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LUTHERAN

B

L

U

L

NUMBER V

V O L U M E XLV I I

E

UNIVERSITY

T

N

OCT O B E R 1967

Conte n ts Crusader for C h rIst i a n Un ity

2

A Newly-Minted Aca d e m i c Yea r

8

The N ew Jerusa l e m

11

College Costs and Financial A i d

13

Bend the Twig Back

14

News

16

Notes

Sports .

22

University N o te b o o k

23

Published

SI)(

University,

P.

Second

Times

Annually

O. 80)( 2068,

Class

Postage

by

T8coma,

Paid

at

Pacific

Lutheran

Washington

Tacoma,

98447.

Washington.


CRUSADER FOR CHRISTIAN UNITY The Most Reverend Arthur Michel Ramsey, Archbishop of Canterbury, is one of the most courageous, visionary and dedicated Christian Church leaders of our times. A crusader for Christian unity, he is using all the power of his office to bring the household of the Christian faith under one roof. He has visited prelates all over the world, made searching pronouncements, and braved storms of criticism in striving for his goal. gical w r itings are noted for their c l a rity of exp ressio n . They e m phasize the authority and message of the Holy Scriptures.

Born November 14, 1904, he was edu­ cated at Repto n, Madgalene College at Cam bridge, and Cuddesdon Theological College. He then served in the parish and educatio nal ministry of the Church o f Eng­ land as deacon. priest, curate, vicar, lec­ turer, Sub-Warden, canon and professor of div inity. In 1952 he was elected Bishop of Durha m; a n d in 1956 he became Arch­ bishop of York. On June 27, 1961, he was enthroned as the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury, the highest position in the Anglican Church.

To im plement his driving ambition to make the Ch ristian message relevant, he is fearless in presenting his views on the vitally i m portant issues confronting man­ kind. A man of conviction, he has faced up squarely to the profoundly d ifficult­ soc:ial problems of ou r times, includi ng war and all the m ajor social concerns. Because of th e exemplary leadership whic h this man of God has exerted in the many facets of his pasto ral office, I am p leased to present to you, Mr. P resident, H i s Grace, the Most Reverend Arthur M ichael Ramsey. Archbisr,op of Center­ bury, for the degree, Doctor of Divin ity,

This distinguished ch urchman has made sign ificant and far-reaching cont ributions to the spi ritual life of his nation and the world in his career of se rvice. His power­ ful sermons and eloquent speeches h ave evide nced deep concern for the spiritual welfare of his flock. His profound theolo-

honoris causa.

3

-from the doctoral citation


future that lies ahead of it. And you are all here, the youngest and the most junior of you, are all here not just as recipients but as creators. But what do you mean to receive in your years here and what do you mean to create? Let me sum it up under four headings. A University is: a home of freedom, a home of truth, a home of personality, and a home of religion. Freedom, Truth, Per­ sonality, Religion.

The Role of a University in the Modern World An address givan by The Most Reverend and Right Honourable Michael Ramsey, Archbishop of Canterbury, at the opening convocation of

the school year, September 22, 1967. The UnI­ conferred an honorary doctor 01 divinity degree on the Archbishop. versity

Members of the Pacific Lutheran Uni­ versity. I am overwhelmed with a feeling of undeserved honor and privilege and delight at becoming today one of your doctors and one of your alumni, taking my place amongst you who have all the priv­ ileges of this lovely campus. You have welcomed me today in the mosl generous and eloquent words, you have shown me a welcome of friendship which has warmed my heart and I want you to know that all my days I shall cherish this great honor and feel that I am one of you. I love universities and university life, because as you have just been reminded, before I got involved in ecclesiastical office I spent a good many years myself as a university teacher. And I never feel happier than when I find myself again on a university campus amongst students and teachers and doctors and professors. Let me then speak from my heart and from my experience of th.e role which a university can fulfill in the modern world. But to you who are students here let me just say this as a preliminary. If you join a very ancient university you feel Ihat it's there and you come to receive what it gives you. When you join a young univer­ sity such as this, you know, 100, that you are coming not just to receive from the institution, but you are supposed to have a share in the creation of an institution that is to last for many, many years. Pacific Lutheran University is what all of you are making it to become in the long, long

A Home of Freedom First. a home of freedom. One of the lovely things about a university is the free­ dom which its students enjoy. There are certain rules, there are certain regulations which direct you and if you fall afoul of some of the rules and regulations, you may find yourself in trouble. But the rules and regulations in any university are pretty few and there is a wonderful freedom, freedom of choice. You are free to believe in any religion or none. You are free to adhere to any set of political opinions or none. You are free to attach yourself to any ideology of your choice or none. You are free to choose the subjects of your study and the way in which you study them. You are free to choose your friends and your companions. And in such a large part of every day and every week, you are free to enjoy activities of your own choice. There is no freedom, I believe, quite like the freedom of st dent days and the more elderly among us envy you and would love to be coming here having it with you all over again. But freedom has its problems as well as its delights. Think just for a moment about the true meaning of freedom. Super­ ficially we all lend to think of freedom as doing what we like any moment thai we like. I make my choices doing just what I like, say, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednes-

4


day, Thursday. But If I fol l ow freedom on that purely libertarian thesis, by the time Friday comes I may find that because I have indulged my freedom so generously on the previous days, when It comes to

A Home of Truth Then the university Is a home of truth. And a university is a home of truth be­ cause It teac h es truth in Innumerab l e aca­ de mic fields and also because it pursues truth by research . What a wonde rfu l art

Friday there may be someth i ng that I had

really ardently wanted to be do ing and yet I can't get on w ith do ing it, because

the art of the teacher is. Communicating between truth on the one hand and people on the other.

my will to do it has been weakened by the supposed freedom with wh i ch I have been acting .

I am sure that you will find your teach­

ers are practic i ng an art which evokes great adm irat i on and wonder and a great

And just from empirical experience we find that the ideal of freedom of doing j ust

com bination of gifts, to be g raspi ng the t ruth with the i r own minds and to be con­ veying to the persons to whom they can­ vey it not only accurate information about it but a love of it, enthusiasm for iI, and a

what we like w henever we like it d oesn t '

work.

We

need

to

go

back

and

re­

formulate our idea of freedom in rathe r a deeper way. Here is a new formulation of it which I suggest to you

sense of wonder about the subj ect matter of the particular Iruth. And conveying truth to persona l i t ies means not only the aca­ demic know l edge but great g ifts of human sympathy and understanding, because the action of mind upon mind is insepa rable

.

My f reedo m doesn't mean my power to do ju st what I like whenever I like it. No, my freedom is my power to choose for

myse lf a goal and a purpose and freely to unite a l l my powers and fa culties in the consistent pursuit of that purpose. That is freedom Indeed. That is the free life. That is th e truly free man. And it's this which

from Ihe action of person upon person at every l eve l of personality.

Yes, here Is a home of truth in which the t r uth of all the arts and sciences here

Christian phil osophy describes wh en It speaks of God whom to serv e is perfect freedom, the glorious freedom of the sons of God.

engaged are taught. Bul a university can­ not be truly a pl a ce of teaC hing unless it's also a place of research where truth

5


is being explored, investigated and added to. Why? Because truth i s n t stat ic. No

are

single

just a place where people are trained to

professions, not just a place where people

'

one

of

the

arts

or

the

sciences

prepared

for

particular careers,

not

here being taught is static. And you don't

be able to make

real l y teach it and learn it unless you show i t to s omething that is living and growing with great vistas for exploration within

that way, but a place where people's per­ sonalities

itself.

community.

serve

are

their

money in this way or

inspired with

fellows

in

the

a

desire

wide

10

human

Now, it isn't possible for every teacher

I am sure that this university sends out

to be engaged actively in resea rch. It isn't

into the world personalities inspired w i t h

possible for every student on every campus turn himself into a research worker.

humanity,

a longing t o

to

b e serving God and serv i n g

because we live in a world 'in

True enough. B ut

t believe that every stu­ an d a g a i n to be br o u g ht Into touch with the

which

dent within the un iversity ought a g ain

g rief and tragedy and hunger. The scope

existence

immense. Let this great university go on

of

research,

with

the

spirit

for

of

there

our

is,

service

alas, for

much our

division

fellows

is

and just

research, to have at least just a peep at

sending out men and women ready to be

that great world, that imaginative, intellec­

serving their fellows in every way.

tual world of exploration and inquiry. We can't all be research workers. Some o f us

A Home of Religion

have to be practical workers in all sorts of fields.

But we can all be in touch with Ihat spirit of research and have a glimpse

Then,

of it. That spirit makes such a difference

I

kept that

of a

home of personality leads on to a home of

of human

religion. The age

life anywhere. The spirit of research b r i n g s with i t the spirit

re ligio n.

home of freedom, a home of truth, a n d a

to Ihe whole of university life and it makes such a difference to the whole

a home of

last. But of course the true meaning

of religious tests is past.

And on this campus, as on thousands of

of reverence and wonder

others in t h e Western world, the individual

and humility.

is

free

to

profess

any

religion

or

no

religion. Religious tests are no longer. We have wonderful academic freedom in that

A Home of Personality

respect. But the age of Christian influence has

Then a university is a home of person­ ality. I h o p e and I am sure that this uni­ versity

is

a place

full

not past.

of highly marked

be

c am pus

a

And t h i s universily

place

where

the

will

widest

always

academic

alities be growing in relation to the per­

freedom is combined with the presence o f C h ristian influence. Christian i n fluence stands for a certain u n derstan d i n g o f man and the world. Put it like th is. The ancient Greek poet Sophocles said, "Many t h i n g s are marve l o u s a n d noth ing is more marvel­

sonalities of others in the fulfillment of all

ous than man."

individual

personalities.

Every

ou ght to have

its eccentrics. They are a true part of its common life. In a univer­ sity we come not o n l y to have our minds fed with knowledge but

of us

to let our person­

That is the humanist creed that man is

in a human community.

wonderful

And a university as a home of person­ ality is therefore a place not j ust where

agree

people are trained to be skilled in certain

man

6

and marvelous. We Christians with the humanists in saying that is w o n d e rf u l and marvelous, but


C h ristians go on and t h e y say something else. They d o n ' t only quote S o p h o c les, but they q u ote the Psalmist, and the Psalmist said: "I thank t h ee, 0 God, for I am fear­ f u lly and marve lo u s ly created." Marvel­ o u s ly c reated. T h at's j u s t the difference. M a n with all his marvelo u s powers, o f b rain an d ski ll a n d s p i rit, is a creature and h i s true mean i n g a n d work is seen when

into the heart of s piritual t h i n g s . H e re was a y o u n g Ge rman monk. He just made h i s protest a n d h e went t o t h e c h u rch door i n the town o f Wittenberg a n d pin n e d h is pro­ test on t h e c h u rch door. Amo n g those 95 theses, perhaps the one t h at moves me most i s the one w h i c h says this: "The t r u e t reasu re of the C h u rc h i s the Go s p e l of t h e g l o ry an d g race of God." T h e re is

h e h u m b l es hi mself i n the p resence o f a C reator, a Savior, and a J u d g e . I won't pursue that fu rther . B u t there is the key to the C h rist ian u n de rstan d i n g of man and the wo rlld. An u n d e rstan d i n g w h i c h leads on to the conviction t h at every man, woman, and ch ild has an eq ual dig nity fo r a l l eternity because Ch rist d ied for all as the Sav i o r of all. An eternal and ever­ las t i n g worth for every s i n g l e man, woman, and c h i ld in the uni,verse is created i n God's o w n image fo r t h e end of fellows h i p w ith God forever. And so far from being i r relevant to the u rgenc ies of a u r contemporary w o r ld, i t i s just t h i s b e l ief i n t h e eternal verities that gives the right backg ro u n d for our u n der­ s ta n d i n g o f t h e c o n temporary world with i n w h i c h we are placed. This is a C h ristian un ivers ity, more s p e c i fically it is a L u t h e ran u n iverslty. I am not myself a Luth eran, but one does not need to be a L u t h e ran fo r the p u r p ose of recog n izing in M a rt i n L u t h e r one of the g reat creative men of God o f all time. One of the wo nderful t h i n g s about Martin Luther is t h at tremendo us results fol l owed from the little local acts of fai l hfuln ess. In his own little local acts of fai t h f u l n ess, the truth, as he saw i t , he l i ttle knew that he was re-creating the c o u rse of h uman h is­ to ry. Why? What happ ened? T h e re were s candals i n the contemporary world and c h u r c h . Scandals which now all Ch ris­ tians of eve ry persuasion, Cat h o lic and P rotestant, w o u ld acknowledge to be scan­ dals. The presen ce of commerce coming

somel h i n g that a l l of us who are C h ristians can stan d fo r. B u t when we u se the words "stand for" we can learn t h at sta n d i n g for something does require c o u rage and is somet h i n g that is very costly. Whatever cause we are sta n d i n g fo r as Chr ist ians in contemporary soc iety we won't be f r i g h t­ ened in o u r stan ding if we catch some­ t h i n g of t h e s p i ri,t of o t h e r words of Luther whi'ch are very mov i n g . "Here I stand. I can do no o t h e r. " May that s pirit fill all those w h o in t h is u n iversity, so won d e r f u l l y free a n d at t h e same time so C h ristian i n influence, learn from a 'home of freedom, a home of t ruth, a home of pe rson a l i ty, a home of reli g io n . May God be w i t h Pacific Luth eran U n ive rsity for many years, yes, fo r many centu ries to come. May ·t h i s u n ivers i ty, amo ngst whom I am so utterly p ro u d now to have my own little place, may it go on sen d i n g people out who will b ri n g these realities home to the t ro u b led wo rld i n w h i c h we a r e l i v i n g .

7


"A Newly-Miinted Academic Year" by President Robert Morlvedl September, 1967 It affords me pleasu re to welcome both returning and new members of the fac­ ulty to a newly-minded academic year­ nine months of time and opportunity no one has experienced before. To me it is an awe-inspiring situation. How we spend our time and effort will immediately affect the lives of at least 2,700 students; ulti­ mately It may affect the lives of tens of millions of human beings-many millions yet unborn. Since there are many newly-appointed members of our faculty and staff, I want particularly to welcome them. In the proc­ ess of appointing you, we have conscien­ tiously attempted to acquaint you with our peculiar purposes. We know we have not fully succeeded; hence we shall continue some orientation conferences and discus­ sions. At this moment, I want particularly to urge you to study our declared pur­ poses as a University of the Church. You will find the statement in the front of our catalog, as well as in the Faculty Hand­ book. I earnestly invite you to make the clearly stated concepts a part of your per­ sonal philosophy and practice. To the former members of the faculty and staff, I invite you to be aware of the fact that one of your important and imme-

diate opportunities and obligations is to do all you possibly can to assist your new colleagues to make a happy and comfort­ able adjustment to their new environment. One of the reasons they are here is to bring to us new ideas and new insights for enabling us to attempt to do a far better job than we have done before. They can do this only if we receive them graciously and establish meaningful lin'es of com­ munication.

The Fuse Is Short Since we gathered a year ago as a fac­ ulty, almost incredible things Ihave hap­ pened in the United States and around the world. Of one thing I am certain, never have we begun a school year with so milny people aware of so many profoundly dis­ turbing problems to be solved. I say "aware of," for most of the problems them­ selves have been known to tens of thou­ sands of informed and sensitive people for many years. Little has been done, how­ ever, because the fuse to the dynamite has appeared to be as elastic as our na­ tional indifference. Now, however, millions -but far from all!---of Americans know that time is running out. The fuse is get-

8


out content, but, as one faculty member of

ting frighteningly short.

the

It was inevitable but shocking that the

Sun

Valley

"Everything

President of the United States had to ap­

Academy

that

of

Boys

happens to

says,

the student

point a high-powered committee to try to

from the moment of his arrival to the mo­

ferret

ment of his departure is curriculum." This

out

the

causes

of

the

horrifying

riots and pilLlage which have fallen like an

brilliant

Egyptian

coordination

plague

upon

our

cities.

Any

concept

suggests

of

knowledgeable person knows the cause­

escaped

two hundred years of injustice, unwisdom,

Nason of Carleton

and

deprivation.

knows that

it

Any

is

thoughtful

impossible

to

I

person

our

effort

the

which

attention.

need

have

President

John

declares-and

think-"We teach

for

may

them

too

rightly,

much,

lay

too much emphasis on courses and cred­

preserve even

its and examinations; we too often regard

half-heartedly to educate a large segment

education as the acquisition of knowledge

national peace and order by

trying

of our population and at the same time

and too seldom as imparting an

deprive them of the basic rights stated in

of inquiry." Alfred North Whitehead goes

attitude

still further: "The solution which Ii am urg­

our most sacred national documents.

ing is to eradicate the factual disconnec­

Make Teaching Relevant This

year,

as

never

before,

tion 01 our subjects which kills the vita'iity

we

of our modern curriculum. There is only

must

one subject matter for education, an d it is

enter upon our teaching assignments with a kni,fe-sharp awareness

of

the need

Life

to

make both content an d methodo'rogy more relevant to our

national and local

bra,

prob­

lems than we have in the past. We live on

becoming an

urban

from which

dreary

face if we

plays

of of

so­

all,

Literature,

History,

a couple of

represented

with

in substance,

"Can such a list

by

pedagogical committed to

be said to represent

it?" We are fortunate, in the words of a

contribution to the savage problems of the

Columbia University president, that "There

cities of America-and particularly the one

is

on whose doorsill we sit.

r10

known curricular device by which an

earnest and intelligent young man can be prevented

Need Open M inds curriculum.

from

getting

some kind of an

education."

Our conference is focused upon the con­ core

follows;

Life, as it is known in the midst of living

01 this fact, we can never make a deep

the

of

memory.

ciety. Unless we as an educational com­

of

nothing follows;

Shakespeare

acter, to be,

munity, recognize the peculiar importance

cept

Instead

notes and short analyses of plot and char­

in our environment. America is, almost with speed,

manifestations.

languages never mastered; and lastly, most

want to be a significant educational factor lightning

all its

from which nothing

the edge of Tacoma, but Tacoma is a part of the responsibility we must

in

this single unity, we offer children-Alge­

We

The Six R's

have

already been at the problem for years, but

It is against this background of indictment

it begins to appear that what we thought

that Dr. Richard E. Farson, Director of the

as short a time as a year or two ago is

Western Behavioral Sciences Institute, de­

already

out-moded.

