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SPORTS Sports editor says: I want you to be a fan

BUSINESS Nokia deal may be the change Microsoft needs

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

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OORING

SEPT. 13, 2013

AST VOLUME 90 SPECIAL EDITION

mastmedia.plu.edu

GARFIELD BREAKS GROUND What to do atPLU

By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor Nine golden shovels stood propped in the ground with hard hats hanging off of them, awaiting the start of the ceremony. People involved in the construction process sweated in their dark business suits in the 75-degree heat. They shifted in their plastic chairs and squinted in the sun. John Korsmo, president of Korsmo Construction, and Kirk Rector of Affinity Real Estate Management took the podium. The groundbreaking ceremony of Garfield Station had begun. Garfield Station is a construction project for a new building that will stand on Garfield Street between C Street and Pacific Avenue. It will house apartments, offices and retail spaces. "It's going to be great for PLU, it's going to be great for Parkland," Dick Muri, state representative, said. e bu:I ing hasb en in e planning process since 2008. Investors forced local businesses to vacate in fall 2012 for an anticipated start of construction in winter 2013, but a lack of funding delayed construction until September. Demolition of the old buildings, which had sat vacant for nearly a year, took place from August 26-29. An empty lot greeted new PLU students at the start of the school year. Now that construction has begun, Garfield Station is anticipated to be completed in August 2014. Sheri Tonn, vice president of finance and operations, commemorated the history of Garfield Street during the ceremony. She explained that the name Garfield Station referred to the former railway station on the comer of Garfield and C Street, where the Northern Pacific Railroad ran south from downtown Tacoma.

Ongoing "To Be Human." Art exhibit featuring expressive, realist and abstract images of the human figure in work in a variety of media. DailySept. 11-0ct. 9, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. University Gallery in Ingram.

Friday Follow the Chocolate Trail: Women's Center, reDesign House, Diversity Center and Wang Center open house. Meet the staff, learn about upcoming events and enjoy chocolate, trivia, games and prizes. Various locations. 2-4 p.m. Karaoke night. Join Campus Ministry for a wild night of PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

City council members. repreHentatives from Korsmo Constru<'tiou and Affinit;v R ...al Estate Manayement and Pacific Lutheran administrators toss the f1rsl shovelfuls of dirt in the construction c Jarfield Station. Korsmo Construction anticipates completing the projed; in August 2014.

Tonn also spoke about the old Dahl grocery store, recently demolished, whose owners Hans and Malla Dahl gave PLU faculty unlimited credit to buy food during the Great Depression. Local politician Douglas Richardson said residents of the apartments would have no property tax for the first 12 years and retailers would pay both property and sales tax. He described the project as an investment, and said the tax revenue for the county would be greater than it was before. Despite this, Tonn described the rent for the building as "pretty affordable," comparing them to the Westminster Towers apartments on Park Avenue. "They're not Seattle prices by any means," Tonn said. Barbara Gelman, former

INSIDE

council member, said Garfield Station was like the "fourth cornerstone towards the renovation of Garfield Street," and said when investors first met, it was as if "the Garfield Street dreams had finally come true." Rector said Garfield Station was the "next logical step from the bookstore." Indeed, John Schack, the architect who designed the Garfield Commons, designed Garfield Station in the same architectural style as the PLU bookstore. University Pastor Dennis Sepper gave the project a blessing. The people in suits donned their hard hats and planted their golden shovels into the ground. Shutter clicks filled the air as local press caught the moment on city

camera. Several smiles later, the planners dispersed to talk with audience members and enjoy the refreshments of lemonade and cookies.

Note: Reland Tuomi contributed to this article.

singing, laughing and meeting w friends. AUC CK Hall. 8:30-11 p.m.

Saturday Wall-raising kickoff event to begin the construction for the Habitat for Humanity home. 10-11 a.m. Email service@plu.edu for more information.

Sunday Richard D. Moe Organ Series. Featuring Paul Tegels, University Organist. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 3-4:30 p.m.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

Sunset hike to Mount Rainier. Join Campus Ministry's annual hike to bask in the splendor of creation. Sign up in the Campus Ministry office, AUC 190, or call 253-535-7464. 1-9 p.m.

Student-driven policies take effect By RELAND TUOMI News Writer Stay in Place This procedure will go into effect when there is a potentially dangerous situation off campus, as opposed to a traditional lockdown that is brought on by a direct threat to campus. Students are to immediately proceed to the nearest building and stay there until it is safe to leave. All buildings with a card swipe will automatically lock, and buildings without a card swipe will be physically locked and be inaccessible until the lockdown is over. Activities in the buildings will continue as usual during a Stay in Place.

"The hope is that Stay in Place will be a more accurate representation of the [level of the security] concern," Tom Huelsbeck, executive director of residential life and associate dean of campus life, said. New visitation policy On-campus residents may now choose the hours for their halls and wings to allow guests to visit. "This is transitional housing," "Students Huelsbeck said. want additional freedom and responsibility, and setting their visitation times will satisfy both." This new policy will not affect Kreidler and South as there were already no constraints on visitation in these halls.

Alcohol in Kreidler Of-age students living in Kreidler Hall may now have alcohol in their rooms. This was granted to South Hall residents last year, and Residential Life believed the next logical step was to give Kreidler the same privileges. Both halls are only available to students with a junior class standing or who are age 20 or older. Alcohol is only permitted in the student's room, and when there is an open container, only that student's friends who are 21 and older are allowed to be in the room. U there is a minor in the same room as an open container of alcohol, serious consequences will follow whether the minor was drinking or not.


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SEPT. 13 2013

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THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 13, 2013

A&E 3

STUDENT MEDIA SHINES Getting Technical: Organizations encourage students to get involved Mast Media introduces upgraded new website By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor

It's available online, aired on TV and can be picked up and read in almost every building on campus. Student media plays a major role in the Pacific Lutheran University community and is gearing up for a successful year of production. within the Encompassed student media title is a variety of media outlet organizations, but connecting them all is the University Student Media Board (USMB). "It's kind of the platform, or spider web, that holds student media together," Sam Hosman, chair of USMB, said. "It's a really good group of people and student leaders." All student media organizations are student run, although some have staff advisers. This year, student media aims to have a strong presence across campus and provide a valuable experience for students who choose to be involved. "Student media is a great learning opportunity for students," Hosman said. "Not only do they learn within their own individual organizations, but they are also able to impact the whole campus." Among student media organizations is Saxifrage, PLU's annual literary and art magazine. Much more than just a publishing outlet, Saxifrage creates opportunities, events, musical performances, workshops and multimedia extravaganzas for artists and writers. Senior Melanie Herring, a co-editor of the magazine, said, "this year, Saxifrage is working to strengthen the community of extracurricular as well as careerdriven artists by allowing ample opportunities for them to get involved through events that showcase their art and connect

them with equally creative peers." Submissions to the magazine can be anything from short stories, to photos, to musical scores and are judged by members of the PLU community. "We're going to be the people who help artists get together and meet one another," senior Chris Mahon, another co-editor of Saxifrage, said. ''We're going to be giving them chances throughout the year to have an audience for their work." To keep updated with Saxifrage, visit its website at http://www.plu.edu/saxifrage/, its Facebook page and its Twitter account. The Matrix is PLU's journal of social justice, created to help student voices on important topics be heard. It works to start valuable conversation and unite scattered dialogue into one central magazine. All students and viewpoints are accepted, and The Matrix encourages students to submit their work. Many types of submissions are welcome, including poetry, essays, artwork, photography, song lyrics and comics. There will be an interest meeting for The Matrix on Wednesday from 7-7:30 p.m. in the lower grey area of the Anderson University Center (AUC). Unlike the printed Saxifrage and The Matrix, LASR is a radio station. Any student can join and start his or her own radio show, regardless of his or her major. "LASR is seeking to create a space where you can share your music with a cool community of DJs and with the entire campus," Olivia Ash, general manager of LASR, said. Anyone and everyone can apply. To get more information, visit LASR's website at http:// www.plu.edu/lasr/.

By LEAH TRAXEL

Online Editor

The Mooring Mast is PLU's weekly, award-winning newspaper. The primary role of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information about important issues, events and trends that impact the PLU community. The staff publishes new issues every Friday and uploads new content to the website on a daily basis. 路 Interested writers and contributors can join The Mooring Mast at any time throughout the year. They may choose to write for news, arts and entertainment, business, opinion or sports. Photographer positions are also available. Mast Student Television partners with The Mooring Mast by producing video components for written pieces. Alongside these videos, interested students can start their own video productions or take part in Mast 1V's weekly live news broadcast, News@ Nine. Meetings for The Mooring Mast and Mast TV are held every Monday at 8 p.m. in The Mast office in the lower AUC room 172. Students can attend a meeting, visit The Mooring Mast site at http://mastmedia.plu.edu/ or email masttv@plu.edu or mast@ plu.edu for more information. Now is the time to get involved, make an impact and, most importantly, have fun.

Welcome to the new school year, Lutes. Whether it's your first time on campus or you're anticipating graduation this year, everyone is excited to have you on campus. Here at The Mast, we've been making some big changes. The biggest one you'll notice is our website. Some colleagues at The Mast and I have been working all summer putting together a website we think you'll love and use. These changes were part of a reassessment of how The Mast produces content. Even though we're a weekly paper, we don't live in a world where the news happens on a weekly basis. The news is happening every second of every day, and this new website is helping us adapt to that system.

The updated website gives us the flexibility to add a lot of cool things to our coverage. From our site, you can find a weather forecast, our latest stories and archives of The Mast going back to 1924. We can also expand our coverage to include things the paper hasn't in the past, such as lifestyle stories, and we can share video, photos and text like never before. We've put in a lot of hours to update everything about the way we bring you the campus news, but we still need your help. We asked ourselves, "what do Lutes need to know every day?" and we tried to guess how you would answer that question. So visit the website, check out what's new and tell us your thoughts by commenting on the stories you'd like to see more of. We need to know if we got it right. Welcome to the new school year, and welcome to the new Mast Media.

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Arts and entertainment clubs seek participants By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor When it comes to the start of the year, overwhelming can be an understatement. The tidal wave of emails, pamphlets and handouts swarming campus during the first

weeks of fall semester makes it easy to overlook information. Yet for Pacific Lutheran University's clubs and organizations, this is an important time to start attracting interested new members. Among the multitude of

clubs and organizations, music and theater groups shine. For those looking for a chance to become involved, here is a simple breakdown of some of the best arts and entertainment related organizations PLU has to offer. The HERmonic and PLUtonic

PHOTO 8Y LACE SMITH

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Junion< Olivi.a Ash, Jakob Maier aud Angela Shif'r, LASR participants, inform incoming students about the student radio station. New<'Onleffl gather around tables to sign up for student orga..n:izalions during the Involvement Fair on Monday. The rair functioned as an opportunity for clubs and o.rga.nizations lo alt.met new members, gnin publicity and encourage inleraclion within lhe PLU community.

a cappella groups are upbeat, competitive and talented. Honing in on a shared love of a cappella music, these groups also tour and compete against other schools at a national level. PLUtonic auditions will be on Saturday from 12:30-5:30 p.m. in Mary Baker Russel Music Center room 334. HERmonic autions are on Saturday from 12-4 p.m. in Anderson University Center room201. The PLU Jazz Choir is an opportunity for music students to play, sing and perform jazz music. This choir goes on tour and performs periodically throughout the school year. For more information, visit its website, http://community.plu.edu/-jazz/. The American Choral Directors Association is for students with a passion for choral music. This organization aims to inspire members to excel in choral music through networking and performance opportunities, workshops and teacher panels. It meets monthly and aims to attend the 2013 National Conference in Dallas. Other musically-minded students can turn to Mu Phi Epsilon, an internationally music fraternity recognized with a rruss1on to sponsor musicianship, support service to the school and community and spread an appreciation of music

and friendship through music. This small group creates members opportunities for to perform and serve in the community. To get involved, check out the Mu Phi Epsilon website, http://community.plu. edu/-muphiplu/. For theater, students can turn to PLU's Alpha Psi Omega, "a national theatre honor society devoted to supporting studentproduced theatre," according to its website. This group will perform in a variety of plays and will hold auditions four to six weeks before each show. To find out more information about becoming involved in Alpha Psi Omega, email theatre@plu.edu. For those who love dance and meeting new people, the welcoming atmosphere of Swing Club may be just the place. Meetings are held every Monday at 8 p.m. in the Cave. Anyone, regardless of dance ability, may join at any time. Now is the time to get involved. Not only can great opportunities, connections and memories be found by joining the aforementioned organizations, but 64 other clubs and organizations are also welcoming new Lutes. Al:l:end a meeting, audition or simply check out a club website to get started.


THE MOORING MAST -

4 BUSINESS

SEPT. 13 2013

I'm new here: the Business section By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Welcome to the centerfold of the paper and another year, or maybe your first year, at Pacific Lutheran University. My name is Bjorn Slater, and I am a finance major, a junior and editor of the new Business section, which has replaced the Features section this year. Business is a broad term and covers many topics, so there

are a lot of options as far as content for this section goes. I plan on keeping up on as much national news as possible, such as Microsoft's recent acquisition of Nokia' s Phones Division for $7.2 billion. I will focus on local news more relevant to us here at PLU as well, like the financial side of the Garfield Station construction. I also plan to roll out content about furthering your career, such as how to find an internship,

and what kinds of experiences students have had with their internships. You can already read article below on how to find a job while going to school. I am open to ideas from readers as well, and if you would like to get more involved, feel free to email us at mast庐plu.edu about writing stories of your own. I look forward to hearing responses to the new section and hope everyone had a great first week back.

LOOKING FOR A JOB? HERE'S SOME TIPS By KELSEY HILMES Guest Writer The start of a new school year has begun, and with it we each bring a set of goals and responsibilities for the months ahead. As first-years who want to save money or as juniors who just realized they need to pay their rent, finding work in college is a common goal among all college students. According to the United States' National Center for Education Statistics, 79 percent of college students in 2008 worked while enrolled in college full time. Recent trends indicate that number is growing. While job hunts can be

daunting, there are lots of resources available to kick off your search. Here are a few tips for finding work: 1. Visit the Career Connections Opportunities Board As the official site for job listings on campus, the opportunities board includes volunteering, work study, oncampus and off-campus jobs as well as internship positions. You can also submit your application on the board. At the beginning of the school year, the job listings may focus exclusively on one kind of job - teacher's assistants, lab graders, assistants in the music department - but more jobs will be posted throughout the year. I recommend checking back once a

week. 2. Don't refuse off-campus jobs There are lots of great places in Parkland and Tacoma that hire students who qualify for work study. In the case of Federal Work Study, these positions must be for a non-profit or a company that works to serve its community. The funds for Federal Work Study come from the federal government, which means that it helps both you and your employer. Even if you do not qualify for work study, off-campus jobs can offer you a closer tie with your community and encourage you to go out and enjoy Tacoma. 3. Get help with your resume, cover letter and interview

The office of Career Development, which works under Career Connections, offers resume drop-in hours from 3-5 p.m. Monday through Friday in Ramstad 112. They will help you edit or write your resume to highlight your strengths as a candidate. You can also visit the Ramstad Commons to set up an appointment for a mock interview where you can practice answering the most conLIDon interview questions.

give you a leg-up as a candidate. For example, if you are in finance and interested investing, joining the Mary LundDavis Student Investment Fund (SIF) will give you experience in choosing stocks to invest in. SIF started with a $25,000 donation from Mary LundDavis in 1982, and under the management of PLU students it has grown to over $160,000. Members meet Thursdays in Morken 138 from 8-9 p.m. to discuss potential investments for the fund in different equity sectors. The start of a new school year and finding a new job can feel overwhelming, but with some perseverance and focus, landing a part-time position can be a reality for anyone.

4. Keep your eyes and ears open There are lots of opportunities on campus and in your areas of interest for paid work positions. Being involved in organizations across campus can help you learn about these opportunities and

* * * ATTENTION STUDENTS * * *

Nokia Price Since Microsoft Announcement Sept. 3, 2013

NON-DISCLOSURE OF "DIRECTORY INFORMATION" The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, popularly known as the "Buckley Amendment" and carrying the acronym "FERPA," governs the University's collection, retention, and dissemination of information about students. (The document appears in the Student Handbook.) One category of information covered by FERP A is called "directory information." Pacific Lutheran University has designated the following items as directory information: student name, local and permanent addresses and telephone numbers, E-mail address, date and place of birth, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, class standing, previous educational agency or institution(s) attended, major and minor fields of study, anticipated date of graduation (if that has not yet occurred), and degree(s) and award(s) conferred (including dates). The PLU FERPA policy appears on the Student Handbook website for at: http://www.plu.edu/student-handbook/code-ofyour review conduct/FERPA.php. Under FERPA the University may disclose directory information without prior written consent unless an "eligible student" (18 years or over) or a parent (if the student is under 18 years of age) gives notice in writing to the .contrary to the Office of the Vice President for Student Life restricting the disclosure of the directory information, as it pertains to the student, by the last day of registration for any given academic term at this University. Please be assured that PLU uses discretion when releasing information (e.g. roommate notification or compliance with federal requirements.) If you participate in activities such as music or drama performances, athletics or represent PLU in other public capacities, University policy is to issue minimal information in press releases. If it is your wish that PLU NOT disclose "directory information" about you under any circumstance, you must come to the Student Life Office, Hauge Administration Building, Room 105, on or before September 20, 2013 to complete the appropriate form and meet with Laree Winer to understand fully the impact of the restriction. This restriction will

remain in effect until the 10th day of the fall semester of the next academic year, unless you revoke it in writing.

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Microsoft gambles big on Nokia By WINSTON ALDER Business and Ads Manager Microsoft has had its busiest summer in years, with multiple headline-capturing stories over the last few months. On July 18, Microsoft took a more than $900 million write off on its Surface RT tablets. This was quickly forgotten, however, as CEO Steve Ballmer announced his retirement on August 23. This too was quickly overshadowed by bigger news. On Sept. 3, the once biggest corporation in the world bought the once biggest phone maker in the world, with Microsoft acquiring Nokia's Smart Devices unit. So Microsoft now owns the manufacturing, design, distribution, sales and marketing teams that used to be Nokia's mobile phone business. This $7.17 billion deal may cement Microsoft's direction just when it needs to change.

Markets reacted overwhelmingly positively to the news of Ballmer's exit, driving Microsoft's shares up 7.3% on Aug. 23. But this was quickly erased with the news of the Nokia acquisition. As Tim Schwartz, money manager, said in a Bloomberg phone interview, "the perception is that this is going to be a continuation of the old management and old-school Microsoft mentality." By making such a huge move before his retirement, Steve Ballmer has committed Microsoft to a path before his successor even has a chance to be hired. Redmond's future is now even more tightly tied to the failing Windows Phone business than before. While statements from Microsoft say the Nokia business unit will help it make more money off

Windows Phones, it first needs to sell a few of those phones. Good thing Redmond is still sitting on a mountain of cash ($70+ billion). At least, Nokia shares are soaring.

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OPINION 5

THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 13 2013

An introduction to Mast Media By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chi.ef In the spirit of orientation, it's time for introductions. We are Mast Media, your oncampus studentproduced news source. Mast Media is the converged efforts of The Mooring Mast - Pacific Lutheran University's award winning student newspaper and Mast Student Television, the oncampus video production learning iab. Mast Student Television and The Mooring Mast have been around for a pretty long time - 41 and 90 years respectively, but more on that in a minute. However, like many of you, we're also trying to find our place on campus. Two years ago, The Mast and Mast 1V operated as separate endeavors. Every week The Mast published a new edition of the paper and the 1V station would air an episode of News @ Nine, the weekly news show. The two outlets worked independently to assign, produce and publicize content. Eventually, we decided to pool our resources, embarking on last school

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Jessica Trondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Winston Alder mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Alison Haywood A&EEDITOR

Kelli Breland BUSINESS EDITOR

Bjorn Slater OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Sam Hom SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Kels Mejlaender ONLINE EDITOR

Leah Trax.el

year's trial run of merged production. In that time, we've experimented with how to best serve an active campus with diverse needs, as well as foster a sustainable method of participation in student media. And that's where Mast Media was born. From this point forward, all content created by both The Mast and Mast 1V can be found on one website, http:// mastmedia.plu.edu. Here you11 also find classroom content under the LuteTimes' header, as well as plenty of online-only content that is updated daily. We're no longer a once-a-week production. The print issue will still come out Friday morning and News @ Nine will still air news every Thursday at 9 p.m. But when something happens Friday night, you won't have to wait seven days to hear about it from student media. For more information on our website, check out the page 3 article by our online editor, Leah Traxel. Another new addition this year is our Business section, where we will inform you of national trends and provide insight on resources you can use during your inevitable job hunt. For more on the section, see the piece by our business editor, Bjorn Slater, on page 4. This issue of The Mast hopes to serve as your introduction to campus. It's a little shorter in length than our standard

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MAST TV

lSPLU

GENERAL MANAGER

Storm Gerlock NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Allison Reynolds

recycle your copy of

ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

AT A GLANCE

By BRITTANY JACKSON ASPLU PR Director

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

issues will be, which will start to hit stands Sept. 20. But we aim for all of our content to be of use to everyone within the PLU community, from clubs to get involved with on campus to how to talk to your academic adviser or how to be a great Lute fan. Beyond the website and new potential for content, The Mast is celebrating a milestone this year: 90 years of publication. In the upcoming year, we will be celebrating our anniversary with all of you. We're hoping our makeover and updates ensure at least another 90 years of serving this community. If you'd like to get involved with Mast Media, please be in touch. There is information on our website, http://mastmedia.plu.edu, as well as on our Facebook page, about how to volunteer, get paid, place an ad, share a tip or write a letter to the editor. Don't hesitate to contact us via email at mast@ plu.edu or masttv@plu.edu for more information, either. And if you just want to follow along, that's great too. You can find us on Twitter at several different usernames, including @PLUMast and @maststudenttv. Welcome #newlutes and #welcomehomelutes. We are excited to call you our audience, and we sincerely hope our place on campus continues to be on your screens and in your hands.

The Moormg Mast

Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University(ASPLU) is the elected voice of the student population. The organization's goal is to inspire and represent the PLU community through living out the mission statement of voice, vision, and action. ASPLU seeks to positively impact PLU through work done by the senate and planning events throughout the year. As the only voting members of the organization, the senate encourages students to offer feedback about PLU and represents their voices during senate meetings and the legislation process. Past senate projects include

passing a joint resolution with the Resident Hall Association in support of gender-neutral housing, organizing Take Back the Tap and installing blue emergency phone stands throughout campus. ASPLU also works to plan events each year such as Homecoming, the major spring music festival, LollaPLUza, and teams up with the Diversity Center for Diversity Week. The opportunity to volunteer on a planning committee is always available and welcome. If interested in running for senate, there are a number of open positions, and there will be an interest meeting in the Anderson University Center room 133 on monday at 7 p.m. Elections will be held Sept. 26 and 27.

Visit http://plu.edu/asplu to get involved

Ten things I wish I knew as a first-year By ASHLEY GILL Opinion Editor Getting caught up in all of the excitment of college is normal. Last year when I came to campus, I wish I had known the following:

1. There are always people to meet If you do not click with your wing mates or if you commute and find it difficult to make friends, that is okay. The clubs, intermural sports, activities and events may be a little intimidating at first, but they are a great way to get involved. Don't wait until junior year to realize how many people you could have met or how many things you could have participated in during your years at Pacific Lutheran University.

2. Use the resources on campus If not for better understanding and better grades, using resources like the Writing Center and Academic Assistance, gave me peace of mind. No matter what

my grade ended up being on a particular assignment, I knew that I had done everything I possibly could have done. This felt a lot better than beating myself up about not getting a perfect score.

3. Talk to professors Take advantage of office hours and start a conversation. It is a great way to build connections on campus. This can come in handy when you are looking for jobs in the future or even when you are just in need advice.

4. Studying away is possible PLU makes it easy and affordable to travel, but start looking into it as soon as possible, even if you are thinking of studying abroad a year from now. After winter break, the process starts passing by very fast and spots fill up quickly.

it to slip out of your pocket. It can be a lot better to invest in something for your card now than pay to replace it or have to get it reactivated.

6. You don't have to buy new books Buying textbooks used, renting them or finding them cheap online are great options and can save you hundreds of dollars. Be aware, however, there will be times when new books are required, normally because it is an original textbook written by your professor or the book may include electronic additions.

7. Sit in the front row It is an easy way to immediately be noticed by professors, and you can avoid being distracted by your classmates. You will always be able to hear the professor and see the board.

end of the semester, you will be rushing to the concierge desk and digging into your pockets for just enough change to print that final paper due the next morning.

9. Say no to on-campus extras Many of us are away from home and don't have our parents supplying us with food anymore. While the school does provide wholesome options, it is up to us to decide not to eat pizza every meal. It can be difficult to not give in to the entire freezer case of Ben & Jerry's or not take full advantage of the all-you-care-to-eat meals. But it is important to find a good balance between the things we love to eat and the things our parents love us to eat.

10. Don't give up

5. Protect your LuteCard

8. Don't go print crazy

There will come a point when you are so overwhelmed that the community college in your hometown is looking pretty nice. You will be proud you got through those

I went without a LuteCard holder for

The amount of money we are given

stressful times though. It does not happen

a weekend and ended up losing it twice. You need your LuteCard for practically everything on campus and it is so easy for

for printing seems like it will last forever, but it is gone before you know it. Even if you are not in any writing classes, by the

often, but there are occasional bumps to get over. Just remember hard times will not last forever, and it will get better.


6 ADVERTISEMENT

THE MOORING MAST_

SEPT. 13 2013

I support a union, because it would not only give us tbe means to improve our working conditions, but also raise the standards for all faculty and students. With a fair and democratic union vote, PLU can continue lo move orward 1n fostering the values it hopes to represent-quality education, thoughtful inquiry, and service to others.

,.. ADJUNCTS & CONTINGENTS TOGETHER FOR QUALITY EDUCATION

actogetherwa.org â&#x20AC;˘


SEPT.13, 2013

Our Campus Our Culture Our Mission

THE MOORING MAST -

This month, certain contingent faculty at PLU will receive a ballot in the mail from the National Labor Relations Board asking if they wish to be represented by a union. To everyone who receives a ballot, please vote. You will be affected by the outcome of this election whether you vote or not.

ADVERTISEMENT 7

Your ballot must be received by October 10. The outcome of the vote will be by simple majority of votes cast. Make sure your voice is heard.

For more information go to:


THE MOORING MAST

8 SPORTS

SEPT. 13 2013

Football

Volleyball

Men's Soccer

Women's Soccer

Cross Country

Upcoming Games

Upcoming Games

Upcoming Matches

Upcoming Matches

Upcoming Meet

Sept. 14 at California Lutheran, noon Sept. 21 vs. Redlands, 12:30 p.m.

Sept. 14 vs. Concordia College, 4 p.m. Sept. 20 vs. Pacific, 7p.m.

Sept. 13 vs. Southwestern (Texas), 5 p.m. Sept. 14 vs. Hardin-Simmons, 7 p.m.

Sept. 14 vs. Puget Sound, noon Sept. 22 at Pacific, noon

Sept. 14: Sundodger Invitational Women- 9 a.m./ Men- 9:45 a.m.

Previous Games

Previous Games

Previous Matches

Previous Matches

No previous gamers

Win (3-0 ): Sept. 7 vs. Ohio Northern Win (3-0): Sept. 6 vs. Wisconsin Lutheran Loss (2-1): Sept. 7 at Occidental Loss (3-2): Sept. 7 vs. Washington (Mo.) Wm (4-0): Sept. 8 vs. Evergreen State Win (2-0): Sept. 8 at Whittier

Previous Meet Aug. 31: UPS Invitational Women's XC (second), Men's XC (third)

Cheerful fans lead to teams' success Passion and dedication are vital in being a world-class fan By SAM HORN Sports Editor It was the moment of truth. For the Pacific Luther.an University football team, this was the chance to win its sixth game of the 2010 season. Tied 28-28 with crosstown rival Puget Sound with one second remaining in the game, seasoned PLU kicker Rich Isett looked onward towards the goal posts. Isett, who graduated from PLU in 2010, warmed up his leg as he stepped onto the field. With time winding down, Isett leaned into the kick. The ball left his foot faster than the eye could blink, sailing end over end and soaring through the goal posts. The kick would've easily been good from 60 yards out. With that kick, PLU had won its sixth game of the year and looked unstoppable. The field goal was PLU's first game-winning kick since November 1989. After successfully converting the game-winning kick, Sparks Stadium was cacophonous. Fans left and right went

ballistic. They couldn't believe what had just happened before their eyes as Isett celebrated with his teammates at midfield. The PLU football fan base is extraordinary. These fans should get paid. They're that good at what they do. They're professionals. Many sports fans aspire to become legendary like the PLU faithful, but few ever reach the pinnacle in professional fanning. Yes, "fanning" is a word now. In order to become a great fan, one must have a desire to yell- a lot. It doesn't matter if you're watching a pee wee soccer game or a PLU football game. Loud and cheerful fans are what motivate players to excel on the field. Except for golf. Golfers are certainly a different breed of athlete. They really need all that silence to hit a solid drive. Whatever works I guess. Not only do fans have to be loud, but they also have to be respectful. When a team is having a rough game and can barely scrape together any

points, the worst thing that can happen is when its fan base starts booing and leaves the stadium. Fans need to be a source of encouragement to their team. They also need to be loyal if they want their team to stand a chance of winning. They can't just get up and leave. Fans have to give their team a chance and stick around until the end of the game. The golden rule of fanning is to show your beloved team that you care about them. This year at Pacific Lutheran University, students have much to be excited about. The PLU football team is slated to finish in second place in the Northwest Conference this fall. The women's soccer team is coming off of its first winning season since 2006. The PLU fan base has something to look forward to this fall. PLU should rise to the occasion and display their fanning at every sporting event this fall? This is our moment of truth. Don't waste it.

What makes a good fan? Sam says: • Wear black and gold, no matter the sporting event.

• If your voice is hoarse at the end of the game, then you've done your job.

• Be respectful. Athletes hate it when you don't support them. • Don't make noise when noise isn't necessary.

Follow @MastSports on 'lloitter for live updates

PHOTO BY ALISON llAYwOOD

As an avid PLU sports fan, I have deemed it unacceptable to wear anything but black and gold. It's OK to show off your pride.

PREDICTIONS FOR THE LUTES' FALL SEASON

Fall sports aiming to seize control of the Northwest Conference By NICK BARENE Guest Writer FOOTBALL Pacific Lutheran University's football team is entering the season with high hopes. They posted a 7-3 overall record and made an appearance in the NCAA Division III national playoffs for the first time in 11 years. Sixteen are returning starters from the 2012 team, including captain Mychael Tuiasosopo, senior, who earned second team All-American honors last year as a defensive tackle. The Lutes are poised for success as they boast three preseason first-team All-Americans with Tuiasosopo, wide receiver and Kyle Warner, junior, offensive guard Chris Edison, a senior. Senior Jordan Patterson, a linebacker, received second-team honors. The team has been ranked 13th in the nation by http://www.

MEN'S SOCCER The men's soccer team has finished in the top half of the Northwest Conference table every year since 2003. The 2012 squad continued that winning tradition with a strong 9-4-1 record, good for second place in the NWC. This season, the Lutes will look for leadership from first-team All-NWC selections forward Derek Johnson and midfielder Giancarlo Santoro. Both players are seniors. Johnson co-led the team last year with nine goals.

with their young players, led by sophomore Lauren Larson who scored a team best nine goals and was selected to the AllNWC Second-Team. A revamped coaching staff will aid the team in its quest for a top-of-the-table finish.

Huston, a senior, were both awarded AVCA All-America honors.

Predicted record in 2013: 9-7-2

The cross country team will rely on the strength of its talented returners, and invest hope in a large class of incoming runners. Lauren Knebel, a sophomore, and Alan DenAdel, a senior, both advanced to the NCAA West Region Championship in 2012. The Lutes are already off and running in 2013 with DenAdel and sophomore Amanda Wilson each taking third place at the Puget Sound Invitational. DenAdel won the Apple Ridge Run at Central Washington University on Sept. 7. The Lute women took second place .i n the team standings with 39 points while the men took third place with 61 points.

VOLLEYBALL

After finishing sixth in the NWC with a 4-5-7 (6-5-7 overall) record, the women's soccer team will look to improve its place in the table. A pre-season poll predicted the Lutes to finish fifth

The women's volleyball team had a stellar 2012 season. They qualified for the NCAA tournament, won the Northwest Conference Championship, and finished with a 20-6 record. The team will enter the 2013 season ranked 21st in the nation and will look to continue its success from the previous campaign. However, the team has loftier aims than just a pre-season ranking. "The ranking is the last thing on our mind," said setter Samantha North, a junior. 'We take one

d3football.com/landing/index.

in the conference, which would be

step at a time to accomplish our

Predicted record in 2013: 8-2

their highest finish in 7 seasons. The Lutes will look to rebuild

goals." North and teammate Bethany

Predicted record in 2013: 10-3-2 WOMEN'S SOCCER

Predicted record in 2013: 22-4 CROSS COUNTRY

MEN'S GOLF In 2012 the men's golf team finished in fourth place in the NWC, scoring 21 out of 32 possible points. Dustin Hegge, a senior, earned second team allconference honors after finishing as the 2012 NWC Player of the Year. The men's golf team will begin their season on Sept. 22 at the Mary Hardin-Baylor Fall Intercollegiate tournament.

Predicted men's 2013 placing: third WOMEN'S GOLF The women's golf team finished in fifth place in its 2012 campaign. The team is reloaded for 2013, as it did not lose any players to graduation and will look to use its experience to aid them in the quest for the NWC title. Junior Kristina Norlin will look to continue her dominance in NWC play after averaging 89 strokes per contest last year.

Predicted number of regional Predicted women's 2013 placing: qualifiers in 2013: 4 third


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Bitcoins: from humble beginnings to a legitimate currency PAGES

SPORTS Women's soccer ties with Puget Sound 1-1 PAGE15

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

OORING

HE SEPT. 20, 2013

Top 10 recycling worker wishes

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 1

mastmedia.plu.edu

Unraveling the contingent faculty controversy

By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor With a 76 percent recycling rate, Pacific Lutheran University is a school that is familiar with sustainability. However, it can be confusing to know what can and cannot be recycled, so sustainability technicians, the student workers who sort the recycling, contribute a lot to PLU's high rate. To make these student workers' jobs run a little more smoothly, you can follow these 10 tips. 1. Pour your leftover liquids elsewhere

Open drinks tossed into the recycling are not immune to the forces of gravity. Junior Riley Swanson, a sustainability technician, said the spilled drinks make the job much harder, because "everything gets all wet and sticky, and then we [sustainability technicians] have to clean the bags after each use." Instead, pour out drinks in a water fountain or bathroom, or just screw the cap on the bottle. 2. Keep your food waste wrapped up

If you only ate half the sandwich you bought, don't just toss it in the trash. Any food waste should be wrapped in its packaging and recycled so student workers can compost it. Junior Zack Wangler, another sustainability technician, said this is the best method for disposing of food when a compost bucket is not nearby. 3. Lids and recycling are the new normal Whether it's an empty soda bottle or a jug of milk, both have lids that should usually be put in the garbage. However, senior Nathan Rhoades, a sustainability technician, said PLU has recently discovered a salon company, Aveda, that accepts the lids. Christine Cooley, sustainability manager, said Aveda is trying to use them to make their product bottles. In residence halls, containers are available for students to recycle the bottle lids in. Elsewhere on campus, lids should still be taken off of bottles but then also put in the recycling.

RECYCLING CONT. PAGE 3

w Arts&

MileyC the line .raunchy, page6

Sports

Volleyb fourthw路 pagel4

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Members of Students of the Left, including senior Katie Giseburt (right), participate in a sit-in during chapel break on Wednesday to raise awareness about the contingent faculty vote on unionization. Contingent faculty have until Oct. 10 to cast their ballots.

By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor Last spring, Students of the Left spoke up about supporting contingent faculty's right to join the Service Employees International Union. On Wednesday, however, they chose a different tactic to express solidarity with the faculty members who would be able to vote. Senior Julia Walsh said,

"I don't have a personal interest in whether the faculty decide to unionize. I have an interest in whether the faculty have a choice. They should have the choice." The contingent faculty debate has been brewing at least since spring 2011, when a survey revealed that a significant number of contingent faculty were dissatisfied with their wages and job security. The issue came to a head when a significant

portion of contingent members filed faculty union cards with SEID, and some faculty declared their intention to join the union in an open letter to the PLU administration, which they published in The Mooring Mast as a paid advertisement. The PLU administration immediately expressed opposition to the unionization effort. Since

FACULTY CONT. PAGE4

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

Panelists push for immigration policy reform By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer "Immigration Near and Far," a panel of four speakers discussing the importance of immigration reform in the U.S., marked Constitution Day at Pacific Lutheran University. The campus community gathered

in the Anderson University Center ~egency Room to listen to the lecture and subsequent conversation. Two of the panelists were from PLU's Hispanic studies program Carmina Palerm, associate professor of Hispanic studies, and senior Wendy Martinez, a major in Hispanic studies and political science. The other two guests

Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act

The 2013 Senate bill would change the family and employmentbased visa categories for immigrants, provide critical due-process protections, increase the availability of nonilnmigrant workers to supplement all sectors of the workfol'(E! and provide legal status to 11 million undocumented immigrants within the United States. i""

@ 11

were Mary Beth Leeper, a PLU alumna and attorney specializing in immigration law and domestic violence, and Leno Rose-Avila, a member of the board of directors for Amnesty International. Throughout the lecture and the following discussion, all four speakers emphasized the importance of immigration reform in the U.S. Reforming the immigration policy would allow immigrants to have access to work permits, allow people to immigrate to the U.S. and help the people who have already immigrated here. "Immigration is such a complex issue that sometimes

IMMIGRATION CONT. PAGE3


2 ADVERTISEMENT

Our Campus Our Culture Our Mission

THE MOORING MAST

This week, certain contingent faculty will receive a ballot to decide whether to form a union at PLU, or not. To those who receive these ballots, please do your own research and consider: Union dues and fees, and the costs of collective bargaining. Union dues may be coming out of your paycheck, and could amount to 1 to 2 percent of your annual salary. The impact of a union on our culture of collaboration. A union bargaining unit will create two distinct groups on campus.

SEPT. 20 2013

Our culture of collaboration through a shared governance system is rare in higher education today. Bringing a union to campus will boil down to two simple questions: What will you gain? What will you lose? Your ballot must be received by the NLRB in Seattle by October 10. The outcome of the vote will be by simple majority of votes cast. Failure to vote is not a ''no" vote. Make sure your voice is heard.

Progress that is already being made without a union.

For more information go to: www.plu.edu/unionfaq


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 20 2013

NEWS3

Lutes participate in annual Mount Rainier hike What to do atPLU

Ongoing University Songregation church service. The University Congregation is an ecumenical, Reconciling in Christ faith community, welcoming people of all faith backgrounds. They are a student congregation of the ELCA. Sundays, Lagerquist Concert Hall, 11-12 a.m.

Friday Women's volleyball match: PLU vs. Pacific. Olson Gymnasium, 7 p.m.

Saturday Women's volleyball match: PLU vs. Linfield. Olson Gymnasium, 7 p.m. Studio series: Opera Night. Singers from PLU and private studio students present a riight of Opera. Features past and present students of Janeanne Houston. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30 p.m.

Sunday PHOTOS COURTESY OF CATHERINE GRAHAM

Foggy weather did not deter students as they participated in Campus Ministry's annual Mount Rainier hike on Sunday. TOP: Sophomore Cady Smith, sophomore Caitlin Dawes and junior Pete Swanson enjoy the sack lunches provided by Campus Ministry during the lunch break. BOTTOM: A small group of students bike through the mist on the Nisqually Vista Ttail. Junior Catherine Graham, who took this photo, said she kept trailing behind to take photos and almost lost the group in the fog. RIGHT: Although the mountain itself was not visible, students still took the opportunity to enjoy nature.

IMMIGRATION FROM P GEI you think about it from far away and think it doesn't really impact you," Martinez said. But, she continued, "there are students who sit next to you in your classes who are DREAMers [the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act], people who immigrated here at a young age, graduated high school and now have work permits. Immigration 4mpacts

everyone." Rose-Avila and Martinez both strongly emphasized that most immigrants come to the U.S. for work-related reasons. "People don't really come here for Disneyland. They come here to work," Rose-Avila said. the speakers However, expressed doubt that serious immigration reform would happen in the near future. "I would really love to see the Senate bill come to fruition." Leeper said, referring to S. 744,

RECYCLING FROM PAGE 1 4. Break it down Breaking down cardboard boxes and any other type of jug or bottle doesn't take much time, but Wangler said, "it makes our job a lot easier, and it actually helps use less resources as well so that you can keep sustainability going."

or the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act. "I don't think it will," Leeper said. "I think the House will be inclined to pass parts of what's talked about as comprehensive immigration reform. Then I hope that will be reflected in the next presidential election." The panelists also discussed the one-year bar when applying for asylum. This requires applicants to have been in the U.S. within one-year of their

application. Part of the bill that the Senate is working with involves removing that bar, which would enable a large population of people who have strong cases to apply for asylum. A large number of people with strong cases are denied asylum because of inadequate legal representation or various other minor factors. "I love the Constitution, but I know it has to change," RoseAvila said. "You're the ones who can make a difference."

Habitat resoration work party. Come help make Parkland more beautiful. This is a chance to experience the Fred L. Tobiason Outdoor Learning Center and the Hillside Habitat. Lower AUC steps, 1-4 p.m.

IN REMEMBRANCE PLU alum John Rogex Johnson, 73, was a victitn of the Navy Yard shootings in Washington on Monday. "J.J.:' Johnson studied mathematics. He '1s survived by his four adi.tlt ,, step-daughters and his wife of neatly 10 years, Judy.

Vibrators and other sexual items cannot be recycled either. "There was a very intricate dildo I found one time," Wangler said. '1 don't know what all the little buttons and everything were used for." 8. Don't recycle bottles of biohazards

5. Coffee cups are compostable Be kind to the cups that carry your morning wake-up call, afternoon energy boost and evening kick. Wangler said the lids are recyclable, though the straws are not, and the cups are compostable once they have carried coffee. 6. How you recycle makes a difference If you have several different materials to recycle, don't try to make a recycling hybrid. Rhoades said he has found empty bottles and old papers in plastic bags, which he then has to open and sort. You can be the one to start the sorting process.

7. Can the condoms Some things are best left in the landfill. "The condoms are the most ridiculous things and the most disgusting," Rhoades said of the used condoms he finds in the recycling. "Don't give us that gift," Wangler

said, who has also found many.

While water bottles are recyclable, sometimes their contents would be better off flushed. "We've had bottles of urine," Wangler said. "We have to pitch it [the recycling] out, because it's a biohazard at that point." 9. When in doubt, don't throw it out PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

If you're not sure if Junior Nicole Jordan, a sustainability technician, breaks down cardboard to recycle. She said she has been inleresled in something is recyclable sustainability since coming to PLU, but this is the first year she has had time to help. or not, don't just throw it in the trash. Rhoades 10. Be nice said that about 90 percent of what is thrown Swanson said he wishes the campus out by the campus community is actually Remember these student workers community would be more respectful and recyclable. "If you don't know whether it's are just like you. "Know that there's not aware that it's PLU students doing the job. recyclable or not, we would rather you put robots sorting," Wangler said, but that it's "Just a bunch of little itty bitty time savers it in the recycling bin," Wangler said. students who have busy schedules, classes that take you like two seconds, take us two and other jobs. seconds times a hW1dred,'1 Wangler said.


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

SEPT. 20 2013

NEWELCA BISHOP INSTALLED By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor The installation of the new Bishop of the Southwestern Washington Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America took place at 3 p.m. on Saturday. A congregation of approximately 400 people gathered at Trinity Lutheran Church in Parkland. During this ceremony, the Rev. Mark S.

Hanson, presiding bishop of the ELCA, declared Rev. Richard Emil Jaech the bishop of the Southwestern Washington Synod of the ELCA. The Rev. Kim Jonathan Latterell was installed as assistant to the bishop. Choral Union, directed by PLU's director of choral activities Richard Nance, lead the hymns, and Zachary Lyman, associate professor of music, accompanied on trumpet and Jonathan Wohlers on organ.

FACULTY FROM PAGE 1 then, students and faculty alike have been trying to make sense of the situation, with SEID distributing pro-union information and campaigning hard to gain student and faculty support. Meanwhile, the PLU administration has been releasing carefully crafted statements that some students and faculty said did not answer their questions.Many contingent faculty members have remained tightlipped on their stance on unionization for fear of losing their jobs. This timeline attempts to accurately summarize the chain of events leading up to October's election. Spring 2011: The PLU chapter of the American Association of University Professors publishes a survey of contingent faculty members' working conditions. Fall: For the first time, the amount of financial aid provided by the university is greater than the amount spent on faculty compensation. Stephen Starkovish, PLU's provost, said the gap between these numbers will only continue to grow. Dec. 2012: The Provost creates a task force to address the concerns brought up

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

The Rev. Mark S. Hanson, presiding bishop of the ELCA, gives the Rev. Richard E. Jaech a necklace and a staff after installing him as Bishop of the Southwestern Washington Synod.

by the AAUP survey. The members are Cameron Bennet, dean of the school of Arts and communication, Jim Albrecht, dean of humanities division, Kirsten Christensen, associate professor of German, and Michelle Dijkstra, resident instructor of computer science and computer engineering - the only contingent faculty member. Jan.: The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) sends representatives to collect signatures on union cards. April 11: The SEID files a petition to the National Labor Relations Board to represent contingent faculty members at PLU. April 12: Some faculty members place two full-page advertisements in The Mooring Mast. One is signed by contingent faculty members who urge their contingent colleagues to join them in their efforts. The other ad, signed by tenure and tenure-track professors, appeals to tenure and tenuretrack faculty members to support their contingent colleagues. April 24: PLU's administration files a legal challenge to the union's petition. Its main concerns includes that the university is a religious institution and that the population of contingent faculty is too

varied to be considered one community of interest. May 1: Students of the Left host a rally in support of contingent faculty and deliver a petition with 10 percent of the student population's signatures urging the ASPLU passes a resolution in support of contingent faculty's right to vote on whether or not to unionize. May 4: The PLU Board of Regents adopts a resolution "regarding compensation for faculty, administration and staff and maintenance of physical resources." The resolution does not distinguish between contingent and tenured faculty and calls for a detailed plan on how the administration plans to increase faculty compensation over the next seven years. May 31: The faculty task force the Provost put together in December issues a memo with recommendations on contingent faculty policies. June 7: After a series of hearings, the regional director of the NLRB orders that an election be held. Those eligible to vote include 152 contingent faculty members who have taught at least one class in two consecutive years between the 2011-12

school year and the 2013-14 school year. Two of the eligible voters are now tenure-track, and at least 22 eligible voters no longer work at PLU. The ruling also determined that both full-time and part-time contingent faculty would be represented by the vote. PLU has since filed an appeal at the national level. Sept. 12: Students of the Left meet with President Thomas Krise to discuss their concerns about the administration's actions regarding unionization and said they were dissatisfied with the information he provided. The President's office schedules a follow-up meeting for Sept. 19. Sept. 19: The regional branch of the NLRB sends ballots to eligible faculty by mail. Oct. 10: The deadline for votes to arrive at the regional NLRB office in Seattle. The results will be announced that day. "Your first job is to take care of your students and then protect your faculty," Walsh said. She emphasized she respects the administration, even though she disagrees with its stance. "I just hope there's some peace that can come out of this."

* * * ATTENTION STUDENTS * * * NON-DISCLOSURE OF "DIRECTORY INFORMATION" The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, popularly known as the "Buckley Amendment" and carrying the acronym "FERPA," governs the University's collection, retention, and dissemination of information about students. (The document appears in the Student Handbook.)

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One category of -information covered by FERPA is called "directory information." Pacific Lutheran University has designated the fo11owing items as directory information: student name, local and permanent addresses and telephone numbers, E-mail address, date and place of birth, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, class standing, previous educational agency or institution(s) attended, major and minor fields of study, anticipated date of graduation (if that has not yet occurred), and degree(s) and award(s) conferred (including dates). The PLU FERPA policy appears on the Student Handbook website for your review at: http://\vww.plu.edu/student-handbook/code-ofconduct/FERPA.php. Under FERPA the University may disclose directory information without prior written consent unless an "eligible student" (18 years or over) or a parent (if the student is under 18 years of age) gives notice in writing to the contrary to the Office of the Vice President for Student Life restricting the disclosure of the directory information, as it pertains to the student, by the last day of registration for any given academic term at this University. Please be assured that PLU uses discretion when releasing information (e.g. roommate notification or compliance with foderal requirements.) If you participate in activities such as music or drama perfonnances, athletics or represent PLU in other public capacities, University policy is to issue minimal infonnation in press releases.

If it is your wish that PLU NOT disclose "directory information" about you under any circumstance, you must come to the Student Life Office, Hauge Administration Building, Room 105, on or before September 20, 2013 to complete the appropriate form and meet with Laree Winer to understand fully the impact of the restriction. This restriction will remain in effect until the 10th day of the fall semester of the next

academic year~ unJess you revoke it in writing.

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THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 20, 2013

A&E5

The rise of the dystopia.â&#x20AC;˘films Popularity of dystopian themed and novels sky-rockets Roth's "Divergent," starring Shailene Woodley, is set to hit theaters this year, and the early half of 2013 saw the release of movies like "The Host" and "Warm Bodies." The dystopian craze has also spread to more adult movies like

Living vicariously through a character who does something we will probably never do is a very attractive prospect. The world is in disarray. In apocalyptic dystopian A pandemic or war or alien entertainment, the attraction invasion has left humanity with a lies in the thought that maybe government that started out as an we should return to a simpler attempt to put together a broken life, and maybe we could society but became survive and be happier a totalitarian body. after a catastrophic event. Out of nothing, a It returns everyone to a hero will rise, an level playing field. outsider no one Like it or loathe it, as long as there are That is why so called expected will lead a scary things in the world, dystopian "reality" shows such as rebellion to put the entertainment is here to stay. "Doomsday Castle" and world to rights. "Doomsday Preppers" This is the exist. We like to think that dystopian storyline, we would be ready, when a recent trend in the reality is that most of entertainment from us would die without our young adult novels to blockbuster "Elysium" and "World War Z." cell phones, let alone without films. While many credit "The running water. Dystopian stories all work Additionally, research has from a basic framework: the Hunger Games" with sparking the dystopian trend, it really only shown that dystopian novels world is a mess, and someone tend to arise as a response to reignited the flames. needs to fix it. The real kickoff was a book times of threat or danger. For Dystopian literature has a long history stemming from classic for young adults by Lois Lowry example, according to this works like George Orwell's called "The Giver," about a boy research by the book sharing, "1984" and Ray Bradbury's living in a colorless, seemingly cataloguing and reviewing GoodReads, fear of perfect society. "The Giver," not site "Fahrenheit 451." Now, many people think of surprisingly, is scheduled to be communism and fascism in the 1930s-60s spawned Bradbury's dystopian literature in the form of adapted into a movie soon. During this frenzy for dystopia, "Fahrenheit 451" and Orwell's books for young adults. The avalanche of dystopian many people wonder what makes "1984." It is possible that today's entertainment certainly began the genre so appealing and there are many reasons. wave of dystopian literature for there with a little book called It's comforting to know young adults is inspired by an "The Hunger Games," written by Suzanne Collins. Selling millions there is something worse out event such as 9/11 or even by the of copies, "The Hunger Games" there, especially in the recent vapid nature of pop culture and trilogy captured the hearts and uncertain economic and political the fear of what that will do to our society. minds of many readers, and atmosphere. Like it or loathe it, as long People like to look at the eventually became a hit film. happens destruction of society and say, as there are scary things in the As always when something does well "this is where we draw the line" world, dystopian entertainment is here to stay. So stock your commercially, studios take notice and "we will never go this far." In contrast to this, everyone underground bunker with water and begin adapting other young also loves to see the people rise up and canned food and settle in for adult novels into movies. A movie version of Veronica and overthrow the government. the long haul.

By RACHEL DIEBEL Guest Writer

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PHOTO COUIITESY OF RDTI'ENToMATOES.COM

A helicopter is overtaken by a swarm of zombies in this summer's release of "World War Z." The film featured a modern twist on the classic dystopian storyline of the zombie apocalypse.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: Upcoming entertainment events are open to all students By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor

It's that time of year again the lazy summer days are gone and have been replaced by the excitement and eventfulness of fall. Not only have classes begun, but so have the concerts, performances and special events welcome to all Pacific Lutheran University students.

"To Be Human" Sept. 11 - Oct. 9, University Gallery Kicking off the year is the gallery opening for the art exhibition "To Be Human." Featuring expressive, realist and abstract images that portray the human figure at work, the University Gallery will be open weekdays from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. for viewing. All pieces in this exhibit are taken from PLU' sown permanent art collection.

Opera Night Saturday, Lagerquist Concert Hall

PHOTO BY KELLI BRELAND

"Kiss me, Kate," which opens Oct. 19, will be one of the first performances held in the newly renovated Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

While art appeals to some, others enjoy music more. Saturday is Opera Night in Lagerquist Concert Hall. Singers from PLU ~ be performing in this traditional exhibition of opera music. Admission is free, and the performance will be from 8-lOp.m.

"Kiss Me, Kate" Oct. 19 - Oct. 20, Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Also taking the stage this fall will be the cast of "Kiss me, Kate," directed by Jeff Clapp, associate professor of theater. This musical theater production was originally produced in 1948. It is a playwithin-a-play in which the actors' on-stage interactions become increasingly complicated by offstage relationships. Go see "Kiss me, Kate" in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 19 from 7:30-9:30 p.m. or on Oct. 20 from 2-4 p.m.

"Night of Musical Theater"

"Candlelight Accoustic PLUtonic and HERmonic ACappella Concert Set" Nov. 6, Northern Pacific Coffee Company Music will also be in the air during "The Candlelight Acoustic Set" at the Northern Pacific Coffee Company on Nov. 6 from 8-10 p.m. This event will be held in honor of the end of UnPLUgged - an electricity saving competition between PLU's residence halls - and the winner will be announced during the evening. Come experience the wonderful atmosphere of this night of music, coffee and sustainability.

"Sin by Silence" Nov. 12, Scandinavian Center

Oct. 25 - 27 Lagerquist Concert Hall If "Kiss me, Kate" just wasn't enough musical theater for you, check out "Night of Musical Theater" from Oct. 25 - 27 at 7:30 p.m. in Lagerquist. This PLU tradition is a student-led collaboration that will feature numbers from a variety of popular musicals. "Night of Musical Theater" is also looking for pit orcherstra players. Email Kameron Jacobs, music director, at jacobskl@plu. edu for more information.

Taking a far more serious tone is the documentary film "Sin by Silence," which will be shown in the Scandinavian Center on Nov. 12 from 7-9 p.m. This film addresses the highly emotional issue of domestic violence through the eyes of women incarcerated for killing abusive husbands. Following the screening will be a discussion led by one of the domestic violence survivors featured in the film.

Nov. 17, Lagerquist Concert Hall While PLUtonic and HERmonic do not yet have -their own feature film, "Pitch Perfect" conveys the main idea. Like the students featured in "Pitch Perfect," these two organizations are PLU's competitive a cappella groups. Their first concert will be on Nov. 17 at 2 p.m. and again at 4 p.m. in Lagerquist. Don't miss out - take a seat and enjoy the remarkable performances put on by these gifted groups.

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THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

SEPT 20. 2013

Miley Cyrus:

'B~eaking

Her provacative "twerking'' performance part of trend

Series enters final half offifth season

Bad'

is a must- see By THOMAS HORN Guest Writer

By HALEIGH MISSILDINE Guest Writer The performance of Miley Cyrus during the Video Music Awards (VMAs) in August left little to the imagination. Cyrus stripped down to a nude-colored latex bikini and danced provocatively throughout her song, twerking and grinding on musician Robin Thicke. Cyms performs in a similar manner in her new music video, "Wrecking Ball," grinding on a wrecking ball and licking a sledgehammer in a seductive manner. These displays have stirred up a lot of controversy arotind Cyrus. Some say she shouldn't be acting this way, especially since she is a former Disney star. Others say people should leave her alone. First-year Ashley Connors said the VMAs try to out-do itself every year, but this time it went too far. "My friend said that this ~as the first year she had to shield her mom from the VMAs," Connors said. First-year Emma Southard said the "performance was not appropriate for the VMAs. Children watch that."

"My friend said that this was the first year she had to shield her mom from the VMAs." Ashley Conners first-year

I can agree with that. However, what we really need to look mto are the reasons why she's performing in such a provocative manner. The real question is whether she would be noticed if she did not act that way. In today's world, one has to stick out among the crowd to be noticed. If this is true, then from a marketing perspective, Cyrus' actions make sense. She wants to continue to make money with her music career, so she has to do something that will make people notice her and talk about her. There is also speculation that Cyrus has gone wild because of her restricted child and teenage years when she had her show on Disney.

During this time, she had to be a role model for children who watched her show. Once she got out of her Disney contract, she began to express herself in a more sexual way, as we saw with the VMAs and her music video. This is another thing we need to think about celebrities are treated so differently from regular people and are put under a lot of stress and scrutiny. Their lives are largely controlled by their record contracts and managers, and sometimes they don't even have a say in what they do. Cyrus should not have to put on a show that looks like it could be in a strip club or be nude in her videos in order to get noticed. I do understand that nudity is not always sexual, but at this point, Cyrus has taken it a step too far. No longer is she being tasteful, and unfortunately, I can no longer see the artistic · appeal of what she's doing. She's crossed the line from artsy to right out raunchy and provocative. What everyone wants to know is why she is presenting herself this way. Perhaps Cyrus should not be blamed for her provocative actions. Instead, we need to think about the situations and experiences that she's had that were out of her control and likely brought her to this point.

P HOTO COURTESY OF STRAITSTIMES.COM

Miley Cyrus raises controversy as she "twerks" on Robin Thicke to Thicke's song "Blurred Lines" during her VMA performance last month.

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Knowinghowtoputan audience on the front edge of their seats is vital in the television industry, and AMC' s "Breaking Bad" certainly knows how. With a brilliant cast that includes Bryan Cranston - who also starred in Fox's "Malcolm in the Middle" - "Breaking Bad" has grown in popularity and is highly addicting. The second half of the fifth season just came on the air, and it came with an mtensity that is growing exponentially The basic plot of "Breaking Bad" centers on the life of Walter White, by Cranston. played Walter has terminal cancer but does not have enough money to pay for his therapy. He is a high school chemistry teacher with a broad knowledge of chemicals. Looking for a means to pay for his treatment, he decides to start cooking crystal methamphetamine. One of Walter's old chemistry students, Jesse Pinkman - portrayed by Aaron Paul - is known for cooking crystal meth. So Walter and Jesse form a partnership in the drug business. After a while, Walter realizes that he has more than enough money to treat his cancer, and Jesse and Walter soon have so much money they do not know what to do with it. At this point in the show, things start to get serious. People are killed due to bad drug deals, and Walter and Jesse begin to cross moral boundaries

PHOTO BY COURTESY OF WWW.AMCTV.COM

"Breaking Bad" lead character Walter White is a cancer pallenl turned drug dealer. Here he poses with stacks of cash he gained through sales of crystal methamphetamine.

that the typical person would not. Walter starts to break his good side and becomes competitive at almost any cost. "Breaking Bad" rarely has a dull point and twists and turns happen throughout all five seasons. The tension rises and never stops. For example, at first it seems the heart attack of Walter's brother-inlaw H ank Schrader - a DEA agent portrayed by Dean Norris - is random. Later it is revealed that Hank's suspicion of Walter cooking meth was what triggered the heart attack. One of the greatest properties of "Breaking Bad" is that the opening scene in every single episode is always unique and something strange normally occurs. At first, the opening scene does not make a lot

of sense, but as the episode continues, parts of the show clarify the opening. Another thing that separates this show from others is the different camera angles that are portrayed in each episode. Sometimes GoPro cameras are used, which give a certain style of artistry to the show, while in more intense situations, the camera sometimes shifts r apidly. This makes it hard to follow everything, but it makes viewers feel as if they are actually in the show. With the well-known cast of Cranston, Paul and many more, "Breaking Bad" has something to show and is not for the standard viewer. This show defines intensity I guarantee you won't be disappointed.

New exhibit explores what it means 'To Be Human' definition of human beings in a variet)r of ways and to find common ground in society's shared experiences. One series of woodcuts features The first art exhibit of the school year abstract representations of part-divine, opened Sept. 11 in the University Gallery in Aida Ingram Hall. "To Be Human," part-human Hercules next to portraits of according to the description provided Native Americans. The exhibit also featured artist selfin the gallery, seeks to examine the portraits, letter prints, and a three-dimensional piece. All the pieces came from the university's permanent art collection. "I think it's cool how the human condition can be represented with so many different mediums in so many ways," senior Sam Hosman, a graphic design major, said. "It shows how different we are, but how we're all also the same." The exhibit' s description description :-mounted on the gallery wall-said, "from the mythic to the very real, from the individual to the group - each work PHOTO BY LEAB THA.XEL in this exhibition offers an Senior Lili fischer looks at a piece titled "Captive" by Keith opportunity to stop and Achepohl. The exhibit "To Be Human" opened Sept. 11 in contemplate what it is that the University Gallery in Ingram Hall. makes us human."

By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 20, 2013

A&E7

Concert is a failed affair AWkward mix of rave and country culture clash at state fair By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor The state fair usually brings cotton candy, carnival rides and country music to mind, but apparently furry boots and fishnet tights are joining the ranks, at least judging by the concert set at this year's Washington State Fair. The Puyallup Fair isn't just sporting a new name - it's sporting a new lineup as well. United States of Consciousness, event organizers who specialize in electronic dance music (EDM), brought the EDM concert Digital Affair to the Washington State Fair this year, giving traditional fairgoers a taste of the rave subculture. Big names like Chuckie and Excision headlined. Going to the fair this year was an odd mixture of familiar activities and new twists. For one, I was going with friends - not my family - and for another, I was on my own budget, which severely limited the amount of deep-fried foods I ate and the number of rides I went on. The familiar funnel cakes, elephant ears and roasted corn on the cob were there, but the prices were new - probably jacked up to fund the renovation of the fair grounds. Most of the rides were the same as ever, but gone were the days of the $7 unlimited ride bracelets $30 ride bracelets that are only valid midweek are the new norm

- or paying $3.50-6 per ride. My excitement at the newly renovated wooden rollercoaster and the newly built inversion coaster was deterred by the $10 price tag on each as well. I quickly grew bored of touring the hobby hall, which seemed to contain more salespeople marketing their "as seen on TV" wares than actual hobbyists anymore, and headed over to the event I'd been waiting for: the Digital Affair concert. I entered the gates to the grand stand and left the world of family fun and farm animals behind. Gone were the overweight adults and tiny children. I was suddenly surrounded almost entirely by people my own age, late teen and early twentysomething-year-olds. The crowd was not as big as I had expected it to be, perhaps due to the $55 price tag - the most expensive concert at the fair this year save for Carrie Underwood. The fair organizers would have been better off reserving the stage for another country artist. United States of Consciousness should have known better than to put on a show so soon after Freak Night tickets went on sale. Most Washington ravers had probably already blown their money for the two-day Halloween festival, leaving them with few resources and little desire to dish out more cash for a sure to be less impressive show. The concert-goers seemed uncertain of how to dress for this

PHOTO COURl'ESY OF KYLE GRIFFITH

An eager crowd gathers around the Washington State Fair stage last weekend to await the concert, Digital Affair.

cross-cultural event. A couple of girls were in full-out go-go gear, complete with microscopic booty shorts, push-up bras, animal hats and furry boots. I can only imagine the looks they must have gotten walking around the fairgrounds dressed like that. Most people aimed for more subtle tributes to rave culture, like beaded bracelets and colorful bandanas. The show itself was excellent. I wasn't around for the opening DJs, but I spent a solid three

hours dancing non-stop as the M Machine, Chuckie and Excision laid down beats. Smoke machines, lights and huge screens with abstract designs made for an almost club-like atmosphere. People actually screamed with anticipation as Excision came on, and I found myself making a giant 'X' in the air with my crossed wrists at the end of his set along with everyone around me. Still, the show would have been better with more people and at a more club-like venue. While

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I enjoyed the music and show itself, having an EDM show at a country fair was just a strange juxtaposition, and I'm not sure it was entirely successful. Cowboys stuck to their country music and rodeos, and even the draw of big names like Chuckie and Excision wasn't enough to coax a large number of ravers down to the fair. the Maybe next time Washington State Fair will think twice before clashing cultures like that.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

SEPT. 20 2013

Intro to the school of business There are careers in finance in every sector ranging from government to private wealth management, it is only a matter of narrowing down your options. The concentration requires 20 credits in the selected electives.

By BJORN SLATER Business Editor For many of us, the first week back to class was like getting back on the bike. For others, it was a brand new experience. The first semester of college can be a great time to explore your opportunities, and the school of business at Pacific Lutheran University offers plenty. In order to declare a business major, you must first complete eight foundation courses. These courses give you the basic skills you will need to succeed in the upper level classes. Once you have completed the prerequisites and been accepted into the school of business, it's time to enroll in some 300 level classes and potentially start thinking about a concentration. At PLU, we have five concentration options: accounting, finance, management and human resources, marketing or individualized.

3. Management and Human Resources The management and human resources concentration is aptly named in that it prepares students for beginning management positions and teaches them how to deal with the humans within an organization. In your first upper division human resources class, you learn about many different scenarios, psychological phenomena, ethics and general types of people that you may have to deal with in any given organization. Further classes narrow the study to specific organizations or how to deal with people in a global context. Management and human resources not only gives students the tools they need to lead and manage a group of people, it also conditions them to be strong communicators who make ethical decisions and understand any kind of person you might work with. The management and human resources concentration requires 16 credits in selected electives.

1. Accounting Accounting, or as my high school accounting teacher taught us, "the language of business," is centered on creating financial records for organizations. The skills learned from accounting can also be applied to bookkeeping and auditing while providing an in-depth understanding of a company, a necessity if you plan to manage one. A concentration within the school of business at PLU requires you to take a specialized set of electives that focus entirely on your chosen concentration. An accounting concentration requires 24 credits in the selected courses on top of the BBA core classes required of all business majors.

4. Marketing Marketing can be a controversial subject, but at its most basic level, it is about fulfilling the needs of the customer. Whether the customer realizes they have a need for a product or service is up to the marketing team. People can also be marketed and branded, as we have seen from the Michael Jordan line of clothing produced by Nike. Jobs range from advertising to public relations to online marketing and everywhere in between. At PLU, there is a special focus on ethical marketing, since ads come out all the time that breed controversy because they promote stereotypes or target an inappropriate audience for the product. The concentration requires 16 credits in the selected electives.

2. Finance The finance concentration studies the relationships between resource allocation, time, value and risk. It also brings to light the differences between how these relationships vary or change whether dealing with them on a corporate or personal level. At the personal level, finance deals more with investments, while in corporate finance, the bigger issues are asset and resource allocation. Financial professionals are not only well-compensated in the workplace today, they are sought after and respected for the value they add to any organization.

PHOTO BY LAILA CASPERSEN-ANDRESEN

Students shown on the second floor of the Morken Center for Learning and Technology, home of the School ofBusinessand second home to Business, Math and Computer Science majors.

to have the approval of the dean of the school of business. I came to PLU knowing that I wanted to go into the school of business and thought that I wanted to go into ac'-ounting for sure. Two semesters and one finance course later, I had changed my mind and decided to go for the finance concentration. There is no need to know exactly what you want to do or study right away, not even after a year of college. But if you think you do know what you want to do, I recommend keeping an open mind. You might just find another field of study suits you better. For first-years, I can only say that now is the time to do some exploring and see just what kind of scholar you want to be.

5. Individualized If you want to go into business, but do not think any of the concentrations are for you, there is an option to create your own concentration with the help of a faculty member. You have to choose 16 credits in upper level business electives that relate to each other in some purposeful way. Students wishing to follow this path need to create a proposal that is endorsed by a faculty member and need

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Days since first transaction July 17, 2010 By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Currency is ever-changing, and whether that change be in price or printed appearance, most industrialized nations use some form of paper currency. There is a new player in the game, however. The concept of bitcoins was posted on the Internet by a pseudonymous developer known as "Satoshi Nakamoto" in 2008. Bitcoin is tied directly to the Internet and is the world's first free market decentralized global currency. 路 Bitcoins come into existence seemingly out of thin air, but the real answer is slightly more complex. Anybody can have a computer run the open-source mining system that races every other computer on the mining network to decipher a 64-byte

number. When your computer gets the 64byte string correct before anyone else you are awarded 25 bitcoins and a new block is created. There have been comparisons between bitcoin mining and winning the lottery, but in reality, you are millions of times more likely to win the lottery than find bitcoins. People who have their computers constantly mining for bitcoins are willing to invest a substantial amount of capital into hardware upgrades because the faster your computer can "mine" the more likely you are to beat out competitors on the network. Some have also compared bitcoins and gold because of the way bitcoins are limited in production. The servers that host the bitcoin miners

communicate over the Internet and confirm each transaction by adding it to a ledger, which is updated and archived periodically. Another key component of each ledger update, aside from archiving transactions is that it creates some freshly minted bitcoins. Every four years, the number of bitcoins produced at each update is cut in half, until the year 2140 when this value will round down to zero. There will be a total of 21 million bitcoins in circulation, and production will be- completely cut off, like exhausting a virtual supply of gold ore. Some would go further. Tyler Winklevoss, one half of the famous duo known best for their role in the creation of Facebook, . claims that bitcoins could actually be a better long-term investment

than gold. The difference being that bitcoins are simply easier to store since storage is 100 percent virtual. Tyler Winklevoss and his brother, Cameron Winklevoss, presented at the Value Investing Conference in New York on Tuesday. Three months earlier, they filed paperwork for a bitcoin ExchangeTraded Fund (ETF) that would allow the virtual currency to be traded as easily other commodities such as gold ETFs. The most notable early transaction using bitcoins was a pizza for 10,000 bitcoins. Today the online currency trades for $140, making that a $1.4 million pizza. Whether you want to use bitcoins to buy pizza or whatever else on the free market, there's no denying that it is a viable and valuable commodity with incredible potential.


SEPT. 20, 2013

THE MOORING MAST

BUSINESS 9

Summer at The News Tribune By SAM HORN Sports Editor There is so muchtotell.From interviewing Seahawks' quarterback Russell Wilson to having lunch with Seattle Times' sports columnists Larry Stone and Jerry Brewer, I don't know where to start. To say that my internship at the The News Tribune was amazing would be an understatement. I am so blessed to have had the opportunity to gain professional journalistic experience at this fine newspaper organization. I have been enthused about writing for my entire life. Ever since I could write in second grade, I have followed my passion for writing. What started out as short novels about mythical lands soon turned into articles about sport figures by the time I reached high school. The love of writing has been in my

blood for a while, and I am so glad I was able to expand my journalistic knowledge by interning at The News Tribune. My main responsibilities at The News Tribune consisted of covering multiple Tacoma Rainiers games and one or two Seattle Mariners games. In late August, I covered a Tacoma Rainiers game where leftfielder Carlos Peguero smashed a walk-off grand slam to win a nail-biting game. Peguero hit the grand slam with two outs left. Afterward, I interviewed Peguero, and he was speechless. It was awesome to see one player be so happy. In covering the Mariners' games, I had the incredible opportunity to sit in the press box. One of the benefits of sitting in the press box with other reporters was that we were the recipients of free food at the buffet stand. It felt good to be a reporter. I could get used to this lifestyle. I also had the opportunity to cover a week-long tennis tournament held in Tacoma. Witnessing a player who was ranked in the top 1,000 in the world was eye-opening. I had no idea that people could be that good at tennis. It is one thing to watch

e .COID them on television, but it's a lot different watching them in person. While the internship was mostly a good experience, there was one aspect that wasn't too great. That was the commute. Living in Enumclaw over the summer, I had to travel to Tacoma and Seattle almost everyday. Yes, I know, that's a lot of gas. Fortunately, I was reimbursed so I didn't have to worry about being a poor college student. Looking back on this internship, I cannot believe that I had the honor of

being the sports intern at The News Tribune. It was a surreal experience. Being able to work in a professional newspaper setting in the future would be a dream. I have the mindset and the determination to become the best writer I can be. Even though my writing hasn't been fully polished, I have the desire to learn more. By interning at The News Tribune, I was able to refine my writing abilities. This internship experience helped me realize how to reach my full potential.


THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

SEPT. 20 2013

Wanderlust Editor reflects on navigating new culture By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor When you travel to a foreign country, at first you don't know anything. You don't know who the local sports teams are. You might not even know what sports are popular. You do not know the differences between the political parties, or even how many there are. You don't even know whether to say "sorry" or "excuse me" when you bump into someone. It's confusing, it's embarrassing, and I want you to embrace it. I was at dinner the other night with some friends, including an international student, talking about President Obama's speech on Syria and how cool it was that King 5 came to PLU to interview some students, when the international student asked what King 5 was. Which got me thinking. When I went to Germany, I didn't know any of the local news stations either. I didn't know which ones were right or left leaning, or who the president was. I didn't even know Germany doesn't have a president- they have a chancellor. And you can't know either. These things, these little things, that make up the cultural fabric and background and history of a place are so different all over the world, and there are just so many of them, you can't possibly know them all. It's too much. All you can do is spend time in that place and try to pick up on as many of them as you can. This past summer I did an internship at a major German newspaper in Berlin. My internship coincided with the start of the campaign season for their upcoming September election, which the organization did ongoing coverage of. I did tons of research on the various political parties. I learned about the big ones and the little ones, the startups and the giants, the radicals and the moderates. I asked people them opinions. I felt very smart - an expert in world politics. After my internship ended, I visited a friend in England for a week. Suddenly I was an ignorant American again. I didn't speak the language, or at least I was immediately recognizable by my accent, and I didn't know anythinÂŁ about anything. I had spent so much time focitlffiig on German politics that I hadn't brushed up on Britain's at all. Sure, I'd heard about William and Kate's baby boy in the news - who hadn't? But my friend had to explain to me what the difference between the Queen and the

Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jessica 'lrondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER Winston Alder mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR Alison Haywood A&EEDITOR Kelli Breland BUSINESS EDITOR Bjorn Slater OPINION EDITOR Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR Sam Horn SENIOR COPY EDITOR Keis Mejlaender ONLINE EDITOR Leah'Iraxel

MAST TV PHOTO COURTESY OF ALISON HAYWOOD

News Editor Alison Haywood poses in front of statues at the Perpmon Mqseum in Berlin. Germany.

Queen Mother was, and who all the royals were, and where they fell in line for the throne and why everyone hates Prince Charles. When I got back to my hometown after three months of being abroad, I was relieved to finally be somewhere

where ~WÂĽ safe.tfamiliaT Guess again ..... I had mISsed a huge news story on a sexual abuse scartdal that had rocked my community of 11,000 to its core. Once again, I was out of the loop, struggling to~ up~ BUl wl\fie being llie one who aoesn't know anythlng is embarrassing, it's this confusion that allows room for new knowledge. Don't be afraid to go new places and ask the dumb questions. In the long run, you11 wind up expanding your knowledge - it just doesn't feel that way at first.

Pfease recycle your copy of /

THE MOORING MAST

The Mooring Mast

GENERAL MANAGER Storm Gerlock NEWS @NINE PRODUCER Allison Reynolds ADVISERS ClifTRowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information._ to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Sustainability says hello By CHRISTINE COOLEY Sustainability Manager I am delighted to see The Mooring Mast plans on running a weekly sustainability column this year. I'd like to help explain what sustainability is exactly, and what it means to Pacific Lutheran University. Sustainability is the ultimate form of efficiency, a self-renewing system that can nurture and support the environment, the people within that environment and the economic structure built from it. about Sustainability is evolving the concept of success to include the well being of the people and environmentinvolved in generating prosperity. The mantra for this has

become prosperity."

"people,

planet,

These areas

are

equal to and dependent on each other. They form a triad where having achievements in any area without addressing the others does not constitute success. Sustainability is not about high-minded rhetoric. It's a pragmatic tool for getting the most out of ourselves and our environment in a way that will last indefinitely. The reason for viewing our endeavors through this lens is that it better represents reality. Without prosperity and wealth in a society, there is little ability to improve quality of life. In turn, a kind and healthy society can create a stronger, fairer economy, and a diverse and rich natural environment forms the foundation for a healthy society. PLU has done a fantastic job incorporating this concept into its culture and has become

a national leader in the sustainability movement. Our vice president of finances and operations is one of the cofounders of theAssociationfor the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. Former President Loren Anderson was an original signer of the American College and University Presidents Oimate Commitment (ACUPCC), a pact among college presidents to attain carbon neutrality as well as to begin incorporating sustainability into the curriculum. Upon becoming our university's president, Thomas Krise reaffirmed this commitment with added enthusiasm. The hard work of faculty and staff across the university has made PLU the first in the nation to be Sustainable Tracking Assessment and Rating System (STARS) accredited. PLU has also

been one of the few to attain a gold rating. Universities are the ideal place to experiment and develop these concepts. The world looks to them for their innovation and wealth of perspectives when it comes to problem solving. PLU's Sustainability Office provides resources and support that will strengthen the environment and community. We provide the Bike Co-op, the SurPLUs store, habitat restoration, recycling and programs like unPLUgged. These help bring us closer to the goal of being a carbon neutral and zero waste university that others can use as a model. The Sustainability Office cannot make PLU sustainable though. That's for the members of PLU's community to do. It's l:he adions of all of the Lutes together that will achieve that

goal. So please, be involved on some level. Whether it's as simple as recycling your waste and drinking from a reusable mug, or as intensive as a habitat restoration work party, be a part of what makes PLU great. Use this column as inspiration and choose to do something to improve Pacific Lutheran University now and preserve it for the future.

Jibr 111.0ll information on PLU ~.

lih 11.1 on Facebook httpa:/Aoiow~eoml

PWSustainability

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THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 20 2013

OPINION 11

:Easy textbook transition at Garfield Book Company·· BySH~ON

MCCLAIN Guest lVriter ff you have visited the Garfield Book Company ·this year, you have probably noticed some· changes. Most notably you are no longer picking your own textbooks ofHhe shelves. The process for buying textbooks has been simplified. Instead of trolling through the stacks of textbooks on the shelves, looking for your dass and then. trying to figure. out what section you are in, now you just follow the steps. Three banners proclaim the steps within the process to aid students in the transition. First, you go up to the secondfloor <:ounter, look up your class schedule and give it to the sales associate. Next, an expert l:>-Ookstore employee will easily locate your textbook while y6u wait. Finally, you pick.up your bQoks and ean pay right thete at the counter. For those who like the tjtange, myself included, the new setup proves to be more streanilined and user--friendly thCUl it was before. A worker who has experience with the textbook

the GBcfs decision the accessil:>ility 9f textbooks, One I\Ull-Or is that students were going into tl't~ bookstore each week for their reading assignments and were able to have access to textbooks withoutpaying for them. While Amanda Hawkin$, store manager, said this rt.UnO:r behind

t9 r~trict

does have some. truth to ·it, the piain :reas.Qn for the change i§ theft,

':{he(!; is always a. ptobltmi for bookstores and,. in the CBC' s case, not necessarily from Pacific Lutheran U:nive:l'sity Students. There are theft rings that travel to each college bookstore in the area to steal textbooks.

There is a. big market for buying and. selling textbook§ online, and this facilitates theft. Jt is becoming a problem

fo:r bookstores like GBC and many colleg~ in Washington ha*e tnade the switch to What Hawkins calls "counter servke.I' There are those who don't like the change. They find that

students. Sotnething had to change

about the way the textbooks

$Jste.tn now find$ your boo.l<s for

were •l>ituated .in the. c~, an.it the bodkstore chose to change fa.,

you. lt enllu:res that you get the correct books. I have heard. some. rumors tjrculatirtg abqµt the rea1>0ns

someone el$e searching for your book$ make$ the wait too long,. and that the:i:e Js a lot of confusion over whi<;h. emFloyee is helping you. Al$o, if you are. the nitpick.y type, which I mµst admit that I am, you may not li.l<e that you don't get to piek out the best used copy of the textbook. However, if you don't like the copy of the textbook picked out by the employee, you c-0uld request a -different copy. All in all, I do support the GBC s decision. The bookstore gets a lot of flak from students on decisions it must make as a business. Theft means the bookstore loses potential profits, and when students read the store's textbooks .it creases the binding,. so it can no longer be sold in new condition, decreasing its product value. The CBC works hard to balance the needs of the students it serves with its responsibility as a business.. It has worked to reduce book costs l:>y more tha11 $130,000 this year~ which I ani. in fay6r of; because that. means lower textbook prices foi

PIJQ'f(l BYA,$HW(~

"$end e.smile. spe<!i,alist" Cm11ti.1ey Va~ 11>icl11 fe.llbw l!t\phomoJ'lloKelU-Brcli!"dJnl<>otdgg up h¢tclas'se!i IWth,e tmrtbook coonter.in the~ ld Ba<>k CQmpi:u;r•

a way thatwotUdbe1 potentiall)l>·· more hfmefictal·fot smd.ents.

Take advantage of study away opportunities at college By ASHLEY GILL Opinion Editor Before I decided was going to commit to Pacific Lutheran University, I attended one of the open days for perspective students to explore campus and learn about the school. My mom and I spent the day hearing about how great PLU's academics are, how small the class sizes are and how much financial aid is available for students. One thing that stood out for me was hearing about the Wang Center and how many study away opportunities are possible. As images of culture-rich villages, bustling cities and amazing landscapes ran

across the projector screen, I had fantasies of myself traveling the world during college. When I thought it could not get any better, they said the word - Antarctica. My jaw metaphorically dropped. I could not believe that if I wished, I could take a class surrounded by glaciers, whales and penguins. Studying in Antarctica is definitely a once in a lifetime opportunity, .as is any study away trip. As we continue on with our lives after graduation, we will be transitioning into new careers, starting families and facing endless financial commitments that put the possibility of travel on the backburner. The luxury of traveling is also not always available to everyone at retirement either. One thing that I think holds students back the most is the cost of studying away. Trips can range anywhere from hundreds to many thousands of dollars per trip. This can make almost anyone think twice about spending money earned from summer jobs, asking parents for the money

For more information visit the Wang Center website at http://www.plu.edu/studyaway/home. php +

or most of all, more student loans. It comes down to the students, how intense their desire to travel is and how willing they are to make a financial sacrifice for something they may never be able to do again. Prioritizing a travel and academic experience over more student loan payments can be extremely difficult. Also finding the time during the year and room in school schedules can prove to be a struggle. A great thing about PLU is it makes it easy to study away. Advisers try their best to work a desired program into a schedule and match it with required courses. The Wang Center has scholarships available to help ease the financial stresses on students. Studying away during the semester can occasionally be cheaper than staying on campus for classes. PLU financial aid can sometimes transfer with semester programs also. PLU is supportive of students studying away and forms J-term and semester programs yearly. The opportunity is handed to students if they choose to reach out and grab it. Having the stresses of travel plans already figured out is a huge benefit PLU provides to those wishing to study away. I still reflect on the opening day presentation of the Wang Center as one of the many primary reasons I decided to attend PLU. · I thought to myself when I made the decision to study away for this J-term that I would never forgive myself If I looked back at this point in my life and regretted not traveling when I had the chance. We are young and the time for us to

take advantage of these life experiences is now. 111 be going to Rome this J-term. This course not only is relevant to my major in social work but it also covers my Christian religion general education requirement. The fact that it is taking place in a beautiful and historical city in a country I have dreamed of visiting is the cherry on top.


12 STUDY BREAK

THE MOORING MAST

EET

SEPT. 20 2013

EDIA

JESSICA TRONDSEN

STORM GERLOCK

LEAHTRAXEL

Editor-in-Chief

Mast TV General Manager

Online Editor

Jessica is a senior and a double major in communication journalism and English nonfiction with a minor in womens and gender studies. She has worked at The Mast since her first year at PLU.

WINSTON ALDER

Business d Ads Manager Winston is a finance and economics student. In addition to The Mast, he is an intern at Russell Investments and a member of the student investment fund.

ALISON HAYWOOD

News Editor Alison is a senior at PLU majoring in journalism and German with a minor in music. She has been involved in student media since her first year at PJ.,U and is a German tutor this year in Academic Assistance.

Storm is a senior majoring in communication with an emphasis in journalism and minoring in literature. This is her second year as Mast Student Television General Manager.

Leah is a communication major with an emphasis in journalism and minors in computer science and math. This is her first year with The Mast, but last year she worked for The News Tribune.

KELS MEJLAENDER

ALLIE REYNOLDS

Senior Copy Editor

News @Nine Producer

Kels is a senior and a double major in English Allie is a junior majoring in communication with and history. She also works as a history tutor for a concentration in journalism and a minor in Academic Assistance and for PLU Archives. womens and gender studies. She also provides content for Mast Media's website.

KELLI BRELAND

SAM HORN

AdEEditor

Sports Editor

Kelli is a sophomore majoring in business and minoring in communication. She is part of the international honors program and has a strong intrest in journalism and writing.

Sam is a junior and a communication major with an emphasis in journalism. He is minoring in sports managment and recreation. Go Lutes!

;h

).'

POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Apply online at

http://www.pluiedu/ BJORN SLATER

Business Editor Bjorn is a junior and a finance major. He is a co-captain of the ultimate frisbee team.

ASHLEY GILL

Opinion Editor Ashley is a junior and a social work major with a minor in sociology. She also enjoys video editing for News@ Nine.

career-connections/ -t


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 20 2013

13 SPORTS

SPORTS SCOREBOARD Football TEAM

WINS

LOSSES CONFERENCE STREAK

Men's Soccer

Women's Soccer

Volleyball

TEAM

WINS

TEAM

TEAM

PLU

5

Pacific

2

0

Whitworth

2

0

0-0

Won2

Pacific

5

Willamette

2

0

0-0

Won2

Willamette

4

Linfield

3

Whitworth

2

Won2

0-0

Linfield

0

0-0

Wonl

PLU

0

0-0

Wonl

UPS

0

Lewis & Clark

0

2

0-0

Lost 1

0-0

Lost2

UPS

PLU's UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 21 vs. Redlands, 12:30 p.m.

0

0-0

Tied 1

0-0 0-0

Lost 1

2

0

WINS

Whitman

Wonl

0-0 0-0

George Fox Whitman

LOSSES CONFERENCE STREAK

Lost 1 Wonl

LOSSES CONFERENCE STREAK

Whirn:onh

4

UPS

2

2

Lost 1

George Fox

5

3

0-0

Wonl

Wonl

Linfield

4

3

0-0

Lost2

0-0

Tied 1

UPS

5

4

0-0

Lost 1

4

PLU

2

2

0-0

Tied 1

PLU

4

0-0

Won2

Linfield

4

0 0

0-0

Won4

Whitworth

6

6

0-0

Won3

4

5

0-0

Lost 3

5

0-0

Wonl

10

0-0

Lost 5

6

0-0

Wonl

3

0-0

Wonl

5

0-0

Lost4

LewU&Cluk

3

4

0-0

Lost4

George Fox

2

2

Willamette

2

3

3

Pacific

PLU's OPCOMING GAME: Sept. 21 at George Fox, 2:30 p. m.

LOSSES CONFERENCE STREAK

1-1

1-1

5

WINS

0-0

Won3

Willamette

0-0

Wonl

Lewis & Clark

0-0 0-0

Lost 1 Lost 3

Whitman

PLU's UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 21 at Pacific, noon

Pacific

2

PLU'S UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 20 vs. Pacific, 7p. m. Statistics found at http://www.nwcsports.com/landing/index.

SPORTS

TALK Who is your favorite player to watch in the NFL right now and why?

路 Chris Porter, junior

Chase Luplow, junior

Tom Brady, since he is calm and collected in crunch time.

Peyton Manning, because he can score on any play.

Chase Lameroux, junior Greg Zuerlin, because he has the biggest boot in the league.

Caitlin Karr, sophomore Russell Wilson, because he is a leader on the field.

FALL SPORTS PICK 'EM STARTS UP AGAIN Monday Night Football: Denver Broncos vs. Oakland Raiders By SAM HORN Sports Editor It might be three weeks into the NFL season, but it's never too late to People start 路 predictions. nationwide are starting up fantasy football leagues this week - ridiculousness. At Pacific Lutheran University, the sports pick 'em has been an annual tradition since, well, last year. Nevertheless, it's going to be a long-standing tradition. Hopefully. This year, seven PLU students have bravely stepped forward to participate in the Fall Sports Pick 'Em. It's a daunting dask, I know. Every week, these students pick who they think will win each week. For instance, this week Fall Sports Pick 'Em is kicking off with a Monday Night Football game involving the Denver Broncos and the Oakland Raiders. Unsurprisingly, every student is favoring the Broncos in next week's matchup. Each student involved in the Fall Sports Pick 'Em come from a different background. Kara Sherman is a guard for the women's basketball She averaged 8.3 team. points a game last year as a sophomore. Kyle Peart, a senior, throws the shotput and discus for PL U. If he is handed an object, he11 throw it a long way.

