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Degree requirements are specifically sta ted in this and the University

Catalog . The srudent is responsible for becoming familiar with these requirements and meeting them.

The information contained in this brochure is su perce ded by the

Univer siry Catal og of Pacific Luther an Univcr 路ity. For more complete information on the University, please requ es t a copy of the University Catalog from the Admissions Office, Pacific Lutheran University,

Tacoma, Was hington 98447. ni vc r sity reserves the right to make necessary change s in procedu re s po li cie s, c alenda r, and curriculum.

The

,


WHYPLU? PROFESSIONAL ACCREDITATION •

Our business programs are accredited on both the undergraduate and graduate levels by the

American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. Our accounting program is also accredited bv the AACSB.!t is the first business school in the Northwest to achieve this national recognition

�f all three programs.

HIGH QUALITY FACULTY AND STUDENTS •

Virtually all of the BBA courses are taught by full-time faculty with appropriate doctorate

degrees. •

The business school is a unified academic organization without departments. This

maximizes interfield cooperation among faculty members. •

Our students (including about 45% women) come to us from all areas in the west. High

standards of scholarship are maintained, and many students go on to graduate programs.

HIGH QUALITY CURRICULUM •

Courses are offered both daytime and evening. This allows students the flexibility to

schedule classes around other important commitments or responsibilit,ies. •

There are specialization opportunities provided in the fields of: Accounting Finance Human Resource Management Management Information Systems Marketing Operations Management

The class sizes are appropriate to the instructional methods used, averaging 21 students

per class. •

Careful academic advising and career counsefing is available by business professors with

similar professional interests.

HIGH QUALITY RESOURCES •

The library contains one of the most complete collections for working executives in the

South Puget Sound area. A recent acquisition program was supported by the Ben B. Cheney Foundation. More recently, the computerized Frank Haley Business Information System was established to provide quick access to the card catalog for Business in our own and other libraries. •

VAX 11/7R5 and 11/750 computer systems and the availability of over 40 terminals mean

"hands-on" access to this important managerial tool. Students have access to an extensive variety of software packages including four languages (Pascal, BASIC, FORTRAN, and COBOL),

a

number of statistical packages (SPSS, SCSS, Minitab, SAS, C-Calc, etc.), a Data

Management System, and two text editors. Also available in our computer labs for student usc are 18 113M-PC-s.

JlIne 1, 1986

1


CONTENTS 4

Accreditation

4

Tuition Rate

5

Admission

6

Professional Opportunities

6

Career Services

7

Facilities

8

Student Organizations

8

Internships

8

Advising

9

Registration Procedure for BA Courses

9 10

University Calendar and Credit Hours Degree Requirements

11

BBA Degree Requirements

12

Areas of Concentration

14

Course Descriptions

20

Business Administration Faculty

22

Consulting Professors

23

University Officers

24

University Board of Regents


ACCREDITATION The Bachelor of Business Administration program, the Accounting program, and the Master of Business Administration program are professionally accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. What does such accreditation mean? AACSB accreditation helps ensure quality educational standards in collegiate schools of business and provides benefits to students, faculty, employers and the public. Approxi足 mately 1,200 colleges and universities in the United States offer business degrees, but only slightly over 200 are accredited by AACSB. Of the more than 500 masters programs, approximately 165 are AACSB accredited. In 1982 AACSB began to award a separat2 accreditation of accounting programs. While nearly all of the 1,200 schools that offer a business degree have an accounting program, only 44 accounting programs are accredited by AACSB. AACSB accreditation standards and procedures represent the voluntary efforts of schools to stimulate excellence in collegiate programs for business. This peer review process mitigates the need for government interference and assures that institutions are evaluated by experienced individuals with detailed knowledge of management education. They have applied measurements which have wide acceptance in the educational co m munity. AACSB standards affirm the long standing integrity of degrees awarded in business and manage足 ment. As such, AACSB accreditation represents an institutional commitment to educational excellence and serves to attract quality faculty members and students. Accreditation mea'ns that a business school has met certain minimum standards in areas such as faculty resources and qualifications, intellectual climate, admissions policy, degree requirements, library and computer facilities, physical plant, and financial resources. AACSB curriculum standards require that students complete broad and significant work in mathe足 matics, communication skills, and the social sciences and humanities. Based on this foundation, all students at AACSB accredited institutions are exposed to studies in marketing, finance, economics, legal environment, accounting, quantitative methods, management information systems, organization and behavioral theory, international busi足 ness and ethics. The curriculum standards are an i mportant assurance that business school graduates possess the academic training necessary for their subsequent careers. Any collegiate institution offering baccalaureate andior masters degrees in business administration and management may apply for AACSB accreditation. Businesses as well as u niversities and colleges may apply for membership to AACSB. Membership in AACSB, however, does not constitute accreditation .

TUITION RATE Part-Time (1-9 Hours) Full-Time (10-15 Hours)

$230 per semester hour $3,330

Full-Time (16 Hours and Above)

$3,330 plus $200 per hour above 15 hours

Full Academic Year (35 Hours Maximum)

$7,155

The additional per hour charge above 15 hours may be refunded if the total hours for the year does not exceed 35 hours. For further tuition information, contact the PLU Business Office. Financial aid is available for any qualifying student interested in majoring in business. Students who wish to apply for aid should contact the Financial Aid Office as early as possible to ensure maximum consideration. Grants and Scholarships for business students are also available,

4


ADMISSION Requests for genera! university infor m a t ion and application forms related to t h e process of adm ission should be direc ted to t he Office of Adm ission.

To be el igib le to declare a major or m inor in Business Adm inistra t ion, a student m u st have: 1) Been offic ially adm itted to t h e Univ ersity GIld 2) Successful l y completed 24 semester hours of college level work and 3) Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above. FRESHMEN It is reco mm ended t h at first year stu dents concentrate on c o u rses w it h in t h e College of Arts and Sciences. Fresh m en are also encouraged to meet w i t h t h e Undergraduate Advisor to discuss t h e BBA program requirem ents and to p l a n t h eir schedules. Early c o u rse b y course p lanning is especially im portant for students who a r e planning to take a concentration and/or m inor.

TRANSFER STUDENTS The fo rmal indiv idua l evaluation of all transfer courses is done in the Registrar's Office. The Registrar, w i t h fac ult y cooperation, determines to what ext ent credit can be granted and advanced standing recognized for tests passed, work done in o t h er col leges, military service schools, ext ension programs and s pecial exam inat ions. The Registrar a ssist s in arrangem ent for ( c ourse c h aHenge) examinations for credit. He is also t h e contact for st u dents w ho p l an to take advantage of veterans' b enefits. Questions conc erning your transfer to PLU shoul d be direc t ed to t h e Transfer Coordinator w ho is located in t h e Registrar's O ffice. Transfer st u dents s hould also plan t o meet with the Undergraduate Business Advisor to discuss the BBA program and to determine t h e transferability o f b usiness courses from o t h er coll eges.

