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SPORTS Both basketball teams' seasons continue to plummet

BUSINESS

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Holiday consumerism valued over signficant others

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE FEB. 14, 2014

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mastmedia. plu.edu

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 11

lnterfaith Amigos promote religious pluralism

Symposium focuses on catastrophe By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor

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PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Imam Jahmal Rahman (left), Pastor Don Mackenzie (middle) and Rabbi Ted Falcon (right) discuss the five stages of interfaith diaolgue.

By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor A rabbi, an imam and a pastor walk into Pacific Lutheran University. No, this isn't the beginning of a bad joke. It was the beginning of a presentation by the Interfaith Amigos, three friends of different religious backgrounds who now give inspirational talks on what it means to be interfaith Imam Jahmal Rahman, Pastor Don Mackenzie and Rabbi Ted Falcon drew an audience of approximately 70 people to the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts auditorium, including University President Thomas Krise aos:l Bishop Rick Jaech, bishop of the southwestern

Washington synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Senior Lucas Kulhanek, who is a Campus Ministry steward and co-chair of the Interfaith Student Council, got the idea to bring the Interfaith Amigos to PLU after seeing their presentation on a Ted Talk two years ago. When he _ brought up the idea to university Pastor Nancy Connor, he found out that Connor and class of 2013 alum Anna Milliren had previously tried to bring the trio to PLU but were unable to due to the cost. "They gave PLU a really good deal this time," Kulhanek said, saying it cost $1,500. The Amigos made secular references to books such as "The

Road Less Traveled" and "Three Cups of Tea." They also read from their respective religious texts and talked about the five steps of interfaith dialogue, which they based on their own friendship and experiences. Rahman said most people coming together for interfaith dialogue start by comparing their religions and focusing on what they have in common or what is different between them. Prior to even entering that stage, however, he said they need to create context to get to know each other as human beings. Rahman also emphasized the importance of looking at one's own religion from multiple perspectives to get a better understanding of it. "Interfaith is

not about conversion. It's about completion," he said. Kulhanek described interfaith as different religions coming together to fulfill a global mission, and, in the process, developing friendship and a mutual understanding of each other's religions. The imam, the rabbi and the pastor read passages from their holy books, which proclaimed their respective religions to be the "right" or "best" one. But then they read other passages with interfaith connotations, implying that all religions are actually one. They ended their presentation by singing a song in Arabic, Hebrew and English with a simple message: "We are one."

The Wang Center's annual symposium, which has explored subjects relating to water usage and advances in global healthcare by NGOs, will be focusing on genocide and understanding crimes against humanity. The symposium is titled "Shoah," a Yiddish word meaning "catastrophe" or "devastation," because the conference will cover many forms and acts of genocide, including the World War II Holocaust, a term that actually means "sacrifice." The Holocaust, along with the other genocides to be discussed, will be referred to as Shoah to use appropriate terminology and promote understanding. Beginning Thursday, Feb. 20, and concluding Friday, Feb. 21, the symposium will cover many acts of violence against humanity, focusing on case studies in Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, Latin American and the U.S. "We have a wide range of countries and issues to discuss," Tamara Williams, executive director of the Wang Center and a professor of Hispanic studies, said. "But there are still more that we have yet to cover." Cultural anthropologists, peace practitioners and even 1997 Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams will be exploring and analyzing issues of gender, the impact of political organization and the arts, stories of resistance and more. A finalized list of the location of events will be listed online Monday. The event is free and open to the community, but thosewillingtoattend are encouraged to register online at http://wangcentersymposium.org.

Abortion clinic arsonist and child molester is alum Business

American Associdt路 updated page4

Sports

Seattle Super B'll

page8

Everett and Bellingham. He served 12 years in a federal prison for these crimes, has a history of involuntary mental health Some Pacific Lutheran University alumni are evaluations and criminal convictions and has been publishing books, appearing on "The Voice" and in and out of jail since his release, The Seattle Times reported. making scientific breakthroughs. Beseda allegedly molested an 11-year-old girl But there are other alumni who will never at a Fred Meyer store in appear on the cover of an Snohomish Jan. 27. Police Admissions magazine. released photos from Fifty - eight -year-old surveillance cameras, and at Curtis Beseda, a PLU alum, Curtis Beseda, a '78 PLU least eight people identified was arrested Monday near alum, was arrested Monday Beseda. the university's former golf A Pierce County sheriff's course for an alleged case for alleged child molestation. deputy saw his van, which of child molestation that looked suspicious because of occurred last month. the way it was parked, and Pierce County sheriff ran the license plate number, deputies arrested the convicted arsonist when they discovered him The Seattle Times reported. The deputy discovered the registered owner of sleeping in his minivan on Park Avenue South, according to a Seattle Times article. The office of the van was wanted on a felony arrest warrant and alumni and constituent relations confirmed Beseda called for backup to arrest the occupant, according to The Seattle Times. is a PLU class of '78 alum. Jail records show Beseda was booked into the Beseda, who is from Snohomish, made headlines Snohomish County Jail Tuesday morning for child in the 1980s for setting fire to abortion clinics in molestation on a $250,000 bail.

By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor


THE MOORING MAST

2A&E

FEB. 14, 2014

Strident DJs bring down the bass in the Cave By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

First-year Chris Boettcher dances while junior Chris Johnson, also known as DJ Will3SCR33N, performs at the DJ show in The Cave Feb 7.

A capella groups prepare for contest By BLAKE JEROME Guest Writer

a turntable for his birthday last year. "I've always been interested in it because I've DJ'd at a couple places around campus using my iPhone," he said. Johnson said he was asked to DJ at Tingelstad's all-hall event "Under the Seastad," but when the Resident Director asked him to keep his set appropriate for a fourth-grade audience, he polite\y declined. "We're all adults here. People aren't nice in the real world, and you11 hear a lot worse things," he said. "If you want me to play at a fourth-grade level, I should go to an elementary school."

For more pho.tos of the DJ show, check out mastmedia.pl.u.edu

Students perform Eve Ensler's feminist classic ••

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By now, everyone has seen the 2012 box office hit "Pitch Perfect," but few know that a cappella competitions really exist outside of Hollywood. Pacific Lutheran University will host the quarterfinal round of the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella Saturday. The event begins at 7 p.m. in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts and will showcase 10 of the best a cappella teams in Washington and Canada. Among the 10 are PLU' s very own HERmonic and PLUtonic. HERmonic is an all-female group while PLUtonic is just the opposite, featuring an all-male cast. Both teams, however, are sure to be very competitive Saturday night. Last year in the quarterfinals, PLUtonic took first place with HERmonic right behind them, placing second. "With two teams from the same school being so closely matched, it forces us THERmonic] to step up our game," sophomore Megan Zink, financial director of team HERmonic, said. However, Zink also said the rivalry is always a friendly one. PLUtonic and HERmonic routinely practice in front of each other before shows in order to calm the nerves associated with performing in front of a large crowd. "This is what it all comes down to," sophomore Katie Coddington, a soprano singer for HERmonic, said. Zink agreed. "The ICCA championship is what we work for all year long. When we aren't competing, we are getting ready for this tournament," she said. Coddington said she wasn't worried about the other groups who will be competing. "Every team is really good and has the potential to win, but we aren't scared by any of them," she said. "As long as we do what we've practiced, it will be a great night." First and second place will advance to the semifinal round hosted by Pomona College in Claremont, Calif. April 5. PLU students with a valid ID can buy tickets at the door for $15 or at varsityvocals.com. Zink said she expects the 630-person auditorium to sell out.

Tacomans looking for good electronic dance music usually need to travel to Seattle to get their fix. Last Friday, however, students needed to go no further than Pacific Lutheran's own dance venue, The Cave. Four student DJs and the student radio station, LASR, teamed up to bring an amateur DJ show to The Cave. Strobe lights, lasers and a projector screen lent to the dub-like atmosphere. At its · peak, about 60 students came. "It was sort of a mini-rave, but there weren't any drugs from what I could see," junior Chris Johnson said, who performed under the name DJ WID3SCR33N. Students danced .and jumped around. One dancer spun LED

lights on a string, and a handful of "glovers" gave each other "light shows" using gloves with lightup fingertips. Senior I.V. Reeves planned the event, coordinating the concert with LASR and inviting his friends to DJ. Reeves also DJ'd the third set of the night, playing mostly hip hop and rap. Junior Bruno Correa, a.k.a. DJ Fiendcraft, opened the show with a set consisting of hip hop, trap and house. "My favorite genre is tech-house, but not many people like that, so I do a lot of, like, electro-house," Correa said. "It's pretty popular now." Johnson's set also featured trap influence, but was distinguished by its heavy bass. "I definitely like that real grimy, slap-you-in-theface type bass," he said. Johnson said he got serious about DJing when he received

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PHOTO BY KATIE DEPREKER

Junior Aiko Nakagawa, sophomore Alex Clayton and junior Sarah Wheeler rehearse their performance for the Vagina Monologues Tuesday evening. The Vagina Monologues will take place Feb. 13, 14, and 15 at 7 p.m. in the AOC CK Hall.

ByTAHNAYEECLENDINEN AdE Writer The Vagina Monologues began when Eve Ensler decided to interview countless women about their most intimate body part - their vagina. In the show and book, Ensler asked questions such as "What would your vagina say if it could talk?" or "If you could dress your vagina what would it wear?" The responses to most of the questions range from simple to thought-provoking speeches designed to encourage a whole new way of thinking. One of the monologues performed simply. begins with "My vagina is angry." Another is entitled "Hair," leaving the content both obvious and vague to the viewers, until the speaker begins to address the audience. Every time participants perform the show, it is a new experience for the

The play is more often than not a audience. Sometimes it is performed by a single actress doing multiple part of the larger movement called readings and playing out numerous V-Day. V-Day, according to its website, scenes. is "a global activist movement to end On the other hand, it can be a full violence against women and girls." theatrical event, with a handful of The 'V' in V-Day stands for "vagina," actors who attempt to make the words "victory over violence" and most of those Ensler interviewed come to commonly "Valentine's Day," as life. V-Day is Feb. 14. In an interview she did for a Men are highly encouraged to Random House feature, Ensler said, come and watch the play alongside "One of the reasons I do this is that their female cohorts. While the play is every night women leave that theater centered around the female anatomy, changed. I've had so many women and therefore seems as though it may come up to me after the show and say, only relate to women, it is also an 'I am so happy to have a vagina. I did awareness movement. not feel this way when I came into the Men who want to become aware of theater."' the various social aspects and issues The subject matter itself, as revolving around vaginas are again described by Ensler in an interview for encouraged to be present. The Pacific Lutheran Univeristy The New York Times, serves to do more than be acted out on stage. It gives a Women's Center is sponsoring this voice to those who need it most. year's Vagina Monologues, which "I think often women are · not is being performed in the Anderson listened to, and the monologue forces University Center under the direction you to listen," Ensler said. ·of Lillian Ferraz and Ingrid Clark.

UNIVERSITY GALLERY ·suowcASES FACULTY ART By JESSE MAJOR Photo Editor

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Peggy Vance, senior administrative assistant, looks closely at Spencer Ebbinga's, associate professor of art and design, piece "When I was a Kid" in the Faculty Exhibition in the University Gallery Feb. 5.

Upon walking into the opening of the Faculty Exhibition in Ingram Hall's University Gallery Feb. 5, one of the first sights was "Sushi/Sake for Two," a piece by Spencer Ebbinga, associate professor of art and design. Two pieces of real sushi topped dishes created by Ebbinga, who described his piece as romantic. Other art joined Ebbinga' s from six other faculty artists: JP Avila, Craig Cornwall, Bea Geller, Steve Sobeck, Jessica Spring and Michael Stasinos.

The exhibition gives students the opportunity to see the work their professors do professionally .. "I think it's huge [for students] to see that their professors are working," Ebbinga actually said. "Producing artists is significant." Senior "Katie Hoffman, an art student, agreed. "It's inspiring to see what they are doing," Hoffman said. "It's neat to see them as artists and not just professors." The exhibition also gives other faculty and staff members a chance to see what the art professors produce.

Peggy Vance, senior administrative assiStant, said she's been looking forward to the exhibition all year. · "I love it/' Vance said. "I'm always in the office and don't get to see their work often. It's fascinating."

The Faculty Exhibition run.~ through March 5 Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. University Gallery


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 14, 2014

Marketing:

BUSINESS 3

V-Day traditions may he more about a 'love' of revenue than significant others

By JILLIAN STANPHILL Guest Writer As you walk the aisles in search of the perfect Valentine's Day gift for that special someone, stop and think about the hundreds of thousands of people around the world doing the exact same thing. They are worrying about what to get, fretting over · prices ~d hoping their sweetheart will like their gift. However, the true meaning of Valentine's Day can get lost in commercialization. Globally, many countries follow the U.S.'s westernized practices of Valentine's Day spending, including Greece, Finland, Estonia, France and Japan. In fact, a marketing translation mistake started a unique Valentine's Day tradition in Japan. Morozoff Ltd., a confectionary and cake company headquartered in Kobe, Japan, marketed a Valentine's Day advertisement in 1936 that featured people giving each other chocolate on Valentine's Day. In translating the advertisement, the company portrayed women giving chocolate and gifts to men, instead of men giving the items to women. Fast forward to 2014, and it is considered customary for women

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Buying chocolates, desserts and other themed decor for Valentine's Day isn't limited to the United States. Marketers in Japan also have taken advantage of the tradition, as they annually sell massive amounts of these goods to Japanese consumers.

to give chocolate to men, due to this mistranslation iri. the original advertisement. Indeed, Japanese society expects women to give these gifts of chocolate to every male friend or male co-worker. In order to gain further holiday business, "White Day'' became a traditioninJapanMarch 14, 1978. On White Day, men give the

women who gave them presents on Valentine's Day a gift in return. Men are supposed to spend two to three times more on the women for White Day. Businesses earn more than half of Japanese chocolate and confectionary sales during this time of year, proving the marketing teams involved in these

holidays have done a wonderful job of inserting not one, but two, previously uncelebrated holidays into the Japanese cultUre. Although the United States only has one Valentine's Day related holiday, every year in the United States, Valentine's Day themed advertisements encourage people to shell out massive amounts of money in

order to impress their significant other. According to the National Retail Federation, Valentine's spending in the U.S. has increased every year, from $108 per person in 2010 to $131 in 2013. Men tend to spend about twice as much as women do for the· holiday, but surprisingly enough, both single males and females spend more than married ones. Many people don't even buy gifts just for a romantic partner people buy gifts for friends, other family members and even their pets. The rise in Valentine's Day spending is a great relief to the industries that profit the most from the holiday, such as greeting card companies, florists and jeweler·s . Thanks to the timelessness of holiday spending, these companies can breathe easier as sales rise after the recession in 2008. In a 2013 survey conducted by the National Retail Federation, 54.7 percent of people said they were planning on purchasing at least one greeting card, 51 percent planned on a candy purchase and 36.6 percent on flowers. Other common categories for gifts are jewelry, clothes, meals, movies and gift cards. No matter the country, culture or gender, there is always a reason to celebrate loved ones and companies recognize this.

Get involved in Beta Alpha Psi Accounting organization gears up for spring events By COURTNEY FORBIS Beta Alpha Psi Digital Media Coordinator If you walk through the Morken Center for Learning and Technology, you might notice students wearing a gray hoodie with a red triangle and the letter 'P' on the front. If you ask one of the wearers, you will learn they are members of Pacific Lutheran University's Delta Rho chapter for the accounting and finance club, Beta Alpha Psi (BAP). If you'.re already picturing a club where students meet once a week to count money - think again. BAP is a nonprofit international honorary and service organization for financial information students and professionals.

It focuses on promoting the study and practice of accounting, and management finance information systems, providing opportunities for selfdevelopment and associations among members and encouraging a sense of ethical, social and public responsibilities. PLU's BAP chapter, Delta Rho, offers many opportunities for students who want to have an advantage over their peers in the accounting and finance fields. It is a great environment to develop professionalism, improve communication skills and meet new friends with common interests. In the beginning of the fall semester, the chapter hosts workshops where students receive great advice on how to dress for success, write the perfect

Check out Delta Rho's new website at http://www.plu.edu/bap/ to learn more about the chapter, event information, schedule and how to become a member.

resume and network confidently with professionals. These workshops prepare members for networking events hosted by big firms where they connect with recruiters to learn more about the company and potential careers. For instance, a few members attended the Washington Society of Public Accountants event at Emerald Downs while others connected with Boeing employees during a tour of its aircrafts' interior designs. Even last fall, Delta Rho teamed up with the Mary LundDavis Undergraduate Student Investment Fund to host its first accounting and finance networking event at PLU. Commitment to the organization typically ranges from one to seven hours per week, depending on meetings and additional events. Delta Rho members volunteer at different facilities, such as Habitat for Humanity and Filbert Acres. It also has fun social events that include everything from eating at Farrelli's Wood Fire Pizza to hosting a pajama party while watching Christmas movies. Delta Rho is committing time to two big events this spring. The chapter is hosting its first fundraising event March 14 called Musical Collection &

PHOTO COUIITESY OF BETA ALPHA PSI

Members of Pacific Lutheran University's chapter of Beta Alpha Psi gather in front of a house they helped build as part of the "Habitat for Humanity" community service project in November. The group is preparing for similiar events during the spring se~ester. •

Silent Auction with a cappelfa groups PLUtonic and HERmonic as well as Emmy-award winning comedian John Keister. Funds will go toward a program and scholarship a mentorship program for accounting and finance students next fall.

Four members will be competing in Best Practice at BAP' s regional meeting April 1112, in Portland, Ore. winners will First-place receive $500 and will have the opportunity to compete against other regional first place winners at the annual meeting.


THE MOORING MAST

4 BUSINESS

FEB. 14, 2014

AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION Student leaders transform business organization By VICTORIA ATWOOD American Marketing Associ.ation Vice President of Programming Only a few years ago, Pacific Lutheran University's chapter of the American Marketing Association (AMA) had a traditional club structure. It had weekly meetings, a few events and perhaps a big fundraiser-over the course of the year. There was an executive board that consisted of a president, vice president, treasurer and so on. But it became clear that this wasn't working. Too often, members felt they had little to contribute at meetings where officers were doing all the planning - or there were no upcoming events in the near future and meetings were pointless. The club did not heavily publicize events, the events had low attendance and even AMA members could forget an event was happening. Within the past year, that has all changed. AMA has gained new life through major restructuring. First, weekly meetings went out the door so the club could focus on its new speaker series. . new series, With this marketing professionals from around the region have come to speak on topics from branding to relationship marketing.

Speakers have included Clayton Krueger of Farrelli's Wood Fire Pizza, Rusty George of Rusty George Creative and Dan Rosales of Northwestern Mutual Finance. Additionally, AMA's officer board has been completely restructured. Gone is the rigid hierarchical structure where all officers answered to the president. Now, the executive board is .made up of four vice presidents, all equal: a vice president of finance, a vice president of operations and two vice presidents of programming. This new framework will allow for greater collaboration and creativity as AMA grows and evolves to meet the needs of its members. This spring, a number of speakers are already lined up, including Madonna Hanna, creator of the "Dare Not to Swear" campaign, and another talk from George. But they aren't the only ones. There are several other speakers that are sponsored or co-sponsored by AMA tentatively coming to PLU this spring. AMA will also be doing site visits for the first time ever this semester. This will involve a group of students going to local businesses to observe what marketing looks like outside of the classroom. These groups will have limited

PHOTO COURTESY OITHE PLU AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION

Clayton Krueger ofFarrelli's Pizza guest speaks at an event hosted by the American Marketing Association that took place this past fall.

space, so interested students will want to keep an ear out for when dates and times are announced. Finally, students connected with PLU's chapter of the AMA earns them the chance to hear about regional AMA events, from conferences to networking events. As the club continues to grow, its members will be able to represent PLU more frequently than ever before.

The chance to learn about the latest developments ii; marketing or meeting with important people in the industry should be enough to grab anyone's attention. Right now, AMA is full of exciting opportunities for students, from networking with marketing professionals to accessing a huge amount of regional and national resources. Students from multiple

disciplines - public relations, human resources and, of course, marketing - have found that the American Marketing Association is a great investment in their futures. To keep up with AMA, send an email to ama@plu.edu and ask to be put on the mailing list or go on Facebook and Like "PLU American Marketing Association."

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THE MOORING MAST

6 OPINION

FEB. 14, 2014

Nobody should feel 'singled' out ByTAHLIA

TERHUNE Columnist

I haven't spent a Valentine's Day single since I was in sixth grade. It began with plush toy exchanges during passing periods and "check yes or no" letters. Throughout the years, I always found myself in a relationship on this particularly special day. This year, however, I will be partaking in the holiday single. I am looking forward to Valentine's Day more than ever. Of course now that I am not involved in a relationship, I find it od d that our culture typically leaves this d ay u p to the couples. I didn't think too much of it until I found myself volunteering to work on Valentine' s night. My once romantic holiday turned into an opportunity to serve couples at the restaurant where I work. I was not too concerned except for the fact I did not know what to do on

February the 14th since my day w as not planned out for me as usual. For the past month, I h ave observed my peers whining about sappy cou ples or joking about how they are going to be alone forever. Singles should view this day as something positive to m ake it their own. You are not obligated to anything, which means you can make of this day whatever you wish . You can just do something fun, get a group of your single friends together and go laser tagging. Junior David Stenger said he will hang out with his other single housem ates on Valentine' s Day. If you want to be adventurous, use this day as an opportunity to meet new people. "I feel like you always bond with other single people on Valentine's Day," sophomore Caila Fautenberry said. "It's kind of funny actually." Society has marked Valentine's Day as a time to celebrate with a significant other. In reality it should just be a day to acknowledge love - whether that be with your friends, family or yourself is up to you. Of course in grade school, you are required to bring cards for all of your classmates, or m aybe your m om gave you a teddy bear each year. H owever, as you get older this fades away, and it seems as if people only think they can participate if they are in a relationship. I w ant to be able to tell my friends how much I care about them, to tell my parents how much I appreciate them and even to remind myself I love who I am. I don't need a soulmate to share

love with others in my life. This year I am going to utilize the free time I will h ave during this season of adoration to sh ow others how mu ch路 I care about them . Rather than investing my time in do-it-yourself gifts to save money on the expensive d ay or last-minute shopping, I will invest my time in small acts of appreciation for those I care about. You d on' t have to be d ating someone to love him or her, so there's no reason why you shouldn't show it. If you're single on Valentine' s Day, call up that old friend you've been meaning to talk to. Get yourself some Ben & Jerry's and that new watch you've been looking at. Call up your parents just to talk not asking them for money might be a refreshing change of pace. If you're in a relationship, then cherish this time. Use this day as another excuse to publicly share your affection for your significant other. If you're single, then partake in Valentine's Day too. Make it your own. If all else fails, The Huffington Post concludes that chocolate is more stimulating than kissing - you're welcome. Rom antic dinners and roses although they sound delightful - are not in my horizon for this holiday. Instead, I will volunteer to w ork and make some extra m oney that I can spend on myself. After that, my evening will be just another Friday night to spend with friends and go out. I have never been more excited for Valentine's Day.

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CllIEF

Jessica 'frond.sen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

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Sustainability:

ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Sustainable displays of affection By SAMANTHA

LUND Columnist

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Valentine's Day is hard for everyone. One obvious reason for this could be because you are single. Being single on Valentine' s Day is rough trust me, I h ave been there. Valentine's Day can also be a struggle for people in relationships, because expectations are so high. There is pressure, not always by your loved one, but by stores and advertisements. The pressure to provide the most romantic, trendy and chocolaty gifts is intense. the pressure With increasing, Valentine's Day is coming close to Chri.Stmas as the most commerciali2:ed holiday of the year.

To stay away from the commercialized and overexaggerated Valentine's cliches, some students plan to stay out of it and spend a night at home. "Me and my boyfriend are planning a night in, making dinner and watching a movie at home,"sophomore Melissa Inouye said. try a This year, homemade, sustainable, creative Valentine's Day. Do not give into the companies that are using chemicals, sweatshops and polluting the earth. There are plenty of tricks to stay away from Hallmark, Victoria's Secret and Hershey's. These are the biggest contributors to the Valentine' s Day madness according to The

Huffington Post. Plus Trojan, but please still use those. Putting a little extra effort in and making things yourself shows your love that you care more anyway. That is what it's really about. Anything handmade, from a sign saying you love someone, to a personalized picture frame made by you is a great way to show someone you care. Let us start with our favorite part of Valentine's Day - the food. A simple way to make your sweetie something sugary is to use

your Google machine and search your favorite treat. Pinterest is full of ideas, just remember not to let all the other goodies on Pinterest distract you. Spending an afternoon on it is too easy. Try making your Valentine a batch of his or her favorite cookies or surprise that special someone with some chocolate covered strawberries you made at home. "Making homemade treats is definitely the w ay to go," junior Gailon Wixson said. "Even if they don't taste great, usually boys d on't care." Valentine' s dinner is always a big deal, and restaurants make a ton of money off of it. Visit a locally owned restaurant this year and give back to your community. Staying local will give back to your community and small businesses are, on average, more sustainable. Marzano' s is a close, locally owned place to visit where the owners appreciate Pacific Lutheran University students coming in. When it comes to getting gifts, going noncommercialized is a challenge. I'm sure you are all very creative and will definitely

make your significant other h appy with a handmade gift. How ever, if you are not the crafting type, try giving back to the planet. many There are websites that give you the opportunity to adopt an animal in your significant other's name. You can save an animal on a farm that otherwise would be on a dinner table, you can save manatees and dolphins or you can save your significant other's favorite rainforest animal. W o rl d w ide w i l d li fe. org has a gift center on its website where you can instantly adopt a baby animal for your loved one. Your boyfriend or girlfriend can even name the animal. However, if you do go this route, make sure you still have something to hand that special som eone on Valentine's night. That is where flowers come in. Flowers play a key role in Valentine' s Day. Obviously roses are the most commercialized and the prices get marked up during the holiday. This Valentine's Day try giving your lovely someone a potted plant that will last longer than a week and stay beautiful. Show that special someone your love, but keep the earth in mind and stay sustainable.

The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and dist ribut e information t o its readers about important issues, event s and t rends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres t o the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p .m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu. for advertising rat es and to place an advertisement . Subscript ions cost $25 per semest er or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast @ plu.edu.

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FEB. 14, 2014

Seattle Seahawks parade exceeds expectations Super Bowl champions earn a well-deserved celebration By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer

PHOTO BY GIANCARLO SANTORO

More than 700,000 fans showed up to the Seattle Seahawks parade. The population of Seattle is about 600,000. Do the math.

Feb. 5 was a day that Seattleites had been waiting on for nearly 40 years. That was the day the city celebrated the Seattle Seahawks' victory in the Super Bowl with a parade through the streets of Seattle. The city had not had a parade for a sports team since the Seattle SuperSonics won the NBA Championship in the spring of 1979. In the weeks leading up to the game, people around the Pacific Northwest embraced the Seahawks. Even non-sports fans made time to watch the Seahawks. As the day of the game finally came, the fans' enthusiasm for the team was replaced with apprehension and nervous energy. Questions like "what if they lose?" and "this is Seattle, we can't really win, can we?" rose out of the dark. The answer was yes, the Seahawks could win, and they did. The new question was just how many fans would show up to the parade after the Seahawks beat the Denver Broncos to a bloody pulp in the Super Bowl. Early estimates said the parade would attract about 300,000 people, the same number of people who celebrated the Seattle Sonics NBA title in 1979. That was a poor guess. "I wouldn't miss this for anything," senior Trevor Hamilton said. "I grew up going to Seahawks games with my dad." Seahawk fans around the area must have shared Hamilton's sentiment, because about 700,000 people attended . That means the amount of p eople at the parade exceeded the number of people who live in Seattle, which is roughly 600,000. Consider this: the parade occurred on a weekday when schools were in session, m any businesses did not release their employees and it was a frigid 15 degrees Farenheit out.

Those are some loyal fans. "It may be cold out, but I'm warm inside. Go Hawks," senior Greg Bishop said. The fans waited in the bitter cold for a chance to see their team, which had finally brought a championship home to Seattle. As the adoring fans cheered the returning victors, Marshawn Lynch threw skittles, Pete Caroll waved and the entire region let loose and celebrated. When the day was over and the after party had ended, people returned to their normal lives and began the long wait until next year. "I can't wait to go to a game next year and see the Lombardi Trophy in the trophy case," Hamilton said. Now that the celebration is over and Seattleites finally know what it feels like to win the Super Bowl, they all mu st once again face the realities of life. The Mariners will probably be terrible again and the Sounders will be decent, but it is up to the Seahawks to accomplish another first for the city of Seattle: a repeat.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Russell Wilson led the Seattles Seahawks to their first Super Bowl championship.

* * * ATTENTION STUDENTS * * * NON-DISCLOSURE OF "DIRECTORY INFORMATION"

3702 South Fife Street Tacoma, WA 98409 Appointments 253.617.7000

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, popularly known as the ."Buckley Amendment" and carrying the acronym "FERPA," governs the University's collection, retention, and dissemination of information about students. (The document appears in the Student Handbook.) One category of information covered by FERPA is called "directory information." Pacific Lutheran University has designated the following items as directory information: student name, local and permanent addresses and telephone numbers, E-mail address, date and place of birth, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, class standing, previous educational agency or institution(s) attended, major and minor fields of study, anticipated date of graduation (if that has not yet occurred), and degree(s) and award(s) conferred (including dates). The PLU FERPA policy appears on the Student Handbook website for your review at: httpJ/www.plu.edu/student-handbook/code-of-conduct/FERPA.php. Under FERPA the University may disclose directory information without prior written consent unless an "eligible student" (18 years or over) or a parent (if the student is under 18 years of age) gives notice in writing to the contrary to the Office of the Vice President for Student Life restricting the disclosure of the directory information, as it pertains to the student, by the last day of registration for any given academic term at this University. Please be assured that PLU uses discretion when releasing information (e.g. roommate notification or compliance with federal requirements.) If you participate in activities such as music or drama performances, athletics or represent PLU in other public capacities, University policy is to issue minimal information in press releases. If it is your wish that PLU NOT disclose "directory information" about you under any circumstance, you must come to the Student Life Office, Hauge Administration Building, Room 105, on or before February 19, 2014 to complete the appropriate form and meet with Laree Winer to understand fully the impact of the restriction. This res!Dction will remain in effect until the 10th day of the fall semester of the next academic year, unless you revoke it in writing.

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Lutes luck limited on senior night

HERmonic wins a cappella semi-finals

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

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OORING

FEB. 21, 2014

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 12

mastmedia.plu.edu

CHAMPIONS: Lutes outswim opponents

A way to stay safe:

There)s an app for that By RELAND TUOMI News Editor

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

The Lutes swim team chants out "PLU" to give each other confidence before the meet begins.

By SAM HORN Sports Editor The Northwest Conference is home to a new women's swimming champion. Not since 1996 has the Pacific Lutheran University women's swim team won the NWC title. PLU was able to edge out defending champion Whitworth by two points for a nail-biting victory in the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center. PLU scored 618.5 points, while the Pirates from Whitworth tallied 616.5 points. The slight margin of victory is the second closest in NWC history, trailing only the 1-point margin for Willamette over Linfield in 1994. "I was so impressed with the toughness and attitude of our team," head coach Matt Sellman said in a press

conference. "This was a hard, tough win that came from every person tied to our program - athletes, coaches, managers, trainers. We are so proud to be Lutes and to have won this championship 路 as a complete team, top to bottom. We weren't perfect, but we were special." By achieving the lofty feat of winning conference, Sellman received his second consecutive NWC Coach of the Year honor. Sellman' s personal trophy case will need more space, as this is his ninth coaching honor. Sellman earned two other NWC Coach of the Year honors and five Capital Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors. Heading into the 400-freestyle relay, the final relay of the meet, the Lutes held an eight-point lead over Whitworth. First-year Morgan Commander, 路 sophomore Hanna Armstrong, firstyear Darcie Booth and sophomore

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Melissa Dean finished in second place to pick up 34 points, essentially locking up the impressive victory. In addition to helping seal the win for the Lutes, Dean set an individual record at the meet, which the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center hosted. Dean broke a 25-year-old record in the 100 freestyle with a time of 53.27 to take third in the event. Karen Hanson previously held the record with a time of 53.31in1989. Sophomore Natasha Sioda also broke a record herself. The Curtis High School grad took third in the 200 backstroke with a time of 2:06.0 to break Hanson's 1992 record of 2:06.01 by one-hundredth of a second. Whitman (559 points), Pacific (366.5), Puget Sound (348.5), Lewis & Clark (300), Linfield (219) and Willamette (166) followed PLU and Whitworth.

There's often a time in a person's life where they find themselves in an awkward or uncomfortable situation. It could be on a bad date, in a sketchy part of town or sitting at home alone with feelings of uncertainty about a possible unhealthy relationship. In any of these situations, people need a good friend to save them and get them somewhere safe. That is where Circle of 6 comes in. Circle of 6 is a free app created to protect people, more specifically, college-aged women, from potentially dangerous situations. The app allows users to pick six of their closest friends to be part of their circle. When users are in an uncomfortable situation in the future, they can send a message to their circle asking for someone to pick them up, call them with an excuse to leave or ask for relationship advice. There is also a hotline icon which the user can customize to a localized number they trust. In three taps - opening the app, tapping the middle circle and sending the message - all six friends will have received messages and know how to help. Once a friend comes or calls, the user can click a check mark to send a message out to the rest of the circle informing them of the user's safety. Pacific Lutheran University's Green Dot Coalition, along with Campus Safety and the Women's Center, is trying to promote the app on campus, not only as a tool for safety but also as a way to promote a sense of community on campus. "The more people think 'What's my responsibility in this community?' the more that translates to building a better community," Johnathan Grove, men's project coordinator at the Women's Center, said. "We think downloading the app will allow people to make a commitment to community safety." The people within a user's circle don't need to have the app as well, since the messages will be sent via text. The texts asking for a ride will also have GPS coordinates for easy locating. "If applied, it [the app] will be very affective," Greg Premo, Director of Campus Safety, said. Premo also wanted students to program Campus Safety's number (253-535-7441) for the hotline icon in case of emergencies. "It's such an easy app. I hope people download it," Grove said. "It's not 'new toy on Christmas morning' cool, but it is cool when you need it."

Nobel Peace Prize nominee to visit PLU By SAMANTHA LUND Guest Writer . International peacemaker Steinar Bryn is scheduled to visit Pacific Lutheran University Monday and Tuesday on his way to the Nobel Peace conference. Bryn's visit will be one of many he has made to PLU to speak to students about the Nansen Dialogue Network (NDN). The NDN is an international that promotes organization dialogue and peace building talks in countries with active conflict. Bryn received a fourth nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize this year for his work with NDN. He actively works路 on building peace in the world's conflict-sensitive areas.

Bryn is the senior adviser of NDN where the vision is "to empower people who live in conflict situations to contribute to peaceful conflict transformation on the basis of democracy.and human rights" according to its website, http://www.nansen-dialogue.net/ It also has a modern take on conflict resolution. As its website states, NDN brings together a variety of people to discuss their conflict and solutions, seeking 路 institutional change and beneficial joint understanding. PLU teaches NDN's method to communication students, and one of the Wang Center's study away programs goes to NDN headquarters in Lillehammer, Norway. In the last decade, Bryn has visited PLU many times. Amanda

Feller of the communication department said she is close with Bryn and keeps him coming back to PLU along with the Wang Center and the Norwegian Studies program. Feller is the leading professor of PLU's Conflict and Global Peace Building major. For his upcoming visit, Bryn will be guest lecturing in Communication and Norwegian Studies classes. Bryn will be hosting a screening of his award-winning film "Reunion: Ten Years After the War" Tuesday night from 6-8 p.m. in the Chris Knutsen room of the Anderson University Center. The film, released in 2011, revolves around the meeting of Albanians and Serbians for the first time since their countries began fighting in 1999.


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FEB. 21 2014

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Sustainability teaches nasty course in Garbology

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

Left: Nathan Rhoades, senior, sifts through the piles of garbage for items that are actually recyclable at the Garbology event last Friday afternoon. Right: Junior Asia Wolfe and Andre Lavoie, who doesn' t attend PLU, search through piles of garbage for things that are actually recyclable at the Garbology event last Friday afternoon.

Most items can be either recycled or composted. If an item is recyclable, it can be converted into reusable material. on Compostable items, the other hand, are organic in nature, and can be left to decompose. "If you don't know if something should be recycled or not, just recycle it," Nakagawa said. "We hand sort all of the recycling every day, but we never sort through the nonrecycle bins." Common items that should

Nakagawa said. Students can view the results of Garbology on Sustainability' s website: http://www.plu.edu/ Most schools in the country sustainability/. today recycle, but students at The results display the Pacific Lutheran University weight of the original garbage have turned it into a science. next to the actual weight of Last Friday, five members of un-recyclable, un-compostable the Sustainability Committee material after they sorted it. held their annual Garbology Sustainability will also event in Red Square to promote present the results to students the importance of recycling. through fliers members will Junior Aiko Nakagawa, distribute around campus. Residence Hall Association "Things will change, but to sustainability director, and what extent depends on how we sophomore [Sustainability] Zack Wangler keep the led the message going," Sustainability Nakagawa said. team. "People tend to team The be more aware was assisted by The goal is to show students that much of 路 what they approximately throwing are 25-30 student of what they are throwing away does not away for about a volunteers month, and then belong in trash cans. throughout the they forget." day. The only way Sustainability for students to Zack Wangler members remember to Sophomore collected the recycle, Wangler garbage from said, is to find a trash bins way to make it in various matter to them. residence "I really love halls around the outdoors, campus. never be recycled include aerosol exploring, hiking, biking and They then brought the cans, batteries, household glass, everything else," Wangler said. garbage to Red Square and medical waste, plastic screw-on "To see that [outdoors] be sorted it into the proper caps, paper coated in metal and polluted is really sad to me. I receptacles. any hazardous waste. got involved with Sustainability The goal, Wangler said, is "There will always be a to make the world a cleaner to show students that much of percentage of people who are place." what they are throwing away recycle-ignorant or who simply Whether someone is a gamer does not belong in trashcans. just don't care. Our goal is to looking to lower the costs of About 67 percent of PLU's lower that percentage," Wangler computer equipment, or a lover daily trash goes into recycling said. of the outdoors who is disgusted bins, but Wangler said there is Nakagawa said the by seeing trash in the forest, still room for improvement. Garbology movement is an recycling affects everybody, "The remaining 33 percent attempt to enlighten PLU Wangler said. of garbage is being put into students. It's up to human beings to un-recyclable, un-compostable "If we can encourage people leave the planet better than we containers, and that number to intervene when their friends left it, and the movement starts could easily be cut in half," try to throw recyclables in the today, Wangler said. Wangler said. trash, we've done our job,"

By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

Sophomore Robbin Howe searches through piles of garbage for items that are recyclable at the Garbology event last Friday afternoon. Robin said her advice for recycling is "even if you're not sure if it's recyclable, you should recycle. Sustainability sorts through it all so they will catch it if it is."


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 21, 2014

NEWS3

New solutions for campus safety escort in effect

/. /

..................~--.,, .

··-···- - · · ;· ~,,J PHOTO BY RELAND TUOMI

Director of Campus Safety Greg Premo gives the presentation on Campus Safety escorts. On this slide, he is proposing a new perimeter for the escort service to keep campus safety officers closer to campus.

By RELAND TUOMI News Editor The Campus Safety escort program has been used by students not only as a way to travel safely, but also for convenience. Campus Safety Director Greg Premo and other members of Campus Safety discussed this matter at a forum, as well as possible solutions to avoid the abuse Jan. 7. Premo emceed the event, listing off usage statistics as well as costs. Members of the President's Council made the final decision to shrink the perimeter Tuesday. Premo said the annual cost of the driving escorts increases

each year, this year costing the university $67,500. Premo also said there are about 1,900 total rides per month, a dramatic difference from other universities. University of Puget Sound's program, for example, which only gives out about 25 rides per month. At Pacific Lutheran University,

"If there's an emergency, we need those [safety] officers here." .....

Greg Premo Director of Campus Safety

3702 South Fife Street Tacoma, WA 98409 Appointments 253.617.7000

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however, only about 450 students regularly use the service annually. With this low number of students actually using the service combined with the service's use for non-safety reasons, Premo and Campus Safety decided to make a change .. One of the solutions suggested, and the one the President's Council decided on, is creating

a

a smaller perimeter limited to the area immediately around campus. With about 1,900 rides per month and the average escort driving time taking between 1520 minutes, a smaller perimeter will lower that average and keep safety officers closer to campus. The new perimeter will only go· as far as 116 Street rather than the current perimeter ending at 112 Street. One student at the meeting stated that escorts going to 112 Street aren't used to get students out of a dangerous situation, but just for a ride to QFC. Premo used this statement to emphasize his next point: students are to use the escorts for

emergencies, not for leisure or convenien ce. "We need those drivers [safety officers] nearby, and they can't be if they're d riving someone far away," Premo said. "If there's an emergency, we need those officers here." Instead, Premo su ggested students use Zipcars for errandrunning. Another student at the event suggested having the smaller perimeter during the day and to only allow for the larger, original perimeter at night. Premo acknowledged the idea, but said he thought it would be confusing, especially with daylight savings. However, Seattle University has a similar program that only allows shuttle service availablity after 6 p .m., allowing the later time idea to still be an option. In addition to a smaller perimeter, Campus Safety will not be implementing the shuttle service during the summer. "We use our safety officers who are designated to patrol the campus and respond to calls to cover these requests," Premo said. "We have such a small number of students over the summer term we can not justify the added expense to staff the position." The summer hiatus will begin May 26, after graduation weekend, and will resume normal operations again Aug. 15. Premo said the safety officers need to stay close to campus in case of an emergency, and while the smaller perimeter may inconvenience a small number of students, it will provide more safety for more students campus wide.


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

What to do atPLU Ongoing Faculty Exhibition: See faculty members of the department of art and design showcase their work in different mediums. Feb. 5-March 5, Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-4 p.m. University Gallery in Ingram.

"Us Local People: Sarni Vuoir)l)a and Resilience:" the Come learn about migratory people of northern Scandinavia and celebrate their culture. Scandinavian Cultural Center, Feb. 6- April 1.

Friday Wang Center Symposium, "Legacies of the Shoah: Why Do People Kill? Understanding Genocide, War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity." Various locations. 8:45 a.m.-9 p.m.

Chinese New Year Celebration: Celebrate the Year of the Horse with Hong Hall's Chinese Wing and the Chinese department. The Cave, Hong Hall Lounge. 7-9 p.m.

Late Night Programming: Minute to Win It. Hinderlie Hall Lounge. 9-11 p.m .

Saturday Senator Steve Conway Town Hall Meeting: Senator Conway will be speaking about legislation in Washington State and the 29th Legislative District. Garfield Book Company Community 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Room,

Softball Game vs. Pacific University Softball Diamond, Double Header, 12-2 p.m., 2.-4 p.m .

Harstad Play Date: Harstad Hall's annual allcampus event with a theme of childhood activities and treats. Harstad Hall, 7-10 p.m.

Sunday Softball Game vs. Georgefox. Softball Diamond, 12-2 p.m.

Habitat Restoration Project Work Party: Support the Sustainability Office to restore the habitat South of the AUC. Fred L. Tobiason Outdoor Learning Center, 1-4 p.m.

Wendy Byrnes Jr. BM Recital: Free admission. MBR Music Center 330, Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3-4 p.m.

Monday "Lean In: Are You My Mentor?" AUC 133, 6-8 p.m. Scandinavian Folk Dance. AUC CK West, 7-8 p.m.

Tuesday Reunion Film Screening: Four-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee Steinar Bryn will be screening his film "Reunion." AUC CK East, 6-8 p.m.

FEB. 21, 2014

Scan Center exhibit celebrates native Scandinavian culture By UNA TINGVIK HAAVE Guest Writer The Pacific Lutheran University community had the chance to learn about the musical art of joik when Risten Anine Gaup, a Sarni from Northern Norway, performed traditional Sarni songs Feb. 6. The Sarni are the indigenous people of northern Scandinavia and Feb. 6 was Sarni National Day. The performance was part of the the opening of the Sarni exhibit in the Cultural Scandinavian Center, "Us Local People: Sarni VuoiIJIJa and Resilience." Attendance was high for the opening, with every seat filled and some standing to watch Gaup perform. Gaup traveled from northern Norway to perform in PLU's second annual celebration of Sarni National Day. PLU students and Sarni Americans in the area gathered in the Scandinavian Center to hear Gaup sing and talk about the role the traditional Sarni form of song, joik, has played in Sarni history and culture. "foik is a form of musical expression, and it is actually one of the oldest forms of musical expression in the world," Gaup said. She explained that many Sarni stopped using this form of expression for a long time because Christian authorities prohibited it. They were convinced Sarni was the devil's language, and Sarni joik was the devil's song. Though this view has changed over the years, there are still Sarni people

PHOTO BY MARLENE ANDREA WALTOFT

Troy Storfjel, associate professor of Norwegian and Scandinavian studies, enjoying some authentic Scandinavian cuisine.

who do not perform joik today. "Still today, I know people in my hometown who don't like that I'm standing here joiking for

you right now," Gaup said. She explained that her father taught her and other. Sarni children to joik at an early age in

Kautokeino, Norway, and that because of his efforts many more Sarni natives know how to joik today. After Gaup' s

performance, organizers encouraged attendees to walk around and look at the various exhibit items, one of which was large authentic Sarni tent. Organizers also offered reindeer meat, which is a traditional Sarni dish. As the evening proceeded, documentary films "Tundra Cowboy" and "People and Power: Under Northern Lights" played for the attendees. an Troy Storfjell, associate professor and of Norwegian Scandinavian studies and a Sarni, also spoke at the event. He spoke about the iinportant role joik has played in Sarni culture. He explained that because the Sarni people had managed to take something that had been looked down upon for so long and tum it into something to be proud of, it has been an iinportant part of the indigenous rights movement. Storfjell said it is one of the reasons why the Sarni people are also considered leaders in this movement. Storfjell also drew a parallel between the Native American tribes' and the Sarni people's struggle for human rights and dignity. "We're working to build a Native American Indigenous. studies program here at PLU," Storfjell said. Storfjell and three other professors are working closely with the Puyallup and Muckleshoot tribes and the Seattle Indian Health Service. They are creating a program that is closely with the associated local Native American population and also studies the Sarni people. The Sarni exhibit runs until April 1.

Sex Positive with multiple partners: polyamory By RELAND TUOMI News Editor For many people, the idea of seeing their significant other with another would be heartbreaking. But students learned Feb. 10 that some people actively seek this out. To start off the semester, the Sex Positive series introduced polyamory to Pacific Lutheran University. The Women's Center and Diversity Center host the award-winning Sex+ series, focusing on spreading knowledge and understanding of sex and relationships. and Polyamory- unlike polygamy polyandry, where there is one primary person with multiple partners of the same sex-allows a person to have many partners of different genders and levels of relationship commitment. Someone may see one of his or her partners as a live-in boyfriend or girlfriend, while another partner is seen as a new love or crush. "Poly has many definitions," Allena Gabosch, a Sex+ panelist and executive director of the Center of Sex Positive Culture, said. "But it is mostly focused on relationship structures and communal ethics between partners."

The panel was made up of five people in polyamorous relationships, one exclusively gay, two in bisexual relationships and a married couple. When asked how polyamory works in their marriage, Adrianne and Jay - who did not give their last names - gave informative answers. "I love the freedom to connect with other people," Adrianne said. "I love seeing him [Jay] be in relationships and be happy with those people."

Jay agreed, saying polyamory has allowed him to make deep connections with a few people whereas monogamy only allowed for a relationship with one person. The audience asked Jay and Adrianne if they ever feel jealousy within their relationship, especially since they are married. "I feel a sense of compersion," Adrianne said, "which means that I get a sense of joy from seeing my partner interact with others. Like, when I see him kiss someone, he looks so cute and happy and that makes me happy." Attendees also asked the panelists what major misconceptions people have about the polyamorous community. The most common one the panel discussed was the myth everyone in the community has sex all the time. "I wish," Gabosch said. "The funny thing about the poly community is we spend a lot of time talking about sex and relationships and don't have a lot of sex." At the close of the event, the panel encouraged students to learn more about polyamory and to learn more about themselves.

To learn more about polyamory, visit the Center for Sex Positive Culture's website at http://thecspc.org/.


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FEB. 21, 2014

A&E 5 ..

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Hit BBC series returns with witty dialogue, new villain By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor

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January ushered in a new year, new study away trips and, most importantly, a new season of BBC s "Sherlock." The British mini-series has received awards and critical praise since its premiere in 2010, but fans of the series were forced to wait two years after the second season, which ended on a major cliffhanger, for the show's return. This is partially due to the popularity of the series' two main stars, Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes and Martin Freeman as best friend John Watson. Cumberbatch starred in the latest "Star Trek" film and voiced two different characters in "The Hobbit" series. Freeman plays the lead, Bilbo Baggins, in "The Hobbit" series. But the show that launched their was careers "Sherlock," a modem adaptation of Arthur Sir C o n a n Doyle's "Sherlock

Holmes," which is set in a London that includes everything from cars to cell phones. Sherlock's super sleuthing skills apply just as well in the 21st century. He can deduce a person's habits, family or darkest secrets from mannerisms or objects like a phone or a hat. He also prefers texting to phone calls. Following the usual series format, season three is divided into three 90-minute episodes. The story picks up two years after Sherlock's apparent suicide, just as John Watson is moving on with his life and preparing to propose to his girlfriend, Mary Morstan, who is portrayed by Freeman's real life partner Amanda Abbington. During episode one, John struggles to forgive Sherlock for the suicide deception while the consulting detective tries uncover terrorist plot against Parliament. In the second episode, Sherlock reminisces

about past cases during John's wedding to Mary and in the third, Sherlock faces off against his latest nemesis, professional blackmailer Charles Augustus Magnussen, who is portrayed by Lars Mikkelson. As a show, "Sherlock" has been known for its witty, fastpaced dialogue, intricate criminal cases and character development. Season three included all of these, but it had an even stronger emphasis on the character development. Overall, the third season worked welL It may not have surpassed some of the flawless episodes of seasons past, but it did have numerous spectacular moments, such as John's succession of attacks against Sherlock when the detective insensitively explains his faked suicide. Another included John's bachelor party, during which John and Sherlock both get completely drunk and try to solve a case that ends with Sherlock puking on a piece of evidence. What the stories in season three did lack was the presence of an overarching villain. Magnussen disappears entirely from the second episode, and he failed to really

stand up to the quirky madness of previous villain Jim Moriarty. Despite this, the series provided another intriguing season that tops practically everything else on television. Some reports have given fans reason to hope for a season four as soon as Christmas. However, other sources warn it could be another two years before "Sherlock" solves his next case. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CREAT£VE COMMONS

Solo, pianist will 'turn Lagerquist to gold' Art Centre. Justifiably a bit hungover, and betraying slight but visible traces of unease, Moonface wasted little time launching into a full "Breathe on my skin; be my first violin; I am performance of his most recent album. blind and helpless, what else is there to say?" Hungry, hoarse-throated devotees banged their fists on the edge of the stage. Spencer Krug - known by his soloMoonface's stripped-down, vulnerably project moniker, Moonface - stepped onto introspective, solo piano record "Julia with the stage of Seattle's Columbia City Theater Blue Jeans On" came out October 2013 on on a fairly quiet Sunday in November. Jagjaguwar Records. With whiskey in one hand, his other I admit, when I first discovered shielded his eyes from the stage lights, Moonface, I had made a mental category unceremoniously bright for the kind of for the quirky but unremittingly original show that should be dimly lit. warbling synth-guy from Wolf Parade He arrived in Seattle shortly before via and Sunset Rubdown, which had since Greyhound from Vancouver, B.C., where disbanded. Yes, Moonface is the same just the day before he played a sold-out individual. No, he is not the same artist. show at the Djavad Mowafaghian World Moonface marks a total departure from those acts in which Krug was one of several key ingredients in the groups' composition. Yes, Moonface is the same individual. alchemical Moonface may never bring back "Kissing the No, he is not the same artist. Beehive," "111 Believe in Anything" or "Snake's Nathaniel Youmans Got a Leg." The alchemy LASRDJ of Moonface is perhaps in its most transformational

By NATHANIEL YOUMANS LASRDJ

stage yet. It should keep the needle of your turntable in constant contact with "Julia" for at least seven days. There are some artists who are talented at their craft. Then there are those artists who, on the lower frequencies of intuition, strike you in the stomach with what could be described as the ineffable PHOTO COURTESY OF SPENCER KRUG embodiment of awareness-as-art. Spencer Krug, also known as Moonface, will perform Feb. 27 in Lagerquist . It is that organically developed craft that will keep you without months of college. Associated Students of PLU and Lute release when, in the album's first single, he sings: "Everybody ends up talking to the Air Student Radio will host Moonface' s second stateside show since his return from sky or looking the elephant in the eye." I have had the immense pleasure of what a four-month European tour. We will be busy turning everything into was once a pipe-dream - bringing one of my favorite artists to Pacific Lutheran gold. Moonface performs Feb. 27 at 8 p.m. in University - come to fruition in my final Lagerquist.


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Students prepare for annual social justice event By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer Students will have a chance to learn about oppression firsthand at the sixth annual Tunnel of Oppression at Pacific Lutheran University Feb. 28. The Tunnel of Oppression is a multimedia, interactive experience designed to raise awareness about the oppression of individuals throughout the country and the world, according to the Diversity Center's website. The Tunnel will be filled with exhibits highlighting issues such as heterosexism, human trafficking, intimate partner violence and torture. These are just some examples. Student volunteers will act out real-life scenarios in the exhibits. Tour guides lead groups of participants through a variety of exhibits. Last year, junior Amanda Brasgalla worked as one of these guides. Brasgalla said the Tunnel of Oppression is a way for students to see a multitude of people who are oppressed around the world. "It helps explore issues that many people do not talk about, and hopefully opens some people's eyes to those who are lacking voices in the world," Brasgalla said. "I enjoyed working it, because I feel like it's a great vehicle for some people to see how lucky they are." Senior Saiyare Refaei has performed at Tunnel events in the past. In 2012, she played a child returning home to find her

parents h ad been taken by police or military forces as part of the Latinos Unidos club' s exhibit. Refaei said the best thing about being a part of Tunnel was seeing the reaction of those coming into the scene. "I remember making someone cry," she said. "To make an impact like that was very powerful for me, and demonstrates that Tunnel can become very real, and demonstrates acts of oppression that are traumatic and happening every day." The Diversity Center, the Women's Center, Associated Students of PLU and Student Involvement and Leadership are sponsoring the event. According to PLU's web page, the goal of the PLU Tunnel of Oppression is to raise awareness of issues of privilege and oppression by presenting scenes grounded in real-world, lived experiences and to provide space for dialogue and reflection on social justice issues. Sophomore Denae McGaha said she thinks the Tunnel event works well. "The participants put so much time and effort into it. You can tell that it's a really loving way of students educating their classmates," she said. Refaei said she will be designing another scene with Latinos Unidos Club. She said she looks forward to walking through Tunnel for a final time as a PLU student_

The Tunnel event will be in the Chris Knutsen Hall in the Anderson University Center from 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

"It [the Tunnel of Oppression] helps explore issues that many people do not talk about." Amanda Brasgalla junior

FEB. 21, 2014

Commuter student complaints

PHOTO BY KATIE DEPREKER

First -year Matthew Orcilla relaxes in The Cave between classes. The Cave is reserved for first -year and sophomore co=uter students to socialize, study and have lunch.

ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer Society often equates the college experience with students living in dorms, sharing everything from rooms and bathrooms to seating in the dining hall. It is important to remember, however, that this is only one kind of college experience. Commuting to school is more often than not a reality for many college students. According to the Pacific Lutheran University website, 54 percent of students who attend PLU commute. students Commuter face their own problems. "It gets really hard

when there are especially long gaps between classes," first-year DeSeila Scott said. "There is nowhere to go, nothing to do and no place to nap." The Cave and the Commuter Kreidler Lounge operate from 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. They are supposed to be the commuter and transfer student havens, however, they offer no support to those who have late meetings or practices. "A 24-hour commuter lounge area with a full kitchen, microwave and nice comfy couches for taking naps would be really great," sophomore Courtney Randall said. The most common complaints among

commuter students were the issues of involvement and dining. "It is really hard to get involved because almost all the events are held here at night," first-year Emi Smith said. "Not to mention everyone already has their friend cliques from orientation or whatever, so it is super hard to make friends." "Oh yeah, it also sucks not to have a dining plan, because it is ridiculous to pay $15 for dinner," Randall said. "Customized meal plans would be really nice." Dining and Culinary Services provides smaller meal plans for Kreidler, South Hall and off-campus students.

Garfield Street coffeeshop is Parkland's own living roolll

PHOTO BY LINA AAS-HELSETH

LEFT: Juniors Cady Smith, left, and Chloe Hagstroem, right, do their homework in the back room at Northern Pacific Coffee Company. "It's a great place to study, and I am actually able to get things done," Hagstroem said. RIGHT: Ed Cedras, who owns NPCC, brews a cup of coffee for a customer.

By LINA AAS-HELSETH 路 Guest Writer You might have noticed the tiny coffee shop on the comer of Garfield and C streets, just a stone's throw away from Pacific Lutheran University. At any given time, Northern Pacific Coffee Company is either filled with students or musicians putting on a show, and the atmosphere is always very welcoming. Ed Cedras moved to Parkland in 1994 and bought Northern Pacific Coffee Company, also known as NPCC, in 2011. Cedras, a New York native, said he wanted to get a change of scenery from the chaotic big city lifestyle. He found the coffee consumption in the Pacific Northwest area interesting. "You know, being born in

New York and spending most of my childhood and youth 路 in the South, I've definitely noticed the high coffee consumption here in the Pacific Northwest," Cedras said. "I think it's the weather. It gets cold here." Junior Chloe Hagstroem said she often finds herself studying at NPCC and takes advantage of the shop's amenities. "I like studying here because the atmosphere is very studious - when bands aren't playing of course," Hagstroem said. "There's always people I know here, so it's a great place to study, and I am actually able to get things done." Sophomore Brent Tyhuis said he appreciates that, unlike his dorm, NPCC has many tables, which makes studying easier. "I haven't really been here that often, and I don't really know

why, because it's a great place to relax, grab a cup of coffee and just study," Tyhuis said. Students aren't the only ones who spend their time at NPCC. Parkland local Kesendra Williams swings by the coffee shop at 3 p .m. every Friday. "I usually meet my theater group here. This place is a

wonderful space for the local community to gather together," Williams said.

U.S. coffee consumption is big bucks Coffee consumption remains high throughout the year. According to First Research, there

"It feels good to be able to give back to the community by having this shop up and running." EdCedras Owner, Northern Pacific Coffee Company

were about 20,000 coffee shops in the U.S. with combined revenues of $10 billion in 2011. Seattle residents consume more coffee than any other American city. According to a study conducted in 2011 by market research firm NPD Group, there are 35 coffee shops per 100,000 residents. On average, Americans drink more than 4,600 cups every second, more than 400 million cups of coffee every day and consume 300 billion pounds of coffee beans every year. When NPCC owner Ed Cedras was asked why he chose Parkland of all places to buy a coffee shop, he said, "How can you not? This place is great, and it feels good to be able to give back to the community by having this shop up and running."


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8 BUSINESS

FEB. 21, 2014

The Disney College Program Student shares experience of magical internship By ZACH WITTSTRUCK Guest Writer Lutes searching for the adventure of a lifetime could get the opportunity to see their wishes granted with the Disney College Program (DCP). Lutes, including myself, have represented Pacific Lutheran University in both the California and Florida programs on a handful of occasions. I participated from January to May of 2013, and I am so grateful to be counted among the Lutes who have called the Magic Kingdom their home. PLU is currently represented by sophomore Lindsey Campbell,

who is in the DCP in Orlando. Campbell said she is ecstatic to get the word out about this exciting opportunity. Since her arrival to the program Feb. 3, Campbell said she has already met people studying a variety of topics from around the world through the DCP. "I have met education, theater, biology, pre-med, computer science and social work majors, just to name a few," Campbell said. "Disney creates happiness for people of all ages, cultures and backgrounds." My own Disney experience closely relates to Campbell's when it comes to meeting a variety of people.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ZACH WITTSTRUCK

Students who take part in the Disney College Program can enter the Disney Parks for free during the duration of the internship.

Today, I have friends from Australia, South Korea, England, France and several U.S. states. I owe it all to my time as a Disney intern. During my internship, I took part in two advertising courses, several volunteer opportunities and I took advantage of nearly every social outing Disney provided. The extra effort in my job location gave me perhaps one of the most rewarding relationships I made through my program. One night at work I decided to stay an extra two hours to help a co-worker with a side project. We quickly became friends, and I eventually learned that he was an illustrator and graphic design artist for Pixar. Since meeting him, I have learned about the different programs Pixar is using and the marketing strategies for their new projects from him. This incredible connection has PHOTO COURTESY OF ZACH WITTSTRUCK fueled my passion for my career Senior Zach Wittstruck poses wit h Goofy during his free t ime in t he Disney choice even further. College Program. Disney designs its internships to present its students with a opportunities. March. When they're not working, variety of incredible opportunities The application contains - professional ambitions are a interns can enter the park for free information about college courses and enjoy everything it has to offered, job opportunities that are high priority. 路 available and other details about As a Fortune 500 company that offer. In the five months I was the program can be found on the just added two more major labels - Marvel (2009) and Lucasfilm privileged to spend in Disney official DCP website. (2012) join its already stunning World, the park constantly blew lineup that includes ABC, ESPN me away by how much there was FLU and Disney representatives, and Pixar - the Disney Company to see and do. Every day is an adventure, including myself, will hold an is a terrific place for networking. During the program, and the DCP will provide information session March 3 from participants meet with and study nothing short of an unforgettable 5-6 p.m. in the Anderson University under experts in the fields of experience. Center, room 133. Disney is accepting We welcome anybody who is marketing, advertising, public relations and business, but applications for the DCP for interested in this remarkable chance they can also take advantage its fall advantage program of a lifetime. of a variety of other learning from now until the end of

CONSUMER DESENSITIZATION Advertisers feel the threat of customer sensory overload By AMANDA GENTRY Guest Writer On a daily basis, consumers can see anywhere from hundreds to thousands of advertisements yet only be consciously aware of a small amount of them. This is due to desensitization - the more ads we see, the less attention we pay to each individual ad. As we progress in years, we are faced with alterations in marketing tactics as the consumer and technology change. Ads are becoming more interactive and are catered to individual needs and preferences to make them more stimulating to the purchaser. According to an article in the "Journal of Interactive Advertising," some approaches to advertising may work in the short term. But in the long run, these are likely to be unsuccessful as shoppers become more accustomed to this new style and

learn to overlook these messages. In the book, "Gimme! The Human Nature of . Successful Marketing," John Hallward states that in a study that asked viewers to describe a television ad they had recently seen, only about half could correctly identify the company the advertisement was promoting. This has become a real problem for companies who want to get

consumer will see them, whether it's on the Internet, product placement in a TV series or even in mobile applications. This forces marketers to keep up with the development of technology and social media sites as well as popular trends. By doing so, their messages become widespread in a number of interactive and personal ways to get the attention of their intended

With the number of advertisements consumers see in one day, they may not be consciously aware of them all, because they are subconsciously tuning them out. their names out there, so they are coming up with new and creative ways to advertise their products and brand labels. In order for advertisers to be remembered, they have to strategically place ads where the

audience using emotional and sensory triggers. In December 2006, the California Milk Processing Board resorted to cardboard "Got Milk?" ads encased in the bus stop walls in San Francisco that emitted the

smell of chocolate chip cookies to play to the consumer's sense of smell. Since businesses put out numerous advertisements for the public eye to see, shoppers are bombarded with them. According to the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, "although the brain is an amazing organ, it's not equipped to process the billions of bits of information that bombard it every second." It also describes that the brain has filters to keep the brain from overloading, allowing the brain to only process about 2,000 bits of information per second. number of With the advertisements consumers see in one day, they may not be consciously aware of them all, because they are subconsciously tuning them out. As marketing continues to change, consumers are becoming more oblivious to what they see around them.

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As technology has increased, so have a dvertisements and the variety of mediums 'that a marketer can use to reach advertisers. In the past, advertising mediums were much more limited. This vintage soup advertisement from 1934 would only have been available in print, in contrast to the variety of technological mediums available to consumers today.


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FEB. 21, 2014

BUSINESS 9

'DUMB STARBUCKS' Parody busi~ess may face corporate lawsuit By JILLIAN STANPHILL Guest Writer When it comes to creating a parody company based on a real corporation, Starbucks isn't the company to mess with. Recently, a coffee shop opened in the Los Angeles area called "Dumb Starbucks." Every menu item mirrored that of Starbucks, simply with the addition of 'dumb' in front of the drink. The logo and attire of employees followed suit. comedian The operator, Nathan Fielder, claimed that by simply adding 'dumb' to the title, his small business just barely falls under the requirements for fair use or parody law. would mean that This Starbucks would have no right to sue. Starbucks thinks otherwise. Dumb Starbucks is not in any way affiliated with the original Starbucks Corporation. "We are evaluating next steps, and while we appreciate the humor, they cannot use our name, which is a protected trademark," the Starbucks Corporation said in a statement released Feb. 10. Almost as quickly as Dumb Starbucks opened, it closed, lasting only four days. The Los Angeles County Health Department shut down the coffee shop because it was operating without a health permit. Fielder said he still has big plans for his brain child and plans to open a new store in Brooklyn.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

"Dumb Starbucks" is not affiliated with the original Starbucks Corporation. The parody business was only open for four days . The Los Angeles County Health Department forced it to close because it did not have a health permit.

His show "Nathan For You" airs on Comedy Central and focuses on marketing plans to expand small business clientele that are a little less than orthodox. His Twitter handle for his operation, @dumbstarbucks, has 15.5 thousand followers and only eight tweets. Aaron J. Moss, a partner at Los Angeles law firm Greenberg

Outsourcing: ByCHEYANNE SCHAEFER Guest Writer From kindergartners to college students, many people consume goods on a daily J?asis and are unaware of the ethical debate surrounding the production of these goods. A major ethical debate involves outsourcing internationally, a practice that is growing in the United States. According to Investopedia, a website that defines business terms, outsourcing is "a practice used by different companies to reduce costs by transferring portions of work to outside suppliers rather than completing it internally." example, companies For can send tasks in accounting, research and financial analysis to another country in a different timezone overnight, where the workers would complete the tasks and send them back to the U.S. company by morning. This definition also includes major U.S. clothing companies that utilize foreign sweatshops. There are many companies in the U.S. using outsourcing to help make a larger profit. These include Amazon, Ford, Dell,

Gateway, Target and many more. These companies provide exceptional products that people are constantly paying top dollar to buy, but perhaps not all of these customers consider where these products are coming from. Businesses want to outsource because they are seeking to make the best profit possible. They can achieve more profit by continually having lower costs with production in other countries. Some companies in the U.S. are clearly driven by the profit motive, which is what outsourcing helps achieve. Another great reason to outsource is that it helps allow companies to reach outside the U.S. to find the best expertise for the job. On the other hand, with businesses moving their work out of the U.S. to other locations where they can maintain cheaper costs, fewer jobs are available to the average American. This then creates a more uneven distribution of wealth concerning the economy, as the owners of the company become wealthier and the average person becomes poorer. With these factors in mind, there is a common question of

Glusker, said Dumb Starbucks "is copyright and trademark infringement on steroids" and "You can't just take a famous logo and trade dress, call it dumb and use it to sell the very same products in competition with the company you're making fun of." Even Jimmy Fallon was confused by Fielder's reasoning behind the small business, or as

Fielder called it on "Late Night WithJimmyFallon" lastTuesday, an "art gallery." "The health department came and shut us down for selling coffee without a health permit," Fielder said on Fallon's show. "What they don't understand is that, technically, legally speaking, we're an art gallery. And the coffee we're selling is

considered the art." What Fielder doesn't seem to understand is that the real issue facing him is possible jail time. Starbucks could sue, and he could lose the case. The law of fair use that he is protecting himself with may not be on his side, but on that of Starbucks. Previous United States Supreme Court cases about fair use have led to a specification in fair use. The U.S. Supreme Court has stated that the work being parodied must add "something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the first with new expression, meaning, or message." It cannot "merely 'supersede the objects' of the original creation." With this in mind, Dumb Starbucks may be able to win this case, as the lines of customers stretched around the block were not likely to have been caused by a desire for the product. More likely, people visited the coffee shop for the novelty of the experience, as many took pictures of Dumb Starbucks. But this certainly doesn't mean the new coffee shop adds anything new with a further purpose. It is a copycat replica of Starbucks with the addition of one adjective. Currently, there are no Dumb Starbucks in operation and Fielder is attending health court for his health permit violations.

The debate over the ethics of this controversial practice heats up whether outsourcing is or is not ethical, but it really boils down to an individual's moral perspective. One way to look at outsourcing is that it helps provide jobs and income for other countries around the world that may be in dire need of the help. As for the con side of outsourcing, some people may question the actual quality and safety of the products being outsourced. Every country has different production and safety laws. "We need to go back to old school America and make it all here," sophomore Alyssa Luttress, a business student, said. "I understand how cost efficient it is to outsource, but in the long run we can be so much more cost effective, efficient and have more domestic opportunity." Another business student, senior Tabitha Gross, said she feels it is a necessary but problematic business practice. "With consumers demanding low-priced goods and services, businesses have no choice but to decrease their own expenses in order to remain competitive in the marketplace," Gross said. However, Gross said she

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

A young man working in a factory in Marrakech, Morocco manufactures chess pieces for an American game company.

believes outsourcing is not the answer to delivering low-priced goods and services. "It often reduces the quality of the products and services while putting qualified workers in the community out of work," Gross said. two Considering those opinions, it seems as though it is unethical to outsource when the U.S. population is in need of jobs

and many prefer American-made products. By discontinuing outsourcing, the US would then have more jobs available for people living in the U.S. However, even with these advantageous outcomes, it is always important to remember the benefits that would end along with outsourcing.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

FEB. 21, 2014

Wanderlust: The Land Down Under is full of surprises

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA98447

By MADDIE BERNARD Guest Columnist When I first set out on my monthlong Australian journey with 13 other Pacific Lutheran University students, I did not know what to expect. In retrospect, it was a bad idea to blindly travel without doing any research. Most people do not know that Australia is the same size as the continental United States but only has the population of Washington and Oregon. They also find it surprising that the Sydney Opera House is as far from the Great Barrier Reef as Texas is from Massachusetts. I sure didn't know these things before I ventured into the Land Down Under, but I wish I had. Before the trip, all I really knew about Australia was that they have kangaroos, koalas, the Great Barrier Reef, beautiful beaches, P. Sherman 42 Wallaby Way and the Sydney Opera House. So many Americans, myself included, assumed that Australia would be a tropical version of the United States and that most things would be the same. However, my travels in Melbourne, Canberra - Australia's capital - and Sydney proved my initial thoughts wrong, and I was pleasantly surprised by Australia. The focus of our class was to study the media industry in Australia. We met with news anchors, radio hosts, producers and journalists who willingly welcomed us into their workplaces. I could not believe the hospitality we received and how these very highly esteemed people told us all their secrets. We would never be allowed access to these places in the United States, and it was mind blowing that these people took the time out of their busy day to meet with us. We always received a warm Australian welcome at each place we traveled. Locals would approach us when we were lost to give us directions and then would spend 10 minutes telling us their favorite sites and restaurants we should visit. Oftentimes, people would hear our strong American accents and strike up a conversation because they wanted to know about our journey. One particular instance occurred when we were on a bus to Canberra. It was toward the end of our 12-hour travel day, and we were all starving. A few 路~tudents and I began to talk about our favorite types of food when a local man turned around in his seat and chimed in. We talked for a while, and when he heard we were studying media,

EDITOR-IN-CIIIEF

Jessica 'frond.sen mast@plu.edu

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu

NEWS EDITOR

Reland Tuomi A&EEDITOR

Alison Haywood BUSINESS EDITOR

Kelli Breland OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR Sam Hom PHOTO EDITOR

Jesse Major SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Kels Mejlaender PHOTO COURTESY OF MADDIE BERNARD

COPY EDITOR

Sophomore Maddie Bernard relaxes by the water in front of the Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia. As a symbol of Australia, The Opera House, has earned the repuation of a world class perfoming arts center.

he instantly perked up and said he worked for Parliament as the media liaison for the prime minister and could give us a behind the scenes tour of Parliament. He not only kept his promise and gave us a specialized tour, but also sat down with us for coffee and answered all of our questions about how to begin a career in media. This man is one of the most powerful media specialists in Australia, and we met him on the bus. His hospitality was incredible, and I believe he truly encompassed the Australian spirit. His acts of kindness made a lasting impression on me I know I will not forget. These acts of kindness caught me off guard, because strangers are not so friendly to tourists in America. Australian friendliness truly was a breath of fresh air and was something I did not expect to encounter on my journey. Another huge surprise occurred at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. I was shocked to learn that Australia has supported and fought with the Americans in every war. I had no idea the Australian military helped our country so much in war and was slightly disturbed that I had never learned this fact in school. On the other hand, Australian children know all about how they had helped the U.S. in battle and hold great pride in their history. At the memorial, I had a huge

Blake Jerome ONLINE EDITOR

realization - Americans don't know much about Australia. As I reflected upon my journey so far, all the ignorant questions I had asked came flooding back to me: How do you play cricket? What is Vegemite? Who is the prime minister? How did people come to inhabit Australia? In that moment I felt so naive. The Australians knew so much about my way of life, and I knew so little about theirs. We as Americans need to learn more about Australia and the foreign countries we travel to. We should not be naive when we travel, and we should do our research before we depart. There are wonderful countries out there, full of kindhearted people who certainly know a lot about us. I believe it is our duty to become more informed about other cultures, because we share so much common history. Americans should take on the Australian spirit in particular and treat strangers with more hospitality. Strike up a conversation on the bus with someone - you never know who you may meet. The Land Down Under made a lasting impression on me and is definitely some place I desire to return to in my lifetime. So get informed and travel the world, because there are beautiful places out there that just might surprise you.

Leah Traxel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Storm Gerlock MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Evan Heringer NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Allison Reynolds ADVISERS Cliff Rowe ArtLand POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community.

The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than

500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p .m . the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Students on a budget need Netflix, not cable By KATELYNN PADRON Guest Writer

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Keeping up with popular television is part of the college experience. At only $7.99 per month, Netflix allows viewers to watch a wide array of shows and movies on a tight budget. But somehow Comcast and other cable providers are still in business. If you watch every game or match of every sport, you may want to pay for cable. However, if you only follow one or two

teams, you should consider dumping it. This football season, my husband and I went to family members' houses and to Buffalo Wild Wings to watch the Seahawks demolish the competition. It's a lot more fun to watch live sports in a community setting and it can save you $70 per month. While Netflix doesn't have movies until a couple months after they exit theaters, Redbox does - and you can rent them for $1.30 per day and return them to any Redbox. There's one at Walgreens on the comer of Pacific Avenue and 121 Street. It's much cheaper than buying movies on demand from your cable company, and it's still pretty convenient. Even if you absolutely need movies on demand, you can still ditch cable. I admit, I miss watching television premieres on cable.

Especially premieres of suspenseful shows that inspire sp oilers on social media, like "The Walking Dead." But in the long run, it's better to make friends and attend "Walking Dead" viewing parties instead of wasting money watching the show alone. However, if you have too many shows that you like to watch right when they air, Netflix may not be for you. You may have noticed that if all your friends and family followed my advice and got rid of cable, you would never be able to watch live sports or television premieres. I suggest you make friends with a few people who are ridiculously into sports or television premieres and cannot part with cable. That way, you11 always have a place to go to watch the Seahawks and "The Walking Dead." Netflix can help students on a too-small-for-cable budget enjoy movies and television.


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â&#x20AC;˘ THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 21, 2014

OPINION 11

Facebook gives users new gender options

Reclaim and embrace 'vagina' By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Columnist

For the last few weeks, you may have noticed posters advertising for Pacific Lutheran University's annual production of "The Vagina Monologues," an episodic play by Eve Ensler. Just last year, I couldn't help but be enticed by the posters. I wasn't entirely sure what the play was about, but I had somehow together the cobbled broad notion that it was a collection of monologues on women's experiences. Although I had thought about what it may be about, I somehow hadn't gone to see it yet. However, this year, I was able to attend.

Ensler wrote the first draft of the play in 1996, basing it on interviews Ensler conducted with about 200 women. It began with Ensler and some friends casually discussing their with sex, experiences relationships and violence against women, but their stories led to other women's stories until there was a network The purpose of the work is to celebrate the vagina, which has had a history fraught with hushed tones and absence. Even today, many still act as though "vagina" is a dirty word, unfit for public conversation or display. Junior Sarah Wheeler, a cast member of PLU's production, was in "The Lists," a monologue that elllbraces vaginas as the center of a women's sexuality. After seeing it her first year at PLU, Wheeler said she thought it was unbelievable. ''.At that time, I could barely say 'vagina' out loud, and here were these women shouting to the rooftops their feminine power," Wheeler said.

Wheeler finally decided to participate this year and described the experience as "completely unnerving and uncomfortable, as it's been really difficult for me to show a sexual side of myself to the world, but why should it be?" "The Vagina Monologues" embraces women's sexuality, and this embrace must also include vaginas. As some friends and I were perusing the posters, one said, "Why can't they call it 'The Women Monologues?' 1 would be much more willing to see it then." For me, this is the point, or a piece of it. We cannot keep pretending that nothing exists between a woman's legs. Society must reclaim the word "vagina" and put it at the forefront to represent the unique, significant and diverse experiences -0ÂŁ all women it is central. Every experience I have ever had in my life has been in some way influenced by the fact that I have a vagina and am gendered as a woman. Yet, it is still hard for women to come to terms

with their vaginas. Often, I hear vaginas mentioned with the words "dirty," "disgusting'' and "hate." "People act like talking about women's bodies is a dirty thing that should never be done under any circumstances, but it's not," Wheeler said. Through her participation in the play, Wheeler said she has come to the conclusion that "rejecting that notion and feeling the rebellion in saying the lines in such a public space is beyond liberating.'' Not until "The Vagina Monologues" did I hear of love and acceptance of the vagina. It was fantastic and yet made me feel oddly uncomfortable at times. One monologue, "Reclaiming Cunt," ends with calls for audience members to say the word "cunt." I must admit, I couldn't bring myself to say this word aloud just yet. However, in the process of reclaiming these words, we must be willing to say them without shame. To reclaim "vagina," we must embrace the vagina.

By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist Facebook users no longer have to pick between just two gender choices. The company has added a vast number of alternative and gender genders identifications for users creating profiles. While previously offering only a female or male option, Facebook has released a selection of more than 50 gender-identifying or in some cases unidentified - choices. ABC News reports there will be options for pronoun use such as him, her and their as well. Facebook's own diversity page released the statement, "When you come to Facebook to connect with the people, causes and organizations you care about, we want you to feel comfortable being your true, authentic self." While this decision may not affect everyone, the community it does affect is speaking volumes on behalf of those who have been advocating for change. In an age where online identity is so prominent in daily life, the demand for choices available for some of the 1.23 billion active monthly users was exceedingly high. For those that may be in opposition, Facebook's representatives said they simply considered the underlying fact for an individual's need of expression. Alex Shultz, Facebook's director of growth, said, "It was simple: Not allowing people to express something so fundamental is not really cool, so we did something." This quote is critical in understanding the decision made by Facebook. Whether people believe it was a good business move for Facebook or not is irrelevant. In its market, Facebook is catering to the consumer, who in this case was demanding options. Facebook representatives said this did not personally affect other users who would only identify with the male or female options. A petition for a variety of options was the spark to create this new stride in social change. While companies such as Google+. have had options such as female, male and other, Facebook has placed itself as frontrunner, providing the most diverse collection of expressing your gender. While a handful of users may need some explanation on what the vast number of different genders even mean, the only people personally affected by this new addition are those who lobbied for it in the first place. Overall, it seems as if users are happy with this decision. "It's good that a social media site with the global reach that Facebook has is taking the initiative of providing people with the option to express who they want to be and who they identify as," sophomore Christian Dilworth said. Facebook has done an excellent job of maintaining itself as a business that meets the demand of its users.

'P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast OUR GENERATION LEADS THE WAY By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist People constant ly tell us Millennia-ls to put our phones away. They tell us we are losing our roots, and we are losing history, and that we do not have our priorities in order. We are plagued with selfies and Fear of Missing Out (FOMO). People tell Millennia.ls we are coddled, and we do not work hard enough. They tell us not to expect technology to do everything for us. While it's true we sometimes waste our time with ridiculous things on YouTube, being a Millennial is much more than that. Millennia.ls are not like any other generation before. You are special. You might feel like people keep telling you what you are doing wrong or that you need more experience before you can get a good job. In reality, you are a Millennial, and you are already running the country. Being young is no longer a handicap it is a strength. Our generation is the first since the 70s-era generation to be taking a radical stance and pushing for real change. Millennials are a true force in three

areas: the workplace, politics and art. It is no longer "You are the future." Instead, we have become the now. We are not waiting until we are in our 30s and 40s to get high-paying . corporate jobs and have our voices heard. We are a generation of today, and we are not waiting to change our country, we are doing it now. Junior Allison McClure said she believes the new generation is right on mark. "The fresh perspective is an opportunity to shape the new American value system," McClure said, "though it's still important to recognize the past as not simply the wrong way to go about things." There are 70 million Millennials, just like you and I, who have not reached the age of 30 yet. The first wave is hitting the workforce and creating new jobs that are different than any before. Technology is something we are especially skilled in. The technology of our generation is bringing us into higher positions in companies, causing older employees to be stepped over. We are the new, creative form of business. We bring innovation where tradition used to be. Millennials have taken over the workplace. Everyone knows Mark Zuckerberg. Nobody knows Michael Duke, the CEO of Wal-Mart, which was number one on CNN' s Fortune 500 list. "As young people," sophomore Ryan Fenton said, "we hold the potential for power in the country, which is really important." Our generation is moving tradition

aside and is ready" for a bigger and better tomorrow. When it comes to change, we are unwilling to wait. We have pushed for the legalization of marijuana and gay marriage. We take a stance for things we believe in, and we do not take no for an answer. Older generations may say we are too radical. However, no other generation has proven to have as much power, or be as radically different and tolerant as we have. We have banded together, not as Republicans or Democrats, but as a generation of newwave thinkers who will get the change we desire. Our generation constantly pushes our agenda through our music, our art, our celebrities, and we are not afraid to yell it from the rooftops or our Twitter accounts and Facebook walls. But our art, our music and our television programming not only represent what we find beautiful, but what we find important. Our celebrities represent us, and the change we stand for. Our celebrities know us, and we relate to them. We do not allow the president alone to stand for us, because we are not the same as the rest of America. We are the Millennials. We are different, and we are brilliant. Next time you think you1l never get hired or that people do not take you seriously because you are 20, you like sports and you do not have as much experience on your resume as the next person, just remember that you are a Millennial. And you are a force.

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Corrections Feb. 14 Issue The front page story, "Symposium focuses on catastrophe" misidentified the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize winner speaking at the conference. Jody Williams will not be speaking at the symposium. Deputy Assistant Secretary Jerry White, a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997, is a speaker.

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__,. THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

Edited by Timothy E. Parker February 16, 2014

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PLU focuses on Facebook's new gender options The Mast asked students in a poll starting Feb. 10 how they felt about Facebook's new gender options. Join the conversation at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section. •

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... THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 21, 2014

SPORTS 13

SPORTS SCOREBOARD Men's Basketball

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ARoUND THE LEAGUE••• BASEBALL: George Fox pitcher Tom Za.rosinski. a junior, d<>minated the College ofldaho batters for 8.0 innings in a 4-0 win Sunday in the Cavalier Classic at Concordia. Zarosinski only allowed two hi.ts and I no runs with eight strikeouts and a walk in the shut out. He is 2-0 on I the season with a 0.60 ERA and 16 I strikeouts in 15 innings this season.

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MEN'S BASKETBALL: Senior ~ 1 Daniel Zitani of Pacific posted a pair : of20-plus point games last week. Zitani drained 28 points to help I lead the Boxers past George Fox '~ Tuesday. The senior scored 30 points l in a losing effort to Lewis & Clark 1 Saturday. Zitani continues to lead the . 1 1 Northwest Conference in scoring with ' about 19 points per game.

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SPORTS TALK

Who should win the MVP Award in the NBA this season?

Kevin Durant 31.5 points per game 5.5 assists per game 7.8 rebounds per game Player Efficiency Rating: 30.97

Paul George Max Totaro, sophomore "Kevin Durant, because he's on an absolute tear this season, and he's the best scorer in the league."

22.3 points per game 3.4 assists per game 6.3 rebounds per game Player Efficiency Rating: 20.63 Statistics found at espn.go.com

. Day,ton Harris, sophomore "Paul George, because he means the most to his team, even more so than what Lebron James means to the Miami Heat."

·1

·M AST SPORT PICK 'EM IS BACK Will the Portland Trailblazers or the San Antonio Spurs win Wednesday night? By SAM HORN Sports Editor It's spring time and you know what that means: Mast Sports Pick 'Em is back. This time around, five athletes will be competing against each other in an attempt for bragging rights. The two returning competitors are senior Kyle Peart and sophomore Drew Oord. Three other Pacific Lutheran University athletes will join them. Junior Michelle Hogan is fresh off a historic 2013-14 swimming campaign in which the PLU women's swim team earned its first Northwest Conference championship since 1996. First-year Cale Powers is

gearing up for football, but I'm sure the field goal kicker will have time for the Mast Sports Pick 'Em. Last but not least is junior Alan Bell. The speedster will be competing on the track this spring in an attempt to achieve conference glory. For the first week of the competition, I asked the competitors who will win between the Portland Trailblazers and the San Antonio Spurs. It was a unanimous vote. Everyone said the Trailblazers will earn a hardfought victory. So much for controversy. would be While it interesting for one person to favor the Spurs in this matchup, the Trailblazers

have been one of the most surprising teams this season. · I mean that in the best way possible. Going into the season, not much was expected of the only Pacific Northwest pro basketball team - may you rest in peace, Seattle SuperSonics. All the Trailblazers have done this season is lead the league in scoring, rebounding and free throw percentage as a team. The Trailblazers have put the Pacific Northwest back on the map, seemingly rectifying our region. Although the Trailblazers have lost their last two games, they should be able to overmatch a depleted Spurs squad.

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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

FEB. 21, 2014

Northwest Cup doesn't go as planned for Lutes softball team Lutes fall to 1-3 on the season after bein:g outscored .36-18 in Portland ninth inning, Robinson forced a groundout to give the Lutes their first win of the season.

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After starting off the season with a win, the Lutes-' second game for Saturday was rained out. This forced PLU to prepare for a triple header Sunday. The Lutes headed back to the diamond the next day to take on the Beacons of Northwest Christian, looking for a 2-0 start. Instead, the Lutes were the victims of a 10-5 loss. The Lutes started hot, taking a quick lead by scoring three times in the opening inning. They held their 3-0 lead for two innings, but in the third, the Beacons' bats heated up. They seemingly chased Lutes' starting pitcher Kelli Crawford, a sophomore, away from the game after they scored six runs. Junior Leah Butters replaced Crawford and slowed the Beacons down, but the damage had already been done. The Lutes attempted to come back by adding two runs in the fifth inning, but the Beacons tacked on another run in the

In Pacific Lutheran University's third game of the Northwest Cup, the team squared off against Oregon Tech, losing 104. The game was a back and forth affair, with Oregon Tech taking an early 1-0 lead. The Lutes quickly struck back, however, taking a 2-1 lead. After an exchange of runs for each team, Oregon Tech scored in the sixth inning and took a slim 4-3 lead into the final frame. Robinson, the winning pitcher from Saturday's game against Northwest Christian, was on the mound. After a complete game the day before, she pitched well for six innings, but the Oregon Tech bats caught fire in the top of the seventh inning. They managed to push across six runs, extending Oregon Tech' s lead to 10-3. The Lutes fought back in the bottom of the seventh, but were only able to score one run in the lopsided loss.

