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SPORTS Volleyball ranked 13th after two conference wins

AdE From Emmy's to 'Emily PAGE5

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE SEPT. 26, 2014

OORING http://mastmedia.plu.edu

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE

Stuen reopens, revived and ready for residents

PHOTOS BY KATIE DEPRECKER TOP PHOTO, Left to Right: Vice President of Student Life and Dean of Students Joanna RoyceDavis, Resident Director Mercy Daramola, Resident Assistant with Additional Duties 'fyler Dobies, President Thomas Krise, Resident Hall Council President Mollie Paree and Dean of Campus Life and Executive Director of Residential Life Tom Huelsbeck participate in cutting of the ribbon to freshly renovated Stuen Hall. LEFT PHOTO, Left to Right: First-years Hilary Vo, Katherine Nakasone, Emily Odegard and Miranda Wesen with Patricia Krise, who attended with husband and President Thomas Krise. RIGHT PHOTO: First-year, Marissa Modestowicz, center, celebrates t he grand reopening of Stuen Hall with other residents.

By RELANI) TUOMI Editor in Chief

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PHOTO COURTESY OF http:/ /golutes.com BY Jacqui Gutierrez LEFT: Mike Arguello RIGHT: Jordan Downing

Stuen Hall has been under construction since summer 2013 and was scheduled to be reopened the following fall. After much construction and scheduling set-backs, residents moved in Sept . 13. Stuen residents had moved in on Sept. 4 with the rest of campus, but into Tinglestad. The whole hall fit on the eighth and ninth floors. "The [Stuen] community really ponded in T-stad," said Tyler Dobies, Resident Assistant with Additional . Duties. "We are really grateful to T-stad for sharing their space with us." Stuen residents - often referred to as "Stuen-ites" - moved in Sept. 13 in the morning. "RHC did a great job decorating both Tinglestad and Stuen," Resident Director Mercy Daramola said. "They really made it feel like home."

A ribbon cutting ceremony to officially open the building took place on Sept. 16. Executive Director of Residential Life Tom Huelsbeck was the master of ceremonies, where President" Krise, Vice President of Student Life Joanna Royce-Davis, Resident Hall Council president Mollie Paree, Daramola, Dobies and Huelsbeck cut the ribbon. Stuen comes with some upgrades in this remodel, such as LED lights in resident rooms, heated floors in the restrooms, steel plates to reinforce the walls and card access for residents' rooms. "I love the card access because I kept losing my keys, so it's one less thing to carry," Dobies said. "It's really cool, too ." To learn more about Stuen's updates, visit: http://www.plu.edu/residential-life/ misc/residence-halls\ stuen-hall. php.


I .

THE MOORING MAST

2NEWS

SEPT. 26, 2014

New food choices on campus Something for every picky eater By DENAE MCGAHA Guest Writer If you are what you eat, students are in for a transformation. This year, students will notice changes in dining options such as extended Commons hours, a smoothie bar at Tahoma Bakery and Cafe路 and nearby off-campus dining alternatives. Central to campus, the Com~ns dining service is open for dinner until 8:30 p.m., an hour later than last year. Junior Abbie Johnson, a longtime Dining And Culinary Services employee, finds merit in the change. She recognizes it allows more flexibility for students with busy schedules. Johnson says the extended mealtime caters to a more solitary atmosphere, as many students who use the extra hour come in by themselves.

Johnson's Commons coworker, junior Amber Stokes, observes that fewer students come during that final hour, making it a quieter time to get dinner. Anything but mellow during a rush, the Tahoma Bakery and Cafe now offers a smoothie bar .. Already popular among students, the smoothie bar offers a wide range of flavors and supplements. Stokes views the smoothie bar as convenient and its options as plentiful and healthy. From a fruity treat to a meal replacement protein shake, students can personalize their smoothies to cater to their nutrition, their sweet tooth or both. Track athlete Dominique Jackson, a junior, finds sustaining options in many of the smoothies, especially thanks to the variety of natural supplements. Even as the evening hours at Tahoma have been cut to make way for the extended time in the Commons, the new

smoothie bar has opened up Tahoma to a whole new world of possibilities. More possibilities for off-campus dining are now available. The newly opened PanAsian Cuisine restaurant and Warthog Barbeque Pit are both within a five minute walk from campus, located on Pacific Avenue. First-year Emma Bauman has already deemed the food at the Pit as delicious. Describing it as likable and affordable, sophomore Emma Southard says the Warthog Barbeque Pit offers students countiy-style cuisine. A tip from Southard, get your timing right and you could have your choice of one of the Pit's daily homemade pies, fresh from the oven. As this new school year starts, the new culinary options on and around campus are sure to offer students new dining experiences.

PLUTO pushing traditional boundaries By KAITLYN HALL Copy Editor Blended learning, a model that combines traditional, faceto-face instruction and online learning, is being incorporated

into PLU classes for the first time this semester. Frank Moore, Associate Provost of Information and Technology Services, hopes that the Pacific Lutheran University Teaching Online (PLUTO) program will increase student retention rates and summer

Frank Moore, Associate Provost for Information and Teclmology Services, at PLUTO programing seminar

revenue, allowing PLU to reduce budget cuts and invest money back into its students. This fall's blended classes are a precursor to fully online classes, set to be . offered in summer 2015. M o o r e recognized that students who don't live near campus or work during the summer may not have the ability to take in-classroom classes, making online courses crucial to revitalize what Moore called a withering summer semester. "We're hoping next summer will be the first summer we have classes fully online," Moore said. "The interesting thing about classes online is if we don't do that for our students, somebody else is going to do that for our students, and that kind of defeats the purpose [of keeping classes on-campus only]." PLU received a grant from the Benson Family Foundation to host the PLUTO Institute in June, which trained a discipline-diverse group of 10 facufty in teaching blended and online classes over four days.

Each of the 10 faculty who participated in the course is teaching a blended course he or she developed at the PLUTO institute. At the end of fall semester, students and faculty involved in the blended courses will be surveyed about their experience. Moore said another PLUTO Institute is planned for January to prepare additional faculty to teach online courses in summer 2015. Online classes will be completed through Sakai and will not come at an additional cost to the university, Moore said, because the infrastructure needed for online learning is already in place. emphasized that Moore blended and online learning will not compromise relationshipbuilding between students and faculty. "I l<now that PLU prides itself on really important facultystudent interaction," Moore said, "but you can still be hightech with high-touch."

New Dean of Students joins PLU family "During the search process I felt a great connection to the students and faculty I met," Royce-Davis said. "This is a place Joanna Royce-Davis joined the Pacific that, in every way I have experienced so Lutheran University community as the new far, is fully invested in their students' Vice President for Student Life and Dean learning, their experience and their of Students this year. Royce-Davis brings a outcomes." Royce-Davis' daughter is a fi rs t-year new motto to the offices of student life: the student-teacher investment is reciprocal, student at PLU. She said it's great to see her daughter's experiences and it' s an everyone has something to learn. Royce-Davis was born in Boston, Mass.路 insightful look into the lives of students. Royce-Davis said one of her goals is and predominantly grew up in New England. She said that the West Coast is to make sure administrators are fully the home of her heart and has a particular partnered with students and faculty to fondnes s for the Pacific Northwest. In reinforce the support and experience of her spare time, Royce-Davis loves to go student learning. PLU students don't just ou,tdoors, making PLU's closeness to learn in the classroom, Royce-Davis said. It' s important for PLU to stay rooted in numerous outdoor activities a perfect fit. "I love adventure . I'm one of those its strong foundation, Royce-Davis said. people who will (try) most anything once: She also pointed out that she wants to zip-lining, skydiving, camping and so on," make sure those foundations are effective 路and bring good experiences for PL U' s Royce-Davis said. After rece1vmg her undergraduate students. Though Royce-Davis has received degree from Indiana University, she earned her master's degree from San Jose awards and recognitions throughout her State University and her doctorate from career, she said her greatest professional Syracuse University in rehabilitation accomplishments are when students come back to her and want to have a friendship. psychology. "Having a community of care around is Royce-Davis was Dean of Students at Pacific University for 15 years, but was one of the best things I, or anyone, could ask for," Royce-Davis said. drawn to PU) by its mission.

World News

Trending: ~

Miss America

~

Alaska Reporter

Miss America, Kira Kazantsev, was kicked out of her Long Island sorority after a hazing scandal she admitted to on "Good Morning America" Tuesday morning. Social Merua went off the charts this week when a reporter from Alaska, Charlo Greene, quit her job on air, promoted legalizing marijuana and said the F-word.

~ Scotland

On Sept. 18, Scotland voted on whether or not to separate from the United Kingdom and become independent; 55 percent of the votes came out in favor of staying part of the United Kingdom.

~ Ebola Fever

In worst-case scenario, Ebola cases could reach 1.4 million in 4 months, CDC says.

~

Orange is the New-Black

Show writer divorces husband and begins dating actress Samira Wiley, who plays Poussey on the show.

~ Urban Outfitters

Company apologizes for selling faux blood-splattered Kent State University sweatshirt.

~ Emma Watson

UN' goodwill ambassador, Watson promotes #HeForShe gender equality campaign

..." U Pliresident ,.,, ama President Obama announces plan to attack Syria Sept. 23 on CNN.

PLU News

Trending: Meant To Live

By-MICHAEL DIAMBRI A dE Writer

MTL began in 2004 as a student-led conference supported by the Wild Hope Project. This conference's objective is to give students a place to connect with others besides their usual peers. Meant to Live is associated . with Homecoming and will give students, alumni and "others" the chance for more informal conversation. Meant to Live lecture will take place Oct. 3 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the Scan Center.

~ llomecoming

Royce-Davis is a firm believer in the PLU mission statement and said diversity is crucial for developing critical thinking and understanding the richness of the human experience. Royce-Davis strongly encourages all Lutes to engage with the people and organizations they find themselves in contact with throughout their PLU experience. "Ask questions, get advice and support each other," Royce-Davis said .

PLU' s Homecoming, Oct. 3-5, will include something for everyone. 1964, 1974, 1989and 2004 are the featured reunion classes.

~

My Language MvChoice

PLU Students will be featured in billboard ads around the . South Sound, promoting awareness of offensive language.


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 26, 2014

NEWS3

New Campus Safety shuttle policy promotes promptness According to Premo, the time it takes a shuttle to get to and from the far houses takes time away from responses to closer issues and can cause a backup. This year, PLU is also hiring off-duty police As the 2014-2015 school year kicks off, Pacific Lutheran University Campus Safety is headlining new officers to patrol campus and around campus in policies and enforcing old policies in new ways. CSAF the afternoons and nights. Over the last year, CSAF works to promote a safe environment and acts as PLU's has received a high number of complaints from the enforcement agency for campus problems. CSAF is residents surrounding PLU about off-campus parties instating a new shuttle service policy, hiring off-duty being loud and unsafe. In response, CSAF hired a group of about 20 police officers and hoping to make '14-'15 go smoother police officers to watch over campus for parties, than previous years. This year, the CSAF shuttle service is changing its illegal activity and speeding. The police officers are hours and radius around campus. The shuttle service not working for PLU, so if an officer shuts down a party, it's to that officers discernment whether or picks up students on or off campus not the house should be fined in a PLU vehicle and transports and whether or not to arrest them to another location. It runs 4 students. Most parties usually p.m. to 3 a.m. daily. A CSAF officer will walk with lfyou need Campus Safety's are given a ticket at most, Premo said. · .a student to a location to ensure assistance, call Off-campus parties are a safe arrival as part of the CSAF a major problem PLU faces. escort service, which runs 24/7. 253-535-744i Premo said students disturb the With the new hours, CSAF community and leave parties also enforces a new sli.uttle pick drunk or high, disrupting the up and drop off perimeter. The campus environment. PLU is a shuttle service can pick up and drop off at locations from to 116th St. to Tule Lake Road drj campus, which means any students found drunk or high will be sent through Student Conduct. Tickets and from Pacific Ave. to Washington High School. The shuttle perimeter was only shortened on the have already been given out to loud, off-campus north and west sides of campus because the extended parties during the first weekend of school. CSAF will not call your parents, discipline radius was not a good use of school time and equipment, you or find you guilty of any crimes. CSAF is the said Greg Premo, Director of Campus Safety. It seemed that the calls could be narrowed down to enforcement and safety group on campus; therefore, PHOTO BY SAMANTHA LUND three or four houses in the extended perimeter using they will write down and report on issues and then Adam Shreiber, Campus Safety Operations Supervisor, working the shuttle service to and from class, Premo said. The send the reports through the necessary channels. new radius was worked out over the last year by CSAF, "Campus Safety addresses the small issues," Premo at front the front desk in CSAF headquarters, lower level Resident Hall Association and ASPLU after holding said. "We11 come and try to fix the situation, we11 call Harstad. open forums for students to be involved in the decision. the Sherriff' s Department or the fire department if it is unattended, always lock up their bikes and report any "The new shuttle radius is the original radius that necessary, but we are the first responders." Currently, CSAF is seeing high numbers of bike suspicious activity. Campus Safety had before 2005," Premo said. "For Weekly CSAF briefs can be found in The Mooring some reason, it was changed in 2005, and it isn't the best thefts and unattended item thefts. Bikes, purses and backpacks are all crimes of opportunity, Premo said. Mast. use of our time." Students should remember to not leave personal items

By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor .

CSI •• Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

Theft at Tinglestad Campus Safety (CSAF) was called due to theft report outside of Tin~lestad on Sept. 8. After reviewing claims and footage, no suspects have been determined. Theft in Library A student called CSAF to report a stolen purse from her backpack, wfoch was left unattended in the Library on Sept.8. After reviewing security footage, no suspects have been determined. Theft in South Hall CSAF was called for a reported bike theft. The bike was left locked outside of South Hall on Sept. 9.

Theft in Pflueger Student reported to CSAF a stolen bike on Sept. 16. The bike was .Jocked overnight to a rack outside. The lock was left behind. CSAF will review footage to find possible suspects, no additionaf actions have been taken at this time.

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Concern for People · in Ingram . CSAF was called to Ingram Ceramics studio by a student on Sept. 19, reporting another student had been electricuted by a power outlet The student did not need medical attention, but the outlet has been placed out of order.

.Alcohol Policy Violation CSAF officers observed students in Tinglestad gated lot loading backpacks with beer on Sept 19. Students were tracked to Pflueger hall. CSAF notified the Resident Assistants and the students were addressed in their rooms. The students cooperated and turned over their alcohol. An incident report has been forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Alcohol Policy Violation Vehicle Theft in Harstad Lot CSAFwascalledbyastudentwhosecarwasstolen CSAF responded to a call from a Tinglestad from Harstad Lot on Sept. 19. CSAF reviewed the on Sept. 19, who reported the odor of marijuan. surveillance footage and found two unidentifiable and no answer to a student's door after sever. suspects. Pierce County Sheriffs Deptartment has knocks. CSAF officers and an RA entered the roo been notified. and visually searched it, finding no marijuana, bu finding alcohol cans in the trash. Later that night, Medical Aid in Tinglestad CSAF and the RA returned to talk to the students CSAF responded to a call from Tinglestad on The students cooperated and handed over the· Sept 19, from a student who had sustained injuries while playing soccer in the Olson Field House. alcohol, and said a guest had brought the mariju CSAF advised the student to go to the hospital and and none was in the room anymore. A report been filed to Student Rights and Responsibilities. get X-rays. No further action has been taken.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

SEPT. 26, 2014

Dance delivers diverse options to PLU students community. The creative journey of the Dance Ensemble culminates with a final formal performance at the 2015 Spring Dance Concert. To help create the exciting choreography for the final show, the PLU Dance page states Dance Ensemble will have help from dance faculty, alumnae and professional choreographers. The Dance Team is also involved and helps bring leadership and experience to the work of the Dance Ensemble. Audiences of every technical dance level are invited to audition and participate. Auditions will begin on Nov. 7 in the Columbia Center Studio for student choreographers. Auditions for dancers will be held the first Friday of spring semester in the Columbia Center Studio. "To anyone interested in choreography, bring your music, dance phrases and ideas," McGill said.

By TERRAN WARDEN Guest Writer Dance programs offered by Pacific Lutheran University give students a glimpse into a magical world of dance. Students are offered opportunities to audition for the Dance Team and Dance Ensemble, as well as minor in Dance. Dance Team 2014-2015 This year's Dance Team promises to be an amazing group this year, based off auditions for the team were held on Friday, Sept. 12. "There is so much talent in the team selected this year," Dance Director Maureen McGill said. The team is led by three captains: senior Elizabeth "Molly" Maloney, junior Amy Arand and junior Miranda Winter. "The captains have outstanding leadership and talent," McGill said. "The keen leadership of the three captains will surely promote creative and challenging performances." New members of the team, such as Lauren Castle, are excited to dance as a part of this team. "The captains this year are so nice," Castle said. "I am so excited for the year!" Team captains are proud of their selections. "I am incredibly excited as it is my last year on Dance Team ... The other captains and I are so proud of this talented group of dancers who bring a diverse set of strengths and styles to the team," Maloney said. The captains of the team, along with Dance Director McGill, will be working on performances throughout the year in a

PHOTO COURTESY OF MOLLY MAWNEY

This year's dance captains are junior Amy Arand, senior Molly Maloney and junior Miranda Winter (left to right). variety of styles, including jazz, funk and modern. The team plans to perform six to seven routines this year, but the styles have yet to be determined. The hip-hop and porn routines will be new additions to the team's repertoire. "The new styles should be an exciting challenge for us," Maloney said. The 2013-2014 Dance Team competed in its first dance competition last year and is still discussing competitions for later in the 2014-2015 season. The team will perform throughout

the year at Men's Basketball games, Fall Preview .Day on Oct. 5 and Global GetDown on Nov. 21. The Dance Team's second anunal Winter Showcase will be held held in the black box theater on Dec. 5. Dance Ensemble 2014-2015 PLU's Dance Ensemble is an opportunity for students to perform without being on the Dance Team and to choreograph their own routines, bringing their artistic visions to life in the

The Spring Dance Concert At the end of the Dance season, the Dance Team will join the Dance Ensemble for a final showcase. The show will be directed by Dance Director McGill and will showcase the student dancers, student choreographers and professional choreography of the 2014-2015 Dance season. "The 2015 Spring Dance Concert promises to be a stellar one with so much incoming dance talent in the university," McGill said. "A variety of styles, music and ideas will wow the audience!" For more information on Dance at PLU, contact Dance Director Maureen McGill via email at mcgillma@plu.edu.

Lyrics for Lutes: alma mater music needs words By KAITLYN HALL Copy Editor Pacific Lutheran University is searching for lyrics for its new alma mater song commemorating the university's 125th anniversary. Any member of the PLU community can enter the online lyrics contest, with the winning lyricist receiving two tickets to Teatro Zinzanni in Seattle. "The idea is for people to essentially contribute to a crowd-sourced set of words," music professor Gregory Youtz said, "and anybody- current students, faculty, alum, staff- can throw lyrics against this tune, and somehow we will decide."

PLU' s most recent alma mater tune - of the three or four songs used since PLU's inception- was composed in the 1950s and is clearly outdated, Youtz said. By involving the PLU community, Youtz hopes the lyrics can have the same timeless, Lutheran quality as his piece. The selected lyrics will likely address themes of PLU, such as diversity, global education and sustainability. "Every set of words reflects the values of the current generation, and maybe 50 years from now somebody will look at this and go 'Oh, this is so dated,"' Youtz said, "but what we're hoping is that at least for a while, these words will reflect who we are, what we value." Youtz suggested potential lyricists

Movies with Michael 'Twins' shows depth, 'Lucy' feels hollow By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer The Skeleton Twins Rated R Run Time: 1hr 33 min As Maggie (Kristen Wiig) is about to down a deadly dose of sleeping pills, she receives a call from her estranged tw1n Milo (Bill Hader), who's in the hospital after a suicide attempt. Maggie hesitantly makes room for Milo to come stay with her and her husband (Luke Wilson) in upstate New York. Realizing their lives are total messes, Maggie and Milo start looking for the reasons their lives went so w rong. Those who like indie flicks will find this an enjoyable film, but it will not make sense for everyone. If you have never been estranged from someone who once meant the world to you, it's highly probable you will find no personal connection to the film. Despite relating to it or not, one should be

able to notice Kristen Wiig ("Bridesmaids," "SNL") and Bill Hader ("Tropic Thunder," "SNL") manage to achieve a great balance of both perpetual sadness and quirky humor throughout the movie. Along with the film's great stars comes great writing and a well-rounded supporting cast. "The Skeleton Twins" brilliantly portrays the bond of siblings and how familiar our dysfunctions seem. One statement, made by Wiig's character, Maggie, sums up the melancholy vibe of the film: "Few people are stars, the rest of us are just walking around wondering how our lives got so bad." Despite its sad premise, "The Skeleton Twins" shows us that sometimes when our lives fall apart, the most unexpected sources can be the ones to help put it back together.

*****

should avoid jargon and focus on words and Norway in combination with famous that invite people into the PLU community. Lutheran hymns, creating a piece meant "They have to sound like we actually to capture the identity of PLU. It can be mean this," Youtz superimposed on "O Day Full of Grace," said, "so that when we sing it, we really do which has a unique, Listen to the new get that warm, gooey antique three-phrase community feeling." structure. alma mater song and President who composed Youtz fronted the search for a the new alma mater submit lyric ideas to new alma mater song, tune as part of his Lutheran Recessional, http://plu.edu/Jyrics will partner with Youtz an alternative to PLU's to select the lyrics. beloved "Processional Krise felt it necessary that PLU develop a of Joy." new piece of musical His recessional features folk music of PLU gateway identity for students, staff, faculty and program locations Trinidad, China, Mexico alumni, Youtz said.

Krise;

Lucy RatedR Run Time: 1 hr 29 min Lucy (Scarlett Johansson) is a young American woman who's pressured by her boyfriend into carrying a mysterious briefcase to a Taiwanese gang leader. The contents of the suitcase are revealed to be a super-powerful drug called CPH4. After being forced to take CPH4, Lucy is given access to a greater capacity of her brain than a regular human, slowly building up to 100 percent brain capacity throughout the movie. Lucy finds she needs the drug to survive and hunts it down. Lucy finds professor Norman (Morgan Freeman), an expert on the brain, to tell him all about her new abilities and knowledge. The action and intense pace continue to build as Lucy gains access to the powers of her brain. This is the type of movie that might be better after smoking weed. "Lucy" captivates viewers with its great visual effects and intense action scenes, but the story line comes off as hollow, flawed, and bizarre. "Lucy" tries to make sense out of too many things at once, leaving much unexplained. In addition, it's certainly not the best acting we have seen from co-stars Scarlett

Johansson and Morgan Freeman. Overall, the film was entertaining but failed to meet the possibly great potential it possessed. It is worth seeing, but it's better saved for a Netflix night.

*****


SEPT. 26, 2014

THE MOORING MAST

A&E5

FroIn Eininys to 'Einily' ByMATTHE"WSALZANO AdEEditor The question every Lute is trying to answer: "What will you do with your one wild and precious life?" Juniors Camille Adam·s and Rachel Diebel are on their way, and students get to watch. Diebel and Adams started answering the question in their freshman year-. On assignment from The Mooring Mast, they created a video package together to accompany a story. Former General Manager Storm Gerlock found out that Adams wanted to be a screenwriter. She encouraged Adams and Diebel to write and produce a show for Mast TV and they liked the idea. "We literally just decided to," Diebel said. "If we had known what it entailed, we would have never had done it. But since we were so naive, we were like 'we can just film a thing,' like 'that's fine!"' Two years later, Adams and Diebel are best friends, housemates and entering their third year writing original series for Mast TV. Last year, their second show, "Impressions," contained six episodes, totaling sixty minutes of content. These sophomores' attempt proved to be quality. "We submitted for a couple awards at the end of the year, and Camille

[Adams] ended up getting nominated and nominated ju st waiting for for a Northwest Emmy," Die1>el said. this .. . It was phenomenal to think She's making that we were just at Adams a T-shirt the very beginning of ·' ·o-..; about her Emmy that process at [the nomination. age of] twenty." This fact is Their nomination has not well-known only fueled their wild around campus, ambition. Diebel, the getting lost director and producer in the shuffle said this year will be during end-ofthe most ambitious year activities, project yet. "We want to win that so take note now. This is Emmy!" she said. "This the first time in year's production is Pacific Lutheran a lot more formal, University planned and well history that put together than the anyone has previous years. We been nominated have a much bigger for a Pacific team than we've had Northwest . in the past. The first College Emmy year, it was literally in the Writing just Camille and I Category. doing everything. This PHOTO COURTESY OF CAMILLE ADAMS "We couldn't year we have more believe we Juniors Camille Adams and Rachel Diebel official production were able to be at the 2014 National Academy ofTelevesion team roles ... It's going there," Adams Arts & Sciences Northwest College Awards to look more official." .. for Excellence ceremony. sa1.d . "H earing This year's show all the speeches is "Dear Emily," . a of professionals who have been 24-episode adaptation of the children's in the business for twenty years, book "A Little Princess" in a video blog and thi s is [the professionals'] first style. It will premiere in the spring. The Emmy, and they ' ve been nominated 18th-century book tells a hopeful story

of a young girl who, upon her father's death, loses everything but overcomes her miseries. "'The Little Princess' gets dark, as books of the 18th century for little girls go, like parental death is dark," Adams said. "So we're trying to get to some themes of privilege, and loss, and get those to an audience. " The production duo wants to get audiences to connect on a personal level. "I think that it would be nice if people would consider their own privilege, especially in the United States attending, you know-its not Stanford, but PLU is a very nice university with a good reputation," Diebel said. "It's important for us to look at our own position. I hope that the show at least gives people some sort of pause." Later this year, students can tune into "Dear Emily" on Mast TV. Students should pause and consider the grand, important themes of what is shaping to be another Emmy-worthy series and the nature of what Adams and Diebel are doing. They are passionate about their work, they are good at it and they are reaping in accolades. In the words of junior Denae McGaha, actress in "Impressions" and "Dear Emily," "Look at the kind of results you can get if you just act on what you're interested in!"

Center for Media Studies kicks off with mixer By ALLIE REYNOLDS General Manager of Mast TV The School of Arts and Communication hosted a party, celebrating .the official opening of the Center for Media Studies Thursday, . Sept. 18, (CMS) on at B Sharp Coffee. House in downtown Tacoma. · Students, alumni, staff and faculty from the communication department, MediaLab and student media networked and caught up with one another, signaling the start of another busy school year. During the event, MediaLab General Manager Amanda Brasgalla, MediaLab Faculty Adviser Rob Wells and Provost Steven Starkovich shared their ideas and hopes for CMS, which opened this semester in the School of Arts and Communication. The CMS was created to bring the arts and communication departments, student media and MediaLab together and be a place where students can collaborate on different ideas in journalism, public relations, graphic design, art and theater. By doing this, CMS will serve to improve the visibility of PLU as a place

where media convergence is not just bring about more community-centered a multidisciplinary approach in their talked about, but practiced daily. work that not only reflects PLU' s mission SOAC education which faculty hopes Students will work on projects of serving community, but invites more will encourage fantastic results. that are brought to the center from thoughtful inquiry. Students will take Matthew Salzano contributed to this article. the community. As Communication professor Art Land explained, community members will come pitch their ideas to fellow Communication professor Joanne Lisosky, who then passes on her selections to Wells, who then decides what resources get allocated to this project- whether MediaLab, Graphic Design students, or any combination of the SOAC emphases. "It's trying to bridge the campus and the professional w orld," Land said . "There's doing projects for class, which is all w ell and good, but we all know there's a different standard and a different expectation PHOTO BY ELISE ANDERSON level for professional-level Junior Camille Adams, senior Sam Horn, first -year Genny Boots and junior Natalie DeFord enjoy projects." networking at the CMS Event. !his new focus may

A glance at the Fall season By BRITTANY JACKSON Copy Editor Each fall, campus is buzzing with events, and this semester is no different. The calendar is full of performances by talented Lutes campuswide. Here is a look at some of the upcoming events. Starting off the year is the University Jazz ensemble's first concert at 8 p.m. Oct. 3 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center. The ensemble will perform music ranging from classic big band jazz to modern contemporary styles. Tickets are $8 for general admission, $5 for seniors and free to . the Pacific Lutheran University community. A number of theatre performances will take the stage this semester. The first is the student-directed, dark comedy "The Play

About The Baby." This production blurs Also on stage is the thoughtful play the line between reality and fantasy as a "The Boys Next Door," which explores the young couple must cope with the loss of triumphs and frustrations of the daily lives a newborn baby and ultimately question of four developmentally disabled men. The whether the baby ever truly existed. cast features a group of fresh faces. With Students can catch the show at 7:30 p .m. a total of eight spots, first-year students Oct. 10 and 11 in the Karen Hille Phillip dominate the cast list. The show opens Center. . 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16 in the Karen Hille Phillips · Music will fill the air as the University Center and runs through Oct. 26. Symphony Orchestra begins its busy Musical theatre returns Oct. 30-Nov. 1 season on Oct. 14 in Lagerquist Concert with the student-run production "Night of Hall. The performance begins at 8 p.m. and Musical Theatre." The production consists tickets are available through the Concierge of a series of short musical sketches Desk. highlighting the funny and not-so-funny Students who enjoy singing can attend parts of being a young adult: Performances the Oct. 21 and 22 performances of the are at 7:30 p.m. in the Karen Hille Phillips Fall Choral Concert in Lagerquist Concert Center. The music continues with the talented Hall. Enjoy performances by the Choir of the West, University Chorale; University voices of PLUtonic and HERmonic, PLU's Singers and University Men's Chorus. Both men's and women's a cappella groups. performances are at 8 p.m. Along with amazing voices, each group

Fall Events University .Jazz Ensemble

. Oct. 3. 8 p.111.. "The Play About the Baby" Oct. JO and 11. 7:30 p. m. University Symphony Orchestra Oct. 14. 8 p.m.. "The Boys Next Door"

Oct. 16. 7:30 p.m. Fall Choral Concert

Oct. 21and22. 8 p.m.. "Night of Muscial Theater"

Oct. 30-Nou. 1. 7:30 p.m. PLUtonic and HERmonic

Oct. 29, 8 p.m.. boasts regional and national achievements in high-level competition. Their first performance is 8 p.m. Oct. 29 in Lagerquist Concert Hall. With all of these great upcoming performances this season, students should mark their calendars so they don't miss out on the fun.


THE MOORING MAST

6LUTELIFE

SEPT. 26, 2014

Welcollle to Student Media Lute Air Student Raido, a letter

The Mooring Mast

By OLIVIA ASH LASR General Manager

By RELAND TUOMI Editor-in -Chief Welcome, fellow Lutes, to another academic year at Pacific Lutheran University. PLU is known for its athletic department, music department and focus on social justice. But one hidden gem at PLU is our Student Media. Social justice magazine The Matrix, literary magazine Saxifrage, radio station Lute Air Student Radio (LASR) and television station and newspaper combination Mast Media are all excellent outlets to express creativity and convey information. This section of The Mooring Mast, "Lute Life," will showcase archived pieces from The Matrix and Saxifrage for those on campus who haven't seen them. PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR All student media at PLU is run Reland Tuomi, senior, is the Editor-in-Chief of by students, which means students The Moorin{J Mast. She is a Communication major are able to freely decide what they_ with an emphasis in PR and Advertising want to write about, rather than having a professor tell them what is an art piece representing a favorite considered "good" to write. TV show or anything you think other Student media is meant for the students would like. students, so go find something worth Anything you would like. writing about, whether it's a news story, a work of fiction about birds,

DearPLU, Lute Air Student Radio may just be my favorite thing ever. Scratch that, LASR is my favorite thing ever. You may think LASR is just another college radio station. WRONG! We are also a family. We are passionate about music. We go record shopping together. We host concerts and open mies. And yes, we are also an online radio station. LASR streams online at http://www.plu. edu/lasr. We have myriad shows- from ska to folk, and from pop to live ukulele tunes. We love it all. To be a radio disc jockey, you don't need any particular major, or even have any knowledge of audio tech. We can teach you all that you need to know. The commitment · is pretty-minimal- each DJ hosts a show at least an hour each week; some overachievers do multiple shows or more than one hour. It's all up to you. At the moment, LASR is not yet on air. We are doing a big tech overhaul, so it may be a few weeks until we are up and running. In the meantime though, if you are interested in joining the LASR family, please shoot me an email at ashoj@plu.edu. LASR is a place to express yourself. It's a place to expand your musical horizons. It's a place to eat too much candy and meet new

PHOTO COURTESY OF OLIVIA ASH

Olivia Ash, senior, is the General Manager of Lute Air Student Raido (LASR). She is a Communication major with an emphasis in PR and Advertising.

people and relax with some tunes. It's your place. How's that for cheesy? LASRlove, Olivia Ash LASR General Manager

A letter from social justice zine, The Matrix By ANGIE TINKER AND LAURA JOHNSON Co -Editors of The Matrix

PHOTO COUR1'ESY OF ANGELA TINKER

Junior Angie Tinker is Co-Editor of The Matrix and majoring in History with an emphasis in the Modem Era in China.

Campuswide, from conversations in the Commons to discussion in the Diversity Center, social justice is not just an expression heard only in passing. Rather, social justice is a thriving aspect of the culture at Pacific Lutheran University. As a community, PLU has many strong voices and organizations centered on social justice promoting multifaceted equality in our society and working as advocates and activists. The Women's Center, the Diversity center and Grass Roots Environmental Action Now (GREAN) are only a few of these organizations that enrich our campus. It doesn't stop there. As PLU's social justice journal, The Matrix is more than just a publication. It's an opportunity for advocacy. We envision The Matrix as a significant aspect of our campus by being a platform for social justice dialogue, and, above all, a space for students to find their voices. "A student-run, studentdriven, and communityThe centered publication, Matrix creates a space for multifaceted conversations on social justice," said senior Ruthie Kovanen, a past editor of The

Matrix. These conversations can take many forms: essays, poetry, artwork, music and much more. The power behind The Matrix resides in building an avenue and opportunity for truly united dialogue across campus. The space we imagine The Matrix builds is important because it helps to rediscover our understanding of advocacy. "The Matrix widens existing social justice conversations on campus and allows students to engage in a form of public activism that challenges the notion that rallies and protests are the only way to create change," Kovenan said. As students, activism and advocacy can be as simple as picking up a pen or opening a computer. We at The Matrix hope to spark conversation and action instead of inaction in our community by encouraging students to participate, explore their passions for social justice and submit this year! There is an exciting, newaround beginning energy campus this year. If you are interested in harnessing this energy to get invo~ved, or are interested in submitting, check us out on our website. You can also find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter at

PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA JOHNSON

Junior Laura.Johnson is the Co-Editor of The Matrix. and is an English Literature major with a minor in Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

Night tonight, Friday, Sept. 26 and will be publishing our own upcoming social justice newsletter. Let's start changing our campus one voice at a time!

@thema~plu

We will be at the Open Mic

Like 11s on Facebook! https:/ /ww~rfaceboo~.~om/~~W~Mi\St~~:c,li~'.i . . ~-'~~·~Y.-~:~·, ;\' > >--::~~....--.·.i..'t.. i ;~ ?'/), . .~ .~..,~:\-~,...,.~ j~Q.~t~}~~,> -~~r... . ......... ,a.'.

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Sincerely, Angie Tinker and Laura Johnson Co-Editors of The Matrix


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 26, 2014

LUTE LIFE 7

An invitation from Saxifrage

If you would like to join any of these organizations, look for them on Facebook, Twitter and each . . organ1zat1ons website, or visit http://www.plu.edu/ studentmedia/

-

)

PHOTO COURI'ESY OF JAKOB MAIR

Senior Jakob Mair is an English Poetry Writing and Philosophy double major and is a co-editor of Sarifr<l{Je.

By JAKOB MAIR AND MEG DOLDE

Co-Editors of Saxifrage You may have seen copies of a book with a golden flower and the number 40 engraved on its kaleidoscopic cover. You may have opened this book and found it full of student poetry, prose, photography, paintings and musical compositions. You may have been intrigued and asked yourself, "what is this beautiful artifact I find in my hands?" Or you may not have even seen this

PHOTO COURI'ESY OF MEG OOLDE

Senior Meg Dolde is an English Writng major and is a co-editor of Saxifrage.

book, and are wondering exactly what this strange thing is. The answer to both of these questions is this: that book is the latest edition of Saxifrage, Pacific Lutheran University's premier literary and art magazine. Founded in 1975, Saxifrage has published 40 collections of poetry, prose, art, photography and music. Saxifrage is written by and for PLU students, faculty and alumni-a book by the people, for the people. Saxifrage is also committed to fostering a community of artists on campus, hosting events throughout the year to offer a venue for creatives to showcase their work. Be on the lookout

for open mies, art gallery events and author readings - they're coming your way. Saxifrage is also proud to have a column in The Mooring Mast that showcases outstanding work from its past issues as well as entirely new creative work. Saxifrage accepts year-round submissions for publication in the magazine and its weekly column right here in The Mooring Mast . Send all submissions, questions, rants, raves, ponderings, wanderings and general thoughts to saxifrag@plu .edu. You can also find Saxifrage online at Facebook, Twitter and on the PLU website at htttp:/I saxifrage. plu.edu.

1""-

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25o/o 路OFF YOUR TOTAL PURCHASE +FREE SHIPPING!*

www.GarfieldBookCompany.com "Discount & 路tree shipping is automatically applied to your order. Exdudes textbooks and course materials. Online only.

-


._..

THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

SEPT. 26 2015

Practice political participation this election "The reason to vote is not because of a big issue, it is an deadline for Congress to act, a act of citizenship," said Michael compromise bill is often passed Halvorson, Pacific Lutheran at the last minute or even after University associate history the deadline, evidenced by last professor. The big issue for Senate elections year's government shutdown. This isn't a fault of the system, is that Republicans can gain the majority. The because it makes Repub li can it difficult for "The reason to vote is Party needs a one group to net gain of six comp l ete l y not because of a big seats to take the control issue, it is an act of control of the government and Senate. There abuse its power. citizenship " are seven If members states holding of the same party controlled both houses of Senate elections currently Congress, though, they'd be able represented by a Democrat, but to get along more easily than were . won by Governor Mitt Romney in the last presidential they do now. The House isn't likely to election. switch party control this year. A Republican in each of these This has to do with numerous states has a realistic chance factors such as gerrymandered of defeating the Democratic congressional districts, incumbent or winning an open according to Larry Sabato, the seat that a Democratic sen ator director for the University of currently holds. It's even a Virginia Center for Politics. possibility that Republicans can Regardless, it's still important to defeat Democrats in states that vote in House elections. President Obama won in the last

By PHILIP PASSANTINO 路 where few bills are agreed upon by both houses. When there's a Guest Writer

--

The results of Election Day on Nov. 4 will determine the path of the United States for the next two years, which is why it's so important to vote. Some might not know that there's an upcoming election. The U.S. Constitution mandates that elections for the House of Representatives and for about one-third of the Senate be held every two years. The last congressional election was held in 2012, at the same time as the presidential election, which means the next congressional election will be held this year. There will also be state and local races on the ballot, but I'm going to focus on what's at stake on the federal level. Currently, members of the Republican Party control the House of Representatives, while members of the Democratic Party control the Senate. This has led to legislative deadlock

recycle your copy of

Student Media: Back in full force By ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager and Online Editor

-,.

路 After a rough summer and late beginning, student media is back and ready for another year here at Pacific Lutheran University. When the new media outlet heads were hired at the end of last year, we honestly had no idea what we were in for .

Cut to the summer and the student leaders of Mast Media, Saxifrage, The Matrix and Lute Air Student Radio are m eeting with our various faculty and staff advisers about changes for this year, including pretty big budget cuts and a new class to add to our already hectic schedules. That isn't stopping us from making the best of a situation. We're lucky to h ave a great, dedicated team of student m edia leaders who are open to new ideas,

- ~

L

witter

@PL

The Mooring Mast

.

rrurumum wage, even though Senate Republicans will block them because they believe it'll burden businesses and lead to layoffs. The difference between a Republican Senate and a Democratic Senate will determine what issues Congress tackles for the next two years. It's true that one vote will almost certainly not m ake a difference in a federal race, but if thousands of people think like that and do not vote, that'll make a difference. Many brave Americans h ave died protecting our freedoms. It'd be a shame if we didn't take advantage of our freedom.

PLU LuteVote is a project branched from ASPLU that enourages students to vote and increase civic participation. Visit their website at 路 http://www.plu.edu/asplu/misc/Lut e-Vote. php to register to vote!

fo llow

P[ease

....

presidential election. If Republicans take control of the Senate, they'll make sure President Obama does not overstep hls authority by using the Senate's committees to investigate abuses of power, according to David Nather from POLmco. It's entirely possible that President Obama and congressional Republicans are able to compromise and get things done, like President Bill Clinton and congressional Republicans did in the 1990s, but there' s also a chance that they'll be unable to get along and few things will get done legislatively. If Democrats maintain control of the Senate they'll focus on raising the . federal

PHOTO BY ALLIE REYNOLDS

Mast T V General Manager and Online Editor Allie Reynolds (left) taking a selfie with 2013-2014 Mooring Mast Editor-in-Chief Jessica Trondsen (middle) and current Mast Editor-in-Chief Reland Tuomi (right).

working together as a team and the idea of convergence. That' s why while student media will be producing the same new sp aper, new s program, radio shows and magazines you know and love, we11 also be mixing it up a little bit to work closer together with one another and work on PLU's student media convergence. So here' s what you can expect from student media this year: Mast Media will still produce a weekly new spaper, The Mooring Mast, but you'll now find new section "Lute Life" in the middle of the paper. "Lute Life" aims to reach all aspects of the PLU campus we don't u sually see, like archives from The Matrix and Saxifrage as well as columns from current LASR disc jockeys and m ore news from Morken and Rieke, the science-centered buildings on lower campus. Mast Media is also now part of the Northwest News Connection, a coalition between other private universities in the area including Whitman College, George Fox University, Willamette University and Whitworth University. Each w eek, we11 be featuring a story from each school on our website in order to form a better connection and friendship with colleges in our area while also sharing their stories with the PLU community. Mast TV has gotten some new u pgrades including a new Tricaster, which will improve the quality of our weekly news broadcast, News @ Nine, which will begin sometime in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned! We'll also be airing a new entertainment series, "Dear Emily," which is written and produced by juniors Camille Adams and Rachel Diebel and will air on Mast TV later in the spring semester.

In addition to "Dear Emily," other entertainment shows are also in the works, so Mast TV will not only be your source for PLU news, but also a place where you can gather around the TV with your friends and enjoy stories fellow Lutes have created for the small screen. PLU' s social justice magazine, The Matrix, will be producing a newsletter as well as a m agazine at the end of each semester. Literary m agazine Saxifrage w ill be having more of an online presence this year and will co-host Open Mic nights with LASR and The Matrix where students can showcase their creativity and talent in any form they wish . The first one will be tonight, Sept. 26, with more to follow throughout 路t he semester. This year, you11 see a lot more convergence between the various student media outlets on campus. We're excited to bring the PLU and Parkland community events, new s, entertainment and a source of creativity. One of the reasons why student media is so important on the PLU campus is that it helps create a community. This year you11 notice a cohesive bond between media ou tlets on campus. Stay tuned, Lutes! Student media is coming at you full-force this year.

" This year, you'll see a lot more convergence b etween the various student media outlet s on campus. "


--.:-路~

OPINION 9

THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 26, 2015

Meet Mast Media

........

RELAND TUOMI

Editor-in-Chief Reland is a senior majoring in PR and minoring in Marketing. She loves corgis, Chipotle burritos and being sassy.

ALLIE REYNOLDS

Mast TV General Manager Allie Reynolds is a senior majoring in Journalism and minoring in Women and Gend er Studies. Allie enjoys playing Nancy Drew computer games and pretending she's best friends with Mindy Kaling and Leslie Knope.

CAMPBELL BRETT

Multimedia Editor Campbell is a Senior Business major, enjoys spending his time editing video and composing music. He is also a student DJ and involved with the PLU Swing Dancing Club.

~

ZACHARY BOYLE

News @Nine Producer Zachary Boyle is a senior Biology major. This is his second year involved in student media. In his spare time, Zach likes to add Sriracha to every food imaginable and make bad pun jokes.

BJORN SLATER

Business and Ads Manager Bjorn is a senior Business major with a concentration in Finance. He's also a men's ultimate frisbee team captain and loves to barbecue.

BRITTANY JACKSON

Copy Editor Brittany is a senior 路 English major and Communication minor. Sne loves quoting Harry Potter, traveling and chai tea lattes.

_.

KAITLYN HALL

Copy Editor Kaitlyn is a first-year Journalism and Hispanic Studies major. She also plays violin in USO. Read and follow her olog, http:// alogophileslexicon. wordpress.com.

~

GIANCARLO SANTORO

Sports Editor Giancarlo is a senior Journalism major and sports enthusiast.

ASHLEY GILL

Opinion Editor Ashley is a senior Social Work major with a minor in Sociology. She also enjoys video editing for News@ Nine.

MATTHEW SALZANO

AdEEditor Matthew Salzano is a first-year Communication major coming from Spokane, WA. He serves as President of the Foss Residence Hall Council. Make sure you follow him on twitter - @matthew_paul.

SAMANTHA LUND

News Editor Samantha is a junior Journalism major. She is the captain of the Women's Tennis team, and thinks all pugs are awesome!

POSITIONS AVAILABLE Apply online at http://www.plu.edu/ career-connections/

-..;::-or 路


~

THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

SEPT. 26, 2014

IPORTllCOREIOARD AROUND THE LEAGUE •••

Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Whitworth

3

0

0

1-0

Woo3

Linfield

2

0

0

0-0

Woo2

Willamette

2

0

0

0-0

Woo2

PLU

1

0

0

0-0

Wool

Puget Sound

1

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

George Fox

0

2

0

0- 0

Lost2

Paci.fie

0

2

0

0- 0

Lost2

Lewis & Clark

0

1

0

0-1

Lost3

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Sep. 27 vs. Trinity (Tex.), 4:00 p.m.

Women's Soccer

onference football coaches amed Linfield as the pre-season avorite to lift a sixth straight C Gridiron title. The Wildcats ook last year's title with a perfect 0 record and went all the way o the NCAA Division III Playoffs efore losing to the eventual

N'S GOLF: Willamette senior yan Kukula took first place at e Pacific Fall Opener at the ail Valley Golf Course with career best score of 64 over 18 oles, helping Willamette finish · second.

Men's Soccer T~

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Puget Sound

5

2

1

2-0

Woo5

PLU

5

3

0

2- 0

Woo4

Whitworth

6

0

1

1-0-1

Wool

Lin.field

3

3

1

1-0-1

Wool

Willamette

4

4

Q

1-1

Lost 2

Pacific

3

4

0

0-2

Lost2

Whitman

3

4

0

0-2

Lost 2

G1'orge Fox

2

14

1

0-2

Lost2

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Sep. 27 vs. Linfi.eld, 2:30 p.m.

Volleyball

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Lewis & Clark

4

1

2

2-0-1

Tiedl

PLU

9

2

0

2-0

Won2

Whitman

4

2

1

2- 0-1

Tied 1

Puget Sound

4

1

0

2- 0

Woo4

Lin£eld

5

1

0

2-1

Wool

PLU

3

2

1

1-1

Wool

Pacific

4

3

0

1-1

Lostl

Willamette

2

5

0

1-2

Wool

George Fox

0

4

2

0-2

Lost3

Whitworth

1

5

1

0-3

Lost4

Lewis & Clark

OSS COUNTRY: The PLU en's and Women's Cross ountry teams competed in the 014 University of Washington undodger Invitational over past weekend that featured ver 400 student-athletes and 0 programs. PLU junior Amie ilson was the women's top racer ·th an 88th place finish.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Sep. 27 vs. Lewis d Clark, 12:00 p.m.

- ~'~

Santoro sneaks... By GIANCARLO SANTORO

Sports Editor To be as cliche as possible, with every new year comes new responsibilities. As students and student-athletes are starting to get more and more settled in for the long haul that is the school year, they are also becoming acquainted with their scholarly and social obligations. It is a time for change for everyone, whether first-year or senior, and The Mooring Mast is no different. There has been a change of guard here at The Mast, but the quality of the paper will always l::ie a constant in the ever changing landscape of Pacific Lutheran University. While writing for The Mast as a staff sports writer last year, I learned a lot about the ins and outs of student media.

As a senior, I have become accustomed to people relying on me to get things done to the best of my ability, and part of what makes PLU great is that it expects this out of the entire student body. As the new Sports Editor, I will be taking on a leadership role which I am not familiar with but am excited to be part of. Lute student athletes are some of the best and most feared competitors in the state and they demand excellence every time they step out to compete. For those that don't know, The Mast is an award-winning, student-run newspaper with a staff dedicated to getting the news to the PLU community. My job is not only to make sure that PLU sports teams are covered in an accurate and timely manner, but that they are interesting and

Director of Athletics Communications Senior Emily Cook's second-place performance paced the Pacific Lutheran Women's Golf team over the weekend, as the Lutes finished fourth at the Pacific Fall Opener at Quail Valley Golf Club. Cook followed Saturday's first-round 74 with a second-round 81 to finish with an 11-over 155, three strokes behind Whitman's Kelly Sweeney (71-81-152), who took medalist honors. Jeankie-Jhen Aczon tied for eighth at 19-over 163 (83-80), while Desirae Haselwood was two strokes behind her (85-80 - 165) to tie for 13th. Madison LaVergne (91-91 - 186) and Kadyn Coltom (92-102- 194) rounded out the PLU quintet, while Anna Jessen played as an independent and finished with a weekend total of 177 (87-90). As a team, PLU posted rounds of 333 and 336 to finish at 669, 93-over-par. Whitman won the team crown at 632 (309-323), with Willamette taking second (324-

_,,~

3

4

0

2-0

Won2

6

5

0

1-1

Wool

Pacific

5

5

0

1-1

Wool

Whitman

5

6

0

1-1

Lost 1

Puget Sound

2

9

0

1-1

Wool

George Fox

2

10

0

1-1

Lostl

Whitworth

7

4

0

0-2

Lost 2

6

5

0

0-2

Lost 2

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Sep. 26 vs. George Fox, 7:00 p.m.

Change is good worth reading. As with any organization, we will make mistakes. But we will be sure to hold ourselves accountable for correcting those mistakes as quickly as possible. After playing on the PLU Men's Soccer team and going out to support my fellow Lutes for the last four years, I know what it is like to be both an athlete and a fan. The sports section will do its best to reflect that. Sports have the ability to bring people together in ways that other things can't, and the PLU sports tradition is only getting stronger every year. I hope you will join me and the rest of The Mast staff in welcoming the new school year, and I hope to see you on the court, field, pool or track in full voice. Go Lutes.

Women's Golf takes fourth at Pacific Fall Opener By TYLER SCOTT

.

Lin£eld Willamette

334 - 6~8)

and Whitworth taking third (334-328- 662). Lewis & Clark placed fifth (353-352 - 705), followed by Linfield (374-356 - 730), Pacific (403-394- 797) and Puget Sound (440-447- 887). PLU has next weekend off before heading to the Whitworth Invitational on Oct. 4-5 at Canyon Lakes Golf Course.

PHOTO BY ATIIl.ETICS COMMUNICATIONS

Emily Cook, senior, leads PLU to a fourth place finish in Oregon.

Lutes finish 11th at St. Martins Invitational ·- tl1e-·weeI<end .-63:0vei-par ··W1th_ a..i:eam' score of 915 (298-309-308) at the par-71, 6180-yard course. Western Washington claimed the team title with a weekend total of 838 (14-under-par), while Simon Fraser placed second (844, 8-under) and British Columbia placed third (850, 2-under) . Junior Justin Lee w as the Lutes' top placer, following a first-round 72 with back-to-back rounds of 77 to finish with a 13-over 226 to tie for 44th. First-year Mitchell Baldridge was one stroke behind (76-73-78 - 227) to PHOTO BY ATID..ETICS COMMUNICATIONS tie for 471;[1. Junior Zach Martinson tied PLU\• .Justin Lee lakes a shot ut the Sn.nil MW"lin°:; Lnvitc. Lee for 55th (76-79-75-230), with sophomore finished lllh ngn.i.nsl mo1'lly NCAA Division fl schools. Thomas Huddleston tying for 60th (7481-78 - 233) and junior Ryan Fenton (7780-80 - 237) and junior Sevryn Modahl . By TYLER SCOTT (78-80-79 - 237) tying for 66th. Western Director of Athletics Communications Washington's Anthony Allen and British Columbia's Evan Holmes shared medalist The Pacific Lutheran Men's Golf team· honors at 6-under 207 for the weekend. concluded the Saint Martin's Invite The Lutes have the next two weekends ranked 11th on the team leaderboard off before returning to action Oct. 11following three rounds in two days 12 at the Culturame Classic down in at Olympia Country & Golf Club. Aloha, Ore., at The Reserve Golf Club. Taking on almost exclusively NCAA Division II programs, the Lutes wrapped

+


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 26, 2014

11 SPORTS

Men's soccer breezes through competition on first weekend of Northwes[ Conference play . By GIANCARLO SANTORO-

Sports Editor The Pacific Lutheran University Men's Soccer team got off to a flying start in the opening games of Northwest Conference play at home against Oregon schools George Fox and Pacific. Gamel Eager to push on from back-toback preseason wins last week, a youthful Lutes team were quick and efficient against George Fox and opened up Northwest Conference play with a 2-0 home win. "We knew coming in that with such a young team and so many new players that it might take us a while to gel," PLU head coach John Yorke said. "The fact that we played three consistent top 25 .teams in the nation in preseason from around the West Region has really helped get us ready for conference play." After a scoreless opening 30 minutes, the Lutes' hard work finally paid off when junior Jordan Downing found the net in the 34th minute. A thorn in the side of the Bruins all game, Downing collected a pass from sophomore KC Phillips and made no mistake with the finish, blasting it into the upper corner for the Lutes' first goal of conference play. It was Phillips' first assist of the season. "Scoring the first goal is always the hardest part, but after that it gets easier," Downing said. "I'm just happy it came early in the season, and it gives me a boost of · confidence for the rest of the year, which is something that didn't happen my first two years." Both teams had a couple of decent chances but went into

halftime with the score 1-0 for Conference victory against the Elan Yogi. Pacific University Boxers on The goal seemed to wake PLU. the Lutes up, and it was one Picking up where he left off Sunday at East Field. in the first half, Downing added For the second day in a row, way traffic from then on. It didn't take long for PLU his and PLU's second goal of the junior Jordan Downing could not game just three minutes after the be kept off the scoreboard and to level the score, and they restart to make it 2-0. his two goals, the first a game did so after Pacific goalkeeper Sophomore Junior Loreto got winner, earned all three points for Leyton Thommasen took down sophomore Junior his first assist of the season when the Lutes. "It was very important to come Loreto inside the box. Loreto he picked a pass to Downing who hit a low drive across the keeper out and get two wins especially scored the third goal of the from the top of the box to put the because the team is young this season from the penalty spot year," Downing said. "We are to tie the game 1-1 in the 63rd game beyond the Bruins. "The first win is always good trying to develop as a unit and minute. With the game looking because it provides confidence prove that we can win just like the destined for overtime, within our team," senior Justin . classes before us." Manao said. "It shows the team Although a whopping 38 sophomore transfer Nate that every game means something shots were taken by both teams Popp found Downing on a run through the Boxer defense in in conference play." combined throughout the game, the 82nd minute. Once again, The Lutes were dominant on offense and came Downing made no · away from the game mistake with the with 13 shots; three finish and buried it on goal compared "We are nowhere near what our potential from close range. Downing to George Fox's nine is yet but we keep making progress and and two on goal. Both wrapped up the continue to get better." scoring two minutes were goalkeepers later in the 84th relatively untested, with minute to make it PLU junior goalkeeper John Yorke 3-1 after scoring on a Mike Arguello making LU junior Jordan Downing (15) prepares Men's soccer head coach clear shot following to kick the ball downfield. Downing scored two saves, while George a pass from senior two goals in each game this past weekend Fox's Ricardo Sotelo Justin Manao. It was to help the Lutes go 2-0 in opening NWC, made only one. ,lay. Downing's team"I was happy with the team's performance overall," the first half finished scoreless at leading fifth goal of the young season. Yorke said. "We are nowhere 0-0. home in the first weekend," Yorke "We had to make some mental "George Fox and Pacific both said. "It creates excitement and near what our potential is yet, but we keep making progress adjustments," PLU head coach had down years last year, but I belief within the team and gives and continue to get better. I was John Yorke said. "I believe the think both of them were much us some juice to carry through the happy with how the game went." players were also forced to realize improved," Yorke said. "It is week as we prepare for our trip to With the win, PLU improved the need for playing at a higher really important that we continue Oregon." to 4-3 overall and 1-0 in NWC intensity and speed of play, and to beat the teams that we have The Lutes return to ·action finished ahead of in recent years." this weekend when they head to play. George Fox fell to 2-4-1 that really helped." overall and 0-1 in conference. The Lutes' quick passing game PLU junior goalkeeper Mike Oregon to face off against Linfield and speed of Downing left the Arguello finished the game with and Willamette. Pacific defense exposed numerous six saves compared to five for Game2 times, but it was the Boxers who Pacific's Thommasen. With the Despite going a goal down to took the lead against the run of win, PLU improves to 5-3 overall, start the second half, PLU roared play in the 50th minute. Pacific's 2-0 in NWC, while Pacific falls to back with three unanswered Andrew Tanaka scored off a shot 3-4 overall, 0-2 in conference. goals to snatch a 3-1 Northwest from 10 yards on an assist from "It was huge to get six points at

Golden goal gives women's soccer first win

PHOTO BY DAVID MAIR

Rozell (grey) attempts to steal the ball from a Pacific defender and send the Lutes on the attack. The Lutes are hoping to improve on last season's third place finish and are off the mark in Northwest Conference play.

By DAVID MAIR

Sports Writer Coming off the back of a 1-0 Northwest Conference loss to rivals University of Puget Sound earlier in the week, the Pacific Lutheran University women's soccer team bounced back last Sunday against the Pacific University Boxers at home on East Field. It was a bright and sunny afternoon and the stands

were full in anticipation of the Lutes' first home conference game. The game kicked off with PLU taking charge of the field and both teams playing well and moving the ball quickly. The Lutes kept pressing the ball inside the Boxer half for the better part of the game, but the Boxers ·1ooked dangerous on the counter. Although the Lutes were able to prevent the Boxers

from scoring in the first half, they couldn't open the scoring either despite · taking seven shots. The first half ended 0-0. ''We especially moved first to the ball and won it in the air the majority of the time, which helped us keep possession more than Pacific," first-year forward Kelsey Hathaway said. During the second half, the Lutes were even more aggressive. After taking seven shots in the first half, compared to just one for Pacific, PLU continued to look dangerous going toward goal. Despite taking seven shots again in the second half, PL U could not find a way past a stubborn Boxer defense. PL U came close to winning it with two minutes left in the game off shots from Hathaway and junior Emily Hanna, but both missed wide, guaranteeing the game would go to overtime. Hoping to make their statistical dominance count, the Lutes came out strong again in overtime. With both teams starting to tire, PLU junior Lauren Larson kept running at the Boxer defense, causing near goals. Against the run of play, it · was Pacific who almost stole it

in the 95th minute off a shot by Deanna Quadrel that went just wide. The game would go to double overtime with the the score still tied at 0-0. As the heat began to take a toll on both teams, PLU got their winner in the 106th minute of double overtime when senior Blake Warner crossed to Larson for the golden goal, sparking the Lute bench to rush the field in celebration. Hathaway credited PLU's drive and perseverance as

what the team will take away from the win. PLU sophomore goalkeeper Takara Mitsui made three saves in the game compared to five for Pacific's Kristina Morris. With the win, PLU improved to 3-2-1 overall and 1-1 in NWC. Pacific dropped to 4-3 overall, 1-2 in conference. PLU will prepare to face off against Oregon schools Lewis & Clark and George Fox at noon Sept. 27 and 28.

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PHOTO BY DAVID MAIR

Sophomore forward Kaylie Rozell dribbles the ball toward the Paci.fie defense. The Lutes needed a goal from junior forward Lauren Larson in double overt ime t o defeat the Boxers.


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 26, 2014

12 SPORTS

Lutes hold off Whitworth in Northwest Conference opener

Pirates force a fifth set but lose 3-2 six final points to win the first set 25-21, PLU jumped out to an early 6-1 score in the second. The Lutes were in no mood to let Whitworth back into the match, and finished the second set 25-16. Not ready to give up despite the lopsided score, Whitworth fought back to take the third and fourth sets 17-25 and 22-25 to ensure a grand finale in the fifth and final set. With Whitworth riding a wave of confidence, the Pirates did their best to silence the boisterous crowd by pulling out a qllick 4-6 lead over the Lutes. PLU would not be denied, though, and rallied to win the set 15-12 and the match 3-2. "In volleyball, like any other sport, it is important to be focused and checked in every play," Cooley said. "I thought the team did a fantastic job bouncing back and forgetting their mistakes in the fifth set after a rocky start to come away with the PHOTO COUIITESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

PLU players Kylai Cooley (12), Gabrielle Alley (5), Lauren McClung (14), Lucy Capron (3) and Amber Aguiar (yellow) celebrate after scoring a point against Whitworth. The Lutes went up 2-0 before los ing the third and fourth sets to take the game to a fifth set. PLU outlasted Whitworth and came away with a 3-2 victory at Names Family Cotirt.

_the home crowd was fantastic, especially from the baseball team." Sports Editor The emotionally charged crowd was in full voice to cheer on the Lutes, who Defending Northwest Conference started the match in commanding fashion volleyball champions Paci.fie Lutheran by taking the first two sets over the Pirates University started their march toward and eventually claiming the win. another title by winning their first six '1 think it is important for the team to preseason games in a row, eventually win the opening NWC match because it finishing with a record of 7-2 going into establishes who we are and what we hope NWCplay. to accomplish this season," junior transfer Conference play started off with a bang Kylai Cooley said. ''We hold ourselves to for the PLU volleyball team, ranked No. a high standard, which involves winning 13 in NCAA Division III, after defeating the conference." Whitworth in five sets at Names Family Both teams played out a grueling first Court last Friday. set that featured路 12 tie scores, but the "I thought the m atch against Lutes didn't look back once the score was Whitworth was great," head coach Kevin Aoki said. "We played pretty well and that even at 20-20. After taking five out of the

By GIANCARLO SANTORO

win."

Aoki echoed Cooley's analysis of the match. "We came back after losing sets three and four, to win set five, and that says something about the team," Aoki said. "I thought we passed, served and set pretty well, but we need to improve our overall hitting percentage." Senior libero Amber Aguiar finished the match with 41 out of 112 digs for the Lutes compared to 30 digs for Whitworth's Maddye Dinsmore. PLU senior Samantha North notched 45 -assists on the night while Cooley, first-year Gabrielle Alley and junior Lucy Capron tallied 13 kills each. PLU's record improved to 8-2 overall and 1-0 in NWC. Whitworth dropped to 7-3 overall, 0-1 in conference.

STAT SHEET The Women's Volleyball team has finished in the top two of the Northwest Conference every year smce 2006 and has been crowned champions five times since then. The Lutes are going for their third straight title in 2014. Statistics courtesy of http://www. nwcs ports.com/sports/wvball/archive

Volleyball sweeps Whitman, goes 2-0 on weekend Lutes now ranked #13 in NCAA By DEBRAH CABANOS

Sports Writer Olsen Auditorium was full of activity as the Paci.fie Lutheran University Women's Volleyball team hosted the first two home Northwest Conference matches last weekend. The Lute volleyball team, previous conference champions, won both of their matches. The 18-woman team, comprised of six first-years, two sophomores, five juniors and five seniors, fought a tough battle against Whitworth University. "Based off of the preseason records, Whitworth seems to be our best competition," said Samantha North, senior captain and setter. The game could have gone either way, with the Lutes winning the first two sets and the Pirates winning sets three and four. PLU kept fighting during set five, which led to a well-deserved victory. "Coach reminded (us) that competition like that is why we play the game," junior middle blocker Michaela Edgers said. "A win against a good team like Whitworth can only help our confidence," head coach Kevin Aoki said. "The team knows that we will get everyone's best shot." The following day, the volleyball team returned to play a game against Whitman University. The girls came out strong and energetic for match No. 2 and swept the floor by winning all three sets: 25-18, 25-15 and 25-17. ''We did very well when it came to serving, serve receive passing, and defense," senior outside hitter Ariana Judson said. ''Without a strong back row, a team cannot do as much offensively." Once again, the Lutes played infront of an enthusiastic student section. ''While playing, we were definitely feeding off the crowd's energy," said senior Amber Aguiar, senior captain and libero. "Seeing our student section being so involved and supportive contributed to our win for sure." Students also commented about how much fun they had supporting their fellow Lutes this weekend.

"Throughout the duration of the game,. our student section was really pumped up and loud," first-year Jacob Bockelie said. "Our whole baseball team went out to support them to set the standards for the rest of the games." The team has set their goals high by striving to win the conference title and advance to postseason. ''We believe that you can only reach your one team goal if you set daily and weekly goals for yourself and individually as a team," junior outside hitter Kylai Cooley said. "We would eventually love to go to nationals but it is going to take us doing little things daily to win conference games, (and) then to win the NWC." With two wins last weekend, the volleyball team improved to 9-2 overall and 2-0 in NWC. Whitman fell to 5-6 overall and 1-1 in conference. The Lutes travel to Oregon this weekend to match up against George Fox and Linfield. Their next home game is at 7 p.m. on Oct. 10 at Names Family Court.

"Seeing our student section being so involved and supportive contributed to our win for sure."

Amber Aguiar Senior libero

PHOTO- COURTESniFATHLETICS COMMuNICATIONS

Junior Lucy Capron (3) led the Lute offense with 13 kills.


NEWS

SPORTS

"Sign Me"raises money for children in need of Medicare pg.2

Two wins moves Women's Soccer into Third pg.12

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE OCT. 3, 2014

OORING http://mastmedia.plu.edu

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 2

Lutes' poster campaign spreads across South Sound By GENNY BOOTS Guest Writer My Language My Choice is taking to the streets of Pierce, Thurston and King counties. The passive poster campaign that began at Pacific Lutheran University is teaming with Clear Channel Communications to release a "Words Can Hurt" public service announcement. There will be 112 billboards around the Puget Sound area spotlighting the My Language My Choice (MLMC) challenge: .to accept personal responsibility for your words. In 2012, Diversity Center director Angie Hambrick and designer Lace Smith began a poster campaign focusing on everyday derogatory language with funding from a grant by the Seattle Pride Foundation. The posters feature PLU students, staff and alumni ripping through the word or phrase of their choice. The project started with "That's so gay," "Bitch" and "Illegal" and has grown to include "Exotic," "Retarded" and "Ghetto" to name a few. These words and phrases are examples of "micro-aggressions." LUTES POSTER CAMPAIGN

PHOTO COURTESY OF H'ITP://WWW.PLU.EDUIDCENTER

Sophomores, Jessica Crask (left) and Davon Benefield (right) stand up for the My Language My Choice campaign. "It's sad that the music, clothes and the language we use creates an image of what race is supposed to be." Crask said.

The Mast welcomes back the class of '64

CONTINUES ON PAGE 2

Togas in Tacoma: PLU's Greek Life By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

PLU FOOTBALL TEAM OF 1964

WHAT'SINSI A&E A preview of new PLU show "Boys Next Door" (pictured) pg. 5

OPINION Learn the do's and don'ts of being a renter pg. 9 SPORTS Men's Soccer assistant coach celebrates 300th game pg. 11 LUTE LIFE Read through archives from 19 Matrix on pgs. 6-7

Laurels, catering, Mediterranean food, glow sticks, firework glasses, Greek decorations, two student Disc Jockeys and a root beer keg came together on Sept. 26 for Hinderlie Hall's annual Greek-themed Toga Party. . This year's Party stands out from those of years past. Hinderlie Residence Hall Council (RHC) hosted the event along with Hinderlie's resident assistants and Resident Director Kat Slaby. The event was hosted in the lower level lounge and was filled with lights and artwork depicting Greek gods and goddesses, such as Zeus, Athena, Aphrodite and Poseidon. Sophomore Kiera Stevens, Hinderlie RHC president, said this year's Toga Party aimed to further adhere to the Greek theme. "Everyone dresses up in bed sheets PHOTO BY NATALIE DEFORD . that look like togas, and we just dance Sophomore Meg Burnett, winner of the toga contest. around and have fun," Stevens said. There was an array of food and just outside was a keg filled with root beer. look like rainbows. In addition to the Mediterranean dishes Student DJs and seniors Campbell Brett served by campus catering, there were also and Madison Barger performed at the event, grapes and other snacks from Hinderlie each playing for two of the four hours. RHC. "It was awesome to get to DJ the event, Students could also make their own but it was also nice to get the second half off laurel headwear out of paper and craft so I could dance," Brett said. supplies provided, whereas last year, Halfway through the event, three Stevens said she went out with friends and students placed in the toga contest. gathered leaves from campus. Sophomore Meg Burnett was the first-p lace "I actually thought, 'hey, let's not winner. destroy the environment around school Between 250 and 300 students attended and actually make fake laurels this year,"' the event, donned in togas crafted from bed Stevens said. sheets and safety pins. The entryway 9f Hinderlie Hall was "We had a really great turnout," Stevens festively decorated with a welcome sign said. written in Greek and RHC members handed out glow sticks and glasses that made lights


THE MOORINGMAST

NEWS2

OCT. 3, 2014

Students witness true effects of drunk driving By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer Pacific Lutheran University student s w itn essed a p ickup t ruck screech t o a h alt and slam into a teleph one pole on 125th an d C St. a t approximately 12:30 a.m. Thursday morning. Some students living off-campus in that neighborhood were st artled or awakened by the sound of the crash. "I d idn't see it, but I just heard huge crash after huge crash and didn't know where it was coming from," junior Alyssa W orkman said. "Then, looking outside, it was obvious the truck had rolled across the intersection and crashed into the pole." The students called 911 and Campus Safety immediately . About 20 students ran from their homes to make sure no one was harmed, including senior Dan Stell, Associated Students of PLU Vice

P resid ent. "A crowd of peop le w as running fro m m y street," Stell said . "I w as happy about PLU's stance right in that moment' cau se we w ere all making su re ev eryone w as ok." As stu d ents arrived at the scene of the crash , the male driver, estimated to be in h is late 20s or early 30s, exited his truck . The street w as covered with gl ass and objects belonging to th e driver. "The guy opens the door and just stumbles out," Stell said. "He fl owed out of his car with a backpack and began randomly p icking things up." Students helped the man, asking if he was ok, but he was non-responsive and appeared to be under the influence of alcohol. He then wandered off in to the neighborhood before authorities arrived. Police asked the student w itnesses what happened and went to find the driver. Once they had rounded up a

su sp ect, they took St ell with them to identify the driver. Stell s aid police thought the man was ob vious ly intoxicated and planned to b ring him to the st a tion and ord er blood work. No one was h armed in th e acciden t, and a fe w students ev en t ook selfies with the wreck ed truck afterward . " Good job sh owing concern, b ut a t the same time you need t o treat it seriously even after y ou realize everyone's ok," St ell said. " H ow w ould you h ave acted if it was one of your friends? W oul d y ou take a selfie?" Stell said this incident serves as a serious reminder for students not t o drink and drive. " It's good no one was hurt, but recognize the seriousness of it," Stell said. "Always h ave a p lan of how you're going to get h ome . Set things up before you have fun. "

Members of Pacific Lutheran University's Progress club held their annual "Sign Me" drive this past Friday. Based in Red Square, Progress members spent the day volunteering their clothing and their bodies as canvases for the donating public. This event, along with Progress' popular "Save it or Shave it" fundraiser in the spring, raises money for the Free Care Fund at Mary Bridge Children's Hospital in Tacoma. According to the club's website, Progress' mission is to raise funds to go toward children who are in need of medical care and to advocate and raise awareness about the healthcare system and issues in U.S. health care. Junior Katie Johnston certainly became more aware of Progress' goal because of this fundraiser. The eyeful of sharpie covered camarades drove her to ask about their cause, says Johnston. She also said Progress' methods are different than other clubs.

While Johnston is not eager to be covered in permanent marker herself, she admires the drive of students involved with Progress. It was good to see students taking leadership and action, she said. Progress' actions caught senior Tabitha Gross' attention when it spread out as far as her home base of Morken last year. A business major, Gross sees merit in the fundraiser, noting its valuable visual and interactive aspects. "It gets people asking questions ...lt got me curious" Gross said. First-year Gavin Jackson, an excited member of Progress, is glad Progress has that effect. Jackson says he jumped into Progress after he saw how fun the group seemed at the Involvement Fair earlier this year. Aside from the amusement of Progress, Jackson is invested in its cause. "Kids should be having fun" Jackson said. He is also looking forward to Progress' future visit to the hospital when they will meet and play with the children they are supporting.

Michael

Phelps

U.S. O lympic swimmer gets second DUI in Baltimore. Phelps said he is "deeply sorry."

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Secret Service

Head of the U.S. Secret Service, tasked with guarding U.S. President Barack Obama, has resigned following several high-profile security lapses including a break-in recently at the White House.

Thou sands of people h ave joined p rod emocr acy p rotests which h ave sp read throu gh H on g Kong.

Vlad the Imaler Archaeologists b elieve they've found the dungeon where the real-life ' D r acula' character w as h eld.

Ebola P HOTO BY DENAE MCGAHA

First-year Gavin Jackson gets signed to raise money for children in need of health care.

MLMC flourishing. Du ring the 2013-14 sch ool year, MLMC partnered w ith the W omen' s Center, the PLU Athletic department and the local school d istrict to develop specialized editions. Th ese days it' s rare to find a notice b oard on camp us that doesn't have a poster about MLMC. What H ambrick an d the Diversity Center started doesn't seem to be slowing down anytime soon. The cam p aign's su ccess is credited to student leaders.

D11.1..i1bon

uranr Pmftssor. /{is~nlt' Snulies

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HPPT : / /PLU.EDU/DCENTER

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The C EO of Threshold Entertainment says a live-action sci-fi film based on the video game "Tetris" will be coming into theatres soon.

Micro-aggressions are regular sayings that are derogatory and insulting d espite the in tent . Taking resp onsib ility for persona[ langu age, becoming cognizan t and beginnin g the conversation are fhe integral steps to the MLMC camp aign. It caught on. With over 200 Facebool<: shares and 6,000 notes on Tumb lr, the wave of social media attention kept

Emi(~

iPhon e 6 Plus displays at Apple stores have become targets fo r phonebending demonstrations n a tionwide.

Tetris Movie

MY LANGUAGE MY CHOICE FROM PAGE I

D'路路

Trending : ,.1 iPhone 6

~ HongKong

"Sign me" raises money for children in need of healthcare By DENAE MCGAHA Gue.~t Writer

World Ne ws

"A lot of people have called me exotic and I would t ake it as a compliment . But now I realize that exotificat ion and racial fetishism are microaggressions ..." Jimena Mascaro, Class of 2014

Five children are being h eld for observation after coming in contact with the man w ho was diagnosed with the first case of Ebola in the United States.

"Whether it was in you r res h all, the D-Center, your team, your classes, p eople t ook resp onsib ility. Saymg 'Hey, I'm choosing not to say this. Whatever you do, is ug to you, but I'm choosing n ot. ' Hambrick said. Now, as the billboards start to go up, the conversation is spreading. The billboards have been donated by Clear Channel, on a space-available basis. They are prin ted on fully recyclable "Eco-posters" and will 路be located on major secondary arterial roads. The boards will be up for the full academic year, and will be located in the South Sound. There seems to be no stopping this camp aign . From cork boards to b illboard s, universities around the country have applied the MLMC form at for their own communities. Even as th e MLMC campaign sets its sights to a national level, it will carry on here at PLU. "Wherever you fin d on campus, community I hope you have these Hambrick conversations," said . And that' s where it all starts. A conversation. A celebration fo r the campaign and billboard release will be held Saturday, Oct. 18 from 4-6 p .m. at 208 Garfield. This event is open to the public.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 3, 2014

NEWS3

HOMECOMING AGENDA Er:o-o

Saturday, Oct. 4

Fridau, Oct. 3 n. • .L.. A·

Classes without quizzes Sit in on a PL.U class

9:00A.M.

