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INjured and GUT: An exclusive pg. !i

Lute 12's show pride from around the world pg. 6-7

Swimming success on Senior Day pg. 11

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

His Majesty King Harald V set to speak at Commencement News Editor This May, His Majesty King Harald V of Norway is scheduled to visit Pacific Lutheran . University to celebrate the school's 125th anniversary and speak at the university's Commencement j:eremony. PLU was founded by Norwegian immigrants iri · 1890: HM King :Harald . has close ties to the school. Before the ceremony, HM King Harald will meet with Norwegian students at a gala luncheon to raise funds for an endoWm.ent supporting PLU and exchange programs with Norway: _ While he is here, HM King Harald will

receive an honorary degree from PLU. HM King Harald will receive a Doctor of Laws jure dignitatis because of his long record of distinguished service to his country and the world, according to the PLU Board of Regents. "Lutes all around the globe feel honored to have King Harald Vas our most distinguished guest and Commencement speaker to mark our Quasquicentennial year," said PLU ·President Thomas W. Krise. "His Majesty's presence :will underscore our deep personal and institutional ties to Norway-ties that began in 1890 and continue robustly today." More about His Majesty's visit can be found at http://www.plu.edu/marcom/ news/2015/02/10/thekingatplu/

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ZIMBIO.COM

LEFT: His Majesty King Harald V of Norway and Queen Margrathe II of Denmark. RIGHT: His Majesty Kind Harald Vis the leader of Norway, a constitutional monarchy. He is traditionally head of the state, but his duties are mainly representative and ceremonial. The legislativ., and executive powers lie with the country's elected bodies. The Norwegian monarchy dates back more than a thousand years and Norway has had more than 60 named sovereigns. HM King Hara! d V was crowned in 1957.

ehane

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On her film, filmmaking and her vocation Before studying and graduating Magna Cum Laude at Harvard, Jehane Noujaim was awarded the Gardiner Fellowship for "Mokattam," an Arabic . film she directed about a garbage~ collecting village near Cairo, Egypt. After graduafui.g, Noujaim joined MT\7 News as a segment producer for the documentary series "Unfiltered." After leaving MTV, Noujaim produced and directed a feature documentary "StartUp.com," which won countless

awards. Noujaim has since directed and created many documentaries that won many awards. Recently, Noujaim has worked on "The Square," which follows the uprising in Tahrir Square in Cairo which inspired the country and the world. "The Square" was nominated for an Academy Award and won the Directors Guild Award. Noujaim is coming to Pacific Lutheran University to talk with students about her vocation.

"I think it is my role to reflect back the world that we are living in that I see around me and to communicate the sparks of hope and the miracle I see in human nature." Jehane Noujaim Academy Award nominated filmmaker

EXCLUSIVE: Jehane Noujaim continues on pg. 4

"I wanted to wait until I'd been in his job a while. I didn': want the story of SHP .RP to be about what J'm aboutit' s about the victims." Lt. Col. Celia FlorCruz on advocacy, "From victim to survivor'' pg.2

"It's not to.o often we get the chanC!• to play a team with th.it kind of calibur." Jennifer Chil jress on Women's Baske :ball playing George Fox, "Losing streak c :intinues for women's basketball" pg. ii

"The willingness to be vulnerable is 'omething every relatioru hip needs to survive. Keeping walls up between partners is jm.t another way of saying 'I don't trust you."' Samantha lJnd on relationship lessnns, ''Three lessons from '51l Shades'" pg.8


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Military woman shares her story with PLU a medical unit. She now serves as the Soldier Readiness Officer of the U.S. Army's largest division - the 7th Infantry Division at Joint Base Lieutenant Colonel Celia Lewis-McChord. FlorCruz also runs the Sexual FlorCruz is coming to Pacific Lutheran University to share her Harassment/Assault Prevention journey from sexual assault (SHARP) program at JBLM. She . victim to military leader. has been working with victims FlorCruz' s lecture will be 路 of sexual assault since 1977. the opening lecture for the SHARP is the first Army-required . Spring Spotlight Series comprehensive program that centers titled " ... and Justice on awareness and prevention, for All?" training and education, victim FlorCruz was advocacy, reporting response, sexually assaulted and accountability as it aims to at age 17, but she "eliminate sexual assault by creating did not allow a climate that respects the dignity of her story to stop every member of the Army family." there. Since joining JBLM, FlorCruz She went on to has become the top sexual assault graduate from prevention and response officer in West Point, fly the 7th Infantry, which includes the helicopters as a base's main combat brigades. Medevac pilot in Her position as a SHARP leader Operation Desert has thrown FlorCruz into the Storm and command limelight because of rising reports

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Trees on upper campus have taken leaf, making upper campus a little more bare. Trees across campus have been cut down because of disease and weather .. Prior to Christmas, the tree taken down near Red Square was beginning to lift out of the ground. Facilities management took the tree dowri because there was fear of it falling on a student. Another tree by the library fell down during January. The tree was diagnosed with a fungus by an expert brought in by Facilities management. Several other trees surrounding Red Square have been removed in the past weeks because of similar fungal conks found at the base or the trees. The same trees barely endured a severe ice storm that occurred in 2012. All trees that have been removed so far were both Gleditsia Triacanthos, commonly referred to as Honey Locust, a deciduous tree native to the Pacific Northwest

of sexual assault in the military and lawmaker attempts to find solutions. With her background and military experience, FlorCruz has made it her goal to lower sexual assault rates in the military and on college campuses. Sexual assault is most prevalent 1n the military and on college campuses. For FlorCruz ,these places are where she wants to start making a difference. FlorCruz is the second event opening the Spring Spotlight Series. The series is a combination of justice-related events open to the community. The topics include sexual assault, sex trafficking, environmental justice and the removal of indigenous children and the youngest voices of the Holocaust. FlorCruz will visit PLU Feb. 17 to share her story. Her lecture will be in the Karen Hillie Phillips Center at 6p.m.

Quick Facts:

of service women are raped

of assaults About go undocumented. Statistics found on the U.S. Anny's sexual assault repo :t of2012

region. Many students have been concerned with the sudden uproot of trees. "Removing the trees will make the campus look ugly and the beauty of the campus is one of the main reasons I came here," first-year Tori Henning said. "I hope more trees are planted." Fortunately, "there is a plan to grind the stumps and to replant the area with different species," grounds maintenance specialist, Kenneth Cote said. To learn more on the continuing 路 matter, contact Facilities management at their website: http://www.plu.edu/facilities-management/

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A look at changes around campus and 2015 LollaPLUza Samantha Lund News Editor Spring semester brings with it weekly Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University meetings to discuss changes around campus and new policies for students. Recently,. ASPLU has been making decisions that will affect students this year and next. The first big change ASPLU is looking to make is taking Impact out of ASPLU and making it a part of Student Media. As of the Feb. 10 ASPLU Senate -meeting, the process has begun to separate ASPLU and Impact. If all goes as planned, Impact will join Student Media Board next year, said senior ASPLU Vice President Dan Stell. Impact has been a part of 1-SPLU for more than 13 years. Now, Impact Director Haley Ehlers and Stell agree that this move will be beneficial for Impact and help the organization to grow. Student Media Board is an organization that is attempting to make Student Media work together across campus and provide multimedia coverage and opportunities to all students. If this bill passes and Impact becomes a part of Student Media, the

budget will not change for them but will become an average of thei, last five year's budgets. However, the ultimate budgeting decision will be left up to the Senate. Along with moving Impact out of

ASPLU, Stell says there is talk of creating a Student Programs Board. A Student Programs Board has been in the works for three years now, but Stell thinks it is on its way to success. 路

As Pacific Lutheran Uni'rersit:}r gets closer to May, rumors have been going around about the who, what, where, why and when LollaPLUza will taki~ place. Senior Andrew Larsen, Programs Director for ASPLU~ tcuched base on a few new details o 1 the event. LollaPLUza, the annual I'LU outdoor concert event, will change locations and be on the golf cour;e this year. There were fears and mumblings that ASPLU was goir.g to charge for LollaPLUza becrnse it was on the golf course but those rumors are false. Loll;J.PLUza will continue to be a free concert open to all students. Asofrightnow,ASPLU is still finalizing cor .tracts with artists to headline the concert. . There have been an ov~rwhelming number of on-campus groups who have reached out to P.SPLU to be involved as well, Larsen said. The concert cannot meet all :he requestS from bands, but Larser thinks the concert will provide m exciting opportunity to showcase some local PLUtalent. 路 ASPLU meets Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. The locations change frequently and can be found online.


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Camp s Safet

Taken from weekly Cam

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Medical Aid in AUG

Campus Safet"y -(CSAF) was notified that a guest of a conference had fainted and was on the ground of the Anderson University Center. The guest regained consciousness and was escorted home by a friend. No further action from CSAF was taken.

Medical Aid in Foss

Campus Safety (CSAF) respondEd to a call about a student losing consciousness. Central Pierce Coun :y Fire and Rescue responded to the cell and transportation to the hospital was not necessary. The student decided :o go home instead.

Secunty Violation in llnqlestad

Campus Safety (CSAF) found students on the 8th ai.<d 9th floors of Tinglestad during a routine walk through. The 8th and 9th floors are _ off-limits to students, but the students claimed not to notice the si~s posced about the :;:estrictions. Botn students cooperated and left.


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Guest ACT 1 Theatr.e Productions is currently putting on performances of "The Last Five Years." VVhat' s unique about this production is not just the giddy music that envelopes this sorrowful story, but that Pacific Lutheran University students and alumni are working together on this show. "PLU Students are the most professional, even under pressure ... Full of grace" said Petra Karr, a PLU alumna. For most of her shows at ACT 1, a black .box theater company in Sumner, Wash., she ii-itentionally reaches out to Lutes in the School of Arts and Communication. "I like being able to draw [talent] from where I trained," Karr said. "I hope they will continue to be part of our productions even after they graduate." Karr, who now has a daughter studying at PLU, has been acting and directing in theatrical productions since she was 16. She attributes her success in directing after completing her education to the outstanding faculty she studied under and the many performance opportunities at PLU. Amy Boers is in charge of the music for this show. Boers is a familiar coach and accompanist to both vocalists and instrumentalists in the PL U music · department. She has been working with student performers at PLU for about five years. Boers helped to recruit current Lutes for the show to provide the musical accompaniment: sophomore Oay Snell, guitar; first-year North Foulon, violin and junior Piper Foulon, cello. Senior Alex Gallo is the musical' s male lead. Gallo, who sings in. Choir of the West, was invited to audition by Boers because of his previous work with her in the PLU music program.

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Jehane Noujaim is visiting Pacific Lutheran University Thursday, Feb. 19, to screen her· Academy Awardnominated film, "The Square," at 5 p.m. in the Karen Hille Phillips Center. She will also deliver the second Ambassador Chris Stevens Memorial Lecture directly after at 7:30 p.m. Noujaim exclusively spoke with The Mooring Mast to talk about her film, filmmaking <ui.d her vocation as a filmmaker. You can read even more online at http://mastmedia.plu.edu.

PHOTO BY EDDIE MCCOVEN.

Senior Alex Gallo performs as Jamie in rehearsal for ACT 1 Theatre Production 'The Last Five Years:? in Sumner, Wash., on Feb. 5.

. When asked how his education atPLUhad helped to eqillp him for this role, Gallo said, "The diversity in coursework, specifically the general education core, helped me to understand the character of Jamie, and to better portray him." "The Last Five Years" is a contemporary musical chronicling the failed marriage of Jamie, an aspiring writer who gets a publishing deal, and Cathy, an unsuccessful actress whose failure at marriage is akin to her failure at show business. Final performance dates for "The Last Five Years" are today, tomorrow, and Feb. 15. Tickets can be purchased at http:// actl theaterproductions.com.

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ERIN FLOM Guest Writer In the 1970s, Pacific Lutheran University had a prominent children's theater. Senior Mitchell Helton is · hoping to bring it back this year with a production of "Charlotte's Web," based on the novel by E.B. White. The show premieres 7:30 p.m. tonight As part of his capstone project, Helton was able to combine his two passions, and children's theater literature, into this production. Helton said he chose "Charlotte's Web" because it was his favorite story from when he was a kid. He admires how E.B. White "doesn't censor topics that others think would be too delicate for kids." By having children's theater at PLU, Helton said

PHOTO COURTESY PLU MARKE!lNG AND COMMUNICATIONS

Senior Mitchell Helton, director.

"it's a great way to get the ·community involved." That's exactly what he did. James Sales and Collins elementary schools will see the production. Helton said that the students "will fill the entire house." All 600 seats. back By bringing children's theater, it also "provides an opportunity [for younger students] to

Mast: When students leave after viewing "The Square" and listening to your lecture, what do you want them to do? Jehane Noujaim: If "The Square" could stand for anything, it's this idea that if you bring someone to power Bush, Obama, whoever is next in 2016 - you have to keep challenging them and holding power accountable. The work isn't done once all the votes are in.

PLU strives to help Lutes determine their "vocation" - how would vou define yours, and how did you realize it? I am a storyteller and [ use film to tell those stories. I think it is my role to reflect back the world that we are living in that I see arournl me and to communicate the sparks ·Jf hope and the miracle I see in human nature. · [M]y mom took me to the garbagecollecting village in Eg:rpt when I was about 16. I was dra'NTI i.nto this community and started ta1ing pictures. I took pictures at weddingE and of older family members - memmies of events and people that they wer,~ not able to preserve for themselves. When I was 18, the UN Conference on Population and Development asked me to show some of these photographs in Cairo. I was very excited, it was my first exhibit. After about two days, 1hey were all taken dov,'TI except for three of them.

ii PHOTO COURTESY OF NOUJAIM FILMS

see a live production who wouldn't normally get to," Helton said. Senior Asia WolfeJ who plays the sheep, said she's - excited to have so many kids in the audience and that as an actor, "you feed off the energy of the audience and kids always have more energy." Wolfe also said acting for children's theater "forces you to tap into your inner kid." The play follows the original story very closely Helton mentioned that E.B. White even helped with the script adaptation. The completely studentproduced show ''had minimal time commitment," Helton said. He explained audiences "will have to use creativity to create the world; the kids will make the show whatever they want it to be." After he graduates this May, Helfon hopes to work in children's theater.

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When you get an idea for a film, what is your next step? I am usually struck with an idea for a film when I meet a person or am confronted with a situation that surprises me, inspires me, or makes me question my way of thinking. The next step is research. Not always glamorous, but digging deeper into the story. [My team and I] start reading news articles, figuring out key pfayers, starting conversations with them and with colleagues we may want to work with on a project: We see whi~ characters might be able to carry the story - people that will lead us through the story we want to tell. What is your advice to aspiring filmmakers? Don't ask for permission to pick up a camera. If a story moves you, find the characters that will help guide you through the story and find out if you can spend some time with them. I also advise finding a mentor, a filmmaker that you admire, and try to spend a year working with them, or interning for them - it is the best way to learn.

Some of the people or ~anizing the conference were so upse: and angry with me, for showing the:;e very dirty sides [of] Cairo. I got so depressed; looking at this empty wall <md thinking, "I failed at this." ... [T]hen I started thinking about the intense emotion that had come out of people from just seeing those pictures. Here I was, just a teenage nobody with no voice, but all of a sudden I put up these photos and people were arglling and having conversatiorn: they never would have had - I had begun a debate without opening my mouth. I saw how powerful an ima:~e can be. [Photography and filmmaking] allows you to transport people to places they never would have ordinarily gone. You can give people tht! experience of seeing the human Sfirit thriving in adverse conditions -- which is incredibly inspiring. You can show a film, al.ow a person to step in another's shoes and consider a point of view they had n~ver thought about before. That is a powerful, be<.ntiful thi.'lg. This is why I became a filmmaker. -MAlTHBlf SALZANO

usic of year


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PHOTO COURTESY OF WIND ENSEMBLE

LEFT TO RIGHT: First-year Gabriel Johnson, junior Devin Turner, first-year Ingrid Smith, junior Kristi Eckroth and first-year Lyndi Knox take a selfie in Nashville. ·

of fresh and saltwater exhibits locat·~d in Chattanooga. First-year Jennifer Brown said the trip The Pacific Lutheran University Wind "was .a wonderful opportunity to get to Ensemble enjoyed the opportunity to know the people I will be studying with for · bring their Lute tunes to Tennessee and the the next few years." The group got the opportunity to r·~cord Parkland community through their January Term tour which consisted of concerts m Elvis' former Nashville studio, Studio B, which PJwell highlighting their described as his extensive capability highlight of the trip. and immense "It was a wonderful At Studio B, dedicatipn to their they recorded "Moon craft. opportunity to get to by Night," whid1 can PLU associate be listened to onlne at know the people I will be Edwin professor l)ttp://www.plu.edu/ Powell led the students on their way studying with for the next wind-ensemble/listenwatch/. through Nashville to few years." In honor of their Chattanooga, Tenn. eight day traveb, the Friends and family students came back to Jennifer Brown had the opportunity to PLU and performed a first-year follow their travels on Homecoming Ccncert the updated blog. Feb. 5 in Lagerqust. Day one stated, They p.ayed "Nine hours, two flights, two busses and a set one final time. Pieces that . . french-hom-stashed-m-a-wheelchair-closet their Tennessee made the cut included the world preiniere later, the party has arrived in Tennessee!" On the way to Chattanooga, a stop at the of "For Those Who Wait," a piece composed Jack Daniels Distillery in Lynchburg was by Greg Youtz, associate professor. The Wind Ensemble's next concert is:: p.m. followed by a walk around the Tennessee March 15 in Lagerquist Concert Hall. Aquarium, known for its elaborate mix

BROOKE WOLFE

Staff Writer

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BROOKE THAMES

A&EWriter

Northern Pacific Coffee Company was packed full on the night of Feb. 7. The Pacific Lutheran University community came together at the coffee shop Jo shell out support for The 322 Jazz Collective, a PLU-based band that is bringing jazz back one note at a time. Comprised of five talented musicians, The 322 Jazz Collective formed over January Term with the goal of sharing their love of music and having fun doing it. Members of the group include junior BrandonLee Cierly, saxophone; sophomore Elliot Turner, guitar; firstyear Marc Harper, bass; sophomore Thomas Hom, drums; and senior Tyler Peterson, piano. Playing in PLU' s University Jazz Ensemble caused these instrumentalists to form a common bond over jazz music.

''We found that there were a lot of· similar interests in the types of music we like to play in our free time,"· Peterson said. Through experimental sessions, the friends discovered that they gelled well together as musicians, but Turner said that it was· onememberthatprompted the official branding of the group. "[Harper] was the catalyst for it," Turner said. "[He] got us all together and was like, 'Hey, we should play a few gigs around the area."' The gathering at NPCC was The 322 Jazz Collective's debut performance, and the start of what Turner describes as an experiment in fun and creativity. "We're trying to be a lot more creative and new

More information: http://facebook.com/ the322jazzcollective

in what we're playing as opposed to just pl.tying a lot of old standads," Turner said. "We just want to try and give our own spin on things and play our music." Not only does the band play classic jazz J>ieces and covers of songs, but also a number of original works. Songs composed by members Harper and Peterson were fea ured during the jazz night. When asked why j izz is meaningful to him, H rrper said, "jazz is one of the only ways I am reall3 · able to express a lot of what I'm unable to say using v rords alone." The 322 Jazz Collective' s appearar ce at NPCC is only the fi·st of many prospective s h.ows the group will be putting on for the PLU comm unity and the wider Tacoma/ Seattle area. ''We love to play," Harper said. "So, if you ... want a jazz-flavored ~;roup to play for you, g=t in touch."


6 FEATURE

From Germany to Bolivia, France to Uruguay, Lutes sent the Seahawks love and good wishes as they made their way to the Super Bowl. . Most students at Pacific Lutheran University are native to Washington, meaning the local Seahawks- are important to most Lutes. · · While students took January to fly around the world, try new cuisines and meet new people, most groups took the time to take pictures sporting their 12th Man pride. J-Term study away is made of short-term, faculty-led pro~ams in countries around the world. Each J-Term, students immerse themselves in a new country, culture or discipline. For more information on FTerm study away, go to www.plu.edu/ study away ·

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Next year, Lutes will be able to visit: • Austria, Czech Republic, Germany • Bolivia and Peru • The Caribbean • China • Ecuador • England and Scotland • Germany and The Netherlands • Italy 111 Martinique • Tobago •Uganda • United Arab Emirates ® Uruguay • Hawaii • Holden Village, Wash. • Neah Bay, Wash. • Tacoma, VVash.

FEB. 13, 2015


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THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 13, 2015

Recent Super Bowl ads are super down MICHAEL DIAMBRI Columnist

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@piu.edu

This year's Super Bowl was rather An example of one of the memorable, heartbreaking rather than happy Super Bowl ads. The somber, and it's not just because Tom Budweiser commercial was about a lost puppy and his Clydesdale friends. Brady and the deflators (New England Patriots) defeated the Seattle Seahawks. Aside from that, individuals themes that perpetuate negative ideas Super Bowl XLIX contained should recognize that many of these about American society and could help advertisements with topics such as advertisements made important points the reputations of broadcasters, the NFL domestic abuse and adolescent deaths. about issues in society. and advertisers. Other advertisements had positive The Super Bowl is a great platform Overall, it seems to be that the public messages, but in general they carried a to make these issues known. Perhaps thought that the ads were too sad. serious tone. the best platform many companies or Hopefully in the future, we can return "Really, America?" asked first-year . individuals will have all year. to watching more feel-good ads, which Grace Jones, "Why did the ads have to NBC announced the Monday are less p:mvocative. be so disappointing?" following the big game that it averaged When in doubt, people love puppies, A lot of good discussion was started 114.4 million viewers per minute. That Doritos, chocolate and Beyonce. It's because of these ads, and clearly a good is enough people to fill the seats at beautiful to imagine an advertisement amount of thought was put into making Century Link Field 170.7 times. with all of those things. them. · In conclusion, although this year's Fun, creative and often risky ads While watching the Super Bowl, have always brought in many viewers advertisements were not necessarily people often want to forget about what that would not normally care to watch happy, they did spark a lot of good is wrong with the world and simply the National Football League. Meaning, discussion. have fun with friends and family. some people gather to watch the Super Let's hope that advertisers learned Some of this year's ads could have put Bowl just for the advertisements. from this year's Super Bowl experience a damper on this aspect of the biggest Super Bowl advertisements have and come back to Super Bowl L with a game of the year. always come under serious scrutiny. In full arsenal of good ads. Let's face it, it is not enjoyable to sit the past, there have been ads that literally in a room and watch ads that make you tum women into objects. This year's feel bad about the world you live in. advertisements did a better job avoiding

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett ·NEWS @ NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art land

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POUCIES AND PROCEDURES

News Editor

Women and men both want sex,

it is 2015 after all, I'm allowed to say that now. However, the way we show it and the'way we ask for it is a bit different. In "50 Shades," the woman is just as empowered as the man but she never shows how much the sexual desire is reciprocated, ·it just is. On the other side, he is full of that desire and sho:vs it in the way she wants him to - hence, lesson number one. "50 Shades" can show you how to want a woman and tell her that without being completely creepy.

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Christian the main male cn<:u:acter, is in control. He wants to with a woman, and he makes his boundaries and himself. In the story, he tries to challenge himself and never takes anything he doesn't want. His intentions are clear. That is <:nT,.,.,t·h1r1<> - a man who is forward and does everything because he wants to and works for it.

Valentine's Day is one of the best holidays; everything is pink, red and full of love and hope. This Valentine's Day, every mom in America is happy because "50 Shades of Grey" is coming to theaters and they can leave their husbands with the kids and their "mommy porn. "50 Shades" is not only a mommy's guilty pleasure, but a college girYs .too. After the book first became popular, girls fled to the mall to buy a copy and .rm sure many men went after them to find out what their partners were reading and why they all wanted their men to dress in a new style or talk to them with a different tone. I would know, r Ill guilty of the same thing. This .year, for Feb. 14, I'm taking my tlate to see "50 Shades" and I fully expect the theater to be full of moms waiting to see the main characters take their clothes off. However, I'm also hoping there is a learning experience that will come to my date after 1'1111111 OOUlll'ESY OF CllEAmlE COllllMOllS watching this drool-worthy movie. The two "50 Shades of Grey" stars Dakota-Johnson as Anastasia Steele and Jamie Doman as Christian Grey, shown above on the cov_er of Entertainment Weekly to promote the upcoming film.

be every ret:am:msJtup needs to survive. between Keeping walls partners is another of saying don't trust you." In "50 Shades," both. characters have secrets and are uncomfortable with certain aspects of relationships and their bodies, however, they make those vulnerabilities known ·and they allow their partner to try and move past them with as much comfort as possible. This is not only a lesson for men, but also for women: allow yourself to be truthful and vulnerable to your partner because that is how real love and trust is built. It may be slightly silly to take real relationship advice from a book about sex and steamy elevator kisses, however this book has sold more than one hundred million copies. Oearly, they're doing something right.

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran · University community.

.The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessaily represent those of The Mooring Mast ;taff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than

500 words, typed and emailed to ~1ast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and er:·ors. Include name, phone number and class sta J.ding or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place <n advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semi:ster or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, e nail mast@ plu.edu.

Please recycle


--FEB. 13, 2015

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at is Caree Co

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Much like the gym or the library, Career Connections is an on-campus resource not many students utilize, but should. Unlike the gym or library, however, Career Connections can really help a student with their life after college. I guess gettirtg fit and being well-read will help a student after college, but Career Connections will help students find a job or internship, prep for an interview and even find an alumni in their field of study to shadow or interview. · Career Connections also hosts dLfferent career fairs targeted to different majors. The next career fair, on Feb. 25, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Scandinavian Culture centei:, will be targeted to humanities majors, so there will be employers from the humanities fields eager to discuss their positions to interested students. If a student doesn't don't kn.ow what he or she wants to do in life, Career Connections also has a variety of

Editor-in-Chief

personality tests to help students determine wh:it career path is best for them. This month, Career Connections is also hosfatg weeklong workshops geared toward first-year, sophonore and transfer students to jump-start their careers, but it is open to all students. Next week, Career Connections will discuss grad sc..1tool, how to create a Linkedin profile and ha·re career counselors meet with students. Career Connections is a great place for a stud<nt to get started on their life after college, and the people in the Career Center are happy to help.

The Career Center is located in Ramstad 112, and more information can be found on their website htto://www.olu.edu/career/

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for Spring semester! questions, email mast@plu . edu. To apply for the position please visit Career Connections at https://www. myinterfase . com/plu/Student/

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10 SPORTS

Women's Basketball

en's Basketball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE路

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TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

18

3

11-1

Won 1

George Fox

21

0

12-0

Won21

Whitman

16

5

10-2

Won6

Whitworth

19

2

10-2

Won 1

Lewis & Ciark

12

9

7-5

Won2

Puget Sound

18

3

9-3

Won3

Pacific

11

to

6-6

Lost 1

Whitman

14

7

9-3

Won4

Willamette

8

13

6-6

Lost 1

Pacific

9

12

5-7

Won 1

Puget Sound

10

10

5-7

Lost2

Lewis & Clark

8

14

5-8

Won 1

Pacific Lutheran

7

14

5-7

Won2

Linfield

9

12

3-9

Lost 3

George Fox

5

16

3-9

Lost 3

Pacific Lutheran

4

17

1~11

Lost 7

Linfield

3

18

1-11

Lost2

Willamette

1

12

1-12

Lost 5

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: 6 p.m. @ Willamette

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: 8.p.m. @Willamette

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH MOCZ楼GEMBA

Sophomore Brandon Lester passes the basketball against Pacific Jan. 31.

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FEB. 13, 2015

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PHOTO COURTESY OF AMANDAWILUAMS

Junior Jori Hall looks to pass the basketball against Puget Sound Jan. 27.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUI GUTERREZ

Junior Joseph Bowley races to the wall against Puget Sound Jan. 31.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUI GUTIERREZ

Junior Shanell Sullenberger i:;repares for her race during a meet again:;t Whitman Jan. 23.

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Men's Basketball v. Pacific (W) 52-41 Women's Basketball v. Pacific (L) 56-51

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Men's Basketball v. George Fox (L) 73-72 Women's Basketball v. George Fox (L) 89-36 Men's Swimming v. Seattle U. (L) 120-80 Women's Swimming v. Seattle U. (L) 130-70

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Men's Basketball v. Lewis & Clark (L) 63-56 Women's Basketball v. Lewis & Clark (L) 67-50

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Men's Basketball v. Linfield (W) 61-39 Women's Basketball v. Linfield (L) 68-57

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Men's Basketball v. Willamette (W) 62-55 Women's Basketball v. Willamette (W) 67-63 Men's Basketball v. Whitman (L) 79-43 Women's Basketball v. Whitman (L) 90-56 Men's Swimmingv. Whitman (W) 121-84 Women's Swimming v. Whitman 143-6~

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Men's Basketball v. Whitworth (L) 78-59 Women's Basketball v. Whitworth (L) 65-49 Men's Swimming v. Whitworth (L) 120-85 Women's Swimming v. Whit-worth (W) 118-87

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Men's Basketball v. Puget Sound (L) 65-54 l/\Jomen's Basketball v. Puget Sound (L) 76-6 3

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Men's Basketball v. Pacific (L) 72-67 Women's Basketball v. Pacific (L) 88-52 Men's Swimmingv. Puget Sound 175-8:' -women's Swimmingv. Puget Sound l7t;-86


._... THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 13, 2015 Ill

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Calipari of the Kentucky team and even a third ranked Gonzaga Bulldogs representing the state of Washington.

By Austin Hilliker Sports Editor The bone crunching hits, onehanded catches and questionable celebration dances of football season have sadly come to an end. Watching Kam Chancellor jump-and-clear a herd of offensive lineman, not once, not twice but three times to almost block a field goal was exhilarating, but it's time to move on. It's basketball season. The buzz around the sport of basketball is something Seattle sports fans have missed ever since our beloved Super Sonics were shipped off to Oklahoma. Washington basketball fans have now split into two groups: . bandwagon members of the Portland Trailblazers, or fans of the Washington Huskies or Washington State Cougars. Witp. that said, praise to those who have stuck with college basketball. Those of us who ):lave chosen to stick with watching Division - I college basketball and been greatly rewarded with dramatic buzzer-beaters, acrobatic dunks and an unexplained passion by fans that fill the gym. Not to mention an unbeaten coach

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The Difference Between the Two

Watching professional basketball has always se~med to miss a key element in my mind: consistent fan support. It seems the people that watch professional basketball are more "fair-weather'' fans than anything else, supporting their team when they are doing well and then falling off as the team struggles. Division - I college basketball fans seem to take an enormous amount of pride in sticking with one particUlar school, never following the trend of whose number one in the nation, unless it's their team of course. The National Basketball Association is filled with overpaid dramatic athletes. When you turn on the TV, you get more caught up in the drama of one of the players complaining than actually watching the game itself. The athletes noticeably flop to the ground when someone of the opposing team merely touches them, making for a great acting performance and a not-so-good

streak c

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

PLU Junior Michaela Edgers had a career high 1 O points, going 5-5 from the field, as the Lutes fell to George Fox 85-49, on Feb. 7.

By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Coming back from a four-game losing road trip, the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Basketball Team was seeking a win while at home for only three games .. The team played Lewis and Clark, University of Puget Sound and George Fox over the course of the week, unfortunately continuing their losing streak. Game day took place Feb. 3 at 6 p.m. and 173 people filled Olson Gym to watch the Lutes go head to head with

s By AUSTIN HILLIKER Sports Editor The men and women's swim team at Pacific Lutheran University didn't miss a strqke when they entered the pool against the University of Puget Sound Loggers on Feb. 1, for Senior Day. The women's team capped off another stellar season, as they went on to beat the 'Loggers with a remarkable 176-86 performance, going undefeated in the Northwest Conference. The men's· team brought in an equally impressive win finishing with a score of 175-87, capping off their season at 5-2.

ti

11 SPORTS

atch eollege basketball instea<j

basketball game. The name on the front of the jersey is more important than the name of the back of the jersey for the college basketball players that play at the highest level. It's more about representing their school, rather than playing for themselves. What to Watch for the Rest of Basketball Season

With March Madness less than a month away, it would be unfair for me to not give my thoughts and picks for the rest of the season and even the big dance. Watch out for Gonzaga this year. I know last year they were kicked out in the third round, but with the new addition of forward Kyle Wiltjer, a transfer from the University of Kentucky, the odds are in favor of the Bulldogs to finish within the top five and even gain a number one seed in the tournament My Cinderella team this year has to be none other than the University of Northern Iowa, a team playing a rather weak conference, but has the potential to make a name for

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itself in March. Just like in years past, Duke University probably won't make it to the Elite Eight due to them underestimating a small school during the tournament, thus putting a damper on Coach Krzyzewski' s 1,000th win. Of course, the moment we've all been waiting for is who will win March Madness this year. Simply put, a team from Washington will take home the title.

Whether it's the HJ.skies, Cougars or Bulldogs, a team from the evergreen state will win the national championship and basketball in Washington will be restored. Remember, it's basketball season, and when you go to turn on the TV after a long day of classes, put on college hoo:Js, not the NBA.

COURTESY OF. CREATIVE C )MMONS

Dion Waiters at Syracuse University during the 2011-12 basketball season.

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the UPS Loggers. talking with coaches and finishing their visit by cheering The Loggers cut down the Lutes over the course of the at their possible new home. game, taking the win back home to the Sound at 68-49. The Lutes came out strong, holding a lead against the Following their defeat, the women laced up once again Bruins for the first five minutes of the game, but wi~re just to take on the Lewis and Clark Pioneers, where they met simply outplayed in the end. there demise 43-58. George Fox was able to score 39 times _off of PLU In their third home game stretch, they fell with a turnovers and shot 45 percent from the field. 36-point deficit to the George Fox Bruins, 49-85. "It was a tough team, but we still improved," said coach "It's not too often we get the chance to play a team Childress. with that kind of caliber," Junior Tayler .Flemming, along said head coach Jennifer with first-years Kate Kramer and Childress. Bailey Raines, all scored three Heading into the game, pointers, causing PLU to lmd the George Fox was ranked game in three point percentage at fifth in Division ill of 25 percent. the National Collegiate At the end of two 20-minute Athletic Association halves, the women walked off the and ranked first in the court with another loss, but with Northwest Conference. their heads still held high. T '.ley are Jennifer Childress They were and still are now 1-11inNWC,4-17 oveiall. Head Coach undefeated. Next, the Lutes will go on a two During Saturday's game game road trip. The first stop is at 4 p.m., the fans piled against the Willamette Br~arcats, into the LuteDome enduring the treacherous rain. who are 1-9 in the NWC. Both sides of the gym were filled with cheering fans from The game will be played at Willamette's home court in tip off to the final buzzer. Salem, Ore. When the two played each other earlier in the Energy was high since it was Admissions Game Day, season, the Lutes prevailed in double overtllne, 67-1)3. where high school prospective athletes spent .the day Tip off is scheduled for 6 p.m.

"It's not too often we get the chance to play a team with that kind of caliber."

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Overall, the Lutes won a combined 19 of 28 events, 10 by the men and nine by the women. One of the most notable performances was by junior Shanell Sullenberger as she finished the day with individual wins in the 50 freestyle, 200 breaststroke and participated in a team win with senior Michelle Hogan and juriiors Hanna Armstrong and Melissa Dean as they won first place in the 400 freestyle relay. On the men's side, junior Joseph Bowley held nothing back as he went 4-for-4 on the day, winning the 100 breaststroke, 200 breaststroke, 200 individual medley, and teamed up ·with senior Basil Whaley, first-year

-~-

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Paul Jett and junior Brian l~.uggles to win the 200 medley. On this special Senior Day, six men and six women were honored for their accomplishments· and hard work, but it's not over yet. The ·Northwest Conference championships are just around the corner and Lutes are looking to make a name for themselves yet again. If the women can match last season's performance, they will be back-to-back conference champions, while the men's team focuses on bringing in another top three finish within the last four years. The championships will be held Feb. 13-15 in Corvallis,.Dre.

----PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUI Gl TIERREZ

Senior Jake Dacus participating in the men's 200 yard butterfly final. Dacus -finished second in the race with a time of (2:03.34).


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FEB. 13, 2015 II

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12 SPORTS

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finishing the game in nine innings. It was shortened to seven. Sophomore Kort Skoda Jitched five innings and struck out· seven to earn the win: Skoda only gave up two runs and three hits. Junior Drew Oord provided two runs for the Lutes' offense, hittillg a pair of triples. Senior Collin Nilson doubled twiceand also drove in two runs in :he vvin. PLU finished its four-game stint in the Tucson Invitational Game on Sunday against La Verne .

SAM HORN Guest Writer GAME1

..-~

~

The Pacific Lutheran University baseball team narrowly won its first game of the season 5-4 against La Verne in the Tucson Invitational Games, thanks to senior closer AJ Konopaski. Konopaski, a preseason first-team AllAmerican, recorded his first save of the season by striking out two batters and allowing a pair of hits in the final two innings of Fridays game. . By doing so, Konopaski earned his 21st career save, tying the PLU career saves record. Aaron Roetcisoender, an '05 graduate, was the fellow Lute with 21 career saves. Starting pitcher Chris Bishop, a senior, pitched four shutout innings before allowing four earned runs in the fifth. Fellow senior Jake Otness stepped in for Bishop and allowed two hits before being replaced by junior Cory Nelson. Nelson recorded the win for the Lutes. On the offensive side of the ball for the Lutes, senior Collin Nilson drove in a pair of runs while going 2-for-4 with a single and a double as five different Lutes tallied multiple hits. Junior Brett Johnson also had two hits, including a triple, and drove in a run. The Lutes' batters pummeled La Verne starting pitcher Javi Iniguez as they scored four runs in just the first inning.

GAME4

PHOTO COURTESY OF JESSE MAJOR

Senior pitcher, AJ Konopaski, tied the record for saves in PLU history as the Lute baseball team took on la Verne at the Tuscon Invitational Garnes last Friday, Feb. 6.

mustered a run of their own. Junior Kyler Blades drove in two runs on a two-out single in the second inning. With the score reading 5-3 in the fifth inning, Blades GAMES2&3 brought two more runs home with another single to knot up the score at 5-5. There was no shortage of offense in the The Lutes took an 8-7 lead into the top Pacific Lutheran University baseball team's of the ninth before sophomore Jacob two-game sweep of Texas-Dallas in the Clements cleared the bases with a double, Tucson Invitational Games on Saturday. putting PLU up 11-7. Otness closed out the The Lutes won their first game 11-8, which day on the .mound with 3.2 innings of to was followed by a shortened seven-inning earn the save. 9-3 victory in the evening. In the Lutes' second game of the In 'the first inning, Texas-Dallas had _ doubleheader against Texas-Dallas, jumped out to a 5-0 lead before the Lutes darkness prevented the teams from

The Lutes' following opponent in the Tucson Invitational Games was TexasDallas.

' CHRISTIAN BOND

GAME2

~

I~~

An overtime thriller took place Feb. 6 between the Lutes and the visiting Lewis and Clark Pioneers. The final score was 55GAME1 51. Senior Austen Wilson and first-year Dylan Tied at 54 with 1:54 seconds left in the Foremen were the hero's for the Lutes. game, the Pacific Lutheran University was able to get a crucial offensive Wilson men's basketball team found themselves in a battle with the neighboring University of rebound and put the ball back up f9r two to tie the game with 1:39 left. This would Puget Sound Loggers Feb. 3. ultimately be the last bucket of regulation, After a couple of shots down the stretch · from the visitors, the Lutes fell short in the forcing overtime. In overtime, Foreman was able to conference battle 61-54. drive hard to his right and finish with an The action was tight early on in the first acrobatic layup, pushing the Lutes ahead half. Each team traded buckets back and forth. The game was tied at 11, when UPS by one, and they would never look back. Senior Terrell Williams was able to knock went on a 5 point run. The run continued, down a three to get the momentum going in until the Loggers lead 21-12 with 10 PLU'sfavor.JuniorShaneJacobcontributed minutes left in the half. The Lutes fought their way back into with a couple baskets, stretching the lead to the game in the last portion of the first half seven with three minutes remaining in the then the Lutes· came back with a run of half. Senior Kevin McCrossin was able to hit their own.· two back-to-back three point shots to the The scoring charge was lead by trio senior Austen Wilson, sophomore Brandon delight of the crowd. A layup with four Lester and first-year Dylan Foreman. The seconds left from sophomore Brandon three took turns putting points up to bring Lester sealed the deal on a great half of the Lutes within 4 points with a little over 3 basketball from the Lutes. PLU had a 10 point lead going into halftime. minutes remaining in the period. The Lutes continued to try and stay ahead The Loggers were able to counter and as McCrossin continued to bury three point pull away from the Lutes leading 32-28 buckets. With 13 minutes remaining in after the completion of the first half. Senior Terrell Williams was able to lead regulation, the Pioneers began to mount a the Lute charge with a couple of huge comeback. Wilson was able to gobble up an la)iups. offensive board, and lay the ball in for two, Three point shots from Senior Kevin essentially sending the game to overtime. Mccrossin, Lester and Foreman brought In overtime, junior Serg Ovchinnikov got the game to a tie at 54, with a little less than two minutes left. The visitors came up it done everywhere for Lewis and Oark; big, hitting a three to ·pull away from the three point land, inside the paint or from Lutes, and hitting all four of their final free the charity stripe, it didn't matter, he was throws, clinching the game. The game was scoring. After cutting the lead to one, Foreman a close battle. The teams were virtually even in field was able to send the Lutes to the lead. Free throws from Lester and Wilson goal percentage, rebounding, turnovers, seciled the deal as the Lutes would go on fast break points and bench points. Where to win 55-51. the Loggers gained an edge was points Statistically, each team found advantages off of turnovers. Doubling the amount of in different categories. PLU was out points as their opponent, UPS was able to rebounded by 12 boards. This resulted in capitalize on the mistakes of PLU leading numerous second chance opportunities for to a Lute loss. Lewis and Clark, but luckily they rarely cashed in. Ultimately, the Lutes took better care

Pacific Lutheran University's unblemished season is no more after losing 9-5 to La Verne in the final game of the Tucson Invitational Games. Sophomore Landon Packard's basesloaded double put PLU up 4-1 early, but the lead wouldn't stand for long. La Verne added three runs in the third inning and five more in the fifth and sixih innings to solidify the victory. Junior Garrett Brown pitched four innings as the Lutes starter Jefore being replaced by junior Cory Ndson in the fifth frame. PLU committed ~:ix defensive errors, preventing them from mounting a comeback. The Lutes will travel to Portland on Valentine's Day to participate in the Concordia Tournament. Their first game of the two-day tournament will be agal.i-ist Oregon Tech at 2 p.m.

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Guest Writer

·4111'1'-

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of the basketball. The Pioneers turned the ball over six more times than the Lutes. This resulted in 14 points off of turnovers compared to only six for the visitors.

GAME3 It was raining both outdoors and inside Olson Auditorium as the Pacific Lutheran University men's basketball team stormed past George Fox with a 70-58 win Feb. 7. The Lutes got it done on offense and defense, and earned another conference win Junior Bryce Miller had a stand out performance. The Lute big man gobbled up an abundance of rebounds, and with the help of his teammates, PLU was able to roll to a 70-58 victory over George Fox. Early on, the game was tight. George Fox was able to go on a run and stretch their lead to six with eleven minutes remaining in the half. Both teams scored with ease throughout the first half.. PLU stayed persistent in trying to cut away at the Bruin lead. Momentum started to swing in favor of the Lutes when senior Kevin McCrossin found senior Terrell Williams and l].ooked him up with a beautiful assist, putting the Lutes within striking distance. Williams continued to attack the basket off the dribble, earning layups or trips to the free throw line. The half ended with the Bruins in the lead 33-

29. The Lutes came out of haHime strong, converting on the first four b' ickets of the second half moving them to tl .e lead. George Fox would retaliate, not letting the Lutes pull away too far. George Fox had been running a full cm ut, trapping defense for the entire game. With seven minutes left ·n the game, McCrossin hit back-to-back three's, followed by a layup and a Jumper from Miller and Williams. PLU r.ever looked back from there, finishing fr e game and securing the win. The Lutes did a great job on both ends of the floor on Saturday night The conferences leading scorer, :;enior Jonny Howard of UPS, was shut clown by the Lutes, allowing him to only 8 Joints. Miller was phenomenal on the backboards as well. He tied his career high with 15 rebounds. He also had 13 poirtts. All together, the Lutes out-rE bounded the Bruins by 20, giving them a hu;~e advantage in the game. Today and tomorrow, the team travels to Oregon to take on Willamette and Linfield. The Lutes could potentially tie and pass Willamette in the Northwest Conference standings, baring PLU wins Joth of their games and Willamette loses ·Joth of their contests. Linfield sits at the 1:: ottom of the conference. The push for.the playoffs is on.

PHOTO COURTESY OF. JACQUI GUTIERREZ

First-year Dylan Foreman scored 14 points, while also gaining four assists and two ;teals against the University of Puget Sound Loggers Feb. 3.


Swimming takes Northwest Conference pg. 6-1

Opera star coming to PLU pg. 4

Children's Voices: The holocaust and beyond pg. 3

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

PLU Health Center responds to measles outbreak SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Measles is making its way across the country and the Pacific Lutheran University Health Center is getting ready for the possibility of it coming into Lute territory. The students who stand to lose the most in a measles outbreak are those not vaccinated. Even if they do not catch the virus, unvaccinated students could be asked to leave campus and put their education on pause for undetermined amount of time. PLU is a small community that contains a handful of unvaccinated people, director of the Health Center, Sudana Doll said. Measles is one. of the fastest spreading viruses. Since Jan. l, 141 new cases of measles have_ been reported in the US. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) measles was eradicated in 2000. Since then, there have been a couple small outbreaks each year, most of which aj_d ne>t have more than 100 cases. In 2014, that number skyrocketed and the U.S. experienced 23 measles outbreaks including one large outbreak of 383 cases. 路 This year, the measles are a very real threat to people's health. With two outbreaks already occurring, the U.S. government is urging people to get vaccinated. The majority of people who contract measles are not vaccinated and catch the

Quotable "I've had them since 2003, it's like wearing gloves on my feet" Junior Jimmy llbrink about his Birkenstocks, "Birks on campus" pg. 5

"We still have a shot at the playoffs. A lot would have to go right, but we need a great effort on both nights ..." Steve Dickerson, Head Coach of Men's Basketball on this weekends games. "Men's basketball splits v-day weekend" pg. 11

"It's my job to teach him that when he's in the vest, he's at work." Senior Morgan Woods on training a guide dog, "Please do not pet the guide dogs" pg. 8

"Two weeks ago I passed someone who had their iPad propped on the steering wheel and streaming a video." Senator Ann Rivers on why Senate Bill 5656 is necessary, "Put your phone down and drive" pg. 2

Before . 2001, the measles had been completely wiped out of the U.S. virus easily. Vaccination is the only way to be protected, and even then, vaccines son;ietimes do not work. "The vaccination is very effective, there are very few people who have gotten the infection who have been vaccinated," Doll said. "But it always lowers the severity of the symptoms. When young people get the vaccination, it is very effective." Since January, there have been cases of measles at Eastern Washington University. College students are contracting the virus because foey are not vaccinated and fae virus spreads quickly. When an outbreak of measles occurs and someone contracts the virus, they can infect rooms they are in. Those rooms will stay infected for up to two hours and other people can catch measles by going into the room. Though the measles virus does not show signs or symptoms for the first several days the carrier is still contagious. If a carrier of

a

measles walks through a room, they could leave the room contagious hours after they leave. "If someone came into an exam room here with measles, that room would be infected for at least an hour," Doll said. "It would have to be sectioned off because if anyone goes in there they could get it." Measles infect the body in the form of a fever, skin rash and a cough. Other symptoms include red eyes, sore throat and a running nose. Most children ih the U.S. get their first vaccination at one year old and their second when they are four years old. There are some people who choose not to be vaccinated in the U.S. because of religious or medical preferences. Some countries do not vaccinate as regularly, leaving children and adults susceptible to the measles. PLU has a small population of students on campus who are not vaccinated. Now that the measles is spreading, Doll is

/ ~

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE INDEPENDENT

Measles is one of the most contagious infections in the world, and it is making a comeback.

concerned for those students. When a student is accepted to PLU and Chooses to attend, the Health Center gets their records, including vaccinations. Students who do not have their Measles Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine have to sign a waiver before coming t:i campus. When they sign the waiver, students agree to leave campus if or when an outbreak occurs. In the event of a measles outbreak on or near campus, those select students will be asked to leave campus and not n!turn until the Health Center says there is nc more risk for measles. Students asked to leave campus because of the virus could be gone for many weeks and essentially miss an entire semester, putting their education on hold. If students on campus are not 1 'accinated with the 1v'.l}v1R shot and would like to be, the Health Center has the vaccine. "Many times international students come here without immunizations and the first thing they do is get their Mv1R," Doll said. "We've got a list of the stu<lents who have decided not to and we can call them up whenever." The measles outbreak touched PLU students recently. fa December, DNO students were. aboard a fli;;ht from California with someone who was infected. PLU was contacted bv the airline and informed that J:4e students may !lave been in contact with a family infected. The students had been vaccinated and were not quarantined.

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Tunnel of Oppression gives students one day to experience social justice SAMANTHA LUND News Editor This year, the Tunnel of Oppression aims to bring back tough messages and lessons. Hopefully, students will walk away thinking about what each person can do to fight social injustice. The tunnel is an annual event Pacific Lutheran University holds to raise awareness of issues of privilege and oppression by presenting scenes grounded in real-world, lived experiences. Senior David Nguyen has been a docent for the tunnel the last three years. When he started, Nguyen remembered the tunnel being much more shocking and remembered a fake rape scene taking place. "Over the years that has kind of lessene_d a little, I think," Nguyen said. "I think that's because a few people have problems with the scenes because it feels too real to them." Nguyen thinks the realistic scenes are the only way to make students change their minds and open their eyes. He thinks the tunnel will be more

shocking and _inspiring this . transgender health care with its scene. year. "[The Tunnel] ties into our Nellie Moran, another senior involved in the tunnel, mission statement. [It] really is helping to create two scenes. embodies that," Moran said. Moran is involved in the "And it has people reflect Diversity Center's scene which critically on their actions and depicts the differences in how everyday lives and some of the black victims and suspects are choices that they are making treated in the medfa compared everyday that are affecting to white victims. other people." Moran is also involved Groups go into the tunnel in the Queer Ally led by a docent Each Student Union's scene is separated scene.QASU by curtains and holds a is hoping different to inform theme. students After on

through each scene, students are taken into a debriefing room -where they can talk about what they saw and how it affected them. "It is dark and heavy," Moran said. "But it is important." For the second year, the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee is getting involved with the tunnel. SPAC aims to show social injusl ice in the athletics community and brii.'g a different style to 1he tunnel than people would e):pect. This year, SAAC aims to focus on diffen nt issues athletes face. "Athletics isn't always accesoible to completely everyone," SAAC president, Amy Wooten said. Wooten gave thE example of a Muslim track runner who had to buy special clothing to participate. Then the runner got disqualified for h~r outfit. "We're supposed to be inclusive," Wooten :;aid. "But there are a lot of .ssues we encounter along th路~ way at different levels."


