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.Su mer S onsCata

Ion - June 15-19 on - Jun 22-July 17 midon July 20-24 Ion 0 July 27-Aug. 21 r

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路on

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University Objectives Pac i fic Lutheran U n i versity is an i n tegrated Christian co m m u n i t y dedicated to providing a h i g h quality l i beral educa t i o n . I t offers each person t h e opport unity t o acquire t h e perspective, insight a nd disc i p l i n e that give added pu rpose and direct ion to l i fe. I t offers encounters with mankin d's intel lect u a l , artistic, cultural and natural heri tage, t h rough which the ind ividual can affirm self-worth and develop potential for self-rea l iza tion and service . Practically speaking, a l i beral education stimu lates deve lopment of mature personal characteristics, com petence in resea rch , clarity in thought and creativity in action. I t also inspires a sensitivity and awareness of the individual's relationsh i ps with God and hu manity.

INDEX/TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Courses Information Courses of Instruction

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H

Harstad Ha l l Ivy Ivy Ha l l L Li bra ry M Math B u i l d i n g R Ramstad Hall X Xav i e r Hall o O lson Auditorium P Swi m m i n g Pool

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M Monday T T uesday W Wed n esday

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Hauge Ad m i n i st ration

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IN I n gram Hall E Eastvold G Memoria l Gym

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I n d icates a n Experimental Course I n d i cates an Eve n i n g Course

Thu rsd ay Friday

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P12345). Please indicate this number on each course registration •

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Classes will meet during the t i mes and days i n d icated in the course description followi ng the lis t i ng of the course. The n u m ber i n paren theses after the cou rse title indicates the n u m be r of semester hours of credit given. A System Code Number (SCN) follows each course title (example

HA

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Buildi g Symbols and Day Codes

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Cou rses nu mbered 101-299 are considered lower d i vision su bjects. Cou rses n u m be red SOO or above are graduate cou rses. Courses n u m bered in the 300's and 4OO's are open to both graduate and u p per d i vision undergraduates. Such courses may be a part of the grad uate program provided they are not specific req u i rements in preparation for graduate study. Upper division students may be enrol led in a SOO-Ievel cou rse i f , a t the t i m e of registration, t h e y provide written permission f r o m the Chai rperson, Director, or Dean of the academic u n i t that offers the course. I t is understood that any student given such permission w i l l have met all assumed or specifically i ndicated prerequisites and w i ll have an above average academic record. I ndependent study, thesis, o r studio projects may be autho rized in certain specific cases i f arranged by the department a nd a pproved by the Chairperson, D irector, o r Dean concerned. An i ndependent study registration card is ava i l able i n the Reg istrar's Office. The University reserves the rig h t to m odify specific course req u i remen ts, to discontinue classes in which the registration is regarded a s i nsufficient, and to wi thdraw cou rses. Course offering changes may occur b u t only u po n approval o f the Dean of Summer Studies.

Academic Adv ising and Assista nce Center . 27 Adm issions I n formation 27 Bookstore . . 28 B u i l d i n g Sym bols and Day Codes 2 Campus Min ist ry . 28 Costs 26 Cou rse Descriptions Anth ropology . 24 Art 3 Bi ology .. . 4 Busi ness A d m i n istration 5 Chemistry . 6 Commu nication Arts . . 6 Computer Science . 14 Coope rative Ed u cation 25 Earth Scien ce 7 Eco n o m i cs . . 7 Education . 8-11 Ed u cational Psy chology 11 E n g l ish 12 French . 15 Geol ogy . . . 7 German . . . . . 15 Health Education . . 21 History . . , .......... 13 Mathema t i cs .. . 14 Modern & C lassical Langua ges . 15 Music . . . . . 16-17 Norwegian . . . . .. . 15 N u rsing . . . . . .. 18 Ph i l osop hy . . . . . 19 Physica l Ed ucat ion . . . . 19-21 Political Sc ience . . . 22 Psych ology . .. . . . 22 Religion . . . 23 Swed ish . . . 15 Soc iology & Anth ropol ogy 23-24 Soc i a l Wo rk . . .. . . 24 Statistics . . . . . . 25 2 Cou rse I n formation . . . ... . Food Servi ces . . . 28 G radua tion/Commencement . 26 Housi ng .. . . . . 28 I n s u rance . . . . . . . . . . 27 . .. . .. . ... . . , ... 32 Map Midd le College . . . . .. . .. . . 28 Objectives . . . . . .2 Recreational Faci l i ties . . . . 27 Reg ister of Unive rsity Offi cers/Board of Regen ts . 31 Regist ration In formation .. .. . . . 26 Residential Life . .. . . 28 Student Life . . .. . .... 28 Tu ition . . . .. . . 26 Un iversity Faci l ities a n d Information . 29 .

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ART Phone: 383-7573 CERAMICS I, II, AND III (4) P3040 PJ0402/P30403 (June 22 - August 19)

*230/330/430

AIRBRUSH TECHNIQ UES (4)

/

(June

Ceramics I: Ceramic materials and tec hniq u es in cl udi ng hdnd-built

A special

and wheel-thrown methods, clay and glaze fur m a ti un. Includes a C(,ramies

II, III:

prior tu 430; 430 may be taken twice. Pr ereq ui si t e : 2.30. 1\·1aterlals fce: B. Minas.

c

SCULPTURE: FROM RODIN TO NOW (4) (June 22

-

a

Pl0404

a

July 17)

include lectures ;lIld weekly day-long field trips to visit sculptors'

A look at the con te m por ary art sc(!ne with special attPlltiuil given to art orthwest with trips to galk'rlcs and museums, visit> To studios

and discussion; with artists worki ng in this arca. I his course may be

taken concurrentlv with Art 286. Fit'ld trip t ra v e l cxpen � to be sh a r e d r\'1TWRF. I, -116. I n , t ru c tor : W. Tomsic.

VISITING FACULTY

by students. 9:00 · a. m. -1 2 : 00 noon.

Laura McCallum, Profession I Artist, M.A., University of Washington, 1978. 6arbara Minas, M.f.A., Unive rsity of Puget Sound, 1979.

CONTEMPORARY ART: STUDIO EXPER IENCE (2) (August 3-14)

An o ppor tunit y of working in contemporary mf.'tiid dnd styll�S wi t h

a

projects of various types from abstract painting to con u : pt u l drl. No previ o us studio expel ipnc<' is required This c our se may be taken

concurr en tl y with Art 285. Studio fee: $10.00. 12:30 p.m. -3: 30 p.m. MTWRF. IN-138. Instructor: W. Tom sic.

326/426

PHOTOCRAPHY I AND II (4) (June 22

-

Pl04(l7/P10408

July 17)

A st udio coursro in photography as ,.lIl art

furm.

F'rimar)' lone

nl ra - ti O n

on Cdmpra t ec hni qu es dnd usc o f darkroom. Stuc!.'nt p r oduc ti o n of slid f '

and print

portiulim, with

an e m p h d si s upon creative

a

Dennis L Cox, 1972, Artist in Residence, M.F . . , Washingt n State U n i v e r ity, 1972. George R. Elwell, 1959, Associate Professor of Art, M.A., New York University, 1955. Walter L Tomsic, 1970, Associate Professor of Art, M,F.A., University of Colorado, 1967.

CONTEMPORARY ART SCENE: NORTHWEST (2) P4040S (J u Iy 27 - August 7)

P40406

to airbru�h tech nique s in

FACULTY

ar ea. Field trip travel expenses to be shared by students. 9:50 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MTW R F. IN-116. I n str u ctor : L. McCallum

-286

Introduction

Studio ice' $25.00. 9:00 d.I11.-12:00 noon. MTWRF. IN-126. Instructor: D. Cox.

stud i os and the i mp or t d n t sculp ture s in the

in th e

c ou rs e oliering an

demonstration. super vised s tudi o , individual and group critiqucs wpekly. D p ,H t nlC nt l (oquipment is availabl , but students are encour a g ed to consider p u r ch s i n g their own airbrush and airhose, t te r c o ns u l ting wi t h i l1S t r u ctor as to type best suiting their needs.

A study of the historical and technolugilal dl'velopmenb of mo de rn sculptur e from Rodin, the fir st modern sculptor, to th e present where scul pt or s work in medi,l ranging f;om neon to earth. The course will

-285

Pl04Il'J

July 17)

basic o per dtiorlS and stenciling p roced ur es employed with ai r brush in a variety of medid. Although contr I of process will be stressed, Cll'atlvity and i magination will be encouraged. Format wil l be lecture ­

$30.00. 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. ,vlW. IN-144. Instr u t or :

-282

pri nt m ,lkin g , dr,.lwing, painting, graphi cs , ceramics, etc.., including

T·chniques in ceramic construction and experiments in gl a z e for mation. 330 must be taken

s urv ey of c era mi c art.

22

and

be t"ken pri or to 426. ,""llt'ri"ls fee: $35.00. 9:00 a.I11.-12:00 noon. M TW R F. IN-1l4 Instructor: C.R. Elwell.

exprro>sive experimentdtion. 326 I11U"t

3


B I O LOGY Ph on e : 383-7561

The PLU Bi o l ogy Field Stat i o n l ocated at Manchester State Park, Ki ap County, Wash i n gton, encompasses 11 1 acres of land an d

15 person>, for further detai l s contaCt Dr, David Hansen, Dept. of Biology, p h o ne 383-7565.

a ppro xi mate l y one-h a l f m i le of beach front. The terrestr ial

-592

h ab i tat is a diverse ble nd of old , second growth n orth west

forest, i n cluding b i gleaf maple, alder, we�tern red cedar,

Douglas fir and more than 1 00 species of flo we ri ng p l a nts, and ferns, The diverse flo ra is com p lem ent ed by a rich moss asse mbl age of n ort h wes t birds (over 1 00 species ) and mammals, It is or1 of th few beach areas in the region wh ere rocky­ i n tertidal, mud bay and grave l l y beach habitats may be fou nd within a quarte r - m i le walk o f one a nother. To com p lement these terrestrial and i ntertidal studies the department a l so m a i nta i ns a boat equipped for off-shore ana l ys is of wate r qual ity nd pl an t and a n i m a l life, Study at the si te is s u pporte d by the ree nt construction of an A-frame b u i ld ing f u ll y equipped for natural hi sto ry studies and providin g for cooking, bathing and sleepins. Overall, the PLU Bio lo gy Field Station a l l ows for an intense I arn i ng experie n ce while st i l l affording one t h e re l a x i n g atmos phere p rov ided by the meeting o f no rth west wo od s an d sea. S ee Biology 591, 592, 593 and 594 for u n ique one-week summer opportun ities at the Biology Field Station.

112

HUMANISTIC BOTANY (4)

A on -week (5-day) work h p at the PlU Biology F i e l d ration at Man ch ster St a te Pa rk sp ec i fi c a l ly de igned to i n t ro d u e th p ri ma ry and secondary tp dc h er or nyon inler St 'd in the n ort hwes t avifauna to the common birds lour region. lectute$ wrll fa us on bird migrat i on , b r eed i ng b havior,natural h ist ory and classification, Field work wi l l con .is t of le a rn i n g how t<) id ntify ca r r I l y the morl' common birds by b,1th th ir ight and song. Techn i quC's such as cap t u r i n g biros with rnrst nets and banding them will be em ployed to afford ve ryone t' xpe ri e n ce in h a n dl ing Jnd ob rvi n g wild bird.s u p close. Class wi l l meet at 8 :00 a.m" July 20, in Ivy 1 06 dnd l eave that afternoon for th rielcl Station. W wil l stay th entire week at the Field St ati on. returning t the Cdmpus n July 24. A $15.00 fee for fo o d will be ch a r ged; each person is r espo n > i ble for his/her own sleep i ng ba g, towe l s , toiietrie . etc. Tran sp or t a t i on i� pr ov id ed . For further d t.iils cont dCt Dr. Denni� J. Mart i n , Dt'pt. of Biola 'y, phone 383-7564.

Pl0602

(June 22 - J u ly 1 7)

-593

An i ntroduct i o n to the basic pr i n ci p l es of biology wi th an emphasi s on p la nts and th eir impact on people, The major topics w i l l i n c l ude : Use f u l p l ants; poiso nous pla n t s; medicinal p l a nts, includi ng narcotic and h al l u c i n oge n i c plants; food p l ants and orga n i c garde ni ng; and pT nt propagati on, I ncludes laboratory. Satisfies g ene ral university requirement. 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 2:30 p . m. MTWRF. Ivy 1 05. Instructor: M. C ra yto n .

201

(June 1 5-1 9)

communi!i's; lab and field work will emphasize id ntification of

common or ga nis m , des(ription of community tru tu re , and natural h i s tory . I,�� w i l l meet at 8;00 a. rn., J u ne 1 5, in Ivy Hall 1 06 and prcKe('d to tlw F k ld Stdlion; we will r turn to campus f r i day evening, Each �tudent must p rov id e his/her own s le e pi ng bag, towels, toiletries, field cl oth es , etc. Trdn5port.:ttion Jnd wad i ng gedr wi l l be providecl. A $15.00 fee wil l be charg d for room and board. F r f u r th er inform,nion contact Dr. MrGinnis, Dept. of Biology, phone 383-7570

(June 22 - J u l y 1 7)

The growth , contro l , ph ys iol ogy , isolation and identification o f microorg an is ms , eS!Jec i a l l y those which affect humans, Includes l a b or dtory. Prereq u i sites : Biology 1 1 1 , Chemi str y 103, e q u iv ale nts or co n s ent. (This cou rs e is i nte nded for n ursing or other n o n -science majors; not open t o bi ology majors,) 8 : 25 a.m,- 12 : 30 p,m, MTWRF. R-207. Instructor: A, Gee .

328

DEVElOPMENTAL GENETICS (4)

-594

P2060J

at the PLU Mand1Pst 'r 'i ta t Pdtk Field StiltIon introdlll tion to the fishe!o of PugC! S o und, Lel t ures wil l review fi�h phyl oge n y and cIJ�,ifiCll io;) .l!o well as th life histories of r Hnmon l o c a l fish . Field and lab work will i n cludl': olle('tion of inteltidal Mid ,ubtidal fishe, with beJch e in e , trawls, and, for 1.r 1 vae, p l ank to n nets: identificaliorl and di,section; and, oh., r Vdt ion of fi ,l1('s

This 5-day workshop

provides an

in dquaria, Class will meet

8 : 00 d.m., l une 2.9. i n Ivy Ha l l '106 and proc 'eel to

fee will be charl,;ed for room and bn rd. lor fUrlhpr informcltiofl co n t clct Dr. Me Jlnni'\, Dept. of ilio1t)ln, )hur1e 383-7570

FACULTY John T. Carlson, 1975, Associate Prof ssor of Biology.

(J une 22-26)

Ph.D., Un iversity of M i n nesota, 1 976,

A on e-week (5-day) wor k shop at the PLU Biology Field Station at M anch este r State Park serves as a pr act i cal introduction to flowering

Michele A. Crayton, 1977, Associate Professor of

B i o logy, PhD" Oregon Stat University, 1974. Arthur Gee, 1968, Associate Prof ssor of Biology, Ph.D., Purdue Univer i t y , 1 970. David Hansen. 1974, Associ ate Profe sor of Bio i gy, PhD., Uni rsity o f Ca l i forni a, Irvine, 1974.

plants for primary and secondary school teachers or a n yone de s iri n g to

bl'come more familiar wi th floweri ng p l ants, Topics to be i n c l u ded are: collection and mo u nti ng of spe cime ns , structure and id ntification of fl ow ers , and aspects of eco logy related to the var i et y of flower types found. Students wi l l stay at the f i eld station d u r i n g the co u r se , We wil l rncC't for introdu( ,lory material in Ivy Ha l l 1 06 at 8:00 a.m. , JlIne 22, and th e n go i rect ly to the fie ld station , returning to the PLU ampul on the a fter n oo n of J u n e 26, Each i ndividual must supply hi s/h C' r o wn s l eep i n g bag. t o we ls, toiletries, etc. An additional fee of $15.00 wi ll be ha rged for f od, Transportation will be provided. Course is l i mi ted to

at

the Field ':>tation; we w i l l retur n to G.irnplI" r riday even ing, J u l y 3. Each student must provi (' his/her own slp(.ping b'lg, to e l, toi l e t ri �,field cloth '), etc. T ran pOrldtion dnd wdding geM Wil l be prov ided . A $1 5 .00

FIELD BIOLOGY WORKSHOP: INTRODUCTION TO FLOWERING PLANT IDENTIfiCATION (2) P40604

FIELD BIOLOGY WORKSHOP: INTRODUCTION TO FISHES OF PUGET SOUND (2) P40607 (June 29 - Ju ly 3)

(July Zl - Aug ust 21)

An or 'an i s m 's genetic material e n codes t h e information which is l1 e e ss ary to regul ate all of the processe s carried out by the organi s m . T h is regulation occurs thro ughout the l i fe o f the organism, i n c l u d i n g du ri ng the development l e a di ng to the ma t u re form. Genetic abnormalities are often re fle cted in developmental abnorma l i ties, For ex mple. many h u man birth defects can be traced to ab normalities i n t h e exprpssion of the genetic informatio n . I n this course we will c plar the r ole of e xp ress i on of genetic i n formation i n guiding the developm nt of o rg a n ism s . The scope w i l l be broad, ra nging from bacteria and viru e s to humans. Pr erequ is it e : g e n era l biology, a.ss u m i n g the course included an introduction t o molecu lar genetics (PL B i o logy 156 o r eq u ivalen t ) . 8:25 a,m,- 1 2 :30 p,m. M TWRF. R-21 0 . I n st r uc to r : J. Carls o n .

-591

FInD BIOLOGY WORKSHOP: INTRODUCTION TO INTERTIDAL ECOLOGY (2) P40606

A 5-da workshop at the PLU Mdnch stcr State ark rield St atio n pr vid s an introduction to th ')tru ture nd dyn�mi ;, of temperate inte rt i d.l l communities, Le ctu r . s will r(,view the literature on these

INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY (4) P10601

FIELD BIOLOGY WORKSHOP: INTRODUCTION TO IDENTIFYING BI RDS OF THE PUGET SOUND REGION (2) P40605 (J u ly 20-24)

Dennis Martin, 1 975, Assista nt Professo r of Bi ology , Ph . D., U ah Sldte

4

niversity, 1975. Richard McGinnis, 1 972, Associ ate Prof sor of Biology, Ph D , Univer tty of So uth ern California, 1974.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BBA 383-7252 281

FINANOAL ACCOUNTI NG (4) Oune 22 - July 17)

MBA 383-7250

Pl0801

ethical, religious, economic, and educational and international implications in the formulation of business policies and objectives. Includes comprehensive case analyses. Required for business majors. Prerequisites: Senior standing; 281,282,350,364 and 370. 8:00 a.m.10:30 a.m. MTWRF. HA-221.lnstructor: R. Nibler. T"lIv card required.

An introduction to accounting concepts and principles. Preparation and analysis of financial reports. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon. MTWR. R-ll0. In truetor: C. Purdy.

282

490

ACCOUNTING I NFORMATIO N SYSTEMS (4) P20802 (July 27 - August 21)

analy is and Interpretation of accounting and economic data and their usc in planning and control. Applications utilizing computer terminal. Prerequisite: 281. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon. MTWR. R-ll0. Instructor: C.

and Promotion. Both consumer and industrial prod ucts will be included. U.S. Interntional Trade Ad ministration representatives will

Purdy.

provide a d iscussion of each nation's business and economic climate. Prerequisite: BA 370 or Permission of Instructor. For more detailed

(June 22 - July 17)

Pl080J

MANAGEMENT (4)

information regarding this study tour,contact Dr. David McNabb,

critical e ami nation of the principles and processes of administra­ MiHld" m nt techniques and the functions of planning, organiz­ ing. di rectio n and control are discussed from both the classical and the behavioral po in b of vi w.Study of the concepts and characteristics of

A

383-7301.

tion.

.

*550

the production function. Introduction to case analysis and problem­ solving techniquc.s. Prerequisites: Econ 150, Stat 231 (may be concur­

operate. It encompasses three major perspectives: the external organization environment, including legal, ethical, social,economic and political influences; the organization itself as an entity; and the internal organization environment. Prerequisite: 350 (or 502). 6:30 p.m.-l0:00 p.m. MW. HA-221. Instructor: C. Hansvick. Tall'y card

PERSONNE L AND INDUSTRIA L RELATIONS (4) P40804 (June 1 - J u ly 10)

Detail d ex a mi nat i on of behavioral processes of individuals and gro ups in business organizations. Emphasis on policy issues and specific problems in managing human resources with focus on modern pr de ti es of indu,;tri I relations and personnel management in

required.

*590

industrial <lnd other organizations. Concentrated study of the tools of financial analysis: Fund, and cash flows, critical analysis of financial planning and budgeting, and the concepts related to capital expendi­ ture budgeting, and the cost of capital. An introduction to financial strategies and de.ision-making for financi ng, expansion,and dividend

present idea, market analysis,cost estimates as part of a marketing plan. Prerequisite: BA 502. 6:00 p.m.-l0:00 p.m. T. HA-221. Instructor: S. Thrasher. Tally card required.

policies. ReqlJired for business majors. Prerequisites: Econ 150, Stat 231, BA 281, and BA 350. J u ni o r standing. 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. MW. HA-204. Instructor: T. Sepie. Tally card required.

MANAGER IAL FI NANCE (4) (June 22 July 17)

FACULTY

Pl0811

Christine Hansvick, 1979, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Ph.D., University of Windsor, 1977. Gundar J. King, 1960, Professor of Business Administration, Dean of the School of Business Administration, PhD., Stanford University, 1964. David McNabb, 1979, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1979. John Meehan, 1980, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, PhD., New York University. Roger Nibler, 1980, Visiting Assistant Professor of Business Administration, D.B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1974. F. Thomas Sepic, 1979, Associate Professor of Business Administration, PhD., University of Washington, 1979. Steven Thrasher, 1980, Associate Professor of Business Administration, PhD., Northwestern University, 1974.

-

Concentrated study of the tools of financial analysis: Funds and cash flows, critical analysis of financial statements and other financial information, t chniques of financial planning and budgeting, and the concepts related to capital expenditure budgeting, and the cost of capital. An introduction to financial strategies and decision-making for financing, e;.;pansion, and dividend policies. Required for business majors. Prerequisites: Econ 150, Math 128 (or equivalent), Stat 231, and BA 281. Junior standing. 9:50 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MTWRF. HA-204. I n str uctor: J. Meehan. Tally card required.

370

MA RKEnNG SYSTEMS (4) (July 27 - August 21)

P20805

The flows of goods and servicC's in the economy, economic and behavioral approaches to the analysis of demand; the role of the mJrketing functions in d business firm. Determination of a marketing mix - p r o d uct poli cy, pricing, channels of distribution, and marketing communications. Prerequisites: Econ 150, Math 128 (or equivalent), Stal 231, and BA 281. J uni or standing. 9:50 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MTWRF.

