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Table of

Massive On slaughts of C i rcu m stances ....

3

Survival Belongs to the Fittest.

11

To Create a Distinguished Center of Learning. ... .. VOLUME LIII Published

March

six

times

1973

No.2

annually

by

Pacific

Lutheran University, P. O. Box 2068, Tacoma, Washington,

98447.

PLU Teacher Placement Effort Eases Job Squeeze . ...... 20 .

Second class postage paid

at Tacoma, Washington.

Teacher Education 1973

EDITORIAL BOARD

Dr.

. ....... 17

Eu ene Wiegman

.

Rev. Milton Nesvig

. Asst. to the P resident

for Church Relations and Publications .

Rev. Harvey Neufeld

.

.

Vice-Presidenďż˝ Development .

James L. Peterson

.

.

Staff Photographers

O. K. Devin Theodore Leonhardt

News Notes ........

26

Univer sity Notebook.

32

Sports

36

Editor'

Kenneth Dunmire Darel Roa

21

.Di rector

Alumni Relations Clay ton Peterson

Where Are We Now? P re s id ent

. O.K. De v in,

Inc

Graphics Design

As our

_

.

........

theme

indicates, the

intent of this

Reflections is to take a look at

issue

of

urrent and a ti ci pated

economic realities and to apply them to the concerns of Contributors: for

de v e lopm e nt;

vice-president C a rrol

for

Dr.

A.

Dean

business

D eBower,

education; of

Clayton Peterson, vice-president and

associate

Buc!1anan, finance;

Dr.

professor

of

Stanley Brue, assistant professor

ec 0 n 0 mics;

John

Hanson,

education

placement director and fifth year coordinator.

today's

campus.

Dr.

Stanley

Brue

has

provided

a

provocative look at the current state of the nation's economy.

With

that

overview

ill

mind,

A.

Dean

Buchanan anel Clayton Peterson deal with the pmblems anel

opportunities facing private

higher education

ill

both operational and developmental efforts.

1


Massive Onslaughts of CircuIDslances Stanley Brue

Ideas are inherently conserv ative. They yield not to the attack of other ideas, but to the massive onslaught of circumstances with which they cannot contend. John K. Galbraith The past four years have been a remarkably perplex ing period for the economy of the United States. The Nixon Administration clearly inherited an economy "vhich was traveling at a pace inconsistent with price stability. Excessive total spending in the economy had resulted in an unacceptably rapid rate of inflation. Thus, "game plan I" was quickly placed into operation. The

initial

Nixon "game plan"

sought to cool the inflationary pressures in the

over路heated econo my by a judicious

application of the brakes. The income tax

surcharge (originally enacted under the Johnson Administration) was extended. The federal budget was moved from a deficit of over in

1969.

$25

billion in 1968 to a sl ight surplus

The rate of growth in the money supply was restrained. But slamming on the

brakes at a high rate of speed is not without its dangers. The economy shuddered, shimmied, windshieldl

and A

screeched mild

to

a

recession

near

halt.

occurred;

The real

driver was thrown through the economic

Unemployment rose from 3.6 percent of the labor force in

1970

and to 5.9 percent in

1971.

growth

1969

to

4.9

stagnated. percent in

Ironically, the rate of inflation, the problem which

prompted the appl ication of the brakes in the first place, remained at an unacceptably high level. A new economic strategy was clearly in order. Controlled Acceleration Whereas the in itial strategy had been one of braking, "game plan II" was designed to pick the driver from the pavement, bind his wounds, place him back in the driver's seat, and convince him that the vehicle 'Nas basically sound. "Controlled acceleration" became the by路word. The excise tax on automobiles "vas repealed to stimulate the growth of consumer spending. Accelerated depreciation allowances and a reinstitution of the investment tax credit were undertaken to promote greater business spending.

3


The federal d eficit, partially by design, was moved from a position of near b a l ance to one of record-setting deficit. .Ll.ccel eration, a l though

less painful t h a n b r king, w a s realized t o b e as potential l y

dangerous. W h i l e the rate o f inf l a tion appeared t o b e d e c l ining slightly, it remained a definite matter of concern. T h e risk of an expans ionary policy was that t h i s rate mig h t

nOl

cominue to subside. T o hedge against this potential reversal, and t o break

u nw arr anted inflationary expectations, direct wage and pr i ce controls \lvere applied. A '

90-day freeLe was followed by mandatory Phase II contro l s. The economic and po l i tica l irony was now complete. A f i sc a l l y conservative President

(1) the largest back-to-back (2) d i r e c t federa l intervention in p ri v ate wage

found himself u ncomfortably pr'esiding over and defending budget deficits i n Arnerican history a n d

and price decisions. O l d ideas yie l d ed to a "massive o n s l a ught of circumstances" with v"hich they cou l d not contend.

Selective Enforcement I n January

1973 t h e man d a tory (Phase II) wage a n d price control program was

p artial l y disman tled in favor of "vo l u n tary" controls. I n reality, t h e curren t wage a n d price pol icy (Ph ase III) is o n e o f selective enforcer e n t. The admi n istration h a s let i t be known t h a t th e wage a n d price decisions of large u nions and corporations wi l l be closely moni tored an d that price a n d wage rol lbacks will be ordered when these decisions are i nconsistent with the goa l o f contro l l i n g inflation. It is much too ear-Iy to judge "garne p l a n II" and t h e sh i ft from mandatory to "volun tary" wage a n d price contro ls. Current economic indicators appear to be mixed. Real econom ic growth acce l e rated in 1972 and wiII Iike l y remain a t a rapid, yet sustainable, rate in

1973. U nemployment is relucta n t l y yielding to in crease d aggregate

dema n d . T h e major u n c ert ai n t y in 1973 is i n f l a tion. T h i s sterns from two factors, the first of wh ich is

the

u npred ictability

of

the

reaction of unions

and

prod ucers to the

"vol u n tary" contro l s. Ph ase III may prove to be premature. The oth er uncertain ty is '

the federal budget deficit. I t is essen tial t h a t the existing deficit be reduced as the economy once again approaches its full pote n tia l . Some of this reduction wil l be

4


automatic since federal tax revenues increase as individual and corporate incomes rise. Federal expenditure reductions or new tax soul'ces, nevel'theless, may be required. In this connection, the twin issues of spending priorities and tax equity will remain in the spotlight. Rather than speculating upon the future, however, it is more instructive to reflect upon the past and present. The imposition of direct wage and price controls, however reluctantly, by an economically conservative administration is an event of historic importance.

A

cursorary

examination

of

this

occurellce leaves one remarkably

confused. A more intensive analysis, however, is enlightening. The Nixon wage and price controls, both in their original and current forms, represent a recognition that the American economic system is quite different than traditional perceptions of it. Competitive free enterprise, alas, is not sufficiently competitivel

Self-Interests In 1776, Adam Smith cOlltended that when numerous, diverse economic units pursued their self-interests and were constrained by vigorous price and wage competition, the net result would closely resemble the social good. Society's economic goals, as well as those of its component parts, would be realized. But what is the case when gigantic economic units, each possessing varying degrees of concentrated economic power, pursue their self-interests?

Furthermore, what if the price and wage competition

between and among such units is virtually non-existent? What insures that society's economic goals are realized under these circumstances? The answer, of course, is that no such insurance exists. Thus

a

balancing mechanisill is

often required. The federal government's power of direct and indirect intervention in ( private ecollornic clecision-mak ing provides this balancing force. Direct wage and price controls are a clear example. Other recent interventions of a more indirect nature have occurred in the areas of environmental protection, consumer protection legislation, and industrial safety. Concentrated economic power, both in the product and labor markets, insures the need for concentrated governmental pO\jver. This is an essential relationship which requires additional clarification. Economic power and cOllcentration are complex phenomenon arising from a variety of sources.

Bigness,

in

itself,

is

neither

economically

desirable

nor

undesirable.

5


Performance, not structure, is the most i m porta n t econo m ic c r i ter i a . Yet performance and structure are otten u n i quel y re l a ted. One m ust co m p rehen d the nature of the A mer ican economic structure if he is to understand such pro b l ems as i n f l at i on and u n e m p l oy ment. The l a rge corporation and the powerful l a bo r u n i on are not ou tcomes of spo ntaneous comb u s t i o n . F or whatever the rea so n s , o u r society has a l l owed a nd even encouraged i ncreases in the s i ze of econo m i c u n i ts. I t has direc t l y promoted t h is growth through patent leg i s l a t i o n, govern m e n t a l

cont racts and su bsid ies, tax provisio n s , a n d l abor

legis l a t i o n . Wh i l e m u ch of the growth i n the s i ze o f econo m i c un i ts is the l ogical o u t come of techno logy a n d the dr i ve for econo m i c effi ciency, certa i n l y n o t a l l of i t may be so e x p l a i ned. Rather, the growth and co ncentrat i o n o f economic power i n the U n i ted S t ates has been a matter o f p u b l i c po l icy-p o l i cy p romo t ing concentra t i o n together w i th t h e l ack o f adeq ua te p o l icy retard i n g i t . Key I ndustries The do m i na t i o n of l a rge economic u n i ts is apparent i n b o th the product market and the resource marke t. The largest 200 ma n u fa cturi ng f i rms in the U n i tes S t ates co n t rol over 60

per' cent o f

the

total

manufactu r i n g assets.

The 50 l a rgest banks own

a p p roximCltely 40 per ce n t of all banking assets. Of the 200,420 l a rgest manufactur i ng f i rms in 1970, 102 ear ned 50 per cent of the total pro f i ts. The advertising budget of Proc tor

and

Gam b l e

is

20 t i m es

Depart me n t ' s a n t i-trust div i s i o n .

as

great

as

the

t o tal

b u dget o f

the J u stice

Key i n dustries in the economy are dom i n a ted by

four or fewer corporati ons. A part i a l l is t inc l u des the f o l l ow i ng i nd u s t r ies: automo b i l e, a l u m i n um,

to bacco,

breakfast

cereal,

compu ter

hardvvare,

soap

and

deterge n t ,

too t h pa ste, rubber, e l ectric l i ght b u l b, a n d off i ce cop y i n g equ i pment. The

co n t i n u i n g

merger

movem ent

has

re- i n forced

the

trend toward

"overa l l"

concen t ra t i o n . S i nce 1950, nea r l y 20,000 large mergers (those i n vo l v i ng m a n u f acturi n g f irms o f over $10 m i l l i o n i n asset size) have occurred. A t o t a l o f 327 corporati o n s which ranked a m o n g the l a rgest 1,000 m a n u fact u r i ng firms of 1950 had been acq u i red or m erged by 1968. Whi l e only s i x corpora t i ons w ith asse ts of $250 m i l l i o n o r more were acquired d u r i n g the ent i re 1948-1966 per i od; s i x such f i rms were p u r ch ased in

1967; 12 in 1968.

6


Conglomerate

acqu isitions,

those

invo lving

basical l y

unrelated

en terprises,

have

become the primary type of merger during the past decade. One might ask what Aetna Fina nce, Avis Car Ren t a l , Sheraton Hotel' Corporation, Rayo n ier Wood Products, Con tin ental

Baking, Can teen Corporation, and

Hartford Insurance Co. a l l h ave in

common. The a n swer, of course, is that each was an acqu isition of Inter n a tional Telephone

and

Telegra ph

d uring

the

past

decade.

In

fact,

ITT

acquired

33

corporatio ns in the initial three months of 1969 a l one. Numerous other examples may be given. Teledy ne, I nco acquired 127 firms during the years 1960-1968. Textron, Inc.'s acquired subsidiaries inc lude such vvell known firms as Vita Var Paints, Home l ite Saw, Gorham Silverware, Ta lon Zipper, Spiedel Watch Braciet, E-Z-Go Go l f Carts, and Shaeffer Pen Co. Nor is the current merger moveme n t limited to a few "growth congl omerates." Est a b l ished corpor atio n s have d iscovered it advantageous to diversify through acquisition. A n d the movement con tinues. In 1972, we l l over 2,000 more l<arge mergers trans pired , the major ity of them cong l omerate in natu reo

Non路Price Competition The trend is clear. Large eco n o mic units dominate the production of ma ny go ods a n d services in the United States economy, and these units are getting l arger. Co mpetition, as a resu l t, has increasingly become of a no n-price variety. The "discipli nes of the market" have been

partial l y rep l aced

by the "dictates of l arge producers." The

aggrega te results of the in ter-related decisions of l arge econ omic units need not correspo n d with broad econ omic goa l s o f price sta bility a n d full, emp l oyment. If the product market is less than vigorous l y competitive, what is the case in the market where l a bor resources are exchangedl The an svver is obvious. The American labor movement is a study in the growth a n d consol idation of eco no mic power. Large and economically powerful unio n s administer wages, just as producers administer prices. Whi Ie competition remains a n important element, wages are u nm ist aka b l y the product

of

co l l ective

bargaining;

they

are

the

outcome

of

economic

power

re l a t ionships. Furthermore, union wage settl ements establish the wage expectatio ns and standards for the n o n-unio nized sector. Nor is unionization limited to the private

7


sector. The unioni7at ion of pu blic emp l oyees is a l o g i cal extension of the union movement. So

to is white collar and p ro f essio nal unionism. It does not require

supernatur"al w isdo m to

iscover that economic power can beST be

co

ntervailed by

economic: po wer. The result of unioniLation of the economy is that cornpetitive forces

in the l abor market, as those in the product market, are inadequate to i nsure the rea l ization o f full 8n1ploymellt and price stabil ity. that l arge produc t i on units exercise consi der ble control over

Ont;.e it is understoo

prices and that large l abor unions "admirlister" wag es, the i nflationary bi as in the econorny is easi l y understood. Inflationary spirals may be inst i tuted by either party. Corpora tions may arbi rar ily raise prices in order to increa Unions

may

nego tiate

p ro duc t i v i ty . In each

for

case,

w'ge

increases

which

their profi

far exceed increases

margins. in

labor

the existence of concentrated economic power is evident

since if no such power existed, competi t ive forces al one would determine wages and prices. The labor union

call

demand and rece ive

a

higher th n compet i tive wage rate {Jartia l l y

because i t fu lly realiL8s that the emp loyer will be able t o shift th i s cost inr;re<:lse to the

consurner in the form of higher J)rices. One d oes not hear l oud noises fro

I

the United

f.>.uto Workers darn nding the disso lution of General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler Corpor lion. The large employer is less likely t o t ke

a

hardline bargaining stance for

the same reason. The apparent abi lity of large corporations to m a i ntain h i gh profits in

the face of unionilation, itselt attests to the exis tenc

of corporate pricing power.

Inflationary Bias Thus, the A nerican economy has an inflationary bias. The consumer can always be relied upon to pay the bill f or he i s environment dominated

a

m iniscule economic Imit forced to function in

by pO'lvedul

un i ts.

But since hi gh rates of inflation

an are

irlConsist Ilt with overall economic stabi l i ty, the federal governrnent is forced to take act i on. When traditional anti-inflationar"y measures tail,

as

they did d u r i ng the i n i t i a l

Nixon econom ic strategy, direct vva ge and pr ice contro ls are necessitated. B o t h the mandatory Phase II and "vo l untary" Phase II I reality.

Th i s

real i ty

co n t r o l s

i s th at the struC1ure of

are an a dmission to economic

the American economic system is

insufficiently compet i t ive to insure rel a tive price stab il i ty.

8


A further admission of this reality is the failure of the Nixon Administration's initial anti-inflationary strategy. As discussed earlier, this was a br aking policy. Traditional fiscal and

monetary policy failed because the Administration failed adequately to

recognize the existence of concentrated economic power. Corporations responded to I'educed product demand by reducing employrnent and output, not by restricting pl'ice increases.

Unions

responded

to

tight

labor

markets

by

accepting

increased

unemployment in their ranks, not by lowering wage demands. Arthur Burns, the current chairman of the Federal Reserve System and a key advisor to President Nixon during the early stages of his first administration, recently admitted that "the hard fact is that market forces no longer can be counted on to check the upvvard course of wages and prices even .

