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www.plu.edulprintlcatalog


Contact Information The universi t i. loca t ed at So u th 121st Street and Park Avenue in su b u rban p, rklancl. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p. m. Monday through Prid ay. Most offices are 10 ed for chapel on Monday, Wednesday,

n d Friday from 10:.0 to 11 ;00 a.m. during the school year. The university observes al l legaJ holidays. The University ent er maintains an information desk that is open daily from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

a

(9:00 a.m. to 7: )0 p . m.

011 Sa t u rd ay and Sunday). Visitors a re welcome at dll)' time. peci�1 arrangements for tours and app intments may the Ofnce or Admissi n .

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

rea

coile 253

TbePresident ........................ ............... 535.7101

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT: • General interests of the LJni ersity, church

pr idelI/@plu.edu The Provost

.

. .. .

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.

.. ... .

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........... 535.7126 prollost@plll.cdil

.....

Academic Advising ..... . ............. ........ .... 535.8786

relations, and commL1I1ity relations • Academjc policies 3J1d programs, facu l ty

appointments, and curriculum development •

aadv@pLu.edll

Admissions

.. . . .......................... ........ .......

-35.7151

Academic advising. developing academic go. Is, 0 ing a major, and class 'cheduling; support for acuity ad visor s ; first-year student registration

eh

1.800.274.6758 admissiollS@plll.edll Alumni and Parent Rd.alions . .. .......... 535.7415

be made through

General in fo rm lion, d m i ssi on of students. and publications for prospective st udents and advanced placement

Al w11 ni programs and services

hape l, S unday worship, and religious life at the university

Campus parking, safety, and information

C:Jreer op tion s

a/1111111i@piu.edli Campus Ministry ........... . .............. . ..... . . . 535.74 4 cfllil1@plu.edu Campus Safety and Information .. ...... 535.7441 campIIssa!ety@pl,l.edll Career Development

......

.... . . ...... .......... 535.7459 wreer@plll.edll

The Vice President for Development

and Uwver ity Relations ....... ............. . 535.7177

develnpillent@plu.edli

• Gifts, b que ts. g ra n t s, and the annual fund

Financial Aid and Student

Employment .. ...... . .......... ........... ... . ...... .. 535.71 4

fi llaid@p /u.ed u The Vice President for Finance and Operations

...................... 535.7121

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.

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..

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535.7126

student

F i nan cia l management a n d administrative services

jillal1ce@plll.ed" Graduate Studies

F inan c i al aid, work study, and employment

. raduate

programs

provost@plll.edll Wang Center for international Programs/ Office of Off-Campus Programs ..... 535.7629

• International study

il1pr@pitl.eriu The R.egistrar ..... ........... ... .. ..... ...... ......... . 535.7131

• Transfer credit evaluation, advanced p lacemen t ,

graduation, c lass schedules, grades, c1as room sched u ling, institutional research

registrar@pLIl.edu The Vice President for Student Life

.

.

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................ ..... . ... . .... ... . . . . . .

535.7191

• Residence halls, COW1Se1ing and testing, health services, multicultural affairs, international students,

slif@pILl.edu

e.xtracurricular

Student Services Center

.

. 535.7161 I.HOO.678.3243

...... .............

..

Fi n an cia l, cholarship, and loan in for mation, and schedules, regist rati o n

Summer es�i()ns

1.800.678.8648 sp a cs umm er@plu. e d ll

P r further information, please visit th e PLU hom e page t www.plu.edu. c a t a lo g online, visit www.pl!l.edfllprintkatalog.

To access the PLU

and disability selvices

fees and pa rmcnt p lans, t r ans cripts

s5vc@plll.edll Sommer Sessions ............................. . ..... 535.7161

a ctivities,


UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE CATALOG

m

2002-2003

o .."

with PLU degree requirements, see Ge"eml Ulliversity Requiremellts on page 25.

To become familiar

To learn more about major and minor requirements. see specific department pages starting on page 36.

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Table of Contents

z \1'1

Academic Calendar

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.2

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Individualized Major ............ .............................................. 71 International Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World ............... 72

Mission $loJtement

............................. ....................... .... 3

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.

bjectiv.:s ................................... .

Integrative Learning

.

General [nformation

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3

........................ 4

Admission .............................................................................. 5 financial

id .

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.

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Tuition, Fees, and Payment [ nformati o n .......................... L

Student Life and Campus R -ource, ..... . .......................... 16 .

Aca

emic Proc dures ................................................ ,......... 21

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Anthropology Art

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.................... ... . .. ........ ........ . . ....... . ....................................

Art.5ch 01 of th.' . .

Ar

34

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Majors and Minors .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. ....... .

Ame.ricas

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37

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and Sciences. C Ilege of

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Biol ogy .................. , .............................................................. 40 f ............... . ..... ... ..... .. ........ .... ... ................ 41

Business, School

Chemi stry ............................................................................ 44

hinese Stud ie s ................................................................... 46 lassies

.

l ega l Studies ........................................................................ 77 .

Marriage and Fami ly Th e ra py ............................................ 77 Mathematics .... . ..... ............ .. ............................. ......... ... .. .. . 78 .

Music

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Natural Sciences, Division of

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Nursing. School of . ...................

Philo,ophy .

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84

...,........ 90

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Physic. ... . Politica'! Sci

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Pre-Professional Studies .

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Publi5hing and Printing Arts

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95

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, .................................... 99

. . .... . ................. . ......................................... .. 99

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Scandinavian Area S t udies ocial

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... ....... ...... ... .... . .............. .

Psychology .. ... . . .. ..... ......... .......

Religi n

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nee ... ............ .......................... .......................... 94

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cienccs, Division of ...... . ........ ....... .

........ 100

........... 10J

. ...........

So iology and So ial Work .... ............................... ... ........ , 10 I Statisti . ............................................................................. 103 Theatre

(

Communication and

ce

Theatre) ...................... 47

Women's Studie� ............................................................... 104 Writing ... . . .......... .................................................

..

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105

. .. .... .. ... ... . . .. ... . ................... .... 46

................ . . . ........ . .. . . ...

Communication and Theatre

. ...... ,............. 47

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oI11puter Engineering . ..... ..... . ... :;0

Computer S ienee and

.

ooperative Education Iuternships . .. ....... .

Econoll1ics ....

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Education. Sc h o ol of.. . . .

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English as a Second Envir nmt::nta'!

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Language .

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Admission .......................................................................... 106 Policies and Standards

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....................................... ............. 107

Tuition and Fees ................................................................ 109

61

Financial Aid ......... ........ ....... .................................. ..... ... . 109

. 62

Mdster of Bu sin es Administration . . . , ............................ 109

. .

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52

.............................................. 52

Engineering Dual Degree Program En glis h

.

... ... . . ...................

,

Academic Structure .................................. ...... .......... .. ..... .

..... 73

..

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Languages and Literatures .......... ... . . . .................... ,........... 74

Physical Education. Sc h oo l of ............................................ 91

·COUrse. Offerfrigs· * -' D�grees .......... .

International Programs

.

. . . . 64

................ . . . . . . .... .. ... . ..

.

t udies . . . . . ......... . . . . . ........ ............................ 65

Geosc' nce .. ,....................................................................... 6

.

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.

, ........ I II laster of Science in ursing ... . . . . .. .. . . 114 Master of Arts (Marriage and Family Therapy) liS M aste r of Arts in Education .... .... .. ...... . .... ........... .

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Global S t ud i es ..................................................................... 68 History . .......... . .................. .

Honors Program

...

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Humanities. Division of

...... ........... . 70

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..

71

Administration .. .. .. ..... ..................... ..........

... .. .. . . 116

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University Guidelines ....... ............. ... .. ............................ 117 .

Index .. ... .

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........ 122

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PACIFIC

IJJfHERAN UNIVERSITY The information contained herein r�n�u an ,l(Clirate picture of Pacific Luther:lIl Universit), at he time of publication. However. the university reserve the right to make necessary chant\es in procedures. poliCIes. calendar. curriculum. and costs. 1.lst d in this cat�log are course 3ml summarie, of degree requirements for rna'ors, minors, and other programs in the College of Arts and S 'ence� and the School. "f t he rts. Busin '5. Fdu ;!tion. ursins. and Physical E.ducation. Detailed degree requi rement. • often in I ding supplement,lry sample pr gram ••• re Available in the offices of the individu,li school� and departments. dv isi n g by university per onne! inconsiSlent w i th puhlished statemenlS is not binding.


er:: < a z w -'

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Academic Calendar SUMMER SESSION 2002

I ... . . . ... . . . . . . ... . . ... Tuesdav, MOl}' 28- alurday, JUlle 22 Ierm II ....... ...... ...... .. .......... IOllday, June 24-Salurday, July 20 Wo r kshop Week .... .... ... . . .... . Monday, July 22-Saturday. July 27 Term I I 1 . .. . .. ... .. . ... .. . Monday. July 29-Satl.1rday, August 24 August Commencement .... . ...... 10:30 a.m., aturday, Ugllst 24 Term

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FAll SEMESTER 2002 Orientation

Thursday, S ept e m be r 5Sunday, epternber 8

Classes Begin . . . . ....... . .... ............ 7:00 a.Ill., Momi3y, eptember'l Opening Convocation . .... ........ ... 9:00 a.m., Monday, September 9 Classe.< reSII"lt' at 11:30 a.lII. Mid-semester Break ........................................... F rid a y October 25 Than k. s g iving Rec 55 B gins .. J :35 p.m., \Vednesday, NoYt'l11ber 27 Thanksgiving Recess Ends ........ 7:00 a.m., londay, ecclllher 2 .

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a.m., Saturday. December 14 la ses End .. . . .. .... .. .. ... .. 5:00 p.m., Saturda)'. December J 4 Final Examinations . ......... . ... .... ...... .. Monday. December 1 )­

December Commencement . .. 10:30 .

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Semester End." (aft r last eJ(lll11) ....

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7:00 a.m.,. onda . Ja nua ry 6 Martin Luther K ing Jr., flirthday Holiday ..... ivlolld�ly, January 20 . Cia es End ..... ... . . . ... . .... ..... 5:00 p.m., aturd"y, February I . .... . .. ..

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Begin ..................... ... .. . 7:00 a.m., Wedneday, February .

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Pre idents' Day Holida)' . ...... ...... .... .......... . Monday, February 17 Sprill' Brellk Hegi ns ........................ 5:00 p.m., Saturday, Ma.r h 22 Sprlng Br Jk Ends ............................ 7:00 a.m., Monday, March 3 1 Easter Recess Begins ................................ 7:00 a.m., Frida April 18 �$ter Recess En 1· ...... ................ . . 11:15 <l.m., Monclay, April 21 Classes End .. . .... ............ . . . .. ........ .. ... 5:00 p.m., Saturday, M ay 17 Final Examinations ................ M o nda lvI< 1 9- 5 aturda y, May 14 eme5lt:l' End� ( after I.lst t. am) .......... . .... . ......... Saturday, May 24 May C ommenceme n t ........................... 2:30 p.m., Sunday. May 25 W(1rsizip Service begins (/I 9:30 a. Ill. .

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Comme ncement .. .......... . 10:30 a.m., Saturday, August 23 .

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Orientation ................................................ Thursday, September 4-

Classes Begin . ..

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Opening Convocation

Classes

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at 11:30 (1.111.

resume

unday, S pte mb er 7 a m . , Monday, September 8

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a.m . .

I'vlonday, September 8

Mid·semester Break ........................................... friday. October 24

Thanksgiving Reces� Begins

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. 1:35 p.m., Wednesday,

December Commencement ... 10:30 a.m., Saturday,

C1a�s es End

Final

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a m i n a no ns

0

ember 26

a.m., Monda),. December I

ThanksgiVing Recess Ends . ..... . . .. . 7:00

December 13

5:00 p.m., Saturday, December

................................... Monday, Deccmber

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15-

Saturda\', Deccmbcr 20

Seme ster Ends (after last exam)

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Classes B gin

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S PRING SEMESTER 2004

SPRING SEMESTER 2003

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JANUARY TERM 2004

JANUARY TERM 2003 Classes Begin

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1i:rm II .... ..

FALL SEMESTER 2003

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SUMMER S ESSION 2003 Term I .... .... .................. . .. .. .....

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. .. ............. Monday, Fcbruary 16 'pring Break Begins . ..... ... . . ..... 5:00 p.m., Saturday, March 20 pring Break Ends .... . .. ......... . 7:00 a.I11., M onday :Vlarch 29 Easter Recess Be ins .. . .. .. . ... 7:00 a.m., Friday, pril9 Easter He ess Ends .... ....... .. . . ........ Il:lS .m., Monda)" prill 2 Classe End .. . ........ . ....... . .... ... 5:00 p.m., Saturd, y, 'Iay 15 Final Examinations .. ... ........ Ivlonday, May 17-Sarurday, May 22 Scm st rEnds « fter last exam) . ....... . ..... . Saturday, May 22 May Commencement .. ...... . . .. . ....... 2:30 p.m., unday, May 23 Pre idt'nts' Day J---loliday ... .

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The University

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MISSION

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STATEMENT

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Long commi\1ed to provi d i ng an education distingUIsbed for q ualit y in the context of a heritage that is ,

Luth ran an d an environment that is ecumenically Christian, PLU con tin ues to emb race its primary mission: f knowledgeable per ons equipped with an under. t ndi ng of the human condition, a critical awareness of hwnalll' and spiritual values, and a utpacity for clear and e f fe c t ive self-expression. For alL who choose to seek a PLU degree, the university o ffers opportunity to pursue a va riety of program, of academic worth and 'xcellence. Its standards of performan ce dema nd a finely trained fa culty as w II as highly skilled administrative and supp o rt staff. In its institutional emp hasi 11 s ho i arshl p the Univer Ity views the liberal an' as provid i n the necessary aod e sen ti al foundation for the I chni 'al trammg and education in the p ro fession s which model'll so cie ty requires. The unive rsity aims to cul L iva le the intellect, not fo its own ake merely, but as a t 01 of consci e n ce and an i nstr um ent for service. The diversity and variety of cultural PI' grams and per onal servi e' o(� red by the univ r ityart' intended tu facilitate Lhls positi v e dev lop ment of the student as a wh ole person in order Ihat the deve lopment

'

,

'

our students m i ght function a members of society.

highest potential a well as fulfil lment oflile's pu rpo e arise in the joy of servic to otbers. 11 aid its stud ent in sharing this understa ding, the university seek. to be I

a

othe r wor "PLU affirms that r ah zati

c omm uruty in wruch there

11

of on

'5

i a contill wn and fruitful inleraction bet 'leen what is best in education and

what is n ob les t in Ch ris t ian edihcation.

This deliberate al d simulta ne u atten.tion to the relig ious dimension of the lotal h um a n experience and to the 5t ndards of scholarl bjectiVlty, coupled wilh dear ret og nh . i on of the integrative i mpulse in each, is the essence f PLU.

INTEGRATIVE LEARNINGOBJECTIVES The goals of a PLU education

Critical Reflection •

• • •

consi der issues from multiple perspectives

evaluate assu mptions and consequ ence o f differenl perspectives in select sourc s of information u ing appropriate resear h methods

a ssessi

ng possibl sol u tion s to problems

understand and explain divergent viewpoin [S on complex issues, critically assess the support available for each, and defend one',

wn judgements.

Expression •

communicate de arly and

creat

adapt messages to variou au iences

(fecti ely in bOlh

ral and written forms

symbols of meaning in a va rie t y of expre si ve media, both verbal and no nve rbal

Interaction with Others •

work cre atively to identif)f and cl rify the issues of concern

de velop and promote effe live str a tegi e s and in te rp e rsonal relationships

acknowlege and respond to cont1 icting ideas and pric iples , and identi fy common i nterests

Valuing arti t late and assess sh ape them

oe's own values. with an awareness of the communities and tr adit i ns that have helped to

recognize how oth rs have ar ri ved at v al ues different from one's own

devel op a habit of aring for oneself, for o t he rs and for the e nvironment

a ppro

,

ach moral, spiritual, and inteUectual dev elo p ment as a life-long process

Multiple Frameworks •

rec gniz and understand how cultures profoun dly s hape different assumptions ,md behaviors

id en tify issues and problems facin g people in every culture

c ultivate respect for diverse cultures, pract ices and traditions ,

To see the Inte grat i ve Leaming Obj ctives document in its enti rety contact the Provost's Office at 253 .5 35. 7 126 or vi sit the web site at W\vw.plll.edu/�provost.

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E d u c a t ion-and cducating for serv ice-was a vencrated part o f

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General Information ACADEMIC PROGRAM Pac ific Lutheran L. n iversity uses a 4- 1 -4 calendar which co n s i s t s o f two 1 5- lwek sem�sters b r idged by a four-week J a n ua r , term. Course credit is com p u t e d by ho urs. he m aj o r i t y of cou rses art: offered for 4 h o u rs. Each u ndergrc) d u J t e degree candidate i s expect�d t o com p lete 1 2R hours w i t h a n llverall g r a d e p o i n t aveT­ ag� of 2.00. Depar t m e n t s or schools Illay set h igher g rad e point req u i re m e n ts. Degree requ i rements a re specific all)' s t at e d i n this cata log. Each stud�nt should be orne familiar with these re quire m e n t s a n d p rep a re to mcet t h e m . ACCREDITATION Pacific L ut heran Un iverSi ty i s ful l y ac c red i t ed by t h e Northwest Association of Schools a n d o l legcs as a fo ur-year i. n s t i t u t i o n of h igher educa t i o n . I n addition the fol l o w i n g programs h o l d special ized accredj­ t a t io n s and a pprovals: IlllSill ess - AA ,SH International- The Association to Adva nce Collegiate chools of Business Che/llistry ami BiucilellIistry - mer ica n C h e m i al So ci e t y COlllpllter Scie/lcc (B j - Co m p u t i n g Scien es Accred itation B o a rd., Inc. Edllc(! [ion - Natio nal C u n c il ro r the Accn:d.i tatiOIl of Tea c h e r Ed ucation

Marringe ami a m ily '1 'Izerap), m m ission on A creditation fo r Marriage and F,uni l y T henlpy Education o f the American

Associat ion for Marriage and Family Thera py

LATE-AFTERNOON, EVENING, AND SATURDAY CLASSES

Musi - National s s o c i a t io n of Schools o f Music 'lI rsillg - a t io n a l League for Nursing Socilll Work - o u n i l o n ociaJ \ ork Education

To provide fo r the p ro fess i o n a l growth and cultura.! enrichment

a t r a d i t i o n a l col lege c urse schedule, the u n iversity c o n d uc ts late-a ternoon, eve n i ng , and Saturday classes. In add i t i o n to a wide va r ie t y of offeri ngs i J) the arts and sciences, there a re speci al ized and g ra du a t courses for teachers, a d m i n is t rators, and persons in b usi ness a n d i n d u stry.

of pe rs o n s unable to take

A ny current or prospective student may, upon request d i re ct e d the p rl?sident's ofnc , reviev.. a copy of the documents per­ t a i n i ng to the u n iver 'i t y's varic us accre d i tations and approvals.

to

ENROLLMENT 3 ,0. 0 fu l l - t ime studt'nts; 3 7 6 par t - t i m e stude nts

RETENTION OF FJRST-YEAR STUDENTS The retention of student · entering as fi rst-year stllden � has b een monitored si nce 1 972. Th data fo r the past fifteen years is pr sen ted

ENVIRONS L cated in su b u rb a n Parkland, PL

the S ca n d i navian tradi t ions from which these pioneer. ca mE'. Although fo u nded as a u n i ve rs i t y, thl;: i n s t it u L ion fu nctioned primarily a an Jcade m)' unlil 1 9 1 8, when it c losed � lr two yea r s . It reo pe n e d ;1 S t h e two-year Pacific L u t h er a n 2ol lcge, after m e rg­ i n g with Coltmlbia C o l i ge, pr viously located in Everett. F u r ther consol ida t io n s occurred when Sp o ka n e Col lege m e r ge d w i t h PLC in 1 9 29. Four -year baccabu rea te deg rees wert' first offe red i n education i n 1 939 and i n the l i beral a r t s i n 1 942. The i ns t i t u t ion was reo rga n i z ed as a u n iversity in 1 960, rec l a i m i n g i ts o r ig i n a l name. It p rese n t l y i n c l udes a o l l e ge of A r t s a n d Sciences; profes­ s i o n a l schools o f the Arts, Busi ness, Educa t i o n , N u rs i n g , and P hysical Education; a n d b o t h grad u a t e and con t i n u i ng education p rogra m s . PL has b�en closely a n d p ro d uct ively affi l iated with t h e L u t h e r a n chu rch t h r o ug h out its h i s to ry. I t i s now a u n i ve rs i t y o f t h e Eva n ,ej ical LUlheran C h l i fch i n A m e r i ca ( ELC ) . owned by the m o re than six hundred co n g regations of Regi o n 1 of the ELCA. M a n y i n fluenccs and i nd iv id u a l s have co m bi ned to shape P L U a n d its re"iolla!, n a t io n a l , a n d i ncreasingly i nternational reputa­ tion fo r teach i ng, service, and scholarsl� i p . A dedicalL'd facult), has bee n an extremely important factor. The school has enjoyed a st ro ng l1l usical t ra d i t ioll frol11 t h e beg i n 11 i n g , as well as n o t ewor­ t h y alum n i ach ievem e n ts in public school t ea c h i n g a n d adm i n is ­ t ra t i o n , u n i E'fsity t e a c h i n g and scholarsh ip, the p a s t or a l minis­ try, t h e h ea l t h . ciences and heali n g arts, and busine '5. At PLU t he l ib er al arts a n d professional educa t i o n are dosely i n tegrated a n d col l abora t i ve i n t b e i r educational p h i l osophies, activiti " n d aspirations.

in the following table:

has a p icturesqu e 1 26-acrc

cam p us. The un iversity's geographical setl i ng affords students a

wide variety of both recre a t io n a l and cultural en tertainment options. Recreationa l l y, the g r a n d e u r f the Pacific No r t hwes t encourages p a r t icipation i n h i k i n g , campi ng, c l i m bing, s k i i n " , boati ng, <111d swimming. The m o s t co nspicuous n a t u r a l monument in the ar a is !VI I . Ra i nier. I n addition to M t . Rainier, the d i s t i n c t ive realms 0 tlu= Cascade and Olympic m o u n ta i n ranges and fo rests o f Douglas Fir complete one of the m ost n a t urally t r a n q u il enviro n ments in t h e Un ited State . Students an also enjoy t h aes t h e t i c o ffe ri ng s f ne:lrby Seattle and Tacom a . These c i ty centers h ost a va ri e t y of perf, rm­ i n g and re co rd i n g arts and p rovide dozens of gal lerie a n d m u�eums a s well a s unique shopping a n d d i n j ng experiences.

FACULTY 2 27 full-time faculty'; 1 0 1 part- t ime faculty *pcr AmericalJ Associa tioli or UNiversity

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

To Senior Year

80.9%

6 5 . 4% 70 . 1 °/c,

1 99 1

8 1 .3%

66.0% 71 .1%

1992

79.9%

6 '.1%

1 993

79 .8 % 78 . 3 % 78.0%

73.4% 70.2%

67.4%

66.5% 64 . 8 % 63.6%

83.3%

74.8%

69.6%

80.2% 80. 1 % 8 1 .8%

69 . 5%

66.5%

69.9%

1 9 94 1 9 95 1 99 6 1 9 97

75.7%

7 7. 4%

84 .3%

71.1% 65.3%

67.S

II

74. 1 '!Io

66.2% 6 4 . 0% 6 2 . 7% 66 . 0 % 63 . 5 % 67.9%

69.7%

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO 1 4: 1

the u n i versity, the e pioneers recognized

U

To Junior Year

80,6'1'0 8 1 . 7%

2 0 00

the im po r tant role that a Lut heran educational i n sti t u t i o n Oil the estern fron t ier of America could pia. in the e me rg i.ng future of the regio n . They wa nted the i ns t itution to help i Illm igran ts adjust to t h e i r new land and find jobs, but t hey a lso wa n t e d it to produce graduates who would se rve church a nd com m u n i ty. 4

To Sophomore Year

1 986 1 98 7 1 988 1 989 1 99 0

1 9 99

Pacifi C L u t h c l'an U n iversity was fo u n d ed in 1 890 by a g ro u p o f mo s t l y Norwegian Lutherans from the P uget Sound a re a . They w e re l e d by the Rcv"ren d Bj ug Har t a d . who becam PLU\ first nam i ng

Fall

1 998

Professors d [Initiol/.

mSTORY

president. In

Retention of Entering First-Year Students

Y

WRITING THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULUM PilcHic LUlheran n ivers i t y is a co m m u n i t y of scholars, a co m m u n i t y of readers and w r i te rs . Readi n g i n forms the intellect and l iberates t he i m aginat i o n . Wri t i ng pe r v a d es o u r acaclem ic lives as teachers a n d students, both as a way of com m u n i cl t i n g what w e l e a rn a n d as a means f shap i ng t h o ughts and ideas. Al l faculty Il1C m bHS s hare t he responsi b i l i ty for im proviIlg the


l iteracy of t h e r r s t u d t n b . F,l cu l t y i n eve r y d e p a r t m e n t a n d school

ave rage grade of C or It ighn, o r

make wr i t i ng a n esse n t i a l part o f t h e i r

rieli/o/1st rated C'q u i va icl7t pro/icil'nry. f:i.illt;.

c o u rses

a n d show ,tuci e n ts

how to ask quest i o n s appro p r ia te to tbe k i n d s of read i n g done i n t lw i r fiel d s . Students w r i t e b o t h fO I m a l papers a n d repo rts a n d i ll Jo r m ,, 1 no tes a n d essays i.1l order to master tbe co n t e n t li n d

methods o r t h e va rio m d i ci p l i n e . T h ey

a rc

enco uraged t o

p repare i m p o r tan t p apers i n m u l t i p l e d rafts.

0 1 1 1' yc;l1r a l

tlt� college level, o r

l> C

J.u ngllilge IlIken

hefore /Iill l l! grade wil! /lor (flUill this reqll iremen t . Iw it!//ts w h o IUlve / 1 0 1 sI1 1 isjied aile ()/' b U 1 1i uf these rf<j l l ireme/ils m a)' stIli be admit ted but mllst make lip the deficiel1CY as <111

s:

additio/lal degree rcqu irelllt:1I I.

o z

VI VI

Additional study o C both math e m a t ics and fo r� ign iJng-Llage is ad\'isable for cHtain Jreas in the

:1nd scie nce;; a n d ill some

a rt s

p rofessional programs, Those who 1'0 1 1 0\ the above preparatory program wi ll fijld most c u r r i c u l a r offerings ( ) f t he un ive;!fsi ty open to them and may Jlso ,Jua l i fy f,) r adv'Ulced place m e n t in some a rens. St udents

admitted to either the fal l or spring seme ter.

are

Acc('ptanc� tt) the hll term c a r r ies pcrmi�i()n to attend the prn'iolls summer sessions. Spring acceptatlcc app roves e.nro U menl i n the Janu. ry terrIl. The fol Jowi ng a p p lic a t io n priority daLt:l> m e nded: Fi lII Sef1lesti.'r-Felmwry 1 5;

Spril1g S1'lIle

are

n:com­

la-December 15.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES (First-year and Transfer Students) Student> p l an n i ng to e nler a., fi r�t - )'('ar s t ude n ts may s u b m i t a p p l ication material.s a nyt i me after co m p l e t i o n o ( t h � j ll 1J i or year o f h igh s c h ool. Ad m i s i o n dec i s i o n s arc made beg i n n i n � Octo b e r I . a n d i da te, a r e notified o f t h e i r s t a t us a s �oon a s t hei r c o m p leted appl icil t i o n> h ave been received a n d eva l uated.

S t l1licnts who began their h i ghe r e d u c a t i o n

a ccred i t ed colleges

the univer s i t y each year w i th an average grade p o i n t in excess o f

sta n d i n g a t t h e i nstit u t i o n last attended fu l l - t i me. T h e m i n i m u m grade p o i n t average to b e co n si dered fo r ad m issi on as a t ransfn

www.plll. edul-admi ut he ra n Universi ty welco mes a pp l i c a t ions from s t u d e n t s

w h o exh i b i t capac ities fo r s uccess a t the b a ccala ureate level. must

o t h er ['egiona,!ly

3 .00 (B). Ca n d idates m ll s t have g o o d academic a n d perso n a l

253.535 . 7 J 5 1 800.2 74 .67S R

Ap pl icants

ell

u n iversil' ies are enco u raged to app ly fo r

ad m i s i o n w i t h a d va n ced sta n di n g . Over 400 s t uden ts t r a n s fer to

Admission

Pac i fi c

or

p re5ent evidence of sch olast ic

biljty and

s tud e nt is a 2 . 5 0 cu m u la t ive grade p o i n t ave r,1" e in c o l l e ge - l e vel work from

it

regionally accredi ted i nsti t u t i o n . T n rev i ew i n g

an

a p p l i ca n t's fi le, t h e O ffice o f Ad m i ssion s exaI11I llCS t h e grade

wi t h draw a d m i s s i o n for a n y a p p l i c a n t / s t u d e n t based o n a n

point average, academic progr�s, es ay, and rec o m llle n d a t i o n s. for a pp L ican ts with les.. t nan soplwnlOre s t a n d i n g ( 30 sC'm<'srer hOllrs or 4 5 q u a r t e r h o u r s ) , seco ndary schoo l records a n d s tanda rd ized test score wi l l a l so b e c o n , i d e red.

i n d i v id ual' meeting t h e ' c r i te ri a . A p p l i c a t i o n s for a d m i s . i o n

Crede n t ial

a r e cval l.ulled w i t h o u t regard to race, col o r, creed , rel i g i o n ,

J . form a l App{;cotio n : S u b m i t fhe PLU A p p l i c a t i o n fo r

dem onst ra te q u a l i ties of good ch a rac ter i n order to be accepted fo r ad m iss i o n . B o t h the vice presiden t fo r ad mi ssio ns a n d d i rec t o r o f a d m i ss ions reserve t h e r i g h t t o a d m i t , d eny, o r

g e n d e r, n a t io n a l o rig i n . a g e , m e n t al or phys i ca. l d isabi l i t , ma ri ta l

Ad m issi o n ava i l a b l e fro m h igh schuul counselors or t h l:' P L U

s t a t u s , sexLlaI o r i e n t a t i o n , or a n y other s t a t u s p rotected by law.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS ( First- year/ Tra nsfer Students ) I n eval u a t i n g a p p l icat ion ' t h e Office of A d m iss i o ns i n terprets

Office o f Ad m i s s i o ns . S t u d e n t s m a y a l s o apply o n - l i n e

the c u r r i c u l u m t h at the a p p l i t;'l n t hds p ur s u e d i n h igh school a n l! program i n p r e p a r a t i o n fo r col lege s h o u l d i n c l u d e t h e fo l l ow i n g:

Englisb: 4 years " Mathematics: 3 years ( a lge bra, 2 years, and geo met ry, I yea r) *

Foreign Language: 2 years Social Studies: 2 years Laboratory Sciences: 2 years

Fine, Visual, or Performing Arts: 1 year Electives: 3 veal'S ( selected from the afei\S l isted above, as well ' as cou rses i n comp ute r science, sp eed1, and debate. )

*

Minimum Elll rance Req llire m c llts: 1. I}vo ),ears of co llege p repara tor), malhenwlics (exclusive of computer science) w it h 1m average grade of C o r h(,her; or a l l appro llltd co urse

nt

the c"o llege level, o r demo/1stmtcd eq u i valent

proficiency.

(1\vo years of col lege preparatory malhemaIic> means two years o f h igh sc hool algebra or one )'�a r of hIgh schoo l a l gebra <lnd one y e a r o f high school geometry. Taking the algebr� a nd/or geumetry cou rse� i n m id d l " o r j u n i o r high ,chool i, accep IablE- p rovided t hey a re 11 Igh-school-Ievel co u rses . If 3 <l u den l is a d m i t t e d to FLU with a d fic i c ncy in m a t hemat­ ics, thaI deficiency i, removed by oll1pletian of approl't'd courses a s determ ined by the PLU m a t h placement exal1l.) 2. 7lvo year, of olle foreign Illnguage ill high school, with an

at

www. p l u . e d u . 2 . $35.0(J Applica t w il Fee: A $ 3 5 f e m u s t accorn p a n y t he applica­ tion or be m a i led sep a r a tdy. T h Is no nrefu n dable servi ce fcc

g r ad e p o i n t average and class rank in rela t i o n to the q u a l i t y of a t t h e bacca l a ur e a te level. For exa m p l e , a s t a n dard h ig h s c h o o l

r>q l l i red are:

dot's n o t a p p l y to t h e st uden t's acco u n t . Ma ke checks o r m o ney orders paya b l e to P L O ffi ce of J\d m iss i o n.s. 5 . Ji"illlscripts: Tra n scri p t mll ' l be s u b m i t t e d fro m h igh ' c h o o l and all c o l lege co u rse wor k . Tra n sc ri p t s m ll s t be se n t d i r ectly from the school to PLU. Accepted fi rst-year st udents m ust s u b m i L 3 fi nal h igh school t ransc ri p t which i n d icntes sat isfac­ tory co m pl et i o n 0 h igh Sd1001 a nd attainment o f a d ipl o m a . The u n iversity acC';:p t the Gen tral Equivalency D i p l o m a ( E ) fo r t h ose studen ts who may not have c o m p l eted a traditional h igh school progra m . 4. Recom merIrhl lioll: O n e reconHllt'n dntion m u s t b e p r e pared by

a

p r i n c i p a l , w u n s l o r, pastor,

or

o th e r qual i fied pers o n .

The' fo r m i s i ndudt�d i n t h e a p p l ication packet .

5 . Test Req l l i rel1Ierrt�· All en ter i ng fi rst-year student s m u s t s u b m i t scores from e i ther t h e Co l lege Board , Scholastic Assessm e n t Test ( SAT ) , o r the Amer i cah Col lege "t s t (ACT) Asses ment. Registr lion procedures a n d fo rms are �wailable a t b i g h sch o o l cou nsel i n g o ffice:,.

6. Pcrso llnl £>.;(1)': U ing no m o re t h a n two pages, w r i t e a n essay o n o n e o f these two t o p i c s : a. Descr i be an academi c expe rience th at h a s ' ig n i fi can t ly i nl1uenced your life. b. If y o u co u l d be ,.ny h istor ical or fict i o n a l ch arac ter for one day, who would y o u be a n d why? 7. Stat ement of Good Standing ( t ransfe rs o n ly ) . P

A

C

I

F

I

C

l

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

II

S

I

T

Y

5


z o

Qualified s t ude n t s in terested in

11'0

education ma

11'0

Early Admission be gi n work

award transfer cre d i t to

accelerat i n g t. heir fo r m a l tow a rd a d eg ret' after cumpl l ion

h i gh school students who have co m ­ courSeS in appr oved p rog ra m s . as d.eKri bed be.low. l . Advanced P/ilcelllt'llt Progra lll: r u d en ts who co m pLete

pl ted

the j u n i o r year o r first semester o f the se n ior year o f hig h schoo\.

advanced placem 'lit or c re di t toward g ra d u a t i o n t h rough the

E x ce pt io nal s t udents who

req u i red

units i n

wish t o �nro l l befo re c m p l e t i ng a l l high scho I m u s t have a letter su b m i t ted b y a

recogn i zed sch o I ()ffi iill who appro

e�

c. a

e a rl y college admlssion

Registrar's

be issued n. l y students h ighly

and give assurance that a h igh sch o o l d i p l oma will

pkted co u r s es

standing. ' t u d en ts who a w a rd e d

2. OFF! IA L

of an accredi ted Wa s h ingt o n S t at e c o m m u n i t y coUege on a n o ffi c i a l t ranscript. 3 . In tcmatiolla! Bacm !a urcu k; A maximum o f 3D se me s t er hours may be g ra n ted fo r co Jll plet'ion o f the D i p lo ma . Students are advised to con tact the Registrar's O ffice fo r speci.fic details. Jnd posted

a

4. Other Programs: S t u de n ts who have c o mp l e t ed col l ege c o u r se s

3 5 .00 ap pl i c at i o n fee.

wbiJe i n

Transcripts with Ellglish tnll ls/atioll from each:

The u n ivers i t y re erves the right to make decisions on a n individ ual b asis.

Other FAucatio.nal Experiences 1. Credits ea rned in n o n accredited school are not t ra n s fer a b le . Students w ho have m o t r i cula ted at Pacific L u the r a n UniverSity may

sem ster

o f col l ege - level E ngl i s h or higher. or

E n gl i sh Lmgu3

'C

campus. 4. One academic reference fr om school o fficia ls or aLhers in a position t o eval {lat the s t u d e n t's abili!"y t succeed in a ba cca la ur e ate program. I n ad d itio n , transfer student · from U.S. co ll ege r u n ive rs i ty mu t ha c a reference fro m t he i n ternational s t u d nt advis

r.

6. Personal Essay on one

o f two

t o p i cs l i s t e d

on

2.

J

3. T h e uni

the essay fo rm .

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

to 30 semester

T

does

n o t grant credi t �

iploma (CEO)

e

r

c o l lcge-l vel

General

ts.

4. For info rmation on the C o l lege Level EX,l m ina tion Pro ' ram ( C LE P ) , refer to t he Credit by Fxa lll inat ioll section un der Acade m i c Procedures.

FINAUZING AN OFFER OF ADMISSJON 1. Meclien/ Req uiremellt: B�fo re actual e n ro l l m e n t each new st udt:nl m ust submit a Health Hi 'tory hJ l"jn cumplet with a n accuratE: immun ization record. This i n fo rmatio n mUSt b e acceptable t o the PL Heal t h Servic�s Office. 2. Advance Payment; A $200.00 adva nce payment is lle ce ss a r y i n o rder to confirm an offe r of admiss i o n . T h i s p ayment gllar:11lte s a p i a -e ill t he s t u d e n t body, res rves hO lls i n g on

campus

i f request e d , holds fil1an ial assistance which may

have bec:n awarded, <Ind is re q u i re d before

class registration. applied toward

It is credited 1'0 the studen t's acco unt and is

ex p enses of t he firs! 'emestcr. Fall applimllts offered adrnis­ sioll Ii fore May I / 1 1 /,/ t pas/'mark t he pllyll1eJ1t by May 1. If c i rc u m st nces necessi t a te cancel latio n of nrol l m e n ! and the O ffice of Adm is s i o ns is notified ill w r i t illg before May 15, the 200.00 will be r funded. The refund d, te for the January tenu is D ce mbe r 1 5 .• and for sp ri n g semester January 1 5 . 'lY , illden t bl ormatiorr Fa rm: This form must b e comp leted 3. b all ·tudents and returned wi t h t he ad\eance payment. 4. RcsiderJI1a / Lire Inf()rmatioll Form: This form mllst be completed b}' Ill! student s and returned w it h the adva nce

Transfer of Credits Earned While in U lgh School he u n i ve rs i t y awards credit to high school students fo r ou rses completed befo re hig h school g r ad uat io n. The u n iversity may

I

(' rs i t y

Equivalt!ncy

l . Courses c o m p l et ed with a gr-Jde o f - or higher at o t he r regionally accredi ted c oUeges or u n l er hies norm a l l wi l l be a cc ep te d for gr a d u a t i o n credit with pa s i ng !(f<l Ie and will n o t be calculated into the P L grad po int a v rag . 2. A student may t ra n � r a maximum of '!6 semester or 1 44 qu ar te r hours. Of tbe$e, t h e maximum transferable from a two-year s c h o o l is 64 semester or 96 quarter hO\lfs. 3. St ud en ts who complete t he d i re t transfer as s ocia t e degree from a n accredited Washington t a te com m u n i t y coUege before matricula.tion at PLU will b e admitted \- ith junior s ta n d i n g and will have s a t i s fied ore I o f the ge n e r a l un iver­ si t y r equ i re m e n ts except fo r 4 h o u rs in religion ( frOID l i n e 1 or 2) and 4 h o u rs in Perspectives on Diver:ity.

F

up

hours.

ofFillQIlCes.

requirements.

I

TES) credi t . up to 20

h ours o f College-Level l:'.xam i n a t i o n Program ( LEP) credit, pn viding t h e tl tal of the t hr e e dues n o t exceed 30 semester

requ i re me nt s c om p l et e d and the to t a l hours a epted. I n divi l u a l and depart ments dett' r m i n l" which co u rses SJti sf), major

C

20 semeste.r h ours of U n i t ed States ( lJ 'AFI )/Defensc Ac t iv it y o r No n ­

The uniwrsity a l l ow� u p to

se m e' re r hours fo r m i lit a r y cred i t , and

schools

A

school to waive a particular

Tra d i t ional Educa t ion S u p po r t (DA

ve rs i t y requiremen ts. These materials incl u d e a sum mary of core

P

by exa m i n a t i O ll. A rmed rorces Insti tute

EVALUATION OF CREDITS Transfer of Credits from Othe.r Universities The Re gi s tra r 's Office e a l u a te s all tra ns fe r re co rd s and prov ides a d v is i n g m a t e r ia ls de s i g n e d to assist students to wm p l e te u n i ­

6

or

basil> of

previous lll )naccredited course wo rk r may perition a de p a rtm e n t o r school to receive cre d i t

I nstitu te, loc, t d on the PLU

5. A co mp le ted IlZtema r iol1a/ Srudellt D ecla ra t io l l

p etiti o n a d e p a r t me nt

req u i reme n t on th

Audit level comp l e t i o n of the America n C u l t u r a l Exchange

(A E)

receive credi t . The courses m u st be a part of the reg u l ar

Il�ge ca tal o g , be

u n iver s it )" and be p os t ed o n an official co llege or u n iver s i t y

( c o m p u ter-based ) , o r wr iti n g w i t h g r ad es of B

c

t ra n s c r i p t .

3. fllglislt Projlciell cy, m e as ur e d by one of the fo l l owing: a. Test of English as a Fo re i g n La ng ua ge (TOEFL) w i th a m i n im um score of 550 ( p a p e r test format) or 2 1 3

c.

school may

co l l e ge curriculum of a regionally accredited col lege o r

cop ies are n o t acceptable.

one

h ig h

l i s ted in th� o ffi c i a l

a. secondary school, b . E n gl i s h as a sec on d language program, c . co l l ege or u n ive rsity attended i n the Un itt:d States, h o m e co unt ry, or other co u n t ry. Tr a n s c r i p t s must be sent d i re c t l y from ea ch institution . Faxt'd

b. Two quarters o r

p a r t ic i p at e i n this program w i l l be a m a nn e r consistent with PLU's

credit in

be awa rd ed fo r col lege- level a ca de m i c co urses described in the

s e m es t e r and J an u a ry 1 for � pr i n g semester. Cr 'de n t i a l s req u i re d a re : .

oUege

Gltaiog

un ive.rs i t y o m m u n i ty. App l i c aton deadlines are luly 1 fo r fa ll

U . S.

R u n n i n g Start

p o l i c )' on t ra n s fer of credit fro m o t he r i n s t i t u tions. Cred i t wi l l

cial ly, and in E ngl is h profic iency a r e e n c o u r a ge d t o join t h e

I n ternational Studen t App liwtioll with

under the Wash ington S t a t e

Program are con ' i dered fi rst - yea r st ude n ts with advanced

APPUCATION PROCEDURES (Inlemational tudents) I n ternational , t udents who are q ua l i fi e d aead m ic al l )', fUl a n ­

nonrefu ndable

nIce.

2. RUIII1illg S{(lr/ ProgrwlI: Accepted students who have co m ­

a fter c o m p let i o n of specified co l l e ge wo rk . recom m ended for E a r l y A d m i os i o n w i l l b e considere d . Generally t h e se students rank near tbe top of their clas� and present high ap t i t u d e test cores.

l . A co m plete d

prograllJ o f the College B oa rd may receive cred i t

m i n a tio n

fo r such courses. I n qu i r i es should be addressed to t h e

payment.

Y


------

RETURNlNG STUDENTS

I.

s t udent 's admission to the u n ive rsi t y i s valid for six years. SrudenLs wh o do not a tte nd rhe u n ive rsi t y fo r a p(:J'iod of time lhat incl udes e i th e r a fa l l or s p ri ng semestl'l" must apply to return to the u n i \'ers i t • as d escr i bed below. • ' tude nt s who \'\' i;;h tQ re t u rn \Vithin the six-year admission pe ri od reente r through t11c S t u den t Se rvices enter. Reen tering stu de nts must provide t h e i r c u r rent add res . , d gree informa ti on, Jnd official t ra n s cr i pt s from any co l lege a t t e nde d du ring t heir b. cnce. Bctllrl' reg-i. kring, rce. nter ing . t u de nt s must re olve p rcviou. rinan ci<11 ()bl i <lQ t i on s to the u n iv 'l"sity a n d have a cu rrent health cleara nce lrom n i ve r ity He a lt h Services. • S t ud nts who w is h t return to t h e univ rsity after the si x.-year adm iss io n per i od c. pires must reap p l y for admission. AppliL n t s for readmission are required to s u b m i t a wITIple ted appl icatioll and official t ran ripts from any college attended du ri ng their absence. Application torms may be obtained from and sub m i t ted to the

ffiet: o f Admi:;sions.

2. An academic a L l y di�m issed student may apply for r(,i nstatement by s u b rn i u i n g

a

letter o f p e t i t i o n to the d i rector of a dv isin g . The

petition is acted o n by the Cu mmit tet' on Admissiun and

Re te n t i o n of Studen ts. A s t ud e n t whose pet ition is a p p rove d will be rei ns t a t e d on p roba t ion and Illust pa rt ic ip ate in the pr o b ation ­ ary semeter plan. Refer to lhe A cad e m i c Status sect ioll for a de.,criptioIJ ofprohation A st udent whose pe t i t i on is denied mal' a p p ly agai n for rcinstakm nt after one >ernest r h3:; ('bp �ed : unless iJ1fo rmed otlH!rwise. A dism issed st u de n t may petitIOn for reinstatemrnt only on e p er ·emt'Slcr. An academ ically d i srn i ;;sed t u dent Q);)' be relnst, ted after one semester i t h e st-udent prese nts new e i dence of p o te n ti a l acade m ic •

S t ude n t s

su cess.

who h ave he en d rop p e d f o r academic or d i sc i p l i n ­

Jr y rea'ons and t hl'n reins tated m u s t ide nt i fy a fac u lt y membl'r w i l L i n g to .lC t as a sp(.l I1sor n n d ad visor.

Financial Aid

Z l> Z

2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 1 34

H/IVIV. plu. edul-Iaid

'"

Reco gn i zi ng t h a t m a ny s t u d e nt s \Vho w a n t to at t e n d b c i fl C L ut h e r an n i ve rs i t y wo uld be u n ab l e to meet a l l ex pe n s e s o f emo l l m c n t fro m p e rso n a l o r fa m i l y sources, t h e u n ivers i t y a t temp ts to p ro v i d e fi n�nci,l l ils s i s t a n ce to a l l e ligible s t ud e nt s . An)' stude n t ap p ro ve d fo r cnrollment or cu r ren tl y e n ro ll ed may re ques t fi n ancial a i d . A p p ro x i mately 90% o ( the u n i vcr s i t y's students receive he l p in t h e for m o f g i ft ass istance ( t h a t is, scholarsh i ps, a rt is t i dliev m 'nt awards, or gran ts) , l o w - i n t e rest de fe r re d loa n s , o r e mp loy m en t . I n man)' cases a financial aid award will be a co m b i na ti o n of these forms o f assi tance. The offe r of fi n a n cia l aid is based o n the cost ( r a t tendance, which i s the u n iversity's est i ma te o f how m u ch it costs stud nts i n various c i rc u m s tances to a t te n d PtU. A s t u d e n t 's r s o u rce arc subt racted from the p roje c t e d costs to de te rm i n e fi nancial n ee d . Several d i ffe rent budgets a re used, t ak i n g i n to acco u n t a studen t's tu i t i o n , the cost of books, su p pl i es , housi ng, foo d , tra n s p o r t a t i o n , a n d pe r s o n a l exp e n ses.

l>

,..

c

Pan.'nl" c o n t r i b u tion. a rt' com p u t ed fo r a l l d e p e n d e n t

students by the fe deral processor, I t is b a se d on a fede ral ly

established fo rmula fo r dete r m i n ing p a re n ta l ab il i ty to con t r i b ­ ute toward a st u d e n t ' s educa t i o n . The un ivers i t y a l s o expects students (and their spouses, if married) to contribute toward

e x p e n se . .

. . All app l i c a n ts a re o ffered the maximum amount of aid tor

which t h e y q u al i fy, as f'u nds p e r m i t .

I f fi na n c ia l ci rcu m s ta n ces c h a nge, s t u d e n t s may c o n t a c t t h e

F i n anci J l A id and S t u d e n t Employment

ffice to discuss t h e i r

s i t u a t io n w i t h �l fi n a ncial a i d a d m i n i s t ra t o r a t any t i m e .

If s tud en ts or t he i r fa m i l ies hay

a s l o ss o f empl oy men t o r m a j o r

u n usual c i rc u m stances ( such

m e d i c al

expenses ) th�l t m i g h t

a ffec t the need for s t u de n t Gnancial aid, t h e F i nancial A i d and S t udent m p loymen t O ffice s ho u ld be co n t acted . U n u sual c i rc u mstances m ll st be described in w ri t ing , with the s tudent's name, s tu d e n t ID numher, and all p ert inen t dollar a mo u n ts ind icated.

St udents who rece ive scholarsh i p s from s o u rce s o u tside the

ulliversit v m us t i n fo r m the Fi nan c ial Aid and S t u de.nt E m p lo

-

ment O ffi ce in w r i t i ll" with t h e name of the s c ho la rs h i p a n d the ye a r ly a m o u n t . I n m o� t cases, PLU may be requ i re d by fecit:ral

reg u la t io ns to ad j ust a financial aid package. Loans and work

s tudy w i l l be adj us ted t:i rst . Sc h o lars h ip s and gra n ts w i l l be a dj us t ed o n l y as a las t re s o r t .

F i nancial assistance is a va i l a b le to all qU�ll ified students

regardless

of

race, color, creed, rel i g i o n , ge nder, national o rigin,

age, men tal or p h ysical disab i l i ty, marital s tat u s, o r sexual

orienta t i o n . , or any other s ta t us p rote c te d by law. APPUCATION PROCEDURE

Studen ts must a p p l y fo r fi n a .n c ial aid e a ch year by compl e t i ng a

new Free Ap p l ic a t i o n fo r Fede.ral ludent Aid ( FA F S A ) , Renewal FA FSA, o r d o i n g FAFSA on the Web. Need based aid i s n o t H utO l1l atl a l l ), re newa b l . FA FSA s a r ' genera l l y available i n Dece mber f() r t he upco m i n g academic year. A p pl i c a t i o n s m u s t be s u b m i t ted by t he fo l lo w i n g p r i o r i ty-fu n d i n g dead l i nes for PLU to

be considered for m ax i m u m fu n d i ng .

Entering First-year Students: inil FAFSA or d o FA FSA o n the

" cb

no

later than January 3 1

EoteTing Transfer Student

:

for th e upcoming acad e m i c year.

Mail FAFSA, R e n waI FAFSA, or do

FAFSA on the We b no later than

JaIJlIary 3 1

fo r t he upcoming

academic year.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

I.

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

7


o

Pro Continuing tudents: M a i l F FSA, Re n ewal FAFSA

do

or

SATISfACTORY PROGRESS POLICY

AF A on th e Web no l a te r than February 15 for the u p co m i ng

The p o l. i c y of the u n i ver i t)' is

academic year.

receivin g fi nan i a l assistance

For FAFSA o n the Well, go [ 0 u z � z ...

ing. To do otherwise coul d

h t tp://www.jilfsa.ed.gov.

An a p p l ica ti o n fo r financial aid may be com p l et d at any t i m e , a i d even th oug h need i s demonstrated. T h e

i na nc ia l Aid a n d tudent EmploymeDt Office w i l l cODsider all app lic an t s fo r any awa rd fo r which they m i gh t be t'ligibl . A id awa rds are fo r olle year alld most a re rellewable. provided reapplica t ioll is colI/pleted all time. ji nanrial l/eed mll-liHues, !/nd sa tis(a clOry Qcndemrc p rogress is maintained. Aid is IlO t alltomat ically renewed each year.

NOTIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS 1. Award dec i sio n s for ri rst - ye a r and tra n s fer s t u den t s who meet the F eb ru a ry 1 c o m ple t i o n date. w i l l be made in Mar h, a n d

en ro l l e d fo r a m i n i m u m of 1 2

ffers must be valid at ed by returning t h e signed O ffer o f

r and tran fer st u d n ts m ust also submit the $200 advance p ay m e n t req u i red b y the O ffice of Ad m iss ions. Fina ncial A id . Fi rs t - y

as

poss i ble . bu t m ust be recei ed by

May 1 . No ad va n ce payment is req u i re d from co n t i n u i n g students. A l l s t u d e n ts m u st om plete a sa t i s a c t o r y paym e n t arra nge m e n t w i t h the St ude n t Servi e s Center w i t h i n t\ 0 weeks

of rece i v i n g th ei r o r ig inal offer of fin a nc i al aid to h ol d awa rds. the re ply d a te s p ec i fied a n d wh

sh e i s p u rsu i ng i n awa rde d by P a c i fi c L u t heran n ivcr ity F i na ncia l Aid and St u de t Employ­ m en t Office. Tbe fol lowing requ i remen ts <1 re expected of each fi n a n c ia l aid re c i p i ent : To m a ke satisfactory p rogress towa rd a degre , an under­ g r a d u a t � student mnst complete 24 semester h O llr of cre d i t c< ch academic year. For t h is purpose, an ac. demic year is defined , the fall sem es t er and the prino semester. Fi na n ial aid is a w ard ed for 32 hou rs to co mple.te bachelor's degree in four

ton ' t a te

eed

1 92 and the max i m u m t i me fr me fo r co m p leting a b a cc a la u re­

o r a c a de m i c p ro g r a m , only

tud)' a n d Washing­

rants, i<; cred i te d to the st udent's ac c o u nt

hen

\

each semester. P,J rents and s t u d en ts ,He respo n s i b le' fo r the

charges in excess o f the award. I n some cases aid i awa r ed in excess of d i rect u n ive rs i t y c harges to h el p with l i v i ng exp e ns s. 0 ex p e d i t e a refund students can request re m a i n ing funds from their account by

en ter.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES The basic responsibility for fi n a n c i n g an educatio n at PI. rests with t uden ts and t h e i r families. In additioD to expected contributions fro m parents or gua r dian s , stu d e n ts a r e exp e c ted to assist by c o n t r ibuting fro m their savi ngs and s u m m e r

Opport unity

l.

ign i n g , n d retur n i n g each fi nancial aid n o t ice received. 2. D ecl i n i ng at any tiITIe an)' port ion of an aw a rd . 3. o t ifyi n g the Student Services Center in case o f a cha n ge i n red i t ho u rs a t te m p t ed ; a change i n marital status; a change i n r e idence ( o ff-camp us or a t home); or receip t of a dd it io na l out ide cho l a rs h ips . 4. Providing a co p y of t he i r parenLs' income tax retu r n (Form J 040) a n d lor a copy of th e i r 0\ n i ndividual i n co me t a x re t u r n if req u e s t ed . H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

Enrollm.ent Status Pull-time 3/4 time 1 12 lime Le:,s Ihan 1 /2 lime'

Minimum per te r m

Minimum per year

12

24

All

9

18

6

12

L"Tt:dit .tll'mpted

All

r.'dits att.;rnpkd

,rants, the Was h i ngton State Work S tudy Program , ,duca t i o na l

Add itio nal rights and res p o n s i b i l i ties of fi n a n c i al aid

T

Undergraduate Need-Based Credit Completion Requirements

Satisfactory p rogress is rev iewed for fi nancial a id p u rpose s

rec i pien t s i n cl u de :

U

max i m ulll t imt: fra m e o f I () years. f c rrd i ts al lowable is J 9 2 . )

after t he end of spri ng se.me ter. For Wash in ,t n -tate , eed

demonstrate need.

L

a

(The maxi m u m n um b e r

Less thall l i2 time £lI rol/ment applies to the l' 11 Gram l'ra�mm�. L,:s$ IIIm1 1 /2 rime , ·Ilml/m en! will m/ls� ,1 5111dn., I ', [oa1l tu be canceled and m,lY }eop,ndize rlc{er/ll"llt 5/,H"5.

supplementary to the e ffo rts o f a st uden t's fa m i ly. It is p ro v i d e d

C

must be a c h i eved w i t h i n

earn ing . Fi n a nci a l assistance fro m the u n ivers i t ), is therefore

I

for receiving a degree is e n fo rced . Some fi nJnciaJ aid progrnms ( e . g . , most u n i v� rs i t y gi ft aid p rogra m s a n d Was h i n gton tate Need G r a n t s ) a l l ow aid to b� awarded .1 mllXilll!llll o.lJolir acn­ demic years for entering jirst-year studCIlt5, alld two years for entering transfer students or a maxim um of 144 hours.

For part - ti me undergraduate s t u d ents , a m i n i mu m of 1 2

qualified st udents.

F

ho u rs mal' b e taken quali ­

c red i t hours must b e co m p l e ted each a c ade m i c year and a de g ree

Under federal regu latio ns , adjustments to an awa rd package must be made if a studeDt re ceiv e s additional awards o f a i d from sources ex:ternal to the u n i r ' i l )'. I n eve ry case, however, F i nanc ial Aid a nd Stud e nt E m p l o )' m e n t w i l l attem pt to allow the s t udent to keep a s much o f the award p a c k age as p oss i ble . By treating a i d received Tom external sou rces in l l l i s way, additional avvards from the u n ivers ity" reso u rces can be made to o t h e r

for students who

1 9 2 cred i t

fy i n g fo r fi n !lei'll d i d , a n d t h e m ax i m u m t i me frame of i x yea r s

all p a perwork h as been co m p le ted . Half of the award is d is b u rse d

co nt ac ti ng the Student . rv i ce

e

ate degree is six ye a rs . E en if a s tudeD t ch a nges h is or her maj o r

revi e we d with the group currentl y b e i n g p ro cessed . Aid, w i t h the e xce p t io n of C o llege v\fo rk

or

ssisun

the maximum number of cre d i t hour · t h a t rna)' be t templed is

payment arrang ments will have their awards cancelled. If an

I

sufficient num be r of cre dit hours,

For ful l - t i m e un d e rg r a duate tuden ts receiv i ng fin a nc i I a id ,

do not complete satisfactor),

a p p l i cant later decides to rcap p l y, the application w i l l be

C

a

years.

A pp l ica n ts who do not return their acce p ta nce of an award by

A

redit h ur or m re per emester.

aca dem ic p rogres. in t h e c o u rse of st u d y he

T h i s should be done as soon

n �rudents

ard Jl1 y be made d urin g t h e year i an a id

o r d er t o conLinue t o receive fin a n ial

VAilDATlNG THE AID OFFER

P

t he r are in good stand­ re h a rdsh i �

However, each fi na ncial aid rec ip ien t mLlst m a in t a i n satisfucto ry

e.nt ouL beg in n i ng

i n June.

8

an a\

rec i pi nt has n o t enro lled fo r

2. F i n a n c i al aid decisions for co ntinuing P LU studen ts are mad e

Aid

a

u s e a �ev

However, no in t i tu t i mal grants w i l l b awarded to s t u d en ts with CU L11 U lal ilre gr ade poi n t averages below 2.00. Mo reover, federal regu l a t ions re q u i re thal after fo ur term. or rn re f at tem p ted enrol l ment, st u d e nts below 2.00 c u mu la t i e grade p o i nt average w i l l have their federal tin,lIlcial aid revo ked . Pa i fi c Lutheran n ilrcrsity' Schools of B usines dTI I E d uca t i o n requi re a m. i n i m u m g ra de po i n t erage of 2 . 50. 1 0 b e g i v e n p r i o rity for mo t types 0 financial a i d , a n a p p l i ­ ca n t must be e n rol le d as a fu l l - t i me snldenl. Fo r Federal Pinan­ c i a l Aid p rogram" a fu l l -t i m e student is deoned as any perso n Adj ustments i n

a c tual notification will be m a i led the fi rst we k in Ap r i l . are

a l low st u d en ts \0 cont i n ue

l u ng

who mu t devote th ei r efforts Lo ac h i e vi ng satisfact o ry grades.

bu t failure to m eet the priority date may re u l t i n a red uct io n o f

du ring Ap ril a n d May. No tifica tions

to

<],

S

I

T

Y

ra n d ( EOG). Washi ngt

D

Scholars, v ave, TRIO,

an I aoy other S ta t e of

ashi ngto n funded pr gram, sali facto r y progress is rev iewed at the en I of each semester. The fo l l ow i ng grades do n t i nd i c a t successful co mpletion of acade m ic credit ap p li ca b l e toward a d grec.: i n c o mpletes ( T ) ,

w ith d ra wal ( W ) , u noffi c i al withdrawals (UW) , a n d g rades of E and F. Any co u rses i n wh ich r ades a re rec e ive d are, however, incl uded in t h e m a l<i m u . m n u mbe r l) credit · that may be attem pted ( 192) and a re coDsidered Lo be within the m ax i m u m


t i me frame a i l wable for a c h iev i ng

a degreto (six )/ears) . All credits ear ned by exa m i nation, whi h are applicable

toward , deg r e, w i l l I'll' incl uded in the li mi.tation on credit t ha t can be at te m pt ed w h i le eligible for fi nancial aid. Once a cour. c has been comp l ted sue es s fu lly, the c r d i t hours earned are c:ow1ted t w ard the max i m u m n u mb er o f hours w h i.ch c a n be taken under financ ial aid el ig i b i l i t y. I f a cou rse is s ucce ssful l l com let d mo rc rhan o nce, it is c o u n ted onJy O1lCe rowa rd a � tude nt 's deg ree req u i reme nts and toward the m, imcm n u m ber c f hours that can be ta ke n under fi n a nc i al aid el igi bil ity.

urriculum i nc lude very few [.J nc r e di t es whose c r dit hO llrs are nQt app l i ca b le to a degree. If a ny s u ch -o urses are taken by financial a id reci p i e n ts , tht! h urs w i l l be included i n the l i m ita tio n on c r d its tha t may be attempted and will be co ns i dc re d within the time fr a m e al lowable fo r a ch iev ing a d ree . In the event th aI a l u de n t fails to meet th criteria fo r sa tisfactll ry progress d u r i ng a po rt ic u la r se m este r, he or she will be placed on financial aid p ro bation . F a il u re t o regJ i n satisfac­ tory financial aid academ ic s t a t u s w i l l re wt in the cancellation () fi nancial aid . nee lUlsati s fact ory fi na nc i , I ai d p ro gress has b e en dt:ter­ mined, stud n ts receive offi ial l1o ti fication. Students wh o have had their aid den ied due to u nsa ti sfa to ry progress may ap pl)' for r i nsta te m e n t by s u bm it tin g a le tter of pe ti t i on t the Fi nan ial Aid and t u den t Em ployment O ffice . St uden ts w h os e fi nanc ia l aid ha. b n d nied may petition fo r re insta tem en t of their aid i n one of two ways: 1. they may co mp lete ne semester of full - ti me enroli meJ1t using their ow n financial resources, or 2. they may s u b m i t nIl appeal to the Fi nancial Aid and ludent Emp loy menl Office documenting the u n us ua l ci rcumstances which have made it i m p os ible to make sat i s fa c to ry progress Ju r i ng tilt! se mest e r in ue tion. The u n ivers ity's

CO l1 r�e$

or

eour

u m m e r s e SiOl1S m y a ls o be use d as terms duri n g which a student on tinanc ial aid proba tio n may re ga i n satisfactory academic tatlUo. However, tudents enrolling in s u m m er sessions fo r t h is purpose mList use t h e i r own fin a n ci a l reso urces a nd are inel i' i ble fo r fi na n cial aid through the u n i ve r s i ty.

AID PACKAGES t ud e n ts are u�unlly e.ligible for seve ral di fferent types o f a i d from v a riou s aurces ; there fo re PLU offe rs a fi na n cial aid package of fun ds . F u nds offered de pend on a number of fa c t or s , in dudi ng st a t us as an u nd e r g r a du ate o r g ra d uat e student, t h e funds available at t h e t i me 3 student ap p l i es and the am o u n t of Gnanci I need. A n expect ed famil. contribution is derived usin g a federal orrnula app lie d to FAFSA i n formation.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS Sc hu l ar h i ps und grants are funds t h at do not have to be re p a id . A t uden t 's pa cka ge i n c l u des g i ft monc y w h enever gu id e l i n es and fu nding levels perm i t. Whe re applica ble, the co m b i n t i on of tuition rem i s icm and/or the[ ins t i t u t i o nally funded resources (e.g., lergy Dependent, A l u m n i De pe nd en t , R eg e n ts ) will be aw rded to a maxinHlm of PLU t u i t i o n cost. To receive PLU grant or scholarship a sistance, stl1dents m I1St be full-time, taking a m in i m um of ) 2 nonrepeated cred it hol1I's each term. P L aw ard s gift ass i sta nce for 1 2 - 1 7 hours pe r term for the acade m ic year ( faU and s pr i n g ) o n ly. In addi t ic n, unless Qtherwise no ted, the schol arsh ip. and grants listed below art! necd-based and are available to firs t- degree under�rad uat e.s only. Recipienl must l11;}i nt , in sa t i fa tory academic pro�ress as defined in the carill o\: bv I�in nc i al id. Institutionally con trolled scholarships alld 'ra nts are pro vided by the university a n d/o r university dO llurs. If it is determined tllar all o r a portioTl of a s t u dent ' award is pro vided by a de s ignated o r named SOl/ree, a n updated offer offtnan ial aid will b e sent.

Z l> Z n

PLU FUNDED - NON-NEED FOR TUITION EXPENSES REGENTS' AND PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to

first-year students in re c o g ni t i on of outs tanding academic achievement , s e rvi ce in high s c ho o l and in anticipation o f

continued excellence

at

. Students who met the fo l low i n g

PL

basic reqlI i rements are invited to a p pl y : a p plication fo r ad m i ss i o n postmarked by December 3 1 ; 3.80 GPA at t h e t i m e of admission;

c

1 2 5 0 SAT or 28 A::T; an d U.S. citizen or o b ta i ni n g ci t i zen sh i p. The Rege nt s' Scholarship is awarded to cove r the ful l cost of tuition lip t o 17 em estcr hours per term ( fa l l and · pr i ng) fo r t h e

5 cred its in J- ter m . The P resi d ent 's Scholar­ ship i a h I f tuition award for the academic year. B o t h a re renew.lble fo r three years provided a 3 . 3 0 c u m u l a t i ve PLU G PA is academjc year and

mai n tained.

PLU ACADEMIC SCHOlARSHIPS o f $ 500 to $6,000

a r e a wa rd ed to a d m i t t ed firs t - yea r and t r a nsfe r students, based on a ca de m i c standing a t the t i mt! o f , d mi ssi o n . Students must be . 5. citizens a nd receive an o ffe r of a d m i s s i o n by March 1 . A 3 . 30 PLV GPA is req uired fo r renewal. Fina ncial need is not a d ete rmi n i n g factor.

PHI THETA KAPPA (PTK) SCHOLARSHIPS of $3 ,000 are g ra n te d to transfer students with a PA o f 3 . 0 o r higher, 4 5 + s e m es te r

hours

(60+ q u a rt er hours)

of tra nsferable col le g e co urse work,

alld p roof of PTK m embers h i p. Students must be a d m i t t ed by March l . The award is re n ew a b l e fo r one yea r during the u ndergraduate p er i o d o f s tudy i f a c u m ul a t i ve 3.30 PLU J PA is maintained. F in a n cial need i s not a de te r m i n i ng fa ctor. Three awards are gi ven each year.

ALUMNI DEPENDENT GRANTS of $500 per year for fou r years

a re available to full-time d ep en d e n t s t u den ts wh o se pa r e n t ( s )

attended PLU ( o r Paci fic Lu theran Co l le ge ) fo r tw more. S t u d en t m u s t b e a

.

s em e s t ers o r

. c i t i ze n . Financial n e ed is n o t a

determining factor. re available to

FACULTY MERIT AWARDS

24

st u d en ts who have

c om pl eted 45 s mester ho urs or more al P LU. No s ep a r a te application is necessary. P L stndents fo r sele t i on .

l)'pes of Aid

.."

DONORS/FUNDED UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIPS

facult y recommends in d iv i d u a l

otification is m ade in th

spring semester

for the following year. The award is renewable fo r one year d u r i ng the undergraduate p riod of s tu d y. Financial need is n o t a d et e r m i n i n g fac to r. RIEKE LEADERSHIP AWARDS fo r up to $2 ,000 per year a re

PA and d e m on s t rat e d

ava i labk to s tud e n t s with a 3 .00+

leader hip Or active i nvolvement in a m u l t iethnic co n t ex t . S e p a r a te applic.ltion reqll i red. Con tact Student Involvement and Leadership, 2 5 3 . 53 5 . 7 1 95 .

F ina n c i a l need is n ot a dete r m i n i ng

fa ct o r. CLERGY DEPENDENT GRANTS are ava il a ble to dependent children of o rdain ed mill i sters who are a ct i ve ly 'erving a Christian c o ng re ga t io n full-time. The gra n t amount is $ 1 ,000 per

year ( $ 500 per semester) fo r fo ur years. Financial need is not a d e t e r m i n i ng fa c to r. ARMV RESERVE OFFICER TRA I N ING CORPS (ROTC) SCHOLAR· SHIPS are available to ful l - t i m e u ndergraduat file a

FAFSA

.

t udents must

and m eet all PLU G PA st a n dard s . Up to full t u i t i o n

and ro o m and meals p oss i b le .

all PLU's ROTC , ffic e fo r

i n fo r m a t i o n at 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 8 7 4 0 .

ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS a r e granted t o st udents who have exce p t i o na l abil ity in t h e field of a r t, dance, drama, forensics, and music. TI1e aw ard requires recommendation

by a

PLU faculty m em b er each year and is renewable on t he basis of recomm endation

and parti c i p a t i o n . F in a n ci al need is not

a

deter m i n i n g factor.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

R

S

I

T

Y

9


c

INTERNATIONAL GRANTS are av a i l a ble to gr adu a te a nd

u n de rgrad u a te i l1ternati{.lIl � 1 stude n t s a t ten d i ng Pacific L u t htTan ...J

u z « z

...

Un ive rsity. The a m o u n t is $� ,OOO per year fo r fo u r yea rs . Award d automati c a l l y a n d may be renewed a n n ually fo r qu a l ifyi ng students. F i n a n cial need i not a d et e rm i n i ng factor.

Note: FAFSA

THE AMERICAS GRANT is ava i la b le to citizens o f count. ries i n

[ orth, Central, and South America ( excl uding

States). The

n ited

(except South Hall, where m e als live i n

a

are

not i n cluded ) . Students m ust

r e m a i n :1 I1 es t i m a t e u n t i l ve ri fic a t i o n is compl tec!, i f a s t u d e n t elected.

Stud en ts taking l 2 hour

h al l roO Ill and select d meal plan. Awa rded a u tomati­ to

timely trlmlller eadl year to offillf/tlcia/ need Jar tleed-b(jjed aid.

FEDERAL AND STATE FUN DED

has been

The amount is the equival e n t of a double-occupancy PLU cally and renewed a n nually

;P

Federal PeJi Grants are federal gra n ts a va i l a b l e to s t u d e n ts

orway, or Sweden who are attending PLU ful l - lime. e

holars h i p s ) . S t u d -n t.

2 . 00 PL

who take a t [east 1 cred i t h o u r per semester. P e l l Gr a n ts

NORDIC GRANT is available to c it izens of Den m a r k, Finland,

residen

u mu l at ive

s

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDED GRANTS

FLU residence hall. T h is gra nt re pla ces the I n ternational

1 eland,

d

ith fi n a n c i a l need ( w h o

\

""1$1 be submilted i " (/

reeslab/is/I e"idellce

am o u n t is the equivalent o f a double-occupancy room a nd meals

tndents

m a y not qualify for o the r i n s t itutiona l m ust ma i n ta i n at l east

'ra.n ts. Financial need is n o t a determ i n i n g fa ctor.

grant,

a d m i t ted ful l- t i m e · t u de n t · for a

9- 1 1

less than

maximuIll of fo u r years. S t udent m u s t live in a PLU reside nce

or m o re per semester rece ive

a

fu l l

h o u rs receive 3/4 gra n t , 6-8 h o u rs l / 2 gra n t , a n d h o urs ap prox i m ately

1 /4.

gran t.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are rederally funded grants a w a rd ed o n t h e b a s is of h i gh fi n a n c i a l need.

h a L l . This gra n t repla ces the I n ternational Grall t . Fin a n cial need is nor a dete r m i n i n g fa ctor. NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP a w a rd s are offe red for $ [ ,000$ 2,000 to NMS T- P SAT ( ati n a l Merit Semj-final ist Q u a l i fy­

Wasb ington State Need Grants are a v a i l::lble to e l i g i b l e residents o f t h e St:lte of Was h i ngton w h o a t t e n d PL . These

should i n form tbe Na tional Merit Scholar h i p Corporat i o n of

awarded at PL

i n g Te t - P re-Scholastic Assessmen t 11 t) fi n al i sts . hnali sts

their i n t e n t to en ro l l at P LU.

gua ra l!teed a

1

atiOlw! Merit fi nalists

gra n l" S

llTt?

total of $7, 000 through CI (ombi;ation of a t her

not

st udents frO I11 church

ongr gation. who attend Pacitlc Lutheran

niversity. Through the

'I S program, Pl.U will match, dollar-for-dollar, scholarships from $ 1 00 to $ J ,000 provided by congregations or organizations with i n a church [0 students attending PLU. Students and/or congregations may reserve their m a tchin g fu nds ea rly by submitti ng a PLUMS application for an an t icipated chur h , dlolarship. The PLUMS program' l imited funding will be a wa rded on a fi rst-come, must receive all PLUMS

payments by September I :> . Funds m u t be sent directly to Financial MS

TUITION REMISSION: E m p loyees of the u n iv e rs i ty a re e l i gible fo r

75% t u i t i o n re m is s i o n . Tu i r i o n rem i s s i o n is a u n iversity g i ft reso urce. Stud n ts receivi n g t u i t i o n remission may be awarded ad d itio nal merit and n eed-ba s ed i n s t i t u t io n a l g i fts, but o n l y up to t h e cost of t u i t ion. Rec ei p t of t u i t io n remission may serve to adju t r elimi n a te o th er i nstitu t i o n a l aid previously awarded. F i n ancial need is not a deter m i n i ng fac t o r. to

to

a

3 . 2 5 c u m u lative

h ave an entering

Commu n i ty and Technical C o l leges . App l i ca n t m us t be

a

h e aW<lrd is fo r two years

(

·ee

S a t i s factory Acadernic Progress. ) Download

P ar t n e r and

have completed any TRI

progra m . Reci pi ents mu st demon­

strate fi n a ncial need. F u n d i n g is l i m i ted . nuo p r o g ra ms i n ­

clude: Upward Bound, Ta lent S�arch, a n d SM ART . i\ TRIO

3.00. Re newal wilJ req u i re good a cade m i c 3.00 P L U PA, t i mely reap p l i ca t i o n

awru'd will replace \ ash ington

t:lte

eed

rant el igib i l i ty .

ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to h igh

school s n i ms who have demon s- l m ted acade mic achievement. The award lllay be renewed fo r u p to tl1 ree year , provided that fu nds are ap p rop r i ated and the student remains el igible.

matches D o l la rs

A m o u nts vary. App l ic a t i o n is made through t he

program of C i tizens' Schol a rs h i p Fo undation of

America.

I

year in a vo ca t i o nal progra m appro ed by l h e State Board fo r

www. hecb.wa.gov/ p ay i ng/i ndel(.. h t m l .

stude nt based o n financial need and as fun d i n g permits. Dollars

C

from v,Iww.h ecb . wa.gov/ pa}'i ng/:1i dp rogram s.h t ml.

TRIO - a State Need Grant Program is available t o s tuden ts who

fo r Scholars chapter awards, d o lla r fo r dollar, up to $ 1 ,000 per

A

e d uca t io n assistance ag<'ncy i n

a

appropriate

�t udent' home state.

WASHINGTON SCHOLARS AWARD is availabl e to s t uden ts who

are VVashington State Scholars for fo u r years, s u bject to state

F i e

L U T H E R A N

be

appro p r i a t i o n s by th e Was h ington Sla te Le gisl at ure . To inquire

scholarships from a ny D o l lars fo r Scholars chapter. Pac i fic

P

kamania,

PROMISE SCHOLARSHIPS are ava ilable p e n d in g co nti n u i ng

A F$A, a n d demonstrated fi n a n c i a l need .

a

Pierce,

(See Sa t isfactory Academic Progress. ) D ow n l o a d appl icatio n s

state fu n d i n '.

DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS are avail able to studenb receiving

for S h o l a rs is

owlitz, Frankl i n , King, Kitsap,

Snohomish, Spokane, T hu rst o n , Wal l a W,t/ la , or Ya k i m a and

a p p l i at·ions [rom www.wtb.wa.gov.

standi ng, a c u m u l ative

Lutheran U n h·crs ity is a Col le g i a te

Benton, Cla rk,

( fo u r semesters) a n d the a m o u n t vari es each year depe·n d i n g on

t u d e n t s o n the basis o f acade m i c achievement and

t h ro ug h the

of t h e fo llowing \·Vas h i ngton state co u n t ies i n orc!er to be eligible:

o n th e slatus ()[ fu nding or to down./oad an a p p l ication visit

fin a n c i a l neec!. F i rs t - y e a r s t u d e n t s m us t h a ve c u m u l ative GPA o f

Il1U t apply p r io r to at! nd i ng Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. E l i gi b le ::l p p l icants m u s t be residents of one

m a i n t a i n a PLU G PA o f 3 . 0 each t e rnL

Q CLUB SCHOLARSHIPS ar e awarded to new fi rst-year and

GPA. Transfe r s t u d e n t s are requi red

or j u n i or standing in t he a m o u n t of $2,500 per year ( subject to s t a te fu ndi ng) . StudCllts

'Wa, h i ngton state resident. a h igh school graduate, a n d must

PLU FUNDED - NEED BASED tran sfer

(EOG) are aw,mied to t r a n sfer �ludents w i t h an associa te's degree

(WAVE) i s available to students who have co m pIer d at least one

de t e rmin i ng factor.

90'Vo a n d their d epe n de nts arc e l i gible for up

j 2 h o urs

o r m o r e p er sem ter receive a fu l l gr a n t ; s t u d e n t s laking 9- 1 1 h o u rs r e c e i v e a 3/4 gra n t ; s t u d e n t s t a k i n g 6-8 h o u rs re e i ve a

WASHINGTON AWARD FOR VOCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

application for match ing funds are requi re d. Financial need is not a

up to

accord i n g to Wa s h ington S t a t e law. S t ud e n t s l a ki ng

placebo u n d . S tu d e n t s Illust be enroll ed at least 6 hours per terill.

first-se rve basis; however, al/ match i n g funds dpplications must be

Aid and Student Employment; 1I0t be given to the student. PL

eed G r a n t s

WASHINGTON STATE EOUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS

PL

received by August l 5 . In ad dition, PL

i n accor(hnce with the State H igh e r E d u c a t i o n

1 1 2; a n d s t u d e n t s t a k ing fewer t h a n ) h o u rs a re not e l i g i b le.

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY MATCHING SCHOLARSHIP

financial as istance t

i n ten ded fo r ,t udents w i th h i gh need. Gra n ts are

m u s t be used fo r ed ucat i o na] expenses o t h e r t h a n t u i t io n

a determ i n i ng fa ctor. (PLUMS) provid

are

Coord i n a t i n g Boa rd's policies. Wa shi ngton S t a t e

illstil l lfiorlaj scholarship resou rces. This a m o u n t incllldes the $ 1 , 000 to $2,000 "{a tiollal Meri t Scholarship. Financial need is

10

PLU GRANTS a re a war d ed to

U N I V E R S I T

Y


legislative adjust ment. To renew each yea r the student must ma i ntai n a umulat i 3.30 PLU JP . The Was lt i n 'ton Scholar Program honor t h ree gradu at ing h igh chool seniors from each I g i s l a t ivt: district each year. For more information v i it www.hech.wa.gov/paY lng/ index.html. A l l awards from federal alld Slale sources are made asslltllillg the allticipated fulld, will be available. Should a reductio" ill fu"dillg occur, awards may be reduced or elim; mued.

pr ees in g and delivery of your loan funds. (Please note: If you signed , Mast r Promissory ote "Of 2000-200 I or 200 1 -2002 Federal Fa mily Educational Loans P r og ram loan, you will not need to 'ign an othe r p ro m is ()f)' note and none will be mai led to yo u,) Loan fu nds are electron ically t rnnsmitted to the univers i t y by all knders fo un d on o L i r lender list. VV stro ngly reco mmend you choose a lend 'r from this l ist to avoid h av i ng to sli nd in l i n e i n t h e Student Services ,enter to end rse ( 'ign) yo ur paper check. ,he ks must be endorsed within 30 days after be ing received by the un iversity. I n add it i on ,

LOANS

» z n »

I""

» c

lenders not on our lender list m ay not offer you repayment

Student loans allow 'ou to postpone paying for college expenses until you h ave complet d your education. Loan obligati n s are described i:n t h i ' section a n d i n the prom issory note . Please read

incentives, wh ich could reduce th overall cost of your loan. If you are borrowi n g the FFELP fo r the fliSt time , you must complete an entrance counseling session before loan funds can be released to yo u r

carefully so you un d rsta nd all your re ponsibilities before y u accept a loan.

a

COWlt.

ot completing a session will result

in the loan funds being returned to your lender, causing a pos ible d el ay in settling your account and p os s ib l y i ncurring additional finance c h a rges .

NEED BASED LOANS FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN ( funding is limited)

SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

credit ho urs) undergr.tduate o r (4 credit ho u r ' ) graduate s t udents with h igh n ed. Amouot: Up to $4,000 fo r each yea r o f undergrad uate study and u p to $6,000 � r each 'ear of graduate or profession 1 tudy. Repayment: A fi, ed in terest rate of 5%. Th e rc is a 9- mon t h grace pe r io d after t h e student graduates, w i t hdraw , or d r op s t o

Ellgibillty: At lea t half- t i m e

Eligib lUty!

." z

t lea s t half-time

(6

less than half-Lime art ndance. Principal a n d i n t rest payments begin at 1 2 mo n ths. Dc� rrals avaUable for student s tat us , economic h ard 'hip, 'elect vol u n teer services and p re-ca ncella­ tion borrowers. Comments or Condjtions: Recipient are req u i red to si n a pr mi s o ry note. The promissory not s w i l l be available for ncw borro\ ers to pi ck up in the Student Ser v i ces Center after the fi rst veek f c1as · e.. The student mllst s ign the pro m issor y not ., complete a n o n l ine entrance interv iew, a n d return tl1(, p rom i s­ sory note if a cepl i n g the I an . Con t i n u i ng st ud e n t s w i l l be sent a n o t i ce C r a n a p p o i n t ment to go to t h Student Services Center/Student Loan Office to sign a p ro m issor y notc. All loans n t s i g n ed fo r will b nee/led. Pri r i ty i given to u n de r gr adu­ a t studcn ll. The total loan may be fo rgi en for tea hing in low­ income population a rea , te ach i n g t he di)abled, or teach ing i n a federal H ead Start pr gram. Add iti onal loan cancell tion con d i t ions e x is t . FEDERAL NURSING LOAN ( fu n d i ng I l i m i t ed )

Eligibility: Stud nt enrol led at le3 t half�time

(6 cred it hours)

in

School of N u rsin g ( c.'Ccep t pre- nu rsi ng) . Preference iven to LPN student , Amount: Up to $4 , 0 00

fi.xed in terest rate 0 5%. There i a 9- 111onth grace period aft r the ludent graduat s, withdraws, or dr o p ' to less than hal - time attendance. Pri n cip al and in terest payment beg i n d t 1 2 months. Comments or Condition : Reci pients are requi red to sign a promissor' note. The promissory Dotes wi l l be JvaiJable for new borrowers to pi k up io the Student Service. �enter a ft e r the first week of cl asses. The ,tudent mll5t s ign the prom isso ry note, com plete a n on l in e entrance in terview, and return th > prom is­ sory note if accepting the l oa n . Continuing . t udents will be sent a no t ice fo r an appointment to go to the , l u d e n t Scr ices Center/Student Loa n Offi e t o sign pro missor y notc. All loans not signed fo r will bl' cancelJed. Priority is given to undergradu­ ate st udents. Repayment:

FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOANS

ne or more of the Federal amily Education Loans may be Ii t d on y ur 0 e r. This mean ' y IU may accept r r je t h se 10 n e p a rately. Federal 10 n. ar o bt a ined from a lender (list available i n the Financial Aid a nd Student Empl yment Office) via an clectroni ap pl ication certified by F i na nci al Aid and Student Employmenl. I t is im p or t a nt that when you receive your appli ati n/pro m i ssory note, you mail it back fo r prompt

(4

(6 credit hours) u n dergraduate or cred il hours) graduat student .

Up to $ 2,6 25 per year f r first-year studen ts' $3,500 fo r sophom res; $5,500 fo r j u n i rs and seniors; and $8,500 for

Amount:

graduate students. Repayment� A a riable i nterest rate which hanges an nually and cannot exceed t .25% an d month l), principal an d i n terest payments begin s i x months after the tudent graduates, with­ draw , or drops to les than h a l f-t i me attendance. Comments or Conditions: The fe d e ra l gove rnment p a ys the i nt er 51 on you r loan o n your be h a l f until you enter repaym ent. Yo u are re ponsible or 'e1ecting a l en d e r from the lender l i s t ( list available i n the Financial Aid and Student Emplo)'m n t Office ) . Y(I U h a e t h e o p t i o n t o select a lender n o t o n t h e l is t . However, be aware that doing 0 w i l l usuall delay rece i p t of your loan fu nd" r q uire YOll t o t'I1dorse a paper check in the Student Service Cen ter, and yo ur l o a n is unl ikely to have the financial repayment incentives avai.lable through our lenders.

NON·NEED BASED LOANS UNSUBStDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

(6 credit

Eligibility: Studen t attend i n g at least half-time

ho urs)

or a graduate tu dent attending at lea t half- t i m e (4 -redit hours) who does not qualify for all o r part o f the maximum Subsidized Fedt:ral Stafford Loa n .

p t o $2,62 p e r year fo r first-y a r students; $3,500 fo r sophomores; $5.500 fo r jun iors and seniors; and $ 1 0,000 for

Amount:

grad uate students. Repayment: A \'ari hie i nter t rate which cha nges an nually and ca nnot exceed 8.25% and monthly prin cipal payments begin six months aft r t he tudenl gr adu a t , w i t h d raws, o r drops below half- l i me attt:ndanc('. UlIslI bsidized means you are responsible fo r the accruing i n terest on t he loan, wh ich begins on the date the loan is disbursed; h wev r, i n terest payments may b e deferred untU yOLi enter repa ment. Comments or Conditions: Finan i al need is not a requirement. 'O LI are responsible for s el e c t in g a le nd er from t h e lender list ( list available i n the Fina ncial Aid and Student .mp loyment Office ) . Yo u have t h e o p tion t select a l e n r n t o n the list. However,

be aw a re that doing so \ i l l usually de l a y rece ipt of your loan fu nds, r q u i re you to endorse a p a pe r check i n the S t udent Ser ices Center, and your loa n i s unl ikel ro hav the fi nancial repayment incen t ives avn ilable through our lender . FEDERAL PLUS LOAN Eliga"illty: Parents of dependent ·tuden !. Amount: Parent mil borrow u p to the full cost of their

stude nt's

lIege d ucation m i n u s the amount of any financial

aid the studenr is receiving. Repayment: A variable i n t erest rat which changes an nually and cannot exceed 9.00% a n d m o n thly p rincipal and i nterest P

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paym e n t s b eg i n w i t h i n 60 (l<1 ),s a fter the final d i s b u rsement o f

fu n ds. ( I n t eres t begin s acc ruing [ro m t he date th

YBTERANS AFFAmS AND VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

fll nds a re first

Pacific Lu t he ra n

J i�bursed. P a re n t Plus Loan Request fo rm i s r eq ui re d b y Pa i f i Lutheran Un iversity ilnd the federa l govern­ ment b 'fore this loan , n be i n i t i aled. The Parent P l u s l .a, n Request fo rm can be ob tai ned at the • tuden t Servi ', e n ter. F i n a ncial ne<:: d is not a r quireme.nt. E. i t h er paren t may borrow tbis l o a n for the student. The p a r e n t is resp o n si b l e for sele Ling a lender fr m the le nder l i s t (U t ava i l able in the F i na n c i a l Aid and Stude nt Empl yment file). A separ a t l o a n applicati n a n d p ro m isso ry note wi ll then be mailed to the pa ren t. The parent will t h e n mail back the I an a p p l ic.ltion a n d prom issory note m the ret u rn 'nvel ope provided f, I' p rocessing. Comments or Conditions:

u Z < Z

p to

a

P

l oa n ,

$4 ,000 per year for first- year

'tudents and

so phomores alld $5,000 fo r j u n iors and seni ors.

Repayment.: A variable in teres t rate wh i d} changes a n nually and cann t exceed 8 . 2 5 % and m o n t h ly p r i ncipal payments begin S L X

NAMED ENDOWED/RESTRICTED CHOLARSH l PS

m o u ths after th . t udent g ra duate , w i t h d r aw , or d ro p s to 1 ('S5 than h a l f- ime attcncLmce. UI/subsidized means you ar� respon­ sible for t h e acc r u i n g i n terest on lhe loan. which heg i n s on t,he date the fu nds are first disbursed; h oweve r, i n tere t pay rnent­ may d fcrred u n t il you enter repaymell t . Comments or Conditions: Financi<ll need is n o t a requireme n t . You ,ue resp on ihle � r s ICC li n g a lender from t h e lender l ist ( l ist Jvailable in th e Fi nancial Aid ,l I l d St uuen t E m p l o y ment O ffict' ) . You have the op tion to selec t a I ' n d e r not on the list. Howt:!ver, be 3 \ are that dOLn� so w i L l Ll slIal l y delay re eipt o f your IOJn fW1ds, re quir you lO endorse a paper check in t h e St udent Serv ic '� "enter, and yo u r l o a n may n o r ha e t h e f i n a n cial incenLives a ailable w i t h ollr I nd rs whik you are i n re payment.

For the Ii t of Named EllifowedlRestricted ScholcL rsiIips, visit the PLUcarn log online tlt www. p lu.edu/prin trcatalog.

ALTERNATIVE LOANS Eligibil ity: II tud n ts Am.o unl! Varies Comments and Condjtions: Various alt Illal ive loan are

prov ided for a l l sl lIdeJ1ts, i n d u d i n 7 those not qual i fying for Title I V aid. Please inqu ire i n the Student Services 't:!nter fo r informJtion. TEACB£R CERTl FJC.ATE are el igible to receive a Fed eral St, ffo rd Subsid ized a n d /o r Unsubsid ized Loan up t $5 , 500 . I f a stud nt is i ndependen t or is a de p e n d e n t ludent whose pare n t s a r e denied a P L S loan, the student is el i gi ble fo r all add.itio nal Un s u b s i d ized Fede r,!1 Stafford Loan up to 5,000.

Students accepted i n to this program

PRINCIPAl. CERT1Fl

ATE

Stud nts are not d i g i hle fo r Federal Sta(f(lrd L o a ns accord ing to tederal regula tions. Contact the S tud ent Se rvi ces Ce n t e r fo r

information o n al te.rn a t i

e

loans.

EMPLOYMENT COLlEGE WORK STUDY EligibiUtr- At least parHime stlld en ts. Amount:

arie

based nn need,

n-campus johs; studen1s Lan p p l )' t h rough the Financial Aid and Student Employm nt Offic .

Comments or Conditions: for i n d i v i d ual

jobs

STATE WORK STUDY Eligibility! At lea t part-t i m e stu dents. Amount: Varies bJ ed (,In need.

Off-cam pus jo s; student� must apply for ind.ividual jDbs th rough the F i n a n c. ial Aid and tudent Em ployment Office.

Comments or Conditions:

12

S t u d nts sh o u l d gain a d mi ssio n to t h e u n ivers i t y a n d sec t h e

ffairs .oo rd inator before m king JPplica­ tion fo r benefits. :tudent are req u i re d to re ' ist e r Jt the Ve t e r a ns Affairs Co rdinator'.; Office l o ca te d i n the St ud en t Serv ices Center ( Room [ 0 2 , Ha uge Ad m i n islration B u i ld i ng ) . before each term to i nsure con t i n u ous r ceipt of benefi t s .

I!ligibllity: I n dep nelen l s t ud e nt or dependent tudent who e

parents arc den ied

t e l ephone 800.827. 1 00 0 . u n iversity's Veterans

ADDITIONAL UN SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

Amount:

n iversity's aca d e m i c p ro gr a m s of study are approved by the Wa shi ngton State Higher Ed uc a t io n Coord i n a t ­ i n g Boa rd's State p p rov i n g Agency ( ill e B/SA ) fo r enrollment o persom eligible t o r ' ceive ed ucational benefits under T i t l e 38 and T i t l e 1 0 U " Ve terans, widows, w i d owers, a n d children of deceased or dis abled vet rans whu wi sh to i n q u i re abo ut t he i r eligibiLity fo r benefits should co n t a t the Regional O ffice of the Ve terans , d m inistra t i o n , Fede , I Buildin", 9 1 5 Second Avenu e . Seattle, Washington 98 1 74 . Person s within the ' t a t e o f Was h ington may

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Tuition, Fees, and Payment Information for 2002-2003

LIJ....L:I�{C'I;f�UllJ'.!'I� 111111 IJ.. 11',[1 Il:t..Ilfll.',11 TII!f''''

, -

CredIt MOLIn

Full TIm ..

Cost

UNDERGRADUATE RATES 17

-

59, 250 per se m este r

Yes

Fa l l or S p r i n g

U n dergraduat e Tuiti o n Model (UTM) Fa l l or Spring

M o re than 1 7

Unde rg raduate T u ition Model (UTM) J-term (no additional cost up to 5 credit h o u rs)

1

-

5

Per credit ho ur Herm, or Sp r i n g

1

-

11

Studenh charged per (redit ho u r F a l l , J-term, or Spring

1 or m o re

GRADUATE PROGRAM RAYES

1

» z o

59, 250 per semester + $ 578 pe r hour for each credit over 1 7

Yes

,red it

Cred it hours over 5 are c h a rged at $ 5 78 per credit h o u r S 5 7 8 p e r credit hour for any courses Fa l l, Herm, o r Spring

No

Fall,

NOTE:

.., m m VI

-

12

U ndergraduate Tu ition M o de l (UTM)

o z

taken

$578 per credit hour for any courses Fall. Herm, or Spring

ta k e n or

S578 per credit hour for any courses taken Fall. J-term. or Spring

more

If- call1ptis st udents pay (/ program fec (not PLU t u i tioll)

specijic to the illdividuill p70gmrn 5ires. Contact l/7e

Willig Cr!rtlcrfur

hlLematio/llll Progra ms f o r complete details.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

Stu dents wh earn Credit b Exa m i n a t i o n are charged the follow i n g i n d d dit io n ( 0 t u i t i o n . 3 emester hours . . . . . . . $450 1 semester ho m . . . . . .... $ 1 50

2 se mes t r ho u rs ... ..... 300

4

se m e ter hours . . . . . . . $600

LATE REGISTRATION PEE S t u den t s add i n g o r w it h d ra w i n g fTom courses a f t r t he l a s t d a )1 of add/drop dur ing a term w i ll be assessed an adm i n istr:tt ive handl in g fee of $ 5 0 for each t ransact ion . These el a tes a re l i sted i n t h e class chedu.!c [l) r e a h term.

COURSE FEES Some c o u rs es require class

additional

ees t hat w i l l be assesse d . The

h te r m is ava i lable i n the Student Services

hedule for e

enter and provides

i nformat ion about

any fees that may a rtect

an individual course.

brought to campus. Reg i s t ra t i o n is

date . T h e fee is charged to the st ude n t the application i ' s u b m i t ted.

TRANSCRIPT INFORMATION 2 5 3.535. 7 1 3 5 www. plu. cdu/- '5vc/t raJ/script . h lml

U n o t [ c i a l and official t r a n , cript s a re rocessed i n t h e t u d e n t Services Cen ter. There is a 5 fee fo r each o ffi ial lT a n script . U n o ffi c ia l t r a n s c r i p t s ( u p to t w o a t a t i m e ) are issue.d

a t no

charge. 'It) ('equest an o ffi c ial t ra n s cr i p t , a s t u d e n t may fi L l o u t the Tra n sc r i p t Request l'orm i n t h ludent ervice Center or

$5 fee or each official transcript o r d red . I f pa y i ng by bank card, include the VIS o r MasterCard n u m be r and expiration date, a n d yo m zip code. Payment may also b e made b y check, cashier's check, or m o n ey ord r. Please do n o t mail cash . Student's ful l name Any and all fo rmer name(s) used Social Secu rity n umber a n d / o r PLU iden t i fication number Da t e of b i r t h urrent a d d res s a n d p h o n e n u m b e r Approximate d a t e o f l a. s t of anendance

EDUCATION PLACEMENT FEE

( BAE ) p rogram.

H EALTH SERVICES FEES Health S rvices wi ll charge a stu den t 's acco u n t . or a st u de n t may a n d p rt!s ri pt io ns .

pay directly, fo r immun izations, lab wo rk.

LUTECARD FEE A fee of $ 1 5 is b arge d to replace 10 t or t len s t u d e n t 1 D:. Lf an

Number of transc r i p ts needed

I D card has been damaged, ir must Desk and rep la ced for a fee of $ 5 .

Signature ( mandatory)

Addre ses to which the t ra n scr ip ts are t

be brought to t he Lutecard

UNPA I D FI NES

np<lid fi nes u c h a s those for p a r k i ng iola tions a n d overdue l ibrary materials w il l be charged to the st udent account. tudents as

is

T h e fo l low i n g i n formation is req u i red:

A one-time Educatio n Placemen t Pee of $45 is charged i n t h e la s t

i nc u r red to , void l a te fees

be e n t

Transcripts that need to be sent b y Federal Express ( Fed Ex) m us t h ave the followi ng: • Contact number of the recipie n t of transcrip t ( s ) • Physical address (mu t i n clu d e street n u mber) · Domesti co st is $ 1 0 .50 in add i t ion to fe o f $5 per t ran sc r i p t (may change) •

I n ternational cost is $20.50 i n add i t i o n to fee o f $ 5 per t r a llsc rip t ( ma), c ha nge)

PARKING REGISTRATION Parkmg on the PLU campus is by decal o n l y. Students m u s t es

d u r i n g the term

faxed to 2 5 3.538.2545 wi t h a signature.

I credit h ou r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 6 5 2 o r m o re credits p e r m d i u m ...... $300 or 2 003- 2 004 : I c re d i t h o u r .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... $ L 7 5 2 o r more credits e r medium . . . . . . $350

regi ler t he i r vehi

a co u n t

because o f the requirement for a "ignature. Requests m ay be

For 2002-200 :

,erne ter of t h e B a chel ors of Art's in Educa t i o n

o z

ONE-TIME GRADUATION PROCESSING FEE $55 fec i s charg d to ba alaureat a n d master's d eg r ee Ciwdi­

recei\' d . Requests by e-mai l or p h o ne cannot be p roces ed

This fee i ch arge d in addition to t uit i o n .

ou ra�ed to pay t h ese fines and handling c ha rges.

tor th� y�ar. Fail ure to

do w n l o ad a co p y of the · rm a t the \ ebsite l isted a b o ve. Processing t i me is five workin g days from th e date the request

PRIVATE MUSIC LESSON FEE

are en

' 20

regi tel' w i J I re u l t in a fi n e .

O n l y two

c

pi

5

L

U

per Fed

Ex

request

within 48 hours of t h e vehicle bein g P

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Requests will be returned u n p rocessed to the sender if: • Rl:q u i re d in ormation is m i s s i n g •

Form i, illegibl

Payment is

venues and are available fo r use until May 3 1 , 2003. t ude nt s may purchase as ma n y blocks of 25 meals as they wish, but once purch ase d , they are no nrefundable unless the s tu de n t fo rmally wit h d raws fro m the university.

IlOt i n c l uded

[f an a c co u n t is on any type of hold, the request will bl:

FINANCIAL OBUGATION/PAYMENT INFORMATION

mailed back w i t h

information regardi ng the appropr iate student's res ponsibility to resolve thl: h o ld and res ub mit he request. Official t ra nscri pt s can be made avajlable within 24 hours of rece ipt of re q uest. The fcc fo r th e 2 4 - h ou r o ffi cia l t rans cr i p t s is $5 per c py and an a dditional ad m i nis t r a t ive fee of $20 p e r request. I f the transcript(s) needs to be sent via Federal Ex p re s s

A d m is sio n to o r regis tr a t i o n with the university obligates students fo r pay m en t of all tuition a nd fees. [n a d d i t i o n , all s t u de n t s are req uired to sign a payment contract w i t h the un ive rs ity. This contract will i n fo rm t h e u n i ve rs i t y of which payme n t method has been chosen. If a p a ym e n t contract is n o t signed and received by t h e un i ve rs i t y, then t h e student w i l l

office to c ntacl. [t is the

I­ Z w

:E > -t Go o Z -t "" w W

...

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automatically be selected t o p a y i n full a.ll tuit ion and fe es b y the

add the fee l i st d above.

dates listed below. It is requi red of a l l students to e l ec t one of

INSURANCE

the three payment o p t ions or

Student h ea l t h and ac c iden t i n s urance is available through an

student acco unt. Holds restrict c erta i n uni ver s it y p r ivileges,

independent carrier. Brochures are available from the St udent

including the ri g h t fo r fu rther registration. For pa yme n t

Iealth Center or o n l i n e at www. pl u . ed u/

Life O ffice a n d the

arrangements, please see the S t ud e n t Services Center in the

- s l i f/hs. All students are s t ro n gl y advised to have medical

Hauge Administration B u i l d i n g , Room 102 or call 2 5 3 . 535 .7 1 6 1

i n s u ra nee.

o r 800.678 .3243.

Medical wit hdrawal in surance is a vai lable to all students t h rough a n independent carrier. App l i c a t io ns are available i n the Student Life O ffice and must b� s u b m i tt ed to the carrier prior to the start of classes .

HOW TO MAKE PAYMENTS Payme n t may be made by cash, check, wire, m o n e y order, VISA, o r Ma ste r Ca rd . VISA or MasterCard paym ents may be made 24 h o u rs a da y b y calli n g the .B u s i n ess Offi ce se c u red line a t

253.5 5.8376.

ROOM AND MEALS

Mail payments with b i L l ing statement re mi ttance stub to Pac i fic Lutheran Universi ty, Bu i ne�s Office, T�lcoma, W 98447-3 167 or deliver payment to the PLU Busines� ['fice in the Hauge Ad min istration Build i ng, Room 1 1 0 . Please d o not mail ca s h becks hould be made p ayab l e to Pa ifi Lutheran University. The s t udent's name and PL U ID nu m b e r sh o u l d be i n clud e d with all payments. $30 fe e i.-; charged on all ch e ck s returned due to nonsufficient fu nds.

All i ngle full-t ime ( 1 1 semester ho urs) students must live on ca mp us in un iversity housing unless t hey are: (a) l ivin g with t hei r pare�lt, I gal guard i a n , or hild, or ( b ) at least 20 years o l d r have completed 60 semester cred it hours by Se p t em be r I ( fo r the next fall emester) , or Februar )' I « (or tbe next spring ,eme ·ter)

I-

ElCC pc fo r reside n t s of

.

ollth Hall, all students w i t h an active

ho us i n g ass i gn m ent a re r e q u i re d to be e n ro l l ed in a un.iversity meal plan.