Corruption, greed, violence, inequality - for some, these words conjure up the thought of oppressive governmental regimes that most have heard in history class over the years. Many view nations like North Korea, Mexico and Somalia as shining examples of how the world shouldn't be. There are few ways to combat this type of injustice around the world, and for a good amount of the global population, sports are seen as a haven from the harsh realities of real life. Sports are always there, and they always give hope. This winter and the upcoming summer feature two of the biggest sporting competitions ever created: the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia and the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. These are the competitions that dreams are made of. Sports can give a future to some of the most down-trodden, poorest individuals. There's always a light at the end of the tunnel. Young athletes from some of the most impoverished places in the world dream about competing

in the Olympics or the World Cup, to violence in areas around the and there is nothing like watchillg country. your home country compete for Protests are becoming more glory. and more common by the Unfortunately, the good name day. Frustrated Brazilians are of these events has been tarnished demanding the government over the past few years, and a focus on improving health, host of problems have been well transportation, education and documented by athletes, fans and wage equality within the Brazilian the general public in both Brazil society. and Russia. The citizens argue that is more The biggest problem for both important than spending heaps of countries is money. The World cash on the World Cup. Cup is going to cost $14.5 billion In terms of teams actually and the Winter Olympics cost $50 billion. Neither event is expected playing games in Brazilian stadiums, there are more to break even. questions than answers. Some It seems like astronomical costs lead to a variety of social stadiums are behind schedule, meaning construction crews are and political problems. Money is obviously a huge in a race against time to get ready issue, but it is only one of by June. Although Pacific Lutheran many connected with these competitions. Arguably the most University won't be hosting troubling concern is the rampant the Olympics anytime soon or corruption in various political welcoming giddy soccer fans to and commercial sectors of Brazil East Field, the university does have experience with spending and Russia. From members of government, large amounts of money on to private investors and building 路 buildings and fields. Jeff Piaqaudio, a senior who contractors, residents in Brazil's slums have been forcefully spent four years on the PLU men's evicted, their homes being soccer team, thinks otherwise. demolished to make way for He believes sports should not outweigh the general needs of stadiums. Citizens have not reacted society. "Even spending $2 million kindly, and many have turned

2014 WINTER OLYMPICS RUSSIA

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GAME4 In the final game of the weekend, the Lutes took on the host Cavaliers of Concordia University from Portland. Looking to end the weekend on a high note, junior Leah Butters took the mound for PLU and got the Lutes off to a strong start with three straight 1-2-3 innings. That wouldn't be enough though, as the Cavaliers went on to win 9-1. With the game tied at 1-1, things unraveled for the Lutes in the fifth inning when the Cavaliers managed to score five runs on three PLU errors. The Lutes were unable to mount any offensive comel;>ack, and Concordia tacked on three insurance runs in the seventh to close out its win over the Lutes. Butters threw a complete game for the Lutes, surrendering only three earned runs and striking out three. The Lutes (1-3, 0-0) return to action with a pair of Northwest Conference doubleheaders next weekend at home. PLU will take on Pacific at noon and 2 p.m. Saturday. Afterward, the Lutes will face George Fox at noon and 2 p.m. S碌nday .

Corruption main talking point in Winter Olympics and 2014 World Cup By GIANCARLO SANTORO

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GAME3

GAME2

The Lutes looked to begin their season, as _well as the tenure of first-year head coach Erin Brooks, with a step in the right direction. The team made the drive down to Portland to compete in the Northwest Cup, where the Lutes' first opponents were the Coyotes from the College of Idaho. Pacific Lutheran University eked out an 8-7win. Entering the fifth inning, the Lutes faced a 5-4 deficit. But a two out rally sparked by hits from first-year Emily McConnell, senior Spencer Sherwin and senior Lindsey Matsunaga helped the Lutes take a 6-5 lead. After the Lutes added two insurance runs in the sixth inning to extend their lead to 8-5, starting pitcher Kelsey Robinson, a junior, headed back out to the mound. Robinson attempted to pitch a complete game and clinch the win for the Lutes. The College of Idaho refused to go quietly, grinding out two runs and cutting the lead to one. But with two outs in the

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fourth inning, two more in the fifth and one more in the sixth to win convincingly.

on the new turf field is not number, and it is believed that necessarily beneficial to PLU," corruption has accounted for twoPiaquadio said. "It's a luxury, thirds of the money lost. because realistically it could be The president has not been a spent somewhere else. For the popular figure since before the dollar value that is spent on start of the games, launching sports, they are not beneficial an anti-gay campaign that has enough to society." angered much of the global Both Brazilian and Russian community. Similarly to Brazil, the officials have attempted to cover up the true facts about Russian public has questioned its preparation and budgets, but the government over gross spending sad truth is that the media has that could be used to better the spent more time focusing on the lives of Russians in need. Numerous stories have problems than actually covering the competition. surfaced talking about crumbling But now that Sochi's costs stadiums, unfinished hotel rooms have ballooned to more than all and inadequate accommodations the previous Winter Olympics for tourists and athletes. The combined, people should be feeling is that everything was asking questions. The problem rushed, not at all dissimilar to is that the individuals who are Brazil. The result has been massive asked don't tell the truth. In an interview with Bloomberg boycotting of both events. Television, Deputy Prime Minister Unfortunately for protestors, their Arkady Dvorkovich said that the efforts are likely in vain, as Sochi gain from the revenue of tourism is already nearing completion, is huge. Experts from Bloomberg and Brazil has gotten too big to think otherwise, and the numbers fail completely. show Russia isn't expected to If anything, these similarities make its investment back, and at show us the ridiculous amount $50 billion, they couldn't. of money spent in a time where Russian President Vladamir economies around the globe are Putin originally claimed the struggling mightily. But the show budget for the games would be . must go on, as they say. five times less than the current

2014 WORLD CUP BRAZIL

Total cost: $50 billion Stadium costs: $898 million Boost to economy: No monetary gain projected

Total cost: $14.5 billion Stadium costs: $3.5 billion Boost to economy: $5-10 billion

Statistics found at: http://tinyurl.comllru5g2ob

Statistics found at: http://www.americasquarterly.org/zimbali


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THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 21, 2014

SJIM SJIYS... By SAM HORN Sports Writer The term gay, in all of its various definitions, is not clearly understood. The word is still in its infancy, as our society hasn't seemed to come to terms with what it means and what its implications are. Some look down upon the term because many people cannot understand why one person would have romantic or sexual feelings for someone of the same gender. Being gay, it seems, is a foreign concept to many. Being gay is not a disease. It's not a criminal act to love someone of the same sex. In the world of athletics, players seem to tum the other way when being gay is discussed. If an openly gay man enters an NFL locker room, many players won't give him the respect he deserves. Take San Francisco 49ers runnffig back Garrison Hearst for instance. According to The Fresno Bee, Hearst referred to former NFL defensive tackle · Esera Tuaolo as a "punk" for coming out of the closet, and said that he - while using a derogatory term - wouldn't be wanted in the locker room. It's hard to believe people can be this insensitive. Feb. 9, 2014 will stand out in history. In an interview with "Outside the Lines," NFL prospect Michael Sam, a defensive end from the University of Missouri, announced his sexual orientation. After hearing that Sam was gay, many media outlets - in all of their incessant coverage - regarded Sam as a distraction. Analysts have assumed teams won't want him because of that. He's not a criminal. He hasn't done anything wrong. Being gay isn't illegal. The NFL is willing to accept players who commit crimes, like killing dogs - Michael Vick - or threatening a security guard's life - Adam Jones. I don't understand why NFL teams

continue to accept criminals, but snub gay players. It doesn't make any sense. Not one bit. In a league where masculinity is an overarching theme, there seems to be no room for openly gay NFL players. The NFL is the biggest, baddest sports league worldwide. There's an aroma in the NFL that reeks of homophobia. Sam is here to change that odor. If he succeeded in the Southeastern Conference, widely regarded as the toughest college football conference nationwide, then Sam deserves a chance to play in the NFL. After all, Sam didn't earn first team All-American honors this past season for nothing. Sam will meet both hostility and acceptance once he enters the NFL. According to a survey conducted by ESPN, 32 out of 51 anonymous NFL players said they had teammates or coaches use homophobic slurs last season. Sam comes from a tough family background and knows all too well about the fragility of life. Sam shouldn't be discouraged about these statistics. He knows all too well about the fragility of life and has faced plenty of adversity throughout his life. One of his sisters drowned in a lake at only two years old. Sam witnessed one of his brothers being shot to death. Another brother vanished 15 years ago and has not been found since. On top of all that, Sam has two older brothers who have both been in and out of jail. Sam has had a rough upbringing, no doubt about it. While he is undersized for the defensive end position, he has shown a positive work ethic that any NFL team would appreciate. If anyone can succeed in the NFL as an openly gay player, it's Michael Sam. The NFL needs to learn what being gay is all about. Now's a great time to start learning.

SPORTS 15

Michael Sam shouldn't be overlooked by NFL teams

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Michael Sam bas been at the forefront of sports media for the past week. The defensive end from the University of Missouri annoiinced Feb. 9 that be is gay. If Sam is drafted in May, then be would be the first openly gay player in the NFL.

Lutes' senior night spoiled by Boxers By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University men's game came down to the wire, but a foul shot with less than three seconds remaining saw the Boxers knock off the Lutes 54-51. In the first half, both teams struggled to find their groove shooting the basketball. Both teams shot below 30 percent and scored 22 points apiece in the first half. The second half saw more lead

changes, and the two teams were tied at 51 late in the contest. With just 2.6 seconds left, PLU fouled the Boxers' Landon Littlefield on a drive into the lane. Littlefield was able to convert the shot before going to the free throw line. He missed the attempt, but the Lutes were unable to set up a game winning shot after coming down with the rebound. The Lutes outrebounded the Boxers 41-29 but were unable to hold off the deep bench of the visitors, whose reserves scored 16 points.

The Lutes' Johnny Tveter, Kai Hoyt and Arvid Isaksen all started their final home game for PLU. Hoyt totaled 10 points and added 8 rebounds on the night. Isaksen scored 9 points and pulled down 9 rebounds. Tveter added in a hard fought 6 points. The Lutes fell to 7-16 overall and 4-10 in Northwest Conference play. Pacific improved to 14-8 overall and 7-6 in the NWC. The Lutes will end the 2013-14 season this weekend in Oregon, taking on Willamette today and Linfield Saturday.

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LEFT: Senior Kai Hoyt drives to the hoop while trying to push off a Logger defender. Hoyt finished the contest with two points. RIGHT: Sophomore Bryce Miller dishes a pass to an open teammate for an easy bucket. Miller leads the team in assists, averaging about two assists per game.

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THE MOORING MAST

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FEB. 21, 2014

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL UNABLE TO DEFEAT PACIFIC ON SENIOR NIGHT By NICK BARENE Sports Writer In the final home game of the year for the women's basketball team, the Lutes came up short against the visiting Pacific University Boxers. The Lutes shot the ball well beyond the three-point arc. Senior Shelly Kilcup led the attack for the Lutes with 15 first-half points. She hit five of her first 10 shots from the field, three of which were three-pointers. The Lutes also rebounded the ball well in the first half. Senior Katelyn Smith grabbed 10 of her 13 total rebounds in the first half alone.

Because of their stellar three-point shooting and excellent rebounding, the Lutes went into the locker room at halftime holding onto a 31-25 advantage. The second half told a different tale, as the visiting Boxers came out of the gate on a 10-4 run. The run would be a sign of events to come. After a PLU basket, the Boxers scored 12 straight points to take a commanding 46-37 lead. But the Lutes would not go down quietly, and with the help of Kilcup' s long-range efforts and a basket in the paint from senior Samantha Potter, PLU took a 52-51 lead with three minutes to play. The lead changed hands back and forth over the next three minutes in a chess match of strategic fouls and free

throw shooting. But with 30 seconds to play, back-to-bad three-point shots by the Boxer's Alex Pfefferle all but sealec the fate of the game for the Lutes. Sophomore Megan Abdo hit a three-point shot with 1~ seconds to go, but it wasn't enough for the Lutes as the3 lost a heart breaker on senior night, 67-62. Seniors Meliss< Castor, Chrissy Swope, Potter, Kilcup and Smith all playec their final home game for the Lutes. The Lutes fall to 7-16 overall and 3-11 in NWC play and the Boxers improve to 7-14 overall and 3-10 in tht Northwest Conference. The Lutes will take on WillamettE today and close the season against Linfield Saturday.

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Seniors (from le~ to right) Katelyn Smith, Shelly Kilcup, Chrissy Swope, Samantha Potter and Melissa Castor pause to remember their four years at Pacific Lutheran University. The only two seniors who weren't on the team for all four years are Castor and Kilcup.

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SPORTS Softball saga ends in defeat

AdE Lego movie invokes nostalgia

PAGE15

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE FEB. 28, 2014

New state route would create jobs, raise taxes

AST

OORING

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 13

mastmedia. plu.edu

Legacies of the SHOAH Dehumanization 'comes easy... that's the problem'

By BLAKE JEROME . Copy Editor The Garfield Book Company hosted a town hall meeting Saturday where Washington state Senator Steve Conway made himself available to citizens of the 29th legislative district. The senator invited anyone who lives or works within Tacoma, Lakewood, Parkland or Spanaway to attend the meeting and address any of their concerns about the community. Key hot-button issues on the agenda included the transportation budget, K-12 education funding, environmental issues and the development of more family wage jobs. "No one who works full time should have to live in poverty," Conway said. "We need to continue our work in developing more family wage jobs and using what we can in this state to encourage development of those family wage jobs." Conway said he is working on passing a bill that would fund the completion of State Route 167, connecting SR 167 to SR 509 and Interstate 5. The project's completion- should relieve congestion, move freight faster and allow easy access to the Port of Tacoma. "Completing SR 167 between the Port of Tacoma over to 1-5 is so critical for the development of the port," Conway said. "It has the potential to add so many new jobs." To fund the project, the 29th legislative branch has suggested raising gas prices, which Conway supports. Tacoma resident Pam Pratt voiced her disapproval for the proposed gasoline tax increase. "It's not fair to low income senior citizens," she said. With the growing popularity of electric cars, Pratt said those who purchase less gasoline should pay a higher tax along with higher licensing fees. Conway's proposition would raise the gas tax by about 10 cents per gallon, but could potentially raise enough revenue over the next two years to implement a higher quality public transportation system and allow the state to repair many of the roads in Tacoma and Parkland to include the SR 167 project. Pacific Lutheran University senior Jenny

STATE ROUTE CONTINUED PAGE 2 .

WHAT'S INSIDE Business

Coke Freestyle allows for too many choices page9

Sports

Senior harks back to basketball career page 14

Opinion

Housing: "What to do page 10

LEFT: Jerry White, deputy assistant secretary of state, spoke Friday on "The Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations." Photo by Bradford Lum. CENTER: David Livingstone Smith, an associate philosophy professor at the University of New England, spoke Thursday night on dehumanization. "It comes easy... that's the problem," Smith said of dehumanization. Photo by John Froschauer. RIGHT: Swil Kanim, member of the Lummi Nation, spoke with Jay Julius on "Legacy of the Treaty and Sacred Obligations." Phot o by Jessica Trondsen.

By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chief Communities tend to come together in the aftermath of a catastrophe. Last week, the Pacific Lutheran University community came together, instead, to discuss catastrophe. "Legacies of the Shoah," the Wang Center's collaborative project with the Holocaust and genocide studies program, focused on asking questions about genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. "Shoah," a Hebrew word, means "catastrophe." The symposium featured nine speakers, various discussion panels and ongoing activities related to the conference, including information about the study away program and designated places on campus to reflect on the presentations. PLU's Instructional Technologies'

LuteCast service live-streamed the twoday event, making the presentations accessible to people at home. "Shoah" participants could follow along or join in on the conversation by using the tag #PLUSymposium on Twitter. Presentation topics ranged from the issue of dehumanization to survivorship. . In his speech "Less than Human," David Livingstone Smith, an associate philosophy professor at the University of New England, said dehumanization happens every day. "Every time we think of people as monsters, we're dehumanizing," he said. "Monsters don't exist." During Friday's discussion on the "Legacy of the Treaty and Sacred Obligations," Lummi Nation members Jay Julius and Swil Kanim spoke about how proposed coal exports would affect their land, which is sacred ground to

their tribe. "I believe that what you make with your hands can be sacred," Kanim said. "What if you held onto that one notion - the truth - that in you is a truth that only you can share?" The symposium ended Friday night with Jerry White's, deputy assistant secretary of state, speech on "The Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations." White, a co-recipient of the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize 路 awarded to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, spoke on conflict prevention, religious engagement and survivorship. "Emotions are facts," White said. "Legacies of the Shoah" was the sixth biennial Wang Center symposium. PLU's annual Powell-Heller Holocaust Education Conference will continue the conversation March 12-14 with stories of Holocaust survivors and rescuers.

'Reunion' emphasizes that 'things take time' By SAMANTHA LUND Guest Writer Dialogue was the theme for sixtime Nobel Peace Prize nominee Steinar Bryn's presentation about peace building across About 50 people cultures. gathered in CK East Tuesday night to view his film "Reunion," which portrayed his work with Albanians and Serbians. Bryn told the group that dialogue between Albanians and Serbs had never been properly tested, and if used right, it could do great things. The key, he said, is that things take time. The majority of the night focused on the screening of "Reunion." The documentary centers on a group of Albanians

and Serbians who are reunited after Albanians overthrew Serbian . power. The group met once when the Serbs had power, and then again after the power transferred to the Albanians. The goal was to, again, open dialogue between the conflicting groups and have each group hear the other's side. The documentary takes an emotional tum and was open ended. 路 "What we hoped to accomplish is to break more interest in dialogue because it has not properly been tested yet," Bryn said. The evening concluded with Bryn answering the audience's questions about the film, his work and building dialogue. Regarding all people in society, Bryn said society lacks the

understanding and skills to live in multicultural societies without conflict. Bryn left the audience with a final thought about what people can do. "You should all be on the cutting edge, dealing with conflict," Bryn said. "There is a gap between the money put into peace talks and the 路 results of peace talks." Bryn stopped by 路 Pacific Lutheran Univeristy on his way to the Nobel Prize Forum. Bryn will be at the Nobel Prize forum to talk about his work with the Nansen Dialogue Network (NDN), an international organization that promotes dialogue and peace building talks in countries with active conflict. Bryn is the Senior A~. visor of the NDN.


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PLU Briefs Nursing students score high on nationwide test Nursing students nationwide must pass the NCLEX-RN test to become a registered nurse. Pacific Lutheran University students scored the best in the nation for the second year in a row. A total of 96 PLU students took the test. Of the 78 bachelor of science nursing students who took the test for the first time, 75 passed on the first try. For the entry-level Masters students, 17 of the 18 passed on the first try. Combined, this is a 95.83 percent pass rate in 2013. Nationwide, 50.9 percent of the 29,456 nursing students who took the exam last year passed. In Washington state, 2,579 took the exam and 86:27 percent passed.

PLU ties for third on Peace Corps volunteer list Pacific Lutheran University is now tied for third on the Peace Corps' annual list of top volunteer producing colleges and universities for 2014. The list categorizes schools

nationwide by size. In its category, PLU has advanced 15 places since last year's list. This year, 16 undergraduate alumni serve as Peace . Corps volunteers. In 2013, PLU had 15 undergraduate alumni volunteering overseas. Nine Lutes volunteered in 2012. Since 1961, PLU has provided more than 250 Peace Corps volunteers.

Alum receives TED Talk fellowship Kathryn Hunt, 2011 alum, has been selected as one of 21 worldwide TED 2014 Fellows. Hunt, who graduated with 路 a double major in anthropology and classical studies, will speak at the 2014 TED Conference in Vancouver, B.C., March 17. . A cancer survivor pioneering the field of paleoncology, Hunt teaches medical professionals in Oregon and Washington, including nursing students at PLU, how to recognize the symptoms of ovarian cancer. Hunt's TED talk will focus on how paleoncology will affect cancer research.

PHOTOBYJOHNFROSCHAUER

Pacific Lutheran University Nursing student Haley Urdahl, a senior, works in the lab in PLU's Ramstad Hall. PLU nursing students have a 96 percent pass rate for the NCLEX-RN exam.

STATE ROUTE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Taylor, president of the Grass Roots Environmental Action Now club, asked Conway why he co-sponsored a bill that would rework the definition of renewable resourses in Washington state. The bill would reopen the Centralia Coal Mine that closed in November 2006. At the time of closure, the mine employed 600 workers. "We can't keep investing in jobs that rely on fuel sources such as coal that will be gone within the next few decades," Taylor said. "We should instead invest money into solar panel companies. There are currently five in our state, all at full capacity, which demonstrates that we have a lot of demand for that." PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS Conway said Washington is not Washington state Senator Steve Conway, generating enough tax revenue to invest senator of the 29th district, lead the town hall in expensive projects that do not produce meeting at Garfield Book Company. very many jobs. "I agree that coal -m ining is not our According to http://discoverparkland. future," Conway said, ''but it is a short com, the completed Garfield Station term solution to construction will include much bigger a a series of retail shops problem in this state along Garfield Street to - lack of jobs. While "No one who works full the comer of C Street. I care about the time should have to live Above the ground-level environment, I care retail shops will be a new in poverty." more about people apartment complex with being able to provide 104 residential units. for their families Conway, who was a Steve Conway in today's troubled history professor at PLU Washington state senator economy." from 1981-82 before Conway's pursing a career in politics, message was clear: expressed his love for the school. creating jobs is his most passionate "PLU is a great university. It has endeavor, and developmental projects will great professors and a great reputation," create those jobs. Conway said. "The problem has always "I was involved in helping PLU in been in neighborhoods around PL U developing the project across the street," - they have always really been dying Conway said. "The reason why PLU was neighborhoods. What we are trying to do able to begin that project was because I got a is help PLU develop this immediate area bill passed that allows a 10-year exemption right around the campus so that it reflects on paying property taxes. The balancing the great beauty and overall greatness of act of that bill is that PLU is committed to this university. I am really happy to have providing low income housing and some been a part of that." retail investment in that project."


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 28, 2014

NEWS3

'Lean In' event advocates rnentorship By RELAND TUOMI News Editor The book "Lean In," by Sheryl Sandberg, has inspired networking events and business seminars aimed toward helping women advance in the business world, and Pacific Lutheran 路 University is no exception. PLU hosts a series of these events based on chapters from the book, the most recent of which focused on the mentorprotege relationship. "Lean In: Are You My Mentor?" took place Monday in the lower Anderson University Center, where a four-person panel advised students and faculty members about the importance of mentorship. The panel consisted of Ford Motor credit worker Patty Krise, Laura Majovski, vice president of Student Life and dean of students, psychology Professor Wendy Shore and academic

adviser Pat Roundy. Catherine Swearingen, the director of Career Connections, asked the panel to describe aspects about mentorship, such as how to choose a mentor, if a mentor should be of a similar demographic as his or her protege, why trust is important in a mentorship and many other topics. The panel mostly agreed that an individual should not seek out a mentor but that the mentor should seek out the protege. "Never choose, just let it happen," Krise said. "Get to know and work with that person." Majovski said all the mentors she has had have sought her out. "People who saw potential in me guided me," Majovski said. "And I did the same. No one asked 路me to be their mentor." As for demographics, the panel agreed it was the mind and knowledge of a person that mattered, not their race or

gender. "If you're a woman in a STEM program, you will be in a maledominated field," Shore said. "Someone is just as capable at giving you advice if they are the opposite gender. Don't judge a book by its cover." Roundy emphasized this point, saying that people need those who have the knowledge for a task, regardless of race or gender. Finally, the panel discussed trust within a mentorship. Krise stressed the importance of trust, saying it is fundamental in a mentorship and without it, the relationship is shallow and superficial. There will be two more "Lean In" events this semester. "Is Balance Bogus?" will take place March 17, and "Lessons from former Lutes" will be April 14, where the panel will be made up of alumni.

Crillle Tillle: PLU's Campus Safety Blotter There was a minor two-car accident at the intersection of 121st Street and Park Avenue Saturday at 5:50 p.m. Per the report, the vehicle heading east on _121st failed to yield to the vehicle heading south on Park. A passenger complained of minor knee pain. No other injuries reported.

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Sheryl Sandberg is the CFO of Facebook. She wrote "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead" to help professional women advance through their career goals.

Group discussion seeks to topple rape myths and the patriarchy a white woman who is assaulted by a black man," one attendee said. "It displaces an already marginalized group of people by Debunking rape myths and discussing saying that this doesn't happen to POC their cause in society were the aims of [people of color], to people who identify junior Lauren Mendez on Tuesday. The as queer. This is reinforced by our ads, anthropology and women's and gender our films, our movies." According to the Bureau of Justice studies double major hosted an event Special Report from 2003, for every white entitled "Rape Myths & The Patriarchy." "[Rape] is a topic that is a bit scary for woman who reports her assault, there are people," Mendez said. "I wanted to have at least 5 more white women who do not a place where people could sit, converse report their assault. However, for every and hear from people who are really black woman who reports her assault, passionate about this issue and who have there are 15 more who do not. Rape Abuse Incest National Network a lot of knowledge to share a lot of the myths about rape in general. I think that's reports that one in six women will be the victim of a completed or attempted really crucial." rape within The event their lifetime. opened with However, an airing "Just starting to have a the numbers of Robin c h a n g e Thicke's music video conversation with people about d e p end in g for ''Blurred gender and consent and healthy 路 :th ~~~~ Lines" and sexuality is a 0!ITeat start." women and a discussion . Asian women of why the receiving lower video is KateLutner statistics. considered J'/I'm assistant professor in sociology to have really elements of concerned rape culture. about rapists "There's no purpose for what they're doing in the who may not have known that they raped video whatsoever," one attendee said. "I someone," first-year Felicia Jarvis said. don't get it. All they're doing is walking "If people don't know what enthusiastic around naked. It's just sexualizing consent looks like, how are they supposed to know when it isn't being given?" women." Kowalczyk said when he was growing The group discussion featured senior Alex Knowles, Kate Lutner, up, he learned people weren't serious assistant professor in sociology, and Joe about refusing sex until they said "no" Kowalczyk, resident director of Foss and twice. "This was something that I heard a lot Pflueger halls. The group went through a my male friends talking about. It took of list of common rape myths and worked to time for me to learn 路that any 'no' equals debunk them. "There's a very common myth that a lack of consent," Kowalczyk said. "And rape is always done by strangers - the I was able to learn that through events stranger danger myth with walking like this one and through participating in around at night," Knowles said. "In dialogue with my peers." At the close of the event, the discussion reality, 80-85 percent of rapes are committed by acquaintances of the leaders encouraged attendees to continue victim. Stranger rapes still definitely discussing rape myths with their peers. "Just starting to have a conversation occur, but the majority of cases are from with people about gender and consent acquaintances of the victim." Attendees also began to question if and healthy sexuality is a great start," society's notions of what a victim looks Lutner said. "Start the conversation with people w' you're comfortable with and like is accurate. exp1'!'d from there." "There's an image of a victim of rape as

By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer


r THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

What to do atPLU

Habitat restoration work party beautifies campus By RELAND TUOMI News Editor

Ongoing Faculty Exhibition: See faculty members of the department of art and design showcase their work in different mediums. Feb. 5-March 5, Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-4 p.m. University Gallery in Ingram. "Us Local People: Sarni VuoiI:)I)a and Resilience:" Come learn about the migratory people of northern Scandinavia and celebrate their culture. Scandinavian Cultural Center, Feb. 6-April 1.

Friday Translating Contemporary Mexican Poetry Lecture. Administration Building 200, 2-4 p.m. A Lieder Recital: Tickets $8 general admission/$5 senior citizens and alumni. Free to PLU community and 18 and under. Call (253)-535-7787. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30p.m.

Saturday Elect Her: Campus Women Win! Anderson University Center, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. John Marzano Sr. BM Recital: Free admission, no tickets. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3-4 p.m. PL Utonic/HERmonic double concert: a cappella groups perform their first two concerts since ICCA Free. Lagerquist, 7-10 p.m.

Sunday Double softball game against Whitworth. Softball Diamond, 12-4 p.m. Cameron Bennet and Friends: Tickets $8 general admission/$5 senior citizens and alumni. Free to PLU community and 18 and under. Call (253)-535-7787. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3-4:30 p.m.

Monday "Allyship: Becoming a Champion for Inclusion on Your Campus" with Hudson Taylor, Founder of Athlete Ally. AUC Regency Room, 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday Graduate School Fair. AUC CK, 9 a.m. -12 p.m.

Wednesday Project Saraounia: The Peace Corps celebrates Women's History Month with the Women's Center. Women's Center, 5 -6:30 p.m.

Thursday Makers: Women who make America. AUC Regency 路Room, 6p.m. "In the Garden of Live Flowers" Karen Hille Philips Center for the Performing Arts, 7:30p. m.

FEB. 28, 2014

PHOTO BY REI.AND TUOMI

Senior Kelsie Leu digs up weeds during the Habitat Restoration Work Party on the slope behind Ramstad Co=ons.

Not many people on Pacific Lutheran's campus know where the Fred L. Tobiason Learning Center is located, but they would probably recognize it as the junglelike area near the outside steps to the lower Anderson University Center. One of the sustainability department's goals for that area is to turn it into a beautiful habitat for birds and other small animals to live in. The way it is doing this is with monthly Habitat Restoration Work Parties. This month's Habitat Restoration Work Party took place Sunday, and the handful of student volunteers dug up weeds on the slope behind Ramstad Hall adjacent to the AUC. Sustainability provided gloves and tools for the students to work with during the rainy day. "It's important to turn the space on PLU and return it to its native habitat," senior Kelsie Leu said. "We want to promote a healthy restoration site here and bring

birds back." Throughout the day, students dug up most of the weeds, then covered the area in mulch to keep weeds from growing again. The plan for the area is to plant more trees and non-invasive species of plants, Leu said. The Fred L. Tobiason Outdoor Learning Center was originally going to be turned into a parking lot in the 1970s, but Tobiason advocated for the area to be a learning center for the campus and a natural habitat for native birds. Weeds and other invasive species soon overgrew the area, so those birds could no longer nest there. In 2007, Reed Ojala-Barber - a 2011 PLU graduate - worked with the sustainability department to restore the campus grounds, and since then, volunteers have been removing the invasive species and replanting native plants, Leu said. PLU dedicated the area to Tobiason in April 2011. Future dates for Habitat Restoration Work Parties are March 9, April 13 and April 27 and each last from 1-4 p.m.

LuteCast offers alternative viewing options By STORM GERLOCK Mast TV General Manager Over the course of this academic year, Pacific Lutheran University has been taking steps to completely change the way conferences are presented digitally. PLU has started streaming major talks, conferences and performances in order to allow people to click into the event from virtually anywhere. PLU has branded its platform for streaming as LuteCast, and Instructional Technologies supports and operates it. The service will host both live streamed events as well as archived events, including graduations and convocations. "The commitment to streaming is a fantastic effort to bring these events to audiences that have not traditionally had access to them," Lace Smith, the director

of content marketing for University Communications, said. This year marked the first time PLU streamed the Wang Center Symposium - which took place Feb. 20 and 21 - for students and community members to watch through an online platform. The question is whether students are aware they now have the option to stream lectures. "I've noticed the cameras, and I thought something was going on here," senior Kel Mejlaender said after attending Dorothy Roberts' lecture on "Racism and the Paradox of State Violence." Mejlaender decided to attend the event because the topic related to her history capstone. She said she wasn't aware the Wang Center Symposium had streaming as an option for viewing the different lectures. "I think there are advantages to coming in person, because if you have questions

afterwards, you can ask those yourself instead of just sitting there thinking of them." Although Mejlaender spoke of the benefits to coming in person, she said she related to the reasons student might rather stream the talks. "I think it's also a really great option for those - that it maybe doesn't fit into their schedule - to actually come and attend the event, if they still want to see the main point of what was discussed." Smith said having a different form of attending events would allow for a larger audience that wouldn't usually have the opportunity to stay on campus for events. "I believe that it will widen the audience to include alumni, commuter students and community members that would not otherwise get to partake in the richness of events and lectures that PLU offers on a weekly basis," Smith said.

Year of the Horse celebrated路in The Cave "I thought it was a very yet pleasant notes. Accompanying the Guzheng big culture shock" first-year 路 was also a big drum that various Kimberly Nolasco said. "It was people decided to play as the fascinating making dumplings and having the chance to share Though the official start to crowd shrieked and clapped. this Chinese New Year, Jan. 31, fell during J-term break, Pacific Lutheran University students did not forget it. Students celebrated the start of The Year of the Horse in The "I'm a Chinese studies major, and I haven't Cave the evening of Feb. 21. The celebration was a mix of theatrics, been to China yet, so it is fun to get little crafts and food. According to one folk legend snippets like this." surrounding the new year, Buddha asked all of the animals Annie Twombly to meet him on the Chinese New senior Year. Only 12 of all the animals he asked showed up at his request, so to honor them, Buddha named a year after each animal. Some also say if a person is born in a specific year, then his "I'm so glad they brought the experience." or her personality will have the the instruments," senior Annie Another table was available good, as well as the bad, aspects Twombly said. "That's really for students to practice Chinese of that animal's character. calligraphy and to make lion Upon walking in, each visitor fun." In addition to the Chinese hand puppets. The results were was immediately confronted organizers brightly colored puppets and by large volumes of noise. A music elements, Guzheng - an instrument with set up a table for attendees to various scripted phrases. First-year Karin Luvaas said moveable bridges and a number prepare traditional Chinese of stings - was on the stage for dumplings. Some ha.d e~perience she thought the puppets added anyone to play, and it gave off making them, while others were in a little something extra that made the event unique and very high pitched and choppy beginners.

ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer

enjoyable for everyone. "I feel that it was planned out very well and brought the PLU community together in a fun and different way," Luvaas said. "Making the lion puppets was really different and fun too." Although the puppets, instruments and dumpling making were undoubtedly great touches to the night, no other aspect of the night rivaled the lion dance in the opinion of many attendees. The body of the lion was very long and covered in beige feathers in addition to gold sequins. The face of the lion had orange and red sequins and intricate details that dazzled viewers. jumped The performers and danced around the stage, and the audience showered the performance with applause. "My favorite thing was the lion dance," Nolasco said, and Luvaas agreed. Overall, attendees said they enjoyed the event. "I thought it was great," Twombly said. "I'm a Chinese studies major, and I haven't been to China yet, so it is fun to get little snippets like this. I hope they do it again."


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A&E 5

Club brings Yu-Gi-Oh! battle to campus By NATALIB DEFORD AdE Writer Dualists on campus come together to battle while strengthening friendships. Andrew Morris Junior founded the new Pacific Lutheran University Yu-Gi-Oh! Club in fall 2013. Morris defined Yu-Gi-Oh! as a competitive table-top trading card game. The objective is to reduce the opponent's life points to zero and players can win a match by winning two out of three games. Basic supplies used in the game include Yu-Gi-Oh! cards and a calculator. Advanced level games require coins, dice and mats. Yu-Gi-Oh! Club meetings are Thursdays from 8-10 p.m. in

"Yu-Gi-Oh! brings friends together everybody can hang out."

and

Andrew Morris president, Yu-Gi-Oh! club the Anderson University Center Commons. Members duel head to head and participate in double duels that include four players. At the end of each meeting, there is typically a chaos duel. The club coined the term to mean a "free-for-all" in which everyone plays. "It's every man for himself," senior l.V. Reeves, club vice president, said. Newcomers are welcome at

PHOTO BY NATALIB DEFORD .

Yu-Gi-Oh! Club president Andrew Morris flips through his binder of cards. "It's important to keep the cards in good condition to protect their value," he said.

any time. "We can teach them," Morris said. Morris said he first became interested in Yu-Gi-Oh! in second grade when some of his classmates brought their cards to show-and-tell. Then he started watching the television show. "I just kind of started collecting cards over the years, but nothing serious," Morris said. In his sophomore year of high school, Morris said he found other people with the same interests. ''After school one day, I walked to the McDonald's across the street and three guys from my class were playing, and I was like, 'Woah, cool. I have cards too. 111 bring them tomorrow,"' Morris said. "And we formed a team." The team would hang out in the detention room, a quiet open space, and play on a regular basis. They were eventually kicked out for being there without detention but continued to meet at a local Subway. Morris said finding that clique in high school was a big turning point for him, and he hopes to be able to build that same sense of community here. Morris won his first tournament the summer after his senior year of high school, and he said his passion for the hobby has continued to grow through college. He continues to play in his free time and still competes in tournaments. Outside of its regular meetings, the club sometimes travels to tournaments in the area as well. Club member Angelo Mejia, a first-year, said he likes the club, because it's fun to play the game. "It's strategic," Mejia said. Like Morris, Mejia has been playing for years and used to just

'For the Bible Tells Me So': By UNA TINGVIK HAAVE Guest Writer Through a documentary and discussion, members of the Pacific Lutheran University community learned about the complexities of homosexuality and Christianity. The documentary "For the Bible Tells Me So" played Feb. 25 in the Phillip A. Nordquist Lecture Hall. The University Congregation is an ecumenical, Reconciling in Christ faith community, which means it is open and affirming to all religions, sexual identities and races. "We [the. PLU Congregation Council] wanted to offer a place

for students and staff to discuss the topic of homosexuality in the church in a welcoming way," senior Tommy Flanagan, the president of the University Congregation Council, said. The documentary "For the Bible Tells Me So" illustrated how many Christian denominations today believe the Bible condemns homosexuality. The documentary, however, presented Christian families and scholars that have found themselves swayed or more open to homosexuality after having examined the Scriptures carefully. Members of the religion department as well as the documentary itself acknowledged that many Christians have

"I did see the fear of our families crumbling, and crumbling just means they're being reshaped into something you can't predict." Marit Trelstad religion department chair

thought all of their lives that the Bible condemns homosexuality. Over time this has turned into a deeply rooted belief. "To change deeply rooted beliefs is tough," Seth Dowland, assistant professor of religious history, said. Marit Trelstad, an associate professor of religion and chair of the religion department, also mentioned the possibility that many people's fear of homosexuality is rooted in a fear of their families crumbling. "I did see the fear of our families crumbling, and crumbling just means they're being reshaped into something you can't predict and don't recognize and are not in control of," Trelstad said. The panelists brought up several questions that created a dialogue between them and the audience. Senior Chelsey Oedewaldt was one of many who got involved in the discussion. "I think the intersection of homosexuality and religion is interesting," Oedewaldt said. A congregation that welcomes people of all religions, sexual identities and races, the University Congregation Council has organized several similar events where it has discussed the issue of homosexuality in Christian communities.

PHOTO BY NATALIB DEFORD

First-years Angelo Mejia (left) and Brady Daly (right) playing Yu-Gi-Oh! with junior Andrew Morris during a club meeting in front of Old Main Market.

play with his roommate, first-year Brady Daly, until they joined the club together. Daly said that Yu-Gi-Oh! is not something you can play with just anyone. "When you find other people you get really excited about it," Daly said. "I like that Yu-Gi-Oh! brings friends together and everybody can hang out," Morris said. "The point of the original show was all about friendship." For more information about the club, contact Andrew Morris at morrisab@plu.edu or join the "PLU Yugioh Club" page on Facebook.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE .

Documentary examines issues of homosexuality and Christianity

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Seth Dowland, assistant professor of religion, talks about his reaction to the documentary "For the Bible Tells Me So," "'h1ch was shown in Xavier Feb. 26. Dowland joined two other faculty me::- .:..ers in a panel discussion of the film


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FEB. 28, 2014

CONCERT KICKS OFF BLACK HISTORY MONTH By SAMANTHA LUND Guest Writer Musical groups from Pacific Lutheran University and the surrounding community came together to celebrate Black History Month Feb. 21 in Lagerquist Concert Hall. The admissions office and the music department sponsored the event. Their goal was to show prospective and transfer students alike what PLU has to offer, Melannie Denise Cunningham, the director of multicultural recruitment, said.

"We're part of American history, and we are glad to be here." Sandra Allen Greater Works Chorale "We've been able to showcase the fabulous things that our students do, and so the community has been able to immerse themselves in actual student learning,"

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

Junior Adrian Mayoral dips sophomore Alex Clayton during the Swing Club performance at the Black History Month Concert in Lagerquist Concert Hall Feb. 20.

Cunningham said. "It's been a great thing." The concert highlighted many -musical groups. The PLU Wind Ensemble opened, followed by the Symphony and the Jazz Orchestra Ensemble. The PLU Chorale performed next, giving the audience a taste for the many types of music and performed studied on campus. The PLU Jazz brought Ensemble a new twist to the performance with two guests: The PLU Swing Dance Club joined them onstage to showcase their art in honor of Black History Month as well as a guest vocalist, music lecturer Marlette Buchanan,_. singing "Cottontail." "It's just a great event," first-year Thomas Hom, a performer, said. "I hope it continues next year. There are just some awesome acts." After the PLU groups, musical groups from the community came onstage to perform, beginning with Obe Quarless on the steel drums. Buchanan returned to the stage to perform. 路Another vocalist,

MFA anniversary celebrates memories, writers ByKELS

MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor Memories and creative readings highlighted the 10th anniversary of Pacific Lutheran University's creative writing MFA program, the Rainier Writing Workshop (RWW), Tuesday. The directors and founders of the RWW, Stan Rubin and Judith Kitchen, designed the low-residency program to fit with the demands of their students' established careers and lives, Rick Barot, a PLU associate professor of English, said. The MFA takes three years to complete~ but Barot said students only come to PLU four times for 10-day workshops each August. In honor of its 10th year, PLU celebrated the RWW with two events - an afternoon Q-and-A session with writers of the program and an evening reception with readings from the selected authors. During "The Writer's Story" Q-and-A session in the Garfield Book Company, RWW graduates Kate Carroll de Gutes and Kelli Russell Agodon, as well as Rubin and Kitchen, answered any queries of those in attendance. The writers began by listing the authors or poets who they said inspired 路 them the most. Kitchen said reading the works of others is essential to being a better writer. "Somebody [a writer] comes to mind for each of us instantly," Kitchen said. "If we didn't read, we wouldn't know which boundaries to push

against." Rubin said writing is something ~titers should not be able to cease doing, and if they can, then they shouldn't continue writing anyway. "If you can stop, stop," Rubin said. While there were few in attendance for the Q-and-A session, the main anniversary event that evening in the Scandinavian Cultural Center attracted a greater crowd with attendees in every row of seats. Jay Bates, a graduate of the RWW, introduced each writer and said the primary goal of the MFA in the eyes of Rublll. and Kitchen was not to get their students published or build their resumes but to teach them about the craft of writing. Senior Melanie Hering, who worked for RWW as a student assistant last year, said PLU's MFA program stands out from others in the country. "It's that community and individualized focus," Hering said. "The directors and the faculty and the students had a very vested interest in the program. It was a very welcoming and open community." De Gutes opened the readings with three creative non-fiction piece on gender and sexuality, and Agadon followed with a selection of poems from her latest work, "Hourglass Museum." Rubin then came on stage to read some of his poems from "There.Here.," and Kitchen concluded the readings with excerpts from her essay "The Circus Train." Senior Emily Walsh, an English writing major, said she found the reception tasteful

and informative. 路 family even though you don't 'Tm inspired now," know the individuals." Walsh said. "I feel like I could Barot will become the new eventually do this [a writing director for the RWW June career]." 1, and he said he plans on Barot, who received his honoring what Rubin and masters in creative writing Kitchen have created and from the University of Iowa, continue it in ways they would said the RWW aligned with approve of and appreciate. PLU's mission statement At the evening reading, He also said the RWW Jessica Spring, the Elliott provides a community of like- Press manager, sold a folio minded people for every writer of broadsides of poems by de Gutes, Agodon, Rubin and of the program. "I like to think of these Kitchen. Some of Spring' s residencies as kind of a students designed and printed nerd convention," Barot the broadsides as part of their said. "Everybody exactly final. Barot said proceeds from understands the vocabulary and terminology that everybody the sales will go to the MFA else is using. It's like joining a scholarship fund.

PHOTO BY KELS MEJLAENDER

Stan Rubin, a director of the Rainier Writing Workshop, speaks before the crowd at the 10th anniversary celebration of PLU's MFA program. Rubin read selected works from his collection of poems "There.Here."

alum Stephanie Anne Johnson, came to the stage after Buchanan. The G~eater Works Chorale, singing in honor of Black History Month, wrapped up the night of performances. The last act was not just for performers, but the audience as well. In the back of every program was a song the audience could sing along to with the performers. The song, "Lift Every Voice and Sing," was written to honor the history of African Americans and performed for the first time as a poem on Abraham Lincoln's birthday in a segregated school. Some of the pieces performed were hymns or Negro spirituals. "We get to celebrate black history, which is a part of American history," Sandra Allen, from The Greater Works Chorale, said. "So in a sense, we're part of American history, and we are glad to be here." the Cunningham said showcase was great for admissions and prospective students must have been impressed.

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VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

Students showcase artistic talent at Open Mic Night By UNA TINGVIK HAAVE Guest Writer This year's second Open Mic Night, organized by senior David Gordon, gave Pacific Lutheran University students the opportunity to showcase their talents Feb. 20. Gordon is a co-chair of Associated Students of PLU's Entertainment Committee. "I just- really like seeing the talent that's out there when you just give people the opportunity," Gordon said. Many performed self-written poems and songs. Among them was junior Olivia Ash, who also helped organize the event. According to Ash, events like Open Mic Night are great venues for musicians at PLU to come together and meet other aspiring musicians. "Everyone is really supportive and nice and interested in sharing their music and collaborating," Ash said. The performances were not limited to poetry readings, singing and guitar playing. Open Mic Night also featured dancers. "It's a good venue for people that are just starting off," junior Conner Bowman, who attended the event, sfild. The turnout for the event was not as high as it had been at the Open Mic Night hosted earlier this year. "As it gets later in the year, people get busier," Gordon said. The event was open to the PLU community. "You just kind of have to set it and organize it, and sometimes you make 25 people happy and sometimes you make 80 people happy - but that's the great thing about open mies," Gordon said. "There are always people who want to perform and there are always people who want to see it."


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FEB. 28, 2014

A&E 7

Student places at Miss Pierce County beauty pageant By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor A Pacific Lutheran University junior, Anikka Abbott, placed second in this year's Miss Pierce County pageant, finishing right behind class of 2013 PLU alum Megan Leibold. The Miss Pierce County Scholarship Organization has a history of giving scholarships to young women for more than 40 years. Pierce County has had more women than any other Washington county go on to

become Miss Washington and represent the state at the Miss America pageant. The Miss Pierce County pageant is a 501c3 non-profit organization that awards scholarships to women between the ages of 17-24 pageant judges find "outstanding" within the county. "The pageant shows a lot of different aspects of who you are, and it seeks out those who are very well rounded," Abbott said. Judges observe contestants in six main categories, including a private interview, a community service platform, an evening gown portion, a talent showcase, an on-stage questionnaire and a swimsuit portion. "While it is controversial, it is also the lowest portion of your score," Abbott said. "I do believe, however, that the swimsuit portion is a necessary component of the competition. It builds sell confidence and appreciation for your body. As long as you are comfortable with your body you will be fin e. The board of judges hear the interview portion of the competition the night prior to the event. "The biggest portion of your score is the interview, which is 40 percent of your score," Abbott said. "The interview itseli is very hard. You are expected to be up-to-date on politics as well as give thoughtful opinions on subjects like or abortion Obamacare." The talent segment of the competition is the second largest II

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANIKKA ABBOTT

Miss Pierce County contestants Anikka Abbott (left foreground) and Megan Leibold (right foreground) step forward to hear the results of the pageant. Abbott, ajunior at Pacific Lutheran University, placed second, while class of2013 alum Leibold placed first.

portion of the total score. Abbott, who studies vocal performance at PLU, displayed her voice in front of Sunday's crowd singing "Time to Say Goodbye" by Sarah Brightman. There is more to the Miss Pierce County pageant than being able to sing, however. Every participant is expected to be somehow involved in her community.

Abbott said she is very with the Young involved Women's Christian Association and routinely speaks to young people about empowering and preventing themselves stalking and harassment. "I chose that platform because I was stalked my freshman year of college, so it's a very important platform to myseli," Abbott said. For her work, Abbott won a

$1,500 scholarship. "Rather than setting women back," Abbott said, "pageants give young women an opportunity to show that they can speak their mind, they can have an opinion, they are up-to-date on current events and they are just as smart as anyone else. It's an opportunity to cultivate your mind, your body and your spirit."

"Pageants give young women an opportunity to show that they can speak their :碌rind ... and they are just as smart as anyone else." Anikka Abbott Miss Pierce Courity runner-up

''Lego Movie'' 路colllbines satire, hilarity and nostalgia By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer With multiple worlds, cameos, references and satire galore, "The Lego Movie" is not just a journey for kids. The entire movie is a mockery of society, inspiring people to be themselves and to not follow the norms and rules, because everyone is special. The Lego characters must follow the instructions of the evil President Business - voiced by Will Ferrell - who wants to freeze the ideal perfect society, and perfect Lego sets, by gluing the universe together. He and his surveillance system give off some Orwellian vibes. Of course, since .this is a Lego universe, there a:re instruction booklets telling citizens what to do. These instructions look just like real life instructions for building Lego sets. The main chq.racter, Emmet - voiced by Chris Pratt - is an ordinary Lego figure trying to fit in and make friends with his coworkers and neighbors. Obviously, there are instructions for doing just that. The president tells all of the characters, among other things, that in order to be happy, they must all watch the same TV programs and listen to the same music no original thoughts or actions. Emmet is simply "an ordinary, rulesfollowing, perfectly average LEGO minifigure who is mistakenly identified as the most extraordinary person and the key to saving the world," according to http:// thelegomovie.com.

He's a construction worker who's used to building by the rules and his adventure to stop President Business is hilariously awkward since he knows nothing except how to follow the instructions. On his journey he is accompanied by Vitruvius - a prophesying wizard voiced by Morgan Freeman - and the 'master builders.' The master builders are the people who build without instructions and can take an array of pieces provided by the world around them and use them to build just about anything they need. Along with the master builders are several characters people may recognize, who have been featured in Lego sets throughout the years. Among the general mermaids, pirates, cowboys, knights and astronauts, characters like Batman, Wonderwoman, Superman,

the Green Lantern, Dumbledore, Gandali, Abraham Lincoln and Han Solo can all be spotted in Lego minifigure form. These are not the only things referenced throughout the movie, as there are also goli balls, Band-aids, foil and even a hall-eaten lollipop used as a walking staff. These items are intermixed with the Legos as they might be within in路a child's toy chest. More and more objects and character types are found throughout the movie as the characters legitimately travel through different scenes made out of actual Legos. Everything is Lego. Even gunshots and laser-blasts are made of flying Lego parts. Every object, set and background is composed of real Lego pieces that are identified by their real names and numbers just like in real Lego sets and instructions. Emmet and the master builders journey through the fabrics of space to visit different worlds within the universe, including The Wild West and Cloud Cuckoo Land. In Cloud Cuckoo Land

except the leaders say citizens must have only positive feelings. Negative feelings are to be stored deep down inside where no one will ever find them. Naturally, this can lead to trouble. Negative thoughts are banned from Cloud Cuckoo Land, but original thoughts are not allowed anywhere. President Business aims to prevent all things straying from what his ideal depiction of the perfect universe is by micromanaging everything. But, the main message of this movie is to express yourseli and be unique. Everyone can be special if they put their mind to it, and playing with Legos is the ultimate analogy - and catalyst - for this. "The Lego Movie's" combination of satire, hilarity and nostalgia is enough to please moviegoers of all ages.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

FEB. 28, 2014

Mastering the phone interview Drown out the competition with these eight tips

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The job field is increasingly competitive, and many companies screen candidates over the phone before inviting them to an in-person interview. These interviews can be intimidating, but they can also be a success with the right amount of preparation.

By ZACH WITTSRUCK Guest Writer In our multi-attentive culture, phone interviews are becoming more and more common as the means of dialogue between those in power and potential prospects. Below are a handful of tips that can help you flourish in your own phone interview. 1. Research ·

Knowing the ins and outs of a company and how it conducts itself is the first vital step to acing the phone interview. A good place to start in the reseai;ch process is the website. More specifically, explore the 'About Us' or ' Company History' section in order to get a feel for what its goals and foundational values are. Take notes on what you find and begin to apply it to your working style. Studying this information and incorporating it into the answers you provide will give you a more personal ap~al and make you a natural selection for the position.

2. Keywords Placing keywords into your responses can have a great effect on the appeal of your responses. Since you've done your research, you now know some goals, slogans and other identifiable information that can provide a good idea about what keywords and phrases will make your answers pop. For example, if you were to conduct a phone interview for the Disney College Program, you could use keywords like dream, joy, magic and adventure in order to shape your answers toward the company identity. Having these written down and in front of you while answering questions can help tremendously. · 3. Know the interviewer If possible, knowing

your interviewer can provide an even more personal feel. Getting some background information about the person you're speaking with will allow you to further prepare your answers to appeal directly to them.

However, if this is not possible, just remember that whoever your interviewer is, he or she is there to hire you. 4. Presence and tonality It will pay off if you put the same amount of effort into your phone interview as you would if it were in person. Being focused on the dialogue will allow a connection to be made with the interviewer that would rival that of in-person conversation. Since all that the interviewer has to go on is the sound of your voice and perhaps a single photo of you, mastering how to use it will further convince him or her of how capable you are. With the proper command, you can demonstrate many characteristics such as tone, diction and clarity, which will give your interviewer a good measure of your personality and potential as an employee. 5. Practice, practice, practice

Like training for a sport or studying for a test, rehearsing for an interview will build muscle

memory and give you a leg up on the competition. A good way to practice is to have someone ask you questions commonly used in interviews and for you to figure out the best possible answer to them. Repeating those answers and getting used to the questions will help greatly when they occur in the actual interview. Practice will help in mastering your voice, will assist in settling nerves and will provide a confidence going into the interview. 6. Be your best cheerleader

The fear of public speaking is among the top fears held by people throughout the world. If you are among those who hold this fear, knowing yourself and having confidence in your abilities can play a crucial role in overco~g it. Since your interviewer can't see you, a fun way to fight your nerves is having support notes in front of you. These can be from yourself or those close to you and are great tools to have.

7. Ask questions

The end of an interview almost always presents the chance to ask questions, and this is something to take advantage of. Even if you don't have any questions, expressing curiosity in the job and its details show you are committed on a higher level. 8. The thank you note After the interview, an easy way to keep yourself in the minds of your interviewer is to email or mail a thank you note. Demonstrating your appreciation for that person's time and consideration show s great character and will serve to remind him or her of your qualifications for the position.

In using these eight tips, phone interviews will be an easier obstacle to overcome. For further assistance with phone interviews, the Career Connections Center located in Ramstad Hall is a great resource for inforination.

Teacher-turned-CEO shares advice with students By KATELYNN PADRON Guest Writer Teacher-turned-CEO Carlyn Roy spoke to students Feb. 20 in Leraas Hall about her journey through her education and careers. Roy graduated from the elementary education program at Pacific Lutheran University in 1982. She taught first grade in Spanaway before relocating to Portland. In Portland her first job was as a bank teller. Roy later accepted a position at Woodstone Credit Union in Federal Way, Wash. After that she became the Chief Operating Officer at OSU Federal Credit

Union in Corvallis, Ore. before becoming the Chief Executive Officer of TAPCO Credit Union. Either way, students can say they are keeping their options open. Roy said it is alright to be unsure of your path after college, because no one's path is set, though education and communication programs offer the most versatile skills to those with undecided career paths. Ultimately, Roy said it was her network in the credit union community that got her the CEO position at TAPCO Credit Union. Roy also said students should begin building their networks now. "Do not overlook people because you never know who will be able to help you," Roy said.

You can expect someone in your network to forget who you are, Roy said, and they will be too kind to tell you. A former colleague once contacted her to get together, and she could not remember who he was. She said she spent an entire meeting trying to recall how she knew him. · To prevent an awkward situation when you run into connections, Roy said you should remind them of your name and how you know them. Though Roy said one should never say no to an opportunity, you should know what you can't do. Roy said she was hired to a position in Portland that required her to type up legal documents.

She soon quit because she was unable to keep up with the typing demand. "You are the CEO of your own life," Roy said. "You are the main person who will advocate for your career by taking opportunities and maintaining integrity. Though mistakes are to be expected, you must own up to them, because integrity is one of the few things you cannot recover once it is compromised." For more career advice, Roy recommends that students read "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team," by Patrick Lencioni. Roy's lecture was the first of the spring 2014 MBA Executive Leadership Series. The next installment features Charles and Linda Barbo, of Catalyst Storage, on March 18.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF TAPCO CREDIT UNION

Carlyn Roy is the CEO of TAPCO Credit Union. She began her career as a first grade teacher. She then worked her way up through a variety of jobs before becoming CEO. She shared her story with PLU business students Feb. 20 in Leraas Hall.


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 28, 2014

1 路

E-Commerce:

BUSINESS 9

Protect against attacks from online pickpockets

By JILLIAN STANPHILL Guest Writer As online banking and payments expand, so does the potential for theives to steal personal information. Online hackers have made front page news over the past few weeks, exposing the rising threat of handling money online. Within the past month, the Syrian Electronic Army hacked that compromised accounts Paypal and eBay homepages. There are some easy ways to help protect yourself and your identity while you are online. By reading fine print carefully, you can determine exactly who and under what circumstances your information will be released to. Vi.ruses pose an unexpected threat to online transactions, and some can even record a user's every keystroke. Once the virus perpetrator has a record of keystrokes, he or she can decode credit card numbers, usernames and passwords. However, vi.ruses can be avoided by sticking to credible websites, such as those that end with .gov, .org or .edu. Additionally, do not open emails with unfamiliar subject titles or from unknown accounts. Clicking on ads can also be a way to land a virus on your

P HOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Bit coin is a new type of currency that was created by an anonymous source in 2009. It is entirely digital and is not supported or insured by any bank. Earlier this month, the top two Bitcoin exchange programs were frozen by hackers.

computer, and some vi.ruses can pose as fake spam removal programs. If you do want to download a program aimed at removing spam from your computer, be sure to do your research before downloading any software. It is also important to

determine whether the website is under an insurance policy or not. Phrases such as Member FDIC, FDIC Insurance or the FDIC logo means that the banking institution is insured under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The most important thing to keep in mind is that there is always

a chance of theft. Be smart about who and where you give your personal banking information to. An anonymous source created Bitcoin as a new type of currency in 2009. It is a global currency that is entirely digital and allows people to buy and trade online. However, it is not supported or

insured by any bank. It is untaxed and unregulated. Two Bitcoin exchange platforms, one in Bulgaria and one in Slovenia, were having troubles on Feb. 18 with crediting transactions and withdrawals by customers. Between these two accounts, 56 percent of Bitcoin's activity occurs. International laws condemning hacking are few and far between, and those that do exist are largely unenforceable. Each individual country may have its own set of rules for hacking, but since Bitcoin is a global currency there are no rules and therefore no legal precedent. .If people lose money or theives steal their identies, there is no way to sue or investigate. Benjamin Lawsky, the superintendent of the New York Dep artment of Financial Services, said, "the long-term strength of the virtual-currency industry will require robust safety and soundness requirements - so customers have faith that their money won't get caught in a virtual black hole." Many ideas of how to regulate and keep Bitcoin investors safe are in the works, but as of now investors should make sure to monitor their accounts and invest wisely.

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TOO MANY CHOICES More options for consumers is not always better By NATALIE DEFORD Guest Writer

PHOTO BY KELLI BRELAND

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New "Coen-cola Freestyle'路 machines, like this one at Taco Time, offer more than 100 types of soda to consumers.

With today's market greatly focused on offering customization to consumers, choices can be great, but not in every scenario. Picture someone at a clothing store. This person wants to purchase one pair of jeans that fit nicely, are comfortable and look decent. They may encounter 25 different pairs of pants that fit the criteria. Sure, pants have different styles, different fits and cuts, but tons of different designs in each of these categories may be too much. When trying to make more alternatives, each option becomes less unique as there are only so many characteristics that you can change in a pair of pants. Fewer distinctly different choices can be plenty to choose from. When someone has to try on 25 pairs of pants, the shopper wastes time on the 24 pairs he or she tried on and then did not buy. The buyer may also feel guilty for leaving some of these pairs behind. Such difficult choices are not just limited to the clothing industry, as products everywhere suddenly seem readily available for consumers to express their creativity and explore many options.

In many restaurants, customers can now choose between more than 100 varieties of soda. Students who have encountered this dilemma said they don't believe more choice is necessarily better. Sophomore Ruby Reagan, junior Campbell Brett and I recently went to The Old Country Buffet in Lakewood. It was my first . encounter with one of the soda machines, which was labeled "Coca-Cola Freestyle." Ruby, however, had used such soda machines before. "I like the availability of flavors you can't usually find, such as Lime Coke," she said. But, she said she is not necessarily more likely to buy a soda product with these added options. "I just like having it there," Ruby said. While Ruby said it is convenient to have more choices in a single location, she also said she's noticed the syrups seem to run out faster. Running out. of a customer's favorite flavor of syrup may be a negative, but perhaps it is also a sign of the machine' s popularity. Designing your own personal beverage might be awesome, but consider the wait when each person in line takes forever to decide what they're getting. 'Tm a person who usually knows what I want, so I don't stare at it [the soda machine] fo 1

18 minutes like some people," Ruby said. But it's not that simple for everyone. Campbell returned to the table with a regular glass of some fruit punch. "I didn't know what I wanted, and there was a huge line behind me, so I felt bad," Campbell said. Brett said he went straight to the fruit punch because of the people waiting. "I did not browse like I had intended to," he said. Imagine the frustration . of waiting in line while each person looks through a menu of more than 100 items before deciding on a single beverage. Some people may get tired of waiting or get angry, while some may feel the need to rush their decision in order to shorten the overall waiting time for others. In either case, customers would not be happy. When many options are presented, simple decisions get more complicated. Products may feel more unique to the buyer, but choices can also be overwhelming and create indecisiveness. Opportunity costs are also higher when consumers leave more decisions behind and people are not always willing to spend time weighing their options. The excitement each customer experiences may not always replace the potential problems some buyers may face.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

FEB. 28, 2014

Wanderlust: Food adventures take the cake when traveling

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The difference in food By ASHLEY GILL was not so much of a Opinion Editor burden as a blessing. Taking A common thought advantage of all the types when people imagine Italy of meats Italians serve and is food. Pasta, pizza and, of the different types of pastas course, tiramisu occupied they had was not only fun, my mind on the plane ride but delicious. I could not afford to be to Rome this J-term. I could picky because I knew innot wait for my first meal in the back of my mind I may Italy. I knew if I were to never return to Italy in my indulge in anything on my lifetime. This could be my course abroad, it wouldn't only chance to try entrails be souvenirs - it would be or the extremely yummy Italian cuisine, and I would Roman fried artichoke. A classmate of mine learn to appreciate and tried fried brain and enjoy every bit of it. It can be easy to shy away another enjoyed massive from new and interesting prawns served with the foods when traveling. This heads - including eyes can especially be the case - still attached. The food when you are traveling to resulted not only in full a more exotic country or stomachs, but also many spending your J-term in a . great memories of our time culture completely different in Rome, even when some of the food was not that from your own. In the United States we great - which was rare. Feeding yourself can have a variety of restaurants to eat at that offer foreign be one of the many things throughout our you can do to enjoy your foods streets and cities. Therefore, trip abroad in a way you it might be a shock when did not expect. Trying new the Mexican food we enjoy things can be hard and even so much here at home is a scary sometimes, especially little different than the food when you are already far from home. actually served in Mexico. If you, like me, are not Even in Italy, the pizza adventurous enough to is completely different than the pizza in the United jump into a plate of fried States. Everything from the brain, then try a new flavor ingredients to the toppings of gelato or another type and even the dough looked of dessert every time you and tasted quite different decide you would like to than the pizza 路 in the indulge your sweet tooth. Something else I liked Commons.

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CIIlEF

Jessica Tronclsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Reland Tuomi A&EEDITOR

Alison Haywood BUSINESS EDITOR

Kelli Breland OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Sam Hom PHOTO EDITOR

Jesse Major SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Kels Mejlaender PHOTO COURTESY OF ASHLEY GILL

Junior Ashley Gill eajoys her lemon nnd cocounut flavored gclato in the streets of Rome. Other flavors she tried included tiramisu, caramel and pistachio.

to do was to document the various meals and foods I tried. Snapping a picture to go into your scrapbook can be a fun way to capture another aspect of a culture we sometimes forget when we think back on trips. So next J-term, semester or even vacation when you are traveling to a new place, hang onto your pocket

translator, grab that menu and be confident of that unfamiliar dish you are about to consume. Better yet, just close your eyes and point. Be brave in any situation when faced with new and potentially exciting things, make the most of your trip and always fee<:! yourself.

COPY EDITOR

Blake Jerome ONLINE EDITOR

Leah Traxel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Storm Gerlock MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Evan Beringer NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Allison Reynolds ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

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The Mooring Mast

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Evaluate living.oP.tions before -, . comm1tt1ng By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist

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THE MOORING MAST

Choosing a major may be a big decision in your college career, but right behind that is your decision about living circumstances. While for some it may be easy, others have a difficult time deciding which housing is best for them. Many opt for on-campus housing to get the full college experience. Others want fewer rules and more freedom and choose to live on their own or rent a house with peers. There are many pros and cons with both, and ultimately it comes down to what you value in a living context. For students who live within 30 miles of campus, are older than 20 or have junior status, they may choose to live off campus. This includes the residential halls such as South and Kreidler that are uniquely designed to give a more independant experience with the option to not have a meal plan and with a separate alcohol policy if you are 21 or older. This is my second year as a commuter student, and I have no intentions of living on campus. The beginning of my first year was difficult as a commuter student, because it was a challenge to connect with people. However, it required me to

be proactive and get involved in alternative ways other than residence halls. "I . live on campus for the convenience of having close access to classes, and because it helps me feel connected to my peers and school," sophomore Lee Shaffer said. According to Pacific Lutheran University's Resources for High School Counselors, only 49 percent of PLU students live on campus. This balance means that wherever you stand on the residential scale, you're not alone. The sense of community that can be gained through living in residential halls can be beneficial in building relationships with your peers, however, it can also be costly. For the 2012-13 academic school year, room and board costs were $9,620. Depending on your financial situation, this may be no problem. As an alternative, you could live with parents to save money if you live within 30 miles or you could search for an inexpensive rental house near campus if you are older than 20 or have junior status. "Living off campus saves me money and gives me an opportunity to prepare for independence after graduation," senior Mary Agnes Villanueva said. A thought you may want to consider is you get what you pay for. A positive to living on campus means security and a short walking distance to classes. While living off campus, you may have to consider things such as security and parking or walking. Whether you choose on-campus housing, living with parents or renting nearby with peers, remember to weigh all of your options. Take into account not only cost but convenience and alternative expenses such as driving and parking.

The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or路 Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please e路mail mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast @ plu.edu.

Corrections Feb. 21 Issue Troy Storfjell' s name was misspelled in the photo cutline on the page 4 story "Scan Center exhibit celebrates native Scandinavian culture."


THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 28, 2014

to,Washington Th,e ' Washington State Legislature· made . ihisfory Feb. 26 when Seri.ate Bill 6523 was passed .a nd signed by the governor. The Bill is Washington state's version of Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act, more commonly known by the acronym DREAM The DREAM Act would allow qualified undocumented students to be eligible for financial aid at the university level, allow them to enlist in the military and eventually petition for citizenship. The DREAM Act has a long and difficult history, which b.egan in 2001. Legislators created and introduced the bill to the Senate, but it failed to receive enough votes. However, the driving force for the DREAM Act was persistent, and over the years, lawmakers modified and reintroduced the DREAM Act in 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010. Still, it failed to gain enough votes each time. Under President Barack Obama's administration, the DREAM Act has gained great momentum. By 2012 the DREAM Act movement had spread all over the nation. However, it still failed by a mere eight votes. . Critics of the DREAM Act believe it would be an easy path for illegal immigrants to gain citizenship and even possibly encourage more illegal immigration in the future, but this is not the case. In order to qualify for the DREAM Aetf immigrants must have come to the United States before age 16, lived in the U.S. for at least five years, graduated high school and have no criminal history. DREAMers can then attend universities with financial aid or apply for the military. After two years at a university or in the militaryf and after a waiting period of 5-ai;td-a-half years, they can then petition for citizenship. Due to all of these regulations, the DREAM Act would only allow extremely qualified, hardworking individuals ~

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to become U.S. citizens. We . ~hould not hold back th~ passage of the DREAM Act t1.due to immigration fears. Many undocumented students simply desire to attend college or serve in the ~tary to give back to the country that has given them so much. . It is not fair these qualified and metivated yqung adults are held back from attending college, because they dori't have a social security number. Our country could greatly benefit from their different . perspectives and unique skills. "What if one of those kids could solve the problem of cancer? No one should have his or her intelligence and -life chances limited by a social security number/' sophomore Kindra Galan said. "Education should be for all. The DREAM Act just gives many undocumented students [a chance] to attend college." Education should be available for everyone regardless of his or her immigration status. It is unfair to limit these students when they are simply trying to pursue their dreams. Even though they have faced a lot of resistance in the past, the DREAMers can't be stopped. It seems the more obstacles the DREAM Act has faced, the stronger the movement has become. The states of California, New Mexico, Texas and Washington have approved the DREAM Act and have granted financial ai~ to aspiring undocumented students. Washington state passing the DREAM Act is a huge step for the country that will jump-start the passage of the DREAM Act in other states. People will be chanting the unofficial slogan of the DREAM Act, "Si, se puede" Spanish for "Yes, we can" - because the DREAM Act is not losing momentum anytime soon.

The documentary by Davis Guggenheim, "The Dream is Now," covers the history ef the DREAM Act and individual DREAMers stories. It is availab/.e for vw..ving at http://wwio.thedreamisnow.org/ documentary. For more information, see http:l/dreamact.inful students or http:lhuww.immigra.tionpolicy.orgljustfacts/wlw-and-where-dreamers-are-revised-estimates.

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Consider human rights with immigration By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Columnist

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A friend of mine always gets pulled over by the police. They ask him questions like: "What are you up to tonight?" "Where are you headed?" and "Can I look in your trunk?" He said police officers do not give him a ticket or any other valid reason for pulling him over, but they let him go after asking these questions. He is originally from Mexico, and his appearance is in accordance with his origins. Even as far away from the Mexican border as Washington, some police still violate his constitutional rights and pull him over without probable cause because of his appearance. The constitution outlines our most sacred rights as humans and gives these rights · to not only American citizens, but to all persons. While the "Legacies of the Shoah" symposium had various talks on

this subject, I found alumni Brian Erickson's talk of particular interest. It pertained to our own abuse of human rights at the U.S.-Mexico border. It was titled "What our 'Constitution-Light' Border means for Communities, the United States · and World: Militarization, Abuse and Impunity along the U.S.-Mexico Border." Erickson, a policy advocate for the American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico, emphasized that we can't see what is really going on at the border. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) act without transparency, and we do not get the whole picture from the media. The media can shape the way we think about subjects like immigration, and it has a strong influence over us, including police officers and other law enforcement like CPB agents. Erickson said there are many disturbing cases of excessive force by CPB agents. Of the 24 deaths caused by agents last year, six were standing in Mexico and 10 were U.S. citizens. In ·one case, Guillermo Arevalo Pedroza was shot and killed by an agent on a U.S. Border Patrol boat. He was picnicking with his family on the south side of the Rio Grande said Erickson. The filed reports stated the agent was responding to someone throwing rocks at the boat. However, footage taken with a cell phone doesn't show any rock-throwing. There is no one to hold them accountable for their abuse. There are no reports of officers facing any consequences for excessive force. These immigrants also have

their legal rights violated. There is a court system, Operation Streamline, specifically for immigrants who live in the United States. During his talk, Erickson said they do not get true due process because this system is separate from our regular court system. About 30 people, or more depending on the area, are seen and tried at one time. Erickson also said each individual does not get his or her own lawyer. Instead, multiple 'people are defended by the same public defender. In the media and other public spheres, people call them illegals and describe them as undocumented, and they commonly perceive them as drains on our society. At the PLU fall screening of "The Dream is Now," junior Gina Fioretti, Erickson and those in attendance discussed how "calling them 'illegals' dehumanizes them." . We need to change our mindset on immigrants and not judge them on how they look or their immigration status. Unless we change, our country will continue to exploit the rights of these dehumanized people. Most of us value the human rights that are guaranteed to us in · our Constitution, so there is no valid reason why we wouldn't want everyone to have those same rights. So, make sure to be more aware of the wording you use if you are ever discussing this subject in class or outside of class. Also, be sure to stay informed on this political issue, and don't rely only on one source of media for your information.

OPINIONll

CONFESSION PAGE GOES KRISE CRAZY By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

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If you have logged into the social media website Facebook and read the P.L.U Confess page lately, you know all about the magical things President Thomas Krise has been up to in his life. Anonymous posts from students about Krise's abilities to push the world and make children's dreams come true dominated the Facebook page from Feb. 18-19. Students seemed to either love it or hate it. According to P.L.U Confess, Krise is responsible for not only the creation of Transformers, ·but he also seems to be the closest thing we have to a god walking on earth. One student anonymously posted, "I think the recent surge in President Krise .related posts is refreshing! Everyone takes this page way too seriously and this is a perfect way to throw everyone off that train of seriousness. Laugh, be stupid, enjoy it, then go back to posting confessions." On the opposing side, another anonymous student commented, "Ok this whole President Krise thing is utterly stupid, knock it off!" But a group of students quickly shut that comment down, rushing to the new trend's defense. The new Chuck Norris-like role that Krise has taken on is a great morale booster for Pacific Lutheran University. On campus we do not see or hear too much from Krise, which might make us feel disconnected from the man who is looking over campus. However, once he is turned into a PLU folk-hero, he becomes a part of our daily lives, and he feels closer and more familiar to the students. Having a leader that you not only look up to, but are also familiar with, boosts morale and can be a comforting touch to the community-feel that we have here. "It's kind of entertaining," first-year Ingrid Ericksen said. "I like the posts." Putting all seriousness aside, the posts are funny. There have been multiple complaints, posted anonymously by students, about P.L.U Confess being too gross, too sad, not fun and not honest. The Krise posts are light hearted and funny, and people are bonding over them: For a while, when we were younger, you could begin a conversation joking about Chuck Norris, and you could bond with someone about the jokes. Now, on our campus, people can bond over the P.L.U Confess jokes and have a good laugh. "I thought some of them were creative and humorous, and most of them were just modified Chuck Norris jokes," sophomore Scott Hefty said. Humor can actually make a campus run more smoothly, especially when someone in power is involved. According to Forbes, when humor is introduced into a work area, people are more productive. When a powerful figure allows, and is involved in humor in a working environment, people tend to be more comfortable, relaxed and have an easier time accomplishing tasks. Not only does humor help people accomplish tasks, it also makes people more comfortable asking .for help and opening up dialogue about concerns and changes. · "I think that the page is a useful tool for if you need to get something off your chest. However, that does not open the door for criticism towards others and jokes at other people's expense," sophomore Robert Layton said. "The page is meant for confessions, not as a center for jokes and drama." Even though some students are upset and want real confessions about love, sex, illegal activity and weird personal behaviors, I cannot see the brief trend as anything but positive. It hurt nobody and honored Krise in a weird, but kind of awesome way. Perhaps he saw some of the posts and loves his Lutes even more for it.

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THE MOORING MAST

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PLU,discusses Facebook confessionpage ·The Mast asked students in a poll starting Feb. 25 how they felt about Facebook's P.L.U Confess page. Join the conversation at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section.

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23 Any grape, banana, etc . 24 Alaska native 26 Baby salamanders 27 Wordsman Webster 28 Doris or Patty 29 You can dig it 30" on a true story" 32 Growls from Fido 33 Songs-andskits show 34 Fish-eating eagle 35 Campus cadet org. 36 Run _ (go wild) 38 Black magic 39 Gaiety 44 Snake products 45 Conclude from the

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50 It's hailed in rain 52 Big nonflying birds 53 Sicilian hothead 54 "And others," briefly 55 Athens portico 56 It is measured in ears 57 Give off 59 Eye, poetically 60 Good golfer's goal

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THE MOORING MAST

FER 28, 2014

SPORTS 13

SPORTS BCOREBOABDJ Women's Basketball

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 1at Wr.llam.ett.e, 11 a.m.

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ARoUND THE LEAGUE ••• BASEBALL: Senior Josh Rapacz, a seni-Or from George Fbx, batted .667 (8-12) on~· week, with a .692 on base pct., 1.0-00 slugging pct., a double, a home rwt and four RBI in Cavalier Class.i c at COncordia last week. The Bruins went 3 -0 during R.apacz's streak.

MEN'S BASKETBALL: Geo~ Fox senior Spencer Bolte finished his collegiate career in stellar fashion. During the last week of his four-year career, he ave:raged 24J3 ppg, 5.3 rpg, and 3.3 apg while shooting .532 from the fi.eld, .500 (7-14) on threes, and .842 (16-19) from the ltne. SOFTBALL: In her fust appearance of the season, Linfteld pitcher Shelby VandeBergh, a senior, tossed her third. career no-hitter. She registered fi.ve strikeouts in a five inning, run-rule shortened game. The Wtldcats won S-0 against Lewis & Clark.

MEN'S TENNIS~ Whitman senior Andy Riggs dominated on~ court this past week. In singles play, he went 3-0, while only dropping a total offi.ve games in the proeess. Riggs also won every one of bis doubles matches. SOFTBALL: Shortstop Kayla Anderson, a sophomore from George Fox, hit safely in every game last week with four multi-hit games. For the week, she batted .519 (11-19) with two doubles, two home runs, a I.000 slugging pct., drove in nine and scored eight. In the field. she handled 13 chances flawlessly, with .6.ve putouts and eight assists. The Bruins improved to 9- 0, their best start in team history. WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: Puget Soundjunior Amanda Fl:>rshay scored a career-high 30 poinb in the Loggers' win over Paciftc to clinch a spot in the Northwest Conference Tournament.

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitman George Fox

25

0

16-0

Won25

22

3

13-3

Won3

Whitworth

18

7

12-4

Lost2

Puget Sound

16

9

9-7

Wonl

Lewis & Clark

13

12

8-8

Lostl

Linfield

9

16

5-11

Wonl

Pacific

8

16 .

4-12

Lost 1

PLU

7

18

3-13

Lost 8

Willamette

4

21

2-14

Lost 1

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

4

0

4 -0

Won4

Whitworth

11

3

4- 0

Won4

George Fox

9

0

3-0

Won9

Pacific

7

2-0

Won3

-

Softball

5

0 -2

Lost5

Puget Sound

0

3

0-3

Lost3

LeWis & Clark

3

6

0-4

Lost4

5

0-4

Lost4

PLU

Willamette

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 1 vs. Whitworth, noon

Women's Tennis TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

0

2-0

Won3

2-0

Won2

0

1- 0

Won2

George Fox

3

Whitworth

2

PLU

2

Puget Sound

2

0

1-0

Won2

Whitman

2

5

1- 0

Wonl

Willamette

2

0-1

Lostl

Lin.field

2

0-2

Lost2

Pacific

2

0-2

Lost2

3

0 -2

Lost3

Lewis & Clark

0

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LUTES' UPCOMING MATCH: Friday at Wr.llam.ette, 4 p.m. LUTES' UPCOMING MATCH: Friday vs. Wr.llam.ett.e, 1p.m.

Men set to open spring golf season at PLU Invitational

NORTHWEST CONFERENCE AWARDS Men's basketball Brandon Lester: Honorable Mention NWC Bryce Miller: Honorable Mention NWC

By TYLE{t SCOTT Director ofAthletic Communications With the spring season about to kick off, the Pacific Lutheran men's golf team is wrapping up preparations to open the schedule with its own home PLU Invitational this weekend at The Home Course. The Lutes wrapped up the fall schedule with a second-place showing at the Northwest Conference Fall Classic back in

Women's basketball Samantha Potter: Second-team NWC ;~c;::c;:;c1:::1·=

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October, placing all five· golfers in the top-20 and ranking the Lutes behind only Willamette in the conference going into spring. In his fourth season at the helm, PLU head coach Kris Swanson said he believes -his team has the right balance of depth and talent to aim for the NWC crown and a berth in the NCAA Div. ill National Tournament. "We're trying our hardest to be as competitive as we can and to leave everything out on the golf course," Swanson said. "That journey starts this weekend."

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4

PORTLAND FALLS TO SAN ANTONIO, MUCH TO DISMAY OF MAST SPORTS PICK 'EM CONTESTANTS How many strikeouts will Trevor Lubking record this weekend? By SAM HORN Sports Editor

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Nobody wins all the time. Failure is good for the soul. It helps an individual realize they're mortal. The first week of the spring edition of Mast Sports Pick 'Em was a reality check for all of the participants. Everyone picked the Portland Trailblazers to best the San Antonio Spurs, when in actuality, the exact opposite occured. In a 111-109 victory, the Spurs claimed their · 40th win of the season. That didn't sit well with the Mast Sports Pick 'Em contestants. While the Spurs eked out a win, it means that the contestants are still on a level playing field. No one holds the advantage.

At least not yet. For this week, I asked the contestants how many strikeouts Lute pitcher Trevor Lubking, a junior, would record this weekend. Lubking has made three appearances in the young season, tallying 25 strikeouts. Lubking will be facing a Willamette side that has six wins on the season. Lubking shouldn't have a problem limiting Willamette to a minimal amount of runs, as the Bearcats have batted .223 (37-for-166) with runners in scoring position. Lubking is averaging about eight strikeouts per game thus far, and I'm sure he wants to continue this success against Willamette. I know the Mast Sports Pick 'Em contestants want him to . succeed. They're all itching with excitement to earn their first win of the season.

Alan Bell (0-1) Prediction: 11 strikeouts

One can only wonder if Bell will receive his first win of the season. He seems to be eonfident in bis deciSion.

Cale Powers (0-1) Prediction: 12 strikeouts

Powers is uber confident that Lubking will fan Willamette's batters. Time can only tell if Powers' guess is correct.

Drew Oord (0"'.'1)

Oord plays with Lubking, so he has the inside edge in the guessing game. Let's see if it will pay oft

. Prediction: 10 strikeouts Kyle Peart (0-1) Prediction: 6 strikeouts Michelle Hogan (0-1) Prediction: 8 strikeouts

While Peart didn't finish in first place last year, it will be interesting to see if his low estimate is right. Coming off of a hi.qtoric !IWi.mming season,

Hogan was caught in the moment and didn't tell me her an...wer until the last minute.

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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SAM SAYS... The same night as Jam.es injured his nose, Jason Terry injured his knee. He was later diagnosed with a seasonLeBron James tumbles to ending injury. I never saw the floor Feb. 20. His nose that news on SportsCenter. begins to bleed. Doctors say Center Ronny Turiaf also the apex predator of the NBA injured his knee the same is out for at least two weeks, day James injured his nose, if not longer. The media and will be out until early subsequently blows the story March. I have no recollection out of proportion. of witnessing this injury ESPN, SportingNews. news unfold on SportsCenter com, Sports lliustrated and either. SB Nation all have detailed It's disappointing when stories about how James' players get injured and don't injury will affect the Miami receive any media attention Heat's chances of winning because they're not like their next few games. This is LeBron James in terms of the treatment the media gives skill or poise. It's sad. to only the most prevalent Kevin Durant ended his NBA players. prolific scoring streak less This situation than a month ago. In the span demonstrates that the NBA of 12 games, Durant averaged is seemingly a popularity more than 30 points. contest. The best players in Durant is While the NBA get used to this life widely regarded to be the of media luxury. undisputed front-runner The fact of the matter of this year's MVP Award, is there are plenty of NBA he wasn't the only player players who have suffered achieving success in January. far more serious injuries Devin Harris, who made than James. The casual his season debut Jan. 18 after basketball follower probably his return from toe surgery, hasn't heard of these players' scored 14 points in back-tosituations, or even worse, the back games off the bench last players themselves. week. It's the cold hard truth, But the guard gets no not just about the NBA, but love from SportsCenter for 路 about sports as a whole. his glorious post-surgery Take NBA center JaVale performances. Just imagine McGee for instance. McGee what he had to do to get to was sidelined for the this point in his career. remainder of the NBA season Both Durant and James "after the stress injury in his 路 are great players. They are tibia was revealed to be a the rare specimens the mortal fracture," according to a USA soul rarely witnesses. They TODAY report. have risen to new heights I understand the 7-foot and have given the NBA athlete has been inconsistent 路 something to talk about. in his career, averaging 8.7 That's why they receive an points and 5.7 rebounds inordinate amount of media per game. Since he hasn't coverage. helped his team as much as I realize that the kings James has aided the Heat, he of the NBA garner so much receives less airtime. attention because of what That's just the current they do on the court. It's state of affairs in the NBA. remarkable what James When James' nose injury and Durant can pull off on occurred, I was enjoying the hardwood. It literally some wings with some boggles the mind. good friends at Buffalo Wild On the same note, I hope Wings. I witnessed Jam.es players who might not be as break his nose and blood physically gifted earn some spew out of his nostrils. media ~ttention eventually. It was a grim sight, no have These players doubt. worked too hard to go But once James walked unnoticed. toward the locker room knowing W.s night was officially over, the news was PHOTOS COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS all over SportsCenter.

FEB. 28, 2014

The NBA is like a popularity contest

By SAM HORN Sports Editor

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LeBron James

Kevin Durant

Jason Terry

Devin Harris

Ronny Turiaf

JaVale McGee

PLU senior reminisces on his basketball career By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer

:~

TVETER

American novelist Bill Vaughn once said, "It's never safe to be nostalgic about something until you're absolutely certain there's no chance of it coming back." This past weekend, my career as a competitive athlete came to an end. Now that I know it is officially over, I can't help but feel sentimental about my time as a basketball player. I will always remember what took place in these past four years as an athlete, and I can't help but smile. My four years of basketball at Pacific Lutheran University were a bit like a roller coaster

ride. The journey had its ups and its downs, but the ride was exciting. 路 I wouldn't trade the past four years for anything. When the final buzzer sounded, the feeling that immediately came to my mind was bittersweet. My body is physically ready for a break. It will be great to take time off and let the aches and pains caused by a long season finally heal. But it will be strange not to be preparing for next season. When one season came to an end over the course of these last four years, it was time to begin training for the next one. It is an odd sensation knowing the sport you have committed so much time and effort toward is finished. I do look forward to having spare time and pursuing my other interests. I thought I was coming to PLU to play basketball. Little did I know that by playing basketball here, I would make friendships that will last a lifetime. It took time, but I came to understand the most important thing wasn't the games. It was the relationships I formed with my teammates and the memories I had with

them. I will forever have a special bond with Kai Hoyt and Arvid Isaksen, the two other seniors with whom .I spent four years. PLU men's basketball coach Steve Dickerson always says, "There are few things more special than being a teammate." That is what I will miss the most - the feeling of being a part of something greater than myself. One of the strangest sensations that occurred after the final game of the season was the feeling of taking off the PLU jersey for the final time. Although I will likely play other games in the future, I will never again play a game in which I represent my school. I will never forget the lessons I learned as a member of the PLU men's basketball team. I will always remember that it's important to learn what it takes to be successful not just in sports, but also in life: As one chapter of my life ends, a new one begins. After all, the journey of a thousand miles begins and ends with a single step.