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

New Senate News Editor Texting or making a phone call while driving is illegal in Washington State. When pulled over for texting, a person could claim to be checking directions and get off without any ticket. New legislation is being promoted in the Washington Senate to outlaw cell phone use .completely while operating a vehicle. The new bill will not only make it illegal to use a cell phone, but would also put such infractions on a driver's record for insurance companies and employers to see. In a study done for U.S. News, 80 percent of college students text while driving, and according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, nine people are killed each day texting and driving while more than 1,000 people are injured. The current Washington law · treats these infractions like parking tickets and simply paying the fine will make the ticket go away.

F:~B.

aims to cut do

distracted

Senate Bill 5656 will also increase because she wants to see safer the penalty amount for offenders. roads for everyone .. "Two weeks ago, I passed Currently, a texting and driving violation costs the offender $124 someone who had their iPad for each offense: With the new law, propped on the steering wheel and the cost would increase second streaming a video," Rivers said. offense costs to $209. State The Washington Senate Bill 5656 was first Transportation Commission is proposed Jan. 28 in a Senate supporting the bill along with hearing and was then referred the Washington State Patrol and to the Senate many private Transportation citizens, Committee on "Two weeks ago I passed Rivers said. Feb.9. someone who had their iPad The bill is not Heading meant to be stepping-· the bill is propped on the steering wheel a and streaming a video." Republican stone to more Ann Sen. bills and Rivers of it is meant Ann Rivers La Center, Washington State Senator to benefit Wash. When everyone. Sen. Rivers "It is proposed the bill initially, there my hope that by passing stiffer penalties and raising the stakes was no testimony against it. "I drive a minimum of 400 for those who choose to disobey miles a week on I-5," Rivers said. common sense, we will appeal to "The number of folks that I see personal economics to drive good participating in risky behavior is decision making," Rivers said. astounding." "Ina perfectworld, we wouldn't Rivers is sponsoring this bill need legislation to attempt to force

Gailon Wixson Pursley is a senior social work major at Pacific Lutheran University. On paper, Pursley looks pretty "normal" until you hear about her life offcampus. Pursley is a philanthropist and cancer survivor. June 6 of last year, Pursley had finished her junior year and was recovering from a stressful finals week when she was diagnosed with cancer. Walking became hard for Pursley and after an MRI and a biopsy, Pursley was diagnosed with Stage Three Undifferentiated Sarcoma in her left pelvic area. . "I had started noticing things in March· of last year and it just steadily got worse," said Pursley. Now, nine months later, she is in remission and showing no signs of cancer. According to the Cincinnati Children's Hospital website, "Sarcomas are cancers that begin in the body's connective tissues." Sarcomas can affect bone, soft tissue or both. Pursley suffered from soft tissue cancer, which the American Cancer Society says, "accounts for 7 percent of all childhood tumors" The most common method of treatment is radiation and chemotherapy. "My chemo drip would be 20 hours and then they would unhook me and for

four hours I would do radiation and then I would do another 20 hours of and this would go on for 3 days/' Pursley said. "Then they would release me, and I would feel like crap for two days, and then I would repeat the cycle three weeks later." Near the end "of her treatment, Pursley was featureu in an interview for Seattle's KOMO news. had started a campaign to replace overhead lights in the Ronald McDonald House.

has given me such a greater appreciation being back here and a greater appreciation

" Gailon Wixson Pursley Senior Pursley spent half of her time in treatment at the Ronald McDonald house and noticed the lights made a distinct buzz, one of the last things someone going through chemotherapy and radiation needs when they come home. Pursley and her mother decided to fundraise to get newer, quieter lights for patient rooms. Little did she know that on-camera interview was all it took. After seeing Pursley on television, the owner of North Coast Electric decided to donate all the

20, 2015

people to be responsible," Rivers said. "We do not, however, live in that world." Rivers sees challenges coming up in passing the bill, such as getting the public to support it. Keeping the challenges in mind, Rivers said the bill will be tough but worth passing for everyone's safety. Rivers says the bill will affect both adults and teens equally, however, teens make up the majority of distracted drivers. According to Edgar Snyder Law Firm's accident study, teens between 15 and 19 make up the largest portion of distracted drivers. Teen drivers are also four times more likely to get into an accident while talking or texting than adult drivers. . More information on Senate Bill 5656 can be found at: http:// app.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary. aspx?year=2015&bill=5656

seconds is the minimal amount of time attention is taken away from the road while texting

,f teens say they have texted wh le driving.

I Teens who text while I spend aporoximately I I I I I lane. I Statistics found at www.textinganddri\ingsafety.com

fundraised to pay McDonald inh•rmi>w1 aired",

t:nt:L-"up

installed post-cancer in March. her life back the routine of

are al], itis your illness, when you're here Lutheran University] it's not as much of a problem. I don't feel like I am just being for my illness- now I am a normal student again," Pursley said. But really, she is anything but normal. While she might not describe herself as "brave" or /1 a fighter," Pursley has a new outlook and focus for her life .. She now hopes to become an oncology social worker and to continue her education at University of Washington for her graduate degree. Throughout this process, Pursley says "it has given me a such greater appreciation for being back here [PLU] and a greater appreciation for being healthy ...It is just fantastic to spend time with people my age and spend time with my friends again."

PHOTO COURTESY OF GAJLON \ VIX$0N PURSLEY

During her treatment Pursley ~ plit her between the Ronald McDonald where she shared a room with her and the Seattle Children's Hospital. Children's where she met the \Morld famous musician Macklemore. "He Wes the nicest guy, and so down to earth," said Pursley

How do they choose what goes on your plate? NATALIE DEFORD News Writer The process behind deciding the weekly Commons menu is complicated. Yet, the staff in charge of feeding the many people at Pacific Lutheran University are still able to be accommodating and creative. Erin McGinnis, director of Dining and Retail Service at PLU, said the decision process starts in the summer when she and the · three sous chefs have the most time to plan. They work together to come

up with a four-week rotation cycle that attempts to include the most variety and value for a student's meal plan. "We have to think about what stretches our staff as far as sort of cultural cuisine as well as what's trending out fu,ere," McGinnis said. "It's a lot of brainstorming, it's a lot of printing off articles, seeing what the top ten restaurants are, and I do a lot of research and we try to find the information out there about what's hot and what works." McGinnis, a former Lute, went on to culinary school in New York for two years.

"Food is my passion," McGinnis said. "Being creative with how we can do food for a large volume of people and get the best product out there is the puzzle that keeps me here over 20years." In addition to the creative side of things, McGinnis said these planners must also consider their customer service satisfaction survey. The Commons just received last fall's survey results, which marked categories of value, health and variety. Additionally, there were more than 400 openended comments.

"We take what we want to do and figure out how that relates to our students and what they want to see," McGinnis said. McGinnis says that every year the Commons works to provide students with more options for healthy, vegetarian and glutenfree meals. But still the surveys indicate that the students want more. "We're always trying to get to that bar and the bar is always rising," McGinnis said. McGinnis says the Commons staff also takes into account the· comments they receive via social media, in their comment box and

in person. The staff neets weekly to discuss these mmments as well as how they can have fun in the middle of fr e four-week rotation cycles. "We try to fincl a balance between what11 work and what11 sell, while trying to :-tave a broad enough appeal," M1:Ginnis said. "It's never boring, it's always new."'

Check the Commons menu weekly to see what is for breakfast, lunch or iinner using the online commo:'.lS menu at http://www.plu.edu/dining/ menus/ or on the Lute Guide app.


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

Child n'

oices: The

NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

order to sponsor and rescue 50 Jewish children and bring them back to the United States. There will be a discussion afterward with director Steven Pressman. Thursday will be a day-full of discussion and presentation, including talks with Pressman and others who contributed to "50 Children." There will also be stories of other child rescues in history, as well as a talk about child refugees in modern events. A fully listed schedule of events and information can be found at http://www. powellhellerconference.com. On Friday, March 6, more than 200 local students in grades 8-12 from Keithley Middle School, Washington High School, Mt. Rainier Lutheran and others will attend a series of learning activities focusing on children and the Holocaust. The program includes interactive sessions and discussions as the students read and learn the stories of five children who lived during the Holocaust. The stories are told primarily through the writings of these children. Unfortunately, only one of the five survived. "I think that this is an easier way for the children to learn about the Holocaust because the stories are through children's writing, which I hope will be a palpable way to learn about something traumatic," said Lexi Jason, PLU sophomore and student host for the event The younger students will be placed at tables with 32 PLU student hosts, arranged so each table will have nearly all grades and schools represented. Together with the hosts, students will talk about the stories they read and work through their resulting feelings and questions. 'Tm most excited to host the kids and find out what they know and what they want to learn about the Holocaust," Jason said. "It [the Holocaust] is an incredibly important event in history and I think the morewetalkaboutthings that are traumatic the better we are able to understand them

Children of the past, present and future will be the focus of this year's PowellHeller Holocaust Education Conference with more than 200 local junior and senior high school students scheduled to take part. This year's conference is focusing on the stories of children who fall victim to dehumanization, March 4-6. Both past and present are taken into context with questions of the future. Beth Kraig, faculty planning cocoordinator, said the conference's faculty planning group quickly decided to focus this year's efforts on the stories of children because almost all of the remaining survivors of Nazi camps were imprisoned in their youth. "The stories of child survivors stand out as especially vital testimonies to hear today," Kraig said. Kraig also said the faculty group was interested in addressing the issue of child refugees today, since a 2014 United Nations report stated that half of the 51 million refugees living outside their home nations are children. "The conference should remind and inform audiences of the past destruction and abuse of children in the Holocaust, while provoking us all to reallze that children are still heavily targeted and harmed throughout the world as a result of war, human trafficking, unaddressed poverty and other injustices," Kraig said The conference, which takes place at Pacific Lutheran University, begins Wednesday March 4 with a 7 p.m. screening of the documentary "50 Children" in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. The film is about an American couple that decides to go to Nazi Germany in

NEWS3

olocaust and b

The gates at Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp which read, "Arbeit Macht Frei," or "work makes you free."

and heal from them." Fridays line up is open to the public and Kraig said she expects a presence from most age groups. "This should be an extremely memorable event," Kraig said. "Any PLU student who could come to any part would see the gym full of all the age ranges, in the space together, talking about the same things." It will be a present-day gathering to remember the past, think of the now and be mindful of the future.

â&#x20AC;˘ edical errors in America The American health care system kills tens of thousands of patients each year. Medical errors tend to fall on two sides: either they are mistakes that happen when doctors set a wrong plan, or they happen when they prescribe the wrong medication. Sometimes the wrong medication comes from a doctor's messy handwriting.

Bed sores are a major source of harm. Bed sores are pressure ulcers that patients develop when they have not been moved for a long period of time. In a 2006 government survey, more than half a million Americans were hospitalized for bed sores and of them, 58,000 die in the hospital.

One estimate says medical errors kill 210,000 Americans yearly.

doctors do not know an error has occurred. Spotting medical errors is particularly hard for doctors sometimes. Medical errors can go unfixed because patients live and die all the time and it is hard to know disease.

Doctors with medical errors are shamed, so they choose not to tell patients sometimes. Only onethird of patients are told about a medical error when it happens, multiple surveys find. The lack of communication between a doctor and patient are chalked up to American malpractice suits and fear of them.

The financial side of health care does not necessarily help this system of errors and mistakes. When a patient is harmed, typically they need more care, and the health care provider will profit. Therefore, there is no real incentive for health care providers to improve the system. or drug overdoses.


4 A&E

THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

I ERIN FLOM Guest Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Stephanie Blythe performing at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York in 2013.

Lutes with affinities for Opera have a special opportunity awaiting them Monday. Opera star Stephanie Blythe will be at Pacific Lutheran University to teach a master class Feb. 23. Vocal Studies professor James L. Brown helped to organize the event. "[Blythe] is an advocate for opera and a champion of the whole gambit of vocal music," Brown said. Therefore, she is passionate about offering her skills in master classes. When plannic"'l.g master classes, Brown said "we try to catch people when they're in the area, rather than fly them in." Blythe is in the area rehearsing for Seattle Opera's performance of the Handel opera "Semele."

During the· class, five PLU students will perform for Blythe. Each student will have a half hour to perform and be critiqued by Blythe. After all the students have performed, Blythe will then take questions from the audience. Sophomore Miya Higashiyama is one of the five students performing for

to Blythe. When asked if she was nervous, Higashiyama said, 'Tm terrified." More than fifty students applied to perform for Blythe, Higashiyama said. Higashiyama has previously taken other master classes, including a summer workshop with PLU faculty.

"They really help you to grow in your musicianship," Higashiyama said. The four other students performing are seniors Annie Herzog, Lauren Searls, Sarah Bennet and Eric Olson. Brown believes that having this cla:;s with Blythe will give his students not only a fresh perspective on op!ra, but also a "perspective informi~d by an inte1national perforr1ing career." He also expects his studen:s will gain perforning insight fromh•!r. "[Bly1he] is known as an engaging a.n.d gripping performer," Brown said. For exarr .ple, Blythe requested tha1 most of the five performers sing their pieces in Engli ;h. "It will help [b.l.e students] to 'ocus o::i. the words they-' ·e singing," said Brown, making their performance, and not just their voice, stronger.

I A&E

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

I "Smoke + Mirrors" by Imagine Dragons BROOKE THAMES A&EWriter Imagine Dragons' new sophomore album "Smoke + Mirrors" is both the same and different from their debut record. Songs such as "Shots," "Dream," and "The Fall" are reminiscent of the sounds found on "Night Visions." Tracks such as "Friction," however, present a sharp rock-esque style that is uncharacteristic of the band, but amazing nonetheless. While most of the songs on the album are enjoyable,

Smoke + Mirrors Imagine Dragons $11.99 iTunes free Spotify

the record does have some setbacks. songs like Several "Gold" and "I Bet My Life" contain sporadic bursts of screaming that are supposed to serve some purpose. In reality, they're weird and unnecessary, and distract from the music itself. The album also has its share of uninteresting tracks, including the title track, "Smoke and Mirrors," and "Hopeless Opus." Despite being less than perfect, Imagine Dragons' "Smoke + Mirrors" is a good album worth lending an ear to.

Pacific Lutheran University is known for producing a variety of successful alumni. One such prosperous Lute returned Feb. 12 to share her with her Alma Mater. Gospel singer, Crystal Aikin, '97, appeared at Garfield Book Co. for a signing of her highlyanticipated album, "All I Need." "It is wonderful to be back home," Akin said. Aikin is a native of Tacoma and was first exposed to and began singing gospel music in the church. "I was raised in the church," Aikin said. "[Gospel] is just what we do." Aikin carried her love of singing with her to PLU. Although she was not a music major, Aikin sang in the University Chorale and the Choral Union under the direction_ of Dr. Richard Nance. She graduated from PLU with double degrees in biology and psychology in 1997, and went on to pursue a career in nursing. After spending many years working as a nurse in Tacoma, Aikin took a leap and auditioned for BET' s reality television contest "Sunday Best" in 2007. She was named the inaugural winner, gaining a recording contract with Zomba Gospel. Since her win on national television,

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Crystal Aikin performing at a holiday luncheon in December 2013.

Aikin has released two successful albums - including her 2015- record, "All I Need." Aikin said she was plrnsed to come back and share her success with the people she credits the mo:;t. "I feel like PLU contributed to the success that I have, so I 1hink it's best to come back to where its :a..-ted," Aikin said. As for gospel, Aikin is committed to creating music in the year> to come. "[Gospel] is something very familiar to who I am as a Christiar.,"' Aikin said. "Gospel music is home for me."


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

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on campus MATIHEW SALZANO A&E Editor Birkenstocks are back, and the Pacific Lutheran University campushasnotbeen spared of the resurgence of the classic .sandal. ..t'.5:lS}UOrt l;>lpggers for The New YorkT:Jtn~s,Da:i,ZyMai1and the Wall Streel:Journal have been talking about;> the Birkenstock revival since Spring 2014. Some fashionistas, like New York boutique owner. Jennifer Mankili, declared it the shoe of the summer. not S\lffimer any more, some Lutes are still rocking their sandals - with or without socks

History of Birks Birkenstocks are airrently a worldwide brand: selling more than 800 styles of shoes in 80 countries and employing 2,000 people. Birkenstocks range in price from $70 to $130 and are available in most shoe stores. The sandals began and are still produced in Germany. The family-owned company began in 1774 when Johann Adam Birkenstock was first mentioned as a shoemaker in Langenbergheim church archives. 路 The first Birkenstock storefront opened in 1896 when Konrad Birkenstock manufactured and sold insoles. The brand unveiled their first line of sandals, the "Madrid" model, in 1963. The brand came to U.S. stores in 1966.

crunching the numbers The year Johann Adam Birkenstock was first mentioned as a shoemaker.

Total number of Birkenstock styles available today.

Number of Birkenstock employees worldwide.

Total number of countries . where Birkenstocks are sold.

contributing reporting by DAVID MAIR Staff Writer BROOKE A&E Writer A&EEditor Rrst-year Sophia Mahr (left) and sophomore Lexi Jason (right) both purchased their Birkenstocks while in Germany this January Term

Birkenstocks, can flawlessly transition teens, to your twenties, thirties, forties - all through your life." Lexi Jason

"I've had them since 2003. lit's wearing gloves on junior Jimmy "My feet made them who they are." junior Sarah Henderson

"I have three pairs. I've taken one pair . everywhere since I was 14. England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, France, Honand and Canada." junior Haley Ehlers


6FEATURE

THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

The PLU Women's Swim Team stands atop the podiL m with a first place finis

AUSTIN HILLIKER Sports Editor

They came, they saw and they conquered. In just three short days, both the men and women swim teams of Pacific Lutheran University made quite the statement as they set 21 new school records on the weekend. Records were set by both the men and women during the three day conference championship at the Osborn Aquatic Center in Corvallis, Ore. The women took the crown, finishing first in the Northwest conference. They finished with 779 total points, the most points accumulated by a team in the last four years since Whitworth grabbed 817 points in 2011. The women took first place in seven of 18 events, further supporting the Lutes were the undisputed back-to-back champions.

ABOVE: Four women placed with a top five or better performance in the 100 meter breastroke. From left to right: senior Rachel Althauser (fifth), first-year Chloe Carr (third), junior Shanell Sullenberger (first) and junior Kiana Sullenberger (second).

PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUI GUTIERREZ

One standout performance took place during the women's 1650 meter freestyle. Sophomore Erica Muller put up a th"'!le of 17:34.67, breaking a 24--year-old PLU record. Junior Melissa Dean broke her own school record duing the finals heat in the 100 meter freestyle, with a time of 52.36, placing her second overall.in the event. Junior Hanna ..A.rm.strong and senior Michelle Hogan comreted in the same race, as Armstrong placed fifth with a time of !i3.12 and Hogan finished sixth with a time of 53.95. One of the last races wa:; the most impressive performance for the women's swim team. The Lutes set anew schoolrE cord and a NCAA 'B' qualifying mark in the 400 meter freestyle relay, as Armstrong. Dean, Hogan and first-year Shanell Sullenburger capped off the day and brought in a time of 3:30.86.

The men solid third ] ended the ' 521.5 total p to the secor Pirates who and the fi Missionaries 697-5 points.

Despite conference t a lot to be p1 Sophom took home< 1650 meter which came of breaking The time w< qualifying ti:


FEB. 20, 2015

THE MOORING MAST

FEATURE7

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.....

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s team took home a face finish, as they ampionships with ints. They fell short .d place Whitworth laimed 641.5 points 1st place Whitman would take home

ot taking home the e, the men still had >Ud of. !'re Hunter Cosgrove i.~ond place in the ~· freestyle 16:13.18, ' p two seconds short the school record. s still an NCAA 'B'

Junior Joseph Bowley also recorded an NCAA 'B' qualifying mark, as he tied Trevor Case of the Whitworth Pirates, with a time 2:05.05 in the 200 meter breaststroke. While sophomore Matthew Wehr also set an NCAA 'B' qualifying time in the 200 meter butterfly with 1:51.3, placing him

third overall in the event. Sophomore Cody Hartman added himself to the list of outstanding performances as he also set a NCAA 'B' qualifying time of 1:52.58 in the 200 meter backstroke. Not only did he make the NCAA qualifying mark, he even broke the PLU record in the event, previously set by him last

year. The day was finally wrapped up as Bowley, Wehr, senior Basil Whaley and junior Brian Ruggles set another NCAA 'B' qualifying record in the 400 meter freestyle relay. They finished third with a time of 3:08.48. It wasn't just the players who brought home outstanding performances on the day. PLU coach Matt Sellman was named the NWC Women's Swimming Coach of the Year. This award has been given to Sellman the last three years, making him the first coach in NWC history to do so. The NCAA Division ill Championships will be held in Shenandoah, Texas March 20.

LEFT: Junior Josep i Bowley went 4-for-'~ on the day, winning thE• 100 meter breastroke, 2 )0 meter breastroke, 2 )0 individual medley and the 200 meter team medley.

PHOTO COlJR:I'ESY OF JACQUI GUTIERREZ

BELOW: First-year Paul Jettparticipated in :he men's 200 medley relay and helped his tear1 finish first with a time of 1 :41.35.

-r


THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

on th

Bring attention to Black History MICHAEL DIAMBRI Columnist

February is Black History Month, and although the Black Student Union and the Diversity Center have made efforts to promote inquiry about black history during February, little is being done by Pacific Lutheran University to celebrate it. "Out of the whole year we have a short month to have African-American history recognized" said first-year Quenessa Long. "This is a time to promote a positive understanding of African-Americans." Unfortunately, the history most people think is adequate enough to understand is the history of the ruling class. The history of oppressed groups often remains in the shadows of the historical landscape. But without understanding their history, we can't claim to have an accurate understanding of the past. Since there is a month dedicated to black history, as Lutes who encourage thoughtful inquiry and community acceptance, we need to advocate the importance of studying the histories of various cultures and people groups. The Black Student Union will have

FEB. 20, 2015

panels this month and various other importance of African-Americans in activities. our communities. History is a way of "If it wasn't for BSU [Black Student understanding importance. Union], the Diversity Center, or Black There is so much more the university History Month, this university would could do. If PLU wants to retain and have almost no recognition of African- develop its identity as a diverse and Arnerican culture, and for other people engaging university, there needs to be of color," Long said. "There is a three a breakthrough of thoughtful inquiry percent African-American population at about black history. this school. .. and dropping." For instance, the drama department If PLU believes in the importance of could put on a production of plays diversity, there needs to be a promotion written by African-Americans. The of understanding other cultures that history · department could · bring in goes beyond having a Diversity Center lecturers or start a conference about and constantly saying that we are "all- African-American history. The art department could highlight Black inclusive." Black History Month is the best time History Month with a display of African of the year to do art. this. The business The university department could 'Taking a class or try to get successful supports the understanding watching 'Selma' does not African American of other cultures, business men and but PLU isn't mean you are supporting, women to come and discuss what it is like bringing in ;;md understanding, the a diverse to be a minority in population of the world of business importance of black students, or today. history" doing more Many people are than stating making efforts to that diversity is appreciate black history, but they can't do it alone. important. PLU uses its identity as a liberal Yes, finances are tight, but this arts school to say students develop a university needs to abide by and well-rounded understanding of the promote its mission statement to importance of diversity in perspective, "educate students for lives of thoughtful practice and place. But taking a class or inquiry, service, leadership, and care watching "Selma" does not mean you for other persons, for their communities are supporting and understanding the and for the earth." importance of black history. · Black History Month is important, Additionally, if we limit our and there needs to be more done to knowledge of black history to the foster it across-the-board at PLU. perpetuated idea that black history is restricted to slavery, civil rights and entertainment, we limit the

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Chloe Choi mastads@piu.edu NEWS EDITOR

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GENERAL MANAGER

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Zachary Boyle 1111

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While most of us can agree that it is nearly impossible to not pet a dog whenever we see one, it is not always what the owner wants you to do. That is the feeling senior Morgan Woods has every time someone tries to pet Indio, her guide dog in training. "People will just reach out and start petting him," Woods said. "The proper etiquette is to ask before you do." Students may have seen Woods and Indio, a yellow lab wearing a green vest, walking around campus. The vest reads "Puppy In Training," meaning the dog wearing the vest is being trained as a service animal. Animals being trained for services, such as guide dogs for the blind or bomb sniffing for police, begin their training at eight weeks old and are returned to the

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

to four times per day, usually between classes and passing in the halls. "People in my class are fine because I tell them he's in training," Woods said. "But sometimes people will have their hands out, and then ask to pet him." There are currently three puppies on campus and potentially a fourth one corning soon. Even though it is hard work training a puppy to be a guide dog, Woods said she's having a lot of fun. "You get two days to play with them and treat them like a puppy, and then training begins," Woods said. "We get to keep [Indio] for about a year, which is basically the best part of a dog's life."

RE LAND Editor-in-Chief

ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Land

The responsibility of The Mooring Hast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code ofEt:rics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorial!., columns and advertisements do not necessa1ily represent those of The Mooring Mast si;aff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fower than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place ar. advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semefter or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, en .ail mast@ plu.edu.

Please PHOTO COUl!TESY OF MORIWI WOOIJS

Indio is a 10-month-old yellow lab being trained by senior Morgan Woods. To learn more about seeing eye dogs, visit http://welcome.guidedogs.com/.

training school between 13 and 18 months old. Puring this training, the trainer must ensure the dog is properly exercised, fed a healthy diet and able to follow commands and understand when it is working and when it is O.K. to play.

Woods said people petting Indio is bad for his training because he doesn't know the difference between work and play. "Ifs my job to teach him that when he's in the vest, he is at work," Woods said. Woods also said people come up and pet hirn three


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

OPINION 9

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I TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer Lakewood, and much of Tacoma, is not always recognized for being a well-kept neighborhood. While there are undoubtedly beautiful views to be seen from the city we call home, some neighborhoods do not embrace the cleanliness. City officials in Lakewood have begun to tear down buildings and clear lots, according to Q13 Fox News. Community members are tired of the indecency provided by some community members. "There's debris, there's glass, · there's

hypodermic needles, there's actually been a lot of drug activity on the property'' said Jeff Gumm from the Lakewood department of Community Development. As part of the neighborhood abatement program, the City of Lakewood is taking steps to clean up neighborhoods by creating a process to deal with properties specifically. According to the City of Lakewood and The News Tribune: 1) If there is a complaint about a property, the owner is notified and a hearing is held. 2) If the owner doesn't clean up, an abatement order is signed, the city does the cleanup. The property owner is then billed at 12 percent interest.

"When houses are a mess, it seems like nobody has pride in our city," said David Tamayo, a Lakewood resident of two years. "I think this program is a good way to motivate community members, but it is a little extreme to invade someone's personal prop·erty." While it might be necessary steps to take, it does seem quite enforced. You11 find our own community of Parkland modernizing the community in a round-about way. PLU recently constructed Garfield Station which includes apartments and attractive housing for students. This new construction increases the attractiveness of the immediate area surrounding PLU, whether that was the original intent or not.

It provides a variety of additional housing to PLU students. As Lutes, we take pride in our community, whether that be by character or appearance. "It doesn't bother me how the homes look," junior Andrew Cheney said. "I think it's a good way to elem up the community, but at the same time I also don't believe it's the city's responsibility and it shouldn't be the university'> either." If anything is to be taken fro n this, I suggest we take pride in our home whether we own or rent. Let's embrace 1he great character and uniqueness of our city and where we choose to call home.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

Women's Basketball

en's Basketball 'TEAM

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FEB. 20, 2015

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

George Fox

24

0

15-0

Won24

Won8

Puget Sound

20

3

11-3

Won5

8-6

Lost 1

Whitworth

20

3

11-3

Won i

10

7-7

Won2

Whitman

15

8

10-4

Lost 1

9

14

7-7

Won 1

Lewis & Clark

8

15

5-9

Lost 1

12

12

7-8

Won 1

Pacific

9

15

5-10

Lost3

Pacific Lutheran

8

15

6-8

Won 1

Linfield

10

13

4-10

Won 1

George Fox

5

19

3-12

Lost 6

Pacific Lutheran

5

18

2-12

Lost i

Linfield

3

20

1-13

Lost 7

Willamette

6

17

1-13

Lost6

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Whitworth

20

3

13-1

Won3

Whitman

18

5

12-2

Lewis & Clark

13

10

Puget Sound

12

Willamette Pacific

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STREAK

TEAM

STREAK

LUTE'S UPCOMING GAMES

Baseball WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Willamette

7

0

0-0

Won?

Linfield

7

1

0-0

Won3

Pacific Lutheran

6

2

0-0

Won2

Pacific

1

2

0-0

Lost2

George Fox

2

5

0-0

Lost5

Puget Sound

2

5

0-0

Lost3

Whitman

1

3

0-0

Lost 1

Whitworth

1

3

0-0

Won2

Lewis & Clark

0

5

0-0

Lost 5

TEAM

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Women's Basketball Tonight @ 6 p.m. vs. Whitworth Men's Basketball Tonight @ 8 p.m. vs. Whitworth Baseball Feb. 21 vs. Linfield @ 12 p.m .

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A very important off-seasc>n AUSTIN HILLIKER Sports Editor

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Losing a game is never easy, but losing a game that more than 114 million people watched can be life-altering. For some Seattle Seahawks players, the next step in their career won't be in a blue and white jersey in front of the 12th man. For others, it won't even be in the National Football League. It's the sad truth, but the NFL is a business, and athletes are constantly being cycled through it. At the end of April, a class of fresh and eager talent will enter the NFL and their lives will be altered, but for the better. April 30 through May 2, 256 young men will join the NFL and compete to play on the biggest stage that football has to offer. Some of these players will be future "Hall of Famers" and some won't make it past training camp. If the Seahawks play their cards right, they might be able to pick up a few players that could bring them back to a third straight Super Bowl. In other words, this is a very important offseason. For our hometown Hawks, there aren't too many glaring pieces that need to be added to the puzzle, but at the end of the day, every team is trying to get better. For starters, a point of emphasis will be on offensive and defensive lineman this year. The Seahawks have had issues in the trenches in the past, especially in terms of injuries, and if this problem can be fixed, our favorite running back might be able to experience "beast-mode" more than just a few times throughout the season. Looking at the draft board, a few players could help Seattle out. Jordan Phillips, a 6-foot-6-inch, 334-pound nose tackle out of Oklahoma State could be a player still waiting路 to hear his name called by the time the Seahawks get their turn to pick somebody. This monster of a man could cause quite the disruption in the 2015-16 season. A disruption that could make the Seahawks defense even more frightening. On the offensive side 路of the ball, a name to look out for is T.J. Clemmings, a 6-foot6-inch, 315-pound offensive tackle from

PHOTO COURTESY OF CF EATIVE CCMMONS

Russell Wilson. quarterback of the Seattle Seahawks, has brought the tearn to two straight Super Bowl appearances.

the University of Pittsburgh. With his long athletic frame, he could bE an addition to the line where he could compete for a starting position. At worst, he would sit behind offensive tackle, James Carpenter, a veteran of four years to the NFL. Next on the list would be to select a lengthy and physical wide n:ceiver. All draft boards point to.Amari Cooper, the standout Alabama recorct setter. But in all reality, he won't be there路 AThen it's time for Seattle to pick. More realistic options include wide receivers Dorial Green-Beck:iam from the University of Missouri, Dev:n Smith from Ohio State University or . aelen Strong from Arizona State Universiy. Picking up one of these game-changers :ould amount to something special in the long run. When draft day arriv ~s, it "'rill be important for the Seattle Se iliawks to fill at least the lineman and 路Ni.de receiver positions, alongside picking up other utility players. It's a very important off:;eason for the Hawks, an offseason that could continue a run for yet another Super Bcwl.


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11 SPORTS.

THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

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CHRISTIAN BOND Guest Writer

Gamel The Pacific Lutheran University Men's Basketball 'feam was not looking to become valentines with any Wildcat from Linfield Saturday night. The Lutes showed their love for the basketball by holding on to it. Only turning the ball over three times was the key to success. PLU was able to take the victory 60-45. The opening moments of the game belonged to PLU. Sophomores Brandon Lester and Kyle Sawtell combined for the first five points of the game. The Wildcats weren't detoured as they fought back into the game. With 14 minutes remaining in the first half, Linfield led 1110. The action went back and fourth with each team trading buckets. With 4 minutes remaining, the Wildcats were still in charge 20-19. Sawtell finished the half in style, hitting a pair of free throws and a shot from the three point line, giving the Lutes a 24-22 lead at half. PLU would never look back from their halftime lead. Junior Seth Anderson came out of halftime on fire. A pair of free throws got Anderson going as he continued to convert shot after shot. Linfield eventually closed the gap to five. After a timeout from PLU, the scoring was put back o_n track.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Head coach Steve Dickerson looks to fire up his team during a time out.

Lester showed everyone in the gym that he had ice water in his veins. Lester nailed all eight of his free throws from under four minutes remaining, sealing the deal for the Lutes. PLU gained huge advantages in both rebounding and turnovers against Linfield. The Lutes out rebounded the Wildcats by nine, and only turned the -ball over three times. "On Saturday against Linfield, we executed at both ends of the floor. Kyle Sawtell and Seth Anderson stepped up with good games as we performed consistently at both ends," said coach Steve Dickerson. "We still have a shot at the playoffs, a lot would have to go right but we need a great effort on both nights next weekend!"

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Director of --Athl~!_Lc Communications Dayl The Pacific Lutheran University Baseball Team split a pair of nonconference games Saturday at the Concordia Tournament, defeating Oregon Tech 3-2 in the early game and dosing out the day with a 0-3 loss to tournament host Concordia. Senior Chris Bishop started the first game, allowing two earned runs on six hits with seven strikeouts against Oregon Tech before leaving after 83 pitches with the Lutes and Owls tied 2-2. Senior Jake Otness came in to throw the final three innings, striking out four while allowing only one hit to earn the win. PLU scored its first run in the top of the second inning, as junior Lee Larson hit a one-out triple to left and came in to score on a groundout by senior Bo Pearson. Oregon Tech tied it up with a run in the bottom of the frame before PLU took advantage of an OIT error to reclaim the lead in the fifth. The Lutes picked up the eventual gamewinner in the top of the eighth. Sophomore Ben Welch opened the inning with a single, and junior Drew Oord reached on a fielder's choice. Sophomore Jacob Oements singled to right to put runners on the corners, and sophomore Landon Packard drove Oord in from third on a single to right center. PLU totaled eight hits in the game, although no Lute picked up more than one in the contest. Welch and Packard each added a hit in the Lutes' second game to give the duo two hits apiece for the day. The nightcap saw sophomore Kyle Rossman throw seven innings without allowing an earned run, but he took the loss as Concordia drove in three unearned runs in the bottom of the fourth. Rossman struck out six while allowing only two hits and a walk on 99 pitches. Junior Ty Donahou threw the final frame for the Lutes, striking out two. Quinn Eldridge earned the win for Concordia, allowing only two hits in seven shutout innings. Austin Hadley threw the final two

Game2 With post season hopes hanging in the balance, the Pacific Lutheran University Men's Basketball Team headed south to face Willamette. The team was confident that they could get the job done, having already beat Willamette when they payed a visit to PLU. Despite first-year Dylan Foreman scoring a career high 26 points, the Lutes fell short to the Bearcats 55-64. The first half was a back-and-forth battle with both teams knowing their seasons could be at stake. Willamette pulled out to a slight lead, but PLU stayed close. Foreman was perfect from three point land, going 6-6. With help from sophomore Kyle Sawtell, the two kept

s brilli

the game extremely dose. The half ended with the score at 26-28 Bearcats. The second half started with the same intense action seen in the first half. Junior Bryce Miller was able to convert through contact on a layup. After making his free throw, the game was tied at 36 with 13 minutes left. The Bearcats pulled away, hittin?; a couple jump shots to pull away from ihe Lutes. Foreman stayed hot from beyond the arc, nailing back-to-back threes to try and dose the gap, but Willamette continued to score as well. The gap was too big for the Lutes to close, as the Bearcats hit five of their 1.ast seven free throws, sealing the deal for Willamette, 64-55. Coach Steve Dickerson reflected on Friday nights game. "We came up a little short against Willamette," said Dickerson. "Dylan Foreman had a spectacular game as Willamette concentrated on shutting sophomore Brando11 Lester d Jwn. We missed a couple of shots and made a couple of errors inside of the four minute mark, which hurt us." Ultimately, the Lutes got beat up on fae backboards. PLU was able to gohble up 29 rebounds, whereas Willamette snagged 46 boards. This led to an advantage for foe Bearcats in points in the paint. The Lutes are scheduled to ptiy against Whitworth in Olson Auditoriurr. at 8 p.m. on Feb. 20. The Lutes will then vvrap up thE season at home, when they play against w utman on Feb. 21, for Senior Night.

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innings to pick up the save,. ___ _ Concordia scored all three of its runs in the fourth inning. Konner Reddick reached on a throwing error to open the inning and stole second. After a strikeout, a double to right brought Reddick home with the eventual game-winning run. Following another strikeout, the Lutes' second error of the inning allowed a second unearned run to score. A third error for PLU and a passed ball allowed the Cavaliers' third run of the inning to score.

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Day2 The Pacific Lutheran University Baseball Team scored three runs in the top of the fourth inning and sophomore Kort Skoda shut down the Corban offense as the Lutes picked up a 4-1 nonconference baseball win over the Warriors.Sunday afternoon at the Concordia Tournament at Porter Park. Pacific Lutheran improved to 5-2 this season with the win, while Corban fell to 6-2. Skoda limited Corban to one run on four hits in 7.1 innings to earn his second win of the season. Junior Cory Nelson came in to pick up the final five outs, retiring every batter he faced to notch his first save of the year. Senior Collin Nilson led PLU with three hits in four at bats, while sophomore Jacob Clements tallied a pair of hits and junior Tyler Thompson drove in two runs for the Lutes. PLU got on the board with three runs in the top of the fourth. Sophomore Kory VanderStaay opened the rally with a oneout walk and advanced to third on a single to right center by junior Drew Oord. Nilson singled to left to score the Lutes' first run and put runners at first and second, and Oord followed by stealing third. Thompson stepped to the plate and drove a double to right center to score both runners and put the Lutes up 3-0. Corban got its lone run of the day in the bottom of the fifth. Landon Frost tripled to center and Ryan Rosas brought him home with a sacrifice fly. The Lutes added one more in the top of the ninth. Senior Curtis Wildung walked and stole second before

PHOTO COURTESY 01' JESSE MAJOR

Senior Collin Nilson runs to home base against Corban University Feb. 15. Nilson the day during his at-bats.

coming in to score on a single to left field by Brett Johnson. Caleb Henry started for Corban and took the loss after allowing three runs in four innings pitched. Ryan Wood came in to pitch to start the fifth inning and went the rest of the way for the Warriors. Day3 Junior Tyler Thompson doubled in two runs with two outs as Pacific Lutheran University scored three in the top of the ninth inning to defeat Corban 4-2 in a nonc_onference baseball game Monday afternoon at Wilsonville High School. Pacific Lutheran's second win in two days against Corban improved the Lutes' record to 6-2, while the Warriors fell to 6-3. The Lutes open Northwest Conference play this weekend against fourth-ranked Linfield with a three-game series in Linfield. The series begins with a doubleheader Saturday atll a.m. Sophomore Ben Welch and junior Brett Johnson each tallied a pair of hits to lead the Lutes, with Johnson adding a walk and scoring a pair of runs in the win. Thompson drove in the two runs in the ninth, including what proved to be the game-winner, with his double in the ninth.

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Junior Garrett Bmwn started for the Lutes and pitched 5.2 innings while allowing only two runs. Junior Cory Nelson pitched the final 3.1 innings to earn the w:n one day after picking up a save in a PLU win over Corban. Corban scored its two runs in the bottom of the third. The Warriors opened the inning with a pair of singles, and following a sacrifice bunt to advance the runners a single through the left side scon!d both to make it 2-0 Corban. PLU got one back in the top cf the fifth. Johnson opened the inning with a walk, stole second and advanced to third on a sacrifice bunt. He came in to ~;core on a passed ball to set the score at 2-1. Neither team could find a way to score again until the top of the nin1h inning. Senior Collin Nilson doubled right with one out, and senior Bo Pearso rl entered as a pinch runner at second. Johnson hit an infield single and sophomore Kory VanderStaay flied out to set the stage for Thompson's two-out two-RBI double to left center. Senior Kit Banko came through with a base hit to drive Thomp:;on home and put PLU up 4-2.

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The Lutes take on Linfield, Feb. 21 al 12 p.m. • Article taken from golutes.com

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THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 20, 2015

let DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Atop the mound, with family and friends keenly watching, a young boy was ready to " take on another batter. During the game, the boy accidentally hit another player with the ball and after that incident, he became scared to ever pitch again. Now standing at 6-feet tall on the pitchers mound, winding up his arm while pitching a warm smile to the fans is senior A.J. Konopaski, the top pitcher for Pacific Lutheran University's Baseball Team. The love of baseball began for Konopaski over the river and through the woods in the backyard of his grandma's house, where his qad taught him how to catch as a boy. "It's a family thing," Konopaski said, "filled with lifelong memories." It was not until high school when he realized what a strong arm he had. It was then at Port Angeles High School where he became a closer for the team. "I was decent at baseball growing up," Konopaski said. "I just grew and grew as I kept playing." During his senior year of high school, all of his hard worked accumulated together when he received All-American status.

TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications Gamel

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Junior Megan Abdo scored the final five points of the game, including the game-winning layup, as Pacific Lutheran University daimed a 65-64 buzzerbeating women's basketball victory over Willamette in Northwest Conference action Friday evening at Cone Field House. The win gave the Lutes the 2014-15 season sweep of Willamette, with both wins coming in thrilling fashion for the Lutes after they defeated the Bearcats in double-overtime last month in Parkland. PLU improves to 5-17 overall and 2-11 in conference play, while Willamette falls to 6-17 overall and 1-13 in the NWC. PLU heads to McMinnville, Ore. on Saturday for the final road game of the

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"It was a crazy feeling," Konopaski said. "You see all the others who have earned this award before me, ifs such an honor to now be among them." Though far less glamorous, Konopaski also received a back injury at the end of his high school senior season. As much as he loved baseball, playing in college simply did not look realistic because of his injury. Division I schools were not going to recruit him. That was the time when PLU became Konopaski's game changer. "Nowhere else was going to take me," Konopaski said. "PLU's coaching staff believed in me." In his first year, Konopaski was doing everything he could to not get cut off the team. Four years later, he is a closer. "Being a doser is a high pressure position, which is exactly why I like it," Konopaski said. As this season is his last as a Lute, Konopaski is looking to keep both his baseball and professional career open, in the hope to hit a grand slam in whatever field he ends up in. Konopaski is majoring in business administration and hopes to work in corporate finance in Seattle one day. The other option-being unsigned drafted upon graduation - is a "long shot,"

season, as the Lutes take on Linfield at 4 p.m. A pair of Jojo DeLong free throws gave Willamette a 64-60 lead with 27 seconds to play and appeared to dose out the game for the Bearcats. But Abdo had other plans, as she hit a three-pointer to pull PLU within one with 17 seconds remaining. After sophomore Taylor Talen stole the ball from DeLong, Abdo missed a layup in the closing seconds only to collect her own rebound and put it back in as time expired to clinch the win for PLU. The game featured eight lead changes and five tie scores, with Willamette taking its largest lead three minutes into the second half at 42-31. PLU followed with eight straight points before Willamette countered by scoring six straight. The Bearcats eventually matched their game-high, 11-point lead midway through the half following a three-pointer by Ashley Evans.

-PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Junior Megan Abdo scored 14 points, seven rebounds and four assists as the Lutes beat the Willamette Bearcats 65-64 on Feb. 13.

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AJ. Konopaski was selected as a pre-season All-American for the 2015 baseball

season. Konopaski admits. The team doing the most research and recruiting on Konopaski is the Tampa Bay Rays. The Rays are seriously considering him as a member of the team next year, in hope that he can help their organization for the better. "I've had a blessed baseball career," Konopaski puts it humbly. Thinking about what will happen after

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his last pitch crosses the plate is far from his main focus. Konopaski still has one last season to give it his everything because every time he steps up to tht~ mound, his goal is to "be the best pitcher:' "I feel good about this seasor ," Konopaski said. "The biggest asset of our team is our depth."

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PLU held Willamette scoreless for the Dani Krier posted a doublE-double with next four minutes, and a first-year Bailey 21 points and 10 rebounds, while Jessica Raines three-pointer sparked a six-point McMillan scored 18 and Gt nna Hughes PLU run to make it a five-point game. 路 added 10 for the Wildcats. Linfield shot 58.1 percent :n the second Kelsey Walker's jumper ended the Willamette drought before junior Tayler period to finish the day at 52.5 percent Flemming hit a three-pointer to pull PLU overall (31-of-59). within four at the four-minute mark. Linfield scored the first six points of the Willamette free throws and a DeLong game before a three-pointer by sophomore layup helped the Bearcats maintain a Madison Green-Hayward got the Lutes on cushion, but Abdo took over and scored the board. A three-pointer by Abdo helped the Lutes' final 10 points of the day. She bring PLU even closer befor~ a layup by finished the night with 14 points to go with sophomore Lacey Nicholson ied the score seven rebounds and four assists, while at 8-8. PLU actually continued th~ run with six Flemming added 12 points. Junior Sarah Barnes scored 11 on 5-of-6 more points to use a 14-2 run that gave the shooting, and sophomore Lacey Nicholson Lutes the six-point lead. Linfield tied it back up at 16-16, with tallied 10 points. DeLong led Willamette with 15 points, the final tie of the night cor:i.ing at 23-23 while Kylie Towry posted a double-double . following a layup by Junior Jori Hall. The Wildcats proceedec to score the with 14 points and 12 rebounds. Julia Brand next 10 points to take a 33-23 lead late in scored 13. The Bearcats held a 36-29 halftime_lead the period, while the Lutes scored the final before PLU outscored Willamette 36-28 in four points of the period on free throws the second period. Willamette finished the by junior Tayler Flemming and Greennight with a .436 team shooting percentage Hayward to trail 33-27 at the Jreak. The Lutes scored the fir:;t four points (24-of-55), while PLU shot 38.2 percent of the second period to pull within two from the field (26-of-68). at 33-31 following another three by Abdo, but Linfield scored the next eight points to Game2 push its lead back to double-digits. PLU hung dose for the next eight Pacific Lutheran University shot 23.8 percent for the game as the Lutes fell to minutes, drawing as dose as fye back at 52Linfield 79-53 in Northwest Conference 47 midway through the period following a women's basketball action Saturday layup by junior Sarah Barnes. But the Lutes made only one more basket evening at Ted Wilson Gymnasium. One day after defeating Willamette on the rest of the way, as Linfidd closed the a buzzer-beater layup by junior Megan game on a 27-6 run to daim the win. PLU falls to 5-18 overall and 2-12 in Abdo, the Lutes' junior point guard made four of her six three-point attempts to conference play, while Linfield improves to 10-13 overall and 4-10 in he NWC. The record a team-best 18 points. Sophomore Taylor Talen added 10 for Lutes head home for their fina 1games of the the Lutes, who recorded a season-low 23.8 season next weekend, hostir_g Whitworth percent overall shooting mark (15-of-63) on Friday at 6 p.m. and Whitman on after making only six of 37 shot attempts in Saturday at 4 pcm. the second half (16.2 percent).

Spring season sports starting up ... Men's Tennis Tomorrow at Linfield 1 p.m.

OF JESSE MAJOR

omen's Tennis Tomorrow vs. Linfield 1 p.m.

Softball Tomorrow vs. Saint Martins 12 p.m.


Coconut milk, yes or no? pg. 5

Baseball takes down Linfield pg.1, 12

Fatal stabbing near PLU campus pg. 3

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Relay for Life brings together groups of people to fight against cancer. There are past, present and future Lutes who have and 1..vill battle cancer, and Pacific Lutheran University holds Relay for Life each year in support of them. Relay for Life is an organized, overnight fundraising walk. Teams camp out around campus and members of each team take turns walking around a track or campus. Along with the walks, there are food, games and activities to entertain and make the experience more fun. The goal of the event is to have different relay teams sponsored to walk all night to raise money to support cancer research. Last year, PLU exceeded expectations and raised $25,000 to help battle cancer. Since the first PLU Relay in 2006, Lutes have raised more than $200,000.

Quotable "We have an obligation to consider the fundamental human rights of those around us." Senior Tahlia Terhune on sexual assault, "Continue the conversation about sexual assault on campus" pg. 9

"I live in the moment

and take it as it comes," Terrell Williams on getting into the National Basketball Association after college. "Athlete Focus: Terrell Williams" pg. 12

"Stick to watching how

the athletes perform on the field during an entire season, instead of a seven day event." Senior Austin Hilliker on the National Football League, "A pointless part of football: The NFL Combine" pg. 8

"As an RA, I deal with noise complaints all the time. I can't imagine how it would escalate to someone stabbing someone to shut them up." Sophomore Anthony Aguilar on the stabbing in Parkland, "Fatal stabbing by PLU" pg. 3

PLU' s Colleges Against Cancer club and Relay for Life received the Nationwide Top Ten award for per-capita fundraising several times over the years. Lutes received this award in 2007, 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013. So far this year, PLU has 17 teams participating in the 2015 Relay. In those teams, there are 48 total participants and together they have raised $540 so far. The Relay for Life kickoff event was Wednesday, Feb. 18 in the Cave. Different teams attended the event to sign up for Relay and to celebrate the official start of Relay for Life. The event had tie-dye, music and free ice cream. Teams 路 have been working since Wednesday and the team "PLU Dancers" has already raised $230 for Relay. "Our motto is 'Fight cancer, hug a dancer,"' senior Emily Mansfield said. "To me, its just all about doing something to stop it. It means a lot to me and my family."

Relay is more personal for some Lutes, like Mansfield who have had family members with cancer and choose to honor them. "It means being one step closer to finding a cure that doesn't involve poisoning other parts of the body," senior Gailon Wixson-Pursley said. "Finding a cure could make the fight against cancer unimaginably easier for those going through it." A recent cancer survivor, Wixson7 Pursley joined Relay for Life after being diagnosed and beating cancer last summer. Wixson-Pursley and her friends are participating in Relay to not only honor the fight that Wixson-Pursley has fought, but also the fight that more people lose everyday. To get involved in this year's Relay for Life, go to http://relayforlife.org/ getinvolved/findanevent and type in "Pacific Lutheran University."

PHOTO COURTESY OF KARU FLOYD

PLU celebrates Relay for Life by dre!;sing up the bust of Martin Luther.

