black movement, the Vietnam War, the women's movement, the environment, and ed ucation. Read­ i ngs from the decade. Guest speakers and f i l ms are a major part of the course.

8:30-1 1 :30 a.m. & 2 :00-5:00 p.m., MTWRF. X-112. Instructor: E. Clausen.

461

WEST AND NORTHWEST (4) SCN: 832461

June 1-August 15

An interpretive research and writing proj­ ect on commun ity h istory, structured to in dividual ized study. On-site resea rch in communities req u i red. Can be used by teachers and prospective teachers in meeting curricu l u m req u i rements. Limit­ ed enro l l ment. Prerequisite: tal l y card signed by instructor must accom pany reg­ istration ; students are advised to n1'eet with the i nstructor prior to J u ne 1. Ca ll (206) 535-7468 for further i n formation.

TBA. Instructor: A . Martinson.

13

LANGUAGES Phone : (206) 535-7210 101

ELEMENTARY LATIN (4) SCN: 848701

Session I: June 25-July 20

This intensive course emphasizes basic ski l ls in reading Latin and introduces stu­ dents to a variety of Roman a uthors.

1 1 :00 a. m.-1:4S p.m., M TWRF. HA-2 10. Instructor: D. Gilmour.

102

ELEMENTARY LATIN (4) SCN: 848102

Session II: July 3a-August 24

A conti n ued i ntroduction to the Latin language and l iterature. Prerequisite: one yea r of high school Latin, or one semester of co l lege Latin. 11 :00 a.m.-1 :45 p.m., MTWRF. HA-204A. Instructor: D. Gilmour.

501

SPANISH FOR THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM (4) SCN: 848507

June 25-July 20

See Education 501 B on page 9 for cou rse description.

FRENCH LANGUAGE CAMP June 18-23

A one-week i mmersion workshop on the PLU ca mpus for c h i l d ren ages 6-1 1. Th rough songs, simple d i alogues, crafts, and games, children learn clear pronun­ ciation, basic vocabu lary a nd such skills as counting, tel ling time and dates. Teaching is entirely in French and the emphasis is ora l, though some writi ng and reading a re in troduced. W h i l e w i ening their cul­ tural hori zons, c h i l d ren experience the thri l l of comm unicating in a foreign tongue and become aware of correct En­ g l ish usage. Tota l fee: $100. June 25-30

A one-week im me rsion workshop on the PLU campus for childr n ages 6-1 1 who participated in Session I, attended camp last year, or have had eq uivalent experi­ ence through travel or French classes (suggested m i n i m u m of two yea rs) . In ad­ d ition to a conti nuation of the above ac­ tivities, c h i l d ren reate and perform in an improvisat ional puppet theatre in the tradition of the French Guignol . I ncreased attention pl aced u pon reading and writ­ i n g . Total fee: $100. For further i nformation about either ses­ sion of the F rench Language Camp, con­ tact Dr. Roberta Brown at (206) 535-7630 or 535-7321. 9:00 a.m.-2 :30 p.m., M TWR FS. Director: R . Brown.


MATH & COMPUTER SCIENCE Phone : (206) 535-7400 tM128

MATHEMAnCS FOR BUSINESS & THE BEHAVIORAL SCIE CES (4) SCN: 836128

Session 1-11: June 25-Augusl 24

Review of algebra , matrix theory and lin­ ear programming, introduction to differ­ ential a nd integral ca lc u l u s. Concepts are developed intuitively with applications. Use of mathematica l tools stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite : high school algebra or Math 101 . 6:30-9:30 p.m., MR. HA-202. Instructor: D. Fat/and.

M323

Session

MODERN ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS (4) SCN: 836323 I: June 2S-July 20

Concepts u nderlying traditiona l com pu­ tational techiques; a systematic analysis of arit h metic; an intuitive approach to al­ gebra and geometry. Intended for ele­ mentary teaching majors. Prerequisite to Education 326. Prerequisite : consent of instructor. 8:00-10:45 a.m., M TWRF. M-172. instruc­ tor: G. Peterson.

CS110A Session

I:

BASIC (2) SCN: 814110 June 2.5-July 20

I n t roduction to int ractive com pu ting, branching, looping, subscripts, functions, input/output, su brou tines and si mple file techniques in the context of the BASIC l a n guage. CS 110 and CS 220 may not both be taken for credit. Prerequisite: high school algebra. 12:30-1:45 p.m., M TWRF. M-112. Instruc­ tor: /. Brink.

CS110B

BASIC (2) SCN: 8141 1 1

t CS144

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (4) SCN: 814144

Pre, I, Mid-Session: June 18-July 27

An introduction to computer science i n ­ cluding algori th m design , struct ured pro­ gra m m i n g , n u mer ical / n on -n u m erical applications and use of data files. PASCAL programming l a nguage is used. Prereq­ uisites: Either Math 133, 227, 128 or equ ivalent. 6:30-9:30 p.m., MTR. M-1 l2. Instructor: J. Brink.

CS21 0

COMPUTER INFORMAnON SYSTEMS (2) SCN: 814210 Session II: July 3G-August 24 Com puter systems and their uses in ed u­ cation, com merce, i nd ustry a n d govern ­ ment. BASIC file manipulations, data stor­ age and retrieval. Compu terized word processing, business problems in statistics, linear programming, regression and other fie lds using existing software packages. 210 and 220 can not both be taken for credit. Pre- or corequisite: CS 110, M 128, Stat 231. 9:30-10:45 a .m., MTWRF. M-l l2. Instruc­ tor: A. Welsh.

tCS270

DATA STRUCTURES (4) SCN: 814270

Pre, I, Mid-Session: June l 8-July '1:7

Workshop: Continuation of PASCAL pro­ gramming tech niques , and a study of basic data structures including linked lists, tree, queues, stacks and graphs. Ap­ plications of these forms to sort ing, search­ ing and data storage wi" be made. Prereq­ uisite: CS 144. 6 :30-9:30 p.m., MWR. 0-104. InslruclOr: L . Edison .

Session II: July ]G-August 24

See cou rse description above. 8:00-9 :15 a.m., M TWRF. M-1 l2. ins t ru c­ tor: A. Welsh.

MUSIC Phone : (206) 535-7603 PRIVATE INSTRUCTION (1 -2) TDA

The Department of Music oHers private instruction in variety f media, su ject to i nstructor availability. Contact the Music Office for lesson, credit and tuition details a t ( 206) 535-7601 .

102 UNDERSTANDING MUSIC THROUGH MELODY (4) SCN: 856102 Session I: June 25-July 20

Introd uction to the m usical arts t hrough a systematic exploration of melody as a primary musical impulse in a wide variety of musical styles, including eth nic (folk). popular, jazz, rock, classical , opera and musical th eatre . Designed to e n h a nce the enjoyment and understa nding of a" mu­ sic t h rough Increased sensitivity to melo­ dy. Not open to Music majors. 9:30 a. m. -12: 15 p. m., MTWRF. E-227. in­ structor: D. Robbins.

201

CLASS PIANO, LEVELS I-VIII (1) SCNs: To Be Assigned

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54

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Session I: June 25-July 20

Daily sessions in piano repertoire, sight reading, improvisation, keyboard harmo­ ny. In addition , students a n d piano teach­ ers desiring to work on piano repertoi re wi" be able to use t he practice faci lities of the school (Pian o Practice House) and get daily suggestions. 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., MTWRF. Pia no House. Instructor: C. Knapp.

430

PIANO MUSIC OF CHOPIN (2) SCN: 856430

Pre-Session: June 18-22

A study and analysis of the piano m usic of Chopin . Emphasis on style and tech­ niq ue. A course designed for piano ma­ j ors, piano teachers, and th ose i nterested in furthering their musical understanding. 8:30 a.m.-12:00 noon & 1 :00-3:00 p. m., C. MTWRF. Piano House. in t ru c t or : Knapp.

450

PIANO PEDAGOGY WORKSHOP (1 ) SCNs: 856001 (cr)/856002

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(no cr) Session II: July 3G-August 24) Piano teaching from t h e earliest begi nner t h rough a d va nced piano student. Teach­ ing ear training, reading, rhythm, posture, h a n d position, theory, methods and rep­ ertoire. Designed for the beginning teach­ er as we" as piano teachers desiring a re­ fresher course. Available for no credit: $60. 8:30 a. m.-12:30 p.m.} MTWRF. Piano House. Instructor: C. �napp.

14

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continued from page 1 4

SOlA

CHORAL WORKSHOP (2) SCN : 856003 (cr)/856004 (no cr)

Mid-Session: July 23-27 Reh a rsal, procedures for traditional, contemporary, avant-garde and "pop" styles; performance practices of the vari­ ous music periods; problems of t h e church musician; vocal development; choral reading; problems of the elemen­ tary and junior high hori ter; physical, psychological and music preparation of the conductor. Write for pecial brochure. Available for no credi t : $1 20.

10:00 a.m.-1O:00 p.m., M nVRF. £ -2 2 7. In­ stru c to r : R. Sparks, E. fr icso n C. Pu er­ ling, E. Harmic, j. Ta ylor, R. Nace. ,

501B

JAZZ ARRANGING WORKSHOP (1) SCN: 856005

Session II: August 6-10

PIANO PERFORMANCE INSTITUTE FOR JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

444

Session I: June 25-July 20

Clinica l applica tion of pathoph ysiological and psych pat hoi gical concepts in criti­ cal care nursing, including utilization of int rpersonal and so histicated techni cal skills. Prerequisites: Nurs 354, 383, 394; concurrent registration in Nurs 424 and 434. Tuition : $1 77 per semester h o ur. Sect; n A : 7:00 a. m. -3 :30 p . m., T. & 8 : 00

For a special brochure, w rite: Music De­ partment, Pacific Lut heran Unive rsity, Tacoma, WA 98447. Coordinator : C. Knapp.

NORTHWEST SUMMER BAND AND CHORAL CAMP Session II: July 29-August 4 For a special brochure, write : Music De­ partment, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447. Coordinator: N. Abrahamson.

SOlC

RETREAT FOR THE ADVANCED STUDY OF ORFF-SCHULWERK (2) SCN : C56006 ( cr)/C56007 (no cr)

August 29-September 2 Advanc d in-depth study of the Schul­ werk volumes, supplements, and related materials with one of America's foremost Orff-Schulwerk authoriti s. Write for special brochure : Musi Department, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 9844 7 . Location: Alderbrook Inn. Limited enrollme t. Prerequisi es: See rochure. Tuition: $1 70; no credit : $125; room and board expenses additional .

8 : 00 a.m.-10:00 p.m., WRfSSu. Off-cam­ pus. Instructor: I . Carley.

596

RESEARCH IN MUSIC (1-4) SCN : To Be Assigned

TBA You may register at any time during t he summer prior to August 1 . Independent study card required; see depa rt ment.

599

THESIS ( 1 -4) SCN : To Be MSigned

TBA You may register at any time during the summer prior to A gust 1. I ndependent study ca r d required, see department.

SCNs : 864444 (A )l864445 (8) June 4-August 24

a.m. -12:00 f) 011, R. Section B: B:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, T. & 7 : 00 a . m . -3 :30 p.m., R . First c i a s onl y : 8:00 a . m . -12:00 noon, T. IN-100. Instructor: Sta ff.

NORTHWEST SUMMER INSTRUMENTAL JAU CAMP

464

Session II: August 5-1 1

June 4-August 24

For a special brochure, w rite: Music De­ partment, Pacific Lut heran Unive rsity , Tacoma, W A 98447. Coordinator: N. Abra h a mson.