5


PROFESSIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Busin ss study is the single most frt?q u<'ntly ch05<'n discipline of studt'nts t'ntering American colleges and u niversities. [t is also an important selection of tho se college grad uates who a re returning to the campus for a second bachelor's degree or advanced work.

White most colle g e graduates are eventually employed in business or government, this choice re fle c ts ¡everal trends.They include the steady improvement in the quality of profe sional busine ss studies, the increased demand for business administration graduates and a wider choice of employm ent opport unities.

Tr, ditionally, Pacific Lutheran UniverSity graduates with a Bachelor of Business Adminis­ t ration d e g ree are employed in the business communities of the Pacific Northwest The national accreditation and the general recognition of the program permits graduates to take advantage of car er opportunities. On the whole, the placement record of the business grad uates in c, reers and in graduate schools for p rofessional studies of business, economics, ed ucational and public administration, and law compares favorably with that of graduates from other schools and colleges and from different field.Th e School of B u siness Administra­ tion faculty members maintain close contacts with a[umni and industry and government services representatives in thei r professional fields. They are g od sources of information to interested stu ents about em p loyme nt trends, opportunities, and required q u alificat ions for the many careers in administration, related p rofessions and postgraduate studies. Fo r this reason, it is highly recommended that the business administration student, upon entrance to the School of Business Administration, select an advisor with similar pro fessional interests. .

CAREER SERVICES The Career S ervices Office provides guidance toward early development of career objectives. The office lists part- and full-time employment opport u nities and s u m mer job openings for students and alumni, assists candidates in developing job search techniques and coordinates an on-campus i nter v iewing schedule and recruiters from industry, business, government and grad uate schools.

6


FACILITIES The School of Bu sine ss Administ ra tion is situated on the seco nd fl oo r west wi ng in the Administration Building. The bui l d in g is l o ca t ed on o ne of the grav ity centers of the camp u s,

adjacent to the Rob rt A. L. Mortvedt Library and the University Center where many informal di scuss io ns take plac e. The la yout of the offices in the Sc ho o l of Business Administration p ro v ides ev ery professo r

an individual office in which per so nal student conferences may take pla ce. The west wi ng of

dministration Buil di ng contains c l a ssroom s which are used p r im ar i ly by th e School of Busin s Admin路stration. In addition to t his, t he l ibrary pr ov ides several rooms for small dis c uss ion gr u ps a n d research co l loq uia . Classrooms are equipped with scre ens for us wit h

the

various types of proje ct o rs and oth er audio/visual equipment. Also, classrooms have h ook u p for p or t a b l e TV sets a nd vid eo ta pe equ ipmen t which are services by a fully equipped TV s tu di o in the Administration Bu i l di n g This studio is re a dily availabl e a n d .

freq ue nt ly used for both ta ping and screening i n business courses, including mat rials rei ted to case work, pr esenta t i ons, r esea r ch st u d ies a nd a v ariety of other spec ia l p roj ects

.

The Rob ert A. L. M or tvedt Librarv now hold s about 20,500 busi ne ss and econo mics books, ' v irt ual l y aU of recent vi nta ge. Many other book s, c l a ssified under rel a ted social sci ence fields, are supp or t ive of the bllsiness and economics program. To su p pl em e nt these resources the library also maintains relations with t he Pacific N orthwe st Biblio g raphi c

enter a nd the

Mid-West Int r Library Center to p r o vide r a pid service t hro ugh in t er- lib rary loans. This -

provides acce ss to such mate ria l s as dom estic and f oreig n doctoral dissertations, p u b lica tion

of business research bur aus, corporate rep or ts, and for ign pe riodica l s . A Third floor wil l be and will include more r esource s f o r st u de nts.

added to the library w ithi n the next y ear,

The business and eco n omics collection was r ecently enhanced through the gen ero sity of

t h, Ben B. Ch e ney Found a t ion. These books are of a practical rather than theoretical nature >

and should p rov ide tec hnica l inSig ht s to fa ulty and s t u de nts alike. A gift from the Haley

family estab l i hed the Frank H a ley Busine ss I nf ormation System whic h provides on l i n e -

mpllter acces sibi li ty to t he card catalog for business in our o w n and other libraries .

he UniverSity l ibr ary is open daily including weekends and evenings during the academic year. Calculators for stu de nt use are ava ilab l e at the checkout desk P hoto c opy mac hines and .

t yp ewriters are also avail a ble in the library for

a sma l l

fee.

he data proc essing center is locat ed in the baseme nt of Robert A. L. Mortvedt Library. The data processing installation houses VAX 1 1 1785 and 1 1 1750 computer s, which are accessible to

s tude nt s v i a 40 te rmina l s T h e U nive rsi ty offers a n extensive v ariety of soft ware o pt i ons .

includ i n . g four lan gllag s ( Pa cal, BASIC, FORTRA

, and COBOL). Softw are p a cka ge s

available includ e SPSS, SCSS, Minitab, SAS, ADA, C-Calc, OMS, and t wo text editors.

The U ni v ers ity Cent er , compl et ed in 1970, pr vides 1 00,000 square feet of service area

inc l ud ing food servic e facilities, l o u n ges, m eting rooms, bookstore, bowling alleys, games rooms, private dining rooms, Chri s Kn u tze n Fello w sh ip Hall, stud ent government offices,

coffee shop, and a student-op ra t ed coffeehouse.

The Swi mmi n g Pool ( 1 965) enc l oses a s wimmin g area 42 by 75 fe et and a diving a re a 30 by 35 feet as w ell as dre ssing room fa ci l itie s. O lso n Physic al Education Auditorium (1969) f acili tat es ca m p u s recreational activities including lectures, the p erform i ng Ar t ist Series, po p u lar entertainment and athletic events. Athletic facilities i nc lud e a Uni-Turfed a u di t o riu m, an

A. Iro- Turfed fieldhouse, and a n all颅

weather turfed track; handba l l , squash, paddleball, complete fitnes s ce nter, and sa u na

fa cilit i es; shower, locker and dr essin g rooms. Ad diti onal p hysi cal ed uc a tion fa cili ti es i ncl ude li ghted tennis courts, a nine-hole golf cou r se and numerous athletic fiel ds.

Columbia Center ( 1962) l o ca ted on lower c a m p u s contains a cafete ria, coffee s ho p , b a k e ry and golf pro shop. The Student Health Center houses offices of the U n iversity doctors and nurses, ou t patie nt -

treatment, reas and beds for day p a tie nts

.