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lO:OOA.M.

10:00 A.M.

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71:30 Athletic J..IJ/I of Fame "j ' ' l-1.mche4n @ Chris lKnutun f..lall

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2014

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ll:OOA.M.

12:00P.M.

Sundau, Oct. 5

9-77 J./omecomin9 Continental Breakfast @ Garfield Book Co · 9 IY/en 's Alumni lennis IY/atch 9:30 f\Jursin9 Alumni Board IY/eetin9 @ Re9ency Room in UC

12-1 ,/../omecominq Game

12:00P.M.

l :OOP.M.

l:OOP.M.

2:00 P.M.

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2:30-3~30 Campus ·rour @ Cloe/< lower 'f-6 hlus ic" fUumni & ·"- Current ~Stud~nt readin9 session 5 :30-9:30 f..lomeco_min9 Concert

Class of 796Lf SOth Reunion!! @ lacoma Country Club

-9:30 .- 10:Lf5 Golden ·· Club· Brunch @ hlary~Baker Russeif~tnusic Center

ll:OOA.M.

77:00 GOU> Pr~ Game Event @ Sp11f..ks Firehouse Deli

l:OOP.M.

3:00P.M.

"1l..Z Dfl-Y:~'Fal/°'?7-;~;~~- ·:D;-yi

9:00A.M.

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((F @omens lflumnl Tennis IY/atch 70 Scan Cen#ier Exhibition 70 Cro}s Ccwntry IY/eet @ South Park

Go 1 i.urts1 ! !

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@SP,arks 1Stadium

3:00 -Or9an Concert by Raul 1hornock 'L.a9erquist Concert .Hall

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Class oF 796'1 50th Reunion @ Gonyea J./ouse 6:00P.M.

6:00P.M.

6-8:30 J./omecomin9 Fall Festival @Chris Knutzen J./all

MORE INFORMATION ON HOMECOMING EVENTS CAN BE FOUND AT HT TP: //WWW.P LU.EDU/ALUMNI/HOMECOMING-2014 .. . ......

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Ham Emergency Radio could save the day currently the station's primary operators. The two work as part of a larger team, linked with Campus Safety, and also help with search and rescue. The key to Pacific Lutheran University "Our basic reason for existence here is student safety could lie in four antennas to keep students safe," Oakman said. on top of the Morken Center for Learning Benton, W7PLU trustee, and Oakman, and Technology. station co-chair, share a common love for During disasters or emergencies, radio. Both grew. up building radios of ordinary methods of communication their own and eventually became licensed can fail. Internet is rendered useless in operat-0rs active in their communities. a power outage because cellphones stop Normally, the presence of a control working as everyone calls 911. Amateur operator-is required to make a call, but the radio, colloquially known as ham radio, station is arranged so anyone could do so routes around these obstacles. in an emergency. W7PLU, the amateur radio station in A sheet on the wall beaiing the word Morken, has been operational for about. "Instructions" in large, red font clarifies four years. Originally proposed for the necessary steps to operate the radios starting a student dub, the idea did not and communicate the emergency to -0ther die out with the initial lack of student amateur radio operators. Each of the interest. station's four radios and satellite phone Rob Benton, PLU mechanic, and has a sheet of instructi-0ns, including Douglas Oakman, religion professor, are labeled pictures. ,,......,,_ ..

By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

W7PLU, directly linked with the state's Emergency Operation Center as well as the Pierce County EOC, has three types of communication: voice, digital and Morse code. Both Oakman and Benton can understand Morse code as it comes in through one of the radios. An-0ther of the radios can decode high frequency emails, received through the radio's ability t-0 tap into Internet anywhere in the world regardless of whether local Internet connection is available. Additionally, the station's satellite phone and other radios can be used by anyone to make voice calls. All of these methods can be transmitted and received instantaneously, supported in a power outage by Morken' s emergency generator. Though the station has yet to be u sed in....,._a ...._.true state of emergency, Bent-0n and

Oakman agree that it may one day be the only option. "Ordinary communications get wiped out," Benton said. "Just in case, we are here." Amateur radio also has uses outside of emergencies and extends far beyond one's local sphere. Oakman said he has used radio to have conversations with people all around the world. He once used it to call his wife, who was in the Seattle area, while he was in Scotland. Radio checks, which include casual conversation with other stations ·a nd other people with licenses, are performed frequently to ensure the station has a dear signal. "We try to work on our skills and be ready for anything that may come at us," Oakman said. W7PLU continues to welcome members to its team, willing to share the heritage of amateur radio with anyone.

______ (SI.•Campus Safety Investigations ~.,._

-•

-

~.

Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

Theft in Garfield Bookstore Campus Safety (CSAF) responded to a theft report at Garfield Bookstore. More than $1000 of inventory w as stolen from the shelves. After looking at the security footage, CSAF and the Sheriff's Department identified the same suspect that committed a prior theft. The Sheriff's Department is opening up an investigation. Drugs in Harstad ·· CSAF responded to a call in Harstad on Sept. 25 because the odor of marijuana was in the hall. The room w as searched but no contraband w as found. The incident has been forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review. Hit and Run in Morken Lot A student reported that they had been involved in a hit-and-run to CSAF. After reviewing security footage, a suspect was found . The suspect was identified as a PL U student and their contact information w as relayed to the victim. No further action w as taken. Harassment in Red Square CSAF received a report on Sept. 26 that an unidentified male had been harassing women in Red Square. CSAF officers were unable to find the susp ect, but reported it to the Sh eriff's Department and offduty cfeputies located the male off-campus. No further action was taken by CSAF. Misuse of University Property A CSAF officer found students on the roof of H auge Administration Building. All the students except one jumped down and ran aw ay. The remaining student gave a rep ort. CSAF officers gave the report to Student Rights and Responsibilities for review.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

OCT. 3, 2014

;Preview: --' Biby' Leadership, brings new life to Vocation and You 路New series begins Oct. 6 theatre season 1

as his counterpart. "It's a story about transformation and loss of innocence," OstliePacific Lutheran Olsen said. "Over the University starts the course of the show, 2014-2015 theatre season Man and Woman cause by questioning reality. Boy and Girl to become "The Play much more About 路 the aware about the Baby," written world." by playwright Marlow said Edward Albee, "The Play About ("Who's Afraid the Baby" is a of Virginia show no one Woolf" and should miss. "The Zoo "The audience Story") centers will take away around Boy and a level of Girl, a young understanding," couple madly in Marlow said, love with each "a realization other. that we all With the have hardships addition of a Jessi Marlow and that's newborn baby, perfectly okay. Junior, Director of "The Play About Boy and Girl The audience the Baby" live a perfect life will learn to until Man and appreciate Woman enter the humor the scene. They in different throw Boy and Girl into Girl are naive and live situations." a world of confusion by in a happy world, Man Onstage Oct. 10-11, mixing fact with fiction and Woman serve as this year's theatre season and calling into question the driving force of the kicks off with a bang with the existence of their conflict, with Man acting "The Play About The beloved baby. as narrator and Woman Baby." Under the direction of

By JOEL THOMAS Guest Writer

juniorJessiM"arlow, lhisdarl< q.miedy features junior Nick Peterson as Boy, sophomore Arika Matoba as GirL firstyear Dane Ostlie-Olson as Man and junior Jessim Lenczycki as Woman. While both Boy and

"The audience will take away a certain level of understanding. A realization that we all have harships, and that's perfectly okay."

the many types of student seminars that The Wild Hope Center puts on for PLU. Faculty and staff will also participate in the "Women, Leadership and "Women, Leadership and Vocation" Vocation" seminar as leaders of small is a three-event workshop series centered discussion groups, panelists and sources on topics related to leadership, vocation of knowledge. and how women in particular approach While the title of this series names certain issues. women in particular, both men and The series is presented by The Wild women are encouraged to take hold of Hope Center for Vocation, Career the opportunity Connections and to engage in The Women's thoughtful Center. discussion with Women, Leadership The first event is PLU faculty and and Vocation Series on Oct. 6, and will staff. focus on success "It' s a chance Success and Failure and failure . The for students to see second event, 7p.m. Oct. 6 inAUC 133 [faculty and staff] highlighting as real people .. . conflict, will be Contliet and it's a chance held Nov. 17. The for [faculty and Nov. 17, Time and Location TBD series concludes staff] to know you with a discussion [students] as real Vulnerability about vulnerability people," Hunnicut March 2, Time and Location TBD March 2. said. An extension Members of the Wild Hope of any gender Project, The Wild identification are Hope Center for encouraged to attend. Vocation was founded in 2011 and works Discussion will center around to enrich PLU students' exploration of Leadership and Vocation, and what vocation. Lynn Hunnicut, the director, success, failure, conflict and vulnerability described vocation as central to PLU's mean to PLU students as they attempt mission. to live out the university's mission Each academic year, The Wild Hope statement: " .. .lives of thoughtful inquiry, Center organizes a variety of workshops service, leadership, and 路c are - for other for students. This year's "Women, people, for [our] communities, and for Leadership and Vocation" series is one of the earth."

By BROOKE THAMES Guest Writer

This Week in A&E University Jazz Ensemble 8 p.m. Oct. 3 in Karen Hille Phillips Center

. Paul Thornock Organ Concert 3 p.m. Oct. Sin Lagerquist Concert Hall

Regency String Quartet 8 p. m. Oct. 7 in Lagerquist Concert Hall

Homecoming Concerts 5 p.m. Oct. 3 in The Cave, AUC Outdoor Plaza

First Women, Leadership and Vocation Session 7 p.m. Oct. 6inAUC133

"The Play About The Baby" Opening Night 7:30pm Oct. 10 in KHP Studio Theatre

A look into LuteLooks Fashion Tumblr highlights lovely looking Lutes the fashion of PLU community members she finds on campus. Takehara was inspired to create LuteLooks after a friend showed her a fashion blog at a different university. "I looked at (the blog) and it was pretty good," Takehara said. "But I thought I could do i~ better and I just really thought it would fit well here .. .I know we have a lot of stylish students here, a lot of strong design and creative people." The blog is a collection of photographs taken on-campus of students' outfits. According to her blog, the intent is to put students on display for an aspect of PLU's culture which is not frequently recognized. "I wanted to create a place that celebrates students' unique and noteworthy style," Takehara said. PHOTO COURTESY OF LUTELOOKS Junior Grace Takehara is the editor of the fashion "I really just want to create a visual blog LuteLooks. interaction with people. Takehara plans to change the website By TERRAN WARDEN format so she has more creative options. Guest Writer "It's on Tumblr right now and I really want to make it a [standalone website], LuteLooks, one of Pacific Lutheran 路 so that it's not in the Tumblr format," University's most interesting student Takehara said. "Then I can be really projects, is a Tumblr blog created and run creative with what it looks like and make by junior Grace Takehara and features it even more visual."

Takehara is also working on incorporating music, cultural aspects and upcoming fashion trends into her blog. Soon, LuteLooks events will be held on-campus and at local businesses. "I just really want to make it interactive, not just through the web, but through other interfaces and channels," Takehara said. Takehara said she tries to incorporate styles of a variety of PLU community members on LuteLooks. "Anybody I see is a potential person that can be on it," Takehara said. "I try to get different styles mixed in, not primarily a certain type of style." Even PLU faculty and staff can be involved with LuteLooks. "I've actually had some [Resident Assistants] on it, like [Resident Directors], so that's really fun," said Takehara. "Whatever makes somebody feel good - I'm hoping to capture that on the blog." Professors should keep their eyes out for Grace Takehara next time they're looking good! Students can take a peek at the blog for upcoming posts and features. Viewers can find the blog at http://lutelooks. tumblr.com and on Facebook at http://

facebook.com/LuteLooksAtPLU. "I hope this quaint blog makes you smile and inspires you to make a statement with your next outfit," Takehara said. "I'll be looking for you. Hope to snap a picture of you soon!" Any student has the potential to be the next LuteLooks feature.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 3, 2014

A&E5

Big name, bigger list Ninth annual Tacoma Film Festival begins Oct. 9 Programs are available at The Grand Cinema and online at http:// www.tacomafilmfestival.com/. TFF also features several exciting The 2014 Tacoma Film Festival events throughout the festival. Before (TFF) has something for every the event officially kicks off, Animator moviegoer. Fans of any genre will find Benson Shum of 253Film will present something they like in the week-long an animation master class. Shum has film festival packed with 100 different worked on films such as "Harry Potter films . ~ and the Goblet of Fire," "Wreck-it This is the biggest year Ralph" and "Frozen." The yet for TFF. TFF Marketing event will be held at The Grand Manager Zach Powers said it keeps growing every year, like "I don't think anyone who enjoys Cinema at 7 p .m. Oct. 4. The Grand Cinema will kick any good art festival. The films have never been film as an art medium will have off the festival with "Laggies," shown before in the South any trouble finding new films that a romantic comedy directed by Seattleite Lynn Shelton starring Sound region, and many Keira Knightley, Sam Rockwell they're excited about." · showings will be accompanied and Chloe Grace Moretz, at by filmmakers. 7 p.m. Oct. 9. "Laggies" was "I don't think anyone who Zach Powers filmed in Seattle and blends enjoys film as an art medium Marketing Manager, Tacoma Film Festival local culture with national will have any trouble finding recognition. a few films that they're excited After viewing the film, about," Powers said. important to us at (TFF}," Powers guests can head to The Old Rector Th~ films aren't the only exciting part. This year, TFF will be joined said. "Leonard Maltin really, really Building and enjoy a cash bar, music by Leonard Maltin, legendary film embodies that. His life work embodies and good company at the Opening Night Mixer. The film screening costs critic and historian. He is famous for that." Showings are held from Oct. 9 to $11. his regular contributions in Comcast Whether an Art major, a Biology Cable and television shows such Oct. 16 in four locations: The Grand as "Entertainment Tonight." TFF Cinema, Tacoma Community College, student or a soon-to-be nurse, every organizers hope that Maltin is the University of Washington Tacoma Lute is sure to find something to enjoy. beginning of a trend of national names and the Museum of Glass.

By MATTHEW SALZANO AdEEditor

on:••·••

TllCOM. •WIGW PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA FILM FESTIVAL

to vist TFF. Maltin is attending two events, welcoming guests on Friday night and signing books on Saturday. Tickets are limited and available online. Powers described Maltin's visit as exciting and a great representative of what TFF strives to be about. "Film discussion and film as a tool to kickstart discussion is hugely

Waiting for 'The Boys Next Door' By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer On the stage, in literature and in art, one can learn about the hardships of the human experience. Paeific Lutheran University's upcoming production of "The Boys Next Door" hopes to honestly display the struggles of developmental disabilities. Conner Brown, first-year and actor in "The Boys Next Door," describes the show as honest. "It will connect with people," Brown said. During its original production in 1988, the cast of "The Boys Next Door" faced the formidable challenge of displaying the everyday difficulties of living with mental disabilities and trying to appeal to an audience. Opening on Oct. 16, under the direction of Jeffrey Clapp, an Associate Professor of Theatre, the cast of "The Boys Next Door" hopes to relate to its audience.

Set in Boston, Mass., "The Boys Next Door" provides a commentary into the lives of four developmentally disabled men who live in a group home with their caretaker, a young social worker named Jack, played by senior Mitchell Helton. "The Boys Next Door" is both comedy and drama and audiences will laugh out loud and cry like a baby. The main conflict of "The Boys Next Door" arises whenJ ack, the compassionate but exhausted caretaker, realizes he needs to move on with his life and pursue his dreams. As Jack deals with his own personal crisis, viewers get a glance at the daily struggles of the men living under Jack's care. Arnold, played by sophomore Anthony Aguilar, has a mild disability. He tends to be obsessive-compulsive and is extremely hyperactive. Though Arnold is able to do a lot of things the other men can't, he is constantly taken advantage of by co-workers and other outsiders because of his condition.

PHOTO BY MATl'HEW SALZANO

First-year Kathryn Wee dances with first-year Conner Brown.

PHOTO BY MATTHEW SALZANO

The collection of first-years includes (from left to right) Jake Eliot, Kathryn Wee, Conner Brown, Emily Curtis and Dane Ostile-Olson.

When Arnold becomes dissatisfied with life, he pronounces he's running off to Russia. No one ever believes Arnold will do anything about the disdain he feels towards his life, until he does. Norman, who is also developmentally disabled, is played by first-year Conner Brown. Norman is the romantic of the group. While working at a doughnut shop, he becomes obsessed with doughnuts and worries the re sulting weight gain will impact the opinion of his love interest, Shelia, played _by first-year Kathryn Wee . Lucien, played by junior Sam Collier, is severely disabled and can't read but still insists on checking out armfuls of books from the library. His disability funds are almost cut off when claims arise that he is faking his condition. The last of the four men, Barry, played by first-year Jake Elliot, is a schizophrenic who believes he is a pro golfer. In Act 2, Barry's abusive father visits him for the first time in years, proving to be harmful to his mental condition. "The . Boys Next Door" stars firstyear students in four of the eight principal roles. Even though it is the first production of their PLU careers, the "newbies" in the play are tackling very challenging roles.

"I was horrified at first, but everyone in the department is so nice and helpful," Brown said. "We just jumped in and learned really fast. The best part (of being a part of this production) has been Professor Clapp' s direction. He knows how to get what exactly we (as a production) are looking for." Brown values this direction greatly as he tackles the many nuances of playing characters living with mental disabilties. "It' s difficult (playing someone with a disability)," Brown said. "It's hard to find a balance of respectfully and honestly displaying a disability, especially in a play with elements of both comedy and drama." Members of the cast are learning that playing these roles with excellence is not about tricks of acting, but about faithful portrayal. "The hardest part (of playing someone with this kind of disability) is making the characters honest and true (especially because it is a comedy)," Aguilar said. "We can do gimmicks to make them funny, but the characters are funny themselves and making them honest will bring out both the funny and true moments." With the hopes of being one of PLU's top productions this fall, "The Boys Next Door" opens on Oct. 16 at 7:30 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center and runs through Oct. 26.


I_

THE MOORING MAST

6 LUTE LIFE

From Saxifrage: "Daw '' Dawn A burning copper coin rises in the East, Its photons stream through the window. Three hundred thousand kilometers a second at least, Visible light: red, orange, yellow, Green, blue, and violet; the colors Blended bright white in A cosmic, optical symphony. The wavelengths of hydrogen fusion. This week's piece is a poem by John Hunter from Saxifrage 1, which was released in spring of 1975. Hunter graduated from Pacific Lutheran University in 1976, with a bachelor's degree in Biology. He currently teaches science at Forks High School and is married to Pamela PHOTO COURTESY Hanson Hunter ('77), a pastor of Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Forks, Wash. He writes at least one poem a year for his family's Christmas card.

OF JOHN HUNTER

Saxifrage is open for submissions for the Oct. 31 issue of The Mooring Mast. This month's theme for submission is "optical symphony." Be creative! Send your poetry, art, fiction and creative non-fiction totalling no more than 500 words to saxifrag@plu.edu for consideration. Find us on Facebook, Twitter and at http://saxifrage.plu.edu.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAXIFRAGE

J s ICE?

Maricel Fee, 路 a junior studying Geosciences, noted that social justice needs equity. "Equality in terms of privileges as well "Social justice" is a term that gets thrown around a lot, but we don't always as economics," Fee said. Maylen Anthony, a junior in Hispanic know what it means. It isn't directly in Pacific Lutheran University's mission studies, agreed. "I think social justice is the recognition statement, but it may as well be for how of your own privilege and ways that you often students hear it around campus. As an editor for The Matrix, PLU' s social are oppressed, then utilizing them in order justice publication, I obviously care about to better the common good," Anthony . this. That said, I know what social justice said. So, how does privilege look? Just means to me, and I'm like differential not here to promote my ideas. I thought it " [Social justice is] having calculus in physics, it's complicated. would be best to see Briefly, what a cross-section of equal opportunities for people get though, treated students thought. differently just everyone." in the People based on who humanities and social people think they sciences are often up Kyle Parsons are. If I walked to their eyeballs in junior into the Old Main social justice literature Market in a burglar and discussions, but outfit, you'd better what do other majors think? believe the baristas would treat me It definitely has to do with equality. "Social justice, to me, means differently than if I entered with a nice achieving equal opportunity, not equal dress and my makeup on point. That outcome, for everyone, regardless of race, simple situation exemplifies an important socioeconomic class, gender, etc," said idea: people will assume different things about you just by what they think they Alexa Bayouk, a junior Music major. Junior Kyle Parsons, a business major, know. . "[Social justice is] often brought up in agreed. "It's having equal opportunities for the context of suppression," said junior Kalie Saathoff, a Chemistry major. everyone," Parsons said. "Especially with respect to race, Andrea Murphy, a sophomore and sexuality, and class." music major, mentioned the importance of These labels and more all h ave baggage. equality. Bayouk notes her own position in "Personally, social justice to me means equitably distributing resources - such as society and the privilege she gets. "As a middle class white female. I've educational, occupational, and financial never found myself to be a victim of social for all," Murphy said. What does this equity mean? Some inequality'', Bayouk said. Equality, equity, and privilege is what would say that it' s having a level playing field, so everyone has the same advantages. social justice is made of, at least according That's not it, though. We can't yet to a variety of different PLU students. give everyone the same chances, because It's not all gloom and doom for society, differences in privilege mean some people though. These aspects can be used for that other big PLU word - "vocation." get more than others.

By ANGIE TINKER Co-Editor of Saxifrage

By JOHN HUNTER 1975 Saxifrage Contributor

Sax路i路fral!e

WHAT IS SOCIAL

OCT. 3, 2014


-THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 3, 2014

LUTE LIFE 7

From The Matrix: ''O Being Asexua By LEAH LARSON Matri.x contributor The article was almost 3000 words, but was abridged for The Mooring Mast by the author. It was originally published in its entirety in the Fall 2013 edition of The Matrix.

The concept of a person who isn't interested in sex befuddles most people. Being attracted to someone of any gender is frequently listed as one of the trademark experiences of being human. People who are asexual are looked upon with a mix of shock and disbelief- they're treated like amoebas or children who haven't reached puberty yet. And I am one of them. Asexuals don't experience sexual attraction. Some have libidos, some don't, some are repulsed by sex and others are all right with it. Just like with any sexuality, there's a spectrum that people fall upon. Personally, I am a full-blown asexual; I h ave never experienced sexual attraction and I am completely indifferent to sex as an activity. However, there is more than one way to be attracted to a person. Our society tends to focus almost exclusively on sexual attraction. However, romantic attraction is a huge part of any relationship. People have romantic orientations in the same way that they have sexual orientations. It has always been obvious to me that I didn't quite fit in with the norm. When my friends and I were 12 years old and having sleepovers, we would discuss our crushes and which teen celebrity was cuter. I always felt as though there was something in those conversations that I did not fully understand. I never had a crush on a person in the same way my friends would - I never cared about what their muscles were like or the way that their hair swooped perfectly over their eyes. I was always more interested in people' s personalities and the things they did. While my friends were interested in those things as well, the topic of conversation was never about how people like Rupert Grint were hilarious in the dorkiest way possible, but tended to focus more on Ryan Gosling's abs or Emma Watson's face. They'd discuss them for hours on end. I never knew what to say when we would talk about these things, so I would simply choose whatever statement was said the most ("Ryan Gosling has a totally hot six-pack") and repeat it. After that, I'd remain quiet and all would be well. People have the amazing tendency to insert their own feelings into other people's silence, and I took advantage of that for the majority of a decade. This phenomenon is seen in places besides those of people who are struggling with their sexuality. If someone is being bullied and no one stops the bully, the victim will assume everyone around him or her is okay with what is happening. Our society is structured in a way that has made it so that a lack of disagreement is viewed as agreement, which is simply false. People who are silent or do not offer their opinion will have something stopping them. Whatever is stopping them needs to be addressed - someone being bullied, or the insecurities of a 13 year old girl who doesn't find anyone attractive. The few times I've been in relationships, they have rarely worked out well. I had my first boyfriend when I was 14. His name was Patrick and he told my friends he had a crush on me but was too shy to ask me out, so my friends pressured me into asking him out via a text message. Patrick was a nice enough guy. While he wasn't the smartest person I knew, he was very curious and he liked talking about things. Our relationship lasted all of a month; it mostly consisted of him trying to call me and me avoiding him. I broke up with him after my friends told me that he flirted with another girl at a party. The ending of our relationship was the first thing that signaled to me I might not be completely normal since my friends had first started discussing their crushes. I felt completely indifferent toward Patrick throughout our entire relationship: I only asked him out because my friends told me to, I never actually bothered talking to him, I broke up with him because my friends told me to, and throughout the entire thing I didn't care at all. I wasn't remotely upset Patrick had cheated on me (according to middle school standards). And over the next two years or so, Patrick and I dated several more times at the urging of my friends. At one point I kissed him out of a mixture of obligation and curiosity and later told my friends I thought kissing was boring. I broke up with Patrick for the last time when I was 16 years old. When I broke up with him, I told him it was because I couldn't handle having a relationship with him anymore. The truth was, I was never able to handle having a relation-

ship with him. Patrick later claimed that he cheated on me because I didn't seem interested in him sexually, which is completely true. One afternoon I was at his house. We were cuddling on the couch and making fun of some bad made-for-TV movie on the Lifetime channel. I started to fall asleep. He woke me up, commented on how sleepy I was, and then asked if I wanted to go to the bedroom. I thought to myself: "Oh, sweet, I can take a nap in there." As soon as we got to the bedroom, Patrick immediately started passionately making out with me. I could feel his teeth. It wasn't pleasant. It was more like he was trying to get all the meat off of a drumstick than kiss me. I was completely uninterested in whatever he was trying. to do. I was under the impression that we went to the bedroom so that I could take a nap. I pulled away, tried to fall asleep on the bed, only to be met once again with drumstick kisses. That cycle repeated for about 15 minutes until Patrick finally gave up and we went back to watching bad Lifetime movies. I fell asleep. It did not occur to me for over a year that Patrick was trying to get past second base, and only understood when a friend had later pointed it out to me. To say I wasn't interested in Patrick in a sexual way is a bit of an understatement. The concept of linking Patrick with sexuality is still beyond me. Regardless, we broke up; he got into heavy drugs, dropped out of high school and now works at a bowling alley. Despite how obvious my asexuality was to Patrick, it was quite the surprise for my parents. Granted, they were quite supportive at first and were mostly concerned if I was happy or not. They quickly transitioned to what I call the "Well, At Least She Isn't Pregnant" stage. They continually asked me whether or not I was healthy, and were really adamant in believing something might be wrong with me hormonally. No matter h ow much I reminded them that I've been asexual my whole life and that my doctors have said that I'm healthy my whole life, my parents kept saying I should visit a doctor to be sure. Thankfully, my parents are now stuck in a blissful stage that I call the "Mostly Ignoring Asexuality but Also Supportive of It As Long As I Get Married One Day" stage. I have no idea if I will get married or not, but the fact that it's an option makes them happy. They want a happy life for me, a normal life. One where I'm safe. Their image of that includes marriage as an option. So does mine. Ideally, they will eventually reach what I refer to as the "Christina" stage, named after my friend Christina. Christina listens to what I have to say and accepts everything I say about my experiences at face value. She questions me only for clarification and never to play devil's advocate. She doesn't attempt to empathize with me because she knows that it's not always possible. I would be lying if I said the day I came out to my family wasn't the single most emotional day of my entire life. I wrote my p arents an email. I cried the entire time I was w riting it. I sent it to them . I cried until they replied. I read their reply. I then cried out of happiness, but nevertheless it lasted for several more hours. I cried that day out of a sense of fear I have never before experienced. Some psychologists list parental acceptance as being one of the most important things for children to experience. I was skeptical of that fact until I came out to my parents. I'm usually of the opinion that if a person doesn't accept me they don't belong in my life. I can dismiss them. However, I cannot dismiss my parents completely. Sure, I can tell my parents to 拢-off when they're hurting me, but I cannot cut them out of my life in the same way that I can cut out a rude classmate. Before I came out to my parents; I was out with nearly everyone in my life. Coming out was old hat to me. I knew how to do it and I was at the point where I could do it casually without thinking about it. Not with my parents. I had to phrase it just right to them. I had to make sure the letter I wrote was absolutely perfect, both grammatically and content-wise. I had to lead them down a very specific path and pray that path led to them still liking me. I had no reason to suspect they wouldn't. However, I also knew I couldn't continue to live in silence around them. I couldn't survive another summer with my mother constantly asking who I thought was sexy, why I wasn't dating anyone or if I was "some kind of lesbian." I couldn't survive another summer of constantly almost outing myself to them, of feeling dirty when I referred to myself as heterosexual or of feeling like I would never be good enough for my family, just because I'm not interested in people sexually. I live in a 路constant state of feeling like an outsider. I'm not heterosexual, but I experience many of the privileges of being heterosexual in that people are typically not prejudiced against me. They're just ignorant to

''

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

This is the symbol of ase}..<1ality. The triangle represents the spectrum between sexuality and asexuality, with white as the sexual community, black as asexual and gray as the spectrum between those ends. The p urple outline of the t riangle represents community.

my entire existence and think of me as an amoeba. I'm not homosexual, bisexual or pansexual, but by not being heterosexual, most people would sort me into the "gay'' category. Even though I'm not gay. The LGBTQ community has been fighting for years about whether or not to include asexuals, and there's a very vocal group that strongly believes that asexuals do not belong in the queer community. They believe that because asexuals don't experience any form of violent prejudice, we don't deserve to be part of the queer community. As though queerness needs to be justified via some Puritanical standard. But that leaves me nowhere. If I'm not heterosexual and I'm not queer, that doesn't leave me as anything. Most people don't even know about asexuality; society can't hate that which it doesn't know exists. To be asexual is to frequently feel as though you're missing something. Society constantly tells me that because I'm not sexual, that I'm missing part of the human experience. Even if people tell me I'm not completely human, that I don't exist because I'm neither queer nor hetero, I know that what they tell me is false. I know I'm human and that I exist. And I like myself. All of myself. Asexual Awareness week is Oct. 26- Nov. 1. For more information, visit http://www.asexualityarchive.com/. For more Matrix content, visit http:llwww.plu.edu/matrixl

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAH LARSON

Leah Larson is a senior at Pacific Lutheran University majoring in English with an emphasis in nonfiction writ ing. She enjoys playing video games and binge-watching Netflix.

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

OCT. 3, 2014

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR The name of the game: from freshman to first-year THE MOORING MAST By KAITLYN HALL Copy Editor

~~

In my first year at Pacific Lutheran University, I am all-too-accustomed to hearing the term "freshman." I'm lucky to be at a school, however, that refers to us as first-year students. It's necessary that I'm given the title of first-year, and not freshman, becauseif my name didn't give it away - I'm not a man. This

outdated title suggests the 路 that regard. youngest class, at both the Outdated terminology, high school and university such as freshman, is level, is made up solely of degrading and inaccurate. men. It suggests that women are In 1947, only 29 percent of less than men. Less able to students enrolled in the fall at perform jobs - policeman, degree-granting institutions postman, fireman - and were female, according that men, not women, have to the National Center for a place in education and the Education.Statistics. workplace. The second edition of Women steadily made their way into college Webster's New International classrooms. By the late 1970' s, Dictionary, which takes up enrollment numbers for men as much space on my shelf and women were equal. In as the entire "Harry Potter" 2009, women comprised series, says this on freshmen: more than 57 percent of fall "A novice, one in the enrollment, according to rudiments of knowledge; a NCES. student during his first year, I'm not called a as in a college or university." freshwoman, though that I1l give the editors a bit of title would be more accurate, a break, as the dictionary was for the same reason that published in 1934 when men the human race is referred dominated post-secondary to as mankind. Masculine education. I can't afford language is a societal today's universities the same standard reinforced by grace. religion and politics. It's Universities in Washington ingrained in my mind, and state, including Washington I'm not the odd man out in State University, University

of Washington, Western Washington University and Seattle Pacific University, refer to first-year students as "freshmen" on their websites. Women's Center Director Jennifer Smith said PLU's use of "first-year" instead of "freshman" is important to removing the gender connotation as well as the implication that a first-year student is immature or juvenile. By using the term "first-year," Smith said, students in their first year at a university are accurately described as such. Male freshmen aren't dominant at our school, where, according to the U.S. News College Rankings, only 38 percent of all students enrolled are male. It's time for the term "first-year" to become the standard, not the alternative.

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Matthew Salzano LUTE LIFE EDITOR

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MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

recycle your copy of

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The Mooring Mast

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Zachary Boyle

All should support HeForShe By ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager and Online Editor

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women are better. It just means you believe in equality. " Now, men worldwide I then had no problem telling my friends and family I was a feminist. are coming forward and I think many people have an issue claiming themselves as feminists supporting women in the because of the media. The media talk about feminists like we want to rise battle for gender eguality above men. worldwide. Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh refers to us as "feminazis," which would leave a bad taste in anyone's mouth for obvious reasons. respective social media sites to show Feminists just want one thing: equality their support for gender equality. Celebrities include One Direction's for both sexes. More celebrities are claiming the Harry Styles, and actors David title of feminist. Much like myself, Tennant, Tom Hiddleston and they steered away from using the Watson's "Harry Potter" co-star title because they didn't hate men or Matthew Lewis. This is such an important issue wore makeup, dresses and high heels. in today's society. It's problematic Things are changing. Celebrities like Taylor Swift and when U.S. Supreme Court rulings Emma Watson are coming out of such as Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, the "feminist closet'' and speaking 路 decide a store has more say in what up against sexism in the media and birth control can be than the woman herself. society. Male senators are deciding our birth Former "Harry Potter" actress, Emma Watson, spoke recently at control methods and reproductive the U.N. about her new campaign, rights for us, even though they will never fully understand what exactly HeForShe. HeForShe encourages men to women go through to have or not to speak up against gender inequality have children. . It's a personal decision that should and sexism by claiming themselves as be left up to the woman, not male feminists. As Watson explained in her speech, senators in Washington, D.C. I encourage all men and women some might wonder why we ignore 50 percent of the population when we're on campus to look further into the HeForShe campaign and support trying to achieve equality for all. Now, men worldwide are coming women around the world . forward and supporting women in the battle for gender equality. Many male celebrities have stepped forward, taking to their

"

..... I've always been a feminist. I grew up in a home where I was always told I could do anything I wanted. I was given the same opportunities a::. my little brother. I'm very thankful that I have parents who support my ambitions no matter what they may be. I've always been a liberal-leaning feminist kill-joy. But, I didn't claim the label as a feminist until my first year at Pacific Lutheran Universi ty. The media make feminism out to be some kind of dirty word. When I thought of the word "feminism" in high school, my mind automatically imagined women in the 1970s burning bras and not shaving their legs. I didn't do that, so I wasn't a feminist. Then I came to PLU and took my first Women and Gender Studies class. We ripped apart Twilight, talked about the over-sexualization of young girls in the media, and wrote about our own experiences of growing up in a gendered society. I was in feminist heaven. I learned that feminism means that you believe in political, social, and economic equality of the sexes. It doesn't mean you hated men or think

For more information, check out the official website http://www.heforshe.org/

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Corrections Sept. 26 Issue Wind Ensemble's Concert on October 19th was not mentioned on a page 5 story "A Glance at the Fall season." Dean Cameron Bennett of the School of Arts and Communication (SOAC) spoke at the CMS event but was not mentioned on page 5 article "Center for Media Studies kicks off with mixe- "


...-: THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 3, 2014

OPINION 9

Rethink responsibilities as a renter are due and house rules will be outlined; don't ignore them. · Befriend your neighbors. Whether your neighbor is a fellow Lute or a member of Many students have moved out of the the Parkland community, knowing your parental nest or college dorm and are neighbors has many benefits. You can go finally experiencing the sweet taste of to them with questions and if you're lucky, freedom at their rental home or apartment. they'll invite you over for a barbecue. Not They have made it free and clear. many would complain about free food Renting is a great way to get some According to the Wang Center, about freedom and feel a sense of what it may 300 students study abroad for J-Term, be like to live independently. However, which means as a Lute, you may likely find every renter should be cognizant of a few yourself needing to sublet (rent your room do' s and don' ts before beginning this new to an individual for a temporary period chapter in their lives. of time). Always communicate subletting with your landlord so they are aware of who their renters are. If you can, only sublet to people you know. If you must have Have open someone you don't know sublet, arrange communication with your landlord. Your for ·specific move-in and move-out days. landlord will act as the gatekeeper for your Write it in a contract so the expectations are opportunity of freedom. While you may clear. hold expectations for renting, your landlord "Do a walk through with your landlord has expectations as well. All expectations · and take a lot of pictures," Junior Sarah should be explicitly described in the rental Davis said. "Claim any issues so they can agreement. Things such as when payments be fixed before you move in. You don't

By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer

Do ...

want damages that weren't caused by you to be taken out of your deposit." Deposits are necessary for securing your new home and are designed to be returned to good renters. To ensure keeping your deposit, have proof of any previous damage and respect the space. This can mean anything from not putting nails in the walls to keeping carpets clean.

Don It...

It's not nice to eat your roommates' food. This rule is simple. Just don't do it. If you must, ask before you assume. Beginning the year without any rules or expectations is not advised. A large part of living with other people is comfortability. If your expectations are never met you might not feel comfortable living in your home or apartment. Everything from cleanliness to having company over should be discussed prior to beginning this journey to avoid future conflict between yourself and your roommates.

Being late on payments is not smart. Your landlord doesn't owe it to you to give you a grace period on tardy payments but they may do so out of the goodness of their heart. Timely payments are a critical aspect in owning your responsibilities. Best case scenario: there are no consequences but you will need to immediately pay and will end up on the bad side with your landlord. Worst case scenario: you get evicted. If renting is something you're interested in, sites such as Zillow and the PLU Housing Facebook page are great resources to find what is available and connect with possible roommates. Renting in college is an experience unlike any other. It's a rare time in life to be on your own, while still having the support of peers and a college community surrounding you. Pay close attention to detail and fully understand your responsibilities as a renter. Most importantly, take advantage of this time while you can.

-=:..

Universal Crossword Edited by Tim othy E. Parker October 5, 2014

Study Break Life Hacks

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PREWOUSPUZZLEANSWER

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ITTY·BIITT THING By Henry Quarters

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~

THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

OCT. 3, 2014

IPDITI ICORllDARD ,_AROlJNffTHE LEAGUE:::"'

Football TEAM

~

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitworth

3

1

0

1-0

Lost 1

Linfield

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

Willamette

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

PLU

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

Puget Sound

1

1

0

0-0

Lost 1

George Fox

0

2

0

0- 0

Lost2

Pacific

0

2

0

0- 0

Lost3

Lewis & Clark

0

3

0

0-1

Lost3

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 4 vs. Linfi.eld, 1:00 p.m.

Women's Soccer TEAM Puget Sound

WINS 6

LOSSES 1

TIES 0

CONFERENCE STREAK 4-0

Tied 1

Whitman

5

2

2

3-0-2

Tied 1

PLU

5

2

1

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6

2

0

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Lewis & Clark

4

2

2

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Pacific

4

4

1

1-3-1

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Willamette

2

6

0

1-3

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Whitworth

2

6

1

1-4

Lost3

George Fox

0

6

2

0-4

MEN'S SOCCER: Whitworth's Michael Ramos picked up the NWC Offensive Student-Athlete of the week after tying the. . Whitworth single-game records for most assists and most points. . Ramos ran out with a hat trick and four assists in the Pirates 7-1 win against George Fox.

Lost4

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 4 vs. Whitworth, 12:00 p.m.

VOLLEYBALL: PLU's volleyball team split their games in Oregon over the past weekend, sweeping George Fox 3-0 and losing to Linfield 3-2 in five sets. ft was the Lutes first loss of the season in NWC play. The Lut~s are now 3-1.

WOMEN'S SOCCER: University of Puget Sound senior forward ~e Jonsson scored three.goals and recorded one assist over two games against George Fox and Willamette, earning her the NWC Offensive Student-Athlete of the week. The Loggers are ranked No. 15 in the nation. Courtesty alhttp://www.awcsports.com/ latld.i.ng/i.ndex

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Men's Soccer TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Whitworth

8

0

1

3-0-1

Won3

Puget Sound

6

3

1

3-1

Wonl

PLU

6

4

0

3-1

Lostl

Willamette

6

4

0

3-1

Won2

Whitman

5

4

0

2-2

Won2

Linfield

3

4

1

1-2-1

Lost2 Lost4 Lost4

Pacific

3

6

0

0-4

George Fox

2

6

1

0-4

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 4 os. Whitworth, 2:30 p.m.

Volleyball TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE STREAK

PLU

10

3

0

3-1

Lostl

Linfield

4

5

0

3-1

Wonl

Puget Sound

4

9

0

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Whitworth

9

4

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2-2

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Willamette

7

6

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Whitman

6

7

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7

6

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5

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 3 vs. Lewis d Clark, 7:00 p.m.

Lutes celebrate like Lutes after win in San Antonio malL The team split up into groups where some learned about the history of the Alamo and some took the time to spend money at the downtown mall and even check out the local shops to see if they could buy an authentic Texas cowboy hat. Some were successful, and some came back with belt buckles and boots instead. The second surprise of the day took place when the team found out that they were going to able to take a trip on the famous riverboat ride through San Antonio. For senior safety Derek Kaufman, this was really exciting. "I've heard about these river-boat rides from family members of mine, but I've never been on one myself," Kaufman said. "I'm really excited to see what this tour has to offer." The Lutes took this opportunity to sing a handful of songs during the hour-long riverboat tour. Those songs included "Call Me Maybe" and "Country Roads." The Lutes were encouraged by the local people who took pictures, laughed and even sang along. After spending all . day in town, the Lutes finally wrapped up their trip and took their talents back to Tacoma. Kaufman said he was happy to be home, but already missed Texas. "This Texas trip really was amazing, and I'm so glad that we got the opportunity to play football and visit the town," said Kaufman. "I11 never forget that weekend" . For the Lutes, it was a trip to remember, and for the city of San Antonio, well, let's just say that the Lutes will be remembered in Texas for a long time.

By AUSTIN HILLIKER Guest Writer

The Lutes football team took on the Tigers of Trinity . University in San Antonio, Texas and won 38-14 last Saturday. This special three-day trip was much different than any other away game. During the three days, the Lutes made the most out of their trip and took the time to visit the city of San Antonio. The trip started with an early morning 6 a.m. wake-up call for the 55 players that were selected by the coaching staff to represent Pacific Lutheran University and the rich tradition the team holds. After all the players gear was packed up and ready to go, each player checked in with his position coach and loaded the team bus. The Trip Begins

~

Many of us have heard the Lutes' famous "attaway" cheers during our time here at PLU, but might not know what this simple cheer means. The first "attaway" cheer goes to the team's bus driver. Many teams countrywid.e never take the time to recognize those who make the logistics of an away trip work, but that's not the case for the Lutes. 路 When the bus finally arrived at Sea-Tac airport, all of the players made sure to take the time to shake the drivers hand, look him in the eye and say "thank you." As the Lutes boarded the plane and readied themselves for takeoff, they took special attention to the flight attendants and made sure everyone else on the plane was paying attention. All of us who have been on a plane have probably ignored the flight attendants while they explain the safety aspects of the plane, but not the Lutes. As the flight attendants explained the safety procedures, the Lutes made sure to copy all hand movements and repeated certain phrases such as "buck.le up" and "be kind to those around you." As silly as this may seem, this is the Lutes' way of showing that they really are paying attention. In addition, the Lutes threw their hands up when the plane took off, mimicking riding on a roller coaster. Shortly after arriving at the hotel, a special "innercirde" time starts, where no coaches are allowed. This "inner-circle" meeting is player-run and a time for team members to speak any feelings that they have about either the upcoming game, or just a comment or opinion they think will contribute to the focus of the overall trip. After this meeting is over, the Lutes kicked back, watched TV and then got some shut-eye, keeping in mind the real reason they came to Texas. When game day finally came around, the Lutes were woken up by coaches calling their rooms to come down for breakfast, where pancakes, bacon and eggs were served in enormous portions. It really is true that everything is bigger in Texas.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRINITY UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

Senior quarterback Dalton Ritchey (10) attempts to break a tackle against the Trinity Tigers. Ritchey threw for 244 yards and recorded one touchdown and two interceptions in the Lutes 38-14 win.

Game Day The Lutes packed into the visitor's lock~r room to ready themselves for the ensuing game. Usually, each player has headphones on, listening to all different kinds of music ranging from calming reggae to some pretty interesting dubstep remixes. As the Lutes took the field, they all took part in warm~ ups and complete their famous "go-drills." These "go-drills" took the Trinity players by surprise, leaving the majority of them with a confused look. When the game finally finished, the team took part in an after game recap, where the players, PLU fans and coaching staff pack the visitors stands and begin to praise players for certain things that they did throughout the game. Lutes Hit the Town The third and final day in San Antonio is where the Lutes really took the city by surprise. The team was surprised with an all day trip to downtown San Antonio, where they visited the Alamo and the nearby

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRINITY UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

A PLU and Trinity player ell! l at the Trinity University Stadium.


4

THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 3, 2014

11 SPORTS

Bloomstine's Road to 300 Class of '95 alum celebrates 16 years coaching ByGIANCARLOSANTORO

years. Being alumni and coaches is not easy, and during many of Bloomstine' s 300 games coaching both men have had to keep their emotions in check. "I thinkJamie [Bloomstine] gets very passionate about games and competition," Yorke said. "I think we've learned how to balance being a passionate alum and a coach that's also passionate." It's that undying passion, however, that has helped Bloomstine remain in Tacoma for so long. "I never thought I'd be around this long," Bloomstine said. "Whether it be that other opportunities come up or you get burned out or whatever, but I have a good passion for the game and enjoy developing players."

Trying His Hand at Coaching

Sports Editor

As four years came and went as a player, Bloomstine's 31 career goals still place him as the seventh leading goalscorer in PLU soccer history. His scoring efforts even resulted in a third round draft pick in 1995 by the Vancouver 86ers of the now defunct A-League, the former top tier of men's professional soccer. "I just got a random phone call one day actually from an agent who said I got drafted," Bloomstine said. "I was like 'w)lat are you talking about? Like military a draft?' Honestly, I thought it was a prank call." Wanting instead to stay and finish out his education at PLU, Bloomstine declined the offer and started Team Jokester coaching with Dunn during fall of '97 after It could be one of the turning 24. main reasons Blooms tine helped lead the has Bloomstine PLU Men's soccer head coach team to a third been able to stick around for so place finish in Northwest long is his love for the team and its Conference and an overall record players. of 14-6-2. Almost any WhenDunn time anyone is within earshot retired at the of Bloomstine, end of the '97 they will hear him cracking a joke at an season, Bloomstine also left after just one season in the program. unsuspecting victim of his choosing. Not even his fellow coaches are safe, He was not gone for long, though, and came back to PLU and the team in 2000 and they are usually the primary targets. as a graduate student. After a brief stint If Bloomstine is laughing, the rest of the as assistant with head coach Joe Waters, team is usually laughing too. When the current coach and alumnus Yorke took team gets down, Bloomstine is the first over in 2002. "When I first got hired, the athletic director at the time said that he thought Jamie was still interested in coaching," Yorke said."I got his number and I could tell he loved the program and was anxious to move it forward, so my impression was that he would be a great guy to help with the transition." Twelve years, 13 seasons and one NWC title later, Bloomstine and Yorke are still leading the Lutes out to battle together. Yorke credits Bloomstine's experience with some of the teams success over the

It seems, in sports, that all the attention goes to the head coach of the team. They are, after all, supposed to be the brains of the operation, which is why the word "head" always has to come before "coach" when referring to them. John Yorke is Pacific Lutheran University's head coach, and his coaching staff-comprised of Peter Voiles, Jamie . Bloomstine and Peter Lechak - are entering their fifth season coaching together. But for Bloomstine, it's season 20 in the program, and 16th coaching Lute soccer players. Over this past weekend, Bloomstine celebrated his 300th career game as assistant coach to PLU's Men's Soccer team. Although the team didn't come away with a win on a dreary day in Salem, Oreg., Bloomstine was honored for his contribution to the team and the university. "Jamie was obviously a player here for four years and had stayed connected," Yorke said. "He loves black and gold probably more than most people do, and he's an example of someone who is a lifelong Lute soccer player." Fourty-year-old Bloomstine has spent more than half of his life committed to PLU and its sporting tradition, and almost his entire life devoted to soccer. Bloomstine started playing soccer when he was six while growing up in Auburn, Wash. He played at Kentwood High School under coach Jimmy Dunn, who was also the PLU head coach at the time. "During my junior year of high school Jimmy really started recruiting me," Bloomstine said. "He said he was really interested in me and it came down to choosing between PLU and Western, so I chose PLU." A standout forward during his youth career, Bloomstine quickly broke into the starting eleven during his first year in 1992 as an outside midfielder because of his precise distribution and vision. The fact that he is left-footed also made him a valuable asset to a '92 team that made it to the NAIA National Tournament in San Antonio, Tex. Despite losing both games, Bloomstine says it is one of his favorite memories as a player.

"He probably loves black and gold more than most people do." John Yorke

one to bring it back up. "It's definitely his humor," senior Justin Manao said. "It lightens everyones' mood 'and helps the team relax and take the edge off of a loss or bad game." "He helps build good camaraderie in the group," Manao said. Even though Bloomstine' s infectious personality can be a distraction, Yorke thinks it adds an important dynamic to the team in terms of the coaching staff. " I think the coaches have to have different personalities," Yorke said. "All the players should have someone they feel comfortable with, and I think his ability to connect with some of the players helps a lot."

•.i

The Journey Continues Bloomstine' s record as player and coach sits at a respectable 204-151-25. Having been through some of the lowest lows and highest highs of the program, Bloomstine has three favorite moments. The first and second, trips to NAIA and NCAA National Tournaments in 1992 as a player and 2011 as a coach, respectively. His third was scoring three goals in 20 minutes in the '92 NAIA Regional semifinal against Concordia, leading PLU to a 4-3 win. With game number 301 coming up this weekend against NWC-leading Whitworth, the question now is how much longer Bloomstine will stick around. "You never imagine being with one program for so long," Bloomstine said. "Looking back, time goes by so fast, and you always want to win more conferences, but I don't know if I'll make it to 600." Whether he sticks around or not, here's to another 300.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU MEN'S SOCCER FACEBOOK PAGE

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU MEN'S SOCCER FACEBOOK PAGE

The PLU men's soccer teams poses with Bloomstine after their 3-1 loss against Willamette in Oregon. By the end of the 2014 season, Bloomstine will reach a combined 400 games as player and coach. ·

Bloomstine poses with a special jersey honoring his 300 games as PLU assistant coach. Bloomstine was a member of both PLU teams (1992 as player, 2011 as a coach) to make it to the NAIA ana NCAA National Tournaments.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 3, 2014

12 SPORTS

Lutes survive double overtinie again, underclassnien shine against George Fox By GIANCARLO SANTORO AND DEBORAH CABANOS Sports Editor and Writer

Gamel The sun graced East Field last Saturday as the Pacific Lutheran University and Lewis & Oark College women's soccer teams battled it out during a high paced Northwest Conference game. The game went into a double overtime, and PLU winning 2-1. The game started out fast as Emily Thompson of Lewis & Oark put the Pioneers on the scoreboard 12 minutes into the game with the help of teammate Anna Thorndike. This was quickly matched by PLU junior forward Lauren Larson as she stole the ball from a defender and scored just six minutes later. With the teams going into halftime at 1-1, the Lutes came back into the second half even stronger by keeping the ball within their possession.

"[Lewis & Oark] have two good forwards and I told our back four girls that they needed to do a good job, which they did," head coach Seth Spidahl said. With neither team finding the net again in regulation, the game went into overtime. Neither team managed to score a goal during the first overtime, so another overtime period was added. "[The game] was really tough but we are resilient," junior and left defender Nicoya Benham-Marin said. "[Lewis & Clark] is a great team and they are fighters too, but they had certain weaknesses we could take advantage of." After two minutes of play in double overtime, junior forward Jamie Hoffman got goalkeeper Geena Fong out of the net which helped her to score the game-winning goal. The Lutes rushed the field with great excitement and hugged one another as they celebrated their well-earned victory. "We have been working on being mentally strong as a team and the girls are learning to embrace playing a full110 minute game," Spidahl said. "This is college soccer, and they have to play strong until the end." The win moved Pacific Lutheran to 4-2-1 overall and 2-1 in conference, while Lewis & Oark moved down to 4-2-2 overall and 2-1-1 in the NWC. Game2

PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

Junior Jamie Hoffman (23) dribbles the ball down the field in the game against Lewis & Clark. Hoffman scored a goal, her second of the season, in double overtime to beat the Pioneers.

Pacific Lutheran University's underclassmen came up big on Sunday at East Field as the Lutes took down George Fox 3-0 to extend their winning streak to three straight games. "We've been practicing well," sophomore defender Lena Moreno said. "We are happy to see our work translate into two wins this weekend." Always strong in front of the home crowd, the Lutes put immediate pressure on the George Fox defense, and opened the scoring after just two-and-a-half minutes. Junior transfer Emily Hanna received the ball near the George Fox penalty area and whipped in a cross behind the Bruin defense to find first-year Machaela Graddy who tapped the ball into the net to make it 1-0 for PLU. It was Graddy' s second goal and Hanna's second assist of the season. PLU's offense tested Bruin goall<:eeper Ally Swanson with seven more shots throughout the opening 45

minutes but w ent into halftime still leading 1-0. With plenty of offensive and defensive options on the bench ready to play, Moreno noted the importance of having a deep bench. "Not every player will play the full 90 minutes, so it's good to have balance in our team" Moreno said. "The players getting subbed into the game know they need to have just as much of an impact as a starter." It took George Fox over 50 minutes to work the ball around a stout Lute defense to get their first shot of the match, which was saved by PLU sophomore goalkeeper Takara Mitsui. The Bruins resistance was broken again in the 68th minute, this time from a comer kick to put the Lutes up 2-0. Senior Blake Warner crossed the ball into the box where it eventually found first-year Haily Smoot, whose shot was deflected off the keeper and into the back of the net for her first career goal as a Lute. PLU would finish the scoring in the 85th minute off of a clever free kick from close range that took the Bruins by surprise. Sophomore Kelly White's shot deflected off the foot of a George Fox defender and into the roof of the net to make it 3-0. Like Smoot, it was White's first career goal forPLU. "Sometimes winning a game 'you should win' can be more difficult," head coach Seth Spidahl said. "The pressure was on us, and they responded brilliantly with the win." PLU now sits in third place with a record of 5-2-1 overall and 3-1 in NWC. George Fox remains on the bottom at 0-6-2 overall, 0-4 in conference. The Lutes will now travel east to face off against Whitworth at noon Oct. 4 and Whitman at noon Oct. 5.

*Game 1 by Deborah Cabanes and Game 2 by Giancarlo Santoro

Santoro Speaks... FIFA needs to practice what they preach

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Russian representatives celebrate winning the bid to host in 2018.

By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor

:-..

Stop for a second and think of the term "democracy." It's one that almost every American has ingrained into theii minds practically since birth, and one that we associate with freedom, strength and courage. Some of the most powerful countries in the world are governed by democracies, and they pride themselves on promoting open and transparent governments that allow their citizens to ask hard questions. But the reality of every government in the world is that they keep secrets. FIFA, or the Federation Internationale de Football Association, is the governing body of world soccer, and it runs itself mainly as a democracy, albeit highly corrupt. FIFA has some big secrets about the upcoming 2018 and 2022 World Cups, and they aren't willing to give them up. Earlier last week, FIFA prosecutor Michael Garcia put the finishing touches on a secret investigative report into the alleged World Cup corruption. FIFA, however, is bent on keeping it under wraps, and Sunil Gulati, president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, is urging them to reconsider.

As of now, the 2018 and 2022 World Cups are set to be hosted by Russia and Qatar, respectively. From the offset, these choices both seem fine. Russia is a large country with a rich sport tradition and vast infrastructure, while Qatar is considered the Bill Gates of countries on planet earth. But, as usual, everything is not as it seems. Despite the fact that the Russia-Ukraine conflict has reached a ceasefire agreement, government officials around the globe have expressed concern about allowing Russia to host the worlds biggest sporting event. Even Senator John McCain, who probably isn't the biggest soccer fan in the world, thinks Russia's aggressive behavior toward Ukraine should be punished by stripping the country of its hosting rights. "It absolutely should be reconsidered," McCain said in an interview with ESPN and ABC. "Is it appropriate to have this venue in Russia at this particular time, and aren't there other countries that would be far less controversial?" Before there can be any talk of moving the venues, FIFA needs to disclose the report to the public. Good democracy promotes the idea of transparency, and according to FIFA, the organization is "firmly committed to the principles of good governance, transparency and zero tolerance towards any wrongdoing." This dishonesty is inexcusable for an organization that is the face of the biggest sport in the world. Billions of people watch and play soccer every day, and they deserve to have a governing body that can do the right thing, even when money is dangled in front of its face. The only thing left for FIFA to do if it wants to keep . any shred of its credibility is to stay true to its mission statement and disclose the report. It may be too late to do anything in terms of changing hosts, and although irreparable damage has been done to FIFA's image, the least it can do is not keep secrets. Secrets don't make friends.

Wor

Cup of Horrors

ussia: • Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych abandons greement to create closer ties between Ukraine and e European Union. • Russian President Vladimir Putin agrees to pay $15 illion worth of Ukrainian debt and reduces the price f Russian gas by one third (according to the BBC). • Russian armed forces move into Crimea, a disputed egion between Ukraine and Russia. • Death toll reaches over 2,500 since unrest began in anuary, many of them civilians (according to The New York Times) • Ceasefire called by President Putin in September 014 temporarily ends fighting.

Qatar: • Two FIFA executive committee members suspended efore the vote in relation to allegations of corruption egarding their votes (according to The Telegraph). • World Cup is held between June and July, with average daytime temperature of 120 degrees ahrenheit. • Over 4000 migrant workers are estimated to die I efore a ball is kicked (according to the International rade Union Confederation). •Workers, mainly from Southeast Asia, live in xtreme poverty.


SPORTS Women's soccer sets sights on a North West Conference title

AdE Disney club comes toPLU

PAGEll

PAGE5

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE OCT. 10, 2014

OORING

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 3

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

"Yik Yak" attack: New app dominates campus culture can be found daily on Yik Yak. "I think it's really just a new alternative to pages like PLU Confess or PLU Compliments," senior Allison Yik Yak is turning into today's McClure said, ''But overall, I've been anonymous "Burn Book" of Pacific a little disappointed at the racist, Lutheran University, opening the gateway homophobic and general bullying vibe to cyber bullying on- and off-campus. that is prevalent with Yik Yak." Yik Yak came into app stores in "If you wouldn't say these things out November 2013. The app allows people loud in the middle of the AUC, why to post anonymously without registering do people get such a kick out of with any organization, such ·as Twitter anonymously putting other people or Facebook. Users can read other users down?" McClure added. posts, or "Yaks" within a 5-mile radius, A frequent target of Yakers around as determined by a smartphone's CPS PLU is first-year Jake Russin, otherwise location. known as "beats kid" by Yakers. Russin Until recently, Yik Yak charged people wears yellow Beats most days around to use their technology. Now that the his neck and there are frequent Yaks app is free, the number of "Yakers" has about him. The Yaks are compliments skyrocketed. and insults. However, Russin has not Sex, drugs, alcohol, parties and let it ruin Yik Yak for him completely. confessions of love can all be found in "I think Yik Yak is fine as long as the PLU zone of Yik Yak. The app has no they aren't making fun of me," Russin administrators looking over each post to said, "but bullying shouldn't be check for bullying, making the app an open allowed at all." market for anyone to say anything they Other students who have been want. targets are not as easy-going about the One of Yik Yak's terms of use is to not bullying as Russin and have stopped use the app for bullying purposes, but that using the. app completely. rule seems to have very little effect on the The app can be a gateway for users. anonymous cyberbullying to take place "I think it is nice when you use it for its without any consequences. Schools in purpose like confessions and to get stuff Chicago, New Mexico and Vermont have off of your chest," junior Kerri Stelk said. banned Yik Yak for bullying reasons "But I think most people use it as a way to according to USA Today. Most high schools anonymously bully other students without and middle schools do have Yik Yak repercussions, which is sad." blocked due to fear of bullying. Anonymous posts such as, "Those jeans Another issue that Yik Yak raises is you were wearing on Foss Field? No." and an issue of privacy. Student posts are "Dear girls in the Harstad basement, Shut anonymous to other students but police Up. No one cares about your jeans and no and law enforcement officials can track one wants to hear you cackling. It's not down phones and locations of users who Halloween, stop sounding like a witch," post certain Yaks. All Yaks are stored, even if the user deletes their post, meaning, at any given time a Yaker From a girl being called out on yik yak: can be found and their deleted Yaks You don't realize what this does to us. It can be read by law enforcement. High school and college students makes us really insecure and want to hide in a closet. Please just leave names out of have been arrested for particularly bad Yaks. Law mandates that high it. schools have non-bullying policies A and students who violate those policies can be tracked down and PHOTO COURTESY OF HTTPSo//TCU360.COM arrested for bullying Yaks. Users An anonymous user's response afrer being called out confessions of crimes and threats can on Yik Yak. be tracked down and arrested for their

By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

posts. The app was not made with the intention to facilitate bullying. One of the creators commented on his app in an article by Diana Graber,•co-founder of cyberwise. org. "We were naive," Brooks Buffingon, cocreator of Yik Yak said. "We designed the app primarily for college students. Using the app the way we intended it to be used requires a certain amount of maturity and responsibility; we were idealistic about who possessed that." Since all Yaks are stored, trends can be found in Yik Yak zones. Yaks tend to get meaner toward the end of the week. On Mondays Yaks are mostly about school work and student' s issues with campus. By Thursday and Friday, however, student move their attention from campus issues onto one another, Yakers need to consider what they are writing before they post and remember that nothing can be taken completely off the internet. Also, remember school zones can petition to have Yik Yak banned and

UnPLUg aims to reduce energy usage By ASHLEY CONNORS PLU Sustainability The month of UnPLUg started Oct. 1. UnPLUg, Pacific Lutheran University's annual energy conservation competition between the residence halls on campus, has been successful in reducing students' energy consumption each year since it began in 2009. This year's campuswide event is the Keep It at 68 Sweater Swap, where students and other members of the PLU community can get a new sweater by trading one of their old sweaters. If they don't have one to trade, there is still the option to pay a few dollars for a sweater. The sweaters will come from Goodwill or other students who have already participated in the swap. The goal is to get students to put on warmer clothing instead of turning on their heaters. Besides turning down or off their heaters, there are many other things students can

do to conserve energy, such as unplugging appliances that aren't currently being used and turning off the lights when leaving a room. Another strategy is adjusting computer settings to automatically tum off or go to sleep after not being used for a certain amount of time. Conserving energy is an important component of caring for the environment and a component of PLU's mission statement. Reducing energy consumption through both changing our behavior, as well as investing in energy-saving techniques, such as the insulating, double-paned windows that were recently installed in Stuen Hall, will go a long way toward helping PLU reach its long-term goal of being carbon neutral by 2020. Students can learn more about the UnPLUgged challenge at https://plu.edu/ sustainability.

PHOTO COURTESY OF YD< YAK, LLC

Yik Yak currently has more than 250 thousand users nationwide.

the PLU administration could disable student accounts.

What's Inside .. A&E Check out this year's hottest and "nottest" shows pg.4

Lute Life

Sports Take a look at the Homeco~ Game results pg.12

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

OCT. 10, 2014

Class of '64 returns to PLU to reminisce on old times By GENNY BOOTS Guest Writer

Trending: Sweet Dreams PLU screens award - winning documentary "Sweet Dreams" and has an ice cream bar to match at 7 p .m. on Oct. 9.

Ferrucci Junior

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~

the 40 staff m embers at Ferucci High in Junior Puyallup, 15 are PLU Alumni.

Meat Eating

PLU w ill be h olding a debate on the merits of meat consumption 7 p.m. Oct. 9.

-~ Cooking

Competition

PL0 chef is one of 16 young chefs nationwide invited to partake in a cooking competition by the International Ch efs Extraordinaire group.

~ Drive to 125 PLU athletics has set a goal for teams to reach 125 collective wins for the '14-'15 school year.

Trending:

~ Raven-SYJ!lone "That's So Raven"

Pacific Lutheran University welcomed the Class of' 64 back to campus for homecoming weekend. 50 years after graduation, these alumni came from across the country to reconnect, remember and celebrate their time at PLU. The event-filled weekend included a reunion reception, formal dinner, lunch with President Krise, chances to sit in on classes and campus tours. The Office of Alumni and Constituent Relations worked with the Reunion Planning Committee once a month during the summer to organize the weekend. "It's been really cool to work with them and give tours of campus," said Katie Curtis, the administrative assistant for the alumni office. "We get to hear about their experiences at PLU and really get to know them." More than 50 people from the Class of '64 attended the reunion. They've all reached their 70s, and most have children and grandchildren. Teachers, pastors, chemists, nurses and doctors, their PLU degrees have put these alums all over the map. One came back to PLU after moving as far away as Tanzania, Africa. A lot has changed since their days as students. In the 1960s, men and women were kept very far apart. Dan and Judy Selmann laughed as they reminisced about the "dorm mothers". "They locked the girls in at 10 p.m. sharp!" Judy Selmann said. While they were at PLU, chapel was mandatory, dancing wasn't allowed and studying at the library was just a little desk facing a wall, Linnea Hillesland said. Another major change was Pacific Lutheran College being renamed Pacific Lutheran University, starting the expansion into the PLU that is known today. They were

PLU News

World News star opens up on Oprah's show about identity. Symone does not w ant to be labeled gay or str搂tight.

Sadie Robertson Duck Dynasty family member joins latest "Dancing with the Stars" performance.

~

PHOTO COURTESY OF GENNY BOOTS

the first class to live in newly constructed Class of 1964 ret urns t o PLU for 50 year reunion. Pflueger, and ten new building sites broke ground. They attended at a critical growing PLU, and recognized much has changed point for the university. It was a different since her time here. time. "There are so many more programs, the "We only paid $425 a semester," said Jerry music in particular, and much more diversity Larson, another returning alumnus. on campus," Hillesland said. Despite the physical changes the In honor of their 50 years since graduation, university has seen over the years, PLU the Class of '64 has created an endowment has remained a place for friendship and fund. One student will be chosen to receive community. For many of the alums in $50,000 every year. Funds are still being attendance, both spouses are graduates. This raised for this gift, but this scholarship will reunion weekend was a time to laugh about join the ranks with endowment from the budding romance, adventures with friends, Class of '63. and sneaking bottles of wine. No matter the time or distance, PLU is "PLU gave me lifetime friends," Judy very close to their hearts and lives. Hillesland Selmann said. said returning to campus feels like coming Even though it has been a half-century home. This years homecoming was truly since they were stud路ents, many of the alumni that: a welcome back home. are still connected to the PLU community. Hillesland had four children graduate from

Jennifer Lawrence Actress opens u p about nu de photo scandal and calls it a "sex crime."

~ 'l\vitter

Twitter sues U.S. government due to spying on users. Under current laws, Twitter cannot inform their users when revealing certain information to the government.

~ Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart announces p lans to end health insurance for its parttime workers, citing rising healthcare costs.

AIUilllla finds faille and success after PLU institution is a great honor. "Your university acknowledging that you are doing good work is a big deal," Weston said. Pacific Lutheran University welcomed In 1985, Elizabeth Pulliam graduated back and honored outstanding alumni from PLU with a degree in Communication during the Homecoming weekend with an emphasis on Journalism. Her peers festivities . Among the honored alumni, had told her she would do great things, but Elizabeth "Liz" Pulliam Weston sat, with her she had her doubts. husband, waiting to receive Distinguished Liz Pulliam Weston earned a Pulitzer Alumnus of 2014 award . Prize in 1989 and become the most-read Weston grad uated from PLU and found financial columnist on the Internet with her way to fame and success, something more than 12 million readers. every graduate hopes to find after college. Weston attributes a lot of her success to Even though Weston is a highly acclaimed the PLU environment. writer, she says being honored by her "The thing about PLU is that you get to know your professors," Weston said. "They can work with you and get you excited about the work. .. what really matters is your relationship with your professors." One of Weston's most famous articles, "The Curse of the Unborn," won her a Pulitzer Prize. Weston was working in Alaska for the Anchorage Daily News and found that Native Americans of Alaska were dying at higher rates than average people. After some investigation, she discovered Native Americans of Alaskan children were suffering from Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. FAS is a disease children get when their mother continues to drink alcohol while pregnant. Weston found a large number of the native population of Alaska were alcoholics and many women were still drinking while pregnant, making unhealthy environments for children and causing a dramatic increase in death rates. Weston dug into the story and brought it to the PHOTO COURTEST OF PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY attention of the country. Elizabeth Pulliam Western has written five books, '路Deal After earning a Pulitzer for With Your Dehl", "The 10 Comnrnndmcnts of Money", "The Curse of the Unborn", Weston "Your Credit Score," "Easy Money," and "There Arc No moved into financial journalism. One Dmnb Questions About Money" of Weston's first financial journalism

By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

stories was about the invention of online banking. "What I like about journalism is that it's interesting; there is something new every day," Weston said. "[Journalists are] the ADD of the majors: we find something different every day." Weston wanted to write about everyday things that could help people and their wallets. Weston wrote for the Los Angeles Times, MoneyTalk and finally settled on writing a weekly column for MSN. MSN stopped posting original content and hiring writers for it last year. Now, Weston works from home, has a financial advice website and freelances for many other companies. She frequently makes appearances on television and radio shows to give financial advice. Weston credits her success to the education PLU gave her, however, she did not aim for the life of success she has built. "My friends and I all got together and talked about where we would be in the future," Weston said . "If I ended up where I thought I would, I would still be in Alaska probably divorced to a cop." Weston is a PLU success story by any standards. Her advice to students is to take complete advantage of all that PLU has to offer. She attributes her fame to hard work, good grades and relationships with people who are willing to help her get to the next level. Weston also said students need to think about the future and be less focused on the "now." Just like finance, if students make an investment in their future now, it will pay off greatly in the future Weston said. "Honestly, I had sol"".le moments when I thought I wouldn't have a job. I graduated in a recession, so people told me it would be hard to find anything. But I landed an internship at Seattle Times," Weston said, "Don't believe what they tell you. Just follow your passi01,1 and your dreams."


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 10, 2014

NEWS3

Lutes dive in to homecoming By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer Associated Studens of Pacific Lutheran University held the PLU Homecoming dance at Point Defiance Aquarium ori Friday, Oct. 4. The aquarium "dance floor" was full of students dancing, enjoying the company of their friends and looking at the fish. The dance had an impressive tum out of more than 400 students, according to Ian Jamieson, Associate Director of Student Involvement and Leadership.

Only 200 tickets were bought before the dance, meaning 200 were purchased at the door. Dancing took place on the top floor overlooking the aquarium, and attendees 21 and older_ could go to the bar in the lower level of the aquarium. "It was fun and I loved that the venue had an interactive element to it," said senior Anne-Marie Falloria, Residence Hall Association President. PLU's next dance will be Spring Formal, which is scheduled for spring semester. PHOTO COURTESY OF NATALIE DEFORD

Aquarium display at the 2014 Homecoming Dance.

Gender exploration bridges the gap between deviant population and religion Oct. 11-18 Gender Exploration Week Events

to attend even if they do not c-0ntribute or join in

By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer Expect to see panels, performancesf galleries, workshops, stories and discussions campuswide. Gender Exploration Week kicks off tomorrow, with an event every day this week.. Residence Hall Association puts on GEW each year, and this year's GEW was made possible by junior Caitlin Dawes, RHA Social Justice Director, who w-0rked in conjunction with -0ther campus organizations. Dawes said GEW challenges pe-0ple's understandings and perspectives on gender, gender expression, and gender performance. New to GEW this year is a gender-neutral church service, with University Congregations and Campus Ministry 11 a.m . on Oct. 12. This service will avoid using words like "He" and instead use words like "They." "A lot of people think that if you are deviant - not white or heterosexual - then you can't be religious," Dawes said. "But it's really important to see that religious life on campus is really willing to participate and there is a possibility for this collaboration." The events are open to all students, faculty and community members. Dawes encourages people

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on discussion. Dawes said the goal is not to make everyone participate but to make everyone think GEW is also not intended to offend anyone, Dawes said,, but rather to critically view the oppressions created by society. GEW addresses t-0pks that many people tend to avoid. "If you're unC-Omfortable during this week good! That's exactly what I wanted t-0 accomplish, what I wanted to achieve," Dawes said. Alex Clayton, Queer Ally Student Union Cocommissioner and Ordal Social Justice Director, called GEW, "A look at moving beyond the binaries of the simple male-female gender system we have in place today and looking at the struggles that Trans people and non-binary people have to face." Clayton said the take-away she wants people to get from this week is the inequality that comes with a gender binary system. "Y-0tl. can't categorize gender as male and female with so many' variations of sex even biologically," she said. "I'm very passionate about getting people to think outside of binaries. Almost nothing in life is binary except maybe computer code." - -- - -

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A student reportecf their bik, !s tolen from the bike rack ne e li~rary. The theft took placdl is ometime between Oct. 2 an ct. 5. No suspect informatio ·s available nor is there an :urveillance of the incident.

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Campus Safety (CSAF) was calle o Old Main Market because a group1 iof middle school students were in th arket stealing items off the shelves. the time it took CSAF to respon o the call, one middle school studen ad left, but another one remained. e student left behind provided hi ame and birthdate but would no ooperate any further with CSAF. H as escorted off campus.

!Medical Aid at Pflue_ger

Campus Safety (CSAF) foun · toxicatedstudentsatthePfluege asketball courts at midnigh riday. One student admitted t, drinking beers off campus bu aid he was not impaired in an~ ay. He made his way back to hi oom and could walk by himself. While CSAF was talking t' e first student, a group o girls walked through, cfearl · toxicated. One of the gir could not walk by herself an CSAF escorted the student t .e r dorm room and waited wi er until she improved. Her as informed. The event wa orwarded to Student Rights an ~esponsibilities

nimal Control called to the Commons

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Campus Safety (CSAF) otified of a dog in the AU Ion Saturday morning and wer equested to help remove the animal. SAF arrived to find the dog ha itten the kitchen staff and was in th dry storage area of the kitchen. CSAF lcontacted animal control who cam and took possession of the dog.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

OCT. 10, 2014 ~

HOT OR NOT Fall TV: What's a niust-watch and what's not? By MICHAEL DIAMBRI, AdE Writer

What do you think?

As the fall television season dawns upon viewers, some notable shows are premiering. Here's what's hot and what's not this season.

Tell us what you thought was hot or not on Twitter:

@PLUMast

Once Upon a Time ABC: Sundays The fourth season of "Once Upon .Ui ll ,, , "' f··.·.·. a Time" .may have a "Frozen" storyline, but this show is red hot. The storyline is truly gripping and addictive. This fairytale-based show can cast its spell on almost anyone. Its growing fan base and various entertaining plot lines make it the hot show to watch this fall. The first three seasons of "Once Upon a Time" are available on Netflix for anyone who needs to play catch up.

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How to Get Away With Murder

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NBC: Thursdays "How to Get Away with Murder" is not recommended for background noise during srudying. This show will ' grab your attention and won't let it go. Viola Davis shows us exactly the acting powerhouse she has built herself up to be. "How to Get Away with Murder" is this fall's best new show. It is sexy, suspenseful and has potential to be one of ABC's best. Will this hot newbie keep its magical charm? I certainly hope so.

Modern Family ABC: Wednesdays After tying the Primetime Emmy record set by "Frasier" for most Outstanding Comedy Series wins, "Modem Family" is starting its sixth season on a high note with great ratings. Personally, I'm ecstatic that Alex Dunphy is a senior in high school. Maybe this means the weakest character on "Modem Family'' could be in her last season. Despite my issues with the show's worst persona, "Modem Family" still manages to make audiences laugh in its sixth season. The only question about this show must be: can any show finally beat "Modern Family" for the Emmy?