Study of jazz arranging techniques for ensembles from small groups with or with­ out v cals to t he Big Band sound. Oppor­ tunity for critique of your ch rts.

4:00-6:00 p.m., M TWRF. £- 22 7 . Instructor: T. Kubis.

NURSING PRACTICUM II (4)

NURSING Phone : (206) 535-7672 424

NURSING CENTRUM (4) SCN: 864424

June 4-August 24 Introduction to acute deviant behavior patterns and to life t h reatening medical­ surgical problems of children and adults. Emphasis placed on complex pathophys­ iological and psychopa thological aspects and t heir implications for the nursing process. Prerequisit e : Nurs 354, 384, 393; con urrent registration in Nurs 434 and 444. Tuition : $ 17 7 pe r semester hour. 8 : 00 a.m.-12 :00 noon, W, IN-122. Instruc­ tor: Sta ff.

434

CUNICAL PROBLEMS II (4) SCNs: 864434 (A)/864435 (8)

June 4-August 24 I ntroduction to nursing actions appropri­ ate to st ressful medical, surgical and psy­ chiatric problems and to the new param­ et rs of nursing. Issues in nursing and changes in health care systems are exam­ ined. Prerequisites : Nurs 354, 383, 394; concurrent registration in Nurs 424 and 444. Tu;lion : $ '1 7 7 pe r semester hour. Section A : 1 :00-5 :00 p.m., W. IN-122. & 1 : 00-3:00 p.m., R. IN- 1 1 9D. Section B: 1 : 00-3 :00 p.m., T. IN- 1 1 9D. & 1 : 00-5:00 p.I:I . W, IN 1 2 2 Instructor: Sta ff. -

15

.

NURSING CENTRUM IV (4) SCNs: 864464 (A)/864465 (B)

Prepara t ion for fut u re professional roles of t h e nurse in hea l t h delivery system. Emphasis on leaders hip and management skills, professional judgment, decision making and the nurse as a change agent. You examine legislation economic secu­ rity, professional growth and the utiliza­ tion of health and wel fare resources. Tu i­ tion : $ 177 per semester h our. 5ecti n A : 10:00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 noon, w' IN100. & 1 :00-3:00 p.m., W. IN-1 16.

Secti n B : 1 0 : 00 a.m.-12: 00 noon, W. IN100. & 1 :00-3:00 p.m., W. IN- 122. Instruc­ lOr ' Staff.

478

SENIOR PRAcnCUM (8) SCN: 864478

June 4-August 24 Clini al application of professional and technical skills in primary or se ondary nursing settings. You function in a staff nurse r Ie and progress to a leader hip role. Prerequisites : Nurs 424 434, and 444 ; concurrent registration in Nurs 464. Tuition: $ 1 77 p eme ler h ur. 32 hour per week TBA. first clas s only: 8 : 00 a.m. -12:00 noon & 7 : 00-3 : 00 p.m., T. IN- 116. Instructor: Sta ff. ,


PHILOSOPHY Phone : (206) 535-7228 t225

ETHICAL THEORY : WHAT MAKES AN ACT RIGHT? (2) seN: 866225

Session I: June 25-July 20

What makes a n act right or wro n g ? Are t h e re absolutes, or is everythi n g re lative? Addresses these and other questions pro­ vided by major eth ical theories in the Western tradition, from the ancient theo­ ries of Plato n i sm, Epicu rea n i sm a nd Di­ vine W i l l to the contemporary theories of Situation Ethics, Radical Choice and U t i l i ­ tari a n ism. Counts toward Philosophy gen­ eral u nivers ity req uirement.

381

THEORY Of VALUE: GENES, ROLES AND MORAL BEHAVIOR (4) SCN: 866381

Explores and critically examines the socio­ biological l i terature and its i m pl ications for our understa n d i n g of general h u man val ues and o u r belief in freedom, moral respo mibi l i ty and basic h u man d i g n i ty. F u l f i l ls Ph i l osoph y core req u i rement.

Introduces teachers and prospective teach ­ ers to the Philosophy for Children program deve loped by the I nstitute for the Ad­ vancement of P h i losophy for C h i ld ren ( IAPC); designed for teach i ng h igher rea­ soning s k i l l s to elementary and middle school c h i l d re n . Workshop is devoted pri m a r i l y to g rades 5-6, but is suitable for teachers of a l l grade levels. The 3-cred i t workshop i n d udes answe ring assigned essay questions about the Phi losoph y for Child ren program; a fou rth h o u r of i n de­ pendent study ca n be arranged w i t h t h e i n st ructor. N o t f o r general u n iversity re­ quirement in P h i losophy.

9:30 a . m - 1 2 : 1 5 p.m, M TWR F. HA-204B. Instructor: C. Myrbo.

9 : 00 a. m.-12: 00 noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p.m., M TWRF. HA-213. Instructor: Dale Cannon.

MORAL PROBLEMS: DECIDING RIGHT AND WRONG (2) SeN: 866226

Add resses selected contemporary moral problems, applying major historical and recen t ethical theories. Incl udes topics such as abortion, s u i cide, capital p u n i s h ­ ment, decepti on in perso nal , business and p u blic life, sexual moral ity, war, a n i m al righ ts, famine, enviro n mental eth ics. For Phi losoph y general university requirement when pai red with Phi losophy 225. 6 :30-9:30 p.m., MR. HA-206A. Instruc­ tors: D. Ealma n//. Nordby.

MODERN PHILOSOPHY: FROM FAITH TO HERESY (4) SeN: 866333

Session II: July 30-Augusl 24

An i n t rod uction to t h e development of p h i losophy f rom 1600 to 1850; marks the p h i l osophic I evol ution from confidence in moral, religiou5, epistemic and political authority to critical scepticism and recon­ struction. Examines important figures and movements in the h istory of ideas, includ­ ing Descartes, Hobbes, SpinOla, Berkeley, H u me, Kant, rationa l i sm, empiricism and i deal i sm . Appropriate as int rod uctory or upper division cou rse. Fulfills P h ilosop hy core requ i rement. 9:30 a.m. -12:75 p.m., M TWR. HA-206A. In t ruclors : D. Eatma n//. Nordby.

Pacific lutheran Univ ersity and Puget Sound' summer climate - both are beautiful!

SCN: 866501 Mid and Session I I : July 23-Augusl 3

Session II: July 30-Augusl 24

333

WORKSHOP : TEACHING PHILOSOPHY TO CHILDREN (2-3)

Session I: June 25-July 20

6 :30-9:30 p.m., MR. HA-204B. Instructor: C. M yrbo.

t226

501

16


PHYSICAL EDUCA liON Pho ne : (206) 535-7350 201 A

BEGINNING GOLF (1) SCN: 868001

Session 1 : June 25-July 20

Act ivity co u rse for men and women . Fee : $5. 7:00-8: 15 a.m., M TWR. a-Fieldhouse. In­ structor: F. Westering.

201 B

BEGINNING GOLF (1) SCN: 868002

Session 1 1 : July 3O-August 24

Activity course for men a nd women. Fee : $5. 7:00-8:15 a . m., M TWR. a-Fieldhouse. In­ structor: B. Haroldson.

204

BOWLING (1) SCN: 868003

360A

tor: M. Benson.

215

INTERMEDIATE TENNIS (1) SCN: 868005

Session 1 1 : July 30-August 24

Activity cou rse for men a nd women. Fee : $5. 7:00-8 :15 a.m., O-Gym, Instructor: M. Benson.

222A

Session 11: June 25-July 20

Activity cou rse for men a n d women . 12:40-1 :55 p.m., M TWR. R-ball Courts. Instructor: M. Benson.

222B

RACKETBALL/SQUASH (1) SCN: 868007

Session 1 1 : July 30-August 24

Act i v i ty cou rse for men and women. 1 2 : 40-1 : 55 p.m., MTWR. R-ba l l Cou rts. I nstruct o r : B. Haroldson.

235

CONDITIONING SWIMMING (1 ) SCN: 868008 Session I: June 25-July 20

Swi m m i n g to develop one's f l e x i b i l ity, muscular strength and cardiovascular en­ durance. A l l the benefits of a good exer­ cise program without the usual strai n on the joi nts someti mes associated with run­ ning, jogging or aerobic programs. Course

tor: G. Nicholson.

491 A

Session 1 1 : July 30-August 24

See description a bove.

Di rected study, rea d i n g and research o n selected topics approved a n d supe rvised by i nstructor. Prerequ isite : I nstructor's signature on independent study ca rd prior to registration.

COACHING PRACTICUM (2) SCN: 868011

Student assistant coa c h i n g experiences. Prereq uisite : Departmental approva l ; i n­ structor's signature on i ndependent study card prior to registrat ion.

TBA. Instructor: F. Westering.

491 8

TBA. Instructor: F. Westering.

361 8

INDEPENDENT STUDY ( 1 -4) SCNs: To Be Assigned

Session I: June 25-July 20

Session I: June 25-July 20

See descript,ion above. TBA. Instructor: D. Olson.

SOl A

See description a bove. TBA. Instructor: D. Olson.

A study of se xuality conce r n i n g responsi­ ble decision making, personal copi ng skil ls, and posi tive self concept. School curriculum models w i l l be studied and eva l u ated . 3:00-6:00 p.m., M TWRF. 0-102. Instruc­

Session I: June 25-July 20

TBA. Instructor: F. Westering.

FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION (1) SCN : 868014

Pre-Session: June 18-22

INTERNSHIP (4-8) SCN: To Be Assigned

Experiences closely assigned to yo ur ca­ reer and academic i n terests. You identify problems to be resea rched, experiences to be gai ned and perti nent reading. Ap­ proved firm/organization mutually agreed u pon by you a nd prog ram coord i na tor. Grade determi ned by month l y progress reports, evaluations by s u pe rvisor and other measu res of achievement. Prereq­ uisites : Declaration of major, at least soph­ omore status and completion of at least 10 h o u r s in major. Tal l y card req u i red. Application forms for Internship available from the School of Physical Education office.

INDEPENDENT STUDY ( 1 -4) SCNs: To Be Assigned

Session 1 1 : July 30-August 24

COACHING PRACTICUM (2) SCN : 868012

Session 1 1 : July 30-August 24

399A RACKETBALL/SQUASH (1) SCN: 868006

Pre-Session : June 1 8-22

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM (2) SCN: 868010

361 A

FIRST AID (1 ) SCN: 868013

The study of immedi ate care given to the i n j u red . I n c l udes sel f-help and home care, if medical assistance is not avai lable or is delayed . Included are selecting words of encou ragement, evidencing w i l l i n g­ ness to help, and promoti ng con fidence by demonstrating competence. Lectures and practice periods. Fee : $5. 6:30-9:30 p.m., M TWRF. 0-102. Instruc­

TBA. Instructor: F. Westering.

BEGINNING TENNIS (1,) SCN: 868004 Session I: June 25-July 20

,

t401

Student assista nt teac h i n g expe r i ences. Prerequ isite : Depa rtmental approva l ; i n­ structor's signature on independent study card prior to reg istration.

TBA . Instructor: D. Olson.

Activity course for men and women. Fee: $5. 7: 00-8 :15 a. m . M TWR. a-Gym. Instruc­

TBA. Instructor: D. Olson.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM (2) SCN : 868009

tor: Staff.

214

Session 1 1 : July 30-August 24

Session 1: June 25-July 20

3608

INTERNSHIP (4-8) SCNs : To Be Assigned

See descri pt i o n above.

). Johnson.

