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eflection£{ PACIFIC

LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

B

L

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E

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J U LY 1 967

N U M B E R IV

VOLU ME XLVII

T

Contents Recall to F u n d a m e n tals

2

The Cl ifford O. O l son P h ysical Edu cat ion-A u d itor i u m Bui l d i n g

5

A Hospital F o r The Soul'

7

News Notes .

12

S ports .

22

U n iversity Notebook

24

Published

Six

University.

P.

Second

Times

Annually

O. Box 2068.

Class

Postaga

by

Tacoma,

Paid

a/

Pacific

Lutheran

Washington

Tacoma.

98447.

Washington.


RECALL TO FUNDAMENTALS "No msn Is the crslilor of his own tsith. Faith Is always Inspired by an ou/s/dB forc8."

their maker. Language will c h ange, courses will cha nge, subject matter and technology will ch ange. But we stil l believe "that God is l ight, and in h i m there is no darkness at a l l . If we claim to be sha ring in his l i fe w h i l e we walk in the d a rk, our words and our l ives are a l ie." On a day l i ke this, it is well to rec a l l t h is fundamental, to sea rch our he arts and ask ourselves if we are earnestly striving to f u l fi l l our com m itment or if we a re per­ petrating a fraud. I ask you to recall the fundamental fact that our name and o u r traditions associate us with one of the most i m portant epochs in the history of the Ch ristian C h u rch, the Luth eran Reformation. We have not asked non-L utherans to accept Lutheran dogmas. We have, however, in the Reformation s p i r­ it, sought to expose a l l students to the vital necessity of th inking about the essen­ tial val ues and bel iefs of Ch ristians: and we have sought to expose you to and to teach you something about the vital neces­ sity to the C h ristian of the im portance of comm u nity wors h i p . We have not been so

Excerpts from President Robert Morlvedt's Baccalaureate sermon,

de livered

May

28,

1967, and based on St. John's First Epistl e.

I want to rec a l l a few of the fundam ent­ als which h ave wa rranted our inviting you to be students at Pacific Lutheran Uni­ ve rs ity . T h e pu rpose o f this institution i s un­ usual. It was cha rtered to offer an educa­ tion w ithin the framework of commitment to the Christian Gospel-the same Gospel s u m marized in the words of St. John. O u r founding fathers h a d never heard o f mole­ cular theory or sol id state physics or Bar­ thian th eology; but they knew someth i ng about education, and they believed that education and the Gospel of Jesus C h rist a re compatible. Regardless of the enormous explosions in learning which have occu rred since PLU's birthday in 1890, those of us who administer the Un iversity today in a world characterized by cataclysmic change, bes­ tial violence, and a spirit of rebellion, sti l l believe that the h u man minds w h ich God has c reated do not or cannot transcend

2


distinctiveness. W h e re such is t h e case, t h e role p l ayed by re lig ion i n the institu­ tion shou l d be carefu l ly d e fi n e d so that p rospective stu dents a n d fac u lty m e m b e rs wil l be p roperly i n formed a n d the state­ m e n t of p u r poses can p rovi d e a c l e a r g u i d e for t h e deve l o p m e n t o f the e d u c a­ Iional p rogram." O n this import a n t occasion, I rec a l l this f u n d a m ental and stress t h e fact that these a re the preCise t h i n g s we at P a c i f i c Luth­ e ra n U nivers ity h ave sou g h t to do. I d o not n eed to tell you we a re l iv i n g in a day of revo l u tion a nd that moral stand­ ards, as we have known the m , a re suffer­ ing an atta c k of social n a p alm p l u s a d evastating art i l l ery ba rrage. I do not n ee d to tell y o u that the seemi n g ly a c c e ptable t h i n g to do is to meet a l most any question of d iversity of j u d g m e n t with mass d e mons­ trations w h i c h often lead to riots a n d d e ath. A f e w years a g o w e assu m e d these i r res pons i b l e res ponses to social p ro b l e m s to be e n d e m i c to c e rta i n u n c iv i l i z e d cou n­ t ries; today they seem to be e n d e m i c to a country that h as for two c e n t u r i es set an example of s e e k i n g to solve p ro b l e m s , even g rievous problems, b y d emoc ratic processes. I do not need to te l l you we are expe ri­ e nCin g a terr i fy i n g i n cre ase in virtu a l ly every category of crime, parti c u l arly crimes of violence-not only in C h i c a g o and New York, b u t r i g h t h e re in Tacoma a n d Seatt l e .

foo l i s h as to bel ieve that wors h i p cons ists of l i sten i n g to s pe l l -bin d e rs . W e h ave not been so foo l i s h as to bel ieve t hat a person can be forced to learn or b elieve anyth ing at a l l . T h e re are some of us , however, who may be foo l i s h enough to b e l ieve that con­ tact with God ' s word and a m i n imal des ire to fee l or p e rceive t h e p resence of God s t i l l pe rforms a mysterious a n d etern a l l y im­ portant f u n ction. I h ave known a g reat many wise people in my l i fetime, but at the moment, I can not recall one-not on e, n ot even my sai nted parents - who was a b l e to convi nce me that God loves m e , gave His l i f e f o r m e , and promised me life ever-l asting. Mysterious and a l m ost u n b e l ieva b l e as th ese asse rtions a re , I still bel ieve t h e m , as m i l l i ons o f others d o a ro u n d t h e wor l d . Today I a s k y o u t o r ec a l l this fu nd ament a l fact. No man i s the creator o f his own faith. Faith is a/ways inspired by an out­ side source.

In a re cent book entitl ed Church-Spon­ sored

Higher

Education

in

the

United

States, M a n n i n g Pattillo, Jr. and Donald Mack e n zi e pres e n t the most e x h a u stive stu dy of this typ e of col lege that has been made up to this time. They stress the Im­ portance of l eaders h i p , mo ney, p l a n t a n d e q u i p m e n t. They lay tremen dous em phasis u pon "the seriousness of purpose" of the col lege. "Tea c h i n g a n d l e a r n i n g are not ends in themse lves , " they say. "The goa l of the c o l l e ge must have roots in deeper va l u es. A college ought to k n ow what it stands for, and these values ought to be p e rceivab l e in the d a i l y lives of the fac­ ulty and students . . A q u a l i ty institution is n ot afra i d to be diffe rent when to be di fferent means to b e better." ( pp . 58-59). To q uote further, they say, "The educa­ tional p urposes of many c o l l eges are in­ fused with religious motivation. T h i s can be a n im po rta n t i ngredient 01 insti tution a l

I d o not know a l l the reasons for th ese con d i t ions, for t h ey are extre m e l y com­ plex, but I am a b so l u tely certa i n t h at I know on e-t he fact that, as a nation, we are tur n i n g our backs u pon t h e laws of G o d , more s p e c i f ic a l l y t h e Ten Command-

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t h o u g h pro bably not his own i n the sense t h a t h e i nvented it. "H i g h er educat i o n c a n n o t, even i f i t woul d , 'give' the student a faith. A n ade­ quate fa i t h is a p ro d u ct of many influ­ ences." ( p. 69). No one kn ows t h is better t h an we do at P a c i fi c Luthera n . For this reaso n , over a s p a n of yea rs , we h ave sought to con­ struct a pattern of i n fluences which look toward a very lofty goal - l ives dedi cated to t he h i g hest val ues we bel ieve man c a n k n o w ; l ives undergirded by t h e power of the Ch ristian Gospel, fo r we bel ieve it alone is the answer t o m an's searc, h i n g; i t a l o n e i s the power o f G o d which leads to sa'iva t i o n . As I see the situatio n , the strongest s i n g le tendecy of so-called church related c o l leges is to become just as m u c h as pos­ s i b le l i ke any col lege that h as a good reputation s i m ply as an acade m i c in stitu­ t i o n . T h i s is an error. I n the first in stan ce, we s h o u l d sti l l strive to thin k of ourselves mean i n g fu l l y as Christian col leges - not as just good c o l l eges o r c h u rc h -related c o l leges. Moreover, we must everlastingly s t rive to determ ine what the c h a racteristic marks o f a Christian college are o r ought to be. We, too , m u st lock our s i g h ts on C ano pus.

ments. Society may h ave repealed t h em; but God hasn't, and we are reaping the wh irlwind we have sow n . Ch fist made very c l ear that He came to f u l f i l l the law, not to destroy it. Hegardless of the arg u­ ments I hear, I still I believe the basic moral B i bl,i c a l law governs olJr world. One of the fas c i n a t i n g th i ngs I read i n the accou nts of putting our rockets and i n struments o n the moon i s t h e often-repeated, a lmost cryptic expression, that the complex s i g h t­ i n g mechan isms are " l o c ked on the star, Cano pus" W i t h o u t some absolutely fixed o bject, it i s i m po s s i b l e to govern the c u rv­ i n g trajectory of t h e ro c kets w h i c h s peed toward t he moon with i n comprehens i b le speed a n d accu racy. This is a good a n a logy of the p u r pose and f u n c t i o n of the laws of God f u l f i l led in the l i fe of Christ. On this im portant day, I s u ggest the need o f l o c k i n g yo u r pur poses on a Moral Canopus. Won derful as your own i nventive powers may be, they a re not e n o u g h . Yo u may face pro b l ems of "situ atio n a l ethics," but so also did Cain and the woman a t the wel l and King David. The only di fference is that the phrase h ad not yet been i n ­ vented w h e n they faced th eir problems.

C onclusion

This is not a lime for pessimism. It is a time for renewal. May God g i ve us the wis­

I f we attain at least a fair measure of suc cess at Pacific Lutheran, what is the u l timate consequence for the studen t s ? " O u r answer," s a y Patt i l l o a n d M a c ­ kenzie, "is a reasoned framework of bel ief that g i ves mea n i n g to h uman experi­ ence. It s h o u l d be a faith that h as some­ thing to say a b o u t the i nescapab le rea l i t ies of li fe - good a n d evi l , joy and suffer i n g , deat h , h i story, God - a faith that will stand the test of t i me. I t s h o u ld be t h e student's o w n i n t h e sense t h a t i t i s a part of h i m - He h as t h o u g h t it thro u g h -

dom and courage to reco g n ize as we l l as to f u l fi l l o u r a p poi nted task.

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Working drawings for a new physical edu­ cation building, featuring a 3,500-seat auditorium and fieldhouse, are being pre­ pared by Robert Bitlsbrough Price, F.A.I.A., Tacoma architectural firm. It is expected that construction will begin by October 1. Pac·ific Lutheran University's 'Board of Regents named the $1.4 million structure in honor of Clifford O. Olson, former PLU coach and athletic director. I,t will be built on the lower campus next to the swimming pool. Completion is ex­ pected by the start of fall classes in 1968. The project will be financed by a Higher Education Facilities Act grant of $424,400, and public support. The multi-purpose building will be used for varsity basketball games, intramural sports and health and physical education classes. Fold-away bleachers and mov­ able chairs will provide maximum ultiliza­ tion of floor space. Acoustical engineering, designed with­ out exposed beams, will provide high fidel­ ity reproduction of both music and speech. The auditorium's floor, like the entire buildil1g, will accommodate many func­ tions. The floor will have a newly-devel­ oped synthetic covering that will be usable for athletics, dances, and other activities. The fieldhouse-originally scheduled to be bui,lt as one of the last steps in PLU's master plan-will be incorporated in the physical eduGation building. It is an 80 by 116-foot extension with a 250-foot ceiling. Its dirt floor will make the fieldhouse suitable for football, base­ ball, track practices, and other "outdoor" sports during inclement weather. In addition to the fieldhouse and audi­ torium, the structure will house: seven classrooms, a wrestling-gymnastics room, three handball courts and one squash court, a weight training room, faculty off,jces, reception and concession area,

5


In all, the record book still has 28 en­ tries established during Olson's tenure as head football coach. But football wasn't Olson's only sport. His three-year record (1938-41) as basket­ ball coach against four-year teams is the best winning record in the school's history. His teams won 44 games and lost only 15. In 1941 his squad won the Washington Intercollegiate Conference title. Dave James, a Tacoma News Tribune sports writer during Olson's tenure, re­ cently said: "This recognition (of Olson) has long been deserved."

lockers, showers, and storage rooms. It was designed to complement the facil­ ities now available in Memorial Gymn­ asium, the swimming pool, golf course, tennis courts and athletic fields. In announcing the Board's decision to name the building after Clifford Olson, Dr. Robe rt A. l. Mortvedt, said: "Few men have had a more distinguished career in the field of teaching and coaching than Cliff Olson. His teams brought glory to a small college and to the City of Tacoma." During his 14 years as head football coach, Olson's teams won the Washington Intercollegiate Conference title three years in a row, 1939-41, and gained national recognition in the process. At one game a crowd of over 22,000 people filled the Tacoma Stadium to watch PLU def at Gon zaga University. Two of his star players in that three­ year era were Marv Tommervik and Marv received All-America Both Harshman. recognition. Tommervik, now a fuel oil dealer in Parkland, and Harshman, head basketball coach at Washington State University, to­ gether hold 25 PLU gridiron r ecords. While a coach Olson established the best record of any PLU mentor in the school's history 64 wins, 33 losses, and 6 ties - and had the school's longest win­ ning streak with 18.

"On occasions like this," said James, "when a good guy is getting a big honor, we like to sidle up and say we knew him, We like to bask in the warmth and pleasure.

"It is like this with Cliff Olson. He was big enough for Pacific Lutheran University when it was just a sprout and I'm filled with good feeling to see that an immensely successful school is big enough in heart and mind to remember its old coach who did so much to build what now has come to be." Olson is presently a Tacoma business­ man. Following his reSignation from PLU, he became manager of the Huth Estate in Tacoma. He held that pOSition for ten years before becoming manager of the Lake­ wood Center. He joined the PLU staff again in 1963, this time as an associate in development. Olson stayed until 1965 when he became manager of the Medical Arts Building in Tacoma. Thomas Anderson, president of Concrete Technology in Tacoma, is the general chairman of the pUblic-support drive for the building. Advisory members are Tom­ mervik, Harshman, James, and Earl Leub­ ker, sports editor of the TNT.

-

6


line. The contagion of this myopia h as infected American ideas and institutions, inc l u d in g , alas, many of our c h u rches and schools; and as American edu cation comes of age, we find ourselves severely handi­ capped by an intel lectual and scholarly isolationism that has perpetuated itself long after politic al and economic isol ation­ ism became untenable. As one who g rew up in the m i dst of an i m mig rant community surrounded by other immigrant comm unities, I. have often pon­ dered the i rony of the process of Ameri­ canization. When each of the national groups came to the New World, it g rew more ethnocentric than it had been in the mother cou ntry: rivalry between Norwe­ g i ans and Swedes was probably never as intense in Scand inavia as it became In M innesota. B u t with the grad ual assimila­ tion of the child ren and g randc h i ldren of the i m m i g rants , this ethnocentrism was re­ placed by the broadened , the broadening. sense of membership in the American fam­ ily. At the same time, however, assimila­ tion represented a narrowing of perspective and a shortening of vision, for it man­ aged to push beyond the American horizon some of the very riches which the i m m i ­ grants h a d carried in t h e i r packs. Sig­ nificantly, the recent "white bac klash" has been most powerful among the groups who arrived most recently. I t s i mply is not true, as the overworked phrase "the Amer­ i can melting pot" wou l d suggest, that each g roup of i m m i g rants contributed to Amer­ i c an cu lture the best that it had inhe rited from the Old Wo r l d , en rich ing the heirs of other cultu res with its distinctive contribu­ tion. How many native varieties of bread have been baked within the continental l i m its of the United States, how m any mag­ nificent kinds of cheese have been made, how many traditional wines have been pre­ pared-now to be replaced by the mass-

An address delivered at the dedication of the Robert A. L. Mortvedt Library, Pacific Lutheran University, April 2,

1967,

by Jaroslav

Pelikan,

Yale University.

The most famous library of the ancient world, built by "Osymandyas" (probab ly Pha raoh Ramses II) more t h an three mil­ lennia ago, is reported by the later chron­ icler, Diadorus Sicu lus, to have borne the inscription: phyches iatreion, "a hospital for the sou l . " Whether or not the report is acc urate, the insc ription is certa inly apt. For in the America of the 20th century A. D . , no less than in the Egypt of the 13th century B . C . , a l ibrary can be a place to d iagnose, to treat, and perhaps even to cure diseases of the soul and the intellect. Indeed, the syndrome of the 20th century mani fests certain symptoms for w h i c h the most re l i able specific is the therapeutic power of the library. On such an occasion as this, a human i stic scholar can probably render no service more appropriate than to examine some of those diseases and to su ggest how the aca demic library may deal with them. I s h a l l concentrate my attention on two. Of a l l the diseases that beset us in the United States , none is more v i r u l ent than cultural myopia, the inability to look be­ yond the th ree-mile limit of ou r own coast-

7


philanthropic

produced lowest common denominator available at your local supermarket! Even more lamentable has been the cultural deprivation as immigrants were homogen­ ized by social pressures and the mass media. For perhaps more languages have been spoken and written in the United States than in any nation in history, at least since ancient Alexandria. Yet now we cannot find people with the linguistic equipment to staff our embassies.

foundations

have

explored

with various institutions the possibility of expanding research and instruction in non­ Western cultures. Here In the Pacific Northwest, where you face Asia rather than Europe, you have special reason to break with the conventional pattern. As more and more colleges recognize the de­ sirability of extending the four-year course to include a year or more of study and service outside the United States, there will be infused into the academic life even of the undergraduate a new firsthand awareness of Asia and Africa. Better ways

A corollary of this situation has been a special indifference to those foreign cul­ tures with which American Iile has not had a historic connection. There Is a bon mot,

have to be found of relating American colleges to colleges in other parts of the world, not to cultivate a romantic exotic­ ism, much less to perpetuate the con­ descending charity of "the white man's burden," but to deepen and enrich the entire humanistic enterprise. Nor can we walt for the cultivation of new languages to take hold in the colleges. Right now

rather old and a little tired by now, to the effect that an optimist has his children study Russian while a pessimist has them study Chinese. The barbed point of the wisecrack Is, however, that In most Amer­ ican communities and even in many Amer­ ican colleges the optimist would find It difficult to let his children take Russian and the pessimist would find it impossible

there must be more rapid, more wide­ spread, and hopefully more accurate trans­ lations of the best productions of the human mind and spirit, so that the orig­ inal text Is no longer a barrier even to those who will not, or perhaps cannot, compensate for their myopia with the cor­ rective lenses of an additional language. There is no excuse, for example, for a col­ lege curriculum In the area of religious studies that does not include the study of other scriptures than our own, not for the purpose of missions or of apologetics (both of which have their place, but not in lib­ eral arts), but for the purpose of combat­ ting ignorance and curing myopia.

to let them take Chinese. Chinese studies are at the stage today where Russian studies were twenty years ago, while Ger­ man and French continue to be the chief languages taught in colleges and de­ manded by graduate schools. Thus If American myopia is cured at all on the college campus, It Is usually cured in only one eye, that which looks across the At­ lantic, more precisely, across the North Atlantic. Pioneering programs in Asian cul­ ture have been doing much to correct this condition, but the pressure of events has been Increasing so much more rapidly than have our academic programs that cul­ tural myopia seems In many ways to be getting worse even in the American academy.