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THE MOORING MAST

FEB. 28, 2014

SPORTS 15

PACIFIC TOPS PLU IN SOFTBALL SLUGFEST

42 combinedruns are highest in PLU's program history By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications Pacific Lutheran softball fell to the visiting Pacific Boxers 19-23 after nearly four hours of play in the opener of Saturday's doubleheader. · The game featured 32 hits, 23 walks, nine hit batters and a total of 116 batters sent to the plate. It marked the highest scored contest in PLU's program history with a combined 42 runs scored. With the loss, Pacific Lutheran dropped to 1-4, 0-1 NWC. Pacific improved to 6-1 overall, 1-0 NWC. Boxer's pitcher Allie Sims (4-0) was credited with the win while junior Leah Butters (0-2) took the loss. Due to the length of the opener, officials called the nightcap prior to the fourth inning of the second game du~ to darkness. PLU's softball field is not equipped with lights. The game will be postponed until April 6 when the Lutes travel to Oregon to face the Boxers on the road.

Pacific led 2-1. Senior Spencer Sherwin, a center fielder, led the way for the Lutes' offense and collected five RBis on two hits and two walks. Junior Kelsey Robinson went 3-for-4 with four runs batted in. Right fielder Alison Behrends, a sophomore, had three hits with a double, and three runs scored while shortstop Lindsey Matsunaga, a senior, went 2-for-5 with two RBis. First-year Emily McConnell was 1-for-3 with two RBis and three runs scored. PLU took a first-inning lead at the expensive of Pacific's starting pitcher Sara Aasness. Aftering hitting Matsunaga to load the bases, Aasness hit senior Katie Lowery to put the Lutes on the board first. A three-error third inning for the Boxers would allow the Lutes to enter the fourth inning up 6-2. However, the four-run cushion wouldn't be enough as the Boxers' bats came to life in a big way. Pacific scored nine runs on five hits including two home runs off the bats of Boxers' center fielder Becca Moen and third baseman Kaitlyn Shikada.

But the Lutes wasted no time battling back. In the bottom of the fourth inning, with the bases loaded and no outs, Sherwin belted a triple down the right field line to clear the bases and shift the momentum in the Lutes' favor. First-year Kailyn Osaki reached first on a throwing error to score Sherwin from third and tie the game at 11 apiece. PLU looked to close things out in the top of the seventh as they held a 15-14 advantage, but a clutch two-out, tworun homer by Boxers' first baseman Ashley Mitchell would spoil the Lutes' plans. PLU matched Pacific in the home half of the seventh to force extra innings. The Boxers sealed their fate in the top of the eighth, sending 12 batters to the plate in the seven-run frame that included two doubles and five walks. The Lutes responded with some noise of their own, putting up three more runs before Lowery lined out to third base for the long awaited final out. Pacific Lutheran returns to action Sunday at noon, hosting a doubleheader against George Fox.

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PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

PHOTO BY BRADFORD LUM

LEFT: First -year Arny King celebrates with her t eammates after scoring a run against Pacific. King has played sparingly this season, obtaining playing t ime in just one game so far, which was against Pacific. RIGHT: Junior Tori Hamura earns the out against Pacific. Ha~ura was a magnet for the Boxers' pitchers, as she was hit by pitches twice.

Bruins softball tealll easily pushes past weary Lutes By NICK BARENE Sports Writer

1·,

+

The Lutes softball team w as unable to end George Fox's ninegame unbeaten streak Sunday, losing 8-1. · The Bruins drew first blood in the third inning. After a leadoff single by Kelsey Hansen, left fielder Ashley Bunce bunted and was able to reach first base on a throwing error. The Bruins scored on a sacrifice fly by Kat Hylton and again on a ground out by Kayla Anderson. Afterward, Amanda Woods hit an RBI single to left field, bringing the score to 3-0. In the fourth inning, the Bruins added two more runs. Baylee Westrick hit a solo home run, and Felicia Chavez hit an RBI single to center. George Fox tacked on a few more insurance runs in the seventh inning when a sacrifice fly allowed two runs to score. Westrick then added her second RBI on a lineout to center. The lone run for the Lutes came in the bottom of the seventh inning when senior Samantha Pryor blasted a home run over the wall in left-center field. "I think this weekend provided

us with an opportunity to learn about ourselves as individuals and as a team," Pryor said. Pitcher Kel!'iey Robinson, a junior, started the game for the Lutes and ended up losing her second game of the season after giving up an unruly eight earned runs. Bruins starter Erin Hento remains undefeated with her fourth straight win as she held the Lutes to just one run on seven hits. Hento also struck out four Lute batters. Officials canceled the second game of the doubleheader due to wet conditions. There is no further information on when, and if, that game will be played at a later date. The Bruins kept their record unblemished, moving to 9-0 overall, 3-0 in Northwest Conference play. The Lutes fall to 1-5 overall, 0-1 NWC. The Lutes will host Whitworth in another weekend doubleheader this coming weekend. "Although the results are disappointing, we know we have the potential to be a good team," Pryor said. "We are looking forward to getting back to work this week."

....

.....

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Giancarlo Santoro contributed to this article.

Junior Kelsey Robinson gave up eight runs to George Fox and surrendered 14 hit s to the Bruins. While Robinson did allow eight runs, only three of t hem were unearned.


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THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

Athlete Ally founder Hudson Taylor to speak at Pacific Lutheran University By SAM HORN Sports Editor

,

~

Sometimes it only takes one person to make a difference in the world of sports: Give the basketball to your best shooter and she11 sink the game-winning bucket. Put the ball in your star running back's hands and he11 run into the end zone for a touchdown. When Hudson Taylor started wrestling at the University of Maryland, he put a human rights sticker on his wrestling helmet as a symbol for the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) community. As a theatre major at UMD, Taylor began to witness the trials and tribulations of homophobic slurs and language. That was all the motivation he needed to make a difference. Taylor realized that LGBT athletes didn't have someone to speak out for them, so he decided to help. Taylor disregarded other athletes' sexuality and expressed that it doesn't matter what their sexual orientation is. He said if "you're an athlete or my teammate, then I respect you." It was then Taylor launched Athlete Ally, an organization focused on endiJ:tg homophobia and transphobia in sports by educating allies in the athletic community and empowering them to take a stand, according to http://www.athleteally.org. Two ambassadors of the foundation are NFL players Brendon Ayanbadejo and Chris Kluwe, both LGBT activists. Pacific Lutheran University is hosting Taylor Monday at 7:30 p.m. in Olson Gymnasium. Junior Arny Wooten, the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) president, is helping to promote the event by using various posters and

social media to reach out to the PLU community. "By reqching out t<? other clubs and groups on campus, we are hoping to generate buzz and talk about Hudson Taylor and Athlete Ally," Wooten said. "We will also be rolling out a new poster campaign either the week before Hudson or the week of his event that is focused on the topic of inclusion within our campus." The posters feature PLU athletes holding up posters stating, "Respect Matters," "Culture Matters" or "Support Matters." Wooten first heard Taylor speak at the University of Washington Summit, which is where athletes and administrators focused on how to "create safe spaces for all within sporting environments," 路 according to http:!/sites.education.washington .edu/ u wcla/content/2013-center-summit-l. "The UW Summit showed me how simple it is to make a difference on your campus by becoming an advocate for inclusion," Wooten said. "It really p]l comes down to respect - respect for your teammates and respect for the sport you play. Students and athletes should all feel safe in their own environment." SAAC is funding Taylor's expenses as a result of the Carol Sheffels Quigg A ward for Excellence and Innovation, which is awarded to faculty, staff and students who demonstrate unusually inventive, original and creative approaches to advance the mission of the university, according to http://www.plu.edu. "As a student athlete I understand the importance of inclusion, and we want others to embrace inclusion on campus as well. I believe that Hudson Taylor fosters a great message for why inclusion matters," Wooten said.

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FEB. 28, 2014

Women's tennis sweeps competition

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

The women's tennis team won 8-1 against the College ofldaho and conquered Lewis & Clark 7-2 this past 路weekend. TOP: Juruor Allison McClure smacks a forehand to her opponent. McClure won in her singles and doubles matches against the College ofldaho Feb. 21. BOTTOM LEFT: Senior Leah Newell eyes down the ball in order to return a shot. While Newell won her singles match against the College of Idaho, she lost her. singles match against Lewis & Clark. BOTTOM RIGHT: Sophomore Samantha Lund lunges at a shot in an attempt to return it. Lund defeated h~r Lewis & Clark opponent in the No. 2 singles match.


SPORTS LGBT activist speaks against homophobia in sports

AdE 'Pokemon Red' becomes group effort

PAGE15

PAGE5

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

OORING

MARCH 7, 2014

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 14

mastmedia. plu.edu

ROTC wins MacArthur Award

It is easy being green at PLU By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Junior Josh Albrecht stands in formation after Physical Training Monday. ROTC earned the MacArthur Award for the third'time in four years last Friday.

By JESSE MAJOR Photo Editor 路 Pacific Lutheran University's Reserve Officer Training Corps program earned its third MacArthur Award in the last four years last Friday. Winning this award demonstrates why the program is one of the top eight ROTC programs out of more than 275 in the country. PLU previously earned the award for the 2009-10 and 2011-12 academic years, according to Lt. Col. Kevin Keller, who said the award was a huge achievement. "We are vety honored to win yet another MacArthur Award," President Thomas Krise said in a press release. The MacArthur Award goes to the top program in each of the country's eight brigades.

PLU represents the Cadet Commands Eighth Brigade, which includes 30 units in Washington, Oregon, California, Hawaii, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada and Guam. The MacArthur Award is earned based on the programs' academics, the cadets nationwide rank on the National Order of Merit List and the cadets' performance .a nd retention and commissioning rates. "It feels really good," junior C,onnor Rowell said. '1t demonstrates our continued effort in and out of the classroom." Keller attributes the PLU ROTC's success to the 90 cadets in the program. "They are incredibly positive, driven, motivated men and women always pursuing excellence," Keller said. "I come to work every day honored and proud to work with them. I'm lucky."

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Game over for (Flappy Bird' page8

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Earning the award also helps the program recruit more cadets. "I couldn't have picked a better school to do ROTC at," Rowell said. When Keller interviews prospective cadets, he tells them if they join the PLU program, they will be in one of the best in the nation. Keller also tells them about the overall quality of the university and about the benefits of its small community. Seniors mentor the underclassmen in ROTC, something that might not happen at larger universities. "They are right down with them," Keller said. Sophomore Georgia Lamb said she feels super fortunate to be a part of it. "For me personally, the award makes me want to push myself harder," Lamb said.

Working in the Sustainability Office, particularly in recycling, can be a really dirty job. But since being named_number 29 in the top 50 Greenest Universities in America list, the office has been enjoying some recognition for its work. The award comes from BestColleges.com, which aggregated the data based on the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Education (AASE) . "Sustainability is right in the mission statement of PLU," Chrissy Cooley, the sustainability manager, said. "It's not a destination, it's a process, an evolving concept." One of the things that makes PLU Sustainability stand out is the heavy student involvement. The office houses 3 full-time staff and more than 20 student workers. Senior Princess Reese, the ecojustice advocate, explained that the office' s programs and campaigns aim to meet a three-pronged approach. Reese said PLU operates with three principles: and people, planet prosperity. "You have planet, which is ecology, which everyone knows about. Then you have the people portion, which is social sustainability, so caring for one another and caring for the community. And then there is prosperity, which is this collaborative effort to integrate systems that

are ecologically sustainable, socially sustainable and financially sustainable." One .of the office's long term goals is to get all the buildings on campus designated Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified. United States The Green Building Council determined the certification, and it is marked by several factors including the sustainability of the construction, interior design and or neighborhood development, among others. "I think we could even take it a step further and look at how buildings can even be good for the environment," Cooley said. "A lot of students may not know that a building is following LEED design, but they know they're more comfortable in that building," Cooley said. One such building is Morken, where Cooley spent time while studying for her MBA. She said she enjoyed the building because of the increased amount of natural light. "I feel more productive, more energized when I'm in that building, and it's nothing that's so outside of the realm of innovation," Cooley said. "These are places that need less cleaning chemicals, they have less carpet, they don't need as much maintenance." The other LEED buildings on campus are the Karen Hille Phillips Center . for the Performing Arts, the Neeb Center and Anderson University Center. While Cooley said many of the

GREEN CONTINUED ON PAGE 2

History lecture focuses on execution By TAYLOR LUNKA Guest Writer A 16th century journaling executioner was the focus of the 40th annual Walter C. Schnackenberg Memorial Lecture Wednesday. Students, faculty, alumni and staff occupied almost every seat in Xavier 201 to listen to speaker Joel Harrington, professor of history at Vanderbilt University. Harrington specializes in the history of Europe, specifically in the Reformation and early modem Germany. His research interests lie in social history, children, family and marriage. Harrington's most recent book, "The Faithful Executioner," was

published in 2012 and examines crime, punishment and ethics in early modem Germany. He began working on the book about four years ago. The night's lecture focused on Frantz Schmidt, a young 16thcentury German executioner. Schmidt kept a journal for 45 years of stories and scenes of the executions he performed. In the early 1500s, sons followed in the footsteps of their father's career path. At age 19, Schmidt began in the execution business helping his father. Schmidt made sure he exuded "professionalism in execution," Harrington said in the lecture. Execution methods in the 16th century ranged from 路 drowning, to whipping and wheeling, and

Schmidt performed all of these and more. In his journal, Schmidt described each execution, who was being executed and the reason for the execution. Why or for whom Schmidt was writing remains a mystery. Harrington's interest in the subject began a decade ago when he came upon Schmidt's journal. "It's an amazing source, and I thought to myself, 'someone should do something with it,"' Harrington said. The department of history at Pacific Lutheran University and the Schnackenberg family began the Walter C. Schnackenberg Memorial Lecture series in 1974. Schnackenberg graduated from Pacific Lutheran College in 1937. He taught at the university from 1942-44 and returned in 1952.


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Student Life cracks down on downloads ByTAHNAYEE

CLENDINEN Guest Writer The rise of online piracy has forced Pacific Lutheran University's Student Life office to take action. The office sent out an email Feb. 12 detailing the ever increasing problem of online piracy. Students are using the university's network as a direct route to download software, which then gives them illegal access to all types of free media. "It is really hard to avoid this," first-year Jenna Williams said. "I don't have any, but hey, I mean, we all have that one friend with a million songs and movies on their · computer." What students may not be aware of, is that committing online piracy has very serious repercussions. The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) regularly troll the Internet and seek out u sers who are sharing files via software on their computers. Because users receive their Internet connection via PLU servers, the administration receives reports about the illegal activity from RIAA and MPAA. Both organizations find

the user's I.P. address, which links music. "We all know it's wrong. I don't directly to a computer or mobile device registered by a student on do it," Aczon said. "I understand the university's Internet server. why people do it though. Everything According to the Office of is expensive enough, like textbooks Student Life, the first time the RIAA and stuff like that." Peer-to-peer software, which m MPAA report a student, PLU will send out an email asking the student allows the user to download all to fix the problem. types of media for free, has been The second time, the Student increasingly beating out providers Rights and Responsibilities (SRR) like iTunes. office takes over the case and asks Students can take several steps to the student to fix the problem and prevent online piracy. First, they can uninstall peer-todemonstrate knowledge of future computer rules and regulations peer sharing software. This includes use. The student is also at risk for but it not limited to Limewire, extensive fines and legal action from . BitTorrent and iLivid . . Whether outside companies at this point. someone uses this software once The third time the RIAA or MPAA or multiple times, keeping it on contact PLU, PLU immediately a computer allows other users to terminates the student's access to actively access and take files off of the university's network and legal the device. action is a strong possibility. Second, students should avoid Piracy fines for downloading downloading music off of the copyrighted software, music or Internet from sites that promise free movies could total up to $250,000 and secure downloads. Not only is per title of downloaded items. In this illegal, it also leaves the user's addition to the fine, there could be a computer open to viruses. prison sentence of up to five years. Students can check if their "I don't do it," sophomore Emily activity is against policy, find Jacka said. "But as long as it doesn't out more information or get help damage the entire system, I think uninstalling peer-to-peer sharing it's fine." software from assistance available First-year Jeankie Aczon also at the Help Desk in the library. said she doesn't pirate movies or

GREEN CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 LEED buildings have sustainable features that aren't rocket science, there are other features that almost sound like science fiction. For instance, Morken and Neeb both use geothermal power, meaning they pull energy from the natural heat of the earth. Some other plans for the future include becoming both carbon neutral and getting to zero waste by 2020. However, Cooley said the Sustainability Office also has more ambitious goals. "The more radical goals we've set for ourselves are rethinking culture and how can the community be supporting something that's sustainable and looking out for each other," Cooley said. One example she used to demonstrate this idea was plastics in the dining area. "The .plastic [a student] uses will outlive them, and they're only using it for a day," Cooley said. Nick Lorax, the Sustainability Lead, agreed with Cooley. "There's a lot of different definitions of sustainability, and everyone understands what that means a little differently," Lorax said. "But to reach these broad, sweeping goals we have as a university, we're going to need every·single person in the university to participate and do their part." Students across campus are proud of the recognition. "It was very nice to see what they're.doing is recognized," junior Mia Martinussen said. "It's such an important topic to be good at." . Junior Thomas Kim also expressed his pride for PLU. "It is such an honor to be part of this university that promotes everyone to be good stewards of this earth," Kim said. 'Tm excited for the next decade or two when I grow up and come back to the university and be able to proudly say, Tm from PLU."' To see how PLU fared in the competition and look at the status report, visit https://stars.aashe.orglinstitutions!pacifi.c-lutheranuniversity-walreport/2013-03-121.

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THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

NEWS3

Alternative spring breaks offer students affordable travel, 'staycation' experiences

What to do atPLU Ongoing

By MARIANNE FLAKK Guest Writer

Branch said the trip costs $150, but that might change,

and that it is a great way for students to give back to the For students who haven't community and broaden yet figured out what they're their perspectives. The doing for spririg break, deadline to sign up is this Pacific Lutheran University Thursday. has some suggestions. For those who would A number of groups and like to go to Holden Village organizations on campus 路 for spring break, Campus plan PLU' s Alternative Ministry has a trip going Spring Break trips. there from March 25-28. One, which Ignite According to the Alternative arranges, is a trip to Portland, Spring Break web page, it is a Ore. and Vancouver, Wash. trip for students to experience from March 24-28. The trip's a week with service and purpose is for students to get reflective experiences. out of their comfort zones, Students will work on see the greater community carpentry, special cleaning, and help people who need it. plumbing, electrical work "We are going to team and painting, Tiffany up with people from the Lemmon, assistant local community and serve director for the Center for people on the street," PLU Community Engagement alum Emily Branch, one of and Services, said. the leaders for this trip, said. "I'd recommend this trip "We will be talking to the for students that are looking homeless, give them food for an alternative spring or clothes - whatever they break experience, that want need - and just interact to meet and work with fellow with them." Lutes, spend time with each Ignite has already other outside of campus, arranged for living away from any distractions accommodations. Branch such as television, phone or said the . group of students Internet access," Lemmon will live with a family and said. "Any students that live as a family. They will want to be in the outdoors, cooperate with BridgeTown working hard, spending time and Bread & Wine Church, reflecting and just finding two local organizations that peace and quiet." help the community.

This trip costs $125, which covers all expenses like food, lodging and travel. The deadline to sign up is today. Outdoor Recreation has planned a trip to southern Utah where the travelers will be hiking, camping and boulde:9ng. On the way home, they will drive through California. The trip will last from March 22-29. Outdoor Recreation has a tradition of arranging trips for students over. breaks. In previous years they have been to Arizona, southern Utah and Canada. They chose southern Utah again for this trip, because it );las nice weather and is warmer than Washington, things students tend to want for their spring break. "It is an awesome opportunity to see areas of our nation, 路 bonding with other students, be active outside and a great outlet," Kelsie Leu, Outdoor Recreation's finance director, said. "And you get to take a break from PLU." The cost for this trip is $300, which covers travel and food expenses, so all students need to bring is appropriate clothing. The deadline to sign up is today at5 p.m. Residential Life is offering

the option for students to have a meaningful spring break and still stay on campus. Running from March 21-26 and located here in Parkland, the Staycation will involve students going out in the local community and trying to tackle food issues. Students will be helping in food banks, elementary schools and Trinity Lutheran Church among others. "We often stereotype people living in Parkland without knowing them and this is a great way to get to know them and the community," Tommy Flanagan, University Congregation president, said. "Also, if you haven't done any volunteering before, this is a great way to start and if you have done it before you will have a lot to offer." Staycation is a free Alternative Spring Break, and the deadline to sign up is today at 5 p.m.

'In the Garden of Live Flowers. A Fantasia on the Life and Work of Rachel Carson.' March 7-8, 1415 at 7:30 p.m., March 16 at 2 p.m. Eastvold Auditorium, Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. $8 general admission, $5 senior and alumni, $3 PLU community and under 18-year-olds.

Students can contact the Center for Community Engagement and Service at service@plu.edu to get in touch with the right contact person for the trip.

"Bringing your 'A' game: Men and relationships." Men of PLU, join the Men's Project to discuss a Guy's Guide to Relationships. AUC 201, 3-4:30 p.m.

Friday-3/7 Nobel Peace Prize Live Stream. Leraas Lecture Hall, 12:30 -3:30 p.m. Women's Center Chocolate Fest. Women's Center, 2-5 p.m Habitat for Humanity Kick-off. AUC Regency Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Battle of the Bands. The Cave, 8-10p.m.

Saturday-3/8 PLU Athletics Invitational. Track, 6 a.m.-7 p.m.

PLU Briefs

Double baseball game versus Whitman. Baseball Diamond, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Forensics brings home bronze

Nobel Peace Prize Forum. AUC 133, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Pacific Lutheran University's Speech Debate team returned successful this weekend from a tournament in Willamette University in Salem, Ore. Members Pam Barker and David Mooney, seniors, beat more than 60 international teams for one of the coveted 8 spots in the semifinals. The PLU team won over international titans likes Chinese National Debate team and the University of British Columba. Barker and Mooney won their semifinal . round and represented PLU in the final elimination round where they placed third. Director of forensics at rival University of Denver Caleb Brooks said Barker and Mooney "were an unstoppable force." PLU has been in the deep elimination rounds of every single tournament it has attended this year. The team ends its regular season at the University of Denver March 14-16. &

New online privacy guidance

+

"Us Local People: Sarni VuoiIJIJa and Resilience." Come learn about the migratory people of northern Scandinavia and celebrate their culture. Scandinavian Cultural Center, Feb. 6- April 1.

The U.S. Department of Education's Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) released new guidance Feb. 25, to help school systems interpret the laws and practices of. protecting student privacy with online education services. The guidance summarizes the major requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) that relate to these educational services. "As an education community, we have to do a far better job of helping teachers and administrators understand technology and data issues so that they 路 can appropriately protect privacy while ensuring teachers and students have access to effective and safe tools," U.S. Secretary of Education Ame Duncan, said. For more information about the guidance, visit http://ptac.ed.gov.

Sunday-3/9 Nobel Peace Prize Forum. AUC 133, 12:30-3:30 p.m. Habitat Restoration Work Party. Fr.ed L. Tobiason Learning Center, 1-4 p.m. Organ Concert. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3-4:30 p.m.

Monday-3/10 Languages & Literatures. AUC 134, 3:45-5:45 p.m.

Tuesday-3/11 "Journey of the Golden Lady," Mutzy' s fight to recover family art stolen by the Nazis. Garfield Book Company Community Room, 10:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. Ignite! Students come together to worship God and understand God's word. The Cave: 6 -11 p.m.

Wednesday-3/12 "So You Want to be an Entrepreneur?" Karen Hille Phillips Center, 5 -7:30 p.m.

Thursday-3/13 Powell-Heller Holoqmst Conference. AUC CK, 1-4:45 p.m. Scandinavian Center 5-7p.m. "8 Things You Should Not Say To Me." Hong Hall Lounge, 5-6 p.m


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

Elect Her offers inspiration to get women students involved in government office

What to do atPLU Ongoing

By JESSICA TRONDSEN

'In the Garden of Live Flowers. A Fantasia on the Life and Work of Rachel Carson.' March 7-8, 1415 at 7:30 p.m., March 16 at 2 p.m. Eastvold Auditorium, Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. $8 general admission, $5 senior and alumni, $3 PLU community and under 18-year-olds. "Us Local People: Sarni VuoiIJIJa and Resilience:" Come learn about the migratory people of northern Scandinavia and celebrate their culture. Scandinavian Cultural Center, Feb. 6-April 1. Powell-Heller Holocaust Conference. March 12-14, Various Locations and Times The Art of Wayzgoose. March 12-April 9, Univeristy Gallery, 8 a.m.-4p.m

Friday-3/14 Psychology Department Colloquium Series. Anticipating Stigma: The Double Burden of Homelessness and Race. Carolyn Weisz of the University of Puget Sound will speak. Xavier 250, 2-3 p.m. French Film Screening. Ingram 100, 5-8 p.m. Powerful Women in Performance. The Cave, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Saturday-3/15 Guitar Festival. MBR Music Center, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Guitar Faculty Concert, MBR 330 5-6:30 p.m.

Sunday-3/16 Final night for 'In the Garden of Live Flowers.' KHPC, 2-4 p.m.

Monday-3/17 PLU Cheer Tryouts. Olson Gym, 4:45-7:15 p.m. Lean In: Is Balance Bogus? AUC 133, 6-8 p.m.

Tuesday~3/18 PLU Cheer Tryouts. Gym, 4:45-7:15 p.m.

Olson

ASPLU Senate Meetings. AUC 133, 5:30 p.m.- 8:30 p.m. University Symphony Orchestra. MBR 330, 8 p.m.- 9:30 p.m.

Wednesday-3/19 SEMAC Forum. AUC CK East, 9:15 -10:30 p.m. Women in Flight. Jackie Cochran. Garfield Book Company, 10:30 -12:30 p.m. PLU Cheer Tryouts. Gym, 4:45-7:15 p.m.

Olson

Spring Leadership Series. AUC 203, 6-7 p.m.

Thursday-3/20 PLU Cheer Tryouts. Gym, 4:45-7:15 p.m.

MARCH 7, 2014

Olson

Editor-in-Chief One woman asked 22 other women a question: Do you think we need more women leaders? In unison, all 23 hands raised - yes. The women, a mix of Pacific Lutheran University students and community facilitators, were participants of Elect Her, a program that encourages and trains female college students to run for student government positions and political offices. Last Saturday, the PLU Women's Center brought the training to campus. Pamela O'Leary, an adjunct professor at American University and Trinity Washington University, flew in from Washington D.C. to facilitate the conference. To start, participants watched a welcome message from Senator Patty Murray, who could not attend the event in person. Afterward, O'Leary asked participants to identify issues important to them and why they were important. Examples of issues the women shared ranged from disability access on campus to more transparency surrounding PLU' s budget. PHOTO BY JENNIFER SMITH From there, O'Leary asked participants Participants in Elect Her watched a welcome message from Sen. Patty Murray, which she recorded to use these issues to create a platform explaining why they would run for a specially for the event. political position and an elevator speech importance of the message. Humphreys written her elevator speech and tested it declaring why they should be elected. said women need to have a mentor from the out on another attendee, O'Leary asked all O'Leary said an elevator speech should beginning, maintain an authentic self and of the students to partake in a campaign contain the position for which a student is "get at the table." 路 路 simulation. running, where the student is from and why In the United States, 18.5 percent of In the activity, each woman wrote her she or he is memorable. Most importantly, congress members are women, with less name on a ballot. She then had to go out O'Leary said, it should begin with the than 1 percent - a total of five women on campus to find people to listen to her student's full name. under the age of 40. elevator speech and collect their signatures "Often we only hear as an endorsement for her women's first names," election. O'Leary said. "State your When the group full name." reconvened, . participants "Twenty percent is the words coming out. Eighty For the speech to be listened to PLU junior effective, O'Leary said percent is how you say it." and Fircrest City Council to pay attention to how Member Shannon Reynolds each student relayed her and Pierce County Council Pamela O'Leary information. Member Connie Ladenburg "Twenty percent is Elect Her Facilitator share their experiences as the words coming out," elected officials. O'Leary said. "Eighty Associated Students of percent is how you say it." PLU representatives also O'Leary advised With these statistics, the United States shared their experiences with student students to use language their audience ranks 80th in the world for women's political government. They said they wished more could connect to, while remanung representation. According to research students knew to attend their Tuesday intelligent, confident and accessible in their compiled for Elect Her, this is becausi: not night senate meetings at 7 p.m. in Anderson approach. enough women run, even though they are University Center room 140. Maggie Humphreys, communication elected at the same rate as men when they chair at the National Women's Political do. March is Women's History Month. ASPLU Caucus of Washington, also spoke on the Once each conference participant had primary elections take place March 13.

Crime Time: PLU's Campus Safety Blotter Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

Alcohol & Drug policy violation- Two incidents of Fire Alarm- A fire alarm went off in Hinderlie Hall alcohol and drug violations were reported Saturday. _on Monday at 11:27 a.m. A source for the alarm One in Tingelstad at about 2 a.m., and one in Harstad going off could not be found, and Campus Safety at about 10 p.m. 路reset the system. Campus Safety assisted Tingelstad' s RA on duty to investigate marijuana odor. Inside a room, officers made contact with several students who had admitted to smoking off campus. After a room search, several bottles and cans of alcohol were discovered along with marijuana paraphernalia. The incident was for-warded to Students Rights and Responsibilities. TINGELSTAD:

RFC- An off-duty Campus Safety officer observed a RFC'd male (Restrticted From Campus) in the basement of the library. Campus Safety officers and PLU' s off-duty sherrif s deputy arrived and escorted the RFC off campus. The male suffers from a mental disability and lives in a group care home near campus. The man was returned to the home and the manager of the home was asked to keep an eye on him:

llARsTAD: Campus Safety assisted Harstad's RA

on duty to investigate a marijuana odor. Several students and non-students came out of the room and cooperated with the search. Three unidentifed males fled the scene in an unknown direction. They were friends of one of the students from high school and only provided first names. No marijuana was found 路 but there were two bottles of alcohol. The incident was also forwarded to SRR.

Theft- A PLU student reported her bike had been stolen Wednesday afternoon outside the library. Campus Safety was able to locate a possible suspect on camera, but no evidence has been discovered.

If yon need Campus Safety's assistance, call (253)-535-7441


THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

A&E 5

'TWITCH PLAYS POKEMON' Thousands of users simultaneously play (Pokemon Red' in video game social experiment rather than skill. programmer chose The "Pokemon Red" for the experiment, because the game's If an infinite number · of play style does not demand the monkeys type at an infinite player to react quickly, and any number of keyboards for an delay in the stream would not be infinite length of time, one of completely detrimental to those them will write the complete participating. works of Shakespeare. The stream launched Feb. This is the theory behind 12, quickly becoming popular the video game "Twitch Plays on Internet sites like Reddit Pokemon," in which an unlimited and Tumblr. Communities ·live number of users play a single blogged events and spawned game of "Pokemon Red." several rnernes in response to the "Twitch Plays Pokemon" natural chaos that ensued from started as a social experiment the experiment. launched by an anonymous One of the more popular Australian programmer. rnernes, the Helix Fossil, was born Tens of thousands of serious due to Red's constant 'accidental' players and trolls alike enter attempts to use the Helix Fossil commands to control the in-game while in and outside of battle. protagonist, Red. A computer Viewers jokingly believed that tries to implement every one of the Helix Fossil was Red's deity, them. From the ensuing chaos, as he was constantly consulting the game is won by sheer luck the Helix for advice. This led to· the creation of a fictional backstory of a holy war between the Helix, or "the good" followers, and the Dorne, or "the evil" followers. All successful events and useful Pokemon were considered to be part of the Helix sect, such as the highvery leveled Pidgeot Pokemon, called "Bird Jesus," that led to many battle PHOTO COURTESY OF REDDIT USER PURPLEMEW victories. Participants It took an estimated 658,000 participants 16 days to beat b l amed the video game "Pokemon Red" in the Internet social anything experiment "Twitch Plays Pokemon." unfortunate

By NICOLE LABO RTE Guest Writer

PHOTO COUIITESY OF J OYSTIQ.COM

While in democracy mode, viewers vote on which direction the character should move.

on the Dorne Fossil, like the accidental release of important party Pokemon into the wild known as "Bloody Sunday" or evolving Eevee into the fire Pokemon Flareon - deemed the "False Prophet'' - instead of its more useful water evolution Vaporeon. With so many participants at one time, including a handful of Internet trolls spamming unhelpful commands, viewers grew frustrated while attempting to complete puzzles to progress. In an attempt to fix this problem, the programmer implemented a democracy-anarchy system. In democracy mode, viewers could vote on what command the character would follow, like "up4" to move up four times. Anarchy mode was what had existed before - following each command in order regardless of whether it was towards an end goal. Many of the followers were outraged by the implementation

of this system. Those favoring 'anarchy' mode would riot and spam "start9," a command equivalent to hitting the start button nine times. This effectively brought the game to a standstill until anarchy was in place again. Depending on what the hive mind wanted to achieve, the command system oscillated · between democracy and anarchy for the rest of the game with both positive and negative results. . Sixteen days, seven hours, 45 minutes and 30 seconds after

launching, viewers successfully beat the Elite Four and completed the game. According to the Twitch. tv site's owners, Twitch Plays Pokemon received more than 36 million views during that time, with a peak of 120,000 simultaneous viewers and an estimated 658,000 participants. The anonymous programmer continued the experiment with the next in the generation, "Pokemon which officially Crystal," launched March 2.

To watch the game or play along, go to http:/ /www. twitchtv/twitchplayspokemon

Professor criticizes academia in new book By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor Some people live by the adage "Don't bite the hand that feeds you," but Arny Young, associate professor of communication, decided she would push the envelope with her new book. In her debut full-length book, "Prophets, Gurus, and . Pundits: Rhetorical Styles and Public Engagement," Young addresses the faults of the collegiate acadeinic system, namely that acadeinics aren't very skilled at talking to the general public. ''We spend a lot of time in grad school training people to be specialized to the point where it becomes difficult for them to speak to lay audiences," Young sfild. · Another issue is once they are

no longer students, scholars in the collegiate world frequently become part of a tenure and promotion system that doesn't recognize public scholarship as legitimate. This means that in order to achieve promotions or tenure, acadeinics must publish work

or research in scholarly journals which aren't likely to be read by anyone but other scholars. For most acadeinics, this means that time spent seeking tenure or a promotion is working on scholarly projects to be consumed by other scholars. "You will probably spend that

"We spend a lot of time in grad school training people to be specialized to the pomt where it becomes difficult for them to speak to lay audiences." Amy Young author of "Prophets, Gurus, and Pundits"

time talking to other acadeinics. You will probably not spend that time actively engaged in the . community," Young sfild. The beginning of the book details the problems and lays a foundation for communication strategies, but the bulk of the book is dedicated to case studies of intellectuals who are successfully communicating their ideas to a broader audience. Young sfild she hopes these case studies can serve as potential role models for acadeinics who want to pursue this kind of work. "The big picture idea is there is enormous potential for acadeinics to engage more effectively with communities and broader publics than their peer groups," Young sfild. "I think most acadeinics are interested in that work, and my book would be a suggestion for how to do that."

Young sfild this communication is becoming increasingly important with the political societal issues such as the economy and climate change. "Scholars are in a position to respond to some of these problems, but we rnfilnly write for each other." However, Young sfild Pacific Lutheran University is the exception. For example, in most colleges and universities, a professor couldn't get credit for directing a play or producing other artistic work, but at PLU, these endeavors would count just like writing a book. "PLU is pretty out in the front of recognizing ·public scholarship," Young sfild. Gurus, and "Prophets, Pundits: Rhetorical Style and Public Engagement" can be found on Amazon for $38.


6A&E

THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

Alumni band 'Mister Master' releases album ''In the Garden

of Live Flowers'' Alpha Psi Omega play explores the life of Rachel Carson By TAHNAYEE CLENDINEN AdE Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRANDT PARKE

Members of the band Mister Master pose after a show in Olympia last October. From left to right: Mark Christensen, drums and percussion; Nick Barene, vocals; Sam Grose, bass; Brandt Parke, lead and rhythm guitars.

By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor Two Pacific Lutheran University alumni just released their band's debut album, which they hope will launch their music career. Alum Brandt Parke, lead guitarist, founded the band Mister Master in October 2011 with fellow alum and drummer Mark Christensen. "It started off as informal jam sessions for the first year and a half," Parke said. "It was a matter of getting together again and again until it slowly fell into place." In 2012, PLU junior and lead singer Nick Barene officially joined Mister Master along with University of Washington student and bass player Sam Gross. Parke said the four-person band played numerous small venue shows and benefit concerts around PLU's campus for a year before they began to branch out. "It took about a year and a half to get some really good songs written and put together. Once we had a solid playlist, we wanted to play shows in the community," Parke said. Mister Master began performing free shows at Northern Pacific Coffee Company on Garfield in Street order to

build a bigger fan base. "NPCC really became our home spot," Parke said. "The majority of the crowd was still PLU students, however, there were others as well since NPCC is open to the public." The band soon found themselves playing to much larger audiences in the Seattle area. "We needed to have something that we could give to people," Parke said. "We decided to record a short three-song set of our most popular songs." The album, "From the Shed," was recorded at Don Gunn Studios PHOTO BY BRANDT PARK in Seattle in October Mister Master recorded their first album "From the Shed" 2013 and features the in October. Guitarist Brandt Parke described their genre as bands most successful "blues, funk and rock in a gritty ball of heavy fusion." songs to date: "Silver Stain," "Destroyer" and "Needin' Reason." to fans just to get our name out there," "We recorded three very different Parke said. "Sometimes, however, songs so people could hear the band's people want to pay for them, which full range, kind of a grunge rock to is greatly appreciated. There is a lot of more funky alternative stuff," Parke start-up costs that go into creating an said. album and every little bit helps." Parke also said the fans of Mister Songs are available on iTunes, http:// Master's music have compared its www.reverbnation.com and http:// sound to a cross between Jimi Hendrix bandcamp.com as a free download and Chris Cornell's Soundgarden, who with the option of donating money for were both made famous in Seattle. the album. "We are already talking about "We are definitely going for it, putting another album together, as but ultimately, our goal is to survive well as producing some merchandise, playing music and being able to T-shirts, stickers and that kind of travel around," Parke said. "We are thing," Parke said. "In addition, we are all best friends, and while Mark and going to put a music video together I have always been the foundation of very soon." this group, it really is a team effort. Mister Master is in the process We couldn't make our music without of building website where everyone." it will post ~how Mister Master will be playing at dates along with NPCC March 15 at 8 p.m. Tickets will pictures and be free . avenues to "We put on a great show, we love buy CDs and our fans and we play music that is merchandise. relatable," Parke said. "We're just "At this point, we are looking to have a good time with happy to give our CDs away anyone who will support us."

"Ultimately, our goal is to survive playing music and being able to travel around." Brandt Parke Guitarist, Mister Master

It is that moment when your alarm clock will go off in five "to 10 minutes. Your body awakens a few minutes before you actually need to get up, and your mind is still begging for sleep. So you close your eyes to get more sleep, and you become stuck in that world between a dreamland and reality. The play "In the Garden of Live Flowers: A Fantasia on the Life and Work of Rachel Carson" consistently transports you between fantasy and reality, leaving you in that same trancelike state. The show is about "Silent Springs" author Rachel Carson and her battle to live in reality while fighting the demons that came along with her breast cancer diagnosis. Carson navigates through the hurdles of everyday life while trying to make sense of her delusions. 'Alice in Wonderland" characters make appearances throughout the show, giving the fantasy element of the show a touch of familiarity . Senior Sarah Makar plays the main character, Rachel Carson. Makar said she is excited for the play to go on, as the show has a message she believes should be heard. "I would encourage anyone with a curiosity about the woman who had the gumption to stand up against an entire industry to save generations from the poisoning of the environment to attend the show," Makar said. "Rachel's [Carson's] strength is unbelievable, and often her contribution goes unnoticed. Her. story is being told." Carson's book, "Silent Springs," created a large stir when it originally came out. It is about the destruction of nature through the introduction of harmful chemicals to humans and animals alike. "While everyone is affected by Rachel's [Carson's] work, not many people know who she is," sophomore Hannah Jeske said. "This show will tell the audience her story and how she has changed the world. It also will give powerful insight into what life is like as a cancer patient." Junior Kayli Felbinger plays the nurse that ushers Carson in and out of various scenes. Felbinger also serves as a major reality check, bringing Carson out of her fantasy state multiple times. "Anyone who sees this show should know that the play skips around in time and not all of it is real, not all of it is imagined - some scenes are both," Felbinger said. "Let the fantasy of this play wash over you, let it be fun, find the comedy in there and laugh at it - it is there. But let it paint a picture of a very real situation too." Members of Alpha Psi Omega, the PLU theatre honors society, organized the completely studentrun show. Most members of the cast have taken away different meanings from the show, but all agree that it should be seen by students, community members and faculty alike. . Sophomore Tasha Smith who plays Alice in the show, said the show is an overall crowd pleaser. "This show is worth attending because it has something in it for everyone. For those who have a passion for ecology, Carson's book, 'Silent Spring,' showed how harmful pesticides can be on plants, animals, humans, and the overall environment," Smith said. Smith said the play goes beyond just the environment, however. ''For those of us who have been touched by cancer, this story deals with Rachel's [Carson's] ongoing fight against breast cancer," Smith said. "For anyone who's a fan of fantasy, come see the 'Alice in Wonderland' characters come to life in Rachel's [Carson's] imagination. .For anyone who simply loves the arts, this show is for you." For more information, visit the show's event page on Facebook by searching for the show title.

Nln the Garden of Live Flowers: A Fantasia in the Life and Works of Rachel Carson" 路March 6-8, 14-15 at 7:30 p.m. March 16 at 2 p.m. Karen Hille Phillips Center $3 students, $8 general admission


MARCH 7, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

A&E 7

BRINGING BuzzFEED BACK New rules at this Personality quizzes dominate the news and entertainment website By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor BuzzFeed has moved beyond its Except I would never behead Anne Boleyn obviously, because she was magnificent. 路 signature lists to chart new territory as the ultimate provider of Internet quizzes. The social news and entertainment website has been hosting quizzes since 2008 according to Fast Company, but in the past few months, its quizzes have been garnering millions of views. A major factor in BuzzFeed's success U:e 路 (,J ~""!ent Share has been rooted in its quiz-takers habit of sharing the results on social media sites like Facebook, according to Reuters. Part of the increasing appeal is also This screenshot shows Mejlaender's results in the "Which Monarch Are You?" BuzzFeed quiz. due to how BuzzFeed has been designing the quizzes visually. No longer are "Which Character From Shakespeare them." Walsh also said she likes that a BuzzFeed quizzes reminiscent of school Are You?" quiz, to "What's your dream quiz-taker can't cheat. "I think they're fun. It's a good stress exams. Instead, quiz-takers select home?," which is featured on "Which reliever. And the descriptions at the end images, or they click on text so colorfully Classic Author Is Your Soulmate?" Most quiz results also include a short are always pretty accurate," Walsh said. designed it transcends the written word Not everyone is addicted, however. paragraph describing what a user's to land in pictorial territory. "They're a great time waster for be flattering, result means, which can Of course, the topics themselves have to interest Internet users, and BuzzFeed spot-on or weirdly inaccurate in the procrastination," junior Richard Olson said. Olson doesn't frequently take the has provided a vast array to ensure that. quiz-taker's opinion. Jordan Shapiro, a contributor for quizzes, because he said the results are In addition to more standard "Which Character Are You?" quizzes, BuzzFeed Forbes, wrote about why personality often inaccurate for him. "I wasn't happy with the results," has featured "What Would Be Your Fate quizzes go viral, looking at their 路history. "Essentially, entertainment said. "I do want to know how Olson In The Hunger Games?," "What Font Are You?" and "What Kind Of Wedding quizzes are diluted novelty versions of they actually make the quizzes though." However popular the BuzzFeed the psychological personality tests that Should You Have?" The quiz questions themselves gained popularity in the 1920s," Shapiro quizzes are now, the nature of them may change in the near future. prove interesting, ranging from "Pick wrote. He later observes, after noting In an interview with Kate Kaye, a a Beyonce," which appeared on the the incredible popularity of quizzes, reporter from Advertising Age, NPR "Apparently, discussed how an online format in we enjoy being which people select their varying interests, likes and dreams make it ideal "Entertainment quizzes are diluted categorized." Senior Emily Walsh for marketing strategists. novelty versions of the psychological said she is obsessed As of March 1, Kaye said BuzzFeed with taking is only tracking the final results of its personality tests that gained popularity BuzzFeed quizzes, but that it will eventually quizzes. compile more information to decide in the 1920s." "I love BuzzFeed where its ads should go and which quizzes. It's become users should see them. Jordan Shapiro my new Facebook," Regardless of the marketing Walsh said. 'Tm potential, BuzzFeed' s quiz formula Forbes contributor constantly taking seems set to be an enduring fad.

year's Battle of the Bands By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor

There's a fight scheduled in The Cave tonight, but Campus Safety won't be intervening. The Battle of the Bands will take place at 7 p .m. "Each band gets two songs and 10 minutes to do whatever they want," senior David Gordon, the head coordinator for the event, said. "At the end, the audience gets to vote for their favorite." Gordon, who is also a co-chair for the Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University Entertainment Committee, said that the event will be very similar to how it's been in the past, with one distinct change. "Last time we had a problem with .people showing up late, but still getting a vote. This year, votes for people who showed up late are going to count less than those who stayed the whole time." Gordon said they will give different colored voting slips to tardy attendees who wouldn't be able to judge all of the bands side-by-side. Battle of the Bands wasn't on the event agenda last year, and Gordon said it was disappointing for many. "It's a fun event that gets a lot of student musicians. There's a little more competition a little more incentive than an open mic," Gordon said, who also said that the event was pretty easy to plan. "You just put the word out to the student body, and you get all these people who are out there and want to play." The winning band receives a guaranteed playing spot in the lineup of LollaPLUza. The regular auditions for LollaPLUza take place on Monday. For more information, contact David Gordon.

Anime club celebrates Japanese art form By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer Art, Japanese culture, movies, television series and multiple genres can all be enjoyed at Pacific Lutheran University's Anime Club. Anime is animation developed in Japan, usually hand-drawn or computer-animated. It is a medium of shows and movies that deal with a wide variety of subject matters and include any gerire. Senior Brendan Farley, Anime club president, is one of the club's two equal-standing officers. He defined the club as a place to come together and watch anime movies and shows. "It's pretty loose as a club," Farley said. "We just pick a list of series then vote on which series to watch for the next month or-however long that series may take." Examples of shows the club has watched include "Code Geass" - a science fiction show about revolution in an alternate universe - and "Baka and Test," which is a comedy series playing up on parodies of various anime. Occasionally the club holds 'food nights' with Japanese dishes to eat while watching. Outside of watching shows, the club typically has a monthly .movie night. Some well-known examples of anime movies include the films 路 by Hayao Miyazaki, such as "Kiki' s Delivery Service," "Howl's Moving Castle" or "Spirited Away." The club also goes to anime films when they're in theaters, which is rare. Sometimes they go to conventions too - "like Comic Con, but specifically for anime," Farley said. Sakura Con is a

good example. "Anime is a major .hobby of mine, and I really enjoy doing it," Farley said. "I wanted to manage the club to make it a better experience for others." Farley became an officer two years ago, but has been a member since he was a first-year. Farley said he grew up watching "Toonarni" .until it was taken down, but he didn't identify anime as a separate medium until his senior year of high school when his friend introduced him to the anime show "FLCL" - pronounced 'Fooly Cooly.' "It was unlike anything else I'd ever seen," Farley said. "I was like 'I gotta get more of this stuff,' and then I joined [PLU Anime Club] freshman year, and I've been. into it ever since." Farley said anime is also appealing as an art form, because it illustrates things that cannot be done otherwise. "It's just a different way of viewing things you've seen before, including scifi, fantasy, drama and everything in between," he said. "Western animation could have the potential to

do that kind of stuff," he said, "but unfortunately what we see is usually limited to cartoons for children or sitcoms ... but anime doesn't have those restrictions." Farley said one of the overall best things about anime is how unique it is compared to everything else. "It can be beautiful in terms of animation and appearance but still have lots of thought into character detail," Farley said. "Even if it's totally out there and bizarre, which they tend to be, it still grounds in real world themes, and it's just a great medium to express any kind of concept." For more information about the Anime Club, email anime@plu. edu.

Ki.Id, from the anime KilG's Delivery Service. . PHOTO COUKl'ESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

MARCH 7, 2014

Game over for 'Flappy Bird' App creator removes

infamo us game from store

By KATELYNN PADRON

Guest Writer Developer Dong Nguyen has canceled his popular app, "Flappy Bird," which was earning $50,000 per day in ad revenue, according to The Wall Street Journal. "I am sorry 'Flappy Bird' users," Nguyen tweeted mid-February. "22 hours from now, I will take 'Flappy Bird' down." In the free app, the player must navigate a bird between pipes by tapping on the screen. With each obstacle, the navigation becomes more difficult. When the bird touches one of the obstacles, the game is over. Nguyen only spent three days developing the simple game. "It is pure. It is all about the game, not about the ornamentation or decoration," he said in his interview with WSJ. Nguyen gave several reasons for pulling the app. "'Flappy Bird' was designed to play in a few minutes when you are relaxed," Nguyen said in an interview with Forbes. "But it happened to become an addictive product." Many of the 543,000 reviews of "Flappy Bird" in the Apple App Store detail players' frustrating, time-consuming addiction to the difficult game. "I am now an atheist," one reviewer wrote, according to BuzzFeed. "There cannot be a god that allows this game to go unpunished." Another wrote: "We should send a group of children to an island with no electricity to continue humanity before it's too late." Nguyen said the addiction was unacceptable.

In addition to being too addictive, Nguyen said he resented how the app changed his lifestyle. "My life has not been as comfortable as I was before," Nguyen said in an interview with Forbes. "I couldn't sleep." WSJ reported that Nguyen found it difficult to walk around his community in peace. Nguyen released the app May 2013. Nguyen said he did not promote "Flappy Bird," but it somehow rose to become the most downloaded free app for iPhone and Android within the last three months. '"Flappy Bird' blew up," senior Lance Mathes said. "I saw it all over social networks." Mathes said his score in the challenging game only reached the 40s. He said he believes the difficulty of the game is part of what makes it so addicting. "You want to just keep playing and getting a better score," Mathes said. Consumer demand for the game did not disappear with the app. Some users are selling their devices with "Flappy Bird" online at inflated prices. One seller listed an iPhone 4 with "Flappy Bird" for $5,000. Many knock-off games have emerged in the App Store. One imitation called "Flying Cyrus," in which players must direct an image of Miley Cyrus to dodge wrecking balls, is ranked third in the App Store. Nguyen's other apps, like "Ninjas Assault'' and "Droplet Shuffle" have also risen in popularity. Nguyen said he will continue to produce games. "After the success of 'Flappy Bird,' I feel more confident," Nguyen said to Forbes, "and I have freedom to do what I want to do."

PHOTO COUIITESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

PHOTO COUIITESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Conquer Tax Season College students can use a multitude of resources By JILLIAN STANPHILL Guest Writer Tax season has begun, and the deadline of April 15 is quickly approaching. This cfil\ be a daunting time of the year for many people, especially college students who may be, filing their taxes for the first time. But there is no need to fear, as there are abundant resources available to help get through tax season. The United Way of King County is running a free tax preparation campaign to offer help and guidance through the process. There are 19 locations across King County for one-on-one help, as well as an easy guided online walk through on http:// myfreetaxes.com/kingcounty for those unable to make it to one of its sites. United Way provides easyto-understand materials and great deduction tips, along with friendly volunteers to ease the stress of filing taxes. It's important to not procrastinate on taxes, no matter how tempting putting them off sounds. The more time and effort you put into the paperwork, the more time you have to edit and

PHOTO COUIITESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Tax season has arrived, and with it comes the anticipation of the April 15 deadline. There are a variety of resources full of information for college students to take advantage of when completing their taxes.

fix mistakes. This will prevent frustration C!Dd maybe lead to a bigger refund check in the future. College students get special deductions when it comes to education costs.

main There are three educational deductions for college students, but only one can be applied. The Hope Scholarship Credit is applicable to the first two years

of college and has a maximum credit of $1,500. The Lifetime Learning Credit has a maximum credit of $2,000 and is based on the percentage of tuition.

The Higher Education Expenses deduction has a maximum of $4,000, but the actual amount in credit will be around $1,000. These are also applicable to parents' taxes based on who is paying the tuition and whether or not they claim their students as dependents. Out-of-state students also need to determine which state to file a return in, or if they need to file in both. Work study programs are taxable too, so talk to the program coordinator to see how those earnings should be filed. There are two different types of scholarships and fellowships - those that are qualified and non-qualified. A scholarship or fellowship is qualified tax-free if it is used to pay education expenses, i.e. tuition, books and required supplies, and at an eligible education institution. A non-qualified scholarship or fellowship is any expense that is not required such as travel or room and board. For more information, research the 'Tax Benefits for Higher Education' under IRS Publ. 970. Taxes may not be exciting, but everyone should give them appropriate consideration and thought by making sure they are filed correctly by April 15.


THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

BUSINESS 9

Students bring the agua to Nicaragua

In spring 2013, Mark Mulder, a Pacific Lutheran University marketing professor, led a group of students to Nicaragua to build a well for the village pictured above. This spring break, he will be leading another group of students back to Nicaragua to build another well.

By SYDNEY FREYER

Guest Writer This spring break, Mark Mulder, an assistant professor of business, and 10 Pacific Lutheran University students will travel to Nicaragua to install a well with Living Water International (LWI). LWI is a global nonprofit organization operating in 26 countries that helps provide communities with safe drinking water to improve overall health. The global water crisis is an issue Mulder said he was passionate about. "The global water crisis offers us an opportunity to become active," Mulder said. "From a business standpoint, businesses and nonprofits can have an active role in impacting the world in a positive way." The idea itself took shape in Mulder's fall 2012 marketing research course. "We took on the role as consultants for LWI and just answered the sort of questions like, 'how are they able to get connected with college aged students?"' senior Alex Quin.er, a trip participant, said of the class. Since he introduced the project, Mulder's introduction to marketing classes have used their class-based skills to raise more than $1,500 for the water project by selling merchandise including wristbands and coupon books. Pacific Lutheran The University project is certainly more than just a team of students. "It takes a village to bring clean

water to a village," Mulder said. "It's really neat to see that for us, our 'village' is PLU, and all of our community partners supporting this project." First-years Branden Stallard and Thomas Hom looked to Trinity Lutheran Church in their efforts to get the community involved. "We told the people about our trip and what we were hoping to accomplish," Stallard said. "And they were really giving and really wanted to help. The whole community at Trinity really opened up their doors to our trip." Others are visiting Brookdale Elementary for a school assembly about the project. "They [the elementary students] were excited about the opportunity to bring clean water to people in need," Quin.er said. During their time at Brookdale, the PLU participants will reach every classroom, teaching elementary students a wide range of topics such as hygiene, sustainability and community and peace building. Parkland Light and Water Company jumped on board as well. More than 9,000 Parkland area residents received bill stuffers about the project and the PLU and Parkland Light and Water partnership. Keithley Middle School and Rainier View Christian Church have also helped the group. Mulder said the individual students going on the trip have

a variety of motivations to share with those in Nicaragua. 'Tm going on this trip because I have been blessed by a lot of generous people in my life and I want to be able to share that generosity and Christ's love with people in Nicaragua," junior Catherine Miolla said. Senior Rachel Espasandin said her motivation comes from academic studies and a desire to build communities. "A big part of my focus for going on this trip is peace building and a big part of that is conflict analysis and studies," Espasandin said. There are a lot of internal campus supporters as well, such as Dining and Culinary Services, HERmonic, Garfield Book Company, Campus Ministry and a team from the Business 190 class's BizVenture competition, who have all given their time and energy to make this project happen. PHOTOBYJOHNFROSCHAUER LWI is already working with . Senior Alex Quiner speaks to stu.dents at Brookdale Elementary School about the community's leadership team the upcoming trip to Nicaragua. The Brookdale students provided him with the in Nicaragua to prepare for the shirt he is holding; which he will wear when he travels to Nicaragua. installation project and ensure the sustainability of the project. This project is an example of how university reach can extend to remote parts of the world and can support global communities in a variety of ways. PLU has a history of this outreach and service, and this group of people will blend their service to others with their own learning about nonprofits and social businesses. The team heads out March 22.

To donate to the PLU

""'- .

-

--PHOTO COURTESY OF MARK MULDER

Mark Mulder, a marketing professor, sits atop the rig he used to drill the well for a Nicaragua village in spring 2013.


THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

MARCH 7, 2014

Wanderlust: Traveling doesn't have to break the bank By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist

""

If you have a passion for travel, a small budget should never hold you back. Many people have perfected the art of inexpensive traveling. All it requires is a little more planning to save yourself thousands. I have always had the desire to travel. Recently, I went to Argentina, Uruguay, the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos islands. This summer I will be trav~ling to Puerto Rico and have begun planning ways to save. As a college student, I don't have a bank account to accommodate a glamourous travel-the-world type of lifestyle, however, I do have plenty of other resources available to me. The largest obstacle travelers often face is airfare. Costly airline prices can often be the majority of what you will spend on a trip. This is why if you plan to be a frequent traveler you should consider signing up for a mileage plan. I recently got my first credit card. Since I plan on flying, I signed up for the Delta Sky Miles American Express card. For every dollar I spend, I earn a mile. This is one way you can earn miles to credit toward your next ticket. Expert traveler Rick Steves posted an article, 'Thrifty 50 Travel Tips," to his website. An important tip he highlights is traveling during the off season. For example in Europe you would want to travel October through April. This would enable you to find lower rates on planes and hotels and experience smaller crowds. Steves also advises sticking to local restaurants. Avoid those that hang signs reading "We Speak English" in the windows, because those will undoubtedly have increased prices targeting tourists. You will find lower prices elsewhere, and when in doubt of what to order, just go with the daily special. An alternative to hotels and house swaps could be hostels. Hostels provide travelers with lodging and inexpensive food with fellow travelers. According to Hostelling International USA, large city hostels

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PHOTO COURTESY OF TAHLIA TERHUNE

Sophomore TabHa Terhune puckers up with a sting ray off the coast of 1"\J.rks and Caicos islands Jan. 30. Kissing a sting ray is said to bring you seven years of good luck. Meeting the sting rays was part of the snorkeling excursion she went on.

will run anywhere from $25-$40 per night while smaller cities can be as inexpensive as $15-$20 per night. While you may sacrifice your privacy, you save an abundant amount on travel expenses and have the opportunity to meet all kinds of travelers. Pacific Lutheran University offers many opportunities for studying away through various locations across the globe. Even just for J-term, roughly 300 PLU students study throughout the world. This is a great opportunity, and you don't have to worry about planning your trip around school breaks since you will be receiving class credits to learn at your desired location. "I think that my experience will be worth the knowledge that I can extract from the culture and professors of PLU," sophomore William Lockert, who is debating studying abroad to Norway and Denmark or Australia,

said. "Although, I wish PLU would provide an incentive [to study away]." My travel to Argentina and Uruguay were mission trips that were organized through my high school. A mission trip is a mobilization of Christian ministry that can vary in tiine, anywhere from a week to a year. For this particular trip, · I wrote a letter that I sent to my family and close friends. I asked for them to keep me in their prayers for the duration of the trip and if they felt inclined to provide any form of donation for support of my trip. I was astonished when they provided funds for more than 75 percent of my trip costs. Fundraising is always a viable option for traveling. You can always find support for your passions if you look in the right places. Whether this is for funding a trip or using available resources such as hostels to save money where you can, you don't have to drain your bank account to see new destinations.

COLLEGE MEMORIES GO BEYOND HOMEWORK By SAM HORN Sports Editor

-

THE MOORING MAST

College is a prime opportunity to make lasting relationships. I know that I h ave made friendships with people who I will h ave a deep connection with for years to come. My dad always told me that his best frien ds were from college. After attending Pacific Lutheran University for the last three years, I realize that my dad is telling the truth. I live life in the moment. I don't focus too intently on the future, just because I want to savor every memory. In 10 years, I will remember the parties I attended, not the tests I somehow completed. In 10 years, I will remember the late nights hanging out with friends instead of lectures. In my second year of college, I asked myself if I'd rather be overloading myself with countless extracurricular activities or gaining experience through internships. I chose the latter option. That has allowed me to not only learn what it' s like to survive in the real world, but it has also given me inspiration to motivate my friends to strive for their goals.

I have committed myself to becoming a journalist. I have discovered my true calling. While it is a relief to know what I want to do with my life, it's the memories I will cherish. I can't express how fortunate I am to be surrounded with great friends and professors. While I make time for arduous study sessions, I also stress the importance of hanging out with friends. My friends have kept me sane. I don't know what I would do without them by my side. If I was simply a hermit locked up in my dorm every night, I don't know how I would survive. There have definitely been nights when I've been a hermit and buckled down on studying, bµt I can only do so much. Last weeken d, I guided several of my friends up Mt. Rainier in a snowshoeing escapade. I realized that I had plenty · of homew ork to tend to, but I knew it could wait. My choice to go up to Mt. Rainier was just what I needed. I had been bombarded by homework, and I knew I could cure my anxiety be exploring the ·outdoors with some buds. Even though the weather at Mt. Rainier was quite cloudy, it was the experience that left a lasting memory in my mind . I calmed down and focused on living in the moment by being with my friends. It proved to be a good idea to relieve my homework anxiety by being around them . All you get is four years. That's it. No more, no less. College is supposed to be the best four years of your existence. In my three years at PLU, this sentiment resonates throughout my blood. I · have enjoyed nearly every moment of the college experience, and I wouldn't trade it for anything.

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The responsibilty of The Mooring Mru;t is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mru;t adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast s~aff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or t itle for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections Feb. 21 Issue

The page 1 article "A way to stay safe: There's an app for that," misspelled the first name of Jonathan Grove.


... THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

Resolve small scale conflict using large scale advice By SAMANTHA LUND

Columnist

Pacific Lutheran University · is full of students from different backgrounds an? different upbringings living together. But just because we all go to the same school and live with one another does not mean we are all meant to be best friends and always get aloi;lg. It is hard to live with people and see them every day, all day in any situation. Hopefully we make some friends we enjoy spending that time with, but even those relationships are not going to be completely stable and perfect. Things about the other

people begin to bother us, introduced students and things about us bother to a method of dealing them, and evenfually with conflict across something comes up and cultures. we are in conflict. He is a six-time Nobel We usually attempt Peace Prize nominee and a to win and solve the leading scholar in conflict problem with whatever resolution. He urged means necessary. What students to remember two we never do is think about things: things take time international negotiation and to create a safe place in relation to our tiny · to talk. Bryn used these social problems. 5ometimes winning methods on large scales is less important than with 10 or 20 people from understanding and different countries in relating to each other. At conflict. In these situations, least give it a try before the conflict is normally a you do something drastic war or suppression. Though we are in a like cut your sleeping roommate's hair or different situation here on consistently leave your our safe campus, it is easy roommate. to stay with a to get into a fight with friend. someone and feel like you "In my friend group, we are at war. usually deal with conflicts You constantly see before they become a them on campus and it big deal," first-year Karli is impossible to avoid Floyd said. She said she someone forever in such has had the same group of a small university. Your friends since sixth grade. friends might feel like they "When there was have to take sides, and in a conflict that had the the whole mess there are potential to escalate, we plenty of casualties. tried to resolve it as soon Not to mention, if as possible," Floyd said. you do not sort out your "I value the friendships problems, you lose a that I have too much to friend and you have to let something break them get over that loss as well. up." Sounds like a small-scale Steinar Btyn visited war tome. campus last week and Instead of dealing with

the war and trying to just survive it, give fixing it a try. Understanding Bryn's method can help. He fully believes that talking things out and hearing both sides cannot only help people relate, but can end conflict. As young adults, we process things through talking about them and relating to other people. That is why PLU confessions pages and PLU compliments pages on Facebook are so popular - you want to know there are people out there like you. Same with conflict. If you talk about your side and where you are coming from, the two sides might realize they are not very different. Or even better, they will realize that the whole conflict stemmed from a misunderstanding. If talking it out and trying to relate does not help, some other methods to try could be to bribe them with cookies to be your friend again, tell them they are pretty, name your first born after them, sing them a song, set up a boxing ring and fight your problems out or just throw a tantrum and do not text them until they apologize - not childish at all.

P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast

A Illessage of hope for a changing church in a changing world By JULIA WALSH

Guest Writer Pope Francis may be one of the most inspiring religious figures living today. His election in February 2013, just before Ash Wednesday, is one of the most surprising events of this decade thus far and a positive portent for the future. Any retrospective, even one to commemorate one year of his papacy, must begin at that point. We, as human beings, Catholic and non-Catholic, have lived in an era of great change and innumerable papal firsts in the last 50 years. with the Starting modernizing effects of the Second Vatican Council in the 1960s, the Catholic Church has made great strides towards modernity,

but the Church is still up to the gilded Papal tiara in problems. Some of these include women in the priesthood, pedophile priests, issues surrounding birth control, AIDS, gay rights, the rise of Islam, the sheer poverty of Catholics throughout the world, the memory of Church inaction during the Holocaust and official support of repressive regimes that killed hundreds of thousands of people, just for starters. Pope John XXIII, initiator of the Vatican II in 1961, hoped to "open the window, to let in the Holy Spirit." Partially, the Council fulfilled his hopes. But he died before the Council was concluded, and his successors - Pope Paul VI, Pope John Paul, Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI - did not continue the liberalizing

Pope Francis has proved to be everything anyone who wishes that good things come out of the Catholic Church could ever.hope for.

agenda in its fullest sense. · The changing Church was not changing fast enough, and I for one doubted any meaningful change would happen during the reign of the Pope archconservative Benedict. · Then, on Feb. 11, 2013, Benedict XVI announced retirement. I was utterly blown away by the news as a student of history, as he was the first pope to retire from office - rather than die - in more than 600 years. He left office and made room for someone else to take the Chair of Peter. From a man who once slapped a British journalist for being too pert with~ I found that shocking. And yet, when Pope Francis was elected in the weeks following Benedict XVI' s retirement, I was prepared to hate him. Surely a man who was that powerful for so long in Buenos Aires had connections to the fascist junta in that country which killed thousands of people in the 1970s. Argentina is famous in my mind for the evils of Juan Peron, for the capture of Adolf Eichmann, for the country's concealment of fascists in hiding froin all over Europe after the Second World War.

It seemed little change and not much of an "open window," could be expected of a man from that environment. I was wrong then. I am rarely so glad to be wrong. Pope Francis has proved to be everything anyone who wishes that good things come out of the Catholic Church could ever hope for. He washed the feet of the downtrodden. He was asked about gay rights and responded, "Who am I to judge?" He kisses babies and plays nice with the powerful but also dressed like a common priest to go feed Rome's poorest of the poor. He is, as far as anyone can tell, engaged in a most thorough housecleaning. The UN still condemns the Vatican policy regarding sexual abuses, and people worldwide are still being prevented from life-saving prophylaxis under the guise of religious conviction. The Church is not perfect and the Pope is not perfect, but he has been a breath of fresh air after decad~s of papal firsts and Church stagnation. So happy anniversary, Pope Francis. Many happy returns. May you live long enough to enact your vision as fully as possible.

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OPINION 11

s.ustainability Waste in the landfill, not in the trash By MADDIE BERNARD

Guest Columnist As I mindlessly tossed my used coffee cup into the garbage after class one day, something caught my eye as I began to walk away. I looked back at the Pacific famil iar beige Lutheran University garbage cans that are divided into three sections: cans and bottles, paper and landfill. · "Landfill," I thought, "that is really interesting. My coffee cup is not simply going into the trash, but into a landfill." This may sound naive, but I had never really made the connection that I was directly throwing my coffee cup into one of America's multiple landfills. Many people, myself included, think that once we discard our trash it just vanishes and is not our problem anymore. "You just think that trash goes away," first-year Jeremy Jackson said. "But when you see 'landfill' on the garbage can, then you think 'Wow, this is going straight to the landfill."' There are 1,754 active landfills in the United States. If you took all the trash from the U.S. landfills and piled it into one massive landfill, it would be 32 times larger than the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. The harsh reality is, trash is still our problem even though we personally may not see it. It is important to realize that we are all contributing to landfills and to reduce our waste. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, in 2012 alone, Americans threw out 251 million tons of garbage. About 36 million pounds put into landfills was food waste. Most food waste is biodegradable and should not end up in a landfill. Instead it should be in a compost pile. Composting is a great way to reduce our waste, and give back to the earth at the same time. When organic material decomposes, it creates a rich and fertile soil. Landfills, however, pollute the earth by sometimes leaking toxic material. Another way to reduce the amount of waste in landfills is to throw away less food. While PLU offers wonderful all-you-care-to-eat dinners, it is easy to take more food than you need and end up throwing extra food away. This extra food often ends up in landfills where it does not belong. As college students, we can make a difference. Do not take more food than we can eat and be conscious that our trash and excess food will end up in a landfill. I think PLU reminds students of this every day by substituting the word "trash" for "landfill" on most garbage cans. "Trash just isn't a good word," sophomore Courtney Lee said. "'Trash' is something you are getting rid of, whereas 'landfill' means that you are literally putting your garbage into the earth." For some PLU students, substituting the word "landfill" for "trash" on garbage cans does not make much of a difference in their lives, but it is a nice daily reminder of our individual responsibility to reduce our waste and save our planet. The next time you go to throw something out,. be mindful about the word on the garbage can because you can prevent waste from going into a landfill.

The Mast will return to stands March 21

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... THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

MARCH 7, 2014

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 2, 2014

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THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

SPORTS 13

SPORTS SCOREBOARD ' "".'"' -

Baseball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Linfield

10

2

3-0

Won5

PLU

7

4

2-0

Won2

George Fox

12

2

2-1

Lost 1

Puget Sound ·

4

6

2-1

Wonl

Whitman

9

5

1-2

Lostl

Lewis & Clark

4

5

1-2

Wonl

Whitworth

3

5

0-0

Lost2

Willamette

6

6

0-2

. Lost 2

Pacific

3

5

0-3

Lost4

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 8 us. Whitman, 11 a.m.

WINS

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ARoUND THE LEAGUE •••

BASEBALL: Pacific Lutheran University junior Chris Bish<>p threw the first nine inning no-hitter in PLUbaseball history Saturday in a Northwest Conference road win over Willamette. Bishop threw 108 pirehes and allowed only two base runners. 'l'RACK & FIELD: Pacific Lutheran University junior 'fevon StephensBrown opened the 2014 spring season -with a. pair of top-three finishes in his three eventS at the Erik Anderson Icebreaker. He won the shot put and finished third in : the hammer to go with a 13th-place throw in the diseus.

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Men's Tennis TEAM

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LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitman

4

0

4-0

Won4

Pacific

3

1

2-0

Won2 Wonl

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George Fox

3

2

3-1

Whitworth

3

3

3-1

Lostl

Puget Sound

1

2

1-2

Wonl

PLU

1

3

1-3

Wonl

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Willamette

1

4

1-3

Lostl

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Lewis & Clark

1

5

1-3

Lost3

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Linfield

0

3

0-3

Lost3

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 18 DS. Whitman, 3:30 p.m.

I

WINS

LOSSES

Whitworth

14

3

CONFERENCE STREAK 7-0

Won7

Linfield

6

0

6-0

Won6

Pacific

8

2

3-1

Wonl

George Fox

9

2

3-2

Lost2

Lewis & Clark

5

6

2-4

Won2

Willamette

2

6

1-5

Lostl

PLU

1

8

0-5

Lost 8

Puget Sound

0

5

0-5

Wonl

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 8 at Willamette, noon

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Women's Tennis

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TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitwo!"ili

5

1

5-0

Won5

I

Whitman

4

5

4-0 .

Won4

PLU

4

0

3-0

Won4

1

Puget Sound

3

1

2-1

Lostl

George Fox

3

2

2-2

Lost 2

Linfield

2

2

1-2

Wonl

Pacific

1

4

0-4

Lost4

Willamette

1

4

0-4

Lost4

Lewis & Clark

0

5

0-4

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MEN'S GOLF: Lin.field junior Taylor '; Klopp posted the lowest round on both days of the PLU Invitational, including a career-low 70 on Day 2, to capture medalist honors with · a two-under-par 142. The junior netted birdies on each of the par-5 I ~ holes for his second career medal ( and 24th career top-five finish. I

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 8 us. George Fox, 1p.m.

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Lutes cap rainy weekend with PLU Invitational team title By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications The Pacific Lutheran men's golf team totaled the low team round for the second consecutive day, as the Lutes' A squad won the PLU Invitational tournament title on a rainy Sunday afternoon at The Home Course. The PLU A squad dominated the top of the leaderboard, as sophomore Seth Nickerson, sophomore Justin Lee and senior Dustin Hegge all finished in the top five and sophomore Kelekolio Moore tied

for sixth. Linfield' s Taylor Klopp took medalist honors as the only golfer to card a score under par at the par-72, 6,847-yard course. Klopp posted a two-under 70 on Sunday to finish at 142 for the tournament, two under par. Nickerson was the Lutes' top finisher with a second-round 71 to finish with a one-over 145 on the weekend. Drew Groshong finished third for Lewis & Clark (147), while Lee placed fourth (149) and Hegge took fifth (150). Moore was part of a five-way tie for sixth place with a total score of 151, and

Chris Bishop tosses first nine inning no-hitter in PLU baseball history By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications Pacific Lutheran won a pitchers' duel in the opener, but junior Chris Bishop stole the spotlight in the second game when he pitched the first nine irrning no-hitter in program history to lead the Lutes to a Northwest Conference doubleheader sweep of Willamette Saturday afternoon at John Lewis Field. Bishop struck out five and allowed only two baserunners 'in the game, walking one in the second irrning and hitting a batter in the third. He finished the afternoon with 108 pitches and induced back-to-back strikeouts to seal the deal and spark a celebration on the mound with his teammates. Bishop's no-hitter is the second in program history and the first to cover a full nine irrning contest. Joel Barnett tossed a seven irrning no-no against Corban (then Western Baptist) during the 1993 season. For the 5-11 junior out of Rochester, Wash., Saturday's gem not only earned a spot in the record books but also helped the Lutes open NWC play in strong fashion on the road. The Lutes scored a season-high 10 runs to support Bishop, with nine proving unnecessary. Junior Collin Nilson cranked his second home run of the day as part of a 3-for-4 effort that included four runs batted in during the big PLU win. Senior Alec Beal added two RBI on a fourth irrning single~ while junior Clay Trushinsky, sophomore Tyler Thompson and senior Dominick Courcy each drove in a run for the Lutes. Courcy and Thompson scored two runs apiece in the win. PLU took the lead in the top of the first when Courcy reached base on an error, advanced on a sacrifice and scored on Thompson's groundout to third. The Lutes added two more in both the third and fourth irrnings before tacking on runs in the sixth, seventh and ninth frames.

Tim Livermore rounded out PLU' s top team at 152 to tie for 11th. "I was extremely pleased with all of the guys on our squad," PLU head coach Kris Swanson said. "We didn't have the best weather, the course was set up tough and it played long. Considering all that, they played at a championship level." With this strong start to the season, the Lutes' confidence should be strong. With a total score of 595, the PLU A squad finished at 19-over-par for the weekend. Puget Sound's A squad took second (613), followed by Linfield (614) and PLU's B team (624). Lewis & Clark

took fifth (640), followed by Puget Sound's B team (657) and George Fox (690). Sophomore Ryan Fenton led PLU's B squad with a total of 151 to tie for sixth. First-year Thomas Huddleston tied for 17th at 158, with sophomore Zach Martinson tying for 20th (160), senior Sam Hodge tying for 22nd (161) and senior Alex Liljestrom taking 28th (165). The Lutes return to actiori this weekend, heading to Fircrest for the UPS Invitational on Saturday and Sunday.

Sam Horn contributed to this article.

TREVOR LURKING FANS SIX BATTERS ON WAY TO VICTORY By SAM HORN Sports Editor Junior Trevor Lubking struck out six batters, much to the delight of Mast Sports Pick 'Em contestant Kyle Peart. While Lubking' s pitching prowess doesn't guarantee Peart a certificate yet, it is a step toward the Promised Land. Peart is now ahead of the pack, which is what he has wanted to do since Day 1. The burly senior has a competitive spirit. Switching our attention to this week, I asked the Pick 'Em participants who will win this weekend between the Toronto Raptors and the Minnesota Timberwolves. If I had asked this question a couple of years ago, you would have thought I was mentally insane. A couple of years ago, these two teams were irrelevant in the basketball world and nobody would have the slightest interest in watching the game. Times have changed though. The Timberwolves now have the future Kevin Garnett in Kevin Love. Love is having arguably one of the best seasons for a forward in the history of the NBA.

And he's only 25. On the other side, the Raptors are equipped with a premier shooter in DeMar DeRozan. He may not be a household name, like Lebron James or Kevin Durant, but he is averaging nearly 23 points per game. This matchup is tantalizing, in that two up-and-coming teams will square off against each other. It should be a classic.

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Who will win between the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Toronto Raptors? Kyle Peart (1-1) Prediction: Timberwolves Alan Bell (0-2) Prediction: Timberwolves Cale Powers (0-2) Prediction: Raptors Drew Oord (0-2) Prediction: Timberwolves Michelle Hogan (0-2) Prediction: Timberwolves

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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SJIM SJIYS... By SAM HORN Sports Editor

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Many think participating in football is a death sentence. Think about it: players run full speed on a field trying to knock each other's brains out of orbit. While it is a dangerous game that can cause concussions, research has shown that this game benefits youth in today's society. Sandra Bond Chapman founded the Center for Brain Health at the University of Texas, where she is a professor of behavioral o!ld brain sciences. Chapman has been involved in brain research for more than 30 years and knows a thing or two about traumatic brain injuries. · Chapman stress~d at the 2014 American Football Coaches Association convention this past January that "the benefits of football to health and well-being far, far exceed the risk of permanent brain damage." According to Chapman, football

Football doesn't negatively affect the brain like people think it does

nearly every year. The group of specialized scientists is working on increasing the connectivity between the temporal lobe and the frontal lobe in the ·brain in order to increase the brain;s productivity. The temporal lobe is the learning and memory center of the brain, while the frontal lobe transforms and applies content in the brain. University of Washington Associate Professor Eric H. Chudler, executive director of the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, said the main goal of the Center for Brain Health is to focus on brain plasticity and performance. Brain plasticity describes how experiences reorganize neural pathways in the brain. Long lasting functional changes in the brain occur when we learn new things or memorize new information. "The brain is so much more amazing than . we ever dreamed possible, so our mission at the Center for Brain Health

is truly to maxmuze human cognitive performance," Chapman said. Craig McCord, the defensive coordinator for Pacific Lutheran University's football team, sent the link to Chapman's video · to the entire football team. He wanted to enhance everyone's understanding of concussions. Having been on the football team at PLU for nearly two years, I have witnessed multiple teammates experience concussions. I've only gotten one concussion in my nine-year athletic career, and it was quite minor. Still, understanding concussions and their severity is important if you want to lead a fruitful life. Too many athletes get too focused on getting back into the game, because they want to help their team win, but they need to realize that if they get a concussion, they'd be doing themselves a favor if they stood on the sidelines.

Lutes lose to dominant Pacific Boxers tennis team By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer After a rough first weekend of conference tennis matches, Pacific Lutheran University returned home Feb. 28 looking to turn things around. Unfortunately for the Lutes, the Pacific Boxers had other plans, running away with the match early and skunking the Lutes by a final team score of 9-0. The day began with the doubles matches, - and the Lutes put up a fight. Junior Spencer Herron and sophomore Jake Yannello hung tough in the No. 2 doubles matchup before falling 8-5. The No. 3 doubles pair of first-years James Okubo and Sam Stadter also lost by a slim margin, 8-6. As the singles matches began, the Lutes

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enhances many aspects of life. It inspires optimization for emerging potential, prevents and mitigates risks of developing lifelong addictions, supersedes · need for negative risk-seeking with positive thrills of camaraderie and purpose, strengthens commitment to school work, provides regular exercise to stay physically and mentally fit while elevating mood and improves sleep habits. In short, football provides one of the strongest protections against unhealthy risk-seeking behaviors, like experimenting with drugs or alcohol. On the other hand, football has its setbacks. Concussions are a risk in football. When a player goes back into a game after suffering a concussion, he is three times more likely to get another concussion. But concussion prevention and care has improved. Chapman works with more than 130 scientists at the Center for Brain Health, which is releasing new medical statements

MARCH 7, 2014

were looking to get therr first singles win of the year.· They were swept in singles matches against both Lewis & Clark and George Fox the previous weekend. The Boxers served up a similar meal of defeats for the Lutes. Angel, Yannello, Okubo, senior Neal Berg and sophomore Brancon Bulaclac all fell to the Boxers in straight sets. The lone match that went to a third set was that featuring Stadter. Stadter won the first set, but was unable to capitalize as his opponent battled back to win the next two sets. Stadter lost 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.

"We were hoping to start this weekend on a good note, but unfortunately we didn't. The good news is we have another chance tomorrow to turn things around," Yannello said.

Singles competition I. Battaglia, Giancarlo (PAC) def. Angel, Sam (PLU) 6-2, 6-2 2. Zuroske, Troy (PAC) def. Stadter, Sam (PLU) 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 3. Faith, Brennan (PAC) def. Yannello, Jake (PLU) 7-5, 6-3 4. Bulling, Lorne (PAC) def. Okubo, James (PLU) 6-2, 6-3 5. Suk)je, Alen (PAC) def. Berg, Neal (PW) 6-3, 6-1 6. Wining~r, Clark (PAC) def. Bulaclac, Brandon (PLU) 6-0, 6-0

Doubles competition I. Battaglia, Gianearlo/Zuroske, Troy (PAC) def. Angel, Sam/Berg, Neal (PLU) 8-3 2. Faith, Brennan/Fl-azier, Grayson (PAC) def. Herron, Spencer/Yannello, Jake (PLU) 8-5 3. Bulling, Lorne/Wininger, Clark (PAC) def. Okubo, James/Stadter, Sam (PLU) 8-6

MEN'S TENNIS CLAIM FIRST WIN OF THE SEASON AFTER OUTLASTING WILLAMETTE By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

Junior Spencer Herron returns an opponent's forehand. Herron helped the Lutes record their first win of the season as he outlasted Willamette's Gunnar Lee in three tense sets. Herron barely won the first set, lost the second set and triumphed in the last set. Herron is now 1-0 in singles matches on the season.

The Pacific Lutheran University men's tennis team sent the Willamette Bearcats back to Oregon with a loss after claiming a 5-4 win Saturday at the Sprinker Recreational Center. Junior Spencer Herron defeated Willamette's Gunnar Lee in the final match of the weekend in three sets to earn PLU its first victory of the young season. The win improved the team's record to 1-3 overall. "Of course it's always nice to get a win, but it's even better to get some of these hard-working young players some of their first victories of the season," PLU head coach Rocky Poulin said. "We can build on this." In addition to getting the team headed in the right direction, the win proved to be especially significant for Herron, as it was his first singles match in two years. 'Tlike the pressure," Herron said. "When you are the last one playing you have a good audience, it makes for an exciting match." Willamette kept it close throughout with some good tennis, but with the loss, the Bearcats fall to 1-5 overall, tied with PLU in NWC play with a 1-3 record. Herron's teammates, first-year Sam Stadter and sophomore Jake Yannello, also claimed their first singles victories of the year, outlasting Willamette's Will Cooper and Devn Abney respectively. "It feels really great to get the first win under my belt," Stadter said. "I was a little nervous, but I knew I could beat him [Cooper). I need to improve on my focus when I'm on the court, though, because it's hard keeping that concentration for a long period of time." The end of the contest was almost soured for the Lutes after losing their first doubles match to Cooper and Abney, but Herron and Yannello, as well as Stadter and first-year James Okubo, rebounded to win the final two matches. PLU will be back in action March 14 when they play Whitman College at Sprinker.

John Tveter contributed to this artide.


-THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 7, 2014

SPORTS15

Gay.athletes finding the courage to come out By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer Athletes Jason Collins and Michael Sam have something in corninon. Unfortunately, the similarity they share is something that has not been universally accepted. It is one that millions are fighting for on a daily basis. In the past year, these individuals chose to risk it all by making arguably one of the biggest decisions of their lives. They both announced they were gay. Despite both men being on opposite ends of their professional careers and from different generations, they share the common desire to make something out of their lives. Like the rest of us, they want to make a name for themselves. But considering Sam has yet to be drafted into the NFL and the 35-year-old Collins is nearing the end of his career after signing a 10-day contract with the Brooklyn Nets, these men have already done what millions have only dreamed. Unfortunately for many who have come out, their dreams can, and have, turned into nightmares. Pacific Lutheran University senior Lucas Kulhanek, a former Pierce County representative of The Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN), noted the difficulty that gay athletes face when deciding whether or not to "come out." "If I was a gay athlete, I would have to think about the consequences that would occur and also the benefits," Kulhanek said. "Ultimately, they are paving a path for future gay athletes, which is a difficult and brave thing to do." Both Collins and Sam's statements have rightly been met with a wave of support. But on the other side, many have asked, what is the world corning to? The answer, in short, is that it's becoming more tolerant. Senior Arny Wooten, president of PLU's Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC), has been working hard to spread an attitude of tolerance around PLU. "This year it has been my goal to make sure SAAC is doing everything they can to show that we are a welcoming and inclusive environment to anyone and everyone in the PLU community," Wooten said. "We as a committee want to foster the notion that it doesn't matter

what your sexual orientation is. If you're our teammate, then we will respect you." With the recent failure of the antigay bill proposed to the Arizona legislature last week, more and more people like Kulhanek and Wooten are actively standing up against sexual discrimination. "Whether it's topics on religious affiliation, ethnicity or even sexual orientation, it really all comes down to respecting your teammates and respecting the game you play," Wooten said. Although Collins and Sam are by no means the first professional athletes to open up about their sexuality, they are joining a select list that is growing by the day. In Collins' case, he has already made history by becoming the first openly gay player to compete in an NBA game. And in truth, it's about time. "I honestly think it was bound to happen at some point, and it is extremely beneficial to society as a whole," Kulhanek said. "Exposure is what humans need and homophobia gets addressed through exposure and advocacy." A common argument some critics rncike when athletes come out is that media attention actually does more harm than good to the athlete. It has been said that focusing on gay athletes corning out actually brings more negativity than acceptance. While that may be true in some circumstances, .positive media attention can also encourage others to conquer their fears. "Gay athletes need to come out on their own terms," Kulhanek said. "They need to decide when the best time is for them because many people struggle with corning out based on the situation they are in." Luckily for the millions who live in fear of ridicule and discrimination based on their sexual orientation, organizations are popping up around the country to help gay and lesbian people feel accepted. "SAAC is the voice of the student athletes, and I believe that the topic of sexual orientation isn't going to go away if we ignore it," Wooten said. "That's why we have found that adopting campaigns like the 'You Can Play Project' is important. No one should ever 路 feel excluded or uncomfortable to be themselves in their own environment."

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.... PHOTO COUKI'ESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

TOP: Jason Collins has received mostly positive feedback after he announced he was gay last year. BOTTOM: Michael Sam could be.the first openly gay player in the NFL if he gets drafted this May.