.

.

in the course of a business recession."

Minding Their Own Business In conclusion, one is reminded of the adventures of AI ice in VVonderland:

Dr. Stanley Brue. assistant pro路

"Tis so," said the Dutchess, "and the moral of it is 'Oh!, 'tis love, 'tis love that

fessor of economics. is in his

makes the world go (Gundl' "

second year at PLU. A graduate of Augustana College (5. OakJ. he holds a Ph.D. from the Uni颅 versity of Nebraska.

business! "

"Someone said," whispered Alice, "that it's done by everybody minding their own "Ah, weill I t means much the sarne thing," said the Dutchess. The Amef"ican economic system largely goes around by everyone minding their own business. Historically,

it

consistent with overall "minding their ovm minding

theirs.

cornpetitive

The

has gone around remarkably well. It revolves in economic objectives, though, only

a

fashion

when economic units

business" are in competition with others, equally powerful, present

forces alone

structure

of the

ale insufficient.

economy

Since

this

is such, however,

is the

thal

case, governmental

intervention be c o m es a n cessity. Misconceptions concerning the nature of the AmericCln e c o n omy are slow to die. Bu1 inevitably they must yield to the "massive onslaughts of circumstances with which they

c

nnot contend." The individual who deplores direct governmental intervention

ought to dire

his

ttention not to the evils of governmental interference, but to the

structure of the economy which necessitates and justifies this involvement.

9


Survival Belongs to the Fittest A. Dean Buchanan

College enrollments are leveling off. Costs will continue to rise. What are we at PLU doing to counter the national trends and to insure that this institution is one of the survivors?

Many distinguished educators and informed financial

the birth rate started up again. Projections now show

managers have accurately documented the precarious position of all higher education nationally. They have

that there will be 4.4 million births in 1975,100,000 more than in 1957. This latter fact is good news for

demonstrated

colleges in 1993, but what of the intervening years?

the

reasons

for the great concern

regarding the survival of the private sector of higher education. Most of the public, however, is only dimly aware of the

data,

E igh t hundred thousand fewer babies were born in the U.S. in 1968 than in 1961. In 1975 there will be

the

reasonings

and

the

predictions

concerning the future of "non-profitland", private higher education in particular.

800,000 fewer second graders and by 1986 there will be 800,000 fewer in the college age pool from which to draw. Th is means an oversupply of teachers and facilities in the common schools and in the colleges. Furthermore, it has been estimated that the rise in

Jellema, Bowen, Jenny, Cheit and Balderston are not

the percentage of high school graduates who go on to

the names of the starting lineup for the San Francisco

college has peaked and may even decline.

'49'ers-but our most recent chroniclers of the cost

Since the birth rate leveled off during 1957-61 and

patterns and the cost-income squeeze in American higher education. These writers have gathered a great deal of evidence on the national scene. My purpose is not to parrot or paraphrase their findings, but to try to apply these facts to PLU.

Not so long ago, demographers were telling us that the U.S. population would exceed 375 million by A.D. 2000 and 2.3 bill ion by A.D. 2100. But the rate

confounded

college age students should remain at present levels during this remaining decade. Enrollments will drop sharply nationally from 1980-198 8 and then edge up again when the class of 1993 matches the class of 1975 numerically.

Enrollment Patterns

birth

then declined sharply until 1970, the number of

these

estimators,

falling

steadily since 1957. In 1957 it stood at 25.311000. By 1969 it stood at 17.7, a drop of 30 percent. Then,

The

private

affected

by

public-private

sector this

will

likely be most severely

decline,

college

since

student

the

ratio

of

enrollment weighs

heavier toward the public sector each year. Our FTE enrollment at PLU expanded rapidly fr om 1,538 in 1961 to 2,651 in 1971 or 73.5 percent.

11


T u i tion and fees in the same time frame increased by

1 1 6 fJercent from p roduced

$774

sufficient

to S 1,670. These twin factors

revenue

to

double

s a l a r i es,

suppo rt路 n ex panded physical plant and pay f o r new programs.

N o w the enro l l ment factor is no l onger

A

dependable.

great

leverage

has

disappeared.

Eff ctivel y, o u r enrollment peaked o u t in 1 969 -70 . A s l ight decrease o ccurred in 1 970-71. In 1 971-72, FTE enw l l ment was e x ac t l y 1 enrollment

this

fal l

less than in 1 970-71. Our

exceeded

1971-72

by

50,

however , large l y due to new programs of continuing

Blit can tui tion continue to be rais d at the present

te l Where is that level beyond which the t uition mnrket w i l l

this

same

tir e

fral1e,

longer support? I a m not content i n

no

knowledge that other

The

these

r路student

cost-

in

was

1961路62

5 1 ,025;

in

1 97 1 -72 it was $ 1 ,817 - an increase of a l rno st$800 or

percent

7.8

per

annum.

However' ,

when

we

co mpare the first ha l f of this decade with the l ast ha l f , we find that the cost-per-student increased by

3.4 p er c e n t from 1 961-62 to 1 966-67; b u t by 10 per cent between 1 966-67 and 1 97 1 路72,

instit u tions are charging

The fastest

riSing area other than instructional is

student 'ervices , w hich rose by 63 percent between

1966-67 and 1 97 1 -72. It should be noted tha t not a l l is due 10 in fl at io n alone or

approaching that barrier , and tha t it wililherefor'e be

services and personnel.

m o re difficult to d e p e n d on expanding this so u rce of

reven e to the degree that we have in the past. D r . Earl Cheit i n his book, The New Depression in Higher

Education, says , " F or schools to bre k-even, revenu es must grow a t the rat

of

6%

percent

er stud nr pe r

ut a t the same lirne the p r o j ec.tion is that

'r)COlTle

parall eled

sharp have been the rise in operating costs at PLU.

more than w e. For o u r mar ket , I bel ieve that we are

year ,

PLU

Instr uc tion rose by 1 06 percent in this 5-year period.

educat ion.

the

In

percentages. Some additiona l statistics show how very

e e x pecte

annat

to grow at more than 5

percent." At P L U , 80 percent of opera ing revenue

C O rn e 5 from tuition.

Now

lagging productivity, but an expansion of

the

pri ncip l e

costs-per-stu dent

r'eason

for

is i n fl a i o n .

be a se labor costs

can

the

sharp

E ssentially

rise in

this is so

urne 60-80 percent of the

bu gets o f a l l institutions in "non-profit land". In the perio rose

1963-68 , e . g . , while the consumer price in ex 13.5 p erc nt , a sea t at the symphony rose 35

percen t , a clay in the hospital 105 percent and YMCA

I ss fees jumped 53 percent. The "non profits" si lilpl y canno t , l i ke manufacturers,

Costs Cost

increase of higher educ tion have expanded far more

rapidly [han the gener I cost of I iving. A gr u p of 10 M idwe tern

private

libera l

arts

colleges ,

knowr, and high Iy respected, conducted costs

a

year

196869 -

index

ago .

4 6 percen t ,

194 9 - 50

the

well and

cost per-STuden t

were:

as

I bar

costs

rise.

so

symphony to

would amount to telling

a

Pet r

iter says , "Tu do

wr

lay

faster" .

Another

area

indu cing a high cost level is de b t service.

During the 50 's and 6 0 ' s , PLU bui l t eight residence hal l s all with 100 percent federal HUD f i nanc i ng- low

interest, 40-y ar bonds . A new physical edu cat ion b lilding

las

a l so

built

partia lly

f inanced

by

a

long-term adera l loan.

Admi n istra tion

165%

I nstr u c tion

358%

Debt servir;e is

Library

303%

fixed cost fil, t o r . Almost al l debt service re lates to

Maintenance and Ope ration

134"1c,

auxiliary ex terprises

of Physical Plant

12

ca mp red

all

s t udy of

19 year Lime span. While the U .S. C . O . L .

increased

Increases

They

a

pr oductivity

Drucker, the well-known business

rn

nageab l e a l though it is a significant

U n i versity CenlCrj,

(residence

halls,

food service,

so that debt serv i ce consumes


$2f::l0 aux i I

per boa rdi ng student annllally of the sources of

d ecision

hard

m

king.

Assurnirlg

no

ch ange

in

of which

e n ro ll m en t , no change in prod uctivity or r 'letho d of

carnes fro ln board and roorn eh r ges. Fortunately, we

op e ration , and ma int ain ing all of the s a nl e programs,

did not overl)uilcl. Our residence halls have had 95

we proj e cted our budget out on a straight line basis

iary

enterprise revenu(:!,

70

percent

for the next s even yea rs . The reslii tin g cumulative

percen t o ccup a ncy on th e average. The

r

ce

of PLU ch an ged drarnatically during the

1960's.

Ou r c pi ta l investment increased from

mililorl

to

$21

between

m illion

l961

$6.4

and 1971.

However, if we apply the c ons t nlction price ind ex, we

wo uld find that it would cos t us 47 percent more

toda y to duplicat rll o rt ar

and

torla y .

our facilities. Hence, ou r bricks

represent

a

tremendous

en d owment

U n e consequence of new f a cili ties which is

of ten ovel looked at the ti me 01 con st rtlcti on is t he futu Ie

1

72

urkeep and oper-t ion .

Between

l 967

and

Our maintenance costs plus debt service rose

132 percent.

startl ing;

"va s

deficit

brought

into

moreover,

if

bud gets

were

balance by increasinq titian solely, the

tuition seven years out would be astro rl O mical eVRn by 1980 standards. a mini cost-simulation pr ogr a rl1

We developed

this

summer and ran very conservat ive data throu gh i 1. I/lle then asked a few "what if" q uest ions , uncier two ass ump tions :

(1)

our budget must be balanced and

(2) there will be no in crea e in enrollment. The key decision parameters show the followin g I-esults under

t h ese two conditions, if we continue to ope rate in th e same manner as in the past.

Projection I\JOW with t hi s

as

background, what of the fUlure?

(1)

the pres e nt

We recentl y engage d in an interesting exercise vvhi ch dra m a t ica lly revea led the need tor sober analy s i s and

Tui tio n and b o ard and room llluSt increase fro m to $4,OOO-an

$:2,900

in crea se of

31.6 percent.

(2)

In o rder for all salaries to rise by 5 per c e nt, either t uiti o n,

board cllld rool11 would h ave to rise to

$3,900 and the student/faculty rat io increase to 19 1

(a

tuitio n ,

54,500 Since the birth rate leveled off during 1957-61 and {hen declined sharply until 1970,

reduction of 20 faculty members) board and

f or

room

will

or

h ave to ri se to

the student/faculty ratio

to remai n at

t h e present 17: 1.

(3)

the nUmber of col lege agt! students should remain

S ala r ies could be increased by 5 percent, tui tion, board

and

room

hel d

at

an iner ase

of 3.6

at plesenl levels dUling thi:; remain i ng decade.

perce t per annum, and the student/faculty ratio

Enrollments WII! drop �harply nati nally from 1980-1988 and then edge up again when [he

helel at 17: 1, prov i d ed stude nt enrollment were i n creased by one thirdl ; (clearly not a strong

class of 1993 matches the class of 1975 numerically.

p r o b a bil ity ) or alternatively gifts Clnd gr ants for

operating p u rposes would have to be increased to 52.400,000 annually or a (41

360 percent in crea sel

Finally, suppose cnro II ment dropped by as little as

1

percent per 'jear) For all other parameter's to

remain the same, in clu d ing our balanced budget, student costs would h ave to rise 64 percent or 7 per ce nt

per

annur ,

close

to

Dr.

Chelt's

(5Y,

percent figure.

13


Some Personal Thoughts

I i r l tr o

t h i s top i c in

IJce

because

think

I

natio n a l l y a r 1 980's

some

th al

facts

and

trends

the

de p ressi n g . I be l i eve t h a t by the ea r l y

500 pr ivate i n s t i tu t i on s w i l l be ou

So me,

busi ness.

very pesSi rl1 i s t i c fash i o n ,

i3

the

U n fo r tu na te l y ,

per h a p s ,

sh o u l d

very

some

f i ne

cease

of

ex i st .

to

i ns ti t ut i o ns w h ich

sh o u l d con t i n ue wi l l n o t make i t. Wh t are we at P L U d o i n g to c o u n ter t h e n a t i o n a l tren ds a n d set a p art t h i s i n s t i t u t i o n as one of t h e su rv i vors, o n e of the i n st i u t i o n s t h a t w i l l be a b l e t o

greet t h a t c l ass o f 1 99 3 7 Geo g r ap hy i s certa i n l y i n o u r f avor . T h e N o r t h west

wi l l c;o n t inue to grow f aster than the average growth in

U .s .

the

Our

tr ad i t i on I

po o l

of

p r ospect i ve

st dents s ho u l d be gr e ate r t h a n in o t her parts of th e

cou n t ry . T h e ex t re mely

i mpo rt ant

C h u rc h a H i l lat io n g i ves

LrS

fac to r of o u r a

L u t h er a n

c c i ded edge

in

that

col l ege a g e s t u d e n t p oo l . W e s h a l l n o t apo l og i / e for

t l 1 is re l a t io ns h i p .

I

am

to ta l lv o u t of sy m p a t hy w i th the tendency o f

so me c h u rc h 路 r e l a ted i ns t i tu t i o ns to go to wha tever m eans

de l nO n St r il te

to

necessary

the

secu l a r ,

n on- re i igious ch aracte r of t h e educatio n a l e x p er i en ce they o ffer to th ei r s tudent s . S u c h eff o l t s , I be l ieve , are

se l f路 defea T i ng .

I bel ieve that 1 h o :; e priv ,te co l l eges which survive w i l l be t hose w i th a l l

n i que cu r r i cu l a- i t w i l l n o t b e t h o se

that em u l a te the l a rger sec u l ar u n i ver s i t y . Or.

J oh n

war ned

p r si e n t o f R ockford C o l l ege ,

Howard ,

rece n t ly

that

" H igher educa t i o n m us t n o t

beco me ho moge n i / ed to conform to t h e e b b and f l ow

of so c i a l the o r y . O n e of the great s tre ngths of th i s nation

has

iJeen

charac t e r i z ed by

col leges

a

sys tem

a ve r y

o pe r t i ng

of

a ll

d i f feren t

se rvi ng d i f fe ren t o b j ec t i ves. Su

en h a n ces

su p p o r t s

and

p rov id es

pro t ection

c l amors o f t h e da y . "

14

h i gh e r

ed uc a t i o r l

grea t d i versi t y , w i t h d i f fere n t

a

aga i n s t

assu m p t i o l ls

and

a system flot o n l y

p l u ral i s t i c

soc i e ty ,

but

to

the

ove r 路 r esponse

H i gh e r e duca tIo n must not bec om e homogenrzed La co n fo r m to the ebb and flow ot social theory , One of the great

strengths of

t h is nation

has been a system of h i gher educat ion characte. i zeci

by a ve l Y gr e a t diversity, With different col l eges operating On d l l terent assumptions and serv ing differen t objectives. Such a system n ot o n ly su pports and e n h a n ces a pl ural ist i c society . but provides protec tion aga i ns t over-response to t h e

c la mo r s

o f t h e day


Fut ure Costs. I predict that educational costs w i l l

I th ink that cost analysis i n h igher educa t i on i s here

continue t o r i se more rapidly t h a n t h e cost-of-liv i ng

to stay. I t

despite all that we might do. As a consequence, cost

work

con scio usness w i l l become a way of life for faculty

resources.

and adm i n istratol路s alike.

analysis ant i - i nte llec t u al , bu t if it is, t h e n so are labo r

As

I tried to show

present

in

th e several proj ect i o n s o f

data, t h e fo recasts ind i cate a ra ther g r i m

p i c t u re I F we contin u e to opera te in today ' s mode.

is one more tool that we can ut i l i L e to

toward

mo re

S om e

ef f ec t i ve u ti l izat ion of scarce

faculty

members

consider

cost

u n i o n s for pro fessors. Yet ,

de s p i te

all

of

these

"self-helps" ,

can

an

inst i t u t ion l ike P L U hope to surv i ve w i t h o u t external

We w i ll have to th ink creat ively abo u t better ways to

a i d ; All of the sta t i s tics su ggest th at they will only

do

wit h the grea test d i f f iculty .

the job o f ed ucation. We will need to create

invigo rati ng managed. response

change

No

but

pr ivate

ori ented

change

co l l ege

wh ich

can

can continue

mode and cont inue

to

be

in

a

survive.

