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Pacific Lutheran College Bulletin Puhli,:h('d qU:J.ttt'fiy by P:J.cific LlItllt'ran Collc/;l' ;H T:lcoln::t and P.ll"kl::llld. \"(i;J,shilll�ton Enu'r('c\::u: sO'cond­ l6, 1917. :it L1uo p(l,�lorrin' :H T.:twlll:J.. \X!a�llIllgLon. lind,· .. chi' An of AUf!lL.�t :24, 1911...

d�\�,; m,]tf�r I\pril

V

L.X

FE

CO

3NTS

The p. cific Luther, n ColIn, � end, •

I.

No.4

RY. 19�1

wmenr

rund.

The Year's Progress.

,

The Proposed

4.

Progres, in

5.

This Year's

THE PAOFI

D ormitory For iris. y nod ical ooperation. Hurdle Must Be Cleared!

.

U THFRAN COLLEGE EN

Of/gill <111£1 efforts of

OWMENT FUND

I,e

F,)llowing upon the preliminary

til(' Fall of 1925, th� en dowment ap­ and summer of 1l)27, under th� direction of Dr. O. H. Pannkoh. sponsorship of Presid 'ne O. . 1. Ordal and Field Agent Geu. Henriksen

pe-al of the spring

:mJ under the of the _ollege,

produced pledges in the aggregat· amount of $290,0011.

to the many Pacific Coast worker·s, mort'

their services

gave

than

Tn additiou

thirty men rrum the Middl e W,'St

in this cause.

Pur-pos and Necd The

main

come from , stability ,'ear.

a

purpos e

permanent

sufFiclCnt

• A fixed 111-

Endowment Fund is to ins ure stability.

the fund

of

�atisfies the demand of

to the m a intenance of

high

ccreditation authorities for

standards of work from ye a r

to

In educational circfes in t he State of \Xiashing r on , �25(),OOO is regarded as

the minimum fund for satisfyi ng this ne ed , in rhe case of a junior col le ge ; in rhe case of a se nior (four-ye:H) col I gc, this minimum is %5(lO,nnn.

Nature of the' Pledge Each pledge to

the Enduwment Fund is a promise to pay to Pacific Luthaa!l _ullege a stiprd�tl'd sum in ,pprcciaticlIl of th value of P:'lcific Lutheran Col lege in its work for Christian education and state-accredited courses, said promise being made "in consideration of the gifts of others." ohlir;ation,

rlw

College

p ref e rs

\'Vhilc the pledge is

accordingly trusts til<' make r of rIp pledg... to p, y w hen

possihle. Ie is :dso :'lgreed in C'lIrrent l11alnrenanct' C:'.xpenses.

a

lega l financial

to tak e the evangelic::d, Christian point of view and ord mak ..s it

and as the.

the pledge that dw Colleg!' may lise 1 '5�.�

of

it for

Adlllill;,·!r<l!ioll uf !he FUlld or Trustccs of the College is l e gal l y resplH1sible ror the :ldll1inistr ation of rhe Endowmcnt rund. The Treasurer of the Fund is Mr. He rman E. Anderson,

TIle bmr·d

President of \Vashingron Hardware Company_ Tacom ,Washington. direction l'vIr. Ludvig

Larson,

Business l'vl an a ger

DJ.vis, Secretary tl t he Bus i. n ess

nected

with the administration

lection

of

the

of

Ma na ger. take the Fund.

und is in rllt' hands

uf

uf

th

care

College, and

of

the business

Unde r his

l'vlrs. Esther de taib con­

Beginning February I, 1031, the col­

l'vIr. Paul A. Preus, furmerly Director and

Trl'::t'irn'r "f th� Fl'dnal Land B nk "f

Sr.

Paul, l'vlinncsora,

and

1l1')[.�

rc .. nrly


connected with the Western Display Company and the Western Stamping Manu­ facturing Company, with offices -'It St. Paul, Minnesota, and Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Preus is also authorized to secure new pledges and additions to the Fund as well as to promote other financial projects of the College. The actual investment of the Fund is in the hands of an Endowment Investment Committee of fiv members, appointed by the Board of Trustees of the College_ This committee at present consists of the following members: Mr. Herman E. Anderson, Treasurer of the Endowment Fund, 924 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, Washington; Mr. August Buschmann (P. L. A., '00), Alaska salmon packer, 375 Colman Building, Seattle, Washington; Mr. Forbes P. Haskell, Jr., President of the Puget Sound National Bank, Tacoma, Washington; Mr. Andrew L. Leknes, banker, Stanwood, Wash­ ington; and President Oscar A. Tingelstad of the College. Amount Collected The total amount paid in to the Endowment Fund up to and including Feb­ ruary 20, 1931, was $125,408.07. Most of the pledges were made payable in five annual installments, the last installment being due in 1932. The economic de­ pression and other causes have slowed up the rate of collection. The estimated rate, as compared with the actual rate, is shown in the following schedule: Total up to July 31, 1928 ; estimated, $ 60,000.00; paid,$ 60,769.46. Total up to July 31,1929: estimated, $110,000.00; paid, $ 90,085.27. Total up to July 31,1930: estimated,$155,000.00; paid, $112,494.22. Total up to July 31,1931: estimated, $195,000.00. Total up to July 31, 1932: estimated, $230,000.00. Total up to July 31,1933: estimated,$245,000.00. Total up to July 31,1934: estimated,$250,000.00. Tn order to catch up with the schedule, ti1e College needs to receive nearly $70,000 by July 31, 1931. Experience in other fields indicates that our Endowment Fiel

Agent will go far on the way to this goal. hI vesl menl s

After the deduction of $16 871 9 0 (for current expenses), which amount i. almost 15% of the total amount collected up to and including July 31, 1930, the balance available for investment on February 20, 1931, was $108 536 17 the disposi­ tion of which on that date was as follows: ,

.

,

Invested in bonds (par value, $71,000) Invested in real estate mortgage and real estate Endowment expenses yet to be amortized Balance of Endowment Fund note of 1928 Cash in savings account (Puget Sound National Bank)

.

.$ 67,453.62

______

_

__

,

_ _____...

2 9 85.78 ,

32,578.37 5,7 1 2 .76

1,664.99 $110,395.52

Less undistributed investment mcome

1,859.35

_$108,536.17 TOTAL The mandate given by the Board of Trustees to the Endowment Investment Committee specifies that investment may be made in first real estate mortgages or in bonds which are rated A or better. The Committee has adhered rigidly to these instructions and has received a special vote of thanks and confidence from the Board.

Income atld Its Uses As stated before, fifteen per cent of the amounts pledged to this Endowment Fund may be used for current expenses. One-half of the income from the re­ maining eighty-five per cent is used to amortize the Endowment Fund expenses, and one-half is used for current expenses. By resolution of the Board of Trustees, rhe fifteen per cent available for


current expenses have so far been applied on the note for $22,584.66, which was issued by the College to the Endowment Fund in 1928. At the close of the fiscal year ending July 31, 1930, the principal of this note had accordingly been reduced to $5,712.76. As soon as this balance has been paid, the fifteen per cent of sub­ sequent collections will be applied to the amortization of the Endowment Fund expenses. If the Fund can be collected at the rate suggested in the original schedule, this amortization will have been completed by 1936. In other words, the full interest income from eighty-five per cent uf $250,000 will thereafter be available for current expenses. In spite of the adverse economic cunditions with which all have been contending since 1919, this goal may yet be possible of attainment. In spite of the slowing up of collections, the income from the Endowment Fund has, thanks to the efficient work of the not fallen far below the estimates based on the lowing are the figures: Endowment income for year ended J lily ceived, $1,208.69. Endowment income for year ended J lily ceived, $2,808.11.