Junior Dalton Ritchey has been the starting quarterback of the Lutes' football team for two years and counting. That's something to put on your resume. Drew Oord, a sophomore, is an infielder on the baseball team. Watch out for Oord when the World Series rolls around. He11 probably pick the correct team to win it all. Junior Valery Jorgensen not only played on the women's tennis team, but she is also a journalism major. Smart choice. Andre Tacuyan, otherwise known as the "human torpedo" swims for PLU. Too bad there aren't any swim meets to pick in Fall Sports Pick 'Em. Sorry, Andre. The seventh 路and final contestant in the Fall Sports Pick 'Em doesn't play a varsity sport for PLU, but he does enjoy his hockey. I am talking about sophomore Max Totaro. Just to warn you, don't say bad things about the Chicago Blackhawks around this man. He will not take it kindly. It will be tough to go undefeated this season, but the Fall Sports Pick 'Em contestants know their sports inside and out, so it could happen. At the end of it all, the winner will receive a certificate and maybe even a hug. To all the contestants of the Fall Sports Pick 'Em, good luck.

路SHERMAN

JORGENSEN

PEART

TACUYAN

Valery Jorgensen pick~ Denver

RITCHEY

Andre Tacuyan ;Pick: Denver TOTARO

Max Totaro OORD

Mug shots taken from GoLutes.com. Totaro's mug shot taken from Facebook.


THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SEPT. 20 2013

Volleyball garners fourth win of the young season Lutes rebound after losing the first set of the match By NICK BARENE

Guest Writer The

Lutes'

volleyball team wasn't rattled after dropping the first set in their match against ConcordiaMoorehead on Saturday. They just went on to win the second and third set, winning 3-2 in their final non-conference tune up. In the opening set, the two sides battled back and forth before the visiting Cobbers gained a sevenpoint lead. The Lutes would battle back •o come within two points of the Cobbers but eventually lost the set, 25-20. The Lutes came out swinging in the second set, leading by as many as 15 points en route to a 25-11 set victory. In the third set, the two teams played another tight game until the Lutes pulled away for a 25-18 win. The Lutes held a 21-18 lead in the fourth frame, but the Cobbers would storm back with an unanswered four to win the set, 25-22. In the fifth and final set, the Lutes cruised to a 15-8 victory after jumping

out to a 5-0 lead. Sophomore Lucy Capron led the Lutes with 14 kills. Samantha North, junior, complemented Capron's eventful night with 44 assists. Amber Junior Aguiar tallied 25 digs and Amy Wooten, also a junior, added seven blocks to the Lutes' winning effort. Head coach Kevin Aoki said he was proud of the way his team handled the shifting momentum of the game. "It's just a matter of making adjustments," Aoki said. "It's a continued effort to get the momentum back on your side." Aoki also praised his team for keeping cool heads during the final set. "You have to stay aggressive and keep swinging and keep playing the way you always play," Aoki said. The Lutes are now ranked 17th in the nation with a 4-4 overall record that includes a sweep of No. 3 ranked Wittenburg. The team will open conference play against Pacific on Friday.

TOP: Amber Aguiar, jwrior, (6) and her teammates huddle together aCter scoring 11 point ag11inst Concordia-Moorhead. BOTTOM LEFT: Jwrior Amy Wooten, junior, pounds the ball pllSt an opponent. BOTTOM RIGHT: AUison Wood, senior, pokes the volleyball over the net.

PHOTOS BY THOMAS SOERENES

Lutes kick off football season with a victory By STEVEN MCGRAIN

Guest Writer With one game under their belts in the 2013 season, the Lutes' football team is living up to their preseason hype after winning 3124 against California Lutheran on Saturday. the season, Going into D3football.com ranked them 13th in the nation. The Lutes shook some offseason rust from their plays in the first quarter, and by the second, the offensive rhythm came alive. The longest scoring drive by the Lutes was a 14-play, 76-yard scoring drive. The first touchdown of the year for the Lµtes was a sevenyard run by quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior. The seasoned veteran at the helm of the offense finished the road victory with 198 yards and four total touchdowns. Ritchey completed 13 of his 26 pass attempts. "We are a very confident team," running back Brandon James, a

senior, said."The rankings never matter because we know we are a good team that can go as far as we take ourselves. We can play with anyone, and we know that." The connection between Ritchey and his highly soughtafter wide receiver Kyle Warner, a junior, did not miss a beat from their big plays a season ago. Their trust in one another has been apparent ever since Ritchey got the nod after a quarterback competition last fall. "My relationship with Dalton started when we played together in the high school all-state game in 2011," Warner said. "We were also roommates in the week leading up to the game. Now, we're roommates here at PLU and have become good friends." Whenever the offense needed a big play, the ball always seemed to fall into the sure-handed Warner, who ended the game with six catches for 125 yards. His most notable reception was a 66-yard touchdown catch and run from Ritchey in the third quarter.

The Lutes' defense was not shy about making clutch plays throughout the game. After place-kicker Nick Kaylor, a senior, made a field goal to give Pacific Lutheran a 10-7 lead going into halftime, the Lutes received the second half kickoff. The kickoff didn't go as planned, as they fumbled the ball and had it recovered by California Lutheran at PLU's 19-yard line. The Kingsmen looked to capitalize on the Lutes' costly error, but linebacker Jordan Patterson, a senior, had different plans. Patterson intercepted the ball at the PLU 7-yard line and returned it to the PLU 33-yard line. Patterson finished the game with five and a half tackles. California Lutheran, after giving a 24-14 lead to PLU, did not stop fighting. The Kingsmen tied the game 24-24 after a successful fourth quarter field goal. In response, the Lutes put together a 10-play scoring drive, with Ritchey finding junior tight end Lucas Sontra at the one-yard line.

"We are a very confident team. The rankings never matter because we know we are a good team that can go as far as we take ourselves. We can play with anyone, and we know that." BRANDON JAMES running back, senior

While Sontra didn't score on the first try, the Lutes were able to score on the second try to go ahead 31-24. They were able to hold onto their lead for the rest of the game. The Lutes continued their big plays on defense courtesy of outside linebacker Joel Anthony, a junior. Anthony finished the game with four tackles, compiling two sacks as well. One of Anthony's sacks came on third down in the pivotal fourth quarter, forcing the Kingsmen to punt. After a three-and-out for the Lutes, CLU got a second chance to tie the score late in the fourth CLU's quarterback, quarter. Cameron Deen, completed a pass to one of his wide receivers for a 4-yard gain, but that was all the damage their offense could muster. Deen's next pass would fall incomplete, and in the next play, linebacker Kyle Bennett, a sophomore, sacked the Kingsmen quarterback. After all of their effort, all California Lutheran could do was watch the clock tick down to zero, giving PLU their first win of 2013. With that victory, Pacific Lutheran moved up in the national rankings. The Lutes now stand at No. 11 in the country. The Lutes' high-powered offense and resilient defense welcomes Redlands to Sparks Stadium this Saturday. Game

GAME STATISTICS:

TOTAL OFFENSi Lutes- 428 , Kingsmen- 345 RUSHING YARDS

Lutes-'234 Kingsmen- 205 PASSING YUDS Lutes-194 l\ingsmen- 140 TOTAL PLAYS

Lutes-62 Kingsmen- 65 3RD DOWN CONVERSJ()NS

Lutes- 4/11 (36%} Kingsmen· 8/J.5 (53%) SACKS Luf.es.· 8 Kingsmen-1 Game mis from http;/lgofuteg.rom/ spmWfoa1//2013·14~wne.

htm

time is 12:30 p.m.

+


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 20 2013

SPORTS 15

Confident men's soccer team prepares for upcoming schedule Lutes have that 'something special' that is sure to guarantee them a Northwest Conference championship By SAM HORN Sports Editor There's a sense of confidence in John Yorke. The man who has led the Pacific Lutheran men's soccer team to six top-three Northwest Conference finishes in his 12-year coaching career is back at it again. "I'm confident that we can win the Northwest Conference," Yorke said. "I believe we have the ability and potential to win it." Yorke has reason to be confident. His soccer team is off to an unprecedented start in the 2013 season. The team has already played six games and boasts a record of five wins and one draw. There are multiple factors that have led to the team's success. One of those factors is on defense, where the Lutes have looked impenetrable. Throughout six games this season, the Lutes have only allowed two goals. One of those goals came courtesy of a penalty kick. Goalkeeper Joe Rayburn, a senior, said he is content with his defenders. The backline has helped out Rayburn so he doesn't have to make many acrobatic saves. One defender, senior Jeff Piaquadio, was named the NWC

Defensive Student-Athlete of the Week when the Lutes recorded two shutouts during the week of Sept. 2-8 against Wisconsin Lutheran and Evergreen State. "I can't really do what I do without a solid backline in front of me," Rayburn said. "The defenders make me look good." Being a goalkeeper isn't a onedimensional position, according to Rayburn. It's not always about making the awe-inspiring save that makes soccer fans jump out of their seats and spill their popcorn. Rayburn has to be a point guard at his position, because he can see the entire field and has the ability to tell his teammates where to go in order to get a shot on goal. "It's really less about one individual. The individual awards come and go as they will, but individual awards don't really mean anything unless they have the bigger team accomplishments to back it up," Rayburn said. In the past two years, PLU hasn't been known for its steadfast defense. Through the Lutes' first four games last year, they had already conceded seven goals. In 2011, PLU allowed six goals through during its first six games of the season. The numbers don't lie, but the Lutes are set on

"I'm confident that we have the recipe for success to act ually win the Northwest Conference." John Yorke head coach

PHOTO BY THOMAS SOERENES Oele nder Jeff Piaquadio, a senior, fightâ&#x20AC;˘ for the ball against a llardin-Simmoo.s attacker on Sept. 14.

conceding fewer goals this year. "I would say we have gotten off to a faster start, more so Rayburn said. defensively," "We've looked way sharper in the back four this year than we have in my previous three years in goal." Not only has the defense looked stellar for the Lutes, but their offense is a fullyfunctioning machine. They have been pumping out goals in every match so far this season. Forward Derek Johnson, a senior, has already scored five goals in six games thus far. Johnson is on pace to shatter his career-high goal tally of nine he achieved during his junior year. After displaying what he can do on the offensive side of the ball, Johnson received the NWC Offensive Student-Athlete of the Week honor for Sept. 2-8. In addition to Johnson, another catalyst for the Lutes' offense is center forward Giancarlo Santoro.

Santoro, a senior, has scored four goals and tallied three assists in six games. PLU has had a reputation for producing quality attackers in the past. In2011, when the team won the Northwest Conference, PLU had two goal-scoring threats in Chad Keams and Spencer Augustin. Augustin scored 19 goals in 2011 and Keams complemented Augustin's feat with 13 goals of his own. Now that those two players have graduated, Santoro is trying to fill their shoes. "Over the last few years, we've lost a lot of good goal scorers. I need to step in and fill in for them," Santoro said. "I'm just trying to push myself as hard as I can." Santoro has definitely made the most out of his opportunity to be on the PLU men's soccer team. He and Johnson have helped the Lutes score 15 goals in six games.

Rigoberto Loreto, a first-year, has also made an impact on the team. He is third on the team with three goals. Northwest Winning the Conference has been the focal point this year in the minds of the coaches and players alike. With a threatening offense that can score at any moment and a defense that will try to shut down any opponent, the Lutes have the resume to accomplish the feat. Winning the NWC won't come easily though. Pacific University is the only other undefeated team in the NWC. Standing at 4-0, Pacific has scored 11 goals in four games. Forward Ian Farley leads the Boxers in scoring with four goals. Despite being in the same conference as Pacific, Yorke remained unfazed about his team's chances to win the NWC. "We have that something special to w~ this conference," Yorke said. "I think that any team that wins the conference has to be a little bit special." Though Yorke said the conference is challenging, he also said, 'Tm confident that we have the recipe for success to actually win the Northwest Conference." The Lutes venture into conference play when they tangle with George Fox on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. and Pacific on Sunday at 2:30p.m.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

Lutes draw with cross-town rival Lutes' offense led by Lauren Larson's boot and ~everal key saves By HENRY SMITH Guest Writer In double overtime, sophomore Lauren Larson helped lead Pacific Lutheran University to a 1-1 tie against the University of Puget Sound on Saturday. The women's soccer team has seen success this year, as they won 2-0 against Whittier on Sept. 8. The Lutes' head coach, Seth Spidahl, said his team felt accomplished about holding off their cross~town rivals, University of Puget Sound. "I felt our team was up to the task today," Spidahl said. "We had a specific game plan that we worked on all week. The players really bought into it and kept their concentration for the entire 110 minutes." During the first half, Larson scored the first and only goal for the Lutes. Her shot sailed past the goalie from 30 yards out. The ball flew in the top corner, just out of reach of the UPS goalkeeper. The goal gave the Lutes their first home goal of the season. "I think the most successful thing about this afternoon's game was seeing the results

of hard work in practice pay

off," defender Blake Warner, junior, said . of the Lutes' Both sophomore goalkeepers, Marisa Gonzales and firstyear Takara Mitsui, blocked nine shots from UPS. Referees penalized the Lutes five times in the first half, but PLU pulled it together later in the game, giving up only one foul in the second half and two in double overtime. On the offensive side of the ball, the Lu tes have struggled to get shots on goal, with only 60 through five games. Their opponents have tallied 80 shots on goal. First-year Kaylie Rozell leads the Lutes with two goals this season. "I think we need to continue to work on our quick transitions from defense to offense so we can score more goals this season," Warner said. On Sept. 22, the PLU women's soccer team will be playing against Pacific University in Forest Grove, OR.

The Lutes' next home game will be Oct. 5 against Whitworth. Game time is set for noon.

PHOTOS BY THOMAS SOERENES

Sophomore Courtney Randall battles against Puget Sound's Jill Shimabulru. Randall has one goal on the season. TOP LEFT: First-year Kaylie Rozell rips a shot on goal against Puget Sound on Saturday. BOTTOM LEFT: Junior Blake Warner steals the ball from a Puget Sound attacke. RIGHT :


I

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• •

II

I

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I

Across the Coc.c"tryJ Adjc.c"ct a"d Co"ti"9e"t facuJty are Co"";"9 T09ether ~;th S£1lA to V;n a Vo;ce a"d Better Co"d;t;o"s ~or Our Pro~ess;o" a"d Our Stc.cde"ts When Pacific Lutheran University contingent faculty start casting our ballots Sept. 19 to form a union, unite for better working conditions, and gain a voice within the university, we won't be alone. University by un iversity, contingent faculty are asserting control over our profession and o ur lives by voting to form unions so we can work for a better future for our profession and the students we teach. In Boston, contingent faculty at several universities, including Tufts University and Bentley University, are voting to form unions and gain a voice on their campuses. Contingent faculty at Georgetown University, George Washington University, Montgomery College and American University in Washington, D.C., have also joined SEIU. With their new contracts, adjuncts in DC have won:

• pay increases; • greater job security; and • professional development funds related to teaching. Th is semester, adjunct and contingent faculty in the Los Angeles area and at more schools in the D .C. area are kicking off new efforts to form unions with SEIU.

ADJUNCTS& CONTINGENTS TOGETHER FOR QUA1.ll Y EDUCATION

PLU Con ingent Faculty: Staying True to PlU Values, ining a Mov ent for High r Education actogetherwa.org

I

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SPORTS

BUSINESS

Football team secures second win of the season

Editor introduces accounting for dummies

PAGE15

PAGES

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

OORING

SEPT. 27, 2013

mastmedia. plu.edu

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 2

Coillillunity raises red ribbons and funds for AIDS cure

PHOTO BY BELAND TUOMI

Participants in the 26th annual South Sound AIDS walk, which was held this year on Saturday at Cheney Stadium, carry red ribbons with names of AIDS victims on them. This year's AIDS walk raised $50,000 for the Pierce County AIDS Foundation, an organization that prevents HIV infection and assists persons affected by HIV/AIDS, according to its website.

By RELAND TUOMI News Writer Advocates and s,u pporters alike checked in at Cheney Stadium for the 26th annual South Sound AIDS Walk on Saturday morning. Among them were a number of Pacific Lutheran University organizations, including Campus Ministry, MediaLab and CircleK, as well as students who had their own teams. At 9 a.m., participants toured some of the sponsors' booths. The walk always hosts an art project, and this year participants could make necklaces with lettered beads spelling out their affiliated group or organization or the name of a loved one affected by the disease. At 10 a.m., master of ceremonies Amanda Westbrooke began the opening ceremonies. She described the history of AIDS and HIV and why it is important to have the annual walk. "It started in the 80s in San Francisco," Westbrooke said. "Half the population of the city died of AIDS and nobody was talking about it. There was a peaceful protest and vigil to city hall one night to raise awareness of the virus and for those lost to it." According to the AIDS.gov website, _1

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Singing competi1ion showdown: "The Voice" versus "The X-Factor"

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million people in the U.S. are living with HIV, so most Americans are at least aware of the virus. Treatment for the disease is well underway, and research for a cure has been funded for many years, thanks in part to walks like these. After the opening ceremonies, the walk began. Participants walked a loop around the field, led by the Rainiers' mascot, Rhubarb the Reindeer, and carried poles with large red ribbons attached with the names of AIDS victims on them. Some also carried signs with AIDS statistics. "We now walk in remembrance of those could not speak in the 80s, and for those affected by AIDS now," Jane Brazell, Westbrooke's American Sign Language interpreter, said. Participants then walked out of the field to the Scott Pierson Trail and around the block a total of 2.5 miles. The first wave of walkers returned at approximately 11:12 a.m., and Westbrooke greeted them with a lunch of hot dogs, chips, fruit and water. The event raised a total of $50,000 for the Pierce County AIDS foundation. "It was extremely rewarding to know that I walked to find a cure," senior Taylor Lunka said. "It was a great feeling to see everyone in the community come together for this event."

PHOTO BY REL.AND TUOMI

Several PLU organizations had teams at the South Sound AIDS walk, including MediaLab, Campus Ministry and Circle K.

Editor encourages students to embrace advising By ASHLEY GILL Opinion Editor By the end of September, new students may feel the pressure to pick a major. Academic adviser Allison Stephens, however, said not knowing your m,ajor right away is understandable. "We love undecided students," Stephens said.

Once an official college student, many begin hearing the question 'what's your major' from new professors, classmates and even family members. With this question circulating throughout the everyday lives of students, it can be understandable for pressure to choose an academic home to develop. Some students can be eager to

"We love undecided students." Allison Stephens academic adviser

cling on to a career they are most familiar with. "We come to college thinking that there are teachers and doctors and lawyers and firemen in this world, and that's like our small narrow frame of what's possible," Stephens said. Students do not have to declare a major until junior year, so it can be really beneficial to spend those first two years investing in interests and exploring rather than committing to a certain path. Some may not realize the path they chose their first semester at PLU is not for them until their junior year, when it might be too late to change majors.

ADVISING CONT. PAGE3


THE MOORING MAST

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SEPT. 27 2013

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Lutes 'draw the line' against coal exports

PHOTOS COURI'ESY OF EMILY BENKELMAN

Members of Pacific Lutheran's environmental action club G.R.E.A.N. participate in the protest Draw the Line in Seattle on Saturday. The main purpose of the rally was to protest against the Keystone XL pipeline, which would transport crude oil across Canada and the U.S. Participants also used it as a chance to express their opposition of coal exports. LEFT: Community member Peter Weston dresses as a wind turbine to express his support of renewable energy sources like wind power. TOP: Protesters set up banners at Myrtle Edwards Park on the Seattle waterfront with anti-coal slogans. BOTTOM: PLU students and G.R.E.A.N. club members pose next to a sign on their way to the protest. From left to right: seniors Emily Henkelman, Katie Giseburt, Kate Pritchard, Kimberly Woghan.

INTERFAITH CONFERENCE INSPIRES FUTURE ACTION interfaith dialogue," Wold said. "We wanted to see what other campuses are doing with interfaith work to develop our own programs here." Threeyearsago,PresidentObamastarted Campus Ministry has been trying to put the Interfaith and Community Service together an interfaith council for students Campus Oiallenge, aka the Interfaith and thought it could gain inspiration from Service Conference, in Washington, D.C. the Interfaith Service Conference. to open lines of communication between Campus Ministry has put on events in different faith communities in American the past, such as the Real Talk Religion universities. )'LU has represented itself events, for students to gain a better every year since it started, and this year understanding of certain aspects of other was no different. . religions. Real Talk Religion events will Senior Lukas Kulhanek, junior Christian continue this year. Wold and University Pastor Nancy Connor Wold said other campuses inspired attended this year to discuss interfaith and some of the ideas for future events. One community service work on campus with of the events focuses on incorporating other university representatives. community service with different faith The three representatives landed in D.C. groups based on and off campus. on Saturday and returned Tuesday night. "We would strengthen interfaith bonds "We recognize the importance of with events like these," Wold said. "We "We're excited to take what we learned from want to create a dialogue and the conference and put it into what we want to understanding [between these do this year." groups]." No definite Christian Wold plans for events

By RELAND TUOMI News Writer

cam.pus ministry steward

have been made

PHOTO COURTESY OF NANCY CONNOR

From left to right, campus ministry steward Christian Wold, University Pastor Nancy Connor and campus ministry steward Lucas Kulhanek pose in front of the Jefferson Memorial. They went to an Interfaith Conference in Washington, D.C. earlier this week to gain inspiration for the interfaith movement on campus.

yet, but more information about interfaith can be gained at the Campus Ministry office in the lower AUC. There is also an

"We're excited to take what we learned from the conference and put it into what we want to do this year to strengthen our

interfaith council that will be meeting this

interfaith component on campus," Wold

year.

said.


THE MOORING MAST

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to do New staff member joins Women's Center What atPLU By KJERSTI ANDREASSEN 路 Guest Writer There's a new face at the Pacific Lutheran University Women's Center this year. Hired in June, PLU senior Jimena Mascaro is the new volunteer and program coordinator. preparing Mascaro's job involves paperwork, making sure fliers are put up and making coffee for vistors. "I was thinking and asking about a scholarship and found out that they also had a job position," Mascaro said. "So I thought, 'this would be an amazing idea. Why not just apply to both?"' Mascaro is majoring in sociology and minoring in women's and gender studies. Originally from Peru, Mascaro said she has personally experienced prejudice as a Latino immigrant, which is part of why she chose to study sociology. "I wanted to understand what was really happening with the system of inequality and with people in general," she said. Mascaro said she wants to fight for gender equity and help disadvantaged women, in particular women of color. She has previously been part of a women's center at a community college. While there, she worked with women from a wide range of difficult backgrounds.

Ongoing UnPLUg. Learn the best tips and tricks on how to save energy. Look out for events, including documentaries, speakers and workshops during the month of October. Kickoff on Friday in Red Square, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Friday

PHOTO BY KJERSTI ANDREASSEN

Jimena Mascaro is the new volunteer and program coordinator at the Women's Center. She is a senior majoring in sociology and minoring in women's and gender studies.

She said the Women's Center at PLU has a very unique atmosphere, something that is helpful to accomplish its goals. "I love the idea that it's not an office. It's a house where you can hang out, and you have the couches and kitchen ... and everyone was so nice," Mascaro said. Upon arriving at the

"I love the idea that it's not an office. It's a house where you can hang out." Jimena Mascaro Women's Center volunteer and program coordinator

ADVISING FROM PAGEl "It's fun to see students give themselves permission [to explore and think about other majors]," Stephens said. It can sometimes be the careers and classes students never expect to enjoy that will ultimately be their vocation. "It's like dating. Be single for a while between majors ... get to know yourself a little bit first," said Stephens. Academic advisers can answer any questions about registration, schedules or adding and dropping classes, which Stephens calls the "mechanics." Stephens said she suggests students research careers of interest, come up with questions to ask and become educated with the different occupations

before going to their advising appointments. "If you're walking away with just mechanics, you're not taking advantage of that full relationship," Stephens said. With thoughts about majors and balancing classes, personal lives and self-care, it can be overwhelming at times. Making sure to address hard times rather than giving up can be vital to academic success in the four years of college most students have atPLU. "We have had students who ended up failing a class just because they didn't come and talk to an adviser and ask 'do I have options?"' Stephens said. Struggles and concerns can build up quickly _and develop into what Stephens describes as a "spiral." Whenever students feel overwhelmed or find themselves

Women's Center, she said she almost immediately asked herself how she could help. Women's The Center seeks to educate both men and women about gender-related issues. Mascaro's responsibility is to help facilitate and coordinate events the center hosts.

Britten Project: Sacred and Profane. Faculty and guest musicians present a tribute to Benjamin Britten in honor of the centenary year of his birth. Free to PLU community. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8 - 9:30 p.m.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLISON STEPHENS

in a downward "spiral," Stephens encourages them to always talk to their adviser. "They might not be able to

Toga party. Join Hinderlie's annual all-hall event. Hinderlie main lounge, 8-11 p.m. Men's soccer vs. Linfield. Synthetic turffield, 1:30-5 p.m.

fix every problem, but they are

Allison Stephens is an academic adviser. The Academic Advising Office is located in the Ramstad Commons.

Green Dot 201 Bystander Skills Training: Part 1. This six-hour training describes Green Dot and trains participants to recognize and respond to Red Dots to create a safer PLU community. Sign up at http://www.plu.edu/ greendot. Morken 103, 3:30-6 p.m.

going to know your options that could alleviate some stress, some weight on your shoulders," she said. If advisers know a student's interests, academic history or feelings about classes, they can be better equipped to help later on if problems should arise. It could also set up an environment where students would be able to come to their adviser for any issues. "I just hope they walk away comfortable with a professional [on campus]," Stephens said. By making connections with faculty members on campus and also their advisers, students have two types of connections during their educational career. "That's just so good to have, and we know it leads to students being more successful," Stephens said.

Saturday Green Dot Bystander Skills Training: Part 2. Morken 103, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bill Lincoln Negotiation Training Series. The Network for Peacebuilding and Conflict Management brings guest speaker Bill Lincoln to teach students about negotiation. Register at http://www.plu. AUC Regency edu/npcrn. Room, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Sunday. Men's soccer vs. Willamette. Synthetic turffield, 1:30-5 p.m. Regency Concert Series: Brass Quintet. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30 p.m.

St. Olaf mourns death of associate college pastor By ST. OLAF COLLEGE MEDIA RELATIONS The Rev. Jennifer Anderson Koenig '87, who served as associate college pastor at St. Olaf for more than 15 years before going on medical leave in April 2012 to focus on treatments for brain cancer, died on Sept. 20.

The funeral will be held in St. Olaf College's Boe Memorial Chapel on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. Visitation will be held in Buntrock Commons on Friday from 3-7p.m. St. Olaf and PLU are sister schools along with 24 other ELCA colleges and universities. They are the only two ELCA

colleges and universities to have .a student congregation recognized by the ELCA. Koenig served in parish ministry in Iowa before coming to St. Olaf in 1997. She described the St. Olaf position as her "dream call," and devoted herself to leading campus worship, preaching and counseling students. "One of her greatest strengths was her sincere willingness to sit down and have a meaningful conversation at any time with anyone," Bruce Benson, a longtime colleague of Koenig and a retired college pastor, said. "She took a genuine interest in people's lives, and that endeared her to so many." Koenig also worked with a variety of departments across campus, from the arts

"She took a genuine interest in people's lives, and that endeared her to so many." Bruce Benson retired pastor, colleague of Koenig

to the sciences. One of the spaces in Regents Hall of Natural and Mathematical Sciences is named in her honor as a. gift from parents of a former student. A dance major at St. Olaf, and Koenig choreographed performed for three years with the professional modern dance company Ballet Harren. She went on to serve three more years on the dance and fine arts committee at Luther Seminary, where she earned her master of divinity degree in 1994. Active in the community as well as on campus, Koenig mentored high school students through a local project and helped lead the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America's Malaria Campaign. Her CaringBridge site details her battle with cancer. Check it out at http://www.caringbridge. org/visit/jenniferkoenig/journal PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. OLAF MEDIA RELATIONS

Article originally published on Sept. 20 on St. Olaf college website.

Reprinted with permission.

Jennifer Koenig, former pastor at St. Olaf College, passed away on Sept. 20 after a long battle with cancer.


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EXPLORING THE PACIFIC LUTHERAN LIFE OF LAURA MAJOVSKI By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor Students filter through the halls of Pacific Lutheran University, coming and going every year but leaving the university relatively unchanged. When long-term staff members leave the university, though, the campus feels the loss until other leaders take their place. Vice President of Student Life Laura Majovski announced last summer that she will be retiring at the end of this academic year after a 22-year career at PLU. Fear not, though. She will still be around campus working part-time in a phased retirement program. How did you wind up at PLU? I came down here when my husband and I wanted to move out of California. We were looking for jobs in Washington, and I was made aware of the therapist position at the Counseling Center. I had had a private practice for many years in California, so I applied for the job. How did you work your way up from a school psychologist to being vice president of student life? President Anderson [Loren Anderson] asked me one day - this must have been '96, so I'd been four years in the Counseling Center - whether I'd have any interest in coming over and serving as his assistant. I about fell off the couch. When you get called into the president's office, you don't think it's for good things. And I said, "but I don't know anything about administration." And he said, "it won't matter. You've got a number of other skills that would be great and so just think about it." So, basically, I talked about it with my husband, and I always knew I could go back and be a psychologist, but I was never gonna get a chance again to go do something different. And so I was his assistant for three years. Then the predecessor [the vice president of student life], Dr. Seevertson [S. Erving Seevertson] retired at 60, and we had a national search for candidates, and those just didn't really work out, and the president asked then if I would take the job as an acting role. I said, "well, OK, 111 take

it as acting." I thought it was really hard, I wasn't sure why anyone would want this job. And I still had young children. In June of '99 I was made acting vice president, and in 2000 he [Anderson] made me permanent. What are some of the roles and responsibilities you have as the vice president of student life? Basically as vice president of student life and dean of students, which I am both of those titles, my conceptualization of that job is to support students and try to make their educational environment and experience as positive and as thriving as it can be. So their main work here on campus, which is getting their education, happens in the best way that it can happen. We have a number of extracurricular programs, so really we're supporting the educational outcomes that PLU really wants. And at the same time we're supporting students with resources ... so you're helping students make the most of their out-of-classroom experience. Do you have a favorite part about your job? My favorite part is students. And my favorite part about this job is that no day is ever the same. And no year is ever the same, because universities are always changing, because the students are always different. We're very different than we were 15 years ago when I started this job in some ways. They're [the students are] all still in the same universe of what's valued at PLU. Can you give one example of something you had to adapt to with the changing generations of students? Social media. I try to keep up with it, and Lace Smith [assistant director of student involvement and leadership, technology and social media] is gracious enough to come over and give me little lessons, because I don't do it as much as you all do. But we need to be relevant. We didn't have websites when I started this job. It was all print. At your time of retirement, you will have worked at PLU for 22 years. Over a third of my life.

PHOTO BY COLBY KLINGELE

Laura Majovski, vice president of student life and dean of students, sits at her desk in the Hauge Administration Building. Majovski will be going into phased retirement at the end of this year.

taking pictures of students and the campus. So what's kept you here? The people. I have terrific colleagues. You can't do this type of work at a university by yourself. You can't really make anything happen without colleagues who are willing to help. And then great students. PLU has a wonderful group of students that I get to work with. What led to your decision to retire? My husband is closer to 70, and PLU has a phased retirement program. I really wanted to work part-time, and this gives you a chance to work part-time to help contribute to the university still, but to step away from the full plate of responsibilities that I have. What plans do you have for after you retire? We're still trying to figure out what 111 do here, so I'm still pretty wide open. The president and I will be in conversation in spring about ways that I can help. I used to joke with people that I want to help the university photographer, because I love

What do you plan to accomplish before you retire? We're working in the division [of student life] to have as smooth of a transition as we can, so we're working on revising our mission and vision statement for the division, and we are updating a strategic plan that we have so that the next person who comes in understands what it is this division's about and what it's trying to do. What are you going to miss most about PLU? 111 still be here, but I won't be around the leadership table. That's got pros and cons - you don't have as much responsibility, but you're also not in the know as much about what's going on. PLU's a very complex organization. But 111 find other ways to support it. Is there anything else you'd like to add? It's been a great job. It's been a privilege to be in this role. I'm glad I had the opportunity.

Chinese wing celebrates moon festival

PHOTOS BY COLBY KLINGELE

The Chinese Wing of Hong Hall organized a celebration for the Chinese Mid-Autumn Moon Festival on Sunday evening. The event featured Jianzi, a traditional Chinese game similar lo hackeysack, a poetry reading by various Chinese classes and moon cake. Approximately 30 students participated in the Chinese wing event. "It was a better turnout than we had expected," junior Chloe Choi, Resident Assistant or the Chinese Wing, said. LEFT: Senior Emily Henkelman kicks the Jianzi in Red Sqare. CENTER: Junior Shunying Wang receives a serving a traditional bean dish as students recite Chinese poetry in the Hong Main Lounge. RIGHT: Sweet bean-curd pastries known as moon cakes are a popular dish in China.


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BASED ON A TRUE STORY:

'Real' horror more fantasy than fact By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor Popcorn tumbles out of the sweaty hands of moviegoers as they gawk at the phrase "based on a true story." Most likely, these viewers have just experienced a horror film such as "The Conjuring." The film, like many of its genre, comes complete with a dark cellar, sinister ghosts and spiritual possession - all of which it claims are ''based on a true story."

a true story." The problem is there are no actual rules or an authoritative regulation on what a producer can claim is or isn't ''based on a true story." '1 feel like if it's based on a true story, it means just some of the facts are true about it and not necessarily everything is true," sophomore Chris Edgecomb said. "I feel like it's more of an attention grabber." The plotlines, facts and details of horror films don't come from fact-checked or scientifically

The problem is there are no actual rules or an authoritative regulation on what a producer can claim is or isn't "based on a true story." Many horror flicks, like "The Conjuring," market the idea that the events they portray really occurred. Some viewers said they are attracted to the idea, while others said they find the claim to be a reason to look for unrealistic mistakes within the movie. "Sometimes, I' m more tempted to find flaws in the movie to see if it could be a true story," sophomore Karen Bullinger said. "Especially with horror movies. I find that I doubt it even more than a movie that doesn't profess to be

credible sources. They come from word-of-mouth legends, newspaper articles and personal claims. In an interview with Cinefantastique Magazine, Wes Craven, writer and director of "A Nightmare on Elm Street," said he was inspired to create the film by "three small articles about men from South East Asia, who were from immigrant families and who had died in the middle of a nightmare."

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Take these articles and give them the context of American teenagers in the 1980s, and you have ''A Nightmare on Elm Street: Based on a True Story." Films that don't base their stories on secondary sources often make an appeal to legitimacy by interviewing the individuals that claim to be involved in the event. This is the case with "The Conjuring." According to the film's website, "The Conjuring" is "based on the true case files of the Warren family." During interviews and video testimonies, the Warrens stick to their story with enthusiasm but the validity of the story still remains a question. It's easy to embellish a narrative that no one else witnessed and change facts that no one can disprove. For the Warrens, there is nothing to lose and a vast opportunity to gain fame by sharing their haunting narrative. The family is featured on multiple websites, has appeared in interviews with a multitude of organizations and even has its own YouTube channel. This October, as you peruse the selection of horror movies, remember that films "based on a true story" may mean terrifying demons or even a possessed doll. They may mean nightmares for weeks. They won't mean a validated, proven and legitimate story.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF COMICBOOK.COM

"The Conjuring" is supposedly based on the true story recorded by the Warren family. Audiences gave it rave reviews when it was released on July 19, 2013.

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Look for an e-mail during the first weeks of school inviting you to participate in the MAP-Works online survey.

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6A&E

SEPT 27 2013

SINGING COMPETITIONS BEGIN ·'The Voice' reigns victorious over 'The X-Factor' in entertainment face-off ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer America has always loved to watch its regular people rise to fame. It is that sacred love that has led thousands to tune in to shows such as "The X-Factor or The Voice, both of which kicked off new seasons this month. The basic platform of both shows is the same. Unknowns perform popular singles with his or her own twist for a panel of celebrity judges, which then eliminate contestants. At the end, only one remains who judges and fans declare to have "the voice" or "the x factor that it takes to make it in the business. The question is what sets the 11

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two shows apart. In a head-tohead competition, a few subtleties make all the difference. Beginning with the format of the shows, "The X-Factor" auditions are almost identical to the "American Idol" process. The contestants who are selected to perform do so for the judges in front of an audience. They are then further refined to a group of 16 or 17. This newly formed group of competitors performs before judges and an audience, and public polling determines who is eliminated each week. "The Voice uses the blind audition setup. Judges sit with their backs to the performers and only turn around to view those they find most talented. From there, the contestants perform 11

PHOTO COURTESY OF THEHOLLYWOODREPOltl'ER.COM

The "X-Factor" judges Paulina Rubio, Demi Levato, Kelly Rowland and Simon Cowell sit at the judges' table during a contestant's audition. This is Rubio and Rowland's first season on the "X-Factor" judges' panel.

in battle rounds, leaving the elimination decisions up to the judges and later the public. As for diva and eye candy appeal, "The Voice gives it with full force. Christina Aguilera serves up a healthy dose of diva during playful banter, which usually comes out when one of her picks is in danger of being lost to a fellow judge, especially CeeLo Green. Eye candy for the show comes in the splendid form of "Maroon 5' s Adam Levine and country singer Blake Shelton. "X-Factor" doesn't serve as much of either category. All of X-Factors's female judges share the caring, encouraging role. None of them stick out as being diva material. As far as eye candy goes, unless rude, aging and British is your style, Simon Cowell just isn't it. On "The Voice," judges Levine, Aguilera, Shelton and Green are all fair. They give criticism where it is due but it's always constructive. Encouragement on the show always feels genuine and nonscripted. "X-Factor's" judges Kelly Rowland, Demi Lovato, Paulina Rubio and Cowell seem to be sitting with an extreme divide. Cowell is his usual self, giving props where they are due but harshly insulting those who are talent-challenged. Rowland, Lovato and Rubio all seem to only give hope to contestants. Their criticisms are constructive but seem a bit more rehearsed. 11

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ENTERTAINMENTWEEKLY.COM

"The Voice" judges' chairs turn away from the contestants during auditions to make the judge choose a contesant based on his or her voice alone. Here, judges Adam Levine, CeeLo Green, Christina Aguilera and Blake Shelton turn their chairs around to praise a contestant.

Comedy and suspense can turn a show with an overdone concept into a weekly thrill worth tuning in to. "The Voice rarely has a comedic moment that doesn't consist of the judges laughing at something they said, bur the talent on the show is serious. The acts are so stellar that suspense is highlighted by the wait for an elimination to be announced. "The X-Factor" has many comedic moments, because they allow those who are talentchallenged to audition. These moments make the show seem 11

like it's all comedy, but there are some powerhouse acts that come through and remind us that it is serious business. Both shows have their own respective pros and cons. To sum it up, "The Voice" brings the diva and eye candy action, fair criticism, comedy and suspense. "The X-Factor'' gives us comedy, suspense, encouraging or harsh criticisms but lacks in the diva and eye candy department. It all boils down to preference in the end, but in a show-to-show battle, "The Voice" emerges victorious.

· g C k d L t• · . Professors' performance SWlil , 1Uil an a Ill Jazz· ignites student inspiration By THOMAS HORN Guest Writer The Pacific Lutheran University Rengency Jazz Ensemble featured swing, funk and Latin styles of jazz during the concert in Lagerquist Concert Hall on Sept. 18. The PLU Regency Jazz Ensemble is made up of three musicians David DeaconJoyner, Clipper Anderson and Mark Ivester. All three of them teach private jazz studies at PLU. Deacon-

Joyner is also the University Jazz Ensemble's professor. Deacon-Joyner performed on piano, Anderson played the bass - both electric and acoustic while Ivester provided the beat on the drums. "My favorite part of teaching is once they've [students] started listening to jazz, you get to see them grow, Deacon-Joyner said. This year marks DeaconJoyner' s 13th year teaching at PLU. Deacon-Joyner said he has played with Anderson off and

"It was cool how they listened to one another and were able to play off each other's ideas."

Clay Snell first-year

pursue his passion for music and got involved with jazz drumming - it's now his career. After the concert, some of the audience members came up to the stage and personally thanked the musicians for the concert. "I liked when they played between styles, first-year Clay Snell said. "It kept the show going. Throughout the nine songs played, the sub-genres of swing, funk and Latin were present. A solo incorporated in every song with every instrument, the performance displayed a high level of confidence. "It was cool how they listened to one another and were able to play off each other's ideas," Snell said. 11

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on since 2000, but Anderson and Ivester have played for 30 years together. "They [Anderson and Ivester] work a lot together. I just grab the

bumper and hang on," DeaconJoyner said. Ivester started teaching private drum lessons at PLU two years ago. "I listened to old jazz records when I was young and focused in on the drurns, Ivester said. "My parents weren't jazz fans but once I started playing in my high school jazz band, I was inspired." Ivester said he wanted to 11

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SEPT. 29: REGEN(tY CONCERT SERIES: BRASS QUINTET 4lli

OCT. 5: CE:LLO AND PIANO WITH 1tJSSI MAK.KONEN.AND ROOSMARIITEPPO PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVECOMMONS.COM


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A&E7

MUSIC OF THE NIGHT Opera singers and audience share vocal delight By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor From undergraduate students to master's degree holders, Pacific Lutheran juniors to 5th Avenue stars, an eclectic group of vocalists came together on Saturday evening to bring Opera Night to PLU. Despite their variances in experience and ability, they all had one thing in common: their teacher, Janeanne Houston. Houston, who is a senior lecturer of music and teaches voice lessons from her private studio and at PLU, organized the recital to give her students a performance opportunity. "They all need experience with an audience," she said. "So I decided to let a large group of students sing together and inspire each other." Mezzo soprano Elizabeth Giesbers, who holds a master's in music from the University of Washington, started off the recital with "Va, l'error mio palesa" from "Mitridate, Re di Ponto" by Mozart. Her deep, rich vocal tones echoed and bounced around Lagerquist Concert Hall, which was less than half full with an audience of around 50. PLU senior Miranda MatsonJewett followed with "Bester Jungling," also a Mozart piece, from "Der Schauspieldirektor." Her antics of leaning on the piano and gazing wistfully into

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

Performers who took part in Opera Night on Saturday prepare to bow for a delighted audience. All of the opera singers are students of Janeanne Houston, Pacific Lutheran University's Senior lecturer of music.

space, as well as her goofy facial expressions, made the audience chuckle. "When you first start singing a song, you're worried about the mechanics and the techniques," Matson-Jewett said after the show. "Then you really start to become the character ... [Tonight] I was more than a character." Four performers later, coloratura soprano Anne Eisendrath, University of Michigan graduate and singer with the 5th Avenue Theatre, finished up the first half of the recital with two songs in English, "Poor Wandr'ing One" from "Pirates of Penzance" and "Monica's Waltz" from "The Medium." Her performances featured just as much acting as singing, and

she danced with, flirted with and teased guest actor Eric Hagreen during her performances. After a dramatic cadenza - a short musical improvisation that showed off her vocal range in "Poor Wandr'ing One," she made as if to kiss him, then poked him on the nose instead and grinned mischievously out at the crowd, much to the audience's delight. Lyric tenor Derek Sellers of the Seattle Opera kicked off the second half with "Comfort Ye Every Valley" from Handel's "Messiah" and "Una furtiva lagrima" from "L'elisir d'amore." He stood with his feet planted firmly on the stage, looking straight out to the audience with his chin slightly raised, the perfect picture of absolute confidence. '1 don't often do little recitals

like this, not since college," he said. "[But] my heart was still palpitating." Sellers described Houston, his voice teacher of two years, as a "wonderful person," saying she was one of the best teachers for tenors and sopranos. "More than a teacher, she also acts as a psychiatrist," he said. Another noteworthy performance came from coloratura soprano Jenny Shotwell, PLU class of 2004, who now sings with the Tacoma Opera and at the 5th Avenue Theatre. During her performance of "Quel guardo il cavaliere, so anch'io la virtu magica" from "Don Pasquale," she sang a showy cadenza that turned into a fit of giggles, causing the crowd to laugh with her.

Michael Dudley, a baritone who has sung with opera companies in Seattle, San Francisco, Vashon and Bellevue, finished off the recital with an excerpt from "Porgy and Bess" by George Gerschwin. Houston sat unseen in the back of the audience and cued him to breathe deeply before he began. First, Dudely mimed cooing to and cradling a baby in his arms, then he set the baby down and gained more energy as he repeatedly insisted, "a woman is a sometime thing," which is also the name of the song. The more energetic piece earned him a passionate round of applause from the audience, a fitting end to the night's theme of audience approval.

Welcoine back to Hogwarts Students react to 'Harry Potter' spinoff announcement By ALLIE REYNOLDS News @Nine Producer Last week, Harry Potter fans rejoiced at the announcement from Warner Brothers (WB) that J.K. Rowling will be penning a screenplay based on an extension of the wizarding world she first dreamed up in 1997. The movie, which is intended to be the first of a series, is entitled "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them." It will focus on the author of the Hogwarts student's textbook, Newt Scamander. The textbook appeared in Harry's bookbag during J.K. Rowling's first novel, "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone." The film will take place in New York 70 years before Harry Potter's time. Growing up in the 1990s and 2000s, much of the student population at Pacific Lutheran University grew up with the bespectacled boy wizard and followed him through his journey to defeat Lord Voldemort. We were there when the

first movie came out, there at countless book release parties

and were there a mere 10 years later at the midnight premiere, decked out as our favorite character from the series. The series taught us valuable lessons about bravery, loyalty and the importance of friendship. Now, we get to see a different perspective of the wizarding world through a character we know almost nothing about, except that his grandson marries the beloved Luna Lovegood. It will be a whole new experience for Potter fans around the world, and fans at Pacific Lutheran University are looking forward to the film series. Junior Emily Mansfield said she remembers dressing up as her favorite Harry Potter character, Dobby, for Halloween one year when she was in second grade. Her love for Harry Potter throughout her continued schooling, and she attended the midnight premiere of, the final Harry Potter movie when she was a senior in high school. "It's gonna be awesome," Mansfield said. "J .K. Rowling is the best person to write the screenplay for this, since she

wrote the world it's created in." Though many fans wouldn't trust anyone else to write the screenplay, as they trust Rowling whole-heartedly with a world they grew up in, others aren't convinced anyone should be writing it at all. "We11 see how it turns out," sophomore Dylan Nehrenberg said. "It should remain done. It ended on a good note and WB shouldn't milk the series for more money." Warner Brothers expects this new series to do well. While it announced the movie last week, WB also announced plans to feature elements of the movie in the theme parks the Wizarding World of Harry Potter in Orlando. H the movie goes according to plan, the young adults who grew up with Harry will have a new series to look forward to from the same mind that brought them their childhood. Although it won't feature our favorite characters, it will give us a look inside a new element of the wizarding world and introduce us to a new wizard we may grow to love as much as we love Harry.

PHOTO COURFESY OF BARENSANDNOBLE.COM

A version of the book, "FBntalitic Beast.5 and Where to Find Them," i5 available in Muggle bookstores.


THE MOORING MAST

8BUSINESS

SEPT. 27 2013

WORKING FOR FREE ••

Unpaid internships still boost student opportunities By KELSEY HILMES Guest Writer

Whether out of desire or necessity, students are flocking to internships in high quantities, hoping for a competitive advantage in the slowly steadying job market. According to a 2012 New York Times article, undergraduates in the U.S. work more than 1 million internships per year, and experts estimate more than half of these are unpaid. As more undergraduates and new degree holders are accepting unpaid internships, controversy over labor laws is starting to stir. Earlier this year, a series of lawsuits hit headlines where the judges ruled in favor of unpaid interns; agreeing that their employers took advantage of them and owed them back pay. The effect these trends have on a small liberal arts college in the Northwest may not be much, however. Maxine HerbertHill, Pacific Lutheran University's director of academic internships, said she observes only a slight difference in the paid or unpaid internship experience. "I have a bias towards paid internships when it's at all possible," Herbert-Hill said. "I think they're a more realistic experience for students to perceive and experience a career field as a professional." She also said there is a greater delivery expected from the student at a paid internship, and students themselves tend to take their commitment more seriously when they are paid. Herbert-Hill estimated that around 200 students do internships on campus each year, although she said she doesn't have full data to back it up. She said she believes that about half of these internships are done as for-credit academic internships. At PLU, students have the opportunity of paying to take internships for academic credit to count toward their degrees. Herbert-Hill said only three degrees on campus require internships as a graduation requirement: communication, psychology and women's and gender studies. This excludes all programs that require special certifications like social work and nursing, both of which require their own form of internship experience. An academic internship is beneficial to students because it requires the student's

PHOTO COUJrl'ESY OF WWW.SMARJ'RECRUITERS.COM

adviser and employer to sign an agreement defining what objectives the intern will achieve. "With a learning agreement, you will always be able to stay on track and achieve the things you set out to do," Herbert-Hill said. ''Without that academic agreement, there's nothing that anyone can do to leverage that employer." Herbert-Hill said she has only seen a handful of employers try to take advantage of their interns over the years. She warned that students should limit the hours they are willing to work on unpaid internships. "I don't want to send the wrong message to our students, that it's OK to work 20, 30, 40 hours a week for nothing," she said. "It's not OK. It's very not OK." The majority of the internships PLU students work are unpaid because of the close ties the school builds with nonprofit organizations. One non-profit that frequently works with PLU students is the Tacoma South Sound Sports Commission, which has been hiring interns for approximately 10 years. Dean Burke, vice president of the TSSSC, said the non-profit tries to pay its interns when it can but budgeting can be complicated. Burke said the organization tries to set aside funding for one paid intern in the fall and spring but might compromise by

lowering the hours of the paid intern or having supplemental interns who work fewer hours in addition to a paid one. "It's hard to ask a lot of someone without rewarding them," Burke said. He later said, "we've all been students. We were all there. It's hard for an intern to stay focused when they have to go to a part-time bartending job later that night." Burke said TSSSC tries to make all internships, paid and unpaid, a valuable experience for the intern and encourages them to take initiative on projects they care about. He recalled one intern who was very passionate about women's lacrosse and worked with them to create a whole new event focused on the sport. They later chose to hire her for a full time position. Students have also found positive experiences in both paid and unpaid internships. Senior Ian Kinder-Pyle has worked three internships throu ghout his PLU career that were paid and unpaid. The first was an international internship at an environmental clinic in Canada, the second was with the Washington State Legislature in Olympia and he now works with the City Club of Tacoma. While Kinder-Pyle said there have been unpleasant or tedious parts of his internships, he has never had a negative internship experience. He said some of the highlights of his internships have been

doing a mock debate at the legislature, meeting Congressman Derek Kilmer at City Club of Tacoma and the many networking opportunities. However, Kinder-Pyle said he was wary about taking an unpaid internship. "You cannot just go in and give them a blank check," Kinder-Pyle said of potential employers. "You need to determine whether or not the people who are becoming your mentor have your best interests at heart." To do this, he said he encouraged finding an internship with the help of Herbert-Hill or a trusted connection to prevent students from being taken advantage of. He also said he suggests setting.parameters about what types of projects and how many hours students will work as an unpaid intern. Kinder-Pyle said he does see a benefit in working unpaid internships, because "it really focuses your attention on why you're doing that experience." Kinder-Pyle is not the only student taking on multiple internships throughout college. Herbert-Hill advises students to start looking at both paid and unpaid internships early, because she is noticing more and more students graduating with two or three internships completed. "I wouldn't discourage a student from doing either one," she said of paid and unpaid internships. "The value comes from what you make of it. It's rich both ways."

ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES Monthly Rent vs. Monthly Mortgage Payment Vacant properties $1,100

Monthly Mortgage Payment

$960 $800

$650

4Q12"': $481 $200

+--~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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•92

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GRAPH COUKI"ESY OF WWW.BUSINESSINSIDER.COM

By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Students are leaving college with record-breaking levels of debt, the only consumer debt on the rise since the recession. Due to the staggering levels of debt, recent graduates admit they have delayed plans to buy cars, houses or even get married. According to a 2013 Huffington Post article, student loan debt passed the $1 trillion mark at the beginning of 2013, up from $550 billion at the beginning of the recession. This sum accounts for about 60 percent of the annual income of the class of 2011. But as the chart shows, the average monthly mortgage payment is $237 less than the average monthly rent payment. This is why it is important to know

how to do a mortgage amortization. An amortized loan is a loan where you figure out the monthly payment needed to make on both the principal, or original amount of the loan, as well as the monthly interest payment. If recent grads knew how to amortize a mortgage, they would realize how much cheaper it can be to own a home than renting. Let's say a student graduates from Pacific Lutheran University with their bachelor's in their chosen field and gets a job in the Tacoma area. Assuming the recent graduate wants a simple one-bedroom apartment, http://www. apartmentratings.com reports the average rent for Tacoma ito be $912, nearly $200 more than the national average. If the graduate looks at houses in the area, they will see that there are hundreds

of houses for sale in the $100,000-$200,000 range. Let's say they want a nice little place so their taste in houses leads them to the $150,000 price tags. If the recent grad has no savings and their parents cannot help out, they will need a loan for the full amount, or $150,000. This is the principal amount of the loan. A common term for home loans is 30 years, and just last week the interest rate on a 30 year fixed rate loan hit 4.5 percent. Once all this information is figured out, they need to open up Microsoft Excel and figure out the monthly payment. If they don'.t happen to have Excel already, there are many online calculators that can do the work for them such as http://www. calculators.bankrate.com. In the first cell, put the $150,000 principal amount of the loan. In the second, goes either the annual interest rate, 4.5 percent, or save a step and make it a monthly rate by dividing by 12, which comes out to 0.375 percent. The last thing needed is the total number of months the loan is for. Simply multiply 30 years by 12 months to get 360. The final step to calculating the monthly payment in Excel is entering these values into one of many premade equations in Excel. For any rookies out there, when doing calculations in Excel, simply go to an empty cell and start the entry with an

equals sign. In this case, following the equals sign, the recent graduate will be using the PMT function. So far the payment cell should look like this: =PMT( Now just plug in the values in the order that Excel asks for them, separated by commas. First is the monthly interest rate of 0.375 percent followed by the total number of months, 360. Next put the principal of the loan expressed as a negative number and then finally the future value of the loan, which is zero. When all numbers are entered correctly, the final equation should look like this: =PMT(0.375, 360, -150000, 0) If the graduate understands how to use cell references they will get the same answer and have a more malleable value. Then they simply hit enter to find that the monthly payment on a $150,000 home loan is only $760.03. That is about $152 cheaper than the average single-bedroom rental in the Tacoma area, $152 that can go toward dates so you can find that special someone who you want to share your wonderful new home with. This will revolutionize the dating game, let me tell you. The person of interest will be so blown away you pay less per month to live in and own a house than they do to rent someone else's, they will stick around simply to learn your financial secrets.


SEPT. 27 2013

+

THE MOORING MAST

BUSINESS 9


10 ADVERTISEMENT

Our Campus Our Culture Our Mission

THE MOORING MAST

This week, certain contingent faculty will be considering whether to form a union or not. To those who are undecided, we ask that you vote, and vote today. We work each day to transform the lives of our students, and we are stronger when united as one community. Our culture of collaboration - where we care

SEPT. 27. 2013

for each other as individuals and hear all voices - is rare in higher education today. Please vote "no" to help preserve our PLU community. Your ballot must be received by the NLRB in Seattle by October 10. The outcome of the vote will be by simple majority of votes cast. Make sure your voice is heard.

For more information go to: . d I +


THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 27 2013

OPINION 11

Garfield Book Company gets its toes wet with Toms products

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

By ALYSSA FOUNTAIN

Guest Writer The fashion and philanthropy of Toms products arrived at the Garfield Book Company at the start of the school year. Toms' campaign, One for One, benefits children iri disadvantaged countries all over the world by giving them a pair of shoes for every pair you buy. The wider population also benefits as, every piece of eyewear you buy pays for a pair of prescription glasses, medical treatment or cataract surgery for people in disadvantaged countries. It is fantastic that we can use a little bit of our money to make an impact in one child's life. Every child will remember the sense of pride they feel when they walk to school wearing shoes for the very first time. In African countries for example, most children who walk barefoot suffer from severe abrasions on their feet due to rocks. To make matters worse, rural villages are often germ-ridden environments, which can mean that the abrasions will become infected. During the rainy season when

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Jessica Thondsen mast@plu.edu

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Wmston Alder mastads@plu.edu

NEWS EDITOR

Alison Haywood A&EEDITOR

Kelli Breland BUSINESS EDITOR

Bjorn Slater OPINION EDITOR Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR

Sam Hom SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Kels Mejlaender ONLINE EDITOR Leah Traxel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Storm Gerlock NEWS@ NINE PRODUCER

Allison Reynolds

everything turns to mud, bugs known as "jiggers" burrow into the children's feet, lay eggs and then erupt from a large, painful, itchy bubble, leaving a gaping wound. A simple pair of shoes would protect a child from this. Moreover, Toms' One for One campaign with the eyewear is magnificent. With that one purchase of eyewear, you can give sight to a person in need of glasses, medical treatment or even cataract surgery through the Toms organization. Blindness is a huge problem in the developing world, as often people do not have the resources to attain reasonable medical care or cataract surgery, and therefore many become homeless dependents. I have seen the lines of 50 people on any given day waiting for cataract surgery at the free clinics. If they don't get in that day, then they will be back at 5 a.m. for their next opportunity. Every day Toms dedicates to providing cataract surgery will impact a vast number of lives. Some people raise concerns about Toms for several reasons. First of all, the same shoes you buy in the U.S. are the ones given in rural villages in the Congo. These will not last long, since in the dry season the shoes will be battling rocks and sliding down silt roads and in the wet season they will be caked with

red mud. They will often cause some harm to the children's feet as the feet will soften while accustomed to wearing shoes. Once the shoes are gone, the children will be more at risk for injury. These shoes do not take into account the climate differences and are unsuitable for walking miles on mountain trails every day to and from school. However, Toms does supply winter boots instead in areas where severe winters are a problem. Further, the eye care poses a problem. If it is true that one set of eyewear equals care for one person, then surely not everyone will be able to be helped. The clinics will turn away countless numbers of people as Toms fall out of popularity. This is clearly not a permanent solution, but it helps the situation. Hopefully while we go through our college lives of keeping up with these trends, the Toms campaign will instill a value of care for the rest of the world. When we go out and begin our careers, maybe we will be inspired to help the underprivileged parts of the world. The act of buying shoes with the intent of benefitting a child in a rural village is a wonderful way to get your toes wet - water does soak through canvas - in the philanthropic world. I am excited that PLU is getting its toes wet by selling Toms.

ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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The M~ring Mastw

·~ . some Parlsi t f,ariswasbusy." . It's nantral to want to Yoika"s, $outh.Africat\$ and• generalize the places . yqu Pacific Lutheran sti.t,dehts rude. ·'·' ,, ~· It"s our w.aY.oc.•.:makfug areWhenl did an interttship ~ot the w'-Otld. • ·• And after allr '~the in Berlin, I worked closely W1lh another intern"at,th,t.v Berliners were rttd~' $®le roqtpA!:\Y ~~ s roum .,simpler b"Gm . . 'l , Succinct •. 1 ... cars '..thti . .• pe<>£ chara~2:e the ' pe\fer s · 0

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you to rethink. Tell an anecdote, tell a story,. hut don't let that story define your perceptfon of a nation.

It's nol: fair to then.'1..


THE MOORING MAST

12 OPINION

By SIU.NNQNMCCLAIN

~of yout~Jll

Guest Writer '1'"'' -..

SEPT. 27 2013

_}?.~

Eveey9fie at s,ome mm;nent or a:Q.d . Some who ljave already tnade PaCific and may not hav-e these feelings. However, others are still transitioning into their life at PLU and may find feelings of hpmesickness creeping up on them at unsuspecting

times. We miss the people and places we have known all our liv-es. tastyearwas my first year here, and I had these feelings every once in a while - iHs completely norm.al. I would find myself feeling homesiek while trying to fall asleep or when I would wish an old friend bad been here to witness a funny joke or when ccl¢brating an accomplishment..lf you find,_youtself feeling homesiclc, . .~·· these tips to try and dimi.ni$h ,. them. =~

1. !~~~~!!l~!~~~~!t

of people talking and laughing and you suddenly are overcome with homesickness, th.row yourself into the conversation. Talk, laugh and joke until you inunerse yourself in the talk of the group, and soon you will be an avid part of the conversation.

It works wonders for helping you forget your momentary

;:i;-

Lea:virigyour l'QOtn fur tn0re than j:USt g~~w classes and ta.king meals in the dining ropm is crucial. If you just sitin your toom alone, you are bound to feel homesick. Make an effort to go out and embrace your new envir-0mnent Take part in things going around on campus ~ go to a PLUt-0nic 0 r HERmonk concert or go to a lecture that sounds interesting to you. Hang out with friends outside. while the weather is still nice. Also, make sui:e you get.off campus once and .a while too. Go for a hike on Mount Rainer with Outdoor Rec or volunteer at a local event with friends.

4 . Get involved Decide on some activities you ate interested in and then participate. Join your hall's Resident Hall Council if you are interested in politics. If you like to write, come W:rite do so for The Mooring Mast or join the creative writing club, The Mark. Pick an intramural sport yo~ have never played before and go qyit There is a club or activity fqr everyone on campus. Even if you are not sure if you will lil<e it, decide to try a few. Making a place for yourself on campus is a great way tq meet new people imd createlong-:lasting friendships.

feelings and pave a bit of fun.

2. Establish a routine

5. Don't go home

Just because your parents aren't around to set rules for yoµ doesn't mean you should stay up until 3 a,ll)., skip class or eat apint ofice c;rearn from Old .Main Market every night · Establish your own daily routine that helps you get enough sleep, attend all your classes and eat healthily.Take the opportunities of (:()liege to empower youi:self and be more self-aware. Establishing a routine not only makes us feel seCUJ,"e in a new environment but also works to make us feel mote productive and mature.

Jt may seem very natural when you are feeling homesick to go home, but this will hinder you in the long run. Gomg home will temporarily curl;> your homesickruiss, but will not get rid of it O\i~r time. It will actually make you more homesiCk later op. Weekends are a gobd time to make friends, so stay.qn campus and spend time with them.

Sustainability Google's carbon footprint has deep impact

By HENRY SMITH Guest Writer Google is by far the Internet's most popular ~earch engine, but some might question Google's sustainability. AB a member of the generation that grew up on websites like MySpace, YouTube and Facebook, I think it is important to be aware of our own online

carbon footprint. For Google to operate, information stored on more than 2 million servers worldwide is run through an algorithm and returned in just 0.17 seconds. While this technological masterpiece has revolutionized the way we obtain information, few people may know the amount of energy that is used to provide the world with this service. It has been estimated that Google uses approximately 2 billion kilowatt hours per year of electricity, which equals 0.013 percent of the world's total energy usage - enough to power a city roughly the size of Miami.

Google uses approximately 0.3 watts, or 10 calories, of electricity to answer each search query. 1his produces one-fifth of a gram of carbon dioxide. 1his means one Google search consumes the same amount of energy as it would take to power a 60 watt light bulb for 17 seconds. Every day, Google could power roughly 1 million of these same light bulbs for 24 hours. In 2010, Google began to offset its carbon emissions by investing in renewable energy elsewhere. Before that, the company generated a total of 1.46 million metric tons of carbon dioxide each year. While Google has begun

"One Google search consumes the same amount of energy as it would take to power a 60 watt light bulb for 17 seconds."

to offset its emissions by investing in renewable energy elsewhere, there are significantly greener alternatives. For example, Ecosia is an environmentally friendly search engine that invests 80 percent of its income in planting trees in the Amazon rainforest to fight deforestation. Ecosia can easily be added to Google Chrome, or any other web browser students on campus use. Pacific Lutheran University is aiming for a carbon neutral campus as part of its 2020 program. While major renovations will help reduce the carbon footprint of different buildings on campus, it is important to reevaluate our own personal habits. Though it may be hard to believe, your Internet use has an effect on the environment. The next time you need to search for information for your class, choose to reduce your online carbon emissions by using Ecosia to make sure that we, as students, help this goal of carbon neutrality by 2020 succeed.

POSITIONS AVAILABLE Apply online at nttp://www.plu.equ/ career-connections/

Sept. 20, 2013

Corrections 1. Provost Steven Starkovich's name was misspelled on page 4 of the article "Unraveling the contingent faculty controversy." 2. The "necklace" the Rev. Richard E. Jaech received in the page 4 article "New ELCA bishop installed" is called a "pectoral cross."

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THE MOORING MAST

SEPT. 27, 2013

SPORTS 13

SPORTS ICDRllDARD Football

Men's Soccer

TEAM

WINS

WSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Pacific

3

0

0

0-0

Won3

Linfield

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

PLU

2

0

0

0-0

Won2

Willamette Whitworth

2

0

2

Puget Sound Lewis & Clark

0

3

0

0-0 0-0

Lostl

0

0-0

Wonl

0

0-0

WINS

PLU

7

0

Puget Sound

4

3

0

Willamette

5 4

2

Whitman

Won2

0

TEAM

Whitworth

Lost3

3

WSSES

TIES

2

CONFERENCE

STREAK

2-0

Won2

2-0

Won3

1-0-1

Wonl

1-0-1

Wonl

1-1

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Pacific

5

3

0

0-2

Lost3

Linfield

3

3

0

0-2

Lost3

7

0

0-2

Lost6

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

George Fox

UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 28 at WtSconsin-Eau Claire, JO a.m. UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 28 vs. Linfield, 2:30 p.m.

Women's Soccer TEAM

WINS

WSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE STREAK

Linfield Lewis & Clark

7

0

0

3-0

Won7

2

0

2-0-1

Wonl

Whitworth

5

2

2-1-1

Wonl

Whitman

6

2

0

2-2

Lostl

Pacific

4

2

1-1-1

Tied 1

2

0-0-2

Tied 2

0-1-1

Lost 1

PLU

2

2

Puget Sound

2

2

George Fox

2

4

0

0-2

Lost3

Willamette

2

5

0

0-3

Lost5

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VOLLE'nALL: Setter.Slurutn'tha N9rth, a junior, wasnameQ fill an . honor;i.ble m.entionfor WC Volleyball Sl;udent,.A.thlet¢<. the W~k a,ward (Sept.}6~22). ~l®itd'/i{~ttp:.!'~-pt)rlf;*""fla~!l•1Jt1~\;

UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 28 at Lewis d Clark, noon

WINS

WSSES

Puget Sound

7

4

0

2-0

Lostl

PLU

6

4

0

2-0

Won5

Whitman

4

11

0

2-0

Won2

Whitworth

7

7

0

1-1

Lostl

Lewis & Clark

2

6

0

1-1

Wonl

Pacific

2

7

0

1-1

Lostl

George Fox

5

5

0

0-2

Lost 2

Linfield

4

5

0

0-2

Lost4

Willamette

4

7

0

0-2

Lost5

UPCOMING GAME: Sept. 28 at Willamette, 7p.m.

SPORTS TALK What's your favorite fall PLU sport to watch and why?

Jake Otness, junior "Football, because

I work at the games and they're a lot of fun."

Zach Phelps, junior

Emily Ames, junior

Blake Petersen, junior

"Volleyball, because, well, you know why."

"Soccer, because the atmosphere is fun and exciting."

"Football, because I like the thrill of the game."

UNBEATEN STREAK IN FALL SPORTS PICK 'EM SURE TO CHANGE How many goals will the PLU men)s soccer team score this weekend against Lin.field and Willamette combined? By SAM HORN

Sports Editor The Oakland Raiders didn't stand a chance. At least not against the mighty Denver Broncos. With Peyton Manning at the helm of the dangerous Bronco offense, anything is possible. Apparently, every competitor in The Mast Sports Pick 'Em felt the same way as most of the NFL analysts did. These students all went with what their guts told them and chose Denver over Oakland. Their choices paid dividends. All of the competitors in The Mast Sports Pick 'Em are now undefeated, standing at 1-0. While last week may have been a walk in the park, this week is sure to stump most competitors. This week, the question is how many goals the Pacific Lutheran University men's soccer team will score against Linfield and Willamette combined this weekend. With the way the Lutes' offense is looking, how many goals the men will score is up in the air. The Lutes' offense has scored 18 goals in their eight games this season. That's a walloping average of just over 2 goals per contest. Senior Derek Johnson leads the team with

five goals. The Broncos' offense might be electrifying,

but the Lutes' offense is looking like a perennial powerhouse in the Northwest Conference this season. The competitors in The Mast Sports Pick 'Em won't have to worry about the Lutes losing though. It's not going to happen. The Lutes haven't lost a game since Sept. 1, 2012.

That's 388 days in case you weren't counting. The Lutes can contribute their successful season to their steadfast defense. In eight games this season, their defense has only allowed three goals. That's not a typo. Their defense is just that good. Unlike last week, the competitors in The Mast Sports Pick 'Em can't decide on one solid answer. While some students said the Lutes will score four goals combined, Kara Sherman went out on a limb and is predicting that the Lutes will score seven goals combined. Sorry to single you out, Kara. At least she is confident in her choice. She obviously has faith in the Lutes' ability to score. After scoring 18 goals so far this season, it's hard not to have faith the men's soccer team will win their games this season. This week will determine who will reign supreme. Stay tuned to find out who will win this week. As always, good luck contestants.

Kara S~etmati.(l~()) predie€ion:. I' ·

·Kara.has a lot of coD.fidence iri her prediction this week. It just might pay '" off.

Andre. \raenyan (I--0) prediction: 4!

Th('; swim $~,a$<>1l is ootbing up, so hop~fulJY Andte keeps his head jn the"

fi··

Kyle Peart (l·Q) prcdicti<>n: 6

g1u:he. ~ unbeaten,stre~kis preefous.

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predictiah: 4 Drew~ord (l-0)

prediction: 4

Valery Jorgen$en (1. .()) •

.

.

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prediction: "

Dalt<mltitehey (1-()) , predwtion:3

nt:unber. Max might be a hockey fanatic, but he isn't shy about strutting his stuff when talking 4\>out s®cer.

Drew w~ts t<> win th.is"oonipetil;lon. :Batlly! That~$ ,;why he did lrl,s re$e~h tmsweek.

··

Valeey wants to bec~m.e apt()fessfonal journalist. so $he did herfai:r share of

research QJi this'weekend's oonwsts. Even though Dalton. migh,t be mote c9nce:rned with t'MtbaU 1;1,-t th~roo-mttnt, he. wants t6 •\vfu this fompetition.


THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SAYS... By SAM HORN Sports Editor Making decisions is never easy. There are always multiple options that have their fair share of advantages and consequences. If the choice you have to make is significant to your life and can alter your career path, then it is pertinent for you to weigh your options. You don't want to end up making the wrong decision that could decide what you do with this one, precious life that we are all blessed with. About two weeks ago, I was a member of the Pacific Lutheran University football team. Being a part of this team was more than just playing football. It was centered on brotherhood. As coach Scott Westering always says, "it's not what you do on the field. It's about who you are." Being a part of this team was a great opportunity. I cherished every moment, even if I wasn't a starter.

Once I accepted the sports editor position at The Mooring Mast, I knew the job required a lot of responsibility. I have to devote much of every week laying out the sports section. Working at The Mooring Mast is a lot of work, to say the least. On the other hand, it is extremely rewarding. After a week of combining football and my editor tasks, I knew I had to part from one of these groups. I knew I couldn't quit my sports editor job, because I want to be a professional sports writer. I wanted to follow my dream of covering sports for a living. In the end, I knew I had to quit football. For several days on end, I couldn't stop thinking about the impact quitting football had on me, and I was so depressed about my decision. For a year and a half, I had been part of something special. I had quickly become great friends with many of the guys on the football team - I considered them brothers. Leaving them left a lump in

my throat. On Sept. 11, I walked to the turf field by Olson Gymnasium. I wasn't there to practice with my teammates - I was there to tell them I was quitting. I remember this moment distinctly. After my teammates huddled around me, I described how the sports editor position took too much of my time. I couldn't handle playing football and being the sports editor. I explained it was just too much work, and I wanted to focus on being the sports editor. my The reaction from teammates was astounding after I told them I couldn't play football any longer. Everyone smiled, knowing I had made the right decision. They were glad I was choosing what was best for my career. Receiving such positive responses from my teammates was breathtaking. I wasn't imagining them reacting so well. I want to thank my EMAL (Every Man a Lute) brothers for understanding my decision. It wasn't easy to quit

SEPT. 27 2013

Never go into a

decision bli路ndfolded football, but I think in the long run, it will help me pursue a meaningful career in journalism. Even though I did make the tough decision to quit football, I couldn't have done it without consulting with my friends. I have a sense of faith in all of my close friends, and talking with them about what I should do helped comfort me with my choice to quit football. If you find yourself stuck between choosing one thing over the other, don't fret. Many people are in the same spot. Never go into a decision blindfolded. Don't choose what to do just based off of what you think is cool or the 'right thing' to do. Always converse with your friends about what you should do. Doing so can help you make tough choices that might ultimately turn the course of your life in a completely different direction. At PLU, there are so many great avenues to choose from when you're seeking out help on what to do. If your friends have

said all they caft say and you are still not totally confident in your decision, talk with a counselor. Counselors are here at PLU to help you. They want you to succeed. If that means they have to help you make a possibly life-changing decision, then so be it. That's their job, and they're really good at it. This early on in my life, I'm actually glad I had to make this decision about whether or not to quit football. Making this choice to stick with my sports editor job has helped me mature and grow into a more knowledgeable person. I have learned that life isn't always easy, and you have to live with the choices you make. I miss playing football nearly every day. I miss seeing every single player on the team every day. I miss Wednesday night practices under the bright lights on the turf field. Even though I deeply miss football, I know in my heart that I made the best possible decision. It may not have been an easy one, but I can confidently say that it will help me out in the long run.

Volleyball sweeps competition Pacific and Lin.field fall prey to Pacific Lutheran University's steady attack and solid defensive play By NICK BARENE Staff Writer GAMEl

GAME2

The Lutes' volleyball team opened Northwest Conference play on Friday night in winning fashion with a three-game sweep over visiting Pacific University. In the opening set, the Lutes came out swinging, jumping out to a 6-1 lead. The team continued its dominance throughout the set, leading by as many as nine points. The Lutes went on to win by a score of 25-16. The Lutes carried the momentum from their first set win over into the second set. Pacific couldn't stop the speed of the Lute attack as they scored on runs of four and five points at a time. Sophomore Lucy Capron scored five of her team-leading 13 kills in the second set and led the Lutes to a decisive 25-15 win. Amber Aguiar, a junior, led the team with 21 digs, and senior Allison Wood added eight kills. In the third set, the Lutes once again jumped out to an early lead. Determined not to go down in straight sets, Pacific would battle back to come within four points late in the frame, but two kills by senior Becca Holtgeerts sealed the sweep for the Lutes. Head coach Kevin Aoki commended his entire team for good play and spoke about the depth of his bench. "Depth is huge for us. It is what has been keeping us at the top of the conference for the last few years, because they [our team] provide such tough competition in practice," Aoki said. "Bench players eventually become starters, because they already have experience." Junior Amy Wooten said, "I feel like every day in practice we're playing against a top conference team. That's how good our bench is."

On Saturday, the visiting Linfield Wildcats looked like they wanted to make a statement against the 18th ranked Lutes. That gusto was promptly extinguished by the Lutes, who won the match in straight sets for their second consecutive Northwest Conference victory. In the first set, the two teams traded a few hard-earned points before the Lutes pulled away for a crushing 25-12 set victory. PLU scored eight aces in the first frame alone, aiding its success. The second set told a similar story, with Llnfield coming out strong and scoring five straight points. The Wildcats held onto the lead until the Lutes took over on a service ace by Capron. The Lutes would not relinquish that lead and went on to win the set by a score of 25-20. In the third set, the Lutes scored five straight points to begin the set. Junior Samantha North scored all of those points. PLU didn't take its foot off the pedal and completed the sweep with a tight 25-21 victory. North paced the Lutes with a staggering 29 assists, compared to just 13 by top Linfield Wildcat Audrey Frazier. North has shown great court awareness during the 2013 season. She has racked up 354 assists over the course of 10 matches. North has the ability to fake the set and then dump the ball just over the net for a point. "The hitters are so amazing," North said. "I hardly have to do anything. I just throw it up there, and they go and hit it." The Lutes improved to 6-4 overall and 2-0 in NWC play after winning both matches this past weekend. The Lutes will travel to Willamette to play the Blitzes next Friday at 7 p.m.

PHOTOS BY JESSI! M.uoll

TOP; Bethany Huston 1111d Haley Urda.ltl, both seniors, combine for a. blocll llgllinst Linfield. BOTTOM LEFT: effort to set up a teammat.e. BOTl'OM RIGHT: Junior Samantha North sets up a ball for a kill.

Ha.Icy Urda.hi digH the ha.II in 1111

+


+

SEPT. 27, 2013

THE MOORING MAST

SPORTS 15

PHOTO BY .JESSE MAJOR

Running back Niko Madison, a junior, runs for a big gain against Redlands on Saturday. Madison leads the team in rushing yards with 160 through two games this season. The running back is averaging just over six yards per carry through two games this season. Against Redlands on Saturday, Madison racked up 118 yards on the ground.

LUTES CAPTURE SECOND WIN OF YOUNG SEASON Explosive Lute offense lays waste to Redlands' defense_for 474 yards in decisive win By SAM HORN Sports Editor Pacific Lutheran's second football game of the season saw the Lutes reign triumphant over Redlands, 35-14. The PLU football team pounded out 474 yards of offense against a weary Redlands' defense. It didn't take long for the Lutes to draw first blood. With nearly seven minutes remaining in the first quarter, quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior, threw a controlled pass to tight end Lucas Sontra, also a junior. The Lutes didn't stop their scoring rampage there though. The Lutes took a commanding 14-0 lead going into the second quarter after a one-yard run by running back Niko Madison, a junior. Madison went on to tally 118 yards on the ground against Redlands. Madison carried the ball 16 times, averaging a walloping 7.4 yards per rush attempt. Compare Madison's average to that of Redlands' top running back, Curtis Tanquary. The freshman running back averaged a meager 3.2 yards per run and totaled 47 rushing yards. The Lutes' defense wouldn't budge an inch, holding Tanquary back to such a limited amount of rushing yards. The Lutes' secondary took advantage of some offensive miscues by Redlands. Safety Sean McFadden, a

"It's all about focusing on beingthe best team we can be with the philosophy of our program." Scott Westering heMl,cQ~h

senior, and cornerback Jonny Volland, a senior, each intercepted a pass. McFadden was a First Team AllNorthwest Conference defensive back last year after picking off two passes and recording 61 tackles. While the PLU secondary caused multiple problems for Redlands' trio of quarterbacks, the Lutes' linebackers didn't make Redlands' offensive starters lives any easier. Linebacker Dalton Darmody, a senior, turned in an impressive game. The 6-foot, 225-pound linebacker recorded seven tackles, with one of them being for a loss of yards. Darmody also forced a fumble, recovered the ball and ran it in for a touchdown in the fourth quarter. He recorded a sack as well. That's a solid day at the office. While the Lutes' defense held Redlands' offense to just 227 yards, Kyle Warner, a junior, was Ritchey's favorite target, snagging five passes. The wide receiver, who set PLU football's single-season record with 1,265 receiving yards in 2012, tallied 137 receiving yards. No matter how hard Redlands' defensive backs tried, nobody could successfully cover Warner. Warner sealed the deal for the Lutes in the fourth quarter after catching two touchdown passes four minutes apart from each other. After Warner caught his second touchdown of the day, the Lutes held a 35-7 advantage. Fellow wide receiver Kellen Westering, a junior, also caught six passes for 78 yards. "They [the wide receivers] played an astounding game," Ritchey said. Warner accounted for about half of Ritchey' s 306 passing yards. While Ritchey completed 19 of his 34 pass attempts and threw three touchdown passes, Redland' s intercepted two of his. "I think Dalton [Ritchey] is excited to get better," head coach Scott Westering said. "He was razor sharp early and then he struggled.

Dalton learned from his mistakes. It was exciting to see the growth and maturity of the team and of Dalton and where he is." In the fourth quarter, defensive back Connor Hoffman, a sophomore, returned one of Ritchey' s interceptions 76 yards for a touchdown. "There were definitely a few balls that I wanted to have back," Ritchey said. "You can never be satisfied. There's always going to be plays in your mind that you wish that you could have back." Redlands managed to score a touchdown late in the fourth路 quarter, but it was just a set of consolation points. The California-based university had no chance of making a comeback with 37 seconds left on the clock. Even though the Lutes put up 35 points against Redlands, there were several missed opportunities in the kicking game. Field goal kicker Nick Kaylor, a senior, had the opportunity to add six points to the Lutes' score but failed to convert on both of his field goals. Kaylor was perfect on his extra point attempts, however, going 5-for-5. "It wasn't Nick's [Kaylor] day. It's not like next week, we're not going to kick a field goal," Scott Westering said. "Some days, for some reason, they just don't have it." On Saturday, the Lutes will travel to Wisconsin to square off against Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Game time is at lOa.m. Scott Westering said he believes that with enough hard work and determination, anything is possible going ahead into the Lutes' upcoming games. "It's all about focusing on being the best team we can be with the philosophy of our program," Scott Westering said. "It's about buying into our program and developing relationships with each other. It's who you are, not what you do. We just want to get as good as we can get."

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP: Wide receiver Kyle Warner, a junior, leaps up to make a catch against Redlands. BOTTOM: Linebacker Kyle Bennett, a sophomore, smacks Redlands' quarterback Alex Bridgford. Ben-

nett fini.Bbed the game with five tackles.


~ -a:: ~

~

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~

Dear Colleagues,

To the Dedicated Contingent Faculty of PLU: As Lutheran clergy, we support the social teaching of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and its call for a sufficient, sustainable livelihood for all people. Part of this moral directive is to honor the human dignity of everyone. We are created in the image of God, and it is from God that we derive our dignity, worth and value. The ELCA Social Statement on Economic Life speaks powerfully to how human beings should be treated in the context of the workplace: "our God-given dignity in community means that we are to participate actively in decisions that impact our lives, rather than only passively accept decisions others make for us. People should be involved in decisionmaking that directly affects their work ...[We] honor the right of employees to organize for the sake of better working conditions and for workers to make free and informed decisions; encourage those who engage in collective bargaining to commit themselves to negotiated settlements, especially when participatory attempts at just working conditions fail,' and discourage the permanent replacement of striking workers." In accordance with our faith, we support the contingent faculty of Pacific Lutheran University in their effort to form a union in order to increase active participation in important workplace decisions, improve working conditions and honor God's gift of human dignity. Pastor Michael Anderson, Holy Spirit Lutheran Church in Kirkland Reverend D. Randall Faro, ELCA, Retired Pastor Eric Utto-Galarneau, St. Mark in Lacey Pastor John Rosenberg, The Lutheran Church of The Good Shepard in Olympia Reverend Ronald F. Marshall, First Lutheran Church of West Seattle Pastor Howard Fosser, Retired Pastor Philip Nesvig, ELCA, Retired

ftU Col'ltil'l1e/lt F().£.l.l lt.f: St~l11q f rue to PLU VoJue71 Joii'll/1

9

~

Movef?1e11t

for Higher [due~ioll• act getherWa.ot9 0

As tenure-track and te.nured faculty members, we support the efforts of our conungent colleagues to organize with the Serwce Employees International Union (SE/U). PLU's conttngent facutty members form an unprofecfed class of employees. Despite excellent qualiflcattons and e'Perience, they have no Job secunty, are Paid a fraction of What we earn, have reduced access to /J/'Ofess/ona/ acUV/ttes, and are barfed by our faculty bylaws from parUcipating on standing committees. And those Who have Part-time appointments (the vast majority) have no vote in our faculty assembly, either.

.we applaud recent administrative attention to contingent issues, and urge that ft conunue. Hcwever, 1n order to ensure that the quality of education at PLU does not suffer as this university follews the national trend of relying more and more on contingent faculty to do its work, We a/so support the efforts of our conffngent colleagues to organize. We believe that a conttngent faculty that is organized With SEIU w111 be better able to systematically raise standarcJs of employment and to actogetherwa.org) Uphold the central importance of teaching and teachers at this university, and at Others. (http:/fwww.

>-3

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0 0

Fa7ulty who have organized at Other universIUes enjoy a Productive, collaborative re/affonship With their admm1strabons, and We ?re very confident that this is P<Jssib/e here as Wei/. We are, naturally, saddened that the admin1strat1on has chosen to toe the union-busung line, breaking with the ELCAS support for umons and commitment to 'honor the right of employees to organize for the sake of batter Working condittons and for Workers to make tree and informed decisions• (http:Jfwww.e1ca.org1wi,atWe-Be/1eve1socia/-lssues1soaa1-statemen1s1Economic-Lffe.aspx), Yet we have faith in the healing faculty elsewhere. Powers Of aJUst workplace, and anbc1pa1e a future at PLLJ that mirrors the eXperience of unionized

~ ~

~

C/.l

>-3

Given PLUS mission to educate students for lives Of thoughtful inquiry, serv;ce, leadership and care-tor ?lher People, for their communities and for the earth, We feel that, as Protected faculty members, 1t " our resp0ns1b1/1ty to demonstrate leadership and care for our co/leagues in this issue. We must also assure that the care we Profess begins at home. We urge our tenured and tenure-track CO/leagues to suppart the efforts of our COnffngent co/leagues. Their success can only benefit the members. enbre PLU communny, strengthening the bond betw.en conungent and tenure-trackJtenufed faculty With hope and support, Kirsten Christensen, Associate Professor of Gennan Amaflda Feiler, Associate Professor of Communication Beth Kraig, Professor of History Mafthew LevY, Assistant Professor ofEnglish KaitJyn SiU, Assistant Pro!essor of Pot/fica1 Seienc, Troy S10!tfei1, Associale Professor ofNorwegian and Scandinawan Studies Barbara Tempie-Thuroton, Prolessor ofEnglish

C/.l

Gio-a Urdangaroin, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies

"'d

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N ~ N Q

~

-+-


SPORTS

:rdens'soccerstill undefeated

AdE Life of a die-hard fan: a summer of supernatural

PAGES

PAGE7

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE OCT. 4, 2013

OORING

AST

mastmedia. plu.edu

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 3

LUTES DON TOGAS FOR ALL-HALL EVENT

PHOTOS COUJrrESY OF MIKE WELLS

Students decked themselves out in bedsheets held up with safety pins for Hinderlie Hall's annual Toga Party las.t Friday night. Loud music filled Hinderlie's main lounge as students danced for more than three hours. LEFT: Sophomore Sarah Henderson rocks out in a bright green toga. CENTER: Sophomore Andrew Morris grabs a smiling senior Carly Brook by the hand on the dance floor, while others mingle in the Hinderlie kitchen. RIGHT: Some togas were more revealing than others.

Police chase down, arrest car prowler in PLU lot By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor Police arrested a man for breaking into six vehicles in the Yakima parking lot at approximately 4:45 a.m. last Friday, Assistant Director of Campus Safety Ron Giddings said. The perpetrator smashed windows on five of the cars and forced a door open on the sixth. A student video officer with Campus Safety observed suspicious activity on the security cameras around the lot and called the Pierce County Sheriff Department immediatley, Director of Campus Safety Greg Premo said. Police arrived on the scene within two minutes and arrested the suspect when the individual tried to run away. Campus Safety said the suspect was not a PLU student.

Campus Safety sent out an email notifying the students whose cars had been broken into and asking them to fill out a theft inventory list with the sheriff's department. Junior Allison Reynolds had an iPod stolen from her Subaru, but her car did not suffer any window damage. "I was lucky my car windows weren't broken, but I felt bad for the students whose windows were," Reynolds said. Facilities Management provided the car owners with plastic bags to temporarily cover their windows from the rain. Only resident students with a parking permit are allowd to park in the Yakima Lot, which is located on the corner of 121st and Wheeler streets in the Northwest corner of campus.

Stay updated on this developing story online at mastmedia.plu.edu

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

A car prowler smashed windows on five cars and forced the doors open on a sixth early last Friday in the Yakima parking lot.

Renowned genocide scholar to visit PLU ByKJERSTI ANDREASSEN News Writer page8

Opinion

Editor expresses lo~ Washington rain

page JO

An expert on the Rwandan genocide and a globally renowned scholar on international law, Zachary D. Kaufman will be speaking on Tuesday at 7 p.m. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the concept and history of social entrepreneurship with Kaufman, a lecturer at and fellow of Yale University. Kaufman said he looks forward to engaging with students and faculty at Pacific Lutheran University. In addition to discussing social entrepreneurship, which is also the topic of his latest book, he

will present a case study from sub-Saharan Africa regarding the Kigali Public Library - Rwanda's first-ever public library. PLU was able to host Kaufman after receiving a grant from the Public Education for. Peacebuilding Support initiative. Kaufman has previously lectured at forums such as the United States Congress, the British Embassy and the Embassy of the Republic of Rwanda. His commentary and research have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post and several other publications. For Kaufman, it is no coincidence that he writes and speaks about these topics.