Rather we m u st develop means to assert ini t i a t ives. VVhat

is

requi red,

believe,

I

is

a

move

them well. We are try i n g to determ i ne

wh ere we have dead wood and then p r u n e - whether it

be

servi ces,

cou rses ,

programs ,

ac t i vities

or

po si t i o ns. Many ins t i t u t i ons have recognized, too late, that

seek i ng

wider

appeal

via

greater

variety

of

program i s su i cidal.

permit any k i nd of ana lysis o r discuss ion o f th i s But

grea ter

governmental

suppo r t

for a l l

inst i t u tions o f higher ed u cation w i l l be req u ired.

G reater

s

ppo rt

wi ll

be

req u i red

a l so

from

the

busi ness sec tor and fro m i nd i vi t Jals who believe i n the dual syst m s o f h i ghe r educat ion. I believe that i nst i tutio n s t h a t

e' m

the res

eet

o f private ente r p r i se

and because t h ey rep resen t pri va te enter r i se in t h e field of higher educat i on c a n expect g reater f i nancial assistance if they t e l l their story clea r l y, ho nestly and

We are con tinuing to strive

for better use of o u r

limited resources. I bel ieve that contin ued atte n t i o n a n d use of cost ana lysis can h e l p us ac h i eve t h a t goa l . We have been apply i n g cost acco u n t ing p r i n c iples to o u r instru ctional program for th ree years now. I t has prod uced some

the ou tcome dur ing the next

der.ade for state and federal su port. Space does not topic.

toward

co nsolidation and e n r i c hment - do ing fewer t h i n gs and do i n g

We can only guess a

i n teresting

re su l t s and led us i nt o

forth-rightly to people. It

should

not

the

coll apse

of

a

m

jor

people how ser i o u s things are. l\JI ean wh i l e , at P L U , surv ive; t h a t

f u rt h e r i n ves t i ga t i o n and analysis.

req u i re

inst i t u tion, like that o f Penn Centra l , t o convince

'1l)e

we

are determined t h at we w i l l

w i ll be o f the f i t test; that we shall

co n t inue to Plake a co ntrib u t i o n to t h i s co m mun i t y, Let

me

our sta te and nat io n.

g i ve yo u one example :

Budgets, i t is said, are l ike sausage. I t is better if you

vlce-pr sident tor

don 't see them made. S i nce we IT'ust n1ake and bu ild

fi nance at

a

in

budget

essential

wh i ch for

we can Ii ve by, cost analysis is good

budget

constr u c tion

and

j u st i f i cati on. A good s o p h i s ticated sys tem can be used to monitor what is happe n i n g in each activity. We a re stri v i n g to develop th is too l as an esse n t i a l device f or

has served as busin"ss and PLU since 1 962. Active

A . Dean Buchan<ln

national col lege financial organ颅

lzotio ns, he IS a graduate of

UnlVe

the

lIY of Cal iforn ia. Berklliev.

and a certif ied publ ic acco untant.

constr u ct i n g a n d c o n troll i n g the b u dget. We would l i k e to deter m ine w h a t is bei n g achieved for what

IS

be ing spent. A g reat dea l o f work lies before us.

15


To Create a Distinguished Center of Learning Clayton B. Peterson

The sur v i va l k i t for p r i v a te co l l eges a n d u n i vers i t ies i n

$ 1 7 ,500 ,000

t h e Seve n t i es w i l l

in the p hy s i ca l p l a n t d u r i ng the f i rst

(2)

U n i ve r si t y )

e x p er t

progra m

17)

i n c l u de; ( 1 ) i m a g i na t i ve l ea de rs h i p , n agen e n t , ( 3 ) a n e xc i t i n g e d u ,at i o n a l

and

so u n d

( 4)

i n a n c i n g.

H oweve r , t hose

ele men t 路 can o n l y be ef fec t i ve if t h er e i s ocu men ted mast er p l a n fo r l o n g

terlll

a

car f l I y

o p er a ti o n and

th ink ing.

( w h i c h was 2Y2 t i mes t h e t o t a l i n vested

\N i t h o u t

amb i t i o u s

ye a r' s o f t h e

70

seemed l i k e t h e w i l dest k i nd of w i sh f u l and

q u est i o n

th is

ven t u r eso me

vvas

project

the that

most Pac i f i c

Lu t h e r a n h a d ever' attem pted .

deve l op men t . A master p l c lrl of operation sets forth the

WOj ect i o ll

of

the

ho pes

and

d r e a ms

for

an

i ns t i t u t i o n vv i t h a set o f p r i o r i t ies and a t i me t a b l e for a c h i evi ng the p r i o r i ties. T h e master p l a n becomes t h e data

base

fo r'

i n te l l i ge n t

dec i s i o n , m a k i n g a n d fo r

ef fer: ti ve ad m i n i st r a t i o n . I t is the ro a d m a p by wh i ch an

i n s t i tu t i o n m ay move co n f icl e n t l y a head to ach ieve

its o bj ectives. In

D u r i n g the past e i g h t years a l l b u t o n e of t h e m aj o r goa l s of P L U h ave been ach i eved . [\l ew bu i l d i n gs o n the ca m p u s i n c l u d e t h e R o b er t M o rtve d t L i br a r' y , t h e U n ive r s i t y Cen ter , C l i ffo r d O l son P h ys i ca l Ed ucat i o n

B u i l d in g ,

the

sw i m m i ng

po o l ,

a ser i es o f

aspects

R egen t s

the G o n yea H o u se ( P res i de n t ' s Resid ence ) , a n d a n e w A l u rn n i H o u se an d a S t u de n t H e a l t h B u i l d i n g . P a r k i n g

the

U n iver s i ty

U n ivers i ty

o p er a t i o n s .

Profess i o n a l

l o t s , recrea t i o n a l p l ay f i el d s a n d ex tensive l a ndsc a p i n g

co n su l t ants hel ped d i rect and eva l u a te the wor k of

of

co m mi t tees of facu l ty , st a ff and a l u m n i , T h e data

Eastvo ld A u d i t o r i u m , were a l so added ,

p r o d u ced by th ese s t u d ies was used to p re p a re a l o n g ter m devel o p m e n t p rogr' a m c a l led P L U S ( P rogram o f Long,range U n iver s i t y S pec i f i c s ) . T h e S pe c i f i c s

we r e

gu i de posts to h el p f a cu l ty a n d a d m i n is t ra t i o n d i rect the i n s t l t u t i o rr a l o n g the pa t h way o f progress. T h ese spec i fi cs were co n cerned w i t h i m p ro v i n g the q u a l i ty of the s t u d e n t b o d y , t h e facu l ty and t h e ed ucat i o n a l

e m p hasis

Heavy

was

laid

upon

the

i m pera t i ve need fo r a n adeq u a te l i br ary . T h ere was also str' i c t i n s i s tence t h a t t h e U n i vers i t y con t i n u e to oper ate

o rl

a ba l a nced budget.

T h e P L U S P l a n was l a u nched in 1 964 as a t h ree- p h a se pro g ra m cove r i n g

O rda l ,

i n te n s i ve s e l f s t u d ies o f a l l

1 9 6 1 , the PaCif i c L u t h er a n

pmgram,

S tuen ,

T i ngelstad a n d F oss r e si den ce h a l l s , A i d a I n g ra m H a l l ,

8 u t h o r i Led

of

Major Goals Achieved

a

te n year per i o d , T h e p r i ce tag of

t he

campus,

i n c l u d i ng

the

p l aia

in

f ro n t

of

D u r i n g t h i s per i od t h e C h e m istry De p a r t r e n t was app roved by t h e A m e r i can C h e m ical S o c i et y and t h e Scho o l

of

N urSing

and

the

S chool

of

B u s i n ess

A d m i n i st ra t i on received na t i o n a l accred i t a t i o n . T h e

accred i t a t i o n s o f the U n iver' s i ty an d t h e Schoo l o f E d u c a t io n l!Vere b o t h renewed a f ter i n te n s i v e s t u d y by

teams

of

e d u c a t o rs .

PLU

beca me

the seco n d

p r i vate un iver s i t y i n the sta t e t o ever have a R h odes Scho l a r . I t is the o n l y i n st i tu t ion i n Wash i ngt o n t h i s year to have two R ot a ry I nt er n a t i o n a l F e l l o w s , T h ese are some of t h e i n d ica t i o n s that the asp i ra t i o ns to ach ieve

new

leve l s

of

e x ce l l e n ce

in

scho larsh i p ,

teac h i ng , co u n sel i n g a n d research were f u l f i l l ed .

17


T h e o n l y maJo r' d i sappo i n tment i n t he program was

so u n d

the t a J i u re to su bstan t i a l l y i n c re as e the endowment

i n novat ive a n d

fu nds. Th i s wa s d u fa c i l i t i es

for

progra

)

i n par t to th for

ami

tact t h a t t h e needs t he

u pgrad i n g

educational

were s o gr e a t t h a t th ey had to be g i ven

h i gher p r路 i o r i ty . I\J ever t h el ess , the P L U S P l a n was an

on a l l

un p ara l l e l e d success. G re a t p rog ress ocr.u rre

f r o n ts

t he

an

vi s i b i l i ty

of

L u theran

Paci f i c

i t y in creased n a t i o na l l y a s wel l as reg io n a l l y .

U n ive

W i t h i n fac I t y , s ta f f , s tu d en t bo dy , a l u m n i and t h e church , there was a grow i ng p r' i d e and co n f i d e n ce i n the U n iver s i t y . The past i s b u t a p ro lo g u e for wh a t is to co rne. T h e

been

tested

before.

T h e o l l t l o o k is so m ewh a t gr i m

i t i s no more d i s h ea r te n i ng than t h e c h a l l enges

faced by those ded i ca t ed peu p l e in th e past who k e p t t h i s sc hoo l go i n g

u rl

s h eer f a i t h a n d deter-m i n a t io n .

Thrust Toward G reatness PLU

The

P r e srd e n t ,

R ege n t s ,

ad m i n i st r a t ion

are

co r1') 1 i tte

to

fa c u l ty

and

corlt i n u i ng

the

towards g rea t n e ss t h a t h a s had s u ch a f i n e

th ru

begi n n i ng . T o h e l p i n

t h i s endeavor , to s t u d y a n d

n a l y z e prese nt c i rc u rn s t an c es and t h e cha l l enges t h a t

flce the U n ivers i ty , two consu l t i n g f i r ms have been H a rr y

eng ged .

and

P r iur

Assoc i a tes ,

co n d uc t i ng the study of no n 路aca dem ic deter m i n e

Seatt l e ,

is

ro ced u re s to

lTlax i m u m eff i ci e n cy and eco n o m y

how

. T h e W a l ter L . Da r l i n g C o r p o r a t i o n ,

ca n be e f fect

C h ir. ago , i s d i re c t i n g the stu

on

E x ce l l en c e ,

Ac de m i c

ies of the C o m m i ss i o n i n i t i ated

last

year

l.Jy

Presi jen t E u ge ne W i egm an to d e l i n e a s p r ec i se l y a s poss i b l e

Paci fie

k i n d s of

the

Lu th er n

Present , l ans

.

programs and

sh a l l

" for

a

p ro v i de

in

servi ces the

that

Seven t i es .

Master P l a n to be c o m p l et e d

in t i m e for p resen t a ti o n to the August meet i ng o f t h e R egents. The

Master

Plan

wi I I

project

the

r

)eans

A/h e reby

\

Pa c i f i c L u the ran w i l l grow i n e x c e l l e n ce a nd depth , i ' f no t

in

prug ra m

s i ze. that

It is

w il l

bring

far s i g h ted

toge ther

all

an

acade m i c

r'cspons ive

to the

needs of t h e Pa c i f i c N o r thwest w i t h t h e p r i nc ip l es of

18

fluid

in

It

wil l

seek

to

be

edu cat i o n a l conce p t wh i l e

reta i n i n g sou nd f i scal opera t ions. T h e M aster P l an w i l l esta b l i sh the co ntro l s tha t w i l l i n s u re t h a t o u r growth is h e a l t h y and s u p p o r t a b l e . T he n o r m a l

co nse q u ence o f a dy n a m i c p rogressive

trad i t i o n i s the need for more money. E ach year the demand means

i ncrea es we

vo l u n t a r y

so c i et y .

m u st s u p p o rt

for

more and more f u nd s . Th i s

re l y

even

from

the

m o re

heavi l y

upon

pr ivate sector o f o u r

I n t h i s respect we are not u n i q u e . Today

nea r l y a l l of the p u b l icly -suppor ted i ns t i t u t i o n s a l so

years j s t a h ea d w i l l t e s t o u r me t t le as i t has never but

pra c t i ce.

manage ment


• have p rograms to

seek f u n d s f r o m p r iva te sou rces.

E du ca t ion has an i n s a t i a b l e appe t i te for mo ney f rom any and a l l sources. T h i s com p l i cates the job of the p r ivate i ns t i t u t ions in

trying

to f i n d the mea ns to

ma i n ta i n and ex tend t h e i r p rograms.

o f g iv i ng has served a s an e x a m p le and a s t i m u l u s to other g i vers.

A Strong Case In

t h e search

for

f u n ds - whether i t be f r o m an

i n d i v i d u a l , a f i r m , a fo u n d a t i on or an o rgan i z a t i o n -

' I nvisible' Scholars h i p

P L U. w i l l be ab le to make a strong case for i tsel f . T h e

A t t h e p resent t i m e no one k nows w h a t f u n d s ,,'V i i i be

Master P l a n wi I I p rove t h a t manag e m e n t u t i l i z e s hard

needed in the f u t u re. The Master P l a n w i l l sp e l l t h i s

data

out

ach ievements i n t h e p a s t decade clea r l y s h o w s t h a t

together w i th

d ue

da tes when

t h ey

m ust be

to

cond u c t

its

opera t i o n s .

The

record

of

ava i l a b l e. We do kn ow t h a t th ere w i l l be a con t i n u i n g

the

need for operat i ng funds to ma ke up t h e d i f ference

exper i e nced ; t h a t the facu l ty emphasizes scho l a rsh i p

between the cost of educat i o n a n d wha t the s tudent

and good teach i n g; that the f i scal opera t i o ns are so l id ;

80

and tha t the s t u d e n t body i s no t o n l y acade m i ca l l y

pay s .

At

the p resent t i me s tu d e n t s pay a b o u t

U n iver s i ty

a d m i n i st rato r s

a re

sk i l lful

and

pe rce n t of the edu cat i o n a l co sts a n d none of t h e costs

respec table b u t so c i a l l y respo n s i b le. T h e h a n d s o m e

for b u i l d i n gs and f a i l i t i es. A l l students - past , p rese n t

c a m p u s and the exce l l e n t bu i l d i ng s s p e a k e l o q u e n t l y

a n d f u t u re - receive a n " i nv i si b l e sch o l a rsh i p " even i f

o f foretho ught and p lan n i n g a s we l l a s arch i tectu ral

they pay f u l l t u i t i o n a n d a l l fees.

esth e t i cs.

I t i s a l so cer ta i n t h a t t here w i l l be needs for ca p i ta l

I n the f i rs t broc h u re o f the PLUS P l an the state m e n t

p u rposes,

was m a d e that a goa l h a d been esta b l i s hed t o i n sp i re

ed u cat ion , q u a l ity those

for

new

for

and

faeu It y

ex panded

sa l aries

to

teach i n g , for f i n a n c i a l aid s pe c i a l

d i mens i o n s

k inds

and

of

r i ch ness

the

g uaran tee

of h i gh

to stude n ts . for

p rograms to

p rogra m s

that total

add

new

educat i o n a l

facu l ty and stude n ts to strive for t h e h i g h est leve l s o f exce l l ence

-

" to

create a d i st i n gu i shed

lear n i ng . " That was and s t i l l

ce nter o f

i s a n o b l e asp i r a t i o n .

