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Partnership in Excellence ,. .

I

. PACIFIC UlTHE RAN UNlVERSIlY

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flw infnrm.:.lltm nmt.lined hen�in n.:t1i.·('Ls .In llcurJhJ pilturl' of racifil­ _it)' ilt th� time of public.:llion. llu\\,,·llit'T. ti1C' univr'\",-;ity feS(,Hl"S the ri�ht 10 m,'k� netl."S�try (h.mgl's in procedures. poljcie�. OJIe.ndJT. CUHKU' lurn, ,lnd (n�t..., . Lulhl'ran Univ

Pacific lu thera.n

nivl'rsitv dues not discriminate on the basis of

sex , race. creed, color, n(ltio� (ll origin , .1ge, or handi("lpp�d condi­

ti<'ln in

<lnd i -

.:

tht' e d uca t ion ll programs or (1Ctivitil's which it llpe rates , requ ired by Title IX of the E.d ucatio n Amendm"nts of 1972

,md the regulations ad" p teLi pursuant there'to, by Title VI and Title

thl' Civil Rights Act of '19M, and by SCL1io n 504 of the Reha­ bilitation Act of 1�73 not to discrimin,ltl' in such milnner. The requirement not to disuiminate in edU((ltionill progr.Jn1S lnd �lcti\'iti('s extends tu empI()ym�nt t herein and t o a dm ission

VII of

.m : d su mmari es of in the Co l lege of A rts dnd Sciences and the Sch"nL, of the Arb, Busin""" AdministT.1tiun, Education, Nursin g, dlld I 'hysic ll Education. Detailed degree requirelllen ts, of ten incl u d i ng suppklmen tZl r y s��mph: programs, are i\v,lilablQ ill the officl's of the indi vi d ual sch"t,l<.:. clnd de part m l'nts. AdVising by universi ty personn (:-'l inconsistent \\�ith pu blish ed statL'm\;.'nt.s is not binding. Li.sled in this c,ltel1og arc cours e dcsl:riptions

d egree requin' llll\n l s ftlr ma j ors, minors. clnd other programs

.:

...

th(;lretu.

Inqu ir i es concerning thl' a pp lic a tion uf said acts and published tu this ullivl'r� it y mel), be referred to: l. The Director uf i 'ersonnl'i , Room 107, I la uge Ad m in istratiun I3u il d ing . Pacific r ,utherall nive rs ity, tdt.�pho ne 53S-71HS, for m,ltters rela t ing to employment p ol ic it' s and pr.1C ticl' s, promo­ ti ons , fring� benefits, tr i ni ng , and griL'Vi.lnc(:' proccdures f()r personnL'i emplc)yed by the u ni versity. 2. Th(' Deputy Pnwost, Ro om tOO, Hauge' AdmiI1l5tration B u ildin,C; , 1\1Cific Lutheran Uni\"L'rsity, t l'i ephu ne 535-7125, for matters rel ating tu studl:'nt admissions, curricu lum, and financial aid. 3. rhe Associate Dean for Studl'nt Lik Room 115, I laugl' Admin­ is tration Build ing, Pacific Lu theran Uni versi t y, telephone -35-7191. for matters rega rd ing administrative pulicies relating to c;.tudents, st u dent -.erviccs, and the student admini�trativ('

re g ul a tions

.:l

grievance procl'dllre.

i. The' A.s,oci,lte Dean for Student Life.

Room 115, H au ge

Administration Building. Pacific LlIt lll'ra n University, tl'il'ph(mt'

535-719"1. fur mattl'r, relating to the application Uf Sccti()f1 504 of the Rdlabilitation Act.

Volume LXV NO.3 Pacific Lutheran Unive 'ity Bulletin (U SPS 417-660) August 1985

3. The Director of the AcadL'mic Adv iSing and Assist�mc(' Center,

Pacific Lutlwran University, telephone 535-7519, relating to the (lcadcmic grievance procedure.

Ramstad Hall,

for Il1Jttc

6. Or the Ass istant S<,cretary for Civil Rights, &Juratiun, Switz"r Building . ."l30 C D.

.

�02n2.

U.s. De'p,lr tmcnt of Street S.w., Wdshington,

Plldfic Lutheran Uni vl,:'rsity complies with the Family Education clnd Priv(lcy J\ct of 1LJ74. Inqu i ri�s nmcerning: the �lppli(il­ lion of this act ,lnd publ ished reg u la tions t(l this uni versi ty m.,y be n:'ferrcd to the [xl'cutivL' S ecretllrv tu the Vice President and UCdn for Stu d ent Life, Room It5, H au ge AdministrZltion l3uilc!ing, I\lCific Lutlwran UnIversity, telephone' 35-7191, ur thl' F" mil y Educatiun Right!-. und Privacy Officl', l)epartml'nt llf EduGlt iul 1 , 330 Illdt}pt�n­ Lienee Avenue S ., \'\'l S hi ngton , D.C. 202m ( tl'lephone Rights

poin" n<J,Itl w.

202r24�-1I11�).

,."I(>.. 1"c:on1.l Ifll�fNlill)n..1 A"pori

"s..:'.·ToI("

r

�".l' he- Airport to PlU: JO fftl��

OO""'nlown T.t<am.. 10 PLU: 7 mile�

Pacific Lutheran University Vol.

C

talog USPS 417-660

XV No. 3 Published six times annually by

Pacific Lutheran University, S. 121st and Park Ave., Tacoma, WA 98447-0003. Second class postage pendin g at Tacoma, WA . Postmaster: Send address changes to Office of Admissions, FLU, P.O. Box hd 117

2068, Tacoma, WA 98447-0003.

1........ItI.��. .. ..

ToOlyrnpi , PQrll.nd nn poinh \.Oulh

,. Tn M

.... ..

. Inirr N.lion.lr..,.,


1


2

Objectives University Pacific Lutheran UniverSity, born of the Reformiltion spirit, main­ tains the privilege of exploration and learning in all areas of the arts, sciences, and religion. The basic concern of Martin Luther waS reli­ gious, but his rejection of church trDdition as primary authority, and his own free search for religious tmth, Served in effect to liberate the modern mind in its quest for all truth. The total impact of Luther'S stand has permanently shaped the modern world and helped pro­ vide the modern university with its basic methodology. Pacific Lutheran University is a community of professing Christian scholars dedicated to a philoso phy of l ibe ral educatiun. The major goals oi the institut iun arc tu inculcate a r e spect ior learnin g and truth, to iree the mind from the confinements of ignor ance and prej ­ udice, to organize the powers oi clear thought and expression, to preserve and extend knowledge, to help men and women achieve professional C(lmpetenc", and to establish lifelong habits of study, reflection, and learning. Through an emp hasis on the liberating arts, the Univ",rsity seeks to develop creative, reflective, and responsible persuns. At the same time, the acquisit io n uf specialized information and technical skill is recognized as a condition of successiul involve­ ment in the modern world. The University seeks to develop the eval­ uatiw and spiritual capacities oi the students and to acquaint them honestly with rival claims to the true and the good. It encourages the pursuit oi rich and ennobling experiences and the development of signiiicant personhood through an ap pr ec iation of humanity's intel­ lectual, artistic, cultural, and natural surroundings. The University affirms its fundamental obligation to confront liber.,lIy educated men and women with the challenges of Christian faith and to inStill in them a true sense of vocation. By providing a rich variety of social experiences, Pacific Lutheran University seeks to develop in the student a joy in abundant living, a fee l ing for the welfare and pers onill int egrity of others, good taste, and a Sense of social propriety and ad�'<juacy. Distinguishing between personal Christian ethics and normal social controls, the University adopts only such rules as seem necessary for the welfare of the educational community.

the

The physical development of students is regarded as

an in t e gral

part of their liberal education. Hence the University encourages par­

ticipation in physica l activities and re spect for health and fitness. Professing a concern for human nature in its entirety, the faculty of the University encourages wholesome development of 01ristian faith and life by providing opportunities for worship and medita­ tion, offering systematic studies of religion, and encouraging free investigation and discussion of basic religious questions. The Uni­ versity believes the essence of Christianity to be personal faith in God as Crt'ator and Redeemer, and it believes that such faith born of the Holy Spirit generates integrative power capable of guiding human beings to illuminating perspectives and worthy pu rp o se s . The University community confesses the iaith that the ultimate meaning and purposes oi human life are to be discovered in the per­ son and work oi Jesus Christ. As an educational arm of the Church, Paciiic Lutheran University provides a locus for the fruitful inter play of Christian faith and all of human le a rning and culture, and as such holds it a responsibility to dis cov er, explore , and develop new frontiers. Believing th.,t all truth is God's truth, the University, in achieving its educational and spirit­ ual goals, maintains the right and indeed the obligation of faculty and students to engage in an unbiased search for tnlth in all realms.


3

12irectory The university is located at South 12 1st Street and Park Avenue in suburban Parkland. Office hours are from 8:00 a . m . to 5:00 p . m . Monday through Friday. Most offices axe closed for chapel on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10:00 to 10:30 a . m . during the school year, and on Fridays during June, July, and August all offices close at 12 noon. The university also observes all legal holidays. The Umversity Center maintains an inlormation desk which is open daily until 10 p . m . (11 p . m . on Friday and Saturday). VIsitors are welcome at any time. Special arrangements for tours and appointments may be made through the admissions office or the univer­ sity relations office.

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT:

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

General interests of the university, church rela­ tions, and community relations

THE PRE SIDENT

A cademic policies and programs,

THE PROVO ST College of Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities Division of Natural Sciences Division of Social Sciences School of the Arts School of Business Administration School of Education School of Nursing School of Physical Education

faculty

appointments, curriculum development, aca­ demic advising and assistance, and foreign study

General information, admission of students, publications for prospective students, fresh­ man class registration, and advanced place­ ment

THE DEAN OF ADMI SSIONS

Transcripts of records, schedules, registration, and transfer students

THE REGI STRAR OR THE TRANSFER COORDINATOR

Financial assistance, scholarships, and loans

THE DIRECfOR OF FINANCIAL A ID

Financial management and administrative services

THE VICE PRE SIDENT-FINANCE

Fees and payment plans

THE STUDENT ACCOUNTS COORDINATOR

Campus parking, safety, and information

THE DIRECTOR OF CAMPU S SAFETY AND INFORMATION

Residence halls, counseling and testing, health services, minority affairs, foreign students, and extracurricular activities

THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT LIFE

Gifts, bequests, grants, and the annual fund

THE VICE PRE SIDENT FOR DEVELOPMENT

Work-study opportunities, student employ ­ ment, and career options

THE DIRECTOR OF CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT

Graduate programs and summer sessions

THE DEAN OF GRADUATE AND SUMMER STUDI E S

Continuing education opportunities

THE DIRECTOR O F CONTINUING EDUCATI ON

A lumni activities

THE DIRECTOR OF THE ALUMNI A SSOCIATION

Worship services and religious life at the uni­ versity

THE UNIVERSITY PA STORS

AND OPERATI ONS


4

Tabkof

Contents

Objectives Directory

Chemistry

2

37

College of A rts and Sciences

3

Academic Calendars

6

Communication Arts

General Information

9

Computer Science

Admission

FinancialA id Costs

Earth Sciences

12

15

Economics

Student Life Adv ising

17

Education

Academic Structure Academic Procedures

English

22

General University Requirements

50

Global Studies

26

History

64

66

Humanities

30

68

Integrated Studies

31

BusinessAdministration

60

Environmental Studies

28

Biology

48

(see under Physics, page 92)

Core Curriculum Alternatives

TheArts

47

Engineering

20

Majors/Minors

Art

46

Educational Psychology Special Education

19

Anthropology

43

Cooperative Education

11

41

33

69

63

40


5 Languages

Affiliate Resources

71

Chinese, Classics (Greek, latin), French, German, Norwegian, Scandinavian, Sign language, Spanish

Legal Studies

74

Mathematics Music

Pre-Professional Programs

74

Natural Sciences

Theological Studies Air Force ROIC ArmyROIC

83

International Programs

83

Philosophy

86 88

Physics and Engineering Political Science

92

95

Scandinavian Area Studies

103

118

122

and Family Therapy

104

106 108

Graduate Studies

Index

102

109

130

131

Application Form Campus Guide

Social Work & Marriage

Statistics

Board of Regents

The Collegium

100

LayChurch Staff Worker Program

Sociology

115

The Faculty

98

Social Sciences

Interim Program

Administrative Offices

Public Affairs

Religion

112

Global Studies Intensive English language Institute Scandinavian Area Studies Study Abroad

Physical Education

Psychology

110

Health Sciences Pre-law

76

Nursing

110

CHOICE WCEE KPLU-FM Center for the Study of Public Policy

133

135

120


6

1985-86 SUMMER SESSION 1985 Monday, J une 24.. ...... ......... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. Thurs day, J uly 4 . . ..... ....... .. Indep endence Day holiday Friday, August 23 .. ... ....... . .. Summer session closes; commencement .

.

.

.

.

FALL SEMESTER 1985 Sat urday, September 7 to Monday, September 9 .......... . Orientation and registration Tu esday, September 10 ..... .... . Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. Opening convocation, 10:00 a.m. Friday, October 25 ............. ... Mid-semester break We dnesday, November 27.... .... Thanksgiving recess begins, 12:50 p.m. Monday, December 2. ........ .. ... Thanksgiving recess ends, 8:00 a.m. Friday, December 13.. ....... ...... Classes end, 6:00 p.m. Saturday, December 14 .. ........ Mid-year commencement Monday, December 16 to Friday, December 20.. ........ ... Final examinations Friday, December 20............... Semester ends after last exam .

.

.

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.

.

.

.

.

INTERIM 1986 Monday, January 6 .......... ...... Begins Monday, January 20 .... .. . ...... . Mar tin Luther King, Jr., Birthday holiday Friday, January 31 ...... ...... .. . Ends .

.

.

SPRING SEMESTER 1986 Tu esday, February 4 .............. Registration We dnesday, February 5 ..... ...... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. Monday, February 17 .... .. ..... . Presidents' Day holiday Friday, March 21 ....... . ......... Easter recess begins, 6:00 p.m. Monday, March 31 .. .. ........ ... Easter recess ends, 4:00 p.m. Friday, May 16...... . ..... ..... Classes end, 6:00 p.m. Monday, May 19 to Friday, May 23..... ..... .... ..... Final examinations Friday, May 23... ... .......... .. .. Semester ends after last exam Sunday, May 25 . ... ...... ........ Worship service and commencement .

.

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.


7

1986-87 SUMMER SESSION 1986

Monday, June 23.................. Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. Friday, July 4 ... ....... ...... . .. Independence Day holiday Friday, August 22 ................. Summer session closes; commencement .

.

FALL SEMESTER 1986

Sa turday, September 6 to Monday, September 8 ............. Orientation and registration Tu esday, September 9 .... ... ..... Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. .

Friday, October 24 .......... .. ... We dnesday, November 26.......... Monday, December 1... . . ... Friday, December 12............... Saturday, December 13 ............ Monday, December 15 to Friday, December 19....... .. .... .. Friday, December 19...... ........ .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Opening convocation, 10:00 a.m.

Mid-semester break

Thanksgiving recess begins, 12:50 p.m.

Thanksgiving recess ends, 8:00 a.m.

Classes end, 6:00 p.m.

Mid-year commencement Final examinations Semester ends after last exam

INTERIM 1987

Monday, January 5 ............... . Begins Monday, January 19 .. .. .......... Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday holiday Friday, January 30..... . ....... Ends .

.

.

.

.

Tu esday, February 3 ............... Wednesday, February 4 ... ........ Monday, February 16 ....... .... .. Friday, April 10 ............ ....... Monday, April 20 ........... ...... Friday, May 15.. ...... . ..... .... Monday, May 18 to Friday, May 22... ...... . ....... Friday, May 22.................. . . Sunday, May 24 .... .... .. ....... .

.

.

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.

.

.

SPRING SEMESTER 1987 Registration

Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. Presidents' Day holiday

Easter recess begins, 6:00 p.m.

Easter recess ends, 4:00 p.m. Classes end, 6:00 p.m. Final examinations

Semester ends after last exam Worship service and commencement


8

________________ ______� � __ __________


9

General HISTORY

Pacific Lutheran University was founded in

1890 by men a nd

women of the Lutheran Church in the Northwest, and by the Rev­

erend Bjug Harstad in particular. Their purpose

waS to establis h an institution in which their people could be educated. Education was (l vene rat ed part of the SC(lndinavian and G e r man traditions from which tht's � pioneers came, TIle in sti tution opened as Pacific Lutheran Academy. Crowing in statu re, ['LA bec ame ,1 junior c olle ge in 1921. Ten yeers later, it \\',lS organized into a three-year nornhll s chool which became a col le ge of e ducation in 1939. After 1941, it ""p<mded as Pacific Lutheran College unti l it w as reorganized ,15 a uni ve rs itv in 1960, reflecting the gro wt h of bot h its profess io nal schools ,lnd liberal arts core.

ACCREDITATION

Pacific Lutheran University is full y accredited by th e I orthw e st

Associatinn of Schools lind Co lleges as it

fou r-yea r institutiun of hi g h er education and by the National Council for the Accreditil­ tion of Teacher Education fUf the preparatiun of elementary and secon da r y kachers, principals, ,lnd guidance counselors with the n1Ctster's degree as the hight'st degree approved. The uni\'ersitv is also approvE·d by t1w Americ,ln Chemical St.>ciety. The Schuoi of

N ursi ng is accredited by the N,ltional League f;H Nursing. The

School uf Business Administration is accredited by the American

Assembly of C olle giate Schools of Business. The Social Work Pro­ gra m is accredited by the C o un cil on S ocial Work Ed uc atiun at the

baccalaureate level. The Depa r tment

of M us i c is acc r edited by th e

National Association of Schools of Mu si c. Any current or prospec­ tive student rna)" upun request directed to the president 's ofiicc, review ,1 copy of the documents p f'rtaining tll the uni vers ity's vari­ {JUS clcc reditat i(.H1s and approvals.

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS Th e U n iverS ity is a member of: Anlerican As soci�ltio n of Higher Education American Council on Education A s s o c iat ion of American Colleges

Ind epe ndent Colleges of Washington, Inco rpornted

Lutheran Educational National Association

Conference of ;\Jorth America of Summer Schools

Western Association

of Craduate Schools

Wa shington friends of Higher Education

Western Interstate Commission fm Higher E ducation

G ROUNDS

Located in suburban Parkland , PLU has a p icturesque

campus, truly r ep r esentative N orthw est.

126-acre of th e n(ltural grandeur o(the Pacific

ENROLLMENT

2,R70 f ull -tim e students 824 pa rt-time stu d ents

FACULTY

214 full-time fa cul ty 61 part-time fac ulty

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO 15.3:1

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

Ln 1969 Pilcific Luthe ran U niv ers ity ad.opted the 4-1-4-cillendilr s emesters br idged by a fo u r­ week interim pe riod . Course credit is computed by hours. The majmity of co urses ilre offer ed for 4 h our s. Each undergraduate degr ee cilndid ate i s ex pe cted to complete 128 hours with an overall grade pOint aver­ age of 2.00. D egree requirements are specifically stated in this catal og. Each which co n si sts of two fourteen-week

student should become f(lmiiiar with these requirements und pre­ pare to meet

them.

LIBRARY SERVICES

The Robert A.L. Mortvedt LibrilrY

is the central multi-media

learning resource ce nter s erving the entire university communitv.

Its collections arc housed and services p rovi ded in a modern fun� ­ tional building which has study spaces for 700 student s and shelv­ ing for more than one-quarter million books, periodicals,

microfilm, and audi�visual materials. The library receives ove r 1,300 current m<lg<u ines, journals, and newspapers. In addition to its ge nera l collection of books an d other materials, the l ibrary has a special c o llection devoted to the S c andin avi a n Immigrant Exp er ien ce and contains the unive rsity and regio n al Lutheran church Mchives. Other special collections include the Curriculum Collection of the School of Educati o n , the microfiche collection of college catalogs, maps, pamphlets, and nation<ll and trade bibliographies.

The library is open for service

110 hours during a typical week in an d p<lrt-time IibrMi­

a regul ar terrr .. A staff of twenty-seven full aIlS

and assistants offer expert reference, information, and media and ,1dvanced libra r y instruction for all students. In addition to st,lndard refer­ ence service, th e li bra ry staff also offers com puterized b ibl io­ graph ic information service. As the result of the Ii b rn ry 's extensive c.ollection of bibliographic tools, com pute. r access t.o other collec­ services. The reference staff provides beginning

tions and electronic mail service, students and faculty have rapid access

to matcriills

which can be borrowed from other libraries.


10 LATE AFTERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES To provi de for the professional growth and cultural enrichment

MIDDLE COLLEGE

I'LU offers a special six-week Summer program for high scho ol

of persons unable to take a fu Ji - time college CUU�SC, t he un ive rsi ty

jun iors and seniors and for first-year college students. Called Mid­ dle College, the program is design ed to ease the trans ition f.rom

and gr,ldu atl' courses for teachers, administrC\tors;, and persons in

tial to successful completion of a college or university program.

conducts lat"e-afternuon and evenin g classes. In additio n to ,1 wide variety of offe::·rings in the art s dnd sciences, there are speciali ze d business and industry.

high school ttl college by sharpe ning learning skills that are essen­ Middle College has b oth an academic program and a counseling and testing component. All students are thoroughly tested a nd

SUMMER SESSION A n extensive summer school curriculum, of the san1£' qunlity as that offered during the regular aCildemic year, is available to (Ill

summer seo sion typi call y is ,1 time when the f aculty offer innovative, experimental co ur ses which cover a broad ra nge of co ntemporary i.ssues and perspectives in qualified persons. In addition ,

evaluated in private sessions with regard to their re<lding, writing, verbal, and milthematical skills. In addition, career counseling is provide d. T he aim of Middle College co un sel ing is to assess each student's talents and interests in order to provi de direction and glJals for the college expe rience.

The aCCldemic program oifers a ch<1nCl' to improve specific learn­

many fields. The summer session consists of two four-week terms, a one-week pn:.'-sessio n , and a une-week interim session,

ing skills es senti al to college success. The classes, offere d at sev­

and begins in the middle of June. A few courses arc t" ught in the

I..1nly, the reby allLHving smilll class size. and close contact between

evening, h\'0 nig hts per week for nine weeks, and Master of Busi­

eral l evels in several disc i pline s , are for Middle College stud ents students and facult y. All students will tak e a study skills

COlirse,

ness Administr<1tion courses ilre t(lught during two six-week terms, twu nights per week. Designed for undergraduates <1nd

select two or thr<..'e' CulLrscs from among thosE,' offered each year.

istr ators s ee king credentials and spec ial courses, ireshmen desir­

gro",th.

graduilt<:.' st u de. nts alike, th� progr l1m serv('s teachers Ctnd admin­

ing to initi,,1te college s tud y, and other.; de siri ng special studi es offered by th e schools and departments. Transient students who

enroll for the summer sessioll

need onlv submit a letter of aca­

demic standing or give other evidence of being prepared for ml­ lege study. A complete $"IIIl11er

Sessioll Catalog,

ou t lining the curriculum as

well �1S special ins t it utes, workshops and sen1in ars, is pr inted each

w hich serve'S ()S a core of the progrc1m. In ad dition, students may Each student's program is individualizl'd ttl p ro mot..:.· maximum

PROJECT ADVANCE

Each semester PLU offers Project Advance, a special. enrichmenl

program for high school j uniors and senior s. Design ed to comple­ ment high school studies, Proje ct Advance allows st udents to earn

one hour of univer sity credit and to expe rie nce college life and

sludy. The top ic of Ihe course is diff ere n t each semester, and fall

sp ring and is aV<lilable from the dean of the summe.r ses s io n ilt the

topic s are chosen tll coincide with the high school Natiol1,11 Debate

uni vers ity.

Topic. Project Advance classes meet onct' a \veek for six weeks in the late "fterne)on.

RETENTION OF FRESHMEN The retention of students entering as freshmen h{1s been moni­

tored since 1972. Those data ,1[1' presented in the fo ll owing table:

Retention of Entering Freshmen

1972 1973 1974 1975 ·1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983

To Sophomore

To lunior

Year

Year

Yeil.r

70.1% 7 4 .7 % 74.0% 71.2% 69.3% 74.7% 74.2 % 74.8% 78.6% 71.1% 77.6% 75.7%

51.9% 54.3% 54.0% 5 2 . 9% 52.8% 57.2% 58.6% 60 . 6% 58.2% 57.1% 60.1%

46.1% 48.7% 49.8% 50.8% 47.5% 52.4% 56.4% 55.4% 54. 1 % 52.7%

To Senior


11

Admission Pacific LutherJI1 University welcomes applications from students

who have demonstrated capacities for success at the baccaiaure,lte

EARLY DECISION

High school students who have decided upon FLU as their iirst

it:.'vd . Applicants who present academic records <lnd personal qll�lli­

choice may be uffered admission as early as C>ctob(:'r 1 of their senior

admission. Applicants for admission clrc evaluated without regard

July are (Kceptable. Eady Decision students are given preferential

tion. Sl'il'ction criteria include grade point (lverage, class r<lnk, tran­

form is av,lilable from the Office of Admissions. If an Early Decision

ties which our experience indicates will enable them to sLicceed at the u nivexsit\, and benefit from the environment will be offered

to sex, racE', creed, color, age, national origin, or handicapped condi­ script patt(:-' rn, test �c()res, and n:."{"ommendations.

I n evaluating i:l pplications the De.an of Admissions interprets

grade point averages and class rank in relatiun tu the quality of the

Novcmber 1 5 of the senior year. SAT, ACT, or WI'CT scores from the previous :VIa), or

year. Early Decision applications must"be made by

treatment in campus housing and fi.nancial aid. A.n Ea.r1y Decision

is unfavorable., <1 student may still be considered for reguldr

admission.

curriculum which the applicant has pursued in high school and in

EARLY ADMISSION

sion on Excellence in Education. For example, ,1 standard high

tion may b€gin work to\v,lrd a degree ,lfter completion of the junior

the light of recommendations published by the national Commis­

school program in prepaI:ation for college would typically include the following:

3 years ( algebra, 2 years, and geometry, 1 year)

for(2ign Language:

2 Y0ars

Social Studies: 2 years

L1.bor<1.tory Sciences: 2 years

Electives:

3 vears

year or first sem(:'ster of the senior yee1r of high school. Exceptional students who wish to enrull before completing all required units in

high school must have a letter submitted by a recognized school offi­

Englis h : 4 years M" themntics:

QU(llified students interested in accelerating thei.r formal educa­

(sclect<:'d hom the a.re�lS listed above, as well as

courses· in computer science, speech, debilte, typing, (lnd music).

Additional study of both mathenlatics and foreign la.nguage is

cial wh ich approves early college admi::ision and gives assurance

that a high school diploma will be issued after completion of speci­ fied college work. Only students highly rt(:ommended for Early

Admissiun w il l be considered. Generally these students rank

amung the top students in their class and present high aptitude test Scores.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT OPPORTUNITIES 1. College Board Exal1liHations:

Students interested

in

seeking

advanced pl<'Kement or credit toward graduation thruugh the

ad\7isablc for certain areas in the arts ,lnd sciences and in Some pro­

examination program of the Cullege Board should direct inquiries

for specific iniormation to the department or school which offers

fessional progTams. 11105(' \.-\'ho follow the above preparatory pro­ gr,l m w i l l find most curricular offerings o f thl' u niversity o p e n to · t hem and may also qualify for advanced placement in some areas.

College Board prog'ram may be addressed to the Office oi

required to have completed two high school years of one ioreign lan­

2. DepartmClltal Examillations: A number of departments and schools

Efiective with the fall semester of 1988, entering students w i l l be

guage (or the equivalent) and two years of college prep,l ratory math­ . ematic s (or the equivalent), excluding course s in computer science.

the a-c ademic subject of their choice. General inquiries about the

Admissions.

offer placement examinations in order that stud<:' nts m ,1y be advised as to the level at w h ich they may most advantageously pursue a given subject. Credit toward graduation may be given in

Students are admitted to either the fall or spring semester.

certain cases, depending o n the examination score and whether

Acceptance to the fall term carries permission to attend the previous summer sessions. Spring acceptance approves enrollment in the

the subject matter was Hot part of the course \vork by which the

h.igh school diploma was earned. Again, inquiries ior specific

January interim. The following application deadlines are suggested:

Fall Semester-Jllne 1 ; Sprinx Semester - Jallllary 1 .

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: ENTEl,ING FRESHMEN

Students planning to enter as freshmen may submit application

matelir1ls anytime (lftercompietion of the j u n ior year of high school.

information should be d irecte�d to the department or school offer­

ing the particular subject.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: TI<ANSFER STLlDENTS

Students who began their higher education at other accredited

Admission decisions arc made. beginning December 1 unless a

colleges or universities are encouraged to apply for admission with

their status as suon as U1eir con,pletcd application has been rec(jved

sonal standing at the institution last attended iull-time. Although it

request for Luly Decision is rccciv(:'d . Cilndid(lh�-s a_re notified of and evaluated. Credcnti2l1s rCl]u ircd arc:

1. Forlllal Application: Submit the UlIljimll Undersmdllate Applicati()I1

for Admission to FOIl1"- Year Coilcgl's and Ulliz}t'rsities il1 the State of

IVaslungtoll. Available irum high schooi counselors or the PLU

Office oi Admissions.

2. $25.00 Applicatioll/Records Fec: A 525 iee must accompany your apf)li�ation or be mailed separately. This non-refundable service

fee does not apply to your accoun t . i\1ake checks or money orders

advanced standing. Candidates must have good academic and per­ does not guarantee admission, a grade point average of (2.15) in all

college work attE'mpted is required for regular admission. Test scores

may be required for applicants who have limited college experience.

Credentials required are:

1 . Forlllal Applicatioll: Submit a U niiorm U n dergraduate Application

2.

3. Tral1script: The tr,lnscript you

submit must include ,1 1l credits com­ pleted through yom junior year of high school. Ii admission is offered, an acceptable final transcript w h ich ind icates satisfzcctory

completion of the senior year and atta.inment of a diploma mllst

4.

be presented.

/\ccolllmendatiol1s: T\vo recommendations must be prepared by

principals, counselors, pastors, or other qualiiied persons. The FLU Office of Admissions will supplv the forms.

'/Till/scripts: Ofiicial transcripts from

all previolls collegiate institu­

tions attended must be sent by those institutions d irectly to the

PLU Oifice oi Admissions. Oiiicial high school transcripts oi

payable to Paciiic Lutheran University and mail to the PLU Office

of Admissions.

Ivith S25.00 non-refundable application/records fee.

credits are necessary if they are not listed on college transcripts.

3. Cicamllce Form: The oifice of the dean of students at your most recently attended (full-time) institution must complete a clear­

4.

ance form (provided by the PLU Office of Admissions).

Re(oIllIllClldati""s: Two recommendations must be prepared by instructors, counselors, pastors, or other qualified persons. The PLU Office of Admissions provides the fonns.

EVALUATION OF CREDITS

5. Tcst RequimllcHt: All entering ireshmen mLLst submit scores from

1 . The registrar evaluates ZlLl transfET records and creates an advising

Americ,1l1 COllege Test Assessment (AC1) OJ; fOr WaSh ington

ments and total hours accepted. Individual schools and depart­

either the Cullege Board, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), or the

State residc'nts, the Washington Pre-Col lege Test (WPCT). RegiS­

tration procedures and forms are available at high school counsel­ ing offices.

oooklet (Cold Book) ind icating completion of any core require­ ments determine which courses satisfy major requirements.

2. Generally, college-level courses carrying grade

"C '

or above

apply toward graduation . "D" graded COurses will be withheld until a student has successfu lly completed one semester's work at

,the u niversity.


12 3 . A community college student may transfer a maximum o f 64 semester (96 quarter) hours of credit from the two-year

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: FORMER STUDE NTS

institution.

Full-time students who have not been in attendance for one

4. To qualify as a degree candIdate, a student must take 32 of the final 38 semester hours in residence.

semester or more may seek readmission by obtaining an approved, at the time

UNACCREDITED EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES

application

for re-entrance from the Office of Admissions unless thev have been

of last enrollment, io! a leave oi ab sence.

Stu­

dents who have been dmpped for academic or disciplinary reasons must identify a faculty member willing to act as a sponsor and

1. Credits earned in unaccredited schools are not transferable at the

adviser if re-admitted. Re-entering students who have attended

time of admission. Evaluation and decision on such courses will

another college in the meantime must request that a t,"nscript be

be made after the student has been in " ttendance at the university

sent from the institution directly to the dean of admissions.

2.

one semester. The university allows up to 20 semester hours of USAFI credit and up to 20 semester hours ior military crc'<iit , providing the total

of the two does not exceed 30 semester hours. 3. The university does not grant credit for college level CED tests.

4. For iniormation on the College Level Examination Program

(CLEP), refer to

the section on Credit by Examination under Aca­

demic Procedures.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: FOREIGN STUDENTS Foreign students who are qualified academically, financially, and in English proficiency are encouraged to join the university commu­ nity. Information and application procedures may be obtained from the dean of admissions.

FINALIZING AN OFFER OF ADMISSION

ACCELERATED UNDERGRADUATE REENTRY FOR ADULTS (AURA)

1.

may seek advanced placement at up to the junior level through the

mit a Medical History Record acceptable to the Service.

2. Adm"ce Paymenl:

of the first semester. Fall applicanls offered admissioll

tematic assessment by a faculty panel of the adequacy and appropri­

mllsl submil

ateness of know ledge and skills demonstrated in a portfolio

lhe payn","1 by May 1 .

befi,re May

1

If circumstances necessitate can­

cellation of enrollment and the de a n

of admissions is notiiied in $100.00 will be refu nded. The refund date for interim is December 15, and for spring semester, January

prepared by the student with staff assistance. Credit awards may not

writing before May 1 , the

exceed 48 semester credits less acceptable college transfer credits.

AURA Pro­

A 5100.00 advance payment is necessary follow­

credited to the student's account and is applied toward expenses

oi 2.5 or higher. Credit awards for prior learning are based upon sys­

Program, contact the Director,

Health

student body and reserves housing on campus if requested. It is

credits at PLU (including Psychology 401) with a grade point average

For details of the AURA

PLU

ing an offer of admission. This payment is the student's acknowl­ edgement of acceptance and both guarantees a plac.e in the

AURA Program. Those accepted into AURA are granted one year's provisional admission, during which time they must complete 12

gram, 535-7518.

Before final matriculation, each new full-time

undergraduate student (ten semester hours Or more) must sub­

Qualified adults, 30 years oi age or older, who have not been enrolled in a baccalaureate degree program within the last five years,

Medical Reqlliremel1l:

15. 3. New SllIdel'll llIforll/lllioll For",: This iorm includes the application ior housing and must be completed by all students and returned wilh the advance payment.

Financial Aid Recognizing that many students who want to attend Pacific Lutheran University would be unable to meet all expenses of enroll­ ment from personal or f,lmily sources, the university attempts to provide iinancial assistance to all eligible students. Any student approved ior enrollment or currently enrolled may request iinancial aid. Approximately 70% of the university's students receive help in

CONTINUING STUDENTS

1.

PRIORITY DArE: All materials must be in the Financial Aid Office by April 1_

2. Mail a Financial Aid Form (FAF) to the College Scholarship Serv­ ice (CSS) by March 1. 3. Submit a PLU Financial Aid Application.

the form of gift assistance (that is, scholarships, talent awards, or

An application for financial aid can be completed at any time, but

grants), low interest deierred loans, or employment. In many cases a

failure to meet the priority date may result in a denial of aid even

financial aid award will be a combination

of

these forms of

assistance.

sider ,Ill applicants for any award for which they might be eligible.

The quantity and composition of an award is based upon demon­ strated financial need, academic achievement, test scores, and

other

personal talents and interests. Need is determined from analysis oi the Financial Aid Form (FAF), which is a statement of financial con­ dition provided by the College Scholarship Service (CSS). Analysis of the Financial Aid Form determines an expected contribution for college expenses from the student and parents or guardian. "Finan­ cial Need" is defined as the difference between total student expenses for <1n academic year and the expected student/family con­ tribution and is a primary available aid. Financial assistance

factor in

determining eligibility for most

is available to all qualified students

regardless

of their sex, race, creed, color, age, national origin, or handicapped condition.

progress is mainlained. Aid is nol alllOlllLllically ren'�l'ed eaelT year.

NarIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS 1. Award decisions for freshmen and transfer students who meet the March 1 completion date wUl be made in March, and actual notification will be mailed April 1 . 2 . Financial aid decisions for continuing PLU students are made in April and notifications are sent out beginning in May.

VALIDATING THE AID OFFER Aid offers must be validated by returning the signed Financial Aid Award Notice and submitting the 5100 advance payment required by the university . This should be done as soon as possible but must an award by the reply date specified will have their awards can­

FRESHMEN AND TRANSFERS

2.

Aid awards are for Olle yrur and mosl arc renc�vable, prOVided reapplication is compleled 011 lillie, finllneilll lIeed conlinlles, alld salisfaclon} academic

be completed by May 1. Applicants not returning their acceptance of

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: 1.

though need is demonst.rated . The Financial Aid Office will con­

be in the Financial Aid

celled. If an applicant later decides to reapply, the application will be

Mail a Financial A i d Fo r m (FAF) t o the College Scholarship Serv­

Aid, with the exception of College Work-Study, is credited to the student's account when all paperwork has been completed. One­

PRIORITY DATE: All

Office by 'March 1 .

materials must

ice (CSS) by February 1 .

3. B e offered admission by March 1 . 4 . Submit a PLU Financial Aid Application from all prior instituitons attended (transfers only).

5. Submit a Fina ncial Aid Transcript from all prior institutions attended (transiers only).

reviewed with the group currently being processed.

half of the award is disbursed each semester. Parents and students are responsible for the charges in excess oi the award. In some cases aid is awarded in excess of direct university charges to help with living expenses. This money will remain on the stu­ dent's account unless requested by the student through the Busi­ ness Office after classes have begun. Under federal regulations, adjustments to an award package must be made if a student receives additional awards of aid

from

somces


13 external to the university. In every case, however, the Financial Aid

Courses that are repeated are also counted in the limitation on

Office will attempt to allow the student to keep as much of the

credits which can be attempted. Once a course has been completed

sources in this way, additional awards from the university's

mum num er of hours which can be taken under financial aid eligi­

award package as possible. By treating aid received from external resources can be made to other qualified needy students.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBlLITIES

The basic responsibility for financing an education at PLU rest�

successfullv, the credit hours earned are counted toward the mini­

b

bility. If a course is successfully completed more than once, it is counted only once toward a student's degree requirements and

toward the minimum number of hours which can be taken under

financial aid eligibility.

with students and their families. In addition to expected contribu­ tions from parents or guardians, students are expected to assist by

or courses whose credit hours are not applicable to a degree, but if

assistance from the lmiversity is therefore supplementary to the

be included in the limitation on credits which may be attempted and

contributing from their savings and summer earnings. Financial

efforts of a student's family. It is provided for students who demon­ strate need . Additional rights and responsibilities of financial aid recipients

include:

1 . Signing and returning each financial aid notice received.

2. Declining at any time any portion of an award.

3. Notifying the Financial Aid Office in case of a change in credit

hours attempted; a change in marital status; a change in resi­ dence (ofi-campus or at home); or receipt of additional outside scholarships.

4. Signing additional documents in the Financial Aid Office at the beginning of each semester.

The university's curriculum includes very few non-credit courses

any such courses are taken by financial aid recipients, the hours will

will be considered within the time-frame allowable for achieving a

degree.

In the event that a student fails to meet the criteria for satisfactory

progress during a particular semester, he or she will be placed on academic and financial aid probation . Failure to regain satisfactory

academic status will result in the cancellation of financial aid. Once "unsatisfactory progress" has been determined, students

receive official notification. Terminated students may apply for rein­ statement by submitting a letter of petition to the Registrar'S Office

and securing a faculty sponsor. The petition and sponsorship letters

are submitted to the Enculty Committee on Admission and Reten­ tion of Students for action.

Students who are placed on financial aid probation may petition

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS/SATISFACTORY PROGRESS

for reinstatement of their linancial aid in one of two ways: (1) They

tinue receiving financial assistance as long as they are in good stand­

Committee on Admission and Retention of Students documenting

The policy of the Financial Aid Office is to allow students to con­

ing at the university. To do otherwise would cause a severe hardship

on students who must devote their efforts to achieving satisfactory grades. However, no institutional grants will be awarded to students

may complete one semester of full-time enrollment using their own financial resources, or (2) they may submit an appeal to the Faculty the unusual circumstances which have made it impossible to make

satisfactory progress during the semester in question. Summer ses­

sions may also be used as terms during which a student on financial

with cumulative grade point averages below 2 . 00 .

aid probation may regain satisfactory academic status; however, stu­

must be enrolled as a full-time student. For federal financial aid pro­

own financial resources and are ineligible forfinancial aid.

minimum of twelve credit hours or more per semester. Adjustmellts

TYPES OF AID

To be given priority for most types o f financial aid, an applicant

grams, a fulltime student is defined as any person enrolled for a

ill all award may be »lade during the yenr Ifall aid recipient has not enrollcd for a slifficiellt nlwlber ofcredit hOl"5. However. eoch financial aid recipiellt

II1l1st maintaill sat isfactory academic progress ill the COllrse of stlldy he or she is pllrsuing in order to colltill"e to receive /illancial assistance moarded

dents enrolling in summer sessions for this purpose must use their

UNIVERS/n' GIFT ASSISTANCE

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS are granted on the basis of aca­

demic achievement and financial need. To be considered, a freshlllan applicant must have a 3.30 secondary school grade pOint average.

btJ the PLU Financial Aid Office. The fal/awing minimum requirements are expected of each financiJU aid recipient: To make satisfactory progress

Scholastic ability must also be reflected in test scores from the Scho­

mum of 24 semester hours of credit each academic year. An aca­

students must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to be quali­

toward a degree, an undergraduate student must complete a mini­

demic year is defined as the fall semester, the interim term, and the

lastic Aptitude Test (SJ\f), or the American College Test (ACT), or the Washington Pre-College Test (Wpef). Transfer and conti/llIing

spring s.emester. As part of their undergraduate program, students

fied for first-time or renewal awards. PLU is a sponsor of Natiullal Merit Scholarships. Students who earn semilinalist standing are

n umbered 300-320); junior and senior transfer students need to

cerning a PLU Merit Scholarship.

are required to complete two interim terms (8 hours from courses complete only one interim term (4 hours from courses numbered 300-320). Graduate students are required to complete 16 semester hours of credit each academic year.

For fuU-time undergraduate students receiving financial aid, the maximum number of credit hours that may be attempted is 175 and the maximum time-frame for completing a b.1ccalaureate degree is

encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office for information con­

PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS ranging from $1,000 to $1,200

annually are awarded to entering freshmen in recognition of OLlt­

standing academic achievement in high school and in antiCipation of superior performance at PLU. To be a candidate, a student must

have an exceptional high school grade awrage, usually 3.75 or

five years. Even if a student changes h1s or her major or academic

higher, present high test scores, and receive an offer of admission by April 1 . Use of a grade prediction equation to determine a predicted

aid, and the maximum time-frame of five years for receiving a

cial 11eed is not a determining filCtor and no application is required. Usu­

program, only 175 credit hours may be taken qualifying for financial

degree is enforced. Some financial aid programs (e.g., Washington State Need Grants) allow aid to be awarded a maximum o f four aca­ demic years. The maximum number of full-time graduate credit

hours that may be attempted is 48, and the maximum time-frame to complete a graduate degree is three years. Provisions to accommodate non-traditional, part-time students

have also been established. Undergraduate students who qualify for these provisions must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours each

academic year and achieve i1 degree within a maximum time-frame

of ten years (the maximum numberof credits allowable is 350). Grad­ uate students who qualify for these provisions must complete a min­

imum of 8 credit hours each academic year and ach ieve a degree

within a maximum time-frame of sl'ven years (the maximum number of credits allowable is 56).

The Registrar's Office evaluates the transcripts of credits submit­

ted bv transfer students and determines which credits are acceptable towa�d a degree at Pacific Lutheran Unrversity. Notification of the

number of credits yet to be earned and of the time-frame in which

financial aid may be awarded is communicated to students dUIing their first term of enrollment. The same procedure applies to aU con­

tinuing students who have never previously received financial assistance.

The following grades do not indicate successful completion of aca­ demic credit applicable toward a degree: E grades, I (Incomplete), W

(Withdrawal), EW (Unofficial Withdrawal, recorded by the regis­ trar), F (Failure). Any courses in which such grades are received are,

however, included in the maximum number of credits that may be

attempted (175) and are considered to be within the maximum time­ frame allowable for achieving a degree (five years). All credits eamed

by examinat ion,

which are accepted as applicable

toward a degree, will be included in the limitation on credits which

can be attempted while eligible for financial aid.

end of freshman year grade average is also a qualifying factor. Finan­

ally forty

(40) students are

selected as President's Scholars without

consideration of financial npp,;

ALUMNI MERIT AWARDS of $1,000 to $1,200 are given to excep­

tional students who are SOnS and daughters of PLU alumni/ae. To be

considered, entering freshmen must have a cumulative high school grade point average

of

3.5 or higher. Non-freshmen and renewal

candidates must have a minimum collegiate grade point average of 3 . 3 to be eligible. Financial need is 110t a de/erminillg factor and comple­

tion of a special application is recommended. Prospective freshmen

by April 1 to be considered. FACULTY MERIT AWA RDS of $1,000 annually are granted to

must also be offered admission

twenty-four (24) students who have completed 45 semester hours or

more at PLU and are not receiving any other merit award. No sepa­ rate application is requ ired. Faculty will recommend students to a

selection committee who will select recipients on the basis of scho­ lastic achievement, special talents, and unusual service to the

university.

PROVOST'S M E RIT AWARDS ranging from $1,000 to 51,200 are

granted to twenty (20) outstanding transfer students each year. To b(,

considered a student must have a 3 . 6 grade point average in at least

45 semester hours of college level courses and receive an offer of admission by April 1 . Preference will be given to students who will

complete an associate degree at an accredited community college (or

a comparable academic experience at an accredited four-year institu­ tion) before enrolling at PLU. A 3.30 grade point average earned ,1t PLU is required for renewal . No application is necessary.

AIR FORCE ROTC SCHOLARSHIP recipients (4-year, 3-year, or

2-year) may attend Pacific Lutheran University. AFROTC classes are

held at the Aerospace Studies DepMtment on the University of Puget Sound campus, about 20 minutes driving time from the PLU campus.


14 TALENT AWARDS are gra nte d to students with financial need who have exce ptional a bility in the fields of forensics, drama, art,

music, o r Jthletics. The candidate must make arrangements with the

school or department concerned for an audition and lor a personal

Mark 5alzm<1n Memorial J. P. CMlslwm Schuid�hip

Mcmorial

u1Ui.<; .lnd u:-nna Lamp �h(li.u.. hip

Gordon Pearson

W<ldl."r l-lindt·rlic Sc.hl..liarshlp Fund

gress of PJrcnts... TC,H:hcr8, i1nd Stud('nts

interview. In some cases a tape or film will be satisfactory. A recom­

\\-'a�h inl;ton StoltI..' Auhm)(lbill..' O("lil'r!o SchlllJrship

considered for a Talent Award .

GOVERNMENTAL GRANTS

mendation from a faculty member must be on file before a student is UNIVERSITY G RANTS are awarded in combination with loans and employment to students with fina nc ial need who do not qualify

for sch olarsh ip assistance.

Foreign Student Grants a re restricted to those foreign students who have provided their own resou rces for at least one year of attendance. Grants usuaUy amount to less than one-third of the cost of atte nda nc e.

MINISTER'S DEPENDENT GRANTS are available to unmar­ ried, dependent children of a resularly ordained, actit" minister or miss io na ry of a Christj,l n church. The minister's principal employ­ ment and primary SOUICe of income must be a result of church work. The minimum annual grant is $200 but this may be increased to 5700 if the eligible student h as a demonstrated financial need as deter­ mined from the Financial Aid Form. If a FAF is sub m it ted no special MDG application is req u ired . June 1 is th e deadline for requesting this grant. Requests received thereaiter will be honored only as budgeted funds pe rmit . ALUII.'lNI DEPENDENT G RANTS of $200 are given to full -ti me students whose parent(s) attended PLU (PLq for two semesters or mo re. To be el igi ble the alumni dependent must be a full-time stu­ d ent (1.2 credit hours per semester) and complete an application in

the Financial Aid Office. December 1 is the deadline for requesting

this grant. Requests R>ceived thereafter will be honored only as

budgeted funds permit.

G RANTS in the amount of $100 per semester sh al l be gi ven to

each of two or more fuD-time students from the same family attend­

ing PLU simultaneously, p rov id ed that the main support for both is from parents and provided they have not received any other univer­ sity grant or award. Married students are also eligible when both are full-time students. An application must be filed in the Financial Aid Office at registration or immediuteIy thereaiter. The grant will be credited after eligibility is established . In addition to its own scholarship funds, the university has at its d isposal the following restricted funds, generally awarded to those students who complete the regular a pplication and who have fin­ ished their ireshman yea r: Aid As�od,ll!()n tor luthl'rJn5 S(h{lIM�hips

rdl , \:orl h P�u:ifL(' [)i-"tri�l Schol,1tship

,\nwric,Jn Luthf'r,m Churrh S:hnlilr"hip ilnd Cran! !\'I('mori'll S(holilr.. hip hu

i\merican lulhL'rJn

Flnrencl' Spinner :\ndC'r$ClH

Progr,lm for Minority

.'\C;sc.x.,i.lled CrO\.�rS' St'hO].JTShip B.E.R.C. Minorily _ (hol .1 rsh lp Ruth ...... nl'Il!>01l Scholarship

(Jlt"-TOn l\-krit J-\w.lrd�

Irt'ne 0

CreSt) \-!torit J\\,·.nd D,wis Fund

Do()littk' 1vh'n,otiJI 5c:"hlll arsh i p

,\km0f1.,1 S<-llol.lr!l-hip Fund \If I\Un,lnd S(hol,n... hlp punJ F()ss Scholars.h i p (for l\'(}fwCgj,ln stud('nls) L (�. f'(J�s MeOl(irldl xhol.H�hip

L c i. f (rikson So:h ol'lNhip EKully

f:J i t h l.uthN,m Chur;:: h Henry

1- 1.1<1:; foundation

Olaf Hdhor�('n ScholarShip W. H . H<1 rd tkL! s..·mi nnry Student Scholarship

Fund

SUl.zan Ingram )\fcrn(1rial xh(lIMShip Fund

Karl Kili<..l n McmoriJI

Fund

William K i lworlh round.1thm SChlll.:JI""hJp

Ebb;:l

F\lnd

\1 l'lvi n Kleweno �...li!mtJri.:JI S(hoJ."tship Larson :\ursing Schlllar<;hip

tl ld\',� and CI.ua L.u!!on SChtllOlrship

W � hiding

louise ilnd Guy lcl'sman Memorial 5cholilr5hip \·Ir. <lnd \·Irs.

�()(>

Marchmd Mcmuri,tl

l�l�seT\'e Life

J nu' Co. Schola rs h ip

l i ndbl'rg Endowed Schnl.lrshlP

Sc h(ll.ush ip Fund

Lul hC'r.:m AT(llhcrhood u');al

I n,Su il

Lila \loe Sc holarsh ip

\·k .md

Mu{'n�

H. �ieman \icmuTlal SChOJ.lTShip

("h('r ;lfld

Nistdd

Mrs. Gus.

o

A'!t""5C",iltc:oi -Sh" kl')" ) Pin.... P.lrkJf' Sc h larsh ip

Ruge.r Paetcl l\1cml'ri.ll Sc:hnl<n:-.hlp �largilTet

pn

BI.1nchc I'LU

M{-mllnal Sdullarship

Women's Club Scholarsh ip

Reese M('moo.,1 �"hlllM!)h i p Dr Walter <md JO.1n R('dman �h.\,'indl Schol arsh ip Siqud,md 'buth Sc:holJrship (North Pacific Dj ... tnct

Skin fl('[ RlUndalion Scholarship !' nl

!='cholt1n-hip rund

£1.1\,ln olnd Idol Tingcbtad ,\1l'mc.-i;,1 S-:l'iulilr.;.hip EVL'lyn S. r{)r\'�nd SchDI,ln,hlp Oord $t<lngJ,lnd \ll'm(lrl,') �chft!M:oi h i p

Ellen \'dlll:: Ivkm!)riJI Sch()IMship

f.

Hoppe'r \1 t'lIlOri.ll Robert

Olson �'lemor�ll

i\_

1\"\('011. .1ri,,)

l- leJvig I\rthur \-1c.ml)ridl [.)oT1Jld

Arunner

the

Students

made at the beginning of the school year and at other times as vacan­ cies occur, The Federal College Work-Study Program offers only on-campus

Many students invest in their future by borrowing educational funds. Low interest, deferred loans make it possible to pay some of the cost of education at a later time. Loans are often included with gift assistance and work to form a financial aid package. There are three major sources of loans at PLU: NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT WAN (NDSL)-Eligibility is determined bv the PLU Fin.ancial Aid Office from the Financial Aid Form and is b.1sed on need. Most loans average S1,()()() annually, but cannot exceed S3,()()() for the first two years of school, nor an aggre­ gate oi $6,()()() for an undergraduate degree. No interest accrues and no payments on principal are necessary until six months after a reci p ie nt ceases to be a h al f-time student enrolled in an eligible insti­ tution. Simple interest is 5% during the repayment period. Up to 100% can cellat io n is ava il a bl e for teaching the handicapped or in cer­ ta in low income a reas. Repayment may be deferred because of fur­ ther full-tin1e study or service in the armed forces, VISTA, or the Peace Co r ps. Exit interviews are req uired by the Business Office upon leaving PLU or transcripts, grades, a n d · diploma are NURSING STUDENT LOAN (NSL)-A federal loan program

limited to students with need who arc accepted for enrollment or are enrolled in the School of N u rsing (usually not before the sophomore

Repayment begi ns one year aiter graduation. Partial or full cancel­ lation is possible un de r certa in condi tio ns .

K.llhryn

n ow m

There are employment opportu nities on campus and in the com­ munity that can help students meet college expenses. Priority for placement is given to those stud"nts who have demonstrated finan­ cial need and haw been awarded a work-study eligibility. Over 900 students work on campus each year, The university'& annual stu­ dent payroll exceeds $1,()()(),()()(). The average on-campus job approx­ imates ten hours per week, and produces around 51, 050 during an acade mic year.

is available, dependent on federal funding. Loans average $500.

Portland I\rea Alumni Sch()larship

5 m l l h J '. d

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

year). The NSL has provisions similar to the the NDSL. Up to $2,500

5t.:h()l.J�hip

..lum

a rsh ips pay for full tuition, books, fees, and supplies, and include a $l00!month stip end (up to $1,()()() pe r school year). Weekly classes are held on campus.

withheld.

\·l.lthcmatic,S Scholc'm.hip

Frt"d 0.

ARMY RarC SCHOLARSHIPS are available (three-vear or Iwo­ year) for students in all discip lin es and are not based on �eed. Schol­

LOANS

Comen:n Scholarship

Johns(1niLlrs()n Schola rship

require a separate application.

students must be eligible for work-study.

Chcll<''Y f-i.JUnddtion l:duc.1Iion.ll Sch()I<lrshlPS

Rev.

with specified need as computed from the Financial Aid Form are

submitted to the State for consideration. Present procedure does not

tions must be related to students' academic interests. To pa rt icip ate,

1-It.�nri('ll.l Button i\:un;ing Sc.h()I.)n;hip Fund

I rw i n Sch()IM�hlP

established by the Council on Post-Secondary Education, students

h

Bur . .daff �'Il'm(lriJI 5ch{)I.1�hip

Tnr)"

WASHINGTON STATE NEED GRANTS are available to eligible residents of the State of Was h ington who attend PLU. These grants are intended for students with high need. On the basis of guidelines

T e State Work-Study Program offers only off-campus work opportunitie� wi.th profit-making and non-profit employers. Posi­

B. Rurns hind

Cari nalk Ml'morial Sc:holtlrsh i p Fund

Idol ,\ .

stud en ts who have exceptional fi.nancial need. Grants range from 5200 to $2,000 per year. The SEOG must be matched with at least an equivalent amount of other kinds of aid (grant, loan , or employment). E l igibility is determined by Federal guidelines.

studv.

c holarshi p Fund

Dr. .md Mrs_ \'\'

SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS

(SEOG) are available to

employment. To participate, students must be eligible for work­

Sindt'r Memunal xhnl....r...hlp

Jorunn Bndland

THE PELL GRANT PROGRAM is a Federal prog ra m d es ig ned to provide the "foundation" for a financial aid package. It is intended for students w it h high financia l need. When completing the Finan­ cial Aid Form (FAF) applicants should indicate that the information is tu be used for dete rm in i ng their eligibility for the Pell Grant by checking the appropriate box. If the St udent Aid Report (SAR) you receive indicates eligibility, all three copies should be sent to the Fi nancial A id O ffice.

All stlldel1t placements for on-calllpus alld Ofj�cnIllPUS jobs nre handled by Career Services Office. Actual assignments for new students are

Al!en mQrc FoundJli(lll s-<�' hol;!r:r,hi.p /\lumni Schol.uship Fund

Wa5hin�ton Con

I.ulhl'r 1.('<lgUl')


15 GUARANTEED STUDENT WAN (GSL)-U nder this program, students may borrow from banks, fredit unions, and savings and loan associations. A separate ,'pplication procedure is required and forms are avail" ble from the PLU Fin a ncia l A id O ffice . Th e m ax i mum s w h ich ,1 student may borrow a re: . . . . . . . . $2,500 U nd ergTadua t e . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,()()(] Graduate. . Rep�yment of p r i ncipa l is d efe rred until six mont hs " fter a recipi-

ent ceases to be a half-time student enrolled in a n eligible institution. The interest rate is 8%; interest is paid by the Federal government \\lhile t h e recipient is attending school.

PLUS WAN -Th is is a non-need based loan for independent stu­ dents and parents of dependent undergraduate students. Payments are not deferred but begin within 60 days after the loan is disbursed. Not all states oirer this loan . Out of state students or parents should check with their nearest co llege or state higher education authorities to dete r m i ne if it is operational. If it is, an application must be o btained within the student'slparent" state of res i den c e. PLU's Fin a n ci al Aid Office has availablt> on ly the Was h ingto n St"te version . The current interest rate is U% and the amount of th e loan cannot exceed the student's c<»t of attend" nce minus other financial assist­ ance (including a Guaranteed Student Loan). An independent stu­ dent cannot have a Guaranteed Student Loan and " PLUS Loan at the same time. If the state or lending institution of the student or p are nt does not participate in the PLUS program, it is possible to borrow t hrou g h United Student Aid Funds (USAF). The m " xm, u m annual amount which a s tu d en t or parent may borrow ranges between 52,500 a n d 3, 000 .

Short term loans are available from various restricted PLU loan funds which include: Alumm /\ssoci.lIIon Lo.m Fund

I\ntun I\ndcr"on Loan Fund Jllhn S B<l\..er Lo<lO Fund I. P. l.lrlSlrOm Ml'mtlrial UMn

AmericJn Lutht'fJIl Chuf'C"h \wnu'n U.l,lO fund

Lily C. Eke-rn Fund

r-und

Ddt,l K.lppol Gamma St ud('nt I.(\')n Fund Manl' I lulh

l.o.m

Fund

Gerhard Klrkl·bo �'kmtlriill

U.MIl �und 510a �'1t"nl(ln<1I SIUth'nl

J. P Pfhll'gt'T Student 1.(1,10 Fund o J. ,tucn Alumni loJn f.und

jCclncl tl' Ols(}n �l>ianJ T'aul-Miq,lm

u'<ln fund

\'\'illncn's ('Jub of Til(l)m,J f{l'yohin;; uXln Fund

o A . nngl�tJd LO.1O Fund

Vl'rnc. Graham uMn Fund

VETE RANS AFFAIRS AND VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

Pacific Lu t h e ra n U ni vers i ty has bee n a pproved by the State Approving Agency as o n e of the qualified institutions which vet­ erans may attend and receive benefits. Veterans, widows, and chil­ dren of deceased veterans who wish to inquire about their eligibility for benefits should l'Ontact the Regional Office of the Veterans Administration, Federal Building, 915 Second Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98174. Students should gain admission to the university before making ,'pplication for benefits. Students a re en couraged to regis ter at the university's Veterans f\Hairs Office before each term to insure con ­ tin uous r;,ce i pt of benefits.

Costs TUITION

Pacific Lutheran Un iversity bases its tuition on a Cost Contain­

ment Plan (CCP) wh ic h provides for a maximum of 35 credit hours for the 1985-86 academic year at a cost of $6535. This can be broken down by terms as foUows: Full-time students (those taking 1 0 or more hours in a regular semester (fall or spring) will be charged $3050 for 10-15 hours pl u s 5H!8 (or each hour in excess of 1 5 . For interim full-time students (those tak i n g 4-5 h o u rs ) will be ch a rge d 820 plus $ 188 for e ac h hour in ex ce ss of 5. These ch arge s (for t hos e who stay within the blanket range of 10 - 1 5 hours for fa ll and spring and 4-5 hours for interim) if totalled by se.mester equal $6920. To reduce th is total to th e CCP m,lXimum ra t e of $6535 fur up to 35 hours, an adjustment will be app l ie d to the student's accou n t . Thi s ad j u s tme nt will be i n the form of il Te r m Load Flexi­ b il i ty (TLF). Term Load Flexibility (TLF) is an adjustment which al lows for any combination of regular hours during the aCildemic year up to 35 hours, for a maximum charge of 56535. This adjustment (if applicable) will 'how on the account after the 10th day of spring semester. Example #1 Credit Hours Tu ition Ex ce ss H o u rs TLF Adjustment Total:

$6535

Example .2

Fa l l

5

13 53050

5820

-0-0-

-0-

$3050

Sp r ing

Interim

;-

Fall

-0-

$820

Interim -0 -0 -

17 53050

;-

5 376 (5 761)

$2665

Spring 18

Graduate Students and NurSing Students (those for ma l l y acce pted to t h e School of N u rs i ng ) will be ch a rged at the rilte of 5198 per credit hour ilnd am not eligi bl e for the Cost Containment Plan or the Term Load Flexibility adjustments. Part-time Students ( 1 -9 credit hours per s e mes ter) will be charged at the rate of S l98 per credit hour and are not e li gi bl e for the Cost Containment Plan or t h e term Loa d F l e x ibi l i t y ad j u st m e nt s . Special Course Fees: A few s p eC ial i ze d courses, e . g . , Physical E d u cat io n, An, and Private Music Lesso ns, require the payment of il spcciill course fee.