SCHOLAR CONT. PAGE3

ZACHARY D. KAUFMAN


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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 4 2013

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What to do atPLU Ongoing

~

Commuter student lounge open daily. 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m. AUC: The Cave.

Friday "The Dream is Now" film screening. Policy advocate for the ACLU of New Mexico's Regional Center for Border Rights will lead a Q-and-A after the screening. Ingram 100, 5-7 p.m. "Coal Cowboy" UnPLUg documentary interviewing the governor of Montana about reducing the nation's dependence on foreign oil by developing diesel fuel from coal. Foss Hall lounge, 7-8 p. m.

Saturday Work party at the PLU Community Garden. Join the garden club and learn about growing food in the Pacific Northwest. PLU community garden, on 121st across from Ingram . 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Sunday PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

Bruno's European Cafe, located just off the Parkland/Spanaway exit of 512, celebrated Oktoberfest in true Bavarian style last weekend. Sylvia's Band (pictured) provided live music, made toasts and yodeled in the large beer tent set up just outside the restaurant throughout the weekend. The festival featured imported beers served by the liter, souvenir mugs and a limited menu of traditional German cuisine.

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~

a

ex+ By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer Every year, the Women' s Center and the Diversity Center work together to host a series of lectures at Pacific Lutheran University known as Sex Positive (Sex+). The talks focus on discussing sexuality and educating students about it. On Monday night, Robyn Ochs, an LGBTQ+activist, came to campus and spoke for this year's first Sex+ event titled "Beyond Binaries." She began the talk by discussing various researchers that helped shape the world of sexology, such as Alfred C. Kinsey. "Kinsey put out the idea that sexuality exists on a spectrum - this was a huge finding of his research," Ochs said. Kinsey, a sexologist who founded the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, started researching sex in the 1940s and 1950s. His work showed that sexuality exists largely on a spectrum ranging from heterosexuality to homosexuality. However, it also includes other sexualities such as asexuality, bisexuality and pansexuali ty. In addition to emphasizing the lack of

Richard D. Moe Organ Recital Series featuring guest organist Daryl Robinson. 3-4:30p.m.

â&#x20AC;˘ Sexuality exists â&#x20AC;˘ on a spectrum

binaries in sexuality, Ochs also emphasized the lack of binaries when it comes to gender and sex. "Your sex is your bits, and your gender is your understanding of yourself," Ochs said. "Your sex and gender are not binaries." Ochs and modern sexologists have both said people are not exclusively male or female. Gender is a spectrum, and therefore people have both masculine and feminine traits. At one point during the lecture, Ochs had students fill out an anonymous questionnaire that ranked their sexual and romantic experiences in regards to their sexuality. Students would mark "O" for heterosexual experiences and "6" for homosexual experiences and answer questions about their activities within the past month, year and before age 16. Through this, Ochs was able to prove that not only

do students' sexualities exist on a spectrum, but also fluctuate quite a bit through time. The event also demonstrated how a person's position on that spectrum isn' t concrete throughout their entire life. "Think about yourself when you were 15 years old. And think about how you understood your sexuality," Ochs said. "Now, think of yourself today. Think about how you think of yourself as a sexual being today. Most of you have changed." As proven in the that Ochs experiment conducted with PLU students, people's sexuality changes and shifts. It may even change from heterosexuality to asexuality. "I thought that the talk was really enlightening," junior Christina Erikson said. "Robyn [Ochs] was fun to listen to, and I feel like I learned a lot."

"Your sex is your bits, and your gender is your understanding of yourself." Robyn Ochs LGBTQ+ activist


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

LUTES DISCUSS '0BAMACARE' Panel pieces together healthcare act one question at a time likely that the Republicans will come up with some backlash for the next election.

By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Social justice directors explored the controversial topic of "Obamacare" in a panel hosted by the Residence Hall Association in Hong Hall on Tuesday. Each directed questions to the panel about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that would pertain to the Pacific Lutheran University student population. The ACA, often referred to as "Obamacare," is a federal statute signed by President Obama to raise the quality of affordable healthcare to a larger majority of the nation. This is done by increasing the number of mandates, subsidies, insurance exchanges and other mechanisms to make insurance more affordable. Two students, junior Michael Cargill and senior Tess Raley, staffed the panel along with professors Karen Travis, healthcare economist, and Kaitlyn Sill, political science. Here is a brief list of some of the questions the directors asked: What is the most important aspect of the ACA students should know? Cargill: You can stay on your parents' healthcare plan until you are 26 years old, so it's nice to have that added cushion until you can get your own [insurance].

T: People working who are 55-65 years old are the winners, so they can get health insurance before they need more medical care. People ages 26-35 are the losers because they will have to pay a lot more than what they get back.

S: The shutdown isn't going to do anything. The shutdown is posturing, flaunting the power Republicans have in politics. Basically, money from your social security checks can't betaken away, but the people who process your check can be delayed. What is the difference between health insurance now and the ACA? S: Right now, Medicare is for the elderly and Medicaid is for low income. There are two types of insurance for mental health and physical health. AMA is combining and the two making healthcare for will pay more standardized everyone. What is your favorite myth about "Obamacare?"

C: There will be more probing questions healthcare economist at the doctor's and Raley: Students that physicians will generally want to get turn into government jobs in small businesses or start their own small agents. First off, you don't have to answer those businesses, and the ACA encourages that so they questions anyway and second, every aspect of your can afford health insurance. health is important, so if you get asked about your recreational drug habits at your colonoscopy, it's Travis: Changes from ACA will involve transfers important, not probing. - winners and losers. Younger people will pay more for older [people], and healthier people will R: That doctors will insert a chip into you to pay for sick people. You all are the losers. monitor your health and location. No part of the

Karen Travis

Sill: There are two parts to this big picture: the government is trying to get more people to have health insurance while simultaneously trying to pay for it. Politicians are facing the question of how to go forward with this without fighting individual rights, such as the freedom of religion and the right of individual choice.

ACA talks about chips. There is one section titled C.H.1.P., but that is an acronym for Child Health Insurance Plan. S: There will be these death panels at hospitals who will decide if people will get health treatment, or if they'll just check into the hospital to die.

What impacts will it have on the job industry? S: Right now, there's a law stating that if a company has over 50 full-time workers, they have to be provided with health insurance. If "Obamacare"'passes, there's the thought· that companies with 60-75 full-time workers will make some of them part-time so they won't have to pay full insurance.

You aren't req: · . ·)v¢:~tliinsutan~,. Travis said, btititwilf~tyaua'POOalWf~. For the.iirSt year you P.OlJ't have it, you have tu pay $95. That WiDgtMJ.Pt however, so that by2016 yottwill l;ie~ witha$7SOfee.

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Who will win and who will lose? S: That depends on your definition of winning and losing. It's hard to know right now, but it's

PHOTO COUKI'ESY OF ZACHARY KAUFMAN

Kaufman is co-editor and co-author of "After Genocide" along with Phil Clark.

Conference examines Jesus through -a Lutheran lens

How have the impacts to defund "Obamacare" impacted the government shutdown?

"Younger people for older [people], and healthier people will pay for sick people. You all are the losers."

SCHOLAR FROM PAGEi

OCT. 4 2013

As a Jew, Kaufman said he grew up learning about the horrors of the Holocaust and personally experiencing antiSemitism from classmates. He said, "on one occasion, a fellow student, who held me personally responsible for the death of Jesus Christ, picked me up, turned me over, and rammed my head repeatedly into a rock until I gushed blood." In some cases, he said, the children had adopted their attitudes from parents and religious leaders. This was how he learned the importance of killing myths, misinformation and misperceptions that lead to persecution. Kaufman was finishing his sophomore year in high school when the genocide in Rwanda occurred from April to July of 1994. Kaufman's mother was born in South Africa, and she told him stories from the region. "I remember hearing snippets

about the Rwandan genocide as it was happening and feeling a visceral reaction because of the traumatizing events in my own past and in the past of my religious community," he said. Kaufman said he wondered if there was anything he could do, but then he thought that since he was just a high school student so far away, there wasn't anything he could do. "I wish I could talk to that kid and tell him that people of all ages, anywhere in the world can - and should - play a part in raising public awareness about, pressuring governments to respond to and helping societies recover from genocide." This idea, he said, is part of what he tries to share in his teaching. "I hope that some leave [the lecture] inspired to pursue their own projects to promote positive social and or environmental change in their local or in our global community," Kaufman said.

PllOTO BY REI.AND TUOMI

University chair of Lutheran studies Samuel Torvend gives his lecture on the Cosmic Christ during the Lutheran Studies Conference on Sept. 26.

By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Speakers analyzed Jesus of Nazareth from a Lutheran perspective during the Lutheran Studies Conference on Sept. 26. Lutheran Studies programs at Pacific Lutheran University sponsored the conference, which included a Q-and-A session after each lecturer spoke. the Following dinner, conference concluded with a lecture given by keynote speaker Gail Ramshaw, a professor of religion at La Salle University in Philadelphia. The conference opened with Brenda lhssen, a visiting assistant professor in PLU's religion department, who described the Byzantine depictions of Jesus in the three main aspects of Byzantine life: Christ of Council, Court and Monks. Professor Samuel Torvend, university chair of Lutheran studies, followed lhssen. He spoke on the cosmic Christ and relation to the wounded earth. Torvend emphasized a point made by Lutheran minister and environmental activist Joseph Sittler - that the Cosmic Jesus is for the care of the earth. The third speaker was Daniel Peterson, is a professor from the Matteo Ricci College at Seattle

University. He focused on the dilemma between the spiritual and religious aspects of people's lives, emphasizing that many in the Pacific Northwest region mark "None" on their census forms when asked for their religious practices. These "Nones," as Peterson calls them, prefer to be spiritual rather than religious, and Peterson said that spiritualism does not mean there is no religion, rather religion has changed into a way to achieve happiness and harmony with God through nature and the earth. They want to experience through themselves religion instead of a structured setting. Ramshaw finished the conference with her lecture, "Jesus as a Champion, Sacrifice, Lover, and Tree of Life." She discussed the metaphorical literalism about Jesus as a figure with multiple identities. These included his role as a champion who works to liberate others, his role as a sacrifice for the good of others - and by extension a lover who sacrifices for others and his representation as the Tree of Life, intended to draw people to the earth. "I went because I'm a Lutheran, so I thought it would be interesting," junior Julia Glassy said. "I went to the Cosmic Christ lecture and I really enjoyed it."

Cosmic Jesus is for the care of the earth. Samuel Torvend University Chair in Lutheran Studies


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 4, 2013

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'NIGHT TRAIN' Jason Aldean concert is unforgettable By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor Blue and white lights shimmered across the ceiling of the Tacoma Dome as Jason Aldean wooed an audience of more than 20,000 country fans during his concert last Friday. The concert was a stop on Aldean' s "2013 Night Train" tour, though it also featured opening performances by country artists Thomas Rhett and Jake Owen. As an avid country fan, I had high expectations for the concert - Aldean is one of the biggest names in New Country. His newest album, "Night Train," sold more than 409,000 copies in the first seven days of its release.

Eagerly awaiting a live performance of some of the album's best, I navigated through the crowd to my seat in the middle section of the Tacoma Dome stands. Surrounding me were mostly people ages 15-25, who proudly sported cowboy hats, flannels, a menagerie of leather boots and a healthy serving of camouflage. Scattered within the young crowd were a few families with excited children, one of who spastically waved a sign that read "I love Jason Aldean" written in green crayon and decorated with cowboy hat stickers. When the stands had filled to near capacity, Rhett appeared and began to sing "It Goes Like This."

PHOTO COUIITESY OF JASONALOEAN.COM

Aldean poses for a photo for his "Night Thain" album, which was released on Oct. 12, 2012. It sold more than 409,000 copies in its first seven days.

The song was popular enough to be easily recognized by most of the crowd, and they promptly quieted down to listen. Unfortunately, Rhett's following songs not only lacked familiarity, but they also sounded so similar to each other that he began to lose the crowd's attention. People grew antsy, and empty cups seemed to travel back up the stairs almost as quickly as their freshly filled counterparts traveled back down. Finally, Rhett headed backstage and Owen took command of the crowd. He pushed back his shaggy, shoulder-length brown hair and sang his hit, "Days of Gold." Behind him, a huge video panel displayed the music video for the song. Images of ski boats, trucks, girls in cut-off jean shorts and a Southern style beach party flickered across the screen. Unlike Rhett, Owen managed to maintain crowd attention throughout his other songs. Some people danced, others sang along and some attempted to film the performance on blaringly bright phones and cameras. After Owen's performance ended, the concert crew changed out the entire set - instead of one stationary video panel, six panels that could move in formation stood above the stage. Aldean's long-awaited was successfully entrance theatrical. A huge orange video

PHOTO COUIITESY OF IASONALDEAN.COM

Aldean performs for an excited crowd during his "2013 Night Thain" tour. After performing in Tacoma, the tour will head south to California.

panel moved to stage level and displayed Aldean's contrasting black silhouette. Behind the screen Aldean played the guitar to the beginning of "Crazy Town." The panel lifted as the lyrics began, revealing Aldean. The crowd roared in approval and rose up from the stands to clap, dance and join in on Aldean' s songs. Aldean cleverly balanced his fast-paced songs with slower ones. He broke up his long performance when he shared personal anecdotes and made fun of his band members, who all shared a long past of bad haircuts. Each of Aldean's songs had something to offer - but the most memorable was his rendition of

"Night Train," for which the tour and album are named. Aldean' s energy and vocals introduced the song's vivid imagery of a night under the stars, but the speckled light of thousands of swaying cell phones and lighters brought it to life. When the concert came to a close, I walked out of the Tacoma Dome with my ears ringing and feet aching. Yet had I had the choice, I would have turned back around and listened to the whole concert over again. The talent, music and energy brought to Tacoma by Jason Aldean' s "2013 Night Train" tour was unforgettable and certainly worth the $50 ticket.

WHEN TRAGEDY STRIKES: How TV shows handle an actor's death ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer When an actor in an ongoing TV show dies, that person's character lives on until the director kills him or her or the show itself dies. The result is different for every show, with some attempting to soldier on. Others simply kill off the character and then fail due to dismal ratings. In July, "Glee's" Cory Monteith succumqed to a drug and alcohol addiction. The cast members on the show will carry on season five without Monteith's character,

Finn Hudson. There will be no replacement for his character. Cast member Lea Michele, who was Monteith' s real life girlfriend, will be continuing on with her character. There is no telling how "Glee's" ratings will fare as it has had ups and downs throughout the show's four-season run. Directors and actors on the show have said they would like to keep the show going in order to help the cast move past the grieving stage. "We ultimately found that our cast and crew wanted to be together," Ryan Murphy, a co-creator of "Glee," said in an interview with El magazine. "They wanted to go back to

Tune into Fox on Oct. IO for a Cory Monteith tribute episode of "Glee"

work, they wanted to sort of be in a place where they could all remember and discuss Cory [Monteith] sooner than later." The fate of "Glee" now rests solely on those who choose to tune in. Popular early 2000s television show "8 Simple Rules," which starred John Ritter as the father, Katey Sagal as the mother and Kaley Cuoco as one of their daughters, suffered a misfortune when Ritter passed away. Ritter, known for his classic appearance as Jack Tripper on "Three's Company," suffered a heart attack in September 2003, leaving the show with a fatherless void. The show continued on without Ritter, trying to replace his character with an eccentric cousin and a witty grandfather. Ratings after the death just weren't the same, and ABC canceled "8 Simple Rules" just one season later. Another option for a show when an actor dies is to replace the deceased character. Or, the show can simply go on, acknowledging the removal of a character. No matter what the show chooses, backlash is inevitable. Either die-hard fans disapprove

PROTO COUIITESY OF TlME;COM

Cory Monteith starred as Finn Hudson on Fox's hil series, "Glee." He succumbed to a drug and alcohol addiction and passed away on July 13. His character will not be replaced on the next season of "Glee."

of the new direction, causing the ratings to fail, or the show loses its magic and both new and old fans can feel the lack of vivacity. It is important to remember the other actors on the show cannot just walk away from a project due to a death. Harsh as this may sound, they and the show's staff put a lot of time and effort into the project. Since most shows that attempt to

the point?" attitude. The point is that the show, if it is a good show, has something to offer. Traditionally, all of the surviving cast members are often, in a sense, penalized for the death of another, and it is not fair. So let the shows carry on and attempt to pick up whatever pieces the tragedy of death leaves behind. Even if the show fails, it fails

continue after a main character's

on the triumph of trying rather

death fail, it can trigger a "what's

than the coattails of giving up.


THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

OCT. 4 2013

.

FILM EXTRAVAGANZA Experience the 2013 Tacoma Film Festival By EVAN DERINGER Guest Writer As students, we all need a little rest and relaxation time off campus with some good films, and the perfect way to do so is by experiencing The Tacoma Film Festival. This eighth year of The Tacoma Film Festival (TFF) runs through Oct. 10 and brings a number of short films from "northwest shorts" to "international shorts" and everything in between. TFF' s director, Laura Marshall, said TFF kicked off the festival in style with a classy "Opening Night VIP Gala," which was on Thursday at 6:30 p .m. at the Annie Wright Kemper Theater. It included a dinner followed by the showing of the film "GBF." "GBF" centers around a group of high school girls fighting for popularity when fellow classmate Tanner becomes the first openly gay student. The girls compete to be the first to have a Gay Best Friend while Tanner is forced to choose between popularity or leaving his past, and the people in it, behind. "GBF" is a comedy similar to the hit movies "Mean Girls" and "Fast Times at Ridgemont High." If a documentary is more your

speed, check out another one of TFF's films, "The Otherside." The Seattle hip-hop scene is exploding with up-and-coming artists that are changing the rap game as we know it, and this documentary is showing just how filthy Seattle can be. "The Otherside" focuses on Seattle hip-hop artists as they attempt to make it big in the "do it yourself digital age." Featuring artists such as Macklemore and the Blue Scholars, "The Otherside" is accompanied by two animated short films and will make its TFF debut today at 12:30 p.m. at the Tacoma Community College. If you miss this showing, there is a chance it may be shown again. TFF has several time slots to be determined, so take a look at the website, http://www. tacomafilmfestival.com to stay updated. Another noteworthy film is "Seventeen Hours In" whose director, Ivo Raza, was nominated for "Best Director" at the Long Island Film Expo. "Seventeen Hours In" is about a woman named Liz who, after being diagnosed with breast cancer, hooks up with a newly single man named Kevin, and together the two explore a mutual

fantasy. "Seventeen Hours in" is a fairly raunchy film that has elements of both comedy and drama. The film will play at 10:30 p.m. at the Grand Cinema on Saturday. TFF brings an opportunity for a night out with some friends with its closing night party, which features the film "Best Man Down" followed by a dinner. The film is a drama that tells the story of a newlywed couple who is forced to cancel their honeymoon in order to organize the funeral for their best man, who died shortly after the wedding. "Best Man Down" stars '~ccepted's" Justin Long, who is expected to be at TFF along with the director Ted Koland for the film' s debut. The Closing Night Party is on Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at The Grand Cinema. more information, For including a list of all of the films TFF will be showing and where they will be shown, head to the website http:// www.tacomafilmfestival.com and follow @tacomafilmfest on Twitter.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMAFILMFESTIVAL.COM

First-Years

MAP-Works • Is an interactive web-based tool that enhances your ability to be more successful in college. • Provides strategies for success and a custom ized report to help you get the most out of your first years of college.

Get Involved Ace Camp

urces

Questions? Contact the Office of Student Life e-mail: slif@plu.edu Phone: 253-535-7191

Look for an e-mail during the first weeks of school inviting you to participate in the MAP-Works online survey.

l


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New on Pacific Avenue Nerdy Stuffs offers comic books and community By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-In -Chief Nerdy Stuffs is here to save the day of any student looking for a local pop culture community. With comic books, apparel, card games, action figures, table top games and much more, local business Nerdy Stuffs now boasts a new location down the street from Pacific Lutheran University. It took approximately 24 hours this summer for the business to relocate from Spanaway to the lot behind the Mattress Ranch on Pacific Avenue. Founded in July of 2012, Nerdy Stuffs quickly outgrew its former location with high turnouts at its multitude of community events. "Our community was growing. Our inventory was growing," Kevin Knodell, the store's community outreach coordinator, said. In his position, PLU alum Knodell talks to local businesses and organizes programs. Of the store's patrons, Knodell said he hopes "they know that we moved closer and that we didn't move away." The store reopened in its new location on Aug. 17 with a free mini comic convention called Nerdy Con. The costumed crowd included a variety of local artists

and writers, including comic writers Brandon Jerwa and Clayton Crain. Nerdy Con was one way Nerdy Stuffs hoped to introduce itself to its new community as "not just a retail space," Knodell said. "It can be, but it's a social space too." With tables set up in the back of the store for customers to play games and follow demos, the staff of Nerdy Stuffs is happy to host its diverse crowd of young and old customers. '"Nerdy' would be the only demographic that really sticks," Knodell said. Nerdy Stuffs also consistently offers events in partnership with the Northern Pacific Coffee Company on Garfield Street. Every Thursday night since January, the two have hosted game nights at 7 p.m. at NPCC. Nerdy Stuffs and NPCC also team up with CLAW, the Cartoonists' League of Absurd Washingtonians, for networking and low-key gatherings known as Drink-n-Draws, where local beers and ciders are on tap for local artists and customers who come out to win prizes. Saturday's Drink-n-Draw raffled off two tickets to Jet City Comic Show, the Nov. 2 Seattle and Tacoma comic book event. Tickets for the show can also be

Nerdy Stuffs can be found on Facebook and in-person at 12223 Pacific Ave S.

purchased in-store for $8. According to its website, http://www.cartoonistsleague. org/, CLAW is a Tacoma "secretsociety'' cartoonist group that sponsors a scholarship for a student enrolled in school and interested in cartooning. In 2012, the group raised $1,059.10 through donations for the scholarship. With CLAW, Nerdy Stuffs sponsors the annual event 24Hour Comics Day on the first Saturday of October. Starting at 10 a.m., the event lasts 24 hours, during which participants are expected to complete a 24-page comic book. Like any Nerdy Stuffs event, anyone is welcome to participate, Knodell said. "There's no such thing as too nerdy or not nerdy enough." Those interested can sign up on the day of, but completing the event "is quite a challenge to do," Knodell said. "No sleep. No rest." The key to the event is to try to draw one comic per hour, Knodell said. "You're not necessarily going for quality." CLAW founding member and local artist Mark Monlux is slated to attend 24-Hour Comics Day. Nerdy Stuffs sells his work. Of the merchandise in Nerdy Stuffs, comic books are what drew in Knodell to work for the store. Knodell was a customer of Comic Book Ink before it closed and struck up a friendship with former Comic Book Ink employee, Carmen Melendez, who now serves as Nerdy Stuffs' general manager. . Knodell attained a part-time position that eventually became full-time. "Other game and comic

Life of a die-hard fan: By KELS MEJLAENDER Copy Editor

PHOTO COURTESY OF cwrv.COM

The ninth season of"Supernatural"

pr~m.ieres on Tuesdi-.y a.t 8 p.tn. on TbcCW.

When I look back on the summer of 2013, I may think about my job, the class I took and the new house I moved into - but I will always recall the friendships I forged watching The CW's "Supernatural." It began with a simple suggestion from my then housemate Jessica Welch, a senior, to watch the show with her on Netflix. With one week of my summer class on Islam remaining, I naively assented to watch, unaware I would shortly deteriorate into a rabid fan incapable of thinking of much else. The show centers on two brothers, Dean and Sam Winchester, who travel around America fighting spirits, demons and other supernatural monsters. The show introduced a complex mythology of angels to complement its demonic aspects in the fourth season. Their jobs, as older brother Dean Winchester states in the opening episode, involve "saving people, hunting things - the family business." My other housemate Malena Goerl, a junior, watched with mild interest at first, but quickly

joined me in the vortex of extreme fandom. On a good week, we could watch four to five episodes every weeknight, hitting double digits over the weekend. With eight seasons and 172 episodes to power through, completing the available episodes before summer's end - with full-time jobs - was a bit of a trial. The story, however, provided a combination of plot, character and humor we were incapable of resisting. "Supernatural" boasts some of the most colorful lines of dialogue on television, with gems like "cram it with walnuts, ugly'' and "text me when Sparkles here retrieves his memory." We even transformed the whiteboard in our house into a "Supernatural Quote Board" for the summer. The characters that spout off these lines have had more than enough time to develop over eight seasons. My favorite is Castiel, an angel of the lord who eventually becomes a close friend of the Winchester brothers, particularly with Dean. Not familiar with the more minute aspects of human

PHOTO BY JESSICA TRONDSEN

Kevin Knodell, Nerdy Stuffs' community outreach coordinator, stands among the many rows of comics available at the store.

stores don't have community outreach coordinators, but that's what makes Nerdy Stuffs unique," Knodell said. As Hollywood takes on more and more superhero based movies, Knodell said he thinks "people should care about comic books, because it's a storytelling medium that deserves a lot more respect than it is often given." Although Nerdy Stuffs sells several different kinds of comic books from local artists to Batman, Knodell said the card game Magic: The Gathering is one of the best-selling items at the store. The fantasy-adventure trading card game can be played by two or more people. From his experience working at Nerdy Stuffs' community events, Knodell said he believes "the artists and writers in the industry are some of the hardest working people I've had the good fortune to meet and some of the

most creative certainly. I think they deserve people's attention," Knodell said. "And their money." Nerdy Stuffs is open seven days a week and offers a 10 percent discount on most items to those who present valid student ID~ "We love our Lutes," Knodell said. "We're happy to call this neighborhood our home."

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

An epic summer of 'Supernatural'

PHOTO BY RlCHARD OLSON

Keis Mejlaender and her housemate, Malena Goerl, pose with their giant whiteboard full of "Supernatural" quotes.

culture, Castiel is often a source of unintentional comedy. For instance, when Dean . Winchester jokes they can try looking for God in New Mexico because he's heard he's on a tortilla, Castiel replies earnestly, "no, he's not on any flatbread." As engaging as the show is, coordinating our schedules to watch together proved difficult, and when Jessica moved out, she told us to carry on without her. Within two weeks, Malena and I had finished the eighth season. Despite scheduling challenges, "Supernatural" brought Malena and I from mere acquaintances

to addiction buddies. Jessica and I further solidified the friendship we had built as housemates the year before. something about There's experiencing a story together - about sharing that fun and commitment that creates some of the strongest bonds. You scream together, you laugh together and you share more inside jokes on Facebook than your other friends can stomach. It doesn't hurt when the story itself is particularly remarkable. Season nine of "Supernatural" premieres on Tuesday at 8 p .m. on The CW.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

OCT. 4 2013

Accounting or Dummies THI~K AHEAD, PLAN FOR RETIREMENT NOW By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Living paycheck to paycheck can be incredibly stressful, especially when students have to start paying for things themselves. Students can take the cost of rent and food for granted when living with parents or guardians, who cover these basic costs of living. Then when they suddenly have the opportunity to move into houses with a bunch of their friends their junior year at Pacific Lutheran University, the responsibility for these basic needs falls on them. This can make it hard to start saving money in college since it is difficult enough to work parttime to barely cover these costs while going to school full time, so relying on parents or working more may be the only options while in school. But as soon as students leave school to join the workforce, it is imperative they start saving because having that little extra cushion will make life much easier. Starting to save is the hardest part. According to The Huffington Post, the median annual income for recent graduates is now $46,412, or about $3,868 per month. After 25 percent goes to taxes, an average of $700 for rent and an average of $287 per month on

food, according to http://www. loweryourspending.com, there is still $1,914 of disposable income that each person must decide what to do with. It may be tempting to take all of the money and go buy a bunch of new toys like a big flat screen television, a PlayStation 3 and Grand Theft Auto V. But resisting the temptation and putting $200, about 10 percent of the remaining take-home pay for the average recent college graduate, into savings can prevent a lot of headaches in the future, or even grant a person millionaire status come retirement time. Let's look at two recent graduates, Torn and Lisa, who are both 22 years old. Lisa decides to start saving for retirement right out of college, and Tom decides to wait a few years and buy a brand new BMW first. Lisa starts putting $200 a month into an individual retirement account (IRA) for a total of $2,400 a year for the first five years, and when Tom starts saving in year six he does the same. The chart shows what will happen to both accounts over a 45-year period of steady monthly deposits of $200 and an assumed annual interest rate of 8 percent. Lisa comes out with a balance of about $967,500, nearly a millionaire. Tom, however, ends up with a balance of about $648,500, a sizeable amount still but $319,000

Tom and Usa·RetirementSavings Account Balance $1,200,000

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less than Lisa simply because he started saving five years after she did. When he started he was only $14,900 behind, but the magic that is compound interest made the gap significantly wider 40 years later. This story illustrates two key points: the earlier a person starts saving the better, and it is never too late to start saving. Ten percent is a relatively

small amount of a person's disposable income and making larger deposits will only make the ending figure more impressive. For example, $500 monthly deposits, just over the 25 percent mark, for 45 years will lead to an ending balance of over $2.4 million. Sounds like enough for all that travelling that was put off while climbing the corporate ladder, with plenty leftover to

live comfortably on a day-to-day basis. Long story short: start saving sooner, retire sooner and with more money. Next time an opportunity arises for a big shopping spree, think about putting some of the money into a savings account instead. Future you will appreciate the thought.

Shutdown problematic for Boeing By PETER MUELLER Guest Writer On Monday the GOP threw an "antiObamacare" wrench into the gears of the U.S. federal machine, causing a government shutdown. The Senate is standing divided over the issues of universal healthcare and the Federal Budget. Domestic businesses are hoping to see a resolution before witnessing the repercussions of the shutdown. Aerospace manufacturer Boeing looks at the month ahead with an eye of discontent. With the omnipresent veil of the government shutdown and potential intrusion within commodity markets by the Federal Reserve, Boeing faces possible pitfalls in the weeks ahead. Early last month, Boeing showcased the

new version of its flagship airplane, the 7879 Dreamliner, in an effort to compete with rival Airbus's A350-800. The upgraded version of the 787 offers 38 more seats and an expanded range of 8,478 nautical miles. Although the new 787-9 is ready for production, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) must certify the planes before Boeing is able to commence production. According to Bloomberg, approximately 15,000 FAA employees were furloughed on Tuesday morning. Among them were the 2,800 safety inspectors needed to approve the new 787-9. Shortly after, the FAA released a statement that all aircraft certification will be postponed. If the government shutdown is to continue through mid-October, the March 2014 delivery dates of the 787-9 could be pushed back for the fifth time in the

PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.CNN.COM

First Boeing 787-!l Dreamliner being rolled out of the factory in Everett on Aug. 27. Air New Ztalnnd is schedulrd to ret·ehe the first 787-9 in mid-2014.

Dreamliner's brief history, according to USA Today. News of delays could weaken Boeing consumer confidence within the aerospace market, and benefit French rival Airbus. Boeing is not only facing possible pitfalls from the inactivity of government, but also from government interference. After much scrutiny from government regulators, the Federal Reserve is now reviewing the role that banks play in the commodities market. In 1999, Congress enacted the GrammLeach-Bliley Act, allowing banks to invest freely in physical commodities. Those looking to reverse the bill argue that Wall Street has gained too much power over vital aspects of commodity infrastructure that could affect the economy when managed improperly. In an attempt to sway lawmakers against the reversal, a group of corporations,

including Boeing, issued a letter warning the Federal Reserve. The letter urged lawmakers to consider the positive effects that financial institutions have had on dampening the volatility of commodities. The involvement of financial institutions in physical commodities has also eliminated the need for businesses to set aside capital for storing raw materials. If the Senate subcommittee overseeing the case rules in favor of limiting Wall Street's involvement in the commodities market, commodity prices could rise ,hindering the domestic aerospace manufacturing industry. With U.S. furloughs and the possible reversal of the Gramm-Leach-Billey Act, Boeing could stand to lose a segment of its market share to nemesis Airbus.


OCT. 4 2013

THE MOORING MAST

ADVERTISEMENT 9

THE FUTURE RESTS WITH YOU Our Campus Our Culture Our Mission

We work each day to transform the lives of our students, and we are stronger when united as one community. Our culture of collaboration - where we care for each other as individuals and hear all voices - is rare in higher education today.

Vote to preserve our PLU community. Vote "no" on the union. Ballots must be received by the NLRB in Seattle by Oct. 10.

For more information go to: .plu.edu/unionfa

+


THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

OCT. 4 2013

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Out of state students: Get used to the rain By SAM HORN Sports Editor It's that time of year again. Yes, our nation has graced us with football, but that's beside the point for now. There's another place and time for that. With fall here, I can only help but admire what's happening outside. Every second, the grass accumulates more and more water. And it's all because of something special called rain. The state of Washington is known for its rain, and rightly so. It rains 150 days out of the year here. There are two things you can do after hearing that mind-blowing statistic. The first option is to scream and pound on your wall if you hate rain. If you fall under this category of person, you will probably move away to some sunny state in the South. Have fun with that.

Your second option is to smile and embrace the notion that it rains here in Tacoma about 150 days. Hearing the rain gracefully fall on your window sill is without a doubt one of the most peaceful sounds known to the human ear. All you want to do is fall asleep. I can't blame you. Rain can certainly act as a remedy for certain aspects of life. If you're having issues finishing your homework on a rainy day, don't panic. Just take a minute and hear the rain knock at your doorstep. It's beckoning for you to step outside and give it a giant, hug. enveloping Don't be afraid of it. It won't bite. Last year, I was studying for a religion exam. I had been studying for about three consecutive hours and my brain simply couldn't handle memorizing what the term 'exodus' means and where Jesus was

born. I had to take a break. As I closed my book, my eyes to the traveled .opposite side of my room. There, smiling at me in all of its intoxicating, natural beauty was the rain. I took one look at the rain and instantly grabbed my bright yellow Patagonia rain jacket. I ran outside and jumped around in the rain. The rain engulfed me with its large drops of water, and I was smitten. I didn't want to leave. There was no way I was going back inside and studying for my religion exam. As fall settles in, there's no way Pacific Lutheran University can avoid the rain. But that's a good thing. We need to appreciate the rain more. It's a way of life for Washingtonians, and all we can do is accept it into our lives. There's no way around it. If you're thinking about moving away because of the rainy

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lut heran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CIIlEF

Jessica Trondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

Winston Alder mastads@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR

Alison Haywood A&EEDITOR

Kelli Breland BUSINESS EDITOR

Bjorn Slater OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill SPORTS EDITOR PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Sports editor Sam Hom smiles through the downpour while walking through campua.

weather here, think again. The next time it rains, consider how soothing it is. The rain is here to be our friend, not our worst enemy. The next time it rains1 just think of how lucky we are. At least we're not in Arizona, where it could potentially be more than 100

degrees with not a drop of rain in sight. That's a depressing picture, or maybe I just have to admit that the rain has turned me into a true Washingtonian. Whatever the case may be, I am certain of one thing: I love the rain.

Sam Horn PHOTO EDITOR

Jesse Major SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Keis Mejlaender COPY EDITOR

Reland Tuomi ONLINE EDITOR

Leah Tra.xel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER

Storm Gerlock NEWS @NINE PRODUCER

Allison Reynolds

Immigration hits home By CARYLY BROOKS AND WENDY MARTINEZ Guest Writers Though immigration is complex, that should not be a reason to disengage and be oblivious to its effects in our country, local communities and, in particular, our campu s. Two voices have come together to collaborate on this piece to demonstrate that understanding immigration can come from multiple perspectives and vantage points and cannot be reduced to a singular issue. This opinion piece is an invitation to Pacific Lutheran University to engage with the local and global aspects of immigration. Immigration is a global issue. Global wealth inequality, neoliberal trade agreements and violence have pushed the majority of migrants to the U.S. and other countries in the global north. In addition to our economy's labor needs, the desire for family reunification and for a better life have brought m any migrants to the U.S. There are heavy flows of immigrants all over the world, disproportionately from the global south to the global north. Scaling down our scope a little bit, immigration is also a local issue. The Northwest Deten tion Center is a facility that detains immigrants throughout our region. A m assive 1,575-bed facility and one of the largest immigration detention centers in the United States is right in PLU's backyard.

However, actually getting to the facility is no easy task. The NW Detention Center is a gray complex complete with a razor-wire fence, and can be found only after driving deep into the industrial tide-flats of Tacoma. Every day, thousands of cars on the interstate pass within a 10-mile radius of the facility, completely unaware of its existence. H owever, for some undocumented students on PLU's campus it can cause anxiety. The nearness of the NW Detention Center is an emblem of a broken U.S. immigration system that profits off of the detention and criminalization of immigrants. Now, bringing it very close to home, immigration is a PLU issue. The erroneous perception of undocumented immigrants as criminals often clouds our vision of immigrants in our own communities. There are undocumented students on this campus, and they are our friends and our peers. We disclose this, not so that they are judged, and not to assume that all students from immigrant families are undocumented, but for awareness and education. Leno Rose-Avila, the director of Seattle's new Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, served as a panelist for PLU's Constitution Day this year on the "Immigration Near and Far," lecture. He noted cer tain hypocrisy in the term "illegal." Rose-Avila said many congressional representatives break laws, yet we do not refer to them as "illegal" representatives. We do not refer

"There are undocumented students on this campus, and they are our friends and our peers."

to students who have received parking tickets as "illegal" students. We think it is wrong to apply this dehumanizing term to immigrants, especially students brought across the border at a very young age. We agree with the many signs held at mobilizations around the country - "no human being is illegal." There is no single story of immigration in the United States. Immigrants are not on e homogenous group but are from m any diverse groups. We ask you to not make assumptions but to engage with the complexity and multiplicity of the stories and the issue. Rather than simply restating the myths of immigration, look into how undocumented students, or "DREAMers," have mobilized across the country for the right to take part in a society they call home. In March 2013, Washington State passed the DREAM Act, Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors, which allows students to have temporary residency while they receive higher forms of education. Be conscious of the sacrifices that DREAMers are willing to make for their education. Some have walked from Miami to Washington, D.C., have gone on hunger strikes, have received death threats for their activism and have been arrested in order to advocate for access to higher education for themselves and other undocumented students. One way to broaden your awareness is to come to the screening of "The Dream is Now," a documentary that puts a name and a face to many of the DREAMers, students who made their immigration status known to advocate for their own educations. We encourage everyone to attend tonight at 5 p.m. in Ingram 100 as an important step toward making PLU a more welcoming, knowledgeable and supporting community for each and every student on campus.

ADVISERS Clift' Rowe Art Land

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast st aff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the T uesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves t he right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections Sept. 27 Issue

In the page 4 article uExplaining the Pacific Lutheran University life of Laura Majovski," the name of S. Erving Severtson was misspelled.

+


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 4 2013

OPINION 11

Wanderlust: The Dreamers <:>f.SaigQn. '

~

By KJE~TI ANDREASSEN Guest Writer

.

.

*

hQspitabler and they love pract!Cih,g their E$glish. So three hours after meefulg

5omeone, I'd be on a er~ and lethal J;notorbike ride on my to a fawrite

Less than .f9Ut months ago, I was standing Qt). my h<>tel room baloony and saylng,. ;'gQOd morning, VJetrtam." I visited the ·\?Pu.ntrY with a·team 0£· 12 other pegple , ~ part <>£ a t:N-ee~moJltll:

plro place.

way

'

I met some incredible •J)e<> ~m. .N;hu,. a J.4..year...old; ' tlµ-Ough ~ .... d' ts so that by the ~. + miSsion~ ~ p~ . "English bf!P~: 'On " . . ty· .mol'.Qihg, ·r·.was.i!K · ~. er Galbes.'~ · ~ in/.. . .ne of a bustllng Saigon , .. e •. w~ a1sQ Angi~, ~· ~Vi~year-­ street, trying .£0 tell the vendors a~art. r~ was a gree~~to a country 1 didn't .know ot ])anker who had lost her jol:>. due ~o cutbacks. She now :Wat&es - m.ore like and a people l hadn't met. memorizes -the 1V show "F~" and Vietnam is what some of us call a "closed countiy /' Little information tea~ EngijSh as a volunteer. Anne Mane, a young German g.ttI who contr-.ry •to the vernroent agenda goes in or ottt. It · a Very poor counby puther studie$ on hold so shed>~ come the Vjetnamese peopl¢, ther with a lot of ~al problems. , n l .• met Durirtg her · ; She So wl'l.ena·~pµ.p-0f white people go to d a passion ,for tea:chin, .le, Sajg(>tlfottw6weeywifuthe ~tip~, is back in-Oerm~ 'gn to "go w~ ... gs lead !,hew/~ this i-1,.

whath

.

.

I saw ~~ in young people who

·

people, r ha-ve no excuse. None of the Vietnamese people I met acted like Victim.st even though by our standards they probably are, Instead, they rise aJx>ve •What 1he world has handed them. They resist fear, and act. Th$? p+:0pleiare hardw9ddng, and they know h~ do what is in £ront of · '' any of them Profr any people gtu

.

~w th()Se who ran a coffee· shop with the intent of helping disabled people find work. J saw others who went out and pla~ with orphans and who talked to young women at an abortion clinic. Dreamers who dream not a,t night~ bttt ·ghtof day. Pe0ple who ~arp

• actions foreshadow what.their 4rul

~ W;ghl ~/";'Y

!ife;

1

t saw"dteamers ;who.,W'orked their tall

off to learn 'Engl:iSh. 'I'M oldest one was 64 years old ....,. the youngest was 14. r

.

y, I met Mrs. Bao, a

wanted a beftef' life for themselves. I saw :Won.µm, and het Amerlcatt huSbMd. dreams for (quntry to become a better After se\reral dt!eade$ in the U.S.r they

a

place. I saw~· on behalf of others. 'But they didn't stop with the dream they did things to make it happen. I can think ofsevetal occasions when I would go to the park and end up meeting some amazmgnew people. P~ple " h;t are extteinely

fi.etnam.

"I saw dreams in young people who wanted a

better life for themselves:'

went back to Vietnam. " Mrs. Bao takes in the dUldren of unwM mothers while those mothers get their lives together, at whicti point she either continues to raise the Child Qt ideally - the mother com(;).$ ·to. pick up

·her child.

·· ·

w"

;tatee>. .ill Vie~ . are llirough the roof, and 6()-70 ~nt of i;he population between 15 and 1~ years 9.f age have had abortions, •Mrs· f>ao told us, "my own children ate adults ru:>w. The children here need me ·more." This woman has 10-20 infants and small children living in her home. My experience in Vietnam changed me. {t gave me courage. Be<:ause wh~ people who face outrageous p<werty and .persecution tan do so much .f<>r other + %'f\f,9rtion

P8010BT~l~

A street vendoriii lfu CblMinh City (Saig-on), Vietruun.:, .~chopped fruit wgo in littl~ plMtic bftgs. Street v~do)'.S ()ften come from poorer parts-Of Vietnii.i:ll ro the city t~ try to make a life for t:beJnSei"l'eS. Still. lt.i~·· Of them live in glatlng' p<iv~

':':·.

"'"~ -~~-·-.-~.,,&~

Sustainability LET'S TALK TRASH By NICK LORAX Sustainability Lead As the sustainability lead at Pacific Lutheran University, Nick Lorax paints a garbage-filled picture and explains what students can do to help contribute to a waste-free campus. The Pacific Lutheran University community boasts a waste diversion rate that pummels the national average. This rate is the percent of material we successfully divert from the landfill in a given period of time. PLU is 68-72 percent, which is far above the national average of 34.1 percent. But we have a long way to go. The PLU Climate Action Plan, published in 2010, calls for our campus to be carbon neutral and waste free by 2020. So if everyone out there is already recycling, some ll}ight wonder how we are going to get from 70 percent to a more than 90 percent diversion rate in the next seven years. Start with the easy stuff. Many paper products can go in the recycling or compost - that cardboard coffee cup, paper towels, napkins from your lunch, this copy of The Mooring Mast, your old daily planner even. If it is paper, put it in the recycling. Additionally, any plastic that you can stretch, referred to as 'plastic film,' can go in the recycling as well. Other recyclables include Styrofoam packaging and packing peanuts, CDs and DVDs, batteries and anything metal, as well as untreated and unpainted wood, mattresses and ripped, tom or soiled furniture. Even clothes in good repair can be recycled.

Lastly, all food products are compostable. A huge portion of the landfill waste that

leaves our campus is compostable, organic food waste. Stay tuned for my next article on compost for further details. If we could sort all our garbage perfectly on campus, I am pretty confident we could get up in the 90 percent waste diversion range, but that still is not a waste free campus. While I am asking you to take the time to actually get your recycling in the right container, I am also asking all of us to make smarter consumer choices. There is no excuse for food vendors to still be using Styrofoam containers. If you go out to eat, ask for a cardboard container 'to go' or bring your own container for leftovers like my partner has insisted we do. Bring your own reusable coffee mug. We drink a lot of coffee on campus, but that does not mean we have to use a lot of paper cups. While it is true the paper cups are recyclable, the most sustainable cup is the one that is never manufactured in the first place. Finally, don't buy garbage in the first place. For example, a nice wooden desk is beautiful, durable, easily repaired and can be resold when it no longer fits your needs. Conversely, cheap 'box store' furniture is made with particle board, easily damaged, impossible to repair, held together by glues made of volatile organic compounds and is impossible to recycle. That means it must be sent to the landfill when it gets chipped or wet. As consumers, we have a lot of power. Each dollar we spend is a vote either for a disposable culture or an enduring community. Think critically about even the most mundane of the decisions you make, as ea and every action we take shapes the

reality of our shared future.

P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast

Pay less attention to pop culture By ALYSSA FOUNTAIN Guest Writer If the eyes are the windows to the soul, surely what we watch must give us a clue about what we really hold dear. Social media and the newest trends all clamor for our attention, but we are deeper people than that. At some point we all need to know what is going on in the world so we can engage with it. Miley Cyrus has won the attention of almost every TV-watching, Internetsurfing person out there after her VMA performance. It was incredibly shocking, slightly horrifying and demeaning, but what is worse is that she took up almost every stage while other things happened worldwide. Four days before Miley Cyrus' performance, the Syrian government used chemical weapons on its own citizens. During that week, the U.S. government debated about going to war with Syria. In the weeks that have followed, militants have killed multiple people at the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, the American government went into a "Shutdown" and Venezuela has

threatened three U.S. diplomats, accusing

them of plotting to overthrow the government. We have to ask ourselves what is so intriguing about Miley Cyrus and other celebrities that cause us to not worry about life-or-death situations. At Pacific Lutheran University we have so many chances to engage the world, but we do not choose to do so very often. We, as humans, like to spend our energy on things that we can relate to. We crave information on something that applies to us, to our generation or to someone we grew up with. Most of us do not think on a worldwide scale simply because we don't understand what is happening. Moreover, we are afraid to confront the reality of the state of our government, or even to process the concept of a child victim of chemical warfare. This response, while understandable, is something I discourage. Even though it hurts more to look at victims of war, it will lead to a greater empathy with our fellow humans. Though it is taxing to try to understand a government shutdown, it is necessary to know where our world today stands. Miley Cyrus captured everyone's attention for good reason. Yet while that happened, the world kept turning and atrocities occurred. At the end of the day, it is your choice on whether or not to keep up with what is most shocking to your taste buds or the flavor of the whole meal.


THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDYBREAK

SIDEWALK TALK How is living in a residence hall that offers gender-neutral housing? Cierra Pettit, sophomore "I like living in a hall with gender-neutral housing, becau se it provides a more welcoming community for everyone."

Kevin Long,junior "Being an RA in the genderneutral housing wing has been great so far. It's a really welcoming community. I find it interesting to see how residents interact with one another when they are living in a wing that's not restricted by traditonal gender limitations."

Lauren Cashman, sophomore "I don't currently live in gender -neut ral housing because I'm an RA, but I think it's a really great opportunity, because in my opinion, everybody has the right to be comfortable in their living environment. I think that gender-neutral housing really provides that opportunity for everybody to feel comfortable."

OCT. 4 2013

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 13, 2013

42 Provide

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lights 36 Protector the meaning 11 Belittled 37 Eye part that 44 Angry frowns 12 "The Divine contracts 46 Gets back at 41 Eternally Comedy" 48 Part of a 43 Airport author lunch lady's 13 "I thought posting get-up never (abbr.) 49 Hammond leave!" 44 Beach towel 18 Things to product grains 50 Income connect 45 Outspoken from wealth 22 Corn serving foe of Antony 52 Bring up 23 Hawaiian 46 Ancient the rear "Hi!" Athenian 53 "It's Always 24 lazuli statesman Sunny in 25 Excavator 47 Madrid tourist Philadelphia" of a sort attraction actor 26 Use your 58 "To a Sky48 "First Lady of maxilla and mandible lark, " for one the Theater" 59 Hollywood 28 Low-budget Helen star Murphy 50 Computer film, often 60 Broadcast 29 "Open all command 51 Fit of bad more than night" sign, maybe temper once 61 "Neither" 31 No longer 54 Ruckus counterpart 55 Retirement bursting at 62 Alex Haley planning opt. the seams? opus 33 Camera 56 Machine63 Practice viewpoint gun syllable public 34 Might, to 57 "_nation, speaking Shakespeare under God ..." DOWN 1 Not divisible ""' HEY, D路DIDDLE D路DIDDLE By Gary Cooper by two ,.,........,.........,,.-r.-....,,,.,.,........,~,... 2 Average ,. score on the 1=11-+-+--lf---+golf course 3 Longoria of TV and film 4 Ransackers, r.,,30-+--+--+at times 5 Be in the audience 6 Exact duplicate 7 Stow, 52 as cargo 58 8 Little bits of energy 9 Ripen 10 Like some 漏 201 3 Universal Uclick magnificent www. upuzzles.com

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Lee Shaffer, sophomore "Living in gender-neutral housing has been great because it's a really inclusive community. If anyone's door is open, you can just walk in and have a conversation. Everyone is really nice."

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+

THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 4, 2013

SPORTS 13

SPORTS ICOREIOA Football TEAM

Men's Soccer LOSSES

WINS

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

3

0

0

0-0

Won3

Pacific

3

0

0

0-0

Won3

PLU

3

0

0

0-0

Won3

Willamette

3

0

Puget Sound

0

0-0

Won3

0

0-0

Wonl

Whitworth

2

2

0

0-0

Lost 2

Lewis & Clark

0

3

0

0-0

Lost3

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Puget Sound

6

3

0

4-0

Won5

PLU

8

0

2

3-0-1

Wonl

Whitman

3

4

2

3-0-1

Won 3

Whitworth

5

2

3-1

Won2

Willamette

5

3

1-2-1

Lost 2

Linfield

3

4

0-3-1

Lost 1

Pacific

5

5

0

0-4

Lost5

9

0

0-4

Lost8

George Fox

PLU's UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 5 at Linfi.eld, 1:30 p.m. PLU's UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 5 vs. Whitworth, 2:30 p.m.

Volleyball

Women's Soccer TEAM

WINS

TIES

CONFERENCE STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

8

0

4-1

Lost l

PLU

8

4

0

4-0

Won6

Pacific

6

2

3-1-1

Won2

Puget Sound

8

5

0

3-1

Wonl

Whitman

7

3

0

3-3

Wonl

Whitworth

9

7

0

3-1

Won2

PLU

4

2

2

2-0-2

Won2

Whitman

5

12

0

3-1

Lostl

LOSSES

Lewis & Clark

5

2

2-1-1

Lost l

Lewis & Clark

3

7

0

2-2

Wonl

Whitworth

5

4

2-3-1

Lost2

George Fox

6

6

0

1-3

Lostl

Puget Sound

3

2

1-1-2

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Willamette

5

8

0

1-3

Lostl

George Fox

2

5

0-3-1

Lost 1

Pacific

2

9

0

1-3

Lost3

Willamette

2

6

0-4

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Linfield

4

7

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PLU's UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 4 at Whitman, 7 p.m.

PLU's UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 5 vs. Whitworth, noon

SPORTS TALK With the Seattle Seahawks undefeated, do you think they will go to the Super Bowl?

Zach Evans, junior

Ryan Erdwins, junior

Amanda Williams, sophomore

Cody Thpen, sophomore

"Yes, because they have a strong defense and their team is led by Russell Wilson."

"Yes, because when it counts, they execute on offense and defense."

"Yes, I hope so. They have a strong team this year."

"It's a little early to talk about the Super Bowl, but yes, we have it locked up."

RITCHEY TOPS THE FALL SPORTS PICK 'EM BOARD Will Peyton Manning throw more, equal to or fewer than four touchdowns against the Dallas Cowboys this week? By SAM HORN

Sports Editor Not many Sports Pick 'Em contestants will be happy this week. Except for Dalton Ritchey. Ritchey was the only contestant who correctly guessed how many goals the Pacific Lutheran University men's soccer team would score last week against Linfield and Willamette. Well, almost. Ritchey guessed the Lutes would score three but they actually scored two. This is where things get dicey. Since Ritchey's guess was the closest to the actual answer, I awarded him the win for the week. To all the other contestants, sorry. For this week, the Fall Sports Pick 'Em participants have to predict if Denver Broncos' quarterback Peyton Manning will throw more, equal to or fewer than four touchdowns against the Dallas Cowboys this week. Manning has been torching defenses so far this season. He has thrown 16 touchdowns and had no interceptions through four games.

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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SJIM SJIYS... BY SAM HORN Sports Editor Linfield has been at the forefront of Division III collegiate football all season long and deservedly so. The Wildcats from McMinnville have stifled opposing offenses and have spread fear among secondaries nationwide. Linfield is averaging a whopping 56 points per game while only giving up 11.7 points per game. Linfield has cruised to three easy victories so far this season, tallying 168 points altogether. This team is ranked second in the nation for a reason. While the Wildcats are looking unstoppable so far this season, they, like all other teams, have their weaknesses. Pacific Lutheran University will exploit those weaknesses this weekend on defense when they face the Wildcats on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. during their Homecoming game

in McMinnville, Ore. Linfield has been strong both offensively and defensively, but penalties have been the Achilles heel of this team. The Wildcats have racked up 21 penalties over three games. That's an average of seven penalties per game. Even though Linfield has savagely beaten opposing teams to a bloody pulp during these first three weeks of the season, its opponents have played a more disciplined version of football. Linfield's opponents have 16 penalties combined. Their opponents might think if they can't beat the Wildcats on the scoreboard, they can beat them in the field of discipline. It could boost their confidence after a blowout loss. Maybe. Even though PLU has been flagged 17 times for holding calls, pass interference calls and everything in between, they make up for it in another area - defense.

OCT. 4 2013

Wildcats can't overloob its game against the Lutes

PLU ranks sixth in the nation in sacks with 10. Three defensive players - Dalton Darmody, Joel Anthony and Kyle Bennett - lead the team with two sacks apiece. It doesn't matter who the Wildcats opt to double-team. The Lutes' defense is going to find a way to get to the quarterback. Even if they don't sack Linfield quarterback Josh Yoder, the Lutes' defense might be able to force Yoder into a bad pass. That can only mean good things for the Lutes. The scary thing is that Darmody is the only senior out of the three sack leaders. Anthony is a junior and Bennett is a sophomore. The Lutes should be able to have a steadfast defense for years to come. Even if the Wildcats' offense can score at will, their offensive line has shown spots of uncertainty. The five men in front have given up six sacks and that's been against mediocre teams.

The three teams that Linfield has faced so far have tallied just 12 combined sacks this season. The Lutes have 10. Do the math. The Wildcats will need to get their offensive line sorted out if they plan on stopping the Lutes' lethal pass rush. To Linfield head coach Joseph Smith, I say "good luck." You're going to need it to find a victory against PLU. Linfield might have looked like a perennial title contender early on in the season, but those dreams have to stay at the bedside this weekend. The Wildcats have to focus on not committing as many penalties, getting more pressure on quarterback Dalton Ritchey and giving Yoder enough time to throw in the pocket. That's an extensive to-do list. Prepare for a rude awakening, Linfield. I hope your Homecoming dance is at least somewhat redeeming.

Undefeated Lutes scrape by Wisconsin-Eau Claire Lutes' consistent running attack paves the road for success with 184 yards By STEVEN MCGRAIN Guest Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHOPS HANCOCK, WISCONSIN-EAU CLAIRE

Running back Niko Madison, a junior, sprints past a diving Wisconsin-Eau Claire cornerback this past Saturday. Madison led the Lutes with 93 yards on the ground in a slippery, wet game.

TEAM STATISTICS WIS. -EAU CLAIRE

PACIFIC LUTHERAN 164 Passing Yards 184 Rushing Yards 1Interception 2 Tot41.1)n:n~ve~~,

:vs. vs.

vs. vs.

167 Passing Yards 145 ltushing Yards 12 Interceptions * 2Tutal Turnovers

,~

It was another victorious "business trip" for the Pacific Lutheran Lutes, who beat WisconsinEau Claire, 21-19. The offensive line shined in the win with the ground game working to perfection. The running backs rushed for a combined 184 yards due in part to the five linemen and tight ends paving the way. Running back Kelly Morgan, a senior, scored to give Pacific Lutheran the lead in the Iniddle of the first quarter. An additional touchdown occurred toward the end of the first quarter after running back Niko Madison, a junior, scored on a seven-yard run. He concluded the game with 11 carries for 93 yards. "It starts with having five guys up front who worked hard all summer, pushing up the extra reps and getting better," offensive lineman Zach Phelps, a junior, said. "Put that together with great systems from the coaches, hard downhill runners in the backfield and a lethal passing game that keeps the defense spread out - the result is a good PLU run game." Quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior, showed how dynamic of a quarterback he is by using his feet and throwing arm. Ritchey completed 20 of his 31 attempts and threw for a touchdown. Six different receivers recorded a reception. The quarterback also rushed for 59 yards, displaying his athletic ability. Ritchey found his favorite target, junior Kyle Warner, for a seven-yard touchdown pass in the second quarter, which ultimately was enough to

hold off the BluGolds. A resilient defense kept Wisconsin Eau-Claire out of the end zone until midway through the second quarter. Linebacker Dalton Darmody, a senior, intercepted a pass from Eau-Claire's quarterback, Mike Munger, and returned the ball 12 yards. Darmody finished the game with five tackles. Down 19-21 in the fourth quarter with 41 seconds left, the BluGolds took a timeout. BluGolds went for the 2-point conversion but failed to tie up the game after defensive end Conor Gabbert, a senior, stopped BluGold running back Joel Sweeney. The special teams did not leave the playmaking to the offense and defense. After PLU scored their first touchdown in the first quarter, the Lutes kicked off to Eau-Claire. Junior Travis McCarthy was the first Lute to make contact. McCarthy ripped the ball out of the returner' s hands, and junior Derek Kaufman was able to recover the ball. The Lutes were able to capitalize on the turnover four plays later. "I was happy to capitalize on the turnover after Travis [McCarthy] forced it," Kaufman said. "Our offense was put in excellent field position." Next week, the Lutes face Northwest Conference rival Linfield in McMinnville, Ore. The Wildcats lost their quarterback, Mickey Inns, to graduation, but the second-ranked Wildcats are still coming into the contest undefeated. "It's always great to get a win, but going into next week, we aren't looking at Linfield any different than we would look at any other team," linebacker Jordan Patterson, a senior, said. "It's another opportunity for us to play football and keep improving as a team."

LUTES REMAIN UNBEATEN AFTER SUCCESSFUL WEEKEND By CHARLES BAUMAN Guest Writer GAMEl This past Saturday, the men's soccer team took on the Linfield Wildcats in a wet and wild game. As the Lutes, ranked sixth in the country, kicked the game off, the torrential downpour consumed the field. This weather lasted the entire game, which had a part in the final outcome of a 0-0 tie after 110 minutes. The Lutes possessed the ball for the majority of the game, taking 19 shots to Linfield's 13. Goalkeeper Joe Rayburn, a senior, saved six shots while Linfield' s keeper tallied six saves as well. As a result of Rayburn's defensive prowess, he was awarded with the NWC Defensive Student-Athlete of the Week honor. First-year Rigoberto Loreto had three shots on goal. First-year Diego Aceves, senior Derek Johnson and sophomore Bryan Anderson each had one shot on goal. PLU had several chances at the end of the second overtime to score, but Linfield' s defense proved to be too tough as the Lutes could

not capitalize. On Sunday, the Lutes take on Willamette, which is looking to improve to 8-0-2. PLU remains unbeaten at 7-0-2, while Linfield falls to 3-3-1. GAME2 On Sunday, the Lutes squared off against Willamette. This game was another nail-biter, as both teams couldn't score a goal through the first 87 minutes. Then in the 88th minute, things swung in favor of Pacific Lutheran University. Johnson scored on an assist from first-year Rigoberto Loreto. Just as the game looked like it was to be the Lutes' seventh shutout in 10 games, Willamette scored with just under 20 seconds left. The Lutes and Bearcats played through the first overtime to no avail. With three minutes left in the second and final overtime, Johnson scored his second goal of the game off of Loreto's second assist. The win boosts the Lutes' record to 8-0-2, while Willamette falls to

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

5-3-1. PLU takes on Whitworth on Saturday, Oct. 5 and Whitman on

Goalkeeper Joe Rayburn, a senior, saves a

Sunday, Oct. 6.

shot against Willamette in the second half.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 4, 2013

SPORTS 15

Lutes volleyball squad holds off Puget Sound Setter Samantha North instrumental in shutting the door in the face of the Loggers By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The distinct smell of rivalry was in the air on Sept. 25 in the Olson Gymnasium as

the Lutes' volleyball team took on the 14th ranked University of Puget Sound Loggers. Ranked 16th in the nation, the Lutes took down their cross-town foes to take control of the top spot in the Northwest Conference. The two路 teams exchanged points back and forth at a furious pace. The Lutes would prevail in the first set, taking six of

the last nine points to earn a 25-21 victory. The Loggers would strike back in the second set, jumping out to a 7-1 lead and controlling the pace of play. The Lutes would come back to within three, but UPS slammed the door shut with a 25-19 win. In the third set, the Lutes retook the lead. Up 12-4 in the set, the Lutes never looked back en route to a 25-15 set win. In the fourth set, the teams, once again, exchanged point after point with the game drawing level at nine points. From there, the Lutes took the lead and held it until late in the frame when UPS tied the score at 24.

Samantha North, a junior, assisted senior Bethany Huston on consecutive serves to take the set 26-24. The Lutes won the match 3-1. "I think it definitely is one of our highlights," head coach Kevin Aoki said of his team's win. "Puget Sound was picked to win, but we played really well." The Lutes are now winners of four straight matches and are undefeated in NWCplay. "We definitely have been working really hard to prepare for UPS, and we played really strong tonight," junior Amber Aguiar said.

The Lutes have impro.ved to 3-0 in conference play and boast a 7-4 overall record after winning 3-1 against UPS and then reigning triumphant against Willamette, cruising to a 3-0 victory on Sept. 2B. The Loggers fell to 2-1 conference and 7-5 overall. The Lutes will travel to Walla Walla to take on Whitman on Friday at 7 p.m. Afterward, the Lutes will continue their road trip to Spokane, where they will square off against Whitworth on Saturday at5p.m.

UPPER LEFT: Head coach Kevin Aoki pumps up the Lutes during a timeout against Puget Sound. BOTTOM LEFT: Amber Aguiar, a junior, successfully digs a ball against Puget Sound in order to set up the Lutes for a subsequent kill. RIGHT: Setter Samantha North, a junior, sets up Bethany Huston for one of her 11 kills of the match.

DenAdel strives for excellence on and off the track By GIANCARLO SANTORO Guest Writer Cross country runner and team captain senior Alan DenAdel has been the top Pacific Lutheran University finisher in all but two races throughout his entire career as a Lute. His secret, he said, is building and maintaining consistency. DenAdel, 22, Gf Bow, Washington, said he always knew that after coming out of high school he wanted to continue his running career in college. At his high school, Burlington-Edison, DenAdel was a three-time state meet qualifier, as well as a member of the 2007 and 2009 state championship teams. After an overnight visit to PLU, he found what he was looking for. "After a couple of years of taking cross country seriously in high school, I developed a passion for the sport," DenAdel said. "I really wanted to continue to run as a part of a team in college, and I had the opportunity to do that here." Since joining the Lutes three years ago, DenAdel has continued to improve on a yearly basis and has transformed into a vital part of the team. His results, to put it

simply, have been impressive.

+

After placing 44th in the NWC meet

during his first year, DenAdel has vastly improved, finishing fourth in 2011 and second in 2012. His 2012 finish was good enough to qualify for the regional championship. "Consistency is a key part of my running in general. I have been described as metronomic by my coach, and it is something I have developed over the course of 10 years of gaining experience as a distance runner," DenAdel said. The thought of running 1 mile can be enough to make some people cringe, and when faced with upwards of 5 miles, most people would say 'forget it.' One of DenAdel' s teammates, senior Michelle Domini, said one of the toughest parts of distance running is staying mentally strong through grueling races. '1 think what makes Alan [DenAdel] so consistent is that he doesn't psych himself out," Domini said. "Some of his greatest strengths as a runner are his work ethic and grittiness. He can push through the pain and exhaustion." This mentally tough attitude has helped shape DenAdel into the runner he is today, and barely one month into the season, he has continued his streak of finishing as the top PLU runner in each of the last four competitions. After competing in the 2011 NCAA

Division III national championship as a sophomore and earning first team allNorthwest conference honors as a junior, he said he is looking to go even further in his final year as a Lute. "Coming into this season, I had four major goals. I wanted to run under 25 minutes for an Bk, win the conference meet, qualify for nationals and become an All-American," DenAdel said. ''A couple weeks ago, I was really excited to run a 24:57 at the Sundodger Invitational Bk in Seattle and meet my first goal.'' DenAdel is not satisfied, however, and said he knows he will have to improve in order to meet the rest of his goals. "I have a lot that I can continue to improve on as a runner," DenAdel said. "I think that I can always improve my biomechanics and running form, but I would also like to increase my range of events.'' In addition to his prowess as a runner, DenAdel has also performed in the classroom, earning Capital One Academic All-District 8 honors in 2013. A mathematics major with minors in statistics and biology, DenAdel said he plans to take a year off to work in a clinical setting before going to medical school in

2015. DenAdel' s consistency in the classroom,

as well as on the field, has inspired many teammates. Domini said DenAdel is a role model to his teammates. '~an leads by example. He works hard, has fun and does well," Domini said. "People see that and want to do the same.''

PHOTO COUIITESY OF PLU ATHLETICS WEBSITE

DenAdel placed first at the Central Washington University Cross Country Invitational with a time of20:07 - bis highest finish so far this season.


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Dear Pacific Lutheran CDntlngent Faculty;

Student Reso/ufion ;n Support of the R;ght of the PL(J Conongent Faculty to Vote

We at New faculty Majority are behind you 100% as you exercise your right to vote for an adjunct faculty union at Padfic Lutheran University. New faculty Majority Is a national organization that advocates forfaculty equality Jn hlgher education. We are also contingent faculty ourselves, who work on both unionized and non-unionized campuses.

ASPLLJ Senate

on Unionization

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Aulho,.d by, Ca<1y B<ook, Eric HenJe, Karina S"'"°'"· Kenneth Stanc;i 2012-13 Sponsored by: Senator Lina Aas-Helseth

So we understand ho111 precariOus positions, having to teach at other schools or holding second jobs to make ends meet, and other factors can make lt difficult to see the institutional forces working to keep the growing system of contingent faculty in place. But in speaking out and participating ln this election, you are already showing fellow adjuncts across the country that self-determination, fair representation. and workplace rights are not out of reach.

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Read first time: 05/0712013 I 2 3 4

You are taking the fir~ st.ep towards reforming a system that denies contingent faculty the respect they deserve and which also shortchanges students and the entire system of higher education,

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When faculty cannot keep regular hours to meet with $tudents because they are trying to put together a IMng by adjunct teaching at multipll! $Chools or by taking a second job, It Is not just thl! adjunct who suffers. When edui;ators are unable to engage ln research or professional development tor Jack of resources or opportunity, the system suffers.

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By joining with contingent faculty from Washiogton, DC who have unionized with SEIU, and in Boston where contingent fa,ulty are also currently voting for their union, you are joining a growing national movement of contingent faculty who are standing up for what we are worth, demanding inclusion in the academic community and daimlng a voicl! for quality education. You are also joining a movement for change In our higher education system that is confronting such Issues as soaring student debt, lack of publlc Investment ln higher education, and obstacles to falr access to higher education.

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When you vote yes to form an adjunct faculty union, you are not only taking an Important step towards greater equity and respect for yourself and your fellow contingent faculty, you are giving yourself a voice in how Pacific Lutheran University and system of highl!r education at large move forward and build a viable future for the entire academic community. In solidarity,

(.)1~ Maria Maisto President, New Faculty Majority

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SPORTS Linfield spanks Lutes at football

BUSINESS 1\veeter steals 1\vitter's success

PAGE15

PAGES

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE OCT. 11, 2013

OORING

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 4

mastmedia. plu.edu

Johnson leads way for Lutes Furlough cancels

Lute Forge By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Forward Derek Johnson, a senior, scores his second goal in 76 seconds to give PLU a 3-1 victory in a match against Whitman la.st Sunday. Johnson leads the team wih the most goals scored with 10. in 12 matches. This was his third goal of the weekend.

By NICK BARENE Sports Writer GAME I: WmTWORTH

The men's soccer team endured a storm Saturday against the defending Northwest Conference champions, the Whitworth Pirates. Forward Derek Johnson, a

senior, scored the equalizing goal in the 83-minute game and helped guide the sixth-ranked Lutes to a 1-1 draw against the Pirates. First-year Rigoberto Loreto was credited with the assist, his team-leading eighth of the season. The outstanding play of goalkeeper Joe Rayburn, a senior, was vital to the game for

the Lutes. He persevered against the constant pressure from Whitworth' s attackers and made two crucial saves in the overtime periods. The Lutes' defense stood its ground until 40 minutes in, when Whitworth's Karl Muelheims collected a long pass and slid his shot past Rayburn from about 5 yards out.

In the second half, the Lutes picked up their pace and were able to produce more shots on goal. Despite outshooting Whitworth in the second half, the teams remained level through the end of regulation. In overtime, the Pirates

SOCCER CONT. PAGE16

While the government shutdown feels far away for many Pacific Lutheran students, others are experiencing its direct effects. One demographic particularly affected is PLU's Reserve Officer Training Corps, whose annual training exercise, Lute Forge, was cancelled last weekend. Lute Forge is one of two field training exercises, or FTXs, that ROTC cadets participate in each year. In this two-day exercise, cadets practice land navigation skills, go through an obstacle course and rappel down a 40foot tower. The event should have taken place last Saturday and Sunday at Joint Base LewisMcChord (JBLM). '1 was disappointed because the fourth-years had put a great deal of time and effort into preparation. We spent a month, month and a half in preparation," Jacob Emery, a PLU senior and executive officer among the cadets, said. Emery explained that the fourth-year cadets are in charge of oversight and planning, the third-year cadets are in charge of execution, and the first- and second-year cadets are mostly learning. '1t' s a lot of fun for the younger cadets," Emery said. "We have a blast with it." Emery described his first time participating in Lute Forge as a first-year cadet as one of his favorite memories from ROTC. "You're able to go out and do confidence [obstacle] courses where you're climbing down a

ROTC CONT. PAGE 3

Lean In event asks women ''What would you do if you weren't afraid?" By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor The ambiguous title of Monday's event led to some creative discussion about fear and empowerment among women. The panel discussion was part of a series inspired by the book "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead." Hosted by the Women's Center, the event featured four female faculty members from across campus who shared their stories of fear and how they deal with it.

Originally based on a TED (Technology Entertainment Design) Talk by author Sheryl Sandberg, the book looks at how differing attitudes between the genders can be responsible for the achievement gap. These attitudes range from making career choices based on family plans that are years from coming true, to choosing to sit away from a table at a meeting rather than at it. In the book's first chapter, Sandberg investigates how fear can prevent women from realizing their goals. At PLU's event, these fears ranged from professional to

personal. For Registrar Kristin Plaehn, fear is what she feels when she attends CrossFit and doesn't want to be embarrassed. Ksenija Simic-Muller, assistant professor in math, said she worries that between her home life and her career, she doesn't have enough time or energy to devote to herself. The conversation also included stories of how faculty members have faced comments and attitudes that reflect gender

LEAN IN CONT. PAGE4


2 ADVERTISEMENT

THE MOORING MAST

OCT.11 2013

We Support Contingent Faculty! PLU Contingent Faculty: Staying True to PLU Values, Joining a Movement for Higher Education Yesterday, October 10th, contingent faculty members at Pacific Lutheran University were to learn if they voted to form a union with SEIU Local 925. Unfortunately, while the votes are in, PLU administrators are blocking a count. Why? I wish there was a good reason to hold up the democratic process. Instead, there are no winners. My family, as many in the PLU community know, has a long history with and a strong love for Pacific Lutheran University. My father served the school for 40 years. I am a proud alum and have numerous relatives as alumni and current students. I've lived and breathed PLU since I was a boy. It puzzles me that PLU administrators are standing in the way of a vote count. Their resistance cannot be on religious grounds. The university is appealing a June National Labor Relations Board ruling that allowed contingent faculty at the university to organize. The university is asserting that its religious affiliation makes it exempt from federal labor law, but Lutherans (ELCA) have long supported the right of all workers to collectively bargain. There's not a "except for" clause in my reading of the ELCA Social Statement on Economic Life. It says that, "We honor the right of employees to organize for the sake of better working conditions and for workers to make free and informed decisions ... " A commitment to lift up the dignity and rights of people in the workplace is consistent with the theology and practice of its corporate ownership-the ELCA. It's a shame that the PLU administration is standing behind a religious doctrine that doesn't exist. While this behavior is unfortunately consistent with the way employers behave in other sectors of our economy, it's especially disappointing when religiously affiliated institutions like PLU don't adhere to their own values to protect the dignity of work and the rights of workers. It doesn't have to be this way. Georgetown University, a Jesuit affiliated university, agreed to remain neutral during the adjunct union election there. They practiced what they preached, and adjunct professors voted to form a union with SEIU in an environment free from institutional pressures. By continuing to spend money on lawyers and lawsuits, the PLU administration may be hoping that delay equals defeat for the large number of contingent faculty who have unequal rights and no job security compared to the tenure-track faculty. That's a losing strategy for everyone. The PLU community-students, alumni, donors and other tenured faculty-are not going to turn their backs on this injustice. We will continue to support PLU contingent faculty because our faith compels us. We also believe that through a union contingent faculty will improve the learning environment at the university. I love PLU, and I know the faculty, no matter their employment status, wants the best for the PLU's future. The administration should let the votes be counted and stay true to PLU values.

Pastor Philip Nesvig, ELCA, Retired


THE MOORING MAST

OCT.11 2013

NEWS3

-

Theater, football mark Homecoming weekend What to do By MARIAH RASMUSSEN Guest Writer Homecoming week is upon us, and there is a buzz in the air about this weekend's festivities. The Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, which has been under construction since 2010, is making its grand opening Saturday with a production of "Kiss Me, Kate." With two main stages seating about 600 people, the Phillips

Center will provide many opportunities for the theater program at Pacific Lutheran University, as well as the surrounding community. The Phillips Center is being named in the memory of Karen Hille Phillips, a big supporter of PLU. "Her love was PLU, but it was always about the students . . . she would be thrilled," Dean of the School of Arts and Communication Cameron Bennett said regarding Phillips' impact on making this center

"Her [Phillips'] love was PLU, but it was always about the students ... she would be thrilled." Cameron Bennett Dean of the School of Arts and Communication

possible. The Phillips Center will primarily be for the use of the theater department, but will also bring in possibilities for major arts programs from around the area to come in to work with students. When asked about what he was most excited for now that the Phillips Center is complete, Bennett said, "seeing the impact on the faces of people who get to see the finished product and what that means." Bennett also said, "it has been a lot of work from a lot of people. We're so excited to see it finished." The theater program is putting on the show "Kiss Me, Kate" to demonstrate the possibilities of the center. "There's gangsters, there's jazz and everything, so it's a really fun show," senior Taylor Capellaro, an actor in the show, said. "This is the first show that

has ever been in this space. I'm very excited to be a part of the first footprints on the stage." The homecoming football game will be kicking off at 12:30 p.m. in Sparks Stadium Saturday, too. The Lutes, who are ranked 15th in the nation with a record of 3-1, will be taking on the Lewis & Oark Pioneers with a record of 1-3. The Lutes had their first conference game last weekend and ended up with a frustrating loss to the Linfield Wildcats. Looking forward to this homecoming weekend, football player Kellen Westering, a junior, said, "offensively, we're very hungry to get back out there. We will come out aggressively and look to put a lot of points on the board." The Lutes will look for their first conference win this weekend to contribute to their overall winning record.

STUDENTS DEFEND PRO- LIFE VIEWS By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer With clubs like Students of the Left and PLU Democrats dominating the political spectrum at Pacific Lutheran University, one student decided it was time to balance things out. Sophomore Amber Stokes formed new club Students for Life, a pro-life club that seeks to raise awareness and create discussion on campus about the pro-life mindset. "Our main purpose of the club on PLU campus is to allow for open conversations about a touchy topic which gives students a chance to formulate their own opinions," Stokes said. "We believe knowing where you stand on the issue is essential, especially for college-aged students where it affects us in many ways." Stokes also said she wanted to provide support for people at all stages, "whether they're in the midst of an unplanned pregnancy or if they're post abortive ... We want to be able to spread the pro-life message through a compassionate and loving way."

Last Friday, the Students for Life club hosted its first speaker, Rebekah Barnes, the northwest regional coordinator from Students for Life of America. Barnes spoke about what is involved in being an advocate for the pro-life mindset, various tactics for discussing abortion with people, and focused especially on what being pro-life can mean on a college campus. "In order to be a pro-life ambassador, it's required that you have knowledge, wisdom and character," Barnes said. Frequently during discussions surrounding abortion, Barnes said, various scenarios will present themselves. She gave examples of rape, incest and poverty as circumstances when a woman might desire an abortion. Given the rate of rape on college campuses and the likelihood that a rape victim may seek an abortion, Barnes emphasized that during a discussion involving rape, pro-life supporters must be empathetic to that circumstance. "You are a caring person who cares about another person's traumatic experiences. This isn't a debate then," Barnes said.

"We want to be able to spread the pro- life message through a compassionate and loving way." Am.her Stokes Students for Life club founder

ROTC FROM PAGE 1 rope that's 40 feet off the ground," he said. "You of course have safety equipment, but it's getting over fears for a lot of people." Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Keller, professor of military science, said that PLU's ROTC had known this was a possibility for several weeks preceding the government shutdown, known as the furlough. They received official word there was no funding for the event from the ROTC brigade at JBLM on Oct. 2 and notified the cadets immediately after. "There are costs associated with the transportation of our cadets to and from JBLM, and meals," Keller sqid. "It's not a big amount, but still, that money's got to be there in order for us to do that." Keller said that while the Pay Our

atPLU

Ongoing Homecoming 2013. Various events Tliursday through Sunday. For a complete schedule, visit www.plu.edu/homecoming

Friday Women's volleyball vs. George Fox. Olson Auditorium, 7p.m. shOUT! QASU' s annual coming-out event. The Cave, 7-9:30p.m. PLU Poro Patrol. Weekly League of Legends meeting. Hauge 101, 4-5:30 p.m. "Kiss Me, Kate." Free preview, PLU community only. Karen Hille Phillips Performing Arts Center Mainstage, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday Work party at the PLU Community Garden. Community Garden, across from Ingram on 121 street. 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Jim Johnson Hall of Fame Celebration. Celebrate Jim Johnson's induction into the PLU Athletics Hall of Fame. University House, 12-5 p.m. Habitat restoration work party. Your capable hands are needed to restore the natural landscape of the Fred L. Tobiason Outdoor Learning Center. Fred L. Tobiason Learning Center near the lower AUC steps, 1-4 p.m. Women's volleyball vs. Lewis & Clark. 7 p.m.

PHOTO BY LEAH LARSON

Northwest regional coordinator from Students for Life of America Rebekah Barnes gives a presentation al the first meeting of PLO's new Students for Life club last Friday. "Pro-life is a message of hope to the pre-abortive and postabortive women. It provides them a space for them to grieve." i;he said.

Barnes continued to say the pro-life mindset does not intend to shame women who have sought out or who may seek out abortions in the future. "Pro-life is a message of hope to the pre-abortive and postabortive women. It provides them a space for them to grieve," she said. Stoke~ said, "We just think it's important to open up conversation about the options women have with a pregnancy. It's a topic that many students don't talk about in order to avoid

Military Act allows military personnel to continue receiving ~eir paychecks, it does not cover other expenses, including training and operations. President Obama passed the Pay Our Military Act on Sept. 30 a few hours before the government shutdown, meaning that all military personnel continue to be paid as normal during the government shutdown. Civilian employees who worked for the military, however, such as accountants and secretaries, were not included initially in this act and did not go to work last week until the Pentagon reinterpreted the act last Saturday to include them, according to an article in The News Tribune published the same day. The act means that military instructors in ROTC programs will continue to go on campus and teach classes during the

shutdown, a spokesperson from Cadet Command said. The spokesperson said,

conflict, but it's one of the most important human rights issues of our time." 路 She continued, "We do not dislike or look down upon women who have had abortions. We just see it as women who weren' t given enough options. We need to change that. We will even offer resources to direct women to support groups for those who have been through abortions." The Students for Life Club will be showing the film "Juno" on Oct. 18 in Ingram 100 at 7 p.m.

however, that some field training exercises might have to be "delayed" until the budget situation becomes clearer. Keller said the ROTC instructors have various courses of action they can take to make up for the missed training session. He said they hoped to cover the land navigation skills during bimonthly labs, which take place on Thursdays and, if necessary, a Saturday lab scheduled to take place in November.

Homecoming 2013 Dance and Speakeasy. Tickets available at the Campus Concierge. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. The Mansion, 539 Broadway. 9 p.m.

Sunday "Kiss Me, Kate." Tickets available at the Campus Concierge or by phone at 253-535-7411 . $3 for the PLU community, students and those 18 and under. Phillips Center mainstage, 2 p.m. University Congregation Homecoming service featuring the Choir of the West, a brass quintet and favorite hymns. 11 a.m. - 12 p.m., Lagerquist Concert Hall.

"As far as a training impact, we11 be able to make this up," Keller said. "There's no significant impact to our ability to train and prepare the cadets." Emery said he felt bad for the younger cadets who would not be able to participate in Lute Forge this year. "This is something they look forward to," he said. "It's excellent training for them, and so missing that opportunity for them is tough."

~'This

is something they [the younger cadets] look forward to. It's excellent training for them, and so missing that opportunity for them is tough." Jacob Emery executive officer, senior


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

OCT.11 2013

Community joins forces to fight hunger

PHOTOS BY JESSICA TRONDSEN AND ALISON HAYWOOD

The 33rd annual Pierce County Hunger Walk raised $45,279 for the Emergency Food Network this year. The event took place last Sunday at Steilacoom Park. LEFT: A woman tries to control her ecstatic Golden Retriever as she begins the walk. Many participants brought pets such as dogs to the event. CENTER: Participants line up at the start gate to begin the walk. RIGHT: A woman leads a crowd in a rousing bout of Zumba before the walk begins. The Hunger Walk featured live entertainment including a band, a high school drum line and dancing during registration.

By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer 路 Church groups, students and community-minded citizens gathered together for a good cause at Steilacoom Park last Sunday to participate in the 33rd annual Pierce County Hunger Walk. Among them were dozens of Pacific Lutheran University students who walked or ran to help raise proceeds for the Emergency Food Network, a non-profit distribution center in Pierce County. Junior Ashely Hill helped coordinate

the PLU team. "I participated in this year's Hunger Walk because I believe that it is a key issue that undermines any social progress we make as a society," Hill said. "People prefer to think of starving children as off in some third world country - out of sight, out of mind - when the reality is that these children are your neighbors, your kids' friends, students in your school districts." The Hunger Walk is put on annually by the Associated Ministries, an interfaith center that does a lot of community work in Pierce County. This year's Hunger Walk

raised $45,279.02. Hill participated in the Hunger Walk for the second time this year. "I checked it out last year and had a great time and really wanted to get more involved this year," she said. Another participant was junior Carly Brook. "I was excited about the idea of acting on hunger awareness and food justice issues in our communities, especially with recent legislation on the farm bill and modifications to food stamps," Brook said. ''People seemed really excited, and it really was a good community event."

This was senior Princess Reese's first year participating in the Hunger Walk. "I was really excited to do it," Reese said. "I've participated in Relay for Life before, but nothing on the scale of the Hunger Walk nor with the kind of outreach to community organizations." Reese said college students have privileges that enable them to be critical thinkers and to improve society. "Given the tools that we have," Reese said, "it's our responsibility to make sure we do as much good as possible in practice in the real world while we can."

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FACIAL AND BROWWAX$37 PHOTO BY LEAH TRAXEL

First-years Brittany Perry (left) and Lovely Shoecraft (right) write down their hopes and fears onto sticky notes during the Lean In event Monday. Participants then placed their sticky notes onto a wall for everyone to read to show everybody is afraid of and hopes for something different.

LEAN IN FROM PAGE I stereotypes. For instance, Simic-Muller was once asked how it felt "knowing you probably only got into grad school because you're a woman." Assistant Professor of Religion Agnes Choi said she cares less about how people judge her likability and more about how they judge her competence. "I care if people respect me," Choi said, who frequently finds herself in male-dominated

conferences and events as a Biblical' scholar. "And if they don't respect me, then I think it says more about the person having that reaction than it says about me." The women emphasized, though, that fear isn't always a negative emotion. "It affected my career for sure," Professor Lynn Hunnicutt of the economics department said, who credits her fear of college-level physics with her decision to pursue economics studies instead of engineering. ''But not all

effects are bad." The other panelists agreed and mentioned that it's important to listen to your gut instinct when applicable, even when it tells you not to do something. "You don't know how things are going to play out," Choi said. The next event in the series titled "Does everyone have to like you?" - will take place Nov.18. Sheryl Sandberg' s original TED Talk &om 2011 is available online at http://mastmedia.plu.edu.

"I care if people respect me." Agnes Choi assistant professor of religion

MIZANI SMOOTHING TREATMENT$34 resent this ad to receive offers. Expires 11 /31/13.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 11, 2013

A&E5

'Breaking Bad' Finale provides closure, thrill and retribution By EVAN HERINGER Guest Writer On Sept. 29, Walter White, aka "Heisenberg," laid down his crystal blue crown for good. "Breaking Bad" has turned into a media icon, captivating millions of Americans with an extremely well written plot, impeccable acting, mindboggling cinematography and flawless directing. Since "Breaking Bad" has received so much attention, there was a lot of talk about how the show was going to end. Millions of people, myself included, were very anxious to see if "Breaking Bad" could deliver until the very end. Spoilers from the series finale are ahead, so take care if you haven't seen the episode yet. The final episode, "Felina," did a phenomenal job of ending the series. It tied things up very nicely, leaving little room for speculation, while providing a sense of closure. Heisenberg's reign is over, the Neo-Nazis - Todd and Lidia - are dead, and Walt has freed himself from his family. The only thing I am left wondering is what happened to the bodyguard, Huell. Although there are a lot of opinions regarding the ending, I am very happy with the way "Breaking Bad" concluded. As season 5 part 2 progressed,

I became increasingly angry with how things were looking for Walt's old partner in crime, Jesse. Walt and Jesse have been together for a long time, but since season 5, things have been quite rocky between the two. Eventually Jesse teamed up with Hank, Walt's brother-in-law who also happens to be a DEA agent, in hopes of capturing Walt. After Walt knew he could not reconcile with Jesse, Walt contacted one of his partners, Todd, and asked if he and his Nazi gang could get rid of Jesse. Todd and his fellow Nazis found Jesse, but they didn't kill him. Instead, they chained him up in a meth lab and forced him to cook. If that's not enough to break your heart, they also made Jesse watch as Todd shot Andrea, Jesse's love, in the head. Things were not going very well for Jesse, but the final episode changed that. Jesse was able to kill Todd with his bare hands, and he escaped the Nazi compound with his life and without being arrested. I was very happy with the way things went for Jesse - it's about time the poor guy caught a break. After the Nazis killed Hank, I was excited to see what Walt had in store for them, although I had a feeling it had something to do with the giant machine gun in his trunk. The Nazis should have known better than to think they could just kill Heisenberg.

PHOTO COURTESY OF VULTURE.COM

Smoke in the air and gun in hand, Walter White, also known as "Heisenberg," looks utterly defeated in this photo from season 5. Bryan Cranston portrays Heisenberg's iconic, teacher-turned-meth dealer character.

There was no better way to take care of them than with a robot machine gun that handyman Walt had built. Yes, it may have been a little impractical, but it made the show go out with a bang, or in this case, several. The most gratifying part of this episode was how the writers took care of Walt. After Walt flees New Mexico and is alienated by his family, he returns to share some information

with Skylar, his wife. Walt finally admits that he wasn't "doing it for the family." He says '1 did it for me." He also provided her with the coordinates to Hank's body, something she could use to bargain with, and hopefully escape any charges headed her way. Although he didn't apologize, he stopped lying for once. In the end, he finally got what he had

coming. After killing countless people, destroying his entire family's life and starting a meth empire, Walt ended up dying from a gunshot wound in the same place Heisenberg was born - a meth lab. Heisenberg may be gone, but we will be saying his name for years to come.