LUTE BUCK DISCOUNT A $75 discount, p e r se mester ( fall and s pr i n g ) , from tuition and other costs wlll be applied to the tudent a count if the speci fi c

Room Charges Dou b l e Room (2 or more people) . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 1 ,440hiemester Single! ingle ( I pe

o n in a I person room) $ 1 ,8 I 5/semester S i n g l e/ D o ub l e ( 1 person i n a 2 pe rso n room) . $ I ,9 1 5/ semester ....

criteria fo r eligibility of the discount is met. The Lute Buck Discount

.

fo rm is mailed with the Student

Although there is no room ch arge fo r I-te rm for t u d c n t s residing on ca m p u_ the previ uS fall or spring semesters, tudents must ancel their J · ter m h o u s i ng if they are not resi di ng o n c a m p u s for more t h a n even days during J - term. Students who have not cance l l e d their h o us i n g for J - term must have a meal plan. onta t l h e Residen tial L i fe O ffice fo r co s t info r m a t io n

Eligibility Criterill: • Out- of-pocket expenses, i ncl ud i n g tuition, room and meals, and special course fee. m i nus any a p plicable rl nancial a id and other resou rces for a semester must lotal �3,OOO or more.

P ayment and the Lute Buck Discount form must be subm itted/ postmarked by July 25 for fall semester and ecember 25 for spring

izes, s t yl e s, and co s ts . �o n tact the Resid ential Life

semester.

Office fo r inC rmation am a pp licat ions . L i m ited housing is , v'l i lable on a da il y fee basis du r i ng win ter and s prin g bre aks . Application. for s i ng!

rooms and other s p ecia l h ou s i n g requests sho u ld he a dd r es se d to t h e Residential Life Offi ce a t 25 .535.7200 or e-mailed to rliJ@plll.edll.

. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . $ 1 , 29S/semester

J an ua ry term

. . . . . . . . .. . . , ........... . . . . .. . . .. . $ ! , I Os/semester

Plan #4: 5 mea ls/ week .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60s/se mester $ 1 4 0 Ja.nuary term living in Kre idl er

or

nly to commuter students and students

outh Halls.

Flexible PLUs Plan . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $195 Commuter srudents and r idents of So u t h Hall h ave the option of purchasing b l o ck) of 25 mea.ls. Meals may be used at all Board Plan P

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A 1 .5% mon t hly interest charge will be a sses sed on owing student (cou.nt bala.nces (hat are 30 days past d ue.

All t1nancial aid and other resources must be applied to the st udent account by October 15 fo r fall and March 1 5 fo r spring. A 1 . 5% monthly interest charge will be assessed 011 owing student aCCQWlt bala nces that re 30 days past due.

$ 275 January term

Me al Pla.n #4 i availa ble

must be applied to the student

$300 Jan uary term

....

resou rces

11. Financial Aid and Other Resources CoWl Costs

Plan # 1 : 20 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . $ 1 ,34S/semester

Plan #3: 10 meals/wc:: ek

All financial aid and other

account by October 15 fo r all and March 1 5 for spring.

meal p l a n # 1 , -#2, or #3.)

$295

Payment in full mus t be made by the 25th of the month preceding

each term.

(St udents living in t r a d it i o nal residence halls must choose from

..

PAYMENT OPTIONS I. Payment in FuU •

Meal Plans

Pian #2: 1 5 me al s/week

No prior owing bala nce to the university.

·

So u t h H a l l is an altern live residen tial o p t i o n with various ap a r t m e n t

Bill ing Statemenrs i n July and

November.

.

14

a hold will be p la c e d on the

Y

1lI. Monthly Payment • Interest-free mo n t hl y pay ments with Twtion Management S ys tem s ( IS), a th i rd - p a rt y administrator. • Payments are made d i rec t l y to T M S. • E n ro ll ment fee for the 8 or 10 monthly annLlal plan is $75. • E n ro l l men t fee for the 4 or 5 m o n thl y semester plan is $50. • All financial aid and other re so u rces must be applied to the student accoLlnt by October IS for fuJI and March 1 5 fo r s p rin g. • F a il u re to make payment as agreed in the paym(�nt co nt ract will


cash check .

-t c:

has prev iously b 'en sent to collec t i o n s by t h e pay i n ful l before classes be'" i n . The collec t i o n s

o z

result tn removal from the Mo n t h ly Pay m e nt Plan O p t ion. I n terest of 1 . 5% p<:r month will b as essed on owing �tu(kllt �cco u n t balan es 30 days after removal from t h l? plan .

Collections Hold

MISSlID PAYMENTS

Any s t u d e n t who

Failure to make pa, ment as agreed upon i n rhe payment contract

will re'ult in a fina.ncial hold being pIa d 011 t h student ace unt. I t is the st udent's responsibility to see that all fi n �l I lc ial aid accepted on the O ffer of Fi nancial Aid i' cred i ted t their tudent account. Pinn ncidl aid i n d ud('� but i . nOl l imited to loan applications, verifica t i o n fo rms, en trance counsel in", etc., a n d nlust be applied to the t ud en t de . Wlt by October 15 for fall sem este r and March 1 5 •

for ·pring semester. • ' t u d cnt accoun ts that are 60 days deli nquen t from the due date, tated in the IXl)'ment cont ract may be referred to a t h i rd-party c

Uect ioll agency.

"

tudent . currently enrolled who have been sen t to a collec t i o n

agency w i l ! b e withdrawn froIll the

wl ive rs i l y

effective i mmedia tely.

Students wi l l receive a W grade on their transcripts. All collection cos , a t torney fees, and in terest inclIrred and allowable under federal a n d 'Was h i n gto n state statutes and laws will be cha rged to t he student br the collection agen y and a re the responsibility o f t he ..tudent to pay. •

ADVANCE PAYMENT I cw studeIJts need to m ake a $200 advance p,lynlent to co n fi nll thei r ()frer If admissi o n . The paynlent is refundable u n t i l Iv!a)' 1 5 It)r £.1 11, December l - for the january term, and january 1 5 for spri ng. Reque-ts or a refund lll ust be made in wri t i ng to the Adm issions Office.

RCllImillg stlidC/II; wan t i ng to reserve a room for the following year must sign a Housing Contr;)ct. anccUations, w ithout peoalty, must be ubmitted in wri t i ng to the Residt'lllial Li e Office by June I . a n dlations received between June 2 and July I w il l be suhject to a $200 penal ty cha rge. Cancellations received between July 2 a n d August 1 w i J l be �ubject to a $400 penalty c h a rge.

STUDENT HOLDS are 1 4 types of ho lds that can be p l a ced on s t u de n t records

Ther

fo r differe n t c i rc umstan es. Ea h h o l d p reve n ts certa i n p r i v i leges a t the ll nivcr� i t y. L i s t d below a re the t y pes of holds t h a t can be placed o n accounts and the o ffices responsible fo r them.

TYPES O F HOlD .... . . .... . ......... ... . OFFICE Admi sions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . d m i ssions Academic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R gistrar's, Stude n t Life , o r Residen t i a l L i fe Academi c S t a n d i n g . . . . . . . Regi t rar's ol lection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F i nan c ia l . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

tlr. i n g

( co u n ts Receivable

I n ternat ional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , I n ternational Student Serv ices

Junior

R

view . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . R gist rar's

No Address Hold All stu d e n ts are requ i red to

V\

keep a cu r re n t pe r ma nen t add ress

w i t h the u n iv rsi ty. If m a i l becorn

s

u ndeliverable, a n a ddre s s

l> Z o

hold w i .! l be placed on t h e acco u n t. B:1 S i c lI niversiry p riviJeges wiLl b t� d e n ied such

as,

b u t no t l i rn i ted

t\>,

register,

t h e r ig h t t

receive copie:; of offi c i a l t ra n s c r i p t s or d i p l o lTla, or cash checks.

Academic Hold The Reg istra r 's

ffice, S tud e nt L i fe

ffice, or Re i d e n t i a l L i fe

O ffice carr place an acco u n t on academic h o l d . Reg i s t ra t io n fo r

c la s s e, is precluded

un t i l

a ny p e n d i n g, m a t ter w i t h t hose o ffices is

settled.

Medic:aJ Hold A medical hold p revents a stu lent from r eg i s te r i n� because Hea lth Se.r ire h� not recei cd the because t h e s t u dent dot:s n o t h a

e

l h e nece sar)' i n l lllllil iza tions.

acce p t

t h e: res['o m i h i l il y a n d legal

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:II

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U p o n regis t ra t i o n , the st u den t and h is or her pare n t s o r l egoll guard i a n , a gre e t o

m

Z .." o

Ie l ieal History Form o r

Rights and Responsibilities

-I

b l i :a t i o n

t o p a y a l l t u i t i o n costs, room a n d m e a l fees, a n d o t he r pec i ,\ l

o z

fees i n c u rred or t o be i nc u r red fur t he s t udcnt's educa t i o n . The lli1iversity dg rees to make av,l ilable t n the s t u d c n t c�rtain educational p rograms and the use o f cer t a i n u n ivers i t y fac i l i ties, as applicable and as described in this catalog. A fa i l ure to pay wh n due all ulliversity bills shall rclea�e the ulliv rsi l y o f all)' obliga t i o n to co n t i n u e to I)rov idc t h e a p p l icable eduC<ltillnal

benefits ,lJld serv i ccs, i n c l u d i ng, but Ilot l i m i t e d to, statements of

h o n o rable d i s m issaL g r'l de rep()rt�, t ranscript o f record s, ,ii p l o lll a s , o r prereg i s t r a t i o n s .

Th

st udt:n t shall a L so be denied

a d m i t t a n c e to classes ,1I1d the use o f u n ivers i t y fac i l i t ies in the

eve n t o f a defa u l t .

Credit Balances If a cred it b a l a n cc occurs on a s t u de n t 's acco u n t, L ilt' un ivers i t y w i l l refund i t accord i ng to per t i n e n t federal, state. and ll n i e r s i t y

regul a t ions. 'r el i t balances a r e proces 'ed t h rough t h e St udent en ter.

Servin'S

Pacific L u theran Un ivcr�ity calculates and ret u rn , ' i t l t! I V fu nds accord i n g to Fede ral Title I V p ol icy 34C1U: 668.22. The amol l n t

t i m e t 11 > stude n t

\ as

en rolled b e fo re w i t h d rawi n g. Th is policy is

which a student receives T i t le I

t udent l.ife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' tuclent L i fe

'

semester i n

a

federal funds.

0% of the sem ster has f fide IV fWlds w i l l b returned I the fcd ral program based OIJ t h e length o f t i me t h qudcnt was If a student w i t h d raws before

elap .. ed, a percent age

cco u n ts Rece iva b le

Fioandal Hold I f a st uden t acc o u n t is past due, it wi l l be p l aced on

.." m m

term i nated.

effect ive for co m p lete o r full w i thd rawal from

Veteran 's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S tuden t Services

ff .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

hold will perm n e n t l y rem a i n 0 1 t h e (lC O ll n l. I f a s t u den t fai l s to

pay 011 the fir t day of clas es, his/her e n rol l men t will be

ol T i t k IV funds ( o t her t l la n l-edera l Vlork S t udy) t h at must he ret u rned to t h e Title IV p rogra m s i ba'ed solei), on t he length tlf

Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Health S rvices tudent 'ervices � 'nler Payment O p ion . . . . . . ..... . Student S rvic . Center Residential Life . . . . . . . ....... Residen t ial Life

No Address .. ..... .. .. . . . . . . .. .

Wr ite-

u n iversity must

or

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE RETURN OF TITLE IV AND INSTITUTIONAL FUNDS IF A STUDENT WITHDRAWS FROM THE UNIVERSITY

cco u n ts Receivab le

£,"dt I nte rv iew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perkinsl

s uch as, but Ilot l i m i ted to, t h e r i g h t to register, receive cop ies o f official t ra nsc rip t s o r d i p l o m a ,

a

financial

h o l d . Basic u n i ve rs i t y privi leges wil[ be d en ied until the acco u n t is settled , i n c J u d i n g the right t o register, receive cop ies o f o fficial transcripts o r d i p l om a , or c;) h checks.

Payment Option Hold All ·tudent are requ i red to sign a pa)rment co n t ract or sele t d pa 'ment option for t:ach academic year they a t tend, The Payment Con t ract fo rm may be o b t a i ned through the tucient Se rv ic s Cen ter. If a t u dent fails to sign a Payment C o n tra c t and sele t a payment option, a hold will be placed on the st udent account wh ich 'wi l l deny the st udent basic u n iversity p r i v ileg s

enrolled b e l�)re w i t h d rawa l . I'or exa m ple, if a student w i t hdra\ when 50% of t he seme,t"r has elapsed, 500;(, of TitlE' IV funds w i l l be re t u rned to the federal programs. After 0% of the semester has elapsed, the s tudent i s co n idered t o have used aLl aid received fo r th�

seJ1lester.

The ret u rn of Title I V fu nd. i dependent upon the date

,l

student w i t h d raws d u r i n g the se mes e_r. \Vi t h d raVl'al date is detined as

ne of the followi ng:

The d a le the student began t h e withdrawal process; . he date t he sr uden r otherwise provided the school \ i t h official n o t i fication o f t he i n t n t to w i t hdraw; P

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r the st ude n t who does no t be g i n the university s w i t h ­

or n o t i fy the sch 01 of the i n t e n t to wi t h dr a w, the midpo i n t o f the payment p erio d or period of enroLlmen t for which Title IV assistance was dis b u rsed ( unless the university can d o cu m e nt a later date) ; I f a t t e n d a n ce is t a ke n , the withdrawal date is d e te r m i ne d from drawal p ro ce ss

for t he perccntage of l u i t iun all we d to be d ur i n g t h e term (as determined by the Regis t rar' s [fice ilnd th niversity Re fu nd Policy). 4. Example of t h e Return of Title IV F u ncb i f a Student Withdraw' are a ail able in the Fi nancial Aid an d S tu den t a c c o u nt

refu nded fo r tha t l im t' period

E m ployment O ffice,

the a t te ndance records . Pacific Lutheran University will:

l . De te r m in e date of w i t hdrawal 2. alculate the percentage of aid deemed to have been used by the student

3 . Calculate the percentage of aid not used by the student, which mllst be ret u rned to federal p r grams.

Nore: Please be aware that a rejil11d dlle to withdrawal from til e 1I11iversity W I I adversely affe t what is owed to tire wliversit), by the sh,delTt. A tllillOn ad;lIstmerrt is applied to the stu de n t account, bllt aid is a lsll reduced, SOIl1 times creating a larger owing balance. SlIIdents s ho uld check with Fil1<l11ciai Aid and lllri.ent Employ melTt to research tire

effict a

IVlr irdrmval will h a ve

011

rheir st udent acco unt.

Order of Return of Title IV Foods If the

wi t h d r aw al date result in

a

percentage of Title IV aid not

lIsed by t he student, then the retu rn of Title IV aid w i ll

occur

in

the fo l l owi n g orde r:

l . Unsubsidized F ed era l Stafford luans 2. Sub idized Federal Stafford loans

11\

3. Federal Pe rk i m lo a ns

... ...

4. Fe d e r a l PL S loans 5. Direct PLUS loans 6. Federal Pell grants

z o

8 . O t h e r assistance u n de r

...

s tu d e n t ' s

7 . Federal SEOG grants

this Ti t le fo r which a re t u rn (")f fu nds

is re q ui r ed . University TUition and CoW'

e Fees Refund Policy I f a s t u d e n t does not w i s h to co n t i n ue a cou rse after the add/ drop p e r io d, the s t u de n t must withdraw from the course. S t u de n t must obtain the instructor' signature on an add/drop

form and s u b m it it to the Student ervice's Cen ter. A $50 is charged fo r ea ch transaction after the last day to a d d /d rop . a d m i n i s t rative fe

Student Life a nd

Tldtion refullds are 1 00% through the last day of the drop/a dd , 2002, February 5, 2003 for spring semester J AIrer that, tu i t io n refu nds are prora ted Oil a daily basis IIIllil 6U% of the semester has elapsed (Example: November 9, 2002 for fall semes ter, April 1 4, 2003 for spring sem ster) , lit which po in t th ere is 110 tuition refll nd. Refu nds from ulliversity hot/sillg are also pro rated 0 1 1 a daily bllSis, with meals refu llded all a weekly

Campus Resources

p er iod ((o r fa ll semester September

basis.

Student

The Academic ertifit:d

ssista nce

e n te r p rov ides tud nL with trained.

peer t u t o rs and a comfortable en v i ro n m e n t where

discovery can occur. Registered PLU of t h e center tu develop effe c t ive tudy tr a t egies and to s u p p l e m t:: n t or r e in fo rce their classroom

students use the free servi ces

Services Cen ter, Pacifi c Lutheran U n i versi ty and received befo re the d ea dl i n e above.

Oral requests are not accept ble. Charges

experience.

will r e m ai n on a stude n t ' s account u n t i l written n o t i ce is

TU.toring takes plact: o n can1pus,

u s u a l l y in t he cademic enter l o ca te d in Ram tad Hall. However, s t u dy and tes t - review sessions may OCClll" in separate locations su h a .s the sciellce or music b u i ld i n g ' , and d r op -i n math t u t o ri n g is avail­ able in the Apple Pi Math Lab , located in Memo rial Gym t o I . t uden ts taking foreign lan gu ag es c a n a ttend wee.k1y i n fo rmal conve rsat i c n groups led by o u r language tu to rs . All a bi l it y levels are welcome at t h ese co nversations. Tu toring es, io ns are et up b}' advance appointment ( d ro p ­ i ns may n o t fi nd tutors ava i lable ) . Durin" fal l a n d s p ri ng semes­ ters, the cen t.er, located in Ramstad 1 1 2 , is open Mond y th rou g h T h u rs d ay fro m (:00 3.m, un t i l 9:00 p.m., Fr i day fro m 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p,m., and unday from 2:00 p . m . until 9:00 p.m. Hours and ser vices are l i m ite d durin ' J-term a n d sum mer sessions. Stu­ dents should stop by the office, cal l, or e-mail to learn more abo u t ollr services or req uest an ap p oin t m e n t . The Academic ssistance websit provides i n formation on t u t o r i n g and weekly u pdates on st udy ses ·ions.

received.

Assista nce

Note: Adva nce Tuitioll Pa yments are Ilot co vered by Federa l Fillall cia l Aid a nd a rc not reJill1da.ble. Unoffidal Withdrawal In the cases of u no fficial w i t h d ra wa l, the last recorded dav o f cl a ss attendance will be used to calculate a refu nd . Medical Withdrawal:

tu d en t s m a y also comp l e tely

\.

i t hd raw

from the u n iversity for a term fo r m edi ca l reasons. The s tudent

must prov ide written evidence from a p hy s ici a n and a p e rso n a l explanatiun to t h e vice p re s ide n t a n d d e a n fo r student l i fe. Th i must be co m p l eted in a

timely m an n e r and in no case la ter than

the last day of c la s s in any given term. I f g r an t ed , the grade of WM will appear on the student's transcri p t . Procedures for Obtaining a Refund

tudent requests withdrawal app roval fro m the Registrar's Office via the S t u de n t Services Center, us i ng a withdrawal form.

ACCESSmIUTY

2. Financial Aid wi l l process the st ud e n t ' s request for w i th­ drawal according to the Federal Title IV pol i c y 34CFR 668.22. Aid w i l l be revised a ccor d i n g to p ub l i s h ed federal p o l i cy . 3. The Re g is tra r' s Office will gi v e a tuition adjustment to the 16

25 3 . � 35T 1 8 wlVw. p lll. edu/- aast

learn ing, risk taki ng, a nd

Not.ice of withd rawal m u s t be gi ve n i n writ ing to the

l.

ACAD EMIC ASSISTANCE CENTER

253.535.7206 www.p!u.edu/-sliflct Th

uni

r ity ol11p l ies with the Ameri an

wi

t h Di ab i l i t i es Act

and Se c ti o n 504 of the Reha i l i t at i o n A t and p ro vi de s reason­ able ccommodation.s to st ud e n ts with disabilities. oordination of services is through the Counseling and Te st ing Office.

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A comprehensive list of services is outlined on the center's

PLU BOOKSTORE 253. 53 5 . 7665

website including a link to the online program, plu.e.recruiting.com.

www. luteworld.plll.edu

This program is a fully i ntegrated employment and recruiting

he PLU B o kstore is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran

service available to studenrs 24 hours

a

day, seven days a week.

University for the benefit of students, faculty, and staff. The book­

Students may access job l istings, post their resumes, and contact

store sells textbooks required for classes. Supplies, gifts, cards, and

employers fro m an)' computer with an Internet connec tion.

convenience store items are also available. Computer software at discounted prices is availab le or can be special ordered. Personal computer systems at educational pric

can be p urchased through

the bookstore. Special book orders are welcome. PLU Northwest is a unique gift shop located at 407 Garfield Street in historic Parkland. Featuring Northwest pottery, clothing,

-oj c: o ,., z -oj r-

COMPUTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

"

(see Information Resources)

m

CONFERENCES AND EVENTS 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 745 0 IVWW. plll. edll/ -events

and foods, the store also offers books and gifts depicting Northwest

Conferences and Events schedules university fa i l i t ies for da nces,

themes and authors. Visit the online store at lu tewo rld.plu.edll and

concerts, fil ms, events, conferenc s, and meetings held on

shop 24 hours a day. Stop by to see our new line of Scandinavian

campus. Students i n terested i n sched uling and event must first

gifts.

CAMPUS MINISTRY 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7464

n > :!:

work with Student I nvolve ment Jnd Leader hip ( 253.535.7 1 95 ) t o develop a n event plan prior t

> z o

"tI

rese rving faci l ities.

c:

VI

www.plll.edtil-cmin

COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES 2 5 3 . 53 5 . 7 206

Paci fic Lutheran University b)' its ver)' nature is a place for the inter­

www.plll.edll/-slif/ct

rn

a tion between faith and reason. Opportunities for the mutual cel­ ebration of that faith on campus are rich and diverse. Chapel worship is held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday morn­ ings during each semester. The University Congregation worships and celebrates the Lord's Supper each Saturday evening and Sunday morning. The University Pa tors are available to provide care, sup­ port, and spiritual direct ion to the u n iversity co mmuni ty. Seyeral denominations and religious groups have organiza­ tions on camp us.

umerous studen t - i n i t iated Bible s t u dy and

fellowship groups are offered. The Campus M inistry Office is availabl

to provide resources or to connect individuals with

organizations that can meet a variety of m i n istry needs. The Campus M i nistr y

<>uncil, an elected student and faculty

committee, coordinates the e activit ies i n a spiTit o f openness and mutual respect.

www.plll . edl//-slif/cs

The pers nill safety of the P LU community is the n u mber one a m p u s Safety and I n formation. Campus safety o fficers

are available to escort students, p rovide veh icle j u m p starts, u n l ock inadvertently locked

v

hides, assist i n changing tires,

r e s p o n d to medical emergencies and fire alarms, and p rovide general telephone i n formation services. Visitor i n format ion is available 24 hours a day seven days a

week through the Campus afety O ffice. Veh i cle registration fo r

o c: ;II

personal and developmental i sues. Trained and ex.perienced psychologists o ffer i n d ividual assessments and coun seling, and a consulting psychiatrist is available fo r evaluation

and possible

medications. A variety of interest and perso nality inventories are available to assist students with

aree r plann ing, educati nal

n m

VI

adjustment, and personal problems , nd issues. Serv ices [o r students wit h disab i L i t ies are also available.

DINING SERVICES 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7472 www.plll.edll/-di,lillg

D i ning Services, owned and o p e rated by Pacific Lutheran U n i ­ versity, is available to all students, fac u l t y, staff, and thei r guests. Students Living on campus are required to be on a meal pl a n . deductions are made for students eating ewer meals than previ­ ously contracted fo r unless granted by the director of d i n i n g services. Resi dential students are offered three meal o p t ions: any 20, 1 5, or 1 0 meals per w e k . Students l iving o ff -l mp lls a r e encour­ aged to select one o f these meal plans ur the flexible meal plan offe red only to o ff-campus studen ts. Students with spec ial dietary requirements, specifical ly ap­ proved in writing by a physician, can in most cases be ac

O ffice 7:00 a . m .-4 :00 p . m . Monday-Friday. Lutheran University is private property and the

mmo­

dated by contacting th d i n i ng services director. This service is provided at no extra cost. Visitors may eat in any of the facilities.

parking on campus is available through the Ca mpus Safety Pacifi

VI

Counseling and Testing Services assist student i n coping with

"Grab and Go" items , re availab le during pe k l u nch hour . No

CAMPUS SAFETY AND INFORMATION 253. 535. 744 1

goal o f

;II

DIVERSITY CENTER 2 5 3 . 535.8750

university reserves the right to res trict access to the campus and

wlVw.plu. edu/-dcenter

buildings.

Pacific Lutheran University is committed to the mission of provid­

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 253.535.7459

PLU are people capable of effective Ii e s i n an expanding, divers

w ww.plu. edu/ -slif!cd

Career Development (housed with Academic Advising for students' convenience) strives to p rovide a program of career development and life planning. Students are assisted i n integrating their personal values and aptitudes with career choices through ind ivid ual counsel­ ing, workshops, and reside.nce hall p resentations. The office staff assist students and first-year alumni in developing job-search techniques by providing an extensive career l ibrary of opportunities in pecific majors, industry directories, and employment forecasts. Additionally, the office coordinates a schedule of recruiters from industry, business, government, and graduate schools. The center coordinates and promotes full-time employment and nonacademic internships. These listings include local, national, and international openings. Specially selected forums througho ut the yea r also bring students and em ployers together, in order to help students find work that is both financially and personally rewarding.

ing a diverse and inclusive education fo r all students. Graduat world. Every student at PL

of

is required to take a course in Alterna­

tive Perspectives and in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. MuLticul­ turalism, outside of the classroom, is experienced through social and educational programming from a variety of sources. The Commit­ tee fo r Educational and Cultural Program ming, ASP LU,

rver-ity

Coalition, and different student clubs and organizations that sup­ port underrepresented populations at PLU all work together to

('re­

ate a campus climate that is welcoming of all students_

An Associate Director for Multicultural Affa i rs and Diversity Advocates staff PLU's Divers ity �enter. D iversity

dvocates are di­

verse PLU students working together to bring m u l t icultural aware­ ness to our campus and surrounding cOl11l11 uniti '. They provide support to students and clubs that work with d iversity-rc.lated iss ues and raising and sustaining general awareness on campus about cur­ rent educational, political, and social issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, age, and sexuality. They are available to help all sruden ts, P

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staff, and faculty who h ave interest in areas of multiculturalism. The

T h i s i n fo rm a t i o n mllst be on fl le befo re a st udent is permitted to

Diversity

register.

enter is located on the ground floor of the University

Center, across from Campus M inistry.

Internatiollal studellts, fa culty, and scholars from coul1tries at risk will be req uired to Itave

the Offi e

protein deriva ti ve-ppd). This test will be dOHe at Ihe Health ,e1ltcr

f Srudent Involvement and Lea de rship helps different

dubs and organizations thai support the efforts of

formal position of the Direcror of Diversit)" who, along with th� student-comprised Diversity Coalition, programs events both so ial and educational for the entire student body on a variety of

multicultural issues; and the Un iversity Diversity tional and

ommittee and the Co mmi ttee for Edu­

u1tural Programm ing both further the u n iversity's

miss io n of multicultural i. m through policy review and event planning on both

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www.plll. cdll/- lib r Information Resources ( l R)-computing and l ibrary brought together i n to one organlzation-is here to help students be successful. Most IR services are located in �Irortvedt Lib ra r y, but 011

the lower level o f the

located on the second floor o f the Hauge

life.

dministration Building .

Persona lized assista nce in co m p u t ing, l i b ra ry, and mul t i media services can be ob tained fro m IR i n formation p rofessionals i n a

253 .535. 724 1

variety of ways. Here a re some good starting points:

IV IVW. p lll. refli/ -ppa

The E l l i o t t Press is PL 's stud io-laboratory fo r the publishing ru-ts. With the pre s's la rge collec t i o n o f let terpress type and

For assistance with comp uter accounts, email, supported

software, and related resources, stop b)' the User , upport help desk i n the lower level o f the l i b ra ry, call the student help desk at

eq u i p m e n t , student design and p roduce prin ted texts using the

2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 5 3 9 8 , email them at comptelc@pl u.edu, o r visit http ://

h a n d - o n t rolled techn iques t h a t nourish today in the l ively art

w'v\'w.plu .edu/-comptelc/.

fo r m known as fi n e print i ng. I n addition to i t s own publ ishing

program, t h e press hou,es a growing co Llection of i n novarive

effective research � t rategies, go to the reference desk on the main

book works and is

level o f the l i b rary, call 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 .7507, send email to ref@ p l u . ed u ,

a

working museum, where visitors may watch

For help o b t a i n i n g the best i n formation on a topic or learning

and try their hands at the technology pio neered by Gutenherg.

or v i s i t h t t p://w\>\'·w. plu.edu /- libr/l i b i n folref. h t m l .

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

http://'I''''w. plu.ed u / - media.

tain an orderly educat i onal environment condu cive to student

Comp llter accounts are essent i a l fo r all PLU students. PLU

lea rn i ng and developmen t . In o rder to fulfill i nstitutional re-

ePass accou n t s a re automatically set up fo r new students,

ponsibility and at t he same t i me follow procedures that are fair,

including an acco u n t username and password. After receiving

on5 1sten t, and protectil'e o f each person's rights, appropriat e

the account n a m e and prel i minary password, activate the

grinr<1 nce procedur s have been established. I f a student has reaSOD to bel ieve that an academic o r admin istrative action is

u n j ust,

acco u n t and change the password. This all ows acces ePass sys tem , which enables

a ' p riciou s, or d iscrimiJ1ato ry, these p rocedures are

Th u nivers i t y has a t e a m of grievance officers to fadI i tate the grievance process. The grievance o fficers are Kathleen Farrell lISan 1'v1a n n ( 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 1 8 7 ) , Patricia Roundy

( 2 53.53 5 . 8 78 6 ) , a n d M d i n S impson ( 2 5 3 . 535.8779). Any of the

resources, the Language Reso urce Center fo r fo reign lang uage

The Health C nter is sta ffed with n urse pract i t ioners and one

aud io, and video technologies. Business,

Rieke Science Center, and education maintain other computer

including pap smears; birth c o n t ro l ; and

labs and technology-rich classrooms, fo r which access may lle

pregnancy tes L i n g and counse l ing. Also o ffered are allerg), shots;

l i m i ted to specific departments or programs.

i m m u n i za tions; ,ex ually t ransmi tted disease i n formatio n ,

Residenc hall rooms all have Ethernet network connectio ns. To

t i ng, and treatment; co nsultations on eat i n g diso rders,

substance ab use, tobacco usage, t ravel gui deli nes and i m m u n iza­ ducation on

a

wide va riety of health concerns.

Sickness and Accident Insurance is available to all students on a volu n ta r y basis. The Health Center strongly u rges all students to

Off-campu:; swde1lts need a

December 3 1 , I ' 56 are required to p rovide o n the u n iversity

modem and an Internet service

entails a monthly charge. Ad d i t i onal i n formation o n co n necting

m u mps, rubella ( M M R) vaccinations after their first birthday.

to the PLU network from off c a m p u s can be fo und a t h ttp:// www.plu. edu/-w mptelc!sllppo rl/access_internet. html

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

computer

provider ( I SP) in addit ion to the PLU ePass. An ISP usually

health history fo rm an i m m u n ization records o f two measles,

L

a

Bookstore.

Immunization PoUcy tates that all students born a fter

e

campus co nnections. For i n fo r m a t io n on setting up

desk. Ethernet cards for most computers a re available a t the PLU

Center websi t l isted above.

i

n i cation software a r e needed on the studen t's c o m p u t e r i n addition t o ePass access. Modems are needed o n l y fo r o ff­

inst ructions i n the ResNet handbook or contact the student help

n i versity group i n s u rance policy can be ro und on the Health

F

connect to the network, an Ethernet card and network c o m m u ­

fo r residence h a l l access to t b e network ( ResNet ) , fo llow the

h ave medical insura nce. I n formation about the Pa c i fic Lutheran

I

o m m u n ication a n d

theat re, a r t , psycholo gy, nursiug, computer science, m a t hemat ics,

refe rral. Serv ices available i n c l u de ca re for i l l ness and injury;

C

i t h the barcode on the back

lea rning, and the Multimedia Lab fo r wo rking with digital web,

physician as,�istant. A phys ician is ava i lable fo r consultation and

A

especially the Haley Center fo r work with electronic i nfo rmation

www.plll. edu/-sliflhs

P

books and multimedia collections a lld equipmem with

to sec i f computers arc avai lable before students set out fo r the

2 53 . 535 .73 3 7

t io n . ; and health

aLiI

lab. The l i b rary has concentra t i o n of comp uters as well,

THE HEALTH CENTER

t

Check

Co mputer rooms are located t h rougho u t campus. The largest is

o f g ri.:va nce p rocedure� a re available fo r review a t the

exa m s,

exclus ive use of the PLU commu n i t y.

in University �enter and may be viewed t h rough a live webc3m

office of each gr ieva nce officer.

physical

PLU's

serves as a PLU l i b rary card.

grievance o ffice rs may be contacted to recei\7e assistance. s

to

of email, an expa n d i n g set of

sources and tools, and other services and resources for the

yo u r student I D card. This card

( 2 5 3 .535 .8786 ) , Kathy Russell ( 2 5 3 . 53 5 . 7 64 3 ) , Richard Seeger

Copi

u e

onl ine student service ', a rich collec t i o n of electro n ic research

avail ble fo r the stud nt tel seck redress.

(253.535.887 1 ) ,

F o r assistance with m u l t i media col l ections, e q u i p m e n t , a n d

services, ca1l 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 5 0 9 , send e m a i l to med ia@plu.edu, or v i s i t

nd proc dur s at the un ivers ity are in te nded to main­

Pol icies

'8

(Library and Computing Services) 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 500

Un iversity Center, and Television Service a nd Audio Services are

THE ELUOTT PRESS I­

INFORMATION RESOURCES

the main public computer room is

social and educational l evel in the area of

multiC1llturalism that in tegrates both the academe and student

....

is $15.

to the Health Center.

tudcnts of Pacific Lutheran University ( ASPLU) has

a

e,

cost

Questions about the i m mu nization polic)' should b e directed

PLll ommuni t)'; Associated

11

after arrival at the u n i versity. The

underrep rese nted pop ulations programs and work within the

Q Z c(

tlIberculosis skil1 test (p u r ifi e d

Other campus resources in the area of mult iculturalism are:

5

I

T

Y


Special library collections, in a d d i t ion to a l a rge collection f books and a rt i cle s in b ot h p r i n t a n d digital fo rmat, include the Sc a n d i na vi a n I m m igrant Experience Collec t i o n , regi o n a l Lutheran c h u rch archives, a n d the Nisqually P l a i ns Collection­ al l in t h e Arch ives a n d S p e c ia l Collections Depart m e n t . Else­ where in the l i b ra r y arc a K- 1 2 cur ri c u l u m collection and a children's l i tera t u re co l le c t ion .

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES 2 5 3 .535.7 [ 94 II'lI'w.plll. edul-admilil1ternatl. html International Student Services pro vides assistance to i n terna­ tional students i n adj usting to the u n ive r s i t y and in meeting both education and personal needs. Services i nclude orientation, registration, a n d on-campus l iais o n with other u n ivers ity offices. Assistance with im m i grat io n and go vernm e nt regulations as well as immigration p ro c edu res regarding temporary travel, work applications, and extensions of stay is available.

KPLU-FM, NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO 253.535.7758

www. kplu.org KPLU is a p u b l ic radio station l icensed by the Federal Commu­ nications Commission to the Board of Regents o f Pacific Lutheran University in the acoma/Seattle area at 88.5 PM. With a network of e igh t booster signals, KPLU extends its service throughout Western Wash ington. Public radio stations are au­ thorized by the federal government as noncommercial to o ffer alternat ive p rog r a m m i ng not fo u nd on commercial ra d i o . Recognized fo r i t s progra m m i n g excellence, KPLU 88.5, Na ­ tional Publi Ra d i o (NPR) , is one of the nation's lead i n g p ub l i c radio stations. KPLU broadcasts NPR news, local and regional news, and jazz to more than 280,000 listeners per week. The KPLU news tea m files h u nd reds o f stories fo r national broadcast with PR each ye ar. KPLU stre a m s its exclusive, a w a rd - w i n n ing jazz, b l ues , and news 24 ho u rs a day on its website. KPLU i s a l so now a leader in wo rld w i d e jass I i t e n i ng.

PLU is the only i n dependent u n i versity in the N ortbwe st opera t i n g a ful l - power N P R member s ta t i o n .

LIBRARY SERVICES

( see

Informa t ion Resources)

MIDDLE COLLEGE 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 .7643 WIVW.pl!l. edul - m ideal PLU offers a s p ec ia l six-week summer program for high school jun­ iors and eniors an d for fi rs t - year college students. Called Middle liege, the p rn g ra m' i ' designed t o ease the transi t i o n from high school to college by sh a rpen ing learning skills that are essen tial to suce ful completion of a college or un iversity program. Middle ollege has both an academic program and an a dv is ing and testing comp nent. All students are thoroughly tested and evaluated i n p rivate sessions with regard to their reading, w r iti ng , verbal, and mathematical skills. In addition, career advising is pro­ vided. The aim of Middle College advising is to assess each stud nt's talents and interests in order to provide direction and goals for the college experience. The academic program offers a chance to improve specific learn­ ing skills essential to college success. The classes, offered at several levels in s eve ral disciplines, are for Middle College students only, thereby allowing small class size and close contact between students and fa Cll l t y. All students t a ke a s t ud y skills course, which serves as a core of the p rogram . In addi t io n , students may sel ec t two courses from among those offered each year. Each student's program is indi­ vidualized to promote maximum growth.

NEW STUD ENT ORIENTATION 253.535 . 7 [ 95 www.plu.edul-sliflorient New stude n t orientation endeavors to ass i s t students and t h e i r fam i lies w i t h the t r a n s i t i o n to PLU. The fo u r- d ay fal l p_rogram

introduces students to many dimensions of PLU l i fe. Fall or i en -

11\

t a t i o n incl ude meeting w i t h a fa ulty ad\'i

·01', t<ll king in sm a ll b ecomi ng acq uai nt 'd with ca m p u s services. a nd h av i n g some relaxed t i me with other students bdor lasses begi n . pe ial d tivitie are also plan ned that resp o nd to co n ce r n - ' of fam i l i � f new s tu de nts . Wh il January and spring ricn t a t i o n ar mo re cond�nsed, they also p ro v id e n..:w · t udents w i th an i n t Todu tien to academic lift' and cocurricuiar a ct iv i t ies .

groups w i th oth r new �tud n

-I c: C m Z -I

,

" m

OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT SERV ICES

2 5 3 .535.7 [ 95 www.p[u.edul-o!(camp

l> Z C

Student I nvolvemen t and Leadership ( SfL) p r o vi d e s o ff-ca mp u s students with a relaxing office and sup portive staff. O ff- campus st u d e n t s are invited to seek involvement, resou rces, and support t h ro ugh this o fl1ce. [L partners with ASP L to coord i n , te co m m u nication and programming and to a d vocat e fo r n o n res i ­ d e n t i al students. I n a d d i t i o n , the fo l lo w i n g resources are ava i la b l e : • Lou nges: e pecially designed fen off-campus s t u den t :; , on the lower level of t h e Uni ersity Center, the u per leve l o f the Ha uge Ad min istration B ui ld i llg, the fi rst floor of Riek Science enter, and the Un i ve rs i t y Gallery ill I n gram H j J • Meal plans: PLU' FlexPlan ( 25 meals p e r ,lcad<:mic year) a n d L u t e Po i n ts are n v e n i c nt a nd <,coIlomical meal options fo r otT­ campus s tud e n ts

A message center: open from 8 a.m._r p . m . Monday t h ro u gh Friday i n the S t u d en t Involvement a n d Leadersh ip Of Ice, is provided for students who wi'h to remain ,\ ( ess i hle w h ile attending c l a ss on campus. ff-campus housing: If yo u are looking fo r o ff-campus housing, check th l)rr-CJmpus not eb o o k s in Residential L i fe and the bull e t i n bO�Hds in the Uc. •

;Q

m

11'1

o c: ::0 n m 11\

A S P LU : Fo ur el<'�kd members o f AS P LU student government

arc off-cam p u s senators.

PROJECT PREVIEW 2 5 3 . 535.8648 Each se m e st e r PLU o ffe rs P ruj ec t Prev iew, a special enrichment

program for high s c h o o l j u nior a nd sc n i o rs . De igned to co m ple m e n t h igh sch oo l sturu

, Pr jeLl Preview allows student ·

to earn one h o u r of u n i c' rsi t), cred i t and to

ex p e r i e nc e

col l ege

l i fe and s t u d y. The r o p i c of the c o u rs e is d i fferent each semester.

Pr oj e c t Preview dasses meet

o n c e .l

week

for six I

eks i n tile l a te

a fternoon.

CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 .7 1 73 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7652 The Center fo r P u b l ic S e r lr i ce co n n ects t h e PLU cam p u ' to the s u r ro und i n g com m u n i ties by provid i n g o p p o r t u n i t ies fo r s t u ­ den ts. staff, a n d faculty to erve commun i ty needs as part of t he i r u n iver5ity exp ri nee. There axe many ways FLU p e o p l e can become i n volved i n co mmu n i ty ervi c at P LU . The y a n work w i t h a l l ages­ preschoolers t h rou gh enior cil izclls--a t- t h c Fa m i ly and Children's Cen ter, a coa l i t i o n of social sC TV i t agencies h o u s e d together in PLU's East Cam ' th at dosdy coop er at e s with the Center fo r PubLI Service. Srudents can also become i n volv d in community work through a dem ic servi -e - Iearning las e that explore the relationship between an ac a dem ic subj ct and com­ munity service experience. The enter fo r P u b l i c Service is a resource to faculty teaching t he e cou rses, vhich are available in m a n y depa r t m e n t s , and can help students find out about them. For 3. va r ie t y of vol u n teer work , i ndiviJual and -tudent �OllpS can also use the Vol u ll teer ent r, part of the enter for Public en·ice, to b ro w s e t h rough l istings o r o ve r 1 00 volunteer oppor­ t u n i t ie on and nea.r the PLLf ampu. and to learn about resi ­ dence hall or student-club . erv i c e pro) Cl�. To find o ut more , b til h IV ro bl!co me engaged in the com­ mun i t y, call t h e enter for P uhli c ervice, or stop by HaT t ad

Hall Room [ 05 . P

A

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I

F

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19


VI w U

RESlDENTIAL LIFE

prov ides p r�l t i cal t:xperien e <l nd a t the sam e t i me deve l o p s an

253.535.7200

unders tanding of �el i.o rei tion to o t h e r ' . ocurricular p ro­ gram ' i n clu de student govern m e n t ( ssociated Students of PL m : d Residence HaJl As o c i a t i n ) , port.:; activities (varsi ty, i n t r�l­ mural, an d club s p o rts) , student media ( newspa per, yea rbook, a r t isti magazioe, rad io, and telev ision), student lubs and orga­ n izations, and com m u n i t y service progra ms. With owr 100 s t u ­

a:

www.plli.edl il-slifirliJ

:::l o VI w a:

The u D iversity requires that all fllJ l - t im�

VI :::l Q.

:!: <

u

o z < w ...

I­ Z ....

o :::l

I­ VI

hours) s t. u dents li ve and one of th

eat on

(12

or more

t hree fol lowin� o n d i t ions:

(I)

or o lder

on

tel'

i ' Living nt home with

pare n t ( s ) , le ga J guardian(s), spouse . or child ( r of ag

seme

ca mpu ... u n ks the student meets

r before September

1

'11); (2)

is

20 years

d e n t activities in which to become i nvolved, the re is sure to be at

for the academic year

or Feburary 1 fo r spri.ng

least one w h i ch will e n r i c h a perso n's col lege exper ience.

status

STUDENT LIFE

mcs r e r ; or ( 3 ) has .Ittainect j un ior (60 semester hours) on or beror September 1 or the

academic year or Fwruary 1 for >11 r i ng 5eme ,\.{'r.

2, 3.535.7 1 9 1

As a res ident ial a m p u , Paci fi c Lutheran Univers i t y oFfers stude n ts a valuable elCperience in c o m m u n i t y l iv i ng. The u nive r­

lVww,plu. erllll-

sity recogn izc� the i m portance of non la� Toom HC l. i vi ties i n

an essen t i a l co m p o n e n t of the aOldellli

p r o v i d i n g a n ed uca t ion. The aim ( 1 f res id e n t ia l l iving i to help stude n t s grow p e r so n ally, sociaUy, ( u l t u ral ly, �nd spiri tllull '.

amp liS resi d e nc e are

rga n i2 d i n t o com mun i t ies in w h ich

each i ndiv idua l cou n t s as a person .

.

ew kn owledge s hared W i l h ve l , personal mea n i n g .

friends i n t h e residenc� h a l l s takes o n a Men and

\.

omen of ma ny ba ckground - <lnd c u l t u res live on

campUSi lhere fort:: , student in res idence h u l l s have a u n i q uc op portu n i ty to broaden theLr "ultural h o r i z I I , . The un iversi t y (<Jres about the qual i t y of l i fe 011 cam p lls. lb� attract ive ,lnd com fortablt:: residence h a l ls en ric h the qual it o r l i fe and enh ance the learn i. ng process. T h ' univ rs i t y offers opport u n ities for studen t leader hip :p�r icncc, fo rmal and info rmal programs, and peer as. oc.iar ions. Th� student gove rning bodie <Ire s t rong and activ Iy participate in cam pus l i fe.

A dection of modem , a t t ract ive halls, each w i t h its ow n traditions and u n ique advcl I1tag " o(fers . tudents the opportu­ n i t y to establi ' h a comfortabk l i v i n g p a t te rn . A l l h a l l s i nclude i n formal l o w1gc s, 'rudy rooms, recre a t i o n areas, and common

An a l l siogle-room hall has bCC11 t'.Stubti shed fo r t h ose 2.0 y a rs of j u n i o r

RESPONSrBlUTIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE Withio any com m u n i t y er ain reg u l a t i ons are necessary Pacifi

i n g busi .nes� o n a stude n t 's b h a l f w i l l need t h e P L U and PI

omply wi t h t.hose s t a n d a r d s . Al l members of t h e the rights and int eg r i t y of others. ,o n d u c t which i s detrimental to students, fa cul ty, staff, or the univers i t y. or which vi olates loca l , state, o r fede r a l laws, may be gro u n ds fo r s a n c tions or for d ism issal. The u n iversity p ro h i b i r s the p o s s ess i o n o r c o n s u m p t i o n of that they will

that o ffered d u r i n g the reg u l a r . caM m i e year, is <tvailable to al l

rooms. The code of co nduct fo r aU stude.nts is a v a ilable o n l i ne at

cover

a

broad range of -on temporary i ss u . and perspectives in

eek terms and a one- week workshop sess i o n and begi.ns

mus ic, and p hysical ed lcation; o t h e r s are ounected more closely

E

R

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the last

taught i n t he evening, two n i gh ts

per week fo r nine week" a n d Ma ter of B u s i ness A d m i n i s t ra t i o n

to recrea tional and social l i fe. I nvolvement in student acr iv ities H

are

cou rses are tanght during two ix- week terms, two n i g h ts per

Student <lctivitics are rega.rd d as essen tial fac t o rs in higher edu­

T

on5. In addition, su mmer session typically is a time

week of May. M a n y cou rses

cation. Some are related to cou rses of i nstruction sudl as drama,

U

per

when the fa c u l t y offer i n n ovative, experi men tal courses, which

\

WWw.pill.ed ulprirI tlhalldbovklll ctivilY. il t l l l l

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q u alified

m�ny fields. The summer sessi o n consists of three discrete (o ur-

STUDENT ACTMTIES 253.53 5.7 1 9 5

C

number

WWW.plll.edlll-su771111Gr

www.pl u.edu/p r i n t /handbook/conduc t . h t m l .

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relea s ed.

An extensive s li m m e r school cu rriculum, of the same quality as

may have vi ' i t ors of the opp osite sex i n their residence ha ll

F

he

253.535.8648

alco h o l i c beverages on ca mpus a nd l i m i t s the hOLlrs when · t u ­

I

or i n formation will not

SUMMER S ESS10N

un iver i t y co m m un i t y are expe tcd tl,) reo pe

C

tomer service and

their p,uents and sign ificant ot hers fo r access. An yone transac t ­

adopt only tbose s t a n d ards bel ieved to be

reas onably neces ary a nd a d m i ts st udents w i th the expe t o tion

A

eu

number alll! Pers on al Identification umbers ( PI N ) . A P I N is a igned to each s l u de n t attending P LU . 111[S s curity is p a r t of t h e u n iversity's pol i c y regarding Fa m i ly Educational Right and Pri\racy Act ( FERPA ) of 1 9 74, Stude n t s may give lhi� n u mber to

campus l.iving.

P

so u rces. We provide in novative

i n q u i ries, schedules, etc, students must have th ir i de n tifi cat ion

added indep ndence while con t i n u i 1\g t he m a ny bene fi ts of

20

'loa o s , acco unt fi n a n c i n g, veteran's assistance, :lI1d other u n iver­

To aCcess info r m a t i o n on " student's fin anc i <l.l aid, b i l l i n g

atta i u ed a

m i n i mu m of j u n i o r status. This l i v i ng option prov i de' for :ome

de n t

ists st uden ts, fam i lies, a n d t h e PLU

a ademic p rocess with finan ial ass istance and reSOUTces.

S o u t h Hal l , an apartment-style residt'nce, i s designed for

n i versir

s

dedicate ou rselves to assist and rducate st udents through the

the needs o f t he older s t u d e n t .

Lutheran

cogni zes

c o m m u n i r y w i t h r<:gistration, fi n a n c ial a i d , P rkins/Nurs lng sity

status. T h i s indepen d e n t l i v i ng environment is i n tended to med

e

r

t h a t liheral education i s for the total person and that a comple­ mentary rel a t i o n s h i p exists between st udents' i n tel lectual dcvelopment and the satisfa c t i o n o( thei r o t h e r ind .ivid uaJ needs. Interaction w i t h persons of differ i n g l i fe expe riences, a p p l ication of classroc)1TI knnwkd g to personal goals a nd aspir tions, and C cu rric u lar experiences are a l l available a nd t o tal compon nt. of ed ucat ion at PLU. In a time when there is 11 need fo r m a n i n g­ fu l commun ity, t11e campus faci litates g 'llll i n e relations h i ps among m � m bt:rs of the university from d i verse rel i.g io us, rac i a l , Jnd cultural backgro u nds. All o f the se.vic..:s and fa c i l i t ies provided are in tended to compleme n t the acad c m ic program. The services reflect changing student n eeds, and the oppor t u n i ­ t ies fo r tudent p'l rt i ci pat io n i n c:lude irtually a l l aspects o f the u nivt:rs i t )'. I n d i v i d ual attention is given to st udents' concerns, i n cluding a \r.!ridy of specifIC serv ices out l i ned here and on the

B u i l d i ng. room 1 02 "

expe r i e n ce.

stude n t s who are 20 year' l)( age or o l der, or wbo h

l i fe of \rigorous dnd

The Student Services Cen ter, located in Hauge Adrnini.s t ration

[or those women who desi re tl1is livi ng

a m i n i m um

niversity also

www. p l u . t'du/-ssvc

ment, and participate j o i n t l }' in all hall acti itie . O ne all­

of age or older, or who h ave attained

creatiw schohHs h i p . Paci fic Luther.an

253. " 35.7 1 6 1 800.678.3243

lounge dnd rt"rea t i on faci J i t i�s and common resi de nce govern­ av a i l a b l e

a

STUDENT SERVICES CENTER

I though t ht!)' are

housed i n separate wings, men <Jnd wo men i n co-cd h a l b share

wo men's hall i

community. The

enviro n ment produced i s conducive to

web at plu.edu/ - s l i f! .

kitc h e n and l aundry fa c i l i t ies. Most of the h a l l s are co -�ducationa l .

lif

The q u a l i t y of l i fe cult ivated and fo stered w i t h i n the un ivers i t y is

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

week. Designed � t 11

I'

llnd rgntd uate a n d graduate students a l i ke,

program serves teacher and ad min i s t ra t o rs see k i n g creden­

tials and spc ia l courses. first -year students desiring to i n i tiate


co l l ege �tud y, a n d ll t her� see k i n g special t u ci i e o ffe red by the scho o ls and dep a r t m e n ts. Non mat ricuJated s tu d e n t <; \ ho enroll for t h e summer session need o n l y s u b m it J letter o f acade m i c stand i ng o r give o ther e\rid�nce of [x i ng llre pared for co l lege work .

A complete SlImnrer Sessioll Cn ra/ug, o ll t l i n i n g the curriculum as w 1 J a sp cial i n s t i t u t $ , wo rkshops, and 'emi nal's, i� p r i n t ed

eadl spring and i s avai lable by cal l i ng or by v i ew i n g it o n l i n e .

VOLUNTEER CENTER

l>

Academic Procedures

n

ACADEMIC HONESTY Both the value and t h e s u cces of a ny academic act ivi t )', as well as the en t i re acade m i c en t e r p ri s e , h ave d epe n d e d fo r cen tu r i e s on Lhe fu n d a mental principle o f absolute h o n e s t y. The u n ive r s i t y expects a l l its fac u l ty a n d st uden ts to honor this p r inciple scrupulously.

S i n ce a c a d e m i c dis h o n es t y is a se ri o u s breach

o f the u n iver­

25 .535.83 1 8 WWIV. pllJ. cdlll- volll lllr

sal l y recogn ized code o f academic

PI.

demonstrable i ns t a nce of s u c h m iscond uct on t he pa r t of a

e t h ics,

it is eve ry fa c u l ty

m e m b e r's o bligati o n to i m pose a p p ro p r i a t e s a n c t io n s for a ny

s Vo l un tee r Ce n t 1', run by slud nt and housed i n t he Center for Public �ervice, eeks to give students oppo r tu ru t i es to put to work their dreams for better wo rld . The Volu n tee r Ce nter has l ist ­ i ngs for over 1 0 0 org<lni7..ations who need volunteers. Students (an stop by and browse through the p l ace ment l i st s, 01' make an ap­ p oint ment ""rjth o ne of t he Volunt er Center cuordinators wh o help mat ch students with organ izaL i o n '. Class projec ts , resi de nce hall group activities, one da)' or several, the Vol unteer Center (, n hel p students helpl

WOMEN'S CENTER

student. The u n i versity" policy on academic i n tegrity and i t s p roce­ dures fo r deal in g w i t h academic misconduct are detailed in t h e

Stl/dent

m

n � ;;J;/ o n 1ft

o c: ;;J;/ m

VI

Halldbovk.

ADVISING The un ive rsi t y expects that all st u d e n ts , at o n e t i me or another, w i l l nced assis tance in p la n n i n g academic p rog ram s consistent w i th their needs and goals. B oth to h el p students make their

i n it i a. l adj ustment to the a c a d e m i c load a t PLU a n d to p rov i d e

253.535.8759

counsel through o u t t h e i r academic careers, the u n i ve rs i t y has

www.plu.edu/-wvluellcen

established

a

Adv i si ng

ffice.

The \¥omen's Center i .In n-cam us re o ur,.e center thal serves 5tudents, staff, and fa cu l t y. Located on lower campus in Lhe l i t l l e b l u e house next to t h e softball field ( l 04 l 24 ,h Street 'outh) , t h e center pr vides adv cacy, r e S O ll r , and educJtional prog ra m ­ ming for a n d ab ut women a n d gc n d r e q u i t y. Both wo m e n and men are welcome to u e the re ource� of the Women' C nter and encourag ed t o take advanta 'e of the safe, supportive, and confidential a t mosphere for supp ort o r network �roups. he staff at the Wome n's enter uffers o l l fi d n t i a l s u p port and a. s i s ­ lance in dea l i n g wi L h sexual hara ssmen t , rape o r ex u a l ass a u l t , a n d dating/relation s h i p iss ues. Throughout t h e yt"ar, the center also p ro v i es a variety of ()PPl1 rtu n i t ies fo r ga t h e r i n g and cd­ ebrat ion.

WRITING CENTER

253.535.8709

lVww. p Ju. edul- wl'iling

The Wr i t i ng Cen ter, 10 ated in Ramstad Hall, p ro v id

> C

s a

place fo r

�t u de n ts to meet wilh trained student readers to discu s their ac d e m i c , creative, a n d professional \ r i t i n g . Student staff mem­ b�rs help writers generate topics, develo p focus, organize m a t e ­ rial, and clarify ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed from the classroom set t i ng, student readers dud w ri te rs talk s riou Iy about ideas a n d w r i t i n g st rategi . lost ses i o n s are one-hour meet i n g" but d rop- i n students w i th brief essays or que L i o n s are welcome. The Wr i t i ng Cen ter is o p e n Mond ay t hro ugh T h urs d a y from 1) :00 a. m . to 9:00 p. m . , FT ida y from 8:00 a.m . to 6:00 p.m., and Su nday from 3:00 to 9:0 p. m. T hese hours may vary sl igh t l y from semester t o serne te r.

network of fa cul t y advisors and a n Acade m i c

Faculty Advisors All s t ud e n t s enrolled i n deg ree p rogra m s have facul ty a d v i s o rs \ h ose overal l resp onsibility is to guide academ i p rogress. I n theLr work w i t h i nd iv i d u al student., ,ldvisors have th dssistance of personne l i n a number of student serv ices offices: Aca de m ic Advising, Academi ssistance e nter, Car er Development,

Counseling and Testing , ervices. Diver ity en ter,

ampus Mi nistry,

international student advisor, and residence hall directors a n d resident assistants.

Trallsilional Advisors: At the t i m e of ent ry, each studenl is assigned a transitional a d v iso r, us u a l l y a ccordi ng to i n teres ts exp ressed by the s t u d e nt . Students who wish t() ex p l o re th e genera l cu r ri c u lu m be fore c hoosi ng a m aj or program are assigned to ex pl ora to r y advisors ( p rofessional advising or co u nse l i ng staff or e pe ially t rained facu l t y ) who wiLl he lp them to make ed u cati o na l plans approp r i a te to thei r interests and talents. Tran itional advi ors are s u ppor t e d by educational pl a n n i ng workshops and by Psych ol o gy 1 1 3, Ca ree r and Educational Plan n i n g . Du r ing a student's fi rs t semester, an adv i si n g fde is c reated fo r the student' advisor, and a Big E nvelop e, an a dvi s i ng g u ide and record-keeping folder. is ' lled to each student.

Major Advisors:

pon formal declara t io n of a major, st ud en ts are ass i g ned major advisors to replace their transitional advisor�. Major

advisors guide students' progr

S5

toward their chosen degree goals.

Studenls may chan ge advisors as appropriate or necessary, usin a simple adv isor c h an ge form. Students and advi. ors are expected to meet regu l arly, t h o ugh the actual number of meelings will vary according to i nd i vidu al needs. Fi rs t - ye a r and so phom o re students are required to meet \vith their advisors before registration for each semester. All students are encouraged to meet wi t h their advisors

periodically.

ACADEMIC STANDING POLlCY The t() l lowi n g t e rms arc u se d to describe a c adem i c s ta nd i n g a t PLU. Academic st an di n g is determined by t h e om m i t t e e for t h e Admission and Re ten t i o n o f S t ud e n t s , which reserves the ri gh t to review a ny s t udent's record to determ i n e ac a dem i c s ta n d i n g .

Good. Standing: A l l students e nro l l ed at the u n iversity a re expected to stay in good academic stand i ng. Good s t a n d i ng requi res a semester grade poi n t average of 2 .00 or h i gh r fo r the i m mediate past sem ester, and satisfactory academic p rogress . Academic Warning: S t u d e n t s whose most recent mes ter grade p o i nt average was less tha n 2.00, whose c u m u l a t ive grade po i n t ave.ra ge is 2.00 or h i gh e r, an d wh o I' a c a d e m i c p rogress is P

A

C

I

f

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

t

V

E

R

S

t T Y

21


\I) ....

II:: � o ....

u o CJ: Q. u

s a t i Ca ctor y a re p l ac ed

i de n t i fy sud] st ud en t , review t he i r records. consider e xte n u at i ng

n academic warning a n d sen t warning

letters . Stude n ts whose cumulative and semesks gr ad e p oi n t

circu m s t a n ces, Jnd decide wheth 'r o r n o t the students shall be

averag e are bel ow

pla ced

are

also placed

)n

_.00 at the end of t hei r first semester at PLV acade'mic wa rn in g.

EUgibllity for Student Activities:

Probation: Student ' o t he r t h an firs t semester students are p la ced

n probalion if t il 'ir cumulative' g r act l! point veTage fal l s b 'Iow

the Com m i t tee for U1C Ad m i ss ion and Retention of

progress. Probation ary s t u dents must meet with the director o f

advising before the te n t h da)1 o f a probationary s e me s t e r to draw up a p lan fo r i m p roviIlg their ac a de m ic work. Academic p roba t i o n is noted on the transcript. failure to a t isfactorily compl et e each dismissal fro m t h e un iver ity. Failure to co mp l e te in l u de s

se

s

A

C

I

F

I

C

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

' me s t er a fter

to complete includes

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

e

free l y

Course grades reflect t h e qua l i ty of students acad e m ic perfor,

ma n ct' as a whole, which normally includes r e g ula r participation ill the total class exp erience and is elral1l3led acc o rd i n g l y. Absences ma y lead to a red uctiun of a s t ud e n t ' s final grade. (n the eve nt of u ll3voiable a bs e n ce, st udents ar expected to i n fo rm the i n true tor. Ass i g n ment of make-up w rk, if any, is at the discr t i on of the i n s t ructo r. CLASSlFICATlONS OF STUDENTS

:

st udents w h o have sat i factorily co mpleted

G raduate Stud i es.

p oi n t a vera ge is above

U

ha

requirement and have been a 'cepted i n to t h e D ivi ion o f

o m ple ti n of at least 75% of the cr�dl t hours

L

nt�

ho ufs.

for t jle Ad m i '. inn a n d Retention of ' t ud e n t r s e r ves the r ig h t to rev it:I" for academic sta t u s Lhose s t u de n t \ 110 fa il to mai n ta i n sa t is f:lct or y a c a de m ic progres. . The com mi ttet: sh a ll reg u l ar l y P

The L 1 n i ersity assum s t h a t ,lL! registered stud

a ccep t e d persona! respon i b i l i t y for r gu la r lass a t ten d a n ce .

Gr(l(il late Stllde'l ts: students who have met graduate entrance

wit hd rawal s, i ncomp ldes, and grades of E or F. The Com mitt e

22

CLASS ATTENDANCE

hours.

Sotisfactory Academic Progress: Satisfacto ry a c a de m i c progress h a l l be defi l1ed

is not affected.

'el1 iors: s t u de n t who htlve satisfact rill' co mp leted 90 s e m e s ter

2.00, may be gra.ntt>d (Ji ll? add it iona l se m est e r or prob a t i o n at th e iliscrelitJn of the Co mm i t tee fo r the Ad m iss io n and Ret e n t i o n o r St u dents. (f a e m es t er grade p in t aver.1ge of 2.00 is not earned in the p n ) b ationary semester, or if a :; l u d e n t fai l s to a c h i ev e a 2 .00 c u m ulative g rad e point a erage after a second r bationary eme ter, the s t u de n t i di m issed , second time and may not a pp ly for reill t, tement u n t i l onc full se m e ste r has passed, a n d then nly i n ew evi fence i s presented i n d i c at i n rr t h e stude n t 's p robabl e . uccess. Th is rule a l so appLie to a r ad m i t t e d student who atta i ns good s t anding and is then d i sm i ssed a second t ime for academic reaso ns.

a t tempted in iln a ca de m i c year. Fa i l w'

( 2.00) in their classes. No

JUJliors: s t u d e n t s who have sat isfact o r i l y compl eted 60 'cmester

re� d m i tted st ud en t w h o fa i l s t o

rei n t alement, but whose semester gra d

level

30 semester hour,.

ter. po i nt average i n t h e

sp rin g semester, inst ru cto r may choose to end wa r n i n g letters to

requirem nl .

of a prohilt ionM Y semester a re di�m issed frol11 t he u n ive r�i t)'. They may 3pply for reinsta tement )' p t i t i o n i n g the :olllm ittee fo r the Ad m i - 'iOll and H.etention of hl d c n t s ( i n c a re of the d i rector of ild i s i ng) . I the p e t i t io n is approved, the reinstated ludent i s on p robation a n d m List partici pate in the p ro b a t i o n a ry semes t r prugram. If th peti tion is de n ied , the student may pet i t ion aga i n aft r one semester unle · s o tb envisc i n for m ed , Students are d is m issed f, r a adem i c reaso n s a fter each btl and

2.00 cumulative grade

Midterm Advisory Letters: I n the seventh week of each fall and

Sopholllore

Academic Dismissal: Students not i n goo d s t a n d i n g at the end

econd Academic Di missaJ:

giate com pe t i t ions and may be adv ised to curtail p a r t icip ati o n i n other e x t r a c u rr i ular activities.

First -year: _ t ucl e n ts who h a ve met firs t-yea r- ent rance

c u m u l a t i e grade p oi n t averages ar still bdow 2.00 after a p ro bat ion a ry semes ter, b u t w hos ' last sei ne te r grade point <IV r ages a re aboV'� 2 .00 a nd who ure ot h e r w ise in good s t a ndi n g , may be gr:ll1ted olle additional se me ler of pr b ut i o n a t the discretion of the Cornmi tt�e fo r the Ad mis sion and Retent io n of S t u d c n t s. Such ludents must par tic i pate i n the p ro ba t i o na r y scme>ter program. Failure to sa t isfa I nily o m p let e each c ou rs e a t t e m p ted i n a probationar y semester may re s u l t i n d i s m i ssa l from t h e u n i ersi ty. rail urc to wmplete i n cl udes withdrawal., in�ompktc , and grades 0 E or F.

attain a

A st u d en t on

for ertification in i n t rcoUe­

tran s c ript Dotation i s mad , .md academic standing

withdrawals, incom pletes, a n d gra des o f t or F. A probcl tio ll pllln may specify reqll iremellts agreed on by the sludcllt {llld director of advising: assignment to II proba t ionary adviso r, specifi ed co ntact with the advisor, limitatioll of credit load, limitation on work o r aC1ivitie , regist rt1 tioll ill {l study skills class, etc. Copies o[ llie agracmeltl are sent to the s t udellt and problHiol1ary adviso r. ill the em! o[ the semesler, the advisor retll ms aile copy to the director af adt!ising illdicating whetlrer o r not tire stur/em has made a l l effo rt t o IlIce! tire terms o f the probatiollilry agreement. Thi; copy is fi led ill rhe Offi�e of the Registra r li nd mny be II cd to make decisions rega rdillg COllrin­ Iled probariOIl and acadelllic dismissal.

se m e .

in dividual chool , depa rtments. or organizations.

students d o i n g work be l ow

course attempted in a p robationa ry se m e s t e r may result i n

p r i ng

nrolled, ful l ,

activities based u pon acad m i c p er fo rman ce m ay be set by academic p ro ba ti o n is n t d ig i b l

Stude n ts ) i f they have fa i le d to main tain satisfactory academic

Continued Probation: Students wh

ny regularly

student ( ( 2 semester h o u rs or more) is eligible v I p ar t ic i, p a t i o n in u n iversity activ i t i e · . Li m i tations on a st ud ent 's ti me

2 .00. or if the r have been on wa rning in the previ uS semester and have fail e d to ret u rn to guod acade m i c standing, or (at the discretion

n a c a d e m ic pr bati n .

Y

NOli-Degree Ulldergrndlill tes: tl nclergradu3t · st ude n t s who are atte n d i ng p a rH i me for a max i m u m of 8 s mester h o u rs but are no offici a l l y a d m i t ted t o 3 degree program. NO li - Deg ree radliMe S/ridellls: graduate � t u d e n t s w ho are a t t e n d i ng part - r i me (or a m ax i m um of <;) semeste r hours b u t a r e nOt o[ficially adm itl\:d to a degree program. COURSE LOADS

The norll1�1 course load � r u ndergraduate students d u ri n g fal l a n d s p ri ng 'erne�ters is L 3 to 1 7 h o u rs per se m e s t e r, i n c l u d i ng phys i ca l E· d u c a t i o n . The m i n i m u m fuJ I - t i me course l o a d is 1 2 h o u rs. The m i n i m u m fu J I - t j me load fo r graduate st uden t s i s 8 h o u r s . A n or m a l wurse l o a d during the J:1ll Uilr y te r m is 4 hours w ith a m a x i m u m u f 5 holLl's. ' I n order fo r :l s t u d e n t to ta e J full cou rse load, t h e student must he form a l l y a d m i t t ed to tht: u n i vers i t y . See the Ad mi ' si o n sectioll oj" this ((Ita/agIor appliciltiotl p roced u res . ' S t u dents who wish to register Cor 1 8 or 1110re hours ill a s e m ester 3 re requ i re d to have at least a 3 .00 grade p oi n t average or c o n se n t of t h e provost. ' Students en gaged i ll co n s i d erab l e outside work Illay be res t r i c t e d to a reduced a cademic load. CREDIT BY EXAMlNATION ( CHALLENGE) S t u dents are perm i t te d , wiLhin l im i t s , to ob t a i n credit b y e xam i ­ n a t io n in lieu of regular e n rollment a n d c l a s s a t tendanc . No m o re t h a n 30 s e m e stt'r h O llI'S m ay be co un t e d toward g ra du a­ t i o n , w h e t h e r [rom the College Level Exa m i na t io n Program ( ·'UP) or a ny t her exa m i n J t io n. Exce p t ions to t h i s rule fo r certa in groups of st udt:nts or p rograms may be made, subject to recommendation by t h e Educational Policies Com m i t tee Jnd a pproval by the facu lt y. Cred i t b y exa m i n a t i o n is o p e n to


fo rmaUy a d m i tt e d , regular-status students onl and does n o t cou n t tow::trd t. h e resi de n c y re q ui remen t for graduation. To r ive credit by x a m i n a t io n , ·tudents m ust c o m p l e t e a � , redit By E xa m i n a ti o n Regis t ration Form ava i l able in t h e tud"nt ervi ccs "enter, ob t a i n th e sig n a tu re o f t h e res p ec ti ve de p a r tm ent d,air or d ea n , and a rr a nge for the exa m i nat i o n w i th the , ppropriate in s tru c to r. The c o m pl e ted fo rm m u s t be re t urne d to the S t u d e n t Services Cent r b efo r e t he eXJ m i na t ion i s taken . G rades for c re d i t by exa m i na t i o n will be s u b m i tted by

the in · l ructor a l o n � w i t h a l l other g r ad e s at the e n d of the ter m .

e x p e r i e n c i n g courses \ [thout c o m p e t i ng d irec t l }' w i t h students who are specializing in t hose areas o f s t udy. G ra d es o f A through C- are rega rd ed as pass; grades o f D+ t h ro u g h E . re regarded as fa il. Pass/fail grades do [lot affect the grade po i n t avera g e . ' Th e pas / fa i l o p t i o n is l i m ited to 8 cred i t h o u rs ( rega rdless of repea t s , p a ss o r fa i l ) . On ly one co u rse m a y b e taken pass/fa i l i n ful 6 1 l me n t o f ge ne ra l u n i v ersi ty or core req u i rements or of the ollege of Arts a nd S cie n ce s re qu i re me n t . The p a s s / fa i l o p t i o n may n o t be a pp l i e d to a c o u rse t a ke n fo r •

CLEP general ex a m i n a t ions are gi ve n el ec ti ve c re d i t on l y. The

l.E.P

subject eXJ m i na t i o n s

fu l fi l l men t of a maj o r or m i n o r p rogram. An exce p t ion to t h i s is a l l owe d fo r one c o u rse in Lhe maj o r or m in o r field i f it was

take n before the maj o r or m i nor

which may ful fi l l requ irements

fo r ma jo r s, program , o r gen e ral u n iversity requirements in t h e i r

de l a red.

was

S t u d e nt s must file t h e i r i n tent ion to exercis

the pas s/ fa i l e n ter no later than the m i d ­ In a full-length 'emester, this is last day o f

respect ive academic a reas. These exa m i n .l t ions a r e s ubj e c t t o

o p t ion with t he Student Services

recommend<ltions hy th Educational Pol ic ies C o m rn i tt

point of the (our. e. t h e eigh t h week. The pass/fa i l o p t io n is l im ited to undergraduate �tlldents o n l y.

e

and

a p prova l by t h e fac ul ty. he minimum passing leve l for CLEP exam i na t i o ns taken a t

Pacific Lutheran

niv rsi t y is the fifl ietb per entile.

Cl'

red it · g ra n ted b}' o t h e r lInivers i t ie , colleges, and com m u n i t y co i l ge , which are earned before entrance, are honored by Pacific Lutheran n i ve rs i ty. The app l i cat i o n o f those redits toward m a j o rs, programs, and general u n iversity re qu i rement s i s co n s i t n t wi t h school, d iv i s i on a l , and depart­ ment policie a n d s t an d a rds . The u n .ivers i ty does not g r a n t credit fo r college - l evel genera l equivalency d i p l o lTla

(G D) tests.

;:I re

typically co ncern ed with

Exc l u s ive p a ss / fa i l

COLUses d

n o t meet maj o r or u n i ve rs i t y

requ i rements w it h o ut fa cu lty appro v a l . exclusive pass/fa i l

co u rs e,

I f a s t ud e n t

t'lk .

an

t h e s t uden t's i n d i v idua.l pa s s / fa i l

op t i o n is not a ffected.

lncomplete ( I ) g ra des i n d ica te that st u d e nts did no t complete t hei .r work because of c ircu tnst<l nccs beyond their control. To receive

An u n derg r a d u, It s t udent may repeat any c o u rse. The C U lTl u l a ­

recorded within the fi rst six weeks of the fo l low i n g semester. The

i � c o m p u t e d u s i n g the: h ighest o f the

grades earned. Credit toward g ra du a t i o n is allowed o n l y u nce. �redit is not a l lowed f o r a m a t h e m a t i c s o r a fo reign langu a ge as a

p re r lj u is i t ' if t a ken a ft e r ,1 h i gher- level cou rse.

For e�x ample. a . tuden t w h o has com pl eted Spanish 2 0 1 c a n no t l a t e r rece i ve credit fo r S p a n i s h 1 02 .

GRADING SYSTEM Students are graded a cco rd i n g to the following designations: Point5 per Hour

Grade

A B+ B

Excel/em

4.00

Good

3.67 3.33 3.00

B-

2.G7

C+

2.33

C cD

D Poor DE

Credit Awarded

Yes

Yes Yes

Fil ii

0.67

The! grades l i s t e d below a r e not used i n calc ulat i n g grade p o i n t earn

d un d er

these

Grade

Description

Credit Awarded

p

Pass

Yes

F I

fail I n co m p l e te

IP

In Progr

AU W WM UW TG

desi 'nat ions.

S5

Au d it Withdrawal Mcdi c<ll W it hdrawa l n o ffic ial W i t h d rawal Grad

S u b m i tted

completed are cha nged to thc defuult grade i n dicated by t h e instructor when tbe i ncompkte IVa :ubl1litted. An i n co mplete is n o t a pe r m an e n t g ra de. An incomplete does not cntitle a s t ud e n t to

at te n d cla ss again without rer gisttT i ng.

In Progress (IP) si 'nifies progreSi. in a urse which normally ru ns more than one term to co m p l e t i o n . In Progress carries no cred it until rep la ced by a pe rm a n en t gra de .

dead l i ne .

i 0

averages. No g r a d e p o i n ts ar'

fu ll ow i n g tht' I, \ hich remains

on the record ( tor example Il3+ ) . Incomplete g ra des tbal are not

No Grade ( N G ) i s a tem porary grade e n t e red by t h e Regis trar's O ffice w h e n no grade has been s u b m i tted by the 'stahlished

Yes

0.00

pas. i n g grade

Unofficial Withdrawal ( UW ) may be ente.red when a c o ur se is n o t c o m p l e ted because of a s t uden t's nona ttendance in the days before the w i t h d rawal d ea d l i n e. See Withdrawal from the University, pre v i o usly l is te d .

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

133 1 .00

earned grade is recorded immediat I,

a

Medical Wltbdrawal ( W M ) is entered when a cou rs e is not co m ple ted due to medicJI co u se . A medical withdrawal does not a ffect a stu den t's grade p oi nt .Iveragc. See lVit.hdrmval from the University, p rev iously l is ted .

Ye Yes

Siltis/acrory 2.00 1 .67

:xl o f'I m o C :xl m 11\

a p prec i a t i o n , value com m i tment, o r c rea t i ve achieve m e n t .

c red i t , an i nco m p le t e must be co mplete d and

course l ist e d

-0

Exclusive Pass/Fail Courses: So m e co urses oilly aware! pass/ fail grade. . The go als of these co u rse s

CREDIT RESTRICTIONS t i ve g rade p o i n t ;,l\ .rag

m

vario us seho Is, d iv is i o ns , and de p a r t m e n l s dete r m i n e the speci­

fic

» f'I » o

No

Pass ( P ) a nd Fail ( ) gr, des are awarded to st udents who select the pass/fail option or who arc enrolled i n exclusi e pass/fail co u rses . These grades do not a ffect a student's g rade po i n t average. Pass/Fail Option: The pass / fail option permits stu dents to exp l D re subject a re a s o u ts ide t h e i r known a b i l i t ies by

GRADUATION S t u d ents exp ec t i ng to ful fi l l degree reqllLrements w i t h i n the academic year ( i n c lud i n g Au g u st ) a re ro: q u ired to fi l e an a p p l i ca t i o n fo r gra d ua t i o n w i t h t h e Regi t rar's Office accord ing to the followi ng: DEGREE COMPLETION

BACHELOR'S AND MAST£R'S DEAD L I N E

Ma 2003 August 2003 December 2003 Ja n u a ry 2004

November

1 , 2002 March 1 , 2003 May 1 , 2003 May 1 , 2003

There are fo u r degree- completion dates ( e n d o f s u m mer session,

fal l semester, J an ua ry, and spring semester) . Degrees are fo rm a lly

cunferred a t Augus t , Decem ber, and �vlay com mencements. S t udents w i t h january d eg re e d a te s a

e

ex p e c t e d to take part i n

the December com mencemen t . T h c ac t u a l datc o f g ra d u a t io n will be recorded on t h e pe r m a n e n t re o rds. Students who p lan to t r a ns fer back to Pa c i fi c Lutheran University for a d eg re e must ap ply fo r g ra dua t i o n P

A

e

l

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

before or

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

23


<1\

"" II:

'::I o "" u o

0:: a..

u w

o « u «

du ring the first semester of their j u n ior year so t.hat de fic i e n ci es

NON-CREDIT JNFORMAL STUDY

may be met before t hey leave campus.

To encou rage l i b e r al l ea rn i n g of all ki n d s . above and be 'and enrollment in cou rses lead in g t oward fo rmal degrees. the

HONORS

u n ivers i ty o ffe rs a va r ie t y 0 01 p o r l u n i t i s for in� rmaJ stud)!:

Honors Program: PLU o ffers its un ivers ity Honors Program to

studen ts seek i n g a spec ial a c ade mi c challenge in class w i th qually capable peers. Incoming fi rst - ye a r students may apply for a course of s t u dy that i n cludes a m i n imum of 1 6 hours o f honors-level courses. The p rogr a m centers o n the theme " Tak i ng Re ponsibility; Matters of the M ind, Matters o f the Heart" and i ntegrat es academic and experiential lea rn ing opportun ities, with the objective o f preparing partici pants fo r l ives o f s e rv i ce and servant l e ad e rship . See the Honors Pr o g ra m section of this catalog for fu rt h e r details.

Members of the academ ic community are e n c o u ra ged to v isit class!' which i n terest th em . No ee is barged for the p riv i l ege . D ing SL> re q u i res the perm ission of the instructo r. REGISTRATION PROCEDUlUlS S t u dents re u i te r by using Ba nn e r Web, a n o n l in e reg i s t r a t i o n

system. [ n a d d i t i on l O registering, B a n n e r Web a l so o ffe r s t u dents

ODors: D e g r e

grades are comb i n ed with PLU grades to determine eligibility. Physica.1 e d u c a t i o n a ct i v i t y course are not included in determin­ ing gra d u a t i o n honors. Dean's List: A D ea n's List is cre at e d at the end of each emester.

To be eligible, a stu den t must have attained a semester grade point average of 3.50 with a minimum of 1 2 g rad ed h ou rs. Honor Societies: E l ection to the Arete Society is a s pec ia l

recognition of a s tuden t's co mmit ment to the liberal arts to ge the r with a re c u rd of high achievement i n relevant course work. The society was o rgan ized in 1 969 by P h i Beta Kappa schularship in the l i beral arts. Student members are elected by the fac u l t y fellows o f the society each spring. B t h juniors an d se n i ors a re e lig i bl e ; h owever, the qualifications fo r election as a

j un i o r are more stri ngent. Students mu s t have: • attained a high gra de point average ( for se n i rs, normally above

3.70; for jun iors, normally above 3 .90); c o m p leted 1 1 0 credit hours in liberal s t u d i es ; dem unstrated the equivalent of two yea rs of c o l l e ge work in

forei g n la n gua ge ; co m plet e d on year of college mathematics ( i ncluding statistics or computer science) or fo ur years of college preparatory malh­ e m a t ics i n h i g h school and one college mathematics o u rse; and • completed a m i n im u m of th re e semesters in re s i nee at the

university.

Phi Alpha ( oc ial Work)

Pi Kappa Delta ( Forensics)

Ps i

• • •

oc cu rs d ur in g June or whetl,er s t u de n t s hegin in lh fal l or spring semester. Early regis tra lio n is o n d u c t e u by the Advi s i ng Office. Registf<ltion m ate ri a b are ent t all a.:cepted e nte ri ng students well in ad ilnce of t h ei r arri aI on c a m p us fo r their first semester. Most students meet i n person with registration c o u ns e l o r as they regi s ter fo r cou rses. S t ud e n l s may also regi s t e r by phone.

If a · t u de n l doe not wi h lO conti nue a course after th e add/ drop period, tb ·tudent m ust wilhdraw from t he com. t:. Tui t i on

iooal life and work o f a faculty member in his r her major discipline. A tuition credit a ccompa n ie s the appointment. I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

on

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE

Sigma T h e ta Tau ( Nursing) S igm a Xi ( c i e n ti fi c R esea r ch )

C

EARLY REGISTRATION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS Students � ho plan to re tu rn are encouraged to register. Ret u rn ing students will recei ve regist rat ion l i me appoint ments to reg ister or summer and fa U terms and for J -term and p ri ng term . Regislration dates a re determined b the number of hou rs. induding t ran f, r hours. co m pleted by the stu d e n l . S t udenLs may regis ter fo r eadl new term or summ r ses ion on or afte r th desi gn a ted da te.

January, depending

hi ( Psychology) Omicron Delta Epsilon ( Economics)

A

terms.

E a r ly re g islr a t i l) n fo r e n te ri ng s t uden t s

fellows are a ppo i n te d ann ually. These appointments are given to o u tstan d i ng se n i o r s tu d e n ts wi t h a view to encouraging rec ipi­ e n t s to c o n s i d er colle ge teaching as a career. An undergraduate fellow i s given a variety o f opportu n i t ies to sampl e the profes-

P

for those

STUDENTS

Undergraduate Fellows: A lim ited number of undergraduate

24

a

co u r�e at any t i me dur i n g the first len days �lr cia;; d uri n g a fu ll­ len g t h semest r. D u r i ng t he a d cl/d r ) p eriod, cou rse may be d rop p ed and tuition w il l be re fu nd ed in fu ll . In mos t cases, a dd in g a nd dropping Cdn be accom pl i -hed us i n g Ban n e r Web. See the Jan l lary term (lllrE SlI lIlI1Wr cata[og5 for the acid/drop periods

EARLY REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR ENTERING

The u n ive rsit y also has c h a p te rs of a n u mbe r of national honor soc ie t i e s o n campus, i n d u d i n g the following: • Alpha Ka p pa Delta ( Sociology)

a ccess final

Adding or Dropping a CoOl'se: A s l ude n t may add or dr

mem b ers of the faculty to encou rage and re c o g n i ze excellent

Alpha Psi Omega (Drama) Beta Gam m a Sigma ( B usiness) M u Phi Epsilon ( Music)

a class, check t hei r schedul s, :Ind grades. B ann e r Web may be ac cessed th ro ug h the PLU home page ( wwlI'.pill.erEu) . Stude nts m�y co nt a c t the S tu de n t Services Center w i t h regi strat i on qu e s l i o n . • tuuenls afC not offici a l ly enrolled u n t i l their regi tration has been cleared by the Sl ud.cIl l A cco u n t s O ni ce. • Stll del1t� re re,pon�ible fo r electing their oll rses . Advi so rs are available to as ist with phnning and w make ugges tlo ns . • Stu d e n ts should be t.horoughly a q uai n t cd w i t h a l l registra t ion h� d u le . m a t rials, in l ud i ll g the cu rre n t cata log a n d da Studenl , re abo e n co uraged t study carefu lly lh� r quire­ ments of all 'K ademic programs in which th ey may even tually decl, re a major.

the ab i l i l y to add or drop

3.50 fo r CIIm /aude, 3 . 7 5 for magna cum lau de, a n d 3 .90 fo r s u m m a C I I tr/ la ude. All transfer

designiJti ng lht'm a s guests o f t h e un i vers i t y.

same as credit fees.

ea rn a cumulative grade poi n t av rage of

fo r car

Visiting Classes:

with honors of cu m laude, mag /la cu m /au de, and s u m m a cu m laude are granted. A s tu de nt must

v os t

pe rm iss i o n of the i n s truc to r, on a n on - redit hasis . An auditor is no t held accoun table fo r exa m i na t i ons or oth r written work nd does not receive a rade. l f the i n stmctor ap p roves , the course may be entered lIpon the r a ns c ript as Judit. Auwl fees are t h e

Convocation o n the most highly q ua l i fi ed e n teri n g freshmen. Cer t ificate , which are mailed i n early May to high schools for pr entation to rec i p i e n t s , recog n ize ou ts t an di ng high school achievement and a n t ic ip a te sup e rio r performance at the university level. These awa rds have no mo ne ta ry value an d do n ot con s ti t u te a cep t a n ce into the Honors Program.

to use u n iver s it y fa d l i t ies fo r i ndepende nt �tudy rna apply t o the pr

Auditing Courses: 10 audit a cou rse is to e n ro l l , with the

Honors at Entrance: These honor are conferred at Opening

Graduation

Guest of Universil:}' Status: Any professional p�rson who wish

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

is not refunded. A $50 ad m i n istrat ive fe e i s c h a rged for any reg i s t r a t io n c ha n ge ft r lhl! a d d / d ro p peri od. Medical Withdrawal: St uden ts may also

co m p l e t el y w ithdraw from the un iver i t )' fo r a term fo r medi al rea ons . The s t ud e n t must provide written e i de n e from · ph YS i c i a n and J personal


exp lanatio n to tht' vice p l'esickn( and dean for student li fe . This

the last cia ' of las, i n any given term. If grail ted, t h e g rade of WM w i l l appear on the s tudt�n t's t ra n s c r i p t .

Official Withdrawal: To w i t h d raw offi ciall)" t h e �tude n t needs to obt ai.n u w ithdrawal [orm fro m the S t ude n t Services Center, fi l l in t b e fo rm, have t ilt! i nst ructo r �ib'l1 t ile fo r m, dnd s u b m i t the c o m p l e t d fo r m t' l I he S tudent Serv i c s C 'nter. Withdrawal forms must be 5L1brn itlt.'ci before th e end of the 1 2 th week. A iN grad\: will app ar n the studen t ' Lranscript. See the Jail/wry term and sulllmer cGla/ogs for the last date' 1 0 withdraw during those rerms.

Note: Credits earned by Advallced Placement-EllglisT, and tiollaT Bacmlaureate-English

the student's trauscript. I f i t can be ddcrmi neci that a student n ver attended a co ur e. the reg isL r a t i n will be cancelled witllout notation on the (Tanscript.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY

t u dt:n ts are enti tled to wi l bdr aw hono rabl)' from the un iversity i f I h ir rcwrd is sati fnctory an d all fi n a ncia l obl igati ns are sa tisfied , Partia l t uit i on refunds arc available. Refer to the Tu ition , m d Pees sectio n or this m ralog jor more injomlaticm.

2.

General University Requirements The u n iver i t y is comm iued t o pro iding a trong liberal arts base fo r all i ts ba c ca l a u re a t e degree progra ms. Acco rd i ngl y, i.n add i t i on to fulfilling ce rt a. i n minimum reqlLir m e nts , aU u ndergraduate student must atisfa to r ily co mple t e all general un ivers i ty requirements (G Rs l . 0 co urse used t o sati fy one GUR may be u d to satisfy ano t her, except l i m ited such use i n the Perpsect ive o n Diversity requiremen ts.

thl: student'> first year. This requireme nt must be met by all students entering PLU w i th fewer than 20 semester hou r . 1 a, lIlq u i ry Selllinar: Writillg (4 hours) - FW, WR:

though

may be usedfor elective credit, Studellts with officially writing COLlrses, including those in Washington State's RUI1I1ing Start program. ar� nonetheless eligible to enroll ill the writing seminar for credit. or they /JIay choose to lise their previuus credits to ;atisfy the writillg ;ell/illar requiremellt, l b. 1I1quiry Seminar (4 hours) - F : I nq ui r ), Seminars a r e courses specially desi gned for first­ year students, which will in troduce students to the methods and topics oJ study within a particular academic discipline or field. Inquiry Seminars also emphasize tbe acadmic skills that are a t the center o f the First-year Experience Program, Worki ng with other fi rst-year students i n a small-class setting that promotes act ive, seminar-s t),le learning, students p ractice fu ndamental skills o f l iteracy, thinking and community as they operate within that particular discipline, I n add i tion to ful filling major and m i no r requ i re ments, an I nquiry Sem i na r ma), ful fi l l no more than one G U R. Ie. Fir5t-year Jail ua r)' Residency Requiremellt (4 hours ) : All first-year students must e n roll i n a c urse during J-term, In addition to ful filling major or minor req u i rements. a course taken during J - term used to fulfill this [esidene), require ment ma), ful fill no more than one G UR ,

on

The Exumilled Life: I n to Un(erraillty (/1111 BCY(J lld The fi rs t - year p rogram provides a sup p ortivel ' ch a l l e n g i n g context in w b i h 0 begin the que t fo r, and ad e n t ure o f, a larger ision for l i fe , University educaLion i� about more than skills; a t P LU i t is about li b e ra t i ng t uden ts for crid al and com m i t ted Ii i ng, ombi ni ng we l l d vcJoped critical capacities w i th com passion and v is i o n for service in a multi cultural, ideologically plur I � odd. I n ad di t ion to orient t i n and adVising programs, the first -year program is c mposed of three req ui rements, One o f the two seminars must be taken i ll 1 111: student" first semester. F i rst-year program reqUlrements must be completed du ri ng

[l/teY/111-

do IlOt ..utisfy this requirelile-lIt,

transcripted college

wilildrawal The grade o f UW will appear

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS - ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 1 . Tbe First-year Experiencc

m

they

Unofficial Withdrawal: studenr who st ps attending a course before the end f the 1 2th week but does not withdraw ma), reeei e an un I ffidaJ

> ,., > o

These seminars focus on writing, th inking, speaking, and reading,The), i nvolve writing as a wa), of thinking, 0 learning, and of discovering and ordering ideas, Taught b)' ra Cldt)' fr0111 the un iversity's various departments and schools, these seminars are organ ized around t op i cs that engage students and faculty i n d ialogue and provide the opportunity to exa mine issues from a variel)' of perspectives,

m us t be comple ted i ll ' t i rn e J )' mall nl:[" and in no case latC[ than

"'II ::III a ,., m

o C ::III

m

..,.

Mathematical Reasoning ( 4 hours) - M R A course i n mathematics or applications of mathematics, w i th emp hasis on numerical and logical reaso ning and on using appropriate methods to fo rmulate and solve p ro b lem s. This requireme n t may be satisfied by a n)' 4 hours from mathemat­ ics (except Math 91 o r Math 99) o r by Computer Science 115 or b)' Stat istics 2 3 1 . This requirement may also be satisfied by the completion ( wi th at least a B average) of the equivalent o f fo u r years o f college preparatory mathematics ( t h rough mathematica l a na l y s i s or calculus o r equivalen t ) . In fu l fi ll i n g the mathematical reason i ng req u i re ment , students with documented d isabilities w il l be given reasonable accommoda­ tions as determined by t h e coordi nator for students with d i sa b i l i t ies and the appropriate fa ulty m mber i n consulta­ tion with the student. I n fulfi l l i n g the Math Reaso ning Requirement, students with documented disabili ties will be given reaso nable accomodations as determi ned by the Coord i n ator fo r Students with Disab i l i t ies and the approp riate t:lcult), member in consultation with the srudent.

3. Science aDd the Scientific Method (4 hours) - SM A science course that tea hes the met hods o f science, i llus­ trates i ts appl ications and l i m itations, and i n c l u d e s a l a b ora ­ tory component. At least o n e of the courses taken to meet l i n e 4 or 2 ( Core I , e) m u s t be a course i n which t h e ubject is natural sciences, i,e., physical or biological science.

4. Writing Requirement (4 hours) - W R All students m u t compl e te 4 cre d i t hours i n an approved w r iting course. F i rs t-year st ud e nt s sa t i s fy this requir ment through the I nquiry Seminar: Writing. S . Perspectives On Diversity ( 8 hours) A course in each o f the following two lines, a. Aiterllative Perspectives (4 hours) - A : A course that creates an awareness and understanding o f d iversity in the United States, d i rectly addressing issues such as ethnicity, gender, disabili ty, racism, or poverty. b. Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4 hours) - C: A course that en­ hances cross-cultural llnderstandings th rough exa m i nation P

A

C

I

F

i

e

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

25


11'1 w ac: ::::J C

CORE REQU I R E M E NTS ErrHER CORE ' Qa CORE II

FIRST-Y EAR E X PER IENCE (1 0- 1 2 HOUBS)

w

U o

WRIT 1 0 1

D..

I n q u i ry S e m i n a r (4)

-

I - Distributive and

Core

I n q u i ry S e m i n a r :

Disciplinary

W r i t i n g (4) - FW. W R

ac:

Art, M usic, Theatr \teToWH! Vi - :Ii

-F

fl{<,t-'jeoI �o UiWj ��s\d�n(.� t\equlTement t�)

Core II

(32 hours) (4) - AR

w

C <t u «

MR Science a n d the Sc i e ntific

(IS hours)

IN.'C. ' "

Wlet'rlod �4) - SWI Writing \4). u n less taken i n fi rst

INTC 1 1 2 - Li erty and Powe r

Pers pectives on Diversity

- Jl,uthmit'J and D i scovery - 1 1 (4) (4)

A nth ropo logy, H istory. or Political

M athematical Reason i n g (4) -

Contemporary World

l'hil osop'rly {I\) - 1'1-1 Re l i gious Studies (8) - R 1 , R2. R3

:E

- Internatlonal Core:

Integrated Studies of the

-11

Four 200-level thematic courses (1 6) - 12 One 3 00-leve l c o u r se (4) - 13

Science (4) - S 1

Economics, Psychology. S o c i o l ogy. or Soci al Work (4) - S2

year - WR

Cross-Cultural Perspectives

c. Rel igious Stud ies (8 h o u r s , 4 from each of two l i n es )

o f t h ree ways :

L B i b l i c al S t udies - R I 2 . C h ristian T h oug h t , H ist o r y, a nd E x p er ie n ce - R2 3_ I n tegrat ive and o m p arati ve Rel igiou' Studies - R3

focusing o n the cult ure of n o n - E u ro-American

societies; ( ii) a fore i g n l a n g uage course n u mbered 20 1 or above ( not sign l a nguage) used to satisfy the entrance re q u irem e nt , or c o m p l e t i on t h r o u gh the first year of college level of a foreign language ( not s i gn language) other than that used to sati -fy the f re i gn language entran e req u i re m e n t . (A forclgn language co m p l e te d t h roug h the second year of colleg level may also be u se d to - i l11 u l taJ1eously s a t i s fy O p t i o n l, or a co m p l e t i o n of a fo re ign language t h rou g h the first year o f col lege level may also be used to s i m u l t a n e ou s ly sa t isfy O p t i Q n I I of the C o l l c ge of Arts a n d Sciences req u i re me n ts [see bt'low j ) i or ( i i i ) p a rt ic i p a t i o n in a n a p p roved semester-long study a b road p rogram ( J a nu a r y term p ro g r a m s are eva l u a ted i nd ividually. ) Notr: 4 hOllrs of Perspectives 011 Diwrsit), courses I1/(lY be lIsed tn (" Ifill

Note: Transfer tlldellr;- fllterillg <lS jUlliors or se/1ior arc rcquirrd to take 4 selllrster hOllrs of religiOIl (fro III lilies I or 2) IIIlicss preswtillg 8 transfer !tollrs of religioll /rolll <ltlter reg iollally tlccredilcd college.; o r 1Illiversilies.

d. Social Sciences ( 8 h ou r s, 4 from each l i n e )

L Anthropology, H i s t o r y, or Political S c i ence - 5 [ 2 . Eco n o m ics, Psy ch o l o gy, Socio logy, o r Social Wo rk - 52 e_ Natural Sciences, Co m p uter Sc i e n ce, M J t h c l11 a t ic�

( 4 hours)

Contemporary \'\iurld

ulliversity reqll irell1ent. The (emaillillg 4 hOllrs must be

The511 4 hOllrs IIWY, ho we ver, satisfy (/ rClj llircl1/C/l r in the or m i l l or_ jllllior and SCllfor t m n�rer studellts sholl either tllke OIlC Perspectives 011 Diversity colll's e (4 credh IlOlIrs) II I PLU thllt does I l o t silllullilllcolIsly fu ljill (Hlollzer gellem l un i versity requircmellt, or they shall sholV thot they h(lve sOlisfied I,oth the A l terJ1lI Iive Pa,pectivcs I1lld Cross - Cllltumi i'erspectivl'S lilies o f the rflj uircl7lellt. major

GENERAL REQumEMENTS AND L I MITATI ONSALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES: ( I I cre d i t h o u r referred to in l istings of re q u ire men ts are eme -ter homs.) L Total HOllrs and Cumlliative CPA: A min�imu m of 1 2 8 ernester hours mllst be co mple t e d with a gra d e point average of 2.00 ( 2.50 in t h e Schools of Business and Educat ion ) _ 2 . Upper-Divisio/l oL/ i-ses: A m i n im u m of 40 se m es t e r h o u rs m u s t be completed from co u r se s n u mbered 300 or a b o ve . Cou rses fro m two-year i n s t i ­ tutions a re not c o n s i d e r e d u p p e r - d iv i s i o n rega rdless o f ubject matter p a r a l le l s ( regardless of major mine r excep t io n s ) . At least 2 0 of the m i n i m u m 40 emester hour o f u pper-division work m u s t be take n a t PL . 3. Final Year in Residence: The final 32 semester hours o f a tu d en t 's program IllUst be con1pleted in residence at PL . No t ransfer credit ma)' be a p p l ie d during a tuden t's fi nal 3 2 hours i n a d e gree p ro g r a m . ( S p ec i a l p rograms s u c h as 3 - 1 , 3 - 2 an d semester a n d J an u a ry term exchange s t u d )' a re exc l u d e d fro m t h i s l i m i tat i o n . )

0_ Physical Education (4 hours) - PE Four d ifferent ph ys i cal

education a c t i v i ty courses, including Ph ys i c al Education [ 00. O ne hour of credit may be earned through a pp ro ve d sports p a rticipation. A l l activit ies are g rad ed on the basis of A , Pass, o r Pail. 7_ Senior Seminar/Project ( 2 h o u r s as designa ted by the academic u n i t of the stud�!1 t's major) - 'R A substa n t ial p roject, paper, p ra c t i c u m , o r i n t c rn s h i p tbJt culmina tes a n d a d va n ces the p ro gram of an a ca d e m i c major. The end pro d u c t must be pres e nted to an o p en aud ience and cr i t ica l ly eva l ua ted by facu l t y i n t h e .tuden t's field_ \Vith a p p roval f the st udent's m aj or d part m en t, interdiscipLinary

capstone courses such as the lobal Studies Research Seminar or the Honors Program Challenge Experience mal' fulfill this requirement. 8 . One of Two Alternative Cores: Core l OT Core 11

4.

I: Tile DistTjLnl t�ive Core (32 hOtlrs)

Arts/Literat ure

(8 h o ur s , 4 fr m

each

(4 h o u rs ) - PH

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

m aj o r must be co m p l e t e d a detailed by each school or d e p a rt men t . At least 8 semester h ou r s mllst be t ak e n i n residence. Depa r t m en ts, d i v i s i o n s , or s ch o o l s m.1Y s e t h igher re si d enc y requirements_

LT

5. Grades for Major Cou rses:

Note: Logic courses d o II at flilfill

26

Academic Major: A

line)

1 . A r t , Mus ic, o r Theatre - R 2. L i terat u re ( E ngl ish or Languages and L i teratures) b. Ph ilosophy

(28 h o u rs )

a. INTC I I I , 1 1 2 Origins o f the Contemporary World (8 hours) - I I b. Four 200-level INTC co u rs e s ( i 6 hours) - 1 2 : N o r m a ll y taken in the second and t h i rd years. May include ap p ro ve d program o f study abr ad. S t u d e n t s select fo u r courses subject to ap p rov a l o f the I n ternational Core ,orn m i tlee. c. One 300-level l TC c o u rse ( 4 h o urs) - 1 3

l-eqllirC/IIent.

3.

- NS

Core II: The Interna t io n a l Core: In tegra ted Stlldies of the

a (all"" t/ml do> IlOt sil/witollcollsly fulfill OilY otlrer general liniversity

ore

PE

(2-4) - SR

o f other cul t ures. T h is req u i re m e n t may be s a t i s fi e d in one

another general

(4) -

S e n i o r Sem i n a r/P roject

Selenc s. (omputer Science. or Mathematics (4) - NS

C O U fse

-(

Physical Education

Natur a l

( i) a

R

th is A

AJI course s counted toward a major or minor must be

rC(/l(iremeHt. N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

(6-8)

A lte r n a t ive Perspectives - A

T

Y


comp leted w i t h grades

f

.-

or

h i g h e r ;lnd \\Iilh

a

cU l11uliltivc

grade po i nt average of 2 .00 or high r in t h o se courses. D parl ments, J ivision�, O f schools may set h igher grade

REQ UIREMENTS ALTERNATIVE PERSPECTIVES

requ i remen ts.

6. 44 Hour Limit: Not more than 44 hours e a rn e d i n one deparl ment ma}' 10 the SA or B d grees.

AI rH A. n-f ANT[-1 ANT[ 1

be

applied

7. Mllsir EIIsembLes: Non-music majo rs fil ay count toward graduati n requi re

m e n t n t more t h a n 8 st.lneste r hours in music ensembles. R.

orrCSpOlI(iellce/[x/(,IISioll

c u rses:

A m a x im u m of _4 hours i n accred i ted corresp o n de n ce o r extension studies lll ay b e cred i te d tOlV a rd degree requ i rem e n ts , co n t i ngen t on a p p roval by t he Reg istra r's ffiee. 9. CO lll m /miry College Cou rse;: A maximum nf 64 h o u rs w i l l be accepted by tran fer from a region al ly accred i ted community col lege. All

co m m u n i t y

l,;ollege co u rse;, a re transf rred as lower-di i s i o n

1 0 . Physicol Educa tion

toward

LII

ph

ical t:du arion activity courses

[excluding

B PE wit h certifi cat ion ] , and B PE degrees) m u s t m e e t Option I . i l , o r IU below. a lHlida t�s fo r the BA i ll ngl i s h , for t h e BA in Education w i th c n ce n t ration in English, for the BA i n Globa l Srudie�, for the BBA i n I nterna t i o nal B us iness, and fo r elect ion to the Arete So iet )' lllUSl mcct O p t i o n 1 . ompletion o f n e oreign bnguage t h rough the . econd year

may ,l isa be met by complet ion f fo u r yea rs of high school ·tudy in ne fo reign language or h igher, or by sat i s factory scores on a with g ra d e s of profi iency examinati n administ(;r(;d by the PL Depart­ m n t f Language. a n d Lit rat U re5. of coUege level. T h is op tion

II.

o m p l e t i on of one fo r<'ign Iall"uage other t h a n t h a t llsed to sat isfy th

oreign language

the first year

0

entrance

req u i rc:'ment t h rough

col lege level. T h is o p t ion may also be met by

sat isfactoqr scores

on a

p roficien cy

exa m i nat ion adminis­

tered by the PLU Depa r t me n t o r Languages a n d Litera t u res.

m. Completion of 4 se mester hou rs in h istory, l i terature, or lan guage ( at the 20 1 leve l , or at ,In)' level i ll a language ollter than t h a t used to ilt isfy the foreign l a nguage e n t rance requirement ) in J d cl i t i o n to course ap l i e d to the general u n iversity requ irc:'men ts, (wJ 4 semester h o u r., in ymbolic logic, mathematics (courses numbered l OO or above), cc mp uter cience, or st , t i s r i cs in add i t i o n to courses app l i ed to the gener 1 wliV\!r ity requirements. o u r es us d to s t isfy e i th e r category of Opt ion II I of the CoUege of ArtS and S iCllce rey uircmcnI rna n t also 11(' used t o sat isfy general u lciversity req u i re.mel1 l s .

