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Table of Contents

American Society: Melting Pot or Mosaic?

.

.

.

.

.. 2

Education: An American Caste System? . 9 "I Never Saw Color". . PACIFIC V OLUME

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.

. ... .14

LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY III

MARCH 197 2

No.2

Published six times annually by Pacific Lutheran University. P.O. Box 2068. Tacoma, Washington, 98447. Second class postage paid at T acoma, Washington.

100 Days in the Wilderness.

.16

The Generations: An Age of Confrontation.

.24

EDIT ORIAL B OARD Dr. Eugene Wiegman .....President Rev.Milton Nesvig Asst.to the President for Church Relations and Publications Rev.Harvey Neufeld ...... Director Alumni Relations Clayton Peterson

.. . .Vice-President Development James l. Peterson .......... Editor Roger Gruss ......Associate Editor Kenneth Dunmire Paul R. Kusche ...Staff Photographers O.K.De vin Theodore Leonhardt 0 K. Devin, Inc. Graphics Design .

.

Contributors: Dr. Stewart Govig, asso足 ciate professor of religion; Dr. James Halseth, assistant professor of history; Dr.Ronald Jorgenson, assistant profes足 sor of education; John Hushagen, PLU junior, New World House participants.

A View of God Behind Bars.

.

26

News Notes ..........

.30

University Notebook.

.34

Sports . . .... ....... ... ..36 .

.

.

.

.


American Society: Melting Pot or Mosaic? By James Halseth

When most of u s t h i nk about American society at a l l ,

The idea of the melting pot has had a remarkab ly

we d o

durable h istory . It was H ector St. John de Crevecoe ur

so aga i n st the backg rou nd o f o u r early

ex periences

2

w ith

American

grammar

school

i n 1782 who fi rst advanced that v i ew of Ame r ican

textbooks. We reca l l that Europeans comi n g to the

soci ety , crea t i n g in the p rocess a n a t i o n a l mythology.

New Wo r l d h ad a l l their anc ient hab its mod ified by

I n America " i nd iv id u a l s of a l l nations are melted into

an Ameri can frontier. O u t of th is ex perience, we have

a new race of men

been taugh t, there grew a common set of attitu des,

who

idea l s and accepted behavior wh ich , take n together,

involuntar i l y swel l s a n d g lows; th i s f irst swell i n sp ires

expl ai n the Ame r i ca n

h im wi th those new thoughts wh ich const i t u te an

national

cha racte r.

Diverse

acts

u pon

peop l es were homogenized as Amer ica became a

American".

"me l t i ng pot".

qu a l i f ications.

. the American is a new ma n ,

new

p r i n c i p l es

.

.

H is heart

But C revecoel'Jr added a few n ecessary His

newly

d i scovered

creature " is


either a European, or the descendant of a 'European."

Crevecoeur was writing about Americans found in what was then the West. George Washington, as much as

he

desired

national

unity

at the ti me of his

succession to the presidency, saw the peo pie of the American frontier, Crevecoeur's "new race of men", as "an uncouth set of people, a parcel of barbarians". Some may think it a shame that the father of the co untry

did

not

appreciate the products

of the

melting pot. But Wash ington may have been right. Symbolic Ideal The myth of the melting pot has not served the nation well. As a symbolic ideal it has frequently

"The myth of the melting pot

enraged those elements in the population that do

has frequently enraged those elements

not melt. The racial cleavages of the 1960's are only the most obvious indications of the failure to evolve

in the population that do not melt.

"

â&#x20AC;˘

any kind of social harmony on the basis of cultural homogeneity.

I n its worst form the myth of the

melting pot has served as a culturally destructive force. I n customary social practice, it has tended to blur or discard the cultural and ethnic attributes of significant groups in a heterogenous population. As a conseq uence,

definitions

of

Amer i can

nationality

have freq uently been negative. Some deluded citizens have wanted to identify that which is not American and such impulses have ordinarily issued from the meltin9' pot as a symbolio construct of nationhood. At various times in the nation's history the Irishman, the Southern or Eastern European, or the Catholic, the

Jew

or

the

Ideologue

have been

defined as

"un-American". The Congress of the United States designates a com mittee

4

to search out

additional

â&#x20AC;˘


"un-Americans".

H ow

many

people

have

felt

constrained to abandon culturally enriching hab its of thought and behav ior and the ties of language and trad i t i on in an effort to conform w i th the styles of a homogenized soc iety , exempl i f ied by Wonder Bread and the Pepsi generation?

it seems to suggest a kind of egal itarianism attractive in

count ry

a

w i th

dem ocrat ic

i m pulses,

Some

contem porary tendencies, however, suggest that the

with one another and soc i a l fragmentation looms as a

The melting pot as a descr i pt ion of social reality i n U .S.

The melting pot as a col lective goal seems adm i rable;

nation i s spl intering as groups l ive iI'), wary tension

Social Reality

the

Gauged by Color

is

i nadequate.

un q u e s t i o n a bly Angl o-Saxons ,

While

betrayed

the

the

a

m e l t i ng

pot

country

has

preference

for

has reached

the

d isqu iet ing prospect. Thus the melting pot as a social goal fails because it s i m ply does not signify anything real in the experience of so many Americans.

mel t i ng poi nt onlv sporad ically. Mult i ple A merican

Painful as it might be to acknowledge, color has

d i a l ects, music, l aws, remaining educational patterns,

served as a more rel i able gauge of American ism than

and even g rudges

the abstract ion of nahonal homogenei ty . To be Black

combine to g i ve testimony to

regional and personal loyalties of a plural society.

in A merica em bodies in one's existence the sy mbol of

Several

l i m i ts,

immigrant

m i gh tily

to

nati onal ities

m a intain

have

customs,

st ruggled

institutional

to

be

in the words of Ra l ph E ll i son, "a

metaphor for the outsider". For the v,isible m i nor i t ies

attachments, or even a spec i a l ne ighb orhood m i xture.

espec i a l l y ,

Some have observed at work a kind of law of cultural

culture has often been smothered by the dom i nant,

dom i nance. M i lwaukee,

In some nei ghborhood s , in a c i ty like for

example ,

the

presence

of

pride

i n self and pride in a distinctive

white soc i ety . The pervasive im pact of host-cul ture

one

dom i nation has extended to academ ic disc i p l ines and

non-Pol ish resident on the block is accepted w i thout

the st ructure and shape of h i gher educa t i on itse l f .

much not i ce. A second fa m i ly outside the t ies of

The

ethn i c i ty

reflected a tendency to write and teach h i story from

Add i t i onal establi shed

may

ra ise

a

m igrations, patterns

of

few

unspoken

q uest i ons.

however,

threaten

l ife.

nei ghborhood

Easy

the

h i stor ical

profession ,

f o r exa mple,

has

long

the point of v i ew of dom i nant el ites, One result has been

the

creat ion

of

horrendous and

monol ith ic

d i scussions of sausage , the wedding dance and D i c k

nat ional stereotypes. The averbal m an of the past i s

Butkus must now com pete w i th the unfam iliar; i n

lost

short , cultural dom ination is threatened - rep l aced足

collections concentrate on the deeds and thoughts of

by anx iety. Such patterns can be observed as near as

great white men. If the melting pot is a useful soc ial

Bal l ard or as remote as the M i ssissippi delta, and they

ideal, why

desc ribe a society whi ch is clearly more what Mi,chael

st rongl y

Kraus calls a mosaic than a melting pot.

" i m portant s ign of b l ack ident i ty and pride"? On

forever ,

as

do

publ i cation

85

endorse

per b l ack

cent

projects

of

studies

and archival

b l ack

Americans

programs

as

an

5


simi lar grounds and fo r simi lar reasons, the f u nctions

A M osaic Society

and practices of A me ri ca n pol itical inst itutions have

To u nderstand the mosaic as a usefu l cu l tu ra l idea l ,

been chal lenged .

however, is to recogn ize t he considerable prom ise of a

important as answer

the

I nsur i ng co nst i tut ional rights, as

that

u nd o u b ted Iy

prob lems

is,

of mate ri a l

does I ittle to

diverse society. The task in that k ind of society is to

deprivat i o n or

emphasize the strengths that come o n l y w it h d iversity

c u l t u ra l loss. " N egl.ect" is not "sal utary" when on ly

and

th ree per cent of the b l ack populati o n , si nce 1 968 ,

p l ura l ism as symbo l ic of respect for each ind ividua l .

looks any

longer to the Federa l government for

lead ersh ip in the strug g l e for equal r ig h ts, and 17 per cent say they w i l l never trust the Federal govern ment aga i n . Most America n institut ions that ignore the mosaic as a p reva i l i n g social pattern risk assu m i n g the same bad odor.

enr ich i ng character ist ics of

The Byza n t i ne word " M osa i c" suggests, better than any word I know , the creat i o n of a society as an aspect of the i nterm i ng l ing of d iverse peoples \i v ho made

their

home

in

the

N ew

World.

Th is

intermi n g l ing demands not so much ass i m i l atio n as i nc l usion to ensu re a ful l measure of eq u a l i ty . For American h i story is the h istory of d iversity

Class Abuse

M ajority g roup oppo sition to various m ino r ities has at ti mes had a basis in c l ass. D readfu l con d i itons of l ife suffered by newly arrived imm ig rar;t groups have been offered as an ind ictment of the suffering peo p le themse lves. The West Coast C h inese in the late 19th century suffered race prej u d i ce and other exte rn al soc i a l abuses, and were req u i red to I ive desperate I ives; that they I ived desperate I ives was regarded as cause to expel t h em from cities l ike Seatt le and Tacoma . Other groups have faced s i m i l a r cha l l enges, and, as new l y arrived peo p l e , have had to face charges of c l a n n ishness for the refusal to abandon cu ltural

The

nat ion itself i s a resu l t of the g reatest folk wanderi n g i n a l l of human h i story a n d the i nteraction o f native (I nd ian) and many a l ien c u l t u res , even civ i l izat ions. He rman Melv i l l e suggested the generosity of the mosa i c as an a l ternative idea when he wrote , "settled by people of a l l nations, a l l nat ions may cl a i m her for the i r ow n . You cannot sp i l l a d rop of Amer ican b lood ," sai d M e lv i l le , "without spi l l i n g the b lood of the w h o l e world a world .