RETURN OF TH.E DEAD Rick, Daryl and the walkers are back this Sunday ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer With Halloween just around the corner, "The Walking Dead" has picked a perfect time to premiere its fourth season. "The Walking Dead" is known for its zombies, cliffhangers, breath-taking twists and for getting its viewers emotionally invested in each character. The season four premiere is this Sunday and is projected to have ratings higher than any other season, as well as heartstopping suspense. However, before we get into predictions for the upcoming season, let's recap the main points of the past ones. In season one, main character Rick Grimes wakes up from a coma in a small Georgia town to find that it has been infested with zombies or, as the show calls them, "walkers." Meanwhile, Rick's wife Lori Grimes and best friend Shane Walsh, thinking Rick is dead, begin a romantic relationship. Rick heads to Atlanta to

find his family and on the way he meets up with a few other

survivors. During the first zombie attack, many of these survivors are lost, but the remaining few continue on to find the Atlanta Center for Disease Control and Prevention, where there's rumored to be a zombie cure. The center, however, self-destructs and no cure is ever found. Season two begins with the group now heading to Fort

Both survivors that were arguing with Rick end up getting shot. The sounds of the shots attract more walkers. After a few more encounters with them, the group determines it is possible for humans to die and return as zombies without being bitten. All of the survivors now carry the plague. The third season reveals that Lori is in the final months of her

Governor, spends the latter part of the season terrorizing anyone who isn't a walker. In a fit of rage, he and his followers attack Rick's group. After losing, the Governor takes his anger out on his own supporters. Rick's group heads back to the prison. For this season, I can make only two logical predictions. First off, more survivors will

Benning. One of the survivor's daughters, Sophia Peletier, is chased and bitten by the walkers. She returns to the group where she gets shot. A clash in a deserted bar between Rick and two other survivors leads to a gunfight.

pregnancy. Though she dies, her baby survives and is named Judith Grimes. The identity of Judith's father is never revealed, but Rick takes her in as his own. All of the survivors now take shelter in an abandoned prison. A survivor, called the

be killed and it will probably be Rick's fault. He is always butting heads with people and his "myway-or-the-highway" attitude is constantly causing conflict. This inevitable conflict almost always involves guns, which attracts the walkers. Since this

PHOTO COURTESY OF AMCfV.COM

usually happens, it would be nice if Rick could display a little more humbleness and stop risking lives for the sake of his ego. My second prediction is Judith will either die from a walker bite or be killed by the Governor. Since he is now determined to ruin Rick and the other survivors' lives by destroying them or their prized possessions, Judith seems like a likely choice. On the other hand, Judith could succumb to the walkers. Proving to be a hindrance, Judith could die or cause her caretaker's death. It is hard enough to fight walkers, but to do it with a baby strapped to your back seems virtually impossible. The next season of "The Walking Dead" will undoubtedly shock viewers. If the show keeps up with the nail biting suspense and plot twists, there is no reason for it not to. The sheer excitement of seeing the credit roll interrupt a climatic scene begs viewers to make predictions and to tune in the next week to see if they were right. Dead" "The Walking premieres this Sunday at 9 p .m. on AMC - watch to see how your predictions hold up.


THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

OCT. 11 2013

Singing, dancing and hijinks: PLU production 'Kiss Me, Kate' opens this weekend By EVAN HERINGER Guest Writer This Saturday marks the grand opening of the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, a day that will be marked with Pacific Lutheran's first theatrical performance of the school year. Directed by Jeff Clapp, artistic director of theatre, "Kiss Me, Kate" is set to make its debut at the center's grand opening. Sophomore Cameron Waters, who plays Stagehand #3 and an

assortment of other characters in "Kiss Me, Kate," said the play is a "light and fun musical written during the golden age by Cole Porter." The Golden Age is the era of theater that produced musicals intended to be loud and fun, such as "Oklahoma!" "The play is based around a theater company putting on a musical version of Shakespeare's 'The Taming of the Shrew' and the hilarity that ensues from the backstage hijinks and mis comm uni ca ti on," Cameron

PHOTO BY TYLER SCHWARTZ

The cast of "Kiss' me, Kate" sings together during a rehearsal this week. The show opens for a student preview tonight at 7:30 p.m.

said. Senior Taylor Capellero plays Paul, a character that is "calm, collected, and organized individual who always knows what to say and when to say it." Capellero sings the musical number "Too Darn Hot," which has been covered by artists such as Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald. Capellero said to expect comedy, drama, and romance plus some jazz and swing dancing. Capellero said he didn't know too much about the play going into it, but some of the things he really enjoys are the gangsters, gambling and dancing. Sophomore Sarah Hubert plays Lilli and Kate and said there are many hidden qualities within the play. She said some scenes are very "emotionally deep," but overall there will be "a lot of laughs." The play is also a 'spectacle,' which means there are big costumes, dances and sets. The opening gala for "Kiss Me, Kate" is this Saturday from 5:30-9:30 p.m. The gala starts with a Wine and Dine at 5:30 p.m., followed by a ribbon cutting and dedication event before the curtain rises for "Kiss Me, Kate" at7:30 p.m. Gala tickets are $75, limited and available to buy from the

PHOTO BY TYLER SCHWARTZ

Sophomore Sarah Hubert gestures dramactically during a rehearsal this week for "Kiss Me, Kate." Hubert plays Lili and Kate and said there are many hidden qualities within the play.

concierge desk or online. For those who cannot make the opening gala, the School of Arts and Communications is hosting a student night tonight, meaning all students get in for free when they present their student ID cards at the Phillips Center doors. The play starts at 7:30 p.m., but to guarantee getting a ticket,

students should arrive early. "Kiss Me, Kate" is also playing Sunday at 2 p.m., next weekend on Oct. 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 20 at 2 p.m. Check the communication and theatre calendar online at http:// www.plu.edu/communicationtheatre/calendar/home. php for more details.

First-Years

MAP-Works •Is an interactive web-based tool that enhances your ability to be more successful in college. • Provides strategies for success and a customized report to help you get the most out of your first years of college.

Get Involved urces Questions? Contact the Office of Student Life e-mail: slif@plu.edu Phone:253-535-7191

Look for an e-mail during the first weeks of school inviting you to participate in the MAP-Works online survey.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 11, 2013

A&E7

Horror movie remakes lack suspense, plot and terror -.

By THOMAS HORN Guest Writer Halloween is nothing without the screams, scares and frights of horror films, but modem day movies have little to offer compared to the classics. Classic horror movies simply have a better quality of terror than their remakes. Imagine the roar of a chainsaw that compels you not only to run, but to sprint. This is the kind of horror scene from movies like "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre," which first shocked audiences in 1974 with Leatherface, the chainsaw wielding villain. Horror movies know how to make an audience pay attention. In modem horror movies, there are copious amounts of blood and gratuitous graphic gore. This makes the movie less scary, yet more sadistic. It reduces the genre of horror to be simply disgusting. With the violence in theremake of "Friday the Thirteenth," more time is devoted to spilling blood than to the actual acting portion of the movie. With classic horror movies, the suspense is what really pulls the audience in. Blood and guts are simply gross and uncalled for, but the suspense has a true horror aspect involved. A good aspect of horror movies is when there is an intense chase going on or when someone

is hiding in a closet waiting for the terror to go away. This is the piece that makes classic horror films worth watching. In the classic film "The Night of the Living Dead," zombies attack a home in the country, and pure terror takes over the lives of the individuals trapped inside the house. True terror is all about suspense. Without suspense, the horror genre would not exist. Villains may never reach their victims, but if there is tension

rising, that is what makes the movie scary. The Stephen King classic, "Carrie," is a great horror movie with elements of tension, suspense and shock. The scene when the immense amount of vile pigs' blood is dumped on title character Carrie is unforgettable. The audience can sense a rise in suspense, but just doesn't know what to expect. Carrie doesn't disappoint as she starts going insane and chaos erupts. Significantly, the pig's blood is

'DUCK DYNASTY': By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor For a culture that relishes dystopia and empathizes with antiheroes, "Duck Dynasty," shouldn't be as popular as it is. Willie Robertson, an important member on the reality show and CEO of the "Duck Commander" duck call business, doesn't cook methamphetamine. His family is functional, anq he certainly doesn't abandon his coworkers to the Neo-Nazis. Yet the "Duck Dynasty" season 4 premiere's 11.8 million viewers surpassed the "Breaking Bad" season 5 finale's 10.4 million viewers.

PHOTO COURl'ESY OF AETV.COM

Kay and Phil Robertson renew their vows during season 4 of "Duck

Dynasty."

PHOTO COURTESY OF IMDB.COM

PHOTO COURI'ESY OF MOVIEFONE.COM

LEFT: Chloe Grace Moretz portrays Carrie, a disturbed high school girl with supernatural abilities. She is covered in blood in this modern portrayal of the original 1976 film. RIGHT: A promotional poster for the 1976 version of "Carrie" juxtaposes Carrie's two contrasting images of good and evil.

Unlike a large portion of popular television, ''Duck an Dynasty'' promotes overarching sense of happiness. It emphasizes the heart, hilarity and humanity of the Robertson family from the backwoods of West Monroe, La. "I watch Duck Dynasty, because not only is it funny, but it also promotes good values," junior Courtney Purdin said. "It's one of the few reality shows where they [the people featured] actually are genuine." The Robertsons founded the multi-million dollar "Duck Commander" business in 1972. Together, Willie, two of his brothers, uncle and friends manufacture duck calls and decoys. Some of the show takes place around the office, but the majority is spent on the other excursions and events surrounding Willie's family and friends. While some episodes include duck hunts, fishing, turtle collecting or even photo shoots, a surprise wedding in the fourth season brings to light the contrast between Duck Dynasty and other reality shows depicting similar events. The wedding was held for Willie's parents, Kay and Phil Robertson, to renew their vows. Willie's wife, Korie Robertson,

led the planning for the wedding in collaboration with other family and friends. Before breaking into what happened with the "Duck Dynasty'' wedding itself, consider the fact that there are a multitude of other shows wallowing in negative drama surrounding wedding plans. One of these includes "Bridezillas," in which tears, screams and meltdowns are the norm. The show's website even advertises its season finale as "with only one episode left, Willara' s meltdown will be one for the books." Other wedding reality shows tend to follow the "Bridezillas" model, creating a conception that, when it comes to reality TV, the focus of the show isn't about the happiness of a wedding, but the conflict stemming from the details. In contrast, the "Duck Dynasty'' wedding did not have the drama between angry wedding planners or overreacting brides. It was about the teamwork of Korie and the other Robertson women, the humor of the men who wanted to fish instead of help prepare and the success of the wedding itself. At the end of the episode, Kay and Phil were led into a decorated

one of the only gory scenes in the movie. This movie was originally made in 1976, but a remake is being released on Oct. 18. This movie will feature Chloe Grace Moretz as Carrie and Julianne Moore as Carrie's mother. Even though Julianne Moore is a good and well-known actor, they shouldn't be remaking this classic. The movie industry should preserve classic films because so many horror remakes can wreck the movie experience. Remakes of horror movies

just go straight into the violence, and all of that flying blood leaves room for only a minimal amount of tension. remake Hopefully, the of Carrie isn't filled with unnecessary blood and gore - it would devalue the plot. A great horror movie should make you feel as if you are in the story, as if someone were hunting you down. The concept of a good horror film is the experience of the suspense.

Hit reality show is 'happy, happy, happy'

PHOTO COURTESY OF AETV.COM

Willie Robertson's uncle, Si Robertson, poses in his camo pants on a lawn mower.

clearing in the woods. Lights, flowers, vines and antlers decorated the wedding arch. Their smiling family and friends sat on hay bales during the ceremony, and the episode concluded with the wedding guests dancing in the candlelight. "Duck Dynasty'' While promotes harmony, family and happiness, a secondary factor in its success is the humor. "My friends that watch it are all obsessed because they think it's funny," sophomore Cheyanne Schaefer said. "I think they just mainly like the jokes that are made on the show." Si Robertson, Willie's uncle, delivers the majority of the jokes. Si is a Vietnam war veteran

of his own ideas. Generally, his humor is clean and random - he's been known to say "Rolo's are for golos not you bozos" and "your beard is so hairy, even Dora can't explore it." Si isn't alone in providing "Duck Dynasty's" humor - the rest of the family does as well - but the humor helps create a positive tone for the overarching theme of the series. Happiness, whether it's from a duck hunt, wedding or even a mason jar full of sweet tea, is the most important aspect of life. It's this happiness that attracts 11.8 million viewers to "Duck Dynasty." Beyond the camo gear and beards, the fact that, as Uncle Si puts it, the Robertsons are

with unparalleled commitment

''happy, happy, happy'' makes

and stubbornness in the defense

''Duck Dynasty" worth watching.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

OCT.11 2013

ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES How to manage student loans in college By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Student loan debt is growing at an alarming rate, and it doesn't show any signs of slowing down. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports there is $902 billion in outstanding student loan debt in the U.S. The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau reports the number is closer to $1 trillion. There are more than 37 million people with outstanding student loan debt according the FRBNY, which means the average debt per borrower is about $24,378. About 65 percent of borrowers who are considered 'high-debt' borrowers misunderstood or were surprised by aspects of their student loans or the student loan process according to http://www. nera.com. To be considered a high-debt borrower, one must have more than $25,000 in student loans, and this group is equal to about 25 percent of the 37 million total borrowers. So about 16 percent of people who take on student loans are going into five figures of debt without even knowing what they are getting into. It is imperative that students and their parents understand the terms of the loans they are taking on, because otherwise it can be easy to get in trouble. According to http://www.asa. org, two out of every five student loan borrowers are delinquent, or late by more than 90 days, for a

student loan payment within the first five years of entering their repayment period. Delinquency can lead to default, and defaulting on a loan can dramatically increase the balance owed, ruins credit scores and, in the case of federal loans, can allow the government to withhold tax returns or a percentage of a person's wages. Now that everyone is properly frightened, there is a light at the end of the tunnel: there are things students can do while still in school to make repaying their student loans easier when it comes time. First, every student needs to know the grace period on their student loans. The grac:e period is how long they are allowed to wait after school until the first payment is due. Not all loans are created equal, and neither are the grace periods, so it is important to keep track of which loans begin to need repaying when. Second, in the case of subsidized student loans, the government is paying the interest on the loans while a student is in school, but for all other loans, the interest starts piling up when they are taken out and doesn't wait for students to finish their education. By simply multiplying the interest rate by the principal amount of the loan and dividing by 12, students can approximate the monthly interest accrued. Student loans require repayment starting after school, but any need-based loans also let students start making payments while in school.

Total student loan balances by age group increasing across all age g roups Bilfions of Dollars

1,000 900

BOO 700

600

400 300 200 100

0 2004

The monthly interest accrued is a good minimum monthly payment while attending school, because it prevents that interest being capitalized, or added to the original loan balance, upon graduation. When this happens, it increases the total balance owed on the loan which consequently increases the monthly interest accrued. Next, start lowering the principal on the loans as soon as possible. Whenever possible, students should try to make payments on the loan, because the

bankruptcy in 2007. The market valued TWTRQ at a penny per share on Oct. 3 before rising to 15 cents and then settling back to 5 cents at the end of the day. Shares in defunct companies like Tweeter are traded on over-the-counter markets rather than on major exchanges such as the NYSE. Yet, stockholders traded approximately 14 million shares of Tweeter by midday last Friday. When the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FIRA) became aware of the situation on that Friday, they suspended the trading of Tweeter's shares. In an official release early Monday, FIRA stated the recent activity of TWTRQ demonstrated a widespread misunderstanding related to the possible initial public offering of an unrelated security." The relation between the two tickers has led analysts to believe that the rise in share price can be linked directly to the news of Twitter' s IPO announcement. On Tuesday, the FIRA assigned a new ticker to Tweeter, THEQG, to avoid any future confusion with Twitter. /1

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2006

2007

2008 2009 2010 40-49 • 50-59 • 60+

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GRAPH COURTESY OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF NEW YORK

marketplace confusion Last Friday, the social media company Twitter announced its plans to become a publicly traded company before Thanksgiving. Analysts are expecting the initial public offering (IPO) to be a success, with The Wall Street Journal reporting a $1 billion registration for launch. In the announcement, Twitter released its stock ticker: TWTR. Twitter is one of Wall Street's most highly anticipated upcoming IPOs. While the majority of investors have most likely taken a Business 101 class, it seems that some have misunderstood the meaning of an IPO. Soon after Twitter's announcement, the stock of a defunct home entertainment retailer - Tweeter - saw shares rise nearly 1400 percent according to Marketplace, a radio show on National Public Radio that discusses market trends. Tweeter used to be listed with the ticker TWTR, but was later changed to TWTRQ when the company declared chapter 11

2005

under 30 • 30-39

Twitter vs. Tweeter: By PETER MUELLER Guest Writer

7%

sooner the balance starts getting repaid, the less interest students will need to pay over the life of the loan. If students can make payments above and beyond the monthly interest, they will be applied directly to the loan balance, which reduces the amount of interest that accrues each month. Finally, upon graduation, students should create a rough repayment schedule for the loan, otherwise known as a loan amortization. To learn more about loan amortization, check

out my first Accounting for Dummies column online at http:// mastmedia.plu.edu. A schedule (or every payment that needs to be made is a valuable resource that will prevent delinquency and default, those cruel destroyers of credit. Student loans are an unfortunate, but necessary, part of college students' lives. They may seem scary, but the road to repayment can be a smooth one as long as students follow these simple tips.

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+

THE MOORING MAST

OCT.11 2013

BUSINESS 9

WHAT TO DO AFTER GRADUATION How to decide between a fifth-year program and the job mar_ket By WINSTON ALDER Business and Ads Manager For finance students, Pacific Lutheran University's addition of a Master of Science in Finance (MSF) program has been quite interesting. The program only takes 10 months, as compared to a typical two-year Master's program. PLU's MSF is also a Charted Financial Analyst (CFA) Institute University Recognized Program. Earned in April, this certifies that the coursework incorporates at least 70 percent of the CFA Candidate Book of Knowledge. In short, PLU will reasonably prepare students for the first two levels of the CFA exam. However, many students still question when someone should enroll in a MSF program and what value it adds to a resume. The MSF degree is a relatively new certification in North America, but it is fast gaining recognition. Often an addition, rather than replacement to a MBA, MSF programs focus rigorously on financial theory, investment analysis, applied corporate financial analysis and investment management. Graduates often place as analysts in equity research, investment banking, sales and trading, corporate finance and investment management fields. For Lutes, the PLU MSF program website states connections with local firms such

as Russell Investments (author's pick), Parametric Portfolio Associates, D.A. Davidson and Pacific Crest Securities. Class of 2013 grads have achieved offers from BNY Mellon, Corporate Finance Associates, Monte Capital Group and Stolz & Associates. While undergraduate students have achieved placement at many of the same and similar firms, MSF students have a much higher probability of successfully earning an offer. Think of it like this: a MSF degree stacks the deck a little for a student, but isn't a guarantee. A MSF degree helps your

resume stand out of the stack and signifies in-depth financial knowledge along with strong drive and ambition. Those three letters are a gateway to a group of higher caliber students that often achieve employment at much more prestigious firms. This degree is not perfect for everybody, some should wait a year or two to gain professional experience first. However, students with excellent internships and good shots at obtaining a job from them may be better served focusing on their career first. Gaining real world experience

tends to help bring perspective to the classroom and students with a few years' experience benefits everybody. For students without offers in the pipeline or those looking to change career paths, the MSF is invaluable. Another group a MSF degree is great for is those without financial backgrounds seeking to add quantitative financial skills. For those who have a short attention span and only read the first paragraph and these last ones, here are the key points: MSFs add an incredible amount of value to a candidate's skill set. In only 10 months, students can

learn skills that allow firms to utilize and implement new hires more quickly, and put them on more complex projects. Firms know this and actively seek MSF students out of the resume stack. PLU' s program is an excellent way to gain the knowledge needed to pass the first two levels of the CFA. So, if students want to transition from another industry to finance, advance to a better firm or don't have a value-adding internship, they should submit their applications - spots fill up quickly.

GRAPHIC COURTESY OF MSF.BUSINESS.UTAH.EDU

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Tenns subject to change without notice. No cash value. Select styles. Valid on regular priced items only. Excludes clearance, textbooks, electronics, TOMS, glassybaby, Dansko and Oleana. While supplies last. Cannot be combined

with other offers, coupons路of discounts exeept,:Alumni Discount. Offer valid only 10.11.2013 through 10.13.2013;路. . , ,.


THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

OCT.11 2013

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Consumer activism an app away By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor

ads featuring gay or lesbian I couples, to the movement I toward free trade coffee beans, buyers want to know their money is supporting -something they believe in and keep it away from companies who don't support those beliefs. After hearing stories about big companies like & Fitch, Abercrombie who's CEO made public statements implying that his brand was only for "cool kids," even college students of limited means want to take action, and it seems that one of the most effective ways to do that is through our purchasing power. Consumer activism is a trend, and it looks like it's sticking around and entering the smartphone realm. Meet Buycott: a free, interactive smartphone application that asks what you care about when you buy things and helps you support them. Fundamentally, it shows PB01'0 BY L1W1 TBADL you where your money Online Edit.or Leah Thl.xel diapi. a screen shot of the is going when you buy 'Buycott' phone app. In an example of the app at work, the something and lets you Kleenex Tissues product is shown. decide if you want to support that company or the app will tell you who it's being Buycotted person based on what they sold it to the company supported - by people support. you're buying it from, who who wish to support The app makes use of the owns that company and bicycle-friendly businesses term ''buycott" as opposed what they use their money and by those who support to "boycott." When you for. LGBTQ equality in the boycott something, you For instance, scanning workplace. don't support it in any a travel-sized package In the end, applications l'f&f... ..,_J&wg,~ pP. ~ ~-----..~~-路;lliRitl~ ~ ~ ~y颅 other filma means you buy they are made bY J(leenex are, and will continue to products that support what and that Kleenex is owned be, popular simply because you agree with. by the Kimberly-Oarke they promote transparency. After scanrung your Corporation, which also More and more thars food, t-shirt, candy bar CD owns I<otex. Poise, Scott, what America, and or anything else you want Huggies and Cottonelle. particularly the millennial to buy that has a barcode, C can also !M!E! that generation, is looking for.

E'!1

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447

~-~--

In a spring article about the millennial generation, TIME reporter Joel Stein argued that this generation - our generation - is lazy and narcissistic. However, we aren't lazy, we're just getting smarter about our activism. Crushing student loan debt and the nature of higher education prevents us from being "activists" in the traditional sense of bra-burning and freeing lab animals - the cost of getting kicked out of school is just too big to pay - but we do have to buy things. Which is why we should use that buying power, and we have quite a bit of it even though we are upoor college students," to promote something good. The past couple years have seen a surge in consumer's interest in what

are~and those companies they buy from support.

From the announcement that a part owner of OUck-Fil-A is anti-gay, to JCPenney's controversial

..

P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast

Positive about Sex+ By SAMANTHA LUND

Guest Writer It is that thought you get whenever you see people tanning on Foss Field or see the hot guy or girl from class working out - I'm talking about sex. You keep all of those dirty thoughts to yourself but don't be ashamed. They are normal and Pacific Lutheran University has given students a place to talk openly about sexual thoughts. Last week, a group of openm.inded individuals came together at a Sex Positive (Sex+) lecture to talk about sex. There is no doubt in my mind that sexual education is important. I am not trying to be your mother and tell you about the benefits of using condoms or why abstinence is the only 100 percent effective form of birth control. But you should be educated for your own good.

Having good health and being careful should be a priority, as is being comfortable in your own skin while

knowing what you want is important. You can wear blue, black, green, red, purple or yellow condoms. Heck, you could wear one that makes "it" look like it's wearing a tux - yes, they really make those but none of that will bring with it the level of comfort that comes from knowing what you want, what you are doing and how you feel. Robyn Ochs, an LGBTQ+ activist, came to campus to talk about sex binaries Sept. 30. Her aim was to have every student in attendance understand that sexuality is not black and white, gay or straight, hetero or homo, but rather that it has shades of gray - maybe even 50 shades of gray. Not only was the lecture original, but Ochs completely caught the attention of everyone in the room. Everyone's sexual journey is different. Robyn Ochs let the crowd know it was completely OK to have your own story. Students left feeling more comfortable with who they are because Sex+ lectures are a place where students can feel completely safe. Sex+ lectures bring students from all backgrounds together to talk about the one thing we all want to discuss - sex. Let's be honest, talking about sex brings automatic friendship. It's enlightening to know that the people you see walking the halls everyday might just have the same

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The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and dist ribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

dirty little questions you do. Once those are out, nothing is stopping you from being best friends. The next Sex+ lecture is on abstinence. Yes, the art of actively doing nothing to another person. Hey, actively doing nothing can be hard. I know when I try to do nothing, I always end up playing Dots on my iPhone. All jokes aside, this lecture could be a stepping stone to understanding your sexuality better. Even if you do no.t practice abstinence, it can increase understanding about the cute girl who lives down the hall that does practice it. Or maybe you will finally understand why you don't practice abstinence other than just wanting to fit in. The lecture, "You Don' t Have to Take Your Clothes Off," is Oct. 28 at 6 p.m. in the Anderson University Center room 133. Even if you believe in taking your clothes off, you should still go. Go and bring your opinions with you. Challenge the ideas, create conversation and create diversity. Open up a dialogue between you and your fellow students to bring brilliant ideas and opinions to the surface. Everyone' s view is brilliant whether it is fully clothed or naked. Show support for knowledge. Or show support for sex. Just go show your supporl, but please keep your clothes on in the process.

+


OCT.11 2013

THE MOORING MAST

OPINION 11

Bea Dropped dishes deserve applause student worker By SAMANTHA LUND Guest Writer

By TAHLIA TERHUNE Guest Writer

I have continuously been told to set work aside during college if possible. I've heard claims such as "you11 do better in school if you don't have other priorities," or "you11 push yourself too hard." But I have grown to love the fact that I am a working student and would encourage anyone else to be as well. People who are not willing to accept the challenge of being a working student are buying into the myth that students who work cannot focus as well on school. To be a working student means you need to have a strong sense of time management. Once you can learn to delegate your time, prioritizing your life becomes much simpler. It seems to me that the more I take on, the better my organizational skills become. Not only will you gain time management skills, but your free time will become much more valuable to you. Soon you will find yourself using free time for activities and tasks you truly enjoy rather than being glued to Netflix. Many people work because they have to pay bills and help contribute to tuition, but for others it can be a choice. Nobody wants to be the college student with 10 dollars to spare. Being able to generate your own income gives you a great sense of responsibility and pride. It will give you experience in the real world and help you feel accomplished. Plus you won't have to beg your parents for some extra money on your gas card. Some might be hesitant about taking on so much. We need to be pushing ourselves to the limits while we are young. As privileged students, we have a vast amount of opportunities laying at our feet that will no longer be there once we are thrown into the real world. Seize the opportunities we have, because now is the time we can handle it. The opportunities for jobs you can explore are endless. Jobs don't necessarily even have to be something you are paid to do. If you find a volunteer position that you desire, go for it. You will still gain a sense of responsibility and learn to manage your time. On-campus work is another option where Pacific Lutheran University does a fantastic job providing opportunities for students to be employed. Of course you always have the option to work off campus as well. I would encourage anyone to consider working while in school. You will find an improved sense of time and be able to show a record of past achievements outside of school. As PLU students, we are lucky to be in the position of boundless opportunities. Take every one you can. Chances like these may not be available later on in life.

When students drop their dishes in the Anderson University Center, everyone claps. It is a Pacific Lutheran University tradition, and it has been for years. However, some have students frowned on our tradition, concerned this promotes singling out and bullying. In the attempt to create a bully-free campus, our clapping has become a casualty. Rather than mourn it, let's bring it back. Students drop things. It is in our nature. Expecting thousands of people to eat in a dining hall every night without having any dishes dropped is insane - hence the plastic dishes we get like toddlers. No matter how many times we drop things, we are still embarrassed. But PLU has a tradition to lighten the mood and create a friendly atmosphere - when someone drops a dish, everyone claps. The clapping is a joke. It is a sarcastic "atta boy" for the dish dropper. The tradition is supposed to save the dropper from embarrassment and maybe give that

person the opportunity to tum it into a funny ~ituation rather than an awkward one. Groups of students have debated about whether or not the clapping could be considered bullying. Drawing attention to students who drop things and "singling them out'' by clapping can be construed as bullying, I guess. As far as I am concerned, there are two great things about the clapping: the student gets to play it off as a joke, and it brings the students together. Any tradition that brings students together, even for a few seconds, is a good one. The great thing about PLU is our family atmosphere. We all are friends and enjoy having each other around. The clapping is just another one of our little family's jokes. Of course these were all just theories, since I had never been a dish dropper. That is, until I decided to test my theories. At 6 p.m., the busiest time of dinner, I became a dish dropper. I was having

dinner with friends when I did it. I did the unthinkable with fear in my heart. I dropped a cup. Just kidding - I launched that cup. I used my elbow to shoot it to the other side of the aisle and then stood to pick it up. At first it was quiet, and that was the most awkward second of my life, but then the clapping started and the mood lightened. I was much less embarrassed than I thought I would be. It really is not like ripping a bandaid off - it's more like telling a good joke. There will always be the argument of history. The Ancient Greeks believed that clapping when dropping a plate gave you good luck. Other traditions have said that breaking things brings bad spirits into the air, and we need to clap to scare them away. If anything, we are upholding old traditions. We all love our school. We all love our traditions, so let's not let them die. Next time someone drops a dish, give them a round of applause.

''Any tradition that brings students together, even for a few seconds, is a good one."

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Single living: A valuable alternative By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Writer We have options available to us as students in terms of how to live and who to live with. Single living can be a viable option if you find it is the right fit for you. All housing options have their merits and drawbacks, and it is great that we get to decide for ourselves what works best for us as individuals. Often, for the first two years of college, students live with a roommate in a traditional dorm room. For their last two years, students generally decide to live either off campus or in South Hall with its apartment style living. Tradition aside, students can also live without a roommate. You can become a Resident Assistant and live by yourself. You can also, by chance, end up in a double without a roommate or pay for this option. Or you can choose to live in Kreidler Hall, a resident hall entirely made up of single occupancy rooms. The atmosphere of Kreidler is very friendly and non-cliquey. Everyone is

welcoming and willing to start conversations with anyone they meet. I chose to live in a single in Kreidler myself this year, and I couldn't be happier with my decision. It just works for me. Those who praise single living enjoy the privacy and the autonomy. Living alone provides you with a private space of your own. You don't have to worry about looking decent all the time in case your roommate happens to show up or about having to find another place to have a personal conversation. You have your own space to use as you want. You can go to sleep and wake up on your own time. This means taking naps whenever you please and not having to coordinate naptime with your roommate's schedule. Another positive factor is you have the freedom to keep the room at the temperature of your preference. The heater can be on or

"Being on your own can lend the unique opportunity of self-reliance."

off. The windows can be open or closed. Even simple things like this can make living experiences easier and more enjoyable. You can do homework, play music, or have people over without worry. You have the peace and quiet when you want it, yet you can still go hang out with your friends. However, while there are perks to single living, there are also pitfalls. Some find single living to be lonely and uninteresting. When you have a roommate there is always someone there to talk to. It offers a special companionship that you can find by living with someone. A roommate learns more about you, and vice versa, than anyone else could learn just by talking to you. Son:ie also might find living alone to be dull. When you don't have anything going on Friday night, having a roommate can sometimes give you something to do. You can tag along with whatever they have going on or plan to do something together. Building close-knit friendships can lessen the effects of these faults to singleliving, though. You can still have meals and attend events with friends and build longlasting bonds outside of traditional resident hall settings. You learn to do things on your own and find ways to entertain yourself. Being on your own can lend the unique opportunity of self-reliance.


THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

OCT.11 2013

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 11, 2013

SPORTS 13

Football

Men's Soccer WINS

TEAM

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Linfield

4

0

0

1-0

Won4

Pacific

4

0

0

1-0

Won4

Lewis & Clark

3

Willamette

3

PLU

3

0

2

Whitworth Puget Sound

0

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0

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WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Puget Sound

8

3

0

6-0

Won 7

PLU

9

0

3

4-0-2

Wonl

Whitworth

5

3

2

3-2-1

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Whitman

3

6

2

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2

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0-6

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Willamette

6

3

Linfield

5

4

Pacific

5

6

11

George Fox

0

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 12 vs. Lewis d Clark, 12:30 p.m. LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 12 at PU{}et Sound, 2:30 p.m.

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CONFERENCE

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4

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2

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2

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5

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 11 vs. George Fox, 7p.m.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 12 at Linfield, noon

Top-tier soccer teams vie for Northwest Conference supremacy By SAM HORN Sports Editor It is time. This is what the Pacific Lutheran University men's soccer team has been looking forward to. On Saturday, the Lutes will wage an epic battle with their cross-town rival, Puget Sound. · The two teams have been at the top of the Northwest Conference standings for most of the season, and for good reason. The Lutes have outscored their opponents 24-6 this season. Armed with a solid offense and a steadfast defense, head coach John Yorke has a team that can repeat the success of its 2011 campaign. In 2011, PLU was equipped with two of the premier forwards in the NWC. Spencer Augustin and Chad Keams led the way for the Lutes, tallying 32 goals combined. Due to the team's ability to score at will, the 2011 squad finished in first place in the NWC with a 15-4 overall record. This year, the men's team has two experienced forwards in Derek Johnson and Giancarlo Santoro. Both players are seniors. Johnson already has 10 goals this season and the team has only played 12 games. If Johnson keeps up this torrid pace, he could possibly surpass Augustin's 19 goal season

in 2011. Even if Johnson fails to meet such lofty expectations, the PLU team will surely find success this season. With Santoro playing beside Johnson, anything is bound to happen with the Lutes' high-powered offense. Across the river, Puget Sound has put up impressive numbers in its own right. The Loggers stand at the top of the NWC with a 6-0 record in conference. Carson Swope, a midfielder, leads the Loggers' attack with eight goals on the season. Accompany that statistic with four assists, and Swope has a good chance to land himself in the First-Team All Conference discussion at the end of the season. Even if Swope receives First-Team honors at the end of the season, I'm sure he won't be pleased if the Loggers don't claim a victory over the Lutes. Swope has seen success playing in the clutch. The midfielder has scored three game-winning goals so far this season. Going into this weekend's match, the Lutes hold an advantage on defense. While many of the Lutes' defenders have been named Defensive Student-Athletes of the Week, goalkeeper Joe Rayburn, a senior, has shut down opposing offenses. Rayburn allows .50 goals per match, ranking 34th

nationwide. There are 408 Division ill mens' soccer teams in the country. Yes, Rayburn is just that good. Additionally, Rayburn has compiled a save percentage of .870, which ranks 19th in the country. Again, there are 408 Division ill mens' soccer teams in the country. Rayburn is exciting to watch during a match. He makes acrobatic saves look easy. He really is in an upper echelon of goalkeeping. Young, aspiring soccer goalies, take note. Puget Sound's goalkeeper also deserves some applause as well. Nathan King, a junior, has only allowed seven goals so far this season and ranks 99th in the country in save percentage at .805. With Rayburn and King exhibiting moments of brilliance, goals will be scarce in the cross-town match this weekend. The result of this match might prove to be the deciding factor at the end of the season when national playoffs approach. Both teams will look to leave every bit of sweat, blood and tears on the field Saturday afternoon in an effort to snag conference bragging rights. It all comes down to this moment. PLU must be ready to take on the conference-leading Loggers if they stand a chance of repeating the team's successful 2011 campaign.

OORD ON TARGET IN LATEST FALL SPORTS PICK 'EM CHALLENGE How many kills will Amy Wooten get next weekend when the PLU volleyball team faces George Fox? By SAM HORN Sports Editor Four. That was the number of touchdowns Peyton Manning threw while overpowering the Dallas Cowboys this past Sunday, 51-48. Four. That was the number Drew Oord guessed when asked how many touchdowns Manning would throw against the Cowboys. Oord smartly strayed away from the majority opinion. He was the only participant to say Manning would throw four touchdowns on Sunday. It' s hard to fault Oord for his Manning threw 16 reasoning. touchdowns in four games going into the matchup against the Cowboys. If you do the math, that's an average of four touchdowns per game. Manning kept his mindboggling touchdown average at four after

torching th@ Cowboys' def@ns@. Manning won and Oord guessed

correctly. There couldn't have been a better way to script this scenario. Nice work, Drew. This week, contestants will have to decide how many kills Amy Wooten will get in the Lutes' match against George Fox tonight. Wooten, a junior, has averaged nearly seven kills per contest, so there' s good reason to suggest that the middle blocker won't wreck havoc upon a George Fox team that has committed 27 blocking errors this season. Watch out, George Fox. Your team might be in third place in the Northwest Conference, but you can never be too safe. The Fall Sports Pick 'Em standings are shaping up nicely so far. No one is in dead last place and on the other hand, no one is the clear front runner. This should be a good, competitive Sports Pick 'Em season. Who am I kidding - lhere is never a bad Sports Pick 'Em season.

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~~


14 SPORTS

THE MOORING MAST

SJIM SAYS... By SAM HORN Sports Editor Insufficient offense won't win games it's a proven fact. This past Saturday, the Lutes football team realized firsthand how posting 216 combined yards of offense wasn't good enough to beat Linfield. The Lutes running attack has bowled over prior opponents, but against Linfield, Pacific Lutheran University tallied a mere 40 yards on the ground. Even though the Lutes couldn't score a single point against the Linfield Wildcats, the PLU football team does not need to worry. Everything will be fine. It might sound crazy, but losing in shutout fashion against a nationally ranked team isn't nightmarish. The great aspect about losing is everyone can learn how to not repeat the same mistakes.

The Lutes might have lost 29-0 to the second best team in the nation, but PLU football can't lose faith. Not yet. Through the first three quarters of the game, it seemed as if the Lutes would pounce on an opportunity to surge ahead. They were only down by 7 points. Until the fourth quarter debacle where Linfield scored 22 points, the Lutes were holding the No. 2 team in the nation to 7 points. That's something to be proud of. No other team Linfield has faced can say they held the Wildcats to 7 points through three quarters. PLU surrendered the least amount of the points to Linfield so far this season. Before the Lutes squared off against the Wildcats, Linfield had been averaging 56 points per game. That average took a significant drop when PLU limited Linfield to 29 points. The Wildcats have feasted on the three other teams they have faced this year, but

OCT.11 2013

Keep your heads up Lutes, everything will be all right

the Lutes proved they had the potential to upset Linfield. They were just several points away from doing so. Linfield is a powerhouse. There's no denying that fact. The Wildcats have cruised to four wins this season and don't look to slow down soon. The Wildcats even have several players who have transferred from large football schools. Two players on Linfield's roster are from Portland State University, a Division 1-AA university. There's no shame in saying the Lutes lost to a team with a high-caliber roster. All the Lutes can do is focus on the next game, which will be against Lewis & Oark. Don't worry about PLU losing to Linfield. That game is in the past. Losing to Linfield might mean not having a perfect regular season record, but a record is not everything. Obtaining a ticket to the big dance is all the Lutes need. If they can set aside this loss

to Linfield, arguably the..best Division III team in the nation, the Lutes might be able to secure a place in the national playoffs. This season, and every other one, should be about making the most out of what you have. What matters is that every player sacrificed himself to be a part of the team. What matters is that each player has enough confidence to rise up to fight another day. If the Lutes can make the most out of this situation, they might just find themselves in the national playoff spotlight. From there, no one can say what lies in store for the mighty Lutes. Leave this past week at the bedside. The Lutes' offense should be able to take advantage of a Lewis & Clark defense that has allowed about 436 yards per game. If the Lutes focus on playing to their full potential next week, then the path to success will be visible once again.

Wolllen's soccer escapes the weekend unblelllished LUTES' SOLID DEFENSE AND STEADY OFFENSE CONTRIBUTE TO TWO SUCCESSFUL OUTINGS By JOHN TVETER Guest Writer GAME 1: WHITWORTH The sun came out this past weekend and provided the perfect backdrop for a pair of Northwest Conference soccer matches at the East Field on the Pacific Lutheran campus. The Lutes' first game of the weekend against the Pirates of Whitworth last Saturday was a tightly contested matchup between the two conference foes. The 90-minute game was not enough to separate the two teams, as both settled for a 0-0 draw after two periods of overtime. The pivotal period of the match occurred in the first overtime period as goalkeeper Takara Mitsui, a first-year, came up with a huge double save to keep the game tied. Mitsui first dove to her right to deny Whitworth' s Megan McCart on a curving shot. She then quickly hopped back up to her feet to throw herself in front of a point blank shot from the Pirates' Ashley

Rothrock, who was attempting to tap home the rebound. "I thought we played really well today," forward Samantha Benner, a senior, said. "The offense will come. We played really solid defense, we kept really good possession - just a frustrating result." The Lutes came up with the big defensive stop when they needed to, but it was the Pirates who were struggling most of the afternoon's 0-0 draw. The statistics showed it. The Lutes outshot the Pirates 22-6 and put twice as many shots on goal as the Pirates, leading the category 8-4. Junior Blake Warner and first-year Kaylie Rozell led the Lutes and combined for nine shots with six on goal. "We did everything but score today," defender Mariah Rasmussen, a senior, said.

GAME 2: WHITMAN There was no evidence of tired legs last

Sunday afternoon when the Lutes took on the Whitman Missionaries. After some pressure yielded a Lutes' comer kick early on in the match, the Lutes played it short to Warner. After Warner took a few touches, she sent a left-footed bending cross into the box. Rasmussen received the cross and slotted the ball to the right of the Whitman keeper for a goal. Rasmussen's goal gave the Lutes an early 1-0 lead in the opening minutes of the match and proved to be the only goal scored by either side for the rest of the match. The goal was the Lutes' first off of a setpiece so far this season. "I played it into the box to give my teammates a chance to get on the end of it. Mariah [Rasmussen] got to the ball and put it into the back of the net," Warner said. "Our hard work in practice has paid off in our games." Whitman forced the Lutes to battle

defensively for the rest of the match. Whitman outshot PLU 10-5. The keeper tandem of sophomore Marisa Gonzalez and Mitsui, as well as the defensive midfield play of senior Alex Murray, led the Lutes' gritty defense. PLU was able to contain the Whitman offense for the rest of the afternoon to complete the Lutes' fourth consecutive shutout. The Lutes' defense has been steadfast this season. It has been about 460 minutes and counting since the Lutes last allowed a goal. The rotating goalkeeper strategy head coach Seth Spidahl has been employing is working. By rotating Gonzalez and Mitsui, Spidahl is keeping both of them fresh, and the performance on the field for both players has been excellent. The Lutes will be on the road next weekend, when they face Linfield Saturday and Willamette Sunday. Both games are set to start at noon.

TOP LEFT: Defender Blake Warner, a junior, blast.s a ball upfield to clear any pressure for the Lutes' backline. ToP RIGHT: Senior Alex Murray, a defender, beads a ball away from any opposing forwards. BOTTOM LEFI': Forward Samantha Benner, a senior, collects a bigb pass before pounding a shot on goal. BOTTOM RIGHT: Courtney Randall, a sophomore, passes a ball upfield to create an attacking opprotunity against Whitman last Sunday.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT.11 2013

SPORTS 15

Lutes' football gets thrashed by Wildcats Disastrous fourth quarter leads to Lutes' demise By STEVEN MCGRAIN

Guest Writer The Lutes opened their Northwest Conference football season in McMinnville, Ore. against the second-ranked Lin.field Wildcats. The Lutes lost 29-0 due to Lin.field's scoring spree, as well as inefficient offense. The contest's final score does not show the effort Pacific Lutheran presented against the Wildcats Saturday afternoon. After quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior, fumbled a snap in the first quarter, Lin.field began a drive on the Lutes' 24-yard line and threatened to score early. The Lutes' defense remained optimistic regardless of the field position, however. After a couple of runs by Wildcats' running back Josh Hill, Lin.field marched down to the 13yard line. Lin.field was forced to kick a field goal, but failed to convert the try. Pacific Lutheran's next offensive series displayed promise early on in the game. Ritchey was able to find wide receiver Ben Welch, a first-year, for a 13-yard gain after a 7-yard run by running back Niko Madison, a junior. On second and nine, Ritchey was able to find Madison on a swing route to the right side for a 13-yard catch, resulting in another first down. The Wildcats' defense broke 路 up Ritchey' s next pass, but the resilient quarterback battled back to run for 7 yards on the

subsequent play. An illegal offensive formation stalled the third down of the drive, and Ritchey's pass was incomplete on the next play. Even though the Lutes had to punt the ball to Lin.field, the offense was able to show signs of life. PLU moved the ball downfield against a Lin.field defense that only gave up 76 yards to Case Western Reserve the previous week. After two three and outs by both sides due to steadfast defenses, Lin.field found some big play help from the legs of its quarterback, Josh Yoder. The play caller passed to the Wildcats' tight end and then ran for 10 yards on the next play. The Wildcats were able to get to the Lutes' 38-yard line. Four plays later, Lin.field's Hill scored, placing the first points on the board to give Lin.field a 7-0 lead. These seven points were the only points displayed on the scoreboard in the first half. The rest of the game was determined in the beginning of the fourth quarter. In the fourth quarter, Lin.field took 14 plays to find the end zone, once again from the legs of running back Hill. Lin.field took a 13-0 lead after a missed extra point. After a quick PLU three and out, the Lutes gave the ball back to Lin.field. It only took the Wildcats six plays to score another touchdown from their 49-yard line. Yoder threw a pass to wide receiver Charlie Poppin, increasing the lead to 19-0. Their two-point

"It just comes down to execution and believing in what we are doing." Kyle Warner junior, wide receiver

conversion failed. PLU retained possession again, but did not keep it for long. Ritchey threw an interception, which returned the ball all the way down to the Lutes' 1-yard line. It only took one play for Lin.field to score. Hill churned his way through the heaping pile of linemen and jumped into the end zone. The touchdown was Hill's third of the day. '1t was frustrating because none of us would have guessed this would be the ultimate outcome of the game," wide receiver Austin Hilliker, a junior, said. "We felt prepared and knew what was expected of us." The Wildcats would convert a field goal later on in the fourth quarter, which resulted in a final score of 29-0. The Lutes turned the ball over five times - four were due to interceptions and another was a fumble on the second play of their first drive of the game. The Lutes' defense played resiliently, giving up 394 yards to a Lin.field offense that has averaged about 535 yards per game. The Lutes' main problem was that they gave the Wildcats excellent field positions to score after the interceptions. The Lutes' offense was able to drive the ball downfield but could never capitalize. PLU tried to convert on fourth down twice instead of kicking a field goal, but just couldn't convert. The Lutes have their homecoming game this weekend as they welcome Lewis & Clark to Sparks Stadium, looking to get back on pace in the Northwest Conference. Kickoff is at 12:30 p.m. "We just need to go back to our core plays, the ones that have been in our system since day one," wide reciever Kyle Warner, a junior, said. "It just comes down to execution and believing in what we are doing."

GAME STATISTICS TOTAL OFFENSE Lutes- 216 Wildcats- 394 FIRST DOWNS Lutes-IO Wildcats- 23 RUSHING YARDS Lutes- 40 Wildcats-194 Game statistics found from: http:/~utes.~013路14/boxscores/l0131005...Pl4z.xml

PHOTOS BY MIKE WELLS

TOP: Wide receiver Jon Zeglin, a senior, leaps up to make a catch from quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior. Zeglin was only able to reel in one catch for 3 yards during the game. BOTTOM LEFT: Ritchey

t-al.kll with an offensive coordinator while the Lutes' defense takes the field. Rit~hi:y had a tough time agai.rult Linfi.eld's defense, throwing four interceptions. BOTTOM RIGHT; Tight end Lucas Sontra, a junior, runs toward the end zone on one of his two receptions last Saturday. Sontra tallied 15 receiving yards in the game.


THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS SOCCER CONT. FROM PAGE I once again applied the pressure, but Rayburn came through with two big saves. Whitworth ended up out-shooting the Lutes 21 to 15. "We kind of sat back at the beginning of this game," defender Bryan Anderson, a senior, said. "Next game we're really going to pressure them." Lutes' Troy-Mikel Olger, a sophomore, and Taylor Jackson, a senior, both received yellow cards. Referees also booked two Whitworth players. Johnson led the Lutes with four shots on goal.

GAME2

With PLU and Whitman deadlocked at one goal apiece, it appeared the men's soccer match would be headed for extra time. That is until forward Johnson put two shots in the back of the net in less than 90 seconds to lead the Lutes to a 3-1 victory. The first goal came in the 82nd minute. Johnson took a rebound off of Whitman goalkeeper Niko Contos and hit a rolling ball into the net from a tough angle against the right end line. The second goal came only seconds later in the 83rd minute, when Johnson took a pass from

OCT.11 2013 fellow senior Giancarlo Santoro and buried a shot from about 10 yards out to seal the game for the Lutes. "He [Johnson] was more physical and moved more -precisely and came in and did some of the dirty work in the game," head coach John Yorke said. PLU took an early lead in the 36th minute when midfielder Santoro collected a pass from Johnson and streaked through the defense to set up a one-on-one with the keeper. He kept his wits about him and put a decisive shot into the lower right side of the net to give PLU

the advantage. PLU would maintain its lead until the 73rd minute, when Whitman attacker Bridger Sellegren came bursting through a gap in the defense and buried a close range shot from about 10 yards out to equalize. Joe Olenginsltj and Bryce Archambeault, both seniors, each received yellow cards during the physical contest. The Lutes are ranked sixth in the nation and remain undefeated at 9-0-3 overall and 4-0-2 in Northwest Conference play. Whitman fell to 3-6-2, and 3-2-1 in theNWC.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP LEFT: Midfielder Tyler Bennett, a sophomore, dribbles the ball upfield during the match against Whitworth last Saturday. BOTTOM LEFT: First-year Rigoberto Loreto, a forward, attempts to kick the ball off of an opposing Whitworth player to regain possession. BOTTOM RIGHT: Senior Jeff Piaquadio, a defender, cleverly weaves through two Whitworth players in an attempt to pass the ball upfield for a hopeful shot on goal.

Living in a fantasy world Fantasy football advice and need-to-know rules for the novice manager BY NICK BARENE

Sports Writer It's not real life, just fantasy fantasy football that is. Fantasy football is a virtual competition that allows participants to pick players from around the NFL and use them to compete with one another. Each team is made up of one quarterback, two running backs, two wide receivers, one tight end, one flex player, one team's defensive or special teams unit and one kicker. The flex player is defined as a running back, a wide receiver or a tight end. A player's performance in each game determines his value, and depending on how well he plays, he earns a certain amount of points. For example, this weekend, Peyton Manning of the Denver Broncos threw for 414 yards, four touchdowns and one interception against the Dallas Cowboys. He earned 1 point for every 25 passing yards, 4 points for each touchdown, and -2 points for his interception. This gave him a total of 36 fantasy points, which is a lot. Different positions and point values for certain statistics can be altered to suit the players in the league. Typically, there are eight to 10 people participating in the league, although there are larger and smaller leagues. The attraction of setting all-star lineups each week but never actually getting to see your team play against another team lies in the experience you gain through management.

The participant takes over the role of general manager, picking and choosing players, setting the most effective lineup, going over stats and, most importantly, reviewing matchups. Match-ups are key to fantasy football success. For instance, if your quarterback is playing against a team with a stingy pass defense, you may want to swap him out for your backup quarterback who is playing a weaker team. Another challenge with fantasy football is depth. This is particularly an issue in leagues with many people, because the players who consistently put up gaudy fantasy numbers will be spread thin. This leaves managers constantly searching for the player who may not necessarily be a consistent point earner, but who is matched up with a weak opponent and has a chance to earn big points. It is also important to have depth in the event that you would like to trade for a different player, one of your players gets injured and cannot play or when one your players has a bye week and won't be earning any points. For someone who is not familiar with players around the NFL, fantasy football is a good way to stay updated on how players and teams leaguewide are faring. Fantasy football is the ultimate game for casual fans and sports nerds alike. The quest to be at the top of your league is a long and arduous process, but those who skillfully manage their teams will find themselves basking in the glory of a fantasy championship.

TOP PLAYERS AND TEAMS IN FANTASY FOOTBALL QUARTERBACK:

1) Peyton Manning, Denver Broncos 2) Drew Brees, New Odeans Saints RUNNING BACK:

1) Jamaal Charles, Kansas City Chiefs 2) LeSean McCoy, Philadelphia EQ{Jles WIDE RECEIVER:

1) Dez Bryant, Dallas Cowboys 2) DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia Eagles TIGHT END:

1) Jimmy Graham, New Orleans Saints

2) Julius Thomas, Denver Broncos KICKER:

I) Matt Prater, Denver Broncos 2) Steven Hauschka, Seattle Seahawks DEFENSES/SPECIAL TEAMS:

1) Kansas City Chiefs 2) Seattle Seahawks Player stats found at: http}tiinyurl.com/lx9cvwf


SPORTS Lutes undefeated so far in volleyball conference

AdE Editor evaluates new apps for moviegoers

PAGE16

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE

OORING

OCT. 18, 2013

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 5

mastmedia. plu.edu

PHILLIPS CENTER OPENS Divestment forum dissects investment questions I

' I'

By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor

I I I l

America has a dependence on fossil fuels, and Pacific Lutheran University is no exception. PLU held a forum lunch Tuesday in the Anderson University Center to discuss the university's decision to use its endowment to invest in fossil fuels and how to avoid those investments in the future, also known as divestment. The forum began with a brief presentation from an outside research firm called Slocum. Slocum, of Minneapolis, Minn., discussed its findings on PLU's . endowment, other universities' endowments and if other schools decided to divest. An endowment is a fund given to a person or organization, which can be used as a tool for intergenerational equality in a sustainable manner for future generations to receive benefit. PLU's current endowment is $80 million, 60 percent of which is for student;.scholarships. The other 40 percent is spent on other needs for the university, including investments in fossil fuels. "Fossil fuel stocks correlate with fossil fuels," ' Solcum presenter Mark Anderson said. "And fossil fuels are a necessary item in today's market, so it makes sense to invest in them." Solcum' s research supports this statement. Solcum works with 48 Endowment and Foundation

I l ' \)

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

"Fossil fuels are a necessary item in today's market, so it makes sense to invest in them."

President Thomas Krise cuts the ribbon of the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts at the opening gala Saturday evening. Formerly known as Eastvold Auditorium, the building was remodeled after a generous $20 million donation by the late Phillips, a PLU alum and former regent. Approximately 600 people, including donors, former presidents and PLU dignitaries, as well as faculty members from the School of Arts and Communication, attended the gala.

WHAT'S INS Arts &Ent.ertainment

Swing club will bring renowned dance inst pageS

Sports

Joe Rayburn is most player for men's soce page 15

Opinion

From scary to sexy: columnist criHcizes the evolution ofHalloween pa.gl! 11

clients. All its views and reasons vary, but Anderson said none of its clientelle have found it feasible to divest from fossil fuels. The reasons behind these decisions were based on stock portfolio size, cost of investment managements and alternatives to divestment. After the presentation, the floor opened up for students to voice their opinions. The first student up was senior Jenny Taylor, president of the Grass Roots Environmental Action Now (G.R.E.A.N.) club on campus. Taylor is responsible for banning bottled water on campus and is a leader in coal train protests . She told the crowd she wanted PLU's endowment to reflect PLU's mission statement of caring for the earth. She also said many other universities have already decided to divest, and PLU should follow their example. Other students and sustainability advocates also stood to express their views along similarlines on the need to divest because of PLU's commitment to sustainability. In addition, ASPLU has drafted a movement to have PLU freeze any new investments in fossil fuel companies and to divest within five years from fossil fuel companies. "This forum is a formal beginning for this conversation," Taylor said. "I hope that the board will be challenged to consider the different forms and strategies for divestment.

Mark Anderson Solemn presenter

New ELCA bishop has office on campus ByKJERSTI ANDREASSEN News Writer Most people know Pacific Lutheran University is a religious college. However, it is much less well known that the Bishop of the Southwestern Washington Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Richard E. Jaech, and his staff have an office at PLU's Trinity House. Assistant to the bishop, Pastor Kim Latterell (pictured left) said that Trinity

Church offered the synod staff the building in the 70s. "They've [the synod] been here for 30 years, and if the building doesn't fall down we11 be here another 30 years," Latterell said. "I think they like the idea that they're close to PLU," Latterell said. "The Lutheran church puts a high emphasis on education. We think the church relates really well to college and university situations." Latterell said Martin Luther was a university professor and pastor himself, and Lutherans

across the world have placed a high value on education. "We have a decent relationship to PLU, but there's not a whole lot of overlap between what we do and what the university does," he said. The ELCA is known for a liberal stance on topics ranging from homosexuality to its interpretations of the Bible. In particular, the church allows people in same-sex relationships to be pastors. "We don't scream and yell and condemn from the pulpit," Latterell said. He

said he thinks other churches are going to wake up and see that this is the way society is going to be. "Our perspective is on being known by a gracious God," Latterell said. "God in Christ has acted in a way to work forgiveness and healing to the whole world, not just a select group of people." "God's attitude toward the world is one of healing, and wholeness, and restoration. We're called to live out that Gospel here on the earth," Latterell said.


THE MOORING MAST

2NEWS

OCT.18 2013

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FORECAST COURTESY OF WEATHER.COM

Clarifying the contingent f acuity situation By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chief The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) placed a paid advertisement on page 2 of the Oct. 11 issue of The Mooring Mast about Pacific Lutheran University's contingent faculty vote on whether or not they should form a union. Faculty voted on Oct. 10, but their ballots have yet to be counted. Written in the form of an open letter by Pastor Philip Nesvig, a retired ELCA pastor and PLU alum, the ad stated that PLU administrators were blocking the count and causing the delay. According to a letter sent out on behalf of the Office of the Provost and Human Resources Department to faculty members last Friday, the ballots have been received by the Seattle branch of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) but are impounded. They will remain so until the NLRB can review a pending appeal PLU made in September. The NLRB regional director decided to hear the appeal. "We're quite confident we'll prevail on all of the issues NLRB said they'd consider," Paul Drachler, SEIU's lawyer for this case, said. PLU had asked that the issue of NLRB's jurisdiction over the university be reviewed, as well as requested that the NLRB reconsider its decision to include full-time contingent faculty in the bargaining unit. "By accepting our request for review, the NLRB automatically - by their own rules - impounds the ballots until the review is completed," Provost Steven Starkovich said.

The votes will be counted after the appeal has been heard or if PLU drops the appeal. "PLU could settle this tomorrow if they rescinded the appeal," Jane Harty, senior lecturer in music and contingent faculty member, said. "They do not have to follow through on the appeal." PLU is standing by its right to appeal as a valid part of the decision process. "If the NLRB saw no merit in our position, they would not have accepted our request for review of the regional director's decision," Starkovich said. The NLRB has been unable to begin the reviewing process due to the government shutdown, which rendered its offices inactive. "Even if there were to have been no review, there is no one at NLRB to count the ballots," Starkovich said. Although the shutdown has exacerbated the holdup, the vote is still delayed by the need to review the appeal. "There is being some spin put on the situation. The government shutdown had little to do with the count," Harty said. While the government shutdown ended Wednesday night, there is no distinct timeframe in which the appeal will be heard or the vote will be counted. "It could be a very long time or a shorter period. There's no timetable," Drachler said. "PLU is in control of whether those votes get counted." By withdrawing the appeal, the vote would be counted when the NLRB returns to full function. While the appeal stands, however, the NLRB must first review it before the votes can be tallied. "We're stuck," Harty said. "The appeal could take years."

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

SEIU placed a paid advertisement on page 2 of the Oct. 11 issue of T~ Moorin!] Mast stating the PLU administration, and not the NLRB, was blocking the unionization vote count. The NLRB was inactive due to the government shutdown.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT.18 2013

NEWS3

'Tapped Out' production team shares experience What to do atPLU By MAUREEN REDMOND Guest Writer

Pacific Lutheran University MediaLab students shared their experiences in the production of the documentary "Tapped Out: Unearthing the Global Water Crisis" in a special preview for communication students Tuesday. Seniors Kortney Scroger, Katie Baumann, Haley Huntington and Samuel Hosman along with junior Valery Jorgensen have been working on the production of this documentary under the guidance of executive producer and senior adviser Robert Wells. "In my experience, this is one of the most impactful and impressive projects that MediaLab has done so far," Baumann said. This team has studied the issue of water crises and takes an in-depth focus in the documentary on water mismanagement, water rights and droughts and the effects these issues have had on people and the environment, specifically in North America. "If you don't see it, you don't necessarily know it or you don't understand the magnitude of it," Huntington said. "So we wanted to kind of shine more of a light on that, so, water issues in North America, but still trying to give it that global sense as well."

Through this documentary, the production because I have never done that before," team draws attention to the issue to create Hosman, who was in charge of the art and environmental awareness. animation, said. "It was a good learning During the presentation, the team said experience for myself." The premiere of "Tapped Out: Unearthing they researched and filmed in Colorado, Texas, Missouri, Ontario, Ottawa and other the Global Water Crisis" is Oct. 26 at 2 p.m. locations. The students conducted interviews in the Seattle Public Library. However, the with locals in each location to learn more future of this production does not end here. about the direct effects water mismanagement The team said it has plans to spread the has had on their communities and the message of the water crisis far beyond just environment where they live. the PLU community. "It will be entered into a lot of festivals, Upon witnessing first-hand the toll that the water crisis has had on people's lives, the and we're actually doing the research for that team members said telling these stories they right now," Jorgensen said. found heartbreaking was challenging. At the same time, Scroger said "meeting these people was also the best." "This is one of the most impactful and The students said working on the impressive projects that MediaLab has done production team so far." allowed them to build skills and learn a Katie Baumann tremendous amount from their experiences. senior "Personally, I am happy to learn how to animate graphics

Pacific Lutheran University has excelled in various sports divisions, but now it's time to take this legacy off the field and bring it behind the podium. PLU's newly formed debate team ranked 10th out.of the 64 teams in the primary debate rounds at the Lewis & Clark Debate Tournament in Portland last weekend. Debate members Andrew Tinker and Brendan Stanton, both sophomores, represented PLU in the quarterfinal round. The Lewis & Clark Debate Tournament is a national tournament and the largest in the Pacific Northwest region. The PLU team beat out several rival teams, including Willamette, Linfield,

PLX Group Exercise. Free for students with Lutecard. Mondays, Zumba 8-9 p.m. Tuesdays, Yoga, 7-8 p.m. Wednesday, Jazzercise, 7-8 p.m. Thursday, Kickboxing 7-8 p.m. and Boot Camp, 8-9 p.m. All classes in Memorial Gym. "Kiss Me, Kate." See the theatre department's first performance in the new performing arts center. $3 for the PLU community. Phillips Center, Friday and Saturday, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.

Friday LASR broadcasts live performance with Charlie Herrmann. Tune in at www. plu.edu/lasr., 1 p.m. Late Night Movie sponsored by Late Night Programming. The Cave, 9 p.m.

Debate team edges out rivals at national tournament ByRELAND TUOMI Copy Editor

Ongoing

Seattle University and Whitworth. The team's new director, Professor Justin Eckstein of the communication department, said he was proud of the way PLU performed. "The 10th seed at a tournament this size is a huge accomplishment," Eckstein said. "It looks like PLU forensics is off to a strong start." Stanton said he was delighted with the success of the first tournament of the year and that "it was especially awesome to place 10th out of a massive 64 teams with my partner Andrew Tinker." The next stop for the PLU debate team will be the Lower Columbia College tournament in Longview, Nov. 1-2.

Saturday "Can You Bring It?" food drive results. Sparks Stadium at PLU vs. Pacific football game. 12:30 p.m. Pflueger

Pfright

Night.

Dancing, pumpkin carving,

food and costume contest. Pflueger residence hall. 8-11 p.m.

Sunday Rachel Pack BME recital. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 5:306:30 p.m.

Oct. 25 Work Party at the PLU Community Garden. 10 a.m. 12p.m.

Oct. 26 Media Lab documentary "Tapped Out" premieres. Seattle Public Library, 2 p.m. PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLIE BEAUVELT

Sophomores Brendan Stanton (left) and Andrew Tinker (right) pose for the camera at the Lewis & Clark debate tournament Saturday.

Oct. 27

Night of Musical Theater. Phillips Center, 2 p.m.

Wrong food labels result in American food waste By SHUNYING WANG Guest Writer Forty percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes into the trash due to the misinterpretation of food expiration dates. A study conducted by the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic and Natural Resources Defense Council found food date labels often mislead consumers to believe the dates indicate food safety. Nine out of 10 Americans toss away food once it passes the expiration date, even though the food is still safe and contains nutritious value. "I absolutely believe that it is misleading, and I absolutely believe that we as consumers throw away product that is completely fine," Erin McGinnis, the director of Dining and Culinary Services at Pacific Lutheran University, said. McGinnis said the study is "eye-opening on several levels" because it challenges us to reconsider date labels - sell by, used by, and best before dates - on food. "Many manufacturers, whether it's prepared or fresh food, want to have a best-by date, and what they are looking ÂŁ01: is to provide the maximum amount of

freshness and flavor," Tom Harvey, the retail operations manager at PLU, said. He said all the different terms for expiration dates are very similar in definition and can be used to replace one another. According to the study, having no serious measures for food date labeling in this country has led to approximately $160 billion worth of food being wasted each year. "I didn't know on a national scope how much food is wasted," Harvey said. "It is a shame with so many people who don't have access to food, and how much we in the United States put in the trash that could have been consumed." When it comes to deciding how long food items sold at PLU can last before they go bad, both the quality and safety issues matter, McGinnis said. "Depending on what kind of product it is, we have to look at all of the ingredients and decide what we would determine would be the shelf life for them," she said. As the director who oversees all the on-campus food services, McGinnis said she and her team members uphold PLU's sustainability mission statement by effectively using the resources from the university.

"I absolutely believe that we as consumers throw away product that is completely fine." Erin McGinnis Director of Dining and Culinary Services

"For me, I feel like we still have room to grow," McGinnis said. "I think where we have room to grow is ... to try to really tighten up what food we bring in, like as a raw product to make something, to the point where we are just exactly using what we bring in." Harvey said the key to reduce food waste at the retail locations is to try to sell the last product to the customers at the last hour of the day. Other methods such as training employees about product rotation can be helpful as well. ult is very important that products get rotated," Harvey said.

"Manufacturers realize the products do sell better while they are fresher." But when there is inevitable food waste, it will either be donated to local food banks or will be sent away to be composted. "One of the things that is very important about [the study] is the idea about sustainability on the other side," McGinnis said. "Our big goal with product waste, with pull date, with all of those things is to make sure that we are ordering as lean as we can and still providing the students with the experience that they want.u


4NEWS

THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 18 2013

YAKIMA LOT CAR PROWLER CHARGED A Campus Safety video officer saw the break-ins occurring and immediately notified Pierce County Sheriff deputies, Director of Campus Safety Greg Premo Two Tacoma residents have been said. Premo said deputies arrived on the charged with crimes related to the car scene within a minute. prowls and thefts in the Yakima parking lot When the police showed up, Chaee at Pacific Lutheran University last month. fled on foot west down 120th Street and Pierce County Deputies charged Julias dropped several items deputies believed Chaee, 21, and Shelby Burgland, 23, with to have been stolen. He gave up the chase vehicle prowling and possession of stolen around the 12100 block of Park Avenue property, according to the Pierce County South, where police restrained him and Sheriff's report. A third suspect, 37-year- walked him to a waiting patrol car. old Tacoma resident Brandon Rudolph, fled Chaee then tried to blame Rudolph, on foot and deputies could not apprehend whom the deputy said he had not seen. him. None of the three were PLU students. Burglund, whom deputies had found Chaee admitted to breaking into six waiting in the green Mini Cooper on 121st vehicles in a PLU parking lot in the early Street and Yakima Avenue, according to the morning of Sept. 27, according to the sheriff's report. Chaee said Rudolph had sheriff's report. He later pointed the blame fled at the same time he did. toward another suspect, Rudolph, who Deputies handcuffed Burglund, who, had escaped. Chaee after being read said Rudolph her Miranda threatened to ''beat Rights, declined my [Chaee's] ass" if to comment and Chaee did not break said she wanted into the cars with None of the suspects were PLU a lawyer, him. according to the students. According to the sheriff's report. sheriff's report, the Deputies plan was simple: booked Chaee Rudolph and Chaee and Burglund were to break into the Pierce into the cars and steal "any and all items County Jail. Rudolph remains at large. possible." Deputies got Chaee's permission to tow They took the goods back to Chaee' s his car and recovered several GPS units car, a green Mini Cooper, where Rudolph's from the vehicle, which they booked into girlfriend, Burgland, was waiting and Property at the South Hill precinct of the serving as a lookout. Chaee said he thought Pierce County Sheriff's office, according to they made at least two trips back to the the police report. mini cooper with the stolen property. Premo said if Campus Safety officers see Deputies found five cars with shattered someone engaging in suspicious activity, windows and one car with the driver-side such as walking without a destination, they door hanging open in the Yakima parking can dispatch safety officers to make contact lot when they arrived, according to the with that person. If there's an actual crime sheriff's report. The Yakima lot, located in progress, however, they should call the on Yakima Avenue and 121st Street, is sheriff's deputies right away. available only for resident Pacific Lutheran Both Chaee and Rudolph have lengthy students to park in.

By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

The car prowlers shattered windows of five cars and forced the driver's side door open on a sixth Sept. 27. Facilities Maintenance provided the cars' owners with plastic bags to cover their windows due to inclement weather over the weekend.

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

Pierce County deputies charged two people with car prowling and possession of stolen property after a series of break-ins in the Yakima parking lot just northwest of Pacific Lutheran's campus. A third suspect evaded capture.

legal histories. At the time of the Yakima lot crime, there were two warrants out for Chaee' s arrest for charges of theft and fourth-degree assault, according to the sheriff's report. Chaee was scheduled to appear in court on Thursday morning, according to the Washington Courts records website. Rudolph had a hearing scheduled for Thursday for an offense he committed last summer. He failed to register as a sex offender three times, according to the Washington Courts records website. Burglund does not have any court appearances scheduled. To protect themselves from break-ins, Premo recommended students park their cars in PLU lots. In addition to having street lights and cameras to act as crime deterrents, a PLU decal makes it easier for Campus Safety to contact the vehicle's owner. "We like to try to contact the victim as soon as possible," Premo said. Premo also recommended not leaving any items sitting out in plain view. "Even clothing that's sitting on the backseat - a thief might believe that you're trying to conceal something," he said. "I don't leave anything sitting in my car. Don't give them any reason to believe that there's something of value there." Junior Allison Reynolds had an iPod stolen from her Subaru, but her car did not suffer any window damage. Reynolds said she believed her doors were locked, and damage to the driver'-s-side door making it impossible to lock from the outside led her to believe the perpetrators had used some sort of lock pick. Locked doors may also not be a deterrent for some thieves, Premo said. He explained that sometimes thieves will file down the ridges on keys to round them out so that they can fit multiple different car doors so they can break in. Campus Safety officers do not have arrest authority, Premo said, and it is Campus Safety's policy not to detain people.

'; Vkfu1'~of the car pro~lers",~g

•· ~ recover theft stolen j?tOPetF can ,,fill out a Pr~perty Claim fon:n on the Pierce COfJIJ.ty Sheriff~,jl website

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City Ph: 253-591-59$4 County Ph: 253-'79&-7522

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"We're utilizing the cameras to help monitor the situation, we're dispatching campus safety officers to be more of an eyes-on type thing and do what they can to intervene, but we don't actually make contact with people committing crimes," he said. "We try to keep visual and relay that information to the deputies."

NEW CLUB CELEBRATES SELF- LOVE WITH LOVE YOUR BODY DAY

Students gathered in the Anderson University Center Wednesday evening to view the Love Your Body Day slideshow. For the first time this year, the Body Love Club organized Love Your Body Day instead of lthe Women's Center. LEFT: President of Body Love Club Alliy Green introduces the Love Your Body Day slideshow. Green used 114 photos of models posing seemingly nude with strategically placed paper !hearts. RIGHT: First-year Abby Thnhoff signs a thank you card for Ordal Hall. The Body Love Club used rooms in Ordal and Harstad Halls for photos.


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 18, 2013

A&E5

LESSONS FROM THE BEST Peter Flahi.ff to lead Lindy-Hop Workshop for Swing C_lub By NATALIE DEFORD Guest Writer With growing membership and new music, the Pacific Lutheran University Swing Club is expanding its array of events by

hosting a renowned Seattle dance instructor. "Peter Flahiff, besides being a gentleman, wonderful person and amazing dresser," Swing Club President Katrina Watson said, "is one of the best swing dance

PHOTO COURl'ESY OF PETER FLAHIFF

Peter Flahiff(right) performs swing dance. He is a well known Seattle dance instructor who will host a free workshop to teach Swing Club members LindyHop, a more advanced style than the usual basic step taught by the Swing Club.

teachers in the northwest." Flahiff approached Watson, a junior, about doing a couple of workshops while he was in town this month, and Watson jumped at the chance. This Monday and again on Oct. 28, Flahiff will be giving a free workshop series in LindyHop. Lindy-Hop is a dance that evolved with the jazz music of the 1920s and '30s. It is faster and more advanced than the usual basic step taught by the Swing Club. Both workshops will begin at 8 p.m. in The Cave, and all PLU students and community members are welcome to attend, no experience or partner required. The workshops are beginner workshops, suitable for anyone interested in dancing. This means teaching will include the basic step for Lindy-Hop, the LindyHop 'swing out' and some basic turns. There will also be partner rotation and in-depth technical instruction for both leading and following. 路 "It's whatever Peter [Flahif] feels like teaching, and instructors at his level are great at reading the crowd, so it will go at a good pace for everyone," Watson said, Afterward, there will be time to practice what is taught and to have fun dancing. Watson said workshops like these are longer than a traditional class, so learning is quick and easy. "People are really impressed when you tell them you've only been dancing for a couple weeks when it seems like you've been dancing for a month or so," Watson said.

Pictures in perspective: By OLIVIA ASH LASR General Manager The concert experience has changed from an audience of listeners who simply want to hear music into a sea of wannabe photographers looking for that perfect Instagram shot. This thought occurred to me during the last concert I attended at the Moore Theater in downtown Seattle at a rather absurd moment of the show. A giant iPhone dropped down from the sky to the stage, the audience cheered and then began taking photos of the scene with their own iPhones. Oh, the irony. This whole spestacle was all part of Father John Misty's tongue-in-cheek performance on Oct. 6. Father John Misty is the moniker that Josh Tillman, a former Fleet Foxes band member, goes by. Under this new name, Tillman

embraces his own dark humor and uses his carefully crafted lyrics to make pointed societal criticisms. His genre can be best classified as a sort of folk hybrid, dripping in irony and sarcasm. Perhaps the most obvious criticism made at his solo show was directed toward his audience. He opened with songs from his first album, "Fear Fun," and then switched to new material. To transition between the two, the stage crew lowered down a giant iPhone cutout which framed him in its screen. Father John Misty said listeners nowadays seem to prefer encountering music mediated by an iPhone, a comment that the audience laughingly disregarded. The whole set was filled with the flash of camera phones. I hate to admit it, but I contributed one flash to the constant strobe - I had to capture his madness.

Photos should be taken at a concert as a way to preserve the memory, but should not detract from the actual reason to attend a concert the music.

PHOTO BY NATALIE DEFORD

The PLU Swing Club gathers for a post-practice photo. Membership levels have surpasse expectations this year, and the group hopes to keep growing.

Swing Club has many other new things to offer this year as well, including bonus lessons, new music, field trips, community outreach and more. Watson said she is really excited for Swing Club this year. "We are growing a lot, in numbers as well as passion," she said. The club has more leaders this year, which makes it easier to have bigger events. Besides the workshops, Watson said the club will be performing at David Joyner's, a professor of music and director of jazz studies, jazz festival in February, volunteering to dance and teach at a retirement home. She also said she hopes to put something together for Dance 2014, a PLU dance ensemble event. Also new this year is Swing Club's DJ, junior Campbell Brett, who said he will continue to "read the crowd and cue up tracks and blend them together in order to keep the audience happy, excited and dancing" at club meetings. Brett plays a combination of

classical swing, new age swing and music that can be can be described as blues or fusion. The club now offers lessons on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. for anyone unable to attend the Monday club meetings. Monday meetings are in The Cave from 8-11 p.m. and include a review of the previous weeks' lesson, a new lesson, a beginner lesson, a social swing dance and a fusion dance. Watson gives a crash course in fusion, or "blues," dancing every week. Watson said the Swing Club's new membership this year has already surpassed expectations, and the club hopes for a large turnout at the Peter Flahiff workshops as well. Anyone is more than welcome to attend any Swing Club event at any time, and more information can be found on the club's Facebook page https:// www.facebook.com/groups/ PLUS wing/.

How camera phones have changed the concert experience

I wish I hadn't, though. I wish I had heeded the. advice of the wholly-wise Father John and left the phone zipped tight in my fanny pack. This obsession to document every semi-interesting moment of life is dramatically effecting the concert experience. Rather than posting photos to simply share, the message between the lines seems to be "look at what I'm doing. Be interested." Perhaps my analysis is a bit cynical, but nonetheless I believe there is truth in it. No, I'm not saying that taking a photograph during a concert is undermining the experience. Nor am I preaching that photographs shouldn't be taken at shows. What I am saying is this: photos should be taken at a concert setting as a way to preserve the memory, but should not detract from the actual reason to attend a concert - the music. There is a problem if taking pictures is getting in the way of enjoying the tunes. Father John Misty, I would like to thank you. Thanks for making me tum my camera lens in on itself and examine my own concertgoer philosophy. I wouldn't have known all it took was a giant iPhone falling from the sky.

PHOTO COURl'ESY OF SHOWBAMS.COM

Father John Misty, also known as Josh Tillman, performs through the cutout of a giant iPhone during his performance on Oct. 6. The iPhone illustrated the fact that, as Father John Misty said, listeners nowadays seem to prefer encountering music mediated by an iPhone.


THE MOORING MAST

6A&E

OCT.18 2013

FREDDY.VS. JASON Classic horror villains compete in head-to-head路battle ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN

AdE Writer In an attempt to discover whether Jason Vorhees or Freddy Kreuger is the supreme horror movie villain, we have placed them in a head-to-head battle. Horror movie fans know them both to be superior beings, but in a comparison between the two, the winner has long been debated. Today, we are going to settle the dispute once and for all. To do so, it is essential to know a few things about each character and story.

Jason Vorhees of "Friday the 13th" died at summer camp when he was a youngster because of inattentive camp counselors. He initially only killed those around the camp - his place of death - but now kills anyone he can get his hands on. Freddy Kreuger of "A Nightmare on Elm Street" is from a town called Springwood. He originally killed and tortured the children of the town, and the town's parents retaliated by killing him. Now, he kills because he is unable to achieve vengeance. First thing's first - style.

PHOTO COURTESY OF HOLLYWOOD.COM

Jason Vorhees, the villian from "Friday the 13th," contemplates his next kill while he sports his infamous hockey mask and machete.

3702 South Fife Street Tacoma, WA 98409 Appointments 253.617.7000

tspaTacoma.com

Jason is really serving up hockey player horror. His hockey jersey gives the impression he either just came from the game or just massacred everyone inside and took the jersey as a souvenir. While I think it's probably the latter, his hockey mask proves unneeded. Someone who is wielding a machete and can't die is just as scary with or without a mask on. Meanwhile, Freddy is giving us Christmas all year round in his red and green striped sweater. His outfit consists of the sweater, trousers and a fedora, which really isn't all that scary. It's his face and hands that make viewers cringe. The parents of Springwood burned him, so Freddy's face and hands resemble burnt raisins. Next up is weapon of choice. Jason uses a machete. This is a classic. It is reminiscent of timeless slasher movies but leaves us wanting more. We have seen countless people get cut up by movie villains, so it's usually left up to the writers to make his kills look good. Freddy has, for lack of a better description, a claw-glove that resembles Wolverine's claws. His kills are more mind bending. They seems to defy logic, gravity and anything else that keeps us sane. That brings us to method of attack.

Jason stalks his victims without rhyme or reason. He seems to have a thing for unsuspecting, over-sexualized teenagers. A smooth kill is committed once Jason has them in his grasp. The special effects team for Jason movies are really good about providing just enough gore without it feeling overdone. Freddy goes for the psychological kill. He also loves a good teenage victim. His trademark move is to slip into characters' unconscious minds uninvited, and if he kills someone in a dream, that person dies in real life.

In this man-to-man battle, Freddy emerges victorious. He makes the movie-viewer shudder at the thought of their own dreams to come, though his style may be less alluring and imagination-driven than Jason's. His style of killing, in addition to his victims being in a state where they are virtually at his mercy, surpasses that of Jason's. Freddy's methodical kills also give horror movie fans a nice break from the traditional sliceand-dice massacres. However, if Freddy loses his number one spot, Jason is a perfect contender for the title.

PHOTO COUM'ESY OF !COLLECTOR.COM

Freddy K.reuger, the villian from "A Nightmare on Elm Street," shows off his hand claw device before heading off to commit murderous deeds.

-a ********** R

PLU alum competes.on "The Voice" ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN

AdE Writer

FACIAL AND BROWWAX$37 MIZANI SMOOTHING TREATMENT$34 Present this ad to receive offers. Expires 11 /31 /13.

Stephanie Anne Johnson, A Pacific Lutheran University alumna, has made it onto "The Voice" this season, and ladies and gentlemen - she is a powerhouse. According to Johnson's Facebook fan page, https://www.facebook.com/ musicsaj, Johnson was born and raised in Tacoma. After graduating from Stadium High School, Johnson moved on to PLU. Singing since she was 14, Johnson started as an open microphone night performer. Eventually, she was offered a job singing on cruise ships. Wanting to branch out into something more significant, Johnson decided to try out for "The Voice," following in the footsteps of previous contestant Vicci Martinez, who is also a Tacoma native. On her Facebook page, Johnson described her style of music as "organic." She said her connection to her music comes from a long line of devotion to the art from her family. Her ability to play guitar in addition to her sultry, folk-bluesy voice make for an unstoppable musical genius. She takes her art seriously and has produced three studio albums titled "Hollatchagurl," "For the Record" and "Orange." All are available for sale on her website at http://sajmusic.com. "Music can save lives, transport the mind and give the body uncommon grace," Johnson wrote on her website. It is clear she believes this from her

PHOTO COUlll'ESY OF SAJMUSIC.COM

Stephanie Anne Johnson, a PLU alumna and local of the Tacoma area, landed a spot on season 5 of "The Voice."

performance on "The Voice." The song that catapulted her onto team Christina Aguilera is "Black Horse and a Cherry Tree" by KT Tunstall. Her rendition of the song was soulful arid original. It felt as though the song had been crafted specifically for the curves of her voice. On "The Voice," Johnson's performance turned the chairs of judges CeeLo Green and Christina Aguilera. Johnson chose Aguilera and soon after the show, Aguilera tweeted "Stephanie Anne Johnson is the real deal! So excited to have her." It is not clear what the future holds for Johnson, but continue to watch her advancement on "The Voice," which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. and Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on NBC.

**********


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 18, 2013

A&E7

A standing ovation Crowd is delighted by PLU production "Kiss Me, Kate'' By THOMAS HORN Guest Writer Viewers enthusiastically cheered and laughed at the student preview of "Kiss Me, Kate" in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts last Friday. Almost every seat in the Phillips Center was full. As the lights began to dim, silence swarmed the room and the first act left the audience wanting more. Laughter and smiles were visible all across the room. "The crowd loved the play. There was so much applause," first-year Will Radford said.

"There was a lot of energy in the room." Every scene had a humorous feel - there wasn't one scene where people didn't laugh. "I would definitely recommend this play to others," first-year Sam Van Roon said. "The cast pulled it off, and I'm very impressed." At the end of the performance, the cast members received a standing ovation. Everyone in the audience was on their feet. Cheering and clapping came from the crowd and the entire Phillips Center had a positive vibe. "Kiss Me, Kate" will be performed again at 7:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday. A matinee will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. TOP RIGHT: The cast of "Kiss Me, Kate" gathers for a group photo on the red carpet during the opening gala of the newly renovated Phillips Center. BOTTOM LEFT: The crowd eagerly awaits the appearance of the "Kiss Me, Kate" cast before the opening gala performance. Tickets for the event were completely sold out. BOTTOM RIGHT: Sophomore Sarah Hubert, plays characters Lilli and Kate in "Kiss Me, Kate." PHOTOSBYJOHNFROSCHAl:JER

Movies: there's an app for that

When entering the theater, start the RunPee app and select the movie you are

bucket of butter-soaked popcorn. You then get your seat, stuff your face with the nutritious snacks and become immersed in the movie. But just as the movie is getting good and a plot twist is right around the comer, your bladder reminds you that it can't hold that 72-ounce drink you just downed. Now you are faced with the decision of making your way to the restroom and risk missing something crucial, or holding it and risk wetting your pants. Well, there' s an app for that. RunPee is an app that will notify the user when it is "safe" to use the restroom, so you no longer have to fear missing a crucial scene. When you walk into the theater, open RunPee and select the movie you are attending. Start the timer when the movie starts, and place your phone back into your pocket. Your phone will vibrate once it is "safe" to use the restroom. RunPee will provide you with a detailed description of what you missed. RunPee also provides a summary of the first 3 minutes of movies in case you are running a bit late, and it will tell you if there is extra footage during and after the credits. Its quite the h andy app and one that every moviegoer should have. So go ahead - order that large soda and chug it, because RunPee will make sure you don't miss a thing. It's available for 99 cents for Android, iPhone and Windows phones. Movies are made easy with

attending. The app will notify you when it is "safe" to use the restroom so you no

apps like these.

By EVAN DERINGER Mast TV Multimedia Editor There is an app for just about everything, and if you like movies or television shows, some of these can be pretty handy. The website IMDb.com, Internet Movie Database, has created a free app that allows u sers to search for things like actors, movies, TV shows, plots and everything in between. The IMDb app also allows you to watch trailers for upcoming movies or TV shows, read and write reviews and even create a 'watchlist' where you can make a list of all the things you wish to watch. This app can broaden your movie and television horizons by providing you with a look at just about every movie and television show that has ever come into existence. The IMDb app is available

for free on Android and iPhone operating systems. If you don't care about who is in a movie and all you want to know is when and where a movie is showing, check out the Fandango app. Fandango allows the user to look at a movie's showing time and location. It can also tell you if a movie has been sold out and, at participating theaters, will allow you to purchase tickets from your phone. If you also want to browse and look at movies, you can read brief plot summaries and watch movie trailers. Fandango also happens to be a free app available on Windows, Android and iPhone operating systems. Once you get to the theater and purchase the movie tickets, you generally make your way over to the concession stand and purchase a soda and a healthy

PHOTO COURTESY OF RUNPEE.COM

longer have to fear missing a crucial scene.

CONCERT IN THE CAVE

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

Pacific Lutheran University alum Justin Klump performs in The Cave during the Homecoming concert Oct. 10. He is an American singer and songwriter

pur5uing a career ill mUllic. Ifa song "Sticks and Stone5" debuted at number 9 on the i'l\mes singer-songwriter chart.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

OCT.18 2013

ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES 路A beginner's guide to building credit By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Credit can be a confusing concept for young people and falling into credit card debt early can be a vicious cycle. According to http://www.creditcards.com, only nine percent of students in 2012 had credit scores that were in that 700-850 range categorized as "very good" credit. However, it also reports that 27 percent of college students have credit cards in their own name, meaning 66.7 percent of students with credit cards have sub-700 credit scores. Many people are afraid to get credit cards because they are scared of missing payments and falling into credit card debt, but when used smartly they build a good credit score and credit history. Future lenders, such as for a home mortgage, will be willing to lend more money to people who have good credit. It shows they make payments on time and are statistically more likely to fulfill the terms of the loan. It doesn't have to be difficult. Building credit can be a safe and painless process as long as students follow these tips: 1. Figure out their credit score

Many students, 85 percent according to http://www. creditcards.com, do not even know their credit score. This is the first thing students need to figure out if they are considering a credit card as a person's credit history is the first thing credit card issuers, or any lender, looks at Everyone is eligible for a free credit report every year from each of the three major credit bureaus via http://www. annualcreditreport.com.