W h a t a grand a n d wo nder f u l a t ta i n m e n t fo r s t u d e n t s ,

ve nture and f o r endowment f u n d s t o g ive stab i l i ty

for a l u m n i , f o r the Ch urch and f o r the facu l ty , staf f

and s t rength to the e n t i r·e oper a t i o n .

and parents and a l l o t hers who love t h i s p l ace a n d

To meet these needs P L U m u s t i n crease t h e a m o u n t of f i n a n c i a l su p po r t t h a t i t receives. P r i m a r i l y t h i s m u s t be ach ieved by broad e n i n g the base o f g iv i n g (get t i n g mor e pe o p l e to g ive) a n d by u p grad i n g t h e level o f g iv i ng b y ex i st i ng donors. O t her i m po rta n t so u r ces o f such f u n d s a re w i l l s, bequests a n d deferred g i ft s .

p ro f us i o n

of

g i f ts

ra ther

than

"the

m i l l i o n -do l l a r

k i n d " o f d o na t i o n . T h i s bespea k s great i n terest a n d by

the

U n ivers i ty

Family

( facu l ty , s t af f ,

a l u m n i , studen t s , pare n t s a n d frien ds ) . N o t o n l y have these

it i s t h i s sp i r i t tha t rnade t he P L U S P l an s u ccee d . I t can be t h e mot i va t i n g power· t h a t vv i l l propel P a c i f i c L u t h e r a n pe l l m e l l towards i ts goa l s i n the years j u s t ahea d . Clayton Peterson has served as vlce-prc.sidcnt for development

T h e su ccesses o f t h e past have been d i rec t l y d u e to a

loya l ty

wha t i t stands f o r . P robably more t h a n a n y t h i n g e l se

peo p l e

g iven

ge n e r o u s l y

i nf l uenced

relat ives.

acq u a i n tances

to

al so

f r iends

s u p po rt

the

but

they

and

during PLU's greatest period of physical and academic growth the u n iversity since

At

1 960, he

holds bache lor's and master's de­ grees from th" U n iversitY of Wisconsi n .

have

b u s i ness

p rograms.

The

i n terest a n d enth u s i a s m of th i s g r o u p a n d i t s record

19


20

PLU Teacher Placement Effort Eases Job Squeeze John S. Hanson s t r i d es

Recen t

in

l o ca t i n g

in

deg r e o f upo n

the

qu l ity

U n i vers i t y ' s

prog rams , co u p l ed t h e T eacher P I

the

both

L l theran

Pac i f i c

w i th

ce me n t

scope o f

and

teacher

ed l ca t i o n

the co m p a ra t i ve su ccess of

Serv i ce i n a sisting graduates

lan d i n g t e ac h i n g j o b s , reflects t h e

and

p ro n l inence Pac i f i c

school d is t r i c ts p l a c e

ny

III

L u t h eran

University ' s S c h o o l

of

E ducat i o n . T h oug h t h e cle ll 1 el n d the

of

pe rcen tage

leac h i n g

fo r

118'N

teachers h a s d e c l ined

in recen t yed r s , s ta t i s t i c s i n d icate t h a t

con s i dera b l y co n

teel cher g ra d u a tes s ig n i n g

PLU

t r a c t s co n t i n ues r;o n s i d er a b l y a b o v e t h e

state average. t ot a l

A

of

poten t i a l

268

teachers

f' e<; e i ved

the i ,

p ro v isio na l cer t i f icat i on d u r i n g t he

1 9 7 1 路72 sc h o o l

year ,

p r i v a te

PLU

milk i n g

the

l a rge s t

te a c h e r

prepar a t io n i n st i t u t i o n i n t h e P a cif i c N o rthwes t . O f

t hese

carld i da tes ,

N ovem ber

last

1 48 h a d s i gn eci co n t rac t s b y :-30 , 1 9 7 2 . W hil e t h a t m a r k i s cJmvn fro ln

yeA r ' s

()3

ce n t ,

per

( :o l ls ide ra b ly above t h e

it

is

ex pected

state-w ide f i g u re

to

be

of 45 per

cent l a 路 t year . S [ te stat i st i cs for the cu rren t yea r w i l l no t be ava i l b l e u n t i l J u l y , 1 9 7 3 . O n l y a fe w o f t h o se can d idCltes not p l aced i n t e ach i ng rosi t io n s ar e st i l l active l y seek i n g

c

n t r ac:ts_ O thers

have accepted n o n - tedc h i n g j o b s , e n t e re d the or

III

il i t ary ,

are co n t inu i n g fo rma l stu y .

O l f f i _lI l ty

p ro por t iO ll

in

f ind i n g

to t h e

posi t i o n s

Ipve l

or

is

o ft e n

in

d i rect

su bj ect for 'N h l e h the

CAnd idate i s prepared . T h e f i e l d s w it h the gl-eatest

continue on page 22


Teacher Education 1973 Where Are We Now? Carrol OeBower It

is

t i me

fo r

com men cern ent;

paren t s ,

f r i e nds ,

facu l ty , g r a d uates a n d stueJ e n t s are g thered i n O l son Aud i tor i um.

" Wi l l

t h e c andi dates for t h e degree,

Bachelor o f Arts in E d u c a t i o n , p l e o se rise ? " i ntones the sp aker , a n d to the pred i c tab le as ton i s h ment o f

I I l OSt one-ha l f of th

th e ilu ci ien ' e

gr ad u a t i n g c l a ss

st a n d s . S u c h is the ro l e o f tea c h e r educa ti o n at Paei f i r: L utheran U n i ve r s i t y . W h a t has hap pened i n t h e nea r pa';t in t h e ed ucal i o n

of these teache r s ? There h a v e b ee n

a

nu mber o f mAj o r

chan ges i n t h e o rofess i o n a l educa t io n sequence , a n d i t i s safe t o assUlTle t h a t d i f fe re nces j ust as I m portant have taken p l ac e o u tside of t h e p ro fessiona sequence.

Some of the 111 0 St iJ 1po rtallt changes i n the t o ta l U n ivers i t y se t t i ng are th > IJ t i l i / Cl l i o n o f su ch c O I1 r"epts as the 4 - 1 -4 calen d a r , the i n ter i m e x p r ie n ce , - ncJ t h e co u r se i dea . TocJay ,

stu den t s usu a l l y

begin

t h e i l'

e x pe r i ence as

so phon ore s or j u n i or t r ansfers in education co ur ses and

the p u b l i c scho o l s c l assrooms d u r ing t h e Same

rno n t h . The co u rse, " Learner and Society , " i nvol ves llIo re than with

60

hOl rs of i n -school

ex

erit:! res w o r k i n g

a c l assroom teacher a n d you ngsters. I n IllOSt

cases the fu t u re teacher has

51

t f i c ie nl op or l lJ ll it ies

work i n g w i t h p u p i l s to p ro vi de a dequate i n S i g h t to m ak e a ratio n a l dec i s i o n about beco m i n g a tea ch e r . Var i ou s

group

p r o c ess

tech n iq ues

are

I i t i l i / eo

to

deve l o p pos i t ive se lf- i f lages for t h e fu tu re tea ch ers

con tinue on page 24

21


con tinued from page 20

over s u p p l y

at

th i s

t i m e a r e t h e sec o n d a r y so c i a l

sc i e nces a n d t h e p r i m a ry grades fo r women teachers. In

con trast,

m o re a n d m o re m a l es are choos i n g a

career i ll the p r i m al-y grades a n d a re f i n d i n g t h e i r sk i l l s i n d e m a n d by sch o o l d i s t r i cts i n a l ! parts o f t h e nat i o ll . ivi u c h o f the b l a m e f o r t h e d i m i n i s h i n g d e m a n d f o r wo men

e l e me n tary

tea c h er s

can

b e p l aced o n a

dralnat i c d m p i n e l e m e n tal-y emo l l m e n t s i n rece n t years. C O l n p areci to 1 97 1 , 1 4 ,609 fewer e l e me n ta ry ch i l d re n repol-ted to sch o o l i n VVash i n g t o n S tate t h i s past f a l l _ A t t h e sa me t i m e many sch o o l boards a re rece i v i n g p ressure to eq u a l i z e t h e ma le/fe m a l e teacher ra t i o t h at has f o r many years been heav i l y vve i g hted in favo r o f w o m en tea c h ers. All

PLU

seco n dary

b u s i n ess ed u c at i o n ca n d i d a tes

l an d ed posi t i o n s th i s yea r co m p a red to 52 per ce n t state

vv i d e .

l a n g u ages ,

Seco n d ary n a t u ra l

tea chers

scien ces

in

and

m us i c , f o re i g n

m a t h em at i cs a l so

fou n d t h e i o b market ri pe. INh i I e

a

sign i f i ca n t

e mo l l me n t

has

dec l ine

not yet

in

been

teacher

ed ucat i o n

no t i ced

at

Paci f i c

L u theran U n ivers i ty , a maj o r i ty o f t h e co l l eges a n d

At

u n i vers i t i es i n the N o rt h west are I-e p o r t i n g a d ro p i n

graduates a n d a l u m n i to f i nd

the

n u m be r

of

s t u d e n ts

e n ro l l ed

in

teacher

prep ara t i o n p ro g r a m s . A s fewer' teachers a re ce r t i f i ed and

as

schoo l

d i s t r i cts so l v e

the

fi nancial

crisis

c u r re n t l y p l agu i n g t h e m , the g ro ss a n d i n defe n s i b l e overs u p p l y of tea c h ers w i l l d i m i n i s h . H o pef u l l y , i n i ts p l ace w i l l deve l o p a n a r ro w m a rg i n o f overs u p p l y t h a t \vi l l st i m u late h ea l t h y co mpet i t i o n f o r t h o se J o bs that do a p pear . At a t i r-ne vvh e n t h e n eed f o r g rad u a tes a n d a l u m n i to f i n d em p l o y m e n t i s so c r i t i ca l , the !"O l e of a tea cher p l aceme n t and co u nsel i n g serv i ce has beco me m o re esse n t i a l to the U n ivers i ty t h a ll ever before. As t h e co m pet i t io n for vaca n t posi t i o n s g ro ws i n c reas i n g l y keen a n d a s can d i d ates a r e forced to m a x i m i z e the i r efforts to

22

l o c ate

po s i t i o n s ,

adequ ate

p ro fess i o n a l

d

t i m e when the need for

employment IS so critica l , the role o f a teachel placement a n d counse l ing service has become more esse n t i a l t o the u n i vers ltv t h a n e v e r before


â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

atte n t i o n

must

g iven

be

to

individual

p l ace ment

needs. Sti l l

h owever, cou ld we l l be a l o n g-range factor s i n ce i t i s n o more econ o m i c a l t h a n cu rrent m e t h o d s .

r'e l a t ive l y

new

as

a

f u l l,time

se rv i ce,

the

ed u c a t i o n career p l an n i ng a n d p l acement serv i ce has added a new d i mens i o n in the U n ivers i ty ' s effort to meet i ts respo n s i b i l i ty to s t u de n ts . The teacher p l acem e n t d i rector meets ""l i t h ed ucat i o n

- R e ce n t u po n ,

State

oth ers

cha l l e n g i n g

S u p reme

pend i n g the

as

t h rough

Amer ican

com m u n i t ies the

in

co u r ts

cases, s o m e acted

Wash i ngton

trad i t i o n a l

fi nanc i ng fash i o n ,

court

of

t a x es .

S i nce

pro p e r ty

f i na nce

are

s t a t e , are

m e t h od

s ch oo l s

g radua l l y

forcing

scho o l most

in

this

a

tot al

classes a n d s t u d e n t teac h i n g sem i n ars o n a reg u l a r

rest r uc tu r i ng o f ed u c a t i o n a l support m e t h o d s . Many

ba s i s

al ternat ive

to

teac h i n g rev i ew

d i spense majors

the

i n terview

i n f o r m at i on

and

regard i n g

m a j o r - m inor

U n ivers i ty ' s

p l acement

salable

com b i n a t i o n s , reco r d ,

d i scuss

tech n i q u es , e ffect ive avenues f o r see k i n g

p l acement

and

an svver

q u est i o n s

regard i n g

career

oppor t u n i t i e s . Ser:o ndary teach i ng

to

f i e lds

ed u c a t i o n

p u rs u e to

cand i d a tes

ce r t i f i ca t i o n

e n h a nce

th e i r

for

com b i n a t i o n s

and

proposed;

ed uca t i o n

l ie

in

the

in

the

bal ance. -The need for early chi I d h o od ed u c a ti o n i ncreas i n g l y

rea l i z ed

t h r o u gho u t

the

is be i n g

nation .

If

a

n a t i on wi l l b e c r i t i c al l y short of tea c h e rs p repared a t th i s l evel for a per' i od o f t i me . W i th deve l o p m e n t o f

e m p l oy m e n t

ber o f po s i t i o n s f o r wh i c h he i s q u a l i f ied_ E q u a l l y

E ng l i sh

in

bei ng

a j u n i or' h i gh m a j o r i n E n g l i sh m o re than do u b l es t h e good

be i ng

m u l tiple

are

oppo r t l l n i t i es . A so c i a l s c i e n ce ca nd i date w h o a l so h a s nu

are

careers

federal prog ram i n t h i s f i e l d sho u l d m a te r i a l i z e , t h e

t eacher

encou raged

methods

rnea rl t i me, m any

are

s c i e n ce

and

m a t h e m a t i cs,

com m u n i ca t i on a r t s , p h y s i ca l ed uca t i o n

and so c i a l s c i ence o r n a t u ra l science.

ce r t i f i cat i o n standa r'ds i n t h e f ie l d , add i t i o n a l cloors w i l l be ope ned t o teacher ca nd i da tes. I n s p i te of the cau ti o n a ry na t u re of many of t h ese facto r s , teacher ed ucati o n i s , and w i l l co n t i n u e to be, one of t h e maj o r strengths in P L U ' s c u r r i c u l u m . T h e dem and

for

teachers

wil l

co n t i nue

i n de f i n i te l y ,

t h o u g h proba b l y n o t aga i n a t the level enjoy ed d u r i ng

D u r i rlg t h e next yea r , seve ral add i t i o n a l factors a re

the

e x p e cted to have a n effect on the teacher m a r k e t i n

ava i l a b l e t o a sp i r i ng tea chers, P L U co n t i n ues t o o f fer

the N o rth west

one of the best.

'60's.

And a m o n g the educat i o n a l ex per' i ences

-The c u r r e n t session of the S tate Legi s l a ture wi II be dea l i ng w i th a proposal to b r i n g teachers' ret i re m e n t benef i ts more i rl l i ne w i th those bei ng gran ted o t h e r state e m p l oyees. I f a new measure m a k es ret i re m e n t

John Hanson, educational place­ ment

direClor

and fifLh y ee r

mor-e ap pea l i n g , i t i s reaso n a b l e to e x pect t h a t illa n y

coordi nator, j O i ned

e d u cato(s w i I I

In

take advan tage o f t h e o p p o r t u n i ty ,

leav i ng scho o l s w i th a h i gher n u m ber of va c a n c i e s .

1 970.

t h e P LU staff

He holds bachelor's and

master's degrees

f rom PL U .