. We are not a natio n , so much as

. We are the h e i rs of al l ti me and w i t h all

nations we d iv id e our' i nherita n ce". N a t u ra l l y , one is conscious that catego ri es such as,

hab i ts. When 路there has ex isted a paral l e l between

"we-they",

eth n ic ity

"sl icke r " , etc. connote social tension and are in part

and

cl ass,

the

ci rcumstance

is

clearly

"b lack-wh i te " ,

" bu mpk i n"

and

ex plosive. I f that ki nd of para l l e l is inst i t u t i o n a l ized ,

the function of ethnocentrism.

the entire soc i a l fa bric is threatened . The o n l y trou b l e

h i story has a lways co nta i ned more mutation than

with

6

to embrace the

v i ew ing

the

m e l t i ng

pot

as

a

su ccessful

co n t i n u ity ,

more

con f lict

demands

for

than

B ut

the

nat ion's

consensus,

and

desc r i ption of A me rican society is that one m u st be

stronger

in cred ibly obtuse to any longer bel ieve it.

ass i m i l a tion. Tension can be creative; confl ict and

acceptance

than

fo r

e


controversy

somet i m es

b ring

abou t

change,

and

change i s somet i mes welcome. F rom the d e mands of you th ,

the

strugg le

of the v i si b le

minor i t ies, the

back l ash of the wh i tetowners, the anger of womens' l iberation poor

and the orga n i zational efforts to free the

can emerge

an A me r i can

m osa ic, rooted i n

m u t u a l respect and d i g n ity f o r the p l u ra l comp onents of a new soc iety. I n some ways, the mosa ic is relatively more modest

"From the demands of youth, the struggle of the visible minorities, the backlash of the whitetowners, the anger of womens' liberation, and the organizational effons to free the poor, can emerge an Ameflcan mosaic, rooted in mutual respect and dignity for the plural components of a new society. "

t h a n the me l t i ng pot as a sy mbol ic idea . It is a l so closer to ou r h i stor i cal experie nce as a people a n d carries with i t an a p p roach a b l e v i e w o f men and the i r i n st it u t ions. I f t h e M osa ic defines cert a i n l i m i ta t ions ' of hope , it a l so enab les u s to th i n k of th e crea t i on of cultu re

in

dyna m i c

and

con t i n u i n g

terms.

Ra l p h

E l l ison saw the appea l of the A me r i can M osa ic when he expla i n ed the mean i n g of the word "Sou I " . A s Ell i son

put

it,

the

" ab i l ity

to

tragic路com i c att itude toward life .

art i c u l a te

th i s

. exp l a i n s the

mysterious power a n d attractive ness of that qu a l ity . . .

k n own

as

'sou l ' .

An

expression

of

A me r ican

diversity with i n u n i ty, of b l ack ness w i th wh i teness, sou l a n n ou n ces the p resence of a creative st ruggle aga i n st the rea l i t ies of existence " .

Dr. James Halseth IS an

professor of He came to PLU

assistant history

i n 1970 from Concordia

College in Moorhead. Mmn , h is alma mater. He earned hiS Ph O. aT Texas

Technological

College.

7


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AI A,\\Il � lt�AI t�AS'rl� S\�S1�1�,\\·' Children are "tracked", "pigeonholed" and "categorized" from the time they take their first reading readiness test. By Ronald Jorgenson

"The G r·eat Melti ng Potl " " F reedom for A I'!!" "Eq u a l

The idea l s which we l earn and which we su pport by

Opport u n ity for A l l!" "Free a n d Eq u a l E d u cation!"

force of law are com mendable ones. We ca n take

These a n d other s im i la r cl iches have been heard by a l l

pride i n o u r efforts to b u i l d a society in which we

of u s . I f not i n a n informal setting , certa i n l y each has

value the ind iv i d u a l ; in which we strive to se c u re free

been e x p l ored as a part of our formal ed ucation.

and eq u al o pport u n ity for a l l; where we seek to

Si nce ear· l y ch i l dhood , each of us has had imp ressed

i n sure equal ed ucation for all. O u r ,govern mental

upon us a n u mber of idea l s wh ich have substa n t ive

processes, al though they at t imes seem sl ow a nd

fo undatio n in the l aws of the l a nd , stemm ing fro m

cumbersome in respond ing to human needs, have

the Decl arat ion of I nd ependence, the Co nst itu t io n ,

prod uced a long l i st of prog rams that have been

a n d subsequent l eg i sl a t i o n a t a l l levels o f government.

developed i n response to speci fic n eeds.

9


What then of the question "Education: l\n American Caste System?"

Definitively ,

caste is one of the

hereditary classes into which H i ndu society is divided. Caste

is also the division of society

on artificial

grounds. Adults and school chi l d ren a l ike tend to think of a caste system as something rather fo reign to our way of life and certainly foreign to our public educationa l systems. It wou Id seem there is amp'le evidence to demonstrate that our educational systems have been designed to prevent preferentia l treatment for select sub-cultural groups.

As

a

governments expected

respons ibility

delegated

to

state

under the constitut ion , it rnight be

that

substantially

differing

I II I

patterns of

I

public education might have emerged as educational systems

developed

historically.

H owever ,

it

has

become c l ear that in our highly mobile techn o l ogical society

there

is

an

amazing

simil arity

and

I:

differences of major consequence in our educational systems from state to st ate. We have come to expect

in whatever part of the count ry we may choose to reside. As

further

guarantees

of more equal educational

opportunity , a plethora of federally funded programs have been developed to upgrade skills and e x peri,�nces of the

"culturally d i sadvantaged". These programs

have ranged from pre-schoo l "H ead Start" programs to graduate fel lowships. Budgets in our public schools refl ect the increasing influence of federally funded programs .

N ationwide,

federal

m on ies

are

now

approaching one-fifth of all dollars spent for public

10

I

I

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��:�JQlonijOOOIO

few

free, universa l , mandatory public education to age 16

II

2 J

,

:.

.

Ii


elementary and

secondary education. Although a

sizeable portion of these funds a re used to upgrade education ,

genera l ly

many of

the

our own so phisticatio n , o u r i ncreased technology .

p rograms are

specifical l y designed to i n s u re more equ a l educational opportu ni ty.

A t the turn of the cen t u ry a n d i n the decades that fo l l owed , John Dewey provided the sti m u l u s for

U nfortu nate l y , it seems as though i n sp i te of o u r ma ny efforts we are " w i n n i ng some battles b u t losing the wa r". A fa i r l y accurate ref l ection of th is is to be found i n the p roduct of our educat ional efforts. A lthough

curric u l u m . I n a sense , we have become the v ic t i m s of

med ian

incomes

of

m i no rities

have

increased co nsid era b l y in the last couple of decades, they have not kept pace w i th med ian i ncomes of majority persons. Part of t h i s can be attributed to discrimi natory h i r i ng practices , but a lack of salea b l e sk i l l s s u rely has had its im pact. These sk i l l s, o r lack of them, are often measured in terms of a h igh school

educators to

become

more

concerned

w ith

th e

i n d ivi du a l , with educat i n g the whole ch i l d . B ui l d i ng u pon the fo u ndations of the work of men such as B i n et , Thornd ike, a nd Wechsler, we were able by the late 30 's and early 40's, to measure w ith more val i d i ty i n terest, T hese

and

rel ia b i l ity,

ach ievement , tools

of

such and

th i ngs as aptitude,

i ntel l igence

measu re ment

and

q u otient. a

better

understa nd ing of curricu l u m , prov ide the educator with the mea ns to better u n d e rstand the "whole ch i l d" that D ewey encou raged us to teach .

d i p l oma , or on e's academ ic success. U nfortu nate l y , i n o u r increas ing l y complex societ y , lo wer

educato rs , as wel l as others in societ y , p l ace more

socio-econom i c w h i tes and m i n o r i ty persons do not,

I t's

fai r l y

commo n

knowledge

that

val i d ity on what is written than on the spoken word ,

as a gro u p , succeed academica lly . I t is the ex ceptio n ,

more val id ity on a number or statistic than on a

rather than the ru l e , that a lower socio-eco nomic class

writte n statement. Man seems to have a need to deal

m i no rity person aspi res to and becomes a wh ite c o l l a r

with

concretes of

rather

behav ior

than wh ich

subjective were

abstracts.

p rofessional perso n . It i s a l so true that a lower-u pper

Measures

c l ass youth seldom beco mes a member of the low

g u ide- l i nes o f t h e current status o f stud e n ts have

i n ten ded

as

soc io-econom ic c l ass. Our ed ucat i o n a l system t h u s

become m u d d l ed to the po i nt where measures of

serves as an u n w i tt i ng a l l y of t h i s a rt i f ic ia l d ivision of

ach ievement

society , an a l ly in the formation of a caste system .

no

l onger are indexes of where the

student is now , b u t "that's where he should be, we w i l l make an academ ic placement accord irig ly , and

Th i s ap parent ed ucatio nal caste system is rooted i n

that's probably where he w i l l be next year and the

our fa i r l y recent past, i n the development o f more

fo l low ing " . Ch i l d ren are "tracked" , " p igeonho led " ,

sophisticated means of measuring h u man behav ior

and "categorized " from the t ime they take t h e i r f irst

and

read ing readiness test .

a

more

comp lete

u nderstand i ng

of

ou r

11


Parents, educators, and the b usiness world usually demand

and get

grades,

comprehensive

academic

reports, and various other measures of behavior, Each in its own way cont r i butes to a set of ex pectations and certain perceptions of the indiv idua l ,

At the

elementary

read ing

groups

level ,

this

designated

Robins,

"Black

by

means such

grouping names

as

in

BI'ueb irds,

B i rds", By the time a youngster

reaches junior high, groupi ng becomes more specif i c i n terms o f courses a student m a y "elect" t o take, The underachiever is encouraged to take "bone-head" math and the achiever takes introductory algebra or geometry,

This

and

other

"electives"

determine

groupings in the requ ired courses. Approaching high school , many choices have already been el im inated and the student is "tracked" into college bound or general non-col lege bound educational programs. Parents, teachers, students, and busi nessmen a l ike are convinced by mountains of information that a person will or wi l l not succeed. When a youngster has compl eted years of formal education, the die has been cast, He has been a b l e to see

that

there

is

little

opportun ity

mobility in the educational setting,

for

upwa rd

When out of

school , it becomes increasingly clear that the same holds t rue in the world of work. Yet many adults naively hold to the notion that "anyone who tries in our society can make i t", We hold up carrots, those exceptions which say "I made it; so can you", This however , fal l s on the deaf ears of indiv i duals who have ju st exper ienced t welve years of pseudo-success, but rea l ist ic fai l ure.

12

1�ltll� r 4 4 4 4 4 ..

,., ,,,, ' ..

• •


Critics of the p u b l ic sch ools have l o ng a rg u ed that many

c h i l d ren

fa i l

to

lea r n

si mply

because t h e i r

create new cultural values. R evenue sou rce s , on wh ich educa t i o n a l

systems

are

d ependent ,

command

parents and teachers do not expect t h e m to . Our

education to be responsive to e x i st i n g cu l t u ra l v a l u es.

demand fo r def i n i t ive grad i ng systems also tend to

Co l leges and u n iversities, b u s i nesses, and tec h n ol ogy

demand that a p prox i m ate ly h a l f of our p u b l i c scho o l

demand certa in

chl d ren w i l l b e fail u res i n the sense t h a t the i r grades

E d u cation o n l y tends to reflect the cu l tu re at large.

k i n ds

of

edu cat i o n a l

products.

wi l l be at the C level (or i ts eq u ivalent) or lower. Th is simply

re i n forces

the

teacher's

pe rcep t io n s

and

Where, then , lay the an swers to t h i s d i l emmai I f we

expectations that many ch ildren wi l l not or ca nnot

do i n fact , cherish the worth

of the i n d iv i d u a l , it

lea r n .

seems that egch of us in our own way m u st b rea k down the art i f ic i a l barr iers that restrict an i n d iv i d u a l ' s

R o bert R o senthal and Lenore Jackson co n d u cted an

fu l f i l l m ent a s a worthwh i l e h u m a n bei ng. Each o f us

i ngenious experi ment inv olv ing severa l teachers at a

must

South San F ra n c i sco grade schoo l who were deceived

bey o n d

i n to be l ieving that so me of the i r st u d e n t s had been

pare n t , teacher or busi nessma n , shou I d be co ngruent

spotted as " l ate b l oo mers" . Eight months late r , the

with o u r be l i efs in h u man pote n t i a l.

ra ise

his

sights

class i f i cations.

and Our

ex pecta t i o n s of behav i o r ,

others

whether

as

" l ate b l oomers" had shown dramati c i m p rovement i n the i r

a cadem i c

ab i l i ties.