Even with the combination of an ex­ panded curriculum, viSiting lecturers, extra years abroad, and the adoption of instltu­ tions In distant climes, there is only one academic unit to which the responsibility for curing cultural myopia can finally be

If this trend Is to be reversed, colleges and universities will have to develop bold and imaginative schemes. Already several

8


assigned,

and that is the

library.

I

the Mortvedt Library. Yet Boris Pasternak

can

undersland why Sanskrit Is not taught In

has

a department of linguistics, even why Hin­

revolutionary Russia live in the minds of

duism is not

Americans than have all the other media

taught In a department of

probably

done

more

to

make

post­

religion, or why in a given year no lecturer

and their message. To be an educated man

comes from Delhi and no student travels

today, a student should become sufficiently

to Deihl. But I cannot understand how a

acquainted with at least one other culture

library

neglect lIs duty by nol acquiring enough

to look with critical objectiVity at his own, and this probably takes personal exposure.

literature about the Vedas to arouse and

But given such exposure, he can be perma­

at

a

self-respecting

college

can

stu­

nently cured of his myopia only by having

libraries,

the opportunity to see many cultures. The

some of them at schools that aspire to

library Is a true hospital for the soul be­

satisfy

the cu riosity

of

any

serious

dent. Yet there are many such

academic excellence. It Is the task of the

cause it, and it alone, can effect such a

library

cure.

world

to

undergird

community

the

that

commitment

to

Increasingly

at

Is

II

work In our curricula, and to combat the Yet cultural

parochialism that continues to foreshorten

Is part of a syn­

drome whose other constituent, historical

the vision of the campus even In an age of

amnesia, is no less pernicious and no less In fact,

world community. From this It follows that we who manage the curriculum and

myopia

endemic to the American spirit.

set

the requirements must get out of the way

some

and let the library perform its therapy on

myopia are at the same time aggravating

students-and perhaps even to professors.

the amnesia, As the vision of the Amer­

In

spite

campaign

of

the

against

printed page,

there

to

cure

the

ican student takes in the cultures of Asia

of the

and Africa, he is in grave danger of for­

no other medium

getllng the cultures of Greece, Rome, the

dominance

Is

current efforts

recent

well-publicized the

of the

adequate to this assignment.

I remain to

19th

century,

and

several

others

in

be­

be convinced that the jet-propelled tourist

tween. It is almost as though there were

of

about

fixed quantity of alien thought and expres­

other cultures than did the bookworm of

sion which one can abso r b, so that when

the

20th

century

learns

more

a

Crusaders

he learns more about the present he must

understood non-Christian ways of thought

forget a corresponding amount about the

better for having traveled in the Near East

past. Such a designation of the

than did Thomas Aquinas,

"allen" is, however, a grave distortion of

the

19th

century,

or

that

the

who

wrote a

past as

Summa against the heathen without. so far

its

as I can tell, ever having seen a heathen.

volves not only the loss of memory about

For while a good picture may be worth a

others but also and espeCially the loss of

deeper

significance,

thousand words, a good book Is worth a

that

thousand pictures. No modem library can

sures,

afford to Ignore the vast improvement of its faCilities and resources made possible

contemporary

by the technological explOSion, and I am

ourselves 01

Identity

for

amnesia

which only our

memory

In­

as­

If, therefore, we sacrifice our his­

torical awareness to our yearning for other Cultures, the

we

thereby

capacity to

rob

understand

gratifed to note how prominent the newer

those very cultures in a constructive way.

media are In the planning and design of

because in our search for the "other" we

9


because t h e c l assics are a ristocratic in t e m peram ent, de Tocquev i l le i n sisted, they are such an antidote in a dem o c ratic na­ tion . I am not a r g ui n g that the study of A ristotle and Horace by L u t h e r and Jeffer­ son o b l ig es us to do the same, t h o u g h s u c h an argu m e n t does make m o re t h a n a l ittle sense; but I am a rg u i n g that when the past is n e g l ected, one thereby becomes less sensitive in h i s res po nse to the pres­ ent, a n d , on the o t h e r h a n d , that t h e men most responsible in t h e i r dealing with the present and most realistic in t h e i r expecta­ tions fo r the futu re are those whose u n d e r­ stan d i ng has been deepened by a l ife long con versation w i t h the past. The most i m ­ p ressive i n stance o f t h i s axiom i n o u r cen­ tury was W i nston C h urch i l l , who p repa red h i m self for h i s ro le in World War II by working on h i s four-volume History of the English-Speaking Peoples. The so-called lessons of h isto ry ate no to riously diifl c u l t to d raw a n d easy to m i s read, but even in a n age of computers n o o n e h as found a better means than a sense o f history to a c qu i re the very wisdom w h i c h seems to be in s u c h short supply in the l i fe of men and of n ations. Mo reover. no one has found a belter means of cultivat i n g such a sense of h is­ tory t han the l i b rary. Lectu res on history may i nspire, and semin ars in h i story may i nstruct; at least I h o pe t h ey do. But h is ­ tory is l earned i n t h e l i b ra ry , w h i c h is the h istorian'S la b o ra tory. He w i l l i ntroduce his students to the w riting of h istory by invit­ i n g th e m to sit next to h i m as he does h i s research and b y encourag i n g t h e m t o look over his shoulder and then to unde rtake s u c h resea rch o n their own . At some point he w i l l look ove r their s h o u l d e r in t u r n , t h e n send them o n the i r way t o d o t h e i r o w n work - a n d t o co rrect h i s. T h i s description is o b viously d rawn f r o m my p artic u l a r vocatio n , w h i c h is the tra i n i n g

c r i p p l e the "se l f." Perh aps i t is because I am p rofession­ ally charged with res po n s i b i l ity for the study o f the past , b u t the h istorical am­ nesia I see about me seems to me at least as fatal to the soul and i n te l lect as is c u l ­ tural myopia. T h e abso rptio n of h isto ry i nto "soc ial studies" in e le m e n t a ry and seco n d a ry schools h as produced an ignor­ ance of the past in some of t h e best and brightest of our col legians. Reciting the l itany that "you can't trust a n yone over thirty," they seem simultaneously to have lost touch with any tradition more than one generation old. No adolescent n eeds to be t o l d that he shou ld t h ink about him­ se l f and the p r obl em of his own Iden tity; that comes a l l too n atural l y. But he does need to be told that even in the midst of searching for t h at Identity he must l e a r n t o think of others-of t h o s e aroun d him with compass ion, o f those before him with appreciation. Otherwise h e w i l l become the victim of t h e fads and fanc ies of the pres­ ent moment, Theological students suppose that t h ey have to have read each new proof that the d oc t rine of t h e T rin ity does not make se nSe to modern man, even though they have never read Athanasius o r Augu stine on the T r i n ity . Courses in phi los­ ophy d i sm i ss al most everything before G. E. Mo o re as metaphysicai no nsense, a n d undergraduates

find

Goethe

incompre­

hensible.

Diagno sing the pecu l i a r i lls of a demo­ cratic society, Alexis de Tocquevi l l e urged that the study o f Ihe G reek a nd Latin classics "is the best antidote against the inherent defects of the times, wh ereas the good qualities natural to the age will blos­ som untended .. A l l who h ave am b iti on s to literary exce l l e n c e in democratic na­ tions shou Id eve r refresh themselves at c lassical springs; that is t h e most w h o l e­ some med icin e for the mind." Pre c i s e ly

10


of graduate students in history, but much of it applies to the teaching of undergradu­ ates as well. It is in the library that an undergraduate will find the Gibbons and the Harnacks, from whom he can learn hIs­ tory in the grand style and experience the humanizing and liberating historical erudition,

It

Left to right, President Mortvedl,

power of their

is likewise in

Thomas

H.

Dr.

Pelikan. Dr.

Langevin. academic vice president.

the

library that he can take into his own hands

suppose that We were the first that ever burst

the source materials from which such his­

Into that silent sea ...

torians have worked, and thus learn a little of the thrill and the agony of historical investigation. Of course, the study of his­

we need the humility that can come only

tory

And that particular bit of surgery is best

in

the library

may

so

overawe

from being cut down to size by history.

the

done in the library.

student that he is paralyzed. In the sting­ ing words of

Kappa

There is only one word for the vision

oration of 1837, "meek young men grow

which I have sought to describe here, a

up In libraries,

vision that embraces both the breadth of

accept

the

Emerson's Phi Beta

believing it their duty to

views

which

Cicero,

which

the present and the depth of the past, and

Locke, which Bacon have given; forgetful

that word is

that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only

three centuries of Its history the Christian

young men in

they wrote

church found that it had to embrace the

point is that they were young

to Isreal, and therefore it became catholic

men in libraries, and that the best way of

by simultaneously declaring its universality

libraries

when

these books." But the

During

the first

Gentiles and yet could not sever Its ties

outgrowing the past is past.

"catholic,"

The library

of outreach and affirming its continuity with

still to know the

contains the best

anti­

the ancient people of God. Because "grace

dote both for historical Ignorance and for

does not abolish nature but sustains it,"

historical

embodi­

this catholic vision of the church has its

ment of living memory, as it is the tomb

counterpart also in the life of the mind,

of

which needs

romanticism. It

everything

in

the

is

the

past

that

can,

in

to

find ils

own

version of

Schlelermacher's phrase, best be returned

catholicity. As a theologian and a Chris­

to history, to which it

tian, I confess my faith in a church that

properly belongs.

Although the library is an avenue to alien

must be one, holy, catholic, and apostolic;

cultures In

so also, as a humanist and

the present,

there

are

other

e

scholar,

I

means of establishing contact with these.

commit myself to a life of the mind that is

But the library is, practically speaking, the

truly catholic. Therefore

only

and an honor to participate today in the

means

for

most

of

us to

establish

I count II a

J ay

contact with those cultures which are sep­

dedicat i on of this magnificent building. For

arated

by

by nurturing such a catholiCity of vision,

space. Even when I stand at the Parthae­

the university library can do for the com­

non

munity of study what the university chapel

or

from In

us

by

Saint

time

Peter's,

as my

well

as

memory

is

founded on books, and it continues to be

does for the community of faith. And thus

sustained

and

the library can truly be psyches iatreion,

flicted

we

as

nourished are

by

the

by

books,

tem ptation

Af­

"a hospital for the soul."

to

11


Building Projects B u i l d i n g a n d remod e l i n g proj ec ts r e p re­ se n t i n g an investment of over $3 m i l lion will be completed on cam pus by the end of

the summer.

Tingelstad H a l l , n a med after former PLU p res id e n t Dr. Osc ar A. Tingelstad, wi l l house 396 m e n on its nine floors. The top eight floors w i l l be divided into four houses of two floors each. They will b e called: Cascade Hou se, floors 2 and 3; Ivy House, floors 4 and 5; E vergre en H ou se , floors 6 and 7; and Alp i n e House, floors 8 and 9. Two s i n gle-story frame u n i ts of World have been u sed for

War II vintage w h i c h men's

dormitories

will

be

converted

to

will become rental units for m arried students. Ivy Court will be used for office and administrative space by the School of Nursin g a n d the Departmen t of Biology.

other

uses.

Evergreen Court

Another new res i de n ce unit, Ordal Hall,

185 w orn e n on its three floors. It is named after f o rme r president, Rev, O l a J. Ordal. will house

Xavier Hall, the old library, is being re­ a cost of about $150,000 to provide faculty offices, classrooms, a la rge lecture hall, a nd a sci e n ce la bo ratory for the departments of histol·Y. soc iology, psy ­ chology, pol itical science a n d geology. Central Services, which includes duplicat­ i n g a nd m ail i n g , will occupy a portion o f the groun d floor. modeled at

On t h e lower carnpus a new ba seba l l d iamond has been Instal led east of the football field. The track around the foot­ b a l l field is being re-worked and c u rbing in stalled around the outside.

(continued on page 13)

12


From The Director I am extremely happy to be associated formally with the Alumni Association of Pacific Lutheran University. This statement, although short, expresses my feelings to­ wards the position of Director of Alumni Relations that I have assumed. My past three years of being associated with Pacific Lutheran University have al­ lowed me to focus upon the Alumni Asso­ ciation from close range. I have seen it develop under the capable hands of Larry Hauge from an essentially paper organiza­ tion to one of solidarity, active interest and an enthusiasm and willingness to work for and with its alma mater. The Alumni Asso­ ciation has come of age. The library fund drive proved this. I hope that in the future we can continue this aging process. Our goal will continue to be a loyal and at times a critical supporter of Pacific Lutheran University and to help the University con­ tinue to increase its role as a leader in higher education in the Pacific Northwest. I have had the opportunity to know only a small number of our alums. I do hope to have the opportunity to meet many of you in the near future. To all of you I pledge

my efforts towards the betterment of the Alumni Association. I am here to serve you as best I can. Your support, counsel and criticism is welcome. I do hope that I will see many of you at our Homecoming festivities November 2-5, 1967.

Sincerely, Jon B. Olson '62 Director of Alumni Relations

Rev, Watness Elected Rev. Luther O. Watness, '49, of Portland was elected to a one-year term as presi­ dent of the Alumni Association at the board's April 29 meeting. He succeeds Rev. David WOld, '57, of Seattle, retiring mem­ ber of the board who had served two years. Chosen vice president was Robert A. Nistad, '53, of Seattle, who succeeds Mrs. Philip (Helen) Nordquist, '57, of Tacoma. The new secretary-treasu rer is Jon B. Olson, '62, who is taking over from Law­ rence J. Hauge, '51, as Director of Alumni Relations.


PLU ALUMNI BOARD &

PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

SECRETARY-TREASURER

Rev. Luther O. Watness '49

Robert A. Nistad '53

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI RELATIONS

Portland, Oregon (1968)

Seattle, Washington (1969)

Jon B. Olson '62 Tacoma, Washington (ex-officio)

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1968

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1969

TERM EXPIRES MAY, 1970

Gustaf Anderson '48

Dr. Jess Bumgardner '49

Duane Berentson '51

Mercer Island, Washington

Beaverton, Oregon

Burlington, Washington

Donald Monson '39

Gerry Dryer '61

Lucile Larson '56

Olympia, Washington

Spanaway, Washington

Tacoma, Washington

Helen Nordquist '57

Dr. Anita Hendrickson '57

Robert E. Ross '54 Tacoma, Washington

Tacoma, Washington

Seattle, Washington

E. Robert Stuhlmiller '57

Terry Sverdsten '57

Dr. M. Roy Schwarz '58

Edwall, Washington

Kellogg, Idaho

Seattle, Washington Malcolm L. Soine '52 Tacoma, Washington

REPRESENTATIVES TO THE UNIVERSITY BOARD OF REGENTS Esther Aus '32, Portland, Oregon (1968)

Ex-officio

Rev. Lowell Knutson '51, Everett, Washington (1969)

Michael McKean

Carl T. Fynboe '49, Tacoma, Washington (1970)

Senior Class President

Alumni Fund -lmpact/67 This ye a r's Annual A l u m i Fund drive was formally sta rted t h i s spring with the n a m i ng of Robert A. Nistad, '53 as gene ral chair足 man. An a p pe a l to a l u m n i was m a iled i n May. ".

Nistad, in his letter to the a l u m n i , said: . . our respons'ib i l ities to the general

o p erat i n g budget o f the University and to o ur own A l um n i S c h o l a rs . . . are t he rea足 sons

that

the

1967 Annual A l u m n i Fund

has been activated."

Discuss Fund Drive - Robert Nistad, '53, (left) chairman of the 1967 Annual Alumni Fund drive, discusses some details of the program with former alumni director Larry Hauge, '50.


He added, " O u r alumn i , by working to­ gether o n the l i b ra ry campaig n , made a tremen dous impact for our Alma Mater. By w o r k i n g together fo r the Annua l Fund we can ag a i n make an impact. Fo r t h at reaso n , o u r theme this yea r is a re m i n d e r o f the power of u n ity of effo rt- I M PACT/67." The fund committee consists of N istad, Duane Berentson, '5 1; J ason D. Boe, 0.0., '51; J. Ar noldi Bricker, '56; Robert L. C u rt i s , '55; Carl T. Fynboe, '49 ; J ac k L. Hoove r , '56; P a u l V. Lars o n , ' 38 ; Don ald F. Re i­ man , '52; Gerald E. Sch i m ke , '55; M. Roy Schwarz, M .D., '55; L. J e ra l d S h effels, '54; D. Eugene Strand ness, Jr. , M.D., '50; E. Robert Stuh l­ m i l l e r , '57; a n d P h i l i p E. Wige n , P h .D., '55.

Two Can Give As Easily As One - Well Alm ost If you contribute to Pac ific Lutheran U n i­ verversity a n d are associated w ith one of the compa n ies whose n a m es a p pear i n t h i s l i sting, you can a rrange to h ave a seco nd g i ft sent to y o u r alma mater, cou rtesy of your c o m pany. Sound easy? We l l, it is. Perh aps the most p l easant aspect of g i ft matc h i ng , next to the good s u c h con t r i bu­ tions do, is how easily you can a r range to h ave them sent. Once you have made your g i ft, just i nform the a p p r o p r iate perso n s at you r company that y o u 've done so. A matc h i ng c h e c k w i l l be sent to your col­ lege soon thereafter, i n d ic at i n g that your g i ft made the mat c h i n g g i ft poss i b le . I n effect, b y matc h i ng your g i ft, your e m p l oyer is recogn izi n g the c o n t r i bution which you, as a n educ ated pers o n , are making to your c o m pany. It ' s t h e boss's way o f saying "th a n ks" to the c o l lege wh i c h h e l ped to prov ide your education. To be sure, g i ft matching is o n l y one way i n w h i ch b u s i n esses a n d corporations

are assisting educ ation. B u t it has become an i n c reasi n g ly signific a nt sou rce of a n ­ nua l su pport. Dozens of PLU alums h ave chosen this method of incre a s i n g the s i ze of t h e i r g i fts to P L U in recent years. Won ' t you c heck over t h i s list i n g to see if your com pany has such a program? If it does, take a moment to have you r gift matc hed. You m ay be s u re t h at both gifts w i l l be gratefu l l y received. KEY TO THE L I ST I N G-To receive more c o m p lete i n formation o n you r com pany's prog ram, contact it d i rectly. To assist you i n identify i n g the im portant provisions of these prog rams, some info r mation has been coded in parenth eses afte r each cor­ porate t i t l e , as fo l l ows : 1 Four-year colleges a n d un ivers­ it ies are e l i g i b l e 2 G raduate a n d profess i o n a l schoo l s a re e l i g i b l e 3 Junior c o l l eges are elig i b l e all A l l t h ree o f t h e above are e l i g i ble epi P rog ram exc ludes p u b l i c institu­ tions L i m ited prog ram fo r pub l ic inst i ­ Ipi tuti ons ; percentage of pu b l i c su pport or c a p i ta l gifts may be restricted; regular prog ram fo r private i n st i t u t i o n s . epr P ro g ra m excludes pr ivate i n stitu­ tions Ipr Limited program fo r private insti­ tut i o n s; reg u l a r prog ram fo r pub­ lic lim P rogram i s i n fo rmal o r restricted to a lim ited number of specific i n st itut i o n s or e m p l oyees sp Compa n ie s w h i c h w i l l match g ifts of a spouse husband or w i fe of an e l i g i b l e employee sp-w Com pan ies w h ic h will match gifts of a wife of an e l i g i b le emp loyee W i l l match g i ft s of a non-alumn i n -a


Chrysler Corp. ( a l l ; sp) Citizens & Sou th ern National Bank (at!: n-a) C la rk Equipment Co.