LGBT activist visits Pacific Lutheran University -

Former University of Maryland wrestling star speaks out against homophobic langauge By SAM HORN Sports Editor Hudson Taylor is on a mission to educate people about the dangers of homophobia in sports. Four hundred students packed into Olson Gymnasium Monday to hear what Taylor had to say about his perspective on the homosexual community. Taylor is a Lesbian Bisexual Gay Transgender activist, and he speaks out against homophobic slurs used not only in athletics, but also in everyday life. He explained that he wasn't always a supporter of the LGBT community. He didn't really understand the group's mission until he witnessed homophobic language occurring in the locker room at the University 路of Maryland where he wrestled. That's when he said he decided to make a difference. "I believe that if you are silent

in the face of oppression, you are culpable for that oppression ... There are everyday instances when people should speak out when they're currently not," Taylor said. Taylor stressed the impor:tance of being aware of how you speak. Using homophobic language can be insulting and should be avoided. Taylor said he believes getting professional athletes to speak ~ut

路 "We're really trying to get it into our athletes' minds that we want to be an inclusive department." Amy Wooten Student-Athlete Advisory Committee

against homophobic slurs can be very powerful because they are 路so influential. "Getting a professional athlete or a college athlete to do the same [speak out against homophobia] could make a major difference," Taylor said. Amy Wooten, the StudentAthlete Advisory Committee president, said she wanted PLU to host Taylor after watching him speak at the University of Washington Leadership Summit last year. "We've already started to implement Rud.s on's message this year with the 'You Can Play' video, and we11 be running an inclusion poster campaign corning out this week," Wooten said. "We're really trying to get it into our athletes' minds that we want to be an inclusive department." In the end, there's no magic trick in ending homophobic language. It can only end by speaking out and taking action.

-. PROTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Hudson Taylor expressed how he was raised in a Christian home and it was looked down upon to speak out against homophobia. However, Taylor wasn't the typical Christian.


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THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

MARCH 7, 2014

PLU alum resurrects soccer career Andrew Croft '09 will travel to Chicago By SAM HORN

Sports Editor

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Sometimes all it takes is one moment to understand your true calling in life. When Pacific Lutheran University alum Andrew Croft was in Uganda in 2012, he was able to appreciate how soccer made an impact on a global level. enough That was; reason for Croft to resurrect his soccer career. Croft quit the PLU soccer team his junior year, because he said he made some bad decisions that left him unprepared for the year's upcoming training camp. Croft said not a day goes by that he doesn't regret making that decision. "Since that day, I have really done some amazing things," Croft said. "I don't think that a couple bad decisions can stop you from chasing your dream, and I have had some very special people

in my life that have helped

me realize that." In December 2012, Croft trained with the Tacoma Stars, Washington State's only professional indoor soccer team. He liveq in Seattle at the time, so Croft had to drive one and a half hours to and from Tacoma three times per week to train and play. Now, Croft plays for the Tacoma Galaxy. The undefeated Galaxy recently won 路the 2014 Northwest Division Title of the Premier Arena Soccer League (PASL). As the team's goalkeeper, Croft has aided the Galaxy in attaining an unblemished record in its inaugural season in the PASL. Now that the Galaxy have been named champions, the team will travel to Chicago's Sears Arena March 15-16 to compete with other top PASL teams from around the Nation for the PASL Premier National Title. "It feels incredible to

be headed to Chicago with the Tacoma Galaxy," Croft said. "It has always been my dream to play in a national tournament and to be able to represent the Northwest with my teammates - who are some of the best I have ever played with - as the best of the best in indoor soccer is a great feeling." Croft said he probably wouldn't be where he is without the support of his wife, Tafara Pulse. Pulse is a professional women's soccer player who plays for the Seattle Sounders women's team. "She pushed me to get back in shape and push through any negative thought I would have aboutnotmakingit," Croft said. "If it wasn't for her, I wouldn't have even taken the idea seriously. She is my biggest inspiration and supporter." For now, Croft has his sights set on capturing the elusive PASL title, realizing he has found his true potential in soccer.路

PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF HALSTEAD

Andrew Croft blocks a shot to prevent the soccer ball from reaching the back of the net. Croft's team, the Tacoma Galaxy, will be headed to Chicago in mid-March to compete for the Premier Area Soccer League National Title.

Lutes softball team riding eight game losing streak By NICK BARENE

Sports Writer

GAME I

.,.

-

The Lutes softball team was unable to earn a victory against the visiting Whitworth Pirates in its weekend double header, losing 4-3 in the first game and 4-2 in the second. In the first game, the Lutes came out swinging the bat well. Senior Spencer Sherwin led the game off with a triple. First-year Thalen Masada then drew a walk and stole second base. With Sherwin and Masada aboard, junior Kelsey Robinson smacked an RBI double into right-center field to give Pacific Lutheran University an early 2-0 lead. In the third inning, senior.Katie Lowery hit a single to center field, scoring Masada and increasing the PLU advantage to 3-0. That would be the end of the scoring for the Lutes.

The Pirates came out in the fourth inning and put a run on the board. In the fifth inning, they tied the game at three on a two-RBI double to left field by Megan John. Whitworth scored the game winning run in the sixth inning on a bunt single by Brittany Connor. In the bottom of the seventh inning, Masada was able to reach base safely with only one out. However, the next batters were retired and the win went to the Pirates. Robinson (1-3) took the loss. She allowed three earned rt碌lS on seven hits alongside one walk and three strikeouts. Makayla Lefever (2-0) got the win, giving up just one earned run on six hits to go with her four strikeouts.

GAME2 In the second game, the Pirates opened up the scoring in the top of the first. The team took a 1-0 lead on a single by Julia Johnson. In the bottom half of the first inning; Sherwin got the Lutes back on track, leading off the inning with a solo blast over the outfield wall. It was her first homerun of the year . In the top of the third inning, the Pirates struck again on Julia Johnson's two-run homerun, giving Whitworth a 3-1 lead. The Lutes would get a run back in the sixth inning. Robinson reached base on a single, followed by senior LindseyMatsunaga on a fielder's choice. A bunt single by Lowery loaded the bases for first-year Kailyn Osaki, who smacked a base hit down the right field line to score Robsinson from third. But the next three Lute batters were retired, and the PLU rally was short lived.

LEFT: Senior Lindsey Matsunaga throws out a runner from her infield spot. Matsunaga leads the team in fielder assists with 21. RIGHT: Junior Leah Butters pitches to a Whitworth batter. Butters couldn't get into a rhythm, as she gave up four runs on nine hits. It was the fourth loss of her 2014 season.

The Lutes stranded seven base runners in the game and totaled 14 for both games combined. The Pirates scored another run on a scoring error, and they cruised through the bottom of the seventh to victory. Junior Leah Butters (0-4) allowed three earned runs on nine hits with no walks and three strikeouts in her complete game effort. Madi Perez picked up her seventh win for the Pirates, pitching four innings. She gave up one earned run on four hits, with three walks and two strikeouts. Whitworth's Riley Fritz earned her first save of the year in relief. The Sunday's games of the weekend series were cancelled due to rain. The Lutes fell to 1-8 overall, 0-5 in the Northwest Conference. Whitworth moved to 14-3 overall, 7-0 in NWC play. The Lutes' next game will be against Willamette March 8. PLU is riding an eightgame losing streak into the game.

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SPORTS Men's tennis tempted by Nationals

AdE Guitar fest plays new tunes PAGE7

PAGE15

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

OORING

MARCH 21, 2014

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 15

mastmedia.plu.edu

JROTC brings fitness

Women gather to discuss race and feminism

colllpetition to PLU

PHOTO BY NINA ORWOLL

Students came to the Women's Center to listen to Giovanna Urdangarain, assistant professor of Hispanic studies, sueak about women of color in relation to feminist theory.

By RELAND TUOMI News Editor

â&#x20AC;˘ PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

Students from four Tacoma-area high schools participate in the JROTC Fitness Competition, hosted by PLU ROTC, March 7. Other events included a two -niile run, dodgeball and a physical fitness test. Kiyeon Lee, head of public affairs, said, "This event is a good recruitment opportunity and a chance for Junior ROTC cadets from high schools to get a taste of what PLU Army ROTC has to offer."

What few people understand about feminism is that most feminist critiques and theories center around opening opportunities for white women almost exclusively. Pacific Lutheran University's Women'.s Center aimed to change this phenomenon March 11 with the "Colors of Feminism" conversation. Urdangarain, Giovanna assistant professor of Hispanic studies, led the event. She described feminist theories and read poems written by a feminist of color and then a.s ked the attending students what they thought of each piece. One idea discussed was the role beauty plays within feminism and whether being what society classifies as

beautiful allows a woman to be a feminist. more "Feminists are than white lesbians wearing Birkenstocks," senior Princess Reese said. "Any woman can be a feminist, regardless of outer beauty." Another idea was questioning why there were alternatives to tl:te word 'feminist,' such as 'womanist' or 'Latina feminist.' The group of students discussed the idea, saying that feminism only approaches white feminist problems. This is because women of color are underrepresented within mainstream society. Furthermore, when women of color are affected by these alternative approaches to feminism, it is only women of color within the United States. Urdangarain also had the group listen to abolitionist Sojourner Truth's "Ain't I a Woman?" speech.

The group of students then discussed why black women rejected feminism, especially in relation to Truth's speech, and the significant political difference between white and black women. Horizontal oppression was also mentioned during this discussion, and how women oppress other women based on race and sexual orientation. The event concluded with a video of a French fashion show where almost all of the models were women of color. The models were not thin but came in all sizes, and instead of strutting down the catwalk, they engaged in step dancing. The group discussed how this fashion show empowered the women to express who they were, rather than abide to mainstream standards of thin bodies and uniformed styles.

Homelessness, race and you A&E By RELAND TUOMI News Editor When walking down a metropolis street, it is not uncommon to see a homeless person. After seeing them, a person may make assumptions about how and why that person became homeless. Social psychologist Carolyn Weisz of the University of Puget Sound spoke about the stigmas of homelessness and race last Friday at Pacific Lutheran University's Psychology Colloquium. Weisz defined homelessness as the lack of fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence, and stigma as personal or social identity that receives negative responses .

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She also said race receives a stigma from society in general. The different types of racism are systematic racism, a system of advantages based on race, oldfashioned racism, which is blatant bigotry, and modem racism, which is rationalized discriminatory behavior. All of these are usually present when a homeless person confronts someone. Weisz conducted a survey with homeless women in 2009 and homeless men in 2010 about the different ways they were stigmatized. The surveys were conducted at the annual Project Homeless Connect, an annual event in Tacoma with the goal to end homelessness. Most men and women surveyed definitely felt the stigma of

homelessness, but black women especially felt the stigma of race, almost twice as much as their white counterparts. Men classified in the miscellaneous race category - not black or white - also felt a racial stigma against them, more so than the homelessness stigma. Most of the "other" raced men were Native American. "Issues of homelessness and race are easy to see and stigmatize," senior Kathryn Boelk said. "It is important to establish the data first and Dr. Weisz did that." Further discussion on race and education will be discussed at the Race and Pedagogy National Conference at the University of Puget Sound. The conference will take place Sept. 25-27.


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THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 21, 2014

PLU Briefs

Yes, balance is bogus

Students attend annual Peace Scholars program

what's going on around campus

PLU philanthropist Wanda Morken dies Wanda Morken, a supporter of Pacific Lutheran Uniyersity, died Sunday at the age of 73.

She and her husband Don Morken were committed to the success and growth of the university, especially in the areas of business and technology. The Morken family provided an endowment for the construction of the $21 million Morken Center for Learning and Technology, which was dedicated in 2006. Wanda and Don Morken also provided financial support to various organizations and scholarships, including the the Morken Family Scholarship. Wanda Morken is survived by her husband, daughter Sonya (Morken) Prata, son-in-law Tony Prata and grandson, Dakota Prata.

Pacific Lutheran University sent juniors Andrew Larsen and Amy Delo to the Peace Scholars for the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Forum Minneapolis the week of March 3. The annual three-day forum, hosted in Minnesota the last 26 years, will allow the two PLU students to listen to Nobel Peace Prizewinning speakers such as R. Edward Freeman, William Foege and Leymah Gbowee. "I like th~ fact they . bring in speakers from business and science as well," Claudia Berguson, associate professor of Norwegian and Scandinavian area studies, said. Berguson also accompanied the students. This year, 19 students formally applied and wrote essays to compete for one of two open slots at the forum, Berguson said. From March 7-9, PLU hosted a live stream for each day of the forum for each speaker. Students could ask questions through G-chat to the speakers skyping into the conference.

Debate team continues winning streak Pacific Lutheran University's debate team traveled to Denver last weekend to complete its last regular-season tournament. Juniors Pam Barker and David Mooney seeded eighth out of the 50 teams from all over the country. Barker also won her third speaker award of the year. Senior Chris Fournier and sophomore Brendan Stanton were seeded 10th. They inissed semi-finals by half a speaker point. "There were a lot of good teams at this tournament, and we held our own," senior Caitlin Zimmerman, a debator, said. PLU also sent sophomore Amy Jones and junior Leah Larson to the elite Pi Kappa Delta nationals in Indianapolis yesterday, which will run until March 24.

PHOTO COURI"ESY KENNETH DUNMIRE

Send your news stories to mast@plu.edu

Wanda Morken died at the age of 73. She is survived by her husband, daughter, son-in-law and grandson.

NEWS3

By MARIANNE FLAKK Guest Writer Sometimes it is good to just be good enough ...,.. that was the conclusion of the fourth session of the "Lean In" series, which asked "Is Balance Bogus?" Monday. The topic of balance between work and personal life was based on questions raised in the book "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead" by Sheryl Sandberg. The Women's Center, Career Connections, Student Involvement and Leadership (SIL), Wild Hope Center for Vocation and the Diversity Center have cooperated to put together a number of panels to address the question of how women view what they are meant to do and their roles in society. 路 The panel consisted of Patty Krise, project manager at Ford Motor Credit, Kate Luther, assistant professor of sociology, Joanna Gregson, professor of sociology, and Lisa Henderson, director of academic budgeting and planning. Lynn Hunnicutt, the director of the Wild Hope Center for Vocation, led the discussion. "It leads to a conversation between the audience and the panelist," Hunnicut said. "They get to talk about what they want to talk about within the topic." The audience members engaged in dialogue with the panelists. "I'm impressed with the questions the students had tonight. They were very insightful," Hunnicutt said. One audience member asked about the fear of missing out on important things in life. "Life is balance," Henderson responded. "You are constantly trying to figure out how to deal with challenges

'Ratchet,' 'exotic' and six other路'things you should not say to me' By JANAE REINHARDT Guest Writer Students gathered together in The Cave the evening of March 12 for a small interactive, discussion-based panel titled, "8 Things You Should Not Say to Me." The panel was a collaborative effort hosted by the Women's Center and the Diversity Center and focused on a group of diverse Pacific Lutheran University female students and their negative social experiences related to their ethnicity. The event welcomed all students regardless of gender, age or sexual orientation to participate and share their experiences. Sitting down in a circle, the six student panelists and close to 15 attendants started by sharing their names and favorite ice cream flavors. Next, junior Lauren Mendez, a panelist representing the Diversity Center, asked the other panelists to each share eight words or phrases commonly used subtly by others to negatively describe their race, sexuality or being. . Words such as 'illegal,' 'exotic,' 'ratchet' and 'white trash' were some of the initial slanders the panelists shared with the all-female group. Panelists and attendants discussed the prevalence of these uncomfortable labels on the PLU campus. "I've experienced many of these negative terms far too many times at PLU," senior Emma Harman said. "It's just not OK. As students attending a diverse university, we should know better."

The conversation turned to discussing some commonly used phrases the panelists found uncomfortable. "You're not regular black," and "Why aren't you exotic?" are just a couple of phrases that panelists shared. "These are ideas driven completely by blind assumption," senior Jimena Mascaro, another panelist and Women's Center representative, said. The group discussed how various media outlets and even celebrities cause many of the misguided assumptions. The term microaggression was introduced late in the discussion to help categorize the usage of these insensitive words or phrases. The Taking Action Against Racism in the Media webpage suggests that microaggressions are best described as, "brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults towards people of color." At the close of the event, the panel thanked attendants for sharing the experience and encouraged the attendants and each other to be aware of these widely used microaggressions, and to take a stand in preventing them on the PLU campus and beyond. "We wanted to give women an opportunity to share their experiences and really have a voice in letting women know that they are not alone in these experiences," Mendez said. "I think we succeeded in that."

in your personal life and your professional life. For me the thing that has worked is setting boundaries for myself and others." Luther also spoke about a solution for deciding what someone should say yes to and when to decline. "You need to choose what means something to you, something you have a passion for and care about and chose to say yes to that," Luther said. The word "balance," however, may not be the best word to describe this process. "Balance is bogus. We often think of juggling instead of balance. And juggling means having everything up there, happening at one time and most people can't do it," Gregson said. "I think a better word would be bowling. You throw the ball to try to get as much as possible, so I prefer that word over juggling." Regardless, the conception of balance changes over time. "The types of things you are balancing change, but you always balance, and you balance it, because you love it," Krise said. Senior Nomiun Gankhuyag, one of the students who attended the panel, said she enjoyed the event. "It is empowering women, and it's good to learn other perspectives and see how others think." Gankhuyag said she learned from the event and plans to use some of the information in her life. "Balance is a hot topic," Gankhuyag said. "I think about it a lot and I realized I can't give and give, but I need to find my values and prioritize." There will be a fifth session of the "Lean In" series April 14 called "Lessons From Former Lutes," where alums will come back to talk to students.

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THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

What to do atPLU

MARCH 21, 2014

Annual Holocaust conference ignites learning at all ages

Ongoing The Art of Wayzgoose. March 12-April 9, University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4p.m

Saturday-3/22 Doubleheader game vs. Puget

Baseball

Diamond,

baseball Sound. 12-5 p.m.

Sunday-3/23 Baseball game vs. Puget Sound.

Baseball Diamond, 9-11 a.m. PHOTOS BY JOHN FROSCHAUER

Monday-3/24 Intramural Sports. Olson Gym,

4-7p.m. Health Care Career Fair. Various

LEFT: Rescuer Nelly Trocme Hewett (left) and filmmaker Pierre Sauvage (right) spoke at the seventh annual Powell-Heller Holocaust Conference March 12. RIGHT: Pierre Sauvage attended the screening of his film, "Weapons of the Spirit" and the discussion that followed.

By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor

Locations, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Scandinavian Folk Dance. CK

West, 7-8 p.m. - It's Spring Break! -

Saturday-3/29 WPFC Soccer Games. Synthetic

Turf Field, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Double softball game vs. Willamette. Softball Diamond,

noon-4p.m.

Sunday- 3/30 WPFC Soccer games. Synthetic

Turf Field, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Softball

game

vs.

The seventh annual PowellHeller Holocaust Conference sought to educate more than just Pacific Lutheran University students. Running from March 12-14, the conference featured visiting academics, Holocaust scholars and donors. There were also many visiting high school students during the last day of the conference. The Powell-Heller Holocaust Conference opened with an evening movie, "Weapons of the Spirit," and subsequent discussion in Xavier Hall. Professor Bob Ericksen, the Kurt Mayer chair of Holocaust studies, said the film focused on a group of people in France who

rescued 5,000 Jews. The creator of the film and a Holocaust survivor, Pierre Sauvage, was present at the screening of his film and for the discussion. The following day included a presentation by Sam Brill who is the child of Holocaust and a panel survivors that included Christopher Browning, a leading Holocaust scholar and the former PLU Kurt Mayer chair of Holocaust studies. High school students from schools like Charles Wright Academy, Mount Rainier Lutheran and Kamiak arrived March 14 for a special morning session with three different segments on three different issues. Ericksen said the focus was on the themes of rescue and resistance. Ericksen also spoke about the

new Holocaust and genocide studies minor, and said he hoped to encourage further education about the Holocaust. The students heard various speakers and listened to Browning, Sauvage and Nelly Trocme Hewett, a rescuer. "One high school teacher told me that was the . most intellectually intense two hours he'd ever experienced," Ericksen said of the presentations by Browning, Sauvage and Trocme Hewett. High School Kamiak senior Tiffany Coons said she particularly enjoyed listening to Trocme Hewett. "I didn't know much about the resistance movement," Coons said. She said it was interesting to see how religion played a . part in activism. "These were ordinary people

making choices and changing things," Coons said. Kaylee Fitterer, another Kamiak High School senior, agreed that Trocme Hewett was the highlight of the conference for her. "It's [being a rescuer] not unobtainable. We all have the potential to be a hero," Fitterer . said. 路 _ The high school students also attended an afternoon luncheon and a number of other students' presentations on topics relating to the Holocaust in the Scandinavian Cultural Center. '1 thought it [the conference] went very well," Ericksen said afterward. "I was pleased with the attendance, and I was pleased with all the presentations, which I thought were very good."

Linfield.

Softball Diamond, 2-4 p.m. Aalotar Nordic Concert. Chris

Knutsen Center, 4-8 p.m.

Monday-3/31 Swedish

Taken from weekly Campus Sa,fety reports for the weeks of March 7 and March 14

cooking

class.

Scandinavian Cultural Center, 9 a.m. -noon.

Tuesday-4/1 School of Nursing ELMSN Info Session. AUC 133, 9-11 a.m. 路 School of Nursing BSN Info Session. AUC 133', 12-2 p.m. Baseball game vs. St. Martin's.

Baseball Diamond, 4-6 p.m.

Wednesday-4/2 Psy Chi Spring Induction. AUC 133, 6 -7:30 p.m. Food Symposium. Sandinavian Cultural Center, 7-9 p.m. Regency

String

Quartet.

Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30 p.m.

Thursday-4/3 Food Symposium. Scandinavian Cultural center, 12-5 p:m. Bjug Lecture.

Harstad

Sandinavian Center, 7-9 p.m.

Memorial

Cultural

Friday-4/4 LGBT

Identity

Crime Time: PLU's Campus Safety Blotter

Workshop.

South Hall Lounge, 6-7:30 p.m.

Drug policy violation- Campus Safety was asked to assist a community assistant in Kreidler Hall March 7 when the CA detected the scent of marijuana. Campus Safety and the CA contacted the student in the room where the smell was coming from and the student led a search of the room. Campus Safety discovered two sandwich bags filled with a small amount of ~arijuana. Campus Safety reported the incident ro SRR (Student's Rights and Responsibilities} for review. Vehicle Theft- A student reported his vehicle was stolen March 10 on Yakima Avenue South along the golf fence fine parking near South Hall. The vehicle was taken overnight, and there was no conclusive video footage of the incident. The Sheriff's Department was contacted to file a report.

to a PLU student, and the student reported a gym bag and GPS stolen.. The student was referred to the Sheriff's Office, and Campus Safety video officers discovered a suspect. -Golf Course: A student reported his car window had been broken into. His car had been parked near South Hall along the golf course's gate. He said his car radio and iPod were stolen. Campus Safety reviewe4 video footage and discovered the theft occurred between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. The student was referred to the Sheriff's Department.

If you need Campus Safety's assistance, call (253)-535-7441

Theft- A PLU employee reported that she found a black male rummaging through her purse in her Columbia Center office March 10. When she confronted the man, he ran away with her debit and credit cards. Campus Safety and the Sheriff's Department searched for the suspect but were unable to find him. Burglary- A PLU faculty member reported her PLU-iSsued laptop h~d been stolen out of her Ingram office March 10. She had left her office for a moment with. the door partially open. At the same time, a student reported seeing a suspicious person in Ingram, which later matched the description from the thief in the Columbia Center. The Sheriff's Department has been advised on this individual.

Vehicle Prowling- Two events of vehicle prowling occurred March 12, both reported around 10 a.m. One occurred near the library and other near the golf course. -Library: APLU Parking Department reported a brokenrearpassenger window in the library's parking lot. The car belongs

Theft- Campus Safety was contacted for a theft-in-progress at Old Main Market March 13. Keithley Middle School students had stolen some food items from the market. The Sheriff's Department cired the students and released them into the custody of their paTents. Keithley Middle School was informed and the students were RFCd {Restricted from Campus).

Theft- A student reported his bike had been stolen from the Anderson University Center March 13. Campus Safety reviewed video footage and discovered a possible suspect, but there was no identifiable information about the individual. The Sheriff's Office was contacted. Informational-A community member contacted Campus Safety March 13 to report a possible burglary in progress at Facilities Management It was discovered the suspicious individual was actually a facilities employee. General Policy Violation- While on patrol last Friday, Campus Safety Officers observed a group of individuals walking through the Harstad parking lot. One individual stopped and began urinating in public. The officers made contact with the student, who was also smoking a cigarette. The student did not know the tobacco policy extended ro the parking lots and apologized for urinating. The incident was forwarded to SRR.


MARCH 21, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

A&E 5

THE ART OF WAYZGOOSE: University Gallery showcases sample of upcoming art festival By ALISON HAYWOOD AdEEditor The University Gallery is displaying prints from last year's annual printed arts festival, Wayzgoose, in preparation for this year's. "The Art of Wayzgoose," which opened March 12 and runs through April 9, showcases prints from various artists that will be on display at the annual Tacoma printed arts festival April 27. Wayzgoose is an annual celebration of the printed arts held at King's Books in Tacoma. '1t's a great chance to see what people are doing," Sweet Pea Flaherty, owner of King's Books and Wayzgoose co-organizer, said. "It gives people exposure to the different arts." This year's festival will include 30 tables with local artists and org~ations, hands-on activities and the opportunity to steamroll prints in the parking lot, Flaherty said. The name, Wayzgoose, comes from an old-fashioned term for a festival when printers would come together and celebrate the summer harvest with prints and festivities, Jessica Spring, Pacific Lutheran University resident artist, said. Spring is a co-organizer of Wayzgoose. Unlike other mediums, printmaking is unique because it's very labor intensive, and printmakers often form a community, Craig Cornwall, PLU resident assistant professor of art and design, said. Cornwall estimated it takes. about 50 hours to complete a print, from start to finish. He said between six and eight students worked for several hours each on the piece "Road Narrows," which is on display in the University Gallery and the Anderson University Center. "Why in the world would you go to all that trouble to carve that great big thing?" Cornwall said. Spring recalled an instance when one art student was studying away in London and was injured. At the hospital, she was talking to a nurse and found out they were both printmakers. There was an instant connection.

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Senior Katherine Vail observes the letterpress prints on display for t he 10th annual Wayzgoose event. PLU's University Gallery will be hosting prints from previous Wayzgoose exhibitions from March 12-April 9.

"That's the kind of community that you have," Spring said. "If you run into a fellow printmaker in another country, you're instantly best friends." Cornwall agreed, saying it is unique to printmaking. "Other mediums aren't like that," he said. To create a print, artists carve out a design on large linoleum blocks. They paint or ink over the block and press it onto a piece of paper, like a stamp. The original design must be carved into the block backwards, because the image reverses when it is transferred onto the paper. The technique dates back to the 1500s,

when prints were commonly used to · make playing cards and pictures of saints, Cornwall said. All of the students in Cornwall's printmaking class will be involved. They are working on designing and carving images for Wayzgoose, and during the festival itself, they will be in charge of inking. Students from Spring' s graphic design and book art courses will also be there. Despite the labor-intensive process involved, Cornwall described printmaking as addicting. "The marks that you get you can't do that any other way."

Tacoma Wayzgoose King's Books 218 St. Helens Ave.

April 27, 11 a.m. -4 p.m.

Event is free and open to the public

'Vagina Monologues' cast performs for women's correctional facility studies department, Lisa Marcus, suggested it. Marcus and Smith made initial contact with the prison, thinking the cast could perform there, which they suggested to the show's three directors: sophomore Ingrid Clark and seniors Lia Lee and Lillian Ferraz. "It was a great idea," Ferraz said. The show is intended to bring attention to domestic and sexual violence, which

many of the women at the prison had experienced. Clark said many of these women had been abused. "It seemed like a really daunting task Students perform "The Vagina because as far as I know, no one has ever at Pacific Lutheran Monologues" done this before," Clark said. "We didn't University annually, but this year's team of know if they would let us into the prison to actors did something special. perform, because it seems like such a new They performed at the Washington idea." Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) Arranging the performance took March 15 after their adviser, Jennifer Smith, months of emailing back and forth and and chair of the women's and gender working with several organizations. They ended up working with Taryn Collis, who works with theater programs within the prison. Ferraz said the WCCW. was once the most violent prisons in Washington, regardless of gender, until a group of women changed the culture of the prison by forming an organization called 'The Village,' with groups and subcommittees focusing on environmentalism, · advocacy and more all aimed at making the prison a.better place. "Because of their hard work, the WCCW is no longer the most violent," Ferraz said. She said that without these women, "The PHOTO COURTESY OF LILLIAN FERRAZ Vagina Monologues" The cast of "The Vagina Monologues" poses after performing at the Washington Corrections Center for Women. The show relationship with the intended to bring awareness to domestic and sexual violence, which many of th_e women at the prison had experienced. prison would have been

By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer

far more limited. The assistant superintendent of the prison ended up censoring one of the monologues dealing with victims of wartime rape camps, which Clark said, was one of the heavier pieces. The cast was not allowed to bring anything in with them except for bottled water. No cellphones. "When we got to the visitors entrance, we had to go through metal detectors and our jackets had to go through x-rays," Clark said. Cast member Anna Loose, a sophomore, described this performance as different from all the rest. They performed in a gym with little setup and no formal lighting. The lights were on and approximately 60 women in the audience were close and clearly visible to the performers. "Looking right at them and delivering lines was really different from when you're usually performing, and you can't see them," Loose said. "It was a very intimate experience." Loose said she had expected a more mixed response, but everyone loved the performance. "I wasn't sure what kind of response we would get," Clark said, "but throughout the show the women were clapping an_d laughing and engaging with us." One woman in the audience found a piece called "Hair" especially impactful, because .it was about learning to love and respect your own body without having to conform to the expectations of others. During a different piece, about the rape of a woman, many were openly crying and comforting each other.

WCCW CONT. ON PAGE 6


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THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

MARCH 21, 2014

NERDLESQUE:

Po-werful -wolllen in perforlllance:

Parkland comic book shop brings nerdy burlesque to Emerald City

Women)s empowerment event draws small crowd, big energy

By ALISON HAYWOOD AdEEditor Comic book and cult classic fans have something extra to look forward to after this year's Emerald City Comic Con: a nerd-themed variety show called "Nerdlesque," organized by Parkland's own comic book shop Nerdy Stuffs. "It is everything l)erdy fused with burlesque," Carmen Melendez, general manager of Nerdy Stuffs, said. Burlesque is a type of variety show, normally with a strip tease, that tells a story or some sort of message, Melendez said. "Nerdlesque" has some sort of "nerdy" theme to it, such as comic book characters or scenes from movies like "Star Wars." Melendez said there will be a Cotham City Sirens act featuring Catwoman, Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy, as well as the 'boylesque' performer Anubis Bennu. "Most of the burlesque performers do a ton of different acts, so it's not just burlesque," Melendez said, saying that they also do comedy and magic tricks. "I love the variety show aspect of it. It's what they're going to bring to this event." Melendez got the idea for the show when her friend Morgue Anne, a burlesque performer in Seattle, said she wanted to do some sort of nerdythemed burlesque show for Emerald City Comic Con. Emerald City Comic Con is a large .annual comic book and pop culture convention in Seattle. This year it takes place March 28-30. Melendez and Morgue Anne decided that a comic book and movie-themed burlesque show was the perfect way to end the convention, so Nerdy Stuffs teamed up with two other organizations, the Seattlebased vaudeville troupe Starving Artists on Parade and Cinema Tri-Force Podcast, to bring the show to Seattle. Nerdy Stuffs will not have a "l?ooth at this year's Comic Con, but Melendez said they still wanted to be involved by putting on this show. "We just want to be a part of Emerald City [Comic Con] and we want to be a part of the burlesque performances," she said. "We just want to support local artists. That's really important."

"Nerdy Stuffs, _Nerdl~sque"

8:p:Jp.. Dante's Seattle -路21+ 5300 Roosevelt Way NE

$10 cover charge

PHOTO BY KATIE DEPREKER

Senior Olivia McLaughlin performs at the "Powerful Women in Performance" event in The Cave March 14. The event celebrated powerful women at PLU and featured singing, fiddling, spoken word poetry and visual arts.

By UNA TINGVIK-HAAVE AdE Writer The Commuter Lounge and the Diversity Center partnered with the Women's Center to showcase powerful women and their talents last Friday in The Cave. "Powerful Women in Performance" was the brainchild of senior Cori DeVerse, whose job is to come up with programs for commuter students at Pacific Lutheran University. "I was inspired by my own theater background to do something that empowered women," DeVerse said. "We have a lot of talented women here, and so I thought 'let's do a show performance, and showcas~ them."' DeVerse sent emails encoura~g

Music Department hiring new chair, faculty By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer The music department will be doing significant .hiring - it needs a new department chair and it needs to fill a second music education position. Students were invited to attend presentations given by final candidates in both searches. Linda Miller, assistant professor of music, was the chair of record for the music education search, which was seeking a second assistant professor of music. She said the position was advertised nationally in The Chronicle of Higher Education and online at HigherEdJobs. According to the job description, Pacific Lutheran University is looking for an "energetic teacher/scholar with a dedication to undergraduate education and collaborative learning." The page also asks for someone with enthusiasm. "We wish to maintain and strengthen the program and reputation PLU holds in the regional music education community," Miller said. The search is a careful process. "It is important not only to identify an individual who meets the academic requirements of the position," Miller said, "but who can enthusiastically support the goals of the institution and the priorities of our department."

Miller said the search also considers whether the background of the candidate will complement the needs of the department and backgrounds of other faculty members. The presentations students could attend were a priority as well. "Students are at the center of our work at PLU," Miller said. "Our students are bright caring individuals who are service oriented." Three finalists presented on campus March 4, 6 and 11. Each candidate performed a conference presentation, a music education major class and a general classroom teacher class for non-music majors. The current chair of the music department David Robbins sent out an 路 email to music students inviting them to attend the sessions. The email ended with, "Hope you can join us for some of the sessions. Your input is greatly valued." "We believe their voice is important in selecting a person who 路will be teaching many of their courses, or who may be advising important degree and career choices," Miller said. The committee is in the process of making its final recommendation to the SOAC dean and the provost, now that the candidate visits have been completed. Read the April 4 issue of The Mast for details on the search for the next music department chair.

female PLU students with any talent to sign up, and sign up they did. "We have everything from a fiddler, to spoken word, to PLU' s dance team and HERmonic [female a cappella team] performing. And then we also have awesome artists," DeVerse said. DeVerse also performed two songs herself. The women's performances seemed to be influenced by the powerful women topic, with song choices like "Let No Man. Steal Your Time" and "Momma Knows Best." First on stage was PLU' s student-run female a cappella group HERmonic. The group performed three songs. Exuding confidence, the women performed with a lot of attitude, fingersnapping and sassy dance moves. "I jumped at the opportunity to

perform with such great talent and such solid people," sophomore Sadi Wentz said, who performed two songs on stage. In between each performance, artwork by female PLU students was presented. The artworks included photographs, paintings, screen prints and steel art. "I do think there's a lot of talent," senior Megan Konkel, who helped organize the event, said. "I think this would be a great event to do every year, just because there's such a wide variety of talent, and I don't think it always gets showcased." The audience also seemed to enjoy the event. "[The crowd] was small, but there was really great energy," Wentz said.

WCCW FROM PAGE 5 If time had allowed, the group would Ferraz said the show continues to have asked the women how they define affect cast members each time the issues feminism, what they think it is and what are opened, so everyone in the room was it looks like to them. Ferraz said that the women in the prison deserve to be a part similarly affected. After the show, there was a discussion of this conversation and deserve to have a session between the audience and cast voice. "I think it's a right that they have members. "They said wonderful things about really, and along with that I think we being empowered," Loose said. "It was need to remember that these voices are important," Ferraz said. just wonderful Ferraz also to hear from said the event them and that caused selfthey were "Throughout the show the reflection and interested in was women were clapping and there our experience enthusiasm performing laughing and engaging and need to it and how it grow on both empowered with us." ends as well as us. So that a want to create was really Ingrid Clark something awesome." long-lasting: C 1 a r k The assistant said that the assistant superintendent was in the superintendent approved and said audience. "He got up and said this was everyone loved the show and would like such an incredible performance," she to see it again next year. Loose said, "Obviously it was really said. "He admitted that he censored one of the pieces and apologized, saying the emotional but it was just cool and I can't piece needed to be performed because it imagine it going any better than it did." "I think it will continue to be valuable j.s important." That was one of Clark's favorite to each community," Ferraz said. "Just moments, but overall she said it was for a few hours we created a community amazing seeing the response from the together and it was really beautiful and women who came and watched. She special and painfully sad and complicated said everyone who had participated and - it was really ridiculous, the amount of watched had been positively impacted barbed wire, and it was sad to leave and know they couldn't." and empowered as women.


MARCH 21, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

A&E 7

All-day festival showca-s es guitar program By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor In an attempt to bolster support, Pacific Lutheran's guitar program sought the help of professional musicians to teach at the fourth annual guitar festival. The department of music hosted the event Saturday in the Mary Baker Russell Music Center. Elizabeth Brown, a senior lecturer of music and head of PLU' s guitar and lute program, organized the event. "We are trying to gain a little more visibility for the guitar program at PLU," Brown said. "This is currently the only standing guitar festival in Western Washington." The festival was an all-day event featuring multiple workshops aimed at helping beginner and intermediate guitar enthusiasts alike to become better musicians. "Anyone ca.'1 play the guitar," Brown said. "You've got to take it slow and be extremely patient with yourself." Workshops included hands on classes where participants who brought a guitar could learn basic rhythm accompaniments as well as more advanced harmonic and melodic motion 路 techniques. First-year Elizabeth Frerking said she had a lot of fun at the event. "The festival was pretty good," Frerking said. "It was well put together and they [the festival] featured some nice workshops." After lunch, guitarists had the chance to perform their newfound skills for a crowd of about 80 in Lagerquist Concert Hall. The orchestra concert embodied some of Brown's regular PLU guitar students along with anyone from the guitar festival who wanted to join in and play. "I rather enjoyed the orchestra concert," Tacoma resident Robert Murphy said. "It was nice to see people of all musical backgrounds, who barely know each other, come together to play a beautiful piece of music." . The remainder of the afternoon was filled with professional musicians such as Bill Clements of Rosewood Guitar in Seattle and professional flamenco guitarist Eric Jaeger. . Clements showcased his collection of handcrafted rosewood classical guitars valued at about $50,000 per instrument. His colleague and professional guitarist Matt Anderson, played a piece on each guitar so festival participants could hear the subtle differences in the individual instruments. "My favorite workshop was the guitar listening session," Frerking said. "It was _ nice to hear the different sounds in all of the different guitars." The flamenco session gave students

Wisecracking sleuth hits the big screen By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOFT

Matthew Anderson, a Cornish College of Arts graduate, plays a guitar he made himself at the Guitar Festival. Thirty-six people showed up to listen to Anderson play six different guitars and experience the different sounds they make.

a crash course that covered the basic fundamentals of the picado and rasgueado techniques. Musicians perform the picado technique by playing alternately .with the index and middle fingers and bracing the other fingers on the strings just above those being played. Rasgueado requires the guitarist to strum the strings downwards with outward flicks of the right hand. "As a classical guitarist, I think that flamenco is an obvious progression," Murphy said. "I enjoyed the workshop and am excited to start learning the style." The performance from the PLU guitar faculty wrapped up the festival. Brown and PLU lecturer Stephen

Howland, who teaches jazz and classical guitar, were accompanied by guest performers Marco De Carvalho, Nate Omdal and 路 Gordy Ryan. They treated the audience to a three-part performance of classical guitar, solos and duos and some original works for the Latin jazz ensemble. Brown said she loves the fact that many of her students are guitar hobbyists and are not striving to become professional musicians. "It's fabulous that we have recorded music," Brown said, "but I love seeing people make their own music. In ancient times, if people wanted music, they had to make it on the spot. Making music is just a part of being human."

PHOTO BY MARLENE.WALTOFT

Flamenco guitarist Eric Jaeger, aka "El Comanche," teaches first-year student Elizabeth Frerking how to play flamenco style guitar. Frerking was one of the 28 perople who attended Jaeger's class for the Guitar Festival at PLU.

It was a movie for the fans, by the fans and it did not disappoint the fans - "Veronica Mars" brought it all to the big screen last Friday. . To anyone else, the movie was just a mystery with a wisecracking P.I. at the helm, but to the fans it felt like the proper finish to a show that ended too soon. When the CW canceled the critically acclaimed "Veronica Mars" TV show after three seasons in 2007 due to poor ratings, it developed a cult following. That following prompted the return of the show in the form of a movie, thanks to a Kickstarter campaign that garnered roughly $5.7 million last year. Without a doubt, the movie catered to its backers. "Veronica Mars" was rife with old jokes from the show and countless appearances from old guest stars. Some who had donated also received the movie the day it hit theaters via digital download . The story begins nine years after the rather grim ending of . the series with Veronica, portrayed by Kristen Bell, about to accept a job at a major law firm in New York and ready to meet the parents of her perfect boyfriend. But a call from her ex-boyfriend Logan Echolls, played by Jason Dohring; draws Veronica back home to Neptune, California, the place where she had helped her P.I. dad solve a number of cases and made herself quite infamous. Logan, the famous son of a movie star, is the prime suspect in the murder of his pop star girlfriend, and while Veronica only intends to help him pick out a lawyer, she's soon drawn into the intrigue of the case. Her murder investigation also happens to coincide with her high school's 10-year anniversary, an excellent excuse to see a lot of familiar faces from the show. 路 Plus, the movie includes a cameo of actor James Franco as himself and a short scene of actor Dax Sheperd - Bell's real-life husband - as a man at a club .. The movie has rather dark themes, likening Veronica's love for seedy mysteries and feelings for Logan to an addiction. The class warfare element, one of the show's central issues, also had major consequences, because the town of Neptune may be home to the rich and famous, but it's also home to everyone who works for them. There's also massive corruption in the sheriffs -department. But these more serious aspects didn't stop viewers from laughing almost the entire movie. It's hard not to appreciate the witty retorts, oneline zingers and perfect sarcasm that all the characters, and especially Veronica, excel at. Some of the more memorable moments included Veronica deflecting the interest of a hedge fund manager at a bar by telling him her boyfriend is a hitman and then asking him for his card since her boyfriend is looking to invest. Another was after someone leaked a sex tape online of Logan and his pop star girlfriend that only showed their legs. When Veronica asked Logan if they had made the video themselves, Logan responds sarcastically, "Oh, that's right. We were shooting some of our usual leg erotica." Critics enjoyed the film - it garnered a 75 percent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes but the chances of Warner Brothers backing more films will depend on how much money the movie brings in. The film earned $2 million its opening weekend, according to TV.com, which may not warrant sequels. But if this is the last anyone sees of Veronica Mars, that won't be a bad thing. The movie wrapped up all the loose ends the TV show left dangling, and while there is potential for more films, everything seemed right by the time the credits rolled, or as right as it ever gets in Neptune, California.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

'DOGE

MARCH 21, 2014

IN'

New meme-based online currency surpasses Bitcoin By BJORN SLATER Business and Ads Manager In the online currency world, there's a new dog in town. Programmer Billy Markus created Dogecoin - pronounced DOHJ-coin in December 2013, and in three months it has gathered a faithful online following dominated by users of Reddit, a social news and entertainment website. The new cryptocurrency - a digital currency that uses cryptography for security is valued at $0.78 per .1,000 Dogecoins. Dogecoin started as a parody of Bitcoin, the first cryptocurrency that surfaced in 2009. Dogecoins feature the image of a perplexed Shiba Inu - a Japanese dog. Since then it has grown to be the most traded cryptocurrency of all time in terms of volume, with more than 61 billion Dogecoins in circulation. Since each Dogecoin is only worth a fraction of a penny, it is mostly used as an online tipping system for Reddit. Users of Reddit can traditionally give each other "upvotes" and "downvotes"

by clicking the corresponding arrow next to the posts of other users and can easily create posts themselves. Now, Dogecoin has entered the picture, and users can give each other a few Dogecoins for a good post or comment. The cryptocurrency is not practical for becoming rich by hoarding-as many did with Bitcoins when they skyrocketed due to the high volume and low value. But 27-yearold entrepreneur Matt Thompson disagrees. According to CNN, he is offering to sell his vacation home for 100 million Dogecoins, or about $78,000, as of March 17. The entrepreneur has proven the usefulness of cryptocurrencies to small business owners. Thompson's success has been in selling games and electronic gaming accessories online using Bitco~ since 2011, and he started using Dogecoins just two

days after they became available online. He's managed to use online

PHOTO COURTESY OF CR!j!ATIVE COMMONS

currencies to sell inventory as far away as China, saying it's "safe and easy with minimal fees."

Dogecoin isn't the number路 one cryptocurrency - Bitcoin still has the largest user base and is more widely used for larger transactions. The average Dogecoin transaction is about $106, while the average Bitcoin transaction is more than $9,300. Doge co in s are mainly being used for fun little things such as buying computer games, which according to Policymic . com, is just what the creators intended. Bitcoin has a bit of a dark past. It was used commonly on The Silk Road, an online exchange where users could buy illicit substances. Dogecoin wants to keep away from that kind of image, and users have been very supportive. Dogecoin Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded

by the creators of Dogecoin, said the community is what really makes this cryptocurrency special. Ben Doernberg of the Dogecoin Foundation, said most of the competitors that have sprung up around Bitcoin are just intended to make a lot of money. Meanwhile, Dogecoin fundraisers managed to raise more than $30,000 to help send the Jamaican bobsled team and an Indian luger to Sochi to compete in the Olympic Games. Dogecoin is still in its infancy Bitcoin has been around for about five years while Dogecoin has only existed for three months. Bitcoin has shown that cryptocurrencies can be incredibly valuable. At one point in early December, Bitcoins were valued at more than $1,200 each. Dogecoin' s high volume and low value at this point in time make high value Dogecoins seem unlikely, but a lot can happen in a few year's time. Who knows, with users like Thompson blazing the trail for high value Dogecoin transactions and an active, supporting community, it could happen a lot faster.

Encounters with.entrepreneurs Business owners share insights with students at panel By KATELYNN-PADRON Business Writer Three Seattle area businessmen offered their insights on successful entrepreneurship to students March 12. The school of arts and communication and school of business hosted the panel in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Shidio Theater. Approximately 15 students and guests were in attendance. Mark Canlis from Canlis Restaurant, Jeff Jorgenson from Elemental Cremation and Burial and Ross Mickel from Ross Andrew Winery discussed their entrepreneurship ventures. Mark Canlis and his brother Brian Canlis are the third generation owners .of Canlis Restaurant. The Canlis' grandfather opened the fine dining restaurant in the 1950s. According to its website, Canlis is a "dressy" establishment where men are required to don suit jackets in order to sit at a window table. Mark Canlis .said he pursued entrepreneurship because he enjoys it. "It's a privilege to work for yourself," Mark Canlis said. "You set the tone, the values, the ethos of the place, and that's who you become." Mark Canlis spoke about the importance of cultivating relationships with customers.

Panel member Jorgenson runs a funeral home that has an ecofriendly approach. Elemental Cremation and Burial uses carbon neutral cremation practices and offers to plant trees in honor of the deceased. Jorgenson said he became an entrepreneur in order to improve the industry by giving decision making power to families. "If yo1:1're going to sit around and complain about it," Jorgenson said, "you might as well do something abo碌t it." Jorgenson said "rigid type-A" personalities won't flourish in entrepreneurship because "you really have to be super flexible." As an entrepreneur, Jorgenson said, "you're always on tornado watch," in case problems arise. The last panel participant, Mickel, owns the award-winning Ross Andrew Winery. Its website describes an intimate group of executive staff members, one of whom is Mickel' s Bernese Mountain Dog, Galena. Mickel cultivated his passion for wine under Canlis Restaurant's wine expert, Rob Bigelow. Mickel said he started Ross Andrew Winery because he was interested in being able to create something on his own.Mickel said the most important thing about entrepreneurship is creating a team. "Get people who are better than you at the things you don't want to do," Mickel said. 路 Amy Young, associate

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Business owners Mark Canlis, Jeff Jorgenson and Ross Mickel share personal stories about starting their own businesses.路

professor of communication, moderated the panel. Entrepreneurship is a relevant topic, because "it's part of the American dream," Young said. "Since 2008, we saw a lot of people lose everything." She said entrepreneurship is a way to cultivate something for the future . Senior Nichole Thompson,

who attended the lecture, said she most enjoyed hearing about Canlis Restaurant. "It's a great atmosphere," Thompson said. "It's a staple part of Seattle." Thompson said she enjoyed hearing the background on how Canlis maintains its customer relationships. The Entrepreneurship Panel

was part of the 2014 SOAC Focus Series entitled "Entrepreneurship - the Pursuit of Opportunity." The next event in the series is MediaLab' s new documentary "Tapped Out" which explores entrepreneurial solutions to water-related problems. The "Tapped Out'' event will be in the Studio Theater April 10 at7p.m.


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THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 21, 2014

BUSINESS 9

. . . • Alum founds the In an interview with Tacoma community reporter Jack Cameron, Thoburn said, "We thought it would take multiple With creative beer and years before we got to this point, a welcoming environment, but the industry moves fast and Wingman Brewers has found a people want their beer." home in the Tacoma community As a Chinese studies major, with Pacific Lutheran University- . Thoburn didn't learn the ins and instilled values at its.foundation. outs of running a brewery in his Ken Thoburn, an alum of PLU, daily homework. founded the popular and local Yet Thoburn said it was PLU's brewery. education system as a whole that After graduation, Otinese inspired him to start his own studies major Thoburn decided successful business. that it was time to give one of "The excitement that PLU his longtime passions a shot: professors had in my learning brewing great beer for the Tacoma made me grow not only in one community. subject, but as a person overall," Proving that one doesn't have Thoburn said. "Making sure that I to be a business major to succeed learned as much as I could is what in such an arena, Thoburn opened has put me where I am now." up Wingman Brewers in 2011 and Interested in applying these has seen his business thrive well lessons to enhancing the Tacoma beyond his expectations. area, Thoburn said he decided Since its grand opening, to not only put his effort toward Wingman Brewers' unique beer his passion for brewing but also has found a fond home within the in creating opportunities for hearts of many who have sampled charities around the area. it. In collaboration with local Though this popularity among charities like Elements of the locals is a good indicator it is Education, Wingman Brewers doing something right, balancing gives a helping hand by donating the high demand for its brews a portion of every sale to the and the small size of its business organization. has proven to be a challenge.

By ZACH WITTSTRUCK Guest Writer

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PLU alum Ken Thoburn founded Wingman Brewers. It is located in Tacoma, near Freighthouse Square and Tacoma Dome Station.

As both an enhancement to its image as a company and a benefit for the community, this type of quality message is in the very foundation of the company. "Tacoma is a special place for all of us. We've lived here for most of our lives and would be exceedingly happy to live and work in Tacoma from the cradle to the grave," Thoburn said. Located just across the street from Tacoma Dome station in Tacoma, this brewery house has been sharing its friendly spark with the neighboring community since 2011. Its beers can be found at several local businesses, including Metronome Cafe, Joeseppi' s Italian Ristorante, the Rosewood Cafe and 208 Garfield cafe just across from PLU on Garfield Street. With his successes after his · PLU journey, · Thoburn said his message to other Lutes is one created from his own enrichment. "To anybody who doesn't know for sure what they want to do, figure out what you like to do and do it," Thoburn said. "No matter how hard it is, it's worth it."

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Energy extraction is 'fracking' controversial ....

-PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is the process of drilling into the e~rth and injecting a large amount of pressurized wat~r and or chemicals into pre-existing fractures to extract natural gas or oil. There is much debate circulating around both the practice's sustainability and possible economic benefit.

By JILLIAN STANPHILL Business Writer The booming energy business has opened the door to a relatively new way of obtaining natural gas and oil - £racking. This practice is controversial from an environmental perspective, but it could also provide the econom1c answ:ers to the energy crisis. · Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is the process of drilling into the earth and injecting large amounts of pressurized water and or chemicals into pre-existing fractures to extract natural gas or oil. According to data collected by the Environmental Protection Agency, the chemicals generally include methanol, formaldehyde, hydrochloric acid, ethylene glycol and sodium hydroxide.

Natural gas and oil extraction systems are common throughout the world and have been used for decades. However, the method of £racking is a new way to source this energy supply. Opponents of £racking are concerned with the environmental impact it can have. They are especially worried about air and water contamination and about the theory of increased earthquakes. The scientific community has produced conflicting data that can support or negate the use of hydraulic £racking. However, according to the Environmental Health Perspectives journal, all of these cons to £racking can and have been scientifically researched and disproved by accredited agencies. University Stanford

geophysicist Mark Zoback studied the chemical solutions used in £racking and found they had not contaminated water and had a statistically improbable chance of contamination in the future. Environmentalists also complain about the amount of water used in £racking, even though the water used in the £racking process is continously reused. An article published in The Los Angeles Times reported that researchers proved earthquakes were unrelated to £racking after a yearlong study found no detectable signs of earth disturbance. This was also backed by the Research Council, National which claimed that the theory of hydraulic £racking causing earthquakes was incorrect.

As focused on the environment as this issue is, the economy is also a major factor to take into consideration. Fracking provides natural gas in a reasonably inexpensive process, and natural gas gives off less carbon-dioxide emissions than coal. When people run the system properly, make laws appropriately and when businesses conduct themselves responsibly, there is no reason why £racking cannot be a viable economic decision and a viable energy ~ource. The Bakken Formation, a rock unit that can be £racked for oil in North Dakota, has been improving the state's economy since 2008, even in the midst of the recession. North Dakota has the fastest growing economy ·in the U.S. coupled with the lowest

unemployment rates in the country. Oil and gas companies are exempt from certain legislation that would otherwise apply to them, such as the Safe Drinking Water Act. Companies are not required to publish the chemicals they use in the £racking process, however, many do provide such information for third-party testing. If the U.S. can be.come energy independent through £racking, it can be secure in the knowledge that the nation can function stably if other countries cut the States off from fuel sources overseas. If the U.S. loses oil connections from other nations, £racking may provide it with the ability to protect, maintain and secure the nation's citizens and economy.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

MARCH 21, 2014

Replace unrealistic body image of_ By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist

-=.:-

Since 1959, Barbie has had a firm spot in the toy industry. According to Forbes, Barbie earns 20 percent of the revenue for the toy corporation Mattel. But after decades of dominance in the realm of toys, the makers of Mattel Barbie finally have some competition - Lammily. Artist Nickolay Lamm is sick of the unrealistic expectations Barbie poses to its consumers. He believes that Barbie, with her measurements that would be impossible for a real human, can create unachievable standards, particularly for young girls. NBC News said Lamm created the new doll, called Lammily, based on information gathered from the Center for Disease Control on the measurements of an average woman. Also i.Tl on the creation process is former vice president of manufacturing at Mattel, Robert Rambeau. Lamm launched the project as a 3-D model online and quickly received a positive response. Lamm is in the process of raising money for his project. After posting a picture of his creation, he achieved his goal of $95,000 in donations roughly within 24 hours, according to New York Daily News. The doll should be going into production this November.

Lammily represents Barbie, but in a realistic way. Described as a sporty version of Barbie with believable proportions, Lammily is shorter and wears less makeup. To put it simply, the line's motto is "average is beautiful." In response to the alternative Barbie, Lamm told TIME magazine, "If Barbie looks good as an average woman and even there's a small chance of Barbie influencing young girls, why can't we come out with an average sized doll?" While Barbie has marked its spot as a must among the toy collection of young girls, the fact that she is unrealistic is inevitable. Rehabs.com reports if Barbie were a real wqman, she could walk no further than two feet, could not lift anything due to the size of her wrists and her waist could only accommodate half of a liver. "I think it's [Lammily] more realistic and doesn't give girls the idea of an ideal image that is impossible to achieve," sophomore Sarah Davis said. Those who oppose Lammily argue that defining average and normal for an individual is contrary to the goal of defying what societal standards should be. While girls should not be influenced to have unrealistic expectations, it is also problematic for a company to define what a normal body looks like. This is an excellent point that acknowledges we need to break the stereotype of normal. The company's motto, "average is beautiful," poses a problem in and of itself. Whatever average may be is not beautiful - you are beautiful. The first round of Lammily dolls will not be in stores as they will be exclusively available to those who have donated to support the project. Lamm hopes to one day expand production and sell Lammily dolls in stores.

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 ~ark Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

EDITOR-IN-CIDEF

Jessica Trondsen mast@)plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Reland Tuomi A&EEDITOR

Alison Haywood BUSINESS EDITOR

Kelli Breland OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill

SPORTS EDITOR

Sam Horn PHOTO EDITOR

Jesse Major

_;::;,.!_.

Sustainability 'Garden' play proposes personal growth

SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Kels Mejlaender COPY EDITOR

Blake Jerome ONLINE EDITOR

Leah Traxel

MAST TV By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Columnist

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In 1962, Rachel Louise Carson published her book "Silent Spring," which is commonly credited with launching the contemporary environmental movement. Carson waited years for someone else to speak out about the harmful effects of chemical pesticides like DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane ), but she finally realized that she was the only one with the knowledge and economic freedom to do it. Her book challenged the practices of agricultural scientists and the government, as it precisely describes the harmful effect of pesticides on the ecosystem as a whole. The time after World War II saw an increase in the use of DDT and other synthetic pesticides. This increase was partially due to the need of the agricultural community to increase it's production of crops. Last week, Pacific Lutheran University put on "In The Garden of Live Flowers," a play on the life and work of Carson. The play suggests another reason for the increased use of pesticides. The other reason is this human fear of "the other." The natural world has commonly been: seen by humans as something different and separate from us. In the play, one community has a panicked reaction to insects and launches a government-driven attack on these creatures. The play portrays this pseudowar between humans and nature as a mirror to the wars between two groups of people. This may seem deeply exaggerated

to viewers and the playgoers may have even had a laugh over it, but this fear of the other deeply pervades our culture even today. Imagine the lengths we will go to keep ourselves separate from nature, the walls and the buildings that keep nature out. See or experience the fear that a snake or spider causes, a panic that usually leads to the death of the being. I know I am not exempt from the fear that I feel when I see one of these beings. One major idea present in all of Carson's works is that human beings are only one part of the natural world. They are given importance or power only in their ability to alter nature, sometimes irreversibly so. Linda Lear, a biographer of Carson and author of the 1997 "Rachel Carson: Witness for Nature," states that Carson "courageously spoke out to remind us that we are a vulnerable part of the natural world subject to the same damage as the rest of the ecosystem." In the play, viewers could see this idea as well. During the war against

the insects, a plane drops the pesticide over the entire community, causing many to become very ill. Once during a television interview, Carson stated that "man's endeavors to control nature by his powers to alter and to destroy would inevitably evolve into a war against himself, a war he would lose unless he came to terms with nature." In "Silent Spring" Carson calls for a change in the way humans see the rest of nature. So, next time you see a spider or some other being that makes you think about screaming and jumping on the closest piece of furniture, think about the cause of your fear. Perhaps you can try to release it outside rather than killing it. This is what my mother always does. She captures the spiders we find in the house to let them outside. The spiders eat bugs and if there are fewer spiders then there will be more bugs. Each piece of the ecosystem plays a vital part. We may have the power to influence and change nature, but we too are impacted by the changes we make to it.

GENERAL MANAGER

Storm Gerlock MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Evan Heringer NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Allison Reynolds ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. 路 edu by 5 p .m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, t aste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections March 7

PHOTO COUITTESY OF JESSE MAJOR

Rachel Car~on, played by senior Sarah Makar, listens to her mother, played by sophomore Jessi Marlow, read "The Adventures of Alice and Wonderland" in the play, "In the Garden of Live Flowers."

In the page 6 article "In the Garden of Live Flowers" the name of I author Rachel Carson's book, "Silent Spring," was misstated.


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MARCH 21, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 11

LETTER FROM THE NEWS EDITOR: A response regarding the representation of women in media By RELAND TUOMI News Editor In Pacific Lutheran University's studentrun media, we pride ourselves on inclusivity. We try to work together, integrate with other offices and do our best to be as inclusive as possible. However, with limited resources available to us, be it money, people or time, inclusion can be difficult to achieve. While covering an event for The Mooring Mast - the second event I attended that day because the news section is low on reporters - I overheard somecine speaking ill of our beloved publication. The person in question described his or her disdain about our Feb. 28 issue and

how there were no female speakers from the social justice event, "Legacies of the Shoah," on the front page. As a woman myself, I can sympathize with this person's discontent with The Mast's 13th issue. As a member of the paper's editorial board, however, I was filled with an intense rage. Not many know this about The Mast, but putting the paper together is not just a job where we clock in and out - at least not yet We don't have set hours. We don't have a quitting time. We stay up putting the paper together until ifs completed. Tuesday and Wednesday nights, I'm lucky to go to bed before 1 a.m. On Feb. 26, the night we put together the issue in question, Editor-in-Chief Jessica Trondsen and I were laying out the "Shoah" story fox about an hour and a half, maybe two. One story on one page took two hours. The order of those three male speakers' photos? That took a good 45 minutes. I ignored the other three and a half pages of the news section until this story was completed, causing me to go home at 4 a.m. I am by no means complaining. I love my job, and I love working within student

media . .But I become frustrated when someone speaks poorly of something I spent a lot of time and energy on. Now, I agree, there should have been a .better representation of women on the front page, and for that, I apologize. Please understand, angry person, that we had no pictures of Victoria Barnett, Professor Dorothy Roberts, Jean Franco or Dagmar Herzog. We had no pictures because we have a limited number of photographers five, if you're wondering - and our photographers had a limited amount of time available to them to attend "Shoah." Actually, if you're worried about female underrepresentation in that issue of The Mast, here are the numbers. There are a total of 14 people on our editorial board, nine of whom are women. Twentytwo people wrote in the 13th issue, and 16 of them are women. Of the 33 stories written in the Feb. 28 issue, 22 of them were written by women. While we recognize the importance of a woman on the front page, we also see the importance of our female representation throughout the entire publication. . So to you, irritated individual who spoke smack about our hard work, we at The Mast would love your input. Send

us your photos of women across campus, and I'd be happy to make a column dedicated to them. If you think you can do a better job at laying out my news section, please come to The Mast office in Anderson University Center room 172 and help me out. I will gladly go to bed at a decent hour while you make sure every story fits, every ad is placed and every picture has a woman in it. The Mast needs to be more inclusive anyway, and we do want that to include your opinion. Afterall, we put the paper together for you, our audience.路 We value and encourage your feedback because you should hold us responsible for what we publish. If you would like to have your voice heard about underrepresentation in The Mast, the overrepresentation of sass in this op-ed or really anything about anything, please consider sending a letter to the editor to http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ contactus/write-a-letter-to-the-editor or joining our staff. But in the meantime, please be mindful of the hard work completed by all women, whether they be Holocaust speakers, sassy student journalists or anyone else just trying to do her job.

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Brand yourself Stereotypical spring for the job market break is not sensible By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

The interests you put on Facebook, the pictures you put on Instagram and the messages you send out over Twitter are pieces of you - they are your brand. Your brand goes a lot further than your social media, and it has a large impact on what companies see when they look at you. Your brand is what differentiates you, as a product, from competing products in the job market, and as college students entering the workforce along with millions of other qualified workers, it is a big deal. According to Forbes, the problem most students have with branding themselves is that they do not do enough research on the process. Most students think about their Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets as their only platforms to watch. Even worse, most people think as long as they do not have partying pictures or drunken selfies on their profile, they are fine. Sorry, but that is so wrong. Branding yourself is Cl.ll about you and who you are as well as who you want the market to think you are. Before taking a leap into your personal brand, take some time to think about who you are and what defines you. Be as specific as possible in your soul searching, figure out your aspirations and wqat it is yo~ need to be successful. Once you know what you want, assess where you are currently and figure out how people see you. You might want to be seen as business-savvy, but if your Facebook is full of statuses about fashion and puppies, you will just confuse people and give off the wrong vibe. Your brand should be a reflection of yourself. If you want to be a businessperson

then tweet about business and put fewer pictures of your outfits all over Instagram. Make sure that your online profiles stay current. If you had pink hair in high school but now are back to your natural color, make sure your profile pictures look like you do now, not the Pepto-Bismol-headed kid you used to be. One of the easiest ways to help your brand is to create consistency with your online presence and your physical presence in the workplace. Not only should you look like your profile pictures, but if you have a work profile, it should have a consistent theme or color scheme. Same basic idea applies for your resumes, cover letters and business cards. If your business cards are red, try to put some red in the heading of your resume, or have a red logo in the comer of your cover letter. Adding a physical logo or brand to your paperwork is an easy way to stand out. No, you are not Disney or Nike, but you are still a brand and what you do with that brand can be very powerful. "Describing yourself in the most honest way possible is the best way of branding yourself," sophomore Will Lockert said. Remember to keep up with your brand and keep it current. Make sure you are always checldng your media, updating your resume, and tailoring your brand to match you as you grow and change. Asking friends and family to look over your brand and give feedback is always a good call. They can tell you how you look and you can count on them to be honest. You might be giving off a completely different impression than you thought and they are the people who you can count oh to tell you. Do not let a possible employer be the first one to say something - talk about awkward.

Check out https://brandyourself.com/ for an easy way to begin an online presence. https:/ /www.linkedin.com/ can help connect you to employers.

Lutheran University who crazy spring break trips. However, we do not has gone on a spring break trip. see this side of spring "It just is not realistic," break represented in sophomore Isabellah the media. No reporter Von Trapp said. "It is wants to focus on college expensive, hard to plan in kids who stay home and the middle of midterms, sleep, even though they and nice tropical locations are the majority. Instead, are far away from PLU. I the media only focuses on know of students going the 25 percent of college to Canada, but that is students who go on wild still not the stereotypical trips. spring break." For instance, if you do Due to PLU's location, a Google image search itwould be very expensive for "spring break," all to fly somewhere like that will appear are Florida or Mexico for photos of girls drinking spring break, especially and partying on beaches on a college studenf s in their skimpy bikinis. budget. 路 There will not be any An organization called photos of college students Spring break is a time . StudentCity creates napping. when we as college spring break travel The media hypes up students are expected to packages for students to the idea of college spring be so exhausted from our locations like Florida or break, when in reality the studies that we travel to a Mexico. majority of students do tropical location with all However, the first part not go to nonstop beach of our best friends and of the package, which parties. have a wild weeklong only included a hotel The college spring beach party. This is the room for seven nights, break trip is an unrealistic idea of a typical college- cost more than $1,000 per fantasy. use Instead studenf s spring in person. In the Northwest, your week for an America, but some might it is harder to have a alternative spring break wonder how often it party spring break trip, trip, building houses or actually happens. simply because it is more serving your community. Most have seen the difficult to get there. The stereotypical spring about how statistics According to a break experience is very Panama City Beach, survey by the National difficult to obtain, and is Florida attracts 250,000 Association of College simply not worth it. crazed college kids for Stores, about 75 percent So instead of feeling spring break, and heard of college students said bad if you are not that spring break should they were going home, having the stereotypical be "the best week of your working, staying on spring break experience, life." campus, sleeping or remember there are lots But the realities of how doing nothing for spring of other students out many of our friends break. That means that there who are not in in college have gone only 25 percent of college Cancun or Florida but are on spring break trips students are going on sleeping on their couch. might be quite different. It makes me question whether the idea of spring break is realistic. While I have seen a few In reality the majority of students do pictures on Facebook of not go to nonstop beach parties. my friends at crazy beach parties, I do not know anyone from Pacific

By MADDIE BERNARD Guest Columnist

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THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

MARCH 21, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS

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4 Bedroom House on Wheeler Street! 4 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, New gas furnace, vinyl windows, washer, dryer, dishwasher, microwave, self-cleaning oven, covered patio, fenced hack yard, hardwood floors computer network, and lots of off-street parking. $1,600 per month~ Contact Dave Carlson; 253-318-7008 or carlsoda@comcast.net

5 Bedroom Houses on Wheeler Street - 5

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Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 9, 2014

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ACROSS 1 Composer Alban 5 _Cove ("Murder, She Wrote" setting) 10 Put in a snit 14 Shampoo additive 15 Immature egg, to a 路 zoologist 16 Hosiery shade 17 Tum on the waterworks 18 White oak of California 19 Hammerwielding god 20 "The is in sighf' 21 Tries mightily to get ashore? 23 Wrinkle removers 25 Deckout 26 Canal country 28 Agra airs 30 Monarch's loyal subject 31 lttalks, it's said 32 You can take it or beat it 35 "So what is new?" 36 Consumer 37 Part in a movie 38 Horse's cousin 39 Furnish, as with talent 40 Small flycatcher

319

41 Remote control, at times 42 House of worship 43 One of the Beatles 45 High-rise unit 46 Command to Michael 49 OPEC's largest customer 52 "National Velvet'' author Bagnold 53 Big-time retailer 54 Grandson of Abraham 55 Sha_ (doo-wop group) 56 Guiding doctrine 57 In stitches 58 Three-pip card 59 Goes tirelessly? 60 "I've got a secret to tell you" DOWN 1 George Herman Ruth, familiarly 2 Distinctive and stylish elegance 3 Disordel1iness 4 Foam alternative for shavers 5 Sun's circle of light 6 Swears 7 Macs 8 Southwest crock pot

36 Gives over for safekeeping 37 No longer working (abbr.) 39 Capital of Italy 40 _-up (confined) 41 Plea at sea 42 Lacks humility 43 Bat's detection tool 44 Light rope 45 Hollowed, as an apple 46 Tenant's payment 47 It might wind up on shore 48 Cause of harm 50 Lumber cutters 51 Bertie Wooster's Agatha, for one 54 Sixth sense

9 Manya new driver 10 Some public-transit systems, briefly 11 Mythological blood 12 Displeased look 13 Minks and sables 21 It wasn't built in a day 22 June 6, 1944 24 Befurious 26 Urgent request 27 Feels achy 28 Helicopter blade 29 From square one 31 Untouchable, in mafia lingo 32 Some urban dwellings 33 Downwind, for a ship 34 Lemon skin

PLU discusses spring break The Mast asked students in a poll starting March 18 what spring break means to them. Join the conversation at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section.

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T otal votes 61

Results as of March 19, 11:00 p.m.

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THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 21, 2014

SPORTS13

SPORTS SCOREBOARD Baseball TEAM

WINS

WSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Linfield

15

3

8-1

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12

5

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George Fox

15

5

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Willamette

10

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Lewis&Qark

5

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. PLU

Pacific

6

9

2-7

Whitman

10

11

1-8

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 22 vs. Puget Sound, noon

WINS

WSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitman

10

3

7-0

Won7

George Fox

7

2

5 -1

Won5

Pacific

6

2

5-1

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Lewis&Qark PLU

5

4

6

5

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6

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I.infield mew up four extra-base hits while hit,ting 1-for-14 to aid the Wildea.st.s in sweeping Whitman over ·the weekend. The right fielder doubled in every game and tripled in another 1 I for a. team-high 12 total bases and J351 , slugging percentage. He drove in two runs ands.c ored five times.

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TRACK Ii: FIELD: George Fors Ezekiel Smith won the Boxer Combined Events decathlon with 6,318 points, wbieh <:urrently ranks No. 1 in the nation.

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 22 at Calt.ech, 10 a.m.

. WINS

TEAM

WSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Linfield

15

1

15-1

Lostl

Whitworth

18

6

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Willamette

9

6

8-5

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 23 at Texas-Tyler, 2 p.m.

I

MEN'S TENNIS: Whitworth sophomore Drew Brigham won both of his No. l singles matches and paired with Shane Sandlin to win twice at the No. I doubles spot. Brigham helped the Pirates earn.a pair ofroad victories at UPSandPtv. .·· · SOFI'BALL: linfteld Wildcat Karina ~vola. struck out 17batters, two short ofLinfielci'a's infle-game record, to lead · the 11th-ranked w~ to a nan:Ow ; 1-0 vicl.ory over George Fox. She •

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Lost 7

Softball

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Women's Tennis CONFERENCE STREAK

TEAM

WINS

Whitworth

7

1

7-0

Won7

Whitman

6

5

6-0

Won6

WSSES

PLU

6

2

4-2

Lost2

Linfield

6

2

3-2

Won5 Lost2

Puget Sound

5

3

4-3

Willamette

3

4

2-4

Won2

George Fox

4

5

2-5

Lostl

Lewis & Clark

1

8

1-7

Lostl

Pacific

1

7

0-6

Lost6

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: March 22 at Calt.ech, 10 a.m.

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PLU men's basketball Hall of Farner Tom Whalen passes away Owner of men's basketball scoring record, earned multiple collegiate honors By TYLER SCOTT Director ofAthletic Communications

PHOTO COUJn'ESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

Tom Whalen (42) lived in an era when Pacific Lutheran University's basketball games were played in the Memorial Gym.

The Pacific Lutheran men's basketball team lost one of its all-time great alums and supporters over the weekend as Hall of Farner Tom Whalen passed away following·a serious illness and surgery. Whalen, a 1996 PLU Athletics Hall of Fame inductee, had a regular presence among the PLU men's basketball team up through the 2013-14 season. Nearly 50 years after he graduated from PLU, Whalen proudly participated every way he could in the program in which he set numerous records and starred for two years. "Tom was a tremendous supporter of our program, attending practices, games and giving our young men many inspirational messages," PLU men's

basketball coach Steve Dickerson said. "He was a great man and will be missed by family, friends and Lutes everywhere." Whalen transferred to PLU in 1962 after two years in community college, and he made the most of his two years on the court for the Lutes. He set a PLU school record with 656 points (an average of 24.2 per game) in 1963-64, making him only the second Lute to score 600 points in a season. That came after a 1962-63 season that featured 537 points as Whalen remains one of only two PLU .players to post two 500-point seasons. • His 1,193 career points rank 17th on the PLU all-time list, and he is the only member of the Lutes' 1,000-point club who reached the threshold in two seasons. His career scoring average of 21.6 points per game is a PLU record, as are his 259 made field goals and 559 field

goal attempts during the 1963-64 season. PLU won the Evergreen Conference title and advanced to the national tournament during both of his seasons with the Lutes. The lanky 6-foot-5-inch center was known for a sweeping hook shot and earned numerous honors in his two years at PLU, including two-time first-team All-. Evergreen Conference, two-time NAIA District I Player of the Year, NAIA secondt.eam All-America, honorable mention UPI All-Coast and honorable mention AP All-America. A memorial service for Whalen will be held Sunday at 3 p.m. at Sound Life Church in Tacoma (3425 176th St. E.). Memorial gifts can be sent to PLU' s Office of Advancement in memory of Tom. All proceeds will go to Lute Club/ Men's Basketball.

LOWRY RECORDS TRIPLE-DOUBLE AS RAPTORS CONQUER TIMBERWOLVES IN SHOOTOUT

How many combined runs will the Lutes baseball team put up against the Loggers in three games this weekend? By SAM HORN Sports Editor Somebody had to win. In an intense battle, the Toronto Raptors prevailed against their opponents, the Minnesota Timberwolves, 111104. Kyle Lowry of the Raptors was the star of the night as he recorded a triple-double, the fourth of his career. Scoring 20 points, 12 rebounds and 11 assists isn't too bad for a player who quietly plays under the radar. This result means that there is a two-way tie for first place in the Mast Sports Pick 'Em contest. Cale Powers was the only participant to correctly guess that the Raptors would win. I guess it pays off to do your homework.

Powers is now tied with Kyle .Peart for first place, while everyone else is tied for second place. . Hey, at least no one is in lowly third place. Yet. Looking forward, I asked the participants how many combined runs the Lutes baseball team will score in three games this upcoming weekend against the dreaded UPS Loggers. With the way things are going for the PLU baseball team, it's a good idea to guess high. This-team is on an offensive outburst as of recently. Throughout its past eight games, seven of which were victories, the Lutes have scored 36runs. That's an average of more than four runs. Yes, this team is that good. The Loggers boast a 5-9

record. In this sense, boast probably isn't the right word. Since March 1, the Loggers have surrendered 40 runs in nine games. The Lutes' offensive firepower starts with senior Alec Beal who is second on the team in batting average. Additionally, Beal has tallied five RBI and one home run. As if that weren't enough, the Lutes have a slugger in junior Collin Nilson. Nilson leads the team in home runs with two. The Lutes will be sure to take advantage of the Loggers' poor pitching performances. PLU will make them pay for their mistakes. This week will determine who might break out on top in the Mast Sport Pick 'Em contest. Stay tuned to find out who it will be.

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Cale Powers (1-2) Prediction: 14 Kyle Peart (1-2) Prediction: 16 Alan Bell (0-3) Prediction: 14 Drew Oord (0-3) Prediction: 14 Michelle Hogan (0-3) Prediction: 15

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I">

THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

MARCH 21, 2014

SPORTS MEDIA NEEDS TO STOP ITS TUNNEL VISION Too much attention is focused on the NFL and various topics regarding the multibillion dollar business By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer The Seattle Seahawks much publicized 2013 season has ceased, but sports media insists on giving the team, and the NFL, exponentially more coverage than they give any other team in any other league. Butpeoplemaynotbereally that interested in knowing what team a defensive backup is visiting for a new contract. The NFL's offseason is not more important or more interesting than March Madness or Major League Baseball's spring training. In the world of American professional sports, ESPN refers to four professional leagues as "The Big 4." These leagues are the NFL (Football), NBA (Basketball), MLB (Baseball) and NHL (Hockey). Those of us in the Pacific Northwest tend to consider the MLS (Soccer) as a "major" sports league as well. It's no secret that although baseball is America's "national pastime," football is king. An estimated 111.5 million people watched Super Bowl

XLVIII, making it the most watched television program in America's history. · To put that number into perspective, the 2012 census estimated there are slightly less than 314 million people in the USA. That means that the experts estimate that about one in three people in the United States watched the Super Bowl this season. that kind of With popularity, it's a no-brainer to give the NFL an inordinate amount of airtime during the season. However, now that the NFL season has ceased, analysts are still talking about the offseason. NFL analysts are discussing possible teams for free agents to join, potential draft picks, jersey changes and other nonsense that should not receive more broadcast time than highlights from a current season, regardless of what sport. It doesn't make sense for the NFL to receive · more attention when its season is nearly six months away. Some people disagree. "I want all the Seahawks coverage possible," senior

Greg Bishop said. "They just won the Super Bowl. The Mariners are so bad and have been so bad for years, that I don't even care anymore. 111 start paying attention again when they win a few games." Seattle fans have grown apathetic over the constant failure of the Seattle Mariners, and yes, there have been a lot of failures. However, the Mariners arguably have the best pitcher in baseball: Felix Hernandez. The team created a buzz when it signed perennial All-Star second baseman Robinson Cano, and there is glut of young, exciting prospects coming up in the minor league system. The Seattle Sounders also pose as an exciting franchise. The team is a recurrent playoff team and MLS Cup contender. The Sounders feature exciting stars such as Clint Dempsey and Obafemi Martins alongside stellar homegrown local players including DeAndre Yedlin (Seattle), Lamar Neagle (Federal Way), Cam Weaver (Renton) and Sean Okoli (Federal Way).

Local sports fans can surely get behind a perpetual winning team featuring exciting stars and productive local players. "I love football, but soccer is exciting too," seruor Trevor Hamilton said. "I learned to be a huge Sounders fan." Now is the time for local sports media to stop its tunnel vision by focusing on the NFL and the Seahawks. They need to wake up and see the other exciting teams that the Pacific Northwest region boasts. Don't settle for the status quo. Don't settle for another Seahawks segment discussing which players the team should sign come Draft Day. Instead, go the extra mile and learn about the Sounders and their season, which has just begun. Absorb some information about the Mariners - could this year finally be the year? There is a lot happening in the Pacific Northwest in the world of sports. The Seahawks are Super Bowl champs now wake up and take a look at the other exciting teams in our region.

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PHOTOS COURI'ESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Baseball continues its winning ways with two wins during St. Patrick's Day weekend By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer

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Starting pitcher Chris Bishop, ajlinior, allowed four earned runs to the Pirates in bis first loss of the season . .

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STINGY DEFENSE HELPS LUTES EARN FIRST WIN OF WEEKEND

LUTES GET HAMMERED BY PIRATES' BATS IN SECOND GAME

No one seems to be able to silence the Lutes' baseball bats or overpower th_eir defense. In the past eight games, Pacific Lutheran University has won seven. Against Whitworth this past weekend, the Lutes continued their trend of winning. Taking the mound Saturday to start Game 1 was pitcher Trevor Lubking, a junior. After swapping runs in the first inning, Luking' s pitching and the stingy defense behind him shut down the Pirates and the Lutes managed to push across two more runs to secure the 3-1 victory. Lubking's stellar outing sparked the victory as he went the distance for a complete game, finishing with 13 strikeouts on 119 pitches. "As a pitcher, it's a luxury to know that if the ball is put into play, it's a sure out," Lubking said. "We pride ourselves on our pitching and defense." Offensively, senior Alec Beal was an offensive catalyst for the Lutes with two hits, including a homerun in the first inning and a double later in the game . .

The Lutes' dominant pitching in the first game of the weekend turned against them in Game 2 of the doubleheader. After giving up three runs in the bottom of the first and another in the third, the Lutes had their backs against the wall headed into the ninth inning. Refusing to go quietly, the Lutes' Bo Pearson, a senior, started the inning with a hit. Pearson contributed to the Lutes with the team's only two hits of the game. "We had to scratch and claw to get some of our runs this weekend," junior Curtis Wildung said. "We have a really resilient team this year." Sophomore Tyler Thompson followed up Pearson's hit with a walk. With two on and no outs, the Lutes looked primed for a comeback. However, the next batter grounded into a double play. After another Lute runner got on base, a fly-out to centerfield ended the game with a final score of 4-0 in favor of the Pirates. Pitcher Chris Bishop, a junior, took the loss after giving up four earned runs and seven hits. He was able to record five strikeouts in five innings pitched.

STATS OF THE WEEKEND

Combined hits: 32 Combined doubles: 8 Combined number of pitches: 697

Totalattendance;590 Players left on base: 36 Statislic8 found. at http:/,golule$.comhiports/

&>g . LUTES EKE OUT A VICTORY IN THE BOTTOM FRAME OF FINAL GAME

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Pitching was the theme of the series between PLU and Whitworth, and the final game of the series proved to be no exception. As the scoreless game headed into the ninth inning, the Lutes were growing desperate. It had been 23 innings since their last run. Junior Collin Nilson stepped up to bat to lead off the inning, and drilled a double down the left field line. A Whitworth throwing error later in the inning allowed him to score, and the Lutes celebrated a 1-0 victory. "Our program is run on an acronym that is very fundamental to our success: E.A.T. [Effort, Attitude, and Toughness]," junior Trevor Lubking said. "As long as we're giving maximum effort, keeping a positive attitude, and being the toughest team on the field, we will keep findfug success." First-year Derrick Mahlum picked up .the victory with eight

scoreless innings, improving his season record to 4-1. Mahlum held the Pirates to two hits along with his six strikeouts on 103 pitches. Junior AJ Konopaski entered the game in the ninth to close it out, and his 1-2-3 inning gave him his eighth save of the year, which leads the Northwest Conference. Senior Alec Beal led PLU with two hits, while sophomore Tyler Thompson, junior Collin Nilson, junior Curtis Wildung, senior Bo Pearson and first-year Ben Welch all added one hit apiece. Pearson managed a hit in every game in the series. The Northwest Conference-leading Lutes 12-5 (7-1) return to action March 22 and 23, when they host Puget Sound 5-8 (33) in a three-game series. The double-header March 22 begins at noon, and the final game of the series March 23 will start at 1 p.m.


SPORTS 15

THE MOORING MAST

MARCH 21, 2014

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Men's tennis team still searching for first conference win By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University men's tennis team is still waiting for its first Northwest Conference win of the 2014 season after losing its home opener 9-0 to the Pacific University Boxers. Going into the matchup at the Sprinker Recreation Center, the Lutes were 0-2 overall and in conference play. Not even the home advantage could help the Lutes Friday. "Last year we started off with an upset of one of the top-tier NWC teams and that set the tone for the rest of our season," sophomore Brandon Bulaclac said. "This year Pacific has done a terrific job recruiting and receiving transfers, which made them even stronger." First-year Sam Stadter put together the strongest performance of the night for PLU, taking the singles match against Pacific's Troy Zuroske to three sets.

After winning the first set 6-3, Stadter ultimately fell short, losing the second set 6-3 and the third 6-4. Trying to gain some momentum for the Lutes, sophomore Jake Yannello came close to defeating Pacific's Brennan Faith by bringing the No. 3 match to extra points. Faith would end up winning 7-5 before winning the next set 6-3. In the doubles matchup, first-years James Okubo and Stadter did their best to earn a victory in the No. 3 slot, but Lome Bulling and Clark Wininger proved to be too strong, prevailing 8-6. "Although we didn't come out with the win, I look forward to giving them [Pacific] a fight on their home courts," Bulaclac said. With the loss, PLU falls to 0-3 while Pacific improves to 3-1 overall and 2-0.in conference. The Lutes look to get their first NWC win on Saturday against visiting Willamette.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Despite losing 8-5 in their doubles match, junior Spencer Herron (left) and sophomore Jake Yannello (right) congratulate each other on a hard-earned point.

Top-ranked Whitman too much for lowly Lutes By GIANCARLO SANTORO

RECENT GAME RECAPS March 1: PLU - 5, Willamette - 4 March 15: Whitworth - 6, PLU - 3

Sports Writer Looking to build on its first Northwest Conference win of the season the previous week, the Pacific Lutheran University men's tennis team came up short against 12th. ranked Whitman, losing 8-1 at the Sprinker Recreation Center. "Playing against Whitman was very tough," sophomore Brandon Bulaclac said. "Being a top ranked national team, they didn't even have to play their best lineup to beat us . . . we actually played them pretty tight." With the loss, PLU falls to 1-4 overall and in conference, while Whitman looks to keep moving up the NCAA Div. ID rankings with a perfect 6-0 record in NWC and 8-3 overall. ''Whitman just proved to be too deep for us tonight," PLU head coach Rocky Poulin said. "We paddled as

much as we could but couldn't close out points like we hoped to." The doubles round was rough on the Lutes as Whitman's Christensen and Jake Hoeger defeated firstyears Sam Stadter and James Okubo 8-5 in the third matchup to get the Missionaires off to a 3-0 lead. The sole consolation for the Lutes came in the singles round when season debutant and sophomore Jeremy Marsh defeated Whitman's Jacob Christensen 6-4 and 6-2 in two路 sets to spoil a Whitman shutout. It was Marsh's first competitive match this spring. "For me personally, the Whitman match was a confidence booster," Marsh said. "Rocky [Poulin] moved me up to varsity for the first time this season, so I was eager to prove myself and.I ended up winning my match to give us our only point." The Lutes return to action Saturday against Whitworth at Sp rinker.