HA-2'13.

*387

Instructor:

D. McNabb. Tally card required.

DATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS (4) (June 1 - July 22)

P40806

VISITING FACULTY

A computer-laboratory-oriented course which includes basic program

flow charting, intensive study of programming languages wi th ernphasi, on BASIC. and the development of a working

and system analYSIS Jnd

knowledge

with

computer

hardware

and

software

systems.

Pr('r('quisitcs' RA 281 dnd BA 282. 5 : 30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. MIN. HA-217.

In�tr uct or: J. Meehan.

455

BUSINESS POLICY (4)

Formulation of

po l i ci e s

P20807

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT OF NEW PRODUCTS (4) PJ0810 (June 2 - August 18)

Tuition: $127 per semester hour. Identification of market opportunities,the choice of which goods and services in what combinations to market, and the prices at which to offer them. Student teams will develop a new product or service and

statements and other financial information, techniques of financial

364

ORGA N I ZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND ENVIRONMENT (4) P40809 (June 1 - July 8)

Tuition: $127 per semester hour. The study of open sociotechnical systems within which a manager must

rent), and BA 281. Junior stand ing . 8:25 a.m.-ll:05 a.m. MTWRF. HA-221. In>truClor: C. Hughes. Tally card required.

*354

,P40808

This is an applications-oriented introduction to the specialized field of international marketing. Students will visit 11 business firms in 9 European nations. Companies visited will be involved in one or more of the Four P's of marketing - Product,Price, Place and Distribution,

Introduction to management information systems. Emphasis on the

350

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (4) (May 25 - July 4)

July 27 - August 21)

to inte gTdte all functions of business. Social,

5

Carlyle Hughes, Professor and Chairman, Dept. of Management, University of the District of Columbia, Washington D.C., PhD., University of Washington, 1966. Charles R. Purdy, Associate Professor of Accounting, University of Minnesota, PhD., University of Minnesota, 1963.


CHEMISTRY

COMMUNICATION ARTS

383-7330 or 383-7553

Phone 383-7762

103 CHEMISTRY OF LIFE (4)

The course will examine subjects such as: (1) The relationship between communication and the law; (2) The effects of verbal and

P21001

(July 27 - August 21)

non-verbal communication cues on judge and jury behavior; (3) The

General, organic, and biochemistry pertinent t o chemical processes in the human organism; suitable for liberal arts students, nursing

Toulmin model and courtroom arguments; (4) Opening and closing statements - argumentative, behavioral and rhetorical principles; (5) Cross-examination.

students, and prospective teachers. Students who have not completed high school chemistry are encouraged to take 104 before taking 103.

Class activities will include: (1) Assigned readings from Communication Journals, Law Reviews dnd textbooks; (2) Guest lectures by attorneys; (3) Observation of courtrooms; (4) Exercises in preparing for courtroom arguing. 8:25 a.m.-ll:05 a.m. MTWR. HA-

9:50 a.m.-ll:55 a.m. MTWRF. R-l03. Instructors: W. Giddings and S. Tonn. LAB: 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. TR. R-302.

321

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (4)

204. Instructor: M. Bartanen.

P21002

-448

(July 27 - August 2 1 ) Chemical methods of quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental methods. Prerequisites: Chem 116 and Math 133. 8:25 a.m.-ll:05 a.m. MTWR. R-l03. Instructor: L

A one-week workshop designed to acquaint students with the naturp and advocacy skiils used in the operation of small claims courts. Almo,t everyone has heard of small claims court but may not realize the court is a convenient and potent tool of the adversary process. The small claims court provides a valuable forum where people can do

Huestis. LAB: 12:00 noon-3:30 p.m. MTWR. R-317.

FACULTY

something about the minor problems and aggravations which frequently confront them. In small claims court,the individual can compete as an equal with even the largest corporation, if the person has the necessary information to properly present his/her case. The course will examine subjects such as: (1) The nature of small claims court and the importance of argumentation and communication skills to it> operation; (2) The skills of practical argument: building a case. d termining salient issues, refuting opposing arguments, and answering question> posed by the judge. Class activities will Include: (1) Reading and discussion of materials related to the small claims (ourt: (2) Guest lectures (if possible) by persons connected with the small claims court; (3) Observation of the proceedings of a local small claims court (if feasible); (4) In-class exercises to familiariLe students with advocacy skills. 9:00 a.m.-12:00

William P. Giddings, 1 962, Professor of Chemistry, Ph.D., Harvard U n iversity, 1 959.

Lau rence D. Huestis, 1961 , Professor of Chemist ry, Ph.D., U niversity of Ca lifornia, Davis, 1 960.

Sheri J. Tonn, 1979, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1976.

COMMU'NICATION ARTS *-445

WORKSHOP IN RUNNING EF FECTIVE MEHINGS (2) P21201 (July 27 - August 21 )

noon and Bartanen.

I am sure that sometime in the past you have left a meeting totally frustrated because nothing was accomplished. If so, this workshop is for you because we are going to examine ways in which meetings can be made more effective. We will look at people's behavior that contributes to effective and ineffective meetings through the use of lecture, discussion, class exercises, practical applications and case

*-449

WORKSHOP I N EFFECTIVE LISTE NING (2)

a child's time than any activity other than sleepingl 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. TR. HA-204. Instructor: G. Wilson.

Pl1203

458

Pl1206

This course is designed to acquaint you with materials, techniques and theories of creative dramatics. You will participate in creative dra­ matics activities, thereby learning by doing. This course is intended for elementary and junior high teachers or prospective teachers, theatre majors, religiOUS leaders. youth and camp counselors, day care workers, social and psychological workers and community theatre

a couple of appendages called ears, right? Unfortunately,

The purposE' of this workshop is to examine listening as a critical communication skill. The underlying premise is that listening is a skill

leaders interested in working with children. 9:50 a.m.-12:30 p.m. MTWRf. M-202. Instructor: W. Parker.

that can be enhanced through training. Through a week-long series of readings, lectures, discussions, exercises and practical applications, we will explore the art of listening. The objective is simply to help one another become more competent listeners. 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon and 1 :00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. MTWRF. HA-206. Instructor: C. Spicer.

FACULTY

Mi hael D. Bartanen, 1979, Assista nt Professor of

Pl1203

Communication Arts, PhD., U n i versity of Southe rn Ca lifornia , 1979. William E. Parker, 1970, Associate Professor of Communica ti on Arts, PhD., University of Southern Il lino is, 1974.

(June 22 - Ju ly 17) This course is designed to acquaint students with the theory and prac­ tice of argumentation in legal contexts. It is based on three premises: (1) legal institutions are important enough to merit close undergradu­ ate study in a variety of contexts and academic disciplines; (2) com­ munication and argumentation theories play a vital role in legal pro­ cesses; and (3) the study of communication and argumen t ation and the law should be both interesting and useful to all studen!>, providing <ldditional value to pre-law students, communication students, amJ students interested in the subject area. The purpose of the course is to provide better understanding of how communication Jnd argumenta­ tion principles affect legal institutions and processes.

CREATIVE DRAMATICS (4) (june 22 - July 17)

hearing and listening are not synonymous. Most of us hear. but only rarely listen.

LEGAL ARGUMENTATION (4)

(June 22 - July 17)

television serves for the viewer? This workshop will address the,e questions and others which participants may wish to raise. The gOdl of the workshop is better understanding of the a('(ivity that takes more of

(July 1 5-19)

-447

CHILDREN AND TELEVISION: A WORKSHOP (2) P1120S

When we think of communication, we tend to think about our abilities as speakers. In our day-to-day interactions, though, we spend far more time listening to others talk than we do talking ourselves. Listening is something that we assume people can do without training. All you need ar

1 :00 p.I1l .-4:00 p.m. MIWRF. HA-223. Instructor: M.

What do we really know about the effects of television on children? Do people watch shows or just watch TV? How can we help our children become better television consumers? What Jre the functions

studies. We will discuss topics such as small group processes, leadership functions, individual leadership styles, parliamentary procedures, agenda setting, time management and conflict management. 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. MR. HA-206. Instructor: C. Spicer.

446

ARGUMENTATION SKI US IN THE SMAU CLAIMS COURT (2) P4U04 (July 20-24)

Christopher Spicer, 1978, Assista n t Professor of

6

Communication Arts, PhD., University of Texas at Austin, 1 978. Gary Wilson, 1 975, Professor of Communication Arts, PhD., Michigan State University, 1971.


EARTH SC I EN C E

ECONOM I CS

Phone : 383-7597 or 383-7645

Pho n e : 383- 7563

351

231

NATURAL HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (6) P21 80 1 ( J u ly 27 - Au gust 21 )

GEOLOGY OF PACIAC NORTHWEST (2) ( J u ne 22 - J u l y 17)

See Statistics 231 on page 25.

·361

·500 APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (4)

Tuiti o n : $1 27 per semester h o u r (Wi l l n o t cou n t f o r Statistics M i n o r . ) An i n tensive i ntrod uction t o statistical methods f o r graduate students w h o h a v e n o t previously taken I n trod uctory Stati t i stics. Emphasis will be on the appl ication of i n fe rential statistics to concrete situations. Topics covered will i n c l ude: measu res of location and variation, probability, esti mation, hypothesis tests.. and regression. 6 : 30 p.m.-10 :00 p.m. TR. HA-210. I n structo r : R . Jensen.

(J uly 20-24)

ENERGY EDUCATION WORKSHOP (4)

·501

ECONOMICS FOR THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM (2) P42419 (J u l y 20-24)

For course descri ption a nd scho larship i nformat ion, see Educa tion 501 H on page 9. •

P41804

504

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS AND POLICY DECISIONS (4) P22004 (J u l y 13 - August 21 )

Tuition : $127 per semester hour Basic economic concepts applied to policy formation a nd opera t i ng decisions. 6 : 30 p . m . - 1 0 : oo p.m. TR. H A - 200. I nstructor : N. Peterson.

(July 20 - August 7) A s u rvey of the world's e n e rgy resou rc with special reference to Nonh America. T pi nsidered i n clude geo logl al occurrence, geographic d i s t r i b u t i o n , and quantit ies of energy resources; the fund ament a l technol ogies and economic posit ions o f these resou rces and the poli ical fram work within whi h the resources a re being deve loped; t h e rate o f use of resou rces; a n d examination of the con­ cept of ren wable re ou rces and a steady-state economy. Energy eduation materials ava i l a ble for use i n the c l assroom w i l l be studied and field trips will be taken to solar, hydropower, co al , gas, nuclear, and coal l i q uefaction faci l i t ies. Previous o u rses not required. 9 : 00 a . m . 1 2 : 00 noon a n d 1 : 00 p . m .-3:00 p . m . M TW R F . R-10B. Instructors : W . Hager, J . Herzog and W . You n gquist.

FACU LTY Ernest M. Ankrim, Assistant Professor of Economics, Ph.D., U n iversity of Oregon, 1 976.

Robert Jensen, 1 968, Associate Professor of Eco nomics, M.A., Un iversity of Nebraska, 1 967.

Norris Peterson, Ph.D. ca ndidate, U n iversity of M i n nesota.

VISITING FACU LTY Steve Jackstadt, Execu tive Director of the H awa i i Joint

FACU LTY John o. Herzog, 1967, C h a ir, Division of Natura l

Cou ncil on Economic Education, Ph.D., U n iversity of I nd ia n a . 1 980.

Sciences. Ph. D., University of Nebraska, 1 963. Brian E. Lowes, 1968, Asso iate Professor of Earth Sciences, ph .D., Un ivers i ty of Was hi ngton, 1 972. Burton Ostenson, 1 947- 1 977, Professor Emeri tus of Earth Scie n ces, Ph. D., Un iversity o f Mich igan, 1 947.

VISITING FACU LTY Wayne Hager, C h a i rman, Engi neeri ng Science, U n iver­ U n iversity of Idaho, 1 972. Eug ne, O regon , Ph. D., Un iver sity of Iowa, 1 948.

sity of I daho, P h . D

P42002

(J u ne 1 - J u ly 1 0) (Also isted i n Stati stics 500 on page 25)

P1 1802

Extended ( i n c l u d i n g overn i g h t ) field t r ips t h rough the O l y m p i c and Cas ade mou ntains w i l l a l low stude nts at a l l levels to gain an und er­ sta n d i ng of the formation of mou n ta i n s dnd cont i ne n t al rocks. P re­ req usite: Prev ious Ean h Sciences course or permission of i ns t ructor. Time to be arranged. G-1 . I n structo r : B. Lowes. C a l l 383-7377 prior to July 20.

543

P32001

The n a t u re a n d role of money; the commerci a l ba n k i ng system; the Fede ral Reserve System; theory of cred it a n d money supply con t ro l ; Key nesian a nd Mone tarist theories of monetary i m pacts on i n flation, i n terest rates, a nd national i ncome. Prereq u isit e : Econ 1 50. 6 : 30 p . m . 9 : 30 p . m . TR. HA-202. I ns t ructor: E. A n k r i m .

GEOLOGY OF PACIfiC NORTHWEST LAB (2) P4180l

MONEY AND BANKING (4) ( J u n e 23 - Aug u st 20)

A study 01 the m i ner a ls, rocks, a n d ge ologic struct u r e of t h e Pacific Nort hwest section of t he Western Cor d i l l e ran mo u n tain belt, lead ing to i ts fo rmation. Students in l u d i n g the h i story of pro ess des i r i n g the laboratory-field trip po rtion o f thi_ course should also registe r fo r E.S. 362 d u ring the summer m i d -sess ion. 7:00 p . m . - 1 0 : oo p.m. M R . G-1 . Instructo r : B. Lowes.

362

Pl8801

( J u ne 22 - July 17)

An env i ro nm�_ ntal study of the ared from the Paci fic to t h e Colu mbia Basi n based o n field t ri ps , l a boratory s t u dies and lectu res. Cou rse study incl udes ecological p r i nciples, h a b itats, plant a n d animal l i fe, geology and man's in teract ion w i t h the environment. Espec i a l l y for teachers of science at element ry and j u n ior high levels. The class is field- based, and ca m p i n g trips, day t r i ps and a t h ree-day v i s i t to the as cades al low study of Was h i n gton from the oast to the i n terior. Pre req u i s i te : at least one sci en e course. Sch olarships may be ava i lable to Wash i n gton teachers. Cont ct Dr. Ost nson (383-7561 ) for more i n formation. 9:00 a.m.-1 2 : 00 noon and 1 :00 p. m . -3 : 30 p . m . MT WR F . Ivy- l l l a n d Ivy-lOS. In str ucto r : B. Ostenso n .

·361

INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (4)

.,

Walter Youngquist, Consulting Geolog ist,

7


EDUCATION Phone : 383-7272 ( E d u cational Psychology cou rses a re l i sted on page

11.)

I

325

READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (4) P22201

Teaching

467

(July 27 - August 21 )

reading

in

elementary

grades,

including

modern

approaches, materials, methods, techniques, procedures and some diagnos is of reading difficulties. Prerequisite: 251 or 321. 9 : 50 a.m.1 2 : 30 p.m. MTWRF. HA-212. Instructor. Staff

408

473

cation, home visits, and the role of the student in the co n fe r e n ing in conferencing are studied and practi ced. Provisions for the needs o f parents o f t h e h and i capped w ill b e studied b y students in t h s p e ' i a l edu cat ion program. Prerequ isi te: student teaching o r teaching ex pC'ri­ ence. 3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. MTWR. HA-l17. Instructor: M . Hilnson.

SCIENCE I N THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) (J u Iy 27 - August 21 )

483

490

Instructor. K. Gerlach.

-501A CIVIL LIBERTIES WORKSHOP (3-4)

A workshop on civil l iberties and their role in the public Khools. The course i ncludes two major components: an overview of ci vil r i ·hts and li berties in the United States w i th emphasis on the ir consti t u t i ndl status and an examination of civi l rights and l i berties in the publ i c school setting, b o t h elementary and secondary levels, w i t h d pMti ular focus o n the rights o f teachers and students. The course meets t h e school l a w requi rement for the princ i pa l 's credentl I . To rece i ve 4 hours of credit the student must co mplete a related proj ect a pprov e d

In structor: M. Hi nes.

ADMIN ISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY (2) P12402 (June 22 - July 1 7)

Library organization and administration in el ementary and secondary schools. 7:00 a.m.-8:15 a.m. MTWR F . HA-2oo. I nstructor: W. E h l ers.

by either instructor. 4 : 15 p.m.-9: 15 p.m. ( Dinner break) TWR. HA-117. Instructors : C. DeBower and D. Atkinson.

P2240J

(July 27 - August 21 ) Those services of a school librarian related to the preservation of all materials wh ich form the sources of reference. 9 : 50 a.m.-11 :05 a.m. MTWR F. L-l06. Instructor: C. Yetter.

-501B

METRICS FOR TEACHERS WORKSHOP (l) P424 1 3

(June 1 5- 1 9)

T,he participants will study the basi c elements of the m e t ri y t l' m and begin to "think metric". Experience with l inear, liquid . mas> and temperature measures will be followed by the development of

PROCESSING SCHOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS (2) (June 22 - July 1 7)

resources the partic i pant can use in the elementary or j u n i o r high classroom. Materials available to teach ers will oe evaluated. Pa ss/Fail

Classification , cataloging and tech nical processing of materials. 8:25 a.m.-9:40 a.m. MTWR F . L-106. Instru ctor: W. Ehlers.

only. 4:15 p.m.-6:15 p.m. MTWRF. HA-11 7. Inst r u c t or : C. DeBower.

SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCE MATERIALS (2) P22405 (Ju Iy 27 - August 21 )

501C

Criteria, p rofess ional literature and tech niques of evaluation of library

DISCIPLINE IN TH E CLASSROOM: A REALITY THEREAPY MODU (2)

P42414

(June 1 5-1 9)

materials (print and non-pr int); the lib rarian's responsibi l i t y to faculty, students and the general pub l i c. 11:1 5 a.m.-1 2 : 30 p.m. MTWR F. L-106. Instructor: C. Yetter.

Good disc i p l ine, unlike punishment. req u ires involve m e n t , r i n g, relevance and responsi b ility by both tedcher and student. Ed uca tol Training Center s h ows that behavior problems di m i n i s h w h e n educators strive t o foster i n the classroom atmosphere the g ro w t h o f

PREPARATION AND UTI LIZATION OF MEDiA (4) P22406

P42�12

(May 26-28; June 2-4 a n d 9-1 1 ) (See also Poli tica l (Science.)

mental reading problems; materials, methods, techniques and proce­ dures. Prerequis ite: 251. 9 : 50 a.m.-ll :05 a.m. MTWRF. HA-206.

457

(June 22 - July 1 7)

of exceptionality. Federal and state legislation. Current issues and practices in delivering services to handicapped peopl e. T h e classroom teac her's role in mainstreaming. 8:25 a.m.-11 :05 a.m. MTWRF. HA-202.

Teach ing secondary reading in content areas; attention to develop­

454

INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCAnON (4) P12411

PROBLEMS OF READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) P1 2401 (June 22 - July 1 7)

P12404

(June 22 - J u ly 1 7)

Definitions, ch aracteristics and psychological aspects of all cat gories

Objectives, materials and methods of teach ing the social studies, recommended to student teachers and ex perienced teachers. 2.25 GPA required. 9 : 50 a.m.-11:05 a.m. MTWRF. HA-l17. Instructor: J . Ramsey.

453

P12410

p.m. MTWRF. HA-117. Instructor: M. Mathers.

SOCIAL STUDIES IN TH E ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) P1 2204 (June 22 - J u l y 1 7)

BASIC REFERENCE MATERIALS (2)

PRIMARY READING (2)

Materials and methods of the primary reading progra m d n d i t s rel a t i on to other activiti es. Prerequisite: teaching experience. 1 1 : 1 5 a.Ill . - 1 2 : 30

L. Stein.

452

P42408

process are also consi dered. L i stening and communicat i o n skil ls u�eful

" ha n ds on" activities needed to ach ieve the objectives of science. Pre­ requi s ite: 2.25 GPA. 8:25 a.m.-9:40 a.m. MTWRF. HA-215. Instructor:

451

PARENT-TEACHER RELATIONSHIPS (2)

An examination of the ph ilosophy and i mplementat ion of pa rE' n t ­ teacher conferencing. Related issues such a s the parent J ! role III ed u­

A humanistic approach with emphasis on those kinds of materials and

420

a.m.-

(June 29 - July 16)

study, vocabulary study, vocabulary development and lexicogra phy. 2.25 GPA required. 8 : 25 a.m.-9:40 a.m. MTWR F . HA-210. I nstructor: M. Math ers

412

(June 22 - July 17)

9 : 40 a.m. MTWR F . HA-1 1 7. In structor: F. Olson.

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (2) P12202 (June 22-July 17)

P22203

P1 2407

student teaching o r teac h i ng experience, Ed 251, EdPsy 468. 8 : 25

The funct ional teaching of communication skills, grades K-6; areas include oral and written expression, listening, reading, l iterature, dramatization, spelling, grammar, handwrit ing, ch ildren's language

410

EVALUATION (2)

Evaluation o f school experiences; problems in c nnect i on w i t h development, organi zation and adm inistra t i on o f tes ts ( s t a n d J r d i zed and teacher-made). Required of f i f th-year s t u d nts. Prer q U I , i t e :

responsible behavior. T h e principles of Reali ty Therapy a n b a p pli ed 5 i n g Re l i ty to create such an atmos phere. Workshop t h emes: Th erapy as an approach to disci p l i n e ; building involvement and communication between teacher and pup i l ; motiva t i ng the ,tu dt'nt i n ster i n g the Identity Society; coping w i t h specific behavior pro ble m , ;

(July 27 - August 21 )

>

The p roduction and use of a variety of instructional materials, flat p i ctures, charts , maps and the 35 mm camera; partici pants produce i tems usef u l in i n struction. $10.00 lab fee is charged. 12:40 p.m.-3:20 p.m. MTWR F . L-129. I n structor: L. Stei n .

8

Continued o n page 9


EDUCATI O N Continued from page

re ponsible student behavior; reviewi ng d is c i p l i nary methods recomrn nd ed by n a t i o n a l spokesmen in ed ucation. Read G l asser's h./en r iry Society prior to Workshop. Preregistration i s necessary by June 2. 9:00 a . m . - 3 : 00 p . m . MTWRF. HA-117. I nstructor: J . W i l liamson.

SOlD

SEX EQUITY IN EDUCATION (2)

This course is designed to acq u a i n t teachers a nd librarians with recent fiction for young people in grade 7-10. Pa rticipants wi l l expl ore materials c u r re n t l y ava i lable in the areas of fan tasy, science fictio n , realism, high i n terest/low leve'l read i n g a b i l i ty. Participants will a lso learn h ow t o in corporate this l i t era t u re i n to effective classroom programs. 9:00 a . m .- 3 : 00 p.m. MTW R F . HA-21 2. I n structo r : K. Le m mer.