For further infor ma ti on reg a rding special student services, ca mpus facilities and res ide nce halls, p l e ase refer to the U n v ier sity Catalog.

7


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS The School of Business Administration encou rages active student participation in the government of the University. It also endorses the following organizations for business students. Alpha Kappa Psi National Professional Business Fraternity American Marketing Association Chapter spo nsored by the Puget Sound Chapter of the American Marketing Association Beta Alpha Psi National Professional Accounting F raternity Beta Gamma Sigma National Honorary Business Fraternity Human Resource Management Association Student chapter of the national association Student Investment Fund A trust fund invested by business students Student Port of the Propeller Club of the United States National Association to promote international business and the maritime industries

INTERNSHIPS Many internship possibilities are available through Pacific Lutheran University's Coopera足 tive Education Program. This program is active in assisting students to identify opportunities for work experiences which will complement the student's educational program. To be eligible for an internship the student must be a senior and have completed at least one upper division business elective. The internship opportunity is designed to allow the student outside experience in a major field of interest. For further information refer to the course description of BA 392.

8


ADVISING The Undergraduate Business Advisor is available to explain the BBA Program as well as to help the students plan their schedules. A progress chart, which outlines the courses required to earn a BBA degree, is prepared for each student and is updated each time the student meets with the Undergraduate Advisor. At the time of major declaration, each student is assigned an advisor (a business professor) with similar professional interests.

REGISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR BA COURSES ELIGIBILITY CARDS Registration for any Business Administration course requires an eligibility card. A special day

is designated each semester for distribution of these cards. They are also available in the

School of Business Administration during pre-registration and in-line registration. Eligibility cards must be presented to the Registrar's

Hice at the time the student registers.

The primary purposes of the eligibility card system are to ensure that a student has met all of the necessary prerequisite courses and conditions prior to enrollment in business classes and to facilitate allocation of scarce classroom and course capacities. ligibility cards are prepared in advance for dec!, red business majors and minors. The cards do not have an expiration date, but eligibility changes as the student progresses through the program.

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR AND CREDIT HOURS The Univ er"ity is on a 4- 1-4 semester system, with two 14-week semesters separated by a 4-week Interim. Fall semester begins e.:lrly in September

and runs through mid-December,

Spring semester runs from early February through mid-M, y, and Interim is the month of January. There are also two 4- to 6-week summer sessions. Most courses carry a value of four semester hours. Full-time students generally take from

12 to ]6 hours each seme ster, and 4 huurs during Interim and each Summer Session.

9


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The Bachelor of Business Administration degree program consists of th irty-two courses (128 semester hours) to be taken over a four-year period, and to be completed with an overall grade point average of 2.5 or above. A 2.5 gpa must also be maintained in business courses. A grade lower than "C-" in the ten required business courses will not meet the degree requirements. It is possible to accelerate through the program by attending summer sessions and extra interims.On the other hand, many students find it useful to exceed the min imum requirements by including related or additional advanced work in their undergraduate studies. Sixteen courses, or one-half of the minimum total degree requi rements, must be taken in fields outside the School of Business Administration. Within the min imum requi rements, as many as six courses can be chosen i n any field without restriction (free electives).At least ten courses are taken in required and elective business s u bjects. BASIC CORE REQUIREMENTS

1. Writing - 1 course (4 hours) - English 1 01 or an equivalent prose writing course. 2. Fine Arts/Literature - 2 courses (8 hours) - four hours from each line: (1) Art, Music, or Theatre - any course from art Or music except those in teaching methods; only the following ,in Communication Arts: 1 5 1 , 162, 241 ,250, 359, 363,364, 458. (2) Literature - any literature course from English or Languages, except courses i n writing, languages, and publish ing.

3. Philosophy - 1 course (4 hours) - any Philosophy course except 1 00, 1 2 1 , ilnd 233. ( However, 226, 323, 325, 326 and 328 count toward fu lfillment of this requirement only when paired with 225; 341.342, and 343 count only when taken in addition to 225 or 233.)

4. Religion - 2 co u rses (8 hours) - four hours from each of two lines: Junior and Senior transfer students need to complete only one course from line 1 or 2. ( 1 ) Biblical Studies - any of the following: 1 1 1 , 211, 212, 330, 331, 332. (2) Christian Thought, H istory, and Experience - any of the following: 121, 221. 222, 223. 224, 225, 226, 360, 36 1 , 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367. (3) Integrative and Comparative Religious Studies - any of the following: 131.231.390. 391, 392. 393.

5. Natural Sciences and Mathematics

-

2 courses (8 hours) - four hours from each of two

lines: ( 1 ) Chemistry, Physics, Engineering.and Natural Sciences. (2) Biology, Earth Sciences (except 101), and Natural Sciences. (3) Math matics (except 1 0 1 ) and Computer Science.

6. Social Science - 2 cou rses (8 hours) - four hours from

e,

ch of two lines:

(1) Anthropology, History. and Polit ical Science. (2) Economics. Psychology (except 1 1 0 and 111), Soci, I Work, and Sociology.

7. Pbysical Education - 4 courses (4 hours) - met by four one-hour activities including P.E. 1 00. One hour c redit may be gained through approved sport p a rticipation. S. lnterim In addition tu the above core requirements, students are required to enroll in two interim sessions ( january). yieldi ng at least eight (8) semester hours of course work numbered 300-320. Junior transfer students are excused from one Interim. -

10


BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE REQUIREMENTS (all courses are four semester hours except where noted) REQUIRED NON-BUSINESS COURSES: I. Math 151, Calculus and Math 230, Matrix Algebra (2 credits) OR Math 1 51 and 152, Analytic Geometry and Calculus, and Math 33 1 , Linear Algebra OR Math 1 28, Mathematics for Business and the Behavioral Sciences 2. CSci 220,

omputerized Information Systems With BASIC

OR CSci 1 1 0, BASIC and CSci 2 10, Computerized Information Systems (2 credits each) 3. Econ 150, Principles of Economics 4. Stat 23 1, Introductory Statistics

5. Upper division (321 or above) Economics elective REQUIRED BUSINESS COURSES:

I. BA 230, Law & Society 2. BA 281, Financial Accounting

3. BA 282, Management Accounting 4. BA 350, Management 5. BA 354, Human Resource Management 6. BA 364, Managerial Finance 7. BA 370, Marketing Systems 8. SA 455, Business Policy (or 456, Honors Seminar)

9. Upper division business elective (321 or above) 10. Upper division bllsiness elective (321 or above) (Business courses completed

for

a

concentration will

meet requirements 9 and

10.)