-As tech no l og i cal adva n ces such as com p uters and teach i ng mach i nes m a k e the i r way i n t o t h e c l assroo m , j o bs

will

be created i n educat i o n f o r p eo p le w i t h

vary i ng sk i l l s. A s a resu l t , a n i n c reasi ng nu m ber o f d i st r i cts a re mov i ng toward d i f ferent i a t i o n i n staf f i n g , a system e m p l oy i n g seve r a l peo p l e w i th v a r i ed sk i l l s t o w o r k a s a team w i t h a group o f c h i l d re n . T h i s ,

23


contin ued from page 2 1 and then are llsed b y t h em to i m p rove the w o r k i n g relationsh ips

they

w i th

have

in

yo u n gsters

the

, lassroo n1. T i me and effo r t is s pe n t o n cam pu s deve l o p mental

or

grow t h

patterns

tu y i n g t h e and

p h ys i c a l

l e ve l s

mat u r i ty

to

ue

n d appr op r i a te lea r n i n g t heol- i es a n d t h e i r

e x pected ,

app l i ca l i o n .

I mportant

Without Failure

boo k s

for ce

co n s i s t e n t

i deas

trw

y o u ngste rs ,

me n t I

of

I u tu re

with

Sl

ch

modern

Schools

as

teach ers

to co n si del

psych o l o g i ca l

Wi:l s h i n gt o n

Teacher

S t ate

E d u ca t i o n C e r t i f i c ' t i o n

G u i del i ne s . A t ea m o f fa c u l ty m e mbers i s responsi b l e

clpproac hes

f Oi t h i s E E E M p roj ect . The successful b len d i n g of edu cat l o l-Ia l theory and i Is p ract ica l a p p l i cat io n i n t h e cl assroom

c'nnot

rece i ve

too muc h emp hasi s _ 1 f t a ch ers a l-e to becone m o re they

effec t ive ,

�a p ab l

u

must

e

h a r ness i n g t h e

of

latest brea k t h ro u gh s i n t h eo r y to t hf3 day t o d y task s nel.essary for l earn i n g t o take p l ace i n t h e c l assroorns i n which t h ey teach .

A balance between theo r y ,md pr " l i ca a p p l icat i o n i s ex tended

in to

elemen tary re la t io n sh i p

ge ne r a l

artivi t ies

me h o d s

at

the

leve l . SOl11e f'f f o rt h a s gone i n t o su c h a in

m et h o d s

spec i f ic

cou rses

as

we l l .

G roup process tech n iq l Jes a l o n g w i t h i n ves t i g t i on o f var i o l J S

the seco n d

teach i ng st riJ teg ies characteme

semester

in

tearh er

ed tlcatio n .

B asic req u i reme nts

inc l ude m i n i- tea ch i n g e x per ien L:es o f ten ana l Y / ed by use o f

il U

io tape an d sO lnet i mes by

use

o f v i deo ta pe.

T he fu t u re teacher aga i n spends most of h i s t i m e i n the gen era l meth o d s course , a b o u t 60 h o u r s , i rl class r oo m

set t i n g ,

sO l

l l et i lll€ S

wi th

a

a

c l ass mClte

wo r k i n g with y O lJ ng s ter s a n d a capa b l e e x pe r i iJ nce teacher.

to

A" a restl l t of SUI

te<:lr hl!I S

pro fl!ss iolli:Ji

f u t. u re

th 'O I Y

re d i n g ,

I !Lle n t s .

)

t l I l l ie

IlId t U I i ty

11\

, Ii. SSfOOl 1 i eU n 9 -

In

OI l!lrcJ ti O I 1d 1

l u l ly

IS

led' he 5_ cl l 1 r1

I meers ,

u n usual

Aga i n

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24

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â&#x20AC;˘ U n i q ue

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seco n d a r y fu t ure teachers h a ve been made poss i b l e by

4- 1 -4

th e

ca

len d a r

during

i n te r i m .

Some

students

are be i n g m a de by r e a d i n g the co l l eg e c at a l og or even ta l k i ng

w i th

a

recent

g r a d u a te .

H o pe f u l l y

these

c o rn l en ts w i l l ma ke i t e a s i er to i de n t i fy d i ffere nces

ch oo se t o i n vest igate i n terests by wo r k i n g with deaf

that a r e now parts o f a v i ta l and v i go ro us p rogram i n

you ngster s , i n o t h e r spec i a l e d u c a t i o n sett i n g s , i n

teacher e du c a t i o n _

a

M o n t esso r i scho o l , ,t'l i t h a r ead i n g reso u r ce tea c h e r , as we l l

as

i ll

teach i n g

an

a l te rn a te

area

such

as a

seco n d a r y person wo r k i n g i n an e l e me ntary s e t ti ng , tea c h er - s

F ut u re extend

thei r

of

p h ys i ca l e d u c a t i o n

m usi c a n d

teach i n g

reco m m ended

leve l s

by

The successful b l e n d i n g of

ex periences a t a n a l ternate leve l . Aga i n t h e a c t i v i ty i s

edu cational theory and its

a fu l l - d a y exper ience often suppo rted b y a p p ropri a te

pract i c a l a pp l ication In the classroom ca n n ot rece ive too much

research a c t i v i t y on ca m p u s .

Students

i n teacher ed ucat i o n a l so h ave o p po r tu n i t ies

i n te r i m

during

p u rsue

to

i n d i vi du al

i n terests

in

co u r ses l i k e Parado x es and Pua les in Mathern t i c s , S i m u l a t i o n a n d G a rnes , a n d

B o dy

L a n g uage. S o me

spend t i m e i n t h e i r home commu n i ty i n i n d e p e n d e n t study

i n si d e a n d o u t s i d e the p u b l i c scho o l sett i n g.

The chan ces fOI- pe r son a l o r p r-o fess i o n a l grovv t h

emphasis.

I f t eac hers a re to

become more effective, they must

be capable of ha r ness i n g the l atest breakthroughs in theory to the day to day tasks necessary for learn i n g to take place.

a re

al most end less_ the

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n

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co u nsel i ng a n d

in

in

group

accessi b l e

a d m i n i strat i o n

Workshops f ro m s i mu l a t

to

and

processes

students o th e r

in

areas .

p r in c.; i pd l sh i p ro l es to a

st ud y of ret i remen t h a ve ai e el gr-a d u a te stude n ts to pu rsue s k i l l s and

i n terests_

l3y

t h e c areful use o f

reso u r ces O u tside a n d i ns i de t h e U n i v e rs i ty , a b m a d p r og ram has been m ade ' v a i l ab l e at m i n i mu m cost. The 1 9 7 1 Wash i n g on S tate C er t i f icat i on G u i d e l i n es

for

P r o fessi o n a l

Ed u ca tors

may ch a n ge t h e e n t i re

co n cep t o f ed u c at i o n iJo t h i r lsi e a n d o u tside t h e Sch o o l o f Ed u c a t i o n t o a c o m pe t e n cy

ased m od e l .

The f i e l d ex p e r ience re q u i rem en t h a s al rearJy been

g i ve n h i gh p r i o r i ty i n the teach er edu cat i o n sequen ce .

U n reso l ved p ro b l e m s re l Cltec to the g u i d e I i nes over t h e

Dr. Carrol

re cost

l o n g h a u l . cost of conversion i n ti me a nd

PLU

reSO llrce s , a n d t h e rea l l o ca t i o n of fac u l t y in wor k r o l e

i fficu l t t o

see

associate

from 1 964-68 a nd I1ltur ned 1 970. A grad­

to the campus in

uate of the U niversity of Omaha,

and respo n s i b l l t ies.

It is

DeBower,

pr ofessor of educatio n, taught at

a l l the cha ng es t h a t h ave

ee n

or

I

he h o l ds a doctorate from t h e University o f Nebraska.

25


News Notes T h e new l ectu re l a b ad d i t i o n corn­

perso ns for who m the fo l l o w i n g

p l etes the $ 543 ,906 re novat i o n a n d

merrl o r i a l s have been g i ve n : A i d a I n g ra m , B a r bara R i c k e r t

remod e l i n g o f w h a t "vas p rev i o u s l y t h e C o l l ege U n i o n B u i l d i n g . T h e

K l o k e , R ev . a n d M rs. L . C . F os s ,

cO I T l p l e x a d d s 3 2 ,000 sq u a re feet o f

Lev i a n d W a r ren T h o m p so n , a n d

academ i e space t o t h e P L U c a m p u s ,

D rs . S u sa n a n d J a m es S k i n n e r.

a n d h as re l i eved a p ress i n g n e e d f o r

i\ll rs. E l i ne M o rk en of Tacoma , f o r m e r

ca m p u s fa c i l i t i es i n art , n u r s i n g

fo r m e r d i rec tor o f n u r s i n g a t P L U ,

a n d t h e sc i ences.

has a l so been h o no red as a d e s i g nate hy fa m i l y a n d f r iends.

The bu i l d i n g has bee n llalTIed A i da I n g r a m H a l l in m er n o ry o f the l a te

A I D A I N G R AM H A L L D E D I CAT E D

A i d a I n g r a l l l H a l l , P L U ' s nellv a rt­ n u r s i n g c o m p l ex , was ci eci ,ica teci i n F e lJ r u a r y d u r i n g c e r em o n i es eO Il­ d u ct ecl by P L U P res i d e nt ViJ i eg l n a n a l H I B o a r e! o f R egerlts c h a i r m a n M i c h a e l Dede r' e r , T h e d ed i c a t i o n a n d oiJen h o use p rov i ded the f i rst p u b l i c i n spec t i o n of t h e 1 20 se a t lec t u re l a b o r a t o ry add i t i o n rece n t l y co m iJ l eted O il t h e

fac i l ·i t ies h ave been d o n a ted by

prov i d es vast l y ex panded fac i l i t ies

M r . & M rs . A . VVe k e l l , M r . & M rs,

for th·e P L U S c h oo l o f N u rs i n g and

O rv i l l e N e is,' , M r. & M rs. V i c to r

the Departln e n t o f A rt , both am orlg

N el s o n , M r . & M rs. G odw i n R o rem ,

the m ost rap i d l y g r ow i n g d i s c i p l i n es

M r . & M rs. H e n ry B e rn tsen a n d t h e

on c a m p u s . T h e art d e pa r tment

K resge F o u n d at i o n .

now has stud ios f o r p a i n t i n g , des i g n , d raw i n g , g l ass b l o'/'/ i n g , sc u l p t u re ,

T h e $ 2 5 ,000 K resge d o n a t i o n was

p h o tog ra p h y , c e r a m i cs a n d g ra p h i c s ,

des i g n ated as a capstone g i f t , ef­

a s wel l a s wo od and m e t a l shops,

fec t i v e l y co m p l e t i n g t h e f i n a n c i n g

lect u re roo m , o f f i ces, k i l n s a n d

o f t h e p ro j e c t . F u n d i n g so l i c i ta­

aU X i l i a ry fac i l i t i es.

t i o n beg a n two years ago with t h e offe r i n g o f a $ 1 00,000 a n o n y m o u s

T h e depar tr n e n t was f o r rn e r l y h o used

cha l l e nge g i ft f r o m a T a c o m a

h o u sed in the o l el u n ivers i ty c h a p e l ,

c i t i z e r] .

si nce r al e d , a n d h a d e x p a n d ed i n t o

so u t h s i d e o f t h e co mp l e x , T h e

several dva i l a b l e roolTiS a c ross t h e

a m p h i theater-sty l e u n i t i s eq u i pped

campus o n a l T I a k e- d o basis.

v\l l th bo t h front a n d rea r a u d i o ­ v i su a l p m j e c t i o n capab i l i ty Cl l o ng

T h e new School o f N u rs i n g q u a rt e rs

P L U , C O L U M B I A U N I V E RS I TY

i n c l u d e fo u r ser n i n a r roo m s , p rac­

P L A N JO I N T E N G I N IE E R I N G

l i g h t i n g eq u i p r l I c ll t .

t i ce l a b o rato r i e s , l ea rn i n g reso u rce

PROG RAM

B as i c a l l y used f o r g e r leral c l ass

t i o n a rea a nd 1 4 new o f f i ces. The

w i t h a si l i a l l s t agc a n d p ro fess i o na l

ro o m Cl n d l ail d e r l l o n s t r a t i o n work , t h e l ah o r atory can a l so be a d apted

roo m s , con ference roo ms , r ecep­ sch o o l \NaS f o r m e r l y h o u sed i n a f r a m e c o m p l e x on l ower c a m p u s .

fo r s l n a l l c o n certs a n d re c i t a l s as we l l as

SO l l i e

e x p e r' i n l e n t a l d r a m a

a n d t he ter i n -t h e r o u n d .

26

S p ec i a l g i fts f o r v a r i o u s b u i l d i n g

M rs. C h a r l es I ng rain of T a coma. I t

A j o i n t st u d i es p rogram i nv o l v i ng the Pa c i f i c L u t h e r a n U n i ve rs i ty D i v i s i o n of N at u ra l S c i e n ces a n d t h e C o l u m b i a U n ive r s i ty S c h o o l o f

T h e b u i l d i n g s t a n d s as a l i v i n g sy m ­

E ng i n ee r i n g a n d A p p l i ed S c i ences

b o l o f t h e l i ves a m i i d e a l s o f t h ose

was a n n o u nced i n F eb ru a ry at P L U .


J

News Notes T h e a n n o u ncement was made

exce l l e nt bac k gr o u n d for med ical

at P L U w i th two years o f grad u ate

j o i n t l y by P L U P resident E u gene

sch ool , Tang i n d icated .

study at C o l u m b i a . A ga i n ,

Wiegman and D r . Wesley H e n nessy ,

Other p rograms i n c l u d e c o m p u t e r

rnenda t i o n b y t h e P L U l i a i son

dean of t h e School of E n g i neer i ng

sc ience, envi ronmental sc ience a nd

o f f i cer a u t o m a t ical l y Q l I a l i f ies a

and A p p l ied S c i ences at C o l u m b i a .

operat i o n s research in add i t i o n to

student fo r acceptance at t h e N ew

D r. H e n nessy v i s i ted t h e P L U

the m o re t rad i t i o n a l eng i neering

Y or k u n iversi ty .

campus t o i n i t i at e t h e p rogram ,

and a p p l ied science d i sc i p l i nes.

k nown as t h e C o m b i ned P l a n . U nd e r t h e new p rogra m , students reco m m ended by P L U w i l l a u to­ m a t i ca l l y q u a l ify f o r adm i ss i o n t o t h e C o l u m b i a U n ivers i ty S c h o o l o f E ng i neer i ng a n d A p p l i e d Sc iences , acco rd i n g to D r. H e n n e ssy .

There a re two separate aspects of the p rogra m , acco rd i n g to H e n nessy

T h e f i rs t i n vo l ves p re - e n g i nee r i n g students o n l y . C a l l ed t h e 3-2 P l a n , a st u d e n t c o m p l etes h i s f i rst th ree

years of the j o i n t p rograrn at P L U a n d then t ran sfers t o C o l u m b i a

S c h o o l o f E n g i n ee r i n g fo r t h e l as t

D r. K . T . T a n g , p r o fes sor of p h y s i cs

t w o yea rs o f p rofess io n a l s t u dy .

at P L U , nego t i ated t h e c u r r e n t

A t t h e e n d of f o u r yeal's he ea r ns

agreem e n t . A cc o rd i n g t o D r . T a n g ,

h i s P L U bach e l o r' s degree, a n d a t

who holds a P h D . from C o l u m b i a,

t h e end of t h e f i fth y e a r , C o l u i ll b i a

the p ro g r a m co mes as t h e resu I t o f

awards e i th e r a bac he l o r' s o r

reCO I ] l

D r . J ef f e rson Y a n g , ass i s t a n t p ro ­ fessor o f e n g i ne e r i n g a t P L U , "v i i i serve a s t h e c a m p u s p r og r a m

l i a i so n of f i ce r . C o l u m b i a n o r m a l l y se l ects o ne i n st i t u t i o n f ro m each reg i o n in t h e U n i ted S t a tes f o r p a rt i c i p a t i o n i n

the C o m b i ned P l a n . O th el' n o r t h ­ west

i n st i t l J t i o n s

c:u rrent l y

parti·

c i pa t i n g a r e R eeel C o l l ege i n O r ego n

a n d Wh i t m a n C o l l eg e i n eas t e r n Was h i n g t o n .

a d i l i be ra te s t rengt h e n i n g o f t h e

m a s t e r ' s el eg ree , depend i n g u p o n

P L U p re-eng i n ee r i n g p rogram

p r o g ra m a n d p e rf o r· m a n ce. S t u d e n t s

P L U O BS E R V A N C E M A R KS

d U I' i n g t h e past t h ree yea rs.

q u a l i fy fo r t h i s p l a n th rough

B L A C K H I STO R Y W E E K

e i th e r a W i t h t h e new re l a t i o n sh i p , P L U

" p h y s i ca l "

or

" c h em

i ca l "

sequence of c o u rses , he added.