A

(L1I1;

n-a)

General Alronics Corp. (all; n-a)

Electronics ( a l l ; n-a)

James B.

A.e!n3 Ula

( 1 .2 ; n-a)

Air Reduction Co. ( a J J : n-a)

Ma l leable

Clow &

I rO:1 Co. (aU)

01 A me ri ca (all; n-a) Am rican Bank & Tru:::.! Co. 01 Pi). ( 1 ,2 : n-OJ) American Exp ress Co. (1.2; n-a) Amorican & Fo rei gn Power C o , Inc. ( 1 ; n-a) Am�ri c [J n Home Products Corp. ( 1 .2: n-a) Ameci e l!ln Metal Climax F o u n d . (all: n-a) American Opucat Co. ( a l l ; sp: n-a) Am fic an Potash & Chern. Co rp. ( 1 .2: epi; n-a) American S me l l ing and Relining Co. (1: n-a) American Sterilize r Co. ( 1 ,2) Am rican Sugar R e li n i ng Co. (all; n-a) Ame rican TOD�c c o Co. (a It) ArmCO �ou ndl ..on (all: n-a) Armslf ong Cork Co. ( I ; n-a) AS'Q c1aled Box Corp. (all; ept) A�l5ocialed Sorlng Co rp. ( a l l : n-al Alho s Sleel and A l u m i n u m , Inc. ( 1 , 2: n-;�l Alln Chemica l Ind ust ri es , I n c . (aU) Aluminum Co.

M.

G i bbs &

Combusti on Engi neering (all)

G I llette C o . ( a l l ; n-a)

Commercial Solvents. Inc. ( a l l :

Ginn

1\

C o n n . lignl

Ule

Power Co.

Conn. Mutual lile Ins. Ca. ( 1 ,3: cpi: n·3) ConsohdaHon CO.l Co. ( 1 ) Consumers Powe, Co. (al l .

CopOlymer Rubber Corn Products Co.

01

P-,rn B r . (all:

& Che mi cal ( ' ; n·al

Har sco Corp. (all; Ipi; n-al

E lect ri c

light Co.

( 1 , 2 ; sp· ..... : n-a)

Hershey Cho c olate Corp. (all; sp-w; n·a)

M IJjj(cn ,

I ron

Hewlett-Packard Co. ( ' ,2; n-a)

Co. (all; n-a)

HIli Acme

Inc. ( 1 . 2 : epi; n-8)

(all;

epi ; n_a)

Hooker

Chemical

Corp. (aU; n-<3)

J . M. Huber Corp. (i-j l l ; s p ; n-sl

II-a)

Hughes AirCraft (all)

Chemical Co. ( 1 ,2; n_a)

Dow Corning Co r p .

Ohio ( 1 ,2;

Co.,

H ollmafl - la Roche, Inc. (all; epi: n-a) H one ywell. I n c . ( t ,2; n-a)

( t .2; n-.il l

Draper Corp. ( 1 .2)

Dresser I ndustri es, Inc. ( 1 .2 ; n_a) W l lbu,. B . D river Co. ( a l l ; n-a) Ingersoll-Rand C o . (all) Ins. Co.

Car

Norlh America (all: I p i ; sp-w; n-a)

International 8us. Machines Corp. ( a l l : n-al

& Fuel Asso ci ates (31\: & Constr u cti on 1 1 ; api)

Easll!fIl Gas

cas Ion

01

Intcrchemical Corp. (all: n-a)

E n-al

&

I n t i . Flavor.

&;

Fragrances. Inc.

InternatmnaJ Tel.

Share Co. (all)

&

( 1 .3 :

epi: n·a)

Tel. Co r p . ( a l l ; n-a)

(1)

Jefferson

Elhlcon, Inc. ( 1 , 2 )

Co. ( 1 ,3 ; epi: n·a)

South W�st Fou n d . ( 1 , 2 : n-al

MIU="

Inc

(liml

Jel!erson Siandard life Ins. Co. ( a l l ; n-a) Jewell T ea Co. (all; n-a)

Johnson & HiggIns (all; e p i ; n-3) J o hn s on & Johnson (all; n-a) S . C . J ohnson & Son, I n c . ( 1 ,2 : n-a) Jones & laughlin Sleel Corp. ( 1 , 2 : Cpl)

E)(-Cell�O COlp. ( 1 ; n - 3 )

n-a)

Cavalie r Corp. (all ; n-3)

J

( 1 ,2 1

Iowa (all; n-a)

Ca rlcr Producls, Inc., N.Y. (<311: n-al

Lighl

(1 ,2)

Harri$-Inlertype Corp. ( a l l ; n-a)

Esso Education FO\Jnd;!tion ( a l l : n·a)

Ca rborun d um Co. ( 1 .3 : n-a)

F

GerrO Corp. ( a l l : n-a)

Fafnir Felfo

Cham pion Papers, I n c . ( a l l : n·a)

F, reman·s MulUal Ins. Co. ( t ,2: n-al

Kaiser S leel Corp. ( 1 .?;

First

Kendall Co. ( 1 ,2 : n-al

Cant

(1)

n-a)

Hawaiian Telephone Co. ( l i m )

Eq Ul ta b[e 01

C4.tIo t Corp . (al l ; n-a)

1 &

(1;

H

H a rtford

ElectriC Bon d

Ce nt r Lll lllln oi s

Gri swold-E.shleman Co.

Hamilton Watch Co. ( 1 .2; n·Ct)

EnSign-Bickford Co. (alt; n-a)

(1 ,2;

Goodrich Co. (all: n-a)

T. Grant Co. ( 1 , 2 ; n-a)

Ebssco Services, Inc. ( 1 ,2)

c

Clu"lad t n G�n . ElectriC C o . , lid.

B. F.

W.

Hercules Powder Co. ( 1 ,2 : n-a)

Eleclrlc Slor�ge Battery Co.

C.Qmptl ell Soup Co. ( 1 , 3 ; sp; n-a)

Glidden Co. (all; n-a)

Corp. ( 1 ; n-a)

Cyprus Mines Co rp. ( U ,. ; epi: n-a)

Do w

n-a)

Co. ( a l l ; n-3)

Girard Trust Bank ( 1 ,2. n-a)

Gull Slates Ut i l i t ies Co. (all: n-a)

Crouse-Hinds Co. (aU)

8ra.wn and Root Inc. ( 1 ,3; n-3) B u rlington Industries (all; o-a)

(a!l; n-a)

I n c . ( a l l : n-al

Guy Gannelt Broadca�ting Servi ces

Corning Glass Works (all; n-a)

Dllco Laboratories. Inc.

Inc. ( a l l ; n'il) Bos�on MAr'lulaCl\Jr � Mutual Ins. Co. (all) BO�8n 4. Gunn 4. Barnes. Inc. ( a l l : n-a) Bristgl-Ml'urG Co f I .3 , epl . n--a) 8r0WT1- �or m on Distillers Corp. { 1 : n-a)

Co rp.

Copley Newspapers (all; sp; n-a)

A. B. Dick C o . (al l : n-al

Bell,

Co. , Inc. (1 , 2 ; s p )

(' ,2)

Cook Foundation, Conn. (all)

Cooper Industries, I n c. (all: n-a)

Diamond Crlstal Sail C o . ( 1 ,2 ; n-al

BishOP T,us l Co., Ltd. ( a l l : e p i ; n-3)

01 illinOIS, (tim)

Inc.

G u l f Oil Corp.

Diamond Alkali C o . (.illl: n-a)

Bloch Brothers Tobacca Co. (all)

&

HIl i .

Guardian life I n s . C o . ( a l l : epi: s p ; n·s)

Continental Can Co., Inc. ( 1 ,2)

Conhnental Ins. Cos. (al l ; n-a) Continenta! Oil Co.

A . Gesner

Gmham Corp. ( 1 ,2)

no;)�

Container Corp . o f Ameri oa (all; l pi : n'3)

Seering

8u ::oiness ME!n's Assur. Co.

n-D.) ( 1 ,2: epi ; n-a) ( 1 .2: Ipi; n-a)

I n s. Co.

o

Barton-Gi l l et Co. (all : n-a)

CIHc.8nter Sleel Co.

I

Dayton Ma'ieable

8,,"11: of California, N.A. (all: n-el) Bank at New York (all. n-a) Ban�e rs Life Co. (alt; ap : n-3)

Bu Ucfl ck

General Public Ulitilies

Columbian Carbon Co. ( 1 ,2; epi: sp)

Alias Rigging and Supply Co. ( 1 ,2 ; epi)

B

Gene ra l Foods Limited (1 ,2; sp: n-a) Gen e ral Mills, Inc. (all; n_a)

(1; nos)

Columbus Mutual life Ins. Co. ( a l l ; sp; n-3)

Conn. Gune

A1rcgh.o.ny Ludlum Ste el Corp. ( 1 ,2; n-a)

Blue

Sons, Inc. (all; n-a)

C lar k , Inc. ( a l l ; n-a)

Colonial Parking, Inc.

Affiliated C om pan i es (all; sp-w; n-a)

Ai r Products and Chemicals, I n c . Albion

&

Coats n-al

Gallo Winery (all)

General ElectriC Co. ( a l l ; n-a) Gene ral Foods Corp. (all; sp; n -al

01

Ate)", Corp. (1 , 2 ; n-a)

(.::1 1 ;

&. J

G<trdner-Dcn"�r Co. ( 1 ; n-al

Clevel.nd Inst.

Cl evl te Corp. ( 1 ,2 ; ep i : n-a)

AerOjel-Gcneral C or p.

E

CllI!!velend Electri c Illuminating C o . (all: n-a)

AbboH L;:lboralories ( 1 .2; n+a) Aero.gJlde Corp. (Om)

G

Cilies Service Co mpany ( 1 ,2: sp)

Matching Gift Programs

Chase M"nhanan 8ank ( a l l ; n-a) Chemical Bank 01 N.Y. Trust Go. ( a l l ) Che mi cal CcnstnJclJon Corp .. ( 1 ,2) Ch tcope-e M n utactunnIJ Co. (1.2; n-al

Bearing Co. Co r p.

(1.2;

( 1 ,2)

K

n-3)

at Bank 0 1 Ha wai i ( l i m ) ( a ir. n-al Motor C o . 0 1 Canad a, lid.

Ford Motor Co. Ford

Fony-Elqhl InSUlations, Inc. (all)

n-a)

Kerile Co. ( a l l : sp; n-a) (all: n-a)

Kern County land Co. (a1l) Walter K idde

&

Co. (1 .21


Waller KIdde ConslruClors ( 1 ,2) Kidder, Peabody

&

p

Co. (lim)

Kimberly-Clark Corp. (all)

Parker-Hannitin Corp (all; n-a)

K i ngsbury Machine Tool Corp. (oJl; sp)

Paul ReYlO're Ule Ins. Co. (all; n-a)

Ki p l i nger Associalion, n lc . (all; n_a)

Rich ard C. Kn igh t Ins. Agen-cy , Inc (al l ; cpi; sp)

0-3) (all: n·a)

Knox Gelatine, Inc. (al!: sp: H. K oh n stamm

&

Co., Inc.

Pennsalt Chemicals Corp. (all; epi: n-a)

l.

Pennsylvani:l Power

L i ght Co. ( 1 ,2; n_a)

Penton Publi sh ing Co. (atl; n-a) Pet ro-Tex Chemicals Co rp.

Philco Corp. (all; n'8) Phi l i p Mo rr i s , I nc.( all)

L Lawyers Cooperative Publishing Co. (a ll ; n-A) Lehigh Portla.nd Cement Co. (1 ,2) Lever Bros. Co. ( a l l ; n_",)

Lile

Ins. Co. (all)

Pitney-Bo .....es. Inc. (all: n-a) Pdl!;burgh Naf. Bank ( 1 ) Pittsburgh Pi ate Glass Co. (a:l; n·a) Preformed Line Preducls Co_ ( 1 : n·al Provldenl Ute & ACCident Ins. Co. ( 1 .2; n-03) Prudential Ins. Co. of Ame ri ca (1.2: n-a) Putnam Management Co . . Inc. (all; n-a)

p,

lo ri l l ar d Co. (all; n · tt ) Lubrlzol Co rp . ( a l l ; sp; n-a) L umm us Co. ( 1 ,2)

Lustra Plastics Corp. ( 1 ) M

C o. . Inc. (all; n-a)

Manufdc'urers Hano ver Trus! Co.

noR) ( al l :

Ouaker Chf)rnical Co rP . (all; sp)

n·a)

Maylilg Co. ( ' ; n·a)

Rex Chai n belt. Inc. (al l ; n-a) R . J. Reynolds Tob acco Co. (all; n_a) Ri egel Paper C o rp . (all; n-a)

Inc. (aU)

McGraw·HII t . I n c. (all; n-e) Mcd\J,R Portland C�menf Co.

Nill

Ban k

&.

(1.2:

Cpl: n·a)

Trust C o. ( 1 .21

Me'ropoH an l i t e Ins. Co.

( 1 .2:

sp: n·a)

MlddleS6)( MutUill Assurance Co. (<.I II; n-<l) Ml dland-Ross Corp. ( 1 ,2: n·al MUlhle-Coss·Dexter. Inc. (all: .pi: n-a) MohllCO I ndust ri es . Inc. (oil; 1 1 m ) Mo uceUo Ule Ins. Co. ( a ll : n-o) MolorolA Found. ( 1 .2)

&. Ma�l'1incry Ins. Co. Yo r� (all: n·a) of Om8hCl-U ni led 01 Omaha

Mulual Boiler MulUal

Rockeleller Family

&

Associ ates ( a l l : sp; n·a)

Roc kwe ll ManulDclUring Co. (al l ) Rockwell·Standard C o r p . ( 1 ; n -a) Rohm & Haas Co. (all: n·a) Rust Engineering Co. (1.2; sp; n-a)

SKF Induslrles. I nc . (all; sp: n-a)

(1.2)

SI. RegiS Paper C o . ( al l)

Sonborn Co. ( 1 ,2: n-a) Scot1 Papcr Co. ( 1 ,2 : n -a)

n-3) (al l ; sp; n-a)

National SISCUlt Co. (all; sp;

Che"'lcaJ Corp. (all; n-s)

N61lClnai lead Co. { al l ; n·al

N ShwlJ Gi'lS

P,pt!i!nc Co. of America (all)

Ne ..... England Gas/Electric As soc . SylS. ( 1 ,2 ; n-.;) New Eng la n d Merchants Nat. Bank ( 1 .2 ; cpi) New Eng la nd MIJhJal Lile I n s . Co. (all; n-a) Newhall Land and F armin g Co. ( 1 .2: n-a) Northwestern Mutual Life Ins. Co. ( al l: n-a) N ort hwt! ster n National Lile Ins. Co. ( al l ; n-a) N Orton

Co .. M...

(all; nos)

John Nuvcen & Co. (1.2)

o Oklal'1oma Gas & El ec triC O li n Mathieson Chem i cal

( a l l : n.a)

Forster &

Co. (1.2: sp-w) Corp. ( a l l : n-a)

O rtho Ph <.t rm aceulical C orp . (1.2; n-a) Owens·Corning Fiberglas Corp. (all; n-il)

CrOSby. I nc. (a": n-a)

To Y'mOl or Corp. ( a l l : n-a) Trans·World Airlines (all: o-a)

TraveleflS Inslrrance C ompa nies (all; n·a)

(1.2)

u Union all

Co. of Ca li f o rni a p ,2 ; n-a)

U. ::1 Borax

&

Che rn Corp. ( 1 , 2 ; ep i ; n-a)

United States Trust Co.

01 N.Y.

(all)

Upjohn Co. (all: n-a)

v Varian Associates ( 1 .2;

n-a)

Victaulic Co. 0 1 America ( 1 .2) Vulc"'n Malerll1ls Co. (at!; n-a)

w

Jose!>" E. Seag r:lm &. S o n s . Inc. (all: n-a) Eeahgr,t· OIS ..... go Fal ls Corp. (all) Sec urity Nat. Bank 01 lo n g Island (al l . epi; n·a) Sec ur i t y Van lines. I nc. (all: !; p : n-a) Seton Leather Co. (all: sp)

& Gas Corp. (1: n·a) Signal ad &. Gas Co. ( 1 . 2 , epi; n-a) Slgnode Fo undat io n. Inc. ( al l ; n-8) Simmons Co .. N.Y. (all; n-a) Simonds Saw & Steel Co. (ali: n-a) SInclair 011 Corp. (all; n-a) Shamfock Oil

4. Ti e rn an . Inc. (1.2) Warner S, othe rs Co .. Conn. ( 1 , 2 : epi; n-a) Warn.,-Lamber1 P h afmaceuti ca! Co. (all) Wa rner and S wasey Co. (al l : n-a) Washington Nat Inc. Co. (aH: n·a) Walkins-Johnson Co. (1,2) Walla�e

s (all)

N

Na lional Distillers &

Time, Inc

Towers. Per rin.

Walker Manulacturing Co. (all; n·a)

Scherlng Corp. (all. n-a)

National ColSI'1 Register Co.

Textron. I n c . (all: n-8) J. WaHer Tho m pson Co ( 1 : n-.1) J. T . T h orpe Co. ( 1 ,2)

Riegel Teldile Corp. (all: n od)

Mun5ingwesr, Inc. (all: n-3) Mutual 01 New

n-a)

Texhle Machine Wor�s ( 1 .2 ; n-a)

Rochester Germicide Co. (1,2; Ipr) Rockoleller Brothers Fund. Inc. (all; s p ; n-a)

Merck 8. Co .. Inc. (all; n · a )

sp: n-8)

Uniled 1 I 1u m inaling Co. (all: s p ; o-a)

Ralslon Purina Co. ( 1 , 2 ; sp : n·a)

"ellon

01 N.Y. ( a l l ;

Co.

Untied Clay Mines Corp . ( 1 ; n-<l)

A

s p ; n_a)

Malalene Surgical Inshuman,s Co. ( 1 ; epO Co.,

&

Tennessee Gas T ransm issi on Co. ( al l : n-a)

Unl·Sery Corp. (all)

Marath on Oil Co. (al l : n·a)

M tine ,Midl&nd Trust Co., N.Y. (1, epi; Mass. Mut ual UI. Ins. C o . (all: n-il) McCormick &

C . Tennan!. Sons

Texas Eastern TransmIssion Corp. ( 1 :

Q

Malhnskrodt Chemical Works (till; epi: n-ai

A. Mallory &.

Tektronix. Inc. ( al l ; n ·al

Turner Construction Co.

T Chemicals, Inc. (all)

Maclean-Fogg lock Nut Co. (1.2; P.

Phillips Petroleum Co. (all; n-al Pillsbury Co . . Minn (1,2; n ·<1 ) Pilot

Line Material lndu:;'rles ( 1 ,2; n-8)

T

(all; n-a)

Phe lps Dodge Corp. (all; n-a)

&.