Endowment Investment Committee. original schedule referred to. Fol­ 31, 1929: estimated, $1,300.00; reo 31, 1930: estimated, $2,958.00; re­

The original estimates were based on an average yield of five per cent. The Fund has actually been managed ill slIch 3 way 3S to yield an average incom.. of nearly six per cent to date. Relation of Endon'lIIent Fund to Develupment Associatioll and to Church A ppropriatioTlS

The fundamental purpose of the Endowment Fund is to stabilize the income required each year to eliminate the operating deficit, whereas the main purpose of the Development Assuciation (whose slogan is: "At least 3 dollar at least once year") is to make it possible for the College to grow and to improve. The in­ come from student fees is abuut forry per cent of the 3mount required to operate without deficit. The in�ome from Church appropriations in the school year 192728 was about nineteen per cent of the amount expended, in 1928-29 about twelve per cent, and in 1929-30 about eighteen per cent. Until such time as the operating deficit can be met in full hy Church appropriatiuns and Endowment Fund income, the Development Associatiun must first uf all make up rhis deficit and thereafter

a

stimulate such improvements and material progress as may be possible through cash and improved credit. Th .. following tahle merits careful study: J 917-28 1930-31 1928-29 1929-30 (actual) Source of Income ( estimated) (actual) (actual) $17,595.66 $18,377.04 $22,719.11 $26,000.00 Tncome from students 9,999.96 11,250.00 5,500.00 hurch appropriations (2 budies) 6,000.00 4,396.45 3,000.00 15% of Endowment collections 3,360.03 ' Endowment interest (one-half) 2,000.00 560.92 1,217.10 Sundry items and donations P. L. C. Development Association . Total Income Total Current Expense ___

__

1,414.80

469.47 16,740.43

835.00 16,747.73

750.00 21,000.00

$25,010.46 $31,565.79

$46,044.31 $45,832.97

$54,878.93 $54,836.11

$64,000.00 $64,000.00

The item of $21,000.00 in the above estimate for 1930-31 must be supplied, either by the Development Association or through an emergency appropriation by the Church, if the present accredited srarus of the College is to be maintained. Future Needs As before stated, the minimum endowment requirement for a junior college is $250,000. This sum, invested at 5%, will yield $12,500 annually. The minimum operating budget for an accredit d junior college is $40.000.

(Pacific Lutheran


College also operates a high-school division). Evidently, then, not less than 307" of the operating budget should be met by stable income from endowment funds, according to accreditation standard in Washington. For a budget of the size of the present budget of Pacific Lutheran CoIIege the income from endowment funds should be about $20,000, or a 5�'r, yield on $400,000. In comparison with these figures the minimum requirement of $500,000 in productive endowment funds for an accredited senior coIlege does not seem out of proportion or unreasonable. It foIIows of necessity, not only that the endowment fund already pledged must be coIIected as promptly as possible. bur also that this fund must be increased in order to satisfy \V/ashington standards. Plans for Stimulating Collections

Mr. Paul A. Prcus will calI upon the friends who made pledges to the En· dowment Fund in 1927. He wiII explain the vital need of this fund. He wiII suggest, out of his rich experience, how individuals may best support this Fund. He wiII answer questions, remove misconceptions where such exist, and assist in every way possible in prom ting correct understanding and friendly spirit, All problems wiII be approached from the Christian point of view.

This

means that people will be urged to pay their pledges when and as the Lord prospers them, because Christian education is the ,ord's work. It follows from this that the College does not feel free to cancel any pledge, because the whole Endowment Appeal was made in the name of the Lord, in the confidence that He would provide; on the other hand, it is not th· policy of the CoIIege to force collections, because it is a cheerful giver that God loves. The heirs of subscribers who have died ince making the pledge will he urged, but not compelled, to fulfill the terms of the pledge, as indeed many have dnne out of respect for the expressed wish of the departed maker. Let the friends of the cause take courage!

If this work is truly in accordance

with the wiII of the Lord, it will prosper. AIl we need to do is to seek His wiII, work faithfully to accomplish it, trust in Him, and pray in His name that we may bl' faithful in our hristian stewardship. The Gospel spirit must prevail. Paid-up PledgeI Let it be r membered that all pledges were not made un the same terms of payment, but that most of the pledges corne fully due in 1932. To encourage friends, old and new, and to stimulate the promptest possible payment of pledges already made as well as the making of new pledges where the wiIlingness to do so exists, the f Ilowing list of paid-up pledges, as ,)f February 14, 1931, is here made public. The complete list of all the original pledges was published in the Rulletin of August 4, 1927, a copy of which may still be had on request. [)ah' Paid ,on Flill .md A mOllnl of Plt"dgc" A,dl,nd. Roy , N. J" Au g , 5, 1927 Aalia, E. E.. ov, 30. 1929 Aasg" rd. J, J" Nov. lB. 1927 Agnew. F. R., luly 21. 1927 Aly".... Mr<. Sophie. Sep t , 1. 1927 Alrick. ,1o"ohine A,. Se pt. 17. 1929 Alyick. H, P,. July 28. 1930 Arndal. L"Iwrcn t' B" J unr 9, 1928 Anacort�s Ladies' AieL Oct. 25. 1927 And,hl. S.. July 21. 1927 Andl'"rson. A. G . . Oct. 5, 1928 Anderson. lVIrs. Anna, July 2.3. (927 Anderson. Anton S. . Aug, 11. 1927 Ande"on. Arthur. July 19. 1927 Anderson. A. S,. July 19. 1927 Anderson. C. A.. Aug. 2. 1927 Anderson. /o.·(rs. Celia. Jan. 27. 1928 Anderson. Erik. July 16. 1927 Anderson. Gt'orge ,T.. Nov. 16. 1928 Anderson. Mr>. l. E.. July 25. 1928 Anderson. M,,: J. A .. Noy. 7. 1928 Ander...on. 1. l-l.. F.. b. 25. p:n:l

$ 20.00

25.00 100.00 10.00 50.00 60.00 25.00 10.00 7.00 2.00 100.00 10.00 "50.00 5.00 25.00 100,00 100.00 5.00

�OO.OO 2 . .00 10.00

�o.no

[)(fte Paid in Frdl and A'HUflnt of Plt!dr,t' Anderson. Jl"n." K. B., Sepc. 9. ICJ27 And�r50n, Julia. Oct, 31. 1927 Andt:rson, N!rs. Julin, July 2, 1929 Andorson. M. A . . Ape 13, InS Ander�on. Nickolai, July 8. 1927 AnJt'rson. Mr:o.. 0., Aug. 2. 1927 Anderson, rvI.�, P.. Sept. 21, 1927 Ltg. I. 1927 And('.�on. Dr. R. A., Anibd.. d, Mr�. B��rrh.l. J ldy 12. 11)27 Anonl'mom. July 23, 1927 Arndon, Gust, July 16. 1927 Arneson. NJary, July 21, 1927 Arnt:;on. J. wI.. July 1. 1927 Arntson, Ol�. Aua. 20. 1927 Ash,im, K. 0.. July G. 1927 .'\!'hC'im. ivlalinus. 0. . Dec. 19. 1929 Ask. A. L.. luly 28. 1930 Ask. Ch,s. W . . M.r. 13. 1928 Ashland. N. H .. July 30. (928 Aus. Ed. JuIr :n. 1927 Rakke. Lars. Nov. 2, 1927 [bkkc·. T. M. . An". I, 1927