P42415

( J u ne 22-26) Thl)

w i l l )lamine sex role stereotyping occ u r r i n g in schools in as curric u l u m , textbooks, l i terature, teacher attitudes, career COurlS ling nd ex tra-curric u l a r activities . I t will help educators develop str t g ies and materials for dea l i n g with stereotyping i n their schc)ols and beco m e acq u a i n ted with recent legislation dea l i n g with s d i scri mi llat i o n . 9 : 00 a . m.-3:00 p.m. MTWRF. HA-21 2 . I nstructor : M Hanson. (ours

areas

·SOl E

such

ITIP (2)

P12416

SOl K

This course is designed to assist school principals to develop curricula that will more effectively a n tici pate and provide for the needs of their students as they face the future and the chal lenges wh ich lie a h ead. The course wi l l focus o n current a n d projected ed ucational trends and the skills knowledge and tech niq ues in curr icu l u m deve lopment most l i k ely to be of use under such educational futu res. 8 : 25 a.m.-11 : 05 a.m. MTW R F . HA-204. I n structor : A. Seagre n .

(June 22 - J u ly 1 7)

(August 3-1 4) The demand for g reater ed ucational acco u n t a b i l i t y has req u i red t h e p r i n c i p a l to be more cog nizant o f h is o w n performance as a n educational leader as w e l l as the performance of other perso n n e l w i t h i n the school system. This workshop w i l l assist the principal t o develop effective sel f -assess ment methods as w e l l as tec h n i q u es and strategies for evaluating the performance of staff. Em p h asis will be placed t h roughout the course on u t i li zation of t echniques and the deve lopment o f strategies for set t i n g u p an affective eva luation process for improving the performance of the pri ncipal and teachers in rela t io n sh i p to the ed ucational process. 1 : 00 p.m.-3 : 30 p.m. M TW R F . HA-204. Instruct o r : A. Seagren.

DISCIPLINE IN THE CLASSROOM: A REALITY THERAPY MODEL (2) P42418

SOlM

(J u ly 20-24)

INTEGRATING THE NEWSPAPER INTO THE CLASSROOM (2) P224JJ ( J u ly 27 - Au gust 21 )

The pu rpose of this course is to i ncrease the know ledge base of edu­ cators relative to t he self-motivati ng teach i n g approach using the newspaper as a teach ing resource and as a tool for i n struction. Applica­ t i o n of skills learned w i l l b e encou raged and enhan ced through cu rric­ u l u m materials an d teach ing strategies. These teach i n g aids w i l l be related to t h e newspaper a n d w i l l be provided as well as presented d u ri n g the class t i m e . 1 : 30 p . m . - 3 : 30 p.m. MWR. HA-21 7. I n structo r : S. G ri f f i n .

Good d iSCi p l i n e , u n l i ke pun ishme n t , req ui res involvement , caring, relevant and r ponsibi lity by both teacher and stud e n t . Ed ucator Trai n i n g Ct'n te r studies show that behavior problems d i m i n ish when ed ucat o rs strive to foster i n the classroom a t mosphere the growth of r p()n�ible b havior. The p r i n ci p l es of Rea l i ty Therapy can be appl ied , u h an atmosph ere. Workshop t h emes : USing Rea l i ty t o c r .at f h er a p y dS an approach to di sci pline ; b u i l d i n g i n volvement and o m m u n i ca t i on b e tween teache r a n d pup i l ; motivating the stude n t in t h 1 < 1 n ti t y a .iety; co ping with spec ific behavior problems; foste ring respo n s i b l e student behavior; reviewing d iscipli nary methods r com mended by national spokesmen i n educa t io n . Read Glasser's I den t i t y Soci ty prior to Wo rkshop. Preregistration is necessary by Jun 2. 9 : 00 a. m . -3 : 00 p . m . MTW R F . HA-117. I nstructo r : J. W i l l i a mson.

SOlH

PROVISIONS FOR ACCOUNTABI LITY AND EVALUATION OF SELF AND OTHERS (2) P42422

SOlL

MUMS: MATHEMATIC UNIT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (2) P42417 ( J u l y 1 3-23)

A u n i u mat hematics instructi o n a l system in which you n gsters are diag n os t i c a l l y tested and grouped on the basis of ach ievement in a topic , i . . addition, s u b t raction , m u l t iplicat i o n , or � ivision of whole nu m bers , fra tions a n d deci mals and study topiCS I n lime-blocks uSing (Neher wri tten le�so ns i n c l u d i ng concept development, practice­ related gam 5 , puzzles and d r i l l . The idea is to identify a n d meet i n dividual needs i n t h e basic ope rations i n a group set t i n g . Pa rticipants will stu dy materials developed by the in structor and others for use i n Cl over P rk lem ntary Schools. May be com pleted as a s u bsti tute for Ed ]26. Pass/ Fa i l o n l y . 4 : 1 5 p . m .-6:30 p . m . MTWRF. HA-1 1 7 . I n structo r : C. 0 Bowe r .

SOlG

LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP FOR PRINCIPALS AND PRINCIPALS TO BE (2) P42421 (August 3-14)

1 he el merw. of teach ing theory as expressed in actual practice a re ex pl ored in this works hop. Students w i l l have a n o p po rtunity to Je e l o p the i r own I TI P procedu res for use I n their own classrooms. 6:00 p.m. - 9:)0 p.m. MWR. HA-206. In struct o r : P. Brown .

"' SOl F

YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE FOR TEACHERS AND LI BRARIANS (2) P42420 ( J u l y 20-24)

SOl)

8

532

CURRICULUM FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) P4242J (Ju ly 20-24)

C u r r i c u l u m content and planning including acade mic subjects, l i fe adjustments, and career cou nsel i n g for except ional adolescents and adults. Focus of t h e course will be for t h e learn i n g disabled and o t h er m i l d l y handicapp i n g conditions. 9 : 00 a . m . - 3 : 00 p . m . MTWRF. HA- 204. Instructo r : B. W h i te.

ECONOMICS FOR TH E ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM (2) P42419 ( J u l y 20-24)

l h i ' worksh p w i l l focus on the devel opment of ,ideas and concepts in economic s w h i c h can be effectively presented to elemen tary c h i ldren t o h -'p t h � m u n d e rstand how economic decisions affect their l ives. Topi cs d iswsse u . will i nclude the scarcity problem, su pply and dema n d . p ri ce s , money. banks. i n f l a t i o n , u nemployment, and the role of gove rn me n t . Tea hers w i l l develop their a b i l ity to ident ify a nd use in o l ve r n t act i v i t i s i n t h e i r own classrooms as a result of their part i cipation i n this wo rksh op. Workshop activities w i l l i nclude the use of fi l ms (i n c l ud i n g Trade-offs) . discussions, games and guest spea kers. T he Wd� h i n gton State Counc i l o n Econom i c Education (WSC EE) w i l l provia �cho l J rs h i p5 to 2 0 elemen tary teachers w h o take t h i s course. on tdC't L y r i s Bal l , Center for Economic Education, PLU (383-7645) for d l d i t iunal i n formation and appl ication fo rms. 8 : 30 a . m . - 3 : 30 p.m. MTW R F . II -200. I nstructo r : S. Jackstadt.

·533

SEMINAR IN MENTAL RETARDATION (2) P12424

( J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7)

Current issues a nd problems related to the education of c h i l d re n with mental retard a t i o n . Prereq u isite: tea c h i n g crede ntial or pe rm ission of i n structor. 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p.m. TR. HA-219. I nstructo r : K . Ge rlach.

534

SEMINAR IN BEHAVIOR DISORDERS (2)

P424J4

(Ju ne 1 5- 1 9) Study of t h e current problems and issues a� t h ey apply to the educa­ tion o f c h i l dren co n s i dered to be " behavior disordered . " I ncludes use observat i o n , behavior m odification Jnd classroom management tech­ n i q u es. 9 : 00 a. m . - 3 : 00 p.m. MTWRF. H A-217. I n structo r : Staff.

9

Continued on page

10


ED UCATIO N Continued from page 9

535

589

ARTS FOR THE HANDICAPPED

(2)

P1 2425

596

RESEARCH STUDIES

(1)

P32434

(June 22 - A u gust 21) See Major adviso r . F i n a l , ori g i n a l coy of t h e pap r(s) must be s u b m i tted to the Graduate Office n o later than two weeks before Commencement.

TEACHING HANDICAPPED CHI LDREN IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM (2) P42426 ( J u n e 1 5-1 9)

597

RESEARCH STUDIES IN EDUCATION

(2)

P32435

( J u n e 22 - August 21 ) (Student may reg ister at any time d u r i n g the summer.)

.

A n examination of teaching strategies to i nc l ude exceptional c h i l d ren i n reg ular classroom set t i n gs. Emphasis on the needs of excepti o n a l chi ldren, program m od i f i cations, a n d classroom management. Prereq u is i t e : teach i n g crede n t i a l or permission of i nstructor. 9 : 00

Se e E d 596.

599

a . m . - 3 : oo p . m . MTW R F . HA-1 1 7. I n structo r : J. Mcleod.

SPECIAL EDUCATION : STUDENT TEACHING

P22413

Phi losophical and theoretical fou ndations of educa t i o n . 9 : 50 a . m . 1 1 : 30 a . m . M TW R F . H A-206. I nstructor: Go l denstei n .

A study of artistic endeavors and l e i s u re time p u rsuits for the h a n dicapped. Activities for the com m u n it y , c l assroom, home, group home, a nd i n s t i tution will be studied. Each participant will complete a project for use with the hand icapped. Prerequisite : teac h i ng credential or permission of i nstructor. 8 : 25 a . m . - l l :05 a.m. TR. HA-21 1 . I nst ructo r : M . M i ller.

537

(3)

( J u ly 27 - August 21 )

( J u n e 22 - J u l y 17)

536

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCA nON

(3-4) P32436 (J ne 22 - Au gust 21 ) (Student may reg ister at a n y time d u r i n g s u m m e r . )

THESIS

(4-6)

P32427 Teachi n g in Special Education classrooms in p u b l i c schools under the d i rection a n d s u pervision of classroom a n d u n iversity teachers. Prereq uisite : tea c h i n g credential or permission of i nstructor. Class times by arrangement. I nstructor: Staff.

545

METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH P1 2428

(2)

( J u n e 22 - J u l y 17)

Semi nar i n research methods a n d tech n iques i n education w i t h emphasis i n desi g n i n g a research project i n the student's area o f interest. Req u i red f o r M.A. Prereq u i s i te : Consultation w i t h student's adviser a n d admitta n ce to t h e graduate p rowa m . 9 : 50 a . m . - l l : 05 a . m . MTWRF. HA-2oo. I n s t r u c tor: F . Olso n .

*550

SCHOOL FINANCE

(2)

(June 22 - J u l y 1 7)

P1 2429

Loca l, state and federal co ntributors to school finance, its p h i l osophy and development; the deve lopment a n d admin istration to a scrool budget. 6 : 30 p.m.-9 : 30 p.m. W R . HA-l 1 7 . I nstructo r : F. Warner.

*552

SCHOOL ADMIN ISTRA liON

(3)

P42430

( J u l y 20 - Au gust 6) Adm i n istration a n d supervision of school pers onnel , p l a n t and pro足 g r a m . the structu re a n d org a n i za t i o n of t he school system. Prereq u i 足 site : teac h i n g cred e n t i a l o r permission of t h e Dean. 7 : 00 p . m . 9 : 30 p . m . MTWR. HA - l 1 7. I n structo r. C. DeBower.

*556

SECONDARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICULUM (3) P12431 ( J u n e 22 - J u l y 17)

A variety of facets o f secondary and middle school programs: f i n a n ce , curri c u l u m , d isci p l i n e , eval u ation, class room manageme n t , the basic e d u c a t i o n b i l l , l e g i s l a t i v e c h a nges, a nd s p e c i a l e d u ca t i o n . Development of secondary a n d middle schools from t h e i r beg i n n i ngs to the present. Critical issues i n the education scene today. 6 : 30 p.m.9 : 30 p . m . TWR. HA-213. I nstructo r : D. M i tchel l .

580

CU RRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

(3)

P22432

( J u l y 27 - Augu st 21 ) Types of curric u l u m organ izat ions, programs a n d techniques of cu rricu l u m development. 8 : 00 a . m.-9:40 a . m . MTW R F . HA-206. I n structo r : Goldenste i n .

*586

SOCIOLOGY O F EDUCATION

(4)

P28604

(July 1 4 - August 20) (Also l isted i n Sociology)

10

Continued on page 1 1


EDUCATI O N Continued from page 1 0

FACULTY

E DUCA IIONAl PSYCHOLOGY

David M. Atkinson, 1 976, Associate Professor of Pol i t i ca l Science , P h . D . , Un iversity o f Ma ryland, 1 972. Carrol DeBower, 1 964-68, 1 970, Professor of E d u cation, Ed.D., Un iversity of Nebraska, Li ncol n , 1964. M. Josephine Fletcher, 1 963, Professor of Ed ucation, Ph.D., U n iversi ty of Wash i n gton, 1 971 . Kent Gerlach, 1 980, Associate Professor of E d u ca t i o n , Coord i nator o f Specia l E d u c a t i o n , Ed.D., U n iversity of Nevada, 1 979. Marlis M. Hanson, 1 971 , Assistant Professor of Ed uca足 tion, M.A., Pac ific Lu theran U n iversity, 1 975. Marjorie Mathers, 1 964-66, 1 968, M . A . , Pacific L u t heran U nivers i ty, 1 974. Gary Minetti, 1 970, Associa te Professor of Education, Directo r of Co u n sell i n g and Hea l t h Serv i ces, P h . D . , U n iversity o f Was h i n gton , 1 976. Lynn Stein, 1 961 , Professor of Education, Ed. D., Montana State U n iversi ty, 1961 . Jane Wi lliamson, 1964, Professor of Ed u catio n , Ed . D., Un iversity of No rthern Colorado, 1959.

Phone : 383-7272

461

GROUP PROCESS AND THE INDIVIDUAL (2) P4260 1

(J u ly 20 - J u l y 31 )

A h u m a n i n terac t i o n l a boratory to faci l i t te th explor ation of the self concept th rough t h e mechanisms o f i n t erpersonal i n teract i o n s and feed bac-k . Emphasis pl aced o n the acq u is i t i o n of ski l l in self足 exploration role ide n t i fication and c l i mate-mak i n g. 1 :00 p . m . -4 : 30 p,m. MTW R F . H o n g Hall Lounge. I n struct o r : J . F l et c he r . Graduate Stude n ts o n l y . Tal l y card req u i r ed.

S01A

VIOLENCE IN TH E FAMILY (2) (July 6

-

P42602

July 1 7)

A course designed to i ncrease awarene 5 of the scope of ch i ld abuse. Workshop participants wi II lE'arn t o ident ify t h e symptoms of psychosocial and p h ysical aspects of a b us e , become aware o f t h e tre a tm e n t possible, a n d learn t o give su pport to those who are abused' and th e abusers. 9:00 a.m.-1 2 : 00 n o o n . MTWRF. HA-21 2. I n s tructor : M. Hanso n .

501B

STR ESS MANAGEMENT (2)

P42603

(J u ne 1 5 - 1 9)

A wor ksh op d , i g n ed to assist i ndividu a l s to i ncrease i n sight i n to human <,Ir ss re po nse , and to o f fer p r a ctic-al te ch n i q ues to develop effective stress-manage m e n t s k i l l s . 9 : 00 a.m. - 2 : 00 p.m. MTWR F . H A-213. I m tructor. J . F l etche r.

536

VISIT ING FACULTY Patricia Brown, M.A., Teacher/A d m i n istrator, Bethel School Distri ct, Tacoma.

AFFECTIVE CLASSROOM TECH N IQUES (2) P42604

( J u l y 27

-

Lu Ann Connole, M.A., Pacific Lu theran U n i versity,

A u gust 7)

1 981 .

T h i s cou rse wi l l e x p l ore va rious tech n i q u e.s designed t o fac i l i t ate u nderstanding of self and others; me.th od for wor k i ng with studen ts. Prerequisite: s t ude n t teach i n g or graduate s tatus. Laboratory experience to be completed in the F a l l . 8:30 a.m. - l l ;30 a . m . MTW R F . HA- l 1 7. In structo r : J . Wil liamso n .

* 551

REFLECTIVE SKI LLS PRACTICUM (1) (J u l y 20

-

Wayne Ehlers, M . L . , L i b rarian, Was h i n gton H i gh Schoo l , Tacoma.

Erwin Goldenstein, P h . D., Professor of Education, U n ive rsi ty of Ne braska.

P22605

Myrna Hi nes, M . E d . , C l ass room Read i n g Teacher,

Au gust 21)

Tacoma Pu b l i c Schools.

A m i n i -pra c t i c u m i n t h e tech n i qu es o f co u n sel i n g ; enro l l m e n t l i m i ted to st udents begi n n i ng th e master 's degree program i n Cou nsel i n g and G u i dance. and i s a prereq u i s i t e to admi ss i o n on regular status to t he C o u n se l i ng and G u i da n ce master's progra m . The practicum ma kes use of cou n s e l i n g sessi o n s with c l i e n ts u t i l i z i n g verbal and n o n -verbal atte n d i n g beh avior. Tal l y cdrd req u i red . 5:00 p . m.- 7 : 00 p. m . MTW R F . H i\ - 1 09. I n s truct or: L. C o n n o l e .

561

Steve Jackstadt, Executive Di rector of the Hawai i J o i n t Cou n c i l o n Economic Education, P h . D . , U n iversity o f I n d i ana, 1 980. Kathleen Lemmer, M . L. S . , D i rector of I nstructional Materia ls, Cl over Park Schoo l District. Peggy McLeod, M.A., Special Education Teacher , Seatt l e School District . Muriel M iller, M . A . T . , E S D #1 21 Coo rd i n ator f o r Arts for the H a n d i cap ped.

BASIC RELATIONSHIPS IN COUNSELI NG (4) P42606

( J u ly 20

-

Au gust 7)

A st udy of t h e theory, process, tec h n iques and characteristics of the co u n sel i n g re.latiomhip. A basic course for M . A . students i n t h e C o u n s e l i n g a n d G u i dance program , T h i s i s a Counse l i ng Theory cou r se . 8 : 30 a , m . - 1 2 :00 noon. MTW R F . H A - 2 1 3. I n structor : J . F l e tch er.

569

CAREER G U I DANCE (4)

P42607

Dale Mitchell, M . A . , Principa l , Puya l l u p Se n i o r H i g h Schoo l , Puy a l l u p. Jerry Ramsey, M . Ed . , Social Stud ies Speci a l ist and Sixth G rade Teacher, Dow n i n g Elementary Schoo l, Taco m a . AI Seagren, Ph . D . , Professor o f Education, U n iversity of Neb rask a . Fred Warner, M . A . , Associate S u peri ntenden t. Bu reau of Su pport Services, Tacoma Schools.

( J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 0)

A s t u d y of careers . thc'ories of choice d n d gu ida nce tech n i q ues. 1 : 30 p . m. - 5:00 p . m . MTWRf. HA-217. I m truct or : G. M i n e tt i ,

Barbara White, M.S., English Depa rtment C h a i rman, Bel l a r m i n e H i gh Schoo l .

Cathleen Yetter, M . L . S . , System Coord i n ator, Texas Trans-Pecos L i b rary Syste m , EI Paso, Texas.

11


ENG LISH Phone: 383-7210

21 9 THE ENGLISH NOVEL (4)

404

PHOO I

(June 22 - J u ly 1 7)

An i n tensive rev iew a n d f i l l - i n on major app roaches to g r a m m a r : the trad i t i o n a l , the structural and the t ransformationa l . 9 : 3 0 a . m .-3:30 p . m . MTWRF. H A - 2 1 4 . I n structo r : L. Johnso n .

443

ROBERT FROST IN TH E AMERICAN TRADITION (2-4) P43002/P43004 (J u n e 1 6 - J u ly 30)

Lucille johnson, 1 953, Professor of Engl ish, Ed .D. , U n iversity of Mon tana, 1 96i.

Richard Jones, 1 969, Assista n t Professor of Eng l ish, M. F .A., U n iversity of Massachusetts, 1 969.

Raymond Klopsch, 1 953, Professor of Engl i sh, Ph .D., U n iversity of I l l i nois, U rbana, 1 962.

ADVANC ED COMPOSITION WORKSHOP (4) P43006

Dennis M. Martin, 1 976, Assistant Professor of Engl ish,

(August 3-1 4)

Ph.D., U n iversity of Callifo r n i a , Los An geles, 1 973.

The study and practice of rhetorical pr i n c i ple s used in writ i n g persua­ sively and i m a g i n a t ive ly. Designed for ei ther two or four cred its. Als o possi b i l i t y of co m p l e t i ng l a b work e<l f l y by special arrangement with inst ructo r; fol low - u p parti cipat ion i n lect u re-dem onstration segmen t. May be tak en for two credits by perm ission o n l y . 1 2 : 00 noon-3 : 00 p . m . f o r lectu re-discussion and 3 : 00 p . m . - 6 : 00 p . m . for lab. MTWR F. H A-21 4 . I n structo r : L. Joh nson .

383

SHAKESPEARE (4)

Pl3007

P23009

(Ju ly 27 - August 21 )

FACULTY

LETTER PRESS PRINTING WORKSHOP: TRADITION AND CRAFT (2) P43005 (J u l y 20-24)

Du ring t h is worksho p , st udents w i l l set, design and print texts o f t h e i r own choice. The class w i l l b e h e l d i n t he Pri n t Shop and w i l l b e a " hands o n " cou rse on th e Vandercook and two Chandler and Price presses. No previ o us prin t i n g experience is assumed o r req u i red. 1 0 : 00 a.m.-3:00 p . m . MTW R F . Pri n t Shop. I nstructor: D. McElroy.

328

AMERICAN LITERATURE SI NCE 191 5 (4)

Focusing on the emergence of a "modern" l i terature i n America in the years following the Great War, this cou rse will define that modern ism through in tensive read ing o f novels by Ernest H e m i n gway. W i l l i am Faulkner, and F. Scott F i tzgera l d . In Hemin gway's post-war Spa i n , in Fa u l kner's Mississ i p p i , and i n Fitzgerald 's Long Island, fiction, l i ke m usic, painting, a n d a rchitecture, was a ss u m i n g new forms and radical new postures; these places and poses form t he context for our reading. An i m portant secondary co nsideration wi l l be the em ergence of the major women writers of the period and the response of these wri ters to the portrayal of wo men cha racters in th e novels of the th ree major male w r i ters. 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 : 05 a.m. MTWRF. H A - 21 0. I nst ructo r : D.M. Mart i n .