If

we

ever

needed

clares,

"Most

students

open minds, that time is today. It is utterly

learned the three R's.

impossible to think of a curriculum with-

college

9

to

learn

the

have

scarcely

They move on to six

R's - remedial


reading, metic. root,

remedial writing,

How

many

or calculate

cule?

between

can

do

percentage,

junior high school tinguish

remedial arith­

adults history

an

or pass

exam,

atom

and

Students have been so

persons can constructively meet the per­

square or

a

plexities

a

dis­

society

thoroughly

ity. face

only

one

book

in

world

which

comfortable

lege

read

a

in

goal of education must

mole­

conditioned against reading that even col­ graduates

of

which

problems

spawn much faster than their answers. The

a

year."

with

be

people

to develop a

can

live

more

change than with rigid­

In the coming world, the capacity to the

new

appropriately is

more

im­

portant than the ability to know and repeat the old. " The

President's

Council

of

Economic

Advisors has now publicly announced what many of us have known for a long time; namely, "The education of our people is the

most

basic

resource

of

our

society

. . . it is the most important force behind economic growth." They used to think the best way to increase national income was Ladies

and

gentlemen,

as

I

read

through reinvestment of capital in material

the

things. They no longer believe this.

stiletto words of our critics, I realize we lenging

but

desperately

difficult

time

be a college teacher or administrator. ficult

as

it

is

to

succeed

in

a

thing else. In the words of

to

drought,

wholly

and

when timberland

not replaced,

deplore the waster

cult to succeed in the kind of environment

and

we are consciously striving to create, for

moved

natural with

to

resources

conservation

-have been neglected for generations. "

faithful servant."

Year of Challenge

live With Change Rogers, of

action

destr'oyed

of all its natural resources-human beings

ant accolade, "Well done, thou good and

pleasure

of

was

nation learned

discovered that some of the most precious

per 5e, even while we are

attempting to merit the supremely import­

Carl

to

the

programs, but only recently has the nation

we are attempting to be a first-rate educa­

Dr.

Francis Kep­

pel, "When soil was eroded by flood and

Dif­

secular environment, it is even more diffi­

tional institution

Edu­

cated people are more important than any­

have our job cut out for us. It is a chal­

with

working

whom long

This is enough to suggest that I am invit­ ing you to a year of far-reaching challenge

I had the

decades

and opportunity.

ago

Nine months

of unused

and sparklingly new Time lies ahead, Time

when we were immersed in the intricacies

and

of directive versus non-directive counsel­

opportunity

which

will

never

again

be ours.

ling, sums up the general problem in these already

May God give us the measure of wis­

upon us, the goal of education must be to

dom, courage, and creativity to use it for

words; develop change,

"In

the

world

individuals who

are

which

who

flexible

is

are

open

to

our joy and that of our students, as well

and

adaptive,

as for the taking of at least one long step

who have learned how to learn, and are

toward

thus able to learn continuously. Only such

premely important purposes.

10

the

attainment

of

His

own

su­


THE NEW JERUSALEM -1967 by Dr. Stewart D. Govig Associate Professor 01 Religion

The Wailing Wall

Israeli soldier near Jerusalem

"For thou, hast

tried

0 God, hast tested us: thou us

as

silver

is

tried."

C rossing the former no man's land by t h e Jaffa Gate, I reeled i n t h e c l o u ds o f d u s t raised b y b u l l dozers c lear i n g away the d e b r i s along t h e a n c i e n t walls. H u n d reds of I s rae l i to u r ists o n the same path way lent a h o l iday atmosphe re to the scene : sol d i e rs and t h e i r g i r l friends, c h i ld ren bear i n g flags, and farmers from t h e k i b­ b u tzim min g l e d freely w i t h t h e Arab pop­ u lace beyo n d t h e wal l s. Ven d e rs hawked t h e i r wares alo n g the ways i de--gum, soft d r i nks, combs, ball pOint p e n s. ne cklaces -and offered u n savory fo ods fo r sale. In the d i stance the s h attered top of t h e D o rm i t i an Abbey was a mute w i t ness t o t h e recent h os t i l i t i es. A t St. Stephen 's Gate

Psalm

66:10. Tank t racks marred t h e as phalt road as we a p p roached J e r u salem, the "city of peace." It was J u l y 5 , o n e mo n t h after the war had begun, a n d t h e o ff i c ial w h o met us at the a i rport welcomed u s as the fi rst "post-war" student g ro u p to v i s i t Is rael. We were ten tea c h e rs of B i b l ical l i t e rat u re from coilleges across the Un ited States, partic i pat i n g in the "Land of the B i b l e Wo rkshop" sponsored b y t h e 'Institute o f Heb rew Studies a t Ne w Yo r k Univers i ty. W i t h i n the c ity I was immed iate ly im­ pressed by the n um b e rs of Israe l i so l d i e rs on t h e streets, each carry i n g an automatic weapo n. T h e tensions of May and June had s u b s i d e d , but f u l l mobi'lization was a p parently maintai n e d . In o u r headquarters at The King's Hote l there were more s o l­ diers. One ar rived i n t h e d i n i n g room, se­ l ected a table beside m i n e, cas ually placed his Uzzi su bmac h i n e g u n o n a c h a i r (muzzle p o i n ted in my d i rectio n!) and gave h is o rder. The day fo l l ow i ng, together with t h ree c o l leag ues, I walked to the "Old City."

the evidence was more vivid; h e re t h e b u rned she l l of a b u llet ri ddled bus b le n d ­ ed w i t h the bu llet and s h ra p n e l scars aro u n d t h e gate. T h e s u n was b r i g h t a n d hot a s I jo i n ed the t h ro n gs descend ing i n to t h e K i d ron Valley on t h e i r way to t h e h o l y s ites there and a t t h e M o u n t o f Olives be­ y o n d . Many gathered around a crude mon­ ument conSisting of stones and the t w i s t e d remains of a motorcycle, several guns and battle he lmets. W reaths of flow­ e rs marked t h i s spot w h e re fo u r I s rae li parat roo pers d i ed in the assa ult u po n t h e

11


Gate. Overhead, a huge Israeli helicopter patrolled the area. In the serenity of the Garden of Gethsemane my companions and I paused to rest in the shade. Beyond, the Valley, historic Jerusalem, entering a new phase of its Ilife and once more cap­ turing the world's attention. appeared as a gleaming fulfillment of the peace sug­ gested by its ancient name. Entering behind the walls once more, I made my way to the most sacred of the Jewish holy places, a wall of huge stones rising over the western remnants of Israeli's ancient Temple courtyard wall and com­ mOlilly known as the "Wailing Wall." For centuries devout Jews have visited the site to pray and to contemplate Israel's lost glory. As I approached, a young I sraeli soldier, weapon in hand, reminded me to cover my head. There I joined elderly pil­ grims and youthful, devout Jews who had come to celebrate their nation's rebirth by praising the God of their fathers. Shortly following the "Six Day War" when the Wall was opened once more for Jewish pil­ grims, the Jerusalem Post reported that two hundred thousand persons-one tenth of the population of Israel-came to the holy place. During a jeep ride around the city Dr. Beroshi, curator of the Shrine of the Book Museum where a number of the Dead Sea Scrolls are housed, described the battle for Jerusalem in which he had taken part. He explained that the Israeli army had encircled the city and, like every army in history, made its assault from the north. At the Mandelbaum Gate, scene of heavy fighting, we saw soldiers removing mines from the area; occasionally we heard booms from the place where they were detonated. In the surrounding areas bulldozers were at work to remove ruins and rubbish. The tension of anticipation during the final days of May was so great, our guide said, that the outbreak of hos-

tilities came almost as a relief. Mobilized from the reserves, Dr. Beroshi had left his family in their apartment and joined his comrades. "For the next three days," he stated, "I was quite busy." The guide at Iisrael's new National Museum was a most competent young lady. In the section which had been dam­ aged by artillery shells she paused in her lecture to exclaim, "You'll have to forgive me if I lose my train of thought here. We are still so terribly excited about what has happened to us during these past weeks!" In a lecture on the subject of modern Biblical research Dr. Moshe Goshen, pro­ fessor of Hebrew and Semitics at Hebrew University, related how the war experi­ ence had deepened a religious sensitivity among Israel's citi'zens. "One month ago," he related, "soldiers who would have pro­ tested being called religious, reached the Wailing Wall still under sniper fire. And they wept like children over what is con­ sidered a desecrated religious symbol." He continued, "Everywhere one hears the word 'miracle. ' It is an appropr,iate term; the significance of what has happened is too great for us to see. Future Jews will have to comprehend it." When our group met for a question and answer session with Israel's Chief Rabbi Untermann, the elderly scholar expressed similar sentiments in his comments. "When the whole story of the war is known," he reflected, "we shall see that it is a story of del·iverance which would be wor.thy as an­ other chapter added to the Bible." Our hosts avoided the words "annexed" or "conquered" in referring to the parts of the city now under Israeli control. To their view, the no man 's land which split this Holy City in two must be eradicated both along its sacred streets and in men's minds. The new Jerusalem is now united once more to give spiritual life to people of all nations.

12


Homecoming HURRY! HURRY! HURRY! To "The Great­ est Show on Earthl" Homecoming -1967 is Just about here. Set aside the dates 01 November 2, 3, 4, 5 lor the gala festivities. The Homecoming committee has chosen for the general th eme of this year's home­ coming the title of "The Greatest Show on Earth!" Long hours 01 plann ing and prep­ aration have gone into this circus motif. Juniors Bruce Eklund and Diana Oas, both of Portland, Ore., are heading up this year's arrangements. Their committee was organized last spring and has been hard at work all summer.

the bonfire-ralty beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Eastvold Auditorium. At 10:00 p.m. an

The curtaln witl go up beginning at 7:00 p.m. Thursday, the second of November, with the coronation of the 1967 Homecom­ ing Queen in Eastvold Chapel. This pro­ gram is complimentary to the public. At 8:15 p.m. in Memorial Gymnasium the an­ nual homecoming concert will begin. This

alumni coffee hour will be held in ·Stuen Hall lounge. Saturday's activities begin early with the annual Powder Puff game set for 9:30 a.m. against the UPS girls field hockey team, and the crowning of Handsome Harry. "The Aroma Bowl," an all star Intra­

year it will feature Ray Charles in "The . . 100%." Tickets Ray Charles Show

murat touch football game, will follow. Kickoff for the annual football game with

can be secured for the concert as well as for all other homecoming activities by con­ tacting the alumni office. Concert tickets

the College of Idaho wilt be at 1 :30 p.m.

.

are being sold lor $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 each. Friday's schedule will feature the annual song fest entitled "Under the Big Top," and

at Franklin Pierce Stadium. Coach Roy Carlson has molded a fine squad this year and aMer the exciting 27 to 27 tie with C. of I. last year the team is more determined than ever to have a victory for the home­ coming crowd.


After the game a reunion coffee hour will be held in Alpine Haus lounge of Tingelslad Hall beginning at 4:00 p.m. The special guests of honor at this reuion will be the classes of 1917, 1942 and 1957. The Robert A. L. Mortvedt Library will also be open so that those of you who have not yet seen this fine facility will be able to do so. The Homecoming banquet "A Circus Feast" will begin at 6:00 p.m. in Columbia Center. Last year over 350 people were in attendance and we look for a larger crowd t h i s year. The ho n o r classes for this reunion will be the "golden" class of 1 9 1 7, the silver anniversary class of 1 942 and the class of 1 957 that had as part of Its distinction several members who helped the basketball team reach third place in the national NAIA tournament in Kansas City.

Dr. Stewart Govig, of our religion de足 partment, will be ou r 1 967 Homecoming speaker and will bring us his impressions of Israel and the Middle East. His topic title is "Can Peace Break Out?" and is based on his observations of the Holy Land immediately after the Arab-Israeli connict this past June. Following the banquet Dr. Govig will show slides of his trip to Israel in the new lecture hall In Xavier Hall (the old library reading room). Coffee will be pro足 vided and an open house of this remod足 eled facility will also be held. For those wishing to attend the Home足 coming Dance it will begin at 8:30 p.m. at the Tacoma Mall. The theme for the dance, in keeping with the general motif, is "Carousel." The dance was moved off campus this year so that ladies attending could wear their heels. This has not been

PLU ALUMNI BOARD PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY-TREASURER

Rev. Luther O. Watness '49

Robert A. Nistad '53

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI

Portland, Oregon (1968)

Seattle, Washington (1969)

&

RELATIONS

Jon B. Olson '62 Tacoma, Washington (ex-officio)

MAY.

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1968

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1969

TERM EXPIRES

Gustal Anderson '48

Dr. Jess Bumgardner '49

Duane Berentson '51

Mercer Island, Washington

Beaverton, Oregon

Burlington, Washington

Donald Monson '39

Gerry Dryer '61

Luci Ie Larson '56

Olympia, Washington

Spanaway, Washington

Tacoma, Washington

1970

Helen Nordquist '57

Dr. Anita Hendrickson '57

Robert E. Ross '54

Tacoma, Washington

Seattle, Washington

Tacoma, Washington

E. Robert Stuhlmiller '57 Edwall, Washington

Terry Sverdslen '57

Dr. M. Roy Schwarz '58

Kellogg, Idaho

Seattle, Washington Malcolm L. Soine '52 Tacoma, Washington

REPRESENTATIVES TO THE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF REGENTS Esther Aus

'32,

Portland, Oregon (1968)

Rev. Lowell Knutson '51, Everett, Washington (1969) Cart T. Fynboe '49, Tacoma, Washington (1970)

Ex-officio Michael McKean Senior Class President


a l lowed i n Memorial Gymnasium because of possible damage being done to the floor. Next year when the new Cliff Olson Memorial Gymnasium-Auditorium is fin­ ished the dance will be moved back to campus. Shoes can be worn on the syn­ thetic floor to be installed in the new auditorium without damaging it. Sunday homecomers may attend the 1 0:30 a.m. worship services of the Student Congregation and the dedications of the two residence halls on campus. Ord I H a ll will be dedicated at 1 :30 p.m. and Tingel­ stad Hall at 2:30. All in all a busy homecoming is planned. We hope you will be here to enjoy it with us. Homecoming can only be successful if the alumni will take an active interest and revisit their alma mater. May we see you at Homecoming this year?

From The Director During the months of October and Novem­ ber many of our alumni will be contac ted by the Lutheran Ingathering For Education (LIFE) prog ram of the American Lutheran Church. This program of the church was initiated to show that the church is Inter­ ested and is willing to support its schools and seminaries. We who are the graduate s of one of these church related institutions know full well the influence that our edu­ cation has had upon our lives. We are in a unique position to support this program in our local congregations. However, some alumni may face a prob­ lem. Many alums still have unpaid bal­ ances on their pledges to the library. The LIFE appeal may appear to conflict with this pledge. The following suggestions may be of help. First, continue your pledges that you have already made to the University. This

money is committed by the University for specific purposes. It is possible to have your LIFE pledge take up at the conclu­ sion of your present commitment, i.e. the Library Fund Drive. Secondly, if your li­ brary pledge is now paid up, then a gift to LIFE will extend and enrich the church's program of higher education. If you so de­ sire. your gift may be designated directly for Pacific Lutheran University. Finally, the LIFE program needs all of our prayers. To achieve the goal o f more than $20,000,000 there must be a deep involvement by all members of the church. You can help as the LIFE goal is to place a major new building on each ALC school campus. Sincerely,

JON B. OLSON, Director of Alumni Relations P.S. The non-ALC alumni may wish to help by contributing direct gifts to the Univer­ sity for the Clifford O. Olson Physical Edu­ cation Auditorium Building.

Understanding Is Board Aim Conducting the business of the Alumni Association is but one facet of the re spo ns­ ibility of the Alumni Board. Under the leadership of Rev. Luther Wat­ ness, pres i de n t the 1967-68 Alumni Board has planned four meetings for this year. A special feature of this year's program will be a two-day meeting in February that is designed to aid the Board members I n gaining a new dimension o f knowledge and understanding about their alma m ater. This program, it is hoped, will result in a closer rapport between all alumni and their alma mate r. Your Board representa­ tives will also be better equipped to rep­ resent your thoughts and concerns to the alumni relations office and the administra­ tion. Results of the meetings of the Alumni ,


Board will be reported as a regular fea­ ture in RE F LECTI ONS. The first discussion at t!lis year's Sep­ tember meeting cen tered around the sub­ ject of an alumni spo nsor ed cont i n uin g educ atio n program. November's meeting at Homecoming will conc e rn itself with the

and l e arn in g program in the un iversity residence halls. A special alu mn i committee has a lso been cha rged with the responsibility of r el ati n g the alumni program to the under­ class students on the c a mpus It i s felt that this co m m ittee will help the s tuden t of today to understan d and re l ate to the past as well as t o give the alumni an in­ s ight i n to today's sludent and his thi n k in g new living

.

.

Cherry B l ossom" p resented at PLU in May of 1935. Our problem is that we have not been able to identify all of the cast. Th is is necessary for the archive records. Those

whose i de nt i ty are not known are all in the back row. B egi nn i ng from the left the sec­ ond. t h i rd, fifth and seventh pe r son s in the row are not known. Your help in ide ntifyin g these peo p l e wo u l d be appre­ ciated. Those i dent i fie d so far are, begin­ ning with the back row left: Norma Preus (or Aida Johnson), unknown, unknown, Ju dy Benso n , E l len B er gstro mm unknown, Keith Reed, Milton Nesvl g, Elizabeth Stu en, Margaret Rorem, John Stuen, Lenore With­ row, Gerhardt Pflueger, Helen Holtcamp, Ro lf Bolstad, Evelyn Raudebaugh and Alvin ,

Ragen.

Help! been rec e i ved by the alu m n i office. It has been gi ve n to the University Archives through the kindness of Mr. Paul A rms t rong, Class of 1936. It depict s the c as t of an operetta "Madame

The picture b elow has

Front row beg in n in g on the left: Eldon Anderso n, Evelyn Monson (or En id Hut­ so n ), Robert Svare, Osten Eliason, Emmet T h omps on , Mildred Monson, Paul Arm ­ st ro n g. If we have missed on any of t hose identified we wou Id app rec ia te knowing this as well. Time see ms to h ave a w a y of di m m i ng the mind.


1906 O. M. Jennestad

" l m pact/67" Report

1 908

The mail is all in and the total has been counted. The " I MPACT / 67 " annual alumni fund drive is complete. This year 21 2 fam­ ilies

gave

$491 0.55

to

the

annual

fund

program. This amount is in addition to the conti n u i ng pledges that are being received each month from our Library Fund Drive. Although the amount is not g reat, it does

Frank W. Peterson 1 912 Scott M . Brown 1915 Philip M . Iverson, Oscar E . Lee

1917 Emma J. Rynning

prove that our alumni are still interested and concerned. The goal next year will be

1918

greater. This must be if we are to conti nue as an effective support group for Pacific Lutheran University.