This and

s i milar

studies

" . . . We must make the necessary effort . . . to brea k

suggest that "teach ers' ex pectat i o n s路 of t h e i r p u p i ls'

o u r way o u t of the p r i son wa l l s of the local and short

perfo rmance may serve as sel f-fu l f i l l i n g prophesies".

lived

Th i s a l so casts doubt on the wisdom of ass i g n i n g

c u l t u res, and we m u st accustom oursel ves to tak i n g a

ch i l d ren

synopt i c v iew of h i story as a wh o l e . "

to

classes

on

t h e bas i s of

presumed

or

h isto r ies of our own cou ntr ies a nd

our own

measured ab i l i ty , wh ich m a y o n l y m i re the l o west - Arno l d Toynbee

groups i nto sel f-co n f i n i ng ruts.

It wo u l d be u n fa i r , however, to leave the i m p ression that

educators

u n f u l f i l led

bear

l ives;

the

so le

respons i b i l ity

for

that edu cato rs, as a g r o u p , have

created and develo ped an i nstitutional caste syste m . I t seems ap parent that school systems do lend their su pport along

to

a

ra c i a l ,

However,

develop i n g et h n i c ,

caste

and

system sub-d iv ided

socio-eco no m ic

l i nes.

educational institutions tend to react to

cultural norms a nd expectations rather than acting to

Dr Ronal d Jorgenson Is an assi. tant Ilrolessor of edu cation A gradUate of GustaVLJS Adolphus Col leg ,he eur ned an Ed,D. at 8all State University He has been very artlve in hllman relations work sillce he came to PLU i ll

19l18.

13


"I never

saw

color before I

Her home add ress has been Ge nev a , Sw i tzerl a n d . She

" A n Indian friend f i n a l l y told h,im ,

was born a n d ra ised i n

l ove us by the way YOLi treat us, We th i nk of you as

school

in

both

Ind i a . She attended h igh

Eth iopia and

Lebanon . She

has

attended co l l ege in Cal iforn ia and Wash i ngto n . H er

'We know you

our b rother. But you weren't ra i sed as an I nd ian so we d o n ' t expect you to l ive as an Ind ia n . ' "

father is an Ame rican Germ an-Canad ia n . She elaborated by referring to another mem ber of the Diane Schafer, 21, a m i d-year gradu ate o f t h e P L U School o f N u rsi ng, cou l d

rightfu l l y c l a im world

citizensh i p . She has I ived or v is i ted in 42 co unt ries. Her trave'l s, the resu It of her father's wo rk as a miss io nary a n d church offici a l , f i rst for the A mer ican Lutheran C h u rch and then for the Lutheran World Federatio n , have given D iane a u nique vantage point from wh ich to observe the confl icts t h at d iv ide

i nternational' student co mm u n i ty, " He i s my sa i d .

"We

g rew

up

in

d ifferent

env ironments, I don't envy what he has nor does h e envy w h a t I have, B u t we share what w e have. I 've met some people who consid er themselves superior because of what they have. Others behave as the i n j u red

party

beca u se of what they d o n ' t have.

I nstead, we shou Id share,"

people,

She compared

And yet , surprisingly it seems, she i nsists, "I never

students, "Most of th em would co nsid er my v i ews

saw co l o r before I cam e to the U n ited States," She related a n example of what she bel ieves to be a

14

PLU

f r i end," she

her v iews to those of h e r fe l l ow

conservative. But I th i nk I

look on a l o ng-range,

wor l d -w id e basis,"

more represeFltative racial att itude of the peopl e she

Diane fee l s that d i ssention at home has bad ly h u rt the

has met aro u nd the wor l d . "When Dad f i rst went out

U .S . abroad, " M u ch is b low n out of proportion by

to the m i ssion f i e l d , he was go i ng to l ive l ike the

the news med i a . But when i t is p i cked u p overseas it

people, I t eventual ly made h i m qu i te u n h a p py,

is genera! ly bel ieved to be accu rate."


�ame to the United States" She sympath izes with the views of today's youth , but

The Soviet U n io n , she be l i eves, explo i ts people, wh ile

c r i t i c izes many of their past meth ods. "I d o n ' t th i n k

t he peo p l e tend to e x p l o i t the U .S .

they've stopped t o th i n k what t h ei r actions would lead to . " she sa i d . "The ra tionale of negat i v i s m serves

"The S ov i et U n i o n has some good projects, but they

no pu r p o se .

are often propaganda d ev i ces or a way to get their foot in the d oor . T h ey ma k e a lot of p ro m ises wh i c h

"We a l l want t o b l a m e o u r pro b l e m s on someone e l se

a r e att ractive to u nd e rdeveloped peo p l es u n t i l they

i n stead of tak i n g the resp o n s i b i l ity ou rselves," the

f i na l l y real ize what st r i n gs are attache d . "

you ng n u rse added. "The U .S . , o n the other hand , i s k i n d o f soft. I t lets I n d iv i d u a l s change

represen t i ng

the

the i r attitudes about

D iane. W h i Ie the U .S

U .S.

abroad

need

to

peo p l e , accord i n g t o

peo p l e use it for a rug . It's sad because you have such a great nat i o n . "

offers many good id eas and

worthwh i l e p rogra m s , they are often presented with

N e ither

the att itu d e , "You're dumb and stu p i d a n d we ' re

respect .

go i n g to teach y ou . "

ap proach ,

she

i n d icate d ,

bui lds

la sti ng

D i a n e , soon to be marri ed , hopes to eventua l l y work

D i a n e added , "The peo ple they're dea l i n g w i th are

as a n u rse overseas. And again, her career goal h ints at

just as i nte l l igent , but perhaps not as educated i n t h e

the fact that t h i s country fa i l s to take advantage of i ts

Western sense . "

fu l l potential for service to ma n k i nd .

She bel i eves that the efforts of the su per powers i n

" I wou l d prefer to work overseas," Diane ad m itted .

u nderdev e l oped nations tend t o cancel o n e a n other

"I n the States nu rses are so bo u n d by l ega l rules t h a t

out, a l though the a p p roaches are ent i r e l y d i fferent.

you can't a l way s u se the k nowledge t h a t y o u have."

15


T

Nelve Pacific Lutheran University students spent the

within that framework, to provide a I'elated academic

1971 fall semester as occupants and participants in

program in a way that would take advantage of the

the

situation

New

World

House,

an

experiment

in

at

hand.

Sessions

with

PLU

faculty

members, informally structured, were held at the

environmental education.

house regularly. The

house

selected

for

the

project

was

an

old

two-story frame dwelling in a low-income area of

The concept is not new. Several Lutheran colleges in

Tacoma, within walking distance of downtown and

the midwest are conducting similar programs. Each

the centra'i area.

project, however, is quite unique as purposes vary due to

I ntent of the undertaking was three-fold: white,

middle-class

suburban

young

people

timin9l, location and

attitudes of the persons

involved.

sOme

understanding of a low-income environment by living

While the first such project, Augsburg College's CI'isis

and working there; to 9ive them a taste of relatively

Colony in Minneapolis, started in the ghetto during

independent and inter-dependent group living; and,

the volatile sllmmers of 1967 and 1968, the New

An Experiment in Environmental Education

16

to give

100


World

H o use

ref lective,

evolved

m a tu ring

partici pa nts. i nvolved i n

as

more

ex perience,

Though

several

of

an

accord i n g

of

the

i n terna l , to

g rou p

N i ne o f t h e 12 have returned to P L U for t h e sp r i ng

the

semester. O ne is attend i ng col l ege in Pen nsy lva n i a and

were

two h ave suspended th e i r for m a l education for the

com m u n i ty prog r a m s, others fo u n d the

time b e i n g .

I iv i n g i n a d i st i n ctly d i fferent env i ronm e n t itsel f a worthwh i l e exper ience .

A si m i l ar

project, b u t w i th

d i fferent part i cipants,

attitudes a nd goa l s , i s bei ng con d u cted d u r i n g the Everyone partici pated i n two courses condu cted by the

Departm e n t of

S oc i ology,

Anth ropology

cu rrent semester.

and

Soc i a l W e l fare, a n d. regu l ar group p rocess sessions led

F o l l ow i ng is a n inte rview w i th members of the Ne w

by Rober -t Menz el , d i rector of C H O I C E , P L U ' s soc i a l

Wor ld House , taped shortly before the project ended

action arra nged

agency.

Beyond

that,

the

you ng

people

add ition a l acad em i c work a nd d ay-to-Day

activities on an i nd i v id u a l b a s i s .

in Dece m b e r . Not a l l were able to ta k e part, b u t it was

a g r eed

that

the

v i ews

e x p ressed

were

representative of the grou p .

derne"

17


A.

What were the steps taken to make the New

World House a reality] KAREN:

When

Rev. Joe Bash (youth d i r ector in

experimental m i n i st r i es for the Amer ican Lutheran Church who instigated s i m ilar groups in the m idwest) came out to P L U two years ago, there wa? a group of students interested in the project. Several of them left or graduated, so the group that f i na l l y came together l ast

spring was a l m ost total l y different from the

group two-and-a-half years ago. R.

H ow is the project funded?

KAREN: We pay our regular fees, tu i t i on , room and board. PLU turns our room and board fees over to us in one l ump sum and we work w ith that.

NE'lV WOR LD HOUSE PARTICIPANTS Lars 80rlaug, senior. Carrnichael. Calif

R Does that cover your expenses?

Doug Ford, sop hornore. Spokane. Wash. Phyllis Haaland, sophomore. Salem, Ore.

KAREN:

Yes. And there's enough for extras, l i ke

field t r i ps.

John Hushagen. junior, Tacoma, Wash. Katy Hyder, junior, Denver. Colo. Chris Klassen, sophomore, Eugene. Ore. Linda Loken, senior, Tacoma. Wash.

R

Other than approval then, have yOu

had any

Ene Strand, Junior, Delta, B.C

problems?

KAREN wou l d

Michele Lynch, sophomore, New Castle, Pa. Karin Stra n d, sophomore, Delta, B.C

The univers ity , I guess, has felt that there

be

money

operat i onal

l ost,

genera l l y .

( N ote

Kurt Stenehjem, sophomore, Anchorage, Ak Karen Svendsen, junior, La Mesa, Calif.

Certa in

funds are sacr if iced , but the pmb l e ms

have been rect i f i ed ) R.

Other than financial, what were the argu ments for

dnd against it?

R.

How did your parents react? I aSSllme you all

have approval

KURT: Moral. This is as coed as you can get, and (the university and our parents) were ori g i na l l y kind of bent out of shape trying to concei ve of together

in

such

cl ose

housemother in between.

18

prox i m ity

12

k ids l iving

w i thout

a

KAR EN: There were varied reactions. Some had to be conv inced that there is academ ic va l ue. Some had to be conv inced that this is an exper ience we cou l d on l y get off campus.