The Mindy Project Fox: Wednesdays As Mindy Kailing portrays the ever-adorable Dr. Mindy Lahiri, she grants audiences with decent laughs and heartwarming moments. Ratings are .,__ _ _ _ _ _ _-4 down for "The Mindy Project'' and many critics believe that the show won't be seeing a fourth · season. Viewers have enjoyed following Mindy on her search for the perfect rom-com ending. Personally, I strongly suggest that you all give "The Mindy Project" a shot. Once you start watching it, you might end up getting hooked to the program as you watch Dr. Lahiri on h'er crazy, quirky, goofy search to have it all.

AtoZ NBC: Thursdays To be perfectly honest, I had beyond horrible expectations for "A to Z." Although it. was not overwhelmingly funny, there are many interesting aspects to the show. The main characters attempt to connect with viewers in the same way the lovable cast of "How I Met Your Mother" did. The premiere has a lot of potential but it didn't leave me with strong feelings. of either enjoyment or dislike.

The Voice

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NBC: Mondays and Tuesdays As season seven of "The Voice" gets on its way, it seems clear that people are not drawn to new judges Pharell Williams and Gwen Stefani. Somehow "The Voice" continues to bring in , big numbers in key · demographics, although dramatically reduced from past seasons. People are starting to figure out that "The Voice" is basically a promotion of its judge's careers and not of its contestants. Adam Levine has had six Maroon 5 songs reach the Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 since the start of the Voice four years ago. Of Levine's mentees - zero. Seriously, have you heard anything from Jermaine Paul or Tessanne Chin? Let's face it, "The Voice" has peaked. It is no longer the innovative and original show it used to be.

Red Band Society Fox: Wednesdays Despite its unrealistic and predictable story line, "Red Band Society" might appeal to individuals who would love to see "Glee," "The Fault in Our Stars," and "Grey's Anatomy'' morphed into a grand spectacle of teenage problems. Octavia Spencer is great as always, but the rest of the cast is sub-par. To paraphrase "Bridesmaids," I've seen better acting in a tampon commercial. "Red Band Society" is doomed.

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ABC: Tuesdays "~··· Side effects of watching . . . . 4 .·\., 11 ( ! "Selfie" include: ~:~1$ ."'' experiencing physical ~~ pain and . severe cringing; loss of ability I to laugh; spontaneous urges to perform acts of violence against televisions; and a desire to flee .,__ _ _ _ _.... into the wilderness and no longer be a part of society.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 10, 2014

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President Liz Perkins (left) and Public Relations Officer Rebecca Johnson in London, England at the Disney Cafe by Harrods.

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Although Disney films are usually associated with childhood, it's common for college students to have some of these classic films waiting for them on their Netflix Instant list. An essential part of growing up has always been Disney, from watching classic animated films to taking a trip to one of the parks. Disney fans should look into Pacific Lutheran University's Disney Club. This is Disney Club's first year of running meetings and events. Last year, President

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Liz Perkins and her fellow officers bonded through their love of Disney and thought about starting a club. "We were really just joking about making a club last year, saying it would be a good idea," Perkins said. "I then started to look in to what it would take to make a club and decided that I should do it." After a lot of discussion, they decided to informally form a club last spring. Fall 2014 is the official start of the PLU Disney Club. Even in its first year, this club is starting off on the right foot. Perkins sees Disney Club as a way to relax and have fun. Perkins said PLU can

be stressful, so it's important that Disney Club welcomes everyone, even those without much knowledge of Disney. It's a place to relax, hang out, and make new friends. Unfortunately, the club is not allowed show movies due to copyright laws. Even without movie nights, Disney Club is still packed with events. Perkins plans to have Disney-themed game nights, baking nights, craft nights and trivia events. They also plan to write letters to the various Disney characters. According to Perkins, students can write to them as if they were friends back home, about how they liked a movie or even just

ask for advice. The letters are then sent to the Disney World P.O. Box. Through Disney Club, students can learn about Disney's College Program. This program allows college students to earn up to 12 credits while working at a Disney park. Disney Club also hopes to be involved in the community. In the future, the club's leaders aspire to provide events for children in the Parkland area. Disney Club meets every other Monday at 7 p.m. in The Cave.

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This Week in A&E "The Play About The Baby" 7:30 p.m. Oct.10-11 in KHPC Studio Theatre

University Symphony Orchestra 8 p.m. Oct. 14 in Lagerquist Concert Hall

Icelandic Art Rug Reception 5 p. m. Oct. 16 in Scandinavian Cultural Center

Icelandic Folk Musician Svavar Knutur 7:30 p.m. Oct.10 in Scandinavian Cultural Center

Simon Kogan Gallery Opening Reception 5 p.m. Oct. 15 in University Gallery

"The Boys Next Door" Student Preview 7:30 p.m. Oct.16 in KHPC Eastvold Auditorium

• • John Paul JOIIlS PLU as chair of music department By KAITLYN HALL Copy Editor New Pacific Lutheran University Department of Music chair John Paul is composing his own story. Paul is replacing Dave Robbins, who has taught at PLU since 1969 and chaired the department for more than 30 years. "I knew about the department - I knew the previous chair, Dr. Robbins, through professional activities, so I had very high regard for the department," Paul said. "The more I studied it and looked at it, the more intrigued and excited I was." As a chair and instructor, Paul has much to share with students and " faculty through his • • .1 journey in music: he began composing in third grade, started working in administration at a video game company and has taught and worked as a music department chair for almost 15 years. Paul began his composition career in third grade while learning to play violin. His teacher asked her students if they wanted to compose a tune for the violin, and he was quick to respond. "Within the first week, I came back with some songs that I had composed, and she wrote it down and printed it out for the whole class," Paul said. His third-grade class played the songs at their concert. Paul continued playing violin and composing throughout high school, and started his undergraduate studies at University of Texas at Austin as a violin

p erformance m ajor. In his sophomore year, Paul realized he could major in music composition and switched majors. He said college is a great place for students to explore and find vocation. "I like that idea, because it's exactly what happened to me: I found my vocation in college," Paul said. He finished his bachelor's degree at University of Texas at Austin and earned a master's degree and doctorate in composition at Indiana University .. Before Paul became a teacher and administrator, though, he composed music for video games.

department, and worked there until coming to PLU this fall. He also served on the board of directors for the National Association of Schools of Music, the organization that accredits PLU's music program. Paul has continued to compose. Paul's most recent composition project is scoring "City Girl," a 1930 silent film directed by F.W. Murnau. One of the last silent films, "City Girl" centers on a waitress from the city who's abused by her fatherin-law after moving to her husband's family's farm . "You oftentimes think of silent films being antiquated, or dated, and you look at this beautiful imagery, beautiful acting S and just this great, powerful story," Paul said. The original score in for "City Girl" disappeared, and JohnF. Paul Paul was able to give Chair, Department of Music it anew voice through a score targeted at a modern audience with elements of jazz "I was not necessarily and Bartok-like dissonance. a video game player, but I Paul is currently working wanted to get experience on getting to know the writing music and do it full- department and its students time," Paul said. "I always and faculty, and hopes they had the dream of teaching, can work together to support but always thought it'd be students' needs. department great to get some practical Music graduates are excelling in experience before I [taught]." positions, earning Paul said he liked the their idea of working as a full- awards and singing at the time composer because he Metropolitan Opera in New was paid for the things he York, N.Y., and PLU's choirs loved to do. His last title was have received international "Gauntlet Legends," released recognition and awards, Paul in 2000. said. "It's amazing stuff After moving to Portland in 2000, Paul began teaching happening, so let's get the at Marylhurst University word out," Paul said. The potential of the in Oregon. Within a year, Paul became the chair music department is music Ma!J.lhurst' s music to his ears. of

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what exactly happened to me: I found my vocation college."

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Preview: 'Waste Not' unwraps perspectives on food consuinption

PHOTO BY TAYLOR LUNKA

"Waste Not" ChiefVideographer Olivia Ash works wit h Adviser Rob Wells.

By JESSELYN KENDUCK Guest Writer A United Nations statistic from 2013 revealed that one-third of food produced internationally is wasted. The proportion is higher in the United States - 40 percent of U.S. food ends up in landfills. Unsettled by these numbers, students Amanda MediaLab Brasgalla and Taylor Lunka set out to create a documentary about food waste worldwide. From recycling initiatives to encouraging the student body to serve their communities, Pacific Lutheran University is known for its efforts in sustainability, conservation and care. These calls to action are prevalent in the mission statement and culture of PLU. When thinking about the idea • of waste, though, one often thinks of water, energy and other natural resources. It seems that the world forgets that food is also a resource that is often misused. As humans, all are connected by the need for food and responsible for waste of this resource. Food is first and foremost seen as a social problem, with nearly 50 million Americans facing food insecurity according to Feeding America. It also stands as an economic and environmental issue_. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, uneaten food that goes into landfills adds a

large amount of methane to the atmosphere, a greenhouse gas that is more damaging than carbon dioxide. The MediaLab project "Waste Not" will tackle this issue by exploring some surprisingly simple solutions. This will include education about waste, as well as establishing awareness within students about the amount of food purchased in The Commons during All-You-Care-To-Eat meals. The production team, comprised of senior producers Brasgalla, Lunka, chier videographer Olivia Ash, assistant producer Evan Heringer and faculty adviser Dr. Robert Marshall Wells, have been working for almost a year. The project has taken them across the U.S., through parts of Canada and to London. During their travels they spoke with professors, farmers, food industry experts and local citizens about food waste and the _:i;.roblems it causes. ''Waste Not' is so much more than just another documentary," Lunka said."It is a topic that affects us all and will force us to take notice of the issue. It will change your views on food drastically." The premiere of "Waste Not" will be held at 3 p.m. Nov. 8 at the Broadway Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Tacoma. Admission is free. More information can be found on the "Waste Not" website, http:!lwastenotdoc. weebly.com.


6 LUTE LIFE

THE MOORING MAST

LETTER TO THE EDITOR This Letter to the Editor was written in response to Angie Tinker's column last week about social justice.

race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, socioeconomic status, religion, or other identities can put them at great risk for these health disparities. Dear Mast and Angie, I even wrote a paper for one of my classes discussing the health disparities I liked your article about social justice experienced by transgender people and in non-humanities majors! It's true that what other healthcare providers and I can it's a term we all hear around campus, do to correct these disparities. In my future but I think we all view it in different ways practice I intend to be a conscientious nurse depending on our vocations. I feel like you who recognizes where health disparities forgot one important major though, and I are occurring and tries to rectify them; would like to rectify that! I am a senior. that's what social justice means to me. Nursing major. PLU has instilled in me a great -Clara Eickhoff awareness and concern for social justice that takes its form, given my major, as If you would like to respond to something you an awareness of and desire to eliminate see in The Mast, write a letter to the editor, go to our website, http://mastmedia.plu.edu and health disparities. Health disparities are when there are select the "Contact Us" drop down menu. higher rates of illness, disease, poor access to care, etc. among certain demographic groups, usually minorities. A person's

OCT. 10, 2014

Are you interested in the creative arts such as writing, music, poetry and more? Then come to the

SAXIFRAGE HANGOUT! 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 15 in The Cave

FROM THE MATRIX: FIND A SAFE SPACE ON CAMPUS By ANGIE TINKER Co-Editor of The Matrix What do the Diversity Center, the Women's Center and your favorite school clubs have in common? They can all be safe spaces. Places like the Diversity Center and the Women's Center were created to give people a place to go to speak without fear. Dan Stell, a senior and Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University vice president, noted they are valuable as safe spaces. "[A safe space is an] environment where your identities will not be challenged or criticized," Stell said. "[It's a place] where you are comfortable, 路truly embracing all the facets of your personality and sharing them with others."

These places depend on the individual. Many find solace in the Diversity Center, but some get that comfort relaxing in a dorm room with friends. Places from the practice rooms in Mary Baker Russell Music Center to the track field or the Counseling Center can all be safe spaces. Safe spaces don't need to be physical locations, though. They can also be digital. When I was a teenager, this took the form of texting. My parents couldn't see or overhear my thoughts in texts, so it was just me and the friends I trusted to share secrets with. Technology has expanded the range of options we have for the safe release of thoughts. Senior David Leon is a bit of a controversial figure on cainpus due to his role in hosting the anonymous confessions pages, such as "PLU Confess & Misc." Leon believes he is helping the PLU community.

"The confessions page allows for an exchange and dialogue to take place amongst everyone affiliated with PLU and to really engage and facilitate widespread community support," Leon said. Stell disagreed, saying confessions pages can lead to bullying without repercussions. "There is no active dialogue when the posts there are anonymous," Stell said. "I would say that in order to have a safe space one must be open to the vulnerability of people knowing your thoughts and ideas." "I think that anonymity can be vitally important in keeping a safe space safe, but I would say it's anonymity towards those that are not a part of it," Stell said. Leon agreed that anonymity is important. "It gives [people who post confessions] a sense of control over their personal safety but also how the world views their own

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individual lives," Leon said. "The fact that we have the ability to cloak ourselves but be able to share out struggles and have others relate is a powerful thing." Leon thinks anonymity builds empathy. People can be nasty, but there is evidence of empathy. Some have confessed about mental health issues and were referred to professional help. "[These spaces] are environments where you begin to critically analyze the different identities that you have and question the privileges that go along with them," Stell said. With this opportunity, a safe路 space can be the place for important conversations to start.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 10, 2014

From Saxifrage: Fraconia Ridge

. ' Senior's composition fanfare is 'giocoso

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANNA RASMUSSEN

Anna Rasmussen is a land mermaid working on her Poetry MFA at the University of Minnesota. She misses the branches at PLU.

By ANNA RASMUSSEN Saxifrage 38 Contributor Guy and Laura Waterman built a house in the snowcapped White Mountains of Vermont. They managed without water or electricity- just two small rooms filled with climbing gear, instruments, and stacks of books. They lived quietly. Often they would walk on the quiet forest paths surrounding the house. Guy would recite Paradise Lost and they'd picnic on a ridge of the mountain. In the early evening they would fill a soup kettle with icy river water. Guy began to stand along the water's edge for hours alone. Pensive and quiet, he counted blackberries and filled notebooks with his memoir. The house was his refuge, and he feared the mountain's shadow. One summer, he took a hike and returned pale. Laura fed him bread and stroked his face, dripping with water. He told her that standing on the mountain cliff, he had almost jumped. With quiet understanding, she asked only for a house she could go to after he left. Eyes filled with salty tears, he agreed. They filled their last year together on long climbs, and slowly building Laura's new house. At night they watched the small water bugs dance in the river brush and quietly recalled their life on the mountain. One morning snow fell on the mountain. Guy awoke early and packed his bag, filling a large canteen with whiskey. Quietly, he Laura, handed her a letter, and kissed her, his tears smudging the ink like water. Saying bake bread today, he left the house. That day the mountain ridge was quiet and icicles melted in slow drops of water filling the river than ran by an empty house.

Saxifrage is open for submissions for the October 31 issue of The Mooring Mast. This month's theme fo r submission is "optical symphony" (be as loose and creative with that as you like!). Send your poetry, art, fiction and creative non-fiction totaling no more than 500 words to saxifrag@plu.edu for consideration. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and at http://saxifrage.plu.edu.

Sax路i路frage

LUTE LIFE 7

PHOTO COURTESY OF TAYWR WHATELY

Senior Taylor Whately won the chance to have his composition, "Fanfare of Giocoso," played by the Lake Union Civic Orchestra. The concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 24 in Seattle's Town Hall.

By RELAND TUOMI Editor-in -Chief The Lake Union Civic Orchestra (LUCO) is a Seattle-based community orchestra, known for its friendly atmosphere, astounding musicianship and regular performances of student-written pieces from across the state. Pacific Lutheran University senior Taylor Whately is one such student to have his piece played by LUCO. Whately, a music and composition major, plays double bass and some piano in PLU' s orchestra program. He was introduced to the competition by composition professor Greg Youtz. "There was a general email sent out first to everyone," Whately said. "He sent me an email a few months later saying 'hey, you should really do this.' So I ended up doing it." Whately's piece is titled "Fanfare of Giocoso," and is happy and playful, as the definition for the Italian word "giocoso" suggests. "I wanted to make a piece that was exciting from beginning to end, since it's an opener to a concert," Whately said.

Whately said he wanted to write a fanfare centered around a seven-eight beat instead of a strict, even meter fanfares are known for. He usually finds inspiration from things he hasn't heard before. "If I haven't heard it yet, I want to write it," Whately said. LUCO will play Whately's fanfare at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 24 in Seattle's Town Hall. Tickets cost $18 for adults and $13 for students and senior citizens. Whately' s music career began in middle school through a mandated music program. "They jot you down for band or orchestra and say 'pick one,"' Whately said, "so I picked orchestra." Since middle school, Whately has played in youth symphonies and youth orchestras in and around Tacoma .. After his final year at PLU, Whately plans on looking for graduate schools, but anticipates he11 wait a few years before continuing his education. "For composition, it's more about finding good composition teachers specifically rather than a good program," Whately said. Whatley's dream job is to compose music, especially for film scores. His favorite composers are Hans Zimmer, known most recently for "12 Years a Slave" and "The Lone Ranger," and John Williams, who's composed music for movie studios since 1954 and themes for the 1984, 1988, 1996 and 2002 Olympics. "Thosetypesofjobsrequirealotofcompositional speed, and I'm good at that," Whately said.

The Concert is at 7 :30 p.m. Oct. 24 in Town Hall. Tickets cost $18 for adults and $13 for students and senior citizens.

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From The Matrix: Infinitely By KRISTIN HAYES Matrix Contributor Of the five classified Romantic languages We have five translations of feminism. Feminisme Feminism Femminismo Feminismo Feminism Our blossoming evolution into third wave feminism Is that of intersectionality And challenging the veil Of sisterhood. The metaphor of these five translations is an embodiment of Telling the truth. Where the organization of letters will vary But the root of the w ord remains. I always and continuously ask myself What it means to be an advocate of feminism. And how it is defined in theory Versus practice. It is how we use our language that will set us free. It is when we understand the root of a word The soul of our speech And the authenticity of our actions. The first step, Understanding the power of our tongue.

When I analyze the translations of feminism I am pleasantly surprised with the simplicity. With each addition or elimination of a letter, I understand how feminism is contextual While eloquently illuminates a universal compassion. The revolution of feminism requires a human evolution. It is a vision A springboard for inspiration Too oftep. abused and misused.

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I advocate feminism because I believe our misunderstandings And battles for power Can be healed with the kindness of our words. I am an activist for social justice. I believe in women. I believe in men. I believe in feminism Feminisme Femminismo Feminismo.

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Internationally Intersectionally Intrinsically Infinitely

Kristin Hayes is a senior at Pacific Lutheran University. She contributed to The Matrix in Spring 2014.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAXIFRAGE

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

Get involved with the Video Production Club on campus By ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager and Online Editor

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Some might not be aware of it, but Mast TV is home to the Video Production Club. The club was founded last year by sophomore Kyle Strumer. Strumer, a journalism major, had the idea to start the club once he noticed that Mast TV was very news-based. He decided to help the station branch out our horizons.

"I thought it would be fun to create an environment where people learn to make movies," Strumer said. "Filmmaking has so many different elements coming together, different talents, writing and acting." At the end of the year, the Video Production Club hopes to host a film festival which will showcase all their work throughout the year. They also want to expand from short films by working on documentaries. "If you're interested in any aspect of film or you just want to learn, we're a welcoming community," Strumer said. "You don't have to know anything, you just h ave to want to learn and make movies." It can be a little overwhelming at first, but learning how to use a camera isn't as hard as it seems. Once you get the hang of it, recording and editing videos can be fun. Seeing your finished product on YouTube, Facebook and even News @

"You don't have to know anything, you just have to want to learn and make movies."

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER Nine can be very rewarding. Nowadays, newsrooms want you to do everything. They want you to write well and know how to use a camera to create a video package for online content. If you're interested in the world of journalism or film after you graduate from Pacific Lutheran University, the Video Production Club could help finetune your skills. If you're interested in a career in the journalism or film world, I encourage you to stop by the Video Production Club's meetings.

The Video Production club meets at 6 p.m. Wednesdays in the Mast TV Studio, AUC 174.

Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu

NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano LUTE LIFE EDITOR

Reland Tuomi OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Giancarlo Santoro COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Kaitlyn Hall ONLINE EDITOR

Please

I

OCT. 10, 2014

Allie Reynolds

MAST TV

recycle your copy of

GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynold

The Mooring Mast

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle

Parking P.rohlems: Students and faculty orive in droves to PLU By KAITLYN HALL Copy Editor

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In my first month commuting to Pacific Lutheran University, I felt much like The White Rabbit from "Alice in Wonderland." I've never been one to be late, so I would leave 45 minutes before class started, leaving me more than enough time

for my 20-minute drive and students, staff and faculty parking - or so I thought. that entered its campus If I arrived at PLU after each day. 9:30 a.m., upper-campus PLU, though, seems to be parking was a fable rather different. When those who than a fact. Even in the commute to campus park, lower-campus lots, the they stay there for the full only parking spots were day. Both staff members positioned far away from and students struggle to buildings. find a parking spot if they By the time I'd driven arrive late or leave in the down to lower campus and middle of the day. found a parking lot where I'll admit it, before I my decal was permitted, I'd interviewed Campus Safety have about five minutes to Director Greg Premo and make the 10-minute walk to Parking Supervisor Jennifer my upper-campus classes. . Gierke, I believed the I'm no stranger to finding parking system was fatally parking at school, after 路flawed . Commuters needed joining nearly all of my the extra parking that was peers in commuting to both only available to faculty, I high school and community thought. It just wasn't fair. college. "I purposely park my car I went to a high school all day, and I don't leave of 1,500 students where campus," Gierke said. almost every student older Premo and Gierke said than 16 drove a car and a staff and commuters have community college that the most parking options. required abundant parking Staff can park in almost all options for the thousands of lots and have designated

spots, Premo said, because the university's 700 faculty tend to be on-campus at similar times, while the numbers of students parking on-campus fluctuate. PLU's parking committee, which is made up of students and staff, examines parking usage and parking solutions. The committee hasn't made any drastic changes to parking in years, Premo and Gierke said. The problem with campus parking isn't that one group has too much or another too little, but that the parking isn't always convenient. "We have parking spaces available," Premo said, "it's just not in a location where the majority of students or staff want to use it." The lesson I've learned: arrive early, and stay late.

IFarking Tips from Premo and Gierke (Campus Saftey): I. "I know cost is a factor. but there's always room in Tinglestad Gated lot," Premo said. Premo suggests purchasing a pass for one of the ~ated lots if a guaranteed parking spot is necessary,

J. Driving to Morken may be worth it. Premo said, because the Morken lot is rarely full. 3. Three types of ticket~ constitute the majority of tickets given: non -registered vehicles, vehicles parked in incorrect lots and vehicles !registered but missing a decal.

14. On -street parking spaces near campus have a two -hour time limit, typically between the hours of 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. or 8 a. m. to 6 p.m. Though Campus Safety officers have a commission to enforce the time regulations, students parking in Pierce County-owned parking spaces lare more likely to receive a ticket for other infractions, such as blocking a driveway or crosswalk. ~- Students having trouble finding parking on upper-campus should try the Nesvig lot, located halfway between lower- and upper-campus.

ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views e>..1Jressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu . .edu by 5 p .m. the Tuesday before publicat ion. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections Sept. 3 Issue

Andrea Murphy is a nursing major, not a music m ajor on the page 6 article "What is social justice."


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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 10, 2014

OPINION 9

Prior to panicking, educate yourself on Ebola By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer Ebola has entered the U.S. This is reason enough to quarantine yourself in your basement or pack up and flee to Canada right? Wrong. The outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is drawing attention on a globaI scale. With thousands affected, Americans stood by in hopes there would be no encroachment of the disease domestically. Thomas Eric Duncan entered the United States last week .with a case of Ebola he claimed. to be unaware of. Naturally, this sparked a sudden panic among citizens fearing they, too, would contract this disease. According to the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Dr. Thomas Frieden, who was interviewed on NBC News, there is no need to panic. "We remain confident that we can contain any spread of Ebola within the United States," said Frieden. I don't believe this disease is something Americans need to worry about. Frieden said that even with the disease being

brought into the U.S., good hospitals and infection control will prevent the spread. Some Americans are expressing unrealistic demands such as suspending flights in or out of affected areas. People will find ways in or out and it's not practical merely to suspend flights. "The best way to protect ourselves is not to seal off these countries but to provide the kinds of services so the disease is contained there. The only way to get to zero risk is to stop it there," Frieden said. The CDC's list of symptoms of Ebola include: fevers greater than 101.5 F, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, pain and unexplained abdominal hemorrhage. Those ipfected with the disease can expect to experience symptoms anywhere between two and 20 days. The late showing of symptoms creates difficulties in the screening process for airlines. They have been checking temperatures of passengers before boarding; however, if a patient has recently been infected they will not test positive. According to the CDC, Ebola is most commonly spread by direct contact, through broken skin or mucous membranes, with

bodily fluids, infected animals and objects stop it there, then worries within the U.S. that have come in contact with the disease. will become irrelevant. With our modern I believe a large part of the fear stems healthcare system, we can expect to avoid from the misunderstanding of the disease an epidemic and that the disease will be controlled. itself. It would be difficult for Americans to The Buffington Post wrote an article exposing the truth about Ebola and contract Ebola so there is no need to panic. common false beliefs. A few of the myths Worrying is not productive, but it would be about Ebola include: the virus is airborne, productive to focus our efforts on stopping waterborne or spreads through casual the problem where it began. UNICEF is contact, International medical teams accepting donations toward relief efforts brought the virus to West Africa and in West Africa. According to their website, bringing Ebola patients to the U.S. puts the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation is matching donations dollar-for-dollar. Americans at risk. Another belief is that, even if cured of Ebola, the disease will still be passed on to [EDITORS NOTE: According to CNN others, and this is the first major outbreak News, Thomas Eric Duncan, the first of Ebola. person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., There is absolutely no reason for p·anic died from the virus Oct. 8 at Texas Health among American citizens. A domestic Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, Texas. No new cases of Ebola have been confirmed in outbreak is simply out of the question. "I think as long as people are careful the U.S., but there are eight confirmed cases about who they interact with and · in Europe. JFK international Airport as well particularly how they interact, it isn't a as four other airports in major cities will be huge threat to us," junior Haley Gredvig screening travelers from West Africa for said. fever.] West Africa calls for aid work to prevent the disease from spreading. If we can

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1--=-THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

OCT. 10, 2014

IPORTI SCOREBOARD >w~::::

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Santoro Speaks... Give yourself a pat on the back, Seattle By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor

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Seattle residents have always loved local sports, and it isn't hard to argue that the Emerald City boasts some of the best fans in the country. You can hardly drive down the street in any neighborhood without seeing the now famous Seahawks blue and green "12" flag waving proudly in the cold Pacific Northwest breeze. Or think back to the outrage that had the city up in arms when the Seattle Supersonics were sold to become the Oklahoma Thunder. Even though poor attendance was part of the reason the Sonics were ultimately relocated - they were in the bottom five for lowest attendance in NBA - Seattletites seemed to find unity in attempting to bring the team back to the city. Although unsuccessful, it showed that Seattle sports fans really did care about having a top-level basketball team in the city, mainly because professional sports are a status symbol. After all, you don't see Little Rock, Ark. with any professional teams. For sports fans in the PNW, unfortunately, the city hasn't had many teams that could match the undying loyalty of its fans.

However, in about the past five years, Seattle sports fans have had a lot to cheer about, and people ar~starting to take notice.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

When the Seattle Sounders joined Major League Soccer as a professional team, it was thought they would be able to fill the void left by the Sonics, and it's safe to say they did. Arguably the poster-boy team of MLS, the Sounders have set the season high attendance average every year since they joined the league in 2009 with an average of 38,558 combined attendees during the last five years. The Sounders are poised to take first place overall in

the 2014 MLS standings to go along with the team's four Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup wins since 2009. It also helps that the captain of the U.S. Men's national team, Clint Dempsey, sports the captain's armband for the Sounders. Then - as if I could get away without mentioning them - there's the Seattle Seahawks. A largely mediocre team through its brief 40-year history, the Seahawks captured the imagination of Seattle fans with the arrival of golden quarterback Russell Wilson and the pure domination of the Legion of Boom, leading to sell-out crowds at every home game. After the Hawks won the 2014 Super Bowl with a 43-8 hammering of the Denver Broncos, the 12th Man took over the city and the fervor has been there ever since. With the Seattle Mariners just one agonizing result away from clinching its first post-season berth since 2001, the city was almost ready to shutdown in sport-induced excitement. We should feel lucky to have such talented teams, but we should also give credit where credit is due. So take a second, Washington sports fanatics, and thank yourself, because you helped take Seattle athletics to a new level.

Dont blame baseball, blame the season By DAVID MAIR General Writer

1• . -

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As James Earl Jones put it, "the only constant through all the years has been baseball." It's the great American pastime. An afternoon spent sitting in the bleachers, wearing short sleeves, with popcorn or crackerjacks watching one's team is great. But is taking someone out to the ball game too much of a time commitment these days? Recently, concerns have come up that the play of game is too slow. According to the MLB website, the past nine seasons have had the most attendance. But current MLB Commissioner·Bud Selig· feels that game play needs to be sped up. In the past week, he announced the formation of a committee to discuss how to speed up the pace of game play in time for a result to be added to the 2015 season. Commissioner Selig's new committee is not without great reason. Society right now is fast moving. People

enjoy fast action and baseball just isn't that at all. In comparison to other sports, it's quite slow. Some games can go for two hours, while others could last up to four hours. It makes sense that many people would become bored with a game that has no exact end time. . On the other hand, the length of a baseball game is what makes the game itself so completely unique, which is why the pace of play should be left alone. It is· one of the only sports that doesn't have a time limit. Fans can come out for the afternoon ready to just soak in the sunshine, watching their team play. The afternoon is spent talking, eating, and enjoying the game, however long that may be. Besides, baseball is not a sport that is meant to be played quickly. It's a game that requires great attention, as well as patience. I personally disagree with Commissioner Selig that the game needs to be sped up. The length of games is fine; it's the length of a season that needs to be shortened. Right now, an MLB team plays a total of 162 games and can play each team on average of 15-20 times during

the season, which will make the season run from late March to late September. The amount of games played are unnecessary, as well as redundant. Especially when a team will play another team three days in a row. It would make more sense for them to play less games and to play every team only five times throughout a season. While I don't agree with the decision to speed up game play, I can appreciate that Commissioner Selig is acknowledging that it might be time for change. The joy of baseball is being able to enjoy a game that could last for the afternoon. Overall, what should be shortened in the MLB is the amount of games played, along with the amount of times each team plays another. I won't be excited to hear if games do get shortened, rather, I look forward to see positive change come from the commissioner wanting to better the sport itself.


....... THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 10, 2014

11 SPORTS

Women's soccer dreaming of NWC title Senior class hoping to make final season memorable

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU WOMEN'S SOCCER FACEBOOK PAGE

Defender Hannah Bush (9) and forward Blake Warner (7) wait for their game against UPS to begin back in 2012. The pair are the only seniors on this year's team. Bush was recruited out of high school to play soccer for PLU. Warner joined the team after originally coming for academics.

By GIANCARLO SANTORO

Women's soccer was at the pinnacle of small college women's soccer," Spidahl said. "I have a lot of Lute pride and wanted to see if we could raise the When the Pacific Lutheran University program back up to the standard of the Women's soccer team tied the NCAA past." record for most ties in a season in 2012, A native of Anchorage, Spidahl many of the players and coaching graduated from PLU in 1994, and instead staff, surprisingly enough, saw it as an of returning to Alaska, he decided to stay improvement. in Washington and coach. Seven ties overall and a sixth place From 2001-2009, Spidahl was the finish in Northwest Conference is assistant coach of the Umversity of nothing to write home about, especially Washington Men's Soccer team, and considering the league is comprised of helped lead the Huskies to five NCAA only nine teams. postseason appearances. But compared to the team's finish the Despite coming from one of the top year before, the Lutes had every reason to men's NCAA Division I team's on the be optimistic about what the future held. West Coast, Spidahl doesn't see PLU as a Seniors Hannah Bush and Blake step down. Warner were sophomores during that "I left UW to gain more of a balance record-breaking 2012 season, and they are in my family life," Spidahl said. "I still now the last members of previous PLU wanted to get back into coaching, and head coach Lynnette Buffington's final the Division ill level has the sort of recruiting class. atmosphere I was looking for." After a It can take a seventh place long time to take a finish during downtrodden team Bush and "At the end of the day; PLU and tum them into Warner's first year in Fall 2011, should be in the conversation winners, but Bush, Warner and Spidahl PLU alumnus for the NWC title every year." were all up for the Seth Spidahl was challenge. hired in place "Seth [Spdiahl] Seth Spidahl of the departed was definitely more PLU Women's soccer head coach Buffington. hands on, and you Flash-forward can tell he really to present day wants his team and the trio has to do well," Warner said. "He sends us helped the team bring the good times back emails at three in the morning and is up to Parkland. all night thinking about what will make us Bush, a Tacoma native and graduate of better. That's something that wasn't there Stadium High School, and Warner, from before." Wheat Ridge, Colo., didn't know what to With Spidahl' s passion and eye for expect coming into _PLU. talent when recruiting, the team slowly Both women joined the Lutes with started to play like a team that believed it winning mentalities; Bush played for could win. Washington Premier FC, one of the state's During Buffington' s last year in charge, top youth clubs, and Warner won two the defense was a mess and the offense state titles at Wheat Ridge High School. was sputtering. A whopping 41 goals PLU, on the other hand, had not been against and only 12 goals scored in 18 as successful. As with most teams that games tells the story. place in the bottom half of the conference, The 2013 season, Spidahls' second in a lot of it came down to the team's charge, couldn't have been any different. attitude. This time, the numbers were flipped . "We played more for each other rather The team, lead by Warner up front than the coach," Bush said frankly. "It and Bu.s h in defense, scored 31 goals and sucked when we lost, but we didn't really conceded only 16 in 20 games played, know what to do about it." resulting in the programs first third place "She [Buffington] basically said 'it's up finish since 2005. to you guys to fix it,"' Bush said. A youthful team with good chemistry Unfortunately, nothing got fixed, and and a winning attitude is a stark contrast the team finished the 2011 season with a with previous seasons, and Bush and record of 4-13-1. Warner have been vital to the transition. "It felt like she lost her passion," 'Tm very grateful for Hannah [Bush] Warner said. "It seemed like it was just a and Blake [Warner] and their stick withjob where she just showed up, coached us it-ness," Spidahl said. "Hannah has been and then left." great for PLU, and PLU has been great for That was until Spidhal took the reigns. Hannah." After being told about the position Spidahl also commends Warner for her by men's soccer head coach John Yorke, hard work. Spidahl was selected as the number one "Blake has been a cornerstone of our choice out of four candidates for the head attack since my first year here and has coaching role. really grown to become a great captain "When I was a student-athlete, PLU and resource for the younger players,"

Sports Editor

Spidahl said. After going from perennial losers to budding challengers, the team has set its sights on the NWC title. The last time the women's team won a conference title was back in 1992, when the team was competing in NAIA From 1988-1992, PLU also won three national tournaments and were finalists twice. While this year's team may not be national championship contenders, Spidahl feels confident. "At the end of the day, PLU should be in the conversation for the NWC title every year," Spidahl. "If we enjoy the journey and the process, hopefully we are in that conversation." It's safe to say that conversation is already well under way. What would have been unthinkable three years ago is now a reality. The Lutes are currently sitting in first place with half of a season to go.

Home Games ...-.: Oct 11. vs. Linfield- Noon Oct 12. vs. Willamette- Noon Oct 19. vs. Whitworth- Noon Oct 20. vs. Whitman- Noon Oct 29. vs. UPS- 4 p.m.

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~

--.:

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU WOMEN'S SOCCER FACEBOOK PAGE

Head coach Seth Spidahl poses for his PLU roster picture in 1992. In his first season in charge, Spidahl led the team to its first winning season since 2006 and the end of a 27-match loss streak to cross -town rival University of Puget Sound. He followed that up in his second year with the program's first double- rligit win total since 2006 and the highest conference finish since 2005.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 10, 2014

12 SPORTS

Familiar foe batters Lutes in Homecoming game Linfield extends winning streak By SAM HORN Guest Writer .After his third interception of the day, quarterback Dalton Ritchey hung his head in sorrow. Ritchey hasn't had a illustrious career against Linfield; he has been responsible for 15 turnovers against the Wildcats in their past four matchups. Pacific Lutheran University's poor offensive execution resulted in just 202 yards as the Lutes lost 41-14 to the Wildcats. The Lutes lost for the 15th consecutive time against the Wildcats. The last time PLU won against Linfield was in 2001. Not only did Ritchey struggle against Linfield - he threw for just 87 yards - and All-Conference running back Niko Madison carried the ball just nine times for 35 yards. In the prior two games this season, Madison rushed for more than 200 yards combined. Both games resulted in wins.

"They are a great football team, and we knew that coming into the game," Madison said. "They out-executed us. We tried our best, but it didn't go according to plan." Linfield' s defense seemed to have an answer for quelling the Lutes' past running success. The Wildcats' defense gave up 94 rushing yards per game, which is first in the Northwest Conference. Led by Alex Hoff, a hulking 240-pound defensive end who has a league-leading 11 tackle? for loss, the Wildcats defense had no problem limiting Ritchey and Madison to 110 yards combined on the ground. "We got to take what they're going to give us," head coach Scott Westering said. "They're very good up front, very physical."

PLU's next opponent on Oct. 11, Lewis & Clark, doesn't seem nearly as invincible. The Pioneers have lost every game this season by double digits. By allowing an average of 428 yards per game, the Pioneers' defense could have difficulty containing Ritchey and Madison when the Lutes travel to Portland next Saturday. Despite their offensive struggles against the Wildcats, the Lutes have tallied 893 combined yards in wins against California Lutheran and Trinity this season. Throwing the football, the Pioneers' primary form of offense, may come into question when Lewis & Clark face a PLU defense that allows only 193 passing yards per game, second best in the Northwest Conference.

"They out-executed us. We tried our best, but it didn't go according to plan." Niko Madison Senior running back

PHOTO BY JOHN FROSCHAUER

Senior Niko Madison (left) attempts to run the football against Linfield at Sparks Stadium in Puyallup, Wash. Madison and fellow seniors Dalton Ritchey and Kyle Warner combined for ll5 rushing yards in the 41-14 loss.

While Ritchey did score with his legs in the first quarter and Madison ran for a touchdown in the second quarter, the Wildcats' defense limited the Lutes to 79 yards and zero points in the second half. Two of the Lutes' second half drives resulted in a combined seven yards. The Wildcats' offense proved to be just as stellar as their defense by eliminating any threat of a possible defeat by scoring 17 unanswered points in the second . half. Wildcat quarterback Sam Riddle continued his effective dissection of opposing defenses - he threw for 355 yards against Redlands- by throwing a touchdown pass and running another one in against the Lutes in the second half. PLU did limit Riddle to 239 passing yards, but he did throw four touchdowns in the double-digit win. Outscoring teams 98-31 through three games this season, Linfield looks poised to win its sixth consecutive Northwest Conference title.

PHOTO BY LUI KIT WONG - SIAFF PHOTOGRAPHER FOR TACOMA NEWS TRIBUNE

PLU sophomore Richard Johnson manages to hold on to the football after being taken down by Linfield's Jake Reimer. Johnson tallied 91 yards on kickoff returns and seven yards receiving.

Homecoming weekend sets good pace for rest of season Central Washington placed in second with 51 points, far behind PLU. Lute sophomores Genevieve Brandt and Shailee Woodard and junior Arnie Wilson placed in the top ten. First-year Sara Newman said the women had a strong front pack. "We all envision what our end result will be before we start," Newman said. "[When] we run, we're all connected. Those in the front pull the others up with them, and those in the back push the others forward ." Newman said though she was nervous to run at home, the home-field advantage largely factored in to PLU Cross Country's overall success. During its bye this upcoming week, the team will have the opportunity to enjoy a bit of a break and work on strategy for the next race. Learning to fight through the pain and overcompensating when negative thoughts arise in the middle of a race are ideas Newman felt the team would discuss during its bye. The runners will tie their laces as they head down to compete at the Lewis and Clark Invitational in Portland on Saturday, Oct. 19.

PHOTO BYNAME HERE

PLU sophomore Charlie Mogen looks to finish the race strong at the PLU Invitational held at PLU's South Park. Mogen was the Lutes' highest finisher in the 8k run with a time of27:47.94. PLU alum Destry Johnson took first place running unattached with a time of 26:28.81.

By DAVID MAIR General Writer ~

The Pacific Lutheran University Cross Country Team demonstrated there's no place like home as they put their best foot forward hosting the PLU Invitational on South Park on Oct. 3. Both men's and women's teams p erformed excellently. Competing against a number of skilled athletes at the invitational, the PLU women's team placed 16th, while the men' s placed 18th. 路 Five schools competed at PLU's Invitational on Saturday. Though the competition was fierce, both PLU

teams shined the brightest among the schools at the invitational. The PLU men's team took second overall, scoring 36 points, only 11 points behind Green River Community College. Though it was a close race between PLU and Green River, the Lutes scored 46 points higher than Olympic College, who placed third with 82 points. Sophomores Charlie Magen, Matthew Macfarlane and Brendon Bonnell placed in the top ten. The PLU women's team won the invitational overall and contributed to PLU's "Drive to 125," bringing the count to 23. They scored a total of 28 points.

XC Schedule Oct. 18 - Pioneer Invitational Nov. 1 - NWC Championships Nov.15 - NCAA West Regional Championships Nov. 22 - NCAA Cross Country Championships


SPORTS

AdE Review: "Boys Next Door" opens hearts, minds and doors pg.5

Volleyball dominates Willamette on "Dig Pink" night pg.12

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

OORING

OCT. 17, 2014

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 4

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

Debate Team faces off over eating faces By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

participate by voting both before and after the discussion. "We polled the audience at the beginning asking whether they agreed with the resolution that the house would not eat a face and then at the end we asked the same question," Stanton said. "There were more votes for the meat side but more people changed their vote throughout the debate to vegetarianism." Interestingly, there were 11 more votes at the end of the debate than there were at the beginning. Stanton guessed this was due to people coming in late during the event. "It was basically exactly the same at the end except for the 11 votes out of nowhere," Stanton said, "so things got a little skewed." Sophomore Elise Anderson attended the debate and ended up changing sides by the end. "I liked the arguments for 'team meat' better," she said. "I was leaning toward 'team veg' at first but I thought 'team meat' brought up a lot of stronger points so in the end I sided with them." Anderson said she had not previously realized how controversial the topic was until she got to the debate and saw all the arguments and involvement on the Twitter feed . "I was pleasantly surprised to see so many people interested and glad to see so many people come out and support the debate team," Anderson said.

Would you eat anything with a face? The "Meat Debate," Pacific Lutheran University's second annual Ruth Anderson Public Debate, took place on Oct. 9 in Xavier 201 with roughly 100 people in attendance. TI1e meat debate's resolve was "this house would not eat anything with a face." The ending poll showed more votes in favor of "team veg," which was against the consumption of meat, but some say the results were inconclusive. Debaters, including professors Karen Emmerman from the University of Washington and Michael Schleeter from PLU, presented arguments both for and against eating meat. "Team meat" had to face "team veg," and anyone could participate in the discussion by using the hashtags "#teammeat" and "#teamveg" to tweet comments or questions. Tweets were shown in a live feed on a projector above the debate, which gave the debaters instant feedback. Junior Brendan Stanton, PLU Speech and Debate Team member who argued in favor of eating meat, said the Jive feedback provided by social media made for an Interesting experience. "The Twitter feed added a fun, interactive level to the debate," Stanton said. "I would look above me and see what people were saying and it was really interesting to get instant feedback." In addition to the Twitter feed, the audience could also

feed from #DebateMeatPLU Alexandra Devine @DevinelyAlex

Erik Tou @eriktou

Aren't there sources of protein without a face? #resolutionwheredidyougo #debatemeatplu

Actually, all 4 panelists.are making a strong case for the locavore movement. #debatemeatplu

The Matrix @thematrixplu If the US switched to full vegetarianism we'd have enough grain left over to feed 750 million people. #teamveg #debatemeatPLU

Joanne Lisosky @joannelisosky "We know animals don't want us to eat them," K.Emmerman says. Poweful argument. #debatemeatplu

Lance Mathes @LanceMathes We need to switch to grass fed meat, the statistics don't lie. It's absolutely essential to our health to eat meat. #TeamMeat #debatemeatPLU

Amy Young @amy_prof The shift from something to someone is a powerful rhetorical move. #debatemeatplu

The English (majors) are coming! By GENNY BOOTS Guest Writer The Pacific Lutheran Univeristy English Club is a new orgarlization coming to campus this fall. It's planning to join the International English Honor Society, Sigma Tau Delta, as soon as the administrators approve. Sigma Tau Delta is an internationally recognized .collegiate orgarlization of English scholars and academics. The new PLU branch, "Upsilon Alpha Sigma," is a club for English majors or minors, but all with the necessary qualifications are welcome. Co-Presidents seniors Jennifer Arbaugh and Nate Schoen, along with advisor Jenny James are still working to become a qualified honor society. As it is now, PLU English

Club is considered an on-campus club and open to all. By the end of the fall semester, Arbaugh hopes the club will become a fullfledged member of Sigma Tau Delta. Potential members must apply and meet certain qualification because the PLU English Club is an honor society. Applicants must have completed two semesters of college, have eight English credits and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and a 3.5 average for English classes. There will be additional requirements for accepted students, according to Arbaugh. Sigma Tau Delta has over 850 chapters countrywide and abroad, and nearly 9,000 new members are inducted annually. There are also branches

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As~~ r~~nes~~y~~~~w~~o~~dt~g~~n~~~~~b~te TeamMeat

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Team Veggie

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'A&E Art credits for the nonartist

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Opinion Raven is Right: Lose the labels pg.8

Lute Life Mast TV is back on Air

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Sports Women's Soccer extends winning streak to seven pg.11


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

World News Trending: Hillary Clinton 路 r... ~ State Former U.S. Secretary of may reveal plans for 2016 presidential bid during midterms.

Glass ~ Google Google Glass

users are treated for Internet addiction from device.

Nurse murders 38 patients

A nurse in Italy was taken into custody for allegedly killing 38 patients because the patient or their family was 'annoying.'

Halloween deaths In the last

week, Hallowe en-related accidents have been linked to three deaths. One victim was an 18-year-old who worked at a com maze as a zombie. In the maze, people shoot zombies from a bus, the bus ran over the 18-year-old and killed him instantly. Nobody knew he was dead until they were setting up for the next round.

OCT 17, 2014

Rocks and ropes: Climbing is the new up-and-coming P.E. class By DENAE MCGAHA Guest Writer Getting fit is getting fun for Pacific Lutheran University students with the new option of rock climbing for Physical Education credits. New this semester, PLU joined with Edgeworks Climbing Gym in Tacoma to offer a P.E. rock-climbing course. Over the course of eight weeks, students of all levels meet at Edgeworks to learn techniques in belaying, bouldering and everything in between. The course instructor, Andy Davis, is more than suited to teach them. An Edgeworks employee, Davis has been climbing for 14 years and instructing for 13 of them. Davis is an eager, experienced climbing coach who wants each student to find fun and fitness in climbing. With experience leading National Outdoor Leadership School courses, certifications from the American Mountain Guide Association and USA Climbing and a climbing record stretching from Canada to Patagonia, Davis is experienced and excited to share. "I teach and guide every age imaginable, but enjoy teaching college outdoor education courses like the climbing course I teach at PLU the most," Davis said. Students don't need climbing experience to take the course but do have to pay a fee . The fee pays for a student membership that includes all necessary climbing equipment, fitness classes, guest passes and access to the gym during all hours of operation. Davis requires at least three climbing sessions

outside of class to make the grade. An outdoor climbing excursion is also included in the class. Although there is a course fee, some may say the benefits of the class are priceless. Senior Richard Olson said he gained personal awareness through the course. "I learned how to be honest about and how to overcome mental, technical and . physical boundaries," Olson said. Life skills such as these are exactly what Davis wants students to learn from the course. "I believe that students will take away a greater sense of confidence in what they are capable of," Davis said. "Climbing strengthens your mind and body in ways that benefit you far beyond the cliffs." Although the course was listed under Banner Web as a "Special Topic," students will likely have the opportunity to experience it for years to come. "The future looks bright," Davis said. "I would also be interested in adding some more advanced classes to provide a progression for students who would like to pursue climbing further." Students interested in rock climbing as a P.E. class, visit the plu.edu/physical-education for more information on P.E. credits. If you are interested in climbing for fun, no matter the credits, visit https://plu.edu/a/aspluoutdoor-recreation for a schedule of climbing trips and other adventures.

PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHEL REYNOLDS

Chris Tuohio climbing for PE credit .

Visiting writers series celebrates IO-year anniversary By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

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The visiting writer workshop series kicked off its 10-year anniversary on Oct. 8 and will continue through the year. Over the past decade, Pacific Lutheran University has hosted approximately 50 writers. PLU has had National Book Award winners, "Yorke Times" best-selling authors, recipients of~ Guggenheim Fellowships and MacArthur "Genius" Grants. This year, PLU is welcoming Paisley Rekdal, Ryan Van Meter and Adrianne Harun. Each writer hosts two events on the day they visit, the first, "The Writer's Story," takes place in the afternoon. "The Writer's Story" is a session where students can ask the writer's questions and get to know them. At night, the writers read their own work. Writer, photographer and poet, Rekdal visited PLU on Oct. 8. She held a "The Writer's Story" event in the afternoon in Harstad and that night she read an excerpt from "Animal Eye," which was a finalist for the 2013 Kingsley Stufts Prize and the Balcones Prize, and winner of the UNT Rilke Award. Van Meter will visit PLU on Nov. 20 to talk about his essay collection

"If You Knew Then What I Know Now." On Feb. 26, Harun will visit the PLU campus to share her work, ''A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain." The Visiting Writer Series has been a successful program on campus. Attendance can range anywhere between 30 to more than 100 people. Ten years ago, the writer series was started by the English .Department. The English Department was looking for a poet and fiction writer, their goal was to bring two people who could design and coordinate a visiting writer series for the PLU campus. Rick Barot and Jason Skipper were hired and their first task was to create the series in an effort to bring award-winning authors to campus whose work could relate to PLU and its students. Each year, Barot and Skipper strive to bring people to campus who not only write meaningful and critically acclaimed prose or poetry, but who will also serve as thoughtful teachers. 10-year To celebrate this benchmark, a commemorative poster has been designed by PLU alumnus Samuel Hosman. It is currently on display throughout the PLU campus.

Paisley Rekdal - Oct. 8 Reading "Animal Eye"

Ryan Van Meter - Nov. 20 Reading "If You Knew What I Know Now"

Adrianne Harun - Feb. 26 Reading "A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain" PHOTOS COURTESY OF JASON SKIPPER

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system, the use of background checks when purchasing firearms and taxation of the marijuana agriculture business. One of the leading issues is Initiative 1351, which affects the education of all students in Washington state from kindergarten to 12th grade. Supporters of the initiative are in favor of reallocating additional funds to the state education budget to reduce the ·n umber of students in each classroom and increase the number of support staff for each student. Passing Initiative 1351 would further focus on areas of poverty within the state, where additional resources beyond what is requested for the initiative will be allocated. Along with Initiative 1351, this year's ballot features dueling Initiatives 591 and 594, which represent two topics involving the requirement of background checks during the purchase and use of firearms.

By BROOKE WOLFE Guest Writer On Nov. 4, Washington citizens statewide will drive, mail or drop their voting ballots for the general election. Students can find information on elections by contacting LuteVote, a division of Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University. The general election consists of the voting taking place before the primary election to give voters the opportunity to have their voice heard on a local level. This election, Washington citizens will cast their ballots for Congressional, Superior Court and Court of Appeals seats as well as state initiatives. The ballots will give citizens the opportunity to decide on topics such as smaller class sizes in the state school

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Supporters of 591 are in favor of of marijuana does not The election rules for Washington State eliminating the possibility of government agencies removing or detaining any stipulate that any change to .tax structure firearms from citizens without due must be· decided on by voters during the process. Additionally, the measure favors general election. Advisory Note Number 8 seeks to optional background checks on purchasers of firearms. · uphold the Legislator's decision. A yes Initiative 594 would require universal vote retains the current tax structure, background checks for all residents maintaining the revenue from marijuana for the state. purchasing a firearm . Along with these initiatives and The use of fuearms has drawn mass attention in the past years and possibilities advisory notes, the general election will for moving forward with the firearm also request votes on the induction of the protection laws are well-represented on state's next Congressional, Supreme Court and Court of Appeals seats. this ballot. With the general election comes the Rounding out the election will be opportunity for citizens to decide the Advisory Note Number 8. Legislators previously decided that · leadership and course of action for our marijuana is not a farm product of state. Washington state. Unlike wheat and dairy products, which receive tax breaks for their agricultural value, the commercial farming

PLU speech and debate team out matches rivals By JUSTIN ECKSTEIN Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Forensics F o r u m recently returned from the f'.. Steven Hunt Classic at Lewis & Clark College. • • j W i i • I • ) C Juniors Angela • ~ •.... '!. : ...... : .. " : ,." ....._ . .·-··«"'41, . . ~,'\~ . .~ . . : Tinker, Brendan •• • • • • • • • *• ••°'" •~ Stanton Megan ' -. Bowen and Tori Sullivan received recognition for reaching the elimination rounds.

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within two-year colleges and high schools. According to the Sigma Tau Delta's mission, it strives to "Provide, through its local chapters, cultural stimulation on college campuses and promote interest in literature and the English language in surrounding communities." "[I hope to] continue these conversations we have in class beyond the classroom and create a support system for the English department [at PLU]," Arbaugh said. The club will partner with campus literary magazine Saxifrage and the social justice zine The Matrix. Arbuagh also plans on bringing in local writers from the Puget Sound area and taking full advantage of the "Visiting Writer Series" events held on campus. "I want this to be a community for writers, readers and thinkers," Arbaugh said . A focus for the club, especially as it develops, is to offer a safe space to share student pieces and encourage publication. Members have the opportunity to submit work for biannual journals, "The Sigma Tau Delta Review" and "The Sigma Tau Delta Rectangle." For now, the PLU English Club is welcoming any and all. The club will offer open meetings throughout the year so students, faculty and anyone interested can participate. The first meeting will be held Oct. 23. Any questions can be directed to Jennifer Arbaugh at arbaugjl@plu.edu.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

OCT. 17, 2014

This Weeki A&E

. "The Boy~ r..u_ Door"

7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, 18, 24 in KHPC

Alice Giles World Harp Thur 8 p.m. Oct.19 in Lagerquist Concert Hall

University Wind Ensemble 3 p. m. Oct. 19 in l.Agerquist Concert Hall

Fall Choral Concerts 8 p.m. Oct.21 in Lagerquist Concert Hall

Art credits for the non-artist By ERIN FLOM Guest Writer Earning required art credits can be difficult for some students, especially if they don't perceive themselves as creative or artistic; however, taking an art class can lead to a new passion, and doesn't always require traditional artistic talent. Graduate student Alliy Green is studying for her degree in education. As an undergraduate, she originally planned to be an English teacher. During her first year, though, Green took an art history class with professor Heather Mathews. "I always thought 'if you can't draw, don't be an artist,' but Heather challenged that idea," Green said. After that class, Green was inspired to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Green took her first formal art class in college and graduated with a concentration in ceramics. Now, as a student teacher at Jason Lee Middle School, she's helping her students realize that art is a form of expression that anyone can do. "[Students] don't have to have artistic talent to get messy and have fun," Green said. Professor JP Avila, chair of the Department of Art and Design and a professor of graphic design, describes art classes as a great way to try new things and open up to new experiences. He argues that if students don't take an art class, they're missing out on a new perspective. Just like any other class, art requires you to view the world in a new way, he said. Junior Bradford Lum said that he sees life in pictures. After switching from computer science to business, Lum finally arrived at photography as his major. Although he's always been passionate about photography, it wasn't until he took Photography 1 at Pacific Lutheran University that he realized his love for art. Lum said. that photography is one of the easiest art forms to get into. His professors were also supportive. "Most of the art professors care about what you're producing," Lum said. "They'll approach you and say 'let's work on your stuff."' Art is also a great medium for self-expression. Junior Jasper Sortun took Photography 1 in her first year. As their

final project, the students were required to take a selfportrait and emulate another photographer's style. Sortun chose to dress in a creepy, doll-like way, surprising her professor with her prints. "I just remember [professor] Geller corning up to me and saying, 'I had no idea you were weird!"' Sortun said. Avila said Photography 1, along with Ceramics 1, are feeder classes; they make students realize they enjoy art and these classes usually lead them to other art classes. Lum also advises students to take Drawing 1 after as it's a prerequisite for many other art classes. Avila said design is applicable in everyday life. Senior Rachel Althauser realized this when she studied abroad in Dubai with Avila's class. At the time, Althauser was a Communication major with a Studio Art minor. "I saw it would be beneficial for my advertising and PR emphasis," Althauser said. She realized it could help her stand out in the future . She is now double-majoring in Communication and Graphic Design. Art requires a different mindset and set of skills, like learning how to spin a potter's wheel or using breathing tedmiques to play an instrument. Avila related it to physical education or kinesiology. "You learn your body and build muscle memory," Avila said. Professor Zachary Lyman said music can be academic and artistic. When learning how to read music, students will find there are elements of math in it. In Music Fundamentals 1 and 2, students learn the basics of music, and since this class starts from ground zero, Lyman said, students don't need any background in music. The music ensembles at PLU hold auditions which are open to all students. Auditions are held during the fall, and the most qualified players are accepted, no matter their major. Private lessons are also open to any student, even if they've never played an instrument. Sophomore Margot Fresquez took Intro to Theatre during J-Term last year. Learning about the history of the art as well as some acting reminded her of how fun acting was. She said her last experience with theatre was in high school and taking this class allowed her to think about her talents.

Although she hasn't decided on a major, Fresquez is able to see how theatre can relate to her current classes. An art class is a great place for students to get outside their comfort zones and learn something new. Students should remember it's OK to fail, Avila said, and shouldn't be afraid if it doesn't work the first time.

PHOTO BY SARA SUZNEVICH

Jasper Sortun, a junior, works on a design for a screenprint for her printmaking class.

'SUPER SMASH' Calling all 'brawlers' By BROOKE THAMES Guest Writer Arguably one of the most classic Nintendo video game series, "Super Smash Bros." has made a home at Pacific Lutheran University in the form of a dub. The PLU Smash Club is a new organization dedicated to the casual and professional play of all versions of the notorious "Super Smash Bros." video game. Hosted every Wednesday in the main lounge of Ordal Hall, Smash Club invites Super Smash enthusiasts to gather and engage in what club president junior Devin Turner said is one of the most fun games in existence. dub Each week, the features a different edition of the game and hosts play at several stations spaced about the lounge, at which fierce and technical gameplay 路 is encouraged. "[Smash Club J is an educational place where people can express their play style, because there are so many ways to play Smash," Turner said.

Smash Club not only provides an atmosphere for competitive garneplay between garners, but also operates a competitive tournament at every dub meeting. Tournaments consist of two brackets: winners and losers. Participants face off against each other in a heated round of Smash in an attempt to advance to the next tournament stage. Winners remain in the "winners" bracket, while losers are knocked to the "losers" bracket. Elimination rounds continue in both categories until a champion in each is crowned. Finally, the two champions go head to head in an explosive final battle to name the ultimate winner of the night, who is memorialized on the "PLU Smash Club" Facebook page. idea of rigorous The competition isn't simply contained within the walls of Ordal Hall. It's the dub president's goal that all of the residence halls on campus will eventually participate in a "PLU Super Smash Bros. Tournament," where the winner would receive a grand monetary prize.

"[The residents of] one hall will face off, and the 'King' of that dorm will face off against the 'King' of all the . other dorms," Turner said. While the PLU Smash Club encourages fast-paced, aggressive gameplay and honing 路 of technique and strategy, casual Smash players are just as welcome to kick back and flex their novice game muscles. At least one station is always dedicated to players who simply wish to relax and have fun. Smash Club is all-inclusive and aims to build a community of players with a love for the game of Super Smash Bros. Anyone interested in Smash experienced and inexperienced, seasoned professionals and eager newcomers - are invited to enjoy a stress free gaming experience full of friendly competition and relationship building. The main purpose of PLU Smash Club, as President Devin Turner said, is simply for everyone who plays Smash to come out of the woodwork and say "let's play."

PHOTO BY KATIEDEPREKER

One of the first PLU Smash Club meetings was held on Oct. 2 in the Ordal Hall lounge. From left to right: first-year Peter Olschner, sophomore and vice president Isak Sommer, first-year Turner Bryk, sophomore Joel Thomas and junior Steven Prichard all engage in an epic gaming battle.

PHOTO BY KATIE DEPREKBR

F'rrst-year Noah Gerlach, junior Miranda Campos and senior Alia Harding set up a new game (left to right).

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News @ 9 is back with new features 'Tm also really excited for 'Dear Emily,"' 路Reynolds said. "It should be really great. We should be able to reach a wider audience this year Student Media at Pacific Lutheran with greater capability for online University consist of a radio station, streaming." two magazines, a newspaper and a Brett is also eager to have Mast TV television station. That's right-a ready for broadcast. television station, called Mast TV. "I am excited for all of the Mast TV has only aired News @ Nine, a live news broadcast, but it " [... I] want to make Mast great content I know Mast TV will has also had student-run dramas TV more visible and active on produce this year," Brett said. Any student can get involved and comedies on its website. Such with Mast TV. Students interested shows include "Dear Emily" this campus ..." in Mast TV production or having year, "Impressions" from Spring their own show should contact 2014 and "Outnumbered" from Allie Reynolds Reynolds at masttv@plu.edu. The Spring 2013. next show will be Oct. 23. Mast TV General Manager News@ Nine is on channel 26 at 9 p.m. Thursdays and is also This story was written in available for streaming online from a link tweeted from @maststudenttv. don't even know we have a television collaboration with Re/and Tuomi. The first episode aired last night and station or a news program here at can be viewed at http://mastmedia. PLU." Reynolds also sits on the Mast plu.edu. This year, station leaders hope to Media Editorial Board and is showcase more than just news. There Online Editor for The Mooring Mast. will be news, sports and a lifestyle She is assisted by Campbell Brett, block for interviews of important Multimedia Editor, and Zachary Boyle, News @Nine Producer.

By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer

people on campus. "I am excited to get people involved with News@ Nine and want to make Mast TV more visible and active on campus through advertising," said senior Allie Reynolds, Mast TV General Manager. "A lot of people

The theme for The Matrix this semester is

Stop & Listen. Take a moment to pause and reflect about your advocacy work, perceptions of your peers and challenge misconceptions and assumptions about Social Justice. STOP & LISTEN: Full Respect and No Assumptions. The deadline is Nov. 10. Send your work to matrix@plu.edu.

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LUTE LIFE 7

FROMT E MATRIX: ADVOCACY too write on occasion, and have been to a few of the placed that were featured in the documentary, including: the Bronx, New York, Paris, Berlin, Jaffa, and Dakar. The documentary showed that each of these places has Pumping through the views of Pacific Lutheran people who articulate through their lyrics what others University is the mission to become advocates within our are afraid to say because of an oppressive government, communities, wherever our college careers may lead us to environmental pressure, unequal rights, and/or fear. be in the world. The beauty and the raw emotion that each of these I believe an advocate is someone who is not afraid to countries' rappers brings to the table, not just as artists but speak up for those who cannot, for those who do not know as advocates for their community, is amazing. how to, and/or alongside those who already are speaking. One group in particular from the documentary that I That is why PLU has the liberal arts education. remember, DAM, raps primarily in Arabic, Hebrew and PLU wants to show each and every one of us that we English. cannot thrive alone; that we are a community. They raise their voices to the Palestinians and to anyone To show that we all have our own perspectives to else who will listen. I knew of the conflict in Israel between bring to the table and to show how to have an academic the Palestinians and Hebrews when I visited there in 2010. conversation with not just our peers, but faculty, and staff. There was a wall that divided Palestinians into ghetto With these classes, PLU broadens our minds with ideas neighborhoods, called the "territories." This experience such as women's rights, gender and sexuality, diversity, gave this song added meaning for me. sustainability, and education, just to name a few. Other countries and their struggles featured in the film But things get more challenging when it comes time to also took my attention. actually being an advocate in the field. One of these countries is France and its ongoing battle One day it dawned on me how scary it can be to face with racial discrimination that results in youth riots against people who are strangers, or even the government. friends and family. Being in the queer Another is Germany community myself, I felt safe at PLU. and the ever-presence of I .never thought that I would need to the Berlin Wall. Although be an advocate within the safety of the "Advocacy is not limited to physically only its ghost Lute Dome. I had not felt oppressed remains, its emotional since high school. And there I was, in the protests and picketing at presence still divides the Aglio line for dinner, tired from the battle Berlin citizens. rallies. It is our voices." of dead week and still recovering from third country A my first final. All of the sudden, the guys that caught my eye was behind me start shamelessly bantering Senegal. Featured here was amongst themselves, including slurs the influence of French towards the queer community and and British colonizers, towards women in their conversation. They said things evidenced by a culture diluted from Westernization. like "fag New York," "gay-ass Nikes," and "I swear Hillary In each of these countries, the documentary highlighted Clinton is a man." several brilliant rappers. These rappers spoke in many There I was. I could not even tum around to glare at different languages about their struggles as individuals, as them. In fact, I have no idea who was even behind me. communities, and as countries. Their words flowed into a I do not know if they could tell from behind that I am form of expression that allowed space for each and every biologically female, and later it dawned on me that I was one of them to say what they feel needed to be said. wearing Nike shoes. I was stunned. One rapper on the Smithsonian show said, "Even if the There I stood: a Reike Scholar, a Social Justice Director words are in a different language, it is the beat that speaks of Hong International Hall, and a periodic QASU member. to me first. Then the whole nitty gritty stuff on what they I could not even look them in the face or side glance at are saying." · them to show my disturbance. This idea connected with me when M.I.A.' s song Bring No. I just stood there. the Noize became my dead week and finals week mantra. It frustrates me that this happens. We pay $45,000 to be M.I.A., a British rapper, combines in her songs advocacy here and the vocabulary rolling off the tongues of some and awareness of the Hindu religion, the Indian ethnicity, students are of high. school level. Seriously? I was left and the politics wrapped around the lives of the immigrant wondering how I could better advocate in the future . Indian community in England. A week after the incident, I watched a show on the After listening to her quick spits for a week I finally Smithsonian Channel called "Hip Hop: The Furious looked up what she was really saying (mostly because Influence of Rhymes," and things started to "click" for me. I wanted to join along). She was saying the whole time, This show connected with me so significantly because I

By CAITLIN DAWES Matrix Contributor

"Bring the noise when we run upon them. Freedom." I'm coming to realize that advocacy can come in all sorts of packages, including education, experience, and music. I'm also realizing that advocacy is not something that can be thrust upon someone; there must be consent and understanding to what someone is about to delve into, which cannot always be predicted. We cannot rely solely on education to spread the works of advocacy. Perhaps, then, we can u se our own words and experiences. Hip hop, rap, and slam poetry are not the w orks of gangsters, drugs, and money. The hip hop community is more than that. It combines the raw emotions of people like you and me. People of all races, ethnicities, sexualities, religions, nationalities, beliefs. Everything. I want to encourage others to learn from the work of those they do not know and see how they express advocacy for their community. Advocacy is not limited to protests and picketing at rallies. It is our voices. This essay was published in the Spring 2014 issue of The Matrix. To learn more about The M atrix or read other pieces from The Matrix, visit http://www.plu.edu/matrix/.

-

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATRIX

Caitlin Dawes is a junior German major and Religion minor at PLU. She works on campus as Social Justice Director of PLU's Residence Hall Association (RHA), Co-Commissioner of Queer & Questioning (q2) and Campus Ministry St eward. She is also involved with PLU's Queer Ally Student Union (QASU), a member of the Interfaith Council and ·works as a Lead Tutor at Brookdale Elementary with America Reads . She is passionate about advo cacy and community engagement.

From The Matrix: Part of the '.'Through the Eyes of the Women's Center" Story By DR. JENNIFER SMITH Matrix Contributor I resist the notion that men and women are polar opposites. I resist the idea that prejudice and intolerance are inevitable. I resist the sense that change will never occur. I resist the suggestion that resistance is futile. I resist privilege in all its forms .. I resist the stereotype that feminists are ball-busting, humorless man-haters. I resist willful ignorance. I resist a world where violence is normalized and accepted. I resist the belief that one person can't make a difference or that small actions don't somehow change the world. I resist the nefarious - isms. I resist the assumption that the Women's Center is for women only. I resist so that my students, my niece, my nephew, and my friends' children can know a better world. I resist the belief that lived experience doesn't count, that our stories aren't transformative . I resist the temptation to remain idle in the face of injustice. I resist because I don't have a choice. I resist. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATRIX

This piece was taken from the Fall 2011 Matrix. To read more of this story and others like it, visit http:!lwww.plu.edu/matrixl.

Dr. Jennifer Smith is the director of PLU's Women's Center and a professor in the Women's and Gender Studies department. Her academic emphases include Modern & Contemporary British Literature, LGBTQ Studies, Women's Literature, and Popular Culture.

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Con1111ents, questions or requests?· Email us at mast@plu.edu

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

OCT. 17, 2014

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Realize parking ·_problems are widespread Tinglestad lot. The exit gate

--

Dear Mast Staff, I appreciate your column about the difficulties of parking on campus as a commuter student. I learned that we have a parking committee made up of staff and students on campus, which was news to me. As a senior, I had never heard of this before and I think a lot of students who do struggle with parking would be happy to know this exists. I wish this committee would make "drastic changes" to parking that they have failed to do "in years," as Greg Premo and Jennifer Gierke from Campus Safety said. Since there have not been significant changes . to this outstanding problem, I am ·having the same issue of convenience as commuters and staff as an on-campus resident. As you stated in your article, staff and commuters

"My parking spot has is motion censored, so a Lute · Card is not required. been taken nearly My friend, junior Kyle a dozen times this Parsons, said that he thinks the South lot isn't as safe as year " the Tingelstad lot, because of do have the most options for parking on campus. As a student living on-campus, I think this is unfair - so I chose to pay $130 for the academic year to park my car in the South Hall Gated Lot. In this lot, each student is assigned a parking spot number. These nuinbers are painted in the respective parking stalls. Depending on when you register your vehicle, you are assigned a number closer or further away from South Hall. Since I lived in South Hall last year, I knew to register my car during the summer to get a closer spot. To get into the South lot, you must swipe your Lute Card, much like the

the entry and exit styles, not to mention the South lot isn't completely enclosed. People from off campus can - and do - easily walk into the lot. I think Campus Safety needs to have better rules, regulations and parking lots. My parking spot has been taken nearly a dozen times this year. When this happens, I call Campus Safety to tell them the person's South Hall decal number if they have one, their license plate and my parking number. The first time I called, Campus Safety told me to park in someone

else's spot. The second time, Campus Safetj told me an unassigned spot to park in. The third time, I was told to park outside of the South Hall lot even though I am paying more than $100 to be able to park my car in the gated lot. Even though paying the extra money is supposed to "guarantee" me a safe parking spot, I have become increasingly frustrated every time I return back to campus because I don't know if my spot will be open or not. I do not appreciate having to pay the extra money out of my own pocket when I am not getting what I paid for. It is easy to wonder what the point of having rules if they aren't going to be enforced. Taylor Lunka, PLU senior

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CIDEF '

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For more information on committees at PLU including the parking committee, please visit http://www.plu.edu/asclcommitteeslhome.php

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The Mooring Mast

NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS

Raven is Right: Lose the labels By MATTHEW SALZANO

AdEEditor

1...:

Raven-Symone doesn't want to be labeled. She isn't bisexual, lesbian, gay, queer, or African-American. She's just Raven. Symone re-entered the news after being interviewed by Oprah Winfrey, commenting she was tired of being placed in a category to describe her sexuality. "I don't need language," Symone said. '1 want to be labeled as a human who loves humans." Her thoughts can certainly resonate here at Pacific Lutheran University. Last year, the project "My Language, My Choice" pioneered individual responsibility· by highlighting the impact one can have with language used toward others. The message was clear. Words can hurt, language matters and opening dialogue is vital to making communities more inclusive. As individuals, we shouldn't have a right to make labels for others. We shouldn't get to categorize anyone. We shouldn't ask "what are you?" or tell people how "gay" they're allowed to be. Our perception of modem stereotypes doesn't give us any authority to decide for others who

PROTO TO CREATIVE COMMONS

Celebrity Raven Symone and host Oprah Winfrey discuss labels on Oprah's "Where are they now" TV special.

they're supposed to be or how they're supposed to act. Symone took her assertion about labels even farther than stereotypes. "I'm an American; I'm not an African-American," Symone said. "I'm an American. And that's a colorless person because we are all people." Symone believes every American is supposed to be a melting pot. She said she connects with all races, genders, and sexualities - one sole label doesn't need to fit her. She is an American woman named Raven, and that's all people should see her as. Symone' s assertion is certainly beautiful, but there's the question of if we really enter a society where the only way we categorize others is the fact that they are alive and sharing in this universe with us. Labels and categories aren't innately wrong or harmful. If you want to be labeled as Latino, gay,

straight, white, black or whatever you please, then do it. Embracing yourself is what is most important, and if identifying yourself with language helps you do it, then do it. But a society that didn't focus on labels or language could invite a new, unprecedented form of inclusivity. What mattered would be your presence in life as a human being who can serve a purpose. Your gender, sexuality, race, religion - it wouldn't need any label. It would not need to matter beyond how it served the community. PLU should strive to be this community. This message is remarkably in-tune with the social justice messages present on campus. What should matter is that you are here, not what you have been branded as in your past. You are engaged in thoughtful inquiry, service, and care.

Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events. and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast ·reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 17, 2014

OPINION 9

Be informe before donating to breast cancer By LEAH LARSON Guest Columnist October is breast cancer awareness month and the Susan G. Komen foundation is practically synonymous with breast cancer awareness. It raises millions of dollars in the name of breast cancer research and awareness each year. That is where it stops, however. While some of their funds do go toward research and awareness, the rest of the funds go toward notoriously suspicious endeavors. CEO and foundation founder, Nancy Brinker, made almost $700,000 in the 20112012 fiscal year, nearly a 64 percent increase from the previous year . . "This pay package is way outside the norm," Ken Berger from Charity Navigator, said. "It's about a quarter of a million dollars more than what we see for charities of this size. This is more than the head of the Red Cross is making for an organization that is one-tenth the size of the Red Cross." Charity Navigator is a website that

evaluates various charities to determine whether they spend their money in an ethical way or not. It ranks the Susan G. Komen Foundation 81 percent satisfactory. However, multiple other breast cancer awareness charities receive much higher scores. The Rose, a similar organization based in Texas, has a score of 95 percent and Breast Cancer Connections has a 98.76 percent score. The suspicious spending of the Komen foundation doesn't stop there. The Komen foundation has a history of suing other disease-based charities based on their use of the phrase "For the Cure." In a report from the "Huffington Post," The Komen foundation has been found filing legal trademarks against at least a hundred small charities including Cupcakes for a Cure, Kites for a Cure and Mush for a Cure. · This means in the past several years, the

Komen foundation has spent thousands of dollars on legal fees to take out other charities that are dedicated to doing the exact same thing that they are - finding a cure for cancer. If the Komen foundation actually cared about · curing cancer, they would not care about another nonprofit raising money for the same goal. "What I find most appalling about the Susan G. Komen foundation is that they only give 15% of donated money to actual research for a cure," said senior Kellie Blauvelt. "Even though their mission is "'investing in science to find the cures."' Most recently, the Komen foundation partnered with Baker Hughes, a drilling bits company. This seems fairly ubiquitous at first. After all, it's just a few drill bits painted pink. However, there are two major problems with this. Firstly, this is done in the name of breast cancer awareness, but the bright pink drill

bits aren't going to raise awareness because they're buried in the earth's crust where no one can see them. Secondly, these drill bits are commonly used in fracking. Fracking is a process for drilling for oil and gas. A federal study conducted last August by the US revealed that most fracking workers are exposed to large amounts of benzene, a carcinogen. Carcinogens cause cancer, which is something that the Susan G. Komen foundation is working to cure. Not only does the Susan G. Komen foundation spend the money it gets to overpay its founder and CEO, it also does whatever it can to take out other cancer charities and sponsors corporations whose activities are proven to cause cancer. So this year, for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, take donations elsewhere. Give money to The Rose or to Breast Cancer Connections. Do something for the cure.