1 926 Mr. and Mrs. Gerhard Haakenson, ( R u th E. B u l i ) , Nina Eide Thompson

A special t h anks to all those who con­ tri buted th is past year. SpeC ial kudos to those 17 members of our " I MPACT / 67 " Century Club.

1 929 Ingeborg B.

Below are listed those who contributed during the 1 96 6-67 fiscal year to the annual fund program. Will name there next year?

we

see

your

CENTURY CLUB Myron B. Kreidler 26 ; E. C. Tveter '28; D r. Jesse P. Pfl ueger '37; R. E . Wiesner '39; Alice Ford Pfl ueger ' 4 2 ; H. Warren

Ghormley '49; Margaret Kutz N istad '52 ; Robert A. Nistad '53; Gerald F. Peterson '55; J. Arnold Bricker '56 ; Robert H. Aust '58 ; Marvin O. Bolland '58 ; John H. Temp­ I n '66 ; John O. Yeasting Han '66; Ken­ neth D. Sammons '68

FACULTY AND NON-AL UMS

Dr. Martin W . Joh nson

Bolstad, A. R. Zielsdorf

1 930 Viola Taw Elsner 1 93 1 Mildred Berven Gault 1 932 W i l liam C. Rasmu ssen, Scholz, C l ara Fjermedal Watts Velton

Muriel

Thrane,

Vetters Muriel

1933 Helen Collins Anderson, John E. Zackrison 1 935 Rachel Flint Freel in. Milton Nesvig, Angela Jacobson Sivertson 1937 Marian Kohler Good 1 938 Stener R. Kvins l and, Paul V. Larson 1 939

M a ry Botten, Lyle Hall, Dr. Ervin E. Krebs, Allen P. Lovejoy, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Mort­

Baard Lervick

vedt, Clifford O. Olson, Dr. and Mrs. James Patrick, Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Ramstad, Carl D. Spangler, Margaret P. Stenson, Dr. Jane Williamson

Pearl Walden Irby, Marg aret Heggen Kvins­

1903 Rudolph E. Hamry

1 9 40 land, Dr. Snyder

Merle

R.

Pl ueger.

Robert

R.

1 941 Norma Larson

Johnson

Deyton,

Nina

Anderson


1942 Marine Rosenau Davis, Jean C. H u ber 1 943 Frances Fin ley Monso n , Helen C h u rch Sny­ der. Lenore Withrow 1 944 Mary Lono Otto 1 945 G race D. B i rkestol , Bob Monson , Fra n c is N iesen Ste l l oh 1 946 Guttorm R. G regersen, Sadie A. So l o m o n , Isabe l Ha rstad Watness, M r. and M rs. Ken­ nE�th An enso n ( R uth Jensen) 1947 A n n a Anderson H o i l and. M r. and M rs. E. Arthur Larson, J r. ( Lorraln Akehurst) 1 948 I n g rid Martenson Fynboe, Gladys Hov l an d Berg u m , M a ria n M . Pearson 1949 Lois Tolile it Ewing, Carl Fynboe, Theol Holland, Beverly Swanson Hed l u nd, Esth e r Ordahl Hje lseth, C l ifford M . Korsmo, La­ Von n e Densow Sturgeo n , Beverly Hed l u nd Swanson, Luther Watness, R uby Watness 1950 Arth u r H . Arp, E lsa K i l ian Bal l , A rd it h Ol­ son Craychee, Erven L. H gen, John K. Hagense n , Lawrence J. H auge, LaMonte Hed l u n d , Morris N . Hendri c kso n , D r. John G. Hewsto n , Sarouel G, Hewsto n , Robert D . Ketel le, Kathryn Lucas Madse n , W i l liam Reiss, Sue Carpy We l l s 1 95 1 Mavis Ken n y

Sanderso n

Hoffman,

Donald

K.

1952 John M. Aaberg, J U l i us L. Eneboe, Leo V. Gaume, H e l en Jensen Hauge, Audrey Ste­ phenson Hewston , Gordo n Meeske. Mar­ garet Kutz N istad, M i l d red Foege Toepel, Rev. Duane E . U l leland, D r. and M rs. Roy Virak (Gloria Jutte) , Bu rton E . Wells

1953 Neal W. Amend, David G . Kent, Betty Rig­ gers Keith , Bettie Cruts Kenny, G le n n Werner 1 954 D r. E l more E. D u n c a n , Dr. Edward E . H a kanso n , Rev. and M rs. James J aeger (Constance Hanson ) , D r. Donald Keith, Rosal ine Reitz Knerr, L . Jerald Sheftels, Marilyn F re n c h U l leland 1 955 I r i s N o rdman Cam moc k , Robert C u rtis, Avis E . Jen sen , R . E ugene Poch e l , Gerald E. S c h i m ke , Faith Bueltmann Stern. Su­ za nne Sol ie Werner, Dr. P h i l i p E. Wigen 1 956 LaVerne Wells A mend, Carl J . H i n tze, Norita M i l ler Liebelt, Joyce Puffert Mazer LCDR and M rs . Stewart Mo rton ( Kath ryn Jerstad ) , Dr. P h i l i p A . Nordquist, Jean Baker Poc h e l , Rosemary E. Roth, Thelma Nygaard Schwarz, Rev. David C . Wold 1 957 Yvo n n e A. D ietz, Marguerite M . E ri c kso n , Betty A u n e E m erson, Dr. An ita Schnell Hendrickson, Robert M . Monso n , Helen Jordanger Nordqu ist, E. Robert Stu h l m i l ler, Pa u l i n e Ziem ke Vorderstrasse, Joanne Bayne W i dman , E l isabeth O m l i Wold. 1 958 Rev. James Berentson, Esther M . E l l ic k­ son, Rev. James N. Floren ce, D r. N o rm a n O . Forness, Ruth Mauerman G a u m e , Jo­ anne Knoph Hedges, Hazel Roti J o h nson, Bonnie Troedson M u l ler. Janet S m ith Ose, Carol Sheftels Q u igg, Beatrice L. Schee le Carol Buschke Thomas. 1 959 Ron ald E. Bacon, No rita N e lson B u rson, W. Larry Eich l e r, Roger C. Ho ltey, Mary Reinertson Monson . Margaret M u rdoch O ldham, D r. M . Roy Schwarz. M r . and M rs . C l ifford J . Se l l s (Norma Kn utzen), Lois Beckemeier Sheffels, Twi l a G i l l i s S p r i ng e r,


Wil lamae K. Wigen

Anderson

Stu h l m m i l l er,

Lester

1960

G l enn Campbell, M ing Yee Wang Chen, David P. Dah l , Howard F. Dempsey, Rev. P h i l i p N. Er lande r, Jean U l leland Hovet, Peter R. Jordah l , Mr. and M rs. James KU­ tilsby (Liv A n ne Boveng), M r. and Mrs. Tom l. McLaughl i n (Rhoda Bloo m q u ist) 1961

Harlan L. Anderson, Daniel E . Benson, Syl­ via Langland Boomer, Margery Kreuger Campbell, Nelda Reede Chandler, Le if O. Dah l , Dr, Darryl D. Dettmann, Rev. and Mrs. Paul W. Eriks (Sally Piehl), Joyce Luiten H i l l , Karen Shaner Jordahl, Marie A. Korsmo, Rev. Russel Muel ler, Richard C. Sch lenke r 1 962

Rita A. Brillhart, Barbara M. Brinkley, Ca rol Teslow Dah l, Kare n Hanson G oebe l , S i ng­ h i l d John ner, M i na Lakosky Ludeman, Rev. and Mrs. Robert Moore (Serena M. Hopp) Dixie Lee Prouse, Ardath Sheggeby Sols­ rud, Mr. and M rs. Wamer V. Wh ite (Deanna Haugland) 1963

Ronald J. Boomer, Patty Hagerman, Nancy A. Krogel , Claudia Lewis, Arleen Searle, Carol J. Walters 1964

Audrey K. A mst, Carolyn Nelson Fran klin, Emily Hallen Parker, Leslie P. Pederson, E l l en L aback Quass, Carol W i l l i ams Sag­ ness, Linda Trabert, Dr. Louis C. Wagner, J r., P h i l i p A. Yokers, Carol G i l l is Zetter­ berg 1 965

Clarice Reinertson Bates, Tho mas O. Car l­ son, Roseanna M . Hester, Stanley Hoobing, Christie Aasen M i l ler, Karl Ost l i ng, Chery l Taylor Pederson, S P / 4 a n d Mrs. David Radke (Lynn Maxeiner)

1 966

Katherilne J. Carso n, LouAnne H i nes Grey, Evelyn Schutte Hedman, Kenneth A. John­ son, Oyars Laukers, Mary A l ice L lewel lyn, Jean P. Nordquist A lan H. Rowberg, Phil­ lip S. Schuur, Judi th l. Seastrand 1 967

David W. Lee The fo l lowing are names of those people whose gifts were receipted after J u l y 31 , 1 967: CENTURY CLUa

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Berntsen ( I da H i nder­ lie '31 ) , Haakon Klrkbo '41 FACULTY AND NON-ALUMS

Grace E. Bl omqu ist, D r. and Mrs. Harold leraas, Rev. and M rs. J. C. K. Preus, Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Ramstad 1906

Levi B. Thompson 1 935 Rhoda Hokenstad Young 1 940

Lowell J. Satre 1941

lenore Jah lstrom Bozarth 1942

Kathryn Wallen Baisinger 1943

Lama Rogers G reer 1946

N e l l i e Ch ristofferson 1948

Ronald V. G ratias 1949

Vivian H u rtig Walz 1949

Rev. C. Ch ristofferson 1950

Roy F. Larson, M r. and Mrs. S. B. Skart­ land (Marjorie Esse)


1951 Robert A. Anderson , Lu c i l l e Stauffnecker Brewer, Maria Ogren Larso n , Thomas D. Sul l ivan 1 955 M i n a Raaen Wigen

Mltt i l staedt,

Dr.

Philip

E.

1957 M r. and Mrs. Jack L Hoove r ( Ma r i l y n M . J oh nson) 1959 Betty C. Muse u s , Don Teigen 1960 Mr. and M rs . James Kittilsb y Bove n g ) , C a ro l N e l son Legg

(Liv

Anne

1961

Ne lda Reede Chandler, Wayne L . H i l l , M D , B i l l L e n n o n , J u dy H i l l es l a nd Nelson 1 962 Patti Fun khouser Lennon 1963 Ann Ingeb ritsen land, MD

Tay l o r,

C h r isty

N.

U l le足

1 964 G l enda R . Sad ler 1 965 Mary O lson Corn i l s , Lt. M ichael E by 1 966 Steve Corn i l s , Gary E . Lerch

r - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --, As

an

alum

I

can

sti l l

is my check for the

help.

alumni

u n d e rstand that t h i s gift wi II the

best

University

interests and

of

the

be used

Pacific

Alumni

Name__ __ __ __ __ __ __

E n c l osed

p ro g ra m .

I

in

Lutheran

Associati o n .

C lass__

__ Add ress _ _ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __

Amount

$

__ __ __ _ _ __ _ _


FO R M E R FAC U LTY

1941

D R. A 0 MRS. WAYNE ALLER ( SHARON FO R RAY '64) were forced to evacuate their home I n Bei rut, Lebanon last J u ne d uring the Middle East war. Wayne was a psy­ chology professor at Beirut Col lege for Women under the auspices of the U n ited P resbyterian C h u rch. He is now teach i n g at Man kato (Minn.) State College.

N E I L J. HOFF was el ected to the na­ tional board of governors of the American Trial Lawyers Association. Hoff is a former Republ ican state senator from Tacoma.

1928 D A N HOINES '28 A 0 WIFE RUBY (LO REEN) '30 spent five weeks last sum­ mer travel i n g i n E u ro pe and visiting rela­ tives In Norway. Two o f their chil dren, Janet and Lee, are students at PLU this year.

1930

1943 RAYMOND KAPUS is g u idance d i rector at Phoenix H i g h School, Phoenix, O regon.

1945 DR. LLOYD M. NYHUS re presented P L U at t h e inauguration of P resident M i lton B. Byrd of the Ch icago State College in September.

1947

TORGER LEE is prin c i pal at M t View Elem entary School ( Mossyrock School Dlst.-Lewis County, W ash.).

DR. WILLIAM K. RAMSTAD has been appoi nted president of the Col lege 01 Marin i n San Rafe l , Californ ia. Dr. Ram­ stad was formerly president of Shore l i n e Col lege In Seattle.

1936

1949

DR. RALPH A. B O LSTAD has returned to the States on a one-year furlough u po n completion of h is t h i rd t e r m a s medical missionary i n Madagascar. He i s working as a resident i n psychiatry t Western State Hospital, Steilaco o m , Wash.

REV. GENE H. UPTON was installed as pastor of Northminster Presbyterian Church i n Rawlins, Oregon. MAJ . THEOL S. H OILAND, pastor of Bethel Lutheran Church of Burien, Wash., has been n amed to the new l y c reated posi­ tion of state chaplain of the Was h i n g­ ton National Guard. E L M E R PETERSON has been appoi nted p rincipal of Gault J u nior H i g h in Tacoma. Pete h as been vice principal of H u nt J u n io r H ig h (Tacoma) for a number o f years.

1937 DR. WALTER SCHNACKENBERG has been appo i n ted to the Fran kl in Pierce (Ta­ coma) School Board.

1939

1 9 50

STANLEY FR IESE represented PLU at the ina uguration of President Robert J . West at M i l ls College i n October.

LEROY STRENGE has been appointed curriculum assistant i n seco ndary science by the Tacoma School Distr i c t. Lee has


taught and served as h e l p i ng teacher in sc ience in Tacoma for a nu m ber of years. RALPH BAIRD has been named d i recto r of the Tacoma School District's Special Education program. Prior to this appoint­ ment Ralph was an elementary principal i n the Tacoma district. E R N I E L U ECKENOTTE, JR., is the new profess io na l and manager of the Earl in gton Go l f C l u b in South King County. Ernie is also owner and manager of Brookside Golf Club near Redmond, Washington. The month of October found DONALD E. WI LLIAMS instal led as President of the WashIngton State Elementary Princlp Is Assoc i atio n at the organ izat ion 's fal l con­ ference I n Yakima, Washington. MARV JOHNSON is prin cipa l of Steele Lake E l ementary School at Federal Way, Wash. H is wife, V I R G I N IA ( I SV ICK) '48 Is teaching in Puya l l up.

1951 T h e Tacoma News Tri bune reports that Washington State Senator JACK M ET­ CAL F may be the Repu b l ican's top candi-

date to oppose U . S. Se n . Warren G. Mag­ nuson i n the upcoming senato rial elec­ tions. D I C K PO LLEN , of the West Coast G ro­ cery Co., Tacoma, was the first-place win­ ner in the Was h i ngton Dairy Products Commission's June Dairy Month adve rtis­ ing co ntest , win n ing a trip for h i mself and his wife to Haw i l or Mexico City. Po l le n designed a series of Dairy Month adver­ tisements. DR. RAY TOB IASON , JR. is assistant superi ntenden t for the Puyal l u p Public Schoo l s. THOMAS SULL IVAN has h is own office of physical therapy in Tacoma. H is wife Joa n ne is working in Puya l l u p.

1952 T H E REV. PA U L BRAA FLADT h a s ac­ cepted a ca l l as pastor of Lakeridge Luth­ eran C h u rc h (Renton, Wash.). Paul has co m p leted req u i rements for a deg re e of master of sacred theology at Pacific Luth­ eran Theologica l Sem i n a ry in Berkeley, Calif., and expects to complete his thesis d u ring the next two years.

1953

DID YOU KNOW THAT . . . there are over 6,000 al u m ni of Pacific Lutheran University. . . . over 2,100 ful l-time s tudents are enro l led at PLU t h i s fal l. . . t h e S c h o o l of Fine and A p p l ied Arts is offe r i n g a new degree program t h i s year, a Bac h e l o r o f Sacred Music. . . . the f u l l - t i m e fac u l ty n u m b e rs 1 20

this year.

D R . DAVID K. R O E attended the meeting of the International Committee of Electro­ chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics I n Garm isch, Germany, last Apri l . He gave It paper there on electrolum lnescence. He then v is ited laboratories i n Bonn, Berl in, B russel s and Newcastle. D r. Roe teaches chemistry at the Massachusetts I nstitute of Techno logy. DR. JAMES KAUTH was transferred back to the San F rancisco Bay area i n July from Texas. He successfu l ly com p leted h i s o r a l exams, a n d Is n o w a Diplomat of the American Board of Su rgery. D r. Kauth Is Deputy Ch ief of the Department of Surgery


at the United States P u b l i c Health Service Hospital in San Francisco.

1 9 54 LELAND WEAV ER was selected in a state-wide contest as one of Washi n g ton 's three " Outs tan d ing H i g h Sc hool Che mis t ry Teachers." Leland is a teacher of chem­ istry at Clover Park High Schoo l . D R . GAYLORD FALDE-Honorary, re­ cently received the Martin Luther Medal­ lion, Lutheran B rotherhoo d's di stingu ished service award. R EV. J OHN V. RYD G R E N is the de­ signer , writer and host of "S i l hou ette, " a weekly nati o n a l l y syndicated radio show, which he describes as a b rand new con­ cept in re l i g i ous b roa dcasti ng. It is a re­ l ig i o us rock-and-roll show in which he uses the top tunes, and interv iews teenagers and top rock stars to prove that relig ion is re levant to youth. REV. R E I N HOLD MI L LER has accepted a call to St. Paul Lutheran C h u rch, Gar­ rison, N. D. LCD R PAUL R U N N I N G , U.S. N . , is sta­ tioned at North West Ca pe , Western Au s­ tralia. He is the only U. S. Forces Chaplain in Australia. With h i m are his wife Marilyn and thei r th ree children.