Lnflguage merit:

Co,u-s,�work alld (he Perspect i ve.; a l l DiversilY Req u il"

A fo reign la nguage course n u m bered 2 0 1 0 1' a b o e u s e d r u

at is fy p l i o n I , or comple t io n of a fore ign lan g u age th rough the fir�t ye�u of college levd w.cd 0 sati �' O p t i o n I I , may h lIS d s i m ultaneously to sati,fy the Per,pect h'es on D ivers i r )! requ i re­

ment.

cou rse i n

.1Il t urc P. M .1I1d of I he N!)rlJ1IVcSt 0 ·t �ullures a n I Peoples of :Iti"" Mlh Americ.t Native Americ"n H"altb The A n lhro p o l ogy of Contemporary America Jew ish Cultu r e 1 lo'ikt.,; C u l t u n d [ ) j :\l.ov�q in I l nwa j i E!ll nie Grou!'s /<'lil l1<lging Cu ir u r;i1 f) i ver�il )' ender , I l 1d Commul1ic; l t ion

Ameri a n ign Language m a y b.:

'ed to s a t i fy t h e Alternative Perspec t i es line, and fureigll lanouar:;r COlll''C ( S ) ( n t sign) may b e used to s at i s fy t h e ross-Cu l t ura l Perspectives u

line Cee above).

e m p hasis on

F '

FD 365

H I 5T 357 H I ST 359

HIST <\60 I NTC 2 3 1 INTC 247 NURS 365 P H FD

10

Body I mage

P H E D 362

Healing

PHI L 220

Wom e n and Phi losoph)'

Arts of I h e

o n IT! o c: ::u IT! VJ

M i n d a n d Body

Worksh p on Alternative Psychology of \ Omen

PSYC 40S

PSYC 4 74 R E Ll 257 R ELl 35 1 RFLl 354 RF.Ll 357

Perspective.

hristiall Theolo )'

inrrch

H islor), Studies

Theological Stu .Iics Major Rdif.lOUS

R E LI 368

fClnini51 and

Sll;N 1 0 1

Sign language

5 1 �N 1 02

Si;!n Language

Thinke.rs. Texts, Jnd ( ;enres Tlwo]og ie.

Womanist

Am rican SocictT Social I'robkm F a m i l ies i n the Americas SCX� Gendt'r, �lnd Society Ja n u a r y o n the H i l l T h e Latino Experiences i n

SOO 1 0 1

240 50(1 362 SOO 440 S CW lil l S PA N 34 1 SP!' ! ) 1 9 5 WMS 1 0 1 SOC[

.S.

I n d i v i ci l l a i s with Disabi[ilies I n t r o d u c t i u n to \

omen'> Studie,

ART. MUSIC, OR TH EATR E - AR

ARTD

H i tory of 'v estern

Art 1 or W�,tern An I T De�ign 1 : Fundam nt.Lls Black and W h i te P ho tograph y Cera m i I

AI TD 1 80

I l isrory

ARTO 1 96

A RTD 226

ARTD 231)

ARTD 250 A RT D 260 ARTD 296 A RTD 26 A R rll 330 ART D 3 3 1 A RTD .,50 A R m 300

J"uJplllr. I

I )raw i n g Dc�ign I I : Co ncept CQlor Pho tograpl,y lntc rmcdiate

Cer;]mics I I

The

rt of t h e H o o k I

' C li l pt uro: I I

Life Drawi n g

ART0 365

Pa i n t i n g I

ARTD

Prin t m a k i ng

370

Modem

ARTD _

I

Art

Sllldic� i n A r t Hbtory

90

Ullders/<Itldillgs Regarding All

A RT I ) J98

L Je,ign: I l l ustration

A RT ! ) 426

E!cClroni

IJnaging

A RT l l 4.10 A tnD �rJ5

Ceramic, I I I

MU l l 470

Pr i n t:ma.k ing I I

Pai n t i n g

j \ RT I l 4 9 1 A R lU 492 M SI IOI P

A

C

I

rld

Drawing

ARTtJ 1 8 J

ARTO

'ontempnr:u,' \\I,

Design i n lhe

J t6

ARTD 1 60

departmental sec/ions of Ille

tlu lin its (illn by till' con/lnitta overst'ci/lg lIlt' glHlfrni lltlivas i ty ""111ir�­ If1mts, (3) CO/lrses offered throllgh carrf!5[>ollricn.c. nfl- litle, lind indepm­ dellt swdie3 are !lo t accepted to .lii/fill the care rC</llireJII!!1/t III Litaatll re. Philosophy, or Rdigious Stlldies.

." ::u

I't livl's

itcrnat i ve Per

J>HED 3 1 5

rksign: G raphic, I

ollrside 'hose 11//1£5 may COIIll ' lor tIle rcquirelllCIIl w/,,'n app roved botll lIy

n

Fcrni llbl I'proJ hes to Li tl'fature AmeriCiln [thnic Literatures Big Fat Lies The Aginll Experience Slave r )' in lhe Americas Afric<ln meri an Hi'lr>r H i. tory of Wo!l1¢n i n the n i ted State> I lolocaust: Destruction of the European Jews Wesl and Non hw<'>t Gender. Sexual i t )'. and Culture The C u l tures of Rac ism Cultu rally Congruc:. n t Heal t h Care 50 iocc o n o m i (' I nfl uences on Health in America

I . 34 1

ENGL 374

ARTD 396

Rcqu ircl1It'nls: ( J ) COHsult prmiw/nr atfilor? fur detaIled spccijiallioll of (OUI'S(,S ,ilM corm' for ,hese r q "ircment . (2) For t/II'tSC lirl�s of /he gl'lternl llll i versity requir.:mell's lViii,,, refer 10 academic discipline or Ill/irs, selected CO",. es

m

nt

Pr

Wom£ n's l . i lt.:raturc

H I H 360

the Co!! g or Arts a nd . cie oces ( a l l BA, as, BARe . BAPE

A

Peoples

HIST 305

graduat io n .

-

P racticing Anthropology: Makah

rielioll:

H

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS In addition to m ee t i n g th e n t ra n c e requ i re me n t in fo r ign Iangua'l:' ( two years 0 high school lan guage, o n e yea r of college language, r demonstra ted e q uivalent p roficienc y ) ' ca n d ida tes in

I.

1 9� 230 33U 3 3 II TH 334 A NT H 338 A 1 1 34 1 A l' l ; 360 ANTH 30 1

HEED 162

d it.

DImes:

No more than ei"ht l -h may be counted

r

l> n l> o

COURSES THAT M HET THE UNIVERSITY-WIDE

Spcc ial

II

Projecbl f ndependcn t S t u. d y

Design: Workshop I n t rod u c l i o n F

i

e

L

U

T

to M u_ i c

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

1

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

27


'"

w cc �

Q

w

U 0 cc

M US I 1 02

Mu,ic ,Inu Technology The Arts of

I n t rod u c t i o n to

16

Bas ic Musi

M U' 1 1 2 1 M USI I 2 2

Th e ory I

Keyboarding

S[ 1 24

I:.ar

M U S I 1 26

Ear Tr a i n in g I I

I

MU 1 20 1 -2 1 9

Priva tl' l nSlIuction

M USI 22 I

Keybo a rd Pro IClency

M U 1 225

Th e ory I I J :uz Theory Laborotory Ear Tra L n in g I I I

M U S I 226

Ear Tra i n i n g I V

M U S I 2 34

History I

M US I 223 M US[ 224

M US l 3 2 7

History I I

M U . I 334

20th-Century Music

MUSI 336

Making Music nalyzing Mu,ic Fundamentals of Musi

M USI 34 5

Co nd uct i ng I

M USI 346

Conduct i n g I I

01111 a n )'i n g

Ac

MUSI 352

Organ I m p rovi5J tion Hi,tor

M US)

Ea r l y

358

M USI 36 0

M US I 36-

n ive rs i t y S i nge " C ha p I Choir

M U 1 361i

O p ra Workshop

M US! 368

Choral

niversit)' Jill.7. Ensemble

M US I 3 7 8 M U S I 380

Unive rs i t y Symphon>' Orchestra

MUSI 38 1

Chamber

M

SI 383

I n tensiv I'

MUSl 390 M US I 39 1

Intensive Performance

l ' nva te I nst ru c t i o n

M U S I 'IOI-4 1 9

Ad

MUSI 4 2 1 M U 1 427

an ced

K tboan.l

dvanced

M US! 430

P i an o Li ter a t ure I I

M USI 445

Co n d u c t i n g I I I

MUSI 446

Co nduct i ng [V

Piano

Pedago gy I

M

Piano

Pedagogy I I

5] 4 5 2 MUSI �53 THEA 1 5 1 T H EA 1 62

Oral I n terpretation

250 THEA 35 1 THEA 3 5 2

Adv�nced Acting

FR E N 4 3 2 '

20th-

Eleme n tary Cerman

20 1 '

I n term dinlC

GERM 202'

I n termediate.

G I:. R I' ,1 10 1 '

COlTIl'osi[ion

THEA 359

Acting for

THEA 363

History of

F

t

C

L

U

T

-H I '

422' 20 1 '

109

Work

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

Y

onver�;Jtion

G�rman Civili7al ion Since 1 750 Adva nced Comp o , i t i on and Convcr;ution , 'rman Literature From the Enlightenment lOth- �entury Li e. rm a n Literature El m ... n t a ry Gree.k I ntermediate Greek East Asian 'OC idie.. I s l a m ic M i d dle.

EaSt lO

Worl l

H I ST 336

Southern Afri a

H I ST 3 3 7

The Hist

338 339

l iST 34-1

IN

245

INT

246 272 101, 102'

1 94

Perspec tives: The

H I ST 220 H I ST 2 3 1 I I lST 335

r

to Rea l i s m

I n term'ti i clll! Greek

Mndem WMld I l istor)'

I.AT

T

ompo!'i l ion anll

G rman -ivilizatinn to 1 750

HI T 2 1 5

LANG

the T h e a t re : Aeschylus t h ro u g h Turgcniev

ennun ,,"d Conversation

G lobal

HIST 4%

the Non - Actor

H

21'

erman

H I�T 2 1 0

I

Actor at

of � rrnc h Li teratU Tc rrend1. Litera t u re ,('nfury I ren h I.ikral lire

G E RM 1 0 1 , 1 02 '

HIST 340

I ntermediate Acting, The

M" te r l ' i ccc s

_Olh- enlury

I l IST

Stage L i h ri ng

Ma t rpi ce, of Frcn h Li terat u re

rREN 43 1 '

HI

tage Makeup

357 TI-f THEA 358

I

of Literature

Stage M onagem e n t

THEA 356

C

Fil m

Fu n da men t a ls of Acting

T I IEA

A

CiVIlizat ion und LliltUl"e

REK

History of American F i l m

THEA 24 1

P

32 1 '

I

H i ' to ry f Fo re ign

Third World

French L iteratu re and Film of t he Americas

42 1 '

I I

THEA I 3

tive

Inter mcdi,lte French

FRE

' R EK 202'

In t roductio n tn Theatre

Tl i EA I 60

Cl1TTlpar

StTategics

FRE

G R E K 1 0 1 , 1 02'

Stage Te h nolngy

ransla t i o n

lo pm en ! :

ompos i t io n and C(l\1ver�ation

CE M

Vocal Peuagogy

[ onomie Dc"

COmposit i o n a nd CqnvcrsatiCln

H I ST .05

MUSI 4 5 1

:1",-1 C()nvers.l!ion

302'

P ia no Literature I

M US I 43 1

22 1

GERM

rchest ration/Arranging

os it i o n

hinese L i terature i n

FREN 30 1 '

Ij E R 1 40 1 '

Skills

Pe.-,.pectiw. on Chinese him

Com

I nkrmedia te rrendl

R E N 20 1 "

,ERM 122'

E. n se m ble Tou r Study: Co nserva t o ry Ex p " r ic n cc

r n lt-r mcd ia te Ch i llest

FREN 202'

, L 43

GHR 1

rfo r m a n ce Stuc.Jy:

MilrriJge, Fum i l y,

FREN l O t , 1 02 '

G 'HM 302 '

Ensemble

P i a no Ensemble

Si ckness,

F i ct io n : Em p h a s i s on Cro,s- u ltu ra l Pers p ec t i ves Post- '<lIon i:t I I it 'ra t u re V()ic� of Diver ity: Post- -"Ionial L itera t u re ,,"d Th en r y Elementa ry h nch

G ERM

Laboratory nsernble Vocal Jazz E.nsemble Jau

M V S I 376

34 1

FRfN 422"

nion

Cnncert Band

MUS! 375

37 1

H�E

W i nd Enseml le

<\US1 370 M US I 3 7 1

27 1

rRE

n i versi t )' 'horille

M U S I 363

CHI

I

ni v er Sl ty Men's .horus

M U51 362

n c iellt F m p i re

J n termediule -h lnese

E

' h o i r of the West

61

of

202'

E G 2[6

M us i c L a ho ra to ry

rc h aeolo!',)

Politic". a n d Revo l u l i o n

CH I

LNGL 233

of Mu, i "I Theater

La\\",

Mad l1l'_ ', and Health .I nd K i l1S h i p Gods, Mugi c, and MImI., E lementa ry Chinese

HI

010 Vocal L i terature

M US I 354

M U S!

Education

A n rh ropol ogy and Media Th

A N T H 380 NTH _ 8 5 A T I r 3::12 CI [ I ( 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 " C H ) ' lll l '

C H i t1 00 I '

PracLicum

MUSI 3 5 1 MUSI 3 5 3

1 1 370

ECON

Electronic Musl

349

355

TH

ANT!" 1 3 7 5

Research i n g Music

M USI 3 40

M 51

A A

Composition

M US l )33

M U SI 3 37 M U S I 3 33

28

Training

M US I 1 2 5

Creative Dwmallcs

C ' Sl udent' m w o m 'el the -ros�-c u l t u ra l l" rspcctiv('s req u i re. m e n t 1.»' takin� a 2 0 1 or h igher�le.vel , uu rse in t h e l a n gu,ISl' llbed to satisfy tbe a d m i$si o n req uirement . or � cred i l5 In " lanF;uage 1I0t prev iou ,ly st ud ied. TH 1 0 2 IJll roullcri l1l 10 Human Cultu r,,1 i)i r.i l y TI I 2 1 0 Glub,,1 Per'rec r i vcs: The Wo rl d i n Ch a nge Peo p l es ot latin America TH 3 3 6 TH }40 The nrhropology f Mri ,I Pacific hl a nd ultllre, ANTH 42 I::il5 t _" a n ultures NTH 343 ANTI I 345 ntempordry (hinJ A l n-H 350 WOlllen and Men ill Wor l d C u l t ures

Keybo a r d i n g

M

P!.IY D i rec l ion

CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPEcnVES -

Keyboardilll!

clnd Cu l t u re I Ke ybo a rd ing [ I

M

458

TI I F A

I

Fund,ltllcntais I I

Musi

51 1 20

MUS I 1

Q « u «

candinavia

Music of

I'vlusic Fundamentals

no

:E

454

MU 1 1 06 51 1 1 3

I"he;Jt re: Ibsen t h rough to the Presc nt

o�t ume [ lc.�igl1

hina

M USI I I I IU I 1 15

of the

cenle Desl�n

M USI 1 04

'1

Hi.tory

H i.story of Jau

M U S I 1 05

U

w

nderstanding t-Iusic th rough ,"kln d y

M U S I 1 03

Modern La t i n

War

in Change

mcrican H istory

I I In

h i n" and

Lat i n American H story:

and

World

Japan,

1 93 [ - 1 945

e n t ral America

the Caribbean

q

of Mexi 0

10dern Ch i na Revo l u t ionary C h i n a Modem Japan

The ndl!!> In Lati n A me rican History Se m i n ar. The Tl l l rd World H istory ,Ind I'er>pectives on D ·velnpme n t Cases i n [ evelopmelll I .i tera t u r and oci,11 Change in Lat.in .'\ lllericJ E I ITIcntary Llt i n


LA!" 20 1 ' LM 2 0 2 ' ' IUS I 1 0 5 I USI I 06 .\- I U S I 1 2 0

I n lermediate· Latin I n ler mcd i a t

[ il l i n

of Ch i na Mu" jc nf SClOdinavia Mu,jc .1 nd Cll I t t I TC

The Arts

Comparative Legal System>

..

The

RELI 1 3 2 R E U 232 REU 233 REI.! 234

The Religion, of East A. i n

Tht' B u d d h i s t Tra d i t ion Th� Rel i gi ons l,f China Tht: Re l i ions of Jap:ln

RE Li 2 3 5

I s l o m i' Trad i l ions

RE U 237 RLU 392

Judaism Guus Magic, and Moral,

�OC1 3 1 0

l a ma i c a n So� ie[}'

- PA N 20 [ ' SI'A

202 '

Elementary

j.lan i sh

I'REN 421 FREN 4 3 1

S pan ish

SPAN 32 1 '

Civilization

SPAN 322" S PAN 325' SPA, 3 3 1

L .iviliul l iol1 and . u l t ur e IntroOutiion to H i spanic Literary StllJics I nt� tlsive S pa n i s b in L a t i n l\maiC' J A dvanced Sp.Il1; ,h Grammar Mas ter pieces of pani,h I i l c ra i llre 2 0t h -Cent ury L i teratu re nf �pain Special loplcs i n pan,sh LlIc.rdt u rc anJ C u lt ure Latin American l . i tera l i re, 1 '192- 1 8 88

SPA

42 1 '

SPAN

·L2

SPAI SPA

423' 4

I'

SPAN 433'

I ntens i ve

:lllJ C Tllpus i t ion and C : u l t t1 r� 0 Spelin

Crammar

Lalin American

FRESHMAN WRITING SEMI NAR - FW " R I l I !) 1

Inquiry Semi l13 N Wri l i n g

INQUIRY SE MINAR -

F

the

Co urses that meel l his req uiremem arc i ndicated in

Class . c h e dul e .

INTERNATIONAL CORE: ORIGINS Of THE MODERN WORLD

III l NTC 1 1 2

I NTC

lnd Pa-vcr

INTERNATIONAL CORE: 200-LEVEL COURSES

INTC 2 2 1

-

Authority and Dis-owry I . i hert)'

-

perience ofW"

The

12

Prospects iM War a n d Pea G nder, S�,u ;ili ty, Topics

in Gender

and C ul t u re

INTC 242 [NTC 244 C 245 I NTC 246 I

TC 247

En f8Y,

World

nntl Pollution Hunger, and P(lVe rt)'

Post -Colo nia l Issues

l-fist,)ry "-nd Per,pe ,·tive� Case� in D"vd o p ll1e n t The Cu ltu res 01 Racism

on Development

- 13 Sy,tems and

INTERNATIONAL CORE: 300-LEVEL COURSES

lNTC 326 I C 327

he

Qu es t for

' ; I "hal Justice:

Rt',.l i i l )·

Core I I Conve�ation.'

E GL 2 1 3

TGL 2 1 4 ENGL 2 1 S ENG L 2 1 6 E N� L 2 1 7 E GL218

Chine,e Lilerature i n Tra l1,Lr t i o n Mast er pic eS

of EU ru�WJ1) Ijlcr,!lurc

Class ic a l M yth o log y l' pies in Lite r a t u re: Themes JnJ

tion Fiction: f'll p hasis u n Cruss,Cultural Perspectiv � Fiction: E mp ha�i , on .ltnn" t i v ' Per>peC l i ves Fi

Drama

ENG L 230 E. G L D I NGL 2 3 2 E GL 2 3 3

COn1empor,uy u t c Ia t u re

GI. 134

Env iron men ta l Literature

E

uthors

Pnetr

�astcrpieces

of

Eu ropea n Litera t ure

Wome n's J .iler3 l u re Post-Col o n i al utero t ure

." ;a o n m C c: ;a m VI

Chaucer En gl ii>h Renaissance l . i u.'rn l uI T

Re,tor,lIi n ,lnt! 1 8r h - .cntury Lite ra t u re RomanLic,nd ic to n a n I iter-li ure 20"'-Cel1tu r y 13 ri t ish L i tera t u re

Stud ies in

A m e ric a n Literature.

20th -Cen tu ry

American

t 820- 1 920

lootry

20th-Ce n t u r y A m e r ic"n Fiction and Dram" Am""ic"n Ethnic L i terature.,

Scminar: Author Seminar: Theme, Genre French Litt:ru t u r < und F i l m s nf the

Americas

Ma"t<!rl'iecc of French Utern t u re

Masterpie es 0 French L i ter" t u re 20'" · :entuc), French Li t�rutur 20'b-Cen l u r y French Literature (;erma n l .it era l ure From the F.nlisht� n nlcnt to 20'"·Cen t ur ), G erma n L i terature Lit erature J n d SOC 'E't)' in ,\i !olienl E urope Li ter;rture and Sod,li Change in L1tin J\mt:riGl

Realism

Masterp,eces of ' can dj n av ian Literature

Ibsen

a !lei StrinJberg

201 -

e n ( u r- y ) a n d i n�l\' j a n Literaturt:

i n t rod Uctio n I n Hisp�nic Litera r y Studies The b t i n " Experiences in t he U.S. \I'l terpi ces of Span�h L iLeratur< 2()' , C en t u r \' Literature of Spa,n SI" 'i,,1 '[('pies in S J' a n i sh l.iter a t u re and Cu l t u re L a t i n }\l1lerican L i terat ure, 1 49 2- 1 8� H

20ltl-Century L a t i n American Literature Special 'Iilpics "l I i n American l.ilera t u re . nd Culture

MATH E MATICAL REASONING - M R

E ll ECO 343 M ATH 105 MATH 1 0 7 1ATI I I I I

Col Jege Mgebra

M AT I I I 1 2

PI�ne Trigonometry

S()lve I t Wit h th" o ll1 J.l uter Ope r a t i o ns Resea rch

CS

Mathematics or P 'rsonal Fi na nce Mathematical

123

Explorations

Modern Elcl11enl<lry Mathematics

and ell ulus, All I n t ro d u ction ,Nmetr), anu Fundi n

Linear Models Analytic

I n t roduct,on t o CaIC1d u s

MATH 1 52

C a l c u l u s fl

M AT H 20)

His\ O r )'

or /VLrlhcl11aticS

M ATH 230 M Ti l 241 .\1ATH 245 MATH .53 M An ... 1 7

Ma trix Algeb ra

M .\TH 3 2 1

Geometry

1 'II-!

Ap pli ed

Stari,ri

s fo r Scienti.sts

O i , c rc l e Stru tun: Mult ivariable Calcul us I n l To u u c r i o n to

Proof in

Linea r Algebra Ilrief IntroduUio"

33 1

340 M 1'H 34 1 1 TI l 34 2 \01 JH 3411 ;-'·I ATH 35 1 M:\TH 356 "lATH 1R 1 (VI A n i B J to.1AIH 455 MATH 4S0 STAT 2 3 1 M ATH

LITERATURE - LT BIN 3 7 1 'LAS 23 1 CLAS 250

11

n

rh�()ry

English Medieval L i l e r a t ur e

M ATH 1 2 8 'I ATH 1 4 0 M TH 1 5 1

Resour <5,

Pnp ula t io n ,

�nd

S PI\ I 4 2 2 SPAN 423 S P,\ 4 - ' I ·Pt\. . 4 3 2 SPAN 4jJ

1I\ I " H

I masin g the Self lmaging the

Voices

S PAN 4 2 1

Spedal lopic s i n lali n ,\merican Li tera ture a n d C u l t u re

Approilches tn L iter.llure of Diversi t y : Post-Colon ial L ite ral u re

Femini;.t

FREN 43 2 C ER NI ,!2 1 ( ; ERM 422 l.. ANG 27 I LANG 272 S ,AN 250 SCA. 4 2 1 'lCAN 422 Sf> .N jL5 S P IN 34 1

in L ati n .\ mrrica

Adva" c

40 [ '

421

I ntermediate Spa njsh

SPA N 2 3 1 SPAN 30 1 '

SPA

22 1

m

FJir), Tal." �nd h , n l JS),

362 ENG!. 67 EN<'; 3 7 1 E NG L 372 ENGI 373 ENG I 374 E GL 4' I ENGL 452 FR E

J> n J> C

� pcci " 1 TOJli c.� in �hild rel1's Lile ratu re

G l 311 1

FREN

i n I . i t er a t u re

Lirera l u re

Ch ild ren', l ite ral u , e

ENL�L

p'll1ish

I ntermedi .Jte

Rritish I ra d i t i ons in

ENC L 343

Rel'gions of Suuth Asia

RElI 1 3 1

1 0 1 . 1 02 '

Sn'lkespc,rr c

FN � I 15 1 EN<;L 352 ENG!. 353

I n termediate

SPAN

ENG L3 0 1

Nnn cgian Norwe� ian Con .... ersatiun �InU 'ornposition Ad\' ;tn�cd . , l I ,vers,n ion and CO!l1pu,ition C u l t u re and Health in Jama i ca Global Perspect ive>: The Wor l d in 'hangc I n lu medi " ,

i'orL RS 395 POI1 2 1 0 POLS 3 8 1

A I Tlt'Jic:ln Tr3r lil iYIl:'

lO r G [ 333 I� N G I jJ4 F. (-;L 3.15 E CL 34 1

Norwegi'l n

ElementM

I,. G I 24 1 ENGI 25 1

l 'robab i l it )' and Stat i S l icri Theory A p p l ied Regression Analysis

N u mer i c a l

A na l ys i s

Ab�tract Alg e b ra Malh cl11;} t i c,,1 Auolysis OpiC6 in

M .l I J 'C1l1a l ics

I n t roductory Sta t ist i cs Applied Statistics

I

VA

Sem i n a r in Problem .'o l v i n g

l n t rodu

C

and A

D iJfcre n t ial Equalio",

STAT 24 1

A

1 0 Probability

I n t roduction t o Mathematical Statistics

STAT 34 1 STAT 342 ST T 343 STAT 344

P

Mathema t' i c s

for Scien tisLS

tion to M�th t'l1latical Statiltic.s

Probabi l i t ), Op erations

and ';tali ,Li ca l Re'ea rch

Theo ry

EC{) [1ometri s

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

29


VI

W CIC

STAT 3 4 � Sf 1 49 1

Appl ied

R�g:rt"" i( )n JoJ S i udy

N OVA

Anal y,is anJ

::)

NATURAL SCIENCES, MATH E M ATICS, OR COMPUTE R

o w U o

SCiENCE - N S

RIO/. I I I 81 L 1 1 3 [ \ 1 )[, 1 1 6

g.

1110

CIC

u

1 02

205

B IOL 2116

o < u «

324 B / u t 3 25 Il [ O L 3 2 6 B I O I . 327 BIOI. 3 2 0 BIOL 329 B [ O L 332 I:lIOI. 34 0 B I O L 34R BIOL lS I 13 1 0 L 36 1

I I u m a n A I1 J l l lJll�! i.It1J I'hy�io!ogy I l u M1.l O Analom ), und Phy.iu]ogy Pri nciples <'l Bi()logy i i l : Ecology, Ev ol u t io n N�tu ra .! H i!lorv o l- Verrci' J .l te< atun I Histo ry of' Chma

BIOL 323

BIOI

Anima'! Ilehuvi"r

�) rn i tJl01(lSY

B[0L 365 8 1 0L 403 B IO L 407 RIOL 4 1 1 BIOL 424

Ecolog)'

BIOL 425 I1[OL 44 1

Biologi\,.il Oceauogra phy Ecological Meth ods MetYllm l ia ll � h)'�iology

Il i 0 I .

! m rnu n o l ot;J'

448 BIO I . 475 O IEM 1 04

�helll istry

CHEM 1 05

C H E N! C H EM CHEM

1 20

1 25

232, 2 .J4 CflEM 3 32, 334 C H E M 336 C HEM 3J � CI [.eM 34 I, 3-13 CHEM 342 , 3'14 C H I::M 4U3 CH EM 405 eliE M '135 CHEM 440 C H EM 450 . H EM 456 cseE 1 1 5 CSeE 1 2 0 CSCE J ) [ CseE 144 eSC!; 245 C:SCE 170 CSCE 3 30 CSeE 3 4 3 CSeE 345 CSeE 3 4 6

Ch�m ist f)' Polymers am I Blopolyrners Soh'e It With the Co m l)u tcr C(lmpll t<!rizd f n fo rm :l liOIl

I n l [()ci u U i o n

CSCE 37 1 C�CF 372 C SCE J80 C SCE 3 85 GS E 386 (se[ 39 1 CSCE 400 CSeE 4 1 0 G\ . CE

412

C S · 420 CSC E �34 CSCE 436

30

P

A

C

I

M o m e n l um, Energy, Pattern Recogn ition

Tran�f'0rt:

I

C

L

U

T

College Algebra

I 12

1 28

H

E

R

A

N

U

Jnd

N

t

V

E

R

S

T

Y

Introduction to Calc u l u s

M ATH 203 MATH 230

l\'fa t r i x Algebra

24 1

H is to r y o f M a t he m a t i cs

A)Jplied S t a t istics fo r Scientists

M AT H 2 4 5

/)iscrele ' t ru c t u res

M ATH 2 5 3

M u l t ivariable Calculus

317

I n t ro d u c t i o n to Proof i n

321

Ceometry

340

Mathematics

LineH Algebra A Brief I n troduclion to Probab i l i t y

MATH 34 1

i n t roduction to M a t h e m a t ical S t a l i s t ics

M ATH 3 4 2

Prclba b il i ty and S t a t i stical Th e o r y

M ATl-1 348

Applied Regression AnJ lysis and A NOVA

MATH 3 5 1

Differential Equations

M AT H 3. 56

N u merical Analysis

M AT H 3 8 1

Seminar i n Problem Solving

l"IATH 4 3 3

Abstract Algebra

480

/vfathcmatical Analysis -topics i n Mathematics

NSCI 2 1 0

Natural History of Hawa i ' i

PHYS 1 1 0

Astronomy

1 26 1 53

College Phys i c s

C o l l e ge Ph ys i c s Genera I Physics

P H YS 1 54

General P h ysics

PHYS 2 2 3

Elementary Modern Physics

PHYS 233

Engineering Statics

P H YS 2 3 4

Engineering Mech a n i c s of Solids

PHI'S 33 1

Electromagnetic T h e o r y

P H I'S 3 3 2

Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics

PHYS

I

Linear Model, a n d Calculus, An I n troducti.on Analytic C;t'Ometry and ['unctions

Calc u l us 1 1

PHI'S 3 3 3

Mass

Plane Tr igo n o m etry

Modern Elementary M a t h e m a t i c s

:VIATH 1 52

PHYS

C""lept>

Softwa re &ngiI1e{Cr i ng

F

Mathematics Expl ora tio n s

1

PHYS

An.1log £)cc l ronics D igi (,r1 E I�l tro n ics Modeling and :ii mulution D.ltaba>e Management Design ,t nd An.l l ysis of AJ"eri r h r l 1 S Algorith m>, Machi nC5, nnd G r a m m a rs Asse mbly LInguage .wd Co m p u t er Organization C o m p u ter A r"h i tec\ u r� Com p uter 'er wQ rks Prol,lem Solv ln s and Prog ra m ming Se mina r Top ics in Computer Science Topics 111 (ompuler �En);lIl"err ng Computer G ra p hics

CSCE 367

M a t hematics o f Pe r so nal F i n a nce

MAT H 1 07

PHYS 1 2 5

10 A r t. i iicial In tell igence

P rogram m i ng LJ nguage

CSCE 348

Capstone: Seminar

tvLATH 1 05

1\,1 AT 1-1

Daw Sl ruc t u res

Se m i n a r

GEOS 499

M ATH 455

Engineeri ng I n t ro d u ction to CO I11[' u I< r Scit l1ce F lectrica l Ci rcu i t> I n t roduction to

Energy and M i neral Re so u rce s for the F u t u re

Ficld Tri p

M Ar H

'{Ste l11' '

Hydrogeology

G e o p hysi cs

Geologic Field M a ppi n g

M AT H 3 3 1

I n organ ic

M ap s : i m ages of the &rth

G EO S 425

MAJ1-! M ATH

Advanced Organic Chem i st ry

M eta mor p h ic Pet rol o gy

GEOS 390

lvf AT I !

l ion 1 0 Re'"J r h instrumellt.ll An Jlysis

P a le o n t o l o gy

M a r i ne Geology

M Al ' I -I 1 5 1

I nl rodu

S t r at i g r a p hy and Sedimentation

G eo l ogy o f Was h i ngton

MATH 1 4 0

B i ochcrniM ry I I

Geology

O p tical M ineral o gy

GEOS 3 6 0

498

Resou rces

rg n eoll� Pe t ro l og y Structural

G E O S 3 50

M AfH

IJ ,ochemistry I

C H EM 4 1 0

M i n e ralogy

1\1 AT H I 2 3

Null- i Li. ol1. D r u �r'}, <l IlC! the 1 l1dividuJ! Org<lJl l c (�hcmiM r )' .m el Lab O rg�!lic Chemist ry J nd Lob Organ i c Special Proj� t s Labo r a t o r y An alylic:r1 ChemisLJ), Ph)" iQlj Ch em ist ry ; } n et Lab Phy� ica l cm i ,r f Y ,I nc! Lab

Ci I EM

("cologie P ri nci ples

G E OS 3 23 GEOS 3 2 4 GEOS 325 GEGS 326 , EO S 327

...1ATH 1 1 1

!\d v;lIlced (�eneral C h em i s tr y

210

GEOS 201

GEOS

u l l l r�

of Na tu ra l

Mct eo ro l <l� )'

,EOS 3 4 1

( jeneral ChL' m i s t r y

_ean o g ra ph)'

Ea rthquakes, Volcanoes, a n d eeologic H a z a rd s

Conservation

G EOS 335

ChemistrY

E.lnri r()l1 nH:·n t�ll

Gene,,)1

C En s 1 0 5

MATH

E\,o l uti tJ n

O u r Changing Planet

CEllS 1 04

G EO S 334

H iStology

BIOL 426

1 03

GEllS 330

Gent!l. ic.s Plan t Diver,i t)' and D ist r ibul io n AdvunceJ Cell Diol()!;y �lu f t,1 H i s to ry of the rac i iie Non]l\"",t -oml'ara tive Anatomy Pbn t Ph) i<dugy PleLnl A nalo m), Develop rnenta l Biol ogy Molecu [a r Biol ogy

A I ClI, 364

10I

G EO S 3 2 9

Entomology

ign

!v1 icroprocessors

GEOS 328

Mic robiology

Dc

Com)Jilers Conserva t io n of Natural Re.sou rce."

GEOS

a n d Diversity

VLSI

ENVT 1 04

, E O S 1 02 Aiolngy

E�pen S ys te ms

Ope ra ti ng Sys tems

CSCE 480

l i EOS

I n l rod u c tur)' lVi lc robi ul<)gy

Ill 0 J 2 (J 1

:E

w

B i o logy " lId t l t e Mocil'fl\ World Ihe H u m a n ( )rg;lll i,nJ I n t roductorv I:,col()gy Pri nciple, o f Bi(.loSY l : C1'II Biolo�y I'r i ncipk. o f Bioll}g), I I : Orgun iSn1a l

llIOJ I 6 1

[lIOI

CSCE 438 CSCI: 444 CS ' E 446 CS ' 4 5 5

I l1dqwnJ<' r l l

334

Engineering Thermodynamics Engineering Materials Science

P H YS 3 3 6

Classical Mechanics

P H I'S 3 5 4

M a themati

P H I'S 356

Mathematical Physics !l

31

Ph ysi c s I

Me

P H YS 4 0 1

In troduction to Q u a n t u m

P H YS 406

Advanced Modern Physics

STAT 24 1

Applied S t a t ist ics for Scientists

hanies


PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY COURSE - PE

1'1 l ED

1 00

Personalized I' it n css Program

P H E D 1 50

Adaptive Ph ys i c,, 1 Activity

P H E D 1 5 1 - 1 99

Individual and Du,,1 Activities

I'H ff) 200- 2 1 9

Aquatics

PI I ED 220- 14 0

!'HED 24 1-259

Rhythm. Team

PHED 3 1 9

TraJll p l n g the [racks o f New Zealand

Ac ivities

PH I L

P ililo$ o p h i cal rSSllCS

1 25

P h i l os ph)'

Moral

[>H l l 2 2 0

Womcn and Plulosophy

P H I L 2 2 _,

Biomed ical E t h ic.:.

P H l l 228

'oeial and Po li ti .1 P h i lo.ophy

P H I L 325

Busine" Ethics

PHIl. 331

A n , e n t Ph ilosop hy

PHil 333 PHIL 3 PHI 36

'

PHIL 338

Exi,tentialism a n d Continental P h i l o s o phy

P H I l 340

PH IL .150 PH[l 353

\ od ern Ph ilosophy

Early [ he

,

nalYlic Tradirion

Prag ma t i�m und Ame£lc�n P h ilo s o phy

Ph il o s ophy

of Scien

e

Ph ilosop hy of Relig i on

S p eci J I Top i cs

RELIGION: BIBLICAL STUDIES (LINE 1) - R 1 REU I I I

Bihlic,d Literatu re: Old and

and

ew Tcstamcnts

RELI 2 1 1

Re lig ion

RELI 2 1 2

Religion and I itenllure o f the

RELl 330

Old Testam en t Studies

"ELl 3 3 1

New Te�tal1lent Studies

RELl 332

Th Li�' of Je>us

Litcr.lturc o f t h e Old Testament ew Testament

RELIGION: CH RISTIAN THOUGHT, H I STORY, AND EXPERIENCE (LINE 2) - R2

RELI 1 2 1 1<1'. 1 . 1 22 1

RELf

222

RELI

223

R E LI 2 2 4

KELI

225

The (hri.:; ti"n TraJi t io n An i e n t Ch urch Histo ry Mode rn

C h urc h

I' he Lutheran Heritase

Faith and Sp i r i t u al i t y

I< ELI 2 2 7

eh ri st ia n Theolos)'

RELf 2 4 7

h r i , t i a n Theology

257

Ch ri.ti n Theolo gy

Rr:U

REU 3 44

RELI

347

RELI 3 5 1 RELI 354

RCLI 357 RFLr 360 R E I [ 36 1 RELl 362 RP.LI 3M

T h eologica l

tudies

Major Rel i gio u

Tbinkers, 1�xts, and

'hurch Histor, Studi

s

Mojor Rel igi Q I• . Th i nkers . Tex t s , "nd Genres

Studies in Ch u rch M i ni s t r y

Church Hi.story ::'tudies luther

Theologi .u � t u d ies C h ri st ia n r lora I Issues

R F LI

Femi n i st

Rr:L1 367 368

Ge nres

Thcological Studies

RELI 365

Introductory

SIOl 205

Human Anatollly and Physiolog

1ajor Relig io u s T h i nkers. T",ts, and Genres

Human A n a tolllY and Physiolog

1lI 0 l 323

P ri nci p les of Biolot'y I I I : E co l og y. Evol u t ion, and

BI0L 327

O rni t h o lo gy

BIOI. 328

M i c r o b i ology

S I O l 329

En to m o log y

SIOl 332

Genetics

B I O l 340

P l a n t D iversi t y and D i s t r i hu t ion

B I O l 348

Advanced

B I O I. 3 5 1

Natural History of the Pa c i fi

361

Il I Ol 403

Dnrelo pmen tal Biolo!;)'

B I O I 407

Molecular Bi ology

BIOl 4 1 1

H istology

B I O l 424

Eco logy

B[OL 425

B iol ogica l Ocea nography

B[OL 42 6

Ecological M.cthocis

CHEM 1 04

E n v i ro n mental Ch em ist ry

tJ[Ol 44 1

'!al11malian Physiology

C H EM 1 05

hcmistry of L i fe

C H Ei'v1 1 20

G e nera l Chem i · t r y

CHEM 1 25

Advanced Ge ne ral C h e m i

C H H"j 2 1 0

Nut r iti on . D r ugs, and the [ndividual

O rgan i c C h e mi s tr y

CHEM 3 3 2 . 334

Organ i c Chem i stry and Lab

and Lab

CHEM 336

O rga n ic

CHf.M 338

Andl yt i cal

-

h e mi s t ry

C H E M 34 1 , 343

Physical C he nl l s r r y and

C H EM 342. 344

Physical C hem i s try and Lab

C H E M 403

llioche mi,try I

CH EM 405

B ioc he mi stry I I I n o rganic Chem istry

CHEM 456

Pol ymers and B i opolymers

ENVT 1 04

Conserva t i o n of Nat u ra l RC-'>()urces

G EOS 1 0 1

Our C han gi ng Pla net

GEOS 1 0 2

General

GEOS 1 0 3

Earthquakes. Vol

no es , and Ge ,logic H, Lards

GEOS 1 04

Con,crva t i o n of

atural

GEOS 1 05

Meteorology

G F.OS 20 1

Geol o gic Principle

G EOS 3 2 3

0 ea nography

I gn eous Petrology

GEOS 3 2 5

S tr u ct u ral Geol ogy

GEeS

O p t i ca l :--'1 i ncralogy

326

GEOS 327

Stratigraphy a n d S diment"t",n

GEOS 3 2 8

Paleontology

GEOS 3 2 9

Met a m or phi c Petrolo y

GEOS 3 3 0 G EO S 3 3 1

Maps: I m ages

of

the .arth

Hydrogeology

(LINE 3) - R3

G EOS 360

Geology of Wash i ngton

G EOS 425

Geologic Field Mapping

R it ual. anJ

Resources

Mineralogy

GEeS 324

Marin� Geology

The Bible and Culture

Lab

I ns t r u mental Anal ysi s

450

Energy Jnd M i neral

Rt.LI 1 33

iAlboratory

peeial Projed

GEOS 350

t Asi�

try

CHEM 232. 234

RELIGION: INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE RELIGIOUS STUDIES

The Religion of E.

Northwest

Comparative Anatomy

Geo phys i cs

T h e Religiuns of uuth Asi&

NSCI 2 1 0

Res

)u rees for the Future

at ural History of Haw" i ' i

PHYS [ 1 0

Descri ptive Astronomy

PHYS 1 2 5

Col kge Physics

RELI 2 3 2 !lELI 233

1 he Buddhist Tr adition

PHYS 1 26

Col legt· Physics

The Reli gi ons of C h i n �

PHYS 1 5 3

The R ligion of Ja pan

P H Y S 1 54

General P hys ics

REI

Islamic Tradi t ions

CAPSTONE: SENIOR SEMINAR/PROJE CT - SR

REL I 23 1

I 234

RELI 235 R E U 23 7 REU 239

Myth.

Symbol

J u da ism

A

Envi ron ment JJ1d

u J t u re

R F L I 390

St u di es in

R E Ll 3 9 1

Socio l o gy o i Rel igion

l I i s to ry of Rel igio ns

RE.LI 391

God" MJgic. anJ Moral

RELI

Reilgion d nd

393

the life Cycle

SCIENCE AND SCIENTIFIC METHOD - S M H 101

l ode r n Wo rld

Biology and the

mUl l 1 3

Th"

mOL 1 1 6

I n t roductory Ewlog)'

I I u ma n

Orga ni�m

J ner "I Physics

TH 199

Capstone: Sem i n a r in A n th ropolog)'

A RTD 499

Capstone: Se nior Exh. i b i t i o n

Se ni or

B I O L 499

Capstone:

BUS

Capstnne: St ra tegi c Management

499

eminar

Ca ps tone: Se mi na r

C H EM 499

Ca pston e: Se n i o r P roj ec t

C H I N 499 CHS P 499

apstone:

I.AS 499

I n t roduction to Hu ma n Bio logka l Diversity

13101 I I I

." ;lO o 1'"\ m o C ;lO m VI

ell Biology

GEeS 3 4 1

mani s t Theologies

RELl l I RfLI 1 32

Org<lnislllal Biology

'Iicrobiulo!lY

G E e S 335

and W

ell B io lu gy

11 '

B I O l 206

CHEM

Am<!r! :1I1 Church I-!l.>tory

C hr i s tian Ethics

S101. 2 0 1

CHEM 435

H i story

R E l . I 226

Princi plc� of Biology

BIOL

rcation J nd Ev o l u t io n

P I III 253

Pri nci p les o f Bi o lo gy I :

S I Ol l ti 2

Di v ers i ty

PHILOSOPHY - PH PH l l I O I

SIOl 1 6 1

enlOr Project

Capstone: Senior Project

OMA 480

I n -depth and lnve tigative Repor ting

C O MA 485

Co m m u n i ca t i o n and Socia l Activi.1111

COMA 499

C ap s to ne : C o m m u nication

P

A

C

I

F

i

e

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N t

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y

31


F 499 [CO 499

CS

. '1 'I EUliC 437 I.'.DUC 41>6 E ( )UC 'l0R E GI. 125 ENe 427 E r L 428 eN L 4 5 1 F.N , I 4 5 2 ENVT 499 FR' ; 499 GFO 499 C F R M 499 I' D

.... o « u «

ANTH 392

Cap,tone:

t\NTH

Senior �el11 i n a r St ude n t TC<IC hillg in K-R EduC<ltion luden t Teach i n g-Element:!ry ( D ual) Alternate Level Stlldent Tea c h i ng-Secondary

EDli ' 430

u

Capstoll.: Sem i na r

AN'f'H 480

H IST

rili ng

Author enre

apstone: .,�minar

Cap t o ne: Sen io r Project Capstone: Rose."

Capstone: e n i (l r

h Se m i na r

Project

Semin"" The T h ird \11/ rid

Islamic Middle

East to 1 945

Global Perspectives:

H I ST 2 1 5

Modern World H istory

World \i ar

H IST

Colonial American History

251

H I ST 252

1 9 t h - Cent u ry American History

H I ST 253

10th-Ce.ntury American HistOl)'

H [ST 294

The

H I ST 3 0 1

I n troduction t o H istorical Methods and Resea rch

Unite.d State, · ' i nc.e 1 94 .5

H I ST 305

S lavcqr

H I ST 3 1 0

Contemporary Japan

in

t h e Americas

H IST 322

Roman

H I ST 323

The M iddk Ages

Greek Civilization

Civilization

Rcn;.lissallce

C3p;lon,,: Senior Project

H I ST 324

Capstone: Senior S e m i n a r

H I S T 325

R efo r m a tion

Projcd

H [ ST 327

The Vikings

apstom:: Senior Project

H I ST 328

1 9 t h -C e n t u r y Europe

H[ST 3 2 9

fu rope and the World Wars: 19 I 4-45

H I ST 3 3 2

England: Tudors and St ua rt s

HJST 334

Modern Germany, 1 1148- 1 945

Capstone:

N u rsing Syn t h e s i s

I ntem�hi" Capstone:

e n i o r Seminar

C a pst()n� : Adv an c e d S e m i n a r in Philosophy

Capstone: Ad\'an�ed

H IST 335

L,b I I

h o l ogy

Research

La t i n American History:

Cen t ra l America and

Caribbean H IST 336

.,apstone: Senior Sem i n a r

Psy

H I ST

Semlnar

Hiqof)' � n d Systems of P ychology

337

H I ST 338

I nternsh ip aps to ne : Senior Sem inar p H o n e: IZeesear h • c m i na r

H IST 339

Capstone: Senior Project

Capstone: Sen i o r Seminar Capstone; Se n ior S e m i n a r a p sto n e: Senior Project pstone: S e m i n ar in Women'., S t ud i e

Southern A frica

The H i s tory o f Mexico M od e r n

C h i na

Revo l u t io na r y China

H IST 340

Modern Japan

H IST 344

The Andes i n Latin American H istory

H IS"!" 3 5 2

The American Revolution

H l ST 3 5 5

A m e r i can Popular Culture

H I ST 3 5 6

American D i pl o m atic History

H [ ST 357

H I ST 359

A frica n American History

History o f Women in th� United S t a te,

of the

H I ST 360

H olo ca u s t: Destruction

POLITICAL SCIENCE) - S 1

H [ ST 370

Environmental H i s t o f )' o f the

AN'I H /\NTH

HIST 3 8 1

The V ie t n a m War and

H IST 4 0 1

Workshops

SOCIAL SCI ENCES, LINE

I nlro d u cl ion 10 Archaeology a n d World Prehistory

1 0.1

· Iobal

NII 1 2 1 0

Per pec tives: The

or t he No r th wes t O[\st , u l t u res a n cl Peoples o f Na t i ve North America Preh �,!ory o f I orrh America at lve American Health The A n th ropology o f C o n t e m p o ra r y f\ mcrica People, or l a t i n A m e rica Jewish u l t urc Anthropology o f Mrica

342 ANTI 1 34J ANTfI 345

East Asian C u l t ures Contemporary

Women

'H 3-4

hin.

a n d Men i n

World

Ceogrnphy and World Prospects

A NTH 3 5 5

A nthropology

[tJ, n ic G.ro ups

36 A Tl I '6 1 ANTH 305

A NT I !

uhures C"I L U res: I' ople. Pl aces and

lanaging C u l t ural Divers i t )'

Prehistoric E n v iro n men t

and Technology

Ma rriage, Family, and K i n , h i p Appl ied A n t h ropology

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

Northwc, t

History of Wes t and Northwe,t

H i sto ry or American Thought and C u l t u re Seminar: American Hi tory

Seminar: Eu ro pean H i sto ry

POLS 1 0 1

I n troduction to Polit ical Science

T h i rd Wo rl d

POLS 1 5 1

A me r ic a n

POLS 1 70

Introduction to Legal Studies

POLS 2 1 0

Global Perspectives: The

G o ve rn m e n t

Wo rld

POLS 282

Politics in the A me r icas Polit ical Tho ught

POLS 326

Recent Political

OLS 3 3 1

I n ternational Relations

T ho ugh t

POLS 3311

American Forei gn Po l i c y

POLS

(�overn ment a n d Public Polic)'

Environmental Politi s and Policy

POLS 347

Political Economy

POLS 3 54

State and

POLS 36 1

Political Parties and Elections

Lo ca l

Government

POLS 363

Politics and the Media

POLS 364

The Legislative Proce&.s

368

i n Change

Current I n ternational Issues

P O L S 325

POLS

The Archaeology of Ancient E m p i res Law, Politics, Jnd Revolu.tion Money, Power, and E , change Sickne�, Madness, and Health

TH 370

AN1l1 375 ANTH 377 ANTI-t 380 NTH 385 ANf!- 1 31!8

A me r i c a n L<!gal H i s to ry

West Hnd

Seminar: Th e

345

States

American Society

H I ST 496

POLS 346

a n d Media

European Jews

United

H .l ST 495

P O LS 23 1

Pacific 1.lund -ul t u res

N T I 1 3S0

I

H I 5T 4�4

Peoples

NTH

C

H IST 47 1

Wo rld in Change

Pa�t Cult u re.s uf Wa h i n � ton State

ANTH 230 ANTH 3 3 0 ,\NTH 332 ANTH 333 ANTT· 1 334

A

H I S T 46 1

Peoples o f the World

220

AN TI 1 225

P

H [ ST 460

P rac ti ci ng Anlhro p ology: IVlakah C u l t u re Pa s t and Prfsen t

A

!-!1ST 4 5 1

Intro d uction to Language i n Socier-y

A NT H 1 9 2

ANTH

1 (ANTHROPOLOGY, HISTORY, OR

Introduction to Human Cult ural Dlversily

N T H 1 04

Cha nge

! ! i n China a n d Japan, 1 9 3 1 - 1 94 5

H I ST 3 2 1

'ap,tone: Senior

1 02

in

Modern Latin American History

H IST 2 3 1

S('min,lr: European History

n Conversations

The World

H IS"!" 2 1 0

Capstone: Honors Challenge Experience ore

32

20

H IST 220

Cap,lon e : Senior Pro 'ecl

T 499

Civ i lilalio n

East Asian Societies

Top i cs III

Special

�crn i nar: Ame rican History

"VM

H i s tory o r Western

H IST 1 09

on

Sem i n a " Theme,

SPA, 499

1 07

History of Wes t e rn Civilization

Cap t on e : Senior Project

SCA, 499 SO -1 499 'iC CW 499

Roman Civilization

H I ST 1 08

Semi nar:

Rill 499

Greek Civilization

CLAS 322 H IST

tudent Te a c h i ng-Sec o nd ary

�emina r: Critical Theory

M Al i- I 499 M U 1 499 RW 499 lJRS 499 PHPD 495 P H E . u 499 PI IlL 499 P I-IYS 499B POLS 499 PSYC 48 1 PSYC 493 RECR 495 RE R 499

Anthropological I n q u i ry

CLAS 3 2 1

St udent '!';;,lCh i ng-SeC\lndJ ry ( D u a l )

I m a gi n at i ve

G L,T 499

Gods, M a g i c , a n d Morals Archaeology: The Field Experience

Writing

GREK 499

465

The Am eri ca n Presidency

POLS 3 7 1

J u d icial Process

PO l.S 3 7 2

Const i t u tional Law

POLS 373

Civil Rights and

POLS 3 7 4

Legal Studies Research

POLS 381

Compara tive Legal Systems

POLS 3 8 2

East Asian Politics

i v i l Liherties

the


POLS 3 8 3

Modern Eurorean Politics

SOCW 385

Social Policy II: Social Policy Analysis

POLS 385

Canadian Government and Politics

SOCW 399

Special Topics in Social Wo rk

P

>

"

The M iddle East

SOCW 472

Social Work Practice II: Families and Groups

P O L S 40 1

Worbhops and Special Torics

SOCW 473

Social Work Practice I l l : Macropractice

P

Advanced International Relations

WRITING REQUI REM ENT - WR

L S 387 LS 43 1

POLS 450

Intern hip i n Politics

POLS 458

I n ternshir in Public Admin istration

P

Internshir in the Legislative Process

LS 464

POLS 4 7 1

Internship in Legal Studies

S CA N 3 2 7

The Vikings

Research a n d Writing

ENGL 224

Travel Writing

ENGL 225

Autobiographical Writing

."

Imaginative Writing I Writing in Professional Settings

SOCiAl SQfNCES, LINE 2 (ECONOMICS, PSYCHO LOGY,

ENGL 324

Free-Lance Writing

SOCIAL WORK, OR SOCIOLOGY) - S2

ENGL 325

Personal Essay

E ON

1 30

Global and Environmental Economic Principles

ENGL 326

Writing fo r Children

ECO

151

Pri nciples o f Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics Labor Economics

321

ECON 3 2 2

Health Economics

E ON 3 3 0

Environmental and Natural Resou rce Economics

ECON 3 3 1

I n ternational Economics

ECON 3 4 1

Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies

EC

N 34 4

ECON 3 4 5

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis Intermediate Microeconomic Analy i

hC N 361

Money and Banking

E ON 362

Public Finance

ECO. 371

Industrial Organization and Public Policy

ECON 495

Internship

ECON 498

Honors Thesis

ECON 499

Capstone: Senior Seminar

P$YC 1 0 1

Introduction to Psychology

PSY

The Psychology of Adj ustment

PSYC 3 2 5

Human Sexuality

PSYC 340

H u m a n Neuropsychology

PSYC

Lea rning: Research and Theory

PSYC 346

Perception

PSYC 348

Cognitive Processes

PSYC 350

Personalit), Theories

PSYC 352

Development: Infancy to Maturity

PSY

Social Psychology

354

PSYC 405

Workshop on Alternative Perspectives

PSYC 440

Psychology of Language

PSYC 444

Adolescent Psychology

PSYC 450

Psychological Testing

PSY , 45 3

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 454

Community Psychology

PSYC 456

Theories and Methods of Counseling and Psychotherapy

PSYC 4 6 1

Psychology of Wo rk

PSYC 462

Consumer Psychology

PSY

Environmental Psychology

464

PSYC 4 7 1

Psychology and the Law

PSYC 472

Psychology and Medicine

PSYC 474

Psychology of Wo men

PSYC 483

Seminar

OCI I O I SO C I 240

Social Stratifica tion Jamaican Society The "Family

sao 336 SOCI 3 5 1 SOCI 362 SOC I 3 9 1

Deviance

Sociology of Religion

,

Research Methods

CI 397

Advanced Composition fo r Teachers

ENGL 4 2 1

Tutorial in Writing

ENGL 425

Writing on Special Topics

ENGL 427

Imagi native Writing III

WRIT 1 0 1

Inquiry Seminars: Writing

c:: :lII

m

'"

WRIT 2 0 1

Writing Seminars fo r I n ternational Students

WRIT 202

Writing Seminars for International Students

Sociology of Law Families i n the Americas

rime and Society

SOCI 4 1 8

Advanced Data Applications

SO 1 44 0

Sex. Gender. and Society

50CI 462

Suicide

50CI 496

Major Theories

SOCW 1 0 1

Introduction to Social Wor k

SOCW 20 1

January o n the Hill

SOCW 275

Social Policy I : History of Social Welfare

SOCW 323

Imaginative Writing I I

ENGL 328

Delinquency and Juvenile Just ice

SOC I 330

SOCI 4 1 3

0

ENGL 327

Social Problems

SOCI 3 IO 326

"

m

American Society

SOCI 296

SOC I

0

Econometrics

ECON 3 5 1

342

:lII

Mathematical Torics i n Economics

E ON 3 5 2

221

m

"

ENGL 323

ECON 1 5 2

0

ďż˝

ENGL 2 2 1

ENGL 227

ECO

>

Social Work Practice I: I nterviewing and I n terpersonal Helping

SOCW 380

Human Behavior and the Social Environment P

A

C

i

f

i

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

33


\1'1 � z ex:

w ...

...

o uJ \1'1 ex: :::l o U o z < w w ex: � w

o

Deg ree and Cou rse Offerings CoUege of Arts and Sdences Divisiun of HLI",a"iri�s Engli.h Languages and Literatures Ph i losophy Re l igion Vivisioll 0 Nalllrill Sciellces Biolo;;y

Bachelor's Degrees

Division of Slicial 5 iellCCS Anthropology Economics History I'vlarriage

of 1\ rts Il,lchdor o r Scicncc Bachelor of Arb in Educa t ion [l,lCheior of Arts i n Physical P.ducafion Bachel r .of f\ rl S i n R� rc fiem B achelor uf Busin' S Bachelor

,md Family Ther,lpy

Polit ical Science Psychulogy

Soc iology a n cl Soci,,1 Work

Chemistry

Science and C o m p u t e r Engi neeri ng Geosci en ces

Ad m i n i . t ration

C o m p l l ter

Ba.:hclor o f Fine Arts Bachelor of M Ll"ic Bac.helor t, ( Music Educatioll Bachelor ()f MusicaJ A rts flachelor or , cienc in Nur, i n � t>Jchclor o r cit�nce i n Physical Educa t i o n

Mathematics

Physics

School of the Arts Art CI)l11mU n i c a t i o n and Theatre

Musi c

School of Business School of Education School of Nursing School of Physical Education Special Academic Programs Mili tary � cience

34

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

Master's Degrees i\laster of Arrs in E d u c a t i o n

Md ter 0\ Ans cD Educa t i o n with Initial 'ni fic a r ion Master of Arts ( Marr iage a n d F a m il y T h e ra p y ) Master of Busi ne�� l\dminiSI�'ati('ll

Master of ' ience in ' u rsinI'


o m

Majors Bachelor of Arts (BA) Anthropology Ar t

English

Environmental Studies

Biology

Fren

'hemistry

C h i nese S t u d ie s lassies

Political Science

Anthropology

Psychology

Art

Religion

Studies

Ge r ma n

S o c i a l Wo rk

ommu nication

H i s to ry

Sociology

Commlwicariol1 St.udies

Iodivid ualized Mathematics

Pnnt/Broadcast JOli rnalislIf

S pa n i s h

Music

IIImt

P h i loso p h y

Economi

Physi

Chinese ( la n g uage )

Biology

(3-2)

Geo··ciences

Computer Engi n ee rin g .omputer Sc i en ce

French German History journalism Mat hematics Music Non cgi a n Physical Education P h ys i c s

Biology

Economic;

Eng l i s h English/Language Arts

Political Science Psrchology

Science Soc i a l Studies Sociology

S peech

Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (BAPE) Phy i ca l Education

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation ( BARec) Rec reat io n Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)

CoIICf1ltratioliS i ll:

E n t repreneurship and New

Ve n t u re Management Fina ncial Resources Management H u man Resource Management

I n formation Management

International Busi ness

Marke t i n g Resource M a n a g e m e n t

Professional Acco u n t i ng

Bachelor of Fine Arts ( B FA) Art

3S a Second

ommlm ication o n d

Social Actil'i_<l1I

Tlreatre Bachelor of Music (BM) Piano

I nstr u m e n t al

o

..,

Science

..,

l.egal tl/di�s Polit i II cicncc

m

::a

PI/olic AfJairs

z C\

I's)"cholog), Re l i g i o n Sociology

Le g al Srud ies Mathematics

\II

Spanish

S p cci;1 1 Educatiun

Actllarial Sriwce llila thematin;

(

oIl-Teach i n g )

Women's StuLiil's

Statistics Music No r weg i a n

'Pel/dillg approval

Health Sciellces

sophomores u nlt!ss otherwise restricted.

300-499 Upper-Divisiotl Courses:

G e n er a l l y op<'/1

to j u n i o rs a n d grad u J te s t u d e n t s , a n d may be considered part of a g r ad u ate pmgr" m p ro v i d ed they a re n o t specific req u i rem e n t s i n p re p a ra t io n fo r grad uate _ I u d )'. seniors unless otherwise specified.' A l s o open

to

500-599 Graduate Courses: Normally open to grad uate s t udents o n l y. I f, d u ring the last semester o f the s en i o r yea r,

a

a n d i d a te for

a

baccalaureate degree fi nds it. possible to complete a l l degree

16

requirements with a registration of fewer than

semester hours of

u ndergraduate credit, registration fo r g rad u a te credit is p nni ·sibJe. However, the total registration for undergraduate req u irements and the semester. A memorandum stating that all baccalaureate

must he dean and presented to the dean of graduate studies at t he t i me o f such registra t ion. This registration d o es n o t apply toward a h ig h e r d e g ree u nless it is later ap p roved by the stude n t 's advisor a n el / o r adv isor)!

requirements are being met during the current

Voic�

com m i t tee.

Bachelor of Music Education ( BME) K- I 2 C h o r al

*Note: LO lVer-aivisioll sllldeltts may e n ro ll pre req u is i tes have been //let.

K- I 2 l nst rumental ( Ba n d )

(Orchestra)

Bachelor of Musical Arts (BMA) Music Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Nursing Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (BSPE) ollcentratiolls in: Exercise Science

Fitness Manage m e n t

Pre-athletic Trailllng P r e - t hera p y

Complementary Majors Global Stud ies

se m es te r

by the appropriate department chair or sc hon l

Organ

Women's Studies

Polit ical

COURSE NUMBERINGS 1 00-299 Lower-Divisioll Courses: Open to fi r st - rear students J n d

signed

Composition

Health a nd

IlIJrr Physics

elective graduate credit shall n o t exceed 16 semester hours during

o m m u oica ti o n

K- 1 2 I n s t ru me nt al

\II m

Sports Ad'llilllstrtl

N u r s ing

Cross-Disciplinary Studies

f"'I o c ::a

Sporr Psychulogy

La t i n

Education

» z o

Reamtiolt

His to ry

Economics

S p e c i a l Ed u c a t i on

En g l i s h

m

1trl1(Jgelllel1t

Wri/iltg

Greek

Dance C o m p u t er Science Computer Science Electrical Eltgilleerillg In/ormarioll Science

S pan i s h

Li te ra t u re

Global Studies

Theatre Commwlicntioll Film Thea t re

Physics

Majors h,:

Ch emist ry Dra m a Earth Sciences

Communication and

Psychology

Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE)

Art

Chinese S t udies

M a t h ema t i c s

Che m is t r y

Enginee r i n g

E n g lish

Environ mental S t u d i e s F re n ch Geoscience Ge r ma n

Chemistry

E n g i n ee ri ng Science

E le c t rica l

Language

M{I/"keting'

5

Bach.elor of Science (BS) pp l i ed Physics

Ant h ropolo g y

Sptei,,1 EdllCil tiol/

Btlsiness Admillistra· lion Finance" [n/orlllatioll Manage·

m

_

A lit/eric Trlli" ;lIg Coadllllg Dlllite Bxercise SciclIce r lea/th Henlilt alld Fit ness

Readillg

B u s i ness

Norwl'giHn

'omputer Science

AqlJati

Tedl/lology

Studio Art

;:III

P hysi ca l Education

[n;frltctiolla/

l3iologr

C\

Ph il oso p h }

LangllClge

Art History

Scandinavian Area

h

Geosciences

Public Relatioll5 Tlretltre

Early Child/lOod English CIS a Secol/(i

The Americas

ill upper·division COIl/SCS if

COURSE OFFERINGS Most listed courses are o ffered every ye ar. A system o f a l terna t i n g

upper-division courses i. pract iced in some departments, the reby assuring a broader curriculum. The u n iversity reserves the right to mod i fy specific course requirements, to disco n t i n ue classes in which the registration is regarded as insufficient, a n d to withdraw cou rses.

GUR KEY A

Aiternatil'e Perspectil'es Art, Music, or Theatre C Cross-Cultural Perspectives F illquir), Seminar FW Inquiry Seminar: Writillg II International Core: O r igins of the Modem International Core: 200-level CO tlrses 12 13 International Core: Concluding ourse LT Literature MR Mathematical Reasoning AR

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\II

c( u II:: w

Natllrlll Scicnces, /VIat /H'I/Hl l ie.<, (II" Comp u ter Sciwee N. p ' Physical [dllCil t i OIl !\("til'ity Cour:'C PH Phi/osop /I)' ru Rf'iigion: Biblica! tlldies (Li/lt? I ) R2 Religioll: Cliristilill Thought, l Iistory, alld ' p - eriellct' (!.ine 2) R3 I�eligioll: lIl fegra tive (llld COII/p a m l iv/' neligiolls Sl l/dies ( l ine ') . M Science (//1(/ Scientific Met/lOci SR Capstone: SCliiOt' Seillillur/Project SI • oeial , eimec; Line I ( A l l i lirol'o[ogy, History, or Political Sciwed S 2 Sociol Sciences Li lle 2 (Economics, Psychology, Social Work,

or

w % I-

"VI'

Anthropology 253.535.7595 WWIV.p/ l l . cdlll� a /l t " ro

AntlHopolo S)' as a d i s c i p l i ne tries to b ri n g a l l of the world's people i n t o hu man foem. T h o u gh a n t hropology d lC, lo o k at "s t o n e s and bone. ," i t ;llso e x a m i n es the p o l i t ics, medicines, fa mil ies, a rt s , aud rel i g i o n s o f peoples Jnd c ul t u r e s in va rious pIa es and t i mes. This mak , th '[udy of ;l n t h ropology a com­ pie.: t<lsk, fo r i t invo lves Jspects of many d i s c i p l ines, fro m geol­ ogy and b io logy to a rt and psycholo g),. Allt b r o p o l ogy i s compo. t' d of fo u r fie lds . Cultural o r so c i a l a n th ro p o l ogy stud ies l i v i n ' human cultures in o rd e r to c re at e a eros -cu l t llr(11 u nders tJJ)din g of h u m a n b havior. Arc h a eo l og y

ocialog),)

Wri ling Reqlliremenl

The Americas

has t h e

www,plu, edul-pols This interdisc ipli nary mi n o r fO(lls

s an

the comparative histo­

in the Western Hemisphere. In in tegr<l t i n !?, scleded in fo r­ m a t i o n about the n i ted States, it rd1ects the rea l i t y t h a t th is co u n t ry is an L n tegral part of t h e c u l t u ra l l y d i ve rs e :md increas­ i n gly i n te rconnected co n temporary wo r l d . nents

Thurston, T. Williams.

MINOR; The m i n o r consists o f 20 h o u rs , i n cluding o n e req u i red and fo ur elective co urses compll'ted with a g rad e of or h i g h e r. Students also m us t t a ke the Co m po s i t io n a n d Conve rsa t i o n l a n guage s po ke n in the A m ericas

MINOR: 2 0 semester h o u rs . aeq Il ired: 1 02 . Choose: 1 0 1 o r 1 03 or 1 04 ; 4 h o u rs fro m courses l i s t e d 330-3 4 5 ; 4 h o urs fro m 3 50-499; a n d 4 a d d i t i o n a l hours in an­ thwpology.

[n re co g n i ti o n o f o u t s ta ndi n g Departlllental Honors may be gra nted

o t he r than t heir n a t i v e l a n guage. Part icipation i ll a relevant of[­

DEPARTMENTAL H O NO RS :

c a m p u s p rogram is h i g h ly rc comme ndt'd. Studen ts may not ap p l y more than one 4 - c re d i t course in the m i n o r to ful fill any other req u i rem e n t , such as geueral u l l i v rs i ty core. m a 'or, o r m in o r requi reme n ts .

work, the d es i gn a t io n W i l h

by vo t e of the a n th ro p o i o 'y fa c u l t y based o n the s t ud en t's per­ formance i n th fo l lo w i n g a reas: I . A n th ro po l o gy course work: 3 . 5 m i n i m u m GPA. 2. Demons tration of active interest in a n t hrop'Olo 'ical

REQUIRED COURSE: cience 282 In trod uction to the A m e ri c a s - S 1

projects <rod activi ties

Pol i t i cal

ELECTIVE COURSES: m u s t choose at lea st

S t u d e n ts

one

the Caribbean -

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www. pLu.edll/

1 0 1 rntroductioD to Boman BiologkaL Diversity - SM (4)

1 02 Introduction to Human Coltura! Diversity - C, S 1 (4) 1 03 Introduction to A rchaeology and World Prehistory - SI

( 4)

1 04 Introduction to Language in Society - SI (4) 192 Practicing Anthropologr- Makah Cnlture Past and Present - A, SI (4) Prerequisite: co n sen t of i n st ruc to r.

2 1 0 Global Perspectives: The World in CJumge - C, S 1 ( 4 ) 220 Peoples o f the World - S I ( 2)

'. nada, L a t i n

U

Semester for De e m b ' r a n d Jallu3 f)' graduates.

Course Offerings

225 Past Cu.ltures of Washington State - S I (2) 230 Peoples of the Northwest Coast - A, S 1 (2) 3 3 0 Cultures and Peoples of Native North America - A, S I (4)

332 Prehistory of North America - S 1 (4) 333

Culture - LT A

fac u l t y by the th ird week of class of t he fa ll semester for the s p r i n g

A me rica s , and the Un i te d -tate - R2 S p a n ish 322 I- at i n Am rican Civ i I izatiOfl a n d Culture S p a n i s h 3 4 1 Lat i n o Experiences in tbe Uilited States - A, IT pa n i h 43 1 L a t i n Am ri an L i t e r a t u re, 1 492- 1 888 - 1..:1' pan ish 432 20th-Century La t in American Literature. - U Spa n is h 433 S p e c ia l Topics in Latin A mer ic. a n Lileratur and P

departmental facll ity. A p roposal m u;t be approved by the May a n d Aug u s t graduatcs, and the t h i rd week of clas of

, S1

hurch H istory Studies:

rk.

dent research must be conducted u nde r the s u pervision o f

co urse w i t h North A m er ica n

History 3 3 7 The H is to r y of M ex ico - C. $ [ History 344 The ndes i n Llt i n American Fl istor)' - C , S I Pol itical Seiene ' 373 CivLl Rights and Civil Liberties - S I Religion 227 Christian Theology: L ib e r at i o n Theol ogy - R2, o r Re l i g i o n 3 3 4 Th eol o g i cal Stud ies: Liber3tion 1'h alogy - R3 Religion 36 1

o ut s i de o f cl ass w

3 . Com pletIon of a sen ior t he s i . . A paper des c rib i n g in depe n ­

conteJ1 t as the pr im a ry emp hasis, a n d one course with Central S O U U 1 A merica n Ct)!1tent as t h e p ri mary e m p h as i s . nlhro p logy 330 u l t Ires and Peo p les () at ive orth merica - 5 1 A n th ro po l o g y 33 4 TIle A n thro p o l o g y of on t-.:mporary Americ3 - A, S I Anth ro po l o g y 336 Peoples of L a t i n Am rica - C, S I. Business 495 I n te rn at i on al Business: Modern Lat i n America Co m m u n ication 337 ews Med ia of the \' estern He m isp here English 232 Women's Literature: Wo m en Writer o f the Americas - A , LT History 220 Modem L a t in American H ist ory - , S I His t o ry 305 Slavery i n the A m ericas - , S I History 335 La t i n . merican History: Cen tral America and

36

BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hOLl rs . 1 03, 4RO, 499. Chou5e� 1 0 1 o r [ 04 ; 4 h o u rs from 330-345 ( peoples cou rses) ; 4 h o u rs from 50-4 6 5 ( topics courses); 8 a d d i t io n a l hours i n a n t h ropology, a t least 4 o f which m u st b e a b o ve 3 2 1 . RccJ l l i red: 1 02 ,

FACULTY: Olufs, Prog ra1l1 A dvisor; Brown, B rusco, Carp, Dwyer­ Shick, Kelleher, K i l l e n , K l e i n , Marcus, P redm ore, Rowe, Temple­

a

goal, b u t u ses d3ta from the p h ys i c a l remains of th e

FACULTY: Klein, '!lilir; B ru s co , Culw n , H ast )', f-luelsbeck, Vaugh n .

rie , cu l tures, a nd contemporary issucs s hared by t h e two co n t i ­

co u rse , or its equiva l e n t , in

s'1lll\e

past c u l t u res to reach i t . ting ui tic a n t luopology s t ud i es human language . V hysiea l a n t h ro p ology studies the e mergence a n d subsequent b i o l og i c a l adaptations of h u m a n i t y a s a species.

253.53: .8727

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Native American Health - A, S I (11)


334 The Anthropology of Contemporary America - A, S I ( 4 ) 336 Peoples o f Latin America - C, SI ( 4 )

Art 253.535.7573

338 Jewish Culture - A, SI ( 4 ) 340 A nlh ropo logy of Africa - C, S I ( 4 ) 34 1 Ho'ike: Cultural Discovery i n Hawai'i - A ( 4 ) 342 Paci6c Island Cultures - C, S I (4) 343 East Asian Cultures - C , S I ( 4 ) 345 Contemporary China - C, S I (4)

lVWlV.plu.edu/-nrt d

In t h i s time of ra p id l y changing co n ce p ts and an almost daily emergence of new me d ia , e m p h a sis IIl Ust b placed on a varie ty of exp e r i e n c e s and creative fl ex i bil i t y for the a r t i. t and the d esig n er. Stude n ts with p rofessio nal concerns must be prepared to meet the modern wodd with both technical skills and the capacity fo r innovation. The d partment's

p ro gra m thert'fore stresses individu­

350 Women and Men in World Cultures - C, SI (4)

alized development in t he

of mind and han d .

354 Geography a n d World CulllJres: People, Places and Prospects - S J ( 4 )

a Bachelor of Arts d eg ree ;

P rt:req uisite : 1 02 o r

onsen t f i nstructo r.

355 Anthropology and Media - C, S I (4) 360 Ethnic Groups - A, SI ( 4 ) 36 ) Managing CoJtural Diversity - A, S I ( 2 ) 365 Prehistoric Environment and Technology: Lab Methods in Archaeology - S 1 (4) 370 The Archaeology of Andent Empires - C, 51 ( 4 ) 375 Law, Politics, and Revolution - C, S I ( 4 ) 377 Money, Power. a n d Excbange - S I ( 4 ) 380 Sickness, Madness. and Health - C . S I ( 4 ) 385 Marriage. Family, and KinshJp - C, S I ( 4 ) 3 86 AppUed Anthropology - S 1 ( 4 ) 392 Gods, Magic, and Morals - C, S I ( 4 ) 465 Arc.haeology: The Field Experience - SI ( I-S) P re req u is i te : onsent of in t r ue tor. 480 Anthropological loquiry - S l (4) Required of major in th e i r j lLnior

or se n i o r year.

491 I ndependent Studies: Undergraduate Readings ( 1 , ) Prerl!qu i ile: d ep a r t me n ta l consent.

492 Independent Studies: Undergraduate Fieldwork ( 1 --4) Prerequisite: depa r t men tal consent. 499 Capstone: SemJoar in Anthropology - SR ( 4 ) Required of rnajors in t hei r j u nior o r senior year. Prerequisite � r o t h e r students: depart men tal

approvaJ.

lise

among a genera.lized p rogram l ea d i n g to a m o rt specialized program fo r the B achelo r of Fine A r t s, i n which each cand idate develops s o m e a rea )f com pe tence; or a degree program in a r t education fo r teaching on se era ] levels . Some · t ndents go d i recLly from t he u n i ersi t y into t h e i r field o f i n t eres t . thers find it desirable and appropriate to a tt e n d a gra d ua te school. M a ny a l u m n i have beell accepted i n t o p res t i ­ gious 'raduate program • • both in t h is cou n t ry and abroad. The var i o us fields of ar t are com p titive and d e ma n d i n g i n terms o f co m m i t ment and effort. lonet lleless, t h ere is a l ways a p la ce fo r th e who a re e t re m e l y skil l ful or h ighly i maginative or, i d ea l ly, boLll. The departme nt's p rogram s t resses bOLh, attem p t i n g to help each . tudent r ach that ideal. Instruct ional resources, when co u p l e d w i t h dedicated and energetic students, have re ti l ted in a n u n us ua l l y h ig h p ercen tage of g ra d u a t s being able to satisfy t h e i r vocational objectjves. S t udents m a y chonse

FACULTY: Hal l a m , Chair; Cox Geller, ,old, Keyes, Tomsic. The de part m e n t h a s sought to m i n i mize p n:rl:<,juisites, en<1bling studen ts to el cc t courses re la t i ng to t he i r in terest� as early as p ossi b l e, but majors are u rged to fo llow course sequences closely. It is recommended that · t u d e n t s i n terested i l l m ajo r i n g ill a r t proper a dv i s i n g . Tra ns fer students' st at u s shall be dete r m i ned at their time o f e n t ra nce. The department r serves the righ t t e retai n, exh i h i t , and reprodtt e st llde n t work s u b m i tte d fo r c re d i t i n any o f its c o u rs es or p rograms, i n c l u d i n g the senior exh i b i tion. A lise or m a t er i a l s fee is req u ired in certain courses. declare their major early to i ns ure

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n im u m of 34 sem e s t er hours, including 160, 250, 2 0 or 350, 365, 370, 499, a n d tbe a n h i s t o ry sequence ( I SO, 1 8 1 , 380); 1 1 ) or courses in t ac h i n g methods may not be ap p l ied t o t he m aj o r. maximum of 40 hours Jllay

be applied toward the degr

e. Candidates llre

enrolled in the

College of rts a nd Scien es and mlIst sa t isfy ge ne ral univers i t y requirements, including a core c u r r i c u l u m (Core I or Core r I ) ,

and the option req u i reme n t .

f 60 se m es te r o r 250; the art h istory sequence ( \ 80, 1 8 1 , 3 S 0 ) ; 8 ad(L it i o na l ho urs i n 2 -d imc nsional media, 8 a d d i tional h o u rs i n 3 - d i mens ional media, a n d 4 hours in art h istory or t heor y (390, o r as approved b y t h e department faculty); requi reJllen ts a n d electives i n area of e m phas i s ; and 499 ( apstone: Senior Exhibitio n ) . Art 1 1 6 or cou r � i n te <1 c h i n g me t h od s may not be included. C a n d i d ate s are e n ro l.l ed in the School of t he Arts and must satisfy ge n e ra l u n iversity requirements, i n cl u d i n g a core c u r r i cu l u m ( ore I or Core I I ) . BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m

hours, including 1 60; 226; either 2 3 0

BFA in 2-Dimensional Media Areas of e m p h as i o ne

: a

m i n i mum

of three courses required i n

area.

Drawi ng/Pa in t ing:

1 60 Drawing 260 I n termed ta te D rawing 360 Life D rawiJlg ( R )

365 Pa i n t i n g I 465 Painting n ( R)

Printmaking:

370 Prin tmakil1" I 470 Printmaking 1 I (R) P

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Film Arts:

230 Ceramics I - AR ( 4 )

226 Bl a c k and Whi tt' Photography 326 Color Pho togrJp hy 4 26 Elect ron ic I m agi n g l足 II: <

250 Sculpture I - AR ( 4 )

[lItiepelldcl I / Study (//lay be applied to C1 l 1y area):

49 1 S p e c i a l P rojects ( R) 498 S t ud i o P roj e ts ( R) ( R )-may be repeated for credit

296 Design II: Concepts - AR (4) Prerequisite: 1 96 o r consent of inslructor.

BFA in 3- Dimensiortal Media Areas of e m p h asis ; a min i m u m of three courses req u i red in o ne a rea.

330 Ceramics I I - A R ( 4) P re req ui . ite: 230.

Ceram ics:

341 Elementary Art Education ( 2 ) 350 Sculpture n - A R (4)

SClilptllre:

M ay be ta ke n twice. Prerequisite: 250.

250 Sculpture I 3 5 0 Sealptm n ( R)

Independent St lldy (may be applied to any a rea):

4 9 1 Special Projects ( R) 498 tudio Projects ( R) ( R ) - may be re p e a ted for credit

370 Printmaking I - A R ( 4 ) Prerequ isite: 1 60 or consent of instructor.

BPA in De ign

1 96 Design I: Fundamentals 296 D e s ig n 11: Concepts 39 De si g n : r a ph i c s I

380 Modern Art - AR ( 4 ) 390 Studies i n Art H istory - A R ( 4 ) May b e repeated fo r cre dit .

Elective courses:

398 Drawing: I lius t rJtion ( R) 4.92 Desi g n : \ orkshop 496 Design: Graph ics I I ( R) - may b e re p e a te d fo r credit

396 Design: Graphics I - AR ( 4 ) Prereq uisite: 1 6 0, 296, o r consen t of instructor.

398 Drawing: Wustration - AR ( 4 ) May be rep e a ted one . Prereq uisites:

BACHEWR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Educat icm.

MINOR IN STUDIO ART: 20 semester hours, including 380, 4 hours in 2 - d imensional media, 4 hours i n 3 - d i mensillnal media, and 8 h o u rs of studio a r t eJectives drawn from upper足 division courses. Courses Lll teac h i n g methods ( 3 '1l , 440) may n o t be app l i e d to the m i nor. MINOR IN ART mSTORY: 24 s e m e s t e r hours, including 1 80 and 1 8 1 , 1 2 hour s in art history/theory elect ives, and 4 h o u r s i n studio electives. Non-concentration courses ( 1 1 6 ) , p ractic a l design c o u rs e s ( I 6, 296, 396, 398, 492, 4 6 ) , and c u rse in teaching methods ( 34 1 , 440) may not be a ppli ed to the m inor. PUBUSHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR: The Publishing and P r i n t i n g Arts m i n o r is e ra slisted with the Department of nglish . See t h e d e s cr i p t ion o f t ha t m i nor u n d e r Pllblishing a n d Printing Arts.

Course Offe rings For collrse descripriol1s, Fisit the PLU catalog online at www.plu.edu/

p ri nt/ catal og. STUDIO

1 60, 196, 226 , 230, 250, 260, 296, 326, 3 30, 34 1 , 3 50, 360, 365 , 3 70, 396, 398, 426, 430, 465, 470, 49 1 , 492, 496, 498 HISTORY AND TH EORY 1 1 6, 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380, 390, 440, 497

1 1 6 Design in the Contemporary World - A R ( 4 ) Re q ui res n o artistic/design background. 160 Drawing - AR ( 4 ) 1 80 Hi tory of We tern Art I - A R (4) 1 8 1 History of Western A r t I I - AR ( 4 ) 196 Desjgn I : Fundamentals - AR ( 4 ) 226 Black a n d White Photography - A R ( 4 ) L U T H E R A N

3 60 Life Drawing - AR ( 2 ) May b e re p e a ted for cre d it . Prere q u is i te : 1 6 0 o r conse n t o f instructor. 365 Painting I - AR ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 1 60.

Required basic sequence:

P A C I F I C

326 Color Photography - AR ( 4 )

331 The Art of the Book 1 - A R (4)

230 , e r a m i c s I 330 eramics I I 4 3 0 eramics I I I ( R )

38

260 Intermediate D rawing - A R ( 4 ) Pr requisite: 1 60 or consent of instructor.

U N I V E R S I T Y

1 60 a n d 1 96.

426 Electronic Imaging - AR ( '1 ) May be taken twice. P re r ' l] u i s i les: 226, 3 2 6 , or consent of

instructor. 430 Ceramics m - AR ( 4 ) May be taken twice. PrerequLsite: 3 3 0 . 440 Seminar i n Art Education

(2)

465 Painting n - A R ( 4 ) May b e t a ke n twic". Prerequisite: 365. 470 Printmaking I I - A R ( 4 ) May b e taken twice. P re re qu i s i t e : 370. 491 Independent Studies: Special Projects - AR (2 or 4) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: j u n io r status, mini足 mum of two courses at 200 level or above tn affected medium with m i nimum 2.5 PA, con cnt of instructor and de p ar tm ent chair. 492 Design: Workshop - AR ( 2 ) M a y be taken twice. 496 Design: Graphics U ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 396. 497 Research in Art History-Theory ( 1 - 4 ) May b e repeated fo r credit. Pren:quisit . : senior status, consent of i ns t r uc to r, and program a p p roval bl' department fa cul ty. 498 Studio Project Iindependent Study - SR ( l- 4 ) O nly one p roj e ct p r e m es te r m a y be u nd er t a k en . M a y b ' repeated fo r credit. Prerequisites: dec l a red major Ln art, senior statu:, conse n t of inst ructor, written p roposal, p rogram approval by department facul ty. Students meeti n g the above req u i rements b u t with less than a 3.0 GPA in the major m ay be re q u i red to p rese nt additio nal ev id en ce of eligibility. 499 Capstone: Senior Exhibition - SR ( 2 ) Must b e taken i n the student's final semester. Prerequisites: declared maj r i n <l.rt ( B or BA), senior s t a t us , reasonable expectation o f com p let i o n of all departmen t and un iversity req u i re m e n ts for g rad uatio n .


School of the Arts

Division of Social Sciences A n t h ro p o l og y

Economics History M a r r iage and Fam i l y Therapy Political Science Psychology Soci ol o gy and Social Wo rk

253.535.7 1 5 0

www.p{lI.ed/l/-sota

The School of the Arts is a community o f arti:ts a n d schola rs­ s t u de n ts, fac u l ty, and ta ff-dedicated to the fu lfi l l m en t of the human sp i r i t thro ug h creative exp res s ion and careful scholar­ s h i p . he School of the Arts o ffers p rofessional ed ucation to a r t ists and com municators within the framework of a l iberal a rts ed u c ati o n . The school enco u rages all o f its mem bers to p u rs ue their a rt i st i c and 'chobrly work in a n e n viro nm e nt t h a t c h al ­ l e n ges c o mp l ace n cy, n u r t u re p e rs on a l g rowt h , and maintains a strong cult ure of coll egi a l integrity. Members o f t he School of the Arts strive to create art and scholarsh i p that acknowledges the past, defines the present, and anticipates the future. Art, communication, music, and theatre are medium of understanding and change which reward those who participate i n them, whether as artist, scholar, learner, or audience. Performances by students, faculty, a n d guests of the school enhance the cultural p ro perity shared by Pacific Lutheran Unive rsi t y and its su rro un d i ng environs. The school promoles venues for c o l la borat i o n between a r t i s t and scholars, among anistic and i n tellectual media, and between t h e u n iver­ sity a nd th . c o m m u ni t y.

DEGREES OFFERED: Bachelor o f Arts, Bachelor o f Science MAJOR REQUIREMENT: A major is a sequence of courses i n o n e area, usually in one department. A major should b e selected by the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be approved by the department chair (or in case of s p ec ial academic pro ­ grams. t h e program coordi nator). Major requirements a re specified in this catalog.

Course Offering For course descriptiolls, visit the PLU catalog olliine at www.plu.edu/

print/catalog. 341 Integrating Arts in the Classroom (2)

Col lege of Arts and Sciences Divisioll of Humanities

Engl ish Languages and Literatures P hilosophy Re l i g i o n Divisioll ofNa/ural Sciences

m z n '"

Global Stud ies H istory Ind ivid ualized S tudy Mathematics Music o rwegian P h ilosophy Physic.s Pol i tical S c ienc.e Psychology Re l i g io n Scandinavian A re a tudies

Classics Com m u n ication C om p u t er Engineering C omp ute r Science Eco nom ics En g i neer i ng Science ( 3-2) E n g l ish Env i ronmen tal Stud ies French G eo s c ien ce s

DEGREES OFFERED by the School of the Arts i n clude the B F A ( B a c h e l o r o f Fine rts) in art and co m m u n i cation and theatre; the BM (Bad1 e l o r of M us i c ) , t h e BMA ( B ac h e l o r o f Musical

Fo r cOllrse offerings, degree requirements, and p rograms in the S hool of the Arts, see Art, JOl1l1llwl icatioll alld Theatre, ;md Mllsic.

n

m

Anthropology Ap p l i ed Physics Art B iology Che m i st r y Chinese S t u d i es

FACULTY: S p i ce r, Dean; facu l ty members of the Depart ments o f o m m u n i c at i on a n d T h ea t re, a n d Music.

Educa tioll.

'"

RECOGNIZED MAJORS:

Art.

Art s ) ; the B M E ( Bachelor o f Music Education ) . Students may also earn the BA ( Bachelor o f A rts) , but this degree is awarded t h ro u g h the C o l l ege of Arts and Sciences. C a nd id ales fo r a l l de g re e s must meet general uni ersity re qui re m en ts and the s pe c i fi c re q u i reme n t s of the D e par t me n ts o f Art, Commu nica­ tion a nd Theatre , or Music. For details about t h e BAE ( Bachelor of Arts i n Education) in art, communication and theatr , or music, see the School of

» z o

Social Wo rk Sociology Spanish Theatre Women's Studies

German

Not more than 44 semester hours earned in one department may be applied toward the bachelor's degree in the college. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQU1REMENTS In addition to m ee ting the entrance re q u i re me n t in fore i g n language (two years o f h igh school language, one year of co ll ege language, or demonstrated equivalent p rofi c i en cy ) , candidates i n

the College o f Arts and Sciences (all BA, BS, BARec, BAPE [ excluding BAPE with certification ] , and BSPE degrees) must meet Option I , I I , or I I I below. Cand idates fo r th BA in English, for the BA in _ducatioD with concentration i n English, fo r the B A in Global Stud ies, for the B BA in Interna tional B usi ness, and for election to the Arete Society mList meet Option I. C om plet i o n of one fo reign language t h ro u g h the seco nd year o f c o l l ege level. This option m ay also be met by completion of fo u r years o f h igh school study i n one fo re ign language wit.h grades of C or hig her, or by satisfactory sco re s on a p rofi c i e ncy exam i nation admi nis tered by the PLU De p a rt ment of Languages and Literatures . II. Completion of one foreign language other than that used to satisfy the fo reign language e n t ra n c e requirement through the first year o f college level. This option may also be met by satisfactory scores on a pr o fi cie n cy exam ination adm inis­ tered by t h e PLU De p a r t m e nt of Languages and Literatures.

I.

I l l . Completion of 4 semester hours in history, literature, o r

language (at t h e 20 1 level, o r at a n y level in a language other than that used to satisfy the foreign language entrance requirement) inaddition to courses applied to the general u n iversity requirements, alld 4 semester hour- in symbolic logic. mathematics (courses n u mb e red 1 00 o r above), computer s ience, or st a t ist i cs in addition to co u rses a pp l i ed to the general u n ive r s it y requirements. C o u r ses used to satisfy either category of Option I I I of t h e C ol l e ge of Arts and Sciences requirement may not a l s o be used to satisfy ge n er al u n iversity requirements.

Biol o gy Chemistry Co m p u t e r S c ie nc e a n d C o m pute r Engineering

Geosciences Mat h e ma ti cs Phy ics

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MINOR: At least 20 semester hours selected from

Biology 253.535 .756 1 www. nsci.pll4.edl4/biol >

" o

..... o III

To learn biology i s more than to learn facts: it is to learn how to ask and answer questions, how to develop strategies which might be em ployed to obtain answers, and how to recognize and evaluate the answers which emerge. The department is therefore dedicated to encouraging stude.nts to learn science in the only way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to independently question it, probe it, try it out, experiment with it, experience it. The diversity o f courses in the curriculum provides broad coverage of contemporary biology and allows flexible planning. Each biology major completes a three-course sequence in the principles of biology. Planning with a faculty advisor, the student chooses upper-division b iology courses to meet indiv idual needs and career objective . Faculty members are also committed to helping students investigate career opportunities and pursue careers which most clearly match their i nterests and abilities. Students are invited to use departmental faciJities for indepen足 dent study and are encouraged to participate in ongoing faculty research. FACUITY: Alexander, Chair; Auman, Crayton, Ellard- lvey, Garrigan, Gee, Hansen, Hesse, Lerum, Main, D.J. Martin, McGinnis, Smith, Teska.

ny biology courses. A grade of C- or h igher must be earned in each course, and total G PA must be at least 2.00. Cour e prerequisites must be met un less written permission is granted in advance b y the instructor. pplicability of non-PLU biology courses will be determined by tbe department chair. At l ast 8 of th 20 credit hours i n biology must be earned in residence a t PL ; for students applying only 8 P LU biology hours toward the minor, those hours cannot include independent study (49 1 ) or coopera足 tive education hours.

Course Offe rings For cou rse descriptiollS,

I I I Biology and the Modern World - NS, SM

116

(4)

Introductory Ecology - NS, S M ( 4 )

1 6 1 Principles o f Biology I: Ceo Biology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Co-registration in Chemistry ( 1 04, 1 20, o r 1 25 ) recommended. 162 Pr incip les of Biology n: Organismal Biology - NS, SM (4) P rerequisite: 1 6 1 . 201

Introductory Microbiology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: HEM 1 05.

205 Human Anatomy and Physi.ology - NS, SM (4) Not designed for biology majors.

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: The

major in biology is designed to be flexible in meeting the needs and specia1 interests of students. For either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree the student must take the principles of biology equence ( 16 1 , 162, 323). Compl tion of this sequence (or an equiva1ent genera1 biology sequence at another institution) is required before upper-division biology courses can be taken. Each of these courses must have been completed with a grade of C- or higher. Courses not designed for biology majors ( I l l , 1 1 3, 1 1 6, 20 1 , 205, 206) ordinarily cannot be used to satisty major requirements. Independent study (49 1 ) and cooperative education may be used for no more than 4 of the upper-division biology' hours required for the BS degree, and for no more than 2 of the upper-division biology hours required for the BA degree. Students who plan to apply biology credits earned at other institutions toward a PLU degree with a biology major shouJd be aware that at least 14 hours in biology, numbered 324 or higher and including 499, must be earned in residence at PLU. Each student must consult with a biology advisor to discuss selection of electives appropriate for educationa1 and career goals. Basic requirements under each plan for the major are listed below.

206 Human Anatomy and Physiology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Not designed for biology majors. Prerequisite: 205.

323

Principles of Biology Ill: Ecology, Evolution,

and Diversity - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 1 6 2 or consent of department chair.

324

Natural History of Vertebrates - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 2 3 .

326

Animal Behavior - N S (4) Prerequisite: 323 or consent of instructor.

327

Omithology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323

or

consent of instructor.

328

Microbiology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 323; o n e semester organic chemistry recommended.

329 Entomology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 323.

332

Genetics - NS (4)

Prerequisite: 323.

340

Plant Diversity and Distribution - N S , SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323.

Bachelor of Arts: 34 semester hours in biology, including 1 6 1 , 1 62,

323, and 499, plus 20 additional upper-division biology hours. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) and Math足 ematics 1 40. Recommended supporting courses: Physic 1 25 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 1 36 ) .

348 Advanced Cell Biology - N S , S M ( 4 ) No scientific methods credit or l a b for spring 2003 and 2004.

BachelOl" of Science: 42 semester hours i n biology, incl uding 16 1 , 162, 323, and 499, plus 2 8 additional upper-divi ion biology hours. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) , 232 (with laboratory 234) , and one additional upper-division cbemistry course with laboratory; Mathematics 1 5 1 or Math足 ematics 24 1 ; Physics 1 2 5 (with laboratory 1 3 5) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 1 36), or Physics 1 53 (with laboratory 1 63 ) and Physics 1 54 (with laboratory 1 64 ) .

35 1 Natural History of the Pacific Northwest - NS, SM ( 4 )

BACHELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION: Students interested in

Prerequisite: 3 2 3 .

this degree develop their biology program through the Biology Department in conjunction with the School of Education. Such students should have a biology advisor. See the School of Edl4cation section of the catalog for recommended bi logy courses and other pertinent information.

403

Prerequisite: 323 and one semester of organic chemistry or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: 3 2 3 or consen t o f instructor.

361

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Comparative Anatomy - NS, SM ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 3 2 3 .

364 Plant Physiology - NS, S M ( 2 ) Prerequisite: 323; organic hemistry recommended.

365 Plant Anatomy - NS, SM ( 2 ) Developmental Biology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323.

407

MolecuJal" Biology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequi ite: 32 .

411 40

visit the Pl.U catalog online at www.plu.edu/

print/catalog.

Y

Histology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323.


4.24. Ecology - NS ( 4 )

4. Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50, and

P r requisite:

5. Declare a major or minor in business through the School of Business. Access to upper div.ision business courses is limited to students who have been admitted t o the School of Business with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above, and who have met the re qu i red prerequis ites. Students with majors outside of the School of Business may gain access [0 specific business courses that support their major studies by permission of the School of Business.

4.25

323.

Biological Oceanography - NS, S M (4)

Prerequisite: 323. 4.26 Ecological Methods - NS, SM (4) Prerequ isi te: 323 or consent of in tructor. 441 Mammalian Physiology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisites: 323,

recommen ded .

HEM 1 20; anatomy and biochemistry

448 lmmUlJology - NS (4)

Prere qui si tes : Any two )f the following cour

s

in Biology: 3 28 ,

332, 348. 403, 407, 4 1 1 , 44 1 . 475 Evolution - NS (4)

Term paper and mini-seminar required. Prerequisite: 3 2 3 . 491 lndepend.ent Studies ( 1 -4) O pen to

qualified junior and senior majors. Prerequisite: written

proposal for the project approved by a faculry sponsor and the departme nt chair.

499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR (2 ) A proposal fo r the t o p i c must be presented to the department early in spring term of the junior year. The s em i nar may be linked to, but not replaced by, laboratory independent study o r inter nship experience.

School of Business 253.535 .7244

til c: III

AFFI LIATIONS: The School of Busi ness of Pacific Lutheran University is a member of the AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The BBA, MBA, and accounting programs are nationally accredited by the Accreditation Co unci l of the AACSB. The school is privileged to have a student chapter of Beta amma Sigma, the national business honorary society recognized by AACSB. Pacific Lutheran University is accredited regionally by the Northwest Association of Schoois and Colleges. D.F.GR.I!E REQUIREMENTS: The

Bachelor of Business Adminis­ tration degre program consists of a minimum o f 1 28 semester hours com pleted with an overall grade point average of 2.50 or above as well a 2.50 grade p o i n t average separately in business courses. C- is the miuim al acceptable grade fo r business courses. At least one-half of the minimum total degree requirements are taken in fields outside the School of Business. At least 40 semester hours are taken in required and elective business subjects. A minimum o f 20 semester hours in business must be taken in residence at PLU.

IVww.plu. edll/-bllsa

Business degree and concentration requirements are estabUshed at the time of m aj or declaration. Students with a

The mission of the PLU School of Bu iness i s to be a bridge conn ecti n g students with the future by integrating competency­ based busin s e duca t io n , engaging a diverse, globalized society, using tcch nolog.ies that improve I arning, and e xe mplify i ng lives f service.

declared major in business who have not attended the university for a period of three years or more will be held to the business degree requirements in effect at the time of re-entry to the university. The use of pass/fail is available in any foundation course as defmed in the Pass/Fa il section of this catalog.

Objectives of rhe

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINIS RATION:

Ulldergraduate Business Progra m

To prepare students for positions in comnlcrcial and not-for­ p rofi t organizations by providing them the basic knowledge o f

how t h ese o rganizations function a n d equipp ing them with th necessary competencies to work effectively. bese com p etencies include ( 1 ) leadership, (2) critical/creative thi nking, ( 3 ) effective communication. (4) team effectiveness, and (5) taking in itiative and managing change. To help students see the interconnections among the many aspects of their world by integrating the liberal arts with professional busi ness education To i de n t i fy and cha l l e nge students to adopt h igh standards for ethical practice and professional conduct To prepare students for lives of s rvice to the comm unity To prepare students to use contemp rary technologies and to embrace the changes c a use d by tedmological innovation To in cul ca te a global perspective in . tudents

Z m III III

Requ ired fmllldation cou rses:

Comm unication 336 Effec t i v e Business Presentations Com puter Science 1 20 Computerized Information Systems - NS

4 4

(Informa tion Ivlallagemel1t stlldwts may substit14te CSCE 1 4 4 for

120)

Economics 1 5 1 and 1 52 Macro/Micro Economics - S2 Mathematics 1 2 8 Linear Models and Calculus, an Introduction (or Mathematics 1 5 1 ) - MR, NS Philosophy 325 Busines� Ethics - PH Statistics 23 t Introductory Statistics - M R

4/4 4 4 4 28

Minimum semester hours in foundation c ou rs es: Requ ired business co urses:

20t Value Creation in the Global Environment 202 Financial Accounting 203 Managerial Accounting 3 0 1 Managing Careers and Human Resources 302 Manageri I Finance 305 Creating and Leading Effective Organizations 308 Principles of Marketing 309 Managing Value Creating Operations 3 1 0 Information Systems 400 Business Law or 405 Law of th Financial Marketplace or 406 Law of the Workplace: Employees, Employers,

FACULTY: Bel l , Dean;

Pratt, Associate Dean; Albers, Ban roft, Barnow , Berniker, Chhabra, Pinni , Gibson, Hegstad, L e, MacDonald, Myers. Pbam, Ramaglia, Se p i c , Simpson, Thrasher, Van Wy he . Yager, Zabriske . The professional B, chelor of Bu iness Ad minis­ tration degree program is composed of an upper-division business curriculum with a strong base in liberal arts. To be admitted to the School of Business, a student must: 1. B e officially admitted to the university. and 2 . Have complet ed at least 32 semester credit hours, and 3. Have suc essfully completed with a minimum grade of C- (or be currently enrolled in) Business dministration 20 1 , C mputer 'cien e 1 20, Eco nomics 1 5 1-152, Mathematics 1 2 8 , Statistics 23 1 , o r their equivalents i n another college o r university, and ADMISSION:

P

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 4

Their Rights and Respons ibilities or 407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Companies, and Products or 408 International Busines, Law 499 a p st o ne Seminar: Strategic Management

4

Minimum semester hours in business courses:

40

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student may elect to co m p let e one or concentrations within the Bachelor of Business Adminis­ tration program. The concentra tion, wh ich is noted on t h e student' t ra n sc r i p t , must be co mp leted w i th at l e a s t a 3. 00 g ra d e point average. C- is the minimal acceptable grade fo r concentra­ tion courses. A minimum of 8 s m e ster hours of the total re­ qu i red for a co ncentration must be taken in residence at PLU. School of Busin internships ( Business 495) will be graded as pas ffail on ly. A l i mi t of one in ternship in any c o ncen t r ati o n will be accepted, not to exceed 4 cred it hours. An end p ro duc t may be required, as determined by the spon sor ing i n s t r u c tor. CONCENTRATIONS: A more

z

Business 335 Fi n a n ci a l I n vest m e n ts Busi ness 405 Law of the inancial Marketplace Business 4 3 7 Financial Ana l ys i s and Str a t egy One of the follo wing: Economics 35 1 Inter me d i a t Macro econo m i cs Economics 3 6 1 vI loney and B anki n g ( 4 ) .