ROOM AND BOARD

The u niverSity requires that all single full-time ( 1 0 or mare semester hours) students room and board on campus unless the student is living at home with parents or legal guardians, is 2 1 years of age o r older during the clIrrcnt sCmt'Stcf, o r h a s senior sta­ t",; (90 semester hours). A l l exceptions to this policy must be addressed to the Res i denti a l Life Office. Food Service is offe rin g three board plans for fall 1985 .1Ild spring

1986.

Plan #1 is full bOi1 rd-20 mea l s per week (breakfast, lunch and dinner 6 days a n d brunch a nd dinner on Sunday) " t a cost of 5730 per semester. Plan #2 is lunch and dinner 7 days a week at a cost of 5675 pe r se mest e r. Plan #3 is break!"ast, lunci, and dinner, Monday through Friday at a cost of 5625 pe r s e mest e r. D u ri ng interim 1986 ( i n January), onl y PI" n #1 will be offered at a cost of S100. Thnse not on campus d u rin g interim should deduct the $100 board cost from the exa m pl e s below.

Credit Hours Tu i t io n Excess Hours TLF Ad j u s tm e nt

$3050 5 376 -0-

-o-0-

S 564 (S 505)

$6"35

S3426

$-0-

$3109

ROOM AND BOARD COST

Spring

Fall Room S SOb Fitll Room $ 730 Fall Board Fall Board Interim Board $ 100 Interim Board Spring Room $ 695 Spring Room Spring Board $ 730 Spring Board

To ta l :

Example #3

17

15

Credit Hours Tuition Excess H ou rs TLF Adjust m e nt

53050 -0-0-

Total:

$3050

$6535

Interim

Fall

4 $820 -0+

53050

15

53050 -0 -

-0-

(S 385)

$R20

S2M5

PLAN # 1

Total:

PLAN # 3

PLAN # 2

$3055

Total:

S 800 Fall

Room

$ 675 $ "100 $ 695 $ 675

Fall Board

52945

Total:

S BOO

$ 625 Interim Board :;; 100 Spring Room $ 695 S p ri n g Bo a rd $ 625 52845


16 Meals are not provided during Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter vacations. The interim bOMd cost will be charged only if a student is on campus during January. Commuter students are encouraged to eat meals on campus and may select one of the above plans (.,n , #2, or #3) or may select lunches onlv at a cost of $245. Single ro� ms Me limited and cost an additional S100 or $65 per semester. Students moving on campus for spl"ing only pay the fall room rate. A limited amount of family student housing is available. The two- and t hree-bedroom u n i t s cost approximately 5 1 50 per mon t h . A damage deposit of $ 1 00 must accom pany a reservation for family student hOUSing. Applications m<1y be obtained from PLU Residential Life Office.

OTHER SPECIAL FEES Student Parking-Permit Required Student Health and Accident InsuRlnce (premium varies by coverage and is optional) Credit by Examination (Department Exam) Educational Placement Fee (School of Education graduates)

No Charge Approx. $1 1 9 (full year) $49.50 per credit hour $25

PAYMENTS

A student's registration for classes indicates that the student understands and agrees to accept the responsibility for and legal obligation to pay all costs incurred or to be incurred fm the stu­ dent's education. Such costs include, but are not limi ted to, tui­ tion, rOom and board, fees required for certain specialized courses, and other special fees which may be assessed from time to time. Although the student's parents or legal guardian may serve as co-signer with the student. the student remains primarily responsible and legally obligated to Pacific Lutheran University. The un iversity, in turn, agrees to make available to the stu.dent certain education(1) programs and the use of certain un iversity facilities, as appl icable and as described in this catalog. A stu­ d"nt's failure to pay university bills shall release the university from any obligation to continue to provide the applicable educa­ tional benefits and services. Such benefits and services include, but are not limited to, statements of honorable dismissal, grade reports, transcripts of records, diplomas, letters of recommenda­ tion, pre-registration, admittance to c1,1sses, housing i n the resi­ dence halls, and the use oi u n iversity faci!.ities. Under certain circumstances, the university may apply student paychecks to u n paid balances. Mail payments with remittance (statement CDpy o r coupon) to PLU, Box 1356, Tacoma, WA 98401 , or deliver payments to the PLU Busine-s O ffice in the Hauge Administration Building, Room 1 1 0 . Checks should b e made payable t o Pacific Lutheran Un ivergity. The ,t1,dent's name and account number should be included on the check. VISA and MasterCard bank c�rds are accepted. I n d i­ c,lte card type, account number, tmd expiration date if transaction is done bv mail. Please do not mail c<1;;h . A discount rate, which is periodic ;lIy adjusted, will be charged against Canadian funds.

FINANCIAL AID Scholarships, grants, talent awards, and loans awarded by PLU Financial Aid Oifice and outside aid (from iraternal organizations, high schools, churches, etc . ) sent directly to PLU, are credited to the student's account in the following manner: leialf of all awards l a rger than $100 arc credited to pach semester. (Example: A 5700 scholarship will resuit in $350 being credit('C! toward fall and S350 for spring semester.) Awards oi 5 100 o r less will be applied to one semester only. Students aTC required to sign for their Natlon,, 1 Di"rect Student Loans a n d Nursing Student Loans in the Business Oifice at the beginning of each semester. Cuaranteed student loans obtained through banks and other lending institutions wiiI be applied in total when received after th,' prop"r endorsement oi the check by the student a t the Business Office. Students who secure part-time e.mployment as pelrt of their financial aid ",ccive monthly paychecks. These paychecks may be applied to unpaid balances. Recipients oi iinancial aid must report all outside awards to the Financial Aid Office. I f actual t u ition amount is less than estimated O n the financial aid ,'ppli<:il­ lion Or aw,ud notice, the aid package may be reduced.

PAYMENT OPTIONS 1 . Payment Beiore Term \legins 2 . PLU Budget Plan 3. Semester Installation Pl,1n 1,

PAYMENT BEFORE TERM BEGINS

Early registrants will be sent a pre-billing of charges and credits. Early payments afe encouraged, tll1d thus(' who pay carly may q"ualify for LUTE BUCKS (coupons redeemable at the PLU Bookstore).

For students who select this option, payment i n full is due before the beginning of the term (fall-September 10; interim-Janu ary 6; spring-February 5). Financial clearance (paid in full) is necessary for ID cMd validation. Registration is subject to cancellation if tui­ tion and fees are not paid.

2. PLU BUDGET PLAN This plan allows ior paying selected educational expenses on a monthlv installment basis without interest. Selected educational expens � s are estimated for the entire academic yenr clnd p,lid in equal installments as follows: a . Full Year Budget Plan-May IO through April 10 b. Hali Yea r Budget Plan-May IO t h rough October ]() (summer and fa\ I ) ; November 10 through April 10 (interim and spring) A Bu dgtt Plan Agreement can be obtained from the PLU Busi­ ness Office and is not valid until signed and approve d . The total amount of financial aid awarded (eXcluding expected earnings irom Work Study ,)nd Washington State Need Grant) can be deducted in arriving at the monthly installments. If a student is a financial aid reCipient, the amount of t u i tion estimated on the Budget Plan Agreement must correspond with the amount of tui­ tion estimated by the Financial Aid Office. Act ual ciass registration w h ic h results in lower t u i t io n may require a reduction in financial aid offered. Those applying for the monthly payment option after May will be charged a 2% per month late ch arge and must pay the back pay­ ments. If d u ring the academic year actual costs vary from the origi­ nal estimate, monthly payments will be revised upon notification of the Business Office. Monthly payments received after the five­ day grace period will be a�sessed a 2% per month late charge. [f a payment becomes delinquent for thirty (30)days, a student may be denied admission to classes, or the university may withhold grade rep()rts, transcript of records, or diplomas. 3,

SEMESTER INSTALLMENT PLAN (SIP)

The Semester Lnstallment Plan requires a 25% minimum down paym ent. The balance rc'maining (plus finance charge") is divided into three (3) monthly installments, due by the 15th of the month (Fall-October 15, November 15, Dece mber 15; or Spring­ March 15, April 15, May 15). If the interim is to be included with spring semester, payments are due February 15, March 15, and April 1 5 . If payment is received after the 20th of the month, a 510.00 late payment charge will b.; assessed in addition to the regular finance charge. In order to qualiiy for the Semester Installment Plan, all prior balances must be paid i n iuIl. Applications for the plan must be made by the tenth day of the semester, and the 25% minimum dOwn payment must accompany the "' pplication. A larger dO\-\in payment can be made and would reduce the finance charges and monthly payments. Upon receipt of the Semester In;;taIlment Plan application with the down payment, a promissory note and payment coupons will be mailed to the address indicated on the applic.1tion. The signed promissory note must be returned to the PLU Business Office. .. *The jillallCt' charge is dcft.'rrllillcd at the dale Ihe 110te is 17csotiafcd l1IU'i i5 sci (/t 4 ');, abozoe 'ileal'eras e yicld of the 26-week U.S. Treasliry Rill.

ADVANCE PAYMENTS New students pay a $ 1 00.00 advance payment in order to final­ ize their offer of admission. For fall acceptance this is not refund­ able after May 1 (December 15 for interim; January 15 for spring semest"r). AIl returning students who wish t<l reserve a rOom the foIlowing year Or I,.vho ilfe receiving financial aid must make a $100.00 advance payment. This ,) dvance payment is applied to the semes­ ter's costs, when appropriate, and is refundable u n t i l J u ly 1 . Students wiIl not be permitted to finalize registration a s long as any biJi remains unpaid.

REFUNDS If a student drops a single cI,bS or completely withdr,'ws from the term during the first two weeks oi the fa.II <lr spring semester, a fuIl tuition refund wiIl be given. The Adva nce Payment is not refunded. A 10% per day charge wiIl be assessed fOr complete withdrawals during the third and fourth week. No refunds ,1fe available after the f<lurth week for complete withdrawals or after the second wel,k of the term for dropping individual courses. In the event of a with drawal from interim during the first week, a full t u ition reiund will be given . No refund is available after the first week. Residence hall and board rdund;; will adhere to the terms of the Residential Life Contract. A prt)-rilta board refund will be made for necessary withdrawal from the university. Board refu nds mtlV be considered for meals olisscd due t o wo � king, but will not b � made ior nny u niversity trips, such as choir, band, orchestrd, athldics, dnd St) forth . Notice of withdrawal must be made in wr iti ng to the registrar <If Pacific Lutheran University, and recei,'ed before the deadlines giwn above. Oral requests are not acceptable.


17

"The quality of Iiie cult ivated and fostered w i t h i n the un iversi ty

is ,1Il e s senti al co nl po n en t of t h e a c ad L' m ic com mun ity. The envi­

Ca mpu s residence h,'lls are small . They are organized into co m ­ mun ities in

which each individual counts as a perso n . New

ronment produced is conducive to a life of vigorous and creative

knowledge shared with friends in the residence halls takes on a

sch o l ars hip. It

very perso na l meaning. Men and women

,lisa reco gnizes that l ibe ral education is for the t o t al person ilnd that a comp iC' me nta ry rel at io ns hip exists between stu­ dents' intellectual development and the satislaction oi their other individual needs. I ntera ction with pe rso ns 01 d iile ring lile styles, "pplication of classroom k no wled g e to p erso n a l goals a n d as pir a ­ tions, and non-academic expe ri e n ces are all inva l u able and vital components oi e duc at io n ilt PLU. In a t i me when t h ere is a need ior m e aningfu l communi ty. the campus facilitates genuine rela­ t ion sh ips among members of the uni ve rsi ty from diverse reli­ gio us. racial. ,lnd c u lt u ra l backgrounds. All of the services and facilities provided are i ntended to complement the a ca d emic pro­ gr,lm. The s erv ic e s provided reflect changing student needs, a n d the opportun i t ies lor s t u d e n t pa r t iCi pati o n include vi rt u al ly all aspects of the u ni ve rsit y. Individual attent ion i s given to every stu­ dent c onc e r n in clud ing a viHiet)' of specific services outlined below.

CAMPUS MINISTRY Pacific Lutheran University by its very nature is a pl<1Ce for the inter,lction between studies and the Christian faith . O pp or t u n i ­ ties for the mutual celebration of that faith on campus are rich a n d divl,ns(>.

C h a pe l worsh i p is held Monday. Wednesday. and Friday m o rn­

ings d u ri ng each semester lor all who w is h to participate. The Uni­

versity Congregation meets in reg u l a r worship and celebrates the Lord's Supper each S un day. Pastoral services of the u n i vers i t y

pastors are available to all students who desire them. Several denominations an d religious g rou ps have organ izatio ns on campus. and there are numerous student-initiated Bible study ,ln d fellowship groups. The Campus Mi n istr y Council, an elected student and faculty committee. coordinates these activities in a s pi rit 01 openness and mutual respect .

RESPONSIBILITIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE

IVithin any community certain re g ul at ion s a re n ece ssa ry. Pac ific

Lu t h e ra n

U n i versi ty ado pts only those st a ndards believed to be reas o n a bly necessary and admits students with the expec t a t io n that they will comply with those standards. All members of the u n ive rsit y community are ex pected to respect the rights and i n t eg­ rity of ot h ers . Conduct which is d e tri m e nt a l to students. lacu l t y, staff. or the u ni ve rsity. or which vio l ates local. state, or lederal laws. may be grounds for sanctions or lor dismissal. The U l livCI'sity

bt"Vcrages ml campus }wu rs whell studellis lIlay have visilors of the opposite sex Iheir residence hall rooms. The Si u dell i Handbook contains the Code

prohibits tile possession or cOtlsumption of alcoholic

alld lilllits the

ill Of C,,"dllet for all stude nts .

ORIENTATION Students are introduced to un ive rsi t y Iile d u ring a three-day ori­ entation before the beginning of the fall semester. In addition. s ho rte r orientation sessions are held before the interim term in 1<1I1uar)' and beiore the spring semester. New s tu de n t s arc inv i ted

to pa rt ic ip a te in an o pt i on a l pre-co lle g e workshop during the summer.

ACCESSIBILITY

The u niversity complies with Section 504 01 the Reh ab ilit a t io n Act and p rovi de s p rog ra m access i bi lity to students with h " nd i­ caps and lor disabilities. Coordination of services is h a n dl e d by the associate dean ior student life.

RESIDENTIAL LIFE

Re s id en ti al l i v i n g i s a n in tegra l part 01 the educational process at

PLU and the residence ha ll s were constructed with that i n m i n d .

U n ive rsi ty pol icy reflects the commitment to the residen t i" l con­ cept. The university requires that all single full-time (10 or more semester hours' students room and board on campus unless the student is living at home with parents or legal guardians, is 21 years 01 age or older during the current semester, or has senior status (90 semester hours. . All exceptions to this policy must be addressed to the Residential Life Office. As a re side n t ia l campus, Pacific Lutheran University offers stu­ dents a valuable experience in community l i v ing. The univerSity recogni zes the importance of non-<:lassroom activities in p rovi d ­ ing an education ior the whole person . The aim of resi de n t i a l l i v ­ ing is to he l p students grnw p ers ona lly. socially, cult ur,'ll y. and religiously.

01 many bac kgroun ds

and cultures live on campus; therelore. students in residence have a u n iq ue

opportunity to broaden their cultur<l l horizons.

The u n i vers ity cares about t he q u a l ity of life on ca m p us . The

g u a l it y of lile and enhance the learning process. Th<' university oilers students high-quality housing opportunities i nc l uding student leaders hip experiences. formal and informal programs, and peer associa­ tions. The student gover n in g bodies are strong and actively parti­ c ip a te in improving the program . A s e l ect ion o f modern. attractive halls. each with i t s o w n tradi­ tions and unique ad va ntage s. offer students the opportunity to es t ab l is h a comfortable l i vi ng pattern. All halls include inform al lo u nge s. s t u dy rooms. recreation areas. and common kitchen and laundry lac il i t ies. a t tractive and comfortable residence halls e nr ich the

Most

01 the ha lls are co-educational. Although they are housed

in separate w i ngs, men and women in cooed halls sh a re lo u n ge ilnd recreation facilities and common residence government, and

particip at e jointly i n all ha ll activities. All-men's and all-women's halls are reserved for those who desire this type oi living experience. Further information re ga rdi ng residence halls can be obtained from the Residential Lile O l iice. I n addition to housing lor single stud e nt s, the u n iversity main­ tain s a limited n umber 01 apM tm e nts un campus for family stu­ dent housing. Two and three-bedroom u nits are available. A ppl ica t i o n for these a pa r tm ents can be made through th e Ollice of Residenti" l Lile .

ACTIVITIES PLU annually registers over 50 academic and non-academic organizations, clubs, soc iet ies , clOd interest groups, which te.stifics to the d ivers ity of campus co-curricular lile. Soc i a l action, reli­ gious, and political orga. nizations; interest and sporting clubs; and service, p rofes � ionat and ac ad e mi c societies are among the options irom which to choose. A complete l i st i ng of recogniz ed clubs and their office rs is maintained at the U nivers ity Center Ollice.

ADU LT STUDENT SERVICES

The O ff ic e for Adult Student Services p rov ides p ra c tica l assist­ ance to s t u d e n t s over 25 and fills the gap for students whose age . multiple commitments, and distance from the c a m p us separate them lrom the mainstream of u niv ersity life. I n formation for greater accessib i l it y to student support services such as pe rso nal and career c ou nse l i ng, orientation. sp ec i al facilities. and health care programs can be obtained lrom the office. An Adult Student Resource Center is located in the U n iversity Center.

PROGRAM FOR COMMUTING STUDENTS Over 1 . 000 PLU students commute to the campus d a il y. Every ef ior t is made to assure t hey enjoy the same well-rounded univer­

sity ex per ien ce as those in residence. F irst- ye a r students should make a spec ia l effort to participate in the orientation program. The student gove rnme nt (ASPLU) sponsors a committee to as sis t those who do not reside on cam p u s and welcomes students desir­ ing to p ar tiCipa te. Specia l facilities in clu d e mailboxes located in the University Center for all lull-time commuters and a day lo unge opera tion in the Cave lor study an d a pl ace to bring or buy l u n c h . O ff-c a mp u s students are en cour a ge d to participate in the varied and f req u e nt activities programs available to a l l students.

ENVIRONS

The university's geog ra ph ica l sett ing aifords the student a wide variety of (x)th recrea tion al and cultural entertainment options. Recreation any, the grandeur of the Pacific Northwest co untry encou rages participation in hiking, c a m ping, climbing. skiing, boating, and s wi m m ing . The most c ons p icuo us natural monument in the area is 1\'1 1 . Rain ier. I n addition to Rainier, the dist i nc tiv e realms o f the Cas­ c" de and Olympic mountain ranges and lorests 01 Douglas Fir complete one of the most na t u ra l l y tranquil e nv i ro n me nts in the United States.

Students can also en j oy the aesthetic offerings 01 ne a rby Se" ttle and Tacoma. These city cen t ers host a va riet ), 01 performing and recording arts ,l nd provide dozens of gal l er i e s and museums <lS well as unique shopping an d dining ex periences .


18 STUDENT SERVICES The Health Service retains the full-time services of a physician's assistant and a registered nu rsE', and the part-time services of a nurse practitioner and tv..o registered nurses. A physician is avail­ able for consultations and referrals. Services av" ilable include out­ patient health care, alcohol counseling and referral, laboratory tests, contraception/pregna nc)' counseling, and health education. All students ar l'ntitled to use the Health Service.

Health and Accident Insurance is available to students on a va/­ Imlan/ basis. The Group Accident and Sickness Medical (xpc'nse

Plan provides coverage 24 hours a d ay, 12 months a year, any­ where in the world. This pliln is available at fall, interim, or spring registriltion only. A broch u re outlining the program is ilvailable from the Student Life Office. International students are required to have this insurilnce coverage. The Counseling and Te sting Center assists students to cope w i t h developmental issues. Trained and experienced psycholo­ gists and counselors and a consulting psychiatrist offer grou p and individual counseling. A variety of interest inventories and psy­ chological tests are. available to dssist students with career plan­ ning, educational ddjustment, and personal problems. The Minority Student Programs Office coordinates a special program which seeks to provide continually for the academic and social needs af minarity students. Supportive services include academic and personal counseling, admissions assista nce, schol­ arship and financial aid assistance, book fund, and convocation

programs.

The International Student Office provides for the various needs of foreign students. Support services include orientation ta the U.S. and PLU, the f·lost Family Program, a liaison with immi­ gration offices, counseling, and advising the International Stu­ dent Organization . Food Service, o w ned and operated by Pacific Lutheran Univer­ sity, is ,wadable to .111 students, faculty, staff, and their guests. Stu­ dents living on campus Me required to take their meals in one of t wo cafeterias. No deductions are made for students eating fewer than t h ree meals per day unless a conflict exists due to work. I n case of ,1 conllict, a student must contact the Food Service Office i n the niversity Center t o obtain approval for a deduction. Students with special diets, approved in writing from a doctor, can in most cases be accommodated by contacting the dietitian. This service is provided at no extra cost. Students living off-campus arc encouraged to select one of the two meal plans offer�-d. One plan provides 20 meals per week, 3 meals per day Monday t h rough Saturday and 2 meals on Sunda)'. The other plan provides lunch only Monday t h rough Friday. Stu­ dents may sign u p for either plan at the Food Service Office. The Food Service operates two coffee shops. One is loc,lted on iovvcr campus in Colunlbia Center dnd the other is located i n the U niversity Center. A discounted meal card is available at the Busi­ ness Office and is designed t o be used in either coffee shop by students. Visitors may Cut in any of the facilities. Only till' coffee shop in Columbia Center is open during vaca­ tion periods. Scheduling Services are maintained i n the University Center. All un iversity activities must be scheduled through this office. Scheduling student activities is d joint responsibility of the Uni­ versity Center d i rector a n d the U ni v e r s i t y Scheduling Committee. Student Government is an integral part of student activities at PL U. The associated students elect a sen,lte to govern their affairs

and oversee a n extensive committee progrllnl that involves hun­ dreds of students in actively planning progmms and representing student opinion on various university boards and committees. PLU Bookstore is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran Uni­ versity for the benefit of students, facul ty, and staff. The bookstore sells the textbooks and supplies that are required or suggested by faculty members for their courses. Additional reading matter, sup­ p l ies, gift items, greeting cards, clothing, film processing, toilet­ ries, and other convenient items are also c1vail''lble. The Career Services Office provides a program of career devel­ opment and life planning. Students are ilssisted in making choices among their Life and work options, during their education and after graduation, t h ,\,ugh conferences with profeSSional staff, workshops, seminars, c1nssroom and residence hall present,l­ tions, and materiJls availc1bl� in the C(1reer Resou rce Center.

STUDENT EMPlOYMENT

The Career Planning and Placement Office coordinates . , 1 1 stu­ dent part-time employment (including CuUege Work-Study and off-campus Work-Study jobs), " nd lists part-time and fuli-time employnwnt opportunities, both on and off campus. The office also lists summer jobs, local and nation-wide. The office stari assists students and alumni in developing job search techniques (also faculty and staff by special arrangement). The office coordi­ nates an off-campLls interviewing schedule of recruiters from industry, business, government. and g raduat e schools.

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES Policies and procedures a t the un iversity are intended to main­ tain an orderly educational environment conducive to student learning and development. In order to ftllfill institutional respon­ sibility and at the same time follow procedures that are fair, consis­ tent, and protective of each person's rights, appropriate grievance procedures have been established. If a student has rcason to believe that an academic o r administrative action is unjust. capri­ cious, o r discriminatory, these procedures are (lvailable for the �tll­ d e n t to seek redress. In situations involving alleged grievances against faculty or aca­ demic administrators, the procedures of the "Academic Grievance Procedu re" shall be followed. The grievance officer to contact i s t h e director o f t h e aCildemi.c adviSing a n d assistance center. I n situations involving a.lleged grievances against administrative staff or any other non-faculty u niversity employees, the proce­ d u res of the "Student Administrative Grievance Procedu re" shall be followed . The grievance officer to contact is the associate dean for student life. Copies of each grievance prOCl'dUft:' (He available for review at the office of the respective grievance officers.


19

vzszng •

The university expects that all students, at one time or another, will need assistance in planning academic programs consistent with their needs and goa ls . To help students make their initial adjustment to the academic load at PLU and to p rovid e occasional counsel throughout their academic careers, the u n i ve rs ity has established a network of fac u lt y advisers and a n Academic Advis­ ing and Assistance Center.

FACULTY ADVISERS All stude.nts in degree programs have facuJty advisers w hose overall responsibility is to guide academic progress. In their work with individual students, advisers have the assistance of person­ nel in a number "f student services offic es : the Acad emic Advising and Assistance Center, the Career Services Office, Counseling and Health Services, the Minority Student P rog rams Office, the Campus Minist ry, the international student adv iser, and resi­ dence hall directors and resident assistants. General Advisers: At the time of entry, each student is assigned a general adviser on the basis of matching student and advise.r interests. Students who wish to ex pl o re the general curriculum before deciding on an interest area a re a ssign ed to exploratory advisers. Those who have definite inte.rest areas are assigned to illtcrest advisers. During the first semester, an advising file for each student is sent to the adviser, and a Cold Book, the student's official record of aCa­ demic progress, is issued to the student. Major Advisers: Upon formal declaration of a major, students are assigned major advisers to repl ace their general advisers. Major advisers g u ide students' progress toward their chosen

degree goals. Since their ac ad em ic needs and interests may shift or change during four years of college, students are a llo wed to change advis­ ers as may be a pp ro priate or necessary, u si ng a simple adviser change for m . Students and advisers are expected to meet regu­ larly, though the actual mLmber of meetings will vary according to individual needs. Minimally, three m e etin gs are required during the freshman year and one each year thereafter, though all stu­ dents are encou raged to meet with their advisers as often as seems necessary or usefu l .

ACADEMIC ADVISING AND ASSISTANCE CENTER The Academic AdviSing and Assistance Center provides a num­ ber of academic resources ior students: 1. tlltorillg by twined upper-division skills counselors is available for most lower-division courses; 2. st lJlill skills are taught either on a one-to-one basis o r i n non­ credit mini-courses; 3. group help sessiolls in several su b j ect areas are scheduled on a daily Or \·\,cekly b(lsis each s e mest e r; 4. academic eowlse/illg by AAAC administrators and skill coun­ sdors assures responsive and pe rson a l assistance with aca­ demic problems. Students may also find u p-to-date information on PLU pol ic ies, procedures, and programs in the AAAC. The office is open Mon­ day through Thursday from 9:00 a . m . until 10:00 p. m . , Friday from 9:00 a . m . until 5:00 p . m . , and S u nd ay from 2:00 until 10:00 p. m .


20 •

mzc

Structure COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Division of Humanities English Languages Philosophy Religion

Division of Natural Sciences Bi ol ogy Chcmistrv E,uth Sci e nu.-s lv1athematics and Computer Science Physics and Engineering

Division of Social Sciences Anthrnpology

Economics Historv Politic,; 1 Science Psychology Social Work and Marri,1ge a nd Family Therapy Sociology

SCHOOL OF THE ARTS Art CnmmuniCt1tion Arts 'vlusic

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SCHOOL OF EDUCATION SCHOOL OF NURSING SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES

DEGREES OF FERED Bachelor's Degrees B,1(helor of Arts Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Arts in Education Bachelor of Fine Arts Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Science i n Nursing

Master's Degrees of Arts in Computer Applications of Arts in EduGltion of Arts i n Social Sciences of Business Administration of M usic M,1ster of Public Administration Master of Science in Computer Science

Master �11aster Mi;lster �aster :vI,1ste,.

MAJORS AVAILABLE BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A.) A nthropulogy Art Biology C h e mistry Classics Comm unication Arts (Broadcasting, Interpersonal Communic'ltion, JOllrn<1iism, Theater) Computer Science Earth Sciences Economics English F ren ch

Germclll

History Le g,,1 Studies Mathemlltics 'vltlsic Norwcgi'l H Philosophy Phv�ical Education/Recreiltion (Administr,1tion, Progr,' m m i n�, and lherapeutic Concentrations) Phvs ic s Po litical Science P syc hol ogy Religion Scandinavian Area S t u d ies Social Work Sociology Spanish


BACHEWR OF SCIENCE (B. S.) Biology Chemistry C om pu ter Science Earth Sciences (Geology Speci<llty) Engineering Physics Engineering Sc ience (3-2) Mathematics Physical Education (Exercise Science and Pro-Therapy C:oncentrations) Physics

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (B. A.E.) Concentrations in: Art B i o l o gy Business Education Chemistry Commu nication Arts Earth Sciences Economics English French General Science Cerman Histon' Langu:lge Arts Mat hernatics Music Physical Education Physics Political Science Scandinavian Studies Social Science Sociology S pani sh S pecial Education

BACHEWR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (B.B. A.) Concentrations in: Accounting

Finance Human Resource Management Management I n formation Sys te ms \1arkciing Operations Management

BACHEWR OF FINE ARTS (B.F. A.) Art Communication Arts (Broadcasting, Theater) Music

BACHEWR OF MUSIC (B.M.) PillI10 Performance Organ Performance Vocal Performance Instrumental Perfurmance Theory and Composition Church Music

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (B. S.N.) Nursing

COMPLEMENTARY M AJOR

G l oba l St ud ie s

MINORS AVAILABLE Anthropology Art' Biology Business Administr,ltion Chemistry Communication Arts I n terpersonal Communication Theater Dance Com put er Science Earth Sciences Economics Education Reading Learning Resource Specialist Special Education Electrical Engineering English Literature Publishing and Printing Arts Writing French German Global Studies Greek History I nJorm(ttion Science IAl t i n Legal St udies Mathematics Norwegian Philosophy Physical Education Aquat ic s Coaching Dance Health Education Phys ic s Political Science Psychology Public Affairs Religion Sociology Spanish Statistics 'pending final approval, fall 1 985


22

Procedures REGISTRATION The normal course load for full-time students is 13 to 17 hours per semester, including phys icill educatio n . A normal student load during the interim is four hours with a maximum of five hours. The minimum semester load for a full-time student is ten hours. Only a student with a "B" (3.00) averag" or higher mill' register for more than 17 hours per semester withllut the consent of the provost . A stu d e n t engaged in much outside work fo r se lf-s uppo r t may be restricted to a red u ced academic loa d .

In t h e spring semester, �tudents w h o plan to return in t h e fall (lre encouraged to pre-reg-ister. Students must register for each new semester on the designated days and are not officially enroli<'d until their registration has been cleared by the Business Office and their Place of Residence forOl has been processe d .

COURSE NUMBERINGS 100·200 lower Division Cou rs es: Opcn to f reshme n and so ph­ omores'" u n le ss o t herw ise res t r ic t ed . 300-320 Interim Course s 32 1 -499 Upper Division Courses: Generally open t o j u n io rs and seniors unless otherwise specified. Also open to g radua te stu­ dents, and may be considered part of a g raduat e progr<lm pro­ vided they ,Ht.' not s p eci f ic requirements i n preparation for graduate study. SOO-599 Gr" duate Course s : No rm a ll y open to graduate stu· dents only. Upper division students may be permitted to enroll with the permission of the chair or dean of the academic u n it offer­ ing the course If all prereq uisi tes have bee n met ond the student has an (lbove-.lVefage academic record. * U pon approval of t h ei r adviser and course instructors, lower division students may be assig ned to upper division courses if prereq u is it es hllve been met.

COURSE OFFERINGS

:v1 0.51 listed courses are offered every yeilr. A system of alternat­ ing upper division courses is practiced in some departments, the reby assuring a broader curriculum. The university reserves the right to modiiy specific course requirements, to discontinue classes in w hich the registration is regarded as insufficient, and to withdraw courses.

EXPLANATION OF SYMBOLS Nfost cou rs es havE' the value of 4 sem es te r hours. Parenthetical nu mbers immed i a tel y after the co urse de sc riptio n s indicate the semester huur credit given . Other symbols are explained as follows: - Course offered first sem es ter II - Course offered second semester I , I I - ourse offered first and second semester in sequence I I I -Course ofiered either sem es t er S - Course offered i n the sU lll mer a/y- Course offered in alternate years als - Course oiiered in alternate summers G - Course may be used in graduate p rog ram s

EARLY REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR FRESHMEN Well in advance of ani"ol on c a m pus for the fi rst s eme st e r, a ll acc e pt ed freshmen are sent registl'ation materials. Most students have the opportu nit y to WOrk personally with an adviser as they plan their schedules. A limited number of students register by mail, and their course selections arc verified by a counselor. Early registration for new freshmen occurs during June or Janu­ ary, depending on whether students begin in the fall or spring semester. Early registration is coordinated by the Office of Admissions.

COURSE SELECTIONS FOR FRESHMEN Students should be t ho ro ug h l y <1cquainted with all registration materials, including the current c" t al og and special information sent by the Ad mi ss i ons O fiict'. It is i m por t a n t also to study the requirements oi all a ca d e mi c programs in which one may eventu­ ally declare a major. First semester freshmen are advised to plan a class schedule that does not excee d 16 credit hours. A normal first semestPr schedule will include three courses of 4 credit hours each, plus one or two of the following: physical education activity course (1 credit hour),

music ensemble ( 1 credit hour). or a choice from among several 2 credit hour courses. (NOTE: Unless otherwise stated in the cata­ log or class schedule, most courses arc valued at 4 credit h ours . ) In order to insure appropriate a ca d e mic progress, freshmen should pl a n to take an interim course in January and to complete a total of 32-35 se me s t e r hours du r i ng their first year. The following will illustrate several first-ye,,, credit hour loads:

(1) (2) (3) (4)

Fall

IlIle;'i,1l

Spr;'lg

4

15 14 15 15

13 14 15 15

5

4 5

TOML 32 33 34 35

The number of credit hours taken mlly vary from YC,lf to year, usually within a range of 30 to 34. However, in order to complete the 128 hours rC'll uired for gradua tio n within four years, a n averag" of 32 credit hours il year i s n eces s,l r y. I . PLU docs /lol II£1ve pll rlicu/ar ,Oll lSes wllicll are reqllired of all fresll­ Illeli. Gencr<1l un iversity rCl]uircmc-nts, includin g il core curricu­ lum (Core I or Core II), must bc' com plet ed before graduatio n . The E ng lish wri t i n g requirement must b e fulfilled before t he s en io r vea r. 2. Siudents are respollsi/J/e for selecling Ilreir courses. Counselors and fa culty advisers are a l wa ys available to assist with planning and to make suggcstlons.

3. Sludmls lVlware sure of tJldr lIlajor sllould be careful 10 include tlrose courses which insllre COJPII'IefioH of that majvr withi" [cHir years.

Some departmc.nts or schools have prerequisite courses which must be taken beiore entering upon the major program itself.

4. Students who arc lIIu1ecided ahout their lltajor course vf study slwlIld lake Ille 0!'l'0rlllllili/ 10 expl"re optiolls. A good way to begin is to take some courses that meet gener(ll un i vers ity or core requiTe­ !nents while selecting several others for explo ra t i o n of sp ec ial interests.

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION Students may add or drop a cl,lSS with f ull ref u n d duri ng the first two weeks (lfter a d,lSS hilS begun. Necesscuy form!; are ,waila­ ble at the Registrar's Office. Students may officially withdraw from a class ,liter the first two weeks by obtaining the instructor's Signature on the change form. The grade oi W will appear On a student's gra d e report and transcript. Stud,'nts may also completely withdraw for medical re a so n s . Written evidence from a p hysic ia n m u st suppo rt u m ed ical with­ drawal. The grade of WM will appear on a st ud e n t 's g ra de report (l n d transc rip t. An unofficial withdrdlVal from a course will be recorded as E. No stu d en t may w it hdra w during final eXllminntion week. I n courses that are completed beiore the normal ending date of 0 term, no student milV withdraw after the final examination has been administere�i.


23 3.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE TERM

4.

obIig.,tions have been satisfied.

Students are graded accord ing to the following designations:

4.00 grade points per hour, credit given A 4 . 00 grade points per hour, credit given A - 3.67 grade pOints per hour, credit given B+ 3.33 grade pOints per hour, credit given B 3.00 grade points pe.r hour, credit given B2.67 grade points per hour, credit given C + � 2 . 33 grade points per hour, credit given 2.00 grade points pCI' hour, credit given C 1.67 grade points per hour, credit given o 1 . 33 grade points per hour, credit given o 1 . 00 grade point per hour, credit given 00.67 grade point per hour, credit given E 0.00 grade points per hour, no credit given. A� =

EXCLUSIVE PASS-FAIL COURSES Departments or schools

111 ,,)' offer courses

in which only pass­

with appreciations,

value commitments,

creative

=

courSes are reported to the provost and this fact is made known to

=

students before they register for these courses.

=

university requirements u n l ess they have been approved as such

=

by the faculty. Taking exclusive pass-fail courses in no way affects

Exclusive pass-fail COurses may not be used to meet major or

the student's personal pass-fail option.

CLASS ATTEN DANCE

=

The univerSity assumes that all registered students have freely

=

accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance.

The grades listed below a re not used in calculating grade point averages. No gr(lde points are earned under these designations. -cr(>dit given (Honors); used only for courses unique to interim - credit given (Passing) - no credit given (Failure)'

I

- no credit given ( I ncomplete)

IP

- no credit given (In Progress; applicable only to certain

300-320 interim course is not recorded on the tran­

script nor is the registration recorded. ind icate that students haw been unable to

complete their work because of circumstances beyond their con­ trol. To receive credit a n Incomplete must be converted to a pass­ grade

WITHIN

THE

F IRST

SIX

WEEKS

OF

THE

l'OLLOWING SEMESTER. Incomplete grades w h ich are n o t con­ verted by removal are changed to the grade indic" ted by the instructor when the Incomplete is submitted. Medical Withd rawal ( W M ) is given when a course is not com­ pleted due to medical GIUSC. The WM does not affect the gr" de point average. In Progress (I.P) signifies progress in a course which normally funs more than one semester to completion. In Progress carries no credit until replaced by a pcrmanent grade. Any course Illil)' be repeated by a n undergraduate student . The higher of the two grades earned is used in computing the cumula­ tive grade pOint average, but credit toward graduation is allowed only once.

the succes s of any academic activity, as well

on the fundamental principle of absolute honesty. The univerSity, therefore, expects all its fac ulty and students to honor this princi­ ple 5crupulously. Since academic dishonesty is il serious breach of the u n iversally recognized code of academic ethics, i t is every faculty member's obligation to impose appropriate sanctions for any demonstrable instance of such misconduct on the part of a student .

ACADEMIC PROBATION Wa rning slips may be given to any students who are doing

"0"

or "E" work at the end of the sixth week. Students shall receive an academic warning i f they fail to keep their current grade point ,lVerage (immediately preceding semes­ ter) at or above

2.00. Stude.nts shall be placed on academic proba­

tion with transcript notation if two consecutive terms are below

2.00.

Students are placed on academic probation with transcript nota­ tion if the), fail to keep their grade p()int average (cumulatively) at

or above 2.00. Students receive official notice of such action. Pro­

The instructor of a 300-320 interim course will indicate in the cat­

alog description which of two grading systems will be used: l . Honors (H)-for exceptional work; P�ss ( P ) ; Fail, no credit-the

(H

{)r both.

The enrollment of a student on probation who fails to earn a c u mulative average of

2.00 by the end of a prob" tionary semester student mily apply for reinstatement

is terminated. A terminated

by submitting a letter of petition to the Registrar's Office and

INTERIM GRADING SYSTEM

and

I'

do not affect the

grade point average.)

2 . The regltlar letter grades: A,8, C . 0,E. (Such grades contribute to the grade point average.) Students in a "regular letter-gr�de" course mal' usc one of their four pass-fail options.

PASS-FAIL OPTlON FOR UNDE RGRADUATE STUDENTS The pass-f,'il option permits students to explore subject areas outside their known abilities and to add a broader range of courses without being forced to compete with m" jors who are specializing in those orcas of study.

1 . The pass-fail option is l imited to a tot<11 of four courses (16 hours) and to no more than two Cllurses (8 hours) per academic year.

2. A student mal' exercise the pass-fail option in no more than two courses (8 hours) taken to fulfill gene r.,l university or core requirements and the foreign language requirement of the Col­ lege of Arts and Sciences. Other courses required for gradua­ tion in a degree program ma), not be taken under this option except for a first course that has been taken before a declaration of a major.

.1I1d

ext-ra�curricul(1r activitil!s

0 grade submitted by instructor

EW = Unofficial withdr<1wal, recorded by the registrar (ell uiv<1lent to an E in (illculation of the grade point average)

registration will not be recorded .

ACADEMIC HONESTY

bationary '!'tudents may be advised to reduce their academic or

Registrar's nutations: NG -

evaluated accordingly. Absences

as of the ent ire ih:ademic enterprise, have depended for centu ries

W M - no credit given (Withdrawal/Medical)

(1) grades

is

instructor.

Both the value

- no credit given (Withdrawal)

Incomplete

the total closs experience and

may lead to a reduction of a student's final grade. In the event of

ASSignment of make-up work. if an)" is at the d iscretion of the

courses whose work t'.xtends beyond a regular term)

in a

(1nee as a whole, which normally includes regular participation in

tesy, as well lUi in their own best interest, to inform the instructor.

AU - no credit given (Audit)

failure

Course grades reflect the quality of students' ,lCademic perform­

unavoidilble absence, students are encuuraged clS a matter of cour­

I' F

ing

Pass-fail students are responsible for all course work and

achievements, or the like. Decisions to offer exclusive pass-fail

=

A

5.

semester.

=

=

The pass-fail option agreement MUST be filed with the instruc­

concerned

-

W

graduation.

fail grades are given. These courses should pursue goals primarily

=

H

through E

examinations.

THE GRADING SYSTEM

-

0+

t·)r NO LATER than eight weeks after the beginning of the

form. Students are entitled to honorable dismissal from the uni­ versity if their record of conduct is satisfactory ,u1d if all financial

grades shall be regarded as "pass," whereas

the grade point average; but credits earned count toward

TO THE STUDENT'S ADVA NTAGE TO WITHDRAW OFFI­ example, one semester to one year) may obt�in « leave of absence

-

grades shan be regarded as "filiI." Pass-fa il grades do not alter

withdrawal form from the Office of the Registrar. IT IS ALWAYS CIALLY. Students withdrawing for a specified period of time (for

In courses taken under the pass-fail option, only A + through

C

Students wishing to withdraw from the term must obtain a

securing a faculty sponsor. The pet ition and sponsorship letters are submitted to the l'ac ulty Committee on Admission and Reten­ tion of Students for action. A student whose petition for reinstatement has been denied may apply for readmission after the expiration of one semester u n less informed otherwise.

ELIGIBILITY FOR STUDENT ACfIVITIES Any regularly enrolled, ful l-time student (ten hours) is eligible for participation in un iversity activities. Limitations on a student's activit ies based upon academic perfurmance may be set by indi­ vidual schools, departments, or organizations. A student on aca­ demic probation is not eligible for interscholastic competition and may also be advised to curtail participation iD extra-curricular activities.


24 CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENlS

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

Freshmen: students who have met entrance requirements. Sophomores: students who have satisfactorily completed 30 hours. Juniors: regular students who have fulfilled lower division requirements and have satisfactorily completed 60 hours. Seniors: regular students who h,we satisfactorily completed 90 hours. Graduates: students who have met ent rance requirements and have been accepted into the Division of Graduate Studies. Non-Degree Undergrad u" tes: u ndergraduate students who me attending part-time but are not officially admitted to a degree program . Non-Degree Graduates: graduate students w h o a r e attending part-time but are not officially admitted to a degree program.

Students are permitted, within limits, to obtain credit by exami­ nation in lieu of regular enrollment and class attendance. No more than 30 semester hours (7 courses) may be counted toward gradu­ ation, whether from the College Level Examination Program or any other examination. Exceptions to this rule for certain groups of students or programs may be made, subject to recommendation by the Educational Policies Committee and approval by the fac­ ulty. Credit by examination is open to formally admitted, regular status students only and docs not count toward the residency requirement for graduation. Arrangements for departmental credit examinations must be made by students with respective departmental chairs Or deans. Evidence of approval and of payment of the fee should be pre­ sented by a student to the instructor who admin isters the examination. The various schools, divisions, and departments determine the specific CLEl' examindtions which may fulfill requirements for majors, programs, or general univerSity requirements in their respective academic areas. These examin.ltions are subject to rec­ ommendations by the Educational Policies Committee and approval by the faculty. The minimum passing level for CLEP ex<lminations taken at Pacific Lutheran University is the fiftieth pe n:::e ntile. CLEP credits granted by other universities, colleges, and com­ munity colleges, which are earned before entrance, arC honored by Pacific Lutheran University. The application of those credits toward majors, progranls, and general university requirements is consistent with school, division.ll, and department policies and standards. The un iversity does not gra.nt credit for college level GED tests

HONORS HOllors at Ent rance: These honors are conferred at Opening Con­ vocation on the most highly quaJiiied entering freshmen. Certifi­ cates are mailed in early May to high schools for presentation to recipients. The granting of Honors at Entrance recognizes out­ standing high school achievement and anticipates superior per­ form.lIKe at the university level. These awards have no monetary value. Gradllatioll HOllors: Degrees with honors of ClIlI1 lallde, mag"a C/lII/ laude, and summa cum laude are granted. A student must earn an average of 3 . 40 for Clllll iallde, 3 . 70 for lI1aglla ClIl1I la/ltie, and 3.90 for 5111111110 culll iallde. Physical education activities are not included in the determining of honors. /-/ollor Societies: Election to the Arete Society is a special recogni­ tion of a student's commitment to the liberal arts together with a record of high achievement in relevant course work. This aca­ demic honors society was organized in 1969 by Phi Beta Kappa members of the faculty. The society's fundamental purpose is to encourage and recognize excellent scholarship in the liberal arts. Elections for the society take place each spring. Both ju niors and seniors are eligible for election, although the 'lualifications for election as a j u nior ane more stringent. The faculty fellows of the SOciety conduct the election after careful review of academic tran­ scripts according to the following criteria. Students must: attain .1 high grade point average (for seniors, normally above 3 . 70; for juniors, nonnaJiy above 3.90); complete 110 credit hours in liberal studies; demonstrate the equivalent of two years of college work in for­ eign language; and complete one year of college mathematics (including statistics or computer science) or have taken an equivalent amount of high school math and college science. To be eligible for election, students must have completed a mini­ mum of three semesters in residence at the university. The un iversity has chapters of a nu mber of national honor societies on campus, including the following: Alpha Psi Omega (Drama) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Administ'ration) Mu Phi EpSilon (Music) Pi Kappa Delta (ForenSics) Ullderg raduate Fellowships: A limited number of Undergraduate Fellowships are d\.varded annually to outstanding senior students with a view to encouraging recipients to consider college teaching as a career. An undergraduate fellow is given it variety of opportu­ nities to sample the professional life and work of a facul ty memb.. r in his or her major discipline. A tuition credit accompanies the appointment. Illdividllalized Majo r for Special HOllors: Supervised by a faculty committee, this program offers junior and senior students (with a grade pOint average of 3.30 or above) the opportunity to develop and complete a personally-desig'ned, interdisciplina ry, liberal arts major. Approval of a faculty sponsor and the Faculty Honors Council are requ ired. The plan of study must includ .. a clear topi­ cal rationale, an integrating final project, and significant work beyond regular courses, e . g . , comprehensive examination.s, inde­ pendent study projects, interdisciplinary senior thesis. Successful completion of an approved study plan warrants the B . A . degree with Special Honors. •

INFORMAL STUDY To encourage liberal learning of all kinds, over and beyond e n rollment in courses leading toward formal degrees, the unive.r­ sity offers a variety of opportunities for informal study : Guest of Ulliversity Status: Teachers and officials of other institu­ tions, visiting scholars and artists, and other professional persons who wish to use un iversity facilities for independent study may apply to the provost for cards designating them as Guests of the University. Such persons, in their use of facil ities, wil l defer to the needs of students and faculty members. Auditillg CO" I'ses: To audit a course is to enroll, with the permis­ sion of the instructor, on a non-credit basis. An auditor is encour­ aged to partiCipate fully in class activities but is not held accountable for examinations or other written work and does not receive a grade. If the instructor approve�, the course may be entered upon the transcript as "Audit." With the approval of the instructor or the department, the student may gain credit for an audited cou rse by passing an examination set by the instructor or the department. The fee for such examination is the difference between the auditing fee and the tuition the student would pay for the course. Visiting Classes: Members of the academic community are encouraged to visit classes which interest them. No fee is charged for the privilege. Because regularly enroUcd students must be given first consideration, persons desiring to visit classes are required to ask permission of the instructor. Visitors are guests of the classes and must conduct themselVeS accordingly.

GRADUATION Students expecting to fulfill degree re'luirements WITHTN THE ACA DEMIC YEAR (including August) are required to file applica­ tion for graduation with the Office of the Registrar by October 1 . There are four degree-completion dates (end of fall semester, interim, spring semester, and second summer session). Degrees are formally conferred at December, May, and August commence­ ments. Statements of completion are issued upon re'luest to stu­ dents who 'lualify for graduation at the end of the interim. The actual date of graduation will be recorded on the permanent records. Students who plan to transfer back to Pacific Lutheran Un iver­ sity for a degree (math, physics, engineering programs) must apply for graduation before or during the first semester of their junior year SO that deficiencies may be met before they leave campus. Attendance at commencement exercises is expected unless the candidate is excused by the provost .

SECOND BACCALAUREATE DEGREE A student may be awarded two d ifferent bachelor's degrees simulta neously, provided that at Ie.1st 28 additiollal hours are earned for the second degree. A total of 156 acceptable hours are required for two simultaneous bnccalaureate degrees.


25 GENERAL UNIVERSI1Y REQUIREMENTS T h e u n i vers i ty is committed, in p r i nci ple as \\'ell as h istor ica lly,

to providing a s tro ng liberal arts b�se for all its baccalaureate de gree progmms. Accordingly, in a ddi t io n to f u lfi ll ing certain s pec ified req u ire men ts, all u n d e rg rad u " te st u dents m u s t sa ti s fac ­ t o r i ly compl e te a core c u rric u l u m . SPKIHED REQUI REMENTS 1 . WRITING (4 hours): Eng l i s h 1 0 1 or an equi va l en t pro s e wri t i ng course. Students should fuHill this requirement ea rly, p refe ra ­ bly in their first or second se m e ste r.

2. PHYSICAL E DUCATION (4 hou rs) : Fo u r I-hour a c t ivi ty

3.

4.

5.

6.

7. 8.

co u rs es, i ncl udi ng PE 100. On e hour of credit may be earned through approved sport s participation. All activities a re grad e d on the basis of A, Pa ss, or Fail . INTERIM (8 hours): O n l y courses n umbered 3()()-320 sa t i s fy t h i s req u i rem en t . ,Ju n ior and senior transfer students need to co m plete only 4 ho u rs from 300-320 interim courses . The c om p let io n of a minimum of 128 semester h o u rs w i t h ,I g rad e po in t averag<' of 2 . 00 ( 2 . 50 in the S c hoo l s of Business Administration and Education). The co mp l e t ion of a minimum of 40 s e m est er hours from courses n u m bered 32 1 or above. At lea s t 20 of t h e m i n i m u m 40 se m e s t e r hours of upper divi s io n work mll�t be taken at PLU. The co mp l et i o n of 32 of the final 38 se m est e r hours in residence at PlU during the senior yea r. (S pec i a l p rog mm s s uc h ,I S 3- 1 a n d 3-2 a re excluded . ) The co m pl eti o n of a major a s det" i led by ea c h school o r dep.ut ­ ment. At lea st 8 semeste r hours m u s t be t,1ken in res idenc<' . The com p l e t io n of all c o u rses counted toward a m aj o r or a mino r with grades of C - or higher and with a cumulative grad e p oi nt average of 2.0 or higher in those courses. Depar t me nt s, divisions, or schools may sct high er grade req ui re m e n t s.

LIMITATIONS-ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES

1 . No t more th.,n 40 h o u r5 earned in onl' de par t me n t may be a p p l i ed to t h l' B . A , ur B.S. d e grc(l , I n t e rim c o u r� es �1r e exce pted . 2. Non-music majors may c o u nt t o \V,l rd g rtldu at io n re qu i re men ts not mon..' than 8 s e me ster hours in music ense mbl es . 3. A maximum of 24 ho u rs in accredited con'espo n de nce or exten­ siun studies mil}' be crl'dited toward degree req u i rement s, con­ tingent on a p p ro val by the regist rar. 4. A maximum of 64 hou rs will be accepted by transfer from a n accred ited co m m u ni ty college.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT All candidates for B . A . or B.s. degrecs must complete one of tluee op t ions involving a fo reign l anguage or specified tlitcrnlltivc. See under College of A rt s and Sciences.

INTERDISCIPUNARY READING AND WRITING AT PW

Pacific Lutheran UniverSity is cl co m m u ni t y of schol tlrS , a com­ mu n i t y of readers and w ri te rs . Rea ding info rms the in t ellect a nd l i berate s t he im agi n a tio n . V\'riting pervades our ac" demic Iives ')5 teilchers and students, both as a way of co m mu nicat i ng what we learn and as Cl meilIlS of 5 h.Jping thought LInd ideas. Our emphasis on l iteracy begins with courses designed to fulfill the university writing requirement. courses in which students learn tn use various kinds of academic and personal writing, to read different kinds of texts more effectively, and to organize the po",ers of clear thought and expression. The university's commitment to excellent writing is reflected in The Writing Center, where trained student consultants from a variety of disciplines help students of varyin g abilities by reading and re spond i ng to papers still in draft. All facu l t y members share the r esponsibili ty for improving the literacy of their students. Fac ulty in every department and school make writing cln essenti,11 part or their courses and show stu d ent!) how to ask questions appropriate to the kinds of reading done in their fields. Students write both formal papers and reports <1nd informal notes and essays in order to m aster the content and methods of the various diSCiplines. They arc encouraged to pre­ pare important papers in multiple drafts. Because errors are a distraction and a synlptom of carelessness in all d iSCiplines, students in all courses are ex pect ed to obse rve the conventions of formal English in their finished work. But liter­ acy is more than (orrc'etness. At Pacific lutheran Un i versi ty rcad­ ing ,1nd writing are part of the process of liberal education .

CORE CURRICULUM: ALTERNATIVES CORE I (DISTRIBUTIVE CORE) A RTS/LITE RATU RE (8 hours)-4 hours from each l i n e :

I. Ar t, M u s i c , or Communication Arts-Any course from Art or Music except those in te a ch i ng methods; on ly the fol lowi n g in C o mmu nicatio n Arts: 1 5 1 , 162, 241 , 250, 359, 363, 364, 458. 2 . literature -Any literature course from E ngl ish Or L..1 ng uages . ( E ngli s h courses in w r i ting, language, an d p u b lishi ng do not fulfill this requ i remen t . ) NATURAL SCIENCES/MATHEMATICS (8 ho u rs) -4 hours from each of two lines: 1. C he m i s t ry, Phy sics , Engi nee ri ng, a n d N atural Sciences. 2 . B io l ogy, Earth Sciences (exce p t 1 0 1 ), and Natural Sc i e n ce s . 3. Mathematics (except 1 0 1 ) and Co m p u t er Scie nce . PHILOSOPHY (4 h OLlfs)- An y P h i l oso phy course except

1()(), 1 2 1 ,

and 233. ( H o we ver, 226, 323, 325, 326, ,1 nd 328 c o u n t toward ful­ illlment of this requirement only w he n paired with 225; 341 , 342, and 343 coun t onl)' whe n taken in addition to 225 or 233 . ) RELIGIOUS STUDIES (8 hou rs )-4 hours from each of two l i n es :

1 . Biblical S t u d i es - Any of the follo w ing :

1 1 1 , 2 1 1 , 212, 330, 331 ,

332.

H i st o ry, an d Expe rience- A ny of the fol­ lowi n g : 1 2 1 , 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 360, 361 , 362, 363, 364,

2 . Christian Thoug ht, 365, 366, 367.

3. I nt e g ra t i ve a n d C o m pa rilt i vc Rel igio us S tu d ie s- A ny of the fol­ lowing: 1 3 1 , 231, 390, 391, 392, 393. ( Ad d i t io n <1l c ou rs es t hat re l ate religion to oth er t op ics o r d i sc iplines and are approved tll meet t hi s req u i rement will be Iistcd in the t i me sch ed u l e . ) J u n io r a n d senior trilnsfer students nec'<i t o complete o n l y 4 hours (one course from lines 1 or 2). SOCIAL SCIENCES (8 hours) -4 hours from eilch line: 1. Anthropology, History, and Politicill Science. 2. Economics, Psyc. ho logy (exce p t 1 1 0 and 1 1 1 ) , Soc ia l Work, and

Sociology. TOTA L : 36 hours, 9 courses.

CORE II (INTEGRATED STUDIES PROGRAM)

A coherent p rogram of i n terd isc ipl ina ry courses that ex pl o res il ce n tral theme-THE DYNAMICS OF Cl IANGE. 1 . SEQUENCE I-THE IDEA OF PROGR ESS (2 courscs, 8 h ou rs ; normillly tilken in the fres h man ye(lr ) . IS 1 1 1 Na t u re ond Supernature IS 1 1 2 From Finite to I n fi n i t e 2. TWO OF THREE 200-lEVEl S EQ U E I\ CE S (2 cou rses each, 4 total; 1 6 hours) I A N RESPONSIBILITY (Courses i n the SE Q U E N C E 1 1 - 1- 1 2205) IS 221 The Expe.rienCl' of War IS 222 Prospects for War dnd Peace LS 223 The Emetgcnce of Mind and :vJorality IS 224 The B rai n, Consciousness, and Transcendence SEQUENCE l I l - WO RD A N D WORLD (Courses in the 2305) IS 233 I m a g ing the Self IS 234 I m agi n g the World S E Q U E N C E rv-TECHNOLOGY AND THE ENVIRON�IE T (Courses in the 240s) IS 24 1 Energy, Resources, and Pollution IS 242 Pop u l "tion , Hunger, dnd Poverty IS 243 Technology and Comput e rs IS 244 Computers and Models 3. CO ClUDING SEMINAR: IS 351 (I course, 4 hours) TOTA l: 28 hours, 7 courses For course descriptions and further details, see the I n tegr"t e d Studies Progr"'" section of this catalog. A brochure is available from the Ofiice of Admissions, the Office of the Registrar, or the program coordinator (Provost's Office). Core I rrqlliwlIl'lIls m�y be met by certain Core II ('OlI rses: Arts/Literature 1 . IS 233 2. IS 1 1 2, 233 Natural Sciences/Mathem"tics 1 . or 3. IS 234 1 . IS 24 1 -242 together 2. IS 223 3. IS 243-244 togetl"'r Philosophy

IS 1 1 1 , 223, 224, 22 t-222 togethe r Religious Studies 2 o r 3 . IS 1 1 1 , 22 1 -222 together, 24 1-242 to gc th e r 3. [S 234

S oc i al Sci en ces 1 . IS 1 1 2, 221-222 toge t he r, 241 -242 tog"ther. 243-244 t o geth e r 2. IS 224, 241 -242 together Sec course descriptions for information about which Co re I requirements a given Core II COurse may fulfill.


26

Anthropology A nthropology as a discipline tries to bring all of the world's peoples into human focus. Though anthro­ pology does look at "stones and bones; ' it also examines the politics, medicine, kinship, arts, and religion of peoples and cultures in various places and times. This makes the study of anthropology a complex task, for it requires an understanding of many disciplines, from geology and biology to art and psychology. Regardless of the specific area

that is studied, the essence of anthropology is the observation of differ­ ent peoples and cultures-studying them as they reaUy are instead of how people think they are or should be. It is through this detailed study of aU people that we gain the full picture of what it really means to be human.

Anthropology is composed of four fields. Cultural or social anthropology studies living human cul­ tures in order to create a cross-cultural understand­ ing of human behavior. Archaeology has the same goal, but uses data from the physical remains of past cultures to reach it. Linguistic anthropology studies human language to discover what it can tell about the human past and behaviors in the present. Physical anthropology studies the emergence and subsequent biological adaptations of humanity as a species. Anthropology at PLU provides students with a well-rounded backgro und in the field which they can use in the business, governmental, and aca­ demic worlds.

Klein, Chair; Guldin, Marchetti, Rasson. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 34 semester hours, incl u d i ng ! O 1 , 102. 103, 480, 490, and one cou rse from th os e numbered 330 to 345, one course from those nu mbered 350 to 395, and 8 a dd i­

tional hours.

MINOR: 1 8 semester hours, including 102, 101 or 103, 4'10. one course from those nu mbered 330 to 345, and on e course from those numbered 350 to 480.

210

GWBAL PERSPECTIVES: THE WORLD IN CHANGE

A s urvey of glob,'1 issues a ffect i ng the human condition in a rap­ idly changing and increasingly interdependent world: modernj­ zation and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resuurces; war and revolution; peace and jus­ tice; and cultu rell diversity. These iss u es are examined in a multi­ diSCiplinary light using case studies drawn fro m non-Western and Western nations. Emphasis on the de vel op me nt of a global per­ spective w h ich recognizes h u ma n commonalities as well as diver­ s ity in perceptions, values, and pr iorities . (Cros s · referenced with !-lIST 210 and POLS 210) (4)

220

PEOPLE OF THE WORLD

An exploration of the world's cultures through a nthro po l ogica l films, no vels , and eye-\vitness accounts. Case studies chosen f ro m Africa, Native Am erica, Asia, the Pacific and Euro-Anlerica pro­ vide an insider's view of ways of life different from o u r o w n . (2)

230

PEOPLES OF THE NORTHWEST COAST

s urvey of the ways of live of the native peoples of co"sta! Wash­ ington, British Columbia, and Southeastern Alaska from Euro­ pean cont,1(t to contem por",y times. Of s pecia l interest are the traditional methods of fi s hing arts, potlatches, status systems, and wealth and their m i pact on the modern life of the region. (2) A

,

240

PEOPLES OF EUROPE

A s u r vey of c o nte mpora ry social liie and customs in E u ro p e, from City-dwellers to peasants, examining the bmad historical, po liti­ cal, ethnic, economic, and religious p 'tt e rn s that tie E urope an c u i · t u re s to ge th e r (2) ,

.