Session I: June 25-July 20

Act ivity cou rse for men and women. Fee: $20. 1 : 00-2 : 1 5 p.m., M TWR. UC-Bowl. lnstruc­

3998

also emph asizes swi m m i ng s k i l l i m p rove­ ment. Prerequisite : Must be able to swim 400 ya rds without stopping and be com­ fortable in deep water. 7:00-8 :00 a.m., M TWRF. Pool. Instructor:

tor: P. Hoseth.

501 8

JAZZ DANCE WORKSHOP (1) SCN: 868015

Pre-Session: June 1 8-22

,

Lea rn the tech niques of jazz da nce. Th rough a contin uous moving workout, increase flexi b i li ty, strength, endu rance and relaxation. A challenging move ment class designed for the beg i n n i n g dancer. Open to women and men. 3 : 00-6 :00 p.m., M TWRF. E Campus-Gym. Instructor: M. McGill Seal.

Tuition for summer i discounted nearly 1/3.

17

continued on page 18


continued from page 1 7

t501C

t501H

SPORTS MOTIVATION I WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868016 Pre-Session : lune 18-22 Stim ulating and i nteresting workshop based on new developments i n psychol­ ogy and athletics. Winning ideas and tech­ niques p resented on motivating both indi­ viduals and teams and assessing strengths/ weaknesses of both. Designed for athletic coaches or anyone i n volved in ath letics. 6 : 30-9:30 p.m., M TWRF. 0-103. Instruc­

tS01D

SPORTS MOTIVATION WORKSHOP (1)

6:30-9:30 p. m.,

0-103.

Instructor:

F.

Westering.

t50lE

SPORTS MEDICINE WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868018 Session I: lune 25-29 The fundamentals of athletic tra i n i ng. I n ­ cludes the preve ntion, t reatment, a n d re­ habilitation of most common injuries sus­ tai ned in ath letics. Lect u re periods and labs, taping sessions, and other "hands on" experiences. Fee : $8. 6:30-9:30 p.m., MTWR F. 0-102. Instruc­

tor: G. Nicholson.

S01F

CHILDREN'S DANCE WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868020 Session I: lune 25-29 Learn the creative tech n i q ues of teach i ng dance in the classroom. Promote a k ines­ thetic awareness t h rough a n understand­ ing of the elements of dance. Tap your imagination and creative resources usi ng dance in the cu rricu l u m . F i lms, lectures and partici pation. 3 :00-6:00 p . m . , M TWRF. E Campus-Gym.

Instructor: M. McGill Seal.

tS01G

PEAK PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP (1)

BASKETBAU COACHING WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868028 Session I I : luly 30-August 3 Practical concepts and tech niques that ca n be successful at all levels of competi­ tion . Em phasis i ncl udes "What to use," "When to use it," and " How to teach it." Presentations by successful guest coaches; both "on the floor" and classroom instruc­ tion featu red . 6:30-9:30 p . m M TWRF. 0-103. Instruc­

tor: G. Nicholson.

lor: B. Ha roldson .

.,

3

5 1 V

t,

t

n

II

SeN: 86801 7 Session I: lune 25-29 Continuation of Sports Motivation I Work­ shop ( PE SOl C). Applies concepts/pri nci­ ples of motivation to specific situations and ci rcumstances relevant to many teach­ i n g and coaching situations. Cou rse ma­ terial class-di rected t h rough discussion and feedback.

t501L

SeN: 86801 9 Session I : luly 9-13 A practical wo rkshop in preventing i nju­ ries and preparing the ath lete for com pe­ tition . Theories of warm-up, pre-season, in -season and post-season conditioni n g techniq ues. Students receive assistance i n planning programs plus actual use o f the eq ui pment in the new Fitness Center. 6 : 30c9:30 p.m . , M TWRF. 0-102. Instruc­

t5011

tor: F. Westering.

PHYSICAL CONDITIONING WORKSHOP (1)

PSYCHOLOGY OF COACHING YOUTH SPORTS WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868022 Session I : luly 9-13 learn important positive and negative fac­ tors which affect the youth ath lete and the coach. Topics include leadership styles, building of winning attitudes, goal setting and re lationships between coaches, par­ ents and the com m u n i ty. Designed for youth coaches of all sports. 6:30-9:30 p.m., MTWR F. 0-103. Instruc­

tor: F. Wes tering.

t501 J

RECREATION THERAPY WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868029 Session I I : August 6-10 U ndersta n d i ng and adapti ng recreation programs to meet the special needs of handi apped populations. Music, creative dra matics, arts and crafts, and ga me activ­ ities will be developed for the physica l l y a n d menta l ly h andicapped, aged, and temporarily disable . Emphasis on build­ i n g or renew i n g self-esteem through leisu r e . 6 : 3 0-9:30 p m . , M TWRF. 0-103. Instruc­ .

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868023 Session I: luly 16-20 New, practical and exciting activities in fitness development, movement educa­ tion, low-organized games and rhyth mi­ cal activities are em phasized. Activities appropriate for K-6 are presented; Stu­ dent learning Objectives (SLO) i n physi­ cal ed ucation are exa mined. 6:30-9:30 p . m . , M TWRF. O- Fie/dhouse & 0-102. Instructor: J. Poppen.

tS01K

ts01M

COACHING SWIMMING WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868024 Mid-Session: luly 23-27 Designed for beginning swimming coaches as wel l as potential swi m coaches who are i nterested in u pgrad i n g t he i r technical knowledge on stroke mechanics, tra i n i n g tech niques a n d methods, a n d coaching strategies. Features presentations by sev­ eral of the most respected swim coaches in the area. 6: 30-9:30 p.m., M TWRF. 0-102. Instruc­ tor: }. Johnson.

SeN: 868021 Session I: July 2, 3, 5, 6 Centers on key characteristics of peak performers and how to develop these characteristics in ourselves and others. I n teresting and sti m u lating; excellent course for coaches, ath letes or anyone interested i n beco m i n g more aware of new high level performance capabil ities.

tor: Sta ff.

t501N

FOOD FOR HEALTH (1)

SeN: 868025 Session II: August 1 3-17 Topics include: Nut rients and their me­ tabolism, food fadism, n utrition label i ng, obesity, n utrition related diseases, nutri­ tion d u ring pregnan cy and n utrition for ath letes.

tS010

MOTOR DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDRE WORKSHOP (1)

SeN: 868026 Session II: A ug ust 13-17 For early chi ld hood ed ucators, elemen­ tary classroom teachers o r physical edu­ cation teachers who wish to devel o p and i m prove children's f u ndamental move­ ment abil ities. Topics include early, inter­ medi ate and matu re stages of motor de­ velopment, c h i l d hood growth and matu­ ratio n , fundamental movement patte rns, fitness and movement abilities of children assessment techniques, childhood obesity and curricu lum applications for the pre­ school and / or el ementary classroom teacher. 6 : 30- 9: 30 p.m . , M TWRF. 0-102. Instruc­ tor: D. Bankson.

STRESS WITHOUT DISTRESS (1)

SeN: 868027 Session II: August 20-24 Topics i nclude the difference between stress and distress, red ucing the harmful effects of stress and the relati onsh i p of i ncreased stress to d isease problems. 6 : 30- 9 : 30 p.m., M TWRF. 0-103. Instruc. tor: P. Hoseth.

F. Westering.

18

e 9 Si

4

S A c iE A g. sl

9. st

51

6:30- 9 : 30 p. m . , M TWRF. 0-103. Instruc­ t o r: P. Hoseth.

501P

6: 30-10: 00 p.m., M TR F. 0-103. Instructor:

t,

t5�


POLITICA L SCIENCE Phone : (206) 535-7595 385

CANADIAN POLITICAL SYSTEM (4)

t553 PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (4)

seN: 876385

PSYCHO LOGY Phone : (206) 535-7294 333

SeN: 876553

ASIAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (2) seN: 878333

Session II: July 30-August 24

Sessions I-II: June 25-Augusl 1 7

Pre-Session : June 1 8-22

The gove rnment and politics of Canada, with special attention to federa lism, na­ tional u n i ty, political culture, and consti ­ tutional development. Conditions per­ mitti ng, the cou rse wi ll i nclude a field trip to Victori a, provi ncial capi tal of British Co l u mbia. 9:30 a . m. - 12: 15 p.m., M TWRF. X-1 14. In­

The course describes the major forces that affect p u b l ic person n el matters to­ day, introduces a n d provides practice i n perso n nel work, a n d seeks t o encourage and develop critical t h i n k ing in the world of work.

lectures, tours and meals w i l l be present­ ed to fa miliarize the student with the Asian com m u n ity in the area. Historical, soci o l ogical and psychological material on the Asian experience; provides the student with a perspect ive on one of the more ethn ica l l y diverse m i nority com­ m u n i ties i n the Nort hwest. Coverage in­ cludes Japanese, C h i nese, Vietn amese and F i l i pi n o cultural groups. Meal fee: $20. 9:00 a.m. -3:00 p . m., MTWRF. HA-212. In­

structor: D. Farmer.

401

SEMINAR IN POLITICS : A WATERGATE RETROSPECTIVE (4) SeN: 876401

Session I: June 25-JuJy 20

An examination of the conditions and cir­ cumstances which c u l m i nated in the res­ ignation of President Nixon ten years ago. An assessme n t of the effects of the Water­ gate experience on the American political system. 9:30 a. m.-12:1 5 p.m., MTWRf. X-112. In­ structor: W. Spencer.

501

6:00-9:00 p.m., M W. McChord. Instruc­ t or : D. O/ufs.

567

PUBLIC BUDGETING PROCESS (4) SeN: 876567

Session I-II: June 23-August 25

An i n t roduction to the major areas of b ud get prepa rat ion, analysis for budget­ i n g, capital budgeting, fi nancial ma nage­ ment, and related issues. 9:30-11 :50 a.m. & 12:30-2 :50 p. m., Satur­ day. X-112. Instructor: D. Olufs.

t335

DEVELOPMENT: INFANCY TO MATURITY (4) SeN: 878335

Session I-II: June 25-August 24

Physical, in tel lectual , social and emotion­ al growth from i nfancy through adoles­ cence to maturity. Prerequisite : Psych 1 01 .

6:30-9:30 p.m., M W. HA-211. Instructor: D. Schmut te.

CIVIL LIBERTIES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS (4)

420

SeN: 876501

Session I : June 25-July 20

PERSONALITY THEORIES (4) SeN: 878420

Survey for the study of person a l ity and for the formulation of personality theories. Tech n iqu es of measurement and impl ica­ tions for counseling and /or psychother­ apy. Prereq uisite : Psych 101 . 9:30 a.m.-12 : 1S p.m., MTWRF. HA-21 9.

May 21, 23, 24, 29, 30, 3 1 ; June 4, 6, 7, 1 1 , 13, 14

See Education 501 A on page 8 for course description.

t553

structor: J. Moritsugu.

PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION (4)

Instructor: J. Moritsugu.

450

PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING (4) SeN: 878450

Session II: July 30-August 24

Su rvey of standardized tests; methods of development; standardization; l imitations and i nterpretations of tests. Prerequisite: Psych 243, a course in statistics, or i nstr uc­ tor's consent.

8:00-10:45 a.m., MTWRF. HA-215. Instruc­ tor: Staff.

460

LEARNING : RESEARCH AND THEORY (4) SeN: 878460

Session II: July 30-August 24

Experimental stu dies and theo ries of learn ing. lecture, d iscussion and demon­ strations. Prerequisite : Min. 1 2 hours in Psychology. 9:30 a.m. -12:15 p.m., MTWRF. X- 112. In­

structor: ). No/ph.