Baseball takes down No. 4 Linfielcj TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications It was better late than never for Pacific Lutheran University as the Lutes tied it with a run in the eighth and scored three in the ninth to claim a 6-3 win over fourthranked Linfield Sunday afternoon at Roy Helser Field. This was PLU's first series win against the Wildcats since 2006. Pacific Lutheran's second straight comeback win gave Linfield its second conference loss in only three games after the Wildcats lost only two North West Conference games in 2014. The win gives PLU the early lead in the NWC race and continued one of the best rivalries in the NWC. "This is a big rivalry in baseball, and it goes back 10 years," said PLU head coach Geoff Loomis. ''This weekend featured two evenlymatched teams playing three incredibly exciting games. The series between these two programs is always competitive, and that's how rivalries are born." The Lutes rallied back from a 3-0 loss in the series opener Saturday to earn a pair of comeback wins and improve to 8-3 overall and 2-1 in conference play, while Linfield fell to 8-3 overall and 1-2 in the NWC. The late-inning excitement began with two outs in the top of the eighth. Linfield led 路3-2 when first-year pinch hitter Jacob Bockelie stepped to the plate and was hit by a pitch to put the tying run on base. Senior Bo Pearson replaced Bockelie as a runner on first, and he came all.the way around to tie it up when

junior Drew Oord hit a clutch double down the right field line. Linfield tried to add pressure in the bottom of the inning after Scott Hilpert reached on a two-out single. Hilpert took off for second on an 0-1 count, but senior Curtis Wildung ired down to second to nab the runner and send the game to the top of the ninth. Wildung wasn't done coming up with big plays fo' the Lutes. The senior catcher stepped into the batter's box with cne out and worked a 3-1 count before turning on a ball and pulling it well over the fence, but 20 feet to the right of the foul pole. On the ensuing pitch, Wildung made sure the ball stayed fair as he sent his first home run of the season over the fence in right center to give the Lutes a 4-3 lead. PLU added two more runs in the inning to p:i.d the lead and give closer A.J. Konopaski, a senior, a bit cf breathing room. Sophomore Ben Welch walked and advanced to second on a wild pitch, prompting the Wildcats to intentionally walk first-year Connor Cantu to set up a double-play opportunity with one out and runners at first and second. Sophomore Jacob Clements hit into a fielder's choice to put runners at the comers with two outs, and seii.ior Collin Nilson came through with his fourth hit-and secornl double-of the day. Nilson drove a deep fly ball off the base of the centerfield wall to s :ore Welch from third and Oements from firEt and make it 6-3 Lutes. Konopaski pitched the ninth for his second save in as many days, extending his program record to 23 career saves. Linfield threatened in the frame with a one-out double by Eric I awson and a walk to Corey VanDomElen putting the tying run CONTINUED at the plate, buL ON PAGE 12


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GENNY BOOTS News Writer Imagine the pop of a button, the squeeze of your old jeans, and the uncomfortable realization that you have gained a few pounds. The "freshman 15" is a common saying that puts fear into first-year college students as they head off to school and away from their family's eating habits. Universities nationwide have r~sponded to this fear by advertising healthier meal and snack choices for students. The Pacific Lutheran University Dining and Culinary team undertook this challenge as they choose what food to put on the plate, the路 shelves and in the hands of the FLU community. Tom Harvey is the retail manager for Dining and Culinary Services. He oversees the The Nook in Hauge Administration Building, The Kelly Cafe in Morken, Tahoma Bakery and Cafe and The Old Main Market. ' Harvey is responsible for the products that fill the shelves at the four campus eateries. He works with a Dining and Culinary Services team _to pick both the "healthy" and "unhealthy'' items that students want. "You see the whole spectrum," Harvey said. "From gummy bears and sour worms

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to organic salads." The Old Main Market is the hub of all the on-campus eateries, with nearly 1500 transactions daily. The most popular items bought are bagels, the house-made yogurt parfaits and the sausage, egg and cheese breakfast sandwiches. Other top sellers include Tillamook cheese squares, bananas and bottled organic smoothies. Whether it is a quick protein bar or bagel on-the-go, Harvey understands that students are increasingly asking for healthier and more convenient options. "What came clear to me is that convenience factor," Harvey said. "We want to eat healthy, but we also want it transportable, so have something in a container that is easy to transport or put in your backpack is important too." But is there enough healthy food to battle the freshman flabbiness? "I think a lot of students when they get away, it's stressful, and so sometimes we go for the unhealthy things. So we want to be sure that there are enough healthy options out there to give you a choice," Harvey said. Though Harvey and his colleagues in Dining and Culinary Services try their best to bring organic, locally sourced food when possible, students are not always impressed with the results. "There is nothing at The Old Main

BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer Students carry their smartphones, laptops and tablets around campus everyday. But, if used incorrectly, those devices could just become extra weight in backpacks. Online pirating could strip students of access to campus Wi-Fi. Pacific Lutheran University community received a concerning email two weeks ago warning about the consequences of music and video piracy on campus. FLU has had a growing number of incidents in which illegal downloads have been made while using the FLU server. "By illegally sharing music or a video, it is like you walking into Walmart and stealing that download. It is the same thing," said Frank Moore, associate provost for Information and Technology Services. The problem comes from using the FLU Wi-Fi while on

campus and the installed software on the student's computer. In order to use the campus Wi-Fi, the computer being used has to be registered to a student's e-pass. That registration creates an IP address for each computer connecting to the Wi-Fi. An IP address is a series of numbers that are separated by periods. This code translates to identify who is communicating through a particular network. When a student makes the decision to access TV shows or movies illegally, they are essentially taking away income from another individual working within the entertainment industry. One flagged way to access this material is through software like BitTorrent or Vuze. Those programs are free for use and easily save on any computer. Large companies such as HBO pay programmers to search for people downloading their material through these sites. Programmers use IP addresses to

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Market that I eat for health reasons. Just for hunger," first-year Oayton Regehr said. "I will usually get a Brisk Ice Tea, doughnuts and pizza bagels. High in sodium and a whole lot of apathy." The communication between what students want to eat and what PLU brings to campus is settled in bimonthly dining committee meetings. "Anyone can go to these meetings," sophomore Reza Refaei said. Refaei has attended these meetings for over a year. _ "No one ever goes because either they don't know about it, don't think they can go or don't have an interest," Refaei said. Refaei has seen positive changes in the products that are served to students. Through his attendance he has spearheaded the addition of the University Commons Good Thing's sunbutter and raspberry jelly sandwich, and more rice and vegetable options, despite the progress that he has seen come from these meetings. "I think that there could be a lot more options in terms of fresh fruit and a lot of the snacks tend to not be on the healthier

find individuals who are gaining free access to their shows and movies. If the IP address that is revealed states PLU, than the Office of Student Life intervenes. PLU receives emails from agencies that have identified illegal activity on the university server, and each week those emails are passed on to Eva Johnson, Dean for Student Development. and Director of Student Involvement and Leadership. Johnson is responsible for halting further actions once they have taken place. If a student is caught illegally downloading on the network for the first time, he or she will receive a letter from Student Conduct explaining that they cannot participate in illegal activity on the PLU server. The Help Desk in the library can help students uninstall pirate software. If the second illegal download is not met with an understanding attitude, Johnson must then meet with the student to have

side and the healthier options seem to be significantly morE expensive," Refaei said. For now, both Harvey and Refaei recommend students to get i :wolved and take responsibility to see crange. There are comment cards, the Culirtary Services Facebook page and the online website to leave suggestions. "We monitor that daily and we try to respond same day to the qm~ries that we get," Harvey said. "We love ihe feedback, and that is really how we drive change. That is an exciting piece of the puzzle."

a conversation about their continued illegal activity and how the student will change their online habits. The third time a similar downloading event occurs the student loses personal access to the network on-campus. This means the student's devices will no longer sync up to the network and the ~tudent will have to go off campus to connect to a different network or use the public library computers. downloading Illegally materials onto a personal computer while on the PLU network violates the student code of conduct. "Take all your devices and_ go to the Help Desk," Johnson said. "Say 'I just want to make sure all my devices are clean from any illegal downloading."" The FLU Help Desk can be found in the Library and hours can be found online at http:/I www.plu.edu/helpdesk/.


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 27, 2015

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About the 2015 Oscars After last year's incident mispronouncing Idina Menzel' s name, the Academy put Travolta and Menzel on stage together to present an Oscar. The result? A creepy back and forth between the two, in which Travolta held Menzel's face in his hands.

Tony Awards and th~ Emmys on his resume. During the Oscars, NPH sang, performed magic and even took off his clothes for the audience.

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The 'best pictures' did not make a ton of money, relatively speaking. The tops

box office hits of 2014 were "Guardians of the Galaxy'' ($332.Sm) and "Hunger Games: Mokingjay" ($306.7m) which made more than three times what the 'best picture' nominee's made. "The Grand Budapest Hotel" ($59m) and "The Theory of Everything" ($33m) did not even come close. The one exception was "American Sniper" ($312m).

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Neil Patrick Harris, the host. 'NPH' has the

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#AskHerMore Womeninthe entertainment industry made the #AskHerMore movement for the Oscars because they wanted women to be asked about more than who she was wearing, who did her hair and where her jewelry was from. Reese Witherspoon started the movement by asking reporters to ask her about more than her clothing on the red carpet.

Best Picture: "Birdman" Best Actor: Eddie Redmayne, "The Theory of Everything" Best Actress: Julianne Moore, "Still Alice" 1if • Best Director: Alejandro Gonzalez Jnarritu, "Birdman" 1!f Best Original Song: "Glory" by John Legend, Common Best Animated Film: "Big Hero 6" Best Original Music Score: "The Grand Budapest Hotel Best Supporting Actor: J.K. Simmons, "Whiplash" Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Arquette, "Boyhood"

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Altercation in apartments turned into murder You're a philosophy majc)r?

hat are you going to do witr that?

he Humanities Career Fair has answered that question for yol1. Go to http://mastmedia.plu.edu to learn mJre.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KOMO NEWS

The University Park Apartments at 400 Wheeler St. are approximately 2 blocks away from the PLU campus,_

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor A noise complaint, turned into a fight which turned into a murder Monday night at a nearby apartment complex. According to The News Tribune's report, neighbors called 911 at 11:30 p.m. to report two men fighting in the third-floor hallway of the University Park apartments on Wheeler Street. The Sheriff's Department responded and found the victim, 50-year-old Dan Hoglund, slumped over in the hallway :hear his apartment. The Sheriff deputy declared him dead at the scene. The Pierce County Medical Examiner's Office said Hoglund died from multiple stab wounds. The Sheriff's deputies arrested a 21-yearold man on suspicion of second-degree murder and was charged on Wednesday. The suspect was found on the second floor of the complex cleaning himself after the altercation, Pierce County sheriff's spokesman Ed Troyer said. A p{Jcket knife was recovered from the suspect' s apartment. The suspect was booked into Pierce County Jail. Director of Campus Safety, Greg Premo said students should not be afraid. That night, Campus Safety was monitoring the

Sheriff's Dept. radio when they heard the call go out The Sheriff Dept.' s deputies arrived quickly at the scene and had the suspect detained. Campus Safety contacted the Sheriffs Department to confirm there was no ongoing threat to campus. The Sheriff's Dept. confirmed the suspect was in custody and no PLU community members were involved in the altercation. Students walking and driVing around campus Monday night saw police cars and ambulances lining Wheeler. "As an RA, I deal with noise complaints all the time," sophomore Anthony Aguilar said. "I can't imagine how it would escalate to someone stabbing someone to shut them up." Some PLU students live in the apartments. According to the Sheriffs Dept. there were no students involved in that night's activities except for those who may have been woken up by the noise. Students feel safe on campus, but this event will act as a reminder to be more careful in general. If students feel like they are ever in danger, or need help, Campus Safety will respond to calls 24 hours a day and can help in most emergency situations. Call 253-5357441 for non-emergencies, and call 253-5357911 for emergency situations.

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THE MOORING MAST

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1moress -w1 ERIN FLOM Guest Writer Nazi-controlled Austria was a dangerous place, but that didn't stop Gil and Eleanor Kraus from ' entering the country. This is the story of the Emmynominated documentary "50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus."

heard before," Pressman said, and it turned into a "meaningful project." Originally a print journalist, "50 Children" was Pressman's first experience with filmmaking. "It was fun to learn a new way to tell a story," Pressman said. Pressman has screened the learn from it today. The three-day film many times with audiences conference is free and open to the - ranging from Holocaust survivors public. to college students. "50 Children" tells the story of '1 enjoy hearing what the Gil and Eleanor Kraus who left audience has to say," Pressman America for Austria in 1939 to said, '1 always learn something bring children to safety in America. new." Pressman discovered this' story Pressman said he wants through his -wife, Liz, one of the audiences "to not just remember Kraus' s grandchildren. Pressman [the Holocaust] but to think later found an unpublished 'maybe there's something I can do manuscript written by Eleanor

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The hour-long film will be screened at 7 p.m. March 4 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center. The director of the film, Steven Pressman, will be at the screening and will answer questions afterward. The film opens the PowellHeller Conference, an annual event hosted by Pacific Lutheran University that examines the Holocaust and how people can

PHOTO BY EDDIE MCCOVEN

On Feb. 21 in KHP, PLU hosted "A Gospel Experience" in association with the Tacoma Ministerial Alliance. The event featured local gospel choirs and the debut of new PLU Gospel Choir, performing Hezekiah Walker's "Greatfullness" and "Every Praise" as well as "Great Is Thy Mercy" by Donnie Mcclurken.

today."' Professor Beth K::aig, director of Holocaust and Genocide Studies at PLU, said she agrees with Pressman. Kraig· said she w:mld like for students to "see the Krauses as disciplined and taler.ted and that people have the abili1y to do what they did too." Kraig also noted ·:hat both the film and the conference "overlap with the mission of PLU. To help people find the very 1: est they have in themselves and to also show the potential you have to reduce harms."

PHOTO BY MA rTHEW SALZANO

Jehane Noujaim, Academy-award nominated director of "The Square,'"visited iJLU on Feb. 19 for a full day of events, including a Q&A and luncheon sponsored by the Wang Center (pictured). At the Ambassador Chris Stevens memorial lecture, Noujaim encoura ~ed Lutes to stand up against injustice. "Your refusal to turn a blind eye to injustice makes a difference," she said.

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FEB. 27, 2015

A&E5

THE MOORING MAST

SAMANTHA News Editor

MATTHEW SALZANO A&EEditor

I thought coconut milk at Starbucks would mean my mochas could start tasting like Samoa Girl Scout cookies. However, when I ordered a mocha with coconut milk, I was not only grossed out that my drink tasted like it was made with dirty water, but that I was actually charged 60 cents more for it. I know it might be healthier, and I'm sure ifs great for people who cant drink milk, but I'm saying no to the new coconut milk trend. Not only that, but the milk had seeped through my cup and left me with a semen-esque layer of coconut milk syrup around my cup. Definitely a mess maker and an appetite-killer.

I find coconut milk, an option so widely-demanded by Starbuck-ians worldwide, a dissapointrnent. I worked for Starbucks in Spokane, Wash., for two years (ending in September 2012). During my time as an espressoslinger, I witnessed many customer complaints about the only non-dairy option, a vanilla Soymilk. Coconut Milk and Almond Milk were regularly . requested from Baristas in my location, and, if my interpretation of social media is correct, across the nation. These customers · went to MyStarbucksldea.com, a Starbucks customer-response site, and lodged 84,000 requests for a new non-dairy option. Starbucks granted the requests and released the new milk option nationwide on Feb. 17. I don't understand the hype. My double-short-extra-foamno-w hi p-one-p um p-w hi techocolate-mocha tastes far better with soymilk or real milk than the watery substance I recieved.

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BROOKE THAMES A&EWriter Tomorrow, members· of the Pacific Lutheran University community can see how powerful their education can be. "Namibia Nine;, is a documentary conceived by Dr. Joanne Lisosky, a professor of communication at PLU. In alliance with the Wang Center for Global Education and the PLU Department of Communication, Lisosky and an array of colleagues have produced a documentary on the experiences of the Nine Namibian exchange students after matriculating at PLU. "The Namibia Nine" event takes place at 6:30 p.rn. Feb. 28 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center. The film will be screened followed by a Q&A with the former Namibian Lutes and the filmmakers. "This is a 'Where Are They 'Now' type story of these nine students who were chosen [to attend PLU]," said Melannie Cunningham, director of multicultural recruitment and logistics manager for the documentary. "This story is powerful." SouthAfrica was charged with the responsibility of preparing the region of South-West Africa for independence after gaining control of the country after World War I. Instead, South Africa maintained control and

' enforced the segregation law known as Apartheid (segregation on grounds of race). In the 1980s, a war for the independence of South-West Africa began. Lutherans around the world rallied together in an effort to aid South-Wwest Africa in gaining its independence. "You see, this story is rooted in the fact that more than 50 percent of the people in South-West Africa were Lutheran," James Unglaube of Evangelical Lutheran Church said. "[South-West Africa was] one of the most Lutheran nations in the world. and Unglaube other Lutheran church officials conceived the idea of bringing 100 high school graduates from Southwest Africa to the U.S. to

ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager AB someone who loves her vanilla lattes, I was excited to try my favorite drink at Starbucks with a coconutty twist The latte tasted about the same, but had a little after taste of coconut. If you're a big coconut fan like I ai.-n, I suggest paying the extra 60 cents to try it out, as it's a healthier dairy alternative than soy.

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attend 29 Lutheran colleges and universities. "We invited colleges to accept these students and grant them full scholarships ... and they did," Unglaube said. After receiving a $2.5 million grant from the German government to create the Namibia 100 program, South-West African students traveled to study abroad in the U.S. PLU was one of the 29 colleges that was invited to participate in the project. Under the direction of former PLU Pastor Ron Tellefson, more than $300,000 was raised to bring nine SouthWest African students to the Pacific Northwest Originally, Tellefson was asked to raise enough to bring only one South-West African student to PLU. "I was able to raise $50,000 (four years' tuition) in pledges for scholarship support within ten days," Tellefson said. "I asked the President, 'What shall we do next?' He responded, 'Bring more [South-West Africans] to PLU."' In_ three months' time, nearly $350,000 had been pledged to grant four-year scholarships to eight South-West

RELAND TUOMI Editor-in-Chief I'm a woman of simple pleasures, and one of those pleasures is a grande, nonfat hot chocolate. During winter 1irne, I might mix it up with a shot of peppermint, but more often than not I stick to what I know: grande, nonfat hot chocolab~. When I was asked to try my favorite Starbs drink with coconut milk, I was hesitant. However, I bit the bullet and ordered a grande hot choolate with coconut milk. Cocount milk turns my simple pleasure into a cr«amy deliciousness I am unable to fully put into words. It ha; the thickness and frothiness hot chocolate with 2 percent or even whole milk would have, but with a hint of sweetness I didn't know I needed in my hot c1Jcoa. Coconut milk provides my grande with 10 grams of fai and 270 calories, while nonfat has 2.5 grams of fat and 270 cal< >ries, too. I am still a woman of si nple pleasures, but this parti :ular pleasure will now include coconut milk.

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African students. "We were able to educate eight young people ... more than any of the other 28 Lutheran institutions," Tellefson said. "[In the early 2000s] we were able to welcome our ninth scholar."

Namibian alun:mi serve as leaders in science, such as tl .e Senior Forensics Controller for the Depai.4::ment of Home At fairs, cued at universities, such as the director of communication and marketing at the University of Nam [bia.

South Africa relinquished control of South-West Africa in 1990, and the country was renamed "Namibia." Following their time at PLU, each of the nine returned to Namibia in hopes to use their education to aid in the development of their newly · founded country. Several of the Namibia Nine now serve roles in the Namibian Government. Pehdapala Andreas Naanda, '92, now holds the positions of personal assistant to the Minister for Foreign Affairs and deputy ambassador to the United Nations for Namibia. "PLU has broadened my way of thinking about the world around me," Naanda said. ''Ifs an education that has prepared me for my diplomatic career." Other

"Our nine all supervise people ... and their staff will tell you that [they are] different from other managers," Cunningham said. "What's different about other managers in the building is that [they] didn't rec;'!ive their education from PLU. The staff recognizes that differen,:e in [the Namibia Nine]." Six of the nine· \Jamibian students will be in attendance tomorrow night, including Naanda. "I feel like [I'm] goir g home," Naanda said. "This is what the Lutes would call 'homeo)ming."' For the PLU comml:nity, this film is a powerful demonstration of the value of a Lutheran education and what it tmly means to be a Lute. "The film reflects fruitful liberation through E ducation, leadership for the ircdigenous people of Namibia, and the vital roles these Namibians me playing in building a democratii: nation," Tellefson said. "They're family," Curmingham added. "They're Lutes."


THE MOORING MAST

6FEATURE

FE:B. 27, 2015

Ann Kelleher Oeft) is a professor of political science and global studies. She retired in 2012.

On Feb. 23, Pacific Lutheran Universit"f posteci on its Facebook page "Is there a pc:rticular PLU facJllty member that L.nspires you? How so? #whyPLU." The comments section. flooded 1Nith more than 100 路eplies. Featured in this section are some 0拢 nl.e most popular professors mentioned on that Facebook thread.

Compiled by Reland Tuomi, Editor-m-Chief

PHOTO COURTESY OF SOAC

Dr. Amanda Feller is a professor of communication, focusing mainly on peace and conflict studies.

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THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 27, 2015

FEATURE7

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Professor Beth Kraig is a professor history of director of Holocaust and Genocide Studies

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

assault By TAHUA TERHUNE Guest Columnist Sexual assault on campus and in the work force is not something often discussed or thought about on a daily basis. Lieutenant Colonel Celia FlorCruz gave a compelling speech Feb.-17 about sexual harassment in both college and military environments, and stressed the importance of education and conversations surrounding this issue. Having served 37 years in the military, FlorCruz is a well-verse_d woman in many aspects of life. Her understanding of sexual harassment is one to be shared. If there is one thing listeners took away, it's to be there for friends or family that have experienced any form of sexual harassment. Often times,. victims feel ashamed and do not want to discuss what happened to them, let alone even report it. Procedures such as rape kits are a

FEB. 27. 2015

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thorough and invasive process that someone who is grieving might have a difficult time going through. It is critical to have a system of support. FlorCruz says the most vulnerable people are those ages 18-24 who are away from home for the first time. They - may also be more vulnerable if they have previously been a victim of sexual assault or heavily use alcohol or drugs. Victims need adequate counseling. This does not have to be professional either. A personal relationship such as a healthy friendship might just be enough to help make circumstances easier. "The best thing you can do for a victim is listen" FlorCruz said. I've heard peers claim that the victim is just crying wolf, or he or she was "asking for it." According to FlorCruz, only 2-5 percent of rape reports are false. Knowing that information, it is ignorant and inconsiderate to ever assume that a victim is not entitled to support and help. We have an obligation to consider the fundamental human rights of those

around us. What did FlorCruz suggest we do? She recommended we change the way we brag about sex. The dialogue society has created around sex is degrading and needs to be stopped. It's as simple as walking away from a conversation and not listening to those around you. In addition, prevention starts with awareness. Often times, predators are experts in rationalizing behavior. Roughly 3-5 percent of men commit more than 95 percent of rapes. Substances such as alcohol are a primary weapon and predators may have hyper masculine behaviors. It is not uncommon for them to lack empathy. "I think it's necessary to open communication," junior Erin McCoy said. "It's always a sensitive subject and we need to get a conversation going." Creating an open dialogue is exactly what we need. We can't avoid words such as 'sexual assault' because they make us feel uncomfortable. It's critical that we embrace open discussions and lend help when we can.

THE MOORING MA:ST Pacific Lutheran Universiey 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MA.f\IAGER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR II

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Sports

When I think of football, I think of jaw dropping

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catches, bone crunching tackles and game winning drives. Now what if I told you there was another part of football that involved a seven day event with athletes taking turns to jump up in the air a few times, run in a straight line a couple more times and even catch a few passes from a quarterback that they have never seen? Well that's what we call the National Football

toward the a large group of the best athletes in college football gather in Indianapolis and showcase their skills in front of hundreds of NFL scouts. Smee 1982, when the event was first started, the goal of this week long event was for athletes to perform with the hope of standing out to future employers. I've been a football fan for quite some time now. I've spectated, participated and even coached the sport. In all the years that I've been around the game, my friends and family always find a way to mention the NFL combine. They talk about how one athlete jumped the farthest, another ran the fastest and there was even a coach who made a funny comment about a player during a live press conference. That just doesn't seem

fun to me. In all it sounds It seems combine focuses more on how bad someone did, as opposed to how good someone did. For instance, former quarterback from Florida State University, Jameis ran a 4.97 second time, which was slower than offensive lineman Ali Marpet, a 307 lineman from and Williams Smith Yes, you read that right, a 307-pound lineman beat the 2013 Reisman trophy winner. That shouldn't happen, but the fact that it did actually moved Winston down in most of the NFL teams draft boards. This hurt the iconic quarterback's chances of getting drafted. Each year, NFL scouts watch hundreds of college football games, evaluating every player, with the hope that a few of the young

Learn all you can about BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer

men will be drafted come a time for the know player. So, what's the of having a combine if everything is known about how a player performs on the field? Last time I there was this thing called the Olympics where athletes get paid to jump high and far, run fast and lift weights. If you want to do that, join the national team instead of putting on a pointless event that isn't going to change how young men play football. Props to NFL network for keeping people busy in the off-season with the NFL combine, but if it were my choice, I'd get rid of the entire thing. Stick to watching how the athletes perform on the field during an entire season instead of a seven day event.

r · g off campus

word of mouth, Craigslist ads, students posting on the PLU Housing Facebook page about open rooms and getting lucky enough to drive by a "for rent" sign. ·

With the semester in full swing, housing application deadlines are fast approaching. Students are faced with the tough choice of continuing to live in the resident halls on campus or "I feel as though I have my moving into a home off of the Pacific own place to call home." Lutheran University grounds. In order to move off campus, there are requirements that must be met. Danielle Sheppard A student must be 20 years or older, junior junior standing in credits or living in their parents' home within 25 miles of the PLU campus. Once one of those requirements is fulfilled, the student is Investing time in choosing a home is cleared to find housing off campus. worth the extra work. The act of moving out can seem "I have space to myself, where I do difficult at first. not have to worry about disturbing Finding housemates to live with others or sharing spaces," junior is usually step one. Filling out a Danielle Sheppard said. "It helps me questionnaire for Residential Life focus on what is most important, getting becomes a thing of the past because my college degree." living off campus means hand-picking Along with personal space, not the individuals who are going to live in having a Resident Assistant and having the next room. an individual room, moving off campus Students find themselves relying on has understandable appeal.

Residence Directors are replaced by landlords whose responsibilities are quite different. Police officers, insurance agents and fellow housemates combine to fill the position of the Residence Director. In the case of structural damage to the home, the landlord can be called, but living off campus means allocating other responsibilities to people besides the landlord. Amenities that PLU used to pick up the tab for now fall on the renters. These utilities include water, electricity and trash that needs to be picked up. Some leases have the utility bill already included in the rent, which can make bill planning easier. If the lease does not include utilities, the renters have to pay each bill to the provider. Cable and internet are not likely to be included in the rent either, even if utilities are included. "I feel as though I have my own place to call home," Sheppard said. "Especially since I am not from this state. Having a place to feel like home is important."

Jeff Dunn ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds

GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds '""'-·""'''"" EDITOR

Brett

NEWS @ NINE PRODUCEF:

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Moorinf ·Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important iss1 Les, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. . The Mooring Mast adheres to the ~:ociety of Professional Journalists Code of I :thics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorids, columns and advertisements do not necess uily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right :o refuse or edit letters for length, taste and e1 rors. Include name, phone number and class sta1ding or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place in advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, tomail mast@ plu.edu.

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Susana Doll's name was misspelled on the front page article ''Get your shots or get the dots:'


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.........

FEB. 27 2015

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 9

I

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NATALIE DEFORD News Writer The Holocaust is important and should be remembered and studied by everyone, including children. The deaths of 11 million people should not be ignored or forgotten. The 8th Powell-Heller Holocaust Education Conference is March 4-6 at Pacific Lutheran University, and people of all ages should attend. With the recent 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwiiz, the Holocaust is a big topic right now. I'm glad it's currently getting a lot of attention, because it's something we should be talking about. Children are the focus of this year's conference, entitled "Children's Voices: The Holocaust and Beyond." A 2014 UN report stated that half of the world's 51 million refugees are children. After reading this report, the conference's faculty planning group quickly decided children should be invited and stories of other children should be heard. About 200 local students, grades 8-12, will attend. They will study the effects of dehumanization of children, both during the Holocaust and today. Some people argue that the Holocaust is too scary and violent and we shouldn't tell our kids about it. But our world today is full of violence on TV and in video games. It's unavoidable. With children already so exposed to such horrors, why not talk about the Holocaust with them? The Holocaust should be taught to children. Yes, learning about such horrific and sad events can be quite a downer. For a child, this could even be emotionally scarring or traumatizing. Some, including Lord Baker,

"I think that learning about the Holocaust can help people see the negative and tragic consequences of hatred and through this learn to accept their differences." Jason said. Jason also said the Holocaust should definitely b~ taught to children, but that they don't need all of the terrifying details to get the idea. "I feel like a lot of people think the Holocaust sl:-.ould be taught to their children in junior high or later becau >e of the subject matter," Jason said. "I would tell them that it's okay to keep the detzils from their younger children." Jason argue:! that parenting is the key here. "Of course, if the child is playing videJ games where they're killing people; then they can I'robably hear about the Holccaust in its fullness," Jason said. "The parent has an oppJrtunity to discuss the value of human life and how it differs in a video game context versus real life." Everyone should attend the Powell-Heller HJlocaust Education Conference. There's no excuse not to gc. We can't let the Holocaust be forgotten. We need to continue teachi.ng so the history and healing can c mtinue.

·Baron of Dorking, want to completely ban all Holocaust studies to focus only on local histories. But, this topic is still important and should not be ignored for such reasons. According to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's (USHMM) website, studying the Holocaust helps students to, "understand the roots and ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping in any society." The USHMM site also provides an answer to the question of why students should study the Holocaust: "The Holocaust provides one of the most effective subjects for examining basic moral issues. A structured inquiry into this history yields critical u lessons for an investigation into human behavior. It also addresses one of the central mandates of education in the United States, which is to examine what · it means to be a responsible citizen." To avoid scaring our kids, while still teaching them to be good people and learn from the mistakes of our past, we can teach them about awful things ma nice way. The student guests will be hosted by 32 PLU students and, together, will read the works of children who lived during the Holocaust. Mostly, these stories are told through the writings of children. PLU student host Lexi Jason, sophomore, said she thinks such horrific stories will be easier for the kids to read since they were written from the perspective of other children. Jason said she thinks the Holocaust is not only an importantandrecentpartofourhistory, but also something to learn from.

we can teach them a about awful things nice way."

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10 SPORTS

F'EB. 27, 2015

THE MOORING MAST

Softball

Baseball WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

Willamette

10

0

3-0

Won10

Linfield

6

George Fox

s

s

3-0

Won3

Pacific

Pacific Lutheran

8

3

2-1

Won2

Whitworth

Puget Sound

4

6

2-1

Won 1

Linfield

8

3

1-2

Lost2

Lewis &-Clark

1

7

1-2

Lost 1

Whitworth

s

3

0-0

Pacific

1

s

Whitman

1

6

TEAM

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Q

0-0

Won6

7

3

Q-0

Wons

7

3

0-0

Won3

4

2

0-0

Lost 1

2

2

0-0

Wont

Pacific Lutheran

1

3

Q-0

Won 1

Won4

Puget Sound

0

6

0-0

Lost 6

0-3

Lost S

Willamette

Q

6

0-0

Lost6

0-3

Lost4

Men's Tennis TEAM

George Fox --Lewis & Clark

LOSSES

Women's Tennis

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitman

6

1

2-Q

Wons

Lewis & Clark

2

1

2-0

Won2

George Fox

2

1

1-1

Won 1

Pacific

2

1

1-1

Lost 1

Linfield

1

2

1-1

Won 1

Pacific Lutheran

1

2

1-1

Lost 1

Puget Sound

0

2

0-2

Lost2

Whitworth

0

4

0-2

Lost4

Willamette

0

1

0-0

Lost 1

-

WINS

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

4

2

2-0

Won2

Lewis & Clark

3

2

3-0

Won3

Whitman

3

2

3-0

Won2

Whitworth

2

2

2-1

Won2

George Fox

3

3

0-2

Lost3

1

2

0-2

Lost2

0

2

0-2

Lost2

0

2

Q-2

Lost2

0

4

0-1

Lost2

--Pacific

Pacific Lutheran Puget Sound -Willamette

LUTES' UPCOMING GAMES Baseball Doubleheader: Tomorrow @ 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. vs. Pacific

vs. PJICITIC t!JTHEl!Al\f tmIVERSITT

Softball -,,,,

Doubleheader: Tomorrow @ 12 p.m. & 2 p.m. @ George Fox

@ l'JICITIC ttrrm:!lAlll tmIVEl!SITT

Men's Tennis Tomorrow@ 1 p.m. vs. George Fox

vs. PACITIC WTHlll!Al\f tmIVERSITT

-7-

Women's Tennis Tomorrow@ 1 p.m.@ George Fox

@ PACll'IC路UITHSRAN tmIV!:RSITY


..... :~PORTS

·11 i

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Austin Hilliker Sports Editor Pacific Lutheran University has always been known for its academically rigorous and challenging courses. The small private liberal arts university has even been a platform for Norwegian heritage to flourish. But people tend to forget one thing: athletics. Lute athletics are top notch in the conference. Football, soccer, golf, tennis, whatever it is, PLU always seems to be in the conversation for some of the best sports teams of the past, present and even the future. But what makes us so good in all these different sports? Hard work, dedication and pride? Most likely. All of those and more could be added into the equation for a successful sports team. But again, people tend to forget a very important aspect: fan support. In order to be a great Lute fan, you must know the basics. Luckily, I'm here to help.

Rule #1: Understand the sport First things first, you need to understand exactly what you're watching. Regarding this rule, let's take a look at softball as an example. There are seven innings in softball, not nine like Major League Baseball. Don't be the person that asks, "What about the last couple innings?" because you will be shunned from the fans sitting around you.

You also need to know that there are no "lead-offs" in softball. Again, comparing this to the MLB where lead-offs are allowed, this isn't the case in college softball. An over-arching rule that is highly encolJ_raged includes watching sports highlights on YouTube, in addit{on to reading sports articles in magazines and newspapers. If you can grasp on to this simple rule, you11 be in good shape.

Rule #2: Talk about it When in doubt, talk it out. If you want to feel smart about sports, then you should talk about them to your friends. The more you talk about the sport itself, the more prepared you will be when it's time for game day. For this rule, let's use basketball as an example. Sports fans have a ridiculous obsession regarding statistics. When talking about basketball, it would be wise to bring up rather unusual stats such as backcourt defense, second chance points and even fast break points. . Just mentioning these three categories will make you seem more knowledgeable about basketball without taking the time to research the sport itself. Once you talk about this kind of stuff, you11 impress quite a few people.

Rule #3: Recognize the Athletes Athletes love it when they get a uat on

the back When you walk past a PLU athlete, recognize them for their performance. Baseball fits rather well for this rule. Let's take senior pitcher A.J. Konopaski for example. This first-team, pre-season All-American pitcher has been in the newspaper a few times already for his stellar performances this year. If and when you walk past A.J., first say hello. You should always be polite, just like your parents taught you in elementary school. Once you successfully execute a well thought out greeting, you can now move on to congratulating him on the team win they had a few days ago. But if it just so happens that the baseball team lost, let A.J. know that the team will be alright and that next time we11 get the win. Simple enough? On to the next rule.

Rule #4: Proper Dress Code If you really want to be the best sports fan that has ever attended PLU, you need to dress in the proper attire. To accomplish this, you can simply take a quick stroll over to the Garfield Book Co., and snag a T-shirt, sweater or beanie of your choice, making sure that it matches up with the sporting event that you wish to attend, and you can carry on your way. Snapchat, tweet, even throw up an Instagram post of you wearing your new clothing, so that people know you are

COURTESY OF GOLU rES.COM

ready to root for fellow Lutes. Once this is accomplished, you are ready for the final rule to becoming a :egit PLU sports fan.

Rule #5: Cheer them on The final rule of becoming a 1;reat PLU sports fan is to actually attend th<· sporting event itself. By attending different sporti1g events throughout the year, you'll l::ecome a more educated fan and you'll _l•e looked at as somebody who shows pride in their school's sports. Moral of the story, go out and Eupport. You11 help the Lutes gain a poss .ble home field advantage by attending the games and who knows, you might have a lot of fun. So get off the couch, put dov. n the TV remote and show some love to ye ur fellow PLU athletes.

II

Sophomore Madison Green-Hayward played 26 minutes for the Lutes and scored 12 points as. PLU lost to Whitman 78-4 7.

dropping the ball in its last two home games against Whitworth · Sports Writer and Whitman. There wasn't a lack of effort by The Women's Basketball team - the women, but instead the loss concludes its 2014-2015 season by came due to a lack of offensive

Steven McGrain

tes lose Christian Bond Guest Writer The Pacific Lutheran University Men's Basketball team had a chance to make a playoff appearance, but needed a lot of help last weekend. Facing two teams that were ranked high in conference, the· Lutes had their work cut out for them. PLU lost both games, 68-38 Whitworth and 88-80 Whitman, but didn't go down without a fight. "The weekend showed the true character of our team," head coach Steve Dickerson said. "We were humbled by Whitworth but came back the next day to play a terrific game versus Whitman. It really was a classic." The Lutes fought hard on Friday night as they faced the top team

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production in two of the four halves. In the first half against No. 20 rari.ked Whitworth, the Lutes only managed to score 12 points compared to the Pirates 38. In the second hill, the Lutes managed to outscore the nationally rari.ked team, 40-37, but the deficit from the previous 20 minutes was too much to overcome. The most glaring statistic from the contest was the turnover margin, 19-10. When playing against a Top 25 team, the ball control needed to be in the Lute's favor, and it was not. Top performers for PLU were first-year Bailey Raines, who recorded 12 points off the bench, and junior Jori Hall, racking up nine points. The final score was 75-52, Whitworth.

.......

II On Saturday, the women played against the Whitma11 Missionaries, but the end result was the same as the previous night. The score after the first half was close with the Lutes only down by nine, 37-28, but the shots did not fall in the second half. In the second half, PLU was outscored 41-19 by the Missionaries. Looking at the game as a whole, it came down to a slow rotation by Lute defenders, which in turn gave Whitman more chances to score throughout the game, especially in the paint. The defense was just slow. It was almost as though they were trying to focus on offense and as long as they outscored Whitman, they could win the game. It could have been six players

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in the conference, Whitworth The Lutes had a five-point lead University. heading into halftime. In the Whitworth walked away with second half, they stretched the a 69-38 victory. lead to eight with a little more Knowing their playoff chances than eight minutes left in the were virtually over, PLU · game. celebrated the careers of their PLU had a 4-point lead with 32 seconds left in the game. seniors Saturday night. Andrew Alness, Austen Trent Tochi Oti hit two clutch free Wilson, Kevin McCrossin and throws for Whitman, sending Terrell Williams were all honored the game into overtime. The late rally meant Whitman had all the before the game. Coach Dickerson had nothing momentum on their side heading but praise for his four seniors. into overtime. "It is always a catch-22 situation The Lutes did not shoot well to see the seniors go," Dickerson down the stretch. Apart from said. "You have spent so much a buzzer beater put-back from time together and gone through sophomore Kyle Sawtell, PLU did so many different things." not score for the majority of the The Lutes played some inspired last two minutes. basketball Saturday night against Whitman was able to finish Whitman. strong and put the Lutes away Whitman was another high 88-80. rari.ked team, but PLU was not The Pacific Lutheran Men's afraid. The seniors certainly Basketball team made its fans wanted to go out in style. proud by showing fight and

....

getting tired and playmg more than 20 minutes in bac'z to back nights. The final score W3.S 78-47. On a positive note, there a:re no seniors on the :~014-2015 basketball team, whic :i. means everyone will be back nE xt year. This team can gain more chemistry in the off ~;eason, a trait that was lacking over the weekend. For example, knowing where a teammate's spo: is on the court and making the e<tra pass, which paid dividend!; during games, but wasn't th1~re often enough. The first-years can be implemented more and feel more comfortable in this styie of offense. Look for big things to come next winter from the L1dy Lutes basketball team.

-

a

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FR )SCHAUER

Sophomore Kyle Sawtell scored a career best 21 points, in a losiug effort to Whitman College on Senior Night.

resilience in their final game. The Lutes finished with an 8-17 record, while going 6-10 in conference. With a relatively young team of talented players, the future looks bright for the program. Coach Dickerson is positive

about the future. "If we work hard ov~r the off season and bring in a 1:ouple of good recruits the futue looks very bright."

-


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 27, 2015

I

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Staff Writer

COURI'ESY OF GOLUTES.COM

Senior Terrell Williams averaged 4.6 points a game for the lutes during the 2014-15 season.

To make sure that her boy stayed active and out of trouble, a caring mother made the decision to have her son play basketball. Though what she didn't know 17 years ago was that she was really handing her son his passion. Now, when team captain and senior Terrell Williams dribbles the ball down the court, he stands 6 feet tall with a passion for the game he truly loves. When he was just a first-year, Williams had the opportunity to shadow the senior point guard at the time, James Conti. "[Conti] was a great role model for me," Williams said. "I was

able to learn a lot from him that has helped me in my playing since then." During his sophomore year, Williams was included even more and began his transformation into a strong leader on the team. He also started in 11 out of 21 games and scored a total of 59 points over the course of the 2012-13 season. Williams became even more impactful as he scored 167 points the following season, starting in 11 out of 25 games. Finishing off his last season, he remarks that it's his "competitiveness" which he brings most to the court, along with being a "leader." "Williams has been a leader in our program ever since he

ball tak s CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

...the Lutes' senior closer induced a pair of fly outs to seal the win. Sophomore Kyle Rossman started on the mound for the Lutes and limited the Wildcats to two earned runs on seven hits in six innings pitched. He pitched out of a bases-loaded, no-out jam in the second inning, allowing only one run in the frame. Senior Jake Otness earned the win after throwing two shutout innings in relief, with Konopaski wrapping it up for the Lutes. Riley Newman started and threw only 2.2 innings for Linfield, allowing one run on six hits before handing off to Joseph Stevick. Stevick threw 4.1 innings, allowing one run on three hits. Cody Walker took the loss after giving up four runs in only 1.2 innings, and Garrett Miller came in to get the final out for the Wildcats. Senior Collin Nilson was nearly perfect at the plate, coming up with four hits in five at bats - including a pair of doubles and driving in four of the Lutes' six runs. Oements scored three of those runs to go

I

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DAVID MAIR

with a double for the Lutes. Junior Tyler Thompson, Oord and Wildung all tallied a pair of hits in the win, and junior Tyler Thompson adding a diving stop in the bottom of the fourth to keep the ball in the infield and save a run for the Lutes. Lawson led Linfield with three hits and two runs batted in, while Jo Carroll added a pair of hits in four at bats. PLU scored first, picking up a two-out run in the top of the first inning. Oements doubled down the left field line and came in to score on Nilson's first single of the day. Linfield scored the next three, tying it up in the second inning on a bases-loaded fielder's choice and combining three hits with a PLU error to score two more in the bottom of the fourth. Pacific Lutheran got one back in the top of the fifth, as Nilson's two-out double scored Oements from first, with neither team scoring again until PLU's late-game heroics in the eighth and ninth. For the weekend, PLU limited a Linfield team that had averaged eightruns per game to a total of eight runs in three contests. The Lutes have now outscored opponents 14-2 in the final three innings of play,

PHOTO COURTESY ORGOLUTES.COM

12 SPORTS

i11 i

set foot on the campus of PLU," said Coach Dickerson. "He has performed admirably in the classroom, on the court and he has set an example- for all of our young players as to what a true student-athlete really is." 路 Dickerson went on to say he has never had a player work harder in the classroom, weight room and on the court. "Terrell has been the true definition of what a team captain is and should be," Dickerson said. The team started out rocky this year, beginning the season 1-5 after just six games. But they ended the season 6-6 at home and 1-8 away. As Williams put it, they were able to "pull themselves out'' and play their "best basketball."

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Although it would be incredibly awesome to go pro, Williams acknowledges that, realistically, it will not be likely. "I live in the moment and take it as it comes," Williams said. "I haven't done much research on it [going into the National Basketball Association] but if the opportunity arose, J wouldn't be opposed to it." For now, he plans to use his business major to go into sports marketing at a busiress in Seattle. Reflecting on his time playing on PLU's court these past four years, Williams said he's realized that he's "gained a bette1 appreciation for those in [his] lfe," and has realized "to enjoy the moments."

I

PHOTO COURTESY 0 l' AARON GUNTHER

PLU head baseball coach Greg Loomis won his 300th game with the win over the Wtld1~ts on Feb. 22.

including a 10-1 ninth-inning advantage. finishing the series Sunday at 12 p.m. Pacific Lutheran hosts Pacific next weekend in the Lutes' 2015 home-opening series. The teams will play a doubleheader on Saturday beginning at 11 a.m. before 路


Softball feature pg.12

Transforming winter fashion for spring pg. 5

How to sound smart about penis size pg. l

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

VOLUME 91 IS SUE 14

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

GENNY BOOTS News Writer Lutes are getting "trashed" this Saint Patrick's Day. Tuesday, March 17 is the annual Garbology event at Pacific Lutheran University's Red Square. During Garbology, students get the chance to see all the waste produced on campus in one day. For the sixth annual RecycleMania challenge, the Sustainability Department is 路 airing out the waste management garbage at PLU. _ Garbology is just one event out of an eight-week RecycleMania challenge. Other events include an E-cyclemania drive to recycle electronics and a showing of the Disney movie "Wall-E." However, the perennial favorite and finale of PLU' s RecycleMania is the all-day trash-a-thon. Over the course of the day, students are invited to sort through all the university's trash collected from the day before. This includes all residence hall, classroom and dining hall waste. "The Garbology event is

exciting because it is a visual representation, in a high profile area, of what is going on on campus with our waste," PLU waste division coordinator, Ryan Grant said. The primary focus of Garbology is to show how much garbage can be prevented from going to the landfill. "Of the majority of our waste on campus, 75 percent of the waste can be diverted immediately from going into the landfill and of that another 40 percent of it can be saved, recycled or reused" Grant said. "Of the waste that we are taking to a landfill on a daily basis, only 10 percent really needs to go into the garbage." Initially started by the nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful, RecydeMania is an international campaign and competition to raise awareness about recycling, conservation and waste management at universities. The campaign began ten years ago between Miami University and Ohio University. Now, more than 350 sustainability programs on campuses across the U.S. and Canada are participating for the

't ta

Quotable "Winning is great, but also it is important to have fun. At the Division III level, we are playing for the love of the game."- Leah Butters "Senior Pitcher Butters" pg. 12

Leah

"Your age does not deterrrrine your value in a group, you do."

eight week competition. The PLU sustainability team collects and measures the amounts of co-mingled waste, glass and compost. This acts as a benchmark for the recycling program and provides a gauge on how well the campus . is responding to conservation initiatives. "Our only job is to report accordingly to how much [waste] we have by either visual estimation or physical weight" Grant said. According to the RecycleMania website, PLU is ranked sixth out of 214 universities, with a recycling rate of 76.225 percent per capita. Of all the waste colleeted, hufes are recycling three quarters of what they could be. This is the highest rank PLU has ever achieved, last year placing 47th. "I think it is really cool," junior Katie Coddington said. "I think it is a really great way for PLU Sustainability to get their name out there and a good publicity thing to make people aware of what they are throwing away." PHOTOS BY GEf\ NY BOOTS

Garbage is collected from arOLmd campus and brought tc Facilities Management and the Sustainability headquarters to be s Jrted路 .and disposed of properly.

e glass, sci Greenhouse coming to campus

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor A new building will be added to campus this summer, just in time to hold the flowers that bloom in spring. A greenhouse is joining Rieke and Morken on the southwest side of campus. The project will be completed

over summer and presented to campus Aug. 5. Plant biology will be the focus of the building, but other scien_ces can make good use of it, too. The state-of-the-art greenhouse will offer students the opportunity to carry out experiments on genetics, cell processes, gene expression and evolutionary adaptations. --

First-year Matthew Salzano, "First-years, don't let your years stop you" pg. 8

"The neighbourhood has become lit up by fireworks purchased from a nearby tribe to celebrate the achievements of dead white men." Senior Angela Shier, "Editor's choice poem" . pg. 5

A projection of what the greenhouse will look like, Aug. 5, when it is finished and presented to campus.

There are gene courses required for biology majors and now those students will be able to use the greenhouse for their experiments. The building will also be a showcase for a botanical collection to showcase biodiversity. The greenhouse will be 1,700 square feet and cost approximately $880,000. The firm AustinCina Architects helped design the building along with PLU. The new building will use a closed-loop, geothermal 路 energy system, meaning no greenhouse-gas-producing emissions will be used in the heating and cooling systems. Professor and Dean of Students Matt Smith is heading the project with help from the Office of Advancement. Rieke was built with a greenhouse sunroof-style inside, but that was not up to par, Smith said. The project has been in the

works since December 2010 when a consultant came to campus to take a look at the existing structure. The consultant decided that it was not worfr. the cost to update the "gre~nhouse" in Rieke and reconmended PLU put its money irto a new structure. The biology department came up with the concept and vision for the structure and met with PLU :;upporter Carol Sheffels Quigg :o get her involved in the project. "How can _ yon study biology without plants?" Smith said. "We need to be able to showcast how impoitant they are to students." The greenhouse will be built with donations fron retired faculty members, the Murdock Charitable Trust, the Norcliffe Foundation and hdividual donors. The Murdocl: Trust in

Continued on PAGE2


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

MA'lCH 6, 2015 Continued from PAGE2 ...

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Emotional for audience} speaker NATALIE DEFORD News Writer "The story of-iliis crisis is not just an American Indian story," the Chancellor's Professor of History at the University of Nebraska said to an audience of more than 100 people Feb. 25. Margaret Jacobs spoke on the removal of Native American children from their families at this year's Walter C. Schnackenberg · Memorial Lecture. This was the 41st lecture honoring Schnackenberg, who was a professor of history at Pacific Lutheran University. He was also chairman of the department of history and served the Board of Regents. Jn 2010, she won the Bancroft Prize for her book "White Mother to a Dark Race: Settler Colonialism, Matemalism and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940." Jacobs talked about the many injustices Native Americans faced throughout history. Specifically, she spoke of the forced removal of children from their families. During the 19th and 20th centuries, United States citizens thought that a potential answer to the supposed "Indian problem" would be the termination and relocation of the American Indians. They also viewed American Indian children as innocent and malleable so these children were offered a "second chance." The idea was that Native American children could be "rescued" from their "Native-ness:' Thousands were taken and forced into boarding schools or

The cover of "A Generation Removed" by Margaret D. Jacobs, this book is the inspiration for her lecture and the compilation of her work.

PHOTO BY NATALIE DeFord

Margaret D. Jacobs lecturing to PLU students at the memorial lecture.

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University (ASPLU) is holding their annual Executive Elections to decide who will be the student body representatives for next year. ASPLU is the student government on the PLU campus. They are the elected voice for the student population and they work to represent student views and concerns to faculty, staff and the community at large.

even adopted into white families. Their real families had no choice in the matter. They were coerced or tricked. These white families often thought they were helping because of how Native Americans were portrayed in U.S. culture. Indian life was said to be a dead-end and adoption was seen as a benevolent cause. Thousands of Native American children were forced to grow up without their families, without their culture and without their native language. These injustices continue to have lasting effects today. Jacobs said that the most touching moment for her was during the Question and Answer portion of her lecture. Several Native American women were present in the audience and shared their stories. They spoke of what happened to their parents and grandparents and how different their own lives are as a result. "It was brave of them to share, and it was very moving to me and very powerful," Jacobs said. Jacobs also said she enjoyed meeting PLU students and answering their questions both earlier that day and at the event. If there was one thing students could learn from the lecture, Jacobs said she would wai<t it to be the issue's universality. "This is not just something that is the problem of American Indian people," Jacobs said. "It's a human rights abuse - sometimes people think they're helping but they don't consult, respect or ask and they instead end up damaging."