Entrepreneu.rship IUl d New Ventu.re Management

20 sem. rull

Professional Acco unting

Business 320 Acco unting Information Systems Business 3 2 1 I n te r m ediat e Accounting I Busines 3 2 2 I ntermediate Accounting I I B usi ne s s 405 Law o f the Financial Marketplace

4 2 2 4

8 semester hOllrs }i"o m the following: Business 23 ost cco u n t ing and antrol Systems ( 4 ) B usiness 327 Ta A cc o u n ti n g I ( 2 ) Busi ness 4 2 2 .onsol i dat i o n s and Eq u i ty Issues ( 2 ) Business 4 2 3 ccounting for 'ot- for- Profit a nd lQvernmental E nt it i e s ( 2 ) B u i ness 4 2 4 A ud i t i n g ( 4 ) Business 4 2 7 Tax Accounting I I ( 2 )

8

24 sem. rus.

Hwnan Resoorce Management

4 B usi ne s s 34 2 l'v1 a na g i ng Human Resources Business 406 Law of the Wo rk p lac e : Employees, Employers, 4 T h e i r Righ t s and Responsibilities 4 Economics 3 2 1 Labor Economics 12 semester hours fram thefo/lowil1g (at least 8 from Business): 1 2 Business 343 Managing Reward S ys tems ( 4 ) Business 442 Leadership and O rg a n izati o na l D e ve l o pm e nt ( 4 ) Busi ness 445 Quality Improvement Strategies ( 4 ) Business 4 4 9 Cu r re n t Issues in Human anagemen t ( 4 )

Business 495 I n tern s hi p (4) Communication 4 3 5 Organizational Communication ( 4 ) Communication 4 3 7 Advanced I nter per so na l Communicatio n ( 4 ) Psych ol ogy 450 Psychological Tes t i n g (4) Psychology 46 [ Psychology of Wo rk (4) 20-24 sem. hrs.

international Busioess

lo ba l 1anagement Business 355 Managing Global Op e ra ti o ns Business 408 International Business Law Economics 33 1 International Ec o n o m i cs One of the fo llowing: An ap proved area course from Anthropology, Political Science ( 4 ) o r Bus iness 460 I nternational M a rk et in g ( 4 )

4

Busin ess 352

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liusine s 358 Ent rep re ne urs h i p 4 Business 405 La, of the Financia l Ma r ke t p la ce 4 Business 430 Entrepreneurial Finance 4 Bus iness 495 Internshlp 4 8 semester hOllrs 1;'0111 t h e followi11g (at least 4 from BI/siness): 8 Busi ness 323 Cost Acco u n t i n g ( 4 ) Business 365 Sales a n d 'ales iVlanagement ( 4 ) Business 438 Financial Research a n d A na ly si s ( 4 ) Busines. 442 Leaders h i p a nd O rganiza t ional Development ( 4 ) Business 467 Ma rket i ng Rese a rch (4) Eco n o m i cs 36 1 Monq' and Banking (4) Economics 371 Indu s t r i a l Organ ization and Public Po l i cy (4) Information Management

T h e mission o f t h e acc o u n t i ng fac ul ty is t o o ffe r a q uali ty b a cc a la u re a t e a cc o un t ing program designed to provide students wi t h a so l i d fo undation for develop ing a wide r a n ge of p r ofes ­ sional careers.

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Econom ics 3 4 4 ' conometric ( 4 ) Psychology 462 Co nsu mer Psyc h ology ( 4 )

8

Business 3 2 1 Intermediate A c co un ti n g 1 ( 2 ) B u in ss 3 2 2 In tcrmediat A ccou nting II ( 2 ) B usiness 3 2 3 C o t Accounting a n d Control S)'stems ( 4 ) B us iness 4 3 0 E n t rep re n e u r i a l Fi nance ( 4 ) Business 4 3 8 Fi nancial Re earch a n d A nal ysi s ( 4 ) Business 4 9 5 Internship ( 4 h o u rs maximum) E co no mi cs 344 Econometrics ( 4 )

12

ales Man a ge m e n t (4) B usi ness 369 I nternet M a r ke t i n g (4) Business 4 60 I n t e rna ti o nal Ma rketing (4) Business 495 I n ternship (4 ) Commun ication 2 7 1 M e d in LitenlC)' ( 4 ) Econo m ics 33 1 Internation,ll Eco nomics ( 4 )

4

(4)

4 4 4

tra tegy (4)

4

A n a l y sis

24 sem. hrs.

Business 365 Sales and

4 4

8 sel1lester hours from the f<lllowing:

42

Marketing Resoorce Management

Business 407 Law of t he rVlarkct place: Consumers, Companies, and P ro duc t s Busin ess 467 Ma rket ing Research Business 468 M a r ket i ng M anag em e n t 12 semester h o u rs frolll the follo wing (at least 8 from B usiness): B usiness 363 C on sum e r Behavior a n d Pro m o t i o n al

24 sem. hrs.

Financial Resou.rces Management

Resource

m llst co m p l et e either Option I of the Colleg of Arts and Sciences fo reign l ang ua ge require m e n t s or on e semester o f s t udy abroad 0- 1 6 And

22 sem. MS.

Business 3 75 I n t ro d u c t i o n to I n formation Management

4

B usiness 3 76 Ethical Issues in Information M a nage men t Business 478 I n fo r mation Management S e m in a r 12 semester hours ji-om the following: B usiness 3 2 0 Ac co un t i ng I n formation S y s t e ms (4) Busi ness 377 Data Base Appl ications in Business (4) Business 378 El ctronic Com merce ( 4 ) Busi ness 495 In tern s h i p ( 2-4 ) A n )' llpper-level computer science course ( u p to 4 c re d i t s )

2 4 12

GENERAL BUSINESS MINOR RULES: Al l courses must be c om p leted with a grade of C- or higher. A cumulative grade point a ve ra ge of 2 . 5 0 for a l l courses in the minor is re q u i red . At l e as t 1 2 semester hours must be upper division, and at least 8 sem<'stcr hours m ust be completed i n residence. MINOR IN B U SINESS ADMlN ISTRATION: A m i n i m u m o f 20 semester hour in husiness courses, including 20 1 . See General B usil1e", Aiillor Rules above. M I NOR IN FINANCE": A

minimum of 20 seme s te r hours, in cluding 20 1 , 202, 302, a n d 8 hours from the following: 335, 437, and 438. See Gelleral Busilless Mil10r Rules above. MINOR I N INFORMATION MANAGEM ENT: A mi ni m u m of

20 se mes te r hours, in c lu d i n g 20 1 , 202, 3 1 0, a nd 375, and one o f 377 or Co mp ute r Science and Co m p u te r ·ngineering 367, and 2-4 h ou r s from 376, 78, and 478. Prerequisite fo r minor: CSCE 1 20 o r C CE 1 44. See Gel1eral Busilless Minor Rules above. MINOR IN MARKETING*: A m i n i nlllm of 20 sem e s t e r hours, including 20 1 , 308, and 468, an d 8 hours from 363, 365, 369, 460, and 467. See General Business Minor Ru les above. *

Pending final approval.


ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: The accoun t ing certificat PI" gram i s a va i l a b le fo r students who hold a baccalau足 rea te de ree (any field) and wish to co m p l e te the ed u ca tio n a l req u i rement t

the Certified Public Acco untant (CP ) examinat ion: 24 credit from 202, 2 03 , 3 20, 3 2 1 , 322, 32 3, 32 7, 405 , 4 2 2 . 423, 427, 424. on tact the School of Business for fur足

tht'[ i n formati

s i t for

n.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: See Gradllate Stt u/ies.

400 Business Law ( 4 ) 405 L

w

of the Pinancial Marketplace ( 4 )

406 Law o f the Wo rkplace: Employees, Employers, Their Rights and Responsibilities (4) 407 Law o f t h e Marketplace: Consumers, Companie , and Products (4)

ca C

408 International Business Law (4)

Z m \II '"

422 Consolidations and Equity Issues ( 2 ) Prerequisites:

Course Offerings For course descriptiO/IS, vi it the PLU cata log onlille at www.plu.edu/ print/catalog.

320, 3 2 2 .

423 Accounting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Entities (2) P re re quisi t

: 202, CSCE J 20.

105 Personal Financial Planning and Consumer Law ( 4 )

424 Auditing ( 4 )

2 0 1 Value Creation i n the Global Environment (4)

Prerequisi tes:

202 Financial Accounting ( 4 )

427 Tax Accounting I I ( 2 ) Prerequisite s:

Prerequi it s: sopho more stand ing; M TH 1 28. 203 Managerial Accounting ( 4 ) F a m i l i a r i ty with M ic roso ft Excel o r (l t her spreadsheet req u i red. Prerequ i sites :

\II

320, 3 2 2 . 202, 327,

SCE 1 20.

430 Entrepreneurial Finance ( 4 ) w ft wa re

202, CSCE 1 20

is

Prereqlli. ite:

02.

437 Financial AnaIysls and Strategy

302. (4)

30 ) Managing Careers and Human Resource (4)

Prcreq lli.ite:

302 Managerial Finance (4)

438 Financial Research and Analysi ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 0 2 , a n d a t least (lne upper-d ivision Business prefix elective from the li t of F in a n cia l R sour es Managemen t con足

Prerequi ires:

202, CSC

1 20, ECO

1 5 1 , 1 52 , TAT 23 1 .

305 Creating and Leading Effective Organizations ( 4 ) 308 Principles of Marketing

(4 )

442 Leadership and Organizational Development (4)

Prerequisite: 05.

309 Managing Value Creating Operations ( 2 ) Pr requisi te : 202, E O l 1 , 1 52, M TH 1 2 8.

445 QuaJity Improvement Strategies ( 4 ) Prere q u i s i te:

310 Information Systems ( 2 ) Prerequisi tes:

202. C C

1 20 .

Prerequis ite:

Pr requisite: 202.

Prer quisi tes: 308, jllJlior st a n d in g .

202.

467 Marketing Researcb ( 4 )

Pre re qu is ite s : 3 0 8 , C S E 1 20, S TAT 2 3 1 .

322 Intermediate Accounting n ( 2 )

Prerequisit : 32 1 .

468 Marketing Management ( 4 )

Prerequisites: 3 0 8 a n d o n e u p per-division marketing class.

323 Cost Accounting and Control Systems ( 4 )

203.

327 Tax Accoonting I ( 2 )

478 Information Management Seminar ( 4 ) P re re quis i t es : 3 1 0, 3 7 5 .

335 Financial Investments ( 4 )

485 Study Abroad ( 1 - 3 2 )

Prerequi 'ite:

Prerequisite:

302.

junior standing.

342 Managing Human Resources ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 0 I .

486 Study Abroad ( 1 - 3 2 )

343 Managing Reward System ( 4 )

488 Special Topics ( 1 -4 )

P re re qu is i te :

P rere q ui s it e : 30 I .

jll n i(lr standin g.

489 Special Topics ( 1 -4 )

352 Global Management ( 4 ) P re requ i s i te: E N 33 1 .

491 Independent Studies ( 1 - 4 )

355 Managing Global Operations (4)

495 Internship ( 1 -4)

Prerequisite:

Prerequisites: junior standing a n d instructor app roval.

352.

358 Entrepreneurship

(4)

30 1 .

460 International Marketing (4)

321 lntennediate Accounting 1 (2 )

Prer q u i s i te:

305.

449 Current Issues in Human Resource Management

320 Accounting I nformation Systems ( 4 )

Prer quisites:

centration courses.

Pass/fail.

(4)

499 Capstone: Strategic Management - SR (4)

363 C o n umer Behavior and Promotional Strategy ( 4 )

Prerequisites:

365 Sales and Sale M anagement ( 4 )

503 Understanding and Managing Financial Resources ( 4 )

369 Internet Marketing ( 4 )

504

P r requisite:

505 Managing Effective Organizations ( 4 )

308.

375 Introduction to Information Management (4) 376 Ethical lssues in Information Manageme.nt 377 Data Base AppliatioDS in Business ( 4 ) 378 Electronic Commerce ( 4 )

(2)

302, 305, 308, 309, 3 1 0; enior s ta n d i n g.

Legal and Ethical Environment o f Business ( 4)

5 1 1 Managerial Acco unting ( 2 )

P re re quis i te s : 503, E C N 500. 5 ) 2 Value Creation: Operations and Information Systems (4) Prerequisites: 503, E ON SOO. P

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5 1 3 Marketing and Value Creation ( 2 ) P rl're l u i ' i tes: 5 0 3 , ECON 500.

Chemistry

535 Fin ancial lnvestments ( 4 ) Prerequisi te : 503, ECO 500. '" '" w

Z

253.535.7530 www.dlenl. p lll.edtt

537 Decision Models and Strategies for Financial Managers

(4)

Prerequ i s i tes:

503, , CO

Ch e m is try seeks toerstand the fu nua mental n a t u re of matt er, as

well as h ow its om po i t ion and e nergy content change.

500.

thi ' knowledge influcn

540 Effective Negotiadons (4) Prerequ isite: 505. Prerequisite: 505. 54.2 Man agement of Change ( 2 )

P re re q u i i te: 505.

(2)

P re req u isi te: 505. 54.9 Contemporary Human Resource Management ( 2 ) P r req u isite: 505. 553 Transnational Management ( 2 ) P re requ is i te : 50S. 555 Knowledge Management (-I ) Prereq u i s i te : 505. 558 New Venture Management (4) Prereq u isite; -03 . 564 Managing Services Marketing (4) Prerequ isites: 5 0 3 , F .O 500.

F a c ul ty research projects i n volve underg raduate pa r t i c i p a t i o n .

566 Developing New Products and Services

(4)

h air; Co t to n , M a rd is, Swa nk, To nn, Waldow.

FACULTY: Fryhle,

5 J 2.

Prere quisite :

St u de nt decid i n g to major in c h e m i s tr y should officially declare

574 Advanced Serrice and Manufacturing Delivery Systems ( 2) Prerequisites: 507, 5 1 2.

their intent a s ' oo n

as possi ble and

n o t later than 'l fter h av i n g

co mp leted Chemistry 232 and a fter co n s u l t at i o n with a faculty advi or in the

b c m ist r y department. Tra ns fe r lude nts desiring

d ep a r t m e nta l advisor no

575 Electronic Commerce (4) Prerequisites: ECON 500, 520.

to major in c h e m istry s h o u l d consu l t

577 Project Management (2) P rereq u i s i te: 505 .

i m p o rta nt tools and s t ro ngl y reco mmend' that a student

579 Technology Commercializ.ation and fiansfer ( 2 ) PrereqLl i si tes : 505 a n d ECON 500, 520.

c o u rse i n co mp uter science.

a

l a t er than the beginning o f thei r ju nior year. The c h e m is t r y dep a r t m nt

onsiders compukrs to be

pl a n n i ng to major in chem i s t r y take at least one 2 -cred i t h o u r

BACRELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry [ 20 o r [ 2 5 , 232, 234,

332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 499. Requi red supporting courses:

580 Technology Strategy and Competitiveness ( 4 ) P rerequisites : 504, 5 0 5 , 5 [ [ , 5 1 2, 5 [ 3 ; E ' ON 00, 520.

Math [ 5 [ , [ 5 2; Physics [ 53, [ 54, [ 6 3, [ 64.

587 Special Topics (2-4)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCB MAJOR ( t hree al t er nati ve s ) : l.

588 Special Topics ( 2 - 4 )

ene ral - Iead s to American Chemical

ociery ce rtifica tion;

Cht' m i stry

[ 20 or 1 25; 232, 2 3 4 , 332, 3 34, 3 3 8 , 3 4 [ , 342, 343, 344, 405 o r 450 or 456, 4 [ 0, 435, 499; Malh J 5 [ , [ 52; Physics 1 53, 1 54 , 1 63 , [ 64. For American h e m ical Society ce r t ifica ­ t i o n , 450 , nd ei t he r 405, 440, or 456 are r e quire d . 2. Bio clwmistry emphasi.l: hemistry 1 20 o r 1 25 ; 2 2 , 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 [ , _ 4 3 , 403, 405, 4 J O, 435, 499; B iology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323; 4 ho urs 'elected from B iol og y 328, 3 3 2 , 3 4 8 , 36 4 , 4 0 7 , 44 [ , 448 or C h emis t r y 342; M a t h l S I , [ 52; Physi 1 5 3 , [ 54, 1 63, [ 64. 3. Chemical-physics emphasis: Chemistr [ 20 or [ 25; 232, 234, 332, 334, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344, 4 9; Ma t h [ 5 1 , [ 52, 2 5 3 ; Physics 1 53 , [ 54, 1 63, 1 64 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2 , 33 , 3 56.

590 Strategic Management i n a Global Context (4) Prere qu i sites : 500, 504, 505, 5 [ 1 , 5 J 2, 5 [ 3 . 59 1 Independent Studies ( J - 4 ) Req ui res pr i o r approval by M B A p rogr a m d i rector a n d consent of i ns t ructor.

595 lnternshlp ( [ -4) Req u i res prior approval by MBA p ro g ra m d i rector and consent of i nst ruc tor. Pass!ra i l .

Generalized Chemistry Curriculum for t h e BS Degree SPRING

FAll

First-year (1) hcmistry 1 20 o r

1 25

Math 1 52

I n quir y Sem i n a r o r

Physi

Core course PE 1 00 or

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Chemistry

Math 1 5 [ Wri t i ng Sem inar

44

se o f

our l i ves i n many p ro fo u n d ways.

Whether i n terested i n the che m ica l pro� ssion itself, i n clu d i n g bioch e m istry, polymer chemi, t ry, radiation ch m i s t ry, 3nd o t her special i t ies, or in ch em i s t ry in conjunctio n with other fields such as business, the soc ia l sciences, and the h u m a n i t ies, s t udents w i l l have s u ita bl e programs ava i lable to m e e t t h e i r in terests at PL . D iversity i n career p l a n n ing is a key concept in the c he m i try department. Progra ms are ava ilable \ h i ch are broadly a pp lic a b l e to t h e heal th, biol ogical, phys i cal , ("I!vironmenlal b h a v io r a l , ami fu ndame ntal chemical s iences. The ch em i s t ry depa r t men t's coms 5 , cu r r ic u l u m , fac u l ty, a n d facil i t i es a re app roved b y t h e American Chemical Society, The. depa r t men t uses n u n1' roas scientific inst ru ments in the labonHories. Rese a rc h and te ach i ng equipment incl ude: 300 Mrl7 Fo ur i e r t r a nsform nuclea r magnetic reso nance, Fou rier t r a n s form inf.rar d, ultraviolet, visible, enl ission, and electron spin re� o n a nce spect ro meters; gas an d liquid chromatographs; gas chromatography! ma 'pec t romet ry; electrophoresis; prec i ­ sion refra lometer; dipol o mete r; sh rt path dist i l lation appara­ tus; sci n t il lation co un ter; zo ne refiner: fluorometer; C - H - N a na lyzer; I C P-AE$; an d t w o SC[ w o r k t a t i o ns.

54.1 Managing Innovation and Technology Change (4)

545 Continuou Improvement Strategies

es

activity

5

232, 2 3 4

1 5 3, 1 6 3 ( 2)

Inqu i ry Seminar or

Writing Seminar P E 1 00 or activity


105 Chemistry of Life - NS, SM ( 4 )

Sophomure

Ch e m i s t r y 332, 334 ( r . 3 6 ) Ph ys i c s 1 54 , 1 64 ( 2 )

C hem i st r y 3 3 8

S tudents w h o have n o t c o m p l eted hl�h s bool c.h e m i s t ry re ce n t l y

Bi logy

Biology 1 6 1 ( 2 )

s h o u ld take 1 0 4 beiore taking 1 05 .

Core courses

162(2)

Corc o u rse.,

Junior

Chemistry 34 1 ,

Core course

120 Gene.raJ Chemistry - NS, S M ( 4 ) of high school chemistry is requ i red. S t u d e n t s w i t h n o

O n e year

343

Chcmistry 342, 344

h e m i s t ry 4 1 0

Sellior h c m i s t r y 499

Elect ives

hemistr 499 h em i s t ry 4J5

Elecr ives I . Re fe r to the Divisioll vi Nal l l w i Sciell ces ,c c l i oll of t h i s catJlog fo r other b e gi n n i n g c u r ri c ul u m o p ti o ns . 2. T hE' d e p a r t m t'n t stres. the i m p (l I"tance of t,ll, i n g p h ysics d u r i ng e i t h e r the first ye,u or t he sop h o m o re year. T h i s p e r m i t s a b e l t r u ndersta ndinu o f c h e m i s t r y a n d enables a student to complete deg ree re q u i re m e n t s w i t h no s ch ed u l i n g d i fficult ies in t h e j u n i o r and s e n io r years. t u d e n t s i n t e rested i n th Ba c h el o r o f Science with bio hemistry e m p h a s i s sho u l d plan to rake b io l o gy in the al te rn ate y ar. 3. S t u d e n ts desirin ' to fu l fJl lhe College of rts a n d Sciences foreign I, nguage req ui rem nt under p t i o n I, o r who desire to attai n o r m a i nta i n a l anguage proficie ncy, should take a l a n gu a g<, ou rse as p a r t of t hei r oplional selections.

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recog ni tion 0 outsta n d i ng work the desi ·' nation willi Departmental HOI/()r; may be granted to Bachelor f S ience g r a d u a tes by vote of thl' facu t l y of t he chemistr dep a r t men t, based on the studen t's p er fo r m a n c e i n t h ese areas; I . COll rs/! work: he gf<lde p o i n l average in che m is t ry ou rses must be at least 3 . 50. 2. Written work: From the time a , l udent dedo res a majo[ i n c h e m i s t ry, copies o f o u tst a n d i n g work (e.g., l aborator y, sem i na r, and research re p o r ts ) w i l l be ke p t fo r later s u m m a ry eval ua t io n . 3. ral commrmica t l(}ll: ·tud n t s mu l evide.nce a b i l i l y t o co m m u n icate effectivel, as i nd icated b)· L. he SLI m of the.ir pa rtici p a t i o n in class di. cussi o n , sem i nars, help session leadership, and teaching assistantsb i p wo rk . 4. htrlepelldetll chemistry-related activities: Po si tive 'onsider­ atiollS i n cl ude th elCtenl nd qua l i ty of extrac u r r icular w rk done i n background readi ng, i ndependen t s t u dy, and research;

ass i s t i ng in laboratory p reparatio n , t each i ng , or advising; a n y other chemist ry-related e m p loym en t , on cam p U 5 or elsewhere; and particip a t i o n in campll� and p ro fessi o na l c h e m i s tr y­ rdated organ i1Cations. The depar t ment I honors design ation will appear on a graduat­

h igh school c h mistry o r

a

we ak mathemal ical backgro u n d

hould take .hemistry [04 before t hi cou rse. M AT H [ 40

or

m:1th pIa em en t in

125 Advanced General Chemistry - NS. SM ( 4 ) A n o u tstanding record i n a one year h igh school c hem ist r y c o u rse

or advanced high school che m istry is req u i re d .

.oreq ubi tc: M ATH 1 5 1 .

2 1 0 Nutrition, Drugs, and the Individual - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prercq ui.si leS: o n e y a r o f h igh school ch e m i s t ry o r equivalent recom mended.

(4) 234.

232 O rganic Chemistry - NS, SM Pre requ is ite; 1 20 o r 1 2 5 .

oreq uisit :

234 Organic Chemjstry Laboratory I - NS, SM ( I ) Coretl u is i te : 2 3 2 .

332 Organic Chemistry 1 1 - NS, SM Prerequ isites: 2 3 _ , 234.

(4)

Co req uis ite: 334 or 3 3 6 .

334 Organic: Chemistry Laboratory n - NS, S M ( I ) Prereq u i s i t e : 234. Con:quisite: 332.

336 Organic Spedal Projects Laboratory - NS, SM ( I ) Corequi i t e : 332.

338 Analytical Chemistry - NS, SM (4) Prerequ i s i tes : 1 20 or 1 25; J IA'1"1 I 1 40. 34 1 Physical Chemistry - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prereq u i s i te : .HEM 1 20 or 1 2 5, MATH 1 5 2, PHYS 1 54 . 342 Physical Chemistry - NS, SM PrerC'lu i s i te': CHEM

(4)

1 20 o r 1 2 , 1ATH 1 52 , PHYS 1 54 .

343 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory - N S , S M ( 1 ) P re req u i s ite or corequ is ite: 34 1 .

344 Physical Chemistry n Laboratory - NS, SM ( 1 ) Prereq uisite o r core q u i s i l.e: 3 4 2 .

403 B iochemistry I - N S , SM (4) P re requ i s i t e s : 3 3 2 , 3 3 4 .

405 Biochemi t ry n - NS, SM ( 3 ) P rerequ is ites: 34 1 and/or 342 o [ permissi o n ; 403. 4 10 Introduction t o Research - NS (2) Stude n t alt nd s m i n c1 rs as p a r t. of t h e course req u i re me n t . 435 Instrumental Analysis - NS. SM ( 4)

i ng chem i s t ry major's t r a n sc r i p t .

Prerequisi te ; 3 3 8 ; 34 1 and/or 342; 343 .

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: S t u d e n t s i nt re t ·d in this degree devel o p their c h em i s t r y progr;ut1. through the department in conj u n ction w i t h the chool of Educat ion. See Schoul ofEd,./wliol1 section.

440 Advanced Organic Chemistry - NS ( 2 )

CHEMICAl ENGINEERING: S t u d e n t s i n t e rested i n p u r s u i ng studies in chemical e n g i ne e r i n g shou l d sec the course o u tl i n e i n t h e Er lgillee r illg Science t ion of t h i s c,llalog. The d epart m e n t chair sh o u ld be consulted for assignment of a prog r a m a d v i s o r. MINOR: 22 semester h o u r s , i n c l u d i n g 1 20 or 1 25 ; 2 3 2 , 234, 3 3 2 , 3 3 4 or 3 3 6 ; 3 3 8 , an d 4 h o urs o f add i L i o m l 3 0 0 - o r 400-level c hem istry course ( s ) co m p l e ted w i t h gra d e s o f C o r h igher.

orequisi te:

co u rse h i gh e r than 1 40.

a

Prerequ i s ite: 3 32 .

450 Inorganic ClLemistry - NS. SM (3 ) Prerequisite:: 332. 34 1 ; Prerequisite or co n:qu i sit e :

342.

456 Polyme.rs and Biopolymers - NS, SM ( 3 ) Pre requ i s i te: 31 1 ; Prerequisite o r cmequisite: 342.

491 Independent Studies ( 1 , 2 ,

or

4)

Proposed p r o j ect Ill u s t be approved by department chair and su per v i s o ry respo n s i b i l i t y

accepted by an i ns t ructur. M a y be

t aken m o rc t h a n once.

Prerequisite and corequisite requirements are strictly Imforced.

497 Research ( l , 2 0 r 4) May be taken more t. h a ll o n c e .

Course Offerings

499 Capstone: Semjnar - SR ( 2 ) St udents attend s em i n a r s a s part o f t h e course requ i re m e n t .

For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog olllillt' at www.pJu.edu/ prin t/cataJog.

598 Non-thesis Research Project ( 2-4 ) Open to master's d e g ree candidates only. Prerequisite: consent of

104 Environmental Chemistry - NS, 8M (4)

de p ar tme n t ch a i r.

Studen t s w i t h o u t high chool chemistry arc encou raged to take

1 04 before taking 1 05 or 1 2 0.

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• These courses may co unt for program credits only when the stude/It's course project is fOCI/sed on Chilla and is approved by the program chair. ,. History 496 may be COUll ted toward program requiremellts ollly when it focuses specifically on China.

Chi nese Studies 2 53.535.76 1 9

www.pl.l.cdu/-csp III W

W III W Z

The Chi nese Studi pro"ram is an interdisciplinary program wh ich is designed to provide students interested in China a broad foundation in Chine e language, culture, and history, and an opp rtunity t o focus on the reljgious-philosophical world vie\ and the economic and business structure of China. The progr m requires that major and minor students complete course w or k in at least three different disciplines: Chinese lan­ guage, history, a n d anthropology, with optional work in political science, the art , religion, business, and other disciplines. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the univ rsity'$ China exchange programs (currently at Sichuan Univerity and Zhongshan Univers ity) and may request that credits earned through these programs be coun ted toward the major or minor. With the approval of the p rogram director, selected Janu­ a ry-te r m , ummer, and experimental courses may be included in the major or minor. FACULTY: A commi ttee of faculty administers this program: Youtz, "air; Ba rnowe, Benso n , Byrnes, Dwyer-Shick, Guldin, I ngra m, Jensen, Li, M a n fr e d i , McGinn is, Yie. Mr. Sidney Rittenberg erves a honorary advisor. BACHELOR O F ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours ( 2 4 required,

8 elective); studen t s

mu

t take at least one Chinese history

co u rs ' .

Required

CUll r5es: (24 semester hUllrs)

Anth ropol ogy 343 East Asian Cultures - C, 5 1 .hinese 2 0 I Intermediate Chinese Chinese 202 Intermedjate Chinese Hi tory 339 Rcv l ut io n a r y Chino Rel igi on 233 Religions of China hinese St udies 499 Ca p s to n e: Senior Project - SR Anthropology 345 Contemporary Ch ina - C, S I Busi.ness 3 5 2 Global Management' Chi nese 30 1 Compo ition and Conversation ,hinese 37 1 Chinese Literature in Translation - C, LT Chinese tuJies 2 7 1 Perspectives on Chinese Film - C Ch ines Studies 287 Sel cted Topics in Chinese Studies His t ory 338 Modern Ch.ina - C, S I Hi tory 496 Sen inar: The Th ird World (a/y on China) ... - C, I , SR Music 1 05 The rls of China - AR, C Political Sden e 3 8 1 Comparative Legal Systems - C, S I

(8 required, 1 2 elective)

Required ollrscs: (8 semester hOlln ill Chillese Irmguage) C hi n e s e LO I Elementary Chinese

Ch inese 102 Elementary Chi nese (or o ne equivalent year of un iversity-level Chinese, upon a p p roval of the program chair)

Electives: (12 semester hours from at least two additional departments)

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287 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies: Chinese PhIlosophy (4) 499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR (

1-4)

Classics 2 5 3 . 535.72 1 9

www.plu. edl//-lallg/c1assics. html The Classics Program is a cooperative e ffort among the Depart­ ments of Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy, Religion, and Art. I ts goal is to unite the "heart of the liberal arts" with the mind, through history and philosophy, and rhe soul, through religion, and to embellish this trinity of themes with the visual experience of art. This in terdepartmental Classical Studies major requires the completion of 40 semester hours, induding at least one year of one of the classical languages ( Greek and Latin) and two of the other. The remaining cours s are selected from the list below in consultation with the program coordi nator. The Classical Languages major require a l l 40 semester hours in language study.

Students are expected to become familiar with the reading list for that part of the program (art, literature, history, philosophy, or religion ) in which their interest l ies. The program is designed to be flexible. In consultation with the Classics Committee, a student may elect a course or courses not on the classics course Ii t. Al l core classics courses are taught out of the Department of Languages and Literatures.

Anthropology 345 Contemporary China - C, S I hinese 3 7 1 Chinese Literature i n Translation - C , LT Chin e Stud ies 2 7 1 Perspectives on Chinese Film - C Chi nese Stud ies 287 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies Hi tory 338 Modern China - C, S 1 Hi to ry 339 Revolutionary China - C, S I Mu ie 1 0 5 The Art of China - AR, Religion 2 3 3 Religions of China - C, R3

P

print/catalog.

27 1 Perspectives on Chinese Film - C ( 4 )

Latin 1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary Latin 20 I , 202 Intermediate Greek 1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary Greek 20 1 , 202 I ntermediate Art 1 80 H istory of Western Art I - AR Classics 2 3 1 Masterpieces of European Literature - LT lassies 250 Classical Mythology - LT Classics 3 2 1 Greek Civilization - S l Classics 3 2 2 Roman Civilization - S I atLtral Sciences 204 History of Science - NS Philosophy 3 3 1 Ancien t Philosophy - PH Religion 2 1 1 Religion and Literature of the Old Testament - R I Religion 2 1 2 Religion and Literature o f th Ne\ 11 stament - R I Religion 2 2 1 Ancient Church History - R2 Religion 330 Old Testament Studies - R I Religion 3 3 1 New Testament Studies - R I Independent Study Courses Selected January Term Courses

46

For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog unLine at www. plu.edu/

CLASSICS COMMITTEE: Snee, Coordinator; Arnold, Batten, Jansen, E. Nelson, Oakman.

Electives: (8 se mest er hOIl rs )

MINOR: 20 semester hours

Course Offerings

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I . 'v\ i l l , a t t he t i me n f declara t i o n . hal' d (u l1lU i a t i v grade p o i n t a erage of 2.50 r h igh e r. 2. \Nill have ue e� s fl l L l )' co m p l led t ht! co m m u n i c a t io n core cour e s ( 1 23, 27 1 , 284. 285) wiLh a g ra d po i n t average o f 2."0 o r h igher. Studenh who o mp let 1 2 3 or 27 1 w i l h a grade p o i n t average of 3 . 0 or higher m a y declare p ro is i on a l J y u n t i l successful c l m p l d i o l 1 o f t h e core course ' 1 23 , 2 7 1 . 2 8 4 , 28 5 ) . Prospective m ajo r s w i t h g r adt' po i n t 8VtTagcs fro m 2. 50-2.99 h ve t h e o p t i o n to co m p l e te an a p p l i cation packet and m ay be ad m i r ted as . pac a l low s .

'" o s: s: c: z

COMM UNlCATION CORE COURSES: Com munjca t ion

Communication and Theatre 253. 35 . 776 l lIl1V 1V.plll. CI/I1/-tot h The fa u l t y or t he Department of Co mm u n i ati n and T heat re b c o m m i t te d to d p h i lo ophi(.,l per,pe tive on c mm u n i ca t io n as the pmcl: . . hy vhich � ha red understandings . r e (['rated amon ' audil!nces t h ro ug h tht: ust' uf s ' m bols. I m pl iciT w i t h i n thi� u ll(krst ,U1 d i n � is .lg rement on t he as s u m p t ion t h a t p pit: i t rera t w ith one an other or lhe p u r po 'C of a ch i e v i n g outcomes, an .1 t h a t t h is i n tc ract i ( n i accomplisht·J t h ro u gh a variet y of

media.

We focus our c u rr i c u l u m and education o n four abi lity gTOU ) tlut each . tudent sholl I ma ter. F i rs t i. th abi l i t )' t u th i n k a nd rc"tlC "t criti caily. S tu d e n t � hould b e able t o ob erve. analy-u, p .: rce i w relat ion sh i ps, reaso n , and m a ke i n ference� ab\lu t the i r liv ' and world" Second. s t u de n t s shoul j be able to express t h e mse l ve s effectively using v e r ba l a n d no nveroal techniques. T h i rd , . tudents s h oul d be a Ie to i n te r act with one am t h e r and their e n v i ro n m e n t . Final ly, s t uden t s should develop an ability to value t hemselves, t h ei r enV Iro n me n t , and oil er as d iver . ,lnd important fa cts of o u r s o c i a l l i ws . ith t he It:arning of the e a b i l i t i es comes a responsi h i l i t y to co m mu n i t ), and s o ci a l ser i

�t u(lics. Fil m , P r i n t l B roadcasL Jou rnalism, a n d P u b l i c Relations B ach e lQ r of rL. e m p h a s i s areas a n d the B a c h e l o r of Fine Arts conct:.ntraLiun i n Coml1l u n ication and Cl ci al lu t ice Il1U t campi tt: t he ollowing ore courses: 1 23 I n tro d u tion t< R he to ri c a l Co m m un i c a t i o n 27 1 'Ied ia L i te ra cy 284 C;pt:aking Sem i n a r 2 1) 5 \'\ riting Sem i n a r 4 9 5 I n t e rn sh i p 499 C"pstonc (t he B FA dc:grees usc 4 8 5 as t h e ca p s t on e)

BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAJORS: 40 -44 of the a reas of conce n t ra t i o n :

$

111

stcr ho ur, i n

l . COlll llllllliwl ; 0 1 1 SI I/dies - relt u i red co urses: ulll m u n i c a t i o n Core c o u rses plus:

4 cred i t s fro m : 3 7 8 Broadcast J o u rn a l is m 384 dvanced t'ws Re p o rt i ng 388 dvo a y VV r i t in g or a p p roved research course 4 creuits fro m:

326 81 385 433 435

, roup o ll1ll1 un ication M ed ia Law I n t ro du c t i o n to P u b l i c Relation s

437

Interpersonal Commu n ication

R h et ori al a n d Commu n ication Theory rgan izational Co m n llt n i e<1t i on 436 Per uasi o n on llic l and � o m 1l1 u n icat i o n or a p p roved

440

t he o ry (OULe 4 <-redits from:

.'28 3

rgull1t' n tatiol1

0

dVJllceJ Public. Spea k i ng ud io Produ ction ideo Prl dllction 380 Newspaper Editing. Layout, a n d Desi g n 43R dvanced Pub lic Relation ' 480 I n -de p t h and Invest igat ive Repo r t i n g or approwd a p p l i ca t io n comse

1 5 1 , 1 60. 1 62 , 1 63 . 24 1 , 3 58 . 3 :9 , 363 , 364 , 4 - 8. 'o cou rse MA co u n ls toward the u nivers i t y o re r q u i r m ·nls.

e m p b asis

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: t udents I ho wanl [ 0 d ec la re a major in co m m u n icat io n with an emphasi in 11 1 m , p r i n tl broadc<'l st, public rc lat io n. . or a Bachelor l)f Fine Arts in Soc i a l Justice a n d dvocdcy:

-I :t m » -I ::0 m

any

beg i n n i ng w i t h the prefIX

M I NOR REQUI REMENT: All Bachelor o f rlS e m p h a si s a reas re q u ire the l.'O m p l e t i o n of ei her " m i n r ppr ved by he major advi s r or a S 'If-direct d m i nor i n c l u d i ng th fo l l o w i n g areas: 3 or 4 seme ter hour in e ol1 urn i cs, 4 se m es te r h o u r in . ta t isti.:: or n: ea rc h method�. and 1 2 scme tcr h o u rs in social , (iell es.

o

439 I n terc u l t u ra l .o mmu n i c a t io n

FACUlTY: I nch, �"air; Bartanen, lkcvar, Clap p, L b renhu lis, Fel ler, H<lrnc , La nd , L i 0 ky, I 1 ielLke, Ro wt' , picer.

COMMUNICATION CORE COURSES: Ail 13 a c h el o r of Arts 1 , [ea: (Commu n i cation t ud i e ' , Pr i n t/B roa dcast Jou rnali 111 , F i l m, anJ Puhlic Rt'l at i o n :lnd Bachelor or Fine r t s (Co m m u nication ilnd 'odal Justice) must complete the fo llowi ng I' ,'ourse ': 1 23 , 2 7 1 , 284, 2R5; 3 34, 390. 39 1 , 92, 393, lr 43 ; 495, 49

» z

4 cred i t s u f " Va l u i ng" from : 3 3 4 Gender m m u n icatio n 390 o m m u n i ca t i o n Ethics 39 1 IfTlfTl un i c a t ion Ab ro ad 392 Com mun ication Ab ro a d 393 o m m u llication Abroad

e.

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREM ENTS: Only the fo llowing courses [rom Co mmunication and Theatre m a y be use 10 m et t h e ge neral ul 1 iversi core rc q u i rem nt in the a rt s:

o z

Plus

4 el e c t ive hour,.

2. Film Studies - reql / ired courses:

o m m u nicat ion Core courses pl u s : 374 Video Production 375 Film PI' ldu(tiun TH EA 162 History (,f A m e r i ca n Film T I I F A 460 Film Seminar Plus d ec t ive h o u rs from 00- <l nJ 400-level courses sele ted in c o n s u l ta t i o n wilh advi 'or. 3 . Prillt/Broa dcast jOllrtliliiSIN - reqllired course,:

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... a: �

c( ... :z: � Q Z c( z o

:,;ommunication Core courses plus: 480 In-Depth and Investigative Reporting 4 cr�dits from: 378 Broadcast Journalism 384 Advanced News Reporting Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in

1 6 credits from: 328 Argumentation 334 Gender Communication 433 Communication and Rhetorical Theory 436 Persuasion 439 Intercultural Communication (cannot be double­ dipped with other requirements) 440 Conflict and Communication (cannot be doubledipped with other requirements) 8 credits from two of the following categories: Speech and Debate, Service learning, Study Abroad, Foreign Language. Minor in one of the following areas: anthropology, environmen­ tal studies, global studies, legal studies, political science, psychology, social work, sociology, women's studies, or a self­ directed minor consisting of 3 or 4 hours in economics, 4 hours

consultation with advisor. 4. Public Relations - req uired courses:

Communication Core courses plus: 385 Introduction to Public Relations 435 Organizational Communication 4 credits from: 378 Broadcast Journalism 384 Advanced News Reporting Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

in research methods or statistics, and 12 hours in social science. 2. Thea tre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - req uired courses: 1 5 1 Stage Technology 160 Introduction to Theatre 24 1 Oral Interpretation of Literature 250 Fundamentals of Acting 352 Stage Management 357 Intermediate Acting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre II 454 Play Direction Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

5, Theatre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - req uired courses:

1 5 1 Stage Technology 160 Introduction to Theatre 225 Theatre Practicum 250 Fundamentals of Acting 352 Stage Management 357 Intermediate Acting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre I I 4 2 5 Theatre Practicum Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

3. Theatre - Design/Tech nical Emphasis - req uired courses: 1 5 1 Stage Technology 225 Theatre Practicum 352 Stage Management 356 Stage Lighting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre U 425 Theatre Practicum 4 credits from: 250 Fundamentals of Acting 454 Play Direction 4 credits from: 452 Scenic Design 453 Costume Design Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in

6. Theatre - Design/Techn ical Emphasis - requ ired courses:

1 5 1 Stage Technology 160 Introduction to Theatre 225 Theatre Practicum 352 Stage Management 356 Stage Lighting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre " 4 credits from: 250 Fundamentals of Acting 454 Play Direction 4 credits from: 452 Scenic Design 453 Costume Design Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

48

consultation with advisor.

In addition to requirements listed above, candidates for the BA degree must meet the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement.

All candidates for the BFA degree must satisfactorily complete a formal internship of 1-8 semester hours under the supervision of a faculty member.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: At least 54 semester hours

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

in any of the three areas of concentration:

See School of Educa tion.

1. Communication - Com m u n ication and Social Activism ­

MINORS:

req uired cou rses:

I.

Communication Core Courses plus: 4 credits from: 330 Public Speaking 425 Forensics Practicum 4 credits from: 384 Advanced News Reporting 388 Advocacy Writing 433 Rhetorical and Communication Theory 425 Journalism Practicum or approved research and writing course 4 credits from: 326 Group Communication 334 Gender Communication 440 Conflict and Communication or approved interaction skills course

271, 284, 285, plus 1 2 hours from 300- or 400-level communi­ cation courses selected in consultation with advisor. 2. Film: 20 semester hours, including Communication 27 1 , 374 or approved production course, Theatre 1 62 and 460, and 4 credit hours of upper-division electives from either Commu­ nication or Theatre.

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Minor in Communication: 20 semester hours, including 1 2 3,

3. Theatre: 20 semester hours, including 1 5 1 , 160, 24 1 , 250, plus 4 hours from communication and theatre course selected in consultation with advisor. 4. The Dance Minor is crosslisted with the School of Physical Education. See the description of that minor under Physical Education.

5. The Publishing and Printing A rts Minor is crosslisted with the Department of English. See the description of that minor under Publishing and Printing Arts.

Y


Course Offerings: Communication For course descnptions, visit the PLU ca talog olliine at www.plu.edu!

print! catalog.

Prerequisite: 374. 480 I n-Depth and Investigative Reporting - SR (4)

Prerequisites: 380, 378 or 384.

1 23 Introduction to Rhetorical Conmllmil;ation (4) 225 Communication Practicum ( 1 )

An instructor in the area of i n terest must approve the p roject and agree to provide guidance. 234

475 Advanced Media Production ( 4 )

Introduction to Research In Communication ( 2 )

27 1 Media Literacy ( 4 ) 284 Communication a s Proc�ss: Speaking Seminar ( 2 )

285 Communication as Process: Writing Semina.r ( 2 ) 321 The Book in Society ( 4 ) 322 PubUshing Proudures ( 4 ) 324 Nonverbal Communication ( 2 )

Prerequisite: Comm unication core o r consent o f instructor. 326 Group Communication ( 4 ) 328 Argumentation ( 4 ) 330 Advanced PubUc Speaking ( 4 ) 334 Gender and Communication - A ( 4 ) 335 Intercultural C-ommunication Workshop ( 2 )

485 Communication and Social Activism - SR

(4)

n

o

491 I ndependent Studies ( 1- 4 ) A student should n o t begin registration for inde p en d ent study until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a

:!: :!:

c: z

departmental sponsor. 4.92 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 )

n

A student should not begin registration fo r independent st udy until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a departmen tal sponsor.

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493 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 ) A student should not begin registration for in d e p ndent study until the specific area fo r i.nvestigation has been approved by Q

> z

departmental sponsor.

c

495 I nternship ( 1-8) 499 Capstone: Communication - sa ( 1 -4 ) 500 Effective Communications ( 2 ) 596 Research in Communication ( 1 -4 )

For graduate students only. 597 Re�arch in Communication ( 1-4)

336 Communicating i n Bus.iness and the Professions ( 4 )

For graduate stl dents o nly.

373 Audio Production ( 4 )

598 Re�arch in Communication ( 1 -4)

Prerequisite: Commun ication core or consent of instructor.

For graduate students o nly.

374 Video Production ( 4 )

Prerequisite:

ommunication core or consent of instructor.

378 Broadcast Journalism ( 4 )

Prerequisite : Commun ication core o r consent of instructor. 380 NeW5paper Editing, Layout, and Design ( 4 )

P rereq uisite: Communication core or consent of instructor. 38 1 Media Law and Principles (4) 3 84 Advanced News Reporting ( 4 )

Prerequisite: Communication core or consent of instructor. 385 Introduction to Public Relations ( 4 ) Prerequisite: Communication core or consent of instructor. 388 Advocacy Writing ( 4 )

Prerequis ite: Commu nication core or consent of instructor.

Course Offerings: Theatre FaT collrse descriptions, visit the PLU m tillog olllille at \Vww.plu.edu/

print/catalog. 1 5 1 Stage Technology - AR ( 4 ) 160 Introduction to Theatre - Aft ( 4 ) 1 6 2 History of American Film - Aft

(4)

163 History of the Foreign Film - A R ( 4 ) 225 Theatre Practi.cum

One semester hour credit may be earned each semester, but o n ly 4 semester hours may be used to meet un iversity requirem nt . An instructor in the area of i nterest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance.

390 Ethics in Communication (4)

241 Oral I nterpretation of Literature - Aft (4)

39 1 Communication Abroad: Studies in Culture ( 1-4)

250 Fundamentals of Acting - AR ( 4 )

392 Communication Abroad: Studies In Culture ( 1-4)

35 1 Stage Makeup - AR (4)

393 Communication Abroad: Studies in Culture ( 1-4)

3 5 2 Stage Management

425 Communication Practicum ( 1 ) An instructor in the area of interest must approve the p roject

3 56 Stage Ligbting - AR ( 4 )

and agree to provide guidance.

- AR

(4)

357 Intermediate Acting, The Actor At Work - Aft ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 250.

433 Rhetorical and C-o mmunication Theory (4)

358 Advanced Acting - AR ( 4 )

435 Organizational Communication (4)

Prerequisite: 3 5 7 .

436 Persuasion

(4)

437 Advanced Interpersonal Communication ( 4 ) 438 Advanced Public Relations ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 3 8 5 o r consent of instructor. 439 Intercultural Communication ( 4 )

Prerequ isite: Communication core o r consent o f instructor.

359 Actiog for the Non-Actor - AR ( 4 )

Not open t o theatre majors or minors. 363 History of the Tbeatre: Aeschylus Through Turgeniev

- AR ( 4 ) 364 History of the Theatre: Ibsen Through t o the Preseot - AR ( 4 )

440 Conflict and Communication (4)

Prerequisite:

ommun ication core or consent of instructor.

450 Wowhop in Effective Public Speaking (2) P

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(I) One seme t e r hour credit mal' be e a rn ed ea ch semester, but on l y 425 Theatre Practicum

<1 s meste r 11(,)u� may be u s e d t o meet u n i ver s i t y requirement,;. An instn. lcto r i n the area of in terest must approve the proj e c t and agree to p rovide gu id a nc e . w 0: r­ « w :r rQ z «

Comp uter

452 Scenk Design - AR ( 4 ) 453 Costume Design - AR

(4)

458 Creative Dramatics - AR

E spe cial ly a p p rop ri a t e fo r busin ess majors and other students wish i n g an in troduction to the com p uler and applications of software packages. Computer Science and COlllpu ter EIIgineering 1 '14:

(4)

460 FUm Seminar: Approaches to Film Theory - AR

I n t rod u c t ion to

neering, m at h em a t i cs, and most sci ence m aj ors , as well as others wishing a strong experience. in co m pu te r p rogra m m i ng.

( 1 -4)

z o

491 Independellt Studies

r­ « u

492 Independent Studies ( 1 --4)

CO lllpliter Scie/lce ami Co mputer Ellgineerillg 270:

'istration a p p r o v ed by a de p a r t m e ntal sponsor.

Da t(l Structll res

This is t h e second course in the major. With d epa r t me ntal

R q u i res p re- reg istration approved by a departmental sponsor.

a p p ro val , students with a t rong p ro g r a m m i n g ba c kg rou n d may receive a d va n c e d placement i nto this co urse.

493 lodependent Studies ( 1 -4 ) Req u i re!

pre-r gist ra ti o n approved by a d ep a r tm e nt al sp on sor.

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT: All s t u de n ts have u n l i mited access to the un iversity Computer Center's u er-room faci l ities. The Dep a rt m e n t of o m puter Seienc a n d ,oll1p uter En g in ee.ring also m a i n t a i ns a S laris server a n d 1 b o ratories of its own. The upper-level lab c o n t a i n s L i n u x , dnd 'vVi ndow. workstation:;. The other lab is used as a te a chin g laboratory a n d op n lab; i t has 1 8 Windows T wor . tations and co m p u ter p roject i o n eq ui p men t. All machines are on the E t h ernet, are accessible through the campus network, and have ful l a c c es s to the I n ternet.

( 1-4)

For gr ad u ate st uden ts on ly. 597 Research in Theatre ( 1-4) F o r graduate st u d en t s on ly.

( 1 -4) t ud e n ts on ly.

598 Research in Theatre

POI' grad u ,

te

253.535.7400 s.plu. edll

Computer Science �() mputer sc ience dea ls with the th eory, d e sign, and a pp l ication of computing systems a n d the s t u d y of the s to r i n g a n d m a n ip u­ lation o[ inform a t i o n . The p ro gram at Pacific Lutheran Un iver­ sity pr vides a broad base core of fu n damental m a terial t ha t st ress es analysi;; and des ign expe ri e n ce s w i t h substan tial labora­ tory work, inc l ud i n g software development. In addition, stu d en t s are expo ed to a variet y of pr ogr a m m ing la nguages and sys t e m s . St u den t can choose from a number of upp er-level courses wh ich i n s u re a depth of knowledge and an understanding of cu rrent d eve l p ments ill the fie l d . T h e Ba chel o r of S c i e n ce degree i n co m p ut e r cience has b ee n ac ft'd i t e d by the o m p u t i n g Accredita t i o n C o mm iss i o n o f

AB ET. Computer Engineering Comp u ter n gi n e e r i ng is a rel ative l y new e n g i n eeri ng s p ec i alt y lh, t has grown o u t 0 rapidly evoking m icro- and m i n i-com ­

pu ter tech nology. The c u rr i c ul um co nsi sts of essential a n d adDIKed e l e m en t s fro m co m pu te r science and elect rical e n gineer­ I ng, de vel o pi ng both ha rd wa re and oftware ex p e r t i s e . Elec t ive s pe r m it con entration i n are-'\!> s uch as i n t eg ra t ed circu i t design, m icroprocessor appl icat ions, com puter des i g n , a pp li ca tio n soft­ ware deve lopment, and artificial i n te l l igence. Blaha, Chair; Brink, Hauser, Kakar, Murp hy, pillman, Wo l ff.

FACULTY:

BEGINNl N G CLASSES: There a r e several beg i n n i n g-level classes

in co mp uter science desig n ed for students with various

needs: ompllter Science a n d Compllter Engineering 1 1 5:

Solve if with the CO lllpllter

50

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S tudents majo r i n g i n com­ p u ter science may ch oos e to earn either a Bachelor o f Arts d e g ree or a Bachelor of Sc i e n ce degree. The Bachelor of Arts p rog ram is the m i n i m u m p reparation suitable for further profess i on a l s tudy a n d is often combi.ned with extens iv{� s t udy or a second maj o r i n an a l lied field. The Bachelor of Science is a stron g , scien t ific deg re e that co n tains add itional c ou rs · s in co mputer science, math emat ics, a n d science a n d serves b o t h s t ud e n ts go i ng d irectly i n to em ployment o n graduation and those going into gr a du a t e pro g r am s. Both degrees are based on t h e same core courses: Co m p u t e r Science and :om p u te r Engineering 1 44, 270, 34), 380, 499, Mathematic 1 5 [ , 1 52, a n d 245. Students should begi n Com­ p u t er Science and o m puter Engineering 1 4 4 , 270 a n d Math­ ematics 1 5 1 , 1 52 e a r ly i n their progra m . A m i n i m u m g r ade of C - is required in a l l c o u rses ( i ncluding su p p o r ting courses) co unted fo r the major. COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS:

computer Science a nd Computer Engi neering lVWIV.

omp u ter Science

For stu d ent s majoring in co m pute r s c i e n ce, co m p uter engi­

(4)

Pre requ isite: 1 62 or i n s t Tllctor's p erm is si o n .

596 Research in Theatre

cience and Co mputer Ellg ill€crillg 1 20:

Compllterized Information Sys rems

454 Play Direction - AR (4) Prerequi ' i les: 1 5 1 , 250, and j un i o r status.

Requ i re' pre-re

E s p ec ia l l y fo r students with little or no b a c k gro u n d in co m­ who wi. h an i n t ro d u cti o n to the lise of the co m p u ter fo r p ro b l e m so lv i n g . ot r e c o m me n d ed fo r s t ude n ts with strong mathematics ba kg ro ll n ds. Thi course also sat i sfies the Mathe m a t i cal Reason i n g re qui re m e n t . p u te r science

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BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

t le a s L 26 se mester ho u r s of

com p u ter ci e n ce and (; n g i n ce r i ng i ncl u di ng

1 44 , 270; 346 or 380; and 499. The re ma i n in g hours are from com p u ter science and e n g i neer in g courses numbered above 329 (except 345, 449, and 50 1 -509 ) . U p to 4 hours may be subst i tuted from lath 340, 34 1 , and 356. R e qui red s u p po rti n g : �il a t h [ 5 1 , 1 5 2, and 245. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 44 semester h o u rs in c o m ­ puter seienc plus 30 h o u rs of sup p o r t i n g cou rse in ma t h e m a t ­ ics and science. The 40 sem est er hours of mmputer science must i n cl u de 1 44, 270, 343, 346, 37 1 , 372, 380, 499, and 14 addit iunal credits o f a p p roved e l ec t ive courses, one of w h ich must be from 367, 420, 436, or 444. Elective courses s u b m i t ted for app roval are t o be selected from the com p ut e r scicrlce cou rses nu mb e re d above 329 ( e xce p t 345, 449 and 5 0 1 - 509), o r hours from Ma t h 356 n o t cou n t ed toward the 30 hours of req u i red s upp o rt i n g co u rses. The 30 hours o f su p p o rti n g course in mathemat ics and science m us t i n cl u de: 1. Mat h 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 230 ( o r 33 1 ) , 340 ( o r 34 1 ) . 2. A m i n i m u m of 1 2 hour of npproved scien c o u rses which i n clu d e s a year's sequ en ce of a laborato ry science. P h ys ic s 1 5 3 , 1 54 with 163 , 1 64 are prefe rred. Chemistry 1 2 0 or 1 25 and either 2 3 2 o r 3 3 8 , Bi o l ogy 1 6 1 , 1 6 2, Geosciences 1 0 1 , 1 0 2, o r 1 03; and 20 1 are acceptable.


3. Approved sciences courses arc: any Biology except 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 ; any Chemistry except 1 04, 1 05, 2 1 0; any Geosciences �x.:epl 1 04 ; any Physics except 205 ; Computer Science and Engineering 345. 4. The remaI n i n g hours, if any; may be chosen from any Math­ ematics course n umbered above 329 ( except 446) or any ap­ proved science course.

330 Introduction to Artificial lntclUgence - NS 343 Programming Langnage Concepts - N S (4)

Prerequisite; 270. 345 Analog Electronics - NS ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 245

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: 20 semester hours includ­

346 Digital mectronics - NS ( 4)

ing Com puteT cience and Computer Engineering 1 44, 270, and 8 additional hours of upper-division computer science courses numbered above 329 ( except 345, 449, and 50 1-509 ) . Required suppor ting: Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 28 , or equivalent.

348 Modeling and Simulation - NS ( 4 )

MINOR I N IN FORMATION SCIENCE: 24 semester h ours

367 Database Management - NS ( 4 )

inc luding Computer Science and Com puter Engineering 1 44 and 367, Business 202, at least 4 additional hours from compu ter science courses numbered above 250 ( except 345, 449, and 50 1 509) , a n d at least 8 add i t ional hours selected from Business 320, 3 7 5 , 3 76, 378, or 4 7 8 .

(4)

Prerequisite: 270, MACH 245.

P rereq u isite: 1 44. Prerequisite: 1 44. Recommended: 2 7 0 a n d either MATH 34 1 o r 345. VI n

Prerequisite: 1 4 4 Recommended: 2 70.

'"

3 7 1 Design and Analysis of Algorithms - NS (4)

Prerequisite; 2 70,

MATH

Z

245.

f"I

m

SECONDARY TEACHING MINOR: See description under

372 Algorithms, Machines, a n d Grammars - N S ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 7 1 .

Scl100l of Educa tion.

380 Assembly Language and Computer Organization - NS ( 4 )

ELEMENTARY TEACHING MAJOR: See desc ription under

Prerequisite: 2 7 0 . Strongly reco mmended: 346.

STATE ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS: See description

385 Computer Architecture - NS ( 2 ) Prerequisite: 380, MATH 245.

under

386 Computer Network - NS (4)

School of Educa tioll.

School of Educa tion.

BACHELOR O F SCIENCE MAJO R IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING: Computer Science and Computer Engineering

1 3 1 , 245, 345, 346, 499: Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 253, 340 or 34 1 and one of 230, 3 3 1 , or 3 6; Comp uter Science and Com ­ puter Engineering 1 44 , 270, 380, 480; Physics 1 5 3, 1 54, 1 63 , 1 64 ; Chemistry 1 20 o r 1 25; at least 4 semester h o u rs chosen from Physics 233, 234, 333, 3 34, 336, or Chemistry 34 1 ; 1 0 additional semester h o u rs from arty upper-level Computer Science and Com puter Engineering course ( except 449 dnd 50 1 -509 ) . MINOR I N ELECI'R1CAL ENGINEERING: Computer 'cience

and Computer Engi mering 1 3 1 , 245 , 345, 346: and 144. Required supporting: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 2 5 ; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, and 245 or 253; Physics J 25, ! 26, 1 35 , 1 36 or 1 53, 1 54 , 1 6 3 , 1 64.

Course Offerings

Prerequisite: 1 44 . Reco mmended: 270, 346; MATH 34 1 or 345. 39 1 Problem Solving and Programming Seminar - NS ( I ) Pass/Fail only. Students m'lY take this course more than once.

P rereq uisite: 2 70 or consent o f instructor.

m

400 Topics i n Computet' Science - NS ( 1 -- 4 )

"

Prereq u isi tes: 2 7 0 and M AT H 2 3 0 O r 3 3 1 .

Z m m ;g

420 Software Engineering - NS ( 4 ) Prerequi i tes: 2 7 U , MATH 2 4 5 .

Z G't

4 1 2 Computer Graphics - N S ( 4 )

436 Pattern Recognition - N S (4) Prerequisites: 2 70, M ATI-I 245. 438 'Expert Systems - N S (4)

Prerequisite: 330 or consen t of im.tructor.

print/catalog.

444 Operating Systems - NS ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 380. MATH 245 .

1 1 5 Solve It With the Computer - MR, NS ( 4 )

Prerequisite: fulfill ment of t h e PLU ent rance requirement i n mathematics. 1 20 Computerized Information Systems - NS ( 4 )

P rerequisite: MATH 1 28 or 1 40 or equivalent. 1 3 1 Introduction to Engineering - NS (2) Pre requisite: Completion o f college-preparatory mathematics. 144 Introduction to Computer Science - NS ( 4 )

446 VLSI Design - N S ( 2 )

Prerequ isite : 346. 449 Computer Science in the Secondary School ( 2 )

n o t count toward a major in computer science. Prerequisite: 1 44 .

Does

455 Compilers - N S (2) 1 rerequi ites: 3S0, MAnl 245. 480 Microprocessors - N S (4)

Prerequ isites: 346, 380.

Prerequisite: Four years of h igh school mathematics or MATH 1 40 or equivalent.

491 Independent Studies ( 1 - 4 )

199 Directed Reading ( l or 2 ) Admis ion only by department invitation.

492 Computer Science Research ( 1-4)

245 Electrical Circuits - NS ( 4 ) Prerequisite: MATH 1 5 1 ; PHYS 1 54 or consen t of the inst ructor.

499 Capstone: Seminar - SR ( 2 ) The[e are 2 credits given each term for

270 D ta Structures - NS ( 4 )

Prerequisite: a grade of C- or h igher i n 1 44 . 29 1 Independent Studies - N S ( 1 -4 )

Prerequisite: consent of department chair.

Z

4 1 0 Topics i n Computer Engincering - N S ( 1 - 4 )

For course descriptions, visit the FLU catalog online at www. plu.edu/

A grade of C or higher is strongly recommended in all p rerequiSite courses.

:P Z C

Prerequisite: consent o f department chair. Prerequisite: con ent o f instructor. J total of 4 credi ts. Prerequisite: Senior Computer Science or Computer Engineering major or consent o f depart men t chair.

503 Workshops in Educational Technology ( 1 - 4)

Docs not count toward degree. in computer science.

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11\ Q. J: 11\ Z III: '" IZ

z o I­ <£ u :J Q w w

> I­ <£ III: w Q. o o u

Cooperative Education I nternships

Fo r Wll rse descripliolls, visit tJle PL

253.535.7324

priIlI!catalvg.

Course Offerings

IVWlv.pl I I . er/14 1 - C(lop e d Coopera t ive Educalion is

G

u n i q u e p ro ' ram t hat. o rre r.� h a n d s -o il

job , peri nce. Th rough i n te r ns h i ps students w ave work i n g and le a rn i n g tog�t ha. T h e p ro g r a m feat ure. sys temat ic cooperation between the u n i vers i t and an extensive munber o f employers i n the Pllgt!t

(lund com m u n ity, though

a

student m a y

,tuden15 ga i n an apprecia tion of the re l a t io n s h i p belw en th eo ry and app l ica t io n . and may learn, both early and first hanel, a bo u t new develop ments in a p ar t ic u l a r field. J\ co p ern t i ve

educJ t i o n experie nce enables s l u d en ts to become aware of the c hang ing d i l1l ensiom

f work. It is fa bric of i nves t iga t i e lea fll i ng.

a

376 Work Experience J ( 1- 8 ) Requ i re s the co m p le t i o n of a Cooperat ive ducalion L ea r nin g Agr eme nl in con u l l a t i o n w i t h a fa c ul t y sponsur. 476 Work Experience D

p ar ticipa te in a co- p ex perience a n yw he r' in th' world .

CII l aiog orJiille ar www,plu.edll/

( I- 3 )

Req u i re the comp l e t ion f a Coop erative Edu cation Lea rning Agreement in cons u l t a tion w i th a faculty sponso r.

477 International Work Experience ( 1 - 1 2 ) Requ i res c o m p l et i o n of I he L n terna t i ona l Co o pera t i ve Education Agree men l, comp l et iot1 of , · learJ.nce checkl ist , a nd a n a p p ro ved p l a n of report i n g i ll co n sul tat ion w i t h a facu l t y spon so r. 576 Work Experience ill ( 1-4) Requires c o m p l e t i c1 n , f a Coop rative E d u ca t i o n Agreement i n con u lt a l i o n with .1 fac u l ty sponsor and the s tude nt's g ra d ua te

kcy p ro g r3 m in PLU's

FACULTY: Herbert· H i l l . Di reCior TWO MODELS: The Coopera ti v e E d u c a t i o n Program acco m ­ m o d a t es bo th part- l i me a n d fu ll - t i m e wmk schedules. Part · t i me wo rk allows student to t.1k on-campu co u rses concurrently. A

program adv isor.

ful l -t i me work ex p erien ce requ i res s t u de n t s to dedic ate the ntjr term t o tht!ir co-op � mplt)}'111el l l. In mO$t cases , st uden ts will follow o ne or the () th er, but · n1l' dep a rl m� nt s or schools may develop seq ue n ces that co mbine b o t h full - t i m e a n d part-t i me work options.

THE PROCESS FOR TUDENTS: To be d i g i bl c fo r a' d m i s s i on into the Co ope rative Ed u c a t i o n Program a s t u d e n t mu t have completed 32 semester h O ll r� and b in good standing with the

u n i versity.

lude n l ' whn wish to en ro l l in Cooperative Ed u ca t i o n mllst ire t r o r t h e Co-op P rogram to determ in e' el igib ility, terms fo r pl ace m en t, a reas o f i n t rest, ac ade.m ic r� q uirements, and i nt ern sh i p o p ti o n s . Studen ts a re responsible for co m p le t i n g a learning agreement includi ng learnlll" objc rives, rel a ted a c t i v i t ie , and academi documentation of l ea rn in g d u ri ng t h e i r cooperative ed u ca t i o n exp erien c. Each s t u den l m u s t arra nge fo r acade m i c supervision from a fac u l t y p o n s o r. Fac u lt y a r c IT spo ns ib l e for in urin g t h a t the work experience provi des a pp ropr iate learning 0PP rtuni­ tic , f, r helping to establish the l ea r n i ng agreement, and fo r det r mi n i n g J grade. Lea rn i n g i ' ass essed t h rough a Lear n i n g Agreement, comp l e t ­ i ng a n acade mic p r oj ec t, per iod i canta t w i t h the fa cu l t y spo nsor, and a n on-site s u p e rv i s l' \.... ho acts as a pro� s� i o n a l role model , net m e n t o r. The lea r n i ng agreement, developed by each stud l1t with the dssistance t ) f a faculty s p onsor, L ists lea r n i n g obj ect ives, a descript ion of h o w t h o se objectives will be accom­ pLi b d, and how' s t u d e n t.o; wi l l do c u me n t what they have learned . The learning agree m en t is signed by the s t u d e n t , the fac u l t y poasor, the p rogram d i re c t o r , and the work s u per v i s o r , each of whom rece i C 5 a copy, �oIltact ( pe r o nal , phone, elec t ron ic, etc.) between thc fac u l t y spo nsor and the s tud en t must be s u ftlcient to allow the 'pomor to serve a s a resource and p ro v i d e academic supervis ion . Site vi its may be made by the fa cu l ty SpOIl o r o r the en-op program d i recto r i n agrecment w i t h t h e facul t y sponsor. Employers a re res p o n s i b l e to: ( l ) provide o p portu n i t i� s R r students to a ch i ev e the i r l e a rn i ng objective ' w i t h i n th e l im i ts o f their work elt i ng�; (2) h e l p stud nts develop ski l ls reI ted to the contextual aspects of the work w o r l d (sllch as rela t ionships w i th w - wo rkers ) ; and ( 3 ) fu c i l i t a t stud IIts' i n tegration i n to their work selling so thaI rheir emp loyme n t proves va l u a b l e and proehl l i ve. S t ude n ts are req uired to register fo r at least l cr ed i t hour after ac plin ' , c o - o p posit ion . Th rougho ut all undergraduate a cadell1ic car<!e:l" a student may receive a maximum of J 6 c red i t s i n coo p erative educa tion . c on tact their depa r t ment fa c u l t y or the

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Economics 2 5 3. 5 3 5 . 7598

w w w.p l l4. ec /t /l- ew ll "B)' vir/lie of exchange, one person's property is belleffcia/ to a/I others." -FRFDEIU("" I3AqlAT Econo mics is the st udy of how pc p i e e s ta bl i s h social a r range­

m e nt s for pro d uci n g a nd d i s t ributing goods and ser vices to susta in and enhance h u m a n l i fe. Its ma i n obj ect ive is to de t er­ m i n e .lll fficiellt use of l i m ited eco no m i c resou rces so that p oplc recei ve the 1l1Jximum h.:n tit at the lowest cost. The econom ics d i sc i p l i n e e m b races a body of t ec h n iq u es and co nce p t ua l too ls t ha t ar o u r c o m p lex ecollom i

usefu l for u nders ta nding and ana l yz i n g ystem .

FACULTY: R e i m an , Chuir; R. J e n�e n , N . Peterson, t Cla i r, Terada, Travis. BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: ( A l M i ni m u m of 40 semester h o u rs, i n c l u d i n g 15 J , l52, 3 5 1 , 3 5 2 , 4\19, J 2 h o urs of l'lectives in

eco nomics, 4 hours selected fro m Mathematics 34 l or Sta t i s t ics 23 l , and 4 h ours e l ec ted from Econo m i cs 344 ( i f llul used as economics electives) , Business 202 or 302, Mathematic; 348, o r u p to 4 ho urs i n o m p u t e r sci ence . ( B ) A g rade p o i n t a erage of 2.50 in all c l as s in d u d 'd in the 40 semester hours to\ ard the major. Wi th departmental ap proval, Econ om ics

J 30 may be s ubst i t u te d D r Economics 1 52 for p urpo es of major and minor requirements. Eco no m i c 499 meets the senior sem i n a r/project require m e n t .

For stu de n t s p la. n n i ng grad ua te work in e co n o m i c s or b usi ness , add itio nal mal h preparcltioll will be necessary. For speci.fic ou rSe!, onsult your maj r advisor,


3 44 Econometrics - S 2 (4)

CONCENTRATIONS: T he Economic, Department offers t he fo l l ow i ng concent rations:

Prereq u i s i t e : STAT 2 3 1 01' eq u ivalen t .

Dome!t ic E(QIIl) lllic Allalysis� 1 5 1 , 1 52, 35 1 , 3 5 2, 495, 499: 1 2 homs ch ose n from a mo n g : 32 1 , 322, 36 l , 36 2 . a n d 3 7 1 ; Polit ical Sci ence 345, 346; Stat istics 23 1 or 34 1 ; 4 h o u r s chose n from o m p ute r Science and ,Qm p u te r a m o n g B usi ness 202.

345 Mathematical Topics i n Economics - S 2

Prcreq u i,ites:

1 3 0, 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ,

or

(4)

consc'n t o f i ns t ructor.

3 5 1 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis - S2

or

Engineering 1 1 5 . or Math 348.

Prerequ.isites: 1 3 0 or 1 5 1 ; M ATH 1 28 , 1 40,

International Ecollomic A nalysis:

352 Intermediate Mkroeconomic Analysis - S2

1 5 1 , 1 52 , 5 5 1 , 3 5 2. , 495, 499; 1 2 ho.sen fro m a m o n g : 330, 3 3 1 , 33 5 , 3 38, 339, 34 1 ; Poli t i cal Scim ce 3 3 1 , 347; Stat isti 2 5 I o r 34 1 ; 4 hou rs chosen (rom among B us i ness 202, Co m p uter S c i e n ce a n d Co m pu ter Engi­ n eering 1 1 5, or Math 34u. hours

Ma rilema t ica / Eco numics: 1 5 1 , 1 52, ' 44, 345 , 3 5 1 , 352 , 4( 9;

hours o f l:-co no m ics electi es; Mat h

o r 34 1 .

The Modem

1 5 1,

8

1 52 , 25 3 ; S tat istic s 2 3 1

(4)

m

o c:: n » -I

151.

(4)

Prerequ i s i tes: 1 30, 1 5 2, o r c o ns e n t o f i n s t r. - uctOf; M T H 1 28, 140, or 1 5 1 . 353 Strategic Behavior - S2

o z

(4)

36 1 Money and Banking - S 2 ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 1 5 1 o r c o n e n t

f i n s t ruc tor.

362 PubUc Finance - S2 (4) P re re q u is i te s : i 30, 1 52,

Ecollomic Ellterprrsc: 1 5 I , 1 52 , 3 2 1 , 35 1 , 3 52, 3-3 ,

3 7 1 , 495, 499; 1 2 h o u rs of Bu s i ne s electiv s (200 Ie el () r h ighe r, 20 I reco m m ended ) ; Sta t istics 2 .3 1 or 34 1 . B u s i ness 492 may be s ubs t it u te d for Econom ics 495. HONORS MAJOR:

utsta. n d i n g studenrs may choo�e to p ursue

gra l uattng i n eco nom ics wit h ho nors, [n add i t i o n to mt!cti ng ;Lil ot h e r major req u i re ments, in o rder to bi:' gran ted departmen tal h ono rs a stude n t m u s t : ( ) have a n overal l u n iversity grade p o i nt average of 3 . 5 0 or be t t e r ; ( B } take 4 h o u r beyo nd the s ta n d a rd major in 498, HOIl rs Thesis ( Studen ts a p p l )· fo r a d m i.ss i o n to t h is c o u rse i n the seco nd semeste r of t h e i r junior year. The department gra n .!s a d m ission t () 498 , I l o n ors Thesis, based o n t he studen t's prior work in eco n o m i c s a n d the q u a l i t y of t h e gen era l re earch p roPiJ Sa l ) ; (C) p rcst: n t t h e res u l t s of till' work completed i n 498, Honors Thesis, a t a meet i n g of O m i c r u n Delta Epsilon ( the eco no m i c s ho no rary) . MJNOR: 24 sem e s te r hours. i n c I l l d i og 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 3 5 1

or

352,

a nd

1 2 add i t io n a l hour s of e l e c t i ves , 4 of w h i c h may be in statistics.

ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCI ETY: The de p a rt m e n t o ffers mem bersh i p in O m i c ro n Delta Ep s i lo n , the Inte rn at i o nal

Prerequis ites: co n s e n t o f the d ep a r t m en t a n d co m p l e t ion o f either 3 5 1 or 352. 495 Inte.rruhip - 52 ( 1 - 4 )

Pre re q u i s i tes: s o ph o mo re stan d i ng p l u s o n e co u rse i n eco n o m ics, ;1 n d consent of t h e depa r t m en t ,

498 Honors Thesi - S2 ( 4 )

Research p ro p os al a n d topic developed by t h e student i n the j u n i o r year. Application to en ro l l is m a d e in the second emester o f the j u n i o r year. P r e re q u i s i te: economics major , nd co n s e n t o f t h e de p a rt me ll t . 499 Capstone! Senior Seminar - 5R ( 4 )

P re reqU i s i te : 3 5 1 or 3 5 2 ( may be t a ke n concurre n tly) . (4)

School of Education

Por cOllrse descriptiul ls, visit the PLU catalog onlilJe

at

www. plu.edu/

print/catalog, 1 30 Global and Environmental Economic Principles - S2

S t Lldents ca nnot take bo t h 130 and 1 52 for cred it. 1 5 1 Principles of Macroeconomics - S2

('1)

1 5 2 Principles of M icroeconomics - S 2

(4)

(4)

2 5 3 , 53 5 .7 2 7 2 www,plu. edu/-educ

The School of

Education o ffe rs

u n d e r g r a d u ate and g ra d ua t e

p rograms of s tu d y l ea d i n g to ce r t i fica t i o n fo r elementary, seconda ry, a n d s p ec i a l ed u cat. ion teac h e rs,

administrator ,

rea d i n g spec.i al ists, a n d school lib rarians. The c u r r i cu l u m is d esi g n e d to p ro v i de g radua tes with a blend of t he

St udents c a n n o t take b o t h 1 3 0 a n d 1 S 2 for c redit.

and

a

l iberal arts

va r i ety of gu ided field experiences begi n n i n g early i n

the e ducat i on a l seq uence. T he fac l l l t ' i s c o m m i t ted t o t h e

321 Labor Economics - S2 ( 4 )

d e v e l o pmen t o f c a r i n g , c o m petent e d u c a t i o n a l leaders

Prereq uisi tes: 1 30, 1 5 2, o r c o n sent o f i nstru etuL

commi tted to l ive (Jf s e r vi ce . A co n s i s t en t em phasis o f a l l p rograms is t h e p r o m ot i o n o f s t ud e n t l e a rn i n g i n K · 1 2

322 Health Economics - S2 ( 4 ) 330 Environmental o.nd Natural Resource Economics - S2

o r c o nse n t o f inst ructor.

Prerequisites: 1 50 , 1 5 2 , or cunsen t o f i nst ructor.

338 Environmental EI:onomic PoUcy in Europe - S2

(4)

339 PoHtiod Economy of Hong Kong and China - S 2 ( 4 ) 34 1 Economlc Development: Comparative Third World

(4)

Prerequisites: 1 3 0 o r 1 5 1 , o r conse n t o f i n structor. 343 Operations Research - M R ( 2 ) Prerequ isi te: TAT 23 l o r equiva l e n t .

(4)

i nstitutions.

FACUIn: Beck, Deall; Lei tz, Associate Dean; L a m o rea ux , Director ofMA with "er ti(ica tiorl Program; Ba r r i t t , Byrne , Chasta i n , Gerl a c h , I-T i l l is, Lewis, McG raw, M i n e t t i , Mulder, Reisberg, G. Wi l l ia m s , Ye rian, Ye tter.

(4)

335 European Economil: I ntegration - 52 ( 4 )

Strategies - C, S2

P rerequ i s i te: 3 5 1 or 3 5 2 ( m ay b e taken concurren t l y ) . 49 1 l ndependent Studies ( 1 -4)

of Ee/lAmt iou.

Course Offe rings

33 1 International Economics - S2

486 E.volution of Economic Thought - SR ( 4 )

520 Economic PoUcy Analysis ( 4 )

mt'mber.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: Sec SciIool

Prerequ,isites: 1 30, 1 52,

371 Industrial Organization Il11d Public Policy - S2 (4)

Prerequ isites: 1 30, 1 52 , o r conse n t o f i n 'tTuc tor,

500 Applied Statistical Analysis

Eco n o m ics Hl)norary Socie ty, to qualified m aj o r s . f o r speci fi c c r i t<:: r i a , se� any dep a rt me n t a l fa c u lry

o r co n s en t o f i nst ructor.

PROGRAMS OFFERED: The S ch o o l o f

Educatio-n is National ,ouncil fo r Accred itation o f Tea c h e r Education ( NeATE), t h e o rthwest Asso c i a t i o n of S c h ou l s a n d Colle ges, and. the Washi n g t o n State Bo a rd o f E d ucat i o n fo r t h e preparat i o n of e l e m e n tar y, s e cu n d a ry, and s p e c i al ed ucation teachers, r ead i n g s p e c i a l i st s , school l ibrarians, and ad m i n is t ra to rs, w i th the Master of A r ts in Education the highest degree a p p r o ve d . T h e ac c re d i t a t i o n gi ves PLU gTaduates rec i p ro c i t y with many other states. accredited b y t h e

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z o I­ et u ;:)

Q ...

The School of Ed uc ati on (Iffers cou rsewor k towJrd ( h e c nver ' jun , renewa l , l l r rei nstatement of teJch i n � ce r t i fi c a t e s . I t orfer� various o p t ions t o a d d endorscments t(l c u r rt'n t c e r t. i fi­ catl!S, It .1J 0 ffers cO llrsework a n d support to i o d ividtds seeking \Va h i n gt()tl ta te Profess ional C c r t ifi ca t S O l' cerL i fic a ­ t ion u n de r t h e al iona l Board of Professi o n a l 1eaci1ing S t a n ­

RESIDENCY TEACHING CERTIFICATE: S t udents who

dards.

rt'qu irem nr:; i n t l u de

Current graduale program

in dude Maste r

successfully com ple te

ments

Ill lllended by t he c h ool r Educa t i o n c rl i fica t . A idition I ·tate Wa shington Stat Pat ro l check, an FBI

rt'G(

fo r a Washington re s i d e n cy teaching a

fi n ge r p ri n t check, and

a

pas, i n

score on state e n t r y-tll-pract ice

with Re:; i dtmcy Teacr ung Certific a t i o n ; C l assro o m Te Jching;

tes ts . I n fo rmation regard i n g aU sta te requirements and p roce­

C lassro o m Tea h i ng:

d u res fo r cenification l avai labl

rban Learners; L i ter ac y with options of

e ndor ements in Rea di n g , Library and Media Educat io na l A d m i n istration. The S hoal of

ervices; and

in t h e School of

ducarion is in the

ELEMENTARY CERTlFICAl'ION AND ENDORSEMENT OPTIONS: he basic u n d e rg rad u a t el m e n t ar y edu ation

dvi · i ng.

p ro g r a m consists of a fo u r- te rm program.

ElJGlBUTY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMlSSJON TO UNDER­ GRADUATE OR CERTIFICATJON-ONLY PROGRAMS: A l l enter an und rgraduate degree/cert i Ci ca ­

tion or cer t i fication-only program m ust a ply to the School Educali n. A completed School t ransc ripts

0

f Ed ucation application, o fficial

f a l l coLlege/univers i t y work. w r i t i n g samples,

o ffk i a l do .umentation of college a d m i s i o n o r o t h r a pp r o ved

March t o re e i e p r i r i t y consideration fo r adm i ssion

to the 5cho I of Ed u ca t io n fo r the followi n g te r m . I . Evidence o f ver h a l and quan t i t a t ive a b il i t y · . i l l u s t rated by a core

Qn the \; a.hi ngton Edu.cat ors Skills Tes t Basic. S i x

lest d.ttes are avaii Jl 1" du r i n g t h e year; check t h e School o f

5 . \ riting 1 0 1

( G PA) of 2 .S0 or h igher

Appl ical ion fo nns anu p ro c edu re s f,

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admission to profes­

appeal ule adm iss io l l process,

meet

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t1

in any p rogram

st ud y

0

are

dvi sing in

in t he School of

Educution is subjt'ct to co nt inu ous assessment o f student deve! 'p me nt ,Hld perfOfman e . S tu (knts a r required to demonstra te [he master of kn owledge, skil ls, professionalism, :miwde , Jnd d i position- re q u i re d fo r effectiw practice. Recnrds w i l l b e reviewed at t h e e t d o f e a c h St'mester 10 ensure s t uden ts are meeting standards th ro ugh out the proo ra m .

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support

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residency dcmcntary K-8 teach i n g certi ficate

ancl a K- 1 2 special edu ca t io n endorsement. T h i s req u i res the co m p l e t i o n of the p ro fes s io n a l edu

a ti on

sequence for

elementary education students, the co m pletion of coursework r.:qu i red for primar, endorseme n t i n spec ial t'd ucat io n , and the com pi rion of a

3 . They may earn

a

24-semester-hoLL[

academic emphasi�.

resi dency elementa r y K-8 teaching certi ficate,

a support i n g enJor., eme n t in a w n t e n t area and

a

waiver i n

spe ia l e d u c at i on t h ro u g h t h e com p le t i o n of a 1 1-seme ter­

incl u de : A n thropolo"y 1 02 or equivalent; M a th e m at i c s

i

m u l t i subjcct tea her. U nd r g r a d ua t e

sequcllce for c l m e n ta!'y education and 24-semester-hour acad e m i

hour p rogram (allowing fi t l1de nt s to team special ed uc a t i on after graduat ion or five yeMs under th

assu m p t i o n t h a t they endorsement i n p(> ci a l e d u ation tlu r i ng t h is t i m e period ) , and/or a u p po r l ­ ing ndor 'elUent i n readillg anJ/or Englis h as , Seco nd La ng u a ge . This requ ires the co mpletion of t h e professional

will

School of lhe Art 341 or Art 3 4 1 and !\usic 34 1 . For se cond­ ary edu c at i o n stude n ts t h ese include: Anthropology/ History 2 1 0; or Anthr po l ogy 102 o r e qu iv ale n t . A

educa tion (K-� )

This re q u i r e s t h e comple t ion of t.he p ro fe s s i o nal e d ucat i o n

1 23 or equ iva le n t (musL belaken prior La Education 406 ) ; Biology I I I odiC!' science equivalent; Natural Scie nces 206 or pby:.ical scicnce e' l uivulent; Phy ' k a l E du ca t io n 322 and

P

10

I . They may eMn a residen y elemcl1 tJr-y K-8 tea ch i n g cer t i ficate.

posted .

I'

4

profess i o n a l eel u a t i 1 n 'eq uence, includi ng:

2. All cou rsework in major and m i n or fields a n d a l l educa t i o n c u rs ' ork has been completed IVitb a grade 0 or bet ter. ( ec ndary educatio n rudents are req u i red t o earn a g rade of II- or better ill all educ,nion co urs wo rk. ) 3.AL 1 ndd it io nul cour es relnted to and requ ired for education program an d teachc.r certifica t i o n have been c o m pleted with the

4

students have several o p tio ns fo r b u i ldi ng a pro.'ram upon t h e

date s for certi fica tion when:

or

4

Education

t h e program for all ·t udcn t s seeking ee r Lficat lon as an elemen­

All ( o u r . e w rk is com pleted w i th a c u m u l a t i\'c grade p o i n t average of 2 . 50 or ab ov e and t h e st udent' d g r e c has b 'en

a grade ' f

Educ:ltion

The professional educa t i o n sequence forms the fo u n d at io n of

B A E and/or CERTIFICATION REQUIRBM.l!NTS: S t udents bee me

4

7 tl/ld S pecia l cduc. t ion 438 tu lent Te acbi ng in Element,uv $chool 5 Education 450 'I n q u ir y i nto Lea rni ng a n d Teaching: Re flective Practice and Sem i n .] [ 4 • If n o l colllpletcd i1l fl previoL/$ tenn.

the dlool of Educat ion O ffi ct'. o nLinuati

4

Educatic)n 4 4 S t udent Tea ch i ng - E le m e n ta q' ( D U'll )

a l l t he requi re men t s may

drnL�. ion appeal forms

Jvailable from the Coord i n aror o f

4

E ducation 408 l.iteracy i n a K - H Educ a t io n Ed uca tio n 4 24 I n q u iry i n to Teaching I: Diverse Learners

or

sional st ud ies in e ducation are avai lable from the Schooi of

Ed u ca t i o n . St uden ts who do not

2

Educat i o n 4 0 6 Mathemat ics i n K - 8 Education

Term [ V Educa t i o n 430 S tud e n t Teach i n g i n K - t\ E d u c a t i o n

eq u iv a l ent: g r a de o f C or high.:r

or

Teml II

4 1 0 S c i e nce/ H ea l t h i n K-8 Ed uca t i o n 4 1 2 Social S tu di es in K-8 Education Education 425 I n q u i r y i n t o Teach i ng 1 1 : D i verse Learners

2 . Sophomore s t a nd i ng ( 3 0 or more semester h o u rs) 3. Cllm u lat ive gmde po i n t average

and Neglect

Terlll 1Il

Educat ion web s i t e [or t h e dates.

4. Psymology 1 0 1 or equiva l e n t : grade of

h i l d Abuse

E d u c a t i o n 394 Technology and Te a ch ing: La bo ra tor y·

peeiJie refj lliremellts iI/elude: pas i ng

4 4

Spe c i a l Educat ion 4 i! O I s s u e s a n d Pro b l e m s of

u b m i tted to the ' ch oo l of E d u c a t ion by t h e first Friday i n or

Profess ional Educa tion Sequence TerllI I Educa t ion 3'10 I n q ui r y i n t o l.ea rn ing 1 : I nvest iga tion i n to Lea rn i n g and Devdo p ment Education 392 I n q u i l')' i nt o Lea rn i n g I I : I nvestigation i n to Lea rn i n g a n d Development

standard i zed test scores, a n d letters of reco m m endation m ust be

ctober

to

ttldent.s shortld meet with School of Edllcation advisors each semester a nd tile Cert ificillion Officerfor updates ill program or applica t io l t requ irements.

f redesig n in g i ts gr a dua te programs. For infor mation about a n t ic i p at ed o p t io ns that will be available beg i n n ing in 2003, contact t h e Sd1001 o f E d u ation's Coor d i nator o f Ad m i s ­

indivi d ua l s seeki ng t

from t h e Certification Officer

Ed u ca t i o n . State req uiremellts are su b;ect

immediate c h ange.

proce s

sions and

54

program of p rof ssiona l s t ud ies in t h e

m el ali related a ademic require­ for ;] degree o r a cer t ifi ca te , and who meet all state

require m e n t s w i l l be

Arts degre<!s

a

a

School of Educat ion, who

co m ple t e

education Y

coursewor k to ea rn a primar

quence fo r elementary education students, t h e


com pletion o f 24 semester h o urs in an academic are,\, and 1 6 semester hours i n special education and/or read ing and/or E nglish a s a second language. Note: Courses taken within the 24 semester hour academic support area must meet requirements for supporting content area endorsement as specified by state requirements. Information abo l / t all state endoTsemeli f-il fciuding those ill special eduCll tion, " eading,

anli English as II secolld Imlgl/age-fan be obtained fro m the oordil1ator of Adm iss ions a nd Advising ill the School of EduCll t ion. SECONDARY CE RTIFI CATION AND ENDORSEMENT OPTIONS: All u ndergraduate students seeking secondary

cer t i ficat ion in a content area ( except those seeking certification

i n music and p hysical education) are req�ui red to complete the following four-term p rogram of study. Professional Ed ucation Sequenc e Ti rm I

Education 390 I nquiry i ntu Learning I: I nvestigation into Learning and Development Education 392 I nquiry i n to Learning l l : I nvestigation i nto Learning and Development S pecial Education 480 Issues and Problems of Ch ild Abuse and eglect+

4 4

Term III O n e cou rse from Education 440-449

Education 4 2 5 I nquiry into Teaching I I : D iverse Learners

2 4 4 4 4

Terlll I V

Ed ucation 4 5 0 Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Pract ice and Seminar Educat ion 466 luden! Teaching - Seco ndary (Dual) arId S p ecial Education 439 S tudent Teaching i n Secondary School

4 7 5

or

Edu ca tion 468 Student Teaching - Secondary •

If not completed ill

a

10

previous term.

The p ro fessio nal education sequence fo rnu the foundation o f t he program to r a U st udents seeking certification i n a content area ( except music and physical education st udents ) . Under­ graduate s tu d e nts seeking cert i fication/endorsement in a content area ( usually to teach in grades 4- ( 2) have several options for building program upon t h e profe sional education sequence, i ncluding: 1 . They may earn a residency secondary teach ing certificate with a primary endorsement in a content area. This requires th e com p letion o f the professional education sequence for secondary education students and a teaching major or academic m a j o r that meets s tate endorscme� n t requirements. 2 . They m ay e a rn a residency secondary teachi n g certificate with a p ri mary endorsement i n a content area and a primary endorsemen t i n s pecial education. This requires the comple­ tion o f the professional education sequence for secondary education students, teach ing major or academic major, and coursework requi red for endorsement in special educati o n . 3 . T h e y m a y e a rn a residency secondary teach ing certificate w i t h a primary endorsement i n a content area a n d a waiver i n special education through t h e completion of a 1 6 -semcster­ h o u r program (allowing students to teach special education after graduation for five ye.ars under the assumption that they will complete coursework to earn a p ri mary endorsement in special education during this time period), and/or a support­ i n g endorsetnent i n reading and/or English as a second l anguage. �

m

CERTIFICATION IN MUSIC OR H EALTH AND FITNESS:

o

Undergraduates have the option of completing p rograms that lead to bachelor's degrees in m u s ic or llcalth and fitness and residency teaching certificates. All individuals wish i ng to earn a Bachelor of Music Education or a Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education with a residency teaching certificate m ust ap ply and be accepted i nto the School o f Education� They must also complete the following courses. I . Musi c education m aj o rs must complete Education 3 9 1 ( o ffered every fal l ) , E d ucatio nal Psychology 36 1 ( o ffered every sp r i ng) , SpccLal Education 480, a n d all cou rse req u i re­ ments pecificd by the Department of Music. 2. Students seeking a Bachelor o f Arts i n Pbysical ducation m ust com plete Educa t i o n 390 a n d 392, SpeciaJ Education 480, and a l l requi rements specified by the School o f Physical Education.

c r.

l> -t o z

PREPARATION F O R TEACH ING IN C H RISTlAN SCHOOLS:

Term II

ducalion 3 9 4 Technology and Teach ing: Laboratory' Edu cation 424 Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners Educational Psychology 30El Educational Psychology

Note: Secondary teaching majors and m inors h ave been designed to align with state endorsement requi rements and to meet specific departmental standards fo r majors and m i nors. Cou rse and hour requirements for teaChing and/or academic majors vary according to departmental requ irements.

S tudents who may be i nterested in p repa r i n g to teach in priv<lte or Christian schools will begin t h e i r professi o nal preparation by all req u i rements fo r tht' Washington Sta te Teacher's Certificate. In addition, the), will take the Religion m i no r ( Teacher Educa­ tion Opt�io n ) noted under the Rel ig i o n deparl rnenl co u rse o fferings, and add a private chool p racticllm to tht' i r program. EARLY ADVISING OPTIONS: During fi rst o r sophomore ),e;1 [,

prospective education students planning to enter the S c hool o f Education s h o u l d m e e t w i t h the Cuordinator fo r Ad m issions a n d Advising and/or a facu l!)! m e m b e r i n the School o f Education to d iscuss the various options l isted above and to det.ermine their program o f study CERTIFICATION/ENDORSEM ENT OPTIONS FOR PER­ SONS WHO HOLD A BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM A REGIONALLY ACCREDITED INSTITUTION: Persons who

hold a baccalaureate degree (or h i gher) fro m a regionally accredited i n st itution and who wish to pursue teacher certifica­ tion should make an appoin tment with the Coordinator of Adm issions and Advising for a planning session. O p tions for these individuals i nclude: 1. They may e nroll in a cert i fication-only p rogram. ( Typically classes i n such a p rogram would be taken in the undergradu­ ate p rogram.) 2 . They may enro l l i n the Master o f Arts i n Education with Residency Cert i fication Progra m . This 1 4 - month cohort program l e a d s to an MA degree and K-8, multisubject certification with the possibility of content area (4- l 2 ) certification ( depending u p o n previous coursewo rk) . Participants move t h rough this fu ll-time program as a cohort. As a part o f their program, they complete a yea xlong i n tern­ ship with a cadre of colleagues in r m urb�\O m iddle school. PROFESSIONAL TEACHING CERTIFICATE: Certificate requirements i n Was h i ngton changed on August 3 I , 2000. The

following guidelines govern certificat ion a fter that date: 1. All teachers earning certification i n Was h ington after August 3 1 , 2000 will receive a Residency Teaching Certificate. This cert i ficate is valid fo r five years. ( WAC 1 80 - 79A- 1 4 5 ) 2 . With i n a five-year period, teachers i n 'vVashington must earn a Professional CertifIcate. ( 'vVAC I 80- 79A- 1 4 5 ) 3 . Qual i fications for t h e P ro fessional CertitI c a te i nclude: a. To qualify for a Pro f�e ssional ertifIcate, an individual must have completed p rovisional status as a teacher in a public school pursuant to RCW 28A.405.220 or th equivalent i n a state board of education approved p r i va t e school. b . Candidates fo r the Pro fessional Ce r t i fIcate must com plete an approved Professional ertificate p rogram, which has P

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been collaboratively developed by the college/university and the respective Professional Education Advisory Board ( PEAB). c. The candidate must successfully demonstrate competency in three standards ( i.e. Effective Teaching, Professional Development, and Leadership) and the IB criteria relevant to the th ree standards. (WAC I BO-79A-206 ( 3 ) WAC I BO-7BA-500-540) 4. The Professional Certificate i s valid for five years. It may be renewed through the completion of 1 50 clock hours. The clock hours must be related to: <1. the six state salary criteria used to identify appropriate clock hours; b. one of the three standards required for the Professional Certificate. 5 . Teachers who held a valid Initial Certificate as of August 3 1 , 2000 will be allowed t o have one more renewal o f their Initial ertificate before they must meet requirements for the Professional Certificate. 6. Teachers who hold a Continuing Certificate as of August 3 1 , 2000 will not be affected by changes i n certification require­ ments. No te: Information about the Washington State Professional Certificate and Pacific Lutheran Ulliversity's Professional Certifica­ tioll program is available in the School of Educa tion Office. Individuals wishilIg to discuss options sh ould colZtact the Coordina­ tor of Admissions mId Adv ising.

GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL OPTIONS FOR EDUCA­ TORS: The School of Education offers pro fessional development programs that allow educators to earn pro fessional and/or National Board of Professional Teaching Standards Certificates. Up to 4 semester hours from these programs can be applied to a variety of master's degre programs. Current emphases/options in MA programs for educators include: 1. Master of Arts in Classroom Teaching; 2 . Master of Arts i n Classroom Teaching: Urban Learners; 3. Master of Arts in Literacy with options for endorsements in reading, library and media services, and English as a Second Language; 4. Master of Arts in Educational Administration with certification as principal/program administrator. The School of Education also offers certification-only programs in educational administration and programs that will enable teachers to add additional endorsement in shortage areas such as special education, reading, library and media services, English as a second language, and specific content areas. Detailed i n formation about these options can be found in the Graduate Studies section of this catalog. Information about current and anticipated graduate and p rofessional options can be obtained from the Coordinator of Admissions and Advising in the School of Education.

ENDOR.SEMENT REQUIREMENTS AND UND ERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY THAT LEAD TO ENDORSEM ENTS: Endorsement requirements are established by the State of Washington. Pacific Lutheran University's School o f Education currently is authorized to offer the following primary endorse­ ment : English (4- 1 2 ) English/Language Arts (4- 1 2) Elementary (multisubj ect, K-B) Health and Fitness ( K- 1 2 ) Library and Media Services ( K- 1 2) H istory (4- 1 2) M, thematics (4- 1 2 ) Music Choral ( K- 1 2) General ( K- 1 2) Instrumental ( K - 1 2 ) Science (4- 1 2) 56

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Science, Designated Biology (4- 1 2 ) Chemistry ( 4- 1 2) Earth Science (4- 1 2 ) Physics ( 4- 1 2) Social Studies (4- 1 2 ) . Special Education ( K- 1 2) Visual Arts ( K- 1 2) World Languages, Designated French C K- I 2 ) German ( K- 1 2 ) . orwegian ( K - 1 2 ) Spanish ( K- 1 2 ) The School of Education currently i s authorized to offer the following supporting endorsements: Drama ( K- 1 2) English ( 4 - 1 2 ) English/Language Arts (4- 1 2 ) English as a Second Language ( K- 1 2 ) Health and Fitness ( K- 1 2 ) History (4- 1 2 ) Library and Media Services (K- 1 2 ) Mathematics (4- 1 2 ) . Music Choral ( K- 1 2 ) General ( K - 1 2 ) Instrumental (4- 1 2) Read ing ( K - 1 2 ) Science, Designated Biology (4- 1 2) Chemistry (4- 1 2 ) Earth Science (4- 1 2) Physics (4- 1 2 ) Special Education (K- 1 2 ) World Languages, Designated Chinese ( K - 1 2) French (K- 1 2 ) German ( K- 1 2 ) Norwegian ( K- 1 2) Spanish ( K- 1 2) Visual Arts ( K - 1 2 ) Note: 111e fact that the School o f Education i s authorized t o issue certain endorsements does TIot indicate that Pacific Lutheran University has a specified program of study leading to these endorsements. Listed below are general endorsement requirements followed by a list of teaching majors, teaching minors, or programs of study that lead to an endorsement. If there is any question about whether a course not listed belolY can be substitutedfor an endorse­ ment requirement, the candidate must provide evidence that the cOll rse covers a particular essential area ofstudy. Evidence might include (but is not limited to) a catalog cOllrse description, syflablls, letter from the illStntctor, portfolio, or presentation ofcourse products.

Teaching Endorsements

ARTS - VISUAL ARTS State endorsement requirements: ( 1 ) Skills and techniques in

multiple media (painting, sculpture, d rawing, computer, photography); ( 2 ) Composition and production using design principles; ( 3 ) Analysis and interpretation of art; ( 4 ) Social, cultural and historical contexts and connections; (5) Material, equipment, and facilities safety. Seco ndary teaching major leading to a supporting (aI/ levels) endorsement - 36 semester hOll rs: Art 1 60; I BO or j B l ; 1 96, 226,

250, 296, 33 1 , 365, 440

BIOWGY State endorsemen t requirements: ( 1 ) Botany/lab; ( 2 ) Zoologyllab;

(3) Genetics; ( 4 ) Microbiology or cell biologyllab; ( 5 ) Chemistry/lab; ( 6 ) Ecology; ( 7 ) Evolution; ( B ) Lab safety, Y


practice, and management; ( 9 ) Lab, inquiry-based expe.rience, ( 1 0 ) Contemporary, historical, technological, and societal is ue and c ncepts.

Secondary teaching lI1 inor leading to a supporting mdorsell1ent -

English 2 1 4 or 2 1 5; 24 1 , 25 1 , 328, 403; Communication 330 or 284 and 285.

Secondary teaching major leading to a primary endorsement

- 36 semester hours

Biology 1 6 1 , 162, 323; 328 or 348; 332 or 407; 340; 426 or 474; Chemistry 1 05 or 1 20 SecOIldary teaching millOr leading to a supporrillg erzdorsemen t - 20 semester hours

Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62; 201 or 328; 323; Chemistry 1 05 or 205

ENGLISH/ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

world, multicultural, and adolescent literature. Secol/dar)' teaching major leading

State endorse ment requirements:

strategies for ESL. Supporting endorsement - all levels

HEALTH / FITNESS ( I ) Foundations of health and fitness; ( 2 ) Safe Hving, including first aid and CPR; ( 3 ) Scientific foundations for health and fitness (anatomy, exercise physiology, kinesiology/biomechanics, psychomotor maturation and development, and motor learning); ( 4 ) Movement, activities, and application with attention to special needs populations; ( 5 ) Coordinated health education (alcohol and other drugs, diseases, injury prevention, human relationships, nutrition, HIV prevention, and abuse prevention). Please see req uiremellts for Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (BAPE) with Certification Imder Physical Education.

( I ) Acting skills; ( 2 ) Theatre design and construction; ( 3 ) Directing; ( 4 ) Stage manage­ ment; ( 5 ) Analyis and criticism; (6) Equipment, materials, and facilities safety.

AI/ levels - s upporting - 20 semester hours.

NOTE: Students who major in drama will only receive a Supporting Endorsement and mU5t still complete a Primary Elldorsement.

Theatre 250 or 458; 454; 358 o r Communications 1 23 ; 8 hours from Theatre 1 5 1 , 352, 356, 452. EARTH SClENCE

( I ) Physical geology; ( 2 ) Historical geology; ( 3 ) Environmental issues related to earth science; ( 4 ) ceanography; ( 5 ) Astronomy; (6) Meteorology; ( 7) Lab safety, practice, and management; ( 8 ) Lab, inquiry­ based experience; (9) Relationship of the concepts of science to contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues.

State endorsement requ irements:

Secondary teaching m ajor -

leadhJg to a primary endorsement

48 semester hours

eoscience 1 02 ; 1 03 or 1 04; 1 05, 2 0 [ ; Physics ! l 0, 1 25, 1 3 5; 4 hours from Math 1 40 or higher or on course from Computer Science and Computer Engineering 1 44 or 220; 12 hours from upper-division Geoscience courses; Chemistry 1 04 or 1 20. Secondary teaching lI1inor leading to a supportirlg elldorsemen t

HISTORY State endorsemCllt requirements:

Secondary teaching major leading to a prim ary e1ldorsement

- 36 semester hours

H istory 30 1 , 460; 8 hours from H istory 2 5 1 , 252, 253; 1 6 hours o f electives (at least 4 hours upper-division electives in U.S./EuTopean and 4 hours upper-division electives i n non­ Western history from 107, 1 08, 2 1 5 , 335, 337, 338, 339, 340, 344 ) . Secondary teaching minor leadillg to a supporting endorsement -

MATIlEMATICS ( I ) Geometry ( Euclidean and non-Euclidean); ( 2 ) Probability and statistics; ( 3 ) Calculus (integral and d ifferential ) ; ( 4 ) Discrete mathematics; ( 5 ) Logic and p roblem solving; (6) History of math or founda­ tions of math.