19


RE L I G I O N Phone : 241

(206) 535-7228

BIBLICAL LITERATURE : OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT (4)

SCN: 880241 Session I I : July 30-Augusl 24 Literary, h istorical and theological d i men­ sion of the Bible, including perspective o n contemporary problems. 8:00- 10: 45 a . m., M TVV R F. HA-202. Instruc­ tor: S. Govig.

251

INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY (4)

SCN: 880251 Session I : June 25-July 20 Basic questions of the C h r istian faith ap­ proached topical ly. Questions such as w h at Christianity means by " God" w i l l be considered through B i b l ical, h istorical, and contemporary resources. Some atten­ tion given to chal lenges to the Christian faith and its i nteraction with other perspect i ves. 72:30-3: 15 p. m. , MTVVR F. HA-202. Instruc­

tor: M. Poellet.

261A

RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD (4)

SCN: 880261 Session I : June 25-July 20 A critical i ntrod u ction to the study of the religions of the world emphasizi n g h is­ torical origins and cu ltural devel opments. Readi ngs ar centered u pon pri mary sources in translation. 8:00- 1 0 : 45 a . m. , M TWR F. HA-200. Ins truc­ t or : P. Ingram.

t261B

RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD (4)

SCN : 880262 Session I-I I : June 25-Augusl 24 See course description above.

6:30-9:30 p.m., MW. HA-200. Instruct ors : P. Ingram, S. G o v;g.

373

491

THE LUTHERAN HERITAGE: EUROPEAN STUDY TOUR (4)

SCN: 880491 (cr) July 10-31 A summer study tou r marked by three major Eu ropean events: (1 ) the 7th As­ sembly of the lutheran World Federation; (2) the con t i n u i n g celebration of luther's 500th bi rthday; and (3) the 350th a n n i ver­ sary of the Oberammergau Passion Play. Visit h istoric " luther places," and see art and arch itecture of the counter-reforma­ tion in Bavaria, Austria, and Switzerland. Attend l utheran World Federati o n ses­ sions in Budapest and H u n gary. Tour cost: $2,595 a l l - i ncl usive (subject to chan ges in airfare or exchange). Optional four semester hours cred i t : $240. (Tour members taking the course for credit w i l l b e given reading and w r i t i n g assignments by Dr. Ralph Gehrke, Professor of Reli­ gion.) For additional information, contact Dr. Ralph Gehrke, ( 206) 535-7237 or write Department of Religion, Pacific l utheran niversity, Tacoma, WA 98447 by May 1, 1984.

LITE (Lutheran Institute for Theological Education) SUMMER INSTITUTE OF THEOLOGY AT PLU: "THE LI BERATING WORD" (1) SCN : 880001 (cr) July 9-1 3 A week of study for laity, lay staff wor kers, clergy a n d fam i l ies. Guest lectu rers : Dr. letty R ussell, Yale Divin ity School, "Scrip­ t u re as liberating Word"; Dr. J o h n E l l i ott, U n i versity of Sa n Francisco, New Testa­ ment lecture; Dr. T. Er nest Campbell, Gar rett Evangel ical Semi nary, " Preac h i ng the liberating Word." Sessions held each mor n i n g and eve n i n g with afternoons free. May be taken for one semester hour credit. Contact the LITE Office, Pacific lu theran U n iversity, Tacoma, WA 98447, or cal l (206) 535-7342 for registrat ion i nformation .

SOC IA L WO RK/ MARRIAGE & FAM I LY TH E RAPY Phone : MFT 519-522

(206) 535-7659 PRACTICUM I-IV (4 each)

SCNs: To Be Assigned May 21-Augusl 3 The four practica are part of a cont i n uous process toward developing specific ther­ apeutic competencies in work with mar­ riages and fam i l ies. The practica present a com peten cy-based program i n which each student is evaluated regar d i ng case management ski l ls, relat ionsh i p skil ls, perceptual s k i l ls, conceptual skills, and structu ring s k i lls. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and tal ly card req u ired. TBA. Instructor: C. York. .

tsw 365 HUMAN SERVICE SYSTEMS CHANGE (4)

6 : 00-10:00 p. m., TR. E Campus-22. Instruc­ t or : V. Hanson.

SW 475/476 FIELD EXPE RIENCE (4)

9: 1 Ml

SCN : 884365 June 12-July 5 Theories and strategies used in mai ntain­ i n g relevance between cl ient needs and com munity needs a n d human service de­ l iVf�ry systems.

SCNs: 884475/884476 Session I-II: June 25-August 24 Supervised field work with an agency or i nstitution. Applicatio n/i ntegration of knowledge, t h eory and u n dersta nding. Development of skills common to social work. Prerequ isites : Consent of instruc­ tor and tally card req u i red. TBA. Ins tructor: W. Gilbertson.

AMERICAN CHURCHES (4)

SCN: 880373 Session I: June 25-July 20 Explorati o n of how religion ha h aped American culture and how social change has i n fl uenced the religiou s expressions of Americans.

.A3 Pre

Sur No SOl thE tio clu anI OCt

ern pie as � Bri cisi

9:30 a.m. -12: 15 p. m., M TVVR F. HA-202. I ns t ructo r : J. Brown.

382

Mi

WI thE foe (or triE filn ing ine OUI al l

9:0 Ml

WORK IN AMERICA (4)

SCN: 880382 Mid & Session I I : July 23-Augusl 1 7 An i ntensive exploration from the per­ spective of Christ ian theology a n d et hics of this current social issue. 12:30-3 :15 p.m., M TWRF. HA-200. Instruc­ lOr: M. PoeJ/et.

----

� -

-


SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY

STATISTICS

Phone: (206) 535-7394

Phone: Economics Dept., (206) 535-7595 231

INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (4) SCN: 888231

Session I : June 25-July 20 Descriptive statistics: measures a central tendency and d ispe rsion . I n ferential sta­ tistics : generalizations about popu lations from samples by parametric and nonpara­ metric tech niq ues. Methods covered w i l l i n c l u d e est i mation, hypothesis-testi n g, simple co rrelation an alysis, l i near regres­ sion and chi square ana lysis. Not appl ica­ ble to mathematics cred i t . 8: 00- 10:45 a . m . , M TWRf. HA-21O. Instruc­

tor: R. Jensen.

A220

PEOPLES OF THE WORLO (2)

A401A, B

seN: 802004

SCNs: 802001 (4 crs)/ 802002 (8 crs)

Mid-Session: July 23-27 Why don't we non-ju dgementally view them as j ust " d i fferent"? This workshop focuses on how we lea r n to u nd e rstand (or misunderstand) peoples of other cou n­ tries and/or other ways of l i fe. T h rough films, guest speakers, discussions and read­ i ngs we will explore other cultures, exam­ ine our reactions to t hem, and develop our own guidelines for dealings with glob­ a l cu lt u ra l diversity. 9 : 7 5 a.m.-12:00 noon & 1 : 00-4:00 p. m., M TWRF. HA-210. Instructor: G. Guldin.

eA331

NATIVE PEOPLES OF THE NORTHWEST COAST (4) SeN: 802003

Pre-Session & I : June 18-29 Surveys the origina l i n ha b i ta n ts of the Northwest coast from Oregon t h ro u g h Sout heastern Alaska, from pre-con tact to the present t i m e. Exami nes (1) the tradi­ tional l i fe of those native A merica ns, in­ cl u d i ng their art, economy, bel i ef system and political system; ( 2) the changes that occurred due to early contacts with gov­ ernm nts, missionaries, and business peo­ ple; and (3) those societies today, as well as sovereignty fights, Alaska land clai ms, Brit ish Columbian laws . and the Boldt de­ cision in t h e i r native contexts. 9:00 a. m.-12:00 noon & 1 : 0(J... 4 : 00 p.m., MTWRf. HA-274. Instruc!Or: L. Klein.

ARCHAEOLOGY FIELD SCHOOL (4, 4)

Pre-Session II: June l l-July 6 or August 3

Hoko R iver Archaeological F ield School : Pacific Lutheran U n iversity offers an eight­ week archaeolog ical field school at Hoko R iver on the Olympic Pen i nsula, north­ western Wa s h i ngton . I nvestigators focus on two u n iq ue coastal s i tes: a 2,900-year­ old waterlogged fishing camp (contai n i n g perishable arti facts) a n d a la rge nearby s h e l l m i dden/rockshelter. This secluded site, situated next to where the Hoko River enters the Pacific Ocean, has been t h e location for ongoing field programs for seven years. The two site excavations provi d e an opport u n i ty to eval uate the su bsistence/settlement practices and tech­ nologies of prehistoric Nort hwest Coast f i s h i n g c u l t u res. The field school can be taken as a 4-week (4 credit) or 8-week (8 credit) class. Total cost for t u i t i o n , room and board is $480 per 4-week session ( $960 for 8 weeks). Please request a n ap­ p l i cation soon by contact i n g Dr. Da le Croes, (206) 535-7739. TBA. Instructor:

S401

D. Croes.

SIGMUND FREUD AND NORMAN O. BROWN (4) SeN: 886001

Session I: June 25-July 20

orman O. Brown's Life Against Death i s w i de l y recog n i zed a s o n e o f t h e most penetra t i n g and original d iscussions of psychoanalys i s and its impl ications for t h e u ndersta nding of h u man nat u re a n d t h e nat u re o f society. This course exa m i n es Brown's i nterpretations of F reu d's psy­ choanalytic vision, and his appl ications of it to social science, literature, and religion. 9:30 a. m. - 1 2 : 15 p. m., M TWRf. X-203. In­

structor: A . 8ibJa rz.

21

500

APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (4) SeN: 820500

June 4-July 13 S e e Economics 500 on page 7 for course description .


ADM I SSION I N FORMATION

Non-Degree Students

If you are a non-degree student plan­ ning to enrol l for the summer session only, without intention of working to­ ward a degree from PlU or for a teach i ng certificate, you need not file a form al ap­ plication or submit transcripts from other schools you have attended. You may enroll in any course for which you have the necessa ry prerequisites.

Degree Students If you plan to work toward an u nder­ graduate deg ree from PlU, you must complete a formal application for admis­ sion. The necessary forms may be ob­ tained by contading the Admissions Of­ fice (535-7151). If you have done accept­ able work in another accredited college, you will be granted advanced standing for previous wo rk. If you are seeking adm ission to the master's degree program, you should contact the Office of Graduate Studies

Degree Programs - Bachelor's Anthropology Art B io logy Business Administration Chemistry Communication Arts Earth Sciences Economics Ed ucation English Foreign Languages H istory

Mathematics Music Nursing Philoso hy Physica Education Physics Political Science Psychology Religion Scandinavian Studies Social Work Sociology

r

Degree Programs - Master's Master of Arts, Education Cl assroom Teaching Counseling and Gu idance Educationa l Ad m i n istra tion Educational Psychology Reading Special Education

Master of Arts, Social Science Orga n i zational Systems Marriage & Family Therapy Psychological Counseling I n divi d u al i zed Study

Master of Business Administration Master of Music Composition Conduding

Educatio n Performance

Master of Public Administration

(535-7143).

If you are seeking certification, you should contact the School of Education

(535-7272).

If you are a continuing student at PlU and wish to enroll for the summer session , simply return the enclosed registration form by mail or in person to the Regis­ trar's Office.