A study of the distinctly American the mes and language of Frost's poetry. This course w i l l in clude f i l ms and record i n gs o f the poet reading his own work. Stu dent s opting u pper-level or extended cred i t w i l l be req u i red to write a special paper. Tex t : Complete Poems o f Robert F rost ( H o l t Rin ehart & W i nsto n ) . 6 : 30 p.m.-9:50 pm. T R . H A 21 2 . I n structo r : R. Jones.

312

P43003

(August 1 7-21 )

Novels are the most po pu lar and pervasive l iterary form of o u r c u l t u re . T h e cou rse w i l li n o t only in troduce students t o selected a u t hors and works, b u t will teach them how to read a novel. It will provide h i storical ilnd thematic bac kground to make f u t u re novel read i n g more informed and sensi t ive. And, i t w i n reflect a l so a his torical and c u l t ura l s u rvey o f t h e 18th a n d 1 9th ce n t u r i es. While tracing t he rise o f the novel, auth ors i n c l u ded will be Henry Field ing, Jane A u sten, Cha rles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, and Joseph Conrad. 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 :05 a . m . MTW R F . HA-208. I n structo r : R. Klopsch.

*232-432

CRASH COURSE IN GRAMMA R (2)

Daniel Van Tassel, 1 970, Professor of Engl ish, Ph.D., U n i ve rs i ty of Iowa, 1 970.

VISITING FACULTV Davis D. McElroy, Cen t ra l i a Co l l ege, WA., Ph.D. U n iversity of Ed i n b u rgh.

(J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7)

O u rs w i l l be a s t u dy of eight great plays by the Bard and, for co m p a r i ­ s o n , one play by a mode r n . To enha n ce o u r appr eciation of t h ese s e l ect ed comedies. histories . a n d t ragedies, to get beyo nd t h e wri tten word to the spoken, from text to stage, a n excursion to the Shake­ spe a r e F es t ival in A,h l and, Oregon is pla n n e d . Those opting for t h e extended weekend stay i n Ashl a n d ( J u ly 3-6) f o r i n t e n sive theat re­ going (taking i n five prod u c ti on s ) , su pplemented by backs tage visits and inte rviews w i t h actors and techn i c i a n s , w i l l pay a s u rcharge of $90. 00 to cover theatre ti ckets, lodg i n g , and rou n d t r i p t ran sport a t i o n . T h e s u rcharge s h o u l d be deposited d i rect l y i n Account 561 . 383 at t h e Bu s i n ess Office. Suggested read i n g i n Sh akespearean c r i t i cism wi l l be plac � on reserve in t he library. 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 :05 a . m . MTWRF. HA-21 4. I nstruct o r : D. Van Tassel.

11


H ISTORY Phone : 383-7595 322

THE SPIRIT OF THE CR USADES (4) (July 27 - August 21)

P23805

WEST A N D NORTHWEST (4) PJ320S (June 22 - August 21) i n t e rpretive rese a r c h a n d w r i t in g p r o j e c t on co m mu n i t y

460

An h i s to ry , s t r u c t u red to i n d iv i d u a l i z ed , t u d y . I d e a l for both u n d e r g r a d u a t e d n d 5 t h year o r g r ad u a t e s t u d e n t s . St u d e n t s e n ro l l i n g i n t h i s course s h o u l d

See Modem & ( I ssica l lang uages 3 2 2 ( n page 1 5. Ma y be used as a History elec tive b u t d oes not f u l fi ll G e n e r a l U n iversity Req u iremen t in:

H i s to ry .

332 Th

ENDLA N D : TUDORS AND STUARTS (4) (June 22 - July 1 7)

m a k e a r r a n ge m e n t s w i t h t h e instructor by j u n e '1 , 1 9!1 1 . F o r fu r ther i n fo r m a t i o n c a l l : 383-7635. I n s t r u c t o r : A. Martinson.

P13202

Rise of the Tudors , H e n ry V I I I, Th e Refo r m a t i o n i n E n

492

land,

Cranmer a n d t he Book of Common Pray r, Mary Tudor and Persecution , El i z:abet h I , the El iza beth n Re nai ssa n c e , Jam s I , Div i ne R ig h t M n . 1fc h y , Ci il War a nd i n terregn um , t he Restorati o n , the Glorio us Reva l u ion , Ideas and An in Stuart En g l a nd . 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 :05 ordquist. a . m . M TW RF . X-204. In t ruetor : p,

399

INTERNSHIP (1-6)

P3320J

Th is course is desig n ed t o raise and study q u e s t i o n s abo u t t h e cu l tural l y an d soc i a l l y accepted ideas about women in the 20th century. I n terpretive writing proj ects an d readings w i l l exa m i ne the images an d roles of women through individualized study. Students

(June 22 - August 21) work or s pecia l field r ea r ch .

e n ro l l i n g i n th i s class should make arrangements w i th t he instructor by j u n e 1 , 1 981 . F o r f u r t h e r i n formation ca l l : 383-7638. I ns t r u ctor:

Of f- ampu, study In co n nect i o n wi t h St u de n ts e n ro l ing i n t h i s course sh o u ld make a r ra n ge m e n ts w i t h t h e i nstructor b y j u ne 1 , 1981 , a n d have completed one co u rse in h is t o r y

l

nd o n

yea r of

o l l ege .

tor:

401

WOR KSHOP: THE TWENTI ES IN AMERICAN H ISTORY (4) P43204 (June 15-26)

t ud y

A.D. Martinso n .

S. Ran d al l .

For fu rt he r i nformation ca l l : 383-7635.

I nSlr u

FACULTY Arthur D. Martinson, 1966, Professor of H i story, Ph. D., Washington State University, 1966. Philip Nordquist, 1963, Professor of History, Ph.D., U n i versity of Washington, 1964. Susan L. Randall, 1979, Assistant Professor of History, Ph.D., University of Utah, 1979,

o f t h e poli tic.a l , econom ic, and so ial!c u l t u ral h i s t o ry of th e

U n i ted Sta t s d u rmg the decade of the 1 920's. P rticu lar e m ph as i s w i l l

be g iven t o t h i mpa t o f prosp rity a n d g f w t h on t he nation and i ts i ns t i t ut i o ns. In add i l10n to t he exami nation of the di erse issu es of the d a y - r e t u rn to n o rm Icy, i n c reased material prosperity, rev o l u t i o n i n mora

a n d m n ners, empha s i s on y u t h ,

cr

INDEPEN DENT STUDY: PERSPECTIVES ON 20TH CENTURY WOMEN (2-4) P33206 (June 22 - August 21)

t iv it y i n the arts, Red

Scar , r h i b i t i o n , and the s tock m a rket ra h of 1 29 - various historica l i n terpretat i o n s of the er wi l l a l so be exa m i ned. Explo r i n g

the essence of t he Tw ' n t ie . is one of t h e n o "al obj c t i v e s o f t h e I=Qu rse . F i l m f e : $10 .00. 9:00 . m . - 1 2 : 00 n o o n a n d 1 : 30 p . m . - 4 : 30 p . m . MTW R F . A - 106. I m t ru c to r : S .

Randal l .

13


MATH EMATI CS and COM PUTER SC I EN C E Phone : 383-7400

路 M 128

MATH EMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (4) P33601 (June

FACULTY

2 - August 21 )

Kenneth Balker, 1%6, Professor of Mathematics, Ph.D., U n iversity of Colorado, 1 971 . N. Christian Meyer, 1970, Associate Professor of Mathe颅 matics, Ph.D., Un iversity of Oregon, 1 970.

Re iew of a lgebra, matrix th ory and l i near programm i ng , proba b i l i ty theory, introduction to differential and int gral calc u lus. Concepts a re devel ped i n t uit i v e ly with ap p l i c a t ions . The us f math matical tools i s st res sed thr u g hout tht! c ur e. Prereq u i s i t e : h ig h school algebra or 1 1 . 6 : 30 p . m . -9 : 30 p.m. MR. H -208, I n structor: K . Batker.

CS 139

BASIC I (1)

P41402

(June 22 - July 2)

I n trod uction to i nteract ill co m pu t i n g , branch i n g , l oping, su bscripts, and funct ions i n t h e c o n te xt of the BAStC l a n g u a ge, (Stude nts wish i n g p r f i iency i n BASIC s h o ul d Iso take CS 1 40.) Prerequ isite : h i g h school a l ge bra . 8 : 25 a ,m .- :40 a .m . M TW R F . M-1 1 2 , I nst ructor: N . C . Meyer.

CS 140

BASIC II ( 1 )

P41403

(July 6-17)

Conti nuation of CS 139 includ i n g inp ut/ou tput , character variables, subroutines and si mple f i le tech n i ques in BASIC. (S t u d en ts may e n roll in 1 39 and 140 duri g the same sem st r o r d i fferenl semesters.) P re req u i s i te : 139 or eq u ivalen t or i n st r uc tor ' s oment. 8 : 25 a,m .-9 : 40 a . m . MTWRF. M -1 1 2 . Instructo r : N.C. M ey er.

14 t


MOD ER,N & CLASSI CA L LA NG UAG ES Pho n e : 383-721 0

路100

CONVERSATIONAL NORWEGIAN (2)

325

P15001

( J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7)

A n i nve,tigat ioT) of the nat u r e of language ; p r i n c i ples and tech n iq ues of descriptive lan guage analysis; a pp l icat i o n of l i ngu ist iCS to the teach颅 i n g and learn i n g of English for the native and non-nat ive speaker. The content i s a l so o f i n terest to teachers o f E n g l i sh and L a n gu age A rts as well as to t hose who are in terested i n a cq u i r i n g a working k n owledge of the d i sci p l i n e and its r e l a t i o n to other fields. Pass/Fail only. 8:00 a . m . - 1 2 noon and 1 : 00 p . m . - 3 : 00 p . m . MTW R F . HA- 223. I n s t r ucto r : R . Swenson .

An i n troductory cou rse i n Norwe gi a n , emphasizing t h e basic s k i l l s of speak i n g and listening. Cou rse content chosen w i t h the needs of th e traveler i n mind' . No prereq u isite. 7 : 00 p.m.-9 :00 p . m . MTR. HA-216. 'I nstructor: J . Rasmusse n.

路100

CONVERSATIONAL SWEDISH (2)

13802

(June 22 - J u l y 1 7) An int roductory co urs e i n written and spoken Swed ish. Particu lar emph asis will be pl aced on accurate pronu nciati o n and conversatio nal idioms. 7:00 p . m . -9:00 p.m. MTR. HA-223. I nstr ucto r : B . Magn usson.

101

ELEMENTARY GERMAN (4)

FACULTY

P14203

Brian Magnusson, ph D. Cand idate, U n iversity of

(J u n e 22 - J u l y 17)

Wisconsi n, M . A . , U n i v ersity of Was h i n gton, 1967. Janet Rasmussen, 1 977, Assistant Professor of Modern & C l assica l Langu ages, PhD., Ha rvard U n iversity, 1 975. David Suderman, 1 973, Assist a n t Professo r of Modern & C lassical Lan guages, Ph D . , U n iv ersity of Ch icago, 1 973. Rodney Swenson, 1968, Associate Professor of Modern & C lassica l Languages, Ph . D . , U n iversity of M i n nesota, 1 967. Paul, Webster, 1 969, Assistant Professor of Modern & C lassica l langu ages, M.A., Un iversity of Califo r n i a , los Angeles, 1967 .

An i n trod uction to German and the approximately 100 n,i l l ion people who spea k t he l a n g u age. Essentials of pronu nciation , practice i n wri tten and o ra l expression, and su rvey o f t h e geog rap hic, demogr aphic and political situation of the German peoples in Eu rope. 8 : 25 a . m .-ll :05 a . m . MTW R F . HA-216. I n structor: P. Webster.

102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN (4)

P24204

(J u l y 27 - August 21 ) Con ti n u ed i n t roduction to the German lan guage a nd its s peakers. Fur ther p ractice in o ra l and written use of German. Ou t l ine of the recent h istory of t h e German peoples. Prereq uis i te : one year o f h i g h school Germ a n , o n e semester o f college German or equivalent experience, 8 : 25 a . m . - l l :05 a.m. MTW R F . HA-216. In s t r uct o r : P. Webster.

路322

TH E SPIRIT OF THE CRUSADES (4)

WORKSHOP IN I NTRODUCTORY LI NGU ISTICS (4) P43806 (J u l y 6- 1 7)

P23805

( J u l y 27 - Au gust 21 ) The confrontation of the Christian West w i t h t h e Islamic East goes back a t least to 1096 and t h e F i rst Crusade. Then as now, the city Jerusalem was the focus of both spiritual longi ngs a n d po litical mach in a t i o n . With i n t h e context of h i storical- pol i t ical events, w e w i l l attemp t to recaptur e the spi ritual idea l s which dr ew mass movements of pilg rims and ch i l d ren, as well as k i ngs and va ssals, toward the Holy Land. What power d i d Jerusalem hold ove r the Christian imagination? What bitter experi ences tempered that enth usiasm? How was the Islamic t h reat u n der stood ? These are among the questions to be exa m i n ed in an i nterdiscipli nary fash i o n , using the ch ronicles, art, and poetry of the C r u sades. 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p.m. MTW R F . HA -216. I nstructor : D. Suderma n.

15


MUSIC

Phone : 383-7601

201

CLASS PIANO, LEVELS I-VIII (2)

SOlD

P1S601

( J u ne 22 - J u l y 1 7 ) T h e study o f sca l es, ar peggios, tech n i q u es , i m provisat i o n , h a rmon i z a ­ t i o n , transpo s i t i o n a n d repert o i re i n a cl as� e t t i ng . 1 : 3 0 p. m .-4: 00 p. m . MTW R F . Piano H o u s e . I n s t ructor : C . K n a p p .

"'247

(J u l y 1 3-17)

Methods a n d m a t e r i a l s o f teach i n g a n d p l a y i n g percussion i n s t r u m e n ts in t h e p u b l i c schools. 6 : 4 5 p . m. -1 0 : 00 p . m . MTW R F . E-228. I n structor: D . Robbins.

443

KEYBOA RD L1URA lURE OF BELA BARTOK (2) P45601

(J U ne 1 5-19)

A study of r prese n tative works of va r i o u s periods of Bartok . 8 : 30 a . m . 1 2 : 00 noon and 1 : 00 p . m . -3 : 0Q p.m. MTW R F . E-227. I n st ructor : C . Knapp.

"'SOlA

KATO HAVAS WORKS.... OP FOR STRINGS (2) P45605/ P45606/P45607

SOl E

(June 22-26)

Kato Havas is an i n t er n a t i o na l l y k n own a rt i s t -teacher and a u t h o r . Her "n ew approac h " t o s t r i n g p l a y i n g t h rough t h e release of p h ysical t e n s i o n s a n d mental a n x i e t i es h a s had a tre m endous i m pact on pl ayers of a l l levels of a c h i e v e m e n t . Her w a r m t h s p r i n k l ed w i t h l i v e l i n ess a n d w i t i s a p p ea l i n g to non-musici a n s as w e l l . To use t h e words of Kato Havas h e rself, "The aim of t h is a p p roach is not so much the i m parting of knowledge. The a i m is rather t h e e l i m i n a t i o n of a l l exist i n g obsta­ c l es, bo t h p hysical and menta l , so t h at t h ro u g h a relaxed co n t ro l a n d coord i n a t i on t h e pl ayer may b e a b l e t o release t h e f u l l force o f h i s m us i cal imagina t i o n . " 9 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 noo n , 2 : 00 p . m . - 4:00 p . m . , 7 : 00 p . m . - 9 : 00 p . m . MTW R F . E-227. I n structors : Kato Havas and A n n T r e m a i n e . C h a m ber Orches t ra m e m b e rs h i p o pe n to a l l i n a t tendance. Cost : 2 credits-$1 96.00 ( P45605) : Part i c i pa n t , n o cred i t -$1 25.00 (P45606) ; Observer-$75.00 ( P45607 ) . $50.00 depOsi t due by J u n e 1 . Special broc h u re a v a i l a b l e i n t h e M u s i c Departmen t .

SOlB

ORGAN WORKSHOP (2)

S01F

TH I NGS THAT GO "BUMP" IN THE CLASSROOM (1) P45610 (J u ly 27-31 )

T h i s cou rse w i l l explore methods o f genera t i ng crea t i v i t y w i t h ,ou n d . T h e cou rse w i l l a n a lyze s o u n d a n d h o w i t m a y b ordered to create tension a n d release. Sou nd gestu res w i l l be su b,eq u e n t l y l i n k ed to­ gether to i n t roduce co n cepts of form. E m p h asis w i l l be p l a ced o n i n ­ te rest i n g a n d access i b le sounds, bot h t r a d i t i o n a l d n d "off- t h e-w a l l , " l e a d i n g t o such cre a t i o n s as a f u g u e f o r Vene t i a n b l i nd s o r a concerto fo r g a r g l e r and wastepa per baskets. Through such pi eces the student is exposed t o the c h a l l enges and rew a r d s of perfo r m a n ce wit hout h a ving to master t r a d i t i o n a l music t e c h n i q u es . The cl ass is offered for e l e men­ tary c l assroom teachers as well as rn u s i c educa t ors at a l l leve l s , i n a l l med i a . 1 : 00 p.m.-4 : 30 p.m. MTWR F. E-227. I ns t r u ctor : D . Rob b i n s .

P45613

T h i s workshop is i n tended fo r t h ose musicians whose co n d u c t i n g s k i l ls have suffered from l ac k of pract i c a l a p p l ication . Ed uca tors on t h e e l emen t a ry l evel, c h u rch orga n i sts/cho i rmasters, and s t u d i o teachers often spcnd most of the i r professio n a l m u s i c m a k i n g and teach i n g in l i m i te d - o r non-co n d u c t i n g roles. Yet occas i o n a l l y c i rcumstances w i l l d e m a n d t h e m t o assume t h e role a n d function o f a f u l l y com pete nt co nd uctor. Th i s workshop w i l l address the specific tech n i c a l , gest u ral . a n d k i n etic problems t h ese m u s i c i a n s face as co nd uctors. Pa r t i ci p ants i n t h e workshop a re encouraged t o b r i n g speci fic l i t era t u re they ha ve co n d ucted or m a y co n d uct in t h e f u t u re to receive coa c h i n g i n c l ass. D i scuss i o n , demonstra t i o n , a n d video-t a p i n g w i l l be employed to h e l p t h e workshop participants w i t h i n d i v i d u a l problems. Prev ious c o n d u c t i n g t r a i n i n g (basic cond uc t i n g classes a n d/or experience) is a p p ro p r i a te but not req u i rcd . T h i s wo rkshop affords the m u s i c i a n t he rare opport u n ity for specific, i n d i v i d u a l i z ed, yet low-key h e l p w i t h h i s/her con d u cting p r o b l e m s . 1 : 00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. MTWRF. E-228. I n structor: D. D a h l . S pe c i a l A u d it Fee i s $1 00.

ORFF FOR nu: MUSIC SPEC IALIST (1)

WIND ENSEMBLE TECHNI QU ES AND LITERATU RE ( 1 ) P456 (J u l y 20-24)

A su rvey of standard a n d new l i terature for t h e wind ememble w i t h e m p h as i s upon pedagogical met hods. The course w i l l be tai lored t o t h e n e e d , of stud e n ts in t h e class. T i m e to b e a rranged. F i r s t meet i n g J u l y 2 0 at 6 : 3 0 p . m . E-306. I nstruct o r : L. C u r t i s .

(j u ne 29 - J u ly 3)

SOl C

P45608

(J u ly 1 3-17)

T h i s workshop is i ntende d for th ose m u s i c i a n s whose condu cti ng s k i l ls h ave su ffered from l a c k of pract ical applica t i o n . Ed u cator s on t h e e l e­ m e n t a ry lev e l , c h u rch o rga n i s t s/choi r masters, a n d s l u d i o teachers o ft e n spend most of t h e i r profes s i o n a l m u sic m a k i n g a n d teach i n g in l i m i t e d - o r n o n -cond u c t i n g role�. Yet occa s i o n a l l y c i rcu m s t a n ces w i l l demand t h em t o as s u m e t h e role a n d f u n c t i o n o f a f u l l y competent cond uctor. T h i s workshop w i l l add ress t h pec i fi c tech n i c a l , ges t u r a l . a n d k i n e t i c problems t h ese m u s i c i a n s face as condu ctors. Participa n t s i n t h e w o r k s h o p a r e e n cou raged to b r i n g speci f ic l i t e r a t u r e t h ey have co n d ucted o r may con d u ct i n the fut u r e to receive coac h i n g in cl ass. Discuss i o n , d e m o n s t r a t i o n , and video-ta p i n g w i l l be employe.d to h e l p the work s h o p p a r t i c i p a n t s w i t h i n d i v i d u a l problems. Previous co n­ d u ct i n g t ra i n i n g (ba s i c cond ucti n g cl asses a n d /or experienc.:e) is appropriate b u t not req u i re d . T h is workshop affords t h e m u s ician t h e rare o p p o r t u n i t y f o r speci fic , i n d i v i d u a l i z e d , yet low- k ey h e l p w i t h h is/ her con d u c t i n g problems. 1 : 00 p . m . - 4 : 3 0 p . m . MTW R F . t-228. lnstruc­ tor: D. Robb i n s .

PERCUSSION LADORATORY WORKSHOP (1) P4S602

PROBLEMS I N CONDUCTING (1)

"'SOlG

T H E MUSIC O F IGOR STRAVI SKY (1)

P45611

(J u ly 27-31) A brief s u rvey of t h e p r i n cipal s t y l e periods o f t h is most signifi cant of twe n t i eth -cen t u ry composers. Represe n t a t i v e works from the com­ poser's t h ree style periods - Russian , eo-C lass i c a l . a n d Seri a l - w i l l s h ow how t h e com poser's style evolved over t h e c o u rse o f h i s l o n g ca reer a n d how t h is composer presents a s u m m a r y o f t h e d i fferen t i n f l u e n ces on art m us i c in t h e f i rst h a l f of t h is ce n t u ry. Selected read­ i n g s from the composer's m J n y au tobiographical w r i t i n gs w i l l i l l u mi­ nate the p h i l osophy and (Taft behind the works. The s u rvey w i l l be di rected toward a l l i n terested m u s i c l i st e n e r , . regardless of back­ g r o u n d or tech n i ca l k n owl edge. 6 : 4 5 p . rn . -1 0 : 00 p.m. MTW R F . E-228. I n s t r u c t o r : D . Robbi n s .

P4561 4

(Ju l y 6-10) An i nterm ed i a t e l ook at Orff tech n i q ue , t h rough movem e n t , speech, song, i m provisa t i o n , dnd p i tched and u n p i t ched i n s t r u m e n t s . Wear comfortable clot h i n g . 9 : 00 a.m.-1 2 : 00 noon. MTWR F . E-228. I n s t r u c­ tor: D. Asplund.