Suburban Propane Gas Corp. (all: n·a)

S un r ay OX Oi l Co. (all: n_a) W, H . Swe ney & Co. (lim)

Per!;onal Products Corp. ( 1 ; n-a)

Ko ppe rs Co., Inc. (all; sp: n·a)

M

Si er l i ng Drug. I n c . (all; n·a) J. P. S te \len s & Co . • Inc. (all: n_a) Slevens Candy Kitchens. Inc . (1.3; n·a)

CMrles J . W e b b

Sons Co.. I n c . ( a l l ; n-il)

Welch Grape Ju ice Co., Inc. (all:

n'<:I)

Weste r n Publishing Co. ( atl : n·a)

\Vesl l O g ho u se Air Brake Co. ( 1 .2) W h ir l po o l Corp. (al l ; n-a) John Wiley & Sons. Inc_ (aH; WIUiams .\ Co.. Ponn. ( a J l )

n·al

Wlnn·Dlltie Siores. I n c. (aH; s p ; n·a) Wolvorine S l'1oe and Tann in g Corp. (1: n-a) Wo rt h i ngt o., C orp . ( 1 .2; n-fl.) Vlyandolle Chemicals Corp. ( 1 .2: Ipi; n·a)

Singer Co. (1.2) x Smith K lme 6. F re n ch Laborato ries (all; nod) Smith·lee C o.. Inc . . N.Y. (all: n·a) Xerox Corporal ion (al ! : sp; n·a) Spe rr y & Hutchinson Co. ( al l : n-a) Sp1uce Falls Pwr. & Paper Co . . ltd. ( 1 ; epr: n-a) y Stackpole Carbon Co. (all: n-il) Siandard Oil Co. (Ind.) ( 1 ,2; n-a) youn g .\ Rubic3m, I n c . (all: epi; n-a) Standard Oil Co (N.J.) ( a l ; n-a) Standard Oil Co (O.,io) (al l : n-a) Stauffer ChlO'mical Co. (1,2: n ·a) TOlal: 339


A LU M N I DAY

LAST CALL ! ! ! IMPACT / 6 7 * The

'67

A n n ual A l u m n i F u n d su p p o rt s t h e

U n i ve rs i ty p rog ram a n d o u r A l u m n i Scholars, Only you can make it successfu l .

Closes July 3 1

1

,

.

Over

400

campus April 29 festivities,

alumni for the

Former

converged

on

the

annual Alumni Day

Alumni

Ass ociation

presi­

dents were presented plaques at the banquet. Past

presidents

they

served

Sivert

M,

who

(1 928-30),

Frederick

left

Wedeberg

Anderson ( 1 9 4 1 -42), berg

attended

include:

A.

and the years right, first

( 1925-26), Martha

Myron

Heany

to

B.

Hoff

H;ermstad Ceder­ Kreidler

(1 948-49),

(1 959-60); second row,

row,

Caroline

( 1 936-38),

Clarence

Lund

Eldon Kyllo ( 1 949-50),

Carl T. Fynboe ( 1 953-54,

1 963-65),

Ronald E.

Douglass ( 1 956-58), Eugene F. Jack ( 1 955-56),

Alu m n i S u rvey Pacific Luth eran U n iversity's a l u m n i sur­ vey, m a i l e d d u r i n g March, is presently be­ ing studied by t h e a d m i n istrat i o n , Of the 976 questionnai res mailed to a c ross-sec­ tion of the a l u m n i , 400 were retu rned fo r a 41 per cent res ponse, The s u rvey was co n d u c ted so that t h e U n ive rsity c o u l d study t h e reaction of its fo rmer students c o n c e r n i n g t h e i r edu ca­ tional expe riences w h i l e at P L U , The i n ­ formation w i l l b e c o n s i d e red a s academic c h a n g es take place. Larry Hauge, rec e n t l y res i g n e d a l u m n i d i rector, e x p ressed p leas u re in t h e an­ swers to t h e one question c o n c e rned with a l u m n i relations. O f the 396 who res pond­ ed to t h e q u estion : "Do you feel the A l u m n i Office keeps you sufficiently in­ ?" 98 per cent answered fo rmed " yes. " M rs , G e n evieve M u rphy, who c o n d u cted the su rvey, s a i d : "The response was grati­ fy i n g and anyone read i n g t h e comments would become aware of t h e s i ncer ity of those res p o n d i n g , The fact t h at so many r e p l ied leads me to bel ieve the questio ns were relevant and of interest to the alumn i . "

T, alai Hageness (1 934-35), Rev. David C . Wold (1 965-67), rence J, 2

Rev. Hauge

Milton

Nesvig

( 1 943-45),

Law­

( 1 958-59),

, Dr, and Mrs. James G , Patrick of Spo­

kane

(standing),

partment

of

former

business

chairman

of

administration

the

de­

and

his

wife, received special recognition at the ban­ quet, 3

, Alumnae from the days of Pacific Luth­

eran

Academy

( 1 894-1 920)

chat

at

their

re­

union in Stuen Half, 4 .

, Prof. and Mrs. Theodore O . H. Karl were

hosts in Stuen Half for the Class of 1 942 re­ union.

Here

Mrs,

Karl,

right,

visits

with

Mrs,

Marv (Carol Haavik) Tommervik and her broth­ er, Arthur Haavik. 5 , . . A t the reunion of the Class of 1 957, Mrs. Helen

Nicholson,

former

housem other,

talks

over old times with Mr. and Mrs. John Olden. Mrs, 6 .

Olden is the former Mildred Van Buren, Joe Greco, center, College Golf Course

pro, talks with Marv Harshman, '42, as he and Roy Larson,

'50, (left) are about t o tee-off at

the alumni golf tournament.

Tom

Gilmer,

'58,

was chairman for the event and also won the Marv Tommervik perpetual trophy with a s core of 70 strokes for 18 holes, Ronald Gratias, '48, won the low net award and Gene Lundgaard, '51 , the low Callaway.


4

2

5

3

6


The Unive rsity Seal Symbol i d e ntity is as i m po rtant to an i nsti­ tution as person a lity is to an i n dividual, fo r they serve the same pu rpose. A u n i­ ve rs i ty must esta b l i s h a positive and recog­ ni zable image ; and it must e l i m inate t h e self-defeating confusion of previous fo rms of i d en t i fication . In 1 960 Pacific Luth eran Un i v e rs i ty had many images. It meant d iffe rent t h i n g s to d i fferent people. It had a l u m n i and friends who associated with PLA, PLC, Spokane College, and C o l u m b i a C o l lege. The de­ cisio n in 1 960 to c h an g e Pacific Lutheran from a "college" to a "un iversity" weak­ ened sen t i m e n tal ties for the school's a l u m n i . A new form of ident ity was needed to d raw to gether the various fact ions who h e l d a l l e g i a n c e to "their" school. Thus i n t h e fa l l o f 1 960 a sea l was de­ s i g n ed and presented to the Un iversity a nd its fo l l o w i n g . It was t h e fo c u s of the d i s­ t i n ctive perso n a l i ty of t h e i n stitution , sym-

bolizing t h e Un i v e rs i ty's h e ritage and function. The e l l i ptical shape w a s adapted from the seal o f The American Luthera n C h u rc h . I t symbol izes t h e c l ose t i e between t h e two bodies. In a d d i t i on , t h e ancient sh ape is a sign w h i c h i n d icates t h e re lationsh i p betwee n God a n d man. I n side the c i rc l e is the "Chi Rho," a s i g n designating Jesus as The Ch rist. It is p lanted in the book, which stands both for the B i b le and the student's main teac h i n g too l. The lam p--a traditional symbo l of learn­ i n g in t h e Western c iv i l i zation-holds the flame w h i c h i l l u m i n ates t h e book. One of t h e greatest natural resources i n the Pacific Northwest i s t h e everg reen tree. It is inco rporated into the seal to reflect P L U 's tie to its locale and to serve as a symbol o f the abu n d a n ce o f t h e natural s u rrou n d i n gs, a n d man's depend­ ence u po n i t . Paci fic Lutheran U n iversity has used t h e s e a l in m a n y ways, as witnessed i n the pictu res. It bel ieves t h e symbol has formed the basis fo r a pos it ive, desirab le identity.


P LA M r. a n d Mrs. B I L L STORAASLI (ALMA S I NLAND) celebrated their fiftieth wedding ann iversary on May 1. A golden ann iver­ say recept ion was held for them at Trin ity Lutheran Church in Parkland.

19 3 6 ..

M rs. Roy V . Johnson (SYLVIA COL L I ER) teaches third grade at Fern H i l l E lemen­ tary (Tacoma). She wil l spend the s u m m e r traveling i n Eu rope w i t h a maj o r part o f the t i m e divided between the B ritish Isles and Ge rmany.

1944 D E L SPRA G U E has retired after 24 years in the Navy and Merch ant Marine. He is an electrical engineer fo r Robert and Com­ pany Associates, an arch itectu ral engi neer­ ing firm in Decat u r, Georgia. J E RROL E NG E is i n rea l estate develop­ ment fo r Ozark Pa radise Village, H a rri­ son, Ark.

1947 DR. R I CHARD LANGTON was elected to be the I ntermo u n tain C o n ference represen­ tative to the Campus Co u n c i l , Arizona State Un iversity, Tempe, Ariz. Dick is supe rintendent of schools in Paradise Val­ ley (Phoenix). Ar iz.

1948 DR. RALPH HAUG EN has been promoted from associate to full professor of speech o n the St. O l af Col lege faculty.


p rofess o r of b i o l o g y at P L U . The d i s p lay i s j u s t the f i rs t of several to b e p laced i n

1949

the a q u a r i u m .

V O N N Y ( D EN SOW) S T U R G E O N a p pear­ ed I n the major s u pport i n g role o f D o l l i e I n 'Annie G e t Yo u r G u n " offered C o l l eg e

o f the

Seq uo ias

by t h e

( F resno,

C a l if.)

p o i nted

Dr. l i fe

nudsen

W.

LA R S O N

has

d i s t rict

m anag e r

fo r

Security A d m i nistration

been the

ap­

Soc i a l

was awarded

m e m b e rs h i p

in

the

Ta­

of

the

coma Zoo l o g i c a l Society. DR.

JON

E R ICSON,

c h airman

speech and d ra m a depart ment a t Central Washington State C o l l eg e ,

Music T h eate r i n A p r i l . HOWARD

an honorary

moted to d ra m a .

fu l l

p rofes s o r

h as been of

speech

p ro­ and

i n Wenatchee.

1953 1950 M r.

and

Mrs.

Leo

N E A L A M END

Vilstrup

(DOLORES

ting u i she d

was

p resented

S e rvice Award

by

the

the

D is­

Q u i ncy

LA NGS ET), owners o f H u nter's V i d e o Son i c

(Wash . ) Jaycees. This i s the h i g hest award

i n M i lw a u k ie, O re . , won second pr i ze in a

a n n u a l l y presented to an o u tstan d i ng Jay­

nationwi e contest conducte

cee.

last f a l l fo r

wit h

B E R E NTSON

has

been named

director of th e c a m p a i g n d i v i sion National

Repu b l ican

of the

Congress iona l

Com­

mittee. B u e h l 's office w i l l be i n Was h i n g­ ton,

D. C.

JACK

JUST I C E

h as

been

g ranted

a

year's sabbatical leave fo r post g raduate

study from his post as director of a d u l t ed ucation for B e t h e l School coma). HOWA R D story,

..

SHULL

had

h is

D is t r i c t fi rst

(Ta­ s h o rt

y O l d Man-By God , " p u b l i she d

i n a recent i s u e of LEAT H E R N E C K , the Marine Corps magazine.

1952 A n exhib i t that w i l l l e t vie we rs trace the c o m p l ete

food

cycle

o f the

oceans

was

i n st a l l ed in th e aqua r i u m at P o i nt Defiance Park (Tacoma). The d is p l ay c u l m inated two y ars

of

work

by

DR.

JENS

n o minee

organizations.

nation.

1 9 51 BUEHL

The

is

s e l ected

for

his

a c h i ev e m nt i n h i s c h ose n field and wo rk

t h e best Sony win dow d i s p lay.

KNU D S E N,

c o m m unity.

state

and


RONALD DOUGLASS has been elected to the PLU Board of Regents as a repre­ sentative of the LCA . He will serve a three­ year term. J I M WILLIAMSON has received a Na­ tional Defense Education Act fellowshi p in reading a t the University of Arizona. He will have a one-year leave of absence from hi s position as English and social studies teacher at Ford Junior High (Tacoma). D R. RON REULE has completed his resi­ dency in urology at the UW and has re­ turned to the mission field. He and his family will be located at the Lutheran Hos­ pital, Eket, Eastern Nigeria. ROB ERT NISTAD has been elected to the Lutheran Mutual Insurance Co. Advis­ ory Board. Bob, whose agency is now in the company's top ten in sales. lives in Seattle.

1 9 54 REV. JAMES JAEGER, pastor of Ascen­ sion Lutheran Church in Seattle, is also serving as the chaplain at the Children's Orthopedic H ospital. EVANGELINE RI MBACH com p l eted her Ph.D. in musicology last May at Eastman School of Mus ic, Rochester, N. Y. H er dis­ sertation title was 'The Church Cantatas of Johann KUhnau." Last year she was ap­ pointed contributing editor to the new music journal, C H URCH MUSIC '67, and has been assistant professor of music at Concordia Te chers College, River Forest, III., since 1 964.

1955 D R. ARTHUR G. KI MBALL has received a Fulbright grant to spend the 1 967-68 academic-year at the Japanese Interna­ tional Christian U niversity in Tokyo, Japan.

R IC HARD T. LARSON, 3 bi ology instruc­ tor and audio-visual director at Franklin Pierce High School (Tacoma) , will par­ ticipate in an institute for advanced study in educational media at Oregon State Uni­ versity this summer. D R. EDWARD E. HAKANSON finished his Ph.D. at the U niversity of Minnesota, graduating December, 1 966. He is now assistant professor in the College of Edu­ cation at Florida State University. DICK BARCLAY, Sumner H igh athletic director, is mov ing to nearby Green River College in Auburn as director of admis­ sions. PAUL STEEN has accepted a position in educational TV at San Diego State. Mr. and Mrs. CARROLL KASTELLE (DE­ LORES J ENSEN '52) and family are leav­ ing in July for Lagos, Nigeria, where Car­ roll will spend two years at the American I nternational School. During the first year he will serve as assistant superintendent, and become superintendent in the second year. Carroll is on leave from his duties as principal of Gault Junior High in Ta­ coma.

1956 JAMES R . CLIFTON received a Ph. D. from Oregon State U n iversity i n June. He will work for Argonne Laboratories in Aurora, III. DON MORTENSON, a fifth grade teach­ er, was named an outstanding young edu­ cator by the Fairbanks (Alaska) Jaycees. Dan's wife KATH RYN (KOLKOWSKY) '60 teaches, too. Next fall will find the couple and their three-year-old daughter Erika at Eastern Washington State College where Mr. and Mrs. Mortenson will be working on their masters degrees in education. TERRANCE R. BROWN wi l l be assistant director of fi nancial aids and a half-time


teac h e r of science a n d science e d u cation at South ern O regon C o l lege this fa l l . Terry received a D . E d . from Oregon State i n J u ne .

CHANGING YOUR ADDRESS?

1 9 57 DAV I D N ESV I G w i l l receive his D . E d . deg ree in psyc h o l ogy fro m t h e U n i versity of I n d ia n a i n A u g u s t. He w i l l become a n assistant professor o f psycho logy a n d edu­ c ation at San D iego State C o l l ege i n S e pt e m be r . J O H N DA H L B E R G is t a k i n g a sabbatical leave to atte nd gra d u ate school a t the U n iversity of O regon to work for a doc­ torate. M r . and M rs . J O E G. W I D M AN (JO A N N E BAYN E ) h ave been l i v i n g o n S t . P a u l I s l a n d in t h e Bering Sea fo r t h e past t h ree years. Joanne teac h es a n d Joe is s u per­ i n ten dent of the two P ri b i lof s c h o o l s .

1958 REV. ROY M . T R I B E i s t h e P rotestant C h a p l a i n at Echo G l en C h i l d re n 's Hospital in Sno q u al m ie Fa l ls (Was h . ) . H is tra i n i n g for t h i s position i n c l uded w o r k a t S t . E l iz­ abeth's Hospital in Was h i n g to n , D. C., Red Wing Sc h o o l for Boys in M i n nesota a n d two years res i d e n cy i n Luthera n Gen eral Hospital, Ch icago. I I I . D O N ROHE i s e m ployed with the State P u b l i c Health Dept . in Los Angeles and i s working towards h is M . S . degree a t C a l i­ forn i a State C o l lege in Long Bea c h . NAN­ CY ( R I C H A R D S O N ) ROHE '59 was elected C itizen of the Year in Downey by the Downey J u n i o r W o m e n ' s C l u b . She is a lso president o f Women of the C h urch of C hrist L u t h e ra n . D R . DAV I D B . WA KE. ass istant profes­ sor of a n atomy and col lege b iol ogy at the

If

you

are

planning

to

move

this

summer,

p l ease l e t u s k n o w y o u r n e w add ress as soon as

possi b l e ,

copy o f

so

that

Reflections

Mag azi nes d resses are

that

are

you

mai led

s u bj e c t t o

a n d a r e often

can

receive

your

p ro m p t l y .

long

to

outdated

delays

in

ad­

transit

lost. S o d o l e t u s know of a n y

change r i g h t away !

U n iv. of C h i c a go, h as been awarded the Q u a n t re l l Award, the natio n 's ol dest prize for outsta n d i ng u n d ergradu ate i n struction. D R . J O H N r� I LS E N is d i recto r of the Snohomish Unit of No rthern State Hospital (Was h . ) . John was a psych iatrist o n the staff of Northe rn State H o s p i t a l at Sed ro­ Woo l l ey for fo u r years. DAV I D R. K N U TSON received a n M.A. in a u t u m n , 1 966, from the D i v i n i ty S c h o o l at the U n iversity of C h icago a n d c o n t i n ues to study part-t i m e towards the P h . D . He is working as an adviser in soc i a l scien c es and h u m a n ities in the C o l lege at the U n i­ versity. MA R I LYN ( FO R C E ) K N UTSON '59 h as been su bst i t ute teac h i n g in the Chi­ cago P u b l i c S c h o o l syste m . T h ey h ave one d a u g h te r, Kari, who i s two years o l d .

1 9 59 D O N T E I G E N , b u s i ness education teach­ e r at W i l s o n High Sc hoo l (Tac o m a ) . has been re-e l ected president of the Tac o m a Assoc iation of Cl ass roo m Teac h e rs . D O N ­ A L D KVA M M E '57 w a s re-elected fi rst vice


president of TACT a n d P EA R L (WA L D E N ) I R BY ' 4 8 w a s e l e cted elementary school vice presi d e n t. REV. R E U B E N E. LA H T I is in Worcester, Mass . , i n t h e C l i n ical Pasto ral E ducation Program at A n dover-Newton S e m i n ary a n d Worcester State Hospital. H e is serv i n g p a rt-t ime in t h e H i g h l a n d L u t h e ra n p a r i s h . RE V. J A M E S M . B UL L O C K , pastor of Our Saviour's Lutheran in Cathlamet, Wash . , was e l ected pres ident o f the Wah­ k i a k u m Cou nty M i n i sterial Assoc . , vice president o f the Portland Pasto rial Con­ ference - ALC, secretary of the Lower C o l u m b i a I n ter-Luthe ra n Cooperation Com­ m ittee and is a d i recto r on the Board of Lower Co l u m b ia M e ntal Health Center. J EA N N ETTE (B E R G ST R O M ) SAL T W I C K h as co m pl e ted cou rse re q u i rem ents f o r a Master of N u rsing deg ree a n d is cu rrently wo rking on her thesis w h i l e tea c h i n g a re­ fresh e r co u rse fo r professional n u rses sponsored by the King County N u rses Assoc iation, Seattle. KA R E N L. KNUTZEN is a fourth grade teac h e r a t Salmon C re e k S c h oo l , H i g h l in e S c h o o l D ist. (Seattle). S h e received the PTA G o l d e n Acorn award i n Feb ruary. ELA I N E ( M A G N U S O N ) BALON is s u bsti­ tute teac h i n g in Snohom ish County (Was h . ) . Her h u sband, Gene, transfe rred to the Da rrington Ranger D istrict as t h e T i m b e r M a n ageme n t assistant. Rev. a n d M rs. T H O MAS U N MACHT (SHARON THO RV I LSON '60) h ave moved to Daly City, C a l i f . , w h e re Tom i s pastor of West l a ke L u t h e ran C h u rc h . R E V . K E N N ETH W. GAMB I s pastor of the Prince of Peace Lutheran C h u rch in Evansd a l e , Iowa. R I CHARD O L S E N received h is P h . D . in c h e m ic a l e n g i neering from Oregon State i n June. D i c k , who works for the B u reau of M ines at A lb a n y , O re . , was granted a

patent recently for an ion exchange resin counter cu rrent extraction apparatus.