A state se n a t o r , reg i o n a l p u b l i c

to t a k e a d v a n tage of t h e rn O l"e t h a n

The sec o n d p rogra m , cal l ed the

ar1'1ong a l a rge g ro u p o f b l ac k

st u d e n t s w i l l have a n o p p o rt u n i ty

30 e rlg i n ee r i n g a ll d a p p l i e d s c i e nce

4-2 P l a n , a p p l ies to a l l q u a l i f i ed

p ro g ra rns ava i l a b l e at C o l u r n b i a.

s t u d en t s , as "ve i l as e n g i n eer i n g

A m o n g t h ese , b i o - e ng i nee r i n g a n d

students.

eng i nee r i n g b i o l ogy p ro v i de a n

fo u r - y e a r u n de rg r a d u a t e p ro g ra m

I t i nvo lves a n o r m a l

off i c i a l s , a rt i s t s a n d e d u c a t o r s vve r e

l ea d er s h i gh I i g h t i n g a sev e n · clay B l a c k H i s tory INeek o bserva nce o n

the Pac i f ic: L u t he ra n U n i versi t y

campus i n F e b r u a ry . T h e observance was spo n sored by

BA N T U , a new organ i/at i o n o n ca l l 1 p u s t h i s year wh i e h o f fers mem­ bers h i p t o the more t ha n 1 60 m i n o r ity students e n ro l l e d at t h e u n ivers i ty . A m ong t h e guests ta k i ng part i n t h e

I-r: Yang, Hennessy , Wiegman, Tang

B l ac k H i s t o ry Week p rograrns were

27


News Notes S t te Sena to r G eorge F l emi ng o f

black, w e en d eav o red to rflake i t a

B u c h a nan is a certified p u b l i c

O l y mpia; Dee B o t l ey , Tar.om

worthwh i l e learn i ng exper i e n ce .

accou n t ant a n d a g r aduate o f t h e

Model C i t i e s h o u s i n g coo r d i nator;

B lack cu l t u re i s mo re t h a n j u st

U n ive r s i ty o f C a l i fo r n i a , B e r k e l ey .

R a v m o nd Bec k l es , h i st o r y instru

s i ng i n g , da nc i ng and ath l et i cs, "

H e has h e l d var i ous posts w i t h the

tor and

COl H

u n it y spec i a l i s t ,

N a t i o n a l Asso c i a t i o n of C ol l ege a n d

Sea t t l e I n du st r i a l Eco n om ic O p­

U n i v e rs i ty B u s i n ess O f f i cers a n d

portu n ity Program; D r. N ol a n

th i s ye a r i s t h e d i recto r of the o r·

E l l iso n , pres iden t o f S eat t l e Ce n t ra l

gan i / a ti on ' s nat i on w i de p rogram of

Com mu n i ty Col lege; Seatt l e C i t y

se m i nars for col lege a n d un iversi ty

Counci l man S a m S m ith; R e v . A . A .

accou n t i n g officers,

Hankerson , Tacoma C ommu n i ty Col lege; L e R o i S m i th , E vergreen

He is a l so sec reta ry of the Western

State C ommu n i ty C ol l ege; Seat t l e

Assoc i at i on of C o l l ege and U n i­

telev i s i on spo r t s cO lll m e n tator

Martin Wy a t t ; and R o ber t F o rd , d i l e 'tor of B l ac k Stu

B l ack H istory Week fash i o n show

ies and U rb n

Affa i rs, U n iversity of Puget S o u n d .

Madua ka, E n g l i sh; C u rt i s Barnes , r t; and R ay m o nd M i l l er , re l i g i on, ,

P L U S I T E OF MAJOR U R BA N BUCHANAN R E SIGNS

P L U l er. tll rers H e l e n A n w u l i

a l so p r tic i a te

a l ong w i t h stu­

dent s F o r rest H udso n , Shei l a

Lowerv , D i ana C ri lll , M ichele E l l i son and J o .A n n R i cha dson. Mov i e s , p l ays , art e x h ib i ts , m u s i c a l

PLANN I N G PROJECT

BUSIN ESS, F I N AN C E POST

A p roject i nte nded to develop A. Dean BlJcha nan , vi ce-p res ident

sou nd l ong-range p l an n i ng and

for busi ness and f i n ance a t P ac i f i c

pol i e ies for P ie rce C o u n ty · Tacom

L u t h e an U n i v e rsit y s i nce 1 96 2 ,

w i l l beg i n t h i s sp r i n g w i th a ser i es

h a s res i g ned h i s po s i t i o n t o accept

of u r ban p o l i c y i n s t i t u tes condu cted

a si m i l r p os t at Ca l i f or n i a L u t h eran

on the Pac i f i c L u theran U n iver s i t y

C o l lege , T h o u s a n d O a k s.

campus,

I n anno u n ci ng accept n ee of t h e

T h e i n s t i t u tes w i l l be con d u cted by

pr senta t i ons and dances were a l so a p r t of t he pmgra rn .

Pu rpose o f t h e obse rva nre , ac­ cord i ng to H l i dson ,

l ack H istory

Wee k co-chairma n , was t o

"

show

resi g n a t i o n , P L U P res i d e n t E u gene

t h e B rook i ngs I ns t i t u t i on of

Wi gl

Wash i ngto n , D . C . , a n d w i l l feat u re

n

state d B u c h a n a n wo l i d

be Ie v i ng P L U a bo u t J u ne 1 .

Dr.

Wiegma n accepted t h e resignat i o n

the expert ise of some of t h e nat i on's most p r or l l i n e n t u rban sc ien t i sts.

g ra t i t de and apprec i t i o n to t h ose

w it h r eg ret , e x pressi n g gratitllcle a n d

great b l ac k Illen an d women who

a n d respect f o r Bucha n n ' s ou t­

B r o o k i ngs is a non · p r o f i t organ i / a ­

were for-e ru n ners o f ou r great B l ac k

stand i n g con t r i b I t i on to P L U ,

t i o n ded icated to e x p l o r i n g new

Du r i n g t h e 1 1 year' s t h at B u cha na n

toge t h e r m , el ach ieve rn u tl al goa l s ,

Her i tage . " We ar

and bet ter ways for peop l e to l ive

e n deavo r i n g to m a ke b l ack

�l llflen t s more se ns i t ive

n

aware

of the i r r i c h he r i tage," the Ta co m a se n i o r ex p l a i n ed .

28

vers i ty Bus i n ess O ff i cers .

"

0 1'

the

non·

has h eaded the bll s i ness a nd f i n ance opera t i o n at P L U , in buil d i n been

s

cld 'd

oV

r

$1G

m i l l i on

a r l d equ i p ment have to

t he P L U cam pu s .

I t serves federa l , state and l ocal gove rn m ents and has spea rheaded effort S in maj o r c i t i es ac ross the country,


News P u r p ose of t h e l o c a l sern i rl a r s is t o

t h e sess i o n s , a p l an f o r a c t i o n w i i l

D i s t i ng u i s h e d C h r i s t i a n L ec t u re

co n f ro n t p u b l i c o f f i c i a l s a n d c i v i c

be deve l o ped a n d p rese n t ed t o tile

S e r i es. O n e of t h e v'io r l cJ ' s 1 I 1 Os t

l ea d e rs w i th t h e rlew k n o w l e dge

publ ie by t h e sem i n a r pa rt i c i pa n ts .

p r o n l i n e n t t h eo i o g i J n s , D r . L o n n i n g

ava i I able f ro m rec e n t u r b a n researc h an d to a cq u a i n t t h e m w i t h way s

otes

to

has w r i tt e n m o re t h a n

F l l tl d s f o r t h e $ l 5 ,000 p r o i ect h ave

20 bo o k s o n

t h eo l o g i c a l a n d c u l t u r a l i ssues a n d

use t h e i r k nowledge i n t h e p o l i c y ­

been so l ic i ted f ro m p r i v a l e SOl l r-ces

i s a f o rmer m em ber o f t h e N O rlNe­

mak i n g pr ocess.

by a co m m i t tee h eJ d ed by J o h n

g i a ll P a r l i a men t .

A ra nl , Wey e r h ae u s e r C o m p a n y v i ce­ C h a i rman of the I tl sti ltJ te p h ase of

p res i d e n t , ;;m el H owa r d S c o t t ,

H e s p o k e t o b o t h d rea pasto rs a n d

the p ro j ec t is P L U P r es i d e n t E u ge n e

p res i d e n t o f U n i ted M u t u al S a v i n gs

st u d e n t s el u r i n g h i s th ree-d ay v i S i t

W iegman .

B a n k a n d a P L U R eg e n t .

to P L U .

H e o u t l i n ed p l a n s f o r

a

se r i e s of 1 0 o ne-day se rn i n ars a l

P L U i n v o l v i n g 8 0 l oc a l p e r-so n s , c a r e

O t h e r mem bers o f t h e p ro i ect

Accord i n g to L o n n i n g , deve l o p ­

ca refu l l y sel e cte d f o r t h e i r c o m m i t­

st er i n g CO tl r n 1 i t tee a r e G o odw i n

r ll e n t s a rKI t r e n d s i n rel i g i o n i n t h e

men t a n d l ea d e r sh i p a b i l i ty.

C h as e , ret i r-ed p resi d e n t a n d c h a i r

U n i t e d States a re s i m i l a r to th ose i n

o t f i c i Cl l s , b us i nessme n , l a b o r l e a d e rs ,

ma n o f t h e bo a r d , P ac i f i c l\J a t i o lla l

N o rway .

educ ato r s a n d r-epres e n t a t i ves o f a

B a n k of Wash i n gto n ; P e t e r Wa l l e r i c h ,

t h e J e su 'i movement a rr l o n g y O U i l g

Public

H e spo k e p a rt i c u l a r l y o f

b r o a d selec t i o n of c i v i c: , serv ice a n d

p r es i de n t of S o u th Tac oma M o t o r

N o rweg i a n s , w h o a r e sea r c h i rlg f o r

spe( : i a ! i n terest g r o u ps w i l l be i n ­

C o m p a n y ; a n d P i erce C o u n t y E x ­

'Nay s to sa t i s fy a h u n g e r i n t h e i r'

v o lved , h e sa i d .

ten s i o n A g e n t F ra n k J a c k so n .

so u l s .

P i erce C o u nty co mm i ss i o ne r s ,

" INe I ive i n a n age wh i c h i s so d o m ­

T h e sem i n ar-s vv i l l be h e l d ev e ry th r ee I;vee k s horn A p r i I th rough O c t o b e r . M uc h of the su bjec t mat ­ te r w i l l be g l ea n ecJ f rom

<I

sa m p l e

su rvey o f Tacom a iheJ c i t i z e n s

T ac o m a ' s m a j O r a n d c i ty ma nager

i n ated b y t ec h n i q u e , b y e f f i c i e n cy ,

a n d other p u b l i c o f f i C i a l s and c i v i c

by t h e q u est f o r p ro f i t , t h ey j u st

l ead e r s t o o k p a r t i rl t h e p ro j ec t

d o n ' t see a ny t h i n g vvo rt h \Nh i l e i n

p re-p l a n n i, rl g .

l i v i n g fo r t h i s , " h e sa i cl . " T h ey have to t u m s o m ew h ere to f i n d

p r i o r to t h e sem i n a r-. A b road

so rn et h i n g vvh i c h i s gr-ea t e n o u g h

spec t ru m of cu r rent a nd fu t u r e i ssues wi l l be dea l t w i th . ec:o nom i c

L E CTU R E S E R I ES F E ATU R E S

dev e l op me n t , governmen l a l ef t i­

NOR W E G I AN BISHOP

rjency , tJX t i o r l , t r an spo r ta t i o n , J o b s , b u s i n ess o p p o rtu n i t i es , a g r i ­

The ro le o f t h e c h u rc h i n b o t h

cu l tu ra l dev e l o p me n t , g rowth ,

N o rway a n d t h e U rl i re d S tates,

soc : i Cl J a r id hea l th se rv i ces, e nv i r o n ­

part i c u l a r l y with rega rds t o y o u n g

m e n t , q ua l i ty o f l i fe a n d o t h er·s.

peo p l e , w a s a n a l YLed at P L U i n J a n u a ry b y a p ro m i n e n t N o rvveg i a n

These i ss u es wi l l be a n a l Y L ed i ll t h e

b i sh o p , D r. P e r L O rlil i n g .

l i g h t o f co mmu n i ty a tt i tu des, a s \;ve l l as the l a test i n u rb an -ru r a l p l an n i n g

n d p o l icy-rn ak i rl g re­

secnch d a t a . ,I"t the co n c l u s i o n o f

D r . L o n n i n g , b i s h o p o f B o rg , F red r-i k sta d , j\l o rWilY , a p pea reel LJ n cier- t h e spo n so rs h i p Df t h e S t a l ey

I - r : La n n i ng , Pres i d e n t E m eritus Ro bert M Q r"tvedt

29


ew Notes a n d dec isive enough to make l i f e

for in t he so-cal l ed F ree W o r l d . "

wo rth I i v i n g . "

he observed.

The c h u r ch i n N o rway is op en to the J esus peo p l e , he i n d i c ated. H e had one concern abo u t t h e Jesu s

eo p l e , a fea r t h a t t h ey m i g h t

sl i p i n t o a k i n d of r i g i d f u ndamen­ t a l isr . : ' T here i s t hat Tendency , "

B is h o p of B o rg s i nce 1 969 , L o n n i n g was Dean of t h e Bergen C at h ed ral f ro m 1 964-69. P r i o r to t h a t t i m e he served in t h e No rvve g i a n Pari iament and as an i n s t ructor at t h e O s l o Teachers' Tra i n i ng C o l lege.

h e sa i d , " b u t so f a r there h a s been so m llch of I i f e and so m u ch o f

Among t h e bo o k s he has a u t h o red

renewal i n t h i s t h a t I have been very

are The Dilemma of Contemporary

happy abo u t i t . "

Theology, H u ma n i t ies Press; Off the Beaten Pa th, Ha rper and Ro w; Pa th­

H e env ied t h e good attendence i n A m e ri c a n c h u rches , b u t i n d i c ated

ways of the Passion a n d The Fourth Candle,Augsbu rg P u b l i s h i n g H o use .

Leakey

that in A m erica the ch u rch p l ays a d i fferent soc i o l o g i c a l ro l e . " The American society is so e x t remely p l u ra l i s t i c , peo p l e need to bel o ng to a se t t i ng t h ey can fee l is t h e i r own . Y o u r c h u rch he l ps serve t h i s Tlee d .