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Lute soccer player earning worldwide respect Manao represents the American Samoa national soccer team, credited with assist in team's first -ever victory ByGIANCARiosANTORO Sports Wrjter Pacific Lutheran University junior Justin Manao earned himself a special kind of hat during his first year as a student more than two years ago, but it isn't the kind you would find in your father's closet. Manao earned his first "cap" back on Nov. 22, 2011 by making his international debut more than 5,000 miles away for the American Samoa national soccer team. It also landed him in the upcoming documentary "Next Goal Wins," whieh goes behind the scenes of the team's first ever victory. A "cap" is another word to describe a player who makes an appearance in an international soccer game for his or her respective country. If the coach of the team invites a player to be part of the roster, that player can add to his or her "caps" by playing in games. There was one .slight problem though. The only thing Manao knew about the team is that it was part of one of the most humiliating moments in soccer history. "I was told they lost 31-0 to Australia, and that they were the worst team in the world," Manao said, smiling. As a member of the Oceania Football Confederation, American Samoa was scheduled to play Tonga, Cook Islands and rivals Samoa as part of qualifying for the

2014 World Cup in Brazil. Going into the first match against Tonga, American Samoa was on a 30-game losing streak and FIFA, the governing body of world soccer, ranked them as the 206th team in the world. To put this number into perspective, there are 206 national soccer teams in the world. Almost every country has its own national soccer team, and depending on where a player, or his or her parents, were born, they can be selected to represent that country. Manao qualifies by way of his father, who is half American Samoan. Manao' s uncle, part of the American Samoan side of the family, is the Technical Director for the team, and spoke with head coach Thomas Rongen about calling him up to the team a more than two months into his first season with the PLU team. He credits his uncle and new teammates for helping him make the transition. "He [Manao's uncle] inade me feel more comfortable being 路there because I didn't know any of the team or the surroundings," Manao said. "They [the team] treated me like one of their own and pretty much took me in like one of their brothers." Although the idea of representing any country in an international soccer game seems daunting to many, Manao credits his experience on the PLU men's team with helping him become one of the team's most important players.

"It helped that I was one of the best on the team, and they respected me a little bit more when they saw I could actually play soccer," explained Manao. "It was definitely a couple steps down from the PLU level though." The higher level Manao referenced meant that he was one of the first players picked by Rongen to start against Tonga. What he didn't know, however, was that he was about to make history. Manao described his emotions about supplying the assist to fellow college student Shalom Luani for the historic 2-1 win as "unreal." "The whole atmosphere of playing with guys who had never won a game and then to win that game was an unreal experience for their country and for them," Manao said, beaming. "It was the first time I think I've ever cried winning a soccer game. It overwhelmed me." British production companies Archer's Mark and Agile Films captured the joy of Manao and his teammates as part of "Next Goal Wins." The crews stayed with the team before, during and after the games to shoot what Manao describes as more or less a "sob story." The companies have since began the process of promoting the film, which is set to be released this May. The release date is fitting, considering the team is set to travel

to Hawaii in June for a week of training, and Manao plans to be there. "I'm honestly just waiting for the invite at this point, but I am ready to go." For more information on the film, "Next Goal Wins," visitwww.nextgoalwinsmovie. tumblr.com.

..-or:"

---. PHOTO COURTESY OF JUSTIN MANAO

Junior Justin Manao played nearly 500 minutes and scored one goal this pnst season for the PLU soccer team.


I ',.._

THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

MARCH 21, 2014

Injuries lead to new outlook on life for multi-sport athlete By SAM HORN Sports Editor As each second passes, senior Matt VanEaton widens his smile and tightens his grip on a medieval death device. Don't be fooled. He's not a serial killer. Far from it. VanEaton is mustering all his strength to launch a hammer into the air during a track meet. VanEaton is grinning because he knows this hammer throw will be his best one yet. He is grinning because he is summoning his God-given strength to force the hammer into the atmosphere. More importantly, VanEaton is grinning because he knows how much he has progressed since his earlier injury-riddled years as a collegiate athlete. bystander The observant wouldn't know this is VanEaton's first year on the track team. His thunderous throws disprove that notion. For the majority of VanEaton' s collegiate career, he has been a member of the Pacific Lutheran University football team. While he did throw shot put in high school, and was quite fond of it, VanEaton hasn't participated on the track and field team. Until now.

MAKING THE TRANSITION Upon entering PLU, VanEaton knew he wanted to play football at the collegiate level. VanEaton was a linebacker all four year~ at PLU and said he cherished every moment of it. However, during his senior year, he said he knew he wanted to pursue another challenge - try something new. That something

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Senior Matt VanEaton is competing in the ham.mer throw for the first time in bis athletic career. While be did throw the sbotput in high school, VanEaton decided to pursue football in college. After football ended this past fall, VanEaton decided to pursue a spot on the throwing team. The transition didn't come easily, especially since VanEaton bas struggled with injuries in college.

new was throwing the hammer. As daunting as the task seemed, VanE.a ton was ready for the test. Making the transition from linebacker to hammer thrower seemed natural for VanEaton. During the winter of his senior year, he constantly trained and constantly strived for new goals. He wanted to get stronger, faster, smarter and more agile. VanEaton prepared himself for the spring season and seems to

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be keeping up with the rest of the pack. "He kind of helped me have a little more fun this year with his attitude of laughing, but still 路 knows when to be serious," senior Kyle Peart said. Keeping pace with Peart is no ordinary task. Standing at 6 feet 6 inches, the mammoth man has solidified himself as one of the most accomplished throwers in the Northwest Conference. Peart finished fifth in the shot put and 12th in the hammer throw at the NWC Championships in 2011. If that wasn't enough, he placed first in the hammer throw at the NWC Championships in 2012 while earning second place in the shot put. That same year, Peart qualified for nationals in the hammer throw and shotput. Every day, VanEaton attempts to best Peart, but it's not easy especially with all of the injuries VanEaton has suffered over the路 past three years. In his sophomore year at PLU, VanEaton had a promising future in football. He was starting on third downs as a linebacker when the defensive coordinators implemented a new scheme. They wanted VanEaton to become a star as a pass rusher and a star on special teams.

RECEIVING THE NEWS

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP: Senior Matt VanEaton powers through a throw on bis way to a personal best mark. BOTTOM: There is nothing that unifies a coach and athlete like the good, old-fashioned fist bump. Coach Dan Haakenson has been impressed with senior Matt VanEaton thus far and is pleased with bis improvement.

collegiate career had taken a terrible detour. 路 "I remember being like 'I can't be like this, I need to be positive. I can't let this hold me down.' I remember from that day forward, I've been different ever since," VanEaton said. "I think I wouldn't be the man I am today without my knee injury." VanEaton worked harder than before to recover from his devastating injury. He refused to let anything stand in his way. He refused to be content with ending his athletic career as a sophomore. He wanted to make the most out of his time at PL U. VanEaton returned to the field the following year ready for battle. Only this time, VanEaton was a changed man. He was constantly positive and enthusiastic. He refused to focus on the troubling things in life, like suffering another demoralizing injury. Even though VanEaton finished his junior year unscathed, save for the occasional bruise, he wasn't so lucky the next year. During a football scrimmage as a senior, VanEaton burst forward and tackled a running back near the sidelines. VanEaton didn't get up. He lay on the turf clutching his right knee, letting loose a horrific scream. The scream penetrated the cold air and traveled across the field. VanEaton had tom his meniscus again. To say that VanEaton was unlucky in the injury department while in college would be a severe understatement.

And then VanEaton received an injury diagnosis - he had tom his anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and ripped open his meniscus in his REHABILITATION right knee. PROCESS Having suffered one of the more serious injuries in the world Nevertheless, VanEaton of sports, VanEaton could only persevered through his most watch from the sidelines. recent injury and battled through He was finished. His career much hardship. as a collegiate athlete seemed to Fellow linebacker Ben be coming to an abrupt end as a Kaestner, a senior, persuaded sophomore - .much too early for VanEaton to join him in the gym anyone. while he was still on crutches. "That season was looking kind . Kaestner said that VanEaton of bright for me, and then that could still work on strengthening injury came," VanEaton said. "It his upper body. couldn't have come at a worse VanEaton was able to conquer . e. " tim any lingering knee issues after Going through surgery, working out with Kaestner on a VanEaton said he was depressed. regular basis. Today, VanEaton He was nervous he would never attributes much of his athletic get to see the field again. His

success to Kaestner. had After VanEaton successfully recovered from his second knee injury, he finished his senior football season and played in nearly every game.

"That season was looking bright for me, and that injury came. It couldn't have come at a worse time. "

Matt VanEaton But that wasn't enough. VanEaton wanted more. So he joined the track and field team as a hammer thrower. His fervent personality has transferred over to the throwing cage as well. "Throwers are oftentimes kind of, I don't want to say introverted, but for lack of a better word, they're cerebral people," head throwing coach Dan Haakenson said. "Matt [VanEaton] brings a kind of energy and a real positive outlook that I think is nice. It really does help out the team. A lot of the athletes can get very introspective and he kind of breaks that up and makes people laugh." Peart shared similar feelings concerning his energetic teammate. "Definitely his happy attitude has worn off on us, and we can have more fun even on the bad days," Peart said. As VanEaton prepares to vault the hammer in the air, he grits his teeth. His eyes focus on the hammer. His hands release the object with authority, launching the hammer into the sky. The hammer lands on the damp grass with a thud. VanEaton smiles. He is content. The throw has satisfied his standards. After all these past years of overcoming seemingly impossible obstacles, VanEaton can finally smile with confidence.


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AdE Dance 2014 explores different cultures, identities

SPORTS Baseball steals one from Loggers PAGE14

PAGE7 PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

AST

OORING

HE APRIL 4, 2014

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 16

mastmedia.plu.edu

Lutes still can't light up, despite pot legalization By ALISON HAYWOOD A~EEditor

Marijuana may be legal in the state of Washington, but Pacific Lutheran University students still can't legally light up. Possession and personal use, legal under state law for people more than 21 years of age, are still prohibited under PLU policy. "Possession or use of marijuana is a violation of federal law, and therefore, it is a violation of university policy," Greg Premo, director of Campus Safety, said. The Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act requires all schools and universities to properly enforce and report drug offenses, Ray Lader, director for Student Rights and Responsibilities, said. This includes marijuana-related offenses, regardless of what state law says. "It's the way the government does it when they have unfunded

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'White Rose' fea student resistanc,

mandates with a lot of things," Lader said. "Instead of saying 'Oh, we11 give you money to do it,' they say 'Well, we already · gave you this money. If you want to keep getting this money, you have to do what we want."' Unlike some other schools, however, PLU's policy extends to students even when they leave PLU property. According to the Student Code of Conduct, PLU's jurisdiction extends to all students enrolled in courses at PLU, including incidents that happen on holidays or during breaks between terms. While it is considered a policy violation for students to use marijuana off campus while they are enrolled at PLU, this is difficult to enforce. Most drug-related offenses that come to Student Rights and Responsibilities are reported by Residential Life or Campus Safety. Both organizations' jurisdictions stop outside of PLU property.

"Most cases, if we don't know, we don't know," Lader said. Students are not immune to the policy just because they keep their usage off-campus, however. Even by state law, it's illegal for minors less than 21 to possess and use marijuana, and Pierce County has enacted an ordinance to ban marijuana use in unincorporated areas, The News Tribune reported last December. AlthoughPLU is located within the boundaries of Parkland, some students living off-campus may be affected by the b_a n. If Campus Safety gets a call regarding an odor or alleged possession, they send out Campus Safety officers to investigate, Premo said. If they can pinpoint the source of the smell, they perform a student-led search of the room, meaning the officer asks the student to open various drawers and cupboards but does not conduct the search themselves. . They then confiscate any

Will the high pr· of college pay off. page8

Opinion

Seljies for cancer awareness page 11

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Forum continues VP se,

marijuana and paraphernalia they find : and · ·Iefer the student . to Student Rights and Responsibilities. and dirty Marijuana paraphernalia are destroyed. Clean paraphernalia may be reclaimed at a later date, Premo said. Even if students aren't found to be in possession of marijuana on campus, they may still be cited. If a smell is strong enough that a Resident Assistant or resident feels the need to report it to Campus Safety, it counts as a disruption of the community and can result in educational sanctions. . "Any time people are causing a disruption to the community, and causing people to complain, it is a problem," Premo said. One sophomore male, Adam*, who has been using marijuana for

about a year, said he disagrees with this policy. "I don't think it should be something that automatically gets you a referral to Campus Safety or Student Conduct or anything," Adam said. "People just need to be more open about it and talk about it more. Just like, 'Hey, you know, you're stinking up the hall, is there any way that we can work together to make this work for both of us?"' It's more difficult for students to be cited for a marijuana violation when students are discreet about their activity - when they do not have a strong odor, are not creating noise complaints and give RA or Campus Safety no ·cause to investigate.

MARIJUANA CONTINUED ONPAGE3

Salish origin stories and culture explored By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

page6

Business

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

ABOVE and LEFT: A PLU alumnus, who preferred to remain anonymous, smokes marijuana at his home.

Students at Pacific Lutheran University had the opportunity to learn about local Native American tribes in the South Puget Sound area March20. Suzanne Crawford-O'Brien, · associate professor of religion and culture, gave a powerpoint presentation titled "Healing Landscapes: Wellness and Place in Coast Salish Religion and Culture" to a crowd of about 100 students and faculty. The event took place in the Scandinavian Cultural Center and Marit Trelstad, the head of the religion department, organized it. O'Brien, who specializes in Native American religious traditions

and religious diversity in North America, said her seminar is meant to explore the intersection of place and wellbeing among the Coast Salish - Coast Salish is an ethnographic designation of Native American cultures who speak one of the Coast Salish languages - and considers how places can act as sources of healing. "Initially I was unsure about how the lecture would go," senior Nichole Thompson said. ''.I wasn't sure if I would be able to take anything away from it that would be·relevant to my life, but once the event started, I was really impressed with the content." O'Brien's lecture focused on the Coast Salish peoples of Washington and Oregon. O'Brien spoke about everything from local creation stories to early Native American architecture still

used in a lot of structures today. According to the Snohomish, their ancestors are descended directly from . the chum salmon of the Pacific Northwest: Every year the people perform a "salmon ritual" to celebrate the fish, who they say are the givers of life. Tribal members go fishing and they cook the first salmon they catch. After every tribe member has eaten a piece of the fish, the remaining bones are sent down river where they .believe the fish will be reincarnated. Salish people also have a great respect for nature, · especially Mt. Rainier because it has provided them with water and vegetation. "The presentation led me to reflect on my current position within nature," junior Janae Reinhardt said. "[O'Brien] was super captivating."


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APRIL 4, 2014

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PLU volunteers buddy up with Brookdaie By RELAND TUOMI News Editor

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

First-year Luke Smith pushes 9-year-old Justin on playground equipment at Brookdale Elementary School. Smith and 11 other PLU students partnered with the Big Brothers Big Sisters program at Brookdale Elementary.

The Big Brothers Big Sisters program at Brookdale Elementary School reflects the Pacific Lutheran University motto that encourages thoughtful inquiry, service, leadership and care to the community. Twelve college student volunteers go to Brookdale, only a few blocks south of PLU, once a week for about an hour to work with the elementary students. The college students have committed to volunteer for a year. "We love working with PLU students because of their volunteer spirit," Shanna路 Faulkenberry, coordinator for the Brookdale program of Big Brothers Big Sisters, said. Volunteers who work with the elementary students meet the children's needs and promote education by reading books, focus ing on building their self esteem and learning about themselves. The volunteers also play board games or outside games with the kids. Later on in the semester, Big Brothers Big Sisters want the volunteers to help the kids with a science project. The Big Brothers and Big Sisters also sit and eat with the kids during their lunch period Wednesdays and Thursdays. "The goal is to make a long lasting, self sustaining sense of self worth within

these kids," Kerrisan Meyer, case manager for the Big Brothers Big Sisters program at PLU, said. "PLU students have a lot to offer, and the kids are always excited路 when they come in." Some of the volunteers work with kids who can be disruptive during class. Meyer said this one-on-one time the children get with PLU volunteers can help the kids learn how to act selflessly in class. Some of the student volunteers joined this program as part of their major, such as first-year Luke Smith. "I wanted experience for my major," Smith said. "I want to work in primary and secondary education, and I had experience from my mom' s daycare. I thought it would be a good idea." First-year Kalina Springer said she wanted to get involved to give back to the community. "It's great to give the kids one-on-one attention that they might not be getting at home," Springer said. "It's good to focus on something all the way through." Most of the PLU volunteers learned about the Big Brothers Big Sisters program at Brookdale from the volunteer fair last September. To get involved in this program, visit the next volunteer fair in fall 2014, or to get involved now, contact Shanna Faulkenberry at PLUbigs@bbbsps.org.

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APRIL 4, 2014

First VP candidate comes to PLU By RELAND TUOMI News Editor Students, faculty and staff came to the question and answer forum for Leah Barrett, a candidate for vice president for Student Life and Dean of Students. Earlier this year, Laura Majovski announced her plans to retire from the position. The daughter of a Lutheran minister, Barrett was a graduate of the University of Wyoming and is the assistant vice president for student affairs at the University of Brockport in New York. Before organizers opened the floor for questions, the hiring committee asked Barrett what opportunities there are for innovation and advancement in Residential Life and how she qualifies for the job. After first thanking everyone for coming to the forum, Barrett said Pacific Lutheran University needed to work on retaining students. "We need to keep students not only involved [at PLU] from their first year to second year, but also from their second year to their third," Barrett said. ''We need to avoid the sophomore slump." · Barrett went on to describe her qualifications for the position of VP, saying she has been told she is both good at communicating orally and in writing. She also said she can identify a person's strengths and is able to motivate others into action. After describing her love for the campus and for the size of PLU, organizers opened the floor for questions. One faculty member asked which of the following Barrett wanted to prioritize for student life: vocation, women's empowerment, career development or student development.

"All at once," Barrett said. "We can't silo information . Students will move from the classrooms into the real w orld, and they need to know their vocation, feel em powered and feel they h ave developed their careers." A student at the forum asked how Barrett would. engage with the students and h ow she would advocate for them with the administration. Barrett said she would invite any student or students over to her house for lunch to talk. "111 engage with some student leaders automatically," Barrett said, ''but I need to know how the rest of the student body is doing." Barrett also said advocacy is important, but that also depends on whatis being advocated, saying student wants and needs don't always match. This statement was not necessarily well . received by some of the students in attendance. "I was encouraged by some of her answers, but I'd like to pick her brain about student engagement on campus," junior Dan Stell said. One staff member asked how Barrett supervised and what could be expected from her as a leader. Barrett stated she is not a micromanager, saying she works on performance planning and how to help people get to the next step at work. She concluded by saying she works with people differently based on their needs. "The forum gave me a good feel for her style, her vision, what she'd like to do and where she's been," junior Amy Jones said. "I think she'd be a dynamic vice president." There are two other candidates for VP, Joanna Royce-Davis, who visited yesterday, and Keith Champagne, who · will visit this Tuesday.

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MARIJUANA CONT.

FROM PAGE I "If a student has not created any issues and they're not disrupting the community in any way; it's probably not going to come to anyone' s attention," Lader said. Adam said he never keeps marijuana or paraphernalia in his room. Instead he keeps it in a vehicle not registered to PLU, which he always parks on county roads, and he only uses it off campus. "Keep the smell down, ·because that's really what gets people," Adam said. Premo said there has been an increase in odorrelated complaints regarding marijuana since the drug was legalized in Washington state a year ago, but no more violations regarding possession than in previous years. Campus Safety responded to 11 narcotics complaints Sept. 1-Dec. 5. Last academic year, during the same period, they had only seven complaints. "I think students are utilizing it off campus, and · when they come back, that odor's just so strong that it's · causing complaints," Premo said. "There needs to be some additional education to the students that it's still a violation of our policy and of federal law to go off-campus and utilize [marijuana]." Adam said legalization was not a factor in his decision to start using it. "Most people think it's OK, or they don't think it's OK. Whether or not it's legal is not going to change their mind about that," Adam said. "I don't think I've met anybody who' s directly said they want to try it now because it's legal." Since marijuana possession is a misdemeanor,

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

P LU policy and Federal law prohibit st udents from smoking and possession of marijuana on and· off camp us.

not a felony, under federal for breaking PLU' s drug law, Campus Safety does policy, they are required to not report marijuana- complete a substance use related violations to the assessment and be placed on Pierce County Sheriff's disciplinary probation. By Department, Premo said. ·the third offense, suspension They do report other is recommended. narcotics, however. Although the Family Unlike the federal law, Educational Rights and however, PLU's policy Privacy Act (FERPA) has does not make a distinction provisions allowing for between marijuana and parental notification in the other types of drugs, case of student disciplinary excluding alcohol. action, in general, a student's For Lader, the severity disciplinary record with a of sanctions has to do more university is considered an with the amount of the drug academic record and cannot a student was in possession be released without the of and whether or not he or student's written consent. This means that she was planning on dealing. "If someone is dealing, u n i v e r s i t y - r e 1 a t e d that's going to be dealt ' disciplinary proceedings with a lot more severely result in very few than someone with a minor consequences for students possession," Lader said. outside of PLU. For students' first drugDespite the ambiguity related offense at PLU, of the laws and regulations marijuana, sanctions will be mostly surrounding educational. They may Premo had clear advice to be required to pay a fee students who are considering and attend an education using it: "Think twice about session, perform community doing it. If you're making service and write a "letter that choice to do it, think of mutual understanding" about your actions coming to demonstrate their back to campus and how you understanding of the policy, can minimize impacting the Lader said. community around you." Depending on the students' histories and the severity of the violation s, Jesse Major contributed to this p arental notification may be article. requir.ed. The second time students *Student's name has been are found responsible changed.

PL UBriefS

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Karl Stumo plans to resign

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Karl Stumo, vice president of Admission and Enrollment Services, is retiring from PLU.

Karl Stuffio, vice president for Admission and Enrollment Services, announced his intention to resign at the end of the academic year. He is leaving Pacific Lutheran University for a new position in River Forest, Ill. as the vice president of Enrollment and Marketing at Dominican University. Stu.mo began working at PLU as the dean and associated vice president of Admission and Financial Aid before becoming VP for Admission and Enrollment Services in June 2007, where he oversaw the Offices of Admission, Financial Aid and Student Services. Stu.mo also worked to accomplish the university's overall goals by developing marketing, financial aid, recruitment and communication strategies. Both Stu.mo and Laura Majovski, who will retire from her position as vice preident of Student Life and Dean of Students at the end of the academic year, will be celebrated at the annual Farewell Reception May 19.

PLU a finalist for carbon neutral award Pacific Lutheran University' s Study Away programs can give a person a completely different perspective on life. But the plane ride·s to the different countries and continents make up 19.4 percent of the university' s carbon footprint. To offset these emissions, PLU' s Study A way program partnered with Earth Deeds, a company that measures ecological impacts, to teach students how to give back to the earth while studying away. This process of neutralizing a carbon footp rint is called "onsetting." This program is a finalist for the 2014 Second Nature Climate Leadership A wards. "Aiming for carbon neutrality is important, but it is the bare minimum," Christine Cooley, PLU's su stainability manager, said. "Innovative projects like onsetting soar past neutral and allow for regenerative sustainability projects serving the ones that support the global and local environments PLU visits, and the communities where students study away." A stop-motion film produced on campus and narrarated by KPLU' s Kirsten Kendrick highlights the onsetting program that will take place during the Study Away trips in the 2014-15 academic year.

To vote for PLU's video, visit http:l!wUJw. plane tforward . or g I id eaIa Iign i ng -c arbo 11 ne u tr al i ty-goal s- wi t h-ed u ca tiona l-m iss io 11 onsetting and click the thumbs up symbol in the left column . Voting ends April 15. If you have a story for PLU Briefs, send us a tip at lit p: 1, ;astmedia.pl11.ed11/tip-li11e/


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

What to do atPLU Ongoing The Art of Wayzgoose. March 12-April 9, University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4p.m 路

Friday-4/4 National Geographic State Geography Bee. AUC CK, 9 a.m3:30 p.m. LGBTQ Identity Workshop. South Hall Main Lounge, 6-7:30 p.m. Food Symposium: Fungi for the People. Scandinavian Cultural Center, 7-8:30 p.m. 'Una Sola Familia.' Xavier 201, 7-9 p.m.

'Waiting for Godot." Karen Hille Phillips Center, 7:30-9:30 p.m. LollaPLUza Headliner Announcement Show. The Cave, 8-9:30p.m.

Saturday-4/5 'Waiting for Godot." Karen Hille Phillips Center, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Tasha Smith Jr. BM Recital, MBR 330 8-9 p.m.

Sunday-4/6 Organ Concert. Tickets: $15 general admission/ $10 senior citizens (55+) and alumni/$5 PLU community, students, 18 and under/free for PLU music students with PLUID. For tickets, call (253)-535-7787. MBR 330, 3-4:30 p.m. Women's basketball open gym Olson Gym, 4-6 p.m. Kroy Miller BMA presentation. MBR 306, 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Monday-4/7 National Public Health Week AUC, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Languages & Literatures. AUC 134, 3:45-5:45 p.m.

Tuesday-4/8

APRIL 4, 2014

Symposium supports local food By NATALIE DEFORD Guest Writer Food takes much more work than most people realize, and the food system can be complicated. Pacific Lutheran University's second Food Symposium kicked off Wednesday night with keynote speaker Thomas Pogge, professor of philosophy at Yale University, who spoke about the Millennium Development Goals and global hunger issues. Three panels of four, each with two professors . and two community membersfilled Thursday. The panels dealt with diversity, justice and sustainability. Between panels was a food expo, with poster presentations, snacks and demonstrations from Dining and Culinary Services. Rachel Haxtema, AmeriCORPS VISTA Healthy Parkland Coordinator, was very involved with preparations for the Food Symposium. Haxtema said the Food Symposium is a community event somewhat initiated by PLU's philosophy department, which held the Food Symposium coordinated by Aaron Mckenna about two years ago. She also said that this year's focus was mainly on food production and animal ethics, while this year's focus is more on community issues around food. Haxtema works in the Center for Community Engagement and Services (CCES), and she's working on The Healthy Parkland Initiative, figuring out on ways to get healthy food to low income people in the community. One of the projects she works on with Pacific Lutheran University and Trinity Lutheran Church is the monthly community meal, which is normally vegetarian because it has less of an impact on the environment. Haxtema said it also reveals delicious vegetarian meals, which are not known to many people. But this month's community meal was special for the Food Symposium~ The community meal, doubling as Thursday night's symposium dinner, used squash from Trinity Lutheran's garden across the street, which is called The Garden of Edible Grace. "We're trying to find as much local food as possible," Haxtema said. Senior Shunying Wang was one of the volunteers who helped Haxtema by cutting, peeling and dicing the squash. "I thought it would be fun to come and prepare the dinner for the community," Wang said. 路 The squash was roasted and used in a hearty salad, which also included greens, eggs, onions, shallots and berries - all local food items from Holly Foster of Zestful Gardens and also from Terry's Berries. "I think the main focus of this meal is to teach people how to eat and cook locally and that there are foods available in our community right here in Parkland,"

PHOTO BY BRADFORD LUM

Keynote speaker Thomas Pogge, director of the global justice program at Yale, speaks about globai economics in terms of global hunger at his speech, "The Hunger Games," on the first day of the Food Symposium. The Food Symposium is from April 2-5.

Haxtema said. "It's not impossible, it's difficult especially this time of year, but it's not impossible to eat locally or at least try to find some local foods to put into your diet."

"Learning to ~ow your own food helps you understand what goes into growing really good food." Rachel Haxtema AmeriCORPS VISTA Healthy Parkland Coordinator

Haxtema explained several benefits of eating locally or from one's own garden, using the products of The Garden of Edible Grace as an example. "Because they're grown across the street, there's no transportation costs, we know exactly what went into the soil, what went onto the plants - which was totally organic and no pesticides or chemicals - so that makes it healthier food and more fun to eat." Haxtema also pointed out that knowing the work put into food helps one to gain an appreciation and understanding. This is also

why she said this year's Food Symposium includes farmers and people from United Farm Workers. "I think there's an invisible side to our food system that we don't know a lot about where people are working really hard for really low wages doing really difficult labor," Haxtema said. She said many do not often think about these types of things. "Learning to grow your own food helps you understand what goes into growing really good food,. but it also helps you respect the work of other people as well," Haxtema said. She also said this is one of the reasons why Thursday was so focused on local food options. 路However, she said the larger Food Symposium is to get people thinking about the food system in new ways and to hear new thoughts about the philosophy and ethics of food. But she said she hopes the events also help people to learn about what's happening in this community. "We hope to bring global and local into the discussion," Haxtema said. There is an opportunity to work in the community gardens at Trinity Lutheran and at PLU this Saturday. '1t's a great way to learn about gardening and see how to grow food in the Pacific Northwest," Haxtema said. All food from both gardens is donated to the local food pantry.

National Public Health Week AUC, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. "Why Christocenterism is a Pluralistic Age?" AUC Regency Room, 1:45-3 p.m.

Crime Time:

Housing Sign-Up AUC CK, 3:30-7 p.m.

Information

Process.

Wednesday-4/9 National Public Health Week AUC, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. "Rescue of the Jew'' exhibition event. AUC, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., 2-5 p.m.

Thursday-4/10 National Public Health Week AUC, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 'Watch Your Mouth. AUC, 6:30-8 p.m. MediaLab' s "Tapped Out" premiere. Karen Hille Phillips Center, 7-9 p.m.

Cam_Eus Safety helped Information and Technology Services remove a computer from Ramstad Hall Marcll 24. The computer was removed from an office because of a possible security issue.

Drug policy violation

PLU's Campus Safety Blotter Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports attached to a bike rack near MBR with both wheels gone. There was no PLU bike registration tag so the -Owner is unknown, and the question remains if there was ever a theft at all.

If you need Campus Safety's assistance, call

Information

A student contacted Campus Safety A Kreidler Community Assistant March 25 to report someone had possibly (CA) called Campus Safety because he (253) 535-7441 entered her South Hall apartment when she or she had smelled marijuana March 24. was away. The student said her roommates Campus Safety and the CA knocked on the were gone for Spring Break and she was door where the smell was coming from, but living in the apartment alone. there was no answer. When she left the apartment, The CA and Campus Safety entered the student's door was open and her the room to see the resident was not in his or roommates' doors were shut and locked. her room. 1hey found several cigarette butts When the student returned to the apartment, and a small amount of marijuana in plain sight. The incident she discovered her door locked and her roommates' doors open. was forwarded to Student's Rights and Responsibilities. There was a desk and trash can moved in her room, but nothing taken. Theft The student said a couple of power outlets were not Campus Safety was contacted about the possible theft working, so perhaps Facilities had come by. Campus Safety of two bicycle wheels near Mary Baker Russell last Friday checked with Facilities, however, keep said it had not gone into morning. A PLU staff member said they had seen the bike the room. No further action had been taken by Campus Safety.


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 4, 2014

DANCE CONCERT:

A&E 5

New nam¡e, new director, new direction

PHOTOS BY EMILY JACKA

LEFT: Junior Bethany Auld rehearses for Dance Concert Wednesday in the Columbia Center. Dance Concert will take place in the Karen Hille Phillips Center April 11 and 12. CENTER: Performers practice some of the more athletic moves for a piece they will perform. Dance courses at PLU are cross-referenced with physical education/movement studies. RIGHT: First-year Tory Rivera practices her piece for Dance 2014. The event will feature two dances by professional choreographers as well as student work.

By UNA TINGVIK-HAAVE AdE Writer Pacific Lutheran University's annual dance concert is right around the comer_ In addition to works by seven student choreographers, this year's concert will also be comprised of two works of professional choreography by Director Paula J. Peters and guest choreographer Mary Reardon. As with every year, a wide variety of dances will be presented on a presidium stage. There will be jazz, modem and traditional pieces. Standing out this year is Peters'

contemporary jazz piece "Confine(less)," which is inspired by the ambition and drive of the female dancers at PLU. "What I get a sense of from the students that I have worked with is that they want more dance," Peters said. "I think they want more performing opportunities, and they're quite capable of it." Another unique performance this year is Reardon' s piece, which expounds on the individual choices we make when taking time out for fun. "I think this is going to be an interesting year, because we have Paula Peters," junior Avelon Ragoonanan, one of the student

choreographers, . said. "This is her first time here, so some of the techniques have changed, and some of the functions of how the program was scheduled before has changed." One of the changes Peters has been made this year is the name of the concert. While in the past the official name of the annual dance concert has been Dance Ensemble,"this year Peters decided to change the name to Dance Concert. "For me 'Dance Concert' is just how I tend to view what dance is when it is on a presidium stage in this way," Peters said. "I like process more than I like product, so

once it gets into the theater, I want it to be done professionally. I want it to be done well. So to me it's more of a concert and not a recital."

Becoming more than 'just pals': first date tips for guys and gals By ZACK WITTSTRUCK Guest Writer The experience of a first date is nerve wracking for some and a welcome challenge for others, but it almost always comes down to analyzing every decision f9r the date. In a survey conducted by the app company Wist, such decisions are broken down for those of us who want, need or just casually care about the outcome of such occasions. After you've worked up the courage, and no doubt prepared yourself for success, it's time to ask that special guy or gal on a date. The only choice left is to decide where to invite them. Guys, if you're willing to brave putting your kitchen skills to the ¡ test and join the 22 percent who would readily do the same, be prepared to do your homework, especially if your confidence isn't "Top Chef' material. The Wist survey found that 38 percent of women would welcome this gesture, but another 32 percent preferred a fun and casual restaurant instead. If those odds aren't appealing, however, ladies, you should know that 43 percent of guys would be happy to go to a casual and fun restaurant arid save showing off their cooking skills for later dates. Now that you've chosen the perfect place for your date, it's time to choose what to order. Whether it's happy hour or not, the drink you choose on a first date could not only be a sweet deal, but a deal breaker as well.

Guys, if you find yourself surprised when your date orders and shoots back a shot to celebrate your romantic occasion, you would find you're in good company with the 99 percent of men who prefer their date resist the urge to pound a shooter or two on the first get together. Ideally, if she looks at the wine list intently and orders from there, regardless of how expensive it -may be, it pays off for the boost of attractiveness level. Thirty-five percent of men

stated that their 'dream woman' would order wine, and another 26 percent said they'd find a specialty cocktail a welcome addition to the table as well. So what does this mean for the specially priced beer on the tap? It means there is more to go around for those women who are in the 18 percent.

Ladies, if the date across from you decides on anything but a well drink like a classic rum and coke or a cold beer, you can proudly count yourself unique in thinking they are still in the desirable 63 percent. Most women prefer their star of the night to steer clear of the colorful world of twisty straws and fruit filled drinks on the first date. So gentlemen, please indulge â&#x20AC;˘. them by not gettmg anything too bright and colorful, regardless of how convincing the other 12 percent of guys maybe. Though you may enjoy the challenge of snatching up and eating the cherry at the bottom of the glass, the first date is not the time or place for such endeavors. Since you've chosen the lucky place and have aced your drink menu quiz, it's time to pay the check. Guys, if old fashioned habits are your thing, you're like the 57 percent who reach for that bill without so much as a second thought. But it's important to note that

only 36 percent of women expect such chivalrous action of you and that another 31 percent of women would evenly split the bill. So if you went into the date ill prepared with a light wallet, which 100 percent of people of both genders highly recommend not doing, then feel free to roll the dice on splitting the bill. After all, you've nailed both the choice of setting and your drinks, which made you look like a champion, so you should have some momentum going for you anyway. That being said, we are living in a new age and both men and women who took the survey scored in the 20 percent range in believing the bill is the responsibility of the one who initiated

While a fruity cocktail is a safe bet for a woman to make a good impression on a first date, men should refrain - 63 perc~nt of women surveyed said they preferred their date to order a well drink or a beer.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

the date. Thus, if you find yourself within this group, the decision of who should fork over the money should be the most cut and dry choice of the night. Regardless though, be sure to . leave a classy and appropriate tip for the server. We are still civilized after all. Thanks to the surveyors at the Wist company and its dating app, all of this information is here to help people with first dates and aim at guiding them to a second one. If you need more statistics before jumping into a first date, then the people at Wist and yours truly are here for you. Good luck and most importantly, have fun.

,,,

The Mast does not endorse gender roles, heteronormativi ty or irresponsible/ underage alcohol consumption. The suggestions in this article are intended to inform and entertain, and should not be taken as rules.


6A&E

THE MOORING MAST

The 'mother' of all finales Sitcom ends with a legen-WaitNineSeasonsForit-dary conclusion By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chief Kids, around Thanksgiving 2010, I became aware of a show called "How I Met Your Mother" (HIMYM). I binge-watched the first few seasons and fell in love with hopeless romantic Ted (Josh Radnor) and his cohorts. Afterward, I followed along week by week so I could laugh as Barney (Neil Patrick Harris) executed scenarios from his Playbook, hypothesize the importance of Robin (Cobie Smulders) and cry when Lily (Alyson Hannigan) told Marshall (Jason Segel) his dad died. I came to feel as though I were invited into their booth at Maclaren' s while hearing these stories. When it was announced the shew was coming to an end after nine Jong seasons, I accepted the bittersweet challenge of saying goodbye to a tale so well told, because I trusted my onscreen friends to guide me to a proper conclusion. And, flash forward to today, I believe they did. However, after waiting a legendarily long time for Monday's · series finale, one thing became clear to me: if I had really been part of their friend group, they would have given · me an intervention about my obsession with their story much sooner. They would have reminded me that no matter how creative, poignant or thoughtfully designed I deemed it, it's a story made for a TV show. Better yet, it's a TV show where I and many other fans got wrapped up in semantics and lost track of its point. Like any die-hard viewer of HIMYM, I was strung along from detail to detail and season to season waiting for the clues that would finally lead Ted to divulge how he met "The Mother" - and why it was such a long and important tale. And in the end - spoiler alert - all of the viewer-generated theories that sought to answer that question were kind of correct. I alm_ost wish I were. joking. A lot happened in this show's finale. Among those things were babies, a wedding, a divorce, a death and several reunions. That's a lot to cram into a 44-minute episode. But if any show could pull it off, it'd

For more, check out "The nwnbers

behind 'How I Met Your Mother"' at http://m.astmedia.plu.edu

APRIL 4, 2014

Proctor Art Gallery showcases local artists By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

now\ rnet"'ou rnot\,e( PHOTO COUIITESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

More than 12.9 million viewers watched Monday night's series· finale of the CBS sitcom "How I Met Your Mother." The controversial finish for which fans waited nine seasons for was the show's most-watched episode.

beHIMYM. Throughout its entire run, HIMYM has been a show that cared about each and every one of its 9,125 scenes. With its flash-forwards, flashbacks and its long-winded story arcs, it seemed to effortlessly provide viewers the consistency and continuity that most shows overlook. And fans paid attention. As the finale neared, my heart sank as I read online speculations that Ted's motive for telling the story was because "The Mother" was dead. It took so long for us to meet her. But since every scene can later be circled back to, fans knew Ted's season eight wish for 45 more days with his future wife could serve as plausible justification for 'The Mother's Dead' theory, just as much as a seemingly offhanded exchange of dialogue during this season's "Vesuvius" episode could nail her into the coffin. That's the thing about HIMYM: it never makes off-handed comments. In this show, everything - for better or worse - happens for a reason. This entire season was dedicated to Barney and Robin's wedding. In the finale's flash-forward to three years from last week's ceremony, Robin and

Barney divorce. Season nine may now seem like a waste of time, but it wasn't. It showcased all of the little character nuances that punctuated why the two ~ere flawed for the marriage, let alone one another. And as far as the long-awaited reveal of "The Mother" (Tracy, played by Cristin Milioti) and the moment when Ted meets her, that was all the show ever promised. It delivered that. Viewers, myself included, still had time to fall in love with her quirks. She was the perfect match. Yet the reason she wasn't introduced until the end of the eighth season suggests the final moral of the story: it was never really about her, just how Ted met her. From the very title, the show has been about Ted. From the pilot episode, Ted's attention has been on Robin. For better or worse, that storyline came full circle. · It may not have been the finaie I'd have written for my beloved series, but I'm satisfied. It answered my lingering questions - except for why Future Ted sounded like Bob Saget for so long - and it even kept me laughing, hypothesizing and crying all the way to its much-hyped, controversial finish.

The Tacoma community is home to more local art than what Pacific Lutheran's University Gallery displays. The Proctor Art Gallery, located in the heart of the historic Proctor Business District in downtown Tacoma, is home to a wide variety of different styles of art created by a number of local artists. The gallery features work in watercolor, oil, acrylic, mixed media, jewelry, pottery, glass, metal · and wood. Carolyn Burt founded the gallery in 2008 and since its opening, she has seen about 400-600 visitors per month. "I taught art at every level for 24 years," Burt said. "After retiring I decided to fulfill my dream of opening an art gallery." The gallery uses a cooperative (co-op) business model, meaning its members voluntarily work together in order to showcase their work in the store. The gallery's 18 members each work two shifts per month and attend regular events at the gallery in order to meet and greet with potential customers. Burt said retail galleries usually charge the artists a 50 percent commission on each sale. However, because her business is a co-op, she only charges the artists 10 percent on each sale. Artists must also pay a minimal monthly rental fee for their space in the gallery. Anyone interested in becoming a member of the Proctor Art Gallery must apply and then go through a jury selection process. Other artists, however, prefer to sell their work on consignment, which means the artist is subject to retail fees . . "Pacific Lutheran University art students are welcome to apply to our gallery. We are always looking for connections within the community," Joni Joachirns, a local jeweler and five-year gallery member, said. "We pride ourselves on only accepting quality work. However, it isn't an easy gallery to become a member of." The Tacoma Weekly and South Sound Magazine voted the Proctor Art Gallery the best art gallery in Tacoma in 2012. The gallery also placed fifth in the King 5 best of Western Washington contest for "Best Art Gallery." "The art featured is nice, but it isn't unaffordable," Joachirns said. "Our art ranges in price from $10 all the way up to $2,000. We even offer a layaway program." Expertise, reputation of the artist and time spent are some of the factors that determine how much a specific piece is valued at. "Every artist here has fans who come in to see their work," Joachirns said. ''.Art feeds the soul and mankind was born to create," Burt said. "Overcoming the fear of what someone will think . of your work and the fear of being rejected is the difficult part of the art process."

Proctor Art Gallery - open daily 3811 N 26th St. (253) 759-4238

Exhibit commemorates anti-Nazi student group's resistance and resolve By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor

"The war was so big, but you hear about all of these little things that people did that had an impact."

Today's students had the chance to learn about German students of the 1940s during the library's exhibit on the Nazi Richard Olson resistance group, · Die Weisse Rose, or The junior White Rose. University students led and operated The White Rose. Numerous stands with information and pictures dotted the ground floor of the "Most German youth thought they were said. "There's a real sense of realism - the library and continued up to the second and being idealistic in their enthusiasm for the way they [the actors] dress, the way they third floors. The information ranged from Nazi party," professor Bob Ericksen, the behave, the kind of interrogation they go profiles on specific members to general lCurt Mayer chair of Holocaust studies, through." The Nazis also arrested Sophie Scholl's information on The White Rose and related said. "This is a real story about outliers." Holocaust material. When Ericksen teaches the Holocaust brother Hans Scholl and their friend and The exhibit has been touring the U.S. and 360 course, students watch the film "Sophie fellow resistor, Christoph Probst. All three appeared at Pacific Lutheran University Scholl: The Final Days," which details were some of the individuals who had fullMarch 10, the week of the Powell-Heller one of the primary leaders within The length panels in the exhibit detailing their Holocaust Conference, and concluded White Rose and her resistance when she is lives and contributions to the anti-Nazi Tuesday. arrested and later executed for distributing effort. The primary students of The White Rose The White Rose is a fairly exceptional anti-Nazi pamphlets. "The acting and the directing of the also included Willi Graf and Alexander group in Holocaust history, because most film are really high quality," Ericksen Schmorell. The members rejected the Hitler young people in Germany were pro-Nazi.

Youth, joined prohibited youth groups and read banned books for information. According to interrogation records, Hans Scholl created the name, The White Rose, randomly, "proceeded from the assumption that powerful propaganda has to contain certain phrases which do not necessarily mean anything, but which sounds good which stand for a programme." The White Rose most notably released six different pamphlets criticizing Hitler and the Nazis from 1942-43. In February 1943, Schmorell, Graf and Hans Scholl tagged buildings with slogans such as "Down with Hitler" and "Freedom." Junior Richard Olson took the Holocaust 360 course with Ericksen last spring and learned about The White Rose. "It's a big exhibit focusing around one thing, which is eye-opening that this one little thing that a group of people did had so much. in it," Olson said. "The war was so big, but you hear about all of these little things that people did that had impact."


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 4, 2014

A&E 7

~U"i11cJ cfuli li'of<fs :Disney-themedfairy tale dance By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor A few beauties and even a beast danced the night away at the first ever fairy tale dance Monday in Anderson University Center.

The event, sponsored by the Swing Dance Club, was an opportunity for attendees to dress up as their favorite fairy tale character. Natalie DeFord, the club's public relations coordinator, planned the event after seeing a new favorite Disney movie. "When 'Frozen' came out, I got really excited about Disney music," Deford said. "Then we just kind of realized that a lot of Disney

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movies have s wing -a ble songs in them, so I thought: 'If we can swing dance to any type of music, why not Disney music?"' Deford said that attendance usually spikes on special event nights such as Halloween and other holiday dances. '~Pe op 1 e seem to really like when we h ave a themed night, so I'm hoping to do them once a month in the future." PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA Andrew Morris, a two- Senior Jayde Haggard dips junior Katrina Watson at Swing Dance Club's fairy tale dance Monday. year veteran Dancers wore festive costumes and danced to Disney music and classic swing-dance songs. of the club, dressed up as · Katrina Watson· agreed, saying Ron Stoppable from the Disney series "Kim "when I found out there was a swing club at PLU, I was really Possible." "This is one of the more fun excited. It was actually one of the experiences when we do big reasons I came to PLU." Swing Dance Club meets dances," Morris said. every Monday in The Cave and DeFord said swing dancing is an inherently social activity, Wednesday in the lower AUC grey area at 8 p.m. which is a big draw for some. For more information about "It's a good way for people to VIDEO just come together and dance," the club and upcoming events, DeFord said. "It's also very social, check out their Facebook page COMPONENT at https://www.facebook.com/ I like that." · ONLINE groups/PLUSwing/. Club president and junior


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

APRIL 4, 2014

Is it worth it?

'MONOPOLY'

High price of college degree will pay off in the future

Pass go, collect business 'cents'

By JILLIAN STANPHILL Business Writer While campus life presents plenty of distractions, it's difficult to forget the high price of an education at Pacific Lutheran University. This thought is quickly followed by the everloorning question, "Is it worth it?" as the dread of loans, hours of work and fear of the future comes to mind. These questions are not only at the forefront of students' minds, but in the minds of educators themselves. CollegeMeasures.org is a website database that collects information from thousands of universities nationwide to categorize degree and major worth. Numbers may vary based on how frequently schools submit information, but a student can get a general idea of how much he or she will spend compared to what the particular degree is worth by state.

Elizabeth Dwoskin, a writer for Bloomberg, followed College Measures and the support of the state of Virginia. have Legislators proposed to make a federal database, similar to College Measures, available to the public with updated information for every private and public university in the country. It hasn't been voted for yet, but legislators have acknowledged the worth of the information. Pacific Lutheran has increased tuition for the coming school year, 201415, to $36,180. Let's assume that a student will pay around $144,720 for a degree earned in four years from PLU. From this data, and one's own personal circumstances loans, scholarship, financial aid - one can begin to estimate the amount needed to even out financially upon completion of a degree. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) released its 2013 Salary

Survey in January 2014. This document offers a breakdown of the toppaying and top-hiring industries, as well as salary ranges for each individual bachelor and master's degree. This data illustrates the specific industries that desire certain majors. The NACE survey also provides up-to-date information on what the class of 2013 accomplished career-wise so that you have the most relevant information on what may happen after earning a diploma. By focusing on those questions you can take the next step and do some research that may help you breathe easier or may encourage you to work harder, earn internships and diversify your resume. There will be a need for someone with your degree. Upon graduation and job search time, be fully invested in your capability to be the person needed to fill the job you want to lead to a career.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

ByKELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor A staple of the board games family, "Monopoly" is more than just a fun pastime - it's a tool for learning business strategies. Growing up, children can learn a lot about business savvy practices and responsible finances from the game about avoiding bankruptcy. These are some of the things you learn when you "pass go, collect $200." 1. Keeping finances

track

of

Nothing puts a damper on your roll more than realizing all the money you have left consists of a few fives and ones. "Monopoly" forces players to practice responsible saving, aiming for that $200 salary and looking to build a sizable chunk of change for investments. Like in life, "Monopoly" .teaches players to spend wisely, because the money isn't guaranteed to keep on coming. 2. Knowing when to invest

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Secrets of Marketing: By KATELYNN PADRON Business Writer Some call it marketing, others call it manipulation. Companies use a multitude of strategies to get shoppers to buy more, and many consumers don't even recognize many of these tricks in action. Businesses carefully optimize each element of an item for sale, - from item placement to decor - to create more spending. You may not notice these strategies, but chances are they affect your spending habits. One of the most common tricks companies use is the method of insinuating freshness. Fore example, you may be caught in a sudden rainstorm when buying produce at .the grocery store. Stores use mist machines to keep produce looking fresh. You are much more likely to purchase crisp, dewy spinach than a bunch of dry, wilted leaves. However, these mist machines actually do more harm to 路your produce than good. In 1990, The New York Times reported an outbreak of

'Legionnaires' disease, a flulike路 illness, spread by the mist machines at a Louisiana WinnDixie. The Louisiana Office of Public Health found 34 people infected by the system, two of whom died. Connie Morbach, a microbiologist for Sanit-Air Inc., said the sprinklers are "not a problem unless you inhale the droplets." She said she suggests shoppers avoid the mist. Some stores play a thunder sound to alert customers that the sprinklers are about to come on. This can give you the opportunity to avoid an unwanted shower. Another way stores insinuate freshness is by placing flowers and produce near the entrance. "Flowers, as everyone knows, are among the freshest, most perishable objects on earth," Martin Lindstrom, marketing expert and author of the book "Brandwashed," wrote. "Fresh flowers are placed right up front: to 'prime' us to think of freshness the moment we enter the store." Whole Foods follows this freshness recipe, Lindstrom

Of course, you have to spend money to make money, and "Monopoly" encourages wise and timely investments.

Players have to strategize what to buy - a low-cost property that will yield little rent or a pricey one that may yield more and when to buy it. Properties are only available to buy when you land on them, and while waiting might be more financially responsible in the shortterm, "Monopoly" teaches players to plan ahead and see how spending now can result in a windfall later: Arranging deals

3.

business

Game changing trades occur when you are polite, persuasive and show your opponents everything they have to gain by trading one or a set of properties for some of your properties or money. Thus, "Monopoly" also teaches the art of smooth business dealing. 4. Vigilance in business

upkeep Another aspect of responsible business behavior is . monitoring your properties. According to "Monopoly" rules, if someone lands on your property and you do not collect rent before her or his turn ends, you cannot collect it at all. This teaches players to pay attention to their assets and monitor their businesses, because a

lapse of attention directly affects the contents of your savings. 5. Facing the reality of interest Alas, even when you are a responsible businessperson, sometimes properties fail to return the profits you need, and to pay the rents of your opponents, sacrifices must be made. In "Monopoly," properties can be mortgaged and immediately supply the mortgager with a sum of money. However, this money doesn't come free, because to get their money-making properties back, players have to pay 10 percent interest on their mortgages. 6. Knowing there's

an

element of chance As with everything in life, business is rife with good and bad luck. Whether it's a roll of the dice that lands you in jail or an opponent landing on and purchasing the last property you needed to complete your monopoly, there are some aspects of business you simply cannot control. "Monopoly" helps players learn how to accept the things they cannot control and . then move forward to make the best of it.

Learn these common tricks to save you from manipulation

said, and hopes its customers associate the entire store with freshness because of that first impression. A second popular technique that marketers use to increase sales is to put the necessities in the back of the store. You may have wondered why you have to head into the depths of a store for necessities like bread, cereal and milk. Leah Zerbe from RodaleNews. com wrote "grocery store milk, and other things that just about everybody needs, are put in the back of the store so you (and your children) are more likely to make impulse purchases as you make your way the dairy section and back." No wonder those Oreos made their way into your cart. Store placement is not likely to have been the only reason for those Oreos to end up in your cart - marketers have also harnessed the science of craving. Beverage companies set their coolers to exactly the right temperature to create "sweat" on the outside of cans. Lindstrom said this sweat triggers a craving for the product.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Grocery stores often place flowers near the entrance to insinuate freshness.

"What those little drops of sweat signal to us subconsciously is that the beverage is rtot just cold but ice-cold," Lindstrom wrote, "which as everyone knows, makes soda a million times more tasty and refreshing." Many companies also include addictive ingredients in their products to induce craving. MSG, sugar and caffeine are among the worst perpetrators. "Caffeine activates the pleasure centers of the brain by slowing down the rate of dopamine reabsorption," Lindstrom wrote, "making 路us feel peppy and good (cocaine and heroin do the same thing, but obviously to a much greater degree) ."

Once consumers are no longer caffeinated, Lindstrom said, they begin to feel tired and irritable. In order to return to a positive state, one must consume more caffeine. The same goes for sugar found in large quantities in most soft drinks - and MSG, which is found in most salty snacks, like Doritos. Next time you pick up a few things from Walgreens on Pacific Avenue, remember that marketers have engineered . everything to encourage you to spend. Save some money by recognizing these tricks and keeping your money in your wallet.


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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 4, 2014

BUSINESS 9

Did you know? Facebook announced that it will be exploring options to create Wi-Fi drones and satellites to bring Internet to "every person in the world."

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATJVE COMMONS

Source: www.bcc.com/news

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10 OPINION

APRIL 4, 2014

Wanderlust:

Give travel destinations a second chance By ALLIE REYNOLDS News @Nine Producer

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While most students were in class looking forward to their spring break adventures, a lucky few members of Mast Media's Editorial Board, myself included, were able to attend the College Media Association Conference in New York City. I had once visited New York City for a few days during the summer before I started high school, and I remember not being too impressed. Of course, I was on a student tour with teachers for chaperones. The tour was hasty and cut short due to a cancelled plane ride days earlier. I remember the smell of garbage, loud noises and rude people wherever I went. So while I was looking forward to attending the conference and learning new ideas and tips, I was a little nervous about the idea of being in New York City itself. I had always thought I'd feel too overwhelmed living in a big city, but I loved New York. I loved the energy, the different attractions and the fact that basically anything can be delivered to your closet of an apartment. Our temporary housing location, an apartment we were able to rent for the week, was located on the Upper West Side, a couple blocks away from Central Park. We had to take the subway to explore the sights and sounds of the city and to get to the conference every day near Times Square. I was nervous at first - I didn't want to look like a tourist - but I came back to Seattle wishing we had our own subway system to make getting around easier for everyone. We were also lucky enough to score tickets to Jimmy Fallon's "The Tonight Show" monologue rehearsal. As a huge fan, it was amazing being in the historic Studio 6B in Rockefeller Center and seeing the studio and the host that I watched nearly every day in person.

Selfies are now serving a purpose, though not without controversy . As a way to spread awareness for cancer research, the newest trend is to post a r:a. , . ~ r ., ... J 路 selfie without makeup. Originating in the United Kingdom, this trend has become popular in the U.S. The promotion, although created with good intentions, is creating . a controversy. The idea is simple: you bravely snap a photo of yourself all natural and post it online. Users will tag their friends and challenge them to do the same, stimulating a chain reaction. The goal is to get as many people as possible involved to raise awareness for

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Allie Reynolds, Ma.st Media's News @Nine Producer, poses next to a promotional sign for The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. The junior and other Ma.st Media staff attended a Fallon monologue rehearsal while in New York City for a journalism conference in March.

Based on the audience's reactions to jokes, Fallon decided which ones to use for the actual show that night. It was an incredible experience, and I'm so glad that it worked out for us. It's definitely something 111 never forget. At the College Media Conference we learned new tips for the journalism world outside Pacific Lutheran University and also tips on reporting to improve the newspaper and our website itself. While I learned a lot at the conference, I feel like I learned more about myself by exploring the surrounding city and a whole different coastline. New York City is the hub of all media, which is something I definitely want to work in after my time at

PLU. I never even considered the idea of moving to New York City and applying for jobs across the country, but after my experiences there, I definitely will be considering jobs across the country. If you visited a city, a country or even a town when you were younger and didn't like it, my advice is to give that place a second chance. We're constantly changing as people, especially in college, with new experiences under our belt every day. I'm so glad I was able to travel to New York City again in my 20s, because it was a trip that showed me I was ready to move on from the suburbs and into the city if that's what works out for me.

Controversial selfies for good cause not courageous, but effective By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist

THE MOORING MAST

cancer. Some believe this new act is both empowering to women and helping the fight against cancer. On the other hand, some argue that it is insensitive to women who have been through chemo and it is irrelevant to actually supporting cancer. 路 Kristina Egan of the The Huffington Post writes that the movement of selfies is 路empty. It lacks the actual desire to effectively help raise awareness for cancer or contribute to funds for research. However, she adds that the controversy of this movement itself has helped increase awareness. One womap., who previously had battled cancer, commented on one of these selfies stating how she relied on makeup during chemo to help her feel . beautiful during the hair loss. The irony of this trend had personally offended her. One of the major flaws of this trend seems to be that the no-makeup selfie is being considered as a courageous act. Clearly, an act like removing makeup is minimally courageous when compared to the difficulty of and courage necessary for cancer. There needs to be a more sensitive

language toward those partaking in this and a stronger sense of respect for who they are trying to help. "I think there are good intentions behind them [no-makeup selfies], but they're not relevant," senior Mary Agnes Villanueva said. "There has to be better ways to boost cancer awareness than this. But I guess any movement for the cause is better than nothing." Regardless of the issues surrounding the trend, it did prove financially beneficial to the fight against cancer. People pledged upwards of 拢2 million to be donated within 48 hours, according to the Independent.com. While women who post their bare faces for social media to see may appear to be empowering women more so than supporting the fight against cancer, at least something is being done to draw attention. What they have begun to do is open up a dialogue for people to discuss what it means to be aware. There have been donations from this trend, and that alone is reason enough to encourage it. It may not be the most holistically pleasing way to raise awareness, but it has made an impact. To make an impact is better than nothing.

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Paci.fie Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Paci.fie Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words~ typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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1THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 4, 2014

Lutes should lend a hand in landslide aftermath BY SAMANTHA LUND Columnist Sometimes in what seem like the worst moments, we get the pleasure of being reminded how wonderful other people can be. The mudslide in Darrington, Wash. has given us the chance to see how extraordinary people can be in the face of catastrophe. The minute the mudslide hit March 22 at 10:37 a.m, many Darington survivors were on scene to help their neighbors and rescue anyone and anything they could. Ever since the slide, Washington, along with the rest of the country, has been supporting the people of the slide and giving much needed help and supplies. The mudslide swallowed homes, destroyed the landscape and as of Thursday 29 people have died and 20 are still missing. The amount of support pouring in foi; the victims of the slide is incredible. If you do not have a chance to go up to Darrington and see it, watch any news program or read any Washington paper, and they will show the humane acts taking place. Stores are giving away free supplies for people working on the rescue team, boy and girl scouts are collecting food to donate, high schools and churches are lending their space to foster people who lost their homes and people are stopping their daily routines to give their time and volunteer on the site. Our support for the victims should be pouring in with the rest of Washington's. Pacific Lutheran University is known for giving back to the community and helping however we can. We help the environment, we participate in community outreach projects and we help each other each time we hold a door open for an abnormally long period of time just to be polite to the next person. We are a community of givers. Deciding to give back is the hardest part for most people but probably the easiest for Lutes. The hard part for us is deciding how to give back. There are already more than enough people in the slide area giving hands-on help. The city reports that it needs more money to continue the efforts and maintain spirits. · Of course, you do not want to throw your money at

something without knowing it will directly help. However, there are charities that ensure your money will go toward the effort. The United Way of Snohomish County has already pledged $75,000 to the cause, and any more donations they receive will go directly to mudslide efforts. If talking to someone on the phone is too ' 90s for you, you can donate to the Red Cross, which is helping with mudslide efforts, by texting "Redcross" to 90999. When you text that number, you will automatically donate $10. If you text your donation, it will come out in your phone bill rather than your bank account. "I think givmg donations is important," sophomore Sevryn Modahl said. "But along with giving donations, we should show our support by posting about it [on social media] ." Modahl' s hometown is Darrington' s close neighbor, Arlington, a community that has been affected by the slide. It's no secret most college students have empty bank accounts. If not, the money we do have gets spent on junk food and new apps for our phones. If you do not have money to donate, and do not want to drive a couple hours to Darrington to donate food, you can join the support system online u sing the social media tools in your pocket. Share pictures, tweet your support and educate your" Facebook friends around the world on what is happening here in your home. That support can not only move people to help, but it also shows the affected community your support and helps it to push on through this disaster. Let's support and send our neighbors the love they need now more than ever.

To show your support via social media, use the hashtags #osostrong and

#530slide. Give it an extra Lute touch and add

#lutesforoso.

LETTER FROM THE COPY EDITOR: I've got 99 problems, but handouts ain't one By BLAKE JEROME

Copy Editor

Military veterans are one of the most important diversity groups in the country today - this was the message Pacific Lutheran University received March 20. Safe Streets and Pierce County VetCorps partnered with PLU to host a veterans' issues meeting in the Anderson University Center to address some of the problems military veterans and their families face l!l Pierce County. It opened with the reading of Anthony M. Hassan's "I'm Coming Home," a poem that raises the question, "What is society doing to help its troops transition to civilian life after their military service is complete?" The .. overwhelming consensus: Pierce Coup.ty needs to be a lot more veteran friendly. Joanne Haffly, a United Service Organizations volunteer, said, 'The rest

of the country forgets about our men and women in uniform. They go off to war while everyone else bad< here [United States] carries out their daily lives. I believe it is our responsibility to give them a leg up when they return." While I agree that veterans should receive every benefit the military promised them in their enlistment contracts, I don't agree with the notion that it is society's responsibility ·to give our veterans a leg up. Before I continue, I should mention that I served five -years in the Army Military Police Corps - two and a half of those years in Iraq. I know what it feels like to be deployed to a place where each day holds a certain degree of ambivalence. There is no arguing the military is tough. Soldiers, marines, airmen and sailors must endure hardships that a lot of people might not be able to handle. However, they knew what they were signing up for. It is no secret that the United States was in a conflict with Iraq and is still in conflict with Afghanistan. By enlisting in any branch of the military, you accept the fact that you will likely be deployed. · · The . problem with expecting ~cial treatment when exiting the military is the fact that no one asked anyone to join in the first place. · If service members had been tom away from their

families in a draft, forced to quit their jobs and placed in a situation where they could potentially be killed, it would obviously be different. But just as a police officer or firefighter chooses to risk his or her life on a daily basis for the good of a community, so does the military service member. The military preaches to all of its members a set of values that it strives to achieve, one of which is selfless service. According to Mernam-Webster, "selfless" means: "having or showing great concern for other people and little or no concern for yourself." If service members truly live by this definition - and most soldiers I know do try - then they can't expect any form of reciprocity for services rendered to their country other than · what has already been promised to them in their enlistment contract, otherwise it would no longer be a selfless service. Veterans who earn an honorable discharge already receive the G.I. Bill, which helps pay for 36 months of schooling. They ar~ also entitled to at least one guaranteed VA home loan in their lifetime, as well as many other benefits. Non-service members are often expected to go to college or go straight into the work force and find gainful employment They too are hard workers just trying to make ends meet. A veteran

being hired over a college educated person for the sole reason that they were in the military is incredibly unfair. are However, there instances when military members should be allowed special opportunities. If a service member is badly ·injured in the line of duty - loss of limb, eyesight or some other extreme physical or mental damage - then it would be acceptable for an employer to give special consideration to them when hiring, since the same care is given to civilians when they are injured on the job. If I learned anything at the veteran issues' meeting, it's that the debate is ongoing. There are those who don't want handouts, because they feel they worked too hard in the military to be given special treatment when they get out There are also those who think that because they performed a service that . others weren't willing to do, they should be given opportunities that others aren't entitled to. We can decide to give handouts to veterans or treat them as equals and require them to put in the same work as everyone else. Regardless of where people stand, however, the military has a huge presence in Pierce County. As responsible citizens we can't continue to ignore the issue, because it isn't going away anytime soon.

OPINION 11

PLU events can take us beyond education By SHANNON MCCLAIN Columnist

The ongoing Food Symposium at Pacific Lutheran University, which began Wednesday and runs through this Saturday, offers more than just an education on food democracy. The philosophy department, Center for Community Engagement and Service and Trinity Lutheran Church organized the symposium. The topic is food ·democracy, and it will address local and global ways to solve the problem of hunger and the lack of access to food in some parts of the world. It began with a keynote address by Professor Thomas Pogge, the director of the Global Justice Program and a Leitner Professor of Philosophy and International Affairs at Yale University. A series of panel discussions with faculty members and members of the community followed the address. Students presented posters, held food demonstrations and participated in a community meal and a day of service. As I looked at the schedule for this event, I began to wonder what PLU' s reasons were for putting on events such as this one. Of course, it is a college campus, and events like these could be purely for educational purposes. In some ways, they are intended to educate and inform on a particular issue in our world. Then my gaze drifts to the day of volunteer service. This is a different kind of education than keynote addresses and panel discussions. This volunteer work is education through experiencing the reality of the issue. I used to volunteer at a shelter for women who had experienced abuse, both physical and emotional, at the hands of their husbands, boyfriends or other intimate partners. No matter what facts and information I gathered about domestic violence, none of it compared to the reality of watching these women try to move forward and create a new life for themselves. _Seeing the issue firsthand through volunteer work inspires awe and can evoke passion. For some, this passion may even lead to a vocation. Vocation almost becomes synonymous with passion at PLU. It is advocated as an important piece of the school's curriculum and atmosphere. It is the ending question of Mary Oliver's poem "The Summer Day:" "what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?" The significance for PLU and for us as students is that we are at the gateway of our future. We are trying to figure out what we want to do with our lives. Junior Liandra Daniels said vocation is "a path others follow that brings them to conclude who they are and want to become." It is PLU' s hope that we will do something that matters to us, that we are passionate about and that is our vocation. PLU provides us with events like the Food Symposium not only so that we will be educated on these different issues, but so that we will also discover a passi~m for something . from an event. This passion could lead us to find more than a suitable career - it could be a way for us to make a difference in the world.

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THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

APRIL 4, 2014

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HOW TO PLAY: Sudoku High Fives consists of five regular Sudoku grids sharing one set of 3-by-3 boxes. Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition. The numbers in any shared set of 3-by-3 boxes apply t o each of the individual Sudokus.

PLU dis~usses ca11cer awareness selfies The Mast as}:ced students D:ia·pollstarti:Q.8' April I what they think of Facehook's cancer awareness "makeup 15effi.ea;"

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Join the conversatitih i4. htq>:t/mastJliedia;plu.edu/ in the Opinion section. .';::

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What do you think about Facebook's "No Make up Selfies" for cancer awareness? 49% They are not the best way to spread awareness but it works.26 votes 23% Other.12 votes 19% They are offensive.10 votes

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4% They are great! They get people talkin,g about cancer awareness.2 votes

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AWARD SEASON By Hoity Copeland

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-·THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 4, 2014

SPORTS 13

SPORTS SCOREBOARD Baseball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Linfield

21

3

14-1

WonlO

PLU

16

9

8-3

Won3

Willamette

16

10

10-4

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George Fox

20

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Puget Sound

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AROUND THE LEAGUE ••• I

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Whitworth

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Pacific

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Lewis & Clark

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BASEBALL: Danny Clifford, a senior from George Fbx, sparked the Bruins' winning streak this.weekend with three doubles, a home run, six runs scored and.five runs batted in. The Bruins swept Whitworth in three games.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: April 5 at Linfield, noon

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitman

10

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7-0

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Won2

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Won5

Pacific

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LUTES' UPCOMING MATCH: .April 4 at Pacific, 4 p.m.

SOFTBALL: Sophomore Amanda. Woods, also from George Fbx, led the Bruins with a double, three home runs, eight runs scored and 12 runs batted in • over the past week. TRACK & FIEW; Puget Sound's Alicia Bums he]ped her 4x400 meter relay squad run a sub-4:00 relay for first time in ove.r 17 yean1. The relay's time of8:59.17 set a Peyton Scoring I Meet record and is the 8eC<lnd fastest NWC time this season.

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Saturday at ~orge Fox, noon

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TRACK & FIEW: Paciftc Lutheran University senior Kyle Peart's hammer throw of 186-11 at the ~t Sound Peyton Scoring Meet this past weekend ranks sec(;md in NCAA Division ill. He also ranks fifth in the nation in the shot put.

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LUTES' UPCOMING MATCH: Saturday us. Willamette, 3:30 p.m.

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Lutes rowing settles for fourth and fifth place at Daffodil Sprints By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications Weather concerns forced the cancellation of the se<;ond slate of races, but the Pacific Lutheran women's rowing team had a chance to compete in a pair of races at the Daffodil Sprints Saturday morning at American Lake. The Lutes' first race was the women's Varsity 8, with PLU placing fourth overall. Puget Sound won the race with a time of 8:44.9, followed by Lewis & Clark (8:56.8) and University of Oregon (8:57.8). The Lutes finished with a time of 9:02.7 to beat out Washington State (9:37). PLU closed out the day with a fifth-place finish in the women's Varsity 4 race. The Lutes completed the race with a time of 9:10.3, behind race-winner Western Washington (8:37.3), University of Portland 'A' (8:43), Willamette (8:57) and Portland State (9:04.3) and ahead of University of Portland 'B' (9:22.1) and Washington State. The Lutes head to Vancouver this weekend for the NCRC Invitational set for 8 a.m . Saturday.at Vancouver Lake.

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PHOTO BY 1ESSE MAJOR

The women's rowing team has been recognized as Pacific Lutheran University's latest varsity sport. The Lutes are coached by Thomas Schlenker, who was a former crew member at the University of Washington.

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LUTES BASEBALL TEAM MANAGES ONLY 10 COMBINED RUNS AGAINST THE HATED LOGGERS OVER THREE GAMES Will the Kentucky Wildcats or the Wisconsin Badgers prove to be victorious this weekend in a highly anticipated Final Four matchup? By SAM HORN Sports Editor This is the week of sharing, because after all, sharing is caring. Two weekends ago, the Lutes squared off against their hated nemesis, University of Puget Sound. In three games, the Lutes scored a combined 10 runs, going 1-2 over the weekend. With that said, I asked the Mast Sports Pick 'Em contestants how many combined runs the Lutes would score against the Loggers. Three of them, Cale Powers, Alan Bell and Drew Oord said 14, so I gave them all the win. I decided it would be in my best interest to be kind instead of give no one the win.

That's just coldhearted. Moving forward, the Final Four is upon us and many people nationwide. could not have dreamed that Kentucky, Florida, Connecticut and Wisconsin would be remaining. Well, with the exception of Florida, because they're the top overall seed. One of the Final Four games, the matchup between Kentucky and Wisconsin is particularly intriguing because both teams are seemingly equal on paper. Both teams' tempos are relatively slow-paced and they don't rush their shots. They take their time. Kentucky and Wisconsin pride themselves in rebounding, as both teams averaged 33 or more rebounds a game. Kentucky has the slight edge in

rebounding, so it11 be interesting to see what the overarching theme will be that determines the winner in this contest. All the craziness of March Madness ends in the next couple of days. As sad as that is, it will be exciting to see who the winner is after the past few weeks of neverending surprises. If Wisconsin prevails over the hungry Kentucky Wildcats, Powers will be the sole owner of first place. Nearly every contestant, except for Kyle Peart, picked Wisconsin. If Kentucky wins, that could alter the Mast Sports Pick 'Em standings a tad. The Kentucky Wildcats and Wiscon5in Badgers will kick off their game at 5:49 p.m. this Saturday. CBS will air the game.

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Powers (2-2) Prediction: Wisconsin Alan Bell (l-3) Prediction: Wisconsin Drew Oord (l-3) Prediction: Wisconsin ..C--

1"fle Peart (1-3) Prediction: Kentucky Michelle Hogan (0-3) Prediction: Wisconsin


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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

APRIL 4, 2014

Softball team splits the weekend against powerhouse Linfield By NICK BARENE

PACIJ'lC LUTHERAN UNIVER SITY

7

5

LUTES RALLY PAST LINFIELD FOR LONE VICTORY OF WEEKEND --~

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In a pair of games against fifth-ranked Linfield this past weekend, the Pacific Lutheran University softball team managed a 7-5 win in the first game and a 5-2 loss in the second. In the first game, the Lutes trailed 2-1 until the fourth inning when they exploded with a fiverun rally. With two outs and the bases loaded, first-year Einily McConnell slapped a single that brought in the tying run. Senior Spencer Sherwin then smacked a double to right centerfield that scored three runs. . The next batter, fellow senior Lindsey · Matsunaga, reached base on ·a fielder's choice and Sherwin was able to score. Both McConnell and Sherwin were able to handle being up to bat with two outs and the bases loaded. Neither batter let the

moment get too big for them, and they came through with clutch at-bats for the Lutes. "I fully immerse myself in the task at h and, because that's really all I have control over in that moment," Sherwin said. Linfield scored two runs in the sixth inning to draw within two. In the bottom half of the sixth inning, senior Katie Lowery earned an RBI on a fielder's choice to bring the Lute's run total to seven. The visiting Wildcats scored a run in the seventh inning, but pitcher Kelsey Robinson, a junior, recorded the save for the Lutes. Starter Leah Butters, a junior, earned her fourth win of the season while giving up three earned runs on eight hits with one strikeout and two walks.

Sports Writer

GAMES STATISTICS Combined hits: 36

PACIJ'lC LUTHERAN UWIY.ERSITY

LUTES STRUGGLE TO SCORE RUNNERS EN ROUTE TO A LOSS TO THE WILDCATS

Combined home runs: 5 Combined errors: 10 Combined walks: 14 Combined pop flies: 81 Combined number of strikes: 303 Total strikeouts: IB

Combined number ofruns: 19 Total attendance: 347 Statistic& fowid at littp:/~toM)lorl:s/

5

2

The second game began with both teams hitting home runs in the first inning, with senior Spencer Sherwin going yard for the Lutes. Linfield also scored a run on a bases loaded walk in the second inning, and the score remained 2-1 until the bottom of the fifth inning. Robinson earned an RBI on a groundout to tie the game. But in the seventh inning, the Wildcats put up three runs and recorded the final outs to win the game. Robinson, who started the game on the mound after earning the save in the previous game, took the loss. She pitched 6.1 innings and gave up four earned runs on 11 hits with two strikeouts and five walks. She also had a solid pair of games at the plate, going 4-7 with an RBI. The Lutes struggled to find

their groove offensively in the game, stranding 10 runners on base over the course of the contest. Despite losing the second game, the team felt good about the way they played. "Linfield has consistently been our toughest competition the four years our seniors h ave been here, so beating them definitely confirmed that our team has a lot of talent," Sherwin said. "This year has been all about figuring out who we are as a team, and these past couple of weeks. I think we have made some great strides." PLU moves to 8-18 overall and 5-9 in Northwest Conference play. Linfield is now 22-6 overall and 16-2 in NWC play. The Lutes will take on George Fox April 4-6.

Baseb all avoids t h ree- gam e sweep again st crosstown rivals By GIANCARLO SANTORO Guest Writer

2

0 PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

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6

13

PACJ.FIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

LUTES LOSE IN EPIC PITCHERS' DUEL Four hours, 442 pitches and 15 innings later, the Pacific Lutheran University men's baseball team fell at home to crosstown rival University of Puget Sound, 2-0. In what can only be described as a pitchers' duel, it took until the top of the 15th inning for UPS to score the all-important two runs to claim its first win of the three-game series. With the win, UPS improved to 6-9 overall and 5-3 in North~est Conference, while PLU dropped to 12-6 overall and 7-2 in NWC. "Playing UPS is always an important weekend for us," junior AJ Konopaski said . "Not only are they conference games, but they are our crosstown rival, and we always want to have the best team in Tacoma."

LOGGERS THRASH LUTES

The game turned out to be an endurance test for both sides, with pitchers Konopaski and junior Trevor Lubking pitching 4.2 and 8.1 shutout innings respectively. Despite the good showing by the Lute pitchers, Logger pitchers Jarrod Beiser and Troy Kakugawa came aw ay with the win. Offensively, sophomores Tyler Thompson and Drew Oord and junior Colin Nilson came the closest to putting the Lutes on the board, but couldn't make the breakthrough. "This weekend, we didn't have very much offensive production," Lubking said. "We lacked the big hit or hits on Saturday in the marathon of a game and UPS had the one clutch inning and came out on top."

5

It turned out to be one of those days for the Lutes, with officials postponing the second game of the day due to darkness with .UPS leading 13-6 in the bottom of the eighth inning. Despite PLU taking a 2-0 lead into the third inning, UPS smashed four straight runs on four hits in the fourth before junior Curtis Wildung made it 4-3 in the bottom of the fourth with a solo home run. UPS extended its lead in the fifth and put the game away in the sixth by hitting four doubles and seven runs to create a lopsided 12-3 score. After going down another run in the top of the eighth, PLU tallied three runs in the bottom of the same inning to make it 13-6 until darkness made the game unplayable. · "The team lacked timely hitting in the first two games," senior Alec Beal said. "We left a lot of runners on base and couldn't drive them in. That first game also seemed to give UPS all the·momentum heading into the second game."

4

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

LUTES ABLE TO AVOID THREE STRAIGHT LOSSES WITH A NAILBITING VICTORY

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Determined to avoid a sweep, PLU took the third game of the rivalry series 5-4 Sunday. "Coach Loomis told us to 'flush' Saturday after the game had been postponed," junior Trevor Lubking said . "He said that they may have won today, but the sun comes u p and tomorrow is a new day. And that's the mentality we all had going into Sunday, and we pulled out a victory." With the win, PLU sits near the top of the NWC with a 13-7 overall record and 8-3 in conference. Despite the two wins, UPS still sits behind PLU in the standings after dropping to 7-10 overall and 5-4 in NWC. · "Losing the first two games was tough, but we definitely wanted to avoid a sweep," Konopaski said. "Winning the third game not only prevented us from getting swept by our rivals, but it kept our NWC title hopes intact."

Junior Chris Bishop pitched for the Lutes through eight innings and didn't give up a run until the sixth. Konopaski took over in the ninth and threw a perfect inning to come away with the win. Beal, Nilson, Oord and first-years Ben Welch and Jacob Clements all batted in run s for the Lutes. "Our team has a lot of promise going forward, and we are still in control of our own destiny," Konopaski said. "We just need to continue to improve from an offensive perspective, and we will win a lot of games." Splitting their four-game road trip in California, the Lutes will take on Linfield Saturday. Game time is set for noon and will take place in McMinnville, Ore.


.c-

THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 4, 2014

SAM SAYS... By SAM HORN Sports Editor It hasn't even been two years, but the scent of a national champion is in the air at Pacific Lutheran University. In 2012, the PLU softball team won the national title and didn't seem to struggle during its impressive run. In celebration of the momentous occasion, former governor Ouistine Gregoire named May 25 "Pacific Lutheran University softball day." This year, the other PLU team armed with bats seems ready to win it all this year. Yes, I'm referring to the baseball team. In years past, the baseball team has settled for mediocrity. The baseball team hasn't been crowned Northwest Conference champions since 2009. That drought could end in 2014, because this year is different. Thi!; year, the baseball team is armed with some heavy artillery accompanied by a stingy defense and an unrelenting pitching staff. This year is destined for greatness. The baseball team came alive this March after settling for a 5-4 record in February. On March l, the baseball team squared off against Willamette in a doubleheader, winning the two games by a combined score of 12-1. That was only the beginning. The baseball team went on to win four

consecutive games, limiting its opponents to less than three runs in three of the games during the victorious span. This was due, in part, to the team's stellar defense. . Through 24 games, the PLU defense as a collective whole has compiled a .968 fielding percentage. Opposing batters haven't had the luxury of getting on base via an error on a consistent basis. This PLU defense is the real deal. While the fielders have been nothing short of extraordinary, the PLU pitching staff has been fanning batters regularly. The pitching staff as a whole has collected 215 strikeouts. Compare that with 173 punchouts from the team's opponents. On top of that, junior Chris Bishop pitched a no-hitter against Willamette and fellow junior AJ Konopaski is the team leader in saves with 10. The team's strikeout leader is none other than junior Trevor Lubking. For me, the 'Big Three' comes to mind when describing these three dominant pitchers. The baseball team is enjoying a twogame winning streak in which it outscored Claremont 22-4 in two games combined. Boasting a 15-9 record, the PLU baseball team could be the recipients of national glory in the coming months. It shouldn't be too long before Washington Governor Jay Inslee declares May 25 as "Pacific Lutheran University Baseball Day."

SPORTS15

Baseball team looking like .future national champions

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PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

LEFT: First-year Ben Welch blasts a line drive between the gap against University of Puget Sound March 23. TOP RIGHT: Junior AJ Konopaski is t he team's leader in saves with 10 on the season. BOTTOM RIGHT: Junior Trevor Luhking has pitched well this spring, as. he has compiled a 1.61 ERA over eight games.

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SPRING BREAK FOR WOMEN'S TENNIS TEAM GOES ACCORDING TO PLAN

PLU loses twice against California but regains composure to capture two victories to split the weekend By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University women's tennis team spent its spring break winning two and losing two in four nonconference matchups against California schools Caltech, Whittier, California Lutheran and Occidental. PLU started the trip slowly after losing the opening two games by scores of 9-0 against Caltech and 8-1 against Whittier. The Lute women rebounded, however, to earn a hard fought 5-4 victory over sister school Cal Lutheran and closed the trip out with a commanding 7-2 win over Occidental. With the wins, PLU improved to 8-4 overall and 4-2 in Northwest Conference play. "I think that California is always a learning experience for our team," junior

Allison McClure said. "We play a few conference," sophomore Samantha Lund schools that are tough and push us to the said. "We aren't used to playing on these limits, as well as pulling on our depth to outside courts, and we had a bit of catching battle it out and win against schools that up to do." are very close to us." The Lutes seemed to adapt better to the The Lutes endured a rough outing in outdoor surface in the following games and their opener against Caltech, which started 路 claimed their first win of the trip against out strong by winnii-tg three straight Cal Lutheran to snap a four-loss streak. doubles rounds. Senior Leah Newell and Lund opened First-years Megan Beyers and Emily up the scoring for PLU in the doubles Bower came the closest to victory but round with an 8-4 win to pave the way for ended up losing 8-4. an 8-6 win by McClure and junior Mariah Caltech swept the remaining six singles Siemion. Bower and Beyers finished the matches to post the shutout. doubles round with an 8-2 wiri of their Riding a three-game losing streak, the own. Lutes would fall in the next match against "I think that [the win] shows how we are Whittier, but did get on the scoresheet. learning and growing even within the few Whittier dominated the doubles days that we are here in California," Lund competition and claimed five out of six said. "We're using these matches to learn games in the singles. Bower had the lone and get better and take some new tricks win for PLU in a super tiebreaker. . and skill back to Washington to be even "Our first two matches were tough, better competitors within our conference. " and they were against top seeds in their The women finished off the trip with a

solid 7-2 win over Occidental. As in the day before, Newell and Lund, McClure and Siemion, and Beyers and Bower swept the doubles round with 8-3, 8-0 and 8-4 wins respectively. In the singles, Newell won 6-1 and 6-0 to get off the mark and was followed by wins from McClure, Siemion and Bower. McClure won by identical 6-1 scores in two sets, while Siemion won 6-2, 6-0. Bower finished the match against the Tigers winning 6-2, 6-0. Occidental won the first and third singles rounds to avoid the shutout. "The main takeaways from this trip are centered around improvement," McClure said. "Especially coming back with another half of our season left, this trip is a catalyst to keep improving and hopefully not peak too early like we .did last season." The Lutes return to NWC action at home against Pacific this afternoon at 3:30 p.m.

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PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

LEFT: Senior Leah Newell returns a serve to her opponent. On the season, Newell is 2-9 in singles. RIGHT: Junior Mariah Siemion, a transfer from the University of Washington. returns an opponent's serve. Siemion has only lost three singles matches this season accompanied by eight wins. The women's team now stands at 8-4 on the season.


THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

APRIL 4, 2014

Going beyond the field Power ball wasn't always in Nilson's repertoire "When I came to college I weighed about 170, and now I weigh about 200. So hitting the weight room was really what did it," Nilson said. When junior Collin Nilson hits the ball, The added muscle was just what Nilson he hits it hard. Really hard. needed to transform him into t!1e real power The pitcher and outfielder is the Pacific threat that he is today. Lutheran University baseball team's leader One of his bombs traveled well past 400 in home runs this season and has been feet. known to crush balls out to more than 400 "I hit one the other day that was 375 feet. feet to the wall, and I heard it went about This season, the Lutes are 15-9 overall another 80 feet," Nilson said. and 8-3 in the Northwest Conference, aided To put the right-hander's power into heavily by Nilson. perspective, center field at Seattle's Safeco He has already crushed three home runs, Field is 401 feet. · batted in 13 runs, hit seven doubles and has Nilson has also pitched 10 innings for racked up 35 total bases. He also boasts the the Lutes this year with a 1-1 record and second-most at bats on the team with 76, a · recorded eight strikeouts . .250 batting average and a whopping .461 Nilson is a player who is willing to do slugging percentage. whatever it takes to help his team, whether At 6 feet 3 inches and weighing 200 it's taking the mound or taking an opposing pounds, Nilson is an imposing figure. With pitcher yard. the effortless nature of his swing, one would But Collin isn't worrying as much about think Nilson has been hitting <lingers since blasting the ball as he is about winning. The he was old enough to take the field. team is in second place in the NWC and is .But it hasn't always been so easy. battling Linfield - last year's NCAA Div. "I actually had never hit a home run until ill National Champion - for the top spot in I came to college," Nilson said. "I always hit the conference. the ball hard, but never hit any homeruns." "We feel good," Nilson said. "It was It wasn't until last season he hit his first good to get some runs this weekend. I feel round-tripper and led the team with three like I'm swinging the bat well, and we feel homeruns. The difference, Nilson said, good about where we are as a team." hasn't come through improving his swing.

By NICK BARENE Sports Writer

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. PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Junior Collin Nilson has been a dominant force offensively for the Lutes this season. Not only does he lead the team in home runs and runs batted in, but he also pitches. Nilson is 1-1 on the mound with a 5.40 ERA and eight strikeouts.

Age isn't a limit for one tennis player By MARIANNE FLAKK Guest Writer

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PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

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First-year Sam Stadter has played beyond expectations this year: Coming in, Stadter wasn't even sure jf he wanted to play tennis, but he doesn't regret making the choice to committ to the sport he succeeds in.

The tennis season for the Lutes has already started, and for one of the players, the season is off to a very good start. Sam Stadter First-year has already obtained the No. 2 singles spot on the Pacific Lutheran University tennis varsity team. "I love how the game is played and the matches last a long time," Stadter said of his choice to pursue tennis collegiately. Stadter has not declared a major yet, and for him, playing tennis at PLU was not a major priority. "Tennis wasn't my main focus, but it was a bonus,"

Stadter said. "The coach was really adamant that I go here, and everyone is really nice." Young athletes often have favorite professional athletes that inspire them to become better players in their sport and to work harder. Stadter is no exception. "John Isner is my favorite because he is a really humble person, and he is a very hard worker," Stadter said. John Isner is an American tennis player who made it to the quarterfinals in the summer Olympics in London 2012 - one of the greatest accomplishments in his career so far. Another man who has influenced Stadter is his father. "My dad is my role model for sure," Stadter said. "He has

taught me to be myself and to never give up." Even though tennis players are on the field alone most of the time, they are· still a part of a bigger team and spend a lot of time together at practice and on the road. "The traveling is really furi and the people on the team are some of my best friends," · Stadter said. Since he has already reached the No. 2 spot as a first-year, Stadter could reach even greater heights in the years to come. Stadter isn't letting the notoriety get to his head though. 'Tm just having a good time, and it's a really relaxed environment," he said.