16


MUSIC ·501H

CHORA L WORKSHOP (2)

P45612

(August 3-7)

FACULTY

R e hear � a l proced u res f o r t r a d i t i o n a l , co n tempor a ry, av a n t - g a r d e a n d " po p " style,>; perf rmJ n c e pract ice� o f t h e various m u s i c p e r i o d s ; p ro b l e m s of t he ch u rch mu i c i a n ; v o .1 1 developme n t ; c h o r a l r e a d i n g , p r o b l e m s of t h e e l e mentary a n d j v n i or h i g h c h o r i s t e r ; p h y s i cal, psy­ c h o l o g i ca l and m u s i ' prepara t i o n of t he con du ctor. 1 0 ;00 a . m . - 1 0 ; 00 p.m. TW R F . E-228 . I n s t ructor s : 1. Skones, E. H a r m i c, a n d S t a f f . Write for speci a l broch u r e .

David Dahl, 1 969, Associate Professo r of Mu sic, M.A., U niversity of Washin gto n , 1 962. Richard Farner, 1 976, Assist a n t Professor of Mu sic, M.M., U niversity of Michiga n, 1 974. Gordon Gilbertson, 1 954, Professor of Mu sic, M.M., Northwestern U n iversity, 1 942. Edward R. Harmic, 1 971 , A ssistant Professor of Mu sic, M . M . , U n iversity of A rizona, 1 969. Calvin Knapp, 1 959, Associate Professor of Mu sic, E d . D., Teachers Col l ege, Co l u m bia U niversity, 1 973. Lawrence Meyer, 1 969, Professor of M u sic, Ed.D., U niversity of No rthern Colorado, 1 964. Barbara Poulshock, 1 976, I n structor of Music, B.M., Pacific Lu theran U n ive rsity, 1 977. David P. Robbins, 1 969, Associate Profes sor of Mu sic, M.M ., U niv ersity of Michigan, 1 969. Maurice H. Skones, 1 964, Chairman, Professor of Mu sic, Director of Chora l Music, D.M.A., U niversity of Arizona, Tucson, 1 976. Ann K. Tremaine, 1 976, Assista nt Professor of Mu sic, M.M., U n iversity of Washington, 1 974.

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR PIAN ISTS Summer I n s t i t u t e for H i g h School P i a n i s t , ( j u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7 ) . Write to the Music D e p a r t me n t , Pacific Lutheran Un ivers i t y , Tacoma, WA 98447, for a special bro c h u re. I n s t ructo r : C. K n a p p .

NORTHWEST SUMMER MUSIC CAMP (J u l y 20-24) Wr i te to the M u s i c Depa r t m e n t , Pac i f i c L u t h e r a n Un iversity, Tacoma, WA 98447, f o r a special broch u re. I n s t r u c t o r : L. Meyer.

VISITING FACULTY David Asplund, Mu sic Specia list, F r a n k lin Pierce School District. Larry Curtis, Professor of Music, Director of Bands, Ca lifornia State U niversity, Long Beach. Robert DeCormier, Director of the New York Choral Society. Kato Havas, Fou nder and Director of the I n ternational Music Festival of O x ford , E n g l a n d . IPaul Mattson, Director o f Chora l Activities, Foothi ll Col l ege, Los A l tos Hil ls, California. Daniel Moe, Director, Oberlin Col l ege Choir. Sam Smith, Visiting Professor of Voice. James Taylor, Director of Choral Mu sic, Be l l evu e High School.

17


NURSING Phone : 383-7672 424

NURSING CENTRUM III (4)

P36401

FACULTY

(June 1 - August 21) Tuition : $127 p e r semester h o u r In t rod ucti o n to acut devi n t behavior

Susan Boots, 1 979, I nstructor of N u rsing, M.S.N., U n iversity of Wash i n gton, 1 979.

atte r n s a n d to l i fe t h re a te n i n g

medical-surgi al prob lems of chil dren a n d a d u l t s . Emphasis is placed on com p l e x pathophysiological and psyc hopathol gical aspects and

Constance Kirkpatrick, 1 980, I n structor of N u rsing, M.S., Un ivers i ty of Rochester , 1 979.

thei r i m p l i cations for the n u rs i n g process. Prereq u isite : N u rs i n g 354, 384 and 394, and concurrent reg i s t r a tion in Nu rsi ng 434 and 444.

Sylvia Novak, 1 979, Assistant Professor of Nursing, M.s.,

Classes a re schedu l'ed to meet on Mondays 8 : 00 a . m . - l 0 :00 a . m . in I N -

Califor nia St ate U n iversity, Los An geles, 1 972.

1 22 a n d o n Wednesdays 1 0 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 noon i n I N- l 22.

434

CLINICAL PROBLfMS (4)

Phyllis Page, 1 976, Ass istant Professor of Nu rsi ng, M . N . , U n i versity o f Wash i n gton, 1 977.

P36402

( J u ne 1 - August 21)

Susan Schmitt, 1 980, I nstructor of N u rsing, B .S. N.,

Tuition : $1 27 p e r semester h o u r .

Pac ific L u t heran U niversity, 1 976.

Int rod u ctio n t o n u rs i n g actions a p p ropriate to st ressful med i c a l , s u r g i c a l and psyc h i a t r i c problems a n d t o t h e n ew parameters o f

Susan Shumaker, 1 979, I nst ructor of N u rsing, B . S. N . , Pac i fic Lu theran U n ivers i ty , 1 973.

n u r s i n g . Iss ues i n n u rs i n g a nd changes i n hea l t h care syste ms a r e exa m i ned. Prereq u i s i tes : Nursing 354, 384 a n d ]94, co ncu rrent registration in Nur ing 424 a n d 444 . C l a ss will meet o n Mondays 1 0 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 no n in I N-l 22 a n d 1 : 00 p . m . -3 : 00 p . m . in I N-l l 1 D; Wednesdays 8 : 00 a .m . - l 0 : 00 a . m . in I N- 1 22 a n d 1 :00 p . m . - 3 : 00 p . m . i n I N - 1 1 1 D.

444

NURSI NG PRACTICUM II (4)

Doris G. Stucke, 1 967, Professor of N u rsing and D i rector of Sch ool of N u rsing, Ed. D., Teachers College, Col u m b i a U n iversity, 1 967.

P36403

( J u n e 1 - August 21 ) T u i t i o n : $127 per semester hou r .

I a n d psychopa t h o logical

C l i n ical application o f pathophysiologi

concepts i n critical c a re n u rsi n g , i n c l u d i n g u t i l i zation of i n terpersonal and soph isticated tec h n i ca l s k i l l s . Pre req u is i tes : Nursing 354, 384 and 394, and co n c u r r e n t registration i n N u rs i n g 424 a n d 434. Section A: Tuesday 7 : 00 a . m . - 3 : 30 p.m. and Thu rsday 8 : 00 a . m.-1 2 : 00 n o o n . Section B: Tuesday 8:00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 noon a n d T h u rsday 7 : 00 a . m . - 3 : 30 p.m.

464

N URSI NG CENTRUM IV (4) (J un e 1 A ugust 21 )

P36404

-

T u i t i o n : $ 1 27 per semester h o u r . Prepara ti on for f u t u re professi o n a l roles of the n u rse i n the health delivery system. Emp hasis i on leaders h i p and ma nage ment skills, p rofes s i o n a l j u dgment, decision m a k i n g, and t h e n u rse as a c h a nge Jge n t . Students examine legislatio n, eco n o m i c secu rity, professi o n a l growth and the u t i l i zation of hea l t h a n d welfare resou rces. Prereq u i si tes : N u rs i n g 424, 434 a nd 444, a n d co n cu rrent reg istration i n N u rs i n g 478. I n i t ial class meeti n g for a l l sec t i o n s w i l l be held on Monday, lun 1 , 1 0 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 noon i n I N-l00. Reg u l a r l y sched u l ed meetings for a l l secti o n s w i l l b e a n Wednesdays, 1 0 :00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 noon i n I N - l 00. Section A : 1 : 00 p . m .-3 :00 p . m Wed n esday, i n I N - 1 1 6 . Sect ion B: 1 :00 p .m .-3 : 00 p. m . , Wednesday, I N- l 2 2. Section C: 1 :00 p . m . -3 : 00 p . m . , Wednesda y, HA-214. .â&#x20AC;˘

478

SENIO R PRACTICUM (8)

P36405

(June 1 - August 21 ) T u i t i o n : $127 per semeste r h o u r C l i n ical a p p l ica t ion of profess i o n a l a n d tec h n ical s k i l l , i n primary o r

seco nd ary n u r s i n g sett i ngs. E a c h student i s exp ted to f u n ction in a st a ff n u rse ro l e ilnd prog ress to a lead e r s h i p role. Prereq u i s i t e s :

N u r i n g 424, 434 a n d 444. a n d concu rre n t registra tion i n Nu rsing 464. 32 h o u rs per w k as a r ranged.

18


PHYSI CA L EDUCATI O N

PH I LOSOPHY

Phon e : 383-7350

Phone : 383-7228

325

ETHICS AND BUSINESS (4)

P16601

FACU LTY

( J u ne 22 - J u ly 1 7 )

Econ o m i c l i fe presu pposes an a r ray of moral values and presents i n d i v i d u a l s and society with major et hical problems. This course ex plores the nature o f the moral v a l ue s i m p l i c i t and explicit in t h e free e n terprise system and assesses them i n the context of various moral theories. It will a l so add ress a variety of particular moral probl e ms confronted in business activity such as those involving em ployer足 e m ployee re l a tions, adverti s i n g , manage r i a l decisions, corpo rate social responsi b i l i t y and some aspects of ethics codes adopted by assorted professions. F u l f i l ls p h i l osophy core requ irement. 9 : 5 0 a . m . 1 2 : 30 p.m. MTW R F . HA-215. I nstructor : C . H u ber.

1 9 75, Assistan t Professor of Ph ys ica l E d u c a t i o n , M.S. , U n iv e r s i t y of Utah, 1 964. Gary A. Chase, 1 970, Assoc iate Professor of P hy sical Education, M.s., Wash i n gton State Un iversity, 1 964, Rick Eastman, 1 978, Assistant D irector, U n iversity Center, B. A . , Pa c i f ic luth eran U n i versity , 1 975. Paul E. Hoseth, 1 968, A ss o c i a te Professor of Health & Phys ical Ed u ation, Ed . D. , U n iversity of Oregon, 1977.

381

Maureen E. McGill, 1 977, I nstructor of Ph y sica l

Edward W. Ande rson,

THEORY OF VALUE: GENES, ROLES A ND MORAL BEHAVIOR (4) P26602 ( J u l y 27 - A u g ust 21 )

Ed uc at ion , M.A., Western Was h i n gton U n iversity, 1 977. B radford M oore, 1 980, Assist a nt Professor of P h ysica l Ed ucat io n , M.S., U n iverSity o f O re gon , 1 978. David M. Olson, 1 968, Professor of P h ysical Education, Di rector of t h e School of PhYSi ca l Education, Ath letic Di rector, Ph.D., U n iversity of I owa, 1966. Marvin Swenson, 1 969, Director of U n iversit y a nd U n iversity Center A ctivit ies, Ed. D . . Was h ington State Un iversi ty, 1 972. Forrest Westering, 1 972, Associate Professor of P hys i ca l Educat ion, Ed. D. , U n iversity of Northern Colorado, 1 966. Arno Zoske, 1 980, Soccer Coach , M . A . , Unive rs i ty of Or g o n , 1 972.

"The good which I wa n t to do, I fai l to do," said St. Pa u l ; "what I do i s t h e wrong wh ich i s agai nst m y w i l l . " Why we behave a s w e d o at times puzzles all of us. Why do we do what we rea lly do not want t o d o ? Why do we do what we bel ieve to be wron g ? I f we a re caused to d o what we believe to be wrong, can we rea l l y be held morally responsible? Why do we h ave the be l i efs that we do about right a n d wrong a n yway? Are these bel iefs i n a n y sense t r u e ? Sociology a n d biology recently have offered disconcert i n g a nswers to these q u estions. It is claimed that we behave as we do simply as a consequence of the i nterplay between soci ety's i n fl u ences and our basic genetic make-up. Even our highes t and nobles t values a re t h o u g h t t o be determi ned by t h i s i n terplay. I n t h i s cou rse w e shal l explore these issues b y read i n g some f the socio biological literatu re a n d subjecting i t t o c r i t ical exa m i nation. We shall explore t he i m p l ications of soc.iob iologists' claims for our u n d erstand i n g o f general human val ues a nd for o u r belief in freed o m , m o r a l responsibil ity, and basic h u man d i g n i t y . F u l f i l l s p h i losophy core req u i rement. 8 : 25 a . m . - l l :05 a.m. M TW R F . HA-208. Instructor: G . Myrbo.

$393

V ISITING FACULTY Mike Benson, B . A . , Ten n is

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION : THE LOG JC OF RELIGIOUS BE L I H (4) P26603 ( J u ly 1 3 - August 1 9)

I nst ructo r , Pacifi c lu thera n

U n iv e rsi ty .

I t is often su pposed that form a l l y d isci p l i n e d reason can shed no l i gh t on religi ous c l a i m s , a n d t h a t st ubborn attem pts t o t h i n k clearly about t h e fo u n dations of rel i g i o us belie f amount to what the Greeks called hu bris a n d the l ews cal led churzpah . In t h i s cou rse we shall exa m i n e t h e role of formal l y d i sci plined reason in c l assical and contemporary a ttempts to address some issues basic t o religio n : th e exis tence o f God, the logical status of religious l a nguage, the veri ficat ion of re l i g i ous claims, a n d the problem of ev i l . Students w i l l w r i t e t w o short papers, a take-home f i n a l , a n d b e respo n s i b l e f o r cl ass d iscussi ons. F u l f i l l s p h i l osophy o r e req u i rement. 6 : 30 p . m . -9 : 30 p.m. M W F . HA-210. In struct o r : I. Nord by.

T e ac h r a n d Coac h , Evergreen Sl a te Col lege , B . A . , U n ive r s i t y of Was h i ng t o n , 1 973.

Pamela Hickey,

M . S . , A t h l e t i c Tra i n er f o r Sea t t le Ma r i n e rs and P l U .

Gary N ic holson, Jerry Poppen,

M . A . , Physi c a l Ed ucat ion Speci a l is t , F ra n k l i n Eleme n t a ry Schoo l , T a orna . M. A. , Dire o r of Ph y s i c a l P u b l ic Sc ho o l s .

AI lweit,

UC Jl io n , Oly m pi a

FACU LTY 1 964, Professor of Phi losophy, Ph.D. , Un iversity of Wi sconsin, Mad ison, 1 962. Gunnulf Myrbo, 1970, Assist a nt Professor of Ph i los p h y , P h . D., U n i versity of Cambr i d ge , En g land , 1972. Jon J. Nord by, 1 977/ A ssistant Professor of Ph i l osophy, Ph.D., U nive rsity of Massachusetts, 1 977.

Curtis Huber,

19

Continued on page

20


PHYSICAL EDUCAl i O N 361B COACHING PRACTICUM (2) ( J u l y 27 - August 21 )

Continued from page 19

lOlA

BEGINNING GOLF (1) ( J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7)

P1 6801

Stude n t -assistant coach i n g experiences. T i mes to be a rranged. Prereq u i s i t e : depa rtmental approval (383-7350). Stude n ts mus t secure inst ructor's s i g n a ture on a n i ndepend e n t study card befo re registe r i n g . I n s t r u c t o r : P. Hoset h .

Activity cou rse for men a n d women. 7:00 a . m . - 8 : 1 5 a . m . MTW R. OA­ Field House. I n struct o r : F . Weste r i n g . Fee: $5.00.

201B

BEG INNING GOLf (1) ( J u ly 27 - August 21 )

·401A

P26802

BOWLING (1)

P16803

401 B

(June 22 - J u l y 17)

Act i v i t y course f o r men a n d women. 1 : 00 p . m .- 2 : 1 5 p . m . MTWR. UC Bowl. I n st ructors : M . Swenson and R . Eastman. Fee: $20.00

214

BEGINNING TENNIS (1) /June 22 - J u l y 1 7)

INTERMIDIATE TEN NIS (1) (July 27 - A u gust 21 )

401C

P26806

4010

SCHOOL HEALTH ( 2) (J u l y 27 - August 7)

491

P26808

PROfESSIONAL PRACTICUM (2) (June 22 - J u l y 1 7)

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM (2) (J u ly 27 - August 21)

on an i n dependent study card a r r a n ged . I n structor : D. Olson.

491

Pl6809

reg i s t e r i n g . Times to be

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 -4) (J u ly 27 - August 21 )

P26820

P46821

A s t i rTlU l a t i n g a n d i n t eres t i n g workshop specifica lly des i g n ed for today's ath letic coach o r a n yone i n volved in athletics. Sports Motivation is based on many new developments in psychology and a t h l e t i cs. Many w i n n i n g ideas and tec h n i ques are presented o n motivat i n g i n d i v i d ual s and teams. assess i n g strengths a n d weaknesses of i n d iv i d u a l p layers and teams. 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p . m . MTVV R F . OA-102. Instructor: F. Wester i n g .

Pl681 1

study

before

·5OlA SPORTS MOTIVATION I (1) (J u n e 1 5- 1 9)

P2681 0

Student-assistant coach i n g experiences. Times to be a r ranged . Prereq u i s i t e : departme n t a l approval (383-7350). S t u d e n ts must secure i n s t r u ctor's s i g n a t u re on a n i n dependent registe r i n g . Instructo r : D . Olso n .

Pl6819

Directed s t u d y , rea d i n g and research on selected topics a p proved a n d supervised by i n structor. St u d e n t s m ust secure i n s t r u ctor's s i g n a t u re on an i ndependent study card before register i n g . Times to be a r ra n g ed . I n struc tor : P. Hoseth .

St uden t -assist a n t tea c h i n g expe r i e n ces. Times to b e arranged. Pre� q u isite: depa rtme n t a l approval (383-7350) . Stude n ts must secure i n structor's signature on an i n dependent study card before registeri ng. I n st ructo r : P. Hose t h .

361A COACHING PRACTICUM (2) ( J u n e 22 - J u ly 1 7)

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1 -4) ( J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7)

Directed s t u d y , read i n g and resea rch on selected t o p i cs approved a n d s u pervised by i n structor. Students m ust secure i n st r uctor's sign a t u re

tudent-assista n t tea c h i n g exper i e n ces. Times to be a r ranged . Prere q u i s i t e : depa r t m e n t a l approval (383-7350). Students must secure i n st ructor's s i g n a t u re on an i n de pen dent study card before registe r i n g . I n structor : D. Olso n .

360B

P468 1 7

b a l l camps. I ns t r u c t o r : Staff

Presen tation and d i s cuss i o n of health concepts t h a t relate to the t o t a l sc hool h e a l t h p r o g r a m . 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 :05 a.m. M T W R F . OA-102. In t ru ct o r : P. Hoseth.

360A

COACHING CLINIC: VOLLEYBALL (1) (August 9- 1 2 or 1 3-16)

co n d i t i o n i n g exercises t h rough observat i o n and di rected study associ­ ated w i t h vol l eyball camps. T i mes co i n cide with the con d u ct of v o l l ey­

P26807

Activity cou rse for men a n d women. 1 2 :40 p.m.-1 : 55 p . m . MTW R . OA­ H a n d B a l l . I n s t ructo r : M . Benso n .

295

P468 1 5

Opport u nity f o r learn i n g vol leyba l l tech n iq u es, s k i l l s , st rategies a n d

Hand B a l l . I n s t r uctor: D. Olson.

RACKnBALL/SQUASH (1 ) ( J u l y 27 - August 21 )

COACHING CLINIC : BASKETBALL (1) ( J u l y 6-10 o r 1 3-17 or 20-24)

Opport u n i ty for l e a r n i n g basketball tec h n i ques, s k i l l s , strategies, and con d i t i o n i n g exercises t h r ough observat i o n and di rected study associ­ ated w i t h basketba l l camps. T i mes co i n c ide with the con d u ct of bas­ ketball camps. �A. I n struct o r : Staff.

Act i v i t y cou rse for men a n d wome n . 1 2 : 40 p . m . - 1 : 55 p . m . MTWR. OA­

222B

COACHING CLINIC: SOCCER (1) P46814 ( J u l y 5-10 or 1 2- 1 7 or 1 9-24 or August 2-7 or 9-14 o r 1 6-21 )

d ition i n g exercises t h rough observat io n s and d i rected study associ­

P2680S

RACKETBALL/SQUASH (1) (J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7)

( J u n e 29 - July 2)

ated with soccer camps. Times coincide with t h e cond uct of soccer camps. �A. I n s t r uctor : Staff.

Ac t i Vity cou rse for men and wom e n . 7 : 00 a. m . -8 : 1 5 a . m . MTWR. OA Gym. I n st ruc t o r : M. Benso n . Fee : $5.00.

222A

P4681 3

Oppo r t u n ity f o r lea r n i n g soccer t e c h n iques, s k i l l s, strategies, a n d co n­

P16804

Act i v i t y course for men a n d' wo m e n . 7 :00 a . m . - 8 : 1 5 a . m . MTWR. OA Gy m. l nst ructor : M. Benso n . Fee : $5.00.

215

FI RST AID (1)

A w o r k s h o p designed to meet req u i rements for t h e R e d Cross S t a n ­ d a rd F i rst A i d and Perso n a l Safety a nd CPR Certifica t i o n . 6 : 00 p . m . 1 0 : 00 p . m . MTW R. O A - 1 0 2 . I ns t r uct o r : E. A n d e rso n .

Activi ty cou rse for men and women. 7 : 00 a . m . -8: 1 5 a . m . MTW R . OA­ Field House. I n s t ructo r : R. Moe. Fee : $5.00.

204

P26812

c a rd

·5OlB

before

SPO RTS MOTIVATION II (1) ( J u n e 22-26)

P46822

T h i s course is a con t i n uat ion of Sports Motivation I. Sports Motivation II t a kes concepts and pri nci ples of mot ivation and appl ies the m to spec i f ic s i t uat i o n s and c i rcumstances that are releva n t i n many teaching a n d coach i n g s i t u a t i o n s . Feedback and class d i scuss i o n s b r i ng out many key areas that are d i r ect l y related to the needs a n d i n terests of t h e cl ass. 6 : 30 p . m.-9 : 30 p.m. MnVR'F. O A - 1 02. I n struct o r : F. Wester i n g .