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Visit http://bcconnections.org/ for Breast Cancer Connections or http://www.the-rose.org/ for The Rose to donate or find out more information on breast cancer, events and resources.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. JS vs. Whitman, 12 p.m.

Santoro Speaks... Don't give up on college athletics By GIANCARLO SANTORO ·

Sports Editor

Whenever I'm asked if I still play soccer for the Pacific Lutheran University Men's Soccer team, the painful answer I always give is, "I played my four years, I'm retired." Of course, at 22 years old, I am not ready

to give up playing the only game I have known my entire life. In terms of being able to play competitively, though, my options are very limited. At this point, my motivation to do so is probably an even bigger problem. After crossing the threshold from being a student-athlete to just a student, it made me think of how grateful I am for my

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PHOTO COUIITESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

experience with collegiate athletics. That being said, it's not all fun and games balancing schoolwork with the responsibilities of being part of a team. It's getting to that time of the semester where being a student-athlete can feel like it's more trouble than its worth. Mid-term exams, projects and presentations are beginning to pile up and spending hours at practice every week isn't going to get that essay written. I am sure, having been through it all, that it's worth it at the end of the day. According . to statistics gathered by the NCAA, there are around 420,000 student-athletes competing across -three main divisions in the United States. Research from the National Center for Education Statistics puts the number of. American college students at 21 million, which means that student-athletes make up only 2 percent of the total college student body in the U.S. Whether you find yourself on a team roster at the biggest school in the country, or the smallest, you are part of a special group with the potential to create memories and

experiences that will never be forgotten. Even though burning the candle at both ends can feel like. more of a chore than privilege, you are actually very lucky. Representing PLU on the field has been one of the best decisions I have made in my life, and it is an experience that 111 cherish for the rest of my days. There's. nothing quite like putting the jersey on and competing with some of your best friends. To be incredibly cliche: whether we won or lost, we were still a team. It was always nice to know that once the dust settled after a loss, we could pick ourselves b~ck up, go to practice and get back to work. So when it's Sunday night and you're trying to do homework on the bus back after a long weekend in eastern Washington, just remember: most college athletes only get four years before retirement.

Football back on track with win in Portland By STEVEN MCGRAIN Guest Writer

..._

The Pacific Lutheran University football team rebounded after a difficult loss the previous weekend against Linfield with an impressive 44-7 Northwest Conference victory over Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Ore. "We came in and played our best football in all facets of the game," senior wide receiver Austin Hilliker said. "Our intentions were not just to beat Lewis & Clark, but to play Lute football." Pacific Lutheran's defensive front was far too much for the Pioneers offensive line. Sophomore Zach Littlefield, Lewis & Clark's quarterback, was heavily pressured on every pass play, which resulted in sacks or incompletions. The Lutes defense tallied four sacks and one interception by senior linebacker Blake Peterson. Their pass completions came on short routes or behind the line of scrimmage, nothing to challenge the Lutes down 'ield, allowing the secondary to keep the receivers covered . Littlefield completed 13 of 20 paos attempts fo r 133 yards

with an interception for the Pioneers. The Pioneers' running game was also nonexistent. The opposition only racked up 54 rushing yards on 33 attempts, which averaged out to 1.3 yards per carry. Part of the reason the Pioneers one-dimensional ground game was unproductive was due to the Lutes' defensive line and linebackers remaining stout at the point of attack. Lewis & Clark's starting running back, junior Josh Bocker, was held to 15 yards on six carries. The majority of their rushing yards came from senior wide receiver Jacob Constantino on passes behind the line of scrimmage, considered a lateral; he totaled 56 yards on eight carries . The Lutes' offense was also back in their usual rhythm on Saturday. Senior quarterback Dalton Ritchey and senior wide receiver Kyle Warner connected in the end zone three times, one coming in the first quarter and the other two in · the second quarter. The third touchdown took place on a play call that Warner could not hear, leaving him to make up a route into the end zone and a reception for a Lutes touchdown.

Ritchey was taken out of the game in the middle of the second quarter, but returned in the third quarter for the opening drive and then was done for the rest of the day. The Lutes quarterback completed 11 of 12 pass attempts for 138 yards and four touchdowns. Warner recorded five catches for 79 yards and three touchdowns. The Lutes look to continue their dominant performance when they travel to Forest Grove, Ore., on Saturday, Oct. 18 for a meeting against the Pacific Boxers.

Oct. 25 N'o


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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 17, 2014

11 SPORTS

Lute volleyball looks to go one step further Senior Amber Aguiar talks NCAA Nationals By DAVID MAIR General Reporter As co-captain of the Pacific Lutheran University volleyball team, senior Amber Aguiar said volleyball is the ultimate team sport because it's impossible for one person to take over a match. Working together and trust are crucial to the success of the team. She believes it's a mental game, so it's vital for the six players on the court along with those on the bench to contribute to one cohesive team. Aguiar has played volleyball every year while at PLU. In the past three years, she's laughed, celebrated in the wins, comforted in the disappointment of the losses, and belted out to "Lion King" songs alongside a group of women she has been blessed to call her sisters. They all support one another and are happy for each other's individual and collective successes, something Aguiar has never experienced on another team. When Aguiar started as a first-year, she got a little bit of playing time as the defensive specialist. Though she was quite intimidated on the court, she was able to gain great game experience. She solidified her position as a primary defensive specialist her sophomore year,

gaining more confidence along with feeling comfortable playing. During her junior year, she earned the position of libero, which exemplified her mentality to be a leader in the back row. She was able to push herself to higher standards, taking responsibility for her new position. Aguiar is now the senior libero, as well as co-captain, where she is working to make a positive atmosphere for the whole team to have as great and memorable experience as she did. This year, the volleyball team has the opportunity to win a third straight NWC title, and coming this far is an impressive feat in itself. Winning a third title would truly illustrate all the work the team has collectively put in this past season. Aguiar sees it as more of an expectation for the team路 than anything else. With the first round of the NWC conference over, Aguiar knows the team can keep the first place spot by continuing to work hard every time they step on the court. Their overall goal, though, is actually based around the postseason. The team is aiming to win the NCAA championship. In the past three years, the team has gone to NCAA regionals, only to be eliminated in the first round . Regardless of the outcome in the

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PHOTO COURTESY OF AMBER AGUIAR"S FACEBOOK PAGE

Senior libero Amber Aguiar (yellow) talks with her teammates during a match. The Vancouver, Wash., native has been a regular starter for the volleyball team since joining in 2011. Aguiar broke two PLU records in 2013 for most digs in a season (589) and digs per set average (6.2).

upcoming postseason, though clearly Aguiar and the team have their eyes set on the championship, Aguiar embraces the fact that PLU volleyball gives support to one another, sparks passion for the

game, and creates friendships that will last forever. Aguiar said she's lucky to have a group of women she can share her fondest memories with, both on and off the court.

~

Women's soccer extends winning streak to seven By CHRISTIAN BOND Sports Writer Gamel At the midpoint of the season, the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Soccer team looked to remain perfect at home against Linfield. Home fans were not disappointed, as they were treated to a 1-0 victory over the Wildcats. The physical game included about every element of weather in the Pacific Northwest. Even a tornado warning issued during the first half didn't stop the Lutes from taking it to the Wildcats. For most of the first half, the ball was controlled by the Lutes. The aggressive style paid off in many opportunities to score off of corner kicks; however, none were cashed in. A little over halfway through the first half, in the pouring rain, a goal was scored by PLU's Emily Hanna, a junior. The midfielder put the ball in the back of the net from just inside the 18-yard box. This proved to be enough to win the game for the Lutes, but the game was far from over. Thunder, lightning, rain and- hail sent fans trying to find cover. On the wet turf, the ball skimmed and skipped quickly, making routine passes a lot harder than usual. With the lead, PLU played a more conservative, defensive style during the second half. A fantastic performance from sophomore goalkeeper Takara Mitsui kept the Lutes in the lead throughout the game. She came up big on several occasions to secure the win for the lady Lutes. The greatest scare from Linfield came early in the second half. A handball in the box gave the Wildcats a penalty kick.

Mitsui stuffed the shot, and with help from her teammates the ball was cleared out, and the scare was over. Linfield was able to get some decent shots off, but none were able to make it past Mitsui. "There are a lot of ways to win a soccer game," said Seth Spidahl, PLU Women's Soccer coach. "Today we had to battle the elements and a senior-laden and experienced Linfield team who stepped up the intensity in the second half. I'm proud of the way we defended, battled and a great save by Takara on the penalty kick to keep the score 1-0. That is how we won today." The Lutes look to remain dominant heading into their next game. "Looking ahead to Willamette, it's a hard working team that tries to out energize their opponents with work rate and physical play. We need to match their energy and aggression and implement a possession style of soccer which will dictate the pace of the game," Spidahl said. Each hard-fought win earned by PLU's Women's Soccer team keeps it undefeated at home. It looks to keep momentum going as it makes a push toward the postseason.

Game2

Pacific Lutheran University wrapped up the first half of the 2014 Northwest Conference women's soccer season with its seventh consecutive victory against visiting Willamette 3-0 Sunday afternoon. With its fifth consecutive shutout, PLU (9-2-1 overall, 7-1 NWC) now has the longest shutout streak since the 1991 Lutes also shut out five-in-a-row en route to the NAIA National Championship. PLU's seven-match winning streak is now the longest since the 1992 team won 12 in a row. After assisting on PLU's gamewinner in Saturday's 1-0 win over Linfield, Kelsey Hathaway scored the Lutes' first goal of the day - the eventual game-winner- on Sunday. Hathaway took a pass from Hannah Bush about 18 yards out and dropped it across into the lower corner of the net to put PLU up 1-0 in the 23rd minute of play . . The Lutes made it 2-0 in the 39th minute when Kelly White scored on a penalty kick. PLU's final goal came in the 80th minute as Hathaway passed to Machaela Graddy about 10 yards in front of the goal and the first-year forward put it in for her third score PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS of the season. Takara Mitsui earned her seventh PLU junior Emily Hanna scored the lone goal against Lin.field on Saturday to give the Lutes shutout of the year, making a pair of a 1-0 win. Since transferring from Highline Community College, Hanna has started every saves for the Lutes. game for the Lutes and has recorded one goal and three assists.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

First -year forward Kelsey Hathaway (5) followed up on her game winning assist the previous day against Lin.field with the opening goal against Willamette. Hathaway also assisted on the Lutes final goal against the Bearcats in a 3-0 win on Sunday.

Bearcat goalkeeper Emily Sewall made three saves while allowing the three goals for Willamette. The Lutes held a 14-12 shot advantage as the Bearcats fell to 2-9-1 overall and 1c6-l in the NWC. PLU holds a three-point lead in the NWC standings ahead of cross-town rival UPS. The Lutes begin the second half of the conference season at home next weekend. They will host Whitman on Saturday and Whitworth on Senior Day Sunday. Both matches are set to begin at 12p.m.

-

Game 2 recap courtesy of PLU Athletics Communications.

Stat Sheet The team's streak of seven straight victories and five straight shutouts are the longest streaks of their kind since the early 1990s at PLU. The Lutes are now ranked 25th in the nation by the National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA).

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 17, 2014

12 SPORTS

Men's soccer falls in Tacoma rivalry match Lutes lose fourth straight NWC game ByGIANCARLOSANTORO Sports Editor

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Pacific Lutheran University's Men's Soccer team succumbed to its fourth consecutive loss after University of Puget Sound's Andrew White scored a goal right before halftime to give the visiting Loggers a 1-0 Northwest Conference victory over the Lutes Saturday on East Field. The 6 p.m. kick-off meant the Tacoma rival match was played under the lights, with both teams needing a win. UPS needed the points to keep the distance between themselves in first place and Whitworth in second in the standings. PLU knew another loss would seriously damage their

~

PHOTO BY JOHN FROSCHAUER

PLU senior defender Kevin Wien heads the ball over a UPS for ward during the Lutes 1- 0 loss to the Loggers. It was the first time UPS has beaten PLU at home since 2011.

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chances of placing in the top two. As with most PLU-UPS match-ups, it was physical from the start. Despite a mostly back-and-forth first half, the Loggers looked the most likely to score first. After some quick play around the PLU box, UPS' ninth shot of the half found its way past PLU goalkeeper, junior Mike Arguello, in the 43rd minute. UPS forward Cameron Lorek found White who gave Arguello no chance with a shot from 10 yards. Despite the Loggers dominating the Lutes in shots, nine compared to two, and comer kicks, seven compared to zero, both teams had it all to play for in the second half. "I thought we came out strong and ready to play," senior defender Bryce Archambeault said. "As the game went on, it was hard to settle the ball down at feet and play our game." The Lutes' main offensive threat seemed to be coming from comer kicks, and PLU defender sophomore Isak Visser almost leveled the score in the 55th minute on a header that was blocked near the goal line by a UPS defender. The game continued to go back-and-forth, with neither side able to conjure any meaningful chances on goal. In the 75th minute, sophomore midfielder Junior Loreto' s comer found the head of sophomore KC Phillips, but to the despair of the home crowd, the ball cannoned off the crossbar. "We ended up just kicking and chasing, which made it really tough for both teams to have possession and made it hard for us to score," Archambeault said. Head coach John Yorke agreed. "We could never find a rhythm and we were missing that one extra pass," Yorke said. "We have to think about the tradition we have here and the pride that we want to continue to uphold." PLU would keep pushing to find the goal that would bring the game to overtime, but the Logger defense held strong to record their sixth shutout of the year. With the loss, PLU dropped to fifth place in the NWC standings with an overall record of 6-7 and 3-4 in conference. UPS kept their place at the summit with a record of 9-3-1 overall and 6-1 in conference. When asked about the rest of the season, Yorke noted . that this year's team is a work in progress. "We are going to try to build for the future with this team," Yorke said. "This was a good experience for them

PHOTO BY JOHN FROSCHAUER

Senior defender Bryce Archambeault shields the ball for the Lutes early in the first half. For the second season in a row, the Lutes have lost four consecutive matches in the stretch of games against Willamette, Whitworth, Whitman and UPS.

[underclassmen] to see what goes on during games like this. We'll try to remember it and hold onto it." PLU returns home for two straight weekends, starting with the visit of Whitman Saturday, Oct. 18 and Whitworth Sunday, Oct. 19. Both games are at 2:30 p.m.

Home game schedule Oct. 18 vs. Whitman- 2:30 p.m. Oct. 19 vs. Whitworth- 2:30 p.m. Oct. 25 vs. Willamette- 2:30 p.m. Oct. 26 vs. Linfield- 2:30 p.m.

Volleyball dominates Willamette on "Dig Pink" night By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor Sporting either bright pink socks or headbands in honor of "Dig Pink" night, an event to help spread awareness of breast cancer, the Pacific Lutheran University volleyball team dominated Willamette in its Northwest Conference matchup from the start of the match. PLU juniors Lucy Capron and Kylai Cooley put on a ~how for the pink-clad fans Friday night after their combined21 kills helped the Lute volleyball team sweep Willamette in three sets at the Names Family Court. "I think it's always important to promote awareness of something other than just volleyball," PLU volleyball head coach Kevin Aoki said. "Anytime we can help that kind of cause, I think its great." Feeling confident about its 3-2 set NWC win against University of Puget Sound earlier in the week, PLU carried the momentum against the Bearcats by taking the first set

by a relatively close 25-18. Feeding off of the arrival of the football team in the crowd during the second set, the energetic Lutes never looked in danger of letting Willamette back into the match. The attacking duo of Capron and Cooley won the points in the second set with the help of seniors Samantha North and Amber Aguiar. After jumping out to an early lead, PLU won the second set 25-15 and went into the break up by two sets. Determined to close the game out, the Lutes put in a complete performance in the third set that saw a number of fringe players take the court for PLU. A flurry of points to start the third set meant the game was always going to go to the Lutes, who claimed the set and the victory by a score of 25-7. "It was great that everyone got into the game during the last set," Aoki said. "It was important to give the kids that work hard in practice and don't get to play a chance to go out in front of the home crowd." North finished the game with 33 assists and Aguiar

finished with 21 digs. With the win, the Lutes are now ranked 17th in the nation and first place in NWC, with an overall record of 14-3 and 7-1 in conference. Willamette fell to 9-8 overall and 4-4 in conference. "Ever since the Linfield game, we have been working on building confidence and team chemistry," outside hitter Capron said. "Tonight's game was out of this world. It felt really good." The Lutes now head to eastern Washington to take on second-placed Whitworth Friday, Oct. 17 and Whitman Saturday, Oct. 18. If the Lutes win both games, they will take a huge step toward lifting the NWC title. "We take it one match at a time, which is something a little cliche like Russell Wilson would say," Aoki said. "We have five home matches in a row coming up, so it will be great i:o have the home support."

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PHOTO BY GIANCARLO SANTORO

PHOTO COURTESEY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

ABOVE: PLU volleyball players celebrate scoring a point against the Willamette Bearcats during their 3 -0 win on Friday the Names Family Court. LEFT: PLU dressed in pink to support breast cancer awareness. The Lutes have now wo11 four straight NWC matches.


NEW ADDITION: How To Sound Smart New weekly article pg. 3

SPORTS Lute Football falls to Pacific pg.12

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE OCT. 24, 2014

OORING

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 5

http:/ /mastmedia.plu.edu

Lutes swap sweaters

Gen-eds Why do we care? By GENNY BOOTS News Writer

PROTO BY RELAND TuOMl

On Sept. 18, Lutes gather in the Anderson University Center to swap and buy sweaters to stay warm for the duration of the UnPLUgged challenge. The sweaters at the event were donated by students. For one afternoon, the AUC became a thrift shop for Lutes.

Fall Career Fair: More than just a meet and greet By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer Walking into a job fair at Pacific Lutheran University is like walking into a rainbow. Booths of all colors and assortments surround students and offer them free candy and swag. Perhaps even a future career could be this rainbow's pot of gold. More than 130 students attended last week's Fall Career Fair in the Chris Knutzen Hall Wednesday Oct. 15, but free items were not the only thing these students sought. More than 55 vendors, including 17 volunteer organizations and 38 employers, were there to offer opportunities to students. The volunteer organizations present included Amepcan Red Cross, Peace Corps, The Rescue Mission and Lutheran Mission Corps. wide variety The employers included of YMCA, Goodwill, Tacoma Community College and Weyerhaeuser. Upon entry to the Career Fair, students swiped their LuteCards and received freshly printed name tags including their majors, if declared. Students were free to wander and interact. Marie Boisvert, Director of Graduate Admission, was tabling

outside the fair for PLU Graduate School opportunities. Boisvert said the job fair is not only a great way to connect employers and students, but that it also coincides with PLU's mission statement. "It can solidify the steps you need to reach your future career," Boisvert said, "but it can also help you find your passion, your vocation." The PLU offices that held the Fall Career F.a ir were Career Connections, the Academic Internships Office and the Center for Community Engagement and Service. T o m m y .&.. Skaggs, Coordinator of Stu d en t Employment and Technology, welcomed students at the swipe-in station at the career fair' s main entrance. "The goal of the Career Fair is to get students to talk to employers," Skaggs said. Some employers return each year. Either employers approach the fair, or they are recruited, Skaggs said. He said PLU also tries to include employers that they think students would like to see at the fair. Skaggs encourages anyone who was unable to attend the Fall Career Fair to go online and check out the Lute Link program. Lute Link is an online database featuring PLU alumni who are interested in meeting and mentoring current PLU students. "With Lute Link, a career fair happens anytime," Skaggs said. Lute Link can be accessed through the Career Connections website, specifically at: http://www. plu.ed u/ career-connections/ alumni/ll-studentinstructions. php.

It's not uncommon to hear the quiet grumbling of a senior on their way to their physical education class or overhear a rant about a religion reading from a group of students at Old Main Market. Even cries of desperation fill the dorms as students struggle through their general education classes. In order for any of the 3,500 undergraduate students at Pacific Lutheran University to graduate, they must fulfill the general education requirements. through Whether this is International Honors or the GUR program, students are expected to fill their schedules with a variety of classes across disciplines. Forcing students to reach outside of their comfort zones can be, well, uncomfortable. Professor Brenda Llewellyn Ihssen teaches a 200-level early Many of Christianity course. her students take the class to satisfy their Christian religion requirement. "I know that more students in these courses will be less invested initially because they will see this as subject matter to 'get over with."' Llewellyn Ihssen said. PLU's GUR programs are managed by two administrating groups: The General Education Council and the Education Policies Committee (EPC) . Both panels are under the scope of the Office of the Provost. The EPC evaluates courses, programs and departments and how they fit within PLU's academic requirements. It's a panel of seven elected faculty members and additional advisory members, including one student representative. The EPC reports its assessments to the General Education Council which oversees all curriculum changes.

The framework that guides the General Education Council, the EPC and all courses at PLU are the Integrated Learning Objectives (ILO) . These principles outline the goals PLU has for all students. such as critical Abilities reflection, expression, and interaction are included among the ILOs. It is the core to PLU's undergraduate education. Hal DeLaRosby, Director of Academic Advising, said general education requirements and ILOs teach students how to learn. Still, students bemoan. General education classes are typically larger classes that are difficult to get into and schedule. The apathy for many general education classes is what DeLaRosby attributes to a checklist mentality. "I think that some students see ·the general education program as a checklist, hoops to jump through," DeLaRosby said, "but the students who view the GURs as something that enhances the experience get the most out of it." Ashley Mercy, -senior Nursing major, is one student who uses GURs to her advantage. GURs can be enjoyable and can contribute to your other classes she said. "In nursing, there is such a set agenda of classes I really liked taking GURs," Mercy said. "One of my favorite classes was my philo~;ophy class, 'Ethics of Food,' where I learned about the link between processed food and chronic health issues. What I learned in that class impacted the way I think about the world and my approach to nursing." The General Education program is here so each student can grow and learn outside of their focus. "Learning what wisdom looks like and how one might use it can happen in a variety of contexts, but it has an excellent chance of success if that process begins in a Gen-Ed course," Llewellyn Ihssen said.

What's lnsideJ ,,,

A&E Check out a review of Lena Dunham's new book

Pg.5

Lute Life Macro art ... what's that? Pg. 7

Sports Women's soccer remains on top of Northwest Conferenc Pg.12

Opinion Eating disorders, thigh gap everything in between Pg.8


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

OCT 24, 2014

Lute care ab'o ut frieiiClship ''Upper ''路an.d ''L ower '' don 't ma tt er E DITOR'S NOTE: Whether on upper or lower campus, students go to Pacific Lutheran University with the expectation to learn, be apart of the community and find their vocation. Upper campus is known for being an artistic hub for musicians, painters and writers. Lower campus is known as a home to the athletes, where being a jock means partying on Friday nights and your dorm is loud past the respectable quiet hours. Art students and athletes have their differences, but at the end of the day, all students are Lutes. The community is strong and friendship is important, no matter the label.

Maylen Anthony路 An upper-campus non -artist By DAVID MAIR Staff' Writer Junior Maylen Anthony lived in Hinderlie Hall for two years and hates upper-campus stereotypes but finds herself caught up in them often. Anthony knows people on lower campus, however, she found herself spending more time on upper campus. In her eyes, the stereotypes are fa irly stup id, yet ring true quite often, because to a degree the upper and lower campuses lead themselves to a level of convenience. Meaning, people live next to things they enjoy, so Music majors live next to Mary Baker Russell and athletes live by the gym. While she was not particularly musically inclined, living in Hinderlie Hall gave her the wonderful opportunity to support and enjoy the music of the friends she made from Hinderlie Hall. The people she fostered friendships with were ones that most of their interests clicked quite well. Some of the friends she had that first year in Hinderlie Hall, she calls her closest friends and is roommates with them. As of this year she declared herself a Hispanic Studies major with minors in Religion in addition to Women and Gender Studies. Anthony has kept herself busy while at Pacific Lutheran University. She's a sojourner advocate for the Wang Center. She became an advocate because shL is passionate about studying away. So far, Anthony 1as studied away to Neah Bay, Wash. and Granada, Spain. Her hope is to study away in London next fall. Anthony is a campus ministry steward who thoroughly enjoys the university congregation. She also plays a character in her friend's popular Mast Media Television show. Anthony enjoys attending activities provided by the Women's Cen ter such as the Vagina Monologues and Sexperts. Beyond her immense involvement at PLU, Anthony has a wide variety of interests. She enjoys cooking, read ing, along with watching all of her fa vorite shows on Netflix. Though she does wish she could play on the Ultimate Frisbee team, she does not consider herself an athlete, mainly due to her lack of hand eye coordination. However, she can't get enough of simply being outdoors where she spends most of her time hiking. She has come to realize that spending quality time 1

Maylcn Anthony outdoors, hiking.

with family and friends is something she highly values. During her time at PLU, she has come to value PLU's dedication to students' vocation. She wants to focus on d iscovering what it is that sh e is truly passionate about, rather than merely picking a job that will earn her the largest sum of money. The kindness from the entire student body, such as being able to walk across campus without opening a door because someone is holding it open for her, is an aspect of PLU that Anthony believes is unlike most other schools. From her two years living in Hinderlie, Anthony found herself becoming aware of the upper campus and lower campus stereotypes. Though she does not appreciate stereotypes, she acknowledges that she often perpetuated the ones of upper campus.

John Morasch: A lower-campus competitor By BROOKE WOLFE Guest Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN MORASCH

Firsl -year John Morasch

Lower campus is known as a home to the "jocks" of Pacific Lutheran University, where partiers live and are looking for more fun than education. The lower end of campus stretches across Morken to the Anderson University Center. Lower campus include resident halls Tingelstad, Pflueger and Foss. First-year John Morasch is an intended business major and a member of the PLU football team living in Tinglestad this year. Morasch cares about his education and all the friends he has made while living there. Morasch enjoys being on the PLU team, he likes to play pingpong and on Sundays he sits with friends and watches Seahawks games. Morasch decided to live in Tinglestad because of its location and number of people who call it home. Tinglestad is also convenient because it is close to the gym and the field where he practices. Morasch describes his hall as lots of fun and easy to meet new people. With seven floors of residents stacked up, there are ample activities and students to meet. "I like to just wander around and ask what's up" Morasch said, because there is always something going on. Tinglestad is home to many football players, so when Morasch comes home he is surrounded by teammates. On weeknights, he is usually seen playing video games, hanging out with h is friends

and listening to music, until quiet hours of course. Morasch is originally from Kent, Wash., where he attended Kent Lake High School. Morasch decided to make PLU his home because of the small campus and close community he saw here. PLU also gave Morasch the chance to play football in college, which is what he wanted to be involved in. Morasch started playing football when he turned six and hasn't stopped since. Morasch is a wide receiver for the team, which is currently 3-2 for the season. Right now, Morasch is focused on his business program classes and is planning to major in business with an emphasis in finance. Morasch is hoping to become a financial consultant after graduating. H is favorite class currently is Business 201: Value Creation in the Global Environment. Along with his business classes, Morasch is fulfilling general education requirements and has found value in his professors so far. Morasch likes to study on the top floor of Morken on the couches. For Morasch, that study space is another attraction to lower campus. Within the first two months of school, Morasch has had the chance to get to know his new team and new home. Even though football season will end, Morasch will remain part of his team. Whether he lives on lower or upper campus, his friends are what is really important.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 24, 2014

NEWS3

How TO SOUND SMART When asked about the Hong Kong protests Protesting? Why?

Occupy central The term "occupy central" is commonly. used to describe the occupy campaign in Hong Kong. The name Umbrella Movement was coined by Twitter user Adam Cotton on Sept. 26, in reference to the umbrellas used for defense by protestors against tear gas. Some protestors are against the name Umbrella Movement because that name has violent connotations.

In September 2014, students in Hong Kong began a separate protest. Students broke into the main government compound in late September and Occupy decided to start their movement early along with the students.

Nqt everyone agrees There is a large spectrum of opinion m Hong Kong over whether or not the issue is important enough to split China in two halves. The protestors want political reform and democratic elections that meet international standards. However, Hong Kong is a businessminded city and some citizens are more con cerned with how the. protests will negatively affect the econom y rather than their democratic rights.

Government officials

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Protestors are on the streets ecause Chinese citizens are angered by the government's ruling on who can run as candidates in elections. The government is limiting the pool of candidates allowed to run for Hong Kong's leader. The candidates are due in 2017.

Protestors have called for the resignation of Chief Executive CY Leung for his handling of the situation, but the Chinese government is continuing to support him. The Communist Party newspaper "People' s Daily" has covered the situation in · favor of " Leung.

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Campus Safety (CSAF) responded to a medical aid call after a student had an allergic reaction. The student's symptoms had diminished and CSAF was not necessary.

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Illegal dru~ at Foss Campus Safe (CSAF) responded to an RA' s c about the smell of marijuana coming from a student's room. The student admitted to smoking off campus but denied marijuana was in his room. The RA and CSAF searched the stu9-er:i-t's ~ ~~-, ttj !__f room and found presmption' ~... r..,.__,,.~ ISii'ri'~ -~-· '""""" drugs belonging to a relative. The incident was reported to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

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Campus safety (CSAF) responded to a call about a Bethel Higfi School student who hit her head on the side of the pool. The student go permission to leave her in the care of her coach.

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Campus Safety (CSAF) responded to a call about the odor of marijuana. CSAF knocked on the door to no response. There was nobody inside but a fan was on.

· 1 I Vandalism in Tinglestad Campus Safety (CSAF) found vandalism in the 2nd floor of Tinglestad. There was black graffiti located on a door in a 2nd floor lounge. The vandalism was documented and a w ork order has been submitted to facilities management.

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Campus Safety (CSAF) was called to MBR because an employee was having a cardiac episode. Central Pierce Fire and Rescue was called arid the employee was taken to St.Claire's Hospital.

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Campus Safety (CSAF) responded to a student's call reporting several items had been stolen from his car. There were no signs of forced entry. Surveillance shows a possible suspect but nothing conclusive.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

OCT. 24, 2014

'SWEET DREAMS' WON'T PUT YOU TO SLEEP By ERIN FLOM Guest Writer .... ·in._ _,, . ~~ · uvoc

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Night of Muskal Theatre 7:30 p.m. Oe:t. 30, 31 .i;ri KHPC

ONLINE TERRAN'S

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The film "Sweet Dreams" will be screened next week at Pacific Lutheran University. It's a perfect fit, as this semester marks the beginning of PLU's Holocaust and Genocide Studies minor.The film follows women of the first female drumming group in Rwanda. Not only does this group break gender roles, but it also brings women together from two sides of a tragedy. Rwanda's two main ethnic groups, Hutu and Tutsi, had strong tensions between them. In 1994, these tensions turned into a violent climax in the form of genocide. Within a few months, more than 800,000 Tutsi were killed. 20 years later, the people of Rwanda are still in the process of reconciliation. The women in the film were only children or young adults when the genocide happened, but they carry the scars of the genocide, some of them literal, said professor Kirsten Christensen of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies program. Through their drumming group, both Hutu and Tutsi women are able to join together. "It's humbling to see these women have the capacity for joy after a genocide," Christensen said. Not only do these women seek their creative goals of performing, but they also

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pursue a business in the form of an ice cream shop called Sweet Dreams to he1p fund their drumming. Christensen said this film examines what it takes to live after a genocide. The film follows the ups and downs of starting a business and allows both Hutu and Tutsi women to tell their stories of the genocide.

"[The film] doesn't sugarcoat anything," Christensen said. Many PLU students had not been born, or were too young to remember this terrible event in history. It's important to remind students of how recently genocide has occurred, Christensen said. The film was an obvious choice for PLU, Christensen

"Sweet Dreams" has connections to various programs, including women's and gender studies, business and holocaust and genocide studies. To help process the heavy topics discussed in "Sweet Dreams," its Academy Award winning director, Lisa Fruchtman, will be at the screening for a Q-and-A. Ice cream will also be served after the film by local business Ice Cream Social.

Weekly Gossip with Terran Go online and get the scoop on, celebrity gossip with our in-lwu.~ pop culture expert, Terran Ward$! Visit mastmedia.plu.eda.

This Week: Kesha's lawsuit ·against Dt Luke f-Or allegedly sexually abusing btr for more than 10 years.

Movies with Michael: ''Gone Girl'' Spoiler alert: reconsider getting married By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer

*****

"Gone Girl" is a dark film that unearths the bad intentions of two partners in a struggling marriage. Ben Affleck ("Argo") as Nick Dunne and Rosamund Pike ("Pride and Prejudice") as Amy Dunne headline the star-studded cast of "Gone Girl" as the world's worst couple. On their fifth wedding anniversary, Amy Dunne mysteriously disappears. As detectives unearth evidence, NiCk Dunne becomes the prime suspect in the case of her disappearance. It's revealed that Amy is framing her husband through a montage where Pike solidifies her Oscar nomination. Amy manipulates others at her whim,

including her rich ex-boyfriend Desi, who she uses for refuge, played by Neil Patrick Harris ("How I Met Yoi.lr Mother"). Harris and Pike have great on-screen chemistry that climaxes with an act of sheer insanity from Pike's character. Nick finds evidence he's been framed, but it appears to be too late as his wife's plot to portray him as a murderer gets national media attention. Nick is branded as cheating, lazy and abusive. Nick, who now loathes his wife, goes on national television trying to bring Amy back hoping to play out his own revenge on her. With this couple, every act of maleficence is responded to with a greater reaction. It appears this couple might remain together, as long as they don't crack each other's skulls open first. Do you think that all of your exgirlfriends or boyfriends are crazy? Well, honey, you haven't seen "Gone Girl." This film was absolutely insane, in a good way. Is it bad that I am now wildly attracted to Rosamund Pike? That explains to all readers that I have terrible taste in women. From the acting to the production and cinematography, "Gone Girl" was unsettling m the best way. I would be shocked if it doesn't receive at least a few Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Director (Fincher), Best Actress (Pike), Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Original Score, and Best Sound Mixin . Al~ough Affleck gave a very strong performance, I don't see him coming away with a nomination in a year with an especially strong Best Actor category. Overall, every aspect of the film was exceptionally strong. "Gone Girl" do_es not try too hard to appeal to the viewer, it simply follows a good story and captures audiences'

attention because it is one-of-a-kind. "Gone Girl" proves that bad people really are meant to be bad together. I would not be surprised if Nick and Amy Dunne spawned the Antichrist. The Dunnes' sinister love left me not able to take my eyes off the screen, even in moments where taking my eyes off the screen would have been better for my sanity. Recently, I was thinking about putting myself back out on the market- single and ready to mingle - but "Gone Girl" makes me never want to get married. I am legitimately worried that the person I fall in love with might end up being just like one of the psyChos in the Dunne family. "Gone Girl" was a stellar adaptation of the book, most likely because the film's screenwriter was also the book's author, Gillian Flynn. Movies often do not live up to expectations books set. Be honest, how many movies have you seen that were better than the book? Flynn's adaptation of her own novel makes me feel like all authors should be hired as screenwriters for adaptations of their work. It clearly worked well in this case. "Gone Girl" was one of the best film-adaptations of a book in the past few years. .


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 24, 2014

A&E5

DUNHAM DELIVERS WITH NEW BOOK

PHOTO FROM CREATIVE COMMONS

Lena Dunham, author of "Not My Kind of Girl,'' being interviews in 2012 at Fortune's Most Powerful Women Conference.

By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Lena Dunham's life - and book debut - is quite a page-turner. At 28, Lena Dunham is the creator and director of the acclaimed Home Box Office (HBO)-show "Girls." She has been nominated for eight Emmy A wards and has won two Golden Globes, and she was the

first woman to win the Directors Guild of America award for directorial achievement in comedy. A few weeks ago, her first book was published by Random House. "Not That Kind Of Girl" is a collection of short essays. The essays in "Not That Kind of Girl" are all about Dunham's experience growing up, how it has shaped her and how it continues to do so. It is by no means a basic chronology of

where she grew up, what school she went to or who she associated herself with. Rather, it's a collection of essays and stories that invites readers into portraits of Dunham's life and thoughts as she grew up. In one essay titled "Emails I would send If I Were One Ounce Crazier/Angrier/ Braver," she writes several emails to anonymous people about things she wishes she could have said. It includes an email to a childhood friend she first performed oral sex on when they were in college. She told him he should have called when her cat died. "Grace," which discusses the loving relationship Dunham has with her sister, tells the story of her sister confiding in her about being lesbian. One essay is simply a list of things she's learned from her mother. One example is that sometimes a dog smells another dog's "tushy," and it just doesn't like what it smells. The collection includes many more hilariously thought-provoking pieces. In this collection, Dunham demonstrates how talented she is as a writer. She eloquently depicts a very real experience of what it is to grow up - especially as a woman. Her witty humor, along with an always-sarcastic undertone, coupled with her much-needed perspective on life enables readers to enjoy her stories while . simultaneously gaining a new frame in which to view the day-to-day. Without a doubt, young women will enjoy reading this book. It's not only relevant but possibly necessary in today's society, where women are sexualized. While it does revolve entirely around a girl's life experience, men could also serve

to benefit from it just as much, if not more. Dunham's writings provide an insight that too often men do not bother to take the. time to gain. Each essay, though hysterical, force the reader to pause and realize that Dunham is pointing out something in her life that is true in others' as well. It's a genuinely great read because of how Dunham is able to pull the reader in so well. "Not That Kind of Girl" is a page-turner from cover to cover; with each essay being a gut-bustingly funny tale of Dunham's life. It reminds any who read it that life is awkward and uncomfortable but full of meaning and joy.

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RE LAND 'A REVIEWS nnnabell e' is. a horror-ble fright fest By RELAND TUOMI Editor-in-Chief

*****

On the heels of 2013's horror hit "The Conjuring," you'd think its prequel, "Annabelle," will legitimately scare you, but you'd be dead wrong. The prequel follows a young couple, Mia and John, and their relationship with the creepy doll, Annabelle, from "The Conjuring." Annabelle didn't play a significant role to the plot in the first movie, so it makes sense to have an origin story for her.

Mia is pregnant and has a vast doll collection, while John is in his residency at a local hospital. They are attacked in their home by the neighbors' daughter and her boyfriend, who are soon shot down by the police. The neighbors' daughter dies in the nursery holding the Annabelle doll. Ever since, scary events happen to Mia and John, even after they move. The film runs much like a typical demon/possession horror movie. There are some good jump scares, but other than that it's pretty predictable: gid gets scared, demon wants a soul, husband

and baby only show up when it's convenient, doll continues to be terrifying and you keep asking why doll collecting is a thing, blah blah blah. One of my biggest petpeeves in this film is the demon itself. Warning: here come spoilers. One of the things about demon and possession movies is the demon is never or barely seen. This adds to the mystery, and therefore the fear. In "Annabelle," you only see the

PLU Presents Green Hills Alone to pursue his music is rooted in his artistry and imagination. Miller regards music as his way of staying creatively active Green Hills Alone, an up- and continuing to be inspired and-coming musical artist in the everyday world. This based out of Portland, Ore., is 路 philosophy also extends into coming to Pacific Lutheran University for the third time on Oct. 30. Chris Miller, aka Green Hills Alone, has formed a lifestyle out of creating and sharing music. Music struck a chord with Miller when he was a child, when he began playing the piano and his song writing. violin. Miller doesn't write about In high school, he switched anything in particular, but over to the guitar and began lets the songs develop by playing in bands with friends . themselves. "I was one of those "You just kind of pick up [musical] kids," Miller said. your guitar, sing, and find Miller has since transformed out what it is you're singing 路 into solo artist Green Hills about," Miller said. Alone. His decision to continue The content of his

By BROOKE THAMES Guest Writer

Green Hills Alone Show 7:30 p.m. Oct. 30 Free in The Cave

newest record developed out of the loss of a family member. Death is the central theme of his new album - seeing it not as something that should be feared, but something transformative. It will be released later this year. To Miller, music is a form of self-discovery and a way of separating from the bustling world around him. His stage name, "Green Hills Alone," is the epitome of that belief. It comes from a line of a poem that resonates deeply with Miller. "Ralph Waldo Emmerson ... has a poem called 'Goodbye Proud World' about saying goodbye to th~ busy world and finding peace in a solitary, natural space," Miller said. Miller says his music

PHOTO COURTESY GREEN !ill.LS ALONE

is his solitary, natural space, and he wants it to mean the same to his audience as it does to him. Miller enjoys performing for PLU students and feels inspired by them. "There's an energy and enthusiasm in people going to college that I get a lot out of," Miller said. Anyone is welcome gather and enjoy a night fun and music with this up-and-coming songwriter.

demon's hand at first, which is great, because it adds to the fear. But then we see it, full body and face . I laughed out loud, it looked ridiculous. There is one light at the end of the Annabelle tunnel, though: there will be a sequel to "The Conjuring" in 2016 directed by James Wan, who directed the first film and co-produced "Annabelle," according to Deadline. Overall, this is a fun, memorable movie. You11 get scared and tense, but easily shake it off in the next scene.


THE MOORING MAST

6 LUTE LIFE

OCT. 24, 2014

School of business unveils new graduate program

By RELAND TUOMI Editor-in-Chelf Finding a job after college is on most students' minds, especially near the end of spring semester. With the new graduate program from the School of Business, it can be easier to get a higher paying job more quickly. The Master of Science in Marketing Research (MSMR) is hosted by the School ofBusiness and will be a full-time 10-month program starting in fall 2015. The graduate program will begin its first cohort this fall and finish in June. To receive an MSMR at Pacific Lutheran University, a student will take 10 classes adding up to 38 credits. The program will guide students as they develop and complete a marketing research project. The classes focus on market research, data collections and synthesizing the data to present a project in June. Four classes will be taken in fall, one in J-term, four in

spring and one in June, so its might feel like a fifth year of undergrad. "I think I might enroll (in the program]," said junior Kyle Parsons, a Business major emphasizing in Marketing and Finance. "You get it in less than a year, so it's really intense, meaning you get a lot out of it. Plus, you can get it really quickly." Applications are due by March 1earlier for international students - and are available online now at http://www.plu. edu/admission/graduate/how-to-apply/ home.php. The program is accepting 20 students and PLU alumni receive a 10 percent discount. An applicant must have a bachelor's degree from an accredited university and a minimum 3.0 GPA. The application also requires a $40 application fee, GMAT or GRE scores, an updated resume, an official transcript, an essay on personal goals between 300 and 400 words, and two letters of recommendation. All of this information can be found online.

This may sound like a lot of work, but compared to other graduate programs around the Puget Sound, PLU's MSMR is much more swift and concentrated. For the University of Washington's MBA in the Foster School of Business, the application requires a $160 fee, three recommendations, seven years of experience, an interview and will take two years to complete the degree. Seattle Pacific University requires a $50 application fee, GMAT of 500 or higher and GPA of 3.2 or higher, five years of post-baccalaureate work, two letters of recommendation and take three years to complete the degree. 'Tm interested in the 10 percent discount, but I also have been here four years already and I'm still not used to living in Parkland," said senior Dania Tolentino, a Communication major with an emphasis in PR and Advertising. 'Td be more inclined in doing it right after I graduate because 111 be 23 and already have my masters. But I might want to go out and get more

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experience and more money before getting my masters." For those still uncqnvinced about the graduate program, professor Mari Peterson, director of the MSMR program, says a master's degree will lead to a higher paying job. "The average mean wage is highest in the state of Washington than the whole United States," Peterson said. "There is a need out there and that need is based on the number of positions and wages earned." And employers are more likely to higher someone with a masters rather than BA. In addition to business majors and minors, interest may come from computer science, communication, economics, math and psychology students, said Petersons. To learn more information about the MSMR program, attend the information session at 6 p.m. this Monday, Oct. 27, in Morken 103.

ALSIN-ST


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 24, 2014

LUTE LIFE 7

Advocate for advocacy By ANGIE TINKER Co -Editor of The Matrix What do the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, the protests in Ferguson and the Ruth Anderson debate on vegetarianism all have in common? They're all forms of advocacy. The word advocacy comes from Latin roots meaning "to speak for." This goes a long way in explaining how advocacy can take so many different forms, as people speak for the issues they care about, from topics such as healthcare, the environment, social justice, politics and more. It's even in Pacific Lutheran University's mission statement, "[ ...] service, leadership, and care - for other people, for [student's] communities, and for the earth." Serving, leading and caring are all essential to being an advocate. Small wonder, then, that PLU is full of advocates. One such person is junior Jenna Harmon, the president of the Grassroots Environmental Action Now (CREAN) club. CREAN has tackled a wide array of

environmental issues, such as trying to stop coal port terminals and encouraging PLU to divest from fossil fuels. Harmon sees the environment in all parts of life. "I always try to think about my impacts personally on the environment and reduce those," Harmon said. "I also try to educate others on ways to be more sustainable through CREAN, and the classes I'm taking will help me to work for environmental non-profits in the future and even this summer." Jumping into advocacy can be hard, though. One on-campus group, the PLU speech and debate team, is interested in helping students learn the skills they need for advocacy. Calvin Home is an assistant coach for the debate team. He believes debate can help people become better advocates for causes they are supporting by "challenging [your] beliefs, giving you the tools to effectively communicate [your] views and by encouraging a culture of sharing and entertaining a wide variety of beliefs and values." The debaters believe it. Sophomore

From The Matrix:

Matthew Aust details one of the unique benefits of debate, arguing for positions you don't agree with. "It is important, if you want to persuade people, to acknowledge that alternative viewpoints are valid," Aust said. First-year Hannah Bates agrees. Arguing new topics and different sides each round has helped her expand her views. "Debate has also simply educated me on global events," Bates said. "Part of being an advocate for something is knowing about it and debate has given me the knowledge to better communicate my own ideas." You don't have to be a debater to be an advocate, but it can't hurt. In the end, it's about bettering the world. As long as there's value in life, we have a responsibility to advocate. "[Advocacy] means, fighting for what you believe, generally for policy and through political leaders, but fighting for what you see as right," Harmon said.

Image Macros: The Poetic Form of the Internet Age

Perspective

By PAM BARKER Matrix Contributor Whitewalls White shoes White cars White people White World Everything growing up was white An Advocate I never dreamed I'd be Perspective colored the sky Love blurred my straight lines Understanding opened a window The fresh air was overwhelming It's easy to think That the world is the way it always will be But that is not the case Because people change And come And go And adapt Perspective is the key I carried unknowingly To unlock the world And its beauty Bright walls Pastel shoes Neon cars Beautiful people Technicolor World

By JAKOB MAIER Saxifrage Co -Editor When asked to picture either a poem or a piece of visual art, people often conceive of two separate works: the visual as a painting on a canvas, a sketch.in a notebook or a photograph in a frame, versus the poetic as a collection of words in black ink arranged on plain white paper. This dichotomy held for years with few exceptions-that is, until the advent of the image macro as a poetic form . The image macro, defined simply, is text placed on top of a picture. The poetic image macro emerged from the image-based online meme tradition. Influenced by movements like pop art, and the work of conceptual artists such as Jenny Holzer, poetic macros consciously took the basic image form of online memes and incorporated artistic elements in order to create a new, internet-based form of poetic expression. Like all robust artistic mediums, macros come in many styles, but generally share a similar mode of presentation: short-form poetry digitally situated within an image in order to create a piece of art that is based on the relationship between the two. As such, they resemble a collage in how they incorporate multiple elements in a single piece. Thriving writing communities of the Internet and post-Internet movements make prolific use of the macro, utilizing its visually arresting and easily accessible form to

" CRYING " BY ANGELA SHIER

Macros are short-form poems digitally situated on an image. This combination of text on art creates art based on the relationship between the two.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEAH LARSON

"TRAFFIC" BY ANGELA SHIER

communicate messages that range from somber to comic, sincere to absurd. Writers post them on Twitter or Tumblr, where their simple and interesting juxtaposition of image and text can garner hundreds of thousands of likes, retweets and reblogs. In this manner, the macro is truly the poetic form of the information-inundated internet age. Image macros abound on websites and online literary journals such as Internet Poetry, The Mall, and Have U Seen My Whale. Recently, they have found their way into print in collections such as Boost House's 2014 release "The Yolo Pages." This collection, also featuring selections from weird Twitter such as @horse_ebooks and flarf poets like K. Silem Mohammad, presents the diverse work of macro artists like Michael Hessel-Mial, Ashley Opheim and Pacific Lutheran University's own Angela Shier, who is one of the founding editors of The Mall. In "Traffic," Shier demonstrates a collage-based approach to macros, creating a three-tiered background of city, Mount Rainier and plain black field on which to foreground the poem. The text follows the slope of the mountain, but uses the mountain's body as a canvas for the poem's climactic line. The poem as a visual object takes place in the mountain's presence in the canvas of the image, but the content of the poem itself also takes place in Mount Rainer's shadow across I-5. In this way, this macro achieves a form of interconnectivity in which each of its elements reference the others in familiar terms. Shier's "Crying" is a more abstract macro form, wherein the text has no visual or emotional connection to its background. This disconnect causes the reader to need to create their own understanding of the link between

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANGELA SHIER

Angela Shier is a Anthropology and Communication major. She works for LASR as the Web & Tech Director and and ASPLU as the Venues Director. She also reads tarot cards. Find her at the mallmag.com, angeshier.tumblr.com, and @angeshier.

text and image - in this way, the abstract macro relies on metaphor to achieve its success and meaning. The image macro is still an emerging and evolving form, initially defined by the. Internet but now beginning to branch out into books, prints and even wheatpasted street art. Its rich combination of poetry and art makes it an exciting form at the crossroads of writing, graphic design and visual art. Be on the lookout for image macros on the Internet, and consider creating your own.

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Pam Barker graduated in 2014. She was a Political Science major, a successful member of the debate team, which was ranked in the top 32 teams of the country and the president of the Resident Hall Association in 2013-14, where she initiated inter- hall cooperation through monthl:imeetings. She is an assistant debate coach at Carroll University in Helena, Mont., where she teaches people to be successful advocates for the issues they find important.

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

OCT. 24, 2014

Educate yourself on eating disorders: Thigh gaps and everything in between By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer

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THE MOORING MAST

Eating disorders are the most lethal psychiatric illness. According to ANAD (National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders), ·up to 24 million people suffer from an eating disorder. This can include anorexia, bulimia and binge eating. This isn't a new topic. Eating disorders have been discussed decade after decade, yet we still don't understand them. "I almost feel like eating disorders is a tired-out topic for some people; it isn't new and cutting edge," senior Ruthie Kovanen said. "I feel like there is a danger in dismissing that and thinking it's not a problem." I believe it's important to draw attention to the ridiculous online culture we have created via media surrounding the encouragement of treating our bodies poorly. Instagram, Tumblr, Reddit, Pinterest and other social media platforms have become ammunition for a constant war a large portion of society is battling. "Why can't we just be satisfied with the way our bodies look and be honest with ourselves about what's really going on?" said Dr. Neeru Bakshi, Medical Director of the Eating Recovery Center of Washington. The Dove body campaign was a fresh alternative to the usual objectification of women we often see in media. I was relieved to finally see a company attempt to alter what we accept as the "norm" for beautiful. Beautiful should be you, not a comparison of yourself to an idealisticphotoshopped image. I was discouraged to learn that internal contradictions prove that loving your body is far from the core message. A beautiful movement was soon discredited once I realized Dove's parent company, Unilever, also owns Axe. If you're unfamiliar with the Axe Body commercials, imagine barely-there clothing draped upon conventionally beautiful women lusting after men. This double standard creates a l_ack of credibility in any uplifting movement they attempt to pursue. We see what we want out of media. If _you want to see recovery stones bemg used to raise awareness, you11 find it. If you want to see "real body" campaigns encouraging all shapes and sizes, you11 find that too. Alternatively, if you want to find unrealistic bodies to compare yourself to, the Internet is plastered with them. Blogs such as Tumblr, Pinterest and Reddit have subsections titled "ProAna" (pro anorexia) or "Thinspiration," which naturally encourage eating disorders. Eating disorders tend to be secretive, so having online eating disorder communities can be empowering and create a sense of community. For example, if someone was aiming to lose a certain amount of weight, and they felt the urge to eat, they could tum to that online community for support to continue their unhealthy abstinence from food. While it is comforting to feel support, there is a danger in a community that would encourage any form of malnourishment. Another danger to this vicious thinking is the recent push to be fit or get healthy. Of course health and fitness are something we should strive for, but we may just need to redefine what "fit" is and what "healthy" looks like. Bakshi believes healthy is a balance with food, exercise and life. This idea of balance is so important. If you are only focusing on the food and exercise, the stress of reaching perf~ction might compromise your quality of life. That is no way to live.

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CIIlEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano BUSINESS EDITOR

Bjorn Slater OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Giancarlo Santoro COPY EDITOR PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

If you feel like you struggle with body image, an eating disorder or low self-esteem, consider visiting the PLU Counseling Center.

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COPY EDITOR

Kaitlyn Hall ONLINE EDITOR

Anytime we are cutting out food, we are treating our body poorly by malnourishing it to some extent. It seems a pattern of eating disorders is often to set a goal for what will allow the individual to feel OK A goal might look like the common buzzword·"thigh gap." This fairly recent trend calls for blank space between thighs. Some may have this naturally, and for those in the media it may be airbrushed. This means that the goal may be entirely unobtainable. As college students, it's not uncommon to feel the pressure to have a slender body. According to ANAD, 95 percent of those with eating disorders are between the ages of 12 and 25. For those of us in that age demographic, we are most likely familiar with the dreaded "freshman 15." In recent studies, it has been exposed as a

in school or work may be potential signs as well. To begin, just acknowledge you've noticed some changes and you are genuinely concerned for them. It all begins with creating a dialogue. It is imperative that you are selective of the words you choose .. Avoid saying things such as "If you just ate you'd be okay" or "If you went on a diet then you'd feel fine ." Being empathetic and willing to help are the best things you can do. Take that extra step to accompany them to the doctor's office or visit websites with them. "Even if there is a hint of a question that you might have an eating disorder, reach out and get some help," Bakshi said. "There is no harm in reaching out and asking or getting an assessment with a professional." Seeking help is nothing to be ashamed of and can only help. Even takin~ a moment to visit websites such as http://www. 1 eatingrecoverycenter.com to ge_t _information can be benefiaal. "You are very strong and you are not alone," Kovanen said. "There are people to help you in this and it's not your fault; recovery is possible." According to ANAD, only one in 10 people with eating disorders receive treatment. Here at Pacific Lutheran University, many resources are available for those looking to reach out. LuteFit acknowledges the relevancy of eating disorders and it's impact upon the college-aged population. They encourage students to seek support from the Health and Counseling centers. As a communit)r, we must understand that eating disorders aren't just about food and they are not about a choice. Not eating isn't the problem, it's a symptom. Eating disorders are a complex issue, emotionally and physically. We need to responsibly use social media to portray ourselves and our bodies. We need to hold advertisers to a higher standard or at the least, acknowledge the truth behind brand messages. "Accept your body for what it is and what it can do for you and the strength and power that it has," Bakshi said. The college age is a difficult time, earning new responsibilities and being thrown into a new culture in which we have more control over our lives. We need to respect ourselves and our bodies so others will too.

"You don't have to be skinny . to h ave an eat•ing d.lSOrd er, •t's not J·ust about the food and it's not J•USt for WOIDen"

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Brittany Jackson

myth that negatively contributes to the influence of eating disorders. "For someone already at risk, it provides mental ammunition to perpetuate behaviors," Bakshi said. It's important to reach out for h~lp because the side effects of eating disorders can be severe. According to ANAD, eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any other mental health disorder and have a suicide rate 50 percent higher than the general population. Physical side effects include osteoporosis, heart damage, hair loss and fertility issues. Many of us, including myself, can be naive to the truths of eating disorders. Bakshi provided some of the most common myths about eating disorders: you don't have to be skinny to have an eating disorder, it's not just about the food and it's not just for women. "Men, like women, feel similar pressures to have a certain body type. I've experienced many male friends consume extreme amounts of protein just to bulk up because they feel like a muscular body type is what they need to view their body positively", first-year Matt Salzano said. If you suspect a friend or family member may have an eating disorder, don't stand by. Indicators may include the individual becoming more withdrawn or isolated. Changes in appearance or performance

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The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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OCT. 24 2014

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 9

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Realize depression is a disease, not a state of mind

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By MICHAEL DIAMBRI Ad E Writer The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that one in every 10 Americans older than 12 is currently taking medication for a depressive disorder. If depression is a serious health issue for millions of Americans, why does our culture so frequently u se the term "depressed" to describe ourselves and others when we're mildly inconvenienced? The person you think of as depressed or miserable could in fact have depression. It is highly unlikely that any .person enjoys suffering from depression. First-year Yadira Avendano has been diagnosed with various depressive disorders. "It's sad how depression is romanticized in o·u r society" Avendano said. "You see people celebrating sadness and brokenness saying they are depressed, especially on social media, but the truth is depression is different from being sad" It's hard for those who do struggle with depression to make others understand what suffering from depression is like. "It's hard to describe what it is like having depression; the feelings and lack of feelings you have. There isn't a way to communicate it to people who don't suffer from it" Avendano said. "People who don't suffer from it say 'cheer·up' or 'snap out of it.' They don't realize that it isn't conditional sadness they are feeling. It is a heavy feeling. There are some days that my brain wants to do something but my body just won't. I am a pretty happy person actually." In the nervous system, neurotransmitters are responsible for causing chemicals to release in the body that give people various sensations. Research done by the scientific and psychiatric communities has shown that neurotransmitters in the brains of people who have depression do not work properly, making it harder for people with depression to feel calm, content, hopeful and prepared. · Today, people claiming they are "depressed" has become just another way of expressing sadness. Yes, people do go through stages in their lives where

they will become sad because of various circumstances, but that doesn't always mean they are depressed. Unlike a sad phase in life, depression is a serious long-term ailment that many people have to struggle with daily. Claiming one has depression has very serious connotations. It should be taken into consideration that this term should not be thrown around the way it is in our society. Living with a depressive disorder makes each day a battle. Although medication helps, many people become dependent on these medications as they try finding the right dosage level to suit their individual medical needs. In addition, missing a dose can prove to be harmful to an individual's mental state. It should also be considered that the

"Triggers are a real issue for depressive people," Avendano said. Saying things along the lines of "You make me want to kill myself," can be difficult for someone with depression to hear. Using phrases like this should not be considered appropriate in our society. USA Today recently reported there is a suicide in America almost every 13 minutes. In the time you spent walking to the university center or to class, there is a strong chance someone has just taken their own life. Suicide and self-harm should, under no circumstances, be used as a laughing matter. Robin Williams, beloved American comedian, took his life earlier this summer. Many people never expected this out of America's funniest man. No one ever

"Being happy isn't easy for everyone, each of us experience happiness in a dif£erent way. " many side-effects of antidepressants often make medicating appear to be a bad idea for many people who struggle with depression. Studies conducted at The Tokyo Institute for Psychiatry and The American Psychiatric Association concluded that people diagnosed with depression are at a high risk rate for suicidal thoughts and actions. A website called http:// allaboutdepression.com/ reports that about 15 percent of the people who are clinically depressed die by suicide. People who struggle with depression have reported that even seemingly insignificant actions, words and events can bring out suicidal thoughts.

expected to hear about Williams' inner demons, the struggles that wrecked him and gave him a feeling of only one way out. It was revealed that Williams struggled with depression for a long time. Words carry power. One thoughtless word can ruin someone's moment, day, week or even their life. This article should not make people become hyperanalytical about how we treat each other. My goal is to remind all of us to be careful to watch our words. One never knows what the true experiences are of the people we engage. If you are experiencing sorrow, do not exaggerate and say you are depressed. It comes off as ignorant to people who truly struggle with this disorder and it makes

their medical problem seem less severe than it is. Avendano gave insight to this saying people who struggle with depression, "should speak up about it or else our culture's thoughts about and the stigma around depression won't change. I want people to know that depression is serious." Pacific Lutheran University has promoted the careful and respectful usage of vocabulary through the "My Language My Choice" campaign. Today, you have the choice to be a positive, caring and conscientious member of society, or you can be someone who is not. Being happy isn't easy for everyone, each of us experience happiness in a different way. Give people their best chance at happiness by watching your words and making the effort to bring positivity into others' lives. I would like to add that if you, or someone you know, is struggling with depression there are many options to get help. For example, PLU offers counseling for people who are struggling with things like depression. Do your research, find out which option would best suit your individual needs. Healthy living and being active are two great ways to start on a road to recovery. Even if recovery is just a state-of-mind, it is a better state-of-mind than hopeless suffering. With all of this stated, remember that one positive word can change someone's day in ways you couldn't even imagine. Please take the time today to spread positivity.

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The counseling center is located on the top floor of the AUC. Open 8 a. m. - 5 p. m. IMonday - Friday. Contact them at 253-535-7206, or at councen@plu.edu.

SUDOKU High Fives

Study Break

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HOW TO PLAY: Sudoku High Fives consist s of five regular Sudoku grids sharing one set of 3-by-3 boxes. Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition. The numbers in any shared set of 3-by-3 boxes apply to each of the individual Sudokus.


THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

OCT. 24, 2014

SPORTS ICORlllABD AROUND THE LEAGUE•.•

Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

5

0

0

3-0

Won5

Pacific

3

2

0

3-0

Won3

Willamette

4

Puget Sound

3

Whitworth

4

2

3

0

2-1

Wonl

0

2-1

Wonl

2-2

0

Lostl

PLU

3

2

0

1-2

Lostl

George Fox

0

5

0

0-3

Lost5

Lewis & Clark

0

6

0

0-4

Lost6

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 25 vs. Willamette, 1p.m.

Women's Soccer TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

Puget Sound

10

3

PLU

10

3

TIES 0

CONFERENCE

STREAK

8-2

Won4

8-2

Wonl

Lewis & Clark

9

4

2

7-3-1

Won3

Linfield

10

3

0

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Won3

Whitman

7

6

2

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George Fox

3

8

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Whitworth

4

10

3-8

Lost 2

Pacific

5

Willamette

2

2-7-1

8

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Lost3

Men's Soccer

VOLLEYBALL: The Whitworth volleyball team completed its first sweep over PLU since 2010 and are tied for fust place in NWC with the Lutes. PLU and Whitworth split wins this season With the Lutes winning the first at home. If PLU wins out, • ~ey will win the conference.

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' :FOOTBALL: Pacific University junior quarterback Warner Shaw rompleted 21 of 24 for 244 yards lmd three touchdowns with no interceptions to lead Pacific to ~ 31-28 win against PLU. Shaw finished the game with an 87.5 eompletion percentage, placing him in the top 50 in the NCAA ~·

. •

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

10

3

2

7-1-1

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Willamette

10

4

7-1-1

Won 4

Whitworth

11

2

6-1-2

Won 1

Linfield

6

6

4 -4 -1

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Pacific Lutheran

7

8.

0

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7

8

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5

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WOMEN'S soc:c~: University of Puget So-and JUDIOr forward j Amalia Acorda-Fey sc~red three 11 goals and two game winners over• the weekend as the Loggei:s won ': games against Whitworth and h Whitman. UPS is tied with PLU . atop the NWC standings.

Lost6

WINS

Puget Sound

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 25 us. Willamette, 2:30 p.m.

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Information taken from http://www.nwcsports.com/landinglindex

TEAM

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Pl ,U

15

4

0

8-2

Wonl

Whitworth

15

5

0

8-2

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Puget Sound

8

11

0

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Linfield

1

8

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6-4

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Willamette

10

9

0

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10

9

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8

11

0

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George Fox

3

17

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2- 8

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Pacific

5

13

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1- 9

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.

Lewis & Clark

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 24 us. George Fox, 7 p.m.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 25 us. George Fox, 12 p.m.

Santoro Speaks... Domestic abuse rampant in professional sports By GIANCARLO SANTORO · Sports Editor

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As we start to get into the tail-end of October, it may surprise many of you to know that October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Unfortunately, it may not be as much of a surprise that a number of talented professional athletes are currently either on trial or being investigated for domestic violence. One high-profile example is Ray Rice, 27, a former running back for National Football League team Baltimore Ravens. Rice is accused of knocking out his wife, who was his girlfriend at the time, and dragging her unconscious body onto the street, all of which was recorded on a security camera. The NFL' s response was to suspend Rice indefinitely. He was also cut from the Ravens and is awaiting trial in November. Hope Solo, 32, the starting goalkeeper for the United States Women's National Soccer team, is also awaiting trial in early

November after being accused of assaulting her half-sister and 17-year-old nephew while intoxicated. These two situations show that domestic violence is gender-blind. It also shows some athletes never learned the rule "don't hit," in pre-school. There are differences in the two cases, however, mainly in the fact that Rice was caught on video versus Solo whose charges are written up on a police report. While .Rice's foolishness is practically an open-and-shut case, his lawyers are preparing to argue that he should be reinstated into the league and only serve a six game suspension, the maximum number according to the NFL' s domestic abuse policy. Meanwhile, Solo, who faces up to six months in jail if found guilty, has been representing the U.S. at the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship, and started in goal as early as a week ago. All of this begs the question of why any sort of no tolerance policy regarding domestic and sexual abuse has not been drafted in American professional sports.

Of course, every situation NFL's Relative Arrest Rates is different, and the law Arrest rates relative to national average for men ages 25 to 29 "innocent . until proven 40 50 10 20 JO guilty," should be followed. If an athlete is on trial, Gun-~~a::.t~o~~;1:1:~~ t':L;:;;:r;';'t;;Jh ';;~'::;;:=; ' ar..:.w surely the m:uumum penalty is that he or she Sex offense t=:==:=.::=-==:--:-..u. should be banned from Murder ' practice and games. DUI i By not banning these Prostitution " r players, it sends a message Disorderly conduct ·. "' ·. ;, that athletes are exempt from punishment the rest of society faces. It's hard to measure the damage that is done to the image of the player and the team the player represents in situations like this, which is probably also why it is so difficult to come up with a minimum amount of time GRAPIDC COURTESY OF FIVETHIRTYEIGHT an athlete should serve a to follow the rules is to hit them where it ban. hurts. Double digits usually do the trick. By taking them off the field. Surely 10 games should be considered, because the only way to teach athletes

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Seattle Seahawksjust don't look the same By AUSTIN HILIKER Guest Writer

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One year ago, the Seattle Seahawks sat atop an impressive 6-1 record, where they utterly dominated almost every team in all three phases of the game offense, defense and special teams. By the time the regular season was over, the Seahawks. were the favorite to make it to the Super Bowl, and in regard to that game, well, just look at the ring running back Marshawn Lynch has. Fast-forward to the current 2014-2015 season and critics are now talking about how the Seahawks will struggle to even make the wild card spot in the NFC. Intense locker room issues led to the trading of standout wide receiver Percy Harvin to the New York Jets just last week, creating a media storm hours prior to the Seahawks 28-26 loss against St. Louis. A verbal outburst by wide receiver Doug Baldwin, "we have to quit BS-ing ourselves," after losing to the Dallas Cowboys on week five shows that cracks are starting to form in the Seahawks previously impenetrable armor.

It seems that being the defending Super Bowl champions is much harder than most people thought. Add all these problems together and we have a dismal Seahawks team on a two-game losing streak, struggling to find their true identity and in a mad scramble to figure out who will replace Harvin in the line-up. It seems that every team that wins a Super Bowl one year, struggles at one point during the next season with these kinds of issues. The almighty Baltimore Ravens with Hall-of-Fame linebacker Ray Lewis didn't make the playoffs following the Ravens' Super Bowl win during the 2012-2013 season, and it shocked a lot of people. With all this said, is there any sort of solution? Indeed there is. And it involves Marshawn Lynch. During the three losses that the Seahawks have endured this season, Marshawn Lynch only touched the ball 18 times or less: six times against San Diego, 10 times against Dallas and 18 times against St. Louis. When Lynch touches the ball 20 tirii.es or more, the Seahawks have won every game by at least six or more

points. Coincidence? I think not. Lynch is one of the most dominant running backs in the league at the moment, and to not give him the ball just seems absolutely ridiculous. Being a defending champion seems to really have put a target on the Seahawks' backs and based on their performances during this year, these attacks by their opponents are really starting to beat them down. Thank goodness we haven't even hit the halfway point of the regular season, and there is still time for the defending champions to turn things around. Let's just hope Lynch can get a few more carries and in turn take our beloved Seahawks back to where they belong. . Back on top.

·~


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 24, 2014

11 SPORTS

Volleyball swept Friday, rebounds Saturday Lutes share summit with Whitworth in NWC From ATHLETICS

COMMUNICATIONS Gamel The Whitworth Pirates completed the sweep of seventeenth nationally-ranked Pacific Lutheran University on Friday night with scores of 21-25, 20-25 and 21-25. It marked the first time the Pirates have swept the Lutes since 2010. PLU and Whitworth now share first place in the Northwest Conference standings with each team owning a 7-2 record. PLU is 14--4 overall, while Whitworth is 14-5. A Lutes offense that is not familiar with double-digit kills was limited in this match. Junior Lucy Capron and senior Amy Wooten tallied eight kills each while senior Ariana Judson and junior Kylai Cooley added six apiece. Judson led with a .294 attack percentage. Senior Samantha North guided the Lutes with 27 assists and senior Amber Aguiar led with 19 digs while Capron added 16. PLU finished with a .106 team attack percentage while the Pirates were limited to a .180 clip. Whitworth's defense posted 14 blocks in comparison to PLU's nine.

For the Pirates, sophomore Brenna Broil led with 11 kills and a .292 hitting average. First-year Cassandra Mendoza added 11 kills while sophomore Haley Vick contributed 10. Junior Maddye Dinsmore tall.i ed 37 assists and junior Elizabeth Ginley led with 18 digs. Following a 4-4 tie in the first set, Whitworth scored 12 of the next 16 points to pull ahead 12-6 on its way to a 25-21 Pirates set victory. In the second set, the Lutes came from behind to push a 10-10 tie. The set remained tightly contested from there, but the Pirates would score eight of the final 12 points to take the 25-20 victory. Both teams battled it out in the third set as it featured 11 tie scores. With a 7-6 score, PLU took possession of the lead for the first time in the match. The Pirates would jump ahead only to once again relinquish the advantage to the Lutes. With the score 21-20 in PLU's favor, the Pirates rallied for the final five-consecutive points to take the 25-21 set victory and complete the sweep of Pacific Lutheran. Action continued on Saturday night when PLU traveled to Walla Walla, Wash. to matchup with Whitman.

Game2 No. 17 Pacific Lutheran University and Whitman battled it out in five-sets on Saturday with the Lutes taking the 3-2 victory with scores of 22-25, 25-16, 21-25, 25-19 and 15-6. PLU advanced to 8-2 in Northwest Conference play, 15-4 overall while the Missionaries are 4-6, 8-11 overall. The Lutes remain tied with Whitworth for first place in conference standings. PLU junior Lucy Capron led the Lutes with 24 kills while senior Samantha North guided her offense with 46 assists. Both Capron and North added 13 digs while libero Aguiar led with 29. 路 Junior Michaela Edgers accounted for eight of the team's 19 total blocks, adding five kills with no errors in 10 attempts. The Lutes limited Whitman to a .056 team attack percentage. "One word: GRIT," head coach Kevin Aoki said after the match. "Capron lit it up but Edgers was the difference maker. The team played with so much heart." The Lutes took a 14--11 lead in the first set only for Whitman to put up a six-point rally, shifting the momentum in its favor. PLU pushed a 22-22 tie, but the Missionaries recorded the last three points

to take the 25-22 win. In the second set, the Lutes owned an early 3-0 lead and would never trail the Missionaries, eventually taking the 25-16 set victory. The third set was tightly contested, featuring nine tie scores. Following a 18-all score, Whitman put away seven of the final 10 points to win the set 25-21. With the 16-12 score in Whitman's favor in the fourth set, PLU initiated a momentum shift and scored 13 of the final 16 points to tie up the match and push a fifth set. The Lutes kept their pace in the fifth, scoring the first five points on their way to the 15-6 final score that secured the five-set victory. After much time spent on the road, PLU volleyball returns home to play fiveconsecutive matches on their home court in Olson Auditorium. The Lutes will host George Fox and Linfield on Friday Oct. 24 and Saturday Oct. 25. Both games are set for 7 p.m.

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Men's soccer splits games against the Whits By CHRISTIAN BOND & DEBORAH CABANOS Guest Writers Game l Looking to make a run toward the top of the table to end the season, the Pacific Lutheran University Men's Soccer team took out the Whitman Missionaries in its Northwest Conference game at East Field with a 2-0 victory. Hovering around .500 midway through the season is not really a place any sports team wants to be, but that's the position the Lutes found themselves in heading into the game on Saturday. Early in the game, a controversial no call got both Lute players and fans fired up. Whitman senior goalkeeper Niko Contos came out of the box after a ball that PLU first-year Joel Frykholm was . going after. This resulted in a huge collision between the two athletes just outside the 18-yard box. No card was issued to the Whitman keeper, sending Lute players into a frenzy. Frykholm had to leave the game with an injury. In the first half, the Lutes came out aggressive. Near misses from first-year Eddie Na and sophomore Christian Nesselquist were encouraging, and the Lutes were getting the looks they wanted. In the 33rd minute, junior Jordan Downing was chasing down a ball going towards the goal. Contos made an effort to knock the ball away to safety with a slide tackle before Downing could reach it. Taking place inside the Whitman 18-yard box, the keeper got everything but the ball, resulting in a red card, leaving the Missionaries with only 10 players. Whitman's back-up goalkeeper, senior Stuart Ellsworth was substituted in to take Contos' place in goal. The red card resulted in a penalty kick for the Lutes which sophomore Diego Aceves drilled into the top right comer of the goal. The Lutes lead the Missionaries 1-0 at halftime. PLU did not let off the gas p<:!dal. In the second half, during the 69th minute, senior Justin Manao skipped a ball past the keeper for another goal. First-year Bennett Bugbee set up the opportunity for his teammate with a nice pass. Manao was able to tum and fire from the right side of the goal, and get it past the keeper in the bottom left comer. This game didn't consist entirely of PLU offense. The defense was able to keep Whitman off the scoreboard to record a rare shutout for the Lutes. PLU junior goalkeeper Mike Arguello brought both saves and leadership to the Lutes. Commands from Arguello to his defense about where to be on the field helped the Lute defense stay organized and keep Whitman off the scoresheet.

Game2 Eager to build off of their win Saturday against the Whitman Missionaries, the Pacific Lutheran University Men's Soccer team entered the field hoping for another win. Unfortunately, the Whitworth Pirates came out with the win, inching by the Lutes with a 4-3 score. The first 30 minutes started slowly, with neither team able to score. The action started picking up when the Lutes scored the first goal. PLU seniors and co-captains Justin Manao and Kevin Wien worked together to bring the Lutes on the scoreboard in the 31st minute of the game. Manao whipped in a free-kick with Wein making a clean kick to get the ball into the goal. It was Wein' s first goal of the season. Their 1-0 lead was cut short when Whitworth scored two penalty goals in the following ten minutes. The first one was scored by junior Michael Ramos in the 36th minute of play. The next penalty was scored by sophomore Sam Engle, giving the Pirates a 2-1 lead going into halftime. The intensity level of the game skyrocketed after halftime. In the 51st minute of play, Engle scored again from a comer kick by sophomore Spencer Wolfe to bring the Pirates up to a 3-1 lead. Whitworth junior Tyler Clarke scored a goal with the 路 help of junior Robby Uben. With the Pirates scoring yet another goal, it brought them to a substantial lead of 4-1. With the intensity building on the field, spectators observed a lot of unfair calls made by the referee. However, the Lutes did not let the crowd put them off their game. 路 "The referee is something that we cannot control so we should focus on the things that we can control and get past ill of that," Wien said. With the pressure to score mounting by the minute, the Lutes fought hard to redeem themselves. Within five minutes, first-year forward Eddie Na scored two goals to cut down the Pirates' lead. Na proved his skill and speed by going around Whitworth' s defense to make a goal in the 75th minute of play. Manao contributed to the last goal of the game when he provided the assist for Na to score in the 79th minute. "The last 20 minutes brought us together and it showed how much of a team we are and how we fight for each other," junior defender Luke Martinson said. As time was running out, the Lutes tried their best to tie the score. Unfortunately, there wasn't enough time as the Pirates' defense retaliated by taking control of the ball. The clock ran out of time, giving Whitworth the 4--3 victory against PLU.