2. Credit cards should be for emergency use only Nobody wants to pay interest on a stick of gum or a pair of socks, so it's important to be smart about purchases on credit. Some credit cards give rewards if used for purchasing certain things. For example, according to http://www.americanexpress. com, a Costco TrueEarnings card earns three percent cash back at U.S. gas stations, one percent cash back at U.S. restaurants and one percent cash back on other purchases including anything at Costco. This makes it easy to decide what kinds of things to put on credit, because the rewards are actually pretty decent, but not all credit cards make it so easy. A general rule of thumb is that credit cards shouldn't be used for everyday purchases. Obviously the Costco card is an exception, but credit shouldn't be a substitute for things that students generally spend cash on. This habit can quickly lead to debt, so debit cards or cold, hard cash are the best option for ordinary items. An appropriate time to use a credit card would be to help pay for textbooks. Let's take a look at a theoretical biology student, Mary. She works a couple jobs to help pay for college and saves during the summer to help pay for books. However, her last semester she finds out that she has made a terrible scheduling mistake and she needs to take three biology classes. She has $400 in her budget for textbooks, but the total cost of all of her biology books is more than $600 and she is worried that she won't be able to afford all of them by the time classes start in a week. But Mary forgot one important thing: she hasn't maxed out her

PHOTO COURTESY OFMONEY.USNEWS.COM

credit card on silly things like shamrock pajama pants. She is able to put one textbook on her credit card and pays off the charge once she gets paid at the end of the month. This is just one example, but in the end it is up to each student to determine what an" appropriate" item is to purchase on credit. If students max out their credit cards every month, whether it is frivolous spending or not, it damages their credit score. Even if the balance is paid in full at the end of the month, 30 percent of what gets reported to credit bureaus are the amounts owed at the end of each month before repayment. 3. Pay the balance. EVERY. SINGLE. MONTH.

Paying the balance is still incredibly important. While 30 percent of the credit score is made up by the balance owed each month, 35 percent is made up by payment history. This makes it imperative that payments are on time and paid in full. Creating a schedule for monthly bill payments is a great way to stay on top of things. Making payments up to a week in advance will ensure that they are processed on time and prevents any late payments from having a negative effect on students' credit scores. If they own smartphones, students can use the Google calendar app to automatically notify them each month before

payments are due. In the event that students aren't able to pay the balance on their card at the end of the month, it isn't the end of the world. Many credit card issuers are willing to provide a little wiggle room so long as they get a phone call ahead of time. In the end, they want to make sure they get their money while keeping customers happy. As long as these tips are kept in mind, growing credit is not only possible, but pretty simple. Students who ensure that they don't put unnecessary charges on their credit cards and pay the balances every month are well on their way to establishing a good credit score and a healthy financial future for themselves.

Getting ready for the career fair By KELSEY HILMES Guest Writer Wearing jeans to a Career Expo seems like an obvious mistake to me, but every semester, a few poorly prepared students violate the rules of professionalism by donning their graphic tees to meet potential employers. Catherine Swearingen, who became the director of Career Connections in July, said students' wearing street clothes is the biggest complaint Pacific Lutheran University hears from employers after a Career Expo. Hoping not to make similar mistakes, I joined fellow students and Career Connections路 for the event "Ready . . . Set . . . Job Fair!" The event provided tips, professional advice and the opportunity to practice for the Career Expo. "Students are young and don't have a lot of experience networking and job seeking," Swearingen said. "We try to give them every opportunity to present themselves the best way they can." For those of you who couldn't make it to the event yourself, here are a few bits of advice from it: 1. Research the companies you want to speak with

Don't walk up to a table and ask, "what do you do?" That may be acceptable to do at a student involvement fair, but not for professionals. Make sure you visit the Career Connections website to see what

companies are coming. Select those you are most interested in and be sure to read their websites, social media profiles and any recent news articles about them. This prepares you to carry on a brief, but meaningful, conversation with recruiters. 2. Create an "A" list and "B" list Many organizations at the Career Expo may interest you, but some will more than others. Make an "A" list of companies you are the most excited about and write down what you like about the company and what you have to offer them. Your "B" list should be similar but include your "second-choice" organizations. When you go to the Career Expo, you already know which tables to speak with first and what you will want to say to them. Career Connections does advise talking to one "B" list company first to get some practice before speaking with your "A:' list. 3. Leave your backpack at home

As well as your sweatpants, your textbooks and your post-gym hairstyle, ditch the backpack. The only things you should take with you are your student ID card, and a nice folder with your resumes, business cards and any notes you want to consult before approaching a recruiter, also known as a padfolio. Don't forget to go home and change into something professional before stopping by.

4. Follow-up It can be difficult to find time to email someone you spoke with, but it makes you stand out from the crowd of 100 other students who spoke to the same person. Don't just thank them for speaking with you, but remind them of who you are by mentioning what you discussed. Make sure to use a professional e-mail account. No one is going to open an e-mail

from hellokityluvr93@aol.com. The same applies to your voicemail message - no rapping, no jokes. Whether job hunting is routine business for you or a new and intimidating process, everyone has something more they can do to step up their game. By considering these improvements, you can build your confidence and increase your chances of building relationships and opportunities with great employers.


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THE MOORING MAST

OCT.18 2013

BUSINESS 9

The Business of Halloween By PETER MUELLER Guest Writer Halloween has been celebrated in this conntry since the inception of colonial America, and all those costumes, candies and decorations to bring in October's harvest cost Americans quite a sum. Halloween is a major national holiday and is second in consumer spending behind Christmas. Children have traditionally been the primary participants in Halloween, but in the past three decades, more and more adults have begnn to take part. According to the National Retail Federation, 161 million Americans say they are celebrating the holiday, and with those people spending an average of $70 per person, Halloween has become a big source of business. In September and October, Halloween retail stores, known as pop-up retailers, find their way into vacant retail spots across the country. Four companies control the Halloween retail market: Halloween City, Halloween Adventure, Spirit and Halloween Express, all of which have identical business models. Each company targets vacant

retail space in high traffic areas near middle class neighborhoods with disposable income. An eightweek lease for these types of retail properties can range from $25,000 to $75,000 per month. Over the past decade, these retailers have become more professional with every year. This has increased consumer interest, and has made property management firms diligent about providing real estate to pop-up retailers each year. Competition in the business of Halloween is as fierce as a regiment of 9-year-olds draped in Iron Man costumes sparring against imaginary bad guys. Real estate is a critical priority for these four companies, particularly Spirit, which holds more than 600 retail stores come September. More crucial for competition than the location of these pop-ups are the products they carry. Aside from the fake blood, decorations, plastic weapons and stereotypical Halloween costumes there are the "trendy" costumes. The top five best selling costumes have been different every year due to new video entertainment characters, changes in pop culture and Internet trends. Some of this year's top 10 costumes include the minions

PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.THEBOKEN.COM

The inside of a Halloween store in Hoboken, New Jersey showcases the variety of merchandise available for the holiday.

from the Universal Pictures film "Despicable Me," a Miley Cyrus costume and a yellow hazmat suit from AMC's television series "Breaking Bad," according to MarketWatch, a financial information website. Each company is pushed to predict what consumers want in a costume and stand to gain a substantial amount of market share if done successfully. In 2011, Halloween Adventure manufactured a large amount of hamster masks in the wake

of a popular .Kia commercial depicting hamster, dancing and driving to electronic music, along with Muammar Gaddafi masks. These two masks made the top 10 costume lists on several blogs and led Halloween Adventure to outsell competitors and post record profits. pop-up These seasonal retailers may be short lived. Retail space vacancies have been on the decline, Internet marketplaces are capturing more of the market every year, and other retailers

are repositioning themselves to bring in consumers. Value Village, the secondhand clothing retailer, has repositioned itself to provide consumers with new Halloween merchandise and costumes to grab more Halloween participants. Analysts expect consumers to spend nearly $7 billion on Halloween-related items this year, pushing these pop-up retailers to find more ways to provide the perfect costume for the upcoming holiday.

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By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor Congress narrowly avoided on the federal defaulting government's loans by voting in a bill to raise the·debt ceiling and reopen the government late Wednesday evening. The bill comes just hours before the government would have defaulted on all its debt, and 15 days after the government shutdown because Congress couldn't agree on a budget. The bill raises the debt ceiling for three months. In the meantime, Congress and the President plan to address longstanding budget deficits with spending cuts. You don't have to be an economist to know that the financial issues plaguing the federal government aren't good for our healing economy, but what exactly is going on, and

how we might be affected, is still up in the air. Despite the confusion, if you have a student loan, you can understand the debt ceiling. Students take out loans to go to school all the time. That loan has an agreed upon interest rate, which is - hopefully - a small percentage of the loan's initial value that gets componnded over the time the student doesn't pay the loan back. Assuming the loan is this loan unsubsidized, will accrue interest starting immediately. Ideally, the student will get an income-generating job once he or she graduates and will start paying back the loan and interest in installments. For the federal government, "loans" come from two places as described by the U.S. Department of the Treasury Bureau of Public Debt. The first category is the money the government owes to its own agencies such as Social

Security, Medicare or federal government employee retirement benefits. The second category is the money the government owes to outside entities. By selling treasury bonds and other securities, the government effectively gets loans from foreign or state governments, various kinds of investment funds and even private individuals. The biggest difference between a student and the federal government is the amount of debt The average student graduating from college in 2011 had about $26,000 in loans to pay off. The U.S. is looking at $16.7 trillion in debt. Where to place the blame for the national debt can vary. Generally speaking, the Republican party is known for promoting legislation that reduces direct spending on governmental programs. However, one article from a

Washington State University professor claims that Republicans and Democrats are equally responsible for the steadily increasing debt. Democrats contribute through direct spending on governmentfunded programs, and Republicans contribute to the debt indirectly by advocating for tax breaks, which reduces the government's revenue stream. Usually, the government would borrow more money to help cover this deficit, but the debt ceiling prevents that from happening. The debt ceiling is the monetary borrowing limit that Congress sets for itself. The ceiling is regulated by legislation and is the only thing that could prevent the federal government from borrowing more money in order to continue funding the country's federal programs. By not being able to fund these programs - the student's version of paying the bills the government would have to default on all its debt. For the student, defaulting on his or her student loans is a terrible thing. The loan ultimately gets sent to a collection agency, and then the Internal Revenue Service can start taking actions to forcibly get the money back from him or her. For instance, they can intercept paychecks from his or her employer as payment for the loan or repossess belongings to offset the outstanding value of the loan. The former student's credit score will plummet, and it will make it very hard for him or her to get a loan or buy things like a car or a house in the future. The same things will happen to the federal government if the

tank, and it will be harder for the government to get any loans in the future. It will also lead to higher interest rates across the country, from home mortgages to credit card rates, since the federal government's credit rating is a baseline for credit throughout the U.S. It may also lead to reduced foreign investment in U.S. Treasury securities and currency. Even with all this in mind, it's difficult to determine what could result from the U.S. default, because it's never happened before. Even though Congress voted to raise the debt ceiling, the damage may have already been done. Fitch, a leading U.S. credit rating company, is currently reviewing the AAA federal credit rating because of how close a call default was. Simply raising the debt ceiling doesn't change spending on its own. It only means the country can continue to borrow money with the hope that reductions in spending and or increases in revenue will allow the government to repay its debt. · Wednesday marked the 79th time Congress has raised the debt ceiling since 1960. Some economists argue that while the country can survive even extended periods of the government shutdown, not raising the debt ceiling could be disastrous. It would be the first time the U.S. has ever defaulted, and the first time in world history that a conntry has voluntarily defaulted. While the country can breathe easy for another three months, let's hope the threat of default doesn't come back in January.

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THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR I n Defense of Villainy: Fictional villains can empower real people ByKELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor

For all the variety of characters in stories, it seems to be an unspoken rule that villains - the primary antagonists - must be male and straight. While issues like sexism, racism and homophobia are often combatted with positive examples in books, shows and films, villains are an untapped source of potential for breaking down stereotypes. While sexuality is sometimes simply not discussed when it comes to a story's 'big bad,' readers or viewers usually presume an antagonist is straight. This is

particularly problematic for gay men, because they are so often portrayed as weak. That is wh y characters like Cyrus Beene, of the TV show "Scandal," are so promising. Portrayed by Jeff Perry, Cyrus is the U.S. president's chief of staff and is also openly gay and married. he cannot While necessarily be called the show's big bad, Cyrus is certainly ruthless and makes many morally questionable decisions for the supposed greater good. It is difficult to accept stereotypes of gay men as powerless when confronted with a character like Cyrus. In the latest James Bond film, "Skyfall," there were some pretty heavy hints that villain Silva, played by Javier Bardem, is bisexual. Rather than trying to send any signal to audiences that bisexual men are evil or bound to go wrong, the choice supplied a much more enlightened that men perspective in the LGBTQ community are not incapable of great authority. When it comes to women as primary antagonists, the examples can be more difficult to sort through.

Wanderlust: ByKJERSTI ANDREASSEN Guest Writer

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This morning I woke up, picked up my phone and rolled out of bed. I jumped in the shower and got dressed. I then walked over to the Anderson University Center, where I bought coffee and devoured a quick breakfast before class. I suddenly noticed that sitting around me were similarly zombie-eyed students facing the same mix of sleep deprivation and early classes as me. It's that time of the semester the library grows fuller, the stacks of books taller and students' gazes duller. I imagine that my fellow students' morning routines were pretty similar. "I'm not that well off." "I am not especially privileged." Those are two statements I often find myself thinking. Today, I wonder if they are true. Maybe you didn't have class today. Maybe you hung out in the library all day studying. Maybe you went to work. But 111 bet that like me, you slept in

While it's true many villains in fairy tales are women, these antagonists are in belittled roles, lashing out because of vanity, en vy or witch-like cruelty. Essentially, these are in women being evil traditionally "female" ways. Female villains in stories, when they do exist, often still serve a higher male power. This is the case with characters like witch Bellatrix Lestrange of "Harry Potter,'' who ultimately serves the male wizard Voldemort, and Princess Azula of "Avatar: The Last Airbender," who ultimately serves her father, the Firelord. When women are the ones pulling the strings, they are often behind the scenes and not revealed until the end of the story, such as in "The Dark Knight Rises" when it is revealed that not Bane, but Talia is the great villain. The few horror movies that portray women as villains usually depict them as being evil for typical "female" reasons. The titular villain of "Carrie" wreaks havoc after her dress is ruined. In the nineties movie, "Urban Legend," the female serial killer sadistically kills

out of vengeance for her boyfriend's death. In most stories, women are not villains because they crave power for themselves - they're villains because of appearances or romance. That is why when a woman is the primary antagonist for reasons the typical male antagonist might be - money, control or even sadism - it is a welcome change. And there are some cases of this, few though they may be. In the fantasy book trilogy "His Dark Materials," the complex and deadly Mrs. Coulter is the face of evil for the story's protagonist. Yet Mrs. Coulter' s wicked actions are driven fully for a desire for power over others, not an absurd quest for vanity or a trivial romance. The White Witch in "The Chronicles of Narnia" is anot..11er example of a female villain motivated by a desire for pure power. Fictional villains may be an odd form of activism, but there is no denying that it is satisfying to see villains so often the harbingers of extreme power - as people traditionally written off as weak.

Rethink what it means to be well off

a bed, and that you had hot running water in the bathroom. You probably had money to get food and drink as well. This spring, I was fortunate enough to meet a group of refugee children in Mae Sot, Thailand. They are like most other kids, except that the place they call home is a garbage dump on the border between two countries. I got to play with them, sing with them and hug them. Their toys are old paintbrushes and tom up plastic bags. They have less than $7 per week to live on. Still, they smile. More than anyone else I've ever met. They don't have toys,

but they have each other. And they are radiantly, intensely happy. They hug and carry one another. Compared to me, those children have nothing, and yet they are endlessly richer than I am. Those children have understood something I easily forget. To them, people are more valuable than anything else. The kids who laughed and hugged and carried each other were, and are, so much wiser than I am. They already know one of the most important things in life - loving one another. Tomorrow, my alarm will go off again. Another day will begin, progress

and end much the same as today did. If I am honest with myself, though, it doesn't have to. I have to ask myself why I'm willing to let tomorrow be just another day. I think about how it would be if I were a little less selfconscious. I think about how I would be If I put aside my textbooks for an hour and offered someone a hug and my undivided attention, or if I bought the person in line behind me coffee. If I lived less like a distracted and stressed student and more like one of the children at this garbage dump, how my world change.

OCT. 18 2013

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Jessica Trondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

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The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Ma.st staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed t o mast@plu. edu by 5 p .m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Ma.st reserves the right to .refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

Corrections Oct. 11 Issue

PHOTO BY KJEllSTI ANDREASSEN

A refugee sits on the deck of his house a<ljacent to acumulating trash. This dump is located in Mae

In the article "Lean In" on the front page, the sponsors of the event included Student Involvement and Leadership, the Center for Vocation/ Career Connections and the Harstad Women's Empowerment community, along with the Women' s Center.

Sot, Thailand.

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THE MOORING MAST

OCT.18 2013

Halloween is now more seductive than scary By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Writer To quote the popular 2004 movie "Mean Girls," "in Girl World, Halloween is the one day a year when a girl can dress up like a total slut and no other girls can say anything else about it." Behind the horror movies, the haunted houses, the playing pranks and the costume parties are women and girls dressing up as sexy kitties, sexy nurses, sexy - enter pretty much anything here. Even the most ordinary objects, like crayons or iPods, are sold as provocative and revealing costumes for women. If women have gained many freedoms, including the right to dress as we please, it seems strange Halloween is different. The media markets these sexy costumes to us, but we must take some responsibility for

their presence in the first place. If we didn't buy these costumes, then costume manufacturers would market something else to us, perhaps real costumes that actually look like the thing we are trying to be. We choose to dress up in these costumes, and there are many different possible reasons as to why. Perhaps it has the effect of making us feel more attractive, more wanted by those we want to see us as desirable. It might be a way to flaunt our feminism and our rights as women. Halloween could be a showcase for the fact that women can now dress as provocatively as we want. Or maybe we don't want to go against the grain. Some women may feel that if they aren't sexy like everyone else, then they run the risk of seeming unattractive or prudish. It could also be that we feel trapped in our consumer society. We don't know how to say "no" to the big companies that offer these costumes to us and spend a lot of money to make us feel we need them. It all comes down to the fact that Halloween is no longer scary - it is sexy. While Halloween was once about blood,

death, the strange and the macabre, it is has been boiled down to begging for candy and playing sexy dress up. Halloween is not the first casualty. It seems our society is simultaneously pulling death close and shoving it away. We have a multitude of horror movies highlighting the many different perturbed areas of insanity, death and the beyond. Yet, to counteract it, we have books, and shows romanticizing movies death and dying. The "Twilight Saga" transforms vampires and werewolves into lovers. They become characters with human traits to be fantasized about, and sexualized, by young girls and mothers alike. Halloween, death and the afterlife have all become things we romanticize and sexualize. In the middle of this are women with only two costume choices: witch or slutty nurse. We can either embrace these as our only two options, or we can take back Halloween. We can use it as a chance to be creative and come up with a new funny, scary or silly costume. Just like Lindsey Lohan in her "ExWife" costume, you will certainly stand out much more.

P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast

Make 'FOMOtivation' a part of daily life By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

of anxiety, a sort of anticipatory regret" psychologist Rebecca McGuire-Snieckus said in an article from the magazine

Psychologies.

College students - though some won't admit to it rely on their social media. In fact, social media fuels our perceptions of what our lives should look like. Facebook updates and Instagram pictures instill these ideas. Buzzfeed countdowns set our priorities and opinions. I'm not proud to say it, but I do fall into this category of the "media-influenced." I also know that I'm not standing on this island alone. With all this attention surrounding media there has been a backlash - FOMO. FOMO, or "Fear of Missing Out," is sweeping the nation as an excuse every sad college student can use to explain why they are always checking their phones. It is real. "[FOMO] is a type

What psychologists want us to know is how to propel ourselves out of it and save ourselves from the social media monster taking over our lives. To do that, they want us to shut off our phones and get away from social media. Honestly, that's crap. FOMO has come out of the social media world we've developed, and it does cause anxiety, but under no circumstances do we need to be saved from it. Instead, let's use it to fuel our days and motivate us to one-up each other's experiences. FOMO. works like this: you see your friends posting awesome stuff like their trip to Argentina or having drinks with the super hot guy you have Chemistry with, and you, sitting at home alone on a Thursday night, get sad because you want to be out with the hottie from Chem. Psychologists say the human mind is not equipped to handle this kind of constant stimulation without becoming depressed. Now let's say you keep

and you have nothing to do. That's when the hypothetical you gets sad. Let me propose another idea. Show these psychologists who isn't weak: us. Let's take FOMO and use it. Let's call it FOMOtivation. FOMOtivation will be our generation standing up to fear and turning it into being awesome. Fear is a basis for human motivation. All animals learn quickly when fear is in the back of their minds. From now on, let's use that fear to push us to go out and experience life. Let's play a game called 'Beat that girl having coffee with my Hottie.' For every status that makes you sad or upset, go out and do something that you think is more awesome. Go do things that will make you happy and maybe take a few pictures and post them to your site - give the next Facebooker some FOMOtivation. I will now ask for one second to really make professors mad. Next time you're in class, pull out your cell phone. Just pull it out. Just do it. Now, do it. FOMOtivate yourself. Maybe don't take that advice, but if you are a progressive FOMOtivational

This is my call to arms. Arm yourself with your cell phone, FOMOtivate yourself to do your homework even, FOMOtivate yourself to listen to your lecture and be a good student or just FOMOtivate yourself to stay awake during the second hour of the lecture on the Civil War. Put a picture of a hot model studying as your background and FOMOtivate yourself to study. In class was a stretch, but you can FOMOtivate yourself anywhere, and I challenge you to find places where you wouldn't normally think to be motivational and FOMOtivate yourself there. FOMOtivate yourself all over that place. FOMOtivation is meant for us, as social media users, to use as a tool in feeling good about ourselves and our media usage. We should not have to hide the fact that we love our cell phones and that we absolutely can't stop looking at Instagram pictures of puppies. Use FOMOtivation to turn your browsing into inspiration and get up and go do something to FOMOtivate someone else. Warning, this will create a generation of completely amazing people.

OPINIONll

Reconsider stigmas of mental illness By ALYSSA FOUNTAIN Columnist It may surprise you to know that one in four Americans suffer from mental illness, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. That means you most likely have a close friend or family member with mental illness. You may not know it, though. There is a very simple reason you don't know this about your friend or family: stigma. We are taught to believe that serious mental illness means "insane" and "assylums" and "murderers". Part of this misconception is related to the assumed severity of all mental illness. It really does not surprise me that people have these misconceptions. We see tragedies like the Washington, D.C. Naval yard shooting and the Sandy Hook incident and see that mental illness is tied路to those tragedies. No wonder there is such a stigma about mental illness. It is easy to deem someone "unstable" and a "threat'' when we hear that they have struggled with mental illness. However, while serious mental illness can rriean that you has daily struggles, it doesn't mean a person is violent. There is also stigma on the other side: people assume that having clinical depression is the same thing as being depressed and suggest that some good sleep or a pumpkin pie latte and chocolate will cure all. Then they wonder why, after six months, their friend still hasn't come out to a party. There is often a miscommunication about what mental illness means. Some people consider anyone who goes to the counseling center with a brief bout of depression as someone in this category. However, the face of serious mental illness is entirely different. By mental illness, I am talking about the people who deal with lifetime struggles. I mean those who have to take medication, who see a psychiatrist and who struggle to get out of bed everyday. There are basics that everyone should know about mental illness. There is a large mental illness spectrum, ranging from anxiety disorders to personality disorders. However, many people with mental illness function quite well with medication. The problem with stigma around mental illness is that it keeps people from getting help. Some people with these illnesses may need to take medication. A lot of times though, there are stigmas surrounding medication. Recognize medication can allow a person to face their day, and even laugh and smile. It can be a huge gift for some people. Having a mental illness is kind of like having a broken arm. It's basically a little extra bulk that's uncomfortable, you have to drag it around. But it's just a little extra part of the awesome package of a person. Because of the large stigma surrounding mental illnesses, many people are too afraid to come forward and identify as a member of this group. If you do learn that one of your friends is severely struggling, be an encouragement and a support for them. Try to accept that some negativity is probably a symptom, not a personality trait. For a lot of people dealing with severe anxiety and clinical depression simple things like getting up, showering, and putting on an outfit is a major success. It is also often so tiring they are ready to go back to bed. So if you see a friend with mental illness

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have just climbed a mountain,


THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

OCT. 18, 2013

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker October 27, 2013 ACROSS 1 Conkon the noggin 4 Runsfor â&#x20AC;˘ exercise 8 Snipesof Hollywood 14 Half and half? 15 Continental cash 16 Amatter of will? 17 Mighty small 18 Ancient portico 19 Polar cover 20 Aviation pioneer 23 Ukraine port 24 When doubled, a British band 25 Timothy Leary's hallucinogen 28 Ending for "soft" or "hard" 29 Be a secret author

33 Type of pressure

34 Beefeater, for one

35 Church 39 41 42 44

46 48 52

53

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59 62 63 64 65

66 67 68

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22 25

26 27 30

31 32

33

35 36

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1 Dog's utterance 2 City near Syracuse

3 Potato gadget 4 Sermon on

37

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item 38 "Nota chance!"

¡ 40 Afghan money 43 Fishes of the perch family 45 Capable of being stretched 47 Bridal announcement word 48 Wilder play " Town" 49 Husband and brother of Isis

50 Syllable before the last 51 With wisdom 55 Answera job ad

56 Six Flags attraction

57 University city of Norway

58 Embarrassing error

59 Bioclass locale, often

60 Canton in the Reuss River valley 61 Card spot

the Mount deliverer 5 Apalled reaction 6 Raise, as crops 7 Emulate

8 5

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11 "Fond du" finish

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SUDOKU High Fives

e 2013 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

NONE LEFT By George Delli

6 3

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Is Halloween too sexualized? The Mast asked students in a poll if they thought Halloween is more about the sleaze i:a.ther than the sweets, and here are the results. Join the conversation at http=llmastmedia.plu.edu/ in the Opinion section. tlESVU'S AS <>Jl' ll P.M. WliDN!l:Sr>AY OCJ', l(I

Hacks Bring a water bottle to your next presentation. When you lose your place or forgtt what to say, take a sip. You ltave a oment to get ha.ck on track and no one will no ice.


+-

THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 18, 2013

SPORTS 13

SPORTS SCDREBOABD Men's Soccer

Footliall TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Pacific

5

0

0

2-0

Won5

Linfield

4

0

0

1-0

Won4

Willamette

4

0

0

1-0

Won4

PLU

4

Lewis & Clark

Whitworth

4 2

Puget Sound

4

3

0

1-1

Wonl

0

1-1

Lost!

0

0

0-2 0-2

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TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

Puget Sound

9

3

0

7-0

Won8

PLU

9

3

4-1-2

Lost!

Whitworth

6

3

Linfield

6

4

2

4-2-1

Wonl

3-3-1

Won3

Whitman

4

7

2

3-3-1

Lost!

Willamette

6

4

2

2-3-2

Lost!

Pacific

6

6

1-5-1

Wonl

0-7

Lost 11

George Fox

12

0

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct.19 vs. Pacific, 12:30 p.m. LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 19 at Whitman, 2:30 p.m.

Volleyball

Women's Soccer TEAM

WINS

Linfield

11

LOSSES

Puget Sound

7

2

TIES

CONFERENCE STREAK

TEAM

WINS

LOSSES

TIES

CONFERENCE

STREAK

0

7-1

Won3

PLU

12

4

0

8-0

WonlO

2

5-1-2

Won5

Puget Sound

12

5

0

7-1

Won5

PLU

5

3

4

3-1-4

Tied!

Whitworth

11

9

0

5-3

Won2

Pacific

7

3

2

4-3-1

Lost!

Pacific

5

10

0

4-4

Lost!

Lewis & Clark

7

4

4-3-1

Lost2

George Fox

8

8

0

3-5

Lost2

Whitman

8

5

0

4-5

Wonl

Lewis & Clark

4

10

0

3-5

Lost3

Whitworth

6

5

2

3-4-2

Wonl

Whitman

5

16

0

3-5

Lost5

George Fox

3

8

1-6-1

Lost3

Willamette

6

11

0

2-6

Wonl

Willamette

2

9

0-7-1

Tied!

Linfield

5

10

0

1-7

Wonl

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct. 18 at Pacific, 7p.m.

LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Oct.19 at Whitman, noon

SPORTS TALK ·Who do you think will win the World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals, Detroit Tigers, Los Angeles Dodgers and Boston Red Sox?

Sebastian Hernandez, junior

Michael Palmer, first-year

Emily Nehser, junior

Sam Geisslinger, sophomore

"Boston Red Sox, because David Ortiz comes up clutch in big moments."

"Boston Red Sox, because I have heard the most positive comments about their team so far."

"Boston Red Sox, because they all have awesome beards."

"St. Louis Cardinals, because of the depth of their pitching staff."

WOOTEN TALLIES 12 KILLS TO THE DELIGHT OF TACUYAN IN FALL SPORTS PICK 'EM

Will the Denver Broncos stay undefeated after facing the Indianapolis Colts this coming weekend? By SAM HORN Sports Editor George Fox wanted the punishment to stop. Junior Amy Wooten was demolishing them. She was exploiting their weaknesses and ended the volleyball match with 12 kills. The members of the George Fox volleyball team weren't the only people saddened by Wooten's 12 kills. Everyone in the Fall Sports Pick 'Em was depressed about Wooten's 12 kills. Except for one person: Andre Tacuyan. Tacuyan guessed Wooten would record 12 kills and was ecstatic when he realized Wooten had played up to expectations. Tacuyan, along with Drew Oord and Dalton Ritchey, sit atop the Fall Pick 'Em standings after this past week. Tacuyan might have correctly guessed the number of kills Wooten would tally against George Fox, but this is a new week. A new question means optimism and the chance to move up the standings. This week, I asked contestants whether

the Denver Broncos will stay undefeated after facing the Indianapolis Colts this

coming weekend. Unsurprisingly, most of the contestants are guessing that the Broncos will have an unblemished record after squaring off against the Colts. Except for two people: Max Totaro and DrewOord. Totaro believes the Colts are the complete package. He says their offense is well-balanced. The Colts have ran for 784 yards, complimented by 1,295 passing yards. I'd say that's relatively balanced for a pro-style offense. With Andrew Luck at the helm of the offense, the Colts have seen success so far this season. They sit atop the AFC South at 4-2. Armed with a defense that ranks ninth in the NFL with 17.0 sacks, the Colts have a chance to surpress Peyton Manning's offensive attack. Statistically speaking, the Broncos don't have a solid defense, so Luck might be able to exploit a defense that ranks 30th in passing yards allowed. With bragging rights on the line, this

pivotal NFL game could detennine which contestant will rise to the top.

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THE MOORING MAST

14 SPORTS

SJIM SJI YS... By SAM HORN Sports Editor

-

My name is Sam Hom. That may sound insignificant to the importance of this article, but just wait - it gets better. In 1987, the Boston Red Sox took to the baseball diamond, but there was something different about the team on that July 25 evening. A new player had been called up and was seeking fame at the major league level. That player's name was Sam Hom. No, it was not me. I am not a former professional baseball player, nor am I almost 50 years old. I only wish I could swing a baseball bat as well as any of the Pacific Lutheran University baseball players, let alone a major leaguer. Standing at 6 feet 5 inches, the powerful first baseman named Sam Hom became a rising star with the Red Sox and eventually ended his eight-year career with the Texas Rangers in 1995. Even though Hom didn't get voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, I was inspired by the fact someone in professional sports actually has the same name as me. I can only imagine how average citizens named Jennifer Aniston or George Oooney feel. Ever since I was able to watch archive footage of Sam Hom taking his cuts with the Boston Red Sox, I have become quite attached to the Red Sox organization. I despise everything New York Yankee-related and wish Alex Rodriguez would just admit to

being baseball's biggest villain. The Boston Red Sox ended the 2013 regular season tied with the St. Louis Cardinals for the best record in baseball at 97-65. The Boston Red Sox entered the playoffs with the most runs scored with 853. That far surpasses the offensive juggernaut of the Detroit Tigers, which scored 796 runs during the regular season. Based on their statistics alone, the Red Sox seem poised to make a World Series entrance. Even if the Boston Red Sox don't advance to the World Series, I commend them for getting this far in the playoffs. Watching the Red Sox this year has been a joy. I have been a supporter of their beard madness - please see Mike Napoli, Dustin Pedroia, Jonny Gomes, Ryan Dempster, Jarrod Saltalamacchia, David Ross and Mike Carp. The Red Sox faced the Detroit Tigers Sunday in Game 2 of the American League Championship Series. Throughout most of the night, the Red Sox bats were dormant. There were no eruptions and no earthquakes from Fenway Park. Down 5-1 in the bottom of the eighth inning, the Red Sox seemed aimed for a disastrous offensive outing. The Tigers' dominant starting pitcher, Max Scherzer, a sure Cy Young award winner, was keeping the Red Sox offense at bay. The Red Sox couldn't muster enough firepower to outlast the dangerous Detroit Tigers. Well, until David Ortiz stepped up to the plate.

OCT.18 2013

I will always bleed red and white

With one swing of the bat, Big Papi knotted up the game at 5-5. The ball rocketed off of Ortiz's bat with such force that it careened over the fence near the bullpen in deep right field. Even Torti Hunter's leap of faith couldn't stop the ball from flying over the fence. Fenway Park exploded into cacophony. While there are no active the Green volcanoes near Monster, there was an eruption. Ortiz saved the Red Sox from certain death. Not only would the Red Sox be down 2-0 in the ALCS if Ortiz didn't hit the grand slam, but Boston would be heading into Detroit down 2-0. That's a death sentence. After Ortiz blasted the grand slam, Saltalamacchia backed up Ortiz's effort with a walk-off single in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox are alive and still functioning, and I could not be any prouder after they won 6-5 against Detroit late Sunday night. Even though I live on the other side of the country, I will always bleed red and white. It also doesn't hurt that my favorite color is green and the Green Monster is, well, green. My name is Sam Horn and I will forever be a Boston Red Sox fan. I will continuously take pride in the fact that I support one of the league's premier teams. Now, if only I could grow a mountainous beard like Mike Napoli to show my true love for the Boston Red Sox.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS, KEITH ALLISON

PHOTO BY JESSICA TRONDSEN

TOP: Red Sox player Mike Napoli in all of his natural beauty. BOTIOM: You don' l have to let me know - I'm well aware my beard is lacking the proper ingredienl.s.

Lutes rebound against Lewis & Clark after tough loss to Linfield Running back Madison racks up 183 yards on the ground to lead the Lutes to victory By STEVEN MCGRAIN Guest Writer Lutes football recovered after a rough loss to Linfield last week, winning 42-21 against Lewis & Oark during Pacific Lutheran University's homecoming weekend. Although the Lutes did win, they started off slow. Turnovers and punts filled the entire first quarter for the Lutes offense, which tallied only 50 yards on 17 plays in the opening 15 minutes of the game. It was not until the middle of the second quarter when running back Niko Madison, a junior, scored from 4 yards out to tie the game at 7-7. Madison, a premier back in the offense, had his best game of the season so far with 20 carries for 183 rushing yards. He also tallied 36 receiving yards. Fellow running back Kelly Morgan, a senior, also showed a great deal of speed, recording the longest scoring play for the Lutes on a 48-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Morgan was able to produce 58 yards on three rushing attempts and also scored another rushing touchdown in the fourth quarter. "The key for the run game started this week in practice, which was one of our crispest, most fast paced weeks we've had," offensive lineman Zach Phelps, a junior, said. "You take all that preparation and add in Niko [Madison] running like a man inspired, and we will get

closer to closing our performance gap. I'm so proud of Niko and Kelly [Morgan] and the way they ran." Quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior, responded after a tough five turnover performance from last week. threw only one Ritchey interception against the Pioneers and was also able to find his favorite wide receiver, junior Kyle Warner, for several big catches. Even though Ritchey was the victim of a tumultuous first quarter, he was able to find six different receivers throughout the game. Warner recorded the longest pass of the day, which went for 31 yards. "We kept the game simple and limited the mental mistakes we made the previous week," Warner said. 路 Ritchey completed 20 out of his 32 pass attempts for 237 yards and three touchdowns. Warner led the receiving corps with eight receptions and accounted for 146 receiving yards, as well as two touchdowns. Tight end Lucas Sontra, a junior, recorded the third passing touchdown on a 5-yard reception in the third quarter. "The biggest thing was to come out and be us, and play to the best of our ability," wide receiver Austin Hilliker, a junior, said. "We know we are a very talented team and know what we are capable of. We started out a little slow, but were ultimately able to pick it up."

The

defense

had

a tough

task containing Lewis &

Oark

quarterback Keith Welch, who had eight total touchdowns the previous week. Welch scored the first seven points of the game on a 7-yard run in the second quarter, but was quiet for most of the remainder of the game. Welch wasn't able to score again until the Lutes were up comfortably in the fourth. "He [Welch] is the key to their offense, but we knew if we could shut him down as much as possible it would be a good day for the defense," linebacker Jordan Patterson, a senior, said. Patterson recorded a team high seven tackles Saturday. Other notable defensive performances were cornerback Connor Cummings, a junior, tying linebacker Dalton Darmody and Jonny Volland, both seniors, with six tackles. Volland also forced a fumble, which comerback Spencer McKinnon, a junior, picked up. Safety Greg Hibbard, a junior, forced the only turnover off of Keith Welch, returning an interception for 15 yards on the Pioneers' opening drive in the first quarter. The Lutes look to build on their performance for next week's opponent as they welcome the Pacific University Boxers to Sparks Stadium for a 12:30 p.m. kickoff. The game will mark former Lutes' receiver Tyler Bowen's first game back at Sparks Stadium.

Bowen coaches the tight ends at Pacific.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP: Wide receiver Kyle Warner, a junior, leaps up to catch a pass from fellow junior Dalton Ritchey. BOTTOM: Ritchey remains poised in the pocket to deliver a catchable ball.

+


THE MOORING MAST

OCT. 18, 2013

SPORTS 15

Lutes benefiting from Raybuin's presence in goal Steadfast goalkeeper leads by example on a team that looks to win Northwest Conference title 路 By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer Every successful soccer team has a goalkeeper that it can count on, and for the Lutes that player is Joe Rayburn. Rayburn, a senior, came to Pacific Lutheran University in the fall of 2010, and the men's soccer program has really turned the comer since the 6-foot-4-inch goalkeeper began playing between the sticks. Since 2010, the Lutes have gone 44-1610, recording a winning percentage of .682. Rayburn has been the primary keeper in nearly all of his time at PLU after seizing the job midway through his first season. Rayburn, 22, is from Portland, and after a stellar soccer and golf career for Sunset High School in Portland, he said he was looking to continue his soccer career collegiately. "I had some talks with a few Division I schools, but for whatever reason those talks all fell through," Rayburn said. Head coach John Yorke recruited

Rayburn in January of his high school senior year. "I did some soul searching, and talked to my friends and family," Rayburn said. "They told me that I deserved to keep playing, to keep doing something that I love." In 2013, the Lutes have gotten off to the best start in school history, starting the season with a 12-game unbeaten streak before taking their first loss against Puget Sound last Saturday. The Lutes' success has also garnered national attention. They have risen in the polls and are ranked fifth as of Oct. 8. Rayburn has been phenomenal defensively thus far in the season, but he shares his success with his defensive backline playing in front of him. "My successes individually and as a team this season is both due to our improved defensive discipline and our mindset change," Rayburn said. When first at PLU, Rayburn said the team focused more on offense, looking to outscore opponents.

"This season we have more of a nononsense attitude," Rayburn said. "This year we have chosen to defend better, and we are reaping the rewards of that." Rayburn has made 40 saves and has recorded five shutou ts so far this season. He is recording a shutout percentage of .833, which ranks 49th in the nation. As life has moved forward for Rayburn, he still maintains close ties to the people who have helped him become who he is today. He said he still depends on his family, and he knows they are always there for him. "Growing up I really looked up to my brother," Rayburn said. "He's five years older, so he experienced everything first. He really showed me how to be successful. My family is my rock." Rayburn's brother played college basketball at University of CaliforniaBerkeley. The perspective Rayburn gained from his family has helped him thrive since he

arrived at PLU, both on and off the field. In the classroom he is a finpnce major, and in 2012 he earned Capital One Academic All-District 8 NCAA Division III First Team honors. This prestigious award recognizes some of the most successful Division III studentathletes in the western United States. Rayburn said he is focused right now on making his senior season as successful as it can be, but he is also aware that all too soon, his time at PLU will end. "It's been pretty strange thinking about future plans, [and] having to face the reality of making real-life decisions," Rayburn said. "It's just a new chapter of my life that I'm looking forward to." Rayburn has talked to a few former coaches about possibly attending a few soccer combines and maybe playing lowerdivision soccer. At the same time, he's looking into obtaining finance internships and advancing his career in that light.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

LEFT: Senior Joe Rayburn leaps off the ground to secure a shot against Willamette Sept. 29. Rayburn has won numerous accolades in his PLU career. In 2011, Rayburn was named as a second team AllNorthwest Conference goalkeeper. RIGHT: Rayburn makes a save in a victorious outing against Willamette Sept. 29. The Lutes won 2-1 in double overtime.

Nick's Picks: Fantasy players to watch this week By NICK BARENE Sports Writer QUARTERBACK- Philip Rivers of the San Diego chargers has put up

consistent numbers through the first six weeks of the season and is looking like the player he was in seasons prior. He has racked up 1,610 passing yards and 13 touchdowns. If he is available, take him. He could be a difference maker on your team.

TIGHT END- Dolphins tight end Charles Clay is surprising many owners this season and is ranked seventh among players at his position in terms of fantasy points. Clay is in the top 10 among NFL tight ends with 23 catches this season. Look for him to have a big game against the Bills in Week 7.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS- The Kansas City Chiefs have been RUNNING BACK- The mystery that is Stevan Ridley continues. After

putting up just 16 fantasy points through the first five weeks, the New England running back exploded for 96 yards and 2 touchdowns. Owners may want to consider hanging on to Ridley for at least a few more weeks as the Patriots face the Jets, Dolphins and Steelers in the coming three weeks.

disrupting offenses since Week 1. This past weekend, the Chiefs recorded 10 sacks against the Oakland Raiders, registering 27 fantasy points. The Chiefs are facing the struggling Houston Texans this coming week and are sure to wreak havoc upon an offense that is struggling with quarterback uncertainty.

KICKER- Despite his team's struggles, Eagles kicker Alex Henery is ranked WIDE RECEIVER- While playing mediocre at best through his first few

games, Chargers wide receiver Keenan Allen has come up big in his last two contests totaling 222 yards, 2 touchdowns and 33 fantasy points. With San Diego

fifth in fantasy points scored by kickers. He'll get a chance to earn more in Week 7 against the Cowboys. Henery has been in double figures twice this season. The former Nebraska Cornhusker kicker has successfully converted 13 of 16 field goals

taking on the woeful Jaguars this week, look for Allen to have another big game.

this year.


THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

SLOW START DOESN'T PREVENT LUTES VOLLEYBALL FROM WINNING IN GAME 1 By NICK BARENE Sports Writer Losing the first set only lit a fire underneath the Pacific Lutheran University women's volleyball team last Friday night against George Fox. After dropping the first set 25-19, the Lutes rattled off victories in the next three sets en route to their ninth consecutive win. The Bruins struck quickly in the first set; hitting the ball hard and playing aggressively. They took the lead from the start and didn't let up, winning the set 25-19. In the second set, the Lutes took the lead early, but the Bruins wouldn't go down easily. The two teams exchanged the lead several times with the Lutes holding a slim 23-22 lead late in the set. Outside hitter Lucy Capron, a sophomore, tallied two consecutive kills to win the set for the Lutes. The Lutes led from the first serve in the third set. Solid hitting across the board led to PLU winning 25-17. First-year player Taylor Komagome was a force coming off the bench. The defensive specialist tallied two service aces and 17 digs.

"She [Komagome] is so solid on defense," head coach Kevin Aoki said. 'Tve never had a player who can hit the floor that fast." The pace of the Lute hitting proved too much for George Fox to handle. In the final set, the Lutes finished off the Bruins in decisive fashion with a crushing 25-13 victory. The win was a sign of the Lutes' continued dominance over George Fox, as the Lutes have won 23 of the last 24 contests against the Bruins. The Lutes remain undefeated in Northwest Conference matches, and sit atop the league table. "There's always a target on your back when you're leading the league," Amy Wooten, a junior, said. "We feel like there is always room for improvement, and we don't want to get complacent." Several Lutes rank among the nation's top specialists. Setter Samantha North, a junior, averages 9.8 assists per set, which is 31st in the nation. Libero Amber Aguiar, also a junior, ranks sixth in the nation in digs per set (6.7). As a team, the Lutes are ranked 10th in the country with 19.1 digs per set.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Libero Amber Aguiar, a junior, digs a ball to set up a teammate for a kill against George Fox last Friday. Aguiar finished with a team-leading 23 digs.

OCT.18 2013

Pioneers fall to Lutes in straight sets in Game 2

PH<YI'O COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

The PLU volleyball team gets psyched before playing Lewis & Clark Saturday. Their pre-game rituals worked as planned, as the Lutes walked all over the Pioneers on their way to a 3-0 win.

By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer The Lutes hosted the visiting Lewis & Clark Pioneers Saturday in front of a

boisterous crowd in Olson Auditorium in the athletics nightcap for a busy Homecoming Saturday. After starting the match slowly against George Fox Friday night, the Lutes were looking to get off to a quicker start against Lewis & Clark. The Lutes rolled to a 3-0 win against the Pioneers. "Our focus before the game was to start quickly," junior Amy Wooten said. "We wanted to value tough serves because a good serve makes the entire defense's job easier." Haley Urdahl, a senior, began the match serving for the Lutes, and she set the tone quickly for the match by peppering the Pioneers with pinpoint serves. The Pioneers had difficulty returning Urdahl's serves, as the outside hitter finished with six aces in the match. Urdahl helped the Lutes jump out to a 10-0 lead with a couple of unhittable serves in the first set. The Lutes never looked back and cruised to a 25-11 win in the first set. The Lutes' first set momentum continued throughout the rest of the

match. The Lutes went on to win the second game 25-13, and the third 25-18. The third set also featured appearances from several of the Lutes bench players, something that both the starters and reserves enjoy. "Tonight was really the first time this season that our entire bench got into the game," Wooten said. "Our reserves push the starters every day in practice, and that helps us a lot. Knowing that they are always there, pushing us to get better keeps the starters working hard and not taking playing time for granted." Michaela Edgers, Ariana Judson, Kacey Hartman, Becca Holtgeerts and Lauren McClung were the substitutes who had a chance to show head coach Kevin Aoki how they have improved over the course of the season. Edgers, a 6' 4" sophomore, led the reserves with two kills. The Lutes, who stand at 12-4 (8-0), have now concluded the first round of conference play. They have played and beaten every Northwest Conference school once. Pacific Lutheran University will return to action this weekend as they head south to Oregon to play Pacific on Oct. 18 and Linfield on Oct. 19. Both game times are set for 7 p.m.

DenAdel finishes on top in PLU Invitational

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Senior Alan DenAdel leads the men's cross country pack Saturday. He firmly kept his lead, winning the Pacific Lutheran University Cross Country Invitational at PLU South Park. DenAdel won the Sk course in 25:50.07, beating second-place finisher Brady Beagley of Western Oregon by about 21 seconds. As a team, the Lutes finished fourth with 115 points. Genevieve Brandt, a first-year, was the Lutes' top finisher on the women's side. The PLU cross country team will travel to Estacada, Ore. to compete in the Lewis & Clark Invitational this Saturday.


SPORTS Lutes conquer Bearcats in five sets

Ae;E Night of Musical Theatre does not disappoint

PAGE15

PAGE7

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE NOV. I, 2013

OORING

AST

mastmedia.plu.edu

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 6

PFLUEGER EVENT 'PFRIGHTENS' STUDENTS

PHOTOS BY EMILY IACKA

Students donned scary costumes and gory makeup for Pflueger Hall's annual RHC event Oct. 19. LEFr: Sophomore Amber Stokes paints pumpkins at Pflueger Pfright Night. CENTER: First-year Jessica Crask, dressed as Jigsaw, won the award for scariest costume at Pflueger Pfiight Night. RIGHT: Sophomore Kindra Galan won the award for having the most original costume at Pflueger Pfright Night.

By NATALIE DEFORD

Guest Writer Devils, cowgirls and even a bloody Freddy Krueger took over Pflueger Hall Oct. 19. Costumed Lutes showed their Halloween spirit this month by dancing, decorating cookies and painting pumpkins during Pflueger's annual all-hall event, Pflueger Pfright Night. Pflueger' s Residence Hall Council organized the event. Pflueger's RHC vice president, sophomore Erin McCoy,

estimated about 350 students filtered through over the course of three hours. "Our RHC did a great job of planning Pfright Night," McCoy said. Every gathering area was packed, including the dance floor, second floor lounge and lobby. They even ran out of pumpkins for decorating because of such a high attendance. Students entered the scene through smoke-machine fog and Halloween decorations. The hall's walls and windows were covered in fake blood. Kristoffer Larsen, a non-graduate

international student, said he thought the event was well decorated. Luca Lezzi, sustainability director for Pflueger's RHC, descnbed Pfright Night as a Halloween dance party with activities. This year included cookie decorating and pumpkin painting, ''because carving [pumpkins} can get really messy," Lezzi said. McCoy said Pflueger's RHC spent weeks coming up with ideas for the evening, so there was a lot for everyone to do. "From the photo booth to

the costume contest, each of our activities wa"s a success," she said. For the costume contest, judges named the scariest, funniest and most original outfits to reward the efforts Lutes put into their costumes. According to Residential Life's Pflueger Hall page, "Pfright Nighf' is one of the many "pfun" events put on by Pflueger throughout the year. "It was a great night with a lot to do," sophomore Jillian Stanphill said. "I had so much fun dressing up with my friends."

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

PLU community mourns loss offormer facuity ByRELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Fonner Associate Provost David Yagow and Professor Vernon Hanson of the social work department died within the past two weeks. Yagow passed away at the age of 69 Oct. 23 and Hanson passed away Oct. 15 at the age of 81. Vernon Hanson Vernon Hanson was born July 2, 1932 in

Fairfield, Mont., moving to the Puget Sound area

with his family at age 10. He graduated Ballard High School in Seattle, then Pacific Lutheran University and then went on to serve in the U.S. Army for two years. After marrying Marlis Majerus in 1958, Hanson attended Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minn., then interned in Fort Worth, Texas where his first child, Erik, was born. He soon moved to Medford, Ore., working as a Lutheran minister for five years, where his children Dayna and Kyle were born. Hanson's passion

for social and economic justice during the Gvil

Rights Movement and the Vietnam War led him away from the parish and toward a career in social work. After earning a master's degree . from the school of social service administration at the University of Chicago in 1970, he returned with his family to Tacoma to Pacific Lutheran University, where he influenced many students during his 24 ye~s as a professor in the social work department. At PLU, he initiated innovative programs aimed at broadening experiential learning

VERNON HANSON

opportunities, including New World House, the Cooperative Education program and Second

DEATHS CONT. PAGg4


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It's OK to wait: Abstinence is the latest topic at Sex+ event By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor The use of the words "sex" and "abstinence" in the same sentence may seem oxymoronic to some, but guest speaker Heather Corinna showed that, indeed, abstinence is part of the Sex Positive vocabulary. Throughout the presentation, Corinna emphasized the importanc-e of affirming personal decisions about sexual activity. She described how every person should know what "criteria" are necessary to have a fun, safe sexual encounter, and that those criteria can be very different from others'.

"No one gets to decide this for us," Corinna said in her presentation. "It needs to be a choice." The event was titled "Abstinence: You Don't Have to Take Your Oothes Off," but Corinp.a's presentation demonstrated a desire to provide affirmation of all sexual decisions, not just the decision to not engage in sexual activity. "Sex is optional. It's not required. Ever," Corinna said. She used this point to highlight the idea that, since it's optional, a person can be clear with themselves regarding what situations are okay to engage in and what situations are sexual

"Sex is optional. It's not required. Ever." Heather Corinna guest speaker

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deal-breakers. To help in this process, Corinna asked audience members to finish the sentences ''I want/ will want sex when/if...," "I don't want sex when/if ..." and "I guess I'd be okay having sex if ..." Sophomore Miranda Treutel said that she was pleasantly surprised by the presentation. ''I expected it to be 'you should not have sex,' but it was more open," Treutel said. Sex+ is in its fourth year of programming, but has never held an event centered on .abstinence before, Jennifer Smith, director of the Women's Center, said. Smith said feedback from past participants had mentioned wanting some abstinencecentered events, but the idea was made especially urgent after Brad Henning' s appearance on campus last spring. an educational Henning, speaker, was brought on campus to discuss healthy relationships. Some who attended the lecture thought he engaged in "slutshaming'' rhetoric that blames and shames women for expressing their sexuality. "After hearing what he had to

PH<rro BY EMILY l&CKA

Sophomore Alice Henderson writ.es her thoughts about sex during a group activity at Sex+ Monday.

say, it was clear a conversation needed to happen," Smith said. Corinna argued that any kind of shame attached to how a person expresses - or chooses not to express - his or her sexuality

contributes to a culture that doesn't value choice or consent in sexual decisions. Monday's event marked the end of the Sex+ events for the semester.


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G.R.E.A.N. club members attend coal export hearing What to do atPLU By LEAH LARSON Guest Writer

Hundreds gathered in the Tacoma Convention Center Oct. 19 to attend the fifth and final scoping meeting for the proposed coal terminal in Longview, Wash. Among those were roughly 15 PLU students. The scoping meetings were designed to ascertain the opinions of Washington residents on the proposed terminal. During the meetings, various community leaders asked a panel of experts questions concerning the issue. The site of the scoping meeting was also home to a rally for both supporters and opponents of the terminal. According to Millennium Bulk Terminals, an operating bulk materials port that may build the coal terminal, the proposed coal terminal would process up to 44 million tons of coal yearly, employ 135 workers and create up to 1,400 jobs for Washington residents. Coal export is a lucrative business, but not everyone is enthusiastic about it. Critics say it would be bad for the environment. In fact, president of the G.R.E.A.N. Oub, senior Jenny Taylor, said that of the 850 people who attended the public hearing, arourid 750 were opposed to coal export. Opponents to the potential coal terminal said they fear it could create harmful coal dust. They also believe it would create a traffic gridlock in Longview as

Ongoing Family weekend. Various locations, Friday through Sunday. For a complete schedule of events, check out http://www.plu.edu/parents/ family-weekend/home.php.

Friday

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAIYABE BEFAEI

Members of PLU's G.R.E.A.N. club, clad in red shirtB, attended a prot.est against coal exports in downtown Tacoma before the hearing Oct. 19. Many environmental activist groups and individuals expressed concern over the effects building a coal t.erminal in Longview, Wash. would have on the environment.

the 16 coal trains leave and enter the city daily. "Coal doesn't necessarily feel like something that applies directly to our lives, but burning coal is incredibly detrimental both to our health and to environmental health," Taylor . said. Opponents also said coal processing has been shown to add to pollution and global warming, therefore possibly damaging the environment further. Millennium Bulk representatives said their factories will be able to handle the coal in a way that will not negatively impact the environment. Some of the students present at the meeting, however, said they were not

convinced. "I just don't think it's possible to accurately predict what the coal may do to the environment of that area," junior Christina Erikson said. "Sure, they might say that they can take care of it in a clean way that won't harm the environment," Erikson said. "But historically speaking, coal has been shown to be extremely harmful for the environment. Just look at China." Despite the widespread opposition to the coal terminal in Longview and the argument that it could potentially harm the environment. Millennium Bulk said the potential jobs it could create outweigh the harms. "Communities are still recovering from the economic

downturn," Mark Martinez of the Pierce County Building and Construction Trades Council said. ''This project provides an opportunity to turn it around with the thousands of jobs that would be created and millions in tax revenue generated." Millennium Bulk said the project would create $70 million in direct wages during the construction period of the terminal alone. While no more scoping meetings for the project are being held, people are still able to submit their comments to Millennium Bulk online via their website, http://millenniumbulk. com, until Nov. 18.

Kjersti Andreassen contn"buted to this article.

Campus Ministry office ass~stant bids adieu to PLU By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Administrative Assistant Jennifer Walleman of Campus Ministry is leaving the rainy weather and bad drivers of the Pacific Northwest to return to her home state of Missouri. Walleman began working at Pacific Lutheran University's Campus Ministry in September 2011 when her husband was stationed at JointBase Lewis McChord. As an administrative assistant, Walleman schedules and prints bulletins for chapel. She communicated with groups inside and outside of PLU to find out about events for the bulletin

announcements, and she also worked on the website and assigned tasks for the campus ministry stewards. 路 . ''You can't get anything planned with campus ministry without going through [Walleman]," senior Tommy Flanagan, University Congregation council president, said. 路 Campus Ministry held a farewell reception Wednesday for Walleman. University pastors Dennis Sepper and Nancy Connor organized the reception and many Campus Ministry stewards and University Congregation Council members attended. They asked Walleman what she would miss

about the area and PLU in general, laughing at memories and inside jokes. "Ever since I started working here, I immediately noticed everyone here really valued being here and wanted to make the most out of their time here," Walleman said. Near the end of the reception, Pastor Connor and Pastor Sepper presented Walleman with a PLU sweatshirt;- and the University Congregation Council gave her two tickets for a Missouri versus Texas football game. Walleman and her husband began driving back to Missouri today with their two miniature schnauzers to live withher mother-in-law. Her husband has a found a job with a threemonth contract in Kansas City, Mo.

HONG HALL CELEBRATES FALL

Drawing for a Living: an Making Money as illustrator. Steve Lieber and Erika Moen from Periscope Studios in Portland discuss being a freelance artist in this economy, their work with comics and internship opportunities. Ingram 100. 2-4 p.m.

Saxifrage multimedia showcase. Attend the first ever showcase for PLU's premier literary and art magazine. The Cave. 7-10p.m. Family Game Night. All are welcome for this family weekend event. Tingelstad Hall, 7-9 p.m. Late Night Fish and Chips Bingo. Come play an intense game of bingo with Late Night Programming for your chance to win a pet Betta fish or a big bag of chips. AUC Commons, 9 -11 p.m.

Saturday Egyptian Archaeology: The Future of the Past. Faculty Fellow Donald Ryan examines issues regarding Egypt's antiquities in the midst of the country's state of political volatility. AUC, 9:30 a.m. PLU football vs. UPS. See the Lutes take on our crosstown rivals, the Loggers. Wear your black and gold and bring your Lute spirit! Sparks Stadium in Puyallup, 12:30 p.m. PLU Variety Show. Come support students who have auditioned for a spot in this showcase of unique talent. Space is limited, so RSVP soon. AUC Chris Knutz.en Hall, 7 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.

Sunday Family breakfast, Minuteto-Win-it style. Families can compete in a . variety of 60-second challenges at different stations while eating their breakfast. The Commons, 9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Coffee and fellowship. Come join other families and students before and after worship for a cup of coffee. Mary Baker Russell Music Center, 10:15 a.m. University Congregation Family Weekend Worship. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 11 a.m.

Hong RHC host.ed the Fall F\Jn Party Tuesday evening, which featured board games, apple cider and decorating gourds. LEFT: Junior Carly Brook cuts a rotten

Gina Gillie and Mark Robbins recital. PLU professor and Seattle Symphony principal team up to present horn several original compositions by composers from the Northwest, including two of Gillie's own works. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 5:30

pumpkin with o butter knife. She later decorated the pumpkin. CENTER: Junior Hallie Peterson trie8 to get other people to guess the phrase "cease fire" while

p.m.

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playing "Catch Phrase!" at the Hong Fall F\Jn Party Tuesday. RIGHT: A Hong resident fishes an apple out of a pot of caramel at the Fall F\Jn Party.


THE MOORING MAST DEATHS FROM PAGE I Wind, a learning program for the elderly. During the 1980s, he and his wife led student groups to Nicaragua, El Salvador and Mexico for experiences that combined sefVi.ce, education and social justice work. A lifetime sports lover, Hanson played varsity baseball and basketball in high school and college. He remained physically active until Alzheimer's slowed him down in recent years. While in his 50s, he developed an interest in Tai Chi that continued after his retirement. In 1996, he founded the Tai Chi, Qigong, and Self Care Center of Tacoma. His Tai Chi practice took him to China for study several times. Hanson's kindness, humor and openminded integrity have made a deep imprint on the lives of his family and friends. Always striving to be his best, he led modestly and by example. His unique career path, driven by strong progressive beliefs and values, inspired those around him. His ready smile and enjoyment of other people endeared him to all he met. He lovingly supported others, both in the pursuit of their dreams and in their moments of struggle. Hanson is survived by his wife of 55 years, his three children and their partners, five grandchildren and brothers Bob and Merle. Hanson's memorial will be held in early January, 2014.

DavidYagow Dave Yagow was born Dec. 17, 1943, in Rockford, ill. He received his bachelor's degree from Concordia Senior College {now Concordia Theological Seminary) in Fort Wayne, Ind., and in 1965 graduated with a master's of divinity from Concordia Seminary in St. Louis; He was ordained in the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod, in 1970, later transferring to the ELCA roster. Yagow worked 路a s the registrar for Concordia Seminary in 1971 and was an assistant pastor at the Chapel of the Cross-Lutheran in St. Louis in 1973. He was registrar and assistant professor of exegetical and practical theology at Concordia Seminary in Exile (Seminex) beginning in 1974. He came to Pacific Lutheran University in 1976, where he was hired as executive assistant to then-Provost Richard Jungkuntz, and thus began his 24-year tenure in the Provost's Office.

NOV. l 2013

Yagow was promoted to deputy provost in 1983 and served in that role, later renamed associate provost, until 2000. In this role, he was a master of budget planning and implementation and served as recording Secretary for the Deans Council. He also led two university self-studies for the reaccreditation process. For the academic year 1988-89, he served as provost pro tern after Jungkuntz retired. Between 2001 and 2007, he served as a senior lecturer of religion and as special assistant to the provost. He continued to teach religion classes part-time, as he had done while an administrator. His students enjoyed Yagow as a teacher and engaged in spirited discussions with him during his classes. He officially retired from PLU in 2007. Friends remember him as someone who absolutely came alive when he preached. He was well-known for his chapel homilies, where he often took on the persona of a biblical character. Earlier in his career, he occasionally

Yagow was a gifted writer who knew the importance and the power of just the right word.

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Paul Menzel philosophy professor emeritus

preached for the Sunday-morning worship program produced by Church Relations and broadcast on KPLU. Yagow was known as a man who relished life and would always have an interesting story to tell when friends dropped by, philosophy professor emeritus, Paul Menzel, said. "He was curious, ~llectual and an avid reader," Menzel said. "He had a fine, uplifting sense of humor." Menzel also said Yagow was a gifted writer who knew the importance and the power of just the right word. In his retirement, Yagow continued his travels to countless art shows throughout the region, mal<ing personal connections with vendors that continued through the years. For many years he attended the Puyallup Fair, now the Washington State Fair, each day it was open, becoming a docent of sorts at the piglet palace. On campus, he was a dedicated and loyal fan of the tennis and track and field teams, but especially of the baseball team, regularly attending its practices as well as both home and away games. He befriended many student athletes and was proud of their personal, academic and athletic successes. "He was passionate in the best sense," Menzel said. "He spoke with insight, judgment and a deeply humane feeling." Services celebrating his life will be held Friday at 2:30 p.m. in Lagerquist Concert Hall. This article was compiled using information from a press release sent out by the Office of the President Oct. 27.

This article was compiled using information from Vernon Hanson's obituary published by

his family: http://vernhanson.com/

ASPLU sponsors concert to encourage students to vote By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Each year, Americans are given the right, and the privilege, to vote. not However, many of us take advantage of this American pastime simply because we have not registered to do so. Here at Pacific Lutheran University, we have acknowledged this problem with Lute Vote.

Lute Vote is a project created by Associated Students of PLU and many other university campuses to "increase civic participation through educating students about their rights and encouraging increased participation," accordin~ to the ASPLU website. "Young people are underrepresented the political process," Anika Glass, LuteVote outreach director, said. Glass also said the average voting age in Washington state is 64 years old. This year, there are 46 million Americans between the ages of 18

and 30, mal<ing college students the majority voters. To promote Lute Vote, PLU and University of Washington Tacoma (UWT)

collaborated to put on a concert Wednesday. ASPLU scheduled a pre-party costume dance in Red Square, but no one attended. Students took the Washington Bus, a nonprofit nonpartisan service, to reach out to young people to vote. The bus took them to The Swiss, a venue in downtown Tacoma. Students could not only dance to

performances by SHEBEAR and Michelle and The Club, but also turn in their November ballots. Mail-in ballots are the most popular method of voting in this state, so it is important for students to update their registration every time they move. It is especially important to update that information if residents are out of state.

If you would like to see your county's online voter pamphlet, visit Lute Vote's website at http://www. plu.edulasplulmisc/Lute-Vote.php

Canipus Ministry party celebrates Reforniation Day

PH(Yl'()S BY IESSE MAJOR

Campus Ministry put on their annual Reformation Party Wednesday evening to commemorate Martin Luther's contributions to the Christian church. LEFT: Sophomore Maylen Anthony plays the game "Pin the Thesis on the Door," a nod to when Luther nailed his 95 theses on the church door in Germany listing his criticiBms of the Catholic Church at that time. RIGHT: Junior Catherine Graham writes a sentence about Martin Luther for "Paper Tulephone" at the Reformation Party. In Paper Tulephone, participants guess what the phrase someone wrote. is based on a drawing that someone else drew.

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'Gravity' New film offers surprising themes of literary merit By THOMAS HORN Guest Writer Titrough all of the stunning visuals, the defined symbols and the incredible acting talent, "Gravity" has the potential to win best movie of 2013 at the Oscars. The visual imagery revealed in "Gravity'' is simply stunning. The characters observe Earth from an unusual perspective, but a variety of objects also hurtle through space - aimed straight at the characters. A quality that isn't found in most movies is being able to have such specific details in the special effects. Earth comes across as a magnificent planet - the quality of the special effects gives the film a good chance of winning an Oscar. There are multiple elements in "Gravity'' that makes it stand out from similar movies such as "Apollo 13" or "Star Trek." The movie has a form of a literary merit, featuring multiple 路 symbols and themes. "Gravity'' also only has two actors in the entire movie - George dooney and Sandra Bullock. While only having two actors in a movie could take away from the quality, this is not the case with "Gravity." Instead, the limited cast actually adds to the movie. This is because the audience gets to know the characters so much more in depth than if there were multiple actors in the film.

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KANYEWEST IN CONCERT What concert lacks in sound quality is made up for by West's showmanship ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Guest Writer

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"Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, depicts the story of two astronauts floating untethered through the blackness of space.

Viewers also get to focus on every single emotion the two of them go through, especially Bullock's character, Ryan Stone. She is the star of "Gravity." Ryan is a medical engineer who is conducting space shuttle operations with the help of an astronaut called Matt Kowalski, played by George Oooney. She is going through a rough part in her life as she journeys into space, since her daughter passed away at the age of four. The movie makes it clear Ryan hasn't found her purpose in life. As the film progresses, prayer is portrayed symbolically in a scene where Ryan is fearful for her life. She falls asleep in her space craft and has a dream where she bows her head and talks to herself about how she wants to live. This particular scene had a theme of never losing

hope, but the rest of the movie had other thematic moments about beauty and the significance of life. One scene that represents the meaning and beauty of life is at the end 'of the movie when a frog gracefully swims through crystal clear water. "Gravity'' is no actionpacked thriller, but it presents new ways of looking at life. Viewers need to pay attention to what's going on to understand the conception of the film. The film critic website Rotten Tomatoes gave "Gravity'' a positive 97 percent rating, an unheard of high score. The Seattle Times gave "Gravity'' four out of four stars. For those looking for a drama film that involves some abstract thinking, "Gravity'' is the perfect movie. This film is likely to win multiple awards at the Oscars - "Gravity'' definitely deserves it.

When Kanye West stepped onto the Key Arena's makeshift stage Oct. 19, the air outside was crisp, seats were jam packed and people were sweaty and loving every minute of it. The sound system blared as Kendrick Lamar, who opened the show, recited the lines of "Poetic Justice." The bass made the ground tremble beneath our feet. As Lamar walked

PHOTO COUJrrESY OF KEYARENA.COM

Kanye West performed in Key Arena Oct. 19 as part of his "Yeezus Tour." The tQur visited 23 cities across the northern United States.

off stage, we quickly switched from applause to chanting "Kanye, Kanye!" Eventually, the chants died out and he stepped on stage. As he came out on stage, the crowd went silent for an awkward few minutes. We wanted West to do something. To jump, fall or even move. He just stood there staring at us. Suddenly, he let out a bloodcurdling yell that caused us all to look around, bewildered. The first song he performed was from his new album "Yeezus." The speakers were so loud it just sounded like static, but we didn't care. In normal Kanye West style, the show was full of moments that would undoubtedly cause nothing but controversy. The dancers on stage for most of the show were dressed in nude costumes or as nuns and preachers. More than once, props and ceremonies used during the show resembled those of actual Catholic ceremonies. West even went so far as to have a Jesus impersonator walk the stage with him. Many people were taken aback by this, and it was apparent that this act caused a few people to leave the show. Another interesting aspect was West's style of dress. His first performance outfit was

a ski mask covered in precious stones, a long tank that could easily be mistaken for a dress and baggy skinny jeans that didn't cover West's nether regions. West later performed in nothing but jeans and a jacket, baring his chest during the second half of the show. The first half of the concert was focused around West's latest album. While we were excited about this, most of those i,n attendance were waiting for classic Kanye West songs. These came in the second half of the show beginning with "Heartless" and ending with one of his earliest tracks, "Through the Wire." It was a huge disappointment that he did not perform the songs that catapulted him to fame. Hits like "Good Life" and "Gold Digger'' were not a part of the set list. Overall, even though it was a static-filled, noisy, sweaty place, the Key Arena was the place to be Oct.19. venue What the lacked in sound quality, West made up for in and showmanship performance. His antics on stage left us in the crowd entertained and mentally reminding ourselves to buy tickets to see his next show.

Battle of the Bands: Of Monsters and Men comp~tes against The Head and the Heart By EVAN BERINGER Multimedia Editor The Indie music scene has been teeming with great bands, and this week we will put The Head and the Heart face to face with Of Monsters and Men. 路 It's fairly hard to judge bands if you don't have a little background. The Head and the Heart hail from the great city of Seattle. The band formed in the summer of

2009 and debuted its self-titled album "The Head and the Heart'' in June of that year. This year, the band released its second album, "Let's Be Still" Oct. 15. Of Monsters and Men is an Icelandic band, but its members sing in English. The band formed in 2010 and released its album ''My Head is an Animal" in 2011. The album peaked at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 album chart. Now let's get down to it. First up for comparison are the bands' vocals.

The band's skilled harmonic trio and accoustic sound is a force to be reckoned with.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SUBPOP.COM

The six members of the popular Indie band, the Head and the Heart, pose together for an album cover.

The Head and the Heart centers around vocal harmonies between the three vocalists of the band: Josiah Johnson, Jonathan Russell and Charity Thielen. The unconventional voices of Russell and Thielen really stand out. The two have gritty, booming voices that set them apart from most artists, and Johnson is there to balance it all out. They have the perfect vocal trio and absolutely rock the vocal harmonies. Although The Head and the Heart has outstanding vocals, Of Monsters and Men has a duet that can match it. Of Monsters and Men's vocalists consist primarily of Nanna Himarsdottir and Ragnar Porhallsson. They may have extremely difficult names to spell, but their vocals are like candy for your ears. The two have very clean voices that perfectly match each

other. There isn't very much of a change in the vocals from .song to song, and they can seem repetitive after a while, but the band still produces an amazing sound. They may not be gritty like The Head and the Heart, but after you hear one song, you11 be itching for more. As far as style goes, both bands fall under the musical genre known as "Indie," but this does not mean they have similar styles. The Head and the Heart tends to have a prominent acoustic sound incorporated with the perfect touch of piano, violin and drums. The band's classic fingerpicking guitar styles and its utilization of piano and violin, when combined with the vocals, ends up producing a very distinctive style.

Of Monsters and Men tends to be a bit more diverse when it comes to style. The band likes to use the acoustic sound in some songs but often switches to electric guitar with some horns and sound effects sprinkled in. In this battle between two prominent Indie figures, The Head and the Heart emerges victorious. The band's skilled harmonic trio and acoustic sound is a force to be reckoned with. The Head and the Heart may not be as popular as Of Monsters and Men, but it did originate jUst up north in Seattle and is definitely a band to watch. That being said, both bands are worth checking out. Now go fill your debit card, search them on iTunes and press the download button like there is no tomorrow.


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David Roholt Gallery Opens Art exhibition provokes a strong and positive student reaction ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN Ae3E Writer An exhibition of paintings by famous artist David Roholt provoked a strong and positive

reaction from the crowd during the gallery opening Oct. 17. Originally from Salt Lake City, David Roholt's work has catapulted him into worldwide fame. According to his website, http://davidroholt.com, "he has

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOFI'

Jenny Roholt, artist David Roholt and Denise Yochum talk during Roholt's gallery opening in Ingram Hall. Seven of the featured paintings have never been displayed in a gallery.

been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions in Canada, Denmark, England, Germany, Nicaragua, South Korea, and the United States." "The atmosphere is very opinionated," sophomore Katie Wentzel said. "The art is very expressive." Roholt's art consists of bright colors and harsh lines. Some . paintings feature sizzling oranges and reds as the main focal point. Others have sultry, yet calming blues and purples. The subject of his paintings, is not always however, immediately clear. Roholt' s art dwells on a blurred line between appreciating the abstractness of art and embracing the modern use of color and lines. "I like the abstract qualities of his paintings" sophomore Jessica Gunns said. "He uses a lot of color and texture in his art." Other students at the gallery opening appeared to enjoy Roholt' s art as well. "The art is very modern and provokes a lot of communication," sophomore Alexandra Steves said. During the opening, there were many active and spirited

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOFI'

Michael Rubalcava and Nick Mann discuss David Roholt's Caboose Car, which Roholt painted in 2008. The gallery i.s open in Ingram Hall through Nov. 13.

debates all over the room. People zoomed from painting to painting with their views plastered all over their faces. From jubilant smiles to scowls, the communication came from all directions in every form. All in all, Roholt' s gallery wasn't a typical stuffed shirt

event. There was room for discussion, laughter and the art seemed to motivate sincere emotion in its audience. Roholt' s exhibition is available for viewing from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and will run in Ingram Hall's University Gallery until Nov. 13.

3702 South Fife Street Tacoma, WA 98409 Appointments 253.617.7000

Fall Choral Concert

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Performance packs Lagerquist By THOMAS HORN Guest Writer The Pacific Lutheran University choir students demonstrated a wellbalanced sound during the Fall Choral Concert. The concert included the Choir of the West, Chorale and the University Singers and took place Oct. 22-23 in Lagerquist Concert Hall. There was not an empty seat to be found throughout the entire hall. The choirs performed under the • direction of Nathan Frank, ·a visiting music instructor, and Brian Galante, an associate director of choral studies. Frank conducted both the University Singers and Chorale, while Galante conducted the Choir of the West. The Chorale performed first, and ithad five songs that featured multiple soloists. The soloists varied in different dynamic levels, but the rest of the group

accompanied all of them. The audience could hear every little detail in Lagerquist "On the stage, you can't hear the same clarity when you're performing," first-year Elliot Turner, who plays the guitar in the jazz band, said. ''When I'm in the audience, I can hear everything so clearly." All of the soloists had voices that were able to cut through the accompaniment of the group and be heard by the audience. First-year Michael Greer had a solo during the song "MLK," which he said he thought went really well. "My music teacher always says as long as you're happy with your performance, there's nothing to be ashamed of," Greer said. The University Singers, an all-female choir, performed next. The group sang three songs and used percussion instruments, unlike the other groups. Following the University Singers, the Choir of the West, a co-

ed group and top choir at PLU, came on stage to perform. They sang five songs with especially loud bass notes. The last song the group performed featured Paul Tegels, university organist and an associate professor of music, on the organ. The organ added a classical effect to the overall song - it filled the entire hall with sound. All three choirs performed the final song of ·the night, "Beautiful Savior," together. The choirs invited the PLU alumni in the audience to participate as well. As the last note faded away, they received a standing ovation. "It was really astounding. It was great to see how many alumni there was," first-year Kyle Sturmer, a bCl$ singer in Chorale, said. '1 can tell that they still have a passion for music and that's so cool to see." The next choir concert is the Choral Series, Choral Union,. will be Nov.16.

FACIAL AND BROWWAX$37 MIZANI SMOOTHING TREATMENT$34

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THE MOORING MAST

NOtl.2013

A&1Vi

'NIGHT OF MUSICAL THEATRE' Traditional performance of classic numbers is a success ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN A~E Writer There was "No Day But Today'' for audiences to attend Night of Musical Theatre. The cast's phenomenal work took place last Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. Night of Musical Theatre was a collection of musical numbers derived from various popular musicals. Some parts of the,performance that did have a sub-story line really grabbed the attention of the audience. One of the best numbers of the night was undoubtedly the cast's rendition of ''Big Spender" written by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields for the 1966 musical "Sweet Charity." The actresses were dressed in a classical burlesque style. The rendition was just enough to leave you wanting more, but not enough for you to feel as though you've already had it all. The dance was reminiscent of the original "Sweet Charity" version, but it was no generic copy. It was incredibly fun to sing along and watch the performers enjoy themselves on stage. The most intense part of the night had to be during the song "Make Me Happy," which left the audience captivated by a gripping love triangle. A woman, who works as a Spanish tutor, falls in love with

one of her students. They are inevitably caught by the woman's boyfriend. In a fit of passion, the boyfriend confronts the lovers later on in the show with a drawn handgun. During a struggle for the gun, the lover is shot. Even though it was clearly not a real shooting, the acting in addition to the singing was so heartfelt and sincere it was hard for viewers to grasp the fact that they were watching a play rather than an actual scene of life. Every act in the play was performed as though it were the main one, making all of them seem equally important. There were no awkward scene changes or lagging moments. The entire production was well rehearsed and put together. All of the singers were adequately matched in talent and ability to perform. Anyone who hasn't attended a Pacific Lutheran performance should mark their calendars for the next time an act is scheduled. PLU's performers do not disappoint.

PHOTOS BY ALISON HAYWOOD

ABOVE: Junior Amelia Heath poses during "Big Spender." TOP RIGHT: Lutes perform the song, "Masquerade." BOTTOM LEFT: First-year Nanna Laursen sings in "21 Guns." BOTTOM RIGHT: Andre Lavoie plays the drums in the Orchestra.

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Zombie Zumba Costumed Lutes flood Olsen for special event By KELLEN WESTERING Guest Writer Zombies flooded Olson Auditorium Monday as Lutefit presented, "Zombie Zumba." More than 50 students attended,dressed in creative costumes such as a blood dripping axe murderer and Buzz Lightyear. Zombie Zumba encompassed exercising through both Zumba, a

fitness program that incorporates elements from various styles of dance, and the celebration of Halloween. "I had such a great time," junior Bethany Auld said. " I love to share my passion at the same time as creating a healthy environment to exercise while having fun." Auld teaches a Zumba class for Pacific Lutheran students every Monday night. ''When I heard there was

PH<rrO COURTESY OF KEUJ: BRELAND

Lutes gathered in Olsen on Oct. 28 for Zombie Zumba. Costumes, music and fun were in abundance during this special Halloween themed event.

going to be Zombie Zumba, I got really excited," Auld said. "I'm very glad Lutefit put this event on." LuteFit is a PLU organization that promotes exercise. Susan Westering, a member of the Lutefit committee, said LuteFit promotes a climate of wellness in which students, staff and faculty may become more engaged in healthy behaviors. In the spring, LuteFit puts on the Color Run. Zombie Zumba was LuteFit's fall event. Zumba instructors Kristyn Dahl and Mandy Huetten led the charge. The Lutefit committee recruited them to come and put on this event. They have been featured on "livening Magazine" and voted the Best of Western Washington in Fitness Instruction. "PLU was very energetic and a lot of the students really got into it," Dahl said. "It made for a fun atmosphere." The zombies danced for 40 minutes straight. Up-tempo music blasted wall to wall in Olson Auditorium. But there was

40 zombies dancing in unison to Michael Jackson's ''Thriller." The zombies were in full effect and in their natural habitat. "Finishing with the song 'Thriller' was the best possible way to end the night," Westering said. "It fit perfectly, and every student was in character." After the ''Thriller" finale, it was time for the awards. Director of Academic Advising Hal De La Rosby, who was the MC for night, announced the winners of the costume contest. A student who wore a red tutu with blood markings everywhere won the award for scariest costume. A Clark Kent won best costume by wearing a revealing Superman shirt that showed off his abs. 'The costumes were very entertaining .to see," Dahl said. "Watching the students do Zumba in the costumes was priceless." Despite the fun students had dressing up in crazy costumes, Auld said her favorite part was being able to do Zumba with her friends. "Seeing everyone who came to the class engage with the

only one wa.y to end the night.

instructors, shaking and having

The final song consisted of all

a blast was a memory 111 never

PH<rrO COUR:rESY OF KELLl BRELAND

Lutes gather on stage in front of a lighted background of eerily lit trees.

forget," Auld said. Westering said her favorite part was the grand finale. "Seeing everyone dress up in costume was really fun, and then ending with all of us doing ''Thriller'' was great," she said. Auld said she thought the event was fun and worth doing again next year, but would like to see more people attend in the future. "I think that if we advertise for the event more and bigger, then the turnout would've been greater," she said. Once the clock struck 10 the zombies crept their way out of Olson Auditorium into the spooky fog of Parkland.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

NOV. I. 2013

ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES How to protect your identity online By BJORN SLATER Business Editor Although most students have grown up with the Internet, it is still relatively new as far as marketplaces go. However, the Internet is far from primitive. Most people with bank accounts are able to make electronic purchases the problem is doing it without having their identity stolen. Identity theft is a reality for more than 15 million Americans annually according to http:// www.identitytheft.info/victims. aspx, and that doesn't even include the 100 million people whose identities are put at risk each year by lost or stolen information from government and cotp9rate databases. Not all of these cases are online identity theft - the traditional methods of dumpster diving for bank statements and old bills still work for aspiring identity thieves - but for proficient ''hackers" it is a simple task to take advantage of unsuspecting Internet users. There are many things Internet users can do to stay safe while browsing and, especially, shopping online. Here are some tips for guarding against online identity fraud: Consider using a credit card instead of a debit card Many credit cards come with built-in identity theft protection, so if a strange charge appears on someone's credit card statement all that person has to do is call his or her credit card company and the company will investigate the charge. This means people should check their credit card statements

more than once a month when the bill comes, as many companies have varying time limits on how long a charge can be disputed after it is charged to the card. Debit cards offer less security because banks are less diligent about pursuing fraudulent purchases from a personal banking account versus a credit account that uses a credit card company's money to make a purchase. Only trust secure websites One of the best ways to keep identities secure is to stay on websites that have the ''https" prefix and the little padlock in the search bar. When using sites that only have an ''http" prefix, make sure anti-virus software is up to date and stay away from sites with unfamiliar names or sites that instantly open multiple pop-up ads without clicking anything. Don't open links in emails Trustworthy businesses won't send emails asking for additional financial information according to the Better Business Bureau, and even if the email seems legitimate, remember that it could be a scam site posing as a retailer. It is always safer to type in web addresses instead of clicking on links anyway, but fraudulent emails are especially risky. Change passwords regularly Most sites have different requirements for passwords, so Internet users end up with different usernarnes and passwords for each site they visit. Using a mix of numbers

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOFI'

A more traditional method of identity theft is pencil rubbing a credit or debit card.

and upper and lowercase letters, while annoying to remember, makes passwords harder to crack. Keeping track of passwords can be a hassle, but making a secure document with all of the different usernarnes and passwords will help keep them all straight. Avoid using Google Drive a simple Word document saved to the hard drive of a personal computer is plenty secure as long as anti-virus and spyware

software is up to date. Be extra careful shopping on cell phones Using mobile devices to shop is rising in popularity, but the shortened web addresses make it easier to trick consumers to visit harmful sites. Also, using public Wi-Fi hotspots while browsing may speed up connections, but can also make valuable personal information accessible to hackers.

Avoid entering passwords or debit and credit card numbers while using public Wi-Fi. These tips aren't all it takes to stay safe online. Remember to be smart when browsing the web, and a good rule of thumb is to never trust anyone met on the Internet who is a stranger in real life.

Identity thieves are always lurking, but using good judgment and keeping these safe browsing tips in mind can help mitigate the risk of identity theft.

Career expo offers volunteer opportunities work they enjoy and can lead to jobs and internships later on. "It's kind of one big one-stop-shop for a lot of different opportunities," Tracy Pitt, recruiting and outreach manager for Career Connections, said. Students who registered in advance for the career fair received nametags with their majors on them at a checkin table outside of the Chris Knutzen Hall. Students traveled across the hall between the job fair and the volunteer fair, occasionally stopping at the photo booth that offered free professional photos for students to include on their Linkedln accounts. Some students, like firstPHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR year Nicholas Dominichi, Junior Alex Dassofl' fills out an information request form for the Navy at the Fall Internship, Volunteer, & Job Fair Oct. came to the career expo With 23. their class. "Overall, there's really volunteer side since they're &JobFair. By KELSEY HILMES good information, really good so closely connected," Tiffany Ordinarily, the event is Guest Writer all about internship and job Lemmon, assistant director people there, and people get opportunities, but this year, for Community Engagement jobs there," Dominichi said. Volunteering has always Career Connections chose to and Services, said. "You "It gave me a lot of ideas been an option for career combine the career fair and get to know a variety of about what to improve on in growth, but students don't the volunteer fair for the first organizations here in Pierce the future." always recognize it as such. Dominichi isn't the only County." time. More than 60 companies who is using the career student Lemmon said Pacific "We worked to make it and organizations networked an all-encompassing event Lutheran University fair as a chance to practice for with students in the Anderson for students so that they combined the fairs because future job hunts. After three University Center Oct. 23 for can experience both the job volunteering helps students career fairs, senior Dominic the Fall Internship, Volunteer, and internship side and the learn more about the kind of Napat, a student employee

of Career Connections, has noticed positive results. "I've networked with a lot of people, I've gone on some informational interviews, and I've gotten some job offers from the fairs," Napat said. JII noticed I've changed how I conduct myself professionally every year. It's better." The combined fairs resulted in higher student attendance. Pitt said the combined fair is something Career Connections hopes to continue in the future. "Logistically, we11 always be making it better, ironing out any kinks that we find," Pitt said. "But I think students are enjoying being able to find internships and jobs over here and also volunteer positions over there."

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. I 2013

BUSINESS 9

Masdar: City of the future

PHOTO COURTESY OF BLACKLEMAG.COM

By PETER MUELLER Guest Writer When one thinks of a futuristic, sustainable and technologically groundbreaking city, an image of the Jetson' s residence in Orbit City might come to mind. Aside from a suitcase that can change into a hover car and an artificially intelligent companion named Rosie, Mubadala Development Company's Masdar City in Abu Dhabi envelopes all of what the city of the future might look like. In an effort to move the United Arab Emirates' natural resource based economy away from oil production, Masdar City is looking to be the international hub of

renewable energy innovation. In 2006, planning and development on Masdar City began with an initial budget of $22 billion. The five-phase 'plan included corporate headquarters, 1,200 storefronts and residential space for 50,000 people. Now in phase two of the project, Masdar City is composed of 3,000 inhabitants, the Masdar an unmanned Institute, inner city transport system, two corporate buildings and multiple residential housing complexes, Bloomberg reports. in All development Masdar City is designed and built with sustainability and renewable energy in mind. Fosters and Partners, a leading green architecture firm, has created -structures

that maximize organic light, shading and air flow to create a climate 10 degrees cooler than outside the city. All structures within Masdar feature solar panels that generate 30 percent of the city's energy. Alongside the incredible functions of Masdar' s city structures is the design of the buildings, which are nothing short of architectural eye candy. With fractal-like structure with designs accented traditional Middle Eastern patterns, the city is a template for sustainable modem architecture. Masdar City is creating a template for zero emission inner city travel. No personal automobiles are allowed within the city, leaving residents to use an unmanned,

zero emission mass transit program called Personal Rapid Transit (PRT). Designed by 2getthere, a sustainable mobility solutions company, the PRT system features an underground system that transports citizens from station to station in a Mitsubishi i-MiEV automated electric cabin car. In order to maximize and eliminate shading roadways at ground level, the PRT system is completely underground. When the financial crisis of 2008 struck, Masdar City was forced to scrap the expansion of the underground PRT system in order to cut costs and continue ground-level development. In response to the expansion cut, engineers heading transportation in Masdar City are looking to implement an unmanned electric car pilot on ground level in 2015, Scientific American reports. Masdar City has also reached an agreement with Abu Dhabi to expand the neighboring city's mass transit and light rail systems to run through the city. The most groundbreaking part of Masdar City is the Masdar Institute. The institute is a graduate school developed in association with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and it offers eight Masters programs. The student body of the Masdar Institute includes 213 graduate students from 33 different countries. The institute' s facilities include sustainable labs that are conducting some of the world's most innovative and renewable energy nanotechnology research. Masdar City and the Masdar Institute have started

working on a project to create new biofuels for the aviation industry. Nearly 500 acres of coastal land was donated to them by the United Arab Emirates for the project. The project looks to. take carbon dioxide rich saltwater from shrimp and fish farms from the surrounding area and pump it into semi-arid land to grow salt tolerant plants such as salicornia. Once the plants have been harvested, they are then crushed to create biosynthetic kerosene for aviation-grade fuel. 1he project is still in the but experimental stage, past projects by the Masdar Institute using the same technology have yielded promising results. In 2011, the Masdar Institute began a similar project on a smaller scale that created enough biosynthetic kerosene for an Etihad airways cargo plane to fly from Abu Dhabi to Seattle year round. With every piece of arid land needed for conventional agriculture and with only 3 percent of the world's water being fresh water, this project might be revolutionary to the biofuel industry. Developers of Masdar City have set the completion date for 2025. The rapid growth and promising results of the city's innovation have led some corporations, including the electronics and electrical engineering company Siemens, to move their headquarters to Masdar City. Masdar City is aggressive and in sustainability renewable energy projects, treads lightly with zero emissions and could one day be the template for sustainable inner city development and architecture.