HOW TO DECLARE A MAJOR: Students are eligible to declare a major in Business Administration after completing at least 24

semester hours with a 2.5 gpa. To schedule an appointment to declare a major, please call 535-7244. Please be prepared with the folluwing for your appointment: Bring your goldbook with transcripts. NOTE: Request all transfer transcripts and your PLU transcript al least 24 hours in advance from the Registrar. Declared students will be given priority in registration.

11


AREAS OF CONCENTRATION The School of Business Administration offers the following areas of concentration: Accounting Finance Human Resource Management Management Information Systems Marketing Operations Management The concentrations (which are in effect majors) prepare the student for employment in the specific areas. When the student completes the concentration it is noted on the transcript.The student must have a 2.5 GPA in the concentration chosen for this certification. ACCOUNTING

Upper Division Hours

1. BA 381, Intermediate Financial Accounting .......................... .. .. .. 2. BA 3. BA 4. SA 5. BA 6. BA

382, 385, 483, 484, 487,

4 Advanced Financial Accounting .. . .... . . ... ... . . . . . . .... . .. ...... 4 Cost Accounting ............................................. 4 Income Taxation 4 Auditing .................................................. 4 Accounting Information Systems .. . . . . . . . . .� .

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24 Students wishing to prepare for the CPA Examinations should take the full sequence of accounting courses plus have a workable knowledge of business law (BA 435 is recommended) . .FINANCE

1. BA 364, Finance 4 2. BA 367, Financial Markets ....................................................... 4 3. BA 464, Financial Planning & Control " 4. BA 381, Intermediate Financial Accounting, OR BA 461, Portfolio Management 4 5. con 352, Intermediate Micro, OR Econ 361, Money and Banking . � .

(Eilher course will

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CWIIlI as Ihe upper divisiol1 ecol1omics reqlliremelll)

20


HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1. SA 354, Human Resource Manag ement ............................................ 4

2. SA 454, Organizatio nal C h ange and Development . 4 3. BA 457, Productivity and the Quality of Work Life 4 4. BA 458, Advanced Human Resource Administration ................................ 4 .

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5. Econ 321, Labor Ec onomics, Labor Relations, and Human Res ou rces

4 20

MANAGEMENT lNFORMATION SYSTEMS (and Information Science Minor)

1. CSc! 144, Pa,cal 2. CSci 270, Data Structures . 3 C ci 467, Data Base Management .

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4. BA :125, Information Systems in Organi zations 5. BA 421, Systems Design and Analysis .

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6. BA 428, Seminar in Management I nformation Systems 7. BA 487, Accounting Information Systems .

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4 ............ 4 .

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MA RKETING

1. BA 370, Marketing Systems 4 2. BA 475, Marketing Management .................................................. 4 .

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3. SA 471, Marketing Research 4. Two of the Foll owing: BA 472, Advertising and Sales Management .

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BA 473, Indust rial Marketing & Purchas ing

BA 474, Internat ional Marketing

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OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 1. BA 350, Management 2. BA 385, Cost Accou nting 3. BA 450, Production and Operations Management .

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4. SA 473, Indu s trial Marketing ilnd Purchasing

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13


COURSE DESClUPTIONS (all courses

are four semester hours

except where /loted)

(Roman numerals designate Semester(s) offered: I-Fall, II-Spring, I II-Both)

Business Administration 230 Law and Society A study of the legal system in the United States and the regu�ation of relationships between individual citizens, groups, and the governmental agencies and branches. Review of the rights and obligations of individual citizens and corporations, administrative law, and the procedures ,nd practices of the courts in a modern society. In troduction to legal instruments for international transactions.Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. I II

281 Financial Accounting An introduction to accounting concepts and principles. Valuation theories in the U.s. compared to those in other nations. P reparation (manual and computer) and analysis of financial reports. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 1 II

282 Management Accounting Introduction to management accounting infmmation systems. Emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of accounting and economic data and their use in planning, control, and decision making. Prerequisites: 281.Sophomore Standing. I II 325 Information Systems in Organizations Int roduction to the fundamental concepts of systems and information as they apply to organizations. The focus will be on the integration of information systems into the structure and decision-making process of management. A v a riety of strategies for the development and implementation of management information systems in organizations will be developed. Pre requisites: CSci 1 44 or 220. Junior standing.I 340 International Business An integrated study of international business functions and related concepts, practices, and policies, using a project and case ana lysis. Prerequisites: BA 281, Econ 331. I 350 Management A critical examination of the p rinciples and processes of administration in an increasingly international context. Management techniques and the functions of planning, organizing, leading and directing, and controlling are discussed from the classical, behavioral, and more recent integrative points of view. Included is the study of concepts and characteristics related specifically to the operations function. Introduction to case analysis and problem solving techniques. Prerequisites: ECON 150, STAT 23 1 (may be concurrent), and BA 281 . Junior standing. I II 354 Human Resource Management Detailed examination of the behavior of individuals and groups in business organizations, with emphasis on policies and practices for solving human resource problems. Fundamentals of personnel/human resource procedures in the U.s. and other count ries. International aspects of human resource management will provide insight into the problems of managing foreign operations. I II 364 Managerial Finance Introduction to the p rincipal problems, theories and procedures of financial management: valuation, financial planning, financial statement analysis, capital asset acq uisition, cost of capital, financing st rategies ( including capital st ructure theory and dividend policy), manage­ ment of working capital accounts, and financial dimensions of international t rade (including foreign exchange risk, country risk, translation gains and losses). Prerequisites: CSCI 220 (or equivalent), ECON 150, MATH 128 (or equivalent), STAT 231 , and BA 281.Junior Standing. I II

14


367 Fina nc ial Markets Analysis of the characteristics and determinants of an efficient financial system; pricing of capital assets; supply and demand for loanable funds and the level and structure of interest rate ; savings-investment process and financial intermediaries; insurance and reinsurance markets; commodity markets, and international finance. Prerequisite: BA 364. I

370 Marketing Systems The flows of goods and services in the U.s. and global economies; economic and behavioral approaches to the analysis of domestic and international demand; the role of marketing functions in business and not-for-profit organizations. Determination of a marketing mix: product policy, pricing, channels and physical distribution, and marketing communications. Prerequisites:

E C O N 150, MATH 128 (or equivalel'1t), STAT 231, and BA 281. Junior standing. I

II

381 Intermediate Financial Accounting Concentrated study of the conceptual framework of accounhng, valuation theories in the

.s. and abroad, asset and income measurement, financial statement disclosures, and foreign currency translation for multinationals. Prerequisite: 281. I II