JEWISH CULTURES

A survey of Jewish cultures of the past and present in a vari ety of s etting s including Poland, Morocco, and China, as well as Tacoma and New York. Jewish et h n ici t y and identity will be relat ed to q ue stion s of assimilation, Jew/Gentile relations, and nationalism with a focus on the Jewish communities of Eastern Europe, the U. S . A . , and Israel. E m pha s i s on religion, history, literature, music, and humor as reflections of basic Jewish cultural themes. Films and guest speakers will complement class lectures and dis­ cussion. (2)

330

CULTURES AND PEOPLES OF NATIVE NORTH AMERICA

A comparative study of Native North American cult ures from their arrival on the continent through today. Stress on traditional societies, their h i s to ry under colonization and their emergence as vital contempnrary societies. Examination of U.s. and Canadian laws, policies, and conflicts, includi ng land fishing c1"ims, issues of sovereignty, ilnd religi o u s righ t s (4)

COURSE OFFERINGS EXPLORING ANTHROPOWGY: MONKEYS, APES, AND HUMANS

.

Introduction to physical anthropology with a s pec ia l focu s on hu man evolution, the fossil evidence for h um an development, the role of culture in human evolution, and a co mpa ris on with the development and social l ife of the non-human p ri ma te s (4) .

102

EXPWRING ANTHROPOWGY: ARCHAEOLOGY AND PREHISTORY

Introduction to the ideas and practice of arc h a eol og y, used to examine the sweep of human p rehis t ory from the ea r l iest stone tools to the d evel o pment of ag r ic u lt u re and metallurgy and to enrich our u ndc.rstanding of ext inc t societies. Local archaeological sites will be eXamined. (4)

270

FACUIIY

101

103

EXPLORING ANTHROPOWGY: CULTURE AND SOCIETY

Introd uction to social-c ultural anthro p ology and cultural linguis· tics, concentrating on the ex plora t ion o f the infinite variety of human endeavor in all aspect s of culture and all types of societies; from tool ·m a k ing to lang uage, religion, politics, law, warfare, fam­ ily kinship and art; from hunters and gath e rer s to indus­ trialists. (4)

332

PREHISTORY OF NORTH AMERICA

334

THE ANTHROPOWGY OF CONTEMPORARY AME RICA

An archaeological reconstruction of ec o nom ic, social, political, and r elig io u s life in North America from the time the first settlers entered the continent d u ring the lee Ages to the Mound Bu ilders of later times and ultimately to the first contact with Eum pean set· tlers. (4)

An investigat ion of A m e rica n social patterns and problems designed to g iv e insights from a cross-cultural perspect ive; explo­ ration of American solutions of co m m on human problems; educa· tion, religion, politics, fa mily and concepts of j u s t ic e ; a determination of what is u niq u e about the "A merican Way." (4)


27 340

CULTURES AND PEOPLES OF ASIA

of South, Southeast and East Asia with an emphasis on the c u l t ural patterns (social, religious, k i n shi p, pol itic al , and eco­ nomic) of the region; concentration on the civilization centers of India and China and their elfect o n s urrou nd i n g peoples; the role of Asian peoples in a cont em po ra r y setti ng. (4) Survey

345

CHINESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY

An immersion into the Chinese world-v iew, culture and societv­ to ex po sin g the student to the way of life fo r on e-guart e ; of h u mani t y; Chinese cult ure, both traditional and contemporary, including fol k religion, family life, h u m a n relations, politics, social

490

SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOWGY

Selected topic in co n tem po ra r y anthropology to

be

i nvc'stigatcd

through student research and consultation. Required of maj o r s a n d minors in their j un io r or senior year. Prerequ isite for other students: departm en t al e.onsen t . all' (2)

491

INDEPENDENT STUDY: UNDERGRADUATE READI NGS

geared

R ead ing i n specific areas or issues of ,' nthropology under super­ a faculty member. Prerequisite: de p ar tme nta l consent . ( 1-4)

structure; Confucianism and Communism; the People's Republic, H o ng Kong, Ta iwan, and the Overse.ls Chinese. (4)

492

350

WOMEN AND MEN IN WORLD CULTURES

A n ove rvi ew of the vil ri a t ion of sex roles and be havi o rs t h rough­ the world ; evol u t io n of sex roles; theories of matriarchy, patri­ archy, mother go dd ess es innate in eq u alities; i mpa c t of European patterns in the world; ma rriage patterns from polygyny to polyan­ dry; egalitarianism to fem inism. (4)

out

,

355

TECHNOWGY IN CULTURE

and meaning of technolngy, crafts, and art ifacts in the world's c u l t u res. Investigation of technology in the cont ext of cu l tu re, including the symbolic and artistic wo rl d of tradit iona l tec h n ol ogie s Exploration of how cultures create the worlds th ey i n h a b i t a n d change their social and natural worlds through time. Students will be en c o ura ge d to work with a s pe c if i c teChnique or tech n olog i cal aspect of J culture. (4) A study of the use

.

360

ETHNIC GROUPS

nature tif et h n i c groups in America and ab ro ad ; the varying bases of dhnicity (culture, religion, tribe, " race," etc. ); problems o f group identity and boundary mainte­ na nc e ; e th n ic sy mbo ls ; et h n ic po l i t ic s; ethnic neighborhoods; and ethnic h umor. (4) A n examination of the

365

ARTIFACfS AND ARCHAEOLOGY

interpretation uf archaeological m cl t e r i cl i s . Tech niques interpreting pa st h u m a n tech n ology and ecology. Re p l ica tion of the s te ps of manuf(lcture, usc, zmd discard (If tools; analyti­ cal procedures for ceramic, bone, sto n e cl nd met(J1 artifacts; analysis of debris from foo d processing activities; the US" of com­ puters t() .1n.,ly1.(' c u l t ural data. (4) Labor<lto.ry

u s e d in

­

,

370 THE FIRST CIVILIZATIONS

The or i g in s of a gr i c ult u re, writ i n g , cities, and the state in many parts of the world, comparing and contrasting the great civiliza­ tions of antiqoity, incl udin g Mes op ota mia Egypt, India, Asia, M es o am er ica, and South Ame ri c 1 (4) ,

.

.

375

LAW, POLITICS, AND REVOLUTION

380

SICKNESS, MADNESS, AND HEALTH

A s t u dy of p ol i t ics and Iilw t h mu gh the political structures and processes of t ra dition a l illld contemporary societies; concepts of leel d ers h i p, factionalism �1n d feuds, powe r, authority, revolution, ..lnd ot her reactions to colonization; law a n d cuntlict re sol u ti o n; con n icts of national and l oc a l level lega l systems . Examples from ar ou nd the world: Burma, Pakista n, th e Pacific, Africa, L,tin America, and Nu t ive America. (4) A cro ss -c u l t u ml

t:.'xamination of systems of curing practices a n d and m e n t a l i l lness and h l>alth; preven­ tion cln d h ea l i ng; the role of r e l igi ou s v iews; nature and skiJls of cu rer s ; definitions of disease; variation in disc.lses be t ween classes and ethnic groups; impact of modern medic.11 .1 nd p s ych o ILlgical prJctitioners. (4)

cultural views L l f p h ysica l

­

392

GODS, MAGIC, AND MO RALS

re l i g ion ; a survey of h u m a n i ty 's concepts of Jnd rel atio nship s to the supernatural; examination of the varying personal and group fu nc t io ns that re li g ions fulfill; ex plorat i o n of rituals, be l i efs , and systems of morality in re l igion s both "primi­ t i ve" cln d historical; origins of re l i g ion ; science "versus" r('ligion; the nature of reality. (Cross-mlerenced w i th REI. 392) (4)

The a n th ropo logy of

480

ANTHROPOLOGICAL INQUIRY

An historic and thematic studv of th e theoretic.ll foundations of sociocultural anthropology; r ese a rc h methods; how theory <1nd methods are used to e s ta b l i s h anthropological knowledge.

Required of majors in their j u ni o r or senior year. ar)' (4)

vision of

INDEPENDENT STUDY: UNDERGRADUATE FIELDWORK

St ud y 01 sp eci fi c areas or issues in a n t h ro polog y through in-field methods of analysis and research "'pported by appropriate read­ i n g under supervision of a fa c ulty member. PrerequiSites: 490 and d e pa r t. men ta l consent. ( 1 - 4 )

501

GRADUATE WORKSHOPS

590

GRADUATE SEMINAR

Graduate workshops in special fi e ld s or a rea s for varying periods of time. ( 1 -4)

Selected topics as announced.

i nstr octo r. (1 -4)

P re req u is i t e : consent of t h e

591

Dl RECfED STUDY (1-4)

595

G RADUATE READINGS

598

RESEARCH PROJECf (4)

599

THESIS (4)

I n d e pe n de nt st ud y card re g u ired . (4)


28

Art I n this time of rapidly changing concepts and an almost daily emergence of new media, emphasis must be placed on a variety of experiences and creative flexibility for the artist and the designer. Students with professional concerns must be prepared to meet the modern world vvith both technical skills and capacity for innovation. The department's program therefore stresses individual­ ized development in the dexterous use of mind and hand . A highly professional faculty, well-equipped studios, and a comprehensive curriculum offer variegated opportunities for study in the visual arts. S tudents may choose among a generalized pro­ gram leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree; a more specialized program for the Bachelor of Fine Arts, in which each candidate develops some area of competence; or a degree program in art education for teaching on several levels. Recent graduates may be found in a variety of fields. Several have become established as painters, printmakers, or sculptors; some are successful studio potters; others have gone into commercial photography or film animation-even the produc­ tion of feature films. The television industry employs still others. A number are working in the design field as graphiC designers, illustrators, pack­ age designers, or art d irectors in firms around the coun try, in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Seattle. Alumni have been involved in museum work and in serving on the faculties of various educational institu tions, from elementary through high schools as well as community colleges and universities. Some students go directly from the university into their field of interest. Others find it desirable and appropriate to attend a graduate school and have been accepted into prestigious graduate programs, both in this country and abroad. The various fields of art are competitive and demanding in terms of commitment and effort. Nonetheless, there is always a place for those who are extremely skillful or highly imaginative or, ide­ ally, both . The department's program stresses both, attempting to help each student reach that idea\ . Instructional resources, when coupled with dedi­ cated and energetic students, have resulted in an unusually high percentage of graduates being able to satisfy their vocational objectives.

FACULTY Cox, Chair; Geller, Gold, Keyes, Kittleson, Minas, Roskos, Schwidd er, Tomsic . Artist-in­ Residence: Torrens.

The department has sought to minimize prerequisites, ena· bling students to elect courses relating to their interests as early as possible. It is recommended that students interested in major­ ing in art declare their major early to insure proper advising. Transfer students' status shall b e determined at theiJ time oi entrance. The department reserves the right to retain, exhibit, and reproduce student work submitted for credit in any of its course.s or programs. A use or materials fee is required in certain courses. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 32 semester hours, including 160, 250, 230 o r 350, 365, 370, and the art history sequence (180, 280, 380). A maximum of 40 hours m.,y be applied tow.ud the degree. Candidates are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences and must siltisfy general university requirements, including a core curriculum (Core I or Core II), and the foreign languageialternative requ irement. BACHELOR OF FINE A RTS MAJOR: A minimum of 56 ,,,mester hours, incl uding 160 and 250; the art history s�quence ( 1 80, 280, 380); 8 hours in pictorial media. 8 hours in materials media, and 4 hours in " rt history o r theory (381, 386, 388, or as approVl'd by the department fac ulty); requirements and electives in area of emphasis; and 499 (B.F. A . candidacy exhibition). 110 or courses in teaching methods may not be included. Candidates are registered in the Sc.hool of the Arts and must sahsfy general uni\'ersity requirements, including a core curriculum (Core I or Core I I ) . B , F. A . i n Pictorial Media Areas of emphasis: a minimum of three courses required in one area Drawing/Painting: 160 Drawing 360 Liie Drawing (R) 365 Painting I 465 I'<'inting II (R) Printmaking: 370 Printmaking I 470 Printmaking II (R) Film Arts : 326 Photography I 328 Film Making 426 Photography II ( R ) Independent Study (may be applied to any area): 492 Studio Projects (R) (R)-may be repeated for credit B.F.A. in Materials Media

Areas of emphaSis: ,) minimum of three courses required in one area Ceramics: 230 Ceramics r 330 Ceramics I I 430 Ceramics I I I ( R ) Sculpture: 250 Sculpture I 350 Sculpture I I 450 Sculpture I I I ( R ) Craits: 215 Crafts (l�) 216 Jewelry (R) 315 Stained Glass (ofiered periodically) 335 Fibers(R) Independent Study (may be .'pplied to any arcn) : 492 Studio Projects (R) (R)-may be repeated for credit


29 B.F.A. i n Design Required basic sequence: 196 Design I: Fundamentals 296 Design II: Concepts 381 Twentieth Century Design and A rchitecture 396 Design: Graphics I 491 Desig n : Workshop Elective courses: 395 Desig n : Environments . 398 Design: Illustr,)tion 496 Design: Graphics I I Su pporting courses in art may b e chosen i n accord with indi­ vidual interests. Supporting courses from other departments and schools may also be elected (for example. Business Administra­ tion 370 or 472 and Communication Arts 374 or 380). Appl icable courses \.vill be recommended by advisers. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION : See School of Education. The Publishing and Printing Arts minor is cross-referenced with the Department of E nglis h . See the description of that minor under English. ' M IN O R I N STU DIO ART: 20 semester hours, including 11 0, 4 hours in materials media, 4 hours in pictorial media, clnd 8 hours of (o' lecrives. 'MINOR IN ART HISTORY: 20 semester hours, including 1 1 0, 1 2 hours in art history electives, and 4 hours in studio art.

·pending final faculty approval, fall 1985

COURSE OFFERINGS STUDIO

160 196 215 216 230 250 296 326 328 330 335 341

350 360 365 370 395 396 398 426 430 450 465 470 491 492 496 499

DRAWING DESIGN I: FUNDAMENTALS CRAFTS JEWELRY CERAMICS I SCULITURE I DESIGN II: CONCEITS PHOTOGRAPHY I FILM MAKING CERAMICS II FIBERS ELEMENTARY ART EDUCATION SCU LPTURE LIFE DRAWING PAINTING I PRINTMAKING I DESIGN: ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN: GRAPHICS I DESIGN: ILLUST RATION PHOTOGRAPHY II CE RAMICS HI SCULPTURE III PA1NTING II PRINTMAKING II DESIGN: WORKSHOP STUDIO PROJECTS DESIGN: G RAPHICS II B.F.A CANDIDACY EXHIBITION

HISTORY AND THEORY

1 10 180 280 380 381 386 388 440 490 497

INTRODUCTION TO ART TRADITIONS OF WESTERN ART MODERN ART CONTEMPO RARY AlIT TWENTIETH CENTURY DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE IMAGERY AND SYMBOLISM AMERICAN AlIT SEMINAR IN AlIT EDUCATION SEMINAR RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY-THEO RY

110

INTRODUCTION TO ART

Art in the modern world seen in relation to history; a search for meaning in an age of science, industrialization, and nationalism. Not intended for majors. (4)

160

D RAWING

A course dealing with the basic techniques and media of drawing. (4)

180

TRADITIONS OF WESTERN ART

A su rvey tracing the development of Westem art from prehistory to the beginnings of the modern epoch in the 18th century. (4)

196

DESIGN I: FUNDAMENTALS

An introduction to design through the study of basic techniques, color theory, and composition. (4)

215

CRAFTS

Studio experience in a variety of art media and techniques. Of par­ ticular interest to teache.rs (l nd to recreation ilnd social service workers. May be repeated for credit. (4)

216

JEWELRY

A study of form and technique in the design and execution of jew­ elry objects. Includes stone setting, fabrication, and casting. May be repeated fo r crcdit. (4)

230

CERAMICS I

Ceramic materials and techniques including hand-built and wheel-thrown methods, clay dnd glaze format io n . Includes a sur­ vey of ceramic art. (4)

250

SCULITURE I

Variolls techniques and materials of sculpture and tJ,cir influence on three-dimensional form. (4)

280

MODERN ART

A survey of modern art from the latc 18th century through major movements of the 19th and 20th centuries up to the Second World War. (4)

296

DESIGN II: CONCEPTS

An investigation of the process of creative problem solving in a methodical and organized manner. I ncludes projects in a v" riety of design areas. Prerequisite: 196 or consent of instrurtor. (4)

326, 426

PHOTOG RAPHY I, II

A studio course in photography as an art form. Primary concen­ tration on carner" techniques ,md use of darkroom. Student pro­ duction of slide and print portfolios, with an emphasis on creative and expressive experimentation. 326 must be taken before 426; 426 may be taken twice. 426 includes emphasis on color printing. (4, 4)

328

FILM MAKING

A studio course in film making as an art form. A study of the male'­ rials and techniques of film making and the production of student 8 mm. and 16 mm. films. Classic and experimental films will be su rveyed. (4)

330, 430

CERAMICS II, III

Techniques i n ceramic construction and experiments in glaze for­ mation. 330 must be taken before 430; 430 may be taken twice. Pre­ requisite': 230. (4, 4)

335

FIBERS

Exploration and deveiopmenl of fiber structu res dnd soft art forms with non-loom and loom techniques. May be repeated tor credit. (4)

341

ELEMENTARY ART EDUCATION

A study of creative growth Jnd development; art history and thempy in the c1,1ssroom . (2)

3501450

as

studio project;

SCULITURE II, III

Concentration on a particular medium of sculpture including metals, wood, or synthetiCS; special sections cmphdsizing work from the human form as well as opportun ity for mold making and casting. 350 must be taken before 450; 450 m,W . be taken twice. Prerequisite: 250. (4, 4)

360

LIFE DRAWING

An exploration of human form in drawiJ\g media. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 160 or con.,ent of instructor. (4)

365, 465

PAINTING I, II

Media and techniques of painting in oil or acryliCS. 365 must b,> taken before 465; 465 may be taken twice. Prerequisit,,: 160. (4, 4)


30 398 DESIGN: ILLUSTRATION Proj�cts in various types of illustration [rom story to advertising. Prerequisites: 160 and 196. (4)

370, 470 PRINTMAKING I, II Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and photo processes involving lithographic, intaglio and screen printing. 370 must be taken before 470; 470 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 160 or consent of instructor. (4, 4)

426

PHOTOG RAPHY U (See 326)

380

430

CE RAMICS m (See 330)

a t Europ<'an and Ame ric a n antecedents as they apply to contem­ p o ra r y d i rections. Includes a substantial section on aesthetics and art t h eor y. (4)

440

SEMINAR IN ART EDUCATION

381

450

SCULPTURE III (See 350)

465

PAINTING II (See 365)

470

PRINTMAKING II (See 370)

490

SEMINAR

491

DESIGN : WORKSHOP

CONTEMPORARY AlIT

The deve lo pme n t of art

from 1945 to the present, with a brief look

TWENTIElH CENTURY DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE

J\ study of twentieth c e n t ury devel o pm e n t s in architecture dnd rel" ted fields as well as certain d e s i g n areas. (4)

386

IMAGERY AND SYMBOLISM

A survey of symbolic pictorial, and pl(1�tic expressions in \"/estern tradition from t h e perspective of their philosophical and theologi­ cal impli ca tio n s, with p,<rticul,lr e mp h asis on the development of the Christian cultus. (4)

A study of instruction i n t h e s ec on d ary school in c l u d i n g appropri­ ate media ,1nd curriculum development . aly (2)

Selected topiCS considering Some aS p 0 c ts of the v i s u il l arts. MclY be repeuted for credit. Prereljuisitc: consent of instructor. (4)

388 AMERICAN ART A s t u d y of the traditions and developing characteristics of Ameri­ can st yl e from e a rl y set tlements to the p re s en t . (4)

A tutorial course which may deal with any of several aspects of the d.'sign field with particular emphasis on p ract i c a l ex p e r i e nce "nd building a portfolio. (2)

395

492

STUDIO PROJECTS

496

DESIGN : G RAPHICS II (See 396)

DESIGN : ENVIRONMENTS

An inve s tiga tio n into var i o us types of environmf'nts w i t h p a r ti cu 1M L· mp ha si s on residential. Included will be a brief history of fur­ niture a n d de s ig n s t y le s ; approac he s to p l a n nin g and procedures; (lnd an introduction to technic,li dra\...·ing und model building. Pre­ req ui s i t e: 1 96 or consent of instructor. (4)

396, 496 DESIGN: GRAPHICS I, II Design (lnd execution of printed materials; emphasis on technical prnced ure s and probh:-ms . in mass comrnunication. 496 explores ildvanced lL'chniques with multiple color, typography. and other complex probl�ms. 3% must be taken before 496. Prerequisite: 160 and 296 or cnnsL'nt of instructor. (4, 4)

A t utori <l i COllr!:i4!

w i t h individual investigation of [I p a r t icu l ar medium, for major students only. M ay be rc p e" te d for cred it. Pre­ requisites: senior status, consent of inst ru c t or, and program approval by dep a rtme nt rilculty. 1 11 (4)

497 RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY-THEORY A tutorial CQurse for major students \,\'ith research into a particular asp�ct of art history or theory. May b e repeat ed for credit . Prereq­ uisites: senior status, consent of instructor, and program approva l by department faculty. (2 or 4) 499 B.F.A. CANDIDACY EXHIBITION Exhibition of u nd erg ra d ua te work by B.F. A . candid,l tcs. S tu de nts a re re s pon sib le ior all arrangements in consult,lti"n with their majur advisers. (no credit)

Schod of

The Arts

The School of the Arts of Pacific Lutheran Univer­ sity is a community of artists dedicated: to provide energies and facilities for the focused refinement of creative activity; to operate in the vanguard of artistic understanding and to assume an additive rather than imitative position relative to that understanding; to pursue study of both the historical and theoreti­ cal aspects of our creative legacy; to recognize change in artistic criteria without devaluating the traditional concepts of discipline, craftsmanship, and academic profeSSionalism; to foster activity free from the caprice of the market­ place but, by virtue of its substance, not aloof from nor incompatible with practical concerns; to animate and "humanize" the academic climate of Pacific Lutheran University via the creative pres­ ence by sponsoring a rich and varied program of events in the arts;

and to provide the students of Pacific Lutheran University an opportunity to experience first hand the unique "chemistry" of the creative process.

FACUL1Y

Moe, Dea n : faculty members of the Departments of Art, Communication Arts, and Music.

Degrees oifered by the School of the Arts include the B . F. A . (Bachelor of Fine Arts) in a r t or in communication arts, the B. M . (Bachelor of Music), and the M . M . (Master o f Music). Students may also earn the B.A. (Bachelor of Arts), but this degree is awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences. Candidates ior the B.F. A . and H.M . as well as the B . I\ . i n art, wmmunication arts, or nlu.sic nlust nleet general un i versi t y req uiremen t s and the s pecific re q u irem en ts oi the Departments o f Art, Communication Arts, or Nlusic. For d e ta il s about the B. A . E . (B achelo r of Arts in Edu cn tio n) in art, commun.ication arts, or music, see the School of Education. For course offerings. d e gre e requireme nt s , and progr"ms in the chool of the Arts, see: A RT COMM M USI

N ICATION ARTS


31

Biology The Department of Biology is dedicated to a teach­ ing process, not j ust a delivery of facts. Facts form the foundation of science but approach in£inity in number. Therefore, the biology faculty stresses the gathering, processing, retrieving, and interpreting of these facts. The biology faculty believes in the notion that one of the most profound requirements in science is learning to ask the right questions and to recognize the answers. The department is therefore dedicated to permitting students to learn science in the only way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to independently question it, probe it, try it out, experiment with it, experience it . In addition to diverse faculty and balanced curricu­ lum, the department provides numerous facilities for its students, including: herbarium, invertebrate and vertebrate museums, greenhouse, vivarium and surgery room, climate control rooms, growth chambers, vertebrate physiology and cell physiol­ ogy laboratories, a field station located on State of Washington Parks land, and a boat equipped for studies of Puget Sound . Qualified students are invited to use these facilities in independent study or participation in ongoing faculty research. Career avenues for graduates are numerous. The biology faculty are committed to helping students investigate and obtain the career which most clearly matches their interests and abilities.

Plan I I I-Bachelor of Arts-Chemistry Emphasis: 28 semester hours, including '155, 156, 253 and 254, plus 15 additional hours i n courses nu mbered over 254. Req ui red supporting co u rses :

Chemis t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 331, 332 with laboratories, plus one of the following-Chemistry 321 or 403 and Math 133 or equivalent . Recommended supporting courses: Physics 125-1.26.

Plan IV-Bachelor o f Science: 40 semester h o u rs , incl u din g '155,

156, 253, a n d 254, plus 28 addi t ional hours i n courses numbered

over 200. U p ttl 8

hours Me

pe rm itted in cou",scs n umbered

between 201 and 206. Requi red supporting courses: Chemistry

1 15, 1 1 6, 331 with laboratories; M a t h 1 5 1 ; Physics 125-126 or 1531 54 .

Plan V-Bachelor of Science-Research Emphasis: 4 0 semester hours, including 155, 1 56, 253, 254, and 495, plus 25 additional hours in courses numbered over 254. Requ i re d supporting

l I S, '1 16, 33'1 , 332 with laboratories; Math 151; Physics 125-126 or 153-154.

courses: Chemistry

BACHELOR OF A RTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Education.

MINOR: At least 20 semester hou rs s elec ted from any biology

courses except thl)se nu mbered 300-320 ( i n terim), i n w h ich a grade of C or higher is c"rned. Pass-fail courses may not be cOllnted. Prerequisites mllst be met unless a written w<liver is obtained in odvance from both the instructor and the depart m en t ch. ir. Applicability of non-PLU biology credits will be deter­

mined by the department ch,'ir. Consult the chair for assignment

of a minor advi s e r.

COURSE OFFERINGS 111

BIOWGY AND THE MODERN WORLD

A n introduction to biology, designed primarily for non-biology majors. Fundamental concepts chosen from all areas of modern biology i ncl uding the environment, population , h 'l m a n anatomy and phYSiology, genet ics, evolution and biological controls. lec­

FACULTY

t u res, laboratories, and d i scussion. I n (4)

Lerum, Chair; Alexander, Carlson, Crayton, Dick­ man, Gee, Hansen, J. Jensen, Knudsen, Main, D. J. Martin, Matthias, McGinnis. BACHELOR OF A RTS Or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR:

The major in biology

is d es ign e d

to be flexible in meeting th e

n ee ds and s peci a l interests of students. Several OptillnS fo r m ajo r

programs Me available. In each plan for the major li�t"d below, minimal re qu i re rn e nts are described, and students should

consult their major advisers On the selection of electives which will h 'Ip them adequately meet their pre-professional and

educational go;;ls. A depar tmen t adviser must be consulted before comple t iO n of B iolog y 253, t h e final course in the initial t h ree semester core courses required of all biology majors.

I n terim cOurses (300·320) cannot be counted towMd the major.

Plan I-Bachelor of Arts: 32

semester hours, induding

Plan II-Bachelor of Arts-Comprehensive: 36 se l11 e�ter hours,

1.55, 156, 253, and 254, plus 23 additional hours in courses numbered over 200. Up to 8 hours are permitted in course s numbered between 20'1 and 206. Required supporting COurses: Chemistry '1 15, 1 16 and Math 1 33 or equivalent. Recom· i ncluding

mended s upporting courses: One semester of organic ch e m ist ry

HUMANISTIC BarANY

sis o n plonts and their impact on people. Topics included are: basic plant structure and function; po i sono u s plants; medicinal piants; food plants; propagation of house plants; home care of pl" nts; plant identification. I ncludes labo ratory. Ll (4).

155

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I: POPULATION BIOWGY AND DIVERSITY OF LIFE

Introduction to science and levclsof organization in biology; Men­ delian genetics and populat ion

biology;

history and diversity of

life. Requi red of al l biology majors. Includes laboratory. Co- regi s­ tration in chemistry is st rongly recommended. 1 (4)

156

1 55, 156,

253, and 254, pl u s 19 additional hours. 4 hOurs are permitted in COurses n u m bered below 150 (if completed before taking 1 55) and up to 8 hours arc per m itte d in cou.rses numbered bet\\'een 201 and 206. Requ i red supporting courses: Chemistry '105 or 1 1 5 a n d Math 133 o r e quivalent . Recommended supporting courses: Physics 125-126.

a nd P hys ics '125-126.

112

An introduction to the basic principles of biology with an empha­

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II: THE CELL AND BIO-ENERGETICS

Cellular and molecular levels of biological organization; cell u l t ra­ structure and physiology, molecular genetics, energy transduc­ tion; energy flow a n d

nutrient cycles

in ecosystems. Require d of

all biology mojor>. Includes l a bora tory. Assumes completion of one semester of college chemistTY ( 1 04 or 1 15). Pre re qu i s ite: 1 55 . I I (4 )

201

INTRODUCTORY MlCROBIOWGY

The gro\vth, control, phYSiOlogy, isolation, and identification of m icroorganisms, espeCially those which affect h u m a n beings.

I nclu des la bo rato ry. Prerequisite: CH EM 105 or consent of instruc­ tor. 1 (4)


32 205, 206

HUMAN ANAlOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

first semester: matter, cells and tissues; nervous, endocrine, skel­ eteli, and muscular systems. Llboratory includes ((It dissection .,n d experiments in muscle physiology and reflexes. Second semester: circulatory, respirato ry, digestive, excretory, tln d repro­ ductive systems; metabolism, temperature regulation, ,l nd stress. Laboratory includes cat dissection, physiology experiments, and study of d,'ve loping organisms. 205 (I) prerequisite to 206 (JI). (4, 4)

253

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY III: BIOLOGY OF THE STEADY STATE

The basic problems f,lccd by pillnts and aninlt1is in maintaining themselves; structural adJptatiuIls, homcostnsis, internel l regula­ tion, wtlter and temperature control, gas exchange, vascular sys­ tems, and inte r,1(tion between organisms. Required llf all bioillgy milJors. Concurrent registration in 254 required. Prerequisites: 155, 1 56, and CHEM 105 or 1 16. 1 (4 )

254

PRINCIPLES OF BIOWGY III: LABORATORY

An investigiltivc I,)boratory designed to introduce students to the scientific proces,S. Includes familiarization Ivvith and methods of using scientific l i terc)ture, data reduction and ana lysis, experimen­ tal design and execu tion, and scientific writing. Concurrent regis­ tr"tion in 253 required . Prerequisites: 155, 156, and ( H E M 105 or 116. 1 (1 )

321

ORNITHOLOGY

The study uf birds with emphasis on local species; designed for students with hobby interests as well tlS for (1 dvilnced biology stu­ dents. Field trips. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 254 or consent of instructor. I I (2)

322

MICROBIOLOGY

The structure, physiology, ge.nctics, metabolism, a n d ecology of microorganisms. Includes laboraturv. Prerequisite: 254 or consent of instructor; one semester orgarl'ic chemistry reco mmended. 1 1 (4)

324

NATURAL HISTO RY OF VEIITEB RATES

Classific,lt-ion, n,ltural histury, J_nd economic importance of ver­ tebrates with the exception of birds. Field trips ilnd laboratory. Prerequisite: 254 all' 1 985-86 (4)

326

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Description, classification, caus€." function, ,l nd development uf th� behavior of il n imais. L�ctures elnphils ize (In ethological JPproach to the study uf beha.vior focusing on comparisons "mong species, as well as phySiOlogical, ecological, and evolution­ ary aspects of behavior. L1boratory i s not rigidly scheduled ,1 nd �\Iill ('ofl:-;ist of it behavioral investigation of th� students' chuosing. I'rereqllisitc: 254 Or consent of instructor. I I (4)

331

GENETICS

BclSic concepts including considercltion of lllollocuiar basis of gene t·xpn.:�ssitln, rL'combin,ltiOn, genetic vari,)bii ity, clnd consideration of cytogenetiCS dnd �1l) pul(ltion genetics. Inclu d('� labu r(ltorv. , Prerequisite: 254 I (4)

340

PLANT DIVE RSITY AND DISTRIBUTION

A systematic introduction to plant diverSity. Inter(lction betwet"n plants, theories of vegetatiOlj.,1 distributiLln. Emphasis on higher plant t.1xonom '. Indudes 1,1boratDry and field trips. Prerequisite: 254. I I (4)

346

CELLULAR PHYSIOWGY

DC(lis with how cells are orga ni/ed to sti:1y (liive; enzyme kindic� and rl'gul,)tory mechani slils; bioche mistry of mac-romolecules; energy metabulism; membrane structure, permeability (1 nd trans­ port phenomencl; functioni:ll ultri:l structure; canCl'r cell.s as mudel syst(>ms. Prerequisites: 254 and one semester of orgnnic chemistry. 1 (4)

347

CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY

A laboratory experience in techniques and types of instrumenta­

tion often encountered in biochemical and cellular research including ani m(l l ce.1I culture, cell fractionation, USe uf radiotrac­ er5, biochemical assays, mcmbrune pheI10nlCll<1, spectrophotom­ et ry, Warburg respirometry. May be elected only by students with il serious inte.rcst fur this type of training. Curequisite/ prerequi� ,ite: 346 or CI-fEM 403 and consent of instructor. I ( 1 )

359

PLANT ANAlOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

H igher plant structure dnd function from germi n,ltion to senes­ CL'lloSe, including basic anatomy, seed genn incltioll, watL'r rela­ tions, respiration, mine r,11 nutrition, photosy nthesis, growth regulators, and reproduction. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 254 and one. s mesterof orga nic chemist ry. 1 (4)

361

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES

An integrated study of the principles of vertebrate structure. Con­ siders how and why living vertebrates attained their present struc­ t u re by e m p h a s iz ing phylogenetic, developmental, a n d physiological topics. Prerequ isite: 254. I (4)

371

INVERTEBRATE ZOOWGY

Introduction t o the form, function, natural history, and phylogeny of the major phyla of II1vertebrates. Llboratory exercises will include dis sections, field studies, and collections. Prerequisite: 254 or consent of instructor. ,'iy 1 985-86 I I (4)

372

GENERAL ENlOMOWGY

An introductioll to insect anatomy, physiology, ontogeny, and behavior. Llboriltory includes gross disseLi iun, field study, il.nd the collection and (iassification uf insects. Prerequisite: 254 . el/y 1 �86-87 1 (4)

375

PA RASITOLOGY

A study of the behavior, morphology, life histories, and host-paT<l­ site rel,l tionships of the common varieties of parasites that infect vertebrates, with special emph,lsis on thuse of humans. Includes laboratory Clnd field tri p s. Prerequisite: 254 or consent of instruc­ tor. dly 1985-86 II (4)

385

IMMUNOLOGY

Immu nology is thL' study of the biological properties which enable an organism to respond to changes within itself when the changes represent the presence of foreign substances, either from the external environment or self-induced. Consideration of the biol­ ogy and chemistry of immune response: the s pec i fic i ty of the orgilnism's immune reilctions, the types and roles of lymphatiC cells, chemical clnd functional characteristics of immu noglubulins and complement, genetic control of the immune responsE', hyper­ sensitivity reactions, and immunodeficiL'ncy diseases. Practical ramificcJtions include methods of i m lll unochemical analySiS and clinical applications. Prerequisites: 322, 346, or CHEM 403. all' 1985-86. II (2) �

403

DEVEWPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Consideration of the development of multicdlular orga nisms, foc­ using on thL' molecular base,; fur devdopmen t . Topics include morphogenic mov�mc:nts, cell dE'termination Clnd differe ntiation, p(lttC.nl fo rmation, cell interactions in develupment, chemical messengers in development, ,md genetic regubtion of develop­ men t . L1bnratory includes experimental problems and descript ive embryology. PrL'requisite: 254. II (4)

407

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

An introduction to molecular biOlogy, emphilsi:<ing the molecubr bIology of ('ukMyotic cells. TopicS include recombinant DNA pro­ ced u res, genetic engineering, gene fine structure, gerle expres­ s tu n , sequenCIng of n u c l e ic acids, naturCllly occurring rearrangements of the genome, chemical synthesi� of oligollU­ cleotides, (l nd the nloleculclr compusitiun and an:hitecture of somL' cellulor compclnents. Prereq uiSite: any (lll(' of 322, 331, 346, 403, or C H E N! 403. Interim (4).

411

HISTOLOGY

M icrosc(lpic study of normal cells, tissues, and organs oi verte­ brates. This study is both structurally and ph)'siologically Ori­ ented . PrereCl ulslt,,: 254. II (4)

424

ECOWGY

Organisms in relation to their enVironment, including organisma} adaptations, population growth and irHcr,lCtions, and ecusystem structure ilnd function. Prerequisite: 254. II (4)

425

BIOWGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY

The ocean as l'nvironment for plant and animal life; an introduc­ tion io the structure, dynamiCS, and history of marine ecosystems. Lab, field trips, and term prclject in addition to lecture, Prerequi­ site: 253. I I (4)

426

FIELD METHODS IN ECOLOGY

S'1mpling techniques and analySis of natural ecosystems. Inde­ pendent project required. Prerequisites: 254 and 424 O r consent of instructor. II (2)


33 MAMMALIAN PHYSIOWGY

441

491, 492

Functions of principal mammaJiam organ systems emphasil.ing control mechanisms and homeostatic relationships. Human-ori­ ented laboratory indudes work in circulation, cardiograp hy, psy­ chophysiology, kmperature regulation, and other areas. Students are required to design and execute a major experiment of their own. Prerequisites:

254 and CHEM 331. Anatomy and biochemis­ try recommended. 1 (4)

by regular courses; open to qualified ju nior and senior majors; students should not elect independent study unless they know in advance the specific area they wish to investigate and can demon­ strate a serious interest i n pursuing it. It is suggested that the stu­ dent spend one semester researching the l iterature and writing a proposal (for

1 scm. hr. of credit) and the next semester actually

carrying o u t the project (for another 1 sem. lu·. of credit). Students

EVOLUTION

475

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Investigations or research in areas of special interest not covered

will not be permitted to use

Gvo.lution as a process: sources of variation; forces overcoming genetic inertia in populations; speciation. Evolution of genetic systems and of life in relation to ecological theory and earth his­

491 -492 for filling in a deficiency in

their progra m . Prerequisite: written p roposal for the project approved by a faculty sponsor and the department chair. (1-4)

DIRECfED STUDY

tory. Lecture and d iscussion . Term paper and mini-seminar

495

required . Prereq uisite:

Original experimental or theoretical

490

254. I all' 1986-87 (4)

research open to upper

division students intending to graduate with a Bachelor of

SEMINAR

Selected topics in biology based on l iterature andlor original research. Open to j u nior and senior biology majors.

Science-Research Emphasis. Requires a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor and the department chair. (2)

(1)

School o[Business Administration I n concert with general university require ments, the business curriculum prepares graduates for responSible positions in business, education, and government. O ptional concentrations are offered in the fields of accounting, finance, human resou rce management, management information systems, marketing, and operations man agement.

AFFILIATIONS The School of Business Administration of Pacific Lutheran University is a member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business. The B . B. A . , M . B. A . , and accounting pro­ grams are nationally accredited by the Accreditation Council of the AACSB. Pacific Lutheran University is accredited regionally by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Sixty-four semester hours or one-half of the minimum total degree requirements are taken in fields outside the School of Business Administratio n . At least

40 semester hours are taken

in required and elective business subjects. The Bachelor of Business Administration degree program

FACUIIY

consists of 128 semester hours to be taken over a four-year

King, Dean; Bancroft, Barndt, B arnowe, Berniker, Bitner, D. Carvey, L. Carvey, Cubbage, Hegstad, Lauer, McNabb, Myers, RamagIia, Savarino, Scha­ fer, Sepic, Thrasher, Van Wyhe, Wahlen.

period, and to be completed with an over-all grade point average of 2.5 or above as well as a

2.5 grade point average sepMately in

business courses. D grades in business administration core courses (including the two upper division business electives) will not meet the B . B . A . graduation requirements. BACHEWR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

230, 281, 282, 350, 354, 364, 370, 455, and 8 semester hours of ADMISSION

upper division business electives. Required supporting courses:

The professional Bachelor of Business Administration degree program is composed of an upper division busi ness curriculum with a strong base in liberal arts. Undergraduate students arc admitted to the School of Business Administration upon the successful completion of at least semester hours with

24

a cumulative grade point average uf 2.5 or

above, and the declaration of business administration as the

Economics

150, Math 128 (or 151 and 230) (or 151, 152, and 331) 231, and one upper division economics comse. NO MORE THAN 50 PER­ Computer Science 220 (or equivalent), Statistics

CENT OF THE TOTAL HOURS MAY B E BUSINESS COURSES. The elective courses are chosen to support students' professional career objectives or graduate study plans. They may reflect business administration concentrations or selections from

major field of study. Transfer students are also required to have

entirely d ifferent fields. The latter may include work in other

maintained the grade point average of 2.5. The student's interest

professional schools or progra ms.

to acquire a professional competence is desired and the assign­ ment of a business faculty adviser is required. Students considering graduate-level study should seek early planning advice from the faculty concerning appropriate under­ graduate course selection. Graduate students are admitted to the School of Business Admin istration when they meet the req uirements specified in the M . B . A . brochure.


34 CONCENTRATIONS:

A concentration is it specialization within the School of Busi­ ness Administration. The concentration, which is noted on the student's trilnscript, must be completed with at least a 2 . S grade point average. Accou nting BA 381 Intermed i,lt" Financial Accounting BA 382 Advanced Financial Accounting BA 385 Cost Accounting BA 483 Income Taxation BA 484 Auditing SA 487 Accou nti ng Iniormation Systems Finance

BA 364 BA 367 BA 464 BA 381

Ma nager ial Finance Financial Markets Financial Plan nin g and Control Intermeruate Accounting OR 46 1 Portfolio Manag.'ment ECON 352 Intermediate Micro Economic AnalySiS OR ECON 361 Money and Banking (Either course will fulfill the business requirement for a n upper division economics course.)

Human Resource Management BA 354 Human Resource M an a geme nt BA 454 Organizational Ch a nge ,lnd Development BA 457 Productivity and th e Quality of Wo rk Life BA 458 Advanced Human Resource Administration ECON 32 I Labor Economics, Llbor Relations, and Human Resources ( Thi s will fulfill the requirement for an upper division economics cour,Se.) M anage ment Information Systems (Completion of this conc<'n­

tration also fulfills the re qui rem en t s for an Information Science minor within the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.) CSC! 144 Pasca l ' CSCI 270 Data Structures CSCI 467 Data Base Management BA 325 Information Systems in Organizations BA 421 Systems Design and AnalySiS BA 428 Seminar in Ma n age ment I nformation Systems BA 487 Accounting Information Systems ·CsCI 144 may be taken in l il'u of CsCI 220 by students in the rvtanagement Information Systems concentration to meet the School of Business Administration computer science re quirem en t .

Marketing BA 370 Marketing Systems SA 470 M ar keting Management BA 471 Marketing Research and Consumer Behavior Two of the following: SA 472 Advertising and Sales M,magement BA 473 Indust rial M arket i n g and Purchasing BA 474 International Mark et ing O p er a ti o ns M anage me nt

BA 350 M anageme nt BA 385 Cost Acc ounting BA 450 Prod uction and Operations Management BA 473 Industrial Marketing and Purchasing

COURSE OFFERINGS LAW AND SOCIETY

230

A study of the l eg al system in the United States and the regulation of rel at io nships between individual citizens, groups, and the gov­ ernmental agencies and branches. Review of the rights and obliga­ tions of individual citizens and corporations, administrative law, and the procedures ,lnd practices of the courts in a modern soci­ et y . Prerequisite: sophomore standing. I n (4)

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

281

An introduction to accounting concepts and principles. Prepara­ tion and analysis of financial reports. Prerequisite: sophomore stand ing. I II (4)

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING

282

Introduction to management accounting information systems. EmphaSis on the an al ys i s and interpretation of accounting and economic data and thcir use in planning, control, and decision ma ki ng. Prerequisites: 281. Sophomore standing. I I I (4)

INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN ORGANIZATIONS

325

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of systems and infor­ mation as they apply to organizations. Focus on the integration of information systems into the structure and decis ion-m,'king proc­ ess of management . A variety of stra t egi es for the design ,llld implementation of management information systems in organiza­ tions will be d evelo ped Prerequisites: CSC! 144 or 220. Junior standing. 1 (4) .

INTERNATIONAL B U SINESS

340

I ntegrat ed study of international business functions, and related concepts, pract ices, and p o lic ies . Project and case analyses. This is the principal business admi nistration cou rse for students in the Global Studies International Trade minor. Prerequisites: 281 and ECON 331. 1 (4)

MANAGEMENT

350

A critical examination of the princ i pl e s and proce sses of adminis­ tration. Managem e nt techniques and the fu nct ion s of plann ing, organizing, direction, and control are disc.ussed from both the cl,lSsical and the behavioral points of view. Study of the concepts and characteristics of the production function. Introduction to case analYSis and problem-solving technique s Prerequisites: ECON ISO, STAT 231 (may be concurrent), and BA 281 . Junior standing. I II (4) .

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

354

Detailed examination of the behavior of inruviduals and groups in business organizations, with emphasis on pol icies and practices for so l v in g human resource p robl em s Fundamentals o f person­ nel/human resource procedures in industrial and other organiza­ tions. Prer equisi te: 350. I II (4) .

364

MANAGERIAL FINANCE

Concentrated study of the tools of financial analysis: Funds and cash flows, critical a na lysi s of financial statements and o the r financial information, t echn iq ues of financial planning and budg­ et i ng , and the concepts related to capital expenditure budgeting, and the cost of ca p it al. An introduction to financial st rateg i es and decision m ak i ng for fina nci ng expansion, and dividend po l ici es. Requ ired for business majors. P rereq u iS i t es : CSC! 220 (or equiva­ lent), ECON 150, M ATH 128 (or eqUivalent), STAT 231, and BA 281 . Junior st and i ng. I II (4) ,

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION : Economics 150; Math 128 (or 1 5 I and 230) (or 151, 152, and 331); Comp u te r Science 220 (or equivalent); Statistics 231; Business Administra­ tion 281, 350, 364, 370. A grade pOint average oi 2 . 50 in these business courses is required for the minor. MASTER OF BUSINESS A D M I NISTRATIO N : See Graduate

Catalog. BUSINESS ADMINIST RATION COURSES

Courses nu mbered 100-299 are available to all students. Courses nu mbered 321 -499 are open to s tud en ts with j u n ior standing and the required prereq uisit es. Courses nu mbered 500-599 are reserved for students in the M . B . A . program and students in other PLU graduate programs who have an approved field in business. The middle digit of th e course number indicates the field of conccntrJtion: 2 - ma nag em ent information systems 3- law 4-general service -human resou rce management 6-finance 7-marketing 8-accounting 9-specialized and predominantly ind e pendent st u d i es �

FINANCIAL MARKETS

367

Analysis of the characteristics and determinants of an efficient fi n anc ial system; pricing of capital as se t s; supply and demand for loanable funds and the level and str uc t ure of interest rates; sav­ ings-investment process and financial intermed iaries; i n s u ran ce and reinsurance markets; commodity markets; and international fi n a nc e. Prerequisites: CSC! 220 (or equivalent), ECON 150, M ATH 128 (or equivalent), STAT 231, BA 281, 364. 1 (4)

MARKETING SYSTEMS

370

The Hows of goods and services in the economy, economic a n d be ha vio ral approach es to the analysis of demand; the role of the marketing functions in a bu s in es s firm. Determination of a mar­ keting mix-product policy, pricing, channels of dis t ri b utio n s, and marketing communications. Prerequ is it es: CSC! 220 (or equ iva ­ le n t) ECON 150, MATH 128 (or eq uivalent) , STAT 231, and BA 281. Junior stan d i ng . I II (4) ,


35 381

457

INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Concentrated study of the conceptual framework of accounting, valuation theories, asset and income measurement, and financial statement disclosures. Prerequisite:

382

281 . I 11 (4)

PRODUCTIVITY AND THE QUALITY OF WORK LIFE

Examination of the sociotechnical determinants of organizational and individual productivity, with s u b sequ e n t exploration of

issues that affect quality of work life

ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

industries.

PrerequiSite: 354. II (4)

in service and ma n u facturing

Concentrated s t u d y of equ it y m ea s u rement i n clu d i n g t h e accounting aspects o f partnerships, corporations, and consol i d a ­

458

tions. Also

Detailed coverage of modern human resource p roced ure s : job analysis, employee selection, training and career d eve lopme nt, compensation, safety and health, labor relations. Review of the legal context of employment pr a ctice s . Prerequisite: 354. 1 (4)

includes financial statement anal ys is and an introduc­ tion to accounting problems of not-for-profit organizations. Prerequisites: 281, 381. I II (4)

385 COST ACCOUNTING Developm en t a nd a na lySiS of cost information use i n decision-making, income determination,

for management

and performance

evaluation, u si ng a variety of computer niques. Prerequisites: equivalents.

392

and quantitative tech­ 282; CSC! 220, MAlli 128, STAT 231 , or

I II (4)

461

ADVANCED HUMAN RESOURCE ADMINISTRATION

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

Discussion of sound portfolio management t ech niques: Security

selection and construction of efficient asset p o rtfo l io s ; measuring investment performance; capital market efficiency; selected recent

developments in portfolio analysis. Emphasis on risk and return

INTERNSHIP

A program of full-time experience closely related to the student's specific career and academic interests. The student is expected to develop the internship opportunity with a firm or organization, and the School will prepare an internship agreement. This agree­ ment identifies the problems to be researched, experience to be gained, and related readings to be accomplished. Monthly pro­ gress reports and other measures of achievement will be used to determine the grade. Not more than

2 hou rs of credit will be 8 hours

relationships of securities and portfoliOS. Prere quis i tes: CSC! 220 (or equivalent), ECON 150, MATH 128 (o r equivalent), STAT 231 , B A 281,

464

364. 1 (4)

FINANCIAL PLANNING AND CONTROL

Intensive analYSis of major financial decisions; financial planning and budgetary control; mergers and ac quis i tions; prediction of corpor<lte failure; bond refu nding; new equity issues;

recent

developments in capital structure theory as applied to financial

granted for a full month of io ternshi p, and not more than

decisions. Emphasis on decision making. Prerequisites: CSC!

of accumulated credit will be granted for the internships taken. The internship cannot be used to meet the minimum requirement

B A 281,

f()r two business administration elective courses,

470 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Analytical approaches for the solution of marketing problems, developing strategies, planning and administering comprehen­ sive marketing programs; evaluation and control of marketing operations. Prerequisite: 370, CSC! 220 (or eq uivale nt ) . I II (4)

and i t must be before g rad ua tio n . Prereq ui­ sites: 281, 282, 350; ECON 150; STAT 231; one additional course in the student's area of conce n tra t io n . (2 or 4)

completed prior to the last semester

421 SYSTEMS DESIGN AND ANALYSIS Integration of the areas of computer technology, systems analysis, systems deSign, and implementation. E mphas is on the formaliza­ tion of the information systems analysis and d evelopment proc­ �ss. Exercises and case studies to deal with information an al ys is and the logical specification of the projec t . Prerequisites: 281, 282, CSC! 144 (or 220). II (4) 428

SEMINAR IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

A course involving a significant hands-on p roj ect , software review and selection, and management applications by organizational functions. Prerequisites:

435

281, 282, 421, 487, CSC! 144 (or 220). (4)

450

II (4)

PRODUCTION AND OPE RATIONS MANAGEMENT

Critical study of key concepts, practices, and qu an ti tative

tech­ production of goods or serv­ ices. I ncludes examination of facility des ign ; work design and measurements; and production planning, control, and schedul­ ing considerations. Prerequisites: 350, l\'IAlli '128 (or equiva lent) , CSC! 220 (or equivalent). 1 (4) niques applicable to managing t he

454

471

220 150, M ATH 128 (or t'quivalcnt), STAT 23 1 ,

364. I I (4)

MARKETING RESEARCH AND CONSUMER BEHAVlOR

Tec hniques and useS of marketing research in the business deci­ sion-making process. Emphasis on research d esign, vMious sur­ vey methods, research instruments, and sam p l ing pl a ns a s they

relate to marketing consumer products and services in a changing

environment. Contemporary behavioral science concepts to be

selected marketing projects. Pre­ 370, CSC! 220 (or equivalent). I II (4)

examined and incorporated i n requisites:

472

ADVERTISING AND SALES MANAGEMENT

Role of advertising and personal selling in the marketing program;

BUSINESS LAW

Procedu res, contracts, agencies, negotiable instruments, business organizations, property, trusts and WIUS, transportation, lI1sur­ anee and employment.

(or equivalent), ECON

ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE AND DEVEWPMENT

using a di ag­ nostic a pproach and employing approp ri ate st ra tegie s t o devel op

Examination of the need for change in organiz.ations,

analysis of market taIgets; develo pi ng market potentials; media selection; designing the promotional message; evaluation and control of the p romotional mix. Prerequisite: 370. I 1I (4)

473

INDUSTRIAL MARKETING AND PURCHASING

Analysis of the industrial buying and policies a nd procedures ; selection of

selling process; purchasing sou rces of supply; contract analysis and negotiation; marketing problems of manufacturers of industrial goods; d evel oping and implementing industrial mar­ keting strategies. PrerequiSites: 350, 370. n (4)

474

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

Introduction to marketing pro blems a n d opportunities facing U.S. firms which conduct business in a n international context. Cov­

ered are the changes necessary in marketing programs whenever

human resources vital to every organization's economic viability.

exam­ are the economic and cultural forces that make these changes necessary. Prerequisites: 370, ECON 331 . I II (4)

with knowledge of evaluation methods and interventions that

481

Emphasis on developing the skills of an internal c ha nge agent facilitate planned change. Prerequisites:

455

350, 354. ! (4)

BUSINESS POLICY

Study of organizational administration from top management per­

strat egi e s and p o lic ies to support of organizational objectives. Implications of reso u rc e avail a bil ity, technology, and the economy; education, rel ig io n, ethics, and spective. Formulation and execution of

integrate aJ! management and business functions in

personal values; social responsibility; public policy; and interna­ tional relations for top management decisions. Includes compre­ hensive case analyses. Required for business administration majors. Prerequisites: senior s t and i ng, 282, 350, 364, 370; 354 rec­ ommended.

456

I II (4)

HONORS SEMINAR

business transactions cross international boundaries. Also ined

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN ACCOUNTING

Exploration of current issues and trends in the

co n cept u a l frame­

work of accounting, the environment in which accounting oper­ ates, and the problems of communicating financial information useful to decision-makers. Prerequisites: of instructor.

483

(4)

281, 381, 382, o r consent

INCOME TAXATION

Comprehensive study of income

tax concepts, reg ul a t ions, and

tax planning principles. Emphasis on individual and business income taxation. Prerequisite:

281 . I II (4)


36 484

AUDITING

550

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND ENVIRONMENT

Com prehensive study of auditing concepts and procedures; anal­ ysis of risk through the study and evaluation of internal controls,

The study of open sociotechnical systems within which a manager

study and evaluation of account balances; reporting of risk; review

nal organization environment, including legal, ethical, social, eco­

both administrative and accounting controls, and through the

of the development and meaning of proiessional responsibility and ethics; review oi operational auditing. Prerequisites:

381, 382. I II (4)

487

281, 282,

Application of information systems concepts to the basic account­ ing iniormation systems and the expansion of traditional account­

r

ing models to include the com uterized information systems approach. Topics include manua accounting systems, reporting

objectives, procedures for systems analysis and design of account­ ing systems, behavioral aspects of systems design, audit trail,

inkrnaJ control, legal environment, audit requirements, and com· puter processing technology. Prerequisites: 281,

490

282, CSC! 220 (or

(4)

demand. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

(4)

(1-4)

Fundamental assumptions, principles, and procedures underly­

accounting model; matching of expenses with revenue; measure­ ment and- reporting of income statement and balance sheet accounts; consolidated statements; and using and interpreting

financial statements. Theoretical framework for financial deci­ sions; decision theory relative to working capital management,

short and intermediate-term financing, capital investments and

valuation, capital stnlcture and dividend policy, and long-term

(4)

FUNDAMENTALS OF MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING

Principles and processes of administration. Techniques and func­

tions of planning, orga nizing, directing, and controlling. The

flows of goods and services in the economy; economic and behav­ ioral approaches to the analysis oi d.emand; the marketing func­

tions in business firms. Determination of the marketing mix. I I I (4)

503

MANAGEMENT USE OF COMPUTERS

Topics include understanding fundamental components of com­ puter languages, statistical packages such as SPSS-x and minitab,

word processing, and spreadsheet constnlction. Prerequisite:

ECON

500 (may be concurrent). I II (2)

520

PROGRAMMING FOR MANAGERS

Computer programming

including branching,

looping, sub­

scripts, input/output, character manipulation, subroutines, file manipulations, data storage and retrieval. Advanced work Ivith

software packages. Prerequisite:

503. (4)

specification of the system. Emphasis on the iterative nature of the analysis and design process. Prerequ isites:

501, 503, 582. (4)

SEMINAR IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

In-depth study of selected topics related to management informa­

tion systems (MIS). Projects will entail application to the func­

tional areas of business. Prerequisites:

501, 520, 521 (or 587), 582.

(4)

535

I II

503, 550; ECON 500, 543.

(4)

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT

Investigation of the roles of managers in the modern society. The

exploration includes, but is not limited to the topicS of corporate

approach to these topics combines the use of cases, readings, dis­ cussions, and simulations. Prerequisites:

550, ECON 504. (4)

PLANNED ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

Detailed examination of techniques for diagnosing administrative problems requiring change, and for planning, imple menting, and

evaluating changes undertaken through systematic programs of

individual, group, and organization development. Emphasis on the problem assessment skills of internal cha nge agents and on interventions aimed at structural changes, management training,

and career development. Prerequisite:

555

550. U (4)

BUSINESS STRATEGY AND POLICY

An integrated management approach based on decision-making

analysis in complex cases and comprehensive field situations.

Advanced readings and library research integrate concepts of management and business functions including consideration of legal, social, and international aspects of the business environ­ ment. Prerequisites:

551, 564, and 570, any one of which may be 555. I II (4)

taken concurrently with

561

INVESTMENT ANALYSIS AND MANAGEMENT

Introduction to the nature, problems, and processes of evaluating partic"lar securities and portfolio construction and administra­

ticular

LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE MANAGEMENT PROCESS

Survey of federal and staie laws, rules, and regulations that directly impinge on the manager's deciSion-making in the modern

business enterprise. Includes legal implications for the individual

ma nager and his/her corporation that follow from business deci­

silms in areas such as employee relations, consumer protection,

security and exchange regulations, rights of corporate share­ holders and creditors, antitrust laws, and environmental pro­ tection. (4)

securities,

Prerequisites:

564

security

portfolios,

501, ECON 543. 1 (4)

and

total

wea l t h .

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SEMINAR

Analysis of optimal financial policies. Intensive investigation of

the valuation process and its resulting impact o n firm investment,

financing, and dividend policies. Discussion of the modern the­ ory of financial structure and policy, as well as major case analysis.

Emphasis on the application of contemporary financial theory

and analytical techniques to the solution of complex financial problems. Prerequisites:

570

INFORMATION SYSTEM S DESIGN

System development processes. Information analYSis and logical

528

design and computers. Prerequisites:

tion. Special attention to the risk and rate-of-retu r n aspects of par­

An introduction to computer systems and their uses in industry.

521

studies of modern techniques/methodologies as applied in

selected situations and industries; quantitative models, systems

554 FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE

ing accounting; transaction anal ysis and the fundamental

502

Analytical approaches to operational management; the relation­

ship of production to other functions and external factors; Case

technological change on organizations and society. The workshop

supervised by the instructor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

financing. I II

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT AND SYSTEMS SEMINAR

responsibility, ethical issues in management, and the impact of

DIRECTED STUDY

Individual studies; readings on selected topics approved and

501

551

553

SEMINAR

Seminar on specifically selected topics in business. Offered on

491

nomic, and political influences; the organization itself as an entity; and the internal organization environment. Prerequisite:

502. I II (4)

ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

equivalen t). I n

must operate. It encompasses three major perspectives: the exter­

501, 503; ECON 504, 543. I II (4)

MARKETING MANAGEMENT SEMINAR

Marketing man,lgement policies and programs; interrelated ele­ ments of the marketing mix and the relationship of marketing to

other internal functions; changing social and legal environment,

innovation, and modern marketing philosophies. PrerequiSites:

502, 503; ECON 504, 543. I I I (4)

581

SEMINAR IN FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING THEORY

Advanced accounting concepts and stan dards; current problems

and trends reflected in accounting literature; designed for profes­ sional accou ntants.

582

(4)

A.CCOUNTING INFORMATION AND CONTROL

Applications of accounting information, services, and systems to management problems. Prerequisite:

587

501, 503. I II (4)

FINANCIAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Expansion o f traditional accounting information flow models to

include computerized systems. Emphasis on the financial infor­

mation needs of management and the resulting systems require­ ments. Prerequisites:

501, 520, 582.


37 590

SPECIAL SEMINAR

591

INDEPENDENT STUDY

593 THESIS Research study to meet Thesis Option requirement for elective in the M . B . A . degree progra m . (4)

Selected advanced topics; offered on demand. (4)

Individual reading and studies on sel.'cted topics; minimum supervision after initial planning of student's work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (1-4)

Chemi The history of civilization is inseparable from the history of chemistry. Everything that occurs in nature-from mental processes and behavior, to the furniture we live around, to the tools we use for work or play, to the problems of pollution-is chemically based. Chemistry seeks to understand the fundamental nature of matter, the changes in its composition, and the energy changes accompany­ ing these changes. Use of this knowledge influ­ ences our lives in many profound ways. Whether interested in the chemical profession itself, includ­ ing biochemistry, polymer chemistry, radiation chemistry, and other specialties, or in chemistry in conjunction with other fields such as business, the social sciences, and the humanities, students will have suitable programs available to meet their inter­ ests at PLU. Diversity in career planning is a key concept in the chemistry department. Programs are available which are broadly applicable to the health, biological, physical, environmental, behavioral, and fundamental chemical sciences. The chemistry department's courses, curriculum, faculty, and facilities are approved by the American Chemical Society. The staff of eight persons with doctorates has composite expertise in virtually every field of pure and applied chemistry. The faculty are very active in basic and applied research, and most are also significantly involved in the com­ munity, applying their expertise to enhance the quality of life of the citizens. The department uses numerous scientific instru­ ments in the laboratories. Such major research and teaching equipment includes: n ue/ear magnetic reso­ nance, infrared, ultra-violet, visible, atomic absorption, flame photometry, emission, and e.lectnm spin resonance spectrometers; X-ray crystallog raphic diffractometer; gas and liquid ch romatographs; precision refractometer; dipolometer; scintillation counter; wne refiner; a complex microprocessor system; and a fluorometer.