50.00 2�.O(l 50.00

25.00 5.00 5.00 10.0(1 1 0. 00

5.00 3.00

5.00 50.00 5 0. 00 50.00 10.00 0 . 00 50.00 500.00 50.00 5.00 30.00

111.00


Paul A. Prell;


dmt 25.00 l3akkom, Mr>. O. H., AUB. 24, 1929 50.00 !lubo, 1'. J., Dec. 16, 1930 500.00 !lactlesoD, arl, J uly 19, 1927 100,00 liathen, C. N.. ()v. 1.7, 1.930 25.00 tlcaty, Mni. Ann3. July 12, 1927 300,00 Beck, Al ... ar, Aug. 16, 1930 100.00 llcnrud, R. C & O. P., J.n. 16, 1928 10.00 !lenson, Mrs. C. 1.. Sept. I, 1927 200.00 )jenson, Carl, Nov. II, 1930 5.00 Benson, Mrs, K., July 16, 1927 25.00 !lendey, Mrs. louis. E., July 19, 1927 50.00 tierg, Christiao, M",r. 28, 1930 _ 25.00 !lerg, Gunne r, J uly ZO, 1928 30.00 B<rB, J. A" Oct . 14, 1929 30.00 !lers, P. I., Nov. 13, 1929 'i.00 !lerge, Mrs. H., Jul y 15, 1927 10,00 Ue. rntsoo , ThooL, Feb. 3, 1928 20.00 Becs.th, A., July II, 1927 150.00 Bethany Ciecle, Belhngham, Dec. 22, 1927 Bethel L3di�' Aid Society-Brulih Prairie, 25.00 July 19, 1930 10.00 Birkeland, Paul, Sept. 26, 1928 20.00 Bjerke, H. C., July 23, 1927 50.00 Bjontegard, IUiI J., Jan. 4, 1930 100.00 Bjorlie, L. P., July 12, 1927 10.00 Bloom. O. A., Mac. 2. 1926 10.00 BOlOn.ad, O. H., July 6, 1927 10.00 Borgen, E. A., Jan. 10, 1929 5.00 BorresQn, H. C., July 16, (927 ')0.00 floye, Pe<er C, Dec. l l , 1930 25.00 !lruten , J ohn, Jul y l'i, 1927 10.00 Braaten, S. G., J.n. 21, 1929 100.00 Brager, CI3ri:S5a, Oct. 6, 1927 100.00 Brager, C O., Oct. 9, 1928 1000.00 !leag«. 01< 0., No v . 19, 1927 12,00 Brandt, Dr. O. E., Aug. 10, 1927 ).00 Brown, Mrs. Ann.a. Aug. I, 1927 25.00 Bruland. C R., Oct. 25, 1929 25.00 Bruland. Jacob. June 3. 1929 5.00 Bue, Harry. July 23. 1927 25.00 Rue, Peder, May 30, 1930 500.00 Buli, Ole. Dec. I, 1927 29.00 Bull, Osc", June 2, 1927 50.00 Bu ringrud, T. S., Jan. 27, 1928 40.00 Burscn, Rev. J. Theo., Apr. 29, 1930 250.00 Buschmann, August, May 23, 1930 5.00 Camas Ladies' Aid, June 21, 1929 Carl.on, J. O. (R & H Tire Shop). July 16, 1927 5.00 ....... 1.00 arlson, �lrs. �1orrisJ July 8, 1927 C ""al lut h. Guild, Portland, July 12, 1928 15.00 25.00 Choate, Alice. J.n. 3, 193 I 20.00 Chri:stens\:n, iVlrs. C .• Aug. 9, 1927 25.00 Christenstn. C. 0., June 17, 1929 30.00 Christenson, C W., Aug. 24, 1929 ).00 Christen�cn. John. Aug. 5, 1927 10.00 hristens�n, M. B. . Aug. 1, 1927 h ristensen. Olive T., Oct. 23, 1927 100.00 'i00.00 hristensen. De. \Y/. T., Sept. 15, 1927 Christianson, Casper, July 7, 1927 5.00 5.00 Chri�tofTcrson. IVlrs. Hilde, St'pt. 12, 1927 100.00 Clark, Mrs. Alyce Lee, May 21, 1929 25.00 Colbo, lester, Sept. 22, 1930 10.00 Colleen, Charles, Jan. 4, 1930 250.00 C lI ,ns. Mrs. Anne, Nov. 4, 1929 100.00 Columbia Luth. College, Nov. 10, 1925 5.00 Conley. Beulah. May 8. 1929 Conway.Hichland Ladies' Aid. Jun€' 16, 1930 50.00 D.1�lum. John 0., Nov. 3, 1927 25.00 D"hl. Anelle, J.n. 7, 1929 50.00 Dahl. Gu". Oct. 5, 1928 10.00 D�hl. Mrs. Hen rietta Klockstad. Auf:'. 11. 1927 25.00 5.00 I).hl. M. I! .. Oct. 25, 1929 Dahl. Oscar. July 19, 1927 50.00 Dahl. Otto. J uly 16, 1927 25.00 Dahl e. T. K .• Jan. 7, 1929 300.00 Dal e. Agna. Jan. 16. 1931 125.00 Dale. Mrs. Anna, Jan. 16, 1931 100.00 D.1Ik. A. . Mar. 13. 1928 100.00 Daniel,. Me. & Mrs. W. F., Oct. 7, 1930 50.00 Danielson. Petre J., July 16, 1927 25.00 Dig,ene., N.Is. July 23, 1927 10.00 Docken. Mes. Johanna. July 7. 1927 100.00 Dragn .., Hans. July 8, 1927 100.00 Dullum. M.«ha , July 9, 1930 _. 50.00 East Stanwood Luther Ladies' Aid. } une 30. 1930 200.00 Fa t Tacoma M3nuf..cturinc Co. . Aug. 31. 192? 500.00