.,,

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

PLU senior midfielder Justin Manao passes the ball between two Whitman defenders during the team's 2-0 win on Saturday. It was Manao's first goal of the season. Manao finished the weekend with two assists against Whitworth in PLU's 4 -3 loss Sunday.

This loss for the Lutes gives them a 4-5 conference record with Whitworth at a 6-1-2 conference record. The Lutes will return home next weekend against Linfield and Willamette on Saturday and Sunday, respectively. Both games will start at 2:30 p.m.

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Game 1 by Christian Bond and Game 2 by Deborah Cabanas

Final Home Games Oct. 25 vs. Willamette- 2:30 p.m.

Oct. 26 vs. Linfield- 2:30 p.m.

*Oct. 26 game is Senior Night. Seniors Justin Manao, Kevin Wien and Drew Sadowsky will be honored prior to kickoff.

-路


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 24, 2014

12 SPORTS

Women's soccer still tops NWC despite loss Underclassmen lead team to win on Senior Day By DAVID MAIR General Writer Game l

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Pacific Lutheran University' s Women's Soccer team went up against the Whitman Missionaries on Saturday at East Field, and despite taking the lead first, the Lutes ultimately fell 2-1 in its Northwest Conference game. Prior to the match, the Lutes sat nicely atop of the NWC conference standings and was ranked 25th in the nation. Whitman, on the other hand, was only ranked fourth in the NWC conference, with a 4-2-2 record. "Whitman played good on the day with one player scoring two special goals," said PLU head coach Seth SpidahL "We probably deserved a second goal to tie the game but it just didn't happen. Sometimes that is just soccer." The Lutes came out strong with the whole team sporting pink socks in support of breast cancer. At the 10th minute of the game, sophomore forward Kaylie Rozell scored from about 10 yards out with the assist from first-year forward Kelsey Hathaway. Unfortunately for the Lutes, after the goal the energy seemed to slip away as Whitman took control of the rest of the first half. In the 38th minute, Whitman scored, ending the first half tied at 1-1. "They [Whitman] were really good at possessing the ball, they connected well with each other and were very fast," Rozell said. "As a team I think we struggled a little bit in the end of the first half, but came back better in the second." To the dismay of the Lutes, the Missionaries came out even stronger in the second half, scoring almost immediately from about 18 yards out in the 53rd minute. At the 87th minute, Hathaway went for what would be the final attempt on goal for that game and missed . The game ended with Whitman taking the win, 2-1. "Even though we were down, we never stopped working hard as a team," Rozell said. "I think we finished the game out strong even though we didn't come out with the win." Despite losing its three point advantage atop the NWC, Spidahl found positives in the loss. "I told the team the good thing about winning is you're winning, and the bad thing is the target grows bigger with

each win," Spidahl said. "Sometimes we have to take a step backwards to continue to move forwards." The Lutes faced off against Whitworth the following day.

Game2

Throughout the second half of the game, the Lutes continued with great momentum and strong defense, leaving the Pirates unable to score at all for the rest of the game. It didn't stop there, though, for PLU. In the 80th minute forward Machaela Graddy won the ball from a defender and went on to beat the goalie, sealing the game for the Lutes at 2-0. With the win, the Lutes are tied with University of Puget Sound for first place in NWC with a record of 8-2 and 103-1 overall. Whitworth fell to 3-8 in conference and 4-10-1 overall. PLU will head south to Oregon to face off against George Fox, ranked seventh in NWC, on Saturday Oct. 25 and Lewis Clark, ranked fifth in NWC, on Sunday Oct. 26. Both games are at noon. . The Lutes have the potential to take a big step toward the NWC title when they host UPS at home on Oct. 29, something the team is getting ready for. "We are very excited to take on UPS at home," Warner said. "I think it's our year to take the conference."

Under the blazing sun, the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Soccer team was looking to get back to winning after its seven-game streak was snapped with a loss the previous day against Whitman. The Lutes faced off against the Whitworth Pirates and came away with a 2-0 win Sunday. Prior to the game, the team honored seniors Blake Warner and Hannah Bush for their contribution to the women's team in a Senior Night ceremony. "My attitude going into the game was just to play hard for each other and not to worry about losing the day before," Bush said. "I thought losing sort of gave us a good idea of the challenges ahead and that other teams are going to come out hard for every game and we need to be ready." The Pirates maintained control at the start of the game, though the Lutes' defense was enough to keep the Pirates Giancarlo Santoro contributed to this article from scoring. 路 Closer to the end of the first half the Lutes finally got their sea legs, pushing back with great momentum. In the 25th minute, first-year forward Machaela Graddy took a great shot at goal. Not long after, in the 31st minute, first-year forward Kelsey Hathaway saw her attempt at goal miss wide. While the Lutes couldn't score a goal in the first half, they kept up consistent ball movement among each other. Finally, in the 34th minute, sophomores Lena Moreno, defender, and Kaylie Rozell, assisted forward, in an PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS amazing goal off a comer kick. The women's team poses with seniors Hannah Bush and Blake Warner during the The first half el).ded with. Senior Night ceremony. Both players were honored for their four -year contribution to PLUup 1-0. the team prior to kickoff against Whitworth on Sunday.

.Football stunned by Pacific, lose second game in NWC '""

By STEVEN MCGRAIN Guest Writer

1...::..-...

The Pacific Lutheran University football team played out an unorthodox Northwest Conference game against Pacific University on Saturday, falling to the Boxers 31-28 for the first time since 1972. PLU's defense faced off against a strong Pacific offense who simply played their best football at home in Forest Grove, Ore. Pacific's junior quarterback Warner Shaw did not throw an incompletion until the third offensive drive and marched to a touchdown on the Boxers' opening drive. Shaw completed 21 of 24 pass attempts for 244 yards and three touchdowns. Regarding the play of Shaw, PLU senior safety Derek Kaufman said, "his ability to extend plays and elude our pass rush, gave them an opportunity to continue drives." Pacific dominated the time of possession due to the inability of the Lutes to force a fourth down. The opposition would find themselves in a third down PHOTO COURTESY OF PACIFIC UNIVERSITY'S ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS situation 15 times throughout the span of the game, Pacific University quarterback Warner Shaw carries the football against the PLU defense during the Boxers 31- 8 upset win over the but PLU's defense could not get off the field, as Pacific Lutes. It was the Boxers' first win over PLU since 1972 and the t eam is tied for first place in NWC with Linfield with a record of 3- 0. PLU converted 11 of those 15 attempts into first downs. di-opped to 1-2 in conference. On the other side of the ball, I:L U' s offense only converted three out of eight attempts at a first down, resulting in the to consistently gain 5.5 yards per carry," PLU junior offensive Boxers controlling the time of possession by nine minutes. lineman Cody Erp ling said. "We just ran out of time in the end." Lute senior quarterback Dalton Ritchey had an uncharacteristic With the loss, PLU drops to 3-2 on the year, the two losses outing. coming in NWC competition making a chance at the playoffs Ritchey, who averages 153 passing yards per game, recorded nearly impossible after reaching the postseason the last two -The Lutes have had two or less 127 yards and his main target, senior wide receiver Kyle years. Warner, accounted for 105 yards. Northwest Conference losses Pacific continues its surprising run up the NWC and is 3-0 in The one thing the Lutes quarterback does throughout the conference and 3-2 overall. progression of the game is spread the football around to multiple every year for the past five seasons. "At the moment, we are focused on playing Willamette this receivers. On average he finds six different playmakers, but week, nothing more, nothing less," PLU senior wide receiver Saturday he only targeted four. Austin Hilliker said. Ritchey finished the game completing 14 of his 25 pass -The last time PLU lost more than PLU welcomes the Willamette Bearcats to Sparks Stadium in attempts for 127 yards and three touchdowns. Tacoma, Wash., on Saturday, Oct. 25. ~ck.off is at 1 p.m. two NWC games was in 2009 Senior tight-end Lucas Sontra recorded his first touchdown of the season. when the team finished 3.:. 3. "We performed well, we pass blocked well and were able

Stat Sheet

-.-


SPORTS _ Lutes take historic 56-14 win over Willamette pg.11

Review: Taylor Swift's "1989" pg.5

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE OCT. 31, 2014

OORING

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 6

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

ole Day explodes into actio

PHOTO CREDIT: GENNY BOOTS (ABOVE) AND MILES RADFORD (RIGHT)

Pacific Lutheran University hosted a Mole Day Eve celebration Oct. 23. The PLU chemistry department and Chemistry Club worked together to put the event on for students to celebrate chemistry. The events included chemistry experiments, making sweet treats like caramel apples (above) and, of course, blowing things up(right). Mole Day is celebrated annually at PLU and worldwide in honor of Avogadro's Number 6.022 X 1023, which is a basic measuring unit in chemistry. Mole Day was created to foster an interest in chemistry.

"Sweet Dreams" inspires PLU students What's Ins By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

The Pacific Lutheran University community had the chance to experience something sweet on Tuesday night, both with film and with ice cream. The Holocaust and Genocide Studies program's fall event served in remembrance of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda by screening the film "Sweet Dreams," followed by discussion and an ice cream social. "Sweet Dreams" is a by documentary Rob and Lisa

Fruchtman about the only all-women drumming troupe in Rwanda. The women in the drumming troupe open their own ice cream shop in Rwanda after partnering with some businesswomen in Brooklyn. All this is done while the women in Rwanda continue to deal with the many challenges of life post-genocide. , A crowd of more than 220 people attended the screening of the documentary in the Anderson University Center Regency Room at 7p.m.

After the film, which is about an hour and a half in length, there was a Q-and-A session with director Lisa Fruchtman, who said she was very pleased with the screening at PLU. "I was thrilled to see so many people and I hope they benefited," Fruchtman said. "It was great to see such a full house." Rachel Diebel, PLU junior, said the audience was very reactive.

CONTINUED ON PAGE3

A&E Preview: Night of Musical Theatre pg.5

Opinion Campus policy on e it might surprise yo pg.8

Lute Life 'Untitled Poem' from Saxifrage pg.7

Sports Volleyball sweep路s G Fox and Linfield pg.12


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

vs â&#x20AC;˘

World News

Trending:

A rivalry built on culture By GENNY BOOTS News Writer

STATISTICS Percent of applicants accepted:

PLU: UPS:

75% 85%

Tuition per year:

Full-time undergrads: ?

PLU Crime Rate and statistics: (Per lOOK people)

PARKLAND: Crime Index: Violent Crime: 312 Property Crime: 4,816 Total Crime Index: 5,128

TACOMA: Crime Index: Violent Crime: 797 Property Crime: 6,349 Total Crime Index: 7,146

Ten miles separate Pacific Lutheran University and University of Puget Sound, but apparently the separation pertains to much more than sharing a city. "Everyone at UPS hates people from PLU," UPS senior Kenji Senkito said. Methodist and Lutheran, North End Tacoma and Parkland, intellects and dumb jocks, all shape up to the Loggers versus the Lutes. These exaggerated stereotypes and "us-versus-them" mentality are nothing new for a cross-town rivalry. The relations between UPS and PLU have been smoldering for years on the fields, courts and in the stands. The rivalry is a story that has graced the plots of. movies, television shows and annals of history. PLU and UPS certainly fit the bill. Located about 10 miles from each other, the origin of the rivalry is attributed to proximity. "It's a regional rivalry, two small D-III schools battling it out for top dog in Tacoma, trying to find their niche," UPS senior Reilyn Garton said. However, the back and forth between the two schools is rooted more in their similarities than differences. Both have similar student populations and demographics. They are both liberal arts universities in the Pacific Northwest and the Loggers .appeal to the same application pool as the Lutes. Many of the athletes playing at either school were recruited by the either because the schools share the same high school athletes to pick and choose from. Those who are from the area have friends and former teammates that play for both schools. This makes for intense and highly anticipated athletic match-ups. The most recent UPS and PLU face-off was Oct. 29 when the women's soccer teams played a heated game at PLU. The teams

OCT 31, 2014

battled for first place in conference and the Lutes took the victory 3-L This game marked the first time women's soccer has beat UPS since the 1980s. ""One of the reasons it's such a rivalry is because we are two of the better teams," PLU head soccer coach John Yorke said. "When it's you r natural rival, the-proximity of the schools, and with two very good programs who beat each other makes it an intense game." In most years, the Lutes and the Loggers battle each other for the conference championship. The next time UPS and PLU meet will be on the football field Nov. 11. The Lutes have been nearly undefeated against UPS since 1988, losing once in 2005. This hasn't stopped the Loggers in their hopes to beat PLU. "For our summer practice jerseys we put the date of our PLU game on the front We get really prepared for it," UPS sophomore Steven Branham said. Branham said there has been animosity between the two teams. "Every year we play for the Tacoma Totem Pole, but [the PLU] coach won't even bring it out anymore," Branham said. -The rivalries between all athletic teams is under the context of friendly competition. "At the end of the day these are friends from across town that we respect and love getting to know," Aaron Steelquist, PLU ultimate frisbee alumnus current Programs Director said about his years playing against UPS. Beyond the athletic sphere, the rivalry begins to falter. "I mean I don't really care ... I don't think about it that much," PLU senior Lucas Sontra said. "I was interested in going there, so I don't have any beef with them. It's a good school." The 125-year shared history between the universities makes the rivalry an old tradition, but one that is fostered in a culture of respect and friendship.

,I' FIFA World Cup

Logo unveiled for upcoming cup to be held in Russia.

iPod Classic

Apple pulled the plug on original iPod because it could not get the parts anymore, CEO Tom Cook said.

Boston Police

The nonprofit that supplies protection for police dogs posted a photo of a puppy in a bulletproof vest at the Boston Police Department.

,!'NASA IWcket

NASA rocket meant to carry supplies to the National Space Station exploded. The damage was significant and millions of dollars worth of supplies and equipment were lost. No people were hurt.

,I' Fireball

Fireball Whisky is being pulled from the shelves in Europe because it contains too much propylene glycol - an additive that prevents evaporation and is a stabilizer in foods. It is not going anywhere in the United States.

1989

Taylor Swift's newest album "1989" hit stores this week This album is home to "Shake it Off," Swift's second best-selling single.

Seattle Times

FBI created a fake news story disguised as a Seattle Times article to nab a bomb threat suspect in 2007.

You CAN HAVE IT ALL Exploring fully inclusive religion By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer On a rainy Oct 22 at 7:30 p.rn., the Rev. Monica Coleman gave a lecture titled "You Can Have it All" in the Karen Hille Phillips Center. It was presented by the department of religion. It marked the ninth annual lecture as part of the David and Marilyn Knutzen Lectureship. The Knutzens are Pacific Lutheran University alumni and, through their lectureship, bring renowned scholars to address questions and challenges of today through a living faith tradition. Coleman is an ordained minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. She' s an activist, scholar and wrote a book titled "Not Alone" about depression. She is also a professor at Claremont University. Her lecture revolved around the concept of transreligous spirituality. It is the idea that one can be of all the religions at the same time. To explain the meaning of this idea, Coleman used the Rev. Michael Bernard Brentworth as an example. Brentworth is the leader and creator of the Agape Church, a church where every religion is practiced simultaneously. More than 10,000 people attend regularly. It was important to distinguish that religion has concrete dogma, while spirituality is a direct realization of reality. Though there are many different religions, they can have many parallels. In all religions, both love and intelligence exist. Every religion has the same "ultimate" or "god," same destination and same

teaching of principles, according to Brentworth. Even religions with multiple gods all stern from the same ultimate power, Brentworth argues. Often, it is because religions are partial that these similarities are overlooked. It can be noted that religions will fall into three categories of states of mind: exclusivisrn, inclusivisrn and pluralism. Exclusivisin, where the followers of that religion believe theirs is the right and only acceptable one; inclusivisrn in which followers acknowledge that other religions are okay, but theirs is still better; and pluralism, where followers believe all religions have the right idea, and that is transreligous spirituality. To solidify the idea of transreligous spirituality, Coleman used an elephant :r;netaphor and urged the audience to imagine many people with their eyes closed and touching a certain part of the elephant The elephant is massive but each person only gets to touch one part. Due to the massive size of the elephant, the people are unable to tell they are all holding onto the same animal, which they thought was all separate things. Before concluding, the Rev. Coleman brought in her personal learning of black studies with a term from W.E.B. Du Bois, "double consciousness." Du Bois coined the term to refer to the challenge of having an African heritage; while at the same time having a European upbringing and education. She connects this term to how people view themselves in society. Whether through race, thoughts or ideals, it is necessary for people to possess a dogged strength to navigate from being tom in

PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MAIR

different directions. "It [double consciousness] relates to us because there's an internal view of self and then the world's view," junior Denae McGaha said. "At PLU, there's a journey of finding whq you are, and PLU gives the confidence to reject what the world tells you to be."

Coleman and Marylin Knutzen at the 9th annual Knutzen lecture.

By recogruzmg how people look at religion and equalizing every religion, having it all is realistically achievable.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

NEWS3

How TO SOUND SMART When asked about ISIS The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is also known as the Islamic State across Sunni areas of Iraq and in Syria. ISIS started as an al-Qaida splinter group. It has killed dozens of people at a time and has carried out public executions and crucifixions. It has taken over large swaths of northern and western Iraq.

ISIS' s original strategy for revenue was through extortion and robbery. Recently, the strategy has shifted to generating resources through large-scale attacks aimed at capturing and holding territory. Unable to serve under Iraqi government after Suddam Hussein's military was disbanded, the soldiers became ISIS fighters.

ISIS leader, Abu Bakr alaghdadi is very mysterious - little is known about him or his life. He formed a military group in northern Iraq provinces before joining alQaida.

• •

SWEET DREAMS FROM PAGE I There were moments during the film when people in the crowd would dance, cry, cheer, snap, clap, hold their breath or laugh out loud. "People should be prepared to experience the ultimate sadness but also incredible joy while watching . this film," Diebel said. '1t's an emotional roller coaster and I was not prepared for the highs and lows." The event's large turnout did not dwindle as the film ended as the majority of attendees stayed for discussion and ice cream. Kirsten Christensen, Associa~ Professor of German, was one of the event's main supporters and is one of the faculty coordinators of the newly offered Holocaust and genocide studies minor. '1t's really me~gful to me that it's 9:15 p .m. and people are still here," Christensen said. "This is an important remi.qder of what happened and tl)e · difficulties of post-genocide life." . Fruchtman said the film's narrative story alsoc shows the power of saying yes. · The women in the film all had to say yes to bold or seemingly crazy ideas to get to where they are now. The drumming troupe women had to say yes, the company in Brooklyn had to say yes, and Fruchtman said she had a similar experience when deciding to make the film. '1 encourage you all to say yes to your dreams," Fruchtman said. More information about "Sweet Dreams" is available at http://sweetdreamsrwanda.com. about More information Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the new minor can be found at http://www.plu.edu/hgst/home.php

The United States and several Arab nations carried out air strikes against ISIS in Syria to intensify the campaign against the Islamic militant group. ISIS headquarters, storage facilities and training compounds are the targets.

Twitter Feed from #SweetDreams Sweet Dreams Rwanda @SweetDreamsDoc Pacific Lutheran University we've shared a fabulous evening. Many thanks Daphne and Nancy, to everyone that came....

TEDWomen @TEDWomen lngoma Nshya not only drum, they opened the first ice cream shop in their hometown, "Sweet Dreams." sweetdreamsrwanda.com #TEDWomen

Rachel Diebel @diebelra I hOpe that someday I love something as much as those women loved drumming. The joy in their eyes is something to aspire to. #SweetDreams

Rachel Diebel @diebelra "Develop the woman and you develop the whole family." #SweetOreams #truths

Follow the Sweet Dreams women at @SweetDreamsDoc and check out the film or find show times for "Sweet Dreams" at http://sweetdreamsrwanda.com

On Oct. 3, ISIS released a video showing the beheading of a hostage, humanitarian worker Alan Henning. ISIS blames the United Kingdom for joining the U.S.-led bombing campaign in Iraq and Syria. In the same video, the group threatens the life of an

Hallow-weekend Parties, Pfright and fun

~

By BROOKE WOLFE Guest Writer

Students will be celebrating their first holiday of the year at Pacific Lutheran University by dressing up, going out and staying in. This year, Halloween lands on a Friday and students are gearing up for a weekend full of events on and around campus. Parties, school sponsored get-togethers, and fall favorites like pumpkin patches and com mazes will bring costumed Lutes out and about. Students will fill the roads, trekking to the closest houses for themed parties. "It's the holiday where anything is acceptable," sophomore Patrick Thomas said. "It was fun last year, and it should be the same this

has students partying on back-toback weekends. Other students travel off-campus and out of Parkland for the weekend. Some will travel to Western Washington University and Washington State University in search of a good time with friends. Going to the larger universities nearby gives Lutes the chance to meet up with old friends and make new ones. PLU is a mostly dry time." campus, and some students are not going to take Recently, Campus Safety sent all students an the risk. email reminding them that the consumption of Nearby haunted houses and com mazes have also been in the running for student Halloween alcohol in any form is not allowed on the PLU campus, regardless of the individuals legal age, plans. With no costume needed for attendance, students wanting to get involved in festivities but except in Kreidler and South Halls. Off-c~pus parties are encourag:d to s~rve non-alcoholic+ not wanting to dress up in order to do so, have beverages and practice Active Bystanders found fun in these choices. conduct. Along with the perks of getting to kick back in Even with the warnings, Lutes expect offsweats, most businesses offer student discounts on Halloween for the college student budget. campus parties to have drinking games, liquor and crazy costumes. Campus Safety is not Activities gaining attention on campus oblivious; they expect it as well. include Pflueger Pfright Night and Hinderlie's In order to get ready for the busy weekend, Annual Haunted House. Both are happening tonight in their residence halls, and have outfit planning has been become a top priority on student's checklists. Costumes ranging from encouraged students to celebrate the together. "I'm going to the Pfright Night because it's firefighters to movie personalities are waiting in closets across campus. free and I don't have to stay out late to attend," Couple costumes are leading the way in first-year Jesse Kenduck said. With Halloween comes the fun of popularity, and picking a close friend or partner crafting, costuming and enjoying the spook. to collaborate with starts the decisi~n proces~ in Regardless of the choice in activity, Hallowthe right direction. Students ar~ t~g ~o thrift weekend is expected to have many Lutes shops with a tight budget and rmagmation to make some creative costumes for the weekend. celebrating and showing their holiday spirit. For more information about Halloween at With the freedom of new identities, and plenty of alcohol, no one is sure when this PLU, students can check out the PLU website for year's Hallow-week will end. Traditionally, a list of Halloween events. Halloween at PLU has consisted of a full three days: Thursday, Friday and through Saturday. However, the date for this year's Halloween


I

THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

This Wiek: ,.,~ u.····· ..~,·.:..·.·.

. . A& Th Events Oct. 31-Nov. 6 Nigltt of Musital Theatre

7;30 p.m. Oct. 31; Nou. 1in KHPG

Mary Baker Russell Music Scholars 3 p.m. Nov.] in Lagerquist

'Jfombone Studio Rttital 8 p.ni. Nov.1 in Lagerqui.st

Athenia Chamber Ensemble 8p.m. Nev. 2in~

Camas Wind Quint.et

8 p.m. Nov. 4 mLagerquist

ONLINE

OCT. 31, 2014

What happens at Chapel? By ERIN FLOM Guest Writer For many students, Chapel is just the half-hour break between classes on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Many students don!t know what happens during Chapel. Junior Maylen Anthony, a campus ministry steward, said Chapel usually begins with announcements for campus events, from either of the university pastors Rev. Dennis Sepper or Rev. Nancy Connor. A welcome and a prayer then follow. Next, a hymn is sung. These hymns can range from classic to contemporary, Sepper said. Often, faculty or students perform hymns during Chapel. On Wednesdays, Chapel Choir performs, which anyone can join. After singing hymns comes areading and a homily from the speaker that day. Speakers at Chapel can be students, faculty or community members. Although the service is based in Christianity, the speakers at chapel come from a variety of religious backgrounds,

including different faiths or no faith at all. Sepper said he wants Chapel to reflect the diversity of campus. The service ends with prayer, and snacks are available afterward. "Anyone can come to Chapel," Anthony said. "There's a misconception that you have to be Lutheran, but that's not true." More than 50 years ago,

Chapel was mandatory. Each student had an assigned seat and attendance was taken. Chapel didn't become voluntary until the 1960s, which resulted in less attendance. Today, anywhere from 40 to 100 people attend Chapel in Lagerquist. Sepper advises those curious about Chapel to look at the Chapel calendar to see who is speaking and attend Chapel

that day to see what it's like. "[PLU can] nourish your spiritual side of life," Sepper said. "We care for the whole person: body, mind and spirit." Chapel is one way to cultivate students' spiritual sides. Anthony said it's nice to have a break in her day, to sing and relax.

Sidewalk Talk: Chapel TERRAN'S take "I ,.0 to OMt,pel l;tees.qee I.think that 111y spitit.ua.l

GET THE SCOOP!

flXperienee is:~tinportant

part nfmy PLU ~r.,.

Weekly Gossip with Terran

Law-en ~"11ter

~1 don't umaUy go to Chapel. Growing uP, I went to church on the weekends and going <lu.rinf the~. ""'80tt solllething, we did, S() l got into tJia.t routin«'.F ·CtuitJ ~,' sop/iolwtt

Go online and get the scoop on celebrity gossip with our in-house pop ealture expert, Terran Warden!

This Week: Iggy Awlats battle with. ·Snoop Dogg owr social media raged this week.

ATHENIA CHAMBER ENSEMBLE By BROOKE THAMES AdE Writer

On the aGENda This week viewers learned about ghost-hunting with host Genny Boots and get their A&E scoop from A&E writer Michael Diambri.

Watch it later online at http://mastmedia.plu~edu or tune in at 9 p.m. every Thursday to News @Nine on Mast TY! r: ·,: "'"'"'""·

"'~=---------~~~-----'

The Ohio-based Athenia Chamber Ensemble will visit Pacific Lutheran University to present a unique musical experience. According to the Music Department website, the ensemble "strives to break down the traditional formalities of the concert experience" by creating an interactive environment. The group attempts to create a more "open and enriching experience" by opening up the communication between performer and viewer. Included in the event program will be a quiz where audience members can guess which composers and music styles match up to different variations of a piece the ensemble will play. Four pieces will be performed in the concert. "The Blind Men and the Elephant" and "Brush Strokes" were commissioned by the Athenia Chamber Ensemble. The first piece will be performed at the beginning of the concert and the latter at the end of the night. According to the show program, "The Blind Men

and the Elephant" is based on "an ancient parable taught as a warning for people that promote absolute truth or exclusive subjective claims." The piece "Brush Strokes" is a musical representation of specific forms of art and contains three sections that focus on three distinct and distinguished visual artists: Georges Seurat, Vincent Van Gough and Jackson Pollock. The remammg three pieces that will be performed by the Athenia Chamber Ensemble are works by George Frederick Handel, Zoltan Gardonyl and Allan Stephenson. The ensemble is composed of three professors of music from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Alison Brown Sincoff, Michele Fiala and Matthew Morris founded the ensemble in 2009 and have since performed and created chamber music using the flute, oboe and bassoon. The Athenia Chamber Ensemble has traveled with these instruments all over the world to perform in countries such as Italy, France and Russia. The ensemble will travel to PLU to share their interactive concert experience with the entire community Nov. 2.

Bringing innovation to the concert experience at PLU

PHOTO COURTESY WSU NEWS

The three members who founded the Athenia Chamber Ensemble are Alison Brown 'Sincoff(flute), Michele Fiala (oboe) and Matthew Morris (bassoon).

Athenia Chamber Ensemble 8p.m. Nov. 2 Lagerquist Concert Hall Free for PLU community


THE MOORINGMAST

A&E5

NOMT2014

Student-produced musical revue brightens three nights

OCT. 31, 2014

"Last year's p roduction of NOMT h ad one story going throughou t the program," Heath said. "This year is more thematic, and more like a series Pacific Lutheran University' s Night of vignettes, looking at the smaller of Musical Theatre (NOMT) is a studen t- stories happening in the lives of each run and -produced program that gives character." students opportunities to show off Heath said that she thinks students theatre skills they' ve developed. will find them selves relating to the Under the direction of senior Sam show' s themes and characters. Chapman, NOMT will feature various "Awkward first dates, feeling musical numbers pressured to do productions from something other such as "Rent" and than what you're "Showboat." "We've got an incredible passionate about, "[Chapman] resisting and production depression, gives great insight cast the urge to Facebook and instructs well," stalk your ex' s n ew first-year Lydia Bill team. I think that will girlfriend - it' s all said. really translate to the in there ... it reminds An intended the audience that once the others have been theatre major, Bill audience has a vocal lead in throu gh the college curtain comes up." a performance of exp erien ce before "Don't Tell Mama" and came out the from the famous Amelia Heath other side alright," Broadway musical H eath said. Senior, NOMT Stage Manager "Cabaret." Heath and 'Tm excited," Bill the entire NOMT said. "This is my first team h ope the PLU musical perfo rmance at PLU outside of community will come and support this choir." year's production. Attending NOMT is free; however, "We've got an incredible cast and donations will be accepted upon production team," Heath said. "I think entrance into the Karen Hille Phillips that will really translate to the audien ce Center. Don ations will go toward the once the curtain comes up." next production of NOMT. Showings of the Night of Musical Stage manager and senior Amelia Theatre start at 7:30 p .m. and will run Heath pointed out what to look for in from Oct. 30 to Nov. 1 on the m ain NOMT this year. stage at the Karen Hille Phillips Center.

By MICHAEL DIAMBRI Ad E Writer

REVIEW: Purchase the album: $9.99 - Amazon $12.99 - iTunes Not Available - Spotify

路lot Swift has grown into her own person. She's not here please anyone but herself and she couldn't hear you

she w~ to over the sound of her seven Grammys.

ilf~'d:

a lyrical genius and her transformation into a

_ 'P queen should scare superstars like Katy Perry and

tady Gaga. Swift's new sound is refreshing, whimsical and downright catchy. Sorry, housemates, but this album will be on repeat for at least a month.

ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DIAMBRI

First-year Conner Brown and sophomore Lexi Jason perform the Elvis song "Little Less Conversation" from the musical "All Shook Up" in a NOMT rehearsal on Oct. 28.

Taylor Swift's "1989" Does Swift shake off her haters?

A NOTE FROM A&E EDITOR MATTHEW SALZANO: Before assigning this week's issue, I had requests from many of my Mast writers to be assigned the eagerly anticipated "1989" review. I decided it was in everyone's best interest to show you not just one review, but five. These five writers each took almost 49 minutes out of their busy lives to listen and tell you how Swift did in her fifth album so you can decide if it's one to skip. People may say she goes "on too many dates" and has "nothing in her brain," but clearly Taylor Swift is doing something right with "1989." Having an older sister has exposed me, and millions of other brothers, to the complete discography of the queen of crossover. I believe "1989" might be one of her best pieces of work so far. Though many Swift fans may miss hE!I'. classic ballads such as "White Horse" and "Back to December," fans of the sev'en-time Grammy Award winner should find "1989" irresistible. I think those who aren't Swift fans will enjoy the nice change of pace she takes in the album. Anyone should be able to find at least one song they enjoy - or just can't get out of their heads.

MICHAEL DIAMBRI

AdE Writer Taylor Swift's album was expected to be new and amazing once "Shake it Off" hit the top of the charts and every girl - and her boyfriend - knew and loved the song. However, after listening to the rest of "1989, I am disappointed her single is the only innovative and fun new song. The rest of the tracks followed Swift's usual boy-crazy equation - minus a guitar. In a time where pop music seems to be limitless, Swift takes a step back and plays it safe. A fun night of dancing it out with Swift has to be put on hold while you listen to several slow-jam-head-nodding tracks about Jove. Sorry, Swift, I wish you were feeling 22 again. At least then you were a bit of fun.

SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Taylor Swift has pushed the envelope to find a new sound that redefines her in her new album - and it totally worked. The album cover is crazy cool. My favorite songs off the album are "You Are in Love," a classic Swift song about what it is to be in love, and "Style," a positive anthem of how who we are will never go out of style. "1989" has a great feel : both heartfelt and creative.

DAVID MAIR Staff Writer For those who have been excitedly awaiting the former country star's first officially documented pop album, "1989" doesn't disappoint. Swift hits the essence of the 1980s with an array of punchy beats and synthesized rhythms, while managing to stay within the relevance of the 21st century. Songs like ''Welcome To New York" and "Style" sound like they could've definitely been anthems of the late 1980s, while tracks such as "All You Had To Do Was Stay" and "How You Get The Girl" fit in beautifully with today's top pop hits. The unusual musical composition of "I Know Places" and the slow, sultry sound of ''Wildest Dreams" resemble tracks of beloved pop artists such as Larde and Lana Del Rey, who have gained praise for their unique - and almost strange - musical styles. Critics of this new pop album may state that the songs sound too generic or that the new direction is uncharacteristic of Swift, given her country roots. Those who've been anxious to revel in Swift's pop transformation, however, will be appreciative of the mature and artistic route that Swift has taken in this new album era. 路mors Taylor Lwiku and Allie Reynolds (left to right) purchased 1e deluxe edition of"] ll89" at Target early Oct. 27.

BROOKE THAMES AdE Writer


6 LUTE LIFE

THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

A perspective on Gender Exploration Week By CAITLIN DAWES RHA Social Justice Director Over the course of Gender Exploration Week (GEW), I was surprised as to the diverse group of students I was able to reach out to. Instead of just seeing familiar faces, students whom I have never met before took a brave step and gave the events a go. Students learned about one another Oct. 18 in The Cave, as we went around the room sharing our coming out stories, which really helped give context to people and their lives and where they are at today. Students learned about the importance of GEW and why, as a university, we put on such an emphasized week. I was surprised to see students who participated in the tabling Oct. 13 with the prompt question, "what are you coming out as today?" PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATRIX This startled many people, but also had them think about Caitlin is the current Social Justice director for PLU's Residence Hall what their identities are and Association, a contributor to the Matrix and active in queer issues. even witness a few students and staff come out publicly in regards to their sexuality or another person's expression of gender and gender identity. identity. Tomorrow can still be a day where you I am proud to say that over the course of the can be an advocate or an ally for someone. week, more than 500 people that participated I hope people were challenged this week to either actively or passively with the programs and self-reflect, and discovered more about themselves Facebook feed. and their community. Just because the week is over, doesn't mean the conversations have to stop. This piece was also featured in The Matrix's newsletter. Similar to when we are on break, we are still students learning in our community and will learn every day. Tomorrow can still be a day to learn about

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

-

LUTE LIFE 7

Halloween costumes: be fun, not offensive This isn't something new to Pacific Lutheran University, but it is something that needs to be acknowledged. Williams explains that it has a Whether you're trick-or-treating, similarity to the "My Language, My enjoying scary movies or exploring Choice" campaign PLU has recently haunted com mazes, H alloween is a fun promoted. It is also similar to the Ohio time for people of all ages. State University's "We're A What isn't fun, though, is Culture, Not A Costume" seeing people dressed up in campaign. offensive costumes. "Most people don't People may not always "Halloween is a goofy occasion, and some think too much about the think of it, but the spooky and funny Halloween costumes make the statement that a part of deeper implications of their actions, language, or their costumes that seem like no someone's culture is goofy." costume for Halloween," big deal can actually be quite Williams said. harmful. This topic was This awareness is discussed last Tuesday in Jessica Williams an ongoing effort that Stuen. junior doesn't just end with "My Examples of offensive Language, My Choice," or costumes can be as simple promoting awareness for as people dressing up in Halloween costumes. another culture's traditional It's about a general mindfulness of how Some PLU students have chosen to garb as a stereotype. people with privilege can unknowingly "Halloween is a goofy occasion, and make a stand. Resident Assistants Riley Burleigh be offensive and rude to others. some costumes make the statement that So go out and have a great Halloween, a part of someone's culture is goofy," and Jonathan Adams decided to advocate but don't ruin someone else's·time with in costumes. Williams, for sensitivity junior Jessica Williams said. "These costumes are often exaggerated to make another RA, helped run the event. The an offensive costume. the costume a joke, and no one wants to event focused on how costumes can be offensive. believe their culture is a joke."

By ANGIE TINKER Matrix Co-Editor

An example might be if someone chose to dress up as "Mexican" by wearing a sombrero and poncho. While this may seem harmless, it still suggests all people from Mexico dress like that and have certain mannerisms associated with that stereotype.

a

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

The "We're A Culture, Not A Costume" campaign began in 2011 by The Ohio State University to encourage students to avoid offensive costumes on Halloween.

---

Saxifrage: UNTITLED POEM By AMARIAH CLIFT Saxifrage Contributor Thank fearless love for a passionate life. Throttles charge the gallows as if oddly shaped feet pour over mountains There are things, the things no one has thought of before Thin, thick, the golden gate plays games, gives way to distrusting forgiveness Thrusting and diving, trusting the knifing thief Thoughts and dreams, whispers and spit Through mediums and dominatrix Thinking, inking, chumming, coming Thumbs are an evolutionary error This lullaby perfume pierces the prince Thrilling and drilling the president, he's drowning in his will to represent Threads rip at the sight of wrong and rotten thicks of ruin Thistles lump near the top, swinging while ticks sway and swoon Throw candles like fireflies, halt the stop watch knowing desire as we die Throats bleach with boiling bills, and melodiously drown in melancholy ornaments Theories prove insane is a thorough man with an open book of blank pages Thwarting covers, nobody remembers, none have known his face Thrifty as he is, they thrive on peace and bits of him Thirty thousand cherries dropping at once, an atomic bomb Threatening the fictitious fruit and depriving them of their dairy-free dreamscapes Thirsty Thursday looks at f*"king Friday with a fringe of fear and inevitable fate This feeling strives for a piece of an idea Those thinkers, sultry like lively lace purple violet lilacs Throttle sticks like lit dynamite to the corpses of conscious cornucopia Thirsting crooked thatches croon about WD40, singing of slippery songs Thespian facades, escapades and escapes, long catharsis reaction Thumping metallic beats, drum the dents in my souls Thermal conspiracy, heating the eggs equally hard boiled Thin trees fragile nuances manifesting smoldering adolescent passion Themed leaves seize Victoria's secrets, branches boast their bulimia Thoms are for foreign foliage fornication, induced by imbecile imports Thumps will free theatre floors' footsteps, and y~wn gouging groans between the cracks Thugs wail woes, worries and warts, sailors chug the tailored mug Thongs, ass cracks and crackerjacks, sweet till the sweaty end Thaw the swallows nest, waking feathers from their preening and unrest

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAXIFRAGE

This week's untitled poem was submitted to Saxifrage by Amariah Clift. She is a sophomore studying Communication. She doesn't like turkey stuffing or spiders. Her favorite color is green.

---

....

Editor's note: This poem was edited for print. The original poem is in its entirety online.

Sax·i·frage

Saxifrage is open for submission for publication in the Mast. Send your poetry, visual art, fiction and creative non-fiction totalling no more than SOD words any time to saxifrag~lu . edu for consideration. Find us on Facebook, Twitter and at http://saxifrage.plu.edu

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_., 8 OPINION

THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

Don't huff and puff E-cigs on campus By MICHAEL DIAMBRI Ae5E Writer

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rel and Tuomi mast@plu.edu

_,._

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

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When we were kids, we were taught that smoking kills. This generation was thought of as the one that could finally kick the nicotine craze. This may not be so, because "vaping," smoking using an electronic cigarette, has become a popular habit among young adults. P HOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS Most electronic cigarette The FDA reported e-cigarette cartridges and solutions contain n.itrosamines, diethylene glycol and manufacturers also produce e-cig liquid, which contains little or no tobacco. This other ingredients that could be harmful to humans. has led many of the members of the e-cig industry to promote vaping as a Lutheran University's stance on the use E-cigs are different because the safer, healthier option than other means of tobacco-free electronic cigarettes? university does not want students to of smoking. As I interviewed PLU staff I got engage in an unhealthy lifestyle. This claim may not be accurate. the same answer: PLU is a tobaccoTom Huelsbeck, the associate dean These juices often contain nicotine, the free campus. But electronic cigarettes for Campus Life and Executive Director main cause of most smoking addictions. usually contain no tobacco. of Residential Life, released a statement The research into the effects of I spoke with Terri Phillips, the to me providing information on PLU's vaping is far behind the incredibly fast Associate Vice President of Human residential life policies on electronic - growing rate of the electronic cigarette Resources about PLU's policies, on cigarettes. industry. electronic cigarettes and its tobacco-free "The use of e-cigarettes is not With this new revolutionary form policy. permitted on campus as a part of of smoking comes new laws and Phillips confirmed the use of e-cigs the University Policy: Tobacco Free regulations. on campus is not allowed. Campus," Huelsbeck said. The residence Legally, people can "vape" as much "We made an informed decision halls are included in this policy because as they want anywhere it's allowed, as to be tobacco free, within this policy they are a part of campus, but it is not long as the cigarette is battery powered we decided to include electronic a Residential Life policy. The primary and doesn't contain tobacco. This has cigarettes," Phillips said. "E-cigs are not issue is the health related concerns led to situations where vaping has been FDA approved and the Pierce County associated with e-cigarettes (even spotted at movie theaters, concerts and Health Department has banned them though they don't contain tobacco)." even schools. PLU and other universities need in public places as well. This alarmed Buying an electronic cigarette and us as a safety concern and we are very to make their policies on the use of vaping is technically illegal for anyone concerned about the health and wellness electronic cigarettes known to their younger than 18. The laws surrounding of the PLU community." students. Saying a campus is "tobaccoe-cig purchases are generally similar I sat down with a first-year student, free" is not specific enough. to those that surround smoking and who chose to remain anonymous. He The American Heart Association using tobacco products in Washington confessed he set off a smoke detector reported e-cigarettes differ from state. These laws are hard to regulate while vaping in his room on campus. traditional cigarettes in that they do , and enforce with e-cigs because of their "I was just sitting in my room with not contain carcinogens such as arsenic online availability. friends, we had been vaping for around and vinyl chloride. Additionally, there Vaping has become more appealing 30 minutes and the smoke detector went isn't secondhand smoke associated than smoking. Individuals can still off" he said. with vaping. The main components achieve a nicotine buzz while of a cartridge of "juice" are not having to withstand the nicotine, propylene glycol, taste or smell of traditional "[The PLU tobacco-free policy] solvents and flavors. cigarettes. According to USA include [ s] electronic cigarettes." In fact, people can vape Today, "Due to the relative while enjoying a wide variety of newness in the popularity of flavors, including bubble gum, vaping, the long-term effects Terri Phillips raspberry, mint, watermelon of vaping have yet to be Associate Vice President of Human Resources and coffee. Many health analyzed." officials and parent groups Tobacco control are concerned that the flavors at the Boston expert and nicotine may make it a gateway to "I knew that it was a tobacco free University School of Public Health smoking, especially for teenagers. campus, the vape had no tobacco and Michael Siegel said "as long as e-cigs are It is common knowledge that nicotine my vape had no nicotine in it," he said. primarily used to help quite smoking is an addictive substance. Nicotine "I didn't think it would be against any and not to spur kids to smoke, they will addiction could be promoted by using rules." be a benefit to public health." an electronic cigarette. He said he knew a lot of people who Many people addicted to cigarettes Another coneern about electronic had done this. said vaping helped them quit smoking cigarettes is that certain types of "That was the original purpose and other tobacco products. Most of vaporizers can be used for THC-based for their use" he said. "The whole them said they did this by switching products, such as dabs or hash oil, community of e-cigs and vaping is to e-cigs and then slowly reducing the which are considered illegal in many about getting people off of cigarettes." nicotine-level. on college campuses, states and in any When asked if e-cigs were healthy Although many people may other area that receives federal funding this student did say that e-dgs indeed claim this to be true, the Washington or is owned by the government. were unhealthy. State Department of Health does not Vaping has become more popular "Bottom line, it is not healthy to put encourage this as a method of quitting and acceptable in our culture, especially anything in your lungs that isn't air" he smoking. However, quitting smoking with younger people. This is because the said. "It's become a very social thing." is clearly no longer the primary use of e-cig industry does a lot of its marketing When asked about what PLU should e-cigs. through social media. do about e-cigs he said, "I don't want I recommend that young people In addition, anyone can find a the school to make a big deal out this, it avoid using them. Because there is not plethora of videos online about how does really help people get off nicotine. a lot of agreement on the use of e-cigs, to perform creative smoke tricks while I do think people should avoid vaping people should not partake in vaping just vaping, often making it seem cooler to in their rooms because it can set off because it is considered something that younger children and adults. alarms" he said. "Campus Safety told is fun to do. There are also influences from me that the smoke detectors are very I encountered a number of people celebrity icons and peer groups. Vapes sensitive here." who could attest e-cigs can help people can be spotted at almost any college Evidence shows vaping can actually quit smoking, but the process took a party or one can simply drive around set off fire alarms, but there have also long time. Only one person I talked to Parkland, where a wide variety of been reports of other products such as had fully quit smoking, meaning they people can be seen vaping in their cars. air freshener, hairspray and burnt toast no longer even used an e-cig. Many celebrities like Katy Perry and setting off alarms as well. These are The risks are much higher than the Leonardo DiCaprio have been known to examples of products PLU can restrict rewards, in this case, so don't smoke. enjoy vaping as well. from being in the residence halls, but With all this stated, what is Pacific are unable to enforce.

~f you want more of the DOH's opinion and research on e-cigs go to:

http://www.doh.wa.gov/Youand YourFamily/Tobacco/OtherTobaccoProducts/ECigarettes

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and dist ribute informat ion to its readers about important issues, event s and t rends that impact t he Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres t o the Society of Professional Journalist s Code of Ethics and t he TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, colwnns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisemenh Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu. 路


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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

OPINION 9

Think twice about scandalous costumes this Halloween By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer Halloween was not intended for bare legs or push-up bras. According to CNN, 43.6 percent of the U.S. population will wear costumes this Halloween. Spending for the spooky holiday throughout the U.S. in 2013 was $6.9 billion. Money is poured into this traditionally Pagan holiday that originated from Celtic beliefs. Halloween was originally a deeprooted tradition, not part of the American culture. Our capitalistic minds turned a cultural tradition into an entirely new market nearing $7 billion annually. It is not unlike Americans to adopt new traditions early immigrants brought from European countries. I am curious to know how this holiday that held great significance turned into the opportunity for women and men to dress inappropriately. I use the word "inappropriate" under the assumption that not all individuals I see would proudly strut around half-naked in a sailor costume in front of their parents. In the popular movie from 2004, "Mean Girls," Lindsay Lohan Cady Heron says, "In girl world, Halloween is the one time of year a girl can dress like a total slut and no other girl can say anything about it." Personally, I have yet to meet a girl who hasn't seen this movie. Media is constantly embedding the idea that is OK to sexualize ourselves. You might be OK with dressing a little scandalously on this fright night, but viewing this issue from another perspective could change that. The Buffington Post wrote a piece on the sexualization of costumes for our youngest trick-or-treaters. Imagine your little sister is

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Examples of a police officer costume for young girls and boys. Both differ dramatically from the materials used, the young girls costume is used with shiny material and the boys with a softer more realistic material, to the amount of skin revealed.

deciding to be a police officer this year. Rather than the traditional full pants, boots and long sleeve shirt, you11 find the brand Alterego at Value Village featuring tot-sized, dolled-up girls wearing short sleeve dresses with heeled calf-high boots. Junior Sara Suznevich gave her opinion on

Study Break

Life Hacks

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 26, 2014 ACROSS 1 Point of interest 6 The one over there 10 Stench 14 Deep, lustrous black 15 Car, for short 16 Camembert kin 17 Putting things into motion 20 Priest's leave 21 Deli selection 22 "Survivor" network 24 Between half and all 27 "Blue" singer LeAnn 28 Dish with seasoned rice 31 Exclaimed in delight 33 Building blaster 34 Maine national park 36 Morethan miffed 38 Certain collectible 41 Memberof the peerage 42 Le Carre hero George 45 Heart-rate abbr. 48 Copier powder

50 Abnormal swelling 51 "Lord, _?" (Last Supper question) 53 Cloth joiner 55 Weedog

56 Italian seaport 58 Boardroom visual aid 61 Yellowish vegetable 66 "Zip-DooDah" 67 Infinitesimal amount

68 Arm stiffeners 69 College quarters 70 Wind resistance 71 In an appropriate manner DOWN 1 Roarer in film intros 2 "Shogun" belt 3 Picnic side dish 4 A lternative to DOS or Windows 5 "Auld

22 Bean counter, for short 23 Lighter brand 25 Polished and wellgroomed, as a lady 26 "No traffic:" 29 Very little, as of ointment 30 Substance used to protect or stabilize 32 All (attentive) 35 Fuzzy, bushy hairstyle 37 Children's author Blyton 39 Charged atomic particles 40 Seuss' Horton, e.g. 43 Tall, flightless bird 44 Do more than chat

45 Words describing a fairy-tale wolf 46 Prefix meaning "false" 47 Coin producer 49 Motley, as an army 52 Native American pole 54" Doubtfire" 57 Desperately dry 59 Blue green shade 60 Tarantino's " Fiction" 62 Here-there connection 63 Hagen of the stage 64 Maglie or Mineo 65 "Get your hands off me!"

Lang_" 6 Ink on skin 7 "Say what?"

8 Had the special

9 Expensive

car trips 10 Marks on old manuscripts 11 Had a nightmare 12 Ewing and Getty, e.g. 13 Stand firm against 18 Herd of whales 19 Ifs done in the slammer

@ 2014

Universal Uclick

www.upuzzles.com

Halloween costumes. "Now with these sexualized costumes being made for younger and younger girls, they are going to think they need to dress that way," Suznevich said. "Seeing young girls like this can even start sexual exploitation at a younger age for girls."

The Buffington Post interviewed, a police officer with a 7-year-old daughter who said, "Policewomen wear pants while they work. It's hard to chase bad guys down in stiletto heels." I fully acknowledge that everyone has the right to dress how they want, but it is more than just going out for the night. Allowing companies to make millions off of barely-there clothing is setting a low standard for youth that actively participate in Halloween and the ever-increasing sexualization of our society. There is also the double standard of men not being as sexualized when it comes to Halloween costumes that is often ignored. We are quick to judge advertising companies for featuring the half-naked women chasing down a man for an irrelevant product, yet we are only promoting the ideals of sexualizing women or men by purchasing sexualized costumes. 'All in all, I hate the image that society puts out there for women to have to dress sexy for Halloween" Suznevich said. "Dress how you want and if that means you wear a sexy outfit then go ahead." I am suggesting we have fun with the holiday and enjoy it as a time to spend with friends or family. I encourage you to think twice about that costume you may wear this year. I strongly doubt the Celts ever envisioned the holiday transforming into a time where it was acceptable to wear a sexy doctor's costume. Have fun with the holiday and help change the way society clashes with sexuality.

~

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PHOTO TO CREATIVE COMMONS

1 0126

SLIPPERY CONDITIONS By Rob Lee

1t


THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

OCT. 31, 2014

SPORTS ICDRllOARD l<'«>•<»,.,..,.,..,,.,.,...,.,.•.,.,,,,,......,.,,,,..,,,,,....,.,.,"-"'"'

t AROUND THE LEAGUE•••

Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

6

0

0

4-0

Won6

Pacific

4

2

0

4 -0

Won4

Whitworth

5

3

0

3-2

Wo.nl

4

PLU

2

0

2- 2

Wonl

!lOWING; After a season~pening win at tbe Women's f:onegiate Diii/Club Vani.ity $+ race in the Portland Fall Classic on the Willamette River pt Portland, the Lewis & Clark J'ioneers earned the &st-ever NwC "Crew of the Week" award . ~the conference welcomes WOmet)'S rowing as an official for the 2014-15 year.

Men's Soccer TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

Willamette

12

4

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

9-1-1

Won 6

Whitworth

13

8-1-2

Won3

Puget Sound

ll

4

Pacific Lutheran

8

9

2

8-2-1

Lost l

0

5-6

Lin.field

6

Wonl

4 - 6-1

Lost 2

8

Whitman

8

9

Pacific

6

9

4 -7

Lost l

3-7-1

Wonl

George Fox

2

13

0 -ll

Lost ll

2

~-

Willamette

4

2

0

2-2

Lost l

Puget Sound

3

3

0

2-2

Lostl

George Fox Lewis & Clark

0 0

6 7

0 -4

0

0-5

0

Lost6 Lost 7

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 1 vs. Puget Sound, 1p.m.

Women's Soccer TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

PLU

13

3

Puget Sound

12

4

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

ll-2

Won4

10-3

0

Lost l

Lin.field

12

3

0

9-3

Won5

Lewis & Clark

9

5

2

7-4-1

Lostl

Whitman

8

7

Whitworth

5

11

George Fox

3

10

2

3

6-5-2

Won l

4 -9

Lost l

3-8-1

sport

Lost2

Pacific

5

10

2- 9-1

Lost 5

Willamette

2

13

1-10 -1

Lost 7

MEN'S SOCCER: Willamette junior forward Yazan Hishmeh tecorded his sixth and seventh. ~e-wiiming goals of the l.eason as Willamette won 3-2 at pacific Lutheran and 1·0 at Puget Sound to move info first place in ~e NWC standings. Hishmeh has 13 goals this year. ! ~ROSS COUNTRY: The Northwest Conference ~pionships for cross country will begin this weekend on Saturday, Nov.1 at Willamette University in Salem, Ore. Information courtesy ofhttp://www.nwc:sports.com/landinglindex

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. I vs. Pacific, 11 p.m.

0

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 1 vs. Pacific, 1:30 p.m.

Volleyball LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

17

4

0

10-2

Won3

17

5

0

10 -2

Won 6

9

12

0

8-4

Won l

TEAM

WINS

PLU Whitworth Puget Sound Lin.field

8

9

0

7- 5

Lostl

Willamette

11

10

0

6-6

Lostl

Lewis & Clark

10

ll

0

4-8

Lost 2

Whitman

8

13

0

4-8

Lost4

George Fox

4

18

0

3- 9

Wonl

Pacific

6

14

0

2-10

Lost 1

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 31vs. Lewis d Clark, 7 p.m.

Santoro Speaks... PHED, beneficial or detrimental? By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor

L-

·-

About two weeks ago, I received an email from Pacific Lutheran University asking me to complete a survey related to my experience with the universities' General Education Program, or, GenEds. At first, 111 admit, I ignored it, perhaps being too preoccupied with writing articles for this fine newspaper. After receiving two reminder emails, I caved and tried to think back to what I did and didn't like about my GenEd classes. For the most part, they were very informative - at times even eye-openingand some of my favorite classes at PLU have been ones that didn't have anything to do with my major. Then I started thinking of a debate I had with a friend about the university's physical education requirements. Why, my friend asked, should students be required to pay the university to be physically active? Should students who have to take out substantial student loans

be exempt? What about student-athletes who exercise on a daily basis? According PLU's website, as part of GenEd' s, almost every student is required to fulfill a certain amount of credits in five areas of study: Engaging Arts and Performance, Interpreting Living Conditions for a Humane Future, Exploring Nature and Number, Investigating Human Behavior, Culture & Institutions and Encountering Perspectives on Diversity. PHED falls under the first category of the five, and in order to graduate, students must complete three activity courses and PHED 100: Personalized Fitness Program. Basically, students are spending thousands of dollars to take,PHED classes that may: 1. require the student to take out more student loans than necessary and 2. take time away from studying for classes that are needed to complete a degree. That doesn't even take into account that some people just don't want to be physically active. If it is not part of your lifestyle, and if you don't want it to be, it does seem a bit unfair. But here' s how I look at it:

I am incredibly fortunate to not have student loans hanging over my head once I graduate, so for me, PHED classes aren't so bad. I can actually use my legs and not have to sit behind a desk or in front of a computer for long hours on end. As a former student-athlete, it also allows me to be slightly competitive again and have fun. Everyone's experience is different, however, and what works for me may not work for you. However, I will say this: the overarching theme of PLU' s mission as a university is to educate its student's minds and bodies. A big part of learning is stepping outside of your comfort zone, and for some, being active isn't as easy as it is for others. That being said, it can be seen as a good thing that PLU cares about keeping its students healthy by discouraging a sedentary lifestyle through required PHED classes. Or, it can be seen as a ploy to squeeze more money out of students. That is for you to decide.

In the en d, there doesn't really seem to be a right answer, and maybe there doesn't have to be. Attitude goes a long way in determining whether something is beneficial to you or not. While the cons may appear to outweigh the pros in this argument, you may one day be sitting in a cubicle daydreaming about playing badminton in Olson Gym.

Dalton Ritchey thankful for unique football team By David Mair Staff Writer Standing tall at 6 feet, senior Dalton Ritchey is the starting quarterback for Pacific Lutheran University's Football Team. Ritchey grew up loving the game of football in Onalaska, Wash., a small town about halfway between Tacoma and Portland, and played football for Onalaska High School. Being able to play at PLU has only increased his passion for the game. "The guys around the program are unlike any program," Dalton said. "I can honestly say I love playing with all of them, so coming to practice and playing a game I already love is that much better." Since he picked up the pigskin for the Lutes three years ago, his role on the team

has changed drastically. Its only losses in Northwest Conference When Ritchey was a first-year, he and overall this season were against switched from quarterback to receiver so Linfield 14-41 and Pacific 28-31, both he could be able to help quality opponents. in anyway that was With three games necessary. "We constantly strive to left this season, the During his team is ready to sophomore and junior get better, ·so why should finish what they years Ritchey became started back in that stop?" starting quarterback. September when Now, he is a they snuck out with Dalton Ritchey prominent figure on a 35-28 win against the team that has built California Lutheran senior trust among the guys University. to the point where "We constantly players come to him for advice around the strive to get better, so why should that stop?" Ritchey said. "We focus on always offense. PLU head coach Scott Westering has giving it our best shot and sometimes the confidence in Ritchey with the on-field games doesn't go the way we want." As he wraps up his final season as a checks and decisions. Currently the team is 4-2. proud Lute, Ritchey wants to leave the field

knowing he left it better than he found it. A legacy is what he hopes to leave for the new guys. Specifically for the quarterbacks, so they know what it is like to play at an extremely successful level. Ritchey wants to pour everything he has into the football tradition at PLU, and strives to be part of the group of great quarterbacks. According to Ritchey, the experience on the football team has been one of the best in his life so far. Through the PLU football program he has fostered long-lasting friendships, created _wonderful memories and enjoyed the opportunity to play football at a high level. "I am very blessed that God h ad led me down this path to this school," Ritchey said.


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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

11 SPORTS

Lutes bounce back in dominant fas hion with historic 56-14 win over Willamette road loss last weekend, the Lutes · rebounded in the most dominant way possible Saturday . Willamette picked up 75 yards on its first drive to take a 7-0 lead and added 64 yards on its final drive late in the fourth quarter, but the PLU defense limited the Bearcats to 151 yards in between as the Lutes out-gained the ,.,.~ Bearcats 686-to-290. Northwest Conference leading .. .. l -~ rusher senior Dylan Jones broke PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER th third l d a 57-yar run on e p ay PLU quarterback Dalton Ritchey throws the football in the from scrimmage as Willamette game against Willamette. opened the game with five consecutive running plays By TYLER SCOTT leading to a touchdown. Director ofAthletics Communications The Lutes responded with a five-play, 75-yard drive of their own, complete with Willamette took the opening kickoff and a big play. drove down the field for an early lead, but For the Lutes it was through the air, from that point on it was all Pacific-Lutheran however, as senior Dalton Ritchey dropped University as the Lutes broke a 44-year-old a perfect deep ball into the hands of senior program record with 686 yards of total Kyle Warner for a 47-yard scoring pass offense in a 56-14 Northwest Conference to tie it up less than five minutes into the football victory over the Bearcats Saturday game. afternoon at Sparks Stadium in Puyallup, From there the PLU defense stepped up Wash. and the offense never let up as the Lutes Going against a dangerous power- scored on every drive except their final rushing team following a disappointing possession before halftime, when a missed

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field goal sent PLU into the break up 28-7. The Lutes came right back out in the second half and scored a touchdown on their first drive of the second half before a fourth-down stop in their next possession included the only missed third-down attempt of the day for PLU, not counting quarterback kneels at the end of the game . Officially, PLU converted 11 of 13 thirddown attempts while holding Willamette to 1-of-9 on third down . The Lutes held possession for more than 40 minutes, including more tb.an 22 minutes in the second half. PLU finished the day with 26 first downs to 11 for Willamette and posted a symmetrical yardage tally of 343 on the ground on 48 carries and 343 through the air on 25 pass attempts. Ritchey put up the best game of his collegiate career, completing 15 of 22 pass attempts for 302 yards - an average of 13.7 yards per pass - and five touchdowns while rushing for 130 yards on 14 carries (9.3 per carry) and another score. Senior Niko Madison tallied game-high 136 rushing yards and a touchdown on 16 carries, while Warner caught two passes for 111 yards and a score. Senior Lucas Sontra caught three passes totaling 47 yards and found the end zone

each time he touched the ball for three scores. Senior Fernando Barrett added one big catch: a 43-yard scoring grab. The PLU defense posted a balanced effort, . with 20 different players picking up at least one tackle and no one totaling more than six. Seniors Joel Teats and Travis McCarthy tied for the team lead with six apiece, while juniors Chase Houser and Cody Tupen each sacked Willamette sophomore quarterback Trent Spallas once. PLU' s 56 points marked the highest point total since a 62-14 win over Puget Sound in 2001, and also marked the most points the Lutes have ever scored against Willamette. The Lutes' 686 yards easily surpassed the previous program record of 653 set in a 47-0 win against Whitworth way back in 1970. The win improves PLU's record to 4-2 overall and 2-2 in conference play, while Willamette falls to 4-2 overall and 2-2 in the NWC. PLU returns to action this Saturday, when they will travel to take on cross-town rival Puget Sound at 1 p.m .

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Bearcats claw back, Lutes win on Senior Night By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor Gamel It's a tight race for first place at the top of the Northwest Conference table, and the visiting Willamette Bearcats ensured its team stayed there with a 3-2 Northwest Conference ·w in over the Pacific Lutheran University Men's Soccer team last Saturday at PLU's East Field. Despite the loss, PLU head coach John Yorke was happy with the performance. "I thought we played really well, one of the better games we played all season," Yorke said. "Unfortunately, they had a penalty kick and we had a bad defensive mistake which is a little bit of the same kind of stuff that has cost us in other games as well." Three shots in the first 10 minutes for the Lutes set the tone for what would be a high-scoring match, and PLU dominated the early proceedings. Shots by senior Justin Manao, first-year Nate Popp and sophomore Rigoberto Loreto gave the Bearcats early scares, and their resistance was finally broken shortly before halftime. A whirlwind of goals in the final seven minutes was started by PLU sophomore Diego Aceves off an assist from first-year Tarald Waemess. In the 39th minute, Aceves took a pass from Waemess before unleashing a shot from 10 yards that flew past Willamette junior goalkeeper Braydon Calder to put the Lutes up 1-0. Just three. minutes later the score was level. Willamette junior forward Garrett Ross passed to junior Sebastian Mortimer who hit a hard shot from 18-yards past PLU junior goalkeeper Mike Arguello in the 42nd minute. Seconds before halftime, PLU struck again to make it

Willamette's turnaround was completed in the 73rd minute off a goal by NWC Offensive Player of the Conference candidate junior Yazan Hishmeh. Sophomore forward Julian Hanlon-Austin's shot deflected off of PLU's crossbar to the grateful feet of Hishmeh to score his 13th goal of the season and the game winner. After the game, Yorke said he was looking for improvement Sunday against Linfield. "We need to make the choice to win and be choosing to win rather than just letting it happen," Yorke said. The Lutes hosted Linfield the following day.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JACQUI GUTIERREZ-ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

Left to right: Seniors Drew Sadowslq', Bryce Archambeault, Justin Manao and Kevin Wien pose for a Senior Night Picture. ·

2-1.

Waemess turned from provider to scorer when junior Game2 Jordan Downing dribbled into the Bearcats' box to find It was a game of firsts for Pacific Lutheran University Waemess, who tapped the ball in from six yards in the 44th · Men's Soccer players against visiting Linfield in their minute. "When we were up 2-1, we had three chances within Northwest Conference match Sunday at East Field. A first goal, a first start and a first sweep of Linfield since 12-yards to make it 3-1or4-1," Yorke said. "We missed all 2011 helped the Lutes run out with a 3-0 win. three of them, and then the game went the other way." The last home game of the 2014 season meant it was Senior Unfortunately for the Lutes, their scoring for the day Night, and seniors Justin Manao, Bryce Archambeault, was over. PLU continued their offensive onslaught into the second Kevin Wien and Drew Sadowsky were honored with their half by committing numbers forward and testing Calder, families before kick-off. By tradition, every senior starts the match on Senior who came up with big saves. Things weren't going so well for the Lute's defense Night, meaning Sadowsky earned his first start as a Lute. "I thought we fought hard and it was unfortunate to either. go down after having the lead yesterday but we came Senior defender Kevin Wien was called for a hand ball back strong today," Sadowsky said. "We got the result we inside the PLU box. Willamette forward Alan Hernandez stepped up to score from the penalty spot to make it 2-2 in wanted and got the clean sheet." Despite all the attention being on the seniors, it was two the 59th minute. first-years who combined to open the scoring in the fifth

minute. Making his third start of the season, first-year midfielder Joel Frykholm found first-year forward Eddie Na, whose first touch deflected off of his face. Keeping his composure, Na was able to make a quick tum and shot past Linfield senior goalkeeper Grant Loriaux for the unorthodox goal. It was his sixth of the season in just 11 starts for the Lutes. The team seemed to feed off the energy from the goal and moved the ball around the Linfield defense with ease. A couple of shots from Na and Manao forced good saves from Loriaux, whose defense was struggling to keep up with the speed of PLU's forwards. Things would only get worse for the Wildcats when Loriaux had to be substituted off in the 35th minute with a possible concussion after a collision with Manao and one of his defenders. He was replaced by first-year Jack O'Keefe. O'Keefe only lasted four minutes on the field before getting scored on, this time off of a comer kick. PLU.sophomore Diego Aceves' cross skipped through on the ground to an unmarked Archambeault, whose sliding shot snuck under O'Keefe in the 40th minute. PLU went into halftime leading the Wildcats 2-0. "I think the early goal hurt Linfield a bit, and we did a good job of putting them under pressure," PLU head coach John Yorke said. "Some intelligent decisions in the midfield helped us keep the game going in their end the first half." The Lutes killed the game off less than 10 minutes into the second half when Archambeault and sophomore Nate Popp dual-assisted sophomore Rigoberto Loreto in the 52nd minute. Archambeault's cross squeaked through to the back post where Loreto roofed his shot into the net to make it 3-0. "Joel Frykholm played really well and him and Justin (Manao] found each other and just put so~e pressure on them," Yorke said. "It definitely gave us the confidence to keep going forward." PLU junior goalkeeper Mike Arguello finished the game with one save and was replaced by fellow junior goalkeeper Kyle Vanderwaal in the 75th minute. "I think what was different this game is we had a lot more desire," Sadowsky said. "Everyone was hyped up because it was Senior Night and we wanted to put on a good show for our fans and get the result we have been waiting for all weekend." With the win, the Lutes moved up a spot in NWC to fourth with a record of 5-6 and 8-9 overall. Linfield' s second loss in two days sees them drop to fifth with a record of 5-6-1 and 8-6-1 overall. PLU travels to Oregon this weekend to face Pacific Saturday, Nov. 1 and George Fox Sunday, Nov. 2. Kick-off for both games is 1:30 p.m.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 31, 2014

12 SPORTS

Volleyball shuts out George Fox, Linfield By GIANCARLO SANTORO AND DEBORAH CABANOS Sports Editor and Guest Writer Gamel

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When Pacific Lutheran University's volleyball team was asked what they thought the key to Friday night's 3-0 Northwest Conference win against George Fox was, they said one thing: junior Lucy Capron. "Our defense really stepped it up against George Fox, and a huge shout-out goes to our outside hitter Lucy Capron," first-year Julia Hutchinson said. "She practiced so hard this week and brought that same intensity to the game. She was a big factor to our success." Senior libero Amber Aguiar agreed, SC!ying, "Lucy Capron had an outstanding game," The junior outside hitter lead the team in numerous attacking statistics en route to a key victory to keep the Lutes in first place in NWC. Capron's 16 kills, 31 total attacks and five service aces condemned Geor路ge Fox to its ninth conference loss of the year. The Bruins opened the scoring in the first set and both teams traded points in what proved to be a back-and-forth start to the match. George Fox took a 5-4 lead before the Lutes turned on the attack. Once Capron, senior Amy Wooten and junior Kylai Cooley found their rhythm, their kills helped the team finish the first set with a comfortable 25-14 score. In the second set, the crowd could be forgiven for thinking they had deja vu. The Bruins took the lead before being pegged back by the attacking power of the Lutes and key digs by Aguiar. George Fox clawed 路t heir way back after some exciting rallies to bring the score to a close 11-9 for the Lutes, but once again, PLU piled on the points to win the second set 25-14. "I thought that we came out with fire and sustained it the entire match," Aguiar said. "I felt that the starters worked really hard to give other girls the chance to play." With their backs against the wall going into the allimportant third set, George Fox came out with a purpose

and even lead the Lutes at 9-8. Despite continuing to hang with PLU at 13-15, the Lutes scored four unanswered points that turned out to be key in the 25-18 third set victory. "Our offense killed it this weekend and Amy Wooten played one of the best games I've seen from her," Hutchinson said. "It was awesome." PLU senior Samantha North was also huge for the Lutes, and her 35 assists w ere instrumental to Wooten, Cooley and Capron' s kills. "We were focused and played with purpose," Aguiar said . The Lutes took on Linfield the following day, knowing a win would keep them tied with Whitworth atop the NWC standings.

Deborah Cabanas contributed to this article Game2

On a stormy Saturday night, the Pacific Lutheran University volleyball team came out strong and defeated the Linfield Wildcats 3-0. The last time these two teams faced off, the Lutes lost the game in five sets. "We wanted to show Linfield who we are and prove that the team they beat last time is not the team we are today," first-year defensive hitter Julia Hutchison said. "We played our hearts out and beat them in three." PLU took an early lead in the first set with a score of 8-3; however, Linfield played strong to tie the set at 11-11. Linfield was up 15-13 when the Lutes took a timeout. Following the timeout, the Lutes scored seven consecutive points, which helped contribute to their 25-20 set win. The second set was a challenge as both teams went back and forth for control, which included six lead changes and 14 tie scores. With ties at 19-19 and 20-20, the intensity rose on and off the court. After they broke the tie barrier, the Lutes went on to win the set with a score of 25-23. This set win was secured with a kill by senior middle back Amy Wooten. "Last night, it felt like we had complete control of the

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Senior libero Amber Aguiar prepares to set up a teammate during the Lutes win over Linfield

game," Wooten said. "I think every girl on the team had an outstanding game." The third set was a lot easier for the Lutes as they displayed their dominance on the court. They built up an early lead to keep up a four point advantage until reaching 15-11. The Wildcats played hard to close the gap to one point, but it was not good enough. 路 The Lutes teamwork was evident as they went on to score the last six points in the game. The final kill was delivered by junior outside hitter Lucy Capron. "Our win was a full on team contribution," senior defensive hitter Amber Aguiar said. "On the court we performed on all cylinders both offensively and defensively." With the win, the Lutes have an overall record of 17-4 and a conference record of 10-2. The loss for Linfield gives them an 8-9 overall record and a 7-5 conference record. The next four games路 will be held at home on Names Family Court Friday, Oct. 31 and Saturday, Nov. 1. Both begin at 7 p.m.

Game 1 by Giancarlo Santoro and Game 2 by Deborah Cabanas


AdE PLUtonic and HERmonic debut performance review pg.5

SPORTS: Cross country competes at NWC championships pg. 11

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE .NOV. 7, 2014

OORING

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 7

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

Midterm elections: Red's on top With behind-the-scenes coverage of election night parties By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor The midterm elections saw background checks for firearms become more strict, a mostly Republican nomination across the board and a marijuana excise tax confirmed. Parties gathered around Washington to watch the midterm results pour in at 8 p.m Nov. 4. This year, more people voted by mail-in ballot than did in the 2012 presidential election. Most of the races will not be over for a while as all the ballots are assembled and counted. However, that small fact did not stop groups from celebrating the preliminary results at 8 and 9 p.m. election night. This year's election was particularly important because it came down to five Senate elections statewide to decide whether or not the Republicans would take control of the Senate. Currently, the Democrats hold 25 out of 49 Senate seats in Washington, meaning any election could turn the majority party around. One of the races to watch was the race between Steve O'Ban and Tami Green. Tuesday night, Tacoma Rep. Sen. Steve O'Ban received the news that he was ahead in his race by nearly 10 percent. He and his family celebrated when the numbers rolled in. Currently, the GOP-led coalition keeps control of the Senate and the main points on the agenda are curbing greenhouse gas emissions, a gas-tax increase for highways

PHOTO BY SAMANTHA LUND

Republican Reps. Bruce Dammeier, JT Wilcox and Steve O'Ban gather on election night, waiting for first- round results to come in.

and tax revenue to help fulfill a court mandate for schools. With the Republicans taking hold of Senate seats, it looks like that agenda will be changing. The Republicans were ahead in most of the House races as well. However, even with those leads, it is unlikely the Democrats will lose control of the House. A highlight of the night for Democrats was when the results came in for a Democrat nominee that passed away six days before the election. Rep. Roger Freeman' s name stayed on the ballot for a House seat. If he wins, another Democrat will be appointed. Mark Miloscia, a former House Democrat, switched positions and ran as a Senate Republican. Miloscia's early results showed him in the lead. If those results hold, he will enter the Senate as the 25th Republican in the 49-member Senate, giving them the majority of support in the Senate, which will likely change the course of legislation. Along with elected officials, the voters also chose not to pass Initiative 1351, which would have reduced K-12 class sizes across the state. The Initiative lost by less than 1 percent. Since 2008, Pacific Lutheran University has sent interns to KOMO News in Seattle and The News Tribune in Tacoma to give local media coverage of the events happening statewide. PLU is the only school that givesthis opportunity to Communication students in the country. Students were sent to the Republican and Democrat campaigns' election night parties, as well as the Initiative 1351, Initiative 591 and Initiative 594 election night parties. The Republicans might have gained control over the Senate, however, Initiative 594 passed which calls for more restrictions and background checks when purchasing firearms. One Republican supporter at the Rep. Party's Lakewood event heard the news and yelled, "They're taking away our guns!" At the 1-594 party, supporters surpassed the room capacity of the Edgewater Hotel ballroom. Among the many supporters was Gov. Jay Inslee and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray. "We can show the rest of the country the way by voting yes on 1-594," Murray said. By the people's vote, Washington became the first state to close the loophole on background checks. Initiative 591 did not pass, which would have made it illegal for government agencies to take away or confiscate guns without due process or from requiring background checks on firearm recipients unless a uniform national standard is required. The 1-591 party was somber, but offered supporters gun magazines to read as well as antiObama materials. Director for Development for the Second Amendment Ray Carter said 60-70 percent of the people at the 1-591 party were "carrying."

feed from #WAelex2014 Thanh Tan @TanlnSeattle

Nathan Gorton @lmnotanate

If some of these #waelex results hold , #voters deserve big kudos for seeing through spin.