As leaders, ASPLU Senators strive to uphold the tradition of positive action by mentoring new student leadership and recognizing the need for chai<ge, according to their website. The interest meeting for students will be tonight at 6p.m. The interest meeting is mainly for students wanting to run for office and become ASPLU president or vice president. The primary elections will happen March 12-13 with the final elections March 19-20. Students running for office should be interested in government, leadership and getting involved on campus. At the interest meeting, current ASPLU representatives will discuss what. it means to be the student body presid~nt and vice president. Representatives will also be discussing what the election process will be like as far as debates, campaigning and getting elected. Students eligible to run must be full-time with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher. Regular ASPLU Senate meetings are held Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m.. Students are encouraged to attend, participate and have their voices heard.

PHOTO BY MATI HEW SALZANO

View of the construction site from second floor Rieke Science Center. As of March 6, the site is pretty bare. "What may look like dirt and mud now will soon be home to a new plant science research center 1or faculty and students," Quigg said.

Vancouver, Wash. and the Laurie-Berry said. "Most Northcliffe Foundation in of our experirr ents failed Seattle also donated to the because the plan :s could not thrive Dn lighted t;helves in an project. Quigg is the main equipment room." individual donor responsible The new growing space for the greenhouse. will provide the proper light, "It's very exciting to know temperature and humidity that work has started on the levels for plant gr ::>wth. greenhouse site," Quigg said. Current biolo zy students "It will be a wonderful, and see the addition as a much sorely needed, addition to needed step for their campus." department. Senior Lucas Sontra took Quigg' s family has strong ties to PLU, even to this day. the mandatory botany class Plant life and PLU are both and said the acldition will make learning mt: ch easier for very important to Quigg. "I come from a farm future students. background, and ai-n very · "Currently, the class has mindful of the extreme to travel to University of importance of plants in our Washington to d:i [research] lives," Quigg said. "In short, and being able to get the they are essential to our lives." same experience on carapus The new greenhouse will without needing t) plan a field be a very welcome asset to the trip would be verr beneficial," Sontra said. "I think it will PLU campus, Quigg said. The biology department in also attract studerits who want particular will make good use to focus on botanical studies to PLU." of the greenhouse. "One of the common Sontra is excited at the sayings in the Division of prospect of the 1ew facility Natural Sciences is that opening the doors to new students learn by doing research opport11nities, he science," biology professor said. Neva Laurie-Berry said. "The For Mary Ellard-Ivey, new greenhouse will allow a biology professor, the students to be engaged in greenhouse will be an asset to plant biology hands-on in a both of her classe:;. modem, professional setting." "The ability tc grow :arge All biology majors are populations of mC)del genetic required to take a course plants will allow students to in plant biology at PLU. do crosses and :iemonstrate The greenhouse will more principles of genetics," Ellardaccurately reflect the current Ivey said. "I am particularly state of the field, Laurie-Berry excited about the oppo:rtunity said. I will soon ha\"e to bring Laurie-Berry is a biology some of my work to PLU and professor whose research involve students.' focuses on bacterial pathogens For now, the greenhouse that infect tomato plants. For is a plot of land f ectioned off her, the greenhouse means between Morken and Rieke. she can study the infection· in Students sl:- ould not a natural tomato host rather experience any c.ifference in than being limited to smaller their day-to-day 1~ves because model plants. of the construction, other than Laurie-Berry said the the path leading to Olson greenhouse will make an being blocked off. immeasurable difference. Next year, sbdents will "The biggest problem I likely see new classes, new faced in my Plant Physiology projects and n•~w flowers lab this past fall was a lack blooming on campus and in of suitable growing space," the greenhouse.

attitudes were able to and what is

PHOTO BY MATIHEW SALZANO

The site is currently under construction and will continue to be worked on through the summer. The unveiling and dedication ceremony will be held Aug. 5, 2015 for the campus to see.


THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 6, 2015

'\fEWS3

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor On March 3, the Internet exploded with stories about a new study released about penis size. The researchers used other studies and their own information to find the average penis size for men. The international study looked at more than 15,000 penises to show men what a "normal range" was. Penis size is an important issue to most men and women. According to a

average erect penis

Big feet, or big anything else, don't matter. Seriously.

The average erect penis is 5.17 inches long and 4.59 inches in girth.

The average flaccid penis The average penis, when flaccid, is 3.61 inches long and 3.67 inches in girth.

Medical Aid in Olson Gym Campus Safety (CSAF) responded to a call in Olson from a student who injured his ankle while playing soccer. An emergency call to the hospital was declined and CSAF escorted the student back to his room.

There might be a correlation in height.

There is a definition for a micro-penis. A micro-penis is one that is smaller than 2.05 inches flaccid and 3.35 inches stretched or erect.

Race is not a factor when it comes to th1~ size of your penis. We know, it's crazy.

The most consistent correlation the study found was between a man's height and his penis size. This means there COULD be an association between height and penis size.

Theft in AUC

Campus Safety was contacted about the theft of PLU equipment from the Mast TV office. The theft appears to have occurred over a period of time rather than at once. CSAF was provided with a list of students who had access and is looking into it.

study in The New York Times, men search the Internet for answers about their penis more than any other body part For every 100 searches about penises, the internet receives 67 searches about the heart, 57 about eyes, 40 about heads, five about the brain, three about the liver and two about the lungs. Of the many penis searches, the most popular were "how to make my penis bigger" and "how big is my penis?" Obviously, some things need to be cleared up.

Harassment in Harstad

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A student reported that an boyfriend was harassing her and her .------1fathe:r. The ex lives in Atlanta but the student is concerned he will return to Washington. CSAF gave the students information on resources that could help her cope.

1-----1 Alcohol violation in Harstad Campus Safety observed a student and three non-students entering Harstad with alcohol. CSAF contacted the student's room and recovered the alcohol. The non-students were asked to leave campus at the residents request and the incident was reported to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Medical aid in Lagerquist

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Campus Safety responded to a student who rolled lier ankle on the stage in the Mary Baker Russel Music Center. The student refused any transportation or extra help. No further action was taken by CSAF.

Property damage at South Hall

The gate arm for the South Hall parking lot malfunctioned and struck a vehicle entering the lot. The incident was captured on surveillance cameras and saved. Engineers :responded to the scene and removed the gate arm.


4A&E

MARCH 6, 2015

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rit ERIN FLOM Guest Writer This year marks the lQth anniversary of the Visiting Writer Series at Pacific Lutheran University. Over the past 10 years, PLUhas welcomed more than 50 authors to read their work and share their insights on writing to students and the public. The final author of this year's series, Adrianne Harun, came Feb. 26. Hamn teaches at ,The Rainier

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Writing Workshop, PLU's Master of Fine Arts program for creative writing. Hamn read from her most recent work, a novel entitled "A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain." It tells the story of five friends living near a highway where many women and girls have gone missing and the strangers that come to their small town. . Hamn said she was ·inspired by the real events of the Highway of Tears, along Highway 16 in British Columbia, Canada, where aboriginal women and girls have

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"[Harun] gave me some insight to the process of writing and creating characters." Rebecca Bowen Junior

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r gone missing and some found murdered. ·"It was cool to hear the background to the story," junior Rebecca Bowen said. "It gave me some insight to the process of writing and creating characters." Bowen also commented on the structure of Hamn's story and how it switched from the narrative of the five friends to brief vignettes, and said it was important for students to know "it's okay to let yourself play with formatting." Sophomore Lois Yi liked

hearing from someone who "has a foothold in the indmtry" and "is relevant and accessibl·~-" Junior Fae Pickering aspires to become an author, and listening to Hamn reminded t.er to "write what's in your head" and not care what others think. The event was held in the Anderson University Center's Regency Room. Though the room was large in size, the small attendance made for an intimate setting. The Visiting Writers Series will continue next year, bringing more authors to campus.

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"House of Cards" season three SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Netflix launched season three of "House of Cards" in its entirety last Friday and it housed a shift from the sCheming world of politics to a character-driven drama. "House of Cards" and other Netflix originals never cease to shock and disturb audiences. In a good way. This season opened with the ever-ballsy Francis "Frank" Underwood (Kevin Spacey) talking directly into the camera as President of the United States. After two years of scheming, conniving and lying, Underwood is the leader of the free world. With Underwood in office, the season focuses on two main issues: his plan to create American jobs and his hopes to get re-elected. Articles have been going up . on the internet criticizing the show about its unrealistic approach to a jobs package or Underwood's bad southern accent. Let's be realfar·a second: this show is great and if that is all you can find to pick at, you can sit and watch C-SPAN if you need realistic political television. Underwood is a characterization of every American's power-hungry-get-what-you-

want alter-ego. This season showed less of evil Underwood and more of his "soft side," if you can even call it that. Throughout the season, Underwood tackles issues with his family, his marriage and his love and concern for (very few) people. More than anything, we saw the struggle in the Underwood marriage between Francis and Oaire (Robin Wright). As much as we all want love stories and heart-breaking stories, "House of Cards" isn't the place for this. · I watched the entire show in a threeday binge fest and I was thrilled from the first episode. Underwood was in full force bringing in new bills and peeing on graves with his power-wife by his side. The "Oassic Underwood" style slowly gets lost throughout the season to what becomes a normal TV drama. The season gets slow in the middle but the finale is a classic Underwood thriller. Everything fell so perfectly around him that the viewer is left wanting more. So much more. I'm still left wanting Netflix to bring back classic Underwood. I want him pushing girls in front of trains, back-stabbing and manipulating. "House of Cards" still stands above most. It kicks the average drama into the dirt and spits in its fa1:e.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NETFLIX

U.S. President Francis Underwood (Kevin Spacey) meets Russian President Petrov (Lars Mikkelson) in Netflix series "House of Cards."

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCHOOL OF ARTS ANC COMMUNICATION

s BROOKE THAMES A&EWriter This week, the Pacific Lutheran University department theatre debuts its production of "Steel Magnolias," an inspirational story about life's value and . the resilience of companionship. Set in the mid 1980s, "Steel Magnolias" chronicles the tribulations and triumphs of five women over the course of three eventful years. The play highlights values such as friendship, humor and hope in spite of tragedy. "Steel Magnolias" was written by Robert Harling in 1986 as a way for him to come to terms with the death of his beloved sister. The play was popularized by the 1989 film of the same name, featuring acclaimed actresses Julia Roberts, Dolly Parton and Sally Field. "[Harling] found that, as a playwright, he

Steel Magnolias Karen Hille Phillips Studio Theatre (Black Box) 7:30 p.m. March 6, 7, 13 and 14 2 p.m. March 15

could illustrat·: how the women [in his sister's life] used humor in the face of sorrow," d [rector and assistant director of theater Lori Lee Wallace said. "Steel Magnolia's" is being produo!d by the drama department in an attempt to brin5 the plays sentiments of :ompassion and support to the PLU community. The play also presents the unique opportunity of featuring a predominantly female cast, as all of the mai :i. characters are women. "We thought the community wc•uld like to see the talented women in our department shine in an all-female casi," Wallace said. Wallace al£ o believes that the audience will form strong :onnections to the characters that these female actors will portray. "The charac:ers are not just women that Harling knew [...] they <re our own friends, sisten;, mothers and daughterE," Wallace said.


MARCH 6 2015

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I Fashionable lutes have been building up a rockin' winter wardrobe. Their cold-weather looks are tried aAd true, but what are Lutes to do a beautiful spring day comes around?

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Staff writer Brooke Wolfe looked through the closets of three Pacific Lutheran University students and picked basic pieces that allow anyone to flawlessly transition from cool winter looks to hot spring fashions.

LEFT: Junior Zachery <:untz shows khakis combinE!d a denim be layered to adjust to temperatures. But ones the sun rises, so should the hem lines. Switching out floor length pant for mid-kn·~e shorts allows for a similar outfit to move to sprin!J. Ditch the sweater for a pair of long socks to optimize the season's look.

RIGHT: First-year Genny Boots rocks dark washed jeans, knee-high riding boots, a soft graphic tee and a cozy flannel, creating the perfect winter outfit. A mix of color and warmth creates an effortlessly comfortable look. For transitioning into spring, the outfit can quickly be changed by wearing the graphic tee and flannel with a simple body-con skirt and tights. Keep the boots for extra warmth during chilly spring mornings.

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BROOKE THAMES A&EWriter A collection of literary-minded Lutes gathered to share their creativity as contestants in a writing contest. Sponsored by Saxifrage, the Writing Competition held on Feb. 26 in the CAVE provided an opportunity for writers to perform, have fun and receive recognition for their talent in the process. Saxifrage is a student-run literary arts journal. For 40 years, the Saxifrage team has been responsible for publishing the creative works of students, faculty, staff and alumni. At the conclusion of every year, Saxifrage produces a book comprised of poetry, prose, visual art, etc. created by members of the Pacific Lutheran University community. Saxifrage also sponsors several events throughout the year aimed at writers and other artists. "We run events to foster

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community and bring together the many creative individuals at PLU," Co-editor Jakob Maier said. The campus-wide Writing Competition was held by Saxifrage in cooperation with the English Honor Society. The competition was organized as an opportunity for students to perform their works of art in front of an audience and perhaps gain an award for their talent. Contestants in the competition had the chance to perform in three categories: short poetry, short prose and Worst Poem Ever. Two awards were given in each category, a People's Choice Award based off of audience voting and an Editor's Pick A ward: Prizes for winning in a category included $20 gift cards to Northern Pacific Coffee Company and 208 Garfield. Eighteen individuals took part in the contest, and 10 of them entering the category Worst Poem Ever - a fun category that challenged

contestants to craft their most inferior attempt at poetry. Events such as the Saxifrage Writing Competition are sponsored with the goal of bringing creative minds together. "We put on the writing contest because we thought it would be a fun and entertaining chance for students to share their work," Maier said. "Saxifrage...is the only real venue that members of the PLU community have to share [it]." The Writing Competition is an example of one of the many ways that Saxifrage strives to create a platform for PLU' s creative geniuses. "We got the chance to hear very creative work. .. [at the Writing Contest]," Maier said. "Some of it humorous, some of it heartwrenching, but all of it absolutely wonderful." Submissions to Saxifrage can be submitted at http://www.plu.edu/ studentmedia/saxifrage by March 9.

FAR LEFT: Senior Nate Schoen read from Kant's "Critique of Pure Judgement." LEFT: Sophomore Clay Snell, the event's MC, and the winners of the People's Choice Awards: firstyear Athena Gordon, poetry; senior Samuel Ryan, worst poem ever; and Cameron Kobes, short prose. RIGHT: Judges and the winners of the Editors' Pick Award: senior Jakob Maier, judge; senior Angela Shier, poetry; senior Meg Dolde, judge; senior Jen Arbaugh, judge; first-year Calley Odum, short prose; and senior Nate Schoen, judge.

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6FEATURE

THE MOORING MAST

Kuan-Ting Loiao, Senior "I think it looks professional and you know who is in charge of what. You can tell the regular student employees and the managers. You can recognize everyone." Has no gold name tags

Adrian Mayoral,路 Senior "It means I'm part of the 'gold name t~g' cltJ~Wll~re you have a gbld

n~~~g but it really doesn't mean anything." Has two gold name tags, one for being on RHC and one from ASPLU

MARCH 6, 2015


..... THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 6, 2015

FEATURE 7

Kelsey Monahan, Sophomore "I guess when I'm wearing my gold name tag I'm representing PLU and other students know what it is and what it means. It's a representation of what I do for the school." Has two gold name tags, one ,from ASPlU and one from RHC. ·

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olunteer position <:o I feel when I wear it, out that is it. I'm not like 'oh my gosh tQ11colllect ali the name j:ags.'" H;:l11:ii''"liftt>1n.n1r1 name tag, School Business ambassador

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name tag to sure, every student Jdents wearing them.

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"I'm g?i119 1 t~f~~t'~~t: I wanted ofile becau~1~V~~~!ll~~6ad and I was ~ -,:>: .. :.:/\:;;,,>-··'~'.tt:,:t*)<"Gf<.i{(, "- one • iust hke,.w.~11:1. lfi:tl''i'lbt gorng to be Jett , .• J,", •. \A~«:''.: ·, ·..·-/,:. '.·: out I'm go1hgto getone." Will have one gold name tag from RHC. •

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Grace Hochstatter, Sophomore "For me, it's just kind of like weird because I'm one of the only ones wearing it because it creates a barrier between me and other students." Has one gold name tag from RHC

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toll.

Opinion Editor

When I arrived in Bali, Indonesia, last J-term for an art class, the hot and humid weather was just as I had anticipated and the beautiful colors of flowers and plants were just as vibrant as I had imagined. What I was not expecting were the massive amounts of trash throughout the streets and in the ocean. The Balinese are not particularly wasteful people, in fact, they try to waste as little as possible. It is not that they littered the streets, rivers and clear blue oceans out of laziness, but they literally have nowhere else to put it. It is not without pain either. I remember hearing a story about a taxi driver and tourist passing a river filled with plastic bottles and waste, and the taxi driver mentioned sadly to his passenger that he used to swim in the river when he was young. Bali, along with other countries worldwide, has always produced natural materials they were able to just toss away or bury to decompose. With introductions to plastic and other non-compostable materials, along with a tourism boom and only so much land to support it all, the trash has taken its

To be honest, I am not always the most environmentally friendly person, but I could not help but think of how much tourists, like myself and my classmates, contribute to this issue. In the markets and various shops catering to tourists, plastic bags are given with every purchase. Our class was told about two young girls from a sustainable "green" school in Bali, who took on the project to ban plastic bags in Bali. This was inspiring and prompted me to reflect on my own habits with plastic bags at home, especially when it comes to shopping and using the provided plastic bags instead of reusable cloth ones. One aspect of this issue that cannot be helped is the fact that the water that flows through the faucets in Bali is not safe to drink. Locals and tourists must purchase bottled water, boil water, purchase large refillable water containers for in-home water dispensers or refill personal water bottles. It IS easy to imagine just how many plastic water bottles are thrown away every day in Bali. Refilling our own water bottles was something that was very quickly ingrained into us as one small thing we could do to reduce our impact to the beautiful island's environment. I appreciated my clean drinking water, recycling abilities and clean environment at home greatly during this trip and realized how much I have taken those things for granted. I also realized that while we do have things like more effective recycling and drinking water at home, we

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Dear fellow firstyears: don't be afraid to take advantage of every resource and opportunity available to you. If the rest of you are like me, the first few weeks of school were invigorating - I felt like I could do anything. I put my email next to every club, applied for any job regardless of how much it expenence it

called for and out there. If continued to be me, this energy and confidence slowly wore down., Eventually, the excitement of all the newness wore off, and got to you: just a I can't lead upperclassmen." "I'm just a first-year, I should stick to 100-levels.'' "I'm just a first-year, I'm not ready to start a club." I want to tell you all something: that's bull. Your year in college does not determine your strength as an individual, you do. Your age does not determine your value in a group, you do. Bac:k in September, I took a lot on: being an editor for The Mooring Mast, a Resident Hall Council president and working

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98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Jeff Dunn ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds PHOTO llY ASHLEY GILL

Small plastic disposable cups filled with clean water are mass produced and sold throughout Bali, Indonesia. The cups have a "juice box" concept that is a convenient way to get clean drinking water without buying water bottles, but it produces just as much if not more waste, especially since the cups are not reusable like water bottles are.

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett NEWS @ NINE PRODUCER

are more wasteful because we have the land to hide it. In Bali, the people are spiritual, in the moment and not as materialistic as in American society. They use and take what they must and try not to waste when they can avoid it. They have to be more careful because the waste is visible to them, but in the United States, garbage is "out of sight, out of mind." What I have learned while abroad in January has given me a view of sustainability that has stuck with me more than anything else has

before. I not only have a deeper appreciation for things such as clean water, but I have taken a little bit of that Bali mindfulness home with me. Doing simple things such as opting for a cloth bag rather than a plastic one while grocery shopping or being more aware of the waste we personally produce every day can make a huge difference for our landfills and our global environment.

I for the Pacific Lutheran

some events, go to Career workshops and dropin hours, chat with your professors. (;o to The Career Connections office and don't be afraid to apply for jobs that say "management." Go to involvement fairs and don't be afraid to tell clubs you will step up and take an active role. Come and write for The Mooring Mast, make your own LASR show or create a TV episode for Mast TV. Attend RHC meetings and

vantage of all front of me. It's hard to like I can do it to lose some In looking to a future of many more classes, late nights and hard work, sometimes I just lose all of my confidence. So let's have this letter be an encouragement for both me and you, first-year reader. We are first-years, and we have unique perspectives to bring. We are first-years, and we can re-energize lifeless clubs and programs. We are first-years, and we will be PLU leaders.

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute infc rmation to its readers about important issu~s, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Sâ&#x20AC;˘>ciety of Professional Journalists Code ofK:hics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast i,taff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fower than 500 words, typed and emailed torr ast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before i: ublication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right tâ&#x20AC;˘> refuse or edit letters for length, taste and en ors. Include name, phone number and class standing Olf title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per sem< ster or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.


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MARCH. 06 2015

OFINION 9

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TAHUA TERHUNE Guest Writer With the recent outbreak of diseases ranging from measles to whooping cough, vaccinations have become a key topic in today's news. Across the country, doctors, celebrities and parents are taking a stance on how they feel about vaccinations. According to NBC, a recent survey from the Pew Research Center found .that 68 percent of Americans believe that children should be required to be vaccinated, while roughly 30 percent say that parents should be able to decide not to vaccinate their kids. This debate seems to have no end in sight as provaccination advocates and anti-vaccination supporters continue to argue. Lately, through national news and social media, critique on the belief of those opposing vaccinations has been more than harsh. Name. calling-such as "dumb" and "stupid" have been dealt out to those who are exercising their free will. Experts spoke on behalf of the matter is NBC and pointed out that mocking a person's individual belief will not persuade them to alter their ideas. It is, in fact, counter productive to

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the pro-vaccination movement. not. ''When you attack somebody's values, they get Ultimately, when you are electing to not vaccinate your defensive," said Harvard Instructor David Ropeik, former child, it is not just a choice for your child. "By choosing not to vaccinate a child, then in turn the Director of Communications for the Center for Risk Analysis. "It triggers an instinctive defensiveness that choice is made to expose other kids to disease your child certainly doesn't change the mind of the vaccine-hesitant might be carrying," said junior nursing studi!nt Elena Oelfke. "Vaccinations protect many person." While there is undeniable lives from diseases that have been quantitative evidence that "Ultimately, when you are around for hundreds of rars." vaccinations have health Not vaccinating your child benefits, http://vaccines.org/ electing to not vaccinate your increases the potential for :;preading points out some benefits of child, it is not just a choice for diseases because the appropriate vaccinations that contributes to preventive measures are not taken. your child.'' your quality of life and overall "As a nursing student, Yve come health. Immunizations can save to realize that patient education is a person's life, vaccination is key," Oelfke said. "I think every very safe and effective, parent should be educated about what vaccin<Ltions are, immunization protects others you care about, what they do and why they are important bdore they immunizations can save your family time and money, and begin to decide if they do or don't want to vaccnate their immunizations protect future generations. children." One day, many of us will become parents. WE· will have There are multiple reasons why people should be vaccinated; however, I do understand that they are skeptic, to make an educated decision on whether to vaccinate our and I understand why a parent would believe they have children or not. Whatever you may choose, thin1< about the the right to decide if their child receives vaccinations or effects it may have.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

Baseball TEAM

MAR. 6, 2015

Softball WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Willamette

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Pacific Lutheran

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--

LUTES' UPCOMING GAMES Baseball Doubleheader: Tomorrow 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. @ Willamette

vs. PAClYlC W'Tll.Bru\N OltryutS~

Softball Doubleheader: Tomorrow 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. @Whitworth

@ ?ACll'lC W'!'lf!IBAN UN!VLll.S!TY

Men's Golf

Women's Golf

Tomorrow@ UPS Invitational Gold Mountain Golf Club

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THE MOORING MAST

MAR. 6, 2015

ighlights: The MVP race ... who will _it be?

illiker's Austin Hilliker Sports Editor This year's basketball season has been a wild one. Lebron James came home to Cleveland, James Harden has yet to shave his beard and Steph Curry still shoots the three ball from anywhere he feels necessary. Although these three players have their own unique traits, in addition to being on some of the best teams in the National Basketball Association, they still have one thing in common: The ability to be the most valuable player in the league. With basketball season coming into its last 20 games for most teams, the race is officially on for the NBA' s best player. Option #1: The King Lebron James has been a dominant performer, game after game. He can shoot from almost anywhere on the court and

PHOTO COURTEsYOF ESPN.COM

llSPORTS

never backs down from a challenge. Standing at 6-feet-8 inches, 250 pounds, James is a force to be reckoned with. James currently averages 26.2 points, 7.2 assists and 5.8 rebounds per game, numbers only fit for a king. He has brought national attention back to his home town of Cleveland, and even has his team sitting with a 37-24 overall record. In terms of playoff implications, the Cleveland Cavaliers sit in the middle of the pack at the number four seed. They hope to climb the ladder as they fight to be the best team in the Eastern Conference. Even with eleven new teammates and an entirely new coaching staff, Lebron makes quite the case for the MVP.

game this year, which means he has played in a total of 58 games, something that most athletes aren't capable of doing. Not to mention that standout center Dwight Howard has missed 27 games, and Harden still has kept the Rockets afloat. MVP caliber? I think so.

Option #2: The Bearded Wonder

Option #3: The Kid

Critics have spoken and they are saying that we could be in the presence of a new king. In my opinion, this is highly unlikely. A more realistic prediction is James Harden in the MVP race and not sitting up on a throne. Throughout the 2014-15 regular season, Harden has managed to grab 27.1 pointsper-game, alongside 6.9 assists and 5.8 路 rebounds. The Houston Rockets are on the rise, as Harden has them at 41-18, which in the Western Conference puts them as the third ranked team behind Memphis and Golden State. In addition, Harden hasn't missed a

Does this guy ever miss a shot? Watching point guard Steph Curry play basketball is one of the most entertaining and exciting things that someone can do. Curry came to the Golden State in 2009, where he made an immediate impact, putting the Warriors back on the map and stealing the limelight in the state of California. The kid has managed to put up some impressive statistics as well. Curry has averaged 23.9 points-per-game, in addition to 2.1 steals and 7.8 assists. In other words, this youngster has brought his team to a 46-11 overall record and even currently a number one seed in

I

the Western Conference. Former Brooklyn Nets head coach, and now NBA analyst, P.J. Carlesimo said that the award should go to the best player on the best team and Curry makes a very strong case for this. He has done this even with a great supporting cast around him. It's not everyday that you see a single player make such an impactful case with equal levels of talent all around him. Who should win then?

......

PHOTO COURTESY OF ESPN.COM

In my mind, Steph Curry makEs the best case for the MVP race, but the s~ason isn't quite over just yet We11 just have to wait and see who comes out on top, until the final decision be made. Until then, let the stats speak for themselves and root for whoevt:r you feel necessary.

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--

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Baseball -Bishop tosses one-hitter in walk-off opening win as Lutes and Boxers split 2-1 and 13-6. -Rossman and the Lute offense combine to overpower Pacific in series clincher 14-0. PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

-PLU Softball swept by George Fox in Northwest Conference opener 3-l and 15-5. -Lutes Softball completes the sweep of Pacific in Sunday's twinbill 7-6 and 4-3. PHOTO COURTESY OF C OLUTES.COM PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

411

Tennis -Lutes fall 9-0 to George Fox in NWC home opener. -PLU Men's Tennis ends weekend with 9-0 defeat against Pacific. PHOTO COOR:I'ESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Women's Tennis -George Fox hands PLU 8-1 women's tennis defeat. -Lutes fall to Pacific 6-3.

...... PHOTO COURTESY OF ( -OLUTES.COM

PHOTO COORI'ESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM


THE MOORING MAST

MAR. 6, 2015

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Pacific Lutheran University, she mowed down batting rotations at Oeveland High School in Portland, Ore. During her first year at PLU, Butters had to learn a new style of pitching. The development of her style started in middle school and eventually changed as she entered into her college career. She went on to become the SA Portland Interscholastic League (PIL) pitcher of the year three times in a row, but her team never advanced past the second round of· the playoffs for numerous reasons.

Steven McGrain Sports Writer When the Lutes' ace scans her defense and climbs back to the top of the mound, she has the mentality of 'Tm the Best." The personal motto scrolls through her thoughts like a digital billboard. This simple repetition is how she became the pitcher she is today. Before Leah Butters came to

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

David Mair staff Writer It was the thlrd game of the 2015 season for the Pacific Lutheran University's Softball Team, but for one first-year, it was her first time

The Portland product chose to become a Lute because of "the academics, the people, and it is the perfect distance from home," Butters said. "PLU was close enough that my parents can still watch me continue my career," Butters said. In her first season at PLU, Butters was an addition to a 2012 · team that already had seasoned veterans. The pitching staff included All-American Stacy Hagenson, the perfect mentor for an aspiring pitcher. Butters contributed in the regular season, but as playoffs approached, she was a supporter from the dugout. Unlike some teams, the Lutes knew the role everyone had; each player knew how important it was to do her job to the best of her ability. This attitude is what

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First-Year

playing on a collegiate diamond. Facing off in one weekend, first against St Martin's and then Northwest, first-year Sydney Smythe finished the game going 5-7, scoring a solo home run and fourRBI's. All these remarkable feats in one weekend earned her the athlete of the week honor for the Northwest Conference as the Out/ Center Fielder for PLU's softball team. "It was one of the .greatest feelings being able to get awarded athlete of the week," Smythe · said. "It was much of a surprise knowing that I'm a freshman and they were my first ever collegiate games." Head coach Lance Glasoe agreed, saying Smythe has taken advantage of all of her

opportunities. "Opening weekend was payback for all the hard work she has put in during the fall and winter training," Glasoe said. Throughout her high school athletic career at Elma High School,. Smythe was a highly decorated player, on more than just t.11.e diamond. On the basketball court, she was named defensive player of the year all four years of high school, and saw the team to three league .championships. On the soccer field, she served as captain for a year, and brought the team to first All-League team status for two years. But on the diamond is where Smythe has shined the brightest and the longest, as she has been playing softball for 15 years.

it more and more," Hamura said. had three new coaches in the last One thing that she has always three years with the new arrival of loved about softball is the social coach Lance Glasoe this year. aspect of the game. Her favorite "[The transition] was really part of softball is "playing with tough for me ... it taught me that the girls on the team and building I have to be flexible and accept whatever comes at me," Hamura friendships with them." As a first-year, Hamura was said. a part of the 2012 National The transitions may have been Championship team that set a rough on Hamura, but they have record for wins in a season with . not been rough on her playing. 45. From starting in only 2 out of 16 She is now the team captain of games her first-year season with the 2015 Lutes, but her transi;tion a batting average of .200, Hamura from a first-year champion to a then started 35 out of 38 games her senior leader hasn't always been junior season and hit an overall of .320 in 100 at bats. smooth. The Lutes softball team has Ber senior seasons looks just

Guest Writer What would make someone leave the beautiful sandy beaches of Hawaii to come to rainy and cold Washington? The love of the game. And for senior Tori Hamura, that game is softball. You wouldn't know it now, but Hamura didn't always have an intense passion for softball, especially when she began playing at the age of seven. "It was kind of hard at the beginning, I didn't really like it, but as I got older, I started to like

1n s II

s

en's Golf • PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Tomorrow @ UPS Invitational Gold Mountain Golf Club

won Pacific Lutheran softball a National Championship in 2012. "It was overwhelming and amazing to be part of that team," Butters said with a grin on her face. Although that historic run was three years ago, Butters still remembers the lessons passed down to her from the seniors in 2012. "Every pitch matters, every batter is legitimate, just take it one pitch at a time and remain mentally tough, no matter the circumstances," Butters said. As a senior, Butters now has the power to influence the rest of the players. Her message is simple, but reflective of a senior who has matured over the previous three seasons. "Enjoy each season, and more specifically each game. I

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOJ .UTES.COM

wish I would hav1~ treasured everything," Butt-~rs said. "Winning is great, but also it is important to, have Wi. At the Division ill level, we are playing for the love of the gar1e." 0

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Senio Infielder Tori Stephanie Compton

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itc er Lea B

en1

SPORTS

Over that time she says it was "winning the state championship [her] senior year of high school" and "earning first team all state" were her greatest memories. Smythe said that she is drav,m to the game because of "the competitive nature" along with "the heart [she.has] for the game." While her love for the game far exceeds the size of the ball she catches in the outfield, playing for PLU was not her intent when she came here. During tryouts, Smythe actually just walked on. "Sydney came to us as a walk on in the fall," Glasoe said. "[Assistant] Coach Califano immediately identified her as a strong athlete who could help our program." Currently, the Lutes are 3-5

with the season just starting. Smythe said her goal is to "help the team get to thE conference tournament.". Even in her first year, Smythe has already establ .shed huge goals for herself af; she looks forward to the next four years. One goal she hopes t< J accomplish is getting the team to the national championships. 2012 was the last tine the Lutes won the National College Athletic Association Champie nships. Earning another title like that is a massive goal, but it is possible, especially with a player such as Smythe. "I give everything l can to make the team the best W(~ can be and that's all we can as1. from every one of out players," ~>mythe said.

amura as promising but with a minor injury in the first double-header of the season, Hamura may have to lead the team from the dugout for a short time. Hamura' s hand in Lute softball may not end after this season, as she may come back next year as an assistant coach. If she doesn't coach next year, she plans to stay in Washington and find a job related to her major of exercise science. No matter what happens in Tori Hamura' s final season as a Lute, she will leave her mark on her younger teammates, and she will leave as a National Champion.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GO LUTES.COM

II

I Women's Golf Tomorrow @UPS Invitational Gold Mountain Golf Club

• PHOTO COURTESY OF CREAT :vE COMM:ONS


Lutes carry that weight pg. 2

I

Triple Threat: PLUtonic, HERmonic and Clay Crows pg.5

On the same team, giving the best to PLU athletes pg. 11

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

L

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The return of bottled water at PLU SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Four years ago, Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University passed a initiative to stop the sale of bottled water on campus. Senate Resolution 6 for the ban of sale of bottled water passed Feb. 8, 2011. The resolution called for all markets campus wide to stop selling bottled water to encourage environmental awareness. Students going into Old Main Market today can purchase Propel's unflavored electrolyte water. Propel' s electrolyte water is one of the . newest editions to OMM. The bottled water was brought to the market in Jan. 2015 from Pepsico, the drink provider of PLU. The bottled water that Pepsico sells is Aquafina purified water. None of the markets on campus sell Aquafina. ~~ Flayo;red waters have been sold through the markets on campus with or without Resolution 6. Propel flavored waters were not banned with bottled water in 2011. Propel unflavored electrolyte water joined the flavored waters this year. Electrolytes are minerals that carry charged ions through the blood and help the brain and muscles function. The human body needs electrolytes to function and electrolyte water is a popular way to replenish those minerals. The ingredients in Propel unflavored water with electrolytes are purified water, sodium bicarbonate, magnesium sulfate and potassium bicarbonate. Electrolyte water has more ingredients

uotable "I hope that PLU will change their policy.".Junior Kyle Parsons ''Baring it all for art'' pg. 4

."The memories will last forever and sharing that with a team is really special." Senior Sam Angel, "Record-holding Lute climbing the ladder''

pg.12

"I encourage young women to own their -'Basic."' Senior Allie Reynolds, "Letter from the· editor: Basics Unite"

pg.8

than regular, purified water. PLU students have been drinking flavored water and enhanced water even with the bottled water ban. The markets cater to what students want and buy, Retail Operations Manager, Torn Harvey said. PLU students buy more Gatorade than anythiag, Harvey said. The amount of Gatorade sold at PLU is comparable to grocery stores and_ the markets try and cater to the buying trends that students set. "If it is something that students would like to ban, I can certainly go along with that," Harvey Said. "It really is a gray area." Harvey began working at PLU in 2012, after the resolution was passed. When he came in, there was flavored water and he noticed the gray area but continued to cater to what students were buying. "The way Pepsi presented it to us was that it has the same amount of electrolytes that can be found in Gatorade, and we sell a lot of Gatorade," Harvey said. "That aside though, what is important is the benefits of electrolytes." Bottled water was banned to prevent plastic waste, according to the resolution. T'nere are more than 47 million gallons of oil in the production of plastic bottles each year, and 86 percent of the bottles end up in landfills each year, according to Resolution 6. The initiative aimed to reduce waste from water bottles, however, markets continue to sell soda, Gatorade, juice and milk in similar plastic bottles. Water bottles were specifically chosen because the PLU campus can be outfitted with water fountains as an alternative for

when they buy sodas and coffee from OMM, Harvey said. There are soda fountains and discounts for students who bring their own mugs for coffee. Harvey attempts to make sustainable, healthy options, but students spending habits also affect how the market i; stocked. To make changes in the market, students need to speak out about what thEy want or watch what they are buying be·:ause that directly affects what is provided, Harvey said. "We're here to support the students and if we feel like it violates the intent, we have no problem taking it out," Harvey saij. The ban on bottles is specific to pure water, sophomore and At-Large Senator Ashley Connors said. "It's annoying because we've banned bottled water," Connors said. "You might have added something to it, bu1 it is still water." ASPLU is not looking into ma<ing more resolutions regarding bottles or campus. As a sustainability office repr1esentative, Connors said students should use reusable water bottles instead of any plastic bottles. "Money-wise, you'd save a lot of money getting a PLU water bottle," Cornors said. "The [sustainability] office would .ove to see people using regular bottles more Jften." Students are encouraged to sp1!ak out on their feelings about the Propel wz ter bottles or any products around campus. All bottles can and should bE recycled, Harvey said. "If you look in the garbage caru, now, you will find things that don't belong," Harvey said. "Being sustainable is important."

bottles.~

There are ways students can be sustainable

what are we charging fer, are we charging the right amount, how do we compare to our compE titors and so on," Plaehn said. College is about the experience. When applying for g:aduation, At Pacific Lutheran University, that students are prompted to accept or experience ends with a walk across decline the fee, and by dee lining, the the Tacoma Dorne stage, a diploma entire application will be denied. and a $100 dollar fee.· Students graduating in ~)eptember To graduate, PLU seniors have or that are not participabng in the to pay a mandatory commencement ceremonies are still requirEd to pay. fee of $100 with the graduation "If I had a choice there shouldn't application. be one, or they ;hould be After spending four years more transparent about paying for tuition, books and what that is supposed to course fees, this last charge to pay for," senior Hailey the student account is often met "We just put so much money into our Olafson said. "They are with complaints and annoyance. not transparent at all about "I think ifs kind of school. Graduation should be exciting where that money goes." ridiculous," senior Ashley rather than 'pay more money."' The cornmenc~rnent fee Marcy said. "We just put so is being revisd for its Ashley Marcey· much money into our school. accuracy, but th1e intent is ·Senior Graduation should be exciting to make sure that students rather than 'pay more money."' are getting. a rraduation Commencement is the experience that is as good official graduation ceremony as it can be, said :"laehn. forPLU. the Tacoma Dome, paying for those To find more information about This year, the event will be at events, paying for the parking lots," graduation, go to http://www.plu. the Tacoma Dorne on May 23 with Senior Advisor to the President, edu/registrar/graduation/. King Harald of Norway as the Kris Plaehn said. "It goes to pay For more information about commencement speaker. After the for those specific components of money allocation at PLU, check out ceremony, a reception will be held at commencement." http://www.plu.edu/finan :e-adrnin/ the Gonyea Residence with President And those components add up. budget::-finance/. Krise and Baccalaureate. "It is not a small fee. We would be the The annual grumbling has not first to admit that," Plaehn said. fallen on deaf ears. The Board of Regents and Budget Advisory "I think they are really looking at

GENNY BOOTS News Writer

Council have begun the process of detailing the budget for the upcoming years. All university fees, including the commencement fee, are being reexamined. The specific $100 fee goes toward the various event costs of commencement. "It provides some of the fund4i.g for things like printing the diplomas, having the diploma cover holders. It also provides things like paying for


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

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MARCH 13, 2015

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The revival of the PLU Feminist Student Union SAMANTHA LUND News Editor A 10-minute walk across Upper Campus on Monday was all it took to make a difference. Ten students gathered March 9 to stand up against sexual assault by carrying a mattress around Red Square and through the University Center. Sophomores Chyna Boonlom and .Kendra Saathoff organized "Lutes Carry That Weight" to bring awareness to gender. based violence oncollege campuses. Boonlom and Saathoff decided to host this event, with help from the Women's Center, because of a story they heard about a Columbia University student who was sexually assaulted. Emma Sulkowicz, a student at Columbia University, was sexually assaulted but the perpetrator walked away with no punishment. In response, Sulkowicz carried a mattress around campus with her to show the weight that all rape victims carry with them each day. Sulkowicz could not ask for help carrying the mattress, but took it when it was offered to her to spread awareness about how victims feel. With this story in mind, Boonlom and Saathoff brought a group of Pacific Lutheran University students together to carry a mattress around campus in support of sexual assault awareness.

PHOTO BY SAMANTHA LUND

"Today was a national day of awareness, so a bunch of campuses were doing it," Boonlom said. "We are showing solidarity to stand against violence and demand better policies on how all universities will handle these issues." The mattress made its way through Red Square and into the UC where students stopped and watched. The group sparked discussion among students waiting for their lunches and working on homework in the Commons. Two first-year st.udents were sitting close by and one asked the other what was going on. "Watching it pass by was the first time I had even thought about it," first-year Jennifer Brown said. "It is really cool that they are bringing everyone awareness about it." The other first-year, Megan Cummings, agreed. "I think it is really cool that they are giving a voice to many women who have been affected by sexual violence," Cummings said. "It's great that we have people on this campus standing up for that sort of thing." The mattress caused the two to stop and have a discussion about路 sexual assault and Sulkowicz, Brown and Cummings said. Brown had never heard the story ~<!~~d ~~'=---

liked that the students shared the message by carrying the mattress. The event was put together in two weeks after Boonlom saw a post about it online. She took interest in the project and, with the help of Jonathan Yglesias and Jennifer Warwick from the Women's Center, made

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PHOTO BY SAMANTHA LUND

2015 Grad Gift Announced Incoming student will receive scholarship from Class of '15

Seniors look to give back by creating a scholarship opportunity for an incoming first-year in this year's Grad Gift. The Grad Gift is an annual fundraiser that allows the senior class to give back to Pacific Lutheran University. Students who attend PLU are expected to exemplify the school's mission statement and participate in the Grad Gift. The Grad Gift is a tradition that seniors are expected to take part in with. Last year, however, only 49 people participated in giving back. This year, the Student Philanthropy Committee has made it a goal to get more Lutes, of all ages, involved in the fund.raiser. This year's fundraiser will take on a new shape and style over the course of the next three months. Rather than asking people

"It

wru;; a club here and we want to bring it back because it embodies a lot of the issues that we, as feminists, are interested in," Saathoff said. "It is very mucl1 more than just women's rights, we want it to be for everyone." April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and the Feminist Student Union will be up and running by thm and will be hosting meetings and discm-sions about different issues. The mission statement of the group includes more than just feminism. It stands against all types of oppression. If students want to reach out to the group, or become a member, foey can find more information at their Facebook page: facebook.com/pages/PL U-FeministStudent-Union/16645660340;'126 or email Boonlom or Saathoff at their PLU emails.

Lutes started carrying the mattress in Red Square in front of Karen Hillie Phillips Center during Chapel Break on Monday morning. Before participating in the walk, students had to sign waivers allowing their pictures to be taken and acknowledging what they were doing and why they were there. From Red Square, the students went into the UC, down the stairs and circled back to KHP.

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

the event happen. . Boonlom and Saathoff. are using this event as a kickoff for the PI U Feminist Student Union club that they are starting. up on campus. The club is not official yet, but Boonlom and Saathoff are planning to have the first meeting the week after spring break.

to donate for the gift, there will be a series of events and the proceeds from them will go to th~ fundraiser, senior Salina Ellison said. Ellison researched the last graduating class's fundraiser and felt it needed a new direction and to be better integrated with the PLU community. This year, she hopes to make the Grad Gift experience something that everyone enjoys and participates in. "If people are going to these events as first-years knowing it is going to a scholarship, by the time they're a senior they'll want to be involved," Ellison said. "You really don't have to go out of your way to make an impact." The new Grad Gift theme is "Who's the Lute?" It will center on the idea that one incoming first-year w i 11

receive a gift from the graduating class. That gift will be given to them in the form of a one-time scholarship when they come toPLU. "The thought behind this is that it is a full circle," Ellison said. "People helped you get to come here and you help the next students by doing the same." After the "Who's the Lute?" student is chosen, he or she will write a note about themselves that will be sent out to all the donors and people involved letting them see who the Grad Gift went to. This way, the money trail is completely transparent and people can see their money going to something good, Ellison said. The first of the Grad Gift events will be on March 15 at Northern Pacific Coffee Company from 6-8 p.m. PLU artists will be performing at the coffee shop to support the Grad Gift. There will be a $2 cover charge that will go toward the Grad Gift and 15 percent of the proceeds will go to the gift as well. The 322 Jazz Collective and members of PLUtonic and HERrnonic will be performing at NPCC. The events will be held on the 15th f each month for the remainder of the chool year in honor of the class of 2015. e Grad Gift committee will also host bowling night for students at Paradise owl April 15 and The Haven on May 15.

Sophomore Chyna Boonlom carried her mattress with her through her school day.

PLU News Trending: Party like ih: 1989 The Women's Center faculty and staff are hosting a party to celebrate the center's 25th anniversary. The party is 80's prom themed and will recognize women who are "rock i:tars." One student, one staff member and one alumni will be recognized. The party is March 13 from ?-10 p.m. in Memorial Gym.

Study Away '15-'1&路 The semester study away deadline is Friday, Mru:ch 13. The J-Term study away appLcation due date has been moved to April.

lute Baseb1aH The PLU baseball team has climbed to number 19 in the Top 25 Division III baseball teams in the NCAA.

Namibia Nine The premiere of a PLUlead documentary brought leaders from Namibia to campus. The documentary follows rune leaders through their lives after attending PLU and leading their O)untry.


MARCH 13, 2015

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THE MOORING MAST

NEWS3

Campus Safety Investigation • I • Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports Medical Aid in Olson GYm

Campus Safety (CSAF) responded to a call in OJ.Son from a student who injured his ankle while playing soccer. He was supplied with an ice pack and no hirther medical assistance was taken.

AJcohol Violation in Foss

Campus Safety discovered an Akohof Policy Violation in Foss and notified Residential Life. CSAF and Res Life contacted several students and a non-student in the room. The occupants were cooperative and the alcohol was disposed of upon request. ·The incident has been sent to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review.

t-----.Theft in South Hall

Campus Safety was notified of a bicyde theft a student. She reported her bike had been last seen secured to a South Hall bike rack just a few hours before. There are no suspects.-

oy

Theft in Pftueger

Campus Safety was notified of a bicycle theft by a student. He reported his bike had been missing for 48 hours. There are no suspects.

AJcohol Violation in llnglestad

Campus Safety responded to a Tinglestad Resident Assistant with a room contact reference for a possible Alcohol Policy Violation. CSAF searched the room and found and --+------+disposed of the alcohol in it. The incident was forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review.

To avoid meningitis, Doll suggests students not swap saliva or share cups. Most students are not vaccinated for meningitis when they are younger With spring break around the because the vaccinations are expensive corner, students going home or and not required. The meningitis vaccine is a series of visiting friends in Eugene, Ore. might three shots which can cost up to $300 be put at risk. Washington health officials are on each. When there is an outbreak, the high alert as a meningitis outbreak hit Center for Disease Control and the University of Oregon. The University of Oregon in Eugene Prevention and state officials usually saw a spread of potentially deadly supply free vaccination. clinics to meningococcal infections through prevent people from contracting the campus. Four Oregon students infection. Meningitis is not a small rash or an developed the infection since the start annoying cough, of the school but a deadly year, according disease. If not . to UO officials. "Don't kiss a duck, don't treated properly The university or timely, had to schedule f- - - a duck." meningitis can a campus wide lead to death or vaccination clinic Susana Doll serious medical for as many as Director of the Health Center is.sues. 22,000 students Symptoms and those at risk. of meningitis More than 800 Washington State residents are include a sudden high fever, headache, enrolled at UO and schools statewide stiff neck, vomiting, confusion, are becoming hyper aware of the seizures and in some cases, a skin rash. For Doll, the answer is simple: be possibility of the bacterial infection careful when visiting a UO duck over spreading. All of the Oregon cases involved spring break. "Many students are going to visit the B strain of the bacteria that causes meningitis and infection. The their friends and just be careful," Doll same strain that led to outbreaks at said. "Don't kiss a duck, don't f-- a Princeton and University of California duck." Along with the meningitis scare, Santa Barbara in 2013 and 2014. These outbreaks resulted in 13 infections and Doll wants students to be safe during the break. one death. Over spring break, Doll wants Spring break is coming up March 23-29, and Susana Doll, director of students to be aware of other health the Health Center, is hoping students risl<s like having unprotected sex, will make smart decisions when going being under the influence of alcohol and not getting enough sleep or water. home or visiting friends in Eugene. Bacterial meningitis occurs when the bacteria enters the bloodstream and reaches the brain and spinal cord.

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor


4A&E

MARCH 13, 2015

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Nude models ·included RHIANNON BERG Guest Writer MAITHEW SALZANO A&E Editor Lutes can learn from nude models in the classroom, but Pacific Lutheran University students aspiring to be nude models on campus need to keep their clothes on. Nude modeling is used to hone a new artist's skills, said associate professor of art and design Michael Stasinos.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Michael Stasinos, assistant professor of art and design Unlike inanimate objects, even the most unskilled eye can recognize errors in drawings of the human body, Stasinos said in a March 6 interview. It doesn't take a trained artist to notice uneven limbs or awkward body proportions; therefore, the artist must try their best to be accurate. ''We all have an innate feeling from just looking at our ourselves and people our entire lives," Stasinos said. "It [is] a subject that gives the student no excuse but to do their best... you can't really fudge it." First-year Jorge Molinero is an aspiring artist who took Stasinos' figure drawing course this term hoping to improve his artistic skills. "Before [the class] I would draw a person, but it would be off," he said. Now that he is further in the course, he recognizes "there's so

much that goes· into drawing a person that I didn't know about before." While Molinero was striving to enhance his artistic talents, junior Kyle Parsons said he was hoping to gain further experience as a nude model. The art department relies on contact from models themselves or references from other universities rather than soliciting models. Parsons expressed interest in modeling for Stasinos' class in Spring 2014. After reaching out to the professor again last fall, he was scheduled for modeling sessions in the spring section of Drawing 2. Parsons attended two of his scheduled modeling sessions on February 23 and 25. "At first I was nervous," Parsons said. "As soon as I started doing it, it was really easy [and] I was super comfortable, and it was a lot of fun, too." Both Stasinos and Parsons said it was helpful for students to draw models with varying body types. "I also wanted to do it because a lot of the models in the class ... are in their 40s or 50s, and they're not necessarily in the best shape," Parsons said. ''I think it's good that the students get [someone] who is fit and can actually model and they can actually draw the muscles they're learning in class." In an interview with The Mooring Mast on March 9, Stasinos and JP Avila, associate professor and chair of the department of art and design, said hiring a PLU student as a nude model was a violation of an unwritten but

assumed art department policy. Stasinos said Parsons was hired when a male model had a medical issue and dropped out of a scheduled session. Parsons was hired as a replacement.