1960 A R D E N MU N S O N a n d h i s fa m i l y res i de in Beave rto n , O re . , where A rd e n teaches PE at M u l t nomah E l e m e n t ary Sc hoo l . D O N G S . H O U i s managing d i rector at a t ra d i n g c o m pa n y in Seo u l , Korea. The f i rm exports cosmetic items to the U n i ted States. LEE H ILL is atten d i n g the U n i v. of Georgia (Athen s ) , this s u m m e r on a Na­ t ional Sc i e n c e Foun dation sponsored insti­ tute fo r college teac hers . After t h e institute Lee and h i s fa m i ly, PAULA (TRA N U M ) '59. p l a n to travel in the eastern states o n the way home to Ash lan d , O re . , w h e re Lee h as been tea c h i ng at Southern O regon C o l lege for the past year.

1961 MYRT L E ( L YONS) OSBO R N E wo rks fo r Spec i a l Services at Fort Lewis as a p ro­ g ra m d i rector. Her h us b a n d , B i l l , is e m ­ ployed by DuPont Com pany, DuPont, Wash. PETER G A H L O F F has accepted a n ad­ m i n istrative aSSista n tsh i p at P u rd u e U n iv . i n t h e school o f h u man ities, social science a n d ed ucation w h i l e working fo r h i s P h . D . G E O R G E E M L Y a n d his fa m i ly are leav­ ing this s u m m e r fo r the Good S h e p h e rd S c hool in A d d i s Ababa, Eth iopia, where G I L A N D E R SO N , '5 1 , is p r i n c i p a l . A s u m m a ry of fac u l ty lectures g iven by K E N N E TH J. E R I C K S E N i n a se ries spon­ sored by t h e Li nfield c h apter of the A m e rican Assoc iation of U n iversity Profes­ sors was printed in a recent Linfield C o l ­ lege B U L L ET I N . P rofessor E ric ksen h a s t a u g h t at L i n f i e l d s i n c e 1 965. Soon h e w i l l


receive h i s P h . D . from Rice U n iversity, Texas . CA R L E E N SO R E N S E N is lea ving J a pan after two years of teac h i ng in d e pe ndent schools. She will trave l to C o penhagen via Russia, a n d sp end the s u m m e r with h e r family and friends in D e n m a rk. In the fal l , Carleen will beg i n at New York's Par­ sons School of Desi g n .

1962 R E V . RON T H O R E S O N a n d h i s w i fe MA R I LYN ( L E R U D) '57 res i d e in Spri ng Valley, C a l if., where Ron is pastor of a new c o n g reg a t i o n , Lord of Life Luth e ran C h u rc h . L A R R Y FLAM OE h a s bee n pro moted to the rank of C a pt. and is now on tem pora ry d u ty in South east Asia. B I L L S I SSE L i s an e n g i n e e r i n g tech n i ­ c i a n at Wah C ha n g C o r p . i n A l b a n y , O re. LOREN TOWE i s on t h e staff of the B u c k l ey-King M o rtuary and B rookside M or­ t u a ry i n Taco ma. He and w i fe L i n d a have recently p u rc h ased a new home i n the F i r­ m o o r area. B I L L HANSON is spearhead i n g a dri ve to estab l is h l i ve , s u m m e r theater in Fed­ eral Way (Was h . ) . B i l l w i l l h ave three the­ aters g o i n g this s u m m e r. One w i l l feature S h a kespeare, another conte m p o rary dra m a , a n d a t h i rd c h i ld re n 's p rod uctions. B i l l i s a g raduate student in d rama at the U W . A L LAN B L O M Q U I S T h as b e e n g ranted a one-year leave of abse n c e from the Issaquah S c h o o l D i st. to accept a fe l l ow­ s h i p to Mi c h igan State U n iv. The program is a n e w experi m e n tal tea c h i n g f e l l ows h i p i nte g rating m a t h , read i n g a n d t h e s c i e n ces. A ,I will be atte n d i n g from J u n e , 1 967, to J u n e , 1 968. S I D S H E LV E R is a man agement analyst in the em p l oyment security de partment for the State of Washington.

OLA F M A L M I N represented PLU at the ina u g u ration of t h e p re s i dent of the State U n iverSity of New York, Col lege of Buf­ fa l o . O l af is on t h e m u s i c facu lty at the Buffalo i n stitution. D I X I E LEE P R O U S E is te aching first grade in the Su nnyvale School D istrict (Cal if.) for the fou rth year. S h e re ceived t h e Valley Forge Teac h e rs Medal Award from the F reedoms Fo u n dation. The past three s u m mers have been spe nt traveling t h ro u g h the Southern, New E n g l a n d and West Coast states.

1963 J A M E S H . C L I FTON received a scho lar­ s h i p at the a n n u a l M e d i cal Honors Day at the UW. RUTH ( G U N DE R S O N ) SCHA F F L E R is l iving i n Seattle w h i l e her h us b a n d , A l b e rt, is stationed i n Vietn a m . J I M CAST L E B E R RY has moved t o Rich­ land w h e re he w i l l be teach i ng in Saca­ jawea E l em entary S c h o o l . Jim has been teaching and coaching in M o n tesano (Wash.) since g rad uation. W I L L I A M R . LEWIS g raduated from Luther S e m i n ary, St. P a u l , and has accept e d a c a l l to Beth any Lutheran C h urch in S po­ kane. The ELDON ANDE RSENS (JOYCE L U N D MA R K '63) are in Portl a n d , O re . , where E l d o n w i l l beg i n a n i n te r nsh ip at the U n iv. of Oregon Hos p i tal . He received h is M . D . degree from the U n iv. of Cali­ fo rnia, San Francisco in June of this year. C H R I STY U LL E LA N D was graduated this s p r i n g from the UW S c h oo l of M e d i c i n e . She plans h e r i n te r n s h i p i n pedi atrics at H e n n e p i n C o u n ty Gener all Hospital, Min­ neapo l i s . PH ILP H U L T w a s graduated f r o m t h e Lutheran S c h o o l o f T h e o l ogy, Rock I s l a n d ,


in May. He a n d wife M A RY A N N ( M A N DT)

'67

reside

in

Buena

Park,

C a l if.,

tion with the Clover Park School

w h e re

P h i l i p has accepted a c a l l to become as­

u l ty of Bethel H i g h S c h o o l . Tacoma.

sistant pastor at Lutheran C h u r c h of the Good Shepherd. KAR E N (HANSON)

A R V I N M E Y E R is wo r k i n g in the radio­ c h e m i stry

B IL L I N G SLEY

D istrict.

M A R G O A N N E K N U D SON is o n the fac­

department

of

Reed

C o l l e ge

is

d o i n g research in t h e f i e l d of n e u t ron acti­

tea c h i n g f i rst and se c o n d g rade at Ramona

vation a nalysis a n d study i n g reactor o per­

Sc hoo l , Hawthorne, Calif.

ation.

M I CHAEL E LLI O TT g ra d u ated from Con­

His wife, Lisette. is teac h i n g fourth

grade at O a k G rove S c h o o l .

cordi a S e m i nary, S p r i n g field, I I I . , and was

KATH L E E N

E.

A N D E R SO N

is

m i n ister

ordained at O u r Saviou r's Lut he ran C h u rc h ,

of e d u c ation at G race Lutheran C h u rch i n

G ranada H i l ls, Calif., i n J u ne. H e has accep ed a c a l l to pasto r, St. Matthews

C o rva l l is,

Lutheran C h u r c h , Stratford,

lence

O ntario, Can­

ada.

O regon.

A N o rthwest in

sented to

CHAO-L I A N G

C H OW was

i n i tiated

into

"Em m y " award

educatio nal

t e c t u r e a n d A l l i ed Arts, May 1 0 , 1 967, a n d

tau g h t by JAY M. W E l L,

will

Arch itecture

from

degree UW

in

of

pre­

D i strict e d u cational television station. The award, fo r a fourth

the

was

KPEC, the C love r Park School

Tau S i g m a Delta H o n o r Society in A rc h i ­ receive

fo r excel­

p rograms

g rade science series was one

of six

Bachelor

of

p resented t h is year by the Seattle Chapte r

the summer

of

of

1 967. S h e p l an s to c o m p lete req u i rements fo r a deg ree of Master of U rban P l a n n i n g b y 1 988.

the

National

Academy

of

Television

A rts and S c i en c es. DICK

N E LS O N

was

named

head

cage

mentor at Moses Lake {Was h . ) High School. He

has

been

assistant

coach

at

Colfax

(Wash . ) . GARY S U N D i s assistant manager of the

1964

advertis i n g

G E O R G E B EA RD has been i n t e r n i n g at Salem

Lutheran C h u r c h ,

Mt. Verno n,

this

N o rt h e rn q u a rte r

past y e a r a n d is re urning to Pacific Luth­

public

eran Theo l o g i c a l S e m i n a ry ( Be r keley) this

Pacific

in

SHORT i s a medical

p u b l i c ity

department

Rai lway.

Seattle,

re lations

w h e re

for

the

He he

will will

for

head­ handle

company

in

the

Northwest.

P h a rm a c i st

fall fo r his final yea r. JOYCE (LARSON)

and

Pac i f i c

expects to

Intern

receive

ROY h is

K.

CARLSON

pha rmacy

degree

tec h n ol o g ist at Mason C l i n i c (Seattle). H e r

t h i s s u m m e r . H e i s at West C rest Pha rm­

h u sband, To m , w i l l b e teac h i n g i n dustrial

acy in Seattle. After

arts i n the Seattle-Eve rett a rea. ROB ERT SH I V E was comm issioned

School

i n Fe b r u a ry at Ft. B e n n i n g . Ga. H e is now at Ft. Benj a m i n Ha rrison at the Adj utant

Ocosta

LT.

General

School

i nstructional

as

an

methods

i nstructor

in

the

in

educat i o n a l

research

years

with

(Taco ma)

High

Schoo l ,

the and

Clove r one

Westport,

Park

yea r

at

Was h . ,

M A R V S N E LL . h i s wife . S H A R O N ( P H E L P S ) , and

fam i l y

will

move to

Ly nden ,

Wash . ,

w h e re Marv w i l l be head footba l l a n d track

d iv i s io n .

DAVID K N I E F E L received a n N D E A Fel­ lows h i p

two Dis!.

to

the

U n iv. of M i a m i , Coral Gables, F l o r id a . He will halle a leave of absence from h is posi-

coach and social s t u d i es teac her at Lyn­ den

High

School.

L T . DAVID M . LA N G received t h e U . S. Air

Fo rce

O utsta n d i ng

U n it

Award

as

a


permanent

decoration

for

h e l ping

the

451 0th Com bat C rew Trai n i ng Wing ac h ieve an except i o n a l l y merito rious rating fro m Jan uary, 1 964, to Decem ber, 1 9 55. JACK ESTES w i l l coach basketb a l l and basebal l at P e n i n s u l a Col lege ( P o rt A n ­ ge les, Wash . ) . Fo r the past two years h e h a s b e e n a n assistant coach a t Grays H a r­ bor (Wash.) C o l lege in footb al l , basketbal l a n d baseball. GARY D . LA N G E received the A m e rican Society of Periodont ists Award given an­ nually to the UW Dental Schoo l senior stu d e nt showing exceptional i nterest and abi l ity i n the field of Periodontics. D R . LOU I S C . WA G N E R , J R . was i n itiated i nto O m i c ron Kappa U p s i l o n , the national dental honor society which was esta b l ished of h o n o r students i n dentistry who d i st i n ­ g u ished themselves both i n s c h o l ars h i p a n d c h a racter a n d possess q u a l ificat i o n s f o r future professional g rowth. D r. W a g n e r received h is deg ree as an honor g ra d u ate from the U n iversity of Was h i n gto n School of Dentistry.

1965 RONALD M I LLER was awarded a s u m ­ mer fel'lows h i p in the department of b i o l ­ o g i c a l structure a t the U W . D u r i n g t h e s u m mer, R o n w i l l b e w o r k i n g w i t h D R . M . R O Y S C H WARZ ' 5 8 on t h e , " I n itiation o f G raft-Versus-Host Reactions by Trans­ formed Small Lymphoctyes." In a d d ition , Ron received t h e E . O. Jo nes Prize for o u tstanding scho l a rs h i p d u r i ng h i s sopho­ m o re year. GARY J O H N S O N received a Lange Medical P u b l ication Award fo r scho l a rs h i p d u ring t h i s past year at the Medical School. DONALD F . S A M U E LS O N has c o m p l eted

1 6 weeks of Naval Offi cer C a n d i d ate train­ ing at Newport, R. I . , and received h i s . c o m m ission a s ensig n , U S N R , Medical Service Co rp. He w i l l report to the U . S. Naval Hospita l , Befhesda, Md., for duty. D E N N I S LAN GSTON received deg ree f r o m P ac i fic U n iversity

his B . S . i n May.

Den n i s w i l l conti n u e his studies in the School of O ptometry at Pacific. The Langs­ ton s (SA N D RA STE I N ) l ive in Forest G rove. ROBERT sioned an

E. RUN N I N G A rm y second

was c o m m i s­ lieutenant on

comp letion of the Qua rtermaster Officer Cand idate School at Ft. Lee, Va. , in May. BARBARA ( P E RRY) HALEY is a case worker for the Wash ington State Depart­ ment of P u b l ic Assistance. EVA J O H N S , a teac h e r of German in Puyal l u p, has received a N D EA Fel low­ s h i p to study for her M.A. deg ree at the UW. She will spend the last q u a rte r to u r­ ing Germany. She w i l l return to h e r posi­ tion in Puyal l u p the following year. R ITA ( P ETERSO N) KOEPKE has been teac h i ng E n g l ish in Lathrop H ig h School in Fa i rban ks wh i l e h e r h u sband, Eugene, was i n the service at Fort Wainwrig ht. They have recently moved to Madison, Wis., w h e re h e will com plete h i s u nder­ g rad uate work at the U n i versity. DAVE and LY N N E (MA X E I N ER) RA D K E a re l iving i n Bangkok, T h a i l a n d , where Dave is ass i gned with the de puty c h i ef , t h e U. S . A rmy's J o i nt U n ited States M i li­ tary Advisory G ro u p . Lyn ne is teac h ing the first g rade at the International School of Ban g kok. Although the school has a conte m p o ra ry Ame rican c u rr i c u l u m , it is o rgan ized and fi nanced by the Thai peo p l e and tuit ion charges. The teachers a re fo r the most part A m e ricans, and the classes are f i l led predom i nently with c h i l d re n of A m e rican gove rnment e m p loyees.


CHARLOTTE M O E is e m p loyed at Salem ( O re . ) Genera l Hospital. SA N D RA B O W D I S H received a g rant from the Lutheran C h u rc h i n America Yo u t h M i n istries Board to fin ish h e r mas­ ter's deg ree at U n i o n Theo log ical Se m i nary by J u n e, 1 968. She w i l l b e wo rking with Youth Associates, a n experi mental youth program i n New Jersey, for the s u m me r. B I L L SCHARNWEBER has a teac h i n g fel­ lows h i p in Euro pean h istory at the U n iv. of M ichigan. He w i l l receive an M.A. i n h istory a t WSU i n A u g ust. JAY and J UDY ( F RAZ I E R ) HAAVIK w i l l b e moving t o E l g i n , I I I . , where Jay w i l l be taking h i s theolog ical interns h i p at E l g i n State Mental Hospital. J u d y w i l l teach i n Elgin. GARY J O R G E NSEN is the genera l ac­ c o u n t i n g s u p e rvisor for the Tw i n Harbor (Was h . ) b ranch of Weyerhaeuser. He and w i fe JOLA I N E ( L O N EY) are living i n Cos­ mopol is. W I L L I A M WADE is e m p l oyed as a de­ part ment manager with Sears, Roe b u c k and Co. in Seattl e . R I CH ARD H I L D A H L received a master's degree in busi ness a d m i n istration from t h e Un iv. of O regon. He is e m p loyed a s an associate professor at Lane C o m m u nity Col lege in Eu gene. He teaches acco u nt i n g and business law. C O N N I E ( H AA N ) i s teac h i n g third g rade a t Trent P r i m a ry School in the P l easant H i l l d i st r ict.

1966 J U L I A (BARN ETT) O L S E N i s work i n g a t P r i m a ry C h i l d ren'S Hospital on t h e adoles­ cent-psych iatric ward in S a l t Lake C ity, Utah . Her h us b a n d , Steve, is wo rking for a sheet metal contractor a n d is studying de­ s i g n d raft i n g . PAULE TTE ( B E R G ) A N DER SON is d o i n g p u b l i c health n u rsing i n Seatt l e .

LYNN ERTSGAARD w i l l b e transferring to Lutheran S c hool of Theo:ogy a t C h icago this fal l for h is second year of s e m i n a ry wo rk. W I LMA ( BAER) w i l l be teac h i n g m u s i c and art on t h e second ary level i n H a rvey, I I I . , a s u b u rb o f Ch icago. L O R NA ( LA M M I ) KELLER is teac h i ng first g rade in Nort h r i dge, C a l i f . , w h i le her h us b a n d , B i l l , is atte n d i n g San Fernando Valley State Co l lege. He has been ac­ cepted to the U niv. of Iowa for doctorial study. D O R OTHY WI L H E L M S is working as a caseworker in t h e p u b l i C assistance office i n Everett. V I CTOR SEDO has moved back to Can­ ada, where he is a medical soc i a l worker at G l e n rose General Hospital , Edmonton, A l b e rta. R O N M E RCHANT has signed a con tract with Sk agit Val ley Col lege (Was h . ) to be an i n structor in b u s i ness a d m i n istration and e co n o m i cs . Ron w i l l receive h i s M . B.A. degree in August from the Univ o f Oregon. JOE GRANDE received a scholars h i p award i n "recognition o f outsta n d i n g schol­ astic acco m p l ish ments" at the Lutheran Seminary in C o l u m b u s , O h io. I n early J u ne KA R E N (KANE) and Joe returned to Seattle where they w i l l spend the s u mmer with h e r parents. Duri n g this past school year Karen has been teac h i n g secon d g rade i n t h e Columbus P u b l i c Sc hool system. J U DY SUNWALL taught t h i rd g rade i n C o l u m b i a Heig hts, a s u b u r b o f M i n n e­ a p o l i s , last year and w i l l be teac h i n g s u m ­ m e r s c h o o l f o r s i x weeks. O S M U N D KV ITH A M M E R was c o m m is­ sioned an Army second l i e utenant u pon g raduation from Transportation Officer Cand idate School at Ft. Eust i s , Virginia. D u ring the 23-week course, he was trained i n s u pervi s i n g the transportation of m i l i­ tary pe rson n e l and e q u i p ment by rai l , water, land and a i r. H e received extensive


instruction in transporting c o m b at troops and s u p p l ies over j u n g l e terra i n . KA R I N MAG N U S S E N is a recent gradu­ ate o f Pan Am erican Wo r l d A i rways I nter­ national Stewardess C o l l e g e in Miami, F l a . S h e is serv i n g aboard J et C l i p p e r f l i g h ts from N ew Y o r k southward across the Atlantic to Latin A m e r i c a and t h e Caribbean. CAROLYN ( M O N S O N ) THO MAS i s teac h ­ i n g first grade i n S a n D ie g o C a l i f . H e r h u s b a n d , G R I F F '65, is a ho s p i tal co r psma n with t h e Navy. G O R D O N B L O M Q U IST co m p leted h i s first s olo fl i g h t rec e n t l y in a T-34 Mento r, the Nav y ' s pri m a ry f l i g h t tra i n er. He has been i n p i l ot training at the Pensac o l a ,

( Fl a . ) .