Tonight's results in 19 words- don't go crazy, we have some problems but huge tax increases and enviro hysteria isn't the way up. #waelex

Ray Shipman @rayshipman22 Thank you Washington State for voting against the constitution that gave you all;the rights that you are voting against . #Waelex #i594 #i591

1e Osprey @TheAvianFurry 1-$1 is losing according to the oSeattletimes and 1-594 was approved with a clear majority of the votes. Awesome! #WAelex #Midterms2014

Ken Campp @kencamp Election day might as well be Christmas for political junkies. #waelex

PHOTO BY SAMANTHA LUND

Newly elected R-Rep. Melanie Stambaugh cuts in to her celebration cake. When Stambaugh got word she was ahead, she hugged her mom and her sister, who is her campaign manager.

The Republican and Democrat campaign parties had the normal "thank yous" after the results came in. At the Republican election party, O'Ban was the favorite of the night with his whole family there and his son, Thomas, singing the national anthem for the event. Tami Green, the Democrat nominee running against O'Ban for a Senate seat said, "I'm not surprised by the numbers cause it was gutsy for me to do this, but let's wait and see the second round," after seeing her first round of numbers coming in behind O'Ban. The Democrat's party was held at a Famous Dave's near PLU. Former PLU President the Rev. Eugene Wiegman was in attendance, showing support for the candidates. More information on the election can be found at http://thenewstribune.com and more election night party facts, quotes and pictures can be seen on Twitter by searching the hashtag #waelex.

What's In A&E Halloween's best-dresse with Lute Looks pg.5 OPINION

Naomi Bess @bessisbetter "Washington state is the first state to close the loophole by popular vote." - Cheryl Stumbo #waelex

Pierce County Auditor @PierceCountyAud Returns like a Presidential! As of 6pm, Pierce ranked in 62,250 ballots and has sorted 44,900. Numbers exceed 201 2 Election Day! #waelex

Be aware: budget binds an'd cuts on campus pg. 8 SPORTS

first place since ~98 pg.12 LUTE LIFE

From the Matrix: Stop and Usten: No, really... pg. 6-7


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

NOV. 7, 2014

LASR working to get back on air By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Pacific Lutheran University students can stream Lute Air Student Radio (LASR) via the PLU website 24/7 or at least they could until the end of last school year. Last year, LASR received a letter from the Recording Industry Association of America informing LASR that it was in direct violation for not providing metadata while streaming. Essentially, this means that LASR was not showing the information of each song it played, including the artist's name and song title. LASR did not have a program with the capability to provide metadata. LASR recently found a program that will solve their dilemma, known as Spinitron. According to Spinitron' s website, it's an online playlist-management solution that handles playlist data capture, archiving, reporting and dynamic online publishing, among many other features. Currently, LASR is in the process of having the program installed. The other issue hindering LASR from having

the station ready for the year is building its music library. Since the station runs 24/7, they need a great d eal of content to fill the time when DJ shows are not happening. To build up the music library, LASR is digitizing an immense amount of CDs. LASR is also in contact with a number of promoters who take new artists and get traction for them via airtime on college radio station s. Though LASR feels the pressure to be on the air as soon as possible, it's h ard at work making sure everything is just right to allow it to reach its potential for PLU students to enjoy. General m anager Olivia Ash's goal for LASR this year is to have the station w in Most Improved Station, an award given by the College Music Journal. The only way for LASR to receive the aw ard is to make it a space that is an open dialogue and creative space that bridges the gaps between students at PLU. The radio station is completely student-run and u ses an open format, which means DJs can play whatever music they choose. "The open format is celebratory of all music," Ash said. "LASR creates a good, cool

PLU Halloween

community through music." There have been more than 30 applicants for DJs this year. LASR is constantly hiring via their website, where one of the only requirements is to be passionate about the "awesomeness" or music. . These soon-to-be DJs will gain much experience. The DJs are taught wh at it means to make a quality show, along with all the technical ins and outs. By DJs having the opportunity to learn these aspects of radio, it inherently benefits the students of PLU. With DJs who are aware of new and upcoming trends in music, the studen ts at PLU will be able to learn more about mu sic they might not have known about. LASR also brings stu9.ents into a creative community. LASR will be on the air in the near future but details are still being figured ou t. Find more information about LASR student radio and their first showtimes of this year at their website, h ttp://www.plu.edu/lasr/.

Domestic Violence Month

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Panel meets to wrap up the month of lessons

For all ages, sizes and species, living or dead

category. Marginalized communities face extra challenges, especially the LGBTQ community. Students attended an Oct. 27 panel on Statistics show individ uals in the queer domestic violence to conclu de Domestic community are less likely to come forward Violence Awareness Month. about cases of DV. The five panel members were Jonathan Reporting cases of DV in nonGrove, former head of the PLU Men's heterosexual partnerships is especially Project; JC Pankratz, crime victim advocate difficult because it involves corning out to from the Rainbow Cen ter; Matty Smith, related institutions or to the police. They advocacy director for Rebuilding Hope!; have to come out to people who won't and Nadia Vanatter, Crystal Judson Family necessarily understand, said Grove. Justice Center. Gender makes this a bigger issue as well, The panel d efined domestic violence (DV) and the transgender community faces ext:a as the antithesis of healthy relationships. challenges. Add itionally, they said DV is about power The LGBTQ community, Pankratz said, is and con trol, and that its umbrella includes now also feeling extra pressure to remain m more than physical and sexual violence. good standing with new marriage equality Much of DV is related to violating a laws . . person's boundaries, which can start with The panel discussed rape behvern sm all instances falling into a pattern and married couples and partners, stressing increasing each year. domestic violence is illegal no matter what The panelists said 1.3 million people the relationship is between people. The are affected by DV each year in America. panelists said it's shocking for some people Rou ghly one person to realize they still have in four will experience a righ t to what happens DV, and that's only "It's stat istically imp ossible . to their own bodies. reported cases. Contrary to wh at some "It's statistically not to know someone directly people may believe, impossible not to impacted. " marriage does not make know someone a person owned by his directly impacted," Jonathan Grove or her spouse, the panel Grove said. Form.er head of the PLU Men's Project said. Panelists said Pierce County DV is equivalent to that of Seattle, because Pierce County has a higher number of crimes per capita. Students were also reminded to think 路"about the people indirectly involved with DV cases, such as children and friends of victims. "It's hard to call the cops on someone you love," Grove said. According to Grove, 'p lenty of DV instances go unreported. DV involves power and control but can include a wide variety of different tactics. There are many things a perpetrator can use to control his or her partner, such as the partner's child ren, financial control, mtimidation, coercion and rtorms. The perpetrator will use whatever works ro control a person or make them fearful of F hat will happen if they don' t do what the perpetrator wants. This isn't just an issue of men controlling women, but rather a situation that can happen between any two people. This type of relationship can be between anyone, and yet it is difficult to get people to see what it is outside of the classic male-onfemale scenario. People see DV through a narrow viewing box, which can give abusers power. This problem can make it easier for perpetrators to get away with various forms of abuse and DV that fall outside of the stereotypical

By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

PHOTO BY BROOKE WOLF E

Trick-or-treater dressed as Princess Peach and lined up at dorms for candy Oct. 31.

By BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer Strollers, families and students packed the Pacific Lu theran University campus in Halloween costumes, ready to have fun at the annual Halloween events on campus. The night started with trick-ortreating in the residence halls. A twist on this classic tradition, families from the surrounding community were invited to come spend Halloween with PLU 路 students. Children dressed up as anything from princesses to super heroes and filled the sidewalks campus-wide to hunt for candy. The lounges were decorated with cobwebs and the smiling faces of Lutes waiting for the participants. Bags of Twix, Skittles and Starbursts were opened at 6 p .m. and the candy did not stop flowing until 8 p .m. "I w anted to help out," Tinglestad RA Kenyah Huskey said. "I was home for the night and enjoyed seeing the little kids dressing up for Halloween ." During the trick-or-treating trek, Hinderlie' s Haunted House attempted to bring some screams to the night. H alloweeners entered at their own risk for a m emorable scare. The main lounge was transformed into a wicked w onderland complete with jack-o' lanterns, zombies . and plenty of terrorizing screams. "I like going through [the h aunted house)," said Marena, an elementary school student dressed as a princess. "It was not too scary."

Later in the night, students began to get ready for events of their own. Pflueger Pfright Night was a hit among Lutes as the on-campus party of the night. Costumes were encouraged and Pflueger was filled with Lutes dressed as their favorite animals and characters. Pflueger' s first floor was decorated with festiye lights, water pong tables, and carnival games. Students from the residence hall volunteered their time to decorate and make sure other Lutes enjoyed their time. "I am glad I came," first-year Ben Accord said. "The games were fun and I got to b ring my friends." After winning prizes, p arty-goers could m ake their way ou t back and enjoy some dancing. A tent was set up to create a covered d ance floor area. For students looking to relax, pumpkin painting and treats were offered upstairs. On the second floor, tables were set up with personal pumpkins to choose from and an array of p ainting supplies. From small quotes to the Batman symbols, creativity w as thriving while the sugar w as in abundance. Across the way, a caramel apple station m et every sugar need . Students lined up to make these m asterpieces of a different, edible kind. In case the sugary dipped apples weren't enough, ice cream, punch, popcorn and Tootsie Rolls were included to complete the late-night m eal. PLU's Halloween 2014 came through as a su ccess. Students and community members came together for a safe and enjoyable night.

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 7, 2014

NEWS3

HowWhen TO SOUND SMART asked about the Election Night Republicans came out on top

Minimum Wage Hikes

Based on polling, the Democrats were favored to win this election, however Republicans won the majority. With so many Republican victories, particularly in populous states like Florida and Texas, it remains very likely that Medicaid programs will remain unexpanded.

Abortion Restriction

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North Dakota and Colorado rejected "personhood" amendments that states life begins at conception. Both states rejected the amendment to add "unborn human beings" to the definition . . of "person" and "child" in the state's · criminal code. In Tennessee, they approved an ~ amendment t_hat will ~et_ the state

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Marijuana legalization

California voters approved a measure that reduces "nonserious and nonviolent property and drug crimes" from a felony to a misdemeanor, which will affect current inmates. The movement will reduce penalties for one in five criminals statewide.

Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C. passed initiatives to legalize marijuana. The measures will not take effect immediately. Alaska and Oregon are in the position to join Colorado and Washington state in the near future, with fully legalized marijuana sales.

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oters in Alaska, Arkansas, Nebraska and South Dakota approved a minimum wage increase above the federal minimum of $7.25/hr. All four states are Republican-leaning, suggesting the wage hike is fairly widespread.

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compiled from CNN. VOX.Com and The News '.lfihwle.

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CSI ••

Campus Safety Investigations

Theft in the library Campus Safety received a report of a theft from a student. The student believed her debit card was taken from her purse when she left her purse unattended on the third floor. She noticed charges at a nearby store and plans to notify the sheriff's department.

Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

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Noise control in Tinglestad

Campus Safety contacted multiple students about a complaint that others had heard them yelling and swearing. The students who were accused became argumentative. This is the third time this month Campus Safety has had to call their room for excessive noise. This incident has been forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Medical aid in the AUC Campus Safety was con~acted I because a student worker slipped on water in the kitchen and hither head as she fell. She complained of a migraine and Campus Safety escorted her back to her Resident Assistant.

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Campus Safety responded to call from Foss for medical assistance. A student had an allergic reaction to something they ate. Central Pierce Fire and Rescue responded assisted the student and transported them for treatment.

Theft in Reike

Vandalism in the AUC

Student reported an unknownl person had taken her bicycle without permission. The bike was locked up outside Reike. There is no suspect information at the time.

During a routine patrol, a Campus Safety officer noticed a damage to a mannequin sitting near the stairwell in the lower Anderson University · Center as a part of a School of Arts and Communications project. The mannequin was missing clothing. No suspect information is available at this time.

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Vandalism in Pflueger A student reported four students forced their way into his room and damaged his closet door. He denied any injury and identified two of his aggressors as off-campus students. This incident has been forwarded to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Alcohol violation in South Several Pacific Lutheran University and non-PLU students were found in a room with alcohol. There were underage students among them. Campus Safety disposed of the alcohol and reported the incident to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Week of 10/27-11/3 Campus Safety weekly reviews

are compiled from all the calls ~d reports made by Campus Safety each week. The "CSI" is compiled and written by Samantha Lund, News Editor


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

NOV. 7, 2014

PLU GOSPEL CHOIR COMING By BROOKE THAMES AdE Writer It is well-known that Pacific Lutheran University has various choirs on campus, but a new group is attempting to break out of the traditional mold and throw a new kind of culture into the mix. The Gospel Choir is a developing choral group whose goal is to bring cultural diversity and awareness to the PLU community. A gospel choir is a company of vocalists whose songs are derived from the traditional Christian hymns and chants sung by black slaves. Led by sophomore Teryn Reche, the Gospel Choir is attempting to add an element of cultural variety to the common choir experience. "This choir is ... not only for the African American community but also for those of diverse backgrounds . . . to connect musically outside of the traditional Eurocentric styles that are commonly represented here on campus," Reche said. Gospel Choir is not a new idea, however. A group of students passionate about representing African-American culture at PLU organized and conducted a Gospel Choir in the early 2000s. When the students graduated, the choir w as suspended.

Inspired by a visiting choir that performed at last year's Black History Month Concert, Reche spoke to Melannie Cunningham, the Director of Multicultural Recruitment, about bringing new life to the once-active PLU Gospel Choir. "We wanted Black History Month to be big this year and to actually be recognized, so part of that process was also adding a Gospel Choir," Reche said.

Ready to sign up? Interest meeting: 7:30 p.m. Nov. IO Mary Baker Russell Room322 Cunningham set a performance date in February for Black History Month, along with providing a choir director for the group. Support and interest from students h as proven to Reche that she and Cunningham are doing something positive for the PLU community. The two h ave w orked to resurrect the Gospel Ch oir in order to continue to pu rsue the goal of raising cultural awareness for students and faculty.

"I hope to accomplish actual diversity on campus with this project," Reche said. "Just like with [Black Student Union] or any other club, you go there to learn about different cultures through education, experiences and hanging out in a community." Reche, who is African-American, has felt pressure to conform to the ideals of Western culture in the past. Therefore, she also wants Gospel Choir to be a refuge that allows other black students to feel comfortable"participating and immersing themselves in their own cultural traditions. Her goal is to help others get in touch with and celebrate their ethnic identity through this new project. The student reaction to the idea of a Gospel Choir seems to be positive, as well. "It's a good opportunity to add depth to our choirs [on campus]," first-year Sarah Giomi said. First-year and member of the University Singers Choir, Sydney Davies agreed saying "it will be cool to see something different from the u sual here at PLU and I'm looking forward to seeing [the Gospel Choir ] perform." The Gospel Choir is anxious to receive participants who are excited to sh are this new cultural experience with their peers and w ho are eager to bring diversity and awareness to campu s.

Sidewalk Talk: Gospel Choir Interviews By MICHAEL DIAMBRI, Ad E Writer Photos By MATTHEW SALZANO, Ad E Editor

TERRAN'S take GET THE SCOOPf

Weekly Gossip }Vith Terran Go online and .get the seoQp on cekbn.ty gossip with our in-hoU$e f><>P cultur~ expert, Terran Warden!'

What your :rawntt .fand ~f~itiJr~) celebrities W-Ore blWlo~n20:I4.

·"I think [getting a gospel choir] is awesome. I really like gospel music!' Tussa Alcorne, soplwmore

"I have gone to watc h gospel choirs before and t hey're really awesome. It will add to PLU's diver sity."

"I did not know PW was getting a gospel choir. ·If I can find time to go see it, I certainly will." Garrett Hittner, first-year

"I think it's great. Religion is a founding · pillar of P LU, and having a choir Ulie that would be beneficial~

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Swing Club teaches lost art By ERIN FLOM Guest Writer

Tnis we.e t Gennf'i~refvi~ed Maureen MeGill.;' a,:PLU faculty member and au:thor wwho is wdting about peQPle who have cC)mmtmicated with the &ad.

Watch it later online at http://mastmedia.plu.edtt or tune in at 9 p.m. every Thursday to News @Nine on Mast TV!

Wandering down to The CAVE on a Monday night, one will find the comfy chairs pushed aside revealing an open floor and fast music from a past era playing. Here, students learn the dying art of swing dance. Jayde Huggard, a former student at Pacific Lutheran University, was first dragged to Swing Club in 2008 and was quickly hooked. Now, six years later, he teaches students a variety of dances during their Monday night meetings. Swing dance is an umbrella term for a variety

of dances including lindy they've learned and put hop, west coast swing and it into action with music the Charleston. from the era. It's casual and "[Swing] is easy and fast attendees can dance with to learn," Huggard said. "It's anyone. a gateway to learning other Sophomore Karin Luvaas styles of dance." joined Swing Club last year Meetings begin at 8 p.m. as a way to get involved with about 40 minutes of at PLU. She had very little instruction where students experience with dance and learn and practice new enjoyed leariUng all the dances or moves. different styles and moves. It's fast-paced with "[Learning swing] helped constant motion. Students with my confidence," don't need to bring a partner Luvaas said. because every few minutes Her favorite dance is partners rotate. This is so lindyhop. students have a chance "It's fast-paced and to dance with people of · complicated at first, but you ·different skill levels. just have to let yourself go announcements, and dance," Luvaas said. After there is a social dance from Joel Thomas, a firstabout 9-11 p.m. dancing year, enjoyed Students take what in· high school musicals but was never formally taught. Thomas enjoys the energy and feeling of swing dancing. Although he enjoys dancing, it's the people who make it even better. "Everyone loves what they do," Thomas said, "and everyone's so welcoming."

Weekly 1:30 p.m. Mondays

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Sophomore Annalise King dances with PLU alumnus and Swing Dance instructor Jayde Huggifrd at the "Fairy Tale Dance" in April 2014.


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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 7, 2014

A&E5

HALLOWEEN'S BEST DRESSED LuteLooks and The Mast report on what Lutes rocked their look A NOTE FROM A&E EDITOR MATIHEW SALZANO: LuteLooks editor Grace Takehara and I went out to Pflueger Pfright Night Oct. 31 to find the best-dressed Lutes. While I took photos, she scouted with her acute eye for the fashionable styles dominating the room. While every Lute was rocking it this Halloween, we think these few deserve to be listed as our top 5.

By GRACE TAKEHARA LuteLooks Editor Sophomore Allison Bourquin mean-mugged as Wrath, one of the seven deadly sins. Rocking black leather and ripped tights, Bourquin looked like she's straight out of a moody Sky Ferreira music video. Giving a classic Disney character a makeover, Foss and Pflueger's Resident Director, Angel de Jesus Gonzalez, looked quirky and polished as the Mad Hatter. Gonzalez tastefully mixed his plaid vest with a paisley dress shirt topping it off with a cool hat. With elaborate makeup and an outfit complete from headto-toe, sophomore Kiera Stevens scored major points in execution and creativity. As a "Steampunk Robot," Stevens ventured away from mainstream and proved that originality makes an impact and is epically awesome. Dressed as the iconic Princess Peach, senior Lauren Mendez looked sweet and ready to take on any fantasy foe. Mendez captured every element of Peach, from the blonde hair to her bubblegum pink dress - all she was missing was Mario. Senior Dania Tolentio repped the new girl in music, FKA Twigs. With her gelled baby hair and all, Tolentio looked ultra cool and proved that Halloween costumes can make a fashion statement.

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PLUtoniC and HERmonic

Review: this academic year's debut performance PLUtonic, HERmonic has formed a sisterhood. "I am so blessed to be given the wonderful opportunity to sing with these girls and learn from them," fi!st-year HERmonic member Amira Beidas said. "They are some of the most talented girls I have ever met!" HERmonic and PLUtonic are excellent representations of the talented young individuals gracing the stage at PLU.

By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer Harmonizing until kingdom come, Pacific Lutheran University's a cappella groups HERmonic and PLUtonic graced the stage at 8 p.m. Oct. 29 in Lagerquist Concert Hall. Each a cappella group sang seven songs and captivated with melodious audiences harmonies and engaging performances. Both groups accepted donations that went toward funding this year's trip to the International Championships of Collegiate A Cappella (ICCA). Both groups have done well at ICCA - last year, HERmonic sang in semi-finals. PLUtonic Having singers with range that would make Mariah Carey jealous, PLUtonic really brought their great vocal technique to Lagerquist Wednesday night. PLUtonic shined in their second set with a wildly entertaining rendition of "Rude" by Magic!, when they brought a young lady onto the stage and serenaded her. The entire audience laughed and swayed along.

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DIAMBRI

LEFT: three PLUtonic members sing "Hooked on a Feeling" by B.J. Thomas. RIGHT: HERmonic members sing the song "Break Free" by Ariana Grande. Both groups performed Oct. 29 in Lagerquist Concert Hall.

Clearly, this group of young men put a lot of effort into their presentations. "It's a brotherhood, a family," senior .Matt Serino said. "Shows are hard to put on sometimes but it's amazing, and being with these guys is worth it." Serino is right. PLUtonic was amazing and the crowd agreed. "The PLUtonic men had great stage presence and cheered each other on," first-year Sophia Mahr said. "It was wonderful to be in that atmosphere - it really felt like they were making the audience a part of the show."

HERmonic HERmonic strutted their stuff on the stage dressed in black attire and laced in sparkling jewelry. Their jewelry was not the only thing that shone on the stage: HERmonic showed the PLU community why they are one of the area's premier collegiate a cappella groups. Creatively presenting renditions Qf songs such as "Girls Chase Boys" by Ingrid Michaelson and "Human" by Christina Perri, HERmonic captivated audiences with their sexy, stunning voices. Sophomore Kiana Norman

performed the Ariana Grande song "Break Free" to perfection. "[My performance was] super fun, but crazy!" Norman said. Another great performance by HERmonic was a solo from junior Denae McGaha, who soulfully sang "I Choose You." HERmonic capped off the show .with a fun, flirty and Halloweenthemed performance of Rihanna' s "Disturbia," a perfect a cappella song. These girls 路 clearly work hard -on their harmonies and are all extremely gifted young ladies. Similar to the brotherhood of

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 7, 2014

From The Matrix:

LUTE LIFE 7

STOP AND LISTEN: no, really. ••

By LAURA JOHNSON Matrix Co -Editor

By ANGIE TINKER Matrix Co -Editor

What do stop signs and Pacific Lutheran University's social justice journal, The Matrix, have in common this semester? For both, you are required to come to a complete stop. When I first came up with this question, I could not help but cringe; it almost sounds like the punch line of a badly constructed joke. Yet, as we were brainstorming ideas for how to promote and explain this semester's theme of The Matrix, "STOP & LISTEN," I could not help but continue to refer back to the iconic red and white of a stop sign. Whenever one encounters a stop sign, its meaning seems easy enough: stop. However, the more you drive and walk through intersections, you come to realize that there can be a plethora of interpretations of what stop means. There will be drivers who pause for the recommended "one-Mississippi," drivers who lightly tap on their breaks in a "rolling stop" and those who merely see this sign as a suggestion and not a law as they drive right through. It is similar when talking about stopping in a social justice context. When you ask people to stop and listen to social justice issues, there are people who give you their undivided attention and truly listen to what you have to say, those who might take out a single headphone to hear about your latest issue for advocacy and those who will pass right by your petition altogether. However, like a stop sign, there truly is a right way to stop. And really, there is a necessity to stop. Living in a world with complex local, national, and global issues, we cannot as a society - and as a campus - be breezing on by when we are asked to stop and think about social justice. Advocacy and writing about our stories is empowering, but it loses meaning without a receptive and respectful audience. Therefore, while we are working this semester at The Matrix to encourage students to write about issues they want their fellow Lutes to pay attention to, we are also encouraging students to think more critically about what it means to listen .

Talking is only half of a conversation; the other half is listening. When thinking about issues of social justice, it's important to take time to follow The Matrix's theme this year and Stop & Listen. I'm on the debate team, which has given me way too much time to argue with other people. When I'm outside of debate rounds, though, I don't usually like to get into too much direct rebuttal. The reason is that any good debater knows that it's far more important to really know what someone is saying. Otherwise, people just end up talking past each other. Why is that a social justice issue? There are crucial issues in society where people are on opposing sides. Listening takes respect. When talking about someone you disagree with, it's too simple to just repeat what others say. It's too easy to say, "I disagree with that politician because my friends all say that the politician hates America." It becomes an echo chamber. Listening is something radically different, though. It takes a serious moment to stop, to let go of all of the preconceptions and assumptions, to truly listen to what someone has to say. It isn't easy. In fact, it can be incredibly frustrating to listen to someone. The urge to interject, to disprove, to argue, is strong. Even if we can stay silent, that doesn't mean that we are really listening. We can tune out, we can stay disinterested, or worse, we can avoid even showing up. . Listening to someone means giving them your full time and attention. It extends beyond the time and place. It means keeping it in mind. That' s something I think we all deserve. The deadline for submissions for The Matrix is Nov. 10. You can submit poetry, prose and photos to http://matrixaplu.edu or on our website.

COURTESY OF THE MATRIX

This is the cover of The Matrix from Fall 2013 titled "Common Ground." Copies of this issue and the "Mosaic" from Spring 2014 can be found outside The Matrix and Saxifrage office in AUC 144.

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sugar By KARA LARSON Saxifrage Contributor Perfection must be distinct for everyone or America would be cheerleaders and lawyers and Gap babies.

How about three groovy chicles with freshly shaven pale legs in a red car with the passenger window rolled down no - cracked And a curvy old highway with \hose hallucination heat ripples rising from the stretched pavement even in March And a bumpy wooded driveway to a rusty moldy cabin with an unbelievable deck before a smooth mirror of old growth and mountains with a pinch of snow lingering

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And margaritas feta cheese green garlic olives hummus tomatoes cucumbers and that good chewy bread It was March. PHOTO COtnn'ESY OF S.lXIP'llAGE

Kara Larson graduated from PLU in 2001 with a degree in English Writing. She was working as a member of the SaxifrwJe staff where she met some of her most genuine, lifelong friends. She now lives in Seattle with her husband and two dogs. While no longer a poet, she earns a living writing for Starbucks.

Saxifrage is open for submission for publication in the Mast. Send your poetry, visual art, fiction and creative non-fiction totalling no more than 500 1fOTds any time to saxifrag@plu.edu for consideration. Find us on Facebook, Twitter and dt http://saxifrage.plu.edu

And sunning and swimming in briefs and bras and then skin and realizing only a little later there was an old man down the beach, fishing. He couldn't see the details. And walking down the wobbly pier to toss croutons (we ate all the good chewy bread) to the lonely birds. They landed in the mirror like little dried sponges. And stopping to dance on the aged gray log savagely: like no one was looking and no one was and we made noise with our bodies and laughter that we would never make if we knew someone was looking or maybe now we would. On the blue drive back up that curvy old highway

Sax·i·frage

with scorched cheeks and salty skins we rolled up that cracked window and said that was a perfect day.

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l=THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

NOV. 7, 2014

Everyone can be a feminist: A male perspective By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer

Social equality is what the feminist movement stands for, but this has not always been the case. Whenever I have identified myself as a feminist to my male friends, I am usually met with blank stares, quick judgments or indifference. As a middle-class white male, I thought that no one would respect or want to hear my opinions on equality because I thought they wouldn't be welcomed. Feminism has been portrayed in our society and through social media as men being on trial, not about fair treatment of all people. A few years ago when I was talking to a close friend, I described my beliefs in equality. She said that I was essentially a feminist. To which I said, "I am not a woman, so that is impossible." The label "feminist" leads many men away from feminism, because they see it being exclusively for women. This is not the intention of the word. It is supposed to be different from "chauvinist," who is someone who believes a member of

one sex or group of people is superior to another and thus deserves better treatment. The feminist movement has not portrayed and advertised itself in a way that has been welcoming to men. This is because the movement has been interpreted as feminist hating men and them no longer wanting ordinary white males to have a say in equality. Social media campaigns like #YesAllWomen, a Twitter hashtag in which users share examples of mistreatment toward women, have made many men think that they are not allowed to be feminists and feminists do not accept them because of their gender. This is something that needs to change. The feminist movement needs to be about equality. That is what many feminists are striving to do now. Actress Emma Watson gave a speech

I should be paid the same as my male counterparts, I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body, I think it is right that women be involved in the policies and decisions that affect my life." Watson worded this beautifully in her speech. Whether female or male, as humans we deserve to have our voices heard in society, so that no one gets left behind, has to suffer or is mistreated for who he or she was created as. should be supporting Men campaigns like HeForShe. "It's about eliminating inequality, and creating equality of the genders... making an equal plane" said junior anthropology and women and gender studies major Nate Bannister. "If men support feminism, we are helping eliminating self-hate and unfairness in our society." 路 Bannister said many Americans misunderstand the feminist movement. "A lot of people in our society like Rush Limbaugh broadcast what they believe feminism to be, without really understanding it, and others listen," Bannister said. It is important for everyone to support social equality. If we want to see change, as Bannister emph asized, feminism is a movement for everybody. So, men, if we believe in equality, let's not be afraid to identify ourselves as feminists. Let's, at least, speak up and help others achieve the same rights we have. Let all members of humankind have their fundamental rights.

"Th e label "feminist" itself leads many men away from feminism, because they see it being exclu sively for women." on gender equality to the United Nations earlier this year for the HeForShe campaign, urging men and women alike to simply recognize equality and become advocates for change. "If there is one thing I know for certain it is that this [feminism being considered man-hating] has to stop," Watson said. "For the record, feminism by definition is the belief that men arid women should have equal rights and opportunities. I think it is right that

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MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The Mooring Mast

Be aware of budget binds and cuts on campus

Students going to a private university like Pacific Lutheran University are bound to spend large amounts of money to earn their respective degrees. So much in fact, that according to The Project on Student Debt, an initiative of the Institute for College Access & Succes, 56 percent of college students in Wasliington state will leave college with financial debt. But, we never really expect the university we're attending to

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Zachary Boyle

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By ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager and Online Editor

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

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be going through the same thing. Unfortunately, here at PLU, we're experiencing a budget crisis. In every department, we will be noticing cut backs here and there. It may be seen across campus as less funding for students to attend conferences in various departments, cutbacks on funding for Student Media and other clubs around campus and new charges when they decide they need to take their lunch on the go. In a memo sent to PLU faculty and staff, President Thomas Krise blamed the budget cuts on a smaller first-year class. In the same memo, Krise reassured staff and faculty that the admissions department has implemented new marketing materials in order to attract more first-years to apply and attend PLU next fall. PL U is preparing for the enrollment of first-years to get worse before it gets better, but PLU plans on being creative and proactive in its approaches over the next couple of years, hoping that their approaches will result in an improvement of numbers that also keep with our academic reputation. While Krise tells staff and faculty

that the operating budget for this year and next will be significantly impacted, steps are being implemented to work with fewer resources, such as growing revenuegenerating programs. In the next couple weeks, I will be sitting down with President Krise, who has graciously agreed to talk to me about the budget problem at PLU. I intend to find out more specifics about the projects PLU is generating in order to improve the budget and increase enrollment for the coming years, as well as more specifics on what programs and departments are the hardest hit by budget cuts. Stay tuned as I find out more information on what changes we may see around campus in the next couple years. As a senior, my time at PLU may be quickly coming to an end, but before I leave I'd like to know what problems and obstacles the next general manager of Mast TV and Mast Media staff have to endure so I can try to prepare them for the next couple years, even if it means a bigger cut on our student media budget or further cutbacks on programming.

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the P acific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalist s Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. 路 Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections Oct. 31 Issue In the article "NOMT 2014: Studentproduced musical revue brightens three nights," Amelia Heath should be credited as the assistant director; senior Mitchell Helton was the stage manager for Night of Musical Theatre. In the article "You can have it all" Sponsors David and Marilyn Knutson's names were mispelled. The leader of the Agape International Spiritual center is named Michael Bernard Beckwith, not Brentworth.


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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 7, 2014

OPINION 9

Don't let feminist misconceptions fill your mind By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer Feminism is a popular and ever-growing ideology present worldwide. Despite its popularity, it has a lot of misconceptions. One of the mostcommonmis_conceptions is that all feminists hate men. Do some feminists hate men? Yes. Are they statistically likely to have experienced multiple traumatic events with multiple men throughout their lifetime? According to organizations like the Women's Aid Federation, that's incredibly likely. In those cases, their feelings toward men and masculine culture are understandable. However, not all feminists hate men. A lot of feminists find men to be quite amiable. Feminists oppose dominant power structures in society that unfairly benefit men while disenfranchising other genders. Unfortunately, men constructed_those power structures. That's why they get the blame most of the time. Even if the men

currently alive did not construct those power structures, they still benefit from them. "For a long time I thought that all feminists were hyper-masculine lesbians," said senior Christina Erikson. Erikson has done research surrounding feminist issues for her capstones including the treatment of women in America in modem Islam. "When I was in high school, I thought I couldn't be a feminist, because I wasn't a masculine lesbian. Now I know that isn't true." Feminists support women. Feminists, therefore, support feminine traits and a woman's right to self-determinate. If a person wants to be a housewife at a young age and have a lot of children, that isn't anti-feminist in any way; it is just as valuable as a person who wants to be a CEO and never have children. What matters is that the individual can choose what they want. There's also an incredibly common belief that men cannot be feminists. This is somewhat of a controversial topic within feminist circles.

Many feminists claim because feminism is historically a safe space for women, men should not be able to enter that space by calling themselves feminists. Rather, they should refer to themselves as "feminist allies." Others argue that anybody who believes women fundamentally deserve the same rights as men are feminists, regardless of their gender identity. "I honestly do not care," Erikson said. "As long as a man does not speak over a woman on feminist issues, he can be whatever he wants to be. The title doesn't matter but the actions do." Feminists oppose dominant power structures in society that unfairly benefit men while disenfranchising all other genders. This is better known as the patriarchy. Unfortunately, it is not only non-males who are harmed under the patriarchy. It is a common myth that feminists only support and fight for ·women's issues while · ignoring the ways men can be hurt. This is ardently false. Within the realm of the patriarchy, men are also frequently

harmed. The difference is that men are taught to hide their traumatic experiences so as not to appear weak. This results in instances of abuse toward males being largely ignored. Just as feminism has tried to break down the boundaries of femininity by saying that not all women have to be a specific way, feminists are trying to do the same thing for masculinity. Men do not have to be uber-macho gods who are pinnacles of strength. Just like with every thing else in the world, there are a lot of different misconceptions about feminism. However, the most common ones are that all feminists hate men, that feminists are masculine lesbians, that men can't be feminists and that feminists only fight for women. And none of these misconceptions are true.

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Universal Crossword

Study Break Life Hacks

Edited by Timo thy E. Parker November 2, 20 14 ACROSS 1 " Four" at the

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THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

NOV. 7, 2014

IPOITI ICDBllOARD AROUND THE

Football

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TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Pacific

5

2

0

5-0

Won5

Linfield

6

0

4-1

Lostl

Whitworth

6

3

0

4 -2

Won2

PLU

5

2

0

3-2

Won2

team

Willamette

5

2

0

3-2

Wonl

SWIMMING: Pacific Lutheran

Puget Sound

3

4

0

2-3

Lost 2 Lost 7 Lost 8

~ell Sullenberger qdped lhe Lute women's team tie for ~meet title.of Friday's NWC

George Fox

0

7

0

0-5

Lewis & Clark

0

8

0

0-6

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 8 vs. Whitworth, 1p.m.

Women's Soccer WINS

TEAM

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Men's Soccer

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 7 vs. Willamette, 11 a.m.

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WINS

Whitworth

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Willamette

12

5

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12

LOSSES

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J;lelays.' Sulknbe.rgerswam in the mixed 200 medley relay . . LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 8 vs. Puget Sound, 1:30 p.m. ll:-44.05) and women's 300 · 1 !>reaststoke relay teams (3:28.63). 1 ~he followed that with a pair of WINS LOSSES TIES CONFERENCE event titles (1:02.19 in the 100 IM ! TEAM lmd 30.96 in the so breastroke>. 'I PLU 12-2 19 4 0 l ! 12-2 Whitworth 5 0 19 SOCCER: The NWCtabIJ 10-4 has seen three different teams, 12 Puget Sound 11 0 Whitworth, Willamette and UPS Linfield 8-6 9 10 0 ~tin fust place at some point 11 12 6-8 0 ~is season. Heading into the . . Willamette Jast game of the season, all three ~ Lewis & Clark 5-9 11 12 0 !eams have the potential to win 14 5-9 9 0 i:he conference title. Whitworth ~: Whitman ~t (30 pts), Willamette is secon~ George Fox 20 3-11 4 0 li9 pts) and UPS is third (28 pts.) i

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 7 vs. Willamette, 7p.m.

Santoro Speaks... Christmas is starting a little earlier every year By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor

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If you're a fan of good cheer, decadent food and festive gatherings, be glad you live in the Pacific Northwest, because the fall and winter months here are a holiday lover's paradise. With Halloween behind us and the jacko' -lanterns starting to collapse, we can now look forward to the next big holiday. Christmas. Or am I forgetting something? Ah, Thanksgiving. How could I forget? It seems every year, Christmas has slowly been creeping up on Thanksgiving when we least expect it, and people are starting to take notice. United States Women's National soccer team forward Alex Morgan was among those who are not too pleased with Christmas coming early, and she went to so.cial media, of course, to vent about it. "Seriously saw Christmas wreaths and ornaments all over Houston today. Come on people. Too early. Too early ...," Morgan said. We've all heard it from both sides of the issue: either you complain about hearing Christmas music as soon as the calendar hits November, or you are gleefully singing along to "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer." I even overheard a conversation about someone listening to Christmas music a week before Halloween started. It's no secret anymore, and to be honest, it really never was. Christmas is America's favorite holiday. A multi-billion-dollar industry, Christmas has conditioned us as a society to start gearing up to spend big 'on gifts, trees and lights as soon as possible. Thanksgiving doesn't have anywhere near the same pull in terms of marketability as Christmas, which is often why it seems to be rushed out the door like an unwanted guest. If the capitalization of the holidays bothers you, I am sorry to say not much can be done to stop it. A 2012 statistic from Statista puts total retail industry sales during Christmas time at $3 .12 trillion. As the population continues to rise in the U.S., this number will only continue to

increase. Compared to $59.1 billion spent on Thanksgiving in 2013, according to U.S. News, and $6.9 billion spent on Halloween, according to Forbes, it is painfully obvious that Christmas is also America's No. 1 consumer spending holiday. Basically, we have ourselves to blame for the phenomenon of Christmas decorations going up earlier and earlier every year. Pacific Lutheran University, and most universities around the country know this, and the annual PLU Christmas Concert is . one of the university's top grossing events. PLU Christmas Concert ticket sales opened at 7 a.m. sharp, and eager concertgoers had already been lined up since 5:30 a.m. on Nov. 3. Just three hours later, the concert sold out completely. As if the tickets flying off the printer weren't enough of an indication that PLU is all about Christmas, Santa Claus made an appearance in PLU's Anderson University Center the following day. Thanksgiving lacks the same feel-good vibe as Christmas, and while is hard to beat the Thanksgiving spread, there's a reason PLU doesn't have a Thanksgiving turkey concert. The answer of how to push Christmas back to its rightful month is unclear, but at least football does its part to make Thanksgiving relevant. So, please, save your trip to the Christmas tree farm until the Thanksgiving leftovers have been eaten.

PHOTO BY RELAND TUOMI

Santa visited PLU as part of a Business 201 class project called Biz Venture. Students set up a photo booth with Santa to generate funds for a charity that will be chosen once the project is completed.

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Yes, cool it down Christmas- 76°/o No, get into the spirit!- 24°/o


_,,,. THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 7, 2014

11 SPORTS

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Lute cross country gives all at NWC Championships Using their home-field advantage, the men and women runners for Willamette swept the team titles for the second year in a row. The Bearcat women's 16 points were one shy of a perfect score, and dwarfed the PLU women's score of 229. For the women, sophomore Genevieve Brandt's 23:51.2 time helped her to a 33rd place finish in the 6k, the highest for the Lutes. During the same race, sophomore Shailee R. Woodard and junior Amie Wilson placed 54th and 59th, with times of 24:50.2 and PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS 24:54.1, respectively. PLU sophomore Genevieve Brandt was the highest finisher for both the men and women's team at the Northwest "We worked together in our Conference Championships at Willamette University in Salem, Ore. Brandt will now begin preparation for the races and overall performed NCAA Regionals. well," Brandt said. "Six of the girls set a season personal Conference Championships Saturday in record on the course that was muddy and By GIANCARLO SANTORO Salem, Ore. Sports Editor slow. They were really competing." "What impressed me is the incredible Whether it was the mud or the Runners are often their own toughest amount of focus and support that everyone competition, the PLU men couldn't muster critics, but the Pacific Lutheran University had without taking it too seriously," enough points, and finished at the foot of men's and women's cross country senior Hannah Walton said. 'J\11 of us had the table with 254 points. teams didn't take their ninth and sixth our parts to play during the race路 and we Like the women, the Willamette men's place finishes to0 hard at the Northwest executed them beautifully." team dominated with 41 points.

Sophomore Charles Mogen's 41st place in the 8k led the PLU men, and sophomores Matthew Macfarlane and Brendon Bonnell finished in the top 60 for the Lutes. The women's team and Magen will continue training in preparation for NCAA Regionals Nov. 15, also at Willamette University on the same course. "The women's team has an incredible strength and tenacity that keeps surprising me," Walton said. "The combination of supportive teammates, amazing coaches and great managers made this weekend so worth it.

_,,,,...

"All of us had our parts to play during the race and we executed them beautifully." Hannah Walton senior

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Volleyball sweeps Oregon schools again at home By GIANCARLO SANTORO AND DEBORAH CABANOS Sports Editor and Guest Writer Gamel Halloween night can give anyone the spooks, but the Pacific Lutheran University volleyball team did the scaring against visiting Lewis & Clark College on Friday, sweeping the Pioneers in three sets to continue its march toward the Northwest Conference title. Senior Amy Wooten and juniors Lucy Capron and Kylai Cooley continued their impressive form and combined for 30 kills throughout the match. "We had an incredible crowd on Halloween night and I believe that we used that energy from the fans to give us some momentum," senior Lauren McClung said. Not distracted by the wide array of costumes in the crowd, the Pioneers took the lead against the Lutes, and it was a close match halfway through the first set with the score at 14-13 in favor of PLU. Six unanswered points helped PLU feel a little more comfortable at 20-14. "We could have stopped them from going on fewer serving runs," junior Alyssa Workman said. "They had a couple times where they got four or five points, so limiting those would obviously have helped." PLU took the set 25-17. Lewis & Clark matched up well with the Lutes, and the team fed off the energy of every missed shot by PLU in the second set. Despite not holding the lead after going up 3-1, the Pioneers were a thorn in the side of the Lutes, and three straight points cut into PLU's lead at 14-15. Senior Sam North was setting well the whole night and eventually helped the team finish out the second set 25-19. "I think we played great defense in the first two sets," Workman said. "Lewis & Clark was scrappier than we expected, so there was a lot of long rallies." The third set tested the Lutes' defensive ability and the Pioneers were determined to make the game difficult in a 路 do-or-die set. PLU seems to have a habit of trading points early on in sets, and Lewis & Clark started well by taking a 5-3 lead. Both teams went back and forth for the rest of the_ set, and the Pioneers held a. three-point advantage over the Lutes at 16-13. A nail-biter at 22-22, the Lutes didn't panic and took the last three points to earn the sweep with a 25-22 third set win. North finished the game with 39 assists and senior Ariana Judson added seven kills. "Moving forward, we can; t waste time and energy worrying about what other teams in the conference are doing," Judson said. "We just have to focus on ourselves

PHOTO COURl"ESY OF ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS

The volleyball team lines up prior to its home match against Pacific at the Names Family Court. Six seniors, Amber Aguiar, Amy Wooten, Ariana Judson, Samantha North and Lauren McClung, were honored during Senior Night and came away with the three_set sweep.

and our upcoming matches." With the win, PLU improved to 11-2 in NWC and 18-4 overall. Lewis & Clark dropped to 5-9 in conference and 11~12 overall. PLU returned to the Names Family Court the following day to take on Pacific.

Game2 The Lutes played against the Pacific Boxers Saturday, coming out triumphant with another three set sweep in their last weekend home game of the season. The seniors were also honored in a pregame ceremony. ''.Although it was senior night, we, as a team, wanted to play for the seniors since it was their special night," said sophomore defensive specialist Taylor Komagome. The game started off with the Lutes getting to a solid four-point lead. However, the Boxers rallied to bring the score to 11-10. This didn't stop the Lutes as they went on to win the set 25-14, scoring 14 points out of the last 18 plays in the set. The second set proved to be more challenging as the game tied at 13-13 and again at 16-16. The Lutes eventually went on to win the set with a score of 25-17. "There was a moment in the second set where we seemed to let up a little, but for the most part we played very strong and consistent," senior middle blocker Lauren McClung said. 路 The Lutes won the third set in a pretty quick round.

With a third set score of 25-14 and the sweep secured, the players could rest and enjoy the win. The stands and student sections were filled as the PLU community came to support their girls in their final weekend home game. Amber Aguiar, Amy Wooten, Ariana Judson, Samantha North, and Lauren McClung were the seniors recognized on Senior Night. For North, the game did not feel any different. "I know we still have some of the season left," North said. "I do not think it will hit me until next year when I do not have school or volleyball to occupy my time." McClung saw the game as a special night as support from fans, friends and family flooded the court. With the two wins last Saturday, the Lutes have a 12-2 Northwest Conference record and an overall record of 194. Pacific continued to struggle and fell to 2-12 in conference and 6-16 overall. "Even though last night was sentimental, we are still looking forward to finishing off our conference strong in hopes to continue on in the regional tournament," McClung said. The Lutes will play their final game of the NWC season on Wednesday Nov. 5 at home against University of Puget Sound at 7 p.m. and finish the season away at Willamette in Salem, Ore., also at 7 p.m. Game 1 by Giancarlo Santoro and Game 2 by Deborah Cabanas

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 7, 2014

12 SPORTS

PLU: ready for NBA season By JAKE BILYEU Guest Writer Just as the Major League Baseball season comes to an end, the National Basketball Association season has come to fill the void. The offseason was filled with crazy twists and turns, with the greatest being LeBron James taking his talents from South Beach and returning to the Cleveland Cavaliers. former Minnesota Timberwolves center Kevin Love arrived with James as w ell, and the time has come to see if all of the big stars can walk the walk again. The exhilarating action of Wednesday night focused on the team that ended last season on top, the San Antonio Spurs. The defending champions hosted the Dallas Mavericks, a division rival and one of the few teams predicted to be atop the stacked Western Conference this season.

The contest got off to a slow start, but after the stars of both teams had shaken off the rust, the intensity picked up very quickly, with the Mavericks taking a 53-45 lead into halftime. However, the Spurs took control of the game in the third quarter, and then held off a late and furious Dallas comeback to win 101-100. The second primetime game of the night pitted the Houston Rockets against the Los Angeles Lakers, featuring the highly anticipated return of the Lakers' star Kobe Bryant. However, the Rockets were there to crash the party, and they did just that. Houston cruised all game, dominating the Lakers from inside and out and ultimately winning 108-90. To make matters worse, the Lakers star rookie, Julius Randle, suffered from a broken leg injury in the fourth quarter of his NBA debut, putting a damper on the evening in Los Angeles.

It must be said that basketball's popularity h as w aned over the years, and according to statistics taken from the Harris Poll in January 2014, just 6 percent of Americans consider basketball their favorite sport. Despite this, the Pacific Lutheran University Men's Basketball team is excited, and shared their thoughts on the upcoming NBA season. . "What I'm looking forward to about the NBA season is to see the NBA teams that completely changed their roster around, like the Cavaliers, Mavericks, Celtics, Timberwolves, Wizards and Bulls," first-year Dylan Foreman said . "I'm excited to see how the new players mesh with their new teams." Sophomore Clint Absher was also ready fur basketball season to start. 'Tm most excited for Derrick Rose to get to play this year," he said. "He's finally returning from injury and his passion for the game makes him exciting to watch." It's sure to be an exciting NBA season, and hopefully PLU is ready for greatness as well.

Basketball: the superior sport By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer

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With all due respect to comedian George Carlin, when it came to which sport is the best, I believe he had it all wrong. On Wednesday, Oct. 29, two major sporting events took place: the National Basketball Association season opener .and game seven of Major League Baseball's World Series, where the San Francisco Giants beat the Kansas City Royals 3-2. Carlin had a hilarious monologue "Baseball versus Football," where he laid out why he believes baseball is superior to football. · With two major sporting events scheduled on the same night, I'm giving a nod to Carlin by doing my own, "Basketball versus Baseball." "The relationships that are built between baseball players, and the competitiveness between the line is incredible.

There is nothing better," said first-year infielder for Pacific Lutheran University's baseball team Landon Packard. In basketball, fans can depend on the game lasting 2.5 hours, whereas in baseball the game can last up to four hours. In basketball, if a player is not in he sits on a bench. The thought of a bench is just lovely. But in baseball, when a player is not in, he sits in a dugout, essentially a hole in a ground where people spit. In basketball, when a player is under misconduct, he receives a nice card, a kind gesture from the referee. When a player in baseball commits an offense, he's thrown out. In basketball, players can be seen on the sideline enjoying · a refreshing glass of Gatorade. Yet baseball players are seen leaning against the railing of the dugout chewing tobacco, a substance shown to cause cancer. In basketball, hand signals are used sparingly, mainly when a player sinks a three his teammates make the three

point goggles gestures. Hand signals are used excessively in baseball that it looks like there's a bug eternally flying around the face of the one doing the signals. In basketball, the coaching staff wear suits. It's professional - they look nice and in charge. Imagine Terry Stotts, the coach of the Portland Trail Blazers, wearing a uniform. No one, especially his players, would take him seriously . Baseball coaches wear the same outfit as their players, and it looks as though they were too cheap to go buy a suit and instead they grabbed a spare uniform from the locker room. In basketball, the pace of play is quick, with points constantly being scored. The game is then exciting and entertaining, keeping fans on the edge of their seats. Quite the opposite happens in baseball, where fans can doze off for an inning without missing anything. America's greatest pastime is really America's greatest naptime.

Women's soccer defeats UPS for first time since '98 By CHRISTIAN BOND

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Guest Writer Rivalry games are one of the best parts of college sports, and rivalry games with conference implications are even better. The Pacific Lutheran University women's Soccer team had a chance to take a threepoint lead at the summit of the Northwest Conference. That was exactly what they did as they beat the University of Puget Sound 3-1 Wednesday, Oct. 29 on PLU's East Field. With both.teams sitting at the top of the conference standings, coaches, players and fans knew the game would be great. The first half was evenly matched. Back-up junior goalkeeper Bryce Kennedy was able to step up big with clutch save after clutch save for the Lutes. Both teams had their chances, but the first half ended in a 0-0 tie. Coach Seth Spidahl was proud of his defensive squad. "Bryce· Kennedy, who had not played yet in the regular season as a goalkeeper, stepped up to play really well because Takara [Mitsui] was out with a concussion." Spidahl also highlighted the play of PLU' s back four, comprised of sophomores Kelly White and Lena Moreno, first-year Megan Anderson, and junior Nicoya Benham-Marin, saying they all did well. Coming out of the half, the sense of urgency to get on the board first was apparent. In the 53rd minute, the Lutes got a chance on a corner kick. Moreno sent a beautiful ball across the front of the goal into a crowd of players. Out of nowhere, first-year Hailey Smoot was able to leap over everyone in her way and head the ball just under the cross bar and into the back of the net. The scoring did not stop there. In the 69th minute, senior Blake Warner

was able to send a pass right in front of the goal. · Waiting there was first-year Machaela Graddy, who was able to skip the ball into the bottom left corner of the goal. This put the Lutes up 2-0, and much closer to winning a conference championship. UPS was not ready to give up, however. In the·79th minute, senior Robin Vieira of the Loggers was able to send in an absolute laser past the Lute keeper. Although the goal was impressive, the Loggers remained down 2-1 with about 10 minutes left in the game. To add an exclamation point to a stellar game from the PLU women's Soccer team, junior Lauren Larson was able to add another goal in the 87th minute. Larson received a pass from junior Emily Hanna, and from the top of the box put one past the Logger keeper, all but assuring the win for the Lutes. "I thought we played good and deserved to win, and it wasn't like we scored and then hung on to win by defending," Spidahl said. "Our energy, focus, concentration and discipline was as good as it's been all season." The Lutes traveled to Pacific Saturday, Nov. 1 and came away with a 2-1 win in second overtime, courtesy of a golden goal by sophomore forward Kailey Rozell. With the wins, PLU improved its NWC record to 12-2 and 14-3-1 overall. Pacific fell to 3-10-1 in NWC and 6-11-1 overall. Sitting in first place with a three-point cushion above second-place UPS, PLU could win the conference title outright with two wins when they travel to Oregon to face Willamette and third-place Linfield Saturday Nov. 7 and Sunday Nov. 8. Both games start at 11 a.m.

PHOTOS BY GIANCARLO SANTORO

ABOVE: First-year Haily Smoot jumps with a UPS defender to meet the ball and eventually scores off of a header from a corner kick by sophomore defender Lena Moreno. BELOW: Both t eams react after Smoot's goal gave the Lutes a 1-0 lead against rivals UPS.


AdE

SPORTS

Trolli Takeover: PLU's newest candy trend

Men's Soccer finishes season with cross-town loss

pg.5

pg.11 ' PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVEJ;lSITY

HE NOV. 14, 2014

OORING http://mastmedia.plu.edu

Veterans Day Ceremony

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 8

STAFFING ERROR Campus Safety leaves students without a ride By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUERAND PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

On Veterans Day Nov. 11, 2014, Pacific Lutheran University held a special Veterans Day ceremony in Lagerquist as well as a weekend football game in their honor Nov. 9. This year's ceremony was particularly emotional. Read more on pg. 2.

New Integrity Policy Students overwhelmingly vote yes An example of a major infraction would be a student plagiarizing a paper in its entirety. A minor infraction would be a The Associated Students of student doing a citation incorrectly Pacific Lutheran University voted or forgetting a citation altogether. on a new Academic Integrity Policy When a professor writes up a Nov. 4. The new policy, Senate student for a major infraction, it still goes on his or her permanent Resolution Three, passed 20-1. The vote was held during the record as before. If the teacher writes the student weekly ASPLU meeting in the Anderson University up for a minor infraction, Center. the student is given a Before the new policy learning opportunity. is put into effect, it will The opportunity go to the Faculty Agenda. is for the student to attend With the current Academic an educational meeting Policy, professors that helps the student Integrity have two choices when it comes to understand what they did instances of academic dishonesty. wrong and how they can do They can either let it slide, or report better next time. At the end of the the student. It would go on their student's time at PLU, if permanent record forever. "For teachers, the he or she only has one minor infraction, he or frustration with that policy was that there was no s .. u she can have it expunged. ,, .d tatistica y, d h d sai students who cheat All a stu ent as to o mi d d 1e ground , senior Tess Sawatzki, an have higher GPAs is remember to request at-large senator. it to be expunged. In Regardless of the / . the event a student severity of the student's incurs two minor infraction, if a teacher wrote infractions, it turns up a student it appeared on his into a major infraction, or her record as a major infraction. which cannot be expunged. To solve this problem, the Campus "There has been a lot Life Committee worked alongside a of among excitement lawyer for the past year to rewrite students around the learning the Academic Integrity Policy. opportunity," Sawatzki said. "But The Campus Life Committee is students have expressed concerns composed of six faculty members, with messing up in two different who, according to the PLU website, topics." "consider in a coordinative fashion Teachers in each field will have matters pertaining to the academic their own way of citing students for and social aspects of university life." infractions. This means that even if The new policy would have a student receives a minor infraction two types of infractions: major and in math as well as English, those minor. two still tum into a major infraction.

By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer

A recurring 路 question brought up at forums discussing the policy was exactly who looks at permanent records. Graduate schools and prospective employers must request to see a student's integrity record, infractions do not automatically show up. A council of PLU faculty will meet tonight, Nov. 14, to vote and decide whether or not the new infraction policy will become a permanent change. Our neighbor, University of Puget Sound, has a similar lenient policy. According to the UPS website, when a student incurs an infraction for the first time, the consequences are left to the teacher. when Though, it's a student's second time it goes to a hearing 路 board, where the bo~d impose a consequence. It will go on a student's record if the hearing board makes that decision. A recent article from the New York Times shows that the issue of plagiarism goes beyond the collegiate level. The . New York that Times reported Montana Sen. John Walsh had his degree revoked from the Army War College on Oct. 10 because he had copied large sections of a paper he wrote in 2007. To find out more about PLU's integrity policy, visit http://www. pl u:ed u/ srr I code-of-conduct/ academic-integrity.php.

Students calling the Campus Safety office on Halloween night were out of luck. Campus Safety had a staffing error which left many students without a ride that night, forcing them to walk around Parkland. The Campus Safety office receives calls all year from students looking for rides. Halloween weekend was projected to have more party-going Lutes than most weekends, which means more calls for escorts back to campus. Wild rumors about Campus Safety have been flying around campus. Students have been wondering if rides are not being given to students because they are partying and drinking. However, this is not the case. Campus Safety escorts were temporarily unavailable during some of the usual hours of operation on Halloween night, but this is a single occurrence, according to Campus Safety. When a 21-year-old student, quoted in this article under the pseudonym "Alex", was out partying and bar-hopping with friends, the group had no ride home. So, of course, they called Campus Safety for an escort. They needed to find a safe way home after having too much Halloween fun. Alex' s friend made the call, but Alex said Campus Safety told her friend they should try calling a cab instead. "Originally, I was upset beca:use Halloween is one of the biggest party weekends on college campuses," Alex said. Later, Alex was informed that the lack of escorts was due to a staffing error. Campus Safety assured Alex that this error is not going to affect their regular operations or escort service. "I feel that Campus Safety should have been better prepared with all of. their staff knowing what to expect during such a crazy weekend," Alex said. Alex was not the only student that was left high and not so "dry" during the rainy weekend. A group of girls were out partying that same night and called Campus Safety for a ride. They received the same response. "I felt abandoned in my time of need," said a 22-yearold PLU student, who will also remain anonymous. "The safety officers for campus were not doing their job due to understaffing." No comments from Campus Safety have been issued to any members of Mast Media at this point. There is no cau se for student concern that this issue will happen again. Editor's Note: The students in this article chose to remain anonymous due to fear of a backlash from speaking out about their partying habits and Campus Safety. This was co-written with Samantha Lund.

.I


THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

NOV. 14, 2014

PLU honors veterans, old and new Lagerquist fills with emotions and pride during Veteran's Day service alcohol and drugs, and 22 veterans commit suicide everyday" Shumaker said. "The service was very touching," Patricia Krise said. "Steve is a great inspiration for us all." "Thank you for your service" was an expression that rang The audience erupted in support and a standing ovation after throughout Pacific Lutheran University and around the country his speech. Nov.11. Veterans Day is a chance for Americans to commemorate PLU has a long history supporting the military and veterans. the 20 million living veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces. Campus is located five miles from Joint Base Lewis-McChord Nearly 150 people gathered in PLU' s Lagerquist Concert Hall (JBLM) and was recently ranked fourth among regional for the university's celebration and remembrance. universities in the West in the 2015 U.S. News Best Colleges for The master of ceremonies for the Veterans Day event was Veterans. PLU Director of Military Outreach Michael Farnum, who said PLU is part of the Yellow-Ribbon GIEducational Enhancement the service this year was outstanding. Program. Working with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, The event speakers included PLU President Thomas Krise, PLU offers full scholarships to qualified veterans. professor of military science and Commander of the ROTC "PLU values global education and having veterans in class battalion Lt. Col. Kevin Keller and student Steve Shumaker. brings experience and that global education to the classroom," Shumaker's speech was the highlight of the ceremony. Farnum said. Shumaker served four combat tours, two in Iraq and two in Following the Veterans Day celebration was a viewing of the Afghanistan, and is now a junior Political Science student at Veterans photo gallery wall. Members of the PLU community PLU. The audience listened in reverence and awe as he tearfully with military ties submitted photos that were hung in Kriedler spoke about his time in the service. Hall's first-floor lounge. "What am I willing to die for? What am I willing to live for? The university is hosting other events celebrating veterans Why am I here?" s·aid Shumaker recalling the questions he often later this month, including a Thanksgiving meal for 120 active asked himself as a helicopter crew chief flying in and out of · duty soldiers from JBLM. dangerous combat zones. Veterans Day was a time for thanking and honoring the Shumaker' s voice stammered with emotion as he spoke service people of the Armed Forces. about the tragedy and violence he experienced. He also spoke about the social problems facing veterans today. "There are 300,000 homeless veterans, countless addicted to

By GENNY BOOTS News Writer

90%

Veteran period of veterans served Vietnam Era

Gulf War

Peace time Korean Conflict World War II

Numbers from current wars are still increasing.

e In the United States, 300,000 veterans are homeless.

22 veterans take their own life daily

tittttttt tttittt•. iitt

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUERAND PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

Pacific Lutheran University hosted a veterans game Nov. 8 when the Lutes played the Whitworth Pirates. Veterans were honored with free food, admission and a PLU Color Guard appearance. The keynote speaker for PLU's Veterans Day ceremony student, Steve Shumaker, makes the coin flip before the game with President Thomas Krise by his side. ·

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUERAND PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

Veteran Edwin Hoffart (right) talks about his days flying a B-17 bomber. Hoffart worked at PLU for a few years after retiring from the military in the 1980s.

information taken from http://www.va.gov/vetdata/

PHOTO COURTESY OF GENNY BOOTS

Annie Dodge, who j6ined the WAV (Women Accepted for Volunteer) in September 1942, with her son Don Warren Dodge (left) and volunteer Patty Gaspar (right). Behind them is President Thomas Krise (left) and Michael Farnum, Director of Military Outreach.

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 14, 2014

NEWS3

HowWhenTO SOUND SMART asked about Death with Dignity Death with Dignity

. D W D Requirements

Death with Dignity (DWD) is To request a prescription for lethal medications, a suicide committed with the aid person must be an adult, a of a physician. The term is often interchanged with physician resident of Oregon, Vermont or assisted suicide. Washington, capable of making and DWD advocates argue that they Three states have passed laws communicating health care decisions are not suicidal and do not w a n t . t o permitting Death with Dignity: and diagnosed with a terminal illness Oregon, Vermont and that will lead to death within six die, but would rather die on their own. term~ than suffer from a Washington. Montana and mon~. ternunal disease. New Mexico have positive Patients must. ~ake two .oral court decisions determining requests to a phys~~an and ~ _written physicians cannot be request. J?1e pres~~mg physioan ~4 · prosecuted for prescribing a . cons~ting physman 1!1ust confirm medications to hasten death under diagnosis and prognosis. The two . · In 2013' me d ications were . . physicians must also determine if the · di ·d al certain orcumstances. . d t 173 d ispense o .11:' V1 u s. patient is capable of understanding Of the 173 partiopants, _159 such a request. The patient also goes through a psychological examination. are known to have died, 119 died after ingesting the medication and 26 died without taking the medication. For .ri~an.y ~aynard has been a topic of discuss10n recently. The 29-yearthe remaining 14 people, ingestion old was an advocate for Death with status is unknown, becaus~ the Department of Health has received Dignity after she was diagnosed no documentation that indicates with brain cancer. She was told she death has occurred. only had six months to live. Of the 159 participants, 77 Maynard moved to Portland when she was diagnosed. She wanted to participate percent had cancer, 15 percent had in Death with Dignity. Maynard took her BY SAMANmALuND.NEwsED.rroR neuro-degenerative diseases and 8 Information compiled from the percent had other illnesses. own life on Nov. 1 as she had planned. 84 percent of the participants Since her diagnosis, Maynard became an Department of llealtb. CNN s.nd were at home when they ingested advocate for DWD and is making headlines Death with Dignity Nationi1l Center. the medication. countrywide.

DWD Allies

By the Numbers

a

In the news today

/illll! _ _ _ _ _

LiNK comes to PLU Less informational, More propaganda which "are possibly one of the worst places to exists as a human beings," according to the presentation on Wednesday. All of the profits that LiNK raises go to The nonprofit organization Liberty help a newer generation of North Koreans for North Korea (LiNK) visited Pacific escape. The "Jang-ma-dang generation," Lutheran University Wednesday, Nov. 5. or the "market generation," are the North The ·social campaign movement arrived Koreans who are roughly college-aged with posters, T-shirts and a message "to and have grown up with access to black spread awareness and raise support for markets and outside media. the rescue of North Korean refugees' These young people cross the northern immigration to the U.S." border into Orina and from there, the North Korea is "the most repressed journey is long. The refugees have to travel · country in the world," LiNK Nomad, a a 3,000 mile modem-day underground term for the organization's members, Billy railroad before they officially become a Arnold said. Set "political refugee." to snappy tunes If any of these and trendy visuals, individuals are Arnold and his "I came out because I believe caught while in colleague Marissa Orina, they are Paiva presented for in social justice on campus. automatically more than an hour returned to North to nearly 50 PLU Showing up is 90 percent of it." Korea and face students in the Cave life - threatening Cole Chernushin lounge. punishments. In Associated Senior order to achieve Students of Pacific refugee status they Lutheran University must make it out of and the Residence Orina and into any Hall Association were both contacted by of the bordering countries. LiNK last week to put on the event. Caitlin To raise money for the organization, Dawes, RHA Social Justice Director was nomads like Arnold and Paiva go around excited at how many people showed up. the country speaking at universities, high "There were way more [people] than I .schools and businesses. LiNK operates on expected," Dawes said. "This whole thing a social media fundraising principal similar was put together in a week and a half. Billy to the website "Kickstarter." Interested [Arnold] and Marissa [Paiva] made this people can put in their email and receive happen." their own fundraising page to send out to LiNK began as a student organization friends and family members on various at Yale University in Connecticut. Soon, media platforms. This year, the goal is to LiNK had chapters in universities across raise $200,000, which will be matched by an the country. From Yale, LiNK set up unidentified donor. headquarters in Washington D.C. Several PLU students put in their emails "In D.C. they were trying to lobby to the and many more were curious to learn big politicians," Arnold said. about the programs LiNK offers for college The organization moved to Los Angeles students. Interested participants can go to and started a massive rebranding in 2008. http://www.libertyinnorthkorea.org for "Now, we do what the North Korean more information. For some, it was just a people want," Arnold said. chance to support social justice on campus. North Korea is currently under the "I came out because I believe in social authority of dictator Kim Jong Un. Of the justice on campus," senior Cole Chemushin children living in North Korea, 28 percent said. "Showing up is 90 percent of it." are malnourished and many citizens endure incredible poverty. Citizens can be sent to political prison camps for speaking out against the regime. Estimates place 80,000 to 120,000 people in such prison camps,

By GENNY BOOTS News Writer

FAMILY WEEKEND Shows~

family and food

The PLU vs. Whitworth football game attracted many Lutes and their families. The game gave students an opportunity to show their families PLU's school spirit. Families were welcomed to Pacific Spirits were especially high since PLU Lutheran University last weekend with walked away with a 41-27 win over the three days full of events. Activities started Pirates. Friday evening with an Associated Families that decided to stay onStudents of PLU Bingo Night and ran campus during the football game were until family weekend worship Sunday invited to attend the Thor Heyerdahl afternoon. Film Festival in Lutes' parents the Scandinavian and extended Cultural Center. families came Seats were filled in dressed as the event cycled black and gold through two films support to and one lecture. PLU students. " [ T h e More than 150 weekend] has been families came to very welcoming," support PLU for Kim Mair, firstfamily weekend. year David Mair's Compared to last mother, said. year, many more "I have had the families came chance to visit my to support their son and see what PLU student, he is involved in." each event was One of the about full. more memorable Family events was the weekend was Matt Baker planned by Comedy and Stunt students and PHOTO BY BROOKE WOLFE followed Show faculty and Matt Baker on stage with Emily, a Lute family by the Residence each event had a member, during a comedy stunt for the show. Hall Association purpose. CarnivaI. Saturday "Over the night gave Lute summer the planning started," said families the chance to bond over laughs Nolan Ryan, the assistant director of and suspense. Baker put on a show for alumni and constituent relations. "There the parents and students with jokes and is a committee of students from all over tricks. campus to get student input." After Baker's show, Lutes and their Early Saturday morning kicked off families could take a short walk over to the weekend's festivities with the Lute the Anderson University Center to take Brunch. PLU President Thomas Krise and part in the RHA carnival. The carnival ASPLU President Sarah Smith greeted provided cotton candy and caramel com everyone, and families were encouraged along with games, which left students to socialize. After brunch concluded, juggling their many prizes from the night. students led the way to a variety of After another night with their students different events on and off campus. and a Sunday brunch, family weekend "We wanted to see what Gavin [our was over and families headed home. son] has been doing," Renee Jackson, Family weekend was a success and some first-year Gavin Jackson's mother, said. parents will be coming back for another "This weekend is a free welcome to see family weekend next year. your student." Karla Myers, mother of sophomore The families were taken on tours, Kari Lundgren said she is absolutely introduced to their Lutes' friends and coming back next year. "[The students] taken on the necessary grocery and Target need mid-semester hugs and pep talks trips. for encouragement!" Myers said.

By BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

NOV. 14, 2014

TERRAN'STAKE:Off-CainpusDining By TERRAN WARDEN AdE Columnist

u....:: 4.. n:ven.,;s+

0

Nov~路fl.4-,21

TERRAN'S take

Food is an important aspect of a college student's life - money is put on LuteCards just for dining, mealtimes are important when scheduling classes and most social events revolve around food. Pacific Lutheran University provides a large variety of dining options on-campus, including Old Main Market, Crave and Aglio. But, let's face it: on-campus dining gets old. The surrounding Parkland area has a great variety of food available for offcampus dining, including Chinese food, coffee shops, ice cream and Italian eateries. I visited as many restaurants as my budget would allow, and came up with four places I want to go over and over again! Pita Pit (921 Pacific Ave) Pita Pit is a delicious restaurant that's quick, fresh and tasty. It offers a 10 percent discount to all Lutes. The concept of Pita Pit works like a Subway, except with pita bread. There is no shortage of unique options to try - with meat pitas, vegetarian pitas, breakfast pitas and salads. Pita Pit allows customers to customize pita: fillings including meat, veggies, sauces and cheeses, so it has something for everyone. One of the best parts of the quick and tasty meals at Pita Pit is that it offers healthy meal choices, which is important when combatting the "Freshman 15." Pita Pit is also a great choice for offcampus dining because they are open until midnight Fridays and Saturdays, so those late night cravings can be fulfilled. My recommendation: the beef gyro with tzatziki and secret sauce. Farrelli's Gourmet Wood Fired Pizza (210 Garfield St. S) Farrelli's Wood Fire Pizza is an Italian restaurant focused on wood-fired pizzas. Farrelli's also has a bar perfectly decorated for watching upcoming Sea:hawks games.

Farrelli' s offers a student discount pizza deal as well as the use of dining dollars on LuteCards, making it the perfect spot to use meal plans outside of the Commons. Students who show their PLU Student ID can get a slice of pizza and a soda for $4.99 While Little Caesar's offers an entire pizza for $5 further down on Pacific Ave, Farrelli's pizza is delicious, high quality and customizable for the same price. The slice is also a large portion, almost one-fifth of a pizza. Besides the slice-and-a-soda option, the student discount is for any two-topping pizza of your choice from the list of toppings on the menu, which include multiple kinds of cheeses, meats and vegetables. Farrelli' s works as a great way to get gourmet food on a budget. When I first walked in, I immediately thought it was the perfect place to take a date.

Farrelli' s also offers other options including sandwiches, salads and pastas, but not with a student discount. Any pizza choice is sure to be great with quality dough and toppings, along with a great wood-fired cooking process. Uni Teriyaki (212 Garfield St) Uni Teriyaki is a fast and tasty Asian restaurant specializing in Teriyaki, Ramyun and Korean Bi Bim Bop. Not only is Asian food a crowd favorite, Uni Teriyaki executes these main dishes deliciously. Although Uni Teriyaki does not offer student discounts, most dishes are reasonably priced, such as $4.99 for Ramyun or Chicken Teriyaki. Uni Teriyaki also offers a wide assortment of appetizers and smaller dishes, like Gyoza and even Kimchi, a Korean staple. What makes Uni Teriyaki different than

the average teriyaki shop is the variety of Asian foods they offer. It includes Chinese, Korean and Japanese all in one place. With a wide assortment of Asian dishes, this is another restaurant with something for everyone to enjoy. My recommendation: the Korean Bi Bim Bop, as Bi Bim Bop is a difficult dish to find except for at specifically Korean restaurants or at my grandmother's house and is a favorite among Koreans. 208 Garfield Although 208 Garfield doesn't offer student discounts, 208 Garfield is owned and operated by PLU so prices are reasonably set and affordable especially for what the restaurant offers, and they accept LuteBucks. 208 Garfield has menus inspired by the comfort foods of Italy, Spain and Scandinavia. For its meals, 208 uses locally grown and produced ingredients. Everything is quality made and even their sauces are made from scratch! If you're 21 or older, you can even try their beer and wine menus, offering only local drinks including some from Arch Terrace Wines - Terra Blanca Vinters in Benton, Wash. Most meals are about $10, and 208 Garfield offers delicious, fresh and comforting warm paninis starting at only $5 and served all day! My recommendation: the Ham with Bel Paese and Red Onion Panini for $5. Other locations near campus Taco Del Mar and Subway both offer 10 percent discounts. Other restaurants around PLU include Reyna's Mexican Restaurant, which used to provide a student discount menu, told me "A lot of our customers are not students, so we think it is unfair to give discounts to one majority of customers and not the other." Either way: off-campus dining can be affordable and incredibly delicious. Be sure to try these restaurants out!

MOVIES WITH MICHAEL 'Interstellar' takes a light-year to watch By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer

***

"Interstellar" is a 路 mindboggling, visually-spectacular and beautifully-acted film. But here's the catch - it's way too long. If you thought "Avatar" was too long, take this into you consideration before decide to go see "Interstellar," it's only eight minutes shorter than "Avatar." Although it's long, each part of "Interstellar" has its purpose,

This week, Genny talked t() Brooke Thames and other Lute8 aboot the new Trolli Sour Brite Egg eraze on-Campus.

Watch it later o.nline at http://mastmedia.plu.edu or tune in at 9 p.m. every Thursday to News @Nine on Mast TV!

and each scene's purpose is justified by the end of the film. Living on the increasingly uninhabitable planet humans know as Earth, former NASA Cooper (Matthew pilot McConaughey) is living as a farmer with his father-in-law, son and daughter. Life isn't pretty for the inhabitants of Earth. It is predicted that in the near future, all of humankind will starve or suffocate. Cooper, along with a team of scientists (Anne Hathaway, David Gyasi, Wes Bentley), is informed by a leading professor, Brand (Michael Caine), that there is a wormhole

near Saturn that may lead to other, possibly inhabitable planets and is tasked with the mission of exploring them. The fate of the planet now lies in their hands. However, as anyone might expect, space travel is hard - they have little luck in finding an inhabitable planet. As they traveled through the universe, time on Earth lapsed. Cooper's daughter, Murphy (Jessica Chastain), is now the same age as Cooper when he left and she is professor Brand's assistant. On his deathbed, the professor eventually admits to Murphy that the Earth could not be saved. He believes its current inhabitants are doomed. All of this happens during an intergalactic adventure, as the team of scientists hopes to find the salvation of the universe somewhere among the stars. Chastain is a marvel as ever. She is the best shot "Interstellar" has at an acting nomination at the Academy Awards this year. I don't think she should receive one for this film. Instead, viewers should look out for her in "A Most Violent Year," where her performance is already getting pre-release buzz. Those who love science will love this film. The film uses plenty of physics, astronomical

and quantum lingo that makes no sense to someone majoring in the social sciences and humanities. . I enjoyed the dazzling lights, beautiful cinematography and high intensity space-drama, but it was just too dam long. I felt as if I could have traveled the universe, found my true love, had an amazing vocal solo and saved the human race before the end of this film - it was that long. I was done with my popcorn before the half-way point of the film.

I do not find that acceptable. you go see Before "Interstellar" get all your snacks in the largest sizes possible, make sure all your homework is done and get a solid work out in. It's going to be a long haul.