20

Con tinued o n page 2 1


PH YSICAL EDUCA liON Continued from page

*50lC

*501K

20

PSYCHOL()(;Y OF COACHING YOUTH SPORTS (1) P46823 (June 29 - J u l y 3)

A review o f hea l t h related curricu l u m packages and ideas currently being used in the schools. Suggested topics to i n c l u d e : drugs and alcohol. n u t r i t i o n , sexu a l i ty, con sumerism, smoking and stress. Prog ram developers will often be used to demonstrate use of their materials. Students selec t i n g to take the cou rse for two credits w i l l develop an additional cu r ricu l u m project. 6 : 30 p . m . -9 : 30 p . m . MTW R F . OA-103. I nstructo r : P. Hoseth.

T h i s workshop is especially designed for youth coaches of all sports. Stud ies a re made o f the i m portant factors both positive and negative that affect the young athlete and the coach. Such topics as leadership styles, building of w i n n i n g attitu des, goal setting and relationsh i ps between coaches, parents, and the com mun ity are included. This is an excel'le nt course to en rich a l l coaches' backg rou nds in sports psychology. 6 : 30 p. m.-9 : 30 p . m . MTWRF. OA- 103. I n stru cto r : F. Wester i n g .

SOlD

*SOlL

P46831

( J u l y 6-8)

Preve n tion and care o f common r u n n i n g inju ries incl u d i n g k n ee and heel in j,u r i es, Ach i l les tendon problems, stress fractures, s h i n splints , a n k l e s p r a i n s , and neu romae. 8 : 00 a . m . - 1 :00 p . m . MTW. OA-102. I n structo r : G. Nicho lson.

*SOl E

MOVEMENT EDUCATION FOR SPORTS SKI LLS (1) P46825 ( J u ly 6-10)

*SOl M

P46826

SOlN

(July 1 3- 1 7)

COACHI NG FOOTBALL: SECRETS OF A CHAMPION (1) P46827 ( J u l y 1 3- 1 7)

* 501 P

Organ ization, prom otion , strategies, and systems basic to a successful collegiate football program will be prese n ted. 6 : 30 p . m . -9 : 30 p.m. MTWRF. OA-102. I nstructor: F. Westering,

SOlH

P46833

(August 1 0- 1 4)

STRESS WITHOUT DISTRESS (1)

P46834

Stress h a s been identifi ed as o n e o f t h e most signif icant health problems facing us today. Without stress many of us wou ld not function well and yet too m u ch stress can be very dele terious to hea lth. The course will co nsider : 1 ) What is stress? 2) What s h o u l d I know about stress? 3) How can I reduce the harmful effects o f stress? and 4) The relationsh i p of i n creased stress to d isease problems. 6: 30 p . m. - 9 : 30 p.m. MTWR F . OA-102. I nstructo r : P. Hoseth.

HYPERACTIVE CHILD AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (1) P46828 ( J u l y 20-24)

PHYSIOLOGY AND THE COACH (1)

CHILDREN'S DANCE (1)

(August 1 0-14)

Focus on cu rrent methods of d i agnosis and treatment of hyperact ivity. Mate r i a l w i l l be presented through lectu res, guests, related art i cles, and boo ks. I m p l icat ions for educational tech niq ues in classroom set足 ti ngs are stresse d . Students may take part i n several off-ca mpus trips to schoo l s and agencies. 9 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 n oo n . MTW R F , OA-102. In structo r : B. Moore.

*SOlJ

P46832

Designed to in troduce tech niques and strategies for lead i n g chil dren i n to significant movement activities. Activit ies are des i g n ed to promote k i nesthetic awareness and confidence in i n herent creative powers. Workshop w i l l also prov ide opportu n i ties to explore tec h n i q u es for using creative movement as a curricu l u m tool in the classroom. F i lms, discussion, lectures, and part icipation in movement session will co mbine to make this a thoroughly worthwh i l e l e a r n i n g experience. 9 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 : 00 n o o n . M TW R F . OA-Dance Stud io. I n s tructor: M . McG i l l .

New, pract ical, and exci t i n g activities i n fitn ess development, movement educati o n , low-organized games, and rh yth m ical a ctivities w i l l be emphasized. Activ i t i es appropriate for K-6 w i l l be presented. Student Lea r n i n g Objectives (SLO) i n physical education w i l l be examined. 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p.m. MTWRF. OA-Field House. I nstructor : J . Pop pen.

*501G

JUDGING GYMNASTICS ( 1 )

A work shop designed to presen t the tech n i q ues of ju dging gymnastic events. Class presentat ion will cover the bal ance beam, free exercise, vaulting, and u n even para l l e l bars. Class members w i l l get actual judging ex perience from viewi n g (1) f i l m s and (2) demonstrat ions. Beg i n n i n g and experienced ju dges are welcome. 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p.m. MTW R F . OA-Balcon y. I n structo r : P. Hickey.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1)

(J u ly 27-31 )

(August 3-7)

Participa n ts w i l l l e a r n how to effectively teach seasonal s p o r t s k i l l s terminology a n d g a m e concepts to p r i mary students through a com bination of cooperative movement educational strategies. Tech n iq u es to promote active participation by all students w h i l e l e a r n i n g t o un derstand seasonal team sport concepts w i l l be emphasiz ed. Des igned to make winners of both teachers and studen ts. 6 : 30 p.m.-9:30 p . m. MTWRF. OA-1 02. I n structo r : A . Twe it.

*50lF

HEALTH ENHANCEMENT PROG RAMMING (1)

The course should appea l to anyone concerned with "staying well" as an al ternative to the illnesses i n d u ced primarily by l i festyle. The course w i l l deal w i t h self-responsibi l i ty as a positive approach to opti mal health. Various models of i n tervention w i l l be discussed. Specific approaches w i l l include proper n u t r i t i o n , weight management, i n d ividually-tailored exercise, stress redu ction tech n i ques , and smoking abatement. 6 : 30 p.m. -9:30 p.m. MTWRF. OA-102. In structo r : G. Chase. Fee: $10.00

SPORTS MEDICINE: RUN NING INJURIES (1) P46824

CUR RICULUM MATERIALS FOR HEALTH EDUCATION ( 1 ) or (2) P46830 ( J u l y 20-24)

SOlQ

MODERN DA NCE (1)

P46835

(August 1 0-14)

Des i gned f o r the beg i n n i n g dance s t u d e n t i n o r d e r to promote t h e development o f n e w k i n esthetic a n d creative awareness. I t w i l l explore dance tech niq ues i nclud ing technical movement, vocabulary, i m p rovisation and composi tion, and an introduction to effort-shape p r i n c i p l es . 2 : 00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. MTW R F . OA-Dance Studio. I n structo r : M . McG i l l .

P46829

( J u l y 20-24) Workshop presents physiolog ical appl ications t o coach ing. Topics w i l l i n clude t h e development of muscu lar strength a n d endurance, and the rel ationship of n u trition, envi ro n ment, sex, age, and ergogenic aids to athletic performance. 6 : 30 p . m . -9:30 p . m . MTWRF. OA-102. I n structo r : G . Chase.

*SOl R

COACHING COMPETITIVE SOCCER (1)

P46836

(August 1 7-21 )

Tech niques, tr a i n i n g methods, systems, and strategy of coach i n g soccer. Appropriate for in terscholastic and age-group coaches. 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p . m . MTWR F. OA-Field House. Instructo r : A. Zoske.

21


PO ll i CA L SC I EN C E

PSYCH O LOGY

Phon e : 383- 7595

325

POLITICAL THOUGHT (4)

Pho n e : 383- 7294

335

P1 7601

(June 22 - J u ly 1 7)

P1 7801

A �u rvey of t h e o r i g i n J n d evo l u t i o n of major p o l i t ical co ncepts i n a n c i e n t , m « d i «va l , a n d early m o d e r n t i mes. Such i d eas as s t a t e , o b l i g a­ t i o n , a u t h o r i t y , co m m u ni ty, law and freedom w i l l be s t u d i e d devel o p­ m e n ta l l y . 9 : 50 a . m . - 1 2 : 30 p . m . MTWR F , L-'106, I ns t ructo r : D. F a r m e r .

363

MEDIA, GOVERNMENT, AND POLICY (4)

(June 22 - J u l y 1 7)

PhYSica l , i n t e l lect u a l , soci.! l , a n d e m o t i o n a l grow t h from i n fa n cy t h r ough adolescence to maturity. Prere q u i s i t e : 1 01 . 8 : 00 a . m . - 1 0 : 30 a . m . MTWRF. H - l 09. I n s t r u c to r : A. Bottone.

401 A

SEMINAR: ASIAN-AMER ICAN EX PERIENCE (2) P47802

P27602

(J u l y 27 - August 21 )

(J u n e 1 5- 1 9)

Lectu res, t o u rs, a n d meals w i l l be presen ted to fa m i l i a ri z e t h e s t u d e n t w i t h t h e A s i a n co m m u n i ty i n t h e area. H is t o r i ca l , SOCiolog i c a l , a n d psych o l o g i c a l m a t e r i a l on the Asian experience w i l l be covered. T h i s course is i n te n ded t o g i v e t h e s t u d e n t a perspective on one of t h e more e t h n i ca l l y d iverse m i n o r i t y co m m u n i t ies i n t h e Nort hwes t . Coverage w i l l i n c l u d e Japanese, C h i n ese, V i e t n a m e s e a n d F i l i p i n o c u l t u r a l gro ups. Speci al fee : $25.00. 9 : 00 a . m .- l : 50 p . m . MTWR F. HA-216. I ns t r u c t o r : J. Morilsugu.

I n q u i ry i n t o the re l a t i o n s h i p between p u b l ic w i l l a n d p u b l i c p o l i cy i n America, concen t r a t i n g o n t h e p i v o t a l r o l e of e l e c t ro n i c a n d p r i n t med i a . Exami nes m e d i a i n con texts o f o p i n i o n forma t i on , express i o n , a n d effect>. A t t e n t i o n to pol i t i c a l c u l t u re , u s e s o f p u b l i c o p i n i o n p o l l s , a n d gover n m e n t a l regu l a t i o n , secrecy, a n d i n formation management. 8 : 30 a . m . - l 1 :00 a . m . MTWRF. X-1 1 2. I n s t r u c t o r : W. Spencer,

·371 JU DICIA L PROCESS AND BEHAVIOR (4)

DEVELOPMENT: I N FANCY TO MATURITY (4)

P1 7603

·401 B

( J u n e 22 - Ju ly 1 7)

SEMINAR: BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION TECH N IQUES (2) P1 7803 ( J u n e 22 - J u ly 1 7)

An P a m i n a t i o n of t h e nature of l a w , j ud i c i a l organiza t i o n , and j u d i c i a l r o l e s . Pa r t i c u l a r e m p h asis is g i v e n to t h e p o l i t i c a l n a t u re of t h e j u d i c i a r y a n d t h e m u t u a l i m pacts o f l aw and t h e pol it i c a l syste m , No prereq u i ­ s i tes. Opr2ll t o teac h e r s , p r a c t i t i o n ers , a n d persons i n terested i n the l aw . 4 : 30 p , m , - 9 : 3 0 p.ln. M TR. X - 1 1 2. I n st ructo r : C. M a r s h .

T h e a p p l i c a t i o n of behavio ral p r i n c i p l es to a c a d e m i c , perso n a l , a n d s o c i a l pro b l e ms of c h i l d r e n , y o u t h a n d a d u l ts . Special e m p h a s i s given t o s e l f-m o d i f i ca t i o n approaches. 6 : 00 p . m . - 9 : 00 p.m. MW. H A - 200, I nstruct o r : E. Severtson ,

501

420

CIVIL LI BERTIES IN PUBLI C SCHOOLS (3-4) P42412

(May 26 - J u n e 1 1 )

Su rvey for t h e s t u d y of perso n a l i t y and for the fo rmu l a t i o n o f perso n al i ty theorie s. Tech n i q u es of meas u re m e n t a n d i m p l ications f o r cou ns e l i n g a n d/o r psychotherapy. Prereq u i s i t e : Ps ycholo gy 1 0 1 . 9 : 5 0 a . m . - 1 2 : 30 p . m . MTWRF. HA-210. I n s t r u cto r : ). M o r i ts u g u ,

FACULTY

450

David M. Atkinson, 1 976, Associate Professor of Po l i t ical Science Ph.D., Un iversity of Maryland, 1 972. ,

.,

PSYC HOLOG ICAL TESTI NG (4)

P17805

( J u n e 22 - J u l y 1 7) Su rvey o f s t a n d a r d i zed t e s t s ; m e t h ods o f d e v e l o p m e n t ; s t a n d a rd i z a t i o n ; l i m i t ations a n d i n t e rp re t a t i o n s o f tests. Prereq u i s i t e : Psychology 243, a cou rse i n s t a t i<;tics, or i n s t r u ct o r 's consent (383-7658) , 9 : 50 a.m .-1 2 : 30 p . m . MTWR F . HA-219. I n s t r u c to r : E. Seve rtso n ,

Carrol E. DeBower, 1 964-68, 1 970, Professor of .

P17804

(J u n e 22 - J u ly 1 7)

See Ed u ca t i o n 501A o n page 8.

Education , E d D Li ncol n , 1 964,

PERSONALITY THEORIES (4)

U n iversity of Ne braska,

Donald R. Farmer, 1 955, Professo r of Po l itical Science,

460

Regency Professor, 1971 -72, Ph.D., Un iversity of M i n nesota, 1954. Carolyn W. Marsh, 1 980, Assista n t Professor of Legal Stud ies, J.D., Geo rge Was h i n gton U n iversity, 1 978. Wallace H. Spencer, 1974, Assistant Professor of Po l it ical Science, Ph.D., U n iversity of Was h i n gton, 1 977.

LEARNING: RESEARCH AND THEORY (4)

P27806

(J u Iy 27 - Au gust 21 ) E x p e r i m e n t a l s t u d i e s ,l n d th eor i s of le a r n i n g . Lect u re , d iscuss i o n and d e mo n s trations. Prereq u i s i t e : a m i n i m u m o f 1 2 h o u rs in psyc h o l o g y , 9 : 5 0 a . m .-1 2 : 30 p . m . MTW R F . X - 1 1 2. I ns t ru c t o r : J, N o l p h .

FACULTY John N. Moritsugu, 1975, Assista nt Professor of Psychology, Ph.D., U n iv rsity of Roch este r, 1977.

Jesse D. Nolph, 1 968, Associate Professor of Psycho logy, P h . D . , Corn e l l Un iversity, 1 971 .

S. Erving Severtson, 1 966, Professor of Psych o l ogy, P h . D . , U n iversity o f Ut a h , 1 966; D i p l omate i n Cl i n i cal Psycho logy, Ameri ca n Board of Professional Psychology, 1 977.

VISITING FACULTY Anthony Bottone, 1\11 . 0 . , C h i ld Psychiatrist , Grou p Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, M . D . , State U n iversity o f New Y o r k , B rook lyn, 1966.

22


241

RELIG ION

SOC OLOGY/ ANT ROPOLOG Y

Pho n e : 383-7228

Phone : 383-7660

BI BLICAL LITERATU RE: OLD TESTAMENT (4) P 1 8001 (June 22 - July 1 7)

ANT 401

I n this class we s h a l l i n ve tigate th vari us ('uitur , l l r.. i J inm lll . u l l l l eastern A laska. Focu s i n g o n bO l h h i st o r i c and cOlllempor"r; way 1 l i fe we s h a l l use t h e resources of i l ka and eli, u,� I ll p lou l l J J l illn 1)1 t h ese resources. We s h a l l i n ves t it;al the Rm�ian , I I I n g l l 'il .. ncii n,l­ via n , and Asian cu l t u res w h ich h ave sh a ped modern l ife . ''> well .lS look­ ing at the types of com m u n i ties i n the reg i cm (N.B. , linin . !ishtn ' . Iog ­ g i n g , religious ) . A l o n g w i t h m pus- as II �tlldy w I' " ., 1 1 ! rav!'1 I i i some of these co m m u n i t i es to o bse rve them i n ,ll lion. I n ' ru( l o r� : L. Klein a n d M . Roza n s k i . Pl e a se ont.tt t i nmUl\Oh 1m ,Jr l , 1 1

Literary, h istorica l a n d t h eological d i mensions of the O l d Testa ment, i nc l u d i n g perspective on contemporary problems. 9 : 25 a . m . - l l : 05 a . m . MTW R F . HA-206. I nstructo r : J. Peterse n .

241

BI BLICAL LITE RATU R E : N EW TESTAMENT (4) (June 22 - July 17)

P 1 8002

Biblical, historical and t h eological d i mensions of the New Testament, i n clud i n g perspective on contemporary problems. B : 25 a . m . - l l : 0 5 a . m . M TW R F . HA-200. I nstructor: M.J. K reyb i l l .

·261

RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD (4) (June 22 - August 21 )

A NT/H IST 401

PJ800J

A critical i n t roduct i o n to the study of the religions of the world em p h a s i z i n g h i storical origins a n d cultural developmen ts. Read i n gs are centered u pon p ri mary sources in tra n s l a t i o n . 6 : 30 p . m . - 9 : 30 p . m . T R . HA-21 5 . I n str uctors : S. Gov i g a n d D. Saxby.

343

LIFE OF JESUS (4)

P1 8004

(June 22

-

CHJ NESE CULTURAL CONTINUrTY AND CHANGE (4) TOUR fl40201 (June 1 1 - July 1 )

I n structo r : Greg G u ld i n_

SOC 401 A

July 1 7)

STRA TEC IES FOR SELF­ JRA NSFORMATlON (2) (June 1 5-19

P48fiU I

This is a course i n A p p l ied Sociology. After i i Mening.1l t nliv{'ly t o w l .11 sociologists and other soci a l scient ists suggest aboul l h .. df'velopment of sel fhood, we w i l l map strategies for selt- h,mg . nlf!�p- l I .ltC�jl I r self-transformation i n c l u de s I f-nypnO'iis. journ.,1 writing, (r ali visual ization , sel f-tapes. d ream an a l y s is . hiote>dback. ,lilt! severlll o t hers. The sessions w i l l in c lu d OJ ual work wilh Ih �e r l lPthml a� w e l l as d iscussion about those U rjcQn'i ious dnd {"O/l�(IOII' faClo['; w h ich i n h i b i t or enha nce healthy sel fhood 9 ·OO a.nl. - 1 2 ,100n a IIII I UO p . m . - 4 : 00 p . m . M TW R F . HA-21 0. I nWu tor . D. Oberho tlPI

A study of the l i fe and teaching of J esus; an h i storical su rvey of " Life of Jesus" research, form and redaction c r i t icism of t he Gospel trad i t i o n ; t h e r e l igious d i mensions of Jesus' l i fe a n d thought. B : 25 a . m . - 1 1 : 05 a . m . MTW R F . HA-21 3 . I nstructor : S . Govig.

451

CULTURES OF SOUTHEASTE R N AlASKA (4) STUDY TOUR P40201 (June 1 -26)

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN THOUGHT (4) P28005 (July 27 - August 21 )

Contem porary issues a n d problems in t h eo l ogy w i t h reference to B i b l i c a l a n d h istorica l resources a n d recent u n dersta n d i ngs of h u m a n i­ ty a n d the world. Prerequ isite : o n e lower d iv i s i o n course or consent of i n s t r u ctor: B : 25 a . m . - l l : 05 a . m . MTW R F . H A -202. 'I nstructo r : P . Verh a l e n .

SOC 401B

PLANN ING FOR CHANGE (2-3) 1'48ftOl (July 20-24) (Also listed i n Edu al ion 401 ) about change in an o rga n i za t i o n need ml! be l h�� ha7dld

B r i n g i ng process. In this workshop panic i pants wilt be intr oduC' 'd tn I he t h eoretical basis for orga n i zat i ona l c h a nge . dml wi l l w I� through I h p rocess of p l a n ned change i n a real - l i fe � I l u"t,on. t a h Ihll\(( ip,1 Il1 w i l l h a v e com p l eted a d e t a i l e d plan for a per�onal or OTg�nilati.,r <11 change project by the e n d of the cou rse. flange dgerJI kill mtilid contracting, d ia g nosis, objective �e lll n R . explorallon and test/liK of options, t a k i ng action and e a l uat iorL Thp (orn p 1 '/1 i agent/consultant role will be s t ressed . ThiS VOl " s n p will he h Ipl u l tlJ a n yone with any p l a n n i n g o r ma naf;ing re�pon�ibr l rt ip 111 �<- h (Jol�, gove r n m e n t and soci a l service agen c i , vollllllel r ()fgalli,�titlm, chu rches, and bus i n ess. 8 : 30 o1.m . -4 : 30 p.rn" M rwR . 8: ill a.rn - 1 1 noon, F . HA-210. I n s t r u ctor: R. Me n ze l . Add ilrcmal fe ' : ]0 00

FACU LTY Stewart D. Govig, 1 958-60, 1 961 , Professor of Religion, PhD., New York University, 1 966. John E. Petersen, 1 967, Associate Professor of Religion, PhD., New York University, 1 970.

{Jflh Ild/lg

VISITING FACU LTY Mary J ean Kreybill, PhD. Candidate, UniverSity of Chicago, 1 98 1 . Douglass Saxby, Instructor, Tacoma Community Col lege, PhD., Princeton, 1 965. ph il Verhalen, Instructor, Bellarmine H i gh School, S.TD . , Gregorian University, Rome, 1 969.

SOC 401C

CONFLICT RESOLUTION (2) P·1860] (July 20-24) (Also listed in Edu( liol1 40 1 )

A n i n tensive, one-week se m i n a r workshop fo r t{'"rlll'r�. ild i l l i l l r� 1 .1 tors, cou nselors. soci a l workers. a n d pw Ti ll' ",II .� ", ,1 �i�t participants i n beco m i n g more self- o n fid .. n t II I ·fil'l t i \ ' \\ I \ h I h� resol ution of confl ict. Emphasi .. i s p l ac d all Ih .lI 'Iui�ll ioli "I .. k d l� a n d strategies (active l i sten i n g . I gi a! o me fJuent I"i . p� hl)� I I l hf' i etc.) that e n cou rage creative problem � Iv i n g . PMr i, Ip.lIlt, \ , I I I "n d p rocess w h ich has proven to be e l f t i v (' In r >slllvin� �rud flf nmr., havior, i n ter-generational a l ie n a t i o n , onllirt b",rw 11 " .Ifl .lnt! m a nagement a nd typical fam i l y prohl m\. 8 : n .nI.-4 00p,m . . I IW R 8 : 3 0 a . m . - 1 2 :00 n oo n . F . H A -206. I mt ru ctor : J . I\nd r�oll

hologi\l<

LITE (Luth eran Institute for Th eological Education) SU MMER INSTITUTE OF THEOLOGY (July 6-10) T h e m e : "Meeting the C h a l l e n ges of the 'BO's" A week of study for laity, l ay staff workers, c l e rgy and fam i l ies. Two credits ava i l ab l e , u n i versity or Se m i nary. Contact t h e L I T E Office for registra t i o n i n formation (383-7342 ) , or write to L I TE, Paci f i c L u t heran U n i ve rs i t y . Tacom a . W/\ 9B447. I n s t r u c t o rs : E x p l o r i n g " Faith in F ree­ do m " with Dr. David M i l l a r , U n i versity of Gl asgow, Scotland ; A "Theological U p d a t e " w i t h D r . Ted Pete rs , Pacific L u t h eran Theolog i ­ cal Sem i nary (PLTS) ; and " T h e Gospel of Mark " w i t h D r . J a c k Dean Kingsbu ry, U n ion Theological Sem i n a ry . R i c h m o n d , Vi rgi n i a .