R. Who had to do some convincing?

prev iously . I wanted to broaden my ho rizo ns and

PHYLLIS: I d id . I n a way it was a mora l t h i ng and in

norma l ly be in my c i rcle of friends, act, a n d how I

a wav it was academi c . My father d id n ' t l ike the idea

react to them.

learn about other people; how kid s, that wou l d n ' t

of me liv ing i n a house with six guys and I th i nk it was my mother who d id n't care about the academics of the th ing. They both took a stand aga i n st it, b u t eventu a l ly l et m e decide w hat was best f o r myself.

j u st

b e i n g on

and l i ste n i ng to lectures and taking tests. E d ucation is

l iv i n g . There's the who l e idea of getting to k n ow and u nderstand other peo p l e and interacti ng with these peo p l e.

Why did you want to be part of the New World

House?

R.

One

of

your

major

points

has

been

living

together How has it differed, really , from a fratemity

JOHN: I ' d had sociology classes at P L U and had done

some rea d i ng about l i fe i n the i n ner city , where it is not a subu rban l ife sty l e . N ot hav i n g l ived in that sort of sett i n g , I d i d n't have any fi rst-hand ex perience with i t . I wanted to experience i t , to have it come al ive. I wanted to get i nvolved i n commun ity work, to learn why peop l e a re po or and vvhy the system keeps them poor. I a l so wanted the expe rience of g roup l iv i n g a n d a chance to supp l ement my edu cat ion i n a way that I cou l d n't do on campus. I wanted a chance to exp lore myse l f a n d how I relate to other peop le , and I wanted to f i n d out if I cou ld l ive i n a communal sett i ng and sti l l be myse l f and still keep my sa n ity . I 'm test i ng myse l f in a lot of ways.

or sorority house? CHRIS: I f i nd the d i fference i n the fact that, fi rst of

al l , a sorority or a fratern ity is exact ly th at. I t's one or the other. We're both i n one. I find that males l iving with females is a more rea l ist i c l iv ing situatio n . That's what most o f us w i l l be d o i ng most o f o u r l ives and where most of us come fro m . I al so f i nd that the intent w i th wh ich the 1 2 of us went i nto t h is t h i ng is far

There

were

two

main

reasons.

F i rst ,

I

cou l d n't stand the un iversity any longer, so I saw th is

d i fferent

from

the att itude

I

env i s ion at a

fratern ity or sorority . The d ifference, overall" is that we've had the w i l l ing ness to u n derstand a n d delve i nto each other rather than just to l ive with each other and surv ive. R.

KURT:

is m o re than

experience that i nvo lves a lot of l earn i ng and a lot of

PHYLLIS Yes.

1

Ed ucation

a l itt le broader than that . Li ving with 12 people is an

R: Are you glad you did?

R.

KAR IN:

cam pus. I t' s more i nteresti ng than j u st reading books

What

have

been

your

aC l

ivi ties and your

ex pe r i ences In the comm u n ity' What do you do in a typical day?

as an opportu n i ty to do what I enjoy d o i n g , and that I 've h ad an oppo rt u n i ty to wo rk with a

is l iv i ng w ith the kids. These peo p l e in the house are

KAREN:

d i fferent

m i n i ster who

hom

any

other

peo p l e

I 've

known

was p l a n n i rlg a day care center i n

19


Sal ishan,

a

publ ic

housing

neighborhood.

The

something to help the poor, the best thing I can do is

the Salishan area to find out the reaction of the

organize

people

consciousness that their ex istence and the ex istence

to

this

kind

of

thing.

That

was

rea l ly

the

midd l e

class

to

help

create

a

i nteresting, having those people welcome me and

of a poor person are l inked together, and that we

other people from the H ouse into their homes, and to

have to cooperate to survive. That was a very, very

share the i r l ives, d i scomforts, and the different kinds

great lea rning experience .

of joys they find in a d i fferent l i fe style. Actually, we weren't all out to get involved in some program, save some commu n i ty or solve some problem. I nstead we were learning what the situation is and learn in.g about

R

Old

you find

R .

How

many

meet i ng people from different

backgrounds diffiCUlt, or was it much eas i er than you

had thought it would be?

faculty

Dr.

John

Welfare,

helped

organize

had in the Salishan area. Overall it was a really , really

biology

Here in our own community the

people are more like us, economically and socia l l y, but we haven't been as openl y accepted as we have been in our working situation. There's been a mixed reception in this neighborhood.

of

the

it.

Professors

directly

Urban

courses i ndividually , w i th the

and

Engl ish

departments.

The

sociology profs were here at least once a week. JOHN. Bob Menzel (C HOI C E director) started us out this year with a three-day group process session, and he fo llowed it up with weekly group process sessions on Monday nights. It was a course we received credit

I got inv o l ved with the welfare task force of Area

Chairman

Jobst, Vernon Hanson and D w i ght Oberholtzer. We additional

the Tacoma

Schiller ,

involved were also from that department, R ichard

rei igion ,

JOHN

direC1ly

Department of Sociology , Anthropol ogy and Social

arranged

reception.

were

meet with them?

KAREN: I was very well accepted in the contacts I nice

members

involved with your project and h ow often did yOu

PHYLLIS:

that from the inside.

Coalit i on.

From that

I

for, cal led Psycho l ogy of Adjustment

Dick, Vernon

and Dwight came down, usua l l y on Wednesday night.

started working with Food First, which is the food

Sometrmes we'd read books and tal k about them or

bank

we'd go different pl aces. We had movies, speeches,

program

C ounty wanted

sponsored

A ss o c i a t e d

organizationa l to

by

the Tacoma-Pierce I'm

doing

work with that group. As I

said , I

learn why

M in i s t r ies.

peop l e are poor and what

welfare is doing to people . I did that by spending quite a b i t of time in the Public Assistance office , observ i.ng and talking to recipients at different times,

20

I f I want to get invol ved, if I want to do

class.

building is being bui l t by vol unteers. I did a survey in

and

speakers

came

in

to

talk

to us.

It was an

independent study in sociol ogy that we a l l took. KAREN: Beyond that ďż˝ had a Child and Adol escent P s y ch o l o gy

s e m i nar

and

there

were

other

independent socio l ogy studies.

finding out what they went through With Food First

JOHN:

I gained a better understanding of the midd le cl ass

sociology course and also there was an independent

Field Expe rience in Social Intervention is a

than I d id of the lower c l ass, because I am m i dd le

study in economics.


R.

What has impressed you , either negatively or

KAREN: I fee l that I have learned how to l isten and 110W to express myse l f, to comm u n i cate. That's one

of the most positive th ings, al ong w ith the c l oseness a group of peo p l e ca n have when they a l l have t he same intent in m i nd. N egative t h ings - there have been needs

for

privacy,

I

suppose,

today. I nstead o f work i n g from eight i n the morn ing u nt i l six at n ig h t , ma king money , so you can enjoy

positively. a bout th e proJ ec t ?

that

have

been

com pr ised a b i t . At the same t ime, when a person is rea l l y in need of pr ivacy there are a number of places

yourse l f aftervvard s , I prefer right now to work and l ive i n a more basic way, d ea ling more d irectly with people; not hav ing a job but l iv ing by more of a t rust; not own i n g a car and not own ing a house and hav i n g payments, b u t b y work i n g my way th rough I ife with peopl e . I've ga i ned new i nsights in my relationsh ip to God . For me it's just universa l , the chan ges. I 'm a d ifferent person. F or me the change has been very great. I

we have bee n a b l e to go. That's part of l ea r n i n g too.

DOUG:

Lear n i ng to be co nsiderate, watch i ng out for other

found that I was more or less wa l l owing in

peopl e ' s needs but l ett ing people k now when you

current that leads you from h igh school to col lege,

have a strong need for pr ivacy and qu iet; arriving at a

from occu pa tion to this forma l k i nd of l i fe sty le that

more genera l state of ho nesty.

I rea l l y d i d n 't know abou t . I was just there beca use that's whel-e I was su pposed to be, in the un iversity

R

..

How do you think you've changed from lhls

experience? KURT: I ' ve learned how to l isten, how to speak to

the poi nt, and I ' ve been g iven some i n s ights into som eth i ng I 've searc hed for, for a l o n g time, and that's h ow to be congrue nt, not cou nting myse lf out i n a ny g iven situation b u t being aware of everyth ing, a l l the factors involved in mak i ng congr uent, d own to eal路th , real ist ic decisions. Th rough active in vo lvement in the commun ity and other activ it ies I 've had ti me to re-eva l uate many, many of my goa ls and have ga i ned some in sights into what is worth wh i le. I enjoy I ife at a more basic level than society i s I iv ing a t

the

and doing what I was su pposed to be d o ing, without , it real ly being a cho ice of m i nd . Th is N ew Wo rld House ex perience has g iven me the opportu n ity to draw back from the exper ie nces that I 've had and to take a more objective look at what i have been d o ing, what I am do i ng, and what I want to do ill the fu ture. I n that sense it has gi ven me a d irection to go, a new d i rectio n . R.

What might that direction be?

DOUG: If you ' re ask i ng me for a maj or or a field, I

don't have o n e . I t' s a matter of priorities. What it has shown me now is that I am not headed i nto an occu pational f i e l d , and that I am more i n terested i n some other th i ng s for r ight now. M y immed iate plan leads me back to campus next semester to take some courses that are mean i ngful to me and not necessar i Iy mea n i ngfu l to an occ u pation or a major . From there, my plans today are that I won't retur n to schoo l next fa l l .

21


been d oing t h i s semester. I want to con t i n ue that on my ow n . I ' d l i ke t h e idea of pla n n i ng my o w n d a y - getti n g up in the mor n i ng and decid i n g , that da y , what I want to

do.

If

I

have

comm itments,

I 've

made

the

comm itments myse lf, and that's part of my dec i s io n . So I guess the b iggest change I 've seen i s being able to do more of what I want to d o , i nstead of on ly what I shou l d d o . One th ing I 've been th i n k i n g a l ot i s about mak ing a statement to the un iversity that there are other ways I can educate myself, apart from read i ng a lot of books and going to c l ass and tak ing notes and tak i ng tests and writing papers, that whole trip . That's va l id , b u t there are other ways, and I gu ess in JOHN:

I 've made some stri des i n doing what I want

to do more often rather than what I sh o u l d d o . AH

t h i n k that's val i d : academ i c cred ; t for l ivin g .

my I i fe I 've been prog rammed to d o what I should

K U R T : Th ere are a lot of peopl e that aren ' t going to

do; that was go through h ig h school , get good grad es;

school . There are a lot of people on th e i r own , and a

go to co l l ege, p ick a major , take classes a n d ram o n ,

lot of free you th . There are a lot of peop le w i th

get a degree i n fou r years; then go o u t into t h e world

burn ing desi res for knowledge who find that the

and l ive. Wel l , it was sa i d ear l ier by someone in the

university only suppresses that desire.

house , I th i n k it was Chris, who f i rst i n t rod uced the idea of th is being for h im a 4 0 days, sort of B i b l i ca l , spending 40 days i n the w i l d erness. That's taken on a lot of mea n i ng for me. So has the Year of Reflection idea that Dr. Wiegman brought up at the beg i n n i n g of the year

I have reflected on a lot of things, on my

educat io n , on my goa ls, on the people I love and the people I come i n to contact w ith and on direction.