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 14, 2014

A&E5

TROLLI TAKEOVER "Trolli Eggs" are the new campus candy craze By BROOKE THAMES

AdE Writer

Trolli Eggs Available at Old Main Market

$1.89

It's a bean; it's a worm; no, it's Trolli Sour Brite Eggs! Old Main Market's newest best-selling candy is an interesting combination of the hard and soft textures of jelly beans and gummy worms. It has a multitude of Pacific Lutheran University students cashing in their dining dollars. With more than 500 bags of the delectable treat selling since Sept. 4, it's an understatement to say so-called "Trolli Eggs" are a hit in the PLU community. According to the package, the eggshaped candies are "soft gummy centers covered in a thin candy shell." They come in an array of watercolor-like patterns of green, orange, yellow, pink and blue. With a sweet shell on the outside and a soft, sour gummy center, these treats offer a dynamic that is most definitely unique. Tom Harvey, the retail operations manager for Dining & Culinary Services, said a large part of the appeal is the taste and texture of the candy itself. "The sweet and sour is a classic combination," Harvey said, "and getting it in small doses is dangerously addicting." Students agree that it's the strange and surprising texture that lures them back to Trolli Eggs again and again. "You think it's a jelly bean but then you're like, 'Whoa, it's a gummy worm!"' first-year Victoria Henning said. Sophomore Suzanne Bjornson agreed.

"It's a texture thing," Bjornson said. "It's of the success and growth of the candy just different." production industry in the years leading Harvey also attributed the popularity of up to the 1970's. the candy to life experience, convenience Merder found immense success in and the simple fun of eating sweets. the creation of his Trolli candy brand, a "We connect life experiences with name that originates from the mythical flavors," Harvey said. troll creature that was "[Trolli Eggs are] small, popular with children portable and easy to store. at the time. For others, [they're] just DOING THE MATH creation S~c~975 Tr~~~ plain fun." ' and This semester, Lutes... has been Merder Accessibility amu路s ement aside, there GmbH' s top-selling and the is something that makes consumed 513 Bags brand, Trolli Eggs extremely company has risen to be the secondunique. Old Main Market ate over 40,000 eggs carries several Trolli brand spent roughly $970 manufacturer largest candies, but none of them of gummy candy in rank dose to Trolli Eggs in Germany, behind terms of sales. Haribo. In the first eight weeks candy Trolli of the semester, 513 packages of Trolli Sour has become greatly successful in the U.S., Brite Eggs were sold at OMM. a popularity that is mirrored on PLU's The next most popular Trolli products campus. lag significantly behind, with Trolli Peach In the opinion of Sophomore Kacie O's selling 202 packages and Trolli Apple Mansten, it's the fact that Trolli Eggs O's and Trolli Octopuses selling only 100 are "college-friendly" that makes them packages each. popular among students. With an estimated lead of 300 bags, "I feel strange as a college student eating Trolli Eggs reign supreme. a hai:i.dful of gummy worms, but [Trolli "We fly through those things," OMM Eggs] are a more mature way to eat candy as an adult," Mansten said. . employee and senior Alex Tuman said. Established in 1975, the Trolli brand was Whatever the appeal of Trolli Sour registered in Germany under the Merder Brite Eggs - whether it be taste, texture GmbH Company by the company's or the simple fun of eating candy - the founder Willy Merder. Merder decided bite-sized treats are surely PLU's most to expand his existing food production popular candy. company into the realm of sweets because

Genny on the Block

First-year Genny Boots and senior Aubrey Frimoth talk about Trolli Eggs in this week's "On the aGENda."

Head online to see Genny Boots' interview with Brooke Thames, along with anew segment where Genny takes to the AUC to see what Lutes think! http://mastmedia.plu.edu

'Waste Not' provides food for thought By MATTHEW SALZANO AdEEditor

+

In the U.S., 40 percent of food produced is wasted - and that equation just doesn't add up. This is the message in Pacific Lutheran University's newest MediaLab documentary, "Waste Not," which premiered Nov. 8 at the Broadway Center for Performing Arts in Tacoma, Wash. The event was much like the movie: almost entirely student-produced. The event was introduced by PLU seniors Anne-Marie Falloria, Amanda Brasgalla, Taylor Lunka, Olivia Ash and junior Grace Takehara. The five MediaLab associates told the story of the film - the timeline, the travel, the donors and the experience. "We've learned a lot about food and how it's wasted," Lunka said. "And we've learned a lot about ourselves." The film, which ran approximately 30 minutes, was produced mostly by students. The team of senior producers included Lunka and Brasgalla, and Ash

PHOTO BY MATTHEW SALZANO

From left to right: Kate Edwards, Ben Rasmus, Dana Frasz and Samuel Torvend speak at the "Waste Not" premiere event panel on Nov. 8 in Tacoma, Wash.

was the chief videographer and narrator. "Waste Not" focused on more than just how and where food is wasted. It also focused on what individuals can do now about food waste. One expert in the film was an organic farmer named Kate Edwards, affectionately called "Farmer Kate."

Edwards said that people aren't connected to their food, but are "connected to convenience." The film seemed to strive to reconnect people to their food and how to use it best. The film presented five key terms which can help individuals take action: planning, portions, date labels, storage and forgotten foods.

According to "Waste Not," focusing on these five key terms helps individuals and families use all of their food to its fullest rather than leaving waste behind. After viewing the film, moviegoers could stick around for a panel. The panel was composed of seven food waste experts, most of whom were in the film. These experts helped illuminate topics

within the film as they answered audience questions and explained further background on what their work entailed. Beth Elliot, Executive Director for FISH Food Banks of Pierce County, was present on the panel. Her insight drove the issue closer to home. "There is a lot of poverty in Pierce county," Elliot said. She said FISH served 562,000 people last year, and that 40 percent of these people were 18 years old or younger. Dana Frasz, founder of FoodShift, an organization out of Oakland, Calif., which facilitates organizations long-term sustainability efforts, educated audiences about "food deserts," which are areas containing no real access to fresh produce. Pierce County has several of these areas. The "Waste Not" premiere event contained many of these lessons about food waste in an attempt to see what will balance the food equation. Further information on "Waste Not " is available by contacting MediaLab at ml@plu.edu.


THE MOORING MAST

6 LUTE LIFE

From The Matrix: 'Iron Knees' By AMANDA SEELY Saxifrage Contributor How sad to veil a pretty face in cloth; How pathetic to kneel and submit to invisible almighty and despotic man. Commodified solidarity and morsels of culture fill the bellies of pinatas; pummeling these with pent up angst is a favorite pastime of festive progressives Nauseatingly hackneyed, right? Rich western-women as the moralistic bannerbearers of the world: the angle of their powdered noses the perfect trajectory of scorn; a pedestal of martyrous feminine "compassion" the ideal vantage point for superior judgment. But standing ringside, throwing taunts and hurling bets is not the same as taking a hit. We have our own battle - great as Goliath and insidious as cancer. Women, turn your tenacious gaze inward and confront the emptiness that consumes you and breathes life into your frenzy. As I gaze in shame past my blurry, exaggerated features and commit that degrading act of self-punishment I wonder when I will deem my face to precious to bow before a receptacle for sh*t. 路 How sad to veil a pretty face in toxic chemicals; How pathetic to kneel and submit to a porcelain confessional and retouched fashion models. No, we don't need men to actively oppress us. In our "advanced" society, we are adept at doing it ourselves. Our natural impulses? Sloppy excess. Our beauty standards? Redemption of the inherent insufficiency of the female body. Sisters, mothers, daughters, friends; when will we say, "enough is enough?" Our knees are sore - let's stand up.

NOV. 14, 2014

Women in politics: Does it matter? women need to be a part ofthe conversation. important to have equal "It's representation. It's important to have voices of all different kinds revolve around issues that are important," said Sarah Smith, the president of Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University. "It'd be great if we had more women in politics because it could lead to other women looking up to them and then them wanting to get involved in politics and engaging in those conversations."路 Jen Smith, director of the Women's Center, agreed, saying the message is most important. "Numbers are great, visibility is great, but what is more significant is the messages those candidates are bringing and the policies they support," she said. Of the 435 seats in the House of Representatives, only 79 representatives and three delegates are women, and of the 100 seats in the Senate, only 20 are filled by women. If having women in democracy is so important, then why aren't more women engaged in government affairs? PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS Sarah Smith said it's because women Shelley Moore Capito, R-W. Va., is the senatorwho identify as feminists are more likely to elect for West Virginia. She is the first female vote for a man than a woman if they felt the senator for the state and has represented West man would better represent their needs. This Virginia's second congressional district since 2001. creates a bit of a paradox, because gender equality should be represented in politics, By RELAND TUOMI but at the same time people want their issues Editor-in-Chief represented and valued as well. "It's important to have all different In the elections that took place last week, identities represented in the government," West Virginia and Iowa both elected their Sarah Smith said. "How accurate can first woman to the U.S. Senate. Shelley representation be if it's only by traditionally Moore Capito will represent West Virginia . one type of person? Lack of accurate and Joni Ernst will represent Iowa. Both representation lacks accurate voice. A more women represent the Republican Party. But accurate representation leads to a more really, what took these states so long to vote effective government." for women? So while it is great that more double-X The problem isn't women, though chromosomes are coming into DC, what women do need better representation. The we really need to be aware of is the policies problem is the representation of values and the politicians represent, the values they policies. hold and if they will be a good fit for our Women provide an alternative government. perspective men can't, and for any national government to have full representation,


..... THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 14, 2014

LUTE LIFE 7

STOP & LISTEN: A.figurative and literal perspective Everyone is guilty of gossip. Once started, rumors spread at an exponential rate. Gossip can be looked at as a coping mechanism to deal with Stop, and listen. Stop when, and where? And boredom. It is therefore quite obvious that people who listen to what? It doesn't mean that whenever you're engage in chitchat about the lives of other people approached by a person you stop whatever you're have no life of their own, and this is emphasized by Eleanor Roosevelt's words, "Great minds discuss doing, and give them your undivided attention. ideas. Average minds Nor does it mean that discuss events. Small you listen to everyone minds discuss people." and agree with them we hear Often without having a say in Gossip can be looked at as a about people of note, the matter. coping mechanism to deal with orators being praised The significance of the for delivering eloquent topic is more figurative in boredom. speeches, but hardly the framework of social ever do we hear about justice issues. someone commended for Equally weighing the being a "good listener." wants and needs of people ·with one's own wants and needs would be one way of stopping and Listening can be thought of as an art, a skill that listening. By doing that, you set your egocentric only a few learn to master. Sometimes, people just want to be heard, wishes aside, and regard every life just as whether they're right or wrong in their opinions. important as yours. · In the words of Mercedes Lackey, "It's only From a social justice perspective, if politicians and leaders adopted a similar philosophy and gossip if you repeat it. Until then, it's gathering considered the value of each individual worldwide information." So, the next time you engage in a conversation, to be equal, the battle plans would be replaced by ask yourself this question, ''.Am I gaining sheets of harmonious symphonies. In a societal context, the implication of the knowledge by listening to my own words or by listening to what the other person has to say?" theme, "STOP & LISTEN," is more literal.

By ENOCH JAMES

Matrix Contributor and Sociology Major

---

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATRIX

Enoch James is a junior studying Sociology. He is a transfer student on the T.O.H. Karl Forensics Team.

From Saxifrage:

NOIR& SEPIA By JOSEPH FRIES Saxifrage 34 Contributor I sometimes feel

the world revolves in shades of grey

like an old silent moving picture,

round and round, quiet, still, with

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

words flashing on the screen and

a faint piano tinkling tunes, notes, scales,

occasionally faint splotches of color

spreading, amoeba-like, into silence

painted onto film, flaking away

to reveal, what? I know not,

and, leaving it all bare,

how can I say? Too many questions

Joseph Fries attended Pacific Lutheran University from 2004-2008, studying French and English. He later received an MFA in poetry from Saint Mary's College of California. He may or may not have written an alliterative heroic crown of sonnets about a Viking teddy bear, and hopes that everyone will continue to split rocks!

running throu gh to the fin.

All the wrong answers. Am I, like

the lady, gloriously out of focus,

walking in a waking dream of shadow,

moving lips with nothing to say,

and stumbling over patches of light,

smooth and clean and white,

fettered in a washed-out world?

Waiting to be rescued and

carried away into the sleeping night,

brought back to love and laughter

hollow with too many questions

which are, perhaps, too late,

and given all the wrong answers,

for the n ext film is about to begin:

the piano stops playing at the end.

-.

Saxifrage is open for submission for publication in the Mast. Send your poetry, visual art, fiction and creative non:.fiction totalling no more than 500 woras any_ time to saxifr_ag@plu.edu for consideration. Find us on Facebook, Twitter ana at http://saxifrage.plu.edu

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,_ THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

NOV. 14, 2014

Educate yourself on FCKH8 before you donate By LEAH LARSON Guest Columnist

THE MOORING MAST

FCKH8 is a company that is notorious for putting together quick and funny videos about various activist causes and selling shirts to .raise money for those causes. Unfortunately, that's also a really easy way for a company to make a lot of money. FCKH8 is a for-profit company. The money they make off their T-shirts or from the advertising on their YouTube videos goes directly toward various employees' paychecks. Ultimately, FCKH8 has successfully raised almost $6000 for various charities with their anti-racism gear. Those $6000 will go on to do great things, but FCKH8 still falls short in its advocacy. FCKH8 claims that money from their T-shirts go toward various activist causes. Recently, they produced a line of T-shirts with phrases like "RACISM ISN'T OVER BUT I'M OVER RACISM." They said that $5 of each shirt sale go toward nonprofit groups like Race Forward, among others. But that isn't true. On their Facebook page, Race Forward made a post in September which states, "It has been brought to our attention that outlets have been reporting our affiliation with Synergy Media and FCKH8.com. Race Forward has never received any money from Synergy Media nor do we have an agreement with the company or FCKH8.com campaign. To be clear, Race Forward would not accept any proceeds from this effort." In short, FCKH8 lied about what was happening with the profits made off of various T-shirts. While they no longer claim that they donate to Race Forward, the fact that they spread false information about their finances is still unethical and should not be ignored just because they say they've given money elsewhere. They lied in the first place and could easily lie again. "For FCKH8 to say that they're giving money to charities that aren't accepting

l-

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CIIIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bjorn Slater mastads@plu.edu

--

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Examples ofFCKHS merchandise shown above. T-shirts sell for about $15 each and are an easy way to raise money for important causes.

the money is fraud, pure and simple," said junior Angela Tinker. "Lying like that shows they're a business where a portion of the proceeds may go to charity. It's like when you pay an extra five cents at Starbucks to donate to the Red Cross. That might help, but really it's still about making profit." In response, FCKH8 later released a statement saying that Race Forward is a homophobic organization that trivializes breast cancer awareness. Admittedly, Race Forward is an organization that combats racial injustices and is not in the business of battling homophobia or breast cancer. Even if FCKH8 wasn't lying about what they do with their money, their organization is still an amazing example of slacktivism. Slacktivism is a type of activism which encourages activities like buying a T-shirt and then doing nothing else. It's similar to when your Aunt Kathy changes her Facebook profile photo to a picture of a cartoon character to raise awareness for children who experience abuse. It's a nice thought but nothing actually gets done. "FC:KH8 focuses on gimmicks, like

little girls cursing, and doesn't have any real means of advocacy," Tinker said. "They distract from the real issue. It's like Kony 2012, everyone was talking about it because it was a gimmick, but all that it produced was slacktivism." That sort of activism does very little. "In order to be successful, activism needs to have goals it can meaningfully and measurably achieve," Tinker said. Effective advocacy means engaging in thoughtful discourse with people around you, even if it's just on Facebook. It means boycotting businesses and writing letters to politicians. Making brightly colored T-shirts and gimmick-laden videos does not fit into the model of effective advocacy. FCKH8 does start conversations about LGBT issues and only LGBT issues, as their merchandise section for queer individuals is labeled "LGBT Equality." That's a step. It's important to start conversations about the experiences of queer people and all oppressed people. But it's not enough of a step.

P{ease The MoorinP: Mast

Halloween horror: Campo no show By ALLIE REYNOLDS Mast TV General Manager and Online Editor

-

Halloween weekend can be one of the busiest of the year on a college campus. With all the parties and alcohol consumption happening in the area, it's safe to say that many students would have taken advantage of our university's Campus Safety escort service. But, unfortunately, students were unable to use the service Halloween night. My roommate and I were a 20-minute waik from our house, hanging out with other fri ends at a

local restaurant. It was nearing 1:30 a.m., and we didn't feel too safe walking back to our house in the dark, cold and wet weather. Thinking we could just take the Campus Safety escort service back to our house, we dialed the escort number only to be turned away, because of an issue with understaffing. My other friends tried to call, all ending with the same result: a walk home in the cold in our Halloween costumes. The following week, my other friends in my group wanted to know why the escort service fell through for us on Halloween. While talking to supervisors, we were able to get a response back from Campus Safety about the understaffing issue on Halloween. Campus Safety director Greg Premo informed Vice President of Student Life, Joanna Royce-Davis, that "it was a staffing error that resulted in lack of shuttle service on Halloween. The intention was for there 路 to be service and it was miscommunication that resulted in the lack 路of service and lack of appropriate explanation to students

A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Giancarlo Santoro COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Kaitlyn Hall ONLINE EDITOR

Allie Reynolds

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett 路

NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

recycle your copy of

~-

NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund

who called in." While it's unfortunate that a staffing error occurred on one of the busiest nights of the year for Campus Safety, I felt jilted. I know a problem with the shuttle service is people taking advantage of it, like asking for a shuttle service for a group of people. Groups of people should feel safe walking to their destination because there is strength in numbers. I have never done this my entire four years at PLU. I've only used the shuttle service three times in my entire time at Pacific Lutheran University, and the one time I really needed it, and it was unfortunate that it wasn't being offered. Although Campus Safety admitted they made a mistake, I hope this error will result in no understaffing issues on other big party weekends throughout the year, such as LollaPLUza weekend. As someone who uses the shuttle service only when I feel unsafe to walk home, it was a big let down to not have that service available to me on the night I felt like I needed it the most.

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rat es and t o place an advertisement. Subscript ions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections Nov. 7Issue In the article "Midterm elections: Red's on top" on the front page, at the time of publication Initiative 1351 h ad less votes, but the final ballot count reveled that Initiative 1351 did pass.


I_

.. OPINION 9

THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 14, 2014

Sustainability: Practice your voting rights for the environment By ALEX DOMINE Sustainability Coordinator A man clad in neatly pressed Wall Street regalia addresses a congregation of gas tycoons and declares "endless war" ·on those pesky environmentalists. He seeks one thing: to spread petty gossip about liberal celebrities to turn the public against environmental advocates. This scene, although reminiscent of a teenage drama, came from a secretly recorded speech delivered by Richard Bergman, a political consultant, to oil industry executives. Now, in the wake of his $3 million consultation, Pacific Lutheran University students in support of climate action need to push harder than ever before to fight the good fight -especially after last week's election results. A major result of last week's election

is the Republican control of the Senate This means a congressional push to force Committee on Environmentalist and Public President Obama' s hand on a harmful pipe Works. The committee chair is assumed to system called Keystone XL. veer from climate advocate Barbara Boxer, The pipeline is a vessel for dirty oil to flow from Canada to the United States. D-Calif., to James Inhofe, R-Okla. Inhofe' s 2012 book asserts that global The State Department keeps tf:i.e project on a short leash and it warming is the "greatesthoax," andhe will ultimately be its decision if it's of will no doubt attempt to fasten a muzzle on "University students in support national interest. However, the Environmental of climate action need to push legislature Protection Agency's harder than ever before to fight a efforts to cut pollution. controlled by the good fight." When the newly supporters of Keystone XL Republican-controlled is a formidable Congress gears up in 2015, some environmental topics will opponent, even if Obama is on the be on the agenda. Oil companies invest in environmental side. the Republican Party, and with the recent On a more promising note, a measure to Republican control over Congress, oil promote efficient energy in buildings could businesses will want to cash out on their be the bill that Congress uses to show the end of the bargain. public that both parties can collaborate

without too much fuss. The measure would enforce stricter rules on the energy efficiency of appliances in homes, offices and other buildings. It didn't pass at the last session because they were all too absorbed in the foreboding Keystone XL project. Perhaps Congress will take a page out of PLU's book in an effort to promote energyefficient buildings. It's evident that the fossil-fuel business is frantic for support, and political factions that think environmentalists are lying tree huggers are assembling for even more mudslinging against the climate truth. Universities are mavens for innovation and critical thinking, and as such, it's vital that Lutes and students everywhere are prepared to use the ballot box as a sword of change. The Earth depends on it- literally.

~ ·

Universal Crossword

Study Break Ljfe Hacks PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

SUDOKU High Fives -

2 8

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4

1 7 1 9 4

6

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9 Hypnotist's

10 11 12

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24

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command Kind of park St op associating with Grammywinning British vocalist Plied the oars Charge English assignment More healthy Your email · account has one Conventions African fly Jones index Mai (rum drink) Postal creed conjunction Beginning of a conclusion

38 Wanda of comedy 41 Genetic material (Abbr.) 45 Lemonlike fruit 46 Bit of ingenuity 48 Royal crowns 51 Oracle site 53 Ziti, e.g. 54 Can't stand 55 Wears well 57 Word with "beam" or "blow" 61 Bird whose male hatches the eggs 62 Length x width, for a rectangle 65 American broadcaster 66 Mauna (Hawaiian volcano) 67 Mr., in India

._..

.....

--© 2014 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

PLENTY OF MAIL BOXES By Gary cooper

9 1

5

8 2 7 3 6 1 3 1 3 5

ACROSS 1 Like a rainbow 6 Harry's first lady 10 Autocrat until 1917 (Var.) 14 Zoo heavyweight, briefly 15 End of t he year, for some 16 Change the decor 17 You may get its stamp of approval 19 Again 20 Interlace flowers in a circle 21 Not in drive or reverse 22 Asian language 25 "Boola Boola" singer 26 Mashed, as oranges 28 Lacked, briefly 30 "Acid," briefly 32 Caribbean, e.g. 33 First-born, compared to the others 35 Crowned heads 39 Debussy's "La " 40 Ring bearer, often · 42 "Polly" follower 43 E or G, in music

5 2

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Edited by Timothy E. Parker November 9, 2014

5 2 3 4 9

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6 7

HOW TO PLAY: Sudoku High Fives consists of five regular Sudoku grids sharing one set of 3-by-3 boxes. Each row, column and set of 3-by-3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition. The numbers in any shared set of 3-by-3 boxes apply to each of the individual Sudokus.

--


,:.. THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

NOV. 14, 2014

IPOBTI ICOREIOARD . AROUND THE LEAGUE•••

Football WINS

TEAM Pacific

6

LinJield

7

PLU

6

LOSSES 2

2

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

0

6-0

Won6

0

5-1

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0

4-2

Won3

Whitworth

6

4

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4 -3

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Willamette

5

3

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3-3

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Puget Sound

5

3

George Fox Lewis & Clark

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Whitman

10

10

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LinJield

6

11

4 -9-1

George Fox

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: NWC season conclrukd Alisa Stang won a total of six events against WJllamette and LinBeld over the weekend to give, the Pirates two NWC wins. Stang WINS LOSSES TIES won events in the 200 freestyle, · TEAM ihe 200 medley relay, and the 200 PLU 21 4 0 freestyle relay as well as the 50 Whitworth 21 5 0 Jreestyle, the 100 freestyle and pie 400 medley relay. Puget Sound 12 13 0

Volleyball

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Puget Sound

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Whitworth

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11

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Willamette

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14

Pacific

6

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Puget Sound

CONFERENCE

0 -7

TIES

9

13

TIES 3

1-5

LOSSES

Whitman

Willamette

LOSSES

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WINS

14

15

0

TEAM

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WINS

Whitworth

9

Women's Soccer 15

TEAM

7

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 15 vs. George Fox, 1p.m.

Linfield

Men's Soccer

FOOTBALL: PLU quarteiback, senior Dalton Ritchey rushed for a career-beSt 203 yards on only 16carries against the Whitworth Pirates. Ritchey recorded three touchdowns, including an ~7-yard scoring run that saw him break two would-be sacks ktd was 13-for-23 passing for !I.SS yards, giving him 361 yards responsible for. Ritchey also ~t two interceptions..

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: NWC season conclrukd

Lost6

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MEN'S SOCCER: Whitworth

senior forward Michael Ramos notched two assists to bring his season total to 12 against Whitman in the Pirates 3-0 NWC win. Ramos' 13 goals helped lead Whitworth to the conference titre~

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I LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov.14 vs. Colorado College, 12:30 p.m.

Santoro Speaks... It's rating time: Fall sports By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor

~

......

-

With the Northwest Conference regular season officially finished for every fall sport except football, which will conclude this weekend, the results of Pacific Lutheran University's varsity sports teams were decidedly mixed. For some, it was more of the same. For others, it's back to the drawing board. While the NWC tables in volleyball, football and men's and women's soccer speak for themselves, 111 give my two cents from a fan's perspective, complete with ratings and all. Lets take a look at how our teams finished, starting with the team that was almost the Hollywood story of the season: women's soccer. Coming off a third-place finish in 2013, head coach Seth Spidahl and the Lutes entered 2014 armed with a strong core of returners and some quality recruits. In a season that promised so much, the Lutes are left with a bitter taste in their mouths after two heartbreakfilg losses in

Despite Fobi's praise and agreement their last two games saw them drop from first to a familiar - and unwanted - third. among other coaches in the league, the While it looked for so long that a first Lutes finished dead even in the table and conference title since 1992 would be in their record. Fourth place at 7-7inNWC, 10-10 overall, heading to Parkland, the Lutes couldn't get it was a rebuilding year for the Lutes after the results they needed. It wasn't all bad, though, and the tearri' s losing eight seniors in 2013 and returning only four in 2014. first win against University of Puget More than half of the team, Sound since 1998, a 3-1 18 out of 30, are result at PLU' s East Field, was the highlight sophomores or of a good season. younger, and At 14-5-1 overall and Yorke and the rest of the coaching 12-4 in conference, they staff are sure to earn a B+. note the play of NWC, t:>e wary of Lutes first-years Eddie in 2015. With the men's soccer Na and Bennet Bugbee as the team sitting dead center in the NWC table with bright spot in a one game left in the PHOTO COURl'ESY OF NWC WEBSITE frustrating season. Na's seven goals season, Willamette University's head coach, Lloyd Fobi, and five assists were vital to the Lutes, and reportedly told PLU head coach, John Bugbee' s three goals and six assists mean Yorke, that the PLU team played some of that the future is bright. the best soccer in the whole conference. Inconsistent probably sums up the team's

season best. Overall, B-. Saving the best for last, the PLU volleyball team was the only side to win conference, and they made it a three-peat with their sixth consecutive sweep over the weekend. Although PLU is technically tied with Whitworth with a 14-2 NWC record, the Lutes were simply a class above the rest. The numbers were impressive: eight wins and zero losses at home, 11 sweeps in 16 NWC games, 21 wins out of 25 games played overall and a fourth conference title in the last six years means volleyball is, without a doubt, the most successful varsity sport at · the university in recent years. The highlight in a near perfect year? Seventeen sweeps out of 25 total games played showed that the Lutes were a complete team in all aspects of the game. Winning the conference outright would have been an A+, but perfection is hard to come by. Overall, another dominant season results in an A. And, now, bring on the winter.

PLU celebrates veterans on Family Weekend By JAKE BILYEU Guest Writer There was a special feeling in the air over the weekend here at Pacific Lutheran University. Some would attribute that feeling to the innumerable amount of family members that were here throughout the entirety of PLU' s Family Weekend. Others would attribute it to the myriad of highlight plays pulled off by PLU's offense during their Saturday afternoon game against Whitworth. But then, many others were feeling special because of all of the kind acts and displays put up on campus and at Sparks Field to honor Veterans Day. Sports can be a release from the pressures of a stressful life, and many veterans around the country are avid football fans. The PLU President himself, Dr. Thomas Krise, a retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel, is veteran, and participated in the pregame coin toss. To honor what veterans have done for the country, the

football team held its second annual Military Appreciation Day, meaning anyone affiliated with the United States Armed Forces received free admission and concessions. Game-day wouldn't have been complete without music, and the First Corps band played while PLU' s Army Reserved Officers Training Corps (ROTC) Lute Battalion presented the flag during the singing of the National Anthem. Some of the funding for PLU sports teams comes from generous donations by veterans, and the football team did its part to give back and put smiles on the faces of the crowd by coming away with a commanding 41-27 win. Over the past couple of months, students have seen their colleagues on campus donning their ROTC uniforms, and this weekend everyone was given a chance to give thanks and give back in many ways to those who have served to protect our country. One way that h as likely been seen by all students on campus, but perhaps not noted or acknowledged for its meaning, is the tying of the golden ribbon$ around the trees on campus.

These have served as a constant reminder to the ROTC students on campus and any war veterans that may have taken part in the Family Weekend festivities over the weekend that we truly and greatly appreciate their dedication to our safety. It is of the utmost importance that we take the time to support those that volunteer to defend our nation, especially since our campus has a military base located nearby. Students were given a small break from class on the morning of Veterans Day, which some took as a chance to get some more rest. But since all students here at PLU hear the jets leaving the base and students wearing the camouflage practically every day, some felt that it was very important for them to take part in the ceremony at the Mary Baker Russell building, which had its walkways decorated with small American flags Tuesday morning. It is the season of giving thanks after all, so it was certainly fitting to give thanks to some of those who deserve it most, the veterans.


• THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 14, 2014

11 SPORTS

Swimming picks up where it left off with two • pre-season wins ByDEBORAHCABANOS Guest Writer With the cold weather settling in, athletics move to indoor sports. One sport to keep an eye out on this fall is swimming. The Pacific Lutheran swim team started the 2014-2015 season at the Northwest Conference Relays two weekends ago. At the Northwest Conference Relays, hosted by Williamette University, the Lutes came out with a first-place tie, sharing the title with Whitworth University. Both teams had a score of 64 points. The following weekend, the Lutes had another meet, hosted by Linfield University. The women's team dominated with a score of 345 points, 163 points ahead of Whitworth, which came in second place. On the men's team, the competition was a little bit tougher as the men came out in third place. PLU hosted two dual meets on Nov. 7 and Nov. 8. Winning both meets against Lewis and Clark and Pacific, the men's and women's teams start off the official season with a 2-0 record. The weekend was made even better

by an impressive debut by junior Shanell Sullenberger, which earned her NWC Student-Athlete of the Week for swimming honors. The 18_:-person men's team this year is made of three first-years, five sophomores, four juniors and six seniors. On the women's team, there are two first-years, eight sophomores, six juniors and seven seniors, totaling 23 women. "The [womens team] lost several great senior leaders last year," sophomore Jessica Stenberg said. "We gaiii.ed some very good talent and have gotten stronger since last year." · The talent and dedication both teams have is evident in their early season wins. With practices four to five times a week, the teams train together to support and ·motivate one another. "Each day our practice is super intense but it will pay off come conference championships in February," first-year Sam Couch said. "I have complete faith in our coaches and their training." The team's next two meets will be held at Linfield Saturday, Nov. 14 and Williamette Sunday, Nov. 15, respectively. Students should come out and support their fellow Lutes when they return home to the PLU Pool in 2015.

--.:

.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

Junior Shanell Sullenberger races against the clock versus Pacific at the PLU Pool. Sullenberger helped the Lutes sweep the Boxers in the 200 medley relay.

_. 4

Men's soccer concludes season with cross-town loss

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE PLU MEN' S SOCCER TEAM FACEBOOK PAGE

The men's soccer team poses prior to a game during preseason. Despite a difficult season with a young group of players, the Lutes still managed to finish in fourth place in NWC, and Will be able to count on a strong group of returners in 2015.

By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor Despite having nothing to play for but pride and Tacoma bragging rights going into the final Northwest Conference game of the season against University of Puget Sound, the Pacific Lutheran University Men's soccer team gave a good account of themselves, but ultimately fell 2-1 at UPS in Tacoma. "It's a rough loss against these guys because I felt like we played really "well," sophomore midfielder Diego Aceves said. "We can only go up from here." With the UPS football team playing Linfield in the main stadium, the game was moved to the smaller, more rugged grass field; a tactic usually used by UPS head coach Reece Olney whenever the Lutes make the short trip across town. "I thought they showed a lot of heart and determination," PLU head coach John Yorke said. "We were a bit unlucky to not win or at least tie the game, but give credit to UPS for doing what they do well."

Whenever the Lutes and Loggers .play, it is almost guaranteed to be physical, and the wet grass made for multiple slips and hard sliding tackles from both sides. Knowing that only a win would keep their faint chances of winning the NWC title alive, UPS came out after its Senior Night ceremony fast, putting immediate pressure on PLU junior goalkeeper Mike Arguello and the Lute defense. The conditions made for some sloppy passing, and a couple of defensive miskicks allowed UPS to grow in confidence on the attack. Both teams had opportunities early on to break the · deadlock, and in the 19th minute, the Loggers' persistence paid off. A couple of quick passes, UPS' midfield got the ball to the top of PLU's box, where forward Andrew White had found some space. Taking one touch, White's sliding, left-footed shot looped over Arguello and into the net to give the Loggers a 1-0 score midway through the first half.

"We had a couple of very good chances that if we would've finished, it could have changed the game," Yorke said. It almost went from bad to worse just minutes later. After a header off of a UPS comer was destined for the top comer of Arguello' s goal, Aceves, stationed on the post, somehow managed to head the ball off of the crossbar and away to safety to keep the Loggers from getting a second. PL U is no stranger to coming back from going a goal or two down this season, and cracks in the UPS defense were being exploited by the combination of first-year forward Eddie Na and junior forward Jordan Downing. Bruised and battered by the UPS defense, some good work by junior forward Bryan Anderson helped tum the game for the Lutes, and his hard work was rewarded with the equalizing goal in the 55th minute. Na cut inside from the right to hit a low shot that UPS goalkeeper Nathan King could only push into the feet of a wide open Anderson who couldn't miss from six yards. After the goal, the Lutes kept pushing, sensing they could sneak another goal. It wasn't to be though, and the Loggers scored what would be the game winning goal in the 66th minute. "We just didn't know how to finish the team off and get that last goal," Aceves said. Midfielder Sam Zisette drove into the heart of the PLU box where his shot deflected off the leg of a PLU defender and past a helpless Arguello. UPS would hold on to the 2-1 score, but it ultimately stayed in third place after a Whitworth's win sealed the NWCtitle. With the loss, PLU finished its 2014 NWC season 7-7 and 10-10 overall, the first time since 2004 the team has lost 10 or more games. "In terms of record, the season wasn't exactly what we were hoping for," Yorke said. "We have such a large amount of key returners coming back that I think we have a chance to be very good next year.""

"We can only go up from here." Diego Aceves Sophomore midfielder

........

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.. THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 14, 2014

12 SPORTS

Football runs out to big win on Family Weekend By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer

'.,..

The Pacific Lutheran University football team had the Whitworth players walking the plank as the Lutes defeated the Pirates 41-27 in its Northwest Conference game Saturday at home. "I know it's a classic cliche, but it was a team win," head coach Scott Westering said. It was a chilly afternoon when the Lutes faced off against the Pirates, and the crowd and players did their best to keep warm as winter approaches. The fall colors of the surrounding trees provided the perfect backdrop at Sparks Stadium, the Lutes' home field. At kickoff, many people had already filled the stands, but there was a constant flow of people coming in throughout the game. The first quarter started with a bang for the Lutes, as senior running back Niko Madison scored a touchdown on their first drive. Nearing the end of the first quarter, PLU struck again after senior defensive back Greg Hibbard intercepted a pass from Whitworth quarterback Bryan Peterson to score on a 43 yard run. Whitworth would answer with a touchdown of. their own with just one minute left in the first quarter to make it 14-7 in favor of the Lutes. Early in the second quarter, senior quarterback Dalton Ritchey scored a touchdown on an 87-yard run. Ritchey ran for 203 yards throughout the game. The score was then 21-7, with the Lutes leading. Spirits were high and bottoms were barely on their seats, as Lute fans celebrated.

Later in the second quarter, senior running back Niko Madison scored a 57yard touchdown. Madison. ran for 158 yards in the course of the game. The first half ended 28-7 with the Pirates trailing and the Lutes' heads held high. While both teams discussed the first half in their respective locker rooms, some families were standing in line at concessions, while some were seen taking pictures with their family. The Pirates, needing a touchdown to get back into the game, got the better of the Lutes in the third quarter. They scored a touchdown and put up solid defense, which stopped the Lutes from scoring. Though no points were scored by PLU in the third quarter, it did not put a damper on the spirit of the Lutes. Players gave each other high fives, slaps on the butt and supportive words as players came on and off the field. A family atmosphere among the team was clearly evident. As it w.as Family Weekend, students could be seen enjoying the game alongside their families. There was hardly a cloud in the sky, just as there was hardly an empty seat in the home section of the stadium. Ritchey seemed to have flames on his feet when he blew past the Pirate defense fate in the fourth quarter to score a 47-yard touchdown with just two minutes left. Ritchey had 13 completed passes and only threw two interceptions. Soon after the game finished the sun was shining down on the Lutes as they took the win41-27. The Lutes happily walked off the field, though, instead of going straight to the locker room, they all mingled with fans and even more with their own families.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

PLU quarterback Dalton Ritchey runs the football on his way to a t ouchdown in the second quarter. Ritchey and the team held a Veterans Day/Military Appreciation Day gathering to honor America's veterans.

Prior to the game, the Lutes held a Military Appreciation DayNeterans Day get-together, which attributed to the overall excitement throughout the game. Just like the answering machine message of coach Westering that says, "choose to make it a great day," Westering said he tells the team that he continually wants them to choose to make it a great game. This has been one of the largest senior classes for the PLU football team in a while. They have one game left against George Fox. "I keep reminding the team to make 'treasure-chest memories,' to not lose the

joy," Westering said. "There's excitement with the last game together." With its third win in a row, PLU improves to 6-2 overall and 4-2 in NWC play. Whitworth fell to 6-4 overall and 4-3 in conference. The Lutes play their last game of the season at home Nov. 15 against George Fox. Kickoff is set for 1 p.m.

路Lute NWC First-Team student-athletes Men's Soccer

Women's Soccer

~

-路Eddie Na, First-year, Forward

Kelly White, Sophomore, Defender

Takara Mitsui, Sophomore, Goalkeeper

20 games played, 14 starts 7 goals, 5 assists 19 points-Fifth-best in NWC

20 games played, 20 starts 3 goals, 1 assist 7 points- Most for PLU defense

19 games played, 19 starts 62 saves, 10 goals against NWC Defensive Player of the Year

Volleyball

-

Kaylie Rozell, Sophomore, Forward 20 games played, 18 starts 6 goals, 1 assist 13 points- Second most on team Samantha North, Senior, Setter

Lucy Capron, Junior, Outside hitter

Amber Aguiar, Senior, Libero

25 games played, 25 starts 922 assists, four straight NWC First-Team awards

25 games played, 25 starts 320 kills, 42 service aces

25 games played, 0 starts 613 digs, 502 total attacks

The Northwest Conference recogriizes student-athletes on their athletic achievements throughout the season and awards standout players with spots on the NWC First-Team, Second-Team and Honorable Mention. Here are the Lutes, with the exception of football, which will be decided next week, that earned NWC First-Team for Fall sports.


,....

- az<t:t(ii# Lutes support Linfield after tragedy

The "now" fashion

pg.12 PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE NOV. 21, 2014

OORING

AST VOLUME 91 ISSUE 9

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

Big beards, bigger Inoney The first Bjug Harstad Day of Giving exceeds expectations

By NATALIE DEFORD News Writer In honor of Pacific Lutheran University's 125 years, students and staff set a goal to raise $50,000 in one day of giving. That goal was nearly doubled during Harstad Day. The Pacific Lutheran University Armual Fund, part of the Advancement Office, sponsored a special effort this year with the first Bjug Harstad Day of Giving Nov. 12. Lutes raised more than $94,712 from 302 donors in just 24hours. Bjug Harstad was PLU's founder and first

president. Harstad was memorialized in the original PLU building, which was named after him. The building was originally home to classrooms, now, PLU has expanded and Harstad houses female students and Campus Safety as well as some classrooms. Bjug Harstad had an incredibly large beard. In spirit of Harstad, paper beards were found campuswide on the faces of many PLU community members and friends. In honor of the day of giving, -TelALutes held a fundraiser in hopes to meet its goal. People could donate online but were also contacted via phone by the TelALutes. The TelALutes are 14 student callers who contact alumni and collect donation money for PLU. The team this year consists mostly of new callers, 10 of whiCh are first-years,

with only four returning TelALutes. The program is led by Kelli Conley, the program coordinator for annual giving. Martha Meyer is one of three TelALute student supervisors. She said the primary function of the TelALutes are, "maintaining and building relationships between campus community and. off-campus community." TelALutes, in addition to helping raise money for Bjug Harstad Day of Giving, is working toward reaching a team goal of $225,000 for the year. Bjug Harstad Day of Giving was such a success it could become a PLU tradition Meyer said.

Actual: $94,712

PLU raised $44,712 more than the original goal

What·s A&E

With 302 donators, each donation averages $313.62

That is the same as all 3,500 PLU students donating $30

Vagina Voices: Auditions begin pg.

It would take a Washington minimum wage worker 10,163 hours to make the same amount

What could you buy with $94,712? Bjug Harstad Day of Giving spirit can be found by searching #BjugHarstadDay Or check out the TelA.Lute program at its website: http:/lwww.plu.edu/advancementlannualfundltelalutes.php

50,112 Bags of Trolli Eggs from OMM • 31,570 Mechamcal pencils 7,893 USB drives • 105 MacBook Airs 37 Students' meal plan ''N.' for a semester • 2 Students' year of tuition

Opinion Is hookup culture·g1 .~ or bad? Check out sides pgs. 8-9

Lute Life Helping other peo)! teaches you abo.tif yourself pg. 6

Sports

_

Senior night fo Football pg. J~


I THE MOORING MAST

NEWS2

NOV. 21, 2014

Annual Harstad Empty bowls fill empty stomachs Students sell pottery to raise money for homeless memorial lecture By GENNY BOOTS News Writer Cathrine . Sandnes, a Norwegian journalist and editor, proposed a new idea in front of a crowd of Lutes on Monday night: has equality gone too far? Sandnes presented "Why Norwegian Women Can Have it All" as the speaker for the Harstad Memorial Lecture. Bjug Harstad's descendants and other donators fund the annual lecture series. Sandnes' lecture focused on maternity and p aternity leave in Norway, the balance of w ork with family life and how roles of both men and women have changed within Norwegian culture. The Norwegian approach to parental leave has been lauded as one of the best systems in Europe and worldwide. In Norway, both women and men receive three months of paid work leave, and then can split up additional leave time for a maximum of twelve months. There is also thirty minutes set aside each workday for a woman to nurse her child. Balancing the work life and family, audience member

Christy Olsen-Field said "The Norwegians have a lot of things that make sense." However, Norway 40 years ago was very different. Sandnes spoke about the differences her mother experienced "It was the wife who had responsibility for the home" Sandnes said. "Now we ask when will it be acceptable to be a stay-at-home mom?" The drastic shift in ideology h as taken the notion of equality to what Sandnes outlined as "strengthening men's rights to parenthood and women' s rights to work life." Sandnes has experienced firsthand the parental leave programs in Norway. She is the mother of two children with a long profession al career as a journalist and editor, and is a national karate champion. Overall, the response was positive Senior Emily Mansfield said. "I thought it was really good. I came with my gender and society class and we were just discussing parental leave policies around the world and it was interesting to get perspective from Norway," Mansfield said. ·

this year after last year's 120 bowls sold out within the first hour. Nick Lorax, head of the sustainability department, thought the involvement from so Pacific Lutheran University students played many departments was very important. their part by participating in "Empty Bowls," an "I'm really glad we received more help from event hosted by the sustainability department the students and professors to promote Hunger and in the arts department this Homelessness Awareness year," Lorax said. "It's great Week. to see students, professors "Empty Bowls" welcomed and other services around the PLU community with campus working together for ceramic bowls sold for $10. a common goal." The bowls were filled with Aftei:: purchasing a free soup of the buyer's bowl, buyers were ·given free choice. The event was a soup. Dining Service chef joint effort between many Erick Swenson prepared departments on campus. a hearty beef soup, while Arts and Communication Chef Chuk Blesson provided students and faculty a lighter pumpkin soup, members made 190 ceramic fitting for the upcoming bowls for the event. The Thanksgiving holiday. PLU Community Garden All donations were cohtributed fresh vegetables given to Trinity Lutheran for the soups. Dining and Church to benefit their Culinary Services, alongside current situation in aiding their food distributer the homeless in the greater Sysco, also played a role PHOTO COURTESY OF SAMANTHA LUND Parkland area. by providing the soup and In addition to "Empty Senior Suzanne Barnes dishes up soup holding the event from 4-6 Bowls," PLU also encouraged p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 19 for ''Empty Bowls" in the Anderson the students to attend University Center. outside Old Main Market. "Working for Change" panel "It's a fun campuswide in the Anderson University activity that benefits a lot of people," said Rebecca Center headed by PLU alumni. At the panel, Farris, Senior Administrative Assistant of Dining students were presented with post-graduation and Culinary Services. opportunities about serving the hungry and I Arts and Communication brought 190 bowls homeless.

By AUSTIN HILLIKER Guest Writer

CALLIN' IT A BAD ROMANCE Taking out the stigmas behind romance novels By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Sexual shaming is cast upon romance writers because some people see their genre as autobiographical, porn for women and smutty. Professor of sociology Joanna Gregson disproved these stereotypes in her lecture, "Love Between the Sheets," held at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 12 in the AUC. This lecture was part of the Sex+ series which hosts two lectures each semester. According to the Pacific Lutheran University's website, Sex + "will give space for students to learn, unlearn, and relearn while giving them the tools to engage in positive and healthy sexual relationships." The Diversity Center, Lute Fit, the Health Center and .the Women's Center all sponsor the lecture series. Gregson' s lecture was the first Sex+ event of the year. Gregson' s goal was to disprove any stigmas against romance genre writers. Gregson said to combat the stigma, writers will either personalize it. By embracing it head on or professionalize it by

end of the academic year," Gregson pointing out the sexism. "Though, in the end, there's this double-bind said. The two are the first to conduct tension formed as a writer of the genre," Gregson said. "That you can embrace what you love to write, any research on romance fiction but at the same time you're still writing about sex." from a sociological perspective. She explained that it's a genre written largely for Gregson said her favorite book is "Pride and Prejudice," which women by women. The room held roughly 40 students with only 10 Gregson said clearly fits the men in attendance. Continual nods of appreciation definition of romance. Her favorite and agreement, along with laughter came from the contemporary romance fiction audience. After the lecture finished, about 25 people is anything by Jenny Crusie or Kristan Higgins, "both of whom stayed to talk about the lecture. "There's no good position to be in," student write stories filled with humor," Allison Sullivan said. "Writing in the romance Gregson said. The next lecture in the Sex+ series genre is a double-edged sword and this lecture gave will be California "Yes Means Yes" me a new perspective on it." Gregson began teaching as a sociology professor Legislation, presented by Kaitlyn at PLU in fall 1998. She has published work . Sill, a political science professor at on teenage mothers, incarcerated mothers and PLU. It will take place 6 p.m. Dec. divorced women. The manuscript taken from the 3 in AUC room 133. data collected by Gregson and her co-researcher Jen Lois, a professor at Western Washington University, is currently under review. "We hope to have something out in print by the

PLU students and staff feel effects of Hong Kong protests to the streets in protest. The protests h ave become violent in some areas and Chinese citizens are being tear gassed, hosed and managed in other violent manners by the ·Many Americans have taken a blind government. eye to the state in Hong Kong during the Senior journalism last few weeks, but not Pacific Lutheran major and University's Lutes. exchange Hong Kong has been in the midst student, of numerous ongoing riots because of Shunying unhappy citizens that believe they were lied Wang feels to about electing their own representatives that. what the for congress. government is Hong Kong officials had planned to give doing is absolutely this freedom of election to its citizens in wrong. She believes 2017, meaning the citizens of China would that the government is have been able to choose who they wanted attempting to gain even more control to elect to government offices. of its own people. The government has now backed out · "To me, a promise is a promise. If we of that offer because the National Peoples have made a promise to Hong Kong to Congress announced that there will be no grant them democracy in the past, we such election because the committee wishes should keep our words," Wang said. "To not to place anyone from opposing parties keep some control over Hong Kong politics inside its government. seems like our governments way of saying, Since the government took back their 'I must have full control', which promises, the people of China have taken

By AUST IN HILLIKER Guest Writer

makes me question ou r governments moral is happening. We have talked about the principles." · events in class," Manfredi said. Manfredi said he believes we as N ot only have the riots impacted ·the students at PLU, but it Americans and outside observers should has also promoted be careful when talking about the issues in PLU associate Hong Kong. · professor and "I think it's important that we as outside chair of the obse-rvers be as skeptical as possible of Chinese Studies reporting ·on the subject," Manfredi said. Program, Paul "The 'Umbrella Protests' are a very good Manfredi, to test case for the possibility of neutrality and initiate a platform objectivity in world news media." It has become apparent that the for this students to talk about the behaviors within the political issues have subject. Manfredi triggered more riots throughout Hong believes the Kong. Wang said she hopes one day this platform he has can all be set aside, where both the words established in class, "China" and "h appiness" can be brou ght is somewhat helping together. "I want to see · the continuous inform others about development of the country so that no w hat is going on in Hong Kong. "I have friends and associates in Hong matter where in the world I end up being Kong directly impacted by the protests. · in the future, I can see people smiling when I also have students from Hong Kong they mention China," Wang said. who feel strongly, naturally, about what


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 21, 2014

How TO

NEWS3

SOUND SMART

When at the Thanksgiving table with Family

Tfils speoaJ.erufion'.'or'H<>W'roSOi.fuff's m:arf"iSnor about one topic, but five different topics to b~ up at the Thanksgiving dinner table when you feel the need to

sound smart.

Barbie designer Nick Lamm created tattoo, cellulite and acne stickers to make dolls more realistic.

Ebola might be contaminating the world's chocolate supply. There is a fear that Ebola will hit Ivory Coast and Ghana, which is where more than half of the world's chocolate is made. In reaction to the fear of ebola-spreading chocolate, manufacturers are marking up prices because its getting harder to find chocolate sources that are not contaminated.

Apple investors hope the company will soon be worth $1 trillion. The company currently st~ds at $670 billion and is worth more than any other company in the world.

~Snow;, ~o

getting be a real issue. In Buffalo, NY four people died during the last snow storm. One was in a vehicle accident and three had heart attacks while shoveling snow. The storm brought 6 feet of snow to the city.

Measles might be making a comeback. Measles kills 400 people daily, and unlike • Ebola, it can easily leap between people through the air, drinks and touching one another. Ninety percent of people infected have not been vaccinated. The economic downturn has taken a toll and people no longer feel the vaccine is necessary, which means more people will get infected.

0

CSI

•• Campus Safety Investigations Taken from weekly Campus Safety reports

Restricted person in Library

. 2ls1S!S ..... .

Library staff contacted Campus Safety due to the presence of a disruptive man in the library.

~~P~t !~~ier,c~~~ctri~es~~ I L,~~ ;. ~

a nearby care center. The man seemed to suffer from a mental disability. He was compliant with the request to leave and sign a Restricted From Campus form. The man left campus boundaries under the observation of Campus Safetv officers.

t. !F_;_ ,k~:FJ

i

~ ·=·, ~~;~.o;~:;!.

Collision on 121st Street

A student reported a hit-and-run accident she witnessed. Campus Safety was able to find one of the victims who declined to file a report due to minimal damage. No further action was taken by Campus Safety. ·

Theft in the AUC Campus Safety .responded to a theft at Old Mam Market. 1 Employees saw someone place food into their backpack without paying for anything. The officers located the subject and when they checked their backpack they found nothing.

Concern for people in Foss

,

1 1 3

e ·· ~ ' ' '·

Collision in Morken Lot A car accident occurred in the Morken parking lot. The officers took pictures of the crash, but the damage was minor, no other action was taken.

~.

-~·-··~----··· ···-·-~-'~

; I•

·

1 1

Vandalism in the AUC Campus Safety responded to a call from the second floor men's restroom. Officers found a toilet paper dispenser with black marker writing on it. The issue has been passed on to facilities.

~=-,~~

Week of 10/14-10/21

If you ever need help: Call.Cam.pus Safety at 253-535-7441 ~Campus Safety at cilin@plu.edu Or visit Campus Safety iJJ. the lower level ofHarstad Hall

I

Campus Safety performed a shuttle ride to Foss !fall because a student was intoxicated. Once inside, it took the student 40 I minutes to be able to function on her own. At that time, Campus Safety left and the incident was reported to Student Rights and Responsibilities.

Medical Aid at the Turf Field A student dislocated his elbow at the turf field inside of Olson gym. The student was taken by Pierce County Fire and Rescue to the hosoital.

Theft in South A student reported Christmas lights being stolen from outside their suit door. Campus safety filed the report but no other action has been taken

Campus Safety weekly reviews are compiled from all the calls and reports made · by Campus Safety each.week. The "CSI" is compiled and written by Samantha Lund, News Editor.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

A.& Events Nov. 21- 0-ec. 5 Oay Crowa lmprovPerf~ 7:30 p.m.. NQa:'2fin KHl

. Brass Bieital 8 p.m. Nou. 25 in Lagerquist

Jazz Combos 5 p.m. Dec. 2in.TheCAVE>

Wmter Date Showease 5p.m.. Dec. 5in KHP

ONLINE TERRAN'S

take GET THE SCOOP!

Weekly Gossip with Terl'Jlll Go online and get ·th£ scoop on celebrity gossip with our in-house p<>p culture expert, Terran Warden!

This Week: 'ltrrangivesanexpansive review of"~tU;" One Diredron'sbrand-~ alhqfu.

On the aGENd&

VAGINA VOICES By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer Most people don't go around talking about vaginas. The Women's Center at Pacific Lutheran University is putting on a production that does just that - "The Vagina Monologues" will be on stage early February. Auditions were held Nov. 11 and · 12 in the Anderson University Center. Junior Courtney Gould, a director of "The Vagina Monologues," estimated that approximately 30 femaleidentified students auditioned. "We hope the cast can really tap into their characters, because they are based on the experiences of real women," Gould said. _The monologues performed are based on interviews conducted by the show's creator Eve Ensler, who drafted the play in 1996. Whether talking about vaginas or not, public speaking or auditioning for a play can be nerve-wracking. However, Gould said directors were

impressed by many of the young women who auditioned. Senior Aubrey Frimoth was one of the female students who auditioned for the show Nov. 11. "I auditioned for it because I've seen 'The Vagina Monologues' in the past years

The subject of the play is in the title itself: the vagina. "At a liberal arts college [like PLU], there is a lot of empowerment that can happen," Frimoth said. '"The Vagina Monologues' gives students, faculty and staff a place to express that and learn

Aubrey Frimoth senior

and was inspired," Frimoth said. "I had never heard of it until my first-year - it really made me think After I saw the show, I knew I wanted to be a part of it." "The Vagina Monologues" is an episodic play about a subject that has often been seen as taboo by modem society.

about it. It invokes thought and makes the word less scary." The show's directors hope "The Vagina Monologues" will bring about this empowerment. "Women don't talk about their vaginas or their sexuality - it's · very internal," Gould said. "It's a good experience for women [to see the show],

because it opens up the topic so that women can feeling comfortable talking about their experiences." Showings will go offcampus, as well: one showing will take place at the Washington Correctional Center for Women in Purdy, Wash. "They really love it [at the correctional center]," Gould said. "They become very empowered by our performance." Although many people "The Vagina believe Monologues" promotes female liberty, the monologues ·have come under scrutiny from many critics, including some feminist groups. The monologues have become especially unpopular with socially conservative groups such as the American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family and Property. However, PLU's production hopes to be liberating and educational for all people. "It should empower everyone," Gould said.

Favorite Thanksgiving recipes Mast writers fill you in on what will fill you up A NOTE FROM MATTHEW SALZANO, A&E EDITOR: This issue of The Mast serves for the week of Thanksgiving and is the second-to-last issue this academic year, landing right before the holiday season. This year, the staff hopes we can provide you with some holiday fun with our favorite recipes!

potatoes, return to the pan and add all the ingredients except for the marshmallows. Using a potato masher or whisk, mash the mixture until smooth. If using the marshmallows, transfer the warm potatoes to a baking dish, spread marshmallows on top and bake in 350 degree oven until the marshmallows are lightly browned and melted.

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"Marshmallow Baked Sweet Potatoes are one of my favorite Thanksgiving recipes because my family always saves it for the holidays. It's one of those things that you only get once a year, so they have an authentic feeling to them. The maele syrup and marshmallows make it seem like more of a dessert so I always save them for the end."

Crockpot Garlic Mashed Potatoes 5 lbs. rea potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks 8 ounce package cream cheese 8 ounce container sour cream 1 V2 cups chicken broth 3 teaspoons garlic powder Salt to taste 1/2 cup butter, melted

"I really like Crockpot Garlic Mashed Potatoes because Thanksgiving just isn't the same at my house witfi.out these mashed morsels. The turkey is great and all, but come on. Potatoes."

RELAND TUOMI, Editor-in-Chief

~ Marshmallow Baked Sweet Potatoes

Watch it later online at http:/hnastmedia.plu.edu or tune in at 9 p.m. every Thursday to News @Nine on Mast TYI

Auditions for 'Monologues' begin

"At a Liberal Arts college, there is a lot of empowerment that can happen ... 'The Vagina Monologues' gives students, faculty and staff a place to express that and learn about it."

Directions: Place[otatoes into a large pot and cover with salte water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain. Transfer potatoes to a large bowl and mash with cream cheese and sour cream until thoroughly combined; slowly mash in chicken broth, followed by garlic powder and salt. Beat potatoes with an electric mixer on high speed until whipped, about 2 minutes. Transfer potatoes to a slow cooker. Set slow cooker to low and cook for 3 hours. Stir melted butter into potatoes just before serving.

This week~ Ge~ discussed the . Huntet>: Original boots being the new on~campns trend.

NOV. 21, 2014

3 large garnet sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch dice 1/4 cup salted butter 1/2 cup cream or whole milk 2 tbsp maple syrup 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon Mini marshmallows (optional) Directions: Boil sweet potatoes until soft enough to pierce easily with a fork. Drain

GIANCARLO SANTORO, Sports Editor

~ The King Family Green Beans & Bacon 1 pound of fresh green beans 1/2 lb. of bacon 1 sweet onion, chopped Directions: In a medium sized pot, first brown the bacon. Once bacon is somewhat cooked, add green beans and onion. Let simmer for 20-30 minutes, or until green beans are done. Enjoy! "I love The King Family Green Beans & Bacon because it reminds me of my Grandma. I miss her a lot during the holiday season and this is my way of including her in my holiday festivities even though she's no longer with us."

ALLIE REYNOLDS, Online Editor

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Deford Family Green Bean Casserole · 3 cans green beans, drained 1 can cream of mushroom soup 3/4 cup milk 1 can French fried onions or 11/3 cups Directions: Heat oven to 350 degrees. In medium ceramic casserole pan, mix beans, soup, milk and 213 cup onions. Bake for 30 minutes until hot. Top with remaining 213 cup onions. Bake 5 minutes more.

"I love the Deford Family Green Bean Casserole because I grew up making it with my mom. Not only is this dish delicious, but it's also easy to make. And, bonus, it's the ultimate comfort food that reminds me of family and fun."

NATALIE DEFORD, News Writer

~ Sam's Leftover Sandwich Any desired amount of: Turkey Cranberry Sauce Sprouts Sourdough bread Mayonnaise Green onions Directions: Put the ingredients between the two slices of bread. Enjoy. ''.After Thanksgiving, I am so full that I don't want to cool<. anymore. But let's face it, an hour later I want another snack - so I make Sam's Leftover Sandwich. Make two, and bring one Black Friday shopping!"

SAMANTHA LUND, News Editor

~ Easy Pumpkin Cupcakes 1 box yellow cake mix 1 (15 oz.) can pumpkin pie mix puree 2 tsp ground cinnamon Directions: Put all of the ingredients together in a mixer, and mix thoroughly. The mix will be incredibly thick, so make sure to have lots of patience as you place these into cupcake wrappers. Bake according to cake mix directions. Enioy with store-bought cream cheese frosting! "I pretend to be good at baking, but I'm not. Baking Easy "Pumpkin Cupcakes leaves me feeling like a baking god without making me do any real work! Plus, it reminds me of how much I love home and those I cook with."

MATTHEW SALZANO, AdE Editor


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 21, 2014

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE By IAN SMITH

A&E5

HUNT'路E RB O路T S Hunting fashion or passing trend? H that boot lasts five years, definitely want a pair." The stylish trend was then the yearly price for the rain intended for something far from boot is $32, which seems like a steal. its daily use. With colder weather on "Boots have always been The Hunter Boots brand campus, puddle-aware students began as the North British popular," senior Martha Meyer have been turning to the ever- Rubber Company and supplied said. "They are just another kind protecting comfort of rain boots. its everlasting shoes to soldiers of popular boot." Through the years, the classic ' during both World Wars. From After the misty mornings has taken on a whole new the trenches to the Palace, the pass, the warm weather will meaning. British Royal family fell for the bring an array of new footwear This fall, the Hunter Original boots in the 1960s and hasn't trends. boot has led the charge against stopped wearing them since. For now, Hunter Original c;hilly days. Some say that the expensive boots will continue to warm the "I think that Hunter boots price tag was meant for the elite feet and empty the wallets of the offer a fashionable take on - not the street. puddle-runners ready to make rain boots," said junior Grace "I haven't seen them around the investment. Takehara, editor of LuteLooks. yet," sophomore Quinn Johnston "[They] are versatile, functional said, "but I wouldn't spend $150 and offer a change from the on [a pair of boots]." familiar." While some are mortified by The British boot has turned the pretty penny, the statement heads of more than fashion piece can be understood by editors. others. People of all ages and "Personally, I think that nationalities have taken the they can be overpriced for opportunity to upgrade the function of the shoe," their cold weather wear with Takehara said, "but if these. Since 2007, sales have you put thought into skyrocketed for the brand its versatility in your worldwide, according to the wardrobe, then the Are the boots worth the buck? Wellington website. investment can be It rains 146 Days in Tacoma, Wash. With chunky socks or on worthwhile." 5 -year lifespan of a boot: 730 days their own, Hunters have had With the average shoppers emptying shelves all Hunter Original A pair of Hunter Original boot: $158 season long. Retail stores like boot claiming to last Cost per rainy day: 22垄 Nordstrom's and online pop- five years, the trend up shops like Zappo's and Shop becomes more sensible. Bop have been rolling through The original glossy black orders to catch up. boot that has become the "I don't have them," first- best seller in the United States year Maggie Watson said, "but I is ticketed at $158.

By BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer

DOING THE MATH

WATERMARK PHOTO BY JAN SMITH

Terms subject to change without notice. No cash value. Select styles. All offers exclude textbooks. electronics, glassybaby. Danske and Oleana. While supplies last. Cannot be combined with other offers, coupons or discounts. Doorbuster prices valid 6:0Dam路 1O:OOam only; Happy Hour prices valid 4:00pm-6:00pm only; All day prices valid 6:00am-8:00pm only. All prices valid only on 11 21 2014.


THE MOORING MAST

6 LUTE LIFE

NOV. 21, 2014

From The Matrix: Helping others to learn about yourself By PRINCESS REESE Matrix Contributor At graduation in May, my mood about entering the real world reflected the season. The air was clean, the days bright, and everything was new. I had spent four years exploring Tacoma as an undergraduate, desperately trying to connect theoretical knowledge to what I witnessed around me, to me, because of me. Women and Gender Studies prepared me to learn in non-traditional spaces. Anthropology helped me understand influences of culture and worldviews. The Diversity Center gave me as much theoretical understanding of oppression and identity as I could handle. I was ready. So, this fall I started my job as College Bound Assistant Instructor in the Tacoma School District. Looking at Tacoma high school graduation rates, I knew I could make a difference. I would inspire my students as a black kid who grew up in South Seattle and made it out with two majors! Wasn't I just the inspiration they needed to know

leaving everything they know behind. that they could do it, too? laughing through my doors. They are learriing to discern when to They needed forgiveness and grace and The funny thing about praxis, though, is stem expectations. I needed to know that exercise power and resistance. They are that you don't have it until you've done it. their stories were unbelievably large and examining authority figures with careful Boy, did I need practice. eyes, scrutinizing abuses of privilege and Imagine how floored I was when I met unbearably complex. My college knowledge. my students and they education must They are forming chosen families, not invalidate learning about alliances and loyalty. barely cared everything they They are battling to enjoy their youth about my had to offer. while the time to move on quickly stories. I student approaches. They are living rich lives full was helping "Wasn't I the inspiration they One college - needed to know that they could do told me: "If a of astonishing triumphs and infuriating teacher assigns failures. b o u n d They are living for themselves, their busy work, I students, it too?" will skip that communities, and the future spaces they yet only half class every hope to inhabit. They are teaching everyone consistently day and only . they meet without knowing it. turned in homework. show up to They are shaping me. tum the work My students are a constant reminder My high school experiences as a person of color, in. My time is too valuable to waste inside that work in a community is not about me. female and poor came rushing back. These a classroom where I'm not being taught." It is about improving oneself to serve the students didn't need me to inspire them. And she was right! These students know community the best way one can. They needed me to understand them. themselves well. Ultimately, the choice to live and Many have experienced trauma on breathe Tacoma, the desire to "help" the They needed me to remember being fifteen, stumbling into school with little levels I don't comprehend, even though inhabitants of this intricately woven city, sleep. They needed me to remember that I grew up in a similar environment. They must begin with one thing I have learned the classroom was affected by a million are navigating family and community ties, this year: shut the fuck up and let them factors before they came pushing and not quite knowing how to leave without speak.

STOP & LISTEN: An update By ANGIE TINKER Matrix Co -Editor It's been路 a busy week in The Matrix office now that the deadline for submissions has come and gone. "Stop & Listen," this semester's theme of our social justice magazine, is in full gear. We've had all sorts of submissions that have latched onto the idea of "stop and listen." There are a lot of misconceptions that our authors have wanted to dispel about a. variety of social justice issues. This issue covers topics as widespread a11 justice for undocumented workers and positive community justice. Just like the student body of Pacific Lutheran University itself, the social justice passions of the community are diverse. Authors used a wide variety of approaches to discuss social justice. For instance, Thomas Kim, senior, approached the question of immigration from an economic, mathematical viewpoint. In contrast, senior Kyrie Benson

tackled the issue by discussing her experiences in Mexico through the perspective of a poem. Senior Kristen.Hayes wrote about the significance of taking time to pause and recharge in order to be an effective activist for social justice causes. Luke Gillespie, junior, wrote about the constant pull of social justice in queer identities. It wasn't just individuals that subroitted to The Matrix, though: organizations around campus were represented as well. For instance, first-year Millie Pacheco and junior Caitlyn Dawes both submitted pieces on the importance of pursuing social justice on behalf of the Residence Hall Association. They are both social justice directors, Pacheco for Hong Hall and Dawes for RHA as a whole. Senior Carly Brooks submitted a piece for the Cente.r for Community Engagement and Service that takes a very local perspective on social justice and community service by focusing on the relationship between PLU and the greater Parkland

community. As co-editor, Laura Johnson and I have worked through the layout and formatting of The Matrix, it has been nothing short of astounding to see what we've gotten from the community. We've toured classrooms, posted reminders and tabled to promote submissions this year. That's perhaps where one of the most unique submissions comes from. This semester, while tabling, we asked interested people to let us take a picture of them holding a sign that says, "I want people to Stop & Listen to .. ." The responses came from all comers of the community as people asked for others to listen to empowering music, the environment, victims and the Black Student Union. The expected release date for the "Stop & Listen" issue of 路The Matrix is Friday, Dec. 5, with a celebration planned to be held in the Cave.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATRIX

The theme for The Matrix this semester is "Stop & Listen." To learn more about The Matrix, email them at matrix@plu.edu.

Career fair offers opportunities for students By RELAND TUOMI Editor-in-Chief

PHOTO BY RELAND TUOMI

Students came to the Career Fair hosted by Career Connections last Wednesday in the Morken Center atrium. They interacted with businesses such as Alaska Airlines, Amazon and New York Life Insurance.

College students nationwide all have one unanswered question: what am I going to do after college? Pacific Lutheran University students are no different, which is why Career Connections offers career fairs for students. The most recent Career Fair was from 3-6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19 in the Morken Center's atrium. Businesses in attendance included Alaska Airlines, New York Life Insurance Company and Amazon. This was the first career fair at PLU Amazon attended. "There's a lot of great talent here," said Seyash Singh, a business analyst for Amazon. "So far, it's been a good experience." Career Connections will host more career fairs throughout the year, and each will focus on different concentrations and majors. "The target of career fairs is to better align majors with employers," said Jody Hom, Recruiting and Outreach Manager for Career

Connections. "The benefit for career fairs is to provide the opportunity fo.r students and employers to connect and build network relationships that can result in in_ternships or potential careers." Many students attended the event looking for internships and opportunities. "I was really interested in working with Alaska Airlines. I asked them about job shadows and informational interviews," senior Amanda Brasgalla said. "I think [the career fair is] beneficial because it gives students opportunities to talk to recruiters that might be interested in joining their companies." Students can connect to employers through a site called Lute Link as well, where students can connect with alumni in jobs that interest them. It can be found on the Career Connections web page at http://www.plu.edu/ career-connections/home.php. Career fairs in the future will focus on nursing and healthcare, social sciences and arts and communication. .For more information, visit the Career Connections website . .


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 21, 2014

LUTE LIFE 7

Debate writes history at Linfield speaker in the senior division. Ten teams represented PLU atthe tournament and consistently defeated top schools in the Pacific Lutheran University debaters took region inch~ding Linfield, Willamette, Gonzaga home the most world's style debate awards and Seattle University. Teams debated on issues including at one tournament in the program's history at immigration policy, death with dignity laws, Linfield College this weekend. criminalizing street harassment, quarantining Senior division people exposed debate duo Angie to Ebola and U.S. Tinker, senior, and · Brendan "I think our showing at Lin.field foreign diplomacy Stanton, juniqr, proves that PLU's debate program in the Middle East. "I think our earned first place showing at Linfield in the preliminary is one to watch out for." proves that PLU' s rounds and debate program is received a finalist one to watch out Hamiah Bates award in a field of for," Bates said. first-year 32 teams. The team is open to Junior division all students with or Hannah team Bates, first-year, and Matt Aust, sophomore, without debate experience and meets 6-8 p.m. and junior -division team Caila Fautenberry, Tuesdays and Thursdays in Ingram Hall. They will host a high school speech and senior, and Austin Ballard, junior, received awards for debating in the semi-finals in a field debate ·t ournament on campus Dec. 5 and Dec. 6. All students are welcome to judge at the of 28 teams. "Seeing PLU get so far in both divisions was tournament. For more information, e-mail T.O.H. Karl exhilarating," Tinker said. "I've never seen that Forensics Team director Justin Eckstein at much excitement on the team." Tinker was also recognized as the third best ecksteja@plu.edu.

Taxi Rides PLU Special

By BRENDAN STANTON Debate Member

Leasing from Tacoma Yellow Cab

To Airport: $65 Price for 4 people: $16.SO/person Price for 3 people: $21.SO/person

Call Keven 253.678.2631 orafter7pm Paul 253.219.0280

--

For airport rides please schedule a day or more in advance. Call, text, or email:

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANGIE TINKER

kevtacyelocab@hotmail.com

Angie Tinker (left) and Brendan Stanton (right) with their award for winning first place in the preliminary awards at Linfield University.

From Saxifrage:

-.

LEAN IN By GRACE GARVEY-HALL Saxifrage 38 Contributor

Lean in closer 111 tell you. Passion is pen and Paper and words Fillin

Fillin~

Filling the page Hot water washing away Mud and revealing inspiration

Saxifrage is open for submission f_or !ublication zn The Mast. Sen your poetry, visual art, fiction and creative non-fiction totalling no more than 500 words any time to saxif!_ago/}plu.edu f!!r consideration. Find us on Facebook, Twitter and at http:// saxifrage.plu.edu ·

Sore muscles Heavy with accomplishment

PHOTO COUJn"ESY OF SAXIFRAGE

My heart swingll:tg From sorrow to delight Rediscovering melodies I once loved My body pressed into yours, Or is it yours to mine? Crunchy sidewalk leaves And the crisp apple of Fall A cup of tea on my windowsill

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Grace Garvey-Hall is a senior at PLU majoring in Hispanic Studies and English with an emphasis in creative non-fiction. Upon graduation in December, Grace will return home to Minnesota. One of her short-term goals is summiting Mt. Rainier. Her longterm goal is becoming a writing professor.

--·

A smile, Better yet a laugh Escaping Whife I fook the other way

Old letters God.

Sax·i·frage

A poem

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Like us on Facebook! l1ttps:/ /www.facebook.com/PLUMastMedia

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THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

NOV. 21, 2014

Avoid participation in hookup ·culture By MICHAEL DIAMBRI AdE Writer

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Many people argue that the hookup culture in college is liberating. In reality, the hookup culture only liberates miscommunication, poor health ch9ices and incidents of rape and violence. Today's college students may think that casual flings and hookups are essential to the college experience. Students don't realize that these undefined, reckless endeavors are getting them nowhere. College is a complicated time. You can complicate the craziness of college more with an impractical hook up or fling. As any person who has ever been in a relationship that has gone wrong can tell you, miscommunication is a · . relationship killer. The intentions of the random hottie you are making out with at a party might not be clear. Situations like this lead to poor communication climates. In the hookup culture of college, mixed signals are constantly being sent off and perceived as something that they are not. Especially because a great

deal of the communication done is non verbal. We all know catching "the feels" sucks. Especially when this is just with a casual fling, or when you learn that you were just a rebound. When the feeling turns out to not be mutual, one side of the relationship ends up hurt and heartbroken. Additionally, representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other professional organizations have said that the hookup culture is not healthy. The CDC reports that around 10 million college-aged people are diagnosed with sexually transmitted diseases annually in the U.S. It is scary to think about if people involved in the hookup culture bother to get tested for a sexually transmitted disease.

"Mixed signals are constantly being sent off and perceived as something that they are not." Also, how can we expect incidents of rape and violence in college to end when having sex with someone is promoted among students, especially through social media. Just look at Tinder, Yik Yak, Twitter or Instagram to see the promotion of the hookup culture. The ·miscommunications occurring in the hookup culture often leads to instances when individuals feel pressure to give consent when they don't want

to. This is because many people have perceived the hookup culture to be the societal norm. Additionally, having sex with someone who is intoxicated is considered rape. An individual who has had too much too drink is not in the right mind to make an insightful decision and give consent. Although not all situations of rape involve alcohol, unfortunately, instances of. rape involving alcohol have been perpetuated by the hookup culture. The National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reported this striking fact about sexual abuse: yearly around 97,000 students ages 18 to 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape. College is being glorified as something different than what it is intended to be. For many, college no longer means preparing yourself for your future, it only means enjoying right now. Being in college grants less supervision and levels of independence to constantly make individual decisions that most have not had before em(}lling. This · certainly comes into play when students decide to try new things in college. They feel like they are free. I am not saying "don't experiment" and "don't party'' - college is all about new experiences, making connections and seeing what the world is like. Make sure you are thinking with your brain and not with your genitalia when you experiment. Although people may tell you how liberating the hookup culture is, feel free to not be a part of the hookup culture . and live a healthy and safe life.