1955 JAMES A . LOKKEN i s an e d i torial ass ist­ ant on the new LUT H E RAN FO RU M magaz ine. MARY EST E R G R EE N has completed fo u r years of teaching l o r t h e Lutheran Mis­ s ion in New G u i nea. She returned home via Australia and the O r ient and is now attending Lutheran B i ble I nstitute in Se­ attle. BOB CU RTI S has been elected vice president of the Wash in gto n Ret ail Co u n c i l . FAITH ( B U ELTMANN) STE R N a n d fam-

i ly spent an i n fo rmative and enjoyable week at Expo 67 whi le camping out near Montra!. They l ive i n Takoma Park, Md. PAT R I C IA MORIS is working at the U. S. Naval Hospital in Philadel phia, Pa,

1956 WALTER BALL has been appo inted vice principal of Mann J u n i o r Hig h (C lover Park). Walt has been a sixth g rade teacher in the Clover Park Di strict fo r the past few years. BOB L U N D G R E N , a C.P.A. in Portland, O re . , is c u r rently the Contro l l e r-Treas ure r of Schetky E q u i pmen Corp. He is on the Executive Board , and Cont i n u i n g Educa­ tion Comm ittee of two profes sional soci­ eties, and is an i nstructor of acco u n tin g for the A merican Institute of Bankers. He is also past treas u rer and pr es iden t of E p i ph any Luthe ran i n Portl and. RUTH ( H E I N O) L U N DGR EN is wo rking on her Master's in E n g l ish from Portland State and is a chu rch organ ist. They have two children, Ma ry and John. DAN G R E FTHEN has bee n appo inted a cou nse l o r at Seattle Comm unity Col lege. WA R R E N ME Y E RS was elected dean of the Utah District L.C.A. pastors In May. He and his wife (ANNE STEWART) l ive in Roy, Utah.

1957 MAJ. M A R V I N H . KlnS co m p l eted t h e f i n a l two-week p h ase o f the A rmy Reserve School Associate Command a n d General Staff course at Ft. Leavenworth , Kansas. The graduation marked the end of five years of study fo r Major Kitts. DR. A N ITA (SC H N E LL) H E N D R I C KSON is part of a University of Washington de­ partment of optha l mo logy research team. Sh e was featured in a recent a rticle in the Seattle P.1.


1958 LT. LAW R E N C E ROSS is p resently sta­ tioned aboa rd the n u c l ear s u b m a r i n e USS Sargo, which is homepo rted at Pearl H a rbor. DON HALL is vice p resident and man­ ag i n g d i rector of F l u ke I n ternational Cor­ poration (a s u bsidia ry of J o h n F l u ke Mfg. Co. i n Seattle) and has assumed the same d uties fo r the n ewly fo rmed F l u ke (Neder­ land) N. V . . a D u tch corpo ration w h i c h wi l l sel l , service and man ufac t u re fo r the E u ropean ma rket.

1959 D R . LUVERN V . R I E KE-H onorary, re­ cently received the Martin Luthern Medal­ l io n , L u theran B roth erhood 's d i stingu ished serv i c e award. A . G L E N J O H N S O N , JR. i s an ag ric u l ­ tural economist w i t h the U . S . Department of A g r i c u l t u re , So i l Conservation s e rvice, E & WP U n it i n Po rtla n d , Ore. CHAR LOTTE (TO LLEFSON) MOSQUE­ I RA is c h ief d ietitian at Resthaven Com­ m u nity Mental Health Center, Los Angeles . U pon n o m i n at io n by t h e N a t i o n a l Luth­ eran Campus M i n istry the R EV. D . LOTH A R P I ETZ o f P h i lo , I I I . , h a s been e lected to the campus pasto rate at Northern M i c h i­ gan U n iversity, M a rquette, Mich. The elec­ lion was by the Lutheran Campus M i n istry of Wisco n s i n and Upper M i c h igan. Pastor Pietz w i l l be s e rv i n g both the Lutt-1 eran and Presbyterian sludents on the campus. He and w i fe CA R O L Y N E ( L I N K) ' 6 0 a n d daughter, Kaari n , h ave moved t o M i c h i ga n . R E V . A N D M R S . A L V I N D U N GA N ( H I L­ D R E D H A N S E N '60) of Star P rairie, Wisc., held a gather i n g o f P L U a l u ms o n July 4t h . Those p resent i n c l u ded D R . AND MRS. A R M I N MOHR ( B EV E R LY SWA N S O N '59) of Rochester, M i n n . , M R . A N D M RS.

PAT R I C K M U LLEN (JOYCE HANSEN '59) of M i n n eapo l i s , M i n n . , R EV. AND M RS . RONALD A L E XA N D E R '60 ( KATHY McCALL '61 ) of M i n neapo l is , M i n n . , D R . A N D MRS. SA M U E L GAN G E '61 (PATTI F I N N '59) tem po ra r i l y of R iver Falls, W isc., and a total of 14 c h i ld ren u n d e r seven years of age.

1960 TH E R EV. H E N D R I K LA LJ R recently e­ ceived the Mart i n Luther Medal l i o n , Luth­ e ra n B roth e rhood's d istin g u ished service award. The Tom Hansens ( M E LVA F U H R) h ave moved from San Francisco and the West­ ern B i g 8 's p u b l ic i ty d i rector's j o b to Kan­ sas C ity where Tom h as been appointed d i rector of p u b l i c relations fo r the N ational C o l leg iate Athletic Association. BARBA RA ( ISAA CSO N ) O L S O N is teac h ­ i n g edu catio na l ly h a n d i c a p ped m i no rs (average or above inte l l i gence, yet ach iev­ ing two or more y ars be low g rade leve l ) . H e r h usband C h a rles is a n i n d ustrial e n g i­ neer with Va rian Associates in Palo A lto, C al if. JANICE ( KA RLSTAD '66) and G E RRY FOSEN were in N o rway fo r seven weeks d u r i n g the s u m m e r visiting Ge rry's rela­ tives. T h ey have moved to S i e rra Vista, A riz. , where they bought a home and a re tea c h i n g at Genera l Mayer's E l ementary School at Fort Huachuca. Gerry is teac h ­ i n g s i x t h g rade and P . E . , and Jan is teach­ i n g fourth g rade. T I M OLSON is leac h i n g E n g l is h at Shorecrest H i g h School ( S h o re l i ne School D i strict. Seattle). LO R E L I E ( IH L E N FELDT '61 ) taught six years in Shore l i n e and is now working on a Master's i n Education at Seattle Pacific Col lege. REV. ROBERT E. E R ICKSON i s serv i n g Calvary Luth e ra n C h u r c h , Morro Bay, Calif. His w i fe, M E R R I ( N ELSON '62) i s teac h i n g


fi rst g rade in Cayuces, Cal if. TOM McLA U G H L I N is tea c h i n g at Tacoma Commu nity Col lege.

h i sto ry

to fin ish work on his Ph.D this winter. J U D I E ( H I L D E B RA N D) HOLMQU IST is starting work on her Master's Deg ree in Sociology t h rough the extension depart­ ment of San Jose State Col lege.

1 961 THE REV. MATTHEW ERNST was cal led as pastor of F i rst St. John Lutheran Lutheran C h u rc h , Northside, Pitts b u rg h , P a . He was ordained Septem b e r 1 0 , 1967, at E m manuel Lutheran C h u rc h , Spokane, Wash. MARIA N N E (POTTER) MEYER is teach­ ing at Lister Ele mentary School (Tacoma). DAV I D C R OWN E R is assistant professor in German at Gettysb u rg Col lege. He taught at Hartwi c k Col lege, Oneonta, N . Y. for t h ree years wh i l e wo rking for his P h . D . R O G E R M I STER E K is customer service representative fo r Portland General Elec­ tric in O regon C i ty. DONALD S O R E N S E N is assistant cash ier fo r the Wh idbey Island Bank in the Coupe­ v i l l e, Wash . , otf.ice. He served as president of the Cou pevi lle Lions Club fo r 1966-67. L I E F DAH L and wife CAROL (TESLOW '62) have moved from Taco ma to Seo u l , Korea, where L i e f h a s accepted a posi­ tion as department d i rector-business man­ ager for the Korean C h u rch Wo rl'd Serv­ ice. They w i l l be t h e re for th ree years. TOM CROS I E R is a p h a r macist in G riggs Department store i n Pasco. D IA N E ( E R I C KSO N ) PETERSON and h e r husband, Way ne, have returned t o t h e States from Taiwan. They spent the sum­ m e r in Wisconsin and are now in Texas where Wayne is working on h is Master's Degree at Texas A & M . TH E RE V. JOE E. S M ITH was recently insta l l ed as pastor of Hoquiam's (Was h . ) Saron Lutheran C h u rch. N O R M DAHL has moved from the U n i ­ versity o f Neb raska t o t h e Un iversity of Min nesota to teach p h i loso p h y . He p lans

1962 JAMES A N D BARBARA ( F LETC H E R ) B EALS a r e p resently in R io de Jane i ro at the Lati n American Regional Office of the Food and Agrict u l t u re O rgan ization of the U n ited Nations. The Beals have been trav­ el ing around the wo rld for the U . N . fo r t h e last two years. J i m i s a fisheries consu ltant for the world organ ization. SA N D RA (TYNES) HAG EVI K is counselor for the Neighb orh ood Youth Corps in D u r­ h a m , N . C . , while h e r husband, George, fin ishes his Ph.D. in Regional P l a n n i n g at the U n iversity of N o rth Carolina. RALPH R . CARSKA D D E N was ordained as a deaco n of the E piscopal C h u rc h , and has accepted a c a l l as c u rate at C h rist C h u rch, Tacoma. THE REV. IVAN E. LA RSEN is serving as pastor for fo u r congregations of the Mc­ G regor-White Earth Lutheran Pa rish in Mc­ G regor and Wh ite Eart h , North Dakota. RE V. ROB E RT MOORE is pastor of St. Paul Luthe ran C h u rc h , E. Ch icago, I n d i ­ a n a . H is wife, S E R E N A ( H OPP) i s teaching i n an e le m entary school at H i l lside, I I I . For the past fo u r years D U AN E M . J O H NSON has been a navigator for the Air Force stationed i n Texas and Massa­ c h usetts. He has now entere d p i lot tra i n i ng . R O G E R B R EWINGTON is t h e o pe ra­ tions manager of the customer service de­ partme nt at the electron ics systems center fo r the National Bank o f Was h i ngton in Tacoma. MARTHA "MARTY" ( EDWARDS) MANDT is teach i n g t h i rd g rade at Cotati Schoo l , Cotati, Calif. H e r husband H aro ld works fo r the Cotati Fire Department.


DON

SLAT E R

g raduated

f rom

O regon

State U n iversity with a B.S. i n eng ineer­ ing t h i s past s p ri ng and is wo rking fo r t h e state h i g hway plann ing d i v i s i o n i n O l ym pia. A U D R EY ( P IE R C E ) N E I LSO N is teach­ ing in the Clover Park School D is t rict.

1963 N I TA HOINES i s a s u pervisor o n the n u rs i n g staff of Gene ral Hospita l , Seattl e . P A U L WOLD moved t o H o u ston, Texas, w h e re he is with B o e i n g Co. on the A p o l l o M a n n ed L u nar Lan d i n g Prog ram. N O R MA ( M E R R I LL) LEMKE was pro­ moted to buyer's assistant i n the l ingerie department me rch an d i s e h ea d q u a rters of Sears Roebu c k and Co. in Ch icago, I l l . T H E R EV. J E R R Y P ROTEXTOR was o r­ dained May 1 4, 1 967, and is s e rv ing the B roc ket-Lawton parish in No rth D a kota. THE R EV. G E R A L D GETTIS was called to a th ree-cong regat i o n parish at Te u lo n , Manitoba, Canada, abo u t 3 0 m i l es from W i n n i peg. These th ree c o n g regatio n s are parishes of the Evan gel ical Luthe ran Ch u rch of Canada. Afte r tea c h i n g for two years in M i a m i , Fla., D I C K C L A R K j o ined t h e Navy as a n officer candidate. H e prese n t ly h o lds t h e rank of Lt. ( j . g . ) . D i c k h a s made o n e tour of Vi etnam and returned there in J u ly. He f l i es the F4 (P hantom) , a jet f i g h t e r a i r­ craft. M E R LYN O V E R LA N D has enlisted in t h e U. S . A rmy and is an off i c e r can d i date a t the Aberdeen P ro v i n g Gro u n d , M d . B O B J O H N SO N is teach ing in H i l lsbor­ o u g h , C a l i f. His w ife ( MY R T IS KA B EA RY '62) has competed h e r fifth year work an d rec eived h e r f i ft h year teach ing c redential this past s p r i n g . CA ROL WALT E R S is teach i n g n u rs i n g a t Seattle Comm u n ity C o l 1ege. N A N CY K R O G E L com ple ted a master's deg(ee in edu cat ion at Stanfo rd University

t h i s past s um m e r and is cu rrently teac h i n g s e c o n d g ra d e i n Wenatchee. B E V E RLY (STI MSON) K I R KPA T R I C K is living near Wash ingto n , D. C., w h i le h e r h u s ban d , R o b e rt, attends officers s c h o o l fo r t h e National G u a r d . A L I C E (HA M M E R STRO M ) D E VERS I s l i v i n g in A n kara, Tu rkey, w h e re the A i r Force transferred h e r h usband Martin fo r a two-year tou r of d uty. SHA R O N T O B IASEN is in Ge rmany for a m u s i c in stitute s pon sored by an O regon u n ivers ity. JERRY CU RTIS i s golf coac h at Bethel H i g h School (Tacoma). PAU L F LATNESS attended an N D EA in­ stitute i n h i story fo r n i n e weeks t h i s s u m ­ me r a t Kansas State Teachers C o l l e g e , Emporia, Kansas. M O R R Y K IM B R O UG H is a salesman with the Bargreen- E l l i n gson, I n c . , Restaurant E q u i pme nt and S u p p l ies, in Tacoma. B A R B A RA HALL graduated fro m Everett General Hos pital Schoo l of N u rs i n g and is wo rking at U n ive rsity Hos pital i n Seattle. JUDY SWA N S O N returned to Stanford th is past s u m me r after teac h i n g fo r the A i r Fo rce i n Japan last year. She com­ p leted h e r mast e r ' s deg ree and is now teac h i ng th i rd grade in Wenatch e e . G E O R G E A RO LA and h i s w i fe KAR E N ( M ITTEN '64) are stat i o n e d a t M c Coy A F B , i n O rl an d o , Fla., w h e r e 2nd L t . George i s the c h i e f, data automat i o n . D I C K BA K K E N i s teac h i n g E n g l ish at P o r t lan d State U n i v ersity and has recen t l y p u b l is h e d I s s u e 9- 1 0 of h is magazine " Salted Feathers."

1 9 64 M A R K L O N O has retu rned to D rew U n i­ versity as d i recto r of p u blic affairs after s ix mon t h s active d u ty fo r tra i n ing with t h e M a r i n e Aviat i o n Res e rve.

Mark L a n a


PAUL D. S M I T H is doing g raduate work i n biology at the U n iversity of M i n nesota. E N G S I K TAN G is a medical tec h no l og ist working at Peninsula Hospital in B u r­ l ingame, Cal if. He rec ently ret u rned from a month visit at home i n Th a i l a n d . A R L E N E (OLSTAD) KA N E is a p u b l i c h ealth n u rse in Anchorage, A l as ka . L T . H O W A R D N . LA RSON w a s recently awarded the Air Medal. H e flew a B-52 for t h i rty combat m issions over South East Asia and the Western Pacific. MARY C ROCKER is a school n u rse for the South Kitsap (Was h . ) Schools. 1 ST LT. M ITCH E L L B I L L I N G S is with a U. S. A r m y art i l le ry d ivision in Vietnam. JIM CRABTRE E is teaching b i o logy and math at South Mercer Island (Wash.) Jun­ Ior H i g h School. H is w i fe A N N (SO I N E '64) has been a psyc h iatric soc ial wo rke r at Echo Glen C h i l d ren's Center. K E ITH SWENSON is i nterning at Beth le­ hem Lutheran Church in C h icago after complet i ng his stud ies at L u t h e ra n School of Theology i n Ch icago, Rock Island Ca m pus. W h i l e at sem ina ry, h e and h i s wife G EO R G E N E (MOSKOV ITA '66) were house parents at Bethany Home fo r c h i l­ d re n in Motine, I I I . LT. LLOYD SCH N E I DE R is a B-52 navi­ gator an d based in G u a m . R O B E RT D E R R s p e n t seven weeks t h i s s u m me r at Rutgers U n iversity, New J e rsey, at an N D EA I n stitute in Russian. He w i l l receive h i s B . A . fro m the U n ivers i ty o f California at R ivers i d e in M a r c h 1 968. His wife, G EORGIA ( B U CH O LZ '62) attended an eight-week N D EA I nstitute in S panish at C a l iforn i a Luthe ran Col lege i n Thousand Oaks this s u m mer. S h e w i l l continue to teach Span ish at Alessandro J u n i o r H ig h Schoo l in R iversid e w h e re s h e is chairman of the Foreign Lang u age De artmen!. DAN SELMANN finished his int rns h i p at Emanuel Hospital in Port l a n d this su m m e r. He a n d h i s wife J U DY (PEDERSON) have

retu rned to D u buque, Iowa, where Dan w i l l b e finishing sem i nary a t Wartburg next s pring. J u d y took one yea r of g raduate school at Portland State's School of Social Wo rk, and worked as social servi ces di­ rector of a Head Start p rogram t h is su m m er. DALE THOMPSON is tea c h i n g voca l m u s i c and ceramics at Kennedy H i g h School, Anaheim, Cal if. BARBA RA BAUER i s tea c h i n g n i nth g rade E n g l ish at East J u n io r H i gh SchooL G reat Falls, Mo nt. KA R L E E N KA RLSON is atte n d i n g an N D EA I n stitute i n G u idance and Counsel­ i n g on the j u n io r col lege level and work­ ing for her Master's degree in g u idance and counse l i n g at W as h i n gton State U n i ­ versity. This i n stitute invo lves t h i rty peo­ ple, mostly h i g h schoo l teachers. DR. ROB ERT CA R M I C HAEL is serv i n g a s capta i n in the U . S . Army and is based at Ft. Hood, Texas.

1965 THOMAS CARLSON is em ployed with Booz A l le n A p p l i ed Resea rch, Inc., as a computuer prog ram m e r, in their Kansas City, Mo., offices. W I LLIAM BLYTH E received h i s Cali­ fo r n i a secon d a ry teac h i n g credential from Cal ifo rnia State Col l ege at Hayward and is now teac h i ng E n g l i s h in the Tul are U n io n H i g h School D istrict. C I FFORD MAU D S L I E N is l ibrarian at H i g h l i n e H i g h School in Seattle. H is wife, L I N DA ( KOW I N G ) is teac h i n g science at Hyak J u n i o r H igh in Bel levue. DI NA (YU) SWENSON is assistant l i­ b rarian in the U n iversity of C h i cago's li­ brary. Her h usband R O G E R is studying fo r a doctorate at C h i cago. After .tea c h i n g two years i n Pan a m a, J U D I D OE R I N G returned to her h o m e i n Puya l l u p for t h e s u m m e r t o attend school


at

PLU. S h e is

now tea c h i n g

in

Teg u c i­

galpa, Hondu ras.

s u m mer.