LU studen Art from Kyle's modeling in Figure Drawing First-year Sadie Martinez

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

JP Avila, associate professor and chair of the department of art and design Stasinos admitted this decision bent the rules, and decided to reestablish them. On the morning of March 10, Parsons received an email from Stasinos which said he would not be invited to his previously scheduled sessions on April 27 and 29. Parsons doesn't think PLU students should be stopped from pursuing nude modeling on campus. ''I think that I'm an adult [and] Dr. Stasinos has in the syllabus that, if you're not comfortable with drawing people naked, this isn't a class for you," Parsons said. "I think that [the art department] should overlook that [I'm a student] and if a student wants to model for an art class, they should be allowed to." Parsons will still pursue his career in nude modeling, but hopes he will be able to do it oncampus again. Tm really disappointed that I can't come back," Parsons. said. "I hope PLU will change their policy."

First-year Jorge Molinero

PHOTO COURTESY OF KYLE PARSONS

Junior Kyle Parsons

GUEST Reland Tuomi, This week, Reland talked to Saxifrage editp:~ Meg; D(>lde about· ·all tllW-gs student medil:tI: ·


A&E5

THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 13, 2015

PLUtonic, HERmonic anc~ . Clay Crows spring pre U3

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LEFT: HERmonic members first-year Lydia Bill, firstyear Rizelle Rosales, senior Biffy Binkley, first-year Kiana Norman, first-year Amira Beidas, jun or Sadi Wentz and junior Kairie Coddington perform March 8 in Lagerquist Con::ert Hall. CENTER: PLUton c men sophomore Josh Bozich, junior Reggie Collins, firstyear Tevita Tupou, senior Matt Serino, junior Domenic DeSoto, senior Kyle Mitchell and senior Chris Glessman stand in formation during one of their numbers during the spring premiere. BEL.OW: The Clay Crows, including seniors Ryan Sundberg, Mitchell Helton, Joshua Parmenter and Tova Lyng play the improv game "timeline."

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BROOKE THAMES A&EWriter Family, friends and lots of Lutes filed into Lagerquist Concert Hall March 8 to witness an entertainment extravaganza put on by some of Pacific Lutheran University's most beloved performance groups. PLUtonic, HERmonic and Clay Crows banded together Saturday to produce their 2015 Spring Concert, a show that elicited laughs, awe and thunderous applause. Comedy and music seem worlds apart, but this is not the first time that a capella and improv have shared a PLU stage. HERmonic and Oay Crows have a history of performing together. Inspired by the success of a former collaboration, the two groups decided that it was time to get back together. "We thought that it would be great to break away from our usual concert and add something new and fun," said HERmonic president senior Anne Herzog. '1 talked to ... [the] president of PLUtonic,.arid he agreed." The show featured several sets of music performed by PLUtonic

and HERmonic, accompanied by a hilarious half-hour performance by Oay Crows. Highlights of HERmonic' s performance included a mashup of "Try," by Colbie Callait and "Pretty Hurts," by Beyonce, and the group's International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella set featuring tracks by Beyonce, Sia and Taylor Swift. PLUtonic delivered on their classic combination of humor and music in their opening song "Low," by Flo Rida and earned a well-deserved standing ovation with their performance of the hymn "How Great Thou Arf' featuring sophomore Josh Bozich. The comedic acts of the Oay Crows served as a welcome intermission between the music. The crowd offered up big laughs to games such as "Timeline," in which the members play scenes before and after a specific event, and "You're Fired," where a cast member must decipher why he or she was late for work given clues by the other actors. "The premise [of 路the show], as it usually is for any of the a capella or improv shows here on campus, [was] ...to have fun," said HERmonic and Oay Crows

member, Sadi Wentz."We all love to showcase what we do ...whether it's singing songs that everyone loves or getting a few laughs." The formula of comedy and melody equated to a spectacular performance by all three groups in an collective singing/improv activity. A surprise group act presented the members of Oay Crows with the challenge of acting out songs sung by PLUtonic and HERmonic. It is fun performances like these that Herzog said provides an important escape for students, faculty and staff. "When people come to a HERmonic and PLUtonic concert, they get a Chance to take a break

from their daily lives and whatever may be stressful to them to relax and listen to great music," Herzog said. Shows such as the PLUtonic, HERmonic, Oay Crows Spring Concert are unique displays of

talent, hard work and ftn. '1t's not often that lhe theatre department and the music department get to collz borate for fun like this," Wenlz said. "This was truly some of the most fun we've had on stage."

Ordal: VCR, DVD player, Playstation, board games (Scene It?, Cranium and more), pool, ping pong, badminton, basketbalr, soccer.

ERIN FLOM Guest Writer The residence halls' front desks do more than just give mail or rent out cleaning and cooking supplies. Most front desks also offer games and activities for students. "College students have a limited budget," said Kreidler' s community assistant with additional duties (CAAD), senior Kyrie Benson. Having an inventory of supplies that can be checked out from front desks lightens the load for students. What each front desk has to offer is different and everything offered to students is "based on some sort of a need," whether it's practical or social, said Hinderlie's Residence Hall Council president, sophomore Kiera Stevens. "The main source of funding [for the front desk] comes from Res Life," said Harstad's resident assistant with additional duties (RAAD), junior Katie Coddington. "But if RHC has leftover funds, they can use that to fill in that need." Coddington also stated that funding is based on the number of residents. So, a large hall like Tinglestad will have more funds to start out with compared to smaller halls. Students do have a voice in what the front desk supplies for students. "We don't know what you want or need," Coddington said. Most halls have a suggestion box, "or talk to your RA" Coddington suggested.

Kreidler: pool, board games (Settlers of Catan, Cards Against Humanity and more) Hong: DVD player, Playstation, Nintendo 64, board games (Apples to Apples, Guess Who and more), ping pong, basketball, a soccer ball, frisbees, hula hoops, football Hinderlie: DVD player, DVDs (Mean Girls, The Simpsons Movie and more), Wi1(2) + games, board games (Risk, Would You Rather and more), sidewalk chalk, face paint, poker chips, plastic bowling set, Bop-It

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Foss: ping pong, basketball, volleybafl, baseball, board games (Battleship, Fact or Crap and more)

South (not pictured): pir g pong, volleyball, croque1, board games (Twister, Catch Phrase and more)


6FEATURE

THE MOORING MAS1 First-year Aspen Eckert "Ym going home to southeast Idaho. I plan to sleep in a lot and enjoy the sun."

Sophomore Katerina Volosevych "I'm going to go home and I'm literally just going to play piano, hang out with my family and play tennis!"

some sun. The PLU Health Center is providing free condoms and the mo after pill for students to take with: them their trips over the bre~.t Susana Doll, the direct~pr~ Health Center, said students shou,J'.d/{emember all tqecrisky activities 9-~k sprin~pre~ 7 that. c~ happ,w ~$;unp,,;-Otected se~ and '

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

Whether ....,they're sfir traveling far';away, Lut1 :111 enioy their spring break. .3-'Zl classeS: ·•· be free '' '• ' g~tting"tnt1 ier.~ Unive:rSity offers an · ·· W~Jk~: sprip.g break option foJ:iLutes all that.'sttidents)l.l,'t~.l:~~M~~:oe~arei·:ef, but ' .~ ,tO get crazy or staf home there are many riskS m jµst. break-time their p~ents. . . . activities, I??ll said, <. · ,~\'• . .. ' ''/ Altematii:~ sp~g break tri~. ~ve,;·• i •·. · Drivirt~,~~~\}6~0 , Murst .. getting ' ' s~dents ~i~~ce. to enga.ge IDr;·~~~ce ' dehy~~i:;;~~~~~~~ilfug< suribumt are WIth the Sl.lft~~g . ~?mmUIJ1ty and all very real, p.l!Ooleml tf1at Clp'l • beco111e volunteet:3 · •· ··· •!i';~r:~:~li/1,sr ...,,. r serious issues without shidents realizirtg; One mp'W:ill be v;ohmteetm'g'With the .. ?top by the Health Center to stock up J:'carkland community and the other will op. enough mediqation and ,protection be b:~v;~g to the US-Mexico border to .;Jor anY'triP you ~~ttakeand don't be ;tparli(ipate in an i:I:nplersion experience m . 1 ~aid 1 t6 'MKque5ti.bns~~ 1it comes to Texas. · . ·· your.safety. Some sports teams will be traveling fo different states for competition and to get . Headshots b'r/Mattf;ew ..,,,,,.,_,,.,,,., 1

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Groundskeeper Diane Waiface "Tm taking my grandkids to Lincoln city - to the beach!f/


FEATURE 7

.CH 13, 2015

Senior Joseph Norton "I'm going to be wliting my Capstone. It's about Hus crazy German philosopher guy named Martin Heidegger. And poetry, and stuff."

_.....

~ophomore

Kiera Stevens

."I'm going to California with my friend. She invited me to go with her and I was like, 'Yeah! Let's go on an adventure!"'

Junior R~der Turnbull

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'1 plan to work 40 hours again for a week, and have .a kindof relaxed spring break. Pretty mellovv." 路 Froschauer


THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

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MAUCH 13, 2015

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TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer "Suicide bombings," "air strikes," "cease fire treaties" and "mortality rates" are a . small selection of the many depressing terms you'll hear in conversation regarding the Israeli. Palestinian never-ending conflict. Terms you may have heard that I am particularly against are Pro-Israel and Pro-Palestine used by individuals who do not have any grounding to support their positioning. This conflict that is rooted deep into history both religiously and geographically is a complex issue that many involved may not even see holistically. Younger generations have been raised to hate either side with no foundational reasoning. A novel could be written to explain exactly where the conflict lies between Israel and Palestine, but to sum it up: During the Holocaust, incentives to band together heightened as Jews were beginning to flock back into Jerusalem, desperately fleeing Nazi persecution during World War II. Under the leadership of David BenGurion in 1948, the Jewish Community in Israel reinstated sovereignty over their homeland. Israel's Declaration of Independence of the newly found modern State oflsrael was announced the day British forces retreated from Israel on May 14, 1984 according to http://science.co.il/Israel-history.php. Palestinians were then removed from the land they had called home for many

THE MOORING MAST

years. A majority of the conflict involves numbers is a morbid way to identify who is the enemy in this war. If we land and who is entitled to it While most of us are not in a value peace we must value human life, position to take a side, that does not which would lead us to believe all blood mean we should give up on being shed is valuable life lost. I want to :make it very clear I'm not knowledgeable on worldly conflict. It is our responsibility in the world of saying that there has not been war crimes committed and there is surely academia to remain curious. By free will we can surely have evil on both sides. However, for the sake of moving opinions, but that's not my point. If you truly value peace and desire a resolution forward and creating solutions we must between the two states, it's critical that stop framing this as who is right and we stop counting who's right and who's who is wrong. wrong. We need to take down the tally Tim Mayfield, a writer for the board we've been keeping to see who's Australian Broadcast Corporation wrote, worse or who's better. "In the face of the intensifying tragedy It's important to have an in Gaza, Australia must be a voice in understanding of what is going on in the favour of moderation and constraint in world. You'll gain perspective and will this conflict, not a cheerleader for one constantly-be challenging your views if side." you critically think about problems and Many countries (not excluding the solutions in the world we live in. U.S.) favor a side and surely there are Headlines are constantly flooding 路 news sources skewed by these biases. It's refreshing to see individuals the news with recent bombings injuring civilians. We need to be refocusing our acknowledging that peace will not attention ~.m problem solving or creating be reached if we can't maintain civil dialogue to find a solution. feasible solutions. "I haven't been paying too much The entire language surrounding this conflict must be altered to create attention to the Israeli Pale"stinian a constructive environment in which conflict," junior Sara Suznevich said. leaders, peacemakers and mediators can "But I think countries should remain begin to facilitate a dialogue to regain as un-biased as possible for the sake of progress." peace. Qasim Rashid, a lawyer and bestWe've muddled in the conflict for too selling author of "Extremist," wrote long as biased individuals and nations. in an article published by Huffington Let's work together to reframe the Post, "Arab blood and Jewish blood are dialogue and broaden our perspectives human blood - and all blood is equal." of conflict both locally and globally. This is what we must focus on, that all blood is human blood and it's equally valued. Comparing death toll

Pacific Lutheran UniversitJr 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR Jeff Dunn ONLINE EDITOR Allie Reynolds

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Allie Reynolds

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Campbell Brett NEWS @ NINE PRODUCEH

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS

Cliff Rowe Art land

Please recycle your copy of

POLICIES AND PROCEC URES

The Mooring Mast

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ALLIE REYNOLDS General Manager of Mast TV A lot of girls get offended when they're called basic. It's just another one of the hundreds of negative labels society uses to put down women, and I'm so tired of it. I love iced vanilla lattes, scented candles from Bath and Body Works and worship the ground Taylor Swift walks on. To most, this makes me a basic white girl. According to Urban Dictionary, a basic white girl is "your run of the mill white girl that has no identity of her own." She wears leggings as pants, owns Uggs and North Face jackets and posts her coffee and food pictures on her Instagram account, using the hashtag #blessed. I don't think women should feel ashamed for liking what they like. If you like posting pictures of your food on Instagram and counting down the days until Pumpkin Spice Lattes are available again, I don't think you should feel ashamed for being you and liking what makes you happy. News Editor Samantha Lund and Mast TV General Manager Allie Society teaches young women that it's okay to Reynolds accidentally showed up to an event wearing the same outfit. compare ourselves to one another and put each Society considers the puffy black vest very 'basic' attire. other down. Calling other young women out on what they like is doing the same thing. she becomes a negative stereotype, even though she was Life is so much easier when you surround yourself being told to buy these objects. I find it really frustrating," with friends who support you rather than bring you down Mansfield said. for liking what makes you happy. I encourage young women to own their "basic." Take _Senior Emily Mansfield is doing her Capstone project as many selfies as you want, drink your flavored lattes in sociology on women being called "basic" in the media and yell One Direction and Taylor Swift lyrics at the top of and society. your lungs. You shouldn't feel ashamed for liking things "Girls are told to buy Starbucks, Ugg boots and other that make your day a little brighter. things that are considered basic. Once she buys them,

The responsibility of The Moorill!f Mast is to discover, report and distribute :information to its readers about important issnes, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the ~;ociety of Professional Journalists Code ofl:thics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed路in editorials, co.lumns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewerthan 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place :i,n advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, t:mail mast@ plu.edu.


....... MARCH 13 2015

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 9

n Dear Mooring Mast, First, thank you for your publication each week. I enjoy reading it on Friday afternoons. I was prompted to send an email after reading the feature "How to Sound Smart: About Penis Size" on page 3 of the March 6 issue. It was under the "News" section, which I found intriguing (and somewhat disturbing). I realize that I am at a liberal college, and~ as a conservative person, occasionally feel a little out of place. I recognize and actively try to appreciate, however, the diversity of opinion, beliefs and values on our campus. But because the paper serves a -significant role in representing Pacific Lutheran University, this piece seemed

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a bit unnecessary to me, and made me want to disassociate myself from my school. One may also consider that placing "How to Sound Smart: About Penis Size" adjacent to an article about the Holocaust conference is a bit troubling. And potentially disturbing. And disrespectful, given that an article about penises, which I dare claim isn't exactly table talk, is roughly six times the size of the article about the Holocaust conference. It just made me wonder - would we want a younger generation of future Lutes to pick up that paper and associate penis size with Pacific Lutheran University? Would we want an older generation of Pacific Lutheran University alumni to believe that this is how its alma mater now represents itself? Call me a radical, but I still like to identify myself with values, manners and class. And

while a small feature in a college newspaper- attEmpting to be edgy may not seem like a very big deal, I believe it is these little things that lead to a general distancing and abandonment of true morals and values in our culiure. I also recognize that a piece in a newspaper does not compose one's entire perception of the University- but I certainly felt less proud to call myself a Lute when I saw this today. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Carly Stauffer First-Year

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THE MOORING MAST

Baseball

MARCH 13, 2015

Softball WINS

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9

7

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3

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3

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13

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13

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6

4-2

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Linfield

10

4

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8

9

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Lewis & Clark

6

6

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Linfield

11

6

4-5

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Pacific Lutheran

4

8

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Lewis & Clark

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13

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10

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12

1-8

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Doubleheader: Tomorrow 12 a.m. & 3 p.m. vs. Whitworth

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7

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6

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Lewis & Clark

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3

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632

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635

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670

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310 288

598

+22

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3

304 298

602

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Puget Sound

4

317 312

629

+53

Pacific Lutheran

4

337 344

681

+113

Whitman

5

330 306

636

+60

Puget Sound

5

374 375

749

+181

Linfield

6

328 316

644

+68

Olympic College

6.

402 420

822

+254

Lewis & Clark

7

375 362

737

+161

Next Tournament

Next Tournament

Tomorrow f6r the Lewis & Clark Invitational @ Heron Lakes Golf Club

Tomorrow for the Lewis & Clark Invitational @ Heron Lakes Golf Clut

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PHOTO COURTESY OF HERON LAKES GOLF CLUB

PHOTO COURTESY OF HERON LAKES GOLF CLUB


-THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 13, 2015

11 SPORTS

Hilliker's Highlights: A home run type season around the sport is unparalleled to anything we've seen in awhile, especially for Seattle Mariners fans. Here's everything you need to know about the M's and what to watch for as we get closer to Opening Day of baseball season. We were so close

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The Seattle Mariners went 87-75 during the 2014 regular season.

Austin Hilliker Sports Editor It's almost that time again. Sunflower seeds, hot dogs and rally fries. A time when sunshine is consistent and rooting for the home .team is encouraged; it's baseball season. Spring training for professional baseball has officially started up. The excitement

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It came down to just one game last year. The Kansas City Royals stole the spotlight from the Mariners as they grabbed one of the last playoff spots available_ Left with a bitter taste in their mouths, the Mariners made some wholesale changes with the hope that feeling would never come back again. In the off-season, the M's managed to steal out-fielder Nelson Cruz from the Baltimore Orioles. Cruz was the 2014 home-run leader in Major League Baseball. Cruz is expected to give Seattle the upper 路 hand on offense, something that has been a point of emphasis for the clubhouse in recent years. In addition to Cruz, the Mariners picked up pitcher J.A. Happ from the Toronto

Blue Jays. Happ produced quite well for the Blue Jays, holding a 4.22 earned-runaverage (ERA) during the 2014 season. Pitcher Taijuan Walker, a player that has bounced around in the Mariners farm system, also looks to hold his own, and he will most likely be a key component of the Mariners pitching staff throughout the 2015 season. Walker pitched only eight games last year, but has made managed to grow on the M's clubhouse during his time in Seattle. Spring training so far Spring training might not count toward teams overall records in the .regular season, but it's still a time where every player gets the chance to show off their skills during this evaluation process. So far, the Mariners don't look too shabby. They have fought through 10 games in spring training and hold a record of 4-5. Don't let the record fool you though. It's hard to evaluate a team only in the spring because the line-ups are constantly changing and some of the more talented players don't play as much.

Looking to the regular season Opening Day is closer than we all think. On April 1, the Mariners will open their season against their American League West rivals, the L.A. Angels, in a highly publicized game. This year looks bright for th1~ Seattle Mariners. Expect an abundance of homeruns from our offense and gold-glove type plays from our defense. Don't strike out on an opportunity to miss a great season for another Seattle sports team.

Nelson Cruz will play the 2015 sea~ on in a Seattle Mariners uniform.

adn_ess, Cinderella is always invited to the a ce

Steven McGrain Sports Writer The idea of an upset should be thrown out the window when discussing March Madness. If the top-ranked men's Kentucky Wildcats were defeated in the first round by a 16-seed from a small college, it should not be considered an upset. The underdog was just making the most of their opportunity and wanted to win more. March Madness is a 68-team tournament single-elimination for Division I men's and women's basketball. The event occurs over the span of six weekends. All 68 teams are broken up into four different regions: west, Midwest, south and east. It begins with the First and Second Round, then Sweet Sixteen, Elite 8 and at the conclusion of the

tournament is the Final Four. illtimately, the two best teams in the tournament play for the National Championship. At this point, the Cinderella aspect of March Madness needs to be forgotten. The universities who have been given this title in previous years cannot be labeled with this character's forename anymore because they are invited to the dance every year. Mid-major teams are considered any school - not associated with the five main conferences: Big 12, Pacific-12, Big Ten, Southeastern Conference (SEC) and Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Any team not involved with these conferences has less of a chance to win the National Championship. Gonzaga is not part of any of

those conferences but has been in the tournament on a consistent basis ever since Dan Dickau

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Gonzaga plays in the West Coast Conference. The bulldogs have made the NCAA. Tournament the last 15 straight years

........

transferred from the University of Washington in 2001. Similarly, the Butler University Bulldogs were described as a "sleeper team," but this does not make any sense considering they were ranked 11th in the country. The entire season, they went unnoticed by most people because of their conference, the Horizon League, has no big name schools. Was it because their roster was not full of household names? Gordon Hayward, Shelvin Mack and Matt Howard were well known in their region. This Bulldog team ended up making it to the National Championship where they fell to Duke University. Furthermore, if this Cinderella dance session for Butler was just a one-time occurrence, then they should not have made it

in the following year (2011), but they did, losing in the National Championship game to Connecticut in 20E. Butler is projected at a #6 seed for this year's tournament. College basketball fans zre filling out numerous bracket'. When inking in what team sh(luld win it all, look at the body of work by these schools throug:i.out the year, the experience, h )W they play and then make your choice. Do not choose by colo : of their uniforms, mascot, masco :' s name, flipping a coin or what y )ur pets' name is, but by actually doing the homework on, each team. Then, like everyone el >e, you'll realize there are no Cir .derellas, just elite basketball team:; playing for a National Championship.

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On the same te_am, giving the best to PLU athlete:s this time. "The history is everything," Staff Writer Doll said. "You almost never find something on a physical." The Health Center, Last year, all first-years under new leadership, were required to have their aims to continue protecting physical on-campus, but this and providing for athletes year the Health Center accepts throughout the spring. physicals performed in the last Coinciding with the American year from off-campus doctors. College of Sports Medicine For upperclassmen, a the Health requirements, screening physical is required. Center assures that students Both the pre-participation are ready for the rigorous physical and screening physical competition of collegiate can be completed at the Health PHOTO BY AUSTIN HIWKER sports. thirty minutes from paperwork Center, the student's primary Sports physicals provider or an emergency The Health Center has to walking out the door. are free for students. The clinic. Women can opt for appointments are covered by chosen not to perform EKG' s After June 1, every the Wellness Plan, which each because of the expensive price a breast exam added to their participating student must be and low risk of abnormality. general examination, while Lute pays $350 dollars for per However, sudden men receive a hernia exam cleared in order to practice. year. Incoming first-years can "In Italy they do an death symptoms are still asked and are reminded how to complete their physical in the history questionnaire. perform tentacular exams on EKG [a process that records anytime after their deposit is The center previously themselves. electrical activity of the heart] made. Every athlete must complete on all athletes ...high school perform blood work for every To beat the fall rush, summer athletes on up," Director of athlete, but after multiple a physical before practicing and late spring appointments years of the practice, that and playing their sport. Fm the Health Center Susana Do11 _ a:re an option. Tequll:ement was Temoved. fust-yea:rs, \bis consists 0拢 a said. Scheduling physicals early pre-participation physical. from the testing from required "The horrible sudden death and before sports seasons start Medical, injury and family [occurrence] can sometimes be physical protocol. helps keep the crowds moving Each physical should take history is all covered during detected through this." in and out in a timely manner.

Brooke Wolfe

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTEs.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLLJTES.COM


- · - -----

----

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THE MOORING MAST

MAR. 13, 2015

I

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Record-holding lute climbing for the children's shelter in Missoula. Staff Writer During Angel's freshmen year of high school, he primarily played The longest tennis match ever soccer, along with baseball. He recorded in the Guinness Book of was interested in tennis because World Records lasted 60 hours 59 it included aspects of both sports. minutes and 58 seconds. It was Angel saw that tennis was active played in Missoula, Mont. on · like soccer and also involved March 11, 2011. hand-eye coordination like The one who holds this record is baseball. none other than Pacific Lutheran Due to his soccer and baseball University's own tennis player, schedules, Angel missed almost senior Sam Angel. all of the tennis practices. Despite "Sam is definitely a positive for his lack of attendance, he still our team on and off the court," won junior varsity divisional. said head coach John Cassens. "That was a great feeling and I For Angel, winning that world loved how I picked up the sport record was one of his proudest so quickly," said Angel. moments. He knew he had done When he came to PLU's courts, something no one had done Angel said he started at the before and it even raised money bottom of the ladder. Now, he

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has reached his aspirations and ·weekend. rests at the top. At the midpoint of the season "I feel like I've taken on more Angel set 5th place as the team's leadership and I like watching goal. the other guys play where I used Angel acknowledges that the to be," Angel said. top four teams in the conference Since he is now a leader on the are really tough, but he says that team, Angel said that he helps he "just wants to have fun with motivate the team by example, the guys this season and get as in addition to encouraging his many wins as possible." teammates. As Angel nears the end of his Angel started out 5-4 in singles career, he says that the friends he and 2-1 in doubles during 2011- has made thus far will be what he 12 season. He went 6-13 in singles cherishes the most. and 7-11 in doubles during the "I've met some of my best 2012-13 season and 1-12 in singles friends and incredible role and 3-10 in doubles during the models through my experience," 2013-14 season. Angel said. "The memories will Right now, the PLU men's last forever and sharing that with tennis team is 2-5. Angel has been a team is really special." injured this past week, but coach Cassens hopes he's back for the

Sam Angel finished se :ond in the state doubles comJetition while attending Hellgite HS. He also was an all-stat~ tennis and soccer player.

Smooth transition for so ball outfielde league outfielder her junior and senior year, as well as captain of the softball team. When asked about the transition from high school to college softball, Alcomendas said, "The transition hasn't been that bad for

Christian Bond Guest Writer ·

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First-year Jessica Alcomendas has a batting average of .286, going 4-14 so far this year.

A successful first attempt in sports is a rare occurrence for any new athlete. More athletes fail their first time around, finding success later rather than sooner. This isn't the case for first-year outfielder Jessica Alcomendas. Alcomendas' first collegiate hit for the Pacific Lutheran University softball team was a home run against Northwest University. The first-year outfielder found a pitch to her liking .and drove it over the left field wall. Alcomendas calls Vancouver, Wash. home. She attended Mountain View High School where she was a 2nd team all.

a a tot e Stephanie Compton Guest Writer As sophomore Lute tennis player Emily Beemsterboer steps up for a serv'e, she plays a song in her head. It helps her "keep the pace and stay positive" in a match. But before Beemsterboer started tearing up the court at Pacific Lutheran University, she was tearing it up over in Japan. She came all the way to PLU from her hometown of Tokyo. She began playing tennis as a freshman in high school while in

me."

She said that college softball is a lot more intense than high school softball. "We do a lot more weight lifting and more hours of practice than in high school," Alcomendas said. ''But other than that I was honestly ready for that next step of intensity for softball. I love playing college ball here at PLU." Alcomendas attributes here success to both her parents and past coaches.

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Japan with some help from her computer science teacher. "[The computer science teacher] was the coach ... he needed more girls to play and he asked me to join," Beemsterboer said. Beemsterboer also said the biggest difference between tennis in Japan and the U.S. is the amount of people who play tennis. "[In Japan] we would only play a couple of international students." Beemsterboer' s tennis idol Kei Nishikori, also from Japan. "He has changed a lot and it shows me that I can improve too,"

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Beemsterboer said. Beemsterboer is also very motivated by growth in her sport and enjoys excelling at the game she loves. Winning isn't everything and Beemsterboer values tennis for giving her a group of friends that she gets to enjoy this journey with. Women's tennis head coach Lorrie Wood said Beemsterboer is a hard worker and is very invested in her teammates. Beemsterboer may be a sophomore at PLU, but she is only in her first year of athletic

"When I was four years old my parents put me into multiple sports to get a feel for what sport I liked best," Alcomendas said. "The moment I stepped onto a softball field I knew that this was my sport." Alcomendas described her parents as her role models, because "they taught me that it is okay to fail and in the game of softball you have to be okay with failing sometimes but be able to find your way back to being the best you can be." Alcomendas said that her past coaches were a huge part of who she is today. "They pushed me to be the best I could be and would believe in me when some days I didn't even

believe in myself," Alcomendas said. "I play for my role models on that field becacse with.out them I wouldn't love the game as a much as I do now ,Jr cherish it as much as I do." There are veiy limited opportunities for soflball players to continue on to be p:·ofessionals. Alcomendas unden tands that these next four years could be her last for playing competitive softball. Her dream away from the softball diamor .d involves becoming a K-9 officer. Akomendas is still young, but shows great promise for the future of PLU softball. Her energy in the outfield, along with her big bat are great attribliies the team can use.

re as 0 Ii eligibility. She chose not to play in the 2013-2014 season for academic reasons, but this season tennis has helped with her academics. "Tennis helps me manage time between homework and practice," Beemsterboer said. After PLU, she hopes to travel through Europe and hopefully back to Japan, but tennis will never be far from her mind. Beemsterboer believes that tennis is "good for all ages" and hopes more people take up the sport that she loves. And with the summer months ahead, there's no better time to get out and play.

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Spring season sports starting up ...

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Men's Track & Field

Women's Track & Field

PLU Invitational 9:30 a.m. @ PLU Track

PLU Invitational 9:30 a.m. @ PLU Track

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVJ: COMMONS


Travel Tips and Experiences pg. 6-7

Review: Kendrick Lamar's "To Pimp a Butterfly'' pg. 5

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

Pacific Lutheran University baseball took down across town rival University of Puget Sound to claim the Lutes' final win in the Drive to 125. The Lutes cut down the Loggers 6-1 Tuesday afternoon. To celebrate, PLU athletics will host a celebration in Red Square April 10 from 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. with free cupcakes. Even with the Drive finished, sports teams continue to compete. Look through pages 10-12 for more updates and a full game recap.

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Fresh faces take the presidential election

"I didn't choose the play, the play chose me."- Sophomore Kiera Stevens "Canines divine Friday" pg. 4

view

"No matter the profession someone is aspiring to be, we all have an opportunity to create our own masterpiece with this career choice. " Senior Steve McGrain, "A different art, sports writing" pg. 12

"Simply put, just because a doctor says, 'It's a girl.' when someone is a baby doesn't mean they are a girl." Junior Angie Tinker, "Increase awareness on TDOB" pg. 8

JEFF DUNN Copy Editor The new President and Vice President do not bring years of experience to Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University, but instead bring a fresh vision and a desire to help. Junior Martha Spieker and Sophomore Ellie Lapp have been elected the new ASPLU President and Vice President and are ready to hit the ground running.

Spieker is a double major in Political Science and Hispanic Studies. She spoke quickly and excitedly about traveling to Spain and Norway during the spring and fall semesters of 2014, respectively. Spieker is passionate about her new position, and she wants to hear people's stories and learn about their interests and concerns. "I hadn't been directly involved with ASPLU before the election," she explained. "But we're really excited to be present at events, and we want

PHOTO COURTESY OF ELLIE LAPP

Spieker (RIGHl) and Lapp (LEFT) are mainly concerned with changing and broadening student government's role in every Lute's life. Mainly, they hope to make ASPLU transparent and accountable to students.

people to feel very comfortable approaching us." Spieker is also involved with Oub Keithley, which connects PLU students with the Parkland

community through service and outreach. Spieker said PLU students 路 should know that ASPLU is an advocacy organization. Their goal is for ASPLU's focus to be shifted away from programs and events. Not that they won't still plan and organiZe some events. "We want to engage students. We want to create a space where students can have an open dialogue," Spieker said. Lapp is double majoring in Anthropology and Global Studies with a minor in Hispanic Studies. She's very interested in international nonprofits and developments. Lapp was named a peace scholar for next year and was previously employed as a tour guide on campus. "I know it's been a really important part of my life here at the university," Lapp said. She said that learning so much about the university and being able to share her love of PLU with prospective students was exciting. Lapp and Spieker are

currently focused on mnnecting students to resources that can help them. "People have already approached me and vc iced their concerns," Lapp said. "People can approach me and i alk to me about things they're Fassionate about." Spieker and Lapp both like to work with divers;; groups of people, and they. l:: oth hope that working with A~PLU will give them perspective 1eeded to succeed outside of PLU. "At. the end of the day, we're all human, and it's about helping each other," Spieker said. "What's a 路better way to do that than with a po ;ition like this?" Spieker and Lapp were sworn into office on M:rrch 31 at the weekly Senate MeEting. To learn more inJormation about ASPLU or how you can get involved, visit http://www. plu.edu/asplu/


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

Creating NATALIE DEFORD News Writer There's a new face, or helmet, of Pacific Lutheran University. The new Lancelute mascot was created to match the goals of athletics and also the school as a whole. "We wanted something that we could use not only at athletic events but could also be kind of a face of the university," said Sarah Hebel. the Marketing and Social Media Coordinator for Athletics. "Something we could utilize at athletic events but also at other university events across campus." The goal of the new mascot was to the PL U brand and make him a fan people would want to see around campus. "We decided to get a new mascot because our old one was not very approachable or friendly," Hebel said. "We wanted to create something that would be more fan-friendly and would really engage the crowd or visitors on campus." After unveiling the new mascot at one of the basketball games, Hebel said she's had nothing but positive responses. The mascot's presence has been requested for Admissions events路 and anything with. the attendance of community members and prospective students. "I think that it's been a good run so far of having something that the university can see and identify as kind of the face of PLU," Hebel said. The older mascot had pieces of armor, was very dark and carried a shield. The new mascot has typical body armor, which features the PLU

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new logo on the chest, with a yellow cape and a giant helmet. "It's nice because it's subtle but it also stands out in a crowd so you see it walking by and you know you want to give it a high five or say hi or take a picture," Hebel said. With the costume comes a weapon sword - which Hebel said could be "'*'"r+i"'"'1h1 used at games when points are scored or as a to charge up the crowd. The shield of the previous mascot was less effective because it was awkward to carry around and the shield reminded people of being on defense rather than charging forward and scoring. PLU Athletics approached Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University for toward a new mascot last year. Then Athletics matched those funds in order to create the piece together. Hebel said then looked at other mascots for inspiration, sketching together the pieces they wanted, and mascot costume from can be found on the Fa.Cebook, Twitter and lns:tai;ram. there will be a to the mascot after the uo,cornirlL2: rE~'d.ElSi!l'l1 of the PLU Athletics website. "The goal of the mascot is to be a symbol of PLU s@.ool spirit among our student body and our surrounding communities," Hebel said. "Lancelute's personality and liveliness represents Lute pride and brings that energy to life at events across campus." ~uu.l::!uU>

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home router will actually send relies on the PLU community for some information to the devices in reports of network problems. "A lot of times we get calls, or your home and some information out to the Internet and ours just a vague e-mail that comes and There is nothing as annoying put your wireless device on the says 'there's a problem with the to a millennial than a slow same network as all of the other wireless' and that's the end of it. Unfortunately that just doesn't do wireless network. Unfortunately devices." When there are too many us a lot of good," said Help Desk at college campuses, thousands of young adults logging on with people using a particular access Specialist David Domask. their computers, tablets, phones, point, it can slow down the The Help Desk is available until 1 a.m. during the week printers and televisions puts a system for everyone. This spring semester there and 10 p.m. on the weekends to serious strain on networks. At Pacific Lutheran University, were many overlapping classes answer these questions. They are the team that keeps it all running scheduled at the same time in also available nearly around the is the Information and Technology Ramstad with more than one dock by email. Usually what disrupts the (ITS) Department. hundred people using the same Services Tucked away in the Mortvedt 路 access point. Briggs and his team network can be something -as Library under the "HELP" sign, rearranged the wires to put in unassuming as a hair dryer. This this 25-person team is responsible another access point a few feet is because of the two different frequencies that for monitoring, updating and away and balanced the wireless broadband fixing any network problems. wireless networks use. There is across the building. The PLU network is split This type of maintenance work a 2.4 and 5.0 gigaheriz spectrum between two different connection is vital to the health and reliability that the network uses. Things points: one in the Mortvedt of the university's network. ITS like hair dryers, wireless printers Library and the other in the Morken Center for Learning and Technology. ITS uses only twowired routers on-campus, as opposed to the one home wireless router that many are used to. These routers go into every building on campus and create a network for that building. "It creates a network for and then that Tingelstad, Tingelstad network has to exist ITS Network everywhere," Manager Greg Briggs said. "Because people would be pretty ~ Plug it in! Physically connect upset if their Internet connection only worked when they were in ~ all devices, including printer: Tingelstad." and tv's to the wired n Access. points throughout For computers, this campus spread the network and allow for different devices to through Ethernet cables, connect. which are available at the '1t is what most people Help Desk. would think of as their home router. It's the thing that has the radios in it that lets your device communicate," Briggs said. "Your

' and televisions and low-budget computers use this lower frequency network. "In the lower spectrum the 2.4 gigahertz spectrum everything generates interference," Domask said. "So someone pops on their hair dryer in the room next tb you, suddenly there is an interference point between you and your access point." To get the best Internet connection, it is important to make sure that you are using the 5.0 gigahertz frequency, where there is not so much activity or noise. Apple products such as iPhones and Macintosh laptops already have dual band capabilities and due to recent changes, should automatically switch onto the faster, 5.0 gigaheriz frequency. The best Wi-Fi on campus is in the dorm rooms, where there is a

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guaranteed one-wired connection per bed. If it is possible to into h'掳le wic:ed connection an Ethernet cord, tl-e fatemet "is going to be -the best. And we promise, the absc lute best," Domask said. However, the best ai id simplest solution to ai_-._y networ c problems is to just call. "Really reports are essential," Domask said. By calling, e-mailing or physically speaking v-. ith a Help Desk staff member and answering a few quick questions, 1:an help fix the problem much fast,~r. "Just knowing the: t there is a problem somewhere doesn't really help," Domask said. "We need to know where it is and there are a few tests WE can run to help kind of get the scope of the problem." "It's kind of like if you drop your car off at the mechanic and say 'it's had a prcblem for a while' and then you j J.St leave," Biggs said. The grumblings a :10ut slow Wi-Fi do not fall op. deaf ears. The team at ITS works diligently, network despite increasing demands and falling budget allowance to deliver the best Internet services. Bu: it takes the students, staff and faculty to report network problems to keep it running at full capacity. "The more reports v.路e get gives us a betteridea of what's going on and a better idea of where to look for the problem,''. Dom:i.sk said. For any questions on what you can do to update your devices, get an Ethernet cord or how. to get the best connectie>n, contact the PLU Help Desk at 253-5357525, helpdesk@plu.edu or at the Mortvedt library.

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APRIL 3 2015

THE MOORING MAST

1

The no

apps

J Life hacks you didn't know you needed

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

For iPhone users, Carrot is a to-do list with an attitude and can be your best friend or your worst enemy. Carrot can hold your hand through dayto-day tasks, workouts and recently has expanded to weather forecasts. S o m e businesses have jumped onboard the Carrot train, offering users

Waze is a community based traffic app. Other drivers in your area can post and share information about driving conditions, accidents and gas prices around you. Waze alerts you as you approach a waiting cop or an accident that is stopping miles of traffic. The Waze community can also edit streets to show construction changes to roads and closed down streets. Waze won the Best Overall Mobile App award at the 2013 Mobile World Congress and is continuing to be upgraded and improved today. Waze can be used on an Android, iPhone, Windows phone or Blackberry.

rewards for getting certain tasks and workouts done. Carrot is pretty simple. You put in tasks or goals and if you achieve them within a reasonable amount of time (as deemed by Carrot) you get rewarded and Carrot will like you and treat you well. If not, the app shames you and will be in a bad mood. Anything you need motivation with, Carrot can surely get you to do it. The worst part of the app is that it costs $2 and is only for iPhones. If you are not one to throw yourself into an App and fully commit, Carrot probably isn't the right App for you.

Update: Bottles aren't back

A letter from the editor

In the March 13 issue of The Mooring Mast, I reported a story, "Bottles are back" that questioned whether or not the Propel unflavored water bottles should be sold on campus. Since that article was distributed, students have responded and shared their opinions. That is exactly what we want here at The Mast, to raise awareness and get people involved. Once the article was published, the dining services reached out to us and to help them announce that the propel water bottles 路will no longer be sold on campus. 路 "On a daily basis we explain to our guests and students why PLU does not sell bottled water, said Retail Operations Manager for Dining and Culinary Services Tom Harvey. "The retail units more than any other organization support and defend Resolution 6 to the student body and guests."

There is a security risk when using Waze while driving. In December, the Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck sent Waze a letter complaining about the police-locating feature saying it would be "misused by those with criminal intent to endanger officers and community."

mpus ::;arety I ken from weekly Campus Safe' Medical Aid in Admin

Alcohol Policy \!1olation in Hinder1ie

Campus Safety received information of an Alcohol Violation in Hinderlie Hall. CSAF and the Resident Assistant attempted to contact the resident but there was no answer at the door. CSAF performed a room check with the RA and discovered the room empty but found alcohol in plain view. The alcohol was photographed and discarded. The incident has been sent to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review.

Security Violation in Harstad

NEWS 3

Campus Safety received a call explaining that a visiting high school student called 911 for medical aid. The student had fainted while attending an event on campus. When CSAF officers arrived, the student was conscious and sitting. Pierce County Fire and Rescue arrived and took over evaluation of the student. The student's chaperone was present and contacted her parents. The student was then transported to Mary Bridge Children's Hospital.

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Campus Safety received a call from Residential Life reporting an unwanted guest outside of a room in Harstad. CSAF notified the Pierce County Sheriff's Department who then contacted the non-student. CSAF issued a Restriction from Campus to the nonstudent. ResLife and CSAF contacted the original caller with the complaint, and she believed two students in Harstad were letting the non-student in so he could stay in an unoccupied room. CSAFt---discovered an unsecured room with signs of having been lived in. A review of surveillance footage showed the two students swiping the man in. The incident has been forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review.

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4A&E

THE MOORING MAST

• ER.IN FLOM Guest Writer Ever wondered what happened to O:i.arlie Brown and friends when they grew up? The play "Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead" finds the famous Peanuts characters in high school, dealing with more than childhood shenanigans. "Dog Sees PHOTOCOURTfSYOFKlERASTEVENS God" deals with substance abuse, Sophomore Kiera Stevens homosexuality is the director of "Dog Sees God." and bullying. The director, sophomore Kiera Stevens, admitted that the play can be "in your face" at times, but that it is "shocking in a way that makes you think." The play also deals with "insecurity,

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self identity and social identity," first-year Nie Roycroft said. Roycroft plays O:i.arlie Brown. "It's kind of a coming out story," senior Grant Hillard said. ''But at the same time it's a lot about being yourself and feeling free about that." Hillard plays Matt, a high school aged Pigpen. Although the actors may be playing iconic characters, "the writer has taken those characters that we're familiar with and created like completely new characters," Hillard said. ''When you ·grow up, you are vastly different than you were even a year ago," Roycroft said. "We're constantly going through changes and so I feel like it does give a little bit of leeway to kind of play up whatever I want to be, whatever [O:i.arlie Brown] is." Stevens felt a strong connection to the story. "I didn't choose the play, the play chose me," she said. After reading the script, she knew she wanted others to be able to see the play. The play is running independently

APRIL 3, 2015

from Pacific Lutheran University's theater Stevens wants a directing program for department, and is entirely student students called Dog House. Dog House produced. would give students "a little bit more room Stevens felt limited by the guidelines to experiment'' with their theater skills. students have to direct shows. Stevens Stevens envisions this prcgram giving explained that the two student directing opportunities to students to not only direct, programs, Upstart Crow and APO Main but for writers and actors as wdl. Stage, have specific Since the show is guidelines . for a independent, Stevens had to show. APO Main do everything on her own, from the iniiial analysis Stage shows are " reserved for bigger I didn't choose the play, to planning auditions and productions, while callbacks. the play chose me." Upstart Crow is for "It all feels worth it Kiera Stevens smaller shows in the because I'm very passionate Black Box. about doing thi> show so it's Sophomore "[My show] fun work," Stevens said. didn't work within Although ~;he directed either of those one acts in high school, this is Stevens' first ti me directing spaces, and I just felt very restricted" Stevens said. "So I thought atPLU. to just do it on my own." "The way that the show is 1urning out is Although there are many acting and giving me more confidence in myself that I directing majors "there's not a lot of can direct things," Stevens saic:. opportunities for us to be able to direct," The show opened with a student preview Stevens said. Both Hillard and Roycroft on April 2, and runs througr April 4. All expressed interest in directing in the future. shows are in the Cave at 7:30 p.m.

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Copy Editor

"Without music, life would be a mistake," recording artist Alicia Keys said, quoting German philosopher Friedrich Nielzsche as she and several other artists signed a "Declaration" that marked the official launch of the new streaming service Tidal. · Rapper and entertainment entrepreneur Jay Z heads up the service, promising higher quality streaming and a focus on artist compensation. Tidal is the

American branch of the Swedishbased streaming media company Aspiro, which Jay Z purchased March 13 for $56 million. Streaming music and royalty payments are some of the most prominent issues in the music industry today, and Jay Z believes Tidal is the solution. Several other artists will claim partial ownership of Tidal, including Jay Z's wife Beyonce, Alicia Keys, Chris Martin of Coldplay, Daft Punk, Kanye West, Jack White and Deadmau5. "This is a platform that's owned by artists," Jay Z said in an interview with The N= York Times.

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iI "We are treating these people that really care about the music with the utmost respect." Royalties on streamed media aren't only a problem for emerging artists, either. Last November, Taylor Swift delayed the release of her newest album, "1989," on Spotify. Soon after, Swift removed her discography from the site entirely. Swift's label head, Scott Borchetta, had a dispute with Spotify over the actual amount Swift was being paid for streaming her music through the site, saying she was paid less than one percent of what she was promised. The streaming business is incredibly competitive right now. Spotify alone has 45 million users (15 million paying) as of January, and the Internet radio service Pandora reported 250 million users as of March 2014. But much of this commercial success never reaches the artists. Spotify has received criticism and been accused of not compensating artists fairly. Because of the way Spotify pays record labels, much of the money that an artist makes via Spotify isn't distributed properly. · Spotify offers two streaming

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options: an advertisementsupported free version and a premium version that costs $9.99 per month. Neither of Tidal's streaming options will be free. One option costs $10 per month and includes access to standard quality streaming of music and videos, plus some editorial content. The second option costs $20 per month with access to "High Fidelity'' streaming music and videos in addition to the editorial content. Sophomore Makayla Tolmie is a Spotify Premium user of three years and a Lute Air Student Radio disc jockey at Pacific Lutheran University. She uses Spotify to stream music on her radio show. "As a college student, it's really convenient to have a Spotify

account,". Tolmie s<tid, referring to the half-off deal that Spotify offers to anyone with a student email address. "I do 1eel bad about it sometimes, because I know the artists aren't being paid what they deserve." Tolmie purchases vinyl copies of any albums she re illy likes. She thinks the $20 per m<Jnth price for a Tidal subscription will attract a crowd, but it won't be a college crowd. "As far as selling it to college students goes, nol::ody's going to buy it, because i1 's like going back to buying full price alb1lID.S," Tolmie explained. "[For $240 dollars] if you're inlo vinyl, you can definitely get a rtice turntable and speakers for aoot .t that much."


APRIL 3, 2015

THE MOORING MAST

a later builds myself," The incredibly the recent

Download our Mobile App available on the Apple App Store or Google Play

#Its Ducky

A&E5


6FEATURE

Tilll MOORING MAS BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer For Spring Break, a quick trip to New York City and the District of Colombia was in order. In New York (skyline, right), I spent time traveling on the subway, being an embarrassing tourist and discovering new hidden hotspots. Within the first couple hours in the city, I purchased a Metro Card, which is essential to traveling within Manhattan. Traveling by taxi can be time consuming because of traffic and can also be expensive. A subway ride is $2.75 compared to $10 plus per taxi ride. After figuring out transportation, I visited Times Square on the first night, followed by Central Park (left) and a Broadway show the next. There are multiple options to get cheaper tickets to see a broadway show. Rush tickets are sold the morning of the show and are given to the first customers in line. The tickets are usually at least 50 percent off during rush. Box offices open for rush at 9 or 10 a.m., depending on the theater. Tickets are not sold online. There are also lotteries which provide the option to get tickets even cheaper. Lottery tickets are around $30 per ticket and take place two and a half hours before the nightly show. Groups of one or two people line up to put their name in the lottery. Depending on the show, about 20 tickets are chosen for each night and those individuals are responsible for having cash to buy the tickets on the spot. Student discounts and cancellation tickets are other ways to get around paying the full price. After 6 more days traveling around Staten Island, Brooklyn (The Brooklyn Bridge, left) and the East Village, I hopped on a bus to D.C.. A bus or train can be taken to get to D.C. from New York. The train is more expensive and stops often on the route. The bus is cheaper but can get stuck in traffic. I bought my ticket the day before I left and the Amtrak ticket was $84 and a Bolt Bus ticket was $11, so I went with the bus ride. Once in D.C., I checked into my hostel and started exploring the city. I stayed in a hostel that was two blocks from Union Station and was walking distance to the National Mall. The National Mall includes the Capitol Building, the Washington Monument (right) and all of the Smithsonian's, except the zoo. The museums and monuments are free and extremely packed with people, so plan accordingly. My highlights of the National Mall included going to the National Archives, the Washington Monument and the Capital Building. The National Archives house the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution along with the Bill of Rights. There is high security in this building and photos are strictly prohibited. Be prepared to wait in line to see the documents at least 30 minutes and take the restrictions seriously, there are video cameras in every comer. The Washington Monument was special because it looks over a reflecting pool and is surrounded by American flags around the entire pavilion (left). To go inside the monument, tickets need to be reserved 2 hours before the tour. Going to the monument to get a ticket before starting another monument tour provides the opportunity to see most everything in a day. The Capitol Building is simple because contacting your Congressman allows for a private tour. My current congressman is Denny Heck, and his office set up a private tour of the building for me which was different than the general public tour. The building has high security and surrounded with armed guards, bringing only the essentials can cut down on the security check time to get into the building. To end the trip, I flew back to SeaTac out of the Dulles International Airport. Be aware that the Reagan International Airport is 15 minutes out of D.C., while the Dulles International is around 50 minutes away.

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Traveling with a backpack is a challenge that has endless rewards. Flying on an airplane allows passengers to bring one carry on and one personal bag. This can equate to a backpack and a purse for those passengers who don't wish to check a bag. Checking a bag is a hassle and costs $15-$25 per bag depending on the airline. Checking a larger bag also includes waiting for the bag after getting to the destination, which can be a pain. Instead of paying for a suitcase, ditch the extra outfit options and commit to packing less and only bringing a carry on.