Naval

Air

Sta ti o n

­

since

Septem­

ber, 1 966.

J U D ITH SEAST R A N D i s teaching i n t h e B e l l evue S c h o o l D istrict.

CRAIG

K N UTZ E N

is

stationed

at

Fort

B e nning, G a .

B R E NT W.

OLSEN

has

c o m pleted

fense Information S c h o o l at Ft. Harrison,

Indiana. He

De­

Benjamin

i s now an i n fo r m a­

tion specia l i s t for t he T h ird Brigade ( AI T ) at the

U.

S . Arm y Training

Center,

Fort

Lewis.

1967 M A R C I A N JACO B S is working as a p u b­ l i c health nurse with the m i grant wor kers in th e P u ya l l u p Val le y. GORDON WAHTO has been accepted for graduate study i n E ng l i sh at the U n iv. o f Oregon. C U RT G A M M E L L has s i g ned a co ntract to teach at Mount Tah o m a H i g h Schoo l (Taco m a ) . G E RA L D R O L O S O N i s a senior i n for­ estry at the UW. KEN TETZ is a management tr a i nee for U n io n O i l Company i n the Tacoma area.


M a rriages J u n e 25, 1 966: Rev. Ken n eth W. G a m b ' 5 9 t o Barb a ra J. Post, G o l d e n , I l l i nois, Aug ust 8 , 1 96 6 : B i l l W . Osborne to Myr­ tle J . Lyons '61 , P a r k l a n d , Wash. Aug ust 6, 1 966 : Fred A n d e rson to P a u l­ ette Berg '66, Seatt l e , Wash. A u gust 1 3, 1 9 66: Lynn E rtsgaard '66 to W i l m a Baer '66, S po ka n e , Wash. D e c e m b e r 1 7 , 1 96 6 : W i l l i am H . K e l l e r I I I to Lorna N. La m m i '66, L o s Angeles, C a l if. February 1 8 , 1 967: P h i l l i p G . G o l d be c k '64 to G w e n d o l y n L. O w e n s , S i lver S p r i ngs, Md. Febr u a ry 24, 1 96 7 : C a r l M . Searcy, J r. '61 to Jewellyn C. Carlso n , Seatt l e , W a s h . March 1 8 , 1 96 7 : Dav i d R . R h ig e r t o A m e ­ l i a R . A l c a n tara ( fa c u lty), S e att l e , WaS h . March 1 9 , 1 967 : Olav S. E n g e n ' 6 4 to H i l degard I . Lonset, Seatt l e , Wash. M a rc h 21 , 1 96 7 : David A. A l b recht '65 to Jan E. A a l b u e '65, Tac o m a , Wash. A pr i ll 1 1 , 1 967 : John R. Van Tine, 3rd to Karen Sue Ol s o n '62, Vientiane, Laos. A p ri l 29, 1 9 67 : Thomas S. S h o rt to Joyce C. Larson '64, Seatt le, Was h . J u n e 2, 1 96 7 : R i c h a rd W. L i n d b e rg to Susan Vo n H o l lweg '67, Seatt l e , Wash. June 1 7 , 1 96 7 : Wi l l ia m S issel '62 to Susan K. A r mstrong.

Births To Mr. and M rs. Major Owens ( Karen Cr usan '62) , so n , Tad Jerome, born May 1 , 1 966. J u l e O. C rabtree (Georg i a n n Rei n bo l d '61 ) , d a u g h te r , J u l ienne Marie, bo rn Au­ gust 20, 1 9 66. R i c h a r d W i lson '64 ( J a n i c e Fannon '63),

d a u g h te r , K i m be r l y A n n , born Nov e m b e r 1 5 , 1 9 66. J a mes Cape l l i '58 (Carlene C h ristensen '61 ) , daug hter, Suzanne Janeen, born No­ vember 1 6 , 1 9 66. J o i n s si sters C h e ryl 6112 a n d C a ryn 5 . J a c k D. Doepke ' 6 5 ( J u d y W i n j u m '64 ) . d a u g h te r , Tonja Ly n n , b o rn D e c e m b e r 2 , 1 966. J o i n s Bradley J a m es 2 112 . Larry H a rd m a n ( G loria Landsem '65 ) , d a u g h te r, J i l l M a ri e , b o r n December 3 , 1 966. J o i n s Sheri Lynn 2. Steve O lsen ( J u l i a Ba rnett '66 ) . d a u g h ­ t e r , A n g e l a M a r i e , b o r n Dec e m b e r 4, 1 966. G a ry J o rgensen '65 ( J o L a i n e Loney '65), d a u g h te r , J u l i e D i a n n e , born December 1 8 , 1 966. La rry G. M o ntag u e ( P a u l i n e E l m e r '64 ) , son , Marc Tod d , born December 1 8 , 1 966. J e r ry Hansen ( S a n d i Fre d i k i n d '65), son , J o n E r i c , born J anuary 1 0 , 1 967. Paul C. Lucky '57, so n , Christian Mi­ c h a e l . born J a n u a ry 1 2 , 1 967. J o i n s sis­ ters, S o n j a M a rie 8, Rebecca Linn 5 a n d Jo nette C h rist i n e 3. B rad Luton (Sylvia S h u ley '61 ) , son, Brad I I I , b o rn J a n u a ry 1 2, 1 967. J o i ns Kari Lee 1 112 . B u rton Fedde (Antoi nette G ri m l u n d ' 5 9 ) , d aughter, C a l l ista A n to i nette , born J a n u ­ a ry 1 8 , 1 9 67. J o i n s Hans 6 a n d Peder 5 . Ma rv i n N eveu (Carol H a l l d o rson ' 63) . d a u g h t e r, Cynth i a A n n , born January 2 5 , 1 967. J o i n s David S c o t t 4 112 . Gary Isaacson ( E l o i s Ne lson '57), son, Arne Allen, born J a n u a ry 3 0 , 1 967. Joins K risten LaVe r n e 5 . Vernon S h e l don ( L o i s Meyer '58), d augh­ ter, Karen M a r i e , b o rn J a n u a ry 3 1 , 1 967. Joins L i n d a 4 112 . Roger D. Trygstad (Carolyn B loomfield ' 60 ) . d a u g h ter, Katrina Kay, born February 22, 1 967, A d o pted M arch 1 3 , 1 967. K e n R i is '59 (Aud rey Egge '62). d a u g h ­ ter, S o n j a A l ta, born Feb ruary 25, 1 9 67.


C l a re n c e M. W h i te (Sylvia Sanders '60), son, P e t e r And rew, b o r n Feb ruary 27, 1 967. A l be rt Schaffler (Ruth G u n derson '63), son, G regory Thomas, born February 28, 1 967. Joins Lauri E l izabeth 2. Char les S o m m e rs (Arlene K i n ared '59), s o n , Walter C h arles, born February 28, 1 967. Adopted March 1 6 , 1 967. J o i n s Frank Charles 1 112 . Ron Thoreson '62 ( M arilyn LeRud '57), so n , Nat h a n i e l Scott, born M a rch 9, 1 967. J o i n s Beth Kyrsten 3 V2 . Larry Flamoe '62 ( Karen B i rd '61 ) , daughter, M i c h e l l e Renee, born March 1 3,

1 967. R u sse l l Bisping '65, son, Jeffrey Louis, born March 21 , 1 967. Joins Scott 20 months. Arden M . Mu nson '60, son, Robert Arden , born March 3 1 , 1 967. J o i n s G reg M ar足 s h a l l 5. Randy S amson (Lois R i s c h e r '63 ) , son, Steven Thomas, born April 4, 1 967. M . Roy Schwarz '59 (Th e l m a Nygaard '56), son, Ryan M e r l e , born A p r i l 6, 1 967. Ivan Debbon (Ardis H a m i l ton ' 6 4 ) , son , Jon David, born A p r i l 1 1 , 1 967. Joins Debra Lyn ne 4 . J a c k K ro l l ( J a n e Ross '60), s o n . David Ross, born A p r i l 1 6 . 1 967. Joins Dana 2 V2 . Lee Cheek ( B arbara N elson '57), s o n , D a n i e l Clyde, born A p r i l 24, 1 967. J o i n s brothers M i chael and P a u l . K e r m i t Sveen '59, s o n , E r i k M i c h a e l , b o r n A p r i l 27, 1 9 67. J o i n s C h ristofer J o n 2 .

First Announcement

HOMECOMING NOVEMBER 2

-

5


Pattie f u l f i l led h is part of the ag reement. He

sent

the

g rew and

R u ssi an Exchange

Russian

d i ed

five different sh rews.

The "cold war" between the U n ited States

in

small

the

voles

a n i ma l s

Pacific

and

that

Northwest:

t h ree

ki nds

of

Pattie recaived 20 spec i m en s - n o ne of

and R u ss i a i s a reality. D i p lomats issue warni ngs and s o u n d p rotest while arm ies

w h i c h can be found i n the U n ited States.

face each other across

c h i p m u n ks, and field m i c e of t h e U. S.

barbed w i re and

retaliatory miss i l es lie i n wait. But t h e re exist

in

both

c o u n t r ies

men

and women w h o do not have t h i s an imos­ ity.

They

wo u l d

rather

share

with

their

"en emi es" than fight them.

Some The

are

main

to

the

advantages

kangaroo

of

the

rats,

trade,

in

Pattie's o p i n i o n , a re the teach i n g a i ds it p rovides

and

the

addition

it

m a kes

to

an i m al s

a

P L U 's w i l d l ife c o l lection. Pattie

Often they are authors. On other occa­

s i m i lar

said

that

with

these

teacher w i l l be able to e x p l a i n to a c l ass

sions they are m us ic ia n s o r s c i ent ists.

the d i fferences - and i n so me cases the

One s u c h pe rson is Donald Pattie, P LU bio logy teacher.

s i m i l arities - that

Pattie i s conducting a n exchange with a fel low teacher from the Zoolog i ca l Museum at Moscow State U n i v e rs i ty. The knowledge they s h a re i s n ' t g o i n g to help win a wa r between their cou ntries. It i s n 't even g o i n g to a i d one or the other i n p l a n t i n g a m a n o n t h e moon. What i t w i l l d o is h e l p t h e i r students become m o re fa­ m i l iar

with

a

small

part

of

the

a n i mal

k i ngdom. Pattie a n d the Russian are exchanging animals - s h rews rodents.

and

different types of

Earlier t h is year Pattie received a letter from the Moscow U n ive rsity's m u se u m .

other PLU facu lty mem ber, E. F. Kossova, t rans lated the letter. W h at the Russian sci­ entist wanted were representatives o f N o rt h A me r i c a n s h rews and voles o r f i e l d m i ce. In retu rn, the Russian promised to send s i m i lar a n i m a l s from E u rope and Asia. The exchange was a g reed u po n . When Pattie's s h i pment arrived, it contained skins and sku l ls of different animals native to the A rctic and steppe reg ions of E u r-Asia.

exist

between

the

two

cou ntries' a n i m a l s . T h e c h i p m u n k t h a t Pattie

received,

for

example, i s nearly identical to the one fo u nd i n the Pacific N o rthwest. However, both

are

vastly

d i fferent

from

one

type

l iv i n g i n the state of Wyo m i n g . T h i s is d u e t o t h e an i m als' habitat. Both the

Russian

and

the

N o rthwestern

c h i p­

m u n k live in s i m i l a r c l i m ates - d i fferent from that of the southwestern section of the U n ited States. A nd it works the other way too. " O u r students are taught," Pattie said, "that the kangaroo mouse a n d Perboa o f E u rope a r e o f d ifferent fam i lies. B u t o n l y by exa mi n i ng t h e s k u l l can you d i s t i n g u ish between the two. "The reason for t h is , " h e said,

"is t h at

the two a n imals live in s i m i la r reg ions but in d i fferent pa rts of the world and devel­ oped from d ifferent ancestral forms. " N o w when we teach our b i ology c l asses about the effect o f c l i mate and te rrain on a n i mals, we can demonst rate what we are tal k i n g about." Pattie hopes the exchange was only the l i rst of many.


C ore Curriculum Two years ago, as part of the continuous effort to i m p rove Pacific Luthe ran Un iver­ sity's acade m i c p resentatio n , the faculty accepted the c h a l lenge of rev ising the school's c u r ricu l u m . The need f o r such self-im prove ment was o u t l i ned by D r. Robert Mortvedt in h i s last Pres ident's Report: " D u r i n g the cu rrent period, i t is particu larly i m po rtant to p robe the c u rricu lum because o f the so-c al led explosio ns of kn owledge and techno logy. Many fields, part i c u l a rly science and math­ ematics, are expan d i n g with i nc re d i b l e speed. "Moreover, old barriers w h i c h used to separate the various d e partme nts beg i n to be as f u l l of holes as slabs of Swiss cheese. Biol ogy, c h e m istry, mathematics and physics are n o longer neatly defined de partments. A w h o l e n ew vocabulary is being c reated to fac il itate more i n te l l i gent commun icatio n . " H e also state d : " O f a l l the k n o w l edge now av a i l a b l e to man k i n d , what parts o u g h t to b e taught to special g ro u ps?" These are some o f the questions he pre­ sented to the faculty. After one yea r of study, the educators reported, "no con­ sensus in the answers attempted . " B u t t h e i n v estigation c o n t i n u e d , a n d late in the recent school year two p ro g ress re­ ports were subm itted. A fo undation for g rowth had been laid. The repo rts came from the C o l l eg e of Profes s i o n a l Studies (CPS) and the C o l lege of Arts and Sc iences (CAS). Although both g ro u ps were concerned with the i n t roduction of a " c o re " c u rric­ u l u m , they d i ffered on its i m pl e m entation. The CPS report favored a 4-1-4 p l an (fo u r m o n t h s each semester and one month of study in between) with the various d is-

c i p l i nes gathered u n der th ree courses. Meanw h i l e, the CAS c o m m i ttee said that it wasn't convinced that a 4-1-4 prog ram was the most efficient way to use fac u l ty time and the instituti o n ' s economic re­ sou rces. The two gro u ps did agree, however, on several poi nts. Both favored abo l i s h ing credit h o u rs and req u i ring instea d 36 cou rses fo r g raduat i o n . They a l so agreed on al lowing students to h ave an option o f selecting a restricted n u m b e r o f pass-fa i l cou rses. The working a rrange ment o f the "core" was treated differe ntly by the comm ittees. The CAS report favored a total of 1 5 courses i n the core: n i n e in h u manities, two in one natural science, two s e m i n a r cou rses, and t w o i n a n y t w o of the so c i a l sciences. U n d e r this plan, a student i n a maxi­ mu m-major fie ld would have to t a ke 1 9 courses i n his major , 1 5 in the core , and 2 electives, i n o rd e r to meet the gradu­ ation req u i rements . T h e "core" proposed b y t h e C P S also i n c l uded 15 d is c i p l ines, b u t divided them i nto three courses : society, t h o u g ht, and expression. T h e two plans will continue to be studied t h i s s u m m e r, a n d next fal l they w i l l be pre­ sented to the facu lty c o n ference.

Pacific Luthe ran Un ivers i ty is striv ing for acade m i c excellence i n other ways. D u r i n g the 1 966-67 school year over $1 1 5,000 was received in g rants. These g i fts made possible the a d d i t i o n of equ i p ment, and i t al lowed the c o m ­ m u nity to benefit f r o m the U n iversity's k n owledge. For exam p l e , $1 2, 900 was received from a National Sc ience Fo undation ( N SF) g rant to al low PLU to sponsor an " I n -Service


Institute in Mathematics for E l eme ntary Teac hers. " U n d e r this program the school taught area teachers new i n novations in the field of mathematics edu cation. NSF grants also tied the U n iversity and the comm unity together with the start of the $ 1 2,552 " P rofessional N u rse Trainee­ ship P rogram, " and the $4,520 resea rch grant for the study o f subsid ized housing and the adj ustment of older women. And this s u m mer, with the aid of a fed­ eral grant, PLU' s edu cation department is instructing teachers on the various tech­ niques to use in Head-Start c l assrooms. But i n add ition, the grants, both federal and p r ivate, a l l owed the Un iversity to ex­ pand its teac hing faci lties. The physics department, for examp le, received a $ 1 9,900 grant - matched by the U n iversity ­ to buy new equipment. The c h e m istry de­ portment obta i n ed a $1 1 ,500 grant, and another federal grant - to be matc hed by the Un iversity - p resented the institu tion with $ 1 2,500 for the p u rchase of labora­ tory and c l assroom equipment. One of the largest grants to be received by PLU wi l l run over a th ree-year period. The $ 1 98,567 gift from the Research Cor­ poration w i l l enable the school to add eight science p rofessors and strengthen the science program. The first insta l l ment of $ 5 1 , 700 begins this fa l l . Other grants expected next year include a continuation of the $1 9 , 499 mental health grant ; $20 , 1 75 for the p rofessional n u rse trai ning ; $7,450 for public -health n u rs i ng training; $1 8,000 for a commun ity rapport study of Pierce County; $5,000 for l ibrary books, and a m atch ing grant for $ 1 2,575 for e q u i pment .

Student E lections Stanley Stenersen, Spokane senior, is the president of the Associated Stu dents of PLU for the coming school year. Other officers elected include: Lloyd Eggan, Pocate l l o, first vice pres ident; M i chael Dool ittle, Tacoma, second vice pres ident; Kay Evans, Tacoma. executive sec retary ; Char leen Strand li en, La G rande, O re., l eg­ is latu re sec retary ; Robert Yost, Canby, a re., treasu re r ; and John Bierman, Federal Way, ch ief justice. Coord inating board members are Mi chael Ford. Denver: Steven Morrison, Beave rton , a re . ; James Wid­ steen, Port Angeles ; and Lee K l u th, Port­ l and. C l ass presi dents will be M i chael Mc­ Kean, Aberdeen, senior; Robert K l avano, P u l l man, junior; and James Peters, Eph ra­ ta, sophomore. Barbara Th rasher, C l i nton, Wash. , w i l l be Associated Women Stu dents president.