22

many ways we're gett i n g cred i t here for l iv i n g , a n d I

KATY : I 'm rea l ly loo k i ng forward to goi ng bac k to

PL U . I've decided on a maj or and I 'm rea l ly excited about it. T h i s is the f i rst t ime I 've rea l ly been excited about schoo l and I want to f i n i sh; it may take me longer to f i n i sh , b u t I rea l ly want to get my bachelor of fi ne arts. M I C H E LE : I was ready to q u it school . I d id n ' t want

to because I l i ke schoo l , but somehow the structu re

I " shou ld" go to schoo l next semester but si nce

wasn 't what I wanted . I ran i nto th ese peop l e one day

don't want to , I'm not go ing to. There are no courses

and decided th is wou ld

at PL U that excite me a n d I 'm not go i ng back to

educat i o n . I don't t h i n k I 'l l have any trou b l e going

school unt i l I 'm excited abo u t it aga i n , as I once was.

back i nto school but it won ' t be the saill e for me. I 'm

be one way to try an

I see a l ot of va l u e in ed u cat i o n , in formal ed ucati o n ,

d ifferent now . I 'm more able to accept what I want

and I see a tremendous amou nt of va lue i n what I 've

to do , to wa l k i nto schoo l and say to the professor,


" I want to l earn how to w r i te - what courses do you

for a wh i l e; I d i d that. N ow I k now I h ave the a b i l i ty

have to offer me? " I have m ore self-conf idence. I f I

to demand th ings that I need , thi n gs that I want from

ca n ' t f i n d what I want to learn one p l a ce, I ca n go

th at structu re.

somewhere el se.

R. R

What

about

" re-€ntry"

i n to

the

camp u s

you

G ene ra l l y

I get the i m p ression

I t ' s been

a

that for most of

m aturing experi ence a nd you've

gai ned i n self-confi dence. I s that true?

env i ronment. Do y ou env ision any problems? KA R E N : We've ta lk ed about the prob l e m s of g o i n g

KA R E N :

back

acce pta b l e to j u st go a l ong. Here, I ca n ' t d r ift a l on g

i n to that l iv i ng situa tion , a n d

I

su p pose i t is

Yes.

I 've

fou nd

that

before

it

was

goi ng to be h a rd , l i v i n g i n the g i rl s' do r m , accepti ng

too eas i ly because I b u m p i n to someone often e n ough

the

a

who w i l l make me face u p to someth i n g , or m a k e me

mad e the

th i n k or m a k e me re-adjust. I t 's not easy, n ot as easy ,

ru l es .

But

I

feel

I

can

handle

tremendous feel i n g j u st k n ow i ng

that.

that I

I t' s

dec i s ion to b rea k away from the u n iversity structure

to d r ift a l ong .

T H EY CAME TO G R I PS W I TH

" S he' s more outgo i ng , open and

T H E MS E LVES - JOBST

mo b i l ized , as far as I k now , to

sure of hersel f ," he said . "She

solve the problems.

seems to have crysta l l ized her l ife . " "These young people cou ld handle

The a cade m i c exper ien ce was

anyt h i ng r i ght now ," ob served

differe nt too, ac cord i ng to J obst .

R i chard Jobst, o ne of three

" The d iscussions we had down

professors who were closely

t here were at a level and at a tone

associated with the New World

that I have never experienced i n an

House project.

a cad em ic situat ion , " . he sai d . "At

"The u n iversl ty d id not turn i ts

back ," he added point i ng to the ,

efforts of P residen t Eugene W iegman , Provost R i chard J ung k untz , V i ce-President for Busi ness and F i nance A. Dean

f irst , they were m i l es ahead of what " How they came to grips w i th themselves I n that env i ro nment raises ser io us q u est ions about the academ ic experience w e get at a

I thought was releva n t at that point and they wanted to branch in to other th i ngs I t was a fantast ic experience. ' ,

university, any u n iver sity , " he

There were "hassles" before the

added He po i nted out one of the

project got un derway, Jobst agreed

girls, for

"

examp l e ,

who had been

B u t I bel i eve the u n iver si ty

Bu chanan , and dea n s Margaret W ick stro m and Ph i l ip Bea l .

,

The experience had su ch an effect that Jobst d id n't know if he was ready for a no ther one i m med iate l y . "I have very strong feel i ngs for th is group," he

sa id .

·" 1 d on t th i n k I cou ld '

generate t he l eve l of feel i ng s w i th

wit hdrawn , was d r ift ing and had

hand l ed it we l L They were

another group t h a t I d id w i th t h is

had academ i c problems.

co nf ronted w i t h the problems and

one .

23


, e GeftereliOftl: An Age of Oonfrontation B y John Hushagen In

I - ecent

yea rs

the

terms

Sad but t ru e , th i s att itud e is a l l too preva lent in o u r

"Estab l i sh m ent"

a nd

so c i ety. A lthough

" su b -cu ltu re" h ave been used to desu i b e a fo r m of

gu i lty

polarizat i o n

" Esta b l i sh m ent" .

categories co m p lex

in

Amer ican

rep resent

so c iety .

Although

these

a gross overs i m p l i ca t io n

of

of

I f i nd t h i s frustrat i ng , I too a m

d i scr i m i nat i ng

aga i n st

m e mbers

of

the

a

p ro b l e m , they have beco me a part of the

When

I

meet

modera t e l y

rheto r i c o f co nfro ntat i o n between yo u ng a nd o ld .

a

m i d d l e-aged ,

wel l -d ressed

"stra i g h t "

pe rson ,

lo o k i ng ,

often

I

feel

t h reatened . To me th is i n d i v i d u a l i s one who has bee n As a part of the youth " s u b - cu l tu re" , I recog n i ze that

at least mate r i a l l y rewarded by the system that I fee l

there is far too l it t l e com m u n i ca t i o n between p eo p le

shou Id

my age and ad u l ts. Both g r o u p s a re to b l ame for th is

co mfortab le po s i t io n and

co nd i t i o n

t h i s status by asc r i b i ng to a set of va l u es perpetu ated

as

pre-j udge,

i nd i v i d u a l s

catego r i z e ,

in a nd

each

g ro u p

tend

d i scr i m i n ate

me mb ers of the o p po s i ng g ro u p

to

ag a i n st

T h e resu lt of t h i s i s

by

be

an

changed .

u n fa i r

He

system .

appears

He

to

have

g a i ned a

I assu me he h a s atta i ned has a vested

i n terest i n

kee p i ng t h i s system r u n n i ng smooth l y . I d o n ' t accept

often fee l i ngs o f th reat on bot h sides. I f p eop le ta l k

many of h i s va l u es, nor do I respect h i s resist a n ce to

a t a l l , they talk t o o r a t each other , el i m i na t i ng the

change

cha nce

for

e f f e c t i ve

co m mun i ca t i o n

and

u nderstand i ng _

Most

d i scri m i n a t i o n

encou nters

invo lve

no

ve r b a l

e x change a nd a r e u su a l l y d o n e q u i ck ly a n d i n p a ss i n g . T h e r e are many w a y s peo p l e d i scr i m i nate aga i nst each

F o r e x a m p le, i f a " l o ng ha i r " goes to a p ro spective

other. As a youth w i th sho u l d er-l e ngth h a i r , I often

e m p l o yer for a job , t h e em p l oyer' s d e c i s i o n i s often

feel the st i n g of p rejud i ce o n the basis of my outward

made

app eara nce. I represent a segment of those that want

appearance. S o t o o , a " st r a ig h t "

on

the

basis

of

the

appl icant's

perso n a l

look i ng i n su ra n ce

to see change come to America n so c iet y . I q. uest i o n

sa l esma n m ay receive " b ad v i bes" if he w a l k ed i nto

the system t h at r i chly rewards some wh i l e keep i ng

a n arts and crafts sho p run by l o ng - h a i red! yo uth s. I t

thousands more in poverty . I try to p u t my q u est io ns

seem s it i s m u ch too easy for peop I e to j udge f irst and

i nto

ask quest i o n s larer .

actio n .

To

many

of

t h o se

that

h ave

been

reward ed , my p r esence, my actio n s , a nd especia l ly my appearance represent a threat.

24

In

situa t i o n s l i k e

th is a

pr ocess takes p l ace that


J o h n H u shagen is

a

j u n i or from K a l a m a , Wash . , maj o r i ng i n

overcome the fear of peo p le he ne i th er k nows n o r

h i sto ry . H e w as a

und erst a n d s . O n e g o o d way I h a v e fo u nd to d o th i s i s

part i c i p a n t i n the N ew

thro ugh d i a logue.

Wo r l d H o u se project Most p eo p l e ca n talk wel l , b ut few k now how to

d ur i ng the fa l l seme ster.

l i ste n . P ro per l i sten i ng i nvolves concentr'at i o n on and el i m i nates the possib i l ity ot co m m u n i ca t i o n . Words

i n terest in w h at anoth er' person is say i n g. I n a two or

may o r may no t b e spo k en , a nd f o r t h e most p a r t ,

t h ree-person d i scuss i o n , very l i t t l e real l i sten i ng t a k e s

neither i nd iv id u a l attempts to u n d e r stand t h e o t h e r ' s

p l a ce . I nd i v id u a l s tend to spend most of t h e i r t i m e

b i ases

fo r m u l a t i ng a response t o what t h e speaker i s say i n g .

or

"where h e ' s co m i ng fro m " . F o r ex a m p l e , i f I

have a co nf l i ct w i th an ad u l t , I tend to j udge and

A good I istener c a n p a r a p h r ase w h a t the speaker h a s

catego r i z e t h i s

j u st sa i d .

mysel f

i nd iv i d u a l

am j udged

a nd

in

the sa m e way that

catego r i z ed .

He

is

I

l i k e an

object a n d h i s p resen ce i s a s tu m b l i ng b l o ck t o me. By n o t t a k i ng t h e t i me to f i nd out so meth i n g about h i m , I end t h e sea rch for co m mo n gro u nd before I start.

If

I

am

I f p eo p le w o u ld t a k e the t i m e to l i sten t o

each- other

i n stead

d i si nterested l y

of

j ust

form i ng

or

t o l erat i ng a

rebutta l ,

t h e words sign if i ca n t

i m p rove ments i n co m m u n i cation a n d u nd e rstand i ng cou l d be seen .

the o n e u nd e r scr ut i ny , I , too , am

treated l i k e a n obj ect and in a sense d eh u ma n ized . I

Effective cormn u n i ca t i o n is an every day st ru gg le . I t

am f i r st feared , then j u d ged , and f i n a l l y co un ted o u t

req u ires a se n si t iv it y toward others a nd toward o n e's

and

l abe led

" u n d e s i rab l e " .

In

these

k i nd s

of

se l f.

In

enco u n t e r s , ne i ther o f us is w i l l i ng to l i sten to t h e

eno ugh

other

I n stead ,

a nd

the

resu l t

is o ften

f r u strat i o n a n d

an

i n crease i n the leve l of po l a r izat i o n .

our

d eh u ma n i z ed

t i me to we

real ly

treat

m a n i p u l a ted " E stab l i sh me n t "

each

a nd is

so c iety we se l d o m take

talk

w i th

o ther k i c k ed

an

object

T h e q uest i on w e , of b o t h g r o u p s , must ask o u rselves,

"sub-cu l t u re" , a n d v i ce versa.

is:

How

ca n

co m m u n icat i o n

we

b u i ld

and

b r i d ge s

our fel l ow m a n .

as

objects aro u nd . to

the

to

be

The youth

I f w e a r e to b u i ld

to

create

better

br idges of u nderstand i n g , we m u st p u t " h u ma n ness"

understa nd i ng ?