382 Advanced Financial Accounting Concentrated study of equity measurement including the accounting aspects of partner足 ships, corporations, and consolidations. Also includes accounting for multi-nationa,l corpora足 tions and not-for-profit organizations. Prerequisites: 281, 381. I II

385 Cos! Accounting Development and analysis of cost information for management use in decision making, income determination, and performance evaluation, using a variety of computer and quantitative techniques. International implications arising from the use of traditional inventory models. Prerequisites: BA 282, CSC! 220, MATH 128,STAT 231, or equivalents. I II

392 Internship A program of full-time experience closely related to the student's specific career and academic interests. The student is expected to develop the internship opportunity with a firm or organization, and the School will provide an internship agreement. This agreement identifies the problems to be researched, experience to be gained, and related readings to be accomplished. M ont hly progress reports and other measures of achievement will be used to determine th

grade. Not more than 2 hours of credit will be granted for a full month of

internship, and not more than 8 hours of accumulated credit will be granted for the inte rnships taken. The internship must be taken for a grade if used to meet one of the

requir d upper division business electives. Prerequisites: 281,282,350, ECON 150, STAT 231; I II

one additional course in the student's area of concentration. (2 or 4)

421 Syslems Design and Analysis Integrat's th

areas of computer te hnology, systems analysis, systems design, and

implementation. Major emphasis of the course is the formalization of the information systems analysiS and dev lopment process. Exercises and case studies deal with information analy i

220). II

nd the logical specification of the proj ct. Prerequisites: SA 281, 282, CSci 144 (or

428 Seminar in Man a gem en t Informalion Syslems A course involving a significant hands-on project, software review and selection, and management applications by organi7.ational functions. Prerequisites: BA 281, 282, 421,487, ri 1 44

(or 220). ][

435 Business Law Procedures, contracts, agencies, negotiable instruments, business organizations, property, trusts and wills, transportation, insurance and employment. II

15


450 Production and Operations Management Critical stud y of key conce pts, q uantitative techniques and practices a p p l ied by American and foreign management to the production of goods or services. Includes examination of bcility design; work design and measurements; and product ion planning, control, and sc heduling considerations. Prerequisites: 350, MATH 1 28 (or equivalent), CS I 220 (or equivalent). !

454 Organizational Change and Development A course designed to examine the need for change in organizations, utilizing a diagnostic a p p roach and em plo y i ng appropriate strategies to develop h u m a n resources vital to every orga n ization' S economic viability.E m p hasis will be u pon developing the skills of an internal c hange agent with knowledge or appropriate eva l u ation methods and interventions that facilitate planned change. Prerequisites : BA 350 and BA 354.I

455 Business Policy Study of organizational administration from top management p r pective. Formulation and execution of strategi s and policies to integrate all management and b usiness function in support of organizational objectives. Implications of resource availability, technology, and the economy; education, religion, ethics, and person I valu e s; social responsibility; public policy; and international relations for top management decisions. Includes comprehensive case analyses. Required for business m a j ors. Prerequisites: Sen ior standing; BA 282, 350, 364, and 370. I II

456 Honors Seminar The purpose of t h is course is to offer an integrative capstone experience to sen ior students in bu siness adm i nistration. Comprehensive case analysis and field study draw on the s t udent ' s k no wl edge of all business functions. Formulation of plans and policies include the review of relevant social, ethical, religious, economic, legal, and international issues. The course is offered once each year during Interim and concentrates on a special topic each time. This course meets the BA 455 requirement for business majors, but require a higher grade point average. Prereq uisites: Senior standing; BA 282, 350, 364, and 370. Interim only.

457 Productivity and the Quality of Work Life Examination of the sociotechnical determinants of organizational and individual produc 足 tivi y, with s u bsequent exploration of issues that affect quality of work life in service and manufacturing industries. Com parisons of U.s. and foreign firms and cultures will provide reasons for differences in productivity and QWL. Prerequisite: BA 354. II

458 Advanced Human Resource Administration Detailed coverage of modern human resource procedures: job analysis, employee selection, training and c a reer development, compensation, safety and health, labor relations. Review of the U.s. legal context of employ ment practice , and of human reso u rce p ractices in other countries. Prerequis ite : 354. I

461 Portfolio Management Discussion of sound portfolio management techniques: security selection and construction of efficient asset portfol ios; measuring investment performan -e; capital market efficiency; selected recent development - in portfolio analysis. Em phasis on risk and return relationships of sec u rities and portfolios. Exchange risk and international diversification. Prerequ isites: C 1 220 (or equivalent), ECON 1 50, MATH 1 28 (or equ ivalent), STAT 231, BA 281, 364. I

464 Financial Planning and Control Intensive analysis of major financial decisions: financial planning and control; capital bud get ing; growth strategies; valuation; bond refunding; new equity iss u es; recent develop 足 m nls in capital structure theory; international aspects (includes international capital investment, and financing international operations). Empha s i s on decis ion making. Pre足 requisites: S 1 220 (or equivalentl, EC I 150, MATH 1 28 ( o r equ ivalent), STAT 23 1 , BA 28 1 , 364. I I

470 Marketing Management See BA 475

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471 Marketing Research and Consumer Behavior Techniques and uses of marketing research in the business decision- m a k i n g process. E m p hasis o n resea rch design, v a r i o u s s u rvey methods, research i n s t r u ments, and sampling p l a n s a s t hey rela t e to marketing c o n s u m e r prod u c t s a n d services in domes t ic and i n t rn a t io n a l enviro n m ents. Contemporary behavioral science concepts to be examined and inco rporated in selected marketing projects. Prereq uisites: BA 370, CSCI 220 ( o r equivalen t ) . I II

472 Advertising and Sales Management The role o f promotio n a c t i v i t ies ( a d vertising, personal sell ing, sales promotion a nd p u b lic i t y ) in t h e domestic a n d i n t e r n a tional marketing of goods a n d services; ana l y s i s of t a rget markets; developing market potent ials; media selection; designing the promotional message; evaluatio n and control of the promotional mix.Prerequisite: BA 370. I II 473 Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Analysis o f the i n d u s t r ia l b u y i n g and selling process i n domestic and i n ternational business exch anges; p u rchasing policies a n d procedures; selection of sources of s u p pl y , i n c l u d i n g i n t e r n a t ionai sourci ng; m a r k e t i n g prob'lems of m a n u fa c t u rers and s u p pliers of i n d u s t r i a l goods a nd serv ices; develop ing and implement ing domes t ic and global i n d u s t r i a l mark e t i n g strate gies. Prerequisites: B A 350 a n d 370. I I 474 In ternational Marketing I n t rod uction to m a rk e t i ng problems and opportunit ies facing US. firms in an international marketing c o n t ext. Covered are t h e c hanges necessary i n marketing programs whenever business t ransactions cross i n t e r n a t i o n a l boundaries; t h e economic and c u l t u ra l forces that make these c h a nges necessary. Prerequisites: BA 370, ECON 331. II 475 Marketing Management A n a l y t ical a p p roaches to the solut ion o f domestic, international and m u l t inat ional marketing problems. Developing strategies, p l a n n ing a n d a d m i n istering comprehensive m a r k e t i n g programs; use of c o m p u te r models; evaluation a n d control of marketing operat ions. Prerequisites: BA 370, o n e 400 level m a r k eting course, CSCI 220 ( o r e q u i v a le n t ).I