REG I STRATI ON I N FO RMATION Registration by Mail Ma il registrations must reach the Uni­ versity no later than ten days before the first day of the class(es) for which you are registeri ng . Simply m ail your comp leted registration form with check, money order, VISA or MasterCharge card num­ ber and expiration date to:

Registrar Pacific lutheran U niversity Tacoma, Wash ington 98447 Please make sure you've i ncluded the fol­ lowi ng information : 1. Bank card n umber ( V I SA or MasterCard) and its expiration date. 2. Student 's Social Security Number. 3. Name of student. 4. Name of cardholder (if different from student).

Registration by Telephone Please have the fol lowing i nformation available when you make your call to

535-7136: 1 . Bank card number (VISA or Master-

6. Permanent address if different from 7.

6.

9. 10.

11.

above. Telephone n umber. Date of birth. Ethnic origin (optional). Religious preference (optional ) . System Code Number (SCN) for each course in which you are registering.

Telephone registrations are restricted to students with bank nrds only. Courses

requ iring a ta l l y card are excluded from te lephone registration.

Registration on Campus

Advanced registration by mail is e n ­ couraged. Please use the enclosed sum­ mer reg istration form . Alternat ively, you may register on cam­ pus beginning April 2. Registration for the second session must be completed by Monday, July 16. If you are pla n n ing to attend the entire summer session, you should complete registration for both ses­ sions at the time of the initial registration.

Charge) and its expiration date.

2 Student's f u l l name.

3. Student's Social Security N u m ber.

4. Name of card holder (if different

5.

from student). Address while at PlU.

22

If you desire a transcript to be evaluated and a progress chart created or brought u p to date, you should make you r request to the Registrar's Office by mail or by per­ sonal appoi n tment , preferably before June 13.

Registration Changes and Withdrawals Please notify the Registrar's Office of any adds or d rops from a course. There is no process ing charge to substitute courses. If you register for the first session only and later decide to enroll for the second session, you may do so by adding the de­ sired courses on a drop/add form. The balance of tuition can be paid on t h e fi rst day of seco nd session. If you register for both sessions and decide not to conti nue i n the second session, you must make an off icial withdrawal from the second ses­ sion cou rses.

Official withdrawals, with a grade of "W," may be given any time dur ing a ses­ sion, but there will be no refund if the withdrawal is made after the third (second day for workshops) day of the class. Unofficial withdrawals will resu lt in

continued on page 23


REGISlRAliON I N FORMAliON continued from page 22 grades of t l EW" and w i l l cou n t as fa i l hours i n t h e G.P.A. Courses may be changed from audit to credit or cred it to audit t h rough the third day of class.

10 Cards You need a valid I D Ca rd in order to use the l i brary, cash checks o n campus, and to obtain other U n iversity services and p riv­ i leges. Regu lar year students may have Cards val idated in the Business Office. Those here for the summer only should request t he i r ID Card at the l i brary u ntil classes begin, at which t i me you should request your ID Card at the Busi ness Office.

Student Course Load and Waivers

Tuition, Room and Board

Payment I nformation

T u i tion per semester hou r $1 20.00 Audit 30.00 M . B .A. & N u rsing pe r semester hour 1 77.00 Private Music lessons (13 Yl hour lessons 1 semester hou r credit) ( Per semester cred it hour in 75.00 add ition to t u i tion) Residence Hall rooms Dou bl occupancy, both 250.00 sessions Single occu pancy, both 325.00 sessi ons Dou ble occupancy, one 1 40.00 session S i ngle occ u pancy, one session 1 80.00 May 21 -June 24, $5.00 per day A u g ust 25-September 7, $5.00 per day Board Mon-fri (per sessi on) 1 55.00 B reakfast, l unch, d i n n er 45.00 L u nch o n l y 1 20.00 L u nch & din ner

Tu ition and fees a re due on or before the f i rst d y the class meets. M a i l or deliver t u i tion to the PlU B u si ­ ness Office, P. O . B o x 1 356, Tacoma, WA 98401 . Payment may be made by check, paya ble to " Pacific Lu theran U n i versity" or by V I SA or MasterCard. The student's f u l l name and Social Sec u r i ty N u m ber must be written on you r che k . Should you wish to use you r bank card, please complete the appropriate spaces on the front of the registration for m .

=

The maxim u m course load for each summer session i s 6 semester hours. Graduate students may not take more than 12 semester hours during the sum­ mer to cou nt toward the master's degree at Pacific lutheran U n iversity. Waiver requests 01 academic require­ ments for graduation should be made on the appropriate Un iversity form w i th sig­ natu res of approval from the adviser and the school o r department head, and sub­ m itted t o the Dean of Summer Studies.

Insurance Accident and health insu rance may be purchased a t low cost from the U n iversity Business Office at the t i me of registrat ion . Students in a n y of the fo l lowing catego­ ries or activities a re req u i red to purchase this i nsurance o r provide evidence to the Un iversity of similar coverage from a n­ other sou rce : foreign student; n u rsing . student; studen t participating in off­ campus overn ight tou rs ; and student par­ ticipating in the following courses : Anth 401 A, B Archaeology Field School Field Biology Workshop : Bio 591 Int rod uction to Floweri ng Plant Identification Nat u ra l History of the E S 351 Pacific Northwest Geology Field School ES 390 Shakespeare (trip to Engl 383 Ashland for Festiva l )

Transcript Requests I f you w i l l need a transcript of summer work, you shou ld complete a transcript request form a t the Registrar's Office. This should be done before the last week of summer classes. Transcripts cannot be sent if you have unpaid b i l ls at the U n i versity.

Graduation/ Commencement Students who plan to complete require­ ments for a degree d u ri n g t he u m mer should fill out an Appl icat ion for Gradu­ ation. These forms are ava i la bl e in front of the Registrar's Office. U nd e rgrad uates should ret u r n th co mplet d form to the Regi t rar 's Office, and gra u ate stude n ts shou l d ret u r n the completed form to the Graduate Office, no later t ha n J u l y 6. Commencement ceremonies will be held o n August 24 i n Eastvold Aud itori u m at 7 : 00 p.m.

23


GENERA L U N IVERSITY I N FORMATION Why PLU for Summer Study? A Unique Academic Environment Pacific Luthera n Un iversity is a n i n te­ grated Christ ian communit y ded icated to providing a high quality l iberal education . It offers each person the opportu n ity to acquire the perspective, inSight and d is­ cipline that give added purpose a n d di­ rection to l i fe. I t offers encoun ters with mankin d's in­ tellectual, artistic, cultura l and natural heritage, t h rough which the individual can affirm self-worth and develop poten­ t i a l for self-realization and service. Practica l ly spea k i ng, a l i bera l education st imulates developmen t of mature per­ sonal cha racteristics, competence in re­ search, clarity in t hought and creativity i n action. I t also inspires a sensitivity and awareness of the indivi d u a l 's relation­ ships with God and h u man ity.

Vacation Studies It is easy to combine a vacation with summer study at PL U . Nort hwest native and visitor alike can enjoy the proximity of the area's natura l wonders - lakes, streams, salt water beaches, mountain t rails and campgrounds. The PLU summer program offers weekend adventures, i n ­ c l u d i n g mountain climbing, nature h i kes, salmon and t rout fishi ng, sightseeing and many others. Rail roads, buses and highways make the campus easily accessible to outlying areas. Sea-Tac I nternational Ai rport, a 30m i nute d rive from PLU on I nterstate 5, is conven ient for out-of-state students and visiting faculty .

Summer School and Academic Year Enrollments Summer School 1 982 enrol lment to­ tal led 1 71 1 . Academic year enrol lment to­ tai led 3582, with 2800 fu l l -time students. I n order to give PLU Staff more oppor­ tunity to enjoy the beau ti fu l Puget Sound summers, most offices close at noon on Fridays. However, the U niversity Center I nformation Desk is open on a regular basis Friday afternoo ns . T h e U n iversity Center Building a l so is open weekends, as is the Columbia Center Coffee Shop; the Sw imming Pool is open Saturdays (see Recreational Faci l ities for hours ) .

Academic Advising! Assistance Center I n formation is available in the Aca­ demic AdviSing and Assistance Center concerning all PLU academic policies, procedu res and programs. The center also provides assistance with academic s k i l l s such a s reading, t i me management, notetaking and exam preparation. Dur ing summer sessions, tutorials can be arranged by t h is office on a fee basis for most PLU cou rse offerings. The Center is located on the second floor of the Mortvedt Library, just off the study lounge, and summer hours a re Monday t h rough Th u rsday from 9 : 00 a . m . to 5:00 p.m. a n d F r iday from 9 : 00 a . m . t o 1 2 : 00 noon.

Bookstore The PLU Bookstore is owned a n d oper­ ated by Pacific Lutheran U n iversity for the benefit of students, facu lty and staff. The bookstore sells the textbooks and sup­ plies that are req u i red or suggested by faculty members for their cou rses . Addi­ tional books, suppl ies, gifts, greeting cards, clothing, f i l m p rocessi ng , toilet ries and other items are available for yo u r convenience.

University Accreditations Pacific Lutheran U n iversity is the only degree-granting Lu therafl institut ion in the Pacific Northwest. I t is fully accredited by t he Northwest Association of Schoo ls and Colleges. Professional accreditations are held by the School of Busi ness Admin­ istration with t he American Assem bly of Collegiate Schools of Busi ness, the School of N u rsing with the National League of N u r ing, the Music Depa rtment with the Na t i ona l Association of Schoo ls of M u sic, and the School of Ed ucation with the Na­ tional Council of Accred itat ion of Teach­ er Education. The latter is for the prepara­ t ion of elementary and secondary teach­ ers, principals, and guidance counselors t h rough the master's degree level. The undergraduate program i n Social Work is accred ited by the Cou ncil on Social Work Educatio n . The University is a lso approved by the American hemical Soc iety.

Campus Services and Facilities

Summer hours are : 8 : 00 a.m. - 4 : 30 p . m . MlW R . 8 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 noon Friday.

Pacific Lutheran U n iversity does not discrimi nate on the basis of sex, race, creed, color, national origin, age, or handicapped condition in the education programs or activities wh ich i t operates and is req u i red by Title IX of the Educa­ tion Amendments of 1972 and the regula­ tions adopted pu rsuant thereto, by Title V I I of the Civil Rights Ad of 1 974, and by Section 504 of the Rehabi litation Ad of 1973 not to discri m inate in such manner. The req u i rement not to d iscriminate in education programs a n d activities extends to employment therein and to admission thereto. Inqui ries concerning the appli­ cation of sa id Title I X and published regu­ lations to t h i s U n iversity may be referred to the Un iversity's Equal Employmen t Opport u n ity Officers or t h e Di rector o f the Office of C i v i l R i g h t s o f the Depart­ ment of Hea l t h , Education and Welfare. Pacific Lutheran U n iversity complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974.

Extra hours: J u ne 2 (Sa!.) J u ne 4 (Mo n . ) J u ne 2 5 (Mon.) J u ne 26 (Tues.) J u ly 16 (Mon.) J u ly 28 (Sat.)

1 1 :00 a.m. - 2 : 00 p.m.

5 : 00 - 7:00 p.m. 5 : 00 - 7 : 00 p.m. 5 : 00 - 7 : 00 p.m. 5:00 - 7 : 00 p.m. 1 1 : 00 a . m . - 2 : 00 p.m.

I f you have specific textbook needs at other times, please phone (206) 535-7665 d u ring regular bookstore hours and ar­ rangements will be made to serve you .