Faculty research projects involving student partici­ pation are in progress in many important fields of chemistry. Some of the general areas are : polymer stn/cture and properties, synthesis ofheterocyclic com­ pounds, fungal and chemical cleavage of lignin, sirllc­ tural and mag netic studies of inorganic complexes, organic kinetics, photochemical reactions, the role of n u t rition in health, and the biochemistry of drug actions.

FACUIIY Giddings, Chair; C. Anderson, Huestis, Nesset, Osborne, Swank, Tobiason, Tonn. Degrees in chem istry a re the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science for students wishing to structure their undergraduate education .l round a full ch e mi s try m.l jo r. The B . A . program is the minimum preparation suitable for further professional studies and is often combined with extensive study or a second major in an allied field. The B . S. program involves additional chemistry courses and serves both students go ing directly i.nt" employment u n graduation and those going intl) graduate programs. lt is offered with emphasis in chemist ry, biochemistry, or chemical physics. The first option is an A merican Chemical Society certi­ fied program . The latter two options are offered in cooperation with the biology and physics departments for students wishing to work at the interfaces between chemistry and biology Or physics. Students contemplating a major in chemistry are invited to discuss thdr interests and plans with members of the chemistry faculty at the earliest possible time. Opportunities for honors work i n chemistry are described below. Students deciding to majm in chemistry should officially decl<lre their intent aiter having cLlmpleted Chemistry 331 il n d after consultation with a faculty adviser i n t h e chemistry depart­ men t . Transfer students desiring to major i n che.mistry should consult a departme ntal adviser no later than the beginning of the ju nior year. The foreign language requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences should pre fe rab l y be met in German or Russian. The chemist ry department considers computer usage to be an in creasingl y important tool in professional and personal activi­ ties. Further, laboratory work in the department places consider· able emph asis on computer use. Therefore, the department strongly recommends that a student planning to major in chemistry take at least One two-credit hour course in computer science.


38 BAC H E lOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry 1 15 , 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 33 1 , 332, 333, 334, 34 1 , 342, 343, 460. Required supporting courses: Ph sics 147, 148, 153, 154; Moth 1 5 1 , 152. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR (t h",,, alt"rn" t ives): t . CClIcral-Iends 10 A merical1 Chemical So(iety ccrtifict1tioll: C hemis­ try lIS, 1 16, 32 1 , 331, 332, 333, 334, 34 1, 342, 343, 344, 405 or 450 or 451>. 435, 460, 490; P hy s i cs 147, 148, 153, 154; M,l t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 . For A m t'rit',1n hemicnl Socil,tv certification, 450 <1 nd ' either 405, 456, or Cooperative Edu cation 476 arc required. 2 . Biochemistr\f emplli"';: C he mi st ry 1 1 5, 1 16 , 321, 331, 332, 333, 334, 34 1 , 343, 403, 405, 435, 460, 490; Biology 155, 156, 253, 254; four hours selected irom Biology 322, 326, 33 1 , 346, 359, 375, 3R5, 44' 1 or Chemistry 342; Physics 147, 148, 153, 1�4; . 1�1 , 152.

3.

Math

.

Chemical-physic5 "1 i,!';'a,i" Chemistry 1 15, 1 1 6, 331 , 332, 333,

334, 341, 342, 343, 344, 460; Physics 147, 148, 153, 154, 331, 332, 336, 356; Moth t 5 t, 152, 253.

Generalized Chemistry Cuuiculum for the B.S. Degree

FALL

C he m . 1 1 6 152 P hysics 154 or

B iolog y 156 (2)

PE IOU o r "cti" ity

C h e l11 . 3 3 ) , 333 I'hysics 153 lJI' Biology 15" (2) Two additional n.l urscs

Chem.

332, 334

Ph.ysics 154 Or Biology 1 56 (2) Two additional cuurses

104

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

Basic principlcs of chem ic.1! struct ure and re.d.ctinns, with applica­ tions to h u m a n activities cl nd tht' natural environ m � n t . No p rereq­ uisite; s t u d t:' nts without high school c hem L'itry arc encou raged to

115. Phy,ical therapy a n d military req u i ri ng a yein of chemistry should inclu de '104 and 105. Also s uit .1bl c for environmt'ntid �tudies, gener"i sri� ence teachers, B. A . in �.1fth scil'nces, .1 nd �(:' nc ral u n i versity core 105

CHEMISTRY OF LIFE

General, organic, and biochemistry pertinent to chemical proc­

esses in the h u m a n orgil nism; suitablt3 fur l i b e r,,! clrts studt::'n ts, nursing students, and prospective teachers. Students who hc1V� before t" king

115, 1 16

105. J[ (4)

encourag ed

to t<1kc 104

GENERAL CHEMISTRY

First semester tDpics include the structure of matter, atomic and molecular theory, state.s o f matter ilnd quantitat ive relationships.

J unior

Chem. 342, 344 Core course( s ) E lectives

Chem 34 1 . 343 hem . 32 1 ore rourse(s)

Sen>nd semester topics include kinetics, chemical equilibrium,

thermochemistry, study o f t h e elements grouped accord ing to the pcriLldic tc'lb!e, radio-chemistry, and inorganic qualitative an<llys is.

Designed prim,"il)' for students who want to major i n b i olog y,

Ekchves

c h e m istry, engineerin);, geol ogy, or p hy s ics . Includes aU pre medi­

Senior

·hem . 460 hem . 490 Electives

Chern. 435 F.lecti\'('s

cal, predcntal, pharmacy,

me di c a l technology

student s, and stu­

dents p l t1 n n i ng to transfer to .some u niversity dental hyg ie n e progra m s .

High school c hemistr y o r pe rnl i ss ion of instructor

rc q ui red . S t u dt'nts with n o high school (h�mistry or \""fslk milthc­

( 1 ) RI.:.·fer to the Divi�ion of 0Jaturai Sciences section of this

c.:ll,dog for other beginning cu rric u l u m options.

(2) The department stresses the im portance oi taking physics du ring eitiwr the in_'shman yet'l f o r the sophomore year. T h i s p e r m i t s a better understanding of ch em ist ry (lnd en<lbles a student to complete d egree requirements \vith no schedu li n g d i fficulties in the junior and senior y('afs. (3) Stud,'nts desiring to fuliiLl t h e College of Arts and SciL'nees forcign languagl' requirement u nd er Option I , or Whl) desire to dtt(,in or maintain il la n gu .1ge proficiency, should t<lkl' <1 langlldge cou rSt' dS pa f t of their optional course selections.

DEPARTMENTA L HONORS: In recognition of outstanding \\'ork, t h t' dc.sig·nation 7.uith Departmental H01lors may bE' grallted by vol<.' of the i,1('u l ty of the Chemistry Oepartmc.nt, based on the student's p c rfo rm anc(' in th es e <1Jc a s : ( I ) COlfrsc lcork: The gr<lde point average i n ch emistry cOli rSt.'s

.

(2) Wrill el1 work. From thl' time a stud en t declares a major in chL'mistry, copies of outstzlIlding work (e. g . , labo rc1tory,

st;.' m i n ()r, and r('.scc1fch rcport s ) w i l l be kept for later summary ('v(lluatioI1.

Oml (omnlllllicntior!.

COURSE OFFERINGS

not completed high school chemistry (1 re

S{)phon1ore

(3)

MINOR : 21 se me ste r hours, including 1 1 5, 1 1 1'i, 3 21 , 331 , 332, 333, and 334, compl et e d with gradc, of C or higher.

requi re ments or College of A r t s and Sciences option 1 1 1 . 1 (4)

Math

( o r corE' course)

must be ot l e a s t 3 . 50

i ng program seque nce shl)uld be ioUnwed through th" iirst yea r with Ch emistr y n5 ,l n d 1 1 6 t ak en in pla ce of Genen11 Physics. G e ne ral Phys ics and Organic C hemistry should be token during the second year. The d epa rt m e nt chair should be consulted for assignment of a progr..lm a d viser.

n u rsing prugrJms

Optionol fourth cou rst' (3)

PE lOU or activity

the Physics-Engineering section o f t h i s c.1talog. T h e 3 - 2 engineer­

tilke 104 before taking 105 or

SPRING

F",'shmon ( 1 ) Chem . 1 1 5 Moth 1 5 1 Physics 153 or Biology 1 55 (2)

CHEMICAL ENGIN E E RING: Students interested i n p u rsuing studies in ciu.\micai engineering should sec the course outline i n

Students m u s t cvidencE' (1 bility to (0 111 -

ll1 u n ira t (' cfft.1 ctively as indic(lted by the sum of their pilrtici­ pation in c!d.S S discussions, seminilrs, help session leadership, ,l nd te.ach ing assista n t s h i p work.

' 4) /l1(iCp Clldellt (hemistry-relaJect acfipitics. Po siti ve considerations include the extent and q u ali t y of ('xtracurriculilr work done in backg roun d r e a d ing, independent study, and research;

,lSsisting in laboratory preparation, t(,<1Ching, or advising; (l ny

uther chcmistry-rL'i ated emp loym e n t , on cll m p u s or el se­ where; .1nd participCltion in campus and profession.11 chemis­ try·rdc'l kd organizations. The d e partment ,1 1 honors deSignation will appear on a gradu­

maticol bac kgro u nd should take 104 bcfml' this course. Corequis­ ite: M ATH 133. Prerequisite: 1 1 5 f o r 1 1 6 ; I f o r 1 1 ') , I I ior 1 16. (4, 4)

210

NUTRITION, DRUGS, AND THE INDIVIDUAL

I\n introduction to basic metabolk inlL'ractipns, gt·ncral endocri­

J1Ll!ugy, mind {lnd body interactions, and roles of d rugs in modify· ing biological and l"lChaviurai functions. N u trition topics will include food p reparation, " t he balanced m",ll philosophy," n u tri­

tional myths, the effects of s t res s, envirunment,1 1 c1 nd societal i n fluences on diet. Pr0r('Cjuisitcs: one yc.cl J of h igh school chl'mis­

try or equ ival e n t suggested. Meets gL'neral u n i v e r s i t y ('ore req u i re­ ments. 1 (4)

321

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Chemical meth()ds of quantitative an<1!ysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and sdt'Cted instrumental method s . Prerequisites:

116 a n d MATH 1 3� . 1 (4 )

331, 332

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

An i n t e rpretatiun of properties and reactions of alip h a t ic an d ,l fO­

matic compounds on uisite:

the basis of currenl chcn1ical theory. PrerE'll­

1 1 6 . Corequisites: 333, 334. 1 1 1 (4, 4)

333, 334

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORAlORY

Reactions a n d conventionJi a n d modern techniques of s y n t h e si s , sepcuatio n , and ana lysis

uf organic compounds.

)\<1 ust accompany

33 1 , 332. I I I ( 1 . 1 )

336

ORGANIC SPECIAL PROJECfS LABORAlORY

Indiv i d u a l proj e ct s emphasizing c ur rent profess ional-levc'l meth­

ng Lhl'mistry mtljor\ dipluma and trl1ll.script .

ods oi synth e si s a n d property determ in<ltion of organic com­ pounds. This courSe is on al tern,ltive to 334 o n d typically requires

3ACHELOR OF ARTS IN ED UCATION: Students i n t e rested

somewhat more timc colll m i t m e n t . Students who \vish to prepare

this degree develop their chemistry prq,'Tilm through t h e

for careers in chemistry or rei(ltcd areas should apply for depart­

:>artn1L'nt in conjunction w i t h the School o f Educotion. See

mental approvill of their ildnlission to this cou rSl'.

1001 of Educcltiun section.


39 341

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

490

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH

A s tu d y of the re la t i on sh i p between the t'nergy conte nt of sys­

A course des igned to introduce the student to l abora to ry resea rc h

t t' m s, work, and the physical and chemica l p roperties oj matter.

t ech n iq u es. lise of the c hem ic al literature, research proposJI and

Topics include classical and statistical thermodynamics, thermo-

h � mi s t ry, sol u t io n pro pe rti es, and phase eq u i l ibria. Prere ,!u i­

sites: C H I:.M 1 1 5, M ATI 1 1 52, PHY5 154. 1 (4)

342

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

report w ri t ing . Em p ha s is will be on the student d evel op ing and making pr()gr�ss on an i nde pe nden t chemical resei'rch problem

chose n in con su l t at i on with a member of the chemis try fa c ul ty Pre requ isit e : 342. I (2)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

A study of the phy� i cal pro pert ies of atoms, ITIlllL'cules and i on s, and th�ir correla tio n with structure. Topics i ncl u de classical a n d

491

m o d e rn q ua nt u m mech a n ics, b o n d i n g t h �or y, atomic and molec­ ubr structure, spectroscopy, and c hem ic,1 1 kinetics. f'rere'!uisites:

offered c ou rses . Proposed p ro ject must be ilpproved by de p art ­

C H EM 1 15,

tor. May be taken more than once. I !I ( 1 , 2, or 4)

343, 344

MATH 152,

PHYS 154. I! (4)

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABO RATO RY

Experi me nts in thermodynanlics, sol u t io n behavior, and mo l ec lI ­ l a r st r uct u re de sig ne d t(,) a cqu a in t students with in�trllmL'ntiition,

dat,1 h andling, correlati ons wi th t h e ory, and data rel iability. Com­

puter llsage is e nco u raged . Corl'quisit� or p re requ isi te : 34 1 , 342. I II ( I , I )

360

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY: A NON-CALCULUS APPROACH

Of fered si m ul t a neousl y with 450. Includes se p a ra te p ro blem s and

BIOCHEMISTRY

An oVl'rvicw, in c l u d ing biochemical structures, n1t�chanisms uf reactiu ns, mct<lbolisnl, ge n et ics, basic p harmacology r-e l e van t to mechanism� of re actions, and the biochemistry of the c<,l1. Majors .He encouraged t o take both 403 a nd 405 jor .1 mOre complete u nd e rst a nd ing of bi och e mistry. AI�o f r B. A. majors and non­ majors i n terested in bi o ch emis t ry a s a sup port ing field of knowl­ e dge . L ab o ra to r y d e sig n e d to s t i m ulate creat i v i t y and probl e m- solv i ng abilities t h ro ug h the use of mod C' rn biochemical techniques. Prerequ isite s : 332, 334. I (4)

405

BIOCHEMISTRY

A s t ud ' of chemical reactions ilnd st n.lct u rC5 in living cells. To pics include enzyme kinetics a n d m echa n i s ms of Ciltalysis, mct,lbu­ l ism ,

and

b i oc h e mic al genetic�. Conce p ts introduced i n PhysiC<11

C h e m ist ry and B ioc h emistry w i l 1 be applied in t h is (Ourse. Designed for st uden ts interested i n g rod uat e school tlr res earch .

Pre"'qui,ites: 332, 334, 34'1 andlOr 342 or permiss i on , 403. Jl (2)

435

INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS

Theory and prac t ice of instrumental methud s along with basic

electronics. Sp eC ial emphasis w il 1 be p l aced on radiocl1<,mic,11. m..1SS spectrometric, chromatographk', ilnd electroml'tric mt� t h­ ods. Prereq u isites : 321, 341 and/or 342, 343. Jl (4)

450

INORGANIC CHEM ISTRY

Tec h n iq u es of s t r uct u ral determination (m, UV, VIS, N M R, X-ray, EI'R), bo nd ing p r indp les, n on -me t ,, 1 compo unds, (tlord in,1tion chem ist ry, organometal1ics, donor: acceptor concepts, ",action pathways and bioch em i ca l applications Me cove red. l<1b oratory

w i l l include sy n t hes i s a n d an in-depth ex plora t ion oj t h � phy sical p ro pe r t ies of nun-ml>taL c oord i n,ltio n and orga n o me taU ic com­ pounds. Prerequisites: 3 3 1 . 332, 341; wreLl uisl tc 342. all' II (3)

456

POLYMERS AND BIOPOLYMERS

/\ cou rse p r(' sen t ing the fu nd a m ent al s

of po l ymer synthesis, solu­

t h e rmodYllilmic p r o p ert i es, Ill ui€'('uiar c h a rllcterization, molecula r weight distributions, a n d solution kinetics. Free ra d i ca l,

t io n

condensation, ionic, and biopolymer systems are coVl're d, with

illustr,1ted a pplicat io ns taken from the m edica l , engin("cring, and c h emi ca l fields. The

nne-credit

l a bo ratory examining polyme r

synthesis t hro ugh e.xpcrimcnts is optional. Pre req u is i te : 341; cure4uisite, 342. a/y I I (3 )

460

ment chair and su pe rviso r y respons i bi lit y acce p te d by an inst ruc­

497

RESEARCH

Experimen t ,11 or theoretical invest ig,1 t io n open to upper division students with consent of de pa r t m en t chair. May be taken more than once. G e nerally will consist of an cxp,1I1dcd study of the research project develo pe d in 490. I I ! ( 1, 2, or 4)

597, 598

GRADUATE RESEA RCH

O p en to master's debTfee candidates o n ly. Prer el.J uis i t e : consent of

Sl)Jnc sep a ra t e !ect u res. at)' I ! (3)

403

Li b r.". y andi o r labo rato ry st u d y of t op ics nut included in reg u la r l y

SEMINAR

Presentation by st u d en ts of knowledgt' ga i ned by personal librory or lahoratory research, s uppl emen ted with seminars by p ract iCi ng scientists. Pa rtiC ipat ion of all seninr che mist ry m tlju rs is required and ,111 other chemistry-oriented st u d e nt s are enc o u rag e d to parti­ cipate. Seminar program will be held d ur ing the e n t i re year but formal regist ra t ion will be in the spring semester. I !I ( 1 )

de p ar t m e n t chair. I II (2-4)


40

College 0 Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities English Languages Philosophy Religion

Division of Natural Sciences Biology Chemistry Earth Sciences Mathematics and Computer Science Physics and Engineering

Division of Social Sciences A nthropology Economics History Political Science Psychology Social Work and Marriage and Family Therapy Sociology

Degrees Offered Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science MAJOR REQUIREMENT

A major is a sequence of courses in one area, usually in one department. A major should be selected by the end of the sopho­ more year. The choice must be approved by the department chair (or in the case of special academic programs, the program coordi­ nator). Major requirements are specified in this catalog. The qual­ ity of work must be 2.00 or better. D grades may be counted toward graduation but not toward a major. Recognized majors are: Legal Studies Anthropology Art Mathematics Biology Music Chemistry Norwegian Classics Philosophy Commu nication Arts Physical Education PhYsics Computer Science Earth Sciences Po litical Science Economics Psychology Engineering Religion Scandinavian Area Studies English Social Work French Sociology German History Spanish Not more than 40 semester hours earned in one department may be applied toward the bachelor's degree in the College.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE/ALTER N ATIVE REQUIREMENTS

In addition to meeting general university requirements, candi­ dates in the College must meet the requirements of Option I, II, or 1Il: l . 16 semester hours in one foreign language' II. 8 semester hours in one foreign language' 4 semester hours in logic, math/computer science (except MATH 101), or statistics 4 semester hours in history, literature, or language I l l . 4 semester hours in history, literature, or language 4 semester hours in social science, which may include geogra­ phy 4 semester hours in natural science, exclu ding math and geog­ raphy 4 semester hours in logic, math/computer science (except MATH 101), or statistics 'Option I may be satisfied by four years of high school study in one foreign language. If students have less than four years, place­ ment and credit should be determined by examination. Freshmen planning to continue in a foreign language begun in high school should take the College Board Placement Test offered during ori­ entation. (This test is required of those freshmen who plan to study German, French, or Spanish . ) Continuation of a foreign lan guage should not be deferred . Students with 2-3 years of high school language who wish to continue should register for the second yearcourse. Students may receive credit for any language course in which they are placed without regard to high school credit. Final decision of placement is made by the Department of Lmguages. Students may not receive credit if they vol untarily select a course level lower than that in which the department places theM. The ioreign lang uage requirement in Option II may be met by satisfactory scores on a proficiency examination or by more than two years of high school work in a single language. Two years are sufficient if the grade point average for the total units in that lan­ guage is 3.00. Candidates for the B.A. in English, or for the B.A. in Education ' with concent ration in English, must meet Option I . No course will be allowed to meet both general university requirements and College of Arts and Sciences requirements. Where possible, courses taken to fuliill such requirements shall be in different areas.


41

Communication Arts I n order to explore fully their potential as human beings, people must first expand their abilities to communicate. Communication is the process by which feelings and ideas are shared and is the foundation on which learning rests. Providing a field for both humanistic and scientific research, the communication arts focus on how and why people communicate through language (both spoken an.d written) and through nonverbal means. The effects of all forms of human communication are also studied . Within the Department of Communication Arts, four distinct, vet interrelated areas of human com­ munication �ay be explored: broadcasting, journal­ ism, interpersonal communication, and theater. Students majoring in any of these areas articulate and test their ideas, develop their individual abili­ ties, and gain competence in various strategies for improving effective communication . They acquire knowledge and skills that apply to nearly every aspect of their private and public l ives. C areer prospe.cts for students tra ined in communi­ cation are excellent. A person's career may ulti­ mately turn out to be quite different from what was originally anticipated, of course, but in a rapidly changing world, certain fundamental skills and resources are necessary for adaptation and success. As the work environment in the coming decades becomes increasingly oriented toward communica­ tions, it will be critically important for students to have the ability to communicate clearly and effec­ tively, both orally and in wTiting. Those who major or minor in one of the communication arts will be far ahead of their contemporaries who neglect to prepare for the world of tomorrow.

2. I nterpersonal Communication-Required Courses: 123, 233, 283, 32h, 328 (or 234 plus an " dditional 2 hours), 435, 436, plus 12 houJS from communication arts courses selected i n consul­ tation with adviser. Students electing a I",blie reintions empha­ sis are req uired to take 123, 171, 233, 283, 285, 326, 328 (or 234 plus an a d d d i t ional 2 hours), 330, 435, and 436. 3 . Jou rnalism-Required Courses: 1 23, 1 7 1 , 233, 283, 380, 38 1 , 384, 480, p l u s 8 hours from communication arts courses selected in consultation with adviser. Required supporting areas: 4 hours each in economics, history, a n d political science plus

8 additional hours in one of those areas. Students must

earn a grade of B i n 283 or have the instructor's permissiun in

order to advance in the sequence.

4. Theater-Requ i red Cou"es:

151, 160, 225, 241, 250, 356, 357, 363, 364, 425, plus 6 huurs from communication arts courses selected in consultut"ion \"" ith adviser.

In add ition to requi",ments listed above, candidates for the

B . A . degree must meet the foreign language req uirement in the

College of Arts and Sciences.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: At le,lst

52 semester 2 practicums in any of the two areas of concentratil)n 8 roadcasting-Rc<juired COurses: 123, 171, 233, 283, 373, 374, 378, and 381, plus 20 hours selccted in cons ultation with hours plus

adviser.

Theater-Required Courses: 123, 151, 241, 250, 356, 357, 363, 364, " n d 454, plus Ih hours selected in consultation with ad\lis-:'r.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN E DUCATION: Sec School of

Education.

MINORS It1te rpersonal Communicat ion:

20 semester hOurs, including 1 23, 233, 326 or 328, 330, and 435 or 436. Public Relations: 20 semester hours, including 1 23, i7l, 283, 285, and 435 or 43h. Theater: 20 semester hours, including 151, 160, 241, 250, plus 4 hours from' commun ication arts courses seiL'Ctcd in consultation

with adviser.

The Dance Minor is cross-referenced with the School uf Plwsi­

,

cal Education. See the description of that minor under Phy,i al Education. The Publishing and Printing Arts Minor is cross-referenced with the Department of English. See the description of that

minor under English.

FACUIIY

COURSE OFFERINGS

Spicer, Chair; Bartanen, Becvar, Doughty, Gillette, Nordholm, Parker, Rowe, Wilson.

123

CORE REQUIREMENT: Only the following courses from

Communication Arts may be used tu meet the core requirernent in the a r t s :

1 5 1 , 162, 241 , 250, 359, 363, 364, 458.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

the areas of concentratio n :

40 semester hours in �nY - of

1 . B roadcasti n g-Required Courses: 123, 171, 233, 283, 373, 374, 378, 381, pillS 8 hours from commu nication art, courses selected in consuit,1tion with adv iser. Required supporting areas: plus

4 hours each i n economics, histo ry, and political science

8 additional

hours in one of those areas. Students must

earn a grade of B in

283 Or have the instructor's permission in

order to advance in the sequence.

FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION

Foundations cOurse that introduces the student to a variety of

communication contexts. EmphaSizes three areas: commur1ica­

tion concepts, i nterpersonal communication, and public speak­

ing.

151

[ 1 1 (4)

STAGE TECHNOLOGY

Basic theory and procedure of technical aspects i n set building,

costume construction, basic drafting, scenery, the assembling, handling, management of t h e stage, and extensive shop work.

[ (4)

160

INTRODUCfION 10 THEATER

Study of both practical and theoretic,11 aspects of the"ter. Expo­ sure to theater and its numerous offshoots ( e . g . , fil m , television,

ruck concerts) t h rough a u d ience p, rtkipation and personal con­

tad. Development of heightened awareness and appreciation of what makes for good theater. ( 4 )


42 162

HISTORY OF AMERICAN FILM

Concentrates on the developme�nt and growth of the motion pic­

325

TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION

VMious content, dependent on faculty assessment of student

ture in the United States from 1895 t 1 the present. Emph"sis on

needs and interests. Topics announced during the fall semester

the film d irector, whose. implementation of film technique and

preceding the course offering. Prerequisite:

t h eory serves as the formative artistic force in the cinema. Societal

inst ructor. (2)

influenl:es slich as economic factors, public attitudes and mores,

U3 or consent of

GROUP COMMUNICATION

and political positions reflected in the Un ited States throughout

326

t h e past 75 years, which provide the film media with shape and

Survey and analysis of smilll group communication theory a n d

thematic focus, will provide parallel points of reference. (4)

researc h . I I (4)

171

MASS MEDIA

328

S urvey of the mass media. History, organization, and mechanics o f print and broadc(1st media. Role of mass

communication

ARGUMENTATION

The study of reason-giving in social decision-making. AnalysiS of

in

the genres, forms and techniques oi arguers. Particular emphasis

developing the political, sociill, and economic f,lbrics uf a demo­

is given to studying academic, legal, and public policy debates.

cratic society. Analysis of the journalist's audience, journalistic

(4)

vocations, and s()cial and legal responsibilities of the med i a . (4)

225, 425

COMMUNICATION ARTS PRACTICUM

One semeste.r hour cred i t may be earned each semester, but only 4 semester hours may be lIsed to meet u niversity requirements. Majors are req u i red to take at least two practicums in one or a com­ bination of the three areas of interest. Students put classroom the­ ory to practical appl ication by individually completing a project relating to an aspect of communication. An instructor in the are" of interest must approve the project and agree to provide guid­ ance. I I I

233

123 or consent of instructor. (4)

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION

The study of methods of gathering, interpreting, and evaluating data in the study of human communication. Both quantitative and qualitative reseMch methods. (2)

236

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

The s t u d y of t h eories and variables relating to the nature of and problems involved in t h e communication 01 individuals l1l1 a one­ to-one basis. (2)

241

ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE

The art of cummunicating the essence of a piece of literature to an

a u d ience;

interpreting it experien ti" l1y, logically, and emotionally.

Individual and group performance. 1 1 1 (4)

250

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING

An examination of the work of actors and actresses, their natural and learned skills; exercises i n memory, imagination, and obser­ vation; improvisations and scenes from modern plays. (4)

283

NEWS WRITING

Basic news and feature writing for print and broadcast media with special attention to clarity, accuracy, and de.1dlir.cs. Most writing done in class under deadline. Techniques nf interviewing and fact­ gathering. Nl.'wS staff orga nization and procedures. Prerequisite:

1 7 1 or concurrent enrollment. 1 (4)

285

INTRODUCTION TO PUBUC RELATIONS

Introduction to the theory, research, and practical aspects of pub­ lic relations. Problem-solving toward creating shared understand­ ings between profit and non-pr()fit organizations and their various constituencies. Strong emphasis on writing. (4)

322

MEN, WOMEN, AND COMMUNICATION

I n t roduction to the means by which appropriate gender roles are Cllmmunicated by the mass media and the ways in which cultural gender role definitions influence how ,>eople communicate with each other. Prereq uisite: 123 o r consent of instTuctor. (2)

323

WORDS, PEOPLE, AND SOCIETY

Examination of how language affects one's interpretation of t h e w o r l d . Focus on the u s e o f symbols, particularly in relation t o t h e m a s s m e d i a . Prerequisite: 123 or consent of instructor. (2)

324

NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION

Focus on the nonverbal aspects of communication within the framework of interpe.rso nal interaction. PrerequiSite: 123 o r COI1sent of instructor. (2)

PUBLIC SPEAKING a variety of speaking

situations and presentatiol111l meth­

ods. To pics vary according to the skill iewl of course participants. Potential topics include audi ence analysis, technical reporting, using visuil.l aids, and persu(lsion . Open to both m<ljors und nOll­ majors. (4)

356

STAG E LIGHTING

Stage lighting from the basic development of electricity a n d light­ ing instruments to

357

FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNICATION THEORY

A n introduction to the theoretical concepts and research tools of interpersonal and mass communication researc h . Prerequisite:

234

330

Focus on

the complete design of lighting a show. II (4)

INTERMEDIATE ACTING, THE ACTOR AT WORK

Study of the actor on today's stage. Work on the anal ysis and per­ formance of the modern realistic play. Practical experience in the

art of the actor t h rough performance Df scenes from plays of the modern theater, emphasis on the importance uf play analysis by the actor, and examination of current acting theory. Prerequisite:

250. (4)

358

ADVANCED ACTING

Study of the work of an actor; character analysis and embodiment, using scenes from plays; includes style.s of acting as defined by historical period. Prerequisite: 357.

359

II (4)

ACTING FOR THE NON-ACTOR

Study of the actor's craft a n d the implementation of theory. Spe­ cifically designed for those who have nourished a curiosity to explore t h e art of acting but have been intimidated by a lack of knowledge or prior experience. I ntroduction of acting theory to those who have never participclted i n ilny theatrical endeavor. Emphasis on indi vidual aw.Heness and interest. Not open to the­ ater majors or minors. (4)

363

HISTORY OF THE THEATER: AESCHYLUS THROUGH TURG ENIEV

Theater as i t evolved from its primit ive origin through representa­ tive societies; Ancient Cree-eel Rome, Renaissance, mode.rn ElIr�)­ pean and American. Emphasis on religious, philosophical, and polit ic.,l thought as reflected in t h e drama of each period.

364

H ISTORY OF THE THEATER: IBSEN THROUGH TO THE PRESENT

(See description for

373

I (4)

363 . ) I I (4)

AUDIO PRODUCTION

Elements of audio production; a n alysis oi prog ram design, script­ ing, and productil)l1 tools and techniques. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: 283 or consent of instructor. (4)

VIDEO PRODUCTION

374

Analysis and

application of program design, writing and produc­

tion tools and techniques. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:

373. (4)

378

BROADCAST JOURNALISM

Tech n iques of broadcast journalism. Applications of news gather­ ing, writing and reporting in a broadcast context. News and fea­ ture assignments using broadcast equipment in the field and studio. Prerequisite: 374. (4)

380

NEWSPAPER EDITING, LAYOUT, AND DESIGN

Selection and editing of news copy and headline writing. Selec­ tion, sizing, and cropping of photos. Functions of layout. Princi­ ples of newspaper design

and their practical applications.

Prerequisite: 283. (4)

381

MEDIA LAW AND PRINCIPLES

The theory and application oi law in news gathering, publishing, and broadcasting. (4)


43 384

phies. Each student is required to direct scenes from plays repre­

ADVANCED NEWS REPORTING

Reporting of politics and police, courts and other governmental functions.

Investigative re port i ng and

a n d writing exercises. Prerequisite:

388

writing. Blend of field trips

283. (4)

pers and broadcast. Function of the editorial and editorial pages in

3139

283. (2)

and individual levels

(2)

ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

Communication systems and studies within formal organizations. Rlcus on theory

1 5 1 , 250,

and junior status.

A

final

project,

1 1 (4)

CREATIVE DRAMATICS

Designed to acqu<1int the student with m<1terials, techniques, and theories of creative dramatics. Students participate in creative dra­ matics. I ntended for elementary and j u nior high school teachers and camp counselors, day care

Ethical practices at the corporate, stnif,

435

periods of theater history.

or prospective teachers, theater majors, religious leaders, youth

NEWS MEDIA ETHICS

w i t h i n news organizahons.

PrerequiSites:

458

EDITORIAL WRITING

Research and writing of editorials and commentaries for newspa­ the news media. Prerequisite:

sentative of all

consisting of a contemporary scene, will c u l m i nate the course.

and research of informational and d irective com­

m unication as related t o channels, structures, status, involve­

ments,

morale, and leadership. Prerequisite:

436

PERSUASION

446

WORKSHOP IN EFFECTIVE LISTENING

233. (4)

with children. S

475

und psychological

(4)

in

working

ADVANCED MEDIA PRODUCTION

Producing, s c r i p t i ng, d irecting, performing ,md eva l u a t ing s o p h i s t icated a u d io and video progra m m i n g .

Pr('requ isi t e :

378. (4)

480

AnaJysis and evaluation of the dimensions of p e rsu asio n in com­ munication emphasizing contemporary theoretical models and research. I nvest iga t io n of how research . and models may be "pplied in con te m porary set t i ng s . P rereq u is i t e: 233. (4)

IVorkeJ's, socjal

workers, and community theater leaders intere st e d

IN-DEPTH AND INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING

Grou p reporting in depth on a single issue. Students select the subject, organize the staff, research an d i nterview, provide illus­ trations, edit copy, and lay out t h e completed work. Submission of students' work to the Moori,,:.: Mast for possible publication. Pre­ requ isite s : 380, 384. (4)

Examination of listening as a critical communication skill, which

485

ca n be en h'lI1ced through tmining. Exploration of the art of listen­ ing through a week-long se ries of readings, lectures, d iscussil)ns, exercises, and practical applic.1tiuns. (2)

with the relationship of communication t heory, mass communica­

450

t i o n . Limited

ous aud iences, types of speeches, use of visual aids, and delivery. as s pe a ke rs. A week-long series of lectures, discussions,

readings, exercises, and practical a pplications to help participants

452

(2)

SCENIC DESIGN

Artistic

and t echn ical development

of abilities in designing scen­

1I1d periods as well as preparation of models, renderings, working

drawings, and scenic painting. Prerequisite:

25 1 . 11 (4)

PLAY DIRECTION

The role of the director, historically and lTitic.,l1y; .111 intensive

study that

is

m ajo rs

communica­

the bulk of their

issues common to the t h ree areas. Students complete a research paper covering some applitation of the intn1disciplinary nature of communication.

491, 492, 493

(4)

SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION ARTS

Investigations or research in a rea of special interest

not covered by A stu·

regular courses; open to qua l ified junior or senior students.

ery, costumes, and make-up for plays of all periods; various styles

454

tn 16 s tud e n ts who have completed

Llrts

major requirements. Discussion of research a n d philosophical

Designed for both novices and those who haw had some experi­

become more comfortable and effective as speakers.

A seminar to acquaint senior level co m m u n ica t io n

tion, and theater as parts of the discipline of human

WORKSHOP IN EFFECTIVE PUBLIC SPEAKING

Audience analysis, topic se.lection, organization of ideas for vari­

ence

INTRA DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES IN COMMUNICATION

both practical and theoretical in its approach to the

dent should not begin registration for independent study u ntil thE specific area for investigation has been approved by a depart. mental sponsor.

596-598

( 1 -4)

RESEARCH IN COMMUNICATION ARTS

For gradu" tc students only.

( 1 -4)

art of the play director. Study of many different directing philoso-

Computer Science Computer science deals with

manipulating

stored information, both textual and numericaL By using the ideas of computer science along with a computer system people can actually amplify their thought processes. Already many new ideas in mathematics, physics, engineering, chemistry, economics, and other fields were either suggested, verified, or expanded by the use of computer sci­ ence. The exploration of the solar system using space probes would h ave been impOSSible without computer science. The list of significant advances in knowledge aided by computer science seems endless.

Computer science students study the theory, design, and application of computing systems. The program covers various programming languages, the development and analysis of algorithms, hard­ ware and software design and special topics in such areas as graphics, pattern recognition, data base management, and fault-tolerant computing.

FACUIIY: Mathematics and Computer Science

Edison, Chair; Bandy, Batker, Brink, Dollinger, B. Dorner, C. Domer, Harter, J. Herzog, M. Herzog, McBride, N . C. Meyer, C. L. Nelson, G . Peterson, Ruble, Spillman, Welsh, Yiu.


44 BEGINNING CLASSES There are two beginning level classes in computer science: Computer Science 110 is programming in BASIC and Computer Science 144 is programm ing in Pascal. Students intt'nding to major in computer science or mathematics or who intend to take more computer science clas,es are advised to take Computer Science 144 first. Computer Science 1 10 is for those who want only an introduction to programming. I n place of Computer Science 1 10 a student may take Computer Science 220. COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR The program is designed to provide sufficient background for advanced study at the graduate level or for enteriog a profes­ sional career. All computer science m.ajors take a core curriculum consisting of an introduction to programming in PASCAL, data structures, digital logic, and assembly language and computer organization (Computer Science 144, 270, 280, and 380). The core courses form a foundation for upper division work, which may include the study of microprocessors, computer architecture, automata, modeling and simulation, and compilers as well as other topics. The program is supported by PLU's VAX 1 1 1780 and 1 1 /750 computing systems, which are available for intera.ctivc use at a variety of locations on campus. In addition, the department has an Alpha micro system, a Tektronix 4054 graphiCS computer, two APPLE's, a PDP 1 1/24 system with UNIX, and five DEC LSI 11 micro systems for student use. Several terminals are available for student usc in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. A typical computer sdence major program is as follows: Computer Science 144, 270 Freshman year: Math 151. 152 8 hours laboratMy science (or sophomore year) Sophomore year: Computer Science 280, 380 Second computer language Math 230 or 331 Junior & Senior years: Computer science electives (Computer Science 490 may be taken several times with different topics) Math 345, 341

Careers in computer science include designing computers and computer systems and applying compu ters to areas such as business administration, economics, and the sciences, as well as teaching and research. Students interested in business adminis­ tration should take courses in the School of Business Administra­ tion (including 281, 282, and 387) as well as COBO L . Students i nterested in the design of compu ters should take Engineering 271, 272, and 352 (along with Physics 153 and 154). For students interested in the more theoretical aspects of computer science, courses in logic are recommended (Philosophy 233, 341. 342, and 343). BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 24 semester hours including Computer Science 144, 270, 280, 380, 2 hours of a second com­ puter language (240 or 242 are suggested) and 6 hours of com­ puter science numbered above 320. Required supporting: Math 151, 152, 230 or 331, 335. BACHELOR OF SOENCE MAJOR: 36 semester hours includ­ ing the computer science core and one of three paths. The computer science core (18 hours) consists of Computer Science 144, 270, 280, 380, and 2 homs of a second programming lan­ guage (240 or 242 are suggested ) . The paths are as foll�ws: Hardware Path requ ire ments

General Path requ i re ment s

Software Path r�quireIfients

CSC! 470 (2 hrs.) eSCI 480 (4 hrs . ) CSCI 488 (2 hr, . ) EGR 271 (2 h rs.) Electives ( 8 hrs.)

CSC! 375 (4 hrs.) CSC! 480 ( 4 hrs . )

esC! 344 (2 hrs . ) CSC! 355 (2 hrs.) CSC! 375 ( 4 hrs.)

Electives (10 hrs.)

Electives (10 hrs.)

The elective includes any upper divisiOn computer science class (numbered above 320), Math 341 or Math 346 or Engineer­ ing 272 (for Hardware Path). Required supporting: Math 151, 152, 230 or 331, 335, 34-5, plus a one-year sequence of a laboratory science (Physics 153-154, Chemistry 115-116, Biology 1 55·156, or 8 hours of earth sciences; Physics 153-154 is required for the Hardware Path). Students are u rged to complete a minor in an area where computers have wide applicability such as the natural sciences, social sciences, or business. In particular, Engineering 271, 272, and 352 are recommended for students interested in the physical structure of the computer.

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: Computer Science 144, 270, 280, and 380 plus 2 hours of a second computer tanguage. Required supporting: Math 151 or 128. MINOR IN I N FORMATION SCIENCE: Computer Science 144, 270, 467, Business Administration 281, 325, plus 4 hours from Business Administration 282, 364, 387, 421 . Strongly recommended: Computer Science 242. MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPUTER APPLICATIONS: See Graduate Catalog. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: See Graduate Catalog.

COURSE OFFERINGS A grade of C or higher is strongly recommended in all prerequisite courses.

110

BASIC

Introduction to interactive computing, branching, looping, sub­ scripts, functions, input/output, subroutines and simple file tech­ niques in the context of the BASIC language. no and 220 may not both be taken for credit. Not normally taken by computer science majors. Prerequisites: high school algebra. I II (2)

115

INTRODUCfION TO THE WORLD OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTERS (MATH 115)

A study of mathematics and computers in the modern world with a wide variety of applications and a. historical perspective. The relationship between mathematics and computers. Elementary computer programming in BASIC. I ntended for non-majors with no previous experience with computers. Meets Core I requirement in natural sciences and mathematics (line 3). Prerequisite: high school algebra. I II (4)

144

INTRODUCfION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE

An introduction to computer science including algorithm design, structured programming, numerical non-numerical applications and use of data files. The PASC AL programming language will be used. Prerequisites: MATH 133 or MATH 128 or equivalent. I I I (4)

199

DIRECTED READING

Supervised study of topiCS selected to meet the individual's needs or interests; primarily for students awarded advanced placement in computer science. Admission only by departmental invitation. (1 - 2)

210

COMPUTERIZED INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Computer systems and their uses in education, commerce, indus­ try and government. BASIC file manipulations, data storage and retrieva l . Computerized word processing, business problems in statistics, linear programming, regression and other fields using existing software packages. 210 and 220 cannot both be taken for credit. Prerequisite 110. Prerequisite or corequisite: 110, MATH 1 28 and STAT 231 or equivalent. I II (2)

220

COMPUTERIZED INFORMATION SYSTEMS WITH BASIC

Introduction to computers and interactive computing. Computer systems and their uses in education, commerce, industrv, and ' govcrnment. Programming in the BASIC language using b�anch­ ing, looping, subscripts, input/output, character manipulation, subrourines, file manipulations, data storage and retrieval. Com­ puterized word processing, business problems in statistics, linear programming, regression and other fields using existing software packages. Covers the same material as 110 and 210 together. Stu­ dents cannot take both 220 and either 110 or 210 for credit. Prereq­ uisite or corequisite: MATH 128 and STAr 231 or equivalent. I f I (4)

240

FORTRAN

242

COBOL

A n accelerated introduction to the FORTRAN programming lan­ guage. Study of the rules of statement formatiOn. Topics include input/output, computation, branching, looping, data types, and subp·rograms. Numeric and non-nu meric problems will be solved. Some previous experience with programming is recom­ mended. I II (2)

Presentation and ,'pplication of the COBOL programming lan­ guage to business problems. Prerequisite: 144 or nO-210 or con­ sent of instructor. II (2)


45 243

ADVANCED PROGRAMl\1ING LANGUAGES

A study of " d vanced progm mming languages such as ADA, C. etc., and the operating system U N I X . Prerequisite: 270. I (2)

270

DATA STRUCTURES

Continuation of Pascal programming techniques and a study of basic data structures including linked lists, trees, queues, stacks and graphs. Applications of these forms to sorting, searching, and data storage will be made. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or higher in , 1 44 . I rr (4)

280

DIGITAL WGIC

Boolean algebra and combinatorial logic applied to basic logic cir­ cu its, digital arithmetic, data conversion, and other components of a computer. Prerequisite: 144. I II (4)

344

OPERATING SYSTEMS

An introduction to computer operation induding batch proCE'''­ ing systems, interacting systems, multi-programming systems, storage management techniques and resource control. In addi­ tion, the course includes an analysis of the deadlock problem and basic file systems. Prerequisite: 270. 1 (4)

348

MODELING AND SIMULATION

355

COMPILERS

375

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

An applications structured programming course solving various problems. Statistics, data structures, mathematical model ing, sim­ ulation, documentation, and team programming techniques will be applied. Prerequisites: MATH 151, CSCl 270 and either M ATH 230 or M ATH 331 . aty 1985-86 II (4)

An introduction to the organization, specification, and analysis of programming languages. Topics include parsing, data representa­ tion, object code, run-time machine structures and optimization. Prerequisite: 270. I I (2)

Basic data structures reviewed and applied to the analYSis of prob­ lems associated with searching, sorting, strings, and minimal paths. Study of the complexity and storage requirements of the algorithms. Use of top-down and structured programming. Pre­ requisite: 270, MATH 1 5 1 . " (4)

380

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE AND COMPUTER ORGANIZATION

Computer assembly language applied to various problems. Topics include data forms, instruction formats, addressing, linking, macro definition, and computer architecture. Prerequisite: 270. I " (4)

385

COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE

An introduction to the structure and operating of large computer systems. Topics include data representation, memory structure, 1/ o processing, multi-processing systems such as paralle!. pipeline, and stack machines. Examples of the architecture of several large systems are analyzed including IBM 320, TI ASC. and CDC STA R . Prerequisite: 380. a t y 1 1986-87 (2)

386

DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS

449

COMPUTER SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

An introduction to computer networks and computer communi­ cation. Topics indude system topology, message and packet switching, bus structures and data-link transmission. Prerequi­ site: 280. aty (2)

Methods and materials in secondary school computer science teaching. LOGO, P ILOT, etc . , may be considered. Does not count toward a major in computer science. Prerequ isite: 144. 11 (2)

467

DATA BASE MANAGEMENT

Data structures and storage methods are reviewed . The hierarchi­ cal, network, and relational modes are studied. Prerequisite: 270. I (4)

470

COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF DIGITAL SYSTEMS

An introduction to the use of CAD systems for digital design. Basic principles of combinational and sequential logic design are reviewed. Simulators, computer hardware description languages, and other computer-aided design tools are developed. Prerequi­ site: 280. 11 (2)

480

MICROPROCESSORS

Study of microprocessors and their use in minocomputer sys­ tems. D�ta representation, instruction formats, programming, interrupts, 110 interfacing, data communications, availnble soft­ ware, and program development studied in lecture and laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: 280, 380. " (4)

488

VLSI DESIGN

490

SEMINAR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

An introduction to the design of very large scale integrated sys­ tems using computer aided design methods. 'Iopics include MOS devices, fabrication pl\Jcedures, chip architect-ure, chip topology, and system timing. PrerequiSites: 270, 280. I " (2)

Selected topics from the list below. I " (2-4) a. AUTOMATA Study of the theory of computation. Turing machines, formal languages, recursive theory, complexity, NP-completeness, and the halting problem may be considered. PrerequiSites: 375, MATH 335. b. FAU LT TO LERANT COMPUTLNG An introduction to the methods of fault detection and location in digital systems and to techniques for the reliable design of computing svstems. Topics include: The D-Al gorithm, Boolean Difference, Path Testing, Triple Modular Re cfundancy Design and the design of self-checking checkers. Prerequisite: 280. (4) c. COMPUTER GRAPHICS Exploration of techniques used to generate and interpret com­ puter graphiCS. Transformations, restoration, enhancement software, and other topics, depending upon available equip­ ment and instructor. Prerequisite: 270, MATH 151 and 230 or 33 1 . d . PATTERN RECOGNITION The use of the computer to recognize patterns in data. Topics include artificial intelligence, cluster analysis algorithms, learn­ ing algorithms, and pattern processing. Prerequisite: 270. e. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING An engineering approach to the development of large software packages. To pics include software requirements definition, structured programming, software design specifications, and software testing. PrerequiSite: 2'70. f . SWITCHING THEORY Advanced applications of Boolean algebra to digital system design. liJpics include decoding networks, harmonic analysis, ULM's, and cellular logic circuits. Prerequisite: 280.

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prereq uisite: consent of department chair. (1-4)

495

COMPUTER SCIENCE RESEA RCH

520

ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

The student becomes involved in an ongoing research project in computer science under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. ( 1-4)

Continuation o f topics in 280. The design of digital control sys­ tems; asynchronous circuits; digital signal processors; digital fil­ ters; timing considerations; use of computer-aided design tools.

(4)

544

ADVANCED OPE RATING SYSTEMS

555

COMPILER IMPLEMENTATION

Continuation of topics i n 344 and 385 leading to the development of an operating system. Emphasis on the interaction between the hardware structure and the operating system; operating system data structures; and operating system security. 11 (2)

Continuation of 355; the structure of programming languages; data and control abstractions; compiler implementation; run time management; a n int-roduction to code optimization. Prereq uisites: 355, 380. aty " 1986-87 (2)

570

MATHEMATICS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

Survey of the basic mathematical tools required i n computer sci­ ence, including graph theory, network now analysis, queueing theory and its applications, stochastic models, and transform the­ ory. Prerequisite: MATH 335. (4)

580

MICROPROCESSOR DEVEWPMENT SYSTEMS

Development of software on 8 and 16 bit microprocessors; micro­ processor applications; interfacing; microprocessor organization; interrupt structures. (2)


46 588

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

survey of techn iques of modeling concurrent processes and the resou rces they share. Includes levels and types of system simula­ tion, performance prl'd iction, benchmarking and synthetic load­ ing, hardware and software monitors. (2) A

590

593

THESIS

Research stud" to meet thesis option requ irement for M . A . M . S. degree. (1-6)

or

G RADUATE SEMINAR

Topics vary by semester, including: a) Artificial Intelligence; b) Information Therapy and Coding; c) Microprocessor Interfacing; d) Computer Security. (4)

Cooperative Education Cooperative education assumes that experiential learning can be an appropriate component of any quality educational program. Though it shares this assumption with other experiential learning strate­ gies such as internships, fieldwork placements, and practica, it differs in several respects, Cooperative education introduces students to an educational work experience early in their academic careers and weaves opportunities for work and learning through­ out their undergraduate programs, rather than concentrating on practical course work at the end, As the name suggests, cooperative education repre­ sents a systematic cooperation between the univer­ sity and a variety of employers in the community. Although the program's career-related advantages are obvious, its main benefits are educational. Students gain an appreciation of the relationship between theory and application, and may learn­ both early and first-hand about new developments in a particular field . Cooperative education provides timely and extended opportunities for devel­ oping communication skills orally and in writing. A cooperative education program can enable stu­ dents to become aware of opportlmities to contrib­ ute creatively to the changing dimensions of work in present-day society, The university and employers benefit as well. The university develops stronger and more creative connections with its community. Employers derive a more efficient device for training and recruiting. More importantly, the partnership provides a unique opportunity for employers to participate in an important educational service to the community.

TWO MODELS The Cooperative Education Program accom modates both part­ time and full-time work modes. Part-time \vork, which allows stlldent� the opportunity to take on-campus courses conCllr� rently, is labeled the " Par,l l1el ModeJ." A full-time work experi­ ence fits under the "A Jternating Ivlodel." In most cases students will follow one or the other, but some departments or schools may develop sequences that combine both parallel and altcrnat­ ing work modes. Full-time summer work, for example, would be classified as an altern<lting cooperative I!ducation experience, and many summl'r jobs provide for learning that relates to students' academic objectives. THE PROCESS FOR STUDENTS In order to be eligible for admission into the Cooperative Education Program a student must have completed 30 semester hours and be in good standing. Students who wish to participate apply to cither the Co-op Oifice in Ramstad Hall or to a Co-op faculty coordinator or sponsor serving this function in specific departments, divisions, or schools. Both written application (l nd personal interviev,: art:' required in order to determine eligibility terms for placement, an.'dS ot interest, (l.cademic requirements, and kinds of positions avail" ble. Students arc responsible for their le,lrning activities during their cooperative educ'1tion position. Each studl'nt must seek out and arrange for academic supervision from a faculty coordinator or sponsor. Faculty arp responsible for insuring that the \vork experience provides appropriate learning opportunities, for helping to establish the learning agreement, and for determining a grade. Learning is facilit,lted through: ( 1 ) usc of a " Learning Agree­ ment" ; (2) completing an academic project; (3) periodic contact with the faculty sponsor; (4) attendance at one workshop during the work experience; and (5) an on-site supervisor who accepts the responsibility to function in a resource role. The learning agreement, developed by each student with the assistance of a faculty sponsor, lists learning objectives with measurable indicators of learning, and also incorporates supple­ merltcuy resources such as reading materials and participation in work-related training sessions. The learning agreement is signed by the student, the faculty 'ponso r, the p rogram d i rector, and the work supervisor, each of whom receives a copy. Contact between the faculty sponsor and thl' student must be sufficient to allow the sponsor to serve as a resource and to provide ac,ldemic supervision. Typically this can be accom­ plished during one or two site visits. Students in a " parallel" cooperative education program may arrange to meet with the sponsor on catnpus. Those involved in "alternating" programs some distance from campus may maintain contact through periodic phone conferences, when site visits are im practical.


47 Employers are responsible to: (1) provide opportunities for students to achieve their learning objectives within the limits of their work settings; (2) help students develop skills related to the contextual aspects of the work world (such as rel ationships with co-workers); and (3) fadHtate students' integration into their work setting so that their employment proves valuable and productive. Students are required to register for at least one credit hour after accepting a Co-op position. Throughout an undergraduate c1cadenlic ccue�r a student may receive a maximum of 16 semester hours of credit in cooperative education. .

COURSE OFFERINGS 376

WORK EXPERIENCE I

A supervised educational experience in a work setting. Requ ires the completion of a Cooperative Education Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. (I -8)

476

WORK EXPERIENCE II

A supervised educational experience in a work setting providing for an advanced level of responsibility. Requires the completion of a Cooperative Education Learning Agreement in consul t,ltion with a faculty sponsor. ( 1 -8)

Martinson, Director.

Earth Sciences Earth Sciences explore the components of the physical universe from humanity 's existing habitat to the foundations of the earth, and bevond to the planets and the stars. A program of st u'dies in these fields acquaints students with their physical world and provides perspective on human development in time and space. Environmental problems also are approached through the earth sciences, which impart a realistic appreciation of society's depend­ ence on earth's phYSical resources. In providing such a perspective, the department fulfills the needs of a variety of students seeking to broaden their l iberal arts education, and also pro­ vides more specialized knowledge in support of several fields, particularly for minor or major stud­ ies leading to careers in resources and environmen­ tal management or scientific research. Situated between the Olympic Mountains and the Cascade Range, the department is ideally located to examine geologic and marine environments, which are unsurpassed for teaching and learning purposes. Graduates in earth sciences hold positions in the National Park Service, the U. S. Geological Survey, oil and mining groups, and geotechnical engineer­ ing, as well as education . The demand for qualified graduates in energy and mineral development has been moderate. Most fields require post-graduate degrees, and to this end, a number of PLU graduates are pursuing master's and doctoral programs at major universi­ ties.

FACUIIY Lowes, Chair; Benham; assisted by Huestis.

The department's programs remain flexible, a\lowing fairly easy scheduling of courses. However, students should notice that upper division courses are offered on a two-ye,1[ cycle. Early declaration of majors or minors in earth sciences will facilitate development of individual programs and avoid scheduling conflicts. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (GEOLOGY) MAJOR: Required courses include: 131, 132, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, and 390, pIllS one from 330, 341, or 360; also req uired is attendance at departmental seminars d u ring junior and senior years. Neces­ sary supporting courses include: Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 16; Physics 125, 126, 147, and 148 (or Physics 153, 154 and labs); Mathemat­ ics 1 5 1 , "\52. Recommended are: Chemistry 34 1, 342; Engineering 351; Mathematics 253; Physics 223; Biology 155 and additional " courses, where paleontotogy is a major interest. BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours in earth sciences, including 131, plus at least three lower division �nd four upper division courses. Attendance at departmental semi­ nars is compulsory during junior or senior year. A field COu rse such as 330, 351, 360, or 390 is recommended. Required support­ ing courses include: Chemistry 104, 105, or "\ 15, 1 16; Physics 125, 126, 147, 148; Mathematics 151. Recommended are: Biology 155; Mathematics 152; Computer Science 144. Options reflect a student's earth science interests and are discussed with an adviser. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Education. MINOR: 20 semester hours of earth science courses, excluding interim cou rses, completed with grade of C or higher.

COURSE OFFERINGS 101

WORLD GEOGRAPHY

Patterns of physical, climatic, and ecological features and thei.r relationship to the development of human cultures. 10 1 does not meet the natural sciences core requirement. 1987 (4)

131

PHYSICAL GEOWGY

An introductory course dealing with the human geologic habitat, both at present and as it has developed through time; materials of earth (and lunar) crusts, their derivation through major earth processes and formation of surface featu res- with emphasis on their significance to cultural development and civilization; labora­ tory study of rocks, minerals, and geologic mapping; field trips are arranged. 1 11 (4)


48 132

HISTORICAL GEOLOGY

A sequel to 1 3 1 which concentrates on earth history, particularly the formation of the North American continent: sedimentary rocks, fossils, and stratigraphic record are related to tectonic upheaval and growth; field trips are arranged . 1 1 (4)

202

GENERAL OCEANOGRAPHY

Oceanography and its relationship to other fields; physical, chem­ ical, biological, climatic, and geological aspects of the sea; field trips. 1 1 (4)

222

CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Principles and p roblems of public and p rivate stewardship of our resources with special reference to the Pacific Northwest. 1 11 (4)

323

PETROLOGY

The occurrence and classification of common rock types; proc­ esses by which they were formed with reference to theoretical principles. Prerequisites: 131 or consent of instructor. II aty 1985-86 (4)

325

STRUCTURAL GEOWGY

The form and spatial relationships of various rock masses and an introduction to rock deformation; consideration of basic processes to understand mountain building and continental formation; lab­ oratory emphasizes practical techniques which enable students to analyze regional structural patterns. Prerequ isite: 131 or consent of instructor. II aiy 1986-87 (4)

326

OPTICAL MINERAWGY

Theory and practice of mineral studies using the petrographic microscope, including immersion oll techniques, production of thin sections, and determination of minerals by means of their optical properties. This provides an introduction to the broader subject of petrography. I aiy 1985-86 (4)

327

STRATIGRAPHY AND SEDIMENTATION

Formational principles of surface-accumulated rocks, and their incorporation in the siratigraphic record. This subject is basic to field mapping and structural i nterpretation. I aty 1985-86 (4)

PALEONTOLOGY

A systematic study of the fossil record, combining principles of evolutionary development, paleohabitats and preservation, with practical experience of specimen identification. These studies are fundamental to the understanding of stratigraphy and the geo­ logic time scale. I aty 1986-87 (4)

330

SURVEY AND MAPPING PRINCIPLES

Lntroduction to techniques and instrumentation of basic su rvey­ ing and cartography. Includes leveling and transit traverses, base­ line measurements, and triangulation; also, applications of aerial photos and their interpretation for geologic mapping. Tech niques for compiling geologic data and construction of geologic maps are among the essential skills covered. II (4)

341

MINERAWGY

Crystallography and mineralogy, both ore- and rock-forming min­ erals. Pre.requisites: 131 and high school chemistry or consent of instructor. Interim 1 987 (4)

324

328

ENERGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE

A su rvey of the world's energy and mineral resources comprising the raw materials of industrialized societies. Studies include geo­ logical occurrence, global distribution, and quantities of such reserves; also, their fundamental technologies and economics, as well a.s the political framework in which they are developed. 1 (4 )

351

NATURAL H ISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

A field and laboratory course examining regional natural history; an outdoor workshop designed for science teachers at elementary and junior high levels. Not to be counted toward a major or gradu­ ate credit in biology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. S (6 )

360

GEOWGY OF WESTERN WASHINGTON

The minerals, rocks, and geological history of the region extend­ ing from the Columbia Plateau to the Pacific Ocea n . Includes field tr i ps . Prerequisite: previous earth science oreonsent of instructor. S (4)

390

GEOLOGIC FIELD MAPPING

490

SEMINAR (1-2)

Combining a survey of regional field geology with a series of local mapping projects, t h is course introduces field techniques of geo­ logic map-making. Included are traversing and data assembly, map construction, section measurements, structural analysis, and chronological synthesis. Graphics techniques are also covered. Prerequisites: previous geology courses and consent of instructor. S (5)

491, 492 597

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4)

GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-8)

Economics Wan t is a growing giant whom the coat of Have was

never large enough to

covel:

"

-Ralph Waldo Emerson

E conomics is the study of how people establish social arrangements for producing and distributing goods and services to sustain and enhance human life. Its main objective is to determine a wise use of limited economic resources so that people receive the maximum possible benefit at the lowest cost.

The economics discipline embraces a body of tech­ niques and conceptual tools that are useful for understanding and analyzing our complex eco­ nomic system. Career avenues for graduates are numerous, since their understanding of the econ­ omy and their problem-solving and thinking abili­ ties are applicable to a wide range of activities in business and/or government.

FACUIIY

Ankrim, Chair; Brue, Grochulski, R. Jensen, Miller, N. Peterson, Vinje, Wentworth.