"'l,mc

U.It

Paid in Full and Amount 0/ Pledge

5.00 Eckrem, Mrs. Peder. July 16, 1927 600.00 Eggen, Mr. & Mrs . N. G" Nov. I. 1927 100.00 Egge n, N. G., Sept. 8. 1926 100,00 Egtvedt, Arthur, June 21, 1930 5.00 EII.rtson, O. G.• July 23. 1927 ".00 Ell ... ", N. P., July 8, 1927 6.00 Elne.., Mrs. Juli•• July 7. 1927 5.00 Enevald:sen, C., Feb. 19, 1926 25.00 Engelstad, Mrs. L. G., Aug. 5, 1927 500.00 Engen, L. L., July 15, 1927 10,00 Enger, S. P., July 15. 1927 125.00 Enger, T. T .• Feb. 17, 1930 25.00 Engeseth, Nels, July 24, 1928 1.50 Enloe. Mrs. G., July 12. 1927 5.00 .Ennen, Herman, July 12, 1927 1000.00 Erholm, Chas .. May 21, 1926 25, 00 Erickson. Alma, Aug. 15, 1927 25.00 Erickson, Eilert, Anc. II, 1927 500.00 Erickson, H. L., Sept. 6, 1928 100.00 erickson, 1. J., Nov. 6, 1928 50.00 Erickson, lacs, Jan. 31, 1928 25.00 Espedal, O. A., Feb. 12, 1930 5.00 Espdund, Even, July 21, 1927 5.00 Estt'r, M rs. Sophie, Aug. 5, 1927 25.00 Evjen, �hrtin , July 19, 1930 50.00 Fadness, Sonya, Feb. 7, 1930 100.00 Falnes, H. J., Oct. 3, 1929 30.00 I'<dde, A. W., J une 30, 1930 First Luth. Eni,:. Ladies' Aid, Kennewlck, 10.00 Aug. 23, 1927 First Luth. Ladies' A id, Grandview, Nov. 10.00 28. 1927 50.00 Fjelde, Mrs. Guri, June 17, 1927 2.00 Flogum, Harold, Feb. 19, 1926 50.00 F i ngalson, E. 0., Dec. 4, 1928 25.00 Floc. Mr>. Hans, Jan. 28, 1930 10.00 Folkcsra d , H., July 7, 1927 250.00 Ford,·. M. H., May 26, 1928 Fore. Nels, (Matsqui, B. C), Sept. 3, 1927 125.00 Fore, Nels, (Parkland. Wash.), Julv 5, 1927 25.00 25.00 Forseth, Geo., July 16, 1927 100.00 Fosne•." O. E .• Sept. 22, 1930 250.00 Fosn. Rev. H. l., Feb. 7, 1930 50,00 Fo .... M argaret L., Oct. 31, 1930 50.00 FO::is, 1\1[5. Minnie, Aug. 5, 1927 50.00 Foss, Ole, Jan. 4, 1929 25.00 Fretheim, E inar H., Sept. 30, 1930 25.00 Frost. louis, Sept. 5, 1929 25.00 Fuls,.s. William, Dec. 7, 1929 10.00 Funrue, Mrs. K., Dec. 15, 1925 25.00 Golde, Mrs. Olava, Aug. 21. 1928. 5.00 G.II0, Roy T.• Sept. 9, 1927 10.00 Gorberg. H. P.• J ul y 23, 1927 50.00 Gausud. M rs. G. T .. Sept. 22, 1930 50.00 Ged stad, A.. July 16, 1927 1.00 Gilbert. G. H .• J ul,. 16. 1927 50.00 Glorum. Johanes, July 23. 1927 100.00 Goplerud. J. C. Mar. 15, 1926 100.00 Gople r ud, J. C. De c. 16, 1930 25.00 Grae, Ivor, Jan. 17, 1928 50.00 Gravrock, Olav. Feb. 15, 1928 500.00 Gray. Mrs. Anna 0., July 28, 1928 3.65 Grenstad, John . .J uly 8, 1927 200.00 Grol!n.sb(·rg. Rev. Ole. Dec. I, 1928 10.00 Gulbranson. Mrs. Kilrin(', Dec. 4, 1928 50.00 Gull<son. Mrs. Ed. May 3, 1929 100.00 Gullikson. Henry. Nov. 2, 1928 50.00 Gunderson. Albert. May 26. 1928 20.00 Gund"""n. G .. July 23, 1927 5.00 Gunderson. I. J., Feb. 9, 1926 5.00 Gun derso n, Mrs. Iver, Dec. 14. 192" 5.00 Gunderson. John. July 12. 1927 25.00 Gunder$on. Olga. Jan. 3, 1928 ')00.00 Haa kenson, E.. Oct. 12, 1927 100.00 Haakenson. Ruth, ug. 3 I, 1929 5.no Haakons. Mrs. C, Ju1)' 19, 1927 25.00 Hagen. Sigvacd. J uly 19, 1927 250.00 Hag oes. l. A., Dec. II, 1930 10.00 Hale, Mrs . Marie, A ug. 'i, 1927 10.00 Hal vo rs on, A., Aug. 5, 1927 3.00 Hamre. Mrs. Ellen, July 12, 1927 50.00 Hansen, Joh annes. June 1. 1927 Hanson, Mr. and M... . A. R., Jan. 4, 1928 300.00 10.00 Hanson. Bertha, July 6. 1927 25.00 H.nson. Chris. 5 . . July 15, 1927 150.00 Hanson, Einar, Jan . 4. 1930 75.00 Hanson. Hans. Feb. 19. 1926 Hanson. J. M . . Dec. 12, 1929 20.00 5.00 Hilnson. Mrs:. IVI.. A ug. Z. 1927 10.00 Han.'on. O. B .. Jul), 21, 1927


.".f'llI/l S. 1\. . • Jail. If}. 192Ci �farttll .. otl, (jl·Oq�C. July 1 2, 1917 :Vhrt 111"011 , M. T., Jul)1 15. 192.7 .� (·ll, Mn. SOphl.l J., Feb. 2�, [928 l'v!ar ... on. i\1r,;. M. . .luly 1'3, 1927 ;\loHlm.

100,O() ';,r)O 10.00 10.00 1.00 2";.00 Il. )0 10.00 5,00 :).00 10.no HI. 00 Z�.(lO

M.l

Louis. July 19. 1927 Ir". Edna, Nov. 15, 192 7 L.. July 23. 1927 i"klkdd. OIl' A .. ;\·lar. 23. 1926 ""'Il,nd, ., July 23, 1927 �'Ie:.fj(}rd. J(·n s. Auf,:. 8. 1927 j\lh'.�I()rd. Ivan C .. jan. 10. 1,)31 iVbyC'r:., �hC;)II,

M,·lby,

Mrs.

13, 19Z7 I\·tl('kei:.oll, Ham. Nov. 26. 19H) ;\'hkhl.�Qn. Rev. A .• On. lO, 192i ,\'I,kkc-ll'iol1. R('v. A.• No\,. 9, IIJ'2j ivllkk.I·I�oll. R t· v . A . . /\pr-. 31\ 1028

tvll'$).:.lrd.

;"'11.

j.,

june

\l,(l()

)O.\I�l

40.00

O.(lI) 2{l.l1()

liller. Arthur. lulr 1'5. 1927 1'I00Ior, .I. R., J.n. 19. In� Mdl('r, Loui!-('. I pro 22. J 930 !\.-J ill ion . ;"'·Ir.!" Bt'l"lh:.. J u l y 19. 1')27 100, r:.. July 23, 19 7 1vI0.'. J. J .. ""J" 7. 19H) '....1o,. Mrs O. J .. July 2�, 1933 tvl e. QI,. Au". 16. 1 930 l\' l oc hl'ln.,; . C;lrl Wl . . Jan. 16, 1 92 8 wloell

Meon. Muon,

100.0:) 10.00

10.00 IO.OU 25.UO 25.00 2'}.00 30.00 100.00

j\iJt�.

Arnt. N v. 12, I <)Z7 H. . Noy. 3. 1927 0 . . July 16, 1927 K" Apr. 7. 1928 K., jan. 3. 1927 .. Ore. 16. In7 O. c.. Auf,:. 25, 1 927

MrS,

G.

10.0(l

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Mo,n, P. Mocn. P. Mohn. J. Molbcrntt. Nloldrl'tll. Vail:.. June Moore. W. P. . Oct. 7.

50.00 25.00 50.00 50.nO

9. I92ti 1929 i\·lorri.!lon, MN-. Ida, Aug:. 2, I�J2S tvlc.'shcr"R". Mr" jul)' 6. 1927 Muellu. �1r�. Ann�. Sept. 2. 1 92 7 Ivlundal. M",. SplOY'. Ju l y 12. 1927 �'fyllrr. lex A . . ivlar. 6, 1928 ,\lrhrc. P. J., Sept. 1>. 1927 Mvrc\J(W'. Sdmr[". H. T.. Sepl. 11, 1927 ,\,tyroll. H:tIlS, Nov. 13. 1919 N:wtrdol, Jolll1. O l. 27. 1<)27 27 ;lton" 9 8r-!;.,nll. !vIOl. Ed .. J:ll1- 3. 192.8 H., Dl'(' S. 1929 Nl"boll. l'viri. Inl�ehorg. JUIl(, 1';. 191�1 Nf·1.�OIl, M.lrtin A .. July 23, 1927 Nrl"on. (\:'(:1[" \'\'.. .lui}' .n. 11)27 r"'Jf·l.�on, Pcl('r. AUf:. J. l'l2?