[[

481 Con t mporary Issues i.n Accounting Exploration of c u rrent issues and trends in the conce p t u a l framework of acco un ting, the n a t i onal and international e n v i ronments in which accounting operates and the problems of

c o m m u n ic a t in g fin a n c i a l i n formation useful t o decis i o n - makers. Prereq uisites: BA 281, 381, 382, or consent of instru ctor. 483 Income Taxation

Comprehensive s t u d y of income t a x concepts, reg u la t ions, a n d tax p lanning principles. E m p hasis on individual and business income taxation. Prerequisite: BA 28 1 . 'i I I 484 Auditing Comprehensive s t u d y of a u d it i n g concepts and procedures; ana l y s ,i s of risk t h rough t h e s t u d y and e v a l u a t ion of internal c o n t ro l s , b o t h a d m i n istrative a n d accounting c o n t rols, and t h rou h the study a n d e v a l u a t io n o f account b a l a n ces; reporting o f risk; review of t h e development a n d mea ning o f professional responsibility a n d e t h ics; review o f opera tional a u d it ing. Prereq uisites: BA 281, 282, 381 , and 382 ( m a y be concu rrent). I [ [ 487 Accounting Information Systems A p p lication of i n formation systems concepts t o the basic acco u n t i n g information systems a n d t h e expansion of t ra d i t i o n a l acco u n t ing models to include the comput erized information systems a p p roach. Topics covered include manual acco u n t in g systems, reporting objectives, procedures for systems analy sis a n d design o f accounhng systems, behavioral aspects of systems design, a udit t ra il, internal control, legal environment, a u d i t req uirements, and computer processing technology. I [ [ 490 Seminar I n d i v i d u a l on specifically selected topics in b u s iness. Offered o n d e m a n d . Prereq uisi te: Conse n t o f instru ctor. 491 Directed Study I n d i v id ual s t u d ies; readings on selected topics a p proved and s upervised b y the i n s t ru c tor. Prereq u isite: Consent of the instructor. (1-4 cred i t s )

17


Computer Science 110 BASIC (2 semester hours) Introduction t o i n t eractive comp u t i ng, branch ing, loop ing, s u bscripts, functions, i np u t ! utput, s u br o u t ines a n d s i m p le file t e c h n i q ues i n t h e c o n t e x t o f t h e BASI

language. M u st be

t a ken with CSci 2 1 0 in ord er to meet the School of Business Admin istration requir'rnent. CSci

1 1 0 and 220 may not both be taken for cred i t . Prerequisite: high school Igebra.

144 Introduction 10 Compuer Science An intro d u c t ion to computer science i n c l u d i n g algori t h m desi n, s t r u c t ured programming, n u me r i c a l n o n - n umerical appli cat ions a n d u e of data files. The PASCA L progra m m i n g l a n guage

will be us d. Prereq u i s i tes: M,l t h 1 33 or Math 230 o r Math 128 o r equ ivalent.

210 Computerized Information Systems with BASIC Computer systems and t heir uses i n e d u c a t iun, commerce, i n d ustry and govern m e n t . B A S I C f i l e m a n i p u l a t ions, data s t o r a g e and retrieval. Co m p u t eriz ed word processing, bu iness problem s in sta t i s t ic , L inear progra mming, regressiun a n d u t her fie lds using e x i sting software p a c k ages. Prerequisite or corequisite:

210 and 220 can nut bot h be taken for cred i t . Prereq uisite: 1 1 0. 1 1 0, Math 1 28, tat 23 1 .

220 Comput erized lnformation Systems with BASIC I n trod u c t i o n to compu ters and interactive computing. Compu ter systems and their uses in education, commerce, industry, a n d government. Programming in t h ' BA

IC language using

branc hing, loop ing, s u b scripts, i n p u t /o u t p u t, c haracter m a n i p u l a t ion, s u b r o u t i nes, file m a n i p u lations, data storage a n d retrieval.

u m p uterized wurd processing, bu siness prob足

lem. in sta tistics, l i n e a r programming, regression a n d o t h er fields using existing softw, re

1 10 a n d 2 1 0 together. S t u d e n t s c a n n o t t a k e both 220 1 1 0 or 210 for credit. Prer e q u i s i t e or c o re q u i s ite: M a t h 1 28 and Stat 231 or

pac k a ges. Covers t h e same material as a n d either equivalent.

270 Data Structures on t i n u a t ion of Pascal programming t e c h n i q u e s and a s t u d y of basic d a t a st ruc t ures including l i n k e d lists, trees, q u e ues, s t a c k s and gra phs. Appl icat ions of these fo rm s t o sorting, searching, a n d data storage will be made. Prerequisite:

1 44.

467 Dala Base Management D ta s t r u c t u res and stu rage methods a re re viewed The hierarc h i a l, n e t work, and relational 270. .

models are studied. Prerequisite:

Economics 150 Pri ncipl es of Economics I n t ro d u c t i o n to the scope of econom ics, including Macro a nd M i c ro Econ o m ics; anal ysis of U.s economic s y s t e m; e m ph asis on c u rre n t ecunomic p o l ic y .

321 Labor Econ omics, Labor Relations and H u m a n Resources The n a t u re and t re a t ment of h u m a n res o u rce problems in the United Sta tes; wage d e te r m i n a t ion, u n i o n i s m, collec t iv e bargain ing, unemployment, poverty and discrim i n a t ion, investment i n human capital an d manpower policies. Prereq u i S i t e : Econ

1 50 o r conse n t .

331 International Economics Regional a n d international specia lization, compara t i ve costs, i nterna t i o n a l payme n t s a n d e x c h a n g e rates; natio n a l polic ies w h i c h promote O r r e s t r i c t t r a d e . Prereq u isite: Econ

1 50.

343 Opera tions Research (2 semester hours) Q u a n t i t a t i v e m e t h o d s for decis ion problems. Emphasis o n l i n e a r progra m ming and o t h e r deterministic m o d e l s . Prereq u isite: S t a t

231 o r equivalent.