NANCY (HU LL) G R OSS is teaching Eng­ lish

at

Cen tral Wash ington State College this past

Hig h l i n e Co m m u n ity Col lege

near

A R D I NE

NU NNEMA KER

remedial

reading,

Seattle. DON is a Ph.D. candidate in ph il­

Chatam

osophy at the U n iversity of Washington.

lock, Calif.

DEAN SANDVI K is wor k i n g o n his Mas­

Union

is

teac h i n g

u ngraded

Eleme ntary

class,

School,

at Tur­

J O HN O. YEASTING - Honorary,

has

ter's degree at t h e U n i versity of Colorado

been elected senior vice president o f The

in the field of finance.

Boeing Co. by the board of directors.

ARDEN

FLOM

is

tea c h i n g

theatre

at

Everett Co m m u nity College, Everett, Wash. ROD IVERSON is teac h i ng j u nior high school in Puyall u p. ENS.

DONALD

ported

for

DAVID

permanent

duty

has

re­

aboard

has

c o m pleted

reserve

Linda are now living i n Seattle. PFC.

SAMUELSON

OLSON

trai n i ng at Fort Ord, Calif. He and his wife, EAR L

GER HEIM

is

stationed

in

Vietnam.

USS

LT. DAV ID EKBERG and his wife MARY

Sperry, a submar i n e ten der, at San Diego,

ANN (SATRUM '66) were transferred from

Calif.

Chanute

STEPHEN TOR KKO

is interning i n

Bel­

l i ngham, Wash., at Our Savi o u r ' s Lutheran Ch urch. in

the

Jr-Sr.

His wife, Cheryl, Mt.

High

A L ICE

Baker

is teac h i n g

School

District

in

art the

ARMSTRONG

School

BEVERLY (MOE)

of

is

Nursing,

M I LLER

HEINR ICH

a trip which Taiwan,

pediatrics

i n­

I II.,

and

CHAR LOTTE returned

i n c l uded Japan,

from

Hong Kong,

Korea and

to

McClellan

AFB,

LT. CRAIG KNUTZEN graduated (dis­ t i n g u i shed) from Officer's Candidate School at Fo rt Be nn ing, Ga.,

and is

1 0th Aviation

now

Division

at

Ft. Benn ing. MARV PETERSON, former P L U football Little All-America, h as f i n ished a tra i ni n g

Tacoma.

recently

P h i l i pp i n es,

AFB,

near Sacramento.

assigned to the

School.

structor on the facu lty of St. Joseph 's Hos­ pital

Calif.,

school w i t h the

U.

S. Army in

Germany

and i s overseas in c o u nter-intelligence. JEAN

NORDQU IST

is at

the

Lutheran

O k i nawa.

Theological S e m i n ary at Philadelphia, Pa.,

C h arlotte is em ployed at Salem (Ore.) Gen­

and living at the Deaco n ess House for the

eral Hospital a n d Beverly at Kuakini Hos­

period of her tr a i n i n g as a Deaconess of

pital

t h e Lutheran C h urch i n America.

in

Honolu l u ,

ROBERT

E.

Hawai i .

R U N N I NG

was

com mis­

M IKE LAWLER is teaching speech

sioned an Army sec ond lieutenant on com­

dramatics at SI.

pletion of the Q uartermaster Officer Can­

Hel e ns, Ore.

date School at Ft. Lee, Va. KAR L

OSTLING

is working

JOHN T. BOE i s teaching advance fixed as

a

psy­

c h o logist for the Tacoma School District.

wing

and

instrumentation

LEE SHANNON second

was

c o m m issioned

lieutenant

after

an

graduating

Ft. Benning, Ga. He was trained in leader­

R ICHARD W. G I R O U X joined t h e staff of Tacoma C o m m u n ity College as a specialist

ship,

tactics

i n testing and learning sk ills. He rec eived

instruction reading,

Psychology

from

of

small

in fantry

u n its,

and

use of i nfantry weapons. He also received

a

in

to

from the In fantry Officer Candidate School,

1966

Degree

instruction

Army Air Force pilots at Fort R u c ker, Ala. Army

Master's

and

Helens High School" St.

in

map and aerial p h otograph

guerilla

warfare,

and

c o u n ter-


in s u rge ncy operations. STEVE C O R N I LS was a wate r safety offi­ cer on the M ississ i p p i this s u m m e r fo r the Iowa Conservation Department. H e re­ t u rned to Wartburg Sem i n a ry fo r his sec­ ond year of train i n g . His wife, MARY OL­ SON '65) i s teac h i n g medical-surgical n u rs­ ing at Mercy Hospital i n Dubuque. She had been wo rking as a visiting n u rs e doing public hea lth n u rsing. PH I LL I P S C H U U R passed the certified p u b l i c accou ntant exam i nation. He is on the Seattle staff of a n ational accou nting Ruth A. Meyer firm. J EA N ( B ROWN) TORRES is an AFDC intake casewo rker for the state depart­ ment of p u b l i c assistance b ranch office at Mt. View Hospita l , Taco ma. D EN N IS HARDTKE is working at Boeing as an i n d ustrial eng ineer. H i s wife, JOAN (FOSNESS '67) is teac h i ng P.E. and gen­ eral science at Totem J u n io r High School, Federal Way, Was h . L I E UTENANT RUTH A. (LARS O N ) M EY­ E R , a m e m be r of the USAF N u rse Corps, recently received a s pe c i a l certifi cate of appre c iation at T i n ker AFB, O k l a . She was c ited for her exem pl ary su pport of the USAF Recruiting Service d u ri n g her previ­ ous assig n ment at K. I. Sawyer AFB, Mich. LOU ANNE ( H I N ES) G R EY is work i n g in the n u rsery at Miami Val ley Hospital. ENS. BARRY K. EGELAND g ra d u ated James R. Feek and was com m issioned at Newport, R . I . , O fficer Cand idate School . D u ring h i s fo u r months a t OCS, he studied m i l itary, tac­ tical, organ izatio nal, and tec h no l og ical s u bj ects. JAMES R. F E E K was comm issioned an Army second l ieuten ant on completion of the O rd n ance Officer Candi date School at Aberdeen P roving G ro u n d , Md. During h is 23 weeks of train i n g , the lieutenant re­ ceived basic officer i nstruct io n at Ft. Knox, Ky . , a n d f i n ished his schoo l i n g at Aber-

deen, where he received ordnance train­ ing i n weapons, combat vehicles, supply, mai ntenance m a nagement a n d leadersh i p . C . D A L E TUVEY is teac h i n g chem istry, physics an d g e neral science in the h i g h school i n Morton, Wash. H i s wife, J U DY (BASS I '67) is teac h i n g t h i rd g rade i n Morton, also. LAU R E N C E A . PETERSON was com­ m i ssioned an A rmy second l ie u tenant after g raduating from the I nfantry Officer Candi­ date Schoo l , Ft. Be n n in g , Ga.

1 967 M E R L I N C . S I MPSON, J R . (M.B.A.) was p ro m oted to the rank of Captain i n the U. S. Air Force. He received an assign­ ment as g ro u n d electronics officer with the ba l l istic m issile early wa m i n g system at T h u l e AFB, G reenland. ROBERT P. E R I C KS E N is a teac h i ng as­ sistant in the h istory depa rtment of the State U n iversity of New Yo r k w h i l e work­ i n g for h i s docto rate in refo rmation an d re n a issance h istory. NANCY J U RG E N S E N and her sister, J A N ET '69, accompanie d by their mother and gran d parents, spent s ix weeks this summer visiting relatives i n Norway and Denmark. N ancy i s now teach i n g kinder­ garten near Seattle in the Lake Was h i ng­ ton School D istrict and J a net is attend­ ing an IBM school there. WAYNE DOTSON is teac h in g in the C lover Park School D istrict, Tacoma. PETER FLATNESS is atte n d i ng H u m­ boldt State Col lege, Calif., to work on a master's deg ree. EARL W . H O R N G R E N , ( M . B A ) reti red U. S. Navy Commander, is now e m p loyed as a systems research ana lyst i n the Ma­ terial Systems G ro u p of the Commercial A i r p lane D ivision of the Boeing Co. C O N RA D R U E was named winner of the Scottish Rite Fo u ndation fel lows h i p to


George Wa s h i n gton U n iversity. He w i l l use

is atten d in g C a l i fo rn ia State Co l l ege at Los

the g ra n t to study for a master's d e g ree in

Angeles,

intern a t i o n a l JAMES

relations.

R EAD

U n iversity

is

OLIVER

atten d i n g

Law S c h o o l

in

W i l l a m e tte

Salem,

J OH N S O N

is

in

Ken ya,

Africa

as a m e m b e r o f the P e a c e C o r p s .

Ore.

BOB

K R I E G E R i s doing

graduate study

DA L E H O U G was s e l ected as a man age­

i n insect t o x i c o i o g y u n d e r a N at i o n a l I n s t i ­

ment i n t e r n for the H i g h e r Ed ucation f a c i l ­

t u t e o f H e a l t h T ra i n e es h i p . He is a t C o rn e l l

i t i es

U n iversity.

Co m m i s s i o n

in

Olympia,

Was h .

V E R G I E P A R S O N c o m p l eted 4 1f2 of officer i n d o c t r i n a t i o n at

weeks

Newpo rt,

R.

I.

S U SAN

(VO N H O LLW E G )

tea c h i n g

gove r n m ent

at

L I N D B E RG i s Men lo-Ath e rton

She has accepted a p po i n t ment as E n s i g n ,

H i g h S c h o o l in M e n l o P a r k , C a l i f . . and at­

USNR,

ten d i ng Stanford

N u rse Co r p s , a n d h as

reported to

t h e U. S. Naval H o s p i t a l , P h i l ad e l ph i a , fo r

Rich ard.

d uty.

si les

GORDON

APKER

has

gone

into

busi­

B u ri e n ,

a S h akey's

P i zza

Parl o r

in

e l e m e ntary schoo l i n the S h o re l i n e School D istrict,

Seatt le.

C H E RYL g a rten

in

M arysv i l l e , DEN N IS

L i b e rty

is

teac h i n g

E l e m e n t ary

k i n d e r­

School

in

G E RA L D

OSTROOT

Va.,

Co.

Her

husband,

Loc k heed

and

CO R N E LL D i v i n ity.

ARMY

P R IVATE

f i red ex pert with

a l so

Mis­

atten d i n g

is

atten d in g

ALLEN

the

C.

M-1 4

rifle

Ya l e

H A LVOR nea r

the

c o m p l e t i o n of b as i c c o m bat t ra i n i ng at Ft.

N avy

for

est

mark

six

is

at

N avy

I I I . He will

then

S c h o o l of months

boot

and

an

u l ti­

to

e d u cation

be

M u s i c at

a

soldier

can

ach ieve

on

his

weapo ns q u a l i f i c a t i o n test. A I h a s now re­ tu rned

Wash.

camp at G r eat Lakes, N o rfo l k ,

fo r

B ragg , N . C , T h e expert rat i n g is t h e h i g h ­

ARNOLD

e n ro l l e d at the

Space

S c h o o l of

Wash .

SU SAN ( M c G E E ) J O H N S O N i s tea c h ing

and

U n i v e rs i ty,

working

Stanford to work f o r h is master's d e g ree.

n ess fo r h i m s e l f . He a n d two oth e r pe o p l e h ave o pe n e d

is

PLU

to

c o m p lete

wo rk

on

an

d e g ree.

TOM ROB I N S O N is teach i n g E n g l i s h a n d is

head

schoo l

of in

the

The

d rama Dalles,

d e p artm e n t

in

a

O r ego n .

mate ass i g n ment to one o f t h e Navy b a n d s . J O H N K I N T N E R i s d o i n g g rad uate w o r k in

t h e o lo g y at Wart b u rg

bueque,

S e m i n a ry

in

Du­

Iowa.

ALAN H E D M A N was named to the N o rt h ­ west

C o n f e re n ce

A l l -Star

b asebal l

team

M B AJAH

has

returned

to

his

h o m e of Kenya t o b e c o m e a c h i e f a d m i n ­ i s t rative

official

in

Central

Nyanza

p rov­

R I C H A R D E L M E R i s atte n d i n g M a r q u ette Dental

School

in

M i lw a u kee,

d i stricts

( u n l ess

p r i nted

Wesley J . Fitts, O rt i n g ; M a r g a ret M c C u l ­ l oc h , P o rt l a n d , O re ; E l a i n e S h u s t a , Ly n c h , W ay n e

Ware h o u s e ,

So l b e r g ,

Sumner;

A n c h o rage, A laska ;

Karen O l ga

N y­

gaard , R e n t o n ; S y l v i a O l so n , S a l e m , O re . ; J o h n D . P e d e rs e n , M i l w a u k i e , O re . ; M i kael

Wis. LOWELL

school

prev i o u s l y ) :

O re . :

ince. U n iv e rs i ty

s i t i o n s for the 1 96 7-68 schoo l year at the fo l l o w i n g

last s p r i n g . BARAK

Teaching Positi ons Accepted T h e fol l o w i n g have accepted te a c h i n g po­

RASMUSSEN

and

his

wife,

L e p p a l uoto , G w i n n , M i c h . ; L i n da Ove rman ,

F R A N C E S ( B U R C H F I E LD '68) a r e l iv i n g i n

Cl o v e r P a r k (Taco m a ) ; P a u l Crown er, Ever­

A l ha m b ra ,

in

g reen

( V a n c ouve r) ;

t h e U , S , Army I n te l l i gence C o r ps . Frances

coma;

Gayl

Cal i f . ,

wh ere

Lowe l l

s e rves

Melaas,

Terry

A,

Highline;

B rown ,

Ta­


P a u l A. H a rt m a n , P L U fac u lty ; M a r garet

Kay ,

Taco m a ;

Dennis

Dave n po rt,

P f l u eg e r, R i d g efi e l d ; Judy Berg m a n . N o rt h ­

Park:

Angela

N i c ho lson.

s h o re ( B othe l l ) ; Ly n n e N e l so n , N o rt h s h o re ;

K a re n

M a d sen ,

Clover

P a t r i c i a Pot t i n g e r, Taco m a ; A l i c e O ' L eary,

l ig a ,

O l y m p i a ; Jeff B l u m h augen , d rea

Beck,

New

l e e n N y q u ist,

G u inea

Oahu,

Puyal l u p ; M i s s io n ;

Hawa i i ; Dana

An­

Kath­ Halvo r­

so n , M a rysv l l e ; D o n n a H a g e r m a n , D u P ont­ Ft.

Lew i s ;

L.arry

S u tt o n ,

Lyn n

acosta;

S t i l l , C lover P a r k ; Pearl W o l l i n , B re m e rto n ; K a ren P a r k e r, C love r P a r k ; Verna G raci­ ano,

Bet h e l ;

N o rman

Le M a y ,

Cape

F l at­

t e ry ; C u rtis W. G a m m e l l , Taco m a ; Barba ra M cGav i c k ,

Beth e l ; Theodo re T h eiste,

Au­

b u rn ; Con stance E . D ow n h a m , Ste i l a co o m ; LeRoy

Sch atz,

Taco m a ;

Galen

Harpe r,

C o n n e l l ; Wa r ren O l s o n , Clo ver P a r k ; Ruth Ogburn,

Fede ra l

Taco m a ;

Way ;

M a u re e n

Koran D .

Jeanne

Udman,

Kaspers o n ,

J o h nson,

M a rysv i l l e ;

B re m e rto n ; Jean ie

F. H e i d e , Beth e l ; Kat h e r i n e Vo i d , Seq u i m ; C h rist i n e U rstad,

H o kensta d , Mon ro e ;

P u e rto

Dale

R ico ;

Peters o n ,

K a re n Bet h e l ;

Beth Ratko, R a i n i e r State Schoo l , B u c k ley ; C h arla

Nelson,

Bet h e l ;

Jean

M a rysv i l l e ;

Peterso n ,

Ron

Wa rre n ,

Fran k l i n

Pierce;

M i ke Hars h m a n , P u y a l l u p ; M a ry Ru th ler,

C l o v e r P a r k ; Susan

Stewart,

M i l­

F ran k l i n

P ie rc e ; G a i l G leystee n , A n c h o ra g e , A l a s k a ; P e g g y Z a n d e r , P u ya l l u p ; R o n N i l so n , M o r­ to n ; C a ro l R u u d , Taco m a ; V . Marie N i ls o n , M o rton ; K e n n e t h b e ru d ,

Ta c o m a ;

a line

Floe,

K l u b­

Seatt l e ;

Re­

H i g h l ine :

Park:

C a ro l y n

stance

Park;

C h a rl es

Park;

Nancy

G leystee n ,

Landrud.

Ludwig,

C lover

C l over

Sze­

C l ove r

Tacoma ;

Olym pia;

Con­

S h a ro n

Tyler,

Sweet H o m e , a re . ; John

M. Erlander, Clover P a r k ; M ichael

C a r re l l ,

Ta c o m a ;

Elaine

Ma rgaret

Cu rry,

Taco m a :

N ewpo rt,

a re . ; Joyce

Gig

Harb o r ;

Mary

Coo k,

Puyal l u p ;

Ja net

Fos n e s s ,

G reene,

W i l d rick, P e n i n s u la,

Do lton,

III.;

D a l e Peterso n , Beth e l ; A n n K. D a n i e l s , Ta­ coma;

D iane

H u l be rt ,

C lover

Park;

J u l ie

D a n s k i n , Edmonds ; Ronald

Rosevear, O rt­

ing ;

Pass ;

Kenton

Smith,

W h ite

Claudia

O ' M a l l e y , L o s A n g e le s ; T h o mas R o b i n s o n , The

Dalles,

Ly n n e

a re. ;

Sc haefer,

O u i g l ey,

St.