·SOC 443

23

SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCAliON (4) rZII604 (July 1 4 - August 20) (Also Ii led in Fduration 586)

The nature and f u n c t i o n i n g o f t h e dU(",ltional sy,tem w i l l ex a m i ned from a sociolog i al pf'f�pN1i\lP � " rI r pi will i n l i t,<ie. education, strati ficat i o n , and S CI " I I � ng" : r l lt· �r hl lnl l� a ' HI1I ,I.' organization ; the 'ochool as a sUCIal i nstrtulion dnd Ihe sO(lol lgy 01 l e a r ning. 6 : 00 p.m.-l0:00 p . m . T R . I IA-21 1 . I nstru lOr ; K _ 'Connor .

Conli/lu >d

orr

pOlI\" 4.


SOC I O LOGY/ ANTH ROPOLOGY

SOC IAL WO RK Phone : 383-7659

ContJnued from page 23.

405

·SOC 462 THE CONTEMPORARY AME RI CAN FAMILY (4) P48605 ( J u n e n - July 29)

P48402

An e x a m i n a t i o n of co ntempora ry merican fa m i ly l i fe p atterns, ch a n g i n g roles of fami ly members , and t h e r e l a t i o n s h i p s of t he f a m i l y t o o t h r soc i al Inst i t u tions. 6 :00 p . m . - 1 0 : 00 p . m . M W . H A - 2 1 4. Instructor: J . S . h i l l e r .

Jim Anderson, Ph .D., Di rector of Hu ma n Relations, Hea r t l a n d Educat i on , Des Moines, Iowa . Provides legislatu re-mandated human r la t ion s trai n i n g fo r a l l p u b l i c school teachers in the Des Mo i n es a re a . Greg Guldin, 1 979, Assistant Professor of An t h ropology, Ph. D., U n iversity of Wisconsi n , 1 977. Robert K. Menzel, 1969, Di rector of t h e Center for Human Orga n ization i n Changing Ev i ronme n ts (CHOICE), Ph.D., T h e F ie l d i n g I n st i t u te , 1 9 78 .

475/476

Kathleen O'Connor, 1 977, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Ph.D., Wa s h i n gt o n U n iversity, St. lou is, 1 974.

504

Jo h n A. Schiller, 1 958, P ro f essor of Sociology and Soci a l

P3840J

ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN MAR ITAL AND FAMILY TH ERAPY (4) P38404 -

Au gust 21 )

T h i s course seeks to prov ide s t u d e n t s w i t h a m e a n i n g f u l p rocess a n d structure b y wh ich fam i l y t h erapy is l e a rned at t h e p r acti cLHn I vel. E m p h as i s will be u pon t h e deve' l o p m e n t o f perce p t u a l , con cept u a l and ex ecut ive s k i l l s used in eva l u a t i n g a n d trea t i n g "peeific ma r i t al J n d f a m i l y dysfu nc t i o n s . Consen t o f i n s t r u ctor/ta l ly c a r d req u i red. I n s truct o r : J . McK a i n .

SOC I A L WO R K

507

P1 8401

J u ly 1 7) Processes of sQ c i a l chang : sllCia l co n d i t i o ns wh ich create t h e need f o r i n t erve n t io n , f he dyn rni cs f ch an g I n i n d iv i d u a l s and grou ps, f u n c t i n o t 0 ial mov e me n ts In affe c ti n g c h ange; i n t erve n t i o n met hods, t ac t i c . nd s tra tegies. Prereq l l i s i t e : 2 7 1 or c o n s e n t o f 385

FIELD EXPERI ENCE (4-6)

( J u ne 22

Work, Regency Professor, 1 976-77, P h . D . , Un iversity of Was h i n g t on . 1 967.

-

i ns t ructor. 9 : 50 J . m . - 1 ·1 : 0 5 .t.m . M TW R F .

J u l y 1 0)

Supervised f i e l d work w i t h an a g e n cy or i nst i t u t i o n . A p p l i c dt lon / i n tegr ation of k nowledge, theory and un dersta n d i n g . De ve l o p m e n t o f s k i l l s co mmon t o soc i a l work. C o n s e n t o f i n st r uctor/t a l l v ca rel � req u i red . I n s t r u c t o r : W. Gi lberts o n .

Sociology, Ph .D., G raduate T he ol og i c a l U n ion, Berkeley, 1 969.

( J u ne 22

-

(J u n e 22 - August 21 )

W. Dwight O be rho ltzer, 1 969, Associate Professor of

SOCIAL INTERVENTION (4)

( J u n e 22

The course w i l l exa m i n e how the conce p t s , v a l ues, and co n t e n t o f m u l ti-cu l t u re relate to, affect a n d i n f l u e n ce i n d i v i d u a l , group d n d co m m u n i ty s e l f co ncept a n d i d e n t i t y . T h e i n t e n t i s to d i scover w a y s to i n corporate multi-cu l tu r a l perspect i ve s into profes s i o n a l and p e rs o n a l p ract ice, o u t look a n d l i festyles. Content areas i n c l u d e : c u l t u r a l p l u r a l ism a n d i t s m e a n i n g i n Ame rica n societ y ; e t h n i c he r i tag e a n d Its r o l e i n a develop i n g s e l f-concept for c h i l d re n a n d a d u l ts . Sp e c i a l effort w i l l be taken to u n d e rst a n d ones ow n et h n i c h e r i t age a n d oth 'rs. Perspectives on Bl ack, A s i a n , Paci f i c I s l a n d , H i sp a n i c , N l i v e Ameri a n a n d E u ropean A me r i c a n h e r i t ages w i l l be p resen t ed : t he i m pact o f racism, stereo ty p i n g, d i scri m i n a t ion a n d socia l class o n i n d i vi d u a l s and school po p u l a t ions; how t o teach a n d l i ve m u l t i-cu l t u r e v a l u e s a t h o m e ; h o w to i n t egrate m u l t i-cu l tu ra l v a l u es, assess m e n t a n d con t e n t i n t o school c l i m a t e a n d classroom c u r r i cu l u m ; t h e profession I a n d m u l t i -cu l t u re ; s k i l l s , a t t i t u d es a n d issues f o r cou n s e l i n g , so cia l wo rk a n d tea c h i n g ; com m u n i ty resources for a m u l t i -cu l t u ra l society. 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 : 30 a . m . M TW R F . X - 20 3 . I n st ructor : T. J o h m t o n e .

FACU LTY

365

MULTI-CULTURAL CO NCEPTS AND SKILLS FOR THE CONTEMPORARY FAMILY AND SCHOOL (4)

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES PRACTICUM I N MARITAL A N D FAMILY THERAPY (4) P38405 (J u n e 22 - A u g ust 21 )

Su p er v i se d pract i c u m in w h ich m a t t e rs o f e t h i c s , i n t c rdis cr p l i n ar ' r e l a t i o n s , profess i o n a l o rga n i za t i ons, fa m i l y l a w / l e g i s l at i o n , and i nd e p e n d e n t pract ice/agency pract ice a r e int egrated i n to t h e c l i n i c a l experience. C o n s e n t of i n structor/t a l l y card re q u i re d . I n s t ructor: J . McKa i n .

- 1 1 2. I n st ructo r : V. Ha ns o n ,

CRISIS I NTERVENTION WITH FAMILlES AND CHILDREN (4) P 1 8403 ( J u ne 22 - J u l y 1 7)

FACULTY

T h iS co u r s will d Iress th ,o u r e of p robl e m s res u l t i n g i n f a m i l y c o n f l i c t a n d e nlergen r i c� r 'q u i n n g i ns t an t i n terve n t i o n . Part i c i p a n t s w i l l a cq u i re .,k i l l s i n aSsessm e n t dnu i n ter ve n t io n i n ni.,es. Wh i le spe­ cial e m p h a� i > wi l l be> o n de\ e l op m e n t o f , k i l l s in d i f f us i n g Jnd solving family co n f l i Cl S a t d i ff'r n l s t d ge5 of ( r ises, course w v er a g e w i l l i n c l u de t h e i m pact of r u g and alc o ho l a b u s e . ch i ld care, d e p ress i on and h a l t h p rc) b l ,' rm o n f " Ol i ly d i,ru p t i o n . Pa r t i ci pa n t s w i l l a cq u i re s k i l l s t h rough t h e us of III t r u ct i o l' 1 . 1 1 t oo l s s u c h a, r o l e - p l a y , v i deo­ feedback, mod e l i n g , ,1I1d c o ach i n g . Spe c i f i c s k i l l - b u i l d i n g exercises, i n c l u d i n g the p roduCfiu n o f video-tap d d e m o n s t ra t ions of p a r t i c i ­ pant compet e n ci s , w i l l ce n t r olrOlJnd t h e h a n d l i n g of a c t u a l pr o b ­ l e ms such as r UI1 -JWd YS , sex u a l a b use . d i sc i p l i n a ry , a n d c h i l d- y o u t h m a n .1gemcnt pl oblem . 1 1 : 1 5 ,un.-1 : 5 5 p . m . MTWRF . HA-200. In t r u C t o r : T. a y n c .

William H. Gilbertson, 1 968, Associate P rofessor of

Soci al Work, M. S.W. , U n iversity of Wash i ngton , 1 956. Vernon R. Hanson, 1 970, Associ ate P ro fessor of Soci a l W o r k , A .M. U n iversity o f Ch icago, 1 970. Jerry McKain, 1 979, Associate Professor of So cia l Work . D.S.W., Cat holic U n iversity of Ameri a, 1 969.

Thelma L. Payne, 1 978 , Assista n t P rofessor of Socia l Work, M.S.W . , U n iversity of Washi ngto n, 1 978.

VISITING FACULTY Ted Johnstone, Soc ial Worke r, Lister Elementary Schoo l , Tacoma, WA , M.S.W., U n iversity of Was h i n gto n .

24


COO PERATIVE EDUCATI ON

STATISTICS 231

INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS (4) (J u ne 22

-

Phone : 383-7469 -CoEd 376

P18801

J u l y 1 7) (Also listed i n Economics)

Descrip ti ve st a t i s t i c s : measures of ce n t r a l tendency and d i spersion. Inf r rl t i a l statistics: genera l i zations about popu l a t i ons from samples by pa r a metri c a n d n o n - pa r amet ric tech n i q ues. Methods covered w i l l i nc l ude es t i m a tion, hypothesis-test i n g , s i mple co rrelation a n alysis,

Date and Time to be a n n ounc U .

I n d e p e n d e n t s t u d y (Md req u i red.

R. jense n .

500

APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS (4) (June 1

-

I

(3-8)

-CoEd 476 WORK EXPERIENCE II (3-8)

l i near expression and c h i squ a r e analysis. (Not a p p l icable t o m a t h ma t ies credit). 8 : 25 a . m . - 1 1 :05 a . m . MTWR F . H A - 2 1 7 . l n s t r u ct o r :

*

WORK EXPERI ENCE

Date a n d T i m e to be a n n o u n ced . I n depen d e n t s t u dy card req u i r ed.

P42002

J u l y 1 0)

See Econornics 500 on page 7.

FACULTY

Robert J. Jensen, C h a i r m a n , Eco nomics Department,

1 968, Associate Professor of Econo mi cs, M . A . , U n iver足 sity of Nebraska, 1 967.

25


COSTS TU ITION, ROOM AND BOARD

Registration by Telephone

$ 98.00 I uil l on P 'I me ter hCIUf Awhr fee p r �eme>ler hou r 24.50 See cou rse description Sp"nal Audit Fee Prlvali! Music Les�ons 72.50 ( 1 3 V, hour each = , emeSler hou r credit) Iper semesler credil houl i n add i t i on t o tuit ion) R Sid TIl • I laU rooms 1 50.00 D ubie (I I up.lncy, both e s ion s 220.00 Smgle oC'cupancy . bO l h sessions Double occupan cy . one se�sion 90.00 I I Igl 0 cupancy. one session 1 25.00 Board Mon- F r r Iper �ession ) Breakfa.st . t U lllh, Di n n " $1 20.00 30.00 Breakf�t Bleakla�1 lunch 65.00 Lundl Only 40.00 L lI nch Dinn r 95.00 Omn I nly 75.00

Please have the fol lowi n g i n formation available when you make your cal l t o 383-7136: 1) Bankcard n u m be r a n d its expiration date 2) Soci a l Security N u m b e r 3 ) Add ress w h i l e at PLU 4) Pe rmanent add ress if d i fferent from above 5) Telephone n u m ber 6) Date of b i rt h 7) E t h n i c o r i g i n (opt i o n a l ) 8) Rel igious preference (opt ional) 9 ) System Code N u m bers for each course i n which you are reg i s ter i n g . Telephone regist rat i o n s a r e restricted t o stude n ts w i t h ban kcards on l y because each regis tra t i o n is con firmed i m mediate l y . Therefo re, the d e pos it for each cou rse mus t be guara n teed a t the time of reg istration. Cou rses req u i ri n g a ta l l y card are excluded from telephone registrat ion .

Change of Registration, Withdrawals

1/1

.. ttdition RC�ltlential Ufe can ar ran ge s h ort term hous i n g for tilden.., deSIring 1 0 st ay o n cam pu s between sess ions or between I 'rm\ D I d ll ·r.! illf rm,Hion and applications are available i n the RL�ld ntidl l i fe Office for ho u s in g ap p l i ation contact : Resirlt· nli.tl l ift· Hiee 1 1 5 t1ministrdllon Building

r It f h

11

Please n o t i fy the Registrar's Office o f any adds or drops from a course. There is no processi n g charge to substitule courses. If you register for the fi rst session o n ly and later decide to enroll for the second sess ion, you may d o so by adding the desi red courses and paying t h e non-refu ndable $20.00 payment per courses. The balance of t u i t i o n can be paid on t h e f i rst day of second session. If you register lor both sessions and decide not to c o n t i n u e in the second sess i o n , you must make a n official withdrawal irom the second session cou rses. Official w i t hdrawals, with a grade o f "W," may be given any t i m e d u ri n g a session, but th ere w i l i lbe no refund i f t h e withdrawal i s made after the third (seco nd day for workshops) day of the class.

383-7200

Payment I n formation A IHUH !l1I1dahll' Ih1yment of $20.00 is req u i red for each course ');1 t r ,l11ol\ I O f ·",.l Inpl " (lr l (" ou rse and a workshop woul'd req u i re 40.f)o 1 0 I I � i 11'1 I hl; u � It1l1c(! of l u i l i o n and fees is due on o r before 111 f i N dol} thl.' l l.h� I rll' 'b. M lll i or deliver rhe balan e or tuilion to t h e PLlJ B u s i n ess Office, P.O. n" n b, T oJ ( l nla . WA 98401 . Paymen t may be made by check, payable 10 "Poll ifI L Ul h -roll l nlver�ily" or by VISA or MasterCharge. Your XlClal '{'II 11\' Number mu�t be wri tten on yo u r check. Should you 1 I 10 US(> YUill ba, , � card. pl ea e om I t e the appropriate questions 1 1 I lll' ilild III 1 11 ' legiMfalion form . r

Transcript Requests I f you w i l l need a transcript of s u m m er work, you should complete a transcript request form in the Regist rar's Office. This shou ld be done before the last week of summer classes. Transcripts cannot be sent if you have unpaid b i l ls at the U n iversity.

ID Cards

Graduation/Commencement

tUr.!Cllt w il l I I J v.tlid to Cards in order to use the l i brary, cash III mpus, and to obtain ot h .r U n iversity services and pflvd. K� Rc�u!ilr yeilf stud en ts m ay h ave ID Cards val idated in t h e Bu 1 / Ultit , Ol lwr� �huuld i nd i ate in t h e space provided on the , 'KI " .. I I n f r m Iltal all 1 0 Card is desi red . Cards may be picked up in l l w BU'1il � If.. 0" he first day of cl ass.

Students who plan to complete req u i rements for a degree during t h e summer should fill out an A p p l i cation for Grad u at i o n . These cards are ava i lable in front of the Registrar's Office. Undergraduates shou l d retu rn t h e completed card to t h e Registrar's Office, a n d graduate students should ret u r n the com p l eted card to the Graduate Office , no later than J u l y 1 5. Commencement ceremonies w i l l be held on Au gust 21 i n Eastvold A u d i to r i u m at 7 : 30 p.m.

h

Registration AtlVdllt '

t'gi�1 olliull by M.li I is encouraged. I he 'nd(J�er.! , u m m er registration fo rm. If{·rnal,lId\l. ynu may regist r on ampus beg i n n i n g Apri l 1. R 'hllalr n r", t he s ·cone! Ses iO n m u st be completed by Monday, lilly 1] If )'OU ar • nldnning to a l le ncl the ent i re s u m mer session, you I ulI l d ,"pl '(1) r '/o:15tra l i o" fOl both s e s ions at t h e time of t h e i n itial I . 'I I r I J(,II. I y,.1J d I i · J t r ol n�crlpt lo be eva l uated and a progress chart created 11 bfOlIJ.:hl LIp 10 ddtI.', you shou l d make your request to the Regist rar's Off ll , hv ," Ii! (II b p�(Jlla l appujn t ment , preferably before J u n e 1 2.

Student load and Waivers

Mail Registration

A Pass/Fa i l Agreement form is avai lable to all u n d ergraduate students desi ring a course on the pass/fail option. Secure t h e form from the Registrar's Office.

Pl ea

t' I1W

Irnpl� mall your rompleted

The maximum load for either term is 6 semester hours. Graduate st udents may not take more than 1 2 semester h o u rs du ring the summer to co u n t toward their master's degree a t Pacific Lu the ran U n iversity. Waiver requests of academic req u i rements for grad uation s h o u l d be made on t h e approp riate U n iversity form with signatu r es of appr oval from the adViser and the school o r department head, and s u b m i lled to the Dean of Summe r Stud ies.

Pass/Fail Option

gist r at ion fo r m along w i t h check, MasterCharge card number and expiration r

nt.<y cud r. 01 VISA or d tl' lo: Rt'ght l dl I'lei i r I lIIh ·r.1Il I iniver Ily J .11< Im� . \0\ 98447 1'1" .1 e 11(,1 ' 'id r l l l'!lI�l r d I IOf1� mus t reach t h e U niversity no later than 10 J.lj· b ·for. t h e fir I day of the class(es) for w h i ch you are m

H·RI � l l·/ 1I1.,

Continued o n page 27.

26


ADM SSI O N I N FO RMATIO Continued from pa

('

Master's Degrees Offered

26.

1. Education a. E l ementary or Secondary School Admin istration b. Counseling and ':::; u idance c. E l ementary Classroom Teach ing d. Secondary Classroom Teach i ng e. Readi n g 2 . Soc i a l Sciences a. H u man Relations Track b. C r i m i n a l Justice Track c. Psych ological Counsel i n g Track d . Marriage and Family The rapy Track e. I n d iv i d u a lized Study Track 3. Master of Busi ness A d m i n istration 4. Master of Public A d m i n istration 5. Master of Music a . Conducting b. Performance c. Education d. Compos ilion

I nsurance Ac idenl and h alth insurance may be purchased a t l ow cost from the Un ivers ity B u s i n es Ifiee at the t i m e of regis t r a t i o n . Students i n a n y o f t h e fol lowing categorl s o r acti v i t i es are req u i red t o purchase Ihis i n surance or provide evidence to the U n iversity of s i m i lar coverage from another soure : foreign studen t ; n u rs i ng student; st u d ent participat i n g i n off-campus ov e r n i g h t tours; and student participat i n g in the fo l lowing eou r es : Bio 591 Field Bi o l ogy Workshop : I n t r oduction to F l ow ering P l a n t I d e n t i f i cation Bio 592 Field Biolog y Workshop : I n t r oduction to I d en t i fy i n g B i rds of t h e Puget und Region Bio 593 F i eld Biology Workshop : I n t roduction to I n tertidal Ecolugy Bio 594 Field B i ology Works hop : I ntroduction to the Fishes of Puget Sound dtur al Hi sto ry of the Pacif i c Northwest E 351 ha kesp d r (trip to Ashland for Fest i v a l ) [ngl 383 E n g l 399 Publishing I n ternship

ACADEM IC ADVISI NG AN ASSISTANCE CENTER

ADM I SS I O N I N FO RMATI O N

I n formation is available in t h e Academic Advising a n d Assistance Center concerning all PLU academic po l i cies, procedures and programs. The center also provides assistance w i t h acad emic s k i l l s such as reading, t ime man agem e n t , note-ta king, term papers and exam preparat i o n .

NON-DEGREE STUDENTS If you Me a non -degree student p l a n n i n g to e n r o l l for the sum mer session o n l y , without intention of work i n g toward a degree from PLU o r for J t ach ing cert i ficate, you need not file a formal application or s u b m i t transcript: from other schools you ha ve atte nded. You may e n r o l l i n any cou rse for w h i ch you have the necessary prerequis ites.

During summer sessions, tutor ials c a n b e arranged b y t h is office o n a fee basis for most PLU course offeri ngs. The Cente r is located on the second floor of t h e Mortved t Library, just off the study lou nge, and summer hours are Monday t h rough Thursday from 9 : 00 a.m. to 5 : 00 p.m. and F ri d ay from 9 : 00 a. m . to 1 2 : 00 noon.

DEGREE STUDENTS

If you p l a n to work toward an li nd 'rgraduate degree from PLU. you m u � t complete a fo r m a l ap p l i cation for J d m i ssion. The necessary forms indY be obtdi ned by contact i n g the Adm i ssions Office (383-71 5 1 ) . If you have done accept a b l e work in a nother accred i t ed college, you w i l l be g r a n ted adva n c ed stand i n ' for rrevious work.

RECREATIONA L FACILITIES EXCEPTIONAL PL U offers a broad variety of recreational opport u n i t i es for s u m m e r students. Exceptional faci l i tie� a re avai lable for m o s t popu l a r sports and pas t i m es.

I f you are seek i n g admi ssion to the master 's degree program, you should con t act the Office of Graduate Stud ies. (383-7143) I f you are see k i n g certifica t i o n , you should co n t act the School of Educa t i o n . (383-7272)

OLSON AUDITORIUM i s a m u l t i p u rpose faci l i ty fea t u r i n g a U n i­ Turf gym nasium floor and an Astro-Turf field house. Act i v i t i es i n cl u de basketba l l , volleybal l , bad m i nton, h a n d b a l l , paddleball, sq uash , and weight tra i n i n g . Hours : 8 : 00 a.m. to 6 : 00 p.m. MTW R F . PLU 1 . 0 . req u i red for equipment chec kout. N o charge.