Campus Ministry Pacific Lutheran Un iversity by its very nature is a place for the interaction be­ tween studies and the Christian gospel. Opport u n i t ies for the expression of faith and worship are provided for the community. During the summer session , the U n i­ versity pastors are available for conversa­ tion and counsel in the Campus Ministry office located in the U n iversity Center (535-7464).

For information aboul PLU summer con­ nd conventions, call (206)

r renee 535-7453.

24


Child Care

Although Pacific Lutheran Un iversity offers no child care or babysitting ser­ vices, many PLU students, faculty and staff utilize the Trinity Lutheran Child Care Center at 1 21 1 5 Park Avenue South. Lo­ cated close to the Un iversity, Tri n ity Lu­ theran accepts ch ildren on a full-time or part-time basis; no drop-in care is avai l­ able. Children from one month of age through k i ndergarten receive excellent . supervision and nutritious meals and snacks. AIthough there is no summer pre­ school program, there are educational activities schedu led for all ages. Feel free to drop in and observe at any t ime, or ca l l Sandy Geissler at (206) 5352699 for further information .

Food Service

The Food Service Depa rtment endeav­ ors to satisfy the needs of a l l and also helps to make you r stay here a pleasur­ able and satisfying experience. The U n i ­ versity Center cafeteria is open to all. Meals are a lso avai la ble at the University Center Coffee Shop and at Columbia Center Coffee Shop. The University Cen­ ter Coffee Shop is open Monday through Thursday from 7:00 a.m. t o 6:00 p.m. and on Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 4 : 00 p.m. One popu lar item offered is a $20.00 coupon

book for a cost of $18.00, a 10'X, savings. The book may be used in any of our dining fac il i t ies. These books are purchased in the Busi ness Office. A variety of meal plans a re also ava il­ able through the Food Services office lo­ cated i n the U n iversity Center . I f you have any questions about the services offered, please feel free to cal l the Food Services Office (535-7472).

Residential Life/Housing

Summer on-campus living continues to grow in popu lar ity as an econom ica l and convenient answer to summer hous i ng needs. Rates remain wel l below the stan­ dard "monthly rental" of a n a a rtment, and new, flexible summer mea plans i n ­ crease both economy a n d convenience. Both single and double rooms are avail­ able, a l though single rooms are lim ited and assigned on a first -requested space­ available basis. Hall-centered programs are coord i­ nated and i n itiated by both students and staff. Many of the programs take advan­ tage of the nearby mountains, l akes, rec­ reation areas, and t he ocea n . On-campus housing m a y be obta i ned by contading the Res iden tial Life Office at PLU (535-7200), or by marking you r registration form. See page 24 for specific costs.

r

Student Life

Many of the Un iversity's supportive services for students are organi zed ad­ min istratively under " Student Life." Of­ fices prepared to serve the summer com­ mun ity include Career Plan n i n g and Placemen t, Counseling and Testing, For­ eign Students, Mi nority Affairs, Un iver­ sity Center, and Resi dent ial Life. Stude nts with concerns related to any of these of­ fices may correspond prior to summer session or stop i n after arrival on campus .

Un iversity Facilities

UNIVERSITY CENTER ( 1 970) has been celebrated as the "College U n ion to suit all." Strategica lly located, the Center's four levels un ite lower with upper cam­ pus. Designed of rustic Northwest t i m ber, the Center environmentally complements su rrounding scenery and houses the in­ formation desk, meeting rooms, cafete­ ria, coffee shop, games room (six-lane bow l i n g alley, bill iards, cards, etc.), prac­ tice rooms and bookstore. HAUGE ADMINISTRAnON BUIWING ( 1 966) houses U n iversity administrative offices, classrooms, f ac u l ty offices, studios and master control for closed cir­ cuit televi sion. THE ROBERT A. L MORTVIDT LIBRARY (1 966) is an a i r-condit ioned mult i-media learning resource center con ta in i ng over one-quarter mill ion books, periodicals, microfi l m , and audio-visual aids. The building also houses the Computer Cen ­ ter , Academic Advising and Assistance Center, U n iversity Archi ves and Photo Serv i ces. XAVIER HALL (1 937, remodeled 1 966) houses classroom , and offi es for facu l ty of the D i vi sion of Social Scie nces . RAMSTAD HALL ( 1 947, remodeled 1959) contains sc ience l a borator y, class­ room, l i brary , museum, research and of­ fice faciliti es for t he Div isi n of Natural Scien es.

MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM ( 1 947) pro­ vides classroom and activity areas for the School of Physical Education and the

Theatre program.

EASTVOW AUDITORIUM (1952) ac­ commodates concerts, special events and plays. It also contains classrooms, stage and radio studio, studios, ensemble prac­ tice rooms and individual pradice rooms for the Music Depa rtment and the Com­ mu nication Arts Department as well as the KPLU-FM radio stud io.

O L SO N P H Y S I CA L E D U C A T I O N AUDITORIUM ( 1 969) ontains a 3,200seat auditorium and complete indoor faci l i t i es for most spo rt/recreation activiti es.

AIDA INGRAM HALL (1955, remodeled 1 971) houses stud ios, offices and class­ rooms for the School of Nursing and the Art Depa rtment, and the Wekell Gallery.

25

Recreational Facilities PLU offers a broad variety of recre­ ational opportunit ies for summer stu­ dents. Exceptional faci l i ties are ava i lable for most popular sports and pastimes. OLSON AUDITORIUM is a m u ltip ur­ pose facil i ty featu ring a Sport Tred gym­ nasium floor and an Astro Turf fieldhouse. Activities include basketba l l , volleyba l l , bad mi nton, handba l l , racketba l l , squash a n d weight tra i n i n g. Hou rs : 8:00 a.m. to 6 : 00 p. m. , MlW R F .

SWIMMING POOL offers Olympic­ si zed swimming area, diving poo l , sun· bathing area, locker and dressing rooms. Hours : 8 : 00 a .m. - 9 : 00 a . m . (ad uit s on l y) , noon - 1 : 00 p . m . (adults only), 1 : 00 - 2 : 30 p . . (all ages), 4 : 00 - 5 : 00 p.m. (students , fa cul ty, staff and fam i l ies only), MlWRF. Evening : 7:30 - 9:00 p.m . (all ages) and 9:00 - 10:00 p.m. (adults only), MlW R F S. UNIVERSITY CENTER GAMES ROOM featu res modern six-lane bowling alley, pool tables, table tennis, shu ffleboard, coi n-operated table games and a putt­ putt cou rse. Hou rs : 1 1 :00 a.m . . 10:00 p.m . , MlWRF. COLLEGE GOlf COURSE is a 2,770yard, n i ne- hole, par 35 layout with a re­ duced fee schedule for students. Hou rs : daylight.

TENNIS COURTS Six courts are ava i l ­ able on lower campus. Stu dents have use priority. Hours: daylight (until m id n ight upon your request for l igh ti ng at Campus Safety Office). -

OFF-cAMPUS RECREATION Nu ­ merous rec reationa l opportunit ies exist close to the campus. Spanaway Park, lo­ cated by a lake two mi les south of campus, featu res canoe, rowboat and paddleboat rentals in addition to swi mming, horse­ shoes, picnic faci l i ties, golf and fish i ng. The public Spanaway Golf Course is a bea utiful championship cou rse with well ­ kept fairways, greens and traps. -

Sprinker Recreation Center, a lso lo­ ca ted two m i les south of campus, has ex­ cellent faci lities for tennis, track and f ield , softba l l , baseba l l , basketba l l , broom hockey and racketba l l . Sprinker also has a sunbathing area, locker and dressing rooms and an ice skating a rena. For pro­ gram days a nd t i mes or court reserva­ tions, phone (206) 537-2600 .


Special Programs Su mmer Scholars Program The Summer Scholars progr am , a t h ree­ week study program for academica lly gifted high school j uni ors and seniors, i s being held a t P L U j u l y 16 t h rough Au gust 3. Sponsored by the Tacoma Area Cou n ­ c i l on Giftedness a n d P L U , t h e program offers scholarl y projects in advanced math ­ em a tics, writ i n g and l i teratu re, physics, political scien ce , phi losophy, h istory, i n ­ ternational issues, a r t and bi ol ogy. Proj­ ects fea t u re combinations of lectures, lab­ orato ry work and field experience, along with exposure to reside n t i a l ca m p u s l i fe. Participants will be selected by May 1 f r om am ng nominat ions received from hi gh sch ools , parents, and com munity groups. For detai led i n formation, co ntact Dr. judith Carr, Director of Special Academic Programs at (206) 535-7130.

PLU Middle College A greal opport unity for high school ju­ niors an d seniors. H igh Schoo l j u n iors and seniors - '84 graduates - can ge t an early start on a successfu l col lege career at PLU t h i s summe r ! Called Middle College, a six -week sum­ mer program (June 23-A u g ust 23) h e l ps students sh arpen learning s k i l l s while ea r n i n g eight to ten regular, t ransfe rable semester hours of college credit. Middle Col lege helps to mak e co l leg e level stud y easier! W i t h i n a framework of i n teresting, contemporary topics, it em­ phasizes basic sk i l l s so important i n col­ lege - written and oral co m m u n i cation a nd math ematics. Each Middle College student w i l l work c lose l y with PlU professors and col lege studen t tutors on the personal, i ndivid ual basis so i m portant t o effective le a r n i ng. There ar six professors on the f acu l ty , from socia l sciences, mathematics, English, bio l ogy and com muni ation arts, plus a fu l l -time counselor. Each student will receive i nd ividual counsel i n g and aptitude or s k i l l s testing. And each w i l l learn how to f i n d and use i n formation at the U n iversity. Classes are s m a l l , flexible and inform I, giving each stud n t an opport u n i t y to get well acquain ted with both instructors a nd fel low students. Midd le College isn't just work. T h ere is plenty of opport u n it y for pl ay, t a k i n g ad­ vantage of P l U 's excellent recreat i o na l facilities - swimming poo l , tennis courts, golf cou rse, bow l i ng a l l ey, games room, jogging-fi tness course, and handball, rac­ ket ba l l and squash courts. Or one can simply enjoy sunbath i n g or fri bee on Pl U 's spaciou s, green ca mpus lawns.

Stude n ts may li ve on ca mpus or com­ m u te, al though n-ca mpus housing i s str on gly re o m mended f o r t h is program. Cost per credit hour i s a su bsta n tial sav­ i n gs over regular t u ition at most private colleges and finan 'al aid, based pri marily on need, is a v a i l a ble . *Tuiti on (8-10 s emester hours/ $120 per semester hour) . $960-1 200 Room and board ( i f desired) . . . . . 500 Textbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30- 80

ADMINISTRATIVE REGISTER Office of the President President, William O. Ri e lce, M.D. President's Executive Associate, Lucille Ciroux Un iversit y Pastors, Ronald Tellefson and Ron Vignec

(es t.) $1 500-1 780

*Approximately 15% savings over year costs.

5�OOJ

The dead l i ne for Middle College a p p l i ­ cations is June 1 , 1 983. F o r m r e informa­ tion, write or call Dr. judith Gur, Middle College, Office of the Provos t , P L U , Tacoma, W A 98447, o r phone (206) 535-

71 30.

Elderhostel Elderhostel combines the best tradi­ tions of education and hostel i n g . I t i s a prog ram for sen ior citizens on the move - not just in terms of physical movement a nd t rave l , but in a sense of reach i n g out to a new experience. Eld rhostel consi�ts of a national network of colleges which offers low-cost, short-term residential academi c programs for older citizens. Persons i n terested shou l wr i te : U n iver­ sity Center, P L U , Tacoma , WA 98447 for informat i on . Four conse ut ive one-w ek hostels are sched u led , eginn i ng o n J u l y

1 1 , 1983.