State endorsement requirements:

State endorsemetlt requ irements:

Secondary teaching major leading to a primary endorsement

- 40 or 41 semester h o u rs

Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 203, 253, 3 1 7, 32 1 , 3 3 1 , 34 1 , 433; 3 5 1 or 356 0r Physics 1 53, 163.

Secondary teaching majo r leading to a prim ary endorsement

36 semeste r hours Students mu t have four years of high school foreign language in

one language or courses through 20 I and 202 at the university level in one foreign language; English 2 1 4 or 2 15; 24 L , 25 1 , 301 , 3 :28, 403; Communication 330; 4 hours from 2 1 6, 2 1 8 , 230, 233, 343; 4 hours from 2 14, 234, 325, 327, 34 1 , 374.

16 semester hours

History 460; 4 hours from 25 1, 252, 253; 4 hours from 1 07, 108, 0[' 2 1 5; 4 upper-division hours from 227, 335, 338, 339, 340, 344.

ENGLISH

-

( I ) PacifiC Northwest history;

( 2 ) United States history; ( 3 ) World history; ( 4 ) Civics/ political science/United States government; ( 5 ) Geography; ( 6 ) Economics.

eoscience 1 02; 1 03 or 1 04; 1 05, 20 1 ; Physics 1 1 0. ( I ) Reading; ( 2 ) Writing; ( 3 ) ommuni tion - speaking, listening, and analyzing; ( 4 ) Linguistics or Structure of Language; ( 5 ) Literature ­ American, British, world, multicultural, and adolescent .

16 semester hours

State endorseme1lt requirements:

State endorsement requirements:

Suppo rtirlg elldorsement - all levels - 1 6 semester hOllrs

-

Anthropology 1 02; Language/ Education 445, 446, 470, 475.

DRAMA

Theatre 250 or 458 ( I ) ; 8 hours from 1 5 1 , 352, 356, 452 ( 2 , 4, 5 , 6 ) ; 454 (3); 358 or Communication 123 ( 5 ) .

( I ) Language acquisition theory;

( 2 ) Cross-cultural teaching and learning strategies; ( 3 ) Literacy development ( reading, writing, listening, speaking); ( 4 ) History and theory of ESL; (5) Instructional

Secorldary teaching millor leading to a supporting endorsement

Chemistry 1 20; 232, 332; 234, 334; 338, 403

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ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)

60 semester hours

- 22 se m este r hall rs

a primary endorsement

English 2 14 or 2 1 5; Communication 284 and 285 or 330; Language 446 or English 403; English 24 1 , 2 5 1 , 30 I; Theatre 250 or 458; 4 hours from English 224, 225, 227, 326, 328; 4 hours from English 2 1 6, 2 1 8, 230, 233, 343; 4 hours from English 2 2 1 , 325, 327, 34 1 , 374.

Secondary tea ching major leadillg to a primary endorsemellt

Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25; 232, 332; 234, 334; 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344 , 403; Phy ics 1 53 , 1 54 , 1 63 , 1 64 ; Required supporting coursework Math 1 5 1 ; 1 52

to

- 44 semester hours

State endorsemellt requ irements:

-

m C C 1"1 » -I

( I ) Reading; ( 2 ) Writing; ( 3 ) Communication; ( 4 ) Linguistics; ( 5 ) American, British,

State endo rsement requirements:

CHEMISTRY ( I ) General principles of chemistry - inorganic, physical, and analytical/lab; ( 2 ) Organic chemistry/lab; (3) Quantitative analysis!lab; (4) Biochemistry/lab; ( 5 ) Physics; ( 6 ) Laboratory safety, practice, and management; ( 7 ) Lab inquiry-based experience; ( 8 ) Relationship of the concepts of science to contemporary historical, technological, and societal issues.

24 semester hours

Secondary teaching minor leading to a supporting endorsement -

24-28 semester hours

Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 203, 3 1 7, 32 1 ; 230 or 3 3 1 ; 3 1 4 or 340.

MUSIC Choral music, General music, Instrumental Music Bachelor of Music Education under Music.

See requirements for P

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PHYSICS Slate endorsement req u i rements:

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.... e( U ::l o w

(I)

eneral p r i nc i p l e s

All levels - primary - 18 semester h O ltrs with t h e waivcr, 32

of

physi s/Iab; ( 2 ) Lab safe t y, p ra ct i ce and ma nagement; ( 3 ) Lab, inquiry - b ased experience; ( 4 ) Relatio nships of t h e concepts of science to contem pora ry, h istorical, technological and societal issues.

Secondary reach illg major lea ding t o a primll ry endorsemCllt

Sp e c i a l Education 30 1 , 3 5 0 , 3 5 5 , 404 , 405, 407, 408; 438 o r 439; 480, 492. WORLD LANGUAGES

situations; ( 2 ) .ulture; (3) I n terdisci plinary i n te g ra t io n ; ( 4 ) Language acqu isition theory; ( 5 ) Methodological study.

Physics 1 53 , 1 63 , 1 54, 1 64 , 2 2 3 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 6 , 3 5 4 ; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 253.

Chinesc - all levels - supportillg

S eco nda ry teaching lIlil/or leading to a supporting endorsement

- 27 semester h O l l rs

C h i n e se 1 0 I , 1 0 2 , 20 I , 30 I , 37 1 ; Lan g ua ge

- 26 selll ester hOllrs

445 .

French - Secondary tea ch illg major leadillg to a primary elldorse­

1 3 6; 2 2 3 ;

mellt

M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 1 53 .

- 3 I selllcster h o u rs

French 20 1 , 2 0 2 , 30 1 , 302, 3 2 1 , 42 1 , 4 2 2 ; Language 445.

READING ( I ) Ass essm en t and d i a gnos is o f re a d i n g skills a n d deficiencies; ( 2 ) Strategies o f how t o teach reading; ( 3 ) Language acq uisiL ionl i n tcgration; ( 4 ) Social! c u l t ural contexts fo r li teracy; ( 5 ) Read i n g p rocess i n c l u d i n g deco d i n g , encod ing, and student res p o nse to child and adolescent- li terature; (6) Begi n n ing l i t er a c y ( reading, w r iti ng , s p ell in g , a n d c o m m u n ication ) ; ( 7 ) Re a d i n g in t h e content areas; ( 8 ) L i teracy fo r a seco nd language learner; (9) Meta­ co g n i t i ve s t r a t egies ; ( 1 0) Risk fa ctors fo r re a d i ng d i fficulties and i n terve n t i o n strategies fo r s t udents ex p e ri neing re a d in g d i ffi c u l t i es.

State fIIdorsemcl/{ req llire/Ilems:

All levels supporting -

1 6 semester hours Education 408, 4 1 1 , 4 1 3 , 438, 490; 4 hours from 4 26, 4 2 7, 428,

o r 429.

S CI ENC E ( I ) a p r im a r y endorsement i n b i o l o g y, chemistry. earth sci en ce , or physics ( a s d e s c r ib e d under des ignated sciences); ( 2 ) a m i n imum of one course from e a c h of the other designated sciences. P r i ma ry endorsemel lt - 40 semester h o u rs (Il l i n i m u m ) I n order to q u a l i fy for a p r i mary e n do ni e me nt i n science, an i nd i v i d u a l m ust meet p r i m a ry endorsement req u i rements in o ne o f t he fo l low i n g : bi o l o gy, chemistry, physics, or earth science. I n a d d i t ion to meeting t h e endorsement require­ ments, t he student must complete a m i n i m u m of one course State elldorsement req l l i relllellts:

French - Secolldary teachillg m i l l o r leading to a supp o r ti ng

endorseme,u - 23 semester l!(Jllrs

French 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 3 0 2 , 3 2 1 ; Language 4 4 5 . German - Scco l'lli llry teaching major leading t o

e n dors e m e l l t - 3 1 selllcstl!r h O Llrs

Il

primary

German 20 I , 202, 3 0 1 , 302, 32 1 , 4 2 1 , 4 2 2 ; L a n g u a g e 445. GermarJ - Secon dllry teaching lII i llor lea ding to a suppo r t i ng endorsement - 23 semester hours German 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302, 3 2 1 ; La n g u a ge 445. Spanish - Secondary tea ch ing major leadillg to a prilllary endorsement - 3 1 semester hOllrs

Spanish 20 l , 202, 3 0 1 , 302, 3 2 1 ; 8 hours fro m 4 2 1 , 4 2 2 , 43 1 , 4 3 2 ; La ng uage 4 4 5 . Spa nish - Secon dary t ea ch ing m i n o r lea di ng 1 0 a supporting endorsement - 23 semester h o urs Spanish 20 1 , 2 0 2 , 30 1 , 302, 3 2 1 ; L a n g u a ge 445.

Course Offe rings: Education For course descriptio/lS, v is i t the PLU ca talog 011 line a t www.p lu.edu/

p r i n t/ ca talo g . 262

Fou.ndatiolls of Education ( 3 )

Concurrent w i l h 263. 263

School Observation ( I )

Concurrent wi t h 262.

SOCIAL STUDIES

390 Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into Learning and Development ( 4 ) Concurrent with 392 - Term I Hub.

State endorsement requirements:

391

from each of the other t hree <lreas.

( 1 ) Pacific Northwest h i s tory; ( 2 ) United S t a t e s h i s t o ry, i n c l u d i ng c hron o l o g i c a l , thematic, m ultic u l t u ral , ethnic and women's h is t o ry ; (3) worl d , reg i o n al , or co u n t r y h istory; (4) Geogra p hy; ( 5 ) Po l i t i c a l science, civics, or government; (6) A n t h ro p o l o g y, psyc h o l o g y, or s o c i o l o g y ; ( 7 ) Eco n o m ics.

Seco nda ry teaching major leading to a p r im a ry

- 40 seme.ster h o u rs

endorsement

Foundatiolls of Learning ( 3 )

Lim ited t o music e d ucat ion majors.

Inquiry into Learning II: IlJvestigation into Learning and Development ( 4 ) Concu rrent with 3 9 0 - Te rm I Hub.

392

394

Technology and Teaching: Laboratory ( 2 )

Pass/ Fail.

H i s t o r y 3 3 8 , 460; 4 hours fro m 2 5 i , 2 5 2 , 2 5 3 ; 4 hours fro m 1 07, 1 0 8 ; 4 h o u rs from 3 3 5 , 3 3 7 , 339, 340, 344; Po l i t ic al Science 1 5 1 ; 8 hours, 4 each from two of the fol l owi ng: a ny ant h ro po l o g y course o t h e r than 1 02 or 2 1 0; any psychology other t h a n 1 0 1 ; So c i o l ogy 1 0 1 or 330; 4 h o u rs from Econom­

Mathematics in K-8 Education ( 4 ) Practicum included, concu rrent w i t h 4 0 8 a n d 424.

406

Literacy in K - 8 Education ( 4 ) For e l eme n ta ry students. Practicum included, concurrent with

408

406 and 4 24.

i cs 1 30 , 1 5 1 , 1 52.

410

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Science/Health in K -8 Education ( 4 )

Practicum included, ollcurrent with 4 1 2 and 4 2 5 .

( I ) Exceptionality; ( 2 ) Curricu­ lum modification and a dap tat i on ; ( 3 ) Inclusion; (4) Assess­ ment including be h av i o r a n a l ys is , I ndividualized Education Plan ( lEP), accommodations; (5) Legal issues; (6) Specially designed i n s t r u c t k 1 n i n all content areas; ( 7 ) Pro-social skills and behavioral p robl e m s ; ( 8 ) School, fa mily, community part nerships; ( 9) Tra nsition; (J 0) O r g a n i z a t i o n a nd manage­ ment sys t e m s ; ( I I ) Methods in e a rly childhood educat ion ; ( 1 2 ) Coll bora l i o n w i t h para-educators.

State endorsement requ i rements:

411

Strategies for Language/Literacy Developme.nt ( 2 )

412

Social Studies in K-8 Education ( 4 )

Practicum i nc l uded, Concurrent w i t h 4 1 0 a.nd 4 2 5 .

Language/Literacy Development.: Assessment and Instruction ( 4 ) 4 13

424

Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners ( 4 )

For el me n t a ry students, concurrent with 406 and 408. Taken as Term II Hub.

58

( I ) Co m m u n ication - speaks,

State endorsement requirements:

understands, reads, and writes in a variety o f contexts and

- 38 semester h o u rs

P hys i c 1 53 o r 1 2 5 ; 1 54 or 1 2 6 ; 1 6 3 or 1 3 5; 1 64 or

se m est e r h O l l rs a b o ve gelleral e dll cil t io n requirements

P

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U

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I V E R 5

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425 Inquiry into Teaching 11: Diverse Learners ( 4 ) F o r lementary ' nd secunddry st udents outside of m u s i and physical educa t ion, concu rrent with 4 1 0 and 4 1 2 . Taken as Term m H ub. 426 Special Topics in Children' Literature ( 2 )

501 Workshops ( 1 -4 ) 503 On-Campus Workshops i n Education Enrol l m e n t ' u bject t

adviso r 's a ppro 3 1 .

505 Issues i n Literacy Education ( 2 )

427 Multicultural Childre.n's Literature ( 2 )

[ n i t ial ( o u rse req u i red or a .ll s t u de n ts i n the master's pTogra m i l l literacy educatio n .

418 Children's Literature in the K-8 Curric.ulum ( 2 )

5 06 Foundations o f School Library Media Center

429 Adoles�t Literature in the Secondary Curriculum ( 2 ) 430 Stude.nt Teaching i n

K -8 Bducation - S R ( I ())

Prerequisite: SuccI'S tul completi o n of Education

c o ur es

[-I I I . Concurre n t w i t h 450.

434 Student Teaching - Elementary ( Dual) - SR

Te rms

oncurrent with 450.

S tu d en ts who have comp leled econdary preferred-level student

should enroll in t h is course.

437 Alternate Level Student Teaching - Secondary - SR

St uden ts w h o have co mpleted elementar

(6)

preferred level student

tea c h i n g should enroll in this c urse. I ndepe n de n t s t udy card 438 Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction

(4) (4)

449 Computer Science in the Secondary School

Seminar ( 4 )

(2)

526 Special Topics in ChUdren's Literature ( 2 ) 527 Multicultural Children's Literature ( 2 )

K-8 CulTiculum ( 2 )

(2)

537 MecUa and 1'echnology for School Library Media

Specialists ( 2 )

(K- L 2 (2)

Req uired for MA. Pn:requ isites: Admis ion to the graduate

( 7)

ith Spe ial Edu alion 439, 5 hours, and ED

C

450,

econdary students.

quired ( I f fifth-yem: studen ts. Prerequi ites: s t uden t teaching o r

teaching experience; 262, 253, EPSY 36 1 . Mal' b e taken concurrently with stu dent tea chin g. 468 Student Teaching - Secondary - SR

544; m i n i m u m of 24 sem

or h igher. Co n c u rren t w i th ro u e 450.

f nursew rk

Prerequisit<!:

d m is. ion to hI? graduat

program or permission

o f 'rad uate advi · o r. 551 Principalship IJ ( 4 )

553 PrincipaJship I V

( 4)

554 Priucipalship V ( I , I )

470 Curriculum, MateriaJs and Inlitruction for Teaching

560 Practi£ � ( 2 )

.English as a Second Langnage (4 )

Designed for MAl crt I r grJIn.

(2)

475 Practicum i n Teaching EngUsh as a Second Language

562 Schools and Society

(I)

Pr re q uis i te : LAN "EDUC 445. . neurrent with LANG/ED ·C rosslist(;'d wi th LANG 4.70.

485 The Gifted Child ( 2 ) 490 Acquisition and Development o f Language ( 2 ) 493 Effective Tutoring Methods ( l ) 496 Laboratory Workshop Prerequ isi tes: conferenct! with lht! i nstructor or tht· dean of t he

(3)

Pr requisite: Ad m is ion to the MA/eer! Prugram i n structor.

or

,-on ent of

eminor ( 1-4 ) May b e repeated for credit. Prert'q u i s i l<!: Ad m issio n t o the M Al .eft progra m .

563 Integrating

564 The Arts, Mind, and Body

(2)

565 The Art and Practice of 'ibching 568 Internship In Teaching

(6)

(6)

Scho o l o f Ed ucat io n .

Des i cr n e d fo r M /Cert program.

497 SpeciaJ Project

585 Comparative Education

(1-4)

ter ho u rs

lea di n g to the M A ; consultation with s t u de nt 's 'ldVlSOr.

552 PrincipaJsblp m ( 4 )

( 1 0)

Prerequi ' i tes: fo rmal ll p lJl i cat i o n ; en i n!' sta n d i ng; c u m ulative

473 Puent-Teacher Relationships

program;

550 Principalship I ( 3 )

467 Evaluation ( 2 )

P rere q ui� itc : conse n t

(2)

545 Methods and Techniques of �arch ( 2 )

(2)

466 Student Teaching - Secondary (Dual) - S R

470.

(I)

544 Researcb a n d Program EvaJulll ion ( 2 )

457 The Arts, Media, and Technology

of 2.50

.k sequen

538 Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction

oncurr nt w i t h st u d e n t lea c. h in g Tl"rm [ V Hub.

(j PA

tn

530 Children's Writing

(4)

450 Inquiry into Learning and Teach ing: ReOective Practice

4 hours.

l nstruction ( 4 ) Prereq u isit : 5 1 0; highly reco mmended t o be taken a t the c.nd of

529 Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum

448 Social Studies in the Secondary School

\

5 1 3 Language/ Literacy Development: Assessment and

528 Chlldren's Literature in

Science i n the Secondary School (4 )

on urr nl

5 1 0.

:

5 16 Teacher Supervision

(4)

446 Mathematics in t h e Secondary School

(2)

5 1 1 Strategies for Language/Literacy Development

Prereq uisit

Req uired for the o n tinuin g level certification of teachers.

44S Method of Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language (4)

456 Storytelling

(2)

515 Professional Semina",: Conlinuing Level, Teachers ( 2 )

(K-12) ( 2 )

(4)

444 English in the Secondary School

44 7

o Z

(2)

5 1 0 The Acquisition and Development o f Language

the

req u i red.

440 Art in the Secondary St.hool

508 Principles o f BibUographk Analysis and Control

o c n l> -l

and Literacy ( 2 )

436 Alternate Level Student Teaching - Elementary ( 6 )

tea chin

507 Principles of I nformation Organization, Retrieval, and Service ( 2 )

509 Foundations o f ColJection Development

(7)

Prerequisite: Succt'. sfu l completion o f Education courses Te r ms

I-I I I .

Management ( 2 )

m

(3)

f the dean. P

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I

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A

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586 Sociology of Education ( 3 ) 587 History o f Education

Course Offerings: Special Education

(3)

For cou rse descriptiolls, visit the PLU Ciltnlog online nt w\vw.plu.edu/

589 Philosopby o f Education ( 3 )

print/catalog.

590 Graduate SeminaT

z o

.... <4: u � o w

o

195 I ndividuals with DisabiUties - A (4)

c r�d it is given. nor is t u i t i o n assessed.

201 Observation in Special Education Programs ( [ )

595 Internship in Educational Administration ( 2 , 2 )

296 Educating the Physically Challenged and MedicaDy Fragile ( 2 )

Prercqui ites: Ad m i s s i o n to t h e graduate progrJ m o r to t he credent iali.ng program; «) m p l e t i o n of cdLl , t ional a d m i n istra­ t ion concen t ration; consultation with advisor.

30] Assessment and Evaluation in Special Education

(3)

596 Graduate Seminar ( 2 )

338 Issue I n Early Childhood Special Education

Pr r q u i ites: Completion o f coursework in educat i o n a l ad m i n istration concentrati o n .

340 Advanced Strategies and Techniques for Teaching

597 Independent Study ( 1 -4 )

in P-3 Settings ( 2 ) Prerequ isite : 399, 490, 492.

598 Studie in Education

34 1 Assessment of Infants and Preschoolers

(2)

Prerequisites : 399, 49U, 4·92 .

Prerequisi tes: Ad m is s i o n to t h e graduate p rogra m ; 5 4 4 , 545; minimum of 26 hours of co ursework leading to t h e MA; consultation with the student's advisor. 599 Thesis ( 3 or

(2)

350 Teaching Students with Moderate Disabilities

(4)

Prerequisit�: 30 1 .

4)

355 Instruction and M anagement of Students with Emotional

and Behavioral Disorders (4)

Course Offerings: Educational Psychology

PrereqLL i s i te: 30 1 .

For course descriptions, visit the PLU cnlaiog online lit www.plu.edu/ print/catalog.

395 Introduction to Language Development and DiSGrders

361 Psycbology for Teacbing ( 3 )

399 Practicum in Special Education ( l or 2 )

Prere q uisites: EDU

263; EP Y 26 1 .

368 Educational Psychology

Prerequisite: consent o f instructor.

(4)

Fo r second ary students who J re not se eking

physical ed u c a t ion 501 Workshops

( 2)

or

special education.

ce r t i fic a t i o n

403 Parent/Professional Partnership in Special Education

in

405 Teaching Srudents with Mild Di abilities

( [- 4 )

5 1 2 Group Process and the lndividual 535 Foundations o f Guidance

(2)

407 Curriculum, lnStroctiOB, and Technology

(4)

Prerequisites: EDUe 400 a n d SPED 30 1 , 405, E D U ; 390, 393, 424.

(2)

P rere qu i s i te: student teaching o r graduate status. Laboratory expe r i e nce as arranged .

408 Transitions nom School to Community

(2)

438 Student Teaching m Elementary School

(5)

550 Beginning Practicum ( 3 )

Conc u rrent enrollment i n EDUC 434 a n d 450.

555 Practi£um ( 3 )

439 Student Teaching in Secondary School

Prerequisi tes: 5 5 0 a n d 56 1 . Prerequisite: Admission

to

(5)

Concurrent enro l l m e n t i n EDU , 4 50 a n d 466.

560 Communication i n Schools

(3)

440 Student Teaching Seminar ( I )

M A/ ert program.

561 Basic Relationships in Counseling

475 Supervising Para-Professionals and Volunteers

(4)

563 Practicum i n Group Process and Leadership

(I)

480 Issues and Problems of Child Abnse and Neglect ( [ )

(2)

485 The Gifted Child

Prerequisite: 5 1 2 .

(2)

4 90 Development in Early Childhood Special Education ( 2 )

565 Advanced Duman Development ( 4 )

A pra'ticum (a m inimum o f one hour each week) i s required i n a school or approp riat agency. P re req u i . i t e : F i fth year o r graduate tat us.

492 Strategies fOT Teacbing Early Learners

PrereL] u isite:

4\1

o r COil

(2)

ent o f i n s t ru ctor.

494 Computer Application in Special Education ( 2 )

566 Advanced Cognition, Development. and Learning ( 3 ) Prerequisite: Ad m i ss i o n t o t h e MA/Ce rt pro g ram o r conse n t" o f

497 Independent Study ( l o r

2)

instru tor.

SOl Off-Campus Workshops i n Special Education ( 1-4)

569 Career Guidance ( 4 )

503 On-Campus Worksbops in Special Education ( 1 - 4 )

570 Fieldwork in Counseling a n d Guidance 575 Mental Health

5 13 Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and

(4)

Instruction

(4)

520 Teaching Students with Special Needs in Elementary

578 Behavioral PToblems (4)

Programs ( 2 )

583 Current I sues in Exceptionality (2-4)

5 2 1 Teaching Stud.ents with Special Needs in Secondary

597 Independent Study ( 1-4 )

Prognms ( 2 )

598 Studies in Education ( 2 )

522 The Role of Health Professionals in Special Education ( 3 )

5 99 The i s (3 or 4 )

523 Educational Procedures for Students with Mild Disabilities

(3) 60

(4)

Prerequisik: 30 I .

(4)

536 Affective Classroom Techniques

(2)

404 Communication and Collaboration ( 3 )

P

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524 Educational Procedures for Students with Developmental Disabilities ( :; )

plea:;ed w i L h t h e i r decision to hav ' par t ici pa ted in the t h ree-two

525 Procedlll'es for Students with Behavior Disorders ( 3 )

THE PLU PROGRAM: T h th r 'e- two $ t udent is aw . rde d a P L degree when the P I . r r 'q u i remen t s are sa tis fied <tnd the progra m of study at t he: ngin e £' I' i ng chooi is co m plelcd. rhe PL deg ree that typically is awarded to three-two students i t h E' B ,l c he lo r o f r t in ph)'sics. he B A in p llysics is well recognize d by engi neeri ng , (hool, a nd is the mo t frequ ntly ;1warded degn:e b y (O lli­ year cho ol w i t h tJlree- two programs. The. p h ys i cs degree c, n be se le c te d by t h ree-two , tudents in all en gi nee r i ng subdisciplines. but st ude n ts wi. h i ng to study c h m i cal engineering may wish to con ider the o p t i o n of obta.ining the SA in chemi stry fro m PLU. Occasional ly, P LU s t uden choos ' lo t ransfer t o an CJl ' i nee ri n g school lhat docs n o t part i ci pate j n the th ree-two pro­ gram. PLU nonel heles - recogn izes t hese students as part i c i p a n t s in t h e t h ree - t w o program and awarcLs them t he appropriale BA degree up o n successful completion of their program at the

526 Advanced Practicum T n Special Educatiou Prl'requ i�ite: 520, 52 1 or qtl iva l e n t .

p ro g r a m .

(2)

530 Assessmellt o f tudeuts with Special Needs Prerequ i i te: SPED .1 0 l .

(_)

(2 )

53 1 �vere and Profound Disabllitie

532 Education and Training of Individuals with Severe and Profound Disabilities 2) 533 Inclusion and Students with Moderate Di abilities ( 2 ) 534 Inclusion and Students with Beilsvior Disorders 535 Inclusion IUl d Students with Mild Disabilit ies

(2)

(2)

537 Issues i n Language Acq isition and Disorders ( 2 ) 538 Issues i n Early Childhood Special Education

(2)

539 Administration of Early ChiJdhood/Speciai Education Programs ( 2 ) 540 Advanced Strategies and Techniques for Teaching in P-3 Grade �ttings ( 2 ) Prerequ isite: 399, 490, 492. 54 1 Assessment of Infanls and Preschoolers ( 2 ) Prereq u isi tes: 399, 490, 492.

555 Supervising Paraeducators in School Settings ( 2 )

568 Internship in Speda1 Education ( 6 ) 575 Collaboration and Team Building

(2)

576 Communication Skills (o.r Collaborative Consultation in Special Education ( 2 )

I n d iv i d u a l departments do n o t p roVide advi

t h e t h ree- two d i rec tor

599 Thesis

' a t i s fied:

I.

o f the fol l o w i n g science and m a thenw t i

( 1 6 ho urs ) : IS I , 1 5 2, 253; 35 1 or Physics 354; Phy ics ( 1 4 h o u rs ) : 1 53 , I S4 , l 63 , 1 64 , 223; Chem istry ( 8 hOLUS): 120 o r 1 25, 33R: (l m p u te r Science a nd .omputer Engineering (6 h ou rs ) : 1 3 1 , 1 44 . 2.(a) For the B A i n p hys ics : comple t i o n o f a n adclition<t1 1 2 h o ur of electives i n sc ien c e and mat h e mat ics fro m !.he fol lo w i n g courses : M at he m a t i cs 33 1 , 356; Physics 233, 33 1 , 3 _� , 334, 336; Co m pu ter cien e a n d E n g i n e er i ng 245 . hem i s t ry 3 4 1 m a ), b e s u I stituted f, r Physic.s 3 3 3 . Th pa r t i uLlr (our e chosen w i l l depend

on

the i n tended s u b d i sci pl l o e a n d the

e n gi n ee ri ng sch o o l 's e n t ra n ce requ ire m e n ts. Students should co nsu l t wlth the program d i rector before choos i ng their

(2)

elect ives.

(3 o r 4. )

of o r ga ni c ch e m istry physic<tl chemi�try

( b ) For t h e BA i n c he m i stry: co m p l e t i o n

at

3.

Paci fic L u the ran

ombine a liberal arts ellucation w i th r igorous study in engi neering. tudents Wll0 comp lete the program earn tw degre .s-one fro m PLU a nd !.he other fro m a n e n !,\ i lH:!e r i ng 5chool. For the wel l p repared t udent , t he total 1 'ngth o f ' l udy i s five yea rs-t h ree years at PLU and two years a t th e engineerin g school, and the prog ram is often re fe r re d to as the Three- Two Engi n<!eri n g Program . M o t ubdi c ip l ine o f e n 'i nec ri ng are ,\va i l able to stud e n ts in t he d u a l - d e gree program . Fortna l agr c m l' r l t s exist witJl olumbia Unjversity in New Yo rk City and Wash i ngto n niver ity i l 1 St. Loui . At both schoub, three-two st u d e n ts fo rm a co mruuni ty. They 'hare re ide nce fac i l i t ies and ft n arc e n roIled in many f the same co u r es . PLU stude n ts who have pa rt ici p ated in t he hree-rwo progra m report t he i r r id1 c ul tural ademi

Co m ple ti on

cours�s ( 4 4 hours): Ma thema tics

Un iversity provide st ude nts w i t h the opponu llit), to

a

t h e P h ysics De p ar t m e n t ) ver)' e arl }, i n

PLU REQUIREM ENTS: I n order to earn a PLU degree in t h e dual-degree p ro g ra m , the following rE' q u i r>mellts m u st be

(2)

Engineering Dual Degree Program

and

(in

m G) ;J;I m m

PLU and t he part icipating el\gin �e r i n g schools rec o m m c n d l i s e t he i r time a t P HJ to secure t he i r academic fo undation. i n ma t hemat i c . physic , and c hem i s t !')" M a t h ski lls a rc parti ularly i m po rta n t to develop, : l.I1 d p o o r m a t h s ki l l s arc lhe most fre q ue n t reason p rospe t i e engi neering st udents fa i l to succeed i n the program.

( 1-4 )

The engi neering du a l - d eg ree progra m

o c: �

t h a I three-two t udents

595 Spedn.I Education: Internship ( J -4)

598 Studies in Education

n the d u a l ­

thei r a c a de m i c p rogram.

590 Research in SpecW Education ( 1 )

597 Independent Study

e

degree p ro g r Ill. All pro p <' ct i v c d ua l ,d cg ree students, regardless of t h ei r int nded engineering subdi s c i p l i n e , s h o u l d consult w i t h

583 Currellt Issues in Exceptionality l2-4)

596 Teclmology and Special Education

Z m m ;J;I

e n g i neering school.

577 The Inclusive Classroom ( 2 )

588 LegaJ, EtbJcaI, and Adminbtrative Issues in Special Education (2)

m

experiences at botl1 schools and are routinely very

(

hemistry 232, 2 3 4 , 3 3 2 . 334) a nd

(

hemstry

34 1 , 3 4 2 , 34 ) .

C(lm p le t i o n of tht: geneT'al u n iverS i t y requirements �l S speci­ fied i n the ca ta log , excep t that the fo l l ow i n g gt' n c ra l re qu i re ­ me n l o are waived fo r al i d ua l -degree stude n t · : ( a ) ompletion of a m i n i mu lll of J 2 semester h o u rs 011 the PL t r a nscr i p t ; ( b ) c o m let ion o f J m i ni m u m o f 40 s e mest e r hOLirs fr m courses n wn b c l'ed 300 and above; ( c ) the requirement that at J a t 20 of the m i n i m u m 40 semester h o u r s of u p p e r-div ision

work final

must b e taken at PLU;

(d)

. t h e requin >l'T1t'nt tbat the

32 se mest e r hours of a s t u d e n t 's progranl he co m p l e te d

in residence at PLU; ( e ) the requ ire ment that the senior semina r/project be c o m p l e ted at PLU. Seru(lr projects fro m th e e n g i neering scbool

schools)

will

(a

cha racteristic of

s a t i s fy the PLU

�('n i o r

Er-accre d ited

pr ject requ irem e n t

fo r

d u al - degree s t u c! <:' n t s upon a pproval <>f t h e p roj ct by the a p p r o pri

a le PLU de partment

chair.

THE ENGINEERING SCHOOL PROGRAM: The .ourst'

of

s t u dy at t he

'hoQI

ngi neerin s school wi l l depend on bo t h the

s

and th

subdis i l l i n e . Between Columbia U n i ve rs i ty and Wash­ n i ersil)l, a p p roxim. teJ y 20 d i fferen t engineering - u b ­ disciplines a re available t o d ual-degree st udents. These include i ngto n

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the more co m m o n subd i s c i p l i nes ( c i v i l , c h e m i cl!, e le ct r i ca l,

nlecha n ical) ,1 11d o t h e rs sIKh as operations researc h , appl ied

mathematics, geological engineer i n g and sys tems science. Details are available fro m the P L program d i re c t o r. to their e ng i n ee r­ ing program, both Colum bia n ivers i t y and \Va h i n g t o n Univer­ sity r q u i re a cu m u l at ive PL g rad e point average of 3.0 or h i g h e r and 'rades of B or better i n p e r t i n e n t mat hematics and sci nce co u rses. Students who do not m ee t these req uirements are co n s idered 011 a ase-by-case basis. Although ·tudmts who choose to t ra n s fe r to a n ot h e r e n g i n ee ri n g school may be able to gai n adm ission with l ightly 10\ r g ra d e s than those required by Col u m b ia University and Was h i n g t o n U n i ve rs i t y, all p rospective e ng i nee ri n g students are w e l l advised to use thi! h igher t a n da rd as a more re a l i s t i c indication of wh a t w i l l be ex p ec t ed of them i n the engineering chool. ACADEM IC EXPECIATlONS: For a d m i s s i o n

..... I!l Z w

For more in(onnatiol/, colltact the dUIlI-degree progra m director irl the Depa rllnellt of Physics or visit t "he program website at www. l1sci.plu. cdIl13-2pro,'rIll7l.

which major c r i t i c al t r a d i t i ons fra me o u r a p p ro a c h e s to l i t e ra ­ t ure and define the i s s u e s that ke e p l i t e ra t ure me an i ng fu l and relevant in our l ives, S t u d e n t s co n s i der i ng E n gl i s h " ilh an em ph asis on l i t e rat u re as a maj o r but who are st il l u ll d ecided, m ight b e g i n with a 200level course. Even t h o u g h no 200-level course i s req u i re d for maj o r s , students may re q ues t t ha t one a p p rop r i a te 200-level co u rse be substi tuted for one s i m i l a r Periods and S urvey s course a t the 300 level. Students are e nco u rage d to take hakespeare ea r ly i n the major. Courses offered t h ro ug h co r re s pon d e n ce , o n - l i ne, and i n de ­ p e n d en t studies are no t ac cep te d to m e e t t h e l i t e r a t u r e req ui re ­ me n t .

All English majors must at l ea st two years of a fo re i gn l a n guage at the un i ve rsity level, o r the e q u i v a l e n t ( see College of Arts and Sciences Foreign

Foreign Language Requirement:

co m p l et e

Language ReqlliremCllts, Option n .

A t least 3 6 a n d up t o 4 4 se m e ste r hours in Engl ish beyond vVriting 1 0 1 , a t lea t 20 hours o f w h i c h m us t b e u p p er division. The fo l l o w i n g course distributions a rc re q u i re d of majors with an emphasis on l iterature: A. Shakespeare (4 semester h o u rs) 3 0 1 S h a kes p e a re B. Periods alld Su rveys (at lea s t 4 semestel" hours from each of the

Major Requiremen.ts:

following lines): I. EARLY

3 5 1 English Medieval L i t eratu re 35 2 C h au cer 3 5 3 English Re n ai s sa n c e Liter at u re

Eng l ish 253.535.874 7 www.plu. edul- cllgl E ngl i s h offers excelknt pre p a ra t i o n for a ny future re q u i r i ng i n tegra t i ve th i nk i ng , s k i l l i n w r i t i n g , discernment i n re ad i n g , an ap p rec i a tio n of human experience and aesdletic values. and the processe o f critical a n d creative expression. Business, govern­ m e n t , technology, education, and publishing are areas where our g rad ua te s frequendy make their c are e rs . Our program o ffe r s e m p ha 'es in literature and w r i t i n g, as we ll as concent rat i o ns in c h i l d re n's l i terature a nd p ub lishi n g . The Engl i s h D e p a r t m e n t also support. dle s t u d y abr a d programs, and we o ffer s t u d y tours to such p l a c es as E u rop e , Australia, and the Caribbean. FACULTY: a mpbeU , Cha ir; Albrecht, Bergman, Carlton, Ey l e r, Jansen, Jones, Kaufman, Lovelace, Distinguished Writer in Residence; Marclls, D. M . Martin, M i r a n d a , Rahn, Rob inson,

English m aj o r with an t' m p h a si s o n l i t eratu re i n t roduces stu ­ d en t s t o t h e great l i terary t r ad i t i o n s of B ri t a i n , orth Amel"ica, and the En gl i s h -.s p eak i ng world. The major in l i t e r a tu re p laces co u rses organized by historical p e r i o d at the heart of the student's pro g ra m , a ll o wi ng s tude n t s to re a d the great works t h a t define the pe r i ods , and to ex p lo re tht' wa y. i n which cultural c o n t ex t s i m p inge upon the l i t erary i m agi na t i on . Students who select the e m p h a s i on lit ra t ure can expect to Ie rn how ensi­ tive readers engage texts through their lnvn s pea k i n g a nd writing, fo llo w i n g their ins ights i n t o the rich pl ea s ures of l i t e ra ry l an ­ gu a ge a n d grow i n g mol' sophisticated in co n t ru et i n g effective literary argu ments. They w i l l also be i n t rod u ced to the ways i n A

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452 Seminar: Theme, Genre Senior Seminar Project: The capstone: senior seminar project is a general university req uirement in al l progTams and majors. Students will customarily satisfy this p re s en ta t io n req ui re m en t in E ngl i s h in their seminar course as a cul mination of their un d ergra d ua t e education, in t h e senior year. Un d e r certain circumstances, students may substitute a n a p p rop ri a te 300level course taken in t he senior year. D. Writing (at least 4 sem ester hOllrs oIany writing course at the 200 to 400 levels).

ENGLISH MAJOR (EMPHASIS ON LITERATURE): The

P

C. Semillar Cat least semester 4 hOllTs} 428 Seminar: Critical Th eo r y 45 [ Seminar: Author

E. Electives (8 semester hours)

D. c a l , B. Tem ple-Th u rs ton.

62

2. M I DDLE 36 1 E ngl i s h Restoration and 1 8 t h - C e n tury 362 English Roman tic and Victorian Literature 3 7 1 Studies in American Literature, 1 820- 1 920 3. LATE 3 6 7 2 0 t h -Cen t u r y B rit i sh L i te r a t u re 3 72 20 t h - C e nt ur y A me r ic a n Po e t r y 3 7 3 20th-Century Am e r i c a n Fiction and Drama 4. LITERATURE AND DIFFERENCE 34 [ F e m i n i s t Approaches to L i terature 343 Post - Co l o n i a l Literature and T h eo r y 374 American E t h n i c Li t e r a t u re

Y

ENGLISH MAJOR ( EMPHASIS ON WRITING): The writing em p h a si s at PLU ha s bee.n des igned for a b ro ad s p ectru m of students, from those wishing to focus on fiction and poet ry, t o those i n te r est ed i n more p ra g m a tic types of writing, to t h o s e set on exploring t heoretical i ss u e s in rhetoric a n d co m p o si t i o n . Foreign Language Requirementl A l l E n g l i s h m aj o r s m u s t co m p l e te at least two )'ears o f a fo re i gn la n g u a ge ,I t the u n i ve r s it y level, o r t h e equivalent (See College of Arts a n d Scien ces Foreign

Language Req uiremen ts, Option I) . Major Requirements: At l e as t 36 s e me ste r hours in E n gl i s h

(excluding Writing 1 0 1 ) , distributed a s fol l ows: A. Writing (at least 20 semester hOllrs in writing, with at least

12


hours lipper divisioll) I . Al leGst 1 2 hour" from <1t least two of t h e fol lowi n g l i nes:

Linguistics or structure of language: Wri t in g/ Composition: one

2 2 7 I maginative v\ r i t i n g I 327 I maginat ive v riting I I 326 \ r i t ing fo r Children

Prospect ive teachers may take Edu ation

Creative

Profes s io n a l S e t t i n g

must

4 2 7 I maginative Wr i t i n g I I I 4 2 8 Sem i nar: Critical Theory

III

Engli h majnr in sat is fy­

:r

For co l l rse descrip tions, visit the PLU catalog Oil/inc at ww·w.plu.edu! p r i nt/catalog. All literature co�/ I'ses fu lfill the gellcral ll lliver ily core IWj ll ircl1Ielit in literature.

I. Lower-Division Conrses

(at least 4 semester h o u rs from l ines I or 2

above)

English majors, and for s t udents considering an English majo r, to satisfy the ge ne ra.! univers ity requirement i n l i te rat ure. Uppn­

divisio ll )

division courses i n literature offered by lhe Depa rtment of En"lish

a ged to t a ke l i terature courses which

contribute to their goa\.

, $

will satisfy the gene ral u n iversity requirement i n li terature as well,

wri ters and which xp and t h e i r

but the fol lowing courses are particubrly recommen led . Th se

experience with t h e history a n d genres o f writing.

[ower-divisi n courses in l i terature give primary attention to the

. Elective (at least 4 semester elective hours ill Englis h beyond

act of reading in d i ffere n t contexts and genres. The courSi:!S e m ­

101)

phasize fo r students [ h e ways i n which fr aming t h e read i ng experi­ ence by d i ffe rent kinds of ques t i on s reveals d i ffe rent t xts, and

CHrLDREN'S LITERATURE: t u d c n t s completing 3 3 3 a n d 8 h o u rs from 326, 3 3 4 , 335 or other app roved courses ( a l l w i t h grades o f B o r h igher) w i l l b

enriches the tmaginative experience o f read in g, lead ing more to

recognized fo r . pecia[ competence

insight o n the part of t h e reader than final an wer . A. Topics in Litera ture

in children's l i terature.

213

MINOR (EM PHASIS ON LITERATURE): 20 semester h o u rs (excluding Wri t i n g 1 0 1 ) , d i :; t ributed as fo [ l ows: 4 h o u rs of

B . Gen res

Shakespeare, 8 hours from Period ' and Surveys (see l i terature

C. Traditions i n Literature

2 1 4, 2 1 5, 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 2 1 8

M jor R q u i re ments), and 8 ho u r ' of elect ives.

230, 23 1 , 232, 233, 234, 2 4 1 , 2 5 1

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON WRITING): 20 semester hours ( ex­ cluding Wri ting 1 0 1 ) , with a t least 1 2 hours in upper division, d is t r i b uted as follows: 12 h o u rs in writing, 4 hours i n literature, 4 h o u rs of elect ive.

11. Upper-D ivision Conrses Designed particu larly for upper-div i s i o n students, usually h u t n o t exclus ively w i t h t h e major i n m i n d . A. B ritish Literatllr"

30 1 , 35 1 , 3 5 2 , 353, 36 1 , 3 6 2 , 3 6 7 B . American Lit eraf!lre 37 1 , 372, 373, 374

MINOR ( EMPHASIS ON PUBLISHING AND PRINTING ARTS): See separate l i s t i n g Li nder Pub/is.hing ami Pri n ti /lg Arts. PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: t udelli ' prepari /lg to teach English in secondary

of t he

The fo llowing courses were designed for students who are not

B . Litemt lire ( 1 2 ..ell1es t e r hOLlrs, with a t l ea s t 4 hOLirs lipper

\"/ril ing

r-

Course Offe rings

42 , 42 Wri t i n g on Special To p ics

e n cour

rts c Ll r ri ultl m,

the School o f Educa t i o n .

consi sten t with the general un iversi t , requirements ( a t least 4 emestcr hours i. n the fo llowing)

Students are

Z G'I

teach in

i ng state certification req u i rements. Cons u l t rour advisor i n

2. S e n i o r Pmjectl e mina r : rhe senior proj e c t , gener Ill' taken in the sen io r year, i ncl udes a capstone pres e n t a t i o n

e

to

take 24 semester hours m i ni m u lll in E n g l ish , and are

advised to fo l low t h e struct ure

o n ficti n

2 24 Travel 'Wr i t i n g 2 2 " Autobiographical Wri ti ng 3 24 F rt:! e - I a nce Wri t i n g 325 Personal Essay

3. Electi

m

St uden ts preparing

elementary schools fol low i n g the Langu age

3 2 Advll nced 'o mposition fo r Teachers c.

529, Adolescen t

E n gl ish major.

Elementary Education:

22 1 Research ,1Ilel Wr it i n g <l

(403)

is e pt:c i a l l y

Literature in the Secondary Cu rricululll, as an elect i ve i ll lhe

it or), Wr i t i n g

3 2 3 v 'r i t i ng i n

o n e course

( 3 28

recommended)

a. Imaginative Wr i t i ng

b. Exp

CO U f se

'dIOO/S shoLild arrange for W I advisor ill

alld Educatio l/. Please also

sec

the School of Education

sect ioll of

tit is catalog.

Secondary Education:

Student. p reparing to teach i n j u n i o r

o r sen i o r h ig h s c h o o l m a y e ,

rn

C. Sp ecial Swdil.'s

both English

333, 334, 335, 34 1 , 343,428 , 4 5 1 , 452, 49 1 ,597 ID. Writing, Language, and Theory Wri t i n g 1 0 l , E n g l ish 22 1 , 224, 225, 227, 3 23, 324. 32 5, 32(>.

327, 328, 403, 42 1 , 4 2 5 , 426, 4 27 , 428

e i t h e r a B a c h lor o f A r t s i n

Engl ish w i t h cert i fi c a t i o n from the School o f Education, o r

J.

Bachelor of Arts i n Educa t i o n w i t h a tea c h i n g major in En­

IV. Publishing and Printing Arts 3 1 1 , 3 1 2, 3 1 3, 3 1 4

glish. The English maj o r with an emphasis i n literat ure and the Engl i. sh m aj o r with an emphasis in '''' riting rna)' both be pursued by p rospective teacher . Secon d a ry educa t io n s t u ­

dents m us t ful fi l l a l l requirements for the E n g l i s h major: 1 of the Fo rei g n L a nguage Requ i rements ( two years of a fo reign l a n guage at the u n iversity level, o r t h e e q u.iva[e n t ) ; at lea t 36 and no In re t h a n 44 c re d i t h o u rs in English; a n d all O p t ion

the spe

illc req u i re m e n t

o r t he major either in l itera t u re o r

i n w r i t i ng. State cer t i fication for tt;'achers also mand ates the fol low ing r <]uirements, which are a n overlay to the major.

urses taken to sat isfy the m aj o r can also be courses t h a t satisfy t h e state cert i fication requirements. Engl ish l i tera t u re; one course American l i terature: one co u rse omparative l iteratu re:

one

co urse

2 1 3 Topics in Literature: Themes ond Authors - LT (4 ) 2 1 4 Poetry - LT ( 4 ) 2 1 5 Fiction - LT (4 )

2 1 6 Fiction: Emphasis 0 .0 Cross-CuJtural Perspective - C, ll"

(4 )

2 1 7 Fiction: Emphasis o n Alternative Perspectives - A , ll"

(4)

2 1 8 D ram - LT (4 ) 22 1 Research and Writing - WR (2 or 4 )

224 Travel Writing - WR ( 4 ) 225 Autobiographical Writing - WR (4)

( 2 1 4, 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 232, 2 3 3 , 3 4 1 , 343, appropriate sem inar)

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227 Imaginative Writ ing I - WR ( 4 )

English as a Second Language

P rereq u isi te: \.lJ R 1 T 1 0 1 o r i ts equivalent, Advanced Placement, or co n s e n t of instru ctor. 230 Contemporary Literature - LT J: 11'1 oJ C) Z III

253.535.7325 www. plu.edtll-aceli

(4)

23 1 Masterpieces o f European Literature - LT

(4)

PLU Minor

232 Women's Literature - A , LT ( 4 )

An interdisci plinary minor i n Teac h i ng English as a Second Language is ava i lable This program can be used to meet the minor req u i re men t in E l e m e n ta r y Education and leads to an additional endorsement for e l emen t a ry or secondary education students. S t u d e n ts majoring in foreign languages in the College of Arts and Sciences may also find this minor a useful addition to their programs.

233 Post-Q,lonial Literature - C , LT ( 4 ) 234 Environmental Literature - LT

.

(4)

239 Environment and Culture ( 4 ) 24 1 American Traditions in Literature - LT ( 4 )

(4)

25 1 British 1i-aditions in Literature - IT

TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

30 I Shakespeare - II ( 4 )

( 1 6 hours requ i re d) Anthropology 1 02 Exploring Anth ropology: Culture and Society - , S I ( 4 ) Language/Educatio n 445 Methods for Te a ch i ng Foreign Languages and English as a S e con d Language ( 3 ) T heo r ie s of La n g u a ge Ac q uis i ti o n ( 4 ) Language 446 Language/Education 475 P racti c u m i n Te a c h ing English as a Second La ngu a ge ( I ) Language/Education 470 Curriculum, Materials and Instruction for Teaching English as a Second Language (4)

3 1 1 The Book in Sodety ( 4 ) 3 1 2 PubUsh lng Procedures (4) 313 The Art of the Book I

(4)

3 1 4 The Art of the Book I T ( 4) 3 2 3 Writing i n Professional Settings - WR ( 4 ) 324 Free-Lance Writing - WR ( 4 ) 325 Personal Essay - WR (4) 326 Writing for Children - WR

(4)

327 rmaginafive Writing U - W R (4) 328 Advanced Q,mposition for Teachers - WR (4)

A.C.E. Language Institute

Re q uired for c e r t i fi cat i o n by t h e School of Education.

333 Children's Uterature - II

(4)

334 Special Topic i n Children's Literature - LT

lay be repeated for credit with different topic. (4)

335 Fairy Tales and Fantasy - II

34 1

The A .C.E. Language Institute ( operated by the American Cu lt ura l Exchange) is an affiliate of PLU offering i n tensive Engli s h lang ua g e classes, which are designed to prepare interna­ ti o n al students for studies i n U.S. colleges and universities, or for professional work req u i ring E n g lish proficiency.

(4)

Feminist Approaches t o Literature - A, LT ( 4 )

343 Voices o f Diversity: Post-Colonial Literature and Theory

FACULTY: B illi ngs Director; Biggs, Haggerstone, Lawrence.

- C, LT

The faculty at A.C.E. La ngu age Institute has ext nsive training and exp e r ie n ce in te achi ng Eng l ish as a Second Language, and all hold the terminal d eg ree of Masters of Arts in Teaching Engl i sh as a Second Language ( TESL) or its equivalent. H av in g lived, traveled, and taught English in many countries throughout the world, both the faculty and staff have gained a n awareness of other peopl es their languages, and their cultures.

,

(4)

3 5 1 English Medieval Literature - cr ( 4 ) 352 Chaucer - cr ( 4 )

353 English Renaissance LiteratUJ'e

-

u:

(4)

361 Restoration and 1 8th-Century LiteratUJ'e - LT ( 4 ) 362 Romantic and Victorian Literature - IT 367 20th-Century British Uterature - LT

,

(4)

A.C.E. CURRICULUM: The A.C.E. curriculum is an i n tensive multi-level p ro g r a m from High Beginning to Pro ficien cy. Students study required courses fo r 20 hours per week and can choose an additional 4 h ou r s of classes. The A.c.E. curriculum is based on content and exper ie n ti ai l e a r n i n g which allows students to improve their language proficiency while le ar n i ng about new topics and exploring the local co m m u n it y Upon arrival, students take a placement test to determine t h e i r starting level. Each level requires approllimately 10 weeks to co mpl et e .

(4)

3 7 1 Studies in American Literature, 1 820-1920 - LT

(4)

372 20th-Century American Poetry - LT ( 4 ) 373 2Oth·Century American Fiction and Drama - LT ( 4 )

374 American Ethnic Literatures - A, LT ( 4 )

.

403 The English Language (4) 421 Tutorial in Writing - WR ( ) -4 )

CERTIFI CATES AND RECOMMENDATIONS:

A plan of stu d y must be approved before the student may regis­ ter for the co u rse.

Certificate of General English: S tud en ts who suc c e ss ful ly complete the Advanced Level ( Level 5 of 6) will be awarded the Certificate of Completion for General English.

425 Writing on Special Topics- SR, WR (4) 427 Imaginative Writing m - SR, WR F l) r

n i ors o n l y.

(4)

Certificate of Academic Proficiency: Students who s u c cess fu l l y

complete the Proficiency Level (Level 6 of 6) will be awarded the Certificate of Graduation for Academic Proficiency.

428 Sem.i.nar: Critical Theory - cr, SR ( 4 )

Recommended for p ros p ecti ve gradu a te s tu de n ts .

Director's Recommendation: PLU's Engl ish language profi­ ciency requirements for admission can be satisfied with a recommendation from the A.C.E. director. Students who main­ tain good attendance and earn a grade of A o r B i n all P ro fi­ ciency Level classes qualify for this recommendation.

45 1 Seminar: Author - LT, SR ( 4 ) 452 Seminar: Theme, Genre- cr, S R (4) 4 9 1 Independent Studies 597 Graduate Research

64

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The A .

Course Offerings

.

F.. Lang uage ills / i l l/ t£' is located at 1 2002 Park l\vcl1 ue .ills/

Ilorth of 1 2 1 st Sl reet. Phone: 253.535.7325 FAX: 253.535.8794

High Begbming Level Read jng and V r i r i ng o m Jn u n jcation Sk i lls

E-mail: a ce li @pl ll. edu

Listening

m

Voca ular), and Sen tence B ui l d i ng

Intermediate Level

Environmental Studies

Rea d in g and Wri tin g Movie Liste ni ng and Vocabulary

253.535 .8720 11Iww.p//.I.edlll -el1vt

Grammar

High Intermediate Level Rea d ing and Iv r i t i n g

ul ture and Co mm u n i t y I nteraction Curren t Is ues L i sten i n g and D iscussion

P r on uncia t j on

Advanced Level Reading and Wr it ing Research and Oral Presentation

Academi Li s ten i n g ,rammar

Proficiency Level riting

PLU Audit Audit Revi w

Academic Skills ·tudents may bl! granted p e r m ission to take re gular university

classes fo r credit. This option provides st udents an opportunity to earn credits toward their degree while co m pl e t i n g their advanced courses i n En gl i s h as a Second La n gu a ge .

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS:

A .C.E. Language Institute has a lo ng-

e t a blished commun ity-based h os t family program fo r s t ude n ts who wish to l ive with a U.S. fa m i l y fo r o n e or more se m es t ers . > a nd p re fe re nce s , students are placed with the American family most suitable fo r t h e m . These fa m i l ies-a l l carefully screened by t h e institute-provide s tud en ts with room or room and meals at rea so n ab l e rates. The rooms ar equipped with a desk, ch air, and good l ighti n. g in a dd iti o n to stan d ard bedroom furniture. Each host family anJ their i n ternational student agree upon the fam il y r ule s a n d si g n formal, written statement. Weekend and/or holiday visits wi th an American fam i ly c a n also be a rranged.

Based on mutual l i kes, d is l i ke

a

Language Institute a 'sists its students

with career choices, col l ege pla ceme n t , immi gra t i on m atters,

medical and dental n: .fe r r a ls , and perso na l

ACTIVITIES:

conce rn s .

pecial cultural and social aetiviti

s a r e planned

regularly for st ude n ts . In addition, field trips add si gnifi c ant l y to

cultural enrichment. Students and staff take trips to Mt. Rainier, local museums, art galleries, zoos, children's day c a re centers, and re ti re m e nt homes. Students ean also participate in intramural sports activities su h as oecer, volleyball, and basketball. Six tennis courts, a golf course, a sw i m m in g pool, and several gymnasium gi 'e students addi tional opportuni ties for recre­ ation. Help i s also provided t students who want to join groups or take part in vol u nt ee r services ...vl,ile in Taco ma. Language mentors are U.S. stud e nt s and adul ts wh are intere ted i n engaging i n ternational students in free conve r.s a t i o n one-on-one or in mall groups .

LANGUAGE MENTORS:

SCHOLARSHIPS:

o z

Available after the fi rst 'ession for those students who de monstrate financial need.

II'

-t c: o

m II'

36

co m pl et ed

se.mester h o urs,

with

grade of C or h igher.

To enhance th e for ma l educ a ti on a l e xp er ienc e , the fol low i n g are als a v ai labl e to A . C . E . L ang u a ge Institute st u d e nt s :

COUNSELING: A. .E.

::a

FACUlTY: committee o f b c u l ty admi nisters this program: Swank, Chair; Bergman, Fole y, Garrigan, Hansen, Rowe, Teska, Yerian.

Credit Courses: Certain pread m i t t ed , qualified, advanced-level

HOST FAMILIES:

<

The Environmental Studies P rogr a m at PLU exam i nes the rela­ t i ons h i p between h u m a n s and the e nvironment through .1 wide va r i e t y o f perspec tives wit hi n the university curriculum . The i ntegrative a p pr oa c h of the program, essent ial to the devel o p ­ ment of an understanding of the global im pact of human civili­ zation on the natural environment of o u r plan e t, encourages students to b lend many perspectives un environmental issues i n to their program of st u dy. The program, in k eping with the broad l i be ra l arts objectives o f the univeL ity, offers a maj o r or a m in or in Environmental Studies. 't udents have the opportunity t o l i nk environmental t h emes to any area of the cu rricul u m they sel ec t in t h ei r c m ple­ mentary major or minor. The program is over een by an i nterdisciplinary fa c u l t y com­ m i ttee. Students i n te r t d in t he Enviroum nlal Studies major or mi nor hould meet with the chair of the En imnmental S t u d i es Com m i tt e e.

om m u n icat i on Skills

Grammar and

Z

[ . Foundations for .Envlronmental Studies 4 semester h o u rs elect one of the ol lo w i ng courses, which introduce tudents to e nv i ronm e n t al i sues through a m u ltidisciplinary and i n tegrated a pp roa ch . These courses involv the co nst ruction and i n terpretation of arguments from a variety of perspec­ t ives : Environmental 'tud ies/Geoscienccs [ 04 C o ns er va t ion of I a t ur al Re so u r ces Engl ish /Religio n 239 Environ ment , nd Culture 2. Disciplinary Breadth Students are required to take courses that provide an in - d e pth s tudy and elCposure to environmental i ss u s within d is c i plin es . A. The EnviTonmenl and Science R s e me s te r h urs Select two courses from the following, wh ich emphasize the und rstanding of scientific rea s on i n g a.nd argument , the interpretation of data and r da tion h ips in the natural wo rld, and the ci e n t i fi c context f en viron men tal issues. The c o ur 'es m us t be from d ifferent dep a rt me n t s : B io lo gy 1 1 6 I n t rodu c to ry Ecology Bi logy 424 Ec ology Chemistry [04 l1vi ronmen tal J he mis try l e S i c n c es 334 Hydrogeology B. The Environment and Society 8 semester hours Select two courses fro m the follow i ng , which fo cus on the u nderstanding of the institut ions within which e n v i ro n ­ mental decisions are made and investigate the i mpl eme n ta ­ t ion and i m p l ications of environmental Jecision . The courses must be from d i fferent departments: Economics 1 30 Global and Environ mental Economic Princ iples Economics 330 Environmental and atural Resource Economics Pol i tical Science 346 E nv iro n m e nta l Pol itics and Policy

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C. The Environment and Sensibility 4 semester hours Selec t o n e c o u rse from t h e fo l l o w i n g , which exa m i n e the

I n t e r n a t i o n a l Core Psychology

ways i n which nat ure exists i n human consc i o u sness, values,

and perceptions. S t u d e n ts receive g u i dan ce in ca reful read­ ing, t h o u g h t fu l w r i ting, d n d 'ensi t ive atten tiveness t o n a t u re a n d to env ironmental issues: English 234 E n v i ro n me n t al L i tera t u re E n g l i s h 324 ree-Iance Wri t i n g ' Rel igion 365 Christian Moral Issues ( Enviro n m e n ta l E t h i cs o n l y ) "Stlldents I1IlIst lIotify thc ill5tructor of their illtellt 10 comple!e a

� f­ Z w

:i: z o DC Z > Z

Rel i g io n 365 Christian Moral

Issues ( E nviro n m e n t a l Ethics

o n l y)

Studellts 1/111.11 llOtify the instructor of their in ten I to comp/erc a ill Ell vi rn 111/1 C/I tal :'{lIdics so thllt t h ey «111 JOCIIS their illde­ pendcllt \.vork ill the coursc Oil o n (;'m!iro l l l l l c n tn i then-H' o r isslie. *

lIIinor

4. Environmental Studies 350 Environmental Methods of Investigation

4

semester h ours

major in E,jvirOIl1,rcl1tal

Course Descriptions

pendent work

For course descrip tiolls, visit the PLU catalog olliinc

Studie, so rhar they mil fOCils their imic­ in the CO ll rse on {HI Gll VirOll ttlen [oi lhflnc or issl/e.

3. Elective Courses 4 s e me s t e r h o u r s S e l e c t o n e course t h a t i n t eg r ates a n d a p p lies enviro n m en ta l concep ts w i t h i n a special t o p i c area. This course s h o u l d be selected in consu l t a t i o n with t h e i r program advisor: nv i ro n m e n ta l S t u d i e s 325 E c o l o g y, Co m m u n i t y and C u l ­ ture i n Australia E nviro n m e n tal S t u d.ies 487 Spec i a l To pics in Enviro n m e n tal S t u d ies I n terna t io n a l Core 24 I Energy, Resources, and Pol l u t i o n

w

2 4 ! E nergy, Reso u rces, a n d P o l l u t i o n 464 Env i ro n m e n t,ll Psych ology

International Core Psychology

1 04 Conservation of Natural Re, ources - NS, SM ( 4 )

325 Ecology, Community and Cultu.re i n Australia ( 4 ) 350 Env ironmental Methods of Investigation ( 4 ) Prere q u i s i t es: Lines 1-3 c o m pleted o r consent o f i. n s t r u c t o r. 487 Special Topics in Eoviromnental StudJes

( 1-4)

495 Internshjp i n Environmental Studies (4) By co nse n t o f t h e chair o f Envi r onm e nt a l S tudies on ly.

Psychology

o r additional a p p roved courses t h a t meet o u tcomes/

499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR ( 4 ) A substa n t i a l proj e c t a n d a p u b l i c p res en t a t i o n o f t h e results are required. Pr e re q u i s i te : E VT 350.

objectives

4. Advanced In.tegrative Courses 8

www.plu .edu/

49 1 Independent Studies ( I -4)

242 Po pula t i o n , H u n ge r, and Poverty

4114 E n v i ro n m e n t a l

el t

print/ca t a log.

sem e s t e r h o ur s

Al l majors m ust c o m p lete the fo llow i ng courses. It is expected that they will have com pleted all of t he o ther requ i rements

before t hese fi nDI cou rses. nv ironmental Studies I n v e s t i ga t i on E n v i ro n m e n ta l S t u d ies

350 E nviro n mental Methods of

499

Capstone: S e n i o r Project

Additional Requirements: A com plementary m i no r o r major in a n o t h e r d iscipli ne. An i n t e rn s h j p i s requ i red, either fo r the capsto n e project o r a s a s e p a rate experience. S t udents m u s l receive a pp r o va l fo r t h e i r i n ternship by t h e c h a i r of E n v i r o n m e n tal Studies. A m i n i m u m o f 2 0 hours of upp e r - d i v i s i o n cred i ts is re­ q u i red in the major.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 2 0 s e m est er h o ur s , completed with gr a d e of

or h igher.

!. Environment and Science 8 semesler h o u rs Se.lect t w o COLlrses from the fo l l o w i n g w h i c h exa m i ne the scientific fo u n d a t ions o f enviro n me n t a l problems: Env ironmental S t u dies/Geosciences

1 04

Geosciences

'olls e rvat ion of

Na t ur ; !l Resources

B i o l o g y 1 1 6 I n troductory Ec o l o gy hem i s t ry 1 0 4 fuw i r o n m e n t a,l Chemistry Stllde:llIs majoring i'l a ,ratl/rai scicl1ce discipline a l ld who have takell II higher-level Chem istry CO II rse ( 1 20 o r above) will be allowed to substitu te IUlOtha cuurse in cOIJsultotioll with the EnviroJll1lental Stl/dies Committee.

2. Environment and Society 4 semester hours Select o ne cou rse fro m the fol l o w i n g which p u rsue t h e 'tudy o f i n s t i t u t ions where envi ro n mental perspect ives and pol icies are a p p l ied:

Economics 1 3 0 Glo bal and E n v i ro n m e n ta l E c o n o m i c Princ i p l e.'

Eco nom ics 3 30 Environmental and Na t ur a l Re so u r ce E c o n o m i cs Pol i t ical S c i e n ce .346 E n v i ro n m e ntal Politics a n d Pol i c y

3. Envlromneot and Sensibility 4 s e m e t e f hours Select o n e course from t h e fo l lowi n g which exa m i ne values, perce p t i o n , and

e xpres s i o n as they relate to enviro n mental

issues : Engl ish

234

nv i r o n m e n t a l Litera t u re

English/Rel igion 239 E nvironmen t a n d C u l t u re E n gl ish 324 Free-lance Wr i t ing* 66

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2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 73 78 www nsci.piu. edu/geos

The geo sc i e n ce s are d i s t i n c t fro m other natu ral sciences. The study o f the earth is i n terdisci p l i nary a n d h i sto r i c a l , b r i n g i n g k n ow l edg e fro m many other fi eld to help so l ve problems. Geoscie n t ists i nve s tig a te con t i n e n ts, ocea ns, a nd the a t m o s p h ere, a n d e m p ha s i ze both the p rocesses t h a t have c h a n ge d a n d are c h a n g i n g the earth t h ro ugh time and the res u lts of those p rocesses, s u c h as rocks a n d sed i ments. O ur fa s t - r i s i n g h u m a n p o p u l a t i o n is dependent u p o n the e a r t h fo r food, water, shelter a n d energy a n d m i neral r e s o u rceS . S t udy i n t he geo s c i e nc es r e q u ires c r ea t i v i ty a nd the abil i ty to i n tegrate. Geologists observe processes Jnd p rod uc. ts i n the field and in the l a b o ra t o r y, merge d ive rse d a t a , de vel o p rea so n i n g skills that apply t h ro ugh geologic time and create and i n terpret maps. The fie l d goes b eyo n d p u re research scie nce, and i n c ludes applied t o p i cs l ike the rel a t i o n s h i p s o f n atu r a l eve n t s snch as earthquakes and vol c a n oes w i t h h u m a n societies. The Depart ment o f Geoscien ces r e c og n i z es that it is n o lo n g e r s u ffi c i e n t ,i us t to have k no w l e d ge of the fac t s of the. fie J d ; successfu l s t u dents m u s t h a v e q u a n t i t a t i ve skills a n d be able to c o m m u n icate clearly through w r i t i n g and spea king. Lab o r a tory


experien es arc an i nte gr a l part of all co u rses. Many courses i nvo lv the us' o f m i cros opes, in ] u d i ng L he de pa rt m e n t ' s sc a n n i. n g electron m icroscope. om p u t e es are u s ed in m os t cOllr'es to help s t ude nt understand fu ndament I p he n o m e n a . obtain c u r rent i n forma tio n , and comm u nicate resu lts . F ie l d t ri p s re i n c l uded in ma n ' courses. Pac i fi c L u t h e r a n n i ve rs i t y is 1 ( • ted at the l e ;l d i n g edg western North America, i n the Puget Lowla nd, between tbe J ramatic enery of t h e O lympic u n t a i n s and the ascade Ran ge . Pierce Q u n t y has d iverse ge o l o gy. wh ich is re fle cte d in elevat i o ns t h a t ranoe from sea l evel to more th ,l n 1 4 ,000 feel Geoscien e gr. duate wh leel to work after completing a PLU degree a re employed by tile U. S. Geological Survey. reso ur ce companies, gove rn men t a l ag�ncies, a n d private-sector firms. Many graduates ar clHrentl y empl yed in ge o te ch n i cal and envi ronmental fields. Gradu ales who co mbine g e o sc ien ces with education are employed in p ri mary a nd Tcondary educJtion. Careers in geosciences often req u i re pos t - g radu a te degrees. Many B m a j o r, have been s uccess ful at maj r rese a rch graduate schools.

FACUIl'Y: Benham, Cllair;

Foley, Lowes. McKenney, Whitman.

The Bachelor of Sc ience degree is in te nd ed

as a

p re-p rofessional

degree, for s t u den ts interested in gr a d u ate school o r working in geo sc i en ces . The B ac he lo r of Arts deg r ee is the m i n im u m p rep a r atio n appropriate for t he fiel d and is best co m b i n ed with other degree progr ms, such

as majors i n social s c i en ces or the

m i n o r i n Environmental Studies. Th d epa rt m e nt str ngly recomm nels that ail s t u d e nts co m ple te Math 140 or h i gher before enroiling in 300-level and h i gher courses in geosciences . Studen ts sh Jllid also

note that upper-division

4.

con si derations for hon or� i ncl ude research, geoscience-related e m p l oy m e n t , a n d pa r t i c ipat i on in prof< � ­ Other activities: Positive

i n vol ve m e n t in the d e pa r tm e n t , doing i ndependent

sional organ izat ions.

print/catalog.

Our Changing Planet - NS, SM ( 4 )

102

General Oceanography - NS, S M ( 4 )

103

Earthquakes> Volcan(H!s, and Geologic Hazards - NS, SM

104

Conservation o f Natural Resources - NS, S M (4)

105

Meteorology - NS, SM ( 4 )

Geologic Principles - NS, SM ( 4 ) This course me ets state education certification req u i remen t s fo r content in p h ys i c a l and historical ge o log y. 201

323

eosciences; courses i ncl ude: 20 1 plus at least two lower-d iv i s ion from 1 0 1 . 1 02 , 1 03, 1 04, 1 05; 8 credit from 324, 3 2 5 , 326, 32 7, 329; 8 credits from 3 23, 328, 330, 332, 334, 335, 341 , 350, 360; J credit of 390; I c red it of 495 and 2 credits of 499. 425 recommended. Required s up port i n g courses include: eh mistr)' 1 04, J 20 or 1 25. Op t io ns reflect a student's in tere ts a nd are dl.'i C ussed with n ad isor.

BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION:

See School

or EdIlCCltiMI.

324

Igneous Petrology - NS, SM ( 2 )

Prerequisites: 325

I . 1 . 2 0 1 . 326, Or c o n S('!1 t o f instructor.

Structural Geology - NS, SM ( 4 )

P re req u is i te : 1 3 1 . 20 1 . o r consen t o f i nS l ructor. 326

Optical Mineralogy - NS, SM ( 2 )

Prerequisite: 1 3 1 , 20 I , o r consen t o f ins tructor.

Stratigraphy and Sedimentation - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 2 0 1 or co nsent o f insturctor.

Paleontology - N5, SM ( 4 )

Prerequ isite: 1 3 1 . 20 I , or consent o f inst ructor. 329

Metamorphic Petrology - NS, SM ( 2 )

Prerequ isites: 1 3 1 . 20 1 , 326. o r c on se n t" o f inst ructOr.

Maps: Images of the Earth - NS. SM ( ,� ) Prerequ isite: prev i o u s science ( g eo s ci t: n ce p r ferredl . m a t h o r co m p u t e r science co ur se o r co n s e n t o f i nstruclor.

330

332

Geomorphology ( 4 )

334

Hydrogeology - NS, S M ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 1 3 1 , 20 1 . or consent o f i n s t r u ctor. 335

Geophysics - N5, SM (4)

Prerequisites: 1 3 1 o r 2 0 1 , one semester o f calculus, physics 34 1

Energy and Mine.ral Re ourus for the Future - NS, SM

(4)

P rereq u i s i tes : 1 3 1 . 20 1 ,

or

consent of i nstruc tor.

Marine Geology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 1 02 , 1 3 1 , 20 1 . o r consen t o f instructor.

of cou rses in ge scien s, c()m p l eted with g ra de of or hig h e r. Req u i red: 20 I and at least three upper division co urses (a m i n i lll Lun of 8 upper- d i vision cred i t h o u rs) .

360

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: [ n

rec g n i t i o n of o u ts t a n d i n g work the design . tion with Depar tmental HOllors m ay be g r an t e d

390

to Bachelor

geo l o g)' courses p re fer re d . )

f Sc it'nc grad uates by

a

vote of the fac u l ty of the

Depart ment of eoscicnces. based upon the s t udent's perfor­ mance in these areas: 1 . olnse work: The grade po i n t average in geos cie nce courses

mUst be at least . 50. 2. Wrirfen IVork: From the t i me a student d e c l ares a major in g eo sc i e n ce s , co p ies () o utstanding work ( e.g., l a b o r a to r y r ports, po. t r pr�)j<,ntati n . written repo rts ) w i ll be kept fo r later s u m mar vallUl tion. 3. Oral (OIIl IIl Hrrira tio1!: t uden ts m u s t evidence a b i l i t y to commu nicate effediv('\y as i nd i ca t e d by the sum of t h ei r participation in cl ass discUSSlO ns, Se m i Jlars, h el p sessions, and t eac h i n g assi t. ntship work.

( h igh­

school-level or above ) , o r consent of in structor.

350

M I NOR: 20 emester hour�

Mineralogy - NS, SM ( 4 )

Prereq u i s i tes: 1 3 1 , 20 1 o r co n s en t of instructor.

328

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: :n se meste r hours in

m VI

(4)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 44 s

2 0 1 . 3 24, 3 25, 3 26, 327 , 3 2 9, 335 <Ind 425; plus two from 3 2 3 , 328. 330, 3 3 2 , 334, 34 1 , 350, or 360; o ne credi t o C 390; 498; 2 c r edi ts o f 4 9 9 . e cessar y ' up po r t i ng courses i n l ude: C h e m i s t T Y 1 20 or 1 25 ; Physics 1 5 , 1 26 ( 1 35 and 1 36 labs) (or Physics 1 53 , 1 54 and lab ) ; Math ematics 1 5 1 and either 1 52 or Comp uter S c i e n ce 1 20. At least one additio na.! hemistry co urse is rec o m m e n d e d fo r preparation or grad uate school. Bio lo g)' 32 and a dd it i on al cou rses a.re rec mmended when p l eo n to l o gy is a major interest.

m Z ('\

101

327

me s t e r hours i n

o VI ('\

For COl lrse descriptions, visit the PLU mtalog olllille at www.pl u.edu/

courscs are offer ed on a two-yea r eye! . Early declaration of majors o r minors in geosci en ces will facilitate development of individual programs and av o i d s c hed u l i ng conflict-·. geosciences; co urses incl ude: one from 1 0 I . 1 02, 1 03, 1 04 o r 1 05;

m

Course Offerings

Geology of Washington - NS. SM (4)

Prerequisite: p rev i o u s geoscience o r COTlsent of ins t r u c to r.

Field Trip - NS ( I )

Prerequisite: 1 3 1 , 20 I , or co ns e n t o f i n s t r u c t o r. (300- level 425

Geologic Field Mapping - NS, SM ( 5 )

Prerequisites: p re v ious 300-1e e l

ge ol og y cou rses a n d consent of

instructor. 491

Independent Studies ( 1 - 4 )

497

Research ( 1 -4)

O p e n t o upper-Jivision students. 498

Seminar - NS ( I )

499

Capstone: Seminar - SR ( 2 )

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ISSUE CONCENTRATIONS:

G lobal Studies

1 . Comparative Eth n i dt ies a. Requ ired: A n t h ropology 300 t h n i c G ro u p b. Eled ive.s:

2 5 3 .5 . 5 . 7 1 3 2 wlVlV. p lu. cdlll-g lst

At l east

The ] lo b a l S t u d i e � Program is a response to global t re nd s L h a t

i ncreas i n gly affect o u r l i ves . The program focllses o n t h e forma­ tion and emergence u f the m o der n world and i t s gru\ i ng eco­

nomic, c ul t u ra l , polit ical, and ecolog i c a l i n terdependence. B y

10

o ...

ex-perience. tl1e Global

tudies

A nt h r r logy

u n d e rstand

English 2 3

t udie

m ajor

it is

a

a

Music 1 2 0 Music a n d Cult ure Religion [ 3 1 Rcli�ions of South Asia Re l i g io n

Rel ig i o n 392 Gods, M a g i c , and ( also An th ropo l o s')'

Span i s h 3 2 2 L a t i n A m e r i c a n Cultur e a nd C i v i l i z a t i o n

a. Requ ired:

Eco nom ics 34 1 Eco no m ic D evel op m e n t : Compar a L i ve T h i rd vVo rld -' t rat egies

b. Electives: A n t h ropology 3 5 1 Women, Colonizution, and D e vel op m n t

Expl u r i n g A n t h ropology: Culture

Engli. h 233 Post-Co l o n ial Literuture

I n t m a t ional Core 242 Po p ul a tion , Hunger, and Pover t y I n ternational _ore History

ne area - sludie

H i sLory

omp(Jll c l1t

Majors are strongly en ouraged to participate in a study abroad program overseas, although local i mernships related to an area concentration may al 0 bl: appro ed. Prc-approv d credit equivalent to 4-8 semester hours may be obtained i f

P l . appro t: d study

4.

abroad

programs and major'. S tude.nts w i l l n rmaliy

req u irement by com pleti ng

499.

GlobaJ Environment

a

research

Chemistry

satisfy t h i s

{llId

project or paper i n

1 04

Geosciences

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or

.Enviro n me n t a l

1 04

I n teIl1il t iol1al T

1 nt e rn at ion a l Econom ics

B i o l ogy 424 Eculogy

se nior project is a gentra l uo iversity requireme n t i n a l l

U

335, H is t o r y 338,

B i ology l i li I n t rOd uctory Ecology o r

E . Sen ior Rese{lrch Project

L

4 1 , I- I i.sto r y

a. Required:

semest r-long prog ra m .

C

develop i n g

b. Plect i ves: l3u s i n e s 355 lobal Operations B u s i ne . 408 Internat ional Busi ness Law Busine, s 460 I n ternational Marketing Econ mics .37] industrial Organization and Public Policy Global Stu die, 493 Global Studies I n te rnsh i p Pol i tic< I Scien e 3 3 1 I n lernational Reiatic n s Political Sci �ll ce 347 Politic 1 Economy

.lllege of Arts and S c i e n ce fo re i g n la ng u ag e requi rt'ment. This may be accom p l ished t h rough a proficiency exa m i na t i o n or t h r ugh the equiva lent of 16 semester h ours u f co u rsework.

I

a

Busines' 3 5 2 G l obal Manag m e n t

F

on

339, Languages 272, S p a n i s h 3 2 2 ) .

F.co n o m ics 3 3 1

to thei r co ursework and at a leve l consis t e n t with O p tion 1 o f

I

foeuse

a. [(etj u ireci:

Students m u s t dem o n s t ra te p roficiency in a lan guage r e le v a n t

C

which

3. GlobaJ Business

tration and one fro m ano Lher.

A

lobal Studies I n te r nsh i p

course

( for exa mple, French

pon approval o f the p rogram cha i r,

C. La�lgli age

P

ases in Developlllt:nt

region or co u nt ry o f particular s t ud e n t imercst

s t ud ents may choose to take t h ree w u rses from a n t' concen­

68

246

496 Seminar: The Third World

Glubal S t u dies 49 -

B . Issue Area Can eutratiolts ( 1 6 semester hours) Four courses must be taken from one of the five concentra­

lob a l Stud ies

H istory and Perspect ives on Devel­

opment

c. History ( 4 ) 3 . G lobal Studies 4 9 9 Rese< r h Seminar ( 4 )

Th

245

I n k rn a t i o na.l Core

emeSler h o u r s )

a

10rals

392)

2 . Development Issues

(4) H isto ry 2 1 5 M ode rn World

students parlicipate i n

sia

heology

hristian

Religion 390 S t u d ie' in the H i s t o r y of Religions

Pr i n c i pl es

D. Experi entia l

Religions o( East

Religion 344 Theological Stud ies

b. Econ()mic� 1 30 Glohal and Environmental Economic

(h -

1 32

Religion 247

and ' o ciety (4)

tions o u t l ined below.

3R 1 COI11[larati e Le ga l Systems

Pol i t i c a l S ienc

1. Anthropology/H istory/ Pol i t ic a l 'cience 2 1 0 Clubal Perspect ives (4) 2. Select two ( o ur 'es (Tom the following t h ree;

102

Literature and Social Change i n Latin

A merica

MAJOR REQUI REMENtS:

A n t hropol 19y

1 09 East A, i a n Socie t i e s

l .anguage. 272

Global

T he Gl o bal Stud ies major is m u l t i J i s i p L i n a r y draw i n g both the Divisions of its co u rses and f, -ulty from depa.rtments H u m a n i t ie , Natural Sciences, and So ci al ciencts and from the Seh ols f t h e Arts and Busi ness. Because the program is des ig n ed to draw on a variety of disc i ­ plinary pe rspe c tiv s t o explain and u nders a n d global trends, n o more th a n tw courses ( 8 '('mester hours) can h e taken i n a ny ooe discipline to ful fil.l t he requ i rements for the issue concentra­ l io n fo r the Global St u di s maj r. In addition, tudents may n o t apply m o r c t h a n two c ou rses ( tl se mester h o u rs) from their p r i m ary major o r from co ur s e , taken to fu l fi l l general u n iversity core requ j remen ts to t h e co m p leme n t a ry maJ o r.

a.

Post- Colo n ial L iteratu re

History 3 3 5 Latin American H istory

Stu dies maj o r.

A. Globo! S t l/dies Core ( 1 6

' d $, Magic, and Morals

392 )

2 2 1 Frt' nch

H i s to ry

are req u i red to de­

t rad i t i o n a l d i s c i p l in a r y major before t h e y declare

Ma.r riage, F a m i ly and K i n s h i p

Li te ratu re a llli F i l m f tbe Americas French 432 Prance phone I.i te m t u re Giobal tudk 495 G l o b a l Studies I n te rns h i p reneh

s e cond maj o r i n addition to a regular d iscipl jn ry m aj o r. J

,'ick ness, Mad ness. a n d Health

385

English 2 1 6 Piction: Cros ' - Cu l t u ra l Perspectives

GLOBAL STUDIES COMPLEMENTARY MAJOR:. The G l o b a l

-tude n ts electing t he G l obal

75 Law, Politics and Revulution

380

( a lso Religion

maj or beca u s e

East Asian -ultu rt:$

Anthr polugy 392

FACULTY: The lobal St ud ies omm i ttee administers t h i s program; Hames, Chair; Batten, l3eck, 6re, zeale , Garr igan , Gr svenur, Lo u i e , SI. Cla i r, To r e n d , Travis.

c l a re

343

A n t h ropol ogy

and to fu nct ion effectively i n t oday' s world.

Studies m3jor i. , termed a co mplementary

336 P ( p ie of Lat i n America

A n t h ropology A n t h ropology

P rog ra m provides students with

the knowledge, pe rspe ti ves, a nd sk i ll , I hey net:cl t

elect ives m u st be u p per-div ision co urses.

Ant h ro pology 350 \I om 11 aud Men i n World Cultures

comb i n i ng academ i c l ea rni n g w i t h language skills , nd pr3 c t i c a l

... c(

II 0

An t h rop log),

on e

. h e m i 'try

a t i o n of

at ural Res o u rce s ur

ort' 24 1 E n�rgy, Re so urces , and Pol l u t io n


b. Elcc/ ives: A n t h ro p o l ogy 354 Gl:ography of Wo rld Cult ures Biology 424 ECQlo g)' ( i f n o t take n as a required course) Eco no m i c s 330 Enviro n mental and Na t u ra l Reso u rce Econom ics Geoscie nces 34 1 Enngy a n d M i neral Reso u rces for t h e Fut ure Global Studies 495 Gl oba l Stu dies I n t e rns h i p Internat ional C o re 24 1 Energy, ResfJ u rces, a n d Po l l u t io n ( if not taken as a req u i red coursed I n t e r n a t io n a l COr' 242 Pop u la t i on , Hun ger, and Povert y

5. International Relations 3.

Requi,.ed:

h. Elect ives: A n t h ro p o l og y 375 Law, Politics, a n d Revolution Economics 3 3 1 I nternational Econom i' E onomics 3 8 1 Comparative E onom ic System ' lobal Studies 399 Global Studies I n r ..:m s i l i p Hist ry 2 [ 5 Modern \-Vo rl d H i st o ry H istory 356 Ame rican D i plomatic H ist ry Pol i t i c a l Science 338 American Foreign Po licy Po lit ical Science 43 1 Ad\ nced l nte rn atio nal Re l a t i o ns Now' Slut/nil.< pla"/ill� to p u rs lle grar/llnfr 511/r/y ill [,Hematiolllli Relations nr stro ngly (l dvtsed ( " take StlIflstlcs 23 j INfo Lh ell/alies 34 J (a cO l l rse ",'t i e h (1/50 sa/is ICS /I gCllcra l lm il'crsily rcq llirelllc'llt il/ Ma rllt:lllot;c (li Rcas(/n;lIg.)

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 20 se.mester ho urs, in l u d i ng two c urses ( nthropology/H is tory/ Pol itica i cience 2 1 0 a n d Global S tu d i es 4 1 1 ) ; a n d t h re o urses from the approved l is t o f c o u rses for an i ss u e eOllcentL.l t i o n t h at appears in the " M ajo r R quiremen " section above. Those s eking a coneentnllion i n core

s m ust take

rem a i n i n g el ec t i

eonomics 3 3 1

es. Conce n t rators

m u s t take Pol i t ical Science 3 3 1

electives.

a�

a.�

o n e o f the t h ree

in In ternat i o nal Relations

o n e of h e t h ree r m a i n i ng

tive. O p p o rt un i t i es fo r dc:v I ping a n a l y t ical and i n ter p re ta i e skills are p ro vid ed through research and writing projects, in[Cmship�, class pr sentations, and 'r udy to u rs . Th{' p ra c t i ce of the historical

meth d leads stud n ts off campus to the i r home towns, to Eur pc or

C hi na or the Ameri ca n Wes t, and to c o m m u n it y inst i t u t ions, b th private and ubLic. The cI p a rt Jn e n t emphasizes individual ad vi ing un ivers ity libm r)' h Idings i nc l ud e significa nt collections in

American, Euro pean, and non-West

m h istory. Canot'[ outlets fo r m aj ors and minors are either c1irect or su pportive i n bu, iness law,

teaching, public

s

e n' ice , new; m e d i a, and other oc

FACUITY: Kraig, Clllm; B e n so n ,

pati

ns.

arp, E r i ck se n , Hames, Kraig,

Nordqu ist.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m o f 32 semester h o u rs, in cl ud i n g 4 hours-American field, 4 h o urs-European field, and 4 hours-non -Western field. S tuden ts are expected to work dosely w i t h the departmen t's fa c u l t y advis rs to i ns u re the most personal ized programs and in t r uct i o n po ible, Ma jors are u r ged to meet the fo rei gn L n guage requirem ' n t of the College of rlS S c i e n ce s under either Option I or Ofllion I I . Those majors who are p re p a ri n g for public scho l teaching can meet th e s tate h istory requirement b en rol l ing in History 460. All maj< I a re and

required to take 4 hours of historical methods and research and 4 h o u rs of s<:' mi llar cr dit. Co m p l etion uf the seminar cour

satisfies the core requirement fo r a se n i o r semi nar/proj ec t . For the m aj o r at leaq 16 semester ho urs must be co m pleted at P I. , i n c l u d i n g 1 l i s to r ), 3 0 1 ,l nd 494 or 495 o r 496.

MINOR: 20

h o u rs with a m i n i m u m of 1 2 hou rs from 300. The minM in history empha izcs a p rogram focus and a p rogram plan, w h i h i s a r ra n ged by the semester

comses n u m he red above

student in con u lta t i o n with a dt'partmental advisor. Fo r

Course Offerings For cou,.se dcscriptiolls, visit the PLU catalog online a/

www. pl u. ed u/

print/catalog.

495 Internship (4) P rere q u i s i te: p ri o r consent of the chair of the Global Studies Co m m ittee a n d of the superv i . ing PLU faculty member.

499 Cap tone: Research Seminar - SR ( 4 ) Prerequ isi te:

Th rough the study of h is tory at Pacific Lut heran U n iv r ity students a pp re cia t i on of Ule hi s t or i ca l perspec­

gain an u ders t a ndi n g and

in relation to both self-directed s t u d ies and regular courses. The

Po litical ciencc 33 1 I n t e rn a t i o n a l Re l a t i o n s

Global Busin

History 253 . 5 3 5 . 7595

NTH/H I ST/ POL 2 1 0.

the

m i nor at least 1 2 'emcstcr h o u r s lllu -t b co mp l e te d at P LU , in cl ud ing 8 hours of upper·division co urses.

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See '[11001 of Edllcat ioll.

Course Offerings For cOllrse descrip t iolls, visit ,Ire Pl.U cawlog online at www. p l u . ed li / pri nt/catalog.

Courses in th e Depa r t m�nt o f History , re o ffe red i n the fo llowing fields:

AMERICAN FIELD 25 1 , 2 5 2, 2 3, 294, 305, 352, 35 5, 356 , 3 57, 3 59, 3 8 [ , 45 1 , 460, 4 1 , 47 1 , 494 EUROPEAN PIELD [ 07, 1 08, 32 1 , 322, 323, 324 , 3 25, 328 , 329, 332 , 334 , 3 60, 497 NON-WESTERN FIELD 1 09, 205, 2 1 0, 2 1 S , 220, 23 l , 3 1 0, 3 3 5 , 336, 3 3 7 , 38, 339, 340, 344, 380, 496 ALL FllU.D S 30 I , 40 I , 49 1 , "95 1 07

History of Western Civilization - S 1 ( 4 )

108 H istory o f Western Civilization - SI ( 4 ) 109 East Asian Societies - C, S I

(4)

2 0 5 Wamic Middle East t o 1945 - C, S I ( 4 ) 210

Global Perspectives: The World i n Change - C, S I ( 4 )

Altho ugh crossli ted w i t h ANTH 2 1 0 a n d P LS 2 1 0, students may receive h i stor ' credit o n ly when t h i s co urse is regi te.rt�d as a

h' tory da · s. P

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2 1 5 Modern World History - C, 5 1 ( 4 ) 220 Modern Latin American H istory - C, S I

(4) (4)

23 1 World War Two i n China and Japan, ] 93 1 - 1 945 - C , 5 1 > "

o .... 1/1

2 5 1 Colonial American Bistory - 5 1

(4)

252 1 9th-Century American Bistory - S I

(4)

253 20th-Century American History - S I

( 4)

294 The United Siaies Since 1945 - 5 1 (4) E n r o l l m e n t res t ricted to fu'st - year st uden ts an I soph o m o res. 30 I Introduction to Historical Methods and Research - 51 ( 4 ) Req u i red for a l l h isto ry maj u rs before tak i ng t h e se n io r se m i n a r. 305 Slavery in the Americas - A, 5 1

(4)

3 10 Contemporary Japan - S I ( 4 ) 3 2 1 Greek Civilization - S I ( 4 ) 322 Roman Civilization - 5 1 ( 4 )

Honors Program

323 The M iddle Ages - 5 1 ( 4 )

(4)

324 Renaissance - 5 1

2 53 .535. 8648

www. pl ll. e du!-spar/hoilor5/lillk!. h t lll

325 Reformation - 51 ( 4 ) 327 The Vikings - S 1

( 4)

t h e t h e m e Tak i n g Res p o ns i b i l i ty : Matters of t h e M i n d , l\'!at rcrs o f t h e Heart. I t i n tegrates academ ic a n d expcri e n t iu l leam i ng

329 Europe a n d the World Wars: 1 9 1 4- - 1945 - S I ( 4 ) 332 England: Tudors and Stuarts - S J

oppo rtu n i t ies . w i t h t h e obj ec tive o f p re p a ri ng p a rt i c ip a n t s for

(4)

334 Modern Germany, 1848- 1945 - 5 1

lives of service and :,ervd n l leadersbip. The p rogram emp hasizes

(4)

the i m p o r t a n ce of ,t u clen t- d i rec t ed lea m i ng, and c u l m i nates in a n experien t ia l proj ect t h a t s t u d e n t s design, i m p le me n t , and

335 Latin American Bistory: Central America and the Caribbean - C, S t (4) 336 Southern Africa - C, 5 1

eva l ua te ( w i t h fac u l t y s u p po r t ) .

(4)

337 The History o f Mexico - C , S I

TOTAL HONOR5 CREDITS: 2 6 sem este r h o urs ( al ! b u t 8 o f w h i c h fLl l fi l ! o t h e r u n iversit y re q u i re m e n t s )

(4)

340 Modern Japan - C, S I ( 4 )

HONORS STUDENTS: Selected o n t h e basis o f grades a n d ( h igh sc h o o l grade p o i n t average of 3.80 . nd 1 2 5 0+ SAT scores) or 2 8+ ( ACT sco rt:S) . reco mm e n a t i o n , a nd comm i t ­ me n t t o program theme. Mu st co m ple te PL w i t h a m i n i m u m

344 The Andes in Latin American History - C, 51 ( 4 )

of 3 . 50 gTade p o i n t average.

338 Modern China - C, S I (4 )

s c o res

339 Revolutionary China - C, 51 ( 4 )

First Year - A l l e n te r i n g first - yeu r h o n o rs student · take t h e F i rst­ xpn icncc:

352 The American RevoLution - 5 1 ( 4 ) 355 American Popular Cultrue - C , SI

yea.r Ho n()r�

(4)

A. H o n o r� Core �eq utnce: Id<.: n t i t y, C o m m u n i ty, Legacy, and

356 American Diplomatic History - 5 I ( 4 )

Fa i th

i J 5 Ident i t y, Com m u n i ty, Legacy, and Fa i t h ( fall; 4 h o u r s ) 1 1 6 Ident i ty, Co m m u n i t )" Legac)" a n d Fai t h ( s p r i ng ; 4

357 African Amerlcan History - A . 5 1 359 History of Women i n t h e United 5tates - A , S 1

(4)

360 Holocaust: Destruction o f the European Jews - A, 5 1

hours)

(4)

370 Environmental History o f the United Slates - 51 ( 4 ) 3 8 1 The Vietnam War and American Sodety - 51 4 0 1 Workshops - 5 1

(4)

( 1-4)

46 1 HJstory of the West and Northwe t - S L 411 H l slory of American Thought and Culture-- S l

(4)

( 1-4)

497 Seminar. European History - S I , S R ( 4 ) Pre requisi te: 3 0 1. e

L

U

T

H

E

R A N

s t u d y a b road or o t her sched u l i n g co n fl icts ) . C o n t i n u i ng t h e

v irtues as a (e nle-ring t h eme, st u de n ts co n s i d e r each v i x t uc

496 Seminar: The Third World - C, 51, SR (4) Prerequisite: 30 1 .

i

Sophomore and Junior Years A. D u r i ng t h e s o p h o m o re a n d j u n io r years s t u d e n t s take fo ur I - credit V i r tue e m i n a rs ( Ho n ors 3 0 1 - 3(8 ) , o r preferably one each semester (or m u l t i p l es in a semester Lo acco m m odate

q u a li t ies necessa ry to resp o n s i bl e leadersh i p . Us i n g d i ffe re n t

(4)

495 Internship ( I - ) Pre requisite: sophomo re sta nd i n g plus one co urse in h isto ry, a n d cons�nt of the depart men t.

F

co res.

focus o n Ta k i n g Respo n s i b i l i ty, the s e m i na rs focus o n t hose

494 Seminar: American HJstory - 5 1 , SR Prerequisite: HIST 3 0 L

P A C I

No te: A l t iz e end oI t h e firSI yeil t, st lldell ts ill /he HOllors core Ho nors Experience will have CIJ I I iviliellcies i f! both

460 West and Northwest - A, S 1 ( ,I )

491 Independent Studies

B. Honors Cr i t i c a l Conversatio n : Ex p e r ie nce and K n owledge. I I 7A Expe r i ence a n d Knowledge ( fa l l ; I hour) 1 1 7 E Exp e r i e n c e a n d Knowledge ( s p r i ng; I hour) choose to enler Core [ o r Core II. The 8 credits ill the Firsl-year

45 1 American Legal Hilitory - 5 1 (4)

70

niversity c(' n ters o n

The H o n o r. Program at Paci nc Luthe ran

328 19th-Century Eruope - S I ( 4 )

U

N

fro m

se

eral p ('r�p(' t ives, i n c l u d i n g c1a�� i c d l , c o n t e m p o rary,

and non -western pe r sp e c t iv es . 'Nhat does it mean to be a person who acts Wisely? co u rageously? w i t h hope? j ustly? These s e m i n a rs provide students w i t h

a

weekly o p p o r t u n i t y

t o i n t e ra c t w i t h t h e i r i n t e l l ectu a l pee rs arou n d a u n i fy i n g t h e m e a n d read i ngs.

B. Pa r t ic i p a t i o n in J a n u a r y term s t u d y ab road/off- c a m pus I

V E R S I T Y


cou rses i. s t ro ngly enco u r ag d but not req u i red. iViost pa rtici­ pa n ts in the J -term abroad will be sophomores, juniors, and

'eniors. . Ho nors student take two 4 -credit courses lIsuaLly during the sophomore and/or j u n i o r years. hey may take Hon ors-byo n t ract course-, whose added d i mensions to convert them to honors a re agreed upon in a contract between pro fessor and stude nt, by the following means: 1. take a regularly scheduled course which, hy contract, explores th<� to p i c through greater depth o r breadth, or 2. do an independent study or research project ( may do o n ly one of these) whose finished product is of potentially publishable quality.

Senior Year - e n i a rs take Ionors 499 C ap s t on e : Honors Chal­ lenge Exp er ien ce (4 hours ) , o ffer d in January term. This sem i­ nar, in cluding academic analysis and a n ex p erient ial component, brings a sense of closure to the pr gram theme of responsibility, and i called Responsibility in Action.

understand themselves and consider what makes l i f� worth l iving In short, study i n the Huma n i ties teaches ways of l i v i n g, thinking, and being in the world. It helps s tudents to situate their beliefs within a w i d e r frame o f reference and to u nderstand and crit ically analyze assump t io ns, traditio ns, truths, and histories. Study in the Humanities assists students to see their responsibility fo r the quality of the lives they lead. I t chal lenges st udents to real.ize the im portance of participating in a larger and broader service to the common go od . •

FACULTY: B . Temple-Thurston, Dean; facult y members o f the Depa rtments o f English, LJnguages and Literatures, Philosophy, and Religion.

graduating with university honors must have met Optio n I or I I o f the o l le g o f Arts a n d Scie nce language requireme nt; only music ed u c a t i o n majors are e x mpted from this requ i rement.

Course Offe rings For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog ol1line at

\,'\vw.plu.edul

pri nt/catalog. 115

Ide.ntity, Community, Legacy, and Faith ( 4 )

116

Identity, Community, Legacy, and Faith (4)

1 17A Experience and Knowledge - CC ( 1 , 1 ) Taken as two sections i n sequence. 30 1-308 Virtue Seminars (l hour each) Each seminar i s 1 c redit; honors stude n ts are required to com­ plete four. 30 1 harit), 302 Co urage 303 Fai th 304 Hope 305 Justice 306 Sel f-Restrai n t 307 v lsdom 308 ompassion 499 Capstone: Honors Challenge Experie.nce: Responsibility

in Action - SR ( 4 )

Division of H uman ities

253.535.732 1

The H u m a n i t ie, faculty at Paci fic l .utheran Um ersity are <.'Xcellent teachers and scholars who model the possibilities of the l i fe o f the m i n d . The H u m a n it ies cultivates an i n tellectual and imagina tive con nection between a living past, embodied in the diverse ,lrray o f cultural t raditions, and the global challenges o f o u r conlemporary world. The Di\'ision of Humanities at PLU invites students to develop critical and flexible minds as part of their beco m i ng persons of co mmitment, vision, and action in the world. Drawing on the rich traditions of religion , philosophy, languages and literatures, students and faculty work together to explore complex perspec­ tives on a variety o f human concerns. Students in the Humanities are en co ura ge d to develop the critical a n d reflect ive ability to: embrace co mplexity and ambiguity engage ther peoples and p e r s pe c t ives app rec i a t e the living past in the present and future en gage t r adi t io ns re tively and criti ally link theory and practice, and the public with the private se e con nections among d iverse cultures ,lJld academic disciplines •

• •

• •

z c < c c » N m C

As a division within t he College of Arts and Sciences, the D ivision of Humanities offers programs in each constituent department leading to the. 13A degree. Course o fferi ngs and degree requirements are l isted under:

s: »

- nglish

Foreign Langoage - Students complet i ng th p rogram and

I

o

Languages a n d Literatures P h ilosophy Religion

;;0

Committed to the i n terdisciplinary nature o f knowledge, the Human i t ies supports a nd partici pates i n the following p rograms: Chinese S tudies, Classics, Envirollmental S t u d ies, G l ob a l Studies, H ono rs Program, the I n ternational Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World, I n ternational Programs, Legal Studies, Publish ing and Printing Arts, Scandi navian Area Studies, and Women's Studies.

Individua l ized Major

253.535.76 19

Supervised by the Faculty Coun c i l for Ind ividualized Majors, this p r ogram o ffers j u n ior and senior s t u d en t s t h e opport unity to develop and complete a personally designed, i n terdisciplinary, l iberal arts major. The course of study culminates in a senior thesis, to be agreed on by the council, the student, and his or her advisor. Successful appl icants to this program will normally have a cumulative grade p o i n t average of 3 . 30 or h i"her, a l though i n exceptional cases, they may d e m o ns t r a t e their potential i n other ways to the Faculty Council for Individualized Majors. Admission to the program is granted by the council on the basis of a detailed plan o f s t u dy, proposed and written by the student, and submitted to the council any t ime after the. beginning of the second semester of the student's sophomore year. The proposal must outline a complete plan of study fo r the time remainjng u n t i l the granting of a degree. Stud)' plans may include a ny of the traditional elements fro m a standard BA or BS degree p rogram. Once approved by both the faculty sponsor and the Facu l t y Council for Ind ividualized Majors, the study plan supplants usual d e g ree requ ire ments, and, when completed, leads to conferral of the BA degree with pecial Honors.

STUDY PROPOSALS M UST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: 1. A Statement of Objectives, in which the student describes what the degree is expected to represent and why the individu­ alized course of study is more appropriate than a traditional degree program. 2. A Progra m of Study, in which the student describes how t he objectives will be a t tained through sequences of courses, readi ng programs, regular course work, independent s tudy, travel, off-cam pus involvement, personal co nsultation with faculty members, or other means. 3. A Progra m of Evaluation, in wh ich the student describes the criteria to be used to measure ach ievement o f the object ives and s peci fi c s the topic o f the seniur thesis. P

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4. A Statement aj'R view, in which the s t udent describes how p revioll s course work and l i fe experiences have p re p a re d h i m or her � r the indiv idual ized study program. 5. Lett II:

o

1'.1 N

c{ ::J o > o z

oj' Recolllmendation. The

I . To a c q u i re a co m m o n background, Internat ional Core/Core I I s t u den t s usua l l y take the required 1 1 1 - 1 1 2 ,�q ue nce i n t heir first year, b efo re taking 200-level courses. Exce p t ion, can be m a d e for tudents with heavy fL rst- 'ear loads, for transfer studen t s , or fo r students wh� shift fTo m Core 1. 2. t udents i n t h e I nternational o re a re str ngly en co ur age d to study abroad. With p r i r a p p ro v a l , a n appropriate combina­ tion of c o u rses a b road supp lemented w i t h an i n t grative p roje c t may take the place of o n e o f the 200-1e el I n terna­ t io n a l Core course . 3. t ude n t s may switch from ore II t Core J at any t i me by requesting the d ea n for sp ec ia l academi pr gram to apply their International Core course credit to or T r qui re men ts . 4. All Internationa.I Con: cou rses arc o pe n to Core [ students as s p ac e is available. (C re II s t udents h ve pr io r i t y in e n ro l l m e n t . )

tudy p ro p o sa l must be

writt n in close consultation with the chair of the Faculty Council for Ind ividualized M aj o rs and with a fa c u l ty member who ag re es to act as p r i m a r y sponsor and advisor to t h e student th ro u g h o ut the course o f study. The fac ul t y sponsor must comment on the fe a s i b i l i t y o f the p ro p o sal and on the student's abi l ity to carry it out. It is s t rongl y recommended t b a t a sec ond ar y fa c ult y spon. or be asked to co-s ponsor and endorse the p ro p osal .

o

...J

rs

POLlCJ£S AND GUlDEUNES FOR CORE U:

A l l subsequen t ch an ges in the study p l an or the s e ni o r thesis m ust be s ub m i tt e d i n writing to th e F a c u l t y Council for Ind ividualized M aj o rs for approval .