If you are a con t i n u i n g ,tudent at PLU and wish to enroll for the s u m m r ,e i o n , s i m p l y re tur n the enclosed registration form by m a i l o r i n person t o the Reg l >t r ar's Office.

SWIMM ING POOL offers Olym piC-Sized swimming area, d i v i n g p o o l , s u n b a t h i n g area, locker and d res s i n g rooms. Hours : 8 : 00 a . m . 9 : 00 a.m. (a d u l t s o n l y ) , Noon-1 :00 p . m . (adu lts o n l y ) , 1 : 00 p . m . - 2 : 30 p.m. ( a l l ages), 4 : 00 p.m.-5 : 30 p.m. (studen ts, facu lty, staff and fam i l ies o n l y ) , 7 : 30 p.m.-9:00 p.m. ( a l l ages) MTWRF.

STU DY OPPO RTU N ITI ES

UN IVERSITY CENTER GAMES ROOM features modern s i x - l a n e bowl i n g al ley, pool tab les, t a b l e t e n n i s , s h u ffleboard, co i n -operated table games and putt-putt course. Ho u rs : 1 1 :00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. MTW R F , and until 9 : 00 p.m. W.

Bachelor's Degree Programs A n t h ropology A rt B i ology Bus i n ess Adm i n i stration C h e m istry o m m u n i tion Arts Earth Scien es Econom i cs Educat ion Foreign Languages H istory

Mat hematics Music Nursing P h i l osophy Physical Education Physics P o l i t ical Science Psychology Religion Scand i n avian Stud ies Social Work SOCiology

COLLEGE GOLF COURSE i s a 2,770-yard, n i ne-hole, par 35 facil ity offering a reduced fee sch edule for students. Hours: da yl i g h t . TENNIS COURTS - s i x cou rts are available o n lower campus. Students have use priority. Hou r s : daylight ( u n t i l m i d n i g h t upon student request for l i g h t i n g a t Campus Safety Office ) .

27

O FF-CAMPUS R E C R E ATION - N u m e r o u s recreati o n a l opportunit ies ex ist close t o the campus. Spanaway Par k , located by a lake two m i l es sou t h of campus, featu res ca noe, rowboat and paddleboat rentals in addi t i o n to sw i m m i ng, horseshoes, p i cnic fac i l i ties, golf and fish i ng. The p u b l ic Spa naway Golf Cou rse is a beautiful championship course with well-kept fairways, greens and traps. Sprin ker Recreation Cen ter, also located a mile sou th of campus, has excel lent faci l i t ies for tenn is, track and field, softba l l , base ball, basket b a l l , archery, apparatus act ivities and ice skati ng. I n fo rmation on h i k i ng, camping and tours can be obtai ned t h rough the School of Physical Education.


STU D ENT LIFE

MID

L E COLLEG ,E

Student Life

A great opportunity for high school juniors and seniors :

Many of the U n iversity's su pportive services for students are organ i zed a d m i n ist ratively under "Student L i fe , " Offices p repared to serve the s u mmer co m m u n ity inc l ude Career Plan n i n g and Placement, Counseling and Test i ng, Foreign Students, M i nori,ty Affairs, U n iversity Center, and Residential Life. Students with concerns related to any of these offices may correspond prior to s u m m e r session or stop in after arrival on ca mpus.

PLU Middle College H i g h school j u n iors and seniors - '81 gradu ates - can get an 'ea r l y s t a r t ' on a su ccessfu l co l lege career at P L U t h i s s u m m e r ! C a l led M i d d l e C o l l ege, the six-week s u m mer program J u n e 1 8 - J u l y 31 h e l ps students s h a rpen lea r n i n g s k i l l s w h i le e a r n i n g e i g h t t o ten regu l a r, transferable semester h o u rs of college cred i L M i d d l e Col l ege h e l ps to make col lege level s t u d y easie r ! W i t h i n a framework of i n te res t i n g , contemporary social science topics, it e m p h aS i zes basic s k i l l s so i mporta n t in co l lege - w r i tten a n d oral commun ication a n d mathema tics. Each M i d d l e College student w i l l work close ly with PLU professors and college student tutors on the personal, individual basis so i m portant to effective lea rning. There are five professors on t h e faculty - two from social sciences, one from mathematics, one from E n g l i s h , and o n e from biology. Each student will receive i nd iv i d u a l counsel i n g and aptitu de or s k i l l s tes t i n g . A n d each w i l l l e a r n h o w to f i n d a n d u s e i n formation at a u n iversity. C l asses are sma l l , flex i b l e and i n fo r m a l , g i v i n g each student an opport u n ity to get well acq u a i n ted w i t h bot h i n st r uctors a n d fel low students. M i d d l e Col lege i s n ' t just work. There is p l e n ty of oppo r t u n i t y for play, t a k i n g advantage of PLU's exce l l e n t recreational fac i l i t i es swi m m i n g poo l , t e n n i s courts, golf course, bowling a l l ey , games room, jogging-fi tness course, a n d h a n d ba l l , racketba l l and squash courts. Or one ca n simp l y enjoy su n bathing or frisbee on PLU's spacious, green campus lawns. Students may live on campus or com m u te. Cost pe r cred i t hour is a s u bst a n t i a l savings over regu l a r t u i t i o n at most p r ivate co l l eges a n d f i n a n cial a id, based p r i m a r i ly on need , is avai l a b l e .

Residential Life/Housing u m m e r on-ca m p u s l i v i n g co n t i n ues to grow in po p u l a rity as a n econom ical a n d conve n i e n t a n swer t o s u m m e r h o u s i n g needs. Rates rem a i n we l l below the sta n d a r d " m o n t h l y r e n t a l " of an apartment, a n d new, flex i b l e s u m me r meal p l a n s i ncrease both economy a n d conven i e nce. Bot h s i n g l e a n d double rooms a re availa ble, although s i n gle rooms ar l i m ited a n d assigned o n a fi rst-requested space-ava ilable basis. H a l l -centered programs are coordinated a n d i n i t i a ted by bot h students and staff. M a n y of the programs take adva ntage of t he nearby mountai ns, l a kes, recreat ion a reas, and t h e ocea n . On-campus h o u s i n g m a y b e obtai ned b y contact i n g the Res i d e n t i a l L i fe office at PLU (383-7200), or by m a r k i n g y o u r registration f o r m . See page 26 for specific costs.

Campus Ministry Pa cific Lutheran U n iversity by i ts very n a t u re is a place for t h e i n teraction between stud ies and t h e C h r i st i a n gospel. Opportu n i t i es for the expression of faith a n d wors h i p are provided for t h e com m u n ity. During the summer session, the U n iversity pastors are ava ila ble i n the Campus M i n istry office located i n the U n iversity Center for conversat ion and cou nsel. (383-7464)

*Tu ition (8- 1 0 semester hou rs/$98 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 784- 980 Room a n d board ( i f desi red) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410

Bookstore

$1 1 94-1 390

T h e PLU Bookstore is owned a n d operated by Pacific Lutheran U n iversity for the benefit of students, facu Ity, staff a n d t h e i r guests. The bookstore sel ls t h e textbooks a n d s u p p l i es that are req u i red or suggested by faculty members for their courses. Additional books, s u ppl ies, g i fts, greet i n gs cards, cloth i ng , f i l m processing, toiletr ies and other items are a v a i l a b l e for your conven ie n ce. S u m m e r hours are : Extra hours:

*Approximately 25% savings over school year costs. The dead l i n e for M i ddle Col lege a pp l ications is J u n e 2, 1 981 . For more i n formation, write or ca l l D r . J u dy Carr, Middle Col lege, Box 1 6, P L U , Tacoma, WA 98447, or p ho n e 383-7130.

8 : 00 a . m.-4 : 30 p . m . MTWR. 8 : 00 a . m . - 1 2 noon Fridays.

June 13 (SaL) J u n e 2 2 (Mon.) J u n e 2 3 (Tues,) J u l y 25 (SaL)

11 : 30 5 : 30 5 : 30 1 1 : 30

a .m .-l : 30 p . m . -7 : 30 p . m . -7 : 30 a . m . - 2 : 00

p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m,

I f y o u w i l l have speci fic textbook needs at o t h e r t i mes, p l ease p h o n e 383-7665 d u r i n g reg u l a r bookstore hours a n d a r ra n gements w i l l be made to serve you.

Food Service The Food Service Depa rtment endeavors to sat isfy the needs of a l l a n d also h e l pďż˝ t o m a k e y o u r stay h e r e a pleasu r a b le and satisfying experience. The U n iversity Center cafeteria is open to all. Meals are a l so avai lable at the U n iversity Center Coffee Shop and at Colu mbia Center Coffee Shop. The U n iversity Center Coffee Shop is open Monday through Thursday from 7 : 00 a . m . to 6 : 00 p . m . and on Friday from 7 : 00 a.m. to 4 : 00 p.m. O n e popu l a r item offered is a $20.00 punch card for a cost of $18.00, a 1 0'y', savings, The card may be used i n a n y of our d i n i n g fac i l i t ies. These cards are pu rchased i n the Busi ness Office.

A variety of meal p l a n s are also avai l a b l e t h rough the Food Services office located in the Un iversity Center (see page 26 fo r cost s ) . I f you have any questions about the services offered , p l ease feel free to ca l l t h e Food Services office (383-7472).

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FACI LITI ES Summer Conferences at PLU

University Facilities

As a public service, PLU makes its faci liti es available for conferences workshops, retreats, and camps. C h u rches, ed ucational grou ps, yout h organizations, civic orga ni zations and other non- profit groups wishing to consider PLU as a conference site should ca l l the U n iversity Center office, (206) 383-7450, regard i n g p rices for room, board, and faci l i t ies for su mmer meeti n gs. This summer, PLU w i l l host more t h a n 50 groups i n cl u d i n g four major chu rch conv ention s , t he Paci f i c Northwest Writers, Fe l l o wsh i p of Ch ristian Athl etes, and n u merous chu rch-related workshops. Youth camps i n clud e wrest l i ng , soccer, basket ba l l , volley ba l l , m u s i c , year­ book, debate, cheerlea d i ng, a nd a pre-college workshop. Sum mer Sess ions students wish i n g to attend any of the sessions may i rq u i re at the Un iversity Center office. U s u a l l y observers are welco med at no cost.

THE U N IVE RSITY CENTER ( 1 970) has been descri bed a s t h e " Col lege

U n ion t o s u i t a l l . " Strategica l l y loca ted , t h e Cen ter's fo ur l evels u n i t e I nwer w i t h u pp e r c a m p u s . Designed of ru st i c Nor t hwest t i m ber, the Center e n v i ro n m e n t a l l y complements s u r round i n g scenery and h o uses the i n fo r m a t i u n desk . meeting rooms, cafet e r i a , coffee shop, gam room (si x - l a n e bow l i n g a l l e y , b i l l i a rds, cards. e t c . ) pract i ce rooms a n d bookstore . HAUGE ADM IN ISTRATION B UI LDING (1 96 0 ) houses U n iversity ad m i n istrative offices, classrooms, faculty offices, studios and master on trol for closed cir u i t television. THE ROBERT A.L. MORTVEDT LIBRARY ( 1 966) is an di r-cond i t ioned m u l t i - media lea r n i n g resou r ce center conta i n i ng over o n e-qua rter m i l l i o n books, periodica ls, m icrof i l m , and audio-visual a ids. The bU i l d i n g a lso hou ses the Computer Center, Academic Advising and As i stance Cen t e r , ni versity Archives and Photo Se rvices. XAVIER HALL (1937, remodeled 1966) houses classrooms, faculty ffices an the ca mpus post office. RAMSTAD HAU (1 947, remodeled 1 959) co ntains science l aboratory, classroom, l i b rary, museu m, research and office faci l i t ies. MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM (1947) prov ides classroom and act i v i t y a reas f o r the School o f Physical E ducation a n d t h e Theater program. EASTVOLD AUDITORI UM ( 1 952) accommodates co ncerts, special vents and p l ays. I t also co ntain s classrooms, work areas, stage and r adio studio, stud ios, ensemble pr actice rooms and i n d i v i d u a l practice rooms for the Music Department and the Com m u n i cation Arts Depa r t m e n t . OLSON PHYSICAL EDUCATION AUDITORIUM (1 969) co ntains 3,200-seat auditori u m and complete i n door faci l i t ies for most sport /recreation act ivit ies. A IDA INGRA M HA LL (1 955, remodeled 1 971) houses stud ios, offices and classrooms for the School of N u rsing and the Art Depa rtmen t .

ELDERHOSTEL: New Summer Feature at Pacific Lutheran U n iversity ' Elderhostel co m b i nes the best trad itions of edu cation and hosteli ng. I t I S a program for senior citizens on the move - not just i n terms of phYSical movement and t ravel, b u t in a sense of reach ing o u t to a new experience. Elderhostel consists of a national network of co l l e ges wh ich offer low-cost, sho rt-term residential academic programs for older citizens. Persons in terested should write the U n iversity Center at PLU for information. The dates are J u l y 5-10 and J u ly 1 2- 1 7, 1 981.

Vacation Studies It is easy to com bine a vacation with summe r study at PLU. Nort hwest native and visitor a l i k e can enjoy the pro x i m i ty to the area's natural wonders - la kes, streams, salt water beaches, mountain t ra i l s and campgrounds. The PLU s u m m er program offers weekend adventu res i ďż˝ cluding mountain clim b i n g , nature h ikes, sal mon and trout fishing : Sightseeing and many others. Rail roads, busses an d h ighways make the ca mpus eas ily accessible to outlying areas. Sea-Tac I n ternational A i rport, a 30- m i nute drive from PLU on Interstate 5, is co nvenient for out-of-state students a n d v i s i t i n g faculty.

29


U N IVERSITY I

FO RMATI O N

University Information

Summer School and Academic Year Enrollments

P cific l u t he ra n U n ive rsi t , i s t h e o n l y degr ee-gran t i n g L u t heran i ns t it u t i o n i n th!' P c i fi , Northw st. It i s fully Jccredited by t h e o nh west A.so jatio n of chools and Col leges. Professional acc reditation s a r held by t h e School of Busi ness A d m i n istration with the A m p f l ("ďż˝ fl A,s mbly o f Col lcgi,He Sc hools of R u s i n es$. t h e chool of N u r>i ng with t h e dtionJI L ague o f N u rs i n g . t h ,'vl u , i ( Depa r t m ent wi t h t h > a l i o n a l Asso ciat i on o f chools o f Music . â&#x20AC;˘m d thp School o f EduCd t i oll w i l h t ill' N. l t i o n a l Council f o r ACC" r pd i t at i on of Teacher Ed u ca t i o n . The I d t ter is for the prepa r a t i o n of el ementary a n d seco n da ry leachers, pri n ci pa ls and guid ance co u n se lors t h rough t h master's d e gree lev I. T h u nd e r g radu t program i n Social Wor k is acc r dlt d by the Cou ncil o n 50 ia l W o r k Educa tion. The U n iversity is also a pproved by t h e American C h emical Society.

Summer School 1 980 en rol lment totalled 1 520. Academ i c year e n rollment totalled 3500 with 2659 f u l l - t i m e students. I n order to give P L U Staff more opportu n i ty to enjoy the beaut i f u l Puget So und Sum mers, most offices close at n o o n on Fridays. However, the U n iversity Cen ter I n formation Desk i s open o n a re g u l a r b a i s Frid ay afternoon. The U n iversity Center B u i l d i n g also is open we kends as a re the Columbia Center Co ffee Shop and t h e Sw i m m i ng Pool.

Pacific Lutheran U n iversity does not disc r i m i nate on the basis of sex, race, creed , color, national ori g i n , age, or hand icapped co n d i t io n i n

the education programs o r activities wh ich i t operates and i s req u i red by Tit le IX of t h e Education A m e n d me n t s of 1 972 and t h e reg u l a t ions adopted pu rsu ant th ereto, by T i t l e VII of the Civil Rights Act o f 1 974, and by Section 504 of the Reh abilitation Act of 1 973 not t o d isc r i m i nate i n s u ch m a n n e r . T h e req u irement not to d iscri mi nate i n ed ucat ion progra ms and act ivit ies extends to employment th erein and t o admission t h ereto. I n q u i r i es concern ing t h e application of said Title I X and p u b l ished regulations t o t h i s U n iversity may b e referred to the Un ivers ity's E q u al Employment Opport u n i t y Officers o r the Di rector of the Office for C i v i l R ights o f the Department of Hea l t h , Education and Welfare. Pacific L u theran U n iversity co mpl ies w it h the Family E d u cat ion Rights and Privacy Act o f 1974.

30


REGISTE Office of Development

President, William O. Rieke, M.D. President's Execu tive Associate, Lucille Giroux U n iversity Pastors, Ronald Tellefson and Ron Vigne<

Vice President for Develo p ment, Luther Bekemeier Di rector Director Di rector Di rector Di rector Di rector

Office of the Provost Provost, Richard Jungkuntz Executive Assistant, David C. Yagow

Special Programs Coordinator, Judy Carr Chair, Division of H u m a n i ties, Daniel Van Tassel C h a i r , Division of Natural Scien ces, John O. Herzog Chair, Division of Social Scien ces, James A. Halseth Dean of Graduate and Summer Studies and Dean of the School of the Ans, Richard D. Moe A d m i n istrative Assistant, Saundra Starre Coo r d i n ator of P u b l i c Events, Noel Abrahamson Dean, School of Education, Kenneth A. Johnston Di rector, Teacher Placement and Fifth Year Adviser, Assistant to the Dea n , Nan Nokleberg Dean, School of Business A d m i n istration, Gundar J. King Assistant Di rector of Graduate Programs, Laura Carvey Adm i n istrative Assi s t a n t , Mary Snow Director, School of N u rsing, Doris G. Stucke

James Peterson

Judd C. Doughty C h ief Engineer, Dave Christian Program Di rector, Scott Williams

Studio Opera t i o n s Supervisor, Vic Nelson Chief Photographer, Ken Dunmire

Board of Regents Tacoma Area and Vicinity

Dr. Thomas W. Anderson Mr. George Davis Mr. M.R. K n udson, C h a i rman D r. Richard Klein Mr. George Lagerquist Mr. Harry Morga n , Jr. Dr. W.O. R ieke, PlU President Dr. Roy V i r a k R e v . D a v i d Wold, Vice C h a i rm a n

A d m i n istrative Assistant, Barbara Phillips

Seattle Area a n d Vicinity

Mr. Gary Baughn Rev. C h arles Bomgren Mr. leif Eie Rev. Dr. A.G. Fjellman M r . Paul Hog l u n d M r . Victor Knutzen Mr. Clayton Peterson Mrs. Doris Rolander Rev. Dr. C l a ren c e Solberg Dr. C h r isty U l leland , Se c reta ry Dr. Geo rge Wade

Transfer Coord i nator, Jean Urban

Di rector, Academic Advi s i n g a n d Assistance Center, Richard Seeger Di rector of CHOICE, Robert K. Menzel Di rector of the li brary, John W. Heussman Reference li brarian, Susan MacDonald Assistant Reference Librarian , Marilyn Martin

Office of Finance and Operations Vice President, F i nance and Operations, Perry B. Hendricks, 'r. Director, Fiscal Affai rs, Ted A. Pursley D i rector, General Services, Howard L. Vedell Di rector, Physical Plant, James B. Phillips Personnel D i rector, Nathan L Walker Director, Food Services, Robert M. Torrens Bookstore Director, Lynn Isaacson Director of Athletics, David M. Olson Assistant Di rector of A t h letics, James Kittilsby A d m i n istrative Compu t i ng Manager, Robert Denning Academic Computer Coordinator and

Eastern Wash i n g ton

Mr. A l bert F i n k M r . James P . Gates Western Washi ngton

Mrs. Helen Belgu m Rev. David Steen Oregon

Mr. Howard H u bbard M r . Galven I rby Rev. John M i l brath Dr. Casper (Bud) Paulson

Systems Manager, Robert Martin

Office of Collegium and Church Relations

Montana and Idaho

D r . Roland Grant Rev. Bob Newcomb Mrs. Dorothy Sc h n a i b l e

Executive D i rector, Harvey J. Neufeld Associate D i rector, Director o f C on grega t ion Represe n t a t i ve>, Joh n Adix

Alaska

Office of Student Life

Mr. Mart i n R. P i h l

Vice President and Dean for Student L i fe, Donald Jerke Associate Dean a n d D i rector of Res i dential l i fe, Rick Allen D i rector, Counsel i n g and Health Services, Gary Minetti Director, Career Pla n n i n g Placement, Richard 路 D. French Assistant D i rector, Pamela Raymer Director, M i no r i ty Affairs, and Assistant Dean, Student life,

Advisory

Rev. Gordon Br u n AlC/NPD Dr. Ronald Matth ias, A L Dr. Ri chard So lbe r g, L C R e v . lla n o Thel i n , lC A/PNWS Perry Hendricks, ,r., Treasurer Drs. J oh n Her z og, A ngelia A lexander, F r a n k Olso n , faculty Th ree PlU Students PlU Offi ers

Amadeo Tiam

Foreign Student A d v iser, Cristina Cables Director, U niversity Cen ter a n d Campus Activi ties, Conference M a n ager/Ass istant D i rector , U n iversity Ce n t e r , Rick Eastman

Deve lopment, Dave Berntsen Plan ned Giving, Edgar Larson A l u m n i , Ronald Coltom Special F u n d i n g, Molly Edman Graph ics and P u b l i cation , Paul Porter U n i versity Relations and Public I n fo rmation ,

Di rector of Com m u n i ty Relations, Bonnie Nelson Di rector of Office of Radio a n d Television Services,

Di rector, School of Physical Education, David M. Olson Dean of A d m issions and Fi nancial A i d , James Van Beek D i rector of School Relations & Associate Dean, Phillip Miner Di rector of New Student Services & Assistant Dea n , Donald Yoder Assistant Dea n , Susan Bies Di rector of F i n a n c i a l Aid, Albert W. Perry F i n a n cial Aid Cou n se lor s , Debra Brackman & Mark Duris Registrar, Charles Nelson Associate Registrar, Loleta Espeseth

Marvin Swenson

of of of of of of

31


PACIFIC lUTH E RAN UNIVE R S IlY

NON路PRO F I T ORGA N I ZAT I O N

Dr. Rich a rd Moe Su mmer Session Pacific L u t h e ra n U n iversity Tacom a , WA 98447 (206) 383-7 1 43

U . S. P O S T G E

PA I D PE

M I T NO. 4 1 6

TACOMA, W A S H I NGTON

pre-session - June 1 5-19 session one - June 22-July 17 mjd-session July 20-24 session two - July 27 -Aug. 21 -


Summer 1981 v.62 no.2 May 1981  
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