Summer Conferences at PLU As a public service, PLU makes its faci l i ­ t i e s available f o r conferences, workshops, retreats and camps . C h u rches, education­ al groups, youth organizations, civic orga­ niz ations and other non-profit groups wishing to consider PLU as a conference site should call the University Center Of­ fice at (206) 535-7450 regard ing prices for room, board and facilit ies for su mme r mee tings . Th is summer, PLU is hosting more than 50 groups, including major church con­ vent ions, the Pa ific Nort hwest Writers and numerous church-related work­ shops. Youth camps includ wrestling. socce. , basketbal l , volleyba l l . music, cheerleading and a pre-college work­ shop. Su mmer Session students wish i ng to attend any of the sessi ons may inqu i re at the U n i versity Center office. Usua l ly observers are welcome at no cost.

26

Office of the Provost Provost, R ichard Jungkuntz Deputy Provost, David C. Vagow Speci a l Academic Programs Director, Judith W. Carr Ch ai r, Division of Humanities, Dennis M. Martin Cha i r, Division of Natural Sciences. Duane Swank C h a i r, Division of Social Sciences, David Atkinson Dean of Graduate and Summer Studies and Dean of the Sc h oo l of the Arts, Richard D. Moe Ad m i n ist rative Assista nt, Constance Bates Coordinator of Pub l ic Events, Noel Abrahamson Dean, School of Busin ss Administration, Gundar J. King Di rector of M. B.A. Programs, Laura Carvey Ad ministrative Assistant, Sherry Kenagy Dean, Sc hool of Education, Kenneth A. Johnston Di rector, Teacher Pl acement and Fifth Year AdViser, Assistant to the Dean, Nan Noldeberg Dean, School of Nu rSi ng . D. Moira Manse ll Adm i n istra t ive Assistant, Barbara Phillips Dean, School of Physical Education, David M . Olson

conlinued on page 27


Dean of Admiss i o n s a n d F i nancia l Aid, James Van Beek Director of School Re lations & Associate Dean, Phillip Miner Assistant Dea n , Cynthia Michael

Director of Financial Aid, Albert W. Perry Associate Dir ctor of Financial Aid, Debra Brac kman

Assista nt D i rector

\

F i n a ncial Aid,

Mark Duris Regist ra r, Charles Nelson Associate R egis t r a r, Loleta Espeseth Transfer Coordi nator, CarniUe Eliason Admin istrative Assistant, Mary AILeD Di rector, Academic A d vi S i n g a n d Assistance Center, Richard Seeger Assistant Director, Wanda Wentworth

Director of CHOICE, Robert K. Menzel

D irector of the L i b rary, 'ohn W. Heussman

Reference librar ian, Susan MacDonald Assistant Referenc L i brarian, Marilyn Martin

For other Adm i nistrative offices, pl ease see t he reg u l a r PlU academic cat al og.

FU LL-TI M E FAC U LTV A Charles D. Anderson, 1 959 , Professor of C hem istry, Regency Prof ssor 1 9741 975; Ph D . Harvard U niversity, 1 959. .

,

Ernest M. Ankrim, 1 976, Associ ate Pro­

fessor of Economics; Ph. D. , U n iversity of Orego n 1976. Dayid M "tkinson, 1 9 76 . Associate Pro­ fessor 0 1 Political Science, Ch ai r, Divi­ sion of Social Sciences; Ph. D., U n iver­ sity of M aryl a nd 1 972 . Myra J. Baughman, 1 970, Associate Pro­ fesso r of Education ; Ed. D., U niversi ty of Nebraska, L i ncoln , 1 975. William Becvar, 1 973 , Associate Professor of Commun ication A rts; P h . D., Ka nsas U n i versity, 1 975 . Steven R. Benham, 1 982, Assistant Pro­ fessor of Earth Sciences; Ph.D., I ndiana U n iversity, 1 979. Mike Benson, 1 981 Athletic Facilities Coordinator and Varsity Tennis Coach; B.A., P i fi c Lutheran U n iversity. Charles A. Bergman, 1 977, Assistant Pro­ fessor of E n g l i sh ; Ph.D., U n iversity of M i n n esota, 1 977. Eli Berniker, 1982, As sis ta nt Professor of Business Adm i ni st ration ; Ph.D., U n i · versity o f Ca liforni a , Los ngeles, 1983. Arturo Biblarz. 1 977, Associate Professor of Sociology; Ph.D., Univ e r sity of Cal ifor nia, Los A n geles, 1 96 . James E. Brink, 1970, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science; Ph . D ., I owa State Un iversit y, 1 970. Joanne E.e. Brown, 1 98 3 Assistan t Pro­ fessor of Reli g io n ; Ph.D. , Boston U n i ­ ,

,

.

,

versity, 1983. Roberta S• • rown, 1979, Assistant Profes­

sor of Modern and Classical Languages; Ph.D., U n i v ers i t y of Ca l i forn ia, Los Ang I 5, 1 979. John T. Carlson, 1 975, Asso ciate Profes­ sor of Biology; Ph. D . , U n iversity of Minn eso t a, 1976. J udith W. Carr, 1 979, Special Academic Programs D i rector; Ph.D .. U n iversity of Washington, 1 974. Kennelh E. Ch ristopherson, 1 958, Profes­ sor of Rel ig ion; Ph.D., U niversity of M i nnesota, 1972 . Edwin Clausen, 1 983 Assistant Professor of History; p h . D . , UniverSity of Ca l i fo r n ia, Santa Barbara, 1979. Dennis L. Cox, 1 97 2 , Assistant Professo r of Art; M .F . A. , Washington State U n i ­ v e r s ity, 1972 Michele A. Crayton, 1 977, Associate Pro­ fessor of Biology; Ph.D., Oregon State U n iversity, 1 974. Dale Croes, 1 982, Assistant Professor of An th ropo logy ; Ph.D., Wash i n gton State U n i v ers i t y, 1 977. Carrol E. DeBower, 1964, Professor of Education i Ed . D., U n iversity of N e braska, Linco l n , 1 964. ,

27

D STA F F

Larry A. Edison, 1 982, Associate Professor

of Mathematics and Computer Science; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1 965. Donald R. Farmer, 1 9 55, Professor of Po litica l Science; Ph.D., U n iversity of M i n n esota, 1 954. Louise S. Faye, 1 969. Associate Professor of Languages (Spanish); P h . D. , U n iver­ sity of North Carol i n a , 1 958. M. Josephine Fletcher, 1963, Professor of Edu cation; Ph.D., U n iversity of Washi n gton, 1 971 . Arthur Gee, 1 968. Professor of Bio logy; P h . D . , Purdue U n iversity, 1 970. Ralph D. Gehrke, 1 975, Professor of Religion; Ph.D., U n iversity of C h i cago, 1959. Kent P. Gerlach, 1 980, Associate Profes­ sor of Ed ucati o n ; Ed. D., Un iversity of Nevada, Las Vegas, 1 980. William P. Giddi ngs, 1 962. Professor of

Chemistry; Ph.D., Harvard U n iversity. 1 959. William H. Gilbertson, 1 968 Associate Professor of Social Work; M . S.W ., U n i versity of Washi ngton, 1 956. Dayid Gilmour, 1 982, Ass istant Professor of Lang uages; P h . D ., Un iversity of Was h ington, 1 976. Stewa rt D. Goyig, 1 958, Professor of R el i g i o n ; Ph. D., New York University, ,

1 966. Gregory E. Guldin, 1 979, Assistant Profes­

sor of Anthropology; Ph. D., U n iversity of Wiscon sin, 1 977. Dayid H. Hansen, 1 974, Associate Profes­ sor of B iology; P h . D. , Un iversity of C a l i fornia, I rvi ne, 1 974. Marlis M. Hanson, 1 971 , Assistant Pro­

fessor of Education; M.A., Pacific Lutheran U n iversity, 1 981 . Vernon R. H anson, 1 970, Associate Pro­ fessor of Social Work; A.M .. U n iversity of Chicago, 1 970. Ed Harmic, 1 97 1 , Associate Professor of Music, M.M., U niversity of Arizona, 1 969. Bruce Haroldson, 1 983, Basketball Coach; M.A., U n iversity of Oregon, 1 964. Larry Hegstad, 1 979, Assistant Professor

of Busi ness Admin istration; Ph.D., U n iversity of Wash ington, 1 978. Anne M. Hirsch, 1 983, Associate Profes­ sor of N u rsing; D . N .S .. I n diana U n iver­ sity, 1 983. Paul E. Hoseth, 1 968, Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education; Ed. D., U niversity of Oregon, 1 977. Laurence D. Huestis, 1 961 , Professor of C h emistry; Ph.D., Un iversity of Cal ifornia, Davis, 1 960. Paul O. Ingram, 1 975, Associate Profes­ sor of Religion; P h . D . , Claremont Graduate School, 1 968.

continued on page 28


Robert J. Jensen, 1 968, Associate Profes­

sor of Economics; M.A., U n iversity of Nebraska, 1 967. James Johnson. Di rector of Aquatics; B .A. , Rocky Mountain College, 1970. Lucille M. Johnson, 1 953, Professor of Eng l ish: Ed.D., U n i versity of Montana, 1967. Kenneth A. Johnston, 1 964, Professor of Edu catio n, Dean of the School of Education ; Ed.D., Was h i ngton State U n iversity, 1 964. David T. Keyes, 1 969, Associate Professor of A rt ; M.A., O h io State U n iversity, 1 966. Gundar J. King, 1 960, Professor of Busi­ ness Admin istration, Dea n of the School of Business Admin istratio n; Ph.D., Sta nford U n iversity, 1 964.

r �

'

.

Gary D. Peterson, 1967, Professor of

..

Laura F. Klein, 1 979, Assistant Professor

of A n t h ropology; Ph.D., New York U n iversity, 1 975. Raymond A. Klopsch, 1 953, Professor of Engl ish ; P h .D., U ni v.ersity of I l l i n ois, U rbana, 1 962. Calvin H. Knapp, 1 959, Associate Profes­ sor of Music; Ed.D., Teachers Col lege, Columbia U n i versity, 1 973. Allyn f. Lawrence, 1981, Ass istant Profes­ sor of Education; Ph.D., U n iversity of Arizona, Tucson, 1 980. Jerrold Lerum, 1 973, Associate Professor of Biology ; Ph. D., Nort hwestern U n i ­ versity, 1 973. Brian E. Lowe , 1 968, Professor of Earth Sciences; Ph .D., U niversity of Wash in gton, 1 972. Kathryn R. Malone, 1981, Assistant Pro­ fessor of History; Ph.D., U n i versity of Pennsylva nia, 1981 . D. Moira Mansell, 1982, Professor of Nursin g, Dean of the School of Nursing; Ph.D., U n iversity of Wash ingto n, 1 974. Dennis M. Martin, 1976, Professor of English, Cha i r,.Division of H u m a n i t i es; Ph.D., U niversity of California, Los Angeles, 1 973. Arthur D. Martinson, 1 966, Professor of H istory; Ph.D., Was h i n gton State U n i versity, 1 966. Maween E. McGill Seal, 1 977, Ass istant Professor of Physical Ed ucation; M.A., Western Was h i n gton University, 1 977. Richard McGinn is, 1 972, Associate Pro­ fessor of Biology; Ph.D., U niversity of South ern California, 1974. David E. McN abb, 1979, Assistant Profes­ sor of Busi ness Administration; Ph.D., Oregon State U n i versity, 1 981 . Richard D. Moe, 1 965, Professor of Edu­ cation, Dean of G radu ate & Summer

Studies, Dean of the School of the Arts; Ed. D., U niversity of Colorado, 1962. John N. Morilsugu, 1 975, Associate Pro­ fessor of Psychology; Ph.D., U n iversity of Roch este r, 1 977. Gunnulf Myrbo, 1970, Associate Profes­ sor of Ph i losophy; Ph.D., U ni versity of Cambrid ge, England, 1 972.