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Nne'oll. Alhrrt, reb. J. JtJ2 N"rgHl'J, Han:'.. J I1 . H. 1928 N l"",-� , KH(,11 M. . Apr. 23. 192(} Nr::-!.. S. 1\ .• Dc.·(', 17. 192') N,·",,,·. I. W. . Sept. 29. 19 2 7 '-J{'�tcl!:arJ. L., jul}, 7. 1927 ,.. tinf'. rvl:tl., jul), n : . 11)27 N,ducu L"dll's' id�\VoodbuTn. 1()3n

·j.no

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5.llI)

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jan.

lchcll, Clara, july 12. 1 9 27 1(, �{'n. Joh:'lllla L.. Nov. 1 2, 1927 Nil·J�('n. wI,,,. Maril. lui}, "l, 1928 N,I" n. A S .. Sept, 17. 1927 Nil:.t.'I\. H. A . . Jan. 28, 193:1 orb},. Rr\·. J. Ton·al, Oct. 14. JI)2f) orb\,. RC'\,. J. Torval , A pr. 10, 191') Nordh}'. A .. I\Ut;. ";. 1927 'I'In h:rf'n. H. J.. Dec. 3 I, 192? N('of'J�tr.lll(l N . Au):. 1, 1927

6,

NCI,um, A II .. On. '). 1927 N ll h uu .�. AI1(irrw. )311. 17. 1()7.Ci (1�hr" John . .1;111. 17. lYHI <. 'r.;"J;"Jrd. L. A., D(' . -J, 1')29 Ou', Ihe A .. julv H. 1927 (lie-I1, [v(,l', Julv :!�. 1927 OdlU". \ttr. &. rl'-. AIl[hon�'. av. 7, 191.') Oit'l·rr. S:l.m, july 6. 1927 O i,,-, n. Mr.... Atlll;t, ju l }, 23. 1927 Oh(,lI. �Ir. &. MrZl. Edwin G .. Sept. 17. 1919 Ol,,·n. J . .I.. cr. 10. 1929 Ol�('n, r... 1r. & i\/lrs. Otto. ('pt. 2, 1930 Oboll. Anton, Aug. 2. 1927 Ol,on. C. J.. OoOt. I, 1927 Olson. Fdmund, Fch 2, 1926 01'011. H. N.. I'.h. 27. 19,0 01,,,,,. H. .. July D, 1927 OJ..rI1. M" J. J . . Jul), 14. IQ27

21.�O

11.75 2 .00

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Knu\, Sl'p L 30, 192Y 1'vl. C., OCl. 2ll, 1927 Oh.OI1, Mr.•. iVL'\r}', SCPl. 1, 1 9 27 01..,011, Ne-i .. , S<'pt. 30, 1929 Ols('Itl, O. S., Sl·pt. 17, 1929 Olson, Oscar L.. Oct. 4, 11)30 Omit:. T. 1-\ .. Sept. 14. 1929 Op,�dal, L.. �ll at. �O. 1926 u�. 20. 1927 OP';CIITl. J:)crf!lt. Op:o.l:td. Mrs. Emeh;a. Ju\ y 2, 192') OpslInd. G. �I.. DC'. I, 1()27 O];..UIl. 0];..(111.

lOti. 1)(1 50. 00 25.01l 25.()U IO.O() 25.0() 30.00

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Op�unJ. G. !\·1.. hr )t 1926 2').00 Orda!' Rev. O . .r., Sept. 26. 1t)27 ·jllO.(l() O\trl·lll. O. S .. Jul}' .s. l'IZ7 5.tH} Our Sllviour·:. LudH'I"::I.1l l\1u):: ion Circk-­ �(l. f\cllin,:ham. AIl�. >. 1 927 IO.llt) Ollr S,lVH)llr·.l Sund:t�, S dl oo ! -Pallcrl:iOIl, D('c. 14. 19Z() ')(l.OO Ov('rland, O. R. Au��. 10, 1928 'jO.{l1l Ovnlllnd, O:o.(,�r. Jail. 'l. 19"'9 25.00 P:t�"�on. J0�{'f C.. July 6. 1927 5.00 P('Jer:o.Qn. .. jull' �, 1927 ),(111 P('cil r:,oll. �·,.,J:l.tti<ls, A l . • 1927 ,>.00 Pc:d"l'"">!lh. Ole. JUI1l' 16. 193{1 5n.lH.1 P�dcrsol1. S. K., SCPl. 14. 1928 25.00 p(·ttrl1on. A. P . . Jul). l'i, 11)27 I,.OO PCH'fSOIl. Car!. Oct. 25. L 927 ).00 I ("tn';on. F r ;t llk, Dec. 12. ItJ28 IUO.Ofl P"cr,on. J. C. . July 5. 1927 10. 00 Pl'tf'rllon. J. C. . M:1L 8, 1 tJ2() 10,0;) Pt>ll'rs n, Ivlr,;. Ju lia '. Aug. 31. 1927 10.00 Pctrr,.;on. :'YIn,. Petn. :vla}' II, 1929 25.00 P('t('non; P. 1\1., Oct. I, 192 7 10.00 l'rcu3. Rl·V. O. J. H.. J un e 30. 1929 50.0') Puivrr. RuJ0lph. Jui�. 16, ItJZ7 125.00 R. 1927 20.(l� 0., Jul)' 23. In7 100.00 Erik I., July 8. 1927 30.00 ua , Oct. 1(1, 19 2 7 5 0.00

H

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Purvi..s. Burt. jul}, C)1I.,lm. H. Qu:�rn, Q m Gef'O}" Quam. N,I, J .. July 8, 1927 Ra.,ch, Mr5. Ing('borg. );1n. (I,

o.no

1930

Rast1lu..:.Cll. Rl'\'. L. Au;.:. 16, 1930 Ra� 1 U":'SI.' II , d�. Sept. 19, IIJZ7 Ra!>l11l1 �en, Pl'tcr. .lui}' 15. 1927 Rasmll$O'icn. Vicloria. AuC. 16 . 1930 R;'}'lllOnd, B. H. . Oct. 3, 1929 Rl'd,·\·n. f);,vid, lui}' 16. 1927 Rl.'f .... lanJ. h!m('r, On. 13. 19JO n eil. l'vlr:.. C. I�.. OV. 2. 1927 Rindal. JO)1I1. N o\' , 2.(). 1930 Hi!ld�I, O. lvl.. Sept. 1. 1927 el\, j:Hl. 7. 1931 Ring... (,lh, Ri:>t')anJ, )110. L. . lUll!' Ill, 1927 nlV 1'lll·S. !vIrs. Anna, Ff'b. IZ. 192(, Hob..rt:'0f!. i\'I�. R. H., Jul}' 16. 1927 RoJ K. 0.. July 16. 1927 Ro�,"d. N.· J" July 16. 1927 RolIl'f:.on, 5{'..�il·. July 10. 1927 R(\llcf.�nll. lvIr�. 1. K.. Julr 16. 1927 Ronnei. Mr,;. Canic, Au)!. 6. 1 929 Ro>,. Mrs. D. B .. July 31. 19 1 O Royn,·. ils G. Jul)' 8. 1927 R.ue. GU�l:l, jUIl{, 30. 1930 Rut.'. JOII I1. jul}, 1'5, l C)l7 Rllnnin·. NIl j. E. Oct. � I, 1930 Rrdjord. �lr. & MI'�. 0., Dec. ,., 1t)28 Rnm. Mr... Ann(', J:m. 24. 1931 Hrllnil1j;. Karen. Emnl.1 & Sol\'{';�.

.

Oa. 7.

1927

R�'lInlll" Soivl'i.:. Aug. I,). IlJ27 S.li.1tcr. JOhlL D('C'. 9, 1 9 27 S:tllld:thi. 01('. O,'c 17. 192'; S:[1nlld�OIl, Mr�. P.. Nov. q, 192.7 ,III, J 1I1�' 28. IfJZS S;1nd. S.ln�k, K. H. . Ju!� (•. 1 (J2 7 S;\Uderwll. l'vlrs. G. A., Atlj:.:. 9. 11)21) S.lmbor. J. A . . (\ug. 5. 1 927 S,lllciwick. Oli\,('. Junt' I, 1927 Sdter, Allton, jan. 28. 1931 S;1lhrr. i\I[r:o;. Annil', Ju l y .n . 19 27 Soth.... C.. Ju l y 8. 1927 S.lrh ...r. i\-'lr:.. C.Holinl' A., Au!'!. 9. IQ27 Sather, G. A . . Nov. 29. 1926 Sch.'lderup. S. R .. Dec. 5. 1927 Schinnt'\. Gu:tt. Julr 28. 1930 SobQ. O. K.. Doc. 16. 192 Sl'i(·T">r.lCi. John. "uly 21 1927 S,..I\'ir;. �"r:-.. H. 13 . . 101), 0, 1927 Sel"ir.. H. '" Apr. 10. 1929 S('ll1. j\.·]n '!:try J\. . J:aI1. IU, 1931