From St. M atthew's Luthera n Church The fo l l owing is quoted from the parish paper of St. Matthew's Lutheran C h u rch, Beaverton , a re . : "A fitting c l i max to t h i s week o f celebration w i l l b e m a d e in the gift which the chu rch library wi l l make to Pacific Lutheran U n iversity Library in ob­ servance of their dedic ation. As a thank­ offe ring to our Heavenly Father for His many blessings to us du ring the past five years, all the Overtime Donations for 1 967 w i l l be set aside for the use of the U n i­ versity Library for buying books. Hel ping ou r Ch ristian young people in their quest for education is a thri l l ing opportunity.


What's New With You? P l ease use the s pace

b e l o w to

send

us

news of an add ress c h a n ge , new pro mo足 t i o n , h o n o rs , a ppointme nts, m a r riages, ad足 d i t i o n s to the fam i l y , t ravel, or to j us t say h e l l o . I nfo rmat ion dead l i n e for the next i s s u e i s Septem b e r 1 5.

LAST CALL ! ! ! Name,_______

Add ress

C l ass__

IMPACT / 6 7 The 1 96 7

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Annual Alumni

F u n d c l oses o n J u l y

31 .

We need y o u r support!

City______

State ____

Zip __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ News N otes: _ _ _

(Send to the Alumni Office PLU)

M a ke your g i ft today!


Howard O . Scott, Tacoma, two year term; -

and

Fi nanc ial Aid resources

U nive rsity will

and

p rovide assistance

g rants

Federal

In

fo r over 600 stu­

pa rt-t ime

,

,

Van Bee k said that institutional resou rces

and

com­

Dr. Mo rtved! for h is leade rsh i p the board of regents fo r its di re c t ion and the student body for ma i n tain i ng a h i g h stan dard

wi l l provi de about $250,000 through s c h o l ­ -

resolutions the corporation

its

mended

in 1 967-68 , accord ing to James Van Beek. F i nanci al Aid Officer.

g ra nts- in aid

th ree-year

term .

de nts

arships,

Seattle,

D ede r e r,

M ichae l

de miC

em­

w it n ess

C h ristian

of

and

aca­

a c h i e ve m e nt in ti mes of worl d and

mo ra l te n s ion .

p loyment.

He re ported that allocation commitments

Reside nce H all Ass i g n ments

have been received for Educational O ppor­

tun ity Grants lotal l n g $1 1 0,450 and Work­ Study

G rants

tota l i n g

$ 2 1 ,000.

Is

It

A p poi n tme nts

ex­

ory

pected that $226 ,000 for Nati o n al D efe n se Student

and

Loans

$25,000

for

the

N u rs i n g

of

perso n n e l

residence

h a ve

ha l l

s u pe rvis­

been an n o u nce d by

Off ic e of St ude n t Affai rs. K. He isler of Wooste r, O h i o

M iss M a ry

Student beans w i l l b e avai lab le.

has

been

dea n

ass istan t

appo i n ted

of

women . She w i l l al so b e t h e h e ad resident in Harstad H a l l . H e r ge neral res p o ns i b i l ­ ities w i l l i n c l ude i n service trai n i n g of resi­ dent assI stants and aiding in t h e adv isi ng of residence hal l g roups and stu de n t

Regents Elected

-

Fou r new reg e nts were chosen a n d seven incum b e n ts re-e l ected at

the P.L.U. corpor­

ation annual meeting held

in conjunction

o rganizations.

w i th the N o rth Pacific District convention

of the American Lutheran C h u rc h. The d is trict which met on c a mpus in June is

M iss H e i s l er is a g ra duate of Witten be rg Col l ege

­

the

T h e new com a ;

regents inc l ude C a r l

Fyn bo e ,

01 Clover Park H ig h School , Ta­ E.

Ronald

Rev.

Frank

Rev.

Karl

th ree year -

Do ug l ass

E ricks e n , Uter

,

,

Aubu rn ;

the

and

t he

Lo ngview ;

P u l lman.

All

wil l

New

Resident heads

The other two are A LC district choices .

C.

Portlan d ;

Getzendane r,

be head res ident for Foss H a l l and Dr. A l l

,

K raa b e l Fra ncisco ,

for T l ngelslad H a l l w i l l

E ve rgreen House , R ic h a rd Mo rten­ in Cascade House and Do u g l as Jo h n­ so n In A l pine House. Steve Kv i ns l and w i l l

Elected as regents-at-Iarge were George San

Rut h

son

Everett. Gal laway,

M rs .

a St. O l af Col­

man in

Donald Corne l l ,

Port Angeles ; Mrs. J. L . Mo i lle n David

. ,

be M i c hae l C u l lom in Ivy Ho use, A lan Hed ­

Re-elected to th ree-yea r te rms were D r.

Rev.

i n c l u de

vers i ty .

Synod of the Lutheran Ch urch In A merica .

the

h ouse mothe rs

lege g raduate ; and Mrs. Barbara Parso ns of Kent, Was h . , who a tte nded McG i l l U n i ­

c iation , and Douglass t h e Pac i fi c Northwest

and

masler of ed u cation

H a lvo r son of Portland , O re

serve

te rms.

Banda, Tacoma ;

a

Berl i n , Germ any.

Fynboe represents the PLU A lumn i Asso­

Paul E.

h as

U n iversity in A the n s . S h e has b e e n an ass i st an t res i d e n t director at O h i o U . the pas! year and last year she was gove rnes s a t a boa rd in g s c h O O l in

corporate owner of the Un iversity. prinCipa l

and

deg ree from O h i o

rector

one-year term ;

fo r of

Pflueger

men s '

Ha l l.

residence

a p po i nted t h is s u mmer

13

.

An

ove r a l l

halls

will

di­ be

Mary K. Heisler


He has served parishes in Red m o n d , O r e . ( 1 953-59 ) ; Port l a n d , O re. ( 1 959-61 ) ; and Seattle ( 1 961 -67). He i s m a rrie d to the fo r m e r Floy A n n Sch i m m e l , a,lso a S t . O l a f g radua te. They h ave fo u r c h i l d re n .

J off ey Ballet F ive p u b l i c perfo rman ces of its 1 967-68 re pertoi re w i l l be g iven by the Joffrey B a l l e t of New Yo r k in Eastvold C h a pel Au g u s t 8 to 12 at 8 : 1 5 p.m. each n i g ht. C o n s i d e red by c ritics to be the most vital y o u n g com pany in the n at i o n , The Joffrey B a l l et was s l ated to take u p resi­ dency o n t h e P L U c a m r ll s J u l y 9, and to remai n t h rough A u g . 1 2 . Fo l l ow i n g its Ta­ coma ap pearances, the co m pany w i l l g ive pe rfo rman ces in Seattle, Boise, Lewisto n a n d Pocate' l l o. This is the fi. rs.t t i m e a m aj o r bal l et c o m ­ p a n y h a s est a b l i shed a s u m m e r resid.ency in a location oth e r than that where it dan ces du ring its reg u l ar perfo r m i n g sea­ so n . Th irty-five adv ance d dance students h ave been selected by Robe rt Joffrey, t h e c o m p a n y fo u n d e r , from 1 45 auditio n e rs from every n o rthwest state , A l aska and Hawa i i , to receive i n tensive t ra i n i n g d u ri n g the PLU resi d e n c y . T h e r e m e a b o u t 4 0 per­ so n s i n t h e reg u l a r c o m pany an d' staff. T h e P a c i f i c N o rthwest B a l l et Association h as been fo rmed to p lay host to t h e com­ pany. Good w i n C h ase of Ta coma, p resident of the N at i o n a l B a n k of Wash i n g to n , is c h a i rm a n of t h e associatio n ' s execut ive. c o m m i ttee.

F o u r Teachers Get D octorates Fo u r P a c i f i o Lutheran U n iversity teac h e rs were awarded t h e i r doctor of p h ,i loso p h y deg rees d u ring c o m m e n c e m e nt e x e rc ises t h i s sp r i n g . T h e y a re Lo wel ·1 C u lver, assistant profes­ sor of p o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e ; D o n a l d L . Patt i e , b i ology i n structor; D o n a l d L. Reyno lds, as sistant p rofess o r o f E n g l i s h ; a n d Johan­ n es A. S c h i l l e r , associate p rofess o r of soc iology. Cu lver received h i s Ph.D. f ro m the U n i­ versity of Southern C a l i fornia. H i s d isse rta­ tio n , "Land E l ections in West German P o l i ­ tics, " traced po l it i c a l deve l o p m e n t in t h e West German states f r o m 1 946-65, stress­ ing the i n fluence of re g i o n a l e l ections. Pattie received his advanced deg ree from t h e U niversity of M o n t a n a . His dis­ sertation was concerned with the ecolog­ ical a n d' p o p u l a tion devel.o p m e n t of a l p i n e verte b rates. Rey n o l d s was awarded h i s deg ree by the U n iversity o f Wash ington. His d i ssertatio n , "The N av e l s o f L . P . H a rt l e y , " was c o n ­ cerned with t h e E n g l is h m a n 's w r i l i n g s . I t was t h e f i rst c ri t i c a l' ana lysis o f t h e auth­ o r ' s works. S c h i l l e r's deg ree was a l so p resen ted by the U n iversity o f Was h i n gton. His thesis, ' T he S i g n ificance of U n iversals, Partic u l ars a n d Value Co m m i t m e n t in the P rocess of Social ization , " dealt with a study o f t h e var iety o f co ntacts that s o p h o m ()re h i g h school students have with parents, peer g ro u ps, com m u n ity a n d extra -c u rr i c u l a r activities.

Rev . D a lton Called The Rev. M o rris V . D a l ton of Seattle has accepted a c a l l to se rve as assistant pas­ tor o f the U n i versity 's Student Con grega­ t i o n . He has resi gned from his pastorate at Be t h l eh e m Lutheran C h u rc h , and w i l l c o m e to P L U S e p t . 1 . A native o f South Leed s , W i s . , M r. Dal­ to n, age 39, is a g raduate of St. O l a f Col­ lege, a n d obtained h i s theol o g i c a l t ra i n i n g at L u t h e r S e m i n a ry, S I . P a u l .

14


Barbara A. Benson, m i c robiology, Uni­ versity of Montana; Karen M. Korsmo, m i c robiology, Un iversity of Oregon; Ping Kwan , physi cs, Indiana State Un ivers ity ; L. M i l ton Chance, physics, Was h i n g ton State University; Constance A. Anderson, medi­ cine, Un iversity of Wa s h i n gton; and David L. Pearson, zoology, Lou isi ana State U n i­ versity. Four of the sem inary students, Gregory Karlsgodt, John H . Moody, Joh n D. Peder­ son a n d B r u ce Swanson, wi l l attend Luther Theologi c a l Seminary in SI. Paul.

Her man Hagen, Luther Theolog ical Sem­ i n a ry, Saskatoon, Sask. ; El izabeth J . Lep­ ley, Pacific Lutheran Theolog ical S e m i n a ry ; David Borgl um, Wartburg Theolog ical Sem­ ina ry , Dubu q u e , Iowa ; Ge rald A. Corn e l l , Y a l e Theolog i c a l Seminary ; and Terry R . Ol iver, P r inceton Th eolog i c a l Sem inary. Two students have been accepted at a school of dentistry : Richard E l m e r , Mar­ q u ette Un iversity, and Randa l l J. O l son, Un ive rsity of Was h ington. Th ree will en­ rol l in schools of optometry : LeRoy W. G i l ge, Pacific University ; Ga rard M. Gus­ tafson, I l l inois Col lege; and Thomas Lor­ entzsen, U n iversity of Ind iana. M e d i c a l students w i l l be: Clayton D. Erickson, Donald Sim mons, J a m es R . Vas­ ser, Le s l i e G. Hage, John M. Meyer, and Douglas Lee la nd, all at the Un iversity of Wa s h i n gton; Duane Natvig, Un iversity of Iowa; R i chard D . O l son, University of M in­ nesota; R i chard Boz e l l , Marq uette Univer­ sity; and John P. Shannon, University of Wi sconsin. Other g raduate students inc lud e : Louise A. Albrecht, Ge rman, Stanford Un iversity; Dean M . Fritts, history, Washington State Un iversity ; Alan Hedman, gu idance and counseling, PLU ; Everett A. Holum and James N. Read, law, Wil l a mette University ; Arthur Hooper, business administration, John Hopkins U n iversity; Dale V. Houg, pol it i c a l science, U n i ver­ sity of Wyom i n g ; Sand ra Kjerstad, h i story, University of Wash ington ; Jon P . Peterson, h i story, H i ghlands Unive rsity ; R ichard J. Rockway, sociology, University of Wyom­ ing; A l l an Schnei der, law, Unive rsity of O r egon ;

Other seminary students are: Robert J. Rism il l e r , Evan g e l i c a l Lutheran Sem inary, Columbus, O h io; T. Michael M c Dowel l , Fu ller Theolog ical Seminary , Pasadena, Cal if. ; David S. Waggoner, Lutheran School of Theology, C h i cago;

Timothy S h e r ry, Engl i s h , Un iversity of C h i cago; M i c h ael Stevens, h i story, Occi­ dental Col l ege; and Martin S utton and Gor­ don Wahto, En g li sh, University of O regon. Olive r Joh nson, Neil Waters, and David Staub will enter the Peace Corps.

Seniors Honored Forty seniors were honored at a May convocation for being accepted to g radu­ ate schools-1 7 of them with assistants h i ps o r fel lows h i ps. In addi tion, 1 2 students w i l l attend the­ olog i c a l seminari es, and th ree w i l l enter the Peace Corps. Five students rece iving fel lows h i ps were: Marcia L. Wake, Frenc h , University of C h i cago; Susan Van Hol iweg, h i story, Stanford U n iversity; Conrad J . R u e , i n te r­ national relations, George Wash in gton U n i­ versity ; David L. Ande rson, Engl ish, M i c h i­ gan State Un iversity ; and David Burgoyne, Unive rsity of New Mexico. Receiving assistantsh ips were : S h a ron M. Kn udson, me dic ine, University of Wash­ ington ; Gary C. Hanson, ch em istry, O re­ gon State U n iversity ; Kath leen F. Fa r n h a m , E n g l ish in Ger man y ; Robert I . Krieger, entomology, Cornell Un iversity; Paul J . Ol­ sen, mathematics, University of Wyom ing ;

15


N.

Students Commended

D.,

Co l l ege ,

Semi nary

v e rs i ty's Un ion

Th e fol l owing reso l ut ion was among those

Theo log i ca l

McCo rm i c k

C o l u m b ia U n i ­

in C h i cago, and

Theological Sem i na ry.

received h i s doctor o f ed u cat io n

passed by the P LU corporation at its an­

from

n u a l meeting June 6 :

Co l u m b i a

Un iversity's

He

d e g ree

Teacher Co l­

l ege.

"Whereas: t h e q u a l ity o f the U niversity

He

depends u pon the calibre of its students,

will

be

responsi b l e f o r aiding

stu­

dents in career p l a n n i n g , educational ad­

8e it resolved: that the vast maj o rity of the

j ustment,

m e n a n d women of the studen t body be

and

addition,

commended for mainta i n i n g a h igh stand­

he

perso n a l

will

teach

In

counse l i n g . psyc ho logy.

Th e

position is under control of t h e office o f

ard of Ch ristian witness, as we l l as aca­

student affairs.

demic achievement i n ti mes of wo rld and

Doris G . Stucke, cha i rman of the depart­

moral tension,"

ment of n u rs i ng at Gustavus Ado lphus Co l­ lege, SI. Peter, M i n n . , w i l l be d i rector of

New Faculty Pacific

L u t h e ran

U n i v e rs i ty

the school of n u rsing. She succeeds Mrs . has

R. E l i n e Morken who i s reti r i n g .

5

h i red

M iss Stucke received her n u rses train­

adm i n istrators and 24 fac u lty mem bers for

William W . Sandler, Jr.

i n g at Si b l ey Me mo ria l Hospital, Was h ing­

the c o m i n g school year.

of

Th ree

th e

ad m i n istrative

to n ,

positions

M i n n esota,

W i l l ia m W. Sand l e r, J r . , associate dean

office from

of

student

Mansf iel d,

affairs.

Penn.,

Dr. Seiich; Adachi

he

has

completed

Mrs.

d i rector

of

Seattle ,

counse l i ng

was

and

testing .

U n i­

on

the

,

M a d ison, S. D. , and received

lege i n Alamosa, Co lo . He

New

h i red

the

remain

h i s master's deg ree from Adams Slate Col­

D r . S e i i c h i Adach i , acting d irector for in

agreed to

Nelson g raduated from Ge ne ra l Bea d l e State Col l eg e

izatio n s.

proj ct

has

request that s h e

staff as assistant registrar.

serve as advisor to several student o rgan­

Career

Espeseth

versity's

d isci p l i n ary co u nse l i n g. In add it io n , he wi ll

su p po rted

candidate

time to her fam i l y .

course

trat io n of residence h a l l s , and w i l l ha nd l e

Ant i-Poverty

a

replacing Mrs. Rolf Espeseth who asked to

H e w i l l be respons ib l e for th e a d m i n is-

federal

presently

be rel ieved so that she cou l d devote more

work for a doctor o f edu cation degree.

the

Is

School in Reedsport, Ore., w i l l be registrar,

College . He received h i s master of educa­ where

and

Charles Nel son , princ ipal of U n ion Hig h

He

State

lion deg ree from Pennsylvan i a State U n i­ versity

bache lo r of

lumbia Un iversity, New York City.

Fla., w a s h i red f o r the d e a n of m e n posi­ the

a

for a doctor of educatio n deg ree from Co­

of men at the U n iversity of M i a m i , M i a m i , In

obtained

of education degree from the U n iversity of

dean o f men , i s n ewly-created.

tion

and

C.,

Washingto n , D. C . She earned her master

motions, a n d resignations. The other post,

graduated

D.

science deg ree from American Un iversity,

were l ett vacant fo l low ing ret i re m e n ts, pro­

will

be

the

U niversity's c h i e f

aca­

dem i c-records officer, an d w i l l b e respon­

as

sible for handl i n g student regis tration .