Roger N ibler, 1 980, Assistant Professor of

Business Administration; D.B . ., U n i ­ versity o f Oklah oma, 1 974. Gary N icholson, Athletic Trainer; M.S., I nd i a na U n iversity, 1 968. Jesse D. Nolph, 1 968, Associate Professor of Psychology; Ph .D., Cornell U n iver­ sity, 1 9n. Jon J. Nordby, 1 977, Assistant Professor of P h i losophy ; Ph. D., U n iversity of Massachusetts, 1977. PhiUp A. Nordquist, 1963, Professor of History; Ph.D., U n i versi ty of Was h i n gt on , 1 964. David M. Olson, 1 968, Professor of Physi ca l Education, Dean of the School of P�ysica l Education, Athletic Di rec­ tor; P h . D . , U n iversity of Iowa, 1966. Franklin C. Olson, 1 971, Professor of E d ucation; Ed.D. , U niversity of Ne braska, L i ncol n, 1 971 . Dick W. Olufs, 1 982, Assistant Professor of Pol it ical Science; Ph.D ., Pennsylvania State U ni versity, 1 979. Burton Ostenson, 1 947-77, Professor Emeritus of Eart h Sciences; Ph. D., U n iversity of Mich ig a n , 1 947. William E. Parker, 1970, Associate Pro­ fessor of Comm u n i cation Arts; Ph.D., Southern I l l i nois U n iversity, Carbon­ dale, 1974.

28

Mathematics; Ph.D., U nive rsity of K a nsas, 1 973. Norris A. Peterson, 1 981 , Assistant Profes­ sor of E anom ies; Ph. D. , U niversity of Mi nnesota , 1981 . Michael N. PoeUet,. 1 983, Assistant Pro­ fessor of Religion; Ph. D., U n i versity of Chicago, 1984. Jerry Poppen, 1 978, Lecturer, Physical Education ; M.A., Pacific Lutheran Un ivers ity, 1 971 . Leon E. Reisberg, 1 981 , Assistant Profes­ sor of Education; Ed . D., Un iversity of Ka nsas, 1 981 . Lois F. Rhoades, 1980, I nstructor of N u rsing; P. N. P., U nive rsity of Wash­ i ngton, 1974. David P. Robbins, 1 969, Associate Pro­ fessor of M usic; M . M . , U n iversity of Michigan, 1 969. Denise L. Schmutte, 1 982, Assista nt Pro­ fessor of Psychology; Ph.D., Southern I l l i nois U n iversity, Carbondale, 1982. David O. Seal, 1 977, Assistant Professor of English; Ph. D., U n iversity of Ch icago, 1 977. Richard A. Seeger, 1 973, Di rector, Academic Adv i s i n g an Assistance; P h . D., U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1974. Susan E. Shumaker, 1979, Inst ructor of N u rsing; M . N . , U n i versity of Wash­ i n gton, 1 983. Linda Siegelman, 1 982, Assistant Profes­ sor of Ed ucation; P h .D., U n i versity of Texas, Aust i n , 1 982. Rochell e E. Snee, 1981 , Ass istant Profes­ sor of Modern and C lassical lan gu ages (Cl assics); P h . D . , U n iversity of Wash­ i n gton, 1981 . Richard A. Sparks, 1983, Assistant Profes­ sor of Music; M.A., U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 980. Wallace H. Spencer, 1974, Assistant Pro­ fessor of Po litical Science; Ph.D., U n i ­ versity o f Washington, 1977. Lynn Stein, 1961-1982, Professor Emeritus of Education; Ed.D., Montana State U n i versity, 1 961 . Duane D. Swank, 1 970, Professor of Chemis try, Ch air, Division of Natural Sciences; P h . D. , Montana State U n i ­ versity, 1969. Lenora B. Weirick, 1 973-80, 1 982, Assis­ t a n t Professor of N u rsing; M.S.N., Wash ingt on U niversity, SI. Lou is, 1962. Anne K. Welsh, 1983, Assistant Professor of Mathematics & Computer Science; Ph.D., America n U n iversity, 1 983. Donald R. Wentworth, 1 972, Associate Professor of Eco nomics and Education; Ph .D., U n iversity of M i n n esota, 1972. Forrest Westering, 1 972, P rofessor of Physica l Education; Ed.D., U n iversity of Northern Col orado, 1 966. Jane Williamson, 1 964, Professor of Edu­ cation; Ed.D., U n i versity of Northern Colorado, 1 959. Charles D. York, 1 981 , Assistant Professor of Social Work; Ph .D., Purdue U n iver­ sity, 1 980.


PA RT-T I M E A N D V I S I TI N G FAC U LTY A N D STA F F Sylvia Allen, M . A . , C o m m u n ity Activi ties D i rector, Little Rock A F B, A r kansas.

Diane Bankson, M.S., Lect u r e r, PL U . Sharon Boren, M . A . , E u gene, Oregon P u b l i c Schools.

Barbara Burke, J . D. , Private C o n s u ltant. Dale W. Cannon, P h . D . , Associate Pro­ fessor of H u m a n i ties, Weste r n Oregon State Co ll ege.

Isabel McNeill Carley, I nt e r n a t i o n a l Orff Spec i a l ist.

Steve Carlson, P h . D . , Professor o f Speci a l Ed ucati on, R u tgers U n ive rsi ty, New J e rsey.

David Cupp, P h . D . , D i rector of Special E d u ca t i o n , F ra n k l i n Pierce School D i st r i ct, Taco ma.

David Eatman, Ph . D. , Assistant Professor of P h i losophy, Xavier U n iversity of Louisiana.

Barbara Eliason, M . A . , Ele mentary P r i n c i p a l , O l y m p i a P u b l i c Schools.

Dennis Fatland, M.S., Lect u rer, P L U . Karol D . Gadwa, M . A . , Coord i n ator, D R O PO U T ST U DY, E d m o n d s School D i st rict.

Erwin Goldenstein, P h . D. , Professor of E d u cati o n , U n iversity of Nebraska.

Helen Hafer, M . A., J r. H i g h C o u n se l o r, S u m ner School District.

Joan Hays, M.A., Reading Resou rce Specia l i st, Tacoma Public Schools.

Gary Holma"n, M.A., Lectu rer, P L U . Walter Hunt, M . A . , Lect u rer, P L U . Bob Jones, M . A . , Assistant P r i n c i p a l , C u rt i s H i g h S c h o o l , Taco ma.

Tom Kubis, Speci a l ist i n Jazz Stud ies, Long Beach State.

Michael Lacey, B.A., Lect u rer, P L U . Stephen C . Larsen, P h . D. , Professor a n d Coord i n ator of Learn i n g D i s a b i l it ies, U n iversity of Texas at A u st i n .

Kathleen Lemmer, M . L . S . , Lect u re r, P L U . Marcia Migdal, M . E d . , Project Manager, Pac i f i c N o rthwest I n ternati o n a l , I nter­ cu l t u r a l E d u ca t i o n a l Consort i u m K-1 2 Teacher T ra i n i n g G l o ba l Studies Project; D i rector, E d u ca t i o n a l Reso u rce C e nter, Seattle C h i l d re n 's Museum.

Barbara Minas, M . F . A . , N o rt hwest A rtist. Gail Morrison, B.A., N o rthwest Artist. Mike Nelson, E d . D., Professor of Spec i a l Education, U n iversity of K e n t u cky.

Helmi Owens, P h . D. , Lect u rer, P L U . James R . Patton, E d . D . , Assoc iate Pro­ fessor of Spec i a l E d u cat i o n , U n ivers i t y o f Texas at Austi n .

Charles R . Purdy, P h . D., Associate Pro­ fessor of Acco u nti ng, U n iversity of M i n nesota.

Jerry Ramsey, M . Ed., Soci a l Stud ies Speci a l ist and Sixth G rade Teac her, Dow n i n g E l emen tary School, Taco m a .

Bob Reinke, P h . D . , Executive D i rector o f N a t i o n a l C e n t e r o f Eco n o m i c E d u ca­ t i on for C h i l d ren, Lesley Col lege, Ca mbridge, Massach u setts.

James Scearce, M . N . S . , Lectu rer, P L U . Joan Scott, B.A., P r i m a r y Teacher, Bethel School District.

Carol Stockdale, M.A., D i rector, A n other Door to Learn i n g, Inc.

Fred Warner, M . A., Associate S u per­ i ntend ent, B u reau of S u pportive Services, Tacoma Schools.

Michael T. Wood, Ph.D., Lect u rer, P L U . Niles Wusterbarth, P h . D., D i rector, Speci a l Education, S u m n er School D i s t r i ct .

Cathleen Yetter, M . LS., System C o o r d i ­ nator, Texas Trans-Pecos L i b ra ry System, EI Paso, Texas.

BOARD O F REG E NTS Tacoma Area and Vicinity Dr. Thomas W. And erson M r. George Dav i s M r. M . R . K n u dson Dr. R i c h a rd Kle i n M r. George Lage r q u i st M r. H a rry M o rga n, J r. Dr. W . O. R i e ke, PLU Pres i d e n t D r . Roy V i ra k R ev . David Wold, C h a i rman

Seattle Area and Vicinity M r. G a ry Baug h n , V i c e C h a i rman Rev. Thomas Blev i ns Rev. Charles Bomgren M r. Paul H o gl u n d Rev. C liffo rd L u nde M r. J o rdan Moe M r. C l a yton Peterson Dr. C h ri sty U l l e l a n d , Secretary Dr. George Wade

Eastern Washington M r. Al bert F i n k M r. J a mes P. Gates

Western Washington M rs. Helen Bel g u m Rev. David Steen

Oregon M r. H oward H u bbard M r. Galven I rby Dr. Casper ( B ud) Pa u l son Rev. E . D u a n e Tol lefson

Montana and Idaho D r. Roland G rant Rev. Bob Newcomb M rs. Dorothy Sch naible

Alaska/Texas Rev. R o n a l d D. Martinson Dr. J eff Probstfi eld

California Dr. W i l l i am Ramstad

Advisory Dr. Ro n a l d Matthias, A LC D r. J a mes U n g l a u be, LCA Dr. Richa rd Tros t , A L C / N P D D rs. C h r istopher Brow ni ng, Dav i s Ca rvey, Dwight Oberholt zer, facu lty R i ck B ra u e n , I a n Lunde, Geoff B u l lock , stu dents L u t h e r Bekemei er, Mary Lou F e n i l i , L u c i l le Gi roux, Perry B . H e n d r i c k s (t reasu re r), R i c h a rd J u n g k u ntz, H a rvey N eufe ld , officers

29


N OTES


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Dr. Richard Moe Summer Session

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Pre-Session Session I Mid-Session Session II

June 1 8-22 June 25-July 20 July 23-27 l uly 30-August 24

M.B.A. Session I M.B.A. Session II Nursing Session

J u ne 4-July 1 2 J u ly 1 6-August 23 June 4-August 24

Summer 1984 v.64 no.4 May 1984  
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