There

is

back i nto

no

O LJ r

d i a logue. O n l y by ta l k i ng , l i sten i n g , and

s i m p l e so l ut i on to th i s prob lem , b u t it is m y bel ief

being sen s i t ive to each other can we of a l l ages l ive

that

a nd grow harmo n i o u s l y together .

each

i nd iv i d u a l

m ust

strive

by

h i m se l f

to

25


(Ex cerpts

from a paper delivered at the Western

Regional

Meeting

of the A merican

Religion, L os Angeles, November

Aca demy

of

covered the tu i t i o n expense and texts fo r Rei. i g i o n "Wo r l d R e l igions" . St ude nts from P L U do nated

331

ad d i t i o n a l reference works. Nea r l y 30 men s i g ned u p

1970).

for the co u r se, offered a s s u m m e r schoo'l cred it and team-taught by a l l mem bers of the departme n t . The

f i rst

"open"

class

was

mar ked

by

an

u n a n t i c i pated

sty l e . When the q u est i o n , "Wou l d a n yone

care to def i n e the term ' rel ig i o n ' ? " was asked; 1 0 hand s went

up

at orlce!

An

i n tense a n d rauco us

sess ion fo l l owed . A d i sa r m i ng d i rectness m a r ked o n e stud ent's com ment to the p rofesso r , " C o m e o n now . The two-m i I e ferry r ide to M cN e i l I sland located in PU(1et Sound near Tacoma i s p l easant , but the ag i ng bu i ld i n g

of

the

spraw l i n g

p r iso n

sta n d s

in

ug ly

co ntrast to the l a n d scape of beach , tree , and meadow beyond . A fter bei,ng escorted beh i nd fence , b a rs , and locked doors the v is i tor qu i c k l y becomes a b so rbed in the i n s t i t u t iona l su rrou nd i n g s . H e re l ive some 1 ,200 federal

p r i so n

sentenced

i n mates , most o f whom have been

for

o ffenses

such

as

bank

robbery ,

narcot i cs v io l a t i o n s , forgery , a nd a u to theft across state l i nes.

c red it

i n tegrated McN e i l .

At

t i mes the

cou rses

i n to

T h ese

the

at

total

the

priso n

educati o n a l

offe r i ngs have

been

wh ich

a re

program at

the

f i rst

such

educa t i o n a l opp ortu n i t ies in the federal penal system.

respo nses were d i ff i cu l t

to contro l .

I n mates bega n t o j i be a t one a n other's v i ews: "Th e trou b l e w i th you i s , man .

. " O t hers were rest less

and

Yet

severa l

wa l k ed

co m m o t i o n

was a

out.

res u l t of a

on e

sen sed

genu i n e sea rch

the for

k nowledge i n a f i eld where a nx iet i e s , co nv ict i o n s , and q u est i o n s were sha red by teacher a n d student a l i k e . S u b seq uent

S i nce 1 968 the P L U rei ig ion department has offered co l l ege

Does bel iev i ng i n G o d make a n y d ifference? Tel l u s what you t h i n k ! "

sessions

became

more

ca l m

and

d i sc i p l i rled . Several' st udents d ropp ed o u t wh i l e t h e rest co m p l eted read i n g ass i g n ments and prepared for exa m s .

In

an

eva l u a t i o n

ta ken

at the end of the

co u r se o n e st udent wrote : After each lect u re I have left t h e c l ass e n r i ched w i th new thoughts of my own and an ent i re l y

The

prog ram

began

when

the P rotestant chap l a i n

secu red f u n d s t o est a b l i s h a " schoo l o f re l ig i o n " to

new

perspective

s u p p l e ment the ex i st i ng voca t i o n a l and c o m m u n i ty

for

co l l ege

espec i a l l y

cou rses

offe red

by

the Tacoma a n d

Fo rt

in

wh ich

to

v iew

G od .

It

shou I d not sou nd strange when I say that p r i son me

has been a tremendous o p portu n ity , i n the field

of

k now le dge

-

and

S te i l a coom C om m u n i ty C o l leges. Cha p l a i n Lawrence

P . L . U . a n d i ts staff m e m bers have enormously

Mathre's g ra n t from the F ederal B u rea u of P r i sons

expa nded this op portu n ity .

27


)

S i n ce beg i n n i n g the "Wo r l d R e l ig ions" cou rse i n 1 9 68

S t . Pau l a n d D ietrich B o n hoeffe r , a m o ng others, have

a n u m b e r of other cou rses have been taug h t , w i t h

given us p rofou nd v i ews of G od f rom beh i n d p r ison

mem be rs of the depa rt ment of ph i losophy a l so ta k i n g

bars. T he M c N e i l students may a l so have someth i ng

part .

to g ive to the pro fessor , and , through h i m , to our

For

o p e n i ngs

several for

of

male

these

offe r i ngs

students fro m

there

our

were

cam p us to

acco m pa n y the p rofessors to t he I s l a n d and take the i r

cam p u s

co m m u n ity .

resu l t o f the

Th i s

program

has been a

thus

fa r .

n otewo rthy

For a teacher of

re l ig i on co u rse with the M cN e i l c l a ss . Th i s pract ice

B i b l i c a l l iterature to exegete the soc i a l views of the

p roved to be p o p u l a r both w ith i n m ates a n d ca m p u s

pro p h et Amos i n the M c N e i l sett i n g is a mov i n g and

students.

O ne

i n mate

about

co m m ented

the

" o u t s i d e " stu dents:

d i fferent

so cio-econom ic

per"spect i v e .

For

co nv i ct s

tend

we

i n sta n ce , to

v iew

and

to

has

re l i g i ous

man y

the

of

issues

the

conv i cts

are

us

P ro fesso r as

"aga i n s t "

been

e l evated

as

to

i n c rease

my

intr i ns i c

prospect ive o f a fu l l a n d mea n i n g f u l l ife . " I n t h e free-wh ee l i n g , ho nest , a n d open responses of

' represe nt i n g the " E stab l i sh men t " , so th a t on some

"I ca n

say for s u re that my i nte r p ret ive concept of the B i b l e

They added to the d i scu ss i o n s , espec ial ly from a

h u rn Q l i ng exper ience. O n e in mate resp o n d ed to the

203 " B i b l i ca l L i te ratu re" cou rse in t h i s way

the M c N e i l

the

men to t h e i r pro fessors a d i alogue h as

developed wh ich opens n ew " i nterp ret ive concepts of

P ro fessor" . Wel i , i n i n stances l i ke these I fou n d

the B i b l e" to the teacher as we l l as to the student.

t h e o u t s i d e st u d e nts sy mpathet ic w i th us.

"The B i b l e as a p iece of I i terature is coo l , " another M c N e i l stu dents assured u s that PLU

coeds wou l d

a l so b e we l come to part i c ipate i n the cl asses. With i n mates b�ing rel eased on parole and w i th new

l i fe I m u st be very se r i o u s and ask how relevant i s the

co nv icts b e i n g transfe rr"ed to the pen i tent i a ry fro m ' t he fed e r a l p r i s o n s , i t is poss i b l e that the rel i g i o n

B i b l e to me as a b l ack man ? "

depa rtment

cc u l d

design

a

regu l a r

sc hool

year

curr i cu l u m f o r McN e i l I sl a n d . A t the present t i m e , however,

f u n d i ng

has

been

ava i l a b l e

only

on

a

I n t h e wake of the A t t i ca tragedy a n d grow i n g p u b l i c concern f o r men i n p r i s o n s , the program at M c N e i l m a y enab l e P L U t o p a rt i c i pate i n p r i son ref o r m .

year-to-year b a s i s .

Dr . Stewart G o v ig

Hopefu l l y some contact w i l l b e m a d e w i t h t h e men

assoc. iate pro fessor o t

is an

when they come " o u t s i d e" . Thus fa r the w r i ter has

re l ig i on A graduate o f St.

met a fo r mer M c N e i l stu dent a t a PLU footb a l l game

O laf Co l l ege. h

( " T h i s is my school now ," he re ported ) , b een h a i l ed from a pass i n g car by another, and shak en hands w i th a

third

former st u d e n t .

28

i n m ate respo n ded , " a n d very poet ic at t i mes and i n a l l b o o ks w e l l w r itte n . H oweve r , a t th is p o i n t i n my

in

a

Pa rk l a n d

studen t

has

supermarket .

en rol l ed

as

a

At

l east o n e

full"time

PLU

is a form er Fu Ibright Scholar and par r sh m i n ister. He joi ned the P L U fa culTy In 1 958 and ea r ned h i S Ph 0 at N ew York U n iversity i n 1966.


â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

There are many ways to build. It takes a great many d ifferent k i n ds

In recent months, in add i t io n to

thermoco u p l e ion ization gauge

of g ifts to b u i ld a g reat u n iversity .

cap i ta l and operating funds, Pacif ir

co ntro l l er) , real estate (recreat iona l

Lutheran U n iversity has r¡eceived

land i n Ca l ifo r n i a , beach pro perty and

Whi l e cash is the most co mmon , it i s

collections (music, orch ids, book s,

a perso n a l residence) , art (pa intings,

a l so possib l e t o h e l p b u il d a f iner

artifacts and m ineral spec i m ens) ,

prints a nd scu l pture) , stocks, an

un iversity w ith other types a nd k i nds

scientific equipment ( m i crosco pes,

insurance policy a n d many other

of g i fts

an electro-physics vacuum ga uge and a

u n iq u e , interest ing and va l u a b l e items.


2

DO ROTHY M E Y E R H O NO R E D AS D I ST I N G U I SH E D A L U M N US

4

3

Dorothy M ey er runs a m ission co m p lex in N ayadupet, Andre Predash , I nd i a . The co m p lex

i ncludes an o rphanage, an e l e m entary schoo l for gi rls, an indust rial schoo l for women, a home for wi dows and an institut ion for the aged. Since the late '40's M i ss M eyer has spent m ost of her career in cit ies, villages and rural areas in southern I ndia, prov id ing sp i ritual and

1)

Pr i m it ive Afr ican scu l ptu re , a

valuab le co l l ect ion of orchids ,

educat ional gu idance wherever she

Senufo fert i l ity sy m b o l , was given

which add new d i mensions to the

is needed.

by Dr'. and M rs. L . H . L eh ma n n ,

study of bota ny at P L U . Last N ovember M iss M eyer was

owners of the N i m b a G a l lery i n Seat t l e.

2)

A spacious residence a n d estate , for m erly the home of Mr . and M rs .

J . H enry G onyea , w a s bequeathed to the university as a hom e for the PLU president and h i s fami l y .

3)

Boo ks a n d art i fact s , the products of a l ifet i m e of N o rthwest

5)

M rs. Pat r i c i a W h i t e , l e f t , prepares to sign documents estab l i shing a l ifeti m e inco m e for h erself through a char i tab l e remainder annuity trust. The pact , whi ch i ncl udes management of certa in pro perties, was arranged by R ev . Edgar Larson, right, d irector of estate planning.