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FE:ATURE 7

r1APRIL 3, 2015

GENNY BOOTS News Writer ntic is not cheap. Finding the tion but it is worth the time and its. Consistently checking flight Kayak or CheapOAir can help ave big. ~ only and don't check luggage. ~nd helps resist buying things in

won't fit in your pack. companies are everywhere. fortable of rides, but you'll have buy yourself a nice dinner after 1ase the pain. JS

are going. This seems obvious, t's around you can budget both oney accordingly. r youth deals when visiting 11ts or national parks. It can pay to r college student! opean food is delicious, but buy eating out all the time, save your meal. A baguette, cheese and cheap lunch and is oh so Euro. stinations are not always the with companies such as AirB&B Even scan through Facebook for Nho might be abroad and have a do you prefer, a sixteen-person e apartment at the same price?

bout an awesome spring break trip? of your own. Mast writers Brooke grand adventures to the U.S. East tively, and came back with great ps on how to do it yourself.

1

What to pack Before deciding what to bring, assess how long the trip is and what types of activities will be done while you are there. Always pack less because most things can be purchased at the destination and do not need to be brought on the plane. For week-long trips, two pairs of pants, two shirts, one sweater, one pair of shoes and a jacket are plenty. When planning the outfits for the week, include the clothes that will be worn on the plane. If an item is not going to be worn at least three times, leave it at home. Depending on the climate of the destination, clothing items will be switched out. instead of a scarf and gloves, a swimsuit and sunglasses might be more appropriate. Do not pack towels, socks, umbrellas or other accessories along this line. Those things can be bought once you land and do not need to take up space in the backpack.

Who goes to Europe for just a week? Oearly someone with a glutton for sleep deprivation and language barriers. Or a person with no intention of ever NOT being a broke college student. All this aside, I spent my spring break across the pond in Belgium and the Netherlands. After a year of travel through Latin America, my passport finally gained a stamp from the European Union. I went to eat waffles, admire European architecture and visit a good friend who studies there. I started my trip with 11 hours of flying right into the Belgian capital of Brussels. The city of Brussels (Brussels Gardens, left) has a little under 1.2 million people and is midway between France and the Netherlands. The Netherlands is relatively overlooked as a holiday destination. d understandably so: the .weather is omy, there are no famous icons like the l Tower or Will and Kate, and it is very dose to more popular destinations, such as 'aris and London. I found during my five days in Belgium that there is a lot to love - you just have to look a bit for it. The beer is the best in world, there is a chocolate shop on every comer and the people are relaxed and genuine. The national hero is a three-foot statue of a boy peeing - it was the fantasy world that I didn't even think to fantasize about. Shortly after settling into Brussels, I traveled by bus to Amsterdam. There are several cheap bus lines that run this three hour trip between the two cities. Amsterdam is well-known for its liberality toward drugs and prostitution. It is impossible to ignore the whiffs of weed and the "relaxed" attitudes of the people. I ended up wandering through small streets and along canals. Amsterdam houses some of Europe's best museums, and I found a bit of culture amidst the Rembrandt, Vermeer and Van Gogh at the Rijksmuseum (exterior, right). After a solid two days in Amsterdam, I rode bikes in the streets, nearly freezing my fingers off. I walked with a mix of curiosity and sadness through the Red Light District, looking at the women in the windows. I binged on free cheese cubes at the Cheese Museum. Amsterdcu:n was neither overrated or underrated. Much like the people on the streets, it was chill. Once back in Brussels, I traveled north to the city of Bruges (canalside view, left). In typical nonsensical Belgian fashion, Bruges was the most adorable, but also worst-smelling, city I have ever been to. The cobblestone streets and canals are reminiscent of Amsterdam.. For all Bruges' charm, the city sits on a very old sewer system and it is unavoidable. Only in Belgium. The week wrapped up with the Cyprus vs. Belgium futbol game, where Belgium swept the match 5-0. It was a perfect end to what ~ love about travel and my adventures abroad: no matter how weird, bizarre, or outlandish a place may be, at the end of the day, there is something very familiar in coming together, drinking <'Ind cheering for the home team. While the time zones proved to be a worthy foe, my spring break abroad was one for the books. Until next time, Europe!

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ia.plu. Online-only: Get more tips with online exclusives "5 New York activities under $5" and "What to do on long flights."

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

APRIL 3, 2015

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iii THE MOORING MAST

ANGIE TINKER Matrix Editor

"Simply put, just because a doctor says, 'It's a girl!' when someone is a baby doesn't mean that they . are a girl."

March 31 was the international celebration of Transgender Day of Visibility. At Pacific Lutheran University, it's important to celebrate Transgender Day of Visibility by highlighting the ways that trans issues come up on campus. Transgender refers to people whose gender identity doesn't match the biological sex they were assigned at birth. Simply put, just because a doctor says, "It's a girl!" when someone is a baby doesn't mean that they are a girl. One way the gender binary is evident on campus is through restrooms. For people who don't fit the gender binary of male/female, or for people who don't match traditional notions of how men and women look, choosing a public restroom can be daunting. Amber Jane, a trans woman and former lute, described her first experience using a women's restroom inPLU.

"I felt terrified and shook a lot." Jane continued, "Whenever someone else was in there I kept quiet and my face down and tried not to cause a scene with them." Another way gender affects trans students is in class. Every semester, I have to write an email to professors explaining that my gender and name don't match the official record that PLU has. This record is hard to change and includes student emails, Banner Web profiles, and Lute Cards. Chris Erikson, a non-binary graduating senior, explained a possible solution: Erikson said that allowing students

to edit their gender and name on their student profile lets professors see a student's preferred identity. Such a change would make transitioning at PLU less of a hassle. "I personally would love there to be more gender neutral bathrooms," Erikson said. "I always feel very weird when I have to use the female bathroom in [the Hauge Administration building] because I have no clue if there are any gender neutral bathrooms." PLU has made positive strides, though. Both the Women's Center and the Diversity Center are safe spaces for gender exploration. Gender neutral residence hall wings and bathrooms have also made an appearance on campus, though they're just the start. It's important to celebrate by making visible the ways that trans issues come up on campus. Resources for trans students can be found at places like the Tacoma Rainbow Center online or in person.

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANA.GER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Jeff Dunn ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds

MAST TV

Please

GENERAL MANAGER

recycle your copy of

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

The Moorin Mast

NEWS @ NINE PRODUCER

Allie Reynolds Campbell Bretl: Zachary Boyle ADVISERS

Cliff Rowe Art land

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ASHLEY Gill Opinion Editor The $100 graduation fee that all graduating seniors must pay, participating in the ceremony or not, was discussed in the March 13 issue of The Mooring Mast. The article, written by reporter Genny Boots, examined where the money goes and why it is important for students to pay it. . Students are given no warning of the $100 cost to apply to graduate from Pacific Lutheran University. They find out when they apply to graduate online and are required to pay it in order to complete the application. If students decline the fee, the application is canceled. This is especially troublesome if students are not prepared for this extra cost and have to save up or even take away from their budgets for food and rent. "I'm fortunate to be a working student," senior Haley Ljunggren said. "But it definitely was an inconvenience and I had zero extra cash for anything other than bills until my next paycheck." There was a lot of interest regarding where the money actually goes to considering we already pay so much in student fees as it is. During an interview between writer Genny Boots and Senior Advisor to the President Kris Plaehn, the fee was explained. "It provides some of the funding for things like printing the diplomas, having the diploma cover holders. It also provides things like paying for the Tacoma Dome, paying for those events, paying for the parking lots," Plaehn said. "It goes to pay for those specific components of commencement." Initially, this is a reasonable explanation for the high

graduation fee. However, I have participated in two graduation ceremonies at the Tacoma Dorne and none of which required extra fees to support it. My local high school graduation took place at the Tacoma Dome, and while we had to pay for our cap and gowns, there was not an extra cost to graduate or to fund the few hours at the Tacoma Dome, parking or any other potential costs. In fact, when I graduated from Pierce Community College in Puyallup, we not only graduated at the Tacoma. Dome, but also received our brand new cap, gown, tassel and a very nice diploma cover for free. The costs were technically already paid for through our tuition costs, even though that quarter's tuition was not any higher than any other quarters that I had paid for. My history of graduation ceremonies fueled my curiosity and disappointment with PLU. After the news article that was published in the last printed issue of The Mast, I was angry and I felt like we were not getting the complete truth. Saying the fee covered the cost of our diploma holders and the Tacom~ Dome felt like an easy and believable thing to say for those who are not local to this area and have never participated in a ceremony at the Tacoma Dome before. There is one aspect that could explain the contradictory information from the Senior Advisor to the President, which is the fact that PLU is a private institution without any federal funding. Even if public colleges and high schools received government money to cover the cost of the Tacoma Dome and other graduation costs, that reasoning should be explained to the student body. Students should be warned about the high graduation fee well in advance and students who do not plan to participate in the ceremony should only have to pay a small fee to cover the cost of their diploma.

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editoria Is, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to nast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class stauding or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place ;,n advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per sem<~ster or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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APRIL 3 2015

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 9

II

believe things like this should be feelings and recognize talked about and discussed. all displeasures ' and "/ do not find any reason for Junior communication major Herny concerns as valid. Smith agrees and believes "not However, I disagree anyone to be upset about talking about it promotes ignorance with her assertion that penises as they are a natural and creates a social taboo that this article went too far shouldn't exist." and it shouldn't have part of the male body." I feel that The Mast did an excellent been published. As a job in the way they reported the biology student and a male, I do not find any reason for anyone to be upset article. I hope that future Lutes, alumni and anyone about penises, as they are a natural part of the male else who reads The Mast knows that we are creating body. Also, many men feel their masculinity is tied to a safe environment to discuss topics like this and penis size as our culture emphasizes bigger is better. provides everyone with a chance to grow and This study is showing college males that there is no understand the human body while giving men reassurance that there is no right size for penises. reason to be ashamed of any part of their body. While many may view this as unnecessary, I

In The Mooring Mast two weeks before Spring Break, March 6, an article called "How to Sound Smart About Penis Size" was published. It was in response to a international scientific study that looked at average penis size and girth of men around the world. A week later, I read the letter to the editor by fustyear Carly Stauffer discussing her displeasure with "How to Sound Smart About Penis Size." I applaud her on her courage to speak out about her

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s HOUSE for rent 1 block from ortvedt Library! bedrooms. require group 01-four students. $1600 month. ($400 room). Two bathrooms, two refrigerators, washer/dryer. Lease June 2015 - June 2016. Okay to sublease. Rental Application required. New flooring. More info at: http://plurental.homestead.com/

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10 SPORTS

THE MOORING MAST

Baseball

AP:lUL 3, 2015

Softball WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

20

8

11-4

Won 10

George Fox

23

5

13-3

Won3

Pacific Lutheran

20

8

12-6

Won2

Whitworth

22

6

13-3

Won?

Willamette

18

7

10-6

Won2

Pacific

20

10

10-6

Won2

Puget Sound

12

13

10-6

Lost 2

Pacific Lutheran

15

11

8-6

Won4

Linfield

18

9

8-7

Lost 1

Linfield

17

9

6-8

Lost 2

George Fox

12

16

8-7

Lost 1

Lewis & Clark

8

19

5-11

Lost 4

Pacific

9

16

5-10

Lost 1

Willamette

7

17

4-10

Lost 3

Whitman

5

18

4-11

Won 1

Puget Sound

4

22

1-13

Lost 4

Lewis & Clark

5

25

2-13

Lost4

TEAM

Game

Next Game

Doubleheader: Today 2 p.m. & 4 p.m. @Willamette

Doubleheader: April 11 @ 12 p.m. & 3 p.m. @ UPS

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Whitman

CONFERENCE

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5-0

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LOSSES

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STREAK

Lewis & Clark

12

2

7-0

Won 12

TEAM

Pacific

10

4

6-1

Lost 2

Whitman

9

5

6-0

Lost 2

George Fox

10

5

5-2

Lost 3

Linfield

9

4

5-1

Won2

Lewis & Clark

6

5

5-2

Won i

Whitworth

6

5

5-2

Lost i

Whitworth

2

7

2-3

Lost 2

George Fox

7

7

3-4

Lost 1

Willamette

2

9

2-3

Lost 6

Pacific

5

6

2-5

Won2

Pacific Lutheran

2

11

2-5

Lost 7

Pacific Lutheran

5

6

i-6

Won3

Linfield

7

1-5

Lost 6

Puget Sound

3

6

1-6

Won 1

Puget Sound

7

0-7

Won 1

Willamette

12

0-6

Lost 2

Next

l'lll<•*"'h

Tomorrow 1 p.m. vs. UPS

Tomorrow: 11 p.m. @ UPS

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RANK

Whitworth

TEAM

PAR

TOTAL

+40

328

Whitworth

RANK

PAR

TOTAL

+40

328

Lewis & Clark

2

+48

336

Lewis & Clark

2

+48

336

Pacific Lutheran

3

+56

344

Pacific Lutheran

3

+56

344

Linfield

4

+73

361

Linfield

4

+73

361

Willamette

5

+90

378

Willamette

5

+90

378

Pacific

6

+163

451

Pacific

6

+163

451

Next Tournament

Next Tournament

Today: Olympic Invite @ Gold Mountain Gold Club

Today: Whitman Invitational @ Wine Valley Golf Club

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vs. PActF!C lJl'!'lil:llJIN l1111Vlll!SITY

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLD MOUNTAIN GOLF CLUB

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLD MOUNTAIN GOLF CLUB

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....: .

THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 3, 2015

11 SPORTS

en's Track & Field

men's Track &

Peyton Scoring Meet

Peyton Scoring Meet

RANK

SCORE

Pacific Lutheran

1

182

Puget Sound

2

159

Olympic College

3

82

Green River CC

4

60

Everett CC

5

36

Whitman

6

26

Trinity Lutheran

7

13

Christ Life

T-8

10

Whitworth

T-8

10

TEAM

--

Fie~ld

RANK

SCORE

Puget Sound

1

186

Pacific Lutheran

2

136

Olympic College

3

63

Green River CC

4

56

Everett CC

5

52

Whitman

6

20

Trinity Lutheran

7

10

TEAM

PHOTO COURTESY OF GO LUTES.COM

Next Meet

Next Meet

Tomorrow: Shotwell Invitational in Tacoma,

Tomorrow: Shotwell Invitational in Tacoma, Wash.

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19 lig ts:

's more than just colors .-..:::::

football field. We would help opposing players up off the ground, tell them that they were doing a good job and other things of that nature. We all played for the black and go .d that we were wearing. Not just for ourselves.

Austin Hilliker Sports Editor Jet black and a rich gold. Two colors that have defined Pacific Lutheran University since it first opened in 1890. The colors not only represent the prestigious institution and its rigorous education system, they also represent the hard work, dedication and pride of PLU athletics.

Off the field

It's Personal

Black and yellow are the official colors of Pacific Lutheran University.

I've always taken a sense of pride in school colors that I represent. In junior high, it was blue and yellow. In high school, it was red, white and blue. No matter where I went, I wanted people to know the school that I attended. In high school, if someone would have told me that in the near future I would be decked out in black and gold, I would have laughed. Black and gold were the colors of my rival high school. There was no way

that would happen. I now stand corrected. The clothes in my closet, black and gold. The decals on my car, black and gold Even my phone case, black and gold. On the field For many PLU athletes, putting on a black, gold or white jersey was a feeling all its own.

Baseball grabs David Mair Staff Writer

All year students have been watching the Drive to 125 tracker at the Old Main Market slowly but surely go up. Finally, their patience was paid off during the baseball game on March31. In honor of Pacific Lutheran University turning the big 1-2-5, a goal was set at the beginning of the year of 125 wins for all the PLU sports to reach together. Now that the goal has been reached, the student body has been invited to celebrate on April 10 from 10:0012:00 p.m. in Red Square. It was a Battle of the Sound as PLU's

Wa~;h.

baseball team completely chopped down the University of Puget Sound Loggers 6-1 on Tuesday, March 31. Earlier in the season the two faced off against each other, the result was similar as the Lutes shook the dust off their cleats victoriously, winning 9-3. The stands were barely filled at the PLU baseball stadium. The 40 brave Lute fans that came out though were bundled up, holding umbrellas as they endured the cold rain for two and half hours. Stepping onto the diamond the Lutes were 19-8. The UPS Loggers were 12-12. Junior Ty Donahue and senior Jake Otness were the pitchers for the game. The first two

al

innings went by with neither team's feet touching home plate. It was not until the bottom of the third when senior infielder Bo Pearson scored. From there, the Lutes kept on shinning regardless of onset of rain. Sophomore infielder made Ben Welch the next point when Pearson singled out to left field advancing sophomore infielder Tanner Williams to second base. Without retaliation from the Loggers senior outfielder Collin Nilson singled to right field sending firstyear outfielder Connor Cantu home. During the seventh inning, things got tense as the Loggers scored off a single through

For me, I was lucky enough to experience the feeling first hand on the football field. With "Lutes" spread across the back of the jersey, my teammates and I knew right away that everything that we did from that point on was a reflection of ourselves and the school that we play for. As a football player, there was an addition to this rule. We went the extra mile to make sure that we were genuine, thoughtful and caring on the football field. Yes, even on the

1n ca pa1g right field. But the tense moment was merely a blink of the eye as the Lutes gained three more points in the bottom of the seventh. The first two were from Cantu along with sophomore infielder Frank Airey, who both scored off junior infielder Tyler Thompson singled up the middle. Finally, Thompson gave the Lutes their sixth and final point from a single through the left side by senior infielder Kit Banko. ,Making the game 6-1. The Lutes are now 20-8. The Lutes will take to the road for the next three games all of which are against the UPS Loggers.

'

Within the community it was a ;pedal privilege to tell someone that you Jlayed sports for PLU. Manners meant everythi.rtg. Sayin;; hello, goodbye, please and thank you. Most of the time, people's eyes would light up. They would be amazed that a young person was portraying a sd .ool so well. Unless it was a University of Puget Sow<d student or alum,, for some reason they really don't like us. Either wi.y, we always showed u'l.em respect. I digrE ss. Each and every time I get the ch< l!lce to wear the colors, I'm proud of it. I'm proud to represent a school, cormnmlity an :l. team that 'stands for so much. I'm proud :o be a Lute.

--

D ·veto 25 Ar:'.

Above: The baseball team huddles up after their win, giving PLU the 125t 1 win.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 3, 2015

DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Athletic and exercise facilities are in the midst of being made anew across campus so students may live a healthier lifestyle at college. With Pacific Lutheran University celebrating its 125th anniversary, many of the buildings on campus are starting to show its age, specifically the athletic facilities. Whether it is sports fields for teams trying to perform at their best or students wanting to stay in shape, facilities are in need of an update. A lack of funding is

m

ii ities re the main factor keeping the buildings from being updated, Athletic Director Laurie Turner said. The majority of facility projects are funded by donors and fundraisers. Since money is a large barrier against bigger and brighter facilities, the key component is lots of "mini master plans" explained Turner. "We have a plan," Turner said. "It's a laundry list and as money comes in, we11 tackle each plan." Over the past five years, many of these plans have been addressed, but there is still a lot of work to be done. The pool· reopened in 2012 with renovations to

I

the roof after a snowstorm destroyed it. During 2011, the track was resurfaced with synthetic surface. In 2011, the six tennis courts were repainted and resurfaced. East Field, the synthetic all purpose field, was constructed in August of 2012. But athletic areas are not the only projects on the list. A lot of time has been invested in planning for a new Names Fitness Center, said Turner. "Maybe 30 years ago [fitness] wouldn't be as important, but now there's a greater focus on exercise and health," Turner said. "We're working to accommodate students being both responsible and

of the Lute's athletic logo from the PLU branding guide is this: "The PLU athletic brand was redesigned in the summer of 2011. It is now the main brand for the Department of Athletics and has replaced the Lute oval-and-script 'Lute' word mark" However, other schools PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNillERSITY have not had the same experience asPLU. All athletic teams w111 go At the beginning of this by the common name of year the University of Tennessee announced that they will no longer "lutes." be using the Lady Vols logo to distinguish its women's athletic Stephanie teams. The athletic teams will now be Guest Writer using the "power T" that has been There is no distinction between used primarily by the men's teams men's and women's athletics at since it was created. The only PLU and it doesn't look like that is sport allowed to retain the Lady Vols logo will be the women's going to change. The lack of distinction basketball tea.i.-n, due to the legacy between men's and women's teams of former head coach Pat Summitt. The women's basketball team, canalsobefoundatPadficLutheran under the direction of head coach University. Women's athletic Pat Summitt, won eight titles teams at PLU are discouraged from calling themselves the during her 38-year reign. In that "Lady Lutes" or "Lady Knights" time, the Lady Vols logo became a and are encouraged to maintain brand for the women's basketball the collective Lutes logo and team and for Pat Summitt. This logo has come to represent identification. the strength of the women's While some teams at PLU athletic teams at Tennessee and unofficially call themselves the Lady Lutes, there is no official Lady their incredible success. The Lady Vols logo as we know Lute logo or title. The description of it today was first used in 1976,

12 SPORTS

responsive to students." Though a number of facilities have been improved, there are still more "master plans" ready to be tackled. PLU is continually "looking to meet the needs of students," Turner said. Names Fitness Center could possibly get a makeover soon, in addition to adding bathrooms adjacent to the new turf field. Olson Gym is also in the running for the installation of a new television screen in the lobby of the building. While money}s the main wall to climb in this whole process, Turner said her goal is to help "create an active environment, here on campus."

after the passing of Title IX. Coach Pat Summitt created the logo to make sure the University of Tennessee was c:eminded of their responsibility to uphold Title IX for their women's teams. All women's teams implemented the logo. shortly after Summitt, but it was the women's basketball team that made it an icon. The women's basketball team may have solidified the logo in history, but it wasn't only used by them. The Lady Vols logo has meaning for every women's team at the University of Tennessee and many are angry about its departure. Former University of Tennessee swimmer Tricia Weaner started a petition to bring back the ca.mpus ;Ride use of the Lady Vols logo for all women's athletic teams. It now has more than 5,000 signatures. The implication of the loss of the logo for the women's teams to some means the loss of an identity. The logo allows the women's teams to stand out and be proud that they are female athletes ar<d that they are among the best at the University of Tennessee. To take their logo away and integrate them with the men's teams takes away from the legac1 that the logo has been building for decades.

was finished August 2012. The field is used by numerous sports. LEFT: The PLU pool V''as renovated Septenber 2012. Roof repairs were the main concern during the project.

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different art, sports Steven McGrain Sports Writer The best artistic demonstration is sports writing. The opportunity to express the progression of a game is an art that some consider lost. Athletic events can be covered in a variety of ways, whether it is through television, radio, social media or print. Print is a lost aspect of sports media. It's not a popular outlet anymore because the game had been over for hours before the article is published. But why should..1.'t print be the most popular form of capturing moments of a game or press conference? Television gives you a visual, radio is convenient when a television is not accessible and social media is the quickest form, though not necessarily the most

253 537 515()

12510 PACIFIC AVENUE SOUTH '" TACOMA, WA 98444

trustworthy. With print, the writer can fully digest the game and pin point a certain progression that was a deciding factor. Whenateamwinsachampionship, they certainly do not hold up a cell phone to show a tweet saying, "the Patriots have won the Super Bowl." They hold up a newspaper with a massive caption and a picture. Yes, call me old fashioned, but if none of those players could screen shot these moments and frame them, the phone would become idle and the picture would be useless. The writers that inspire me are ones who can explain why an offensive lineman has inside out responsibilities on a pass play, in a way that a novice sports fan can understand. Instead, many sports media writers rattle off "spider 2-y-banana," a football play only understood by the football savvy.

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To me, this can tum prnple away as opposed to grab their <ttention. I aspire to become a sports writer so that a greater a Lidience can appreciate an athleti: event. To be able to actually :re:lect on a certain play happe '.led, so that if a player made an exceptional play, his mom can h<mg up it on the refrigerator. To have inside information on a team making their way through March Madness and telling the story to the country has been a dream of mine f.ince the fifth grade. No matter wha1 someone is aspiring to be, we all have an opportunity 1o create our own masterpiece withm this career choice. Mine, hopefully, will be placed on a high sdtool senior's refrigerator because he made the game winning play and that can las!: a lifetime.


The more the better, being a well-rounded athlete pg. 12

New game, new name: Lute Overnight pg. 5

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

VOLUME 91ISSUE17

aka f./Solzilla" Pronounced like "Saul" and known by his fans as Solzilla, Seattle-native Sol MoraviaRosenberg was described by The Seattle Times in 2013 as "the next Macklemore." Hip-hop magazine XXL identified him as a "budding MC to keep your eye on." Sol's musical style is reminiscent of Macklernore (who was also a LollaPLUza performer) - a mix of pop and rap with socially-conscious messages tied together by a plethora of synh1i: and guitar.

J-Sherri is a Montana-based band with a unique mix of electronica, R&B and pop. The Missoula

Insider said their live show "tries to brin~ a clubbanger-inspired sexuality combined 'Nith an electronica-noise-punk sound," with <L strong desire to get people dancing. The groups newest album, "j," is ava lable for free on Bandcamp (https://jsherri.bandcamp.com/ album/j).

The Student Media Board has sponsored Lernolo, a PLU favorite, to make an appearance at LollaPLUza 2015. Lernolo is a celebrated Seattle-based band known for talented leading woman and songwriter Meagan Grandall. The band is releasing a new album at an undisclosed time this year. More information is available at http://lernolornusic.corn. Dude York is a "bratty, batty blend of pop and punk," according to The Seattle Met. The Seattle indie trio's most-recent full length release is. "Dehumanize," which was released in January 2014. The ~oup also just released a new demo, 'Something," on their website (dudeyork. blogspot.corn) at the beginning of this year.

No, ASPLU did not invite :;orneone from the streets. Homeless Man is a Silverdale band that plays jazzinfluenced folk rock music. They have released rnult .ple EPs available on their Bandcamp page (http://homelessman.bandcamp. corn/).

Special appearance from PLUtonic Twitter: @lollaPLUza Instagram: LollaPLUza


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

might

AP:tlIL 10, 2015

II i

News Editor After last week's article "The 'now' apps" was published, more articles about new apps, teclmology and social media news were requested. The Mast staff has been toying with the idea of a "techie" section for a while, and here it is. "Techie Stuff" will be an ongoing article similar to "How to Sound Smart" that will appear from time to time in The Mast .

.._...._..

Space Tag is the next big thing in social media and sharing. It's like graffiti minus the vandalism. Space Tag allows users to leave their virtual mark on places they visit. Users can snap a photo at a location and attach a note. They can share it on their social media network; or they can leave it in the Space Tag universe for others to stumble upon when they visit the same location. Users can scan areas around them for existing tags and go find them as well. Space Tag has only been popular in Florida so far but is sure to spread nationwide. Download the app and check out the Space Tags I've left you readers on campus.

ELLO Ello is not about being popular, it's a big "F YOU" to Facebook. Ello is an alternative social network online created by a group of artists. It is clean, hipster-y and a lot like Facebook. You can post short messages, add photos and @reply to your followers.

Ello was created to give people a social media site that is completely ad-free. When you are using Ello, none of your information is given to advertisers and you will be in a virtual ad desert, with n:o ads to see for miles. Ello' s personal promise to its users is to always remain adfree and maintain its hipster-socialmedia standine:.

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Food on campus might get spiced up next year with a new food truck. With its own specialized menu, the food truck will give students a new place for breakfast or lunch. Director of Dining and Culinary Services Erin McGinnis has been contemplating getting a food truck for a while, but it was President Krise who she gives all the credit to. "The president has been really excited about this idea, ever since he got here he's been asking about a food truck," McGinnis said. "They had one at University of the Pacific, where he came from." The concept for the truck is to bring food to students when and where they need it. McGinnis hopes to create a schedule for the truck that puts it in the comers of campus wit.h the most students throughout the day. "I thin...1< that it is gonna be really awesome for commuter students," first-year Melissa Munson said. "It will give them a different option for dinners so they don't have to pay the all-you-can eat price at dinners and have an option outside of OMM." The truck will accept dining dollars like all other university markets a11d have its own menu rotation. "The t.ricJdest part is trying to figure out the menu mix," McGin1us said: "IY s such a small campus that if you 'Vvere to go to it five days a week, how would we keep it fresh aI1d keep students wanting to come back, you know?"

The truck has not yet been confinned for next year. Dining and Culinary Services needs to make sure it will be successful and~ 路ell marketed before it is promised. From a marketing standpoint, McGinnis is currently trying to figure out wh1t shape the truck will take. The most recent pla 1s have been to wrap a food truck in the Pacific Lutheran University knight logo and drin it around campus during the week. The trucl~ would also be used at sporting events and could be taken out into the community to promote PLlf. PLU's food truck also brings the opportunity to have food at sporting games and either campus events. McGinnis said those event!: could have their own themed foods. McGinnis does not want the trud< to be only junk food. "We've talked about healthy versus craveable foods a lot," McGinnis said. ''We want to give students sorneHung healthy ou: of the truck but those all need to be really crav~-able. We're aiming for crave-able foods." If one of meals at the truck became exponentially more McGinnis said she is open to those meals in the Corr~mons for Right now, McGinnis is l""i-;,...,-,held a .A. . s a senior/ I'::r1 excitei for future students/,. RI-IC cow-i.cil member An11~-lV[arie Falloria said. Bu路~ I'm a little disa JoOirltei i-: s haooeninz 2'l:s;: I'm 11

11

1


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 10, 2015

H

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n

t bout

n In recent weeks, key elements of the story have been questioned and could not be verified. Rolling Stone initiated an external by the investigation, - led Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. Rolling Stone was also criticized for not engaging basic, even routine journalistic .. practice to verify the details.

An article in Rolling Stone

in November described a gang rape at a University of Virginia fraternity. In response, the university suspended all fraternities and launched an investigation.

NEWS3 After its publication, the article started a national conversation about sexual assault on college campuses and ¡the university was blamed. The police in Charlottesville, Va., said last month they had "exhausted all investigative leads" and found "no substantive basis" to support the article's depiction of the assault.

Now, the magazine has apologized for their story about campus rape. Rolling Stone is still being criticized because the author chose to focus on the most extreme parts of rape and did not hold a fair account of what really happens, making the less extreme parts of rape seem less important. The opening page of the Rolling Stone article depicts a rape with the headline "Jackie was just starting her freshman year at the University of Virginia when she was brutally assaulted by seven men at a frat party. When she tried to hold them accountable, a whole new kind of abuse began."

Everyone needs a code NATALIE DEFORD News Writer With concerns for the time and costs spent on one's Pacific Lutheran University experience, a 6-digit registration code is now required for all students regardless of class standing. In order to register for classes, students must first receive their registration access code from their advisor. This new policy will start to affect students this spring as they register for fall 2015. The Admission and Retention of Students (ARTS) Committee asked the Advising Office to generate access codes for everyone. The ARTS Committee consists of seven elected faculty members, several of whom are advisory members. Professor Neal Yakelis, chemistry professor and chair to the ARTS Committee, said, "the committee seeks to develop ways to help students persist

I

to complete degrees in a timely taking next semester and how advisors and make a plan to manner." you're going to graduate on time, graduation is one strategy Yakelis described the previous then they can simply email you we're implementing to increase policy as a loophole in which your registration code," Connors graduation rates, as well as reduce upper division students did not said. student debt." Connors expressed a concern need registration codes from their Connors said another major for graduation rates at PLU and reason for the policy was transfer advisor in order to register. He said such students students who come could risk forgetting in as juniors. Even and requirements though this would be "This is the hallmark of PLU, that the their first year at PLU, subsequently graduate late, which is not cost- students at other universities don't BannerWeb would effective. consider these students "This was a big receive: personalized guidance every upperclassmen and concern to us," Yakelis allow them to register semester... " said. "By expanding the without ever having requirement for access met an advisor. Hal DelaRosby codes to everyone, we "Regularly Academic Advising Director hope all students will meeting with your have communication advisor and talking with their advisors." your plan about Ashley Connors, Associated the amount of students who do will help you stay on track for PLU Senator not graduate on time. Students of graduation, and possibly reveal appointed to the ARTS "This decision, made by the ways you could graduate early," Committee, emphasized that Admission and Retention of Connors said. students are not required to meet Students Committee with faculty She said there are several with their advisor, but that they support, is part of an ongoing additional benefits to meeting are required to communicate their conversation on how to improve with an advisor. plans. "They can provide suggestions retention and graduation rates "If your advisor feels that you at PLU," she said. "Encouraging on what classes to take considering have a solid plan for what you're students to meet with their your interests, as well as suggest

u Taken

Vehicle Collision in LJbrary Lot

Vandalism in Stuen

Campus Safety found graffiti on a brick wall in Stuen wliile doing a routine patrol. The graffiti was documented and a work order was submitted. Upon review of video footage, no suspect was found and I no other action has been taken by CSAF.

Information rec;:iuest in Pflueqer

Campus Safety responded to a report of a marijuana smell in Pflueger Hall. The smell was in the hallway and seemed to lead to a room. CSAF contacted the room, alo~~ with the Resident Assistant on duty but there was no answer. CSAJ:< conducted a wellness check, meaning they went into the student's room to make sure there were no policy violations. The room was vacant and there was no I indication that marijuana was in the room or used in it. No further action has been taken by CSAF.

i1

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I Campus Safe'

a strategic order in wh tch to take those classes," Com .ors said. "They also serve as a se :ond set of eyes on your plan to graduation, making sure you're not forgetting a GenEd or a major re1iuirement. Major requirements aren't always straightforward and do change from time to time, so your advisor can help you keep on tcp of that." She said advisors can also help with career exploration by suggesting internships and other opportunities. Hal DeLaRosby, PLU Academic Advising director, explained how lucky PLU students are to have their advisors. "This is a hallmark cf PLU that students at other univer ;ities don't receive: personalized guidance every semester from ar, academic advisor to ensure maximum opportunities and expâ&#x20AC;˘!riences in college all while focuE ing on an on-time graduation," DeLaRosby said. "Advising is not just about class registration; advising is about the student gettir g the most out of their college invcilvement."

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Campus Safety responded to a PLU student who hit another vehicle in the Library parking lot. CSAF found the damaged vehicle and contacted the owner about the incident. The driver who caused the collision passed along her insurance information and contact information to the other student and CSAF. No further action was taken by CSAF.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 10, 2015

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a scavenger hunt, and whatever fun the res halls will be planning," Cargill said. The main difference between the older Passport Weekend and Lute The prospies are coming. More than 220 freshly-admitted OverKnight is the difference in days. high school seniors will flood Pacific Passport Weekend was traditionally Lutheran University's campus for Lute held from Friday to Saturday. This year, the Admission Office has moved OverKnight this weekend. Formerly known as Passport the event to include a regular school Weekend, Lute OverKnight is a chance weekday. This week students will be for prospective students (affectionately staying from Sunday to Monday, and called "prospies") to stay with current sperid Monday morning sitting in on students and experience life at PLU. classes. "Holding our April 12-13 is the second admitted student and final Lute OverKnight program on a weeknight for the admission season. requires an even bigger Admissions The lute OverKnight strain on the campus Office has been working all year to bring in the Sunday, April 12 to community, so it has been wonderful to see students best and brightest. With Monday, April 13 jump at the opportunity low enrollment over the Contact red.carpet. to open up their room," past few years proving said Assistant Director club@plu.edu to a difficult challenge to the university, these · become a host and of Admissions Hannah weekends are important admissions@plu.edu Middlebrook. As the campus, the to showcase life at PLU. hosts and the Admissions for more information "Lute OverKnight Office gear up for this brands the event more event, the prospective as a specifically 'PLU'. students are getting ready experience," said to make an even bigger Admission Ambassador Coordinator decision. With National Decision Day and senior Michael Cargill. This upcoming event will be the May 1, these campus visits are very biggest of the year, with the campus important. "Lute OverKnight gives such good at the maximum visiting capacity. The entire admissions staff and volunteer insight on what life is like at PLU and OverKnight hosts will be busy it allows for students to truly envision coordinating students and giving tours. what their life would be like for the During the OverKnight program, next few years," said junior Admission prospective students and their hosts Ambassador Isabellah von Trapp. With a bustling campus upcoming, can participate in events across campus. "There will be events such as the prepare for the prospies.

GENNY BOOTS News Writer

II II

"Show them all the paths from lower campus to upper campus. Give them insight! Make them feel like a real student."

"I would take them snack shopping at the market. Or take them to my friends' rooms in other halls so they can see other rooms."

Hillary Powell, Admissions Counselor

senior AUison McClure

"I

night."

senior Moran

Clay Crows, HERmonic and PLUtonic,

because it allows to tell a story without words," junior and PLU Dance Team Miranda Winter said. stories, no matter how many words you use to describe still not complete, and dance a feel your Dance 2015 is comprised of 14 dance pieces, several of them stories that are centered on of serious subject matter police brutality, suicide and mourning lost love.

Kheriaty is dance to look at suicide from an observer's

a theatrical piece that a young woman desiring to a Vaudeville dancer at a club. the Premise of the performance

ones send to left VllOOWS .of soldiers. the messages from ,,,.,.,i;,.,,,,.., had sensed said. felt their toueh, sa¥' or had a dream about then." Drawn from the subied matter

Lute

Titled Nation is making sure no one forgets the importance of black lives. "I feel like sometimes, thri::mg;n

Suicide "Silence of Our Hearts," choreographed by sophomore Abby Kheriaty, is another piece centered on a serious issue. Inspired by personal experience,

$8 General admission $3 Students Dance2015.

dance, caustones and the \...a:nD 1oeain Senior Avelon Ragoonanan is the choreographer of a piece titled "Delights" that fuses theatre and dance together while showcasing Caribbean culture. Inspired by Vaudeville entertainment, "Delights" is a burlesque-themed dance

the dead •n"'"""'I'."'" from ," focuses on widows of soldiers who have died in war. Dance 2015 director the McGill choreographed featured upcoming book of the same name discusses the messages that deceased loved

Dance 2015 shews are 7 and Dance :!. 015 are Senior and $.l PLU Students and 18 and are availabli· at the Desk in the 1Iniriersitu Center and can also be the door,

11

Dancing is a good way to [let] other people see your heart. 11

first-year Jesselyn Kenduck

movu


THE MOORING MA

6FEATURE

1-PLU baseball field 2-PLU men's basketball team 3-Junior Jordan Downing 4- First-year Mitchell Baldridge 5-Senior Leah Butters

6- Junior Lucy Capron 7- Sophomore James Okubo 8-Sophomore Charles Mogen 9-Junior Kelli Crawford 10- Senior Kyle Warner

11-Senior Dalton Ritchey 12-Junior Michaela Egders 13-Sopomore Paige Runco 14-Senior Noel Oteng-1\.fensah


r---I'EATURE 7

.....

""

+

IS-Shanell Sullenberger 16-First-year Machaela Graddy 17-Senior Allison McClure 18-Sopomore Genevieve Brandt 19-Senior Amber Aguiar 路

20- Senior A.J. Konopaski 21- First-year Kelsey Hathaway 22-PLU women's rowing team 23-Senior Tevon Stephens-Brown 24-PLU men's soccer team

25-First-year Dylan Foreman 26-Sophomore Lacey Nicholson

27-Senior Jake Ducas 28-Sophomore Jeankie-Jhen Aczon


THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

I

Ill 11111

APRIL 10, 2015 1111

'

I THE MOORING MAST

MADDIE BERNARD Guest Writer Before I left for my semester-long study away trip to Granada, Spain, I was incredibly nervous. I was starting my life over completely in a foreign country, and leaving my life at Pacific Lutheran University behind. I was the only one studying away in my house, and was nervous that my friends would move on without me, and that I would miss out on a lot at PLU. I was also worried because I would be completely on my own. When I traveled to Australia last J-Term, I was in a group of other PLU students and we were guided by a professor. But now, only one PLU student was traveling with me, and I would have to navigate through this unknown place. Everything in Spain would be new and different I would be living with a host family I had never met before, attending a new school and have to make new friends. Not to mention doing all these things in another language. Though I had been taking Spanish classes for many years, I was not confident in my skills, and hardly participated in class. I was afraid to embarrass myself by making mistakes, so I avoided speaking Spanish. I knew I was going to have get out of my comfort zone, and speak Spanish everyday if I truly wanted to learn the language. It was scary and intimidating, and I did not think I was brave enough. I will never forget when

the taxi driver dropped me and my roommate off in front of our host family s apartment complex. l was terrified and we were completely on our own in this new city. What if this was the wrong address? We would have no way to contact anyone, and had no idea how to get around. When we approached the door to the apartment, I was practically shaking. I was not prepared to start my new life and speak Spanish full time. It was one of the scariest moments of my life. While it was difficult at first, I pushed myself every day to speak more and more. The more I spoke, the more I learned, and the more confident I became. Soon, I wanted to speak Spanish all the time, and I was no !pnger afraid. Studying abroad in Spain pushed me outside of my comfort zone and was the best experience of my life. I met so many amazing people, experienced a new way of life and traveled to four other countries. Even though I was away from my friends and family, we still kept in touch through Skype, and it was as if nothing had changed when I returned. By overcoming my fears, I grew as a person, became more confident and strengthened my Spanish skills. It took a lot of guts, and I had to be courageous every day, but it was worth it. Studying away for a semester also provided more of a rewarding experience than traveling for just one month. Last J-Term, I traveled with a PLU group to Australia, which was a great

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Roo111172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Jeff Dunn ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds PHOTO COURTESY BY MADDIE BERNARD

Maddie in a room of the Alhambra, a large Moorish palace and one of the most frequently visited monuments in Europe, located in Granada, Spain.

Allie Reynolds experience, but since we were only there for 30 days, we were more like tourists. We saw the sights, learned a lot and then went home~ Since I was in Spain for an entire semester, I got to really live there. I experienced Spanish life and culture daily. I lived with a typical Spanish family, ate traditional Spanish food, attended a Spanish University and made Spanish friends. While I did lots of touristy things, I was able to develop a daily routine, explore the city for myself and live more like a local. It was awesome to dive into the Spanish culture, and it felt so different from

Letter_ rom t f caost BRITTANY JACKSON Copy Editor

,-

You would think that seniors at Pacific Lutheran University would bond over the grileling and tiresome process known as capstone. While some do, others selfishly take part in what I call Capstone Shaming. As part of the general university requirements, every student must complete a senior seminar, or capstone, course in order to graduate. Yet even with this universal requirement, some students still trivialize the work of their fellow Lutes by making comments such as "my capstone class is harder than yours." While the content and even process of each capstone varies by department, every capstone still has the same core: research, a lot of work and a presentation. As an English major, I am fed up with students in other departments criticizing my capstone because at the heart of that critique is something even more offensive: that my major somehow has less value than yours. Whether you're joking or not, labeling someone's capstone as "easy' is essentially discrediting all of the hard work they have done on a project that is representative of their learning experiem:e at PLU. And if you haven't figured it out yet, that makes you a jerk. Just because you took that one "easy' literature class doesn't make the whole department easy and it definitely

<MAST1V GENERAL MANAGER

just being a tourist. Spain felt like my second home. In all, don't be afraid to study abroad for a semester While it is a long time to be away, it is extremely rewarding in the end. I would not trade my experience abroad for anything in the world, and am so thankful I had this opportunity. Looking back on my fears now, they seem silly and I cannot believe they almost stopped me from discovering my second home. So be brave, get outside your comfort zone and study abroad for a full semester-you will be glad you did.

dit r: s

II

I

doesn't give you authority to comment on a capstone class that you are not taking. It's not just me who has experienced this type_ of shaming. Senior kinesiology major Hannah Fry said it's irritating when students in different majors say they have harder capstone classes. "It's all relative," Fry said. "Something that seems simple to you might hold more weight [for someone else] because it's their capstone." However, I'm not totally unreasonable. I understand that complaining about capstone is a necessary< cathartic release. However, there's a difference between groaning about your own project and degrading someone else's. I've found that there is some strange belief that if you enjoy your capstone, that somehow makes it easy. Just because I enjoy meeting with my capstone class twice a week doesn't make preparing a 25-page essay and a presentation for the entire English department easy. It makes it more enjoyable. See the difference? As senior finance major Zach Blakeslee pointed out, the ease of a capstone course is based solely on the person taking it. "I don't really care [about capstone shaming]," ~lakeslee said. "I just know they're cramming because they probably didn't do enough research. I've done all the work." So the next time you think you're the only one up late feverishly writing an extra page or scouring through journal articles, remember: you're not alone.

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett NEWS@ NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS

Cliff Rowe Art land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mooring Wast is to discover, report and distribute infcrmation to its readers about important issm~s, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the S•>Ciety of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, colillnns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast i taff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be Jewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to n: ast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before i:ublication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right t• >refuse or edit letters for length, taste and en ors. fodude name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place all advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, e1 uail mast@ plu.edu.

Correctio s · · April 3 Issue

Zachary Boyle wrote the article ((Sexual Anatomy should be discussed not hushed;> his by line was not present.


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 10, 2015

OF'INION 9

-

f

widespread until its inventor told The Atlantic that he appreciates the convenience of Keurigs but fears the didn't even own one. He even said that drip coffee is environmental cost. "I hope that we.can get better at carefully thinking just as easy to make. By 2014, enough K-Cups were sold that they about the full costs not only of K-Cups, but of every disposable and mass-produced item would circle the globe in our lives," O' Brien said. 10 and a half times if Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, they were placed end"The invention of K-Cups the company who makes K-cups, to-end, according to a may be convenient, but said it plans to design a r1~cyclable viral video titled "Kill K-Cup. This organization said it the K-Cup." it is not good for the hopes that each pack will be 100 Lutheran Pacific environment.." percent recyclable by 2020, according University sophomore to their website. Ashley Connors mostly Until Green Mountain Coffee Roasters comes out uses a My K-Cup, which is a reusable version of the with a fully recyclable K-Cup, students who want to original. "[K-Cups] are terrible for the environment, because help the environment should buy reusable K-Cups they're very rarely recyclable or compostable," or brew drip coffee instead. Connors said. "That's why I use the reusable one most of the time." PLU environmental studies chair Kevin O'Brien

HALEIGH MISSILDINE Guest Writer K-Cups are small, single-serve coffee pods that people can use in their Keurig coffee makers. Keurig also makes them for tea and hot chocolate for those who don't drink coffee or want something differe:r;it. Instead of brewing a whole pot of coffee, people can brew only enough coffee for a single cup. The invention of K-Cups may be convenient, but it is not good for the environment. Inventor and founder of Keurig K-Cups, John Sylvan, is not only upset about selling his share of the Keurig company for far less than it's now worth, but he's upset about the environmental implications of this product that is increasing in popularity. New York Times journalist Murray Carpenter reported on the environmental · concerns about K-Cups in 2010, but the issue didn't become

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10 SPORTS

THE MOORING MAST

Baseball

APitIL 10, 2015

Softball WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Whitworth

25

7

16-4

13-8

George Fox

24

8

14-6

9

11-7

Pacific

24

10

14-6

20

11

11-7

Linfield

23

9

12-8

George Fox

14

18

10-8

Pacific Lutheran

17

15

10-10

Willamette

18

12

10-11

Willamette

11

19

8-12

Pacific

13

16

8-10

Lewis & Clark

8

23

5-15

Whitman

6

22

5-13

4

28

1-19

Lewis & Clark

7

26

4-14

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Pacific Lutheran

20

8

12-6

Puget Sound

15

15

Linfield

21

Whitworth

TEAM

Puget Sound --

Next Game

Next Game Doubleheader: April 11 @ 12 p.m. & 3 p.m. @ UPS

Doubleheader: Tomorrow 12 p.m. & 2 p.m. vs. Pacific

vs.

@ PACil'lC ttmmlllU'I Ull!Ml!SlTV

PJICIF!C LlmlEt!ANU!lllVERSITY

en's Tennis TEAM

Women's Tennis

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Whitman

14

5

8-0

Pacific

11

4

George Fox

11

Lewis & Clark

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Lewis & Clark

11

5

8-0

7-1

Whitman

13

3

8-1

6

6-3

Linfield

11

4

6-2

7

6

6-3

Whitworth

7

7

6-4

Willamette

3

10

3-4

George Fox_

9

7

5-4

Whitworth

3

9

3-5

Pacific

6

6

2-6

Pacific Lutheran

3

11

3-5

Pacific Lutheran

5

8

2-7

Linfield

1

9

1-7

Puget Sound

2

13

1-7

Puget Sound

1

9

0-9

Willamette

2

8

i-8

Next Match

Next Match

Tomorrow: 1 p.m. vs Linfield

Tomorrow 1 p.m. @ Linfield

vs.

@

PJIClF!C t.OTl!EltJU\l llll!MmSr!'Y

Men's Golf

Women's Go

Olympic Invite Top 6

Whitman Easter Classic

RANK

PAR

TOTAL

RANK

PAR

TOTAL

Olympic CC

1

+23

599

Whitman

1

+58

634

Bellevue College

2

+31

607

Lewis & Clark St.

2

+79

655

Spokane CC

3

+35

611

Whitworth

3

+86

662

Fraser Valley

4

+41

617

Lewis & Clark

4

+101

677

Saint Martin's

5

+46

622

--

Pacific Lutheran

5

+103

679

Pacific Lutheran

6

+53

629

UPS

6

+204

780

TEAM

Next Tournament Tomorrow: Spring Classic

@

Olympia Country & Golf Club

TEAM

Next Tournament Tomorrow: Northwest Spring Classic

PHOTO COURTESY OF OLYMPIA COUNTRY & GOLF CLUB

Lake Spanaway Golf Course

@

@ PAC!F!C L!T!'lil:RAl'>l Ul\t!VERS!TY

@

AACIF!C t.UTIIT:.B:AN tm!V.ERSlTY

PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE SPANAWAY GOLF COURSE


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 10, 2015

11 SPORTS

Men's Track & Field

Women's Track & Field

Shotwell Invitational Top 8

Shotwell Invitational Top 8

RANK

SCORE

W. Washington

1

139

Saint Martin's

2

Pacific Lutheran

TEAM

RANK

SCORE

Seattle Pacific

1

129

86

W. Washington

2

127

3

59.50

C. Washington

3

124

C. Washington

4

53.50

Mt. Hood CC

4

64

Seattle Pacific

5

50

Saint Martin's

5

51

Puget Sound

6

40.50

41

7

37

Pacific Lutheran --Puget Sound

6

Trinity Lutheran

7

39

8

36

Everett CC

8

27

-Mt. Hood CC

TEAM

..::

PHOTO COOEI'ESYOFGOLUTES.COM

Next Meet

Next Meet

Tomorrow: Pacific Luau Meet@ Forest Grove. Ore.

Tomorrow: Pacific Luau Meet@ Forest Grove, Ore.

.

hoto recaps for t 1s wee RIGHT: First-year pitcher Makayla Bentz get ready to toss a ball against Willamette April 3.

LEFT: Junior pitcher Ty Donahou winds up to throw a pitch against UPS March

31. LEFT: Sophomore Sam Stader focuses in on a ball against UPS Apri14. RIGHT: Three Lutes get ready to start a race April 4 at the Shotwell Invitational. PHOTO COURTESY OF OOLUTES.COM

路11 i

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

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Austin Hilliker Sports Editor From the high school standout, to the C team benchwarmer, there's a place for everyone to play. Not everyone has the talent to play at the highest level of sports, Division I. An even smaller percentage will move on to the professional world of sports. But for some of us, making money in front of thousands of fans isn't the dream. Some of us want to put academics first and put athletics second. Division III offers that exact experience. Being able to participate in sports is a privilege. The opportunity is something that only a select group of people get to experience and without it, sport fanatics and athletes would feel an everlasting void within themselves. Luckily, Division III can fill any such void. With a strong emphasis on academics and an equally strong passion for athletics, Division III is the best place for any athlete to play. Division III is equally as competitive as any other division across the nation. It offers a diff~rent experience than other levels within the NCAA. Shmoop.com, a site that deals with finding the best for its visitors, "Division not have the same ~ or level of Division I or II have. Division III athletes are still committed to their programs, tend to lead more welltounded lives than at.1-tletes at th.e other two levels."