Did you know1 Currency in circulation before 1929 measured 3.125 inches by 7.4218 inches. In 1929, the size was changed to its current measurement of 2.61 inches wide by 6. 14 inches long.

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T

THE MOORING MAST

10 OPINION

NOV. I 2013

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 路Paper or plastic: the cost of using cash THE MOORING MAST

By BJORN SLATER

Paci.fie Lutheran University

Business Editor Cash seems to be going out of style, so much so that there is a cost associated with using primarily cash instead of a debit or credit card. A new study by Tufts University called ''lhe Cost of Cash in the United States" reports the cost of using cash for the average American family is, conservatively, $1,739 based on an average family size of about three people for an average cost per person of approximately $580. These costs come in many forms, from check-cashing services and withdrawing from A1Ms that aren't built by the withdrawer's bank to the cost associated with having to drive the extra distance to a bank or a bank's ATM. These fees stack up, costing Americans a total of $43 billion last year alone according to http://www. cnbc.com. There's no denying cash is an important part of the economy. It provides a psychological security for some 路 people because it is accepted everywhere. However, electronic payment methods are taking over. Credit cards, debit cards, online and even phone payments continue to gain market share every year, putting pressure on businesses to accept electronic payments or risk missing out on customers who don't carry cash. These costs to businesses are reflected in higher price tags on goods and services and sometimes a surcharge at the register. The transition to plastic benefits everyone who hops on the bandwagon - there are numerous benefits to having a debit card and an electronic banking account such as e-banking, or online management of the account, which allows people to check their balance at a moment's notice and even pay bills with jUst: a few clicks. Banks make it easy to sign up. At Bank of America there is no fee for signing up for a checking account, although the bank does like to have

12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jessica 'Ih>ndsen ma1Jt@plu..edu

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER Wmston Alder mtUtada@plu.edu NEWS EDITOR Alison Haywood A&EEDITOR Kelli Breland BUSINESS EDITOR Bjorn Slater OPINION EDITOR

Ashley Gill

SPORTS EDITOR Sam Hom PHOTO EDITOR JesseMaJor

Business Editor Bjorn Slater displays his personal forms of payment methods. In bis right hand he holds bis own Ma,jor League Baseball themed debit card, which he favors for everyday use.

an initial deposit of $20-100. If a banker is available, it is possible for someone to be signed up for a checking account with a temporary, but functional, debit card in his or her wallet in less than 30 minutes. Credit cards often have rewards systems that often allow consumers to save on purchases at certain stores and redeem points for cash or gift cards at those stores. These rewards allow people to partially recoup costs and save themselves money in the long-run. Many of the upsides to plastic come in the form of convenience: it takes longer for a cashier to take cash, get the right amount of change and put it in the customer's hand than it does for the customer to swipe a card and hit "yes" twice.

Titls time cost of cash means that cashiers help fewer customers in a given time period, and their opportunity cost of accepting cash goes up for each customer who doesn't use a an electronic payment method. So, when one housemate asks another for a portion of the utility bill, they should consider an electronic transfer. It saves them the time of going to deposit cash or a check, writing a check or withdrawing cash. Time is money, so time saved is money saved. Every penny counts and Saving a penny here and a penny there adds up. Cash will never go away and it's great for paying back those McDonald's debts, but having a debit card for everyday purchases makes

P{ease recycle your copy of

The Mooring Mast

Different faces of body image is where a lot of the

By ALYSSA FOUNTAIN

Columnist

Winnie the Pooh has something in common with the real world. Our friends are all different shapes, sizes and colors. Meanwhile we all want to be a little more this way or a little more that way,

and so we go to our thinking spots, which

danger happens. All around the world, people seek to change their body in various ways, sometimes going to extreme lengths. It's not just the U.S. When I was in Uganda, there were advertisements everywhere for creams to gain bigger butts and hips. Everyone wants to be heavier, leading to the common compliment: "you are so fat." In the U.S. though, we strive to be our smallest. Stuff and fluff is not okay, and we have to hope our stitching doesn't pop.

people to skip meals or make themselves throw up to lose weight. We fear the things that people say behind our backs. What is even worse is that sometimes people do say horrible things. "She was so fat, it was like, eww" is something I heard the other day. Women often tum to the extremes offered on the 1V: diet supplements, lipo suction and a world of hunger and pain. As I said, body image issues are worldwide issues. It affects men as well as women. Men are

Men are teased about having a "doughy stomach" or about not having enough muscle. Men tend to be so self-conscious about this that they work out to extreme lengths. body Negative image is not only something that leads to crazy diets, though. It is something that also affects us every day. We think about it when we get dressed, we think about it when we see our reflection in the mirror, and we think about it when someone wants to take a picture. It infiltrates everything and can

Pacific Lutheran University does a lot to combat negative body image. We have Love Your Body Day, put on by the Body Love club. We also have the Women's Center - which promotes health for women and men. But I wonder if it is enough. We all come in different shapes and sizes and colors. Personally, I am "short, fat, and proud of that'' to quote Winnie the Pooh. I am proudly made of stuff and fluff. Let's all accept each other for where we are, and not look

We desire to lose

pressured to be larger

lead to poor reactions

down on anyone else

as much weight as possible, leading some

than women with sculpted muscle.

and major dips in selfesteem.

or on ourselves.

COPY EDITOR Reland Tuomi SENIOR COPY EDITOR Kels Mejlaender ONLINE EDITOR Leah'lraxel

MAST TV GENERAL MANAGER Storm Gerlock MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Evan Heringer NEWS @NINE PRODUCER Allison Reynolds ADVISERS Cliff Rowe Art Land P OLICIES AND PROCEDURES

The respoDBihilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5'p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. SubscripiioDB cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. Tu subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. I 2013

OPOOONll

MUSICAL 'KISS ME, KATE' SPARKS DEBATE By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

The theatre department decided on, worked on and performed "Kiss Me, Kate" within four months. There were some students in the musical who had never sung before, and three months of training later, they were on a stage in front of hundreds of people, singing. That alone made the musical a success. The musical was part of the grand opening for the Karen Hille Phillipi; Center for the Performing Arts. The gala held for the opening brought many patrons and filled the theater with 580 people for opening night. After that, the musical did not have a single show with less than 270 in attendance. The director, Jeff Oapp, said he wanted to create a colorful, energetic spectacle

to grab attention, and he did just that. Anything big enough to get attention creates a ripple effect. A week after the 1949 Tony Award winning musical hit Pacific Lutheran University, it became clear that some studen&e- were not happy about the gender stigmas and stereotypes portrayed in the musical. In response, Amanda Sweger, the set director, put together a panel of PLU faculty and actors from the musical to discuss gender dynamics in the play. During the discussion there was a quick shift from focusing on gender dynamics to a debate about the play' s validity. A group of about 20 students gathered in the Scandinavian Cultural Center and wanted to know why the play was chosen and accused it of not being representative of PLU as a population. The -backlash from "Kiss Me, Kate" took place Oct. 21 when students doubted their

voices were being heard. There were three main issues these students had with the musical: it had domestic violence against women, it was 'outdated' and for an older crowd and it lacked a talk-back or any form of educational element other than the paneL which was put together after the fact. The mentality of the panel session was set by the students in the audience. The mentality was to point fingers and blame the theatre department, something I think to be completely unfair and unjust. After the paneL I sat down with Jeff Oapp, artistic director of theatre and discussed his reaction to the panel. Clapp said he did not understand why the panel discussion shifted into attack mode. Clapp said the play was meant to be fun and energetic. The play was realistic in the idea that Frank and Lilly, two lovers in the play, were in love but also fought, just

like couples do today. The musical was meant for everyone to enjoy and appreciate. Clapp, though he was not invited to the paneL said he thought the discussion should have stayed on the gender dynamics. As far as PLU should be concerned, "Kiss Me, Kate" was a success by any measure. We have a great group of faculty who went through 30 scripts before landing on "Kiss Me, Kate," sure they had picked a good play for the opening of our new center. The musical brought attention and music to campus. If we cannot enjoy a play from 70 years ago because it is 'outdated' then we might as well throw away the last 2,000 years of theater, disregarding all the great work that has been done. If we are so progressive that we cannot look back, then we have failed.

Anything big enough to get attention creates a ripple effect.

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B.

Establish boundaries By TAHLIA TERHUNE - Guest Columnist

"Don't talk down to me." "It's your tum to pay." Acknowledging personal boundaries helps contribute to a healthy relationship. If you feel comfortable speaking your mind, this could be because you have established your boundaries and know where to draw the line in your relationships. Having attended the relationship workshop Oct. 25, I can now say I have a better idea of what unhealthy or healthy relationships look like. Our generation has failed at striving for healthy relationships, and I think a large part of that is due to what we tolerate. At the workshop, we spent a lot of time discussing boundaries and what ours were. When I think of the word 'boundaries,' I typically lean toward physical boundaries, because we already have a few generalized social norms to go by. Never have I actually spent time thinlcing about what my emotional boundaries were, let alone what my economic boundaries are. In a romantic relationship, you may need to establish boundaries in all of these regards. Physical abuse is easy to identify, but mental and emotional abuse can easily be forgotten. In a romantic relationship, you usually have someone who wears the pants. 'Ibey are more of a leader in the relationship, and this is perfed:ly natural. However, if the leadership begins to tum into a dictatorship, this should be a red flag. A controlling man or woman in a relationship needs to be spoken to about boundaries. If you don't like being talked down to constantly, make that known. Feeling comfortable empowers you to express your thoughts more easily. It's not solely explicit to romantic relationships. It may come in handy when a friend has insisted they'll pay you back for dinner for the fifth time now. If your boundary and personal values say, Mf won't let a friend take money without paying me back," you11 find yourself with an advantage to let them know that's what you expect. H you haven't acknowledged this as something you value, you may allow the friend to continue this behavior. In turn, the situation could make you uncomfortable, but you might not necessarily know how to go about it. This may lead to unhealthy relationships that have unidentified boundaries. Identifying your boundaries ahead of time gives you more opportunity to establish them early on in the relationship. I think we should hold ~ach other accountable for finding our boundaries and implementing them. . Knowing your boundaries will give you more confidence and allow you to be more comfortable in relationships with your peers, romantic partners, friends, parents and everything inbetween. Do not tolerate anything that isn't up to your standards.

Corrections Oct. 18 Issue In the page 2 article "Clarifying the contingent faculty situation,." members of the national NLRB board agreed to hear the appea1,. not the regional director.

1' er~- are so e big c mpnnies tli~ t eapital ze on the 路01 r lhtlions of' the t nn' cat'

The names of Brendan Stanton and Andrew Tinker were reversed in the photo caption on the page 3 artide "Debate team edges out rivals at national tournament."


THE MOORING MAST

12 STUDY BREAK

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parl<er November 3, 2013

ACROSS 1 It may be seen over a bowl 6 Has wings? 10 Special police team 14 Diving duck 15 Promenade for Plato 16 Botanical branch point 17 A wit's attribute 20 Seasoned

52

53 56 57

59

61 65 68

sausage

21 Tropical trees

22 Religious splinter group 24 Shirt part 25 Wedding announcement word 26 Luftwaffe battlers

69

71 On the calm side, at sea 72 Utopia 73 Old-fashioned exclamations ·

(abbr.)

47 50

13 18 19 23

26 27

28

31

33

35 37 38

39

DOWN

1 They're made daily 2 Old Pisa dough

41

42 Blarney ern building Stone land material 43 Pants measure Using few words 48 Slog Like Miss 49 Tried out Congeniality 51 Found comSouthwestmon ground ern tOlJt1l guy 53 Onthe Copy Pacific editor's find 54 Barinthe Some black water 55 "_porsheep TISSU0 ridgehot ..." softener 58 SwashbuckWeatherler's weapon man's word, 60 Terrier named fora sometimes Matched Scottish isle collections 62 Wifeof Mr. Dithers "Let us know if you're 63 Wrinkle, as coming" one's brow 64 Keeps comletters pany with Belt-maker's · tool 66 Atomic number of Slept like_ Handover hydrogen 67 Perfect Ex-leader of rating in Russia gymnastics Dome cc:Ner?

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SPORTS TALK What's your favorite sport to play and why?

Travis McCarthy, junior "Football, because it's a contact sport."

Joey Domek, first-year

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"Football, because I get to hit people and not get in trouble for it."

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DENVER BRONCOS FALL TO INDIANAPOLIS COLTS OCT. 20 How many assists will setter Samantha North get against Whitworth this Saturday?

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top of the board with a record of 3-2. Totaro is · not far behind at 2-3. Andre Tacuyan and Dalton Sports Editor Ritchey join Totaro with the same record. Things could get hairy this week if someone Six points was all that seperated the Denver correctly guesses how many assists junior Broncos from the Indianapolis Colts. The Colts Samantha North will get against Whitworth proved the NFL analysts wrong. Let me restate this Saturday. that. Only one person can win. Andrew Luck Colts' quarterback North has been on a tear this season, singlehandedly proved the skeptics wrong. averaging more than 10 assists per set. The second-year phenom passed for 228 yards, Volleyball can be a difficult sport to predict complimented with three touchdowns. because there's no time frame, meilning that the He absolutely shredded the Broncos' weak two teams can play anywhere from three to five secondary. He read them like a book and sets. Peyton Manning of the Broncos didn't have an There's no way to guess how many sets answer, as Denver lost 39-33. Whitworth and Pacific Lutheran University The result of this game definitely shook up will play this ·weekend, but one thing is for the Fall Sports Pick 'Em standings. sure: North will tally an obscene amount of Only two contestants, Drew Oord and Max assists. Totaro, correctly guessed that the Colts would Last weekend against Willamette, North pull the upset. recorded 65 assists. That's not a typo. She's just With that pick, Oord comfortably sits at the that good.

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV.1 2013

SAM SAYS... Fans are being robbed by the NFL people are ready to submit and pay nearly every penny out of their pockets to produce .fancy stadiums, the short answer is no. '1t would depend on how much Professional sports teams have asked [tax] money goes towards the stadium," too much of taxpayers in the past 90 years. sophomore Sam Geisslinger said. "Why Since 19'23, 186 professional sports . should everyone chip in if not everyone stadiums have been built in America. This watches the NFL?'' process has cost about $53 billion, and Of all the sports stadiums, the NFL has taxpayers have accounted for nearly 61 received the largest taxpayer contribution percent of the costs. at 68 percent. Considering many people go through The Minnesota Vikings have been at the their lives having a difficult time paying for forefront of this heated topic for the past groceries, gas and house payments, this is year. too much to ask. Zygi Wilf, the owner of the Vikings, told Millions of people do not make millions Minnesotans if they didn't fund $1 billion of dollars and cannot afford life's many for a new stadium, he would relocate the luxuries like an exotic vacation to the team. Wilf, although he is loved by many Bahamas or the newest Lamborghini Minnesotans, is a con. model. He is a liar. 1be American median household A New Jersey court ruled that the Wilf income is just above $50,000 as of 2011. clan defrauded many business partners out 1hat figure is well below $1 million. of millions of dollars. 1be many who fall under this category Now, he has to pay $84.5 million to his of •average American citiz.ens" enjoy many former partners. Wilf has been ordered to ~in life even though they may not be pay 60 percent of the damages. After this able to afford iL lawsuit, Wilf is running dangerously low One of those loves is the NFL. on funds. 1be statistics can prove that fact - 64 How can Wilf possibly afford to produce pen:ent of Americans watch the NFL each a $1 billion stadium? week,. according to ''By the Numbers," a Well, by deception of course. show that airs on ESPN. Wilf received a subsidy package from Ewn though Americans probably love lawmakers for about $500 million, $348 f!'l1ft'J aspect of the brutally physical sport, million from the state and $150 million I bet they're not ready for this: the NFL from Minneapolis. Surprisingly enough, wants evm more money to build newer Wilf gave the Vikings a $50 million grant to and better stadiums. help finance their stadium. H the NFL wonders whether or not

By SAM HORN Sports Editor

All of this happened while more than half of Minneapolis schools were struggling with budget cuts. Wilf really couldn't have found a worse time to ask Minnesotans to cough up some money. While the NFL rakes in millions of dollars every year in revenue, stadiums actually have a negative impact on local economies. City residents' income actually decreases after the construction of a new sports stadium. The Wall Street Journal reported in 2011 that 16 percent of the annual budget in Hamilton County, Ohio, is still going toward the Cincinnati Bengals' stadium 10 years after it was built. Either the people of Hamilton County are obsessed with football, or the NFL kings are forcing these poor residents into giving up more money than they want to. . As if the stadium issue isn't worrisome enough, NFL ticket prices are shooting through the stratosphere. The Chicago Bears lead the league in one category: ticket prices. The average price of a Bears' ticket is a whopping $446. I could think of five things off the top of my head that I would rather spend $446 on. Few fans actually have enough money to afford this. NFL teams need to stop worrying about what their stadiums look like. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers might have a gargantuan cannon that fires off each time the Bucs score, but it doesn't appear to have made an impact on the Buccaneers'

football skills, as they stand at 0-7 this season. The front offices of each NFL team need to concentrate on howtltey will make their team better the following year, not what their stadium will look like. It's not what you look like, it's how you act. The Buccaneers are robbing their fans of a promising season. When it comes down to wins and losses, no one cares about the the aesthetically-pleasing cannon. The Bucs fall short, just like the Vikings, who have a 1-6 record in 2013. Fans pay good money to watch their teams play. Even if they can't afford a Lamborghini or a trip to the Bahamas, they still have the opportunity to watch their favorite NFL team battle it out each week during the fall. Dear NFL, please stop focusing on remodeling your stadiums and worry instead about next year's draft. After all, most NFL owners think the Vince Lombardi Trophy is more important than a $1 billion stadium.

Some information gathered from Sean Conboy's article, "The NFL is Running a Billion-Dollar Con" from the Pittsburgh Magazine.

Pacific Lutheran University welcomes soldier onto men's soccer team By GIANCARLO SANTORO Guest Writer After serving in the United States Army for more than eight years, first-year Jeremy Dornbusch has had to contend wilh a different kind of battle in his first year at Pacific Lutheran Unm!rsity. Upon aniving on campus back in August. it would be hard to blame anyone for mistaking Dombusdi as a new coach. Born in Trtusville, Fla. on July· 24, 1983, Dornbusch is more than 12 years older than some of the incoming first-years. Despite his age, the reality is that Dornbusch came to PLU to play soccer and get an education, just Jilce the rest of the returning and incoming players. "I came here for the soccer program and the academic notoriety that PLU has with the education you receive," Dornbusch said. "I know a prior alumnus, Andrew Hyres, who played soccer here, and he spoke

with me many times about PLU, and I decided it would be a good fit for me." Coming into training camp, Dornbush was set to take the vacant starting role up front and start banging in the goals, but after falling awkwardly on his right knee during the first week of camp, he received the worst news an athlete can get an ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) tear. ''Tearing my ACL upon arriving was devastatirig and definitely one of the hardest things that has happened in my soccer career," Dornbusch said. "Having left the Army life that I've known for eight years to continue my dream of playing soccer full time, you never think about those injuries happening to you." Dornbusch' s fellow teammate and goalkeeper, . senior Joe Rayburn, echoed the sentiment, saying it was disappointing knowing he would never get the chance to play with Dornbusch. '1 was frustrated in general," Rayburn said. "Not at Jeremy

[Dornbusch] of course, but at the situation, because I felt like he didn't deserve it considetjri~ how hard he works." A year after receiving the silver medal at the 2012 Military World Cup in Azerbaijan, Dornbusch originally came into PLU with the goal to win the Northwest Conference and continue on to take a shot at winning the Division ill National Tournament. With his season over, however, Dornbusch has had to change his mentality and has become a part of the coaching staff during his recovery. "I came in with a leadership mentality to use my experiences that I've been through in life, the Army and soccer, to lead," Dornbusch said, who played with professional and semiprofessional caliber players during his time with the AllArmy soccer team. "I see myself as being a mentor to players on the team, and I feel being able to coach has made an impact in a positive way." Like the rest of the team, PLU men's soccer head coach

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John Yorke, agreed that losing Dornbusch to injury was hard to swallow. On the other hand, he said he has been happy with Dornbusch's involvement this season. ''Jeremy [Dornbusch] is a guy that if he wasn't injured he would definitely be helping us on the field, and [he] has been very involved in our success this year," Yorke said. Since being sidelined, Dornbusch has been working hard to rebuild mobility in his knee. Five days after surgery, he was already bending his knee at

a 90-degree ·angle, a goal for any person following ACL surgery. Until he can be back on the field, Dornbusch will spend his time in the classroom where he is majoring in kinesiology and minoring in athletic training. Although the transition from £Wtting in Iuq and Afghanistan to studying chemistry and exercise science in Parkland, Wash. has been strange, Dornbusch said he has adjusted well. "It's a little different returning to the classroom setting and being on a college campus again," Dornbusch said, who spent a year at Truett-McConnell College in Oeveland, Ga. after graduating high school. "Sometimes I feel out of place, · but then I realize that it's no different being around college students because it's what I worked with everyday in the military." . If things go according to plan with soccer and academics, Dornbusch said he hopes to be coach one day and open his own Crossfit gym.

Nick's Picks: Fantasy players to watch this week By NICK BARENE Sports Writer

QUARTERBACK- Andy, Dalton (CinneiJlati Bengals)

WIDE RECEIVER~ Marvin Jones (CinnciilatfBengals)

KICKER- Adam Vinatieri

(Indianapolis Colts) TIGHT END- Zach Miller(Seattle Seahawks) . . ....

.

.

' DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEA.Ms; Baltimore Ravens


路THE MOORING MAST

NOV. l, 2013

SPORTS 1.5

Lutes battle back to beat the Bearcats AFTER DROPPING FIRST TWO SETS, LUTES VOLLEYBALL ~TRIKES BACK TO WIN IN FIVE SETS By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer When the Lutes' volleyball team hosted the Willamette Bearcats Saturday night, the players knew they had two jobs to do. They had a volleyball match to win, and they also needed to decorate Olson Auditorium with pink as part of their Breast Cancer Awareness Night. The decorating was easy. They had to work a bit harder for the win though. It took five sets for the Lutes to pull away with the victory. After falling behind by losing the first two sets, the Lutes headed back into the locker room in an unfamiliar position. For the first time in Northwest Conference play this season, they were down 2-0 during their intermission. Their backs were up against the wall, and they were looking for answers. 'The first two games we didn't play as ourselves, we

didn't play our game," outside hitter Chelsea Nelson, a junior, said. "One of the great things about our team is .t hat the whole bench stays involved in the game, so whenever anybody is called upon to help the team, they are always ready." The Lutes did indeed go to their bench for help, and Nelson was ready. Nelson brought energy off the bench and finished with 10 kills as she helped turn around the match. Her play was key in propelling the Lutes to quick wins in the third and fourth sets, and a close win in the fifth and final set. The win was the 19th consecutive win for Pacific Lutheran University over Willamette. The Lutes attack was very balanced on the night, with 5 players tallying double-digit kills. Sophomore Lucy Capron led the team with 15 kills, while senior Allison Wood, junior Amy Wooten, senior Bethany Huston and Nelson all notched 10 or more kills as well. Their offensive prowess on the night was only made possible by the excellent defense of the PLU libero Amber Aguiar, a junior, who finished with 29 digs.

Setter Samantha North, a junior, ended up with 65 assists. The 16th ranked Lutes return to action tonight when they host the Whitman Missionaries at 7 p.m. PLU will then face the Whitworth Pirates Saturday in a match that will also be celebrated as senior night.

"One of the great things about our team is that the whole bench stays involved in the game." Chelsea Nelson junior, outside hitter

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

ABOVE: Setter Samantha North, a junior, intently eyes the volleyball as she sets it for outside hitter Amy Wooten, a junior. North wears a pink headband in an effort to support Breast Cancer Awareness. UPPER RIGHT: Sophomore Lucy Capron shouts with enthusiasm as the Lutes win the fourth set. With the game tied 2-2, the Lutes would go on to win the fifth set. BOTTOM LEFT: Libero Amber Aguiar, a junior, digs the ball so the Lutes could capitalize and score a point. Aguiar has been averaging 6.33 digs per set this season. BOTTOM RIGHT: Senior Haley Urdahl lunges to her right to dig the volleyball. Urdhal finished the game with five digs.

Tuiasosopo earning accolades and respect All-American defensive lineman concerned with being a leader, not worrying about the statistics By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The stadium lights struggled to penetrate the thick fog that covered the practice field. The air was frigid. I reached out and shook a massive gloved hand. "Hey, man, nice tp. meet you," senior Mychael "Tui" Tuiasosopo said, grinning. The fourth-year defensive lineman may seem like an imposing figure - he is roughly 6 feet tall and weighs a sturdy 295 pounds - but I was struck first by his friendly demeanor rather than his stature. "He's a good friend to everyone. He's always there to help others," sophomore Cody Tupen, a defense tackle, said. Tupen is among those Tuiasosopo has mentored as a member of the defensive line corps. "All my skills are better. He's

taught me all the little things,"

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our coaches talk about - being a good football player and an even better person." David LaSalata coaches the defensive line and spoke to Tuiasosopo' s cheerfulnesss. "He's one of those guys that's going to be a lifelong friend of the people that he's met here," LaSalata said. "He cares a lot about the team. That's what makes him the great football player that he is." Tuiasosopo is no stranger to greatness. He was selected as a secondteam All-American, a first-team All-Regional player and a firstteam All-Northwest Conference player in 2012. During that successful season, he tallied 46 tackles with 10 for loss, as well as an interception and two forced fumbles. In his second year as both a captain and starter at Pacific Lutheran University, Tuiasosopo has helped the 17th ranked Lutes to a 6-1 overall record thus far in the season.

The big man isn't worried about his stats, though. ''In my freshman and sophomore years, I had some personal goals, for tackles and sacks, but not anymore," Tuiasosopo said. "Defense is about doing your job and helping others. Making tackles and sacks helps the team, and helping the team is my goal." Tuiasosopo' s selfless nature is reminiscent of the style of football Frosty Westering. the legendary PLU football coach, preached. "I remember the first time he [Westering] talked to us," Tuiasosopo said. "He spoke about bringing the best out of each other and out of ourselves. He is the foundation of this program." The fact that Tuiasosopo cares more about the team than he does his own stats is exactly the kind of mindset Westering coached. "We're chasing perfection each week," Tuiasosopo said. "We don't think about playing the opponent. We play against our best selves. We wanl lo be the best

TUIASOSOPO

team we can be every week." Tuiasosopo's name carries a little extra weight. Anyone who is a sports fan in the state of Washington will recognize the Tuiasosopo family name. His uncle, Manu Tuiasosopo, played football at UCLA and in the NFL for the Seattle Seahawks and the San Francisco 49ers. Manu Tuiasosopo started at nose tackle and won Super Bowl XIX with the 49ers. Mychael Tuiasosopo's cousin, Marcus Tuiasosopo, played at the University of Washington anc;l in the NFL for the Oakland Raiders

and New York Jets. His brother, Trenton Tuiasosopo, also play~ football at the UW. Matt Tuiasosopo, .one of Mychael Tuiasosopo's cousins, was drafted by the Seattle Mariners and now plays for the Detroit Tigers in MLB. Another cousin, Leslie Tuiasosopo, played volleyball at the UW and for the U.S. Olympic team. However, Mychael Tuiasosopo said he doesn't feel any pressure to live up to his family name. 'Those guys performed at the highest level and gave their best. The only pressure I feel is to give my best," Tuiasosopo said. Giving his best is what has earned Tuiasosopo the respect of his friends, teammates and coaches. Whether on the football field, or just around campus, he11 be there with a smile and a helping hand.

.-


16路SPORTS

TIIE路MOORING MAST

NOV.12013

Leading by exaillple: The tale of a servant warrior By SAM HORN Sports Editor The year was 2009. The rainy October night sky pelted the Warriors as they waged a battle for conference supremacy against Franklin Pierce High School on the rain-soaked football field. One Warrior lay alone in the rain Bobby Daly. The high school senior and linebacker had just suffered a tibia and fibia fracture while playing for Gover Park High School in a midseason game. He couldn't feel his leg, let alone move it. As the medics carted him off the field in a stretcher in front of many concerned fans, Daly said he wondered if he "would be able to recover after the injury and actually play in college." Daly had served as a critical ingredient to the Warriors' defense in his three years of playing on the varsity squad. As a senior in high school, Daly won the Ironman Award. Daly received the award for not missing a single practice in the offseason or regular season during his four-year high school football career. A tibia and fibia fracture is not a minor injury. Daly had to wear a leg cast that covered everything up to his hip for three months following the fracture. Daly couldn't physically drive, so he would sit across the back seat while his parents drove him to school during his rehabilitation period. He wasn't cleared to participate in any type of athletic activity until May 2010. "It became a burden to be around friends," Daly said. "I kind of got secluded into my own world, because I would be in my room a lot. I fell prey to the 'poor me' syndrome after a while, and it was tough, because I didn't want to be like that. I was mentally weak." Daly's horrific injury might have stolen

his senior year of wrestling and track, but it didn't take away the fact that he had been accepted into Pacific Lutheran University in2010. "I wanted to prove that the coaches didn't waste a recruifu\g trip or roster spot on me as an individual and as a member of the family outside of football," Daly said. "I wanted to show them theY made the right choice." Daly certainly proved he was worth the recruiting visit to PLU defensive coordinator Craig McCord, but not without several roadblocks along the way. "Bobby [Daly] has been everything we've asked for," McCord said. "He is helping coach younger guys, and he's playing through the guys that are starting ahead of him ... his perseverance and his never-say-die attitude has been great." College not only came with homework and smelly dorm rooms, but it also brought new challenges with injuries. During his sophomore year at PLU, Daly pulled his hamstring twice - once during the offseason summer workouts and again during the early part of the fall. His junior year was only worse injurywise. On the second day of fall practice, Daly took on the leading fullback, but he felt something crunch in his shoulder as he made contact. "It [my shoulder] tingled and stung, but I didn't think it was a huge deal," Daly said. What Daly had thought was an insignificant injury swelled into a slightly separated Acromioclavicular joint in his right shoulder. The injury prevented Daly from participating in any football-related activities for nearly seven weeks. Daly didn't suit up until the sixth game in 2012, when the Lutes won against Willamette 41-27. In his final year as a Lute, Daly has recovered from his prior injuries and is now a contributor on special teams. He

-could have given up at any point in the past three years, but he chose not to. "I admire him and look up to him a lot because he's stuck with it [football] and has not given up," senior Jordan Patterson, a linebacker, said. "When I think of a true servant warrior, Bobby is one of the first guys to come to mind." Patterson was Daly's roommate when they were first-years. Daly decided to stick with the Lute football program for one sole reason: relationships. Daly is great friends with Patterson and many other teammates and said he wants to keep these fruitful relationships for as long as he possibly can. "It doesn't matter what you do on and off the field," Daly said. "It's who you are, and in the end, relationships are the only thing that you have left after graduating." Daly has accepted his role on the defense, even though he is not a starter.

Daly's goal is to be a role model on the team. He said he is done thinking about why he isn't starting. "I want to be a leader and let the field take care of itself," Daly Said. When Daly is on the field, he brings a certain level of excitement, Patterson said. "When he got some playing time [on defense] at the end of the Lewis & Oark game this past year, my eyes were fixed on him, and I cheered him on," Patterson said. "Our team knows that he works hard. He deserves to be out there." Rewind back to when Daly injured his leg as a senior in high school. He thought he would never come back to play the sport he so desperately loved. Would Daly agree with that notion now? "Not a chance."

PHOTO BY SAM HORN

Four Lute football players surround senior Bobby Daly, who is decked out in the number 52. Daly's teammates have persuaded him to stick with football, even in dire circumstances. They have stood by him every step of the way. From left to right: seniors Dalton Darmody, Jordan Patterson, Bobby Daly, Ben Kaestner and Mychael 1\riasosopo.

PLU DEFENSE STIFLES WILLAMETTE'S TOP-RANKED OFFENSE IN 35-24 WIN By TYLER SCOTT Director of Athletics Communications Quarterback Dalton Ritchey accounted for four touchdowns and the Pacific Lutheran defense intercepted five passes as the 17th-ranked Lute football team knocked off No. 21, Willamette, 35-24 Saturday afternoon at McCulloch Stadium. Pacific Lutheran improves to 6-1 overall and 3-1 in Northwest Conference play with the win. while Willamette takes its first loss of the season to fall to 5-1 overall and 2-1 in theNWC. Ritchey, a junior, set career highs in rush attempts and yards, carrying the ball 22 times for 158 yards and three touchdowns. The PLU quarterback also threw for 196 yards and one score to total 354 yards. Junior Niko Madison added 73 yards and a touchdown on the ground to go with 41 receiving yards and another score, and junior Kyle Warner caught five passes for a game-high 108 yards. But even with Ritchey's stellar play, the PLU defense was the story of the game as the Lutes forced six Willamette turnovers and held the highest-rated offense in the Northwest Conference to nearly 200 yards below its season average. Willamette quarterback Josh Dean nearly tripled his season interception total, as the Lutes picked him off five times after he came into the game with three interceptions all year. Five different Lutes intercepted passes in

Later in the period, Darmody's the game. Junior Greg Hibbard, senior Ben Kaestner, senior Sean McFadden, junior interception set the stage for PLU's longest Connor Cummings and senior Dalton drive of the game. The Lute offense took Darmody all snagged passes intended for over at the PLU 29 and moved down the Willamette receivers. field in 10 plays spanning 6:03 on the clock. When the Bearcat defense forced PLU Junior Joel Anthony finished with a game-high 11 tackles and three of the into a seemingly-impossible fourth and Lutes' four sacks. Senior Jordan Patterson .17 at the WU 24-yard line, Ritchey rolled right and tossed a 24-yard scoring pass to totaled 10 tackles and two tackles for-loss. The PLU offense opened its first drive Madison in the end zone to make it 21-7. Another big defensive stand helped with a 33-yard gain on a pass from Ritchey to Warner, but that drive fizzled out the Lutes score another touchdown going with a fourth-down incompletion at the into halftime. PLU forced a fourth and 1 incompletion by Dean at the PLU 48, Willamette 36. Kaestner claimed the first interception and Ritchey picked up his third rushing of the game for PLU three plays later, touchdown of the game from 1 yard out as giving Ritchey and the offense a short field time ran out in the half. Midway through the third quarter the beginning at that same Willamette 36 spot. Seven plays later, Ritchey ran it in from 2 Bearcats found their way back onto the yards out to give the visitors the early lead. scoreboard, advancing all the way to firstWillamette tied it up on the following and-goal from the PLU 5-yard line before drive, moving 65 yards on eight plays to the Lute defense tightened up and forced a score on a Dean pass to Derek Traeger from 22-yard field goal to make it 28-10. That was the score going into the final 9yardsout. Dean finished the game with 279 passing quarter of play. yards on 47 attempts, while Traeger caught Willamette made it a two-possession 11 passes for 81 yards and De'Zhon Grace game early in the fourth when Dean capped a 10-play drive with a 3-yard scoring pa8s added nine receptions for 104 yards. The Lutes reclaimed the lead during to Austin Jones to pull the hosts within 28their first drive of the second quarter. 17. But the Lutes responded with a fourHibbard grabbed his interception late in the first quarter, returning it 31 yards to the play 76-yard touchdown drive on their Willamette 28. next possession. Ritchey rushed left for 15 Once again, PLU took advantage of yards on the first play and then broke up the short field as Ritchey's 7-yard TD run the middle for 50 yards on the next play. Madison finished it off with a 6-yard capped a six-play drive.

touchdown run to stretch the lead back to 35-17. That was short-lived, however, as Tyson Giza returned senior Nick Kaylor's kickoff 74 yards fOI. a score to make it 35-24 with 10:07 left to play. While Willamette might have thought it had claimed momentum at that point, the PLU offense switched to clockburning mode and the Bearcats' final two possessions ended in interceptions by McFadden and Cummings to clinch the win for the Lutes. Pacific Lutheran out-gained Willamette 448-to-336 in the win. including a 252-to-57 advantage on the ground. The Lutes struggled to hold onto the ball as well in the game, fumbling six times, but PLU was able to recover all but two of those fumbles. One of the strangest - and likely key plays of the game came midway through the third quarter when Willamette blocked a PLU punt and recovered the ball for what seemed to be a touchdown. However, the Bearcat defender lost the ball before he crossed the goal line, and when the ball went out the back of the end zone, officials ruled it a touchback and awarded PLU the ball at the Willamette 20yard line. . The Lutes return home next weekend for their final home game of the year, hosting cross-town rival Puget Sound University for a 12:30 p.m. kickoff.

PHOTOS COUIITESY OF NAOMI SI'UKEY

LEFT: Safety Greg Hibbard (9), a junior, attempts to tackle Willamette running back Dylan Jones but gets stiff-armed. Hibbard finished the hard-fought game with six tackles. Hibbard is second on the team with two interceptions on the season. RIGHT: Linebacker Jordan Patterson (48), a senior, lunges towards speedy Willamette wide receiver De'Zhon Gnu:e. James SwiD,yard (18), a sophomore, looks on. Patterson is leading the Lutes in tackles this season with 54. He has tallied a te&n:1-leading 8.0 tackles for loss and even has one interception on the season.

;


SPORTS Lutes chop down Loggers with a score of 41-21

AdE One-woman play brings new perspective to Holocaust

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE NOV. 8, 2013

OORING

AST VOLUME 90 ISSUE 7

mastmedia.plu.edu

UnPLUg ends in candlelight set at NPCC

Finders, Keepers: Who owns Egyptian

treasure? By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor

PHOTOS BY EMILY JACKA

TOP: Senior Dylan Bakka plays harmonica with The House Cats 'st the unPLUg winner announcement at Northern Pacific Coffee Company Wednesday. During the month of unPLUG, Hazstad used less electricity than any other hall on campus. Junior Meg Dolde, the organizer for the event, used music to include both PLU students and the community. Dolde said she would like to see more music based events from the sustainability department and said she hopes the energy saving decisions students used <luring unPLUg become permanent habits. BOTTOM LEFT: Senior Jenny 'I&ylor and Sophomore Maya Perez listen to The House Cats at the unPLUg winner announcement. BOTTOM RIGHT: Organizers used tea lights instead of electricity to light the seating area at the open-mic night at NPCC.

WHAT'SINSI Arts & EnterbLinmei垄

Voices muted by no-!wearing policy on LASR路 page6

Sports

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Early time $lot is IJ,Ot an excuse to s'/Cip clad page JO

Donald Ryan's lecture on who owns Egyptian artifacts began and ended as the faculty fellow had intended: with questions. The question of the hour during Ryan's Family Weekend lecture Saturday was: what do we do with Egypt's treasures? "I look at Egyptology as a great liberal arts subject," the PLU graduate of 1979 said. "More questions than answers." The answer to Saturday's question required a bit of a lesson in Egyptian history from more than 4,000 years ago, when ancient Egyptians built massive monuments and temples to commemorate their rulers and the wealthy. Fast forward to Alexander the Great' s invasion of Egypt in 400 B.C.E., arid the first foreign acquisitions of Egyptian antiquities. . Several other civilizations followed suit, but the Arab invasion in the 7th century turned Egypt into how people perceive it today - primarily Muslim and Arab-speaking. It wasn't until the mid-1800s that the Egyptian government began regulating who could take what from the country. Until that point, an unofficial "finders, keepers" policy had been in place. Today, the opposite rule applies: anything found in Egypt must stay in Egypt. This rule applied when Ryan and

TREASURE CONT. PAGE3

PLU to celebrate Veterans Day with special ceremony ByKJERSTI ANDREASSEN News Writer A change in time for this year's Veterans Day Ceremony will allow more students to attend this Monday. The ceremony will begin during chapel break, 10:30 a.m., in Lagerquist Concert Hall. "This is a time period when any of the students or faculty who want can come," Kathy Engle, senior administrative assistant, said. She said in years past, Pacific Lutheran University held a longer event in the a~moon, but many of the students had class and couldn't come. During the ceremony itself, ROTC Lt. Col. Kevin Keller, who has been with PLU since July, will speak. The performers

of PLU's brass quintet will play the military medley, and as they play the different parts, audience members who have served in that particular branch of the military will rise, Engle said. "We want to recognize the students and faculty at our school that have military benefits or are in the ROTC program," Engle said. She said the school also has students and faculty that have served in the military and wants to honor them. This year, Engle said they are also adding a new piece at the end where international students who have served in their own country's military will be recognized. PLU' s Administrative Staff CounciL Campus Ministry,

AmeriCorps and VetCorps are sponsoring this year's ceremony. Right after the ceremony, Engle said, there will be refreshments coffee, tea and cookies. There will also be a memorial table. "We encourage people to stay and celebrate," she said. The ceremony itself is not the only veteran-related event PLU planned this year. Last Saturday's football game versus UPS featured free entry for veterans, active duty military personnel and their families. This Saturday, there will be a VetConnect Resource Fair in the Scandinavian Cultural Center and AUC 133, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

the Diver:sity Center, Student

Week events, visit http://urww.plu.

Involvement

edulnews/2013110/veterans/

and

Leadership,

For a complete list of Veteran's


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Administration crosses with Crossroads By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Oubs at Pacific Lutheran University usually belong to a department or organization on campus. The Body Love club is affiliated with the Women's Center, Philosophy Oub is based in the philosophy department and a cappella groups HERmonic and PLUtonic are with the music department. Crossroads, however, follows its own path. Crossroads is a club on campus not affiliated with any department or organization. It is a private discussion group focusing on students who identify as LGBTQ or who are questioning their sexuality. Crossroads' leaders don't advertise the time, place or members of the club to protect the identities of the attendees. It is a safe space for those not comfortable with their identity or not "out of the closet" yet. Because Crossroads did not have a public face with the name, junior Dan Stell,

a Crossroads co-representative, said the Pacific Lutheran University administration decided to end the club in early September. ''The fact that Crossroads is such a private group has made it so that the administration didn't know exactly what we were," Stell said. At the beginning of this year, Stell said the administration believed Crossroads should belong to an organization with a public face on campus, specifically the Health Center, and wanted to reestablish Crossroads into a new club called ~1~!11111~ Open Door. ''There was a revamping of Crossroads without [the administration] understanding what was already in place," Stell said. At the beginning of the semester, the corepresentatives asked administrators which one of them had access to Crossroads' e-mail account. They discovered it was Matt Freeman, director of the Health and

Counseling Center. When the co-representatives asked if the account could be turned over to the club, Stell said Freeman told them Crossroads had been shut down. This, Stell said, was the only notification Crossroads received about the club's cancellation and of the impending new club, Open Door. In response to the decision not to renew the e-mail -address, Crossroads co-representatives met with members of the administration Oct. 4. Angie Hambrick, director of the Diversity Center, Laura Majovski, vice president of Student Life, and Freeman represented the PLU administration at the meeting with the Crossroads co-representatives, Stell, sophomore Ella Andersen and senior Molly Ubben. At the meeting, the co-representatives prepared a statement for the administrators clarifying Crossroads' _ purpose. Stell said the administrators understood the information and revived Crossroads. "We clarified what Crossroads already

was and what we, as co-representatives, were going to be establishing with it this year," Stell said. 0 p e n Door, a similar club to Crossroads, will be serving a separate group of students than Crossroads, but overlapping in some senses. "There are differences and some similarities between the two," Anderson said. "There is a need for both clubs." Open Door will be open to allies as well as LGBTQ members, whereas Crossroads provides a safe space strictly for people who are part of the LGBTQ community or questioning their sexual identities and accepting themselves. "[Open Door] is about people opening themselves to you and how you deal with that information," Anderson said.

For more information about Crossroads, e-mail xroads@plu.edu. Open Door's e-mail is opendoor@plu.edu.


THE MOORING MAST

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NEWS3

International Education Week provides opportunities for global learning By MAUREEN REDMOND Guest Writer International Education Week provides events and activities from Nov. 11-16 to give students opportunities to experience global education without even leaving campus. Each event that takes place during IEW allows students to learn about different countries and cultures from both international students and Pacific Lutheran University students who have studied abroad. "I think it's just a great way for students to either get a taste of global education and international education through PLU," Carmen Eyssautier, a Wang Center stUdy away adviser, said. Eyssautier also said if students have studied away or are from another country or culture, they can bring that perspective to PLU. The International Student Services page on the PLU website provides details and descriptions of the IEW events. These events have been organized through a cross-campus collaboration

among International Student Services, the Wang Center, Hong Hall, the Diversity Center and other departments on campus that share the goal of raising awareness of the value of global education. One of the events IEW will offer is Around the World, which will place in Hong Hall Wednesday night. International students and students who have studied away will host displays, provide activities and give mini-presentations about their country of origin or where they have studied. "I think it's unique, because you go to a table and experience that culture at the table without leaving Hong, and then you get to see 13 different countries at 路once," Akane Yamaguchi, associate director of ISS, said. IEW events will encourage students to shidy away, host an international student or interact with someone from another culture. "I think a study away can be, and is for many students, a very transformative experience," Eyssautier said. "You learn so much about yourself and your place in the world, and I think that's really important."

It's a great way for students to get a taste of global education. Carmen Eyssautier study away adviser

Yamaguchi said students who study away or interact with international students broaden their perspectives. "In the U.S., so many international students go to higher education institutions around the country, and welcoming them is also part of international education," Yamaguchi said. Sojourner Advocate and senior Jenny Taylor said one of the most valuable aspects of global education is gaining new perspectives. 路 . A Sojourner Advocate is a student leadership position designed to work with the Wang Center in advancing the vision of global education, according to

the Wang Center's website. The responsibilities of a Sojourner Advocate are to assist with events and activities promoting global education, such as IEW. Based on her previous study away experiences, Taylor said she gained "not only perspective on my own life, but perspective on what is going on in the rest of the world." Through the IEW events, students can gain a better understanding of the value of global education as they participate in what International Education Week has to offer. Many students will gain a broader perspective of their own through this learning experience.

What to do atPLU Ongoing Veteran's Month. Join Pacific Lutheran University as it honors veterans and their families throughout November with events that recognize service and sacrifice, including a special Veteran's Day chapel ceremony Monday. Various events - visit http://www.plu. edulnews/2013110/veteransl for a complete list.

Friday Harvest party for Trinity Lutheran food bank. Community Garden, across from Ingram on 121st Street. 10:30 a.m. Women's soccer vs. Willamette. Athletic field, 11 a.m. Swim meet at Lewis & Clark. 6 p.m. Women's volleyball George Fox. 7 P:m.

TREASURE FROM PAGE 1 his team found an unmarked tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings containing two female mummies. One of the mummies was identified as Hatshepsut, the first female pharaoh of antiquity, who ruled from 14791458 B.C.E. The issue becomes less easy to resolve when considering the artifacts that have already been removed from the country. One argument, backed by the largest museums and collectors in the world, is the opinion that Egyptian history is part of human history and belongs to the world, not just the country of origin. Proponents of this line of thinking argue that artifacts that are already PHOTO COURTESY oF Clll!.ATIVE out of Egypt COMMONS should be The bUBt of Nefertiti is at the allowed to Neues Museum in Berlin. Experts stay there. suspect the bust was ta.ken out These of Egypt using less-than-honest artifacts means.

were - for the most part collected legitimately, and so it's important to honor that. There's also the point that by placing these artifacts in the biggest museums in England, Paris, Italy and Germany, they are encouraging tourists to go to Egypt. In the other argument is the line of thought that Egyptian artifacts should be returned to their PHOTO COURl'ESY OF Clll!.ATIVE COMMONS homeland. Because The Rosetta Stone is on display at the British Museum in London. It was many Egyptian ta.ken out of Egypt before there were regulations, so it is technically legal. citizens are poor, they Both the Rosetta Stone and the bust of Nefertiti (pictured le~) are on a cannot afford to visit shortlist of artifacts that the Egyptian government desperately wants back in some of Egypt's most Egypt. treasured pieces in were exposed to tear gas. Ryan said his eyes other countries. The situation is made even more precarious have yet to fully- recover from the damage. Until this year, Ryan had taken a group of by the political unrest in the country. Ryan said some advocates for artifacts staying students on a J-term trip to visit sites in Egypt. where they currently reside argue that Egypt These trips are on hold indefinitely while the country is deemed unsafe for Americans to is too tumultuous for the precious finds. "Now, in many ways, it's lawless,''. Ryan travel to. . Although times are uncertain in Egypt said, citing several pictures of museums cleaned out by looters. "Nobody's watching." right now, Ryan didn't rule out the possibility Ryan has firsthand experience with of an impending personal trip. "It's a matter of timing," Ryan said. "And the social and political chaos. While on an archaeological trip last year, he and his group what's happened between now and when I want to go."

Debate tea01 wins at regional tourna01ent By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chief It's.not up for debate: Pacific Lutheran University's Forensics team won three first place titles last weekend. PLU was one of 15 schools in the Pacific Northwest to compete in the 41st annual Smelt Oassic tournament at Lower Columbia College in Longview. Justin Eckstein, a communication professor, directed the approximately 18 competitors from PLU who participated this weekend. Iri. novice British Parliamentary debate, seniors Mamie Howard and Caitlin Zimmerman won first place. Howard also took first in novice Poetry Interpretation. This was Howard's first tournament, which she said was "a great introduction to the debate world." Sophomores Brendan Stanton and Kellie Blauvelt won first place in novice Duo Interpretation, which entailed cutting up a play into a 10-minute performance.

''You can't look at each other while how they don't donate to cancer research," Blauvelt said. performing," Blauvelt said. Blauvelt and Stanton performed the Nearby colleges Lewis & Oark, Linfield, play "Bea," about a terminally ill girl and Whitworth and Seattle University also her caretaker, who helps her experience life competed at the tournament. Forensics previously competed at the before she dies. "I think we did incredible," Blauvelt said. Lewis & Oark Debate Tournament in "For a lot of the people who won it was the Portland, where they ranked 10th out of 64 first time in those events. I think we did really teams, in October. well." Blauvelt said in the next two weeks, the PLU's team took hmne additional PLU Forensics team will focus on practicing recognition from the Smell Oassic. In for speech categories. Forensics competes National Parliamentary Debate, sophomore Nov. 15-17 at Linfield College in McMinnville, Andrew Tinker won a speaker award. Ore. Senior David Mooney and Stanton also won speaker awards in the British Parliamentary Debate category. "I think we did incredible." Junior Katelynn Padron and Blauvelt were finalists in Kellie Blauvelt Persuasive Speaking. sophomore ''My topic was about the Susan G. Koman foundation and

at

Trumpet and saxaphone concert. PLU faculty Zachary Lyman and Eric Steightner perform. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30 p.m. L.U.N.l.C.Y.C.L.E.R.S. meeting. AUC CK Hall, 6:307:30 p.m. Latinos Unidos salsa night. The Cave, 9:30-10:30 p.m.

Saturday vs.

11

soccer a.m.

game

at p.m.

Women's Linfield.

Football Whitworth.

1

Zumba for Namibia. Help support a group of students traveling to Namibia for student .teaching. The money will help buy school supplies for five schools in Katutura. AUC CK Hall. 3-5 p.m. Harry and the Potters concert. Break out your wand and broomstick for a magical night of wizard rock. General admission is $5 Muggle money, or free with a PLU ID. AUC CK Hall. 7:30 p.m. Work party at the Community Garden. Join the Garden Club and learn a little bit about growing food in the Pacific Northwest. Community Garden, across from Ingram on 121st Street. 10 a.m.-noon.

Sunday Community Beautification Day. PLU and Parkland a:>mmunity members will come together, eat breakfast and clean trash from the streets of Parkland. AUC 203: Regency Room, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Richard D. Moe Organ Recital Series featuring guest organist Ann Marie Rigler. This concert will be a celebration of religious pluralism through solo organ music, representing a variety of traditions. 3-4:30 p.m.


THE MOORING MAST

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NOV. 8 2013

New coach turns wolllen's basketball in a new direction the Lutes, compiling a 54-93 record, so PLU athletic director Laurie Turner had to look for a new coach for the team. The Pacific Lutheran After a thorough search, University Women'~ basketball - Turner decided upon Jennifer team has a new coach this season Childress. had Childress and a new attitude as well. previously been an assistant Previous head coach Kelly coach, recruiting coordinator Robinson resigned this past and the associate head coach at spring after six seasons leading Western Washington University. Childress will look to bring a winning attitude and experience to help turn around the PLU program that enjoyed national prominence in the late '90s and early 2000s. From 1999-2005, the Lutes advanced past the second round of the NCAA Diii tournament five times, but have recently fallen on tougher times. Five seniors will lead the Lutes on the floor, including Chrissy Swope, Melissa Castor and Shelly Kilcup. Kilcup returns to the team after not playing last season. Hopefully Kilcup's play is similar to her first-year and sophomore seasons when she was among the Northwest Conference leaders in 3-point percentage. PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU ATHLETICS A strength of the team this The new women's basketball year should be their frontcourt, coach, Jennifer Childress, has high which will feature the teams' expectations for her team this year.

By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer

other two seniors, Katelyn Smith and Samantha Potter. Potter is a two-time Northwest Conference second-team all-conference player. Those seniors said they have noticed a big difference between this year and the previous one. "She [Childress] was a necessary change," Castor said. "She's brought a new direction to the program and reignited our fire and passion for the game." The team has instituted a quicker, hard-nosed style under Childress, and the players are looking forward to getting to test themselves against other schools. ''We will be a well-conditioned team with an up-tempo style," Smith said. ''We really have focused on defense and rebounding because those are things we can control, and a motto of ours is to 'Control the Controllables,' which means that we only worry about what we can change. We will be a completely different team than last year." Castor backed up Smith's sentiments. "We are looking to run the other team to exhaustion," he said. "We will control the tempo of the game, and therefore we will control the game."

"[Childress] was a necessary change. She's brought a new direction to the program and reignited our fire and passion for the game." Melissa Castor senior

The style of play adjustment has been reinforced by Childress' coaching style. Practices now feature rapid transitions from drill to drill, little wasted time and Childress demanding nothing less than each player's best effort every second they are on the floor. "There is a purpose to everything we do, and it makes sense," Smith said. "She [Childress] does a good job of balancing her criticism of our play while keeping us confident in ourselves at the same time. She

History department offers new Holocaust studies minor By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor At first sight, you mig!it be concerned that professor Beth Kraig is so eager for students to study genocide. Even she said, "it's weird to be so excited about people studying something so horrific." ¡ But after finally getting official approval for a Holocaust and genocide studies minor program, Kraig said she's excited about the program. "What excites me about it isn't the joyfulness, but the intensity of learning that's involved in studying human beings at their worst," Kraig said. "Sometimes you learn the most when you're being challenged to learn about the very worst things human beings can do." The idea for the minor came when Kraig taught her class on the history of modern Israel and Palestine, and she said she realized that two colleagues were teaching courses in related areas: one in literature and the other a Holocaust studies class. The trio collaborated on a combined class period during the semester and were pleased with the results. "That was a real pivotal point. It made us realize how much students could learn if they took classes in different disciplines,"

Kraig said. Over this past summer, Kraig said she and seven other faculty members decided to do something about it. Once a proposal was put together and presented to the Faculty Assembly, it passed, and within a week the Board of Regents had also approved it. "We want to challenge students to be more rigorous in their own thinking about how they exist in the world," Kraig said. The minor requires 20 credits, but some of that can be made up of classes that fall under what Kraig calls "the 60 percent rule." If a student can work with a professor in any discipline and class to gear 60 percent or more of the student's individual classwork to the Holocaust or other instances of genocide, he or she can apply that credit to the minor program. The introductory class required for the minor will be offered beginning in Fall 2014, but Kraig is optimistic that students will be able to graduate with the minor by Spring 2015, since students can apply credits to the minor retroactively. Kraig also encouraged students to meet with her to pre-enroll for the minor and evaluate how many of the classes they've already taken can be applied to the program.

is very direct, straight to the point and she doesn't play mind games. I like her and her coaching style, and our hard work will pay off in the end this year." The Lutes have now played two scrimmages that will help them prepare for the regular season, which officially kicks off Nov. 15 in Olympia against Evergreen State University. The Lutes' first home game is Nov. 21 as they host Oaremont Mudd-Scripps from California at 7p.m.

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"What excites me about it isn't the joyfulness, but the intensity of learning that's involved in studying human beings at their worst." Beth Kraig professor of history

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Extravaganza of arts Saxifrage multimedia showcase makes student work shine By JESSICA TRONDSEN Editor-in-Chief At some open-mic nights, audience members enjoy either music or poerry, At Saxifrage's Media Shqwcase, attendees didn't have to choose one or the other. Pacific Lutheran's annual literary arts magazine, Saxifrage, created the extravaganza, with coeditor seniors Melanie Hering and Chris Mahon as hosts. Promoted as a multimedia,

surround-sound experience, 50 students approximately gathered . in The Cave Friday evening to view art and listen to performances that incorporated spoken word and musical elements. "One of the keystones of the event was having musicians and writers perform at the same time, actually playing music while they're speaking to kind of complement the prose or poetry," Mahon said. The packet;!. venue featured

PHOTO BY JESSICA TRONDSEN

Saxifrage coeditors Chris Mahon, left, and Melanie Hering, right, both seniors, introduce Andrew Johnson, middle, who performed at the Saxifrage Media Showcase Friday.

student produced work, including photography, poems, songs and stories. 11 It was cool to have two people working together for a piece," senior Kristin Hayes, who attended the showcase, said. "It was really engaging." Saxifrage worked with the student radio station, LASR, to coordinate performers. "LASR was our liaison for musicians," Mahon said. The evening included 10 acts. LASR and Saxifrage have previously worked on projects together. At the end of September, LASR and Saxifrage sponsored an open-mic night with ASPLU. "Hopefully we have ongoing events," junior Olivia Ash, LASR general manager, said. During spring semester, Saxifrage and LASR will work together to host a joint launch party. There they will release the new volume of the magazine and LASR's student CD. Mahon said Saxifrage also plans to host more events this semester. "We've gotten some pretty positive feedback from people asking, 'when are you going to do that again?"' Mahon said. "This was kind of 路 an experimental thing, but I think it turned out really well." Mahon and Hering worked with several other organizations on campus to promote the student

PHOTO BY JESSICA TRONDSEN

First-year Abram Misuliti gazes at student photos on display at the Sarifmge Media Showcase.

showcase, including Impact and Mast Student Television. Mast TV produced a commercial for the event, which aired daily oncampus via channel 26 for the two-and-a-half weeks leading up to the Nov. 1 showcase. The commercial can be found online at http://mastmedia.plu.edu. For more information, contact

saxifrage庐plu. edu or visit the organization's website, http:// saxifrage.plu. edu, to submit art or prose for publication.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

PRESENTING THE PAST: One-woman play enlightens audience about Holocaust By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor An unusual art form highlighted a new aspect of the Holocaust as part of Pacific Lutheran University's fall lecture series Monday. "Etty" is a one-woman play performed by theatre professional Susan Stein and directed by Austin Pendleton. Stein visits a variety of .locations to perform the play, including schools, colleges and prisons. At PLU, Stein gave her performance in the Chris Knutsen Hall of the Anderson University Center. Stein explores the life of Esther "Etty'' Hillesum, a young Dutch Jewish student living in Amsterdam during World War II,. by performing a selection of Hillesum' s diary entries and letters, which she presents in a non-chronological order. Hillesum served on the Jewish Council, a Nazi set-up liaison group Jews served on under duress, before the Nazis sent her to Auschwitz, murdering her 89 days later. Stein wrote the script solely with the words of Hillesum's entries and letters with the exception of one explanatory sentence about the Jewish Council. A dinner preceded the

performance for people associated with the PowellHeller Conference - the spring Holocaust conference at PLU and Holocaust studies faculty, donors and students. During this, Stein explained she did not really know Hillesum, and then said, "I only know the paper trail." Because of Stein's acting and the fact that she rearranges the chronology of events and some of Hillesum's words, Stein said, "all you're getting in the play is my interpretation." She said her primary goal is to inspire people to read Hillesum' s writing. "The play is, at best, a glimpse," Stein said. The evening performance began shortly after organizers dimmed the lights. The seven rows of seats were fairly full, the audience facing a black stage that was empty save for an oldfashioned brown suitcase with a glass of water behind it. After a brief introduction by Bob Ericksen, a professor and chair of Holocaust studies, Stein entered the room from stage left as Hillesum. Stein said Pendleton once told her that with the performance, there should be "no acting. Just look into the eyes of the audience and talk."

The

play

covered

many

moments of Hillesum' s life, from

her affair with her therapist to her fear of mental illness, an abortion and the concern she felt for the safety of her family. Stein used hand gestures and voice modulation to convey emotion. Near the close of the performance, Stein said through

Hillesum's words, "every camp needs a poet, a bard to sing about it." The 55-minute presentation concluded with Stein leaving the stage as she had entered though she returned for one brief bow - to change and head the

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Susan Stein performs as Etty Hillesum in the one-woman play about Hillesum's life during the Holocaust, titled "Etty." Hillesum was a young Dutch Jewish student living in Amsterdam during World War II.

Q-and-A session. The questions lasted about as long as the actual performance. '1 particularly appreciated the discussion afterwards," Ericksen said. "So many people had remembered specific lines from the play and talked about their significance." First-year Kalina Springer said she found the Q-and-A session helpful, because the performance moved so quickly. She said she didn't have time to think about it until after. "I thought [the play] brought an interesting perspective," Springer said, because Holocaust perspectives are "usually performed as 100 percent bitter or [with] more of a sad tone." Senior Julia Walsh said she wasn't entirely sure what to make of it. "I hesitate to say I enjoyed it . because of the topic," Walsh said, ''but I felt the pull of it." Stein, who is still revising her script, said she plans to carry on the performances for about another year before she publishes "Etty'' and continues with a different project. "I wanted to give something back to her," Stein said. "To keep her alive." Details about the origin of ".Etty," other events and reviews can be found at http://www.

ettyplay.org/index.html.


TR MOORING MAST

6A&E

Life as an artist: ByUNAHAAVE

Guest Writer Curious to find out how to make it in the art industry, sophomore Emily Guldahl attended last week's lecture on how to make a living as an artist. The lecture took place in Ingram Hall with cartoon artists Mark Monlux and Steve Lieber presenting. "I wanted to get some advice on how to make it, because I have a lot of support from friends and family," Guldahl said. "But I also have some doubts from my family of how I'm going to make money if I choose to major in arts." Cartoon artists Monlux and Lieber have been in the art industry for a long time and have made it big. Monlux is a successful freelance artist, having worked

Students get the 101 on how to succeed in a challenging field

with major companies such as well as personal connections. Microsoft and Kimberly-Gari~. ''.An important way of getting Lieber is an illustrator for work is through referrals," Lieber Marvel, one of the leading said. publishers of comic books and It is also important to have related media in the world today. a contract with a statement of "Every year, 10,000 students intended work and expected pay. graduate from art school looking "Don't draw a line before the to make good money as a career contract is signed and you have professional," Monlux said, received an advance check," kicking off the lecture. "But after Monlux said, making sure to 10 years, only four out of the advise that an artist should never sell the rights to their work. 10,000 are still in the industry." When it comes to time He continued to explain there are many reasons why art school management, both said it is graduates choose to leave the important to stick to a schedule, industry, the main two reasons because with the freedoms that being most do not know how to • come with being a freelance artist, do good business nor know how it can be a challenge to stick to an to manage their time. intended schedule. Monlux therefore suggested "Don't be afraid to pick up the phone," Monlux said. Both keeping a double entry form, Monlux and Lieber agreed that, which is a form for people to to make it as an artist, it is crucial write what they intend to do at to make business connections as the beginning of the day, and

PLU alumni 'Build' powerful new album, join the rap scene

NOV. 8 2013

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOFT

Sophomore Emily Guldahl takes notes during the lecture on life as an artist led by professional artists Mark Monlux and. Steve Lieber.

write what they actually did at the end of the day. This makes it easier for artists to work effectively and be successful at what they do.

Monlux and Lieber finished the lecture by reminding students to always appear professional, both when it comes to attire and attitude.

FROM THE DESKOFLASR No curse words policy limits ·voices heard on student radio By NATE SCHOEN LASRDJ

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROCKWELLPOWERS.COM '

DJ Phinisey, left, poses with Zach "Rockwell" Powers, right. The two lived in the same residence hall while at PLU and released their album, "Build," together.

By EVAN HERINGER Multimedia Editor The Northwest rap artist Rockwell Powers has teamed up with DJ Phinisey to contribute a new album to the hiphop scene, and it just so happens they got their starts at Pacific Lutheran University. Zach "Rockwell" Powers and DJ Phinisey have been making music since 2007, when they first met while living in the same residence hall at PLU. Rockwell has dpened for Northwest hiphop legends such as Macklemore & Ryan Lewis and Common Market, and he has been extremely active in the Northwest hip-hop scene. Phinisey made a name for himself as a prominent DJ in the Northwest hiphop scene, collaborating with artists such as RA Scion and Grynch. The two released their album "Build" Oct. 16, featuring a number of artists including RA Scion of Common Market and Xperience, who was a prominent figure in

Macklemore' s second album "The Language of My World." ''Build" is about an hour long and consists of 12 expertly crafted tracks. It is beautifully composed with a combination of heavy, intense beats, lyrics filled to the brim with emotion and an outstanding ensemble of Northwest artists. It's obvious these guys put a lot of work into this album, and they did a phenomenal job of representing the Northwest hip-hop scene. This album is one of the best that has come from the Northwest. There is not a track on the album that seems unl&able, but here are a few that are outstanding. "Alive" is filled with emotional lyrics pertaining to Powers' s life and is underscored by an uplifting and catchy beat infused with some heavy bass. "Denial," featuring RA Scion, is another personal favorite. It features a . heary and dark electronic beat with lyrics riddled with political undertones. The beat is extremely

catchy and filled with a perfect combination of electronics and bass. "No Bull," featuring Jay Barz and Xperience, is another incredible song. The song centers around the Northwest hip-hop scene and is, qnce again, filled with an extremely catchy beat and chorus. The trio of rappers featured in this song showcases how each artist's style complements the others, making this one outstanding song. PlusJ it focuses on Northwest hip-hop so one cannot help but love it. For those new to Northwest hip-hop, "Build" is certainly a good place to start. "Build" features a number of outstanding local artists and really shows what the Northwest is made of. This is an album that is highly recommended. It is available for download on iTunes and Amazon and is also available in the following Tacoma stores: Bleach, Feather & Oar and Kings Books. Check out Rockwell Powers' website, http:// rockwellpowers.com for more information on the artist.

Lute Air Student Radio has a policy of only playing songs without obscenities in the lyrics. The general rule of thumb is "pretend that Presiclent Krise is listening to your radio show." While this policy is seemingly good, especially for those listeners with sensitive ears, it disproportionately limits what genres of music can be played, namely hip-hop. Every week I sit down in the beanbag chair in my room with a pot of tea to create my playlist for my LASR radio show. I pride myself on having an eclectic mix of songs, ranging from Palestrina to Israeli shoegaze, in order to make a goodhearted effort at playing artists from all different genres. Yet, week after week, I have noticed that hip-hop and rap music is always absent from the week's set list. I have no problem finding folk, garage rock and postrock songs absent of curse words, but every hip-hop song I would like to play on my show has obscenities in its lyrics. While I am aware that I could always just play the censored versions of the songs, there is sometlµng about removing words from lyrics that distorts the piece of art a song is. LASR DJs should be able to play songs without having to resort to messing with the integrity of the

lyrics he artist intended. If curse words happen to be a part of a song, then the artist put them there for a particular effect, and to simply remove or ''bleep" them out can drasticiilly affect the dynamic the artist envisioned for that particular song. There is a reason why works l&e Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" remain unmodified, despite countless efforts to edit some of the more racially charged language. But back to hip-hop more specifically, the language policy is limiting a particular voice from being heard. Many hip-hop songs express a viewpoint from urban voices that come from lower socioeconomic group. An example is Nas' song, "N.Y. State of Mind" off of his debut album "Illmatic," which takes the listener through some of the life experiences of an innercity youth caught up in the struggles of crime and druguse that surround him. Earl Sweatshirt is another hip-hop artist I would love to be able to share with my listeners but cannot due to some cursing in his lyrics. Sweatshirt' s songs have some of the most poetic lines

in any song I have heard. In the song "Chum" from his most recent album, he expresses his struggle growing · up without a fcrther: "it's probably been twelve years since my father left, left me fatherless/And I used to say that I hate him with dishonest jest." Inner-city youth already have a limited voice within society. We should not be working to lessen those voices further. The stories and life experiences that are expressed through these different hip-hop songs are just as deserving to be heard as any Taylor Swift song. I can understand why LASR has the policy about obscenities in songs - to ensure that a wide audience can feel welcome listening to the online station. Yet I still find it problematic when a policy unfairly affects a particular genre over another, whether that was the intended goal or not. It comes down to whether it is more important to ensure a listener will not be offended or if it is more important to allow a broader spectrum of voices to be heard.

Inner-city youth already have a limited voice within society. We sho~d not be working to lessen those voices further.


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 8,2013

A&&7

FISH ARE FRIENDS, NOT FOOD Students win pet fish at Late Night Fish and Chips Bingo By NATALIE DEFORD Guest Writer Students received colorful 路 pet fish and bags of chips as prizes during the Late Night Programming event, Fish and Chips Bingo. The event took place in the Anderson University Center Commons the evening of Nov. 1. About 60 students throughout the course of the evening sat down with beads and bingo cards. The fish prize was a Betta fish in a cup of water with a blue lid, on which the sex of the fish was

written. The new pet also came with a glass bowl filled with marbles, an envelope of fish feed and a packet of care instructions. Late Night Programming organized the event, saying on its Facebook page that it puts on "fun, weekend events in the evenings for late-night Lutes." Two Late Night Programmers, sophomore Domenic Desoto and 路 senior Leslie Ducay, hosted the event, called out bingo spaces and handed out prizes. They determined which rounds of play were "fish rounds," during which a person could win a fish, and which were "chip rounds," where the prize

PHOTO BY NATALIE DEFORD

Sophomore Tabitha Holyfield with her new pet "Mr. Mo The Fish." Holyfield said the 'Mo' is short for 'Mohawk.'

was a bag of chips. Not every round of play required a standard bingo with five spaces in a row. The programmers sometimes wanted an 'X' through the center and between all four corners, an 'L' in any corner taking up nine spaces or even a ''blackout" covering all spaces on the player's bingo card. To win a pet fish, students had to win the proper Bingo combination during a fish round. But there was 路one exception when two roommates teamed up. The women were allowed to trade their two bags of chips they had previously won for a fish. Two other people who won Bingo at the same time had to play rock-paper-scissors for a tiebreaker. Senior Emily Henkelman won the battle. "I'm so excited right now," Henkelman said. "I won a fish." Other winners included sophomore Stephanie Martin, who was the self-proclaimed "winner of the Cheeto bag." The first person to win a fish, sophomore Tabitha Holyfield, said her new purple pet was named "Mr. Mo the Fish." First-year Kalina Springer said Fish and Chips Bingo was a way for students to "get together for fish and chips and scream loudly and bond." Desoto said he and the other programmers planned and executed the event, which meant

taking a trip to Pet-Smart. "Fish and Chips Bingo is a super fun event," Desoto said. "You play a variety of Bingo games with the chance of winning a pet betta complete with a living environment or a bag of your fa_vorite chips."

The next Late Night Programming event is Laser Tag, co-sponsored by ASPLU, in the field house tonight at 9 p.m. Late Night Programming information can be found at https://www.facebook.com/ latenightlutes.

PHOTO BY NATALIE DEFORD

Sophomore Stephanie Martin is the first winner of chips during Late Night Fish and Chips Bingo.

Lutes' Variety Show Special event demonstrates diversity of talents ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN AdEWriter The Parent's Weekend Variety Show was a demonstration of artistic flair Saturday in the Chris Knutzen Hall of the Anderson University Center. Geared toward showcasing the various talents of Pacific Lutheran University to the visiting families as well as students, the show was filled with a variety of performing groups and individuals.. These included the cast of Night of Musicai Theatre, HERmonic, the PLU Dance Team,

fiddler and junior Catherine Graham and PLUtonic. The cast members of NOMT performed songs from their last performance that took place at the recently opened Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. Based on audience applause, the favorites of the night were '~other Day" from "Rent'' and their performance of "21 Guns" from '1\merican Idiot the Musical." When the NOMT performers finished singing, the audience erupted into applause, with even a few audience members giving a

PHOTO BY MA11LKNE WALTOPT

HERmonic performs during the Parent's Weekend Variety Show.

standing ovation. There was a break during their performance, but the applause was equally enthusiastic from the first to the second set. HERmonic, PLU's female a cappella group, performed a mix of songs by artists old and new. The singers included hits such as ''No Scrubs" by TLC and "Mama Knows Best" by Jessie J. Their rendition of "No Scrubs" had more than just a few people singing along. Entire families got involved, and the Slovieg family said they especially liked the familiarity of the songs that were performed. Switching the microphone between different women, most of the singers got the chance to display techniques like old school style beat-boxing. As they walked off stage, the audience showered them with whistles and cheers. The Dance Team performed two different numbers, and each was synchronized. The first was "Waka Waka" by Shakira, during which the team members performed various moves with fancy footwork. "I'm gonna try out for the team," prospective student Jenniler Liu said. ''lhat dance

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOPT

The PLU Dance Tham performs during the Parent's Weekend Variety Show.

was awesome." PLU Dance Team's second set of dancers performed to "I am the Best" by 2NE1. This dance featured lots of spins in addition to lots of layered movements. Graham performed ''Leather Britches," ''Boys, My Money's All Gone" and "Flame Point'' on her fiddle for the families and students. Graham's skill combined with speed was enough to captivate the audience, which sat silently as if in fear of missing something. The final act was PLUtonic, PLU's male a cappella group.

composed of "12 talented goofy guys who come together for the love of a cappella music." appeared on . . PLUtonic '1\merica's Got Talent'' in 2010 and continues to perform in local performances and competitions, yet is never too busy to share its performances with PLU. Spanning the decades, they performed songs from NSYNC like "Here We Go" all the way to more recent hits like "Down" by Jay Sean. It was all of these acts that made the PLU variety show an event that was a perfect example

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THE MOORING MAST

8BUSINESS

NOV. 8 2013

ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES Basic tips for new investors ·and their·retirement By BJORN SLATER Business Editor

to invest in. So here are a few things to keep in mind:

1. Get to know a company Many people think before buying stock planning just retirement means sticking a portion of Researching companies their monthly paycheck into before investing is easy to do a retirement savings account, and may help people get an but what a lot of people don't understanding of what they realize is that there are safe might get for their money. ways to plan for retirement by and Google Finance investing in the stock market. Yahoo Finance are both great to http:// tools for researching stocks According money.cnn.com, stocks have because they have historical outperformed every other data, company profiles, traditional asset class and competitors, industry analysis, provided the highest returns analyst opinions and more. in the long run, close to 10 Reading about a company's percent. That is 2 to 4 percent past is a great way to get higher than the annual return an indication of future on an average retirement performance, and although savings account. reading through pages of Bonds are the next highest, historical data from a company followed by Treasury notes at isn't fun for everyone, the time about 5 percent. investment will literally pay This excludes more off in the long run. complex asset classes such as derivatives, swaps, exchange- 2. Diversify traded funds (ETF) and futures, which require a little Risk isn't a bad thing. As more in-depth study to use as mentioned earlier, the higher investing tools. the risk, the higher the potential Retirement can come a lot for reward. That being said, sooner if retirement savings being exposed to unnecessary and stock market investments risk may be hurtful to finances are combined, maximizing the in the future. People can annual return. avoid unnecessary risk by A lot of people get blinded diversifying their investment by fear when it come& to the portfolios. stock market - it's easy to The number varies, but the think their money is safest general opinion in finance is behind a big vault door in a a portfolio needs to have a bank rather than pumped into minimum of 20 different stocks some company that could go from different industries for bankrupt if the market tanks. it to be considered "wellHowever, banks can go diversified." Others say a bankrupt just like companies, minimum of 30, but after 20 as witnessed during the each additional stock has a financial crisis of 2008 with minimal impact. Washington Mutual Bank. By investing in multiple Its assets were valued at companies, returns the more than $300 billion at the average out and so does the time and it was still necessary risk, so investing in one risky for JPMorgan Chase Bank to company can be offset by acquire the bank and cover investing in a trustworthy, or nearly $31 billion in losses "value" stock, such as Cocawhen it went under, according Cola, that produces consistent to http://www.britannica.com. returns each year. · That's not to say investing Then if the risky company in the stock market is safer. takes off, the portfolio There is still the risk that a return is greatly increased, company will go under, but and if it starts producing one of the key ideas of finance negative returns, they are at is the higher the risk, the least partially offset by the higher the reward. consistent performance of the There are a lot of things to value stock. consider before choosing a stock, bond or Treasury note

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PHOTO COIJlll'ESY OF WWW.COCACOLASTOCKCEKl'IFICe\TE.COM

This is a stock certificate for one share of common stock in the Coca-Cola Company. Certificates vary in design and layout from company to company and may certify ownership of more than one share. Stock certificates are not always issued, especially if it is a large company and the investor is a private individual Companies are no longi:r required to issue stock certificates in the United States because electronic registration is becoming more prevalent.

3. Invest early and often It might seem easiest to just throw a lump sum into a portfolio and leave it there to grow. But in order to earn the best return possible, people should consider putting any cash that can be spared after contributing to their retirement savings account into stocks in their portfolio. By adding money to investments on a regular basis, investors can take advantage of well-performing stocks by buying more and more shares whenever possible. Dividends can be a great way to keep up on investments. Most stable companies, CocaCola for example, send out a portion of their earnings to investors, usually on a quarterly basis, to make up for the lack of growth. Sometimes it could be a penny per share, other times it's more, but investors who set aside dividends for reinvestment have a guaranteed lump of cash to invest every three months.

4. Don't forget about bonds and Treasury notes Bonds and Treasury notes have had historically lower returns than stocks, but the old "the higher the risk, the higher the reward" · adage makes it clear that bonds and Treasury notes are less risky. This makes them a valuable addition to any portfolio since purchasing long-term bonds :may produce similar returns to those of a value stock. Bonds are essentially a loan that investors make to a company. Investors are paid interest on the loan during tht? 'bond's life, then at its maturity date they receive the full amount of the loan back. The return on a bond is essentially the interest rate that the company pays people who invest in bonds. When a company goes bankrupt, it first has to pay off as much of its outstanding loans as it can, which includes repaying investors who purchased bonds. This makes

them much safer investments than stock. and Treasury notes Treasury bills are special in that they can be purchased directly from the government, as well as from institutional banks, and they are considered zero risk investments. They are a form of bond, so basically a loan to the government, but the risk of default is zero because i£ the government doesn't have enough money to pay back the loan they can simply print more. These are just some very basic tips to keep in mind when investing, and in no way guarantee success. They are intended to help reduce risk and inform people about what kinds of options a new investor could consider. Google and Yahoo Finance both have guides for new investors, and sites like http:// www.investopedia.com are great resources for researching and finance terminology techniques.

Get rich or go bankr~pt trying By PETER MUELLER

Guest Writer It seems like just yesterday flamboyant Brazilian billionaire, Eike Batista, was making claims that he would soon be crowned the world's richest man. Only last year, Batista was declared the seventh wealthiest terrestrial individual with a net worth of $35 billion, Forbes reports. With the news that Batista's gas exploration oil and company, OGX, is filing for bankruptcy, the chance of becoming the world's wealthiest man has now disappeared for the Brazilian. Born as the son of the mines

and energy minister of Brazil, Batista sifted through the amazon to buy up gold in his early 20s. Batista resold the gold to major cities across the globe, leading him to his first fortune. In 1983, Batista founded EBX, an international conglomerate containing 10 major subsidiaries. The flagship subsidiary of EBX was OGX. Batista created OGX to provide the cash flow for all of EBX' s other ventures including MMX (mining), LLX (logistics) and CCX (coal). After $5 billion of investments, and many years of failed explorations for oil reserves, speculation of OGX' s true profitability came to a creeping halt. Many investors

had rushed to invest in the company when OGX first reported the discovery of oil reserves that could yield approximately 1 billion barrels. In 2010, OGX had a market value of $34 billion but later stood to suffer $3 billion in losses due to dismal oil production numbers, Associated Press reports. Because of inflated offshore drilling expectations, Batista's personal net worth was based mainly on speculated information rather than true wealth. Batista put every penny he had into OGX without receiving a fraction of the anticipated petrol. Due to an inability to pay off rising debts, OGX filed

for bankruptcy Oct. 30. The filing looks to be the largest bankruptcy filing in South America, Reuters reports. Many analysts expect other subsidiaries under EBX' s umbrella to crumble in the aftershock of the OGX bankruptcy filing. Some analysts also expect Batista to make a return, Associated Press reports. They argue that he is too motivated and too well connected in business circles to fail. Still, the man who was once the symbol of Brazil's economic potential and growth, now faces accusations of lying to investors and a growing pile of seemingly recalcitrant del;>t.


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 8. 2013

BUSINESS 9

Lute Link lets students network with alumni By KELSEY HILMES Guest Writer Being a part of the Pacific Lutheran University community can feel like a game of missed connections. With so many Lute alumni, current and former faculty and professional relationships connecting PLU students to the rest of the world, a strong network can seem close but unreachable. There is a lot of emphasis being put on the importance of networking and mentorship in building a career. The old business mantra "it's not what you know, it's who you know" rings more true than ever in our highly connected digital world. And yet, despite networking' s hunting down importance, alumni has been an incredibly daunting process. To learn their names, you'd have to go through a professor or search the depths of Linked.In, assuming you knew what you were looking for. Lutelink, a new program from Career Connections, seeks to resolve that problem. The new program is an online catalog of alumni who have agreed to make themselves available to be contacted by students. The service functions as a search engine where you can find alumni based on their field of work, job function, major at PLU, industry and location. ''The general idea is to find alumni who want to be career advisers for PLU students and other alums who might be looking for career advice," Catherine Swearingen, director of Career Connections,

+

said. Some of the opportunities alumni can offer through this service are informational interviews, job shadows, and internships. They can talk to students about a variety of topics ranging from the first generation college student experience to gender and women's issues in the workplace. Swearingen said LuteLink · has been about two years in the making through a joint effort of Career Connections, the Alumni Office and the Development Office. · Last June, President Krise sent out a letter announcing the program, and in July the Alumni Office dispersed an e-mail to recruit alumni volunteers. Originally, Career Connections hoped to recruit 200 alumni to the program, thinking that would be a good number to start with. Just a few months after sending out a request, almost 1,400 alumni are involved. "PLU alums really want to help PLU students," Swearingen said. "It's just fantastic. It's surpassed everything we were hoping for." Students can start using the program when they decide they would like to start connecting with alums and build a professional network. When they log onto the Career Connections Opportunity Board, they can follow the liflk to LuteLink, where they can search the listings of alumni and learn a little bit about their careers. They can then click a link to send a message to the alum. The contact information of each alum is kept private and is sent directly

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through the website. Alums then have the opportunity to return the student's message and make a plan to connect. Students are allowed to contact up to 10 alumni each month. "We're taking it very seriously. These are people who have volunteered to help students, so we want to make sure we manage it so that it works best for the students and so that alumni don't feel like they're being overused," Swearingen said.

Because the program is so new, Career Connections doesn't have any data on who is using the program yet. However, it can tell that students are starting to take notice and reach out to alumni through LuteLink. Networking is vital to careers, Swearingen said, because people are more willing to trust hiring a job candidate that a colleague refers to them. Simply put,. networking helps you to find job openings and increases your

charices of being asked to fill them. "It's been that missing next step that we didn't have here." Swearingen said. "We can get you the greatest resume, the greatest cover letter, you can nail your mock interviews, but we didn't have any way to help you with networking. This fills that void."


THE MOORING MAST

lOOPINION

Wanderlust: There's more than one kind offreedom By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor Americans like to think they live in the number one free country. Not just a free country - the freest of the free. Freedom is a major theme in most of our patriotic songs, not the least of which being the national anthem. We honor our military because they "defend our freedom." Even school children have latched onto the idea, justifying every bad behavior with "it's a free country - I can do what I want." But are we really free? Well, compared to a lot of countries, yes. We hold democratic elections, we have an independent press and we have a Constitution that asserts an array of rights and freedoms. This does not make us exceptional, however. Most developed nations can make those claims as well. And there are several freedoms some nations have that we don't. Germans, for instance, are shocked Americans go around touting their freedom when most public lakes in America don't even allow nude bathing. What a horrible, totalitarian regime, they say, banning its own citizens from swimming au natural. And torequireswimsuits while sunbathing is also quite shocking for many Germans. They don't understand how Americans can call themselves free

when they don't even have the freedom to swim in their own skin. Even the socialist. regime of the former German Democratic Republic allowed skinny dipping, albeit grudgingly. Sure, America's got a few on Germany as well. We've got virtually unlimited freedom of speech. In the United States you can share your opinion no matter how unpopular it is, you can speak out against the government or lie about political candidates, and you can call people whatever derogatory names you want, all with protection from the good ole' First Amendment. Other countries don't have that. In Germany, for instance, Holocaust denial is illegal. You can be fined for saying the Holocaust never happened. While this law is Senior Alison Haywood takes a moment to enjoy the cool European somewhat controversial, air on the balcony of the Hunderstwasser House in Vienna, Austria. most Germans accept the fact it's there for a good reveal the tnith about the freedoms that Americans reason. This is a freedom government. can't drive home with an they're willing to give up, That would never open container. because some things are It's not uncommon to more important than free happen in Germany, and Germans don't even go see people sitting in parks, speech. singing about on sidewalk cafes or even The Germans were around shocked, however, when liberty and justice on every on the underground with a the American government national holiday like we do. beer in their hands. I can't Other freedoms imagine this catching on in tried to prosecute whistleblower Edward Germans enjoy are a bit less the U.S. anytime soon. My point is not that the Snowden for leaking important For instance, national secrets. The the alcohol culture is much United States isn't a free United States calls itself more relaxed in Europe. In country, because it most a free country, Germany Berlin, drinking in public certainly is. Just think twice, criticized, and yet this is is both legal and socially though, before assuming how it treats people who acceptable. They think it's we're the freest country of an infringement on personal them all.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Morning class attendance should be expectation, not exception . By KELLI BRELAND AdEEditor About a third of my classmates were missing when I walked into an 8 a.m. class one day, but it wasn't a sudden, miniepidemic that kept them from coming to class. Nor was it because the building 路 was locked, and they simply couldn't get there. It was midway through the semester, so I doubt it was because they all forgot we had class scheduled for that morning. No, a third of the class didn't show up that morning because of the prevailing campus-wide attitude that showing up at 8 a.m. is an achievement. This attitude implies that sleeping through an early class isn't necessarily a bad thing - it just means the skipper wasn't in the "achieving mood" that morning. If attending class at 8 a.m. was compared to an academic test, it'd be as if showing up was an 'A' grade, but

skipping was still a 'C grade. We need to change this attitude -

showing up to an 8 a.m. class should be an expectation, not an achievement. The main complaint against this argument is that 8 a.m. is "too early" for class . . We grumble about it now, but before college we had to get through middle school and high school, most of which started between 7:30-8:30 a.m. On top of starting "early," most of us didn't have the luxury of walking to class five minutes before it starts. Not all Pacific Lutheran University students live on campus and can walk to class, but then for commuters, getting up early for college classes shouldn't be much different than getting up early for high school classes. We may not have had much of a choice in the matter of attending middle school and high school classes, but we successfully made it through those seven years of morning classes. If we hadn't, we wouldn't have been accepted into PLU, because we would have failed our high school class prerequisites due to lack of attendance. Now, we have total choice of whether or not to attend an early class. Thanks to middle school and high school, we should be used to getting up early for class - but for some reason, college is different. It could be because, in college, we have more control over our schedule as a whole. We decide how we spend our

non-class hours, be it studying, working, taking part in clubs and organizations or other activities. This gives us the responsibility to manage our time and make the choice of whether sleep is or isn't a priority. It's this choice of time management that plays a key role in whether we show up to our 8 a.m. class or not. Regardless of how effective we are at time management and how tired we are, we need to consider the fact that, for a PLU student _who takes 16 credits per semester and pays the tuition price of $17,220 per semester, a class for 4 credits costs roughly $71.75 an hour. Skipping that 8 a.m. class means blowing away cash, and a lot of it. Additionally, remember that in many aspects, college is essentially preparation for a career. In the entry-level jobs most of us will acquire after graduation, it's not likely that hours are going to be flexible. "8 a.m. is too early for work" isn't going to fly with most real-world bosses. It's better to gain a good habit of getting up early now rather than having to break a bad habit later. Don't catch the infectious attitude that says attending an 8 a.m. class is an achievement. Whether it's learning to manage time, maintaining an old habit or establishing a new one, we need to make it an expectation to show up to all classes.