La n n i n g , w h o h o l d s b o t h doctor o f theol ogy a n d doct o r o f p h i l osophy degrees, has served as associ ate ed i t o r of L u t h eran Wo r l d , a s a d e l e­ gate to Wo r l d C o u n c i l of C h u rches assem b l ies in 1 9 54 and 1 968 and as a vi s i t i n g prof ess o r at L u ther Theo­

AN C I E N T MAN TOP I C OF L E A K E Y L E CT U R E AT P L U F o u r m o n t h s ago , 28-yea r -o l d R i c hard L ea k ey was th rust i n to t h e m i d d l e o f t h e wo rl d ' s a rc h eo l o g i c a l spot l ig h t w i t h h i s d i scovery ot a n

"We d o n ' t have a s i rn i l a r need i n

l o g i c a l S e m i n a ry , S t . Pau l , M i n n . ,

anc i e n t h u m an s k u l l be l i eved t o be

Sca n d i nav i a , " h e added . A l t h o u gh

and L u t her C o l lege, Deco rah , l a .

more t h a n 2 . 5 m i l l io n yeClrs o l cJ .

of ten i nvol ved i n v Cl r i o u s m i ss i o nary

L o n n i n g was the seco nd sch o l a r to

v i s i ted the Pac i f i c L u t h eran U n iver­

soc i e t i es and in other forms o t pa­

appea r at P L U t h i s yea r u nder the

s i ty campus to d i scuss h i s work in

rish a c t i v i ty , he i n d i ca te d .

spo nsorsh i p of the Sta l ey Lectu re

t h e Lake R u d o l p h reg i o n of Ken y a ,

many S c a n d i n a v i a n s may not a t tend E a r l y i n M a rch t h e y o u n g ex p l o rer

regu l a r c h u rch serv ices, t h ey are

30

Series . The se ries, a p roj ect o f the

East A f r i c a , a n d t o lec t u re o n

He was saddened b y what he des­

S t a l ey F o u n d a t i o n o f N ew Yo rk ,

" M a n 's A f r ican H e r i tage . "

cr i bed as the ef fect of t h e wa r i n

was establ i shed at P L U in 1 969.

V i etnam o n you ng people a l l over

F o u n d a t i o n p ro j ects a re based on

Leakey i s t h e so n of t h e l ate L o u is

the wo r l d . " I t h as res u l t ed in a

the convict i o n that the m essage of

S . B . Leakey , wh o , with h i s w i fe

general skept i c i s m a m o n g y o u n g

t h e C h r i s t i a n Go spel , p ro c l a i med i n

Mary , c o m p r i sed one of the wo r l d ' s

peo p l e n o t o n l y regard i n g t h e

its h i sto r i c f u l l ness , i s a l way s rele­

most h i g h l y respected a n t h ropo­

U n i t ed States b u t aga i n st demo­

va n t and mea n i n g f u l to a ny

l o g i ca l tea m s u n t i l the e l d er

cra t i c va l u es wh ich we say we stand

ge n e ra t i o n .

Lea k ey ' s death last October.


News Notes r q o re t h a n 2 . 5 m i l l i o n yea rs.

A c c o rci i n g to Lea key . the sk u l l ' s

G o v i g , spent 21 d ay s in K e n y a

b r a i n ca p aci ty was much l a rge r

TClnLan ia s tu d y i ng gover n rne n t s ,

than t h a t of o t h e r early s p ec i nl en s

ed u c at i o n Cl I i rl st i tu t i o n s , h o s p i t a l

-

A . Dea n B u c h a n a n a n d D r . S tewar't

L ou i s Lea key fou nd fossi l rerna i n s , a l so i n E ast A f r i c a , of a two l i l l i o n y e a r o l d creatu re t h a t h e na rned H O l n o H a b i l is in the bel i e f it was t h e f i rst t o o l ma k i n g a n cesto r of rn od e r n ma n .

nd

a n d i t s sh a p e " i s re r n a r k a b l y rem i ­

a n d rned i c a l f o c i I i t ies, c o rn m u n i ca­

n i sc e n t of rnodern m a n . "

t i o n s m ed i a and e h u r'eh o rga n i z a ­ tions.

T h e e l d e r Lea k ey ' s e x p l o rat i o n s

T h i g h <:lilel l ower l e g bones, L ea key

were c o n d ucted over rn a n y y ea r s i n

sa i d , a re p ra ct i ca l l y i n d i s t i n g u i s h ­

O l d u v a i G o r'ge i n Tanza n i a , 500

a b l e f r o m the s a m e bo nes of

rn i l es sou t h of the w i n dswept

modern rn a n .

desert east of Lake R u d o l p h w h e r'e h i s son now wo r k s ,

An i n dependent , restless y o u n g ma n , Lea k ey ex p l a i ned t h at h e h a d

Lou i s Leakey 's f i n d s , if acc p led at h i s eva l u a t i o n of them , p u s h e d back t h e o r i g i n of modern m a n , H o m o S a p i e n s , by a m i l l i o n yea rs. R ic h a rd Leakey ' s s k u l l adds a n o t h e r h a l f m i l l i o n y e a rs t o H o m o ' s age,

P L U ' s n oted y o u n g v i s i to r , w h o c u r r e n t l y se rves a s a d m i n i st ra t i ve

t r ied several a d vent u ro u s vocat ions,

safari g u i de and b i g game h u n t e r among o t h e r s , before be i n g u l t i ­ Inatel y I u red b y preh i sto r y a s h i s p ar e n ts "ve re . B u t h e l ac k s acad m i c creden t i a l s f o r s c ie n t i f i c resea rc h . " I have to t u r n t h e

go o d i es over to t h e P h D . ' s , " h e q u i pped .

B u c h a n a n , v i ce-p resident for b u s i ­

n e ss a n d f i n a n c e at P L U , served as bu s i ne ss manager for the L u th e r a n C h u rch in Tanzan ia f rom 1 9 58-62. D r. G o v i g , p rofessor of rel igion , has t rClveled exte nsi ve l y i n that part of the w o r l d ,

In add i t i o n to t h e i r ed ucCl t i o n a l efforts, t h e g ro u p s spent severa l wee k s p r i o r to t h e J o u r n ey co l l e c t i ng foo d a n d c l o th i n g t o be d i st r i bu ted t h ro u g h m i ss i o n sta t i o n s i n b o t h cou n t r i e s .

E ng l i sh p ro fesso r' D r. Dan V a n Tassel l ed a s i m i l a r g r o u p o f

d i rector o f t h e N at i o n a l M u seurn o f Keny a , desc r i bed h i s s k u l l f i n d a n d

TRAV E L , R ESEARCH , D R AM A

stu d e n ts o n a to u r l abeled L i t e ra ry

l eg bo nes fou n d ne a rby .

AMO N G I N T E R I M H I G H L I GHTS

H au nts of the B r i t i s h I s les.

F o re i g n to u r s a stage prod u c t i o n

tend was to g ive students a grasp of the sweep of B r i t ish l i teratu re, i ts o r i g i n s a n d back g ro u n ds.

"

P r e l i rn i n a ry compar iso ns w i t h

,

o t h e r evidence i n d i ca t e , " h e sa i d ,

a n d sev e ral com m u n i ty stu d i es were

" th a t t h e new ma ter i a l wi I I t a k e a

arno ng the rnany h igh I i g h ts of

central p l ace in t h e re t h i n k i ng a n d

Pac i f i c Luth ran U n ivers i ty ' s fourth

re-eva l uat i o n of t h e ev i d ence for t h e o r i g i n of homo sa p i e n s . "

annual J a n u ary i n ter i m . M o re t h a n 1 ,600 s t u d e n t s we re e n r o l l e d i n over 1 20 i n n ova t i v e cou rses, wh i c h we r e co nd ucted J a n . 3-30.

Lea key and h i s e x ped i t i o n asso c i a t e ,

H is i n

" T h e even ts, p henomena and f o l k ­ l o re freq u e n t l y a l l u d ed to by B r i t i s h wri ters is e n h a nced by v i s i t i n g a u ­ thentic set t i n g s , h e sa i d . "

'

O n c a rn p u s , P L U t h esp i a n s p repared

D r . G l y n n I saac , a n a n t h ro p o l o g i s t f ro rn t h e U n i v e r s i ty of C a l i f o r n i a

A n i n tens i ve o n - t h e-scene study of

for Cln a m b i t i ol l s r'epel'tory ser i es

at Be r k e l ey , p i eced toget h e r a

l i fe i ll the Th i rd 1N 0 r l d , as seen i n

f eat u r i n g t h e w i n so me m u s i c a l ,

co m ­

­

p l et e s k u I I o f a n c i e n t ma n f r o m

deve l op i n g E ast A t r' i c a n n a t i o n s ,

" Y o u ' re A G oo d Man , C h a r l ie

f r ag m e n ts fou nd in foss i l depos i t s

was u n dertak e n by 20 P L U students.

B r ow n " . t h e P u l i tL e r P r i ze-w i n n i n g

dated , a l o n g w i t h sto n e to o l s , at

The grou p , u n d e r t h e l ea der s h i p of

" E f f ec t of G Cl rn m a R ay s o n Ma n - i n -

31


News Notes the - M oo n M a r i o l d s" a r i d " A n

S U M M E R S E SS I O N S F E AT U R E

The en e rgy cr i s i s i n t he U n i ted

E ven i n g o f Dance" .

N EW C O U R S E S, W O R K SH O PS

S tates was th

T h e " C ha r l it.: t hoI'm

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to R osehu l g , O r c . , t o p r ev i ew i ts ,

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to J u l y 1 8 m , el fralJl J u l y 1

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Aug ust 1 7 _

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m('l ste r s de ree o r t i t t h

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DOll g l as i n S o ! t I e and S t o c k h o l m ,

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I l u mber of

cOllrses dod p r ivate Il:sso n s are

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1;011 -

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and can oe t r i p in a d it l o n

p roj ec ts.

to i ts mgu l d l co urse� _

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es .

He p red i c t ed t rw t t h e c r i s i s w i l l Jf:lad 1 0 r. : h iJ l lg i n g l i f<c s t y l e s I n A l l er iL cJ

oS

m i l i t a ry

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for M ar r i dge , B oel y L a n g l J elge , IN

r

ncl M o ra l i t y , N at u ra l Se lec l io n i n H urn a n Popll l i , t i o r l , I n d i a n s , N o r se

M y t h o l ogy , Popu l isill , L iv l n g C h l i l c h C h u r : h M us i c , 2l 1 ltl lJll cl lne n ' s S t u d i es . A un i que add i t i o n t o t h e i n ter i m ex perience I,V3S

a

istt y " f o r l " i e r gy a r l e!

CO in i n g Sl llTlI1l C r ilt P L U .

T h e H i s t o ry Dep ar t me n t i s o f f e r i ng seve r a l a l l ·'l f te rnoo n wo r k s h o p s 'l nd

T h e ser l l i n a rs , (Jedr '

re gl I r cQur5e5.

I ncreaseu e f fe t i v e n \i os a n d s h (-l r ncnect sh l l s ,

Th

Sl. l Il1ne r sessi on e X I er i e n l C

( ijrl

t o deve l o p i l l g new

an d

be o f bene f i t

to fJ s t a r s , chapl i n s , y Oll r h ,lrld

re t lect s () ba lance of eriuc8 t i an- 1

C h r i B t i a n edUcat i o n d i recto r s, pal ish

amI recrea t i o nal ar:t i v i l les . I t is al so

wo r k e r s an

speL i al eve n ts tal k s , sem i n r s, va r k ·

inno v l i ve , e X IJi:lI in e n w l :O u 'seS

sho ps, l on :erts , p l oys <Jnd d iSC U S­

COy r i n g

n o g r arlE'_s , no cl asses;

111e nt o f M i

l ay per so ns.

a ti n e when thc fac I I t y l:ClI o'if:lr

ser ies o f 40

, x rJer ien( i al v i g r1et tes.

1\ ser ies of "Sur n in - rs f o r c nr i t h I c i t y i s 1, l a n ne(j ag i n f o r t h i s

C Oll rses a l so i n t l u cted P r epa rat i o n

j u st

.. 1

por ary issu

broad ! ngtl 0 1 ,5

ont 'l1I

n el perSr(; l iVes.

r h ey dea l t

" I r liprllved I n ter iJer s o r l <-J 1

t i ve np ss , on i o ll

"

an

I fe<.. ­

fo ,us i ng on cO l nll1ll l l i g roll, I' ro ess sk i l l s , w ; 1 I

L� h . ' 1 I J . I I y 9- 1 3 . T h e 111I rniJ il s irl�;

V Ll h evnrv t h i ng f r o l l l ,:, 1 1 I i g l's p h y t o

M o re I n t o r rnalion reg'lrd l ng su m mer

( I f t he G o spJ w i l l be dua l t \i,-, i t ll

IJ r i d gc l ess o n s a n d baL k

schoo l may be: o bta i ned by wr i t i n g

duri n g sess i o l l s en t i l l arl " T il u o l o9V

t h e Dean of S u rnn ," r Sess i o n s , P L U

T oe l y

i ns t ru( l io n .

32

r ri O r l! t h a r l i t p rodu

l a n s 1 2 wo r k _ h o s

i n g r l ou o ta i l leeri ng ,

! la�k i ng ,

-

t h i l d of t il e

o f fe red th rol h the M u s i l:. Dell r t ­

dllcted _l u r i n g t h e m O f l t h as i l l t e r i li l

sions

-

Illen t , and the Sf hool o f P h yS i cal

I t was one of sel.'e r a l rl1ea n i r lgf u l ley s

0 11

ea rt h ' s energy f u e l s and i rn por-ts

week

S

111 ,

of E rt h S r- i c nces, D r . Y O l l ngqll ist

in T

a f le r s i l i l i l ar s tud i es heade

wh ich wa s

Sess iorls w i l l r U I l f ro m J u ne 1 8

t owa r el env i r o l l lT1enta l p r o ! l l P r l l S IS

O r egon

D lJ r i n g t h e p r o g r

47 CO IJ r se s , pr i m a r i l y t o r tear 'hers

a t t i tu des

(O l l ia . T he stu dy

a ll

s p o n so red by the P L U 0 pa r t men t

Tile S c h o o l o t E d \ Icat i o ll o f fe r s

T h e su r vey , co nduc ted J a n . [3- 2 4 , -

D r . Wa l t e r Y o u n gq ( l i s t , geo l og i s t .

five n i l l i o f l ga l l o ns of o i l

illl rnod i ate fu t u re.

i n v sl l \jiJ ted pu lJ l i

lecture

U n i ver S i t y ci lJ r i n g S u m me r SeSSIO r ]

p ro tesso r D r_ Donald D o u g l as a r c d ue i n th

-

eb r u a r y I lY

Seven t y t h r ee .

fJl 1V l rO f lrnen l I a t t i t ueJ es , co n du t,; ted hy an 1i1terjffl c l

0

be o f ferecJ ill P ac i f ic L u tll E'r a n

per f u l man ses on t h e P LU stage. R esu l t s of

Near l y 2 0 0 eOu r . sem i llars

i J l odu t i o r l l ead i l l g up to five

topic

/ J rescr 1 ted at P L U in

rn

ssage

Be i ll g H lI l l l Cl I l , " J u l y Hi 2 0 .


University Notebook " I mproved Parish E f fec t i v eness:

sacred and c l assical wo r k s as we l l

The c o n ference, h e l d in conj u n c t i o n

f\lew M o d e l s for M i ssi o n ," a l so

a s a u n i q u e spec i a l presentat i o n

w i t h an i n teri m cou rse i n w o m e n ' s

J u l y 16- 20, co n s i d e rs sou nd p r i n­

e n t i t l ed " S ou nds o f C L e . "

stud ies, was des i g ned t o p rese n t A m erican med i a rea l i t i es in the con­

c i p l e s of organ i L a t i o n a l m a nage m e n t .

The S h o re l i n e C o m m u n i ty C o l l ege

tex t of wo m e n ' s p o l i t i c al , em p l o y­

The w o r k s h o p s a re spo n so red by

C h o i r and Ch a m b e r E n se m b l e a n d

m e n t a n d edllcat ional c o n cerns.

the P L U C H O I C E Center.

the S en t i ne l H i g h S c h o o l Cho i r of M isso u l a , M o n t . , both presented outsta n d i n g concerts d u r i n g F e b r u a ry .

A V ietna mese C u l t u re N i g h t was

named ed i to r of the P L U student

pr esen ted at P L U in F e bruary by

nevI/s paper, The M o o r i n g M a s t , for

a n o r gan izat i o n cal led V i etn amese i n the U .S .