C lover

Helens,

Park;

a re . ;

T i mothy

Letitia

B u rCh­

f i e l d , S t . H e l e n s , a re . ; Rolf O l se n , C l o v e r P a r k ; A l vin B a c o n , P u y a l l u p ; D o y l e O ' D e l l , M e rc e r

I s l an d ;

Carleen

Her itage,

K e n ne­

w i c k ; R i c h a rd Varg o , Taco m a ; Janet void,

aco sta ;

Tom

Wh a l e n ,

East­

Fra n k l i n

Pi erce ; G l e n M e rriweath e r , Taco m a ; Dav i d D i o n . Issaq u a h : A n n E r i c k s o n , Wa l l i n g f o r d , Co n n . ; B o r g n y A r n e s o n , W a l l i n g f o r d , Co n n . ; S h e ri l l B u c h f i n c k, W a l l i n g f o r d , Co n n . ; R i c h ­ a r d N a c e , Clover P a r k ; Sylvia bota,

Rian,

M i l p i tas,

Hawa i i ;

C a ro l

Cal if. ;

Caro l

J a c o b so n ,

Ku­

P o rt l a n d ,

becca O l s o n , Stockto n , C a l i f . ; M a r g i t Lar­

a re . ; L i n d a L i k k e l , P o rt l a n d , a re . ; Debrah

s o n , Fede ral Way ; J a n et E . N e l s o n , C l over

O l s o n , Taco m a ; Ro bert Batte r m a n n , Bre m ­

Park;

Jen­

e r to n :

B e rn i c e A m u n d s e n ,

n i n g s , P u ya l l u p ; Joyce C o n i n e , C h u l a Vista,

Hi lda

Marsh,

Coo k,

W h i d b ey

Ca l if . ;

Clove r P a r k ; T e d D i k e m a n , Ta c o m a ; Mar­

Leo n a rd

Taco m a ;

J u dy

E h l y , Taco m a ;

Joe

Peter­

s o n , Issaqu a h ; L i n d a E rnst, Taco m a ; R u t h

tha

Weber,

lund,

Puyal l u p ;

Sue

Haugen,

I ssaquah ;

C a r m e n M o r r i S , C love r P a r k ; Lo u i s e

G u staf s o n ,

Eugene,

are . ;

Con­

Head,

Island ;

C lover

Taco m a ;

Nancy

M c Ca l l u m ,

S h a ron

Moa,

nie Kravas, F r a n k l i n P i e rc e ; Carolyn O l s o n ,

R u b le, Puyal l u p : Th u rsto n ;

Janet

Marianne

Ro berts.

Lynne

Hossfe l d ,

S u m ner;

C l audia

P e d e rson , Puyal l u p ; Lu ke,

B re m e rto n ;

Ch r i s t i n e

Kent ;

M i ke

B e rg , Mc-

D i ke m a n ,

Este l l e n e

Matts o n ,

G reat

Fayettev i l l e ,

Tac o m a ;

James

Park;

B i anca

Puyal l u p ; Joh n

No reen

Falls, N.

C. ;

E l izabeth T h o m a s , Walters,

Farn h a m , G e rma ny.

Frankl i n

Kro n ­

Taco m a ; M o n t. ; James N o rt h

Clover

Park:

P i a rc e ;

Kathy


1968 TONY L I STER has s i g ned t o p l ay quar足 te rback with t h e Seattle Rangers for the 1 967 season in the Continental Footb a l l Leag ue. G R AD UATE D E G R E E S AWA R D E D A number o f PLU a l u m n i have received profess ional and advanced degrees d u ring the past year. The na mes of some have been anno u n c ed i n earl i e r issues of R E F LECT I O N S . Others known to h ave re足 ceived deg rees rece ntly i n c l u d e : DOCTO R 'S D E G R E E Robe rt A . Carmichae l ' 6 4 , D . D . S. ; U n ivers ity of Was h i ngto n , J u ne, 1 967 Bruce L . Bindel '63, D . D . S . ; U n iversity of Was h i n gto n , J u n e , 1 967 David L. C rowner '61 , P h . D . ; R u tgers U n ivers i ty, May, 1 967 Ken neth J. E r i c ksen '61 , P h . D . ; Rice U n i ve rs ity , J u n e , 1 967 Mo rris Kostoff '62, P h . D . ; U n ivers i ty of Texas, J u n e , 1 967 Gary D. Lan ge '63, D . D . S . ; U n iversity of Was h i n gton, J u n e , 1 967 Jeffrey L. P robstfield '63, M . D . ; Univers ity of Wash ingto n , J u ne, 1 967 John Ray Tobiaso n , J r . , D . E d . ; U n iversity of Was h i ngton, J u ne, 1 967 MASTER'S D E G R E E P a u l H . Bethge '66, M .A . ; H a rvard U n iversity, J u ne, 1 967 Ste p h e n R. B i b e l h e i m e r '66, M . A . in G e rmanics ; U n iversity of Wash ington , J u ne, 1 967 O l g a Ove r l i e B r i ngoff '66, M . E. ; U n ivers i ty of Wash ington, A u g . , 1 967 Ann Saine C rabtree '64, M . S . ; University of Wash ington, J u ne, 1 966 Arden Flam '65, M. Theatre;

U n iversity of O regon , J u ne, 1 967 San d ra Tynes Hagev i k '62, M . Ed. ; U n iversity of Nort h Caro l i na, J u ne , 1 967 S h i rley Harmon Hanson '60, M.A., N u rs i n g ; U n iversity of Was h i ngton, Aug., 1 966 Cam i l le E . Hanssmann '65, M . Social Work; U n ive rs i ty of Was h i ngton, June, 1 967 A . Glen Johnso n , J r. '59, M . A . , A g r i c u l t u ral Econ o m ics ; N o rth Dakota State U n ivers ity, J u n e, 1 967 Doug l as L. Joh nson '6 1 , M . A . Ed. : Pacific Lu theran U n iversity, A ug . , 1 967 Robert Johnson '63, M.A., H i story: San Fra n c isco State, J u n e , 1 967 Olaf Kva m m e '48, M . E . ; U n i versity of Was h i n gto n , J u n e , 1 967 Patricia Moris '55, M.A., Admin. of Hasp. N u rs i n g Service Teachers Col lege, C o l u m b i a Un iversity, New York, J u n e , 1 967 A n nette Tupper Nyg ard '62, M . E . ; U n iversity of Was h i ng ton, J u n e , 1 967 Herbert M . Sie fkes '53, M. Social Work; U n ivers ity of Wash i n gto n , June, 1 967 S h aron Tobiasen '63, M . A . , G u idan c e ; San Jose State Col lege, J u ne , 1 967 E l len Bergstrom Tarango '50, M . L i b rariansh i p ; U n iversity of Was h i ngto n , A u g . , 1 966 Leland Weaver, M . S. ; Seattle U n ivers ity, A u g . , 1 967 BACHELOR O F D I V I N ITY W i l l i a m Batte rma n n '63 ; H a rvard U n iversity, J u n e , 1 967 G e ra l d Gettis '63 ; Lulher S e m i nary, J u n e , 1 96 7 Robert M o o r e '62 ; Luth eran School of Theology, J u n e, 1 967 Je rry R . P rotextor '63; Luther Semin ary, June, 1 967 BAHELOR OF LAW R i c h ard E. Mann '63; U n iversity of Was h i n gton, J u n e, 1 9 57


M arriages J u ly 2, 1 966: Howard N . Larson '64, to Anlca Rando l p h , Roswe l l , N . M. Aug ust 31 , 1 966: Rod W. Iverson '65, to Connie Leffler, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. October 1 5, 1 966 : Joseph D. Kane, J r. , t o Arlene O lstad '64, Seattle, Wash. December 29, 1 96 6 : C. David Olson '66, to Linda L. Magnuson '68. Febru ary 1 8 , 1 967: J. Gerald Sto kle to Eleanor Bousfield '62, Berkeley, Cal if. March 1 9, 1 967: Olav Engen '64, to H ildegard Lonset '67, Seattle, Wash. May 6 , 1 967: Lee M. Sprin ggate, Jr., to Jean M. Tousley '63, Seattle, Wash. J u n e 9, 1 967: Ti mothy S. Q u i g ley '67, to Letitia A. Burchfield '67, Sale m , Ore. June 9, 1 96 7 : Lowell F. Rasmussen '67, to Frances L. Burchfield '68, Salem, Ore. J u n e 1 0 , 1 9 67: Terry L. B i l l er to Peggy A. Zander '67, Tacoma, Wash. J une 10, 1 967: Tho mas C. Spinney to Barbara A. Macdonald '56, Port Ange les, Wash. June 10, 1 967: Roger B. de Lemos to Karen A. Rosenau '62, Fresno, Cal if. Jun e 1 0 , 1 967 : Dana D. Halvorson '67, to Linda D. Nelson '69, Seattle, Wash. June 1 0 , 1 967: N i ck D. Konen to Mar足 lene Shannon '67, Fairfield, Wash. June 1 0, 1 967: Dale Strickland to Kath足 ryn Seu len (Faculty). June 1 1 , 1 96 7 : W i l l i am G iersch to Mary G. Kreps '65, Laure l , Wash. June 1 1 , 1 967: G len Joh nson to Susan McGee '67, I lwaco, Wash. June 1 1 , 1 967: George L. Lo ng '66, to Sharon L. King '68, Waltham, Mass. June 1 6, 1 967: Cl yde H . M i l l er '63, to Carol M. Lu ndgren, Tacoma, Wash. J u n e 1 7 , 1 967: Robert C. Mansfield to Arletta J. Estenson '65, Seattle, Wash. June 1 7 , 1 96 7 : Jon Putz to Renate Schl uter '68, Seatt le, Wash.


J u ne 1 7, 1 967 : Gerald W. Roloson '67, to Judy K. B e rg m a n '67, Seattle, Wash . J u ne 1 7, 1 967 : D o n a l d Sorensen '61 , to A l ice G. Balster, Oak Harbor, Wash . J u n e 23 , 1 967 : J o h n Mart i l l a '63, to Frieda Gri m srud '64, Ta coma, Wash. J u n e 24, 1 967 : Lt. j g R i chard B. R u n 足 n in g '65, t o Joyce A. Con ine '67, Bel levue, Was h . J u n e 30, 1 96 7 : D r . C u rt i s H. N o rt h rop to Marion H. Noffs i nger '64, O ly m p i a , Was h . J un e 3 0 , 1 96 7 : Ti mothy W. She rry '67, to Marcia L. Wake '67, Tacoma, Wash. J u l y 2, 1 96 7 : Steven B. D a l g l e i s h '66, to Susan K. H a u g e n '67, N o rt h f i e l d , M i n n . J u l y 7, 1 967: David E . Meyer to M a r i 足 anne E. Potter '61 , Tacoma, W a s h . J u l y 1 0 , 1 967: Mark A . N e s s e ' 6 5 , to S h e i l a J. Powers, Athens, G reece. _I u l y 1 4, 1 967: R i c hard D . F i n stuen '64, to J u d i th M . A nderson '68, Tacoma, Wash . J u l y 1 5 , 1 967 : Tyler B . Coplen '66, to Anne M. Bryson '68, S pokane, Wash. July 24, 1 96 7 : Ralph J . Fa i rbanks to Pamela J. Swisher '66, Tac o m a , Wash. J u l y 29, 1 967: Robert D . G e i s l e r '64, to Katherine B. J u dd, G re s h a m , O re. J u l y 30, 1 9 67: James N. Reed '67, to Sylv i a E. O l son '67, Seatt l e , Wash. J u l y 30, 1 96 7 : C. Dale Tuvey '66, to J u dy Bassi '67, Seattle, Wash. A u g ust 4 , 1 96 7 : Robert A. C a rm i chael '64, t o J u d ith A . Hebert , San Anto n i o , Tex. Aug u st 4, 1 967: David A. Trapp '67, to Caro l A. Heffe nden, Everett, W a s h . A u g u st 5, 1 967 : R u s s e l A. M . Tweed to Karen L. Stamper '65, Seattle, Wash. A u g ust 6, 1 967: Rev. Hans C. Nord m a r k to Kath leen E. Anderson '64, Corvallis, Ore. A u g u st 6, 1 967: Roger Swenson '65, to Diana Y u '65. A u g u s t 1 1 , 1 96 7 : David R. Dion '67, to M a rcia K. Austreng '69, Mercer I s l a n d , Wash. A u g u st 1 1 , 1 96 7 : J o h n A. Li n d b e rg to J u d ith M . J o h n son '66,

August 1 2, 1 9 67 : Paul L. Flatness '63, to Kathleen E. Tracy, Seattle, Was h . A u g ust 1 2 , 1 9 67: Lt. j . g . W i l l i am M. Ko ll '63, to G l o ria Rein ertson '63, Eugene, O re. Aug ust 1 5, 1 96 7 : D. M i ke L u n dstrom '66, to I ral A . M o b roten '68, Tacoma, Was h . August 1 8, 1 967 : Robert P . E ri c ksen '67, to M e l issa M . D a h l , Tacoma, Wash. August 1 9, 1 967: Mark E . A n d e rsen '67, to B o n n i e L . MacMaster '66, W i l l i s to n , N. D . A u g u s t 1 9 , 1 967: Kenneth M. K l u bberud '67, to D e l o res A. Holt '69, Seattle, Wash, A u g u st 1 9, 1 96 7 : Robert N e i lson to Aud足 rey H. Pierce '62, Seattle, Wash. A u g u s t 1 9 , 1 96 7 : Don S late r '63, to L i n d a Gorham, Beaverton, O regon. Aug ust 20, 1 96 7 : Thomas L . C rosier '61 , to M a ry E. Lacelle, Z i l la h , Wash. August 20, 1 967: David S . H i l les land '58 to L i n n e a J. Eger '64, Tacoma, Wash. A u g u s t 25, 1 96 7 : Dale A. Sears to Joyce M. Fosness '67, Tacoma, Was h . A u g ust 26, 1 967: C o l . Arth u r J . M i d d l e足 ton to Betty L. K r i n g e l hede '66, M i lwau kie, O re. A u g u st 26, 1 967: P a u l D. Sm ith '64, to A l be rt a Fischer, W i no n a, M i nn.

Bi rths To M r. and Mrs. W i l l i a m B l ythe '65, dau g h te r, J e n n i fer Ilene, born J u ne 7, 1 9 63 , adopted A u g ust 9 , 1 967. Roger Brewington '62 (Georg i n a Jones '61 ) . daughter, Sonja A n d r i ne , b o rn March 22, 1 966. J o i n s sister Wanda Eleanor 5 % . Thomas Hager (Connye I d strom '63). d a u g hter, G retchen Anne, born A u g ust 8, 1 966, adopted A u gu st 1 9 , 1 966. Robert Evans (Joanne linvog '65 ) , son, Robert L e l a n d , bo rn October 4, 1 966. Jack W i nsor (B o n itta Johnson '61 ) . son, Eric And rew, born October 23, 1 966. J o i n s brot h e r M a rk 2.


A llen Moen '55 (J u l i a B r u n n e r '58), so n , Kevin To dd, born December 1 2 , 1 966, adopted May 20, 1 967. Joins siste r Cheryl 2.

Larry H . T. Johnson

(Sally N i xon February 1 4 , 1 967. Joins b rother N i c ho l as 3. Donald G ray (Carol F i nstuen '63), son, C h risto pher Mark, born February 23, 1 967. Robert Krieger '67, daug hter, De bra Kath leen, born March 2 , 1 967. M i c h ae l Lawler '66, so n , C h r isto pher Mi chael, born March 3 1 , 1 967. Dean Sandvik '65 (Sal ly Adams '65 ) , so n , Mark Woodson, born A p r i l 3 , 1 967. K u rt H . Stern ( Faith B ue ltmann '55) , son, Alan Jonathan, born A p r i l 3, 1 967. Joins siste r Karen 5 . Ron Lerch '61 (J udy Rasmussen ' 6 2 ) , so n, Scott David, born April 22, 1 967. Joins brother Jeff 1 Y2 . Edward McCagg (Sharon Van Rooy '62), twin daug hters, Mary Randolph an d El iza足 beth So l l i d , born April 29, 1 967. Gene Schaumbe rg '61 (Caron Anderson '63 ) , son, Jason Eugene, born May 3, 1 967. Joins sister Angela 3 % . David L. Legg (Carol Ne lson '60), son , James Aust i n , born May 1 5 , 1 967. J o i n s sister Phy l l i s 3% and b rother Martin 2. Robert Kir kpatr i c k ( B eve rly Stimson '63), son , Robert Claude, born May 23, 1 967. Joins sister M i c h e l l e 1 % . Dennis Ross '60 (Lau rie Beec roft '60), d ugh ter, Cynthia Suzann e, born May 28, '60

'60 ) , daughter, Amy Sue, born

1 967.

Roger M i sterek '61 , daughter, K i m berly Sue, born J u n e 1 , 1 967. Joins sister Be足 linda 6. W i l l iam McA l l ister (Sharon E l l ison '63), son, Sean W i l l i a m , born June 3, 1 967. Joseph Sanchez (Sharon Barnetta '65 ) , daug hter, Michelle La Rue, born J u n e 5,

1 967.

Harlan F. Olsen '60 (Claudia Isham '63), daughter, Amber l o n e , born J u n e 9, 1 967.

Jo i ns b rother B ret 2. Warren Meyers (Anne Stewart '56), son, Stewart Matthew, born J u n e 1 1 , 1 967. Joins siste r Carla 7 and brother Ti mothy 4. Wil l iam H o l m q u ist (Judie H i ldebra n d '61 ) , daughter, Erika, born J u n e 2 0 , 1 967. Joins sisters Jen nife r 4, K i rsten 3 and I n g ri d 2. Terence Todd ( Le n ita Soder '61 ) , twin daug hters, H eather Serena and Jenn ifer C rista, born J u n e 24, 1 967. Orv i l l e Jacobson '62 (Kath ryn B e l g u m '62), daughter, E l izabeth D iane, b o r n J u ne 2 7 , 1 967.

Isaria Kimambo '62, daughter, A i c ha. born J u ly 5, 1 967. Joins siste r Me rcy. Ron Storaasli '58 (Sylvia Joh nson '58), so n , R usse l l Pau l , born J u ly 6 , 1 967. Joins brothers Ronald 1 0 , Randy 7 and R i c ky 5 . Stan Fred ric kson ' 6 1 (Den n ise Tetz '64) , son, Craig Richard, born J u l y 1 3 , 1 967. Ti mothy Olson '60 (Lorelie Ih lenfe ldt '61 ) , son, Paul Ch risto pher, born J u ly 23, 1 967.

Kenneth Ha nson (Patricia Taylor '62), son, David Ke nneth, born J u l y 26, 1 967. Joins brother Jeffrey 4% and sister Tricia 1 Y2 . W. Gerald Lynch (Di ane Bassett '56), son, Peter Co l l i n , born J u ly 29, 1 967. Joins b rothers C h r isto pher 9 , Anthony 6 and M ichael 4 . Richard Ra p p u h n (Sharon Miller '60), daug hter, Tina Marie, born August 3, 1 967. Joins sister Tamara A n ne 4 and Teresa Kaye 2 . James Ol dham (Margaret Mu rdoch '59) , son, Cha rles Kavanugh I I , born Aug ust 1 7 , 1 967.