The

posi t ion was left vacant by the resig nation

Mark

o f Dr. Sven Winther.

has

E.

been

Andersen,

a s p ri n g

a p p o i nted

as

an

g raduate,

admissions

cou nse lor. He was a star basketball player

Dr. Ada c h i is a graduate of Jamestown,

16


J o Ann Jensen: associate professor of b iology; B.A ., PLU; M.A., Un iversity of Southern Californ ia, and Ph.D., Iowa State University; presently assistant professor In biological sciences at Cal ifornia State Poly­ technic College, Pomona, Calif.; Richard Jobst: Instructor in sociology ; B.A., San Francisco State College; pres­ ently wo rking on M.A. at the University of California, D av is; Keith W. McMaster: assistant professor of bus iness adm i nistration ; B.A., University

for the University, and earned four letters in the sport. He will fill a position in the office of university relations left vacant when Ron­ ald Collom is promoted to assistant di­ rector of adm ission this fall. Andersen wlll represent P L U in contacts with high school counselors, teachers and principals, and counsel prospective stu­ dents. New faculty members include : Stuart Bancroft: instructor In the School of Business Admin istration ; B.A. and M.A., Arizona State University ; presently in struc­ tor at Adrian College, Adrian, Mich; Marta Berg: assistant professor I n health and physical education : B.A. from PLU, and is work i n g towards M.A. In guidance at PLU; presently is a physical education teacher at Mou n t Ta homa High School; Ronald Genda: assistant professor of economics; B.S., Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, and presently a graduate student finishing M.A. at Purdue Un ivers ity ; John Herzog : associate professor in mathematics; BA , Concordia (M inn.) Col­ lege, MA and Ph.D., U niversity of Ne­ braska; presently assistant professor of mathematics, Idaho State Un iversity ; Richard Hlldahl: Instructor in school of Business Administrat ion; B.A., PL U; M.A., University of Oregon : presently i n st ructor in accounting and da ta processing at Lane County Community College, Eugene, Ore. ; Gary Holma n : assistant professor in eco­ nomics; B A , St. Martin's College, Olympia, Wash. ; MA, Un iversity of Washington : ex­ pects to complete Ph.D. this fall at the U of W ;

of Wash ington ; M.A., University of Oregon, and is at di ssertation stage for D.B.A. at U . of 0., where he teaches in the School of Business Adm inistration ; Eugene Maier: visiting professor (half­ time) in mathemati cs; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon ; presently associate professor in mathematics at the U of a ; taught a t PLU 1 955-61 ; Katherine M. Monroe: assistant professor in foreign languages (French) ; B.A., Uni­ versity of Londo n, En gland, and M.A. in English and one in French from M iddlebury College, Middlebury, VI. ; presently French and English teacher at Annie Wright Sem­ inary, Tacoma; Burton L. Nesset: associ ate professor in c hemistry ; B.A., SI. O laf College, (Minn . ) . and M.A. and Ph.D., Purdue University; presently a research biochem ist for Parke, Davis and Co., Ann Arbor, M ich. ; Sara Ann Officer: in structor in health and physical education ; B.S., O regon State University. M.S ., Indi an a U n iversity, and Peace Corps member; presently instructor of health and physical education at West­ ern New Mexico Unive rsity, Sliver City, New Mexico;

William Hutcheon: assistant professor i n School of Business Adm inistration ; B.S., University of Rhode Island, and M .A. from the University of Washington; he is at the thesis stage on h is D.B.A. and is an In­ structor at the U 01 W ;

Linda

N. Olson: assista nt professor of

psychiatric and mental health, School of Nursing; R.N., B.S.N., and M . N., Univer­ sity of Washington; presently educational coordinator, psychiatric nursing al Western

17

Dor;s G . Stucke

Charles Nelson

Mark E. Andersen


State Hos pital fo r t h e U of W, Fort S t e i l a ­ coo m , Was h . ;

Com mencement Weekend

J o h n E . Peterse n : assistant p rofesso r i n

M ay 27 - 28 , 1 9 67

re l i g i o n ; B A , S t . Olaf C o l l eg e ; B . D . , L u t h e r S e m i n ary, S I . P a u l , M i n n . , M .A . , N ew Yo r k U n ive rsity ;

p re s e n t l y

wo r k i n g

on

d i s s e r­

in

m a t h e­

Degrees

G a ry mat i c s ;

D.

Peterso n :

B.S.,

prese n t l y

Iowa

i n st r u c to r State

g ra d u at e

U n iversity,

student

Pictorial

l a n g t.J g e s College;

ington,

w h e re

(German) ; M.A., he

B.A.,

San

U n iversity

is

a

of

Sole:

assistant

the

Class

Saverud

2

of

a

b a c helor's she

leg e ; a n d

turned

to

She

shown

prese n t l y w o r k i n g towards d o c ­

torate at t h e U n iv e r s i ty o f D e n v e r ; sor and

c H a i r m an

associate

of the

art

Ph.D.,

C o l l ege ;

Columbia

p h ys i c i st

Mesa, C a l i f . ;

for

U n ivers i ty ;

C o l l in s

Radio,

pres­

been

Paul W . po l'i t i c a l

instructor

in

N o r­

1 965.

B.A.,

M.A.

collegiate here

Daniels. After their

school

studies

age,

two

receiving

Ann

years

re­ ago.

congratulations

Mortvedt

at

Hardtke,

left,

and

the

Joyce

daughters

of Mrs.

ness,

Both will b e teaching in

'34.

Elm er (Ella

Alton Johnson

ington,

D.

Oliver.

Here

C.

on

for

the

he

m eets

are

Dr.

5

and

reached

Pres­

Fosness,

Johnson) Fos­ t h e fall­

flew out from Wash-

graduation

Wayne

of

President Saverud,

his

s on

Mortvedt.

class presi­

dent, and Oliver.

U l b r i c h t : assistant professo r of

science ;

Walters

Among t h e seniors were sisters, Joan

Looking

B . A . , U n iversity of O s l o ; M . A . , U n iv e r s i t y o f h as

is

4

Costa

w e g i a n at U W . s i n c e

Clarence

Joan at Federal Way and Joyce at Gig Harbor.

A u d e n T. Tov e n : i n st r u c t o r in N o rweg i an ; Wash i n g to n ;

children

3

Kwong-Tin Tang : assista n t professo r o f i n g to n ;

was married to Allan

Fosness

p h y s i c s ; B . S . a n d M . A . , U n iversity of Wash ­ enlly

four

ident's Reception with h e r husband looking on.

d e p a rt m e n t ;

B . A . a n d M . F . A . , U n iversity o f W as h i n g to n ; Pacific

its

they include

This year s h e got her

from President Robert

profes­

p re s e n t l y c h a i rm a n of t h e a rt d e pa r t m e n t , Seattle

(senior),

freshman.

three

Schwidder:

during

degree. After h e r sophomore year

E n g l is h ; B A , Bethany C o l l e g e , L i n d s b o r g ,

C.

1967

Seventeen years ago Ann Knorr en-

tered as

K a n sas ; M . A . , K a n s a s State Teac h e rs C o l ­

E rn s t

of

Ericksen (freshman).

fac u lty

profe s s o r

festivities

(soph omore), Paul Hartman (junior) and Robert

man a n d h isto ry ; L.

of

Wayne

Jose

m e m b e r w h i l e w o r k i n g on h is P h . D . i n G e r­ Jimmie

weekend

years at PLU. From left to righ t ,

Wash­

pa rt-ti m e

of the

These four graduates served as pres­ idents

D i ete r S ev i n : assistant professor of for­ eign

highlights

on

M . S . a t W e s t e r n Was h i n g t o n State Co l l e g e ;

State

awarded to 325 persons at t h e

follow:

and

wo r k i n g

were

commencement exercises h e l d Sunday, M a y 2 8 .

tion fo r P h . D . at NYU ;

service

Ph.D.,

Paul S .

professor

of

W o o dring, distinguished the

college

at

Western

Washington State College and education editor

U n i v e rs ity o f Wash i ngton ; presenlly ad m i n­

of the Saturday Review, gives t h e commence­

ist rato r with t h e Office o,f t h e S p o k e s m a n

ment address.

of

E U 'RA TO M , Eleanor

B ru s s e l s ,

White:

Belgiu m ;

i n s t ru ctor,

S c h oo l

6

of

Michael Ann Cassidy, senior nursing

graduate, takes the pulse of her father, David Cassidy of Vancouver, Wash., after t h e pinning

N u rs i n g : B . S . N . , U n iversity o f O re g o n , a n d M . S . N . , U n ive rsity of C a l ifo r n i a , S a n Fran­

ceremony

cisco;

Cassidy.

18

for

nurses.

In

the

center

is

Mrs.


4

2

5

3

6

19


Prior to the establishment of the S t u ­ dent Congregation i n the fall of 1 955, P rof. Roe c on d u c ted 13 col lege confirmation classes sta rti ng i n 1 948. A total of 1 3 7 students were confirmed, and 4 9 o f these baptized. The classes met in the Roe home and were con fi rmed and baptized i n T r i n­ ity Luthera n C h u r c h , P a r k la n d .

R oe Reti res Rev. Ke lmer N . Roe, associate professor of religion and G ree k , retired from t he fac u l ty at the end of t h e school year. P rof. Roe, who came to PLU in 1 947, was c i ted by P resident Robert Mortvedt at commencement exercises May 28 fo r his years of service. B o rn In 1 900 , P rof. Roe is a gradu ate of Luther Col lege, Luther Se m i n ary , a n d he has a master of theology degree from P rinc eton . He taught at Luther Col lege fo r t h ree years, and t h e n served parishes i n G i g Harbor, Was h . a n d Sacramento, Cal if. for 15 years. The PLU confirmation class of the fall of

D u r i n g h is teaching career a t P L U , 445 students s u c cessfu l ly co m pl eted the first semester of Greek. Fourteen of t h e m were wom en . P rof. Roe a n d h i s wife have two c h i l­ dre n : Dr. David Roe, chemistry p rofessor at Massach usetts Institute of Technology; a n d Naom i ( M rs. Donald Nothstein ) , Se­ attle. Both are P LU gradu ates.

1949

is pictured in the Roe home. From left to right, they

include:

first

row,

seated,

Donald

Wil­

liams, Ed Dorothy; second row. seated.

Ellen

Davis.

Anita

Frederick

Rapp.

Arnold

Kiesbu.

Hellbaum, Rev. Roe, Susan Carpy, Mary Arnold,

1

Richard Weatherman; third row, standing, Ivan Shaffer,

Richard

Berg,

Henry

Hazel,

.

. . New York Sextet members greet friends

and relatives .

Gene

2

Lundgaard.

. . . "Bloody Mary", Paula Grams, in "South

Pacific". 3

. . . Concert Band at Cam rose (Alta.) College.

4

.

5

.

.

.

.

May Folk Festival.

. Champion senior debaters, Lynn Still

and Lavonne Holden, feted. 6

.

.

. Mortvedt Library Dedication. Angela Nicholson, May Folk Festival

7

Queen.

8 .

.

. Dr. Jens Knudsen, center, h o nored

Tea'cher of

the

9 . . Sue Richards as "South Pacific". 10 .

.

"Some

"South Pacific".

20

as

Year. Nellie Forbush in

Enchanted

Evening" from


5

Spring Activities 1

6

2

7

3

8-9

4 10


Tennis A young tennis team that captured the Northwest Conference title and n early won the District I-NAIA crown paced spring sport activities. The netmen were led by sophomore Keith Johnson of Ellens b u rg, who suffered only two defeats during the season. He claimed the singles championship in the conference meet, but lost to the Evergreen Conferen ce champion in the District event. However, J ohnson and his teammate, Mi­ chael Benson of Spokane, beat the Ever­ green champions in the doubles' compe­ tition. Tennis coach R i chard Alseth lettered six players, all of them undercl'assmen.

Golf The Lutes ' golf team started the season as a strong contender for the Northwest Conference title spot. However, it ended the year with a fourth place rating in the conference, and fifth in the d i strict. Jay Robinson, a sophomore from Port­ land, received the Denn i s Austreng Me­ morial Trophy as the outstanding golfer.

22


He a l s o was n amed to the c o n ference a l l ­ sta r tea m . Golf seven

m e ntor p l ayers ,

Gene all

L u n dg a a rd

of w h o m

will

Baseba l l

lette red be b a c k

The PLU

next year.

bas e b a l l team, u n d e r t h e g u id­

a n c e o f Coach J os e p h B roe ker, e n d ed t h e season w ith a 7-1 6 reco r d , leav i n g t h e m i n s i xth

Mark the

S a l z man 's

season

co n feren c e

in

track

sixth

mark

of

team

p l ace , a

p l ace

i n t h e seven-m e m b e r

league.

B ro e ke r awarded l etters to 13 u n d e rc l ass­

Track c l osed repeat i n g

year

ago.

me n a n d 3 sen i o rs .

out

AI H e d m an of Eve rs o n , Was h . , w h o w a s a

its

to p

The

perfo r m e r

on

the

Lutes'

b a sket b a l l

t rac ksters won o n e meet a n d l o s t seve n .

tea m , was

named t o t h e N o rthwest C o n­

A l l 1 3 l eltermen w i l l retu rn n ext seaso n .

fe re nce A l l-Star t e a m as a p i t c h e r.

1 9 6 7 FOOTBALL S C H E D U LE Sept. 1 6- C a/ifornia Lutheran College 1 :30 p . m . in Tacoma Sept. 23-£astern Washington State College 1 :3 0 p . m . in T a c o m a Oct.

7-Willamette University 1 :30 p . m . in Tacoma

Oct.

1 4 - University of Puget Sound

Oct.

2 1 -Pacific University

Oct.

2B-Linfield College

1 . 30 p.m. a t UPS 8:00 p . m . in Forest G r o v e , Ore. 8:00 p . m . in McMinnville, Ore. Nov

4-College o f Idaho 1 :30 p.m. in Ta c o m a

PLU Homecoming Nov.

1 1 - Whitman College

Nov.

1 8-Lewis

1 :30 p.m. in Walla Walla, Wash.

&

Clark College

1 :30 p . m . in Tacoma

23


Lois R i m e r , in strlJ cto r in n u rs i n g , was p rom oted recently to the ran k of Major in the U . S . Anmy Reserve. She is attached to the 50th G e n e ral Hospital, a USAR u n it i n Seattle.

nine etp

jlottbook

M i c h ae l Dederer, P L U regent from Se­ attle, was installed as Governor-Elect of D istrict 502 of Rotary I n t e r n a!io fl a l at the d i strict's re cent 53rd a n n u a l c o n fe r e n ce in Seattl e . C layton B . Peters o n , v i c e pres ident for development, and his w i fe s pent t h ree weeks of May trave l i n g in E u ro p e . Peter­ son was a d e legate to the inte rnational convention of Rotary I n ternatio n a l held May 22-26 i n N i ce, France. Den n is L . Cox, art student, received a p u rchase award fo r his c o n c rete s c u l pture, " R i s i n g Bear Study," i n the 9th A n fl u a l N at i o n a l L u theran Student A r t Award P ro­ gram sponsored by Lutheran B rothe rhood. Prof. G un n ar J . M a l m i n , member of the fa c u lty si n ce 1 937, is ta k i n g a year's l eave of absence to teach m u s i c a n d d i rect t h e c h o i r at C a m rose C o l l e g e , Al berta. M rs. Rhoda Y o u n g , associate p rofessor of physical education, w i l l be on leave for health reasons next school year. She also m issed the s p r i n g semester because of i l l n ess. D r. Tho mas H. Langev i n , academic v i ce pres i d e n t , has been e lected to the Board of Control of Con cordia C o l l ege, P o rt l a n d , O re. C o n c o rd ia is p a r t of a system of t h e Luthe ran C h u rch�Mis souri Synod in w h i c h

24


t h e re is a l so a central Board for H i g h e r E ducation. P ri o r t o c o m i n g to PLU, D r. Langev i n served this central board as a d i rector of a system-wide plann i n g project involving all of the col leges. Since 1 965 he has been on an advisory cou n c i l to the central boa rd.

G e r m a n , Japan ese, S p a n i s h , A rabic, Ita l i a n , Ch inese a n d Russian . D r. Stewart D. Govi g , associate profes­ sor of re li gion, has been g r anted a fu l l travel and study scholars h i p i n New York U n iversity's B i ble Professional Workshop. He was sl ated to beg in h i s study in Israe l J u l y 4 and con t i n u e through Aug. 1 1 , if c o n d i t ions in the Middle East perm it.

Pres ident Robert Mo rtvedt gave the com­ me ncement address at Conco rd ia Col lege, Por tland, in J u n e.

Stanley Petru l i s , assistant p rofessor of m usic, will be on leave t h is s u mm er and next sc hool year to work on his doctorate at I n d i a n a Un iversity.

Two facu lty members have been on leave since Janu ary for special study in E u rope. D r. George Arbau g h , chairman of the phi­ losophy department, is I n Den mark doing research on the works of Kierkegaard. D r. Donald Farmer, pol itical science depart­ ment chairman, is in Ge rmany studying state governments. Both men w i l l return i n the fal l .

Faculty members doing g ra d u ate study this s u m m e r inc lude Mau rice H . Skones ( m u s i c ) , Un iversity of A rizo n a ; D r. Donald Pattie (biolo gy), Un iversity of Col orado; Dean R i c h ard Moe (Co l l ege of P rofess ional Stu dies) , New York U niversity; Judd Doughty (spee c h ) . Was h i ngton State U . ; Vernon Stintzi (busi ness a d m a i n istration) , U. of Was h i n g to n ; D r. Harry Adams (phys­ i cs), Michigan State U . ; Joseph B roeke r ( p hysical education ) , Wash in gton State U .

D r. Dwight J . Zu lauf, professor o f busi­ ness a d m i n i strat ion, has been g ranted a year's leave of absence to teach at the Un ivers ity of Min nesota. Three facu lty members have been se­ lected fo r a Deve lopment I nstitute in Edu­ catio n a l M e d i a at San Jose State Co l l ege. The t h ree, Dr. Carrol DeBower, D r. Ly n n S t e i n and J a m e s Davis, w i l l work a s a team d u ring the A u g . 7-25 institute. The 30 members of the instit ute w i l l receive stipends for themsel ves an d their depend­ ents w h i l e at San Jose.

D r. C u rtis H u ber, associate professor o f p h i losophy, is tea c h i n g t h i s s u m m e r at Concordia Semin ary, SI. Louis. D r. Jens Kn ud sen, professor of b iology, is doing mari ne b iology study i n t h e Mar­ s h a l l Islands of the Pacific Ocean under a Hancock Foundation g rant from the U n i ­ versity of Southern Cal ifo rn ia.

E ig h t B ibles in d i fferent lang uages were p resented to the Mo rtvedt L i brary by F red­ ric Bis nett, PLU French i n structor, and h is parents, Rev. and Mrs. R usse l l G. B is­ nett of Mont erery, Calif. Lan g u ages repre­ sented in the col lection are Fren c h ,

Over 2,000 persons will be on campus t h is summer to attend the 14 conventions and conferences which have been sch ed­ u led.

25


�flt(tion� B

U

L

L

E

T

I

N

44 TA C O M A , WA S H I N GTON

98447

Second C l ass Postage Paid at Tacoma, Was h i ngton

Pictured a t their February

01

meeting on campus are mem bers

01

Regents

Reading

clock wise,

the Board

starting

at

lower fight. they In clude: Fred S.

Henricksen,

University al/orney: Elmer White,

Sea/lle con­

tractor: the Rev Ore.: the Rev

Dr

Theo.

Brueckner,

S. C

Beaverton,

Sie/lles, ALC dlstflct

president; Earl E. Eckstrom (chairman). Seattle executive: A.

business

president - bUSiness

Dean

and

Buchanan.

/lnance.

Dr

vice

Robert

Rev . Lowell E

Knutson, Everett ' Mrs

Moil/en. Portland houseWife; Dr Spokane phYSICian, Dr phYSICian,

the

Rev

Paul

E.

Jerrold

Eflc Paulson

Bondo, Tacoma

David Getzendaner

Ever­

ell, the Rev. Ivar Pihi Corva/ls , Ore : Dr Carl Bennett, KenneWick research SCientist the Rev George Grewenow. Portlend. Harold E

Nelson,

retired Tacoma bUSiness executive; Donald E. Cornall chael

Port Angeles business eltecutlve; MI­ Dederer.

Seallle

business

exec III vo .

coma banker; Halvor Halvorson. Spokane con­

the Rev William Foege. Walla Walla. Herman E Anderson. Tacoma business axecutlve the

tractor:

Rev

Mort�·edt.

PLU

the

president.

Rev.

M.

E.

Howard Nesse.

Scoll.

Tacoma;

Ta­ the

Lloyd P

Roholt.

Milwaukie

Ore

J

Reflections 1967 july  
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