49 BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 36 semester 150, 351, 352, 486, 12 hours of electives in economics, and 8 hours se l ected from the following: Economics 343, 344 (if not used as economics electives), Statistics 231, Math 334, 341, Business Administration 281, and Computer Science 110 or 144 or 220. hours, including

For students planning graduate work in economics or business,

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS

Micro Economics; a nal ys is of U.S. economic system; e mph as is on

current economic pol icy. (4)

PUBLIC FINANCE

i nc idence of taxes, the public debt and the provision of public goods such as national defense, education, pure air, and water. Prerequisite: 150. (4)

INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY

can industry and the public poliCies that foster and aIter industrial structure and behavior. Topics include the economics of firm size, motivations of the firm, concentration, mergers, patents, anti­ trust, public utility regulation, public enterprise, and subsidiz"­

CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC PROBLEMS

tion. Prerequisite: 150 o r consent of instructor. (4)

Cu rrent economic issues ; unemployment, inflation, poverty, and

pollution; interests of the class determine specific topics. Pre req ­ uisite: 150 or consent of instructor. (4)

LABOR ECONOMICS, LABOR RELATIONS, AND HUMAN RESOURCES

The nature and treatment oJ human resource problems in the United States; wage determination, unionism, collective bargain­ ing, unemployment, poverty and discrimination, and investment in human capital. Prerequisite: 150 or consent of inst ructor. (4)

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Regional and international specialization, comparative costs, international payments and exchange rates; nationaJ policies which promote or restrict trade. Prerequisite: 150. (4)

341

150. (4)

A n analysis of the structure, conduct, and performance of Ameri­

Introduction to th e scope of economics, including Macro and

331

on inflation, interest rates, and national income. Prerequ isite:

371

Education.

321

the Federal Reserve Syste m; theory of credit and money supply control; Keynesian and Monetarist theories of monetary impacts

Public taxation and expenditure a t all govern ment a l levels; the

MINOR: 20 semester hours, including 150, 351 or 352, and "12 ado itiona l hours of electives, 4 of which may be in statistics.

290

MONEY AND BANKING

The nature and role of money; the commercial banking system;

362

additional math preparation will be necessary. For specific cou rses, cunsult your major adviser.

150

361

ECONOMIC DEVEWPMENT: COMPARATIVE THIRD WORLD STRATEGIES

381

COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

An an a l ysis and compa rison of major contemporary economic

systems. Includes an examination of capitalism, market socialism, centrally p lann ed economies, and systems used in selected co u n ­ tries. Prerequisite: 150 or consent of instructor. (4)

399

INTERNSHIP

A research and writing project in connection with a student's approved off-campus activity. The primary goal is to gain insight into applications of the ideas and methodologies of economics. Prerequisite: sophomore standing plus one course in economics, and consent of the department. (1-4)

432

U RBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMICS

Economic growth process in developing regions of the U. S . ; the

interrelationship of pol i t ic al , economic, cultural, and institutional factors i n the g rowt h process . Pre req uisit e : 150. (4)

486

EVOLUTION OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

Economic thought from ancient to modern times; emphasis on

Analysis of the theoretical framework for development with appli��

the period from Adam Smith to I . M . Keynes; the classical econo­

cations to alternative economic development strategies used in the

mists, the socialists, the marginalists, the neoclassical economists, and the Keynesians. (4)

newly emerging developing countries. Emphasis on comparisons between countries in East and Southeast Asia and countries in Latin America and Africa. Assessments of the relative importance of cultural values, historical experience, and governmental poli­ cies in the development process. Prerequisite: 150 or consent of instructor. (4)

343

490

SEMINAR

Seminar in economic problems and policies with emphasis on encouraging the student to integrate problem-solving methodol­ ogy with tools of economic analysis. Topic(s) selected by class par­ ticipants and instructor. Prereq uis it e : consent of instructor. (4)

OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Quantitative methods for decision probJems. Emphasis on linear

491, 492, 493

INDEPENDENT STUDY

programming and other deterministic models. PrerequiSite: STAT

Prerequisite: consent of the department a nd com pl et ion of two courses in economics. (1-4)

344

500

231

or equ ivale nt . (2)

APPLIED REGRESSION ANALYSIS

Simple and multiple regression analysis as investigative tools. Course stresses construction of elementary linear models and interpretation of regression results. Prerequisite: STAT equivalent.

345

231 or

(2)

MATHEMATICAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS

An introduction to basic applications of mathematical tools used in economic analysis. Topics include simple linear models of sup­ ply and demand, single and multivariable maximization models, and linear difference and differential equation models of eco­

nomic g ro wth . Prerequisites: 150 and MATH 128 or 151 or equiva­ lent. (4)

351

INTERMEDIATE MACRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

National income determination including policy implications within the institutional framework of the U.s. economy. Prerequi­ site:

352

I SO. (4)

INTERMEDIATE MICRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

Theory of consumer behavior; product and factor prices under conditions of mono poly, competition, and intermediate markets; welfare economics. Prerequisite: 'l50. (4)

APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

An intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate stu­ dents who have not previously taken introductory statistics. Emphasis on the application of inferential statistics to concrete sit­ uations. Topics include: measures of location and variation, prob­ ability, estimation, hypoth es is tests, and regression. (4)

501

G RADUATE WORKSHOPS

Graduate workshops in special f ields or areas for varying periods of time. (1-4)

504

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS AND POLICY DECISIONS

Basic economic concepts applied to policy formation and operat­ ing decisions. (4)

543

QUANTITATIVE METHODS

The concepts of probability, sampling, statistical decision theory, linear programming, and other deterministic models applied to managerial problems. Prerequisi te: STAT

590

231 or 341. (4)

GRADUATE SEMINAR

Selected topics as announced. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. (1-4)

591

DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)

595

GRADUATE READINGS

Independent study card required. (4)

598

RESEARCH PRO}ECF (4)

599

THESIS (4)


50

Education

SchOOI O/

The School of Education offers programs of study leading to certification for elementary and second­ ary teachers, counselors, nurses, administrators, and personnel in special education. The curriculum is designed to provide graduates with a blending of the liberal arts and a variety of practical exposures to guided field experiences beginning early in the educational sequence. The faculty is committed to the development of educational personnel sensitive to the varied individual needs of learners.

FACUllY Johnston, Dean; Baughman, Brochtrup, Churney, DeB ower, FletcheJ;. Gerlach, M. Hanson, Lawrence, Mathers, Minetti, Moe, Nokleberg, F. Olson, Pederson, Reisberg, Rickabaugh, Siegelman, Sydnor, Wentworth, Williamson. The School of Educatlon is accr�dited by the National Council for Accred itation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, and the Washington State Board of Education for the preparation of elementary and sec· ondary teachers, principals, program administrators, special education teachers, and guidance counselors, with the Master of Arts the highest degree approved. The accreditation gives PLU graduates reciprOCity with many other states. Programs for the preparation of school librarians, school nurses, school counselors. administrators, and supervisory personnel are available. The School offers course work toward the conversion, renewal, or reinstatement of teaching certificates. The School of Education offers graduate degrees in Classroom Teaching, Reading, Educational Administration, Counseling and Guidance, Educational Psychology, and Special Education. Information regarding these programs is available through the dean of graduate studies.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Students with sophomore standing and with a cumulative grade point average of 2.33 or above may register for Education 251 (Secondary) or 253 (E[ementary ) . Students must provide the School of Education office with Scholastic Aptitude Test ( SAT) or Washington PreC llege Test (WPCT) scores and a valid Health Certificate before enrolling in Education 251 or 253. Out of state candidates may submit scores from tests that are comparable to the SAT OJ' WPCT. Students will make formal application to the School of Education during the semester in which they are enrolled in Education 251 or 253. Education 253 may not be taken concurrently with General Elementary Meth ds. Before enroll­ ing, students must have C- or higher grades i n English 101 and Psychology 101 and must demonstrate proficiency i n writing, spelling, and mathematics admission to the School of Education. Special Education 190-191 may be taken before Education 251 or 253. Special Education 290 may be taken con­ currently. No course beyond Education 321 may be taken without admission to the School of Education. Transfer students who may have had education courses in other institutions should meet with an education adviser for

o

o

before

evaluation of work completed and must a rrange for application to the School of Education, supply necessary SAT or WPCT test scores, as well as a valid Health Certificate, and schedule a screening conference into the School of Education . Students w h o have earned a bachelor's degree at PLU or elsewhere, and who contemplate meeting certification require­ ments, are expected to meet the same requirements for admis­ sion and certification that apply to degree students. The certification sequence will normally require three semesters.

BAE and/or CE RTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Students become candidates for certification when they have completed the following:

1. All course work with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above.

2. Professional Education Sequence for elementary or secondary teaching.

3 . An approved teaching major(s) or concentration(s) (see requirements as listed under Academic Preparation).

4. Securing a valid first aid card at the time of program comple­ tion (or an equivalent

course).

5. Minimum Generic Standards (Chapter 180-89-130 and 135 WAC) .

6. A l l courses in education and in major a n d minor fields with grades of C- or higher.

7. Achievement of proficiency in writing and math skills. 8. Anthropology 21 O/ H ist ory 210 for secondary teaching and Anthropology 102 for elementary teaching. TEACHER CERTIFICATION Initial Teaching Certificate. The School of Education in the fall of 1982 entered into a new program of certification mandated by the State Board of Education under the 1978 Standards for Certification. The four-year curriculum usually leads to a Bache­ lor of Arts in Education and the initial level teaching certificate (see previous catalogs for information concerning the provisional teaching certificate granted under 1 962 Standards). The initial teaching certificate is valid for four years and may be renewed Once for three vears. PLU endorse the certificate on the basis of preparation. S condary Teachers holding initial level certificates shall be assigned by local districts to endorsed areas and [evels only. Teachers holding initial level elementary endorsements shall be assigned to elementary or middle grades only.

s

ELEMENTARY PREPARATION General requirements. [ n addition to the general u n iversity

s

and core requirements in all curricula, certain specif.ic require­ ments in general education must be met. 1. Anthropology 102, Exploring Anthropology : Culture and Society (recommended) or Anthropology 210 / i tory 2 10, G[oba[ Perspectives, must be taken. 2 . Prospective elementary teachers usually meet the Natura[ Sciences/Mathematics core requirement in the following ways: a. Completing Bio[ogy 1 1 1 or another life science course; b. Completing Natural Science 106 or another physical science course; c. Completing Mathematics 323 or equivalent. A year course in one laboratory science may be substituted by those who have adequate background from high school in the other science a.rea.

H

o s o c o ne

Pr fe s i nal Ed u at i n Seque c , Element ary Program. SPED 190 Exceptional Children and Adults, 3 hours (no prerequisite) EDUC 253 Child Development and Schools, 4 hours (2.33 GPA and sophomore status required; prerequisites: ENGL 101 and PSY 10'1) EDUC 322 Genera[ Methods, Primary, 4 hours OR EDUC 323 General Methods, Upper Elementary, 4 hou rs OR EDUC 324 General Methods, Elementary, 4 hou.rs (For all General Met h d s courses a G PA of 2.50 and junior standing are required. Prer q u is ites: EDUC 253 or 321; application, screening, and acceptance into the School of Education; satisfactory writing and math skills.) EDUC 421 Teachers and the Law, 1 hour. (Prere u i ite : EDUC 253) (For physical education majors, PE 328 fulfills the School Law requirement . ) EDUC 430 Student Teaching, Primary, 10 ho (single) OR EDUC 432 Student Teaching, Upper E[ementary, 10 hours (sing[e) EDUC 434 Student Teaching, Elementary, 8 hours (dual) (For Student Teaching a GPA of 2.50 and senior standing are required along with positive field evalu­ ations from EDUC 253 and EDUC 322-4. Prerequi­ sites: EDUC 253, 322-4, 325, 326, 408, 410, and 412; all conditions to full admission met; satisfactory writing, spelling, and math skiJIs.)

o

e

q urs

S


51 EOLIC

435 Professional Se mi na r, 2 ho u rs (must be token con c ur­ ren tl ), with EOUC 430 or 432) Students in elementary education y\'ho do n o t com­ plete al l necessa ry proced u re s befo re Ap ril 15 for fall student teaching or Nove mb er 1 5 for spr i ng st ud ent t (',)C h i n g may expect a d e lay of one semester in bei n g pl ace d for student te ac h ing. A health certificate for teachers will n eed to be on fil e in the School of Education before student tea ch i ng pl a cem e n t Cdn be final iLed .

PrOfessional ized Subject Malter Minor (14 hours required of all elementary candidates)

RCfJuired- 1 2 semester /tollrs 325 EOLIC 326 EOUe 408 EOUC 410 EOLIC 412 EDLIC

[,eading in the Ele m en t a r y

School (4) Mathematics in the E le me n tar y School (2) Ll nguage A r ts in the E l em e n t ar y School (2) Sc i en ce in the E l e men t a ry School (2) So c ia l Studies in the Elemen t ary School (2)

U('cliv<,-2 selllcsier hours 34 1 34 1 PE 22 HED 295

A RT

MUS

Elem e nt a ry

Art Education (2) M u sic in the E l em en ta ry School (2) Physical Education in the El e men t a ry School (2-4) School Health (2)

SECONDA RY PREPA RATION

30 hours) Ex ce ptio na l Children ,md Adults (1) Learner an d Soci et y (CPA 2. . 33 req u i r ed ; sophom'lflo

Professional Seque nce (minimum of

S PE D

190 EDUC 251

level course; prerequ i s ites: ENCL 1 0 1 , PSY 1 0 1 ) (4) 2 . 50 r<' <j u i re d ; prereq­ u isite : EDUe 251) (4) E O Ue 421 Te ac h ers and the Law (CPA 2 . 50 required) (I) (For p hysic.ll education majo rs, PE 328 fu l fi l l s the Sc hoo l l�lW requ i r e. m e n ! . ) E DLIe 425 Ce ne ra l Seco ndary Methods (CPA 2 . 50 req u i red ; p rerequ i si t es : EDUe 25 l, EI'SY 368 or p erm i s si on; st rungl y recommended : SPED 190, ANTH 21()! HIST 210) (4) SPECIAL METHODS See Education adviser (2) EOUC 465 Student Tea ch i ng (CPA 2 . 50 and senior status re q u i re d; prerequ.!sites: EOUC 2 5 1 , FPSY 368, EOUC 425, f irst aid card, all conditions of scree n i ng met) ( 1 0) EDUe 467 Ev al u a t ion (CPA 2.50 req ui r ed ; pr e re q u i sit e : EDLIe 425 or concurrent e n rollment in EOUe 425; may be t,lken conc u rren tl y with EDLIC 465, but not r ecom­ mended) (2) ( Fo r ph ys ica l ed uc,)tion maiors, PE 484 f ul fill s the Eva lu a t ion requiremf""! . ) EPSY

368

Educational Psychology (CPA

LEA R N I N C RESOURCE SPECIALIST (Preparation of School Librarians)

16 semester hours

Students interested i n p repari ng for the re sp onsib i l it y of

a dmin is tra ti on of it sc h oo l l ibra ry may meet s uggeste d s t a nd a rd �

t h ro ug h the following program: Select a m i n i m u m of onc co u rse from each of the fo l lo w ing di v i siu ns : liook alld Mrdia Sclectioll

456 S to ry t e ll ing (4) Se lec t ion o f Learning Resource Materials (2) ENCL 323 Children's Literature (4)

EOLIC

F.OLlC 454

Admillistration EOLIe 451 Adm i n ist ra t i on of the Sch ool Lib ra ry (2) Catn/ugillg

EDUC 453 Processi ng Sc hoo l Lib r,, , )' Materials (2)

Refereuce EDUC

452 Basic Refe re nce Materials (2)

Mrdia Uti/iUllioll nn d Prodllcti,,,,

EOUe 457 Cll rriculum EDUC

580 Curriculum D evelo p me nt (2)

ACADEMIC PREPA RATION A m aio r from those l i st ed m us t b e completed . CllInpletion of a teaching maj or/minu r in a � cco nd

academic area i� st rong l y recommended . (Students d o not major i.n education . ) Teach ing m a jm s arc offered in the fol l o wi ng a re as : a r t, b io logy, business education, chemistry, communiciltion a r ts, earth and genera l sci ences, eco n o m ics , Engl i sh , Frenc h , Cl'rm,m, his tory, lang uage arts, milt h c m a t ics, mus ic , physical e d ucation , p hy s ic s , po l i tic a l scit:nce, Sca n d inavian s tu d i es , socii'll sciences, stH.::iology, anu Spanish.

PREPARATION FOR ELEME NTARY TEAC H I N G : A ,tudmt

prepa ring for e lementa r y schoo l t each ing m ust c umple t " a 24 se me st e r hour dcmentary te ach i ng m ilj or and two minors. One oi t he minors must be the Pro fess io na l Subject Mat t e r Minor of 14 hours. The second must be a 12 hour te ach. ing minor which is d iffe re n t from the ma jo r. See below fm all teach i ng maj<lrs a nd m i nors . Cand idates dc'S iri ng a m i ddle school assign men t s hou l d cons i d e r elementa r y pre pa mt i on . ' PREPARATION FOR JUNIOR HIGH TEACH ING: Students

p r"p a r ing

The follo wi ng s pe cial ized minors in ed uc a t io n are available to S tu den ts de si r i ng to work t ow ard a s p ec ial i zed minor should consult an a d v iser in the School of Ed uc a t io n for assistance in p l a n ni ng t h e i r p rog ram .

all students purs u ing tea c h e r ce r tifi catio n .

READING-14 semester hours

P re re qu is i te: EDLIC Re q u i red

325 R ea ding in the E l e me nta r y Sc.hool

EDLIC 408 L,nguage Arts in the E lem en t <1rY School (2) EDLIC 483 Primary Rea di n g (2) EOUe 479 S peci al Techn iq u es i n Rea d ing (4) Electives-minimum of 6 semester hours chosen in consultatil)n \vith an a dv i se r before registrat ion . SPECIAL ED UCATION

This 32 sem ester hour t each ing m a jo r must be taken in con­ junction with another aCd d e m ic tmchi ng miljor. Stu de n ts should make appl icat io n for a d m ission to the special education progwm while en rol led in Sp ec ial Education 190. Students com pl e t ing this m aj or alo ng w i t h the requi red proie ssi o nal education sequence for e leme nta r y Or s econ d ar y kachel'S will be el ig i b le to teach i n sp ec i a l education programs in the S ta te of Washing to n llnd most other states. Students not majoring in education mil)'

be excused from t h e req u i remen t s of taking Education

253.

25 1 or

Major-32 se mest e r hours total. 25 hours req u i red : S p eci al Education 190, 290, 390, 393, 396, 397, 405 or 406, 438 or 439; 2 hours of 3'19 prac t ic a; 5 hours of el ect ivcs from S pec ial Education 1 9 1 , 296, 395, 403, 475, 479, 490, 491, 494. Minor-18 semeste r hours total. 11 h o urs re q u i red : S pecial

Education 190, 290, 396, 405 or 406. 7 hou r s of ele cti ve s from 1 9 1 , 296, 390, 393, 395, 397, 403, 475, 479, 490, 49 1 , 4'14. A t least one hour of p ra ct icum (399) is reco mmended.

for teach ing o n the ju nio r h igh level a re req u i red to

cornp l ete a t cac hin g maior of approximately 24-32 se m ester hours. A t each i ng minor is a lso requi red . Students must consult

a n ed UGlti on ad v i s(! r rega r ding t eac h ing major and m i n or comb i na tio ns .

PREPARATION FOR SENIOR H IGH SCHOOL TEACHING: St u d ents

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Prep,uat ion and Utilization of Medi" (3-4)

p rep a r i ng for senior h igh teach i ng must complete

a pp r ox i ma t el y 44-48 seme ste r hour!; i n the academic arL'�l in \ovh ich they pl an to teach. A m i nor in a second teach ing ;:1fe�1 is

recommend e d . Students may " Iso find it " d vantageous to their 1) d eve l o p skills in one or morE' cua ch ing (.H�as in re spo ns e to Title IX legi sl at io n , and 2) d e velOp competencies in sp e c i a l education in response to federal special education legis la ­ t io n . I n all casE'S, students must d iscuss their program with a n " d v is e r from the School of Education.

career goals to

PREPA RATION FOR K-12 TEAC H I N G : Students p re p ari n g

for Kw 1 2 te ach ing in art,

music or

physical education mu.st h<1v('

student t e a ch ing ex perie nce on both the el ement" ,y and second­ ary levels. D e t a i led i n format io n regard ing K- 12 certification is

av a i l abl e in the School of Education o ffic e.

A RT Senior High Teac.hing Major: 46 semeste r hours· req uire d :

A r t 160, 1 80/ 230, 250, 280, 326, 365, 370, 380, 440, pIUS ('I('ctives. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester ho urs req u i r ed : Art 160, 230, 250, 365. Professional me th o ds cou rs e req u i red : Art 440. Junior High Teaching Major: 30 se.meskr hours r(',! uired: Art 160, 230, 250, 326, 365, 440, plu s dectives. Teachi ng Minor: 20 semester hours required : A r t 1 10, 1 60, 230, 250, a n d 365. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester ho urs requ i re d : Art 1 10, 160, 250, 34 1 , and 8 sem es te r hours of 230, 3(;5, or 370. Te aching Minor: 12 se meste r hours as determined by t he School of Edu ca t io n . ·Up to three s up po rt n i g courses may be reco mmended. B IOLOGY

Senior High Teaching Major: 48 semestl'r h ou rs requ ired : B iolo gy 155, 15(" 253, 254, 322, 33 1 , 340, 424 Or 425, 475; " choice of 8 add iti ona l semester hl)urs of upper divisilln c o u rs es in biology. Requ i red s u p po r tin g co u r S eS : C he m. i s t r y l 'l S , 1 '16; E art h Sciences 1 3 1 or 132. Education 447 to meet professi(lnal e du c a­ tion req Uirement.

Senior High Teaching Minor: 20 se meste r h o u rs req u i r ed : B iolog y 155, 156, 253; a ch oice of 3 additiona l upper d i v i s ion semE'ster h o u rs i n b io l ogy. Education 447 to meet pro fe ss i on a l ed ucation req u ire me-nt .


52 Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: B iology 155, 156, 253; a choice of 8 additional semester hours 205 and abovt'. Required supporting COllIse: Chemistry 104. BUSINESS EDUCATIO N Senior High Teaching Major: 41-45 semester hours required: Economics 150, Computer Science 1 10; Business Adm i n istration 28 1, 350, 435; advanced typing; business machines; bu.siness communications ( taken at a community c o lle ge) ; Education 34 1, 342, 343, 344. Each student is required to select at least one Mea of concentration from accounting or secretarial. Accounting: Business Administration 381, 483. Secretarial: advanced short­ hand, records management, machine tmnscriptinn (available at a community college); Fducation 345. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours required; cou rses selected i n consultation with advisers in business education and education. Profession.)1 methods COurses required: Education 341, 342, 343, 344. CHEMISTRY Senior High Teaching Major: 4� semester hOllTs required: Chemistry 1 15, 1 16, 321, 331, 332, 333, 334, 341, 342, and 343; Physics 147, 148, 153, and 154; Math 1 5 1 , 152. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: 16 hours of approved chemistry and 8 hours as determined by the School of Education . Teaching Minor: 12 hours as determined by the Sc h oo l of Education. COMMUNICATION A RTS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required : 16 semester hours of Communication Arts 123, 250 or 328, 241, plus 12-29 semester hours chosen in consultation with the major adviser. Supporting classes: Alternative of 16-20 semester hours in English or modern Or classical languages. Secondary Education Te aching Minor: 16 s eme ste r hours required: Communication Arts 123, 241, 250, 283. Junior High Teachjng Major: 24-28 semester hours required: 12 semester hours of Commun ication Arts 123, 328 or 250, 241, plus additional 12 hours in communication arts. Additional 8-12 semest er hours to be determined with department and Sc hool of Education. Teaching M.i n or : 16-20 semester huurs required: Communication Arts 123 and 24'1, plus 8-12 elective semester hours. E l emen t ary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: Co mmunication Arts 123, plus 12 semester h ou rs in com m u n ication arts and 8 semester hours in English. Teaching Minor: 12 s em est er hours to be determined in consultation with the School of Education. '

COMPUTER SCIENCE Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 24 semester hours. Computer Science 1 10 or 210 or 220; 144, 270, 380, 4 semester hours of computer scienrc electives, Math IS ! or 128, Computer Science 449 to meet professional education requirement. EA RTH SCIENCES Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours reqUired, including Earth Science s 131, 132, 202, 325, 327, a nd one of the fo ll ow i ng : 330, 360, 3lJO . ReqUired supporting: Chemistry 103, 104, Or 1 15, 116; Physics 125, 126 (and labs) or 153, 154 ( a nd labs); Math 133, appropriate bi olog y courses. Add itional supp ort i ng courseS should be discussed with adv iser. Junior High Teaching Major: 28 semester hours retl u ired, including Earth Sciences 131, 132, 202, 324 or 325, 327, a nd one of the following: 330, 360, 390. Suggested su pporting: Chemistry 104 or 1 1 5 , 1 16; Physics 125, 126 (and labs) or 153, 154 (and labs); Math 133; a ppropriate biology courses. Add itional supporting courses should be discu ssed with adviser. E l e m ent ary Teaching Major: 24 semester ho u r required: Earth Sciences 131. 132, and 202; Chemistry 104 or 1 15 and one upper division earth sciencecourse. Te aching Minor: 12 semester hours in earth sciences. ECONOMICS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required: Economics 150, 351, 352, 486; 12 semester hours from the follow­ ing: Economics 321, 331, 361 , 362, 371; H istory 460 plus 12 semester hours distributed over areas of sociology, political science, ur anth ropology, (Recommended: Education 448 to meet professional Cduc,ltion requirement.) Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 20 semester hours required: Economics 150, Histo ry 460, and 12 semester hours selected in consultation with advisers in economics and educa­ tion . Professional methods course required: Education 448. J u n ior High Teaching Major: 28 semester hours required: Economics 150, 371, 486; 4 hours from: Economic s 321, 331, 351, 361, 432; History 460 plus 8 semester hours distributed over areas of sociolt1gy or political scienc e Te ac h i ng Minor: 12 semester hours required : Economics 150, plus 12 hours of upper division economics. Education 448 to meet professional education requiremen t . .

Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: Economics 1 50, 371, 486; 4 semester hours from: Economics 321, 331, 351, 352, 36 1 , 362, 432; H ist o ry 460; 4 semester hours from the areas of soc iol ogy or political science. Teaching Minor: U semester hours required: Economics 150 and 8 hours of upper division economics. Education 412 to meet pro fessional educa­ tion requirement. ENGLISH Senior High Teaching Major: A min i m u m of 32 semester hours, 16 of which are to be upper division, is required beyond 101 including 241, 251, 252, at least one course in a historical period (342, 343, 381, 384, 389, 390, 391, 392), at least one course in a major a u th or (382, 383, 440, 45 1 , 452), and 12 hours of electives. All majors must present two years of one foreign language at the co llege level or show eqUivalent proficiency Education 444 to meet professional education requirement. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 20 semester hours required; at least 8 hours should be upper division, Include 4 hours British literature before 1700; 4 hours after 1 700; 4 hours American literature; 4 additional hours in literature. Professional methods COurse required: Education 444 . Junior High Teaching Major: A minimum of 32 semester hours i n English beyond 101 as stated in Senior High Teaching Major above, including the distribution requirements. Majors must present two years of one foreign lan guage at the COllege level or show equivalent proficiency and must take Education 444 to meet pro fessio nal education requirement. Elementary Teaching Concentration: 24 semester hours, including 4 hours in British literature before 1700; 4 hours after 1700; 4 hours American literature, and 12 additional hours in English as determined by the School of Education, Recom­ mended: English 363. Teaching Minor: 12 hou rs req uired, as determined by the School of Education. .

FRENCH Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required, including 32 semester hours of French and 12 semester hours of su pporting courses: French 201, 202 (or equivalent), 321, 351, 352, and 12 additional semester hours, Supporting courses to be selected with the approval of the department and must include L.lnguage 445, which will also meet part of the profeSSional education elective requirement. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours above the 200 level required; courses selected in consultation with advisers in education and languages. Professional methods course required : Language 445. Junior H igh Teaching Major: 28 semes t er hours required as listed for senior high preparation; supporting courses chosen in consultation with major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 16 se m es t er hours above 200 level. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hou rs required, including 20 hours in French and 4 additional hours selected in consultation with the department and the School of Education. Teaching Minor: 12 hours required, as determined by the depart­ ment and the School of Education . GENE RAL SCIENCE Senior High Teac.hing Major: 44 semester hours required: Biology 155, 156, 253; Chemistry 104, 115, 116; Earth Sciences 131, 132, 202; a choice of 8 additional semester hours of upper division credit. Education 447 to meet professional education requi r e ment . Senior High Tea'ching Minor: 20 semester hours required: Biology 155; Chemistry 104; Earth Sciences 131; 8 additional semester hours from these areas or ph ys i cs . Education 447 to meet professional education requirement. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required : biology 4; earth sciences-4; chemistry, or physics-4; 12 additional hours from biology, earth sciences, chemistry, or physics. Elementary Teaching Minor: 12 semester hours required : physical science-4; life s cienc c 4; 4 hours from either. -

-

G E RMAN Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required, including 32 semester hours of German and 12 semester hours of supporting courses: German 201, 202 (or equivalent), 321, 35 1, 352, and 12 add.itional semester hours. Supporting courses to be selected with the approval of the department and must include Language 445, which will also meet part of the professional education elective requirement. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours above the 200 level required; COurses selected in consultation with adv isers in education and langu ages. Professional methods course required: Language 445. Junior High Teaching Major: 28 semester hours required as listed for senior high preparation; supporting courses chosen in consul tation with major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours above 200 level.


53 E lementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required,

including 20 hours in German and 4 additional hours selected in consultation with the department and the School of Education.

Teaching Minor: 1 2 hours requ ired , as determined by the depart­ ment and the School of Education.

HI STORY Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours require d : History 107 o r 108; 109, 210 o r 2 1 1 ; 8 hours of 251, 252, 253; 460 and 12 ad d i ti onal upper division hours in history includ ing a senior seminar. Supporting courses: 12 additional semester hOllrs selected from economics, geography, political sc ience, p syc hology, and sociology. Recommended: Education 420, 448 to meet professional education requirements.

Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours

required: 4 hours from History 251, 252, or 253; 460; and 8 hours selected in consultation with adviser s in education and h istory. Professional methods course required: Educatjon

448.

LANGUAGE ARTS Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours

required . Select minor from English, social sciences, foreign

langu ages, or communication arts.

Junior High Teaching Major: 32 semester hours required: 328; English 403; 4 hours of upper division literature (in

English

addition to course taken to meet general education requirement);

Communication Arts 241 or 326; Education 444 and 12 semester hours from areas of English, journalism, communication arts, or

foreign language beyond freshman level (at least must be in the same discipline,

division).

8 of the 12 hours

and 4 hours must be upper Teaching minor: 16 semester hours required, selected

from offerings in English, journalism, communication arts, or

foreign l a n gu age beyond freshman level; English Recommended: Education 420.

328 is requi red.

Elementary Teaching Major: 24 s emes t e r hours required:

English 328; English 403; English 323, Communication Arts 406 and one of Communication Arts 241 Or 326 or 436; one course

selected from one of the following

areas: English, Communica­ tion Arts, or foreign language above the 200 level . Teaching Minor: 12 semester hours required as determined by the School of Educat·ion. English 328 is req u i red . MATHEMATICS Senior High Teaching Major: 40 semester hours. Req uired : Math 151, 152, 253, 321, 331, 8 hours of math electives above 324 (4 hours can be computer science); Computer Science 1 1 0 or 144, one year (two-course) sequence in a natural science outside mathematics and computer sc i en ce . Math 446 t o meet professional education req ui reme nt . Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 20 semester hours. Required: Math 151, 152, 230 or 331, 4 hours of math electives (321 or above 324), Computer Science 1 1 0 or 220 or 144. Math 446 to meet professional education requirement. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 s e mest er hours. Required: Math 133 o r equivalent; 151, 152, 230, 323 or equjvalent. Com­ puter Science 110 or 144 is also strongly recommended. E lementary Teaching Minor: 1 2 semester hours. Required: Math 323 or eq uival�nt; Computer Science 1 10 is s trongly recomlllended.

MUSIC K-12 Teaching Major-Choral: 56 semester hours required: Music 123, 124, 125, 126, 132, 223, 225, 226, 227, 231, 248, 34 l, 345, 366, 441, 443, 445, 453; eight hours from 360-363; four hours of class piano (minimum level 6); six hours of private instruction in voice; one hour of private instruction: senior recital 420 (half­ recital). Music 341, 441, and 443 are required in the Professional Education sequence for certification. See Music Department

listings regarding courses which are prerequisite for student teaching. Recommended: Music 491 (Independent Study­

Observation) before student teaching.

K-12 Teaching Major-Instrumental: 54 semester hours 'l23, 124, 125, 126, 132, 223, 225, 226, 227, 231, 326, 345, 444, 445; six hours irom 241/242, 243/244, 245/246, 247; eight hours from 370/380; two hours of class piano (minimum level 4)*; six hours of private instruction on principal instrument; one hour of private instruction: degree recital 420 (h a l f-reci t al) . Music 444 required in the Professional Education sequence for certification. See Music Department l is tings regarding courses which are prerequisite for student teaching. Recommended for string majors: Music 454 . Recommended for all instrumental majors: 491 (Independent S tu d y-O bserv a t ion) before student required: Music

teaching.

Secondary Teaching Major-Choral: 54 semester hours 123, 124, 125, 126, 132, 223, 225, 226, 227, 231, 248, 345, 366, 441, 443, 445, 453; eight hours from 360-363; four hours of class pi ano (minimum level 6)*; s ix hours of private inst'ruction in voice; one hour of pI'l'vate instruction: senior recital 420 (half-recital); one hour of music elective. Music 441 and 443 are required in the Professional Education sequence for certifiearequired: Music

tion. See Music Department listi n gs regarding courses which are prerequisite for st ud en t t eac h i n g. Recommended: Music 343, 491 (Independent Study-Observation) before student t ea ching. Junior High Teaching Major: 30 or 31 s emes te r hours required: Music 123, 124, 125, 126, 132, 223, 225, 226, 227, 231, 345, 443 or 444 ; two hours of 360-363 or 370/380; t wo hours of class piano (minimum level 4)* . Two to t h ree hours of Music 443 and 444 are required in the P ro fess iona l Education sequence for cert if ica t ion. See Music Department l ist ings regarding courses which a re prerequisite for student t eac hi ng . Recommended: four hours of p ri va t e instruction i n voice Or principal instrument and guHar la boratory; Music 491 (I ndependent Study-Observation) before student teaching. Junior High Teaching Minor: Two to four semester hours from Music 341, 441, 443, and 444 plus 20 h o urs to be determined in consultation with the School of Education and the Department of Music.

Elementary Music Speciajist-Choral: 48 hours required: 123, 124, 125, 126, 132, 223, 225, 226, 227, 231, 248, 341, 345, 441 , 453; eight hours of 360-363; fou r hours of class pi ano (minimum level 6)" , four hours of private instruction in voice. Music 341 and 441 are required in the Professional Education Music

sequence for certification. One hour of music elective. See Music Department listings regarding courses which are prerequisite for

student teaching. Recommended: M usic

491 (Independent

S tudy-Observation) before student teaching.

"Consult Department of Music concerning descriptions of class

piano levels.

Elementary Teaching Major: Two to four semester hours from 341 and 441, plus 24 hours to be determined in consulta­ tion with the School of Education and the Department of Music. Elementary Teaching Minor: Two to four semester hours from Music 341 and 44 1 , plus 1 2 hours to be determined in consulta­ tion with the School of Education and the Department of Music. Music

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Secondary Teaching Major (44 hours) : Required: Phys ica l Education 277, 282, 283, 285, 286, 328, 329, 478, 481, 482, 484, and 485; Biology 205 and 206. Electives: 2 hours in p hysica l education a p proved by major adviser. For K-12 certification students must also take Physica l Education 322 and 360 in addition to meeting requirements as set forth by the School of Education . Secondary Teac h i n g Minor (19 hours): Required: Physical Education 283, 285 or 286, 328, 334, 478, and 2 hours of electives in physical education as approved by adviser. E lementary Teaching Major (24 hours): Required: PhYSical Education 282, 283, 286, 322, 329, 334, and 6 hours of electives in p hys ic al education as approved by adviser. Elementary Teaching Minor (12 hours): Required: P hys ica l Education 282, 283, 286, and 322. Elementary School Physical Education Specialist (40 hours): Required: Physical Education 277, 282, 283, 286, 322, 329, 360, 478, 481, 482, 484, 485, and Biology 205 and 206. Health Education Minor (18 hours) : Required: Health Educa­ tion 260, 270, 292, 295, 321, 323, 326, and 4 hours of electives with the approval of the health coordinator. PHYSICS Senior High Teaching Major: 34 semester hours required : Physics 147, 148, 153, 154, 223; Math 151, 152; Engineering 231, 271; Chemistry 1 15, plus an additional 4 hours in ch e mis t ry. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 18 semester hours required: Physics 125, 126 (or 153, 154), 147, 148; Natural Science 106; Math 133 o r 151; Education 447. Junior High Teaching Major: 26 semester hours required: Physics 125, 126 (or 153, 154), 147, 148; Natural Science 106; Math 133 Or 151; Chemistry-8 hours from 104, 105, 1 15, 1 16. *Physics 153 and 154 Olay be taken instead oi 125 �nd 126, with concurrent Or prior registration in Math '151 or 152. POLITICAL SCIENCE Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours reqUired: Political Science 101 , 151, 231, plus 16 hours of political science electives; History 460; '12 hours irOOl the iollowing supporting areas: economics, geography, history, sociology, anthropology, or psychology. Education

448 to meet professional education requirement . Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 20 semester hours required: Political Science 101 or 15'1, H istory 460, ,�nd 12 hours selected in consultation with advisers in education and political science. Professional methods course required : Education 448.

PSYCHOLOGY Secondary Education teaching Minor: 16 semester hours required: Psychology 101, 243, and 8 additional hours from upper division courses. Professional methods cou rse required: Education 448.


54 SCANDINAVIAN STUDIES Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours above the 200 level req u i red ; courses selected in consultation \vith advisers in education ,1nd Ic1nguages. Language 445 to meet profesSional education requ irem ent . Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required, including hours in Norweg ian and 4 ad d itional hours selected in consultation with the department and the School of Educa t ion . Elementary Teaching Minor: 12 se mester hours required, as determined by the department and the School of Educatinn. SCIENCE (GENERAL) See (1hove. SOCIAL SCIENCE Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required: 4 hours from History 251. 252, 253; History 460; 4 hours from each of the following areils: anth ropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology, or 4 hours fro m Earth Sciences 101. 1 3 1 . 35 1 , 360; 12 up pe r division hours from two of the following areas: economi cs, p ol i t ical science, and sociology. Education 448 to m e et professional education requirement. Secondary Education Minor: 16 semestc.'r huurs required: 4 ho urs from History 251 . 252, or 253; History 460; and 8 hours selected from economics and politic al science (at least 4 hours from each department). Professional methods course required: Education 448. Junior High Teaching Major: 28 semester hours required: 4 hours from History 2.� 1 , 252, 253; Hi s tory 460; 4 ho u rs from thrt'e of t h e fol kl\-v ing areas: anthropolo gy, eco no m ic s , poli t i ca l science, psy chology, and sodo log y; 8 upper div ision hours f ro m two of the follo wing areas: economics, political science:, and soc iology. Teach ing Minor: 16 hours required : 4 hours from Histo ry 251, 252, 253; History 460; and 8 hours from economics, political science, and sociology. Education 448 to meet profes­ sional edu·cation requirement. Recommended: Ed ucation 420. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required: 4 hours from History 251, 252, 253; History 460; and 16 hours from the following: a nth ro pology, economics, political science, psychology, and sodology. Teaching Minor: 12 semester hours required, as determined by the School of Education. SOCIOLOGY Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required: Sociology 1 0 1 ; 24 hours of soc iology ; Hist,)ry 460; 12 semester hours distributed over three areas of other social sciences. Education 448 to meet profess ional education requ irement . NOTE: Students may e lec t one of the specialized areas in sociology Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours required, including Soc i olog y 10·1 . Additional upper division courses selected in consultation with advisers in education and sociolog)'. Pro fess i o nal m et hods co u rs e required : Education 448. SPANISH Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hour s req ui re d , including 32 seme ste r hours of Spanish and 12 semes ter hours of supporting courses. Spa nish 201, 202 (or equivalent), 321, 3SI, 352, and 12 additional semester hours. Sup po rting courses to be selected with the a pp roval of the department and must include Language 445, which will also meet part of the professional education elective requirement. Secondary Education Teaching Minor: 16 semester hours above the 200 level requ i red ; courses sclectl>d in consultation with advisers in education and languages. Professional methods course required: Language 445 . Junior High Teaching Major: 28 semester hours required, as listed for senior high prep"'<1tion; supporting courses chosen in consultation with major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor : 16 semester hours above 200 level. Elementary Teaching Major: 24 semester hours required, including 20 hou rs in S p anis h and 4 additional hours selected in consultation with the department and the Sch ol af Educatio n . SPECIAL EDUCATION (See above, unde r Special Programs. ) FIFTH-YEAR AND STANDARD CERTIFICATION Program for all candidates holding a valid provisional teaching certificate and working toward standard certification. The fifth -year of teacher education is to follow a period of one year of initial teaching experience. Students must complete a minimum of eight semester hours applicable toward the fifth year, before the beginn i ng of the fourth year of teach i ng. Thirty semester hours in an approved progmm must be com p leted before the beginning of the seventh year of teaching. Students may choose the institution in which they wish to take advanced \-\lark as follows: "I. If they choose to work at PLU or any other of the teache.r education institutions in the State of Washington, thdt institu­ tion shall be res po ns i ble for recommending them for the

Standard Certificate upon completion of thO' fifth-year program. 2. If rLU gr" duatcs wi sh to undertake the' fifth year in an ou t-nf­ state institution, PLU wUI be responsible for recommending them for the Standard Certificate. Stude.nt> must secure gene ra l a pprov aJ of th e i r p lan from the university in advance. There are fou r p rov ision s govern ing the fifth-year pattern of work, accordi ng to the State Board of Regulations: I . The fifth year must includ e a minimum of 30 semester hours of which " t least fi fty per cent must be upper division andlor grad uate COurses . 2. No more than three semester hours of corresponden ce study may be app ro ved as a part of the 30 semester hours in t h e student's fifth-year program . 3 . PLU g ra du d te s must take 15 semester hours of the fifth year in residence " t PLU. A non-PLU student who wishes to be recommended by PLU must take a minimum of 20 semester hours in res id e nce ,H PLU. 4. Students may tnke 1 5 of the required 30 semester hours before or during the first year of teaching ,'xperience with prior perm i ss io n of the School of Education. �Ilowing are requirements and procedures for the approv<ll of fifth-year programs of work ,1\ PLU: I . S pecific co u rse requirements are: Elementary a . Req u i red course: EDUC 467, Evaluation (2 hlOurs) b. One re qu i re d from the following (4 hours): EPSY 535, Fo un da tions of Guidance; EPSY 57R, Behavioral Problems; EPSY 575, Mental Health. c. 2 hou rs from t h e foIlO\�'ing suggested courses: EDUC 473, Pa rent-Teache r Relationships; EDUC SOI, Sex Role Stereo­ typing in Education ; ErSY 537, Redlity Discussion Tech­ niques; EPSY 536, Affective Classroom Techniqu es; 501 Workshops, for exampl e, Disci pline in the Classroom, Encouraging Process. Secon dary a. Requ i red courses (4 hours): EDUC 420, Problems of Read­ ing in the Secondary School; EDUC 467, Evaluation. b. Electives (4 hours): C rollI' A-2 h o urs- co urs es in a t h eoreti ­ cdl or inte rp ersonal framework-EDUC 473, Paren t -Tea ch e r Relations h ips; EDUC 501 , Sex I�ole Stereotyping in Educa­ tion; EPSY 537, Reality Discussion Techniques; or a pp rop ri ­ ate substitutions; Cre"'I' B ·2 hours-courses in a methodolog i cal or instructional framework-Simulation, Film, Interaction Analysis, Program Ideas in the Junior High School, rlants of the Pacific Northwest, etc. 2. Any courses re'commended for the individual student before the granting of the bachelor's degree must be completed. These may be recl)mmended by either the undergraduate adviser or the School of Education. 3. An y course wo rk required by the undergraduate institution andlor the employing school district must be completed. 4. Courses taken should strengthen areas of concentration a nd bu ild stronger general education background as well as fill n eeds in the profess i onal field. This program of studies is to be selected by students with the guidance of those who h,we worked with them d uring their period of initial teaching and the advisers at the recommending institutions. 5. Students secure approval of the recommending institution for work taken elsewhere before the work is begun . Some of the work taken during the fifth year may also apply towa rd a masters deg ree. Graduate students m,'y undertake a program coordinating requirements for standard certification dnd the master's degree upon the approval of their committee chair and the coordinator of fifth-year progrdms. RENEWAL OF INITIAL TEACHING CEIITIFICATE Students seeking to renew their initial teaching cert ific d te must do the following: 1. EnroLl formally in a planned program for the continuing teacher certificate. 2. Nego t i a te ,1I1d establish a "plan of study" with their adviser. 3. Complete 10 semester hours of courSe work a p plica ble to the continuing certificate program which are taken subsequent tll is s uance of the initial certificate. 4. In su r e that official transcripts of applicable course work are on file in the School of Education at PLU. S. Com plete an application for tea c hing certificate with a nota­ ri zed affidavit no ol de r than six months at the time of reCclnl­ mendation for rene \val . 6. Pay the State certificate fee. CONTINUING TEACHER C E RTIFICATE The candidate for a continuing teacher certificate must com­ pl et e at least 30 semest e r hours of upper division or graduate work s u bs eq uent to the baccalaureate degree, of w hi c h 20 semes­ t e r hours must be t<lken after the first year of t eac hing. Candi­ dates must have completed at least three years of service in an educational setting, including at least t\<vo years as a classroom


55 teacher in grades K-12. Additional specific requirf'ments include: T. Completion of the "plan of study" and school district recom­ mendations for studv. 2 . Completion of Educ � til)n 5 15, 516, and 344 . 3. Verification of the completion of continuing level minimum g-eneric standards. 4. Completion of 8 semester hours in the supporting area. 5. Completion of 15 semester hours i n re.side.nce for PLU graduates or 20 semester hours for those who received their initial certificate elsewhere. 6. Completion of 20 semester hours after one year of teaching experience. 7. Meeting the recency requirement, if applicable. 8. Completion of an application for d teacbing certificate with a notarized affidavit no older than six months at the time of recommendation for the certificate. 9. Insuring that official transcripts as applicable are on file in the School of Education. Ill. Payment of the State certiiicate fee. With previous approval and adequate planning, most of the work taken for the continuing certificate may also dpply towards a master's degree. Graduate students mily undertake a program coordindting requirements for the continuing teaching certiiicate and the master's degree upon the appr(l\'al of the faculty adviser or graduate chairperson.

PRINCIPA I:S AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR'S CERTIEICATE Preparation programs leading to cert ification at the initial and continuing levels for school and district-wide progrilm adminis-­ trators are available through the School of Education. Specific requirements for the certiiicates are identiiied in Handbooks available upon request . Master's degrees in Educational Admin­ istration ,1[e described in the Craduate Catillog, w h ich can be obtained from the Craduate Studies Office. CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL COUNSELORS AND SCHOOL NURSES (Subject to new certification requirements as of October 1973) Educational Staff Associate certification for school counselors or for school nurses is individually designed through a consor­ tium consisting of a school district, related professional associa­ tions, and Paciiic Lutheran UniverSity. Additional information on these programs can be obtained by contacting the dean of the School of Education.

COURSE OFFERINGS 251

LEARNER AND SOCIETY: G ROWTH AND DEVEWPMENT (SECONDARY)

Orientation to contem porary schools; human development in relation to individuals a n d groups in an educational setting. Pub­ lic school observation required weekly with students responsible for their own transportation. Prerequisites: PSY 1 0 1 or SOC 1 0 1 , E N C L JO l , sophomore standing, 2 . 33 CPA . ( 4 )

253

CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND SCHOOLS

I n t roduction to the nature of schools and teaching in contempo­ rary society; overview of human development w i t h speCial emphasis on intellectual, social, emotional, and physical dewlop­ ment of elementary age children in a school setting. Weekly public school observations required with students responsible for their o w n transportation. Prerequisites: ENCL 101, PSY 101, sophO­ more standing, 2 . 33 CPA, writing and math skills assessment. Also available as independent study (253 IS) for 1-4 credits, if approved by faculty, for students with extensive background or experience in schools and development . (4)

321

HUMAN DEVEWPMENT

Emotional, social, intellectual, and p hysiological development from infancy through adolescence. A weekly four-hour observa­ tion i n the public school is required. (Individually assigned . ) Stu­ dents responsible for their own transportation. Prerequisites: PSY 101, ENCL 1 0 1 , j u n ior sta nding, 2.33 CPA . (2-4)

322

GENERAL METHODS-PRIMARY

Competencies will be developed for teac.hing in grades K-3, with observation and participation in public schools. Prere.quisites: 253 or 321. 2.50 C PA (4)

323

GENERAL METHODSUPPER ELEMENTARY

Competencies will be developed for teaching in grades 4-6, with observation an.d participation in public schools. Prerequisites: 253 or 3 2 1 . 2 . 50 CPA . (4)

324

GENERAL METHODS-ELEMENTARY

325

READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Competencies will be developed for teaching i n grades K-6. Extended cxperi_cncc and participt)tion in public school class­ rOoms wiLl be provided . Prereyuisites: 253 or 3 2' 1 , M ATH 323, and concurrent enrollment in courses 325, 326, 408, 410, 4 1 2 . 2.50 CPA . (4)

Teaching rea d i n g i n elementary grades, i nc l u d i n g mod ern approaches, materials, methods, techniques, procedures, and some d iagnosis of reading difficulties. Prerequisites: 322-234 or concurrently with 322-324 . 2 . 50 CPA. (4)

326

MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Basic mathematical skills and abilities needed by the elementary school teacher; recent developments and materia.is. Prerequisites: 253, M ATH 323 or equivalent. 2 . 50 CPA . (2)

341

PHIWSOPHY OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Objectives of high school business education programs, the busi­ ' ness curriculum , layout and facilities planning, the evaluation of business teachers and competence for business occupations. Examination of information resources and current thought in business education, cooperative education, and distribut iv(> edu­ cation. Prerequisite: EDUC 425 is recommended. (2)

342

METHODS OF TEACHING TYPING AND BOOKKEEPING

Application of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of typing and bookkeeping. Prl'requisites: BA 281 and advanced typing; EDUC 425 is recommended. (2)

343

METHODS OF TEACHING BOOKKEEPING

Application of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of bookkeeping. Prerequisites: EDUC 425 (may be concunent) and BA 28 1 . ( 1 )

344

METHODS OF TEACHING GENERAL BUSINESS SUBJECTS

Application of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of general business, consumer econom ics, eco­ nomics, business lcl\\I� business mathematics, and business com­ munications subjects. Prerequisites: EDUC 425 (may be concur­ rent), ECON 150, and BA 281 . ( 1 )

401

WORKSHOPS

Workshops in special fields for varying periods of time. ( 1-6)

408

LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE E LEMENTARY SCHOOL

The functional teach ing of communication skills, grades K-6; areas include or(ll and written expression, listening, reading, literature, d rll m a t izatiol1, spelli ng} gra m m ar, h,l nd w ri t ing, c h il d ren1s l a nguage study, vocabulary development, and lexicography. PrerequiSite: 253 . 2.50 CPA and 322-324 or concurrently with 322-324. (2)

410

SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

A human istic approach with emphasis on those kinds oJ materials and " hands on" activities needed to ach ieve the objectives of sci­ ence. Prerequisite: 322-324 or concurrently with 322-324. 2 . 50 CPA . (2)

412

SOCIA L STUDIES IN THE E LEMENTARY SCHOOL

Objectives, materials, and methods of teaching the social studies; recommended to student teachers and experienced teachers. Pre­ requiSite: 253. 2.50 CPA. (2)

420

PROBLEMS OF READING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Teaching secondary rea d i ng in content areas; attention to develop­ mental reading problems; materials, methods, techniques, proce­ dures, and some observation and diagnosis of reading d iificulties. Prerequisite : 251; taken concurrently with 425 and 434. (2)

421

TEACHERS AND THE LAW

A brief study of students', parents', and teachers' rights and responsibilities with some emphasis of the question of liability. Prerequisite: 253. ( 1 )


56 425

GENERAL METHODS-SECONDA RY

446

Curriculum, materials, and methods of secondary teaching; observation and discussion. Prerequisites: 251, EPSY 368. 2.50 GPA (4)

MATHEMATICS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

447

430 STUDENT TEACHING-PRIMARY (SINGLE)

SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

448

SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

449

COMPUTER SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

451

ADMINISTRATION OF THE SCHOOL LIB RARY

Teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of the School of Education faculty and c.Iassroom teachers. Prerequisites: 253 or 321, 322 or 324, 325, 326, 408, 410, 412. 2.50 GPA . Concurrent enrollment in 435. ( 10)

432

STUDENT TEACHINGUPPER ELEMENTARY (SINGLE)

Teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of the School of Education faculty and cla ssroom teachers. Prerequisites: 251 or 321, 323 or 324, 325, 326, 408, 410, 412. 2.50 GPA. Concurren t enroll melit in 435. (10)

Library organization and administration in the clementary and secondary schools. G (2)

434

Those services of a school librarian related to the preservation of all materials which form the sources of reference. G (2)

STUDENT TEACHING-ELEMENTARY (DUAL)

452

Designed for persons who do dual student teach ing. Ten weeks of teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of School of Education faculty and classroom teach­ ers. Prerequisites: EDUC 253 or 321; 322, 323, or 324; and 325, 326, 408, 410, ,lI1d 412. 2.50 GPA. Concurrent enrollment in 435. (8)

453

435

454

PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR

BASIC REFERENCE MATERIALS

PROCESSING SCHOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS

Classification, cataloging, and technical processing of materials. G (2)

SE LECTION OF lEARNING RESOURCE MATERIALS

An opportunity for students to share experiences with an exchange of ideas on pupil behavior, curriculum practices, and ways of improving teaching performance. (Must be taken concur­ rently with 430 or 432.) (2)

Criteria, professional literature, and techruques of evaluation of library materials (print and non-print); the librarian's responsibil­ ity to facul ty, students, and the general public. G (2)

436

455

ALTERNATE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHING-ELEMENTARY

A course designed to give some knowledge, understanding, and study of children, subject matter fields, and materials in the stu­ dent's alternate teaching level plus student teaching on that level. Students who h,we completed secondary preferred level student te,)Ching should enroU in this course. (6)

437

ALTERNATE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHING-SECONDARY

A cou rse designed to give some knowledge, understanding, and study of children, subject matter fields, and materials in the stu­ dent's alternate teaching level plus student teaching On that level. Students who have cumpleted elementary preferred level student teaching should enroll in this course. Independent study card required. (6)

440-448

SPECIAL METHODS IN TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOLS SUBJECTS

Curriculum, methods, and materials of imiruction in a variety of subjects; may be taken for graduate cred i t .

440

SEMINAR IN SECONDARY ART EDUCATION (2)

441

METHODS OF TEACHING SECRETARIAL SUBJECTS

Application of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of shorthand, office practice, simulation, word proc­ essing, and related subjects. Prerequisites: advanced typing and advanced shorthand. (2)

442

METHODS OF TEACHING GENERAL BUSINESS SUBJECTS

Application of research findings and psychological principles to the teaching of general business, COnsumer economics, eco­ nomics, business law, business mathematics, and business com­ munications subjects. Prerequisites: ECON 150, BA 281, EDUC 341, 342. (2)

443 444

CHEMISTRY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2) ENGLISH IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Theory and techniques of English instruction; cuniculum, meth­ ods, resOurces; classroom management . (2)

445

METHODS IN TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Theory and techniques of foreign language teaChing; special prob­ lems in the student's major language, emphasis o�n audioiingual techniques. G (2)

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

Audio and visual materials and aids, their use, organization, and administration. G (2)

456

STORYTELLING

A tombination of disco('ery and practicum in the art of storytell­ ing. Investigates the values and background of storytelling, the various types and forms of stories, techniques of choosing and f telling stories. Some off-campus practice. Demonstrations and joint storytelling by and with instructor. (4)

457

PREPARATION AND UTILIZATION OF MEDIA

The production and use of a variety of instructional mate.rials, flat pictures, charts, maps, and the 35mm camera; participants produce items useful in instruction . $10.00 lab fee is Charged. G (3 or 4)

465

STUDENT TEACHING-SECONDARY (SINGLE)

Teaching in the public schools under the direction and supervi­ sion of classroom and university teachers. Prerequisites: 251, 425, and EPSY 368. 2 . 50 GPA . May be taken concurrently with 467. (10)

466

STUDENT TEACHING-SECONDARY (DUAL)

Designed for persons who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks of teaching in the public schools under the direction and supervision of classroom and univerSity teachers. Prerequisites: EDUC 251 , 425, a n d Ef'SY 368. 2.50 GPA. May b e taken concurrently with 467. (8)

467

EVALUATION

Evaluation of school experiences; problems i�n connection with development, organization, and administration of tests (standard­ ized and teacher-made) . Required of fifth-year students. PrereqUi­ site: student teaching or teaching experience; EDUC 251, 253, EPSY 368. May be taken concurrently wit h student teaChing. G (2)

473

PARENT-TEACHER RELATIONSHIPS

Issues and skills important in conferencing and parent-teacher relationships. Emphasis on effective communication skills. Spe­ cial education majors and teachers examine relevan t placement processes and parent needs. (2)

479

SPECIAL TECHNIQUES IN READING

Individual diagnostic assessment of read ing problems using both formal and informal testing techniques. SpeCial instructional methods for remediation for children with reading difficulties. Practicum required. Prerequisite: 325 or equivalent. (4)


57 483

PRIMARY READING

485

THE GIFTED CHILD

488

READING CENTER WORKSHOP

489

DIRECTED TEACHING IN READING CENTERS

Materials and methods of the primary reading program and its relation to other activities. Prerequisite: teaching experience or concurrently with student teaching. G (2) A study of the gifted child, characteristics and problems, and school procedures designed to further development. G (2)

Clinical study of reading problems and suggested corrective m('a­ sures; to be taken concurrently with 489. Prerequisite: teaching experience. 5 G (2)

Directed observation and teaching in Summer remedial classes in public schools; to be taken cuncurrently with 488. Prcrequ.isite: teaching experience. 5 G (4)

496

LABORAlORY WORKSHOP

Practical course using elementary-age children in a classroom situ­ ation working out specific problems; provision will be made for SOme active partiCipation of the university students. Prerequisite: conference with the instructor or the dean of the School of Educa­ tion. G

497

SPECIAL PROJECT

501

WORKSHOPS

Individual study and research on educational problems or addi­ tional laboratory experience in public ,ch(x)1 classrooms. Prereq­ uisite: consent of the dean. G (1-4) Graduate workshops in special fields for varying lengths of time. (1-4)

515

PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR: CONTINUING LEVEL, TEACHERS

The preparation and sharing of selected topics related to the mini­ mum generiC standards needs of the individual participants. Required for the continuing level certification of teachers. (2)

516

TEACHER SUPERVISION

525

CURRENT PRACTICES AND ISSUES IN READING

Identification and development of supervisory skills for teachers who work with other adults in the classroom . (1)

To examine current practices and issues in the field of reading as described through educational research. The research findings will be applied to �urrent classroom practices. Students will be encouraged to pursue specific areas of interest within the bn,,)d area of reading instruction. Prerequisite: 325 or equivalent and teaching experience. (2-4)

527

PSYCHOWGY OF READING

Principles of reading. perception, word recognition, concept development, and meaning in reading will be explored. The psy­ chological and physiological aspects of the reading act will be examined in relationship to successful reading achievement . Pre­ requisite: 325 or equivalent and teaching experience. (2)

544

RESEARCH AND PROGRAM EVALUATION

Knowledge of student and class evaluation techniques; the ability to select and interpret tests; k nowledge of research design; the ability to interpret educational research; the ability to identify, locate, and acquire topical research and related literature; and the ability to use the results of research or evaluation to propose pro­ gram changes. (2)

545

METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH

Seminar in research methods and techniques in education with emphasis on designing a research project in the student's area of interest. Required for M . A . Prerequisite: consultation with stu­ dent's adviser and admission to the graduate program. (2)

550

SCHOOL FINANCE

Local, state and federal contributors to school finance, its philoso­ phy and development; the development and administration of a school budget. (2)

551

EDUCATIONAL LAW

Study of contemporary federal, 5t,) te, and local statutes, regula­ tions, and case law and their application to public and private schools (K-12). (2)

552

EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

554

SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

Administration and supervision of school personnel, facilities, and programs; with emphasis on the hum,1n relationships in that setting. Prerequisite: teaching experience or consent of the dean. (3)

The preparation and sharing of selected presentations relMed to needs of individual participants. Required for continuing certifica­ tion of principals and program administrators. Registration must take place in the fall semester and participation will be continuous for the academic year. (2)

555

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION WORKSHOP

Projects determined by the class; typical projects include currin)­ lum planning and adjustment, public relations programs, person­ nel employment and in-service training; financing building and educational programs. Prerequisite: one course in administration or supervision. (2)

556

SECONDARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICUWM

A variety of facets of secondary and middle school programs: finance, curriculum, discipline, evaluation, classroom manage­ ment, the basic education bill, legislative changes, and speci,)1 education. Development of secondary and middle schools from their beginnings to the present. Critical issues in the education scene today. (3)

558

INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

Internship in educational ,)dministration planned with the School of Education in cooperation with selected educational administra­ tors. Prerequisite: course work in educational administration and admission to the graduate program. (2-4)

571

HISlORY AND PHIWSOPHY OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Historical perspective and current status; development of func­ tions and structures; issues in curriculum; philosophy of adminis­ tration; case studies. (4)

573

STUDENT PERSONNEL WORK IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Student personnel services in higher education; use of personnel data; co-curricular activities; student welfare; contemporary trends in counseling problems related to student life. (4)

579

DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION IN READING

Causative factors relating to reading difficulties; some opportu­ nity to apply remediation techniques; open to those with teaching experience. (2)

580

CURRICUWM DEVEWPMENT

585

COMPARATIVE EDUCATION

586

SOCIOWGY OF EDUCATION

587

HISTORY OF EDUCATION

589

PHIWSOPHY OF EDUCATION

590

GRADUATE SEMINAR

Types of curriculum organizations, programs and techniques of curriculum development. (2) Comparison and investigation of certain materials and cultural systems of education throughout the world. (2) The nature and functioning of the educational system will be examined from ,) sociological perspective. Topics include: educa­ tion, stratification, and social change; the school as a complex organization; the school as a social institution; and the sociology of learning. (4) Gre,)t educators, educational theories, and educational systems from antiquity to the present. (2) Philosophic,)1 and theoretical foundations of education. (3) A workshop for all Master of Arts candidates in the School of Edu­ cation which provides a forum for exchange of research ideas and problems; candidates should register for this seminar for assist­ ance in fulfilling requirement. No credit is given, nor is tuition assessed . (0)


58 597

INDEPENDENT srUDY

Projects of varying length related to educational issue$ or con­ cerns of the individual participant and approved by an appropri­ ate faculty member and the dean. (1-4)

598

STUDIES IN EDUCATION

A res(;' arcli paper or project on an educational issue selected jointly by the student and the graduate ad viser. It will be reviewed by the student's gr" duate committee. (2)

599

THESIS

For Master of Arts Gmdidates who elect to ",rite a thesis. The the­ sis problem will be chosen from the cand idate's major field of con­ centration and must be app roved by the candidate's gra duate adviser. (3-4)

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOWGY 368

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Principles and research in human learning and their implications for curriculum and instruction. Prerequisite: E:: DUC 251, 253. (4)

501

WORKSHOPS

Graduate workshops in special fi Ids for varying lengths of time. ( 1 -4 )

512

GROUP PROCESS AND THE INDIVIDUAL

A human interactiun laboratory to facilitate the ex pl orat io n of th e self concept thro ug h the mechanisms of int er pers ona l interactions and feedback. Emphasis placed On the acquisition of skill in self­ exploration, role identification, and climate-making. G (2)

535

FOUN DATIONS OF GUIDANCE

The focus is on developing a n understanding of the serl'iceS ,1Ild proces$es ,1Vilil(,ble to assist individuals in making plans and deci­ sio ns ,lCcording to their own l ife pa t ter n . G (4y

536

AFFECfIVE CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES

will ex pl ort' various t ech n i'l ue s designed to facilitate understanding of self and others; methods for working with stu ­ dents. Prerequisite: student teaching or graduate status. l�lbora­ tory experience as arranged . G (2)

This course

537

REALITY DISCUSSION TECHNIQUES

565

ADVANCED HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

A comparative study of

human development will be made at vari­ ous levels of development through observational assessments using non-standardil..ed instruments: e.g., sociometric ,cales, autobiographies, interviews, interaction analysis and other appro­ priate measurements. A practicum (a minimum of one hour each week) is required in a school or appropriate agency. Pre -requ isit e: Fifth year or graduate s t atus . (4)

569

CAREER GUIDANCE

A study of careers,

570

FIELDWORK IN COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE

A culminating practicum of field experience in schools or agenc i es using theory, skills, and techniques previously learned. A variety of work experiences with both individuals and grou ps . Students i n corporate consultation experience following the Adlerian model. (4)

575

MENTAL HEALTH

Basic mental health princ ip les as related to interpersonal relation­ ships. Focus on self-understanding. La borat ory ex pe rience s as a rranged . (4)

578

BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS

Adlerian concepts provide basis for observation,

motivation, lilod­ ification, and l ife style assessment. Skills for assisting people in developing responsibility for their Own behavior is focused . labo­ ratory exp er i ence as arranged . (4)

583

CURRENT ISSUES IN EXCEPTIONALITY

course will concentrate On the characteristics of exceptional students and the counselor's role in dealing with a variety of prob­ lems they may have. 11,e fo llow ing Meas will be studied: l ea rni ng disabilities, emotional problems, p hysic a l problems, and the gifted student. Given every other interim. G (2-4)

This

597

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Projects of varying length related to educational issues or con­ cerns of the individual participant and approved by an appropri­ ate faculty member and the d ea n . (1-4)

598

srUDIES IN EDUCATION

r",.,arch paper 01' p m jec t on an educational isslte selected jointly by the student and the graduate adviser. It will be reviewed by the student's graduate committep. (2) A

THESIS

The lise of

599

social

The thesis

Reality Therapy in " helping relationship-schools, agencies, mental health clin ics, or un iversity res i d en ce s , L,lboratory ex pe rie n c e as arranged. Prerequisite: 553. G (2)

551

REFLECfIVE SKILLS PRACTICUM

A min i-practicum in the techniques of counseling; e n rol lm e nt lim­ ited to students beginning thE' master's degree program in Coun­ seling ilnd Guida nce, "l nd is a pr e requ isite tOildmission on rcgulilr status to the Counseling and Gu idance master's program. The pra c t icum milkes LISe of couTl seling sessions with cli.ents lltilizing verbal and non-verbal attending behaviOr. ( 1 )

552

SOCIAL LEARNING-MODELING PRACfICUM

A min i-practicum in the theory and techniques of social learning and role modeling. Pre req u is i te : 551 . ( 1 )

553

REALITY THERAPY PRACTICUM

A min i-practicum in counseling using the theory and techniques of reality therapy. Prerequisites: 552 and 561 . ( 1 )

554

GESTALT TIlERAPY PRACTICUM

min i-practicum in counseling using the theory and techniques of Gestalt t herapy. Prerequisites: 553 and 56·! . ( 1 ) A

561

BASIC RELATIONSHIPS IN COUNSELING

of the theo ry, process, tech n iques, and characteristics of the counseling relationship. A basic COurse for M . A . students in th e Counseling and Guidance program. (4) A study

563

PRAcrICUM IN GROUP PROCESS AND LEADERSHIP

A human in teraction laboratory which explores interpersonal operations in groups and facilitates the development of self­ insight; emphasis on le adersh ip and d ev elopm en t of skill in diag­ nosing individual, group, and organizational behavior patterns and influences. Students will co-facilitate a laboratury group. Pre­ requisite: 5l2. (2)

theories of choice, and guidance techniques.