THE MADNESS OF THE FINAL FOUR By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

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It isn't called March Madness for no reason, and this year's NCAA division I college basketball tournament has not disappointed. When billionaire investor Warren Buffett offered $1 billion to anyone who could fill out a perfect tournament bracket, it seemed the entire country jumped on board. However, Buffett isn't stupid - no one has ever officially completed a perfect bracket. In fact, a math professor from DePaul University concluded the odds of filling out a perfect bracket were 1 in 9.2 quintillion. This is because there are always upsets - lower ranked teams beating higher ranked teams - and they are always very unpredictable. In the first round alone there were eight upsets, perhaps the biggest when

the lowly, 11th-ranked Dayton Flyers conquered the sixth-ranked Ohio State Buckeyes - an upset that prevented 80 percent of the Americans who had filled out a bracket from winning the prize money. By the end of the first weekend and 48 games later, everyone in America had at least one blemish on their brackets. According to · Slate.com, every American could . fill out a random tournament bracket for the next 290 million years, and there would still be a 99 percent chance that no one would win Buffett' s contest. In a perfect world, the four number one-seeded teams from each region would win out and advance to the Final Four. However, this is not a perfect world. Florida is the only one seed to advance to the Final Four. The other three teams are the second-seeded University of Wisconsin Badgers, the seventh-seeded

University of Connecticut Huskies and the eighth-seeded University of Kentucky Wildcats. The Wildcats have their work cut out for them. A number eight seed has only won the tournament once - Villanova in 1985 - and Florida and Wisconsin look nearly unstoppable. Don't give up hope just yet Kentucky and Connecticut fans. If fans have learned anything from watching college basketball, it's that anything can happen. Last year in the Elite Eight round of the tournament, Kevin Ware landed awkwardly after attempting to block a shot and broke his right leg on the court. Both games will be played Saturday afternoon. The Gators will face the Huskies at · 3:09 p.m., while the Badgers will take on the Wildcats at 5:49 p.m. . Regardless of who wins the competition, it's sure to be full of intense thrillers and buzzer beating finishes.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The teams involved in the 2014 Final Four are the Kentuck-y Wildcats, Wisconsin Badgers, Connecticut Huskies and the top overall seed, the Florida Gators. Given all the insanity that has occured so far in the tournament, anything can happen.


SPORTS Student gives Brazil something to bark about

AdE "Hebrew Idol" rocks the Bible

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

OORING

APRIL 11, 2014

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 17

mastmedia.plu.edu

Students participate in detention center protest

AST

Men's Project challenges masculinity stereotype

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Tony Porter, a co-founder of"Good Men," points to random audience members of the "A Call to Men" townhall conference April 4 and asks how they want men to act in the world their daughters grow up in. Porter challenged audience members to challenge the stereotypical ideas of masculinity.

By JESSE MAJOR Photo Editor

PHOTO BY LILLIAN FERRAZ

Senior Edith Leal holds up a sign at the rally outside the Tacoma Detention Center April 5. Many PLU students participated in the protest, including members of the Students of the Left club. Protesters fought deportation and showed their solidarity with hunger striking detainees. Several detainees had gone on hunger strikes in the past month to protest U.S. immigration policy as well as conditions at the detention center.

WHAT'S INSIDE A&E

New MediaLab documentary premieres page 7

Business

The patent has powe pageB

Opinion

Anti-Rape Wear: Is it victim-blaming. page 11

Sports

Softball drops in Oregon pagel3

"Real men" are strong, straight and emotionless, much like the manly men in action movies. If a man isn't any of these, he's called a woman, which happens to be the worst insult to manhood. PLU's Men's Project partnered with Tony Porter, a co-founder of "Good Men," to challenge this stereotypical idea of masculinity. Porter has also given a TED Talk about healthy masculinity. "Envision a world you want to see your little girl in," Porter told the audience at the "A Call to Men" town-hall conference at Lincoln High School April 4.

"When she comes to age, as men, how do you want to see men acting and behaving in that world?" No one suggested the strong and emotionless man in the movies. Most audience members said men should be respectful. "Respect is what comes up. It's the area men are coming up short," Porter said. Porter also said men are trapped in the 'Man Box.' The Man Box is a metaphor he uses to describe the social constraints placed on men. Men are taught from a very young age to never appear weak or "like a girl."

MASCULINITY CONTINUED ON PAGE 4

The cold doesn't bother Harstad lecture anyway By JANAE REINHARDT Guest Writer The Bjug A. Harstad Memorial Lecture commemorated those who foraged the Arctic to expose its actual beauty and kindled a heartfelt dialogue about Nordic nature. Students, alumni and community members gathered together to learn about Nordic polar literature April 4 in the Scandinavian Cultural Center. Henning Howlid Waerp (seen left), a professor of Nordic Literature at The University of Troms0, gave a powerpoint presentation covering the various opinions of Arctic pastoral literature spanning from the end of the 19th to the beginning of the 20th century. Literature depicting the Arctic region is presented in two ways: inhospitable and menacing or, as Waerp suggested, bright, healthy,

and pastoral or idyll. "The terms pastoral and idyll are interchangeable," Waerp said. He said the term idyll does not derive from the term idyllic, but refers to peaceful scenery. Waerp credited various Nordic nature writers for shedding a true light onto the ethereal beauty and health advantages inherent to the cold and uninhabited Arctic region. Some of these included female trapper Wanny Wolste, Norwegian explorer Fridtjof Nansen and even Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates. "I thought it was pretty interesting," senior Lauren Letsinger said. "He definitely had a lot of diversity in what he was talking about in terms of authors and I definitely didn't think of [the Arctic] being inhabited or even explored that much other than the major explorations that are present in popular culture." Toward the end of his

presentation, Waerp spoke about what sparked his own interest in Arctic literature. He said he regarded the progressive southern movement of the Arctic border and Nansen's books as motivation to study this unique aspect of Nordic literature. "Pastoral celebrates a bountiful present," Waerp said in reference to sustainability expert Greg Garrard. The idea of a region that is perceived in two contrasting ways peaked the interest of many attendants. Some of the attendants used their floor time to speak about their own experiences in the Arctic One audience member agreed with Waerp on the freshness and allure specific to the Arctic and never once considered the land to be inhospitable or dark. She recounted how clean and inviting the Arctic land was upon her first visit and how it continued to "wow" her upon each visit back.


THE MOORING MAST

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 11, 2014

NEWS3

Final Vice President candidates reviewed By RELAND TUOMI News Editor The final two candidates for Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students came to a question-and-answer forum this past week to speak with the campus community. Pacific Lutheran University has been on the hunt for a new vice president since the current VP, Laura Majovski, announced her retirement in ·the fall . The committee to find a new vice president has narrowed its choices to three candidates: Leah Barrett spoke April 1, Joanna RoyceDavis spoke April 3 and Keith Champagne spoke this last Tuesday. Joanna Royce-Davis Joanna Royce-Davis graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor's in special education and is the Dean of Students for University of the Pacific in California. When asked what opportunities for innovation there were at PLU and how she qualifies for the job, Royce-Davis said, "Rather [than] what, go why. Why innovate?" Royce-Davis went on to say that PLU is nimble at finding ways to communicate with students and internally with faculty. The next step, she said, is for all of us to share data about PLU with the student population. 'Tm good with large data sets," RoyceDavis said. "They can be used to understand proxy and to understand and anticipate student problems." Royce-Davis also said that Student Life should begin to anticipate the needs of new and expanding student populations, and she sees herself as an initiator in this way. After answering the initial question the committee had given Royce-Davis, organizers opened the floor for questions. . A professor of natural science asked how Royce-Davis would address the student body's every-changing needs. Royce-Davis described her ability to recognize and anticipate patterns in the student body, and she also stressed the importance of individual check-ins with community members. Next, the Associate Directoroflnternational Students asked what Royce-Davis' experience was with international students and what challenges and opportunities there were with these students Royce-Davis said she shared concerns for international students' experiences. "We need to take international students into account for orientation and housing experiences," Royce-Davis said. "We need to ensure there is immersion for international students." Royce-Davis also said · that making international students feel comfortable is a priority, which can be done by implementing simple things on campus, like having recognizable foods in the dining hall. A student then asked how Royce-Davis planned to implement student voices in administrative meetings and how the students would know they had been heard. Royce-Davis described going to places where food was served or talking to students walking down the sidewalk, saying students are more likely to express their feelings and thoughts in a casual place. "I want to create a space of familiarity and less formal," Royce-Davis said. One of the counselors from the Counseling Center asked how_ Royce-Davis communicates, and then a professor followed that question by asking how Royce-Davis would describe her leadership style. "I want to go on retreats that are dedicated to creating dialogue," Royce-Davis said. 'Tm also not going to ask people to come to my office. I would rather go to theirs." Royce-Davis went on to describe her leadership style. "I lead by example," she said. "I am

conscious of the position and title I would hold, but I wouldn't micromanage and would have a very open-door policy." She also said that she is open to criticism and would use it as constructive learning. Two students asked Royce-Davis the final questions: how she would help students with career services and how she would come into contact with students. "I want to help students achieve what they want to achieve," Royce-Davis said. "I will go to places where the students are to learn more about them." · Keith Champagne Keith Champagne is the Associate Dean of Student Development at Central Washington University and has a bachelor's in public relations from Loyola University in New Orleans. As with the the other candidates; the commitee to find a new VP asked Champagne what opp~rtunities there were for innovation at PLU and how he qualified for the job. "There are three opportunities for innovation," Champagne said. "A leadership review process, boundary-less meeting and research and analysis." He also said the leadership process would include a weekly state of the union meeting while boundary-less meetings would break down barriers between departments to meet and come up with creative ideas. "It will help talented people to come together and solve problems," Champagne said. After Champagne's description, the audience asked questions. A communication professor, Art Land, asked how Champagne would encourage student participation in student media. "We have to tell students that this is their media," Champagne said. "They should use it." An admiriistrative staff member then asked why Qi.ampagne wanted to move from a large school like CWU to PLU. Champagne described how his doctorate in diversity in leadership in collegiate athletics could benefit PLU. He wants to see sports integrated into academics, a major aspect of PLU. · He went on to say he liked that PLU was a religious school, and he· wanted to see · people's religious calling. A psychology counselor asked what Champagne's leadership style was. He said he didTI't believe in micromanagement and that working together to review everything was the way to go. "I allow people to do what they need to do," Champagne said. "We have to work collaboratively." A student followed up by asking how Champagne would gauge student voice around campus. "I'm very receptive to student voice and student needs," Champagne said. "Students want to know I'm real. I want students to know I'm open and available for any avenue." An Office of Admission staff member asked how Champagne would reach students who are not in leadership positions. Champagne described a similar experience at CWU, where students hadn't taken on traditional leadership roles. He said these students were interested in hip-hop, which was not offered on campus. As a result, Champagne suggested they organize a hiphop summit at CWU. "We need to find something they're committed to and then link them to student leadership," Champagne said. He ended the forum by thanking everyone for coming and allowing him to be part of the process. According to Sheri Tonn, a co-committee chair, the committee will make a decision for VP in the next few week, and President Krise will announce the selection.

o-n

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Joanna Royce-Davis is the second cadidate for Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students along with Leah Barrett and Keith Champagne. Royce-Davis is the Dean of Students for the University of the Pacific in California and a graduate from Indiana University with a bachelor's in special education.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Keith Champagne, the third candidate for VP, came to PLU Tuesday. He is the Associate Dean of Student Development at Central Washington University and has a bachelor's in Public Relations from Loyola University in New Orleans. The decision for new VP will be announced in the conling weeks.

p

ws


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

MASCULINITY FROM PAGE 1

What to do atPLU Friday-4/11 National Public Health Week. AUC, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Psychology Colloquium Series: "Lay Beliefs and the Experience of Well-Being." Xavier 201, 1:45-3 p.m. 2014 Beta Gamma Stigma Induction. Morken, 6:30-8 p.m. "Dance 2014." Karen Phillips Center, 7:30-9 p.m.

Hille

Wii Tournament. South Hall main lounge, 9-10:30 p.m.

Saturday-4/12 Double header baseball g~e vs. George Fox. Baseball Diamond, noon-5 p.m. "Dance 2014." Karen Phillips Center, 7:30-9 p.m.

APRIL 11, 2014

Hille

Sunday-4/13 Baseball game vs. George Fox. Baseball Diamond, noon-2 p.m. Double header softball game vs. UPS. Softball Diamond, noon-4

p.m. "Commons on Fire." AUC Commons, 8-10 p.m.

Monday-4/14 Blood Drive. Red Square, 9 a.m.5 p.m.

Coaches will tell athletes to not throw like a girl. "Why doesn't the boy ask what he [the coach] is saying?" Porter said. "Because he knows exactly what he means - it's [being a girl] a place of less value." However, when coaching girl's sports, coaches find other ways to encourage athletes. "Try harder," Porter said as an example. "You can do it. I believe in you." Unlike girls, around the age of five, boys are no longer allowed to cry, Porter said. "But all the women in here could just start crying," Porter said. "There's no rules on that." The underlying theme is men are strong. When a father leaves the house, he may tell his son that he's in charge or is the man of the house. An audience member admitted to telling his five-year-old this. "What time did he go to bed, about seven?" Porter asked him. "What was he actually in charge of? We know he ain't in charge of nothing." Porter asked the audience what this means about the mother. "We don't mean it. We're saying she ain't in charge," Porter said. Porter told the audience that teaching boys this idea of masculinity actually leads to a world where violence against women is allowed. "It's a minority of men, but there's a tremendous amount of violence against women," Porter said. Porter challenged the audience to reject the idea ofstereotypical masculinity when given the opportunity. "Reflect on aspects of manhood that may be harmful," Porter said. "What are the ideas and messages they project? How does it impact you?" Jonathan Grove, an organizer for. "A Call to Men" and the men's project coordinator, said he constantly talks with his son about the ideas of a healthy masculinity. Last year, Grove's son's favorite color was purple. But then his son said, "That's a girl color." When Grove said he asked his son why, he didn't have an answer. "[Men] tend to get caught up on society's exp~ctations of being a man," Grove said. "We aren't allowed to be human. We have to restrain that and it hurts. There's no way for it not to." A $10,000 grant from the Verizon Wireless Foundation funded this event and other Men's Project events.

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"Lean In: Lessons from Former Lutes." AUC 205, 4:30-6 p.m.

Tuesday-4/15 Blood Drive. Red Square, 9 a.m.5 p.m. "Inequality for All" movie screening. Hauge Admin 101, 6-8 p.m. ASPLU Senate Meeting. AUC 133, 6-8 p.m. Chemistry · Desserts Demos. Reike Lobby, 7-9 p.m.

and

Choir of the West Spring Trip Homecoming Concert. Tickets: $8 general admission/ $5 senior citizen (55+), alumni I free PLU community, students, 18 and under. Tickets available thr01,1gh PLU Concierge Desk (253 535 7411). MBR 330, 8-9:30 p.m. Students Who Are Parents Meet and Greet. Kreidler's Commuter Student Lounge, noon-1:30 p.m.

Wednesday-4/16 Career Expo. Get your free Linkedln profile picture! Ramstad Hall 205, noon-1:30 p.m. "History of Baseball in Tacoma." Morken 103, 10 a.m.-noon "Girl Rising" documentary. Ingram 100, 6-8 p.m.

Thursday-4/17 Healthy Body's "Eating Disorders and Body Image." Harstad Fourth Floor Lounge, 6-8:30 p.m. "Hebrew Idol." Karen Hille Phillips Center, 6-9 p.m.

,Crime Time:

PLU's., Carripus Safety Blotter Talrenfrom weekly Campus Saf~ty reports for th£ week ofApril 7 calijng that using the Escort Program for transport to parties was

TheftA studentwhoselaptop had been stolen from Mortvedt , library contacted Campus Safety March 31. She said she had left her laptop oq a table when she went.to the restroom, and when she came back it was gone. . .. · Campus Safety officers r~e~ed video footage and seatchedthe library with no succ:esS. The officers forwarded the report to the Sheriff's Department. · ,

a violation of policy. The students said they understood and an es!=<lrl picked them up. The students were dtoppe'cl o~ at th~ addre~s they asked for· but the .~fficers immediately spotted them walking to the house where' the partjr was taking plare. Campus Safety reported the inodent.to SRR.

General Policy Viol<1;tionAround midnight last Saturday, two students :requested A 1mgelstad ?eSident reported to. Campus Safety an escort from an off-campus house to ti\e Haven Tavern. The , officer informed the students that saying his laptop had been tabn from.his it was .ag;;t.inst escort policy to room. He said it.went missing between tian5pO!tstudents to taverns. . . Apru2-3: The students called back The resident didn't have any idea and requested a ·ride t<> the Neeb as to who could have taken it and filed a yoti' need Campus· r)l .Safety's Center, which the officer denied report with the Sheriff's Department. assi$tance, call (253) 535-7441 since the Neeb Center was closed. The students called a little Alcohol Poli.cy Violationwhile later, requesting a ride to Campus Safety officers responded to a call from library staff on Tingelstad, which was granted. The escort officers took the two reports of an intoxicated student last Friday evening. The studentleftthe library before Campus Safety students to Tingelstad, but didn't see them enter the building. officers arrived, but they located the studentwalking through The officers then drove to the Haven Tavern and witnessed the the East Hauge Parking lot and getting into his car parked.on the two students inside. The incident was reported to SRR street. Campus .Safety made contact with the student, who VandalismA student reported her father's Honda Accord had been was dearly intoxicated. The student said he had been drinking off campus and was going to sleep in his car, assuring officers he vandalized last Sunday afternoon in the South Hall parking lot. There is no suspect at this time, but the student said she would did not have his car keys. Later that evening, the student was seen on video report the incident to the Sheriff's Department. surveillance driving off. Campus Safety officers notified the Sheriff's Department of the possible DUI situation and they Drug Policy Violationreported the incident to Student's Rights and Responsibilities Campus Safety officers responded to assist the on-duty (SRR). Community Assistant in Kreidler with the investigation of a marijuana odor. The men's restroom and the area outside one of General Policy Violationthe rooms smelled of marijuana. Around 4 a.m. last Saturday, Campus Safety received Officers contacted the student in that room, who an escort request from two students who wanted to be dropped admitted to smoking marijuana off campus. He cooperated with off at on off-campus address. Campus Safety officers knew there a room search, and officers located no marijuana. The officers was a party going on in that block and informed the students forwarded the details of the incident to SRR.

Theft-

If


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 11, 2014

A&E 5

Art students bring 'The Odd and Imperfect' to 208 Garfield By UNA TINGVIK-HAAVE AdE Writer Some not-so-perfect art has brightened PLU's outpost restaurant 208 Garfield since last Friday. Seniors Rachel Teahan and Kailey McEvilly painted the art for the show, which is ending today. Titled "The Odd and Imperfect," the art show reflects the women's personalities as well as their art style. "Kailey [McEvilly] and I were sort of brainstorming different ideas," Teahan said, "and we didn't want it super serious, because that's not how we are in general." About a dozen or so pieces were spread around the venue, covering the walls of 208 in bright colors. The pieces were all prints, and primarily lithographs. Teahan' s pieces were

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influenced by the Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead, portraying festive skulls and skeletons. McEvilly's pieces w ere more abstract. "It's meant to explore emotions and feelings arid that kind of thing," McEvilly said. McEvilly said she and Teahan have a quirky style of art. "Generally it's a little bit more abstract it's less about perfection, and reaching that perfection that some artists for," strive McEvilly said. "I think there's a lot of value in PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR imperfections." Tacoma-area residents Sarah Mohr, left, and Stacey Lowrance, right, sit in front of "The Odd and Imperfect" fine art exhibit at 208 Garfield as B o t h they plan an eighth-grade graduation party. The art exhibit ran through April 11. students said were they excited to share their not-so- Exhibition that will feature some a little bit more exposure, get mainstream" and "more abstract perfect artworks with the public of Teahan and McEvilly's work the community a little involved and less apparent as to what their and especially excited to get the in the University Gallery starting and hopefully get more 路people meaning is" than a lot of the art to come to the senior show, that is out there right now. opportunity to share them in a April23. Both young and old attended two also said they liked which comes up at the end of the The venue like 208 Garfield. month," McEvilly said. the opening of the art show. that they were able to the fact "It has more of a relaxed "It's a nice thing for 208 to get display their art off-campus. Both Teahan and McEvilly said atmosphere," Teahan said, people in here," McEvilly said. "We wanted to do sort of a they believe their art is unique comparing it to the Senior solo show that would give us and original, describing it as "less

'DRUNKEN TELEGRAPH' DIALS UP COMMUNITY STORYTELLING By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in -Chief For some, the key ingredients of a good night out are drinks and interesting stories. Having new people to share both with can make the evening even better. Those are the makings of "Drunken Telegraph," a storytelling series that cofounders Tad Monroe and Megan Sukys will host the seventh installment of tonight at the Tacoma Broadway Center for the Performing Arts. Monroe, a Pacific Lutheran class of '97 alum, and Sukys, his friend and neighbor, co-founded the series in 2012 when they realized they were "both interested in connecting to our community and building community," Monroe said. 路 To do so, Sukys and Monroe wanted to bring strangers together to share stories usually reserved for closer acquaintances. "I think the joy of the show is getting a glimpse of people's lives that you never would see unless you were friends," Sukys said. The two have worked with local storytellers to curate tales revolving around a quest or chase for this show, which they titled "In Hot Pursuit." With a range of ages, styles, emotions

and personalities, Sukys said 路 the performers will explore the theme in 路a lot of different ways. "It's great hearing someone who is 22 and then someone who is 72," Sukys said. "It breaks down the boundaries of generation." Monroe said the experience of hearing someone's story can be profound. "Sometimes even a really simple story well told with a storyteller who understands what they are trying to communicate _is really powerful," he said. After the six pre-planned stories, audience members will have the floor during a portion called Story Slam. Attendees are invited to share their own impromptu anecdotes, which they must finish in five minutes. "It's hilarious watching people reach the cut-off," Sukys said. Past themes have included exploring the idea of firsts or transformations, as well as the topic of neighbors or the greatest gift

"The joy of the show is getting a glimpse of people's lives." Megan Sukys

someone's received. The pair like to choose "broad themes with multiple applications," Monroe said, because they are "universal and can be made specific."

is also no stage, which puts performers on the same level as the audience and builds a sense of community. Monroe and Sukys plan to have

Their previous event - and the first to be located at Broadway Center's Studio III - was themed around "Epic Battles," and attracted 171 attendees. "It was standing room only," Sukys said. While they have held past performances in bars and restaurants, Studio III has a cabaret feeling, Sukys said. She said there

another (@ ep i sode of "Drunken Telegraph" this summer, although they have not finalized a venue yet. They had a two-show contract with the Broadway Center.

"Drunken Telegraph: In Hot Pursuit" 7:30 p.m. April 11 Studio Ill, Broadway Center 901 Broadway, Tacoma:

co-founder, "Drunken Telegraph"

Free to the public with ticket reservation


THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

APRIL 11, 2014

Local theater brings Cervantes to the stage By NICHOLE THOMPSON Guest Writer Have you aver dreamed an impossible dream? That is the question central to "Man of La Mancha," which the Tacoma Musical Playhouse (TMP) just finished performing Sunday. This play within a play is about a man named Miguel de Cervantes who is awaiting trial by the Inquisition for foreclosing on a church. Cervantes is a failing playwright, tax collector and poet. Bis fellow inmates have him put on trial because they want to claim his belongings as their own. As part of his defense, Cervantes acts out a manuscript that he is writing. He dreams he is Don Quixote, a knight on a quest, when in reality he is a dying man who can't afford to take care of his family. His quest brings him to an inn, or as he calls it a "castle," where he encounters a troublesome group of men and the woman of his dreams. He is brought out of this fantasy when The Knight of Mirrors, a doctor sent by his family, defeats him in a battle and breaks his spirit. The TMP has both seasoned cast members and actors who have just begun performing - the wide range of expertise is full of talent new and old. Located in the historical Narrows Theatre, Jon Rake founded the TMP in 1994. It is the region's premier musical theater company. The TMP produces six main stage shows per year. "Annie," "Les Miserables" and "Shout!" have all been part of this year's repertoire. The next main stage performance will be "La Cage aux Folles."

Music chair search continues By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The Tacoma Musical Playhouse, located on SiJ...-th Avenue in Tacoma, is a professional theater that brings six shows per year to the Tacoma community. The next show is "La Cage aux Foiles," which opens May 16. Tickets are $29 for adults and $27 for students, military and seniors.

Sue Snyder, the director of marketing at the TMP said, '"La Cage' is a musical that embraces acceptance, love, family and friendship, and although the show

deals with adult issues surrounding sexuality and societal acceptance, the show is performed with great taste, charm and humor."

Tickets for "La Cage aux Foiles," which premieres May 16, are $29 for adults and $27 for students, military and seniors.

Pacific Lutheran University has a critical decision · to make. David Robbins will step down at the end of this academic year after a 33-year tenure as the music chair. The search for a new chair is in the hands of an 11-member conlrnittee led by Cameron Bennett, the dean of the school of arts and communication. Bennett said PLU received approximately 55 wellqualified applicants for the position after the Music Department posted it nationally. PLU advertised the job in The Chronicle of Higher Education, College Music Society and on Higheredjobs.com. Bennett said PLU also mailed a position announcement to all National Association of Schools of Music member institutions. That announcement called for an energetic teacher, scholar and artist as well as someone who demonstrated excellence. Bennett said the committee is looking for a dynamic chair with vision for advancing the excellence of the music program both artistically and academically. "Music is one of the most visible programs at the university and certainly a core of Lutheran higher education," Bennett said. He also said that about 25 percent of all undergraduates at Pacific Lutheran University are involved in the music department, so this change will affect many students. PLU held on-campus interviews for three finalists at the end of February. Music students had the opportunity· to have lunch with finalists. There was also an open forum session as well as a teaching research presentation. The committee invited music students and encouraged them to submit evaluations. A link to a survey for each finalist was sent to students in an email that read, "Your input is extremely valuable in the process." PLU interviewed two additional finalists Monday and Tuesday. Bennett sent out an email announcing this update to music students April 2, inviting them to attend and give feedback. The email read, "After the on-campus interviews of the earlier finalists in late February, the search committee determined that we had not yet found the right candidate to serve as Music Department Chair and has recommended that the search continue." The email also said, "Your participation in completing these evaluations is incredibly rmportant and valuable to the search process." The search committee will meet later this week to make a final recommendation. "The biggest change will be that there will be someone different serving as music department chair after Professor Robbins," Bennett said. PLU will hold a concert in honor of Robbins May 22 at 8 p.m. in Lagerquist Concert Hall.

'Waiting for Godot' stresses hulllan .interd~pendence · director of PLU's version .of the play, described symbiosis in the Director's Notes as "a close and prolonged association between organisms that is, at times, mutually oeneficial and in other situations parasitic." While reading Beckett's work, Parmenter said he came to

has the opposite characteristics with his inert forgetfulness and concern with his physical comfort. Junior Mitchell Helton acted The absurdist . play "Waiting the part of Lucky, a tired, faithful for Godot," written by Samuel ser\rant. Senior Cori DeVerse Beckett, graced Pacific Lutheran played Lucky's counterpart, University's Studio Theater Pozzo, a domineering, talkative last Friday and Saturday in the personality. Karen Hille Phillips Center for In most the Performing versions, Arts. ·P ozzo is a male Part of character, but in this play's PLU' s version, "It's all symbiosis. It's symbiosis." popularity dominant this and success character is played • throughout Samuel Beckett by a woman. .This the years has adds a feminist pla~ght been due to twist to the its ambiguity otherwise all-male - it is open to cast, particularly many different because of the in~ interpretations and readings. believe that, "[Beckett] waJ].ted control and esteemed character It allows each viewer to have to emphasize a person's search she plays. their own interpretation, based on for meaning through a parasitic Anthony Aguilar played understanding and experience. world. We endure suffering being the character Boy, the only link Because of this, people lost, our existence, interactions, between the characters and the constantly asked Beckett to share relationships and journey through mysterious Godot. the authorial intent, but the only life poisoning us." Originally written and clues he gave about the work The plays' two main performed in French, the title were cryptic. characters, Vladimir and "Waiting for Godot" is Beckett's He continuously remarked, Estragon, complement each other. own translation from the French "Why people have to complicate a Vladimir, portrayed by first-year title "En attendarzt Godot." thing so simple I can't make out." Jacob McCallister, is characterized In 1953, the play premiered in Eventually, Beckett was pressed by his restless resilience, musing Paris at the Theatre de Babylone. to admit, "It's all symbiosis. It's on religion or philosophy. The British Roval National symbiosis." Estragon, performed by Theatre poll of BOO playv.rrights, Junior Joshua Parmenter, the sophomore Cameron Waters, actors, directors and journalists

By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Writer

voted in 1999 that "Waitini for is frunµiar about everything. He Godot" was "the most significant tries to reconcile the events of the second act with the events of play of the fOth century." During the play, characters the first, but no one else seems to Vladimir and Estragon waif' for a remember ornotice the repetitio In addition, neither Vladiinii character named Godotto appear. They wait endlessly, but he never, nor Estragon can rememb~ how comes. long they, have been waiting for Godot's missing presence, Godot, and this leads Vla~ along with other aspects of the to question if it has been· days, play, is the reason for the many months or perhaps years. different interpretations. The play is set up to show the ~ The setting is traditionally .m undane repetition of life; but it minimal. In PLU's 'Version, a tree also seems 'to offer relationships and .:i'rock - both simply crafted as a way to get through this from metal - comprise the set. existence. At several points the play, This stripped-down . set allows the viewer to draw a the character.s say it would be variety of conclusions about 1he better if they separated, and at play, ranging from a religious, the end ot each act they mention philosophicalor classical leaving, yet they don't actually perspective to a political, move to go anywhere. Vladimir and Estragon are psychoanalytical or social one. For me, the set demonstrates stuck together in this existence, the existentialist current that runs waiting for someone who never through the play. We are able to comes. They must rely on each imagine that this encompasses other, just like Lucky and Pozzo. any -0r all of human life, because By the end of the play, Lucky is mute and Pozzo is blind. They of the plain set. To further this existential now physically need each other to element, the mirroring of the function in the world as much as events and words of the first and they emotionally did before. e rely on others to help second ad invoke the existential question~ of life and human us through the bad times and existence. such as "What are celebrate the good times and to we doing on earth? What is the get through this world, we need purpose of our life here?" each other - tfl.at is the message Vladirn;r feels that something Of the plav:

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APRIL 11, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

MediaLab documentary 'Tapped Out' premieres on-campus

A&E 7

Lutes look ahead to the ·next 'Hehrewr Idol' By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE BAUMANN

MediaLab filmmakers Kortney Scroger (lefr) and Haley Huntington (right) conduct interviews aboard a Mississippi River r~pair vessel in St. Louis. The two are members of a team that spent 18 months researching and producing the documentary "Tapped Out," which explores global threats to water.

for some people. "The problem seemed more real to me when we interviewed a Texas woman," Jorgensen said. "When she turns on her It is extremely difficult for many to tap, the water is only there because it is imagine a life without water or a life with being shipped to her." contaminated water, but for some, this is an The up-close and personal nature of everyday reality. this documentary has earned it some very This inspired some Pacific Lutheran prestigious recognition. "Tapped Out" has University MediaLab students won several awards. senior Haley Huntington, junior Valery It has collected to two Accolade Merits Jorgensen, senior Kortney Scroger, senior of Excellence, the Rising Star Award from Sam Hosman and senior Katie Baumann the Canada International Film Festival and to make the award winning documentary a first place grand prize from the National "Tapped Out: Unearthing the Global Water Broadcast Society. Crisis." Huntington, one of the senior producers MediaLab students create a on the project, said that acknowledgement documentary every year that almost always of hard work feels good. focuses on social issues or brings attention "Winning a National Broadcast Society to an issue that needs more consideration. Award is great news for us," Huntington This year focused on the water crisis, a said. "My fellow filmmakers and I problem that is worked hard downplayed as . to make the only an issue "To have that big of a t op1c documentary overseas even thought though North tackled by college students man provoking and America faces it influenti al. achievement." as well. So it's a great "Making this feeling to be Sam Hosman film, I learned acknowledged senior how big of with such a a problem it pres tigiou s [water] is in national award." North America" Jorgensen said. "When Hosman, who helped work on the people hear 'water crisis,' they think that it graphics for the film, said he was pleased only affects places like Africa, but the same with the good reviews. problem is in our world." "I am very happy with how the film Students will see perspective-altering turned out," Hosman said. "This is the statistics in the documentary. first time MediaLab has done a movie with According to the "Tapped Out" website, media graphics, and we have already won the documentary focuses on "water awards." related issues across North America and Although "Tapped Out" originally investigates how pressures on water, premiered in October in Seattle, the film including drought, floods, population made its PLU premiere in the Studio growth and pollution are resulting in new Theater of the Karen Hille Phillips Center and innovative thinking." for the Performing Arts Wednesday night. The team of students travelled across The free viewing was open to the public, the US. and Canada collecting interviews and a panel discussion followed the from researchers, scientists, activists, screening. farmers and everyday citizens to observe "The big takeaway is that it talks about and discuss the future of North America's a big issue - clean water accessibility," water supply. In addition to learning about Hosman said. "And to have that big of the future of water, the students also got to a topic tackled by college students is an see firsthand the realities of water shortages achievement."

By TAHNAYEE CLENDINEN AdE Writer

When an assignment for a religion 211 class took a creative tum, it started a new . Pacific Lutheran University tradition "Hebrew Idol." Antonios Finitsis, a of religion, professor founded and organized the film festival in 2007. It became an· annual tradition, and this year's finale is less than a week away. taking· Students "Religion and Literature · of the Hebrew Bible" are asked to research a story from the Hebrew Bible and come up with their own modern day interpretation. The assignment requires students to form small groups and produce a short film that encompasses the message of the story. "Hebrew Idol" consists of an online voting portion and a live finale. During the online portion which closed Wednesday - PLU students voted for their favorite video submission. The three videos that received the most votes will advance to the live grand finale held in the Studio Theater of the Karen Hille Phillips

"The purpose is to show that PLU has talent." Antonios Finitsis f' (I ti" ,~

profesS'>r of religion Center for the Performing Arts Thursday at 6 p.m. "Some of the videos turned in were phenomenal," Finitsis said of his decision to create the contest. "I thought to myself 'I can't let these videos die in my classroom."' The goal of the event is to teach the relevancy of the Hebrew Bible without trying to convert or preach to the audience. Finitsis said when a person watches the videos, he or she would most likely not even realize there is a religious message embedded within the movies. The panel of judges will ask questions about how each video relates to the Hebrew Bible before selecting the winner. "The purpose is to show that PLU h as talent," Finitsis said. "It is a culmination of learning and an opportunity to celebrate these remarkable students' success and talent."

Prior to "Hebrew Idol" there will be a red carpet event where students and faculty will be encouraged to meet and interview the stars of each movie. Finitsis routinely travels to other college campuses around the country and speaks to the administration in an attempt to expand his award winning film festival. So far, no other colleges have jumped on board due to a lack of resources or motivated professors. "This project only works because we have instructional technologies at PLU," Finitsis said. "We have cameras, computers and people with knowledge of video production on campus." The event will be open to the public and admission is free. "To me it's all about the creative process," Finitsis said. "I believe that hard work and creativity ought to be recognized and rewarded."

COMPETE for the ·Jobs YOU WANT! MA in Management with an emphasis in Social and Sustainable Manage1nent Seattle Pac if ic Un iv ers ity offers an innovat iv e , 11-month graduate business degree for any major. Develop an understand ing of ethics and sustainabil ity from a Christian perspective Hands- on learn ing of real-world know ledge and skills Study abroad in Ind ia and C hina Internsh ips & net\'.'Orking with some of Seattle's top bus inesses Profess ional development & job pl acemen t assistance spu.edu / massm A PP LY TODAY

Q Seatd~'P;~ili~·-·"'· UNIVERSITY PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE BAUMANN

Producer and senior Haley Huntington (right) interviews environmental activist Matt Rota of the Gulf Restoration Network. MediaLab researchers traveled to the U.S. Gulf Coast in early 2013 to conduct interviews about threats to N.orth America's waterways.

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THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

APRIL 11, 2014

Monsanto's seed ownership threatens organic farmers

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The Monsanto corporation primarily produces genetically modified seeds that it licenses to farmers. Each year, farmers must buy new seeds and are not permitted t{) use seeds yielded from the past season's crop.

By COURTNEY PURDIN Guest Writer Whether you're eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, a caesar salad or even sushi, chances are, the food you are eating began with one company: Monsanto. Monsanto is the world's largest seed company. It has branches in more than 65 countries, as it exercises massive power over global agriculture. Its seeds are used in 90 percent of soy, 85 percent of com and 95 percent of sugar beets grown in the U.S., according to United Nations University. But these aren't just regular seeds - they are genetically

engineered seeds patented by Monsanto. Monsanto's variety of seeds are modified to be resistant to pesticides, produce higher crop yields, and of course, to look pretty. Independent farmers have to buy these seeds from Monsanto year after year. Patent law prohibits farmers from reusing the genetically modified seeds, so they must purchase more every year. Monsanto even has a team of private . investigators to ensure that its seed patents are not infringed. Monsanto's control over a large percentage of the nation's crops makes competing in the market difficult for organic farmers.

Genetically modified foods can be sold at lower prices and often look better than organic crops, making them very enticing to buyers, especially those who have a lower income. However, because of their genetic modification, Monsanto seeds tend to have a higher crop yield, so in theory, they could help the issue of world hunger. In fact, on Monsanto's website, CEO Hugh Grant cites the world's booming population as a reason for the need to utilize genetically modified seeds. But the seeds aren't free Monsanto still owns the rights to these seeds, and millions of people are still starving worldwide. In an interview for Bloomberg, Grant called opponents of

Marketing Music: .

By JILLIAN STANPHILL Business Writer In the wake of the 20th anniversary of Kurt Cobain's death, sales of Nirvana's music and merchandise are dominating the music industry. The music industry is one of the largest and fastest expanding industries in the world. Massive record labels dominate sales, but small record companies can succeed as well. A lot of business goes on behind the recording studio including cover art and lyrics. The music business is continually expanding, but even with new artists and genres emerging, the classics that we 路love stay with us, and Nirvana has proven that it has staying power for decades to come. Nirvana is as successful today as it was when it was formed in 1987. With an income of $4.4 million in 2013, the iconic status of Cobain and Nirvana are still thriving. Cobain's estate alone is worth an estimated $450 million, according to CNBC Business News.

Monsanto "elitists" who can afford more expensive food . He said they fail to consider the needs of the rest of the world. Grant made $12.84 million last year thanks to Monsanto's genetically modified seeds. For the average consumer, avoiding Monsanto products can be a difficult feat. Organic food is usually more expensive and often less readily available. Consumers even come into contact with Monsanto by eating meat. Much of the livestock in the U.S. is fed genetically modified com and soybeans. Processed foods are also likely to contain Monsanto products, although the average consumer would not know this by just

reading the label. Pacific Lutheran University has taken steps to address this extremely important and relevant issue of food sustainability. The Food Symposium from April 2-5 addressed "both local and global solutions to hunger and food access, specifically through the lenses of PLU's commitments to diversity, sustainability, and justice," according to the PLU website. The website goes on to say that PLU's department of dining and culinary services offers many organic options and serves local meat "raised humanely in certified organic pastures."

~irvana's sales soike 10 wake of trageoy

He was not only an idol of In many ways, business industry early grunge rock fans but an icon fuels the music through market research, client of Seattle. development and advertising. 路 Growing up in Aberdeen, Marketing reigns supreme in Wash., Cobain was constantly everything from the genre label, influenced by the culture of the lyrical changes and album art Pacific Northwest and the diverse to the outfits the artist wears to music scene of Seattle. He formed Nirvana in the interviews, which are specifically late 1980s with the original designed for a target audience. Nostalgia is a great marketing bandmates, Krist Novoselic and Aaron Burckhard. technique, especially with music. Dave Grohl replaced Parents grew up listening to certain bands, and by Burckhard' s a few years later. implementing those bands into Publicity doesn't just have to things focused toward their be about the music. Any Nirvana memorabilia, children, marketers can remind old fans of the music they love apparel or even something as while creating a new generation morbid as crime scene photos can promote the band. of fans. The Seattle Police Department For example, Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was has been releasing never before used in "The Muppets" movie publicly available photographs with permission from members of of the scene of Cobain's death the band. in anticipation of the 20th As technology changes, it only anniversary. helps music sales skyrocket. The 2014 Hall of Fame Maybe you still have that CD induction ceremony for rock and in a box with college junk, but if roll will air May 31 on HBO. not, pull out a smartphone and Any Nirvana performance download all the Nirvana hits you is still a tightly guarded secret, love with iTunes or stream videos but according to the music site through YouTube and reminisce. Loudwire.com, the remaining The 20th anniversary of band members might perform. Cobain's death was Saturday.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS


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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 11, 2014

BUSINESS 9

eturn rom icaragua Business student shares life-changing experience By ANDREA ADAMS Guest Writer My world was flipped upside down this spring when I traveled with a group of business students to Nicaragua. Our goal was to build a well to provide fresh water for the local community, but nothing could have prepared me for the life changing experiences I gained from the people. There doesn't seem to be any words that can do it justice, but Professor Mulder, who led the trip, came close when he said it

was powerful. We traveled to a community named El Limonal. The impoverished village is also known as "The Dump at Chinandega," because the entire community borders a massive dump. Scavenging the dump for recyclables or items to resell make up about 70 percent of the El Limonal community's livelihood. My time in Nicaragua challenged a lot of my values and priorities. We experienced a community in poverty to a degree I had

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREA ADAMS

Junior Andrea Adams poses next to a building in the Nicaraguan village, El Lirnonal, where she taught hygiene and helped build a well.

never seen before, but despite that circumstance, the locals were some of the kindest and most welcoming people I have ever met. When we arrived at the community, our team split into two groups. One group did the manual labor of drilling the well, and the other group taught hygiene to the community. Every morning over coffee and worship, Mulder challenged both groups to focus on being present in each moment. During the day, the manual labor team brought the community closer to clean water, while the hygiene team taught new subjects ranging from hand washing to rehydration after diarrhea. I was part of the hygiene team. We taught the women of the community in the morning, and taught the children in the afternoon. The men of the community spent their time helping to drill the well. At times, laughter cut across cultural boundaries to bring us together, such as when one of our group members had to pantomime proper defecation in front of the entire community. It didn't matter what language you spoke or culture you were from, because the entire community laughed that day.

a oons vs.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREA ADAMS

During her trip to Nicaragua, Adams spent time getting to know the children in the village of El LimonaL

We ended each day with a Bible lesson. On our last day in Nicaragua, I had to tell some of the children I had bonded with during the trip I was leaving. One girl, Ellie, jumped up, put her hand in my face as if to say "stop" and took off running. I was so confused, and I wondered if I had told her to leave by accident. Luckily, she returned a few minutes later with a photo of herself. In the photo, she was dolled up for Nicaraguan Independence Day, where she had been a baton twirler. We sat there together for a few moments looking at the photo and enjoying our time together.

When I went to give her the photo back, she pushed it back into my hands and motioned.that I keep it. I was so touched that this little girl, who had known me all of four days, would give me a prized possession like that. I suspect it may have been the only photo she owned of herself. I framed the photo, and placed it by my bed as a reminder to pray for Ellie and the rest of the children and community in El Limonal. It is a hard adjustment being back home. Everything changed for me in only a week, and I will never forget the community of El Limonal.

rones

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Facebook and Google battle to globalize the Internet By KATELYNN PADRON Business Writer Internet superpowers Google and Facebook are racing to supply Internet access to the unconnected wqrld through balloons and drones. Google's Internet venture is called Project Loon. Last June, it launched 30 balloons off South Island, New Zealand to test their capacity to provide Internet. "We believe it's possible to create a ring of balloons that fly around the globe on the stratospheric winds and provide Internet access to the earth below," Google said on its Project Loon website. Mark Zuckerberg announced March 21 that Facebook would be using drones and lasers to beam Internet service to earth. Facebook is managing the project through its Internet.org Connectivity Lab. The Connectivity Lab homepage says it is a "global partnership between technology leaders, nonprofits, local communities and experts who are working together to bring the

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

internet to the two thirds of the world's population that doesn't have it." These technology leaders include cell phone companies Nokia and Samsung. In Zuckerberg' s paper explaining the latest details of the project, he challenged Project Loon. He said Connectivity Lab intends to use drones in order to "precisely control the location of these aircraft, unlike balloons." Both corporations' programs

position themselves as altruistic attempts to unite the globe. F acebook claims to be building a knowledge economy. "When people have access to the internet," Zuckerberg wrote, "they can not only connect with their friends, · family and communities, but they can also gain access to the tools and information to help find jobs, start businesses, access healthcare, education and financial services, and have a greater say in their societies. They get to participate

in the knowledge economy." for advertising and drives its Google similarly referred to revenues in a massive way." the Internet as "one of the most Little also said he believes transformative technologies of that political boundaries will be our lifetimes." a big challenge for Google and In a 2013 interview with Facebook. "Some governments won't put Bloomberg Businessweek, Microsoft founder Bill Gates was less up with having . that fleet over than impressed with the idea of their airspace," Little said. However, CNN's Heather projecting Internet connection to those in need. Kelly pointed out that "When you're dying of "humanitarian organizations malaria, I suppose you11 look up have been pushing for more access and see that balloon, and I'm not in these remote areas to improve sure how it1l help you," Gates ·the efficiency of aid work. She said it would make it said. Skeptics like Gates cannot easier to set up remote healthcare ignore the concrete benefits stations in situations where the nearest doctors or hospitals are Internet connectivity has for hours or days away. Facebook and Google though. Mark Little, analyst for Ovum Regardless of their intentions, business consulting, said he Facebook and Google will believes the potential increase in continue their connectivity Internet users is primarily a gain competition. for Facebook. Google is testing its balloons in "Zuckerberg is pushing this the atmosphere. as an altruistic way of connecting Facebook is working on more people in the world - the creating technology to transmit net as a basic human right," Little Internet through difficult said. geographic areas. "But by increasing the total of net connections, it also increases To find out more about these Facebook's members and the amount of sharing done, which projects, visit Internet.org and in tum creates more space Google.com/loon.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

APRIL 11, 2014

Wanderlust: Bigger is not always better By MADDIE BERNARD Columnist

,..

;禄

Disney Parks, nicknamed the happiest place on earth, is quite possibly the only place that can make anyone feel like a little kid again. This past spring break, I traveled to Orlando, Fla. with my family and visited the mother of all Disney Parks, Disneyworld - specifically the Magic Kingdom. I have been to Disneyland, Calif. in the past and was excited to compare and contrast Disneyland with Disneyworld. Each year, 52.2 million people visit Disneyworld, and it is one of the most visited theme parks in the world. "'.Jisneyworld is located on 25,000 acres of land and consists of four theme parks - Magic Kingdom, Epcot, Hollywood Studios and Animal Kingdom downtown Disney, two water parks and 24 resorts. Needless to say, it is huge and very crowded. But I, being the Disney freak I am, was ecstatic to be visiting a whole world dedicated to Disney and could not wait to see what this huge theme park had in store. However, during my 15-hour day at the Magic Kingdom, I found that bigger is not always better. There were many occasions my family and I found ourselves hopelessly lost, and had to rely on our map everywhere we went. At times, it was very overwhelming. The theme parks are not located within walking distances of each other, so you have to drive from place to place. This was extremely different from Disneyland and California Adventure because the parks are located about 100 meters from each other, and it is very fun to run from place to place instead of packing up the car and completely moving. I also found路 that in order to visit multiple parks in one day at Disneyworld it costs about $160, while in Disneyland it is only $135. The attractions in Disneyworld's Magic Kingdom are extremely spread out, and it took a long time to walk from place to place. Sometimes it seemed like there was more scenery than attractions in the park, whereas in Disneyland there is a new ride around almost every comer. They also placed many of the other large attractions such as the Tower of Terror and Rock-n-Rollercoaster in other parks in an attempt to attract visitors.

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-ClllEF

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NEWS EDITOR

Reland Tuomi A&EEDITOR

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Kelli Breland OPINION EDITOR Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR Sam Hom PHOTO EDITOR

Jesse Major PHOTO COURTESY OF MADDIE BERNARD

Sophomore Maddie Bernard sits ne"-"t to the beloved Minnie Mouse and Roy Disney. In the background is Main Street USA and Cinderella's Castle. In the castle you can get your makeup and hair done like a princess or prince, and then eat at the fancy restaurant inside.

We live in a society that is becoming more and more accepting of women's rights with every generation. There is no arguing that this trend is positive for everyone - women and men alike because continuing to oppress

Kels Mejlaender COPY EDITOR

Blake Jerome My family and I found ourselves constantly comparing the two parks, saying things like, "That's not like how it is in Disneyland" and being somewhat disappointed. For instance, there were many attractions that were simply not present in Disneyworld's Magic Kingdom. The beloved Matterhorn ride, the Indiana Jones ride, some other kiddy rides and the Toon Town section were not in Disneyworld. I understand that Disneyworld needs to be somewhat different from Disneyland to attract visitors, however, in Disneyworld there were no new rides to compensate for the missing attractions. There was a small circus themed area and an area called "New Fantasyland" to try to make up for the loss of Toon Town, but these areas mainly consisted of scenery and were fairly dull, such as Belle's Castle, which you could not enter unless you waited two hours to get in. My family and I spent 15 hours at the park, and when we left around midnight, there was still a 45-minute wait for the Peter Pan Kiddy ride. In contrast, during Disneyland's final hours, you can hop onto any ride

LETTERFROMTHECOPYEDITOR: By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

SENIOR COPY EDITOR

an entire gender is absurd to say the least. that Words substantiate the message that we still live in a male dominated society are not helping us achieve equality for all. Most of these words are terms we say without a second words thought, like: businessman, mailman, policeman, freshman, mankind, and the list goes on. Feminism attempts to put men and women on a level playing field by bringing language into a more egalitarian form, deconstructing an institutionalized form of linguistic oppression. The feminist movement is a noble endeavor, no

doubt about it, but I do believe people sometimes use words and phrases without intending harm. For example, when someone says, "you're being a sissy" or "every man for himself," they aren't necessarily trying to be sexist. In fact the speaker probably has no idea that what he or she is saying is gender biased at all. Just today I caught myself telling on" of my friends to stop acting like such a girl, which implies that being a woman is somehow inferior to being a man. Even though I know it's wrong to speak like this, I sometimes do it - accidentally of course - because

without waiting in line. Because Disneyworld is the mother of all theme parks, it needs to be able to accommodate thousands of people each day. However, in has become too industrial and has lost a bit of magic along the way. In Disneyworld there were hourlong lines simply to get your picture taken with a character, whereas in Disneyland, Peter Pan approached my 6-year-old brother, and the two skipped through Fantasyland fighting Captain Hook together for 30 minutes. Overall, if you are planning on having a Disney vacation, I recommend going to Disneyland. We live in Washington which means it is closer. The airfare will be more affordable as well. Also, the park hopper passes are somewhat cheaper, and you will get to experience more thrill rides along with the large amount of kiddy rides. While Disneyworld is a wonderful place to spend a family vacation, I found that I enjoyed my time at Disneyland a little bit better. For the best Disney experience though, visit the park where the prices are lower, the lines are shorter and the magic lives stronger.

Words are Words

it has become all too common in our everyday language. I'm not suggesting that it's OK, I'm simply saying that most of the time it boils down to ignorance. Instead of criticizing people for using these words and phrases, perhaps we have a responsibility to teach them how to be more encompassing of everybody. heard I've women on multiple occasions take offense to this subtle without language even considering the possibility that what was being said was innocent in nature. If someone doesn't mean any harm by it, is it still sexist? Words are just a combination of letters i!fter all. They

have no significance until someone uses them in a manner that is intended to hurt you. There are so many other aspects that of feminism we should focus on violence against women, fair in the treatment workplace - that the gender language bias shouldn't be a reason to dismiss the speaker outright. The world is still far from perfect, but I think it's important for us to realize that we have made enormous progress over the past 100 years, and we are still headed in the right direction. Weigh in on the poll at mastmedia.plu.edu.

ONLINE EDITOR

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The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p .m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections April 4 Issue

Erin McKenna' s name was misspelled in the page 4 article "Symposium supports local food."


-

APRIL 11, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 11

Anti-Rape Wear: The fine line between victim blaming and vigilance By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor Rape has been a problem throughout h u m a n history, but one company claims it can help be part of rape prevention - AR (AntiRape) Wear. Advertised as "a clothing line offering wearable protection for when things go wrong," according to its lndiegogo campaign page, AR Wear is a collection of shorts and pants for women that only the wearer can remove. The product is still just a prototype. AR Wear has noble intentions, and though it is rife with a variety of problems on both practical and cultural levels, it should also not be completely dismissed. In a country where one in every six women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape, according to Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), the idea of anti-rape pants does not seem like such a terrible one. People could see anti-rape pants as simply another form of preventing an attack, like pepper spray or a rape whistle. However, AR Wear is ridden with issues ranging from its advertising to its potential for encouraging victim blaming. · To start withthe advertising flaws, AR Wear doesn't exactly scream diversity. In the website's video, a young, white, slim

woman models the product. If you're wondering where the women of varying body types, women of color and men are, the company has an answer. AR Wear site managers posted an update to the website five months ago, explaing its budget only allowed for one model - she just happened to be young, white and media-ready pretty - but also said it plans to market to all women. That's not a perfect response, but it's hard to castigate AR Wear for flawed advertising portrayals when every other company does the exact same thing. AR Wear also promised there will be a line of clothing for men once its budget increases - so that's promising. One glaring problem of AR Wear is that it promotes the stereotype that rapes occur down dark alleys by unknown villains. RAINN' s website states that in reality approximately two-thirds of rapes are committed by someone the victim knows. This is particularly pertinent to college students. More than 75 percent of women who reported rape in 2008 were younger than 25 at the time of the assault, according to the National Crime Victimization Survey reported by the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Traditional college age students are thus more likely to face rape. However, 85-90 percent of college students who were victims of rape in 2008 also knew their attackers, according to the National Institute of Justice. So while someone might use AR Wear for a run late at night, she or he might not think AR Wear is necessary when having dinner with a friend. Another is that women and men both face the possibility of a variety of sexual assaults and physical violence from an attacker even if the attacker cannot get the

victim's pants off. AR Wear does not promise perfection. Most concerning of all, AR Wear can seem to put some of the responsibility for rape in the hands of the victim. Not wearing anti-rape pants could become a new form of victim blaming. Questions like, "what were you wearing at the time of the attack?" could become "why weren't you wearing anti-rape pants?" AR Wear does seem to recognize the potential problem. In its campaign page's preface, AR Wear states, "The only one responsible for a rape is the rapist and AR Wear will not solve the fundamental problem that rape exists in our world." It goes on to say that the world needs awareness and education to end rape and that AR Wear seeks to provide products to women to protect against some rapes until society progresses. Though an interesting product, AR Wear is not going to become a must-have for women, and it seems highly unlikely it will join the lineup in victim blaming, especially since the second sentence on its website is essentially a statement against victim blaming. Additionally, the first update AR Wear made to its website addressed victim blaming concerns, saying, "While we are trying to educate and change the rape mentality in society, thousands of women are being raped every day. They cannot wait for education to change mentalities." Obviously~ the focus on preventing rape should be on education and awareness. Women and men can and should educate and speak about the extreme problem of rape, but progress takes time . Education about consent and rape culture is not going to reach everyone. While your money definitely should go to foundations .and education systems

that teach consent and fight against the potential for rape perpetuated against all people, that increased education and those systems of awareness are going to take time to implement. We can tell people not to worry about sexual assault because it's not their fault, but that very true knowledge is not going to do a lot of good during an attack though it may help with the psychological aftermath. • The primary message should always be that no one can ever blame a rape victim for an attack. You should be able to walk down the street in the nude and drunk without anyone thinking that gives him or her any sort of right over your person. But other messages and tools that hone in on confronting the fact that rapes do happen shouldn't be maligned. There needs to be a dialogue about it, certainly. Any anti-rape product advertised to potential victims should create a controversy, because it means we recognize how easy victim blaming is and how rampant it is in society. Still, if someone wants to take a few extra steps knowing we have not yet reached a society where rape is a rarity - be that in learning self defense or by purchasing AR Wear - that person should not be accused of automatically perpetuating victim blaming. Taking steps to protect yourself in an imperfect world that does have a strong rape culture shouldn't be shamed either. Though the campaigning period for AR Wear ended in November and AR Wear is not yet available for purchase, you can still leave a comment on the AR Wear website voicing your concerns or support: https://www .indiegogo.com/ projects/ar-wear-confidence-protectionthat-can-be-worn.

""<: "

_,..

Finish spring strong Evaluate our Justice System BY SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

As the weather becomes nicer, most want to go outside and play Frisbee and leave our books inside to collect dust. The r e seem to be so many more entertaining things to do: picnics, hiking, tanhing, exploring Tacoma or even just watching TV - "Game of Thrones" did just start up again - can be difficult to resisit. With all the excitement spring brings, our work ethlc can suffer. Grades slip this time of the year, and it becomes harder to motivate yourself to work with summer almost in sight. "Spring is time for flings and fun. No one wants to do homework," junior Naorni Bess said. "I combat that feeling by doing homework at night when it's dark. I'd rather stay up late then miss having fun in the sun." Make sure to set goals. If you want daily· or monthly goals, it makes no difference, because just setting goals gives you something to focus on. You can set reminders in your phone or have a friend do it with you so you can hold each other accountable. Before each w eek begins, take a look at your syllabi and keep in mind • all the dates and deadlines coming up. Set reasonable goals regarding these d ates. Do not overwhelm yourself you can be your own worst enemy. "Making summer plans keeps me pretty distracted from school work," sophomore Erin McCoy said. "I try to get my work done quickly so I can enjoy spring or try to do homework outside." Just because you are making an effort not to slow down this spring does not mean the people around

you are doing the same. Keeping that in mind, plan for alternative study places. If your roommate is bingewatching a Netflix show or your nextdoor neighbors have decided to have a dance party, you need another place to study. The Mortvedt Library is obviously the quietest study area on campus, but the University Commons can also be a good .alternative along with Foss Field on a nice sunny day. With spring comes spring cleaning - use some of your extra time to get rid of anything unnecessary and clean up your workspace. By workspace I am talking about your desk, your backpack and anything else that might need some cleaning out. Clutter can cause unnecessary anxiety and stress. "We start to feel burnt out," sophomore Karen Bullinger said. "Couple that with the sunshine, and all we want to do is be outside, spending time with our friends . Personally, I struggle with it a lot. The best thing I've found for this is keeping a detailed to-do list on my whiteboard." My favorite way of staying motivated is giving myself a reward system. It cannot be anything too easy, like every sentence you get a bite of candy. This will diminish your work quality and leave you without any Sour Patch Kids. The system should be something challenging, but do not work yourself too hard. Try an hour of sunshine for every hour you study, or studying until a certain time each night, and then give yourself the rest of the night to relax. If you give yourself something to look forward to, it can help the studying seem like less of a drag. It is spring and the school year is almost over. With all of your finals and job searching, do not forget to have fun. LollaPLUza is coming, as well as summer and some welldeserved time off. All you have to do is settle down and keep those grades up so you can come back next year and have all this fun again.

mistake and that would ruin his life." While it is hard to deliver such a severe disciplinary action against a young person, we The United States must take note of the principle of the matter. justice system is We need to acknowledge the fact that he was always a topic not of- age to be drinking, and he killed four of controversy, people. Another controversial case was that of especially in cases that appear· to be Robert H . Richards IV, heir to the American chemical company DuPont, who avoided swayed by money. If money has the prison time when charged with fourth degree ability to directly or rape of his three-year-old daughter, according indirectly persuade to The Independent. Richards' argument for a reduced sentence the criminal justice department to award was that he would not fare well in prison. a lesser sentence, we The rape charge Richards received typically are facing a critical carries a 15-year sentence, however, Richards problem. We will lose the value of justice and was able to avoid this when a Superior Court judge agreed with his argument, concluding the accountability of good ethics. As students, we are privileged to h ave that child molesters are frequently targeted by a network in which we can create change inmates. Richards now serves time on his probation. and take a stance. With such absurd cases, As stated by The Independent, Richards does something must be done. The reoccurrence of wealth and privilege not work and lives off of his trust fund while in cases where murderers and molesters serving time on probation. What we need to are being let off with no or minimal jail time question is if he will have a change of character must be a reflection of the flaws in our justice or ever comprehend the depth of his actions. The justice system administered hardly any system. Ethan Couch, a Texan teen, killed four consequences to either Couch or Richards. The people while driving under the influence. severity of their actions is incomparable to the According to CNN, the teen was underage punishments they received. Both from wealthy and recorded a blood alcohol content of 0.24 families, one can't deny the fact that money has a.correlation with a reduced sentence. three hours after the accident. The reality that money is power is seriously While prosecutors requested he receive the maximum of 20 years behind bars, he w as only destroying our justice system and the equal given 10 years of probation. Due to a claim of assessment of all offenders. These cases make media coverage and take priority in headlines "affluenza," he was let off. In this incident, Couch' s lawyer claimed in the news and then fade away. People need that due to his parent's wealth and pnvilege, to take a stance and hold our entire justice the boy never learned limitations. His lawyer ·system accountable for what is going on. As active members of social media, we argued that when people don't have limits, it should be u sing our resources to shed light on hinders their sense of consequences. Many have argued money made a these serious matters. According to spredfast. significant impact on the outcome of this court com, 47 percent of users · share videos or photos they found online. Students couid be ruling. Victim Eric Boyles, who lost both his wife creating photos or video campaigns to call out and daughter to the teen, said "Had he [Couch] the faults in our justice system. Even writing a tweet directed to gain not had money to have the defense there, to also have the experts testify, and also offer to awareness can spark dialogue for change. pay for the treatment, I think the results would Digital Buzz Blog stated 28 percent of retweets on Twitter are due to the tweet simply have been different." It is difficult in cases with such a young containing the phrase "please RT" (please person to distribute harsh punishment. "I retweet). This task is incredibly simple and hardly don't think they should have put him in jail for 20 years, because he messed up once," time consuming, but has the potential to make sophomore Lucas Reinhard said. "He made a a significant impact on a flawed justice system.

By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist

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THE MOORINGMAST

12 STUDY BREAK

APRIL 11, 2014

PLU discusses gendered language

CLASSIFIEDS Rental house right next to PLU. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, swimming pool. $1,700/month, includes utilities. Contact Joe Jordan at 253-678-9167

The Mast asked students in a poll starting April 8 what they think of gendered language in our daily conversations. Join the conversation at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section. ··---

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Do phrases such as "hey guys," "Don't be such a girl ," or the word 'policeman' have a place in our daily conversations? 38% Not really, but there is usually no harm intended.19 votes

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32% Surei those types of phrases are normalized in our conversations.16 votes ~6%

:'Jo. but it is a \Vork in progress to eliminate the use of them.8 votes.

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8% Other.4 votes

Results as of April 9, 11:00 p.m.

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P{ease recycle your copy of

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 23, 2014

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40 Cleveland's lake 42 Cause for a trip to the podiatrist 45 Uses sandpaper on 47 Black-tie garb 50 Hot-weather headgear 53 Nonessential item 54 Senatorial staffers 55 Fabric with patterns 57 Bohemian 63 Neptune's domain 64 "Raiders" object? 65 "Star Wars" pilot Solo 66 In the past 67 Baseball great Williams

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... THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 11, 2014

SPORTS 13

SPORTS SCOREBOARD .,,,

Baseball TEAM

LOSSES

WINS

CONFERENCE STREAK

Lin.field

24

3

17-1

Wonl3

George Fox

23

6

13-5

Won6

Willamette

17

11

10-4

Lostl

PLU

16

12

8-6

Lost3

Whitman

18

Whitworth

14 18

8

7-11

-

Won2

5-10

7

16

5-10

Lost 7

Paci.fie

10

16

3-12

Won2

Lewis & Clark

9

19

3-12

Lost4

SOFTBALL: Sophomore Hannah Dal Pra of Lewis & Clark helped the Pioneers finish the week with a 4'-2 record. She ended the week with 10 RBI, a home run, four doubles and a .524 batting average. Dal Pra also 1 recorded a perfect fielding percentage, starting eve.ry ga,me at second base.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Saturday vs. George Fox, noon

Men's Tennis WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitman

12

3

9-0

Won4

Paci.fie

10

3

7-1

Won4

George Fox

8

3

6-2

Lostl

Whitworth

6

8

5-4

Lost2

Lewis & Clark

5

10 .

5-5

Lostl

Puget Sound

3

9

2-6

Wonl

PLU

3

11

2-6

Lostl

Willamette

2

Lin.field

10

0

10

BASEBALL: Linfield's Chris Haddeland, ajuni-Or, threw a 114-pitch complete-game shutout, scattering just five hits across nine innings, to lead top-ranked Liniield to a 3-0 victory against Pacific Lutheran. He struck out five Lutes en route to his third complete game of the season and Uth of his career, lowering his season ERA to a conference-leading L06 with a 7-0 record in nine starts. It was also his fourth careeJ" complete-game shutout.

Lostl

Puget Sound

TEAM

Softball

AROUND THE LEAGUE •••

2-6

1

Wonl

0-8

I

-

-----

~----,-·

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

28

6

22-2

Won7

Whitworth

22

12

14-8

Lost4

Paci.fie

18

9

13-8

Won3

Willamette

16

14

12-8

Lostl

George Fos

21

12

10-11

Won2

PLU

12

23

9-14

Lost2

Lewis & Clark

10

20

6-15

Wonl

Puget Sound

2

26

1-21

Lost 7

..._....-- -

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Saturday at PU{Jet Sound, noon I

Tennis ! Women's TEAM WINS Whitworth

TRACK: Emily Pai.n~m, a junior from George Fox, ran the second-fastest time in the women's 10,-000 meter.run at the NCAA Division III level this season in the Ssn ~isco State Distance Carnival Fnda.y. She finished sixth overall behind four NCAA Division I runneni.

-- ----

WINS

Linfield

I

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Lost 10

TEAM

11

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

3

9-0

Won2

Whitman

8

8

8 -0

Won2

PLU

10

4

6-2

Won4

Lin.field

8

2

5-2

Won7

Puget Sound

5

4

4-4

Lost3

Willamette

3

5

2-5

Lostl

George Fox

6

10

2-7

Lost3

Lewis & Clark

1

11

1- 9

Lost4

Paci.fie

2

10

0-8

Lost3

·""

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Saturday vs. Lin.field, 1p.m.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Saturday vs. Lin.field, lp.m.

After hot start in Oregon, Lutes softball team drop two. straight By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer GAME I

vs.

GEORGE

Fox

The Pacific Lutheran University softball team had mixed results in its Northwest Conference road trip to Oregon schools George Fox and Pacific this past weekend. While the Lutes did find success against the George Fox Bruins, Pacific proved to be much stiffer competition. In the Friday doubleheader, PLU opened the weekend with a narrow 6-5 win against George Fox. The game was a makeup for one that was postponed Feb. 23 due to rain. They played at Linfield' s Del Smith Stadium. After neither team scored in the first inning, both teams exploded for a combined eight runs in the second. George Fox piled on five runs in the top of the second before PLU responded with three of its own. When first-year Emily McConnell singled to center field, juniors Tori Himura and Kelsey Robinson touched home to score the Lutes' first two runs. First-year Kailyn Osaki then singled to left field, allowing se:rilor Samantha Pryor to score the Lutes' third run at the bottom of the second. The game was then scoreless until the bottom of the sixth when the Lutes tacked

on three more runs to win the game. First-year Thalen Masada scored off senior Spencer Sherwin's triple to center field. Osaki was able to reach second base on an outfield error and Sherwin was able to steal home. · A Robinson single to center field scored Osaki, which proved to be the gamewinning run.

GAME 2

vs.

GEORGE

Fox

The Lutes defeated George Fox 3-0 in the second game, as pitchers Kelsey Robinson and Leah Butters, both juniors, showcased their pitching prowess. Robinson topped off a strong doubleheader by tossing 12 innings, allowing only eight hits over both games combined. Robinson struck out four batters to improve PLU's record to 11-19 overall, 8-10 in NWC. George Fox fell to 19-11 overall, 8-lOinNWC. It only took a three-run home run from senior Katie Lowery to decide the game. Sherwin and McConnell scored off of Lowery's hit. Robinson earned the win after pitching seven solid innings and striking out four batters.

GAME

3 vs.

Pacific scored its third and final run in the bottom of the sixth to make it 3-1.

GEORGE Fox

It was more of the same in game three for PLU against the Bruins. The damage was done in the second and third innings to take another game away from George Fox, winning 2-0. In the second inning, sophomore Alison Behrends doubled to left field, giving senior Lindsey Matsunaga an open lane to score the Lutes' first run in the second inning. Senior Spencer Sherwin scored the second and final run after Lowery singled to center field. Junior Leah Butters continued her good form by tossing a two-hit complete game and striking out five.

GAME 1 VS. PACIFIC Pacific snapped the Lutes' four-game win streak Sunday when the Boxers defeated them 3-1 in Forest Grove, Ore. Scoreless through three innings, Pacific struck first into right field to go up by one. The Boxers scored again in the fourth inning, making it 2-0. In the top of the sixth, Matsunaga singled to the right side to give Sherwin the chance to get to third. Following an error by Pacific's right fielder, Sherwin rounded third and scored to cut the score in half at 2-1.

GAME 2 VS. PACIFIC After nine innings, PLU closed out its Oregon road trip with a heartbreaking 3-2 loss against the Pacific Boxers. A pitcher's duel between .Butters and Pacific's Sarah Aasness lasted until the fifth inning, when Lowery broke the deadlock following a Tori Hamura single up the middle in the sixth inning. Pacific responded at the bottom of the sixth to tie the game at 1-1. The offense on both sides waited until the ninth inning to decide a winner, and unfortunately for the Lutes, it was Pacific who came out on top. PLU made it 2-1 in the top of the ninth when Masada scored off an Emily McConnell single, but the lead didn't last long. Pacific batted in a run in the bottom of the ninth and won the game off a throwing error by the PLU catcher on a failed pickoff attempt. With the second loss of the day, PLU fell to 12-22 overall, 9-13 in NWC while Pacific improved to 18-9 overall, 13-8 in NWC.

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HARRISON SEALS THE DEAL FOR KENTUCKY UPSET Will the Miami Heat or Indiana Pacers win this coming weekend? By SAM HORN

UConn is beside the matter. What does matter, however, is the fact that Kyle Peart was the only Mast Sports Pick 'Em contestant Tbis past week reminded us to correctly guess that Kentucky why March Madness is aptly would pull off the upset. named. Tbis puts Peart in a tie for first In the Final Four, two upsets place with Cale Powers. occured, which seemed like a Tbis week, I asked The Mast throughout . Sports Pick 'Em contestants who recurring theme the entire collegaite basketball would win between the Miami tournament. Heat and the Indiana Pacers. The University of Connecticut The Pacers have been slumping upset top-seeded Florida and in the Eastern Conference, even the Kentucky Wildcats needed a though it is still the sole owner of clutch shot by freshman sensation first place in Eastern Conference. Aaron Harrison to advance to the Indiana has had some embarassing National Championship. losses though. The fact that Kentucky lost to Losing by 19 points to Atlanta

Sports Editor

and getting blown out by the blazing Spurs doesn't look good on Indiana's resume. Miami, on the other hand, have been rolling of late, winning five of the past seven games. Indiana, which was once the kings of the East earlier this season, has been looking like the court jester in the past week. It comes as no surprise The Mast Sports Pick 'Em contestants all chose the Heat to steamroll the Pacers tonight. If the Pacers don't rest their starters, like they've been doing recently, they might stand a chance against the mighty Miami Heat.

Kyle Peart (2-3) Prediction: Miami Heat

Cale Powers (2-3) Prediction: Miami Heat

Alan Bell (1-4) Prediction: Miami Heat Drew Oord (1-4) Prediction: Miami Heat

Michelle Hogan (1-4) Prediction: Miami Heat

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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SAM SAYS... By SAM HORN Sports Editor

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A football locker room is rife with tension. Athletes throw chairs in every direction and passers-by can hear angry voices booming in the nearby hallways. Chaos ensues. This is not an apocalyptic scenario, although the described situation seems like it. Now that Northwestern University is one step closer to titling student-athletes as employees because of what several football players did, this scenario seems ever more likely in the future - mainly because if the students aren't getting paid enough, they'll go on strike. It seems like the Northwestern University football players didn't contemplate the consequences of their actions by winning this legal battle to unionize. I understand that football players feel entitled to a sense of hierarchy. After all, they do h elp Division I colleges rake in millions of dollars annually. No other collegiate sport can compete financially with

APRIL 11, 2014

Unionization shouldn't be the • norm 1n college athletics

this gladiatorial sport that receives nationwide attention every fall . . It seems like accepting a full-ride scholarship to a major college to play football should be enough of a payment. Apparently not in the eyes of some collegiate football players. . Garrett Higgins, a partner at O'Connor Davies CPA, pointed out that "the IRS may be able to make the argument that the scholarship is really payment for services, and therefore compensation, and is now taxable to the athlete." Student athletes go to college to receive an education. Nearly 99 percent of all college athletes won't make it to the professional levels. Most student athletes simply want to attend college, get their degree and become successful in the ever competitive workforce. It's a scary world out there. It seems ludicrous to believe that some student-athletes are more focused on getting paid instead of getting the most out of their education. It's difficult to understand why football players think in the same fashion as the former quarterback at Northwestern, Kain Colter.

Colter told members of the National College Players Association that athletics at Northwestern are more important than academics. "You fulfill the football requirement and, if you can, you fit in academic~,'' .~olter said. Unbelievable. • This could be the beginning of a new world in private college athletics. This ruling won't just affect Northwestern University. Infamous private universities like the University of Southern California and Stanford will have to submit to this ruling as well. Academics should come first when attending college. Student-athletes need to focus on learning everything they can and making the most out of their educational experience, because most of them won't be fortunate or gifted enough to tum pro. The four years in college are precious moments. They shouldn't be wasted by trying to create a union to become employees of a university. Higher education already does enough for student athletes.

Men's tennis repeats opening weekend performances against Pacific and Willamette

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By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer

BOXERS SUCKER PUNCH LUTES ~

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You can forgive the Pacific Lutheran University men's tennis team for feeling like it had deja vu this weekend on its Northwest Conference road trip to Oregon schools Pacific and Willamette. The Lutes lost 9-0 against Pacific on Friday, an identical score to the one the Boxers inflicted on PLU in the home opener. "Our coach said that even though they are a lot higher than us, we still played them pretty competitive," sophomore Brandon Bulaclac said. "We should take it to heart that we can compete with some of the best in the conference." Competing for the top spot- in the Northwest Conference, the Boxers dominated the Lutes on all fronts. Pacific swept the doubles matches with

LUTES SEEK REDEMPTION

8-0 and 8-1 scores. The Boxers closed out the day by winning the singles matches as well. Junior Spencer Herron and sophomore Jake Yanello put up the best fight against the Boxers in the No. 1 doubles, but Pacific's Troy Zuroske and Lome Bulling powered their way to an 8-6 win. "We just need to be committed to getting better each match and practice," Bulaclac said. First-year Sam Stadter competed in the No. 1 singles slot but couldn't pull out the victory. Stadter lost 6-1, 6-0. With the loss, PLU drops to 2-10 overall and 1-6 in the NWC. Pacific is still fighting for the NWC title and is 9-3 overall, 6-1 in conference.

PLU' s sole win in NWC play came at home against Willamette back in March, and the Lutes made it a season sweep with a 7-2 win at Courthouse Tennis Center in Oregon. "Getting_ the win after the Pacific game was pretty important to us," Bulaclac said. "We only beat them 5-4 last time, so to beat them 7-2 was good. They had one of their top players out too, so it was slightly easier." The Lutes continued their strong doubles play throughout the match, sweeping the Bearcat doubles pairs. "Our three doubles teams played some of the best doubles they've played all year," PLU head coach Rocky Poulin said. Coming off a strong performance against Pacific, Yanello and Herron earned

a victory against Willamette's Will Cooper and Gunnar Lee, shutting them out 8-0. First-year duo Sam Stadter and James Okubo also won in the doubles round 8-0. Senior Neal Berg and junior Sam Angel completed the doubles dominance with an 8-4 win against Willamette's Sam Wexman and Blake Brash. Stadter carried his doubles victory into the No. 1 singles round and showed good maturity to rebound after losing 6-2 in the first set against Wexman. However, Herron, Okubo and Jeremy Marsh did their work in the final three matches of the singles round to earn the Lutes' second win in conference. PLU returns to NWC action next weekend at home against University of Puget Sound and Linfield.

>'

Golf teallls fight we.a ther ·conditions, finish above par By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University golf teams took to the course this weekend, competing in the Northwest Conference Spring Classic. Both the men and women' s team had top 10 £µti.shes. The women' s team struggled with strong winds gusting throughout the morning. First-year Desirae Haselwood and junior Paige Henry paced the Lutes, as they both shot a 187. They both ended up tying for 25th place overall. The team finished in sixth place with a 759 overall. "We were playing in wind gusts likely above 40 mph and were putting on the fastest greens I have ever

seen," Henry said. "It was evident that everyone was at odds with the golf course." George Fox came away with the team title, shooting a 660. Sydney Maluenda helped the Bruins by shooting a 77 in the first round and ·a 76 in the second. With its sixth place finish this weekend and its sixth place fuush in the Fall Classic, the women's team is in sixth place in the NWC standings. It will head to Oregon April 19 for the Oregon Golf Association Conference Preview. The men's team shot a 321 in the first round and a 316 in the second round to finish the tournament in third place. Senior Dustin Hegge shot a 77 in both rounds, finishing in a tie for fourth place. Sophomore Justin Lee shot an 80 and a 77; good for a sixth

place tie. Fellow sophomore Seth Nickerson rounded out the Lutes in the top 10 with an 80 and a 78 to finish in a tie for eighth place. Stephen Whitworth' s Plopper took first place shooting a 76 and a 75. The Pirates earned the team win, shooting a 304 in the first round and a 314 in the second. "We can make a push and comeback for the final round," Lee said. "We moved up from fourth to third in the tournament which was a big improvement." The :roen' s team is tied with Whitworth for second .• • 1 place in the NWC. The final L ,,,,_ • • ,.,,,:; tournament of the year, the PHOTOS COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS NWC Championships, will LEFT: Senior Emily Cook prepares to drive the golf ball. Cook tied for 29th place overall and be held April 26-27. finished in second place on the team. RIGHT: Senior Dustin Hegge focuses on a ball as he drives it toward the green. Hegge tied for third place overall at the NWC Spring Classic.


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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 11, 2014

SPORTS 15

Lutes overwhelmed by strong Linfield pitching Baseball team unable to pick up a victory against top-ranked Wildcats By NICK ~ARENE Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University baseball team had a tall task in facing top-ranked Linfield this weekend in McMinnville, Ore. While the Lutes tried to overcome the Wildcats' strong pitching performances, Linfield proved to be on top of its game, sweeping the weekend series.

GAME I In the first game, junior Trevor Lubking had a great day on the mound for the Lutes. He pitched a complete game and gave up three earned runs on six hits while striking out nine batters. Despite Lubking' s gem, the Lutes were unable to come up with the win, as they struggled to score runs against Linfield hurler Chris Haddeland, who gave up no runs on five hits while striking out five. "111 never be satisfied with a loss," Lubking said of his day on the mound. "I got out of a few jams. It's just a matter of making quality pitches." The offense for the Wildcats was provided in large part by Jake Wylie, who hit a two-run homer in the second inning. In the sixth inning,

Kenny Johnson singled to drive in another run for Linfield, sealing the 3-0 victory.

GAME2 The second game saw more offensive woes for the Lutes, and more offensive success for Linfield as they picked up the 7-1 win. After picking up an unearned run in the second inning, the Wildcats exploded in the fourth and pushed four runs across the plate. Their offensive prowess was complemented by another Wylie homerun. Senior Nicholas Hall scored a run for the Lutes in the sixth inning on a sacrifice fly by first-year Ben Welch. With the Wildcats leading 5-1 in the eighth, Wylie hit his second homer, this one a two-run shot, to put the game out of reach. Senior Alec Beal led all hitters with three hits in the affair. Beal would've gone a perfect 4-for-4 if he hadn't striuck out once. As a team, the Lutes struck out six times. Junior Chris Bishop took the loss for the Lutes, giving up four earned runs on six hits and striking out six. Sophomore Cory Nelson pitched an inning in relief and gave up the home run to Wylie.

GAME3 In the final game of the weekend series, the Lutes were once again overwhelmed by Linfield, losing 6-1. The Wildcats wasted no time in getting their bats going in the affair, scoring three runs in the first inning. In the third inning, Linfield was able to score two runs on fielding errors to make it a 5-0 ballgame. They added another run in the sixth when Nick Fisher hit a solo blast over the left field fence. The Lutes scored a run in the eighth inning on a fielder's choice hit by sophomore Tyler Thompson. First-year Derrick Mahlum took the loss for PLU, going 5 and 2/3 innings with four earned runs on eight hits along with four walks and six strikeouts. Linfield pitching allowed just five hits, one earned run, no walks and nine strikeouts. "Our team goes out every weekend with the intention of winning," junior Trevor Lubking said. "We learned a lot this weekend and are prepared to move forward." With the losses, PLU fell to 1612 overall and 8-6 in Northwest Conference play. Top-ranked Linfield improved to 24-3 overall and 17-1 in NWCplay. The Lutes will be taking to the field this Saturday to take on the George Fox Bruins. Game time is set for noon.

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....PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP: Sophomore Maika'i Derouin has started six games for the Lutes in the outfield. He is batting .217 with five hits and one run batted in. BOTTOM: First-year Kort Skoda leads a contingent of baseball players to the dugout.

HEPTATHLON HERO COMPETING FOR REGIONAL FAME

Walton soars to new heights after discovering her passion f o.r track focused on track because that's what she wanted to play in college. Deciding where to go to The Northwest Conference college was more difficult Multi-Event Championships than choosing between soccer only invite the best athletes and track for Walton. She was from around the Pacific split between Pacific Lutheran Northwest region to compete University and Linfield. for regional glory. In the end, it came down to One of those athletes Walton's family background. is junior Hannah Walton. "My parents both did Walton recently qualified for sports at PLU," Walton said. the prestigious two-day event "My dad was on the 1980 in the heptathlon. National Championship Walton easily surpassed football team and my mom the 2,879 point total to qualify did cross country and soccer for the championship meet here. I thought it would be -- she tallied 3,462 points. cool to go to PLU · and play The women's heptathlon track." consists of seven events: the Being a student-athlete 100-meter hurdles, high jump, at PLU is not easy for shot put, 200-meter dash, long most people. Walton is no jump, javelin throw and the exception. She has difficulty 800-meter run. finding free time between Walton has always been track and class. experienced in the world of "I try to have a time of rest, athletics. At the ripe age of sit down, eat and calm down," four, she became involved in Walton said. "I really try not sports. to have any distractions when "I grew up working out, . I study. I don't really have a and then my parents would lot of free time, which is fine, just throw me in all these but I just get as much done as random sports, and I figured I can." out what I liked best," Walton Academics are an said. important part of the college Back then, however, equation for Walton. She is Walton was a soccer player. double majoring in German Walton said she was sure she and applied physics with a was going to continue playing goal of working at Boeing in soccer through high school the future. until she discovered track and Before that though, Walton field in sixth grade. wants to gamer enough "I really ended up liking money to pay for graduate the hurdles - that was my school, where she hopes to main event in middle school," earn a master's degree in Walton said. either industrial or mechanical In high school, Walton engineering. said she noticed she had more Walton will be competing potential in track. She put in the NWC Multi-Event soccer to the side her senior Championships Monday and year in high school and strictly Tuesday in Salem, Ore.

By SAM HORN Sports Editor

So what exactly is the heptathlon?

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A track and field event where each competitor takes part in the same prescribed seven events:

100-meter hurdles, high jump, shot put, 200-meter dash, long jump, javelin and 800-meter run.

""IC'

Definitionfo1md at http://www.thefreedictionary.com

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TOP: Junior Hunnah Walton easily dcurs u set of hurdles en route to winning the 100 -rnetcr hur•_ c» BOTTOM: Racing agains senior Turyn Dec, Wulton (right) fini •hcd in seventh place at the Lin.field Erik Anderson kd1rc,1kcr.


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THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

APRIL 11, 2014

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Brazil is ho01e to a new dog Lute soccer player bringing his talents to the international stage By SAM HORN Sports Editor Peel back the pages of a dusty, old dictionary and scour the pages for 'dog.' If you're meticulous in your search, you will discover that 'dog' is defined as: "a domesticated carnivorous mammal that typically has a long snout, an acute sense of smell, and a barking, howling, or whining voice. It is widely kept as a pet or for work or field sports." However, there is another definition of 'dog' that more accurately describes senior Giancarlo Santoro. It goes like this: "he is sure to cause trouble and be loud but at the end of the day, people like who he is." Santoro has been stirring up trouble recently, but it's the good kind of trouble - if there is such a thing. While attending a communication class in one of the many ancient rooms in Ingram Hall, Santoro was glued to his seat. He wasn't fastened to his chair because of the professor's riveting teachings, but because of what he saw greeting him in his email inbox. There, in front of Santoro, was an email from Ron Smith. Smith's name might not ring any alarms for popularity or uniqueness, but Smith had a simple message for Santoro: he had been selected to join the USA Division 3 All-Star Soccer Team. Santoro is among 16 players to be selected nationwide for this prestigious squad, which will travel down to the soccer-crazed country of Brazil. This year, Brazil has the privilege of hosting the World Cup, an international spectacle. The USA Division 3 All-Star Soccer Team's tour will run from May 27 through June 5. The squad's tour will commence in Orlando, Fla. There, the team will practice for two days before flying down to Sao Paulo, Brazil for multiple games in the City of Jundiai and the state of Sao Paulo May 29, 30 and 31. The team will end its toilr in Rio de Janeiro for one more competition June 3. The team will compete against top U-22 club teams from the Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Sean Helliwell, who coaches at Rose-Hulrnan Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Ind., will be the USA Division 3 All-Star Soccer Team's head coach. "When I opened up the email [from Smith], I was so excited," Santoro said. "I didn't know what to think about it at first."

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Supported by his family, senior Giancarlo Santoro was able to pursue his dream of playing collegiate soccer at PLU.

The fact that Santoro made the USA Division 3 All-Star Soccer Team is no fluke. Soccer has been in Santoro' s blood long before he contemplated attending Pacific Lutheran University.

DEVELOPMENT Growing up in an athletic family in Hartford, Conn., Santoro was exposed to a variety of sports at a young age. Santoro's father didn't just play one sport. Instead, he played nearly every sport conceivable - including basketball, baseball and football - with his athletic, bulky frame contributing to his success. Contrary to his father, Santoro focused on honing his skills in soccer. Santoro' s love for soccer began earlier than most adolescents. Starting in kindergarten, Santoro became infatuated with soccer because he said he loved winning games. His recreational kindergarten team was quite talented and proved victorious in many matches, unlike the lacrosse and tee ball teams he was also involved with. Those teams were the exact opposite, in that they could never win a game and lacked the athleticism to truly compete with other teams. 'Tm very competitive in sports and hate losing," Santoro said. His hunger to win more games carried over to his high school years, where Santoro w as a member of the Skyline Spartans soccer team. In Santoro' s senior year of high school, the Spartans advanced to the Washington state quarterfinals, only to lose to Lake Stevens 2-1. In Skyline's 2010 season, Santoro accounted for six of the team's goals as the team boasted a 12-6-2 record. By earning more wins than losses and draws combined that season, Santoro had reached his goal of "winning games." But he wasn't done.