Further i n formation i s ava ilab l e from the Provost's Office.

Course Offerings

The I nternational Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World

Fo /' course descrip tions, visit the PLU catalog olliinl! at www.plu .edu/ print/cata.log.

I I I Authority and Discovery - 11 (4) 1 1 2 Liberty a n d Power - 1 1 ( 4 )

2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 8648

22 1 T h e Experience o f War - U ( 4 )

www. p l14. edu/-spac/in tcore

The International o re: Integ ra te d Stud ies o f the Contemporary World i s designed a an ,tl t er na t ive way to satisfy core c u r r ic u l u m req u ire m en t s . Co n s is t i ng of interd isciplinary and team-taught courses, the program exp lores c ont e m p o ra r y issues and their historical fo u n dat i o ns using a n lnt grated a pp roach . The p rogra m s t resses c ri t i ca l t h i n king and writ in g .

23 1 Gender, Sexuality, and Culture - A, U ( 4 ) 232 Topics i n Gender - U ( 4 ) 233 Imaging the Self - 12 ( 4 ) 234 Imaging t h e World - 12 ( 4 )

FACULTY: Selected from A n th ro p o l o gy, Art, B iology, Earth

24 1 Energy, Resources, and Pollution - U 4 )

c i en c es, Engl is h , H istory, Languages, P h i los o p hy, P h ysi c s , Pol i t ical Science, Psycho logy, Rel igion, and S o ci olo g y.

242 PopuI.atlon, Hunger, and Poverty - U (4)

c

lntemariollai

Core Com m ittee: Kelleher,

244 Post-Colonial Issues - U (4)

hair; Albrecht,

R. Brown, Byr ne s , Grosven r, Higginson.

245 H istory and Perspectives on 'Development - C, U ( 4 )

INTERNATIONAL CORE COURSE REQUIREM ENTS:

(4 )

(7 courses, 28 hOlUS)

246 Cases i n Development - C , 12

1 . I nternat ional Core 1 1 1 - 1 i 2 : Origins o f the Contemp orary

247 The Cultures of Racism - A, I2 ( 4 )

World (8 se mes te r h o urs) No rma l l }' taken i n the fi rst 'ear. E x p l ores from a global perspective the roots of contem p orar y va l u e s and traditions, with an em p hasis on Euro p e .

2. Four 200-level lnternational are courses ( 1 6 seme ter hOUl'S) Norm all y tak n in t h e second and third years. May include a study abroad. Courses, subject to t he 'hair's a pp roval . The Trinidad Program's Ca n ib b ea n Culture and Society course carries p r ior ap p ro val as the equivalent o f a 200-level co u rse . 7-8 of the following courses, or sim ilar new courses, are o ffere d each year: 2 2 1 The Ex per i enc e of War 222 Prospe ts fo r War and Peace 2 3 1 Ge n d er, exuality, and Cul t u re 232 To p i cs in Gender 233 I maging the Self 234 I m agi n g t h e vVo rld 24 1 Energy, Resources, and Pollution 242 Po p ul a t io n , Hunger, and Poverty 245 H is t ory and Pers pec t i ve s on D e vel o p m en t 246 3, S in Devel o p me nt 247 C ul t u res of Racism 3. One 3 00 - l eve l course (4 semester h ours) normal ly taken a fter or with the last 200-lev I course. 326 The Quest fo r G l obal Justice: Sy terns and Reality 327 Core II Conversations 12

222 Pruspects for War and Peace - 12 (4)

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326 The Quest for Global Justice: Systems and Reality - 13 (4) 327 Core II Conversations - 1 3 , SR ( 4 )


explore the island a n d learn about the varied heritages o f

International Programs

t h is multicultural soci ty. D ur i n g January a PLU faculty member acco mpanies the group to Tri n idad and teaches

253.535.7629

one course, wh ich varies from ye a r to year. From february

www.pIII.edlil-irrpr

to m id - May students take the core course, Caribbean

PLU's i n terna t io n a l programs encou rage students to eXI a n d tht:ir understa nd ing of h u m an i t y's I bal o nd i t io n in a h angi ng and in easi ngly L n � r d pendent world . Mul t i - focused i n te rnat i o n a l p rogram p rovide o pp rtun i t ies fo r o n -campus tudy of glt)bal issue and of th world's r gions, cultures, a n d

C u l t u re and Society, and choose two add itional courses West I n d ies. Students earn

d

tudy o f t h

program are a n n o u nced in early spring fo r the following

a ailabl > from the

ffice of

term p r o gr a m site for 2003 are l i sted on the International

e issues

Programs homepage, WWw.phl.edll/- illpr.

RECI PROCAL PROGRAMS: PLU curre n tly offer three active exchange pro 'ram . These academic p rog r rns provide a l i m ited n u m ber of

students may . pend J ful l year o r s e m e s t e r in the Pe ople' Republi of C h i na t h ro u lh an exchange with Zhongshan Univers i ty in uangzhou ( a n to n ) . At Zhongshan, students I i e i n u n ivl'rs i t y hous i n g and t a ke i n tensive stud ies in M a ndarin h i nese. Students should have had a t least one year of Chinese language b fore applying.

ff-Ca mpus Programs, u nder the

THE AMERICAS: Thi, i n t rdisciplinary m i nor fo c us e on the c

n tempora r y issues shared

i n formati n e

or pecific

excha n ge opportunity a t the

hi nese Studies program is a n

fo u r courses from t h e wide offering of courses a t t h e Un iver­

h i na a broad fo undation in language, c u l tu re, a n d

s i t y o f Dar es Salaam. A J l u n i ve rs i t y course; are t aug h t in E ng l is h . T h is is a fal l scme ter program.

. People's Republic of China - Sichuan University: . t udents may spend

GLOBAl STUDIES: S t u de n ts i nterested i n d iverse cul tures and internat iona l , global issue may u n Je r t a ke a m u l ti - disci p l ina ry r m i n or pr gram desigoed to r A

th e m a t ic , o r disciplinar

Major: Tbe

lo ba l

general physics courses t h a t a r e taugh t in E n g l i s h . Often a P L U profes or will accompany the g r o u p and teach one o f the

tudie rna' r i� termed a compleme n tary

cours

;1

SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES: The S ca n d i na v i a n Area ros - d iscip l i n a ry appro a c h.

ct1l llii1Wviclll A rea

add itional semester and sho rt - t e r m p rogram options throughout the world. A l ist o f 2002-2003 program o pp o r t uni t ie s is available

in the Wang Center's Office of Off-Campus Programs.

IwJie.1

summer option . Add i tionally, o ff-campus programs fo r summer are a n n o u nced in the summer se ' ions c a tal o g .

sec t i on of this catalog.

BROKERED PROGRAMS

Off-Campus Programs:

students can parti c ip a t e in any of the following brokercd

[n add ition to PL To e n ourage studen ts to expand thei r

makes avail, ble various ( l ppo r t u n i ti other

lSlon of the wo rl d , to stud

PLU

and travel in

countries. Students a re encouraged to spe nd

a

conso r t i u m of other midsized comprehensive colleges, PLU offers

SUMMER: Maoy PL -sp o nsored s t udy abroad programs ha\'e

Studie major is a fle xi b l e program i n wh ich the stu dy o f il

EW AMERICAN COllEGfS (ANACSA): In

ASSOCIATED

Millar: The t heor t i :al (J rient<ll ion a n d req u i rement parallel tho 'c for the major ;ll1d ar e de t a i l e d in the Global Studies section of this calal g.

ca ndinavia i ellhanced t h rough

. Extensive study tours are i ncluded. Fluency in

Mandarin i not re q u i red.

r g ulll r d isc ip l in a ry major. For specific i n formation see the

For peCllle i n fomlation see th'

s e m es t e r or year at Sichuan U n iversity (SU) in

Chi nese culture, sludents m a y take organic chemistry o r

t th i r geographic,

Global Stlldies sec t i o n o f this ca t a log .

::I

Chengdu. At SU, i n addition to classes i n Mandarin a n d

inte rests.

majtlr be ause it is take n as a second major in addition to

niversity of Dar es Salaam i n

Tanzan ia. Stude nts study wa h i l i l a n gu a ge a n d select three o r

h i s tory. F o r specifi i n formation see t h e Chinese Studies sec t io n of t h i s catalog.

m;1jor

offers a five-month

u n iver ities o f the Lutheran Chur h, PL

i n l nbdp l i n ary program de sig n d to provide s t u d nts in ter­ ested iJ1

I n a co n o r t i u m effort with other colleges and

B. Tanzania:

Th" Americas section of this catalog.

CHINESE STUDIES: The

student is

A. People's Republic of China-Zhongshan University: PLU

Wa ng 'enter for I n ternational Programs .

by the two cont inents in the we tern h misph reo

chang s each year. In all cases, the PL

i n tegrated i n to the locnl u n iversity and culture.

" i n ternational programs is

comparative histories, cultures, a nd

o z » ,....

Ja nuary. Stud nts apply fo r these programs in May. January

and

More in� rmation about P L

::1:1 Z » ....

term. I n terest meetings for January term o ff-campus

' ultural foci are Africa, Asi, , Europe, Latin

g i o m i made poss i ble by di ersc o ff- anlpu study opportu n itie and i n ternational stude n t exchan ge . T p u r ' ue a program in i nt mational or i n tercultural studies, � tude n ts may en rol l in caur es offered by d partmcnl such as Lan guage , Political cience, and Histor y, o r choose among the spe ial mult i - d i ciplinary prog m Ii ted bel w which o ffer majors and minor i n i n ternati nal studies.

....

semester hours credit fo r the

January term: PLU also o ffer courses during the January

B.

cl o p m ent; g l obal re ourees a n d trade; and pea e, j ustice, nd

America, the Mid d l e East, a n d Scandinavia.

18

m

January to May program.

soc ieties. Glohal Issues include, for example, modernization and human rights.

z

from the regular course o fferings at the U niversity of the

the summer,

erne le r, Ja nuary k rm , or ful l academic year ubr ad . The Wan g f I ce of f - ampus Progr ms h a s i n formation to assist tude n ts in el ct i n g and preparing for t u dy abro a d pr gra ms. Tht' illter-d pcndcnc f al l nati n s of the world a n d t h e need to gain b a s i c knowledge of people. t heir cultures, a nd

Center'

their in lcrrelationsh i p� il n no t bt: overempha ized in the 2 L t ce n t u ry. Witb this focus in m i nd, PLU upports several cat eg o r i e s

of prog r m s.

ECTlONA:PLU-Spoll>Qred Pnmaw.� PLU FACUIl'Y DrRECTED PROGRAMS: A . Trinidad and Tobago: Culture, Creativity, and Complex­ ity in the Caribbean: p ring semest r ( ja nuary to m i d ­ May) i n Trinidad provides stude n ts a u n iq u e o pp o r t u n i t y to

fa c u l t y led or coordinated programs, PLU

programs ( p rogram details arc dvailable o n the In ternational Programs homepage www. p lu.edu/- i n pr.) I ndependent Ljberal are hosted by th

rts Col l eges Abroad: These programs

I n dependen t Liberal Arts Colleges Abroad

( I LA A), ::I co nsortium of Pacific Northwest school i ncluding PLU, G o nz..1ga University, the Un iversity o f Puget So un d , the Uni

r ity of Portland, a nd Willamette U n iversity. Program

sites: Lond n , Engl a nd , and G rilnada, Spain. n ma r k's I n ternational S t udies ( D [ S )

D

I n stit ute fo r Ce n t ra l American Development ( I CAD S )

L i v i n g Ro ute , Findhorm Community Semester

Institute fo r the I n ternational Education o f Students ( IF.

U n iversity of Oslo, Oslo, . orway

U n iversity of Lancaster, Lancaster, England

Service Learning Programs

School fo r Field Studies

Center for

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• I nst it u te fo r Study Abroad A meri ca n I ns t i t ute fo r F oreign S t udy • olleg Year in Athens

Languages and Literatures

253 .535.7220

SECTION & PLU-Approved 'turfy Abroad Progra ms

-' e{ z o l­ e{ z c:; w I­ Z

IVww.pi!l.cd!l1 - lallg

l . In a d d it i o n to the P LU - ,po nsored p rogra m s, there are cou n tless other o p p or tu n i t i es fo r s t u dy ab road . M an y U.S. colleges and u n ivers i t i es have p rogra m s t h rou g h o u t the world, and PL tudent may st u dy t h rough t h ese p rogra ms by special arrangement. Info rmation a n d ap pli c a ti o n fo rms fo r several programs are a vaila bl e in the O ffice of O ff-Ca m p u s P ro g ra m s . Credits a wa rded b y a regionaJly accred ited U . S . col I ege o r u n i ve rsi ty a r e t ra nsferable to PLU. However, d i rect aid fro m PLU cannot be tra ns ferre d to other c olleges . 2. PLU s t ud e n t s who p l a n to study d i rectly in a . fo re i g n scho o l ( n o t in a program sp o nso red b y a coll e ge i n t h e U.S.) must be sure to fi le a le tte r o f i n ten t with the O ffi ce of O ff- Campus I. ro g r a m s and with the c h a i r of th e ir major depa r t me nt before leaving PLU. T h is letter must include what classes wiJi be taken, where a nd fo r what len g th of time they will s tudy their ac a de m ic p rogram. On the basis o f this i n fo rmation, plus a record o f lec t ure s a t tended and exa m i n a t ions c om ple ted, academic c red i t may be g i ven by P LU. S t uden t s are advised to

in a l a nguage , stude n ts d e ve l o p c ri t ical, aesthet i c , and creat ive sensibilities ne ce ssa ry fo r gl obal c i t izenship, and ap p re ciat i o n of t h e i r own language an d c u l t u re. The de p ar t m e n t o ffers a w ide range of courses, n o t only in iJnguag s a t a l l le v els , but aJso in cult ure , l i teratures, and l ing u i s t i cs , both in the original la n guag e

and in I:n glis h transla t i o n . I n s t r uction is al s o given in American

S ign La n ' u agc .

L a ngu a ge students are s trongly enco ur aged to pa r t i c ip a te in the n u m ero u s stud

abroad courses o ffered d u rin g the Jan ua ry fa ll <lnd s p r i ng semesters. or fur th e r in forma ­ t i o n , see the Internatiollal Programs s e c t i o n of th i s catalog. ,1 S

fACULTY: M. Jensen, Ch a i r; R. B rown, Holm(' ren, Lacabe, Snee, Sosu lski,

oven, T. W i l l iams, W i l l ia ms-G i n sberg, Yaden ;

assisted by A r ie ssoh n , Cu rtis, i ll1 d J. Li.

taken a broad. All c re d i t transfe rr e d to PLU will be pass/fail.

COURSES THAT MEET CORE I REQUI REMENTS:

rc erves the r igh t to requ ire ex am i nat i o n s co ve ri ng the

subjects studied.

Literature Requirement

APPLICATI ON PROCESS: All PI.

-sponso red program

20 1

and a b ov e ( two semesters) and

all fi rst - year co u rses of a fo rei g n lan g uage no t pr ev i o usl y studied

nd have an o rficial t r a n s cri p t

( two semesters),

and fa culty reco m menda t io ns sent to the O ffice of O ff- C a mp us

a

weLl a s

hi nt!

e

3 7 1 , Frend1 34 1 , and

Languages 272 meet this req u i re me nt .

fo r the review p roce s s . General deadlines fo r p rogra m

a p p l ic a tio ns a re: J a nua ry 15 for Ta nzania, February 1 for summer ew

Perspectives in Diversity, AJternat ive Perspectives - A:

S p an i s h 3 4 1 and Si gn 1 0 1 and 1 02 meet t h is requireme n t .

1 fo r fall a n d full-year programs, and May 1 for s p r i n g semester p ro grams . ( A p p L ications fo r sp ri ng programs will be acce p t e d until October 1 on a space-available bas i s . )

No rweg i a n, Scandinavian Area Studies, and

CREDITS: PLU awa rd s PLU cre d it fo r all p rograms l i sted i. n

o ffe red in C h i nese,

Zealand,

'l a rch

BACHELOR O F ARTS MAJORS AND MINORS: T h e d e p art ­

m e n t o ffers m ajo rs in C h i nese ' t u dies, Classics, Fre n c h , G e r ma n ,

o rweg ian, and

Ca p st o n e: Senior Project

with a p pr o p r iate de part ment n u m b e rs a ss igned . Letter grades will a lso be posted , al tho ugh t h ey will not be i nclu de d in the PLU c u m ul ati ve grade p o i n t average. Grad es fo r st udy ab roa d

p a n i s h . M i n o rs a re

h i n es e Stud ies, French, German, Greek,

panish . All majors must co m p l e te a w i t h i n the de pa rt m e nt . Majors must complete a t l e ast 12 s em es ter hours in residence a t P L , 4 of w h i ch must be ta ke n c:i ther in the s en io r )'car or upon re turn from a study abroad p rog r m. Mi nors must co m p lete at least 8 h o u rs in residence. Specific re qu irem e nt s (and v a r i a t i o n s from Latin,

SECTION A: PLU-Sponsored Programs. All c o u rses taken on a PI. - s p o nso red program will be l i s ted on th PL tra n s c r i p t

cal ulated fo r ho nors at

nglish

Perspectives on Diversity, Cross-Cultural Perspectives - C: All language courses nu mbered

r U n i ve r s it y, e tc ) . Students a r e asked to s u b m i t

program and S e m este r I p ro gra m s in Aust ralia and

LT: A l l de p art men tal literature

t ranslation, meet this re qu i re m en t .

Programs before they are mailed to the program associate ( i . e . , co m p leted program appl ications

-

cou rses, o ffered both in the or i g i nal language and in

ap p l i c. a tions must be p re - a p p ro ved by the Office o f Off- Cam p u s

Program

PLU is a serious academic e n t erp r i s e . \"' hile g a ini ng p ro fi ci e n cy

Ligh t n e r, Manli' di, Martinez-Carbajo, E . Nelso n , Predmore,

save al l papers and other materials rela t i ng to c o ursework

IES, A l l:S, Butl

g r ad uate and of a successful ca re e r pers o n . Language study at

term a s well

abroad, a n d how the i n tern a t ional ex p e rience w i l l relate to

PL

An u n d e rs t a n d i n g of world c u l t u res and an ability to spea k languages other t h a n one' own are ha ll ma r ks of today's col lege

a re

' r a.d u a tio n .

t h e above) fo r specific m aj or s and min ors are listed below.

PROGRAM COSTS AND FINANCIAL A I D FOR

LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTER: The langua ge cu rr i cu l u m

PLU-SPONSORED PROGRAMS:

Recipro cal Excl1l1ngc Progra ms: Se meste r charges are based on the PLU u nde rg ra du at e tuition model ( UTM) plu s the cost of on­ campus h ou s i ng and a full meal plan . Other PLU-Spollsored Progra ms: Pr og ram fees are calculated at the base price of the p r o gram pl us an administrative fee of $1 000 per semester. Each of the PLU-sponsored p rogra ms will, therefore, ha e a diffe rent program fee. The miniI1lum semester program fee fO T the academic year 2002-03 will be $9,250. On P LLJ -s p on s o red p rograms, students eligible for state and fed e ra l financiaJ aid may transfer their aid awa r d s (with the except ion of work study) to t heir stu dent accounts. Students may also apply t heir un iver i t y grants and sc h o lars h ip s

as

as we ll

government loans on selec ted s p o n sored program,. The Office of Off- Ca mp us Prog rams has detailed i n formatio n on S tu d y

at al l levels features use of PLU's

_

tate-of- the- art mult i med ia

Lan guage Resource Center, loca ted in the Mo rtvedt Library. d\'anced st u d ent s have t he opp o r t un i t y to c o n du c t research at selected Web si tes, as well

<1,

to work as assistants in the cen ter,

gain i n g co m p u ter e xpe r t ise wh i l e accelerating th ei r language skills. PLACEMENT I N LANGUAGE CLASSES: S tud e nts are encour­ aged to o b ta i n as much h igh school p re pa m ti o n in languages as

p oss ible. To determ ine appropriate course p la ce m e nt a t PLU, all s t ud e n ts with previous e x p e rien ce in a la ngu a ge take t h e pl a c em e nt exa m ination, admin istered d u r i n g fi rs t - ye a r s t u d e n t regist ra t i o n , orien t a t i o n week, a n d th rou g h o u t t h e year by s pe c ia l a rra ng e m e nt . St u d ent s q ua l i fyi ng fo r advanced p l acement m ay be allowe d to waive ce r tain maj o r or minor requireme nts .

Abroad and Financial Aid. Tu i tion ex ha nge benefits do not

SENIOR PROJ ECT: Students m aj o ri n g in a fo reign la nguag e

ap p ly to study abroad.

e n roll in 499 c onc ur re ntly with a not h er upper-level co u rse in the m aj o r. The ins t r u c to r o f the latter course normally sup er v i ses the student's seni o r p roj ect: a re s ea rch pap er, i nt er ns h i p , o r other app roved p roject. The s tud e n t p reseI1ls a su mmary of the co mp l e ted ass i g n me nt a t an open d e pa r tmen t al fo r u m . I I I (2)

74

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PROSPECfIVE TEACH ERS: 'tLldents pre p aring to te ac h i n a ju n i r or senior h igh ch o o l may earn e i th e r a Bachelor of Arts d e gree i n Fr n h, Ge r m a n, orwegian, or panish alono with c rti fi ca l io n from the -chool f Educ,l til1l1, or a Bachelor of rts in Education de gree with a teach ing ma'or or m i n or in French, 'erman, Nnrwegicul, or S p nish . S on d a r y t eac hi ng minors <He also available in � h i n e se al d Latin, FJementary teaching majors are avai l a bl e in all f the above languages. All s t u den t s are req u ir d to take L ng\lagc 445 ( M ,thodologics) for certifica­ ti o n . See th e ScilUnl of EdU[(I tioll section of t h i s catalog fo r (enification requirements and the Bachelor of Art · in E d u c a t io n r quirements. MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: In coopera­ t ion with the School elf Education, t h d partment offers a m inor in E ng l i ' h as a Secon d Langttage. Prospect ive teachers as well as student who m y teach English abroad, thro ugh Fulbright Awards o r ser v i ce oppo rtun ities, are strongly encour­ aged to p urs u e th i.s o p p o r t u n ity. Th two required departmental cours � are anguages 445 ( Met hod oklgie s ) a n d La n g u age 446 ( The ries of Language cq u i s i t io n ) . ee the Schoul of Educat ion section for a full description of th m l l1 o r.

Course Offering s:

Languages

For COl/r5C descript iol1s, visi, the PLU carnlog OIllill£' at

v\'\'

v.plu.edul

print/catalog. 271 Literature and Sodety in Modern Europe - LT ( 4 ) 272 Literature and Sodal Change i n Latin America - C, LT (4) 445 Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages and Englisb as

a Second Luguage ( 4 ) 446 Theories o f language Acquisition \ 4 ) Required fo r a m i nor in English as a Second Language,

m \I'>

470 Curriculum, Materials and Instruction for Teaching

English as a Second language (4)

»

475 Practimm in Teaching English as 8 Second Lauguage ( 1 ) lEDUC Pre requisite: LANG/ DU 445. Co n c u r r e nt with LA 470.

z

491 Independent Studies ( 1 -4)

-t m ::u

I:)

492 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 )

» -t c:: ::u

598 NOll-thesis Researcb Project ( 1 -4 ) Classics and CJassical Lang uag es

Course Offe rings For course descriptions, visit the PLU mtnlng nnlifr£' nt

www.plu.edu/

print/catalog.

ou rses in the D par l m en t of Languages and Literatures are o ffered in the following general fields i n a dd i t ion to elerm�nt, Hy, i n term ed iat , and a dva n ced language: CULTURAL mSTORY A I n Englisb Classi . 250 Gas icill Mytholugy Classics 32 1 Greek Ci v i l izat i on Classics 322 R o m a n C i v i l izat ion Scandi navian 1 50 Introducl ion to Sc;)n d i nJv ia Scandi navian 322 Scand i na via a nd World Po l i tics Sca n d i nav i a n 324 The Emigrants

Sca n d i navian 327 The Vikings Sp nish 34 1 The La t i n o Experien ce:. i n [he U. S . B. In Respective Language Fr nch 32 1 French i i l i zation and ,ul t url' German 32 1 German Civilization to 1 7 5 0 rman 322 German Civiliz a t iun Sine.: 1 750 S p a n i sh 32 1 Civilization a n d u l tu re of p a i n Spandl 322 L t i n Ameri n .iviliwtion a n d Cultllre <

m II'>

Course Offerin gs: Classics For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog olllilll! a t www. p ILl.edu/

printkatalog. The m aj o r in classics is des ribed in this cat log u n der Classics. 23 1 Ma terpieces of European Literature - cr

(4)

250 Ctas ical Mythology - lJ' ( 4 ) 3 2 1 Greek Civilization - S I ( 4 ) 3 2 2 Roman Civilization - S I ( 4 ) 499 Capstone: Senior Project - S R ( 2 ) Course Offerings: Greek Fo r CO I I r5e descript iolls, visit the PUJ ccrtalog ollline at w\vw. p l u.e d ul print/catalog,

!vlirwr in ,reck: 20

semester hours, which

may incl ude 1 0 1 - 10 2 .

1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary Greek (4, /1 ) 20 1 , 202 .Intermediate Greek ( 4 , 4 ) 491 Independent Studies

( 1 - 4)

492 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 )

liTERATURE A. In English ,hine e 3 7 1 .hin� e Literature in Tran l a t i o n Classi 2 3 1 Ma<:rerpieces uf European Literature lassies 250 Classical Mythology rench 2 2 1 Fr nch Lilerature and F i l m of the A m e r i cas Lan guages 2 7 1 l . i t e ra tu re and " ociety i n lodern Eu rope L<lllguages 272 l i terature and

.--

» z " c:: » "

cia I

Change in

Latin America Scan 250 Masterpie ces o f Sca n d i n avian Litera t u re Sc;an 4 2 1 lb en and Strindberg SCQ n 42 2 20th - cnt u ry .'lcand i na ian Literat ure B. In Respective language Prench 42 1 , 42 2 Ma , t('rpieces of French L i te ra t u re French 43 1 , 432 2 0t h-Ce n tury French iJlerature Ge r m a n 4 2 1 ,('rman Liter t u r e fro m t he Enl ighten ment to Reali 'm German 422 20th-Century German Lite rat u re S pa n ish 302 I n t roduction to H is p a n i c Li te ra cy Studies S purr i s h 42 1 Mas terp i e c e. of p a n i s h Literature Spanish 422 20th-Century L i te r at u r e of pain Spani 'h 423 Spe ial Top ics in Sp a n i s h L iterature and ulture Spanish 43 1 Latin Ameri an L iterature, 1 4 2-1 888 panish 432 20th-Century L atin Am >rican l.iterature Sp a n i h 433 Special 1i pic i n Latin Am rican Literature J n d ulture

499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR ( 2 ) Course Offerin g s: Latin For COIll'Se desaiptiollS, visit the PLU cliralog ollljlle a t

"" w.plu.edu/

p rintl catalog. Minor in Lnlill: 20

semester hours, which may

include 1 0 1 - 1 02 .

1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary Latin ( 4 , 4 ) 20 1 , 202 Intermediate Latin (4, 4) 491 Independent Studies ( 1-4) 492 Independent Studies ( 1-4)

499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR ( 2 ) Modern Languag es Course Offerings:

Chinese

For course de cripti01IS, visit the PLU catalog onlil1e a t

www.plu.edll/

print/catalog. se m es te r hours wh ich m ay i nclude 1 0 1 - 1 0 2. The major and m inor in Chillese Studies are 'desc ribed in this

Mirror ill Ch inese: 20

catalog under Chh1ese Studies. P

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I O L , 102 Elementary Cbinese

(4, 4 )

20 1 , 202 Intermediate Chinese (4, 4 )

Prereqllisir

30 I, 302

:

1 02 .

1 --4 )

492 Independent Studies (

1 -4)

499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR ( 2 )

Composition and Conversation

(4)

Norwegian

Prere q uisite: 2 2 . 371 Chinese Literature in Tran lotion - C, IX

Fo r course des ripliol/S. vis i l I he PLU

(4)

pri nt/catalog.

No knowledge o f Ch inese req u ired. Independent Studies

( 1 -4)

492 Independent Studies

( 1-4 )

491

49 1 Independent Studies (

catalog olilille at www.plu.edu/

Major ill NUrlvegiclIl: A

m i n i m u m of 34 semester ho urs, i n cl u el ­ ing 1 0 1 - !o2, 20 1 -20.2, .l () 1- 02, ;.1l1 d Sc.1 n d i n a v i a n 4 2 1 or 4 2 2 . Millor i l l Norwegiall: 2 0 s mester hours, which may i n c l u de

L O I - I 02. Course Offerings: c z ct

For course descriPlio/lS, visit the PLU catalog olliine

\!) ct ;j \!) z ct

at wwv•. pl u .ed u/

pri nt/catalog.

Major ill French:

minimum

f 34 semester h o u rs beyond 1 0 1 -

1 02 , i n c l ud i n g 20 1 -202 , 3 0 1 -3 02 , 3 2 1 , 499, a nd th rE'e 400-level

11'1 W

French

courses, one of which must be completed in the senio r yea r. MillOr in Frellch:

20 sem te r hours, excl uding l U I - I 0 2 and i ncluding 20 1 -202, 3 0 1 , a nd t".,.o a d d i t i o n a l upper-division

cou rses .

(4, 4 )

20 i, 202 Intermediate Norwegian

Prerequisite: 202. 302 Advanced Conversation and CompOSition

30 1.

Prerequisite:

491 Independent SbJdies

492 independent Studies ( 1 - 4 ) 499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR

Course Offerings:

22 1 French Literature and film of the Americas - C, LT (4) 30 1 , 302 Composjtion and Conversation (4, 4)

202.

Prerequisite: 302.

49 1 Independent Studies

( 1-4)

492 Independent Studies

( J -4)

(4, 4 )

324 The Emigrants

and two

400-level courses

Minor ill German: 20 semes ter hours, excludi ng 1 () 1- 1 02 and including 2 0 1 -202, 3 0 I . an I two add it ional upper-division cou rse .

(4 , 4 )

1 0 1 , 1 02 Sign Language - A

(4)

202.

40 1 Advanced Composition and Conversation ( 4) Students sh o u ld take t h is co urse in their j u n i o r or senior year.

P rere q uisite: 302. 421 German Literature From the Enlightenment to Realism ­

LT ( 4 ) Pr req ui si te: 35 1.

422 20th-Century German Literature - LT (4) Prere qu isite: 302.

L U T H E R A N

(4, 4 )

Spanish

A m i n i m u m o f 3 4 semester h o u rs beyond 20 I , 20 2 , 30 l . 3 2 1 , 322, 325 and three 400 -level c o u rs e s.

Majo r in Spanish:

musl

complete Lang uages 499.

U N I V E R S I T Y

t least

and a n o t h e r on La t in Ameri ca-must be co m p l et e d at PLU. One 40 0- lev e l course m us t be completed in t he sen i o r yea r. Majors are strongl }' encouraged to purSL\� a t le a s t one semestn of study in a S pa Jli s h - s p ea k i ng country 011 a program a ppro cd by the Spani h facu lt y. Majors may not norma.lly fulfill the requ ire ­ ment fo r Ule majo r tlHo ugh the eI . c l io n of 3 00 - l e ve l cour es during their senior year. Minor ill Span ish: 20 seme ter hours, i n cluding 202, 30 1 , 325. and two addit i onal upper-divisiun courses. two 400-l evel cou rses-one focu sing on

Prerequisite: 202.

C

"w.pl Ll.eel u/

print/cata log.

[n addition, stude n t s

(4)

322 German Civilization Since 1750

I

Sign Language For course de;cripl'iol1s, visit the PLU calalog ol rlille at \

i n cluding

Prerequisite: 202. 32 1 German Civilization to 1750

I II ( 2 )

FiJI' collrse descriptiol15. visit tire PLU C-lllaiog online al www. p l u. ed u/ prin t/catalog.

30 1 , 302 CompoSition and Conver ation ( 4 , 4 )

F

( 1-4)

Course Offerings:

Course Offerings:

1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary German ( 4 , 4 )

I

492 I ndependent SbJdies

4 99 Capstone: S£nior Project - S R

ill Germa l/: A l11iI1 i m u m of 34 em ste r h o u rs beyond

1 0 1 - 1 02 , incl nding 20 1 -202 , 30 1 -302, 32 1 -321, 499,

C

(4)

4 9 ] I ndependent Studies 0 - 4 )

p ri n t/ catalog.

A

(2)

422 20th.Century Scandinavian Literature - LT

(2)

German

20 1 , 202 Intermediate German

(4)

(4)

4 2 1 Ibsen and Strindberg - IX ( 4 )

For cOllrse descrip lio1/S, v sit i tile PL U catalug olilille tit www.pl u.ed u/

P

250 Masterpieces of Scandinavian Literature - LT

327 The Vikings - S I ( 4 )

499 Cap tone: Senior Project - SR

Course Offerings:

(2)

322 Scandinavia and World Politics

P r requj i t e : 3 5 2 .

Prerequ i ,i te:

[,rin t/catalog.

150 Introduction to Scandinavia

42 1 , 422 Masterpieces of french Literature - LT ( 4 , 4 )

Major

Scandinavian

For course descriptions. visit the PLU cGtalo'S mllin!! at www.plu.edu/ 51l1dies: 40 sc m e ste r hours: A cros discipl i nary approach to t he t u d)' of Scandinavia. Sec Iso the section of t h is (,l l ::dog on SCClllllillaviall Arei! Sllldies.

32 1 Civilization and Culture (4)

43 1 , 432 20th-Century French Literaturc - LT

(2)

Major ;/1 Sccl1ldilltlVian Area

Pre requi site: 202. Prerequ isi te:

(4)

( 1-4)

1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary French (4, 4 ) 20 1 , 202 I ntermediate French (4, 4 )

(4, 4 )

30 I Conversa tion and Composition ( 4 )

Lab attendance requ ired.

Lab alte ndan e required.

16

1 0 1, 1 0 2 Elementary Norwegian

1 0 I. 102 Elementary Spanish S tud

Ilts

wit h more

en ro l l i n J

than

two

pain

( 4. 4 )

years

r h ig h school

02. Lab attendance required.

panish must


20 1 , 202 Intermediate Spanish ( 4 , 4)

Political Science 3 7 1 J u d icial Process S I P ol i t i al 5cien c 372 onstilutional Law - S I P li t i cal -cieuce 373 Civil Libert ies 1 Pol i tical Science 374 Legal Studies Research S I Pol i t ical Science 38 1 ol11parative Legal ystem Political Sc ience 4 7 1 In terns h i p i n Legal Sludit:s Psy hology 4 7 1 P ychology and t l 1(> Law - 52 Sociology 351 Sociology of aw 52 -

Lab attendance required.

23 1 , 33 ) Intensive Spanish in LaLln America - C ( 4 ) Prereq uisi tes: Spa n i sh 102 o r t h e equival fit.

30 1 Advanced Grammar and Composition ( " ) Prerequisi te: 202.

32 1 Civilization and Culture of Spain (4)

-

-

C, SI

-

S1

-

P rcreq u i ite: 3 0 1 ( o r oncurrent emollment). Prere q uisite: 30 I (or c o n u rrent e n ro l l m e nt ) .

325

Introduction to Hispanic Literary Studies - LT ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 30 l .

34 1 The Latino Experiences in the U.S. - A, [J' ( 4 )

May co u n t t oward major, but not toward mi n o r i n Spa n i s h .

40 1 Advanced Spanish Grammar ( ,I ) Prerequisite: 302 42 1

l\lasterpieces of Spanish Literature

-

IT

(4 )

421 20th-Century Literature of Spain - IJ' ( 4 )

HlwlV. plu . edul-mfICII l r

The Mar ri age nd Fa m i ly Therapy pro g r a m is a gr duate lead i ng to Lhe Tv! in So c ial Scien es . 4 5 semester hours a re required in the program. For fu rther i n formation, see the , md.l<1t S t udies sec ion 0 t his cata log. The Mar riage and Family Therapy prog ram is accred ited by the Cornm is · i o n on Accred i t a t ion for Marr iage and l-am ily

> z o

program

,... -<

FACULTY: Storm, Cha ir, Clillic Director; M c D o wel l , Visiting

Prereql.lisit : 302.

423 Special Topics in Spanish Literature and Culture - LT ( 4 ) May be repeat d fo r credit with differen t topic. Prere q ui s ite : 3 0 2 .

Professor,

and prac t i

Ts h i m perle,

a

in.ce.nt.

su pervi.sors: Ca l l i so n F i t z .p a t r i c k , l.ewis, ,

Course Offerings

43 1 Latin American Literature, 1492-1 888 - LT ( 4 ) P re requis i te: 302.

For co urse descriptiol/s, visit the PL

432 20lll-Century Latin American Literature - IT ( 4 )

print/cat.al" S·

P r requisite: 3 0 2 .

500 Human Development ( 4 )

433 Special Topics in Latin American Literature and Cultl1re

503 Systems Approach t o Marriage and Family Therapy (4)

- IT

May be repl'ated fo r credit witb. d i fferent t o p ic P re re q u is i te : 302. .

cala log ol /lil/e at www. p lu.edu/

504 family Development ( 4 ) 505 Research Methods in M arriage and Fanilly Therapy ( 4 )

499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR ( 2 )

507 Comparative Marriage and FamiJy Therapy ( 4 ) Prereq u isite: 503.

Legal Studies

510 Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy ( 2 )

25 .535 .840:

Prerequisite or co req u is i te: 503.

www. plll. edul- lega lst di

5 J I Psychosocial Pathology: Relationship to Marriage and the Family ( 4 )

-

Legal Studies is an i nterdisci pl i ndry pro 'ram of stud , foc lIsing on

the nalure of tal and judicial proc s�. Consistent with the p ur poses of the Amer ican Legal Stud ies !\:'sociation, the Legal S t ud ie s Pro­ gram at PLU pwv ides alternat ive approaches to the st u dy of law fro m the acade m ic framework of the D iv is ion s of udal Sc i en ces and Humanities <md the eho Is of the Arts, B us i nes , nd du a­ tion. The tacu l t y tead 1 ing with ill the program emp hasi7.e the devel­ opment of a crit ical l1 nderstanding f the func tions of law, the m utual im pact. of law and soc i et y, and the sources of"w . Students

co m ple tin g a minor in Lega l tudies pursue these object.ives through co urses, directed research , imel internships in offices and agen -ic:s involved in making, en orci ng, in ter preting, an communicating "the law" in co o t mporary Amer ican civil so - iet y. _

FACULTY: Job ' t , Chair; A n d e r on, Arnold, ,

m

2 53 . 535.8782

Therapy Education of the American Ass oci at i on for Marriage and FalllUy Th r P)' ( AAMFT) .

Prerequisite: 302.

H ast y Kaurin, Klein,

l> CI

Marriage and Famil y Therapy

321 Latin American Civilization and CuJture ( 4 )

isosky, Moc

Bruc. Dwyer-Shick,

onald , Menzel, Rowe .

MINOR: 20 semester hour , including P h i losophy 328, Pol i t i al

P re re qui s i te: 503.

5 1 2 PTofessional Studies in Marriage and Family Therapy (3 ) 5 1 9 Practicum 1 ( 2) Pre requisite: 507 and 5 1 2 ; may be taken c on cur re n t l y when sc h edul e allow!;. 5 1 2 ma' '11 '0 bl:' taken co ncurrently with 5 2 1 , Prac t ic u m I I , w i t h

faculty app roval.

52 1 Practicum ll ( 2 ) 523 Practicum I l l ( 2 ) ' 525 Practicum IV ( 2 ) 527 Extended Practimm V ( 2 ) 520 Theory r ( 2 ) 522 Theory n ( 2 )

S ience 1 70, and 1 2 ad di t i ona l seme. ter h o u rs , sel cted i n consultation with t h e p rogram's chai r.

524 Theory i l l ( 2 )

nthropl o g y 375 Law. Pol i t ics, and Revolution C, S I Bwi ness 400 General B u s i nl! Law Bu si ness 405 Law of the i n a nciaJ Market lace Busines' 406 Law of the Wo rkplace Business 407 Law of thl' Marketpl ace Busi ness 408 I. n temat ional B u s i n ess aw Com m u n icat ions 3 8 1 Media Law Economics 3 7 1 I n d u.strial Organ i zat ion and Public Po l ic y - 5 2

590 Graduate Seminar ( 1 - 4 )

History 4 5 1 Legal H i s tory

599 Thesis ( 4 )

-

-

I

Philo ophy 328 Philos phicaJ Issues in the aw Pol i tical Sc ie n ce 1 70 I ntroduction to Legal Studies

-

SI

526 Development o f a Personal Integrated Theory ( 2 ) Prere q u i s i te: consent of tht' i ns t r uctor.

59 1 Director Study ( 1 -4) 595 Graduate Readings (4) rndepe nde n t study card required.

598 Research Project ( 4 )

P

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT: The p o l icy 0 the Ma t h e lll 8 t i s D e p a rt me nt r ga rd i n g mathematics credi t fo r : t u de n t s who h a ve taken the AP a l cul us exam i as fol lows:

Mathematics 253 .535 . 7400 IYww.p lu. edll!- lIla t h II> U

MJ.lh maties is a many-faceted subject t h a t i s extremely u se fu l in

t io n , but a t the same rime is fa sc i n a ti n g and bea u t i fu l in the abst rac t . ft is an i n d i spen sa b l e to o l fo r i n du s t ry, science, governm e n t" nd t he busine ss wo rl d , while the ele ga n ce of its l o gi c and beaut ' o f fo rm have i n t ri g u ed scholars, philosophers, a n d artists s i n ce earliest t i me . The m a t h e m 3 l i s p rog ra m at PLU is d esi gn ed to serve five m a i n obje tives: ( 1 ) to provide ba ck grou nds fo r other disci­ pl i n es , ( 2 ) to p rov ide , co m p re h e n · iv pre-professional program for those d i re c t l y e nt e ri n g the fields of te a c h i ng and applied mathe matic , ( 3 ) to provide a n ucle us of e sse n t i al courses which will develop the breadth and m a t u r i ty of mathematical t h o u g h t fo r continued study of m a th e m a t i cs at th e graduate level. (4) to devel o p the m n t ,l l skills 11 cess a ry for the c re at io n , analysis, and c ri t i que o f math ematical t o p ic s , and ( 5 ) to prov id e a view of mathem atics a , part of h u m a n i s t i c beha ior. its a pp li

FACULTY: C. Dorne r, Chair; Be n k hal ti , 13. Dorner, Hea t h , Meyer, S kl a r,

tuan, \

tI,

Zh u.

PLACEMENT TEST: A p l ace me n t test and backgro und su rvey t help i n s u re that studen ts begin in ma t h e m a t i c s course \ bieb ( rc appropri te to their p re pa rat io n and abi.Iities. E n rollment is not p e r m i t ted ill any of the be g i n n ing mathemat­ ic..� courses ( 1 05, 1 07, 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 , 1 2 3 , 1 28, 1 40, 1 5 1 ) until t h e p l a ceme n t test and ba kg rou n d survey are completed.

student.

MATHEMATICS AND THE COLLEGE OF .ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENT (see ollege of Arts and S c iences Requirement ): A l l mat h e m ati cs co urses ( exce p t 099) will s at i sfy the I gic, m a t h � m at i cs, computer science or statistics pa rt of ption iII of the Co llege of Arts and S c ie n c es re qu i re m e n t . A C O UTse cannOl s i m u l taneously sa t isfy O p t i o n I I I of the Co l le g e of Arts and S ieoces r e q u i re m e n t and t he general u ni ve r si t y requi rements .

c

I

F

I

c:

L

3

151�

AB

4, 5

lSI

BC

3

lSI

Be

4, 5

1 5 1 a n d 1 52

U

*Consult with inSlnlctor if planning to take 1 52. I f a student has taken calculus in h ig h school and did not take an AP exa m , then the s t ud e n t may enrol l in 1 52 after onsu l t a ti o n with a m a th e m a t i c s faculty m e m b e r. I n f h i s case no cred i t is given for 151.

MATH EMATICS MAJOR: The fou ndation o f the mat h ema ti cs program for majors is t h t! three- emeSter sequence of calcullls ( 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 , 253). i n t roduction to proof ( 3 1 7) . ancl l inC<1r al ge b ra ( 3 3 1 ) . S t ud ents with a calculus b ackgro u n d i n h igh school may re c ei ve adva n ced p lacement i n t o t h t' appr priate co u rse i n this sequence. Upper-d ivision work include courses in i nt ro d uc t i o n to p roof. l inear algebra, a straet al ge b ra , IlJlysis, ge om t ry, d i ffe rential e qu a t i o n s , stati stics and numerical a n a l y si s . See the des c r i p ti o n of th ' (ours s , nd the major (either Bachelor o f Arts or 13a dle l o r o f Science) for m o r e detail. Student: majoring in m a th e m a t i cs should dis us . h d u I i ng f these c()u rses i t h t he i r advisor. F o r exam ple, 499 ext e n d o ve r two .,e me. te rs begin ning i n the fa l l sem ester ; May gra duJte s beg i n this capstone course in the fall semester of lhe senior year, while December graduates must b eg i n t h i s CO tHSe in the all s em C " te r o[ their junior year.

T

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V

E

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5

I

T

BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: 3 se meste r hour� �lf mathemat ics, 4 h o u rs s u p p o r t i ng. Required: 1 5 1 , [ 52 , 253, 3 1 7, 33 1 , 34 [ , 4 33 , 455, 499. Req uired supporting: mpu ter Science and C mputer E n g i n ee ring 1 44 , w h i c h should be ta ke n i l l the fi r st year. Physics 1 53 and 1 63 or Com p uter Sc ience al1d amputer Engineering 37 1 or Economics 345 is st rongly recommended. m a t hem a ti cs,

MATHEMATICS AND GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIRE­ M ENTS (see Ge ne r a l Uni eristy Requi re m en t )1 All m ath e m a ti c s courses ( exce pt 0 9) will � at i sfy the m a thematical reaso n in g requ i remt!J1t ( l ine 3 of the general u niversity req u i rements). At lcasl 4 ho urs ar needed. l l m :t th e mat i c s courses (except 099) will satisfy l i n e 2e of Core T: The Distributive Core. At l e a s t 4 hou rs are n\!eded. A course cannot simultaneou ly s a tis fy line 2e ll1 : d line 3 . I n ful rtl l i n g t h e Ma th Rea o ni n g Re q u i rem e n t , students with do u men ted d i sab i l i t i es will be given rea onable a cco m o d a t i o ns as d eter m i ned by the oordi nator for St u d e n t s with Disab ilities and the arprop riate facul ty mem her in consultation with th e

A

AB

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 42 se mest e r hours of 8 o r 9 hours ·uppo rting. Required: lvlath [ 5 1 , 1 52, 2 5 3 , 3 1 7, 3 3 1 , 34 1 , 43 , 455, 499. 8 more hOllrs [rolll: Math 32 [ , 342, 348, 35 1 , 356, 38 1 , 480.

are use d

I'

CREDIT

<

BEGINNING CLASSES: Majors in m a t h e ma t i c s , comp uter science and engineering, and ot h e r sciences usually take 1 5 1 a n d 1 5 2 ( alculus) . J Ilath l S I i also a p p ro p r i a te fo r any student whose h igh s hO�11 m a t hemat ics preparation is trang. Th o se who h ave h a d calculus in h i g h school may omit 1 5 1 (see ArivGllced Placelllelll e c t i o n ) <l nd e nrol l in 1 5 2 after consul tation w it h a mat hema ti cs fac u l t y mem ber. Those who have le ss mathe mat ic backgrou nd rna)' begi n w i t h 1 40 before t ak i ng 1 5 ! . 1 1 t a n d 1 1 2 provi de preparati n fo r 1 40 . Business m a ·ors may sati:;fy the re qu i re me n t for the b us i ne ss deg ree hI' taking 1 28 , 1 5 1 , or 1 52 . F i na n c e majors who h ave a l ready taken 1 5 1 m:ty w a n t to t a ke 2 30. Those who have al rea dy taken 1 52 may want to take 33 1 . For student.:; w h p l a n only o n e m at h e mat ics course, a choice from 1 05, 1 0 7, 1 23 , 1 28 , 1 40, 1 5 1 is advised, d ep en d i n g on i nte rest lI1 < d preparation.

18

SCORE

EXAM

Y

Required slIpportil1g: C o m p u ter Science and ,ampuler E n gin e e r ing 1 44 and one u f Pby · ics 1 5 3 and 1 63 or Com p u t e r , cience and Co m p u t er Engineer i ng 348 or 37 1 or .:onomics 345.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See dwol of Education e t i o n of t h is c a t a l o g. MINOR IN MATHEMATICS: 20 s mestcr h om. of mathematics courses, i n du d in g 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 2 53 or 245 . nd 8 h o urs of up p e r­ division mathematic oursc� excl udi ng 446. MlNOR I N STA11STICS: include tatistics 34 1 ,

m i n i m u m o f 1 6 sem s t e r hours to

least

8 hOlUS from among the o t her statistics courses and o m p u t e r Science nd o m p u t e r Engi­ ne er i n g 1 20 or 1 44. Se e the l a t ist ics scc ti<1n of this catalo g fo r

m o re

at

d cail.

MINOR IN ACTUARIAL SCIENCE:

m i n i m u m llf

24 :;e mes te r

hours chosen from he fo l l ow i n g course s; Hus i n e s 302, 335 , 342,

405; Economics 1 52 , 3 2 2 , 343, 352; and Math 33 1 , 3,t 2 , 348, 356. Also s t r ongl y recommended; Malh 253. At least 1 2 h o u rs must b e from mathematics and a r least 4 from canomics. Stllde/lts who have takel1 calcul!!s ill h.igh school but do 110t have credit fo r 151 do n o t need to take 1 5 1 for tire ma thematics major o r minor. However, th ey s t ill l1ced to complete t h e l1umber of h o u rs ill mathema tics stated ill the rc q uiremelrts.


356 Numerical Analysis - MR. NS ( 4 )

Course Offerings

Pr e r e q u i si tes: 1 52 a n d CSCE 1 44 .

For course descripliolls, visif the PLU catalog online at wWIV. p l u. e d u / print/catalog.

38 1 Seminar i n Problem Solving - MR, N S ( 1 )

Pass/Fail only. May be t a ke n more than once for c redit. Prerequi­ site: 1 52 o r consent of i n s tructor.

gr ade o f C or h i g he r is r e q u i red in aU p re r e qu i s i te courses. A placement test and background s u r vey are r eq u i red before regiskring for b egin n i n g mathematics co u rs es i f p r e requ i s i tes have not been co m p l e ted a t PLU.

433 Abstract Algebra - MR, NS

99 Intermediate Algebra ( 4 ) oes n o t cou n t toward g r a d u a t io n. Available t h rough Middle

P rere q ui s ite : 2 5 3 o r 33 1 .

A

ollege only. m a t h entra nce requirement. math entrance re qu i re m e n t .

1 1 1 CoUege AJgebra - MR, NS ( 2 ) Prerequisites: I w o years o f h igh school a l geb r a .

P re re q ui site: consent o f d e p artm e n t c h a i r.

Prerequisite: I I I o r a t least two ye a rs o f h i gh school algebra. 1 23 Modern Elementary Mathematics - M R, NS ( 4 ) Prerequisite: a qu a l i fy i n g . cnrc on t h e math p I cement test o r a grade of C o r h igher in I l l . 1 28 Linear Models and Calculus, An [ntroductlon - MR, NS (4) Pr re qu i s i tes : two years of h i gh s ch o o l alge b ra o r I l l . Can n o t be taken for credit i f 1 5 1 (or the equ i va l ent) has been p reviously taken with a grade of C or h igher. 1 40 Analytic Geometry and Functions - MR, NS ( 4 ) P rere qui si tes: I I I a n d 1 1 2 or e q u i vale n t high school ma t e r i al .

l S I Introduction to Calculus - M R. NS ( 4 ) P re re q ui s i te: Math a n a l ys i s o r pre-calculus i n h i g h school o r 1 40. 1 52 Calculus n - MR, NS (4 ) Prereq u i s i te : 1 5 1 . 203 History of Mathematics - MR, NS (4)

P r e requ i s it e: 1 5 1 o r conse n t o f i n s t r u.cto r. 230 Matrix Algebra - MR, NS ( 2 )

Prereqnisite: 1 5 1 . 24 J Applied Statistics for Scientists - MR, NS (4) Prerequisite: 1 28 o r 1 40. 2 4 5 Discrete Structures - MR. NS (4)

Prerequ i. ite: 1 52 . 253 Multivariable Calculus - MR, NS (4)

Pr requisite: 1 52.

29 1 Directed Study ( l or 2)

by departme n l a l in v i t a tio n .

3 I 7 Introduction to Proof in Mathematics - MR, N Prer 'quisite: 1 5 2 .

(4)

3 2 1 Geometry - MR, N S (4)

Pre requisi te : 1 52 o r consent o f instructor. 3 3 1 Linear AJgebra - MR, NS ( 4)

Prereq u i ite: 1 5 2 Jnd o n e of 230, 2 4 5 , 2 5 3 , or 3 1 7. 340 A Brief Introduction to Probability - MR, NS ( 2 )

P rere q u i s i tes: 1 52 a n d CSCE 1 44. Recom mended: Math 245.

34 1 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics - MR. NS ( 4 )

P re req u is i t e : 1 52 . 342 Probability and Statistical Theory - MR, NS ( 4 ) P r r q u isite: 34 1 . 348 Applied Regression Analysis and ANOVA - MR, N S ( 4 )

Prerequi. i t e : 3 4 1 o r conSent of instructor. 351 Differential Equations - MR, NS (4)

P rere q u i s i te : 253.

455 Mathematical Analysis - MR, NS (4)

491 I ndependent Studies ( 1-4)

I J 2 Plane Trigonometry - M R, NS ( 2 )

Admission o n l

1"1

446 MathemaUcs i n the Secondary School ( 4 )

480 Topics in Mathematics - M R. NS ( 1-4) May be ta ke n more than once for c re d i t . P re requ isi t e s va r y de p e n d i n g on t h e t op i c .

1 07 Mathematical F..�lorations - MR, NS (4

Pre req u i s i t e : PL

P r e r eq u i s i te: 3 3 1 .

:5: c VI

P re req u i s i te : 253, 3 3 1 ; 3 1 7 or 4 3 3 (with consent o f instructor 4 3 3 m a y b e taken c o n cur r e nt ly) .

1 05 Mathematics of Personal Finance - M R, NS ( 4 )

P rer e q u isite : P L

(4)

499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR ( 2 ) P r e re qu is i te: senior ( o r econd sem es t e r j u n i or) m a t h m aj o r. 598 Non-thesis Research Project ( 1-4) Open to master's degree candidat s only. Prerequisite: consent o f d e par t m en t c h a i r.

Music 253.535.7602 877.254.700 1 www. p lll.edul-l11usic The music program at P LU s t rives to p ro v i d e every student a t th e u n iversit y with a m ea n i ngfu l and enrich i ng a r ts experience, ranging from non-maj o r p r ivate lessons or ensemble p a rticipa­ tion to core courses to fou r d i s t i n ct i v' a c a d e m i c. m ajo rs and two a ca d em i c minors. Nearly one q u a r t e r of the un d e r g ra d u ate s at PLU p art i c ip a te in music an nual ly. The p rogram is fu l l y aco-ed­ ited by the ational Association of Schools of Music and its graduates go on to distinguished and satisfying careers in teach­ i n g a n d p e r for m ing . Facilities for e x plor i ng the musical arts are outstanding. The Mary Baker Russell Music Center, with i ts exquisite Lagerq u ist Concert Hall, p ro v ide s state-of-the-art fo c u s to music study at PLU. MediJ- rich classrooms and labs a ugm e n t studios and i n d ividual practice sp aces . P ri va t .: s t u d y in keybo a rd is available i n p ian o , orga n , and h a rp sich o rd . O t h e r p r iv a te s tu d y i ncl udes voice and all st r i n g , wind, and percussion instruments, t augh t by regularly p e rfo r mi n g musicians. Professinnal -quali t ), ex pe r i e n ce is available to qu a li fi e d per formers in b a n d , orchestra, choir, jazz, and chamber ensembles. FACULTY: Robbins, Chair; Bell-Hanson, B rad l e y, farner, Fro h nm a ye r, Grieshaber, Hoffman, Joyner, Lehman n, Nance, Po p p e , R o n n i n g , Vaught Farner, Yo utz ; assisted by Age n t , Anderson, Baldwin, B l iss, Bloomingdale, Boughten, Box, Buchanan, Campos, h ung, Cripe, Erickson , Fukashima, Geronymo, Grinsteiner, Habedank, Harty, Houston, B. Johnson, M. Joyner, S. Knapp, Kopta, Larsen, McDonald, Nierman, Ott, F. Peterson, Phillips, Rine, S eberger, Scott, Spicciati, Sielert, Terpenning, Vancil, Winkle, Wooster. For i n t roductory courses to t h e field of music, see the d e s c r i p ­ tions of Music 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 , 1 0 3 , 1 04, 105, 1 06, and 1 20. S t u d e n t s i n te n d i n g t o m aj o r i n music should begin the major music sequences i n the fi rst year. f a i l ure to do so m a y mean an extra semester or year to com p lete the program. Following is the p rogram fo r all entering first-year students who intend t o m aj o r in music: P

A

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79


COUllSE 5:

21+ 2 '

Music Fundamentals ' : I l l , 1 1 3 Mus i c and Cul ture: 1 20 ' The()r),: 1 24 E.H rai n i n g: 1 25, 1 2 Ke 'boarding: 1 1 5, 1 1 6. 1 2 1 , 1 2 2 ( per pia emcn t )

u

I

KEYBOARD PROFICLENCY: Basic ke yb o a rd s k i l l s ilre re q u ired in all music majors ( BM, BME, BMA, BA). Attainment of adequ te keyboard kills is a) adjudicated b)' the Keyboard Proficiency Jury, administered each term and b) a g radua t ion requirement. Students are s t ron g ly encouraged to complete this requirement by the end of their sophomore ye a r.

SPRING

FAll

or

4

4 3

LANGUAGE REQUIREM ENT: Vocal perfo rmance major are required to take at least one year of language st u d)' in French or German (sec department handbook) .

These' c o u rses are pr requisite to Theory J 24. All first -year

studellts sholiid register fo r 1 1 J and 1 1 3. A plac .ment test wil l be gi vell duri llg thefir r class mee t ing, a lld, based o n the test Ot/teulne, .students will be placed in either 124, 1 1 3 or retained ill

1

1 1 1. Half-semester CO I I rses.

J

Class size limited.

MUSIC MINOR: Gel/eral: 2 2 mester hour', including M usic 1 20; one of the fo l l o w ing : Music 1 1 5, I I 1 , 1 2 1 , 1 2 2 or 202 ( l credi t ) ; 1 2 4 , 1 2 5, 1 26; 4 ho ur s o f Private I flst ru c t i on (Music 2 02-2 1 9 ) ; 4 hou rs of Ensemble (Music 360-384 ); one of the fol lowing: M w; ic 1 0 1 - 1 06, 234, 3 3 3 , 334; 0 - 1 hour of mu ic electiv-e. Specia lized: 32 se m es t e r hours, includ i ng courses required in the General M inor ( 2 2 hours) p l us 4 add it i on a I hour� of Private Instruction ( Music 40 1-4 1 9 ) and one of the oncen tration ModuI s ( 6 hours) listed under the Bachelor o f Music i n

Performance degree ( see lisring next page) o r i n jazz ( see

be low ) .

JAZZ STUDY AT PLU Iud nts i nterested in pursuing the academic stud}' of jazz at PLU have thre optio ns : l . Specialized Music MillOI' ill Jazz: 32 emesler ho urs, i n clud i ng co ur�es i n the general minor ( 2 2 ) , 4 additional hours of private instruction, nd 6 a dd i t i o nal h o u rs including 1 03 , 224, and 427. Jazz students may fuI fili the ensemble require­ m nt in either the nivc::r:;ity Jan Ens ' m b l e (375) o r combos (38 1 ) . 2. Jazz study in combilla l ion with n il outside, 1I0l"lmllsic field ( Bacilelo( of Musical A,·ts deg ree): 62 semest r hours. Jazz students m y major in music u nder th e BMA degree while com i n i llg musi s tu d i es with a no nmusi academic minor or second major. 3.

tudy in combinati oll with tlOrljazz (classical) pelformallce (Bache/a!' of ML4sic degreej; 80 se meste r hours . Jau st udents may major in perfoImance (see Ba helor of Music below) in which up t half the studio i nstru ion and re ita! l iterature can be in jazz ( see acade m i c p rogram contract fo r

GRADES A N D GRADE POINT POLl CY: 1 ) Only grades o f C or higher in music courses may be counted toward a music major. ourses in which the student re ceive s lower than a C must be repealed, u nless subst itute course work is authorized hy the department. 2 ) '!ajors must maintain a 2 . 5 c umulative grade point av erag e in acade mic music courses ( private lessons and ensembles excluded) to remain i n the program (see de p artmen t hand b oo k ) . MUSIC MAJOR ASSESSMENT: Students pursuing Bachelor of Music ( BM ) , Bachelor o f M u s i c Education ( BME), Bachelor of Musical Arts ( BMA) or Bachelor of Art in m us i c ( BA) degrees will h ave their progress and potential as essed at the end of the first, sophomore, j un ior, and senior years. Assessments are made by t h e music faculty via progress reviews, juries, and p u bl i c presentations. utco mes are pass/fail; students who fail a n asst', ment will n o t b allowed to continue i n the music program ( see department handbook ) . MUSIC CORE: The fol l owing core i s re q u ired in a l l music deg re e programs: Music and ulture: 1 20 Keyboa rd i ng: 1 2 1 , 1 2 2 Theor)': 1 24, 223, 224 Music History: 234, 3 3 3 , 334 Ear Training: 1 25, 1 26, 2 2 5 , 226

26 semester hours The Music core i fundamental to the pursuit of the music major a nd should be completed in the foll owi n g sequence: YEAR 1

Fail

(ifpreferrcd, ca l l take 120 Music a n d Culture sprillg semester) 1 2 5 Ear Tra ining I ( I )

study

Sprillg

121 223 225 Sprillg 1 2 2 224 226 234

Undergraduate Music Major Degrees:

ENTRANCE AUDITION: 1b be a dmi t ted to a music major program, p ros p ect ive stud nts mu t audition for the m u s i c fac u l t y. M usic majors should fill out a declaration of major form during their first semester of ",nrollment in the program and be assigned to a mus i c facult ' advisor.

ENSEMBLE REQUIREMENT: Music m ajo rs are req uired to participate each .emcster in a mu i nsem ble.

A

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Keyboarding I ( 1 ) per placemen t Theory II ( 3 ) Ear Training I I ( 1 ) Keyboa rding I I ( 1 ) per placement Jazz Theory Lab ( 1 ) Ear Tra ining I V ( l ) History I ( 3 )

YEAR l

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: tu de n t s interested in majoring in music shouId comp l e te an ac ade m i c program contract declaring a music major du r i ng their fi rst semester of enroll ment in the program. They w il l be assigned a music fa c u l t y advisor who will assure that the student receives help in ex p lor i ng the various major� and in scheduling music study i n the most efficient and economical m an n e r. Majors can alway ' be ch a n g ed lat r.

P

1 1 6/ l 2 1 Keyb o a rd Class ( I ) per placement 1 24 T he ory I ( 3 ) 1 26 E a r Trainin g I I ( I )

Y E AR 2

Fall

80

I l l ! 1 1 3 Fundamen tals - p re requisit e to 1 24

1 1 5/ 1 2 1 Keyb oa rd Class ( 1 ) per plac em e n t 1 2 0 Musi c and C ul t u r e ( 4 )

Jazz

details ) .

4 2 7 9 4

Y

Fnll

3 3 3 H i s to ry I l ( 3 ) entury Music ( 3 )

Spring 3 3 4 20th

Music Core requirements must b e ful fi l l ed b y e nrol l men t in specific co u rses and may not he taken by means of independent study.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Max im u m of 44 semester hours including music core (26 h ours ) , plus 4 ho u rs of ensemble; 6 ho u rs ( two courses) from 336, 337, a nd/ o r 3 3 8 ; 4 hours of p r i va te instruction fr0 111 202 - 2 1 9; 2 hours of p r i va te instruction from 40 1 -4 1 9; 499 ( 2 cred i t s ) . Keyboard p roficiency re q u i red . In addit ion t o requirements listed above, candidates fo r the BA degree must meet Co L lege of Arts and Sciences requirement (Option J , I I , or I I I ) .


K- 1 2 ITlStrumental (Orclrestra) M u s i c ore

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCAfION: Bach elor of Music Education: K- 1 2 Choral Bachelor f M us i c Education: K- 1 2 I n str ume nta l ( Band) Bache l o r o f Mu s i c Education: K- 1 2 Instr umen t al ( Orchestra)

lv[usic 370, 3 7 1 , 380 Large Ensemble Music 202-2 1 9, 402-4 1 9 , 499'" Private Instruction: Principal Instrument ( 6 semest.ers) Music Education Core Music 24 1 /242 S t r i ng Lab ( 1 , I ) Music 243/244 Woodwind L a b o r a tor y ( 1 , 1 ) Music 245 Brass Laboratory ( 1 ) Music 457 M e th o d s and Materials fo r Elementary S t r i n gs Music 458 Methods and Materials fo r S ec o n d ar y S t r i ngs

Required Components Mlls;c Education Core: All B M E degrees i n clude the fol l owi n g

music education core co u rse s: 240 Fo u n d a t ion s of Music Education 340 F und a m en tal s of Music Education 343 Ma t er i a l s and Methods for Secondary G en eral Music 345 Cond ucting I 34 o ndu c t i n g I I 34 7 Adaptive Music 348 Pract icum i n M u s ic Education 445 onducting III 446 n duct i n g IV

3 2 2

Co mp le t io l! of (lll lI/usic reql/iremerl ts req l l i red prior to

Sch ool of Education sequence requ i red.

I 2

Edu tion 39 1 oundations of Learning Educational Psychology 3 6 1 Psychology for Teaching Special Ed uca t i o n 480 Issues in Child Abuse a nd eglect Education 468 S tudent Teac hi ng

I

10

62 se m e st e r hours Keyboard projiciency req uired. First-year,

opitomore, jtm ior tlnd Senior assessments req u i red.

Completion

ofall mllsic

requ ire me n ts req u i re d prior

to

studellt teach ing.

First-yetlr, Sopholllore, junior alld •

}

4 2 2

62 semester hours Keyboard proficiency requ i red.

First-year, Sop h o m o re, jLlltior alld Senior assessmen ts req u i red. COII/pietion of all mU5ic req uiremellts requ ired prior to student teachil1g.

Sellior Proje ct: half recital

Senior a.sSe£5Illcllts reqllired.

ill

a public forum

l1I illOr o r second major req uired.

BACHELOR OF M USIC IN PERFORMANCE: 26 Music Core jvlusic Private I n s t ruc ti o n (,ec col/wrtmliOIl.< /)1'/0 1Y)( 8 semesters) 22' 8 Ivl u s i c E n s emb l e (se. (ol/centra/iam below) Music 336 M a k i n g Music 3 Music 337 Anal yzing Music 3 Music 338 Research ing M u s i c 3 Music 390 or 3 9 1 I n t e nsi ve Performance S t u dy 4 6 Music o n centration Module (see below) Music Elect ives

5

80 s e m e s t er ho urs

Keyboard p rojic iell CY reqllired.

IS

3

-' 4 4 3

COllsecluive fall/sprillg semester5. ,. SCllior Project: presentatioll

Firs t-yea r, Sophomore, jllt/ior {md Sellior l/ssessme,lIs requ i red.

26 6 6*

26 8 (4 sen esters) 4>1(2 semesters) 4" 3

In a cognate jield o l l tside of I1IlISi" all (/(tlilelllie

K- l 2 ItlStrumental (Band)

Music 3 70 3 7 1 , 380 Large Ensemble Music 202-2 1 9, 402-4 1 9, 499'" Private Instruction: (6 semest ers) Principal Instrument Music Education Core M u i c 2 4 1 String Lab M usic 243/244 \ oodwind Laboratory ( L , I ) Music 245/246 Brass Laboratory ( 1 , L ) Music 247 Percussion Laboratory ( L ) Music 447 Methods for School Band Music Music 448 M a t e r i al s for School Band Music

leachillg.

62 semester hours Keyboard proficierrcy required.

Se n i o r Project: Half recital.

Music Core

StlltiCll t

COllseC/ltive fall/sp rillg selllesrers.

Music ore Music La r ge Ensemble Music 202-2 L 9 P r iva te Instruction Music 4 0 1 -4 1 9 Private I nstruction Mu�ic 336 Making Music Music 337 Analyzing Music Music 3 3 8 Researching Music Music 390/39 1 Intensive Performance St ud )' Music 499 Senior Project�" Musi Ele.ctives

3 3

Music Education Curricula K- 1 2 Choral (Elemetltary or Secondary Emphasis) Music ore 26 Music 360-363 Large E nsemble 6 Music 204/404/499· ' Private I n str uction Voice 6 smesters)6* M u s i c Ed ucation Core IS Music 24� o r 366 Guitar Lab or Opera Workshop I Music 4 2 1 Advanced Ke yb o a rd ( private study) 2 Musi c 440 M e t h od s and M a t er i a l s fo r K-9 Music I 2 Music 44 3 Methods for Secondary Choral Music 2 Music 44 1 or 444 M e t h ods and Materials fo r K-9 Mu s ic I I o r M a t e ri a l s fo r Secondary Choral Music 2

•*

r"I

BACHELOR OF MUSICAL ARTS:

School o f Education Sequence: 1 7 semester hours

.. COIlSi!wlive fall/spring semesters.

VI

• • Sellior Project: half recital

listed below, II music education majors are required to take the following courses in the School of Education:

School of Eduwtiol1 seq"fllce req u i red.

c

First-yellr, Sophomore, junior <1Ird Scniar assruments requ ired.

School of Education Sequence: [ n addition to the music courses

**

s::

62 semester h o u rs

Music Education Core: I S semester hours

.. Consecutive fall/sp ring semesters.

6' 15 2 2 I 2 2

Key/Joard proficiency I·eqliired.

469 Student Teaching Seminar

Sc/wol ofEdl/ca tiol1 se q u e n ce reqllired.

26 6

( ae above) contillliollS non-jazz stlldy req llired.

For I'oeal performance: language study required .. COllseCIIlive fal//sp ri l lg sel1",sters; througho u t the program

Concentrations: !lIstrume1Ita[ - p rivate instruction: 205 - 2 1 9/499 ( S en i o r Pro iect: : full recital) ( L 2 ) , 40 1 /405-4 1 9 ( 1 0 ) , i n c l u din g 499 (Senior Project: ful l recital); ensemble: 370, 37 1 , 380; mo d ul e : 345, 346, 358, 38 1 ( 2 ) , music elective ( 1 ) . Organ - private instruction: 203/403/499 ( Se n ior P ro j ec t : fuL l recital) (22); ensemble: including 38 1 ; module: 2 1 9, 345, 346, 352, 3 58; music elect ive ( 1 ) . Piano - p rivate instruction: 202/402/499 ( Senior Proiect: full recital) ( 1 2) , 2 0 1 /4 0 1 /402 ( L O ) ; ensemble: large ( 2 j , 3 S I ( 2 ) , 3 8 3 ( 2 ) piano elective ( 2 ) : module: 2 1 9, 358, 430, 4 3 1 , 45 1 , 452. Voice - p r i v a t e instruction: 204/404/499 (Senior Project: full recital) ( 2 2 ) ; ensemble: 360-363; module: 3 5 3 , 358, 366, 453 . Composition - private instruction: 3 2 7/499 ( S e n io r Project) ( 1 6); principal instrument 202-2 1 9/40 1 -4 1 9 (8); ensemble: l a r ge ( 4 ) ; module: 3 4 - , 346, music el ec t i ves ( 4 ) . P

A

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81


2-4 credits

Course Offe rings

u

Fall and Spring Semesters. Two half-ho u r lessons per week ( 1 2

Fill' course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog online at www.p l u . edu/

print/catalog.

weeks) i n add i t i o n to daily practice. Summer: 1 2 hours o f instruction to be a n nounced in addition to daily p ractice.

1 0 1 Introduction 10 Music - AR ( 4 )

Special fee in addition to witiol1.

N o t o p en to

majors.

102 Understanding Music Through Melody - AR

Not open

to

221 Keyboard Pro6ciency - AR ( 1 )

(4)

223 Theory JI - AR

ma·ors.

1 03 H istory of Jazz - AR

(4)

224 Jazz Theory Laboratory - AR

( I)

104 M u i c and Technology - A R ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 223 or consent o f i n s t ructor.

105 The Arts o f China - AR, C ( 4 )

225 Ear Training I I I - AR ( 1 )

P re re qui s i te: 1 26 or co nsen t of inst ructor.

106 Music of Scandinavia - AR, C ( 4 )

226 .Ear Training IV - AR ( 1 )

1 1 1 Music Fundamentals I - AR ( 2 )

Prerequisite: 225 or consent of i n s t r u c tor.

1 1 3 Music Fundamentals I I - A R ( 2 ) Prerequisi te: 1

11

or

234 History I - AR ( 3 )

co ns e n t o f i n s t ructo r.

P rereq u isit e: 2 2 3 o r consent o f inst ructor.

1 1 5 Introduction to Keyboarding - AR ( 1 )

240 Foundations of Music Education

o n scnt of i n stru tor re q u i red. 1 1 6 Basic Keyboarding - AR

(I)

educa tion majors o n ly). 241, 242 String Laboratory ( I, 1 )

1 20 Music and Culture - AR, C ( 4 )

243, 244 Woodwind Laboratory ( I , 1 )

Requires no previ o u s music experience. Required fo r music majors and m i n o r ; prerequis i k course fo r M 51 1 2 4; corcq u i site (fa l l term): I l l ! 1 1 3 or con ent o f d e par t me n t chair, ( sp r i n g term): 1 2 4

or

245, 246 Brass Laboratory ( 1 , I ) 247 Per ussion Laboratory

consent of department cha i r.

1 2 1 Keyboarding 1 - AR

327 Composition - AR ( 1 -4 )

Prere q u is ite: 1 1 6 o r consent of i n s t ructor.

Pre.r..:q u isi le: 1 2 L or

May be repeated fo r additional cred i t . Private inst ruction; special

(I)

consent

fee i n addi tion to t u i t i o n .

of instru ctor.

1 25

Pre req u is i te: 2 34 or

P re req u isi t e :

(1) (J

Pre requ i site : 224, 2 2 6, o r consent o f instructor.

or 2)

337 Analyzing Music - AR

Pre requisite: t w () se mes te rs of non- jazz study ( 202-2 1 9 ) o r permission o f t h e Direc to r o f Jazz tudies.

338 Researching Music - A R

340 Fundamental of Music Education - AR ( 2 )

Instruction: Vo ice - AR ( 1 -4)

205 Private I nstrnction: Viol in!Viola - AR

Prerequisite: 240.

( 1 -4 )

34 1 Music for Classroom Teachers

206 Private I nstruction: CeUo/Bass - AR ( 1-4 )

1 -4 )

teach ing ( no n - music education majors) . 343 Methods and Materials for Seco ndary General Music ( 2 )

209 Private Instruction: Bassoon - AR ( 1 - 4 ) 2 1 0 Private I nstruction: Clarinet - A R ( 1-4)

345 Conducting J - AR ( I )

2 1 1 Private I nstruction: Saxophone - AR ( 1-4)

346 Conducting I I - AR (

2 U Private Instruction: Trompet - A R ( 1 -4 )

348 Practicum in Music Education (

2 1 4 Private Instruction: Trombone - AR ( 1-4) Private In tructlon: BaritoDe/Thba - AR ( 1 -4 )

st uden t tea c h i n g .

349 Electronic Music Practicum - AR ( I )

2 1 7 Private a n d Class Instruction: Guitar - AR ( 1 -4 )

Special fee i n addition t o tu i t io n . Prerequisite: cons e nt of

( 1 -4)

i n structor.

2 1 9 Private Instruction: Harpsichord - AR ( 1 -4)

1 credit Fall and Spri ng emeste rs: On half-hour private or two one-hour class le o on per week ( 1 2 we ) in addition to dai l y practice. January: Two 45-llli nute lessons pC I' week in addition to daily practice. SlUn me r: 6 hour. of instruction t be announced in addition to daily pra .tice. St ude nts in piano, voice, and guitar may be as-signed to class in lruction a the discretion of the music faculty. A

C

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U

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I)

Prereq u i s i te: 340; r�co mmended: enro l l fall semester preceding

2 1 6 Private I nstruct jon: Percussion - AR ( 1 - 4 )

P

1)

347 Adapt ive Music ( 1 )

2 1 3 Private Instruction: French Born - A R ( 1 -4 )

2 1 8 Privale I nstruction: Harp - AR

(2)

Offered fo r students preparing for elem entary classroom

208 Private Instruction: Oboe/English Horn - A R ( 1 -4 )

215

(3)

Prerequisite: 1 20, 1 24, or consent of i nstructor.

203 Private Instruction: Organ - A R ( 1-4 )

207 Private Instruction: Flute - A R (

(3)

P r requisite: 2 2 4 or onsent of inst ructor.

202 Privllte lnstruction: Piano - AR ( j -4) 204 Private and Cla

(3)

3 3 3 o r consent o f instructo r.

336 Making Music - AR ( 3 )

Prt'requisitc: 1 2 5 or consent of inst ructo r. 20 1 Private lnstruction: 'azz - A R

o f i nst ructor.

334 20th-Century Music - AR

Ear Training J - AR ( 1 )

1 26 .Ear Training II - AR

(3) consent

333 History 11 - AR

(3) 1 1 3 , 1 2 0, nr co nse nt of i nstruc tor.

1 24 Theory I - AR

Prerequbi te:

(I)

248 Guitar Laboratory ( 1 )

(J)

1 2 2 Keyboarding n - AR

(3)

For students preparing to become music spec i alist s ( m u s i c

1 1 5 or 011. ent of inst ruc tor.

P r:erey uisi t e:

82

(3)

Prerequisite: 1 2 4 o r co nsent o f i.nstructor.

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3 5 1 Accompanying - A R ( l or

2)

352 Organ I mprovisation - A R ( I )

Private instr uction; s p eci a l fe e i n ad d it io n to t u it i o n . Prerequi­

si te: co nsent o f instructor. 353 Solo Vocal Uterature - AR ( 2 ) 354 H istory o f Music Theatre - A R ( 2 )


42 1 Advanced Keyboard Skills - AR

358 Early Music Laboratory - AR ( 1 )

Prerequ lsite; 3

_

_

360 Choir of the West

(1)

May b e repeated fo r addi tional c re d i t . P re.rr qui.si te: ucc ssful com p letion of Ke yboard Profic i e n cy J u ry J n d BM o r BMP. Jury.

or consent o f in t ructor.

- AR ( 1 )

427 Advanced Orchestration/ Arranging - AR ( l or 2 )

36 1 Uuiversity Chorale - AR ( I )

Private instruction; specia l fe e i n add ition to tuit i o n . M a y be

362 University Men's Chorus - AR ( 1 )

re peat e d fo r additional credit. Prerequisite: 336 or consent

363 University Singers - AR ( 1 )

instructor.

365 Chapel Choir - AR ( 1 )

430 Piano Literature I - AR ( 1 )

Pan i i patio n without credit available.

43 1 Piano Literature n - AR ( 1 )

366 Opera Workshop - AR ( 1 )

440 Methods and Materials for K-9 Music I ( 2 )

Prer qui s ite: consent of inst ructor.

('\

O ffered fo r music education majors only. Prerequisite: 3 4 0 .

(1) Speci al fee in add i tion to t u i ti o n .

441 Methods and Materials for K-9 Music n ( 2 )

370 Wind Ensemble - AR (

443 Methods of Secondary Choral Music

368 Choral Union - AR

O ffe red for music education majors only. P re re q u is i te : 440.

I)

Prerequisite: h av i n g p l a ye d i ns t r u m en t t hr o u gh at l ea st j u n ior year o f high school or conse n t of instr uctor.

444 Methods for Secondary Choral Music n ( 2 )

Pr e re qu is i te : 340.

376 Jazz Laboratory Ensemble - AR ( 1 )

(1) P re re q u i site: 346 or c o n se n t of i nstructor.

378 Vocal Jazz Ensemble - AR ( 1 )

446 Conducting IV - AR ( 1 )

375 University Jau Ensemble - AR ( 1 )

445 Conducting I I I - AR

38 1 Chamber Ensemble - AR (

I)

Prerequ isite: 340.

1)

448 Materials fo r School Band Music P re re qui s i t e: 340.

383 Piano Ensemble - AR ( 1 ) 390 Intensive Performance Study: Ensemble Tour - AR ( 4 )

consen t of inst ructor.

3 9 1 loteosive Performance Stud}'! Conservatory Experience ­

(4)

)

452 Piano Pedagogy II - AR ( I ) 453 Vocal Pedagogy - AR

(2) (2)

P re re q u i s it e : 340.

401 Private Instruction: Jazz - AR ( 1 -4)

458 Methods and Materials for Secondary Strings

P re re q ui ite: two semesters of no n-jan. s t udy (202-2 1 9 ) o r

469 Student Teaching Seminar ( 2 )

402 Private Instruction: Piano - AR ( 1-4)

Con c u r re n t e n ro L l I1le n t W i t ll Education

403 Private Instruction: Organ - AR ( 1 -4 )

468

required.

49 1 Independent Studies ( 1- 4 )

404 Private Instruction: Voice - A R ( 1 -4 )

May b e re pe a t ed fo r add i tional credi t . Prerequisite: consent o f

405 Private Instruction: Violin/Viola - AR ( 1 -4 ) 406 Private l osh'uction: CeUo/Bass - AR

(2)

P rereq u is i te : 340.

ircctor o f Jazz S t u d ies.

407 Private I nstruction: Flute - A R

45 1 Pimo Pedagogy 1 - AR ( 1

(2)

457 Methods and Materials for Elementary Strings

Prerequisitl:: co ns e n t o f i n structor.

permi ssi n o f the

or consent of i nstructor.

447 Methods of School Band Music ( 2 )

Prerequi�i te: co n ·ent of i n structo r.

AR

445

Prerequisite:

60, 36 1 , 362 or 363 re q ui red .

380 University Symphony Orchestra - AR (

Prerequisi te:

(2)

P rer e qu i s i te : 340.

37 1 Concert Band - AR ( I )

Concurrent re g i s r a t i o n i n

of

i nstructor.

( 1-4 )

499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR

( 1 -4 )

( 1-4)

Private instruction; special fee in ad d i t ion to t u i t io n . Prere q u i ­

408 Private I nstruction: Oboe/English Horn - AR ( 1 -4 )

s ite : consent o f instructor.

409 Private ln struction: Bassoon - AR ( [ -4) 410 Private Instruction: Clarinet - AR ( 1 -4 ) 4 1 1 Private Instruction: Saxophone - A R ( 1 - 4) 4 1 2 Private lostruction: Trumpet - AR

( 1-4 ) ( [ -4)

4 1 3 Private lnstruction: French Horn - AR

4 1 4 Private l nstruction: Trombone - AR ( 1 -4 ) 4 1 5 Private l ostruction: Baritone/Tuba - A R ( 1 -4 ) 4 16 Private Instruction: Percussion - AR ( 1 -4) 417 Private In tructlon: Guitar - AR ( 1 -4 ) 4 1 8 Private lostructlon: Harp - A R

( 1 -4 )

4 1 9 Private Instruction: Harpsichord - AR

1 credit Fall a n d

( 12

( 1 -4)

Spring ::iemesters: One h a l f- hou r pr ivate lesson per week 4 5 - m i nu te

weeks ) in a d d i ti o n to daily p rac ti c e . January: Two

lessons per

eek i n add ition to d ai l y p ra c t ice . Summer: 6 hours t o da i l y p ractice.

of instru c t i o n to be announced i n a d d i t ion

2-4 credits all and Spring e rn e ten. Two h al f- ho ur lessons per week weeks) in addi t io n to d a i ly p ra ct ice . Summer: 1 2 hours o f instruction to be anno unced in ad d i t io n t o d aily pra c tice .

(12

Special fee in additioll ro tuition. P

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\II

....

u Z .... U \II

Division of Natural Sciences

School of Nursi ng

253.535. 7560

253 . 535 .7672

www. nsci.plil.e.dl1

www. plll.edu/- rlurs

The

ivision of Na tu ra l Sciences ful fills a two - fold p u rpose,

The School of

providing all student · g ro u ndi ng in the scient ific av,a re n e ss vi tal fo r be i n g a c i t iz e n i ll the m dern world and p a r t ic i pa t i n g in democracy.

u rs i ng is a professional school that combin�s

n u rs i ng science with a strong fo undation in l ihNa.1 a r t s a nd

p rep a r i n g its majors for caree rs as sci en ce professionals and a

h u m a n i tic•. It pr e pa re s w1dergraduate students [or generalist nu rs i n g p r ac ti

e;

b u i lds UpCll1 undergTa d u ate n u r ing 'duca­

tio nal experien ces to p repare n urses for adva nced p ra c t ic in

i

To ffi<:el the first pu rpose, t J1c s x depart m e n t s in the division ofter rigorous p ro gra ms in b i o logy, chemistry, geosciences, physics, mathematics, and comp uter s cienc.: a nd co m pu t e r e ng i n eer i ng . l n q ui r y-based l ea rn i ng is e m p hasiz ed in la bo ra t o­ r i e s , re .: a r h e urses , and capstone p roj ec t s . The division-wide under�rad uate res arch p rogram supports one-oll-One i n ves t iga­

specific sp ec ia l t ie s ; and [(>- p onds to education needs of p r acti c­

tions with faculty in which stu dents are immersed in all as pec ts

I t s conti n u u m of educational programs · m pl o

of actl l'1l\y " doi ng" science.

i ng opport u n i t i es that chaUenge st udeLlts to develop skills, att i ­

cou rses dddr�.ss th e bask p h i losophy and methodologies of

co m m u n ities to meet t h e i r health and wel l ness needs.

ing nurses to remain cu r re n t , rODlp tent prac t i t ioners or to

r ev ise

fo cus of their p ra ct i ce . The school exe m p l i fi es the e

in an envi­

ro nment that e n courages i n qu ir y, diversity, l i fe l o ng lea rn i n g, and lernen t s in the hu m an quest for wholenes . .

s p i rituJLity as vital

dyn a m i c learn­

tud es, values, a n d ro le s wh ich fa c i l i tate i n d i v i d uals, fa m i l ies, a n d

To meet the second purpose, b o t h m a j o r and non- major

se ie n c . Th is encourages a n awareness of the l i m i t a t i o n s of

Degrt'c pfl1grams withi.n the School of Nu rs i n g include the Bachelor of Science i n Nu r si n g fo r ba. ic nursing s t uden ts a n d

scie nce as we l l as a n app rec i a t i o n fo r i t s benefits. Cou rses :11 s o atte m p t to pl a ce scienc

the

univerSity's m i ss i o n of elu at i n g fo r l ives of servi

licensed p r ac t i c al n urses, th e RN

and tech nol'lgy in its la rge r socio­

to

MSN program f()[ reg i stered

c ul t u r al co ntext , connect i ng deve l o p m e n t s i. n o ne di c i p l i n e with

nurses, and the M a s t e r of c i en-e i n

tho se i n an lt he r and w i th i.nA uences o u t side the sci nee . Re ga r d l ess of tb ei r maj r. s udents w i J i fi n d i n t h e Na tura l

O u tcomes M:lI1ager and Fam ily N u rse P ra cti t i o n er areas of co ncen tration. An

for close interactions , bound, a n d the deve lop m e n t

cen t ra l

a

of the

e

an d

I n s t ruction. Wo rkshops and short

Also i nt 'gral tCJ th h rst Steps

co urses for i.n terdisci p l i nary

programs

k n ees and fo r o th e r sch )ols o f the u n i versity. ducat ion deg re es with majors a n d m i nors in t h n a rurJi ciences are avai ldb le; � e e the Educa t ioll section of t h i s c talog fo r spe i tit: degr e e f "ljuire m c n t s . See a lso the '�c­ 5

Descr i p t ions of specific

course

Mathema t i cs

C o m p u ter Science a n d

P hy� i s

Well ness Ce n t

r a

support prc>g ram. The cen ter provides as

erves a s a

p ra c t i ce

for undergraduate and graduate stu de nt s.

j,

M iU er,

M jze, Ro b i nso n, Schamer,

ACCREDITATIONS AND AFFRIATJONS:

offer ings and degree req ui re­ Geosciences

sit

Nur ' i n g at Pacific

LuthlTd !l

A meric.an Asso cia ti o n

The School of

Un iversity is a member

f ' o l k gt's of

f the

he BSN program i s appr ved by tJ1e Washington State Nu rsi ng Comm ission and ac c re di t ed by the National League for ursing A cc re di t in g Com­ mis ion, 6 L Broadway, ew York, NY J 00 1 4 (80 0.669.965 " ex\.. 2 2 7; fa x 2 [ 2 . 8 1 2.0390 ) . The M S N pr gram also is accre d i ted b)1 the NLNA . The School is part of Psi hapter-at - Large of S ig ma Theta 1;:1lI l n te rnat ional, the honor society o f n ursing.

ments offered wit h i n the Na t u ra l Sc iences a re listed under :

Chemistry

m at er n i t y

La b u h n , Mal o n e)" Ma riella ,

fo r related p rograms.

B iol ogy

a

Schultz, Tomko, Wo od, Zaich k i n ; a s. isteel by Rinehart.

t udies an d on the H ea l th Scien ces

Programs)

f N u r- i ng i

FA.CULTY: T. M i l l e r, Deall; ikin, Alleman, Bell, Bradshaw, M , Carr, u l b c: rts o n , u l p. Driessnack, Dyb b ro, aspar, Ge o rge ,

BA in

( u nd e r Pre-Professiollal

5ch 01

n u rs i ng services to th� co m m un it y as wel l

co u rses that fu lfill ge n era l u n i v er s i t y req u i rements. The d epa rt ­

t io n s o n £m'iromnelJ /al

o u rses for n u rses a nd others

that i n c l udes a n u rse-ma na ged, pract itioner-staffed clinic and

m�nt lcad i ng to BA and BS degrees, mi nor programs, a n d core

o urses for

'cnter for Con t i n u i n g

invol ved t n healt h c a re are a Js o offered through the ce nte r.

d i v is i o n w i t h i n [ b e College of Arts a n d S c i nces, t he Di \ri­ atu ral . iences o ff� rs maj r pr grams in each depa rt ·

w i l h i n the

ssociate cer t i ficat io n

Educational Staff

the O ffice of th Washington St ate -u pe ri nt enden t of Public

o m p l l tcr Engi­

SiOll of

ments provide su p p o rt in g

1'0

Nu rsi n g E d uc a t i o n . Cours� work i s o ffered in collaboration w i t h

n ee ri n g , Geosciences, Mathematics, and Physics. a

1'1 MSN f, r no n - n u rs i ng baccalaure­

is available for 5(ho )1 nu rses t h rou g h the

o f Biology, C h em i s t r y , Com p u te r Scien A

i:\ p rogram l ea d i n g

whole

concern.

arlson, Dei.l.n; fac u lty mem bers o f the Departments

FACULTY:

are a n d

ate graduate' w i l l b eg i n �llmmt'1" 2003 .

ciences D ivisi o n a faculty devoted to teach ing. Opportu n i t ies p ersoll is

ent ry- Ie

u rsi.ng ", i t h

Co mp u t er En g ineering

Course Offerings

l.lrsing.

For course descriptiolls, IIi il tlle PLU catalog onlille ill www. plu .edll/

Undergraduate Programs

print/catalog.

The ba s ic u ndergraduate program i� designed for stud nts who

T he fo l l ow in g course is o ffered u n d e r N a tu ral Sciences. Other cou rses suitable illr sa tis fyi ng ge ne ral u n ive rs i t y requirements or C o re I r e qu ir e m e n t s may be fo u nd in the l is ti ngs fo r ea ch o f the departments i n t he divisi o n . 210

do not h o ld licensure in pract ical or registered Ilu rs i ng . The LP to BS

program is de ' i g n e d for persons h ol d i n g LP

earned the Bachelor of S c ience i n gi b le to it f 1 1" the N

Natural History o f Hawaii - N s., S M ( 4 )

l icen sure.

G ra d ua t es who successfuJly co m pl e te ei lher prog ram \liU hilve u rs i Jl g degree, and a re eli­

LEX e xa m i n at i o n for I i ensure a s reg i s tere d

n u rses. They are prepared fo r beg in n i ng p rofessional n ur s i n g

specia l se­ dit by exa m ination

positions in hospitals a n d o th e r he alth agencies . quence of study is avaiJable that p rovides

n

options fo r cert illed nursin g assista uts ( CNAs) . The undergra du ­ ate p rograms provide a foundation for graduate t u dy in n urs­

i ng. Under t h e d i rect supervision of i t s fa culty m",mbers, the school uses hosp it al s, m u n i t y, a s weJI

84

as

h ea l t h age n cies , a n d

schools in the com­

t he PLU v ell ness Cen ter, to provide optimal

clin ical l earn i n g experiences for its 'tlldents. P

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H IGB SCHOOL PREPARATION: It is s t r ng l y recommended that a p p l i ca n ts co m p le te a program i n h i gh school that i ncludes: Eng l i s h , four years; mathematic , two y ea rs ( pre� rab ly a lg ra and geo m e t r y) ; so ial science , two year ; on fo re ig n l a ngu a ge tw ears, l ab o rato r y scienc �, t wo year, (in l ud i n g c he mist ry ) ; ,

decti es,

th ree y<:ars.

ADM ISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY: A p p l i cants cep t e d by

must be ac­

the u n i ve rs i t y before considera t io n for acceptance by

the School of N ur sing . Pacifi L ut h ran n ive rs it y weic mes a p p l icat i o n from a l l ·tudents wh have de m on s t rate d ca p ac i t ies for su cess at th b cca l a u reate level. S t ud en ts who p resent app ro p r i a te academic records an d p e rso n a l q u l i t ie s are a d m i t ­ ted either fall or p r i ng se.m ·ter. A p p l i ca t i o n pro edu e a nd other details are o un d elsewhere in t h is ca t a lo g . ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF NURSING: S tude n ts

seek­

ing admi ion to t he Basic p rogra m , the LPI to 8 N sequence, or the RN to MS equence m u s t make formal applic t ion to both the u ni ve rs i t y and the cho I of Nursing. Applica t ions fo r d m ission to t h e n u rs i n g maj r re , vailable from th School of Nursing. All J P p l ication materials, i n c l u d i n g o ffi c i a l t ra n s c r i p t s, a.r · reviewed by the School of Nursing R c ru i t ment, Admis ion, a n d P ro gr e ss ion ommittee and valuated according t o stated admi s ion c ri te r ia. Und rgra d ua te s t u d en ts d es i r ing admission to either fall (I f spring semes ter of t h e fo Uowin ' academic )'e a r should submit their applications by 'larch I . The nu m b er of ava ilab l e spaces e ach semester in the School of N u r ing i s l i m it d; therefore, t h election of st u d ent for admission is com p e t i t ive . S tu d en t s des i ri n g to begin the nursing sequcnc in either fall r s p r i ng semester, and who have a p p l ied by the March I dead l i ne. are notified in earli' A p r i l . Students are ad m i t ted to the tcrlll of t he i r choice insofar as it is possible. Ir there are m re appl icants for th� two seme ter · of the academic year th n c a n b accom mo ­ d a t 'd, quali.fied cand idates are placed on a wa i t i n g list fo r admission to the spring class if spaces b ec o m e a ailable. I f vaca n c i e s occur for the fall semester, thnsc students h o have been a d m it ted fo r spring but who requested fal l placement are given fi rs t p riority. Following t h e i n i t ial admissions c y 1 ( M a rc h I d adl i n e ) . individllals whose applications have been reeei cd by the beg inn i n g f ea c h month will be not i fie d of a p lanee tatus in the n ext month. Application ' for fall plac ment must be recei ed no later t han August 3 1 ; applications for spring p l a c e m nt m u st be rece ive d n later than December 1 5 . A l l p ro sp e c t ive or p re-nu rs i ng students are urged t o seek ea r l y , cademic advisement from the d mi ss io n s CO(Hdinator in the Sch oo l of ursing in order to enroU ·or appropriate prerequisite course s and avoid unnece ss a ry loss of t im e . The Sdw I oj Nil rsiIIg reserves the right of Cflrriw/1I111 (wd progT(lm modification and revision.

ADMISS)ON CRlTElUA

Bas;c!LPN

rlinimum criteria that a p p l i ca n ts must meet to be conside red fo r admis io n to the Bas i c or L P N /B N p rogra ms of st ud y in the hool of Nu rsi n g in c l ud e t h e fol l ow i n g ( RN a p p l i c n ts should refer to i n formation p rovided under IVlSN Sequence Jar Licensed Registered Nursas): 1 . Ad m is sion to Pacific Lutheran

niversit . p pl i ca n ts must have been ad m i t ted t Pacific Lutheran U n ivers i t y before consideration of ad m iss i o n to the S h ool of j ursing.

Admission to the university does 1I0t imply or guarantee adm i'sioll to the School of ursing. 2 . atisfactory co m ple t i o n , or p endi n g salisfactory co m plet i o n, of specified p re req u is i te courses at PL . a r dited c m m u n i t y college, or a n o t h er a c. red ited u nive r s it y. olllpa­

ra b l e COUISe l isti n gs are available lI p on req uest . 3. Completion, or pending co m p l e ti on. f at leas t 30 sem ster c redits (or 45 q u a r te r cred i ts) at tbe coUege level, a.nd class stand i n g of sop h omo re or h i g h e r.

4. A m i n i m u m grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 s c al e in e a c h nursing p re re q u is i te co urse. 5. A m i n i m u m cumulat ive g rade p o i n t average of 2.5 on a .0

sca l e in the p re req u isi t e c ou r ses . 6. A m i n i m u m PL cumulat ive g ra d e po i n t average of 2 .s on a 4.0 scale. ( For tr a nsfer students who ma t r icula te to PL and the chool of N u rs i ng simultaneously, the umul a t ive tran fer g rad e p o i n t a erage as de te r m i ned hy the Registrar's Oftl e is

z C ::0 11\

used.) 7. No mo re t han one repea t of an, single p rere q uisite o r co re q u i s i te cou rse. 8. o mp l e t io n of the uni e rs i ty math entrance requirement, ( i nterm diate algebra at the c o ll ege level with a m in i mwll grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, or completion o f two ears of college p repa ra t ry r high scho I J algeb ra with average gr ades of 2.0 011 a 4.0 sc a l e ) . 9. Ph 'sical health and e mo t i o n a l stability sufficient to meet the demands of n ursing and p rovi de t imely, safe pa t ie n t c are . I . F l uen cy in speaki ng, rea d i ng, wr i t i n g , and comprehending E ng l is h . 1 1 . Civil, adminiStrative, and cri minal histor y clearance in Washington State as well as any other a p p l ica bl e state o r

Z G'l

o u n try. 1 2.

:ubmissioll of a l l requ i red application d oc u m en ts to the f urs i ng b ) ' the desig n a ted d ead l i n es.

School

CONTINUATION POlICI ES

o m p le t io n f ap p roved PR class b e fo re b'g in n i n g nu rs i ng lasses, with d cume.nted yearly u p d ates . 2. o m p le t ion of appro cd first a id course before beg i n n i llg n u rsi n g cla.sses (waived fo r c ur ren t l y l icensed Registered Nurse , Licensed P rac t i ca l N u rses . E mergcncy Med ical Te ch n i ciaIlS, pa ra medics) . 3. Nursing COLlrs�s all h a ve prereq u i s i tes a ncl l11Llst be taken i n seq uence a n d/or co n c u r re n t ly as iden t i fi d in the u rricu­ Ium p la n as well as the c a t a l og . 4. A min imul ll grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale ( ) mllst be a c h i eved in all requi red nurs ing co u rse s. stud ent re ce ivi n g a g rad e of less than 2.0 in an y o u rse which is a. p re requisi te to another n u rs i n g course may not cont i n ue in the nu rs i n g s qu n e unt i l the prerc q uisite cou rs e is rep ated w i lb a grade o f 2.0 on a 4.0 sc ale or abo c. (Othe r p o l ic i es rega rding prog r ssion/c nlinLl-

1.

ation can be found in th

ndergraduate Nur i ng Student Handb ok.) 5 . I nco m plete g r ades in nursing c o u rseS mu t be converted to a passing g rade (2.0 on a 4.0 scale or above ) before. the first day of cl,ISS of the subseq uen t term. 6. S t udc n t s taki n g ap p ro ve d witl d rawals from n ursin g co u rses m a y re.turn to t he School of N u rs i n g in accordance with po li cies listed in the Undergraduat N u rs i ng Studenl Handbook on a space-available basis, not i n g th at t h ey may be s ubj ec t to n e w program requirements. 7. The School of N u rs i n g reserves th right to with raw n urs i n g students who fai l to demonstrate academic or cl i n i c a l compe­ tence or who fail to maintain professional co n d uc t . Unsafe and/or unethical p rac t i c e con s t i tllte s g- roun d " for i m m ed ia te dismissal from t he clinical c mp nem a n d/o r the program. BEAIl'H: N u rs i ng stud n ts are re s p o n sib l t' for m a i n tain i n g op t i m al heal th and are teachers of hea.lth. Physica l exa m i nations,

X-r ay s , and immunizations are requ i re d bl:fore begi n n i n g the p rogra m, and p ri dically th e r a ter. II stlldents must carry p e rso nal health/accident i nsu ra n ce. It is the respo n s i bility of ea h s t uden t to p ro v i de ap p ro p r i a t e a nd ti m el y docllmentation as required. Fa i l u re to co m p l y with any of these requirements will result in the can cellat io n of the s t u den t s' registration in n u r · i ng co urses regardless of their p ro g re ss i n the term.

certain level o f English p rou iency is necessary for a c a de mic success in n ursing and for pa t ie nt safety. Students who a re i d e n t i iied by t h e un i ersity as needing the E n gl i s h as a econd L a n gu age ( ES ) sequence of (OUI·se w i l l

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY: A

P

A

C

I f i e

L U T H E R A N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

85


be rcy u i reti tu take I h E L admls ion to th School English

a� ,]

Foreign

our es before onsideral ioll fo r

Nursing cour

ll l-s i n g and/or to take the Test of LlJ1gua�e (TOEFL) a nd score at I asl 550.

In add i t i o n , aU students for whom Engli h is n 0t t h e i r fi rst la n!,\uage m us t also ta k e and p ass sp ecific tests of English

rehcns ion , gra m m a r, and fl uen cy. G u i de­ l i nes and poli -it'" a n t c o b ta ined from t h > S c h o o l of Nursing. Al l srudents for whom English is not t h e i r first lan guage s h o ul d also be aware t h a t t hey may n o t be able to com plete the program of studv w ith i n the usuaJ t i me fra me.

pro n LU 1ciaL ion, cum

NON-MAJORS ENROLLED IN N URSING COURSES: S t u d e n t s wh

have n o t been a d m i tted to the n u rsing major but who wi h

inst ructors, andior the dean.