(4)

problem will be chosen from the candidate's major field and must be approved by the candidate's g radu ­ ,lte committee. Clndidatcs are expected to defend their thesis in a final oral examination conducted by their committee. (3-4) of conce n t r a tio n

SPECIAL EDUCATION 190

EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND ADULTS

Introduction to th e needs and characteristics of exceptional chil­ dren and adults. Federal and stdte legislation, curre n t issues, and pract ices of delivering serviet"s to handicapped indiViduals. Designed as an overview of the field for underg-rad uate students in special education, ge nera l education, nursing;counseling, and other related fields. (3)

191

OBSERVATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

290

INTRODUCfION TO LEARNING DISABILITIES

Obse rvatio n i n s pec i al education settings in the local Mea. May be taken concurrently with SPED 190. No prerequisite. ( 1 )

Overview of the f iel d of learning d isabilities, including concepts, research practices, e arly identification, and remed iation. (3)

296

INTRODUCfION TO HEALTH AND PHYSICAL IMPAIRMENTS

Study of anatomical, physiological, social, and educational prob­ lems of those with orthopedic disabilities or health problems. (2) NOTE : PREREQUISITES FOR 300/400

LEVEL SPEC l A L EDUCATION: EDUC251 or 2-53 Or consent of instructor. Students not majoring in education may be excused from this requirement.


59 390

INTRODUCTION 10 DEVEWPMENTAL DISABILITIES

A study of the emotional, social, physical, and mental characteris­ tics oi the developmentally disabled. Methods oi classifying, diag­ nosing, and teaching mentally retarded children and adults from medical, psychological, social, and educational pOints of view. (3)

393

INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

Current problems and issues as they apply to the education of children with behavior disorders. Includes use of behavior modifi­ cdtion and classroom m,1nagement techniques. (3)

395

INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND DISORDERS

Introduction to language disorders, assessment, and interven­ tion. Focus on theories of language development and normal lan­ guage acquisition. (2)

396

BASIC ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING PROBLEMS

An overview of the d iagn os is oi learning problems as it relates to teaching. Emphasis on ecological and infonnal tests to determine w h ere the child is func t ion i ng . (2)

397

FORMAL ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING PROBLEMS

Study of a wide range of formal screening and diagnostic mea­ Sures. Emphasis on the selec t ion and use of a pprop ria te tests for making educational deci s ions . (2)

399

PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Experience with spedal education children or adults in it super­ vised setting. 1 hour credit given after successful completion of 35 clock hours. Prerequisite: SPED 190 or pennission of instructor.

( 1 -4)

403

PARENT/PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Presentation of the tL'Chniqucs for working effectively with par­ ents of handicapped children. Discussion of the placement com­ mittee process and of the rights of parents. (2)

405

CURRICUWM FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Focus on teaching academic, social, and adaptive beh,wior skills to mild ,l Od moderately handicapped children. Includes writing individual education plans, precision teaching, diIect instruction, task analysiS, and learning sequences. Prerequisite: General Methods. (3)

406

CURRICUWM FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Curriculum co nten t and planning, including academic subjects, life adjustments, and career counseling for mild to moderately handicapped adolescents and adults. Includes writing individual­ ized educational pl ans (lEP) ,1I1d behav io ra l objectives. (3)

438

STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY SPECIAL EDUCATION

Teaching in special education classrooms of public schools under the direction and supervision of classroom and un iversity teach­ ers. 8 weeks. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (6)

439

STUDENT TEACHING IN SECONDARY SPECIAL EDUCATION

Teaching in special education classrooms of public schools under the direction and supervision of classroom and university teach­ erS. 8 weeks. Prerequisite: consent oi instructor. (6)

475

EFFECTIVE UTILIZATION OF PARA-PROFESSIONALS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Emphasis on management of teacher aids and parent and student volunteers in the special education classroom . ( I )

479

SPECIAL TECHNIQUES IN READING

Individual diag no st ic assessment of reading problems using both formal and informal testing techniques. Speci,11 instructional methods ior remed iation. Practicum required. Prerequ iSite: EDUC 325 or equivalent . (4)

485

THE GIFTED CHILD

490

EARLY LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR THE HANDICAPPED CHILD

A st udy of the gifted child, characteristics and problems, ,lOd school procedures designed to further development. (2)

Diagnostic and remedial techniques used in early childhood edu­ cation with handicapped children. Review of normal and atypical child development and their implications for the learning process. (2)

491

PROGRAMMING EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED

In-depth study in the administration of early childhood progr,101s with emphasis on remediation techniques and interdiSCiplinary approaches. Prerequisite: SPED 490. (2)

494

COMPUTER APPLICATION FOR THE HANDICAPPED

An introduction into the application of computer technology with handicapped students. Focus on current issues and uses of com­ puter technology including computer assisted instruction, soft­ ware evaluation, pupil and data management, and computer aids for the handicapped. (2)

499

SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

501

WORKSHOPS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Current topics ad u l t s . (2)

G radua te

time. (1-4)

520

1m

the teaching of handicapped children and

wo rks h ops in s pec ia l education for varying lengths of

TEACHING HANDICAPPED CHILDREN IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM

An examination of teaching strategies appropriate for exceptional children in regular classrooms. Emph,1sis on the needs of excep­ tional children, program modification, and c1"ssroom manage­ ment. Designed for regular educators. (2)

521

TEACHING HANDICAPPED ADOLESCENTS IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM

An examination of teaching strategies appropriate for exceptional adolescents in regular classrooms. Emphasis on the needs oJ exceptional adolescents, program modification, and classroom management. Designed for regular educators. (2)

530

DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

531

SEVERELY AND PROFOUNDLY HANDICAPPED IN SCHOOL AND SOCIETY

Discussion oi the usc of diagnostiC information in making educa­ tional decisions. Formal and informal tests, ecological information and interviews will be emphasized as the basis for recommending instructional procedures. Prerequisite: SPED 397 or permission of instructor. (3)

Introduction to the phYSica l , social, and educational environ­ ments of the seve re ly and profoundly handicapped and the conse­ quent imp l ic ation s for the education and training p rocess . In terd iscipl i na ry concepts, terminology, and instructional models will be examined. (2)

532

EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF THE SEVERELY AND PROFOUNDLY HANDICAPPED

In-depth study of educational prescription and programming for the severely and profoundly handicapped. Emphasis on teaching stra tegies and cu rriculum modification as they apply to this popu­ lation. (2)

533

SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

Cllrrent issues and problems related to the education of children and adults with developmental disabilities. (2)

534

SEMINAR IN BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

535

SEMINAR IN LEARNING DISABILITIES

Current issues and problems related to the education of children and adults with behavior disorders. (2) Current issues and problems related to the education of children and adults with learning disabilities. (2)


60 537

SPECIAL EDUCATION: INTERNSHIP

Teaching in speci"l education classrooms under the direction and

592

supervision of cl,lssroom and university teachers. Prerequisite:

in learning disabilities. Specialized study in a selected topic. Pre­

Teaching credential ,�nd consent of instructor. (4)

requisite: SPED 535 or permiSSion of instructor. ( 1 )

570

APPUED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS FOR TEACHERS

A survey of the principles and techn iques of applied behavior analysis. Includes behavior modification, self-control techniques, congnitive behavior modification, and rescMch design. (2)

575

INTRODUCTION TO THE CONSULTANT TEACHER IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Introduction to the principles and practices of a consulting teacher model in special education . Focus on instructional delivery appro­ priate for providing direct and indirect services to handicapped chil dren in mainstream classrooms. Includes a one hour practi­

593

576

COMMUNICATION SKlLLS FOR THE CONSULTING TEACHER

Emphasis on the interpersonal skills necessary for the consulting teacher in special education . Exploration of variables involved in developing cooperation between consultants and regular class­ room teachers. 1.ncludes a one hour pract icum. (3)

588

ADMINISTRATION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

I nvestig,ltion of existing special education administrc.l tive units, pupil placement procedu res, student staffings, program reim­ bursement proced ures, and federal funding models. (3)

591

RESEARCH IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

Review of current research on selected topics in special education.

(1)

English �.

tw . .

1'-

"

As a discipline English assists students in achiev­ ing excellence in writing, discernment in reading, appreciation of human experience and aesthetic values, and understanding of the processes of criti­ cal and creative expression. Special programs include concentrations in litera­ ture, writing, and publishing. The Englis!, Depart­ ment also supports the London Program and often offers an interim study tour to the !3ritish Isles.

••

)I' .

RESEARCH IN BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

A combination of organized cou rsework and independent study in behavior disorders. Specialized study in a selected topic. Pre­ requisite: SPED 534 or permission of instructor. ( 1 )

594

RESEARCH IN DEVEWPMENTAL DISABILITIES

A combination of organized courscwork and independent study in developmental disabilities, Specialized study i n a selected topic. Prerequ isite: SPED 533 or permission of instructor. (1)

595

cum. (3)

...

RESEARCH IN LEARNING DISABIUTIES

A combination of orga nized coursework and i n dependent study

SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE DISORDERS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN

Approaches to the assessment and remediation of children with language disorders. Prerequisite: SPED 395 or permission of instructor. (2)

597

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Projects of varying length related to educational issues or con­ cerns of the individual participant and approved by an appropri­ ate faculty member and the dean. CI-4)

598

STUDIES IN EDUCATION

A research paper or project on an ed ucational issue selected jointly by the student and the graduate adviser. It will be reviewed by the student's graduate committee. (2)

599

THESIS

The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's major field of concentration and must be approved by the candidate's gradu­ ate committee. Candidates are expected to defend their thesis in a final oral examination conducted by their committee. (3-4)

CERTIFICATE IN WRITING: Majors are encou raged to include cou rses in writing in their program. Those majors who take three writing COurSes beyond 101 and prepare a portfolio of their work will be awarded a "certificate in writing:'

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON LITERATURE): 20 semester hours, beyond 1 0 1 , excluding ct>urses for interim credit, of which at least 8 hours should be upper division. These courses should include 4 hourS in American literature, 4 hours in British litera­ l'ure before '1700, 4 hours in British literature after 17()(), and at least 4 additional hourS in literature.

MINOR (EMPHASIS O N WRITING): 20 semester hours, beyund 1 0 1 , excluding courses for interim credit, of which at

. '

Jf l�

FACULTY Eyler, Chair; P. Benton, Bergman, Campbell, Jansen-Jaech, Jenseth, G. Johnson, L. Johnson, Jones, Klopsch, D. M. Martin, G. Martin, Rahn, Reigstad, D. Seal. Assisted by M. Benton, Blades, Cady, EllioH, Monroe, Sherry. Distinguished Writ­ ers in Residence: Spring 1985-Richard Murphy, Spring 1986-Lesley Hazleton. BACHEWR O F AIITS MAJOR: A t least 3 2 semester hours in English beyond 1 0 1 . including 241, 251, 252, at least one course in a historical period (342, 343, 381 . 384, 389, 390, 391, 392), at least one course in a major author (382, 383, 440, 451 , 452), a n d

1 2 hours o f electives, excluding interim courses and internships. All English majors must complete at least two years of a foreign language at the university level, or the equiv alen t . (Sec College of Arts and Sciences Rlreign Language Requirement, Option I . ) A t some t i m e during t h e ju nior year, each major must initiate a meeting with a cominittee of departmental faculty, chosen by the student and his or her adviser, to discuss the courSe planned for the final two or t?tree semesters in light of the student's particular interests and goals .

least 8 hours should be upper divisio n . These courses should include 4 hOLirs in British literature before 1700, 4 hours in American or British literature after 1700, and 12 hours in writing courses drawn from 201, 225, 227, 327, 328, 34 1 , 403, 421, or other approved COurses in writing.

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON PUBLISHING AND PRINTING ARTS) : English 312, 321 , 322; three electives from at least two of the following categories:

1. Writing-English 2()1, 225, 227, 324, 326, 327, 328, Communica­ tion Art's 283, 384. 2. Management-Business Administration 281, 282, 370, Com­ puter Science 1 10, 144, 210, Statistics 231. 3. Design-Art 326, 370, 396, 426, 470, 496, Communication Arts 380. PROSPECfIVE TEACHERS: Students preparing to teach in junior or senior high school may earn either a Bachelor of Arts in English with certification from the School of Education, or a Bachelor of Arts in Education with a teachi.ng major in English. See the School of Education section of this catalog for the addi­ tional requirements for certification o r the Bachelor of Arts in Education.


-

61 COURSE OFFERINGS AMERJCAN LITERATURE 241 AMERICAN LITERATURE 342 TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERJCAN POETRY 343 TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERJCAN FICTION AND DRAMA 345 CANADIAN FICTION 440 SEMINAR-A MAJOR AMERJCAN AUTHOR

100

BASIC WRITING SKILLS

An intensive review and practice of mechanics, the fundamentals of grammar, and the structure of sentences and paragraphs. Does not count toward fulfillment of gene ral un iverSity writing requ i re­ ment. (2)

101

COLLEGE ENGLISH

Develo ps a student's powexs to read, think, ilnd write effectively. Emphasis on short pa pers and guided revision. Includes a unit on library research tech n iq u es . 1 1 1 (4)

201

INTERMEDIATE WRJTING

BRJTISH LITERATURE

Opportunities to prac t ice and develop wri t i ng by exploring selected topics from various d i sci pl in e s. Some emphasis on rewriting-focusing the material and adjusting the style for differ­ ent audiences. One section may be devoted to autobiographical writing. (Prerequisite: 101 or its equ i va le nt . Advanced Placement, or consent of instructor.) I II (4)

251

216

ENGLISH LITERATURE: BEGINNINGS TO 1750 252 ENGLISH LITERATURE: AFTER 1750 381 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 382 CHAUCER AND HIS AGE 383 SHAKESPEARE 384 ENGLISH RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 389 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE 390 THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC MOVEMENT 391 VICTORJAN LITERATURE 392 TWENTIETH CENTURY B RJTISH LITERATURE 451 SEMINAR-A MAJOR BRJTISH AUTHOR BEFORE 1750 452 SEMINAR-A MAJOR BRJTISH AUTHOR SINCE 1750

217

216 217 218 230 231

POETRY SHORT STORY DRAMA CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE MASTERPIECES OF EUROPEAN LITERATURE 363 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 364 SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 365 FANTASY AND FAI RY TALES 381 STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 491, 492 INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH 597 GRADUATE RESEARCH WRITING, LANGUAGE, AND PUBLISHING 100 101 201 225 227 321 322 324 327 328 366 400 402 403 421

BASIC WRJTING SKILLS COLLEGE ENGLISH INTERMEDIATE WRJTING AUTO BIOGRAPHICAL WRITING IMAGINATIVE WRJTING I THE WORLD OF THE BOOK EDITORJAL PROCEDURES FREELANCE WRITING IMAGINATIVE WRJTING II ADVANCED COMPOSITION WRITING FOR CHILDREN LINGUISTICS HISTORY OF THE ENG LISH LANGUAGE MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR TUTORJAL IN WRJTING

SHORT STORY

develo p m ent of short fiction, concentrating on themes a nd t echniqu e s of the genre. Includes stories by Ameri­ can, British, and Continental writers. II (4) Examines the

218

DRAMA

A su rvey of masterp ieces from classical Greece to the present, with e m phasis on the basic elements of drama (plot, character, language) and on the traditional genres. 1I (4)

225

AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WRITING

Reading autobiography and wr it i ng parts of one's own, with an e mp hasis on how wri t in g st yl e an d person al identity com plem en t each other. 11 (4)

227 GENRE AND SPECIAL STUDIES

POETRY

A study of poems and co nvent i on s of poetry from the Greek c1,lssics to modem projective vers e . Intended to d eve l o p the read­ er's ability to respond with sensitivity and discrimination to a rich va rie t y of po etic forms. 1 (4)

IMAGINATIVE WRJTING I

A beginning workshop in w ri t ing poetry and sho r t fiction. Includes a study of tec h n iq u es and forms to develop critical stan­ dards and an understanding of the writing process. ( P rerequiSite: 101 or its ell u ivale n t, Advanced Placement, or consent of instruc­ tor.) I (4)

230

CONTEMPO RARY LITERATURE

E mph a s is on American fiction since 1950. I (4)

231

MASTERPIECES OF EUROPEAN LITE RATURE

Representative works of the l i terature of Western Europe, espe­ cially classical, medieval, and Renaissance. 11 (4)

241

AMERJCAN LITERATURE

The co ntin ui ty of themes and forms in American prose, poetry, and fiction from colonization to the First World War. E mphn s is on major works of the 19th centu ry. 1 1 (4)

251

ENGLISH LITERATURE: BEGINNINGS TO 1750

E m p hasis on the continuity and variety of English literature from Beowulf through Neo-c1assicism and the ea rly novel. 1 (4)

252

ENGLISH LITERATURE: AFTER 1750

English literature, especially poet ry, from the emergence of romanticism to the 20th century. 1 1 (4)

321

THE WORLD OF THE BOOK

introduction to the org an izatio n and vocabulary of the pub­ lishing industry, the history of the book and presses, and the basic skills of copy-.,diting and design l ayo ut - in short, the co mplex process by which manuscript copy is brought to finished print. 1 (4) An

322

EDITORJAL PROCEDURES

Practical experience with actual book manuscripts in a broad range of editorial functions, from copy-editing and de s ig n to pre­ p ari ng cost estimates and marketing plans . \I (2)


62 324

FREELANCE WRITING

A cou rse in writing for publication, with primary emphasis on the feature .uticle. Intended to help students develop research and editorial skills; to help them produce writing that is clear, informa­ tive, and expressive ; to enhance their sense of audience; and to introduce them to procedures for submitting for magazine publi­

391

392

cation. 1 1 (4)

327

IMAGINATIVE WRITING II

An advanced workshop in writing poetry and short fiction . Some attention will be given to procedures for submitting manuscript for publication. 1 1 (4)

328

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

A study of rhetorical principles used in writing persuasively and imaginatively. Required for certification by the School of Educa­ tion . [ II (4)

342

TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

Representative poets from the generation of Robert Frost and Ezra Pound to our contemporaries. a ly I I (4)

343

TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN FICTION AND DRAMA

VICTORIAN LITERATURE

Selected authors (including Carlyle, Tennyson, Dickens, and Hardy) and topics Irom a period of rapid and momentous social change. 1I (4)

TWENTIETH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE

Selected playwrights from Shaw to Beckett; poetry of Yeats, Ha rdy, Thomas, and Auden; fiction of Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Greene, Lessing, and others. II (4)

400

LINGUISTICS

Sec Llnguages.

402

HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

The development of English from its Germanic origins to its mod­ ern �trllctu re, spelling, and rich vocabul,uy, drawn frum nldny languages. (2)

403

MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

421

TUTORIAL IN WRITING

A study 01 three major approaches to grammar: the traditional, the structural, and the transformational. Includes introduction to the history (If the English 1,1Ilguagc. 1I (4)

society to the 1950s, with emphasis on major a u t hors between the Wars, including Hemingway, Faulkner, O ' Neill. aly I I (4)

Guided work in an in d iv id ual w r it i ng project. A plan of study must be approved before the student may register for the COurse.

345

440

Literature and

CANADIAN FICTION

Novels and short stories by Anglo-Canadians, with some atten­ tion to French-Canadian literature in translation. I (4)

363

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

An introduction to a rich literary tr" dition, with analysis in depth of such authors as H. C . Andersen, Tolkien, Lewis, Potter, Wilder, and LeG uin, I II (4)

364

SPECIAL lOPICS IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

Content varies each year. Possible topics include genres, themes, historical periods, and traditions. May be repeated for credit with different topiC. [ (4)

365

FAI RY TALES AND FANTASY

Selected fa ir y tales are told, and variolls ways to interpret them are explored, Fa nt a sy is studied as a genre, with emphasis on kinds of fantasies, slich as pure fantasy, sword and sorcery, the detective novel. science fiction, and horror fiction. 1 (4)

366

WRITING FOR CHILDREN

A workshop in writing fiction and non-fiction for children and teenagers, with an introduction to the varieties of contemporary children's Iiter,lture, 1I (4)

381

STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

Studies in the literature of Western Europe irom 700 to 1500, themes, and the

excluding Chaucer. Consideration of genres, pl ace of literature in med ieva l l iie. aly 1I (4)

382

CHAUCER AND HIS AGE

383

SHAKESPEARE

A study of Chaucer's major works, especially The Canterbury Tales, in their l i vel y 14th century set t ing. Includes an introduction to the deve lo p me nt of the English la ng uage . 1I (4) Ten to twelve representative plays. Recommended as background : 251. [ (4)

384

ENGLISH RENAISSANCE LITERATURE

Studies the Golden Age of English literature. Selected poets from Wyatt to Marvell, including Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson; selected playwrights from Kyd to Webster; selected prose from More to Bacone and Browne. (4)

389

RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE

A study of nco-classic writings and the developing social aware­ ness of the preromantic age: Dryden and Pope to Johnson and Blake, Examination of the beginnings of the novel in Deloe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. I (4)

390

THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC MOVEMENT

A study of the romantic awake ning i n Engla n d : B l a ke, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron, and others. Atten­ tion also to novelists of the period such as Austen and Scott. [ (4)

(1-4)

SEMINAR-A MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHOR

Co ncen t rat ed st u d y of the work, life, influence, and critical repu­ tation of a major AmeriG\n author, including substantial library research. I (4)

451

SEMINAR-A MAJOR BRITISH AUTHOR BEFORE 1750

Concentrated study of the work, l ife, influence, and critical repu­ tation of a major B ritish author from the Renaissance tll the age of Fielding and Dr. Johnson, i nc l uding substantial library research. aly I I (4)

452

SEMINAR-A MAJOR BRITISH AUTHOR SINCE 1750

Concentrated study of the work, liie, influence, and critical repu­ tation of a major British author from the age of Blake to the present, including substantial library research. 1 1 (4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH

An intensive course in readi ng . M ay include a thesis. Intended for upper-division majors. [ II ( 1 -4)

597

G RADUATE RESEARCH (1-4)


63

Environmental Studies Prqgram Students concerned about or wishing to enter graduate study and career programs in such fields as environmental science, environmental law, or resource management, may enroll in the Environ­ mental Studies Program. A certificate will be awarded students completing requirements listed below, together \-vith a departmental or school major program. Students interested in the Environ­ mental Studies Program should schedule an appointment wiht the chair of the Environmental Studies Committee, and should fill out an applica­ tion . The student and the chair will develop a tenta­ tive plan and the chair will appoint a three-member advisory committee. The committee consisting of representatives from each of the three major subject matter groupings will approve each student's course program and integrative experiences. The

follo w i ng specific courses are required:

Earth Sciences 222 Economics 150 Business Ad ministration 230

4 hours 4 hours 4 hours

As part of gnld uation requirements, .,11 students co mplete either t h e dist ributive core or the I ntegrated Studies Program. Reco mmended core requirements include:

Distributive Core Arts/Literature: Art 381 and one elective in literature

8 hours

Natural Sciences/Mathematics: Biology 1 1 1 ;

Che m istry 104, 105; Computer Science 144;

Earth Sciences 101, 131, 202; Mathematics 128, 230; Natural Sciences 106 Philosophy: 125; 225 plus 226 or 323 or 325 or 326 or 328; 324; 371; 381; 395; or 427 Re l igion : 351. 382, or 451 , and one elective from Biblical S tu d ies or I ntegrative and Com parative Rel igious Stud ies

8 hours 4 hours

8 hours

Sexial Sciences: History 460; Poli t ical Science 101 , 1 5 1 , 345; Psychology 355; Sociolog y 101, 240, 331 (E conomics

150 may also be counted as fu l filling

a core req uirement)

8 hours

OR

CORE II ( Integrated Studies Program) Integrated Studies I n- 1 1 2, 221-222 or 223-224, 241-242 or 243-244, 351

28 hours In the areas of Natural Sciences and Mathe ma t ics one addi­

tional course (4 hours ) is required, which should be selected from those listed above under Distributive Core.

I ntegrative Experience-4 hours: During the senior year or at another a pproved time, all students pa rtici pate in a study­ research-action program designed to dra w upon the broad

background of the above courses and the expertise of their o wn m ajor fields. Coorses may include, but are not l i mited to, appropriate interim courses; departmental or interdisciplinary seminars; independent s tudy or research courses; field experi­

ence and i nt e rnship prog ra ms ; coopera tive education; employ­ ment o r volunteer service with in commun i ty agencies or organizations.

Environmental Studies Committee: Tonn, Chair; Bergman, Churney, D. Hansen, Lau.er, Lowes, Martinson, Miller, Schwid­ der, Stivers.


64

Global Studies Prqgram The Global Studies Program is a response to global trends which increasingly affect our lives. The program focuses on the formation and emergence of the modern world and its growing economic, cultural, political, and ecological interde­ pendence. By combining a regional concentration with that of a specific global issue, the Global Stud­ ies Program provides students with the knowledge and perspectives they need to understand and to function effectively in today's world.

FACULTY A committee of faculty and faculty associates administers this program: Guldin, Chair; Ber­ mingham, Browning, Carr, Kelleher, King, Klein, Lowes, Predmore, Rasmussen, Toven, Ulbricht.

GWBAL STUDIES COMPLEMENTARY MAJOR The Global Studies major is termed a "complementary" major because it is a second major in addition to a regular disciplinary major. Students elec ti ng the Global Stud ies major are required to dedare a traditional d isci plinary major before they declare a Global Studies major. In addition, the Global Studies major is multidisciplinary, drawing both its courses and faculty from departments of the Divisions of Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Soc ia l Sciences and from the Schools of the Arts and Business Administration. Students may not apply more than two courses (8 semester hours) from their primary major or from courses taken to fulfill general u niversity core requirements to the complementary m a j or. However, such special crediting of courses from the primary major to the complementary m a ju r must be approved by a student's a d v isory committee and the Glnbal Studies Commit­ tee ch a i r.

MAJOR REQUI REMENTS The Global Studies Committee chair assists students to select a n advisory committee of at lea st two fac u lty members from d ifferent disciplines. The ad v iso ry committee helps students plan their progmm of studies. Students take a minimum of 32 semester hours includin g: A . Global Stud ies Core 1. The introductory Global Studies course, Anthropology! History/Political Science 210, Global Perspectives (4 semes­ ter hOllrs). 2 . Anthropology 102, Exploring Anthropology: Culture and Societv (4 semester ho urs) . 3. H istory 2 1 1 , The Wor ld Since 1945 (4 semester hours). 4 . The G lo bal Studies sem i nar, Global Studies 410, Global Futures: Theory and Methods, and 41 1 , Research Seminar (2 semester hOllIS each). B. Four courses from th e Global Studies concentrations (16 semest er hours). C . S tuden ts must demonstrate proficiency in a language relevant to their concentration and at a level consistent with Option I of the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language require­ ment. This may be accomplished through proficiency exami­ nation or throllgh the eq ui va l en t of 16 semester hours of

coursework.


65 CONCENTRATIONS

A . REGIONAL 1. Ti,e Industrialized World a. Social Sciences Perspectives (8 semester hours) Anthropology 240-The Peoples of Europe (2) Anthropology 334-The Anthropology of Contemporary America Economics 381-Comparative Economic Systems History 253-Twentieth Century American History History 328-Nineteen Century Europe History 329-Europe and the World Wars: 1914-1945 History 333-Revolutionary Russia History 334-- M odern Germany, 1848-1945 History 340-Modern Japan History 356-American Diplomatic History History 471-History of American Thought and Culture Political Science 338-American fureign Policy Political Science 385-Canadian Political System b. Hu manities Perspectives (8 semester hours) English 343-Twentieth Century American Fiction and Drama English 391-Victorian Literature French 3n-Civilization and Culture German 321-German Civilization Languages 271-Literature and Society in Modern Europe Scandinavian 322-Contemporary Scandin,wia Spanish 3n-Civilization and Culture A 400-level literature course offered by the Department of Languages, chosen in consultation with the concen­ tration adviser. 2. The Developing World (4 courses, 16 semester hours) Anthropology 330-Cultures and Peoples of Native North America Anthropology 340-Cultures and Peoples of Asia Anthropology 345-Chinese Culture and Society History 330-Modern China Hjstory 335-Latin American History: Central America and the Caribbean History 336-Southern Africa Political Science 386-African Political Systems Spanish 322-Latin American Civilization and Culture Spanish 432-Twentieth Century Hispanic Literature (Spanish America) B. TOPICAL (For each of the topical concentrations, three courses are selected from within the topic and one four­ semester-hour course is selected from the regions listed above.) 1 . Illternational Relat ions (3 courses, one course irom each section) a. Introduction Political Science 336-lnternational Organization and

Lenv

b. Foreign Affairs Political Science 3n-Current l nternational Affairs Political Science 338-American Foreign Policy. c. Elective History 356-American Diplomatic History Integrated Studies 221-The Experience of Wa r Anthropology 375-L.lw, Politics, and Revolution 2. International Trade (3 courses, one course from each section) a. Introduction Economics 331-lnternational Economics b. International Business Business Administration 340-InternationaJ Business Business Administration 474-Internahonal Marketing c. Elective Political Science 336-lnternational Organization and Law A second international business is chosen in consulta­ tion with the concentration adviser. 3. Global Resollrces and Environment (3 courses) a. Introduction (1 course) Earth Sciences 100-Worid Geography b. Electives (2 courses) Earth Sciences 222-Conservahon of Natural Resources Earth Sciences 341-Energy and Mineral Resources for the Future Integrated Studies 241-Energy, Resources, and Pollution Integrated Studies 242-Population, H unger, and Poverty Sociology 361-Population and Development For this concentration, two of these three courses mav be lower division. �

4. MultiCl/ltllral Diversity (3 courses, one cou rse from each section) a. Cosmology and Symbolism Religion 13 I-Religions of the World Religion 231-Myth, Ritual, and Symbol Anthropology/Religion 392-Gods, Magic, and Morals h Human Creations Anthropology 355-Technology i.n Culture Music 432-Music of the World's People c. Social Relationships Anthropology 350-Women and Men in World Cultures Anthropology 360-Ethnic Groups Anthropology 375-Law, Politics, and Revolution Political Science 381-Comparative Legal Systems G LOBAL STUDIES MINOR

l. Global Studies Core A. Anthropology/H istoryiPolitical Science 210, Global Per­ spectives (4 semester hours), required of all students. B. Either G lobal Studies 410, Global Futures: Theory and Methods (2 semester hours) or a fourth course (4 semester hours) in the concentration. To be decided in consultation with the program chair. II. Concentration (3 courses, 12 semester hours) A. The Droe/oping \<\brld Anthropology 330-Cultures and Peoples of Native North America Anthropology 340-Cultures and Peoples of Asia Anthropology 345-Chinese Culture and Society HIstory 330-Modern China History 335- Latin American History: Central America and the Caribbean History 336-Southern Africa Po litical Science 386-African Political Systems Spanish 322-Latin American Civilization and Culture Spanish 432-Twentieth Cent·ury Hispanic Literature (Spanish America) B. Internaliollal Relalions (3 courses, one course from each section) 1. Introduction Political Science 336-International Organization and Law 2. fureign Affairs Political Science 231-Current International Affairs Political Science 338-American fureign Polin' ' 3. Elective Anthropology 375-Law, Politics, and Revolution History 356-American Diplomatic History Integrated Studies 221-The Experience of War C. International Trade (3 courses, one course from each section) I. Introduction Economics 331-lnternational Economics 2. International Business Business Administration 340-International Business Business Administration 474-lnternational Marketing 3. Elective Political Science 336-lnternational Organization and Lnv

A second international business course is chosen in consultation with concentration adviser and the program chair.

COURSE OFFERINGS 410

GWBAL FUTURES: THEORY AND METHODS (2)

411

RESEARCH SEMINAR (2)

Required of all students majoring in global studies. In the first semester (410), an analysis of major theories advanced by thinkers involved in the study of or attempts to change patterns of global interaction, Examination of both primary documents and second­ ary sources, learning how to read them and how to assess their worth, and discovering their methods of analysis. In the second semester (41 1 ), completion of a major research paper draw·ing on or adding to the theories and methods discussed in 410. Offered every two years. PrerequiSite for 410: ANTH/H ISi/POLS 210. Prerequisite for 41 1 : 410. (2, 2)


66

Through the study of history at Pacific Lutheran University students gain an understanding and appreciation of the historical perspective. Opportu足 nities for developing analytical and interpretative skills are provided through research and writing projects, internships, class presentations, and study tours. The practice of the historical method leads students off campus to their hometowns, to Europe or China or the American West, and to community institutions, both private and public. The depart足 ment emphasizes individual advising in relation to both self-directed studies and regular courses. The university library holdings include Significant col足 lections in American, European, and non-Western history. The Nisqually Plains Room of the library speCializes in Pacific Northwest community studies. Career outlets for majors and minors are either direct or supportive in business, law, teaching, public service, news media, and other occupations.

COURSE OFFERINGS Courses in the Department of History are offered in the following areas: AMERICAN FIELD 251 252 253 352 354 356 451 460 471 494

FACUIIY Nordquist, Chair; Bermingham, Clausen, Malone, Martinson.

Browning,

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 32 semester hours, including 4 hours American field, 4 hours-European field. and 4 hours-non-Western field. Students are expected to work closely with the departm e n t 's faculty advisers to insure the most personalized programs and instruction possible. Majors are urged to meet the foreign language requ irement of the College 01 Arts and Sciences under either Option I or Option II. Those majors who are preparing for public school teaching can meet the state histl'ry certification requirement by enrolling in H istory 460. All senil'r majl'rs are requ ire d to tal<e four hours of seminar credit. MINOR: 20 semester hours. 12 h o urs from COurses numbered above 300. Th e minor in hi st ory emphasizes a "program focus" and a "program plan," which is arranged by the student in consultation with a departmental adviser. BACHELOR OF A.RTS IN EDUCATION: S ee School of Education.

COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION THE AMERICAN CIVIL WA R AMERI CAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY WEST AND NORTHWEST HISTORY OF AME RICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE SEMINAR: AME RICAN HISTORY

EUROPEAN FIELD 107, 108 321 323 324 325 328 329

HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION THE MIDDLE AGES RENAISSANCE REFORMATION NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE EUROPE AND THE WORLD WA RS:

332 334 341 342 495

ENGLAND: TUDORS AND STUARTS MODERN GERMANY, 1848-1945 SEVENTEENTH CENTURY FRANCE THE FRENCH REVOLUTION SEMINAR: EUROPEAN HISTORY

1914-1945

NON-WESTE RN FIELD 109 210 211 330 333 335

EAST ASIAN SOCIETIES GWBAL PERSPECTIVES THE WORLD SINCE 1945 MODERN CHINA REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN 336 SOUTHERN ARICA 340 MODERN JAPAN 496 SEMINAR: THE THIRD WO RLD ALL FIELDS 399 401 492 501 590 591 595 598 599

INTERNSHIP WORKSHOPS INDEPENDENT STUDY GRADUATE WORKSHOPS GRADUATE SEMINAR DIRECTED STUDY GRADUATE READINGS RESEARCH PROJECT THESIS


67 107, 108

HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVIUZATION

Analysis of institutions and ideas of selected civilil.ations. Meso­ pota{nia, Egypt, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, the rise of Christian­ ity, and Med ieval Europe in the first semester; Europe from the Renaissance to the present in the second semester. I II (4, 4)

109

EAST ASIAN SOCIETIES

A historical overview of the traditional cultures, traditions, and lives of the people of China and japan. Discussion of the lives of pt.::,asants, emperors, merchants, and warriors in each society. Attention to the great technological and artistic developments in each society. (4)

210

GWBAL PERSPECTIVES: THE WORLD IN CHANGE

A s urvey of global issues affecting the human condition in a rap­ idly changing and increasingly interdependent world: moderni­ zation and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and revolution; peace and jus­ tice; and cultural diverSity. These issues are examined in a multi­ disciplinary light using case studies drawn from non-Western and Western nations. Emphasis on the development of a global per­ spective which recognizes human commonalities as well as diver­ sity in perceptions, values, and priorities. (Cross-referenced with ANTH 210 and POLS 2 1 0 . ) (4)

211

THE WORLD SINCE 1945

A histnrical su rvey on how Thi.rd World nations have sought inde­ pendence in the post-'M.lrld Wa.r II period. Emphasis on events in the Western world leading to World War II and the effects of that war on the Third World. Case studies of countries from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East as examples of the diversity inherent in quests for independence. (4)

251

COWNIAL AMERICAN HISTORY

American institutions from colonial times to the 1 790's; the growth of the colonies and their relationship to the British impe­ rial system . (4)

252

NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY

From Jefferson to Theodore Roosevelt; interpretation of eras from socia\, political, economic, and biographical viewpoints. (4)

253 TWENTIETI-I CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY Trends and events in domestic and foreign affairs since 1900; afflu­ ence, urban growth, and social contrasts. (4)

321

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION

334

MODERN GERMANY, 1848-1945

335

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY: CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

The Revolutions of 1 848 and unification of Germany; Bismarcki.ln and Wilhemian empires; Weimar Republic and the rise of National Socialism; the Third Reich. (4)

Survey of the major aspects of Central American and Caribbean history from color.ial to modern times. Use of selected case stud­ ies to illustrate tht' region's history. Study in inter-American rela­ tinns. (4)

336

SOUTHERN AFRICA

Examination of the history of pre-colonial African kingdoms, Western imperialism, settler colonialism, and the Africnn struggle for independence. Emphasis on the period since 1800. Focus on the countries of South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Mozambiljue, Zimb.lbwe, and on the issues of nationalism, racism, and revolu­ tion . (4)

340

MODERN JAPAN

Study of how japan became the modern "miracle" in East Asia . Primary focus on traditions that enabled japan to change rapidly, the role of the challenge of the West in that change, the industrial­ ization of japan, the reasons for war with the U. 5., and the impact of the war on contemporary japan and its social and economic institutions. (4)

341

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY FRANCE

Structure of SOCiety, development of absolutism, protest of popu­ lar classes, role of France in international affairs, origins of the Enlightenment. (2)

342 THE FRENCH REVOLUTION Structure of society, origins and course of the Revolution, and its impact on France and Europe. (2)

352

THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

The American Revolution as a series of essentially political events s!.retching from the Seven Years War in 1 763 through Thomas jef­ ferson's defeat of john Adams in the Presidential election of 1800. The Colonists' initial resistance to the reorganization of the British Empire after 1 763; the evolution of active resistance into revolu­ tion; the decision to declare independence; the experience of war; the struggle to establish legitimate and effective governments; the framing and ratification of the Constitution; and the Federalist­ Republican battles of the 17905. Emphasis on the role of political thought and ideology in the developmen t of republican govern­ ment in the United States. (4)

354

THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

Europe from the disintegration of the Roman Empire to 1300; reading and research in medieval materials.(4)

The Civil War era from the political crises of the 18505 through Reconstruction. Antebellum sectionalism; the collapse of the 2nd American Party System; slavery; racism; secession; the military, political, and social aspects of the War itself; emancipation; and reconstruction. Empha s is on the Civil War as the central drama of U.s. history and consideration of its p rofound impact on 20th century social, political, and economic cQnditions. (4)

324

356

The ancient Mediterranean world with emphasis upon Greek and Roman civilizations.(4)

323 THE MIDDLE AGES

RENAISSANCE

Europe in an age of transition-BOO to 1500. (4)

325

REFORMATION

Political and religiOUS crisis in the 16th century: Lutheranism, Zwinglianism, Anglicanism, Anabaptism, Calvinism, Roman Catholic reform; Weber thesis, the beginnings of Baroque art. (4)

328

NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE

The expansion of European civilization from 1800 to 1914. (4)

329

EUROPE AND THE WORLD WARS: 1914-1945

AMERICAN DIPWMATIC HISTO RY

The practice, function, and structure of American foreign policy with particular emphasis on the twentieth century. (4)

399

INTERNSHIP

A research and writing project in connection with a student's approved off-campus work or travel activity. Primary goal is to gain historical perspective on such activity, or a dimension of it. Prerequisite: sophomore standing plus one cOurse in history, and consent of the department. (1-6)

401

WORKSHOPS

Workshops in special fields for varying periods of time. CI-4)

World War I; revolution and return to "normalcy" ; depression and the rise of fascism; World War II. (4)

451

330

Dimensions of American law as it relates to changing historical period s (4)

MODERN CHINA

Chinese history from 1800 to the present. Emphasis on the Chi­ nese revolution, why it happened, and what it meant for the peo­ ple llf China . Attention to China's relationship with the U nited States and the Soviet Union. (4)

332

ENGLAND: TUDORS AND STUARTS

AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY .

460

WEST AND NORTHWEST

The American West in the 19th and 20th centuries, Frontier and regional perspectives. Interpretive, illustrative history, and oppor­ tunities for off-campus research . (4)

HISTORY OF AME RICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE

Political, social, economic, legal, and cultural developments. (4)

471

333

Dimensions of American social and intellectual history. (4)

REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA

Post-Peter the Great Russi,,; the establishment of Czarist autoc­ racy; the G reat Reforms of the 19th century; the rise of the revolu­ tionaries; Bolshevism, Lenin, and the Revolutions of 1917; the consolidation of the Soviet state. (4)

492

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4)

494

SEMINAR: AMERICAN HISTORY (4)


68 495

SEMINAR: EUROPEAN HISTORY (4)

591

DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)

496

SEMINAR: THE THIRD WORLD (4)

595

GRADUATE READINGS

501

G RADUATE WORKSHOPS

Graduate workshops in special fields or areas for varying periods of time. 0-4)

590

G RADUATE SEMINAR

Independent Study Card Required. (4)

598

RESEARCH PROJECT (4)

599

THESIS (4)

Selected topics as annou nced . Prerequisite: consent of the

instructor. ( 1-4)

Humanities

Division of

The Division of Humanities, composed of the Departments of English, Languages, Philosophy, and Religion, offers a wide range of courses, both traditional and innovative. Members of the division are committed to excellent classroom instruction and to the research and service which support and draw on that instruction. As preparation for tradi足 tional majors, as a course to the professions, and as a means to finding and fulfilling the excellence in oneself, the humanities are as much the heart of a liberal education as they have ever been. Comple足 menting this training in the language, literature, thought, and belief of the past is an increasingly visible involvement of the division with placing its students in internships and related work experi足 ences such as the English Department's Publishing Careers Program . As one member of the division has written, the humanities "call us to become fully human and to act humanely, compassionately, creatively in an ever-changing society: '

FACULTY D.M. Martin, Divisional Dean; faculty members of the Departments of E nglish, Languages, Philoso足 phy, and Religion. As a division within the Col l ege of Arts and Sciences, the Division of Humanities offers programs in each constituent department leading to the B.A. degree. Course offerings and degree requirements are listed under: ENGLISH LANGUAGES PHIWSOPHY RELIGION


69

Integrated Studies Prqgram The I ntegrated Studies Program (Core

11)

is

designed as an alternative mode of satisfying core curriculum requirements. Consisting of a constella­ tion of interdisciplinary courses, the program explores a central theme- The Dynamics of Change from a variety of academic perspectives. The pro­ gram stresses critical thinking and writing. And it encourages the growth of camaraderie as students progress together through its sequences. A brochure is available from the Admissions O ffice or the program coordinator in the Provost's Office.

FACUIIY Selected from Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chemis­ try, Communication Arts, Economics, English, History, Languages, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, and Sociology. ISP Committee: Stivers, Chair; Benton, B. Dorner, Giddings, Huber, Lejeune, Nordquist. ISP Coordinator: Carr. REQUIREMENTS 1. SEQUENCE I: THE IDEA OF PROGRESS (2 courses, 1 1 1 - 1 12) Normally taken in the freshman year. 2. TWO OF THREE 200-LEVEL SEQUENCES (2 courses each, 4 total) SEQUENCE II (2 courses in the 220s): 221 : The Experience of War 222: Prospects for War and Peace 223: The Emergence of Mind and Morality 224: The Brain, Consciousness, and Transcendence OR SEQUENCE I\I (2 courses in the 230s) 233: Imaging the Self 234: Imaging the World OR SEQUENCE IV (2 cou rses in the 240s) 241 : Energy, Resources, and Pollution 242: Population, Hu nger, and Poverty 243: Technology and Compu ters 244: Computers and Models 3 . CONCLUDING SEMINAR (1 course): 3 5 1 Taken after or along w i t h the final 200-level course. TOTAL : SEVEN COURSES (28 hours)

POLICIES AND GUIDELINES FOR CORE II 1 . Students may begin in any sequence, although Sequence I (the requ i red sequence) is usually take.n first. 2 . Because the sequences are designed as consecutive., two­ course series, students should begin in the first course (fall), if possible. However. the second course may be taken before the first with the consent of the instructors. 3 . Sequences may be taken concurrently and in any order. 4. As the program evolves, alternatives are being added under each sequence (11 :220s, 1I1 : 230s, IV:240s). Students should complete two courses that have been designed together (for example, 241-242 on "Technology and the Environment" or 221-222 on "War and Peace" ) . If necessary, however, allY two courses from the same sequence series may be used. 5. No more than two courses from any one sequence ( L I : 220s, III :230s, IV:240s) may be counted toward the seven-course Core II requiremen t . Additional courses from a sequence may be taken as electives. 6. Not every 200-level sequence will be offered each year; generally three will be available in any given year. 7 . The seminar (351) is taken as the concluding course in the program, either after or concurrently with the last course of the student's third sequence. 8 . Students entering Core II with appropriate previous course­ work at the college level may have certain requirements waived. Students with certain combinations of Core I courses, for example, may have 1 1 1 or 1 12 waived. See the program coordinator for details. 9 . All Core II courses (except the seminar) may be taken as electives by any student. 10. Most Core II cou rses mav be taken to fulfill certain Core I requirements, as indicat � d in the course description:;; , subject to the approval of the faculty. 1 1 . Students transferring from Core II to Core I may use their Core I I courses to meet certain Core I requ irements after consulting with the program coordinator. 12. The Integrated Studies Program is directed by a seven-person committee of faculty representing the academic Meas partici­ pating i n the program . The committee elects a chair and is supported by the associate dean for special academic pro­ grams as program coordinator.

SEQUENCE I: THE IDEA OF PROGRESS

(111-112)

A survey of Western culture from the Renaissance through the 19th century, emphasizing the interaction of religious, philosophi­ cal, and political beliefs with the emergence of new orts and sci� ences.

U1

NATURE AND SUPERNATURE

A study of the emergence of modern science, the development of democratic pOlitical ideas, the renewal of the arts, and the refor­ mulations of religious belief in the Renaissance, Reformation, and E nlightenment. The ideas and accomplishments of Luther, Gali­ leo, Newton, Locke, and Hume are given special emphasis, together with developments i n literature, the visual arts, and poli­ tics. Meets Core I requirements in philosophy Or i n religiOUS stud� ies (lines 2 o r 3). 1 (4)

1 12

FROM FINITE TO INFINITE

Developments in liter,l ture and science, politics and ind ustriali"a­ tion i n the 18th and 19th centuries. Emphasis is given to the intlu­ ence of the Enlightenment, the American and French revolutions, the Romantic movement, the impact of Darwinism and Marxis m . Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or permiSSion. Meets Core I requirements i n lit­ erature or i n social sciences (line 1 ) . 11 (4)


70 SEQ UENCE II: HUMAN RESPONSIBILITY

SEQUENCE III: WO RD AND WORLD

(Courses numbered in the 220s)

(Courses numbered in the 230s)

WAR AND PEACE (221-222)

IMAGING SELF AND WORLD (233-234)

This scquence explores the complexity of war and the diiiicuities

of c1Chieving and maintuining a just peacl'. It considers the fact of

some important wars in our century, investigates the deeper

This sequence explores ho ....v we come to know and partially create

varioliS kinds uf self and world through the images of ordinary life

and through their elaburation in the symbols of the arts and sci­

causes of war, Jnd raises the issues of personal lind social E., thics

ences.

p�ace. vVhen taken as ,1 "vhule, this two-course sequence meets

233

ophy Or religious studies (lines

the self is discovered and constructed in llllf daily world through

during a war and in a sOciety that prepares for war in a time of

the Core I requirement in sllCial sciences (line

221

2 or 3).

1) and either philos­

IMAGING THE SELF

A series of exercises in the visual and literary arts that reveal how

many kinds of images, including dreams, costumes, songs, child­

THE EXPERIENCE OF WAR

Essential background is established by studying the complex his­

tory of several major wars of our time (e.g . , World War

ll,

the Viet­

hood memories, hOllses, church services, dances, television, poet ry, sketching, and constructing models. The emphasis is on

doing or making, followed by reflective analysis. Meets Core I

nam War, the contlict in the Middle East). Emphasis is placed on

requirements in art or literature.

through interviews, films, and literature. The ethical decisions individuals must make in war-time are considered as well (I S the

234

the personal experience of war, both as soldier and as civilian,

pressures of our biological heritage and our idealistic causes.

(4)

222

IMAGING THE WORLD

An exploration of how humans perceive, interpret, and shape

their o w n worlds. Following ,1 n introduction to symbols, symbol , systems, and the ne,ltion uf meaning� the construction of \·\ orld

images in science and theology through myth, model, and para­

PROSPECTS FOR WAR AND PEACE

A study of the in�titutions and situations (political, economic, reli­ giOUS, psychological, historical) that keep the modern world on

the brink of war and make a stable, just peace so elusive. Consid­ eration is given tu p<1cifici.sm ilnd the " just war"

(4)

tradition, as well

,'(S to the technology and politics of nuclear war and its balance of

terror. Students com plete an independent project on topics such

digm are studied. The model of symbolic logic is built to organize

language and thought. Science is then con sidered as a process of the application of logic to e m p i rically gathered data. Vie,,"s of a variety of scientists and philosophers On the way science is done and the way scientists come to know are considered. Theological

language, experience, and use of myth and parable in theological

models are examined. Final ly, some images of the world through

as the draft, the economics of a military state, arms control, the

the eyes of poets are cllmpared to these scientific and theological

uisite:

(lines '[ or

competitions for resources, anti-colonialism and Marxism. Prereq­

243

or permissi o n .

(4)

representations. Meets

Core I requirements 3) Or religious studies (line 3). (4)

in natural sciences

MIND AND B RAIN (223-224)

This sequence explo res how specifically human qualities-includ­

ing morali ty, (\ sense of self. and the capacity for religious �xperi­

t1 nce and belief-are moted in our biology and to what extent we

can transcend that physical heritage.

223

SEQUENCE IV: TECHNOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (Courses numbered in the 240s) RESOURCES, POLLUTION AND POPULATION

THE EMERGENCE OF MIND AND MORALITY

(241-242)

A s u r vey of genetics und evolution, with emphasis on the brain

This scquence considers energy,

natural resources, pollution,

and the emergence of social behavior in animals, prepares for a

population and food issues. Scientific, social scientific, and ethical

morality can be explained in terms of our biological origins. Meets

current trends into the future, and to sugget new possibilities. When t" ken as a whole, this two-course sequence meets the Core I

critical study of the claims of sociobiology that human culture and Core I req uirements in natural sciences (line

224

2)

or philosophy.

(4)

an

investigation

of

s pi r i t u a l ,

mysticnl,

and

relj uircments in science (lines 1 or (lines

THE BRAIN, CONSCIOUSNESS, AND TRANSCENDENCE

A study of the brain as the center of perception, emotion, con­ sciousness, and knowledg('. Includes a study of the brain's func­

tions,

perspectives will be used to explore current problems, to project

other

self-transcending experiencl's, and an exploratiun of the relation­

ship between mind and brain, materialistic and non-materialistic

explanations, clnd the nature of person (ommitmc;:'nt. Prerequisite:

22.3 or p ermission. t\1eets Core I requirements in social sciences (line 2) llr philosophy. (4)

2), and either the social sciences 1 or 2) or religious studies (lines 2 or 3) requirements.

241

ENERGY, RESOURCES, AND POLLUTION

Energy, niltural resources, and pollutiOn are the subjc'ct matter.

Scientific, social scientific, and ethical methods will be studied

ilnd then applied to the practical and political problems of sustain­ ing energy and natural resource production and limiting pollution with a maximum of justice and part icipative decision-m�1king. I

(4)

242

POPU LATION, HUNGER, AND POVERTY

Popul" tion, food, and poverty are the subject matter. Methods

learned i n the first cOurse will be reviewed and applied to the prac­ tical and political problems of sustaining food production ilnd red u c in g population growth and poverty. A miljor Third World

cou.ntry, e . g . , tvIexico, will serve as a case ::;tudy for class analysis and student prtljects. II

(4)

TECHNOLOGY, COMPUTE RS, AND SOCIAL CHANGE (243-244)

A study of modern technology, its historical context, its machines,

and its consequences. The computer, as one in a long line of tech­ nologies, is the special focus. When taken as a whole, this two­

course sequence meets the Core I requirement in natural sciences (line

243

3)

or social sciences (line

1).

TECHNOWGY A N D COMPUTERS

Modern technology

is

the product of sweeping changes in West­

ern civilization. The computer must be seen within the context of

these cha nges. Thus the shift from traditional to technological

s lCiety, the convergcnce of iorces which produced the shift, and

the consequences of the shift on institutions, ideas, and values will be the Object of study. Once this context is estilblished, stu­

dents will study the computer, its creation and uses, what it is,

and whilt it can and c,lnnot do.

(4)


71 244

COMPUTERS AND MODELS

The modeling of social processes and the programming of models for the computer are two important tools used by planners in edu­ cation, business, and government. The use oi models and com­ puters necessitates the making of assumptions and the reduction of reality. Two or three illustrative models will be developed to demonstrate the skills of modeling and programming and to assess advantages and limitations. Simultaneously, students will study the implications of using models and computers and the ethical and philosophic issues which emerge from their use. Returning to the larger context of technology, students will address the questions of technology, "out of control," artificial intelligence, the impacts oi modern technology on the Third World, and the future. A student project will conclude the sequence. (4)

CONCLUDING SEMINAR 351

INTEGRATED STUDIES SEMINAR

A reca pitulation and integration of themes from the previous sequences, with additional readings and discussion. Students im"estigate an individual topic from an interdisciplinary perspec­ tive, make a formal oral presentation, and complete a substantial paper. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 - 1 1 2 and two additional sequences. May be taken concu rrently with the last course of the final sequence. I I I (4)

res Learning a foreign language is fundamental to the liberal arts. When students begin to communicate with other peoples, they discover their own lan­ gu age, and in the study of foreign literature and cultural history they gain understanding of our own cultural achievements. I n today's international setting, foreign language skills. can be an important career asset in fields such as business, government service, journalism, law and medicine. They can ex pand professional oppor­ tunities and mobility within a profession. T he department offers courses in langu age, litera­ ture, and cultural history. It also coop erates with a number of universities outside the United States to allow students the opportunity to study abroad. Language students may also earn credit in the International Cooperative Education Program, which places students in summer jobs in several European countries. The department offers instruction for beginning, intermediate, and advanced students. Those who have already studied a language elsewhere may qualify for placement into intermediate or advanced courses. To help students find the proper level, they are encouraged to take the language placement examination just before the beginning of the fall semester and to consult with a departmental adviser. Students who receive advanced placement may also receive credit toward a major or minor for coursework completed elsewhere. M ajors are available in Classics, French, German, Norwegian, Scandinavian Stud ies, and Spanish . Minors are offered in French, German, Greek, Latin, Norwegian, and Spanish .

FACUIIY Rasmussen, Chair; R. Brown, Chen, DeSherlia, Faye, Gilmour, McKim, Predmore, Snee, Spangler, R. Swenson, Toven, Webster. There are no departmental prerequisites for the study of foreign languages. Potential majors are, however, encouraged to obtain as much high school preparation as possible. Students with previous experience may qualify for placement into inter­ mediate or advanced courses. To determine the appropriate level students are encouraged to take the language placement exami­ nation at the beginning of the fall semester or to consult with a departmental adviser. Those qualifying for advanced placement may also receive c redit for work completed in high school, thus enabling them to pursue a second major. Major and minor programs are available in Classics, French, German, Norwegian, and Spanish. Departmental courses are a primary component in the interdisciplinary majors offered in Classics and Scandinavian Area Studies. Minors are also offered in Greek and Latin. BACHELOR OF ARTS: Major in French, German o r Spanish­ Minimum of 32 semester hours beyond 101-102, including 201, :<02, 321, 351, 352, plus at least 4 semester hours of l iterature. Spanish 322 may be substituted for Spanish 321 . Major in Nor­ wegian-Minimum of 32 semester hours, induding 101, 102, 201, 202, 351, 352, and at least one of the 400-level literature courses from Scandinavian Studies. HONORS MAJOR: Requirements for an honors major in languages are as follows: (1) a major in one foreign language; (2) a minor in a second foreign language; (3) one year of study at the college level of a third fcreign language; (4) the second or third language must be a dassical language; (5) a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in all courses taken in PLU's Department of Languages; (6) at least one departmentally approved term abroad; and (7) preS(>ntation of a senior paper to the department. Major in Classics-40 semester hours, including 8 semester hours each of Greek and Latin and an additional 8 hours of either Greek or Latin. Remaining courses nre selected i n consultation with the classics coordinator. Major in Scandinavian Area St udies 40 semester hours. A flexible cross-disciplinary approach to the study of Scandinavia. S"e the section of this catalog on Scandinavian Area Studies. -


72 MINOR PROGRAMS: Courses are chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser. At least 8 semester hours must be taken in residence. Minor in French, German, or Spanish: 20 semester hours, excluding 101-'102. Minor will include 20 1, 202, 351, and two other upper-d ivision courses. Minor in Greek, Lltin, or Norwegian: 20 semester hours, which may include 10'1-102. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N E DUCATION: Students enrolled in the program arc required to take 445. For further details, see School of Education.