MOVING ON Once Santoro made the decision to attend PLU in the spring of 2010, head coach John Yorke knew he had a prized recruit in his arsenal. "When he first came to PLU, he wasn't very sure of himself, but over the course of these past four years, he's become much more confident," Yorke said. "He's very good on his feet, and he' s strong and quick. He's a very talented soccer player." Santoro made an immediate impact on the soccer pitch when he arrived at PLU. As a first-year in 2010, Santoro scored two goals, including one game-winner, and tallied five assists in his initial collegiate season. Santoro' s soccer success didn't cease after that. His yearning for winning games only grew. While Santoro accounted for seven of the Lutes' goals in his first three seasons on the PLU squad, his goal scoring potential came to full fruition in his senior year. As one of four seniors to start every game during the 2013 season, Santoro found the back of the net seven times. The 2013 season was undoubtedly one of the more successful seasons in team history, as the Lutes set a program record by going undefeated in the first 12 games. With a 13-4-3 final record, the Lutes tied for the fourth-most wins in a season in team history. Standing at 5 feet 11 inches and having the lung capacity of a horse, Santoro has matured into a physical specimen. His ability to run himself ragged and provide teammates with nice setups has made Santoro one of the premier soccer players in the Northwest Conference. As important as winning is to Santoro, living with some of his best friends, otherwise known as "dogs," for the last two years, has far outweighed seeking victory on the pitch.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Senior Giancarlo Santoro races by an opponent en route to unleashing a venomous shot upon an unwary opponent. Over the course of his four years at PLU, Santoro compiled 14 goals.

HOME SWEET HOME Surrounded by some of his closest friends in their cozy living room, Santoro tosses his head back and lets out a howl. Fellow senior Jeff Piaquadio tells a joke, causing every "dog" in the living room, including Santoro, to break out in hysteria. The content of the joke is irrelevant. What is relevant, however, is the fact that Santoro is putting on a masterful display with a soccer ball. The fact that the ball is a replica of the Adidas Jo'bulani World Cup ball is barely noticeable. Tears adorn the sides of the worn ball, but that doesn't stop Santoro from gently maneuvering it around the room. With a tap of his right foot, the ball takes a high bounce and lands directly on his left foot. The aerial tricks are one thing, but Santoro' s dribbling expertise is exemplified with his deft touch. Seemingly dancing around the room, Santoro caresses the ball with his feet. It's as if he were born with a soccer ball in his grip. Santoro' s group of "dogs" consist of seniors Sam Watkins, Cameron Veres, Piaquadio and junior Justin Manao. All of them share Santoro's passion for soccer. The term "dog" or "<logger" is often used around the Brown House, the abode

where the five reside. That's because they view themselves as guys who are "sure to cause trouble and be loud." For the most part, that statement is accurate. "It's been incredible to live with these guys for the last two years," Santoro said. "They're my best friends, and I don't know what I would do without them. They're a crazy bunch of guys." Santoro is the group's outlier in that he is usually reserved and quiet. He does have his momentary outbursts however. "He's a lot crazier than most people think he is," Watkins said. "He may be quiet, but once you get to know him, he's a dog." Soon enough, Santoro will depart May 27 for Orlando 路to prepare for the USA Division 3 All-Star Soccer Team tour in Brazil. This could be the final time Santoro plays soccer competitively. All of the skills and lessons Santoro has learned over the course of his 16-year soccer career will come down to this momentous occasion in Brazil. Temporarily leaving his "dogs" will be emotionally hard for Santoro. However, playing soccer on an international stage in a country known for its soccer prominence is definitely something to bark about.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

Senior Giancarlo Santoro's family members surround him during Senior Day. From left to right: mother, Theresa Santoro; brother, Dante Santoro; father, Vincent Santoro.

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SPORTS

AdE Spring fair offers classic fare

Baseball walks for win 'PAGE16

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

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OORING

APRIL 18, 2014

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 18

mastmedia.plu.edu

Sustainability cuts out 'SurPLUs' program By RELAND TUOMI News Editor SurPLUs closed its doors permanently after its final sale April 11. The Sustainability Department shut down . the item recycling program due to budgetary limitations. SurPLUs was a way for students at Pacific Lutheran University to donate items - anything from spatulas to couches to plastic Christmas trees - rather than throw them away into landfills. The program was part of Sustainability' s goal to become waste free by 2020. However, the program was getting more than customers, donations causing low profit numbers. "We haveFl't been able to get that many people into here,''. senior Nathan Rhoades, the manager of SurPLUs, said. "It's not affordable for PLU to keep it open anymore. We actually pay more for people to staff it than we are earning." Usually, SurPLUs would make at most $10-20 per day and at least 25-50 cents per day. SurPLUs heads decided to eradicate the program two to three weeks ago, partly because SurPLUs was not generating revenue and also because Sustainability was not giving SurPLUs the attention it required. "We have so many things to do we can't concentrate on any one thing very well," Nick Lorax, a sustainability lead, said. Instead of SurPLUs, Sustainability has placed an unattended Goodwill truck outside of the Facilities Management building behind the Morken Center for Learning and Technology.

PHOTO BY KATIB DEPREKER

LEFT: Sophomore Kevin Lester browses SurPLUs' final sale. SurPLUs closed its doors for good April 11. SurPLUs offered gently used and discarded items for a discount to both students and the public. It also sold items to students. RIGHT: Junior Jade Neace works the cash register and tends to guests at SurPLUs' final sale.

This allows PLU students to give back to the comm~ty while still keeping their items out of landfills. Each time the truck reaches capacity, Sustainability will call Goodwill to haul the full truck out and bring an empty one to replace it. "The truck will .t ake in anything from the area," Rhoades said. "They're going to be paying us for the weight of the truck. The money will go back into the PLU budget."

WHAT'S INSIDE

In addition to the Goodwill truck, there are two metal donation boxes outside of facilities for students to leave shoes and clothes for the Susan G. Komen foundation and books for Discover Books. The busiest time of year for SurPLUs is the end of spring semester when students no longer want school supplies or furniture, so they take the items to.SurPLUs. Now that the program is gone, Sustainability will provide five dumpsters and four Goodwill

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Support schoolwork witp, songs page 10

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Shake hand page 15

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

Classing up your language on privilege By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor

A&E

Parkland mural brings community together

trucks throughout campus during . move-out. "There will be a truck near Harstad, South, Pflueger and that area near Hong, Hinderlie and Ordal," Lorax said. There will also be charities accepting any toiletries, including half filled bottles of shampoo and conditioner. "I am sad to see SurPLUs go," Lorax said. "It's something that's been a lot of fun."

The concept of class received a community focus April 10 at the event "Watch Your Mouth." In Anderson University Room 133, students primarily from an "Intro to Sociology 101" class listened to and questioned a panel of speakers on their experiences with class identity. The attendees sat in a circle to facilitate discussion with a PowerPoint to highlight questions. The three panelists also sat i,n the circle, though at the front of the room. Senior Lillian Ferraz led the evening event. The students and panelists touched on a variety of other topics like racism and sexism. The first panelist to speak was Joel Zylstra, the director of Community Engagement and Services. He told the attendees to recognize their own class privilege. "By us being here [in college], we

already have a leg up," Zylstra said. He compared this to the scant 28 percent of people living in the area around Pacific Lutheran University able to get any education beyond high school. Panelist Laura McCloud, an assistant professor of sociology, defined socioeconomic status as one's income, education and occupation. "Why does class matter?" McCloud asked the audience. "We want to think of class as only something that is achieved. But initially class is given to us." McCloud said class is something that affects people deeply, influencing everything from the foods they eat to how they vote. While it doesn't mean one's class is a person's destiny, McCloud said, it certainly also doesn't mean that class is irrelevant. The third panelist, senior Wendy Martinez, spoke about her experiences as someone who immigrated to the U.S. She talked about the long process of getting a

job at Pacific Lutheran on a work permit and the privilege students who are citizens have and may be unaware of. "It's [the event] a very awareness-raising thing," first-year Manuel Tirado, who attended the event, said. "It promotes awareness more than anything else." When discussing possible forms of activism with class privil.ege, McCloud described how humor could play a role. She gave the example of attending a meeting with only female attendees, and asking in a humorous manner where all the men were. Though received as a light comment, she said the question got many women considering why there were no men in attendance. Humor, McCloud said, can be a tool for inspiring a line of inquiry surrounding class or issues of privilege.

PRIVILEGE CONTINUED ON PAGE 4


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APRIL 18, 2014

Desserts, demos and destruction By JESSE MAJOR Photo Editor Chemistry Club and chemistry faculty members displayed entertaining chemical demonstrations and provided desserts at their annual Desserts and Demos night last Tuesday.

TOP LEFT: Senior Alex Wisbeck pours liquid nitrogen while preparing to make homemade Dippin' Dots Ice Cream. 路 BOTTOM LEFT: Maleah Bishop, a 13-year-old, holds sodium alginate, originally a sugary liquid, after dropping it in calcium chloride. The calcium chloride made the sodium alginate form a rigid chain. TOP RIGHT: Junior Sean Murphy drops dry ice into yrater containing an indicator to demonstrate ocean acidification. MIDDLE: Jon Freeman, assistant professor of chemistry, demonstrates the flammability of methane gas. BOTTOM RIGHT: Justin Lytle, assistant professor of chemistry, demonstrates an exothermic reaction with thermite. Lytle used the reaction to burn Peeps marshmallows in honor of Easter.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 18, 2014

NEWS3

Career Expo offers opportunities for students By RELAND TUOMI News Editor Finding a job as a new college graduate can be a challenge, but for students at Pacific Lutheran University, it is a little easier thanks to the annual spring Career Expo. The Expo, hosted by Career Connections, welcomed 53 companies Wednesday looking to hire students for internships and careers. About 300 PLU students attended the event Wednesday. Before students entered the Expo, they received printed name tags with their major and minor on it. . The Expo took place in the Anderson University Center's Chris Knutzen Hall. The representatives set up at tables in a ring around the edge of the CK Hall for students to walk through. Companies such as Aflac, Navy, Xerox and King 5 News attended. With a vast array of options to choose from, students could find a position in jobs specializing in IT, business, health or the military. "I like that the Expo provides opportunities for students to find a career or network," junior Paul Garcia, a computer science major, said. Most of the companies that attended the Expo had attended in the past and wanted to return to PLU. They also provided tips to students

looking for jobs. "Do your homework about the company you want to work for," Sonji Young, the diversity outreach program manager for Cambia Health Solutions, said. "Make sure you are active on social media, especially Linkedln." The Expo provided photographers to take professional Linkedln profile pictures. Students could then access the photo via a link Career Connections emailed to participants. "We provide this service to build relationships with employers," Jody Hom, recruiting and outreach manager for Career Connections, said. "We want to assess more opportunities for students." One of the reasons for the Expo is for younger students to become comfortable networking and interviewing. "It's important for students to get face-to-face time with employers and recruiters," Catherine Swearingen, executive director of Career Connections, said. "[Students] need to get used to talking to recruiters. We encourage them to practice to get the jitters out." The next career-orientated event will be the fall Job and Internship fair. "We were thrilled for this tum out," Swearingen said. She also said any students interested in seeing a particular company present at the next event should email Career Connections.

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Junior Christina Hayes gets some tips from t he World Trade Center of Tacoma. St udent s attended t he Career Expo Wednesday to find internships and career opportunities as well as network with companies in the area.

Future ASPLU and you 'Lean In' event seeks alumnae advice "If you aren't tough when someone pushes you back and you want to be at the table, you have to push back," Hagerdon said. "So if somebody "What would you do if you doesn't like you, don't pull back. You weren't afraid?" - this was just one can't let somebody else and the way of the four key questions a group of that they feel about you from their own Pacific Lutheran alumnae answered perception interfere with your ability to Wednesday during the interactive do what you want to do." "Lean In" panel. The rest of the panel agreed striving This event, hosted by PLU's Wild to be likeable will get a person far Hope Center for Vocation, welcomed but creating a clear balance between PLU students and faculty into the likability and standing one's ground is Anderson University Center's vital to success in the workplace. Regency Room. It gave attendants the Closer to the end of the questioning, opportunity to learn about "leaning in" the panel collectively suggested that and pursuing their ambitions without creating a balance between work life reservations. and home life is vital. The panel included "If you Lisa Kittilsby '84, can hire it done, Tina Hagedron '94, do it," Hagerdon Murphy Shannon said, referring '07 and Jill Hulings to housework or '08. Each panelist childcare. "I know received the same "If somebody doesn't it doesn't seem set of four questions possible now, but you, don't pull when surrounding Sheryl like you find the Sandburg's popular sweet spot in your back." book, "Lean In." salary,. that's when The panelists, who you can ask for Tina Hagedron had read Sandburg's help." book prior to the Class of 1994 The students panel, offered who attended an abundance of the panel said personal knowledge. they gained some Professor Lynn indispensable Hunnicutt, the chair insight they can of economics, began easily employ when entering the by briefly introducing each panelist professional world. . and dove straight into asking the panel, "I attended all of the other panels "what would you do if you weren't for the 'Lean In' series," junior Ruthie afraid or how have you dealt with your Kovanen said, "and I was especially own fears?" curious to see, with this specific panel, Murphy, who works with electoral what alumni had to say about how they campaigns within Washington state, 'lean in' in their career paths." said confidence is key. Kovanen said she had hoped for a "In politics and government, it's more diverse group of people though, predominantly white men," Murphy like an English or physics major. said. "I would say the phrase 'fake it Most of the panelists hold until you make it' is a phrase u sed all positions within the areas of business of the time and is the biggest way I've or communication, which greatly conquered my fears. Be a little extra appealed to attendants like first-year confident even if you think you have no D' Ajah Johnson. idea what you're talking about." "The first time I heard of it ['Lean The next question peaked the In'], I was like, 'what does that mean?"' interest of the audience and conjured Johnson said. "But now I get it. It's not resounding laughter from the panelists: our inadequacies we're afraid of but the "Does everyone have to like you?" power we actually have."

By JANAE REINHARDT Guest Writer

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

President Sarah Smith (right) and Vice President Dan Stell, both juniors, sit in the ASPLU office. The two ran for office together in April and said they are excited to make changes in the ASPLU Senate. 路

By RELAND TUOMI News Editor Dynamic duo Sarah Smith and Dan Stell have won the Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University elections, and they're ready to get down to business. Smith and Stell, both juniors, won ASPLU president and vice president respectively in April. As president, Smith is the student voice in different administration committees. She also guides the ASPLU Senate to ensure its success. As vice president, Stell is head of the board of directors, which has positions representing different parts of campus, including the programming, diversity and sustainability directors. The ASPLU directors work with their administrative counterparts to create a network to make sure everyone is working together for students. In the final few weeks of the semester, Smith said she wants to reach out to and be more transparent with the student body, saying the Senate meeting agenda and minutes will be posted in the Daily Flyer. 'Tm changing where Senate meetings are being held," Smith said. "I want to make it a lot more open and inclusive toward the students so they can walk in and see what we're talking about." Senate meetings will be moved to the Regency Room in the upper Anderson University Center rather than room 133. Smith also wants to put a sandwich board

in front of the meeting place so students will know where the meeting is taking place. Stfll wants to work on developing a branch of ASPLU that will specifically work with programming - such as dances and other entertainment - called the Programming . Board. The board will be self-sustaining within ASPLU to make programming more consistent across campus. "It'sanissueofover-programming,"Smith said. "There's not enough communication with different parts of campus. The programs director can delegate and communicate to what's happening across campus." Smith and Stell also want ASPLU to be a resource for clubs across campus and the Programming Board will help with that. In addition, each board member will focus on one part of programs. So one person under the programs director will be in charge of dances, for instance. Smith and Stell said they want the student body to know their ears are open to change. "This is a place for students to come and see a change on campus," Smith said. "ASPLU is a resource to make those changes. We are here to serve them." Stell wanted students to know they can even stop him on his way around campus. "My vice president hat is always 路on, so if anyone wants to talk to me, do it. I love having those conversations," Stell said.

To learn more about ASPLU, attend the Senate meetings at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays.


4NEWS

What to do atPLU Friday-4/18 Easter Break Begins. PLU offices closed.

Saturday-4/19 Easter Break

Sunday-4/20 Easter Break

THE MOORING MAST PRIVILEGE FROM PAGE 1 Junior Carly Brook said it was a good discussion and that it was intriguing the conversation trended toward the topic of having class privilege versus lacking privilege. "I kind of noticed that it turned into a discussion of how to deal with your class privilege," Brook said, "when I don't know if that was the case for everyone in the room." She also said it was interesting to talk about how some people might have more privilege than others because they went to certain schools that provided information on things like college applications and resumes when other schools did not. "Overall, I think the event was important to uncover a social status [class privilege] that . isn't talked about as often as it should be," Brook said.

Easter Break Ends. Classes resume at 11:15 a.m.

Mortar Board honor society ceremony. AUC Regency Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. "Consent & Sexual Health." AUC CK, 6-8 p.m.

Tuesday-4/22 Former Governor Christine Gregoire speaks on Earth Day. Karen Hille Phillips Center, 7:30-9p.m. MediaLab presents: "Transition from College to Career." AUC Regency Room, 6-9:30 p.m. ASPLU Senate Meeting. AUC 133, 6-8 p.m.

Wednesday-4/23 Senior Exhibition. University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Residential Life Institute info session. AUC SIL Multipurpose Room, 9 a.m.-noon The International Poetry Reading. Hong Hall, 3:30-5:30 p.m. 'Women Sing the Blues." Garfield Book Company Community Room, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Celebration of Service .. AUC Regency Room, 5:30-7 p.m. Michelle Johnson BA Presentation. MBR 306, 8-9 p.m.

Thursday-4/24 Stand in Solidarity Kick Off. Red Square, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Senior Exhibition. University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Residential Life Institute info session. AUC SIL Multipurpose Room, 1-3 p.m. "Take Back the Night." Red Square, 5 p.m.-midnight "Sexuality and Reproduction in Scandinavia." Scandinavian Cultural Center, 5:30-7 p.m. Chorale spring concert. Tickets: general admission, $5 senior citizens (55+) and alumni, free to PLU community, students and 18 and under. Lagerquist Concert Hall, $8

8-9:30p.m .

3702 South Fife Street Tacoma, WA 98409 Appointments 253.617.7000

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FACIAL AND BROWWAX$37 MIZANI SMOOTHING TREATMENT$34

Easter Egg Coloring. Hong Hall, 2-5p.m.

Monday-4/21

APRIL 18, 2014

PLU Briefs:

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Forensics places in top 30 T.O.H. Karl Forensics Forum debators David Mooney and Pam Barker, both seniors, were some of the nation's elite at the United States Universities Worlds Debate Championship at Purdue University. To gain this coveted place among finalists, Mooney and Barker had to out-debate 220 other teams, including teams from Yale, Cornell and Stanford. Professor Justin Eckstein, the PLU Forensics advisor, was also named one of the country's best adjudicators. "It was extremely rewarding to see our hard work pay off," Barker said. This national tournament is the final round for Pacific Lutheran University's Forensics team superb season. Barker and Mooney made it to elimination rounds at every tournament attended, making them the most consistent and competitive teams in PLU Forensics history.

Crime Time:

PLU's Campus Safety Blotter Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports for the week of April 7

Medical AidCampus Concierge staff in the Anderson University Center called Campus Safety April 11 in need of medical aid, because a student had suffered a laceration to her right foot After she controlled the bleeding, the Campus â&#x20AC;˘ Safety officer escorted the student to her on-campus residence. The student signed a medicai release and no further action was required.

Alcohol Policy Violation. An on-duty Resident Assistant (RA) called â&#x20AC;˘ Campus Safety April 11 in response to an alcohol violation in Tingelstad Hall. Campus Safety and the RA contacted the people in the room, two students and two non-students, and then disposed of their alcohol The incident was forwarded to Student's Rights and Responsibilities (SRR). Vehicle DamageAt about 2 a.m. April 12, a student reported damage to her vehicle caused by the Tingelstad parking lot's gate. Video evidence showed the student took an inordinate amount of time exiting the gater causing it to impact her car.

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Medical AidA Tingelstad RA requested Vehicle Damagemedical assistance from Campus Safety A student reported his car had last Sunday for an intoxicated student been damaged by a hit and run in the around 2:30 a.m. The student was Morken p{:lrking lot April 11 around 3 vomiting and so intoxicated that she p.m. Video revealed found no suspect was unal:>le to answer questions. The RA vehicle information. Campus Safety took called Central Pierce Fire and Rescue no further action. before Campus Safety, and they said the student was ai>le to stay in her room the remainder of the evening. Campus Safety reported the incident to SRR.

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APRIL 18, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

A&E 5

Life,lOilg ;a~n.~ef pllfsues passion at PLU ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer Sophomore Courtney Volta started dancing at a young age and since then, she has blossomed into a full-fledged powerhouse of dance. Volta began dancing at the tender age of 6 at All That! Dance Company in her hometown of Eugene, Ore. She started focusing on studying jazz, tap and ballet dancing. Volta said dancing was just a fun and exciting pastime until the fourth grade. It was around then that she decided to join the competitive team of All That!, buckling down and getting serious about her dancing. Her . seriousness showed through when she began teaching classes in middle school. By the time high school rolled around, Volta was dancing almost constantly. "By high school, I was dancing about 25 hours a week - before and after school - and traveling to competitions on the weekends," Volta said. Dancing, although pleasurable for her, was beginning to take its toll on Volta. "My senior year [of high

Courtney Volta has been dancing since the age of 6. She performed in. "Dance Concert" for the first time this year.

school] I started to get pretty burnt out. With so many commitments, I felt like I was no longer dancing for myself," Volta said. "But I did, so that I wouldn't disappoint my family who had paid so much for my training and traveling, and my instructors who had invested so much in me." After a short summer intermission between the end of high school and the start of Pacific Lutheran University, she decided to join the PLU Dance Team her first year and participated in the Spring Concert. However, she did not go on to pursue a spot on the team this year. She said the break has given her a new sense of what it means to be a dancer. "The ability to express what I feel words cannot is the biggest reason I love dancing so much," Volta said. "There is no feeling

"There is no feeling like being on stage conveying a powerful and personal message to an audience through dance." Courtney Volta sophomore

like being on stage conveying a powerful and personal message to an audience through dance." After dancing in multiple pieces as well as choreographing several original dances, Volta has yet to choose a favorite form of dance. She does, however, hold true to the fact that being surrounded by loved ones makes a considerable difference in which dances are especially memorable. "Dances that have a special place in my mind are ones that I danced with my closest friends," Volta said. "There is so much power when you dance with someone whose energy you feel and feed off of." Volta's latest work includes her performance and choreographed dance in this year's "Dance Concert" production. She danced in several acts, and her own work, "Joy," debuted on stage to applause, cheering and whooping. Even though this is a milestone for her, Volta said she . has no plans to slow down anytime soon and intends to dance w ith PLU again next year. "Dance is absolutely a lifelong passion. I can't imagine not dancing again," Volta said. "I hope I can be 90 years old shaking what I've got."

PHOTO COURTESY OF QUINN HUELSBECK

Sophomore Courtney Volta, a former dance team member, performed in "Dance Concert" at PLU for the first time last weekend. Volta, who has been dancing since the age of6, described dance as a "lifelong passion" and said she "can't imagine not dancing again."

Choir of the West returns from Montana tour first year of Choir of the West, which he with choral music." year's volunteers were really appreciated. Carson said Galante told students they Additionally, breakfast was usually described as a mixed vocal ensemble. can come to Pacific Lutheran University, provided by the volunteers at the home "Music is really intense," Carson said. The choir usually rehearses four days major in something other than music and where the choir members stayed. The . After 30-plus hours of b_us riding and per week for about 90 minutes each day. still get a music scholarship. churches normally provided dinner for the So, Carson said, these high school stops choir as well. five performances, the Ch01r of the West Choir of the West guidelines indicate Outside of church performances, high returned from.its 2014 Spring Tour Sunday members should practice in their own time. build important connections and show off night and sang in 'il. Homecoming C-0ncert···· ······ Carson······said······· this ··· ·outside····· practice · ··· whatthechoixr·can·do: ·········································· ······· · school visits· andhomestaysi thetour ·also Tuesday evening. ", received special emphasis for the set they However, <Carson said the intent of the included scenery and several pit stops. Senior Lisa C-at1son attended the took on tour, which contained lengthy high school stops was more to share the The choir visited The Lewis and Oark homecoming concert and estimated pieces. collegiate muJic experience with students, Inten:>.retive Center in Great Falls. Watson fttat--. ~PP..roximately) 10_0 people. were in "There wasn't too much repetition in in comparison, to the oftici~~ff?tfalJces< said iliat; . foX: he_r, the best part. of the ~~endance:-Sh.e...~so said the chou: sang 11 rehearsal," Carson said. "The songs were which all tooklplace at ~iif~.c ("\;, ,, /ll\USeum was: fee~g the pelts of different pieces. so long that repeating would tire out our Congregatipn members fronr these animals. '1 liked the variety of the pieces they Whitefish was another stop, where the S k _·"' choir had lun _ ch and a. few hours of tourism played," Carlson said. "There were . , po ·ane . r~ lig10us ones an d f o lk ones among others. " [ ('a:\'('H'l\'Ol't h and sh oppmg. • .,. "·~ '"""' .• • The tour also inql_:!q~ seeing the Great 1 Leading up to the homecoming cc:mcert, ' 1 . the West Ill Leaven\\;otth, Missoula, F'.111s of the . tour a* diences m van?us '_r:; ~...w-~. G _reat_ F1all_s_. K<allspell and ,. viewed the s.1·ghts Wl:l'l.l:fows of amd Montana, mcludih.1:r avenworth, ''0'it""'! ··-·· _ . ___ } / ~-cthe bus as well. T~ . rhi \,;,. >~···. · ~-.,···~·~· ;::::::y • ,_ , iv¥ssoula, Great Falls, spell and •ot;~;;;,c,_,/(' '""""'""'-··-'-· -..:;:·· ... ~~ .-,,:'.~~~!fJ:.··were . mount~ everywhere Spokane. · "--'·-~"o<..-::;;;..: and lots of cows," Watson sru.d. \ Brian Galante, an assistant professor of '.\fissouh\, While there were many great aspects of music, directed this year's tour. Galante Spring Tour this year, Carson emphasized ha1s been serving as the choir's conductor the choir always continues to aim for dJriri.gRicl:t<lf<;i_Nance's 2013-14 sabbatical voices." churches hosted the choir members, greatnessyearround. leave. ·· At some locations, only parts of the providing them with places to stay and "We all strive for a really high quality 1T he choir also collabQ[ated with Oksana prepared pieces were . performed, while food. . performance that's well put together Jw:i,ior Katrina Watson is concluding her and in tune and also to have fun with the Ezhokina, the chair of piano studies, during the entire tom.: set was performed in other the first half of the perform!ifice. . .. _.. . locations. ···• second _year as a Choir of the West member, performance," Carson said. "You can't be 1The entire choir, which , i§ composed /~,.,The concerts were in churches, but and she said her homestay experience on super uptight like it has to be perfect, but of about 40 members, went on the tour, the tour also included some high schools tourthisyearwasbetterthanherexperience youwantitasgoodasitcanbe." stai}'ing in homestays and riding a bus with with exchanges - where the Choir of the last year. While Carson said it's obvious all the a bathroom, television and Wi-Fi. West sings a few pieces for the high school "Everybody had really nice beds for choir members enjoy performing," he said Members spent bus time playing games, choirs, which will sometimes sing back if us, at least in mine, which doesn't always he likes, "how all the members really care listening to music, sleeping, looking over time allows. happen, so that was nice. And all the people about the music." music to be performed and even doing Carson said that visiting high schools were really nice," Watson said. Watson described Choir of the West as, is, "to show what we do here, show about Watson said that, in past years, choir "a place where I can go and make highsome homework. Sophomore David. Carson is in · his Choir of the West and what's going on here members have had to sleep on floors, so this level beautiful music."

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THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

APRIL 18, 2014

FAIR FOOD: the good, the bad and the ugly Fire destroys b'uilding after fair This: fair also received some unintended attention when a twoalann fire broke out in one of the barns Sunday night after.the fair dosed. A hot water tank inside a nearby Krusty Pup food stand caught fire. Employees called 911 after they were unable to douse the flames with fire extinguishers. Of the 50 animals inside the barn, firefighters and fair workers were able to rescue 49. According to reports, one piglet died as a result. Evergreen Hall, which housed the petting zoo and other 4-H exhibits, was gutted b}"the flames. The building was a complete loss. Fair officials said the fair will still open as planned next fall, though some of the exhibits may need to be housed in tents. PHOTO BY LEAH TRAXEL

Though sporting a new nllme this year, the Washington State Fair boasts some of the same staple foods it has for more than 100 years. Scones are an excellent choice for fairgoers looking for a tasty treat that won't ruin their diet - at least not as badly as the deep-fried butter.

By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor . Thousands flocked to the Puyallup fairgrounds last weekend for the 25th annual spring fair. The spring event is kind of like the younger sibling of the grand Washington State Fair' at the end of the summer - all the same things, just less of them. As expected, fair animals, rides and food were the main attractions. While the £air's activities and attractions are smaller in number compared to the September fair, it draws a hefty crowd. In 2010, the fair reported more than 126,000 attendees. While some might waffle about whether the rides are worth it or be unsure about looking at the animals, you'd be hard pressed to find someone who doesn't enjoy fair food. In honor of the fair' s end, here's a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of fair food options.

option at the fair, but they're the most delicious, and one can feed two to three people depending on your appetite. I've never seen these offered anywhere else, so it's definitely something to take advantage of during fair season.

BONUS Good: scones This fair staple has been at the Puyallup fairgrounds for more than 100 years. Fisher,

the Seattle-based manufacturer, boasts it uses the same recipe today it used when it started operations in 1910. Hot and covered in jam, these things are a must - and a fair price too at $1.50 each. If you get the craving for them outside of the fair, you can usually find the scone mix at the grocery store. Cash & Carry also has a 50 lb. package of the mix - for heftier appetites.

The Bad: fair burgers The only claim to fame a fair burger has is that it's usually covered in grilled onions. Other than that, it's nothing special. At more than $5 a pop, you're better off stopping at a McDonald's on your way home than springing for a burger and a drink. Because burger joints in the fair get so busy, more often than not your burger was made before you ordered it and had been sitting under a heat lamp for a while - not a recipe for the greatest burger ever.

The Ugly: cheesy fries Fries and cheese, what's not to love? Well, you probably won't love the heart attack you're giving yourself with the combination of nacho cheese and salty fries. Not to mention the cheese itself starts to take on an orange tint the longer it sits on the fries, which is not exactly appetizing. I'd be lying if I said I'd never had them, but 111 concede 100 percent they don't look good at all.

The Good: elephant ears No, they aren't actually the ears of elephants, but they look like them. These delicious crepe-like cakes are fried, doused in butter and then slathered with your choice of cinnamon sugar or raspberry jam. At $6.75 each, these aren't the cheapest

Compiled from reports in The Tawma

News Tn1mne.

BONUS Ugly: fried butter PHOTO BY LEAH TRAXEL

For fair attendees less concerned about being heart-healthy and just looking to indulge, curly fries covered in nacho cheese are a tasty treat.

At this point, they're just trying to be ridiculous.

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Documentary tackles wealth inequality in America · By UNA TINGVIK-HAAVE AdE Writer Through the documentary "Inequality for All" and subsequent discussion, Pacific Lutheran University students learned about the fast-widening inequality gap in the United States. The documentary played April 15 in the Hauge Administration Building. "This is such a pertinent topic right now," Kaitlyn Sill, an assistant professor of political science, said. "We felt that this was something we should open up to the campus community." Regarding wage inequality, the U.S. is one of the most unequal countries in the world today, and the inequality gap is only widenipg. The documentary, "Inequality for All" not only examined the widening income inequality in the U.S. but also presented former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich's views on what is happening and why it is happening in the U.S. today. After the screening it was the students' turn to share their views, which varied

greatly. A couple of them had opinions so different they had a heated discussion. · Sill said she tried to do a few screenings per year and to choose a topic that makes people think about government and politics and not just current events. "We really try to dig in and actually talk about the actual underpinnings of our government," Sill said. "And then we like multiple perspectives." One question the documentary posed, and one that also came up in the subsequent discussion, was: "How do you build wealth in the U.S. when you don't have anything?" The movie offered several solutions to this problem, most of which required the government to raise the minimum wage, strengthen workers' voices, invest in education and fix the tax system. "I actually learned a whole lot, because I'm not very educated in the whole economics discourse, which is really what came out today," junior Chris Johnson said . Sill said she was surprised by the high attendance. "We had political science, philosophy and probably some econ students, and so we had a pretty good tum out," Sill said .

Chef takes silVer at culinary competition By ALISON HAYWOOD

AdEEditor

third year Blessum has participated, and the third year Blessum has earned a silver medal.

PLU Dining and Culinary Services sous chef Chuk Blessum took home a silver medal after partidpating in a Top Chef-style cooking competition in Los Angeles April 4. Thecompetition,calledFlavors, was put on by the National Assodaton of College and University Food Service. Contestants were given the principle ingredient, live Maine lobster, and challenged to create a dish around it. They were judged on organization, professionalism, hygiene and technique as well as the quality of their final dish. Blessum made lobster en burre blanc with saut of fennel . Three other competitors earned gold medals. Chefs from PLU have competed in NA0JFS since 2007. This is the CHtlK BLE·S SUM ;,.,.,,·_-~,-;;~~;;@;:,:,,,<;---;:.;>dll';"M~--~~ w 'f!"W;;>;

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APRIL 18, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

A&E 7

Dancers get lost and find themselves

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

The cast of "Dance Concert" performs "Get Home," choreographed by sophomore Miranda Winters, April 11 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. "I think people get lost in a lot of things," Winters said. "In events, in their minds, even in other people, so we constantly have to re-find ourselves and going back to your roots, to home, is the best way to reconnect and remember who you are and who you want to be. My dance is about finding yourself after getting lost. It's about getting back home and getting back to your soul."

Students connect with coininunity through art project community were the most common themes the attendants mentioned. In the months following the meeting, Refaei sketched a rough design of what she Two Pacific Lutheran University said she thought incorporated the ideas students are in the midst of a community gathered at the public forum. involvement project they hope will The design spells out the word ultimately bring the people of Parkland "Parkland," with each letter representing a closer together. different part of the community - people, Project manager Carly Brook, a junior, agriculture, recreation, kids, landscape, is working in partnership with lead artist academics, native people and diversity. and senior Saiyare Refaei to paint a mural Each letter will contain its own design that on the 114-foot, west-facing wall of the tells the story of the corresponding theme. Parkland post 路 and Brook office, located Refaei held on 路 the comer another public of Garfield and meeting April C streets. 8 to . present the "When I rough draft to learned about "[Parkland is] an area that has the community this project, and give people a I was really a lot of struggle, but also has a chance to critique excited to help the design. put Parkland lot of vibrancy and a lot of active Diane Crews, back on the founder of Olivia community organizations." map," Brook Jane Enterprises, said. "It's said, "I am Carly Brook an area that embracing this has a lot of junior [mural] because I struggle, but think it's a good also has a lot of way for this vibrancy and neighborhood a lot of active to finally come community together." organizations." There are more Refaei proposed the project after a trip than 15 groups that have committed to to Oaxaca, Mexico last year. Refaei said either help fund the project or volunteer she spoke with some of the street artists their time painting. Both Franklin Pierce in Oaxaca who routinely paints murals and Washington high schools will have on the sides of buildings to tell that students at the multiple volunteer paint neighborhood's specific story. days . . "We chose the post office because we "It will be nice to see some of the wanted a community-oriented mural," different groups come together that might Refaei said. "We want to tell" Parkland's not normally encounter one another story." otherwise," Brook said. The . two launched the project in The wall is scheduled to be primed December after getting approval from PLU April 26 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m., and Brook and and the post office. They held a community Refaei said they urge anyone interested to forum to determine what residents would come out and help. Those who can't make like to see in the theoretical mural. it to the priming but would still like to Brook and Refaei split the 40 people participate can help stencil the outline on in attendance into small groups and the wall May 3. a~ked the groups to list a few themes that "Ilris will be an ongoing summer encompass Parkland. Diversity, rural to project that we hope to have completed no urban transition, resiliency, wholeness and later than August 16," Refaei said. "There

By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor

PHOTO BY BLAKE JEROME

Junior Carly Brook (right) holds a stencil in place to paint a "coming soon" sign on the wall of the Parkland post office, while senior Saiyare Refaei documents her efforts. Refaei got the idea to paint a mural as a community involvement project after speaking with street artjsts in Oaxaca, Mexico.

will be multiple volunteer painting days scheduled and posted on our website." So far, Brook and Refaei have raised $10,000 for the project, but they said with the high cost of paint and the enormity of the space to be painted that the project could cost even more. Safe Streets volunteer Marlene Hayden said, "This mural is helping to build a sense of commi.Inity that I haven't seen in a long time. That kind of connection oftentimes gets lost in the process." First-year and volunteer Ariel Wood also said the project was about community.

"I really want the people of Parkland to know that even though we are only temporary residents here," Wood said, "we really care about this community and want to show it." For more information about the Parkland mural or for information about how to donate visit http://parklandmural. wordpress.com or http://discoverparkland. com. Brook has also created a Facebook page, "Parkland Community Mural Project."


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8 BUSINESS

THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 18, 2014

CEO opinions make or break company specialty apparel brands, targets its marketing at a particular segment of customers." · He continued to say the company is opposed to any "discrimination, bullying, derogatory characterizations or other anti-social behavior based on -race, gender, body type or other individual characteristics." Most Facebook commenters didn't buy the apology. One commenter wrote, "Sales must've dropped this week." · Another commented, "111 believe it when he adds .bigger sizes." Some, however, were supportive: "If there are stores specifically meant for just ·plus sizes," one commenter wrote, "what's wrong with a store specifically for smaller sizes?" A&F' s sales have diminished for the last four quarters, according to Bloomberg. Another CEO' s views fueled a controversy that led to recordPHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS high sales. After Dan Cathy, the CEO of Chick-fil-A, spoke out against gay marriage, prote.sters gathered around the resturaunt to According to The Huffington share their views. Surprisingly, this caused the company's sales to rise 12 percent. Post, "the Baptist family that Jeffries is still under scrutiny don't belong [in our clothes], owns Chick-fil-A, a fast-food By KATELYNN PADRON for comments he made in 2006 and they can't belong. Are we chain based in Atlanta, has for Business Writer years given millions of dollars about the "exclusionary" brand. exclusionary? Absolutely." "In every school there are the Last spring, Jeffries' to organizations fighting sameA CEO' s oplllion can make cool and popular kids, and then controversial comments sex marriage and supporting or break a company. Clothing there are the not-so-cool kids," circulated the Internet. heterosexual ones." retailer Abercrombie & Fitch Jeffries said in an interview with Dan Cathy, CEO of Chick-fil-A Many consumers said they (A&F) and fast fpod chain Chick- Salon, a news and entertainment were offended, causing A&F to _ also told the Baptist Press that "We fil-A have both been affected by website. know that it might not be popular lose popularity. their CEOs' opinions. · "We go after the attractive allapologized on with everyone, but thank the Jeffries · A&F CEO Michael Jeffries' American kid with a great attitude Facebook saying, "A&F is an Lord, we live in a country where personal opinions added to a and a lot of friends . A lot of people aspirational brand that, like most we can share our values and downward spiral in sales. operate on biblical principles."

Cathy's views led many gay marriage supporters to protest Chick-fil-A. A trio of drag queens even recorded a parody to the tune of "Hold On" by Wilson Philips. It's called "Chow Down (at Chickfil-A)." The drag queens sang about their love of Chick-fil-A food and about their sexuality. "Chick-fil-A says you make the baby Jesus cry ... Chow down at Chick-fil-A, even if you're gay," the song went. Regardless of the negative publicity, Chick-fil-A's sales rose 12 percent. Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee dubbed the company's 2012 record sales day "Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day." Despite the record sales, Cathy expressed his regrets about associating the company with his views. "I think that's [same-sex marriage is] a political debate that's going to rage on," Cathy said in a March 14 interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "And the wiser thing for us to do, is to stay focused on customer service." The results of a CEO' s opinions are somewhat unpredictable. While Michael Jeffries' opinions further buried A&Fs sales, Dan Cathy's were beneficial to Chickfil-A. Regardless of the effect on sales, both CEOs apologized for offending and alienating consumers.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 18, 2014

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BUSINESS 9

Corporations get social Businesses create unique social media personalities By JILLIAN STANPHILL Business Writer F.::lllc>'.'. u:. (•': 1 :. rtt·.. r.

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Social media is no longer about the individual. Companies, conglomerates s1·.1:i_11:.' vour t J\. ' ._., \t 1 and corporations are starting to pins\\ ith us' ,t: "Add us on Snapch ~ realize the impact their social media accounts can have on profits and marketing reach. These businesses can hire ··use our :;hashtzig 1 • public relations personnel to Like us on Fzicebook 1 utilize these social media accounts as free sources of advertisements. PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS Most companies use Taco Bell (@TacoBell) is a great straightforward materials and marketing campaign. as photo tagging. a professional tone, but a new be Facebook seems to Many companies have used example of consistent tone and trend is catching on among a plateauing in popularity, these new features for Twitter, humor. wide variety of businesses - a especially with newer social but it is too early to tell whether It aims to be funny and keep media · sources captivating they are positively or negatively a steady stream of tweets that personality for their accounts. Just like a celebrity account, younger users. affecting those businesses. follow a 'personality' of the Instagram recently surpassed businesses are attracting Twitter is only second in company. customers by establishing a Twitter as the most popular social popularity to Instagram, and not It also retweets and replies unique personality for their social media site for smartphone users, far behind. frequently when it is directly media. according to CNBC. Twitter allows for retweets, tweeted at, which engages the Twitter, Facebook and Since then, Twitter has released favorites and replies, which consumer. Instagram are all prominent a multiple photo sharing feature allows a brand or business to Snapchat has come into play business tools that can be - up to four images - for its directly address an individual as a marketing medium, and you can add TacoBell on Snapchat incorporated into a strong . smart phone application, as well customer.

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to learn what the new flavor of Doritos Locos Tacos will be. (@ General Electric generalelectric) still has a professional tone and avoids humor, but it uses a different technique to engage attention. It has created a Vine profile that encourages individuals to recreate science experiments. General Electric re-posts the best ones. This creates a sense of personal worth for the consumer along with a commitment to the company. As new marketing tools become available, it is important for a company to utilize the possibilities and keep a consistent identity for the business. Misused social media can be damaging to a company's reputation, but the opposite is also true. Social media has the potential to become the most used and most effective advertising technique as technology advances.

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The Internet cookie crumbles Companies explore alternatives to traditional online tracking By KELLI BRELAND Business Editor

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The Internet cookie has crumbled, and market researchers are scrambling for alternatives. This isn't the kind of cookie you buy online and eat, it's the name for the technique researchers have used for years to track your online data. When you visit a website, the site will attach a "cookie" to your computer. This little line of code provides the website with Hie means to recognize your computer when you visit the site again. This is often how email sites remember your login name and password, shopping sites bring up recently viewed items and how weather sites recall the zip code you entered the last time. Cookies may sound useful and harmless, at least until advertisers enter the picture. According to BBC News, advertisers and marketing firms have been found to implant "third party cookies" or "tracking cookies" into web browsers. These cookies keep track of every site you visit, and then the data is used to create tailored advertisements based on your visited websites and searches. For example, if you search Amazon.com for hiking boots and then log onto Facebook and see advertisements for hiking gear, it's because a third-party cookie was placed onto your computer. According to The Daily Mail, researchers found that "During one 15-minute surfing period, one investigator's computer was

inundated with 600 cookies, 350 of which were the tracking variety." Many consumers have recognized the advertiser's enthusiastic use for the cookie a variety of web browsers, such as Safari, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome now offer an easy option to tum off cookies. As a result, the cookie is beginning to die out. According to The Wall Street Journal, the slow death of the cookie has not led marketers to give up on Internet tracking. Instead, they are exploring new options. One of these new options is called "device identification." This method would mean that instead of attaching a cookie to the web browser, a tracking mechanism would be implanted in the device itself. Manufacturing companies would implant themselves tracking devices on computers, smartphones, tablets and other Internet accessing equipment. Thus, manufacturers would have the power to obtain the information first, and then they could sell what they gather to third party marketing firms . There is no word on whether consumers will be able to "opt out'' of device identification if it is implemented. A second option, according to the Interactive Advertising Bureau, is to use cloud targeting. It is unclear whether this method will be successful. It would mean that instead of trying to collect the data on one device or web browser, companies would try to target

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

While the idea of companies tracking your Internet activity may seem scary, throwing your computer out is not the best idea. Instead, you can simply disable cookies on your web browser. .

the consumer's entire "cloud" of. employees. information. On a personal level, you can A "cloud" is when a group use cloud computing to be able to of computers or devices use access data on all of your devices. the Internet to store all of their For instance, Apple offers a information in the same location cloud option in which all data instead of storing it on their hard saved on your iPhone, iPad and drives. Mac computer goes to a cloud, On a commercial scale, many and then can be accessed from companies use cloud computing any of your Apple devices. to store massive amounts of data, If marketers choose to target which can be accessed by all the cloud, they may run into

problems with storing the huge amounts of data they can collect. Additionally, there is no indication of how consumers will be able to protect their information from those who target the cloud. The method companies will ultimately choose to continue tracking consumers online is unknown.

But one thing is clear cookie is dying out.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

APRIL 18, 2014

Sustainability Go trayless, save food

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Luthen:m University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

By MADDIE BERNARD Columnist If you ate dinner in the University Commons April 7-8 of last week, you may have noticed something strange - someone asked for your leftover food. an Senior Jenny Taylor, environmental and Hispanic studies major, and some of her Pacific Lutheran University classmates conducted a study of food waste during dinnertime in the Anderson University Center. From 5:30-7:30 p.m., they asked students to dump their leftover food into large buckets, which they later weighed. The results were shocking. They found that the food students threw out from April 7 weighed about 163 pounds. For April 8, diners wasted 101 pounds of food. That's an average of about 66 pounds of food wasted per hour. "It's a lot of food. It's a lot of wasted resources," Taylor said. "If students were more conscious of how much they put on their plates, Jess of that food would be going to the compost." Food waste appears to be a huge issue, especially in the United States. Throwing away leftovers not only wastes food, it also wastes money, water and other resources. By wasting perfectly good food, we are clogging up the landfills, wasting the water used to grow the food and wasting the gas and fuels used to ship the food to our location. Food waste starts a chain reaction and causes more unnecessary waste in the process. By reducing our food waste, we can not only save money, but also other resources. While food waste is a large, global problem, it can be solved through our simple, everyday choices. PLU has been working to reduce its food waste over the last few years.

EDITOR-IN-CIIIEF Jessica Trondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR Reland Tuomi A&EEDITOR Alison Haywood BUSINESS EDITOR Kelli Breland OPINION EDITOR Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR Sam Hom PHOTO EDITOR Jesse Major PHOTO BY KATIB DEPREKER

Sophomore Kevin Lester considers which bin to drop his leftover bin into. PLU encourages sustainability, and provides many recycling options.

In the past, Taylor and her friends did a study of food waste in the AUC to determine if the use of trays caused more food waste during dinnertime. They found students wasted about 250-300 pounds of food at dinner when trays were present. Trays often cause us to take more food than we can eat, which results in higher food waste. There is a positive correlation between the amount of wasted food and tray use. The results of their study caused the AUC to eliminate trays from dinnertime, and it is why the AUC still remains trayless to this day. The April 7-8 study was a followup to see how much food waste accumulated in the AUC after trays had been removed from dinner. As the results show, the trayless policy

reduced the amount of food waste by about 50 percent. "We are just trying to remind you why we don't have trays," Taylor said. "It actually does have a pretty big impact." At PLU, we can each reduce our personal contribution to food waste by not using trays. Know how much you can eat, and don't let your eyes trick your stomach into thinking it's hungrier than it is. "Ask for smaller portions," Taylor said. "Try to be conscious. All this good food is being thrown away. It's kind of heartbreaking." While food waste seems like an insurmountable issue, if we each do our part, we can significantly reduce the food we waste.

Use melodies to make the most out of studying --,..

ByTAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist

A mere few weeks of school remain iri this semester. Promises of sunny days are distracting for students who are eager for summer. While it may be difficult to maintain focus while studying, there is one solution - music. Many argue that music is distracting and can hinder you from your studies. Other sources suggest that with the

proper music selection you will not only be able to focus better, but you may see direct results through an increased grade point average. I can't study without listening to music. No matter what homework I am doing, it has become a habit to automatically turn on a song once I begin to study. Other students feel differently. "I usually have to read for homework," sophomore Caila Faunterberry said. "It's difficult to read while listening to music." Edutopia.org, a site that shares evidence-based K-12 learning strategies, features an analysis of a study conducted by Nick Perham, a lecturer at the University of Wales, regarding the effects of listening to music while studying. His main point is that music causes distraction. Perham found that lyrics will disrupt your comprehension of reading. His argument is valid in that trying to

understand two ideas at once will not be as effective as focusing on one concept at a time. He could not deny, however, .that music can affect your mood greatly, which could contribute to a happier atmosphere for studying. If you are not in a positive mood, Perham found that simply listening to music can boost it, altering your state of mind. Spotify, the music streaming service, conducted a study with psychologist 路Emma Gray to research habits and effects of studying while listening to music. The research concluded the critical factor in deciding whether this is beneficial or not comes down to the type of music you listen to. The amount of beats per minute can trigger different parts of your brain and each subject works best with different genres. For those studying science, humanities and languages, the left side of the

brain is most active during these types of learning. So listening to songs with 5080 beats per minute, such as "Mirrors" by Justin Timberlake or "We Can't Stop" by Miley Cyrus were the most effective, according to Metro. For those studying art, English and drama, these subjects trigger the right side of the brain for creativity. Listening to "I Can't Get No Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones or Katy Perry's "Firework" stimulated the mind best. The study also found that math students who listened to classical music consisting of 60-70 beats per minute received an average score of 12 percent better on their tests. "Iflknewthatmusiccould improve my grade average then I would certainly try it," Faunterberry said. Next time you go to do homework, consider turning on some music that best suits your studies.

SENIOR COPY EDITOR Keis Mejlaender COPY EDITOR Blake Jerome ONLINE EDITOR Leah Traxel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Storm Gerlock MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Evan Heringer NEWS @NINE PRODUCER Allison Reynolds ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

EDITOR'S NOTE The front page of last week's issue included a photo of an April 5 protest at the Tacoma Detention Center.

The Ma.st has received feedback about the content of the sign, which includes a Spanish expression that, while relevant to the coverage of the protest, may be offensive without more context. Our intent of running the photo was to report that PLU students participated in the protest because the issue affects members of our community. Please look for a full story about the protest in our April 25 edition.


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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 18, 2014

Troubling tution costs causes turmoil By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

In President Obama's January State of the Union speech, he called for a reversal on rising tuition costs. "Higher level education cannot be a luxury," President Obama said. "It's an economic imperative that every family in America should be able to afford." To that, I say, "heck yes." I also wonder why Pacific Lutheran University is not listening. Last year, tuition alone cost $32,800, rising this year to $34,440. Last year, students got a letter in the mail about rising tuition, which explained the extra $2,000 added to our bills. That letter caused a stir and a grumble among students, but not enough for them to get up and do something about it. It seems like students are just savoring the time they have until it gets bumped up again. In Florida, tuition for state colleges and universities is frozen. This applies to universities across Minnesota too. A frozen tuition is just that, a tuition price that does not waver or increase over time. It is a trend that is catching on in many universities. Colleges are realizing how tempting a frozen tuition is to. most students and are giving them what they want. PLU should jump on board, before legislation passes, and become one of the many colleges leading the way. We are very progressive in so many things. We should be progressive in tuition and student life as well. "In todays world, we need a college degree to get hired at most places," sophomore Emma Pierce said. "But in order to go to college, we have to invest a lot of our time and money. In order to make money, we have to pay. It's kind of like a never-ending cycle." With tuition across the country rising, community colleges and accelerated

programs are getting more enrollments than ever. These types of schools offer quicker degrees or the option to skip over those general education courses that add years to your university time. General education requirements are something that make PLU special. However, if tuition is rising and those requirements are the reason students have to stay in school for four years instead of three, then I do not see how that cost is worth it when we could go to a community college and do those for a much less burdensome price. "I feel like PLU could maybe see where they could adjust their budgets in some places, like not watering the grass during certain seasons or limiting how many dishes students use at dinner," Pierce said. "By reducing the budget in certain areas of excess, there would be more funds for scholarships." Another option that colleges and universities have decided to take part in is setting up programs to offset the cost of tuition. For instance, university sustainability programs have promoted the concept of offsetting tuition with being sustainable. Therefore, if students over the course of a year can recycle and reuse 90 percent of waste produced, tuition would not be raised the next year. These programs support not only a tuition freeze, but environmental awareness and student involvement as well. Some schools argue they offset raising tuition by raising financial aid, which is a misconception. According to economist and publisher Mark Kantrowitz, schools hand out a lot of aid, but to raise aid by another dollar, they must raise tuition by $1.50. At that rate, colleges would be raising tuition about 50 percent faster than the rising inflation of our country. Financial aid cannot be the only solution. Internal programs should be taking an active role in working toward a fixed tuition rate. If there is anything I know about Lutes, it is that they love their school, but they also love change, and we make change happen where we see it is necessary. When Lutes push for change, they can make anything happen.

It seems like students are justsavoringthetiinethey have until it [tuition] gets bumped up again.

OPINION 11

Be aware of intimate partner violence By SHANNON MCCLAIN Columnist In 2007, the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) reported that 21 percent of college students had experienced dating violence from a current partner, while 32 percent reported dating violence from a past partner. While anyone can be affected by intimate partner violence (IPV), including men and women in both same-sex and opposite-sex relationships, those at the greatest risk of nonfatal intimate partner violence are females aged 20-24, according to the NCADV. Jennifer Warwick, a victim advocate for the Women's Center and the Voices Against Violence project coordinator, said that in her experience it seems disempowerment tends to work more effectively than physical abuse. Just like off campus, the most common form of violence on college campuses is emotional, mental and verbal violence, which can then escalate to physical violence. Two popular tactics are isolation and verbal abuse. Isolation can be disguised as love and romance. The partner says things like, "I want to be with you all the time." Just this statement alone doesn't mean it is IPV, but if the victim doesn't really want to spend all of her or his time with the other, then it becomes a form of isolation as the victim cannot see friends or family as often or at all. The other common tactic is verbal abuse. This is name calling and other forms of shaming. It could even be shaming the victim's friends by saying things like, "Why would you want to hang out with them?" Warwick said electronics also play a role in IPV. Email, social media and particularly texting can be used by the abuser to monitor their partner. We are always accessible and can feel like we must always answer a text, while phone calls we could ignore. Often the reason people stay in these unhealthy relationships is because they are unable to路 recognize that what they have is unusual. We learn a lot about relationships from our families and communities, but we also learn from the media, particularly television and movies. Sometimes the only models we

are exposed to are not great relationship examples. Warwick said that it can be a lot for young people to unpack. We need maturity and time to move past the scripts of "what should be" and be able to say that "what is" is not right. It is more difficult for women to say they don't want to be in a particular relationship anymore. Stereotypically, women are supposed to be the fixers and the nurturers, so they can feel like they have to try to make it work. However, Warwick said she does see more empowered college women each year. As the victim advocate, Warwick sees a lot of people, even RAs, who are worried about friends or residents who don't hang out with anyone but their partner. These friends want to be supportive, but it is hard to begin that conversation, and they are afraid to judge others' relationships. Warwick encourages them to broach the subject and say something about it. If the signs are there for others to see, that means it could be pretty bad. Make sure the friend feels supported and let her or him know that you will be there to listen whenever she or he is ready to talk. The victim needs to be ready. It is a balance between the elements of fear and love - her or his safety has to be compromised enough for the victim to take action and get out. When the victim is ready, 路 Warwick advises she or he connect with an advocate like herself. Advocates can provide emotional support and empathy, and they are also confidential. It is victim-centered, so an advocate will not tell the victim what to do, but will just give the options. To learn more about healthy relationships, Sexuality Awareness and Personal Empowerment Team (SAPET) coordinates healthy relationship workshops to help students explore what they want from a relationship and their partners and how to spot the signs of IPV. Additionally, this month is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and Monday at 6 p.m. in the Chris Knutzen Hall there will be a workshop organized by SAPET on consent. It will include information on health and contraceptives, healthy communication in a relationship and models for healthy relationships. 路 Then, ."Take Back the Night" will begin Thursday at 5 p.m. in Red Square. This event shows support for victims of all kinds of violence. These are some ways students can get involved and learn more about these issues on campus. Education leads to awareness, which leads to more support for people in an unhealthy relationship or violent situation.

LETTER FROM THE BUSINESS EDITOR:

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.Coping with a liberal arts education By KELLI BRELAND Business Editor As an active member of a liberal arts .college community, I have received a full academic serving of our world's uncountable issues. Among many classes, I have watched miserable documentaries about corporate corruption, and others about gendered violence. I have read firsthand accounts of grim colonial racism and persecution. I've even discovered the factual horrors of factory farming and climate change. My awareness of this wide spectrum of issues is certainly important. In fact, through my studies of these grim topics, I have changed my personal perspective in a multitude of ways. That said, there is no getting around the fact that these topics are depressing, and at times, hard to cope with.

One of the most difficult aspects of learning about a global issue is just that - it's a global issue. When faced with such huge problems, it's challenging not to feel powerless. I have found myself asking, "What can I really do about sexual assault in India?" or "What do I do about the cholera outbreak in Haiti?" I don't think there is one correct answer. Instead, I think it comes down to two things - perspective and personal responsibility. Perspective is extremely important when coming to terms with issues in the world. Instead of exclusively looking at the problems, we need to remember that there is immeasurable good as well. Remember there are happy, healthy children, fu1filling relationships and people saved from illnesses and poverty every day. There are people passionately following their vocation, people making beneficial scientific discoveries and people simply having fun. I'm not saying that we should forget the problems. But I am saying that the positives in the world are just as important as their negative counterparts. When it comes to personal responsibility, I think it is OK to say that we cannot personally solve everything. Activism is undeniably important, but not every person can be a passionate activist on every issue. We

can't donate to every single charity, but not donating to a specific charity doesn't mean we don't care. Instead, it is up to the individual to decide her or his own personal best plan of action. I don't think it is fair to develop a standard for "what it really means to care about an issue." As a college student, I think it is critical to stay informed on issues and apply them as best as I can to my own personal choices. For example, my class on gendered violence taught me to recognize warning signs of domestic violence and sexual assault. Thus, with my new awareness, I do the best I can to prevent these situations from happening to the people around me. At the same time, I haven't volunteered at a battered women's shelter or donated to a domestic violence related cause. But I don't think that means I don't care about the issue. The bottom line is that as individuals, everyone can have a different response to an issue. As college students who are educated in many problems, we do not have to feel guilty about not being 路 able to make a big of a difference as we'd like.

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THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

APRIL 18, 2014

Universal Crossword

CLASSIFIEDS

Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 30, 2014

ACROSS 1 Teamwork inhibitor 4 Good old boy 7 Beard grown by a fanTier 10 Cold blocks 13 Beat it 15 Jeans brand 16 Convent dweller 17 one's welcome 19 Like a debtor's ink 20 Papal emissary 21 Mansion and its land 23 Small container for liquids 24 Restored to a better condition 28 Naval rank (Abbr.) 29 One customer 30 Small cloud 31 Beam in the attic 33 Highlands tongue 34 Pretty much in the neighborhood 40 First word in a Springsteen title 41 Mongolian tents 42 Sudden thrusts, in fencing 45 Wagon wheel groove 46 Word before "blonde" or "Wednesday''

49 Group

12 Conclusion

of larks 52 Scam victim 53 Person of GenTian origin 54 It can come after a shot 56 Barnyard bleater 58 Worked a manual transmission 60 Wriggly fish 61 Before, before 62 It has two or more amino acids 63 Crucial 64 Knightly title 65 Word with "want" or "personal" 66 Wordless yes DOWN 1 Develop gradually 2 Knuckled under 3 Alphas' opposites 4 Military station 5 Small celestial body 6 Where cows graze 7 "He's making_, checking it twice" 8 Entered 9 Render ineffective 1 O As payment (for) 11 Stick on a table?

14 Like some

18 22 25

26

27 29 31 32 34 35 . 36 37

38

advanced exams Word of acceptance Potatoes and yams _Orange, N.J. "lfall _ fails ... " White-tailed quadruped 32K ounces Tropical forest "Honor father . :--:" Upto the task Flour-andfat sauce thickener In an elaborate manner Bond or mart start Chewed a carrot, say

39 Polo Grounds legend Mel 43 Piano school assignments 44 Buddhist enlightenment 46 Astate capital 47 Skimpy bathing suit brand 48 Did a sheepdog's job 50 Babel construction 51 Keeper's place 52 Not really all there 55 Rose plant fruits 56 Comic book scream 57 Very small 59 Place for a nice steam

Rental house right next to PLU campus, 4 bedroom (I master for 2 beds so usually 5 person house), 2 bath, swimming pool. Rent is $1,700 including utilities! Breakdown: $340.00 per person. If interested contact Joe Jordan at (253) 678-9167

4 Bedroom House on Wheeler Street! 4 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, New gas furnace, vinyl windows, washer, dryer, dishwasher, microwave, self- cleaning oven, covered patio, fenced back yard, hardwood floors computer network, and lots of off-street parking. $1,600 per month. Contact Dave Carlson: 253-318-7008 or carlsoda@comcast.net

5 Bedroom Houses on Wheeler Street - 5 Bedrooms 2.5 baths and just a short walk to class. Lots of off-street parking, territorial view, private deck, full -sized washer and dryer, all appliances including dishwasher. Room for six students. From $1,975/Mo. Contact Dave Carlson: 253-318-7008 or carlsoda@comcast.net

SUDOKU High Fives

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PLU discusses study music The Mast asked students in a poll starting April 15 what type of music they listen to while studying. Join the conversation at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section.

What music genre do you like to listen to while studying? ..................................... .. ...... . 2"1% Other10 i;otes

24.% Instrumental9 votes 2:2% Rock8 votes -~

--

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Hacks Only a few ingredients and no idea what to cook? Try http://www.supereook.com/. ..... You enter what food you have, and it fives you recipes that use those foods.


<-

THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 18, 2014

SPORTS 13

SPORTS SCDBEBDARD -

Baseball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Lin.field

27

3

17-1

Wonl6

Willamette

21

11

13-4

Won4

George Fox

24

8

14-7

Lostl

PLU

19

13

10-7

Won2

Puget Sound

10

17

8-10

Won3

Whitworth Whitman

10

19

7-11

Wonl

18

17

7-14

Lost4

Pacific

11

18

4-14

Lostl

Lewis & Clark

9

23

3-15

Lost8

AROUND THE LEAGUE •••

I

Men's Tennis WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitman

13

3

10- 0

Won5

Pacific

13

3

10-1

Won7

George Fox

9

4

7-3

Lostl

Lewis & Clark

6

10

6-5

Wonl

Whitworth

6

10

5-5

Lost4

PLU

5

11

4-6

Won2

Puget Sound

3

11

2-8

Lost 2

MEN'S GOLF: Willamette junior Ryan Kukula won the men's individual title at the Willamette Spring Thaw in Bend, Ore. while leading the Bearcats to the team title. He shot an S-under 136 for 36 holes. He carded a.5-under 67 in the first round and earned a 3-under 69 in the second round. He won the tournament by nine strokes.

1

Softball

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BA$EB~L: Rolenn Himuro, a junior from Willamette, went 7-for-14 with at least one hit in all four games this past week. including two hits in each game of the aeries at Whitman. He also earned at least one RBI in each of Willamette's three wins against the Missi-Onaries.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: April 18 at Lewis d Clark, 3 p_m_

TEAM

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: April 18 vs. George Fox, 3:30 p.m.

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TRACK AND FIELD: Willamette junior Jordan Loos threw the javelin a persons! record 202' 4.50" at the Johu Knight Twilight to move into second place on the NCAA Division ill performance list for the season. He placed fourth at the meet behind one NAIA. and two Division II throwers. He is fifth on Willamette's all-time list.

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4

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2

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: April 18 at George Fox, 4 p.m_

-

Walton and Runco wrap up heptathlon competition at NWC Ch·a mpionships By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletic Communications A pair of Pacific Lutheran track and field student athletes wrapped up competition at the 2014 Northwest Conference Multi-Event Championships Tuesday afternoon_ Junior Hannah Walton placed ninth and sophomore Paige Runco finished 13th in the heptathlon at Charles Bowles Track. Walton's top event was a first-place showing in the 800-meters Tuesday, finishing the race with a time of 2:25-13. She added a fifth-place

finish in the javelin (28.57 meters) and an 11th-place finish in the long jump (4.28 meters) to total 3,675 points and rank ninth overall. Runco placed 11th in the 800 (2:42.03) and 12th in both the javelin (19.01 meters) and the long jump (3-76 meters) to finish 13th overall with 3,006 total points. George Fox's Maria Green won the conference heptathlon crown with a point total of 4,526. The PLU track and field teams return to action April 25-26 for the Northwest Conference Championships hosted in Tacoma by University of Puget Sound.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

Junior Hannah Walton placed fifth in the javelin. She ranked ninth overall in the heptathlon competition. Tea=ate Paige Runco, a sophomore, finished 13th in the competition.

Konopaski ties PLU single-season save record with win over Saint Martin's By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletics Communications Pacific - Lutheran's baseball team erupted for eight runs in the final three innings, and junior AJ Konopaski tied the PLU single-season record for saves. The Lutes earned a 10-5 nonconference baseball win over Saint Martin's Tuesday afternoon at SMU Baseball Field. With 11 saves this season, Konopaskileads all of NCAA Division III and tied Aaron Roetcisoender' s 2004 program record. He now has 11 saves and two wins out of the Lutes' 19 wins this year. First-year Kort Skoda pitched the first five innings for the Lutes, limiting the Saints to one earned run on five hits before sophomore Cory Nelson took over. Nelson pitched the next two innings and picked up his second win of the season. Konopaski took over ·with one out in the bottom of the eighth and picked up the final five outs of the game to earn the save. First-year Kory Vanderstaay led PLU with three hits and drove in two

runs, while Casey Dawes tallied two hits and three runs batted in. Juniors Kit Banko and Curtis Wildung, along with first-year Ben Welch, also finished with two hits. Fellow first-year Shawn Abe scored three runs in PLU's win. Saint Martin's got on the board first, scoring a run in the third, but the Lutes tied it in the top of the fourth. Wildung led off with a single, stole second and scored on Welch's single up the middle. The Saints took the lead again in the bottom of the fourth, but PLU tied it in the sixth after Collin Nilson doubled, reached third on a wild pitch and scored on an SMU errorThe final three innings featured eight runs by the Lutes and three for the Saints_ The Lutes' win improved their record to 19-13, while Saint Martin's fell to 10-25. The Lutes head to Oregon this weekend for a three-game Northwest Conference series against Lewis & Clark today and Saturday before wrapping up the weekend with a Sunday afternoon makeup game against Willamette.

MIAMI HEAT TAKE CARE OF BUSINESS Will the Miami Heat or Indiana Pacers earn the first -place seed in the Eastern Conference? By SAM HORN Sports Editor . It seems that runs are what define basketball games_ That was the case April 11 when the Miami Heat squared off against the Indiana Pacers, winning 98-86. The Heat were aided by its 16-0 run to end the game_ . This week, I asked The Mast Sports Pick 'Em Contestants if the Heat or Pacers would win the Eastern Conference_ While everyone picked the Heat to win over the Pacers last week, all of them think the Pacers will win the Eastern Conference. This is the second to last question for the Mast Sports Pick 'Em Contestants so next week will determine who will take home the prize. No, it's not money_ Just bragging rights and one awesome certificate. As it stands now, Kyle Peart and Cale Powers are tied for first place so I might have to write two certificates_ Best of luck to all of the contestants this upcoming week.

Kyle Peart (3-3) Prediction: Indiana Pacers Cale Powers (3-3) Prediction: Indiana Pacers

Alan Bell (2-4) Prediction: Indiana Pacers Drew Oord (2-4) Prediction: Indiana Pacers

Michelle Hogan (2-4) Prediction: Indiana Pacers

~


1->

THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

Boston Marathon Bombings serve as a reminder to never give up

SJIM 5JIY5... By SAM HORN Sports Editor Nearly one year ago, one city in America was in disarray. One city suffered major injuries arid three casualties. Now, one city is rebuilding, even if the emotional toll is unfathomable. On April 15, 2013, the Boston Marathon was underway. With the weather forecast promising sunlight, April 15 seemed like any other spring day. Until 2:49 p.m. With nearly 5,000 runners approaching the finish line, two pressure C0oker bombs ·e xploded, sending Boylston Street into near oblivion. and Three people died, approximately 260 people suffered injuries. Limbs were lost. Chaos

ensued. This past April 15, America remembered those who were killed in the Boston Marathon Bombings. Each slain victim had a story to tell. They still had many years left to live and search for the meaning of life. In an instant, that notion was quelled. If it weren't for two perpetrators, the people in the proud city of Boston would be conducting business as usual. But because ofDzhokhar Tsarnaev and his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Boston is stronger. It's because of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and Tamerlan Tsarnaev Boston will never be the same. The city lost three people on that fateful day in April, but Bostonians gathered together and grew stronger as a collective whole. They learned

APRIL 18, 2014

how to overcome unimaginable circumstances. The New England-based sports teams also chimed in to offer support. The Red Sox, Bruins, Celtics, Patriots and Revolution are only related to each other because they are Boston's sports teams. Nothing else links these teams in unity, except for the fact that they offered a simple message to. the city of Boston one year after the horrific attacks: "We're all on the same team." Boston reminds America that resolution after tragedy is possible. Like Vice President Joe Biden said in a tribute to the Boston Marathon Bombings, "America will never, ever, ever stand down. We are Boston. · We are America. We respond, we endure, we overcome and we own the finish line." We will never give up.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The Boston Red Sox are one of the many teams that provided support for the victims of the Boston Marathon Bombings.

Woinen's tennis teain still in hunt for playoff glory Lutes still have chance at Northwest Conference tournament spot despite two heavy losses By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer

LUTES NEARLY SHUT OUT BY RIVALS

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

The Lutes started the weekend by making a short trip across Tacoma to take on the University of Puget Sound Loggers. The Loggers proved to be too strong for Pacific Lutheran University at the UPS Tennis Pavilion, winning 8-1. "We took some hard losses this weekend, but things are looking up," sophomore Samantha Lund said. "The match against UPS was way closer than the scores showed. It seemed like we were doing great the whole time and everyone was having great points, but the scores never get to show that . part." It was atight affair in the doubles round, and PLU may feel a bit unlucky to come away with nothing. The Loggers' Marissa Friedman and Logan Thompson earned the Loggers' first points after defeating Lund and senior Leah

LOGGERS PROVE TOO STRONG

PACIFIC l.UTHERAN UNIVERSITY

Newell by a close score, 9-8. Juniors Allison McClure and Mariah Siemion went on to lose to UPS' s Malia Ford and Holly Dixon by an identical score. "UPS is very similar to us in that we don't have any superstars or standouts," Newell said. "Despite the score, we played really well, so I am proud of that." Unfortunately for the Lutes, things didn't get much better in the singles round. The Lutes' first point of the match game was courtesy of Siemion, who claimed the No. 5 singles victory over Sarah Nielsen with a score of 6-4, 6-2 The closest PLU would come to scoring again was in the No. 2 singles match. Newell lost her opening set 6-4 but fought back to take the next set with a 6-2 win. Newell eventually fell in a 12-10 super tiebreaker.

Saturday's match against Linfield marked the last home game for the Lutes, but in the end, it was the Wildcats who came away with an important 8-1 victory at the Sprinker Recreation Center. "We were disappointed to lose on senior night," Lund said. "But Leah [Newell], our senior, had a great mateh. Her and I won our doubles match, so it was not that bad." It looked like the Lutes were going to make up for the previous day's loss when Newell and Lund defeated Linfield's Caroline Brigham and Mackenzie Fraser 8-6 in the first doubles match. That proved to be all the Lutes could muster as Linfield won the remaining eight doubles matches to strengthen its grip on third place in the NWC. After tying and winning their opening

sets in the singles round, Newell and Siemion couldn't win the points back for the Lutes and fell 7-6, 6-1and6-0, 6-2 respectively. "Linfield is a great team and always have been a challenge," Lund said. "We're going into next weekend with the hopes of keeping our victories in Portland· and getting that spot in the playoff tournament." With its second loss in two days, Pacific Lutheran falls to 10-6 overall and 6-4 in Northwest Conference competition. With UPS' surprise loss at Lewis & Clark, the Lutes are still in fourth place with a chance to take the last playoff spot. PLU wraps up the 2014 season in Oregon at Lewis & Clark this weekend.

Loggers sweep Lutes in Meyer Lamberth Regatta

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Puget Sound swept all six races against Pacific Lutheran University in the regatta at the Meyer Lamberth Cup held on American Lake. In the Lamberth Cup competition between the two women's varsity eight boats, it was Puget Sound c\oc\ting S:l5.6 compared to PL"U's 8:4'2.0 .

-


-路 THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 18, 2014

SPORTS 15

EVERYTHING YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT HANDBALL By COLE CHERNUSHIN Guest Writer If you were born in America, odds are there is a sport you have heard little to nothing about that some students play weekly on our campus - handball. Fellow Lutes Sondre Ericksen and Ditte Rasmussen, both juniors, organize the sport for our school and want to see students at any of their practices for the club they are starting up this year. With more than 20 years of combined experience shared between the two "handballers," there will be ample room for improvement and personal coaching, even if students are already familiar with the sport. Practices will be every Tuesday and Thursday from 8-10 p.m., and all players of all sorts are more than welcome to join. In the words of Ericksen, "All you need to do is show up and try your best." Join in at the next handball meeting in order to try your hand at something guaranteed to get your blood flowing somewhere other than in the library or your dorm room before the end of the year. If you want to join in, then these are the top five things you should know about this sport.

-

1) According to the official website of

the Olympic Games, athletes first played handball toward the end of the 19th century in Scandinavia and Germany.

---

Field handball was first recognized at the turn of the century and it came to Sweden as a sport in 1910.

2) Players are required to dribble a - not surprisingly -

hand- sized ball. They can

pass to any member of their team at will and aim to score points by throwing the ball across the goal line of their opponent's net. PHOTOS BY COLE CHERNUSHIN

Handball is gaining worldwide popularity, though it was first introduced in 1910. The sport has reached most parts of the globe, including Pacific Lutheran University. The handball team practices in Olson Gym and welcomes any newcomers.

3) Team handball looks something like a combination of soccer and basketball with a

4) Handball players often must demonstrate

5) While handball seems to appeal

dash of hockey thrown in for good measure.

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to Northern and Western Europeans,

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.. -

~1"

Gay athletes making names for themselves 路Gordon and Sam are among first student athletes to announce their sexuality By NICK BARENE Sports Writer Although there have been professional athletes who have come out as gay in the past, the topic of collegiate athletes is now at the forefront of the national sports media. Over the past year and half, there have been several athletes from the most popular American sports who chose to come out as gay. Just this week, University of Massachusetts guard Derrick Gordon announced that he is gay, making him the first openly gay Division I men's basketball player. Gordon is one of many college

athletes to come out. Gordon joins Michael Sam, an NFL prospect and former Mizzou Tiger. The case of Sam will be particularly interesting to watch unfold. No player in the NFL has ever come out as gay while playing, and only a handful have come out after retiring. Sam will be the first openly gay active player in the NFL, as he certainly has the talent to be a mid-round draft pick. Many fans and even some analysts have said that professional sports teams will shy away frqm signing openly gay players because they are too much of a distraction for the media. But one thing professional sports has proven is that if you

help the team win, they11 keep you around. The reactions from teammates of virtually every player who has come out as gay have been positive and supportive. This shouldn't come as a surprise, since fans often forgive actual crimes athletes commit. The NFL in particular is known for having players who commit crimes, ranging from sexual assault and domestic violence to crimes committed with weapons and drug charges. Fans shouldn't be upset that a player in the NFL loves the person he wants to love. Instead, they should be upset that every year, dozens of players are charged with crimes that

actually cause harm to other human beings. If a team and fans can look past crimes as serious as these, surely they can look past a player's sexuality. One thing that remains to be seen is how fans will react to gay players at the stadium. Since coming out, both Gordon and Sam have yet to see playing time. Both players have said they expect there will be some fans who will not treat them with respect, but thus far, the reaction from many fans has been supportive. It isn't the fans who are making a big deal about players coming out, or the player's teammates, or their coaches. It's the national media that is

creating controversy over these players. The concerns they raise, that fans won't accept them or teammates and coaches won't accept them, have all been shot down almost immediately. Athletes have come out as gay in the past, but an openly gay player in one of the top sports in America - football, basketball and baseball - is still quite a rare thing. In the coming years, we will begin to see more and more players come out in the top leagues of American sports. While large media outlets regard the subject as one of controversy, we should not let that diminish our support of the athletes.

~

.


-THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

APRIL 18, 2014

Lutes baseball steals two games from third-place George Fox By AUSTIN HILLIKER Guest Writer

LUTES TALLY 17 HITS IN WIN

-

GEORGE FOX TALLIES 18 HITS

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

The Lutes came out swinging against the Bruins in the first game Saturday, recording a total of 17 hits off three of the Bruins pitchers. Pacific Lutheran University managed enough runs to outlast George Fox, 6-5. Among those that contributed to the offensive explosion was sophomore Drew Oord. He said the positive feeling became contagious as the game progressed. "This week we really focused on effectively swinging our bats in practice, and it really showed out here today," Oord said. Oord went 4-for-5 with one run batted in. Despite the Lutes tallying up 17 hits,

they still managed to leave 13 of their teammates stranded on base, giving them a total of six earn~d runs. "Although we hit well, we still need to improve our clutch hitting, so that we can bring more guys across home plate," Oord said. Left fielder Kory Vanderstaay, a firstyear, led off the bottom of the ninth with a solid single to right field. Second baseman Nicholas Hall, a senior, then bunted Vanderstaay over to second base and in scoring position. Pinch hitter Landon Packard, a firstyear, slapped a ground ball over to second base, which allowed Vanderstaay to slide safely across, giving the Lutes the winning run .

The second game of the d<;>ubleheader Saturday was not as promising for the Lutes, as George Fox held the team scoreless. George Fox won 8-0. The Bruins took advantage of key opportunities against the Lutes and succeeded in drawing up the first score. George Fox's first baseman, Danny Clifford, took junior Chris Bishop's fastball deep to right field and past the fences to give the Bruins an early 1-0 lead in the' first inning. The Lutes' pitching staff struggled to keep George Fox off the field as it seemed PLU had no answer to the Bruins' potent hitting.

George Fox compiled a total of 10 hits, as Clifford led the charge going 3-for-5 with four runs batted in. George Fox's pitcher, Ian Buckles, struck out nine Lutes as he only allowed five hits and no runs through eight innings. Despite the struggles, the Lutes did show some signs of life. Bishop struck out five batters and first-year Kort Skoda pitched the last inning for the Lutes. He put a stop to the Bruins' offensive prowess with one strikeout, no hits and no runs.

.~

LUTES WIN WITH WALK-OFF

3

2

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

..-

The final game of the weekend was a success for the Lutes, and the game ended with a wild finish. The Lutes won 3-2. The Bruins struck early in the top of the first as George Fox's right fielder, Zach Rapacz, batted in his brother, Josh Rapacz, with an RBI single to give the Bruins a 1-0 lead in the first inning . Even though the Bruins scored early, that didn't seem to faze the Lutes as PLU sophomore Tyler Thompson hit a deep home run to left field. The solo shot was followed by sophomore Drew Oord' s RBI single, giving the Lutes a 2-1 lead. Not only did the Lutes produce on offense, but they made key plays on defense, which set them apart from the Bruins .

First-year pitcher Derrick Mahlum struck out 11 batters through six innings, giving up only four hits and one run. In the bottom of the ninth inning, the Lutes loaded the bases with pinch runner Casey Dawes, a first-year, on third base. George Fox's pitcher, Sean Eberhardt, threw a wild pitch, leaving Dawes with the opportunity to score, and he did just that. "We're a great team, and we all know we can produce on both sides of the ball," first-year Ben Welch said. "I never had a doubt in my mind that we would come back and win this game." The Lutes will take on Lewis & Clark this afternoon at 3 p.m. PLU sits in fourth place in the Northwest Conference with an overall record of 18-13.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

The Lutes mob first-year Casey Dawes at the plate after he scored the game-winning run Sunday. Dawes scored on a wild pitch to win the game for the Lutes in the bottom of the ninth after an errant throw by George Fox pitcher, Sean Eberhardt.

.....

Unionization of college student athletes splits opinions across the nation By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer

~

A potentially monumental shift in the way collegiate athletes are, or aren't, compensated is set to be decided sooner than you may think. But before you read on, ask yourself: Do you think college athletes should be paid? The Northwestern University football team members will submit their votes to the National Labor Relations Board in Chicago April 25 to change their status from students to "employees," allowing them to unionize and receive compensation. What the vote路 also means is that college athletes would be receiving money through both the union i!Jld through any athletic scholarships the university

already provides. It is important to note this particular ruling would only affect players at private universities, which Northwestern is categorized as. Peter Ohr, the regional director for the NLRB, has already ruled that Northwestern' s scholarship football players were "employees," meaning all that's left is for the players to decide. According to The Huffington Post, reports from Northwestern confirm that Wildcat players have already conducted a secret ballot vote on forming a union to pursue collective bargaining with the school. The vote is unlikely to affect all varsity athletics, as big money sports like football and basketball are what the NLRB is focusing on. Because this issue has the power to change college athletics in a way nobody has ever seen

before, there are a plethora of facts and figures that can be brought up on both sides of the argument. No prize for guessing what the main issue is: money. To be more precise, the disparity in how money is distributed among coaches, the university and the players. University of Connecticut point guard Shabazz Napier, a senior who was just crowned 2014 NCAA National Champion, highlighted the problem from his point of view when talking to reporters in March. "Every time you see a jersey sold, you look at it and feel like you want something in return," Napier said. "I don't think athletes should be getting hundreds of thousands of dollars, but there are hungry nights where I go to bed starving." There wasn't a hint of exaggeration in his voice or his

demeanor. But what he said next was really telling. "If something' s gonna change, it's gonna change. But at the end of the day, we've been doing this for so long." If UConn makes millions on jersey sales and their own players can barely afford to eat, then perhaps athletes should benefit in some way from their hard work, which brings in revenue to the university. While the Northwestern ruling has the potential to disturb more than a few, that it would only affect private institutions rather than public seemed to make the possible change slightly less drastic. However, after Napier's comments, Connecticut State Rep. Matthew Lesser and other state lawmakers are considering allowing UConn student athletes to unionize. Connecticut law, not

the NLRB, governs whether or not employees can unionize at the public university level. Speaking in an interview with CNN, Lesser said, "He [Napier] says he's going to bed hungry at a time when millions of dollars are being made off of him. It's obscene. This isn't a Connecticut problem. This is an NCAA problem, and I want to make sure we're putting pressure on them to treat athletes well." No matter what the outcome, the losing side is sure to be upset. Chances are an official ruling will be dragged out for months, or even years, due to appeals, but it's obvious that something needs to change. Northwestern and UConn look as if they are going to attempt to bring an unprecedented change to college athletics.


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AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 19

Christine Gregoire enforees PNW identity Former govern_or stresses enviornmental awareness on Earth Day By KELSEY HILMES Guest Writer Former Governor Christine Gregoire turns down most event invitations these days, but she made an exception for the sake of Puget Sound. She addressed Pacific Lutheran University Tuesday with a talk called "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us" at 7:30 p.m. in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. Gregoire spoke for the Earth Day celebration at PLU after spending the day visiting campus and classes. Her talk focused on the ecological concerns facing Puget Sound and the necessity of taking individual responsibility to protect it. She was introduced by U.S. Rep. Denny Heck of the 10th congressional district, who said Mt. Rainier and Puget Sound are the first two things people think of when they think of Western Washington. "Anyone who was raised in Western Washington knows how important the Puget Sound is to us, because the truth of the matter is, it is fundamentally integral to our self-identity," Heck said. Puget Sound is the home to 68 state parks, eight national parks and is responsible for almost 90,000 tourism related jobs. Still, Puget Sound continues to be at risk. The biggest problem locals face in protecting the Sound is the rain and storm water washing the toxins away and pouring into the Sound.

Gregoire argued the days of blaming big business for our environmental concerns are over. Environmental regulations for businesses around Puget Sound have been succeeding. Instead, she said it was time for the 4.5 million people living around the Sound to start taking individual responsibility for the health of the estuary. "Lifestyle change can be threatening and disruptive," Gregoire said. "Sometimes it means asking people to change and spend money they don't have." Even so, her suggestions focused on making simple changes. These included cutting back on home fertilizers and pesticides, being careful not to leak fuel when gassing a vehicle, building a rain garden and scooping pet poop and putting it in the trash. She also suggested that consumer demand drives business decisions. To illustrate her point, Gregoire used the example of the perfectly unblemished grocery store apple. Asking farmers to stop using toxic pesticides won't do any good until people are willing to buy produce without perfect skin. For students like junior Ruthie Kovanen, the call to action was a critical reminder to protect Puget Sound. "I like to think of myself as an ecologically-conscious person, but in reality, I need a lot of work. We all do," Kovanen said. "I feel like this lecture is a reminder to all of us, that we are a large part of the problem, but we can be a large part of the solution."

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

Former Governor Christine Gregoire came to speak at Pacffic Lutheran University this past Tuesday for Earth Day. Gregoire's speech primarily focused on the enviornment in Puget Sound and emphasized Puget Sound's importance in the Pacific Northwest identity.

Debate teain refutes coinpetition

WHAT'S INSIDE

By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer

A&E "Hebrew Idol)) goes viral pageS

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Pacific Lutheran University's Speech and Debate team ranked in the top 30 out of 220 teams at the United States Universities Worlds Debate Championship at Purdue University April 13. There, PLU defeated top national teams from Yale, Cornell and Stanford. Seniors Pam Barker and David Mooney broke into octofinals preliminary rounds of finals - at the tournament. "It was extremely rewarding to see our hard work pay off," Barker said. Barker and Mooney have been PLU's most competitive debating duo this year, breaking into final rounds at each tournament they attend. "It was an honor to continue PLU's legacy as a competitive debate powerhouse," Mooney said. PLU has historically been one of the most competitive debate

schools in the United States and has one of the longest traditions of debate of any university Justin Eckstein, a clinical assistant professor of communication and director for the team, said. Eckstein cleared for elimination rounds at Nationals as a judge, marking him as one of the top critics in the nation. "I am very pleased with the way the year has progressed, and I am excited to see what next year holds," Eckstein said. Sophomore Andrew Tinker also attended the national tournament. Tinker broke into final rounds at two tournaments this year, the Lewis & Oark tournament in September and the Mile High Swing in January. "Being with PLU' s debate team this year has caused me to rethink a lot of the academic ideas that I come across, helping me put them into action," Tinker said. "It's been an eye-opening experience." Speech and Debate as an activity has a tendency to produce highly competitive individuals

who excel in their careers, Eckstein said. He also said most debaters go on to achieve great things in the world of politics, business and advocacy. "Being involved in debate has helped me a lot," junior Christina Erikson said. "It's helped me both in and out of the classroom. I'm happy I became involved in it." Eckstein said debate · is notorious for refining public speaking skills, the ability to perform well under pressure, research and advocacy skills. People from all backgrounds can gain from becoming involved in debate. Senior Mamie Howard is new to Speech and Debate this year and attended Nationals at Purdue University. "I never thought trying it out would be so fun and rewarding," Howard said. The 2014-15 Speech and Debate season begins in September. All students are encouraged to join. Editor's note: Leah Larson is on the Speech and Debate team.