Mari on Routh ( Karin Stromberg '60), son, Loren Eugene, born Au g u st 1 8 , 1 967. Donald Swanson (C arolyn Eri c kson '61 ) , son, Keith Edward, bo rn Au gust 20, 1 967. Joins sister Karen 2 % . Ron Boomer '63 (Sylvia Lang land '6 1 ) , daug hter, Sarah Marie, born Aug ust 26, 1 967.


What's New With You?

Deaths

P l ease use the space below to send us news of an add ress c h a nge, new promo­ tio n , hono rs , appoi ntments, ma rriages, ad­ ditions to the fam i l y , trave l , o r to j ust say hello. I nformation deadline for the next issue is November 1 5.

M I NA (FJELD) LA RSE N 'OS passed away in Panorama City, Caiif., o n February 27, 1 967. She was 82 years o l d .

Name ______ Class__

Add ress

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

City_____ State ____

Zip

__ _ _

News Notes :. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

CLARA (KN UTSON) R Y G G ' 0 6 d i e d April 1 , 1 967, i n a n Everett, Wash., hospital. S u r­ viving are two sons, A d am Rygg, both of Everett.

and

Morris

AN ELLE (LANGLO ) HARRIS '26 died May 31 , 1 967, in Santa C ruz, C a l if., as a res u l t of a car accident. She Is s u rvived by a daug hter M rs . Alfred P . E l izalde, two sons, No rman H. Langlo and Lawrence J. Harris, J r. ; a b rother, John Dahl, and a s i ster M rs. Mary Mani both of Tacoma, and fo u r g randch i l d re n . M RS.

ALFIELD

T I N G E LSTAD

(TVETE)

'07, widow of D r. O. A. T i nge lstad, forme r

president of Pacific Lutheran University, died J u ly 1 2 , 1 967, in Seattle. Survivors i n c l ude two sisters, M rs. E l la Foss and M rs. N i na C h e ry m , both of Seattle, and a brother, N o rman F. Tvete, of Rou lette, N. D. A R T H U R STA N L EY B E R E NTSON '30 died sudden ly i n Everett on J u l y 1 7 , 1 967. Death ended a distingu ished career in education for M r. Bere n tson who for the past 1 1 years had served as prinCipal of E merson E l ementary School i n Snohomish. Survivors i n c l ude h is widow Marie, Everett; a b rother, Haro l d , P ortland ; and a sister, Mrs. Harry R. M itchel l , Ma rysv i l le . .

Reported kil led in action in Vietn m t h i s past s um mer w e r e R E N E MALARZ ' 6 6 of Winlock, Wash., and J O H N W. VAN D E­ VENTER '69 of Tacoma. Both were Busi­ n ss Ad m i n istration students w h i l e at PLU.

(Send to the Alumni Office PLUj

G E RALD C. WAGN I LD '70 d ied i n a swimm i ng accident near Cou lee C ity on August 2 , 1 967. He was frem Hart l ine, Wash .


Pacific No rthwest, a majority of w h i ch h ave a h i g h e r t u ition. E s t i m ates of the cost of atten d i ng fou r-yea r state col leges o r u n i v e r s i ties in Was h i n gton ra nge from $ 1 ,400 to $1 ,800. Stud ies c o n d u c ted by one of these state institutions fo und that the average expenditure by a s t u d e n t for an academ i c year was $2,000 and n e a rly 1 0% repo rted s pe n d i n g over $3,000. It is conceiva b l e , then, because o f greater cost o f i n c idental expe nses and "soc i a l izin g , " t h a t $2,300 c o u l d a l s o b e s p e n t a t a state i n s t itu tion d u r i n g an acad e m i c year. Con­ s e q u e n t l y the d i ffe rence in cost between a state and private institution is not as g reat as m i g h t be expected at f i rst g lance.

Col lege Costs and Financial Aid by

James VanBeek, Direc tor

01

Financial Aid

A l o n g with everyt h i n g e lse, the cost o f h i g h e r education h as r i s e n s h a r p l y i n t h e l a s t decade. Between the 1 954-55 aca­ d e m i c year and t h e c u rrent school year, t h e cost of atten d i n g a p u b l i c institution jum ped from $1 ,1 90 per y e a r to $ 1 ,600, more t h a n a 40% i n c rease. The cost at a private s c h o o l d u r i n g t h e s a m e period rose from $1 ,700 to close to $2,500. The expe nse budget fo r most colleges i s made u p of t u it i on and fees, room and board, books and s u p p l ies, and i n c i dental expenses i n c l u d i n g ,(ravel and recreation. Fam i l ies are i n c u r ring most of thes e ex­ penses d u r i n g t h e i r son or d a u g hter's h i g h school expe rience. T u i t i o n , fees a n d cost of books are new expenses to be con sid ­ e red as t hese fa m i l i es p l an for c o l l ege. I t has always been the policy of Pacific Lutheran U n iversity to m a i ntain h i g h edu­ cational standards a t as low a cost as pos s i b l e. The s u ppo rt of the coope rat i n g Lutheran C h u rches a n d f riends w h o c o n. ­ t ri b u te toward the ope ration o f t h e s c h o o l en ables the U n i v e r s i ty to ch arge a lower t u i tion rate than would otherwise be pos­ sible. However, escalat i n g costs o f o p e ra­ tion have demanded periodic i n c reases i n the costs that ou r stud ents i nc u r .

Financial Assistance Accom panying the i n c rease in c o ' li e ge costs h as been a n even m o re d ramatic g rowth i n the amount of financia� ass ist­ ance ava i l a b l e to students. I n stitutions t h ro u g h o u t t h e nation are g ra n t i n g m o re assistance to an i n c reas i n g n u m be r of students. Th i s assistance comes from the schoo ls t h e m se lves, the Fed e r a l Govern­ ment and from p rivate sou rces an d takes the fo rm of s c h o l arships, g rants, loans and part-t i m e e m p loyment. At Pacific Lutheran U n i v e rs i ty, ove r $750,000 w i l l be av ailable to stude nts this year. Most of the funds a re awarded on the bas i s of need w h i c h i s co m puted from a confidential statement s u b m i tted by the parents of a p p l icants. Th i s stat e m e n t . w h i c h serves as t h e o n l y a p p l ication nec­ essary, can be obtained from h i g h school c o u n s e l i n g offices as well' as from the Fi­

Annual Costs It is esti m ated that a res ident student at t h e U n i vers ity will n eed a m i n i m u m of $2,30 0 to meet expenses fo r t h e 1 967-68 a!;ad e m i c year. This fig u re i n c l udes $300 tor i n c i dental expenses and represents the average a m o u n t reported by ret u r n i n g stu­ dents a p p l y i n g fo r financ i a l assistance. The $2,300 total c o m pares qu ite favor­ ably with other private i nstit u t io n s in the

nancial Aid Office. Some students will be denied access to certa i n f u n ds because it was determ i ned from the finan c i a l i n fo r­ mation s u p p l ie d on the statement that as­ s istance was not req u i red.

13


Sources of Aid However, t h e re are sou rces of a i d , mostly i n the fo rm of l o a n s a n d e m p l o y­ ment, avai lable to any a p p l i cant reg ard­ less of the a m o u nt of fam i l y income and assets. I f a fa m i l y is w i l l i n g to bo rrow t h e re is financial assistance ava i l a b l e fo r every student p resently atte n d i n g P L U . The l o a n s referred t o req u i re n o pay ment of p r i n c i pa l u n t i l n i n e m o n ths after the stud ent leaves f u l l-time e n ro l l ment. It is evident that many o f our students a n d their parents consider the advantage and u n i q uen ess o f a p rivate, Ch ristian higher e d u cation w o rt h whatever added cost o r sacrifice necessary. T h e U n iversity esta b l ished a Student Financial Aid Office i n the Fal l of 1 965. T h i s office h a n d l es a l l fo rms o f assistance mentioned a b ove and counsels with students and parents rela­ tive to t h e i r finan c i a l problems. If m o re specific i n fo rmation is. des i re d , contact t h e D i rector of Financial A i d .

G I VES

$20,000-Mrs. Albert

Bend The Twig Back Excerpts from a recent broadcast over Paul Har­ vey News, American Broadcasting Company.

The g rotesque m isbehavior of student mal­ c o ntents a n d student mobs at many of o u r big u n iversities has whetted o u r n at i o n a l a p petite fo r m o re, n ew ·fundamentalist, c h u rch-rel ated c o � l eges and u n iversities. Paren ts, aware that crime is i n c reas i n g five times faster than o u r po p u l ation is in­ c reasin g-and j u ven i l e c r i m e seven times faster-want to pass the b u c k to t h e " llib­ e ra l ed ucato rs." W h e n student g ro u ps in Cal i fo r n i a print pornog rap h i c p h rases on their p i c ket signs i n the name of " f ree s peec h , " even t h e l i beral edu cators become anxious. Conservative c h u rch-rel ated col leges are having no p ro b l e m sec u ri n g facu lties. Many teachers will take a s u bstantial c u t i n pay to get out 01 the "j u n g l e . " B u t to w h at extent w i l l we be suc cess­ lui in altering the basic val ues 0 1 a col­ lege-age student? Very l i ttle, I th i n k. Once the twig is ben t-a nd set-th e re is l i ttle that so-caHed h i g h e r edu cation can do to alter its shape. It is a prova b l e lact that basic val ues rema i n l a rgely constant t h ro u g h col lege. In oth e r wo rds, the m o l d is set i n ele­ mentary and g rade schoo l . Yet, m o s t every c r u sader is sett i n g o u t to solve the prob lem-bac kwa rd ! Espe c i a l l y since the S u p r e m e C o u rt's decision, in effect, evicts G o d Irom the p u b l i c sc h o o l roo m , there i s a n acute need lor c h u rch-related eleme ntary schools where codes of conduct can be strictly enlo rced, w h e re the stu dents may be tau ght to accept-as our n ation 's laund­ ers d i d-a "Iirm re l i an ce o n divine p rovi­ dence . . .

0 1 Tacoma 01 $20,000 to

Wekel/

recently presenied a capital gilt

the University. President Robert Mortvedt, right, received

the

Harold Nelson

contribution

01

and

looking

on

is

Tacoma, a PLU regent.

"

14


P h i l i p J a c o b , in h i s " C h a n g i n g Va l u e s I n

f i s h ed

o bjectives.

Co l l ege, " d e c l ares, " A m e r i c a n c o l lege stu­

words

and

If

thought

you

have

them

to

read

be

the

window

d e n ts today tend to th i n k a l i ke , fee l a l i ke

d ress i n g , you w e r e w ro n g . I f y o u h a v e read

a n d ib e l ieve a l i k e . To an extra o r d i n a ry de­

the

g ree t h e i r v a l ues a re t h e

2 0 t h Centu ry e d u c a ted man o r w o m a n c a n

they

may

be

study i n g

same w h e rever

and

w h atever

.

stage o f t h e i r c o l l eg e c a reers . "Evidently l e g es

in

c o l lege

and

thought

that

no

ralio n a ,1

b e l ieve t h e s e t h i n g s ,

you w e r e wron g .

you

be

do

not

wish

to

exposed

to

If

the

col­

teac h i n g s o f t h e Ch rist iar'1 g o s pe l , I s a y i n

not b reak o r a l te r

a l l k i n d ness a n d fa i r n es s , 'You rea l l y o u g h t

in

p a rt i c u l ar, do

the

"

words

general,

or

n o t to be h e re , for we a re g o i n g t o t r y to

t h e m o l d o f val ues for most students." I n m y own a c q u a i n tances is a d ro pout

p resent the Ch r i s t i a n m i s s i o n at a l l . t i mes

from Wheaton C o l lege. When h e fou n d the

j us t as w i n s o m e l y a n d persuas i v e l y as we

school's

f u n damenta l ist

with

own,

his

the

compatible with the

s c h o o l 's

" u n re a l istic

s c h oo l 's

his

code in

the

views

in

c a n . ' We earnestly p ray t h a t you w i l l

conflict

" pl e d g e "

m o re " l i be ra l " v iews,

so

of

free . We have a c cepted w ith utmost seri­

cam pus

twe n t i e t h

c o n d u ct

centu ry , "

" P l ease , "

I

admon ished,

"don't

t ry

that

you

may,

p a rad o x i cal l y ,

become

ous ness the command o f our Master, Go,

as

tea c h , p reach a n d b a ptize s o that a l l peo­

h e put it-I begged h i m to g o e l sewhere. c h ange W h eato n .

be­

c o m e c a ptive to the G o s p e l o f Jesus Ch rist

in­

p l e everywhere may b e l ieve

to

in

m e ; t h e re

is no other route to rea l l y mean i n g f u l

Let t h e re b e at least a

liv­

i n g ; t h e re is no o t h e r r o a d t o etern al· l ife."

few c a m p u ses left fo r t h e few w h o do N O T

-From a talk by P re s i d e n t Ro bert M o rt­

W A N T T O C O M FO R M to a t re n d . Let t h e re be a few s c h o o ls w h i c h dare to be d i ffer­

vedt

ent. Let t h e re be some cam p u ses on w h i c h

s c h o o l yea r,

at

the

fi rst

c h a pe l

Sept.

21 ,

service

of

the

1 967.

Ch rist, i f h e d ro p ped i n u n ex pected, wo u l d b e comforta b l e .

Dr. Alf M . Kraabel D ies

The M ost I m portant Thing "At P U J , we b e l ieve t h a t we can you

a

t o p - q u a l ity

education

ber since

not offe r

in

music

t h e board o f reg e n t s , d i e d in Tac o m a sud­

or

denly on

s c i e n c e o r h i s t o ry o r anyth i n g e l se u n less t h ese

i m p o rt a n t d iSC i p l i n e s

in

today; am

t ry i n g

not to

waste

any

Fune ral

y o u w h at the

I

am

trying

fo u n d e rs o f t h i s

to

services

Tacoma and Oct.

wo rds

He i s s u rv i ved

I am not beat i n g a b o u t the b u s h ; I

n o t p u ssy-footi ng .

and

res i d e n t

head

for

Pflueger H a l l .

reveren t l y c a l l t h e Son o f G o d . " am

8 as t h e result o f a heart

d e n t c o n g re g at i o n

the

l i g h t o f t h e teac h i n g s o f t h e man whom we "I

Oct.

attac k. H e was assistant pasto r o f the stu­

we a l s o offe r you a n i n v i t i n g o p p o rt u n ity to see a l l

M. Kraa b e l , staff m e m ­ 1 96 2 a n d a fo r m e r c ha i rman of

The Rev. Dr. All

sons,

te l l

Paul,

w e re

held

Oct.

10

in

1 3 i n M i n neapo l is . by h i s w i fe , M a r i e ; two

Bel levue;

and

Rev.

Dr.

A.

Th omas, M i n n e a po 'l i s ; two s i sters, M rs. M i k­

U n i versity it

'kel (Th e l m a) Lono a n d M rs . Geo rge ( E l i ne)

d i re c t i o n now b e l ieve, a n d w h at we earn­

M o rken, both Taco m a ; a n d th ree b ro t h e rs ,

b e l ieved,

w h at those

who

try

to

g ive

W as h i ngto n , D . C . ; a n d R . E . , Lag u n a H i l l s ,

I h ave s a i d

Ca l i f.

in

our

p u b-

15

Iowa;

T.

0.,

Rev.

yOtJ d e p a rt w i t h y o u r d i p l o m a . A l l o f what is clearly stated

M.

0 . , Cedar R a p i d s,

estly hope eac h o f y o u w i l l bel ieve before


H a ppening and E ncounter Happe n i n g and E nc o u n te r . Th ese are not t h e o l o g i cal words, but they are becoming a part of the vocabu lary of American Luth­ e ran C h u rc h c o n g regat i o n s this fa l l . Every­ one of the nearly 5,000 ALC c o n g regat ions are being u r ged to have a Happen i n g and an E n counter before the end o f this year. Hap p e n i n g and E n c o u n t e r are the me­ chanics for carry i n g out an ass i g n m e n t to raise more than $20 m i l lion fo r the c h u r c h ' s m i n i s t ry of h ig h e r ed ucat i o n t h ro u g h a p rogram called L I F E ( Lu t h e ran Ingath e r i n g ,f o r Ed ucat i o n ) . What's a Happen i n g ? It i s a c o n g rega­ tional fu nct i o n , an event, a gath e r i n g e i t h e r w ith a meal o r w i t h o u t a meal . either a l l i n o n e pl ace or a t t h e h o m es of mem­ bers . . . at w h i c h the s t o ry is t o l d . What story? The e x c i t i n g story of the ALC's u n ique m iss ion f i e l d o n the college and u n iversity cam p u s e s , in s e m i n a ries and in the c h u rc h ' s two h i gh s c h oo l s . A dynamic fi lm, " B efore the Cock Crows, " h e lps tell t h e sto ry. W h at ' s an E n c o u n t e r ? It is a proce d u re t h ro u g h w h i c h every mem b e r of a c o n g re­ gat i o n is perso n a l l y c h a l l e ng ed to pledge a l i be ral offe ring to LIFE, payable over a th ree-year p e r i o d . Many laymen have al­ ready res po n d e g w i t h , "We ' re g lad t h e c h u rch i s ask i n g u s t o do a really b i g j o b , " and have accompanied t h i s res p o n s e with a s i zeab le pledge. By the end o f Sep­ tem b e r c lose to $ 2 m i l l ion had been g iven or p l edged t h ro u g h the advanced g i ft p ro­ g ram. Rev. Carro l l Anderson of Los Angele s , western d i v i s i o n d i rector, and R e v . Harvey N e u f e l d , PLU's directo r of c h u rc h relat i o n s who is Pac i f i c N o rth west and Alaska area d i recto r, c o n d u cted a trai n i n g session fo r forty co-d i rectors in Parkland Sept. 15 and 1 6. T h ese pastors and lay m e n represented

the 20 geog raphical areas into w h i c h the 250 cong regat ions of the N o rth Pac ific D i strict have been d ivided. These co-directors will c o n d u ct tra i n i n g sessions in e a c h cong regation i n wh i c h o v e r 2,500 l aymen w i l l be i n volved. P L U 's share in the L I F E campa i g n w i l l be a p p ro x imately $ 1 . 5 m i l l i o n toward a new b u i l d i n g on cam p u s .