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Bjorn Slater

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mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Samantha Lund A&EEDITOR

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

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Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

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MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

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Zachary Boyle

Spend spare time in the community garden this season

ADVISERS Clift' Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer

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The cold weather does not stop life and. growth in Pacific Lutheran University's community garden, and the holiday· season highlights the need for food for many local individuals and families. Hungry Pierce County residents could benefit from students' spare time this winter. PLU's community garden, · founded in 1997 by Brian Norman, is alive and well. Students, community members and faculty regularly keep this garden alive. Located on upper campus by Ingram Hall, the community garden is accessible for all PLU students. Throughout the years the garden has evolved. The garden project was an aspiration for senior Brian Norman in 1997, but his plan was short-lived. It was forgotten until 2006, when students Kate Fontana and Becky Mares volunteered their summer bringing the garden back to life. In 2007, the garden doubled in size, attracting more help from students and faculty. Community organizations such as the Boys and Girls Club were also involved in helping the garden grow. Since 2007, it has been a collaboration of efforts to provide fresh and organic food to the community. Now partnered with local church Trinity Lutheran, the garden annually donates close to 2 tons of carrots, tomatoes, lettuce, broccoli and various other vegetables and herbs to the church. Each month in Pierce County there are more than 115,000 visits made by children, adults and seniors seeking food assistance according

PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW SALZANO

Members of the Accounting Club volunteering some of their time at the community garden. Pulling weeds, harvesting foods, landscaping and caring for plant beds are among the many things volunteers can do at the garden.

to the Emergency Food Network (EFN) . Nationally, according to EFN, 19.5 percent of Americans live in hungry or food-insecure · households. By lending spare time at the garden, students can ensure quality vegetables will be grown for local, hungry community members. It's a small way to make a big difference. "I think it shows that our school and students of PLU want to try and fix the problem by giving food to · those who are less fortunate," junior

Christian McConnell said. Anyone is invited to stop by and lend a hand. The garden has many unique features including raised gardening beds made to be wheelchair friendly. This garden has gone above and beyond to allow for inclusivity among Parkland resident. This winter, if you get into the giving spirit and have some extra time, spend an afternoon tending to vegetables, improving landscaping or supporting the garden in any way you can.

For additional information, email the Community Garden at garden@plu.edu. It may also provide updates and newsletters alona with events~

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and dist ribute information to its readers about important issues, event s and trends that impact t he Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or ·Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5- p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

JOB OPENING The Mast is hiring! We are looking for a Sports Editor for spring semester. If you would like to apply, email The Mast at mast@plu.edu


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 21, 2014

OPINION 9

SAY 'YES' TO HOOKUPS By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor

Friday nights to our parents meant dates, flirting and drinking. For some of us, it means the same. But, in today's competitive world where students need to market themselves, many students now find themselves in the library on a Friday night. We have less time than ever before to focus on relationships and finding "the one," so we have moved on. Young adults are now more empowered to make the choice to seek out sex with no strings attached after a long week of work.

Slut-shaming has always been a part of hookup culture. Young adults are told that casual sexual encounters lead to STI' s, rape and unhealthy views of relationships. However, instead of telling women to keep their legs closed and teaching young adults that casual sex leads to various STI' s, I wonder why we don't take the easier route and teach children to practice safe sex. Hooking up is loosely defined as having sex without being .in a committed relationship. Hookup culture does not depend on alcohol or drugs. Educated young women do not need alcohol or drugs to force them into sexual encounters - we are not the damsels in Disney movies. Also, hooking up does not necessarily mean sex. Hooking up can just be considered making out. Sex does not always have to be a part of the equation. The stigmas against hookup culture comes from three general places: adults shaming us, shaming one another and the media making each sexual encounter into a rape story. . Many adults in our lives have taken a note out of Coach Carr's playbook, which he so eloquently stated in "Mean Girls,"

In reality, if we let women empower "At this age, you're going to have a lot of urges. You're going to want to take off your themselves sexually, they will not need to clothes and touch each other. But if you do get drunk to claim that as their excuse for · touch each other, you will get Chlamydia ... having sex. and die." If casual sex is no longer taboo, open Following this idea, if we eat candy all of and honest conversations about practicing our teeth will get cavities and will fall out. · safe sex are more likely. Rape is a very serious and real threat not Yes, having sex can lead to STI' s just like candy leads to cavities. Instead of teaching to be taken lightly. It seems that colleges are kids to never eat sugar, we teach them to known for having Friday night parties turn brush their teeth twice a day and practice into students being too drunk to consent safe sugar eating. Practicing safe sex is no and being raped. I cannot stress this next different. point more clearly: instead of shaming Peer shaming ostracizes men and women for drinking or choosing to partake women who choose to have sex without in casual sex, teach young men not to rape. It is not crazy to believe that students monogamy. Girls who have casual sex are sluts and men are players, but there are so can partake in casual sex in a smart way, many other labels they fit into. without drugs or peer pressure. Some Peer labels are slowly going out of young adults simply choose to focus on fashion. Calling things "so gay" is no themselves rather than having to keep up longer acceptable and calling a girl a slut is with another person. Shaming them for the same - it is a sexual stigma. Let's drop that is what makes students think they the labels and embrace who we are beyond need to be drunk to have casual sex. that. It is offensive and demeaning to say that The media portrays hookups as horny students need to get drunk to choose to teens looking to fill their pleasures in have sex with one another. We are young. dumb, drunken ways or girls being peer- There is no reason to keep two consenting pressured to go home with a guy after one- adults from practicing casual and safe sex with one another. too-many drinks.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

NOV. 21, 2014

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Santoro Speaks... Senseless act should remind us to be grateful By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor

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Sometimes, no amount of words can do any situation justice. Sometimes, no amount of words can fix what has been done, and no amount of words can stop the pain. Words, sometimes, barely portray emotion - or fix confusion - and they can only serve as remembrance, because things can seem so perfect at the beginning. · Linfield College's football team had just won its sixth straight Northwest Conference title over the weekend with a dominant 59-0 win over second-placed Pacific. As the team, fans and university were getting ready to celebrate, the unthinkable happened: a player was killed just hours after the game. I didn't personally know Parker Moore, the 20-yearold Linfield football player who was stabbed to death at a 7-Eleven near Linfield College in McMinnville, Ore. But that doesn't mean I don't feel anything every time I see or hear about his death. It was a brutally random killing, and because the police fatally shot the suspect at the scene of the crime, the Yamhill County Sheriff's Office is still struggling to find a motive. There is no need for me to go into further detail about the event or about the suspect and victim. Social media and the news can be your sources for saturated, violent media, but I can't help but feel that as a college student and former athlete, this story was particularly chilling.

The reason? It could easily have been me. When I was on the men's soccer team here at Pacific Lutheran University, I had countless Saturday nights after winning a game where I stopped by the local AMPM gas station on Pacific Avenue to get a Gatorade and some snacks before going home to relax. More than a few times, I would keep my eye on people loitering outside of the store, because, as we all know, Parkland is far from the safest city in Washington. I never had the sense that I would be attacked keeping my wits about me was more of a precaution - and I am lucky to say I have never had any trouble. Tragically, I'm sure Moore felt the exact same way. I don't want to break out typical cliches, like, "don't take life for granted," or, "it can be gone in an instant," but this is a situation where these overused phrases have never been more true. The Linfield football team and university lost a member of its £amily to a truly senseless act that may never be explained. Moore, a resident adviser and business management major, was described by Linfield head coach Joseph Smith as "a leader of people." I hope you will join me in sending condolences to his family, Linfield College and the rest of the athletes in the Northwest Conference, whether teammate or opponent, who knew Moore.

PHOTO BY GIANCARLO SANTORO

Members of PLU's varsity athletics teams gathered in Olsen Gym to show their support for Linfield College and Parker Moore. Athlet es from fall, winter and spring sports were present, and all signed t he banner that read "Linfield Strong" with Moore's number, 35, on one of the banners.

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Dickerson: Lutes needs return to "toughness" By JAKE BILYEU Guest Writer

~

Are you ready for some Pacific Lutheran University Basketball? Well, you better be. The 2014-2015 Northwest Conference season opens with back to back games this today, Friday, Nov. 21 and tomorrow, Saturday, Nov. 22 in the Doug McArthur Classic, held at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. To help get you ready for the season, we have to go over what happened last year, and all that has changed since then. Last year, the Lutes' basketball team finished 8-17 in the win-loss category, going 5-11 in conference games. One of the leaders on the team, Arvid Isaksen, was playing in his senior year. So, this year, replacing him is high on the priority list. PLU head coach Steve Dickerson is entering his ninth season in charge of the Lutes, and will look first-andforemost to improve on last seasons seventh place NWC finish. The teams highest finish under Dickerson was in 2011-

2012, when the Lutes finished fourth. In a sit down I had with coach Dickerson, he revisited last season, recalling that Isaksen had been their leader from sheer hard work and motivation for his teammates. Replacing that will be tough, but the Lutes are bringing back a few stars from last year's squad. Terrell Williams, one of this year's returning seniors, will look to finish strong this year in a full time starting role, after spending some of last year and previous years as the team's 6th man. Other returners include two All League Honorable Mention award winners and sophomores, Bryce Miller, a stat-sheet filler at the post position, and Brandon Lester, the team's leading scorer from last year. In that same sit dowri with Coach Dickerson, he noted that the Lutes basketball team had built up a tradition of bringing toughness to the court, but that they had let that toughness slip in the past couple years. The new recruits coming in this y~ar will also look to bring back that toughness. They are making good progress on that goal so far. In the Lutes' preseason exhibition game, first-years

Dylan Foreman and Zach Wallin were among the leaders in scoring. Another problem that the Lutes had last season was finishing games. The Lutes lost many of their games last year after falling apart in the final minutes. Coach Dickerson aims to prevent that at all costs this year, but he may have a tough time accomplishing that goal this year. He believes that the shooting this year could be off the charts, but that the team may also struggle with rebounding this season. And, since basketball games are generally won and lost by rebounding late in games, the Lutes are hoping to bring that toughness back in full force this year. Among all of these things to expect, we should all expect an exciting season of PLU basketball.


.fflJI

THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 21, 2014

11 SPORTS

Baseball: Money talks in Giancarlo Stanton deal Is any athlete worth megadeals? By CHRISTIAN BOND Guest Writer The Miami Marlins have offered outfield slugger Giancarlo Stanton one of the biggest contracts in U.S. sport history: $325 million over 13 years. The Marlins set Major League Baseball contract records in both length and amount of money given to a player. Does Stanton deserve the money? The last time we saw Stanton on the field, he was getting hit in the face with a 90 mile-anhour fastball. The money is well deserved. The two-time all-star is known for destroying baseballs. Stanton made his debut in 2010. His career numbers include 619 hits, 154 home runs and a batting average of .271. This past season was Stanton's best. In 145 games, Stanton batted .288 with 37 home runs and 105 RBI. All of Stanton's past achievements prove that he is going to be a stud for a long time. As baseball fans in the Northwest, we are no strangers to huge contracts. Last offseason, the Seattle Mariners shocked the baseball world by signing 30-year-old second baseman Robinson Cano to a 10-year, $240 million deal. Cano was criticized for leaving New York,

but was able to put up the numbers to live up to the contract. Stanton' s new deal makes the Cano deal look like nothing. ¡ By signing the 25-year-old for the next 13 years, the Marlins have committed to Stanton being the cornerstone of their franchise moving forward. One of the biggest doubts regarding the contract is the length. For that reason, the Marlins have given Stanton the option to get out of the contract in four years when he will be 29, to try and get another team to sign him for a long-term deal. If Stanton does stay at the Marlins for his entire contract, he will be 37 when the 13 years are over. The only real downside I see to the deal is that Stanton has to call Marlins Park, the ugliest ballpark in all of baseball and one that is worth less than his contract, his home. In all sports, athletes are paid for their past performances. . Stanton's four year MLB career shows a lot of promise in years to come. The contract is record-breaking, but it also has holes in it to ensure that Stanton is satisfied with where he is at. Whether Stanton opts out of his contract, or stays with the Marlins for the entirety, he will be a very wealthy baseball player.

Things you can buy with $325 million: -.::

928 Lamborghinis

147 private islands in the Bahamas 72 Space Needles 6.25 Key Arenas

.......

Record-breaking Senior Night ends football season By STEVEN MCGRAIN Guest Writer In its first-ever offical game against George Fox, the Pacific Lutheran University football team out-matched the Bruins in all facets of the game for a 49-7 Northwest Conference victory on Senior Night at Sparks Stadium in Puyallup, Wash on Nov. 15. Finishing up its first season since the football program was cut 45 years ago, George Fox was no match for the Lutes. After a shaky start, the PLU offense found their rhythm, and sustained it through the rest of the contest. Senior quarterback Dalton Ritchey continued to display his ability to lead the offense using his legs and arm. Multiple times throughout the progression of the game, Ritchey ran to pick up a third down conversion or found his reliable senior wide receiver 'Kyle Warner over the middle. In their final game, Ritchey completed 14 of 21 pass attempts for 143 yards and a touchdown. Warner caught six passes for 70 yards and a touchdown. A historic statistic occurred Saturday for senior running back Niko Madison. There have only been three players in Pacific Lutheran history to rush for more than 1,000 yards in a season; the last person to accomplish the feat was Anthony Hicks in 1999. Against the Bruins, Madison reached 1,026 yards on 128 carries for the season. Madison rushed for 162 yards on 23 carries and crossed the goal line twice for PLU touchdowns against the Bruins. "He runs extremely hard and its encouraging for us as an offensive line when he runs the way he does, makes blocking for him worth it," senior offensive line Parker Browning said. "He is a great person and I wouldn't have asked for a better running back during my time at PLU." "It was an emotional h~1ddle at the conclusion of the play, because of all of the hard work as a unit and for Niko [Madison]," senior lineman Tevon Stephens-Brown said. "He is not only a great player, but a great person as well." The Bruins did not record a first down until late in the second quarter, and, by that point, the Lutes had put the game away being up 35-0. The Lutes defense forced six turnovers; the starting quarterback for George Fox was relieved in the first quarter. The ball was intercepted twice by PLU, once by junior linebacker Kyle Bennett and the other by senior linebacker Blake Peterson. The defensive group was able to force four fumbles and recover four out of five. "It was important for us to dominate on defense," senior Derek Kaufman said. "It showed with the six turnovers, I was proud of the way we played as a team." This game signified the conclusion of the 2014 football season.

The departing seniors are the winningest class in the Scott Westering era with a 28-10 overall record and, most importantly, brought the Lutes back to the playoffs for the first time since 2001. Their final play as a class was just like so many before. Ritchey connected with senior receiver Austin Hilliker for a pick-up of four yards, good enough for a PLU first down. The mov~ was only fitting the best senior class in the Westering era to give the underclassmen a new set of downs. Missing out on the the NCAA playoffs with a third-place NWC finish, PLU concluded the season 7-2 overall and 5-2 in conference. George Fox finished their first season back 1-8 overall, 1-6 in conference.

"It was an emotional huddle at the conclusion of the play because of all of the hard work as a unit and for Niko [Madison]." Tevon Stephens-Brown Senior offensive lineman

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-

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

PLU captains, seniors Dalton Ritchey (10), Tevon Stephens -Brown (68), Greg Hibbard (9) and Zach Phelps (50) were honored along with 22 others on Senior Night against George Fox.

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY Class of'IS Austin Hilliker (2), Spencer McKinnon (2), Shawn Bowen (3), Connor Anderson (5), Connor Cummings (7), Greg Hibbard (9), Dalton Ritchey (10), Travis McCarthy (13), Kyle Warner (17), Derek Kaufman (19), Niko Madison (24), Joel Anthony (30),Chris Krieg (34), Doug Sullivan (35), Blake Petersen (40), Nick VanDomelen (46), Austin Cook (47), Zach Phelps (SO), Joel Teats (50), Mikhail Vlasenko (58), Matthew Baker (62), Tevon Stephens-Brown (68), Cody Hatton (74), Parker Browning (76), Lucas Sontra (85) Fernando Barrett (88) .

~


-

THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 21, 2014

12 SPORTS

Cross country runs at NCAA West Regionals By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer

---

....-...

The Pacific Lutheran University men's and women's cross-country teams put their last foot forward of the season at the Division ill National Collegiate Athletic Association's West Regional Cross Country Championships. The championships were held at Bush Park at Willamette University in Salem, Ore. Saturday, Nov. 15. Though there was not a cloud in the sky it was a chilling 36 degrees, tough conditions for anyone to run in. While the sun was shining bright on the runners, it couldn't compete with the beaming spirits and rays of hope coming from PLU's runners. Both PLU teams put their best foot forward, yet the women placed higher at the end of the day. The men didn't place in the top 17 in the men's 8-kilometer race, but sophomore and team captain Charlie Mogen did place 88th with a time of 27:52. "He ran a solid race with twenty seconds off his PR [personal record]," PLU head coach Heather Kreier said. "Since the race conditions were very muddy and slick at 34-degrees, this was a very respectable race for the conditions." Claremont-Mudd-Scripps won first with 46 points while PomonaPitzer ran its way to second place with 52 points. Occidental took third with 97 points. In the women's 6-kilometer race, PLU scored 444 p_oints, and a time of 2:05:49 was good for 16th.

"The women's team had one of the closest spreads the entire season at one minute for the top five," Kreier said. "Most athletes were within thirty to forty seconds of their season PR' s, and since the race conditions were bitterly cold and muddy, the women ran great." Sophomore Genevieve Brandt placed 67th overall with 66 points, setting a time of 24:24:1. In first was Willamette with 31 points and a time of 1:52:36. Claremont-Mudd-Scripps clinchecf second with 54 points and a time of 1:53:54 and Whitworth ran to finish third behind the rest with 147 points and a time of 1:56:45. With the 2014 NWC season finished, Kreier noted some positives. "Our teams have grown in the grit department," Kreier said. "Being able to hold firm with PR' s at a championship is a great example of their determination and hard work."

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

Sophomore Genevieve Brandt was one of the Lutes' m 0 st consistent runners during the 2014 NWC cross country season, and finished the year as one of the Lutes top rUilllers. In every race she competed in, Brandt finished in the top two highest times for PLU women runners at every meet this season.

eet 11 of 14 runners on the men's team are sophomores.

28of32 runners on both teams have sophomore or first-year eligibility.

Sullenberger twins take PLU swimming by storm we get a lot of stroke work, not just freestyle," Kiana said. The varied approach to training has helped, and Shannell even won the Identical twins Kiana and Shanell Northwest Conference Women's Swimming Sullenberger share a lot more than the same Student-Athlete of the Week award after her face. They share passion for the sport of performances at the NWC Relays in Salem, swimming. Ore. and the NWC Sprints in McMinnville, The twins, juniors who transferred from Ore. Oct. 31 and Nov. 1, respectively. Washington State University, joined Pacific Last weekend, they added more wins to Lutheran University's swim team this year for their impressive swimming feats. the Northwest Conference winter sport season. Swimming in Oregon against Linfield Both women started swimming when they College on Nov. 14, the pair won two races were 11 years old. each. Their dad, who swam for West Point, Shanell won the 50 free and 100 free while encouraged both of the women to try Kiana won the 100 back and 100 breast. swimming. The following day, against Williamette After giving it a try, they liked it, so they University, both contributed to win the 400 decided to stick with it. "For a short time, our dad was always our 路 路 medley. Despite being competitors, the sisters love primary coach," Shanell said. "He took us to . most meets when we weren't on a swim dub.'~ swimming with and against each other . "In the end, [Kiana] will always be my built The twins joined Thurston Olympians in training partner," Shanell said. "I want to Swim Club to progress with swimming. win with her and if I lose, she makes it okay." When they reached high school, they They also push each other, which is why 路 swam for River Ridge High School, all while both of them are so successful. balancing track and field. "[Shanell] always pushes when I'm running Together they hold 10 out of 12 school out of steam, and no matter what, she always records at River Ridge. my back," Kiana said. has With their talent in swimming, both Kiana Based on the team's recent 4-0 record in and Shanell signed letters of intent to swim at NWC, the pair have potential to be important WSU. swimmers for the Lutes this season. However, after two years路of swimming at The fact that they see the other swimmers WSU did not yield the improvements they as family, both women said the transition to wanted to see, the Sullenberger twins started PLU has been incredibly easy. looking for a school they could transfer to. Practically thinking in unison, the They remembered Lutes swim coach Matt Sullenbergers agree, "[PLU] is such a healthy Sellman from their senior year in high school. . and happy environment which makes our 5:45 "His program after the last two years a.m. workouts worth .it, because it's like we've demonstrated how good of a coach he was," gained 40 brothers and sisters," Shannell said. Shanell said. Both girls have seen a lot of improvement under his wing. They are already swimming faster than they did at the PAC-12 swimming championships last year. "The program is really stroke oriented, so

By DEBORAH CABANOS Guest Writer

"'

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU SWIMMING FACEBOOK PAGE

The Sullenberger twins, Kiana (L) and Shannell (R) show off their PLU-inspired nails during their Nov. 7 meet at home against Lewis & Clark. The pair look to continue PLU's winning tradition in swimming. So far, the team is off to a perfect start and is 4 -0 in Northwest Conference meets.


I 1m1•1a, li&I

SPORTS:

~et~mdividual m.·~ our sport Drive to 125, 1:.1 with tally

Q&A with "Fairest" author, Marissa Meyer

pg.4

pg.12

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

AST

OORING

DEC. 5, 2014

VOLUME 91 ISSUE 10

http://mastmedia.plu.edu

President Krise explains budget situation By ALLIE REYNOLDS General Manager of Mast TV Due to recent i:utbacks in enrollment, changef \'\ill be happening campuswide during the next couple years. The university is currently going through a 5 percent budget shortage from last year. President Thomas Krise believes the shortage has to do with popular state universities. · The University of Washington openedanextra l,OOOseatsfortheir first-year class and Washington State University eliminated their essay requirement, making the enrollment process easier. Small changes are happening here and there, while those are happening, Pacific Lutheran University is upping their enrollment division. The diviSion is being combined with the academic division to connect the faculty and the academic side of PLU to the admission side for better ... cooperation between the two. "Many students say that they came [to PLU] because of some contact they had from a faculty member, or a coach or from a staff member," Krise said "So helping facilitate that and

making sure what people know what's going on back and forth is really important for successful recruitment." Approximately 64 staff and faculty members around campus have been trained in a program called Six Sigma, which is a process dficiency system used by many corporations. Six Sigma trains staff and faculty to be more efficient and effective in their own work. "We try to cut down on time people are spending doing things that might be automated so that we can then redeploy those people to do other things that can be done," Krise said. Pacific Lutheran University community members are starting to notice a hit due to budget cuts. In response, a group of more than 100 individuals who manage budge_!s campuswide meet once a month ~th budget program leaders. The meetings include deans, department chairs, directors of programs and managers of units. Teri Philips, the associate vice president of human resources, has been running a series of training sessions in order to educate staff members how to manage a budget dire situations like the one PLU iS currently going through.

. Although PLU may be going th'rough ~ budget adjustment period, nothing too significant has been put on the back burner because of the lack in enrollment this fall. "We'd like to have a better way to welcome visiting students than just on the other side of Hauge {Administration Building]. We have some plans on where we might like to [build that]," Krise said. "But that's just kind of a nice to have thing, so we can wait on that until we can afford to do that." PLU is trying to improve enrollment rates by offering new programs, such as the new minor in Genocide and Holocaust studies, and introducing the Master of Science in Marketing Research hosted by the School of Business. Along with new programs, President Krise mentioned the uMy Language, My Choice" camp<tign, which advocates social justice to the South Puget Sound area and advertises PLU to the South Puget Sound community. While President Krise admits budget cutbacks are never easy, "sometimes having to do hard work that's worthwhile is a pleasure."

FROM FAILURE TO NEW FAVORITE? New restaurant tries to make 506 Garfield work By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor STEVEN MCGRAIN Guest Writ~r Less than a block away on Garfield street, M&J's Spirits and Eatery is joining the Pacific Lutheran University community and hopes to be a campus favorite starting in 2015. After four years, $45,000 of debt and countless beers served to students, The Last Exit has shut down and made room for a new restaurant at 506 Garfield. The owner of The Last Exit owed $45,000 to the owner of the complex on Garfield Street. It is also widely known that the

owner served alcohol to minors and since then has been forced out ·of the complex. According to the new owner, the former Last Exit owner fled to Canada and will not be allowed to come back into the United States. The owner is trying to outrun the statute of limitations for his debt. With The Last Exit owner fleeing the scene, Marco Hernandez opened a hookah lounge in its place. His intention was to mainly target PLU students, but the turnout was a completely different demographic that Hernandez was not proud of. · "I was blinded by the $2,000 in revenue brought in on a Friday and Saturday night that I did not stop the issue, when it was

NEWS Lutes light up Red • Square pg. 3

A&E

presented," Hernandez said. Greg Premo, The Director of Campus Safety, told Hernandez there were issues regarding the kind of people the hookah lounge was attracting. Premo was con~erned about students' safet}r on campus with the lounge so close. After the meeting, Hernandez raised his price of entry from $5 to $17 but it didn't stop bad publicity campuswide. Hernandez chose to close his doors but retain the space with the hopes of starting something new. With two small businesses failing in that location in the past

COMPONENTS

CONTINUED ON

PAGE2

LUTE LIFE

The ratings are Open Mic+ in- check out the Concert with Ings best songs, albums, pg. 7 shows and movies of2014. pg.5

.ttrr.i"l\Vi.vw.mastmedia.plu.edu

OPINION

SPORTS

WHAT'S INSIDE

Is Christmas still a religious holiday? pg.9

Santoro says so long... pg.10

News pg. 1-3 A&E pg. 4 - 5 Lute Life pg. 6 -7 Opinion pg. 8 - 9 Sports pg. 10-12


THE MOORING MAST

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By HALEIGH MISSILDINE Guest Writer and SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Pacific Lutheran University's website is the first thing most people see and it sets a tone for campus. PLU's website has to stand up to thousands of other colleges and the poor thing was in need of a face-lift. · Hai Doan, Assistant Director for Social Media and Technology, said the website needed a more adaptive design. The popularity of smart phones forced PLU to build a more user friendly and phone compatible website. The new website is more userfriendly but has many of the same elements of the old site. The banner and menu at the top of the page has stayed, for example, but its

look is different. Users looking at the website with a smartphone or tablet will see a nicerlooking page that fits to their screen. For smartphone users, the change will make navigating through pages easy. The biggest change the website w ent through is something most students and viewers will not notice. The site was changed from Cascade to WordPress. Cascade works well for people who are skilled in web design but WordPress is much easier to master and most people can use it without much effort. "WordPress is a lot more userfriendly," Doan said. "You can interact with the elements." With the old interface, Cascade, it was a lot harder to find which element, or part of the website, you wanted to change. The old website required more technical knowledge.

Cascade makes it easier for make inexperienced users to small mistakes that could cause big consequences. For example, accidentally deleting one line while editing could mess up an entire part of the website. when working in However, W ordPress, the elements are a lot easier to see visually and giving people access to edit certain parts of the website is simpler. · Doan teaches students and faculty from each department who need to update their pages how to use the new design, and they have learned quickly . . Many people are already somewhat familiar with WordPress, but even those who aren't can easily figure it out. "It's easier for people who don't know m u ch about technology to update the website," Doan said.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

STUDENTS RESPOND TO FERGUSON By SAMANTHA LUND News Editor Peaceful and violent protests nationwide plagued the streets nationWide when Darren Wilson walked away from the Michael Brown shooting without being charged with any crime. Wilson, a former police officer, was accused of murdering unarmed Brown. The grand jury's decision led to riots, the worst in Ferguson where stores were looted, set on fire and people were badly hurt. The morning after, Pacific Lutheran University students stood in the rain to hold a silent protest. Through social media and student determination, students came together in honor of victims of racialized violence. Students and staff gathered together at the Karen Hillie Phillips Center. Beginning at 8 a.m. they stood for an hour, holding hands. The protest was put together by senior Ashley Hill, a member of the Black Student Union. Hill said she wanted to voice her opinion and decided to do it in a constructive way. That night, she organized a student-lec:J. protest for the next morning. PHOTO COURI'ESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Yglesias brings new energy to Wonien's Center By BROOKE WOLFE Staff Writer Jonathan Yglesias joined the Pacific Lutheran University commµnity this year as the men's coordinator in the Women's Center. The men' s coordinator position was created in 2005 under a Department of Justice grant given to PLU. From that grant, the Men Against Violence group and the Men's Project also took off. Yglesias said his focus is supporting students who are also interested in social justice. Jonathan graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a master's degree in Sociology after earning a bachelor's degree in Biology and Women's and Gender studies. "I accidentally took a women's studies course," Yglesias said, "and [in that course] they laid out a lot of language and concepts that I didn't know I was already familiar with but that I just didn't have names for." After that class, Yglesias added Women's and Gender Studies to his Biology degree before starting the gender violence intervention post-baccalaureate

degree that was a part of his master's. Yglesias has been at PLU for six weeks and organizes the Men's Project and the group Men Against Violence. The group's purpose is to end sexual and physical abuse against women. Along with discussing aspects of abuse, the group also gives men the opportunity to talk openly about growing up as a male in this society, expectations and masculinity. The Men- Against Violence group is primarily for men, as the name suggests, but like the Women's Center, it continues to be gender inclusive. Women are welcome to join the conversations brought to the group, Yglesias said, because other opinions and view points are appreciated in expanding the conversation. Leading those changes is the possibility of renaming the Women's Center to show more gender inclusivity. The Women's Center heads events like Take Back the Night and Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which is coming up this spring. The Men's Project also holds a Mother's Day brunch and is planning to continue the Men's Health Awareness campaigns on campus. "I think there are good collaborations

RESTAURANT FROM PAGEl

PHOTO BY BROOKE WOLFE

Johnathan Yglesias, men's coordinator for the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Center.

not just among offices, but of different student groups [at PLU] that I haven't seen on other campuses," Yglesias said. "Partnerships with the Diversity Center, Residential Life, and Student Athletics are all possibilities moving forward." The Men's Project and the Women's Center are determined to continue outreach from their office, and keep reaching students who are not already involved. "I am very grateful to be here," Yglesias said.

three years, Hernandez has set his sights on bringing a fresh new look to the space on Garfield Street. Hernandez said his intentions are to have involvement with PLU students because the revenue that could come from students would be monetarily significant. This ti.me, his attempt is M&J Spirits and Eatery, a restaurant and bar with a "family feel." Hernande hope~ the restaurant will thrive in the location. "I want it to be able to be a plac that Lutes want to go to," Hemande said. "Since I am close to campus. it will be safe for them to get home. I am hopefully here to stay.' The restaurant will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner and the bar will open at night. Hernandez is also installing a mechanical bull that he thinks will bring in many students. Construction is still underway Hernandez is still installing outlets and trying to install a working Xbox for customers to enjoy. If all goes as planned, M&:J's should be open by January, just in time for students to get back from winter break.

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THE MOORING MAST

DEC. 5, 2014

NEWS3

How TO SOUND SMART When talking about Ferguson Ferguson is a city in Missouri near to St. Louis where the demographic is 29 percent caucasion and 67 percent black. When compared to other towns in the area, Ferguson is not statistically as a violent area.

Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, was shot and killed on Aug. 9 by Darren Wilson, a white police officer.

A grand jury hearing was held to decide if Wilson should be indicted and taken to a criminal trial. The grand jury decided that there was not sufficient evidence to charge Wilson with any

.

crime.

Some witnesses said Brown never moved toward Wilson before he was shot. Other witnesses said the opposite, that he was moving toward the officer. The most credible witnesses reported that Brown charged Wilson making "a grunting, like aggravated sound."

officers used tear gas in response to the riots.

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By GENNY BOOTS News Writer Lutes donned fuzzy hats, cozy mittens and warm drinks in Red Square to watch the 15th annual Christmas tree lighting. Students sang carols and watched Red Square light up Dec. 3. President Krise ceremoniously flipped the switch, lighting up

the square. The event is always the Wednesday before Christmas concerts start on campus, allowing everyone to get into the holiday spirit. Campus Ministry started the event as a way to fundraise money to decorate campus. Eventually, Pacific Lutheran University had enough lights and the event has shifted into a fundraiser for families

in need. Now, students or community_members can donate money and in return, get to put the name of a loved one on a that will hang on the tree as a decoration. All of the proceeds from the fundraiser go to giving families in need presents and other necessities to give them a Christmas they would not be able to celebrate otherwise. Reverends Nancy Connor and Dennis Sepper led

the crowd in prayers and carols to welcome the Christmas season. "It's tree o'clock!" students yelled waiting for the tree to be lit. The fir tree was donated by Linda and Dave Py~e (alums '01, '98) from the Windy Hills Farm in Olympia. The tree is accompanied by a star on the top of Harstad ·Hall, as well as a lit cross on the other side of Red Square. The

rose window on top of the Karren Hillie Phillips Center is also lit up for the holidays. The tree will shine throughout the holiday season and students will be able to donate, decorate and see the lights until the end of the semester. More Christmas events can be found · on Campus Ministry's site as well as on PLU's calendar.


THE MOORING MAST

4A&E

This Week:

A&E ONL.INE TERRAN'S

take GET THE SCOOP!

Weekly Gossip with Terran Go online and get the scoop on celebrity gossip with our in -house pop culture expert, Terran Warden!

This Week: Shia LaBeouf's alleged rape during his . performance art exhibition.

Stay Tuned: Terran's Take will be updated weekly onlinethroughoutJanuary.

The Mooring Mast and· Mast TV will return in February.

~

~

,~m:;~·:"J!.:':"-:=:~<::~'''"''W·:·:~

On the aGENda

Genny Boots and Michael Diambri cover this year's best everything, and Terran Warden premieres Terran's Take! Watch it later online at http:/ /mastmedia.plu.edu or tune in at 9 p.m. every Thursday to News @Nine on Mast TV!

DEC. 5, 2014

LuteLooks gets new look By MA'ITHEW SALZANO

AdEEditor She sees you when you're walking around campus, she knows when you're checking· her blog and she's been listening to your comments - much like Santa Claus, junior LuteLooks editor Grace Takehara is delivering gifts this winter. With a new website, new contributors and new content, Takehara is taking steps to make sure the blog she started in 2013 doesn't become "stagnant." To begin grand changes to LuteLooks, Takehara has been working on transitioning from Tumblr, a blogging site which functions almost like a social network, to Squarespace, a more traditional website hosting service. Takehara held two focus groups to find out where students turned for content when they woke up in the morning. She determined that the goal was a visual, upto-date and easy-to-use website. With that in mind, the new website ·of which The Mast has been given a small preview - focuses on large images, easyto-read text and minimalistic design. . After four months of research and design, the new website will unveil Jan. 15. In addition to a new online space for LuteLooks, there are new voices. "I really want [LuteLooks] to be innovative, and keep pushing forward and expanding," Takehara said. "By adding contributors, they get to do things that add to LuteLooks and keep pushing it forward. I think that's really valuable in keeping [LuteLooks] relevant to students." Two music contributors, sophomore Austin Miller and junior Zachary Kuntz, as well as two lifestyle contributors, senior

PHOTO BY MATTHEW SALZANO

LuteLooks editor junior Grace Takehara points out changes to her blog.

Dania Tolentino and first-year Rizelle Rosales are being added. Takehara doesn't want to take away from the original goal of LuteLooks focusing on the best on-campus fashion - but feels that music is simply a "natural addition" to accompany fashion· on her blog. She thinks the new Lute contributors will find music, fashion and culture content to inspire readers. Students well-acquainted with culture at PLU may be aware of the newest form of celebrating Lute fashion, an Instagram account titled "Pfly Looking University'' with the username Pfly_looking_ university. The lnstagram, which is run by anonymous PLU students, collects submissions primarily via email and posts these pictures with conversational captions, such as "what quality do you like abou~ yourself?"

They also allude to a future tumblr blog. With LuteLooks being an on-campus fashion blog, one could argue there is no need for another. In one comment, the user claiffis they are a better representative of PLU's community. "Instead of focusing on one fashion style or trend w e want to showcase the university as a whole," the Pfly Looking University administrator wrote on the first Instagram post. "We want to show off the colorful, quirky and realness of our campus ... As a team with varying fashion taste, and personalities in general, we [are] able to create a more diverse [and] inclusive page." Takehara understands this could be seen as a threat to her blog - before these changes, she was the one voice of LuteLooks representing one point of view. However, she's okay with this allegation. "LuteLooks is striving for excellence," Takehara said, "not the everyday."

Q&A: Alumna Author Marissa Meyer By KAITLYN HALL

Copy Editor Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them all? Author Marissa Meyer; a Pacific Lutheran University alumna, seeks to answer this age-old question with the release of her 272-page novella, "Fairest," Jan. 27, 2015, as part of The Lunar Chronicles series. · "Fairest," detailing the backstory of maleficent Lunar Queen Levana, departs from the timeline of Lunar Chronicles novels "Cinder," "Scarlet'' and "Cress," which follow the titular characters as they plot to overthrow and try to escape Levana. Though she's now an internationally-read author, Meyer overcomes similar and celebrates challenges similar victories as those of PLU students and, community members. Fans of Meyer's The Lunar Chronicles will have two novels to look forward to in 2015: "Fairest'' and "Winter," the Lunar Chronicles conclusion based on "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves." Meyer's "Heartless," a prequel to "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" that explores the backstory of the Queen of Hearts, will be published in early 2016. How have you coped with rejection you've faced as a student or an author? I think it's so important to maintain perspective when you're working in any sort of creative field. It's all subjective! I had a fairly fast road to publication, ignoring the 15 years in which I was learning the craft of writing. Once I finally decided to send my work to agents and publishers, it took less than three months to receive a book deal. So I didn't

go through the period of painful rejections that a lot of authors experience. However, now that -the books are out in the world, not every review is glowing and not every reader is a fan. But that's okay - you have to hope that your book finds the readers it was meant for, and understand that it wasn't written to please everyone. Some books that I love passionately have one-star reviews on GoodReads; other books that I hated just as passionately have humongous, enthusiastic fanbases. Write the books you love and hope that they will find their readership. That's the best 'Ye can do.

PHOTO COUR:l'ESY OF MARISSA MEYER .

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"Fairest" launch party

Why did you choose to tell Levana's story in 6 p.m. Jan. 27 "Fairest?" Tacoma Pub1ic Library I was trying to wiite ll02 Tacoma Ave. S. "Winter," the final book of Tacoma, Wash. The Lunar Chronicles, but I kept hitting a wall with it. It ~ ""~~ eventually occurred to me and things started coming that I was getting stuck because together a lot more easily. I didn't yet have a good enough grasp on the villain, Queen What do you draw Levana, and her motivations, inspiration from? . as well as the relationship she Inspiration can come from has with Princess Winter, her anywhere: a great book, or stepdaughter. sometimes even a bad one, a I realized that to finish movie, some poignant song "Winter" and write the series lyrics, a dream, a conversation, conclusion authentically, I or a magazine article - you just needed to explore Levana' s never know. history more. I think it's important as I'd known for a couple of writers to get out in the world years that I wanted to write and explore. I love taking her story at some point, so I classes or trying new things, decided to take a break from like going on a hot air balloon "Winter" to write it. ride or taking a trapeze-flying I wrote it in only a weekclass. It might not make it into a it was the fastest thing I've book someday, but, then, it just ever written and required might. surprisingly little revisions, which has not been the case for Do you have a best piece of my other novels, so I think it was advice for writers? the right time. And after that, I There are a lot of variations was able to go back to "Winter''

on this advice said by many brilliant writers: Give yourself permission to write something terrible. Don't stress yourself out over whether it's "good" or "great" or "perfect'' that's an easy way to never get anything written at all. Just write. Write · your purple prose full of exclamation points and adverbs and all the things they tell us not to write. cardboard Write character. Write cliches and predictable plots. Because you can always go back and rewrite and revise and edit and fix. You can always make it better. But, first, you have to write it.

How has The Lunar Chronicles changed your life.? There are a lot of obvious changes - I'm a full-time writer now, whereas I was working as a freelance proofreader when the series sold. I get to travel and meet readers a lot. I receive fan mail. I got to pay , off my student loans, which was a cause for celebration. But on a more internal, creative level, seeing these books brought to life has given me so much confidence as a writer. Not that I think everything I write is brilliant or everything I write is going to be a winner far from it- but at least now when I;m looking at a blank page getting ready to embark on a new story idea, I know that I'm capable of finishing it. I know it'll be tough and every book will be its own journey, but I can look back and say: See, Marissa, you've been here before. You've done this. You know you can do it again.


THE MOORING MAST

DEC. 5, 2014

A&E5

The Mast's

BEST OF 2014 A NOTE FROM A&E EDITOR, MATTHEW SALZANO To wrap up the last issue of The Mast for 2014 A&E writers Michael Diambri, Brooke Thames and I decided to share our favorite pieces of entertainment media throughout this past year - giving you a month to catch up before 2015 starts. ·

ALBUM

MOVIE

"Pop Psychology'' by Neon Trees Neon Trees introduced their new album with their hit single "Sleeping With A Friend," but this track is just one of the many fun anthems that fill the 10 slots on the album. Quirky-cool lyrics mixed with punchy beats and lively rhythms makes this a pop-lover's dream - and my personal dance album of 2014. - B.T.

''The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part l" Freshly released to fanatics in theaters nationwide, "Mockingjay Part l" reigns supreme for films that made their debuts in 2014. While this latest installment lacks the fast-paced action of its predecessors, the film is jampacked with intricate plot, dramatic character evolution and political intensity that keeps the audience captivated for the entire two hours of the motion picture. - B.T.

"Girl" by Pharrell Williams When 1first heard "Marilyn Monroe," the first track of "Girl," l hated it. I thought it sounded off pitch, or something. But I couldn't get it out of my head. Before long, I had the album stuck on repeat. Williams' talent for creating infectious tunes is why this is my album of the year - it is pop gold. - M.S.

''Boyhood" "Boyhood" is a masterful piece of cinema. Filmed over 12 years with the same actors, the movie documents the life of a fictional family in real-time. It is a comingof-age story about the struggles and joys of life. The movie is long, subtle and so impactful. Months after seeing "Boyhood," I was still thinking about it and having my heartstrings tugged by it. I have never experienced a movie like this. - M.S.

"Ultraviolence" by Lana Del Rey This is Del Rey's darkest, sexiest album to date. Although radio stations won't play her music because "it's too sad and slow," Del Rey is really becoming a force to be reckoned with in the music industry. Del Rey truly is "blessed with beauty and rage." - M.D.

SONG

TV Snow "House of Cards" Season two of "House of Cards" rocked my world. Kevin Spacey continued to amaze viewers with his excellent performance as Francis Underwood. The political drama got even more intense, and the show proceeds to amaze me with its technical excellence. If I remember any show from 2014, it1l be this one. - M.S.

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"Chandelier" by Sia Not only does "Chandelier" provide a great amount of lyrical and emotional depth, but also vocals that blow me away every time I hit the repeat button. Sia truly sings "like tomorrow doesn't exist," and the passion in her voice is what makes this track exciting to listen to again and again. - B.T.

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"I'm Not The Only One" by Sam Smith Smith sings like an angel and makes you cry like a baby. The song simply draws you in - ,it is an outstanding achievement in pop ballads. - M.S.

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''Big Brother 16" Not only was the cast of "Big Brother 16" fantastic - mastermind Derek, good-hearted Donnie, and lying, cheating, backstabbing Frarikie but the twists and turns of this season made the competition a must-watch for all BB fanatics. The many surprises, which shocked and excited viewers along with explosive drama, made this season of "Big Brother" the greatest that I have ever enjoyed. - B.T.

"Parks and Recreation" Leslie Knope is my hero and my muse. "Parks and Recreation" is the quirkiest, most lovable show on television and I can't wait for it to return in January 2015 for its final season. - M.D.

Tell us your best of 2014 - tweet @PLUMast -~~ .

:v1an

+

"Gone Girl" You are the wrong girl if you don't like "Gone Girl." Read my entire review from the Oct. 24 issue of The Mast online at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/- M.D.

extravagant shopping experience featuring homemade items of Scandinavian culture. Handmade goods such as cookies, dishes and clothing were displayed on lot more than sweaters were tables that fill both the lower UC and the e~chctnged at the Danish Bazaar and Scandinavian Cultural Center. ~ordic .Exchange hosted by .Pacific PLU students, faculty and other citizens tutheran •University's Scandinavian of the Parkland(facoma area are invited tural Center on Nov. 22. each year to experience the rich culture of The weekend marked 1he fifth year Nordic tradition and take a little piece of it that the .Scandinavi.ian Cultural Center home to enjoy. has held this Christmas-themed sale in While this year's event was only the collaboration with The Danish Sisterh0od, fifth that The Danish Sisterhood and a group oi 30 women that meets monthly l'l.\J' s Scandinavian Cu\tural Center have in the center located in the lower level of presented the Danish Bazaar and Nordic the Anderson University Center. Exchange, the tradition is far from new. Every year on the Saturday before Thanksgiving, The Danish Sisterhood Full story online: http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ organizes and executes a large and CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTO

"Take Me to Church" by Hozier If Hozier preached at my church I would be in the front row every Sunday. Alternative music fans have been entranced by this song since the day it was released. Now even the mainstream kids are starting to love it. This song is going to be a hit for a long time.-M.D.

Review: "Broke Boy Syndrome" by Tope By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer Tope's newest album "Broke Boy Syndrome" will be released Dec. 15. The Portland native rapper continues to grow as an artist with his latest album. Full story online: http://mastmedia.plu.edu/

PHOTO COUJn"ESY OF TOPE


THE MOORING MAST

6 ADVERTISEMENT

Garfield BOOK COMPANY AT PLU - - - -

DEC. 5, 2014

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THE MOORING MAST

DEC. 5, 2014

LUTE LIFE 7

Lutes join Tacoma Ferguson protest By ANGIE TINKER Matrix Co-Editor Local public officials and advocates joined with citizens on Monday to show solidarity with protesters in Ferguson, Mo. On Aug. 9, Michael Brown, a black teenager, was shot by Officer Darren Wilson. Though disputed by claims that Wilson was attacked by Brown, protestors argue Brown was holding his hands up peacefully. On Nov. 24, a Missouri grand jury decided there was not enough evidence to hold a trial against Wilson. Both events have sparked protests about race and police brutality in Ferguson and nationwide. In Tacoma, a diverse crowd of about 100 assembled at the County-City building. The protesters peacefully marched to Shiloh Baptist Church, escorted by police officers on bike. Protestors chanted the rally slogan, "No Justice No Peace," and held signs memorializing Brown. A group of Pacific Lutheran University students joined irl·the discussion. At the church, a series of speakers discussed the importance of responding and acting proactively. Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, Chief of Police Donald Ramsdell and Patricia Talton, president of the Northwest Leadership Foundation all spoke. Strickland called for meaningful discussion, saying, "Take the time, be

patient, and reach out to those from different perspectives. And if they disagree with you, ask them one simple question: Why do you believe that?" Ramsdell signaled police willingness to help, saying, "We are here to listen; we are here to support." Talton encouraged citizens to remain active, saying "We are here to generate and use power. We all have it right where we are. Don't think it's just the mayor, just the chief of police." After ~ speeches, citizens were split into groups to help answer the question, "What now?" PLU students helped brainstorm. Senior Dan Stell, Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University Vice President, championed the view that people should stay in the moment and understand their emotional responses. Stell reflected on the process of group discussion. "It made it more real to be a participant rather than talking about it like we do at school," Stell said. "[It made me feel] congruent with my thoughts and actions." Proposed reforms included commonly heard cries to have police officers wear body cameras. There were more original ideas, however, such as forming a citizen advisory committee, mandating periodic cultural sensitivity training for police and having an independent prosecutor for cases involving police abuse of powers.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ANGIE TINKER

PLU students who attended the protest (left to right): Angela Tinker (junior), Dan Stell (senior), and first-years Quenessa Long, Tono Sablan and Ray Taula. Two students from Stadium High School joined the photo as well.

This was just a beginning in the process of understanding for both Tacoma and PLU. The Rev. Eric Johnson urged people to keep agitating for change. "Now that we have gathered and walked a mile, now what? Will we take the next step, be the voices and go the next

mile?" Johnson said. At PLU, the Diversity Center, Women's Center and Center for Community Engagement & Service hosted another forum in the Scandinavian Center yesterday, De. 6. '«_.

Open mic night from student media

The return of student media

Friday, December 5th 7:30pm in the Cave

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAXIFRAGE

The Open Mic Concert, hosted by ASPLU, The Matrix and Saxifrage, will take place tonight. If you would like to perform, email lasrgm@plu.edu.

ByMEGDOLDE Saxifrage Co-Editor Tonight at 7:30 p.m. in The Cave, Lute Air Student Radio, Saxifrage, The Matrix and Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University are hosting two events you don't want to miss: the final Open Mic of the semester followed by a concert featuring the band Ings. Originally from Springfield, Mo., Ings is a lullaby rock outfit now based in Seattle. Their first EP, Dog Physics, debuted in 2013, a five track record with titles such as "SoND" and "Sleepy Blinking." Inge Chiles is the founder and singer of the band. I first met Chiles last spring when her group played a show at Northern Pacific Coffee Company (NPCC). She's incredibly down-to -earth and clever, as evidenced by the lyrics she writes. In the title track, Chiles sings, "I will speak your language. I will teach your dog physics." This line, among many others, highlights the whimsy and sincerity that is characteristic of Chiles' songs. Chiles wrote all of the songs in her bedroom, and in her EP she invites us into a world where dogs are friendly aliens and secrets are kept safe. The Open Mic, which will take place before the Ings concert, is a continuation of Student Media's effort to provide PLU students with

opportunities to showcase their creative talents. Earlier in the semester, student media hosted an Open Mic that was attended by musicians, poets and beat boxers alike. "Open Mic is a great way for students to share their creativity with their peers in a relaxed setting. It really is a lot of fun," senior Olivia Ash, director of LASR, ·said. Though finals are fast approaching, tonight's offerings promise to provide an equally relaxed atmosphere. Anyone interested in performing or reading is encouraged to participate, or listen to other students and the wonderful Ings.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MATRIX

The fall 2014 Matrix. is here! Look for it around campus, or pick up a copy in the lower AUC by room 144. Learn about various social justice issues PLU students are passionate about and be inspired to write for The Matrix for the Spring 2015 issue!

Sax·i·frage

PHOTO COURTESY OF LASR

Li:ite Air Student Radio is back on air! After some hiccups with the technology, LASR is back on and blasting the good tunes it's known for. Listen at http:/ /www. plu.edu/studentmedia/lasr/


THE MOORING MAST

8 OPINION

DEC. 5, 2014

Support diversity in politics By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer We are still making history in the U.S. today. The latest election, both nationally and locally, provided diversity for U.S. government and marks a triumphant step for diversity in politics. We need diversity in politics. The U.S. is a democratic government, meaning we elect representatives to voice our opinions in the House, Senate and local government. To fully represent the people, you need a proper representation of the American public. This goes to say that a typical midforties, white, male politician should no longer be the only representat_ive. We need diversity to reflect the true American public. We need older and wise, younger and creative, male and female, multiple ethnicities and differing religions. This blend of who we are as a country must be reflected in our political leaders to offer new approaches, ideas and solutions. This election, year we moved one step closer to becoming a more diverse government. From Utah, Mia Love

became the first black Republican woman to be elected to Congress, according to the Washington Post. It's 2014 and we are still making history. There were nine major firsts in the 2014 midterm elections according to NY Daily News .

Each of the firsts in the breakout box represents an opportunity for new voices to be heard in politics. Each individual elected, while still maintaining to represent the public as a whole, brings a unique approach to government. "It's important in order for all ethnicities and backgrounds to be

represented," junior Cory Nelson said. If we tend to keep a like group of people in government, we miss opportunities to represent the entire public properly. If our perspectives shape reality, we need multiple perspectives to view legislature, initiatives and more from multiple standpoints. We have the opportunity as a young generation to voice our opinions. Voting is our primary way to make sure we feel well represented. Next time elections come around, remember y0t1. have the opportunity to make history.

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-JN-CHIEF

Reland Tuomi mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISJNG MANAGER

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First ...

A&EEDITOR

• Black senator elected by popular vote in the South: Tim Scott, R-S.C. •Black Republican woman elected to ihe House: Mia Love, R-Utah • Iraq War combat veteran elected to the Senate: Tom Cotton, R -Ark. • Female veteran elected to the Senate: Joni Ernst, R -Iowa • Female senators for Iowa and West Virginia. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa and Shelley Moore Capito, R-W. VA. • U.S. governor in a wheelchair in the 21st century: Greg Abbott, R -Texas. • Openly gay state attorney general: Maura Healey, D -Mass. • Youngest woman elected to Congress: Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y.

Matthew Salzano OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Giancarlo Santoro COPY EDITOR

Brittany Jackson COPY EDITOR

Kaitlyn Hall ONLINE EDITOR

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Allie Reynolds

UnPLUg research now complete: Expect results soon By ASHLEY CONNORS PLU Sustainability During October, Neil Wagner, Aiko Nakagawa, and I conducted a study on energy consumption through the annual program UnPLUg. The data collection phase of our research is now complete. Depending on the residence hall in which you live and where you usually spend your time on campus, you could have seen one of our advertisements. The advertisements came in the forms of flyers, pledges, colored tape by door handles and light switches,

surveys and the Sweater Swap hosted by Resident Hall Association and the Sustainability Office in October. You may also have participated in one of these if Neil, Ashley or I directly asked you to participate. We hoped the ads would help reduce energy use in the residence halls, and we wanted to see the effect of different types of reminders on energy usage. A big thank you goes out to all of our volunteers and to the grant from Independent Colleges of Washington, funded by Puget Sound Energy. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to email our lead researcher, Aiko Nakagawa,

at nakagata@plu.edu, her adviser Dr. Chris Hansvick at hansvick@ plu.edu, or the Human Participant Review Board at hprb@plu.edu. You are also invited to PLU' s Psychology Conference Dec. 11 from 4-6 p.m . where Aiko Nakagawa will present the results of this study. In addition, be on the look out for a follow up to this article, which will highlight the primary findings of our research.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: WORDS DON'T HURT By WILL FALLEN Parkland community member Editor's Note: Will Fallen is a member of the Parkland community. His school's prom and graduation took place on the PLU campus, as did several sporting events, including swimming and basketball. He works at the Coca-Cola plant on. 116th St. S.

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No matter what the word, they are merely words and no amount of infliction or ill intent can change that. The context in which a word is used does far more to define the user than the word. Falsely yelling "Fire" in a crowded theater is a malicious act, but the word itself is not a "bad word" at all. In an effort to drive out the political incorrectness of racism, sexism, bigotry and bullying, we have entered an era where the idea "words can hurt'' has become an acceptable opinion, rather

than accepting the fact that some people are just jerks, and their behavior should be the focus of scrutiny. We can't be willing to control the words around us simply because we can't control our feelings about them.

us that this is the only way we know how to get it back. A college in North Carolina has banned the term "freshman" and replaced it with "first-year." While I don't mind that act in itself - I've never been fond of the term anyway - at no

"We can't be willing to control the words around us simply because we can't control our feelings about them."

Now we have the very institutions that teach us these words, telling us to forget about them. Why did we all spend the first years of our lives learning them then? Even if their meaning has changed over the years, our right to use them has not. Maybe it's because of the plague of school violence that has found its way into the system, pushing the pendulum so far away from

time have I ever considered "freshman" to be favoring or promoting raping women. Nor do I think that "firstyear" celebrates diversity. It is as generic of a phrase that they could come up with to insure no offense could be taken by anyone. Why should we all live in fear of saying the wrong word? In the past, if we said something that didn't reflect our intended meaning, we apologized to that person, if

we chose to, and moved on. Now, people are put on display for their mistakes, we demand a public apology, we want to see them grovel, we want to see them break and in the end we demand that they be fired anyway, whether the offense had anything to do with their job,or not. Who is truly committing the malicious act? Sometimes, change is really just preserving what we believe to be right. I know deep down that most people mean well in their attempt to stop the use of certain words; maybe that's why colleges are embracing the idea of banning them. But a place we turn to, to further our education as adults, should not be in favor of restricting any piece of it. If you instill people with all the knowledge you have, you must also give them the freedom to make their own decisions about it and not try to take it back when you don't like their choice.

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Allie Reynolds MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

Campbell Brett NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Zachary Boyle ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibility of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu.. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

JOB OPENING The Mast is hiring! We are looking for a Sports Editor for spring semester. If you would like to apply, email The Mast at mast@plu.edu


THE MOORING MAST

DEC. 5, 2014

Remember Christmas is still a religious holiday By BROOKE WOLFE AdE Writer

OPINION 9

Christmas for Christians and non-Christians alike By KAITLYN HALL Copy Editor

Christmas is rooted in the religious traditions of the holiday. Even activities that non-religious families take part in still have religious meaning. Church services, adapted advent traditions and recycled decorations have led the Christian holiday into the 21st century. PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS 1he holidays have become days covered in red 路 The Nativity is a co=on holiday decoration for many households. and green but behind the It is an example of the religious foundation of Christmas. sparkling wrapping paper and velvet bows, people's the journey from Adam to and churches has influenced Christmas traditions stem Christ. Christmas activities as a from the Christian faith. This journey is illustrated good summation gesture. "Christmas is about through the wreath that While doing these things is fellowship, friends and is formed from a wire beneficial to communities, family," first-year Autumn been have circle covered in evergreen Christians Scherf said. . branches. 1he circle shows completing the same tasks Arguably, Christmas that the journey for Christ's as community building Eve church services attract return has not yet come. activities for Christmas long crowds unseen on any other Christmas baking is also .l>efore the secular idea. night of the year. This act of included in the Christian While some families going to church, at least on tradition. With the advent have adopted a Santathat day, is a tradition that cycle, cooking usually centered holiday, Christmas has yet to be broken. began Dec. 20 and went has remained close to "In many ways until Christmas Day. 1hese Christian traditions. In the Christmas has become trends are still seen today in decorating, celebrating commercialized," Scherf the preparation of gathering and activities leading up to said, "yet in many ways families and friends over Christmas, the religious ties it has still remained quite food before continuing with seep through. religious." festivities. From the church Besides the churchgoers, Along with baking, services that bring massive decorations can be traced giving time or gifts has also numbers of people into back to their religious grown in importance. This places of worship, to the context. selfless nature of Christmas selfless duties of the season, Christmas wreaths are has continued the attitude Christmas was for Christ a common decoration that that Christ strived to pass Mass. It changed with the can be seen on doors from on to the members of the times to become a new, 1hanksgiving on. Some church. but still religious, Christian see wreaths as a symbol of Volunteering at shelters holiday.

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It's the most wonderful time of the year, but not just for Christians. A nativity will occupy my mantle, celebrating the birth of Christ, and I will worship at a Christmas Eve service. Despite its undeniable roots in Christianity, though, I can also celebrate Christmas as a cultural holiday, complete with strings of glittering lights, scratchy sweaters and images of elves and reindeer. 路 1he 92 percent of Americans who celebrate Christmas, according to a 2013 Pew Research study, includes 80 percent of nonChristians, deHlonstrating the power of Christmas nationwide as a cultural holiday. According to Pew Research, only 39 percent of traditional collegeage adults, ages 18-29,

Gifts and the act of giving is ingrained within the holiday season and spirit for everyone to enjoy.

celebrate Christmas as a religious holiday. But Christmas as a cultural holiday isn't just about presents under the tree or the round belly and hearty, booming laugh of Santa Claus. 1he center of Christmas as a cultural holiday is giving gifts of time, money and kindness without an expectation of anything in return. It's that time of year where neighbors bring one another plates of freshly-baked cookies. Community members sponsor families that don't have enough money to buy Christmas gifts for their children. Bell-ringers sit shivering outside stores collecting donations that go to shelters and food banks.

We see the material, extravagant gifts and the bustling shopping malls, but it's our desire to give that hides behind the material fai;ade. We need to revel in the opportunity Christmas gives us to join together in shared celebration. So be kind, celebrate and give - it's the happiest season of all.

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Do you think Christmas is too thrisyan:? ()r,too

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materialistif? Tweil..Xhe"Mast @PLUMast with your opinion. /

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DEC. 5; 2014

THE MOORING MAST

10 SPORTS

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MEN'S .a nd WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: Both PLU basketball teams will begin their Northwest Conference campaigns at home on Names Family Court Jan. 2 against Pacific. The women· start at 6 p.m..and the men at 8 p.m. l ~WIMMING: PLU's men and women swim teams begin the Husky Invitational in Federal Way, Wash., today, Dec. 5 at the King County Aquatic Center. The three day event brings together swimmers from Division I, II and Ill schools and will end Dec. 7. The Lutes return to PLU Pool on Jan. 23 to take on Whitman.

lnfo:rmation courtesy of h,ttp://www.nwcsports.com/Janding/index

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Santoro Speaks... Saying your good-byes is never easy By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Editor I always expected that my final w eeks at Pacific Lutheran University would creep up quickly, but that doesn't make it any easier to reconcile the fact that I will no longer be a student here - or the sports editor for the Mooring Mast newspaper - much longer. While the majority of the university will be dreading their return to classes after winter break, I will most likely be back at my parent's house, wishing I had an excuse to go back for a just a little longer. When I had my first visit to PLU as an anxious high schooler and prospective college student, I can say I was more apprehensive than thrilled. My only experience with the South Sound was when my parents would drive me there to play the local Tacoma soccer club, or to watch my high school football team smash and bash its way to another state championship at the Tacoma Dome. In fact, I spent a lot of my time bad-mouthing the "Tacoma Aroma," and its rundown, cold exterior. Coming from the suburban haven that is Sammamish, Wash., a town that is consistently voted as one of the wealthiest, most welcoming and best places to live in the entire country, I was understandably disillusioned with what PLU and Parkland had to offer. I was a decent student in high school, usually skating around a B to B+ average, put I was never fully committed to going to college, and this was reflected in the fact that I

only sent out three college applications to in-state schools. When it came to deciding where I would spend the next four years of my life after high school, I didn't have a lot of options. My first choice school rejected me, and my second choice wait-listed me, leaving PLU or community college as my only real options. If I wasn't recruited by PLU soccer coach John Yorke, I may not have even been accepted to PLU. Not wanting to let the opportunity go to waste, I packed my bags and moved my hopes and dreams an hour south to become a Lute. Four years on the team .yielded one NWC championship, two NWC First-Team and All-West Region Third team selections and even a trip to Brazil to play soccer. Needless to say, I am very thankful. Now that I am two weeks from becoming a college graduate, I can honestly say it was the best decision I could have made. As with most college students, I hav.e done a_ lot of growing during my time here. I have an entirely different perspective of Tacoma and PLU, and even though I probably won't miss the city itself very much when I leave, I will miss being a part of what I like to consider the PLU network. Let's be clear: I am not talking about the kind of network or networking drilled into our heads by the PLU Career Center, but .rather the network of people and places that makes this place so special to me. I was never involved in anything school-related in high school, except for being on the soccer team, and it took

until my junior and senior years as a Lute to start to make an impact on campus. When I finally declared a major in Communication with an emphasis in Journalism, I decided it was time to step out of my comfort zone and get involved with student media. For the longest time, I thought that school spirit and being involved on campus weren't for me. I was already on the PLU men's soccer team and was representing the university every day at practice and games, so why do more? During my first two years, I was more content to just go to class, go back to my dorm and hang out with my friends. PLU was more of a place that I felt society required me to be at for four years, rather than a place that I wanted to be at. That all changed when I joined student media. Suddenly, I was part of the university iri more ways than just being an athlete, and I became exposed to the rest of the student body that I previously only interacted with in class. I even went on camera for Mast TV, and took the sports editor job at The Mast for my last semester, two things I never thought I would do. There's no easy way to write these things without sounding sappy and sentimental, and even though I am excited for the future, I don't mind that I feel this way. I'm happy I'm not a senior who is constantly complaining about how they can't wait to get out of here, because it means I thoroughly enjoyed my time as a Lute.

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Reflections from an EMAL By AUSTIN HILLIKER Guest Writer My high school football coach always said, "There will never be anything better than playing on Friday nights, underneath the lights." Now that my four-year football career at Pacific Lutheran University has come to an end, I would have to respectfully disagree with that comment. There is nothing better than playing at 1 p.m. on a Saturday with one hundred other guys that I can truly call my brothers. Choosing to attend PLU, and then becoming a member of the football team, was hands down the best decision I have made in my life thus far. Not only has this program taught me both the basic and advanced techniques to su cceed on the gridiron, but it has also taught me to be a better man. Brotherhood, respect, love and selflessness were just a few of the countless things that I learned while playing for Scott Westering and the PLU coaching staff. I learned that it's not -about how many games we win

or how many games we lose. It's about the relationships that are built while battling with my brothers on and off the field. In 10 years I won't remember playing Willamette, UPS or Linfield. 111 remember hanging out with my teammates in the dorms during my first year and going to a lake house with 25 of my teammates for senior trip. Even the latenight talks with my quarterback, Dalton Ritchey, in hotel rooms, during overnight away trips. When p.eople ask me to talk about the PLU football program, I won't talk about how many receptions I had, 111 talk about the exciting times with my brothers. Never in my entire life have I felt so loved by both a coaching staff and players on a team. If I ever needed anything, I could always count on a fellow EMAL (Every Man A Lute) to be there for me. Whether it was 3 p .m. or 3 a.m., I knew that someone would pick up the phone and help me with whatever I needed to get done, no questions asked. Football might be over for me, but the relationships that I have built while participating in this program will never .fade away. I wouldn't trade this experience for anything

in the world. I owe a million thanks to the coaching staff, players and anyone involved in this program. I now have the tools to succeed and be the best man I can be, all thanks to you. Once an EMAL, always an EMAL.

PHOTO COURTESY OF AUSTIN HILLIKER

Hilliker poses with his parents during PLU's Senior Night and final home game of the 2014 NWC season.


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THE MOORING MAST

DEC. 5, 2014

11 SPORTS

SAAC to vote on use offootball pads during off-season Does practicing with pads make a difference? By GIANCARLO SANTORO

won't officially be on the team come spring season, some Lutes with time left to play are in favor of the proposal. Sports Editor "I do believe that certain aspects of no pads is beneficial, since it allows us to emphasize the aspects of the game that For football fans and players alike, there are few sounds don't require contact," junior linebacker Connor Schilling more satisfying than a big hit. The kind of hit where both "At the same time, football is the most physical game said. players' pads smack together like the sound of a whip on earth, and we are inhibited from practicing the contact being cracked has the ability to stir even the most reserved portion." fan out of his or her seat. "Hitting is the most important part of football, While this is commonplace in games, it's very and although there are other aspects we can work unlikely, and even against NCAA rules, to produce on, we're neglecting the fact that contact is an this sound during Division III off..-season football inevitable part of the game," Schilling said. practices. It's the hitting part that Schilling mentioned that According to the NCAA, legislation has been is cause for concern amongst dissenters to the brought to the table by 22 schools hoping to reshape legislation. how spring off-season practices are conducted. The backers, however, say that the vote would The main issue, whether or not to allow football provide student-athletes with skill instruction players to use pads during the off-season, will be and development that other sports like soccer, voted on at the upcoming 2015 NCAA Convention. and basketball, receive during their offvolleyball Pacific Lutheran University's Student-Athlete seasons. Most importantly, it would give football Advisory Committee, or SAAC, is part of the players time to learn safe tackling techniques. voting process, and PLU's SAAC president, senior "Using pads in the spring would give us a chance Amy Wooten, attended the Northwest Conference to practice the proper way to hit and use our pads SAAC meeting to vote. in a safe manner," Schilling said. "Spring would The goal of the conference was to give a say to give us a longer time period to focus on safe hitting, SAAC representatives from â&#x20AC;˘all the institutions in by the fall, we have already covered that part so theNWC. and can focus on working on our plays." "Practicing with pads is always a touchy topic "You couldn't take a soccer ball away from the because it becomes a matter of injury prevention," soccer team and expect them to have a beneficial Wooten said. "If we let the guys go full pads, are practice. Likewise, in football, taking away our we creating an environment for more concussions pads is just hurting us in the long run," Schilling and tom ACLs?" said. Part of the vote will also determine how many Regardless of the outcome, the pressure ultimately days the team can practice, and how many of those PHOTO COUIITESY OF LUTE TIMES - falls on the coaches to ensure their players aren't days players can use pads. The proposal tables that PLU head coach Scott Westering addresses his team. Westering has been PLU's getting hurt, and Wooten doesn't think there is atJeast three days of the week would permit live head coach since 2004 and has overseen a decade of off-season practices with the anything wrong with the legislation. football team. The NCAA's vote could bring big changes to a team that missed out tackling with pads and two days would be used "I think it's important to allow our athletic teams on the NCAA Division III playoffs this 2014 season. for 11-on-ll scrimmages. the ability to have a substantial amount of practice While practicing with pads may seem like a no in the off-season so that they can get better," Wooten brainer, not everyone on the PLU football team is said. "Our athletes' safety and health comes first. convinced it's the best option. "I think spring ball is one of the best opportunities for Once we find the right balance of safety and intensity, our "In previous years without pads, we have been able to focus a lot on our systems and plays, which is great to do, the team to get better as a whole," Sontra said. "Every football teams will be able to practice with more than just especially in an offense as complex as ours," senior tight player gets equal reps, and it's not about competing for a a football." end Lucas Sontra said. "It's great to be able to focus on the spot, but just competing to get better." While Sontra has used up his four years of eligibility, and fundamentals and skills of the game as opposed to hitting someone as hard as you can." Those who oppose the measure also cite issues such as athletes not being able to compete in other spring sports and athletic trainers facing an impossible task of caring for spring sports and the football team, which plays in fall . Sontra also argued that players can actually become better at football by not using pads.

Rough pre-season so far for men's basketball By CHRISTIAN BOND Guest Writer With the winter season in full effect in the Pacific Northwest, it's time to head indoors to watch some Lute basketball. On Dec. 1, Pacific Lutheran University Men's basketball team headed to the ShoWare Center in Kent to face Seattle University in a non-conference game. The Division I opponent proved to be too much for the Lutes, who were swept aside 72-33, but they didn't go down without a fight. The first 9 minutes of the game went well for the Lutes. The score at 11:07 was 9-13 in favor of Seattle U. â&#x20AC;˘ It was the closest the Lutes would get, as the experience and athleticism of Seattle U began to show as the Redhawks started to run away with the game. Seattle U shot 54.8 percent from the field in the first half, hitting seven three pointers along the way. The score heading into halftime was 43-21, in favor of Seattle U. Shooting struggles continued for the Lutes throughout the second half. Just 12 points was all PLU could muster up against a strong Seattle U team in the last half of the game. Despite shooting only 33 percent from the field, it was enough to fend off the Lutes. The final score was 72-33 in favor of Seattle U. Going into its final stretch of pre-season games, PLU is now 1-4 overall and on a three-game losing streak.

doesn't. Also trying to find rolls for everyone. Playing all forty minutes is something that needs to improve as well." In regards to the Seattle U game, Foreman found positives. "Although the score didn't reflect it, the game went pretty well because we got good shots on offense, even though they didn't fall," Foreman said. "On defense we kept them out of the lane and contested all of their shots." In regard to the rest of the season, Foremen isn't too worried about a few bad results during pre-season. "The important thing is to keep building," Foreman said. "We need to get ready to win when league play starts." January holds the bulk of Northwest Conference league play for PLU, and the team wants to be playing its best ball during that time.

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en's Basketball Schedule UC Santa Cruz 2:00 PM Evergreen 7:30 PM "ty Tournament in San Antonio, Tex. 1:00 PM ec. 19 Schreiner ec. 20 Southwestern (Tex.) 1:00 PM 014-2015 Northwest Conference Season Pacific 8:00 PM an. 9 at George Fox 8:00 PM an. 10 at Lewis & Clark 6:00 PM an. 16 Lin field 8:00PM an.17 Willamette 6:00PM 8:00 PM an. 23 at Whitman 6:00 PM an.24 at Whitworth an. 27 at Puget Sound 8:00PM an. 31

at Pacific

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omen's Basketball Schedule

Looking Forward I interviewed first-year guard, Dylan Foreman, to get an update on how the season has been so far, the game against Seattle U, and a look to the near feature for PLU basketball. When asked about how the season has been so far, Foreman said, "we are still trying to put the pieces together, trying to find out what works on the floor and what

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MIKE CENTIOLI

Seattle U junior center Jack Crook goes up to score between PLU players Austen Wilson (22), Kevin McCrossin (25), Jourdan Johnson (l) and Brandon Lester (far right).

acific Northwest Tournament/Pre-season ec.5 Colorado College 8:00PM UC Santa Cruz 6:00 PM :N"orth"West(Wash) 7:00 PM 6:00PM Evergreen ec. 21 Cal Lutheran 2:00PM 014-2015 Northwest Conference Season an.2 6:00 PM Pacific 6:00PM an. 9 at George Fox an. 10 at Lewis & Clark 4:00PM 6:00 PM an. 16 Linfi.eld an. 17 Willamette 4:00PM an.23 at Whitman 6:00PM an. 24 at Whitworth 4:00PM an.27 at Puget Sound 6:00 PM an. 31 at Pacific 4:00 PM

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THE MOORING MAST

DEC. 5, 2014

12 SPORTS

"Drive to 125" Fall, Winter sports aurie ·1 urner: 'The idea for 'Drive to 125' was suggested by [associate athletic director] Jen homas, and I thought it was a great opportunity to uplift the university's 125th elebration throughout the year. This has provided an internal opportunity to ring all om athletes and coaches together to achieve a common goal. It will .ke a team effort to achieve."

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Wins by Sport olleyball

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Dual-sport athlete notes similarities, not differences ..

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By DAVID MAIR Staff Writer For Pacific Lutheran University sophomore Clint Absher, there are more similarities than differences when it comes to playing two college sports. In just his second year at the university, Absher finished his first Northwest Conference season on the men's soccer team and is beginning his second as a PLU basketball player. Even though they are two completely different sports, he remembers when to use his hands, when to use his feet and always to use his head. He's seen the hardwood of the basketball court more than the rugged turf of the soccer field, and has played basketball for 15 years. At Puyallup High School, Absher earned two varsity letters in basketball, and was also team captain for two years. The 2013-2014 winter sport season was his first picking up the basketball for the Lutes as a guard. He played in 12 games. "[Absher has] great athletic ability," PLU head basketball coach Steve Dickerson said. "Most importantly, he's an outstanding young man." In addition to playing basketball, Absher has also played soccer for the past nine years. He joined PLU's soccer team last spring during the off-season as a mid-fielder. "Clint [Absher] made a nice impact with his athleticism, hard work and great team character," PLU head coach John Yorke said. "We are happy to have him here as a part of the men's soccer program. He has a lot of potential as a soccer player." Absher said he feels that his role on both teams is very similar, which is to "bring a lot of energy." Despite only playing five games for the men's soccer team this season, Absher could potentially become one of the leaders come 2015, when he will be a junior on a team composed mostly of underclassmen. He said basketball is more "aggressive"

than soccer, yet both are still "obviously competitive." Absher said his teammates in both sports create a great atmosphere to play in . Absher explained that there are "two sides," to both sports, and it's "eye-opening [to see] what two teams can be like." "Playing basketball and soccer made me focus on exact things I need to work on," Absher said. "[This] carried over into other parts of my life, too." Just being a college student is quite an ordeal to balance, and adding two sports to that would seem near impossible to the average student, but not for Absher. Absher' s dual-sport lifestyle is also helped by the fact that PLU is a Division ill school, rather than Division I or II, where scholarships are involved. Balancing games, practices and meetings "is the hardest part," Absher said. The process is made easier for him through "a lot of help" from his parents, along with his teammates. Yorke acknowledged the challenges that Absher faces. "Playing both sports is probably very difficult," Yorke said. "I support his decision to play two sports and I'm excited to see him on the basketball floor this winter." Even though Absher is only a sophomore, he looks toward the future "realistically," knowing he probably won't play either sport professionally after PLU. Absher, a Business major, is looking for an opportunity in business management or construction management following college. Since Absher is still a sophomore, he has a while to decide. Until then, he can be caught on the field in the fall and on the court in the winter, bringing vital energy to each team. Since athletes at Division ill level aren't bound to a team by money, Absher is an example of someone who truly "plays for the love of the game.

Top: Absher's 2014 PLU soccer roster picture. Bottom: Absher's 2014-20.15 PLU soccer roster picture. Despite being a sophomore, Absher has three years of eligibility left on the men's soccer team and will have two years left on the men's basket ball team after this upcoming season. Absher appeared in five games for the soccer team and three so far for the basketball team.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS COMMUNICATIONS

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