NOV. 8 2013

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The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. Tu subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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-THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 8 2013

OPINIONll

SEX+ IS POSITIVE ABOUT PATIENCE: You REALLY DON'T HAVE TO TAKE YOUR CLOTHES OFF By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist

I've always thought abstinence was the art of doing nothing. When people said they were "practicing abstinence," I would wonder how hard it is to do nothing. The Sex+: Abstinence lecture taught me there's more to it.

Entering as a non-believer, I was waiting for a lecture on

keeping my bits and pieces to myself until marriage: unrealistic for most people my age. Leaving the lecture, I was a

changed woman who now thinks abstinence is something everyone should practice. · This version of abstinence is not the standard. This abstinence is saying "no" to anything that does not completely represent what I want in a sexual encounter. About 30 Sex+ students gathered Oct. 28 - with all their clothes on - to discuss abstinence. Abstinence, in the way students normally view it, was not the topic of the discussion. Author, activist, artist and educator Heather Corinna led the progressive discussion about individuals choosing their own path, leaving labels like' abstinent' out of the night's vocabulary. Abstinence was transformed into abstaining from sex until the terms are perfect for you. This is it people, the peak of being Sex+: only having sex when it is in your best interest. As students, from the second we step foot on campus, it seems like we have no time to think

about anything except school and the future, and the few times we have a moment to think about something else, it is usually about food, clothes or the cute teacher's aide we've been eyeing. It is much harder for us to think about our absolutes - the terms and conditions we hold ourselves to. Knowing our boundaries is healthy. It brings us closer to ourselves and who we are. The Sex+ series asks students to look inside themselves and find their absolutes. In the lecture, Corinna asked students to write on a wall under what terms they would like to have sex, under what terms they would not and· under what terms they can see themselves consenting. Every student should have their own answers to fuese questions. Questions like these do come up in everyday life. You have to be OK with the situation you are in. If not, "you don't have to take

.·.:

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The Mooring Mast

Flirting is a double standard don't even realize their actions could be construed as flirting. Sometimes an individual's personality is flirtatious and he or she don't even think about it meaning anything. For example, a person's · "flirtatious" actions could really have just been intended to be friendly. Despite the subjectivity of flirting, we still perceive it as an indicator of irrefutable interest. Yet, there is a double standard when it comes to a woman flirting versus a man flirting. There is a general With women, there can assumption that when be a kind of blaming or two people are flirting, assumption by both sexes it means they like one that a woman should not another as more than flirt if she is not interested friends. However, there are in the man. too many variables foi this If she doesn't want assumption to always be something to come of her true for every case. flirting, then she is told Often used as a way by both men and other of· expressing one's own women she should change interest in another and her behavior. She is told determining said other's she must stop for fear of interest, flirting has become leading the man on. an essential part of the To my knowledge, in prelude to relations of the man's case, even if he is some kind. These relations flirting just as much as the can range from Icing-term woman and neither want dating to casual sex. anything to come of it, no Flirting is too subjective one tells him to change his for anyone to have 100 behavior - at least not to percent accuracy in the same degree others tell detecting it. Sometimes women to change. one or both of the parties While men may are misreading the other's experience this, I do not actions as flirting. think it occurs to the same Sometimes, one or both extent as it does with

By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Columnist

yc:iur clothes off." Waiting for your own terms to be · fulfilled can be hard. It is harder than it has ever been before;because we are progressive people, and there are many more things we are comfortable adding to our terms. There are major differences in comparing today's sex to sex 50 years ago. There are so many more groups, terms, methods and kinky contortionist sex positions that are easier to learn about now. Everyone's desires are vastly different in today's world, and for once, people are becoming more comfortable asking for exactly what they want. I completely agree with that aspect of the lecture. Learning what your terms are and waiting for them to be met is the only way to know a situation is right. Leaving sex out of the equation, you would not buy a car or choose a school that did not meet your standards. Just the same, you should not

women. I am writing from the female perspective in relations between men and women. This disparity between the sexes when it comes to flirting goes back to the fact that we are sustaining a victim-blaming society and promoting rape culture. We ask, "what was the girl wearing?" or ''how was she acting?" or "was she coming on to him?" instead of "what was going on in her head?" Instead of asking about or speculating on her mindset, we ask or speculate on whether or not the man had a reason to think he had the right. We ask the wrong questions not only with rape, but with flirting. It is not my intention to provide an excuse for women to flirt without consequences, nor am I suggesting that flirting never has any meaning or purpose, but it is certainly something to think about. Of course flirting is flirting, and that is how we communicate our interest in one another, but don't be so quick to jump to assumptions about a person's interest just because that person is flirting with you.

- ·.··:;

ever settle for a relationship that does not meet your standards. You would not attend a school that did not have a philosophy program in the hopes of majoring in philosophy. Under the same logic, you should not have a partner whose philosophy, for example, negates condoms when you really want protection. Here is where patience comes in. Wait. I know, asking students to wait for sex is like asking a teacher to have class outside it is suggested all the time, but you never actually get to go sit outside. In this case, abstinence is still abstaining from sex, but not until marriage. Realistically, be abstinent until your terms are met. Go out and explore yourself, do whatever you want - in the privacy of your own room, please - but make sure you are exploring on your terms and not anyone else's.

.

.S.ubriiit letters to the editor and corrections to . mast@plu.edu

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12 STUDY BREAK

THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 8. 2013

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 8, 2013

SPORTS 13

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 9at Whitworth, lp.m. LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Noo. 9 vs. Puget Sound, 1:30 p.m.

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LUTES' UPCOMING GAME: Nov. 8 vs. Wdlamdtt, 11 a.m.

SPORTS TALK

Jose Bonilla, sophomore · · · ...... · · · · .. · · · · ~ Golden Tate

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NORTH LEADS LUTES TO VICTORY BEHIND HER 49 ASSISTS Will the Los Angeles Lakers or Houston Rockets win Thursday? By SAM HORN Sports Editor Whitworth didn't go down easily. It took five sets for Pacific Lutheran University to triumph over its interstate foes. U junior Samantha North had not recorded 49 assists during the match, who knows what the result would have been. After all, it was North who assisted fellow junior Amy Wooten on her game-winning kill in the fifth set. North has tallied 868 assists in the Lutes' 2013 campaign and shows no signs of sloWing down. Since none of the contestants in the Mast Sports Pick 'Em contest correctly guessed the number of assists North would get against Whitworth, I decided to give the win to Kyle Peart. Peart guessed 55, which was just six digits away from 49. The next closest guess was 40, which Max Totaro and Kara Sherman both chose. Sherman is about three weeks into the women's basketball season, so I thought I'd ask an NBArelated question.

The Houston Rockets and Los Angeles Lakers square off Thursday night. The game pits center Dwight Howard against his former team, the Lakers. The Rockets are first in the Southwest Division, standing at 4-1, while the Lakers stand in fourth place in the Pacific Division with a 2-3 record. Part of the reason why the L.A.-based squad is sputtering at .500 is the absence of Kobe Bryant. Bryant has averaged more than 25 points per game in his illustrious 17-year career with the Lakers. He is a five-time NBA champion and has been nominated to 15 All-Star games. But now that he is injured and growing older every day, the Lakers lack that necessary offensive surge to become a dominant force. Who's in Bryant's place for the time being? Wesley Johnson. Don't worry, I also don't know who this Johnson · character is either. Sherman and Valery Jorgensen are the only contestants who picked the Lakers to win. Statistics from the Rockets-La!ers game on Thursday will be post.ed to http:/lmtutm.edia.plu..edu.

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14 SPORTS

THE MOORING:MAST

NOV. 8 2013

Women's soccer cruises to a win over Pacific GAME STATISTICS Goal$: Ill - 3 Pacific -1 ShoL'5: PL - 10. Paeific - 11

Sm:es: PLO -1. Pal'ifie - 4 PH<Yl'O BY JESSE MAJOR

Fmtls: PLll - 5 Parifir - 6

Junior Blake Warner tries to turn the corner against a Pacific defender. Warner recorded two goals in the contest with only two shots on goal.

PH<Yl'O BY JESSE MAJOR

Forward Kaylie Rozell, a first-year, attempts to cross the ball into the box. Rozell led the Lutes with three shots on target and even scored one goal.

PLU FOOTBALL PULLS AWAY TO 41-21 RIVALRY WIN OVER PUGET SOUND By T YLER SCOTT Director ofAthletics Communications Gusty conditions stifled the Lutes' offense early, but the 16th-ranked Pacific Lutheran football team scored four touchdo\Vll.S consecutive second-half to pull away to a 41-21 rivalry win over Puget Sound Saturday afternoon at Sparks Stadium. The Lutes struggled in the first half as winds hindered the passing game and the UPS defense aimed for a rivalry upset. PLU's defense stepped up to the challenge, limiting Puget Sound to just over 100 yards of total offense in the first three quarters, but the Loggers took advantage of two very short fields to claim a 14-7 lead early in the second half. 'They came over and battled us," PLU head roach Scott Westering said. 'They gave us all we could handle." A Connor Cummings punt return set the Lutes up for their first score early in the second quarter. The Lutes took possession at the Logger 19-yard line and scored three plays later on a 9-yard pass. Special teams helped set the stage for Puget Sound's first touchdown as well, as the Loggers tipped a PLU punt late in the second and began their drive at the PLU 34yard line. Two consecutive first-down completions by Braden Foley led to a 9-yard touchdown pass to Kevin Miller with only five seconds showing on the clock. Early in the third quarter, a fumbled

punt attempt gave the Loggers an even better field position. Puget Sound got the ball first-and-10 at the PLU 15, and it only took two plays for the visitors to claim their first lead of the game when Kupono Park carried it in from one yard out. With the Lutes lined up to play into the wind for the final 15 minutes, scoring in the third quarter gained a greater sense of urgency. "This wind blowing today made a huge impact on the game, a huge impact on us offensively," Westering said. Pacific Lutheran did just that following Puget Sound's second touchdown drive. Quarterback Dalton Ritchey, a junior, connected on all three of his pass attempts and added a 4-yard rush as he marched the PLU offense 69 yards down the field in four plays for his second TD-pass to junior Kyle Warner. After junior Joel Anthony forced a UPS fumble on the next drive and senior Jord.an Patterson recovered for the Lutes, PLU had a short field of its own with a chance to reclaim the lead. PLU kept the ball on the ground for all five plays of its next possession, covering 25 yards and taking the 21-14 lead on a 3-yard Niko Madison touchdown. The Lutes finally hit a big play in the final minutes of the third quarter, as Madison, a junior, caught a short screen pass from Ritchey and took it 50 yards to the UPS 13. Two quarterback rushes later, Ritchey broke into the end zone for his first of three rushing scores on the day and the

PH<Yl'O BY JOSH ATEN

Junior Niko Madison runs for some hard-earned yards against the Loggers' defense. Madison leads the Lutes in rushing this season with 669 yards. He has also scored six rushing touchdowns so far thiB season.

Lutes had a 28-14 lead entering the final quarter. The Lutes scored twice more in the final period. Ritchey kept the ball on the final three plays of the Lutes' 26-yard drive, including the 5-yard TD to make it 34-14. One final Ritchey rushing touchdown ended the scoring for the Lutes. Ritchey totaled 70 yards and three scores on 18 carries one week after scoring three rushing touchdo\Vll.S for the first time in his career. Madison led all piayers in both rushing (73) and receiving (88) yards, totaling 161 yards while scoring one touchdown.

Patterson was all over the field for the Lute defense, totaling 10 tackles with 3.5 for-loss, one fumble recovery and 1.5 sacks. Senior Dalton Darmody added seyen tackles as the PLU defense limited UPS to eight first do\Vll.S and only two rushing yards on 27 carries. With this win, Pacific Lutheran improves to 7-1 overall and 4-1 in the NortI:twest Conference. . The Lutes head to Spokane next week to dose out the 2013 regular season against Whitworth, looking to secure their second eight-win season since 2001.

Lutes' swim team dives into stiff competition this season By SAM HORN Sports Editor Being the best brings success - there's no denying this notion. Goals can motivate people to achieve the best possible results, and working as a team, rather than as individuals, leads to victory. The swim team at Pacific Lutheran University knows about success and knows what it takes to reach the summit in collegiate athletics. Last season helped improve the Lutes' reputation as a 路strong swimming team. The team broke 17 records last year in both individual and relay events. Last season was arguably one of the most successful seasons in Lutes' swimming history, but the team is focused on maintaining its level of success and building off of that. Even though_ the Lutes did break several records last year, they couldn't beat Whitworth at the Northwest Conference championships. Whitworth won the NWC last year in both the men's and women's categories. In 2011, the Whitworth men took top honors at the end of the season. The Pirates of Whitworth have capsized every other team in the NWC for the past few years. While Whitworth will look to repeat as conference champions this year, the Lutes will be targeting the Spokane-based

swashbucklers. "This year, we could come dose but I don't think we can beat them [Whitworth], because they are very, very good," freestyler Brian Ruggles, a sophomore, said. Many teams focus on the results and hardware. For instance, teams might concentrate on how fast their top breaststroker is or how quickly their 400-freestyle relay team can swim. The Lutes are not concerned about the end result, but more on the journey of getting there. "We know that if we work hard and stay focused on enjoying the process, we will achieve our goals at the end, but that process is the most important thing," head coach Matt Sellman said. "We expect to be a very competitive tealJl in the [Northwest] Conference and challenge for the right to stand on top of the podium at the end of the season." Building a strong team can be difficult, but with the correct ingredients, anything can be possible. Sellman managed to recruit 15 first-year swimmers. They are living up to the hype as the Lutes prepare to finally conquer the Whitworth Pirates. "Our rookies are incredible. They have made a very smooth transition to college swimming, and we expect them all to make excellent and significant contributio~ to the team right away," Sellman said. Sellman said the first-years are

demonstrating work ethic and a positive attitude that melds well with the team. "I look forward to seeing them help move the team into the 路upper echelons of the conference and keep us there for a long time," Sellman said. In addition to gaining new talent, successful teams also benefit from good team chemistry. The team has dinner almost every night during the season and also partake in movie .nights 9uring the week, according to Ruggles. . "You want to be ih .a family [setting] where you support eati1t:other so that everyone can train their best so they can compete at thei! best," junior Michelle Hogan said. Sellman even hosts a Christmas party for the swim team at his house in December. 'The team has an enthusiastic and fun personality, but isn't shycwhen it comes to putting their nose to the grindstone," Sellman said. "They work very hard together and then have a good time off deck as a family. J see them supporting each other every day, pushing themselves and their teammates to be their best. When that happens as often as it does in our water, on our pool deck, great things happen," Sellman said. The year, the Lutes will battle it out for conference supremacy against Whitworth. The Pirates have added five first-years to help bulk up their deep roster. The team cruises into conference play

this afternoon when the Lutes travel to Lewis & Oark. The Lutes swim team won't compete against Whitworth until Jan. 18, so PLU will have to wait to find out who will rule the waters until then.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Sophomore Cameron Webber plows through the water during the NWC Sprints this past weekend. The Lute women placed first at the meet, while the men placed third.


1'HE MOORING MAST

NOV. 8, 2013

SAM By SAM HORN Sports Editor The sparkling rays of sunshine seep through my ski goggles. The snow dribbles down my dark blue North Face jacket as I mentally prepare myself for what is about to come next. I firmly buckle my boots to the skis and smile from ear to ear. I know I'm about to embark on an exciting descent and nothing or no one can stop me. My poles attack the snow as I push myself to the edge of Mt. Rainier. After 路 one solid push, I'm off. Flying through the powder snow only leave5 me wishing for more. I wish the mountain could be taller so I could have at least five more seconds of breaching the unpaved snow. Large trees stand ominously in front of me as I weave through the snow. A ditch awaits me to my left, but I dodge it with ease. As I observe an oncoming tree situated in front of me, I decide to swerve to the right of.it. As I swerve around the tree, a thought comes to mind. I am a running back. I am dodging would-be tacklers in an effort to enjoy the heck out of this sunny December day.

SPORTS15

Winter needs to be here already Unfortunately, I have not had this feeling of exuberance through skiing in three years. I have not had to dodge any trees for three years. Most importantly, I haven't seen the sunrise when I arrive at Crystal Mountain Resort early in the morning. My life isn't complete without these. I need them back. Now. I have not escaped the stresses of life for a while and skiing would alleviate some pressure. Winter hasn't graced Washington with its presence since late February and it cannot come any sooner. I am ready to strap up my boots once again and feel the packed snow rubbing against my skis. I am determined to hit the slopes this winter. I have not touched snow in more than seven months and my fingers are itching for some frozen water. The winter not only brings about my favorite time of year, the holidays, but it .also means the snow resorts will open up. The winter is ~m.ost here and I am ready to welcome it with open arms.

PHaro BY JODY HORN

Even though I was able to hike the Wonderland Trail and climb to Camp Muir this summer, I have not been able to ski down beautiful Mt. Rainier in nearly three years. Things are going to change this year. I will grab a pair of skis this winter and hit the slopes. I know I willl be fairly rusty, but the exciting feeling of skiing down a mo碌ntain is hard to beat.

MEN'S SOCCER TEAM WINNER OF THREE STRAIGHT MATCHES Pacific and George Fox fall to Pacific Lutheran University over the weekend after allowing four combined goals By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer The Lutes hosted the Pacific University Boxers on a blustery fall day this past Saturday, winning 3-0. After senior Derek Johnson scored a goal in the first half, the match seemed to be at a turning point. The Lutes were looking for an insurance goal while the Boxers were searching for the equalizer. Looking to seal the win, the Lutes pushed players forward, attempting to create a scoring chance and looking for someone to put that chance in the back of the net. In the 50th minute, midfielder Giancarlo Santoro, a senior, made a clever run down the right wing after which he sent a winding cross into the box. Forward Rigoberto

Loreto, a firSt-year, got to the end of the cross, but still had work to do. He took a nifty touch to his right to sidestep a sliding defender, and then he hammered a shot at the goal from the right side of the penalty area. The shot took a slight deflection from a defender and then slid into the far side of the goal past the helpless Boxer goalkeeper. The Lutes' goalkeeper Joe Rayburn, a senior, recorded his seventh shutout of the 2013 season. ''We knew that Pacific would try to be direct in the first half and that they would play with two target forwards," Rayburn said. "Our game plan was to absorb the pressure early, and then attack when we had the wind to our advantage. We put in a good effort both offensively and defensively today, and we got the win."

ruaros BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP LEFT: Fbrward Giancarlo Santoro, a senior, advances the ball past a Pacific defender. Santoro tallied one assist during the match when first-year Rigoberto Loreto scored in the second half. TOP RIGHT: Senior Derek Johnson squeezes the ball between two steadfast Pacific Boxer defenders. Johnson leads the team with 12 goals on the season. BOTTOM RIGHT: Defender Taylor Jackson, a senior, tries to corral the aoccer ball from a Pacific attacker. Jackson,

along with several other L4lte defenders, helped goalkeeper Joe Rayburn record his seventh shutout of his senior season.

Forward Jordan Downing, a sophomore, added a goal of his own to finalize the scoring for the Lutes. PLU dominated the match statistically, taking 20 shots with 10 of them on target. That statistic was significantly more than the six total shots taken by Pacific. Johnson led the attack with a total of five shots on goal. and senior Joe Oleginski contributed with an assist on Johnson's goal in the first half. The Lutes hosted George Fox Sunday and won 1-0. Oleginski scored the game's lone goal in the 82nd minute. First-year Diego Aceves was credited with the assist. The Lutes men's soccer team has now won three games in a row heading into the conference matchup against Puget Sound this Saturday.


THE MOORING MAST

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NOV. 8 2013

Whitman falls 3-1 against a resilient Lute volleyball team The first set was a dominant performance by the Lutes, who took the set 25-11. The combination of stingy defense and powerful hitting proved to be • Whitman proved to be a pesky opponent a potent combination. The Lutes held the for the Lutes' volleyball team last Friday Missionaries to a .024 hitting percentage in night. the set. The visiting Missionaries played tough, The Missionaries would not go down and the game fea~ed many long rallies . without a fight though. The two teams and spectacular digs. The Lutes came out exchanged leads several times, but on top in the end, however, winning by a Whitman took s:even of the final 10 points score of 3-1. to win the second set 25-22.

By NICK BARENE

Sports Writer

The third set fe<i.tured more hard hitting action from both teams in another close game. The Lutes held a late 23-21 advantage before seniors Haley Urdahl and Allison Wood scored back-to-back kills to seal the set win for the Lutes. The fourth set was another thriller. PLU held a 7-2 lead, but Whitman struck back with seven straight points to take a 9-7 lead. The two teams battled and exchanged leads throughout the rest of the set. Late in the frame, with the score tied

at 24, the Lutes won the match on a kill by senior Bethany Huston, followed by a service ace from junior Amber Aguiar, the team's libero. "There were a lot of long rallies. Our league is really tough," bead coach Kevin Aoki said. "It just goes to show how hard it is to do what we do." PLU was able to win many of those long rallies thanks to the 42 digs posted by defensive specialist and Aguiar. This is the Lutes' third win over Whitman this season.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

LEFT: Senior Bethany Huston bangs home her ninth kill of the match against Whitman. Huston only had one offensive error during the entire match. RIGHT: Junior Samantha North sets the volleyball up for Huston. North ended up with 51 assists during the four· set match.

Lutes' volleyball commemorates seniofs and triumphs over Whitworth By NICK BARENE

Sports Writer Saturday night brought another tough game for the volleyball team, as the Lutes needed five sets to take down the visiting Whitworth Pirates on Senior Night. The first set was a back and forth battle that included 15 ties and seven lead changes. The two teams had fought all the way to a 21-21 tie when the Lutes rattled off the final four points to earn a 25-21 set victory. The second set proceeded in the fashion of the first, with the two teams working hard to score points. PLU once again came out on top though, winning 25-20. In the third set, the momentum began to shift in favor of Whitworth. The Lutes held an early lead, only to have the Pirates come back and win the set 25-21. In the fourth set, the Pirates asserted themselves as a strong attacking team, striking quickly and storming to a 25-16 set victory to force an overtime frame.

The Lutes jumped out to a 12-7 lead in the final set, but Whitworth would rtot go quietly. The Pirates bounced back to cut the Lute lead to 14-13. For the match winning point, junior Amy Wooten smashed home her 11th kill of the night. The Lutes are graduating four seniors: Bethany Huston, Becca Holtgeerts, Haley Urdahl and Allison Wood. Head coach Kevin Aoki spoke highly of his senior players. "When you have four seniors, they make major contributions," Aoki said. "It's hard to play four years. We hold our seniors in high esteem." The Lutes now sit atop the northwest conference with a NWC record of 13-1 and an overall record of 17-5. The team is staying focused on the last games of the regular season and is not concerned with its placement. "We still have some work to do," Aoki said. The Lutes can repeat as NWC Champions if they win their last four games against Willamette, Linfield, George Fox and Lewis & Clark.

None of those teams have winning_conference records, and therefore, the Lutes look poised to head to the NCAA D-III Tournament.

LUTE KILL LEADERS AllU>on Wood - 11 Haley Urdahl - 11 Amy Wooten - 11 Bethany Huston - 10 Lucy Capron - 6 Chelsea Nelson - 4

Nick's Picks: Fantasy players to watch this week By NICK BARENE

Sports Writer TIGHT END- Greg Olson has had a solid season this year for the Carolina Panthers. He has caught one touchdown pass in each of the Panthers last two games, and will look to continue to contribute. Also keep an eye on Indianapolis Colts' tight end Coby Fleenet Fleener and the Colts will take on a weaker SL Louis team in Week 10.

RUNNING BACK- Zac Stacy of the SL Louis Rams looks like he's for real with another explosive game. Stacy rushed for 134 yanls against an elite Seattle defense, and torched the Titans in Week 9 for 127 yanls and two scores. Owners should consider making Stacy a weekly starter.

DEJ'ENSE/SPBCIAL TEAMS- Jna.ttmionbonkisfea&la._, thlAriloaa Cdnala m otea O'l'erlooRd. 'l1ie f.tnliula deCea ii Wdiltf ita own ar tlie t.op ortlte Jeacae hllwftt 11le rft m tlkiar on a lbvflllng Homtoa Taa1ll tam that will he playiaiita laaek'"lp qllllielW. Look &ir the r.da to come up big on defeme in Week 10.

WIDE RECEIVER- C'.ecil Shortaeftlie JacbomilleJlpan will look to pt IDOftnctptiolll DOW that.Justin BlacbJon hum supmWhytJie NFL. Doug BaldtriR ofthe Sa&tJe Wawks will alao 1iecome a bigger put of that ofe• nowthat Sidney Ritt is out with ui iqjurJ Both would mab for pd addltiens to any IDIDlf!l''I telml..

-t


OPINION

SPORTS

Repurpose old newspapers with arts and crafts PAGEll

Women's soccer finishes third in Northwest Conference PAGE16 PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE NOV. 15, 2013

AST

OORING

. VOLUME 90 ISSUE 8

mastmedia.plu.edu

Students travel 'Around the World' without leaving campus

PLU celebrates Veterans Day By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor

PHOTOS BY MARLENE WALTOFI'

Students gathered in the Hong Main Lounge Wednesday evening for the annual International Education Week event Around the World. International students and students who had studied away set up tabl.es with activities to teach their peers about other cultures. TOP: Sophomore Loaha Kaja, from Japan, helps senior Sophie Ro into a traditional Japanese kimono. BOTTOM: Seniors Yi Ma from China, Annie Twombly from America and Quyen San from Vietnam play Maltjong, a Chinese game, at Around the World during International Education Week 2013. RIGHT: Sophmore Simba Change from Zimbabwe tries Norwegian vafler med brunost, or waflles with brown cheese. The Norwegian booth also displayed Norwegian knitted clothing and flash cards with Norwegian to English translations.

Veterans Day is meant to honor both fallen soldiers and those who have been in an active military role. The Pacific Lutheran University community celebrated Veterans Day during chapel break Monday in Lagerquist Concert Hall. The ceremony began with the Posting of Colors by PLU's Reserve Officers Training Corps. Later, PLU student and U.S. Army veteran Sgt. Jeremy Dornbusch read a welcome message written by President Thomas Krise. Krise was unable to attend the ceremony due to a school-related conflict. The Master of Ceremonies, retired Sgt. First Gass Robert Rahal of PLU's ROTC, introduced keynote speaker Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Keller. Keller is a professor of military science for PLU's Army ROTC and veteran of the U.S. Army for 27 years. "As a veteran now, I really don't feel different from a civilian," Keller said. In his speech to the assembly, Keller said Veterans Day is a day for reflection, honor and to remember those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. "There's so many _out ,there who have served and are currently out there serving." Keller said. "They protect us so we can go about our daily lives as usual." Keller also said there is a divide between those serving in the military and those not, otherwise 路 known as civilians. He explained vets make up one percent of the population, and that civilians support their troops but don't understand the issues veterans face. Keller's solution is very simple. "Get out and know us," he said. "Most of us like to talk. We like to share our stories." Keller went on to say that sometimes vets don't share their stories because they believe civilians will not understand what they went through and the problems they faced in combat compared to a civilian's everyday life issues.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

VETERANS CONT.PAGES

WHAT'S IN~

Students volunteer with reading program

Arts &Ent.ertainment

By MAUREEN REDMOND Gliest Writer

Doctor Who's popularity due to a mixture of ''fantasy~ adventure and lwnwr 路路 page6

Opinion

Thanksgiving should be about family, .rwt shopping page JO

Sports

'Making the Big Time': } m t Westering's philosophy on li page JS

Pacific Lutheran University students provide extra help and support for elementary students outside of the classroom. The All-Star Reading Program (ASR) provides an opportunity for elementary students at Fem Hill Elementary School to advance in their reading skills by working with PLU students and other volunteers. Communities in Schools, an organization that focuses on providing support for the success of students, organizes ASR. They work with volunteers who spend

one-on-one time with elementary students who are reading below

their grade level. Communities in Schools of Tacoma coordinator Robin Malich said, "that little extra one-on-one attention just impacts them in so many ways." For ASR, elementary 路 school students, mainly second-graders, are paired with a volunteer who they will work with each Wednesday during the elementary school's academic year. Malich said elementary students connect very well with PLU students and look forward to someone who is young coming to spend time with them. ASR often works with PLU's Hispanic studies students because there is

a large Latino population at Fem Hill.

"I love having PLU students," Malich said. "I'd love to get more ... because it's such a good pairing." Some of the activities are structured around a curriculum program called the Sound Reading System. The focus of these activities is to help secondgraders learn how to listen to and pronounce sounds and words in order to help with reading fluency and comprehension. According to the All-Star Reading Program's website, Sound Reading helps strengthen students' listening and sound discrimination skills. "Before we teach phonics, we need to help the

READING CONT. PAGE3


THE MOORING MAST

2NEWS

NOV.15 2013

WEATHER FORECAST FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

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FORECAST COURTESY OF WEATHER.COM

STUDENTS TAKE ON ELECTION NIGHT By CARRIE REIERSON Guest Writer Newsrooms across Seattle and Tacoma buzzed with activity Nov. 5. Election results poured in, journalists devoured many pizzas and crews of reporters and photographers covered election events all over the Pacific Northwest. Even students from Pacific Lutheran University joined the frenzy. Three teams of student volunteers headed out to the The News Tnoune in Tacoma and the television stations KCPQ and KOMO in Seattle. These students helped with data entry and also covered live events on location with tweets, photos and blog posts. The group at The News Tribune split into smaller teams and went to various locations to cover election night parties. Juniors Amanda Brasgalla and Valery Jorgenson found themselves at a golf course near Gig Harbor chatting with state senate candidate Jan Angel. Others headed out to Cork, a wine bar in Tacoma, to attend a party hosted by opponents of Tacoma Prop. 1, a proposition to increase the earnings tax on utility companies for neighborhood street improvements and safety upgrades. Senior Mariah Rasmussen was part of the team sent to Cork. She covered the event by live-tweeting photos of party

goers and mingling with guests. "It was a little bit stres5ful to be there and to be working for The News Tribune, because I've never done anything like that before," Rasmussen said. '1t ended up not being as stressful as I thought it was going to be. They told us to relax and have fun with it, so we did." The other two teams of students headed to Seattle. One group settled in at KCPQ, a FOX affiliated television station. KCPQ employees tasked the students with entering data into the system in case the computers failed. The computers were up and running, so most of the students spent their time tweeting and watching the election results roll in live. They also had the opportunity to visit the gi:een room, news sets and view the show taping in the studio. The other Seattle group was stationed at KOMO News in Fisher Plaza. These students were also responsible for data entry, spending the night entering numbers into the system as they came in. Once the students finished the work. KOMO news treated them to a tour of the facilities, including the control rooms, news sets and even a short visit with KOMO News weathercaster Steve Pool. At the end of their stay, the students at KOMO sat down with their tour guide Brett Jungbluth, a broadcast engineer. Jungbluth

ended the night by advising the up-andcoming journalists on what they can do to get ahead in journalism.

"Get your hands on as much stuff as you can do, no matter what your school offers you," Jungbluth said.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

A group of communication students poses next to the Q-13 Fbx sign outside of the KCPQ office on election night. The student.a entered data on the election result.a for the scrolling information bar at the bottom of a newscast. (BACK, left to right: junior Taylor Cox, senior Ashley Yi, senior Taylor Lunka. FRONT: senior Alison Haywood, senior Jesse Major.)


TBR MOORING MAST

NOV.15 2013

NEWS3

Study away goes carbon Ileutral What to do By SAMANTHA LUND •Guest Writer Pacific Lutheran University is known for having highly ranked study abroad and sustainability programs. Now, students will be bringing the sustainability initiatives of PLU around the world with them. The Wang Center and PLU earned a ninth-place ranking in "Leading Institutions by Undergraduate Participation in Study Abroad" and also made the top 40 for graduate programs, which is a first for PLU. In PLU's 2011 Greenhouse Gases Carbon Usage and Initiative Inventory Report, the school set a goal to reach a 100 percent reduction in air travel emissions by 2014 as part of its goal to be completely carbon neutral. In 2007, PLU signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment to be carbon neutral by 2020. That goal is now becoming a reality with a new initiative the Wang Center and the Sustainability Committee put together. Starting in fall 2014, students who study away during a full semester will be participating in the offsetting of. the carbon emissions of their plane flights. A small amount ·of each student's tuition from study

away will be going to support programs around the world that are working to create sustainable living, thus giving back to the environment what was taken by the carbon emissions of their flights. Each term, Sustainability and the Wang Center will choose an environmental project and allocate the funds to support it. Current tuition will supply the funding money - students will not have to pay more to study away. Students who study away will also participate in an orientation to educate them about their carbon footprint while traveling and to influence them to be more sustainable, both while abroad and in the U.S. Carbon education is a top priority for the program. Students will learn that air travel emissions are much worse than cars or buses because the carbon from air travel is put directly into the atmosphere. Air travel accounts for 19 percent of PLU's carbon emissions. The coordinator of study away, Tanya Ulsted, and sustainability manager, Chrissy Cooley, headed the project. "The goal is to be educational and mission based," Ulsted said. "One of the big questions now is what we will be contributing to first." Ulsted and Cooley have been working on the project for a

atPLU

"The goal [of study away] is to be educational and mission based." Tanya Ulsted study away coordinator

couple of months now and said the details are not all figured out. The program does have a lot of support, and the coordinators said they are confident it will be successful and completely effective by 2014. "In a flight across the country, each person could drive individually in cars instead and still not have as much carbon emissions as the plane flight," Cooley said. The emissions from student flights are a large part of the carbon footprint of PLU. The program will first take effect with the fall 2014 study away program. Though Cooley and Ulsted have not decided on the first sustainable project, they said they want the first project to be on campus to allow students to see how the program is helping the environment. After the first year, Cooley and Ulsted said they hope to branch out and participate in projects around the world. Their goal is for students in the programs to

READING FROM PAGEi

PHCYl'O BY IOSH ATEN

Volunteers Natasha Meye~ and Malia Rasmussen give second-graders Elisa and Mackenzie encouragement as they ~ad at Fern Hill Elementary.

[student] hear all of the sounds in words," the Communities in Schools webpage states. Students and volunteem may do other act\Yitie~ as~, based on what seems to worl< best for the growth of the elementary student. Malich also emphasized that ASR is meant to be helpful and fun, such as choosing fun books and activities that can be entertaining for both the secondgraders and the volilnteers. She also explained that building a relationship : between the elementary school student and

get the chance to participate in the PLU programs while away. The new initiative has been supported by the Wang Center, the . Sustainability Committe~ Earth Deeds - a program promoting sustainable travel and Second Nature, an advisory board for other schools attempting this. been a "It's really collaboration," Ulsted said. "It would not have happened without that." PLU is one of the .first schools to pilot this program. Ulsted and Cooley said the next step is to get J-term study away students involved. Since J-term is an out-of-pocket expense, the price for students studying away might change. For now, only full semester programs will participate. To learn more about the new initiative and to get involved, contact the Wang Center.

the volunteer is a very important part of the program. PLU students and other community members may volunteer for different reasons, whether they are gaining experience for future work with children and education, earning volunteer hours 'or just want to contribute to the success of young students~ "It's just kind of. giving back to the community/' Malich said. For more information about the AllcStar Reading Program, contact Robin Malich at rmalich@ tacoma.k12.wa~us or call 253571-3873. ASR takes place every Wednesday from 4-5 p.m. at Fern Hill Elementary School.

Work party at the Community Garden. Join the Garden Oub and learn a bit about growing food in the Pacific Northwest. Every Saturday from 10 a.m. - noon.

Community Garden, across from Ingram on 121st Street.

Friday The Deparbnent of Languages and Literature presents: "Oslo, August 31st," a dramatic film about drug addiction. Ingram 100, 5-7:30

p.m. Vpstart Crow presents: ''Proof' by David Auburn. Come see this Pulitzer-winning play about mathematical genius and mental illness. Directed by junior Mitchell Helton. Studio

Theater. 7:3~9 p.m. Collegiate Washington Music Educators Association . Music Night at Northern Pacific Coffee Company. Support this PLU du& for students interested in music education and enjoy a night of music, coffee, food and friends. Twenty-five percent of the profits from the evening will go to CWMEA. Musical selections will include jazz, and classical, alternative everything in between. NPCC, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Global Getdown. Check out the last ,gf the .International Education Week events and dance the night away to music from many different cultures. The Cave, 6:30 p.m. Geographical Jive. Stick around after Global Getdown for Hong Hall's annual allhall event. There will be food, drinks, glowsticks and international music. The Cave, 9-11

p.m.

Saturday

VETERANS FROM PAGEi "We [vets] need to strive to be more patient and understanding to bridge that gap," Keller said. Keller concluded his speech by encouraging students to get to know a vet. "I guarantee that if you get to know a vet, take a little time to learn something about them and understand [them]; you will be rewarded with an overwhelming sense of pride and assurance, proud to be an American and assured of this nation's .s_trei'tgtb," he said. "We are all, in fact, in very good hands." A military· melody followed Keller's speech, where the PLU brass quitent honored veterans and active duty members by playing the service song for each branch of the military: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. When a song played, the members of that branch of the military stood to be honored and recognized. "It was great to see all of the different groups [of veterans] come together and stand during their different songs," Lesley Gardner, a campus ministry administrative assistant, said. "And it was great for everyone to come together to honor those

Ongoing

PLU Well Project & HERmonic Against Dirty WaterConcert.Join HERmonic as they try to raise money to build a well in Nicaragua. The well will provide water for 200 people for up to 10 years. $5 in advance, $7 at the door. The Cave, 7:30 p.m. Choral Union Concert. The concert will feature two large choral and orchestral works, includin~ "Th~ ~ed Man," a multi-media piece, that comes with an accompanying film, and "Eternal Light-A Requiem," a popular modem anti-war piece. 8-9:30 p.m.

Sunday PHCYl'O COURTESY OF JOHN FROSCHAUER

Rev. Nancy Connor opens the Veterans Day chapel ceremony Monday. From left to right, retired Sgt. 1st Class Robert Rahal, Rev. Dennis Sepper, Sgt. Jeremy Dornbusch and Lt. Col Kevin Keller stand behind her.

who have served our country." The event concluded with a moving rendition of "God Bless America" and the retiring of the colors. A reception followed the ceremony in the Mary Baker Russell lobby where PLU ROTC

students and civilians alike spoke to and thanked the veterans who attended. "It truly brightens our day when we receive those random 'thank you for your service' comments," Keller said. month of The whole

November is dedicated veterans at PLU.

to

To find a full list of events; go to http://www.plu.edu/news/2013/10/ veterans/.artifacts ·

Habitat restoration work party. Youi: capable hands are needed to restore the natural landscape of the Fred I. Tobiason Outdoor Leaming Center and Hillside Habitat.

Lower AUC steps, 1-4 p.m. PLUtonic and HERmonic concert. Come see the student a cappella groups . perform. LagerquiSt Concert Hall, 2 p.m.

and4p.m.


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

VOLDEMORT STOPS THE ROCK

Students leave Lutedome, .clean up community

Band emergency cancels concert By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor

I

PHOTO BY ALISON HAYWOOD

Sophomore Ella Andersen plant.s garlic in the Community Garden during Community Beautification Day Saturday. Community Beautification Day was an opportunity for PLU student.s and Parkland residents to improve the local community.

By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor Forty-odd Pacific Lutheran students, local high school students and Parkland residents gave up several hours of their Saturday to work together towards a common goal: community beautification. They donned work clothes and gloves and got to work cleaning up the Community Garden, planting native plants in the hillside habitat restoration area and picking up litter from the streets of Park.land. Eco-justice advocate Princess Reese, a senior, who organized the event, said the purpose of the event was to unite the PLU and Parkland communities and foster a sense of care for one another. "We live in Parkland, and so care for our community is care for ourselves," Reese said. The event was a collaboration between various organizations on campus, including the Diversity Center, the Sustainability

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NOV.15 2013

Department and the Center for CommunityEngagement. Garden Manager Jennifer Watt, a junior, said it was "awesome" having so many people help out at the Community G_arden. ''We've gotten more done [in one hour] than we could have gotten done in four different work parties, two each," hours she said. Reese said she hopes to have a Community Beautification Day twice a year in the future, once in fall and once in spring. VIDEO "Hopefully COMPONENT our efforts will continue to ONLINE grow,'' she said.

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Last Saturday, students at Pacific Lutheran University were expecting to rock out to Harry and the Potters, a wizard rock band. However, the band had to cancel due to a family emergency. ''What happened was an emergency with one of the member's wives/' LASR's general manager, junior Olivia Ash, said. The founders of the band, Joe and Paul DeGeorge, are brothers, so a family emergency would affect the majority of the band. Originating in 2002 from Norwood, Mass., Harry and the Potters became known as the godfathers of wizard rock, a music genre centered around the world of J.K. Rowling' s famous book series. "I've liked Harry and the Potters since 11th grade," junior Christina Erikson said. "I was really sad to hear they cancelled." Harry and the Potters were promoting their album "Voldemort Can't Stop the Rock" on its tour, which included PLU. ASPLU wanted to host a fun fall concert for both PLU and the Parkland coIIUri.unity, and it decided to host Harry and the Potters. "There's a lot of people at PLU and in the Park.land community who like Harry Potter,"

PHOTO BY BELAND TUOMI

ASPLU announced that the highly anticipated Harry and the Potters concert was cancelled due to a family emergency the day before the band was supposed to perform.

ASPLU Public Relations Director and junior Brittany Jackson said. "We thought it would be fun to have them [the band] here." ASPLU is speaking with the band about eventually performing at PLU, much to the appreciation of many local muggles. No final arrangements have been made yet to reschedule the concert.

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SALSA NIGHT Latinos Unidos celebrates Latino culture through dance ByUNAHAAVE Guest Writer In the hopes of teaching Pacific Lutheran University students about Latin dance and culture, Latinos Unidos, a Latino cultural club, organized a salsa night in The Cave Nov. 8. Senior Dominic Napat, an L.U. club member, coordinated the event. "I wanted to create a space for students to have fun and learn how to dance," Napat said. "Also, I wanted to create a space for students who already know how to dance to practice and get to know other people." L.U. is dedicated to teaching students about Latin culture and issues. one way the club members do this is through dance. "We learn different types of Latin dancing like bachata, merengue, cumbia and a wide range of dances," Napat said. Students do not need to be a member of L.U. nor do they need dance experience to attend L.U.'s events. Both beginners and experienced dancers attended

salsa night. "We're all here for one reason and that is to dance and listen to really cool music and be together as a community," first-year Victoria Rivera said. Rivera was one of those with more experience as a former ballroom dancer. "I wanted to get better at dancing and hang out with friends," junior Jasmine Lucero said. "I like how you're able to be more open and see people that you don't normally see all the time." People with a diversity of backgrounds attended. Lucero, who said she has Hispanic roots herself, explained that she had met a student from Norway, as well as students from other cultures at the event. "Not all students who are interested in Latin culture are Latino. I think there is a large group of students who express interest in Latino culture and dance," Napat said. He encouraged all PLU students interested in Latin culture to attend L.U.'s events in the future. "We would like people to

come, regardless of ethnicity," first-year Christian Garcia said. After an hour of non-stop, high-paced salsa dancing, the night finished off with a round of Limbo. Everyone got a turn to attempt to walk under the limbo bar with their backs facing the floor. Every other Friday night, L.U. organizes similar events. "I'm looking forward to going to some of their future events," Garcia said.

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"We're all here for one reason and that is to dance and listen to really cool music and be together as a community." Victoria Riveria first-year

PHOTO BY MARLENE WALTOFT

Junior Jasmine Lucero and senior Dominic Napat dance to salsa music at salsa night. Latinos Unidos, a group that is dedicated to teaching students about Latin culture and issues, put on the event. One way they accomplish their educational mission is through dance.

An underrated genre: By JAYMES FLEURY LASRDJ Underrated, underplayed and underground. No, this isn't the next big indie rock hit - this is the good old third-wave ska genre. Television shows, movies and MTV were blasting these bands

like crazy in the '90s. But as the new millennium came along, ska lost the majority of its popularity. The reasons behind this unpopularity are uncertain, but now the fan base has been concentrated to "occultfollowers" rather than mainstream listeners. I want to spread the message

LASR DJ encourages listene.rs to embrace upbeat Ska music

of ska to as many people as possible, because people deserve great music. The bands of this genre play an overwhelmingly upbeat tone with grooving bass lines, fast guitars and horns. That last item on the list is what makes or breaks the ska band.

PHOTO COURTilSY OF REEL-BIG-FISH.COM

Members of Reel Big Fish, a popular Ska band, pose for a photo. The genre is known for its upbeat rhythms, energy and excitement.

Without the horn section, the band is just another punk-rock wannabe. The genre's roots reach back to '50s Jamaican reggae and early jazz. During this era, performers played horn sections with high popularity. This growth allowed for less formal tones and faster rhythms. Both the U.K. and Germany quickly adopted and then modernized the sound. By the end of the '80s, America had joined the ska movement with full force. I would bet that without the band The Toasters, we wouldn't have had such a rioting ska scene. They performed anywhere and everywhere, especially college campuses. In fact, the most popular venue for The Toasters and other bands were college parties and fraternities. I was first introduced to ska during my middle school years, when I was pretty bummed out all the time, as were many of my peers. Almost every angsty preteen was listening to emo, rock and screamo. This wasn't my scene, and I was getting tired of my dad's collection of classic rock. That's when my sister introduced me to The Aquabats. The band is not angsty whatsoever. Its whole approaCh is to

destroy boredom and save kids from bullies. Not more screaming, no F-bombs, just happy music and 路 laughable lyricsI had just opened Pandora's Box. Ska is a genre full of energy and excitement. Seldom do we find any ska tune with a downbeat feel or even a minor chord. The genre is so deep and spread out, I didn't know where to look. So I downloaded everything in sight. On my LASR station, "Suburban Rush Hour," I try to play all the classic ska bands and their greatest hits. The greatest aspect of these groups is their flexibility. The Mighty Mighty Bosstones have two saxophones and a trombone, while Streetlight Manifesto houses a five-piece horn section. Ska made jazz sound cool once again, and made being the bandgeek acceptable. No two bands will ever be alike. Possibly one of the most famous ska bands, Reel Big Fish, has a goofy and party-like feel, while The Aquabats dress up like superheroes and perform battlesequences on stage. I recommend ska to everyone and anyone willing to expand their libi:ary. Chances are, you nave been exposed in some way.


The 'Doctor Who' Phenomenon Lutes become avid followers of SO-year-old television series By NATALIE DEFORD Guest Writer "Doctor Who" bow ties and blue phone booths can be seen on the belongings of Lutes all over campus. BBC's "Doctor Who" is a wildly popular series that first aired in 1963 and is now celebrating a glorious 50 years in the art of science fiction television. The anniversary special, 'Tue Day of The Doctor," airs on BBC Nov. 23 with a worldwide simultaneous broadcast. While the by-products of this show are everywhere, not everyone knows what the show

PHOTO BY NATALffi DEFORD

The TARDIS drawn in chalk outside the Anderson University Center. Someone Virote 'Bad Wolf' on it. jllst as it appears in the first season.

is about and may require some background information. "The series is mostly about having fun with a crazy person in all sorts of places that may or may not get you killed," junior Adrian Mayoral said. The Doctor is from the planet Gallifrey and is the only surviving member of his species, the Time Lords. Gallifrey was destroyed in the Time War with the Daleks, the Doctor's greatest enemy. They are squid-like creatures inside metal casings with extermination rays. They appear, among other alien species, continuously throughout the show. The Doctor has been running ever since the war and travels through space and time in a blue police box that's bigger on the inside. It's called the Time and Re!ative Dimensions in Space or TARDIS. The Doctor's tool is a Sonic Screwdriver, which unlocks, fixes and jump-starts just about anything: It also sometimes serves as a weapon. He always tries to save everyone, even at the cost of his own life. Luckily, this is not as much of a problem as it is for humans because Time Lords regenerate. When the Doctor faces mortal injury, he doesn't actually die. He starts over as a new. Doctor played by a different actor. This is how he has so far had 11 faces and the show has been able to

continue for 50 years. The series was revived in 2005 with the introduction of the ninth Doctor, played by Christopher Eccleston, and his companion Rose, played by Billie Piper. Since the revival, there have been seven complete seasons in the new series. Following Eccleston came David Tennant as Doctor number 10. The 11th, and current, Doctor is played by Matt Smith. Normally, the Doctor travels with a companion because he is lonely. The companions usually happen to stumble upon the Doctor in some sort of alienrelated crisis on earth. They end up helping him in most cases and are fascinated by him as he is unlike anyone they have ever met before. If a person is lucky enough, the doctor will say, "come with me," hand them a TARDIS key, and take them anywhere they want to go. Mystery is definitely present throughout the show, as it is not just science fiction. Perhaps this mix of styles contributes to the show's popularity. 'Tue shciw contains action, adventure and sci-fi - all genres I love/' j~or Campbell Brett said. Sophomore Maia Palmer said she likes the show's mix of, "fantasy, adventure and humor." She also said "the story is unique

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Junior Campbell Brett and sophomore Natalie DeFord at the Experimental Music Project with a prop that was used in an episode of "Doctor Who." _

and the characters have a lot of depth." She said she enjoys how the Doctor and the companions handle the situations presented in each episode. First-year Kiera Stevens is an avid fan who dressed as the TARDIS for her Halloween costume, complete with light-up hat. Stevens' s favorite part of "Doctor Who" is how it changes over time. She said the show is, "constantly evolving in both people and storyline, which makes the show crazy and amazing." Stevens said her best advice

for newcomers to the show is, "don't judge the entire series by the first episode." One episode is not enough to get the full "Doctor Who" experience and several episodes must be watched in order to see if you like it. that something Whether special is th-<! combining of multiple genres, the actors, the characters, the endless possibilities, the system that keeps the show regenerafing and continuing or a wonderful mix of all of the above, "Doctor Who" has certainly made its mark as something fantastic.

Journey ends for Johnson Alumna bootedfrom 'The Voice' ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN AdE Writer. The progress of alumna Stephanie Anne Johnson on 'Tue Voice" has come to an abrupt end. Johnson is a native of Tacoma and a graduate of Pacific Lutheran University. Her career in music led her to NBC' s singing competition, ''The Voice," where her celebrity coach was Oui.stina Aguilera. Unfortunately, Nov. 7 was her last performance on the stage, but Johnson maintains a positive attitude and remains grateful to her fans for the experience. "What a wild ride," Johnson posted to her blog, http://sajmusic.com. "I'm so grateful to you all for your support and love through this amazing experience." \Vearing a black sequined dress, Johnson performed Maroon 5' s "Love Somebody" with the rest of Team Oui.stina Aguilera before the judges announced which contenders would go on to be a part of the the top 12. The rest were eliminated. Hands joined with

fellow teammates Josh Logan and Olivia Henken, Johnson waited through Aguilera's stalling speech before Aguilera announced Logan would be advancing on to the top twelve. This meant Johnson had been eliminated. A public vote elected the bottom three contestants for each team, and a single judge's vote decided which contestant PHOTO COURl'ESY OF SA.IMUSIC.COM would move on from those three. Adam Levine, casted Throughout her a vote to keep Johnson various performances on the show in her last on the show, Johnson battle. "I loved your true, has received nothing but underlying grit," Levine positive feedback from told a beaming Johnson; judges and audiences Blake Shelton alike. commented on Johnson's Judge CeeLo Green final battle with a lot of commented consistently enthusiasm. Johnson that Johnson "sang with was performing a song a lot of conviction." she had never heard Most recently, Green before rehearsing for that told Johnson that "even pa垄cular round. "I know without being comfortable 路 that, song very well," with the song; you left it Sliefton said. "You sang all on stage." the crap out of it." Aguilera gave high It is the encl for Johnson marks to Johnson from on '.'The Voice;" but she the first time she heard said she will not give up her perform. "I was really on tiyfug to make her taken with the energy路you dreams come true. put out there," Aguile.ra '.'.Even if none of you said after Johnson's first pick me," Johnson said performance. ''You just after her second-to-last move me." pe~ance, ''I will n~ver Maroon 5's lead singer, giv.; up on singing."


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GATHER AT THE GLASS MUSEUM Student night will include free fun, blow torches and culture By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor University students, free food, alcohol, glass, expensive artwork and blow torches. For some, these are things that should never go together - for the Museum of Glass, it's a list of what will be present at its student event, Gather. The event, which takes place Nov. 21 from 6:30-10:30 p.m., hopes to draw university students to the museum for a free night of fun and culture. The regular galleries will be open for students to wander, there will be free food and drinks and a bar will be selling alcoholic beverages to of-age attendees. The Univel'Sity Student Museum Advisory Committee helped organize the event, and five PLU students are part of it, including senior Jenny Tillman. "The Museum of Glass was interested in engaging university students," Tillman said of the committee and the motivation behind the event. ''They really wantto have more of the young community coming out and seeing what kind of things the Pacific Northwest art scene has to offer for them and how cool it really is." The 11-year-old museum is a Tacoma staple, with features such as the Chihuly Bridge of Glass, which spans Interstate 705 and Dock Street, and the landmark conical fixture. The silver, off-center cone houses the museum's Hot Shop, a fully-functioning glass blowing studio. Glass blowing is the technique of heating glass until it is malleable and then blowing air into the iniddle like a balloon. Visitors to the museum can see this happen during regular museum hours, when visiting artists are almost always worlang. At Gather, students who preregister will be able to blow their own glass artwork with the help of some trained staff.

Students can also register for a glass

fusing workshop. The museum is the brainchild of former University of Puget Sound President Phil Phibbs and glass art phenom Dale Chihuly. 路 Chihuly was born and raised in Tacoma and is now world-renowned for his glass artwork, although he doesn't personally blow the glass anymore. Students can see some of his work in the tall windows of the Mary Baker Russell Music Center. While at the Gather event, students will have the opportunity to learn about internships and other opportunities for students at the Museum of Glass. Last year, Gather' s first, the museum estimated about 375 students participated. The museum is also providing free transportation for students. Shuttles will pick up students in front of Harstad Hall at 6:15 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and will take students back at 9:30 p.m. and 10:30p.m. For those who can't make it to the event, admission is free to university students every Sunday during regular hours. To RSVP to the event or learn more, visit the museum's Facebook page at -https://www.facebook.com/ gatherevent2013.

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PHOTO BY IOSH ATEN

The iconic cone of the Museum of Glass stands out against the Tacoma sky. The cone houses the museum's Hot Shop where visito~ can observe the creation and fusion of glass artwork: At Gather, students will have the opportunity to create glass artwork during workshops. .

Get involved, Lutes Club fair offers valuable insight despite low attendence By EVAN DERINGER Multimedia Editor A variety of different clubs packed the Regency Room of the Anderson University Center during the Oub Fair Nov. 7. Oub tables lined the walls of the Regency Room as representatives from each greeted the small number of students who attended the event. Students roamed around and listened to the information

shared by members of each club, occasionally adding their e-mails to the clubs' sign-up sheets. Student attendance was low, but clubs that attended ranged from science clubs and religion clubs, to entertainment . clubs such as the Yu-Gi-Oh! card game club and Karate club. Among the assortment of clubs was the Queer Ally Student Union, or QASU. Junior Michael Cargill, a representative of the club, said

PHOTO BY JESSI! MAJOR

Fft:sh-~ Andn;-fr Lcxldl p~ Yu-Gi-Oh!

at the clubs fair on Nov. 7, The YuGi-Oh! club gave awa7 free Yu-Gi-Ohl cards with club information to encourage new members to join.

QASU is "a club that focuses on Queer justice on campus. So that means you don't have to identify a certain way to get involved." Cargill alSo said the club is about being passionate about Queer justice, regardless of whether club attendees are a member of the LGBTQ community or an Ally. QASU held events during Gender Exploration Week, which was Oct. 11 - Oct. 18 and it advertises for the Diversity Center. Cargill also said QASU might be planning an event for the upcoming World AIDS Day. QASU meets once a week in the Diversity Center. To learn more about QASU, find them on Facebook by searching "Queer Ally Student Union." Another club represented at the fair was InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. "Our club's mission is to be the hands and feet of Jesus through genuine community, through loving and servirig PLU and Parkland," junior Emily Ames, a representative of InterVarsity, said. Ames also said everyone is

always wekome to InterVarsity, and that the club likes to study

Jesus. The club members also focus on what it means to follow Jesus nowadays, and how to bring Jesus into the Pacific Lutheran University and Parkland communities. Details about InterVaristy can be found on Facebook by searching "Intervarsity Christian Fellowship @ PLU." One of the scientific clubs at the fair was the 路 PLU Chemistry Oub. Senior Victoria Richmond, a member of the Chemistry Oub, said the club holds events that inform people about how chemistry plays a role in everyday life. 1be club members cover topics such as how household cleaners and batteries work and can be be improved. The Chemistry Oub also acts as an academic resource to

students. Members can tutor students if they would like. Although they do not operate through the Academic Assistance Center, the members said they would be glad to help students with their chemistry woes. 路 The club fair offered a range of information about many clubs on campus, however, few students attended.

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ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES

路Tips for buying a car in college 路 By BJORN SLATER Business Editor College students rarely need to leave campus on a daily basis unless they are commuter students. However, owning a car is still a priority for a lot of college students, even if they don't know how they will afford it. Whether or not they need a car, a lot of young people feel the need for their own. It makes things like going home for a visit, grabbing meals off campus and seeing a movie mucft easier and is far less time consuming than walking or riding the bus, the exception being a commuter bus. However, not everyone has parents who gave them a car the day they turned 16 and, just in case anyone was wondering, the budget for a typical college student doesn' f have room for a .carsized expense. There are options though, and just in case students have some savings built up, here are some tips for keeping car purchases affordable and reliable: . Buy used Most college students cannot afford $400 per month for a new sports car, so the used car market is a poor colleg~ kid's best friend. Look for cars that are more than three or four years old because after the three year mark, car values tend to greatly depreciate. One of the most important indicators of a used car's health is the number of miles on it. Simply put, the more a car has been driven, the worse condition it will most likely

be in. Obviously this varies greatly across car manufacturers, but in general, the car with fewer miles will 路be in better shape. There are many used car dealerships in the Tacoma area and a few can even be spotted just by driving up and down Pacific Avenue here in beautiful Parkland. Stick to dealers Dealerships may not have the best deals when it comes to used cars, but at least the car will run. Owners can sell the car for cheaper than a dealer, but for most people it's impossible to tell if the car will need thousands of dollars of work in the near future. For college students, it's simply not worth the risk of buying a car from the owner just to have it break down a week later. Dealers have to respect implied warranty laws, which for Washington can be researched at http:// www.atg.wa.gov. Basically, every used car sold by a dealer has to meet certain requirements: the car will be fit for ordinary driving, will have no major defects and will be reasonably safe. Once students stop what worrying about "reasonably safe" might mean in court, they can take advantage of other ~rvices dealers supply. A dealer allows old cars to be traded in for discounts on the purchase of a different car, and also provide financing options should anyone need them. Bring a connoisseur As mentioned earlier, not everyone knows what to look

PB<rrO COURTESY OF WWW.USEDCAJISANDTIWCKS.COM

Several used cars out.side of a used car dealership in Western Washington.

for in a car. This can make a reasonably priced, reasonably safe used car a very expensive compilation of metal and rubber that is very safe once it stops running and ends up stuck in the driveway. The best way to mitigate this is to bring someone who knows what they're talking about. Most people have that friend who is obsessed with cars or at least a family member who has bought a used car before. Take advantage of that person's knowledge and experience, and that person can, in tum, take advantage of the snazzy used set of wheels he or she just helped pick out. Use smart money

Cash in this case cash refers to any money a student may have, whether it's physical bills or in a bank account - is the cheapest way to buy a car. Any form of institutional financing will cause students to end up paying more money than the car is worth over the lifetime of the loan because of the interest that will inevitably accrue. Students can avoid this by waiting to buy a car and saving their money until they can afford it, or by finding different methods of financing. If students can secure a loan from. a family member, it is very possible to do so with low-interest rates or even interest-free loans, because

family members understand studying is more important than trying to come up with a bunch of cash for a car. I'm not trying to promote stealing from relatives, but this is one of the few times that being poor could work in favor of college students, so I highly recommend this route if students need a car and can't .w.Pt to ~v:e ~ ough money. Cars are a luxury that bikes and public transportation are great substitutes for, but nothing beats the feeling of freedom that comes with having a vehicle parked in the driveway that can go from Washington to California overnight, assuming the cost of gas doesn't completely drain the bank account first.

Twitter IPO heating up Silicon Valley By BJORN SLATER Business Editor

Twitter {NYSE: TWTR) common stock price per share since last week's IPO 46 45 44 43 42.60

42

1.65

41 40 7-Nov

8-Nov

9-Nov

10-Nov

11-Nov

12-Nov

13-Nov

DATA KETltlEVED FROM FINANCE.YAHOO.COM

Twitter's stock,. priced at $26 before trading started Nov. 7, hit a high of $50.09 before settling at a closing price of $44.90 the first day. Since then, it has been trending lower, with an average daily price of $42.79. The Wall Street Journal rates the stock as a "hot short," referring to short selling the stock,. but this downward pressure hasn't had. a distinctly negative effect on the company's stock price which has been hovering around $42. As the price stabilizes, analyst opinions will as well. Meanwhile, analysts from Yahoo Finance and The Wall Street Journal speculate this is just the beginning for tech WO' s in Silicon Valley. Chegg, an eightyear-old education tech company based out of

Santa Clara, raised $187.5 million Wednesday as the first tech IPO on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) since Twitter. The Washington Post says there are many companies that resemble Twitter and last year's big Internet IPO, Facebook. On their list of 10 Internet companies to watch are familiar names such as Snapchat, Dropbox, Pinterest and Foursquare. These Internet companies exhibit similar characteristics to Twitter and Facebook, including rapidly growing user bases, innovative concepts and billion, if not multibillion, dollar valuations. November has historically been a great month for the stock market, and if Twitter' s IPO is anything to base judgment off of, this November isn't going to be any different.


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BUSINESS 9

Emerging market economles face hardships Averaae GDP growth rate for the past

5

DATA RETRIEVED FROM DATA.WORl.DBANK.OHG

afloat. Investors rushed to take investments out of countries with flat interest rates, such as the U.S. and Japan, and push them into emerging markets that would supply the needed natural resources to China. Indonesia was the unequivocal flagship of the emerging economies birthed from China's rapid growth. Now, with all eyes fixed on Indonesia and Thailand, many investors have grown weary of the trade deficits

By PETER MUELLER Guest Writer Developing countries with vast amounts of natural . resources have become paramount _to the development of the two blossoming economic superpowers in the world China and India. When the economic crisis hit, China implemented a $525 billion constructioncrazy stimulus package to keep its domestic economy

Pacific Lutheran Un1vers1ty

I

and rapidly growing bubbles within these young markets. Last year, Indonesia seemed to be the most stable and prolific emerging market in the world. Aiding China's unquenchable thirst for natural resources, Indonesia posted record-growth numbers that left puddles of drool on trading floors across the globe. In 2012, analysts predicted a GDP growth of 7 percent, based on a 5 percent gain the previous year. Since 2009,

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Sign-up at www.plu.edu/graduate and click on "Lecture Se11es

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$4 trillion of speculative billion to $65 billion dollars a capital has been rushed into month. Indonesia and other emerging This announcement sent markets such as Malaysia and shocks through the global Thailand. commodity markets and Foreign investment rapidly slowed investment in bonds, infrastructure into emerging markets. and commodities fueled Indonesia now faces a incredible growth for $2.2 billion trade deficit, Indonesia. and Thailand is sitting on Thailand saw the oncoming 17 million tons of rice that flood of foreign investment are beginning to rot, Forbes and took advantage. In reports. an effort to become more Now corruption competitive and shine bright flourishes in all tiers of these in the eyes of investors, governments, and China has Thailand began borrowing to shown signs of slowing down spur growth. its construction-obsessed Thailand started offering growth strategy. If that wasn't enough, housing subsidies, tax cuts and also began flooding Indonesia, Thailand and borrowed money into its 路 Malaysia are all seeing education system. At first, bubbles in each of the the move was well played country's domestic real estate for Thailand and allowed the markets grow with fervor. influx of foreign business to Analysts are staying glued to Thailand and Indonesia, transition with ease. But, with a commodity basing future investments in driven economy facing emerging markets on each an increasing trade deficit country's ability to hurdle and continued government economic obstacles, The Wall spending, Thailand began Street Journal reports. The near future looks a bit to show signs of possible economic pitfalls. disheartening for emerging The policymakers of these market economies, but this prominent emerging market isn't the first time Thailand economies have failed to and Indonesia have faced understand the volatility of economic hardship. Both the international commodity countries came out of the 2008 market and the effect of global financial crisis nearly foreign monetary policy on unscathed after all. their economies. With improved Earlier this year, the infrastructure, education Federal Reserve chairman, and international business the resiliency Ben Bernanke, announced a relations, tapering of the Fed's bond of these two countries is buying program from $85 something to watch for.


THE MOORING MAST

IO OPINION

NOV.15 2013

Flu vaccination helps instead of hinders By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Columni.st

Since Feb. 24, 2010 the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended flu shots for everyone six months of age or older to protect against influenza in .the United States. The CDC defines the flu shot as a vaccine that protects against three or four strains of influenza viruses for the upcoming flu season. These three or four strains are the same kind of strands researchers indicate \Vill be most prevalent for that year. It is important to note that the vaccine \Vill not protect against every strain of influenza and thus does not

guarantee immunity from the flu virus. In addition, it takes two weeks to become fully protected. However, the vaccine is still very much recommended for all persons, and it is reported to be the best way to prevent the flu. Common side effects are soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site, lowgrade fever and aches. the CDC Although recommends it, there are those out there who don't get a flu shot. Some just don't think about getting it, but others adamantly refuse. For the last few years, I wouldn't get a flu shot. I have never gotten the flu before, and I had heard the shot can cause you to become sick. 1his semester, I considered getting the flu shot. I am studying away for J-term, and the Wang Center recommends all study away students get the shot. My main argument against getting the flu shot was debased when I learned more. The flu shot no longer contains an active virus. Instead, it is a dead virus, if it contains any at all. When the dead flu virus is injected into your body, it triggers yoilr immune system

to fight the virus, but the flu virus cannot fight back. The fight is rigged. When the flu virus in the vaccine was alive, there was always the chance it would beat your immune system and you would become sick. Now, your immune system prevails, and you do not end up catching the flu. l ended up getting the flu shot this year. While some feel common side effects from the vaccine, others don't have any at all. For me, I simply felt tired the day after. In some rare cases after getting the flu shot, some people experience flulike symptoms, which are mistaken as the flu. 路 Fever, muscle aches and feelings of weakness may last one to two days after vaccination and are much milder than the actual flu. As college students, we come into contact with a lot of people and common spaces. Living in the residence halls gives us more exposure to spreading illnesses in particular. Even those who

share classroom space are vulnerable. With every common we touch surface doorknobs, tabletops, whiteboard markers or desks - we run the risk of catching something: That is why it is so important for each individual to keep healthy. If you do end up sick, or even if you don't, take measures to keep yourself and other areas germ free with a few simple steps. Cover your sneezes. Use tissues to blow your nose and dispose of the tissues promptly in a trash can. Wash your hands often. Touch your face, especially your mouth, nose and eyes, only when ab5olutely necessary. We all share germs, and taking care of ourselves by preventing every illness we can is just one of the ways we can be respectful of our community. Weigh the pros and cons of the flu shot and make a conscious choice for yourself. Either way, make sure you do everything you can to keep germs from spreading.

THE MOORING MAST Pacific Lutheran University 12180 Park Ave S. Anderson University Center Room 172 Tacoma, WA 98447 EDITOR-IN-ClllEF

Jessica 'Irondsen mast@plu.edu BUSINESS & ADVERTISING MANAGER

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POLICIES AND Pn.ocEDURES

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Spend Thanksgiving giving thanks, not shopping By ALLIE REYNOLDS News@NwProd.um

The day after Halloween, my friend and I were shopping at Target, hoping to score some 50 percent off Halloween candy. When we walked into the store, a scary sight met our eyes: holiday decorations. The holiday season has become so apparent in American society that many of us are not remembering to celebrate Thanksgiving to its full potential. I understand the holiday season is retail's biggest time of the year for sales, but I don't think we should forget about Thanksgiving in the process of preparing for the holiday season. With stores promoting the holidays already, it's easy to forget about Thanksgiving in the hustle and

bustle of the upcoming winter holiday season, especially when stores are now opening on Thanksgiving night to kick off holiday shopping. the Thanksgiving Although narrative of pilgrims and happy, generous Native Americans may not be historically accurate (see column on the real Thanksgiving in next week's edition), I think the Thanksgiving we do celebrate promotes good ideologies we should be thinking about more often. It sets aside a time out of the busy year to come together with loved ones and reminds us to take at least a moment to step back and look at all the things, people and places in our lives we're fortunate to have. It helps us realize all our privileges and to be thankful for them, while also spending time with the people we love. Plus, we get to eat a ton of food for a whole day without anyone judging us. In recent years, Thanksgiving has become lost in the anticipation of Black Friday, where retail stores across the United States open early on Friday morning to shoppers brave enough to face the best sales of the year and a stampede of people. More and more often, retail stores are beginning to open earlier, some as early as 10 p.m., on Thanksgiving. That is just all too ironic. Here you are having a nice dinner with your family and friends, enjoying each other's company and realizing what great opportunities and objects you

have in your life. Then it hits 10 p.m., and you're in line at Walmart battling it out with another person for an iPad Air with a $100 discount. When retail stores open on Thanksgiving, it's easy to forget about the turkey and family and instead jump straight into the holiday season. While it's true that many people don't celebrate Thanksgiving and some families are in financial situations where Black Friday may be the only way they can afford presents, I still think it's important to take a step back for at least a day and be thankful for everything you do have. It doesn't always have to be on Thanksgiving. People should be able to have a nice Thanksgiving lunch with their family and then get ready to go out shopping with the Black Friday crowds. Sometime during the holiday season, we should realize how lucky we are and take a moment to appreciafe our surroundings. 1his year, I encourage everyone to really appreciate Thanksgiving for at least a day. Enjoy spending time with your friends and family and eating the best home cooked meal of your life. Try and take a step back to appreciate all you have. Then maybe take a nap - that turkey does make you tired. Once it hits midnight, and exactly midnight on Thllrsday, you're more than welcome to duke it out for that $100 tablet at Walmart.

The responsibilty of The Mooring Man is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues, events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. The Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of The Mooring Mmt staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or 路 title for verification. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. 'lb subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

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THE MOORING-MAST

NOV.15. 2013

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR Panel members provided necessary discussion of 'Kiss Me, Kate' This is in response to the Nov.1

Mast column about the discussion addressing the play "Kiss ~e, Kate," which premiered at ·the Grand Opening Gala, and the subsequent panel discussion of gender politics. The critical issue of violence against women should be the central focus of these conversations, yet has once again been sidelined in the column. Thus, the primary purpose of our response is to further the conversation begun at the panel discussion regarding the trivialization of sexism and gender violence in our society. Before addressing what was said at the panel, it might be useful to clear out of the way some things that weren't said. First of alL contrary to the characterization ir\ the column, no one was attacked. ·Force was not used - the discussion was mainly about how objectionable it is to use force against women nor was anyone's character disparaged or brought into disrepute. The assumptioa. throughout the evening was that everyone involved in the ptOcluction was acting in goocl faith to bring about a high quality performance that would be enjoyable to the audience. The quality of the production, the talent of the performers, the effort involved bringing off an ambitious production within a remarkably short time was repeatedly affirmed by the panel and by those in attendance.

No one suggested the selection of the particular play had been dictated by the upper reaches of the PLU administration. That's not how this university works. No one advocated abandoning thousands of years of theatrical history. In fact, the question of how a university campus should deal with plays from a historical time period that embrace values that conflict with our own was discussed at length by panel and audience members. No one was excluded from the discussion. The entire PLU community was invited to attend. Several cast members accepted a cheerful invitation to join the panel. They ended up comprising half the panel and made valuable contributions to the discussion. An audience of PLU community members - students, faculty, staff and maybe even a couple of alums - expressed many opinions that represented a diversity of critical perspectives. Some of the opinions were critical of the musical, of the delicate choices involved in its presentation, of the process by which the particular play was selected and mostly, of the gender polities the play evoked and the questionable values it embodied. To critique a performance is not to attack it. It is to pay it the respect of taking it seriously as a work of human creativity. Regardless of the reasons for which the play was selected, "Kiss Me, Kate" had a multitude of subtle and not-so-subtle sexist

undertones interwoven with the plot development. In one poignant moment of the opening Gala performance, the lead female character was put over the knee of her suitor/ex~ husband and spanked. The overwhelming laughter of the audience suggested the majority of attendees found this spanking funny, a response encouraged by the context of the action within the play. She is later threatened with a firearm if she does not comply with her ex-husband's wishes. This, too, is played for laughs. While many have argued that the musical itself must be understood in the context of its time, the reaction of the audience to that material must also be understood in the context of our own time. our own local Indeed, community is scarred by the incident of our former police chief fatally shooting his estranged wife in front of their two children after her pleas for protection had been dismissed. There is something chilling about living in a community that has been touched by such violence and experiencing an audience respond with laughter to violence against a woman and to hear them laugh harder when her protests are treated as comically futile. Sexism and violence against women have become a cultural norm. Had this material been racist in nature, would the audience have received it in the

same maimer? Both racism and sexism continue to be deeply embedded in our society, yet instances of overt public racist statements are no longer as widely accepted as those of overt violence against women. Individuals leaving both the play itself and the follow-up panel, unaware of the problematic nature of such sexist material, demonstrate that even when such issues are pointed out, they readily dismissed and too easily ignored. Humor has long been acknowledged as a tool of enculturation, whereby social messages and norms are visibly tran5mitted through jokes, and yet the very nature of joking obscures the damage and seriousness of what is being communicated. To present and view gender violence in a humorous context without a subsequent critical discussion of that content is to uphold the social messages of "Kiss Me, Kate." Presenting sexist material without public reflection on such content is to allow these ideas to be uncritically perpetuated. The follow-up panel on "Kiss Me, Kate" resisted this perpetuation, fostering thoughtful and productive conversations on the pervasive and hidden nature of sexism and gender violence, as well as other "-isms." The hard work of students, faculty and staff in creating and executing the opening gala is to be commended, but the support

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of our terrific theatre and music departments should not be at the expense of deflecting the critical issue of disseminating unquestioned sexist statements and material. Pacific Lutheran University is dedicated to the pursuit of thoughtful inquiry. The performance pf "Kiss Me, Kate" provides a powerful opportunity to examine the continued invisibility of gender violence and sexism in otir roriununities today. We have a responsibility to cri.ticiill.y · . examine the messages•.. ~g transmitted by our institutions and affiliated programs to oothQttr students and ourbroader ~ty. .; 'J.'.h,e . gender· .;politics panel promoted awareness of, and created diScussion about, the problematic messages presented in "Kiss me, Kate." The majority of comments in this session engaged with the central issues of the invisibility of gender violence and sexism in our society today. It is our hope that these timely and needed conversations will extend throughout our broader PLU community and provide an opportunity for reflection and learning for all of us. Sincerely, Dana Anderson, professor of psychology, Christine Dixon, visiting assistant professor of anthropology

Submit letters to the editor and corrections to masi@plu.edu. ·


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SPORTS TALK Who is your favorite NBA team and why?

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"Boston Celtics, because I love everything Boston."

"Cleveland Cavaliers, because I liked them when they had Lebroi:i James, and I still follow them."

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LOS ANGELES LAKERS STUN HOUSTON ROCKETS AT HOME Will the Montreal Canadiens or the New York Rangers win tomorrow? By SAM HORN Sports Editor There was no doubt about the shot. The ball left Steve Blake's fingers from beyond the threepoint arc and fell gracefully through the net with 1.3 seconds remaining. The Los Angeles Lakers had won the highly anticipated game against the Houston Rockets 99-98. Talk about clutch. Blake finished the game with 14 points, but more importantly, the Lakers managed to finish off the Houston Rockets without the presence of Kobe Bryant. Talk about clutch. Nearly every Pick 'Em contestant picked the Rockets to win, but the Lakers proved them wrong. Two contestants, Valery Jorgensen and Kara Sherman, chose the Lakers to pull the upset, and they are reaping the benefits.

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Bullying doesn't benefit anyone By SAM HORN Sports Editor Our lives should not be ruled by fear. We should be smart in choosing our friends and not have to worry about being physically or emotionally harmed. We only live once, and it should be a goal of ours to make the most out of this wonderful opportunity. Fear should not constitute any part of our lives. If fear dominates anyone's life, that person needs to seek help. · If a so-called 'friend' is an imposing figure in someone's life, that can only mean trouble. Recently in the NFL, two players have been the subject of bullying. One player, Richie Incognito of the Miami Dolphins, was convicted of harassing his teammate, Jonathan Martin. Incognito left the following voicemail on Martin's cell phone a few weeks ago, which Adam Schefter of ESPN helped discover: "Hey, wassup, you half n-- piece of [expletive] ... I saw you on Twitter, you been training ten weeks. [I want to] [expletive] in your [expletive] mouth. [I'm going to] slap your [expletive] mouth. [I'm going to] slap your real mother across the face (laughter). [Expletive] you, you're still a rookie. I'll kill you," Incognito said. Martin was understandably in fear of his life and left the Dolphins. The Stanford product wanted no part of Incognito. I can't blame him for taking action. If I were in Martin's place, I would be scared out of my mind. Not only did Incognito insult Martin's race, but he also threatened his life.

What a piece of scum. Several days after Incognito left the voicemail, the Dolphins organization suspended him indefinitely. Although he is making the argument that he is not a racist and did not mean harm to Martin, I don't buy that nonsense. Not for one second. · If Incognito wasn't a bigot, then he wouldn't have left the voicemail in the first place. As a society, I had hoped we had moved away from these unacceptable acts of racism. We don't live in pre-1%0s America. I understand that life in the NFL is not easy, but bullying should not be tolerated. Martin was already having a tough enough time making a name for himself on the field after being chosen in the second round of the 2012 NFL Draft. Incognito shouldn't have left this voicemail in the first place, but what's been done is done. I am content in the fact that the NFL is taking into consideration Incognito's intolerable actions. Even if it was intended as a joke among "friends," it doesn't matter. Words can hurt. Even though students at Pacific Lutheran University don't participate in the NFL, we all need to be cautious about how we approach certain situations. If bullying is taking place, stop it. There is no place for it in our society. It certainly doesn't benefit anyone, even the bully. I encourage everyone to live their lives to the fullest - make peace, not war. If you are having trouble being a reasonable person, listen to some Bob Marley. You can thank me later.

PH<Yl'O COURfESY OF NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, CREATIVE COMMONS

The Miami Dolphins indefinitely suspended Richie Incognito aAer he bullied fellow teammate Jonathan

Martin.

PH<Yl'O COURfESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Jonathan Martin quit-the Miami Dolphins organization after Richie Incognito bullied him.

Lute volleyball clinches second consecutive Northwest Conference title By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer The Lutes volleyball team completed its regular season this weekend by defeating both George Fox and Lewis & Oark. Those victories rounded out the Lutes regular

season. They finished with a 19-5 record overall, and a 15-1 conference record. That conference record was good enough for.the Lutes to win the Northwest Conference title for the second consecutive season. With that conference crown, the Lutes also secured an automatic berth into the NCAA Division III National Tournament Regionals for the eighth season in the past 10 years. In the first round of the regional, the 15th ranked Lutes will face the 13th ranked Aggies from Augsburg College of Minneapolis. The Aggies advanced into the tournament by receiving an at-large berth from the selection committee, receiving their second tournament berth in school history, the other coming in 1982.

They completed their regular season with a 28-4 record overall, and a 10-1 conference record. That record was good enough for the Aggies to split the Minnesota Interscholastic Athletic Conference (MIAq title with the St. Thomas Tommies of St. Paul, Minn. who are hosting the regional that both the Lutes and Aggies are playing in. The Lutes begin the regional tournament against the Aggies on Thursday, Nov. 14th at 3:30 pm. The Lutes' season now hangs in the balance for every match. Win, and you play another day. It the Lutes lose, however, theitl season comes to a close. If the Lutes defeat Augsburg College, they would play again, Nov. 15 at 8:00 pm against the winner of the St. Thomas-Northwestern - St. Paul matchup. If the Lutes were to win again, they would advance to the regional finals. The winners of the eight regional tournaments are then placed in another single elimination eight team bracket which culminates in the national championship match. The Lutes' chances of success are bolstered by the

experience the squad had when they advanced to regionals last year. Last season, the Lutes cruised through conference play when all of a sudden, All-American setter Samantha North, then a sophomore, went down with a knee injury. That devastating blow was followed shortly by outside hitter Allison Wood, then a junior, breaking her wrist, leaving the Lutes without two starters as they looked to close out the regular season strong and advance to regionals. The Lutes refused to let the injuries derail their season, and came together as a team and advanced to regionals, only to fall just short in the first round. That early exit of last season, as well as Wood and North now being healthy and able to play in these crucial games, will ensure that the Lutes are hungry and focused as they travel to play these matches. With the Lutes' combination of experience, the excellent play of Wood, North, and libero Amber Aguiar, a junior, combined with the great team unity that they have displayed thus far this season, there is no doubt that the Lutes are looking to make their mark.

PLU football wins 28-21 over Whitworth Lutes' attack bolstered by Dalton Ritchey's big day both on the ground and through the air By TYLER SCOTT Director ofAthletics ComTTWnications Junior Dalton Ritchey scored multiple rushing touchdowns for the third straight game and the Pacific Lutheran University defense held Whitworth to negative-13 yards on the ground as the 15th-ranked Pacific Lutheran football team closed out the 2013 regular season with a 28-21 Northwest Conference win over Whitworth at the Pine Bowl. Pacific LutHeran improved to 8-1 overall and 5-1 in conference play, while Whitworth falls to 3-6 overall and 1-4 in the NWC. The Lutes, ranked all season and sitting second in the NWC standings to No. 3 Lin.field, have a bye next week and will await the announcement of a possible NCAA postseason bid following next weekend's contests. The PLU pass rush was relentless against the Pirates, sacking quarterback Bryan Peterson six times for a total of 45 yards. Meanwhile, the run defense limited running back DJ Tripoli to 30 yards on 15 carries for a Whitworth total of negative-13 rushing yards on 30 carries. That marks the first time PLU has held an opponent to negative rushing yards since limiting California Lutheran to minus-5 in a 48-17 win over the Kingsmen

during the 2007 season. The rushing total was the fewest yards a PLU defense has allowed on the ground since the L:utes' 1999 national championship win, when they held Rowan to an astounding minus-63 yards on the ground in a 42-13 win. Saturday's win was closer than those contests due to four turnovers by t:Ke Lutes. Pacific Lutheran fumbled four times - losing two - and threw a pair of interceptions that helped the Pirates stay in the game late despite a 398-207 PLU advantage in total yards. Ritchey threw for 175 yards and a touchdown while completing 15 of his 22 pass attempts, but it was on the ground where the junior quarterback caused most of his damage. Ritchey carried the ball a game-high 20 times for 129 yards and two touchdowns, averaging 6.4 yards per carry with a long of 22yards. Junior Niko Madison added 81 yards and a score on 16 carries as PLU finished with 249 yards on the ground. Junior Kyle Warner caught four passes for 67 yards, and Kelly Morgan's lone reception went for an 11-yard touchdown grab. . Reigning Northwest Conference Defensive Student-Athlete of the Week Jordan Patterson, a senior, was once again a one-man wrecking crew around the line

of scrimmage, totaling eight tackles in the game with four going for a loss. He finished with one of PLU's six sacks, with NWC sack leader Joel Anthony, a junior, adding two more to his season total. Senior Sean McFadden finished with a game-high 10 tackles. Peterson threw for 220 yards on 25-of31 passing with three touchdowns, with scoring tosses going to Drew Oausen, Wade Meyer and Dustin Martin. Casey Monahan and Jacob Kriegbaum tied for the team lead with eight tackles, while Trevor Cooper and Kyle Davidson each snagged an interception. The Lutes opened the game with long touchdown drives of seven plays for 72 yards and eight plays for 84 yards to take a 14-0 lead at the end of the first quarter. Whitworth began its comeback following PLU' s second touchdown, putting together a 17-play, 80-yard drive that spanned 10:22 and featured three thirddown and one fourth-down conversions to make it 14-7. PLU turned the ball over on each of its next two drives, giving Whitworth backto-back short fields to work with. The PLU defense forced a three-and-out on the first of those two drives, but four plays after the Pirates took over first-and-10 at the PLU 17 Peterson found Martin in the end zone · from five yards out to tie it up at 14-14. Pacific Lutheran countered Whitworth's

lengthy first-half drive with one of its own in the second half, taking over following a punt with 7:47 to play in the third quarter and moving 87 yards down the field in 18 · plays and 8:46. The Lutes reclaimed the lead at the conclusion of that drive when Ritchey hit Morgan from 11 yards out to make it 2114 less than one minute into the fourth quarter. A three-and-out for Whitworth followed, and the Lutes capitalized on the short field to score their final touchdown on a 4-yard run by Madison. The PLU defense stepped up on the next two drives to force another three-and-out and a fourth-down stop to sandwich the Lutes' second lost fumble of the game. Whitworth reclaimed possession down two scores with 3:09 to play, and Peterson drove his offense 86 yards on nine plays and only 1:44 to pull the Pirates within seven on a 20-yard pass to Wade Meyer. But the Lutes recovered the ensuing onside kick attempt, and Ritchey converted the first-down PLU needed to run out the clock and clinch the win. The Lutes conclude the 2013 regular season with an 8-1 record for the second time in the past four years, matching the most wins PLU has recorded in a season since the 2000 squad went 9-2.


NOV. 15, 2013

THE MOORING MAST

Enjoying the trip:

SPORTS 15

The story of how one man changed Pacific Lutheran University f~otball for ever

By SAM HORN Sports Editor Following in the footsteps of a legend is difficult, especially if that legend is your father. For the head football coach at Pacific Lutheran University, Scott Westering, this is e~pecially true. He walks in the path left by his father, Forrest "Frosty" Westering, who revolutionized the PLU football program during his 31-year career in Tacoma. The PLU football program is different than most football programs around the country in that it focuses on shaping players into courageous men who always give it their best shot. The PLU football coaching staff is not as concerned about what plr,1.yers do on the field. After all, ifs about enjoying the trip and making lasting memories. In contrast, most coaching staffs at major Division I football programs instill a sense of fear and intimidation in order to force players to excel on the field. That method can only work to a certain point, and then players will quit out of frustration. At PLU, Frosty Westering did the exact opposite. "Dad [Frosty] never went down that road of intimidation and really made the decision that he is going to motivate through treating young men with love," Scott Westering said. "Ifs about getting guys to not be afraid to fail and getting guys to feel good about themselves in a positive culture and environment. If you do that, then you get guys to overachieve." Players certainly overachieved during Frosty Westering's time at PLU. Before Frosty Westering retired in 2003, his teams won four national .championships and competed in eight. Scott Westering served as the offensive coordinator under Frosty Westering in 1999, when PLU won the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl Game against heavily-favored Rowan University of New Jersey, 42-13. Their unique 1999 national championship run involved traveling nearly 16,000 miles to play five games on the road. The 1999 PLU football team was undersized and didn't have any superstars, but the team members played to their full potential and surprised the entire nation. When Frosty Westering passed away in April, he had influenced many people nationwide. People's hearts had been touched and would never be the same. Frosty Westering had a lasting impact on nearly everyone he met. One person who was deeply affected by Frosty Westering's unique style of coaching was former PLU running back, Jud Keim. Keim now serves on the PLU football coaching staff with Scott Westering and coaches the running backs, in addition to supervising special teams. Keim played for Frosty Westering from 1982-1986 and was a two-time all-conference running back. ''There's probably nobody thafs had more impact on me and my life than Frosty," Keim said. "Frosty's stories have filtered every decision I've ever made. Anything and everything in my life has been by him."

PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLEN WESTERJNG

Kellen ~estering, left, and Scott Westering, right, carry on Frosty Westering's legacy. Kellen Wesu:rmg has dealt with m~ti~le iDjuries in his three years on the football team. Scott Westering has compiled a record of 61-39 m his 11-year coaching career at PLU.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Frosty Westering always believed eDjoying the trip was more important than actually reaching the pinnacle in college football: the national championship.

A SEASON DEDICATED TO FROSTY

what that player does have and what that player could do with that potential. "We all think the grass is greener somewhere else, but ifs not about resources," Keim said. "Ifs about what you do with them. Most people focus on what they don't have and what they wished they had, or comparing to what others have. 'Making the Big Time' is learning to get it done with what you do have. Be the best you can be in all things."