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Living a pleasing and fulfilling life is something that only this level can offer. Many athletes are very grateful for the experience. Whether it be academics, athletics, or just everyday life, Division III has a place for everyone. "I was able to compete at a highly competitive level without having to put my academics second," said senior and former volleyball player Allison Wood. "My coaches and professors were extremely supportive of me being successful on the court and in the classroom." It's not every day that you can get professors and athletic coaches on the same side. It's hard to match up schedules for each, thus creating a hectic experience for the athlete. Division III professors and coaches understand that most athletes came to this division of the NCAA to play sports and get an equally important education. When it comes 路down to the reality of it, some of us just didn't get recruited to play at the highest level. "I choose Division III because I wasn't a Division I caliber player and Division III. gave me a chance to keep playing football, while at the same time offering better academic programs than a lot of bigger schools," said senior football offensive lineman Matthew Baker. Division III gives its students everything they路 want and more. :t gives students a chance to compete at a high level in athletics, e.. chance to glli""l a rewarding education anti the opportuni1y to live a well-formed overall life. Tnis level in i11.e NCAA has it all.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 10, 2015

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of playing primarily one position in one sport. But Sports Writer are they still considered an athlete or is this specific Kids these days need to aspiration detrimental to strive to become a well- their development? rounded athlete, focusing . Through the years I have on multiple sports and not learned to define what an limiting themselves to just athlete is. The definition one position or sport. is a person who plays Many children grow multiple sports and is up with the sole focus capable of playing them at

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a certain level. According to this description, a young boy growing up with the intent to become the next best quarterback is not considered an athlete, because he is limiting himself to one position in a sport. At a certain age, it is acceptable to have a child focus on a specific sport, but doing so for their entire adolescence is only hindering their athletic ability. Having a young girl play soccer, then basketball in the winter and then softball or track in the spring can only propel her in the long run.

Kids that learn to play to multiple sports at a young age tend to become more well-rounded athletes.

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12 SPORTS

For a male, playing certain positions in football can make you understand the game even better. In my opinion, the best offensive position in football is tight end. The coordination of

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being able to block a certain "' defender, maintaining body control and even running a ¡ 8c: pass pattern. ::i There are examples of "" ::] dual-sport athletes and 0 .,, eveJ1 triple-sport athlete in (") G;J college. The greatest athlete of all-time is Bo Jackson who played baseball and football 8 Being a well-rounded athlete can propel you into playing your sport at Auburn University. He ~ at the highest level, Division I. was a Reisman trophy ~ "' winner and an All-Star in both baseball, as well as QB," his father kept him professional athletes for a football. Jackson went on focused on football and reason, many of them grew play professional baseball at a young age he was up playing multiple sports. for the Kansas City Royals, destined to become a great First get them away from which was his main love. quarterback. He trained, the television sâ&#x20AC;˘:reens, then He played running back ate, and slept coverages have them find a passion in the National Football because his father would on every field and court League for the Los Angeles not let him think otherwise. available. Raiders, but considered this Ultimately, Marinovich Being capabL~ of playing profession a hobby. went to University of multiple po~:itions is On the contrary, Todd Southern California and a massive advantage, Marinovich was an aspiring has drafted by the L.A. whether it be in :Ugh school, quarterback, but became Raiders, but became burnt college or even professional burnt out by the sport and out due to expectations and sports. his over-powering father. a desire for a sense of peace. Once considered, ''Robo They are called

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Stephanie Compton Guest Writer Everyone knows that Pacific Lutheran University Student Life has a mission statement. It is used frequently and illustrates everything PLU Student Life stands for. But one thing that most people don't know is that in addition to the Student Life mission statement, PLU athletics has one of its own. According to the PLU mission statement, "the Pacific Lutheran . Athletics Department is dedicated to providing a broad-based, quality program and experience for men and women who strive to achieve academic and athletic excellence within the Northwest Conference as well as regional and national levels." This statement encompasses what division III sports is all about, creating an experience.

At the Division III level, PLU is not looking to profit off of the attendance of athletic events. PLU looks to give each and every one of the athletes and students at PLU an experience that they will never forget. This is the last time and place that most PLU athletes will competitively play their sport. Win or lose, it is the experience that matters. While some athletes might go on to Win national championships, like the 2012 women's softball team, the biggest thing PLU gives to its athletes is four years of the greatest time of their life. The second biggest thing that PLU gives to its athletes is an education. There are no scholarships for athletes at the Division III level, so every athlete at PLU is here with the main goal of getting the best education available. The support that is given to athletes to ensure that they get that education shows just how important it is. If PLU was just out to make money off of their athletes the support would be minimal. In many Division I athletic programs, the education of the student athlete is not as important as the monetary gain that they give to the school. Many programs only have student athletes for a few years before they go on to professional careers so their GPA and overall education is unimportant. But here, at PLU, the diploma of the student athletes is the ultimate goal.

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Sophomore Desirae Haselwood scored an 84 last Friday ;._nd an 81 on Saturday to tie for eighth in the individual leader boards at Whitman Easter Classic.

Senior Tevon Stephens-Brown threw 15.4 meters (50-6.25ft) ii the shot put at the Shotwell Invitational.


More than meets the eye: Modern Art pg. 5

How to Reuse the Mast: Celebrating Earth Week pg. IHI

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

APRIL 17, 2015

VOLUME 91 ISSUE 18

路 plans, we don't pfan to need the housing space anytime in the near future."

II I SAMANTHA LUND News Editor "I guess where the story begins is that he lived three houses down from me," Lauren said. "We grew up next to each other." For 21 years, Marl< was like Lauren's little brother. They grew up three houses away from each other, went to the same high school and eventually went to the same university. When Mark grew older and was in high school, he would tell Lauren about girls whom he'd had sex with and she would lend an ear and advice. As Mark got older, Lauren began to notice a disturbing pattern. "He took the virginity of a girl the first time they met and he told me with a smirk on his face," Lauren said. "He would never say

I Quotable

' they had sex or shared a moment, it was always something he took from a girl." After Mark told Lauren what he did, he told Lauren she was the one he was actually in love with, then lunged at her and forced her to kiss him. "I was pushing him away but I couldn't really move," Lauren said. "I finally put my hand on his face and pushed it away. I told him it was not acceptable and I wrote him a letter later explaining why." This was in 2013. The letter to Mark explained that Lauren wanted him to . stop forcing himself on her and she also characterized his attitude toward women as "rude," "sleazy" and "degrading." Lauren expressed concern for her own safety in the letter, saying "When I look at you, I see 路a predator. I see someone I would keep my children away from; someone I would warn my friends about; someone I would never associate myself with."

CONTINUED ON PG.2

"This was my first encounter with an onlim dating website, and I've got to say, I don't see where all the stigma corr es from" Sophomore Jdf Dunn pg.8

"N.G.U.N.N.G.U is never give up,

never ne'rer give up. A slogan from Tumwater that was instilled in me, " Senior Kyle\ Varner, pg.

12

" One of thE 路best ways to foster intimacy in relationships is to practice gratitude for our partm>r." Wome1's Center Member Lucky, pg. 3

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NEWS2

THE MOORING MAST

APJUL 17, 2015

<Can :cllarges, as · :s. are not es not have .e assailant report but :rson may there will record of fue' incident w.ithout c'qoosing to• insist o1,\ a police investigation. A restraining .order is ~eQ: when p~perwork is given to the .g a hearing. If the .a request, it means be a W,l,ll,porary der for three weeks, .requests If

Lauren. doesn't want her story to be one of horror or racy details, 'but somej:hing that women and men can look to and see that victims can stand up for · themselves.

"This process is so simple," Lauren said. "Having it be so also means that people causing the sexual abuse or harassment read this and will go 'oh s~--, l could get caught because this process is so easy."'

. assault isn't eptable and there are. ices available both and. off campus~ PLU's lees Against Viplence grarti is a re~o4rce victims sexual assauff to optaina ·protection·· order, .how . to .increase safety a.rid connect additional resources. can •also contact Campus Safety at: 253-535-7911 for . an emergency and 253-535- · 7441 for non-emergencies,


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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 17, 2015

NEWS3 Ill Ill

0 HOW TO ADD A PINTEREST BUTTON TO YOUR IOS SHARING OPTIONS SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Pinterest is quickly joining Twitter in the list of social media sites that can be used to advertise a young adult's set of skills to potential employers. Users boards can be used to advertise special work or things they are involved with. Keeping up with Pinterest and using it to show employers who you are can be a valuable tool. If you're going to have a social media account, use it. If not, delete it. Looking inactive is worse than not having an account, Communications Specialist Tove Tupper said. Adding a Pin option to your share button will make it even easier.

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Presidential Elections

The United States presidential elections will be held on Nov. 8, 2016. Voters will decide on the new President and Vice President of the United States. Current President Obama is ineligible to be elected for a third term, due to term limits, which promises us a new President in 2016.

The major issues The Keystone XL Project Same-sex Marriage Theabilityoftwomenortwowomen This project could create thousands to marry is certain to be adopted as a of new jobs, but could also be an main issue by the Democratic party. environmental catastrophe. Health Care Obamacare got off to a rocky start, expect Republicans to take advantage of that and Democrats find a solution to its problems.

Gun Control This year, the media showed a plethora of gun-related stories. Expect restrictions on who can purchase fire arms to be a hot topic.

1

Who s Running? Only four candidates have confirmed their Presidential Campaigns.

Hmary Clinton

Ted Cruz

A Democrat, Clinton announced her campaign and has been setting up her election campaign in Brooklyn.

Cruz A Republican, announced his campaign over Twitter, saying "I'm running for President and I hope to earn your support!"

Swipe the Pinterest option to turn it into an active sharing button. You should see it on the sharing screen now. •w.-=AT.8..'f i:r;;

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Marco Rubio A Republican, Rubio is a Senator from Florida and previously served as Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives.

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Rand Paul A Republican, Paul is a physioan from Kentucky. He has been serving in the United States Senate since 2011.

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Women s Center K-9s are here to help for being a place to chill with the Women's Center's Tumblr at books, coffee, tea and relaxing http://pluwomenscenter. tumblr. com/ and a link to the submission spaces for studying or socializing. Yglesias said their goal is form can be found there as well. In addition to the friendly always to be a welcoming space So far, their two posts have human faces at the Pacific Lutheran and that the dogs help with that been on "50 Shades of Grey'' and University Women's Center, you They can also help comfort how to keep the flame of romance can find some furry friends there· those who are victims of stalking, alive in a lengthy relationship. "They're here to help people," as well. The two dogs at the violence, sexual assault, sexual Women's Center are here to help harassment, etc. Yglesias said. with stress management, event As for Yglesias, he is happy to "We don't implement animal suggestions or love advice. therapy, but we do have people have a furry companion with him Lady Jane and Lucky can who come for coffee or tea and at work. be seen in the windows of the just chill and seek out the dogs," "It feels natural to have a nice, Women's Center, barking hello to Yglesias said. little, warm animal near you and all who pass by. He said the dogs are especially I'm very grateful to work in a place Men's popular around stressful times where that's allowed," Yglesias Jonathan Yglesias, Project Coordinator at the such as finals week said. Women's Center, said \glesias said the dogs anyone is welcome to come highly encourage all visit the dogs. He also said students to go to the event they are part of the friendly "It feels natural to have a nice, Dark Matter April 2 at 6:30 atmosphere. little, warm animal near you and p.m. in the Karen Hille Lady Jane is a Phillips Center. It's a free Chihuahua and Lucky is I'm very grateful to work in a event where a South Asian a Chihuahua-Pomeranian trans activist group will place where that's allowed." mix. be giving a workshop and ''Lucky and I both performing a show called "It Jonathan Yglesias got hired in November," Gets Better." Men's Coordinator Yglesias, said. "He's like The dogs will also be at the Women's Center myself, we're both from making a special appearance Virginia." at two of the upcoming Women's Center events. The Yglesias said Lady Jane was found wandering around "It's nice to have a space where "PLU Take Back The Night Rally'' the PLU campus three to four animals are present and people will be April 30 from 5:30-8:00 p.m. years ago and taken in by Jennifer seem to be embracing them," in Red Square. Then they will be Warwick, Victim Advocate and Yglesias said. seen again at the ''Women's Center Voices Against Violence Project Now, the dogs also have their in Red Square" event sometime in Administrator. own advice column where anyone early May. Additionally, Yglesias said the Yglesias guessed that Lady can submit anonymous questions Jane is between four and six years and receive love advice from the Women's Center tends to post on old, and Lucky is nine years old. dogs. its Facebook page, when the dogs The Women's Center is known Their column can be read on are in and ready for a visit

NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

Lady Jane and Lucky give "love advice" to the PLU campus. Students can leave anonymous questions about lo'1e for the pups to answer on their blog. Here's the most recent piece of advice.

Lucky: Yes! One of the best ways to foster intimacy in relationships is to practice gratitude for your pa.rtner. By nJticing and honoring the little things you like about your partner, not only do you make them feel appreciated, but you build within rour heart a deeper sense of respect, connection, and commitment to :hem. Saying "thank you" for things, giving small notes of appreciation, telling others about your boo ... these are things we can do every day (and for freeeeee!). Lady Jane: That is so sweet, Lucky. I see how being i:i.tentional about celebrating the great little things about our partner can bring energy and intention back to a couple, but I think that our Lazy Lover was also looking to add some RRRRRROMANCE into their relationship, if you know what I mean. **attempts to wink bulging eye**


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

ew

etflix excites arvel fans

DAVID MAIR Staff Writer The first-ever superhero based television series to be available exclusively for streaming is now a reality. On April 10, the entire first season of "Daredevil" was released on Netflix. The show is a Marvel Television program released through Netflix. First-year Bryce MacCallum is an avid comics fan. "Marvel has it all covered now," he said, "with movies, television and now Netflix." Daredevil is a superhero that was blinded as a child. As an adult, he is a lawyer by day but fights crime by night using his heightened senses - combined with his billy club - to avenge the death of his father. First-year Michael Pham is another oncampus Marvel fan.

,, w i t h Daredevil in particular, I liked how ironic it was that he was a lawyer attempting to do what he could within the bounds of the law," Pham said. He also said he liked how Daredevil is "a vigil~te who has to come to grips with the effect that violence has on his own soul." The Marvel Studios/Netflix original was created and written by Drew Goddard, who helped create the Emmy award-winning show "Lost." Being created by one of the makers of "Lost" explains the dark, often-edgy vibe the show gives out. MacCallum said he thought it was "darker than anything Marvel has done before - sometimes it didn't even feel like Marvel." The show stars relatively fresh actors: Charlie Cox as Daredevil and Elden Henson as Daredevil's best friend and associate accompanied by long time actor Vincent D'Onofrio as the Kingpin. With the show being aired through Netflix, Marvel is given the opportunity to do more than normally allowed on regular cable television, since Netflix does not have the traditional FCC regulations of broadcast television. "Daredevil" is just the beginning for Marvel and Netflix, as Marvel has set a four TV show deal with the TV and Movie streaming site. Following "Daredevil," the other three shows will be about Luke Cage, Iron Fist and, finally, Jessica Jones.

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Senior Asia B. Wolfe, pictured, won the ASP LU-sponsored "Battle of thE! Bands" event on April 9.

BROOKE THAMES A&EWriter Sharing the stage with LollaPLUza's array of class acts will be some of Pacific Lutheran University's own finest musicians. Lutes gathered last week to watch student artists go head-to-head for the chance to perform at PLU's annual music festival. Students met in the Cave April 9 to cast their votes to determine which student acts will play for their peers at this year's LollaPLUza concert festival Sponsored by ASPLU and LASR, this year's Battle of the Bands gave

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ERIN FLOM Guest Writer Scared of bugs? Then get ready to be frightened by the events of "Bug," Pacific Lutheran University's secondto-last play for this year's theater season, opening April 17. "This play just grabs you and doesn't let go of you," said director, Cameron Waters, a junior. "The entire time you're wondering 'What's Senior Katherine going on? What's Mahoney. gonna happen?"' Senior Katherine Mahoney plays Agnes, the show's lead. "She's had a rough life. She comes from a history of multiple abuses," Mahoney said. "She finds comfort in this new guy, Peter, who seems to be almost her knight in shining armor,

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APILIL 17, 2015

student artists 322 Jazz Collective, Asia B. Wolfe, Ruthie Kovanen and Samuel Ryan the chance to compete for a spot on the LollaPLUza stage. "[LollaPLUza] is definitely a student event and we want to incorporate as many of our student acts as possible," said Morgan Woods, ASPLU's Traditional Events Planner. "Since we have such a huge music program, th =re's tons of people all over campus [who play music]." At Battle of the Bands, students voted to produce two groups that will be featured at LollaPLUza. Read the whole s tm:y online: http://mastmedia.plu.edu

s except for the fact that he's brought a bug infestation with him." The play deals with abuse, paranoia and manipulation. "I think the most difficult thing is portraying these things without it seeming forced or fake," Mahoney

Bug by Tracey Letts

7:30 p.m. April 17 and 18 Black Box Theater

said, "because these are real issues and while these characters aren't real, they very well could be real people somewhere." Waters added that, when talking about these issues, "you tend to get very abstract and people don't like

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I talking about the specifics, and I think theater really forces us to look at the specifics." Sophomore Arika Matoba plays RC., Agnes's friend. "I had never done anything like this before," Matoba said. "In theater we have our types -you know, when you're typecast- so my ty Je is usually the younger sort of char. icter or the more innocent, sweet sort •)f character, so I really wanted to be part of the show because it's very grity, dirty and just very intense." The student-run perfornance takes place in the black box in Karen Hille Phillips Center. Waters sa .d the black box draws in the audience~;. · "It brings everybody ir and makes them witnesses to what':; going on, more than just removed spectators." Waters wants student< to see the play because it's "good to see things that stretch your boundari=s a little bit and get you to think about the way that we treat each other."


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THE MOORING MAST 11111

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ese easy rec1 es! BROOKE \IVOlFE

PASTA SALAD, LEFT: For a fast dinner or lunch this pasta salad is the perfect meal.

Staff Writer

What you need " Cup Noodles " Italian Salad Dressing " Mixed Vegetables (I used broccoli, corn and tomatoes) Directions Boil hot water and pour into the Cup Noodles to the line and let cook. After two minutes, pour out the water in the cup and empty the noodles into a bowl. Cover the noodles with Italian dressing to taste and throw in the veggies for a quick meal! Price per serving: $1.49, depending on veggies used (based on Old Main Market prices)

YOGURT PARFAIT, RIGHT: Dessert in a dorm room can be a hassle to make but this parfait is simple solution. What you need " Strawberry Yogurt " Granola e Honey Directions Empty one container of yogurt on top of granola and drizzle honey on top. Stir and enjoy. Price per serving: $2.19 (based on Old Main Market prices)

BREAKFAST OATMEAL, ABOVE RIGHT: Making breakfast before an 8 a.m. can be tough, but this oatmeal takes less than a minute to make. What you need " Steel Cut Oatmeal e Peanut Butter ., One cup of Dried Fruit e One Banana Directions Boil hot water and pour over oatmeal to cover oats. Stir, then add peanut butter, dried fruit and a banana to taste! Price per serving: $2.03 (based on Old Main Market prices)

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KELSEY BARNES Assistant Editor of Saxifrage Modern art is alive at Pacific Lutheran University. One artist keeping it alive is junior Katie DePreker. · Modern art is commonly defined as a geme in the fine arts that rejects traditional techniques in favor of experimenting with one's own techniques. Essentially, both the definition and creation of modern art are both highly subjective and individualized. Consequently, understanding and appreciating modern art is . _ truly challenging until the viewer can experience a piece of art through its creator's eyes. DePreker, a painting major, agreed modern art rebels against art's norms, but . explained that appreciation of this geme accumulates over time. In her experience, modem art rouses an initial respon8e in the viewer, which may be of "shock and disgust." DePreker feels that her work demonstrates the style of modem art because she has been formally trained, but she challenges and experiments with the traditional techniques that she's learned to create her pieces. In her latest series, DePreker explores. "how - our memories deteriorate over time" due to mental illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, which her grandmother suffers from. DePreker · wishes to communicate this sense of loss

through her work and does so Modem art is often excused by leaving out an aspect from by popular media as being the narrative, as if that aspect aesthetically simplistic and oneis a lost memory. Yet, she hopes dimensional, but this does not viewers will still feel a "sense· mean that its purpose is less of completeness" from each_ significant than artwork from piece because the remainder of another genre. The simplicity the narrative will be visually of the piece may not be readily communicated. . legible, but this does not restrict One of the paintings in this the piece's purpose, or the message series, "Hallucinate," exemplifies the artist is communicating. DePreker' s aim for this collection In fact, this exhibits the beauty and her style of modern art. She of a modem piece of art - it · created this piece with formal can be read in endless ways, techniques but utilized these including, but not limited to, the techniques to create the abstracted way in which the artist intended effect she aimed for. for it to be read. One formal technique she Although an artist of .any modified was watercolor. genre is subject to questions Conventionally, artists apply thin, of intent, artists of modem art transparent layers of pigment to arguably consider these questions their paper by dipping the brush, more often, based on the which holds the pigment, into misconceptions about their genre. water. Since the pigment is highly DePreker is among these artists. diluted, the pigments may run "Especially with modem art, together or mix unless the layer you're trying to describe a concept has ample time to dry. that can't be seen," she said. "So DePreker avoided this you have to apply a lot of intellect possibility with another technique to not only decipher what modem of using tape to keep the face she art is trying to say, but, if you're partially represents from being the artist, you have to make sure obscured. you're communicating something Usually, DePreker more intelligent, and that's coherent. concretely represents the subject Even though it might not initially of her pieces, and therefore the appear that way, you have to be narrative is more legible. In · able to justify the choices you "Hallucinate," she recreates this make."· fragmentary face out of abstracted Modern art is highly shapes. conceptual,. and without In this way, DePreker knowledge of the artist's purpose intentionally omits part of the for the piece, the piece may seem piece's narrative, which speaks to one-dimensional and difficult the sense of loss she evokes in her to relate to. Yet once the artist's latest body of work. intention is understood, the

"Hallucinate" by Katie DePreker

piece becomes dimensional not only aesthetically, but also conceptually. In this way, there is more to

modem art than meets the eye. This article original, y appeared online at http://saxifrage. 'Jlu.edu and has been edited for print.


6FEATURE

THE MOORING MAS1

work to construct better landscaping .areas around the community.

At thls· event, p~rticipant:; ·;lre opportunity. to express· cre,itively perforrnances of happiness, grief, pride. other emotions. The. event· \l\lill allow part cipants to use art to express themselves and take the · opportunity to learn and· appreciate other peopfe'sforms of expression.

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FEATURE 7

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. . .... PQJdommunlty Garden

Roots··• Environmental Action Now are .cohosting a.documentary s~reening about· the role of urban farming in America. The filtn. also showcases people's location affects what they eat. The event is sponsored GREAN and the PLU Community Garden.


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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION 11111

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I of Wisconsin-Milwaukee found the lonelier someone is, the longer they spend on Facebook. Cutting out personal relationships in favor of online relationships has actually been The first thing people see when they scientifically proven to bring loneliness open up Facebook is the slogan, and feelings of stress. "connect with friends and the According to shapemindsoul. world around you on Facebook." Cutting out personal relationships com, personal relationships Connecting with people has never · allow the brain to release been so easy. . in favor of onfine relationships has feel-good chemicals, relieving Anna Caltabiano, writer for the negative feelings and help . Huffington Post, said that social actually been Scientifically proven to people bond on an emotional media can become addictive and level. · it creates a "dangerous illusion bring fonefineSS and feelings Of Stress. As college students, of being connected" through not taking the time to cultivate thinking these connections are personal relationships will be sufficient replacements for real detrimental not only to your personal relationships. personal health, but also to Recently, Kelly Bauer, of into building online relationships, your ability to connect with others in shapemindsoul.com, made a reference which causes their real-life connections your future career field. If you're feeling . to teenagers being called "screenagers" diminish. bogged down by stress or loneliness, a Siinilarly, Mail Online published simple solution is just to power down! because of their obsession with smartphones arid tablets to fulfill social that professor Song of the University

GEORGIA LAMB AND LINA MALMO Guest Writers

needs rather than in-person interactions. In a research study by the International Center for Media & Public Agenda published in . the Huffington Post, researchers found that social media users put more time and effort

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Jeff Dunn

Please

ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds

recycle your copy of

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett . NEWS@ NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe

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University. So to skim a few profiles in JEFF my free time classes was awesome. Copy Editor Sociology Professor Laura McCloud with my assertion that sometimes can't emerge Dating in the age is naturally from an "in real life" something many people still based on . "Oftentimes, you do better haven't fully grasped. identities or social groupings rather like funny I'm an online dating success story. Well, one half of an movies, my friend likes funny movies, you should get online dating success story. My · together sometime and see a funny movie,"' McCloud said. "That's not what compatibility is." significant other and I met on the I also liked the idea of online dating because everyone's online dating site OKCupid more intentions are on their profile (more or less). Typically, than a year ago. · Online dating has exploded what people were looking for was stated right in their profiles. The options on OKCupid range from "New in the past year among college Friends" to "Casual Sex" or "Long-Term Relationship." students, as it transitions from Setting up a profile took some time, but realize that the realm of the taboo to a.more the more time you put into it the better matches you'll socially-acceptable practice. Apps .and websites such as get OKCupid has a great matching system where you Tinder, OKCupid, PlentyofFish a:ri.d more are making answer specific questions such as "Who are you most dating more accessible than ever. likely to reveal your This was my first encounter deepest, darkest with an online dating website, secret to?" you and fve got to say, I don't see rate the question where all of the stigma comes on its importance, from. Many people may be . you to afraid making an account quickly scan potential on one of these websites will matches' profiles for make them look desperate, but information. according to the PEW Research some While Center, more than 50 percent dating websites of Americans agree that online use algorithms to dating is a good way to meet determine compatibility, the dating app Tinder uses people. location to filter the results of its users. Then, users swipe Another issue many people have with online dating left or right on their screens if they see someone they're is the lack of human interaction. Some might say that the level of personal connection required to form a romantic interested in. Tinder has earned a reputation as being a "hook up" relationship just isn't possible to achieve online. The fault though, lies with the communicators. If you can't app, and it's.often assumed that you won't be able to find a relationship on Tinder. That mentality definitely won't communicate well in an online setting, then online dating probably isn't for you (along with many other things our lead you to a relationship. You'd be surprised where you end up after taking a genuine interest in people you meet culture has embraced in the digital age). I'll be honest. I have a hard time meeting new people. online. The best part of finding a date online is the accessibility I've gone to parties. I've made small talk. But I felt like I was always missing connections with people. The stigma and personalization of the experience. Everyone is of being viewed as desperate by my peers definitely looking for something different in a relationship; all contributed to my initial discomfort with online dating. OKCupid did for me was match me with someone who was looking for the same thing. But, certain aspects did appeal to me. As a college student, I didn't have much time to spend meeting people that didn't go to Pacific Lutheran

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The responsibility of The MooriTL{j Mast is to discover, report and distribute inf)rmation to its readers about important issi: es, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the 5 ociety of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to nast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before :mblication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right 1o refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions c~st $25 per sem~ster or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

April 10 issue

The "Dance 2015" article on Page. 5 incorrectly stated ·the dates. Tile showcase was Friday, I1 Saturday, 11.


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APRIL 17 2015

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 9

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' ALEXANDER VO AND KYLIE WHEELER Guest Writers If you woke up this morning and checked Instagram, liked a Facebook post or even sent a Tweet, congratulations; you're part of the 74 percent of men and women who use social media. According to a study done by the Pew Research Center, 40 percent of cell phone owners use social media applications, 28 percent of whom use daily. Technology has become somewhat of a doubleedged sword; it makes our lives easier, yet not without its own shortcomings. Smartphone apps serve literally any purpose we see fit, from messaging

a friend to tracking our daily calorie intake- all in the swipe and tap of a button. With a rising industry of smartphone apps, a growing concern is whether or not littering our phones with these apps makes us productive or are we simply becoming too complacent with our mobile devices? It's a trend we see often in society and we barely take the time to critically think about the amount of apps we download onto our phones. The truth of the matter is that we want to rely on them. Apps give us that shoulder to lean on in a pinch whenever we need help. "Too much good to see the bad," senior Noble Hauser said. "[Apps] revolutionize the way every day can happen. Connecting us to everyone and

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everything." Likewise it can also make us over-reliant oa them as well. Imagine following the directions of a GPS app only to get completely lost when it po:U:its the you into a wall or worse, the middle of nowhere. Use caution and common sense before heedlessly relying on an app, you might just be shutting the door on reality. So do we swipe on or off? The answer lieE in the perfect medium; all in moderation. Apps function great as a resource, but don't depend on them wholly _ as your own personal life coach. Instead oJ being buried in apps, it's high time to kick some of the clutter to the curb.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

Baseball

APRIL 17, 2015

Softball WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Whitworth

27

9

18-6

14-7

George Fox

27

9

17-7

13

13-8

Pacific

27

11

17-7

16

19

12-9

Linfield

25

11

14-10

Puget Sound

15

18

13-11

Pacific Lutheran

19

17

12-12

Willamette

20

13

10-11

Willamette

15

19

12-12

Pacific

16

18

9-12

Lewis & Clark

8

27

5-19

Lewis & Clark

8

29

5-16

Puget Sound

4

32

1-23

Whitman

6

25

5-16

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Pacific Lutheran

23

9

15-6

Linfield

25

9

Whitworth

22

George Fox

TEAM

TEAM

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Doubleheader: April 18 @ 12 p.m. & 3 p.m. vs Lewis & Clark

Doubleheader: April 18 @ 12 p.m. & 2 p.m. vs. UPS

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3

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4

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7

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Whitworth

7

8

6-4

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5

11

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George Fox

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9

5-6

Whitworth

4

10

4-6

Pacific Lutheran

7

7

3-7

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3

12

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9

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5

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12

5

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Lewis & Clark

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626

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+55

631

4

+74

634

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+74

650

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+81

641

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5

+86

662

George Fox

6

+86

646

Willamette

6

+148

724

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April 25 NWC Championship @ Crosswater Golf Course

April 25 NWC Championship @ Crosswater Golf Course

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 17, 2015

11 SPORTS

's Track & Field

men's Track

Pacific Luau Meet: PLU Top 3 Finishes NAME

EVENT

TIME

PLACE

G. Hittner

100m

11.07s

3

G. Hittner

200m

22.16s

3

N. Kime

400mh

57.14s

3

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4x100mr

43.28s

2

T. StephensBrown

Shot Put

52ft 1in

1

T. StephensBrown

Discus

138ft

3

T. StephensBrown

Hammer

172ft 3in

2

E. Swartout

Javelin

183ft 4in

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Pacific Luau Meet: PLU Top 3 Finishes

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N. Dandridge

100m

12.83s

3

A. Wilson

200m

25.93s

3

A. Wilson

400m

59.7s

2

D. Domini

400mh

1:08.72s

2

P. Runco

TIME

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PLACE

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C. Stovall

Shot Put

38ft

D. Jackson

Discus

121ft 10 in

2

D. Jackson

Hammer

137ft2in

2

2

Next Meet

Next Meet

April 18 Spike Arlt Invitational in Ellensburg, Wash.

April 18 Spike Arlt Invitational in Ellensburg, Wash.

Photo recaps for this week LEFT: First-year Caroline Dreher won her doubles match, 8-4. LEFT: Senior Curtis Wildung received honors as national catcher of the week. RIGHT: First-year Mitchell Baldrige took third-place in the NWC Spring Classic_ PHOTO COURTESY OF KARLI FLOYD

PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUI GUTIERREZ

Hilliker's Austin Himker Sports Editor "Make the big time where you are." This saying may be short in length, but by no means does it fall short in its meaning. It has defined the Pacific Lutheran University Football team since 1972 when Forrest "Frosty" Westering first came to PLU and still stands true today. The saying was established to focus on being a better overall person, not worrying about the amount of fans watching the game or getting treated like a celebrity on campus. The focus was extended past the gridiron, to the community, home and wherever else a PLU football player would" venture off to. Frosty came to PLU from Lea College, a small private liberal arts school in Alberta Lea, Minn. He was the head football coach there from 1966-1971, and accumulated a 27-22-2 record while there. Despite an average record during his time at Lea College, something clicked for Frosty and his coaching staff at PLU. He ranks ninth in wins in college football history, appearing in eight national championships and winning four of them.

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Most people would focus on 303 wins, but to him, winning was just a by-product. This philosophy still holds strong today as Frosty' s son, Scott Westering, continues to live out the life-changing traditions and values within it. " For the players within the rich and cultivating program, it's a rather simple concept that takes just a day to jump into, but almost four years to fully appreciate. Reflecting as a senior Being able to reflect on the PLU football journey is an experience all its own. With all eligibility exhausted, senior Derek Kaufman found that this reflection process was unlike anything he had ever experienced before. Kaufman found that being a PLU football player was something special. "For a football player specifically, it's different than being a part of any other team on campus," Kaufman said. "The reputation of the EMAL legacy left by Frosty places each player under an umbrella of morality whether they like it or not." The acronym "Every Man A Lute," or EMAL, has been associated with the program for more than 40 years now. Each year it has brought together almost 100 young men with the focus of growing to be a better person. The effects_ of the program

Once you have gone through the program and experienced its life-changing effects, it's hard to drop the habits you learn from it. Kaufman found this to be true all throughout his career and believes that the reputation of EMAL and the program itself carries what he calls "good weight." "The life values. given to each football player are second to none when compared to other programs," Kaufman explained. "lt carries good weight because of the EMAL reputation of being selfless, a selfstarter and a hard working individual." Kaufman also said that not everyone can

RIGHT: First-year pitcher Marissas Miller pitched against George Fox grabbing the win 9-8,

PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE SHIER

----

PHOTO COURTESY JOHN FRO:>CHAUER

PLU Football, a senior reflectio understand the tight knit group as well as its members can. "Bad weight is only really from judgments made by people who see the EMAL persona as 'corny', but they can only really understand it if they experience being a football player themselves," Kaufman said.

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Down the road Now that Kaufman has been through the program, he is looking toward graduation this spring. He still holds on to a few key things from the program and doesn't plan on letting them go anytime soon. Atthe beginning of every year, each player receives a notebook. Besides the playbook, passing routes and running schemes, the notebook also includes something special. The guts of the book; known as the goalsetting program, influential sayings and poems, in addition to references of what PLU football is really about, is what has really changed these boys into men. "The notebook is a gold mine in my eyes. I will look back to this from time to time however I believe the key values it preaches are instilled-in me at this point," Kaufman said. "I will even teach my children these key values, that's how much it means to

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Kaufman started as the Lutes free-saftey durir1g the 2014 season.

separates you from others. _ To "total release" is to give it yo .ir best shot with 100 percent effort. To "enjoy the trip" is to love every moment throughout your journey. To be a "servant warrior" is ·:o step outside yourself and help others while competing with a great spirit. The program has altered so mar y lives for the better that Scott Westering, to this day, still gets letters from former players about how special the program 'Vas to them and what it has done for the r lives me." The most notable part of this gold mine is specifically. Like Kaufman, some of the men-e,•en say the simple acronym of L.U.T.E.S. To PLU football players, this acronym that their children, without a dou:>t will come to play for PLU. defines what each player strives towards. "I Wt)uldn' t The "L" stands mind my dlildren for "love the game", attending PLU," the "U" stands for Kaufman said. 'Td "uncommon", the "The notebook is a gold mine like them to go "T" stands for "total . ,, where they 2 ctually release", the "E" In my eyes. want to go, but if stands . for "enjoy they choose PLU I Derek Kaufman the trip" and the "S" would be pl1 ~ased," senior, free-safety stands for "servant Kaufman said. warrior." The prognm has To "love the game" shown that it has is to soak in every positive effects. moment whether it's a good day or bad One of the biggest things that mos: of the day. players learn to understand is that ; ou just To be "uncommon" is to step outside the norm and do something positive that have to make the big time where yo .1. are.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 17, 2015

ec uld take his Steven McGrain . Sports Writer "The mindset is to not talk and praise how great of a performer that you are on the field, but let the work ethic and production speak for itself because that is all that matters at the end of the day." This slogan is what drove senior Kyle Warner to a state championship at Tumwater High School his senior year. It is also the mindset he carried with him while on the campus of Pacific Lutheran University. It's rare for a Division III football player to have the opportunity to continue playing professionally, but the Lutes' wide receiver is seizing every moment in pursuit of his dream. ..,,

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"Looking at Seahawks Chris Matthews in the Super Bowl put it in perspective that there is a possibility," Warner said. "No matter where you are, if you have the ability and right mindset, you-could gain an opportunity." After being rejected to attend the University of Washington Pro Day, an event for the top football players to show their skills to National Football League coaches, Warner knew the next avenue was to attend a Canadian Football League tryout.

"No matter where you are, if you have the ability and right mindset, you could gain an opportunity."

Kyle Warner senior, wide receiver 路

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Warner needed a contact to try out for the CFL, and he found advice from, Matt Johnson, a former NFL Safety for the Dallas Cowboys. Johnson aided Warner in his training to become the player he is today. "Matt Johnson was a senior at Tumwater [High School] while I was in 8th grade. I came into contact with him, and he said that he knew a coach at Edmonton, so they knew I would be making the trip and what type of player I was," Warner said.

Intramural spotlight David Mair Staff Writer

-,_-,.

AB a captain of her first intramural volleyball team, first-year Paige Lilly's team lost every game that season, but earned the rank of an all-star intramural athlete. That team was compiled of a group of friends who had never played volleyball before, except for their captain. It was the team's first win of the second season and was Lilly's proudest moment from playing 路 volleyball at Pacific Lutheran University so far. Lilly said of that first win "all of [their] hard work finally came together." When Lilly thinks of why she enjoys playing volleyball so much, her immediate reaction is a grin and a "I don't." Lilly played volleyball growing up on a club team in both middle school and high school. The game of volleyball just seemed to make more sense to her. Lilly knows "what's going on in the game, the rules, and everything compared to other sports." As soon as Lilly started her first year at PLU, she formed an intramural volleyball team during the first semester and since then she has been the captain of three teams for three seasons and plays in the current intramural volleyball season. Now a three-time captain, Lilly has quickly gained a lot of experience during her first year. She said that her favorite aspect of being a captain has been "being able to pick friends to be on [her] team," and getting to "decide who gets to play what position." Sophomore Christian Rude, who has played under the captain-ship of Lilly for one season, said she is a

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MAIR

Paige Lilly was selected as an intramural volleyball captain as a first-year.

fierce competitor. "I just really appreciate how Paige is willing to sacrifice her body on every point, it's really inspiring," Rude said. Every Monday, Lilly can be seen with her team practicing on the beach court on lower camplis. Though she has the team practice on the sand, Lilly prefers hard courts because "it's eaSier to spike the ball on the courts," and it's "easier to run, easier all around." It makes sense as her favorite position she enjoys on the court is outside hitter, along with server. Lilly is currently just a player for a friend's intramural volleyball team. Even though she is not a captain for the team, her role has not changed too much as she said, that people still look to her for game times and forming the lineup for each game. While Lilly does not plan to go professional with her volleyball talents, since she is working hard to become a kindergartner teacher, she does want to continue to play intramural volleyball as a captain with her friends. For Lilly, volleyball simply "puts her heart at pace."

re

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12 SPORTS

he next level

Warner flew to California to attend the CFL Pro Day to display his athletic ability to the Edmonton Eskimos. While on the plane, he came to the realization that he had everything to gain and nothing to lose. "It 路 was a valuable experience to travel down there, it was hard to stand out amongst the others, but it also kind of corifirmed my belief of having the ability to continue playing," Warner said. "There is room to grow though, there always is." There is a difficult obstacle that Warner is facing: the perception of a Division III football player. Not many gain a chance PHOTO COURTES. r OF GOLUTES.COM at a professional level, Warner tallied 3205 total receiving yards off of 189 receptions in four especially when they did years at PLU. He set the record for receiving yards in a s 'la.son in 2012 . not go to a Division I school; with 1264 total yards. where the exposure would be more accessible or the Before playing for the Seahaw ks, Matthews talent does not compare to worked at Foot Locker and flayed for the high tier programs. Although there are only minimal examples Winnipeg Blue Bombers in Cmada. Warner realizes the improbability, but of players coming from Division III football and Canadian Football League, they have knows his potential and the opportunity is there for the taking. become accomplished at the highest level. "N.G.U.N.N.G.U. is never give up, Pierre Gar~on came from perennial powerhouse in Division III football, Mount never never give up," Wap:i.~r said. "A Union. He is now the number one receiver slogan from Tumwater that was instilled in on the Washington Redskins. As mentioned me early on and an acronym I continue to before, Seattle Seahawks' Chris Matthews, embrace because it reminds.ne of where I who on the biggest stage recorded four came from and if I stick to it, I know I can catches for 109 yards and a touchdown. accomplish anything."


Pulling past the competition pg. 14

This patch of soil pg. 2

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

MAY1, 2015

' • ·- r-:•

-1

Garfield Book Co. is done with textbooks GENNY BOOTS News Writer _ Beginning fall term 2015, Garfield Book Co. will no longer be selling textbooks. The Pacific Lutheran University bookstore is stopping its in-house textbook distribution. However, the bookstore will still work as an intermediary for students with a new online partner, MBS Direct. Students will buy their textbooks through the Garfield-MBS service, but will no longer have in-store access to textbooks. Currently textbook program be wi sel

will be very similar to what is already in place. For faculty adoptions it will also be nearly the same process. However, with MBS Direct, students will see major changes in price. There will be new, used, rental and e-book options available and a buy-back program for all purchases. "I think that one of the greatest advantages that we are going to find for our students is that for a lot of the books that MBS offers, . they will offer a guarantee buyback price on it, which something that we can't guarantee in the store" said Garfield Store

more options and also to create some cost efficiencies for the university," Gibbs said. "Which ultimately ends up saving costs for students." The switch away from inhouse textbook sales is a response to the rapidly changing textbook market, which takes students out of physical stores and online where they can search to find the absolute lowest price. MBS Direct is an effort to bring students back to Garfield. After textbooks are ordered, they can be shipped to the store or private residence. Current returns will still students

summer on classes and for fall term. The next steps are to decide how to fill the space left by the shelves of textbooks. "We would be interested to know what students would like _to see. What sort of ·ces, products, experiences d students want," Gibbs "The obviously i, cost and th• alternatives mix comp will go said Director- of Communication Dor The online process for students

VOLUME 91 ISSUE 19

Lutes are all about campus when spring comes. The Jlowers are blooming, classes are going outside and students are studying on the lawn. Meanwhile, #PLUSpring is going booming.

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SS before going to the Health Center. Klingele said she blamed herself at the time because she was drunk and thought the Student senator Colby assault was her fault. Warwick Klingele has made it her goal to talked with her and explained change the conduct system for that she was assaulted and gave the better. her options for how to proceed. A...-9:er The Mast's last article Warwick also told Klingele that there was nobody named about an anonymous student's pofiltive experience with PLU's Sean in the Residence Hall she visited. system and legal action after "I went back [and] a sexual assault, Klingele, a junior, reached out to The "They got to see him, see his found his door and saw what his actual name was," Mooring Mast with a very tears and act like he was sorry. Klingele said. different type of story. Klingele said her I was just a voice on a phone, For Klingele, it was a experience going through wake up call. conduct in 2012 after an a name on a piece of paper." assault was traumatic and frustrating. Going Through Conduct Colby Klingele Since then, Klingele has Senior joined Associated Students of The only legal process that Pacific Lutheran University Klingele took was through and worked with groups on PLU' s conduct system. She campus to change the conduct his room. said she wishes she would've system and make it more fair However, she said she did taken actual legal action, but to victims of assault - like the remember when "things" started she decided not to for· a variety anonymous student's story in the to happen and she tried to resist. of reasons: she was still blaming last issue. "The next morning I was herself, she was moving back covered in bruises," Klingele home and studying abroad and said. "I went to the Health Center lawyers would not take her case. Colby's Story and it was all documented." · The conduct process did not Klingele went to the Women's Klingele attended her first CONTINUED ON college party on Sept. 22, 2012. Center to talk with Victim She was 22 at the time and was Advocate Jennifer Warwick PAGE3

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

drinking alcohol. While at the party, she met a man who claimed to be named Shawn. She left the party to go back to his residence hall room. Klingele said she remembers dancing together and talking to "Shawn." The next thing she remembers is talking to him, drunk, in his room. She said she did not remember how she got to

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THE MOORING MAST

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NATALIE DEFORD News Writer MCKENZIE SUMPTER Guest Writer With speakers, filmscreenings, performances and more, this year's Earth Day lasted a full week. April 18-25 was both Earth Week and Diversity Week at Pacific Lutheran University. According to the PLU website, the two, week-long events packed into one provided, "event_s emphasizing the connections between environmental and social issues," and also, "opportunities to think critically about the intersections of diversity, justice and sustainability." The week was kicked off Saturday April 18 with Habitat for Humanity's Habitat Restoration Work Party and ended with a Garden Work Party in the PLU Community Garden the following Saturday. The keynote speech was the Earth Day ·Lecture on Tuesday titled "This Patch of Soil: Race, Nature, and Stories of Future Belonging."

MAY!, 2015

h f soil: Earth and Diversity weeks unite

This year's lecturer was Carolyn Finney from the Universjty of California Berkeley, who spoke _to an audience of more than 200 students in the Scandinavian Cultural Center. Finney focused on the intersection of race and the environment and begged the question: "Who gets to speak to issues of sustainability?" Finney insisted upon the coexistence of social justice, science and creativity, saying that people should, "learn as much as we can and be creative with how we can do that." PLU sophomore Rhiannon Berg said she was especially inspired during an in-class questions and answers session with Finney earlier that day. Berg said Finney shared a lot about her work and challenges she has faced. "She was very eloquent but also conversational and fiery," Berg said. "She was very energetic about her topic and also very passionate. She was super cool in the way she talked about taking a stand at Berkeley and how she's taking charge with her life."

On - Wednesday, different PLU also held a screening of the perspectives were shared at film "Growing Cities" on Friday. Sounds of Solidarity. The The show was sponsored by the event invited students to come PLU Community Garden and and share their voices and the Grass Roots Environmental emotions through art and short Action Now (GREAN) club. "Earth Week is a really performances. "I love seeing students express great week of the year themselves through story telling · when a lot of different and poetry," sophomore Chris groups and programs on Boettcher said. "Earth and campus join together Diversity Week is needed because to put on awesome it encourages students to explore events centered on environment diversity, especially those who the don't regularly utilize on-campus and social justice," resources, as well as take part in said junior Jenna campus and community projects Harmon, CREAN to improve our environment and club Co-President. emphasize the importance of the Earth and Diversity week was made global community." Events on Thursday included possible through a faculty panel discussion of the hard work of students, environmentalism, sustainability many and climate change. Also on including Harmon, Thursday was an event called as well as many "Challenge Day & If You Really campus and community Knew Me .._." organizations. With this collaboration-filled Friday night featured a performance by a group called· week, much effort was put toward Dark Matter, who put on their "It drawing the connections between Gets Bitter" show in the Karen social justice and sustainability. Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

More than justclass topics are changing in 2015 GENNY BOOTS News Writer A new term brings new classes, and students at Pacific Lutheran University have plenty of new courses to choose from. Each year, departments offer the same type of courses and introduce brand new courses. These newly designed courses are not included in the course catalog or given wide attention. While on Banner, the online registration site for students, courses listed with an "ST" in the title or with a 287 or 387 course number indicate a course hasn't been offered before. This allows professors or departments a chance to test out a new class. For the fall, political science professor Kathryn Sil will teach a course titled "Marriage Equality in the Constitution" (listed under POLS 287). Within the Women's and Gender Studies department, professor Jennifer Smith will

While several individual with two parts over the course be offering a special topics class titled, "Intro Into Trans classes are fresh to PLU, of the year - allow students to Studies" (listed under WMGS this upcoming fall will also bond with each other and their 287), exairtlning the cultural and feature a pilot series of "linked teachers which helps students political difficulties around being courses."· These are classes that grow, DeLaRosby said. Students are sequential, so all students don't have to start over with a transgender. whole new process every These special topics semester, which helps courses are proposed by professors go right into faculty and often reflect their own interests and "I hope that students find the new teaching in spring. For the 2015focus, similar to many January term courses. classes interesting, fascinating 2016 academic year, the religion department is "Marriage equality in and to their benefit to try out." offering a linked course the law? When I was a series with professors college student 15 years and Crawford-O'Brien ago that wasn't being Llewellyn Ihssen. These discussed," said Director Director of Academic Advising two classes. satisfy PLU's of Academic Advising, global religion credit Hal DeLaRosby. "I and Christian religion mean there were people credit, but are geared interested in it, but it wasn't a wide conversation as it is signed up in a fall course will toward students in the pre-health, now. Why not have a topic that is automatically be signed up for nursing and social sciences a related course in J-Term or departments: Both courses offer of contemporary interest?" A "special topics" course can spring. This has been done in the religious perspectives of health, be offered up to three times under past with First-Year Experi~nce healing and wellness. In the fall, students can sign such label before it must be either Program Writing 101 classes and up for RELI 230 with Crawfordadmitted into that department's 190 Inquiry classes. Progression classes - or, classes O'Brien and are automatically curriculum or reconfigured.

HalDelaRosby

placed into the spring course with Llewellyn Ihssen. The concept of linked courses is continuing to be piloted at PLU, and is similar to cor ort classrooms used by the School of Education and the School of Nursing. For now, thes•! courses are experiments to increase learning opportunities for students. "I hope that students find that the new clasEes interesting, fascinating and to ·heir benefit to try out," DeLaRosl:y said. Although regi!:tration week has ended, AcadEmic Advising is still availablE to answer questions and shif: student class schedules at ad\ ising@plu.edu or by appointmer t in Ramstad Commons. Fall term begins September 8.