25.00 250.00 flO.OO 10.00 7� 0(1 's0.00 IU.OO iO.OO

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"' 1111' .. P.:tl:f, July (1, 1927 Sctter, A., Dec. 21. lY27 Shrvt'i;:md, rvlrs. "' July 8, 1927 SlOlOl11'On, Am,lndus, Oct. 10, 1927 .. imonson, Mr. & !vJrs. G" Oce. 17, 1927 Simonson. M. . Nov. 22, 1927 Simundson, Ll'wic, July 1), 1927 Sl\·ubon. j\/Irs . Joh : mn.... Sept. 6, 1927 S k.II•. MI. &. Mr>. P. J., JUll' 23. 1927 Sbtbo, T. 0. . July 15, 1927 Shi. 01, P., Oct. 5, 1927 Skog ell,. A. L Jul y 16, 1927 Skov. Mrs. M.utha. Se pt. 1. 1927 Smidt, :VIrs. H .. July 21, 1927 � mith, C. Hc.nqr, Au�. 2, 1927 Sn"vr, Rev. J. S.. July 8, 1927 Snortbnd, J.lcob. Jul}' 12, 1927 Sober-g. Fred, June 9, 1928 Soiland. Inga. Aug. 20, 193�l Soil.lIld, Tominc, A ug. I, 1927 Sondl'rup, Mrs, A.. Aug. 2, 1927 Sonderup, M.lrgaret, Aug. I. 1.927 S\,.lr('I\."On , Mathias. $(·pt. 14, 1927 Sortcbt'rr,. Torst en, Feb. I. 1925 SQvik, Mr.-... Edward, Sept. 16, 1926 Sovik. Me. 13< Mrs. Edward, Nm·. 13, 1929 Sponhcim. Cl a ra. Aug. 5, 1927 ponhcim, H.l.ld(lr P., April I, It 29, Onl! quarter section land-Nlinn. S,.,dslwu., O. E., JUll' 21, 1927 S.an •• A., July 27, 1929 8. l Y30 Stt'l'.Il. Ole. Jan. Stcl:'nd:lhl. Martin, Nov. t. 1927 S[('nf'("�on. C. H.. July 6. 1927 Slc.vtn�, Stcn;l,. Apr. 3. 1929 S t okst:l d, Rt'v. Christian. Au�;. I. 1927 Ston,. M". N. J.. Nov. 7. 1930 Stora;l:iIi. CI:lr� 0., Sept. 14. 1927 S. u hb. L. 0., Sept. 2. 1930 Svacva"i, Ella, July 23. 1927 Svt'ns.on. Mrs. Tl�n.l, March 31, 1928 S�inth, Lu.�tta. Oct. 6. 1927 Swanso". Iv!. G.. May 10. 1928 Sydnw. {{('v. Arthur & Fannie. No\,. I, 1926 .,d I i.u;-;t'n , tv!. 0.. Sept. 2. 1927 51·,t. S .. Aug. 15, 1927 T <l nbt'r i! . Lena, Apr. 5, 1928 T., u •. Fred. July 17, 1929 Tt'IJ,;t', Nrll i(' , Oct. 8, 1927 Tt'lit'f;<;cn, fvlrs. Tobinc. Dec. I Z, 1927 T,l Ic,bo. John, Sept. 7, 1928 TCllm'",tll, N., July Hi, 1927 Tcs�Jner. Etta H . . Aug. ,,) , 1927 Th.Jr.IldsCI'l, Chns. July 25. 1927 Thomp!'oon. Mrs. Cdia. Aug. 13. 1928 Thompson, L('vi B., June 9. 1928 'Th mps-on. Louise. Au,::. t. 1927 Thompson, M.utin. Julr 16, 1927 Thomp;<;oll, Ole. Jan. 17, 1928 Thorpe, Mn:. Lt'na, Oct. t8. 1928 Tho rse.n, Dr. !vlaric. Jan. 3. 1928 Thor�t'n, Pl'dt'r, July 7. 1927 Thorso n, Stt'ner. jul}, Ll, 1927 Thl'Ondsotl. A . . Aur.. 9. 1927 Th),c, Me. Be M". A"der<, July 23, 1927 Thyt'. Nt'ttte:. Oct. 7, 1930 Tinr:cbtad, B ent, AL\�. 2. 1927 Tin�elstad. M<tric. Aug. 2, 1927 Tingel.stad. O. A. . Aug. t�, 1929 S('ptOll,

Nmllc 2.00 25.00 '.00 10.00 50.00 5.00 5.00 25.00 50.00 5.00 118.00 5.00

25.00 25.00

ll1.00 100.00 25.00 100.00 ,0.00 100.00 5.00 5.00 50.00 5.00 20.58 200.00 2'.00

10.00 500.00 20.00 25.00 25.00 500.00 10.00 25.00 125.00

100.00 2.00 30.00 10.00 100.00 50.00 50.00 10.00 10.00 75.00 25.00 25.00

�O.OO 50.00

25.00

10.00 100.00 100.00

5.00 25.00 50.00 10.00 50.00

10.00 5.00 50.00 5.00 25.00 100.00 25.00 500.00

Tillgcblad, Mrs. O. A" Dec. 31. 1928 Tjerands('n, Jacob, Junt 25, 1930 Tobiason. John, M.H. 10, 1928 .To f t(', Mrs. e., Oc t. la, 1929 TolI�fsrud. A. 0 .. July 19, 1927 ToHuln, C. L., Noy. I I, 1930 ToHum, Marie, J"n. 14, 1931 TorJ;erson, Andre w . Oct. 12, 1926 Torgerson. Mrs. Anna C., Dec. 13, 1927 Torgerson. Herman. Junt' 21, 1927 T oc("l:'sd.ll, K. N .. Jan. 28, I?) I Torvik. Nlorris R.. July 19, 1927 Torw ick. Kn u te, Oct. I, 1927 To ;dah l. T .. Jul" 12, 1927 Trallt'rud. O. I., S.pt. 20. 1927 Soci('ty-Hcmct, Tri ni tJ.' Mi."..:;ion Luth. Oct. 25, 1927 Tri ni tv Youn g p('Op!C'5 Socicty-Silvcrtoll. Oec. 15, 1926 Tron,�dal, Lar!', Jan. 12. 1928 Tronscn, C;tspcr, Jul)' 1(" 1927 Twcit. And r e..... E .. Dec. 7, 1929 Ulld and. Alitrid, Aug. 15. 1927 U l l e l . nd . e. N., July 8, 1927 U ti caa rd. Caro l ine. Dec. 6. 19 2 5 Vu. Luis. J Ull' 21. 1927 Val("ntlne. D. S.. July 15, 1927 Vt's tre, E.. July 22, 19 29 Wagnild, Ben. Jan. 19. 1928 \Y,fag:seth. Henry, Nov. 21, 1930 W/agseth. Marit', Dec. 5, 1927 \Valderhaug, Mrs. J., July 19. 1927 W/angsmo. Paul, Oct. 29. 1929 Wathne. Tho mas. Dec. 6, 1927 Watland, John J.. Ape. 3, 1929 WI edt'ber�. K .. Jul)' 7, 1925 \'(1 q�'dand. !vlrs. Rosa, July 5, 1927 We st Coast Grocc!)· Co .. July 13, 1929 W ha ll, Julius. July 8, 1927 \,(li Iliams. 01,. Oct. 17. 1930 \Vin�c, Hu�o, De c. 2. 1927 Willing \Y/orkers' Socict},-San Francisco. Ocr. 1 7, 1930 Wold. e. L .. Mar. 3. 1928 Wol d. In l-:' r i d, Aug. 20. 1927 Wol d. Ol e , Aug. 20. 19 2 7 \'(f ombl e, D. .I .. J ul l' 21. 1927 Wo m en ' s 1\1i.s:-oioll;lf)' P t'd erat i o ll, Norlh Pu�Cl Sound Circuit, On, I9ZR \'(!ornen'� Mis.�ionary Fl'd('ratiotl', Ort'�on Circuit. Jul" 24, 19)0 W(\lnrn'!' Missionary Ft'dl'Cation, Pacific District, Dec. 2, 1927 Wood, Ida. July 7, 1927 Wood. S. J .. Stpt. 26. 1928 Youn s::; People's Luther Leagu("-He.met, Aug. 29. 1927 Young Pcople's Luther LC.ll:::ue-Hemf"t. May 26. 1926 t ,:: ard. Lars, June 9. 1928 Zelzah Luther Lt'al-iue. N ov. l, 1927 Zoar's L u th eran Lildif".�' Aid-C;ll1by, J;I.I1. 3, 1928 Zwilgmcy("r, P. G .. July 15, 1927 T otal pled,,"" p ai d in full P.lCtial pa},ments on all other ptcd �es Total

pa i d .