4)

the chu rch and to human i ty . A

1 949

P L U graduate, she became

the seventh person to receive the university's Dist ingui shed A lumnus Award . M i ss M eyer has p rovided a v i ta l serv i ce t o man k ind throughout her career and has inspired others, incl uding her s i ster, Herm ina, to

research, were g iven by a Wash ington State resid ent. They

recogn ized for her long serv i ce to

If you des i re to hel p us b u ild a f i ner

follow in her footstep s

are now prom inent Iy d isp layed in

univer sity , the P L 'U Deve lopment

the N isqua l' l y Pl ains Room of the

Office w i l l be del ighted to explore

A native of Kendri c k , I d , she ho l ds

M o r tvedt L i b rary .

w i th you the projects that are c l osest

a master of rel igious educat ion

to your interests and to plan w i th

degree from N ew Y ork Theologica l

Her bert Schoenf ield S r . , r ight,

you the most benef i c 'ia l way s of

Sem inary in add i t i o n t o her P L U

donated a greenhouse and a

giv ing.

degree.


News Notes Now what are we go i n g to do abo u t

law sc hoo l fo l l ow i n g h i s two year

them I"

stay in E n g l a n d

Mo re than 1 0 0 students p art i c i pated

At P L U , B j e r ke has been act ive i n

i n fo reign study tou rs, but the vast

stu d e n t gove r n m e n t a n d h as served

major'ity fou nd a chal l enge a nlong

on v a r i o u s u n iversity co m m issi o n s

the 82 course offe r i n gs o n ca m p u s .

and co m m i t tees. D u r i n g t h e su m mer

I n a d d i t i o n , m o re than 40 stu dents

of 1 9 7 0 he was a su m m er i n tern i n

from pr ivate co l l eges and u n iver s it ies

the off i ce o f Sen . Warren Magnuso n

across the cou nt ry too k their

i n Wash ingto n , D . C . H e h as a l so

in ter i m at P L U as part o f a

rece ived a n u m ber of ho nors from

nat i o n w i d e exch ange progra m .

the h i story department at P L U .

Twenty-nine P L U students st u d ied

D o rothy Meyer

e l sewhere.

H e h as been a mem ber o f the C h o i r o f t h e West a n d had t h e lead ro l e i n the u n iversity prod u ct i o n o f " M a n

B R U CE BJ E R K E F I R ST PLU R HODES SCH O L A R I N T E R I M ENCOU RAG ES

B r u ce Bjerke, P L U sen i o r fro m

SEARCH F O R ANSW E R S

Wal l a Wal l a , Wash , w i l l beg i n

o f L a M an cha" l a st year

Bjerke h a s

also been president of t h e A m e r i can Luth eran C h u rch N o rth Paci f i c D i st r i ct L u t h e r' League

st ud ies a t O x ford U n iversity near Two years ago P L U offered a

London next fa l l as Pac i f i c

m ont h - l o n g J a n u a ry i n te r i m for t h e

Lutheran U n iversity's f i rst R h odes

fi rst t i me. R e fl ect i ng the nat u re o f

Sch o l a r.

t h e t i mes, the co u rse offer ings t h e n r'ead l i k e a check l i st o f nat i o n a l

B j erke was one of fou r ca nd i dates

crises: pover'ty , p o l l u t i o n , rac i s m ,

sel ected from the West Coast i n

drugs,

Dece mb er by a com m i ttee of former R h odes S c h o lars.

As m o re t h a n 2,200 st u d ents

â&#x20AC;˘

enro l led for the u n iversity ' s t h i rd

A h i story malo r with a 3.8 g rade

i nt e r i m last month , cl ass o ffer i ngs

average du r i ng h i s fou r years at

te nded to emphasize a n a l y sis ra ther

P L U , B j erke is p l a n n i ng to st u d y

than c r i s i s . T h e th rust seemed t o be,

modern Jl i sto ry or j u r i sp rud ence at

"We k n ow what the prob l e m s are.

O x ford. H is present p l ans i n c l u d e

Bjerke

31


News Notes RE L I G I O N D E PART M E NT

I n add ifio n , the schoo l s seek to

HE LPS O RGAN I Z E

cooperate on l ibrary acqu isitions.

TEACH E R E XCHANG E

There a re p lans, G ov ig i n d i cated , to A teacher exchange p rogra m ,

even tua l l y i n c l ude Seatt l e U n iversity

invo lv i ng the rel igi o n depart ments

and St. Thomas Sem i n a r y , Ken more,

at Pacific Luthera n , U n iversity of

VVash . , i n the exchange.

Pu get Sound and St. M artin's Col lege, was formal ized recently

" T h is exchange is a particu lar

u nder the title, the Pax League.

mani festation of the ecu men i ca l movement , " Govig noted . " O nly a

Formal ization of the progra m , wh ich has been u n derway on a tentative basis for several years, has resu lted in the incl usion of Pax League cou rses in the respect ive co l lege catalogs for the fi rst t i me .

i n d icated , is b rea k i ng d o w n at a n asto n i sh i ng rate. He po i n ted t o t h e open ness of t h e Vat ican I I Cou n c i l a s a majo r factor. "The d iversity of our backgro u n d s is

PLU ' s department ch a i r m a n , Dr.

now enr i ch i ng what we can g ive to

Stewart Govig, i s to take advantage

other , " G ovig added .

of the var ious specia l t ies and trad itions of each of the facu lties

A l l mem bers of the P l U rel igion

for the ben i f i t of stu d ents on a l l

faculty have part ici pated i n the

th ree campuses.

p l an n ing and co nduct i ng o f the exch ange.

PLU h a s strengths in B i b l ica l stu di es and chu rch h istory . St. M a rt i n ' s facu Ity mem bers are part i c u l a r I y we l l versed on ancient chu rch h isto ry and monast ic i sm . The U PS

2

Strege

deno m i nat ional co mpet it io n , h e

Pu rpose o f the League, acco r d i n g to

For i n stance, Govig po i nted o u t ,

Co l l i nge

few years ago we were ignorant of one another's prog rams. " C h r i st ia n

ST U D E N TS FAST FOR H U N G RY

P L U students cond ucted a 24 - hour fast Ma rch 2 in support of Taco ma area food b a n ks.

PUB L I C O F F I C E GOA L OF P L U P RO F, ST U D E N T

An 1 8-year-o ld P LU sopho more and a 35-year-o ld pol i tical sci ence professor were can d i d ates for p u b l i c o ffice t h i s past fa l l . Though neither was su ccessf u l , you ng T i m Strege, a m ath and pol itica l sc ience major came w ith in _ a few h u n d red votes o f u p sett ing incu mbent A r n old Herrmann for a seat on the T acoma C ity C o u n c i l . A n enthu siastic;, we l l- r u n ca mpaign resu lted in more than 49 per cent of the vote fo r the amb it iou s you ng student.

The project was i n tended to ra ise

rei igion department has

$ 1 ,000 , wh ich wou l d p rovide free

u nde rscored rei igious ph i losophy

food for 4,500 peo p l e for a week ,

imp ressive race for port

a n d world rel igions.

acco rd i ng to proj ect spokesmen .

com m ission.e r.

__ __ __ __ __ __ __

Prof. F ra n k Co l l i nge, too , ran an


News Notes Both ca ndidates showed rap idly

than 800 Tacoma teachers, has

emp loyment opportu n ity fo r rac ial

increasing strength as the ca mpaign

he l p ed create a cl imate in which

and other m i n o r ity groups t h rough ecu men ical-econom ic act io n .

progressed , but as newco mers, they

integrat ion of Tacoma schoo ls

suffered part icu larly fro m the fact

co u l d qu iet l y and effect ively taKe

that the 1 9 7 1 loca l e l ect ions were

p lace.

P L U P resident E ugen e W ieg m a n

rated by many as among the most apathet ic in recent Tacoma h i story .

As both d i rect and i n d i rect results

Project E q u a l ity aff irms the goa l s

There was comparat ive ly l ittle

of th is gradu a l l y i m p rov i n g cl im ate

of the u niversity's fou nd ing fathers,

voter or med ia i nterest in any of

of cooperat ion , a n u m ber of

wh ich were d ig n ity and o p portu n ity

the off-year issues o r races.

co m m u n ity i m p rovem ent programs

for every perso n . "E ncou rag ing new

have developed , inc Iud ing th e

p rio rit ies and eco n o m i c just i ce is

F o r S trege and Co l l in ge, however,

Tacoma Area U rban Coal i t ion , the

consistent with student, facu lty and

1 97 1 was o n ly the beg i n n i n g.

Taco ma C iv i l R ights C o m m ission,

adm i n istration sen t i ment on the

Model C i t ies and others.

P L U c a mp u s , " he added .

TEACH E RS' SE M I NA RS DEVE LOP AWA R E N E SS

â&#x20AC;˘

stated that P L U 's support of

Dr. Gene B recken r idge,

PLU P resident E u gene Wiegman is currently serv ing a second term as co-chairma n of the Taco ma A rea U rban Coal i t ion .

K I DS SHOW H I TS ROAD

After 16 years as a n i n creasingly

sch oo l-com m u n ity re lations

popu l a r sem i-an n u a l cam pus

coord inator for the Taco ma School

trad i t i o n , the P L U C h i ld ren's PLU JO I NS PROJECT EQ U A L I TY

Theatre " h it the road" i n J a n uary.

subject , "The I ntegrated

Si nce the beg i n n i ng of the acade m ic

Condu cted as an inter im cl ass by

C lassroo m " .

yea r , P L U has been assoc iated with

d i rector Eric N ordho l m , the

Project Equal ity N o rthwest, a

Ch i r d ren 's Theatre was b rought to

The sem inar, co ndu cted u nder the

fed erat ion of ch u rch-related

school ch i l dren at 1 2 el ementary

ausp i ces of the P L U S chool of

institutions comm itted to socia l and

schools i n the P ie rce C o u nty area.

E d u cat io n , is the most recent in a

mora l j usti ce.

Pu rpose, accord i ng to N ordh o l m ,

D istr i ct , has been co n d u ct ing a teachers' sem i nar t h i s year on the

series of P LU offer i ngs s i n ce 1 964

was to b ring good theatre to smal l

intended to develop awareness of

T h rough its part icipa t ion , the

com m u n it ies where oppo rtu n i t ies

the speci a l needs o f m i no rity and

un iversity adds its pu rchasing and

for such exposu re are in frequent.

d isadvantaged stud ents.

h ir ing power to that of n early two dozen Northwest rei igious

â&#x20AC;˘

The produ ct ion, "A ndrocles and the

Accord i ng to B reckenridge , the

institutions part icipating in the

Lio n ," w i l l a l so be presented o n

series, w h i ch has invo lved more

program. These groups seek equ a l

ca mpus Ma rch 3 , 4, a n d 1 1 .

33

_____


University Notebook S i xty Model C it ies neigh borhood

Science Fou ndation grant in

State U n iversity Vang u ard . He

you ngsters are part i c i pating thi s

Dece m ber.

succeeds John Beck , a sen ior f rom Ma rysv i l l e , Wash .

sp rin g in a recreation p rogram co-spo nsored by PLU a n d Tacoma Model C i t ies.

The award is designed to h e l p the inst i t u t i o n m a i ntain a strong academ i c program i n science,

The progra m , wh i ch began Jan. 1 5

mathemat ics and engi neering.