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

NEWS3

Pot culture on canipus: coniniunity niaker or breaker? By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor While marijuana possession and use is against the Student Code of Conduct, some Pacific Lutheran University students still partake in the drug. However, students are not united in their opinion of the drug and its effect on the campus community. In the sunshine of Easter Sunday, some Lutes gathered on campus to celebrate another type of holiday - 4/20. With an array of doughnuts, Cheez-Its and Gatorade, the group of about six students played songs on a guitar and talked. None of the students were smoking marijuana on campus, and they said they were not high. Some did say they had smoked earlier in the day, however, and planned to later. Names of the student marijuana smokers are altered to protect their privacy. Karl, a sophomore who has been smoking since he was 15-years-old, said 4/20 is a day to smoke and have a good time, but that it could be more. "Especially now that marijuana is legal [in Washington state]," Karl said while snacking on Chex-Mix. "I think that it's time for us to instead start thinking about how we can use this day for deviance as a way to encourage social changes." Sophomore Pierre, who has been smoking since age 12, said he wasn't sure about the history of 4/20, but said, "It's like a holiday for stoners." He said Karl invited him to join the others, and he came to eat food and play the guitar. None of the students said

they were protesting federal laws edu/2014/04/07 /lutes-still-cantor Pacific Lutheran University light-up-despite-legal-pot/. While Campus Safety officers policies against marijuana, but some did say they didn't agree have been investigating alleged with anti-marijuana policies. marijuana uses about a couple "I think it's absolutely of times per week this year on ridiculous," Karl said of the campus, as seen in The Mast's federal government's laws weekly feature 'Crime Time,' against pot. "I mean, they group Greg Premo, the director of marijuana in with cocaine and Campus Safety, said Campus heroine. And it's just preventing Safety does not investigate off forward movement." campus. Cyrus, a first-year who began Pierre said the federal laws were complicated, but that he smoking at age 16, said PLU's didn't think it was much of a policy inhibits the ability of cause for concern. students to build a community. "I can kind of understand why "You can make it [marijuana] they want to outlaw it, because it's a drug, and it just makes sense I guess," [marijuana] kind of smells like a said. Pierre wears patchouli." "I'm pretty impartial to it." Ariel Grob Despite senior Washington's legalization of the drug, PLU holds to the federal law that still prohibits the possession legal, you can make it available, or use of marijuana, Ray Lader, and it's not going to be a the associate director of Student detriment," Cyrus said. "But it Rights and Responsibilities, said. just seems like PLU's policy This rule extends off campus they're hypocritical in a way. as well, Lader said, because the Because really, I know they're Student Code of Conduct still trying to build community, and applies off campus, the goal being it's [pot is] something that does." to encourage students to be good Pierre, Karl and Cyrus all said citizens at all times. the idea that pot disrupts others is More details on the regulation unfounded. They agreed that pot of marijuana at PLU are available smokers should be considerate, in the front page story of the April but the idea of the smell being a 4 issue of The Mooring Mast, "Lutes disturbance is exaggerated. still can't light up, despite pot "What if I just smell bad, you legalization." It is also available know? Is that a disruption to the online at http://mastmedia.plu. community?" Pierre asked. "I

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Students, faculty and staff gathered in the Regency Room Tuesday to learn about obtaining a career right after college in MediaLab's event "Transition from College to Career." The event, the first in an ongoing series titled "MediaLab Presents," featured alumni from Pacific Lutheran University who graduated within the last 10 years and are from a range of professions. The panel included: Chris Bowen, a project manager at Radarworks; Kristi Bruner, a marketing project manager for Inviso Corporation; Chelsea Corrow, a journalist for The Daily Astorian; Bre' Greenman, marketing operations manager for Retail Brand Presentation at Nike; Graham Johnson, an on-air reporter for KIRO 7 Eyewitness News; and Rob Ripley, a graphic designer in the marketing department at PK Inc. in Seattle. MediaLab emcees, senior Valery Jorgensen and junior Sam Hom, asked the panelists questions. They first asked the panelists when they realized they wanted to do their professions. "I liked art," Ripley said. "I started with photography, but then JP [Associate Professor Avila] worked with me on graphic design." Greenman said she didn't have a specific moment when she knew she wanted to be in marketing, but she knew it happened at PLU. "I liked my marketing classes," Greenman said. "l was encouraged by them. I really started to explore that in my internships." Jorgensen and Hom next asked the panelists how a PLU education affected their lives. "I didn't grasp how much I love learning

untilI came to Pll? Bowen soid He well/

on to say PLU always allowed learning. "When you get out in the real world, it [finding time to learn] is not easy," Bowen said. Greenman also said PLU helped her succeed. "PLU helped me build experience and a resume," she said. "Choosing PLU opened a lot of doors." Hom asked about the most challenging aspect of their jobs and how they cope with it. . "Being creative all the time is really difficult," Ripley said. "Sometimes you hit a creative roadblock. You just keep doing things you're interested in." Bowen said his job provides a challenge in balancing compliance standards with clients. He emphasized the constant battle between clients and stakeholders and how it is important to keep communication open. Jorgensen then asked what traits employers are looking for in a prospective candidate. "A willingness to learn and enthusiasm," Corrow said. "That is very important." Bruner added that initiative is also important. "Be happy to do anything and everything," she said. Bowen also said being dependable is important. He stressed the importance of sweating the details and being there when things get tough. The final question related to how students can benefit from alumni hindsight and what students who are interested in pursuing the panelists' careers can do to prepare themselves. "Dedicate yourself," Gorrow said. "Take your experience for all that it is worth." Greenman said experience is important, but not necessarily a lot of internships. "Get as many internships as you feel you

of laziness and 'we can say whatever stupid things we want to, cause we're high,"' Grob said. "Generally speaking, I associate pot smokers with laziness and people just wanting to escape the real world a bit." Grob said she can smell the marijuana from her house, and it's not her favorite scent. "It kind of smells like a hippy who wears · patchouli who also has a cat and has forgotten to wash their clothes for a month," Grob said. Junior Taylor Lunka said if people want to do pot, that's fine. "But for me personally, I think it creates a negative community, · especially in an academic zone," Lunka said. "We are here to study, we are in college and it kind of detracts from the learning environment that PLU creates." Lunka also said she appreciates how clean the air smells at PLU compared to off campus because of the policy against both marijuana and tobacco. Junior Christina Erikson said she would rather not be around pot and that it could actually be harmful to some students. "For me it was kind of stressful," Erikson said. "One, because I don't like the smell in the first place - it's really nauseating for me. And two, I have asthma, so being in that environment made it hard to breathe in a way." Regardless of student opinion, Lader said PLU will not condone pot. "We can't do it under federal guidelines, period," Lader said. What do you think? Vote in our poll at http://mastmedia.plu. edu/2014104123/poll-what-do-youthink-of-the-smell-of-marijuana/.

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MediaLab career panel offers insights By RELAND TUOMI News Editor

don't think so." Karl said he has apologized to students in the past for the smell, but they have all told him not to be concerned. "People don't really care as much as they would like us to believe," he said. Karl said there is no reason for Campus Safety to stop pot smokers, and it would be ridiculous to try. "To be in my room and to be afraid that I'm going to get in trouble and have to pay fines because I'm feeling good about something, for me, there's a really big disconnect there," Karl said. He also agreed with Cyrus, saying hippy who pot is one of the easiest ways to form good ties with people but that making it against the rules threatens those bonds. "How does having like four or five Campo [Campus Safety] officers outside your door build community?" Karl asked. "People see that and then they ascribe you a label, and then they start treating you a little differently because of that. The policy ends up breaking community, in this case, more than it builds it." Some students who do not use pot disagreed. Senior Ariel G~ob, who lives in a duplex off campus, said some PLU students she knows will gather in a field near her residence to smoke. "I feel it creates a community

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4NEWS

THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

What to do atPLU Friday-4/25 Senior Exhibition. University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 'Fill Me In' Fridays: ASPLU's Outreach Committee will be tabling in the AUC and library during chapel break to ask questions and talk to students about enhancing the PLU experience. Anderson University, 10:25-11 a.m. Relay for Life. Red Square, Friday, noon- Saturday, 1 p.m. Fourth Friday Chinese Talk. Hong Hall Lounge, 5-7 p.m.

Saturday-4/26 Doubleheader baseball game vs . Pacific. Baseball diamond, noon5 p.m.

PHOTO BY TAYLOR LUNKA

MediaLab hosted a panel discussion with former Lutes about entering into a career after college. From left to right: Chris Bowen, a project manager at Radarworks; Kristi Bruner, a marketing project manager for lnviso Corporation; Chelsea Gorrow, a journalist for The Daily Astorian; Bre' Greenman, marketing operations manager for Retail Brand Presentation at Nike Graham Johnson, an on-air reporter for KIRO 7 Eyewitness News; and Rob Ripley, a graphic designer in the marketing department at PK Inc.

Spring Soiree. Ordal Courtyard; 7-9 p.m.

Chinese movie showing: "The King of Masks." Hong Hall Lounge, 8-10 p.m.

Sunday-4/27 Baseball game vs. Pacific. Baseball diamond, noon-2 p.m. Habitat Restoration work party. Fred L. Tobiason Learning Center, 1-4 p.m. "Early Music at it's Finest." Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3-4:30 p.m.

Monday-4/28 Save It or Shave It. AUC Regency Room, 5-7 p.m. "Blood, Sweat and Berries: A Documentary." AUC Regency Room, 6-8 p.m.

Tuesday-4/29 Senior Exhibition. University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Save It or Shave It. Anderson University Center, 5 -7 p.m. "Psi Chi Career Night IL" Join Psi Chi to meet with a variety of professionals who earned undergraduate .. and graduate degrees in psychology. Hauge Administration 202, 5:30-6:45 p.m. ASPLU Senate Meeting. AUC CK, 6:30-8 p.m. University Singers & Men's Chorus. University Gallery, 8-9:30

p.m.

Wednesday-4/30 Senior Exhibition. University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Save It or Shave It. Anderson University Center, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

Thursday-5/1 Senior Exhibition. University Gallery, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. "The Neurobiology of Sexual Assault." Ramstad 206, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. Save It or Shave It. Anderson University Center, 3:30-5:30 p.m.

CAREER FROM PAGE 3 need, experience is experience," she said. "You can also work for just one if you think you11 get enough experience. Work history looks just as good as multiple internships." After a multitude of other questions regarding internships, daily work life and personal life, Jorgensen and Horn opened the floor for questions. One student asked Johnson how he could break into sports writing and reporting.

"Keep your portfolio up-to-date," Johnson said. "Produce some video packages so you stand out. Also, be flexible in doing other things in the workplace. Sports writers generally write other things, too." A faculty member asked what classes the panelists wished they had taken and wished PLU offered. "PLU definitely had what I wanted," Bowen said. "But I wish I had taken some coding classes. Knowing how to use

Crime Time: Resbicted From CampusMortvedt Library staff contacted Campus Safety April 14 in the evening about a non-Pacific Lutheran University person using a public computer to go onto pornography websites. Campus Safety and the PLU deputy contacted the subject when he left the library. The subject was a local resident and has been RFC'd (Restricted From Campus). Campus Safety took no further action. Concern for People and PropertyA Campus Safety shuttle escort was driving along 123rd St. S. April 16 at approximately 1 am. when the officer noticed a man lying in the grass in front of a residence near campus. The officer, thinking the man was a student, called another officer and the PLU deputy. One of the officers woke up the man who was not a student. The man smelled of alcohol and said he had been drinking at Paradise Bowl. The man was cooperative and answered the deputy's questions and provided his identification. The man's friends arrived shortly after, saying they had been looking for him and then took him home. Campus Safety took no further action. Building Security ViolationA Campus Safety video officer observed a student swipe into Foss Hall and then place her Lute Card under the nearby trash can last Saturday at approximately 1 a.m. This is a violation of building security, so Campus Safety recovered the Lute Card and returned it to the student. Campus Safety forwarded the incident to Student Rights and Responsibilities (SRR) for review. Vehicle Prowling and VandalismA student called Campus Safety last Saturday at 6:20 a.m.. to report the student's car had been broken into. The car was parked on 121st St. S. near Ingram Hall and had two items stolen from it. There is no su~pect at this time.

website-building programs is good, but actually building a website is better." Instead of a STEM class, Johnson said he had wanted to take humanities classes. "I wish I'd taken a history or English class," he said. "You should too. Learn how to write, learn how to think." For more information on MediaLab's upcoming events, visit http://community.plu. edul-mllindex.html.

PLU's Campus .Safety Blotter Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports for the week ofApril 14

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Drug Policy Violation ~d Suspicious Activity/Person(s)A Kreidler Community Assistant (CA) called Campus Safety last Saturday morning at 11:30 a.m. to investigate a marijuana-like odor. Campus Safety and the CA noticed the strong smell of marijuana and had the student lead a search of the room. However, the search yielded no sign of marijuana. Campus Safety forwarded the incident to SRR for review. VandalismWhile on a walk-through in South Hall last Saturday night, a Campus Safety officer noticed the emergency exit diagrams had been tom from the walls in various locations. There is no suspect information at this time and a work order has been submitted for the repairs.

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Concern for People and PropertyCampus Safety was conducting a walkthrough in Foss Hall last Sunday when they came across a non-student sleeping on a couch in the first floor lounge. The subject was intoxicated and the Campus Safety officers discovered the subject was a guest of a resident student. The student was not intoxicated, but had left his friend to sleep in the lounge. The Campus Safety officers evaluated the guest, determining they did not need to contact Central Pierce Fire and Rescue. Campus Safety forwarded the incident to SRR for review.

If you need Campus Safety's assistance, call (253) 535-7441


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

A&E 5

'HEBREW IDOL' CROWNS NEW WINNERS By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chief More than 70 people gathered April 17 for the reveal of new campus royalty at the live finale of "Hebrew Idol." "Hebrew Idol" is an annual video competition where groups of students in Associate Professor of Religion Antonios Finitsis' fall semester Religion 211 class produce short film adaptations of Biblical stories. The finale event overfilled the Studio Theater for the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. "We're not worshipping idols," emcee Tommy Flanagan, a senior, said to the audience about the event's purpose. "We're just idly sitting by." That idle wait for the announcement of the winner ended after the crowd heard from the producers of the top three entries and viewed their submissions. This year's overall contest featured four student-produced videos. Earlier this month, the Pacific Lutheran University community had the opportunity to vote online for its favorite short film, which narrowed the contestants to a final three. The nominees first met Flanagan on the "red carpet" - a backstage area where the students stood in front of a red curtain - and answered questions about their projects. Their interviews were livestreamed onto a screen in the main studio. The same screen was used to introduce the celebrity judges of the evening, which included four people dressed in character. Brenda Llewellyn Ihssen, visiting assistant professor of religion, played the 'Scapegoat.' "I carry the sins of everyone," she said. Assistant Professor of English Adela Ramos personified 'Noah's Ark.' Tyler Travillian, visiting assistant professor of classics, was the 'Storm Cloud' who was there to "wash away the sins of the world and rain on your parade." Tim Chalberg, '09 PLU alum, embodied 'The Wall of Jericho.' The judges asked the nominees various follow-up questions about the meaning behind their pieces, the process of working

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

From right to left: To=y Flanagan, senior and host of "Hebrew Idol,'' talks to sophomore Caitlin Dawes, first -year Quinn Johnston and sophomore Lexie Engman during the "Hebrew Idol" finale April 17. The group earned third place for its film "Envious Girls." "Hebrew Idol" is an annual film contest that showcases the work of the Religion 211 class. .

within their groups and their editorial choices. In the end, "Rise to Power" was the grand winner. The dramatic film was based off of Judges 9, a story that included graphic themes - murders, a rape victim and profanity - which sophomore Samuel Collier said were meant to show the relationship between leaders and followers and "the sins of the father." Senior Shaquille Townsend, who also worked on the piece, said none of their group members had prior video-making experience. "Filming was a lot harder than expected," he said. Collier said the project gives students not only insight into how movies are made,

but a way to read and interpret the Bible in a different light. "It still applies to today," Collier said. "Yeah, it's a story of warriors and swords, but it still applies." Sophomore Maddie Bernard said her group's piece, the second-place winning "Evasion," was about the balance between work and family and that the sentiment of the film was to "always tell the truth and not give into peer pressure." The plot of third-place winning submission "Envious Girls" utilized a Biblical retelling of the popular comedy "Mean Girls." The parody of Genesis 16: 4-6, in which Sarai gives her slave Hagar to her husband, Abram, so that he can have

a child, featured characters of the same names transported into the complications of friendships and relationships within an academic setting. Finitsis said he began "Hebrew Idol" as a way to showcase his students' work. Among other facets, the event also relies on multimedia services' technology knowhow, conferences and events' resources and student and faculty participation. "It's an effort that requires a lot of people to work together," Finitsis said. "Hebrew Idol" has occurred annually since 2007 with the exception of last year when Finitsis was on sabbatical. This was the show's first year in the Studio Theater.

Scan Center exhibit pieces together immigrant experience "We cannot tell the whole story of immigration. We can only piece it together." Claudia Berguson associate professor of Norwegian and Scandinavian studies

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Junior Malena Goer!, an assistant for University Archives, explains the significance of artifacts in the exhibit "Piecing Together the Scandinavian Immigrant Experience" in the Scandinavian Cultural Center Wednesday.

By UNA TINGVIK-HAAVE AcjE Writer Members of the Scandinavian Cultural Center have spent the last couple of months piecing together collected documents, and photographs, artifacts literary descriptions in hopes of giving the Pacific Lutheran

University community a glimpse of the Scandinavian immigrant experience in the Northwest. The opening of the exhibition, "Piecing Together the Scandinavian Immigrant Experience," took place Monday in the Scandinavian Cultural Center. "It is important to recognize that we cannot tell the whole

story of immigration," Claudia Berguson, associate professor of Norwegian and Scandinavian studies, said. "We can only piece it together with the primary and secondary sources that we have." Berguson was one of the main organizers of this exhibition. Elisabeth Ward, the director of the Scandinavian Cultural Center, and Kerstin Ringdahl,

the university archivist, worked closely with Berguson. "We agreed that this exhibit would be a human narrative a story of the everyday person as much as the pioneer to the Northwest," Berguson said. As a result, the exhibition focuses on six main parts of the immigrant experience: leaving Scandinavia, corning to Tacoma and the Northwest, church and education, immigrant women and the idea of making a new home in America, the industry of the Northwest, and becoming American. One of the many artifacts displayed at the opening in the Scan Center was an old Scandinavian record player, which played a collection of Scandinavian folk songs. Homesickness was a common topic in these songs, because Scandinavian immigrants often sang songs in their own language about missing their homes after corning to America. had the After people

opportunity to walk around and look at the various artifacts, they. were offered Swedish meatballs and potatoes, which is a traditional Scandinavian dish. Local community members made up the majority of those who attended the opening. "We have a lot of people who are PLU grads who want to keep a connection to PLU, and being a member of the Scandinavian Cultural Center is a great way to do that," Ward said. A performance by historical actor Karen Haas, a member of the Pierce County Historical League, rounded off the opening of the exhibit. Haas convincingly reenacted the life of Thea Foss, an early Norwegian immigrant woman. Foss came to America, worked hard and founded the successful company Thea Foss Waterway Cleanup, which still operates in Tacoma today. The exhibit will run until July 30.


THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

APRIL 25, 2014

HERmonic sings, doesn't place in ICCA semi-finals By NATALIE DEFORD Ad E Writer Donations and fundraisers sent HERmonic flying to California's Pomona College for the semifinals, concluding its journey with the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA). The group will not be moving on to nationals this year. "We had a lot of fun, [had] some learning experiences and hopefully next year we can go again and move on to nationals," junior Lauren Searls, who joined HERmonic this year, said. Searls said the group performed in the quarterfinals at Pacific Lutheran University because it just wanted to compete and have fun. "We didn't expect we'd be going to semifinals, and we didn't have the money," Searls said. "We were just doing it for fun." But, she said, the group was still thrilled when it won the quarterfinals. "We were very excited to move on when it was announced," Searls said. Fundraising began right away, as the trip cost for all members was a combined total of $5,000. HERmonic' s only major fundraiser was a flapjack fundraiser at Applebee' s. The women sang and served as waitresses and hostesses, earning a part of the profits for the HERmonic ICCA fund. The grou p also collected donations through various methods, including creating a GoFundMe account, which is a crowdfunding and fundraising website. PLU helped out as well by contributing all tips from Dining and Culinary Services and campus cafes.

"We had a lot of help from the PLU community, and we put a lot of work into fundraising," Searls said. In three weeks, HERmonic was able to raise the necessary amount for the trip. "Everyone just poured in donations," junior Sarah-lynn Bennett, who joined HERmonic this year, said. "We were able to go without paying for anything through the help of donations and fundr aisers." Searls said the competition at semifinals was high caliber, with groups from the entire west coast trying to move on to nationals. There were 10 groups - two from each region or quarter final. "We knew it would be competitive, but half the group [HERmonic] was new, and we didn't really expect how competitive it would actually be," Searls said. HERmonic had been rehearsing the set they took to the ICCA since the beginning of the school year, Searls said. "Our semifinals' best moment was doing sound check with a cumulative group of people watching on the sides," Bennett said. "Everyone was like, 'who are they?' and it was really cool to show them what we could do." The set had three arrangements and three soloists. During semifinals, each of the HERmonic members h ad to hold a solo mic. This was new, as only the bass, vocal p ercussionists and soloists h ad used mies before. "It added new spontaneity," Searls said. agreed having these Bennett microphones in hand altered the performance. "We had to change choreography on the sp ot," Bennett said. Searls said semifinals were a lot of fun, because while they get to see each other every week, traveling was a good w ay to

get to know each other outside of rehearsal. Everything the singers did, Bennett said, they did as a group. "We just want to perform, because that's what we do, that's what makes us happy and we hope to make others happy from our performance," Bennett said. "That's what we did, we had fun on stage." HERmonic will sing at Relay for Life tonight from 7:45-8:15 p .m. PLU's all-male a cappella group, PLUtonic, will perform

as well. The two ensembles' next p erformance is May 17 in the amphitheater. The event is free and open to the public. Bennett said HERmonic looks forward to working with PLUtonic again. "We're very 'girl power,' but we're very collective with PLUtonic and HERmonic," she said. "When they succeed, we su cceed, when we succeed, they succeed and we're very supportive of each other."

PHOTO COUIITESY OF LAUREN SEARLS

HERmonic members pose before boarding a plane to California to participate in the semi-final round of the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella April 5. The ensemble raised $5,000 in one month to go on the trip. "We just want to perform, because that's what we do, that's what makes us happy and we hope to make others happy from our performance," junior Sarah-lynn Bennett said.

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By BLAKE JEROME Copy Editor Pacific Lutheran University students from a Communication 344 class are trying to raise aw areness for undocumented students by producing a documentary. The film, "Real People, Real Hope," is meant to help people better understand the trials and tribulations that undocumented students must go through to attend school and acquire citizenship in the United States. PLU senior and producer Shunying Wang said, "We want to educate people on this issue [immigration] and create a support system for PLU's undocumented students." After the multimedia class watched the 2013 film "The Dream is Now," Professor of Communication Joanne Lisosky assigned the class a similar documentary with a strong PLU focus. Wang said she was very moved by the film and wanted to have a major role in the production of PLU' s version of the movie. The filmmakers launched "Real People, Real Hope" after learning from the Office of Admission that there were several students on campus who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children, two of whom wanted to be in the movie and talk about their experiences. Wang said people often criticize these students for being in the U.S. illegally and said she really wanted people to know they don't feel like they are taking anyone's

spot. "They had to work really hard to get here, in most cases 10 times harder than normal . students," Wang said. Almost all undocumented students are here because their family brought them to the U.S. at a young age. "They didn't have a choice," Wang said. "Even if they didn't want to come, they weren't given a choice." In 2003, Washington state Governor Gary Locke signed House Bill 1079, allowing students who have been in the U.S. for at least three years to have resident status while attending public colleges within the state. This enables students to pay the cheaper in-state tuition prices, making school much more affordable. Almost 10 years later, President Obama signed a memo calling for deferred action for certain undocumented young people who came to the U.S. as children and have pursued education or military service. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, is a temporary pledge to not deport

young people who are actively pursuing school or military careers. "Even though there have been steps taken to help these students, they still face hardships that most students never will," Wang said. "Every undocumented student that we have interviewed said they wanted to be strong for all of those who are afraid to come forward ." The Real H ope Act, which Washington state Governor Jay lnslee signed into law Feb. 26 of this year, allow s undocumented students to apply for state need grants to help pay for college. Most Washington politicians h ave been supportive of the Real Hope Act, but State Senator Brian Dansel, D-Ferry County, voted against it because he said it "condones illegal activity." Supporting this act, Dansel said, undermines the w ork border patrol does. While Dansel said he has sympathy for illegal immigrants because they can't find work in the U.S., he also said the act is not legally sound. The U.S. should reward

"I hope this documentary gives people a sense of what it means to be undocumented." Shunying Wang producer, "Real People, Real Hope"

on Twitter: I@

immigrants for actually going through the system in order to be a U.S. citizen, Dansel said. "I hope this documentary gives people a sense of what it means to be undocumented," Wang said. Wang also said it takes a lot of courage for these students to be in the film, because while students are protected from deportation by Washington state, their families are not. By admitting they are illegal immigrants, they indirectly admit they most likely h ave family who are also illegally living in the U.S. who are not protected under deferred action. "We had to weigh the risks against the benefits of making this documentary," Wang said. "We have made them aware of the very real consequences, and in the end, they decided they wanted to come forward and use their real names and show their faces on camera." Wang said she believes if the undocumented students do all the same things as U.S. citizens, like paying state taxes, then they too deserve to be citizens. "Real People, Real Hope" will premiere May 2 in Ingram 100 at 6 p .m. The documentary also has a Facebook page with a movie trailer and information about the film. "Many are here [in college] because at one point they spoke up and told someone," Wang said. "We aren't trying to convince anyone of anything, we are simply trying to educate. I want people to know their struggles so they can celebrate in their success."


THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

A&E 7

Sociology major sings his way to Yale By ALISON HAYWOOD AdEEditor Three years into his music degree, thenjunior Brendan Fitzgerald needed a break. He switched his music major to sociology, but kept singing with the Choir of the West as a hobby. So when a professor asked him if he'd like to study music at Yale, he thought it was a joke. Little did he know he'd be accepted - and offered a full ride. "Two weeks later, I had completed a full graduate application, and two weeks after that, I was on a plane to Connecticut, where I auditioned for Yale's school of music," the now fifth-year senior said. "A week later they called me - I'm going for free to an Ivy League grad school." Fitzgerald said he began singing before he could walk. His formal music education began with piano lessons when he was in first grade, and he began singing with the Tacoma Youth Chorus at age 7. He performed several operas at Pacific Lutheran University and with Tacoma Opera. "It [music] became engrained into who I was," F.i tzgerald said. 路 During this time, Fitzgerald developed a passion for sacred music, particularly from the Baroque period. "It's really what I feed off of," he said. "I tell people all the time that if I could sing just Bach for the rest of my life, I'd be the happiest guy ever." Fitzgerald began pursuing a music major at PLU in 2009, but after completing three years of the program, he decided to pursue another course of study. "I was kind of going through a reevaluation of what I wanted to do later in life," he said. Some people had told him he didn't need an undergraduate degree in music. "Music has just been always a part of what I've done, and I didn't want to make myself hate it," Fitzgerald said. Changing his major required Fitzgerald to stay at PLU an extra year to finish his degree. It was during his fifth year that a professor recommended he apply to the Yale Institute of Sacred Music. "It's that [Baroque] music that really speaks to me and makes sense, and so that's why it was even more astounding when I found out that this program was the

PHOTO BY KATIE DEPREKER

Fifth-year senior sociology major Brendan Fitzgerald earned a full -ride scholarship to the Institute of Sacred Music at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. Fitzgerald was pursuing a music degree at Pacific Lutheran University before he decided to switch to sociology his junior year. "Music has just always been a part of what I've done, and I didn't want to make myself hate it," he said.

one that was available. Everything just fit perfectly," Fitzgerald said. Two paper applications, two interviews and one audition later, Fitzgerald had completed his application process in less than two weeks' time. "It was a wild ride all the way," he said of the process. "It was really exciting. It was very stressful, but you know, I felt good about it going into it, and I felt good about it coming out." Though Yale is best known for its law school, the Ivy League university also boasts a reputable music program. Fitzgerald said the program is known by people in the music business for the caliber

of musicianship it puts out. "The program itself is really widelyknown," Fitzgerald said. "It's really intimidating to look at it as an Ivy League school, so I just look at it as another chance for me to go out and sing some Bach." After he completes his graduate degree, Fitzgerald said he hopes to sing professionally in London, a city he fell in love with in 2011 during a summer traveling abroad. "Music has taken me so many different places. I don't ever want that to stop," he said. "I want to see everything, and if I could travel for the rest of my life, I totally w ould."

Fitzgerald said music has always been a part of what he has done, and he didn't want to make himself hate it. "But this new opportunity and where I'm at in life has really shown me I can do it [music] as much as I want to do it and not get upset with it, and not get frustrated," he said. Despite his hiatus from music, Fitzgerald remains optimistic about pursuing a graduate degree in it. "It's what I love doing, and it's what I want to do later, so it's going to be great," he said.

LUTES TO TAKE PART IN LIVE ACTION ROLE PLAY By ZACH WITTSTRUCK Guest Writer Innovative experiences are on the horizon for the student body of Pacific Lutheran University. For the first time ever, the PLU Intramural Sports and Recreation department is offering the unique activity of LARPing and is looking for all Lutes to take part in this special event. stands for Live LARP Action Role Play and calls for participants to dress up and fight for medieval supremacy using foam weapons and magic. The PLU version of LARP will feature four teams who will battle it out

in a capture the flag type arena on the former University Golf Course on campus. Rob Thompson, director of Recreation Activities, said he has high hopes for this event and the identity boost it will bring to the university. "The PLU Recreations LARP event represents the largest innovative program we've offered this year," Thompson said. "We are hoping the success of this event will bring new students to engage in future PLU recreational activities." Intramural sports and recreational events aim to unite students from across campus to enjoy the activities PLU has to offer. This LARPing event looks to expand these ambitions 路 further and give students another exciting option for their recreational and creative needs. By exploring the uncharted realm of medieval role play, PLU and college life everywhere hold a towering potential for change. Thompson said he sees this

as a perfect opportunity to aid in this goal. " T h e goal for this part i cu la r May 1at8 p.m. May4 at noon event is not only to offer Former University Golf Course Olson Auditorium something different, but it is to establish a new tradition important fan. If not participating in advance. Detailed signyear in and year out for the in the combat itself, cheering on up instructions are posted on great battle of PLU," Thompson friends and favorite teams is a the Facebook event page. For said. "I strongly believe through very welcome addition to the costumes, participants can be as PLU Recreation, particularly LARPing event and would be elaborate or as plain as they'd like with intramurals, we can unite a appreciated by all those involved. but they have to wear their team campus." Beginning May 1, participants color. Weapons are flexible Students should also consider are welcome to come to Olson students can make whatever they the release of stress from studies Auditorium and create their want, as long as they follow the they can gain by escaping to weapons 路and other gear prior to safety guidelines. another land and joining a team the epic battle. Whether members have a of fellow classmates in wreaking Here, LARPers can meet their passion for swordplay like the best some havoc with costumes and teams, learn more about the rules action heroes, want to use magic foam swords. and enjoy making their weapons like the wizards and witches of This could serve as a needed according to their creative wills. old or just feel the desire to dress change of pace for many Supplies will be provided but up in awesome outfits five months students and at the very least, an participants are free to bring their before Halloween, all Lutes can entertaining sight to see when own personal materials as well. sign up to LARP. taking a break from the rigorous Students interested in joining With the banners of the four intake of textbook reading. kingdoms flying high, the first this event can find instructions on If students find they are not battle of PLU LARP shall take the PLU LARP event on the PLU of the warrior variety or would place May 4. Noble men and Recreations Facebook page or by rather refrain from the test of women from the teams of the Blue visiting the website http://www. foam combat, there is also a place Wolves, Green Eagles, Golden imleagues.com/Default.aspx and for them on the LARP battlefield. Bears and Crimson Lions shall searching for Pacific Lutheran Wizards or witches, along with face off for the ultimate battle University. commanding powerful attack royal in which one team will reign For further questions or spells, have the ability to resurrect supreme by the final blow of the comments about the event, those who have fallen in battle. contact Thompson at thompsrw@ horn. Another alternative role Participants need to sign plu.edu. for LARP is the role of the all- up on the IM Leagues website

Weapons Building LARPBattle


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

APRIL 25, 2014

Read the ne print "Liking" General Mills could void your right to sue By KELLI BRELAND Business Editor Be careful what you "like" on Facebook, because it might just cost you your ability to take a company to court. General Mills, the company that owns brands such as Chex, Betty Crocker and Haagen-Dazs, is under public scrutiny for attempting to void buyer's rights to sue in traditional court. The company was ratted out for adding language to its website that stated, "all disputes related to the purchase or use of any General Mills product or service to be resolved through binding arbitration." This meant that anyone who had in some way "used a General Mills product or service" was automatically required to give up his or her right to sue in traditional court and could not participate in a class action lawsuit. According to The New York Times, General Mills' definition of "using a product or service" meant anything from downloading coupons, to buying its products, to joining it on online communities. In other words, simply "liking" General Mills' on Facebook could

mean saying goodbye to the ability to sue. The terms did not completely leave consumers defenseless, but they stated that an unhappy customer's only options were either to negotiate the dispute informally or to go through the arbitration process. Arbitration is an alternative to traditional court in which an impartial third party makes a binding legal decision between the plaintiff and the defendant. According to Forbes, arbitration is generally thought to be a cheaper alternative to traditional court, but can still involve hefty filing and legal fees. Arbitration is the method used in television court shows such as "Judge Judy" or "The People's Court." When General Mills' unprecedented terms were discovered on its website, the media and consumers lashed out against the company. Major news outlets such as ABC News, The New York Times and Fox News all publsihed articles that exposed General Mills' new online terms. The publicity was met with unhappy consumer responses. According to the General

E-Cig Business:

Mills website, it became clear that "consumers didn't like it." In response to the exposure and consumer outrage, General Mills announced in a statement on its website April 19, "we've listened - and we're changing our legal terms back." The statement, which was more of an apology, went on to say that "Those terms - and our intentions - were widely misread, causing concern among consumers," and "We're sorry we even started down this path." The statement went on to say the reason that binding arbitration was used in the terms was because it was the most cost effective option, and that the terms have officially been changed to what they were beforehand. General Mills also pointed out in its statement that many other companies have similar arbitration terms. According to the Public Citizen, a group that lobbies for public interests, companies from AT & T, to Wells Fargo, to In-N-Out Burger all have binding arbitration clauses. While the companies constantly change their terms, we, as the consumer, need to be wary of the terms we agree to - and how we agree to them.

Regulation could extinguish controversial nicotine product

By JILLIAN STANPHILL Business Writer The electronic cigarette business is lighting up the drug industry, but may be extinguished soon when the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) begins to regulate sales. Electronic cigarettes are a new tobacco product marketed to people trying to find a healthier alternative to traditional tobacco products such as ~igarettes. But the FDA does not regulate these products, so many potential consumers could struggle to believe the promises these "vapor" companies are claiming. An e-cigarette is a batterypowered cartridge that does not contain tobacco itself but does have a solution with the active ingredient, nicotine, which is a product derived from tobacco. The battery heats up a coil that turns the solution in the cartridge into a vapor, which is then inhaled by the consumer. The FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) only regulates these products: smokeless tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, cigarette tobacco and cigarettes. The CTP is proposing an addition to its authority to include e-cigarettes. According to the FDA, this amendment to the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act would allow the CTP to regulate hookah, electronic cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, other novel tobacco products, and future tobacco products.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The booming industry of e-cigarettes has few regulations on it. In fact, only 28 states restrict the age of purchase for e-cigarettes. However, it is only a matter of time before the FDA begins regulating this industry.

The CTP has been unable to regulate these substances and devices in the past, because they do not contain cut, ground, powdered, or leaf tobacco and instead contain nicotine extracted from tobacco. Los Angeles has taken the issue of e-cigarettes into its own hands by implementing the same ban on smoking regular cigarettes in public places on e-cigarettes. E-cigarettes will no longer be allowed at bars, nightclubs and restaurants, as well as public

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

places like farmers markets, parks and beaches. According to City News Service, a southern California news outlet, proponents of e-cigarettes said they are angry about this ban. They claim that by making e-cigarette users stand in designated smoking spots with regular cigarette users, it will lessen their chances of quitting or switching to e-cigarettes. The problems arising from e-cigarettes aren't solely focused on adult public health concerns,

but on youth ones. CNN followed a report released by Congress that concluded e-cigarette companies "aggressively [promote] their products by using techniques and venues that appeal to youth." The report also stated there are "no federal limits on how they [e-cigarette companies) can market their products," and "only twenty-eight states restrict the 路age of purchase for e-cigarettes." The companies selling these e-cigarettes say their goal is to

assist cigarette users in quitting smoking by switching to . e-cigarettes, allowing them to then break the bad habit completely. However, companies promote their products at concerts, sporting events and other youth focused activities, along with lots of giveaways of product samples. Earlier this month, the FDA released a review containing data that showed an increase in use of e-cigarettes over any other tobacco product in youth. The Smoke Free Trade Association released a statement "We encourage saying, responsible marketing directed to those over the age of 18," and the industry "does not support, and our industry does not use, youthoriented product marketing." As e-cigarettes grow in popularity and continue to be unregulated, it is important for consumers and citizens to be aware of what they are putting into their bodies and what is in the air they breathe. E-cigarettes are addictive, and there have been numerous reports of exploding batteries and injuries from e-cigarettes catching on fire, along with accounts of health issues mirroring that of actual cigarette damage: shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing and loss in taste bud ability. There is no definite word on when the FDA will begin regulating these products, but until then, it is up to the consumers to gain an informed opinion for their own health.


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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

BUSINESS 9

'ORLD New laws may shut down corporation's orca show

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Proposed California legislation would make it illegal for SeaWorld San Diego to keep orcas captive. This legislation was proposed shortly after the "Blackfish" documentary was released. This documentary details the events that led up to the 2010 death of Dawn Brancheau, an experienced Sea World orca trainer.

By COURTNEY PURDIN Guest Writer A new California bill that prevents orcas from being used for performance or entertainment purposes may blow SeaWorld out of the water and raise further questions about the zoo industry. Since 1964 SeaWorld has dazzled visitors with displays of orcas, or killer whales, leaping from the water, interacting with trainers and even waving to the audience. For years this has been both a source of entertainment and education for the general public. However, according to USA Today, a California bill to

"eliminate performance-based and captive entertainment breeding of the whales" could bring these shows to an end. The goal of this bill is to release all orcas held in captivity in California back to the wild and ultimately end the captivity of killer whales. The bill itself states that in California, it would be unlawful to breed, capture, hold or use orcas for performance and entertainment purposes. If passed, this bill would mean an early "retirement" for 10 orcas held at SeaWorld San Diego. According to California assemblyman Richard Bloom, "these beautiful creatures are much too large and far too

intelligent to be confined in small, concrete tanks for their entire lives." This bill comes after the 2013 release of the documentary "Blackfish," which said SeaWorld mistreats orcas. The documentary details the events that led up to the 2010 death of Dawn Brancheau, an experienced SeaWorld orca trainer. It argues that orcas should not be held in captivity on the grounds that life in an artificial environment is unsuitable for an orca' s physical and mental health. According to The New York Times, critics call the California bill an "emotional response" to this documentary.

SeaWorld has responded to the documentary by launching the "Truth Team" campaign, aimed at repositioning SeaWorld as a company dedicated to research and proper treatment of animals. In an open letter, SeaWorld states that it hasn't captured a killer whale from the wild in 35 years because of the success of its breeding programs. They also said its "research has led to a much greater understanding of whales in the wild, giving researchers important scientific insights surrounding marine mammal reproduction." David Koontz, a SeaWorld spokesperson, said in a written statement, "We engage in business

practices that are responsible, su stainable and reflective of the balanced values all Americans share." Despite the controversy, SeaWorld reported fourth quarter 2013 earnings only had "a loss of 13 cents a share and revenue of $272 million:," according to Yahoo Finance. Still, California lawmakers' decision could prove to be a barri~r to a major component of SeaWorld's income. Furthermore, this law could prove to be the first of a movement of laws limiting animals allowed to be held in captivity, which could ultimately harm the zoo industry as a whole.

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Protect yourself from Heartbleed hack By KATELYNN PADRON Business Writer 路1

Earlier this month, a Google programmer discovered the Heartbleed bug - a major coding mistake that made sensitive information such as passwords and addresses accessible to hackers - in an Internet security code. Heartbleed was part of a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption code. According to GMO Internet Group, these codes serve to create safer connections between devices over the Internet. A small padlock near the URL bar on a browser shows u sers that SSL is active. A green bar accompanying the padlock indicates Extended Validation SSL, an extra security measure, is in play. It's likely for people to see this green bar on a PayPal account or online banking. . Heartbleed came from a batch of OpenSSL code. A New York Times article said OpenSSL is a branch of the security system written and maintained by independent programmers. The programmers check and update one another's work, like authors on Wikipedia. OpenSSL is free to any user who cites the OpenSSL Project. According to Business Insider, the Heartbleed bug allows hackers "to trick a server into spilling out data from its

memory, which can include personal information such as passwords and credit card numbers." Organizations ranging from Amazon to the FBI use OpenSSL to secure their Internet transactions. Steven Henson is the only full-time developer working on OpenSSL. Henson discovered and removed the Heartbleed bug when it was inadvertently included in a 2011 code update. But the bug was accidentally uploaded three months later. Heartbleed went unnoticed until earlier this month. Several Google programmers developed a patch for the bug. Organizations must update their SSL coding for the patch to go into effect. According to Business Insider, the top most used 1,000 websites have all adopted the patch and only 53 of the top 10,000 are still vulnerable. Once a website has adopted a patch, users can change their passwords to prevent anyone from accessing their accounts. However, changing a password prior to patching will be useless to protect information, as the new password will be available to hackers exploiting the Heartbleed glitch. Internet users can use a free tool from McAfee, found at http://tif.mcafee.com/ heartbleedtest, to help detect websites that are affected by Heartbleed.

Which passwords should I change? These sites have recieved the Heartbleed patch: Facebook lnstagram Pinterest Tumblr Google/Gmail Yahoo Etsy Go Daddy Minecraft

Netflix SoundCloud YouTube Healthcare.gov Dropbox OKCupid Wordpress Flickr

SOURCE: MASHABLE.COM

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

APRIL 25, 2014

Sustainability Residents have no excuse not to recycle By EVAN HERINGER Multimedia Editor

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Every student who lives in a residence hall on campus receives two blue recycling bins, and Pacific Lutheran University equips every residence hall with a recycling center. PLU is a school that takes pride in the steps it has taken - and is taking - in an effort to reach the goal of counter-balancing any carbon emissions by 2020. But PLU cannot reach this carbon neutrality goal if students don't make an effort to help. Since every residence hall gives its residents recycling bins and even

a recycling center, there are few excuses to not recycle while living on campus. Still, I often hear of people who don't recycle. There are even those who refuse to recycle. I wonder why that is. I wonder if people simply do not care about reaching a goal or about helping to make PLU a greener institution. It really is as simple as throwing that soda can or piece of paper or glass bottle into a recycling bin instead of the garbage can. Sure, sorting the recycling at the end of the week takes maybe five minufes, but I think we can all afford five minutes, even on a college schedule. To put things into perspective, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Facilities, recycling a soda can saves 96 percent of the energy used to make a can from ore and produces 95 percent less air pollution and 97 percent less water pollution. Also, recycling one ton of

cardboard saves more than nine cubic yards of landfill space and producing recycled white paper creates 74 percent less air pollution, 35 percent less water pollution and 75 percent less processed energy than producing paper from virgin fibers. Recycling only adds about five minutes to your schedule at the end of the week, and if you live in a residence hall, there is no reason to not do it. Take the five minutes out of your week and recycle. If you are interested in stepping up your environmental game, I highly suggest getting more involved on campus with sustainability events, clubs and activities.

THE MOORING MAST Paci.fie Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

EDITOR-IN-CIIlEF Jessica Ttondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR Reland Tuomi A&EEDITOR Alison Haywood BUSINESS EDITOR Kelli Breland

To get involved with a sustainability-focused club on campus, G.R.E.A.N. club meets at 7 p.m. in the Anderson Univeristy Center Clubhouse.

OPINION EDITOR Ashley Gill

Email them at grean@plu.edu.

PHOTO EDITOR Jesse Major

SPORTS EDITOR Sam Hom

SENIOR COPY EDITOR Kels Mejlaender

Spend your suninier safe and sniart By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

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We spend all year cramming for tests and deciding what we want to do for the rest of our lives. It's stressful. We all prepare to be free during the summer and finally escape tests and crazy long papers. But when summer is almost here, it is just as easy to stress about what you are going to choose to spend the next three months of your life . doing. I have been stressing over whether or not to find a job, go to summer school, stay at school, go home or just live

out of my car and move to the nearest ocean for three months. On top of that, it seems like everyone on Facebook has plans, an amazing job or has decided to create a cure for cancer this summer. But if you do not have plans for the summer, do not worry, because there is still time. Summer plans for college students usually end up being one of two things: work your butt off to afford food next year or just get completely crazy. Let's start with the easier one. If you decide to just let go and get crazy this summer one last time before you have to become a responsible adult with a paying job, here is some advice for you: stay away from strangers, stay away from drugs, always have sunscreen and bring a friend. That's it. Go have fun. I am not your mother. Nobody is going to stop you. You will not make money, you will not cure cancer and you will have effectively spent three months doing nothing but having fun. You will probably also gain some

weight, just a warning. If you choose to use this summer to work, do not start applying just anywhere. A summer job does not mean the same thing in college as it did in high school. Summer jobs are now meant to be resume builders. Future employers want to see that you chose to build your skills on your own time and not just scoop ice cream for some quick summer cash. With your attention on work over the summer, you should do something that takes focus or learn some skills that take time and most of your energy, because you normally would not be able to do these things while also juggling classes. This summer, take the time to do research and find a job that will help you in the future . 'Tm trying to work with Gig Harbor Life for an internship over the phone so I don't have to commute from Olympia every day," sophomore Natalie Deford said. 'Tm also hoping things work out so I can be a nanny as well for my mom's coworker's two adorable children. If everything goes well, I will be saving up

to pay rent in the fall and getting experience." If you struggle to find a job and you are not successful, do not worry. There are other options if you still want to have a productive summer. Summer school is a very good option. You do not need to spend too much money if you choose to attend a community college and you can get some general education requirements out of the way. If participating in school all year is something that would absolutely kill you, there are other options. Volunteering can be a resume builder. Interning is another resume builder even though it might not fill your bank account. Traveling can also make you feel like you have learned a lot without having to stay in school. There are many options and creative solutions to finding summer plans. Start looking, start thinking, start finding out what fits you. Most importantly enjoy your summer and come back safely next year with some new experiences under your belt, ready to work hard another year.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Context counts for all our content By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-In-Chief On the front page of our April 11 edition, we published a stand-alone photo of senior Edith Leal holding a sign at a local deportation center protest. We ran it with a headline and an extended cutline, but no accompanying article and no translation of the Spanish expression used on the sign. The Mast staff has had a lot of conversation regarding this editorial decision since then. As the school's student newspaper, our aim is to provide credible information that can inform our audience and encourage discussion. To do this, we generate content from across campus on a range of topics. However, this particular protest story was one that required more context, which we should have supplied when it first ran. According to Leal, the sign's expression was slang meant to imply how families are treated when one parent

is held in the detention center. Still, we've heard from others who were concerned about the literal translation of the phrase, which is vulgar. With more context of the protest, the slang could have . been more relevant to the story and its purpose more evident in the translation. On its own, it caused confusion. Our intent of running anything about the detention center protest was to describe the event and the Pacific Lutheran students' participation in it, not to rile up or offend anyone within our community because of the sign's appearance. Leal said the protest also generated a sense of community across Tacoma and PLU. A stand-alone photo acknowledging that many PLU students attended the protest did not go far enough to tell that story. We did not receive any formal letters to the editor about this photo, but if you would like to send one, please direct it to mast@plu.edu. We value your input on this ongoing discussion.

COPY EDITOR Blake Jerome ONLINE EDITOR Leah Ttaxel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Storm Gerlock MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Evan Heringer NEWS @NINE PRODUCER Allison Reynolds ADVISERS Cliff Rowe ArtLand POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, colwnns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors; Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast


-THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

OPINION 11

Film within a film teaches travelers to be aware of their impact By TAHLIA TERHUNE Columnist The screening of "Tambien La Lluvia" - "Even the Rain" - in Ingram Hall taught potential travelers to be aware of their impact without requiring them to leave the city limits. The Wang Center hosted the fictional movie to encourage discussion about cultural immersion and social justice issues. Students, faculty and community members gathered April 17 to watch "Tambien La Lluvia," a story about a director and producer creating a film about Christopher Columbus. In their film, the director and producer wanted to portray the reality of how Columbus denied the indigenous people of the "New World" their rights. "Tambien La Lluvia" is a gripping story that highlights the power governments can hold over indigenous people.

The main characters decided to film their movie in Bolivia, because it was cheaper for production and labor wages. However, the irony is that they are surrounded by Bolivians who are experiencing the same thing as the indigenous people they are trying to represent in their film on Columbus. The directors are so consumed and obsessed with the vision of their film that they are oblivious to the reality of what is happening around them. In this case, the privatization of water by the government denied the locals of Bolivia their rights to water. After watching "Tambien La Lluvia," attendees discussed traveling, studying abroad and exactly what it means to be immersed in a culture. According to the Wang Center, roughly 300 students study abroad during J-term alone. This means a large portion of the Pacific Lutheran University body travels to different cultures around the world. We discussed how our understanding of "Tambien La Lluvia" plays a larger role in our understanding and interaction with other cultures. We need to be culturally sensitive and aware of our surroundings. It is important to be aware of social issues if you plan to really connect with a culture. However, it is especially important for Americans in a developing country to recognize we may have more power than

Change your perfect study spaces feeling isolated. The AUC is full of comfortable booths where you can sit for long periods of time, You walk and the lighting is nice for studying. Also, into the since the Old Main Market is nearby, you library can take a study break and grab some during dead snacks without having to walk across week, and campus. Personally, I think the AUC is a it's packed. perfect, but very underrated, study spot. Another atypical, but favorite, study You scan all spot of mine is Morken Center for the floors for a place to sit, Learning and Technology. Because of all but it seems the natural light, Morken is a peaceful like the place to study. I enjoy sitting at the tables on the first entire Pacific Lutheran floor or in the comfy chairs on the second University floor. Morken is open late, and not many student body people think to study there. If you know you have a long day of has decided to come to the library today. We all know that feeling. It is studying ahead of you, I suggest going frustrating when your favorite study to a coffee shop off campus with some spot is taken or surrounded by too many friends . Getting off campus is a nice people. Although the library wilt fill change of pace, and it is fun to hunt up in the next month, there are ways to down new locations. Some of my favorite coffee study avoid the crowds. Don't be afraid to try a new study shops are Northern Pacific Coffee location if the library is too busy. There Company and Blue Steel Coffee. Both are many study spots at PLU that are are relatively close to campus and have underused, and changing your study peaceful environments. You can relax with your friends, get location may even help you retain more a cup of coffee and a panini, but also be information. 路 According to an article in The New productive at the same time. Getting off York Times, switching study spots campus makes studying more enjoyable actually helps students remember more and also changes up your boring routine. However, if the library is still the information. The change of environment makes the brain take in new facts about study location where you are the most its surroundings but it also absorbs the productive, there are ways to beat the rush of study-crazed students. new facts the student is studying. The first is get to the library early. I The article also stated students retained less information when placed in find that the best way to secure a table at an isolated, quiet area than in a somewhat the library is to eat an early dinner and populated area with a view of a window. head over around 5:30 p.m. or 6 p.m., just While the library is quiet and may as the dinner rush starts. This way you help you focus, it may not help you can beat the dinner and library rush and with remembering information you get a head start on studying for the night. Also, be sure to reserve study rooms studied. Changing your study location early. If you wait until dead week to can help you avoid crowds, retain more information and make studying more try to get a study room, you will be unsuccessful. Reserve a study room now, enjoyable. When you go to the same area every so you can have a quiet area to escape day to do homework, it turns into a from the crowded library. While the crowds seem dreaded routine. It is helpful to find new if you plan ahead, you insurmountable, areas where you enjoy studying, instead too can avoid the crowds during finals of commuting to the library every day. There are a variety of other great week and continue to study in peace. However, you can avoid the finals places around campus to study that can chaos completely by changing up your help you avoid crowds and change your routine. I personally enjoy studying in studying spots. I love to switch up the areas I study, because it keeps things the Anderson University Center. I usually go around 8-8:30 p.m. interesting, and I don't get stuck in a rut. So the next time you dread going to because the dinner crowd has left by then, and it is fairly deserted. There is a the library to write your paper, mix it up slight buzz of noise from students going and find a new study spot that works for to the Old Main Market, but I enjoy not you.

By MADDIE BERNARD Columnist

indigenous peoples. This may not be something we are even conscious of. It is not unreasonable to say that we may be a glimmer of hope to indigenous peoples, just as the movie portrayed. Visiting a country and immersing yourself in its culture and trials means you have become connected in some way to the social issues, be they good or bad, at hand. When we return home, we are filled with meaningful memories of what we encountered. Yet to the people of the country we visited, we were simply bystanders or observers, and thus quickly forgotten. There are two different perspectives, and we should be aware of this when we return home. Sophomore Savannah Turner, who plans on studying abroad, said professors at PLU prepare students for different cultures, particularly in language classes. "Your interaction with a culture varies depending on the country you're in," Turner said. "I think we have a duty as a person to intervene in social justice issues where we can and [when] there's no threat of danger." It is difficult to find a balance between immersing yourself in a culture for a personal learning experience and helping to inspire change if the situation calls you to do so. It is important to use discernment to know when to get involved.

'Girl Rising' gives rise to a particular narrative on education By SHANNON MCCLAIN Columnist

Girl Rising is a global movement for girls' education that is based on the 2013 documentary of the same name, and both the and movement its inspiration are quickly gaining popularity across the country. Though the documentary advocates for a noble cause, it is important for viewers to be cognizant of the producers' intentions. Pacific Lutheran University hosted a screening of "Girl Rising" April 16. By Oscar nominated director Richard E. Robbins, the documentary follows the stories of nine girls from the developing world. It shows their relationship with education and the difficulties girls face in the pursuit of learning. According to the documentary, 66 million girls around the world are not in school. Additionally, many others struggle to stay in school. In the developing world, most expect women to not attend school. Instead, they are expected to fetch water, take care of younger children or get jobs. For the documentary, each girl is paired with a writer from her country. The writer and the girl spend time together so the writer can hear the girl's story and then recreate it for us. The film makes no guarantee of authenticity and states upfront the writers may have modified or embellished the story. that Despite the connotation documentaries are always completely true and factual, most usually have a specific aim. They communicate a particular idea or view to the audience with the hope they wilt take some kind of action as a result. "The film is marketed to the general public to generate funds and gain attention for the cause," sophomore Jillian Stanphill said. "It isn't a bad thing, but it is something we should be aware of while we are watching films like these." In this documentary, education for children, but especially for girls, is depicted as the solution for many world problems like poverty, gender-based violence and sex trafficking. When girls are educated, poverty cycles

are broken. The film argues educated girls stand up for their rights. They marry and have children later and are more likely to educate their own children. As a result, communities and families thrive. To obtain this, the documentary states we must remove the barriers girls face. To get girls in school, we must remove obstacles like early marriage, gender-based violence, domestic violence, slavery and sex trafficking. The producers of the film are marketing the idea that not only wilt education for girls improve the lives of girls all over the world, but it will make a safer, healthier and more prosperous world for all. While there is truth to this, the documentary makers do have underlying reasons for painting the education narrative in this way - they are trying to motivate their viewers to contribute time or money to their cause. The stories of the girls are told by authors, and we have no way of knowing which parts of their stories are true and which are modified. There is an overwhelming sense of hope and positivity at the end of the film. Each girl's story is tied up nicely and everything works out in the end in a kind of happily ever after. This was done strategically. The producers are trying to communicate education as the solution, so the educated girls' problems must all be solved and their lives must be better by the end. Not only is the documentary positive overall, the producers also gave it a sense of familiarity. We feel a connection to the girls in the documentary, at least partially, because of the people that give voice to their stories. When the documentary began, I instantly felt the narrator's voice was familiar. It drew me in and made me feel at ease. It wasn't until the end of the documentary that I realized the voice in the beginning belongs to Alicia Keyes. The narrators of the documentary are actresses like Anne Hathaway, Cate Blanchett, Selena Gomez, Salma Hayek and Meryl Streep. These are voices that we would likely recognize, and it gives the film this feeling of familiarity, so we connect with the girls. The producers of "Girl Rising" made choices about the stories and the narration in order to provoke certain feelings. in the viewer so they can accomplish their aim. Next time you are watching a documentary, or anything calling you to action, be aware of the effect the film is having on you and think about why this might be.

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THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

APRIL 25, 2014

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CLASSIFIEDS Rental house right next to PLU campus, 4 bedroom (1 master for 2 beds, so usually 5 person house), 2 bath, swimming pool. Rent is $1,700 including utilities! Breakdown: $340 per person. If interested contact Joe Neary at (253) 678-9167

Hacks Next time you are studying, pretend yolfMe going to teach the ocilt~Jt to 9thers.

4 Bedroom House near Library! 4 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, 1 car garage. New gas furnace, vinyl windows, washer, dryer, dishwasher, microwave, self-cleaning oven, covered patio, fenced back yard, hardwood floors, wired for network, lots of off-street parking. $1,500 per month, Contact Dave Carlson; 253-318-7008 or carlsoda@comcast.net 5 Bedroom House on Wheeler Street - 5 Bedrooms 2 Baths, just a short walk to class. Lots of off-street parking, wired for network, private deck, full -sized washer and dryer, all appliances including dishwasher. Room for six students. $1,875/Mo. Contact Dave Carlson; 253-318-7008 or carlsoda@comcast.net

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HOW TO PLAY: Sudoku High Fives consists of five regular Sudoku grids sharing one set of 3-by-3 boxes. Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition. The numbers in any shared set of 3-by-3 boxes apply to each of the individual Sudokus.

PLU discusses study spots The Mast asked students in a poll starting April 22 where their favorite study locations are on campus. Join the conversation at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section.

ACROSS 1 Alpine feedback 5 Kin of a tsunami 10 Media watchdog, for short 13 Clench 14 Concerning the moon 15 Hillside, to the Scottish 16 Didn't get straight info 19 "L' del Cairo" (Mozart opera) 20 Nautical command 21 10-point type 22 Dummkopfs 24 Tiffs 25 Repair . socks 26 B.B. King plays them 28 Cajun staple 30 Agreeable odor 31 Assault, in away 34 Audience's accolade 38 Storage space 39 Incredibly stupid 40 Ponzi scheme, for one 41 Sudden burst of growth 42 It gets slapped around a lot 44 Porgies

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33% Other14 votes 19% In residence hall room8 votes

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grp. 53 It gets you there and back 56 Word after "exit" 57 Brownish photo tint 58 Conclude one's case 59 Goto th e altar 60 Erato is their Muse 61 Low playing card DOWN 1 Encourage 2 Early spring flowers 3 Baseball stratagem 4 Get off the fence? 5 Footballteam quota 6 Invisible atmospheres 7 African plains grazers 8 Babble on 9 Bit of history 10 Type of salad 11 Inclines or tilts 12 Yield 15 Hurled weapons 17 Hippie musical 18 Annul

23 Indian bread 24 Drainage "pump" 26 Dark goose 27 Easy, swinging gait 28 Ball or sphere 29 Colorful form of the common carp 30 Come from _ 31 Mudslinger 32 Dos Passos trilogy 33 Baguette, for one 35 Did a ballroom maneuver 36 Difficult responsibility 37 Sacs for spores 41 Good weather forecast

42 They show the Virgin Mary 43 Large tangel o 44 Glimmered 45 "What else I do?" 46 Larklike bird 47 Beyond just chubby 48 Dressed to kill 49 Front of a boat 50 Blackand-white dunker 51 Readyto be harvested 54 Kitchen meas. 55 Older type of computer screen

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THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

SPORTS13

SPORTS SCDREBOABD Baseball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Linfield

29

4

19-2

Won2

Willamette

22

14

14-7

Lost2

George Fox

25

15-9

10

Lost2

PLO

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14

13-8

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Puget Sound

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Whitworth Whitman

Softball

AROUND THE LEAGUE •••

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Lost4

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Saturday vs. Pacific, noon

Men's Tennis

TRACK & FIELD: Whitworth senior Morgan Shea's winning throw in the Whitworth Twilight ofl96' 4 n in the hammer throw broke the Whitworth school record in the event, which he set last year. He threw nearly 20 feet further than the second place finisher. Shea's hammer throw mark moved him into fifth on the Division m performance list and propelled him the top of the NWC performance list. BASEBALL: With a pair ofrecordbreaking saves in wins against Saint Martin's and Lewis & Clark, Pacific Lutheran closer AJ Konopaski, a junior, earned a spot on the D3baseball.com Team of the Week. Konopaski was named Relief Pitcher of the Week a~er totaling 4 .2 one-hit innings in four appearances last week, all PLU wins. Konopaski's save total leads all of NCAA Div. ill.

TEAM

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Whitman

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Pacific

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9-3

Won2

Whitworth

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10

1-5

Won2

Lewis & Clark

7

10

1-5

Won2

PLO

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13

4-8

Lost2

Puget Sound

3

13

2-10

Lost4

Willamette

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14

2-10

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TRACK & FIELD: Whitworth senior Peter Delap won the men's decathlon with a personal best 6731 points. He won four of the ten events and finished second in two others. He currently ·holds the third-most points in Dill.

Linfield

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Women's Tennis

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THE LUTES' SEASON HAS FINISHED

THE LUTES' SEASON HAS FINISHED

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Women's tennis fails to capture postseason berth By AUSTIN HILLIKER Guest Writer

PLU LOSES CHANCE AT PLAYOFFS

LUTES CONQUER BRUINS

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The Lutes fought hard on the George Fox campus courts last Friday against the Bruins and ended up winning 7-2. The Lutes were one step closer to a Northwest Conference Tournament berth. For the Lutes, the day started off rough, as they lost their first and second doubles · matches. But things eventually turned around as the Lutes won the last doubles match and then went on to sweep all six ' singles matches. First-years Emily Bower and Megan Beyers gave the Lutes the first win of the day in their doubles match beating the

Bruins 8-1. PLU senior Leah Newell performed at the top of her game, contributing to the singles sweep. She came out with a notable win against George Fox senior Alyssa Emoto 6-1, 6-4. Newell said she felt extremely proud after the match. "The last time we played George Fox, I lost to their number one, but this time I got the best of her," Newell said. "It was a great match." The Lutes looked to clinch a tournament berth Saturday when they faced the Lewis & Clark Pioneers.

Saturday at the Lewis & Clark Tennis Dome, the Pioneers kept the Lutes from clinching a tournament berth. The Lutes fell 6-3 to the Pioneers. Despite the heartbreaking loss for the PLU women, the Lutes never gave up. There were many positive aspects to take away from the season finale. PLU sophomore Samantha Lund performed well, as she gave the Lutes their first singles win of the day, defeating Pioneer senior Olivia Sweetman 7-5, 6-2. Among the other Lutes who performed well Saturday was senior Leah Newell,

who fought hard but came up short, losing 6-3, 6-1. Newell reflected on the season after her match. "I am very satisfied with our tennis season this year," Newell said. "We have a very young team, and I am extremely proud of how well all of us competed in the conference." Newell went on to say that she had no regrets regarding the season and plans to pursue coaching in the near future. The Lutes ended with an 11-7 overall record (7-5 in conference) and look to bounce back next year.

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INDIANA PACERS SECURE THE TOP SEED IN EASTERN CONFERENCE

How many points will LeBron James score against the Charlotte Bobcats this Saturday? By SAM HORN Sports Editor This one was a bit of a giveaway. When I asked The Mast Sports Pick 'Em Contestants if the Indiana Pacers or the Miami Heat would claim the top spot in the Eastern Conference, the news shortly came out afterward that the Pacers earned the top seed. Hey, at least everybody won last week. I should have been a bit trickier though.

As we look forward, one more week stands between these Mast Sports Pick 'Em Contestants and stardom. For the last question of the spring Mast Sports Pick 'Em season, I asked the contestants how many points LeBron James will put up against the Charlottle Bobcats this Saturday. · Even though Michael Jordan is one of the majority owners of the Bobcats, that doesn't mean they won't get wasted by James' athletic abilities. Winning 99-88 in its first game

against the Bobcats April 20, James scored a team-high 27 points. With that in mind, don't be surprised if James goes off on a scoring tangent this Saturday. He has the ability to do so. If Cale Powers or Kyle Peart correctly pick how many points James will score against the Bobcats, they will win the highly prestigious Mast Sports Pick 'Em certificate. In all honesty, the certificate should just be icing on the cake. The real claim to fame is bragging rights. That's something to be proud of.

Kyle Peart (4-3) Prediction: 37 points Cale Powers (4-3) Prediction: 36 points

Alan Bell (3-4) Prediction: 29 points <::.. -

Drew Oord (8-4) Prediction: 26 points

Michelle Hogan (3-4) Prediction: 35 points


... 14 SPORTS

THE MOORING MAST

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APRIL 25, 2014

PLU baseball inching closer to postseason berth By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University baseball team finished a busy weekend of action in Oregon with a 3-1 record, beating Lewis & Clark twice and beating Willamette in a make-up game from a rain-out earlier this season. Two Lute pitchers set single season team records.

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The first game against Lewis & Clark was highlighted by PLU pitcher Trevor Lubking' s record-breaking performance and consistent offense from the rest of the team. Lubking, a junior, pitched eight innings and gave up two earned runs on eight hits with no walks. His 13 strikeouts on the day put him at 103 on the season, breaking the PLU record for most strikeouts in a single season and ranking him number one among NCAA DIII pitchers. Lubking set the previous record of 102 last season. "Last year, I broke a record that stood for 10 years," Lubking said. "This year I've topped my own number." The Lutes owned most of the offensive action in the game. In the third inning, with first-year Shawn Abe aboard, junior Collin 路 Nilson hit a double into center field to score Abe.

The Lutes added another run in the fourth inning when sophomore Tyler Thompson scored on an error by the Lewis & Clark third baseman. Junior Kit Banko hit an RBI single in the fifth inning, and Nilson scored on a balk to bring PLU's advantage to 4-0. In the sixth inning, junior Curtis Wildung hit a two-run blast over the wall in right-center to give PLU a 6-0 lead. Lewis & Clark scored two runs in the eighth inning, but junior AJ Konopaski recorded the final outs and put the game away for the Lutes.

GAME2 In the second game, PLU pitcher Chris Bishop tossed a gem. The junior lasted eight innings and gave up one earned run on six hits with two walks while fanning nine batters. Lewis & Clark scored a run in the bottom of the first inning, but the Lutes struck back in the second, scoring four runs. With men reaching base on errors, sophomore Garrett Brown hit a two RBI double. Abe also hit a double that scored a run, and senior Alec Beal hit a single that scored Abe and gave PLU a 4-1 lead. Lewis & Clark scored another run in the bottom of the second, and in the fourth inning, first-year Ben Welch scored a run for the Lutes on a fielder's choice. Pinch hitter Nicholas Hall, a senior, had an RBI in both the fifth and ninth

innings. The first was a double down the left field line, and the second was a sacrifice fly that scored sophomore Drew Oord. Lewis & Clark scored a run in the ninth inning but it wasn't enough, as Konopaski recorded the save for the Lutes. The save was Konopaski's NCAA om leading 12th of the year, and the save also broke the PLU record for most saves in a single season.

GAME3 In the third game, the Lutes suffered an 8-4 loss against Lewis & Clark.

Nilson pitched 1.2 innings and gave up four runs, though none were earned. Nilson did his best to help his own cause, as he hit a sacrifice fly in the third inning and a solo home run to left field in the eighth.

GAME4 The final game of the weekend was a makeup game against Willamette from a rain-out earlier this season. First-year Derrick Mahlum earned his sixth win of the year for the Lutes. He went 6.2 innings and gave up three earned runs on seven hits while walking two and striking out eight. In the first inning, Wildung hit a 3-2 pitch into the outfield for a base hit that scored Thompson and gave PLU a 1-0 lead.

In the third inning, the Lute bats came alive and put up a whopping eight runs. With the bases loaded and 路one man out, first-year Kory Vanderstaay drew a walk to bring in a run. Then Welch hit a 0-2 pitch through the right side, scoring Nilson from third. This brought up Thompson, who hit a grand slam homerun over the left field wall. After Thompson's blast, the Lutes would plate two more runs - one on a Willamette throwingerror,andoneonabasehitbyOord. The Lutes weren't done yet. Later in the fourth inning, Thompson struck again, this time hitting a solo shot over the fence in left field. Abe added an RBI single and increased PLU's lead to 11-0. Willamette managed to score five runs over the rest of the game, but the damage done in the third was too much to overcome. Konopaski recorded yet another save, and the Lutes came away with the victory. The Lutes are hopeful to get a playoff spot at the end of the season. "The playoffs are out of our hands at that moment," Lubking said. "If we take care of business this weekend, then the cards may play into our favor." After the weekend's action, the 22-14 Lutes' record improves to overall. In Northwest Conference play, PLU is 13-8, good for fourth place. The Lutes play their final series of the regular season against Pacific this weekend.

Men's tennis drops final matches of season By AUSTIN HILLIKER Guest Writer

PLU CANNOT CAPITALIZE ON MISCUES

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LUTES CONTINUE LOSING STREAK

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

The Lutes hosted their first match last Friday against George Fox, which defeated them 8-1. Despite the loss, the Lutes fought hard, taking almost every opponent down to the wire. PLU first-year Sam Stader gave the Lutes their only win of the day, beating Bruins' senior Justin McClain with set scores of 6-4, 6-4 in their singles match. Stader said that he felt the match went well. "I felt pretty confident and excited to play in one of my last freshman college tennis matches," Stader said. "It was really fun, and the nerves weren't really kicking in."

Stader improved his singles record to 7-11 with his win against McClain Friday. Unfortunately, the rest of Statler's teammates came up short in their matches. The Lutes looked to turn things around Saturday when they hosted Lewis & Clark, which was 6-10 overall (6-5 in the NWC).

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7

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNJVERSITY

PLU's regular season wrapped up Saturday as the Lewis & Clark Pioneers beat the Lutes 7-2. First-year duo James Okubo and Stader, who competed together as doubles partners, contributed to the Lutes' two wins of the afternoon, finishing the season with a 12-5 record. Okubo said he believed his matches went well, considering he and Stader competed against two of the top athletes in the conference - Scott Monisrnith and Cameron Smith. Okubo said he felt good about how the season ended. "Even though we didn't finish as high as we wanted to, I still feel proud to be a member of this team," Okubo said. Sophomore Jake Yannello contributed to the second, and final, win of the day, defeating Pioneers junior Morgan Joyce 6-3, 6-0. The Lutes finished the season 7-10 overall, 7-5 in conference play. They will not qualify for the NWC Tournament.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

LEFT: Junior Spen_c er Herron dishes out a backhand. Over the weekend, Herron won in doubles against George Fox but lost in singles. Against Lewis & Clark, Herron lost in both singles and doubles competition. RIGHT: Senior Sam Angel lost both of his singles mat ches this past weekend.


4IC

SPORTS 15

THE MOORING MAST

APRIL 25, 2014

' 11 "5 Sports ~~ing countries 5 ~ I • ••• and c1t1es together

j By SAM HORN Sports Editor Humankind has seemingly been fascinated by competition for centuries. On the grandest of scales, sports act as a universal language. Participants who have no cultural relation to one another can bond over something as simple as passing a soccer ball or a baseball. People don't have to understand each other's native tongue in order to enjoy a sport. Sports bring people, and sometimes even nations, together. Every four years, the World Cup occurs, drawing international interest. Fans of all countries tune in to watch 32 national teams compete for international glory . . Soccer-crazed national teams take to the pitch to duke it out with their counterparts. Spain and Germany, who have a combined four World Cup titles, stand among the elite. They set the standard for how soccer should be played. However, when these teams compete on the international stage, anything can happen. For the time being, these teams' trophies and titles are put aside because the World Cup, like any other sporting event, is unpredictable. It's chaotic. It's beautiful. "Competition is just an entertaining thing to watch," sophomore Jose Bonilla said. "You have two teams, you usually have a preference for one, and you get emotionally invested in it." Powerhouse teams like Spain and Germany can be upset at any time by teams with no superstars and arguably less talent. Take the 2002 World Cup for example. Spain, equipped with soccer superstars like goalkeeper Iker Casillas, defender Carles Puyol and legendary midfielder Xavi Hernandez, rode the crest of the headlines all the way into tournament play. Spain seemed unbeatable. Invincible. Until the Spanish players met South Korea in the World Cup quarter-finals. At the time, South Korea had never won a game in the World Cup so soccer analysts discounted the team and didn't expect it to even advance past the group stage.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Ahn Jung-Hwan made world headlines when he helped propel South Korea into the 2002 World Cup quarterfinals by scoring the golden goal against Italy.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

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David Ortiz of the Boston Red Sox has helped heal a city that was once in turmoil by telling Bostonians, "This is our [expletive] city!" during a Red Sox game shortly after the Boston Marathon Bombings April 2013.

South Korea proved these so-called analysts wrong, winning multiple games during its successful yet unexpected run. In the group stage, South Korea crushed Poland 2-0 and squeaked past Portugal 1-0. South Korea earned enough points in the group stage to advance to the Round of 16 by drawing 1-1 against the United States. After beating Italy 2-1 in the Round of 16 with the help of Ahn Jung-Hwan, who scored the golden goal, it was time to square up against the Spaniards. Statistics can only judge a team based on what it does on the field . Statistics don't take into account the goal scoring potential of a team or a team's willingness to win. There was no doubt South Korea looked like the underdog in nearly every facet of the game against Spain. South Korea was the clear underdog. It was the classic tale of David and Goliath. Spain seemed flawless in every aspect that year. It would be an anomaly if the Spaniards lost. Well, June 22, 2002 in the Gwangju World Cup Stadium, an anomaly happened. Jaws dropped. Analysts went into shock. Soccer fans worldwide couldn't believe their eyes. South Korea had won 5-3 in penalty kicks after the game against Spain went into overtime. Spain, one of the undisputed kings of soccer, stepped off its throne to make room for South Korea in 2002. There is never just one outcome in sports. In fact, one is a gross underestimate. There can be multiple ways in which one team can conquer its opponent. A powerhouse team, like Spain, is never guaranteed to win, no matter the circumstance. There is always that small percentage the clear underdog can eke out a marvelous victory. "You can't predict it [the outcome]. It's

completely unpredictable," sophomore Max Taturo said. "There's a 50-50 chance every time a team goes into a game that they're going to win or lose." For South Korea, the win against Spain was momentous. It shook the very roots of South Korea' s soccer system. It instilled a sense of promise for years to come in the sport. In a way, it helped unify South Korea as a nation. Sports help provide unification for a team, or a nation in this case. "I like sports because it denies prejudice and does not discriminate," sophomore Sam Geisslinger said. · He said anyone can participate, and sports have something to offer a player at any level. "It can teach life lessons, create camaraderie and be the voice of a nation," Geisslinger said. "Whether you play or just enjoy spectating, sports can inspire and instill a sense of togetherness in everyone." After two pressure-cooked bombs killed three people and injured 264 during the 2013 Boston Marathon, the city of Boston needed someone to "instill a sense of togetherness in everyone." That someone was slugger David Ortiz of the Red Sox. Ortiz helped heal a city after its residents overcame seemingly impossible odds. Five days after the horrific bombings, Ortiz stepped onto the Fenway Park baseball diamond. With a fist pumped towards the sky, the big man exclaimed, "This is our [expletive] city." With 35,000 fans in attendance, one of America's most famed ballparks shook with undeniable support. "This is what I remember," Ortiz told Boston Herald reporter John Tomase. "When I went out to talk, I looked at the people and they were hiding, they were feeling depression." Ortiz said when he spoke at Fenway

Park, he could see the release and the relief. "The look on their faces was, 'Oh, hell, yeah! Why do we have to hide from strangers and terrorists? No, this is who we are right here. Hell, yeah!' That made me incredibly happy," Ortiz said. From that day forward, it seemed like the Boston Red Sox were destined to win the World Series that coming October. Anything else would seem like a tragedy. Boston had gone through too much hardship to settle for anything else. The city deserved the best. In October 2013, the World Series belonged to the Red Sox. One of the offensive catalysts for Boston was none other than David 'Big Papi' Ortiz, who batted .668 with two home runs against the St. Louis Cardinals. Last year, baseball tied the city of Boston together. The city of Boston intently watched the Red Sox pave a way to the World Series. It seemed like Bostonians put their troubles aside for the moment. The wide world of sports has acted like an ailment for countless people throughout the years. On one hand, participating or watching sports can transport an individual to another realm, one of excitement and contentment. When viewing or playing a sport, it seems like a person's troubles disappear and all he or she focuses on is the task at hand. On the · other hand, sports can be unpredictable and chaotic. No two football games are ever identical. Same goes for every other sport in the world. Sports are exhilarating to watch and nail-biting finishes only hurt your fingers. The wide world of sports has the unique ability to unify countries and cities alike.

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Cole Chemushin contributed to this article.

NCAA reduces marijuana suspension, may be on track for medical approval of drug By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The NCAA announced this week that it no longer considers marijuana a performanceenhancing drug and has reduced the suspension for a positive marijuana test from a full season to a half season. Instead of treating marijuana like steroids, the NCAA now groups pot in with street drugs like heroin.

Despite just one percent of college athletes testing positive for marijuana since 1999, it is well known many collegiate and professional athletes, particularly football players, smoke marijuana to relieve the pain they experience as a result of the hits they take. This decision by the NCAA may prompt the NFL to take a similar action. League Commissioner Roger Goodell hasn't ruled out the possibility. "I don't know what's going

to develop as far as the next opportunity for medicine to evolve and to help either deal with pain or help deal with injuries, but we will continue to support the evolution of medicine," Goodell said during a press conference in January. Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll has spoken out in favor of allowing players to smoke marijuana as long as it is for medical purposes. "Regardless of what other

stigmas might be involved, we have to do this because the world of medicine is doing this," Carroll said during a January press conference. Two of the largest sporting administrations in the world have at least considered the possibility of allowing medical marijuana use amongst their players. But it is clear that more research and m edical analysis will be required before players will be able to light up freely.

Perhaps the NCAA and the NFL can partner up to fund research in the field of medical marijuana. In short, it would be a joint effort.

Medical Marijuana is used to lncrc.i;e lun~ capacil) Hrlp control rpilrplir S<'izurrs Help subdue conru,.ion s_1mplorn.• May de. ~i:.<r anxiety mull1ple arthrilis

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SPORTS

AdE Cursed Shakespeare play coming to campus

Baseball in playoffs PAGE16

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE MAY2, 2014

OORING

AST

mastmedia.plu.edu

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 20

Relay for Life remembers and rallies

PHOTO BY BRADFORD LUM

Participants in Relay for Life last Friday stand in silence listening to cancer survivor Daniel Heath, an associate professor and the department chair of mathematics. The Luminaria - white paper bags with messages honoring cancer survivors and victims - stand lit in the background. Each bag contained a lit candle and some sand to prevent it from falling over. Following Heath's speech, participants walked a lap in silence to commemorate those who have died, survived or continue to fight cancer.

By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor For 18 hours, the Pacific Lutheran University campus was devoted to a fundraiser to fight cancer that united students, faculty, community members and more than $19,000 in donations. Each spring, PLU hosts its own Relay for Life, an American Cancer Society fundraiser popular nationwide. This year, PLU had 20 teams and 227 registered participants, according to PLU's fundraising page. After months of preparation and fundraising, PLU Relay for Life hit campus last Friday and Saturday to celebrate survivors, honor caretakers, gather more donations and .e ven make some students marathoners. Relay began on the edge of Red Square

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Dash into page9

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Sports

Men's golf team goes to nationals page 17

accompanied by brisk winds but sunny skies, and rain never arrived to dampen the walkers. The opening ceremony began shortly after 6 p.m. with Marilyn Knudsen speaking about how cancer and disease in general affected herself and her late husband, a professor who taught at PLU. Cancer survivors and their caretakers traditionally take the first lap, but after that, the goal is to have at least one person from each cancer-fighting team on the track at all times - hence the "relay" in Relay for Life. This year's track began under a balloon arch just off Red Square, continued toward Hague Administration Building, curved left to Stuen Hall, left to the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Art and completed the loop back at Red Square. The Relay for Life committee members

- students who organized Relay - had set up a stage for music, performers and speakers near the start of the track, tents of the various teams were scattered across the grass and different fundraising booths lined the edge of the track. These donation-inducing activities included face painting and the opportunity to pie a Resident Assistant in the face. To keep the participants awake, the committee planned a number of activities ranging from musical and dance performances to yoga and zumba. Music played for much of the night and the morning as well. Senior Victoria Harkins, a cancer survivor who's been doing Relay events since high school, said it's enjoyable to eat cake and talk to people at Relay. "But it's also kind of fun to walk laps and talk with friends," Harkins said. "Especially

late at night when you're walking laps and you're halfway delirious." Harkins is one of the committee members, a role she said involved a lot of work but was also enjoyable. One of the co-chairs of the committee, junior Hannah Andrascik, also began Relay for Life events before attending PLU. Both of her parents are cancer survivors, and she said she participates in Relay in honor of them. "I think it's an important cause to be involved with," Andrascik said. "I think we need to find a cure." At around 10 p.m., the Luminaria ceremony began. Harkins said committee members have been collecting the white

RELAY CONTINUED ON PAGE3

White House takes action against sexual assault By ALISON HAYWOOD AdEEditor One White House Task Force is beginning to make a national on combatting impression sexual assault in the collegiate world. President Barack Obama established Protect Students from Sexual Assault in January to address the issue of such violence on campuses. The Department of Education released a report Tuesday giving colleges guidance on how to respond to sexual violence on campus, according to a press release. on The report focuses preventing sexual violence, responding effectively when an attacker assaults a student and improving the effectiveness and transparency of federal

government enforcement efforts. As part of the transparency effort, the department dedicated a website to make enforcement data public and to compile resources for students and schools, NotAlone.gov. The department also created a chart clarifying how federal laws such as Title IX, the Clery Act and FERPA intersect. Ray Lader, the associate director for Student Rights and Responsibilities, said PLU is in a good place with the work it has been doing to confront sexual assault. "This [the report] will just help us continue to hone and improve the services and processes we use to deal with these horrible situations," Lader said. "I know as we work to prepare for the future, we will be using this report to help frame

our continued goal of addressing sexual assault." U.S. Vice President Joe Biden also launched a series of public service announcements Tuesday male celebrities featuring speaking out against sexual assault, according to a White House press release. In one clip, actor Benicio Del Toro opens with, "We have a big problem, and we need your help." Actor Steve Carell later says, "It's a crime. It's wrong." Obama makes an appearance in the video as well, saying, "It's up to all of us to put an end to sexual assault." The short videos are in coordination with the 1 is 2 Many campaign, an initiative Biden launched in 2011 to prevent violence against women.


2NEWS

THE MOORING MAST

MAY 2, 2014

Rll£1f!HU !rlB ID ltllBDJt1J ltM! Apply online! Positions for section editors, hired writers and photographers will be posted up on Career Connections in the coming w eeks. Be sure to apply at http://www.plu.edu/career-connections

Move-out with sustainability and Goodwill By ELLIOTT TURNER Guest Writer This finals week at Pacific Lutheran University, Sustainability is partnering with the Tacoma Goodwill for the Give and Go program. PLU is one of only 15 schools across the country to participate. The Give and Go program is a partnership with Goodwill, Keep America Beautiful - an environmental non-profit - and several other organizations. It is designed to implement effective collection drives during move-out at colleges across the nation. With three million students living on campus at 2,100 colleges and universities

For more information about the Giv~ and Go program or to learn important move-out dates, check online at http:/ /www.plu.edu/sustainability

nationwide, there is a mass of reusable clothing, electronics, books and furniture that students throw away at the end of the school year. The cooperating organizations started this program to address this concern. Sophomore Nick Hester is the student move-out lead this year, and he is working on coordinating with Sustainability and Goodwill to make sure the plan for moveout this year runs smoothly. "PLU was chosen because of how successful our Sustainability office has been and how visible our efforts to make a green campus have been," Hester said. Chrissy Cooley, the Sustainability coordinator, said she was overjoyed PLU could be a part of this program. "Being a premier program in the country is so exciting," Cooley said. "Hopefully other schools can work with Goodwill." Partnering with Goodwill for the Give and Go program is going to benefit Sustainability, PLU and the region as well. Sustainability closed its SurPLUs store in March. SurPLUs sold items students had donated to other students and the community, which prevented clothes, furniture and other accessories from being sent to the landfill. Partnering with Goodwill for the program this year and in the future will help replace a program like SurPLUs on campus, allowing students to give away

useful items instead of throwing them away. This partnership is going to have a regional impact as well. Nick Lorax, the Sustainability lead, said donations to Goodwill during move-out will help 9,000 out of Western Washington's 60,000 unemployed people receive job placement, career training and education. and Goodwill donation trailers dumpsters will be on campus at traditional halls May 19-25 from 11 a.m.-8:30 p.m. There will be an info booth next to the Foss and Pflueger dumpster to help divert recycling and donate-ables from the dumpster. For South Hall, the trailer and dumpster will be open until June 3. There will be one new donation trailer next to Harstad Hall, with four trailers and five dumpsters total including South's. Small donations will be accepted in traditional hall lobbies from May 16-23 and until June 1 for South. With community benefits and an environmental outlook for move-out this year, the Give and Go program is gearing up to be a another sustainable addition to PLU. For students, the important dates and information about move-out can be found in this issue of The Mooring Mast, online and at an info booth outside the dining hall the week before finals.

I Goodiwtl ~rralW

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ILLUSTRATION COUIITESY OF NICK HESTOR

This map shows the location of the dumpsters and Goodwill donations .

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T his ear ,our goa1 is to raise $2.500 t re lace and maintain ·11 u tree 1

campus. a,ke y·our gift today, tne take ·your I Give ... ph,oto at the Ca1 m1 pus ,Concier·ge! For more information visit www .plu.edu/gradg ift


THE MOORING MAST

MAY 2, 2014

NEWS3 RELAY FROM PAGE 1

PHOTO BY NINA ORWOLL

Families from on and off campus came to Relay for Life last week to celebrate and remember those who had died from cancer. For more information on how to participate in Relay, visit http:/ /www.relayforlife.org.

paper bags for months and attendees could craft one the night of Relay as well. Luminaria makers inscribed each bag with messages in honor of or support of cancer patients. The bags lined the track on both sides, a candle inside so that each stood out in the darkness. After a speech from cancer survivor Daniel Heath, an associate professor and the department chair of mathematics, participants walked a lap in silence to honor those who died from, survived or who continue to fight cancer.