Faculty I nformation The promotion of e i g h t faculty memb e rs and the g ranti ng of ten u re to seve n others was a n n o u n c e d at the o p e n i n g convoca­ tion by P resident R o b e rt M o rtvedt. P romoted to p rofessor were D r. George E. Arba u g h , ph i l o s o p h y ; F re d e r i c k L. N ewn h am, m u s i c ; and D r. Jo h a n n es A. Sc h i ller, soc i o logy. Moved up to assoc iate p rofess o r were D r. Carrol DeBower, e d u ­ catio n ; a n d D r. Laurence D. H u estis , c h em i s t ry . T h o s e appoi nted assistan t professor were Geo rgann A. Chase, n u rs i n g ; W i n n i­ fred M . Fish er, foreign lang uag e s ; and D r. Donald L. Pattie, b i ology. Granted ten u re were D r . E m m et E . Ek­ l u n d , re l ig ion ; D r. C u rtis E. H u b e r, p h i los-

16


tu re has been authorized by the Federal H igher Education Fac i l ities Comm ission. Bids for the b u i l d i n g were to be opened October 10, and it was hoped that con­ stru ction wo uld beg i n shortly thereafter.

o p h y ; D r. H u estis; D r. Ken neth A. Johns­ ton, edu cation ; Mau rice H. Skones, music; Dorothy M . Tol l efson, n u rsi n g ; D r. E . Jane W i l l iamso n , edu cation. A p poi nted c h a i rmen of d e pa rtme nts were D r. Sherm a n B. N o rnes, physics ; D r. Paul M . Rei gstad, E n g l ish ; and Carl D . Spang­ ler, acting c h a i rm a n of fore i gn l ang uages. Two fac u l ty members were awarded doc­ torates i n Septem ber. They a re L u c i l l e M . J o h n s o n , E n g l is h . doctor of p h i loso p h y , U n iversity of Montana ; a n d Do ris G . St u c ke, n u rs i n g , doctor of education i n n u rs i ng edu cation admin istration, ColUm­ b i a Un iversity. Six faculty mem bers have been g ranted leaves o f a bsence and sabbaticals this school year. D r. Dwight J. Z u l aut, b u si­ ness ad m i n istration, is a visiting lectu re r at the U n ivers ity of M i n nesota. Sta n l ey Petru I is, music, is working toward h i s doc­ torate at Indiana U n iversity. Rhoda H. Yo u n g , physical education, has been g rant­ ed a sabbatical fo r reasons o f health. G u nn a r J . M a l m i n , fo re i g n languages, is tea c h i n g at Cam rose (Alta . ) Lutheran Col­ lege fo r o n e year. Theodore O . H . Karl, speec h ; and Mau rice H . S kones, m us i c , w i l l spend the second semester on leave for doctoral study.

New Facu lty E i g h t persons have been appoi nted to t h e faculty and th ree t o th e staff since the last issue o f REFLECTIONS. The new additions i n c l u d e : M rs. Janet M . I rw i n , instru ctor in Eng­ ish, B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., D u ke U n i ­ versity. Paul E . Hartm a n , instructor i n s peech and operation manager of c losed c i rc u it telev ision studio, B.A., P L U , 1 967. Lavon C . Holden, instructor in s peech, B A , PLU, 1 967. J e rry D . Kracht, instru ctor i n music and d i rector of o rc h estra, B.M., M .A . , M . F.A., U n iversity of Iowa ; taught i n U n iversity Experimental Schools, Iowa C ity. Ken n eth A. Lueder, instructor in mathe­ matics, B.A., Luther College ; M .A . , U n iver­ s ity of N eb raska; tea c h i n g assistant at Nebraska. Thomas A. M c Kay, inst ructo r in p h i loso­ p h y , B.A., M.A., Gonzaga U n iv e rsity; i n­ structo r of p h i losophy last two years at St. Leo College, Florida. Florence A. O rvik, assistant professor o f edu catio n , B . S . , Moorhead ( M i n n . ) State College; M .A . , Eastern Was h i n gton State College; has taught in Was h i n gton p u b l i c s c h o o l s a n d fo r several years was lan­ g u age arts con s u l tant fo r textbook p ub l is h ­ i n g firm. David E . U r ness, assistant p rofessor of m u s i c , B . M . , Concordia College ( M i n n . ) ; M.A., U n iversity of Denve r ; Ph.D. candi­ date, U n iversity of Iow a ; taught last year at Thiel Col lege ( Pe n n . ).

Cliff O lson B uilding Drive Underway A g i ft of $ 1 0 , 000 from Pacific N o rthwest B e l l of Tacoma kicked off the Tacoma area campaign for funds fo r the C l i fford O . O lson Gymnasium Audito r i u m B u i ld i n g . H eaded u p by Tom A n de rson. Tacoma busi ness executive, the campaign i n the busi ness com m u n ity is i n fu l l swing and thus far a total of $285,000 i n cash and pledges has been received. A g rant of $434,000 toward the struc-

17


John W i l l iam Lennon, d i rector of m e n 's res idence h a l ls , B.A., P L U , 1 96 2 ; M .A . can­ didate, Emory U n iversity ; tau g h t and coached s po rts fo u r years at Ocosta H i g h S c hool, Westport. Roger B. Rodewald, stage tec h n i c i a n , B.A., W i n d h am Col lege (Vt. ) ; studied at New S c hoo l of Social Researc h and N eigh­ borhood Playhouse o f D ramatic Arts (both New York City) and Royal D ramatic Acad­ emy, Londo n , E n g . Victor I . N e l so n , assistant t o t h e c h ief e n g i neer, broadcast and instruction a l serv­ ices, attended PLU and W i l l i a m B. Ogden Radio and Televis ion B roadcast E n g i neer­ ing Schoo l (Ca l i f. ) ; has been annou ncer and eng ineer for th ree Wash ington radio stations.

to re l ieve the pres ident of some of h is duties. Mrs. G i roux w i l l h a n d l e ro utine cor­ res ponde n c e , assist the p resident in re­ search projects and handle regent's affairs. A n ative of Nort h Dakota, M rs. G i roux is a g raduate of J a m estown (N. D.) Col lege. H e r h usban d , a P L U g raduate, is on the staff of Tacoma Co m m u n ity College. They h ave t h ree c h i l dre n . SUMMER CO M M ENCEMENT

Sixty-nine

-

stu­

dents received bacca laureate and master's de­ grees al the I/rst annual summer commence­ ment held In Eastvold Chapel August 1 7. Dr. Angelo Giaudrone, Tacoma superintendenl 01 schools, gave the address. President Robert Mortvedt

presided

baccalaureate

and

servicas

gave

the

held in

the

sermon

at

forenoon .

The Rev. Dr. All M. Kraabel, member

01

the

stall, was baccalaureate liturgist and partIcip­ ated in the graduation program.

Fall Semester Enrol l ment Up Offi c i a l e n ro l lment statistics for the fa l l semester were not avai lable when this issue of R EFLECT I O N S was written. How­ ever, Registrar C harles N e lson reported that 2 , 1 74 students registered the first th ree days of o rientation p rior to the start o f c lasses. He a n t i c i pated an enrol l ment of over 2 , 1 00 f u l l-time students, p l us about 700 part-t ime. Last fall there were 1 ,955 f u l l-time. J . E. Dan ielson, d i rector of adm issions, reported that 826 new students were ex­ pected, of whom 626 were freshmen and 200 were transfers.

Rev. Kraabel, Dr. Giaudrone, Dr. Mortvedl Firsl summer graduating class,

M rs. Giroux Na med Mrs. R i c h ard ( L u c i l le) G i ro u x , sec retary to the p resident s i n c e 1 960, has been ap­ pointed to t h e newly c reated positio n , ad­ m i n istrative assistant to the p reside nt. The Board of Regents c reated the post

18

1967


Board E lects Earl E. Eckstro m , Seatt le b u s i ness exe c u ­ tive, was re-elected c h a i rman o f t h e Board of R e g e n ts at a meet i n g on c a m p u s Sept. 8. A lso re-elected were D o n a l d Co rne l l , Port A n g e l es , sec retary; and A . Dean B u c h a n a n , vice president - b u s i n ess a n d f i n a n c e , treasurer. R e v . M. E . Nesse, Ta­ c o m a , was e lected vice c h a i r m a n . A l l were fo r o n e-year t e r m s . E l ected to s e rve w i t h t h e s e officers on the exec u t i v e c o m m ittee were M i c h ae l D ed ­ ere r a n d E l m e r J. White, both Seatt l e ; a n d E i n e r K n u tz en , B u r l i n gton .

J offrey B a l l et The renowned Jo ffrey Ballet from N e w Y o r k C i t y s p e n t f i v e w e e k s i n res idence o n c a m p u s in J u l y a n d A u g ust. Cl i m axi ng t h i s fi rst res i d e n c y away from h o m e , t h e company gave five w o r l d p r e m i e r p e rfo rmances o f t h e n e w works w h i c h h a d been develo ped h e re . T h e com pany p l ayed to capa c i ty aud ien ces i n Eastvold C h a p e l fo r five n ights, a n d received rave reviews from a rea and national c ritics. Right,

scenes

from

rehe arsals

and

perform­

ances o f the Jaffrey Ballet Company on campus last summer.

fn one photo

Robert Jaffrey, cen­

ter, visits with Eric Nordh olm, left, PLU's tech­ nical

adviser;

a n d Dr.

Thomas

H.

Langevin,

academic vice-p resident.

19


and the artist's tool to form the m a terial, The work simply asks the viewer to use his imag­

ination to read into the work his own explan­

HOMECOMING

a nd

ation

experience.

Th e form's size

and

placement are a foi l for t h e rec t ang u l ar build­

NOVEMBER 2 - 5

mate­

ing. The matarial is Co r-Ten st ee l , a new

rial

"G reatest Show on Earlh" Circus Theme

d evel ope d by the Unitad States Steel Cor­

poral/on. I t is a new steel

that rusts

a

first and from then on never rusts. After

bit

a

at

year

it takes on a deep brown petina, 2 G I VES TREES-Rev. Carl E. L. Lucky, who re­ tired in August as p a st or of Peninsula Lutheran Church, Gig Harbor, Wash . , has presented 1 80 Sc ot ch shown

trees

pine

10

the

Uni versity.

(right) showing

here

to President

Robert

one

of

He

is

the pines

Mort v e dt. Rev. Lucky, who

planted the trees on a plot by his parsonage

in 1959, s a id they will reach a height of about

25

feet.

They

existing trees time

are being used t o on campus. This is

Re v. Lucky has been

plant ing at

complement the second

involved in a tree

PLU. As a child he helped plant a

tree in front of Harstad Hall. The o v er 50 years old, is still standing.

tree,

now

3

MAU R I C I O

LASANSKY

-

Twen ty-five

prints by Mauricio Lasansky

a re

intaglio

on exhibit in

th e Un i versity Ga llery in the library until Octo­ ber 22. The artist and h is wife were present for the opening on Sept. 23. They are shown look­ in g at a self portrait of the artist. Considered by m a n y t o be the world's greatest livin9 print­

maker, La sa nsky is head of t h e department of

A RC H ITECT'S G I FT- Th i s piece of sculpture in front of Tingels tad Hall was presented to PLU

by

a r c h itect

Robert "

Bi l l sb ro ugh

who designed

the

Pric e ,

new

grap hic erts at the University of Iowa.

Tacoma

m e n 's

4

resi­

XAV I ER HALL (old library) h a s been remodeled

dence hall. The first outdoor statue to appear o n the PLU campus, it wa s designed and ex­ ecuted by Harold Balazs of Mead, artist is a native uate

1 966

tects'

of

Medal,

a collaborating aftist.

thalr

Institute

highest

In

This is

for

was

This is the large

formerly

the

reading

Ordal

Hall

wh ic h houses

1 85 women.

6

The artist states that the statue is abstract and not named. It is a lorms forming a single

and offices.

which

5

of Archi­

award,

hall

room.

grad­

in art of Washington State Univa rsi ty. Gold

lecture

Wash. The

Spokane and is a

he won th e American

for classrooms

Nine-story Tingelstad Hall houses 396 men.

series of opposing composition. These

Tile two new residence units will be dedicated

forms are a direct result of the material used

Sunday, Nov. 5.

20


4

2

5

3

6

,

21


Footba l l Fifty-th ree m e n , i n c l u d i n g 2 1 lettermen , a n 足 swered C o a c h R o y Carlson 's c a l l f o r foot足 b a l l th i s fa l l . Although t h e Lutes s u ffered a 20-8 loss i n t h e i r ope n e r against C a l ifo r n i a Lutheran Col lege, i t was ho ped that by the t i m e N o rthwest Confe rence p l ay began agai nst Wil lamette Oct. 7 that the c l u b wo u l d be rou n d i n g i nto a u n it. Captain Jeff Carey is the o n l y starting end from last season an d Ken H a rd i ng the o n ly starting back. Bob Lov e l l , t ransfer from Everett J. C., and Bob B e l l e r , a fo rmer h a l fbac k , carried the load at qu arte rback in the o pener. Pete O l bertz, a frosh from O l y m p i a , i s another signal c a l l e r w i th promise. Hans L i n d st rom, a fres h m an from Puyal l u p , and lee David足 son, s o p h o m o re from Fosler, alternate at left h a l f ; and H a rd i n g i s the right h a l f. F re d Moe, a transfer from W S U w h o s e father S h e l d o n Moe p l ayed for PLU in the early 30s, i s the start i n g f u l l b a c k.

1967- 6 8 Basketbal l Sched u l e DECEMBER

26-L

1 -CWSC at PLU 2-UPS at P L U 5-P L US a t CWS C a-Daffodil Tourney at UPS 9-Daffodil Tourney at UPS 15-PL U at WWSC

5-Pacific a t PLU 6-Pacific at PLU 12-PLU at Linfield 16-PLU at Pacific

&

C

20-Willamette at P L U

22

C at PLU

&

C

FEBRUARY 1 - Whitman a t PLU 2-Whitman a t PL U 3-C of

I

at PLU

9-PLU a t Willamette 1 0- P L U a t Willamette 16-Linfield at P L U 1 7-Unfield at PLU

JANUARY

17-PLU a t L

&

27-PLU at L

22-PLU at Whitman 23- P L U at C of

I

24-PLU at C of I 27-PLU at UPS MARCH 2-SPC at P L U


Angie G , H o l m , j u n i o r e d u cation major from G i g Harbor, h as been named ed itor of the Saga, student yearboo k, for the c u rrent school year. Rev. H arvey N e u fe l d , directo r of c h u rc h re lations, d i d g raduate s t u d y i n theology at Union C o l lege i n Vancouver. :e , c, i n J u l y , H e w a s g iven a fac u l ty g rowth award from the ALC's Board of Col lege E d u ca足 tion for his study, D r. Thomas H , Langev i n , academic v i ce pres ident, and D r. D an i e l R, Leas u re, v i ce pres ident fo r student affa i rs, atte nded the ninth an n u a 'i Col lege and U n iversity Self足 Stu d y I nstitute h e l d at the U n iversity o f C a l iforn ia, Berkeley, i n July. D r , Daniel Moe, d i recto r of c horal act iv足 ties at the U n iversity of Iowa. and David P. Dah l , member of the Wh itworth C o l lege music fac u lty, were g uest lecturers at a Sacre d Music I nstitute sponsored by the d e pa rtment o f m u s i c i n A u gust. D r. 0 , Elton Trueblood, renowned author a n d C h ristian p h i losopher, gave a p u b l i c lecture o n c a m p u s S e p t . 5 . D r. W i l bert J , M c Keac h i e, c h a i rman of t h e psy c h o logy department at the U n iver足 s ity of M i c h igan, was g u est lecturer fo r the ann ual Fac u l ty Fal l Conference h e l d Sept. 1 1 -1 3 , H e spoke o n t h e conference theme, "The U n i v e rs i ty as a C o m m u n ity of S c h o lars and Teac hers , " D r. Tho mas H , La ngve i n , academic vice p resident, has been elected to the Board of Control of Concordia Col lege, Portlan d , O re.

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Dr. J. A. S ch il le r, chairman of the de­ partment of sociology, h as been appo inted to the Spec ial Comm itlee on Un dergradu­ ate Education of the Cou n c i l on Social Work Education, a national body with' h ea d qua rte r s i n New York.

Enrol lment for t h e summer school was 829 t he f i rst term and 647 th e second term, fo r a total of 1 ,476. Students who attended both terms totaled 409, g iving a net en­ rol l ment for the summer ses s ion of 1 ,067.

Peter Lieurance, sophomore from Port Angeles, was elected national president of the Luthe r Leag u e of t he American luth­ eran C h u rc h at the concu rrent L.L. con­ ven tions atlended by 1 5,000 yo uth in Se ­ attle and Da l las Aug. 1 2-1 7,

President Robert M o rtvedt has been ap­ poin ted b y Gove m o r Danie l Evans to the Was h i n g to n Citizens Council of the Na­ tional C o u n c i l on C r i me and Delinquency.

Rev. Karlls K und zl n s , who was a guest le c t u re r at PlU in the 1 950s, died in Se­ atl le in Au g u st. He was Archbishop e m e r­ itus of t h e Latvian Eva n g e l i c a l L uthera n Chu rc h .

P resident Robert Mo rtvedt gave th e ad­ dress at the convocation o pe n i n g the school year Sept. 6 at SI. M a rt i n 's Col­ lege , Olympia.

Attention Parents Is your son or daughte r a PLU a l u mnu s ? Is this copy of the " R E FLECT I ON S " and other u n iversity pub l i cations intended for him o r her sti l t being mai led to yo u r home? Is so, p leas e let the A l u m n i O ffi ce know where you r o f fs p r i ng now i s located so that mail can be properly addressed. The c o u pon below is p rov i d ed for your conven ien c e .

rM��om�------------------ -------------Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, Washington 98447 Na me______ Class (Maiden

year

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Name

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(Married women p lease note you r husband's

Occu pation

full

name

and class

year below:

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Street�

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City

Zl p

State

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Prof. Theodore O. H. Karl . ch airman o f t h e spe ec h department, h a s b e e n elected national pres ide nt of Pi Kappa Delta , for足 ensics h o n o rary. P rof. Karl has been active in this orga n i zation l o r over 30 years, and has h e l d numerous appoi ntive and elective posts in the na tion a l and reg ional u n its of this gro u p.

"The Seekers," popu l a r S i n g i n g and in足 s t r u m e n tal g ro u p from E n g l a n d a n d A u s足 t r a l i a , gave the i r fi rst concert in the U n i ted States before a capacity t h ro n g i n M e m o r i a l Gynas i u m o n Sept. 3 0 . The enterta i n e rs (th ree men and a lady) are w e l l known fo r t h e i r record i n g s of fo l k tunes a n d p o p u l a r music.


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TACOMA, WASHING TON 98447 n �"nnti ,.., �oma, Washington

20·NOVEMBER

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Reflections 1967 october