Scott Westering decided to commemorate this season to his father CARRYING ON THE LEGACY because of what Frosty Westering stood for. The theme for this year is 'the legacy lives When Scott Westering interviewed for on in you.' Frosty Westering embodied a the head coaching job at PLU in 2003, he legendary persona, similar to what Vince knew he was pulling the double cardinal Lombardi did for football or what John sin. He was following a legend, which most Wooden did for basketball. are told to never do, and the legend was his "It was awesome how the captains embraced the idea of having the legacy live father. "My dad built the mansion. I'm just on in us this year," Scott Westering said. read,y to move into it," Scott Westering "We stand on the shoulders of teams that said. "I'm going to move into the master came before us in the '70s, '80s and '90s." Scott Westering says his players have bedroom. Some of the rooms, so to speak, understood that they're part of something I left untouched. Other rooms, I've painted the wallpaper and changed some things special. "They're not just playing football. around. I was humbled and honored that They're involved with something that has PLU gave me the baton from my dad and to continue to run with it." 路 a tradition," Scott Westering said. Scott Westering's work has resembled In addition to all of the national championships Frosty Westering garnered, his father's success in his 11th year as the he also won the prestigious Amos Alonzo head coach of PLU football. The Lutes Stagg Award in 2012. The recipients of are 8-1 this season and are on the brink of this award are all the who's who of college 路 obtaining a Division III playoff berth. After being ranked 13th in the football. In 1983, Paul "Bear" Bryant of Alabama D3football.com preseasonnational poll, the won the award. Penn State's renowned 2013 Lute football team has lived up to the coach, Joe Paterno, won the award in 2002. lofty expectations presented before them. Frosty Westering's status is unheralded, Frosty Westering would be proud of the team's extraordinary accomplishments, but but he never cared about all the hardware. would stress the importance of enjoying That was just a bonus. the trip. "Most things in a competitive arena To Frosty Westering, it wasn't all about are based off of how many wins, rings, watches, plaques and banners you have," winning and losing games. It goes beyond Keim said. "That would be the last thing that. Ifs about 'Making the Big Time' and enjoying teammates' company. Ifs about Frosty would talk about though." serving each other and going above and One of Frosty Westering's more beyond the call of duty. powerful sayings was to 'Make the Big Sure, a team can go undefeated and win Time' where a player was in life. This doesn't focus on what a player has and the national championship, but a concern doesn't have, but instead concentrates on of Frosty's would be making sure the team is relishing the process. Players only have four years to appreciate every prayer before a game, every practice, every snap and every team meeting. One Lute football player who has been uniquely affected by Frosty Westering is his grandson~ junior Kellen Westering. Kellen Westering is a wide receiver on the PLU football team. "[Frosty] has always been someone who makes the other person feel more important than him," Kellen Westering said. "On his death bed, it was never about him. He was still talking to me and caring about me." No player can compete in football for his entire life, so thafs why Frosty Westering stressed the notion that it is important to live in the moment. Frosty Westering's personality was bigger than life itself and his philosophy on life was unlike any other. PHOTO COUIITESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS To officially commemorate Frosty Jud Keim gathers the troops together before a kickoff this season. Keim serves as the running backs Westering this year, a silhouette of the coach in addition to the special teams coordinator. The runiring game has been extraordinary this legendary coach giving his usual thumbsseason. PLU is averaging an astounding 4.9 yards per carry. up sign is embroidered on every Lute

football player's jersey. Junior Joel Teats, a linebacker on the 2013 PLU football team, said he appreciates the patch and is content with this season being dedicated to Frosty Westering. "We touch the patch to remind us what he [Frosty] started through his philosophy of 'Every Man A Lute.' It [the patch] definitely gives us some extra motivation to play the games in honor of his legacy," Teats said.

PLO CHANGED FOREVER In 1972, Pacific Lutheran University hired Frosty Westering, Everything would change that year for the Lutes, and the football program would never look back. Every player's life would be altered from that moment on in a significantly positive manner. The nation came to know Frosty Westering as the ninth-winningest coach in the history of college football, but many . people considered him a saving grace. "I saw young men become giants playing for him [Frosty]. These players not only become giants as players but also grew as young men," Scott Westering said. "Frosty liked to point guys in the right direction when they're away from home for the first time." The Frosty Westering era lives on in Scott Westering. Whether Scott Westering leads a PLU team to a national championship in the next few years is beside the point. Enjoying the trip and 'Making the Big Time' are the two concepts that tiuly matter, according to Scott and Frosty Westering. Ifs all about the process of becoming uncommon, something Frosty preached about while revolutionizing the PLU football program. Every Saturday this season, players commemorated Frosty Westering by tapping a picture of him in the locker room. As each player passes by the image, there's a distinct whisper. '~ttaway, Frosty. Attaway."

PHOTO COUIITESY OF PLU ARCHIVES

Ftosty Westering was born on Dec. !i, 1927 and died April 12, 2013.


THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

NOV.15 2013

MEN'S BASKETBALL LOOKING TO IMPROVE UPON LAST YEAR By NICK BARENE

Sports Writer The 2013-14 Pacific Lutheran University men' sbasketball team will rely on the strength of its underclassmen, including eight first-years, and look for leadership from its three senior players this season. "We have a saying in our locker room that's an old African proverb," head coach Steve Dickerson said, "which says that 'if you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together."' Togetherness and teamwork are exactly what the Lutes need in order to have success this season. They will need to overcome the loss of their leading scorer and rebounder from a year ago, Cameron Schilling. Much of that work will come from the team's trio of seniors: Johnny Tveter, Arvid Isaksen and Kai Hoyt. Dickerson spoke highly of his three seniors. '~d [Isaksen) may go down as one of the best

captains I've ever had. Johnny Tueter is our Swiss Army knife - he can play all the positions - and Kai [Hoyt] is so athletic," Dickerson said. Some key underclassmen will support the leadership from those seniors, including two guards, junior Terrell Williams and junior Daniel Landram, who both saw extended playing time last season. The Lutes' roster also features eight first-year players, some of whom will see considerable amounts of playing time this season. Dickerson said he is confident that the mix of senior leadership and youth will prove to be a winning combination. "We have really good chemistry," Dickerson said. "We're really excited about that." After an 8-17 finish last season, the Lutes have been picked to finish seventh in the conference in the pre-season coaches poll. But the Lutes aren't letting that bother them. 1hey have their sights set on even loftier heights - the playoffs.

WOMEN'S SOCCER FINISHES THIRD IN NORTHWEST CONFERENCE

"We made the playoffs as freshmen," Tveter said. '1t really lit a fire under us and we really want to make the playoffs again." Hoyt spoke to the strengths of this year's squad. "We're really quick. We're athletic. We're going to be really tough on defense, and we have more height this year, and that will work to our advantage," Hoyt said. "We're capable of making the playoffs." The Lutes will have their work cut out for them if they want to unseat the defending champion, the Whitworth Pirates, who have won the conference title for the past four seasons and have been picked to do so again this year. The Lutes tipped off their season on Wednesday, taking on Division I Portland State in an exhibition game. Their non-conference schedule also includes a game against Seattle University at Key Arena. The team will play its home opener against St. Mary's on Black Friday, Nov. 29, and will then open Northwest Conference play during the first week of January with home games versu5 George Fox and Lewis & Clark.

Golden goal propels Lutes to victory Men's soccer finishes third in Northwest Conference

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP LEFI': Kristi D'Alessandro, a senior, dehly dribbles past a Unfield defender. D'Alessandro scored one goal in the match, her second or the season. The women won 3-2 over Linfield to close out their season. TOP RIGHT: Sophomore Jamie Hoffman avoids a Wtldcat defender before passing the ball off for a scoring opportunity. Hoffman tallied one shot during the game.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP: Senior Derek Johnson advances the ball past a Puget Sound defender. Johnson finished the game with one goal. BO'M'OM LEFT: Giancarlo Santoro, a senior, sprints downfield in hopes or finding an open teammate.Santoro also tallied one goal. BO'M'OM RIGHT: Fbrward Brian Lefavour, a seni<n, fights for a header against a Puget Sound player.

Living in a fantasy Nick's Picks: Fantasy players to watch this week By NICK BARENE

Sports writer

QUARTERBACK- The Green Bay Pacers quarterback carousel continues. Senece Wallace. filling in for the iqjured Aaron Rodgers, hurt his groin against the Eagles, and wu replaced by thinlstring qllWrback, Scott Tolzien. While Tulzien has already been named the Packers starter for Week II, managers shouldn't bother taking a chance on him. & iu complere wiknown.

RUNNING BACK- New York Giants running back Andre Brown burst onto the scene this week after missing tJ1e first nine weeks of the season recovering from a broken leg. He carried the ball a hefty 30 times for 115 yards and a score. With the way Peyton Hillis hu struggled this year, expect Brown to take on more of the workload now that he has returned to play.

DEFENSE/SPECIAL TEAMS- The SL Lollis Rams defense, while ioronsistent, has shown Wes of brilliance. One such flash came this week against the Indianapolis Colts. who were held to jml eight points and gave up five turnorus. Thia defense is one that is on the fringt. They have alot of talent and a solid front seven, but they will need to prove that they can be consistent before they can be considered a weekly starter.

KICKER- Kansas City Chiefs' kicker Ryan Succop is owned in just 24 percent ofleagues this fear despire averaging a little more than nine fantMy points per game. The Chiefs are also the only remaining undefeated ream this year. While they face a challenge in the Denver Broncos this week, look for the Chiefs to score some touchdowns. Kickers score one point for every PAT they kick in most leagues, so look for Succop to continue his success.

+


SPORTS Lute swimmers close out 2013 season undefeated

NEWS International-themed music, performances rock The Cave

PAGE16

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

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NOV. 22, 2013

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WHAT'S INSIDE Arts &Entertainment

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Outdoor Rec moves from ASPLU to Athletics Department By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor Students wishing to get off campus and explore the outdoors may find they face several challenges in: the process. Students from out of state may not be familiar with the natural attractions Western Washington has to offer, and the price of gas and gear are rarely conducive to a student budget. Outdoor Recreation is a student-run club that offers regular trips for Lutes to explore nature. Some of their past trips include white water rafting, hiking, spelunking, snowshoeing and skiing. :Formerly organized \lllder ASPLU, Outdoor Rec is now

overseen by the Athletics Department. The office is now located in the basement of Harstad Hall instead of the ASPLU office. "It's actually really nice, because now we have like, one central location where all of our stuff is," senior Anna McCracken, personnel director of Outdoor Rec, said. "I'm really happy about it." Outdoor Ree's budget hasn't changed - it's still approximately $39,000 per year. It just comes from · the Wellness Fund now instead of ASPLU. "The nice part about that is it allows us to subsidize a lot of our trips. Normally these trips would cost a lot more if we were having

to break even," McCracken said. For instance, the most recent

rock climbing trip Outdoor Rec went on cost approximately $200 per student, but participants only had to pay $30, senior Kelsie Leu, finance and operations director of Outdoor Rec, said. Leu said one of Outdoor Rec' s goals for this year was to get more people going on trips, so at the beginning of the year they began planning mid-week trips and multiple trips per weekend. McCracken said so far more than 100 different students have gone on Outdoor Rec trips. McCracken also said Outdoor Rec is a great way to meet new people. "Every single trip, we always have at least someone who isn't signed up with their friends - they don't know anyone - so

there's always a lot of different people to meet," she said.


THE MOORING MAST

2NEWS

NOV. 22 2013

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Ice skating gold medalist sets sights on sectionals By SAMANTHA LUND Guest Writer First-year Jordan Lee left for the ice skating Pacific Coast Sectionals in Oakland, Calif. Wednesday to compete for a chance to go to nationals. The sectionals are her biggest competition yet. The two-time gold medalist has had to overcome many obstacles and is now seeing her dreams come true in her skating. Despite a broken ankle and now an inflamed foot - which she has almost fully recovered from Lee said she does not plan to quit competing any time soon. Lee had been out of competitive ice skating since May. In her first competition back on the ice in August, she qualified for sectionals. Lee said she was surprised and did not expect to do so well. Two years ago, Lee sustained an ankle injury that threatened to take her out of her sport forever. Without surgery, it

my day," Lee said. "I love the feeling of it." Lee said she h o p e s to major in kinesiology many tears and help and discussions, athletes she could not give avoid injuries up ice skating; so she in the future. underwent surgery for Lee plans on her broken ankle. coaching at Sprinker While out after Pacific due to her injuries, Lee Lutheran University said she had a hard time and then hopes staying away from the ice. She to go to graduate continued to go to the rinkto help school. The skater a full-ride inspire other skaters. Lee said some has have told her she was an inspiration to scholarship at PLU. many. For 10 years, Lee Lee trains at the Sprinker Recreation said her mother, Center at least two hours a day if she can who raised her and her sister alone, · fit it in with her busy schedule. She often has supported the ice skating costs by skates in the morning, goes to class, and then working full time. returns home to pick up her younger sister "She's been to all of my competitions," - also a skater - and take her to skating Lee said, ''but this time [for sectionals] practice as I'm just traveling with my well. coach." Now that her dreams L e e ' s To donate, e-mail Lee p·assion is ice of going to sectionals at leeji@plu.edu or go skating and it is are corrtlng true, Lee has another obstacle to something she to https:/ /fundrazr.com/ overcome: the cost. Flying works her life around. "It's to California and paying campaigns/2ckD7. the best part of for ice time and coaching

was unlikely Lee would get to be a competitive ice skater. Lee said that after

expenses is costly, and Lee has started her own fundraiser to help make her dream come true. The first-time sectionals competitor said she wants to use this first year to learn and get experience. Next year, Lee said she hopes to place in the top eight. The top four go on to nationals. Lee said she is accepting any donations, big or small, to help pay for her trip to sectionals. The fundraiser is ongoing, even after her trip ends Nov. 23, in the hopes to get all expenses paid for.

VIDEO COMPONENT ONLINE

INTERNATIONAL EVENTS ROCK THE CAVE By CARRIE REIERSON Guest Writer Students crowded The Cave as a diverse showcase of performances unfolded on stage at Global Getdown last Friday evening. The PLU Diversity Center sponsored the event, and it featured song, dance, poetry, spoken word and various other acts that span the globe, highlighting all kinds · of cultural traditions. The night started with an energetic performance by PLU's step team, Lute Nation, and ended with a rendition of Beyonce's ''Love On Top," which Queen Bee, senior David Leon's drag queen persona, sang. Sandwiched in between these two acts was a wide variety of performances, including a martial arts demonstration, a Native American shawl dance, the musical genres of gospeL jazz, folk and J-pop as well as the Scandinavian Oub's lip-synced performance of YI.vis's "The Fox (What Does the Fox Say?)." In total, 22 different performances spanned two hours. The crowd stayed upbeat, positive and loud from beginning to end. •

"One of my favorite moments was looking out and seeing a full house of support. It meant a lot to both the performers and myself." Lauren Mendez junior, emcee

PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA

First-yee.r Jax Robinson performs with the Dance Tham at Global Getdown Friday evening. Global Getdown wrapped up International Education Week with an event in The Cave featuring live performances by various on-campus organizations. Hong Hall's all-hall event, Discoteca, followed Global Getdown with a campus-wide dance featuring international music.

Junior Lauren Mendez emceed the event and played a major role in putting it all together, along with help from the Diversity Center staff and student volunteers. "One of my favorite moments was looking out and seeing a full house of support. It meant a lot to both the performers and myself," Mendez said. "I hope the students experienced something

about their own cultural background and others' cultural backgrounds." At the close of Global Getdown, Mendez asked attendees to stack up their chairs outside of The Cave to make way for Hong International Hall's all campus event, Hong Discoteca. This dance continued the night's theme of diversity by playing music from

sophomore Caitlin Dawes, the social justice director of Hong Hall, referred to as "a more mature feel, like a 21-plus club." This was the second time Global Getdown and Hong Hall's Discoteca were combined into one event, the first being two years ago. Dawes said Hong's Residence Hall Council hoped to draw a bigger crowd by connecting the Discoteca

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Campus congregation reconciles LGBT members ByKJERSTI ANDREASSEN News Writer University Congregation became an official Reconciling in Christ church Sunday, welcoming the LBGT community into its student congregation. Richard Jaech, the bishop of the Southwestern Washington Synod of the Evangelical Church in America, spoke at the church service. Around 60 people attended - an unusually large turnout, as only 20-30 people usually attend University Congregation. . Nancy Connor, one of the opened university pastors, the service by saying this was "an auspicious moment in the University Congregation's history." During his sermon, Bishop Jaech said the term 'reconciling' represents a goal the congregation has to continue working toward as a process of reconciliation that is not finished. ''We carry out God's work when we welcome people," Bishop Jaech said.

Bishop Jaech also spoke about his and his wife's personal encounters with the LGBT community in discovering their son was gay. He ended by challenging the congregants to welcome everyone, especially those they disagree with. Reconciling PHOTO BY JOSH ATEN in Christ (RIC) is a program Richard Jaech, bishop of the Southwestern Washington Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran for Lutheran Church in America, gives a sermon at University Congregation Sunday as the church was officially communities recognized as a "Reconciling in Christ" congregation. that publicly Senior Tommy Flanagan, 87 churches in the Southwestern welcome people of University of all sexual orientations and Washington Synod of the ELCA president gender identities. According to to become an RIC congregation, Congregation Council, said the organization's website, RIC university President Thomas former University Congregation president Ian McMichael started advocates for full inclusion of Krise said after the service. According to the RIC website, the process to become an LGBT Lutherans in all aspects of more than 500 congregations and official RIC church last spring. life in the church. Pacific Lutheran's University other Lutheran organizations McMichael graduated last year. Congregation is the third of the are on RIC's roster.

Veterans experience culture shock upon return home . By NICK NEELY Guest Writer The Department of Veteran Affairs estimates that veterans comprise 1 percent of the population. According to Pacific Lutheran University's VetCorp, PLU' s campus provides education to approximately 250 veterans - roughly 8 percent of the student population. This statistic may surprise many, as ROTC students can be identified by their uniform, yet veterans cannot. Man}' of them do not want be identified, either. "Some soldiers want to be treated as students and no differently, but when you say 'military,' people have that tendency to want to treat you differently," VetCorps Navigator Johnny Gilbert said. PLU. VetCorps is a organization that strives to incorporate veterans back into civilian 1ife through both club involvement and employment. "A lot of veterans keep their mission-oriented mindset after leaving the military," Gilbert said. "They view graduation as

their mission and don't take time to enjoy other opportunities PLU offers." Gilbert, a veteran himself of a nine-year tour of service, helps veterans with club involvment. ''People appreciate having soldiers around, but with that military connotation, many don't think that they will fit in," Gilbert said. He also said that a lot of people misunderstand military employment, assuming the military is made up entirely of combat soldiers. "When you're not in the combat zone, we're jvst like any other office," Gilbert said. Most military personnel do not see combat until their unit is 'alerted,' Gilbert said. Once a unit is alerted, they receive six months to train and become acclimated for combat. Gilbert said those chosen to be soldiers upon enlisting go through combat training immediately. Veterans do not receive such an opportunity to acclimate to civilian life during their outprocessing pr<)cedures, Gilbert said.

His colleague, Shameka Mitchell, works as an employment !ipecialist. Not only does she help veterans find jobs, but she also 'translates' their military experience into a resume civilian employers can understand. For example, Gilbert worked in 13 Echo. This titles means nothing to 99 percent of the population, Gilbert said, but 13 Echo is the military' s name for a "glorified surveyor." Mitchell also reaches out to employers in the area and finds those who are veteran-friendly. "Some have the stereotype

about veterans having PTSD [post traumatic stress disorder], or they're crazy and don't have any skills coming out of the military," Mitchell said. For the last two. years, VetCorps ran under the student administration, with two different VetCorps navigators, both PLU students and veterans. With Gilbert as the new VetCorps navigator, the office now works under the Diversity Center. "The Diversity Center is a good fit," Gilbert said. "It helps us get the soldiers connected with other students. They feel like they can become a student."

News Writer

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Germs and viruses can spread quickly when people live close together, especially on college campuses. For this reason, Pacific Lutheran University offers all students an annual flu vaccine free of charge. ''The pain of getting a flu vaccine is minimal, compated to the pain of catching the flu later on in the school year," Ross McLeod, health educator at the PLU Health Center, said. McLeod said he urges students to go .get a flu vaccine. He said that especially those with pre-existing conditions affecting their immune system should take the flu vaccine. According to the PLU Health Center website, PLU uses a dead flu vaccine. Since it contains no

active virus, you, can't catch the flu from the vaccine and the shot itself can't make you sick. The website states that with every vaccine there is always a small risk of side effects, but these are extraordinarily rare. Fortunately, for those who dislike needles too much to consider getting a shot, there are other ways of staying healthy. Washing your hands often and getting enough rest are paramount, McLeod said. "Get lots and lots of sleep. Sleep is an important one," McLeod said. ''Normally what happens is that when students don't get enough sleep, they're more susceptible to the flu." McLeod also said that students should get to know what things stress them out, and how to handle them. "Know and control your stress levels, especially around finals/' he said.

Ongoing Student Juried Exhibition. Check out this display of exceptional student artwork, which was chosen by guest jurors. University Gallery in Ingram, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. The National Coalition for the Homeless and the National Student Campaign against Hunger and Homelessness ask that you set aside the week prior to Thanksgiving to donate some time, attention and resources to the less fortunate. Nav. 15-23. For a camplete list of events, visit plu.edulseroice.

Friday Empty Bowls at Charles Wright Academy. Purchase a bowl for $10 and receive a bowl of soup donated by a local chef. Proceeds go to the ;mergency Food Network, an organization that supplies food banks all over Pierce County. 1-3:30 p.m. Poverty simulation. Take part in this interactive role play to learn about how poverty works. AUC CK Hall. 3-6 p.m. Gather an exclusive student night at the Museum of Glass. Enjoy beverages and bites, drinks and dancing at the Museum of Glass - all for free with an active college/ university ID. Museum of Glass, 6:30-10:30 p.m. The Oay Crows perform "Star Trek: Enterprov. Come see PLU' s student improv group for a night of long form improvisation. Admission is free, but donations.are welcome. The Cave, 7:30-8:30 p.m.

"It [the Diversity Center] helps us get the soldiers connected with other students. They feel like they can become a student."

Steel pan and percussion ensemble. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30 p.m.

Johnny Gilbert

Late Night Programming scavenger hunt. AUC north lobby, 9-11 p.m.

VetCorps Navigator

Saturday

Health Center helps stu~ents fight the flu ByKJERSTI ANDREASSEN

What to do atPLU

"Doctor Who 50th Anniversary." Grab your sonic screwdrivers, hop into your TARDIS and join your fellow Whovians in watching the 50th anniversary of this famous TV show, which airs at 11:50 a.m. Meet in the Harstad first floor main lounge, 11:30 a. m. Harp Ensemble Concert. Get caught up on those and concert attendances listen to a variety of music, from Christmas favorites . to jazzy arrangements of classics such as "Wade in the Water." MBR 306: choir rehearsal room. 3-4:30 p.m.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JESSE MAJOR

College students are particularly susceptible to illness, such as colds and the flu, due to a large number of people living close together, high stress levels and a lack of sleep. Washing hands frequently can help prevent illness.

To get the vaccine, students can make an appointment online or by calling 253-535-7377.

The Health Center is open 8 a.m.5 p.m. Monday-Friday, except for noon-1 p.m. when it is closed for the staff lunch break.

Sunday Guitar Orchestra ensemble recital. Went to the Harp Ensemble concert Saturday but still can't get enough plucked strings? Get. your fix with the Guitar Orchestra

the very next day. Lagerquist Concert Hall, 8-9:30 p.m.


THE MOORING MAST

4NEWS

NOV. 22 2013

PHOTOS BY SAM HOHN

LEFf: Abigail Bla.nkner, an a.Cademic ·adviser, goes to refill a wheelbarrow with sod while volunteering for the Habitat for Humanity housing development Saturday. Students, staff, faculty and various clubs and organizations on campus have all volunteered at the Habitat site. CENTER: Brendan Rorem, financial consultant with Thrivent Financial for Lutherans and a class of'89 PLU alum, carries a roll of sod to get a house ready for an upcoming dedication. RIGHT: Local high school students were among the volunteers at the Habitat for Humanity site, known as The Woods, Saturday.

HABITAT FROM PAGE 1 was unique. I was intrigued by the idea of building a community rather than a house," Zylstra said. "The icing on the cake was when I learned they were building a 30-home devefopment here in Parkland." Zylstra said it was easy to get students to volunteer. About 250 students have gone through the orientation with Habitat for Humanity, a perquisite to actually volunteering. About 170 students actually participated with the build. The project also helps students get out of the ''Lutedome" and into the community. "So many students are on campus or living right next to campus - they don't interact with the community of Parkland,

the community they spend 4 or 5 years in," Gauthier said. Through the build at The Woods, students get off campus, meet the families that will live there and learn what's in the

community. ''You begin breaking down perceptions of what Parkland is,". Zylstra said. "We're trying to get students to see Parkland in a different way and to appreciate it for _w hat

"The type of people that go to PLU tend to be the kind that care about others. It doesn't surprise me that Lute students and alumni are out contributing." Brendan Rorem consultant, Thrivent Financial PLU class of'89

it is." PLU students also helped donate $10,000 to the project. The money came from donations, fundraisers, an auction and ASPLU. "It's been neat to see a lot of different groups and players contribute to this project in different ways," Zylstra said. Thrivent Financial also donated $70,000 to the build. PLU alum and Thrivent Financial consultant, Brendon Rorem, said "the type of people that go to PLU tend to be the kind that care about others. It doesn't surprise me that Lute students and alumni are out contributing." Brown said it was "awesome" to work with the volunteers. "Everybody is so upbeat and helpful," she said.

art·c pate MAP-wor s chec -up u vey

Look for your e-mail invitat•on start·ng ovember 8th

All participants wil be entered to win $50 in LuteBucks. Ten cha ces to win!

Q ·estion ? Student Life Office Adrnin 105 253-535-7191 slif@plu.edu

·, PACIFIC l_tm-lERAN I

NIVERSITY


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 22, 2013

A&E5

READING ON THE RADIO "Weekly show is a nerve-wracking and exhilarating experience By KELS MEJLAENDER Senior Copy Editor In dim lighting, the last few notes of the previous radio show's song fades away as I snap on headphones, ready to introduce myself as a guest to the listeners of "Call Me Ishmael" on Lute Air Student Radio. This show will be different though. Instead of just playing music and discussing an array of subjects with the DJs, I'm reading a chapter of my novella, "The Ace of Spades." Last spring, my friend and now housemate, junior Richard Olson, asked if I would be interested in writing a story to read over the course of a few months on the radio show, "Call Me Ishmael," which he hosts with junior Katie Ayres. As a fiction writing major, I eagerly agreed, only to spend the next several months debating what to write. In the end, I settled on a murder mystery. make things more To

interesting for us, I made my housemates - Richard, Katie and junior Malena Goerl - main characters. I did the same for a former housemate, senior Jessica Welch, and myself. In "The Ace of Spades," we become Dick Olston, Katherine Arys, Melanie Garelle, Jes5y Walsh and Chels Laender. I invented a few purely fictional characters for the story too rich college kid Cole Mitchell, his stepbrother Kent Saville and -the caretaker of the family's new mountainside mansion, Pete Paulson. During the first chapter, the seven college students arrive at the mansion for a vacation. But a winter storm leaves them isolated, cut off from Internet access and upending the already weak cell service. When they get bored trapped inside the house, they decide to play the game Murderer. While playing the game, which involves hiding throughout the dark house as one person with the ace of spades card tracks everyone down and "kills" them,

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someone actually kills Kent Saville. In the second chapter, the panicked friends realize the murderer must have either been one of them or the caretaker, Pete. They try to develop a buddy system and collect evidence for . when they are able to contact the police. murderer However, the manages to corner Chels Laender - who took the pictures of the crime scene - and kill her as well as destroy her phone and the evidence on it. In the third chapter, which Richard, Katie, Malena, Jessica and I will be reading on tonight's "Call Me Ishmael," the characters gather together t-0 determine which of them has the most motive and means to be the killer. There have been many unexpected challenges and pleasant surprises going through this process. Reading the story out loud has been both a nerve-wracking and exhilarating experience. The challenge lies in needing to voice multiple characters, since we don't have eight different people to read. Making the voices sound different is certainly not one of my specialties, and it doesn't help that I'm also the narrator. Scheduling has also been crazy, because for five busy college students, saving that one hour every couple of Fridays to

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In "The Ace of Spades," the characters solve a murder mystery in a mountainside mansion.

The story sprung a wealth meet and read a story together is next to impossible. Indeed, Jessica of murder mystery games and has only been able to attend the novels, lead~g to classics like first reading. Arthur Conan Doyle's "Sherlock Regardless, I've never had Holmes" and the many Agatha more fun writing a story. The Christie mysteries. My novella may be a more research has been fascinating. I've learned a few mundane humble addition to the rich things, like how generators history o{ the murder mystery, operate, but. I also know the · but it's certainly been fun to complicated history of society's write, read and have others hear. Incorporating the various obsession with murder mysteries~ The rather gruesome murder quirks of my friends into the of a little boy named Francis characters and sharing this "Saville" Kent - yes, that name experience with them will make should sound familiar - in the ''The Ace of Spades" one of the 1800s captured public attention highlights of my senior year. through the press.

Author Peter Geye visits PLU . After his reading, Geye gave a short speech about his inspirations for the settings and characters in ''The Lighthouse Road." As part of Pacific • During the subsequent Lutheran University's the Visiting Writer Series, Q-and-A session, The audience asked several author Peter Geye - gave more questions, with Lighthouse a reading that captivated students and community cropping up as the session Road members alike in the continued. Geye said he was happy to answer Scandinavian Cultural them. Center Nov. 13. t .e r G(}y c A quiet voice in one of Geye was born and COURTESY OF ENGLISH.UMN.EDU · the comers of the room raised in Minneapolis. After attending the asked the first question: was really interesting," University of Minnesota, "what inspires you to Fautenberry said. "He University of New write?" seemed really passionate Orleans and Western , "The se_asons, -the about his work." weather and the way that University, Michigan Though Fautenberry Geye decided to continue those things influence was there because of around them the people living in Minnesota. gives me inspiration," her affiliation with the This setting became Geye said. ''The lists of Garfield Book Company, the backdrop for his book, things that inspire me are many other students and "The Lighthouse Road." conununity members endless." Geye read from his came for different reasons, A loud voice from second nO¥el while at among the crowd later including their majors and PLU. asked, ''how do you recreational choices. Lighthouse "The Sophomore Kristina choose what to put in Road" details the life of Kusel said she attended Thea Eide, a Norwegian your stories?" "I believe that because she is a member immigrant and skilled of PLU' s writing club, The cook, her son Odd something should tell you Mark. that it will be in the story Einar Eide, a fisherman Geye had visited one involved in a secret rather than trying to put of The Mark's meetings or fit it into the story," romance, and a number of earlier that week. Geyesaid. other characters. "He came to our Many of the students The book spans meeting and was so more than 40 years, and w~o attended the reading inspiring," Kusel said. said they were pleased Geye wrote it in non. "He taught us that you order with Geye' s appearariee as can write your story chronological out of the room. they filed and which he divded Sophomore Caila and not have to stick to by . chapter multiple Fautenberry, who a certain criteria and be perspectives. conventional." Throughout the attended the lecture as Peter Geye' s visit a representative for the reading, the audience marked the last of three was silent save for the Garfield Book Company, events of the Visiting occasional gasp or word said she liked many Writer Series. for this aspects of the event. "It of approval. semester.

ByTAHNAYEE CLENDINEN AdE Writer

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.THE M008ING MAST -

6A&E

.. NOV. 22 2013

To 'Sin by Silence' Documentary gives voice to consequences of domestic violence ByUNAHAAVE Guest Writer Through the documentary 路:sin by Silence" and the subsequent discussion led by guest speaker Brenda Clubine, members of the Pacific Lutheran University community learned about the complexities of domestic abuse Nov. 12 in the Scandinavian Cultural Center. Voices Against Violence, a PLU group that focuses on bringing awareness about power-based personal violence, partnered with the sociology department to bring the documentary and Clubine,

a domestic abuse survivor, to campus: After having served 26 years in prison for killing her abusive husband in self defense, Clubine finally got the chance to tell Pacific Lutheran University students her story. She also talked about the misconceptions of domestic violence. "In a 6-month period, I had filed 42 police reports," Clubine said. "Did it matter? No. Because by the time I was on trial, fighting for my life, they said that the victim wasn't on trial. I was." the film, "Sin by Silence,"

PHOTO COURTESY OF SINBYSILENCE.COM

In an image from the documentaey, "Sin by Silence," a female inmate is led around a prison area.

portrayed a legal system that does not fully comprehend the complexities of abuse. "I had a restraining order. I'd pressed charges. I had hospital reports. I had eye witnesses. I had all those things, and none of it mattered," Clubine said. "Why? Because our system wasn't set up to work yet." In an attempt to iinprove this system, Clubine founded Convicted Women Against Abuse (CWAA), the first inmateinitiated and inmate-led group in the U.S. prison system. She said she created this group to encourage women to share their stories about domestic abuse so they could help other women in the same situation and. s~op the cycle of violence that often develops in abusive relationships. Thanks to the efforts of CWM, laws for battered women have changed since Clubine was convicted in 1983. Clubine, however, said she is still not happy with where society is today. "Do we have 路 a lot of work to do? Yes, we do. Can we all be a part of that work? Absolutely," she said. After the screening, Clubine walked up to the stage and received a standing ovation from the audience. "I'm a survivor," she said. On tables outside of the Scandinavian Cultural Center were recent pictures of the women in the CWAA and information on how to write to them.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SINBYSILENCE.COM

Brenda Clubine, a survivor of domestic violence, spent 26 years in prison for killing her abusive husband. She is now an activitist for domestic violence awareness.

"I'm going to ask each one of you, if nothing else, to pick up one of those pieces of paper and write those women, and let them know that you heard their voice tonight," Clubine said. "That means a lot to them when they have nothing else." Junior Kaitlyn Elms and first-year Katie Hilliker both expressed interest in writing. "I think that they're truly brave to even be in a group like this," Elms said. She said she felt there is a lot of stigma associated with those who have been in prison, but that people rarely ask路 why they are actually there. "What would have happened if they hadn't acted? They probably would have been the ones killed," Hilliker said.

Clubine also talked about the importance of avoiding abusive relationships. Everyone attending the event received red flags as they entered the Scandinavian Cultural Center. Clubine spoke about these red flags, and the importance of paying attention to red flags in a relationship. At one point she asked the audience to raise their flags. "Look at all the red flags, everybody. You all see those? I didn't. I missed them," Clubine said. "Red flags are the things that we need to pay attention to in a relationship." Clubine concluded by reminding everyone to stand up against violence and be a part of the solution.

Movie Stereotyping: Derogatory characterizations have negative societal effects ByTAHNYAEE CLENDINEN AdE Writer The pop culture of our time has become overrun with st@reotypes. They are force fed to us on screen, over the radio and through offensive humor. The worst offenders are Hollywood filmmakers who have highlighted the same stereotypes over and over. _!lgain, imprinting them onto unsuspecting viewers. Some of the most common stereotypes on screen are the dumb 路 blond character, the really smart Asian character and the portrayal of minorities as criminals or thugs. Sophomore Courtney Lee, who is blond-haired, said she has noticed some of the effects of movie stereotypes, such as how

"Legally Blonde" has changed the way blond-haired people are treated in general. "Movies like 'Legally Blonde' have absolutely contributed to the stereotype," Lee said. "In that movie she [Elle Woods] tries to fit in, but she can't initially, because she's not smart enough, and still deviates towards other stereotypical things like makeup, hair and boys." In other movies, we've all seen that Asian character that has an unbelievably high IQ and totally unreasonable parents. This has, in turn, affected the way many Asian-Americans assimilate into real life situations. Sebastian Smith,. a researcher with the AFP global news agency, said, "what makesAsianAmericans' problem unique is that they are trapped in the cliche of having to be clever - clever

Maybe someday Hollywood will be able to break away from stereotypes and realize all of the negative effects they have on our society.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCRIPTSANl)SCRJBES.COM

"Legally Blonde" is an example of stereotyping in.film. Sophomore Courtney Lee said that she believed "Legally Blonde" has changed the way blond-haired people are treated in general.

to the point of being nerdy, out of touch and unable to represent mainstream American life." First~year Emi Smith said she has been faced with the stereotype and backlash when she couldn't rise to meet the unreasonably high standards set for her. "I remember in math class when we had a big project to do, everyone wanted to be my partner," Smith said. "They were all disappointed and withdrawn after they figured out that I

was just as bad at it [math] as everyone else." The last stereotype - of the minority leading the criminal lifestyle - is the most common out of all three. "It's disgusting," first-year Ladedra Hill said. "'She said that in movies, people will see minorities committing crimes, doing drugs or who are pregnant with attitudes. "I've been talked down to or treated badly because of stereotypes," Hill said. "Just

because it happens in . movies doesn't mean its like that in real life." Maybe someday Hollywood will be able to break away from stereotypes and realize all of the negative effects they have on our society. Until then, people who do the stereotyping will continue to get the wrong first impressions, and those who are stereotyped will continue to be treated differently because of them.


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 22, 2013

A&E7

LUTE NATION TAKES OVER Step team performs, reaches out to the community By NATALIE DEFORD AdE Writer Step boots, stomping and . clapping can always be seen and heard from the steppers on campus, but Lute Nation is far more than just a step team. The members said they are focused on collaborating, building a team, reaching out to the community and expanding the name of Pacific Lutheran University. "Lute Nation is building a team," senior Jessica Resop said. She said her favorite part is the team bonding and that a big part of Lute Nation is learning everyone's strengths and weaknesses as a team. There are no tryouts, but rather all levels work together and welcome everyone. Anyone can join. Resop defined stepping as creating a rhythm with hands, feet and legs. She said a Lute Nation performance is when all members come together for a big, "conglomeration of parts." But they are not just a step team. Two first-years, Azana Hyneman and Roland Andrew Cruz Jr., as well as sophomore Yannet Urgessa, said Lute Nation has a greater purpose. All three joined Lute Nation this year and had never stepped before. They said there are challenges and obstacles, but they have been able to figure them out with their teammates. They also focus on giving back to the PLU community. Hyneman said Lute Nation is a, "community-based stepteam." Cruz elaborated by saying

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAMANTHA HAGER

Members of Lute Nation, the Pacific Lutheran University step team, gather for a photo at the annual Pierce County Hunger Walle in Steilacoom Park.

the team's goal is to spread PLU's name to the community. "Everyone has heard of the big schools," Cruz said, "but it's our job to get PLU out there." Cruz said his favorite part is, "when each member learns a particular part of a step." He also said that the most rewarding part is seeing it all come together. "You can say that about life in general," Cruz said. "It's important to know how to work together as a team for a common goal - life is all about team building." The big motto for the team is, "scholars before steppers." Members are required to maintain a 2.0 minimum GPA, but they are encouraged to shoot

for higher. "We can't be beneficial if we are not successful," sophomore Jonathan Adams, a Lute Nation stepper, said. Adams said his favorite Lute Nation aspect is the diversity on the team. "It's really cool how we're all different and still connect," Adams said. "Everyone wants a place to fit in and feel welcome." He said the team welcomed him in with open arms. Adams said his personal goal is for members to, "stay focused and remember why you're on the team - we perform, but that's just not what we're based on." He said he hopes members can, "maintain the idea that you are a

stepper - people know who you are so you have to represent." Senior Mamie Howard is the president, captain and founder of Lute Nation and has been stepping for four years. This is the third year of Lute Nation. "It's so much more than being a performance team," Howard said. Hyneman said Lute Nation gives back to the community by encouraging younger students they can go to college. "It's a big thing to encourage kids to go to school," Hyneman said. "I think that's important." Urgessa said Lute Nation reaches out to many elementary and middle schools. Adams said, "we explain that if you work hard

and find something you love to do that you can get anywhere." He said they also each explain their lives and how they got to where they are today, showing that anybody can get to college. Howard, while working at schools, said she has seen the transition of kids who didn't normally care about school begin to care after seeing Lute Nation come to town. She said her favorite part is seeing youth inspired in this way. Lute Nation strives to work with and perform for all students regardless of socio-economic class, instead of just students privileged to go to specific schools. This is one of the many reasons the team chose to perform at Lakewood's Boys and Girls Oub Nov.12. "They might not see things like this or even think about college, and we want to change that," Howard said. Lute Nation is also trying to collaborate with more teams, groups and organizations on campus. Howard said they are happy to help with trying to reach the community in any way, and PLU is always going to back such an effort. "We're always looking for new ways to collaborate," Howard said. Howard said Lute Nation will appear in Dance Ensemble this spring and they will be working with dancers. and More information upcoming events can be found on the team's Facebook page, Lute Nation (Fans). "Everything We do is geared toward the community," Howard said.

.el Photo Spotlight on 'Proof'

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP LEFT: Robert, played by first-year ~le Stocker, pours a drink for Hal, portrayed by first-year Josh Bozich. They performed in the Vpstart Crow production of 'Proof' on Nov. 15 and 16 in the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. The show was directed by junior Mitchell Helton. 路 . TOP RIGHT: Hal, played by Bozich, argues with Catherine, who is played by senior Sarah Malcar, about the authenticity of a proof. BOTTOM RIGHT: Stocker perfoTinB a soliloquy before his character, Robert, dies.


THE MOORING MAST

8 BUSINESS

NOV. 22 2013

ACCOUNTING FOR DUMMIES

路Be smart about after-Thanksgiving sales

PHOTO COU!n1!SY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

Customers join long lines at Best Bizy in 2007 to take part in Black Friday sales. Whether shopping in-store or online, customers should still be sure to look for the best sales, set a budget and stick to it.

By BJORN SLATER Business and Ads Manager Turkey is what's on my mind for the time being, but many consumers go crazy weeks in advance for what has become a holiday of its own for bargain-hunters nationwide: Black Friday. It may be fun to follow the crowds and compete for doorbuster deals at midnight, but - there are some steps that the more frugal Black Friday fiend can take to gain an edge on the competition. Consider possible risks Fighting the tide at midnight can lead to some great deals, but there are plenty of risks associated with being around so many people. Although it may not be the first thing on consumers' minds, there are criminals out there who may do anything, from stealing purchases

straight from honest shoppers' arms to picking their pockets in the crowd. This risk can be averted by taking advantage of online deals. Many retailers offer similar, sometimes better, deals on their websites. Some of these deals in recent years have included reduced or no-cost shipping, although Yahoo Finance reports that some of these still included stipulations for a minimum purchase. SOcial networking sites are another excellent online resource. By simply "liking" a retailer's Facebook page or including a certain hashtag on Twitter, consumers can earn both in-store and online discounts. To mitigate the risk of criminals for consumers who do choo8e to venture out, whether at midnight Thursday or throughout Friday, consumers might want to consider bringing cash and locking their wallets in the car.

This does two things. First, it eliminates the risk of consumers having their identity stolen if thieves were to get their hands on a wallet full of debit and credit cards. Second, it ensures consumers will be able to fund their purchases. Card readers do fail, and the sheer number of shoppers may be enough to wear out old or faulty maChinery. However, cash will still be accepted instore, and if a machine does go out, consumers who rely on cash may find themselves at the front of the line with smug looks on their faces. Set and keep a budget Whether in-store or online, it is important to have a budget and stick to it at all costs. Especially with the advents of online shopping and credit cards, it doesn't take much to get carried away and spend more than intended. For people who suffer from

impulse-buy syndrome, they should think about whether the purchase will bring a bout of post-purchase regret. Pay attention to online sales Additionally, don't forget about Cyber Monday. To promote online shopping, retailers offer deals to people who shop the online stores the Monday after Thanksgiving. There's no point in going out on Black Friday if there will be a better deal on the desired product three days later, so it is important for consumers to do research beforehand to see which items have the best deals on which days. Last year, comScore, a leading tech analytics company, reported that Cyber Monday spending had hit $1.46S billion, up about 17 percent from 2011. If this trend continues, I think it's fair to assume that retailers will keep the ~deals coming on Cyber Monday this year.

'Lean In': A look at likeability in the workplace By KELSEY HILMES Guest Writer It's a strange moment when a professor sits in front of a room full of students and asks, "what makes a professor likeable?" But sure enough, in the middle of the latest installment of the leadership series Lean In, that's exactly what Mary Ellard-Ivey, associate professor of biology, wanted to know. The event Monday night called on professi,mal women to ask "does everyone have to like you?" It was based on "Success and Likeability," chapter three of Sheryl Sandberg' s book "Lean In." The panel-led discussion focused on the research-supported idea that successful women are liked less by people of both genders. This, Sandberg ultimately argued, can interfere with a woman's willingness or ability to succeed in the workplace. The event began with a short introduction of research about gender, business leaders, and leadership stereotypes from Women's Center Project Administrator Jennifer Warwick. The first piece of research she explained indicated that the

words used on the packaging of children's toys supported gender

norms. On traditionally female toys, words like "mommy," ~'magic" and "hair" appeared most often, whereas on traditionally male toys, the words "battle" and "power" appeared most frequently. She explained the gender stereotypes reflected in the traditionally male toys are associated with words we believe to be qualities of a leader. The long term effects of this could mean that women who are in leadership roles are seen as less feminine and therefore less likeable. Panelists included Ellard-Ivey, as well as the Director of Multicultural Recruitment Melannie Cunningham, Senior Adviser to the President Kristin Plaehn and Director of Athletics Laurie Turner. They shared their thoughts on being "liked" as women in the workplace. Cunningham suggested that while she didn't need people to like her, she wanted to be considered likeable. The rest of the panel generally agreed. Ellard-Ivey said she wanted her colleagues and students to like her, but she considered likability in the workplace a measure of effectiveness in her job, rather than her as a person. "I know they must like me as a colleague, because they keep asking

me to do stuff, and if I was ineffective at my job, they wouldn't," she said. She then asked the audience if a likeable professor was always considered a good professor. A slew of students raised their hands to offer opinions. Turner offered her own idea of what it meant to be likeable in the workplace. At the time she entered her job in the athletic department, Title IX, the law that demanded equity for women in school sports, had just been reexamined. As the only woman in her department, and later the youngest athletic director in the country at a school with a football team, she said she knew that many of the changes for sports equity she went on to make wouldn't always be liked. "If everyone liked me, I wouldn't make the progress that needed to be made," Turner added. After students broke off into small groups with an array of professional faculty and staff, they discussed their own ideas of whether or not they wanted to be liked in their future careers. When the room regrouped, panelists asked students to think about what it meant for them to be liked as a professional and as a leader, and what they wanted to be liked for.

Stay comfortable Overall, the best part about Black Friday and Cyber Monday is the great deals offered both days. Consumers who are looking for the best of the best will need to do a little research on competing retailers to compare deals and look for the best discounts. But equally important as saving money is being comfortable. Online shoppers, keep an eye out for that next pair of bunny-ear slippers, and in'=.store shoppers, make sure to wear some good walking or running shoes to keep up stamina as the hours inevitably slip by. As for me, I'll be most comfortable staying home to enjoy the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, not getting trampled over a discount video game at Best Buy that I can wait to buy online. Did I mention I hate shopping in person?


THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 22 2013

BUSINESS9

The real cost of fantasy sports By.PETER MUELLER Guest Writer In the early 1980s, a group of baseball statistics geeks created fantasy sports. Their system allowed individuals to construct teams with players from across a respected league and pit them against their friends' lineups. Points were calculated by an individual's lineup performance. Today, the socially competitive phenomenon of fantasy sports has invaded the fields of cubicles across the United States. Competitive leagues with cash prizes are rising in popularity, and with them come the fees for joining these fantasy leagues. The fantasy

+

sports market has more than tripled in size since 2004, and has analysts expecting more rapid growth to come, ESPN reports. Rarely will one overhear people in class discussing their fantasy baseball lineups though, because in the U.S., football is king. Football rules the competitive purgatory of fantasy sports with a total of 7~ percent of路 all fantasy sports involvement. This year, there are more than 35 million .Americans participating in fantasy sports. It may be surprising to look at who comprises these 35 million Americans. The average participant is a 41-year-old white male,

making roughly $92,000 annually, who has a family and owns a house, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade (FSTA), a Association company that measures the fantasy sports market. Yet middle-aged family men aren't the only ones getting involved. In fact, women account for 25 percent of the market, a percentage that is slowly growing. FSTA reports that the under-18 demographic is the fastest growing demographic. With 35 million participants spending an average of $111 annually on fantasy sports, and with a growing percentage 路 of Americans owning a smartphone, the fantasy sports market is now a $1 billion dollar industry and growing. Back in 2008, fantasy sports was an $800 million industry. After experiencing an average growth rate of 5 percent over the past five years, FSTA predicts the market to bring in more than $1.2 billion this year. There are two answers for where this money comes from: ad revenue and league entry fees. FSTA found that only 7 percent of fantasy players used one website to compile information, while 48 percent of players use four or five websites. These players also log an average of 25-30 hours per week on fantasy websites. This has advertisers rushing

PHOTOS COUIUESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS

to capture ad space and, with the low barriers of entry into the market, entrepreneurs are looking to catch a slice of the ad revenue being dished out. Many are concerned with the rapid growth in fantasy sports and its legal gambling nature. Back in 2001, the nation 路 was obsessed with online poker and posted the same Ieverous growth as fantasy sports did. Lawmakers later ruled online poker illegal in 2002, destroying the online poker market with one swift blow. Today, many fantasy sports players are registering for payto-play tournaments, such as the Fantasy Football Players

Championship. Many of these pay-to-play tournaments have fees of more than $1,000 with payouts of up to $1 million. Some worry that the gambling-like structure of fantasy sports will attract negative attention from lawmakers and meet the same fate as online poker. For now, it seems fantasy sports is becoming more embedded in American culture, and with an expectation of becoming a $1.7 billion industry in 2015, fantasy sports show no signs of slowing down.

For more on Fantasy Football, see Nick's Picks on page 16.


THE MOORING MAST

IO OPINION

NOV. 22 2013

Wanderlust: Leave the big city bustle behind By SAMANTHA LUND Columnist I had never been more excited than when I got the chance to take a trip to Europe in high school. Not because I knew any of the language$ or because I liked the food or could even tell you about European culture. The only reason I was excited was because a tiny piece of Europe was Paris - the city of love and wonder that every romantic comedy I had ever watched ended in. I wanted to see the Eiffel Tower and the "Mona Lisa," and that was all I could think about. What people do not talk about as much are the smaller cities and towns that are everywhere. On my trip, I spent many days in smaller cities in France, Germany and Spain, and I formed most of my memories in them. At the same time, the smaller towns were just stepping stones until I got to Paris. Then I got there. Oh boy. lt was crowded, nobody cared to help me find my way around and I got lost - a lot. Paris was beautiful and made for some really good pictures, but at the end of the trip, I had more fun in the smaller towns. At one point in my travels I ran into another family from America, and we helped each other find where we were supposed to be. We were all staying in Heidelberg, Germany. Once we got there, we were greeted with friendly faces, and we all ended up getting lunch together. The people who lived in the city were kind and made sure we all had a good time. We were even invited to a party. It

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Sophomore Samantha Lund stands in front of the ruin Schloss Heidelberg in a small town in Germany.

seemed like strangers wanted to make us feel at home. In Germany, the guests always have to take the first drink of their beers before the-party can begin. In small towns, people will teach you the customs and want you to have a good time. And with us, they did. Small towns usually have le5s traffic, are less crowded and you get the chance to take a step back, breathe and look at the world around Y?U without having to be constantly moving. I realized that even though it was not my dream of Paris,_ it was much, much better. The big cities like Barcelona, Paris and London are all beautiful and worth the trip, but the smaller cities should not be looked over. Small cities

are where I met the most people. Travelers should take the opportunity to soak in the culture rather than worrying about seeing all the sights. The culture comes from the everyday people and their lives, not from looking at a big building or a painting. Those things are wonderful too, but they are not the true culture. That would be like someone from Germany coming to America and visiting New York and saying that is the culture. Excuse me, but no. We are not all thin models who live in small apartments. We are not all working on our "big break." We do not all spend our time in the Empire State Building, just like the French do not spend all their time staring at the "Mona Lisa."

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P OLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Take care during finals By TAHLIA TERHUNEE Columist November is flying by, and December is on the horizon, which can only mean one thing for Pacific Lutheran University students: finals are just around the comer. Professors are trying to finish covering class material and students are beginning to realize they only have a limited amount of days to get the best grade they can. With the realization of how close finals season is upon us, I began to get stressed. Finding time during my weekends has become a rare luxury, and I cannot imagine how I will begin to squeeze in time to study for finals. It's the same路 thing every year. Finals sneak up and next thing you know, the third floor of the library is packed and students fill study rooms. The panic ensues when students realize they may not be as prepared as they think, or they feel as if they couldn't be prepared enough. I know I'm not alone in this chaotic period of time. NBC News reported on a survey conducted _b y the Associated Press that nearly one in every five students said they feel stressed all or most of the time. No wonder finals become an added level of stress to our weekly routines. Students from all across the PLU campus had a variety of answers when reflecting on how they handle their finals. Answers ranged from sobbing in the shower and questioning life to flash cards for reading, writing and verbalizing material. Sophomore Sara Suznevich said, "I drink coffee, delete all my social networks from my phone, third-floor-it in the library for a week and try to go home for that weekend to study better." Having techniques that work for you will boost your confidence during finals week and enable you to not feel as rushed or stressed. However, it is important to remember to

take a breather. One student said her planner gets so overwhelmed with t~ do lists and study sheets that she has to plan for times to relax and get sleep. Acknowledging that you need to be refreshed through relaxing, healthy eating and sleep will make a critical difference in your performance throughout finals. In the midst of studying, the importance of taking care of ourselves is easily lost. Rewarding yourself after a hard day's worth of studying is important. Set a goal for yourself so if you study, you get to do something you enjoy that evening. Having perks will boost your motivation and create positive affirmation in study habits. Once you acknowledge your hard work, you should compliment yourself on what you've accomplished. Positive self-speech is a great way to gain confidence. U.S. News has a suggested top five ways students can prepare for finals, the first being to plan your schedule. I find that time always slips away the closer the clock ticks toward finals. Preparing your schedule and physically seeing what needs to be done helps give you focus. Setting reasonable expectations is another highly encouraged suggestion. This doesn't apply just to finals but to your schedule as well. Don't overload your schedule - give yourself some flexibility. Other important factors included on the list were to take care of yourself physically, eat well and utilize the resources available to you. At PLU, we can find an abundant amount of resources available. Professors hold office hours, and though they may seem daunting at first, students should take advantage of them. Professors are there to help us and are more than willing to do so. If something is foggy or unclear, take it up with your professor. There is also the Academic Assistance Center located in the library, room 124. They have tutors for a range of subjects and can also offer help in time management, critical reading, note taking and study tips. Students need to take a breather and not let finals get the

The responsibilty of The Mooring Mast is to discover, report and distribute information to its readers about important issues,-events and trends that impact the Pacific Lutheran University community. Th.e Mooring Mast adheres to the Society of Professional Journalists Code of Ethics and the TAO of Journalism. The views expressed in editorials, columns and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of Th.e Mooring Mast staff or Pacific Lutheran University. Letters to the Editor should be fewer than 500 words, typed and emailed to mast@plu. edu by 5 p.m. the Tuesday before publication. The Mooring Mast reserves the right to refuse or edit letters for length, taste and errors. Include name, phone number and class standing or title for verificati_on. Please email mastads@plu.edu for advertising rates and to place an advertisement. Subscriptions cost $25 per semester or $40 per academic year. To subscribe, email mast@ plu.edu.

best of them. By organizing your schedule properly, you11 save yourself the trouble later on. Know what needs to get done and know that you deserve some time to yourself.

+


t NO~ 22,

2013 .

.. OPINION 1l

TIIEMOORING MAST

·Sustainability Reduce food waste this holiday season By SHANNON MCCLAIN Guest Writer

necessary in fear you will run out of food. Look to the past to determine which dishes served too much, too little and just enough. Also, check the recipe to make sure the yield or quantity is right. You may make way more than you need on accident by just following a recipe that isn't adjusted.to your particular gathering.

2. PLAN AHEAD The holiday season brings gifts, time with family and, of course, lots of food. Along with the season comes a prolific amount of waste. According to the Worldwatch Institute, we generate an additional 5 million tons of household waste between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve in the United States. Included in this figure is food waste, the amount of which equals three times that of what we waste during the rest of_the year. That is an enormous amount of food waste considering we waste an average of 34 million tons of food each year. So this year, try some of these tips to reduce your food waste this holiday season in preparation, serving and cleanup.

1. BE REALISTIC Be realistic when planning· the meals. Think about how much food will actually be needed or eaten during that specific meal. Of course there may be the desire to have leftovers, but it becomes a problem when there are so many leftovers the food will go bad before it can all be eaten. Don't cook more than is

Plan out everything you will need for your meal at home. Then, bring your shopping list to the store with you. In my family, before we shop for a holiday dinner like Thanksgiving, we make out lists of the ingredients we will need. By making a shopping list at home, you can look in your pantry and fridge to see what ingredients you already have. This eliminates the problem of buying unnecessary multiples of certain ingredients. It also helps put a stop to impulse buys. Stores use the holidays to entice .buyers to purchase things they don't actually need.

3.REASONABLE PORTIONS ''During holiday meals," junior Meagan Schultz said, Nmy family commonly serves larger portions than they would at an everyday meal." Take portions of food that are reasonable for you. When you serve yourself, make sure that it is close to an amount you are able to eat. If anything, err on the .side of smaller, rather than larger. You can always go back for another

serving, but you generally can't give back food that has been half eaten. To help encourage people to take smaller servings when you are hosting, use smaller plates and serving utensils. By having guests serve themselves, each individual can choose an accurate serving. This, coupled with smaller plates and serving utensils, can reduce the amount of food that gets left on plates uneaten.

By KELLI BRELAND

4.LEFTOVERS If you do have leftovers, make sure they are properly and promptly stored after the meal. Generally, hot food should not sit out for more than two hours, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. After each individual dishes up his or her food in my house and before we begin eating, we try to put away as much food as we can. That way, we cart enjoy our meal without worrying about food being left out. In addition, if you have more leftovers than you can feasibly eat within the next few days, make sure you send some home with your guests.

5.

DONATE FOOD

If you do have a lot of extra canned foods, local food banks are always looking for donations. Donations can be in the form of canned or dried foods or money. This is not only great for preventing extra food from sitting in your pantry and spoiling, but it contributes to the thoughtful nature of Thanksgiving.

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Take into account the whole story of 'Thanksgiving' AdEEditor·

The word "Thanksgiving" usually brings up . images of steaming turkey, buttery mashed potatoes, festive and happy cornucopias pilgrims sharing a meal with "the Indians." Corporate marketing, elementary school classrooms and cultural traditions often spread and reinforce this joyful modern day connotation of our celebrated historical event's name. As a society; we focus on the positive aspects, and in many cases, we don't really look past the decorations and Thanksgiving Day sales at all. But these connotations and traditions take into account only a fraction of the issues and events that surrounded the fea1 first Thanksgiving. This year, be thankful that you were ri.ot a pilgrim of the Plymouth colony. This Puritan colony, located in what is now Massachusetts, was founded in 1620. Plymouth's first governor, Edward Winslow, declared the first Thanksgiving in the early 1620s, although it was not an official holiday until the late 1860s. According to the writings of Winslow and other salvaged primary documents and artifacts, life in the colonies was far from picturesque at the time. Consider the fact that 104 colonists embarked on the Mayflower in September 1620. After enduring a grueling, 66-day journey across the Atlantic Ocean that killed two passengers, the survivors landed near Plymouth Rock, Mass. During the first winter alone, almost half of the remanung 102 . colonists perished from cold, sickness and starvation. Research conducted by physical anthropologists at the Smithsonian Institution confirms that conditions across the colonies were so bad that the Jamestown colony, which was the original destination of the Mayflower, had to resort to cannibalism to survive. To continue living, undernourished and the ' unprepared Plymouth roiony formed a pact with the local

Wampanoag tribe. The colonists received food and resources as well as hunting and agricultural lessons, while the Wampanoags received protection from enemy tribes. This transactional relationship between the colonists and the Wampanoags sparked a three-day feast and celebration that we now refer to as the first Thanksgiving. Yet the story does not end with a happy celebration of peace, prosperity and exchange. In the following five decades, colonial and political expansion tensions chipped away at Plymouth's relationship with the Wampanoag tribe. During King Phillip's War, which lasted from 1675-1676, the Plymouth colonists fought against the Wampanoags, who had joined three other native nations. The war almost completely wiped out the Wampanoags. Now, in modern times, we need to take this historical information into account as we consider how we view our beloved holiday, Thanksgiving. This single event was a positive product of colonization, as 'it resulted in benefits for both the colonists and the natives for a certain period of time. But it's the other moments in history - moments of war, sickness and death - that caused and were effected by the first Thanksgiving that we need to take into account. We need to look at the whole picture before, during and after the Plymouth colonists feast with the Wampanoag tribe. Just focusing on the Thanksgiving moment disregards · these important moments of history in a way that some people even find disrespectful. In fact, there are modern day movements in the United States called ''Unthanksgiving Day" and "National Day of Mourning." According to one website, https://www .facebook.com/ pages/National-Day-ofrning/138480962838984 ?nr#, "the organizers consider the national holiday of Thanksgiving Day as a reminder of the democide and continued suffering of the Native American peoples." Whether you believe in Thanksgiving or Unthanksgiving, one thing remains clear - it is important to remember we have this holiday because of a 400-yearold history of collaboration between two groups of people. As you cut into your slice of succulent turkey this year, take away the positive aspects of Thanksgiving, but don't ignore the suffering, war and conflict that preceded and came after the first Thanksgiving as a result of colonization.


- THE MOORING MAST

120PINION

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 22, 2013

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Head Coach Profile: Steve Dickerson

Head Coach Profile: Jennifer Childress.

Steve Dickerson is entering his eighth year as the head coach of the Lutes men's basketball program~ Prior to serving as the head coach, Dickerson was an assistant and associate head coach for PLU for three ·years. Before moving to Tacoma, Dickerson was a high school basketball coach in Columbus, Ohio for 33 years and compiled more than 200 wins. Entering the 2013-14 season, Dickerson owns a 71-96 overall record while at PLU.

Childress is entering her first year as head coach at PLU. Before serving as the head coach of the women's basketball program at PLU, Jennifer Childress was an associate basketball head coach at Western Washington University from 2006-13, During Childress' time at WWU, the Vikings had 145 wins compared to just 50 losses. Before coaching at WWU, Childress was an head assistant coach at Cal State-San Bernardino.

PHOTO COURI'ESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

. PHOTO COURI'ESY OF PLU ATHLETICS

Men's ultimate Frisbee team competes in Oregon Fall Ultimate Disc Games Tournament By SAM HORN Sports Editor In ohe of its only fall tournaments in 2013, the Pacific Lutheran University men's ultimate Frisbee team left Oregon without a single win. Placed in Pool B in the Oregon Fall illtimate Disc Games Tournament Nov. 16-17, the men's team squared off against the University of Washington, lfuiversity of Oregon, Lewis & Clark ~d the Oregon State B team. · Since the PLU team was competing against Division I schools with loads of talent, the result is not too surprising. Large schools actually recruit ultimate frisbee players, whereas small schools, like PLU, cat1 only hope to obtain enough athletic players for the next season. Teams played the games in the tournament to 13 points, and one team had to win by two points. The time limit of these matches was 85 minutes. Whitman Alumni, University of Utah and Eugene were the only undefeated teams in the tournament.

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NEW YORK RANGERS SQlJ_EEZE BY MONTREAL CANADIENS Will the Texas AdM Aggies or the LSU Tigers win this Saturday in college football? By SAM HORN Sports Editor The Montreal Canadiens just couldn't do it. They couldn't pull out the win, falling 1-0 against the New York Rangers. In the second period, Ryan Callahan scored his sixth goal of the season to give the Rangers the . lead for good. Brad Richards was credited with the assist, his 10th of the year. The Rangers dominated the game, even though the score might not have shown it. New York had 34 shots on goal, while the Canadiens could only muster 22 shots. I suppose sticking _with America on this pick paid off. Nice call Kyle P-eart and Dalton Ritchey. Way to be passionate about your country. For the final Pick 'Em of the fall, I asked the contestants about the upcoming Texas A&M-LSU game. More specifically, I asked them who they thought would win. · Everyone chose Texas A&M except for Drew Oord, who went out on a limb and chose the Tigers ofL.5U. The two colliegate football teams are fairly even. LSU boasts a 7-3 record, while the Aggies have a 8-2 record. Not much difference on paper. Concerning the actual players themselves, the Aggies have the advantage in one category above · all else: the quarterback position. Johnny Manziel was the first quarterback to ever win the Heisman Trophy, even if he was a redshirt freshman last year. We11 still give it to him. Manziel has had another successful season in 2013, mainly because of Mike Evans, the standout wide receiver. ·

Evans is second in the country in receiving yards per game (126.3). Evans is sure to be a first round NFL draft prospect next year and has helped Manzie} post mindboggling numbers in the passing game. Manzie} ranks sixth in the nation in passing yards (3,314) but is third in the country in passing touchdowns (31). He only sits behind Oregon State's Sean Mannion and Derek Carr of Fresno State. While the Tigers' defense will be targeting Manzie}, they have a talented quarterback of their own: Zach Mettenberger. The quarterback !las efficiently managed LSU' s pro-style offense, throwing for 20 touchdowns. The Tigers won't solely rely on Mettenberger though. Head coach Les Miles has other plans though. The Tigers will run a balanced attack against the Aggies' defense. Not only does L.5U have a game manager in Mettenberger, but it also has one of the premier running backs in the country: Jeremy Hill. Hill has averaged 107.1 rushing yards per game this season, and that's saying something as the Tigers play in the defensive-minded Southeastern Conference. . Both teams have talented NFL prospects on the offensive side of the ball, which should make for a closely contested game. If the Tigers do end up winning, Oord will win the Mast Sports Pick 'Em. If the Aggies win, though, then there will be a four-way tie for first place. If that does happen, then I guess my hand will become tired because I will be writing so many certificates. For the sake of my hand, I hope ~SU wins.

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.. ·miiftr61t1NG MAST

SAYS...

Let's hand out some grades

By SAM HORN Sports Editor

Football (8-1overall,5-1 NWC)

Volleyball (19-6 overall, 15-1 NWC)

Women's Soccer (11-4-5 overall, 9-2-5 NWC)

Men's Soccer (13-4-3 overall, 8-4-2 NWC)

The season is over for most of Pacific Lutheran University's fall sports. With the exception of the Lutes football team, which plays Lin.field this Saturday in the first round of the NCAA Division III playoffs, every teain has completed its season. PLU was well-represented by how many fall athletes received AllNorthwest Conference honors and how the Lutes volleyball team competed in its third consecutive postseason match. Now that the fall season is over, it's time to look back on the triumphs demonstrated in each team's season. . Let's hand out some grades.

The football team has met all expectations presented before it at the start of the season. First of all, the team has improved its running game from last year. In 2012, PLU averaged more than 130 yards on the ground. This season, that statistic significantly improved. PLU has averaged almost 180 rushing yards this season en route to an impressive 8-1 overall record. The Lutes have also improved on the defensive side of the ball. This season, the Lutes only gave up about 303 total yards per game. Even though the defense is senior laden, junior Joel Anthony led the team and Northwest Conference in sacks with nine. This defense will be good for a while. ff the Lutes didn't allow Linfield to score on four separate occasions when the two teams squared off in early October, then I would give them an A. No doubt about it.

The postseason has not been kind to the PLU volleyball team. History repeated itself this year, when the Lutes volleyball team lost in the first round of the NCAA Division III tournament again. This team dominated in the regular season,. as eviden1:ed by its high hitting percentage and undefeated record at home. In addition, .the Lutes have one of the best setters in the nation in junior Samantha North. North was second in the Northwest Conference in assists per set (10.48). North recently received All-American second Team recoginition for her efforts. The Lutes didn't reach their full potential this year because of their disappointing postseason stint, but there's always next year.

Head coach Seth Spidahl has had a major impact on the Lutes' success this season. Even though the Lutes didn't do so well in Spidahl' s first year last season, they were able to enjoy a much more successful season in 2013. Last year, the Lutes finished 6-5-7 overall and sat in sixth place. This year, the tides have turned. The Lutes ended the season riding a three-game winning streak and finished with an 11-4-5 overall record. . This is the first time since 2005 the Lutes have finished in third place in the Northwest Conference .. Now that's what I call improvement.

2013 spelled success for the men's soccer program. In its 12th season under head coach John Yorke, the men's soccer team started out the season on a 12game unbeaten streak. However, in mid-October, the Lutes struggled to find a win. They lost four straight games after winning or tying their first 12games. The Lutes were lucky to have senior Derek Johnson, who scored 13 goals to lead the team. Even though this · team graduated eight seniors, it will be in good hands for a while. First-year Rigoberto Loreto led the Northwest Conference with nine assists. Although the Lutes didn't make the postseason for a third consecutive year, the men's soccer program should be proud of what it accomplished on the field.

GRADE:B+

GRADE:B+

GRADE:B

GRADE: A-

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Women's basketball steals one from Western Oregon University By JOHN TVETER Sports Writer. The Pacific Lutheran University women's basketball team has a motto this season - "Mission Possible." This helps the team keep the attitude that it can do anything. 1he Lutes stayed true to their motto Sunday as l:ti~Y played the Wolves of Western Oregon· University, an NCAA Division l1 school. After losing a close game lo Evergreen State the night before, it would.have been easy for the Lutes to hang their heads and accept the fact that they were supposed to lose. They didn't though. The Lutes were down by five points at halftime, and came out firing in the second half. PLU took the lead shortly into the second period, but the Wolves refused to go away. After a Western Oregon basket, the Lutes' lead was cut to four points with 1:25 to play. · 1he Lutes maintained their composure and calmly knocked down 9-for-10 free throws in the final seconds to seal the 6656 vidory and even their non-conference

record at 1-1. The win was the first career win for head coach Jennifer Childress, who is in her first year as head coach at PLU. "This was such a great win for us," senior Samantha Potter said. "It sets the tone for the rest of our season. A win against a good Division II team like Western Oregon will only push us to work harder. We talk about 'earning four' and this is a stepping stone toward our goal." The definition of 'earning four' means the top four teams in the Northwest Conference advance to the conference tournament at the end of the regular season. ·The tenacious tandem of Potter and fellow senior Shelly IGlcup, who each contributed 19 points and 12 rebounds, led the Lutes. Katelyn Smith, also a senior, contributed four assists and a block, while Kilcup paced the defense with three steals. The Lutes relied on their quality free throw shooting and rebounding for the win. PLU out-rebounded Western Oregon 39-31. The Lutes returned to action Thursday at 7 p.m, when they hosted Oaremont · Mudd-Scripps, a Division ill school from California.

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THE MOORING MAST

NOV. 22. 2013

SPORTS15

Swartout sinks three-pointer to seal the deal for men's basketball Lutes paced by Isaksen's team-leading 15 points By NICK BARENE Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University men's basketball team beat Schreiner in its first game of the regular season in thrilling fashion. Sophomore Erik Swartout hit a buzzer-beating three-pointer to win the game for the Lutes, 76-75. The Lutes came out of the gate playing hard and led throughout the first half, playing to a 40-30 halftime lead. In the second half, the Lutes held a 58-41 lead with 9:08 to play. However, the Schreiner Mountaineers went on a 28-9 run that brought them all the way back. They made 12 free throws during that run and took a 73-70 lead with only 16 seconds 路 remaining. With 10 seconds left, guard Arvid Isaksen, a senior, was fouled but still hit his shot, and went to the free throw line. He converted his shot from the stripe to tie the game at 73-73.

On the other end of the floor, the Lutes fouled Mountaineer guard AJ Myres, who converted his free throws to give Schreiner a 75-73 lead. Then with just three seconds left, Swartout hit a three-point shot at the buzzer to seal the game for the Lutes. ''We set up the play perfectly and Seth [Anderson] made a great pass," Swartout said. "Once I caught it, I looked at the clock and knew I had time. I just did my best to make a play for my team." Swartout said he wasn't thinking about the pressure to perform in clutch moments. ''You have to let all that go and just play," Swartout said. Head coach Steve Dickerson said he was pleased with the win, but was also aware of a few mistakes. "We played so well for 30 minutes and then let it get away. The guys, however, hung in and showed their resiliency," Dickerson said. . Isaksen led the Lutes in scoring with 15 points and added four rebounds.

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP RIGHT: Fbrward Austen Wilson, a junior, played a total of 12 minutes against Schreiner. He scored four points in the game. BOTTOM LEFf: First-year Brandon Lester makes a quick pass to a teammate for a shot attempt. Lester has started every game so far this season. BOTTOM RIGHT: Senior Kai Hoyt focuses on making his free throw. Hoyt was l-for-2 from the charity stripe on the evening and finished the game with only one point.

Lutes men's basketball squashes Trinity By NICK BARENE Sports Writer

+

The men's basketball team earned its second victory of the year with a 67-49 win over Trinity at the Doug McArthur Oassic, which was hosted by Puget Sound. The Lutes shot nearly 50 percent from the floor on their way to a decisive victory. Twelve different Lutes scored points for the team, and guard Daniel Landram, a junior, led the team with 12 points. Fellow guard Arvid Isaksen, a senior, paced the team with 12 rebounds. The Trinity Tigers actually led early in the game, leading 13-6 just eight minutes into the contest. For those first eight minutes, the Lutes shot just 32 percent from the field. Then, Pacific Lutheran University caught fire. The Lutes scored 12 of the next 17 points, and fought to take a 26-24 lead heading into the locker room at halftime. In the second half, Trinity pulled within three points, threatening to take the lead. The Lutes slammed the door shut though, going on a 13-point run and didn't look back. . "Playing 12 guys against Trinity as efficiently as we did tells me that we have some very good depth," head coach Steve Dickerson said. Player Jonathan Wilt led Trinity in both points and rebounds with 11 and eight, respectively. PLU held Trinity to just 33.3 percent shooting (18-of-54) and managed to out-rebound the Tigers 44-to-26. . Dickerson was content with the all-around effort of his squad. "It was a total team effort this past weekend, and that was the impressive part," Dickerson said. The Lutes improve to 2-0 on the season, while Trinity falls to 0-2. The Lutes will face a challenging Northwest University squad in a non-conference matchup in Kirkland Tuesday. The Lutes will open home play Nov. 29 against St. Mary's (Minn.) and will begin Northwest Conference play Jan. 3.

PHOTO BY JESSE MAJOR

Guard Daniel Landram, a junior, finished the night with 12 points. He showed his prowess from beyond the arc against Trinity, as he was 2-for-5. After playing two games this season, Landram ranks second on the team with an average of 11.0 points ~r game.


THE MOORING MAST

16 SPORTS

NOV. 22 2013

PLU men and women swim teams keep rolling, defeat Linfield By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University swim teams kept their unbeaten records intact after dominating performances saw the men win 166-32 and the women win 158.5-46.5 against Linfield last Friday. Coming off of two wins against Pacific and Lewis & Clark the previous weekend, both the PLU men and women improved their records to 4--0 overall and 3-0 in NWC. Lin.field men and women fell to 0-3. "I think they [the PLU swim teams] showed really well, being as tired and beat up as they have been all week," PLU head coach Matt Sellman said. "We had some really tough races, and I don't think I could be more pleased with how they did, considering how hard I pushed them in training." Picking up where they left off from last weekend, senior Kina Ackerman and sophomore Hanna Armstrong both put up strong performances and ended the night with three event victories apiece. Ackerman won all three of her solo events, finishing with top times in the 200 breas~troke (2:33:60), the 200 butterfly (2:20:28) and the 1000 freestyle (11:11:88). In addition to helping win the 400 freestyle relay, Armstrong also swept her solo events, winning the 200 (1:58:88) and 500 freestyle (5:23:54). Fatigue did not seem to be an issue for the men's team either. First-year Joseph Bowley led the men with three event victories, sandwiching a win in the 200-yard freestyle (1:50:54) between wins in the 400 medley relay and the 400 freestyle relay. "It's cool to have our team doing this good so early in the season," junior Rachel Althauser said. "We are all sore because we had a tough week at practice, but the team is really cohesive right now, and everyone is working hard."

PHOTOS BY JESSE MAJOR

TOP LEFI': Junior Kevin McKay paddles through the water en route to finishing third in the 200-yard freestyle with a time of 1:56.85. TOP RIGHT: Sophomore Justin Murrell briskly swims through the water. Murrell placed first in the 1000 freestyle with a time ofl0:45.36. BOTTOM: Senior Kina Ackerman finished first in the 200-yard butterfly with a time of 2:20.28. She beat out her second-place opponent, first-year Sarah Ameny, by just over two seconds. Ameny's time was 2:22.16.

Lute swimmers sweep Willamette, close out 2013 undefeated By GIANCARLO SANTORO Sports Writer The Pacific Lutheran University swimmers closed out 2013 undefeated in Northwest Conference dual meets after the Lute men and women outswam Willamette 148-57 and 164-40 respectively Saturday morning. With the Lutes' second win in two days, both teams boast perfect records after improving to 4--0 in NWC and 5-0 overall. The Willamette men and women have yet to win in NWC meets, dropping to 0-4 overall. "I think winning is important," PLU head coach Matt Sellman said. "Going into the Thanksgiving break with an undefeated record is important. It's fun and it's something that they can look at and smile about." The Lute men started and ended strong.

Sophomore Brian Ruggles, junior James Whaley and first-year Hunter Cosgrove all won two or more events. Ruggles won his solo .e vents in the 200 freestyle (1:49.9) and the 100 freetyle (48.67), while Cosgrove also won a pair of solo events, placing first in the 1000 freestyle (10:28.09) and the 500 freestyle (5:00.9). Whaley joined junior Corban Elliot, first-year Joseph Bowley and Ruggles to win the 200 medley relay (1:41.58), combined with solo efforts in the 50 freestyle (22.95) and the 100 butterfly (55.4). "We are really good at motivating each other," Elliot said. ''We make sure that everyone stays on task and trains just as hard during the break." Sophomore Hanna Armstrong contiriued to lead the way for the women, joining junior Michelle Ho.gap, first-year Morgan Conunander and sophomore Natasha Sioda to win the 200 freestyle relay (1:42.6), in addition to

claiming two solo events in the 1000 freestyle (11:24.28) and the 50 freestyle (25.88). Hogan added another relay win in the 200 medley (1:55.67) with help from Sioda, first-year Therese Ackman and senior Kina Ackerman. Ackerman also placed first in the 100 breaststroke (1:11.14), while first-year Darcie Booth won the 200 freestyle (2:02.0) and the 500 freestyle (5:36.56). With the win, PLU will have three weeks to rest and prepare for the Husky Invitational in Federal Way Dec. 6. "Our ultimate goal is to be preparing well and using these meets to rehearse for the big time in our conference championship in February and nationals after that," Sellman said. PLU will have its next dual meet Jan. 17 on the road against Whitman.

Nick's Picks: Fantasy players to watch this week '

.

By NICK BARENE Sports Writer

WHO'S HOT

WHO'S NOT RAY RICE- Ray Wee of the Baltimore Ravens hasn't had the kind of season one comes to speet limn a player of his caliber. Although he rushed for 131 yuds and one touchdown against the Chicago Bean in Week Il, he is avmgingjust smn fant.uy points per game. Owners should conaider trying to trade him or demot.e him to the bench.

DOUG MARTIN- Doug Martin of the 'limp& Bay Buccaneers hasn't been able to build upon his successful season last year. He lw rushed for less than 500 yards and just one touchdown this year. Some owners have tried to hang on to Martin, hoping that he'll be able to tum the comer. However, it appears that it's time to cut bait on Martin and send him to the bench or the trading block.

STEVIE JOHNSON- Stevie Johnson of the Bulfalo Bills has not been able to stay healthy, and the time he lw played has been largtly fruitless. He is ranked 4Ist in fantasy point.s among receivers this year and is a startir injust 15 pe~ent ofleagues. He may be worth a besch spot to be used in a pinch, but he is not a weekly starter.

+


SPORTS • Men's basketball drops two games over Thanksgiving break

BUSINESS Starbucks lures customers with holiday marketing scheme

PAGE16

PAGE9

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY

HE DEC. 6, 2013

OORING

AST

mastmedia. plu.edu

VOLUME 90 ISSUE 10

LUTES ABROAD:

J-term a popular time for students to study away

The t.acb on thia photo illustration rqrtnent most:ltf~tihatioru offmd to

Lum throiigh 1~flrl'Study Away programs.

By ALISON HAYWOOD News Editor J-term is just around the corner, and many Pacific Lutheran 's tudents will soon be sitting through four-hour classes, cheering on their friends through PLU Idol and catching up on their P.E. credits. Others, however, will be taking the opportunity to participate in one of PLU's most prideful traditions: study away. Approximately 312 students will be leaving the Lutedome this J-term with 23 different study away programs ~ the highest number of programs PLU has ever offered at one time, Megan Grover, manager of short-term study away programs, said.

ary provides a nice time for this type oL opportunity," Grover said of the intertsiv.e four-week programs. "It provi es $hldents the opportunity to trav!iill wt a PLtr professor and With PLU ~tu d1· to;." The t:ourses are organized and led by PLU faculty members and only open to PLU students. They feature a wide range of academic topics, from English and political science to music and P.E. Grover said one of the most unique J-term programs PLU offers is the trip to Antarctica. "Not many other institutions are able to offer a study away experience to Antarctica," she said. "We're pretty proud to be able to do that." In addition to exotic locations like Antarctica, PLU also has five domestic programs located inside the U.S.

Although it seems unusuru to offer study away programs inside the U.S.'s borders, Grover said domestic programs are a unique -0pporhmity for students to have an intercultural experience in the

..u..s.

.

"PLU believes in study away, we believe that students can have a very rich, intercultural experience loc@.:>:-" Grover said. · The most localized study away program is the January on the Hilltop program, in which students participate in community service projects in Tacoma's Hilltop and Salishan neighborhoods. "It's a great way for PLU to develop long-lasting relationships with some ·of our neighbors and neighboring communities, a good way for PLU students to learn a little bit more about,

you know, different communities and societies within the greater. :American FllPWa.ti.on," Grover said. '.'SO I think it's a reaily nearopportunity for students." One downside to J-term study away programs is the cost. The prices are as varied as their locations, ranging from $200 per student for January on the Hilltop to . $11,350 for the Antarctica program. Most programs average between $3,000 and $6,000. "It's a huge range. Again, it's just the nature of the course, what's included in that program fee," Grover said. Although students studying away do not have to pay tuition for J-term, the program fee can be a deterring factor for some; Students' regular financial aid

STUDY AWAY CONT. PAGE 3

Campus Safety respon~s to break-ins in campus buildings By RELAND TUOMI Copy Editor Break-ins occur everywhere, and the Lutedome is no exception. There have been a number of break-ins on Pacific Lutheran University's campus in recent weeks, mostly in the Hauge Administration building but also in Olson Gymnasium and Ramstad Hall. The first break-in occurred the night of Oct. 31 and the most recent Nov. 26. Campus Safety became aware of these incidents the day following each break-in. "There were no forced entries," Greg Premo, director of Campus Safety, said. "So we're finding out about the break-ins the next day when faculty members come in to see items missing and desks rummaged through."

Even though there were no forced entries, Premo said he does

not believe the break-ins were Campus Safety employees, who done by someone affiliated with recognized her. The suspect is a PLU. white female with long brown "It could be a matter of not hair, 27 years old, 4 foot 11 inches locking a door someone thought tall and 115 pounds. was locked, or someone is getting "This description is not far in when the building is unlocked from a typical college student," and staying in," Premo said. Premo said, "so she blends in Campus Safety officers well." assessed the scene Nov. 1 and Campus Safety called the called a forensics team to check for . Sheriff'"s Department and any latent fingerprints. Nothing deputies arrested the suspect for was damaged, but the university trespassing. did lose a few laptops. The suspect had a screwdriver There have been a total of six with her, the tool likely used to break-ins with the most recent get into the offices in Hauge. She one occurring Nov. 26 in Ramstad denied stealing anything but said around 7 p.m. she knew she was not allowed on Campus Safety has a suspect campus. for these break-ins. She had been RFC'd (Restricted from Campus) Call Campus Safety if you see a!'Y in August for wandering through suspicious activity on campus. Olson Auditorium and the pool area. For non-emergencies, call 253A professor saw the suspect in 535-7441. For emergencies, call 253Ramstad Nov. 26 around 7 p.m. 535-7911. The professor contacted


2 ADVERTISEMENT

THE MOORING MAST

12/16

I

12111

12/20

-

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DEC. 6 2013

I

12/19 .

..... 11

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REMEMBER -We only buy back a set amount of each textbook, so it's first come, first serve! Bring all of your textbooks, even those from past semesters -We might buy those.back too!


mre.& 2013

NEWSS

Full-time student, part-time politician Two Lutes balance classes and campaigns this year By LEAH TRAXEL Online Editor Many students on campus cared about the results of this year's election. Shannon Reynolds, a Pacific Lutheran University junior certainly did. Reynolds' involvement, however, went a little further than voting in the election. Reynolds was on the ballot. After determining she wanted to help improve her hometown of Fircrest, Wash., Reynolds decided to run for a seat on the city council against 12-year incumbent Chris Gruver. She won with 59 percent of the vote. "I had no idea I'd win," Re~lds said. Located just east- of Tacoma, Fircrest is home to roughly 6,500 people. Reynolds and her family moved there from Hawaii when she was 8 years old, and she said she has always appreciated the "small town" atmosphere and community-oriented programming. However, Reynolds also said she was concerned the programming from the city was alienating unmarried residents

and young adults. "I didn't one year, but Reynolds said she'd think it was fair they should be like to bring programs like that underrepresented," the 20-year- back. old said. "If I could do any project, Reynolds said her campaign . that's in my top three," Reynolds was unconventional. Instead of said. television spots and newspaper The economics-biology ads, she simply introduced double major said she wants to herself to residents by attending become a doctor in the future, her favorite community. events and one day hopes to open a and being friendly. family practice for disadvantaged ReyP.olds said she expects communities. that community involvement -,,That's my calling, what I'mwill be a large part of her four- pulled to do - put people and year term, but it's also something compassion above money," she's well acquainted with. She's Reynolds said. She said she is a regular attendee and volunteer unsure of her future in politics. of community events such as the "I really like the taste I've gotten city's Tree Lighting, Relay _for so · far [of politics], so I'm not Life and National Night Out. co\inting it out, but I'll just take it In addition, Reynolds said she day by day." hopes to bring a fresh perspec:Qve Reynolds isn't the only Lute to the city council during her with eyes on an elected office. four-year term. Senior Eric Herde ran for a State "There wasn't a lot of vision Senate seat in the 25th Legislative anymore," Reynolds said. "I'm District last year, but lost. more of a can-do-er. I feel that it's "It'_s definitely a steep inlportant to put ~gs in terms learning curve," the Norwegian, of the positive and what could environmental science, math be.'' and political science quadruPle. Reynolds began her political · major said. "We [Herde and his career as an intern in city hall in· supporters] understood it was a high school through the Fircrest long shot." Business Association. The Herde first became interested scholarship program she was in politics just before the involved in was terminated after 2008 election, when a local

STUDY AWAY FROM PAGE I also only applies to semester or year long programs. The only funding _available for J-term programs is the Global Scholar award, a need-based scholarship of up to $1,000. "It's minimal funding. It does offer some assistance, but we don't have any award that would cover the whole program fee," Grover said. "Students may find 4hat a seme~;ter

option is a better value if they're just looking at dollars." While some new· programs are just getting started this year, seven other trips were cancelled for various reasons. Faculty Fellow Donald Ryan canceled his traditional archaeology trip to England and Egypt this _ year due to the political situation in Egypt. President Thomas Krise canceled his trip to Washington, D.C. due to low enrollment, although he will be teaching a course on

congressman held a town forum on healthcare reform near Herde's home. The debate left Herde·interested in more, and he quickly aligned himself with the Democratic party. This year, Herde volunteered as a campaign consultant for three candidates for nearby city council positions. Two of the three won. Herde wants to take office in the legiSlative branch someday, but doesn't have any specific plans. After graduation, he hopes to work for a city planning agency in Tacoma.

MAST

TV

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campus this year. "At PLU, we do have really driven faculty who are really motivated to provide international experiences for students," Grover said. "I think it's just a good combination that works well for PLU, and something we can sustain for PLU."

]-term study away_ programs for 2015 will be announced January 2014.

Heart condition does not deter determined stepper Brittany Love joins Lute Nation despite health problems When the first-time stepper was cleared to First-year Brittanya Love is practice, she one of the newest members of had already Lute Nation, Pacific Lutheran's learned most step .team. Love's journey to of the moves. becoming a stepper was not easy, That dedication but she and Lute Nation both caused Lute expressed excitement that she Nation to made it. recognize While in high school, doctors Love as their told Love she had a small heart "Stepper of the murmur. The stepper said she Week" Nov. 15. was not surprised, because her "I love being mother has the same hereditary part of it. It's just heart condition. so wonderful," The murmur did not affect Love said. her life until she got to PLU and ''When I didn't PHOTO BY EMILY JACKA decid