Febru;u�'

14. 193 I

150.00

25,00 25.00 30.00 5.00 100.00 25.00 20.00 25,00

1.00

25.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 5 0. 00

2U.00 loo.on 50.00 5.00 2 5 .0 0 250.00 200.00 2.00 5.00 10.00 5 . 00 60 . 00 100.00 302.00 10.00 25.00 50.00 100.00 20.00 20.00 100.00 5.00 2 5 .0 0 50.00

IO.no

50.00

25.00 20.00 5.011 �8.6.

38.8") 8.'H 5.0(1 125.(10 10.00 2 5 . 00 50.00 20. 00 5.50

5.00

48,427.92 76.830.15

$125.258.07


THE YEAR'S PROGRESS 1930 March-The Lutheran Students' Union Convention, March 7-9, brought great inspiration to Pacific Lutheran College and increased the prestige and in­ fluence of the College throughout the Church. The Board of Trustees ratified the contract with Architect Charles Altfillisch as designing engineer for the development program. The Alumni Association adopted a new plan of or­ ganization and set up a $1000 student loan fund as its first alumni project.

April-The Choir won new laurels on a concert tour north. The Mid-West Follow­ up Campaign of the Development Association got under way. kla)'-\'V' ork began on the President's residence.

The Church unanimously guar­

anteed the maintenance of the present accredited status of the College and authorized an emergency appropriation, if necessary, for 1931 and 1932. Athletics, the Choir, and debate, all enjoyed a most successful year. }lIllc-"The Saga," the first annual of the College, won entire student and faculty approval as "the best of its size in the Northwest." The graduating class numbered sixty-seven, the largest in the history of Paci fie Lutheran College. The graduating class presented money for an electric-lighted, glass-covered bulletin board. }llly-The Pacific Lutheran Chautauqua proved a successful venture in coopera­ tion on the part of three Lutheran synods. The Mid-\'V'est Follow-up Cam­ paign, despite great and unexpected difficulties, made it possible to close the .fiscal year on July I with a net gain. The net increase in fixed assets for the year included over $5,000 in real estate and over $1,100 in library additions. Miss Irene Dahl hecame Development Association Secretary. Auglut-"The Arions" completed a to,OOO-mile concert tour throughout the North­ west and Middle West under College auspices. The total capital invested in Pacific Lutheran College reached the impressi\'e total of $340,000. The American Lutheran Church voted continued cooperation.

The College placed

83;1" of its 1930 Normal graduates.

Septcmber-There was a 1 Z;/r increase in the enrollment at the opening of the school year on Septemher 9. In its first two years the Development Associa­ tion gathered $35,000 and recruited 5,60() members. The President's residence was dedicated on September 28 and occupied on September 29; cost to date, Mrs. Louise S. Taylor became assistant registrar, Miss Sophia Fowler normal supervisor, the Rev. J. P. Pflueger professor of Christianity and philoso­ phy, and Mr. Paul R. Highby teacher of biology. The Rev. Geo. O. Lane ac­ cepted the call to become field agent for the Development Association. $8,000.

October-Work for the Development Association began in congregations of the Northwesrern District of the Ohio Synod (American Lutheran Church). Mrs. Olive Bomstead Joined the faCIlIty as teacher of typing and shorthand. The American Luther;1I1 Conference, organized at Minneapolis, strengthened the future position of the College. Mr. Paul A. Preus agreed to become field agent for the Endowment Fund, b::ginning February I, 1931. No} ember-Field Agent Lane began his effective work, and Field Agent Elvestrolll and Professor Pflueger received splendid cooperation from Ohio Synod people. Football successes made Coach Olson famous. The faculty granted per­ mission to publish "The Saga" in J 931 also. The Mission Society aroused active interest. December-"The Saga" staff was dected and organized for work. club was orgal1lzed for the discussion of professional problems. of the biology laboratory got under way.

The faculty Construction


1931

janllar)'-The biology laboratory was made ready for service at a cost of $3750. The Lutheran Sunday Sch 01 Teachers' Institute 10 Tacoma drafted five faculty members for twelve lectures, two on each of six successive Tuesday evenings in January and February. A conference of Pacific Coast Lutheran Church officials resulted in an invitation to present a plan and plea for co­ operation ro the Columbia Conference of the Augustana Synod in April. The Board of Trustees authorized the faculty to offer a third year of Normal and Junior Collegt· work in the next annual catalog; the Board also permitted the Choir to accept the invitation to the Young People's Luther League Convention at Chicago under certain conditions; the Board also authorized the land­ �caping of the lawn around the President's residence and the construction of a cement sidewalk along the cast front of the campus as soon as the street is paved. The enrollment passed the nO-mark. A ladies' auxiliary was or­ ganized in Tacoma-Parkland ro promote the dormitory for girls.

February-Me. Paul A. Preus entered upon his duties as Endowment Field Agent February 1 . "The Arions" arranged a two-week concert tour o f Oregon and California. The memb�rship in the Development Association passed the 6,400-mark, and the collections for the Endowment Fund passed the $125,000mark. The Executive Board of the California Conference of the Augustana Synod voted Pacific Lutheran College its moral support.


Tl-lE PROPO ED DORMITORY FOR GIRLS The Next Step ill the Development Program The main steps taken to date in carrying

through the development program

arc the following: I.

The launching of the Devdopment Association, Sept. 23, I !J28.

"At least a dollar at least once ship, February 14, 1931: 6,434.

a year." . Presem goal: 10,000 members.

2. The campus survey by Architect Charles Altfillisch, eral development program is hased upon this survey. 3.

Slogan: Member-

April, 1<)29. The gen­

The construction of th' new che mistr y laboratory at a cost

of $ 5,5\10 in thc

fall of 1929. 4.

The consolidation and cnlargement of thc campus in the winter and spring

of 1930. a

5. The construction of the President's Residence in the summct of 1930, at cost of 08,000. Dedicated, Scpt. 28, 1930. 6.

The construction of the new biology laboratory in Decembcr, 1930, and

January, 1931, at a cost of

$3,750.

enlargemcnt, and improvement of the libra f)' its scrvice, i n the years 1929-193 [. 8. The landscaping of the College grounds; begull in the spring of 192\1; continuation authorized for the spr in g of 1931. The first unit of the propo s e d dormitory for girls is the next step in this de­ velopment program. After that, a li brar)' building. 7.

The classification, cataloging,

and

Why Next�

This dvrmitory project cameo next in the program for the following reasons: 1. Because the dormitor)1 is Ilt'eded in 1931 and will in all probability be a cr ring need in I (32 if not built before. T h e r e are three main reasons for thi' need: a.