344 Applied Reg ress ion Analysis (2 semester hours) S i m p le and m u l t i ple regression a n a l y s i s a s investigative tools. Course s t resses constr uc足 tion o f elementary linear models and interpretation of regressional results. Prerequisite: S t a t

2 3 1 o r equivalent.

18


351 Intermediate Macro Economic Analysis National in ome d 'termination includi ng policy i m plications w,ith the i n s t i t u tional frame­ work 01' the U.s. economy. Prereq uisite: Econ 15 0. 352 Intermediate Micro Economic Analysis Theory of c n s u m r behavior; product and factor pri es under conditions of monopoly,

com petition and intermediate markets; welfare economics. Prereq uisite: Econ I SO. 361 Money and Banking

The nat ure and role f money; the commercial banking system; the Federal Reserve System; theory of c red it and money supply control; Keynesian and Monetarist theories o f monetary impacts o n inllation, int erest rates, and national income. Prereq uisite: Econ 150. 362 Public Finance Public taxation and expenditure at all govern mental levels; the incidence of tax�s, the public debt and the provision o f p u blic goods s uc h as national defense, educa tion, pure air and water. Prerequisite: con 1 5 0.

371 Industrial Organization and Public Policy An analysis of the structure, conduct, and performance of American industry and p u blic policies that fo, ler and alter indust rial structure and behavior. Topics include the economics of firm size, motivations of the firm, concentration, mergers, patents, antitrust, public utility regulation, public enterprise, a n d s u bsidization. Prerequisite: Econ 1 50 or consent. 381 Comparative Economic Systems A n a nalysis and comparison o f major contemporary economic systems. Inclu des a n e x a m i ­ n a t i o n of cap italism, market socialism, c e n t r a l l y planned economics, and systems u s e d i n selected c o u n tries. Prerequisite: Econ 1 50 o r consent. 432 Urban and Regional Economics Economic grow th process in developing regions of the U.s.; the inter-relations h i p of poli t i c a l. economic, c u l t u ra l and i n s t i t utional factors in the grwoth process. Prerequisite: Econ 1 50. 486 Evolution of Economic Thought Economic thought from a ncient to modern times; e m phasis on the period from A d a m S m it h to j .M. Keynes; the classical economists, the socialis ts, the marginalists, t h e neo­ classical economists, and t h e Keynesians.

490 Seminar Seminar in economic problems and policies with e m p h asis on encouraging the student to i n tegrate problem-solving methodology with tools of economic a n a lysis. Topids) selected by class participants a n d instructor. Prereq uisite: consent.

Mathematics 128 Mathematics for Business and the Behavioral Sciences Review of algebra, matrix theory and linear programming, pro bability theory, introd uction to d i fferential a n d i n t egral c a l c u l u s . Concepts are d e veloped i n t u i t i vely with a pplications. The use of m a t h e m a t ical tools is stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: high school algebra o r 1 01 . 151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus Analytic geometry, functions, limits, derivations a n d integrals with a pplications, L' Hospi­ tal's R u l e . Prere q u isite: two years of high school algebra and trigonometry (or concurrent

registration in 1 1 2)

or

1 33 or equ ivalent.

152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I n tegrations, a p p l ic a t ions, and techniques of i n tegration, transcendental, functions, polar coordinates, i m proper in tegrals, introd uction to vectors and partial differentiation. Pre­ requisite: 1 5 1 . 230 Matrix Algebra ( 2 credit hours) A s u rv e y of m a t rix algebra and dete r m i n a n ts with a p p l ications, such as linear program­ m i n g. A first look a t a b s t ract methods i n c l u d i n g some techniq ues o f proof. Prereq uisite: Math 1 51 .

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331 Linear Algebra and Calculus Vectors and vector spaces, m a t rices, q u a d ratic forms, linear transformations, m u l t i v a riable calculus. Prereq u isite: Math 152.

Statistics 231 Introductory Statistics Des c r i p t i v e stalistics; m e a s u res of central tendency and dispersion. Inferential s t a t is tics; gen eralizations about pop ulat ions from samples by paramet ric and n o n - parametric tech足 niques. Methods c o vered w i l l include estimation, hypot hesis- testing, s i m p le correlation analysis, linear expression and chi s q u a re analysis. (Not a p plicable to m a t hema tics credit . )

BUS INE S S ADMINISTRATION FACULTY Gundar J. King, Dean, Professor ( Management). Ph. D., Sta nford Un iversity. D. S tuart Bancroft, Assoc i a te Professor ( F inance). Ph. D., Un ivers ity of Pennsylvania. Stephen E. Barndt, Associate Professsor ( Ma nagemen t). Ph. D., O h io S tate Un iversity. J. Thaddeus Barnowe, Assoc iate Professor ( M anagement). Ph. D., Un iversity of Mich igan. Joanruth Baumann, Lec turer ( Management). M.P.P.A., Yale Un ivers ih;. Eli Berniker, Assis tant Professor ( Management). Ph. D., UCLA. Davis W. Carvey, Professor ( M anagemen t). D. B.A., Texas Tech Un iversity. William M. Crooks, lec t urer ( Management). M.A., George Was h ington Un iversih;. Scott A. Freeman, Associate Professor ( F i nance). D. B.A., Kent S tate Un iversity. Michael E. Gocke, Lec turer (Accoun ting). M. B.A., Pacific Lu theran Un iversity, c.P.A., S tate of Washington. 20


larry P. Hegstad, Assoc iate Professor (Acc o u n ting). Ph D., Un iversity of Was h illgton. Anthony J. Lauer, Assistant Professor CLaw ) . [. 0., Loyola Univers i ty; M. B.A., Pacific Lutheran Un iversity. Diane B. MacDonald, Lec turer ( La w ), J. D., Joh n Marshall Law School. Da vid E. McNabb, Assi s t a n t Professor ( Marketing). Ph. D., Oregon State Un ivers ity.

Gerald M. Myers, Assistant Professor ( Accoun t i n g ) . Ph. D., Un ivers ity of Iowa. Kimberly A. Nunes, Ass istant Professor (Mark e t i n g ) . M. B.A., Sail Fra n c is co State Un ivers ity. Ken ne th D. Pritsker, Assistant Professor ( M anagemen t ) . Ph . D. Candidate, Un iversity of Was h ington. Judith A . Ramaglia, Assistant Professor (Accounting). Ph . D. Ca ndidate, Uni足 versity of Wash ington; C P.A., State of Wash ington. E dryce A. Reynolds, Lecturer (Ma nagemen t Informat ion Systems). Ed.D., East Texas State Un ivers ity. James A. Savarino, As sistant Professor ( Finance). Ph. D., Wash i ngton.