W r i t i ng 1 0 1 I nquiry Sem i n a r : Wri t i n g

ADDITIONAL COSTS: In addition to reg u l a r uni ver s i ty costs,

Physical E d uca t i o n 1 00 Personalized P i t n

students must provide their own transportation between the

n u rsing cou rse. Public

t ranspo rtat ion is li m ite d , so prov i s i o n fo r

professional l i ability

insurance

t udc nts are r q u i r�d t

in speci fied

a mo u nts

ca rr)'

dLl[i11g al l

peri ds of cli n ical experience. or basic s t ud e n t " u 1 i s i n s u rance is a a il a ble u . nder a group pbn at J n o m i n a l cost to tjle s t u d e n l . Ph),sical exam i n a t io n fees, st uclent u n i forms a n d a ny necessa ry cqu i p ment , re also the responsibili t)' of the s t ude_Ill. A fee o f $ 1 00 per semester is char ge d to cover a s sess me n t s , practice, ;lnd cornputl:r l aboratory m a t e r i als, eq u ipment, and supplies . The f t: is iden t i fi e d w i t h spe ifie courses and is p ayable to t he Bu. iness ffi e a lo n g with u n i l'crsity tuition. Prog rams of Study

PREREQUISITE AND COREQUlSITE COURSES TO THE NURSING MAJOR: Each prerequisite and c o requ i si t e co u rse I i ted below m u s t be co m p lete d w i t h a m i ni m um grade of 2 . 0 o n a 4.0 seal i n order to b e considered � u c cssfull), completed. Basic slIldelllS m Lls t successfu l ly co m ple te B i o l og y 205, 206, h e m i , t T )' 1 05, ,tn.d Psychology 1 0 i before begiw1 i. n g t h e •

nurs ing p rog ram . Basic stud.:nts m u s t al so su ccess u l ly I. ) m p kte Biol ogy 2 0 J and P,yc ho l og ), 352 befo re p rogression to second semester sophom o r · - Icv I n u rs.ing courses; i n ad d i t i o n , the), m u s t also successfu l ly co mple t e Statistics 2 3 ] before en ro l lme n t i n Nur ing 3 6 0 or 392. LPN stlldelll5 must SUCCI'. ·full y complete Biology 20 ] , 205, 206; Chemistry 105; Psych olO!:,'Y 1 0 1 an 1 352 before b egin n i ng the nu r s ing program. L P r stud nts mu t a ls o suc essfully complett: Stati tics 23 1 before enroll ment in Nursi ng 360 or 392.

RN stut/ellts mllst successfu l l ), 20

;

o m plete Biology 20 1 , 205, a n d

01e m i s t ry 1 05; Psycho logy 1 0 1 a nd 3 5 2; a n d Sta t i s t ics 2 3 1

befo re begin ni ng

t he

nursing p rogram .

( Fo r add i t i o n a l

352

Psychology

I

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I

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L U T H E R A N

U

N

I

I n q u i r Sem i n ar; G U R

r

ore

V

4 4 4 4

Second Year

First Semester Bio l o g)' 20 I lntroduc t i o n to Microbi ) Iogy Psychology 52 Devdopment: In ancy to M a t urity $la li tics 2 3 J I ntroductory t a l istics ur,ing 220 u r s i n g Co m p e t en c i e I

4 4 4 4

Physical Education

JU/Illory Te rlll N u r s i n g 220 l1 r� i n.g ompekncie, I (if 11M completed 1 I I previoLls firsc se/llester) Secolld Sl?rllcster Nursing

2 0

Pro� ssi

1

4

al Foundations

ur�in ' 2 70 Health \ssessmeot and Promotion

u rs i n ) 2RO

Pathological HUIll,lll Pro

sses

U RI ore

4 4 4 4

Phy i aI Educat i o n

Third Year First Sell/ester u r s i n g Co m pe t e n c lt:� I I urs i ng 3 2 0

2

Nur s i n g 3 3 0 Pharmacology a n d T h e r a p e u t i u rs i ng 340 ' i t uatillns w i t h I n d i v id u a l s ;

Mo d al ities

Adult Hea l th [

Si t u a t io n s w i t h I nd i v id u,] L : M nt:ti Health

4 4 4

4

)rc

E

R

S

I

T

First Semester Nursin ·l20 Leadership and Resou rce M a n a gement Nu r s i n g 430 . i t u a t i o n s WILh

'Olll m u n i t it:

N u r s in g 440 Situations with Individuals: A d u l t H ea l t h IT

Nursi n !) 44 1 'ituations ' m i n.u

4 4 4 4

4 5 4 1

Jallllary Terlll , U RI ore

4

ecolld Semester

N u rs in g 460 Health Carc

y tems and

P

liey

N u rs ing 480 Professional Foundations rr

encourage i n i t i a t iv a nd sel f-direction on th e part of students. C

G U RI Jore

4

Fourth Year

Develop me nt: I n fancy to M a tu r i t y

BSN SEQUENCE FOR BASIC STUDENTS: The curriculum plan for the basic tudent ( t hose who h o l d neither p ractical nor regis te red n u rsi n g Ii ensure) i - designed to fos te r g rowth and to A

Second Semes/f'r Bio logy 206 Human Anatomy and P hys io logy I I Che m is t r y 1 0 5 Cbcmistry of L i n

Second Semester u rs i n g 3 · 0 N ursi n g Re card1 and I n fomlatics Nu rsi n g 6 5 ultural l ' Congruen t Healt hcare ursin 370 S i t u a t io n s wi t h Fanl i l il's : h i ld b cari ng urs i n g 380 S i t u a t ions w i th Fa milies : Ch ildrcaring

AU cOllrses IliIIIICd above a re offered i n <1C<1demic departments ather thall clle School of NIIfSillg, IIl1d a re thereby adlllil1 istered by those respect ive depa rtmell ts ill regurd to schedl/ling, evaill a t ion, gmdirzg, elc. Fur the BSN degree to be a warded, all students Ilil/jt meet both nursing alld Ulliversity requiremel1 ts.

P

RI ore ( F i rst - Year Residen y ReL[ u i remcn t )

URI

tati Lies 2 3 1 I n L rod uctory Statistic.:;

86

G

Ja/7uary Ter/ll

P rcrcq u i iCc and corequisite courses: Biology 20 1 I ntroductory l icrobiology Bioi gy 205 H u man nat my and Physiology ! Biology 20 Hum n Anatomy and Physiology I l h.:mistry 1 0 5 .hemistry of Life Psycho logy

P rogram

Jan uary Ter m

u rs i ng 3 5 0

p rerequisite policies for R N s t u d e n t s , plt·ase r�fer t i n f(,l[Ina­ tion prov ided in this sectio n under MSN Sequence for Licensed Registered Tu rses. )

P�ychol g)' l U I Introduction t

5S

4 4 4

P h ),s i ca l Education

u n ive rs i ty c a m pus and Ule c l in ical areas beg i n n i n g with the first p rivate tra nspor ta tion is essential.

e n ro l l e d fLL I I t i m e . n orm a l l y extend over six semeste rs . For spring seme s te r e n rollment, t h e c u rr icu l u m generally fol lows the fal l sem este r fo rmat. ( Basic students w h o have completed transfer­ a bl e cred i t from another acc red ited inst i t uti on a n d l o r hol d lic�n sur(' as cert i fit:d n u r s i n g a<;sista n t s , sh o l t l d seek a d v i semen t from the Ad m is s i o n s Coord i na t o r regard i ng the pos s i b i. l i r y o f comp let i ng the seq ucnc w i t h i n fi c -emes ters and one J a n uary term. u r ren tl), l icensed cert i fied n u rsi n g assistants are e l igi ble to complete Nu rsi n g 220 through credit by exami n a tion.) First Semesler Biolof,'Y 2 0 5 Human natomy and Physiolog), I P syc h o l ogy 1 0 1 I n t roduc t i n to P ,'cholog)'

chool M Nur ing Rec ruitm nl, Admission , and Pro gres s ion urse

mu st be taken concurren tly and i n

First Year (Pre-Nursing)

to enroll in n u rs i ng co u rses mllst o b t a i n perm ission of the Com mittee, the

es

sequence a s ind ic a te d i n the o l lowing sample curri c u l u m , a n d , i f

0

Y

Nu rs ing 499 Cap ston e : Nursing Synilie. L) GURI are

2 2 6 4


A m i n i m u m of 1 28 scmest<;; r credi t hours is req u i red fo r the baccalau rea te de gree. The sequenc e of required nursing courses co m prises 70 semester cr d i t ho urs.

Prerequisite Nursing COllrses:

BSN SEQUENCE FOR UCENSED PRACTICAL NURSES: The icensed Practical urselRachelor o f Science i n N u rsing ( LPN/ B SN ) sequence of study is designed to provide career mobility fo r the experi enced licensed p r act i ca l n u rse desi r i n g the Bachelor o f Science i n N u rs ing d e g ree . T he p rogram validates the p rior knowledge and clinical competence of the LPN, enabling progression through the RSN curriculum within five semesters, followin g complet i o n of p rerequisite courses. Prospect ive students are encouraged to seek early advise­ ment to reduce time spent in co mpleting prerequisites and to facilitate progress. LPN students are s tron g ly encou raged to make max i m u m p rogress toward completing un iversity require­ ments before beg i n n ing the n u rsi n g sequence.

Prerequisite C()urses B iolog y 2 0 1 I n trod uc tory M icrobiology B iology 205 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Biology 206 Human Anatomy a n d Physiology I I Chemistry 1 0 5 Ch emistry o f Li fe Psychology 1 0 1 I nt ro d u cti o n to Psych ology Psychology 35 2 Development: I n fancy to Matu rity First Year First Semester Nursing 2 6 0 Profess ional Founda t ions Nursing 270 Health A sessment and Promotion ursing 280 Pathological Human Processes Statistics 2 3 I I n t rod uctory Statistics

4 4 4 4 4 4

320 Nursing Competencies II 330 Pharmacology and Ther a peu t ic lv!odalit ies 340 Situations with Individuals: Adult Healt h [ 350 S i t u a t iuns with Individuals: Mental Health

2 4 4 4

Human developmen t o r psychology course(s) covering human

a

l ab with dissec t i o n

development through the l i fespan

z c:

A statistics course

Chemis t ry is strongly re co m m e nded

" VI

Fo r c0ll5idcratiol1 for admissions, applicants must hn ve:

N ur s ing 360 Nursing Research and I n formatic s Nu rsing 365 ulturaUy Congruent I-Iealthcare Nursing . 70 S i t uation. with Fa mil ies: Childbearing Nursing 380 S ituations w i th Famil ies : Childrearing

4 4 4 4

Secolld Semester

Leade rship and Reso urce Ma nagement S i t uations with Communi ties Situations with Individuals: Adult Health I I Situations Seminar

Third Year Filia l Se mester ursing 460 Health Care Sy t IUS and Policy ursing 480 Professional Foundations II ursing 499 ap t on e : N ursing S y n th esis GURI ore

4 5 4 I

Nursing 220 Nursing Competencies I

4

N u r ing 270 Health Assessment/ Health Promotion

4

u rs i ng 320 Nursing Competencies I I

2

Nursing 580 Advanced Pathophysiology

3

G'l

Fall Semester I

Nursing 260 Professional Foundations I Nursing 330 Pharmacology and Therapeutic Mod a l i ties Nu rs i n g 340 S i tuations with I n d i viduals: Adult Health [ N u rs i ng 350 Situations with I ndividuals: Mental Health

4 4 4

4

N u rsing 370

4 6

ituation s with Fam il ies: Childbearing

ursing 490 N u rs i n g Synthesis w i t h 1 00 extra hours Spring Semester I

Nursing 430 Si tua tions with Comm u nities

4 5

Nursing 4 4 0 Situa tions with I n d ividuals: Adult He al t h rr

4

N u rsin g 380 S i tuations with Families: Childrearing

ursing 44 I Situations Seminar Summer Semester II

Nursing 480 Professional Foundations I I

2

Fa ll Semester II

2 2 6 4

General un iversity and other specific requirements needed for completion of the baccalaureate degree ar not listed here. Applicants to the LPN to B sequence are t rongly encou raged to seek advising from the LPN to B N oord inator fo r assistance w i t h their complete programs of st udy.

MSN SEQUENCE FOR NON-NURSING BAtHS GRADUATES (ENTRY-LEVEL MSN) : rhe en try-level MSN is a cohort program designed to prepare cand ida tes with a previou s bachelors or masters de gree to take the NC EX-RN fo r RN licensure and to co n t i n ue with the regular School o f Nursing MSN degree. The sequence of study recogn izes the academic success o f t h e non-n ursing graduate by providing a focused immersion into nu rs ing fo l l owed by graduate study. Students do not receive a BSN degree but fo llowing the I S - m onth im mersion take the licensure exam and con t i n ue in the MSN p rogram. The program is proposed to begin in June 2003. Admission to the sequence is h ighly co mpetitive.

Z

Successfully completed baccalaureate degree in fidd other than n u rsing fro m a ful ly accredited college o r university. • A cumulative gr a de p o i n t average of 3 . 0 on a 4 . 0 scale fo r all college- level work. • Successfu l completion o f all prerequisites. • Applicants must earn a 3.0 o r better on a 4.0 sca J e for all prerequisite cou rses. • Clearance by the Washington S ta te Security Patrol and other relevant a genci e s . • Acceptance to Pacific Lutheran Un ive r s i ty. • Bio psychosocial abili ty to fulfill the job expectations o f a registered nurse at a beginning staff level and to s i t fo r NCLEX­ RN examination. personal essay addressing the appl icant's educational goals, reasons fo r choosing n urs i ng , and co mmi tment to l i felong •

Jmzuary term I

Firs! Semester

ntry-Ievel MS

M ic robiol ogy t o include a lab

S u m mer Sell1ester I

4 4 4 4

Second Year

u rsing 420 Nursing 430 u rsin g 440 Nursing 44 1

Anatomy and Physiology to include

learning, as \-vell as service.

Second Semester

Nursi ng Nursing u rsi ng Nursing

Successful completion of NCLEX-RN Begin M SN degree requirements

MSN SEQUENCE POR LICENSED REGISTERED NURSES: The RN to MS N program begins with the fo undation of the knowledge, skills and e, p e r i e n e o f the registered n urse and

b u ilds an expanded framework for advanced nursing p ract ice in tod ay's health care delivery systems. Designed fo r the registered nurse w i t h a t least one year o f d i rect care n u rsing experience, this program enables s t udents to earn b o t h a bachelor's degree and a master's degree i n nursing. In the first year of the RN to MSN program, students enroll in courses necessary for co mpletion o f the BS degree. D ur i n g t h is fi rst year, s tudents may earn up to 3 0 u p per-division credits through the Pro fessional Po r t folio \Norkshop course, designed to guide the students in earning college credits by do c u m e n t i n g registered nurse employment experiences. Upon uccessful completion o f the first year of the RN to MSN p rogram, students earn the BSN degree. Following s uccessful completion of the Graduate Record Exam ( GRE) and

P

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by maintaining a 3.0 PLU grade point average, the student may progress to the MSN sequence. Prerequ isite Nursing Courses

VI a:: � z

Biology 20 I introductory Microbiology Biology 205 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Biology 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 1 hemistry 1 05 Chemistry f Life Psychology 1 0 1 I nt roduction to Psycholugy Psychology 352 Development: I n fancy to Maturity Statistics 2. l introductory Statistics

4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Prereq u isite G e nera l Ulli versity Requirement Courses

Math Entrance Requirement (minimum CPA of 2.0

sCi/Ie)

all

a 4.0

Foreign Language Entrance Requirement Fine Arts - Art, Music, o r Theater Literature Philosophy (excludes logic or critical th in king) Physical Education - Four different activity courses, including PE 1 00 (See School of Nursing for specific exemptions to the PE

4 4 4

4

requirement.)

ocial Science, Line I - History, A nthropolog}', or Political Science Writing

4 4

Fo r consideration fo r admission, applica nts must have:

minimum cumulative PL CPA o f 3 .00 o n a 4.00 scale for continuation to graduate study. 2 . Completed each nursing prerequisite course with a m inimum G PA o f 2.50 on a 4.00 scale; cumulative GPA average i n all prerequisite and corequisite courses must be a minimum of 2.50 o n a 4 . 00 scale. 3. Achieved j unior class status (accumulation of 60 or more emester hours ) . 4 . for continuation to graduate study, achieved acceptable GRE scores taken within the last five years ( minimum score combined from any two scores must be 8 5 0; preferable that one of the scores used be in the verbal category) . 5. Obtained unrestricted licensure as a registered nurse in the state of Washington. 6. Minimum o f one year of d i rect patient care experience as a registered nurse. 7. For continuation of graduate study, completed a preadmission interview with selected faculty or staff.

The infonnalion COl/Mined IlereiIJ reJlecrs n i l accurate p iclIIre of

degrer from Pacific LIlI/,eran Ulliversity at tire lime of publimlioll.

the university reserve tilt riglll 10 make necessary' cal.",tUJr, cllrriw/lIm, /lncl (0$1$, For slIIdents admiJted to tlu! IIlIrsillg "mjar, regular statllS flr ptovisional. all n llrsing collrslIs urf sequemitll. S ""esfIll completion of all courses In one .eme�ler i.s prerl'quisire 10 enrol/ment in the next semester's co"rses. All sludt'llts /u/Illilud 10 tilt IlIIrsillg major must lid/Iere 10 tire cumcuillm sequence as Olltlillell by t',eir Ilpproved However, Chlllig

Course Offerings For course descriptions, visit the PI. U cotaiog online

Studie

4

I n formation Management Professional Portfolio Workshop rntr duction to Leadership and Management Nursing S ituations with Communities

2 4 3

Nursing 392 ursing Research Nur ing 475 Social and Political Contexts for Nursing Nursing 476 ursing Synthesis Religious Studies (if /lot completed prior to begin n ing progra m)

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203 Ethics and Health Care

\vww.plu.edu/

(l

260 Professional Foundations (4)

Y

ices minor.

or 2 )

4 2 2 6 4

se.r

O p en t o non-majors . 220 Competencies I ( 4 ) Prerequisite: BIOL 206.

MINOR IN HEAIl'H SERVI CES: Health care is a complex system, which now represents 1 6% of the Gross National Product. Many d i sc i plin e s outside of nursing need to be fa mi l i a r with systems and issues within health care. The health services minor is designed to support non- nursing majors, in c l u din g social work, chemistry, biology, business, etc. Students seeking a health services minor must receive approval and advisement C

100 Medica1 Tenninology ( l or 2 ) Open t o non-nursing majors, required for health

6

Second Semester

A

at

print/catalog.

Nursing 365 Culturally Congruent Healthcare

P

in procedures, polici�.

/lCIlde1nic program contract5.

la/wary Term

88

MASTER O F SCIENCE IN NURSING-ENTRY-LEVEL MASTER'S: A cohort program designed fo r th ose who have previously earned a bac alaureate o r higher degree in an academic discipline other than nursing, 'he program will b .gin summer 2003. Tho e intere ted a r e stron g ly ad ised to seek early advisement from the Graduate Coordinator in the School of Nursing at 253. 5 35 .8264. See ,radllate Studies ocction of this catalog fo r further deta ils.

the prograllu uf study l/!lIding to (l Bac1I�/or "f 'ci('flce ;'1 Nunillg

First Semester

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING: o nsult the graduate section of this catalog fo r deta i ls of th program lead ing to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing and/or contact the chool of Nursin,; Jraduate Program (253. 535.7672 ) .

WORKSHOPS AND SHORT COURSES: Co ntact the School o f Nursing Center for Continuing Nu rSi ng Education ( 2 5 3 .535 .7683 ).

First Year: B5N Course of Study Prior to first semester in program

Nursing 390 NUT in g 399 ursing 4 2 5 u rs i ng 454

Graduate Prog rams

SCHOOL NURSE CERTIFICATION: Contact the School of u rs i ng Center for Continuing Nursi ng Ed ucation ( 253 . 5 3 5 .7683 ) .

l . Achieved a minimum ( undergraduate) cumulative C PA of 2.80 on a 4.00 scale fo r admission to undergraduate study;

R .ligious

from tbe School of Nursing prior to declaration. Requirements: Minimum 18 semester hour , including Nursing 1 00, 460, and Philosophy 323, and at least three cou rses from Diversity ( nthropology 1 02, 380, Health Education 265, ursing 365, and Physical Education 362 ) ; ci m i n i nation ( E onomics 322, 'ursing 4 2 0 , and 530); Physiologic Functioning ( u r-ing 280, 330, and Physical Education 480) ; Applied Health Car� ( Health Education 266, 2S I , . li rs i n g 270, and P h ys i cal Education 3 8 1 ) . No more than 8 cre d i ts from any one department .

Open to non-nursing students with permission of in tructor. Prerequisite: 2 20. 270 Health Assessment and Promotion (4) Prerequisites: prior or Lon urrcnt with _60 ,md 280. 280 Human Pathological Processes ( 4 ) Prerequisite: BI L 206. 3 1 2 Peri operative Nursing ( 4 ) 3 2 0 Competencies U ( 2 ) Prerequisites: 260, 270, 280. 330 Pharmacology and Therapeutic Modalities (or Nursing (4) Prerequisite: 280.


340 Nor ing Situation with Individuals: Adult Health [ ( 4 )

Prerequisites: prior or concurrent w i t h 3 2 0 and 330. 350 Nor ing Situations with Individuals: Mental Health ( 4 )

Prerequisite: p r i o r

or

concurrent with 330.

525 Theoretical Foundations ( 3 ) 526 Nursing Leadership and Management

(3)

527 Evaluation and Outcomes Research ( 3 ) 528 Family Theory i n Nursing ( 1 )

Pre requ isi tes: p rior or con curren t w i t h 3 4 0 or 3 5 0 a n d STAT 23 1 .

529 Care Manager Roles ( 3 )

36 J Nursing Situation I Seminar ( 1 )

530 Resource Management ( 4 )

z c: ;lg VI

531 Care and Outcomes Practicum I ( 1-3)

z C\

360 Nursing Research and Informatics ( 4 )

Pre re q u i si te: prior or concurrent enrollment in 364. 364 Nursing Situations I

(5)

Prerequisite: 53 1 .

First enrollment must be for 3 credits. May be repeated for additional credit.

Pr r quisite; 320. 365 Culturally Congruent Health Care - A ( 4 )

( 1 -5 )

Open t non-nur ing students. Prereq u i s ite for majors: 270.

532 Care and Outcomes Practicum I I

370 Nursing Situations with Families: Childbearing ( 4 )

F i rst enrollment must b e fo r 5 credits. May b e repeated for

P re re q uisi tes : 320, 3 0 , 3 4 0 , 350.

additional credit.

380 Nursing Situations witb Families: Chlldrearing (4)

538 Program Develop ment ( 3 )

Prer qu isi t s : 320, 330, 340, 3 5 0 .

Co re q u i site 5 3 0 and prerequisite 5 3 1 .

3 90 Information Management in Nursing ( 2 )

543 Health and Culturally Diverse Populations ( 2 )

Prerequi ire: R , or BS

â&#x20AC;˘

-

or consent of instr uctor.

392 Nursing Researcb ( 2 )

P rerequisi tes : prior or concurre n t enrollment i n

23 1 .

364 and S T

54S Life. Death. and Public Policy ( 2 ) 550 Curricu1um and Instruction ( 3 ) 580 Advanced Pathophysiology ( 3 )

395 Culture and Health in Jamaica - C ( 4 )

582 Advanced Health Assessment and Health Promotion ( 5 )

Prerequisites: Basic health asses ment skills.

399 Nursing Portfolio Worksbop ( 4 )

Open to RN to MSN candid ates only.

583 Clinical Pharmacotherapeutics

420 Int roduction to Leader hip and Resource Management

( 2)

Pre- or co-requisite: 580.

in Nursing (4)

584 Family Nurse Practitioner 1 ( 6 )

Prerequi i tes : 360, 370, 3 80.

Prerequisites: 582 a n d 583.

425 Introduction to Leadership and Management ( 3 )

585 Family Nurse Practit ioner II ( 6 )

Prerequ isi tes : 36 1 , 3 4, 3 5, 392.

Prerequisite: 584.

430 Nursing Situations with Communities

(5)

588 Gerontology Nurse Practitioner I

(6)

Prior r oncurr ' n t e n r llment i n 4 2 0 .

Prerequisites: 582 and 583.

440 Nursing Situations with Individuals: Adult Health n ( 4 )

589 Gerontology Nurse Practitioner I I (6)

P re requ i ites: 360, 370, and 380.

Prerequisite: 588.

44 1 Senior Seminar

(I)

590 Role o f t h e Nurse Practitioner

(2)

Prer quisite: prior or concurrent enrollment in 440.

Co-requisite o r prerequisite: 5 8 4 .

454 Nursing Situations with Communities ( 6 )

590A Seminar i n Advanced Practice Nursing ( 2 )

Prerequisite: prior or con c u rn:nt enrollment i n 425. 460 Health Care Systems and PolJcy (2) Open t n o n - n u r ing students wilh permission of the instructor.

Pr re qu isi t e : 260.

or

589.

Consent of instructor required. 593 Advanced Specialty Practice (variable credit)

461 Nursing Situations n Seminar ( I )

Prerequisite: completion of ali core requirements.

P re re quisite: prior o r concu rrent nrollment i n 464. 464 Nursing Situation

,o-requisite or prerequisite: 5 8 5 or 587 592 Independent Study ( J -4)

U (5)

596 Scholarly I nquiry in Nursing Pract ice ( 4 )

Co-requisite or prerequisite: 532.

Prerequisite: 364 .

597 Computer Application in Nursing Research

Prerequisite: 527.

47 1 Nursing Syn thesis Seminar ( I )

Prcrequi ite : prior or concurrent nroll ment i n 475 and 476. 476 Nursing Synthesis - SR

(6)

( 1)

5 99 Thesis ( 4 )

Prerequisites: completion of core courses, consent of advisor.

Prerequ isites: 4 25 , 454, 46 1 , 464. 478 Elective Clinical Experience ( 1-4)

Pass/fail option. pen to studenls who have completed their jun ior-level nursing cour es o r p rmission of the facul ty. 480 Professlonal .F�undations

U (::. ) Prerequisite: prior or concurrent enrollment in 499.

49 1 Independent Studies

( 1 -4)

Pr re quisi t : p rm issi on of t h e dean. .

493 Internship Abroad ( 1 - 4 ) 4 99 Capstone: Nursing Synthesis - S R

(6)

Prerequ isite : 420, 430, 440, 44 1 a n d p ri or or concurrent enrol l ment in 460 dnd 48 0. P

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Phi losophy 253.535.7234 w1Vw.plll. cd/.//-ph i l > :z:: 0.. o III

o ...

Ph.ilosophy is t he parent academic d i s c i p l i ne that gave b i rth t o taday's variety o f a r t s a n d scien ces. I t examines b a . ic issues i n all flelds and e x p l o re s connec t i o n s among diverse a reas of l i fe . [n p h il o s o p hy the most fu ndamental and enduring o f q u e stio n s are addre�sed: How ca n humans gain k n o wled ge about t h e i r world? \Nhat l i m i t. s a re there to that k nowle d ge ? \Vha t i s the ultimate nature of the un iverse? [ n part icular, what i s the nature o f the h uman person , and what role o r p urposf' is o u rs? How should we live? Are there moral, aesthetic, and religious values that can be adopted rationally and used to guide our decis ions? Study i n phil()sophy acquaints students w i t h major rival v iews o f the world, encou rages them to think p re c i s el y and s ystema t i c a l ly, and helps them to see l i fe c r i ti c al l y, app re c iat i v ely, and whole.

depa rtment faculty. The read ing l ist should be obtained a t an earl)' date from the department chair. I t is best t hat the

Course Offerings For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog online at www. p lu .edu /

USES OF PHJLOSOPHY: Courses in p hilosophy h elp students who ( 1 ) recognize ph il o s o p hy as a c e n t ral element i n a quality l i beral a r t s education; ( 2 ) wish to s upp ort their u nd erg ra du a t e work in other fields, such as l i t e rature, histo ry, polit ical science, rel i gi o n , the s c i nees, d u ca t i o n, o r b u s i n e ss; ( 3 ) plan to u se their study o f p hil o s o p hy i n p re p a ra tio n for graduate s t udy i n law, theology, or med i c ine; or (4) are considering graduate work in p hilosophy itself, usually w i t h the intention of teaching in

1 25 Moral Philosophy - PH ( 4 )

1 0 1 Philosophical Issues - PH ( 4 )

220 Women and Philosophy - A , P H ( 4 ) 223 Biomedical Ethics - PH (4) 228 Sodal and Political Philosophy - PH ( 4 ) 2 3 3 Formal Logic ( 4 ) Counts toward Option m of the Co lle ge of Arts and Sciences re q u i re m e n t .

Undergraduate study i n ph i l o so p hy i s not meant to train

specifically for a fi rs t job. Instead, i t serves to sharpen basic skills i n c r i tical thinking, p ro b l e m olvi n g , resea rch , analysis, i.nterpre­ tation, and w r i t i ng. I t a l so p rovides c r i tic al p e rsp ect i ve on and a deep a p p re c ia t i o n of i de<ls and i ss u es that have i n t r i g u ed humanity throughout the ages, i n c lu di n g those ce n tra l to the Western intellectual he r i t a ge. This p repares students fo r a great v a r i e ty o f positions o f respon s i b i l i ty, es p e c i al l y when coupled with s p e ciali z e d t r a i n i n g in other dis c i pl in es . Those with the h ighest p o tential fo r advancement generally have more than just s p ec i a l i ze d training; rather, they bring to their work breadth of perspective, i n t e llec t u a l flex i bility and de p t h , and well honed skills in critical th ought and c o m m u n i c a t io n .

UNI VERSITY CORE REQUIREMENT: The Core I requirement of 4 h o urs i n philosophy may be satisfied w i th any co urs e offered except for 2 3 3 Formal Logic, 323 Health Care Ethics, and 3 2 8 Philosoph ical Issues i n t h e Law. The initial co u rse i n philosophy is customarily 10 I , 1 25 , o r a 200- level course t ha t provides a more focused topic but is still at the i n t roduc to r y level ( 2 2 0 , 2 2 3 , 2 2 8 , 2 5 3 ) . T h e 300-1evel courses are suited fo r students with p a r t i c ul ar i nterests who are c a p ab l e o f wo rki n g at the u p p e r­ d iv i s io n le ve l . Courses o ffered through c o r res p ondence, o n- l i n e, and independent studies are not a ccep t e d to meet core re q u i r e ­ ment in p h i l osophy. MINOR: 1 6 semester hours of approved p h i l o so ph )' courses; fo r transfer s tudents, at l e a s t 8 h o u rs must be taken at PLU. S t udents co ns ide ring a minor should discuss their personal goals w i th d e p a rt me n t a l faculty. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 32 semester hours, including 233, 499, a n d two [rom among the following five cou rses: 33 1 , 33 3 ( m ust take a t least one of those two), 335, 336, or 338. On a p p roval o f the department, one course (4 hours ) in a n o the r field o f study may be used for a double major in p h i losophy if it h a s a direct rel a t i on s h i p to the sruden t's ph ilosophy p rogra m . Tran fer s t u d e n t s will no r m a lly take 1 6 o r more o f t h e i r 3 2 h o u r s a t PLU. tud en ts intending t o major i n philosoph)' shou.ld fo rm a l l y declare th i s with the de p a r t m e n t chair and choose a depart mental adv i so r. A

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p u rsued a t a l ei s u re l y pace o ver an extended pe ri o d . 3. At least a 3.3 g r a de p oi n t average in p h ilosophy courses, i n clud i n g a t least a B i n 493.

FACULTY: M c Kenna, Cha i r; A rb au g h , Arnold, Cooper, G. Johnson, Ka u ri n , MenL.el, Nordby.

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program not be concentrated into a si n g l e semester, but

p r i n t/ ca tal o g .

the field.

90

HONORS MAJOR: I n addition to tbe ab o ve requirements fo r the m<1jor: l. 493 Honors Research Project, including an hon rs thesis written u n d e r the supervi�ion o f one or more acuity members and p re s e nt e d to the department. 2 . C o m p l eti o n o f the d e p a r t m e nt a l rea d i n g p rogram o f p ri m ar y sources. Honors m aj o rs i.n p h ilos o p hy a re expected to com­ p l eme n t t heir regular courses by read i n g and discus sing t h ree o r fou r i mporta n t works under the personal s u p e rv i s i o n of

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253 Creation and Evolution - PH ( 4) 29 1 Directed Studies

( 1 -4 )

323 Health Care Ethics and Policy ( l or 2 ) 325 Business Ethics - P H ( 4 ) 328 Philosophical Issues i n the Law

(4)

3 3 1 Andent Philosophy - P H ( 4 ) 333 Early Modern Philosophy - PH ( 4 ) 335 The Analytic Tradition - PH ( 4 ) Prerequisite: o n e philosophy course. 336 Pragmatism and American Philosophy - PH (4) 338 Existentialism and Continental Philosophy - PH ( 4 ) 340 Philosophy of Sdence - PH ( 4 ) 350 Philosophy of Religion - P H ( 4 ) P re req u i s i te : o n e course in philosophy or rel i g io n . 353 SpedaI Topics - PH (4) 491 Independent Reading and Research ( 1-4) P r e req u i s i te : d ep art m e n tal consent. 493 Honors Research Project

(4)

4 99 Capstone: Advanced Seminar i n Philosophy - SR ( 4 ) May be re p ea ted once for c red i t . P rereq u i site : three p h i losophy courses or consent of instructor.


BACHELOR OF ARTS I N PHYSICAL EDUCAT ION ( RAPE)

School of Physical Education 253.535.7350 wWIV. p!u.edll!-pheti

The lUl i vc rs it)" s p hys ic al education progra m secb to i ng r a i n i n ... ach s tu de nt <l fu n dam e nt a l re pect for t h e role of physical acti ity in liv i ng. In t r u lion is offered in approximately 30 different p hys i ca l education aeti it ies. The a t ivilY p ro g ra m is u n i q u el y character­ ized by a t i m ely response to st ud en t i n lt-rest · in recre a t i o nal opportunities a ai lable in Lhe Pa c i c ort hwes . The s ch oo l's pr res ional p rog ra m , pr pare p ro s p ec t i � leade rs for ca reers in p hy sic a l edu at ion, h ea l L h , recrea t ion, a th l e t i s , anu therapeutic '. utstandino modern p o rts cilitles incl ude an a l l - weather 400 met r track, an Iymp ic-style s w i m m i n g poo l , six l igh t ed ten n is courts, a n i ne-hole golf course, two ' )'l11nasiums, r a c quet bal l and squash co u rts, a fi t n e ss cente r, and a n all­ purpose astr o - t ur f field hous . FACUlTY: Hoseth , Deall; Evans, lIacker, M Connell, McGi l l , Moore, T n n eh i J l , F.

est er i ng ; a�sis ed by mi d( n, pplegate, i n o t to, Dawson, Frei tag. Hal' hman, 1. Johnson, M Cord, Mye r s , icholson, ren , Pop e n, R ice, R ige l ! , Rya n , Te mp l i n , Thomas. S ott We teri ng, usan Wes te ri n g.

WITH CERTIFICATION: To m ct t h� -tate endorsem n t in

H e a l t h and Fitness, 1 seme ter hours i n c l u d i n g Biology 205. 206; Ht'al t h Education 266. 295, 327, 366; 3(';7; Physi <1. 1 Edu a­ tion 277, 279, 293 , 294, 2 7 . 298, 322 ( 4 hours), 326, 31)6, 478,

DANCE MINOR:

76

semcstt'r hours

including B iol o gy 1 6 1 , 1 62 , 205, 206. 323 or a p p r wd alternate; two fro m h e m i s t r y 1 05, 1 20, 232/234; Hea l t h Educat i o n 2 8 1 , 382; Math 1 2 o r 140; Phvsical Edu ca t io n 277, 480, 486; 495 and/ or 499 (8 hours); Phys i - ' 1 2 51 1 26, 1 3 5/ 1 36 ; Psychology L 0 1 . 352; Statisti ' 2 3 1 . Pre-Athletic Training Concentration: 5 2 semester hou r

including Bi logy 1 0 1 , 205, 20 ; h em is t 1 05; Health Education 266, 28 1 . 327, 382; P hysi . 1 ducation 277. 26, 480, 486; 495 and/or 499 ( 8 h o u rs ) ; Psychology 1 0 1 ; 'tatistics 23 1 . I n addition to t lH" re q u iremen t s listed abo e, cand idares for the BSPE degr e l11 u · t m et the ul leg� of Arts a n d iences ro reign l an gu a ge requi rement.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RECREATION (BARec): 45 semester

hour, i nd u d in g BUS l n e�i> 30 ; Cumrn u n ic a l i o n 3 36; Physi aI Ed uc a t ion 2 77. 2 79, 3 2 4 , 326, 344, 360. 389; Pecreation 2 6, 3 30, 483, 495 a nd/or 499 (8 hour') ; plu 2 ho u rs of approved elec­ tives. in ad d i t io n lO t he requirements l i s te d above, students are stron gl)' e n cou ra ged t complete m i n r in :.l rel a ted fi el d . tudents mu·t have a urrent FirSl AJd and C P R ertificate befo re their i n ternship. C a n d i da te for t he SA Recreation degree must meet the allege of Arts and Sc ie n ce s fo re i gn language r qu i rement.

o c: n :r> -i

z

(BSPE): Exercise Science Concentration: 2 � em es ter h o u rs i ncl udi n g Bi logy 1 6 1 , 205. 206; Ilt'ro istry 1 0 5 ; Hea lt h Ed uca­ ti o n 366; Math 1 28 or 1 40; P h ys ica l Education 277. 3 24, 326, 344, 383, 384. 478. 480, 486; 495 nd/or 499 (8 edits); Statistics 2 3 1 .

Pre-Physical Therapy Concentration:

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Educa t i o n 2H I ; p l u s L hOllr o f approved cI c t i v ,. F i r t aid and

ho u r s i n cl ud i ng Biolo y 205, 20 ; he m is try L 05; Health Education 266, 3 27. 366; Ph)'Sical Edu a t ion 277, 29 , 324. 326, 344, 383, 384, 8 , 41)0, 41)6; 495 a nd/or 499 ( hours); Recre­ at i o n 330, 483.

VI

Ht'al th and Fit ness, 61 �emcsler h o u rs inc lu di n g Bioi gy 205, 206; He Ilh Eu u c .n ion 266, 295. 327, 3 ; 367; P h ys ica l Education 2 7 7, 279. 293, 294 , _97, 2'1 , 322 (4 hours), 3 26. 386, 478, 480, 4 6, 490; and Re I'eation 296. I n add i t i o n to tile requirements l i sted above, calldid:lt�s l u r the B A P F. degree w ithout tea c he r certificat ion m ' r meet the ol lege o f Arts and Scie nces fo reig n l an gu a ge req ui reme nts and a Se n io r eminar ( Physical Education 499 - 4 ho urs ) .

BACHELOR OF SClENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Health and Fitness Management Concentration: 63 emester

-<

:

AQUATICS MJNOR: I

. •

:z:

BACH ELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (BAPE) WITHOUT CERTIFICATIO

U f I -hour courses ( 1 00259), in c l u di ng 100, a re r q u i red for g raduntion . Ei ,ht I - hom a tivity cou rse may be ou n t ed t oward gradua t i o n tudent are enc uraged to select a va ne ty of ani ' i t i es at npproprialt: sk i l l levels. II phy s i at edu , t ion , t iv i t y ourses urc g ra ded lll1 the basis of A. Pa 5 . or Fa i l and are t a u g h t on a coed uc,l l j o nal basis.

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: F

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480, 486, 490; and Recreat ion 2%. I n itial K- 1 2 teacher cert ification i n He:t ! t h ilnd F i t nes s m u st meet the req u i re me nt s establi hed by the S c ho o l of F.ducanon fo r T(\l cher rt ificat ion i n a dd i t i o n to t b e above requ i rements fo r the BAPE w i l l] certifica t i o n . 5 hours i n d u d i. ng Ant hrop()l ­ ogy 1 02/2 1 0; Education 390. 392; EduG.l l ion/Ph sical l:.cl ucation 468. 450; Ps ych o l og y J 0 1 ; p ec ial Education 480; Wri ing 1 0 1 ; p l u s a a l i d first aid card. S t ude n ts re eivi ng a BA PE w i t h cc r t i fi at i o n <11" not required t o fulfill t h e al lege of rts and Scien es fo re i n l an gua ge req u i rements. I CO LII-S s i n t h<.' major and m i n o r tields arc used for tea ch er certification m ust h ave g r ad es of or h igher.

semester ho u r ', i nL i u di n � Bu in 55 202 , Health I:.ducati n 292, Physical E d u ca t i n 2 75 . 3 1 , 344, 495 (4 hours ) , p l u s at least I hour of ele ti\'es ap p roved by the aq ua t i cs d i rec tor. COACHING MINOR: 1 6 semester h O l l rs, i ncl u d in g Ph)'�ical . d u ca t i o n 334, 3 44 , 360, 370-3 79 (2 h o u rs ) , 390, 4 1 0, and He a l t h . PR card req u i red.

19 se meste r h o urs , in l ud i ng PhYSi cal 222, 2 0 or 232, 250, and 462. Electiws: 1 4 homs from M us ic 245, 249, P b ysi ca l Education 60, 40 1 , 49 1 , Theatre 35 ) Summ r co urses mal' be i nc l ud ed a el e c t i ves with th ap r r val of the dance coordinator, Education

• .

EX ERCISE SCIENCE MINOR: 1 9 sem ester h o u rs, i n cl ud i n g Physical Education 360, 383, 384, 480, 486, 49- (4 h o u rs ) , Biology 2 0 5 , 20 are req u i re d a s p rerequ isites to 480. D igncd prim a ril y for biology majors a n d st uden ts pmsuing BA P . o t designed for educati n or BSPE majors. First Jid card and CPR ce rtificate requi red .

HEAlTH MINOR: 1 6 semes ter hours, i n clud i ng Health

Ed uca t i n 266,36 , 367, and 6 h o u rs of elec L ives il p p roved by the program coord i nator, HEAlTH AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT MINOR: 1 9 s�mester

hours, including Physi I EducaLion 293. 334, 344, 360, 383, 384, 495 (4 h o ur ) , Recrea t ion 296. F i rst aid card and C P R ce r t ificate r qui red. Practicllm and i n ternship Jnust be in Health and F i t ness Ma nagement areas. P r i ma r i l y fo r b u s i ness, biology, BAP , a nd BA Re n�a t i o n tudcnts. PHYSICAl EDUCATION MINOR: 19 semester Health Ed uca t io n

2S l ; Physical

326, 334 , 344, 38 ; o n e ourse 294, 297, 298, Recrea t i,ln 296.

hours, i nclud i ng

Educa t i o n 1 7 9 , 322 (2 hours ) , from among t h � fo il wing: 293 ,

RECREATION MINOR: 1 7 semester hours. i n c l ud i n g Physic a l Education 27 7, 344; Rec re a t i o n 296, 330, 83, and 495 (4 h o u rs ) . SPORTS ADMINJSTRATION MINOR: 1 6 se m

t e r hours,

i n cl u d i n g Health Education 292; Phys i ca l Education

44, 38n, 4 1 0, 495 ( 8 hours ) . St ud e n ts mllst have a major i n busi ness, c o m m u n ication, or economics.

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S PORT PSYCHOLOGY M I NOR: 1 9 s e m es t e r hou rs, i ncluding

24 1 -259 Team Activities - PE 244 241 ( Basketbal l and Softbal l ) , 2 3 (Soccer ,md Vo l leybal l ) , ( o-ed Volleyball), 245 ( Te am Handbal l ) , 247 ( L a c ro sse ) , 250 (Dirt'cted po rt s Participation), 259 ( I nd ep e n de n t StudyIActivity).

Phy�ical Educa t i o n 234, 3 6 , 386, 390; 4 ho urs from Ps yc h ol gy 350, 3 5 1 , 3 5 4 ; 4 h o u r ' fro m Health Education 262, 365, Phys i c al Education 308, 3 1 5, 324, 362, 4 1 0. P-ycho logy 1 0 I is re qu i red as a pr r 'qui.. �ite to Psy hol og y 350, 352, an d 354 .

z

275 Water Safety Instruction ( 2 ) Prerequi ite: swim test rc.quired .

Course Offerings: Health Education

o

For course descrip t ions. visit the PLU catalog aI/line

.... < u

at www.p l u.ed u/

277 Foundations of Physical Education ( 2 ) Should b the i n it i a l pro� ' s i o n a l course taken i ll the School o f P h ys ic al Ed u c a t i o n .

print/catalog.

262 Big Fat Ues - A ( 4 )

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266 Food and Health

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279 Teachlng Physkal Activity ( 2 ) Should b e tak n before or c o n u r r n t ly with E OUe 2 6 2 .

(2)

28 1 Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care ( 2 )

293 Teachiug Methods: Fitness Activities ( 2 ) Prerequisite: 2 79.

292 Ilir t Aid ( 2 )

294 Teachlng Methods: Invasion Games P re re q u ir i te: 279.

295 School Health ( 2 ) 327 Substance Use and Abuse ( 2 )

297 Teachjng Methods: Net Games Pr req u is i t e : 279.

360 Professional Practicnm ( l or 2 ) P re req u i s i te: depar t m en t al approval. 365 The Aging Experience: Worlds of Difference - A

(2)

298 Teaching Methods: Target and Fielding Games P re req ui s i te: 27 9 .

(4)

366 Health Psychology ( 3 )

(2)

308 Sports Motivation ( 2 )

367 Health and Society ( 3 )

3 1 0 SocioK.onomic Influences on Health i n America - A ( 4 )

382 I njury Prevention-Advanced ( 2 )

3 1 5 Body Image - A ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 2 R I .

3 1 9 Tramping the Tracks o f New Zealand - A ( 4 )

425 Health Promotion/WeUness InterventioD Strategies (2)

3 2 2 Physical Education in the Elementary School ( 4 ) Observation and/o r pract icum in public schools req u i re d .

4 9 1 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 ) Prerequ isite : consent o f the dea n .

495 Internship - SR ( 2-8) Prerequ i si te : dedaration f major, h urs i n d1e m aj o r.

324 Ph'}'5lcal Activity and Ufespan (4) 326 Adapted Physical Activity ( 3 )

pholTlore s t a t u s, and 1 0

s

33 1 Aquatics Management ( 2 )

499 Capstone: Sen ior Seminal' - SR (2 -8)

334 Scientific Basis [or Thainin g ( 2 )

Course Offerings: Physica l Education

344 Legal Aspects o f Physical Activity ( I )

For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog online at www.plu.edu/ print/C<'1talog.

360 Professional Prac:ticum ( l o r 2) Prere q u i si te : departmental approval.

Should b taken

1 00 Personalized FilDess Programs - PE ( I ) a� a first - year s tudent.

361 Coaching Practicum ( l or 2) Prerequisit : d e p a rt men t a l approval.

I SO Adaptive Physic.a1 Adivity - PE

362 Healing MlS of the Mind and Body - A ( 4 )

1 5 1 - 1 99 lndividnal and Dual Activitles - PE 1 5 1 ( Begin ni ng Golf), 1 53 ( A rchery) , 1 55 ( B owling), 1 5 7 ( Pers o na l Defense) , 1 6 2 ( B egi n n i n g Ten n is) , 1 6 3 ( Begi nning Bad minto n ) , 1 64 ( Pickleball), 1 65 ( Ra qu e tb a lIl S q u a s h ) , 1 66

370-379 Coaching Theory l'cchn iques, systcrn ', t rain i ng methods, st rategy, and ps ych ol ogy of coaching; 370 (Basketball), 3 7 1 (Football), 372 ( Cro ss Cowllryl Track a nd Field), 374 (Soccer), 378 ( oftball/Baseba l l ) . I I I a/y (2)

1 68 ( ice S kati n g ) , 1 70 Sk i i n g) , 1 7 1 ( anoeing), 1 72 ( B a c kpa c ki ng ) , 1 73 ( Basic Mountaineering), 1 74 ( Equitatio n ) , 1 7 5 ( now-b arding), 1 77 ( Weight Training), 1 78 ( Body oning), 180 ( Bicycling ) , 1 8 2 ( Low-I m pact Aerobics) , 1 8 3 ( Power Ae ro b i c s ) , 184 ( Water Aeroh i s), 1 86 (Step Ae ro b i cs ) , 1 9 1 ( Intermediate G o l f) , 1 92 ( ln term�diate Tennis), 1 9 3 ( I ntermediate Badminto n ) , 1 94 ( Inte rme d ia te Equitation) , 1 9 5 ( I ntermediate Racquetballl Squash ) , 1 97 ( Ad v a n ced Weigh t Tra i n i n g ) . ( Racquetba.Il/Pickl ball), 167 ( Roller S ka t i n g ) ,

92

(2)

383 Exercise Testing and Prescription ( 3 ) 384 Foundations of Health and Fitness M8DJlgement ( 3 ) 386 Social Psychology o f Sport and Physical Adivity ( 3 ) 390 Applied Exercise and Sports Psychology

40 1

(4)

Workshop ( 1 -4)

4 1 0 Coaching-the Person and the Profession

200-219 Aquatics - PE 200 ( lndiv idual il£d Swim I n s t ructio n ) , 20 I ( S w im m i n g fo r No n­ swimmers ) , 203 (Synchronized S w i m m i ng) , 205 (Skin and Sc u b a Di ing ) , 207 ( Basic Sait ing) , 2 1 0 ( Intermediate Swi m m ing), 2 1 2 ( Co nd it ioni n g Swi m m i n g ) , 2 1 4 ( Advanced wimming), 2 1 7 ( Li fegu a rd Tra i n ing a n d New Methods), 2 1 8 ( Kayaking) .

402 Dance Production (2)

220-240 Rhythm - P E 220 ( Mov m e n t Technique J), 22 1 (Tai Chi), 2 2 2 ( Jazz Dance Level l ) , 223 (Yoga), 224 ( urrent ann:) , 225 ( B a l l room Dance) , 226 ( Folk and Social O nce ) , 227 ( l ine Dance), 230 (Movement Te c h n iq u e I I ) , 23 I (Grou p h all e n ge O u t d oo rs ) , 2 3 2 ( Jazz D nee Levt'l I I ) , 234 ( Relaxa tion Techniques ) .

490 Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction

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418 Motor Learning aod Human Perfo rmance (4) 480 Exercise Physiology (4) L a b req u i re d . Prerequisite: B l O L 205, 206 . 486 Applied Biomechanics/Kinesiology (3 )

(6)

49 1 Independent Studies ( I P rere qu i s i te: consent o f the d ea n . 495 Internship - SR ( 2- 8 ) Prerequisites: de cl a ra t i o n of major, sophomore status, hours i n t h e major. 499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR ( 2-8)

and 1 0


For course descrip tiolls, visit the PLU cc,tC/!og ol1lil1e elt ww w. pl u . e d u/

prlllt/catalog.

Physics 1 5 3 o r 1 2 S ; 1 54 o r 1 26; 1 63 ( ) r 1 3 5; 1 64 o r 1 36: p l us 1 2 ad d i ti on al hours in physic ( excludi n g Physics 1 1 0 ) , of wh i c h at least 8 m u st be upp r d ivis i o n .

MINOR:

296 Teaching Methods: Recreation Activities ( 2 ) Prerequisite: P H . D

279.

330 Recreation Programming and Leadership ( 4 ) Prerequ isite: PH.£D 277 or conse n t o f inst ruc tor.

Applied Physics

Also avai l ab l e is a major in Ap pl i ed Physics, which i ncludes a s u bs t a nt' ia l selection of cou rses fro m e n g i neering to pro ide a chal lenging a n d highly v er s a t i l e degree. App l ied P h y sics can lead to research or ad anced study in such area. a robot ics-with application in spac exp loration or join t and l i m b prosthcti s : growth of ,in gle-crystal me t al s , which would be thou 'ands of times stronger than the best steels n o w avaUable: mecha n ic s of m a t e r i a. l fai l u re, such as metal fat igu .md fracture: t u rbulence in fluid flow: photovoltaic cell resea rc h for s o l a r ene rg)' develo p ­ ment: or applications of fluid tlow a n d lhermodynamics t o t h e study of p lane t ar y atmospheres a n d ocean c urrents. While many Applied Physics graduates pursue p ro fes si o na l (ilr e r s in i n d u s t r )' i m med i at e l y after grad u a t i o n from PLU, t h e p rogram a lso p rovid s exc e l l e n t p reparation for gr.l d uate st udy in nearly all fields of engineering.

360 Professional Practicum ( 1 - 2) Prereq u i s i te: de p a r t m e n k l 483

approval.

Recreation Administration ( 4 )

Pre requ isi tes: R E , R 330, 360, PHED

344 .

491 Independent Studjes ( [--4 ) Prerequ isite:

co nsen t o f lhe d an.

495 Internship - SR ( 2-8) Prereq u isi tes: dec l a rat i o n o f m aj o r, ho urs ill

sophomore status, and 10

tll ' majur.

499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

( 2-8)

501 Workshops ( 1 -4) 560 Practicum

(l

o r 2)

59 1 Independent Studies ( 1 --4 ) 595 Internship

(I

Physics www.plu. edlll-phys

is the scientific study of the material u n i ve r s<: at i t s most

fundJmenlal level: Lhe mathematical descr i p t ion of space and t.ime, and the behavi r of matter fro m the elementaJY part icles to lh

u n i verse as

a

whole.

phys icist mtght study the inner

wo rki ng s of atoms and nuclei, the s ize and age of the u n ive r se , ! h behavior of h i gh - t e m p rature supercond uctors, o r the l i fe

cycle of stars. Phys i c i s ts us high-energy , cce le rat or s to search for quarks; they design new laser s y tern s for applications in medici ne and commu nica tions; th y heat hyd rogen gases to te mperatu res h ighe.r than the sun's core in the a tt l!m p to develop n uc le a r fu sion as a n energy resource. From a tropbysics t o nuclear ph, . irs to optics and crystal struct u re, physics o!IJcom passes some of the most fundamental and exciting ideas evcr considered. FACULTY:

izing

a

independent research project.. There are two i n t r od u c t o r y course sequences, � ol l ege Physi s a n d Gene.ral Physics; t h e General Physics sequence incorporates calc u lu and is r q u i red for the Bach lor of 5 ience major. Physics 1 5 , 1 54, I ' 3, 1 64, 22 3, 33 1 , 332 , 3 33 , 3 36, 354, 356, 499A, 4 9 9 B . St ro ngly recom­ mended: Physics 40 I , nd 406. �hemi stry 34 1 may be ubst i t u t e d for Physics 333. e q u i red s u pp o rt i n g courses: he m i s t r ), 1 20 or 1 25 ; M th I r l , 1 52, 253.

A typic I B5 physics m. jor p rogram is a s fol lows: First- ye a r

Physi � 1 5 3 , 1 63

1 5 1 , 1 52 Physics 1 54 , 1 64, 223, 3 54 Mat h 2 5 3 Math

Sophomore

Ph}'Sics 3 3 1 , 3 3 2 , 336, 356

Chemistry 1 20 Sel1 ior

First-yea r

.plu.edul

print/catalog.

low studen t-teac her ratio and t he o p p ort un ity to engage i n

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MA,OR:

typical ap p l i ed physics program is a s fo llows: Physics 1 53, 1 63 Co m p u t er Science 1 3 1 Math l S I , 1 52 Physics 1 54, 1 64, 23 3 , 2 3 4 , 3 5 4 Sophomore M a t h 253 Physics 223, 333, 356 JUllior hem istry 1 20 Com p u t t' f Science 144 P hy si cs 33 1 , 334, 499A, 499B Senior Computer Science 245 A

For course descrip t'ioIlS, visit the PLU c{l talog olllille at WW\

Physics

major o ffers a chal lenging program empha

Physics 1 53, 1 54, 1 3, 1 )4, 223, 33 1 , 334, 354, 356, 499A, 499B: omp uler ci e nce 1 3 1 plus fou r course , one of which must be u p per d i v i s i o n , �cl('cted fro m: C o mp u t er S ience 245, 345, 346, Physics 2 3 3 , 234, 333. P h ys i c s 336 may be subst i t u ted for P h ys ic s 234; Chemistry 34 1 may bt: s ubsti tuted for Physics 333. R�quired suppo rting co u rs e s : hemistry 120 or 1 2 5 ; omputer Science 1 44 or 240; Math J :; J , 1 52, 253.

Course Offerings

Starkovich, Chair; Greenwood, Lo u ie, ' ang.

The physics

n III

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN APPLmD PHYSICS:

)

253.535.7534 Physic

Physics 1 53 r 1 25: 1 54 or 1 26: 1 63 or 1 35: 1 64 or 1 36: 2 2 3 , 499A, 4998, p lus 8 a d d it i o n a l , upper-division hours in physics. Requ i red supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

Course Offerings: Recreation

l l O Astronomy - NS, SM ( 4 ) Pre requis it e: MATH I l l .

1 25 College Physics - NS, SM (4) Concurrent regis t ra t i o n in ( o r previous co m p l e t i o n of) 135 is re qu i r ed . Prerequisite: MATH 1 4 0 (or equivalent by placement exam) . 1 26 College Physics - NS, S M required. Prerequ l. ite:

(4)

(or p re vi o u s completion of) 1 3 6 is

Concurrent registration i n

1 25.

1 3 5 College Physics Laboratory ( I ) COnCUHo!IJ t registration in 1 25 is requ i red . 1 36 CoDege Physics Laboratory ( I ) Con -u rre n t registration in 1 2 . i s req u i red. 1 53 General Phrsjcs - NS, SM (4 ) Concurrent registration in (or p re v io u s compktion of) 1 6 3 is

required. Prerequisite: MATH l S I .

P hy s i c s 3 3 3 , 40 1 , 406, 4 9A, 4998 P

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1 54 General Physics - NS, SM (4)

FACULTY:

Co n c u rrent registration i n ( o r p r e v i o u s com p l e tion of)

1 64

is

requ ired. Prerequisites: M ATJ-I 1 52 , P I TYS 1 5 3. 163

Con(urr�nt regis t rat io n i n

VI )0J:

oncurre n t re g bt ra ti o n i n

0.

164

Courses in politica l scie nce

General Physics Laboratory ( 1 )

VI U

1 53 i

requ ired .

policy, comparative govern ment

m e n t provides pre - p rofessional t r ai ni n g lead ing to c a reers in

is re q u i red.

teach ing, law, gove rn m e n t , a n d re l a t ed field ' . The study of politics touches upon other di s c i p l i nes , which in q u i r e i n to h u m a n behavior and develop men t, ranging from histo r y and ph i l os op hy to psychology. com mu nication. and

Engineering Statics - NS (2)

cross-cultural st u d i es . S tudents

Prerequ isite: 1 5 3 .

234

Engineering Mechanics o f SoUds - N S ( 4 )

politics with practical e x peri e n ce by p a r ticipati o n i.n o ne o f the i n ternship programs sponsored by the dep a rt me n t . The department sponsors or o therwise encou rages a c tive

Introduction to Astropbysics ( 4 ) 2 2 3 i s re co mmend ed . Prerequisites:

student p a r t i c ip ati o n in pOli tical life through

class activities and t h ro ugh sllch campus o r g a n i za ti o n s a s the Yo ung Democrats and

Concurre n t enrollment i n

1 54 a n d MATH 253.

the Yo ung R e pub l i c ans ,

33 1

Electromagnetic Theory - NS ( 4 ) P rereq uisi t s : 1 53 , 1 54 and M AT H 2 5 3 .

There are no prerequisites fo r po l it i ca l science courses, exce p t as noted. P r io r consultation w i t h t h e i n s t ructor of any advanced

332 Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics - N S (4)

course is invited. Students wish i n g to p ursue a m aj o r or m i no r in

Prereq u i si te: 3 3 1 .

p o l i t ical science

334 Engineering Materials Science - NS P rer q u is i te s: 1 54 ; H E M 1 2 0 o r 1 25.

co u rse from each of Group A and Group B (8 s e m e s te r ho urs ) . G ro up A - Ame rican Govern ment and Public Policy: 345. 346. 3 54. 36 1 , 363, 364. 368, 37 1 , 372. 373 , G ro up B - I n ternational Relat i o n s , Comparative Government, and Political T h o ug ht : 326, 33 1 , 338. 347, 38 1 , 382, 383, 385, 387.

Mathematical Physics U - NS (4)

Elec.tives:

Major programs should be pl a nn e d in consultation w i t h a (450, 458. 464, or 47 1 ) may be substituted fo r 499; h owe ver. s t u dents m us t

356.

de pa rtm e n ta l advisor. In some i n st a n ces, an i n ternsh ip

Advanced Modern Physics (4)

p l a n this option with the a p p r pr iat e fa u l t y inlern s llp e r vi. o r,

Prerequ isi te: 40 1 .

in consultation with the departmen tal chair.

49 1 Independent Studies ( 1 - 4) 497 Research

( 1-4)

498 Research

( 1 -4 )

MINOR:

With 499 B m e ets th C requ i s i te: 33 1 .

M i n i m u m of

20 semester hours i n clu d i n g 1 0 1 and 1 5 1 .

M i n o r programs should be p l a ll Il ed i n consultation with a departmental advisor.

499A Advanced Laboratory I ( l )

CONCURRENT ATTAINMENT: )0 more

enior seminar/project re qu i re men t .

also be a pplied to the p o li t ic al science

ets the e n i r

than 8 semester

hours taken to satisfy other major or m i n o r requ i re m e n ts may

major. N mo re than 4

su c h semester ho u rs may a ls o be applied to the p ol i t i c a l science

4998 Advanced Laboratory 11 - SR ( 1 ) m

M i n i m u m o f 12 scm s ter h o u rs selected fr o m the

Political Science curriculum.

40 I lntroduction t·o Quantum Mechanics - NS ( 4 )

With 499A

m inor.

semi.nar/project n: qu i re m ent.

Prerequisite: 499A.

RESIDENCY: A and 8 se mes t e r

m i n i m u m of 1 2 semester n o urs fo r the major hours for the m i n o r must be taken i n residence.

MINOR IN THE AMERICAS: See Americas,

Pol itical Science

M INOR IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS: 24 se meste r h urs, in c l ud i n g 345 ( required ) and 20 hours from busi oe, s, economics, p o l i ti c al science, s oc i ol ogy. or statistics.

253.53 5 . 7595 www.plll. edti/-pnis

This m inor offers a n i n terdisciplinary t udy de5igned to

major p r og r a m s whose content has i mp l i ca tio ns

Tht:: - tudent of p o l i t ic s

s u p p o r t many

an d the rela tionship of ·tr uct ures and processes to societal

p lat i ng careers in p ub li c service or graduate s t ud y in public

see ks to understand how governmen s are orga n i zed and structured, how p o l i t i c a l processes are e mploye d ,

fo r p u b l i c affairs a n d is particularl y useful to students contem­

pu r p oses. Since po l i tica l activity may embody and reflect the ful l

a d m i n istration, public a ffai rs. a n d r elat e d programs.

polit i cs while a t the sa m e t i me asking

m e n ts: ( 1 ) Political Scienc e

ra nge o f human values. the study of p o l it ics i ncludes realities o f

how well pol itical syst m s

work what p u rpose s are and ought to b e ser ve d, a n d what e fe e ts re u l t fro m p o lit i c al p h e n o m e n a . Political science e nco u r a ges a cr i tical u n ders tn nd i n g of governm ent a n d poli tics i n the belief that

a

knowledgeable, i n terested, and

aware

cit izenry is needed in

a democratic societ y.

The Public Affa irs m inor includes the fo l lowing req u i re ­

(2)

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345.

' ovcrnmen! and Public Policy;

at le a st five additional co ur ses from thr

e

of the fo ll owing

groups (courses which are taken as pa rt o f a m a j o r program may not also cou n t toward the P u b l ic Affa i r s m i no r ) :

Political Science ( m i n i m u m of 8 hours if this group is se l ected ) 1 5 1 American Government

354 P

with

Distributiollal req uirement: On

Prerequis ite: 354.

406

minor

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester ho urs. 1 5 l , 3 25. 499 ( 1 6 se ll1e - te r hours).

354 Mathematical PhySics I - N S ( 4 ) Prere q u i s i tes: 1 54 and MATH 253.

Corequisite:

or

Reqlli red courses: 1 0 1 ,

(4)

336 Classical Medlanics - NS (4) Prerequ isi tes: 1 54 . 354 or M TH 3 5 1 ( o r c o n se n t of in t ructo r ) .

356

are r equ ested to declare the major

the depa rtment chair as soon as possi b le .

333 Engineering Thermodynamics - NS (4) Pre req u i s ites: 1 54 and M T I 253.

94

of po l i t i c a l >cienc hav the

opportun i t y to combine the academ i c st udy o f gover n m e n t and

Prerequisites: 1 54 , 2 3 3 .

321

and a rea , t u iie . p o l i t ic;]l

p h i l osophy and theo ry. and p u b l ic p o l icy u n d law. The depart­

223 Elementary Modern Physics - NS (4) P re rt:'q u i ite: 1 54 and M TI l 253. 233

e xp l o re va rious top ics in American

gove r n m e n t and pol i tics , international re lat io ns and fo reign

Gene.ral Physics Laboratory ( 1 )

1 54

Sp en ce r. Chair; D wye r - S hic k. Grosvenor. Kelleher,

Ol ufs.

State and Local Government


363 Politics a n d the Media 364 The Legislative Process Ecol/omics (minimum of 8 hours if this group is selected) 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 Pri nciples o f Macroeconomics and Microeco nom ics (or 1 30 Global and Environmen tal Economic Princi ples) 3 2 1 L b r Economi .$, Labor Relations, a n d H u m an R ' ·ourccs 362 Public Finance 3 7 1 I n d us t ria l Organization and Public Policy Sociology ( mi n i m u m of 4 hours if this group is selected) 240 ocial Prob lems 386 Equality and I nequality 4 1 3 Crime and Society Stcltistics ( m i n i m um of 4 hours ) 23 1 I ntroductory Statistics On approva l by th e P u b l i c Affairs advisor, up to 8 hours may be earned through participation in an internshi p p rogram as a substitute for courses listed above ( except P o l it i c al Sc ience 345). I nternship op p o rtun i t i es are offered t h rough several depart­ ments and provide s tudents with actual w o r k experience in state and 10 [ legislative a n d , dmi n istrative agencies. Students i n terested in i n ternships a re urged to consult with their academic a dv iso r s and with intern fac u l t y a dvis ors at an e arl y date. Students interested in the Public Affa i rs m i nor should declare the m inor in the Department of Polit ical Science and consult with the department's Public fairs dvisor. MINOR IN LEGAL STUDIES: 20 semester hours. For additional i n fo rma t ion,

se e

381 Comparative Legal Systems - C . S I ( 4 ) 382 East Asian Politics - SI

\4 )

383 Modern European Politics - S I

(4)

385 CanadJan Government and Politics - S 1 386 The Middle East - S I ( 4 ) 40 1 Workshops and SpeciaJ Topics - SI

PRE- LAW: For i n formation, :sec Pre-p rofessional Prog ra ms.

4 3 1 Advanced International Relations - S 1 (4)

Prerequisite: 3 3 l .

� m \II \II

450 Internship i n Politics - S I

I n ternship i n t h e poli tical d i mensions o f non- g overn mental orga nizations. By depa r t m e n tal conSent onl),. ( 4- 1 2) 458 Internship in PnbUc Administration - S I

o z >

(4-1 2 )

By departmental consent o nly. 464 Internship in the Legislative Process - S I

...

( 4- [ 2 )

\II

By department consent only. ( I nternships with tht: Was h i n gton State Legislature are open only to j u n iors and sen. i o r s I"itb at l ea�t one year at PLU who have taken or take concurrently 3 6 4 . ) 47 1 I nternship in Legal Studies -

..... c: o

51 ( 4 )

m

B y d e p ar t m e n tal co nsent only.

o.n

49 1 Independent Studies

( [-4) By de pa r t me n t consent o n ly. 499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR

(4)

By departmental consent only.

Pre-professional Studies The fo llolV ing pre-professional studies do

/lot

majors, bllt are programs afstudy designed

For co u rse descriptions, visit

the PLU catalog o n li ne at \vww. plu.edu/

print/catalog. 1 0 1 Introduction to Political Science - SI

IaciliwteJiirl hcr

(4)

2 1 0 Global Perspectives: The World i n Change - C , S I 23 1 Current International Issues - S 1

(4)

282 Politics in the Americas - SI (4) 325 Political Thought - SI ( 4 ) 326 Recent Political Thought - S I

(4)

338 American Foreign Policy - S I

(4)

345 Government and Public Policy - S 1

(4)

346 Environmental Politics a n d Policy - 5 1 3 4 7 Political Economy - 8 1 (4)

1 5 1 , 1 5 2; (or 1 30 ) .

354 State and Local Government - S I

(4)

361 Political Parties and Elections - 51

(4)

( 4)

364 The Legislative Process - 51 (4) 368 The American Presidency - S I ( 4 ) 37 1 Judicial Process - 8 1 ( 4 ) 372 Constitutional Law - S J

(4)

The Division of Natural Sciences healt h :scie nce o m m it tel! advises students aspiring to careers i n the health s c i ence, . tu­ dents having such i n terests a r e encoura g ed to obtain a heal t h sciences advisor early i n their progra m . Summa rized b elow , l"e pre- professional requirements fo r m�ll1y hea l t h Tiencc a rea� ; additional i n formation is available through the heal th scien ce committee. ata l o g s and brochures for many ,chools and pro­ grams are available to students in the Rieke Science Center. D ENTISTRY, MEDICINE, AND VETERINARY MED ICINE:

33 1 International Relations - S I ( 4 )

363 Politics and tbe Media - S 1

major at PLU

www. nsci.plu. edulhsc

1 7 0 Introduction t o Legal Studies - S 1

ON

col/still/te academic

Health Sciences

(4)

1 5 1 American Goverom.ent - S J

101; E

to

graduate or professional work after CO lllplctivlI of Ct disciplillilry

Course Offerings

:

( 1 -4 )

Legal Studies.

BACHELOR O F ARTS IN ED UCATION: For i n form ation, s ee School of Education.

P re req u i it

(<I )

(4)

The overwhelm i n g majority of -tu dents e ntering the profes i o n a l schoob for these ca reers have earned bacca laureate degre('s, securing a b ro a d cdu a t ional background in the p roce, s. This background includes a thorough preparation I II the science as well as s t u d y in the social sciences and the huma n i t it's. Thert' are no pre-professional major at PLU; r a t h e r student. s h o u l d se l e c t the major which best matches their i n te rests and which best prepares them fo r alternat ive c a ree rs . I n a dd i t i o ll to the general un iversit), requirement) and the cou rses n eed e d to c u m p l et e t h e s t u den t's major, the followin ' are general l y requi red for admis­ sion to the p rofessional program: B iology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 3 2 3 ; Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 2 5 ) , 232, 32, and 3 3 8 ( with a l l laboratories ) ; Mathematics 1 40; Physics 1 25 and 1 26 or Physics 1 5 3 a nd 1 54 (with a ppropriate labo ratories ) . C h e ck with a heal th sci n e advisor for exceptions or fo r add itions suggested by s pe c ific professional schools.

(4)

373 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties - SI (4) 374 Legal Studies Research - S I

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MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY:

VI W

The university no longer o ffers a medical technology degree, but continues to provide academic preparation suitable for admission to medical technology, hcmatolClgy, and clinical chemistry programs. Minimal require­ ments include: Biolo ' )" 1 6 1 , 1 62 , 3 2 3 , 3 2 8 , 407, 448; Chemistry 1 20, 232, 234, 332, 334, 338; lathematics 1 40. Recommended courses include: Biology 3 3 2 , 3 4 8 , 44 1 ; Chem istry 403; Phy ics

Law 253.53 5.7595

www. p lu. edul- lega lstd

1 2 5 , 1 26, 1 3 5 , 1 36 . OPTOMETRY: VI

c( z o VI VI u.I .....

o IX Q. W IX Q.

Although two years o f pre-optometry study is

th� min i mu m required, most tudents accepted by a 'chool of optometry have completed at lea · t three years of undergraduate work. A la rge percentage o f studen a ccep t ed by schools of

optometry ha e earned a baccalaureate degree. For those students who have not compl red a bacca!J.ureate degree, completio n of such a degree must be done in conjunction with optometry professional studies. The re q ui r ments for adm ission to the schools of optometry va ry. However, the basic science and mathematics requirements are generally uniform and include: B i o logy 1 6 1 , 1 62 , 3 2 3 ; Chem­ istry 1 20 (or 1 2 5 ) . 232, 332, and 338 ( w i th all laboratories) ; one y ar of college mathematics, including calculus (at least through Mathematics 1 5 1 ) ; P hys i cs 1 2 5 and 1 26, or Physics 1 53 and 1 54 ( w i th pprop riate laboratories) . In additio n, each school o f optometry h a s i t s own sp e c ific requirements; check w i t h a health cience advisor. PHARMACY:

Although the pre-pharmacy requirements for i ndividual school vary ( check with a health science advisor), the following COLUses are usually required: one year o f general chemistry; one year of organic chemistry, with laboratory; col­ lege-level mathematics (often including calculus); one year o f English composition. Other courses often required include microbiology, analytical chemistry, and introductory courses in communication, economics, and political science. For example. the University of Washington School of Pharm, cy has approved the following courses as being equivalent to the first two years of its progra m leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 20 1 or 328; h m istr y 120 (or 1 2 5 ) , 232 (with labora­ tory 2 3 4 ) , 3. 2 (with laboratory 3 3 4 ) , and 338; Mathematics 1 2 8 or 1 5 1 ; Statistics 2 3 1 ; Writing 1 0 1 and a second course i n writ­ ing; elect ives from humanities and social sciences. Total credits should not be fewe r than 60 semester hours. PHYSICAL THERAPY: Acceptance to schools of physical therapy has become increasingly competitive in recent years, and students interested in phy ical therapy are s. trongly enco uraged to meet with a health science advisor as early as possible to delamine prerequisites for specific schools. ALl p hys i cal therapy program are doctoral programs. Therefore, potential applicants shou l d plan on completing a baccalaureate degree in conjunction with atisfying admission requirements. Th requirements for admission to schools of physical therapy vary. HOI ever the basic science and mathematics requirements are generally unifom1 and i n clude: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 6 2 , 3 2 3 ; Chemjstry 1 20, 232; Mathematics 1 40; Ph ys i cs 1 2 5 and 1 26 (with lab ratories ) . [n add ition to the principles of biology quence, applicants must complete courses in anatomy and physiology. This adm ission requirement is met by either the combination 205 and 206 or the combination 3 6 1 and 44 1 ; biology majors sJ10uid take 36 1 and 44 1 , th e clear preference of several schools of physical therapy. [n ddition to the cience and mathematics requirements, the v rious s hoois have specific social science and humanities requirements. Check with a health science advisor regarding the e requirements.

96

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Preparation for law school at PLU is an advisi ng system rather than a curriculum of prescribed major/minor or o t herw i se organized courses. The p ri mary reason for such an a p p roach is that the admissions comm ittees of U.S. law schools generally recommend that applicants be well and broadly educated. They tend to seek applicants I-\'ho are l iterate and numerate, who are critical thinkers and articulate communicators. [n essence, they value exactly what a sound l iberal arts education p rovides­ i ndeed, requires. Therefore, regardless of their declared majors and minors, students considering law school are encou raged to demonstrate proficiency in courses selected from across the disciplines and schools while undergraduates at PLU. An appropriate curricular p rogram should be structured from a mix o f the students' personal academic interests, their professional inclinations, and coursework aimed at developing intellectual skills and resources apt to generate success in legal study and practice. Recent successful PLU applicants to law schools have taken such diverse courses as those in the anthropology of contempo­ rary America, social science research methods, American popular culture, English Renaissance literature, newswriting and argumentation, recent political thought, international relations, free-lance writing, intermediate German, animal behavior, neuropsychology, public finance, logic, and moral philosophy. Diversity and challenge are crucial to preparation fo r the study of law. However, pre-law students are also advised to take courses, chosen in con ultation with the pre-law advisor, that will help them to identify, develop, and explore perspectives on the character of U.S. law. Cou rses in U.S. government and history, judicial and legislative processes, research materials and methods, and in ternships may be particularly useful in this regard. Finally, students with an interest i n the law are encour­ aged to participate i n the activities of PLU's chapter o f Phi Alpha Delta Fraternity, International, and a professional service organization composed of law an.d pre-law students, legal educators, attorneys, judges, and government officials. Regardless of their major or minors, students interested in pre-law advising and activities are invited to register with the Pre- Law Center in the Department of Political Science.

Military Science (Army ROTC) 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 8 740

www.plu. edlll-rotc

The objective of the military science instruction within Army ROTC (Reserve O fficer Training Corps) is to prepare academi­ cally and physically qualified college women and men for the rigor and challenge of serving as an officer in the United States Army-Active, National Guard, o r Reserve. To that end, the pro­ gram stresses service to country and community through the development and enhancement of leadership competencies which support and build on the concept of service leadership. Army ROTC is o ffered to PLU students on campus. The lower-division courses are open to all students and are an excel­ lent source of leadership and ethics training for any career. They do not require a military commitment for non-scholarship students. The upper-division courses are open to qualified stu­ dents. ROTC is traditionally a four-year program; however, an individual may complete the program in three or two years. Contact the PLU Military Science Department for details. Participation in the introductory Military Science courses at PLU is open to all students. Students may choose to continue in the advanced courses with the goal of receiving a commission after successful completion of the program and receiving a u n iversity degree. Students seeking a commission are often


reci p i e o tl. of an ROT

scholarship. Being co m m issioned in the

m i l i ta r >' an d/of ree ivi ng a sch olars h i p i nvolves meetin g

three

req ui remen t established by th e Un i ted Stat . m i litary. For spe ific r quire rn t:Jl t s i n con tracti ng o r . dwl ar - h i p elig i b i l. i t y, s t u de nts may contact t h e M i l i tary Science Depa rt ment. Department of Defe nse po l i c i es are not co nsistent with PLU' i ndusi n of sexual orientation in t he a p plication of it Non ­ D iscrim i n a tion of Eq u I Edu tional p p ortun i ty ali ies. The u n i Vl' r-ity i� revie-wing methods of attem pti.ng to m i tigate th os e i nconsist Dei s. Finan cial ass i s tance in the form of t wo- , threc-, and 1')U -year scholarships i s a nilabI to q ual ified appl ica n ts. Schol'lrS h i ps a warded are for $ 1 7, 000 fur tuiti n plu ,I b )ok al l ow a n c ' of 600 and a. m onth ly t i pen d of $250-·$400. Stulit:nts in u p p e r­ divi ion (our es n o t on �cholarsh i p also receive a $350- 400 stipend. To be o rn rnis.�ioned an officer in tht:

5tJ

n i ku

3

FACULTY: Lieutenant -olone! [J row n , Chair The basi ours co n , is t, of two hOLlf o r a adcl11ic i ns t r u tion and mi l i t a r y tra ill i n g per week each sem es te r of the fi rst and sophomore year . S tudents bcg i n n i ng t h e c u rse as ophom ore can ompre s the basic cou rse by atte nd i ng additional academi i n s tructi n. There i, no m i litary c m m i t rn e n t fo r non-scho l a r ­ ship students i n the basic cO\lJ'se. The advanced cour e con iSIS of additional academ ic i ns truct ion and phy. kal condition i n g plus a fo u r-week cldv3 nceci sum mer ca m p at Fort Lewis, Washingto n . Stu dents arc fu rnisl1t:d with u n i for m s and most rextbooks for m i li ta r y sc iE'nce courses.

Course Offerings: Basic Course Ilt

www.pLu.edu/

pri nUcatal og. 1 1 1, 1 1 2

Introduction to Military Science (2)

2 1 1, 2 1 2

Introduction 1 0 Leader hip (2)

Course Offerings: Advanced Course For

co l lrse

descriptiolls, visit the PI.

clIlt/log olliine

01

www.plu..:du/

print/catult1g. 31 1 , 3 1 2

leadership and Management ( 3 )

411,412

Professionalism and Ethics ( )

I nternationa l Core 22 1 ThL' Experi e nce of ar - 12 (4) I nternat i on a l Core 222 Pro-pe t. fo r Wa r a n d Peac - 1 2 P h i l sophy 1 25 M o ral P hi J os ophy - PH Ph i l o soph y 353 Special To pics : Focus n M il i tary Eth ics Ir Wa r - PH (4) Rel igion 36 5 C h ri s t i a n Moral l ss ll �S - R2 ( 4 )

c

ou n s el

'V \II

-< n ::1: o �

o G'I -<

from the ,('m i n a r), of their choice.

Of the possihle maj( rs, E n g l is h , p h i losophy, re l i g IOn and the social scie.nccs are r garded a ' thl: m,)st d e s i ra b le . Other areas are, however, ac epted. fa cul t y llCl v i .' or w i l l a ss i s t students in the 'election of D u rseS nece sar )' to meet the re q l1 i rements of the he o l o gi c al :chool of t h ei r choice. t thl: p r ese nt rilne increasing n u mb e rs of wo me n ar enro l l i n g at selected Protes t a n t emina ries in p u rsu i t of t h e Master 01" Divi n ity d grt! e . C o n su l t th e:: Religi n epartm n l chair lOr furthe r i n formation.

Psychology 253. 535.7294 P cholt)gy is and

a sr:ientitic discipline that seeks to un d ers ta n d h umal\ no nh u m a n hehavior. P yc.h log y i s also a profession that seeks

to change beha ior for the betterment of humankind. Through i ts

r . e-arch activities, and use of com m u n ity res o urces, the Depa r tmen t of Psychology provides st udents wi th a bala nced cposure to p''Ychl.llogy as a scientific discip l i n e and profession. The mJjor i n psychology ( a ) i n t roduces s tu d e n t s to sc ie nt i fic mdh ds of ps yc h o log y, to th eo r i e s a n d research fi n d i n gs fro m t h e c o r a re a s o f psyc.hology, and to t h e h i story o f psycho logy; (b) provides s t u de n t s with o p por t u n i t ies to explore advanced tvp i c in cientific and professional psych o l o g y, c o n d u ct psycho logi- al resear h, and gai n ., x pos u re to t h e prac tice o f psychology i n c om m un it y sdt i n gs; a n d (c) helps prepare studen fo r postgraduate work i n psychology or in related professiol15 such as social wo r k , education, medicine, law, and bu�iness. The major is a n excel l e n t ge n e ra l p re p a r a t i o n for

curric u l u m,

employment in

a

v'� riety of , c t t i ngs.

meet the n e ed s of a variet), of s t u len s . 1() th is end, two majors il ro' offered: the 133chel or of Arts and t h e D, chelor of Scie nce. • i t h e r d egree providc& a . l id fo u n d a t i o n in P Tchology, and either ca n serve as preparation {o r postgradu(\!1? tudy or employmen t . However, for t h o se studen ts who i n t e n d to p u rsue the doctorate in psych I gy fvllowi n g graduation from PLU, 111<:' Bachelor of

Tht:: p ycbology pr og ram is designed to

I ofe: A m axi mu m of 24 semester h u u rs earned in ROT program s may be ppl icd loward a ba calaurealt' degree at P L Students rece ivin g more t h a n 1 2 semester h U I S of R T (rrciil (0\ ard a PLU dcgre are r q l l i r d t o t ake' n.: of the fol1o ing;

(4)

Theological Studies Pre -theological t ud e n ts sh uld c a m p i te th re q u i remt:.nts for the Bachelor of rts degree . .Beside s the gent!.raJ de g r ee req u ire­ m e nts , tllf As ociation of heulogi al Schools recomm ends the f ! I ow i ng:

Englis h: li tera tu re, composi tion, speech, and related shlclies. At l ea s t . ix em�ster,. History: ancient, modern European, and Ameri can . t least t h ree se m es ters .

serne ·ters.

Nli w m l S(itl!(� : preferably physi(�, c h em ist ry, and biolog)'. t least two se mesters . Social S iell :.cs : p$ydl< 10 ' )', SLlciology, econo mics, political 'cience, and educalion. t\t least six semes ters, i n cluding at least one semester of psychology. Fo rl'igll LIlIIg uages - Orlt' or more or tlr- following: La ti n , Greek, Hebre\, , Ge rm a n , F re nch . S tu de n t s who o n tiLipatc: post­ gradu ate tud ics a re u rg� I to undertake thes e discipli nes as earl)' as po. sibl . ( a t least fo u r �el11e ters). Religion: a t ho rou h k no wledge of B i bl i ca l content together with an l n twduction to major religiou U ' ad i tions and theologi al p rob l em s i n t h e co ntext of the pri ncipal aspects of h u m a n ulture as o u t l i n ed above. At l east t h ree �emcsters. S t u d e n ts may well seek

Army.

graduate mu I com plete the rnilitar . . ci nee uJIri( ul UI1l , i n clu d i n g s u cce sful completion of a fo u r- week ad va n ed camp d u r i n g the Sllmmcor bd'or the $Cl1ior year. A dd i t i u n a l i n fo rm::l ­ tion on the Army ROTC p ro gra m may be o b t a i n e d by writi ng Army ROTC, Pa 'ific Lutherall Univ rsit y, a oma , WA 9114'17.

For co urse- descriptiolls, visit Ille l'LU CIllalog orIiine

Philosopliy: orientation in h is t o r y, content, a n d methods. At least

Sc ience d egree is likely to prov i d e an cspecia!ly strong prepara­ tion. The Sa

dor of Sc ie nce d<!gret: is al so

an

e xce l l e n t

prc­

p rofes ional degree fo r those st uden ts WhD plan to enter t h e

fields of dentistry, pu bl i

he'l l t h ,

or

m ed

i c i n e (all

branches. i nc l u d i n g

psychiatry),

eteri n a r y medicine'. Man)' in h u :;i n es"

education, nu rsi n g . �nd social work fi n d J double major with psycho logy to be a va luable ad d i t i on to tJ1eir t ra i n i n g. hilir; A nd e r�;o n . R.M. Brown, - oedert, Hans ick, M o o n , M o ri ts ug u , Rose l l , Toyokawa.

FACULTY: Shore,

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hours in psyc h ol ­ ogy i n cl u d i n g

i O I ; 242; 4'13;

one of 340, 342, 346. 348; one of

350, .� . 2., .1 5 4 ; plus J 6 hours of elective psychology cours s . In addi t i o l1 to the 36 h o u rs in p syc h o l o gy, Statistic 23 1 ( ps yc h ul­ ogy section ) and acc o m p a nying lab are req u i rcd_

P

A

C

I

F

i

e

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H

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A

N

U

N

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97


BACBEI.OR OF SCl ENCE MAJOR: 40 ,cmestn h<)ur in

348 Cognitive Processes - S2 (4

ps)'chology i ncl u di n g 1 0 I;

Prerequi sites: 10 1 , 241; or c o nse n t

242; 340 o r 342; 46 or 348; 493; one lab sec t i o n selected from 34 1 , 34 , 347, 34 ; n ne of 330, 352, 3<;4; 4 8 1 ; plus 1 2 hours of elective psychology C UIses. l.n add i t ion to >­ � o o ::t: U >­ III

G.

_

t h e 40 hou rs in psyc h ol og y, Statistics 2 J ( psychology section)

and a cco m pan yi ng lab and a t leas 20 semester mathematics and natural s c ie nce are required. at least 4 ho u r s Ill u s t be in

biology. Those s t u d e n t s

m a t h em a t ics

hours in t the 20 hours,

enter schools o f de n t i s t r

medici ne, p u b l ic heal t h ,

or

P rerequ i si te:

48

(

Ir

concu rrent e n rollment in

348).

(4 )

PreTe q u i ite; 1 0 J .

352 DeveJopment: I nfancy to Maturity - S2 ( 4 )

tn

Prere q u i:;ite: ·1 0 1 .

vderi n a r ),

medicine s h o u ld n o te t h e sp c i fic p re-prores�ional m a themati and science req u i rements in the appr()priate sections of t h is

349 Experimental Research Laboratory in Cognition ( 2 ) 350 Per onality Theories - S2

and at least 8 hours i n

who, a fter graduating from PLU, phi l)

fj -nstructor.

354 Sodal Psychology - S2

s

P re req u isite:

c a t a log .

(4)

101.

395 Research Laboratory (2)

MINOR: 20 seme ler h o u rs, of

hieb

cit least II h u rs m llst

Pre re q u i s i t e: consen t of in�trllct()r.

be

ta k en in r es i d en ce . S t a t istics 23 1 ( or e q u iva len t ) may be used a.

402, 403 Independent Study ( 1 - 4)

part of t h e 20-hour requiremen t .

Prere q ll is it e : depart mental

The minor in PTchology is de�igncd to supplemen t a nother maj o r in t h e liberal arts or a degree program i n s chool , such as business, education, or n ursin g . Psy c hology

a

con

en l .

405 Workshop o n Alternative Perspectives - A . S 2 ( 2 or

professional

440 Psychology o f Language - S2 Prere q L1 i i t e : 1 0 ! .

1 1 0, 1 1 1 , a n d 1 1 3 do HoL oun� toward the maj o r or

minor.

4)

(4)

444 Adolescent Psychology - S 2 ( 2 )

Course prereq u i s i tes: A grade o f

�-

earn ed in a course in o rder for it t

Pre req uis i te : 3 52.

()r higher m u st h a ve been

q uaJ ify a

a

p rereq uisite.

450 Psychological Testing - S2

(4 )

Psychology 493, already req u i red of 'l ll maj o rs, a l so m ee ts the

Prerequ is i tes: 10 I , STAr 2 3 1 ; or consent of instructor.

s e n i o r sem i n a r/project req u j rem n t \'I·hen

453 Abnormal Psymology - S2

d

project/paper is

Pre re q u i� it . : 1 0 1 .

added. Students may petition the departmenL to do the projed/ pa p er in a n o th e r s ui t a ble

c o u r�e.

(4)

454 Community Psychology - S2 ( " ) Prerequisite: 1 0 1 .

Course Offerings

456 Theories and Methods of Counseling and

For course descriptioliS, visit the PLU wcoiog aniillc nr www. pl u.ed u/

Psychotherapy - S2

1 0 1 Introduction to Psychology - S2 ( 4 )

1) 0

Study Skills

yc ho!ogy maj nr

p

or

462 Consumer Psychology - S 2

Prer q u i

1 1 1 CoUege Reading

(I)

47 1 Psychology and tbe Law - S2 ( 4 )

1 1 3 Career and Educational Planning: Finding Your Way ( I )

u n i ersity re q ui reme nt s

or

Prereq uisite: 1 0 1 .

p. ychology

472 Psychology and Medicine - S 2

maj or or minor requ ireme.n ts .

Prcreqllisit�: 1 ( 1 I .

221 The Psycbology of Adjustment - 52 (2) 242 Advanced Statistics and Research Design

Prerequisit�: 1 0 J .

(4)

431 Psychology Reseal'dl Seminar - SR

and acco m panyi ng Idn n lLl g h l b y

me m bers of t h e p s yc h o l ogy department or consent of instnJC-l0r at least t wo m o n t hs before the heg i nn i ng of the semester.

340 Human Neuropsydtology - S2

1 0 1 , 2 4 2 ; o r consent

(4)

f i nstrll

Prereqll i�i tc:

, IllI

342 ( o r conc urren l- e D ro l iment i n 342 ) .

346 Perception - S 2 (4)

242; or consent o f i n truetor.

347 Experimental Researdt Laboratory in Perception Prerequisite: 346 ( o r con urrent enr l Iment i n 346 ] . I

F

I

C

(4) 42, 46, 34li; one of 3 -0,

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

phom re s t nding p l us one COllfse i n psych ology

con �� nt of the depa rLllll'n l".

P re req u i� i te; .:ons�nt of i n

343 Experimental Research Laboratory in Learning ( 2 )

C

of J40,

496 Research Laboratory ( 2 )

(4)

Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 242; or consent of i nstru ·tM.

A

Clnt!

495 Internship ( 1-6)

340 (or con c u rre n t o r Ihnent i n 340 ).

342 Learning: Research and Tbeory - S 2

P

f i n s t r llcttlr.

352, 354.

or.

(2)

98

emino.r - 52 (2-4 )

Prerequisit.:s: 1 0 1 ; 241;

341 Experimental Research Laboratory in Neuropsychology

Prerequisi tes: 1 0 1 ,

483

493 History and Systems of Psychology - SR

Prerequis ite: 1 0 1 .

Prerequisite:

(2)

PrereqL1is i tes: 1 0 1 , 242. and co nse n t o f i n true tor. P r req u ; � i t,,: ((ln cnt

325 Human Sexuality - S2 ( 4 )

P rerequ i s i t e :

(4)

474 Psychology or Wome.n - A. S2 ( 4 )

10 l.

STAT 23 1

(1,1)

Praequisite: J 0 I .

m inor req u i re m en t s .

Does not mee t gener- I

i t.:: 1 0 1 .

464 Environmental Psychology - S2 (4 )

May not b e ap pl i ed to core, laOb'1lage, or psychology major or

Prerequ isite:

454; or consent o ( i n,truetor.

Prerequisite : 1 0 l . 0

m i nor requirements.

Prereq u i site:

or

461 Psychology of Work - S2 ( 4 )

(I)

May n o t be applied to core, lan guage,

Prere uisi te:

(4) 453,

Prereq ui�i tes: 3S 0 , 4 -0,

print/catalog.

I

V

E

R

(2)

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Y

tructar.


tradition adds its u n i qu e co nt ribution. It calls for a critical yet

Publ ishing and Printing Arts

constr uctive i n terchange. with contemporary s o c i e t y. Final ly, it

253.535.724 1

s it y a each sheds l i g h t on the h u m a n condition.

wWlV.pIIJ.edu/-ppa For m ore than tl enty-liv� year

PJcifi

De p a rt m en t of Engli. h has offered translate a l o ve of book. i n to an

ex

a

Lu th eran

U n iversity's

wa)' to help tuden

i r i ng prof,,� ion, I ca reer i n

p u bl ish i n g . ne of o n ly a few such pr >granL'i in the cmID tr . , t h i s di 'ti n c t i e interdisciplinary curriculu m in P ublis h i ng and

Prin t i ng Arts ( P P ) is high ly n ' p c c t eJ by emplo ers �lr()und the country because i t co mb ines preprofess ional sk il ls a n d e p e r- i ­ ence with the solid f un dati n f a l i be ral (lrts ed uGltion. Th is si x -co urse minor is designed to give st udent� w it h ""lent a nd in terest in w ri t i n g , gra ph ic design, co mm u n ica t i o ns , or b us i ness a head start i n to the worl l ( ) f pu bl i �h ing a n d :J bmad va r i e t y of related p rofessi oll S. The Publi 'h ing

nd Printing Arts progra m I S an especial ly

aluable co mp leme n t to maj

rs wnc

rned w ith l anguage nd th e wr i tten word, ma 'o rs such � s n g l ish, la ngua ges, education, publ ic rela t i on :' , jo u rn al i s m , t r1arketi l1g, and grap hic design . Dut s t u de n ts majoring biology to musi

in a wide spectntnJ of d isciplin es- fro m

to r Ii ion-have discovere d the v lue of a

publishing a n d p ri n ti n g arts m i noT, too. [ t b lth h � l ps to connect them to p ub lish i ng career opportu ni t ies In t hose h e l ds and provi de s a richer u n ders uln ding of the wmp Jex r Ie wr i t t en communications

lh, t

f a ll s orts play i n our lives an

in our

modern wor ld .

PUBLISHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR; Three core courses are re qui red;

ommullication 3 2 1 The Dook in Sc ciel)' English 3 1 2/Co m lJ1un icat i o n 322 Publ i sh l I1g Procedu re' English 3 1 3/ Art 3" I The Art of the: B ok I English 3 1 1 /

t h is 1 2 -hQUT core, st ud ents take three el ec t ive

In addition t

courses ( 1 2 hours) sel ected from at least t wo of the fol lo wi n g ca tegories:

I

riting/ed i t i ng, marketing/management, and

desig n/p rod uctiOll.

Writillg/Editillg: All English w r i t m ' co urses beyond Writing 1 0 1 , i nclu di ng 403; appro ed courses in Commu n ication ( 2 8 5 , 384, 480). Markl!ting/Mcwngell1€m: Approved courses in Business (203, 308, 309, 3 1 0, 365, 46 7, 468 ) or Commun i ca tio n (38 1 , 385, 390, 438). Design/Production: Approved cou rses i n A r t ( 2 2 6 , 3 26 , 3 7 0 , 396 , . 98, 426, 496), E ngl ish ( 3 1 4 ), or Communication ( 3 8 0 ) .

U p to tw, cou rses

( 8 hou rs) can be co un ted

toward Goth a

Publ i sh i n g and Prin ti ng Arts minor and other req ui rements,

such as general u n ivcrsi t

major. To earn a

req uirements, another minor, or a

in Pub l i .. h ing and Prin ti n g Arts" tudents m us t demonstrate computCf skills n d a qum: some foml of pract.ical ex p erience in p u b l i hing- related work gai ned outside th e classroom. min

J'

c a l ls or

a

s ha rin g of in sigh t s w i th other dis i p l i n es in the u n iver­

To these ends the De p a r t m en t of Religion offe rs a wide range o f co u rses and opportunities. Furthermore i t calls students, majors a nd n o n - m ajo rs alike, t o comider que tions of m e a n i n g , p urpose, a n d value i n a society w h i ch a l l t o u often n e glect s these questions.

FACULTY: Oakman,

;:0 m r-

c;, o z

ha ir; Datten, Breazeale, Gross, I ng ra m ,

Killen, Petersen, Stivers, Torvend, Trelstad.

UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENTS: 8 semester hours fo r students en tering as first-year students or sopho mores. Four

lower-division hours s h o u l d be taken before the end of the

sophomore year. The se co nd 4 h o u rs may b e selected fr o m most of the other offerings i n t h e rel i g i o n curriculum. Tra nsfer s t u ­ den t entering a s j u n iors or seniors are r eq u ire d t o ta ke

4 semes­

ter h urs of religion (from l i nes 1 or 2), un less presenting 8

Iran fer hours of re l i gio n fro m oth e r regio nally accredited col­ leges or u n ivers i ties. Courses o ffe red through

orrespondence,

Oil-l ine, and independent studies are not acce pt ed to meet th core r eq u ir ment i n Religiolls Studies. ore I requ i rement in Rel igious

The

.

Studies (8 hours) speCl­

ties that 4 hours must be taken rom each o f two lines, as follows:

I . Biblical St udi es ( R I ) - 1 1 1 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 330, 3 3 1 , 3 32 . 2. Christi, n T h o u g h t , H i s tory, and Exp e r ienc e ( R 2 ) - 1 2 1 , 2 2 1 ,

2 2 2 , 2 2 3 , 224, 2 2 5 , 22 , 227, 3 0, 36 1 , 362, 364, 365, 367, 36R. 3. I n t egrative , nd Co m pa ra tive Rel i g i ous Stud ies ( R 3 ) - 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 1 33 , 2 3 1 , 232, 233, 234, 235, 237, 239, 390, 3 9 1 , 392, 393.

PERSPECTIVES ON DIVERSITY REQUlREMHNT: 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 2 32 , 2 3 3 , 234, 23 5, 2 3 7, 24 7, 34 1 , 344, 3 4 7 , and 392 fu lfill the cros'-cultura l l i n e . 257, 35 1 , 3 5 4 , 357, and 368 fulfi l l the aJterna­ t i e l i ne. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 2 se m est e r hours with at lea, t ach of the three l ines plus 499. 1 6 o f the 32 hours for the major mu r be taken in lipper-d ivision cou rses ( nu mbered 300 or hjgh r). Trans fe r majors w i l l n ormal ly take 20 bour� in res idence. Majors sh o ul d plan their p rogram early in co nsulta­ tion WiUl departmental faculty. Closely related cou rses taught in o ther depa r t me n ts may be con s id ered to a p p l y toward the rel i ­ g i o n m aj or i n consultation with t he chair o f the department. 4 h ours in

MINOR (TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION): 24 semeste.r hours; a l leas t 4 ho urs in each of t he three lines. Transfer m i n o rs under this option nor m al l y take 1 6 hours in reside nce. Intended primarily for pa ro c h ial school teachers enrolled in the School of E duc a t i o n .

MINOR: 16 seme.ster hours with no m ore than 8 ho u rs in one of the li nes l i s ted a bove . Trail fer mi nors under this o p t ion must take at 1e,1st

h o u rs i n residence.

Course Offerings For course descripti ons, visit the PLU cata log o,.llille at www.plu.edu/ print/catalog.

Rel igion 2 5 3.535.7 3 1 7 www.plll. edll/-reli

Religion is an art mpt to understand th e mca � ing 0 h u m� n existence. For bristians m ean i n g is revealed In the love ot God in Jesus Christ. h Departm nt o f Religion lands wi th i n and affirms t h is Christian co ntext. in a wl i vers i t y s t ' ng this mea n� the �e ri ous aca demi c study of the Bible, o f the hi tory of the Christian tracl it ion, of Ch ris ­ tian t heology, and o f world reltgio u. traditio n�. ritical study . calls for open and · uthentic dia l og ue w i t h o t her religiOUS tradi­ tions and seeks lO understa nd a co m mon hu ma Jl i ty as each

I I I Biblical Literature: Old and New Testaments - RI (4) 121 The Christian Tradition - R2 (4) 1 3 1 The Religions of South Asia - C, R3 (4) 132 The Religions of East Asia - C, R3

(4)

133 The Bible and Culhlre - R3 ( 4 )

(4)

2 1 1 Religion a n d Literahtre o f the O l d Testament - R I

2J2 Religion and Literature of the New Testament - R I

(4)

221 Andent Church History - R2 (4) 222 Modern Church History - R2

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223 American Cburch History - R2 ( 4 )

consultation with the pr gram d i rect o r (4 ho urs in cross­ disciplinary co u rse , 2 hour in a se n i or project, und 8 hours of electives) . A t o t al of 40 semester h ou rs is req u i red. Wit h t h approval of the Scandinavian Studies director, selected January­ term, summer, a n d e ' p e r i m e n t al courses may be induded in t h e major program. 0 mo re than 8 s em e s t e r h o u rs m ay be offered to meet both the Sca n d i navian A rea " tudie major a n cl general university requir m e n t s or req u i r m e n ts C o r a second major. Such cross-applicati on of co u rses must be approved by the Scandinavian S tu d i es d i rector. The cross-disciplinary cours 's l i s t e d bdow o ffer an opportu­ nity to view the S ca n d i n av i a n cou n t ries in compurition with o t he r world regions. be)' a r e re g u l a r depa r t m ental offer i n g s in w h i ch studen enrolled i ll tJle S c a nd i navian A rea Studies maj o r focus t h e i r re adi n g and work assig n m e n ts to a siglli (,1I1t extent on Scandinavia. Students m u st co n s u l t w i th th e prngram di.rector concerning regi stra ti n f o r these courses.

22-4 The Lutheran He-ritage - R2 (4) 225 Paith and Spirituality - R2 (4) z

226 Chri lian Ethics - R2 (4'

o

227 (247, 257) Christian Theology - R 2 ( 4 )

I.!)

23 1 Myth, Ritual , and Symbol - R3 (4)

....I

232 The Buddhist lradilion - C, R3 (4)

a::

233 The Religions of China - C, R3 (4)

W

234 The Religions of Japan - C, R3 (4) 235 Islamic Traditions - C, R3 (4) 2 3 7 Judaism - C , R3 (4) 239 Environment and Cultur - R3 (4)

Students

330 Old Testament Studies - RI ( 4 ) 331 New Testament tudies - R I (4)

360 Studie i n Ch ur ch Ministry - R2 (4) 361 (34 1, 351 ) Cburch lI'tstory Studies - R2 ( 4 ) 362 Luther - R2 (4)

rerjllired, to study in rudy opportttnuies are

Languages:

365 Christian Moral Issues - R2 ( 4 )

Norwegian Norwegian o (weg i a n Norwegian

367 (347, 357) Major Religious Thinkers, Texts. and Genres - R2 (4 f'rerequij te: on ent of inst r uctor,

1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary 20 I . 202 [ntermediat., 30 1 Conversation and omposition 302 Ad v a n ced 'onversation and , mposition

Cultural History:

368 Feminist and Womrutist Theologies - A, R2 (4)

Scandinavian [ 50 Introdnction to Sc an d i n av i a Scandinavian 322 ScaJ1di navia and World Po l i t i cs ScandimlViaJ1 324 The Emigrants Scandinavian 327 The V i k in gs

390 Studies in H istory of ReUgion ' - R.3 (4) 391 Sociology of Religion - R3 (4) 392 God, Magic. and Morals - C, R3 (4)

Literature:

Scandinavian 2 5 0 Masterpieces o f Scandinavian Li tera ture - LT Scandinavian 42 1 Ibsen and Stri ndberg - LT Scandinavian 422 20th- entury 'candinavian L .iterature - LT

393 Religion a n d the life Cycle - R3 (4)

(I

C(\Il�enl IIi I he d p a r t m cn l is reqll i r�d. 499 Capston.e: Research Seminar - SR

1101

SCANDINAVIAN COURSES

364 (344, 35-4) Theological Studies - R2 ( 4 )

Independent Studie

enco llruged, though

available at d vari e t y of i nst i t ut i o n s in orway, . weden, and Denmark. A pp ro p ri a t coursework c m p l e ted .lbroad should be submitted to the Scandinavian S t" u d ies d i rect o r for approval toward the maj or. Students i nterest d specifically in o r wegia n language study rwegian major under t h e are referred to the description or the Department of Languages lId L i teratu re ', Al l ore Scandinavian courses arc tau"bt out of this department.