The normal incrt'ase in the enrollment of a successful, growing insti­

tution, as evidenced by the following table, which shows the complete year by year:

enrollment

1\127-28, 171\ 1\124-25,162 1928-29,187 1929-30,214 1925-26,143 1922-23, 84 1930-31,230 (Feh.) 1926-27,157 1923-24,117 b. The increase in the number of active supporters through synodical coopcration and the work of the Development Assocition. c. The new certification law in the State of \'V' ashington, which requires th.. addition of a third year to the curriculum of every state-accredited normal school, including the Normal Department of Pacific Lutheran College. The offer­ ings of this third year must be shown in this spring's catalog. 2. Because a dormitory is an income-producing building, and the College is 1920-21, 68 1921-22, 87

not yet sufficiently out of the financial woods to urge a library building or other non-revenue-producing building ahead of the dormitory. 3. Because the present Main Building (erected in I SY4 ) , ill traditi ns and memories, no

r ic h though it he longer has the popular appeal of a modern, up-to­

datt' ladies' hall. 4. Because the dormItory can be built in units, each accommodating fif t�r students (more or less), and each unit being potentially ial

for the perpetuation of

a

it

most

appropriate me mo r ­

dear and honored name.

W hat

A re the Prospects?

has re solv ed that the first unit of a dormitory for girls may be erected as soon as the Sllm of $40,000 is available for this purpose. onations aggregating about .�S,OOO have been promised for this project, The Board of Truste

s


through the voluntary efforts of two pastors: Carl H. Norgaard and T. o. Svare. Six hundred dollars hal' been received in cash. At the initiative of Mrs. J. A. E. Naess, and under the chairmanship of Mrs. O. J. Swen, the wives of Lutheran pastors in Greater Tacoma, the lady members of the College faculty, and the wives of the College faculty members, on January 29, 1931, organized a ladies' auxiliary to promote the cause of the dormitory for girls.

The president is Mrs. Naess; the vice-president is Mrs. Stuen. It is possible that one individual or a few individuals may be found who will support this project with large gifts. The building would form a beautiful memorial.

Pacific Lutheran Coilege Choir 1929路1930

The Pacific Lutheran College Choir of 1930-1931 has been invited 1Il

to

appea!

concert at the Sixth International Convention uf the Y ling Peoplt"s LlIrlwr

League at Chicago,

Jline

17-21, 1931.


PROGRESS IN SYNODI AL COOPERATION It has become evident that the responsibility of the Lutheran Church for Christian education on the Pacific Coast cannot be weI! met without a larger measure of synodical cooperation. It has been demonstrated at Pacific Lutheran College that practical cooperation of this type can be successful. The present cooperation between the Northwestern District of the American Lutheran Church and the Pacific District of Norwegian Lutheran Church of America has won the approval of these synods and will, God willing, continue. At present the American Lutheran Church makes an annual appropriation f $2,500 to Pacific Lutheran College, the Northwestern District opens its congregations to representatives of the Pacific Lutheran College Development Association, President L. Ludwig of the North足 western District holds advisory membership on the Board of Trustees of the College, and Professor J . P. Pflueger is the representative of the American Lutheran Church on the College faculty. The f rmation of the American Lutheran Conference in October, 1930, opened up further possibilities of practical cooperation. By invitation of the Board of Trustees of the College, officials of the Lutheran Church on the Pacific Coast in synods affiliated with the American Luth ran Conference met at Pacific Lutheran College on January 1 4, 193 1 , to discuss the problem of higher Christian education on the Pacific Coast, particularly as related to Pacific Lutheran College. Those in attendance were: the Rev. G. K. Andeen, President of the Columbia Conference of the Augustana Synod, the ecretary of the Conference, the Rev. C. G. Bloomquist, the Rev. . R. Swanson, member of the committee on synodical cooperation in the Columbia Conference; the Rev. L. Ludwig, President of the Northwestern District of the American Lutheran Church, the Secretary, the Rev. E. R. Pflueger; the Rev. H. P. Halvorson, representing the Rev. P. Strommen, President of the Western Circuit of the Lutheran Free Church, and the Rev. A. E. Myhre of the Lutheran Free Church; the Rev. J. A. E. Naess, President of the Pacific District of the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America, the Secretary, the Rev. Geo. Henriksen ; the Rev. 0_ L. Haavik, Presidenr of the Board of Trustees of the College, the Rev. O. E. Heimdahl, the Rev. R. Bogstad, Mr. J. O. Gulbransen, Secretary of the Board, Mr. G. R. Haukeli, and President O. A. Tingelstad of the College. "A pronounced spirit of brotherly love and cooperation, coupled with a deep sense of appreciation of the responsibilities and possibilities at issue, marked the deliberations." As a practical outcome of this conference, the representatives of the Columbia Conference extended to the Board of Trustees of Pacific Lutheran College an in足 vitation to present a plan and plea for cooperation before that body at its next meeting, in April, 193 1 . Similarly, on February 12, the Executive Board of the California Conference of the Augustana Synod voted to grant to Pacific Lutheran College its moral support. The Pacific Lutheran Chautauqua will this summer be conducted under the auspices of the synods affiliated in the American Lutheran Conference. Pacific Lutheran College is anxious to serve the cause of Jesus Christ as widely and as well as possible, in accordance with the officially adopted policy as stated in the following resolution of May 24, 1930: rrResol'Yed, That the Pacific District approve this statement of principles adopted by our Board of Education in regard to Synodical cooperation at Pacific Lutheran College, according to which statement control (including membership on the Board of Trustees) may be shared only with Synods or groups with whom we have altar nd pulpit fellowship; representation on the faculty be accorded any Lutheran Synod, provided the representatives concerned be satisfactory to the Board of Trustees; and service be rendered as fully as possibl> to all hristians."


THIS YEAR'S HURDLE MUST BE CLEARED! Is the race only to the swift, and the battle only to the strong? Obstacles, hurdles, have stood in the way of Pacific Lutheran College all these years. So also this year. But this year's hurdle mu.rt be cleared! This year's hurdle is the prospective operating deficit of $2 1 ,000. three poss ible ways of meeting this deficit:

There are

I . Voluntary gifts, received through the Development Association or other­ wise, may be applied against the deficit. About six thousand dollars have already been made available in this way. More will come in from this source; but no Mid­ West campaign, similar to the ones of 1 9 29 and 1 930, can be put on this summer. But the deficit must be wiped out by July 3 1 !

2 . The proposed trip of the Pacific Lu theran College Choir to the International Young People's Luther League Convention at Chicago in June may be developed into a concert tour which may win for the College many friends and considerable support. The financial handicap of the tour itself is considerable, however, and the economic outlook uncertain. Because this is the American Lutheran Conference year, the Choir is neverthe less planning to make this tour, if possible. The Choir will, by the grace of God, bring a wonderful message of spiritual uplift and cheer. May God in His mercy prosper the venture! \

3. The Norwegian Lutheran Church of America at its convention last May unanimously passed rhe fol lowing resolution: "BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that, in the case and to the extent that the upport from other sources prove inadequate for the maintenance of the present accredited status of Pacific Lutheran College, the Board of Tmstees of the Nor­ wegian Lutheran Church of America be authorized, on recommendation of the Board of Education , to make an emergency appropriation sufficient to avoid operating de. ficits at Pacific Lutheran College d l/ rin g the next bienllium, it being the purpose of the Church by this resolution to assure the uninterrupted survival of this school in order that Pacific District may cheerfully promote the further development of Pacific Lutheran Coll�ge, and it being the understanding of the Church that such emergency appropria tion shall in no case exceed $ 1 7,500.00."

we

This emergency resolution will not avail unless we who are concerned do can to avoid an appeal to it. Then·fore,

:111

BECAUSE THIS YEAR'S HURDLE MUST BE CLEARED, Let us support the Development Association by word, deed, and prayer! Let us invite, support, advertise, and encourage the Choir! Let us pray the Lord to strengthen and guide us, and let the right re ults!

us

trust in Him for



College bulletin 1931 february