Un iversity of

Eldon L. Schafer, Professor (Accounting) and Direc tor of Accounting Programs. Ph. D., Un ivers ity of Nebras ka; C.P.A. State o f Nebraska. F. Thomas Sepic, Professor ( Man agement). Ph. D., Un iversihJ of Wash ington. B. David Thomas, Lectu rer ( La w ) . J. D., Willamette Un iversity College of Law; M. B.A., Pacific L u theran Un ivers ity. Steven D. Thrasher, Associate Professor ( Marketing). Ph. D., Northwestern Un iversihJ. Glenn A. Van Wyhe, As sistant Professor ( Acco u n t i n g ) . Ph. D. Studen t, Un iversity of Wash ington; C P.A. State of Illinois. Michael T. Wood, Lect u rer ( H u man Resource Managemen t). Ph. D., Un iver足 sity of M i n nesota; C P.A. State of Wash i ngton.


CONSULTING PROFESSORS 1986 - 1987 Kn ut Hagrup, Consulting Professor ( Management)

Chairmmz, Co m lll issioll on Air Transpo rt, Ill ternational Cham ber of Commerce Pres ident (retired), Scandinaviall A i rlill e Systems L. L. D. h.c. (Lmv), Pacific Lu theran University Dr. Sc. h .c. (Engilleering), Graduate School of Transportation, Dresden, Germany Robert Jaedicke, Consulting Professor ( Accounting)

Dean, Graduate School of Business, S tanford Univers i ty B.A. (Accou nting), Un iversi ty of Was h i ngton M. B.A. (Business), Un ivers ity of Was h i ngton Ph. D. (Bu s iness), Un iversity of M i n n esota H. Thomas Johnson

Dwight J. Z u lauf Alumni Chair Professor, 1 986-87 A B. (Eco n o m ics), Haroard Un iversih) M.BA (Acco u n ting), Rutgers Un iversity M.A. (History), Un ivers ity of Wiscon s i n Ph. D. (History/Economics), Un iversity o f Wisconsin c.P.A., State of Wash i ngton Vincent M. Jolivet, Consulting Professor (Finance)

B. E. (Engineering), McGill Un ivers ity M.B.A (Bu s iness), Haroard Un ivers ity D.B.A (Bu s iness), Harvard Un ivers ity Stanislaw J. Sawicki, Consulting Professor ( Accounting)

Sen ior Lectu rer at Victoria Un ivers i ty, New Zealand B. Com. (Accou n ting), Un ivers ity of London L. L. B. (Law), Un ivers ity of London Ph.D. (Econom ics), Victoria Un ivers ihj, New Zealand

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UNIVERSITY O F F I CERS President Provost . . . . . Vice President Vice Presid n t Vice President Collegium . . . .

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William O. Rieke . . . Richard J u n gk untz Perry B. Hendricks, Jr. . Luther W. Bekemeier . . . . . . Mary Lou Fenili . . . . Harvey J. Neufeld .

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UNIVÂŁRSITY BOARD OF REGENTS Tacoma and Vicinity Dr. T.W. Anderson Mr. George Davis Mr. M.R. Knudson Dr. Richard Klein Mr. George Lagerquist Mr. Harry Morgan Dr. W.O. Rieke Dr. Roy Virak Rev. David Wold, chairman

Seattle and Vicinity Mr. Gary Gaughn Bishop Thomas Blevins Rev. Charles Bomgren Mr. Paul Hogland Mrs. 'Ruth Holmquist Mr. Frank Jenning, vice chairman Rev.G. Lee Kluth Bishop Clifford R. Lunde Mr. Wallace G. McKinney Mr. William S, Randall Dr. Christy Ulleland, secretary

Advisory Dr.Glenn Nelson Rev. Richard Trost, ALe NPD Dr. James Unglaube, LCA Mrs. Lucille Giroux Mr. Perry Hendricks, Jr., treasurer Drs.Davis Carvey, Marlen Miller, Janet Rasmusse n, faculty Bruce Deal, John Carr, Greg Nyhus, students PLU Officers

Western Washington Mrs, Helen Belgum Rev, David Steen

E astern Washington Mr. Alvin Fink Mr. James Gates

Oregon Mr. R.William Davis Mr. Galven [ r by Dr. Casper (Bud) Paulson

Montana /Idaho/ Alaska/Texas Dr. John Dahlberg Rev, Dennis Hanson Rev . Ronald D, Martinson Rev, Robert Newcomb Dr. Jeff Probst field Mrs, Dorothy Schnaible Dr. Vernon Sture

C alifornia Dr. William Ramstad

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CAMPUS LOCATIONS Administration Building 1 2

General Services Building 29

Alumni 35

Golf Course

Post Office 27

Bas ball Fi old 40

Haavik House 7

Public/Media Relations 35

Physical Plant 28

Blomquist House 2

Harstad Hal l 2 3

Ramsey House 8

Business Administrati on -Hauge

Hauge Ad min istration B l dg_ 1 2

Ramstad H al l 2 5

Campus Safety (in Harst a d ) 23

Health Center 5

Restaurants 2 6 , 42

Central Services 29

Hinderlie Hall 2 1

Rieke Sc ience Center 20

Christ Knutzen Fellowship Hall

Hong Ha ll 1 8

Security 23

( i n University Center) 26 Coffee Shops -

( University

Center) 26

Ingram Hall 9

Soccer Field 36

Knorr House 4

Special E ducati on 1 5A

KPLU-FM 22

Stuen Hall 1 1

Kreidler Hall 17

Swimming Pool 3 1

Columbia Center 42

Library 13

Television 1 2

(Columbia Center) 42 Delta Ha ll 44

Math Building 39

Tennis Courts 3 3 , 38

Durun ire HOllse 47

Memorial Gymnasium 32

Theatres 22, 32

East Campus 1 5

Mo rrvedt Library 13

Tickets 26

Easrvold Auditorium 22

Music Annex 1

Tingdstad Hall (AlpiJle, Cascade,

Evergreen Court 45

Music (proposed) 1 6

Faculty House 3

ames Fitness Center 32A

Evtrgreen, Ivy) 43 Track 37

Family Student Housing 46

Nesvig Alumni Center 35

Fi ne ArtS Bu i ldi ng 9

Olson Auditorium 3 0

University Ce nter 26

Food Service 26, 42

Ordal Hall 1 0

Warehouse 29

Park Avenue House 6

Xavier HalI 19

Foss Ha l l 24

Trinity Lutheran Church 1 4

Pflueger Hall 34

PA C IFIC LUT H E RAN U NIVE R S I1Y



Day & Evening Bachelor of Business Administration 1986-1987 University Bulletin v.66 no.2 Jun 1986