MAY 1 2015

THE MOORING MAST

NEWS 3

Editor's Note: After our last issue, a student on campus reached out to The Mooring Mast about wanting to share her story. This article is meant to show one student's efforts to change rape culture on campus and how she, through her own leadership and initiative, made a real change for sexual assault victims. The last issue's article nighlighted how helpful PLU can be to students in need, this one looks into how PLU's process became so helpful and the long road one student had to take to see a difference. The victim elected to not name her assailant in this story because if she did, she would be expelled from Pacific Lutheran University. The accused assailant was also not contacted by The Mooring Mast in an effort to minimize harm. -Samantha Lund

CONTINUED FROM PAGE1 live up to Klingele' s expectations. Her conduct hearing was very different than what students would experience today. Klingele and her assailant were ·in two separate rooms and she video called into that room so she could only see the conduct leaders and not her assailant. The call dropped many times and Klingele began to worry. "Colby would be giving her side of the story which was traumatic and the call would just go out," Warwick said. "It was very re-traumatizing." The students both gave their "sides" of the story and then they took a break and came back with questions. While Klingele was in a different room, her assailant was in the room with the conduct officers. "He got to meet them and I never did," Klingele said. "They got to see him, see his tears and act like he was sorry. I was just a voice on a phone, a name on a piece of paper." Klingele said she thinks that directly affected her hearing. However, her assailant was still found responsible. He was given a list of things he could and could not do and was put on disciplinary probation, meaning he could not be the lead of any student-led groups on campus or play in any varsity sports. He did anyway. "They actually asked me what did I expect if I was drinking and in his room," Klingele said. "I was just like, 'Am I on trial for something?"' Klingele said she was never comfortable and that the process did not seem to make a difference. "I was counting on PLU to take care of me," Klingele said. "It is on their [website] that they will protect students." After the Conduct Hearing

Once the hearing was over, Klingele thought her assailant would leave her alone. Instead, he would walk behind her to dinner,

corner her while she was getting her food and wait for her outside her residence hall. He would never say anything, Klingele said - but he would always be there. "I reported it and nothing was ever done," Klingele said. Her assailant ·would also point Klingele out in public to his friends, she said. After talking to groups at PLU about not feeling safe, Klingele was given a contract to sign. The contract split the campus in half, giving both parties parts of campus at certain times so they would never be in the same place at the same time. "I was made out to feel like 'you're the one causing a big deal · about this,"' Klingele said. "So I had to go out of my way and change my day." Klingele talked to Warwick about her experience and Warwick assured her that PLU could not restrict her to certain paths and that it was not fair. Klingele decided to speak out and take action. Klingele said she wanted to speak out on campus about what was happening to her. She wrote an anonymous letter to President Krise titled "Dear Mr. President" in The Matrix calling him to make changes. President Krise reached out to Klingele, and in September 2014 the two met to discuss what happened to her. "We talked for like three hours and I confronted him," Klingele said. "He took my list and started making changes on campus." The Changes She's Made

"This was not something that I sent her on her way to do," Warwick said. "It was really cool to see her go 'This is not right, I deserve better, this community deserves better and I'm going to do something about it.' That's true activism." Warwick gives Klingele credit for everything she's accomplished. Warwick said Klingele did r~search, had courage and made a difference on her own. The copduct pr9cess changed after Klingele' s confrontation with President Krise. Since she

spoke out, the Women's Center has become involved in training conduct officers for the first time. Officers who hold hearings about sexual assault are trained for two days by Women's Center staff and given mock trials to practice. Before, it was all done in an eighthour day. The new process also allows the victim to decide how he or she wants the heariTig to work They can be in a room with or without a curtain and the officers will be in front of them, they can take turns talking in the room, or the process can take place over several days interviewing the complainant and respondent individually. "It's a completely different process because I feel like if they could have seen me· in that room, they would have known what I was really going through," Klingele said. "I feel like that really affected the fairness." Klingele gives credit to Vice President of Student Life and Dean of Students Dr. Joanna Royce-Davis, who sat with her when she became an ASPLU senator and helped figure out how to make changes on campus. Klingele said Royce-Davis helped with the process and gave her all the information she wanted. "She told me that since my hearing, anyone who has committed assault has been expelled," Klingele said. "It was really nice to hear, but I was also like 'Why can't you make mine leave?' It didn't seem fair." Klingele also worked with Director of Student Involvement and Leadership Eva Johnson and the Resident Director of Harstad Hall Melissa Williams. "I was just talking to someone yesterday who was afraid to go in because she did not want to see [her assailant] and I told her it's changed and she doesn't have to," Klingele said. "I could see the tears [of relief] welling up in her eyes and it was really cool to see that." Klingele said there

Klingele and President Krise, supporting "It's On Us," a Gampaign raising awareness about ·sexual assault on college campuses nationwide. In 2015, PLU kicked off the "It's On Us" campai·~n across campus.

are many other changes coming for Warwick arid her work, as well as the conduct system that she can't share yet, but it means good things for victims. However, with all the work she's done, Klingele still struggles with her account. The assailant's name is not in this article because if she shares it, she will be expelled, no questions asked. She said it feels like he is being protected more than she is. "If someone commits sexual assault, there's a statistic that says they will do it at least six more times, on average," Klingele said. "That makes me ask why we are leaving this guy on campus. Like, why? Why? That just blows my mind; it's putting people at risk. "I was talking to Jennifer Warwick about what legacy I wanted to leave here, and we came up with: first, I wanted to have a group to carry my project on forward. And second was to have a more sound and secure hearing process for anyone who goes through conduct cases pertaining to sexual conduct. And third is more transparency from student conduct," Klingele said.

Working with ASPLU

Klingele presented Jter threeyear journey through th is process to ASPLU on Tuesday, April 20. She is putting a groui: together in ASPLU to carry on her work when she is gone. Klingele wants her role to be adopted by a group, to make the kiad easier and more manageable. Klingele will be staying in the area to help the group get started next year and help with anything they would need. '1 really put it on [ASPLU] saying 'You now know me, so you know someone who this directly affects."' Klingele said. She gave ASPLU senators and representatives a call bJ make a difference in campus rape culture. "I made it dear that if someone discloses their story to [<m ASPL U representative], you give them the resources and help them," Klingele said. If students want to get involved in Klingele s cause, they can contact her at girlwiththemagicpen@gmail.com.

)l Letter

to tfie <President Dear President Krise; I am wrimig to you as a concerned student who, despite attempts to have you hear this story, has been kept silent. What I have to say can no longer be taken lightly and. kept unsaid. I have decided to take a stand and break the silence about sexual assault on this campus. Statistically speaking, 35 women out of every 1,000 attending a university are sexually assaulted, (Fisher, B.S., Cullen, F.T., & Turner, M.G. (2000). The Sex'lllll Victimization of College Women. National Institute ofJustice, Bureau of Justice Statistics.). PLU currently has approximately 2, 140 female students. If you apply the previously stated statistic, approximately 75 women have been sexually assaulted while attending PLU each year. Before I begin, I want to hear your voice. Do you think that this campus-YOUR campus, MY campus-is exempt from the national statistics? Do you believe that this school should be keeping sexual assault "hush-hush"? What is your . stance on defending the victim? What would YOU do, Mr. President, if it was YOUR son or daughter who was a victim? lf it was up to you, Mr. President, what would your response be to the attacker? If it was up to you, would the attacker be protected or would there be more serious consequences to their detrimental choices? What ifl told you that many staff and students on this campus are living in a pervasive "rape culture," that through the silence of the campus leaders, is being supported and inadvertently taught to predators and their vlctims? \\'hat if! told you that I was sexually assaulted

this past fall and have been told toke 'P this "issue"' "hush-hush"? \Vhat ifI told )' ou that very few people under your administratior have truly shown any empathy or support form:' case? What this school has put me through .sn't right Every day is a reminder of how I am ;een as "responsible" for my assault, not just by the person who believed that my "no" mean "yes," but by the system that is supposedly then. to support me. Every day is a reminder of how t nsafe I feei on this campus. Every day is a remin• !er of how this school's conduct system has let Ille down. During my hearing I was atta< ked with questions that were accusatory, sham_ ng~ and flar out disrespectful. Isn't it supposed to be the OTHER way around? Shouldn't my' ttacker be the one being faced with these qut stions? Shouldn't it be my attacker who has to defend themselves, rather than me, the victim?! shouldn't be faced with questions that left me £:cling responsible for my assault I shouldn't ie left foeling that I was the '"stupid" one for "fr !ling" for a manipulator who, intentionally and rr ethodically, took advantag<;:c of my vulnerable stat :-of-mind. I definitely shouldn't be left foeling un ;afe on this campus that claims to support its stuc ents. The iro11y is that this ii>t1e of The Matrix is about '~breaking the silence," yet l un writing in fear and anonymity and T'm still bi ·ing silenced through writing this. I am not ''allow• ·d" to talk about it for fear of slander, of the wn ng perso:l hearing~ of retaliation, and many oth1: r reasons. 1

have a voice~a voice that wants to s ;ream froIY1 the tower of Eastvold what is happen .ng on this campus, bu:t the many ··punishments' for "'outing'' my attacker by speaking about my at :ack stops me-so now I share only "With the fo v who do

The first page of Klingele's letter to President Krise reaching out to hi TI about her issues with the process. Find the whole letter at mastmedia.plu.e::lu.


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS4

TECIDE Stuff SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Your new wingman is coming. Set to release in early May, Wingman is a new app that tracks users Estimated Bfood Alcohol Content (EBAC) and actively warns against drunk driving. Users just plug in their body weight, height, sex and age then plug in drinks as you go and Wingman gives an estimate of your current BAC. The user-friendly interface reminds you of when you've had too much to drink and can sit on an iPhone's "Today View" for easy access.

APRIL 17, 2015

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About the Baltimore Riots Gray ran from police and was arrested, the injuries he received while fighting back killed him shortly after. Protesters were out since Gray's death, and a federal investigation was underway. It was not until his funeral that protesters got violent.

Wingman was designed by Teku Industries in Seattle, Wash. The goal of the app is to help college students keep track of the amount of alcohol they've had. Wingman works on iPhone, Apple Watch and Pebble Smart Watches, sorry Android users. The application will only be available on the App Store priced in the U.S. at $1.99 with a onemonth launch price of $.99. The appwillmake ahuge benefit in preventing drunk driving and students over-consuming alcohol, Sam Hayward, head of marketing said. Wingman is also looking to partner with Mothers Against Drunk Driving in the future.

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Campus Safety workers saw a student consume alcohol and dispose of the container over surveillance footage. The stuaent was contacted and denied having alcohol. Pierce County Sheriff's Department arrived on scene and the student became compliant. The incident has been forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Oruq Policy Violation in Harstad

Campus Safety received a call from custodial staff on Monday, 20. Staff informed CSAF of a strong smell o marijuana coming from the North wing of Harstad's third floor. A student-led 1-----search of the room was conducted in the presence of the Resident Director. CSAF found empty and partially full liquor containers and a pipe, as well as a baggie of marijuana. The alcohol, pipe and drugs were disposed of by CSAF and the incident was forwarded to StudentRights and Responsibilities.

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Concern for People or Propertv in T!nglestad

Campus Safety received a call from a student who was stuck in an elevator in Tinglestad. The student found a way out of the elevator before Central Pierce Fire and Rescue could arrive. CSAF and the engineer responded to the scene and the engineer repaired the elevator. No further action was taken.

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Guest Writer A small audience of former leaders and past participants watched as Outdoor Recreation reeled out the highlights of its annual film and photo contest April 16 in The Cave. The hosts of the event, senior Doug Smith, sophomore Reza Refaei and juniors Sonja Schaefer and Jonner Griffin, made the atmosphere fun and relaxed as they commented on the submitted photos and videos. They even made up games to enterta1.â&#x20AC;˘ the audience during technical disruptions. Schaefer, an Outdoor Rec trip leader, said she liked hosting because she can "try to be funny" while laughing at herself. The photos and videos ranged from stunning scenic landscapes to funny inside jokes. It was almost like experiencing an Outdoor Rec trip. Senior Savannah Phelan, one of Outdoor Rec' s personnel directors, likes the community that forms during Outdoor

Rec trips. "[These trips] bring people together," Phelan said. "I actually only knew one or two people on the trip and by the end of it I knew all 14 of them," senior Andrew Leung said. Leung won the photo contest with his photo from the Outdoor Rec spring break trip to Utah (above). Leung said he does not take photos professionally and that all of his submitted photos were taken on his iPhone. Phelan said she's also an amateur. "Luckily we have beautiful places to look at, so that helps," Phelan said. Senior Kristin Hayes, an Outdoor Rec trip leader, won the film contest. Her film was a compilation of memories from her time with PLU's ultimate frisbee team "Reign." Hayes has played for Reign since her first year and "wanted to make a special video to remember all of our time together." Hayes was at the event with many of her teammates, and the video was met with laughter and awws alike.

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to that you would make at homE,. Doing your own cooking while abroad can be Guest Writer healthier and cheaper. Being aware of set table manners in Whether you will study away next the culture you are visiting is also very term or have some extended travel time after graduation, make sure you prepare important. "How you eat can have a lot to do with for "Food Culture Shock." how you get along with others," Hallman In a presentation Monday evening, said. "In Japan, you keep your napkin or junior Maylen Anthony and visiting towel on the table, and its impolitE to have professor of anthropology Heather your hands below the table, and its true in Hallman talked about other cultures too." what to expect and what Alcohol consumption to plan for when it comes is also something to to food in other cultures. consider. In Japan, for ~ "Food is just as much example, sake is drunk of a 'must do' as the at the beginning of both tourist sites of the city formal and informal you're in," Anthony events or functions, and said. "It can be an easy after sake, gm,sts can way to connect with the move onto beer. locals." Unlike in the United and Fast food States and the United American "comfort Kingdom, drinking food" can be found alcohol alone and in some restaurants drinking alcohol with but most abroad, the absence of food is establishments have a upon n many frowned PHOTO BY EDDIE J. MCCOVEN very limited menu, and one that will often reflect Anthropology professor Heather cultures. Alcchol is the generations of meal Hallman spoke about the importance often treated as a social traditions of that culture, of food culture while abroad. "How beverage to g J along eat can have a lot to do with how with dinner, o: at the including some choices you you get along with others," she said. very least, appe1izers. we might find strange or If you're a picky bizarre. eater, or have dietarv "Some foods we find restrictions, mal:e sure t~ taboo," Hallman said. "Animals that hold special significance for us are important to pack something to take with you because you may not have access to certain foods others as a food source." Popular "taboo" dishes include dog and abroad. Make sure to research ¡he food snake in China, raw horse in Japan, and choices and options of the culture you will fried guinea pigs in some Latin American be immersing yourself in. If you are staying with a hos: family, countries. While being "adventurous" when it comes to food choices isn't they can be a great resource on wr at to try, everyone's cup of tea, you can visit a local where you can eat out, and where you can grocery store and find food choices similar buy your own food to prepare.

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搂 if Junior August Mendoza, sophomore Amanda Walls, junior Alyssa Workman and sophomore Cara Gillespie .were members of the winning team "Loyal Opposition."

DAVID MAIR Staff Writer It was a cold, rainy night outside, but inside, it was nothing but bright lights and dressed-up filmmakers. Students in Religion 211 this year put on a faith-filled film festival. The "Hebrew Idol Live Finale" took place 6 p.m. April 16 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center. "Loyal Opposition," "To Save a Hawk," and "The Heisenberg Principle" were the three films competing. The first film involves female e.mpowerment, friendship,

business and deception. "To Save a Hawk'' was a tale of a daughter introducing her boyfriend to her parents, wanting him to change to impress them. The third was loosely based on the AMC show, ''Breaking Bad." The red carpet began at 6:50 p.m. Senior Asia Wolfe played host (a la Ryan Seacrest) as the student filmmakers strutted down the red carpet. After everyone took their seats, each film was shown. Then, each filmmaking team came onstage and was questioned by the judges on their process of making it. Judges asked the teams how

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they were able to form biblical connections within their film to the passage they were assigned. During the judge's deliberation, PLUtonic came out for a surprise performance. Songs performed included "Apple Bottoms Jeans" and "How Great Thou Art." The four female filmmakers of "Loyal Opposition" wore bright smiles that complemented their stunning gowns as they were adorned with crowns and sashes for winning. Hebrew Idol has happened annually since its debut in the 2007-2008 academic year. The man behind the event is Antonios Finitisis, religion department professor and chair. He teaches all Religion 211 sections. According to the PLU Course Catalog, students enrolled in Religion 211 study "the literary, and theological historical, dimensions of the Hebrew Bible, including perspectives on contemporary issues." The final project of the semester is to create a film based on a Bible passage. The top films from each _211 class are apart of the Hebrew Idol Finale. To see additional photos from the event, visit the Hebrew Idol Facebook page www.facebook. com/antonios.idol.

DAVID Staff Writer An English class of three students put on a poetry reading to celebrate National Poetry Month. Poetry Writing 427 hosted a poetry reading in the fireside room of Garfield Book Co. on April22. English professor Enrique Barot teaches the class. He did not want to comment on the event because he felt the success of his students spoke for itself. The class consists of two seniors finishing their capstones, Phyllis Holland and Jakob Maier, along with sophomore Cara Kneeland. "The hardest part about the event was picking your favorite poet to read," Kneeland said. In preparation for the reading and the month, the three students requested their favorite poetry books to be in stock at Garfield Book Co. The store was stocked路 with the students' favorite books in addition to marking all poetry books 20 percent off. Some books that were available included "Love That Dog" by Sharon Creech, "Kim Kardashian' s Marriage" by Sam Riviere, and the "Collected

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Poems of Langston Hughes." The fireside roe m was filled with about 20 p(~ople, 15 of whicl1 read poems. "It turned out great - more people came than 't looked like at the beginning," Holland said. Poetry read ranged from established poets, like Carol Anne Duffy and Nikki Giovanni, to original pieces. People enjoyed cookies and juice provide by Garfield Book Co. while listening to poetry. The audience c:mld also be heard snapping e;ccitedly after each poet, a custo nary sign of appreciation for po,~ts. While professor Barot left the credit with his students, he did want it to be emphasized "poetry classes ai:e wonderful courses available for students to take." National Poetry Month has been a national mi1nth since its inauguration in J996 by the Academy of Ameri;an Poets. If interested in punuing poetry at Pacific Luthera;i University, contact the English department at engl@plu.edu.

Event photos available online: http://mastmedia.plu.edu

usic professors jazz u Tacc>m

1111

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PHOTO BY EC DIE J. MCCOVEN

David Deacon-Joyner (Piano, Professor of Jazz Studies) and Paul Evans (Tuba, Bras:; Instructor) were part of a special ensemble with band leader Keith Henson and singer Dennis Hastings for a standing room only performance at B Sharp Coffee House on April 23 in downtown Tacoma. Accompanied by the band, Hastings sang popular jazz standards that were recorded b~, famed jazz singer Mel Torme, including "Puttin' On The Ritz," "Nice Work If You Can Get It" and "W iatever Lola Wants." - EDDIE J. MCCOVEN

This week Samantha Lurid~s Q&A with PLUza actTHE>

FAME RIOT..

Watch Thursday's show online: -http://masfrnedia.plu~edu/

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MAY 1, 2015

A&E 7

THE MOORING MAST

JEFF DUNN Copy Editor

SWEET LEMONADE Lemonade at the fair was by far the most obvious rip-off. It was available in two sizes, "Large" ($4 per cup) and "Jumbo" {$5 per cup). What you ~1et is some Crystal Lite wi·th a generous helping of sugar mixed in. The real appeal of the lemonade stands was that there were so many of them dispersed throughout the grounds, and if you paid an extra dollar on top of the "Jumbo" pricE:, your cup was refillable at every station.

They say that certain senses are stronger than others when it comes to memory. The fair will always be something I remember with taste. Fair food will always hold a special place in my heart, and I'm not sure why. It's not the most appealing. thing, ·especially since it's mostly overpriced, grease-covered fried food that is certainly not filling. Calling it "food" is a stretch. A more appropriate term would be "palate attraction," since eating it is a similar experience to riding a roller coaster or bumper cars. The Washington State Spring Fair was by no means short on palate attractions when I attended April 18. I picked out my favorites from the myriad of fair food I consumed that day. When everything' s said and done, the food at the fair won't satisfy you. You'll end up spending way too much on way too little. But, I believe that eating fair food is about the experience. It's a part of American culture to overindulge to the point where you endanger your digestive tract. Besides, it beats paying for the rides.

FUNNEL CAKE After a long day of waiting in lines for food, all I wanted was a funnel cake. It's the essential fair food in my mind, and it's hard to mess it up. I purchased a 1unnel cake for an outrag·~ous $9 after tax, and it came with powdered su~1ar, a scoop of strawberries and a dollop of whip cream. This was the fair fc od I remembered. Sw,,et dough mixed with honey and fried in a pan -- you can't go wrong. Tre whole thing was gone in less than two minL tes, and I wouldn't hav" it any other way.

CORN DOG PUPS Purchased from the "Two-fer" for $3.49 for two bags of approximately 6 pups each. Corn Dog Pups are chicken-nugget sized bites of a corn dog, and they weren't bad. They taste just like com dogs, and after I got a cup of ketchup to dip them in, they got my seal of approval. They really would have been improved with some barbecue sauce or campfire s_auce.

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ERIN FLOM Guest Writer The University Chorale performed its homecoming corn:ert on April 21 after returning from itS five day tour in Oregon and Washington. The choir performed at Lutheran churches and various high schools. The tour was a way to "connect and network with other [Pacific Lutheran University] alumni and also to recruit and inspire high school students to come to PLU and to continue music," said chorale conductor and. visiting professor Lauren Whitham. The choir performed 12 times in five days. But they did have some downtime.

"We had about an hour and a half-ish to look at the Oregon capital building and explore the Willamette University campus, and then we had about an hour in downtown Portland/' sophomore Hannah Rausch said, "but other than that we were singing, eating, or on the bus." Sophomore Katie Beck's favorite performance was at Sprague High School· in Salem, Ore. The chorale performed its song "Jabberwocky." "It's really crazy and we scream and [play] instruments," Beck explained. "Up until that point! think people . don't really know how to react to that song," Beck said, "but the kids at that school were all laughing and enjoying it, so it was really nice to get that kind of reaction and see that we are doing it well."

The Chorale's performance at Sprague was Rausch' s favorite as well.· Whitham enjoyed the tour's final dinner at Olive Garden. "At that event we recognized all the people that had helped this year," Whitham said. One of the people recognized was Shirley Garrison, PLU's tour director. Garrison is retiring this year and Whitham used the dinner as a retirement party for her. The choir had 18 pieces in its program, all of which had to be memorized for the tour. "How our program worked - it was basically a story of life,'' Rausch said. The program was divided into five sections: songs .of creation, childhood, love, strife and peace. The tour ended with a homecoming concert in Lagerquist. Whitham dedicated the fir).al concert to her friend Brian Bradshaw who died while serving in Afghanistan in 2009. Whitham and Bradshaw became friends in high school, and grew closer at PLU. They graduated in 2007. Whitham knew this was the perfect concert "that could celebrate the life of my friend Brian, but also tell a story that was relatable to every singer and every audience member, so that it wasn't specifically about one person." "It was a really wonderful emotional journey to go on," Rausch said.

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Ringdahl worked for PLU for 50 years and shaped the archives and the current system.


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Ringdahl's PLU ID Card from Fall 1966. It didn't have swipe access.

nl. spoke about her 50 years eran University at her retirement Scandivian Cultural Center April an as a library secretary and is archivist, curator and respected

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10 OPINION

THE MOORING MAST

I

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RELAND TUOMI Editor -in-Chief

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The Mast has a tradition of the graduating seniors writing good-bye letters to the school, and it is a bittersweet feeling for me now that it is my tum. My time at The Mast began as a News Writer. When the paper needed a Copy Editor, I eagerly accepted the offer the then Editor-inChief, Jessica Trondsen, gave me. Jessica quickly became my friend and mentor, both of us going out with the current General Manager of Mast TV, Allie Reynolds, to get nachos and dirty Shirleys at Farrelli' s. I became the News Editor in Spring of 2014, and am now the Editor-in-Chief. \'\Then Jessica was EIC, I knew we had an excellent captain at the helm. When I was named EIC right before summer vacation, I felt like a lowly news writer pretending to be the boss; I was worried I'd run the paper into the. ground; the stories would be uninteresting and

MAY 1, 2015

11111

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basically no one would care about The Mooring Mast. The administration heads at Student Involvement and Leadership were changing the pay structure, too, which made me worried about hiring, making me more nervous about the coming year. It also created a bitter taste in my mouth whenever I had to interact with administration, and I was worried I would have to butt heads with them throughout the year. It turns out, I didn't need to worry. Well, not too much at least. I was blessed enough to have the most stellar, hard-working and overall excellent editors this year. Whenever a challenge arose, be it a controversial story or sudden halt in production from the administration, the editors of The Mooring Mast were ready to help with solutions and support. I owe them my thanks and more, they are under-appreciated and overworked, a combmation where only the strong survive, which this ed-board certainly did. Some of the problems that surfaced during the year路 at The Mast were internal, but some were brought in from the outside, mostly the administration. Much like many outlets on campus

THE MOORING MAST

experiencing PLU's budget crisis, The Mast had become short on funds. We tried to keep ourselves afloat with ad sales, but those had been lower than projected. As a result, it was a very likely this final issue wouldn't be printed. The Mast editors got together to evaluate plans in order t9 ensure the paper could print its final issue. It was the editors who decided how to save money, how to sell ads and how to ensure this publication that they love so much would be prin,J:ed. Some were willing to donate their paychecks to get it printed because they were so dedicated to having a final issue. As EiC, I learned that I am not solely responsible for The Mooring Mast, that I am not the only leader in this group of people. I am one of many, a team at the helm rather than one person on her own. I couldn't have gone through this year without my team, especially during times of crisis brought on by outside forces. I may not miss PLU when I walk across the graduation stage, but I will miss AUC 172 and all those who made The Mast possible this year. Thank you.

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

-Chloe Choi mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Austin Hilliker COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Jeff Dunn ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds

se ester of sales: seniors mmary m

CHLOE CHOI Business & Ads Manager

---

Student edia senior send off While holding the position of Multimedia Editor for Mast TV, I got to work with many talented students and colleagues. Through helping others learn about multimedia I was able to broaden my own multimedia skill set. The Mast has been more than just a place for students to learn about media, it has become a second home where work is mixed with fun. My colleagues at The Mast are some of the most talented, innovative, and driven people I have known. Over the last year I have learned a lot, laughed a lot and helped students create a lot of great media content. In the coming years, I will look back on PLU and miss my time with The Mast. I hope that my work at The Mast will leave a lasting mark on PLU' s student media. In the coming years, I plan to use the knowledge and experiences I have gained from The Mast to create music videos and do PR for. my musical project "Tutellus." Working at The Mast has been a fantastic experience.

Leaving a mar on When I first decided to join the MastMedia crew almost two years ago, I expected to learn journalism and leadership skills, but I also learned something more valuable: teamwork. Working at Mast TV and The Mooring Mast has taught me that no matter how dire the circumstances, you can make the most of it if you have the best people by your side. As some of you may know, Student Media went through some big changes this year. We're no longer paid by

Campbell Brett NEWS@ NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art land

CAMPBELL BRETT Multimedia Editor

Thank you to The Mast staff for supporting and helping me these past few months. The experience has been eye opening, learning about the paper and all the work that goes into creating it. The Business & Ads manager is a unique position, but I have been pleased to realize it is not completely detached either from the other sections. I am grateful for this opportunity and I am happy to have had the freedom to organize and collaborate with others, while maintaining structure. Working with The Mast gave me the flexibility to learn more about my job, but also experience the other side through journalism. I have enjoyed the opportunity to develop skills, but also to get to know other professionals who are the main voice on campus. I am aiming to go into government and/or nonprofit accounting for my career aspirations. I would someday like to have an apartment with my own library and live in an area that actually gets snow once in a while. It has been a great semester and I will miss the quirkiness!

ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

stipends and took a big cut in our own individual outlet budgets. You would think that these circumstances would 路 hinder us this year, that because we were being paid less, we wouldn't be as motivated or willing to work But, we proved ourselves and the community wrong this year. Sure, we weren't happy about the situation, but when you work with as great of a group of people as I do, you're excited to go to work The MastMedia team is one of the most hard-working, dedicated groups of people cin this campus, and that's because we like what we're doing. I've never met a staff with so much drive, dedication and passion for journalism as the people I'm lucky to call my friends on the MastMedia staff. Next year, you're going to have such a dedicated, passionate team of journalists determined to bring you news and quality entertainment from all corners of campus. I encourage anyone interested in journalism, storytelling

st and making a dang good group of friends to get on board as soon as you can. While I'm sad to be. graduating and leaving Mast TV, The Mooring Mast and my underclassmen friends on the team, I know we're leaving MastMedia in good hands. The Pacific Lutheran University community will have more stories, more entertainment and more content from MastMedia than they will be able to keep up with, because that's what they love doing. Student media has been such a huge part of my life the past two years that it will definitely be a little strange to not sit in on The Mooring Mast production night and attend an episode of News @ Nine every Thursday, but I know for a fact I'm leaving MastMedia with the best people possible. You've got this team! I'm so proud of all the work you've done and know 111 be cheering you on from California.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The MooriT g Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important is~ ues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO ofJournalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not neces ;arily represent those of The Mooring Mao t staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should b ~ fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday befon publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and t rrors. faclude name, phone number and class st anding or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edo1 for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per senester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Follow e Mooring

ast Twi @

LU


MAY 1, 2015

THE MOORING MAST m

s

I

AUSTIN HILLIKER Sports Editor In just one semester at The Mooring Mast I learned more than I ever thought I would.

I learned how to cover captivating stories, collaborate with my fellow editors and even interview athletes that had life-altering stories.

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I first came to Pacific Lutheran University wanting to be an exercise science major. ·That worked out well. Now a senior and rushing to get my Communication capstone done, I look back at what I learned from The Mast and I'm forever thankful. I came to The Mooring Mast later than most. Last February, I took on the duty of Sports Editor. At first it was a handful, learning new journalism techniques via sodal media, writing and interviewing people.

OPJ:NION 11

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Now that the year is near the end, it's still a handful, but I love it. And I don't use that word lightly. The relationships that I have forged, the people I have talked to and the advisers that have knocked me down five times, but picked me up six, have helped me become not only a better writer and reporter, but also a better person. There is nothing else to say but thank you. . Thank you to the readers, thank you to my co-workers, thank you to my critics and everyone else in betWeen.

"What I have learned here forever change my life."

likel I What I have learned here will forever change my life. I can't wait to step into the world of journalism and show off my skill> that tl.-ris paper has given me. It's time to step into mom and iad' s real world and make something special out of my life. Because I worked for Th~ Mooring Mast, I11 be able to do something more than special. 111 be able to do something exceptional and beyond. Until then, I wish the best for :he future years of this paper. I can't wait tc see what happens next.

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ASHLEY Gill Opinion Editor I am not a communication major, I do not have plans to go into journalism, but The Mooring Mast has been my outlet for expression and creativity for the last three years. .During high school, I wrote for the newspaper and became an editor. It was something" that I tried because I love to write, and I soon learned I love to report. The first year I came to Pacific Lutheran University, I immediately got involved with The Mast and started to guest write and it was one of the best decisions of my

college career. I have had the privilege to be a member of The Mast family and continue my passion for journalism before I am no longer able to do so after graduation. Throughout the last three years, I have grown from a ·writer and video reporter to the Opinion Editor. I have seen many changes in staff, leadership, organization and layout of the paper. I have bonded with many staff members who I still keep in touch with and will continue to keep in touch with in the coming years. I will forever take the stories, memories, late nights and friendships with me into the next chapter of my life. I am so grateful for what The Mooring Mast has done for me as a student and appreciate Student Media as an outlet at PLU. Thank you to The Mooring Mast, past and present staff, and the readers that support us.

Pacific Lutheran University doesn't have a Greek row, but that isn't a bad thing. Some students would say that PLU should implement a Greek system because of the widely-known benefits sororities and fraternities may bring to the campus. However, Greek systems need to be analyzed from a more critical perspective. Let's start with what we know. Greek systems often do plenty of good within their communities, such as charity work and community engagement. Members are granted a sense of pride along with a lifelong brotherhood or sisterhood. However, Greek systems also

its: Copy Editor sc:~ys goodbye

By BRITTANY JACKSON Copy Editor As my time at PLU comes to an end, I can't help but reflect on my college and experience the good times I've had. Though I have only been a member of The Mast for less than a year, it has been one of my favorite experiences at PLU. I initially got involved with The Mast because I knew it would complement my studies in the communication department and. would be a beneficial step in pursuing my future career in the publishing

industry. During this past year, I have definitely grown in more ways than just one. Each week, I get to. collaborate with =i. talented group of students and that experience has made me a better editor. While my editing skills have ncreased, the relationships and trust that I formed with my co-workers has been th~ best part of my experience at The Mast. We hold each other to high standards and depend on each other to help answer difficult questions. It's exciting and challenging and the end result of all our hard work is an amazing issue cf The Mast every Friday. · I'm thankful for the group cf people I get to work with and call my friends and my time at The Mast. ·

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n SHELONDRA HARRIS AND AUSTIN MILLER Guest Writers

·Last

promote elitist views. Many of us have heard about Oklahoma University's Sigma Alpha Epsilon's racist video. The video displayed the fraternity singing racist chants· against the membership of ·Black students. Although extrem.e racism ·is present in this case, it doesn't prove that all Greek systems are racist. Yet this situation shines light on the institutionalized problems that are deeply embedded in Greek systems. Greek systems are exclusive to one type of student. Most sororities or fraternities are predominantly one

race. "I think [Greek systems] are a "Being in a sorority or fraternity waste of money. There are oth~r and is a privileged thing," junior Kindra better ways to build community," Galan said. "There are either all sophomore Bruno Correa said. PLU strives for an i.n.dusive white sororities or all minority. There really isn't community. Students don't h:i.ve to any in- worry about what the top house on between." campus is or being rejected b·~cause T o of superficial factors. go Greek Having a Greek system tends o f t e n to exclude non-affiliated students, means whether this is by race, sociopaying economic class or other identitles. high fees. Without a Greek row, students On top can still have most of the b ::nefits of paying that a Greek system offers, such tuition, as networking and comnunity a lot of outreach. PLU is able to achieve a mrne allstudents encompassing campus with.Jut a cannot afford to pay these expenses. Students from low socioeconomic Greek row. backgrourids . are automatically dismissed from membership.

"Most sororities or fraternities are predominantly one race."

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.12 OPINION

THE MOORING MAST

MAY 1, 2015

Letter t the Editor: Sexual ANGIE TINKER Matrix Editor Sexual assault is a taboo topic in society, and is often used to shame victims into silence. This silence only makes it harder for victims to seek justice and safety, and tragically gives abusers the feeling they can't get caught. The narrative about the personal journey of a Lute who went through this trauma, and how easy it was for her to attain the means of safety through Pacific Lutheran University and the legal system, is admirable. The story is }lard to share, but it's an empowering one. There's more room for empowerment,

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though. PLU has given us the tools not just campus event, I remember having to help to respond after-the-fact to these situations, a friend to prevent a stranger from taking advantage of but to prevent them from my friend's happening in the first place. "PLU has given us the tools inebriated roommate. One of these tools was not just to respond afterAt first, it the Green Dot program, involved which was a mandatory the-fact to these situations, watching part of my orientation them make experience. Skills such but to prevent them from as the three D's: direct out on a dirty intervention to stop a happening in the first place" carpet while we tried to situation, delegating figure out someone else to safely deal with the situation, and distracting the what to do. Before long, though, we were abuser away from the situation, can stop able to distract the stranger and get our friend out of the situation. tragic situations from happening. Other programs on c~pus, such as the They can be awkward. At one off-

Sexual Assault and Prevention Education Taskforce (SAPET) work hand-in-hand with Green Dot. SAPET has reinforced in me that consent has to be enthusiastic and that consent for one form of sex doesn't equal consent for all sexual activities. It was amazing to learn how resourceful PLU is for people who, unfortunately, have suffered traumatic situations. Combined with the resources PLU usef; to prevent assault from ever happening, I know that our university is serious ab:mt keeping students safe and healthy. It makes me proud to be a Lute.

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13 SJPORTS

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Baseball

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WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

Whitworth

31

12

21-7

16-8

George Fox

31

13

19-9

13

16-8

Pacific

29

15

19-9

18

19

13-11

Unfield

31

12

17-11

George Fox

17

23

13-11

Pacific Lutheran

23

17

16-1:Z

Pacific

19

18

12-12

Willamette

16

22

13-15

Willamette

20

16

10-14

Lewis & Clark

9

30

6-2~'.

Lewis & Clark

8

32

5-19

Puget Sound

4

36

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Whitman

6

28

5-19

WINS

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Pacific Lutheran

28

11

18-6

Linfield

28

12

Whitworth

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Puget Sound

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21

5

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15

6

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Lewis & Clark

WINS

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Whitman

17

5

12-0

10-2

Lewis & Clark

17

4

11--1

8

9-3

Linfield

14

6

9-3

8

9

7-5

Whitworth

9

9

8-4

Whitworth

6

11

6-6

George Fox

10

9

6-6

Pacific Lutheran

5

13

5-7

Pacific Lutheran

7

9

3-Si

Willamette

4

14

4-8

Pacific

6

10

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Linfield

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15

1-11

Puget Sound

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Puget Sound

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+46

622

618

Whitman

2

+77

653

+45

621

Whitworth

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+81

657

4

+48

624

Pacific Lutheran

4

+82

658

Pacific Lutheran

5

+53

629

Lewis & Clark

5

+99

675

Whitman

6

+69

645

Linfield

6

+178

754

Puget Sound

7

+72

648

Willamette

7

+204

780

Pacific

8

+99

675

Pacific

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+281

857

Lewis & Clark

9

+169

745

Puget Sound

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MAY I. 2015

THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

's Trac & Field

men's Trac

NWC Championships

NWC Championships

PLACE

SCORE

Whitworth

1

234

George Fox

2

127.50

Willamette

3

Pacific

TEAM

PLACE

SCORE

Whitworth

1

218.33

George Fox

2

191

96

Willamette

3

159

4

93

Linfield.

4

83.33

Puget Sound

5

86.50

Pacific Lutheran

5

62.83

Pacific Lutheran

6

67

6

60.50

Linfield

7

61

Lewis & Clark

7

23

Lewis & Clark

8

54

Pacific

8

20

TEAM

-Puget Sound

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Rowing

tn

Western Intercollegiate Rowing Association Championships

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TEAM

PLACE

TIME

UC Davis

1

7:30.8

Pacific Lutheran

2

7:32.8

Long Beach State

3

7:35.9

Lewis & Clark

4

7:36.9

Univ. _of Oregon

5

7:38.4

UC Irvine

6

7:40.0

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The true spotlight Austin Hilliker Sports Editor After an entire semester of dishing out highlights, critiques and my thoughts on what it takes to be the best Lute fan, I have come to the realization that the

highlight for fuis week is a little different. I believe that this week the highlight should focus on my fellow writers and the pieces that they spent so much time on. This is the last paper that I will be a part of for The Mooring Mast and feel that

the attention shotld be put on Mielle, David, Steven and Stephanie. So sit back, relax and have fun soaking in every aspect of their Wiiting. It's been a pleasure to serve you as Sp01ts Editor. Thank you so nuch.

Pulling past the competiti Mielle Hubbard Guest Writer This year the women's rowing team has made some big changes with the introduction of Andrew Foltz as head coach, new oar designs and a new way to raise money. "[Foltz] has pushed our team to set higher goals for ourselves, and the brand new training regiment he has set us on has made those goals realistically reachable," said senior Hallie Peterson. The team is using crowdfunding. This is a way of fundraising by creating a website and asking people across the internet to support a project through donation to buy new equipment. They have used USEED, a website that supports colleges raising money for its various programs' needs. "[Our campaign], along with the NicarAGUA project, is paving the way for programs and groups at PLU to raise money through an incredibly easy way to share an idea or a goal that needs financial support," Foltz said. "I feel like we are incredibly lucky to have gotten this opportunity."

The rowing team hnpes to raise enough money to buy :i. new set of oars. "It's so exciting that· Ne get to promote our new prog:·am through crowdfunding and Educate our family and friends abnut who we are and what we do," sophomore Ticia Hackney said. On the water, thesE ladies have put in more than two hnurs a day to prepare for their regattas. On April 11, the two boats won all four of its races, and on April 19 the team traveled to Vancouver, Wash., and placed third in the l\ orthwestern Conference Championship. "We've been taking it up a level this year, and it has really shovm in our recent races," seru or Savainnah Schneider said. They just returned from Sacramento, Calif., whe ce they raced against schools from California, Oregon and Arizona in the Western Intercollegiate Rowing Association regatta, and are novr preparing to race at the Meyer Lamberth competition on May 2. With their sights sett) compete at the national level after this weekend, the women's team is reaching its goals, one stroke at a time.

The women's team practices its sprints leading up to conference championships to ,,nsure a win in the last few minutes of its race April 26.


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15 SPORTS

THE MOORING MAST

MAY 1, 2015

Coaches p·itch their erspectives o David Mair Staff Writer The people most often overlooked in sports are the coaches. What becomes most . highlighted and recognized are the faces of the athletes out on the field. But athletes can never reach

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

Jennifer Childress has been the women's head basketball coach since April 2013.

their success without having something, or someone to compare it to. For instance. Phil Jackson, a National Basketball Association coach, earned 11 titles with the Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers. Sparky Anderson, a Major League Baseball coach, won two World Series with the Cincinnati Reds and one with the Detroit Tigers (the first MLB coach to win a title in both the National League and American League). It's the leadership and management froin coaches that help shape the greatness of the players themselves. These excellent coaches can be found everywhere, especially at the Division Ill level. Last week in The Mooring Mast, senior Sports Editor Austin Hilliker wrote about the significance of Division Ill sports from his lens as a Division Ill football player. "Luckily, Division Ill can fill any such void [of playing sports for athletes]. With a strong emphasis

on academics and an equally as strong passion for athletics, Division Ill is the best place for any athlete to play," Hilliker said. Division Ill sports must have more attention drawn to them because it is the last. frontier of real student athletes. Coaches are not just coaching champions of teams, but future doctors, writers, researchers and teachers. Many of the athletes playing at the Division ID level have the caliber to compete at Division I or II level, but they "chose a highly respected education over the hype of playing at a higher level. What's not to respect?" said PLU Women's Basketball head coach Jennifer Childress. Men's Basketball head coach Steve Dickerson agreed, saying "I enjoy coaching at this level because athletics itself is not a business· but it is a spoke in the wheel of the entire educational process," he said. "PLU does not exist because of athletics but athletics are a big part of PLU."

IVISI

Softball head coach Lance Glasoe also believes in the importance of Division Ill sports. "I believe what makes Division Ill appealing to student athletes is the ability to have balance in their lives, while still competing at a high level," he said. As for myself, though I exercise and am extremely passionate about the San Francisco Giants and the Portland Trail Blazers, I am not an athlete at any division. Yet through writing for sports, interviewing numerous players, along with coaches of a variety _ of sports, I have come to learn something. The athletes at Pacific Lutheran University are extremely hard working on as well as off the field and truly form a family bond with their teammates. The coaches of the teams are here because they care about each player, instilling in them a mindset of hard work, dedication and love for your family that will carry them beyond their time on the field at PLU.

n 111

Lance Glasoe is in his first year as the head softball coach for the LL tes.

While 111 never see the field as a player, I'm proud to go to a school whose players' and coaches' love for the game extends far beyond the field.

-

tude t before athlete

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Being a "student" before an athlete is important at Division Ill.

Steven McGrain Sports Writer At the Division Ill level, athletes hold the title of "student-athlete," whereas at the Division I and II levels, it can be argued that it is "athlete· student." Senior softball pitcher Leah Butters described being an athlete at Pacific Lutheran perfectly: "At the Division Ill level, we play for the love of the game." In the 2014-2015 season, the Lutes welcomed 119 first-year athletes aspiring to be the next great Lute. For some, sports weren't their first priority. "You come to Pacific Lutheran for the academics, not for the athletics," said junior crosscountry runner Amie Wilson. When sophomore softball player Kailyn Osaki came on a recruiting trip to PLU, the head coach at the time, Erin Van Nostrand asked, "If you were to fall and break your leg, could you still imagine yourself atPLU?" Osaki' s response was simple; ''Yes." Recruiting is a difficult task for Division Ill programs. At higher-level institutions, there is more money and better publicity, and therefore its easier for professional teams to scout the player, and even bring

them into their organization. Not all Division Ill athletic programs have the same exposure. This can be detrimental for coaches to remain successful, but to what extent should they go to secure a top recruit? Some resort to embellishing facility improvements. A PLU swimmer who qualified for state twice was told on her recruiting visit that ''by her junior year, the program would

have a brand new Olympic swimming pool." Since then, the program has received new starting blocks but has cut back its attendance to a training program in California to every other year. the Universities where academics exceed the athletics, with the old and classic look like we see in the movie "Hoosiers" is not what the top-tier athletes typically want. The PLU athlete isn't here for the state-of-the-art facilities or the chance to play on the national stage. Junior football player Ryan Chynoweth came to PLU because of the "special qualities of the program." More specifically, he came for the Inner Game from former head coach Frosty Westering. Also, "Pacific Lutheran was the only school where I saw all the football guys, whereas at other places it was only a couple. I felt welcome from the beginning." A belief of the legendary Frosty Westering was to "make the big -time where you are." This simple yet powerful quote is what a Lute athlete personifies.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOLUTES.COM

The PLU poof's newest renovation was it's roof, that was fixed in 2012.

thletes and alco ol Stephanie Compton Guest Writer Dry Season. It refers to the time in a team's competitive season where the athletes are' not allowed to be around or drink alcoholic beverages. "For .the volleyball team, dry season means you are not to be anywhere that alcohol can even be a factor in the situation," said sophomore volleyball player Cara Gillespie. "For many teams the dry season rules are for everyone, even the over-21 upperclassmen." · If you talk to any team on a college campus, the subject of the dry season is a major one. It can be a decision made by the coach, but it can also be left up to the whole team to decide. "[The volleyball team] redefines it every year," Gillespie said. "We have an alcohol contract with our coach, but we sit down before we have that meeting and decide how we are going to define dry season." At Pacific Lutheran University, the rules of dry season vary from team to team. Some teams, such as the volleyball team and soccer teams, have strict bans on alcohol during their seasons. Other teams, · ·like softball and the men's and women's basketball teams, have more lenient rules for those who

are of legal age. Many dry season rules are not strictly enforced until the conduct of students comes to the attention of PLU. The NCAA.. makes each athlete sign paperwork at the beginning of the year that encompasses everything from gambling to drugs. Within that jumble of papers, studer>t athletes pledge that they understa...'1.d that drinking is against the code of conduct of the NCAA. It is rare for Division Ill athletes to be drug tested, but if a student te:;ts positive for drug use they will lO!;e a year of eligibility and will not he allowed to compete in the upcoming season. One factor that has changed the game for -dry season rules is social media. With platforms like Snapchat' s "Story," it is easy to - get ca:ught drinking in someone else's post. Many teams now include soci_al media rules and consequences in heir team discussion. "[For the volleyball te llll], if you are in a post where i1 could be construed that you weri~ drinking, if you were there but yJu weren't drinking, the consequence is essentially an apology to the team," Gillespie said. The rules may vary from team to team, but it is plain to see that alcohol is a topic of high priority to athletes at PLU.

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THE MOORING MAST

MAY I. 2015

Recreational s

What's special abou: this is that both students and profes:;ionals get to lead the sessions. For instance, there is Yoga with Taken back by a devastating loss Lisa, Cardio Fusion with Kimber and in an intramural championship floor Turbo Kickboxing with Amanda. hockey game, Rob Thompson's life This year, Thompson has been was forever changed. To this day, he sure other Group X activities stay and his college friends still don't talk in stuq_ents' minds, as he is also about it. promoting classes for Zumba, Butts Originally from Rhode Island, an_d Guts, Tae Bo and more. Thompson took up his college athletic These classes offer stud1;nts a chance career as a soccer player at Endicott to jump in and learn new leadership College in Beverley, Mass. skills, while also te11ching new Once soccer season was over, he students and gainho.g m01·e experience found himself engulfed in intramural at what they love to do. sports. His favorite sport to play was Club sports are also 1 big part of floor hockey. He had never played it what PLU recreation has to offer. before, but loved the new and exciting Currently there are five club sports environment the sport had to offer. It offered at PLU: Men's Rc·wing, Men's also helped that all his friends were and Woman's Lacrossi! and even playing it too. Men's and Women's Ultimate Frisbee. After losing the floor hockey Each club sport offe:·s their own championship game, he felt a unique experience, giving students connection to intramural sports that chance to learn, grow and explore he never wanted to let go of. new abilities. "Being able to make new friends "[Club sports] provide highly while participating in these sports competitive play for athletes was why I loved to play," Thompson seeking an intercollegi1te sporting said. "I strongly believe that within experience," Thompson ;aid. "Clubs intramurals there sports are open to is something for players of all skill everyone and I leve s and prides wanted to stay in itsel' on being that environment." great fun while Fast forward stay ng highly to today and com::>etitive." Thompson Lastly, one of now works at ther1ostair,azLng Pacific Lutheran exp riences that University in PLU has to offer the Department of Recreations. He is outdoor recreation eve :its. handles anything and everything These e~ents provid:; students a outside of the varsity sports at PLU. chance to go out anc. participate For the last two years all recreational in activities that involve outdoor sports have been under the control of leadership, outdoor ethics and Thompson, where he pushed to make wilderness safety. All of these events recreational sports a bigger part of are created under a cost effective PLU. program, while being very well Currently there are 36 different organized. opportunities to play in an intramural "Each year hundredE of students sport at PLU. There are 15 different participate in Outdoo1 Recreation sports to choose from in the fall, six trips," Thompson saic.. "Outdoor sports to choose from during J-Term Recreation provides day and and another 15 sports to Choose from overnight trips from kayaking in the in the spring. beautiful Pacific Sound, to spelunking The sports range from flag football in the Ape Caves of Mi. St. Helens. to dodge ball and even indoor soccer Trips are offered almost every or softball. weekend and vary in length from Andrew Cheney is a junior and one day, to a week long spring break has participated in intramurals · for extravaganza." the last three years. He says that PLU This year, groups J: ave traveled intramurals have given him so many to the San Juan Islands, visited Cape opportunities. Hom, gone horseback riding and "Playing intramurals at PLU gives participated h"l many other hikes me the opportunity to play sports arotind the great Pacific Northwest. that I was not able to in high school," The next Outdoor RE creation trip Cheney said. "It is an overall great will be in Leavenworth, Wash. where experience and I plan on partaking in the group will be geocaching and intramurals for the rest of my time at bouldering on May 2-3. · PLU." With Thompson controlling the In addition, Thompson has even reins of this departmEnt, stlidents addedLiveActionRolePlaying(LARP) have found themselv ::s enjoying to the list of sports to choose from paiicipaling in and is open thESe activities to add more me re than ever sports upon "It is an overall great experience and beJore.· reasonable The next requests from I plan on partaking in intramurals for evi~nt that the students. the rest of my time at PLU." department 'Tm always of recreation open for i;; putting on Andrew Cheney looking is coming up Junior for ways on May 8. The to improve ev<!nt is called the PLU "T 1e PLU Color Recreation student experience," Loop," where students VI ill race while Thompson said. "If it's adding a new getting a variety of diff1~rent colored sport or class, or changing rules, I powders thrown in th1~ir direction. encourage any student to reach out to The first 300 people to sign up will me at anytime." · receive free swag. But it doesn't stop there. Thompson plans to continue to Thompson also has organized the improve the recreation department opportunity for students to participate and hopes that more stuc lents will join in other recreational sporting intramurals in future yeas. activities, such as Group X, club sports For more informa ion on the and even outdoor recreation. department of recreatioit, please visit Group Xis an array of fitness classes http:/!www.plu.edu/recr 2ations/. and offers students a chance to get out of their dorm rooms and do somefuing active with others.

Austin Hilliker Sports Editor

a

Congratulations on another great year for our sports teams.

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

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The Mooring Mast Spring 2015  
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