E a r t h i s b e i n g v i s ited regu l ar l y by

P u r-pose o f t h e p rogram was to ac­

ter·rest r i a l ve h i c l e s , accord i n g to

q a i n t students and t he p u b l i c w i t h

S t a n t o n T. F r i e d m a n , a n u c l ear

v a r i o u s as pe c t s o f V i etnamese c u l ­

p h y s i c i s t f ro(n R ed o n d o B e a c h ,

tu re . I t i n c l u d ed fo l k s o n g s a n d

C a l i fo r n i a .

i n te l l igen t l y co n t ro l l ed e x t ra­

poe ms re l a t i ng to V ietna mese h i st o ry , way of l i fe, soc i e t a l roles d

F r ie dm a n , who has spent the past

a n d the ce n t l l ries-o l d struggle for

1 3 years i n vest igat i n g and a n a l y z ing

i ndependence.

U F O repolis f ro m a l l ove r the "v o r l d

wo r l d , p resented a n i l l u s t rated The perfor mers po r t r a yed a cou ntry

lectu re on t h e su bj ect at P L U i n

that is a ill o ng t h e o l des t of mak­

F ebr u a ry . -

k i nd s c i v i l i L a t i o n s , wi t h l egends

re f l ect i n g the s p i r i t o f u n i ty and

O n e of 1 2 sc i e nt ists co n t r i b u t i n g to

re s i l i en ce of the peo p l e in defe nce

the S c i en t i fi c S y m p o s i u m on U F Os

of the l a n d a ga i n s t both n at u ra l

conve ned by the U .S . C o n gress five

forces a n d fore i g n i n v aders.

D u ane Lar-son of San D i e go , C a l i f . , a so p h o m o re at P L U , h as been

the c o m i ng y ea r

.

L a rso n , vv ho served as w o r l d news ed i t o r of the iVl ast d u r i n g t h e 19 72 fa l l sernester, wi l l ed it th e news­ paper d u r i ng both s p r i ng and fal l se me s te rs of 1 97 3 . A p h i l o soph y rn a j o r and h o n ors

student at P L U , L a rs o n i s a

g radu ate of C l a i r-em o n t H i gh S c h o o l in San D i ego . F o l l owing g rad u at i o n

,

L a rson pl a n s 10 p u rsue

g r a d u a t e work in ph i l osophy and t he o l o g y .

yea r s d g O , F r i ed m a n h a s s i n c e g iv e n h u n d reds o f lectu res to co l l ege a n d p r o f ess i o n a l a u d iences i n the U . S .

and C a nada.

The P L U c a m p u s was host to t h ree o u t sta n d i n g c h o ra l g ro u p s d u r i n g

t h e ea r l y p rt of 19 7 3 . Top women j o u rna l i sts from the

I n J a n u ary t h e C a l i f o rn i a Luth era n

Puget S o u n d a rea "vere featu red

C o l l ege co ncert c h o i r presented a

spea k ers d u r i n g a n al l - day co nf er­

vers ati le p rogram t h a t i n c l uded

ence at P L U in J a n u a ry .

,

33


University Notebook 1)

The a n n u a l C h r ist mas Fest ival C o n cert

Co ncert at P L U feat ured t h e C h o i r of t h e We s t , U n i v e rs i t y S y m p h o n y O rc h e s 足 t ra , U n ivers i t y C h o ra l e a n d U n ivers i t y i n a m o v i n g per f o r m a n ce o f R a l p h

S i nge rs

V a u g h il n W i l l i a ms ' C h r i s t mas c a n t a t a , "This Day ( Hodiel . "

2)

C o n n i e J o h ns o n o f W e n a t c h e e , Wash . ,

a P L U soph o m o re , was s e l e c t ed a s P L U ' s

1 97 2

L u c i a B r i de . M i s s J o h n s o n i s

majori ng in n u r s i n g .

3)

A c o l l ec t i o n o f r a r e vo l u mes o n t h e

E n g l i s h poet S h e l l ey were presen t e d t o P L U rec e n t l y by Pay n e

T ac o m a

f i n a nc i e r .

( T o ny l

K e l l o gg ,

F r o m l e f t , K e l l o gg ,

h i s s o n C h a s e , a n d E n g l i s h p r o f esso rs

D r . L uc i l l e J o h n so n a n d D r . Pa u l

R e i g s t ad

4)

.

A m o ng t h e e n t e rt a i nm e n t at t rac足

[ j u n, at P L U t h is wi n t e r were jazz p i a n i st

R a m se y

Lewis a n d pop s i nger

Jack ie DeS h a n n o n .

5)

S i xt y - f ive P L U

s o p h o mo r e

n ursing

s t u d e n t s rec e i v ed t h e i r caps d u r i ng t h e P L U Sc h o o l o f

N u rs i n g ' s

a ll fl u a l n u rs e s '

capp i n g c e r e mo ny i n F e b ru a ry .

B i o 1 0 9 1/

p r o f e ss o r D r . R u t h So rel1so l1 was t h e fea t u red spea k e r .

6) One of

t h e m o s t a m b i t i o u s st age

ef f o r t s ever at P L U i n vo lved

11

performances o f t h ree repertory p r o 足

duct i o n s during J a n ua ry

a nd F eb rua ry .

Fea t u red w e re t h e m u s i cal , " Yo u ' re a G oo d M a n , C h a r l i e B ro w n , " t h e Pu l i t z e r P r i z e - w i n n i n g dra m a , " E f f ec t s

of G a m l11il R il Y S o n M a n - i n - t h e - M o o n

Mar igo l ds , "

a n d " A n E ve n i n g o f D a n ce . "

T h e m u s i c u nci d rama d e p a r t m e n t s a nd the

m o d e r n dance

progru m s .

34

c l ass p r e s e n t e d t h e


Un路versity Notebook 7)

George H . Wey e r haeuser, f o r egr o u n d ,

pres i d e n t o f W e y e r h a e u s e r C o m pa n y , w a s r e c e n t l y i n d u c t ed as a ll h o n o r a r y member o f t h e PLU chapter o f Beta G a m m a S ig m a , n a t i o n a l b u s i n e ss hono ra r y soc i e t y .

The day of t h e i n d u c 路

t i o n Wey e r h a e u s e r h o s ted a l u nc h e o n f o r c h a p t e r members a t t h e new W e y e r 路 h a e u s e r headquar t e rs b u i l d i n g n e a r Tacoma a n d d i scussed p r o b l e m s of t h e forest products i n d u s t r y .

8)

P h i l l i p M i ner, P L U a d m i s s i o n s c o u n 路

se l o r , a d m i r es t h e O l y m p ic G o l d M e d a l w O r n b y Ta c o m a ' s R a y S e a l e s , t h e o n l y U . S . b o x e r t o w i n a go l d d u r i n g l ast year's O l y m p i c G a mes i n M u n i c h .

Sea l es

v i s ited t h e c m p u s to t a l k w i t h s t u d e n t s a nd to r e f e r e e a n a m a t u e r r m g match . Loo k i n g on is P L U m i nor i t y a f f a i rs coo r d i n a t o r H a ro l d G a m b l e .

9) A

K B e l ectro n i c m u s i c s y n t h e s i z e r

w a s rece n t l y a c q u i red by t h e P L U Depa r t m e n t o f M u s i c .

I n t e n d ed

f o r use

i n prod u c t i o n of e l ect ron i c so u n d , i n C l U d i n g so u n ds o f ex i s t i ng i n s t r u m e n t s , t h e s y n t hesizer w i l l

be

used by s t u d e n t s

i n s t u d i o compos i t io n wo r k .

I t was

f i r st p l ayed p u b l i c l y d u r i ng p e r f o r m a n c e s of " T h e B rave L i t t l e T a i l o r " b y t h e P L U C h i l d r e n ' s The a t re t h i s spri n g .

35


University Sports MAR K SALZMAN, FOR M E R

I II al i li o l i n c i l i g S a l / m a il ' S ret l rell1€ n t

years . The y a i so

ATH L E T I C D I R E CTOR , D I ES

i n 1 9 G 8 , t h e n P L U P resi den t D r .

sevent h na t lO ! l d l l y pr i O r to

R ober t Ma r t veti t ca l l ed M a r k ' s

nat io n cJ 1 meet , and l oal h G ary

hB

H . M rk S a l / l ll i'l n , f o r me r P LU

serv ice " o t te n hey o n d t h p ca l l 11 f

C h <-se I B l t h i s SW II ,1i'1er $ h eld

liT h l e t i(' d i r-ec to r fi n d d i rer.to i o f

du ty . " P L. U s i n e

chanrp. to I

ph Y S ica l or/Lie l io n , d i ed N ov. 3 0 ,

awa r ci i n h i s h o n O l , to l ie p I"escn ted

1 972 , i ll Tdco ma f o l l o w i n g

an il ija l l y ( 0 persons Il l a k ln g o u t ·

ex Lenile(j

an

h a s n a lTle�i

an

'

st ilnd i r l g co n t r i lJut i o (ls to t l ark an r J

I l l ness .

f i l �l d i n t h e T l:o rn a

c H ea .

d i rec to r to r 1 1 year s and

a

No

Marj or ie ,

t o r 1 7 yea r s un t i l disabl i n g i l l n ess

Pet e r F n l k ) of Seat t l e ,

A tl ip ro tho ll at i o n ;] 1 I l leo t tm 1 1

P l U 5w i rTl I I lt:

SO i l

fo rced h i s r et i remen t In the s p r i ng

h i s p3 n : n t s , t h ret! s i stel s and bro t h r .

C el r

l ie ti

S

I

l.

O i l t hf' b a ske r iJa l l , O l li l

an d r h y s ic al e d u ccl1 io 1 p ro ra i l'

sea so n P' 1 111" t

I t was I l nde r h i s rl i l ee-

in h i st o ry .

Ie ted

LUTE CAG E RS, SW I MM E R S

bo t h n o pe iJnci d l sp il i r . I tO llI ' r

p l dY , th

'J)(e

a woefu I 1 7

r nC H

r Ll l l i , o ne o f the f i n est at h l et ic

bot h apparen t

p l a n ts of i ts t y p e in the n a t i on .

U n ive rs i t y wlo te t he f i n i sh i n g

co n fere nr"e Cl n(i 7

t:h ap te r s to it

h i h hopes at w i nn i n

nd

ead t rack coach

s

Pac I t rc l u theran

1 9 7 2 73 wi

er

sp o r ts SCilSO r l .

. e ac h , .lIld

I

oo rdi na teeJ t h e sch oo l ' s

br o u g h t I �Sl l rgerll-t:l ami ,i I t h re f.e l l d

of r h e month P L U

T he l e the

!

W nS

1 ill the

o ve r I I ,

'.

i th

both the

S tr i lJ l llp h i n t h e fa I t h a i

utes ha

l eeo rdecJ l o nfere nu�

T he i l C<lll le ro

On the o t her h a n d , the

cl

d i 'iCl5lern l s tJastel ll

d t r i p , cl lE!al1l bOl l t w i th t he f i r

SiJ l l inan roached t h ree I laT i o n a i

bask etbCl l 1 .

t r ack charnf'l io n s w h o w o n e i ght

f i n I season baskelba l l n)ark o f

t i l l es , and was nd11led N A I A D i st r ict

1 0 V il to nes a l l d l b losses l l r o ke

I T r d! k e Oadl of t h e Year i n 1 96 5 .

st r i n g 0 1 25 s t r a ig h t IN i r l i t i n g vea r s

WU I l!

[ I e was h o no l"ed [ ) y t h e N A i l". f O I

fo r P L U f:ageJ S,

d l ed r ' ls of

n

p re-

stra l glll Wi n n i ng y ed r .

I :hal l i p i o n s rl i ps in sw i l l I l l i ng ami

h i s se rv ices t o t he

J1

loop t i t l e and ach iev i l1g a 26th

, sis tant '3s ketbal l a mi foot!) I I

i n l rarflLl rc I p r og r a l l i .

'lIJas d

k . B iJ t J illl t l i'lIY

T r l lJ ll1p h iJ llU U is3ppO l nl ll1Cnl

we r e

t

Ll l te� l o r n p r led

the r O llst l uct i on o f O l so n A ud i to (

He d l so se ved as

I

liv pc r i oris o t

W I N CON F E R E N C E T I T LE S

I i o n that p l a ns were deve l oped t O I

e i ther

200 l a p s , w h l ' hever

Ou r 1 11 9 h i s tenure P L U 's a t h let i c

showed pr obdb l y i t s g reate s t g r-owt h

reo

spon sors f o r r h o even t , w h i c h

t vo h O Il

a

a

S t l cl o n t s, f aud y ail J

wh i r h i nvo lved Sw i l l 1l11 i n

Mark ,

ot 1 Q 6 fl .

the I l Io" t ever , was

le r n bel S 0 f the 51/\ j ll I tealll

cru r te

d l i g h t e r C h e ry l ( M rs .

S,

f i nan ed to . 1 great e x len ( by r

S 1 / 111 i 1 I S s l l r v i ved by h i s w i te ,

m8rrrber of t h r. P L U coach i n g s 1 a f f

c]

Ish e en h Ig hm

I II

svv i lll-a t h o l l

Sa1 / 111. n , 50, ser ver l as a l h l e l i

wll i h a l so fe l lecj [ o d c h G ene L mligaafri , i:md

a

i nJ u f les .

t he

J

I O LJIJ I ,� o i k ey

r ive l osses (8S' i CJ

51 X O U t l l l �JS

1 11

l t . G on!.'

we re

the

w i n i l ln g SeClSO I I .

t i o n a l srna l l­

co l l ege a t h l et iC bo y w h i c h i ll c l u d ed

P L U aq u Clrne n (.Q n t i l1 ued t he i r

Bu t

i ncl u deci se r v i n g 1 h r ee Te r m s

dOn1 Jil a nce i n b o t h con fe ren ce an

wer e

110 t h west N A I A

ilnd l. l n f le l d C o l lege for t he r l t l e

D i s t r i l I I ch a i rnl a n . H e Jlleili ber

36

f iJ l1 k Hd

v tJ/tJ

0

,;vas

as

also a

f t h e b arrJ of d i r ec t o rs

w i n l l i n g 1 6 0 1 1 f:l

SW I I 1 1 1 1 1 I1g

,

W il t s i n t h e

fer , Ill

III

sp i tt'! o f t he sl u m p , t h e L d es hie

wi h a n 8-

to l ie Pil\. i t r c '

l ' O l lfere nce record , as

o f t h e Tac o m a-P i .r .8 C O , Hl t y

P L U tlostetl

e t for

a l l e i g h t ti'!alllS f l n r s he

R ecreat i o n FecJera t io l l .

tfie i r 1 1, i r d ch Cl l np io fish i lJ i l l tOl l r

9 I es 0 1 o ne a n n her .

III

U n i ers i ty " 1 1eI

W i t h i n two


f

In sell ''''Ivsi�, ......e investigate 01,1. st" nglhs and redoubl" 01,1, elforn. Pro",!• .uuc�ion's IInlllest strength lies ill Ihe filet it is wpaJale. Being .lipart from Ihe public:: syl{ems It enjoys He,"­ bllll.,. and independ�nee. Private colleges .nd ulllver�'liei IfI! more th"n just free to experiment, they mll1l ''''perimam in order to survive.

The benefIts of prlvatf! educ<lI,on 'f' not narrow and parOChIal, but <1�lend beVDnd Ihe campus 10 prOVide !oI!rv,CII'l to the t01il1 SOCIO.lty

Thlle benefits dIlI,"e our

purpose and dIrect OUr paths for SUfVIWIII And so, my "�,ends, you Cilll rev thu1 Ihe chall1r'l!ill' 10 privale high'r education fOrt:I' us 10 identify and pur!Oue our 11.englh5 Ii our means of survival. We !""8eO\lnize thl strength of our way ol lifa is found in our dlvormy. and pr<marilv tn our \\uderns, I'\dminislrlt,on, f<leu!!.,.. boiI.d and YOU

We .'so .<!Cognize we

mu" begin lOCI...... bolh publIC and privatll l8Clon, t";lIinIlIO dellelop this nation'l lI,eatest "1$11t-Ine human n· .aurce. Only Ihrough ou, actIon, will our h\lflUI!Je ,,"d future b. auured.



Reflections 1973 march