Thomas I verso n, P L U sen ior from

and co n t i n u es through the end of

She l by , Mont" represented P LU at

the schoo l year, brings the

the 1 1 th A n n i versary I n tern at ional

you ngsters to P L U two Satu rdays a

Chu rch Music Sem inar at Concord ia

month . Bowl i n g , svv i m m i ng ,

Dale Jamtgaa rd , fam ily l ife

basket ba l l , soccer, b i l l iards and

consu ltant fo r the Lutheran Fam i l y

November. He was a membe r of the

shu ffleboard are a m o n g t h e act ivit ies

Service of Orego n , co n d ucted a

N i n th S e l ect Choir, com posed of

offered .

cou rse at P L U in Janu ary entitled,

voca l ists from the 32 L ut heran

" B eyond Games to C reative L i v i ng " ,

co l lege choirs in N o rth A me rica.

ch i l d re n a n opportu n ity for

The cou rse, spo n sored by the P L U

The sem i n a r is sponsored a n n u a l ly

organ ized recreat i o n , exposu r.e to a

C H O I CE center, was hel d on t h ree

by the Lutheran Brotherhood L i fe

subu rban atmosphere, identif ication

successive Su ndays. I ts p u rpose was

I nsu rance Company.

with a n adu lt model and an insight

to h e l p i n d ividuals atta i n perso nal

Teachers' C o l l ege, Seward , Neb . , in

Purpose o f ttle program i s t o give the

into co l iege I ife and campus

growth and i n terperso n a l

atmosphere.

e n r i ch ment.

The R ev . G o rdon Lath rop was i n sta l led as u n iversity m i n ister at Pac i f i c L u theran U n iversity d u r i n g a serv ice of H o l y Com m u n io n Oct.

3 1 . Or. C larence S o l berg of Seattl e , b i shop of the A L C N o rth Pacific D ist rict, performed the i n stallation I'ites

Spen cer

Rob ert Spencer, Port l a n d , O re . , j u n i o r , has been na med edito r o f the P LU student newsp aper, the Mooring Mast. H e w i l l se rve d u r i n g the cu rrent spring semester and t h e 1 972 fa l l semester. Spencer, who is majo ring in p h i losophy and classics, p rev iously

34

Pacific L ut heran U n iversity was the

served as a repo rter on both the

recip ient of an $ 1 1 , 1 03 National

Mooring Mast and the Port land


University Notebook

â&#x20AC;˘ 1 1 Lute Jerstad , 1 9 58 P L U grad w h o i n 1 9 63 became o n e o f the f irst Amer i ca n s t o successf u l ly s c a l e M o u n t Everest, v i s ited t h e cam p u s i n Ja nuary and delivered a n i l l ustrated lecture o n h is adven t u r e .

21

J u l i a n Bond , Georgia state

leg i s lator who has become a pro m i nent civil r i ghts s p o k esma n , di scussed the f u t u re of the struggle for soc i a l equ a l ity du r i ng a lecture a t P L U in Decemb er.

31

C a n d y Brya n t , a fresh ma n from

Tacoma , wa s selected as P L U 's

1 97 1

Queen o f Lights d u r i n g t h e a n n u a l L ucia B r i d e Festival in December.

41

Pa cif i c Lut h e ra n U n i versit y ' s

Homeco m i ng Q u e e n f o r

â&#x20AC;˘

1 97 1

w a s Jo M a r i e

Anderso n , a j u n ior from Rento n , W a s h . Jo M a r i e is a m u s i c major at P L U .

51

T h e Chr istmas Festival Co ncert

progra m s are a n n u a l hol iday season h igh l ights at P L U . T h i s year the con cert program featured V i va l d i 's " G l o r i a " , a maj o r w o r k for m i xed choru s , orchestra and so l o i st s . Part i c i pa t i n g in the program were the Ch o i r of t h e West, the U n iversity S y m p h o n y Orch estra, t h e University C h o r a l e an d the U n iversity S i ng e r s .

71

A record n u mber of so phomore

n u r s i llg students received t h e i r caps d u r i n g the a n n u a l

61

â&#x20AC;˘

Carol

H i d y , center,

M e r ce r I sl a n d ,

nurses' cap p i n g

ceremony at P L U Feb.

6.

S i xt y - f i ve

Wash . sophomore, to o k t o p h o n o r s in

students were ho nored . The largest

P L U 's a n n u a l a l l-schoo l oratory contest

prev i o u s c l a ss to b e capped at P L U

47.

i n November with a speech e nt i t l ed , "So

n u mbered

Disagree ! " R i chard Dev l i n , left, of

provi d e s the student w i t h a n

Sa lem , O r e . , a nd Barbara S c h u ltze of

id e n t i f i a b l e symbol of t h e Schoo l o f

Seatt l e p l a ced second a n d th ird

N u r s i ng a nd

respect i ve l y .

profes s i o n _

a

The ca ppi ng ceremo n y

symbol o f h er

7

35


University Sports

...--ďż˝.

-..WI

LUTE SWIM TEAM V I E S

UW was the Pan-A m er i ca n G a m es

CAGE SQUAD S E E KS

F O R POST-SEASON HON ORS

bronze meda l i st and won the I R A

W I N N I NG Y E A R ;

varsity eights cha m p i o nsh i p at

FUTU R E PROSPECTS B R I GHT

Seven L ute sw i m mers q u a l i f ied for

Syracuse in 1 97 0 .

the N A I A nat i o n a l s and t he P L U

D i strict a n d conference

sw i m m i ng record boo k was i n

T h e L u t e v i ctory cl i maxed t h e most

tatters as coach Gary C hase' s P L U

su ccessf u l fa l l crew seaso n ever at

aij l i m m er i ng in early F ebr uary as

sw i m team awaited d i st r i ct and

PLU .

the P L U basketb a l l team str ugg led

co nference meets i n m i d - F ebruary .

champ ionsh i p hopes went

near the .500 mark , b ut chances for a 25th co n sec ut ive w i n n i n g season

W i n ners of the Nort hwest Conference cham p ionsh i p three of the past four years, t h e Lutes may have t h e i r stro ngest tank team over th is year. W it h u ndercl assmen d o m inat i n g most events d u r i ng a 1 0-2 d ua l meet seaso n , P L U can look fo rward to powerf u l sw i m m i ng sq uad s for several years to co me.

were i m p roving.

D r . Fo rrest E. " F rosty" Weste r i n g ,

It was a n u n u su a l seaso n , w it h 1 3

ath let i c d i rector and footba l l coach

p 'layers of si m i l ar ab i l ity vy ing for

at Lea C o l lege in M i nnesota since

sta rt i ng berths. The d epth

1 9 66 , h as been named t h e new head

ad vantage, however, was often

footba I I coach at P L U .

offset by i n consistency .

An I owa native w ith 1 8 years coaching exp e r ience , Wester i ng succeed s Roy Car l son , who has assu med other

ROW E RS' F A L L

respo nsib i l it ies in the School of

SEASON SUCCESSFU L

Physica l Ed ucat i o n .

I t w a s nea r l y two years a g o t hat t h e

" I l i k e h i s sp i r i t , h is acad e m i c

Lute Var sity R ow i ng C l ub st u n ned

preparat i o n , h i s co n cept of coach i ng

the row i ng world by f i n i s h i ng t h i rd

and h i s ded i cat i o n , " President E ugene

in fo ur - m a n sh e l l co m p et it io n at

W i egma n sa id of Westering at the t i m e

the I RA nat i o na l s i n Syracuse, N . Y .

of the appo i n tment.

T h i s past fa l l i t was the varsity

Marv Harsh man, center, P L U A l u mnus of the Y ear.

eight's t u r n to p u l l off a p l u m . At

36

G R I D COACH NAMED

Prospects for future years were bri ghtened by the emergence of three u nd erclassmen as b o na f id e varsity p l ayers. Sop homore N ea l Anderse n , brother o f former Lut e Mark; sophomore R a nd y Leela nd , brother of former Lutes Doug and Gr eg; and 6-6 fresh m a n forward M i k e Berger were steady co ntrib utors to the L ute attack d ur i ng the latter part of the seaso n .

Sen ior center A k e P a l m of Sweden

the U n iversity of Wash i ngton F a l l

moved i nto s i x t h p l ace on t h e

I nvitatio n a l i n S eatt l e t h ey defeated

a l l -t i me P L U sco r i ng charts w i t h a

the H u sk ies' e l ite srel l by 3.3

good chance to overtake nu mber

seco nds on a three-m i l e course.

f i ve , coach G ene L u ndgaard .


• d

Ir

"

h Er cit

n

Plll h p Natwlelc •

Mt E Le. &rton

. .

. -

Rev Or LoUt Almen l.eA Or G Q' ArbaUllh faeulrv Wilton Berton, ALe R Mr A 0 BUd\,nen. If liJrM Mr Norma" nt I LC Mr C""lI Hu. nga P h LC I R

1'1


TACOMA , WASH .

98447

Second C lass Postage Paid al Tacoma , Wash i ngton

T .... . UwII a CWk

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. ,

COncen. UnlilerlltY Symphony Orchlltnl, IaMakf AUd.. 8: 1 1

P"'" : U n lVlrlity "..,. . EIshoId A&MI •• 8: ' 1 pm. ASPLU Spring SympOtIum T.... . s.ull P.clfJc . PLU. 8 ...... . Whitman It PLU.

.....

at

An E x tl i b l 1 / 0 0..0,. ," 8MII........ UnlwIrthy GaUery. Man*t u..v AnJIr a.teI. i SGftIC. DI ZMrWb• ...... Aud. . :8; 1 S p.m

An

E Jlhlbt c ,

Icu l p l ur.

U n lverllty Library

"Clint and

Gelllll'V .

Brown".

drawing • •

Monllldt

...... . . Whttr,•

..

Willa .... IiillMi Id

1IIJIIeIiIIt . UnfWd at PW TACk. LlnfltIW It flW � EduaattDn SpI"_" UC. 8:00 p.m. a.tfodJl ,.... Cocart. Ofton Aud., a: '8 pm. BIIIII*I . P-.mc . ' L U A 'IiS A ... High« !Je , 8:00 p.m. C linto n EaIWoId Aud •• B:IO a .m,

Co rnlDCMion .

Duffy .

Art EJINbh. ..,.,.,. . ......� till ... . 1'DIII ....... .... 1IIrn IIId __ U"",,*, GIIIIry ....... UwtrY ....... ••• WhfhlllDnft at PLU

Mev '-thill . 0 .. � l'30 p.m. T .... t � COi..._ . WhIt ...... . ..... w.Ma � EdI.. ... ...,. ve . atoo p,"" Orchel1'ta eon.n . 8: 1 1 p.m.

Aud.,

ConCln .

811nd.

U n t v' f lftY

__ ad Aud •• IM l p.m.

....... . . CoIllge af IcWIo at flLU

NAtA T .... Meft

BaMblJI. WlIIIImftta at Ialem. Track. WWSC at Befl lnslham.

Hurling ....... �. UC. ' 0: 30 a .m. Grlduatlon eon.n. 01I0n Aud •• 8: 1 6 pm.

8..... .. Pordand.

LMis

Md

ct.rk

at

8.... 1 1. Whltwordt at Bpolame TrJdE. V..,.... __ "VI-


Reflections 1972 march