COURSE OFFERINGS 200

STRUcrURAL LINGUISTICS

The study of the nature of language; principles and techniques of descriptive language analysis; elementary application of linguistic analysis to selected materials. No prerequisites. (4)

271

LITE RATURE AND SOCIETY I N MODERN EUROPE

Reading and discussion of works in English translation by authors like Flaubert, Ibsen, and Th . Mann, who exemplify Realism and Naturalism in various European literatures. Emphasis on social themes, including life in industrial society, the changing status of wome n, and class conflict. Instructor assisted by other faculty members specializing in the va.rious national literatures. No pre­ requisite. Satisfies the general university core reqUirement in literature. (4)

445

METHODOWGY OF TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Theory ,1 nd techniques of foreign language teaching; special prob­ lems in the student's major language; emphasis on aud io-lingual techniques. (2)

49 1,492 507, 598

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4) GRADUATE RESEARCH (2-4)

250

CLASSICAL MYTHOWGY

Introduction to classical mythology; study of the major myths of Greece and Rome through the texts of Homer, Hesiod, the Greek tragedians, AppoUonius, Vergil. and Ovid; emphasis on the tradi­ tions of mythology, going back to pertinent Mesopotamian and Hittite materials, and forward to influences of classical myths on later literature and arts; attention to modern interpretations of ancient myths. (4)

G REEK

101, 102

E LEMENTARY GREEK

201, 202

INTERMED IATE GREEK

Basic skills in read ing cJassical, koillf, and patristic Greek. I, 1J (4, 4)

Review of basic grammar; reading in selected classical and New Tes tament authors. I, II (4, 4)

421, 422

MASTERPIECES OF GREEK LITERATURE

Available through consultation with the depart ment. Prerequi­ sites: 101, 102, 201" I, II (4, 4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY (2-4)

LATIN

101, 102

ELEMENTA RY LATIN

Basic skills in reading Latin; an introduction to Roman literature and culture. I, II (4, 4)

201, 202

INTERMEDIATE LATIN

Review of basic grammar; selected readings from Latin authors. I, 11 (4, 4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY (2-4)

FRENCH 101, 102

ELEMENTA RY FRENCH

CHINESE

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory attend­ ance required. I, 11 (4, 4)

101, 102

201, 202

ELEMENTARY CHINESE

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese. Basic skills in l istening, speak­ ing, reading, and writing. I, II (4, 4)

CLASSICS The Classics Program is a cooperative effort among the Depart­ ments of Languages, History, Philosophy, Religion, and Art. Its goal is to unite the "heart of the liberal arts" with the mind, through history and philosophy, and the soul, through religion, and to embellish this trinity of themes with the visual experience of art. This interdepartmental major requires the completion of 10 courses, including at least one year of one of the classical lan­ guages and two of the other (Greek and Latin). The remaining courses are selected. from the list below in consultation with the program coordinator. Latin 101- '102-Elementary Lltin 20I-202-Intermediate Greek 101-102-Elementary Greek 201-202-l ntermediate Greek 421-422-Masterpieces of G reek Literature Art 1 10-In troduction to Art Art 180-Traditions of Western Art Art 386-lmagery and Symbolism Classics 250-Classical Mythology English 321-Masterpieces of European Literature History 321-Classical Civilization Philosophy 331-Ancient Philosophy Religion 241-Biblical Literature Religion 341-01d Testament Studies Religion 342-New Testa ment Studies ReLigion 371-Ancient Church History Independent Study Courses Selected lnterim Courses Students are expected to become familiar with the reading list for that part of the program (art, literature, history, philoso phy, or religion) in which their interest lies. The program is designed to be flexible. In consultation with the Classics Committee, a student may elect a course or courseS not on the classks course list.

INTE .RMEDIATE FRENCH

Review of basic grammar; development of vocabulary and empha­ sis on spontaneous, oral expression. Reading selections which reflect France's cultural heritage and society. Laboratory attend­ ance required. I, II (4, 4)

321

CIVI LIZATION AND CULTURE

Present-day France as reflected in current literature, periodicals, television and films, written compositions and oral reports; con­ ducted in French. Prerequisite: 202. (4)

351, 352

COMPOSITION AND CONVE RSATION

Advanced grammar, stylistics, composition, and conversation on cu rrent topics; conducted in French. Prerequisite: 202. l, II (4, 4)

421, 422

MASTE RPIECES OF FRENCH LITERATURE

Authors representative of major periods from the Middle Ages through the nineteenth century; the style and structure and the moral and drti.stic intentions of such authors as Rabelais, Mon­ taigne, Moliere, Corneille, Pascal, Voltaire, Rousseau, Hugo, and Baudelaire. Prerequisite: 202. l, I I aly (4, 4)

431, 432

TWENTIETH CENTURY FRENCH LITE RATURE

Selected twentieth century writers from France and other fran­ cophone countries. May include Gide, Camus, Sartre, Beckett, Aimee Cesaire, and Anne Hebert. Prerequisite: 202. I, II aly (4, 4)

442 HISlO RY OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES Historical develo pment of Romance languages with reference to current languages; same as Spanish 442. Il aly (4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY (2-4)

GERMA N 101, 102

ELEMENTARY GE RMAN

Introduction to the German language. Basic skills of oral and writ­ ten communication in classroom and laboratory practice. Use of materials reflecting contemporary German life. Meets five hours weekly. I, II (4, 4)


73 201, 202

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN

C ont i n ued p ra ct ice in oral and written communication in class­ room and l abora to ry. Use of materials w h ich refl ect co nt empo rary

life as well as the German cultura l heritage. Meets four hours weekly. I, 1I (4, 4)

321

GERMAN CIVILIZATION

German cultural a n d lingu ist i c h istory from the 17 th century to th e presen t . Aesthetic and historical consideration of rep res enta­

321

VIKINGS AND EMIGRANTS

H ighlights of Scandinavian histor y, from the beginning to the pre­ sent. Emphasis on periods and ways in which Scandinavia has contributed to world history. Readings in the original for majors; class conducted in English. aly (4)

322

CONTEMPORARY SCANDINAVIA

tive works from the Enlightenment, the Age of Goethe, the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I I aly (4)

Neutrality and occupation; the emergence of the welfare state; social reforms, p la nned economics, and cultural pol ic ie s ; Scandi­ navia and the Euro pea n co mmuni ty. Readings in the original for majors; class conducted in English. aly (4)

351, 352

421

COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

Intensive review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; use of contemporary authors as models of style. C onve rsation on topics of student in tere st . Conducted in German. Pre requ is i te: 202 or eq u i val e nt . I , I I (4, 4)

421

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE AGE OF GOETHE

Repre sen t ative works from the Enlightenment to Goethe's death, circa 1750-1832, including Storm and Stress, Classicism and Romanticism. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I aly (4)

422

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

Represe.nt a ti ve works from the various literary mo ve men t s of th e nineteenth century, 1 820-1890, i nc l udi ng Biedermeier, Young Ger­ many, and Realism. Prerequisite: 202 or equ ivale nt . 1I aly (4)

431

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

Re p re sen t at i ve works of German literature from Naturalism to Ex pression ism , 1890-1925. Prerequisite: 202 or equ ival ent . I aly (4)

432

CONTEMPORARY G ERMAN LITERATURE

IBSEN, STRINDBERG, AND THEIR CONTEMPORARIES

The great writers of nineteenth century Scandinavian literature­ Henrik Ibsen and August 5tri n d berg- a re studied against the backdrop of their time and the work of other authors who contrib­ uted to the breakthrough of modern forms and themes. Class con­ ducted in E nglis h ; read ings in translation for non-majors. Fulfills core requirement in literature. aly (4)

422

TWENTIETH CENTURY SCANDINAV IAN LITERATURE

Recent trends in Scandinavian literature are illustrated by leading writers like Ve sa as, LAgerkvist, Dinesen, Borgen, R ifbjerg, and Tikkanen. Class conducted in Eng lis h; readings in translation for non-majors. Fulfills core req ui reme nt in literature. aly (4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-4)

SIGN LANGUAGE 101, 102

SIGN LANGUAGE

An introduction to the structure of American Sign Lmguage and to the world of the hearing-impaired. Basic signing skills and sign language vocabulary; fingerspelling; the particular needs and problems of deaf people. Material presented through demonstra­ tions, drills, mime, recitals, lectures, and discussions. I, II (4, 4)

Representative works from 1925 to t h e present; authors from East and West Ge rm a ny, Austria, and Switzerland. P re requisi t e : 202 or equivalent. I I aly (4)

SPANISH

442

Historical devel o p ment of German with reference to contempo­ rary language; conducted in German. Prerequisite: 202. II aly (4)

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory attend­ ance required. I, " (4, 4)

491, 492

201, 202

HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE

INDEPENDENT STUDY (2-4)

101, 102

ELEMENTA RY SPANISH

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

NORWEGIAN

A continuation of eleme nta ry Spanish; reading selections which reilect the Hispanic cultural heritage as well as contemporary materials. Laboratory attendance required. I, II (4, 4)

101, 102

321

ELEMENTARY NORWEGIAN

Introduces the st udents to the pleasure of speaking, reading, and writing a foreign language. These skills are developed through a conversational approach, using songs and other cultural materi­ als, as well as audio-visual media. I, n (4, 4)

201, 202

INTERMEDIATE NORWEGIAN

Develo ps the students' command of the l ang uage while further a cq ua int i n g them wi th the Norwegian cultural heritage. Reading selections introduce the students to Norwegian folkl ore and daily life. I, II (4, 4)

351

CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION

CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE

Historic and artistic elements which h,we shaped Spanish thought and behavior from the beginnings to the present; COn­ ducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: 202. 1 (4)

322

LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE

Historic, artistic, li te rary, sociolo gic a l , and geographic elements shaping the development of the Spanish-speaking New World . Both Hispanic and non-Hispanic elements will b e studied. Prereq­ uisite: 202 or four years of high school Spanish . II (4)

351, 352

COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

Develops the students' ab ili ty to express themselves well in t he l an guage, orally and in w ri t ing. Selected contemporary materials will be used as models of style and usage. Prerequ isite: 202 or equi val en t . (4)

Topics of current interest as a basis for improved oral and written expression; conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: 202. I, 1 1 (4, 4)

352

421, 422

ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION

MASTERPIECES OF HISPANIC LITERATURE

Develops the students' command of the language by emphasizing the finer points of structure, style, and good taste. Prerequisite: 351 or equiva l en t . (4)

All genres of major literary works from the Poema del Cid, to 1898; forces w h ic h produced th e l i teratu re; a pprecia t io n of literature as a work of art. Prerequis i t e : 202. I, LI all' (4, 4)

491, 492

431, 432

INDEPENDENT STUDY (2-4)

SCANDINAVIAN 250

LITERARY MASTERPIECES OF SCANDINAVIA: THE SAGAS TO UNDSET

A sur vey of major authors and works from the Scandinavian countries, beginning with the prose and poetry of the Viking Age and spanning t he contributions of Holberg, Andersen, Lagerlof, Hamsun, Undset, and others. All readings in English translation. ruifills core requirement in l iterature. (4)

TWENTIETH CENTURY HISPANIC LITERATURE

The first semester deals with the l iterature of Spain from the "Generacion de '98" to the present. The second semester deals with the literature of Spanish America from the modernista move­ ment ( 1888) to the present. Emp ha si s on period will vary. (4, 4)

442

H ISTORY OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES

Historical development of Romance languages with reference to current l a ng ua ges; same as French 442. I I aly (4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY (2-4)


74

Legal Studies Prqgram Legal Studies is an interdisciplinary degree pro­ gram focusing on the nature of law and judicial processes. Consistent with the purposes of the American Legal Studies Association, the Legal Studies Program at PLU provides alternative approaches to the study of law from the academic framework of the social sciences, the humanities, business, and education. The program emphasizes the development of a critical understanding of the functions of law, the mutual impacts of law and society, and the sources of law. Students in Legal Studies pursue these goals through courses, directed research, and internships in offices and agencies involved in litigation and legal processes.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester ho urs . l. Required co"rses

(12 hours):

Introduction to Legal Studies (pOLS 170) J u d icial Process (POLS 371) Legal Research (POLS 374) 2. General elec/ives (8 hours): Two courses from the following: American Legal History (HIST 451) Comparative Legal Systems (POLS 381) Philosophy of Law (PHIL 328) Sociology of Law (SOC 351) 3. Special eiec/ives (12 hours): Three COUTses from the following (also, courses in group 2 not taken to fulfill general e l ective requirements may be used to fulfill special elective require· ments in group 3): Business Law (BA 435)

Civil Liberties (POLS 373) Constitutional L,W (POLS 372) COUlt Administration (POLS 571)

Educational Law (EDUC 551)

FACUIIY Atkinson, Director; Bermingham, Brue, DeBower, Dwyer-Shick, Farmer, Jobst, Lauer, P. Menzel, and Ulbricht.

Industrial Organization and Public fulicy (ECON 371) International Organization and Law (POLS (336) Internship in Legal Studies (POLS 471) Law and Society (BA 230) Law and the Human Services (SOCW 458)

MINOR: 20 semester hours, including Political Science 170 and four additional courses selected in consultation with the program director.

athematics Mathematics is a many-faceted subject that is extremely useful in its application, but at the same time is fascinating and beautiful in the abstract. It is an indispensable tool for industry, science, govern­ ment, and the business world, while the elegance of its logic and beauty of form have intrigued scholars, philosophers, and artists since earliest times. The mathematics program at Pacific Lutheran University is designed to serve five main objectives: (1) To provide backgrounds for other disciplines, (2) to provide a comprehensive pre-professional pro­ gram for those directly entering the fields of teach­ ing and applied mathematics, (3) to provide a nucleus of essential courses which will develop the breadth and maturity of mathematical thought for continued study of mathematics at the graduate level, (4) to develop the mental skills necessary for the creation, analysis, and critique of mathematical logic within the context of mathematical topics, and (5) to provide a view of mathematics as a part of humanistic behavior.

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers majors in both mathematics and computer science as well as minors in mathematics, computer science, information science, and statis­ tics. Many of the faculty teach both mathematics and computer science.

FACUIIY: Mathematics and Computer Science Edison, Chair; Bandy, Batker, Brink, Dollinger, B. Dorner, C. Dorner, Harter, J. Herzog, M. Herzog, McBride, N. C. Meyer, C. L. Nelson, G. Peterson, Ruble, Spil1man, Welsh, Yiu.


75 BEGINNING CLASSES

Majors in mathematics, computer science, and other sciences usually take Math 1 5 1 and 152 (calculus). Those who have had calculus in high school may omit Math 1 5 1 and enroll in 152 after consultation with a member of the depmtmental iuculty. TI,ose who have less mathematics background may enroll in Math 133 (algebra/trigonometry) or Math 112 before taking 151 . A placement test is given in class the first day of Math 151 to determine rcadi­ ness for calculus. Business majors usually take Math 128. Those wishing a stronger m.thematics background should take Math 151 and Math 230 or 33 1 in place of Math 128. Others choose from Math 1 15 , 128, 133, or 151 or Computer Science 1 10-210 or 144 o r an interim class depending on thei.r interests and levels of preparation. Remedial: Math 101 (Intermediate Algebra) is available for those who are not ready for other classes. MATHEMATICS MAJOR

The foundation of the mathematics program for majors is the four semester calculus and linear algebra sequence, Math 151, 152, 253, and 331 . These courses are usually taken in sequence the first four semesters. Students with a calculus background in high school may receive advanced placement into the appropriate course in the sequence. Upper division work includes courses in modern algebra, analysis, statistics, applied mathematics, and topology. Students majoring in mathematics are encou raged to include \vork in computer science. Since many careers involve applying mathematics to other areas, it is a good idea to pick one or marc subjects outside mathematics for additional study (perhaps leading to a minor). While many subjects are appropriate, some of the more common ones are economics, business, physics, engineering, chemistry, and biology. A typical major program in mathematics is as follows: Math 151, 152 Fresh man year: Computer Science 144 Math 253, 331 Sophomore year: Physics 153, 154 (if not taken earlier) Junior & Senior years: Math 433, 434, 455, 456, 486 and other electives from mathematics and computer science. BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 28 semester hours in mathematics courses numbered above 150, including 33 1, 433, 455, 486, and either 434 or 456. The choice between 434 or 456 may be replaced by taking 8 semester hours from 321, 335, 341, 345-346, 351, and 460. Required supporting: Computer Science 144, which should be taken in th� freshman year. 8 semester hours in physics are strongly remmmended. Students planning to do graduate work in mathematics should. complete both 434 and 456. BACHEWR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 semester hours, includ­ ing 33 1 and 486 and at least 20 semester hours of upper division mathematics courses. 12 hours of the upper division requirements must come from 433, 434, 455, and 456. Required supporting: Computer Science 144, which should be taken in the freshman year; 8 semester hours in physics. Physics 356 or Computer Science 348 may be substituted for one course of upper division mathematics. BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of

Education. MINOR IN MATHEMATICS: 20 semester hours of mathematics courses, including 151, 152, 253, and 8 hours of upper division mathematics courses. Strongly recommended; Computer Science 144 or 110. Interim courses and 323, 324, and 446 may not be cOLinted toward the mathematics minor. MINOR IN STATISTICS: See Statistics section of this catalog.

COURSE OFFERINGS grade of C or higher is strongly recommended in all prerequisite courses.

A

101

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

A thorough review of first year h igh school algebra and material beyond quadratics. Does not count toward university core require­ ments. 1 II (2)

112

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY

Radian measure, trigonometric clnd inverse trigonometric functions, identities, graphing, solution of triangles, and other topics such as complex numbers. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra. Students with only one year of high school algebra should take 133. I I I (2)

115

INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLD OF MATHEMATICS AND COMITUERS (CSC! 1 15)

A study of mathematics and computers in the modern world with a ,-vide variety of applications and a historical perspective. The rela­ tionship between mathematics and computers. Elementary com­ puter programming in BASIC. Intended for non-majors with no previous experience with computers. Meets Core I requirement in natural sciences and mathematics (line 3). Prerequisite: high school algebra: (4)

128

MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Review of algebra, matri.x theory and linear programming, introduc­ tion to differential and integral calculus. Concepts are developed intuitively with applications. The use of mathematical tools is stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra or equivalent or consent of instmctor. I II (4)

133

COLLEGE ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY

Solving equations, functions, exponentials, logclrithms, radian mea­ sure, trigonometric identities, graphing, and other topics such as complex numbers. PrerequiSite: two years of high school algebra or 1 0 1 or consent. I II (4)

151

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

152

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

Analytic geometTY, functions, limits, derivatives and integrals with applications, LHospital's Rule. Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra and trigonometry (or concurrent registration in 1 12) or 133 or equivalent. 1 1 1 (4)

i ntegrations, applications, and techniques of integration, tr,lI 1scen­ dental functions, polar coordinates, improper integrals, introduc­ tion to vectors and partial differentiation. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I II (4)

199 DIRECTED READING Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or interests; primarily for students il\varded advanced placement. Admission only by departmental invitation. (1-2)

230

MATRIX ALGEBRA

253

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS AND DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

A survey of matTix algebra and determinants with applications, such as linear programming. A first look (It abstract methods including some techniques of proof. ['rerequisite: 151 . I II (2)

An introduction to vectors, multidimensio nal calculus, infinite series, differential equations, and applications. Emphasis on using these topics as tools for solving physical problems. Prerequisite: 152. I II (4)

321

GEOMEfRY

Foundations of geometry and basic theory in Euclidean, projective, a n d non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: 152 or consent. all' I 1986-87 (4)

323

MODERN ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS

Concepts underlying traditional computational techniques; a sys­ tematic analysiS of arithmetic; an intuitive approach to algebra and geometry. Intended for elementary teaching majors. Prerequisite to EDUC 326. Prerequisite: consent of instmctor. I II (4)

324

ALGEBRA AND GEOMETRY FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHE R

Properties of real numbers, linear and quadratic equations and ineq­ ualities. complex nu mbers, polynomials, algebraic structures, func­ tions; a study of informal geometry from a nlature viewpoint using modern vocabulary and notatio n . Geometry topics include congru­ e nce, similarity, symmetry, properties of geometry figures such as quadrilaterals and circles, and relationships among geometrical fig­ ures. Prerequisite: 323 or by placement exam. (4)

331

LINEAR ALGEBRA

Vectors and vector spaces, matrices, inner product spaces, linear transformations. Prerequisite: 152. I II (4)


76 334

ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE AND EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

Random sampling, factors which destroy experimental design, one­ way analysis of variance, hv o-way analysis of vari a nce, factored design, block and latin square des ign Students will also critique published experiments and perform ,1n experimental design project. Prerequisite: STAT 231 or equivalent. iliy II 1986-87 (2) ,

335

DISCRETE STRUCTURES

A first course in the abstract ,tmctures and methods of computer science, The logical structure of sets, relations, functions, combina­ torics, graph theory, Boolean algebras, switching theory, groups and coding theory will be surveyed through problE'ms and theorems whose solutions and proofs clarify logical reiotionships. Prerequi­ sites: 152 and either 230 or 331 . I II (4)

341

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

Probability theory, discrete and continuous distribution functions, moment generating functions, sampling distributions and hypothe­ sis-testing, introduction to regression, correlation, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: 152. 1 (4)

345

INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

351

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

An introduction to differential equations emphasizing the applied aspect. First and second order differential equations, boundary­ value and eigenvalue problems, power series solutions, nonlinear d ifferential equations, numerical methods, the laPlace transforma­ tion, Prerequisite: 253. II a/ y '1986-87 (4)

433, 434

ABSTRACT ALGEBRA

Topics from groups, rings, modules, fields, field extensions, and lin­ ear algebra. Prerequisites: for 433, 335 or 331; for 434, 33'1 and 433. al y n 1985-86 (4, 4)

446

MATHEMATICS IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL

Methods and materials in secondary school math teaching. Basic mathematical concepts; principles of number operation, relation, proof, and problem solving in the context of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. Prerequisite: 253 or 331 or equivalent. 1 (2)

455, 456

MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS

Extended treatment of topics introduced in elementary calculus. Prerequisite: 253 and 331 . 455 offered I each year; 456 offered II a/y 1986-87 (4)

Numerical theory and applications in the arPaS of solutions ofequa­ tions, linear systems, interpolation, and approximation. Prerequi­ s it e : 152 and (144 or 110) or consent of instructor, I (2)

460 ELEMENTARY TOPOWGY An introduction to point-set topology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. \I a/y 1985-86 (4)

346

486

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Continuation of 345, including numerical theory and applications in the areas of matrix theory, numerical diffQTentiation and integration, and solution of differential equations. Prerequisites: 253 ,1I1d 345 or consent of instructor. I a/y 1985-86 (2)

SENIOR SEMINAR

Prese ntation by students of knowledge gained in research under the direction of an assigned professor. Re qu ired of a\l senior math majors seeking a B.A. or B.S. degree. Prerequisite: senior math major (Jr consent of department chair. I , l l ( 1 )

490

SEMINAR

Prerequisite: consent of department chair, (1-4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: consent of department chair.

597, 598

I II ( 1 -4)

GRADUATE RESEA RCH

Open to master's degree candidates only, . Prereq uisite: consent of department chair. I II (1-4)

usze The study of music is, in these times of stress and rapid change, a type of investment that can provide enduring satisfaction . The staff and facilities of Pacific Lutheran Univer­ Sity are such that students may pursue studies in many branches of music leading to academic degrees as well as lifelong enjoyment. Degree pro­ grams include the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Music, and the Master of Music, which is offered with concentration in either conducting, composi­ tion, education, or performance, The Bachelor of Arts in Education with a major in music is offered for those intending to become teachers in the public schools. Both the undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited regionally and nationally. Pacif.ic Lutheran UniverSity is an associate member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

PLU music graduates find places for themselves as teachers of music in public and private schools and colleges, and as conductors, composers, private teachers, and classroom teachers. A considerable number contribute greatly to church worship as organists, choir directors, or full-time ministers, Some have found satisfying careers in music mer-

chand ising, others in concert management. Still others, with emphasis on performance, are in opera and on the concert stage, as well as in popular entertainment, vocally and instrumentally. Facilities include space and instruments for indi­ vidual practice and recital. Private study in key­ board is available in piano, organ, and harpsichord. Other private study includes voice and all string, wind, and percussion instruments, taught by regu­ larly performing musicians. Professional-quality experience is available to qualified performers in band, orchestra, choir, jazz, and chamber ensembles. Exposure to musical literature is to be gained not only through intensive course work in history and literature, but also in attendance at the large num­ ber of concerts annually presented by the perform­ ing organizations as well as by students, faculty, and guest artists in recital. It must be emphasized that music majors form but a part of the multi-faceted program of music at PLU. All students are eligible to audition for the perform­ ii1g organizations and constitute perhaps half of the membership. Introductory music courses during both the regular semesters and the interim are designed for exploration and self-fulfillment.


77 FACUllY Robbins, Chair; Dahl, K. Vaught Farner, R. Farner, Frohnmayer, Gard, Grieshaber, Harmic, Hoffman, C. Knapp, Kracht, L. Meyer, Ponto, B. Poulshock, Sparks, Tremaine, Youtz; assisted by Bloomingdale, Dean, Dombourian-Eby, Dean, Grainger, Harty, S. Knapp, Mazzolini, McCarty, Moore, Odegard, �arce, Pressley, N. Poulshock, B. Shapiro, D. Sha­ piro, Timmerman, Wall. For introductory courses t o the field o f music, sec t h e descrip­ tions of Music 101 and 102. Students intending to major in music should begin the major music sequences in the first year. Failure to do so may mean an extra semester or year to complete the major program . Following is the program for all entering freshmen who intend to major in music: Courses Theory: 123, 124 Music History: 132 Ear Training: 125, 126 Class Piano: 201 Private Instruction: Large Ensemble (performance majors in some areas may postpone this) Physical Education General University Requirements

Fall 3

Spring 2 4

1 1 1 1 1 4

1 1 4

Music majors should fill out a declaration of major form during their first semester of enrollment in the program and be assigned to a music faculty adviser. Only grades of "C - " or better in music courses may be counted toward a music major. Courses in which the student receives lower than a "C - " must be repeated unless substitute course work is authorized by the department. MUSIC CORE: The following core is required in all music degree programs with the exception of Junior High Teaching Minor (non-specialist), Elementary Teaching Major (non-special­ ist). and Elementary Teaching Minor (non-specialist):

Theory: 123, 124, 223, Music History: 132, 231, Ear Training: 125, 126, 225, 226 20th Century: 227

7 hours 8 hours 4 hours 3 hours 22 hours

BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: Maximum of 40 semester hours including Music Core (22 hours), plus 4 hours of ensem· ble; 6 hours of literature/theory electives from 327·339, 423-438; 8 hours of private instruction, piano (minimum class level 2). In addition to reqUirements listed above, candidates for the B.A. degree must meet the foreign language/alternative requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences. BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: Bachelor of Arts in Education-Secondary Choral Bachelor of Arts in Education-K-12 Choral Bachelor of Arts in Education-Elementary Music Specialist Bachelor of Arts in Education-Secondary and Elementary Instrumental Bachelor of Arts in Education-Junior High Teaching Major Consult the School of Education section of this catalog. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION­ SECONDARY CHORAL 22t Music Core Music 360-363 8 Large Ensemble 201 Class Piano: M i n . Level 6 4t 204/404 6 (6 semesters') Private Instruction: Voice 420 1 (half recital) Private Instruction: Recital 248 1t Guitar Laboratory 2t 345 Basic Conducting 366 2 Opera Workshop 441 Recent Techniques for 2t Elementary Music" 443 Methods and Materials 2t for Secondary Choral Music" 445 Advanced Conducting 2t 453 \bcal Pedagogy 2t Music Music Elective 1 54 Total t Prerequisite for student teaching. 'The number of required credit hours to be distributed over the n umber of semesters indicated. " Required in the Professional Education sequence for Certification.

BACHEWR OF ARTS I N EDUCAT ION­ K-12 CHORAL 22t Music Core Music 360-363 Large Ensemble 8 4t Class Piano: M i n . Level 8 201 204/404 Private Instruction: Voice 6 (6 semesters') 1 (hall recital) 420 Private Instruction: Recital 248 1t Guitar Laboratory 2t Music i n the Elementary 5chool" 341 2t 345 Basic Conducting Recent Techniques for 441 Elementary Music"'* 2t Methods and Materials 443 2t for Secondary Choral Music" 2t 445 Advanced Conducting 2t 453 Vocal Pedagogy Total 56 t Prerequisite for student teaching. 'The number of required credit hours to be distributed over the number of semesters indicated. "Required in the Professional Education sequence for Certification. BACHELOR OF A RTS IN EDUCATION­ ELEMENTARY MUSIC SPECIALIST Music Core Music 360-363 Large E nsemble 201 Class Piano: Min. Level 6 204 Private Instruction: Voice 248 Guitar Laboratory 341 M usic in t h e Elementary School" 345 Basic Conducting 441 Recent Techniques in Elementary Music" 453 Vocal Pedagogy Music Elective

Total t Prerequisite for student teaching. "Required in the Professional Education sequence for Certific,)tion.

m 8 4t 4 1t 2t 2t

2t 2t 1

48

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION­ SECONDARY AND ELEME NTARY INSTRUMENTAL Core Music 22t Music 370,380 Large Ensem ble 8 24 1 1242 String Laboratory 2 24.3/244 Woodwind Laboratory 2 245/256 Brass Laboratory 2, 6t 247 Percussion Laboratory 1 326 Orchestration 2 345 Basic Conducting 2t 2--/4Private Instruction: Principal l .nstrument I> (6 semesters') 420 Private Instruction: Recital 1 (half recital) 201 Class Piano: M i n . Level 4 2+ 444 Methods and Materials for School Instrumental Music" 3t 445 Advanced Conducting 2t 54 Total t Prerequisite for student teaching. 'The number of required credit hours to be distributed over the number of semesters indicated . " Required in the Professional Education sequence for Certification. String majors are recommended to take Music 454, 5tring Pedagogy (2). BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATIONJUNIOR HIGH TEACHING MAJOR Music Core Large Ensemble Music Music 201 Class Piano: Min. Level 4 345 Basic Conducting 443 or 444 Methods and Materials: 5econdary Choral Music or 5chool lnstrumental Music

22t 2 2t 2t 2 or 3t Total 30 or 31

t Prerequisite for student teaching. "Required in the Professio,lal Education sequence for Certification. Recommended: Private Instruction in principal instrument or voice and guitar laboratory (4).


78 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN MUSIC tvlusic Core Music 360-363 370, 380 Large Ensemble 2--14-Priva te In st ru c ti o n 201 Class Piano: M i n . Level 4 Basic Co nd uc t i ng 345 Form I 423

22

6 8 2 2 2 4

Theory Electives Jazz Theory L,

II

Linearity

O rch es t ra, Ad v. O rch e st ra t ion Co m posi tio n A rranging, Adv. Ar ra nging Form II, III Performance Electives Private Instruction Ense mbl es L.1 boratory Classes Pedagogy C1a>ses Improvisation Wo rksh op Electronic Musk Practicum Accompanying Organ I mprov isat io n Reco rd i ng Techni'lues & Tec hno logy Historv/Literature E l ectives Mu sic 331-339, 431-439

4

BACHELOR OF MUSIC-PIANO PERFORMANCE Music 22 Core L.1rgc Ensemble Music 2 Music 323 L in earit y 2 Basic Conducting 345 2 202/402 Privatl' Inst r u c t ion : Piano 14 (7 se mes t e rs " ) 218 Private Instruction: Harpsichord 'I 420 Private Instruction: Degree Recital 2 (full recital) 351 Accompanying*' 2 382 Contemporary Directions Ensemble 1 2 383 Two Piano Ensemble Form I 2 423 Form II or I I I 424 or 425 2 Historv oi Piano Literature and 431 I'erf�rmance 2 451 Piano Pedagogy" 4 Lit era ture/ Th eory Electives fm m 327-339, 424-438 6 2 Class Piano: Min. Level 8 201 68 Total *The nu mber of required credit hours to be distributed owr the number of semesters i n dica t ed . **Piano performance majors may el ec t additional emphasis in accompanying or pedagogy. Those seeking emph as is in acco m pa n ying shall elect two additional hours of Music 351 and shall accompany two full vocal or instrumental recitals.

4

Those seeking empha s is in pedagogy shall elect four additional hours of M usic 451 .

Total 54

BACHELOR OF MUSIC The d epartmen t of music also offers the following d egre e p rog ram s: Bachelor of Music in Instrumental Performance Bachelor of Music in Organ Performance Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance Bachelor of Music in Theory and Co mp os i t ion Bachelor of Music in C h urc h Mu sic Master of Music in Composition, Con ducti ng, Music E duc a t i on, a nd Pe rform anc e Consult the G raduale Calalos for details of the Master of Music program.

Core

327-339, 424-438* * German

French or

Total

22

Music 370/ 380 Music 323 326 345 2/4 420 201 381 382 423 424 or 425 445

8 La� E �m� 2 Linearity 2 Orchestration 2 Basic Conducting 14 (7 semesters') Private Instruction Private Instruction: Degree Recital 2 ( fu l l recital) Class Piano: M i n . Level 4 2 Chamber Ensemble 4 Contemporary Directions Ensemble 2 2 Form I 2 Form II or III Advanced Conducting 2 Li terat u re / Th eory Electives from 327-339, 424-438 8 Total 74 " The number of re'l uired credit hours to be distributed over the number oi se me ste rs indicated . St ri ng majors will take an a d d itio nal 2 semest er hours oi Music 454, String Pedagogy. BACHELOR OF MUSIC-ORGAN PERFORMANCE 22 Core Music Ensemble (to include Ch,1mber Ensemble, Music Contemporary Directions Ensemble) 6 2 Music 323 Linearity Basic Conducting 345 2 Organ I mp rovi sation 352 2 Private Instruction: Organ 14 (7 s�mesters*) 203/403 Private Instruction: Har ps icho rd (2 ,;emesters) 218 Private Instruction: Degree Recital 2 (full recital) 420 2 Form I 423 Form II or I I I 424 or 425 2 2 History of Organ BUil d i ng 436 Sacred Music Literature 2 437 2 Hymnology and Music oi the Liturgy 438 Literature/Theory Electives from

327-338, 424-438

Literature/Theory Electives from

Language

BACHELOR OF MUSIC­ INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMANCE Music

BACHELOR O F MUSIC-VOCAL PERFORMANCE Core Music 22 Music 360-363 Large En s e mble R L in ear ity Music 323 2 345 Basic Conducting 2 Class Piano: M i n . Level 8 201 4 204/404 Private Instruction: Voice 10 (7 semesters ') 420 Private Instruction: Degree Recital 2 (full recital) 353 Solo \�c al Literature 2 Opera Workshop 366 2 423 Form I 2 Form II o r III 424 or 425 2 Vocal Ped agogy 453 2

6 Total (,8 ' 'The number of required credit hourS to be d istributed over the number of semesters indicated.

6 8 74

PE 241 Modern Dance COMA 250 Fundamentals of Acting 'The number of requ ired credit ho u rs tll be distributl'd over the number of semesters indicated. **To include Music 437, Sacred Music Literatu re

Recommended:

BACHELOR OF MUSIC-THEORY AND COMPOSITION Music Co re Music Large Ensemble Electronic Music Laboratory Music 249 323 Line arit y 326 Orchestration C o mpos i t ion ( p r ivat e study) 327 Basic Cond uct i ng 345 2/4 Private Instruction: Principal Instrument 201 Class Piano: Min. level 8 382 Contemporary Directions Ensemble 423 Form I Form II 424 Form III 425 426 Ad van ced O rch es t ratio n 445 Advan ced Con duc t ing Li tera t u re lTheory Electives from 328-339, 426-438 li)tal

22 2 1

2 2 14 2 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 6 73


79 BACHEWR

OF MUSIC-CHURCH MUSIC C o re Choral Ensemble L..1rge Ensemble

205

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION : VIOLIN/VIOLA (1-4)

206

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CELW/BASS (1-4)

207

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: FLUTE

208

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: OBOE/ENGLISH HORN (1-4)

209

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: BASSOON

210

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: CLARINET

21 Th

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: SAXOPHONE (1-4)

212

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: TRUMPET

213

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: FRENCH HORN (1-4)

214

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: TROMBONE/BARITONE (1-4)

215

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: TUBA

216

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: PERCUSSION 0-4)

217

COURSE OFFERINGS

PRIVATE AND CLASS INSTRUCfION: GUITAR (1-4)

218

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION : HARP

101

219

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: HARPSICHORD (1-4)

Music 360-363 360-382 2031403 or 2041404

Principal Instrument (Organ or Voice)

22 6 1

12 (7 semesters')

2041404 or 203/403

Secondary Instrument (Voice or Organ) 2 ( 2 semesters') 420 Private Instruction: Degree Recital 2 (full recital) ' 352 or 201 Organ Improvisation or Class Piano : Min. Level 8 2 2 323 Li nearit y Orchestmtion 326 2 Music of ) . S. Bach 331 2 Chamber Ensemble 381 2 Co ntemporary Directions Ensemble "1 382 2 Form I 423 Form II or lIT 424 or 425 2 Sacred Music Literature 437 2 2 438 Hym n ol ogy, Music of the uturgy Advanced Conducting 445 2 Vocal l 'edago gy 453 2 Church Music I'racticum 2 469 LiteraturelTheory Electives from 327-339, 424-438 2 Religion Elective ( Beyond the required courses 4 of Core I or II) Total 78 'The nu mber of required credit hours to be distributed over the number of semesters i n dicated.

INTRODUCfION TO MUSIC

Introduction to music literature with emphasis on listening, struc­ ture, period, and style. Des igned to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of music. Not open to majors . (4)

102

UNDERSTANDING MUSIC THROUGH MEWDY

Introduction to the musical arts through a systematic exploration of melody as a primary musical impulse in a wide variety of musi­ cal styles including ethnic (folk), popular, jazz, rock, classical. opera, and musical theater. Designed to enhance the enj oyment and understanding of all music through increased sensitivity to melody. Not open to majors. (4)

123

THEORY I

The stuay of musical terms, fundamentals, notation, melody writ­ ing, and harmonization through analysiS and writing. (3)

124

THEORY II

A continuation of 123. (2)

125

EAR TRAINING I

126

E A R TRAINING I I

127

JAZZ THEORY I

Development oJ aural skills in simple rhythmic dictation, inter­ vals, sightsinging using p rogreSSive exercises consisting of short melodies. ( I ) Continued devel o p ment o f aural skills in sight-s i nging , melodic and rhythmic d ictation . Elementary harmonic dictation. ( 1 ) Introduction to the theoretical basis of jazz, including melodic, harmonic, and formal aspects as well as ear training. (2)

128

JAZZ THEORY II

A continuation of 127. Prerequisite: 127 or consent of instructor. (2)

132

MUSIC HISTORY I

The evolution of Western mllsic from the early Christian era t h rough the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Prer�q­ uisite: 123. (4)

(1-4)

(1-4) (1-4)

(1-4)

(1-4)

(1-4)

Fall and Spring Semesters: One half-hour private, or two one­ hour class lessons per week in addition to daily outside practice. Interim: Two 45-minute lessons per week in addition to daily prac­ tice. Students receiving permiSSion to register for two semester hours of credit (fall and spring only) will receive two one-half hour private lessons per week. Students in piano, voice, and guitar may be assigned to class instrllction at the discretion of the music fac­ ulty. Special fee in addition to tuition.

223

THEORY III

22-5

EAR TRAINING III

226

EAR TRAINING IV

SystematiC study of emergent theoretical constructs from the 18th and 19th century as represented in literature of that period . (2) Advanced aural skills th rough extended rhythms and melodies. E m phasis on harmonic dictation. ( 1 )

Sight-singing, including pan-tonal melodies. Harmonic dictation of modulatory chord p rogres si o ns involving chromatic alteration. Advanced rhythmiC dictat ion . (1)

227

20TH CENTURY MUSIC

231

MUSIC HISTORY II

The evolution of Western art m u sic in the 20th century from early developments to current trends, i nclu ding study of emergent the­ oretical constructs. Prerequisites: 223, 231 . (3)

The evul u tio n of Western mllsic in the C l ass ic and Romantic er,1 S. PrereqU i s i tes: 1 24, 132. (4)

241-242

STRING LABO RATORY

243-244

WOODWIND LABORATO RY

245;246

B RASS LABORATORY

Methods and materials of t eaching and playing string instruments in the public schools (1, 1 ) Methods and materials of teach i ng and playing woodwind instru­ ments in the p ubl ic schools. (1, 1 ) Methods and materials of teaching and playing brass instruments in the public sch )ols. ( 1, 1 )

(1)

201

CLASS INSTRUCfION: PIANO

202

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: PIANO

203

PRIVATE lNSTRUCfION: ORGAN

204

PRIVATE AND CLASS INSTRUCfION: VOICE (1-4)

(1-4) (1-4)

247

PERCUSSION LABORATORY

Methods and materials of teaching and playing percussion instru­ ments in the public schools. ( 1 )


80 248

G UITAR LABORATORY

Methods and materials of teaching and playing guitar in the pub­ lic schools. ( 1 )

249

E LECTRONIC MUSIC LABORATORY

A laboratory experience dealing with materials and methods of elementary electronic music synthesis. Real-time experience in the electronic music studio, as well as d iscussion of various popu­ lar synthesizers, electronic music aesthetics, and the use of elec­ tronic instruments in secondary education. ( 1 )

323

LINEARITY

Study of contrapuntal writing and techniques of primarily the 18th century including canon, invention, and fugue. (2)

326

ORCHESTRATION

COMPOSITION

A systematic approach to contemporary musical composition; students create and notate works for solo, small and large ensem­ bles. May be repeated for additional cred it. Special fee in addition to tuition . (1-4)

328

ARRANGING

Study of orchestrational techniques applied to commercial music. Prerequisite: 326 or consent of instructor. (2)

f

AI/ music litemture cou rses nllmbered rom 3 3 1 t(1 339 nre opell toal/ lllli­ versity enrol/men/ without prerequisite.

331

MUSIC OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

A study of selected works representing each of the primary areas of the creative genius of ).5. Bach. all' (2)

332

ELECTRONIC MUSIC PRACTICUM

Application of electronic techniques to compositional process. For non-composition majors only. Assigned studio time on a regular basis. Prerequisite: 249. (1)

351

ACCOMPANYING

Practice in accompanying representative vocal and instrumental solo literature from all periods. Special fee in addition to tuition. (1)

352

ORGAN IMPROVISATION

Basic techniques of improvisation, particularly as related to hymn tunes. all' (2)

353

SOLO VOCAL LITE RATURE

Survey of solo vocal literature. (2)

The range, transposition, sound, and technical characteristics of instrume.1ts. Notation, scoring, and arranging for conventional and unique instrument groupings. Prerequisite: 223. (2)

327

349

ORNAMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE PRACTICES OF THE BAROQUE

360

CHOIR OF THE WEST

A study of choral literature and technique th.rough rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. Emphasis on indi­ vidual vocal development through choral singing. Auditions at the beginning of fall semester. (1)

361

UNIVERSITY CHORALE

A study of choral literature and tech nique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. Emphasis on indi­ vidual \local development through choral singing. Auditions at the beginning of fall semester. (1)

362

CONCERT CHOIR

A study of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. Emphasis on indi­ vidual vocal development through choral singing. Auditions at the beginning of fall semester. ( 1 )

363

UNIVERSITY SINGERS

A study of choral l iterature and technique through rehearsal and performance of both sacred and secular music. Emphasis on indi­ vidual vocal development through choral singing. (1)

A practical study of vocal and instrumental ornamentation as it evolved in the 17th and 18th centuries. all' (2)

364

333

A study of secular part song through reading and performance. (1)

MUSIC OF HAYDN AND MOZART

MADRIGAL

Score analysis and study of the historical significance of selected works of Haydn and Mozart. all' (2)

366

334

Production of chamber opera and opera scenes. Participation in all facets of production. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.(l)

MUSIC OF BEETHOVEN

A general survey with in-depth study of selc-cted works. all' (2)

336

CHAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE

A general survey with in-depth stud), of selected chamber works for representative genres. all' (2)

337

THE NINETEENTH CENTURY ART SONG

A study of selected art song literature of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wolf, Strauss, Beethoven, Faure, Debussy, and DuParc. Style analysis and interpretation with performance in class. all' (2)

338

HISTORY OF OPERA

A general survey with in-depth study of selected opera scores. all' (2)

339

HISTORY OF JAZZ STYLES

A survey of the evolution of jazz from 1900 to present including early development and trends. all' (2)

341

MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Methods and procedures for the classroom teacher in developing the various music ,lCtivities in the elementary school. Offered in the fan semester for students preparing to become music special­ ists. Offered in the spring semester for those students preparing for elementary classroom teaching. (2)

343

VOCAL JAZZ TECHNIQUES

370

OPERA WORKSHOP

UNIVERSITY SYMPHONIC BAND

Study of selected band literature through rehearsal and perform­ ance. Membership by audition. (1)

372

UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE

Study of selected jazz literature through rehearsal and perform­ ance. Membership by audition. (1) Section A-Instrumental; Sec­ tion B-Vocal .

380

UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY O RCHESTRA

Study of selected orchestral literature through rehearsal and per­ formance. Membership by audition. (1)

381

CHAMBER ENSEMBLE

Reading, rehearsal, and performance of selected instrumental chamber music. PrerequiSite: consent of instructor. (1) Section A-String; Section B-Brass; Section C-Woodwind; Section D­ Early .instruments.

382

CONTEMPORARY DIRECTIONS ENSEMBLE

Public and laboratory performance of contemporary music. (1)

383

TWO PIANO ENSEMBLE

Techniques and practice in the performance of t wo-piano and piano duet literature; includes sight reading and program plan­ ning. ( 1 )

Methods, literature, style, and technique for the vocal jazz ensem­ ble. Emphasis on the acquisition of skills necessary for tea(hing vocal jazz in the secondary school. (1)

401

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: JAZZ (1-4)

402

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION : PIANO

344

(1-4)

403

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: O RGAN

Small group performance emphasizing individual improvisation in a variety of jazz styles. May be repeated for credit. (1)

404

PRIVATE INSTRUcrION: VOICE

345

405

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: VIOLINIVIOLA (1-4)

IMPROVISATION WORKSHOP

BASIC CONDUcrING

Intro d uction to basic patterns, gestures, and conducting techniques; application to appropriate vocal and instrumental scores. (2)

(1-4)

(1-4)


81 406

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: CELWIBASS (1-4)

407

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: FLUTE (1-4)

408

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: OBOEIENGLISH HORN (1-4)

409

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: BASSOON (1-4)

410 ' PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CLARINET (1-4) 411

PRIVATE I N STRUCfION: SAXOPHONE (1-4)

412

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: TRUMPET (1-4)

413

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: FRENCH HORN (1-4)

414

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: TROMBONE/BARITONE (1-4)

415

PRIVATE IN STRUCfION: TUBA (1-4)

416

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: PERCUSSION (1-4)

417

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION : GU ITAR (1-4)

418

PRIVATE I NSTRUCf ION: HARP (1-4)

419

PRIVATE I NSTRUCfION: HARPSICHORD (1-4)

420

PRIVATE INSTRUCfI ON: DEGREE RECITAL (1-2)

Fall .1 Od Spring Semesters: One half-hour private, or two one­ hour lessons per week in addition to daily practice. Interim: Two 45-minute lessons per week in addition to daily practice. Students receiving permission to register for 2-4 semester hours uf credit (fall and spring only) wiLl receive two one-half hour private les­ sons per week. Students in piano, voice, and guitar may be assigned to class instruction at the discretion of the music faculty. Special fee in addition to tuition.

423

FORM I

Advanced analysis of literature from Classic, Early and Middle Romantic styles in representative genres and media. (2)

424

FORM I I

Advanced analysis of literature from late Romantic, Impressionist, and NationalL'Itic styles in representative genres and media. Pre­ requisite: 423. aty (2)

425

FORM III

Advanced analysis of literature from Modern and Contemporary styles in representative genres and media. Prerequisite: 423. aiy (2)

426

ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION

Directed study and scoring of selected piano works for large ensemble; independcnt study, may be repeated for additional credit. Offered on demand. (1-2)

428

ADVANCED ARRANGING

A continuation of 328 on an individualized basis. PrerequiSite: 328 or consent of instru ctor. May be repeated for additional credit. ( 1-2 )

All music lileml lac COurses Ill/Inhered from 43 1 1 u 438arc opct/ 10a11 l1l1i­

versify enrollment witholll prerequisite.

431

HI STORY OF PIANO LITERATURE AND PERFORMANCE

A study of representative piano compositions of all periods. n/y (2)

432

MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLE

A survey of the various musical cultures of the world: Africa, the Middle East, India and neighboring lands, the Far East, the Pacific Islands, and the Americas. Final sessions devoted to (1) oral tradi­ tion, and (2) the music uf those Wes tefl1 "art music" compOsers who have drawn much of their inspiration frOm rion-We5tern or folk sources. a/y (2)

433

MUSIC OF BELA BARTOK

A study of representative \vurks of vcUiOllS periods of Bartok. aiy (2)

435

MUSIC IN THE UNITED STATES: A HISTORICAL I NTRODUCfION

A survey from the colonial period to the present covering both the cultivated and the vernacular traditions. aly (2)

436

HISTORY OF ORGAN BUILDING

A two-fold study, involving both the technical evolution of the pipe organ (key-actions, windchest deSigns, pipework varieties and constrllcti.on, the organ case) as well as the historical evolu­ tion of the various concepts of tonal design as these relate to the performance of organ literature. a/y (2)

437

SACRED MUSIC LITE RATURE

A su rvey of church music primarily through the study of repre­ sentative major works. aty (2)

438

HYMNOWGY AND THE MUSIC OF THE LITU RGY

A survey of Christian hymnody, considered from both a musical and poetic viewpoint. Also considered will be the concept and performance of music for the liturgy, both historic and contempo­ rary, primarily from the Roman, Anglican, and Lutheran tradi­ tions. all' (2)

439

CHURCH MUSIC

Survey of choral music related to the ch urch year suitable for the parish choir. Particular emphasis on building the parish music library. aly (2)

441

RECENT TECHNIQUES FOR ELEMENTARY MUSIC

The concern of the upper elementary and middle school music teacher, including Orff and Kodaly techniques. (2)

442

METHODS AND MATERIALS OF COMMERCIAL MUSIC

Sources and applications of commercial music methods and mate­ rials, including business and legal considerations. (2)

443

METHODS AND MATE RIALS FOR SECONDARY CHORAL MUSIC

The organization and administration of the secondary school music curriculum with particular attention to the ne(,ds of the ell0ral program. Organization, management, teaching methods, rehearsal techniques, and choral literature appropriate for the var­ ious age and experience levels of students in grades 7-12. (2)

444

METHODS AND M ATERIALS FOR SCHOOL INSTRUME NTAL MUSIC

The organization and adminis tration of the secondary school music curriculum with pMticular attention to the needs of the instrumental program. Organization, management, teaching methods, rehcarsal techniques, and instrumental literature appro­ priate for the various age and experience levels of students in grades 4-12 (3)

445

A DVANCED CONDUCfING

Refinement of patterns, gestures, and conducting techniques; application to appropriate vocal and instrumental scores. Prereq­ uisite: 345. (2)

449

RECORDING TECHNIQUES AND TECHNOWGY

The theory and practice of audio record ing, including laboratory experience with various media, recording equipment, locatiuns, ilnd genre. Private or g.roup instruction. Spedal fee. aly (2)

451

PIANO PE DAGOGY

Teaching techniques for prospective teathers of piano, including techniques of private and class piano instruction. Methods and materials from beginning through advanced levels. (2) Section A­ Basic; Section B-Lower Elementary; Section C-Upper Elemen­ tary; Section D-Advanced.

452

ORGAN PEDAGOGY AN D REPERmIRE

MethOds and techniques of private organ insrruction, including supervised practical experience. A survey of organ literature rep­ resentative of all major composers and style periods. a/y (2)


82 453

VOCAL PEDAGOGY

Physiological, psychological, and pedagogical aspects of singing. (2)

454

STRING PEDAGOGY

The physiological and psychological approach to string playing and teaching. Includes discussion and demonstration of instru­ ment and bow tc>(hniques, private lesson approach and materials, gen e ral and speciiic string problems. a/y (2)

467

COMMERCIAL MUSIC FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PERFORMANCE

Preparation for professional work through practical field experi­ ence in performance situations. Prereq uisites: 442, consent of instructor, a n d j u n ior or senior status. (2)

468

PRACTICUM IN COMMERCIAL MUSIC

supervised educational experience in a work setting. Prerequi­ sites: consent of instructor and junior or senior status. !vtay be repeated for additional credit. (2)

527

532

CHURCH MUSIC PRACTICUM

Planning, rehearsing, and providing weekly muslc for a local church under the gUldancc of a facu lty member. (2)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

P re requisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for addltlonal credit. ( 1 -4)

502

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION : PIANO (1-4)

503

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: ORGAN (1-4)

504

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: VOICE (1-4)

505

PRIVATE INSTRUCTIO N : VIOLIN/VIOLA (1-4)

506

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CELWIBASS (1-4)

507

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: FLUTE (1-4)

508

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: OBOE/ENGLISH HORN (1-4)

509

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: BASSOON (1-4)

5 10

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CLARINET (1-4)

511

PRIVATE INSTRUCfION: SAXOPHONE (1-4)

512

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TRUMPET (1-4)

513

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: FRENCH HORN (1-4)

5 14

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: TROMBONE/BARITONE (1-4)

515

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION : TUBA (1-4)

516

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: PERCUSSION (1-4)

517

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: GUITA R (1-4)

518

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARP (1-4)

519

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARPSICORD (1-4)

520

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: CONDUCTING (1-4)

Fall and Spring Semesters: One half-hour private, or two one­ hour class ie::;sons per week in addition to daily practice. Interim: Two 45-minute lessons per week i n addition to daily practice. Stu­ dents receiving permiss ion to register for 2-4 sem ester hours of credit (fall and spring only) will receive two one-half hour private lessons per week. Students in piano, voice, and guitar may be assigned to cl a s s instruction at the di scretio n of the music faculty. Special fee in addition to tuition.

MUSIC B I B LIOG RAPHY AND RESEARCH TECHNIQUES

Su r vey of the main research tools available for advanced work in m u sic. Course content can be adapted t o needs of students in music education, t heory, or performance. aiy (2)

539

TOPICS IN MUSIC HISTORY

Development of a research paper on a selected subject relating to the departmental upper division offerings in music history and lit­ e ratu re. (331 -339, 431-438). (2)

545

A

469

COMPOSITION

syste matic approach to contemporary music composition; stu­ dents create, notate, and perform works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for credit. ( 1 -4) A

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED CONDUCTING

Directed study of selected SCOres for large and small ensembles, vocal and instrumental. May be repeated for credit. (2)

549

ELECTRONIC MUSIC SYNTHESIS

551

ACCOMPANYING

Directed st u dy of electronic music literature, tech n iqu e s, a n d co m pos i tio n . May b e repeated for cred i t . (1-2) Practice in accompil nying representative vocal and inst"rumental solo literature from all periods. Accompa nyin g in performance will be required. Special fee in addition to tuition. ( 1 )

560

CHOIR OF THE WEST

A study of choral ensemble rehearsal techniques with emphasis on score analysis . ( 1 )

561

UNIVE RSITY CHORALE

A study of choral ensemble rehearsal techniques with emphasis on vocal pedagogy in the rehearso l . ( 1 )

566

OPERA WORKSHOP

Prod uction of chamber opera and opera scenes. Participation in all facets of production . Prerequisite: consent of i nst ructo r. ( 1 )

570

UNIVE RSITY SYMPHONIC BAND

study of band rehearsal techniques with emphasis on score analys is. (1) A

572

UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE

A study of jazz ensemble rehearsal techniques with emphasis on stylistic considerations. (1)

580

UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY O RCHESTRA

study of orchestra ensemble rehearsal techniques with empha­ sis on score analysis. ( 1 ) A

581

CHAMBER ENSEMBLE rehearsal, and performa nce ()f se l ected instTumental

A nalYSis,

chamber music. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. ( 1 )

582

CONTEMPORARY DIRECTIONS ENSEMBLE

Public and laboratory performance of contemporary music. Emphasis u n score analysis. ( 1 )

583

TWO-PIANO ENSEMBLE

590

GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-4)

596

RESEARCH IN MUSIC (1-4)

599

THESIS (2-4)

Performance of two-piano and pia n o duet literature, including score analysis. (1)


83

Division of

Natural Sciences Science education at Pacific Lutheran University is directed both toward undergraduate preparation of future science professionals and toward the creation of critical scientific awareness for liberally educated citizens in all walks of life. Science must be taught as fundamental principles, groups of concepts, bodies of knowledge, and means for survival. Holistic solutions to global problems require the ability to interrelate technical knowledge and human values. Concern for how science is used must not obscure the motivation for pursuit of the best scientific work: the joy of trying and succeeding, the joy of discovery and understanding.

FACUIIY J. Herzog, Divisional Dean; faculty members of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Physics and Engineering.

As a di vision within the College of Arts and Sciences, the Division of Natural Sciences offers programs in each constituent department leading to the B. A . and B . S. degrees and to the B.S. in Medical Technology. M.A. a n d M . S . degrees in Computer Science are also offered . Course offerings and degree require­ ments are listed under:

BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER SCIENCE E A RTH SCIENCES MATH EMATICS PHYSICS AND ENGINEE RING See also the sections of this catalog on the Environmental Studies Program and on the Health Sciences (under Pre-prof,es­ sional Programs). Courses suitable for meeting Core I requirements in Natural Sciences/Mathem.1tics may be found within each department or below:

COURSE OFFERING 106

COSMOS, EARTH, AND LIFE

Consideration of the beginnings, evolution, and possible fates of the universe as revealed by present evidence. The formation and development of planet earth, geologic processes through geologic time. The impact of civil ization On global resources. The .1 tomic and molecular view of chemical prerequ isites for l ife. The origin and formation of the atmosp here and potential threats of altering its constituents. Study of the development and d i versification of life by focusing on unifying concepts and control systems. labora­ tory experiences to reinforce understanding oj how hypotheses arc built and critically tested. Fulfills Natural Sciences!Milthemat­ ies core requirement, line 1 or 2.

School of

(4)

Nursing

A nursing career offers great oppor tunity for a rich and rewarding professional life. It affords virtually unlimited choice of location, environment, and type of service. The physical, mental, social, and spiritual health of people is of universal concern, and those prepared to maintain their good health are in constant demand.

pared for beginning positions in professional nurs­ ing in hospitals and other health agencies. There is a special sequence for Registered Nurse students, graduates from diploma or associate degree pro­ grams, who wish to earn the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The program provides a founda­ tion for graduate study in nursing.

The School of Nursing is a professional school which combines professional and liberal arts stud­ ies in assisting students to develop a sense of responsibility for acquiring the attitudes, knowl­ edge, and skills necessary for meeting nursing needs of individuals, groups, and communities.

Under the direct supervision of its faculty mem­ bers, the School uses facilities of hospitals, health agencies, and schools in the commun ity to provide optimal clinical learning experience for its students.

The generic program is designed for students with no previous preparation in nursing. Graduates who successfully complete the program are eligible to write the State Board of Nursing examination for licensure as Registered Nurses. They are pre-

The School of Nursing is accredited by the Wash­ ington State Board of Nursing and by the National League for Nursing. It is a charter member of the Western Council on Higher Education for Nursing.


84 FACUIIY

all non-nursing course prerequisites and a minimum of 24 semes­ ter credits of the core requirements and elect ives for a total of 56

Mansell, Deall; A�ikin, Allen, Carpenter, Cone, Coombe, Egan, Gough, C. Hansen, Hefty, Herman­ Bertsch, Hirsch, D. Johnson, Kirkpatrick, Lingen­ felter, Mason, McGear, L. Olson, Page, Rhoades, Schultz, Shumaker, Stavig, Stiggelbout, Weirick, Yumibe. ADMISSION AND CONTINUATION rOUGES S tudents seek ing admission to either the generic program or the

sequence for registered nurses must make fonnal a pplication to both the u niversity and the School of NurSing. A ppl icat ions for admission to the School of Nurs.ing are accepted twice during the year. Students desiring admission to either fall Or spring semester of the following academic year must submit applicat ions between January I and Februmy 15. Additional a pplicat ions from students wishing to be considered for any remaining admissions for the spring semester must be submitted September 15. Applications are reviewed only if the applicants have been admitted to PLU and have provided official transcripts as req e sted by the School of Nursing Admissions Committee. The number of spaces in th e School of Nursing each semester is limited; therefore, the selection of students for admission may be co m petit ive . In making the selection, the School of Nursing Admissions Committee uses grades as the major means of determination. Students accepted to begin the nursing sequence in either fall or spring semester, and who have applied by the February 15 dead­ line, are selected for both terms and notified bv Mav 1 . Students ' are admitted to the term of their choice insofa as it is possible. If there are more applicants than can be accommodated, deferred admission to the next term may be necessary. Additional selection for the spring semester is made in the fall with notiftcation by November 1 . With satisfactory progress, six semesters are required t o complete the sequence of nurstng courses leadtng to the Bachelor of Science tn Nursing. All potential Or pre-nurstng students are urged to seek academtc advisement through the School of Nursing Office tn order to enroll for appropriate prerequtsites and thereby avoid unnecessary loss of time. The School of Nursing reserves the right to request withdrawal of a nursing student who fails to demonstrate competency or who fails to matntatn professional conduct. Unsafe practice constitutes grounds for immediate withdrawal from the clinical component. Minimal criteria tor admission to or continuation in the School of Nursing are as follows:

by

u

;

1.

Admission to the university. Applicants must have been admit­ ted to Pacific Lutheran Universitv before consideration of their applic�tion to the Sdloo1 of Nu

�ing. Admission to the univer­

sity does not guarantee admission to the School of NurSing.

2. Completion of or current enrollment in Psychology T01 (Intro­ duction to Psychology) and three of the following: Biology 201 (Introductory Microbiology), Biology 205, 206 (Human Anatomy and Physiology ), Chemistry 105 (Chemistry of Life), and Sociol­ ogy 101 (Introduction to Sociology). TI,e remaining courses will be completed aiter enrolling in the nursing program; however,

both Biology 205 and 206 must be completed before enrollment in Nursing 220 and 224. Students need to plan their schedules accordingly.

3. Completion of a min im u m ot 26 semester credit hours. Some of these may be in progress at the time of appl ication. 4 . A minimum grade of 2.00 (C) in all required nursing and prereq­ uisite courses. A student receiving a grade of less than 2.00 in uny course which is a prerequisite for a nursing course may not continue in that nursing cOurse until the prerequisite course is repeated with a grade point of 2.00 or above. 5. A minimum cumulative grade point average oj 2.33. 6. Physical health and stamina necessary to withstand the demands of nursing. 7. Emotional stability sufficient to cope with the stresses inherent in learning and practicing nursing. 8. Com pletio n of a math proficiency test before Or during the tirst semeste) of the nursing program with a minimum score of 71% ( p rereq is ite to entry into the third semester of the nursing program). All tests will be administered by the testing centN with the student responsible for the nom inal cost of each test. Students receiving a grdde of less than 71 % may not continue in the nursing sequence until the prerequisite test is repeared with a g rade of 71 % or above. Students who do not have 2 yea of high school algebra are advised to enroll for a math elective. Registered nurses are admitted to begin their nursing program in the fall semester. They may choose to be enrolled full-time for a total of sixteen months, or to extend their progrdm and enroll on a part-time basis. The registered nurse student must have completed

u

rs

semester credits. Other minimal criteria for admission to or contin­

uation in the nursing program are as outlined above for the generic

student. The registered nurse who is con siderin g maki ng

applica­

tion for admission to the nursing program is advised to contnct the School of Nursing for advice about p rereq isites to be completed,

u

other requirements to be met, and the program to admission.

pursue after

HEALTH

l

The nursing student is responsible for maintaining optima

health and is a teacher oi health. Physical examination, x-rays, and immunizations aJe required before admission to the clinical areas, and periodically thereafter, and are the respon si bili ty of the student. Each student must carry personal health insu ra nce. ADDITIONAL COSTS

In addition to regular university costs, students are to provide n transportation between the university campus and the clinical labora tory areas beginning with the first nursing course. Available public ans po tat ion is limited, so provision for private transportation is essential. Students are required to carry profes­ sional liability insurdnce during all periods of clinical experience. This is available under a group plan at a nominal cost to the stu­ dent. Health examination fees, student uniforms (ap proximat ely $115.00) and equipment (wristwatch, scissors, stethoscope) are also the responsibility of the stude.nt. A $25.00 tes ting fee, payable directly to the School of Nursing. is assessed at the time of enrollment in Nursing 424. This is the cost of standardized testing. their o

w

tr

r

CERTIFICATION FOR SCHOOL NURSING Educational Staff Associate Certification for school nurses is individually designed through a consortium co nsisti ng of a sc hool

district, related professional assoc iat ion, and Pacific Lutheran

University. Additional information on this program ca n be

o

obtained by contacting the dean of the Sch ol of Ed uca tio n or the dean of the School of NurSing. RESOURCES AND &\CILITIES Good Samaritan H osp i tal , Puyall up, WA David K. Hamry, M. H . A . , P res id e nt

(225 beds)

Peggy Cannon, Vice President

l

Lakewood General Hosp it a , Tacoma, WA (lOS beds) Bruce M. Yeats, Administ ra tor

Cathy Nugent, R . N . , Assistant Administrator for Nursing Service

Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA (493 beds)

l

Brigadier General Darryl H. Powe l, M . D. , Comm and i ng Officer Colonel Mary K. Kuntz, B.S.N., M . N . , Chief, De pa rtm ent of NurSing Mar)' Bridge Children's Health Center, Tacoma, WA (68 beds)

j. Peter Johnson, M . H . A . , Associate Adm i nistrato r Karen Ly.nch, R . N . , B.S . N . , Assistant Administrator for Patient Services Puget Sound Hospital, Tacoma, WA (151 beds) Bruce Brandl.", Administrator L1.rry Howell, B.S.N., M . N .. Assistant AdministratorfDirector of Nursing St. Joseph H ospit al, Tacoma, WA (34D beds) Da n ie l Russell, B.S., M . H . A., c . I . O. , President john M ahe r, B.B. A . , M . B. A . , M . N . A . , Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Hazel Hurst, R . N., B.S., M . N . , Assistant Administrator for Nursing Services 5t. Peter Hos pit al , Oly m pia, WA (328 beds) David L Bj ornso n, M . H . A . , AdministTator Anne Bertolin, R . N . , M . N . , Assistant Administrator Tacoma Gene ra Hos pit al , Tacoma, WA (315 beds) Fred A. Pritchard, M . B . A . , Pres id e t Betty Hoffman, R . N . , B.S.N., M . N . , Assistant Administrator,

l

n

Nursing Services Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, Tacoma, WA R . M . Nicola, M.D., M . H . 5. A ., Director, Tacoma-Pierce County ' Health Department Nancy Cherry, R.N., M.P.H., Director of Nursing Tacoma Public Schools, Tacoma, WA Donna G . Ferguson, R . N . , M . N . , Coordinator of Health and Handicapped, Division of Health The Doctors Hos pital, Tacoma, WA (35 beds) Mary Dean, R . N . , M.A., Director of Nursing Service Veterans Administration Hospital , Tacoma, WA (512 beds) William E. Claypool, A.B., M . H.A., Director joan Stout, R . N . , B.S.N., M . N . , C N. A . A .. Chief, Nursing Service Western State Hospital, S teilac , WA (924 beds) R. Darrell Hamilton, M . D. , Superintendent jalane Hage tt , R . N . , M . A . , Director of N u rsing

oom

ro


85 BACHEWR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING

COURSE OFFERINGS

The curriculum plan and its implementation are designed to

foster growth and to encourage initiative and self-direction on the part of the student.

In addition to nursing requirements,

100

the

student is expected to meet university requirements. Nursing

MEDICAL TERMINOWGY

Study of over 350 word elements ,l nd the application of those terms

courses are sequential in nature and all have prerequisites. A

in understanding over 10, 000 complex medical words in their appro­

should contact the School of Nursing and begin the course

macological reierences.

student interested in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree

priate context. Application of these terms to anatomical and phar­

se.quence upon entrance to the university.

SOCIA LIZATION m NURSING

214

For spring semester enrollment the curriculum generally follows the fall semester format with modifications as necessary to assure

(1)

Introduction to historical perspectives and current trends in profes­

completion of all prerequisite courses by the time they are needed.

sional nursing and nursing education. Concepts of self and SOCiety,

who begins nursing courses in the spring semester. Nursing courses must be taken concurrently and in sequence as indicated in

Framework for developing effective communication skills and help­

A schedule of courses is developed individually with each shldent

the sample curriculum, and normally extend over six semesters.

Psychology 101 or Sociology 10 I

CUR/Core

Physical Education 100

4 4 4 1 13

Interim

Elective

4 4

Sociology 10"1 or Psychology 101 Biology 206 Physical Education

4 4 4 1

13 SECOND YEAR

Psychology 335 or Education 321 Nursing 214

Physical Education

4 4 4 4 1 17

Interim

Elective

4 4

220

Nursing 224 CUR/Core Elective

Physical Education

4 4 4 4 1 17

CUR/Core

Spring Semester Nursing 354 Nursing 384 Nursing 394

CUR/Core

4 4 8

0-4

4 4 4 4 16

FOURTH YEAR

Nursing 434

Nursing 444

CUR/Core

4 4 4 4 16

Interim (optional)

0-4

Spring Semester Nursing 464 Nursing 478

4 8 12

"CUR

=

general un iversity requirement

224

HEALTH ASSESSMENT

Health ass"ssment of children and adults. Emphasis on beginning to the use of health resources, the influence of eco-svstems, and the

role of the health team in well ness promotion. Pre

�quisites:

B10l

205 and 206; CHEM 105; NURS 214;· prior or concurrent enrollment in PSY 335 (or EDUC 321); concurrent enrollment in NURS 220. (4)

NURSING PROCESS: INDIVIDUALS AND FAMiliES

334

resultant health disruptions. Selected situational and maturational

(rises affecting individuals and families. Development of psycho­ motor skills and nursing interventions within the framework of the

nursing process. Prerequisites: 220, 224; concurrent enrollment in

344 . (4) 344

NURSING IN THE CHILDBEARING YEARS

Individual and family adaptations throughout the pregnanc), cycle:

Physiological and psycho-sociocultural aspects of childbearing. The­

ory and clinical application in physicians' offices, hospitals, and in 334. (4)

354

PHYSIOLOGICAL NURSING I

Content focuses On selected complex pathophysiological disorders of children and adults with nUlsing interventions to facilitate adap­ tation and restoration to maximum level of well ness. Holistic

<lpproach to assist in meeting the physiological and psychosocial

384

PSYCHOSOCIAL NURSING

Infroduction to selected acute and chronic psychiatric disorders of

adults. Emphasis on psychopathological aspects of illness and nurs­

ing interventions using interpersonal and other contemporary modalities in the care ot clients with mental health problems. Pre· requisites: 334, 344; concurrent enrollment in 354, 394, (40

394

CLINICAL PRACTICUM I

Cl inical laboratory for Nursing 354 and 384. Application of theoreti­

cal principles based on concepts of pathophysiology and p;ycho­ pathology to the care of clients using the nursing process as a

framework for holistic care. Development of interperson,ll and tech­ nical skills. !?rerequisites:

334, 344;

concurrent enrollment in 354,

384. (4)

Fall Semester

Nursing 424

BIOl 201, 205, and 206; NURS 214; concurrent enrollment in NURS 224. (4)

enrollment in 384, 394. (4)

16 Interim (optional)

with adult clients in hospitals or nursing homes. Prerequisites:

needs of clients and families. Prerequisites: 334, 344; concurrent

THIRD YEAR

Fall Semester

Nursing 334 Nursing 344

skills in client carl'. Emphasis on the role of the professional nurse in implementation of th" nursing process. Selected clinical experience

home environments. Prerequisites: 220, 224; concurrent enrollment

Spring Semester Nursing

COMMONALITIES IN NURSING CARE

Introduction to the use of the nursing process and ps)'chomotor

Basic interruptions in human bio-psycho-social processes with

Fall Semester

Biology 201 CUR/Core

220

assessment techniques as part of the nursing process. Introduction

Spring Semester Chemistry 105

ing relationships. Community experiences with well elderly clients.

Prerequisites: Admission to the nursing major, PSY 101, and prior or

concurrent enrollment in SOC 101. (4)

FI RST YEAR-Pee-Nursing

Fall Semester

Biology 205

well ness, human needs, nursing process, and health care systems.

424

PHYSIOLOGICAL NURSING I I

Content focuses o n selected complex pathopsysiological disorders

01

children and adults of a life-threatening or chroniCally disabling

nature. Nu rsing interventions based on understanding of the bio­ psycho-social disruptions and means of restoring balance to an opti­

mal level of functioning. Prerequis.ites: 354, 384, 394; concurrent enrollment in 434 ,

434

444. (4)

COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING

Identification of major public health problems, levels of prevention, and community health nurses' roles. Models and theories forevalu­ ating, reinforcing, or altering health-seeking behaviors of families,

groups, and special populations. IntroductiOns to selected theories,

principles, and methods of leadership, and concepts of resea rch in nursing. PrereqUisites: 354, 384, 394; cuncurrent enrollment in 424,

444 . (4)


86 444

CLINICAL PRACfICUM II

Clinical application of bio-psycho-social, cultural, and spiritual con­ cepts in acute care hospital and community settings. Use of the nursing process includes interpersonal as well as technological skills. Professional responsibility and accountability are empha­ sized. Prerequisites: 354, 384, 394; COn.current enrollment in 424,

434. (4)

464

478

SENIOR PRACfICUM

Clinical application and synthesis of professional and technical skills in hospitals, health agencies, or other community settings. Prerequi­ sites: 424, 434, 444; concurrent enrollment in 464. (8)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: Permission of the dean. (1-4)

LEADERSHIP IN NURSING

Analysis of health care delivery systems. Emphasis On leadership and economic aspects affecting health professionals and consumers. Prerequisites: 424, 434, 444; concurrent en.rollment in 478. (4)

Philosophy Philosophy is the original academic discipline from which the contemporary arts and sciences have emerged. It continues to examine basic issues in all of these fields as well as to pursue its own distinc­ tive concerns about the nature of truth and reality. Characteristic philosophical questions include: What is human nature, and what does it imply for the possibility of happiness and a good life? Are human beings really free? What is the mind, and what is its place in the physical universe? What objectivity is there to moral, aesthetic, and religious beliefs? What is the scientific method and its signifi­ cance for the rest of human culture? Studying phi­ losophy acquaints one with rival world views, develops the habit of careful and systematic thought, and helps one to see life critically, appre­ ciatively, and whole.

FACUIIY p, Menzel, Chair; Arbaugh, Cooper, Huber, Myrbo, Nordby. USES OF PHILOSOPHY Courses in philosophy meet the nel'<ls of a variety or students: (1) those who desire some knowledge of philosophy as a basic element in a liberal education; (2) those who wish to pursue some special interest, for example, in ethics, science, religion, .the history of thought, or the ideas of particular men or peoples; (3) those who wish tu support their work in other fields, for exam­ ple, literature, history, religion, the sciences, educatiOn, or business; (4) those who plan to use a major in philosophy as preparation for graduate or professional study in another field, for example, theolugy, medicine, Or law; and (5) those whu plan to do graduate work in philosophy itself, usually with the intention of teaching in the field. Undergraduate study in philosophy does not train one specifi­ cally for " first job. It does, however, provide essential perspec­ tives, as well as basic skills in analySiS and interpretation, problem solving, research and writing. These�usually coupled with speCialized training in other disciplines�fit one for a great variety of vocational responsibilities. Persons with the greatest upward mobility in fields such as business management, law, education, engineering, operations research, data processing, or social work, are generally not those with the most specialized training, but those with broad perspectives, flexibility and depth, and skilJs in thought and communication. SUPPORTING PROGRAMS I N PHILOSOPHY FOR aTH ER FIE LDS Philosophy provides a solid foundation for a variety of studies and careers. Students using it to support primary work in other fields may elect a minor o r major Or some other combination of courses of interest. On approval of the department, one COurse (4 hours) in another field of study may be used for the philosophy major if it has a direct relationship to the student's individual philosophy program.

Both how philosophy relates to a variety of careers and what specific programs of study are recommended to support work in other disciplines are described in separate brochures available in the departmental oifice. These include business, education, health professions, law, parish ministry and theological stud ies, social work, fine arts, human it ies, and social and natural sciences. A PROGRAM OF QUALITY PLU's department of philosophy offers a distinctive course of studies. The facultv aU hold the doctorate, have studied at leading institution � in this country and abroad, and have partiCi­ pated in professional programs in the United States and Europe. The excellence of the department is evidenced by grants received and by the success of its graduates at major graduate and profes­ sional schools throughout the country. The department strongly emphasizes the quality of its teaching. All students, but espe· ciaJly those with major or minor programs, receive individual attention and assistance. INTERIM OFFERINGS Special interim courses at PLU explore a variety of topics and cultural perspectives. On-campus studies have been concerned with themes of social and legal philosophy, war and morality, justice, love, capitalism and business, bio-medical ethics, religion and science, and the computer revolution. UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENT The general university core requirement of four hours in philosophy may be satisfied by any course offered except 100 Reasoning, 121 Critical Thinkinx alld Writinx, and 233 ll11 roducticm 10 LoXic. A variety of 2-4 credit hour courses dealing with moral issues, 226 Moral Problems, 323 Health Care Ethics, 325 Busilless Ethics, 326 Moral Problems ill the Social Sen}ices, and 328 Philosoph '! of Law, satisfy this requirement only if 225 Ethical Theory (2 hours) is also taken. 341 Philosophy ofMathematics-Set Theory, 342 Philos· ophy of Mathemat ics - GOdel alld Truth, and 343 Philosophy of LoXics count toward this requirement only when taken in addition to 225 or 233. The initial course i n philosophy is customarily 101. 125, or 225, though none of these courses is strictly a prerequisite for any other course. 3OO-level courses are especially suited for students with particular interests. Faculty consent may be required for registration in some courses. MINOR: 16 semester hours. A minor in philosophy consists of four approved courses; ior transfer studenL�, at least two must be taken at f'LU. Students considering a minor should discuss their personal goals with departmental faculty. If they elect a minor in the field, they should formally declare this with the registrar and the department chair. BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 28 semester hours, including 233 Logic and any two of the four courses in the history of philosophy sequence (331 Ancient Philosophy, 332

Medieval Philosophy, 333 Modem Philosophy, 335 COlltemporary Philosophy). On approval oj the department, one course (4 hours) in another field of study may be used for the philosophy major if it has a direct relationship to the student's individual philosophy program. Tra nsfer students will normally take 16 or more of their 28 hou.rs at PLU. Students intending to major in ph ilosophy must formally declare this with the registrar and the department chair. They should choose a departmental adviser in consultation with whom they will plan their prog·rams.


87 HONORS MAJOR: 1 . 28 semester hours in philosophy, including 233 wXic, at least two courses in the history of philosophy (331, 332, 333, 335). and 493 Sen/vr Re�arch Seminar. 2. a senior thesis (part of 493), a reseMch paper under the super­ vision uf one or more f"culty members. 3. a comprehensive senior examination. Performance on this examination will determine one third of the student's grade in . the Senior Research Seminar. 4. completion of the departmental rcuding program . Excellent programs in the arts and sciences do not rely exclusivelv on leciu ring and group study or on secondary works, but �Iso on one-tu-one tutorial instruction in primary sources. wlajors in ph ilosophy at Pacific Lutheran U niversity are expected to read and discuss a number of classical works under the personal supervision of various members of the departmental f-aculty. Not all works will be additions to COurse materials; some will also be covered in regular courses, and these may be read and discussed simultaneously with class study. With departmental approval, the standard list may be modified in accordance with special needs or interests. The list should be secured at an early date from the departmental office. It is b es t that the reading program not be concentrated into a s i ngl e semester but pursued at a leis u rel y pace over a n extended pe rio d . 5. at least a 3.30 grade point average in philosophy courses.

COURSE OFFERINGS 100

REASONING

Development of reasoning skills and an appreciation for the diverse areas to which they apply, for example, in religion, l i tera­ tun�, science} and computer Jitngllclg�. Students learn how to ask clear questions, recognize and evaluate assu mptions, distinguish various kinds of proofs, nnd clvoid errors of rellsoning in argu­ ments. Does not satisfy philosophy core requirement. I I I (2)

101

PHlWSOPHICAL ISSUES

121

CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING

Perennial philosoph ical issues, systems, ,1nd thinkers; the nature of knowledge, the function of science, values, human nature and its social implications, religion and knowledge of God . Develop­ ment of critical and systematic ph ilosophical thinking about aJi issues. I II (4) Development of the ability to organize and w rite clear, direct English, and to evaluate explanations critically. The uses and abuses of language and argument among contentious, prejudiced, and superstitious people. Reasoning and writing about unusual natural phenomena, public policy decisions, and other topics of interest. Does not satisfy the philosophy core requirement. Does satisfy the English \"riting re'l uirement. I I I (4)

125

MORAL PHIWSOPHY

225

ETHICAL THEORY

Major moral systems of Western civilization; intensive examina­ tion of some contemporary moral theorie.s; critical application to selected moral problems. I II (4) Examination of major moral

systems of Western civilization and

some contemporary ethical theories. Must be taken concurrently with or befo re 325,

326, 328, or 323-1 . 1.1, III.

N in order to use those

cOurseS for the philosophy core requirement.

I " (2)

226

MORAL PROBLEMS

233

INTRODUCfION TO WGIC

Critical application of majo r historic and contemporary ethical theories to a broad range of selected moral problems. For philoso­ phy core requirement only w h e n pa ired with 225. II (2) A study of the principles of argument and proof using both natu­ ral deduction and axiomatic approaches. An introduction to the use of first order logic in ordinary reasoning and cognitive disci­ plines, and to the pr(lperties of formal systems such as consistency and completeness. Includes an introduction to inductive infer­ ence. Does not satisfy philosophy core requirement. 1 (4)

323-1

HEALTH CARE ETHICS: INFORMED CONSENT

The underlying reasons for the legal and moral requirement to obrain the informed consent of the patient before treating; special considerations in therapeutic and research settings; the require­ ment for special groups, e . g . , prisoners and the mentally incom­ petent. Not for philosophy core requirement unless paired with 225. 1 ( 1)

323-11

HEALTH CARE ETHICS: CHOOSING DEATH

The kinds of value we pl,1(e on life; the rel,1tion of the informed consent requirement to an a l leged right of adult patients to die; the criteria for determining when death occurs; the problematic notions of ,1 "natural death," "ord inary" and "extraord inary" medicaJ means, and active "killing" and passive "letting die." Not for philosophy core requirement unless paired with 225. 1 ( 1 )

323-III

HEALTH CARE ETHICS: INFANTS AND CHILDREN

The special problems of consent and value of life which arise in treating the young. Treating the fetus; selecting the sex llf chil· dren; letting defective newborns die; the consent requirement in clinical research on children. Not for philosophy core requirement unless paired with 225. Interim or \I (1)

323-IV

HEALTH CARE ETHICS: DISTRIBUTING SCARCE RESOURCES

How health care should be distributed . What we mean by equality when people have widely differing needs; the meaning and justi­ fication of a ' right' to health care; how to determine the value of life, and health insurance; dilemmas between preventive and curative care; how to allocate scarce, life-sa\�ng resources. Not for philosophy core req uirement unless paired with 225. " ( 1 )

324

PHIWSOPHICAL ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

An examination of fundamental concepts of social thought; human nature, society, authority, community, l iberty, equ,llity,

justice. A p pl icat io n of t h ese concep ts in a discussion of contempo­ rary social institutiuns and their problems: \-var, racism, poverty. crime. all' (4)

325

BUSINESS ETHICS

326

MORAL PROBLEMS IN THE SOCIAL SERVICES

An examination, in the context of various ethical theories, of the moral values implicit and explicit in the free enterprise system; an assessment of some particular moral problems confronted in em ployer-employee relations, advert ising, managerial decisions, ilnd corporate social responsibilities. For philusophy core require­ ment only when paired with 225. 1 (2)

An examination of governmental social services in relation to moral justice, moral rights, and human well-being; particular issues such as abortion, su jcide, ,::tffirmative action, welfare rights, and counseling methods. For ph ilosophy core requirement only when paired with 225. 11 a/), (2)

328

PHlWSOPHICAL ISSUES IN THE LAW

331

ANCIENT PHlWSOPHY

332

MEDIEVAL PHIWSOPHY

An ex-,lmination of various philosophical issues in law using actual cases as well as the writings of legal scholars and philosophers. Topics include fre.edom of speech, contract law, sentencing prac­ tices, tort liability, and various criminal la\'\' defenses. Philosophi­ cal themes include natural law and legal positivism, and moral r"asoning about individual rights. For phiJosophy Cllre require· ment only when paired with 225. Pre- Or co-requisite: one other course in philosophy or legal st u d ies. 1 (4) Th e d evel opme n t of philosophical thought and method from the Presocratic period to the end of the fourth c ent ury A. D. Special emph a sis is given to the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. I all' (4) development of p h ilosophy from Aug u s tine to Ockham. Scrutiny of the sources and n atu re of the Thomistic synthesis, and the reaction to it i n the work of Duns Scotus and William Ockha m . I a i l' (4)

The

333

MODERN PHILOSOPHY

335

CONTEMPO RARY PHILOSOPHY

The development of philosophy from the seventeenth through the early nineteenth centuries; continental rationalism, British empir­ icism, and German idealism; Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Fichte, Schopenhauer, and r iegel. " af)' (4) The development of philosophy from the bte nineteenth century to the present; may include pragmatism, empiricism, process phi· losophy, existentialism and analysis as developed by Mill, James, Dewey, Whitehead, Sartre, Russell, AyeI', and Wittgenste i n . \I all' (4)


88 338

KIERKEGAARD AND EXISTENTIALISM

Modern existentialism, its main themes, " n d their relation to other

350

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Classical and contemporary views of traditional religious prob­

ph ilosophical traditions; its i m pact on such fields as theology, lit­

l e m s : the existence of God,

erature a n d psychology. Life and thought of two key figures:

i m mmtality, and others. II (4)

Soren Kierkegaard and Jean·Paul Sar lrc; rc\" ted thinkers includ­

religio'us l'xperiencc.

revelation,

ing Nietzsche, Heidegger, Jaspers, Tillich, Bubl'r, Camus, and

351

Marcel. I all'

The nature of h u ma n values, contemporclry discussion concern­

340

(4)

THEORY OF VALUE

ing the subjective or objective, absolute or relative character of

PHIWSOPHY OF SCIENCE

such values as the good and the right, the beautiful and the holy;

The general chMacter, fundamental concepts, methods, and sig­

the origin of values, their place in a world of fact, human knowl­

nifLcance of modern science; some attention to specific areas of

edge of t h e m , the character and use of the language of evaluation.

science: phYSical, biological, soci,, 1 : the implications of science and scientific methodology for ethical, aesthetic, and religious val­ ues. I

341

ai y (4)

PHILOSOPHY OF MATHEMATICS: SET THEORY

A study of the historical development and basic concepts of set

theory and the foundations of mathematics. The rel" tionship of logic and set theory to the basic concepts of number and infinity; t h e p hilosophical i m plications of this relationship. Set thenretical paradoxes and proposed solutions. Prerequisite: MATH 128 nr higher math course. Counts 2 hours toward philosophy COre requirement when taken in addition to 225 or 233. II

342

al), (2)

PHIWSOPHY OF MATHE MATICS: G O DEL AND TRUTH

A studv of the tradition,,1 accounts of the nature of mathematical entitic; and rnathpmat iccl i truth according tn logicism, formalism, and i n t u itionism. A study of Godel's Incompleteness Proof a n d its significrlnce for these accounts. Prerequisite: 233 or consent of

in structor. Counb 2 hours toward philosophy core req u irement when taken i n add i t ion to 225 or 233. n ail' (2)

343

PHIWSOPHY OF LOGICS

A study of metalog ic. including the properties of first order logi � . The phllosophlc a[ IS ues raised by d ifferent systems of logiC including modal logi<5, second order logics, quantum logics, a n d other many-valued logics. Prerequisite:

233 o r consent of instruc­ tor. Counts 2 hours tmvdrd phil osophy core requirement when taken i n addition to 225 o r 233. II all' (2)

I I " Iy (4)

352

AESTHETICS

A nalysis of the aesthetic experience and its relationship to the fine arts, l i tcrclture, science, a n d morality; the criteria and concepts e m ployed in a r t i stic expression and aes t h e t ic eva l u a t io n . II

al l' (4)

435

ADVANCED SEMINAR IN PHIWSOPHY

Topic to be announced at the time the course is offered, normally some aspect of contemporor), philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of i n structor. (4)

491, 492

INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH

Prerequisite: departmental consent. I II

493

( 1 -4)

SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR

The vvriting o f a senior thesis a n d taking of C1 comprehensive Sen­ ior exa m i n a t i o n . The work on the thesis constitutes two-thirds of the course; the exam, one-third. Each spring all students i n the seminar will meet periodically to discuss their thesis projects and present their final papers to e ,1(h other. Final copy of thesis d u e May 1; examination to b e t a k e n Ma)' 1 0 . o n l y. Prerequisite: at least

501

11"

philosophy majors

4 courses in philosophy. I I I (4)

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY TO CHILDREN

A n intensive workshop for training teachers and prospective tC(lchers to introduce reasoning skil1s (lnd the ciariJication of ideas

to elementary and middle school age children. Participants will be coached i n the conduct of classroom philosophical discussions and will participate themselves in the sort of philosophical reflec­ tion that the curriculum is designed to foster. Not for philosop h)' core

requirement.

No prerequisites;

teaching experience pre·

ferred. (Cross-referenced with EDUC 501 . ) S (2-4)

Physical Education School of

The university's physical education program seeks to ingrain in each student a fundamental respect for the role of physical activity in living. Instruction is offered in approximately 30 different physical education activities. The activity program is uniquely characterized by a timely response to student interests in recreational opportunities avail­ able in the Pacific Northwest. The school's professional programs prepare pro­ spective leaders for careers in physical education, health, recreation, athletics, and therapeutics.

Outstanding modern sports facilities include an all-weather 400 meter track, an Olympic-styie swimming pool, six lighted tennis courts, a nine­ hole golf course, two gymnasiums, racquetball and squash courts, a new fitness center, and an all­ purpose astro-turf field house,

FACUIIY 0, Olson, Dean; Chase, Hacker, Hoseth, Kluge, Lundgaard, Moore, Officer, Scherwood, M, Seal, F.

Westering; assisted by Adachi, Allen, Benson, Carter, Haroldson, Johnson, Kittilsby, Marshall, Nicholson, Phillips, Poppen, Ryan, M, Swenson, S, Westering.


89 UNIVE RSITY REQUIREMENT: fuu r one-hour COurses (100259), including 100, are requ ired for graduation. Eight one-hour activity courses may be counted toward g rad u atio n . Students are encouraged tn select a variety of nctivilies at a ppn>priate skill I"wls. All p hys ical education activity courses are graded on the

basis of "A," " Pass," or " Fa il" and are taught On a co ed uca t io n a l bas i s .

BACHELOR Of SCIENCE MAJOR: 68-70 hours, including comple t i o n of progTam core requirements and one of two co n ­ centr,1tions. Core Requirements: Chemistry 104, 105 (or 105, 1 1..5 ), Bi olog y 155, 156, 205, 206, PhySical Educ ati o n 277, 360 (2 hours), 481, 482, ilnd 485. Exercise Science Concentration: 34 hours, i nc lud i ng P hys ica l Education 329, 399, 47R, H e a l t h Education 292, Math 133, Com­ pute'r Science 144, Biology 253, P sy ch ol ogy 221, 335. Pre-Therapy Concentration: 36 hours, inc l ud ing He.l lth E d u ca­ tion 281 , 283, Physical Education 399, Biology 201 or 253, Math 133 or Statistics 23 1 , Computer Science 144, Physics 125, 126, and 4 hours of electives in psychOlogy, a s approved by conc e nt ra­ tion adviser. In addition to the req u i re me n ts listed above, candidates for the B . S . deg re e must me.et the fore.ign l anguage/nlternative require­

ment in the COllege of Arts and Sciences.

BACHEWR OF A RTS (RECREATION) MAJOR: 46-54 hours, in c lu d i ng comple ti o n of program core re qu i reme nt s and one of th ree concentrations. Core Requirements: Physical Education

277, 287, Recreation 330, 399, 483, Business Administration 281, a n d PsychOlogy 335. Administration Concentration: 16 hours, i nd ud i n g Business Ad m i n is t m t ion 241, 350, 354, and Co m put er Science 220. Programming Concentration: PhySical Education 285, 322, 329, Health Education 425, and Art 215, plus 6 ho u rs of electives "p p roved by program coordinator. Therapeutic Concentration: 24 hours, i ncl ud ing B iology 205, 206, P hvsical Education 329, 334, 478, 482, Recreation 340 ,l nd ' Special Education 296, plos 2 hours of el ec tive s in s pec i al educa­ tion approved by program coo rdin a t or. In addition to t h e requireme nt s listed above, candidates for the B.A. degree must meet t h e foreig n language!alternative req u i re­ ment in t h e COllege of Arts a nd Sciences.

B . A . IN EDUCATION-SECON DARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCAT-ION TEACHING MAJOR (44 hours): Required: P h ys ica l Education 277, 282, 283, 285, 286, 328, 329, 478, 481 , 482, 484, and 485; B io l og y 205 and 206. Electives: 2 hours in p hyS ica l education approved by m a jo r ad v i se r. fur K-12 certification studen ts must also take Physical Educa­ tion 322 and 360 in addition to m ee ting requirements as set forth

HEALTH E DUCATIO N MINOR (18 hours): Required: Health Education 260, 270, 292, 321 , 323, 325, 327, and 4 hours of electives with the approval of the health coordinator.

SPORTS MEDICINE (Specialization-26 hours): Req uired: ( 1 ) A teaching major with the Prufessional Education Sequence and co m pletio n of aU requirements for the Provisional Cer tif ic ate . (2) B i o l ogy 205 and 206, Health Education 260, 281 , 382, and 4 ho urs of electives in health ed u c at ion, P h ys ica l Education 327, 329, 399, 481 , and 482. (3) 1 , 800 h ours of clinical experience, which may include " practicum or i n ter n s h i p. S PORTS ADMINISTRATION (Specialization-20 hours): Require d : Comple ti o n of a major in b us in e ss administration, economics, or comm u n ic ation arts; P hys i cal Education 328 or Re crea t io n 483, P h ys ica l Education 302, 399, 410, and Health Education 292.

COURSE OFFERINGS Courses in the School of Physical Education are offered in the following areas:

HEALTH EDUCATION 260 270 281 292 321 323 325 326 327 382 399 485 491 501 597

FOOD AND HEALTH STRESS WITHOUT DISTRESS INJURY PREVENTION AND THE RAPEUTIC CARE FIRST AID FAMILY LIFE AND SEX EDUCATION EMGfIONAL HEALTH /DISEASE PREVENTION CONSUMER HEALTH* COMMUNITY HEALTH E RGOGENIC AIDS* INJURY PREVENTION-ADVANCED INTERNSHIP HEALTH PROMGfION /WELLNESS INTERVENTION STRATEGIES INTERNSHIP G RADUATE WORKSHOPS GRADUATE RESEARCH

by the School of Education.

B . A . IN EDUCATION-E LEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING MAJOR (24 hours) : The follo w i ng courses Me required: PhySical Ed uc atio n 282, 283, 286, 322, 329, 334, and 6 hours of electives in p hyS ic a l education approved by mdjor a d v i se r. In i1 ddi ti o n, students must meet rL'qui.rements TIS set forth by the School of Education. SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING MINOR (19 hours): The P h YS i ca l Education 283, 285 or 286, 328, 334. 478, and 2 h o u rs of electives in physical education � pproved by majnr adv is ecr.

fol l o w i ng courses a re required:

RECREATION 330 340 399 483 491 501 597

RECREATION PROGRAMMING THERAPEUTIC RECREATION PROGRAMMING INTERNSHIP RECREATION ADMINISTRATION INTERNSHIP G RA DUATE WORKSHOPS GRADUATE RESEARCH

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING MINOR (12 hours): P hysica l Education 282, 283, 286, and 322.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

E LEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPE­ CIA LIST (40 hours): The fol low in g courses a r e req u ired : Ph yS ica l Educatiun 277, 282, 283, 286, 322, 329, 360, 478, 481, 482, 484, 485, and Bi olo g y 205-206.

275 277

AQUATICS MINOR (18 hours): Required: Ph y ti i ca l Education 275, 33 1 , 375, 399, i-feal t h Education 292, and Business Adminis­ t rat io n 281 , plus 2 hours of electives approved by the aqu a ti CS

282 283 285

d i rector.

COACHING MINOR (18 hours): Required: P hys ic al Education 334, 4 1(), 485, and Health Educ" tion 281 . Electives: 10 hours, including at least one course in coaching theory, from <1mong t he following: Health Education 292 ( req u ire d for non"education majors), Physical Education 308, 361 , 370, 371, 372, 374, 375, 376,

377, 378, and 478. Interim and summer courses mav ' be included

286 287 322

as electives with the "ppruv,,1 of the dean.

328

DANCE MINOR (19 hours); Required: Physical Education 242, 243, 244, 250, 282, 362, and 462. Electives: 8 hours from among the fo l lo wing : Physical Education 310, 360. 401, 491 , Commu ni ­ cation Arts 356, Music 247 and 249. Interim and summer courses may be included as electi ve s with the approval of the dance coord in a t or.

329 331 332

WATE R SAFETY INSTRUCTION FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING METHODS: DANCE TEACHING METHODS: GYMNASTICS TEACHING METHODS: INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS TEACHING METHODS: TEAM SPORTS TEACHING METHODS: RECREATION ACTIVITIES PHYSICAL E DUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICUWM DEVEWPMENT AND ADMINIST RATION ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION AQUATICS MANAGEMENT OFFICIATING


90 334 SCIENTIfIC BASIS FOR TRAINING 360, 361 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM, COACHlNG PRACTICUM 362 MUSIC RESOURCES FOR DANCE 370-379 COACHING THEORY 399 INTERNSHIP 401 WORKSHOP 410 COACHING-THE PERSON AND THE PROFESSION 462 DANCE PRODUCTION 478 MafOR LEARNING AND HUMAN PE RFORMANCE 481 482 484 485 491 501 597

EXERCISE PHYSlOWGY ANATOMICAL KINESIOWGY MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION BIOMECHANICS INDEPENDENT STUDY G RADUATE WORKSHOPS G RADUATE RESEARCH

'pending final faculty a pprova l

100

PERSONALIZED FITNESS PROGRAMS

stimulate student interest in functional personally des i gned programs of physical activity; assessment of physic"l condition and skills; recommendation of spec if ic programs for maintaining and improving physical health. Should be taken as a freshman. I II ( I )

To

150

ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

200-229

INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL ACTIVITIES 201 (Beginning Gol i), 202 (I nterm edi a t e and Advanced Golf), 203

(Archery), 204 (Bowling), 207 (Beginning Gymnastics), 208 (Ski­ ing,), 209 (Intermediate Gymnastics), 210W (Slimnastics), 2 1 1 (Beginning Badminton), 212 (Intermediate Badminton), 213 (Per­ sonal Defense), 214 (Beg i n ni ng Tennis), 215 ( I n te rmed ia te Ten­ n i s ), 216 (Begi n n i ng Ice Sk at ing ). 2 1 8 (Backpacking), 219 (Canoeing), 221 (Roller Skating), 222 (Squash and Racquetball), 225 ( Ae robics ), 227 (�ight Training), 228 (Basic Mountaineering), 229 (Equitation). ( 1 )

230-239

AQUATICS

230 ( Beg i n ning Sw i mming), 231 (Int e r m e di at e S wim m ing) , 232 (Advanced Swimming), 234 (Advanced Life Saving), 236 (Syn­ chronized Swimming), 237 (Skin and Scuba Diving). (1)

240-249

RHYTHMS

240 (Beginning Modern Dance), 242 ( I ntermediate Modern Dance), 243 (Advanced Modern Da nce ) , 244 (Folk and Socjal Dance), 246 (Begin rung Jazz Dance), 247 (Intermediate Jazz Dance). ( 1 )

250-259

TEAM ACTIVITIES

281

INJURY PREVENTION AND THERAPEUTIC CARE

Prevention, treatment, and re h ab ilit ation of all common i njurie s sustained in ath letics; p hys ica l the ra py by empluyment of electric­ ity, m as sage , exercise, light. ice, and mechanical devices. [ (2)

282

TEACHING METHODS: DANCE

283

TEACHING METHODS: GYMNASTICS

285

TEACHING METHODS: INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPO RTS

Planning, tea chin g, and evaluating dance. Encompasses specific movement education activities, conditioning exercises, il,nd the development of modern, social. and folk dance skill for elemen­ tary school age and older. Prerequisite: intermediate skill lev,,1 or completion of a begi nnin g activity course, 277. II 01)' (3) Includes skill d eve l opm e nt , teach i ng expertise, course pla nn i ng, and sa.iety t ech n iq u es in gy m na s t ics . The COurse is des ig ne d for both elementary and high school ages. PrerequiSite: intermediate skill level Or completion of a beginning ac tivity course, 277. I (3)

Planning, teaching, and evaluating these activities: tennis, bad­ minton, track a nd field. Prerequisite: i nterm ediate skill level Or completion of a beg inning activ i ty course, 277. [ (4)

286

TEACHING METHODS: TEAM SPORTS

Planning, teaching, and e va lua t i ng these team activities: basket­ ball , soccer, volleyball, rugby, field h oc key, softball, touch football, team handball. (4)

287

TEACHING METHODS: RECREATION ACTIVITIES

Plann ing, teaching, and e va l u at ing the fol lowing: archery, bowling, golf, outdoor education, and variOllS recreational sports. Prerequisite: 277. Jl (4)

292

FIRST AID

321

FAMILY LIFE AND SEX EDUCATION

322

PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

This courSe meets re q Ui re m e n ts for the American Red Cross Stan­ dard First Aid and Personal Safety. II (2) A study of anatomy and physiology, sex u al roles, reproduction, respo ns ibl e rel a t ion shi ps, respect for self and others, and physicol ond emotional well-being. Stress on responsible decision making concerning s exua l ity by providing ilccuratc information an d a vari­ ety of personal cop ing skills and by e mp hasizi ng a positive self­ concept. Evaluation of school curriculum models. (2)

Organization and administration of a developmental program for grades K-6; sequential and prog re ssive programming; large reper­ toire of activities. 277 is recommended. I (2 or 4)

323

EMafIONAL HEALTH /DISEASE PREVENTION Topics include interperso n<li commun ication, cooperation, Wl!U€­

ing, techniques leading toward a healthier lifestyle through pre­ ventive medicine, substance abuse ( alco hol , tobacco, caffeine, and other drugs), and related dise a se p roble m s . (2)

250 ( Directed Sports PartiCipation), 251 (Voll ey ba l l and held Hockey), 252 (Basketball and So ft ba ll) , 253 (Soccer and Volley­ ball), 254 (Tea m Hanc'Oall). ( 1 )

325

260

A studv of reliable health resources, selection of health care, and the w i ;e choice of h ealth products. I (2) (experimental)

health through wise food choice s . Topics of d iscussion include n u t rie nt s and their metabolism, dietary guidelines, food iadism, labeling, additives, vegetarianism, obe sit y, nutrition-related dis­ eases, nutrition during pregnancy, and nutrition fo r athletes. (I)

Organizations associated with public health and t he ir implica­ tions for community hea lt h p roblem s . Prima ril y designed for health educat io n minor students. II a/y (4)

270

327

FOOD A N D HEALTH A study of the basic req uire m ents necessary to maintain optimal

STRESS WITHOUT DISTRESS

Consideration of stress, what peo pl e should know about stress, how to reduce the harmful effects of stress, and the rel a tio n sh i p of increased stress to disease problems. ( 1 )

275

WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION

326

CONSUMER HEALTH

COMMUNITY HEALTH

ERGOGENIC AIDS

A study of various foods, d rugs, and theories of training that have been introduced to athletics for the purpose of improving athletic performance Or as sistin g in weight gain O r loss. I (2) (experimental)

The American Red Cross Water Safety In structor's Course. Prereq­ uisite: 234. [[ (2)

328

277

Organization and administration llf physical educatiOn and ath­ letics (7-12); curriculum devel opment implementation. Prerequi­ sitt,: 277. Fulfills EDUC 421 ce r t ifica tion require.ment. 1 (4)

cal, sociological, psychological, and mecharucal principles under­ lying physical education and athletics. Should be the initial professional course taken in the School of Physical Education. II (2)

329

FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION The relationship of physical e du ca ti o n to ed u cati o n; the biologi­

CURRICUWM DEVE WPMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The study of physical education for people with metabolic, neuro­ logic, c ardi a c, reSpiratory, and e mo t io na l abnormalities. (2)


� �.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------330

425

RECREATION PROGRAMMING

Supervising and administering recreational programs for the

HEALTH PROMOTION AND WELLNESS INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

school or community. I (4)

Examination of strategies for improving the state of wellness

331

a pproach to health, behavioral intervention, nutrition and weight

through the healthier lifestyles. Topics include the holistic

AQUATICS MANAGEMENT

Topics include training and supervising personnel, linancing, programming, pool maintenance and operation, swim meet man­ agement, and salety and emergency procedures. Study of pool chemist ry, filter operations, and maintenance. Visitation to local pools.

(2)

332

OFFICIATING

assessments; appraisals of health risks; prescriptions lor nutri­ management program.

basketba l l ;

designed t o train qualified officials. Recommended a s a n elective for majors and minurs. I a/y

(2)

training. Topics include the development of muscular strength and endurance, and the relationship of nutrition, environment, sex, age, and ergogenic aids to athletic performance. Prerequisite:

277. 1 (2)

THE RAPEUTIC RECREATION PROGRAMMING

Awareness and potentiality of leisure needs of the temporarily or permanently handicapped. Adaptation of recreation activities to provide opportunities for success and satisfaction by the handi­ capped .

Study of leadership techniques and programming

methods.

(2)

360, 361

462

(2)

DANCE PRODUCTION

An advanced choreography course combining choreography, cos­ tume design, staging, and publicity techniques for producing a

SCIENTIFIC BASIS FOR TRAINING

Presents physiologic and kinesiologic applications to physical

340

health programs in business and industry. Includes computerized tion, health, and activity; and a monitoring system and weight

Rules and officiating t e c h n iques of volleyball,

334

control strategies, health-related fitness, strategies to improve a d herence to a fitness program, and the cost-effectiveness of

major dance concert . Prerequisite:

478

310 or consent 01 instructor. (2)

MOTOR LEARNING AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Provides basic theories, research, and practical implications for motor learning, motor control, and variables affecting skill acqui­ sition.

1 (4)

481

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY

Scientific basis for training and physiological effect of exercise on the human body. Prerequisite: BIOL

482

205-206. 1 (2)

ANATOMICAL KINESIOWGY

Deals with the structural and mechanical function of t h e muscu­ 'ioskeletal syste.m. The kinesiological applications of anatomical

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM, COACHING PRACTICUM

information are given prime consideration . Prerequ isite: BIOl

205-206. 11 (2)

Assistant coaching teaching experiences; planning and conduct­

483

ing intercollegiate athletics and physical education instruction;

The organization, management, and direction of recreational

RECREATION ADMINISTRATION

students work under supervision of the head coach or physical

services: legal basis, administrative procedures, financial aspects,

education instructors. Prerequisite: one course in professional

personnel management,

activities, departmental approval. I II

11 (4)

362

(2)

MUSIC RESOURCES FOR DANCE

Understanding of elementary rhythm techniques. Practical learn­ ing skills for accompaniment for dance classes. Elfective uses of existing music and the creation of sound scores for choreog­ raphy.

(2)

370-379

COACHING THEORY

of coaching; 370 (Basketball), 37'1 (Football), 372 (Cross Countryl Track and Field), 374 (Soccer), 375 (Swimming), 376 (Volleyball)

377 (Tennis), 378 (SoftbaIl/Baseball). I I I all' (2)

INJURY PREVENTION-ADVANCED

A n advanced study in the recognition and treatment of specific

athletic injuries and vulnerable body structures, with emphasis on evaluation, moda.lities of treatme.nt, rehabil i tation, and cu rrent issues. PrerequiSite:

399

281. (2)

organization.

MEASUREMENT AND E VALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The selection, construction, and interpretation of evaluation tech­ niques related to the physical education progra m . Fulfills EDUC

ences to be gained, and readings pertaining to this interest. An approved firm or org'anization is mutually agreed upon by the stu­ dent and the coordinator of this program. Monthly progress reports, evaluations by the supervisor, and other measures of ach ievement are used to determine the grade. Prerequisites: dec­ laration of major, at least sophomore status, and completion of at least 10 hours in the major. May be ta.ken as Physical Education, Health Education, or Recreation credit. (4-8)

WORKSHOP

Workshops in special fields for varying periods.

(1-4)

COACHING-THE PERSON AND THE PROFESSION

Personal and professional requisites of successful sports pro­ grams, including coaching styles, development of leadership qualities, recruiting methods, development of a philosophy of ath­ letics, organization of pre-lin-land post-season programs, award systems, and program evaluation. Consideration of relationships with staff, parents, players, faculty, administration, and media. Budgeting, purchase of equipment and maintenance, and faCility planning and usage.

(2)

485

BIOMECHANICS

An application of physical laws to sports activities. Principles of motion, force, and equilibrium are stressed. Analyses of various sports skills are made. II (2)

491

INDEPENDENT STUDY

PrerequiSite: consent of the dean. May be taken as Physical Educa­ tion, Health Education, or Recreation credit. I ll S

501

(1-4)

WORKSHOPS

taken as Physical Education, Health Education, or Recreation

INTERNSHIP

interests. Student identif.ies problems to be resea rched, experi­

410

internal

Graduate workshops in special fields for varying periods. May be

Experiences closely assigned to student's career and academic

401

and

467 certification requirement. II all' (2)

Techniques, systems, training methods, strategy, and psychology

382

484

facilities,

credi t .

(1-4)

597

G RADUATE RESEARCH

Open to graduate students whose minor is in the field of physical education. Prerequisite: consent of the instmctor. May be taken as Physical Education, Heal t h Education, or Recreation credit. I I I S

(1-4)

91


92

Physics and Engineering While physics searches out the fundamental natu­ ral laws which govern the universe and forms the cornerstone of other scientific disciplines, engineer­ ing makes use of the knowledge of basic science to provide an improved quality of life. As our society becomes increasingly dependent upon technology, the value of an education in science and engineer­ ing can only increase. The Department of Physics and Engineering offers a combination of programs in both basic and applied science. The physics curriculum addresses the breadth of the discipline, emphasizing the process of science and illuminating the basic con­ cepts within its view of nature. The engineering program provides an education of sufficiently fun­ damental nature to permit rapid adaptation to new technical problems and opportunities and suffi­ ciently broad liberal scope to provide awareness of the social responsibilities implicit in engineering. The department maintains degree programs in phYSiCS, engineermg phYSiCS, and 3-2 engineering science, a dual degree program with the School of Engineering and Applied Science of Columbia University and Stanford UniverSity. Concentrations in electrical and mechanical engineering science are available. An electrical engineering minor is also offered, primarily intended for majors in physics or computer science.

FACUIIY Adams, Chair; Clark, Greenwood, Gutmann, Haueisen, Nornes, Tang. Students intending to major in the department are advised carly to take note of the interrelationships between the (areer fields of science (physics), engineering, and technology (also called engineering-te<'hnology). Scientists are motivated by raw

PHYSICS The physics m" jor offers a challenging program emphasizing a low s t udent-teacher ratio and the opportunity to engage in independent research projects. There are two introductory course sequences,

College Physics and General Physics. These General Physics,

differ in the level of mathematics required with

which incorporates calculus, usually involving a a more compre­ hensive analysiS.

General PhySiCS is required fOr Bachelor of

Science majors and usually for Bachelor of Arts majors as well. The curriculum includes MI/sical AcOllstics, a course speciall'y designed fOr music majors as well as other interested students, and

Teaching of Physics for students seeking the Bachelor of Arts

in Education with a major in physics.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 32 semester hours: 1 47, 148, 153, 154, 223, 331, 332, 336, 356, 421, 422. 497-498 may be substituted for 421-422 with conSent of the department. It is recommended that pre-Ph. D. students take 401 and 406. Consult the department for speciiic recommendations. Required supporting courSes: Math 151. 152, 253; Engineering 354; Chemistry 1 1 5; plus either Chemistry 341 O r Engineering 35 1 . A typical B.S. physics major program is as follows: Freshman

PhYSics 153, 154 PhYSics

147, 148 151, 152 Physics 213, 336 Math 253 Engineering 354 Physics 331, 332 Engineering 351 o r Chemistry 341 Physics 356 Physics 421, 422 'Physics 401, 406 Math

Sophomore

Junior

Senior 'Optional

BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: 24 semester hours: '147, 148, 153, 154, 223, plus ten semester hours. Under special circum­ stances 125-126 may be substituted for the 153-154 sequence, upon consent of the department. Additional courses may be desirable, depending on the student's objectives. Consult the department for specific reco mmendations. Required supporting courses: Math lSI, 152.

MINOR: 21 semester hours, including 147, 148, 153, 154 (or

US, 126); three additional courses,

of which a t least two must

be upper division.

cu riosity. They ask the "why" questions and strive to ar.3wer them; their concern is v.l ith the natural world. Pure science is dedicated to acquiring new knowledge, which may in itself have no immediate application. Engineering is basiGJlly concerned with using scientific knowledge for the benefit and comfort of people. While science, particularly physics, deals with the natural world, engineering focuses upon the world constructed by people. Mathematics is the language of communication in both physics and engineering. Wit hout scientists, engineers would have 1'10 accumulated storehouse of scientiiic knowledge from which to draw in creating eng·ineering designs, and without engineers scientific knowledge would seldom be applied to solve practical problems. Engineers take the insights, facts, and formu­ las discovered by scientists and use them in inventing designs to sol ve problems posed in the context of our socia-economic· technical SOciety. PLU has degree programs in scientific fields ,1 S well as progtams in engineering. HO\vever, PLU has no academic program in engineering·technology, a career field concerned with hands-on aspects of routine testing, construction, and maintenance of hardware designed by engineers.

ENGINEERING A smaller u n iversity like PLU is u n iquely suited to foster a student's personal development while making a firm but not premature commitment to professional and career goals. Such a setting also helps a student to clariiy the social context in which engineers function. A major school of engineering like Columbia o r Stanford emphasizes advanced studies, research, and interac­ tion with indust ry. Thus, PLU's 3-2 program gives students the best of two settingS-breadth at PLU and depth i n a n engineering specialty at Columbia o r Stanford. Students have also been involved in 3-2 programs at the University of Washington Or other state universities in the Pacific Northwest . During the first three years of this program students must complete interims,

1 ) all general university core requirements, 2) two 3) all basic science and mathematics requirements, and

4) seven courses in engineering. Once a clear sense of d i rection within an engineering specialty is gained, a recommendation to Columbia or Stanford may be granted. Admission to Columbia


93 is automatic upon recom mendJtion; adrnissio-n to Stimford, however, is competitive. Details of transfer admission are made available in the fail of the third year. i'\onnally two ildditional years are necessary to finish engineering specialty courses clt Columbiil or Stanford. Regardless of eventual specialty, both Engineering 231 Sialics a nd 271 Elec/rical Circl/i/s should be taken. Thesl' should be followed by 232 Mecha/1ics of Solids for students in the mechanical engineering concentration Or by 272 Solid Slate Elect nlt/ic Del,ices io r those with interest in electrical engineering. The natur,) 1 sciellces core requirement is autom" tically satisfied by enginc"r­ ing students as is the second part of option II of the foreign l a ngu age require ment in the Colle\je of Arts and Sciences. Unless they automatically qualify lor fulfilling opt ion I of the foreign language requirement on the basis of their high school work, students are encouraged to satisfy this requirement by means of option I I . Hours freed by satisfaction of the foreign l a ng ua ge requirement on the basis of high school work may profitably be used for taking another core requireme,nt (e.g., arts/literature Or social sciences), for taking mathematics beyond calculus, or lor taking additional courses in computer science. Particular attention should be given to the I n tegrated Studies Prog ra m , known as Core II, and to its applicability for e ngi n e ers in our teChnological society. Students with strong preparation (As and B's) in high school mathematics at least through trigonometryifunctions ilS well as in science t h rough physics and w it h SAT math s co res no lower than 550 should sched ule their classes as indicated below. Students interested in chemical engi nee ring in the 3-2 program should repla ce Physics 1 53- 1 54 (and labs, 147-148) with hem is­ t ry 115-1 1 6 in their first year. Those with less adequate prepara­ tion in mathematics and sciences , part icularly Inathematics. should consider strengthening their background with commu­ nity college work in the summer before enrollment at I'LL! and should postpone the physics sequence until their second year. An a ppro p ri ate first year schedule then includes: Fall-EGR 160 I"traduction /0 E"8i"" rillg, M ATH 151 Calcullls, CHEI"I 1 15 Chemistry, a general university core requirement, and PE 10(1 or a PE activity course; Spring-MATH 1 5 2 Calculus, CSCl l l0 BASIC a core requirement, and a physical education activity course (or PE 100) .

3·2 DUAL DEGREE: Dual B.S. degrees from PLU ,)nd Colum­ bia, Sta nford, or other ABET accredited Engineering School: three full-time years at PLU plus 2 additional full-time yeors at Columbia or Stanford. PLU B. S. in Engineerin g -Science is granted after first year at Columbia or Stanford; B.S. in Engineer­ ing Speci,)lty (E. E . , M . E . , etc.) g ra nted by Columbia or Stanfo rd at the end of fifth year.

REQUIRED COURSES: Physics 147, 148, 153, 154, 223; Engineering 160, 354;382 plus three courses of engineering speciality from Electrical-271, 272, 352, 362 and Mechanical 23 1, 232, 351 , 442. Required supporting courses: Math l S I , 152, 253; Computer Science 240; Chemistry 1 15 . Chemistry 116 is recommended. A ty p ica l 3-2 engineering science program is as follows: Freshman Engineering 160 P hYsics 147, 148, 153, 154 M �th 151, 152 Engineering 2 3 1 , 232 or Engineering Sophomore 271 , 272

Junior

Engineering 354 Physics 223 Math 253 Computer Science 240 Eng i nee ring 271 or Engin eeri ng 231 Engineering 382 Ch e m ist ry 1 15

20 semester hours: 160, 271, 272, 352, 354 and 362. Required supporting courses: Introductory sequence in Physics (2 semesters) and Calculus (3 semesters) and Computer Science 144 and 280. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING MINOR:

ing physics prepa re.s studt!nts for cmployment in many d ivt'r.s(' industries or directly ior graduate study in nearly all fields of engineering. Strength Illay be built in elect rical or rnechanic.:l! engineering s(i� nc('s by careful selection of upper division cuurses. Students clTe urged to develop � minor in either mC:l th('­ matics or computer science, pdrticularly if aspiration to graduClte study in engineering is p a r t of their C{lr('er plan . A minor in business administration is particularly a ppropriat for working in industry i m med i<ltely after graduation. For maximum flexibility in upper division C(lUrses, students aspiring to the engineering phy s ics degree should schedule their first two years identically to those for dual degree 3-2 engineering. Junior and senior year schedules are determined by upper division requirements and by students' objectives.

e

semester Physic 147, 148, 1 53, 154, 223, 331, 356, 421, 422; Engi­ neering 160, 354, 382 plus four courses of engineering speciality, one of which must be an upper division coursc, from Electrical2 7 1 , 272, 352, 362 and Iv!echanical-231, 232, 3 5 1 , 442. Physics 336 may be substituted for Engineering 232. Chemistry 341 m,')' be substituted for Engineering 35 1 . Required supporting courses: M<lth '1 5 1 , 152, 253; Chemistry l IS; Co m puter Science 240. B.S. DEGREE IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS: 48

hours:

A typical l�nginel'ring physics prugrllnl is as follows: Freshm<ln Physics 147, 148, 1 5 3, 154 Engineering 160 1\1,)th lS I , 152 Sophomore Engineering 231, 232 or Engineeri ng 271, 272 Engineering 354 Phvsics 223 M �th 253 Engineering 35 1 , 271 or Enginee�ring 352, Junior 231

E n gi neer i n g 382 Physics 356 Computer Science 240 Physics 331, 421, 422 Chemistry 115

Senior

COURSE OFFERINGS­ PHYSICS 125, 126

COLLEGE PHYSICS

147 , 148

INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS LABORATORY

This course. provides an introduction to the fundamental topics of physic-s o I t is a nun-calculus sequence. involving only the use of trigonometry and Cl)lIege algebra. ConclIrrent registration i n 147, 148 is required . I II (4, 4)

B(lsic laboratory experiments arc performed in conjunction with the General dnd Cl)lIege Physi c s sequcnces. Concurrent rcgistr�­ tion in 125, 126 or 1 53, 154 is required. I I I ( 1)

153, 154

GENERAL PHYSICS

A calculus-level survey of the general fields of physics, including classical m�chan ics, thc'rmodynamil's, electricity ,1nd magnetism and optics. Concurrent registration in 147, 148 a nd prior or mn­ current registration in MATH 151, 152 is requ i red . I II (4, 4)

205

MUSICAL ACOUSTICS

223

E LEMENTARY MODERN PHYSICS

272

SOLID STATE E LECTRONlC DEVICES

331

ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY

A study of musical sound using physics methods: vibrating sys­ tems; si m ple harmonic motion; wave motion; com plex wavcs; wave generation in musical instruments; physiology of heMing; architectural acuustics; dcctronic record ing and reproduction. Laboratory and group tours. No prerequL<;ite courses in either mathematics or physics are assumed. 11 (4) This cOurse covers the various phenomen<) where classical methods of physics fail. Cc)ntemporary interpretations of these phenomena are developed ilt an elementary level. Prerequisite: 154 or 126 Or consent oi instructor. 1 (4)

ENGINEERING PHYSICS

The department offers a fout-year engineering degree for students interested in an engineering related program that includes a su bstantial amount oi basic sc ienc . I t is more ap pl ied than ,) physiCS degree while at the same time more theoretical than the usual engineering degree. The B.S. degree in eng i neer-

e

See Engineering 272.

Electrostatics, dipole fie l ds, fields in dielectric materials, electro­ m agnetiC ind uction, magnetic properties of matter, generation and propag atio n of electromagnetic waves wi th an e m phasis on the relat ion shi p with physic,)1 optics . Prerequisite: 153, 154; COr€­ quisite: 356 or consent of inStructor. 1 (4)


94 332

ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND PHYSICAL OPTICS

A study of the generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves, The n",thematical description and the physical under­ standing of electromagnetic radiation are di scussed with an emphasis on its rel"tionship with physical optics. Prerequisite: 331 , I I (4)

336

MECHANICS

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE 231 232 351 442

492

STATICS MECHANICS OF SOLIDS THERMODYNAMICS TRANSPORT: MOMENTUM, ENE RGY, AND MASS INDEPENDENT STUDY: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SCIENCE