332 Tile L ife of Jesus - R l f rc rcqllisite: n e l ower-d ivision RELI cou rse o r COJ1sent of i nstructor. (4)

491

are

Scandinavia as p a rt of their program.

CROSS-DISCI PLINARY COURSES SOMETIMES

(4)

APPLICABLE TO THE SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES

i t b t h e progl"am d i re c t or to determine applicabili ty. E n g l i sh 3 \ 3/ Art 33 1 The Art o f t h e B, )ok r English 334 Spec i a l Topics in hildren's L i terature H i s to ry 323 T h t' M i d d l e Ag s - S I History 3 2 5 Reformation - . [ Music 1 06 l'A us ic o f 'candinavia - R, C Philosophy 3 3 8 E: istentialisl1l and Con t i nental MAJOR: C o n su l t \

Scandinavian Area Studies 25 .5 5.73 1 4 WWw.l./lI.eti. ll-sctl ll

Scandi navian rea 'tudi , i, a flex ible p r o g ra m which dravis on many u n iversi t y dt'p rtments . It offer� a b roa d perspect ive on 5canJ inavi� p'L�t and prese n t, w h i le develnpi n g useful a na l yt i c a l and comm u n icat ive skil ls. The program reflects both the Sctlld inav ial.l h e r i lag of I he university a n d the d y n a m i c profile of Scandinavia withill lhe world com m u n it)' today.

P h i losophy - PH

Political Science Yl l I n t e rnat i o n al Rel ations - S 1 Political Science 383 Modern Eu ro pea n Pol i t ics - S l Re l ig i o n 2 2 4 The Lutheran Heritage - R2 Re l i g i o n 361 Ch urch H i s t o r y Studics - R2

SCANDINAVIAN STU D rns COMMlTIJ!I!: Toven, Chair alld Pmgmlll Director; Hegstad. Myrb( ,

.

Course Offe ring

elson, Ringdahl, Vaught

Farner.

For course descriptiolls, visit the PLU m talog online (It

Students enrolled i n the . can d i n avian A rea S t u d ies program are

print/catalog. 499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR ( 2 )

Cl<pecte<l to de m on s t ra t e t he equivalent of two years of Norwe­ gian, 'wedisb, or Danish la nguage i nst ru c t i o n ( 1 6 hours). To ga i n a I a�k und r tand i n g of the reg i o n , they also take 6 hours

in Sca n d I n a v i a n cultural bistor

!ld 4 hours

in Scandinavian

l i teratu re .

Maims chao. c additional

1 00

cou rsts

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ocial wo rk majors are encou raged to mi nor i n sociology.

work.

Division of Social Sciences 253.535.7664 'ial iences �eck t o p rov i d e • challenging edLlcaUun in the �ocial �ciences that c r i t i ally a n al yzes t h e past and the present socIal h ist o r y a nd st ructures of human i nte ra ti nn. I n struc t i on i. ibrant a n d re lev an t to the t i m e JnJ wor ld i n wh ic h w l ive a n d en(ourag re spon sible (j t izen h ip fo r tnday , lOd t om{l(fOW. T h ro ugh class room Icam i n g and a p p l ied settings such as su perv ised i n ternsh ips, students in the social sCIences acq u i re an u nders tand ing of society while develo ing the anal)'tl(al l'Ot�b w i th wh ic h t v provide ,ol u l i o n s to <1 dive rse ra nge o t .� oc ia l problems. T h e i i�i o n of �ocial cience� fu lly ' u p po rts i n terdis i pl i ­ nary rrogr�m. . T he I'o gra m i n lhe mcricas, Global S t ll cli s, and Lega l S wd ics a re housed wilh lfl Iht div ision. In a dd it i o n , Social cien 5 fac u l ty "bl1 p.:trti . i p;llt' ,l( t iveiy in o t he r i nterdis ci pl i n a ry programs i l 1c1 u d i ng C h i nese S l u d ies, Wo men's StudiL �, and En vi ronme ntal S tudies. I�o adntin btercd wi t h lll l ilt· d i v is i o n , the enter f o r Eco n om i c Ed u a t i on S C I' ('� 10 b rOdd�n k now l edge of econ om ic ' principll:s .I mong K- 1 2 tem.hers a n d t hei r s t ude n ts in Ihe Pacific Nor thwes t. 'he faculty wit h i n I h e Divi i�lD

fS

PAC ULTY: 0. H u t!L beck, Dei/II; faculty mem bers of the Depart ­ ment. nf Anl hropo l ' )gy. Fcnnom ics, H istory, Marriage and Fa m il y Th erap I, P )I i ti a l :'cicnce, Psychology, Soc i o!ogy and (i�1 Work, and programs in legal Studies, Glob .. 1 Stud ies, a.nd the Ame ricas. As

a

d ivisio n w i t h i n the

Divisi on of So c i a l

ollege of Arts and Sc ie nces, the

cicllcc:; offer, prog r ams i.n each. co n st i t ue n t

dep;Hlment leadillg 10 the BA deg ree. Addi l io na l l y, :J 55 d gr e is offe r d i n psych ology and an IvlA degree is offer d ill marriagt: and fa m j jy thera py . Cnurse offerings <l nd degr e req u irt!m t'nts are I istetl 11 nd er

Field Cnordi/wtor).

Wo rk

II'

o

Sociology

n

Socio lo gy exa m ines t h e p rocesses a n d s t r u c t u res wh icb shape

o

social group' o f a l l siLe , i n cluding fr ie n ds, fa m il i es, workplaces, u n i u e intefpretiv

o CI -<

)f sociology provides students w i t h

a n d naticl11s. The · l u tl .

toob fo r u n ders t a n d i n g the mselves and

ol hers in a changing worl d. Sociology has broad appeal to those

who are in tcreste 1 in developing practical sk i l ls and ana l y t ical t;lle HS. S( m uf the practical pursuits enabled by soci ological t n i n t n g are in the areas of p rogra m development, counsel i ng, rese, reh , c ri m i na l J u s t i , man agement, and marke t i n g . The academic p repa l'at ioll is v;J,luable to those i n terested in p u rsu ing

}> z c II'

o

J drn i ni tration, social work, t heology, o r th�

degrees in law,

n

social science .

The depar tm ent's curricu lum offe rs a vari e t y of cou rses i n socic)I(')gic<l1 a n a lysi s w h i l e p e r m i tt i ng a n opt ion al concentration

i n t h e spec ial i zed areas of fa m i ly/gendeT or crime/deviance. The

curri c u l u m is deliberately flex i bl e to pe rm it students to s t udy

ind i v id ual subject areas, or to pursue majors fiel d.

or m inors in the

t u de n ts majori ng i n bu si n ess , n ur s i n g , education, and

co m p u l r science fi nd the sociological minor p a r t i c u larly useful fo r b roadeni n g their understand i n g of social rules and re lation­ ships, prugrams a n d so l u t ions, and c o n t inuity a n d c ha nge. The acu l l i s , Iten tive to t h e i n d ividual needs of students in their ellons to provide ac ade m ic excellence to a d ive rse s t uden t body.

BACHELOR OF ARTS: Gellerill Mnjor: ·10 semestt:r ho urs, i ncl ud i n g 1 0 1 , 240; 330 o r 362; 39 7, 4 96 , 499 , p l u s 1 2 sem este r h o u rs in sociology a p p rov ed by t he depar t m e n t at hI: 300 and 400 levels; a n d Statistics 23 1 ,

for Sociology ll nd S(K i a l Work majors.

n thropology c non ic

ollcelllratiOIl

MaIOI' !Vith

H i s t ory Marri age and

FACULTY: Le n- uerrero, Chair; Bib larz, H iggi n son , Jobst, Keller (Snci(ll Wurl.. Progmm Director), McDade, Russel l (Social

Fam i ly Th rapy

Pol it ical Science

P sych ology tf)

se me st e r hour s

Major with CO llecn/ration ill Crime/Deviance: 4 0 sem es ter h o u rs i ncl uding 1 0 I , 336, 397, 4 D, 496, 49 ; p l us 1 2 semester hours of

iology a n d 'oci� 1 \"'(l rk

See also cetion s p ecifi c

ill Pamily/Gender: 40

i n c l u ding 1 0 1 ; 330 or 362; 397, 440, 4 96, 499; p l u s 1 2 se m ester hours i n soci ology hosen i n con su lta tio n w i t h the d ep a r tnl ent; and ' tatistics 2 3 1 , fo r Sociology a n d Social Work maj o rs.

a JIi l iated d ' ret') a n d p rograms

.h i ne:.e StLldi� . ;1 bal Stlldit:�, and Legal

l udies.

sociology c hosen in Statistics 2 3 1 , for

on ' u ltation

ith the department; a n d

ociology and Social Wo rk majors.

Revised requirell1ents jor those In(ljorillg in both sociology alld wor k� 80 se m e st r h o ur s i ncl ud i n g So ial Work 2'75, 3 2 3 , 380, 385, 472, 4 7 , 4 75, 476, 485, 486, a n d 499; Sociology 1 0 1 ,

,<o(illl

Social Work See Socio logy

397, 496, 499, plus

and Social Wi)f'k i mmediately lal lowing.

Sociology and Social Work 2 53 . 535 . 72 94 II'ww.p lll. eJu/-soci Soc iol ogy ;'lnd soci al work,

1 6 elect ive cre d i t

( recom mended courses

oei log 240, 296; 330 or 362; a n d 4 ( 2 ) ; S tati stics 2 3 1 for S iology ;md ocial vVo rk major ; Bio logy I l l ; a n d P sych o l­ ogy 1 0 1 . include

MINOR: 20 semester h l rs, i n c l ud i n g 1 0 1 a n d 16 semester hours of soc i al gy ci10 en in con su l tation with the department. tatistic. 23 1 may be i n clud d in the m i nor. Sociology m i n ors n rc r e q u i red to attain a m i n i m u m grad e of C- i n sociology classe s.

oncerned with u nder�ta ndill g contemporary social Iss ues, poli cies, a n J $ol u t iul1 . h i lt: oc i nlogy ml'hd ize� researc h, i n terpreta t i o n , and a nalysis. social wll r k emphaSize inlt:rve n li(ln a n d practice. The disc i p l i ne. share a11 i n terest i n h um a n rel at i on sh ips and experi ence, e l l l <!m pora ry ta m i l y l i fe and fa m i l y polic ic:s, e th n i c d ive r ity and race rela ti ons . puverty a n d soc ial st ra ti ticatio n, -nciaJ ju · t iCf: <md u rn m u n it} o rganizat io n . BOl h d i 'c ipl i nes e n co u ra ge hands-o n l ea rn i n g thro ugh fi e ld p l a ce men ts, in ern­ a.

u i�t i ll c l discipltn

art'

ships, and . en'ice lea rn i ng pro;t:c ts. S r u d ent s milY major in e i tht:r sociology \ r social wllrk , mi no r i n so iolog , or co m p le te a d o u b le major in sociolo gy and 'odal

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ED UCATION: See

choal 0/ Education.

TRANSFER STUD ENT POLI CY: ' he depar t m e n t accepts, fo r rra nsfer credit From an other college or u n ive rsi l y, only those courses equivalent to S o c i o logy 1 0 1 (American Soc i e ty or Intro­ duction to Suciology)

and Sociology 240 (Social P roblems) . I f

students wish t o have a d d i l i o n :11 courses co nsid ered for t ransfer to either l he i r majo r o r m i n o r re q u i rements, t h e y m u s t tlrst meet w i t h Ih depa r t m ent chair. Th student s ho u l d b ring to this i nitia l m eeti ng the fol l owing:

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I . co l lege/t m tve r 'il y t ramcripts 2. co l l .:g e alalog. 3. course �yllabi and other s u p p o r t i n g m a te r i als

Social Work

Dedarcd majors/ m i n ors wi l l be re q u i re d to fill o u t one

petition

per tra nsfer (ou rse. HONORS TN SOCIOLOGY: De p a r t m t! n ta l honors are

a

rded

b y ote of the s o c i olo gy faculty to outstandin ' majo rs . Criteria

for election include a high grade p lint a erage, el ec tio n to Delta, the oc i ol o gy hOllor so c i ety, a n d e xcep t i nal pe rfC>rmancc i n enior �e m i n a r.

Al p h a Kappa

u o

PREREQU1S1TE N()TE: I () I

or consen t of i nst ru c t 00- and 400-level cou rses.

uisite to all

r are

prereq­

III

o

Course Offerings

z

For cou rse descriptiolls, visit the PL U catalog ollti/le at www.plu.edu/

c(

print/catalug.

>

1 0 1 American Society - A, S2 (4)

I!J o ....

240 Social Problems - A, 52 (4)

o

2% Social Stratifiwtion - S2 Prerequisite: 10 I ur 240 .

(4 )

u o

3 1 0 Jwna.ican Society - C, S 2

(4)

I n slructo r conse.nt is re uir d. 326 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice - 52

(4)

Prereq ujs ite: to I or c o n s e n t o f instructor. 330 The Family - 52

(4)

P re re qu i s i t e : 1 0 1 , PSYC

3 5, or co n s e o t or i nstructor.

336 Deviance - S2

Prer

qu isite : 1 0 1

(4) or conse n t o f instructor.

351 Sociology of Law - S2 ( 4 )

Prereq u i�ite: 1 0 1

r

onsent

u f i nstructor.

362 Pamilies in the Americas - A, S2 ( 4 )

[ 1 0 I , A TH 102

Prere q u isite : SO

or

con e n t of i nstructor.

ADMISSION TO THE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM: Studen t

( 1 -4)

seeki n g

387 5pecial l'opics in Sociology - S2

d

Prerequisite:

p a rt m e n ta l consent.

391 Sodology of Religion - 52 ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , one re l ig i on course, or consent o f instructor. 397 Research Method.s - 52

(4) Prerequisite: 1 0 I , j un i o r stat us, l} r on

4 1 3 Crime and Society - S2

ent

of instructor.

(4)

Prerequisite: [ 0 1 . 336, o r consent of inst ructor. 4 1 8 Advanced Data ApplicatioD.'1 - 52

( 2- 4 )

1 397 and STAT 23 1 , d p ar t m e n ta l co n . e n t .

Prerequ isi tes: S

(4) 10 I , o r consent of i n str uct o r.

440 Sex, Gender, and 50ciety - A, 52

Prerequisite: 1 0 I , WMST

462 Suicide - 52

(4)

Pre requi si t es : 1 0 1 a n d con ent o f i nstructor. 491 Independent Studies

( I -A)

Prerequ isi te : d e pa rt m e n t a l

consent.

495 Internship

(J -4)

Dep a r t men t;,! 'ons nl is req u i red.

496 Major Theories - S2 (4) Requi red for se n io r majors. Prerequisite: 1 6 hours o f soc i ol og y including 1 0 1 and 397, en ior tatus, declared major or minor. 499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR (4 )

Re q u ired for s en i o r majors. Prerequisites: 397, 496

senior tal lls; decl3red major o r m i nor.

1 02

P A C I F

i

e

Within a p ro gra m that is firmly based in the l i b ral arts, the social work major is designed to pre pare tudents for b eg i n n i ng p rofess i on ill social work p rac t i ce. Social work has bo th a h eav i ly multidisciplinary-based body of knowledge and its own cuntinu­ ously developing k n owl e dge base. T h e c o m plex i ty 0 so i a l i u > and social p robl em s t h a t confro n t t h e m Clde rn-J.ty social worker require this broad theoretical pers p ect i ve . Social workers a re i nvo lved in a reas that are i n fl u e n ced b political, eco n o m ic , social, psychological, and cultural fa C l( ) rs. To th a t end, t he pro­ gram st r e ss e s an understanding of social science th ories and methods. The curriculum provi des a fo undati n � r under 'land­ i ng the i n te ra c t i on o f individual, fa m i ly, and co mmu n i ty sys­ tems, as the basis for generalist practice. St ud e nts learn a mu l t i ­ method approach to social work practi that enables them t o address a wide range of individual, fa m i l y, gTOUp. and commu­ nity needs. S tu d e n ts en ha n c e the i r c o mm i t m e n t to inf rme d action to re m ove in eq u i t i es based on race, eth nici t y, c ul t u r . gende r , social class, sexual orien t a t i o n , disability, a nd age. The social work fa c u l t y place a h i gh value 011 the int gration of academic and experiential lea rn ing . The program provides field work expe r ie nce in com munity . c t t i n g.. So ial work m ajors have access to a r i ch variety of social sc:: r v ice agencie. in Tacoma a n d Pierce Coonty that p ro vi d e field learning s i tes . Students work with expe ri e n ced , car in g supervisors who help make the e p l a ce m en t s v al u ab le l ea rn i n g exp eriences . Students are p rep ared to work i n a r i e t y of set t in gs, in cl u di n g child welfare, hea l t h . mental health, corrections, aging, and com m u n i ty-based age n ­ cies. Social work majors should consult w i t h a depart men ta l advisor to plan t h ei r course of study. The acuity encou rage s t u den ts to t ak e advcllltage of l ea rn i n g oppo rt u nities that em p ha ­ size m u l t ic ul t ur a l awaren 5 5 and dive r S i ty. The social work program is a c c re d i t e d b the Cou ncil on Social Work Educ.ation.

L U T H E R A N

U

;

ST T 23 1 ;

N t V E R 5 I T V

the Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Work must first apply and be accep ted into the progra m, The social work prog r am welcomes d i vers i t y and invites interest and applications from per, ns who seek to pa rt i c i p a t e in a p ro fe 'ion committed to helping p eople . now and in the future. S t u dents may begin ta k i ng social work courses before b e i n g a d m i tted to the prOC1ram, but only admit ted students a re a l l Ol'.'ed to take 4 00-l e ve l tOill 'e'. Students w i l l be adm itted to the Social Wo r k Program for fa l l semester onl y. The p r ior i t), d a t e for a p p l i at i o n s is February 1 5 , though appl i ca t i o ns will be accepted until <wai lable po itiens ar fi l l e d , Enrollment i s competitive. Adm ission is determined by fac u l t y evaluation of lu de n t applications on t h e basis of the following criteria: I . t r a ns c ript that document the c o mp l e t io n of a t least 40 semester h o u rs of p rescribed cour e work w i t h a m i ni m um grade p oi n t average of 2 . 7 5 . In a d d i t ion , th l u de n t must show s u cces s fu l completion of the fol l ow i n g prerequ isites : Anthropology 1 02, l3 i o l o gy 1 1. t , PsychOlogy 1 0 1 , Soei I gy 1 0 1 , Writing 1 0 1 , an d the PLU malh en t r a nc e req u i remen t . ( No te : grades below C- do n o t tra nsfer) ; 2. a personal essay w h i c h add ress e s (a) i n t rest in s cial w o rk as a caree r, ( b ) li fe experiences shaping an i n terest in so c i a l work, (c) professional socia! work go a l s. and (d) an eval uation of personal strengths and limitations (details may bl: obtai ned from Social Work P rog ra m ) ; 3. a summary o f work a n d volunteer expe r ie n ce; 4. two letters of recommendation that eval uate and doc u ment the a pplicant's p o ten t i al for s u ccess in �oc i a l work ed u c a t ion and p ra c t ic e; 5. Wa s h i n gto n State Patrol C r i m i m ll Hi tory clearance ( p p l i ­ c a n L S w i t h a criminal record will be urge d to explore l h e i r prospects for reg iste r i ng as a counselor or l a t e r bei.ng licensed as a social worker with the State of Wa ' h i n gton);


6.

w r i tten agre m e n t

0

com p l y wit.h th . National Assoc i a ti on of

So ial Worke rs' Code of Ethics

7.

(a

copy of which

IS

available

from t h e S >ci al Work Pr gr m);

personal int el'vicw

( may be request e d ! .

Any fa lsification in the appl ica ti o n fo r a d m i sion i s growld fo r dismis a l frolll the progr;u n. Ap p l ica nts who

are

not a d m i tted

t

can didac y fo r the degree may rea p p l y w i t h o u t prej u d ic . Appli atiun materiab a re available d i rectly from t he :ocial Work Pro g ram in Xavier Hall, o r may b req uested by cal ling 253 . 53 .72')4.

'" � n '"

CONTIN UATION POLlCmS: To re main i n t h e p rogra m , a student m ust : 1 )

m a i n tai n

work courses and

a 2.75 grade p o i n t average in social

e r II grade p o i n t a verag e; and A of Ethics and Uni er ity Code or ' a nduct. u

2.:-0

0

2)

dem mtrate behavior whj h is con i. tent w i th the

Code

BACHELOR OF A RTS MAJOR: 36 se lll ester hours i n soda! work, in J u d i n g 2 75, 323, 3, 0, 38 - , 47 2, 473, 475, 476, 485, 486

1 2 sem es ter h o urs in . oci olo gy, i n luding 1 0 1 , 397 a n d 4 ei<'ct ive re di t s. A d d i t i o n a l requirements incl ude nthropol ogy 102 or 334, Biology I l l , f>:;ychol l;l Y 1 0 1 , S t atistic 2 3 1 ( m u t co mplete the sociolo y secr ion at PL ) . and

499;

Course Offerings For course descriptions, visit the PLU cawlog Ol"llille at W\V'w . p l u. ed u l print/cataloo. 1 0 1 l ntrodOctiOD to Social Wo rk - S2 A volu n tee r �xperience i n lb. e field is

:l

(4)

req u i red com ponent of

lhe ourse. 20 1 January on the. Hill - A, 52

(4)

,ta t i ., t ics.

(4)

The sta tisti

323 Social Work Practice l : Interviewing and

(4)

Mu t also compl ete lab. Prerequisites:

DepClrtment�

Vo lunteer experience is a requi red co m pon n t of the 385 Social Policy n: Social Policy Analysis - S2 Prerequisi te:

275.

(4)

c.ou rse.

(4)

( 2-4 )

472 Social Work Practice n: Families and Groups - S2

(4)

Prerequ isite s : 323, 380, 385. 473 Social Wo rk Practice m: Macropractice - S2 (4) Prerequisites:

2

, 3 80, 3 8 5 .

475 Field Experien� 1 ( 3 ) Prerequ i s i t e : 3 2 , 3RO, 385; t o b e taken co nc urren tl y with 472 and 485; req u i res «( I llS nt () i nstru tor. 476 Field Experience n ( 3 ) M u t he ta ke n c o n c u rre n t l y "ith

473 a n d 486.

485 Field Experien� Seminar I (

I)

Must he take n concurre n t ly with 475. 4 86 Field fu;perience Seminar n ( I )

J'vlust be taken co ncur ren t l )1 with 476. 49 1 Independent Studies ( 1-8) Prerequ isite: con enl o f i n st ru c t or. 499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR ( 4 ) Prerequisites: 472, and 475.

s

pwgram is of� red cooperatively b)' t h e

f Econom ics, Ma t h em at ics, Psy ch ology, a n d

Sociology. T h t: program is , d m i n i s tered hy

2 75, 3 R O .

380 Human Behavior and the Social EnvUonment - 52

387 Special Topics in Social Work

Statistics, a br' n b ()( ap p l i ed mat h e m a t i cs, stu die the III th o d · o logy for the collection and analysis of data (lnd the u.sc of data to make i n feren( s under c on di t i o ns of un ert i nty. Stat istics pl ays a fu n d a men lal role i n the social and n a t ura l scie nc(:'s, <1.: well a' in busi nes., i n dust ry, and government. Statist ical p racti i n clu de s: col lec tion, e x p loration, s U ll1ma r i ­ t:u tio n, and di s pl ay of data; design of ex pe rime nts a n d sa mp l i ng ur ey ; draw ing in fe rences a n d making decision based on data and a.ssessi llg u1e uncerulinlY o f s ud1 in k renc s nnd dcc i s i o s; a l ld t h e .:on t nlcri n of math ema t ic a l m dcls fo r a na lys is of ra ndom proc sses. Prob ability forms tbe co n c pt ua l fou ndation and mathcllla t ica l lu l lgu age for the i n fere nL i al aspects of

275 Social Policy I: H i tory of Social Welfare - S2 Interpersonal Helping - S2

Statistics 253. 55.7598

an

I n terdiscipli lMry

Statistics Co m m i t t ee headed by the ' ta t i s t ics Program d i rector, v/ ho i� app inted bl' he de.1n of the D i v i s i o n of Q ·al . ciences.

'he statistics minor is a d m i nistered by the De part ment or "lath maties. Students i n t ere ste d in a tatistics m i n r nre nco uraged to discuss cou r:e seJ Lilln \ i t h J statisti s fact.I 1 t y m em be r from any discipline. FACULTY: Selec ted facll l t ), fr" 111 the Depa rtme n ts of Economi " Mathematics, Psych o l ogy, and ocio log)'. STATISTICS MINOR: include Slat ist ics

m i n i m u m of

34 1 , at lea.<."t 8 h o ur

16

se m este r h o u rs to

fro m a m ong the lthcr

statistics co urses ( S t a t istics 231 a.nd Sta t i stics 24 1 (annot b o t h be co u n ted toward the m inor). ( n d C om p u t e r Sc i c'n e and Com p u ter E n g i n ee ri n g 1 44 or 220. The stat i st ics courses chosen fo r a statist ics m i n o r will vary with the i n terests of th", sl uden t . Some ty pical program. leading to a sta tistics m i n o r are l is ted b low; l\ com p uter science w urSt' m ll�t be added to each list.

inlere ted ill ma Ihematics, gmd/ w le o r pro/essio lllli work ill statistics, or 1111 IICI lIIlriu/ ca reer:

For slr/de71ts

Stati st i a 3 4 l , 342, .348 For s tude nts ililereSI 'd ill tlCIll lomics or il l/siness: Statisti -

23 1

or

24 1 ; 34 1 , Econ o m i cs 344

or St at i st i c� 34 1 ; .14 2 ,

44 Por studel/ts il l taeS led it1 olher social sci rI e,$: S w t i s t ics 23 1 or 24 1 ; 34 1 ; ECOIIO Ill i s 344 or Stat ist ics 2 3 1 ( P,yc h o l og y ,Lude nts shou l d lak designated sec t i o n s u f Statistics 2 J I . ) For HI/ climes illtcrt'sled il l Illltumi , cif/tce ': Statistic 34 1 , 342, .148 or Stat istic. 2 3 1 or 24 1 , 3 4 1 . 34R Econo mics

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1. Women' wdies 101 In t ro d u c t i on to Women's S t u d i es ( 4 ) 2 . Program Core Courses ( 1 6 ho urs) Stud n ts choose four courses from the fol lowi ng progr a m core courses that introduce \-Vomen's tu d i es in res p ect i ve d i scipline.. Selection mu s t be from two different divisions or schools. Anthro pology 350 Wo men a n d Men in Wo r ld u l tures - C, S I (4) Conun u nication 334 Gender and Communication - A (4) English 231 Wo m en's L i t.erature - A, LT (4) En g l i s h 34 1 Fem i nist Approa hes to Literature - A. LT (4) H istory 359 History of \Vomen in the United State -

Course Offerings For course tlescriptiOT , visit the PLU cata log ollline at www. p lu.ed u /

print!catalog. 23 1 Introductory Statistic - M R (4)

Students should r g i s ter for the lab correspondillg to their lecture section. M a y not be taken for credit after 341 h as been taken.

241 Applied Statistics for Scientists - MR. NS ( 4 ) P re re qu i itt': M n'I 140 or 1 28 . 341 Introduction 1 0 Mathematical Statistics - M R ( 4 ) re req u i si te : tvLATH 1 52.

A. S I (4)

342 Probability and Statistical Theory - MR (4)

P r requ isi te : MATH/STAT 34 1 .

343 Operations Research - !\om. ( 2 ) Prerequi site: 2 3 1 or equivalent. 344 Econometrics - MR ( 4 ) Pr req uisite: 23 1 .

348 Applied Regression and Analysis and ANOVA - M R (4) Prerequisite: 34 1 or co n s e n t o f instr uctor.

491 Independent Studies - M R ( 1 -4) 500 Applied Statistical Analysis (4 )

Women's Studies 2 5 3 .5 3 5 .7296

( fall, J a nuary t e rm )

2 5 3 . 5 3 5.72 1 3 (spring ) wlvw. plll.edu/- lVomerzstrl

Shl d i es i� a mu ltidisciplinary program t h a t n r iches the traditionul l iberal ,\[ s curriculum by add i ng ne� perspectiv s o n women's Jiv and acco mplishments. Based on the study of women in cult ure, s ciety, and h i 'r )ry, the progmm i n co rpo ra tes gende r into other bas i c catego ri es of a n a lys i in l u d i n g t h e dyna m i of social hange, the creati( n and tran mi .j n of culture and the �Irts, the l ega cy and cultural construction of our p hysic al and i n tellectual charucterisli a n d the o rig i n s a n d nature llf cu r ren t theories <1I1d social i ss u es . Vv. me-n's S t u d i e s b roade n s the ed u ca t ion lf both male and female s tud en ts and enhances their areer p re p ar a t i o n and p ro fes s i o n al opportunities wherever rh r is n ed to understand wom e n and the new role

Wome n'

th.at they play ill society. FACUI:I'Y: Wom n's S t u d ie. Exewtive Com mitt

for

e:

Kraig. Chair

all anri Jatluary term; lcKenna, lIai r or Spring; Breazeale. hre n ha u s , Hames, M iranda, R usse l . "rre lstad, Yer i a n .

not required.

MAJOR: The Womcn\ Stlldie� maior is a m ultid iscipl i n a ry and i n terd i sciplinary complementary major. onferral of a bacca l au ­ rea t e degree w i th a maj( r in 'v o m e n's Studies requires wmpl e ­ tion 0 a secon d maj o r from any d iscipline in the unl ersity. Student are encoura g ed to d ec la re both m aj o rs s i m u l t a n e o u sly and to plan a program aware 0 th possibil ities D r applying i nd iv i d u al courses to both majors. Tbe Women's Stud i es maj o r l I ow a p pl ica t i o n of co u rses from rhe sewod m aj o r and for general u niversity req u i re me n t ( ore I and Core Il) t o the Women's St udies major. 36 s emes t e r hours, i ncl u d i n g vVumen'. Studies 1 0 1 and con ­ current e n ro l lm nt i n Women's tudies 490 a n d 49 1 ( 8 hours); four our. ' · from the pproved list o f program core courses fro m two d i ffe re n t di i s i o n s or schools ( J 6 h ou rs ) ; two e l ec t ive courses from two differ nt divi . io ns or school (8 h o u rs ) ; one serv ice learning course (4 hours). S t u de n ts a re required to complete a m inimum of fou r u p p e r div ision courses III the prog ram core and electives.

1 04

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International Core 231 Gen der, S ex u al i ty, and Culture ­ A, I 2 (4) I n t e m at i o n al Core 232 .op ics il G en d e r - 1 2 (4) ( p e n d i ng a p p ro va l o f top ic) P h i l o so ph y 220 Women and P h i losophy - A, PH ( 4 ) P hys i cal Education 3 1 5 Bod), I m a ge - ( 4 ) Ps yc ho log y 4 7 4 Psychology of "'lomen - A, S2 (4) R Iigion 368 Femin ist and Wom ni t Th e ol ogi es - A, R2 (4) Soc i olog y 440 Se,-, Gender, and S o c ie t y - 1\, S2 (4) 3 . Electil1es (8 hours) Students choose two cou rs�' from the o l l o w i n g options. Se l ec tions m u s t be trom two di ffeTent d ivisions or schools. a.. Add i t i o n a l cou rses fro m th p rogram core courses. b. Courses from an approved list p u b li s he d in the class schedule. c. Courses fro m any d i sc i p li n e for which part of Ihe course requirements can be fi.dfi l l ed with a research paper on women or wo me n 's i � ue . This allow. the i n tegra t i on of Women's S t u d ie s pe rspectives i n to cour 'e, that are not explicitly or e n t i rel y tructured around those perspectives. Consent of the i n structor is required. Students should con s ul t the Women's Studies chair before en ro l l i ng for the c o urse and are req u i red to submit the yllabus, research p a pe r, a n d o t h e r re le vant a ss ig n men ts to the 'Women's Studies Executive C o m m i t tee for ap p r o va l upon co mpl e t io n o f th e co urs e. 4. Service Learning/Internship (4 hours) Students must enroll for e i ther a s e r v i c e learning course in co o p erat io n w i th th e enter for Public S e r v i ce or an in ter n ­ ship through Women's S t ud i e s and Cooperative Education. I n te rn s h i p s requ i r d for the �econd majOl- m a y be app L ied to the Women's Stud ies maj or. I n t e rn s hi p s should be a ppro ved by the chair of Women's Stud ies. When t h i s course is sc h e d ­ uled in the semester con ti n uous with the semester in which students enroll fo r Wo m e n 's Studies 4 9 1 i499, o n e- ye a r service learning p lace m en ts or i n t e rn sh i ps may be arranged, but a re

Y

5. Capstone Experience ( 4 hour s ) : vVomen'� Studies 499 Seminar in Wo m en 's tudies (2 h o urs) and \Nomen's St u d i es 49 1 I ndependent S t u di e s (2 hours) M aj ors are re q u i red in their final semester of course work to enroll concurrently for both Women's Studies 49 1 and 499. M aj o rs may enroll fo r Women's Studie 491 ( I n dependent Study) with e i th e r the instructor for Women's S tudies 499 (Seminar i n omen's Studies) or a fa c u l t y member w h ose area of x p e r t i s e qualifies her or h i m as a consultant for the research p roj ect or i n te r n s h ip planned for Women's Studies 499. Re q u est. fo r credit toward the Women's Studies m aj o r and mi n o r from transfer co u rs e s m u s t be app roved b y the Wo men's Studies Exec u tive Commi ttee. Su b m i t syllabus and course as­ s ig n m e n ts to the Women's Studies chair. At least 1 7 h ou rs of the maj o r and 10 hour of t h e m i n o r must be completed at PLU.


MINOR: 20 semester h o u r s , i n clu d i n g one Women', Studies core course ( 4 h o u r s ) , two program core c ou rse s (8 h o u r s ) from depa r t m e n t s in d i fferent d iv is i on s or schools; and two elective courses

(8 bours)

froIll two d i fferent d ivisions or schools.

1. Womel1's ttldies Core COllrse (required - 4 /z o ll rs) ",,ra men', t ud i es 1 0 1 I n t roduction to Women's Stud ies ( 4 ) 2. Program Core COl/ rses (8 h o u rs) Students choose two courses from the following program core courses which i n lToduc women's s t u d i es in respe c ti ve disciplines. Selections must be from two different divisions or

schools: A n t h ropology 3 50 Women a n d M n i n Wo rl d Cultu res

- C, S I (4 )

Com Ill u n i ca t i o n

3 3 4 Gend.er a n d Com m u n i c a t i o n - A ( 4 )

EngIish 2 3 2 Women's Li terature - A , LT ( 4 ) E n g l i sh 34 1 Fem i n i s t p p roa c h es t o L i terat u re - A , LT (4) History 3 5 9 H i story of WoIII cn i n t h e U n i ted Sta tes

- A, S I ( 4 )

Internationa.l Core 23 1 Gender, Sexuali ty, a n d Culture - A, 12 (4 In ternational Core 2 3 2 . o p i es in e n d e r (4) - 12 (pending a p p roval of topic) Ph ilosophy

220 Women a n d Ph ilosophy - A, PH (4)

Physical Educ a t i o n 3 1 5 Body I m a ge - A

(4)

P ychology 4 7 4 Psychology o( Womeu - A, S2 (4) Religion 3 6 8 Fem i n i s t and Woman ist The()iogies - A, R2 (4) Sociology 440 Sex, Gen d e r, and , ociety - A, S2 ( 4 )

3. Elective Cou rses ( 8 h o u rs)

Stude n ts choose two course from the following o p t io n s . Selections must be from t w o d i ffere n t d ivisions o r sch ools. a.

b.

Additional course from t he program core courses. Cour . from an approved l ist pu bl i shed in the class

Writing For coure descrip tiorzs, I'isit the PLU catalog a l lline fit www.plu.edu/ print/catalog.

99 Bask Writing Skills ( 2 )

Avai labl e throu g h M iddle College o n l y.

1 0 1 Inquiry Seminar : Writing - FW, WR ( 4 ) See

"cHernl Ulliversity Requiremen ts, The First-yea r Experie/lce.

201, 202 Writing Seminars for International Students - WR (4, 4 )

schedule. c.

Courses from any d isci p l i n e fo r which part of the course requ i re m e n ts can be fulfi l l e d with a research paper on women or women's issues. T h i s a l l ows t h e i n tegrat ion of Women's S t u d ies pe rspect ives into courses that are not expl i citly or e n t i rely structured a ro u n d those perspect ives.

Consent of i n s t ructor is re q u i re d . Students s h o u l d con ult

the Wo men's S t u d ies c h a i r p r io r to e n rolling fo r the co u rse to subm i t the �yllabus, research paper, and other relevant a.�signments to the Women's Studies

and are required

Executive Com m i t tee fo r ap p ro val upon

completion of the

course.

Course Offerings For course de5cription�, visit tilt! PLV catalog online at www.plu.edu/ p r int/ cat al og .

1 0 1 Introduction to W men's Studies - A

(4)

49 1 Independent Studies: Undergraduate Readings ( 1 -4 ) 4 99 Capstone: Seminar in Women's Studies - SR ( 2 )

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VI ...

G rad uate Stu d i es

VI

Thi 'ecL ion contains i n formation about Pacific Lutheran

ad m i n i s t r a t ors, ,dl l l (.1 nursc� , c li n i cal

Uni ersity graduate programs. Course de, criptiolls for gTaduatt! cour c arc included in the u n dergraduate section of the catalog within the specifil: department or ·choo \ .

Paci fic LU l h er<ln Lnl vecl t y's gra du ate pro gra ms otter !:xcclle l l'( in ad 'anced pro� s i ontl l edu catio n w i t h i n a Icl ng- l o n d l n g l i beral ar ts trad i t i o n in which the mosl (U I dam�' tal hdil �nge fu r l>llticl)' a n d i ndiddual val \l':� are exami ned . j w£ter ' � degre e amlicLltes in husin 55 t.'dll(iltioll, marriage , flU r<l l lily I lwra py, <111,1 n u r i ng cho o ,e to study at PlU 10 i n er as.: thei r u nucrstlll1d ­ i n g ,Il1U (ompele n.::e in th eor '. rt!sl'<lrch, and p r,lct i<.. e. Th tv gil on to b Q i l le th ough t l ul a n d effective I 'adns ill the i r w rn m u n i t ics. Man y a t att racte d tv PlL b, the oppor w n i t ) LO slUd�' in unll ' al l y do e an d � uppl1r tive workrng reia t i o n$ h l pS with aC L omplished fu l l - t i m e I h D facul t y m , o !:X(t'l'ti nn .I J p lntt', sional prao ! t i m 'rs . The Offi ce of raduatc !>tudi�. a � part of t he Office of the Pr \lOsl . cu urdi nale, the wor k or lht.' �(h() ,Is that rrov i d , !;{fO d U,l lL'-l e d i llstTu tion.

worki ng ba(kgrou nd� ar e ncoura g ed tll appl\' The pnl"ram is ilccr eui tt'U \.1) MeS lnt 'rnational-fhe A.�so ci:Jl l ()J1 to d,,:t[lcC C )I leg iate SLhools ot fi lhjness .

The Mastu of Mts in Education meets t he needs of educ d tors by ll f fer ing five cone ntratio n�: I . The Clw;goom Terlciring concentration wI',des ,ldvoll I 'ed

prqJ.lra tion ill ,ubj ed matter and prufeS.'Sl( .I\.ll ed u cati()n for c l em nta r y nnd SCLOntiJry iassroon t ach�r�. 2 . bitt ca llollr l l A d 711 i l't is l nlc i o rl is dc�igncd to prepare proic ion­ .l ls to b 'come elcme Jl ta r y and secoI 1J,\ .' S l o ol prin c ipal� and rrogra m admi n i stra tors. he degree is o pen to q U <ll ifi ed pro­ f'��ion.ili no! t'eki ng princi). ill's a.:dent ial -, a� \\'el l , 3 . The Litl!rac), &location ( )1l cen t rat i on prcl'are� edU(.lwfS to eJlc oura g� l iterac y acqu isitIon a l l d devdopment J Pp mp rt att!

cds a ] i uto! re�t5. Ch il drtn's I itt!rat ure, infurrn<l t l o n 1 i Tt'l-a(y, and tec h nol og} are mph asil, >d th l ollgbllut 4. ,'>J1f!cin/ Erlllctll iOIl 'iceks to 1':' and the qu.al i fi a t io ns o r persons who serve . p ci a l- nc!:d ' ch i ld l'':ll .md )'(\ulh in a vari I)' ,If t:d ucali(l n,l! or rehab ili tative M'tt ings, i nd u d i ng s<.:I [-c(jntai n�cl and rCS()LIrC r o o m tt'ach i ng. speci al cdllC ti�ln con.� ul tl ng !lnd s u p p or t pe rsol1neL and coordi n ation ( 11 1)\ ulTe red i n 2[)()�2( J03 ) . n

.s . j l1e Dt!ginll itlg Cer( ifimt ioll (or Re iricHCyJ is de�igned til rrepJ. qU'l l i ficd teachers with en dorsem Ilts in -Ii ( lemt'nt.H)' ,Juc.ltion) and -\- 1 2 ( S ubJ.:� t l\"lItt'r Sp"' l fk ) .

he Master of Sdencc in Nursing offers a n integralt:d "pp roarh knOWl edge Jlld c l i nic.1 1 c(lTTlpt!tenclr:s e��en f bl to advance�l nllThlllg pradicc, by o fferi ng tW() WJKclit ratiOl \s: I . Th ' Nurse l'mctitrV/l 'f" (o n entrJl io n prepa res n u rses to he primary are provi c!'s. S\ bsequent t( nationJ i I.el' t i lica lion graduate s a rc awarded A R I\; Y l icens ure n � I'a m i l), Nu r� \. Pr.\(.li l illner� I ho. e. . c )pe of r ;luiee illd llde� prevt'n l i ve, pi motlOl1al, d iag nos t ic , and pres<. ri pt ivc '':I'\li e... in pri rnJ r y ,- <l rt! �c:t li flgS.

to

2. rhe Celr e ellf(i lIIco mes lV[IIf/ ngl'" conc<.:nt rlltion pr.:pares : 1 \11 ) S fo adv' nced n ll l � i l l g p rac t i ce in 3 varit'l l' of po siti un wi t h i n e mergi ng Illan agt'd healul c a re , 't uel"nt� f()�ul> on ,�e manugt' ment and a skill �et that a ssures the cli ni (;a. i and m'lIla �L'rin l wml e enct.' nee ded to fU lll;t i on as lIt il i za t ion rev iew c(') ordin:t tors, ri�k man ager :, nurse \:dL!Catu r�. nurlie

p

". e l F I C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

f

T

.11I c! dir,icol competence

" i n a syste ms ap p roach to fa mi! ' tl I e rapy with a r i gorous pra'ti c u m component. 'he prog:mrll is .Ie redl teJ by the Comm i��ion on Accred itation fOi \1.lrr iage and Pa m il )' Th erap y dllcation , tile me ncan As soc i a t i o n t(:Jr :vl ar tiage and Family Thera py.

Admission

�lpl icari ollS from students

yid l i ce lit" �C ho"bt i c abil i l and dem o n ­ to be .K.:epted fo r adlll i�� i() n . Thc dea n \ f graduate �t u d i es rebcrves th right to aJm i t , de ny, or wi thdraw ild rn is�il n for ally applil'il rIt!student based o n an ind ividual\ meeting t h e.�e criteria. Adm i.s io ll decision: art made by the dean 01 graduc te . tudie . upon ca nts

m,lna gerial effec ti ve ness ot' l eaders in b u s i n e,>" go\'emn �n l, a n d

1 06

n urse

who ex h ib .t capadt ie for success at the graJuate leveL Appli­

the

/lOn 'r "fit Mg,1 n iZclt ions. J i ldi 'iduaJs o f ji l l "ducat i"na l <lnd

10 sl uden ts'

Of

The Master of Arts (Marriage and Family Therapy) i s dr:si 'nc:d to develop profe�sill n,\1 skill

Pacitic Lu th eran Un i ve rsi tv wel come 'c,

.:cial ists,

2 5 3 , :; 3 .s . 7 1 5 1 S()().2 74.6 75H IVII·W.pl: I. cd/1/-,llimi

MASTER'S DEGRF.ES OFFERED The Master of Business Administration prllgr.l ITI enhat!

adm i n 1st ra tOI'�. For i".jimll<ltioll Oil Ell l r}'-'L"!" { MS," "rcJgr.�m, ref!?]' III MSI , 't:qllCi/ce for IIml-lUlrsillg HoliK' !! at/,ll ites. "' n mlormlUiQII Oli tire l{i'v 1 0 M::'i I'nlgriltll, rcf�'r In Ihe /I,·l S. !->e<l uell ce for l. iccllseJ R�gi 'l�teJ Nurse� ill ihe Nursinb �(' li(17J (IJ tltL"i Clllll it)X'

Y

must

pres nt

st ra t e quahties of IIOd d a ra� tcr i n !Hder

re com men dat i o n br the t:om rniUe . resp()n�ible for graduate a d m ission i n ach academic u n it. j pplications fo r admission are e a[uated w i t h o ul regard to r:1-C, col r, creed, cl igion, gende r, nat i nal o ri g i n , age, mental Of physical disabili ty, melri tal ,tJtU),

or

�ex.ual

ri n talion ,

tudenl �.:!:kin g admJ:': ion tLl an y gr<l du<ltc program lTIU 't

h uld a

ha

hel ot', degrc _ rrum . regiClna l l y accred ited college

or

u ll i ver;i ry. A cUlTIulatlve undergraduatc grade p o in t ave�ge uf at i . �t 3.n ( 0 11 a 4.0 scale) i� req uired for admission as a regu lar �tll tus grad u ute stud.:n t.

hose s t ude n t s with , n <ll'er,lge of less

thall 3 .0 mJ .. be granted prov iSIOnal SWtllS and wi!! not be

LOnsldl'reJ hr adn l i. �i,�n t o regu l.tr . tah.l 5 un til thL')' have dem o nbl rareo thelT' a bI l i t y to do gradu<ltc work b)f c o m pleting m i n i m u m of R semeSter I l llllfS III

w

rk W i t h

a

a

cumulatiye g rade

poi nt JveraKe or at lea.�t 3 .0.

At the m i n i m u m , ali "ppkation el'a l u.ations a r e based on sch (\ la.� t lc qll I i tltation - , a sta t ml!nt of profe sional g(lii\b, Ie rer OI I·c.:;ommendat lOl l, a n d preparaLi nn ill the prop o:cd fi e l d of �hJd}' ,'ome gr,tJl/ ate program - ma)' req uin.: addi tional evidence fo r adl1l i�s i(j1 1 including, hut not l i m i t 'J 1 o, autobiographical :.t, tcmcn (S , pCI' 'on al i tcrvi ews, standa rdized tests, o r other vidence (If protcs ional aC(()flIpl ishment Listi ng ' fO f each program detai l thest: ,Idditillllal a d m iss ion requirements . Studen t s a ppl)' i ng fo r acirn i. s i o n te graduate st ud)' must �\J b m i t a completed ap p ii': ati ol1 l()fm . a statement 0 goals, a resume, two lette rs of r COlll.l1lel dation, and a Ilot l - rtfulldable ;tppl ica t i un fee of :5 35.00 , App iicr1l11s I I I l 1 I request fr " m l'llt'h previolls/y nllellded insti l L/l iOIl of higher teaming (Url Jcrgm ril lMc l iIul graduate) rm llfJicill/ IrImsctipt to be sell I by the iIJst1Cliriol1 di rectl), 10 the Of,fice 0(. Itlmi 'siom at PI.U. Reter to in d iVldu. d p rograms for appiiGltion deaellines_ Applit:ati HI packets are dl"l ilable hc>m the Off; I' of Ad n1l&­ sions. In summar y, the fol l o w i n g items Illust be on file in the Office \,f dmission, bt!li,r , 1 applica n l w i l l be ((I n. ide red fo r , d m i s�ion:


I The Lom I�tetl ap p l i ca ti o n form. ., statement or professional and educa tional goals. 3. resum�. 4. The 35.00 n o n - r t!l'u ndable l ' ppJic<ltion fee. 5 . -\n official tra n sLnpt from each i m tl t u t i o n o f h ig he r lea rn i n g a tte nded ,\11 \ r,lnscript� m u s t he! Sl'nt di reclly to the ffice ot Adm i ssi ns at PLL from t he in stitu t io n r v i d i ng the l ranscrrp t .

..,. 1\V() Idler, <If r I

"( HL

for all i l 1 ternJltlo nal studen ts ( 'ec intema­

tional ,t uci("nt secl il111 fiH det a i l s ) .

8. • •

dditional ly, spec i fic progra ms requ ire the following: M<I�lcr \)f B u s i n ess Ad m i n istration: GMAT score. M.aSler f Art� in Educatiun: MAT or RE score; personal Inte rview with program director Master f Arb i n Sodal Scie ces (i\fa rri.lge and Fam i l y '· herapv) . Aut biographical statemen t; p e rso n a l i ntervlt:w

((Ir finCl l bt� , ·

M aster vI' Science in 'ur ing: G lU\ with p mgr ..un dJTector.

time.

:til

CHANGE OF STUDENT

score;

p erso n al i n te

ew

Pl ease contact t h� COli sdi ng and Testing Office at 25.3.5 �5 . 72 06 for m !�l rm,llion \)1\ the GM A T, the MAT, and the G R r. Al l records becume pa rt of the applicant's official file and can be neither ret u f 11f'<:\ n or d uplicat ed for any purpose. An oft� r of adm ission is g()od for o ne year ill al! progra ms ex,'erl I'll I' M'lr rlagc and P mil� Therap)', Ia ter of Ar t i n

tions have been met: s,ltisfuctorv fulfil l ment oj COlU'se ddkit'n­

des; satisfclclory completion o f

work wi th

a

"·\.Irk rur CIne . ar after the semester for which Ihey were must reapply.

cum ulative grade point a ver,lge o f 3.0 or h igher,

c o m pit>t io l

efore admission to a i\raciu.I\( pm!j,r.lm. it is advisabk for an a pp li ca n t t sp eak w i th t il ..: progran d i tctw r. In certain programs, a p e r so na int rvicw I S a rccl ulro:mcn l "5 parr of the a ppl icatio n process. See specific pro g r,l nt r\.'q ui rcmenl ' for d tails. CLASSIFlCATION OF STUDENTS: A student may be ad mi tt ed to a

gnduate p n)g ra m with regul a r or pro isional t ud e n t status,

and may enrol l as a full-time or half-rime student.

Regular - Th(lse t den ts <lpproved u nreservedly for admi "ion to gnll.l uut..: st d re granted regular tatus. An u n der, ad u ­ atc �raJt! poi nt avera ge of 3.0 or h igher is requ i d for reg ul ar ' ta t u " Pl'tlVisi(Jlltli - I n s o m e prngrams, newly admitted �ludents are a�bigned prl)vbiollal stiltu Ilntil c rtain progr, m prerl"q uisites have been met. Sludcrlt'o w h() fdii ttl quali fy f< r r�g u l r s ta t u s because of gra d e point averagt: or lack of completion of 5pcdlic pn:r<!l.l tllS i teo; may e granted pwvisiona l status. NOTE: Students v l1() 11<W applied fo r gmduat e slh ool before ·I.mpl t i n g their u n de rg raduate work may be ad m i tte d as r.:gular or pro i-lOnal statu:. stud ent s with the cond ition t h at ,ynrk cannot begi n u n t il they have s Ul ce �s ful l y (ompleted their

ba helor's degree a nd l)ffi ial transcripts with the degree have heen rece i wd y tht: Offi(e of Graduate tudies. l mo:rnational s t lldent� ladcing ; dl'quatl' En ish skills will not be admitted co ndition.!lly.

NrJll- fII a l ricu/meti - SlUl.lenls h ol di ng the bachdor's uegree who w i:h t o p ur lie co ur e work with no intention of qualifying tor an .hlvanced degr e al PLU are da fiified as n U I l - matr i L u lated st ud en ts . A non-matriculaled student may lake a maxi mum of 9 seme ter hour of 500-level courses. A nonmlltriculled student may take an wllimited number of con t inuing educ.'\tion hours. full- tim.' - f , fil(.lLw t "rodents enrolled for 8 or more semester hou rs in IJ I I or sp ri ng 'eIllester are co n sidered ful l-ti me. HalF time? - Cir.l lluate �tu ent I!Tl rolied for at least 4 but less than

,un pic

» o c: » -I m V'I

-f c: o m III

time for visa

and �)tht:'r Jepartuft.; pruced ure , i n t , n1;') t io n a l appJi'-an

bould have th�lr application and all support ing dncumenLs on file i n the Office of ' d m iss i o ns n o less t h l , n fou r nw n ths before n proposed da te of e n tr y , Thl' tpl l " w i ng d,)( u m e n t, are n C.:.t:'is,ltJ' HEFORE an a pp lica t i o n can be p!'()cc�s\;'d , l . for mal a pplica tion for u dm ission and st:lll.:ment 'If go.!l s w ith th

2.

').3 5 .00 non-refun d,lble Jp plica ti()fl fcc

(which

cannot be

waived for any redson ) .

Official tranSL ipLS w i t h I: ngl i sh t ran �la l i o n [r\)1T\ a,h college or u niversity attended in the Un i ted C;h\ t��, h

me

C( l l l ll tr v,

1 1 transcripts tnu!\l b� �ent directly t. ) t h

oth er country,

Office of Admissions at PL

INTERVIEWING OF APPLICANTS:

or

st, tus w i l l be changed

INTHRNATfONAL STUDENTS: To allow

admitted

Policies and Standards

8 em ·�ter bl)ut� of grad uate

f d<'part l11en l .J1 r sch( 01 rcqu i re lll c: n t�. from lIon mtltT/Clllated to regu/arlprov;siolwi n ft�r th�' nlln-matnc u hllt:d �lud(' 1 t co m p l': les tl I.' n orm a l ,lppl ica ulln pr on'ss '1 n d is J.o;ep ted i n to a regular d egre e pIogram . Credit earned d u ring nOll - matriculated cla�sifica.tion m<ly count low.;Jrd a gra tual dcg rL"e, b u t " Ill ), a ' [(:com me n ded b\' the fa c u lt y ,Idvisory comrnit tee JIlU app roved by th\! dea n of gro.l d uate studies after t h e t u d nt h J S be<.' [1 aJmilt d t a degr p rogram . TO such c r d i l (.\n be cou nled that carries ,'I. grade l owe r than H - , I n a l l cases , .1 le tte r illdicat l Tlg ch ange ohtatu will be f,lrwardetl to the s t uden t , with a. P)' t o the advi�or and/or J mgr.!1ll director. S t u dent

EJuc.llinn w i th I n i t iaL Cert ifica tion, and Educati nal Adminis­ tration. Admitted �t ud ents who have not enrolled i n a ny course

TATUS; Student tat u s will b

changed from prOl'lsional tu rcgUlclT ,liLcr the following cond i ­

satisf,lct ry

c()In mendations.

tcSI ' cores

8 �e mest r hours in fall or �pri ns scmest r are co nsidered h a l f­

o-r

from t h e i n stit u t ion pr 'iding

the tra nscript.

3. Two letler� of

fec

mmcndati, n fro m 5dlt)ol llffi'-i.1l� or

pt>rsons of r wgni7ed �ta l\din " A p pl ica n ts transferri rlg from a U.S. co l l e ge or uDlvers l t)' shuuld reques t theu i nlernatJon,l l

s t u d e n t a dv isor

to

�end

a

re l:Om me fi dat i o n .

4. DemollSt rated pronci nev in the L.nglish language t h rough almin i n g a m ini' 1lI 1ll 5(('Jr/: of :! 1 'l Oll the wmpute rized Test of Engl ish as a Foreign ' nguage l TOEF L ) , CU l1d itilln,11 accepran x w i l l not be granted for ! tern a tlO n al students lacking a dequate Eng l ish lanbuage kill s. S l lld� t s \ 'ith J ba ch eil .l r ·s deb'Tce fr m an Engl ish -�peaking college or uni\t'�it)' an� not requ ire to <Ike the ro FL. . 5. Official � res {rum sp 'dli tt 'ts a� r lJu i red fo r certain programs or lOncentration . See mdi, idu.u master s prn({ rams for fu rth e r i n ti rmat ion. I nterna lio nal slud"'l1� a r e required

able

$300.00 tldv' n(e paym

This p aym e n l

h

loubmit a r"'n - r eti.l Ild­

nt folh'w i n g an offer of adl11 j�silln.

ls tht' sl Uden t 's acknowledgment uf accep tance and is credited l\l the stud�nt\ .K(O un t It b <I 1'pl i.:d tl m;t I <'xpcn of the first term of enrollmenl. An 1 - 2 0 form ( Certificale ,)f hligi b i li t y for NOIl- i mm igl :J llt Stlldc:n t Stal�) iii ill b i �ued onl" ( Iter all donllnt' nt� h. w been ' received, t he a p plication has been rev iewl'd , the student h�s been offered admis. iun a n d .IC "t'pred, a n- r t i li -al i In III fU1af1l;r:!� h al been rece ived , and the $300.00 ad vanced payme n t has b.:en received. �ertificati()n from hanks and emha:.sie� � pt'm1 issibl e. A financial , tatclll':lI l form i" a v a i la b le u n t h e ' h Ilr from th' ( ffiee of Ad m i ssio n s upon req llt:s t. he ! -2 0 lOT m should be t aken to tbe .S. onsulalt: 'hen requ sling a i:.a It c me to the U n i ted Stntes for a graduale program . I 20 fo nns i �s ue d by the Office of Gradu.l t.: Studlt:� Mil for master' Jt' n:c progrd m� only and n ot f)] i nll! l1 �i t: En"l J,h language tud)'. [nternatioll .1 1 stu d e n ts a rc rl!quired y nnrn l gr<ltlOn regu l a­ tiuno to I:nroll a� fu l l -ti ml: �tuue n ts (a m i n i m u m o f 8 cr dit hours per , erne, ter). Tht·y are .llst> requ ired to submi t the ap propr iate m ed i c a l fO J1l) . t lhe un i versity " Heal tl ervice. St ude n t may ,1 1 0 b r 'guired 1 ( 1 hav<' d ph . sical exam.

P

A

C

!

F

i

e

L V T H E R A N

U N I V � II 5 I T Y

107


B�C re enrolling for dasst!� , :\11 international s tud<:: n t� a re w Q :::l I­ VI

requ ir.:d to have health and m e d i ca l i n s u ra flce, wh ic h i · obtained t h m ugh the un iver�ity after ar n v'al un Cdm p s. I nrcrn, lt i on . I gr a d ua te stud�n� lUust 31

till11 al Student

' e r v i es

() r<'pl

rl

to I ntern;1 -

at 2 53_53 5. 1 794 , upon regi:n-ati o n for

ate

�tlldent \VI i i he

wi ll l.:hair the st udent 's to

a d v i sor y commi ttee . Student.'> are meet with their advi�ors early in t h ei r p rograms.

mum of 3 2 se mes te r hours i requi re d. I n d i l. i d u a l p rogram: may re q u i re lUore than the m ini mum n LL mlwr of �eIJ1 ester h() llr�, depending upon prim prepar�l t i o n <lnt! spe,i fi � deg ree r..q l l i re­ menb. Any prerequis i te cour�es tal'en d ur ing lhe graduate prngr, m ' hal l not COllllt towa rd fll l Jll ment uf gradu a le degree req ui rements.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT: Graduate work from �ulO ther in�litu­ liun rna} h e accepted fo r tran. ft'r Ll pon petition b y t h

st u de n t

a lld a pp r oval by the program di rcdor. Eight �ell1es lcr hour� ma}'

be t ransferable t" fI 3 2 -semOit.:r- h o u r progra m . I n degree progml1lS requ · r in g vor k beyonJ 3 2 l1e nl l'�te r hOll r" more than 8 semester hours ma_y be l ra n s rred_ In a n y ca e, the s t ud e n l must c o m pl et e at lea i 24 se meste r h ou rs ot' the deg ree program at Pdci fi c Lut h eran niversit),TIME LIM IT: All requireme n ts fo r the master's d egree , incl ud i ng credi t eJ.m d before admission , !nust be wm plet<!d wi t h i n sew n years. Th e seve n -year limit cuve rs a l i CQtlr5 s appli ed to lhe mn tel ' - degree, credi t ran ·ter red from a nother i nst i t ut i o n, compr hensiVt: exa m i nat ion�, r sl'arch, . nd flnai n r,ll l!xam ind ­ tion . The seven-year limit begins w i th b gin n ing date of th� tiT�t COlU�' applicablt: t o the graduate degree. ( ee C/l 'o Sal l,factnry Pro gre�s Policy.)

gra d llate students !Ire req u i red

c

COURSES TAKEN ON A PASS-PAI L BASIS: If a gr ad uat e student's program i ndudes a cllurse wherl! sl lden l m,I �· elcct , Jet ter grade or the PJs�- fa il opt HJn , graduate stude nts must opt for th letter grade. COURSES ACCEPTABLE FOR GRADUATE CREDIT: Al l 500n u mbered courses described in this catal.. are lirad uate lev!:' L in SO Int:- gr J ate programs, a l i m i t e d n u m ber o f 300- leve l an 400·It!vel courses may be accep ted for gmd uate <.: rt'dit. ,-Set::. D�gree alld Co urse Offrr mg;;. fo r gratlualc C O l l I e d..:" n ptll.lTIs. ) A max i mlilll of � semest�r ho urs of co nrinuing edu cat i o n (;redit may be accepted toward a master's degree. rllis applil:'s to ctl!1tinuing education c re dit l<lken at PL or lra n�ferTed from another un IVersity. All cou rses accep ted for the ma�t 'r' degree

�u bject to the approval af the pnlgr. m d in.'c t(\T anJ the: dean of graduate stud ie�. are

ter of tbe senior ye,l r, a candidate for

a

la� l

en e�­

baccala urc.l tc degree

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R S

STANDARDS OF- WORK: Th e m iJl un um M,lnuJCcl ".ceplab le for lht· master 's dear...e i s a '!radt' p o i n t JV r.lg� of 3.0 in a l l grad u al� wo r k. Gr�duale-Ievd ncdil wi ll not bt: !:lI ve n tor Jlny c1a�s in whi ch the grade ea rned i� lo\v<:r than a A ,t udent whost: grade po i nt average rJ J I, below .� .(! i, subje(l mmcn ­ . • h il 1�ta nce .., the rel tn i�m is$al fr m the Jrog riltll. In � w d at IOn for d is mi ssa l or COTI Li n UlI IKe is mdue hy the: �lu deI1 t's advisory l<) m m i l.lec and Jeted upon hy th� dea n 01 grad llate stlLdi<:s . ACADEMIC PROBATION: degree who ia i b tu mni n lil i n

. sluden t

l'u rsu l I l g the mahle r's

,; u nl l1 l ;J !i v e grad.' point average of 3JI may be pl aced 0 11 <)(<td e m il.. p rclha l i o n . Wb c'n . \1( 1 . ;i(; t i (\n is t:lke n, the bt udent w i l l be notIfied 111' It!ttl:r twm the Ofti c� til' the Pr{lVo t ,lll d Dean of Gr adUil le Stud ,e.\. A gr,ldu atc ' l uden l on probat ioll who fai l.<; tll .l t t a i n ,1 <.l1 m ulutive J:(fI'Id� puint ;wel .ig (If :'I.n in tl e n e x l term I)f en rnl l mcnl may be dism issed frum I l le program. A g ad uate stud.:nt \-d nnp l cilrn J n1\l�t ... r's d�gTet! w i th l e - s t ha n ,1 3.!l cumula l ive grade point ,lVe r,\ge in a l l gr,lduate-1 '\'d w ) Jk. "

arl'

I'roQuest of A n n . rhor, M i ch ig;.m . In ildd i t i on , .t l> �'Sc'rl a tiOIl Services p uh l l�tli Jlg loml and an ;l hst r,ICI o f I �(J W(lrU' or fe\ver TILl.lt be �ubmittt'd wilb the � 'lhl i�h i ng fee, to t he ')H1Ct of t h RcgistT�r. nt> l a ter t h <l r lhrt' \'eek� In{flr.: grad u a t i \J1 Fe � 1ilT m i,rofil l1l ing. publish i n )\ �Ib,;trall s . ll ncl b i nd i ng origina th �!oes fo r the perm.me n ! P LLT l 'brarr cu ll edl on .In: paid by s tude n t .. (sec Ilil iml and ret'S "..,tion ) . The seumd m thod is a re c,rre h pap er. L! a pr ogra m req u i res M tullen . d · I re,ea rdl paper upt iom, o n e dligillal paper must b e. �u b m i t t d to the Office of lne Rq:;is t rar w i t h :111 ab trad of l 50 wurd� lIT le\\ tr, n o laler t h a n tLm:l' week:. hefo re ' r, dU.l l i no. Re�earc h papr:rs will b microfilmt'd d t I'Ltl anu 1,lced in the.: PLU l i b r a !) (ollt'ctio n . 'y\i cwfi l mi ng b:s are raid by s t udents. Theses amI r sea".-h p pers must be in th O lfi 'Co' or t h � Ikgi tra r n ut l"ler th,1I1 lh ree weeks befll rl' grad u atIOn . All theses a nd pJ pers p resentt' must be �Ic:an. erro r-free, dud Il Iu", the A PA Style Man ual Details , ne a\�di iabk fl lIn tb Office: of th ' Registrar. The thi rd

m

· t hud ,I' fu lf i l l lng rC!iCllrc h rey u i renlt'nts llieJ in

some pr ograms i� ]:>JPl'r presentJ tio ns or numll1at i ng 'r<)J l:ct s in

speci fi.: CO LI r�e'i d�signed t

lImprehens ive l > integrate . l

prog r:1 m's materi.d w h i le promoting ind P 'fa J.:nl rcsl,.HCh <mel

St1,II.iy.

EXAMINATIONS: Wri \tl.'rI co mpreitemiv · exa m i n lI iom a nd/l 1r or,,1 eX<lll1 inal 1 oJls are r<'q u i reJ i n : ,I ! Sdwo l "�f hI cation

grad uate p r')gra ms, rhe e (,'>.d min,n i n , normally ", iii be seh 'du led 110 later Ih'lIl t h re -si weel\.\ bdilrl! com me n.:

fi nds it possihle til co rn p l te a l l d gn:e r l l u i rc men b w i th

1 08

pe t i tion th" d ea n of gradu,lte 'lL1d i �s r'or tr· Il,fer l red i t. ch a nge of p ro gra m or a u v isor, or any ·.-l q l i ol1 ttl pol · C)'. Pl'l i tillll fu mls llIay b..: o h ta in ed fnlm advisor. .

by

utad Hl!a lth Services <It 2 5 .1.5 3 5 . 73 37 .

If, d uri ng tll

,lilt! prese nted to Iltt? dean of gra d u ,lk �tuilies l ; I lhc; l i ml! 0 -uch n:gi stral l u n Th is reg Istration tl"e� not appll' tOWilrd .l h i gher degret u l l l � it i� l atel· apprnved b , !h..: t u dent 's graduate progm l1l adV f S(lf and/I)T .I d"i sory um m i ttee.

The Ilrst method is ,\ thes is. TIH �e tlld 'n! - w r i t i ng t h eses submit thc lr or ig i n a l t he�c.� lor bi n d i n g and micro fi l mi ng

C(IS i s ' 1 0.00_ � tu de n ts W i th about the i m m u ni:t.1ti\ln pnl ily s h n u i d

GRADUATE CREDIT FOR SENIORS:

mUSl

n l U ,, '

arrival at the uni 'asity. The or LO n e m�

urr.· l1 t emcster

I e q wred to prt.:�t!n t evidence of � b i li tr to do i nd ependent fesea r -b . Th is ca n be de mo!l , t rilled in th ree V,lVS S<!<, ead:l pro­ gram 5enion lor cxplJ Jl ;1 lJ on 01 rcsear.:h opt i on , \vi lili n c;1..:.h gr:\ ll,I t l.' �t rllg a m .

to pfllvide a un iversity health hi story fo rm wi th 3cc u ralt' immun ization records of measles, mumps, t u hell1 , and tet. ll U S ­ d i ph th eria to Health Ser 'ic<!s, SttJ(kn t� born bt:ftlrc /an u,ITY I , 1 9 57, mlL�t provide do.: ume ntat i on for tctallu - d ip h t h eria ( Td) booster within the last 1 0 yean; , A l l i nterna tional stu den ts are requ lre also to lu vc a tubt:rculo�is skin lc� 1 ( pu rified pr< Jkin der i alive-ppd). This test will be done at H t: a\ t h I, . nrices j ft�r questions

re q l l i re rn t.:n t s Ire beir ,; mel d u ri n� Ill ·

THESIS AN D RESEARCH REQUlREMENTS; lit uJents

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT: , II ca nd idate s for the master's degree must complete 24 emester hOlW of Pacific Lut heran LTniverslty courses.

IMM UNIZATI ON POLI CY: All

the L o t,l l rcgi� trilti{\fI fot u llder!>1\(.IUdl� n:qui reme nls

PETITIONS: It is th e stlldent'� respon 'i , i l t ty t o lorm, lIy

m ll1 i ­

HOURS R EQU IRED FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE:

f,

bl;: sign 'u by the up rorriate department ell.lir or �( hool dean

a · · I g ned a fac u l ty advisor r espo n sib le for assist i ng the s tu lkn t i ll det r m i ni n g a progr m t1f ,tudy_ When approp r i ate, t h e advisor en(;/.) uraged

Howev

.. nJ elective gT.Jduutc cred it �hali not ex..:.:cd I !l cmr.'�tt'r h urs

d u r i n g t he sem�t r. A me:m Ir<JI1u u m 't.ll1Tl!-\ that all ha QlJ aure ­

purposes of imm igratio n and u niver.sity rce(1r d - keepi ng.

FACU lTY ADVISING: Upon admission eaLh

rt:gistrat illT l o f re\� er than 1 6 semester h \)llr� nl u rllJer g rad ul1te creLiit, rcgil.tnlt,on for gr�ld ll <1 te cred i t ma� be perm issi ble_

T

V

mer l l .


In a n y case, t he fi n al w n t te n colTl p rehen�ive exa m i n ation lTIu · t be p a . 'cd n o 1.11 r t h a n t1lr1�e I V k l; hcC, r e commen m en t. The Ma l examinat ion OW l' the l h · ,·i. or rcse ar h is c on du c t ed under the d irect i on of rhe s u den t 's adv i,orr comm Ittee a n d must be Cllmplet d succc"sfLllly no later tha n t h ree weeb blofo re com­ mellccmen t.

COllr,e · m u�t be .; III leted, examinations passe I, and t hesis /r search n;� Ul rcT ent� fulfilled in orde r to q ua l i fy for graduation . , raduate students m\l�t apply' fo r gradu at i oD by the fo llowing da lt' : December 2002 January 2003 MIIY 2003 Augw;t 2003

of application: for the acaJemk y 'ar begin rung j , September b

r

qu iremcnts

VI

-l c:

lay 1 , 2002 May I , 1002 ol'embu I 10112

December I , 2002

graduate students m u st m a i n t a i n

December I, 2002

average (It 3.00.

Application fu mlb

May \, 2003 AlIgu�t J . 2003

order

3. MOl. imun graduate finan cial :lid time: J11 ()\\ d: a) The ma, i m u m n u mber 01 fil il- l illl/' j;c.ld u,ltl' credit hours

that may be attempted i� 72, Oi nt! I he

rh t may be anempt<.'d

soon as

72, and I hl: rn ,,· i mum aIlm: �d

I

complete a graduate degree i ., 7 1·ears.

S C HOOL OF B U S I N E S S

App ly I'M gr duation File y(l�lr appli arion for gra d u a t i on with the Regi " t tiT' Office . Yo ur Clip �nd gown order will be bcnt to you. N(!{e. 1(11 "llikflf (id, / 0 comp}, h' tile "..r" .Sa r), re([lIi","ncrll'/or gnu/II(wl'li. rill; 11i'l'licr!/ioll for gr[ldwlti"fI will 1101 <lfllo/11t1 tically lie " 'TWa! ded til til .. I/I!.� I ,OJIIIJWIlUlIIem dale.

Master of Business Administration

Take (:ompl"ehcn ive WT iu en and/or o r al exa m inati on under the dire ct ion of th�' m<ljo!' advis o r 01 adviso r y comm ittee. Dead line: no I<lt r than four week hel( re co mm encement.

Donald R. Bell, PhD, Lkwl. School

Sub m i t these. A mi l'ese.uL h paper. in fin i form to the I egist rar s Oftlce, t h ree weeks pri or 10 graduati{)n. At this ti me he b i n d i ng/m ic rofil mi ng. E t: must e paid.

Catherin

(IfBH"1

l'S,

Pratt, EdD. Aswcimf J)cml fllld Dil t'Clc1r. A W:I

Program, Scliool ofBusilless

MBA PROGRAM: T'he M BA program is ct'nl -red

111

th� ,kill>

and knowledge required for prll tes�lf)n,tI managemen t, proviull1t; a

str ng fou n dation lor re!>poll sih1c lead rshi p in b\.U>in���,

progmm offer. botlr evelllllg and weekt'lid program oJl l/(lTIS f<l $. n'l (Ir�

Tu i tion ch arges f r graduate �tlllknl�

nu m ber uf sem ster hours tor wh ich b, l �o;!d ou a emester huur rale. ur

253. 535.7250 W Ww.plll,edu/-bllsn/ m bil

govern m e n t, a n d non-profit lrgil lliJ ati,IOS. Till ,\ fJU

Tuition and Fees

Tu ition pe r semeSter IH

(l tS.

b ) The maximu m n u mber of [1111 H",,(' , acillale acd i r hOllrs

pns ibk to e mbl bh th� prog ram of stu dy.

.lx il11 u m l i me

I

allowed to mrn pletl' a grad ual'" degreL i� ..;.5 .l"

degree requ i reme nts.

J f)

Note: Less tharz I I2- tunc en rollmen t WIll mUSt I I stwlt'11 1 Iilml 10 be CIIll ceilelJ and II/(ly jeuf'lmi,zf tI :/i'mlt'//t .tilt u '.

See: i n d i vidual mastcr'� prl'gw l1'}\ m , d con centrations for specific

R gi 1 r ror th�sis or re�ea rLh paper as rcqu ired. D ead l i ne: the last accep table regi strat ion datc i� th sem es te r i ll which the studen t expect, to rece i ve h is Ill' h e degree.

MINIMUM/YEAR

e l/:!·tlme

outlined in th is cata log and to abide;! by t.lst.abli 'hed deadlines.

ilS

m VI

3/4- ti

know and follow the procedures

{ ipon acce p ta nce, meet with the assign ed advisor

o

MINIMUMIT£RM

Fu l l - time

iw" i 1able ill the Registrar's Office. a r l i n com mencement exercises must hml1 f o r a cap. g()wn , and hood. to

l I 1 i lllll l U lll ;.Iratlc poi n t

assistance: ENROUMENT STATUS

itre

of each g r ad u a te �tuJe nt

[l

2. Minimu lll credit requiremen l tnr graduate fin ,lIl1;iJ I

RESPONSIBI LITTES AND DEADLINES: It is the responsibility

II nde rg r.ld u ale st ll dent� in order 10 con l i n ul' -ollowing 1.:XCep i m\:

] . M in im u m grade p o i n t ;we ra gc ; [aeh graduat� pro\:I;Lm mon itors the grade point ilverage ,f its �1. 11tift1I�. In bcnera l .

St udents planning to take

as

receiving fi n anciill .l�si�taltl.e, WIth th

Note: Tllf t/re$;Yrtsearch p(lp�r(s) mtl5t be signed II, tlte major Ild1'lsor and have ',eI'll relld by the ell/ire COrl/millee before submission to Ihe Offiu of lire Ileg; Ira,·.

a ls o fi l l flu! a n

POLl CY: Craduatt: .1Ilt! !,rule�­

sional stude n t .. m ust med th e � J n l l.: . Jtb'''dtJr), I' fOgr,,�'

The.Es Du.

March l, 20U .l

Oflk (' of lht;' PI'( vas 1 m

A pri l 1 5.

Grll duatioll Applic;rtion Du. •

nr

applications and i n i o r m olliol1. The priority date fo r sllb mis�\On

SATISFACTORY PROGRES

GRADUATION: All

Gra<jualion Date

A l i m i l ed numbc:r of graduale .1:.�i�1 ,lO t s h ip., ,lle availdhk. Contact the O ffice of Fi n a nci al \ , it!

,I re

a

working cO/llnnm ity. The d.l

d term ined by the

student re,'isters and

are

fj)r 2002-2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $578.00

Thesb bim .li ng / m i cl'l' fi lm ing ( . u bj ect

to change) . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . TheSIS cop )'T i gh tmg . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Resear h paper or p rojtxt ro i a )fiil1ling . . . . . ,........... ,.. ........ .. Grad uatiun t�e ... . . . .. .... . . . . _ . . . . . . . . .. . ..... . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Libraq' fe<! fnr ullenrollcd � t u d nt.> (PI!l' semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$70.00 $45,00

$ 1 0 .00 $55.00 .$25 .00

Financial Aid 253 .5 35 . 7 [ 34 SOO.678 3243

lVww.plu.edli/-Iaici F i nancial a 'S lsta m:e for gl aduate studen t:; is a\�.ulablt' in t h e fo rms of Perkin (a · fu n d ing IJcrm ib ) a nd tafford 'lu dent Loans, graduate as ' i�tantsh i p�, and s h ularsbip s. Stu de nts must be aJmitted to a �r<ldu ilt , p rQgram oc!fon: a 10311 an be g r a n kd. pp l ica tit lns an loan i n f() rm:l t ' on may h (, btain ed from h n anci al Aid.

envjn.n nl III is cnh.l flced h y students, ,1 S wel l a, st udell ts with diverse backg rounds. ::'tudeUb m;l )' t:f1 k t h" ['rogr J m a t terms throughout the vc� r. s wum

a bal;mce of 1011- and part· tim

MBA WITH BMPHA IS IN TECH NOLOGY AND INNOVA­ TION MANAGEMENT (MBA-TIM): III addi tiull

I" I h � gellt' ra l program, PLU oft-ers an Ivl�A w irh ,11 1 C l l l p hJ , i . i n Techn uil lgy a n d I n noy,lt i o n Manag<'m �n t Thi� prug/ i l l lo�u,es on lcchnoloQy and in llova lil1ll Ill,magemen l issl!(;s ilnd skills wi th in a h i gh-qua lity M B} (urrilu i unl . II i, JI!�i!;nt'J fl lr te hni al and non- tcchni ai cm p in ·..,e 1\ llll want .j d epc:r appreaa t i o n of ma nagi ng i n tech n ol ogy oricn tcd lInd/ur liJ,l­ moving innovat in: org. nj 7atttl l1!i. 'lUd 'nt� may .:nler I h evening progr. m a I�nm tlrr o ugh0l11 l il t' vell '\ hI: M BA-1 1 M emphasis is o ffered in the even i ng a n u m ,I tw . year 'alur<lay­ only fOrmat to a coho rl uf �tlldcl1 t , wlltl h g i l l thl pr \gram i n t h e , Ii emester o nl y.

ME

POST MBA-CERT IFICATE IN TECH TION MANAGEMENT: f n d i id

S

OLOGl' AND I NNOVA-

l l O ! J i D � .m l>.ID:\ J

' Trcc

may applY fo r and l' llroll l l1 ;; post-M I\,\ " I'�t i fi calc i n r" ch nCl i­ og)' and Innovation I.wag · ,�m ( rI/\ t). T!t i� L' Ni !eale P

A

C

I

F

I

e

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y

1 09


u pdau" the skil l s and dhilirie5 of MBA degree holders. Req u i remems indude c Onl p k c ion of J 6 scm ster ho u rs in TIM coursework. Th re is a re d u c d app icarion p rocess :tnd the GMAT is not required. For mor m£; rnla rion sec the fo Uowing section on Degn'� Requirf'H1t!nt5 o r the School of Bus in ess MBA website .

Q :::I I­ \1'1

MBA DEGREE. REQUIREMENTS; (48 semester hours) MBA Core 00 ,eml!st r Il(lur,) B usi n ess 505 U ndU"�tandi ng and Re O ll e ( 4 ) ll lL�ine. s Busmess I1 li'.. inl:5.� B usi ness

To pr"pare students fOf managemen t posi t IO n s in commercial rganiult ion by provid ing them tht: basi.: knowledge of how these! organ i7.3 !ion function ,l nd equipping tb.'m with the: 11 Ct.'ssa ry ccmpetcncie to work effect ively. These competendt'� ill dud (l) ]e;.ldership, (2) critica lkrrat ive

anJ not-lor-profit

« :::I Q «

th inking, (3) effective conllnu nicatioll,(4) team effectiveness, (5) laking initiative a n d managing ch aIlge. To give st u de n t an i n teg rated perspect ive of the i ntercon Jl el­ tiom dmong the functiom l an�a of bu�il1 esses and t h e contex­ lu i environment that affects them. fo identify an d -hallengt: �tudenr [(l a dopt h igh �l:il l1d rds tor ethical prac tice and pr fe ional conduct. Ib prepare s tuden ts fo r liv of servi ce to the community. To prepare stullents to Ise contemporarr t el h ao l o . ies and to embrace the ch anges cau�e d by t' h nolt)gical in novation. ]0 inc ulcate a global perspective in students. and

ADMISSION: tudents who h ol d bachelor's degrees I n any t1 tld from r gion ally accredited univ rsi ti6

r colleg s a n d wh() haw

demonstruted theIr ability ur poten tial to do high qualtty

ac-.ldemil work nn a consisten t basis are eowu ra ged to appl y fo r admissi on to the Master of Bu si ness \d rninist rat io n pro

am. Consul tati n about the progr m is available from t he School of nusiness MBA eli!" tor by • \ling 25 3 . 53 .7250 before li l i ng the ap p l i c"tion for admission. For the even ing l\IBA j1rogram and the 've n i ng MBA-TI M pro 'ram stu d� nts may begin st u d ies dny term . App l ications are acc�pted f(lc course, begi nning Sept�'TIlb • Jan uary. fie b r u ar ', May, or J ul y. The Sat urday l\IllA-T! M progr.lm has a priority application de a dl i ne of J une 1 . , pplicdtilJn� re 'dved after the a p p licat i on deadl i l1 c will be cvaluat d ;lnd qualified ap If ants rna}' be aem itte . A l l <Ippli<:, n t, are re q UIred to submIt scores from the Grit uatt.' Management Adm ission kst ( , M AT ) . ow To be adnlilled 1 0 t h M.BA p rogram. can d idates must potential to com pl.ete the . I BA CIlrriculurn ,>u cce;;sfully. Cri ter i a used to evalu,lte a p p l ica nts are:

I

:J.

2.7" or high r cumulative grad e Pl)iIll av�rage

l evel coune-.'i"ork b fore applic tion;

2.

3.

<1 score

of 470

siop TeSl

or

above 0

(GMAT) ;

in

all coUege­

the Graduate M a n a ge rneIl l Admis ­

Evidence o f managerial and profesSltloal ptltentiJl lhmu gh st· t ment of g<>ab, TeC m mend,ltinn ', and p rior exper ience. An interview w 'th the MBA d i rector may be rt'qu r�teJ. A)7plican ts are eval uate d i n divid Jlly, bru.ed nn a r rl.'.�er1tali o n

of t:lctors indic�lting t:quivalence to ad miSSIO n standards. a

rnmi �e of succes� in gradu,lte school, qualiti '� o f good (.ha racter, and potential contrib utions to the educa ti onJI mis�i l)J1 of gradu.Hi: sl udy THF. GRAD UATE MANAGEMENT ADMlSSION TEST� Tbe Graduate Ma nage ment A d m iss i on Test ( G tvIAT ) is a te t of <tplitude rather than a kst bll�ine s knowledge per s t' . The GMAI is a compu ter-adaptive test that is availdble, y .ar · ro unJ, at l<!lit .. enters th rough()ut the world. Cand id,l[es an� exanllned il1 tbree major areaS: verba l, mati ematical, and <l r.alytic I wr i t ing skill:.

scon:

IS ea rned in each a rea, and

tot,ll s,orc , whi ch ranb'Cs betwee. n

nd idates re<.""Cive

200 and SOU.

a

Inform.ltion about the M T may be obt ined from the ounseling and Tc�ting Cen ter at 253.535 .7206, by calling C ; M AT uiredly al 80IJ. 46 2 . 8 66 9, or b}' vi il i ng the web site at 111�·\V.gllm r.org.

ADVISING: The M B director advises ali i ! BA students a l l d 5hrJuhl b � co nta c t d for assista m:e in plannil1g cours e w rk. 110

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R S I T Y

504 Ll.'gJl am.I E t h ica l

EllV l r()nmen l o f B u�iness (4) 50S MJIlllgi ng Joffec t ive Org<ln il.at ions ( 4 ) 5 J I \1,lOagerwl LCOUI1Ung (2) ' J 2 V.l luc Crea l t on: Ope rations Jnd Inf rmatio o »/51t'm. ( 1 · ) Busine 5 [ 3 Ma rket i ng a l rl VJlu t' rcation (2) Communicatiun 50 ) E ftec t ive Comm u nications (2) 1::.:onOll1 i,- ')00 AppJi<'d Sla l .h t ical Analy� is (4) EconoOlio 520 [(,m omic Policy . nal)sis (4)

OBJECTIVES Of THE M BA PROGRAM

w I­

1-.1anaging Fina nddl

Strategic Management (-/

{

s

mester h lUt� )

III a Global Con tex t (4) Busine�, 5RO Te(h n llogy S l ra t egy and Compt:!itlVen ss

Busj n6� 590 Stnlt�i'i L �I a na ge m e n t or

(4) N"t�: llilsillcs 5.�O r; rtf/II;T" ,i 'I '"� ./wlellls in rhe "iCcJllw/OKY QI/d /l1Il<lIl<Hinll ,\,ltlllagt'/IIl"Ill I"tJ IW" l lllJlj",,_ MBA Elect ives ( l -t cmestl1l hour ) Sef eo from Ihi! Joilowill!: HI/si,l!',;; ((Jll rses:

535

Fi n a ndal lnvest mc Ill� (·1 ) 537 ( );;:(i sion l l<)ild� 0111\1 Str.H );ic. fur Fi nancial �bnagers ('I ) 540 'fkcti t: Negl}t iJ li olls (4) 54 1 MUJli.tgi ng I nnuvat ion Jn l! li dmoltlgy Change (4) 54 2 M.lllag<! ment of Change ( _ ) 5 4 5 .,'n l i n ull us I m p rovemt.nl S t r a t e gie� ( 2 ) 549 Cu n tcmponll"}" Hu m a n Resource lanag Ulellt (2) 553 Tr,ln�n.ttional

555 5 'i 8 564 5h6

[an<l�e men l

(2)

Knlllv lcJg' :"lan , gemenl (4) '1,,\\' Ven tu ri:: Man agement (4 ) �tJnaging Ser "' i ("e� Mark eti ng ( 4) Oevelu p in g • Tew f'roli uLts Jnd . ervices

(4)

574 Ad"'ln(,'d S....rvice anu ManufdClu ri ng Deliver y

Syste m' (:! ) 575 £1.:ctroOl' Commerce ( 4 ) 77 Prllj;:ct Management (2) 57 9 1 e h n o l os}' Com mer ial i:la t ion ano Tra nsfer 5 8 7 or 5 11 8 "pedal Tork" (2-4 ) " 9 1 Indepenueu t Studies ( 1 -4) 5')" I n ternship ( 1 -4 )

(2)

MBA CONCENTRATION IN TECHNOWGY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMHNT (TIM) DEGREE

REQ UIREMENTS: (48 semester hoors) MBA Core ( j() se mester hou rs ) (set' allOve (;n M IlA Care rel/llircltl<'llts)

Strategic. Man gemenl ( 4

s� mester

hours )

580 Tt'clt Il Cl !" gy Stralegl' and CllJnpeLitiv ness ( 4 )

MBA-TIM Concentration Courses r 1 4 scme,tcr hours)

RelJ uire d Sp.:cializlltiolls COllrses: (8 �em�ster hau �) 54 1 \ I a nagll g I nn Olrat l.m " !lei rCLhn o]ogy Change (4) 5 5 5 KnuwleJ ge \l.IIl,lgt!ITl ent ( 4 ) Specillli;:(lc;OIl Electlvt's: ' 6 hours) Selt!ct .Ii·om tftl' Ji) lllIlI'l/I�r

5-12 �tanasemtnt of Ch ange ( 2 ) 545 Cllnt i nu p u . I I'm e l11!! n l �trah:.gies (2) 54') <";u nte l11porar� Human Ik uru� Ma nage mcnt (2) 5:l� New Ven t u re M allJgem<!nt ( 4 ) 566 Devd()p l ll� Nt'\ I'rnJuc l � ilnd Servi,es (4) 574 Ad v J.llced Service and M.lI1ufactu ri n 7 Del ivery y:.. ! l!ms (:. i 575 flecl rn n i l Cum merce (4) S77 Pro)l;:Cl M.l1tagcmelH ( 2 ) 5- T 'h nulos} �()mmerClul!lJ t inn .mJ Tra nsfer (2)

Select p i,ll r\lpks ('iR7 \lr sRi!). I ndepen de nt Studies (59 1 ) , 3n I n te rn sh i p. ( -95 ). app lOved \(Ir T I M .

See

wurse

dbai pt i() l1� und;;:, BU5jl1l.'�5.


POST MBA-CERTIFICATE IN TECHNOl.OGY AND

INNOVATION MANAGEMENT: ( 1 6 semester hours)

:;·1 1 Managi ng l l1 llova l i ull amI Tcch n uh>gy [,h a nge l4) :- S S Kn owledge M an agemen t ( u 5fjU Tcc h n ol lgy 51 ! J lcg y Jild Compeli livepess ( 4 ) 4 ho u r TIM elective from ,l p pmved 15 t'ie((ivc i is t

If a �tuJen t has re c ei v ed .l T'L U � I B in the past five years, pl" 'viou , 1 ' 1 I c o u r�e\\'ll r k m'l} hl' C! 1IIH,:d (oward c<1mple ion o f t h e e l ti fie.lte rt!qu irell l<:nts. A m i n imu m or 1 0 P()�t M BA �emc�lI:r h u rs i. rcquir"cI . I f a ,t udt'nt has ret.: i\'cd .l n . IBA from an{)ther institution i n the past Ive yean" c�l lli\'aknt previ ous coul'sework wiJl be .:: msidl"TCd lClw.lrd com p l l Io n of t ilt' ceni ll,-,ItC rt!q u i r �mel1ts. ;\ minimum of t u post-l--'IBA scnwstl.'r h O l l n is reQu i red .

[ ro g rams belor, :\\.I tn i�,i()n. (S�e i n dividual concentrations � r tests and p racq u isi tes specific to the concen t ration.) Stud�l1ts admitted pr '{isiorhtJJy m us t full til l the following re.quirement� in (lrdt!!' to be granted regu l.<lt st a t us: completion Ilf 1 2 h urs of gra d uate course work wi t h a m i n i m u m grade puinr average of 3 .0.

EXAMJ NATlONS: �tudc.nl� row-t exam i n at i o n

over course

take a cO Ill prehensive

work. Comprehensive examinations are

'l r r'lIlgt'd by e-dlh pr. ,gr.lm's coordinator.

/\1\ oral ex,m i nalion \'1.'1' cn u r s e work and!or res . rch mOl}' be sch edu le.d a t the dis-:retion of the student's advisory commit­ t e no later tha n t h ree wl:ck, hefore comm encement.

m

'" -t C o

Classroom Teaching (32

em

er hours)

m '"

FACULTY COORD INATOR: C. D o u gl as Lam oreaux, P h D CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: T h is program i s designed to pmv ick ,ldyal1<:ed preparat ion In subject matter and professional education fo r element.lI \ ,HId '�(;L)I1dary teachers. PREREQmSITES: Beyond the ge n era l prerequisit s, .lpplicants rn u st hllid a \'JJid teach i ng certi f1c ate and should ord i n a r il y have �uccessfully co pI 'ted one y�.\ r of t each i n g or related prof s­ sional ex perience. ,,\ gLlJe point average of at lea t 3.0 and GRE or othel ad mission t '�\ .1 l1fllved by th" faculty coordinator and com p l et ed in the p as t five veal', are required. Students not meeting some of t hese: equin:rncnts nH)r be granted provisional

st,l tus. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE COURSES: ( 7-9 "t!me:.t r ho urs)

14 '1 Me l h o�ls a nd '\ d nicp.le o t Re� e,i rch (2) ( I l i� s t rongly recllmmt:(lded that sl udents complete 544 Resc< Hch/ Pmgnull Evalu at i ons before enrollm en t in 545.) ( 2 )

011< 4 thI' foliowillg: 58 5 Comparati

S C H O O L O F E D U C A T i O �J

"86

Master of Arts in Education Lyo n G. Beck, Ph D, I I!(//I, !ie/lOol tJ{ hlllclIlion C. Dl l u g l� Im'lr�aux, PhD, Director uf GrudllClte Sllld;!'., 'ch ool 01' Edrlcntwll

e

(3) (J ) (3)

Educatioll

ociolog)' o f Edu\Oalic lIl

5 8 7 l l isto ry o f I:: ducation 5 8 9 Ph i Io:;ophy of E uGllion ( 3 )

Ont' "r til(> foli(1willg: 59 ' St udies i n Education (2) 599 Thesis ( 3 or 4 )

gr Id ,at progra m in �d cation ttl provide ll ll.lhfi d (.>erson wllh opportun i ties t o de feiOp thel ' k i l l s in ll:aching and pre pare t hem�o.:kes or ed uc,H i o nal le"uer�l ,i Jnu s rvice rol s req ui ri ng ad ,ln eed prep.l r a t i o n . The rnalor field. o r CUI1 Ct'n tral ion a re de�igne d to pro v i d e ma x I m u m tlt',:ihiJ i t y i l l an e).pcriencc-(),il:n kd cnv i n n m <! n l. G r ,l du a le cnn cl1 trutions are offered i n Clali )'(l( 111 Teac h i n g , R", ' ideney Certl fil:all(Jn, Ed uciltional \dm i n i.t r;lt.ion . and Lit�rJ cy .e duce)­ tiOIL f'cq u i relllen t� for c,\(h (lIlCe n t l , tiOn ;"lT l i�lt:d 'epa r;l l el)· I"Bow i llg th i s �eclion .

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS:

COORDINATI NG MASTER'S DEGREf. WITH CONTINUING

req u i re m e n t

PURPOS.E: Th.: l U ql0'(' llf t h IS

AND PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: S tudent­ ' a n I n i t w l or Residenc y Cert d kate Ill ay coord i llate t he ivla tcr ( )C Arb in EU Ue<lli '11 degree with thl: req lir .nll:n ts I" r C n li n u l n " ()J' Prufessiontll Ccn ifi ca t ioll . CradulI tt' s lud nts p ll r ,'l1 i ng the COnl ll1 uin or Profes:;iOlla l Cer titic.Ht' ,hllllid disCllS� tlleir program, \' jth lh�' p r gram co l u i n a t o r or their ' Jvisor in the ::'chool oi Educ< tion. Students intend ing to work toward ;J master's degree mU. 1 wll1pJete forma l appl ic,ltiO[ r r ad m i� i o n to the Offi e of Adm issiP IlS, St uJen l s I n tend ing l<l complete requ irement - f()f Ih\.' Profc�"i(,"u.1 CenifiC<lh: mils! C lm r lde a formal apl'liuJti()Tl tv Ihl:. S,huo l \/!· ['.ducah, n .

holdin

( 1 0- 1 8 'em c.sler hours) ar dt:teml i ned in cowmltation with the major advisor, AJ I co u rses accepted for the master's d e gree arc subject to the approval o f lht' ca n d idate" advis If or the ca.n d i dale's adv isory comm ittee. o u rse' 111a ' be selected fro m the follOWing a reas : Ed Ila t io n , Educa t i tl Oa l P�>'ch(llog)'. and Special Education.

C()urses

ACADEMlC SU PPORTING ARE

:

(8- 1 6 sem e ' ter hours)

I II t his con centrati o n , n o more than 1 6 semestel hours may be

Cl pphed ing

l:.d u -'Hio ,II Psychology or Special Educ tion. This

ro ,

a re.\ .

as s umes a

prerequi. ite b a c kgmund in t h

p prova l of C\ u rses

co ur�e�.

. UPpl)rt­

'oo rst's shall be u pper- d ivi�ion or grJd uate -level

lh

1.0

fulfill thi'i requiremcnt 'hal l be

obtained from tht.' st udent's advisory com mi ttee. The stud�nt's

Supplrt ting ,Irea mal' be ch lls�n fr m one of the f II ving:

Language Art Ma th lIlatics amI Computer SC1cnce M usie Phy�ical Edll al ion

Art

Biolo!!,)' H USirl t'S '

eh m i�. lr>' .. omm u n icatio n E((Illo rn ic�

Phy�i c$ Pnl i t i Cill St.ien cc

Ed uo::a t I l1ill Ps),clJ ( I\ugy

10 lTIaster's degree progr:m1$ anu to l'ror<!,\�lon:t 1 cer t ificate programs, aPl'lkwlts must. hav\: cnm p le t J J 130\ ,)( BS lkgtee I rUlI 1 .1 rt'SI<lnu l I) ac(n:Jited inslltu­ hon of h igher educa tiun and nlLl�t � ub Il1 it rCCOII I !lll' nci.ltlons and leM �t'()re, from appropriate sere ning tesb. tudenr5 mar ht! req U ired t hav d persunal i nterview w ith Ihe diJ'ector ot gl1ldu.ltl

ADMISSION: por regular admission

P

Eng l ish

Psyc liolo"y

Cm�'r \1 1 Sciclle.: C enscien ce

Soc i a l Sciencec' Sociology

H i!>tory

Spcdal Education

C

l

f

l

C

l

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

111


Educational Administration (:J2 semester hours) . D o ugfa� Lam Qreaux P h D

OORDINATOR:

FACULTY

CONCENTRATION OBJECTI V E:

h i , pt()grJ I11 h de�i!:,' l1 ed l o

prepar.: elementary ,LOd seco n darr school princi l 'a L � and p rllgra m a d mill i :t r a to :. PRE REQUISITES: I3 yo nd the gen�ral pr<:l"Ct1L1 j.;ite

mUST It ld

J

n.lid tcao.:.h mg

or

ES

applica nt ·

ccrti li cale ami shtluld

f kuehing I ) r rage )f a lea,t 3.0 ' l i d score fr m either t h e li R E o r oth er ad rUl� si on rest a p prov ed by the faculty oordi lla tor lind (Om pleled with in th P3.'>t nve yea rs are requ ired for regula r ad mIssion. ordi n ari ly hav" su c

es

fu ll} wm p l� ll?d Iwo r.:a r�

relatt:d exper ience . " J\ b'Tadc

poinl ill'

' Ccwdidllt,''\ lo r an lIumini5trtlliw creilrllfitli " WI Iw,,1' colIIJ1l�t�ti thru years of r..,,;:}ti/lg u r 'ri.ued l'Xr�nii/l(C b,ll)" 1�lIanCC of rhe (ll imilmt'o.Irive ITcrielilLtJi.

r ' d(iin ppt:c IJli slS e�pha'i?(.'(l the u n JerlYl l1g ph i ln soph�.

lhin t h is program is i h:gral to

prerequisites. applic':l HlS must hold a v l i d le.h:h illg or E -\ rt' rt i ticate, huve (llm plde u nderg r.ld ua te cd uc,\l ion course in the tea..:hill" uf fi 'ailing and the l eachi ng " f hlll glluge arts amI h;lve sLlcces. fu l l y com p let ed two ear, 01 tea ch i ng or e1akJ (!.xperi em.e. A grad poi!l\ ilvcrage ot .t {) and s\IPm i, ion of l�..t scoreS nn Ihe e RF or o t her dmi�, i o n test ,l pproved by III ;;I..: u l t, (00 d ina l r and (()111' Icted w i t h i n th past five year� are rc::q lt ired ti.r regular dd mi. sinn Siudents IllJ! meeting Ihe�e req u l re me n t s may he g ran led prov is iunal statll$ PREREQUISITES: Heyon :l the gmcral

GE, ERAL REQm REMENTS AND CORE COURSES:

( 1 3- 1 j . t'mcste r

hour )

mdY apply fo r the Educat l ollal Adm l n istration CCrliticn ti o n O n ly program.

Re, ·UL ! 1 and Program Eh1l u;l lilln (2) Mct}\Cld � .I n c! tcd,mques of J{�se3rch (2) _u rri cul lnl D e'. elllpment (2)

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE CO URSES:

alii!

oJ ,/II' JOlllllvillg:

posst!ss a m�t�f ', degret"

( 7-9 semt�ter hour�)

545 Met ho d� ,Illd Techniques of '!I'

of tilt! Jollowillg:

Sl!5 586 587 51\<)

Compa rative Education Suc iol gy of £O ucat itln

O m� of thl! fi:"/OWI/I�: 598 Sl UlJ i " in Edu 5\19 Thesis (3 ( H i)

585 Compar,l l i ve Edw.'allnn (J ) "86 Sodnl }g) (If Edu ..atior, ( 3 ) 5R7 H i·tory ,It Eciu cll i')fi (3 )

esearch ( 2 )

589 P h ilo lpby of f.ducaf lon ' One or th� rnl/oll'lr1g: 598 Sl u oies in EJUCJliull 12.) 599 Thesis (3 o r 4 )

(3; (3)

History o f Eliuc.ltioll 3 ) PhiloslI phy 0 Education

(3)

REQUIREMENTS:

diff>ring credent ials mu., t be determi ned at the beg i nni ng ca lldida te's prugram i n cunsul ta t i on ·illl

m�tance . andidates seeki ng the MA

in

all

01

Option 1 : Scbool library Media/llRS Endor ement ( 1 2 �emc!>tn hour )

S06 F oundJl i o n s l)� Sdll lilf Librar y I 1t:dia 5 0 7 Prmciples

the

Jd · i�o r. For

Literacy Education (35 semester boU1"!l) Cathl en

YL' tI �r, Rill) CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: The l i l e raq l'ducatinn progrn rdlects current t hollg h t and pr� c l i cl.' w h e re langllilge and literacy arc viewe ,IS looL fur i�<l mi ng dl ros: lhe! (.urricu­ [Lim. I'he p ri nCIpal guru is to prep:!r.: ed lKar ors- pecifiC'" dl l y dd�srullm 1 �( ht:I' , s� h()lll ljbra ria ns, and read lll g ,pecia lbts­ to e ncour Ig..: litera.:)' .1 ' llil.ition a n d developmt' l1 t ap prop riate to slUde nl�' ne�c.l� and 1Il Iere�ts. rhc i lTlpm w.nce of chi ldrc.. n's l i terarure inf rnwlnn literacy, a mi tc�h no logy wi th i n l ikrd :y

tasks i� empha si l.cd lhruug h nul both thellt)' and

I

F I

e

L U

T H

E

R

A

N

U

N I

ractice. The V

E

R

enkr

'1a nage men l ( 2 )

Educalinnal Adm i n istra­

J.m Lt?W1S\ P h D; a nd

(2), ill!ll

tit

INFORMATION AND LITERACY:

til n and princi pJl'� ucdentlal wil l take di erent op tio ns fro m those taken by ,and idule� �eekil1g the dt'sree without the cr�dl.'nt ial. l ke'ovi se, tho�e with i nter�sts in busi ness m a nage­ ment r in a dmi n iste ri n g and <.;oordina tin g spe lal programs may h oosc' opti ns t o t h� lr cowse of studies which wi ll enhance the i r pwfessio nal development Jn Il"reSt.<; 10 all CiL\t<S. the courses must be chosen ud "gre d up on in co n s u l t,l tion with the cand id;It�'s a visor, .m d mu:,l ml.'e t tbe C l"l.! d i l hour req uirement.

ATO RS :

of

52 To p ic s i n ··· h i l d r n\ Li terat u re ( 2 ) 5 2 9 Adolel>ce nl Llter,H ufc I n t h � Sec Hldary Cu rri cu l um ( 2 )

TION: I n terdi.' ipl i nary progr. m optitlll� for a p pl i cant: 'ee.ki ng

C

ttr huursJ

Ji!lIol\'illg: 456 �ror telJi ll}:\ (2)

On e

PROGRAM OPTIONS IN EDUCATI ONAL ADMIN ISTRA­

A

(4 seme

528 C h i ld ren'� UlcraLUrt' i n K 8 : rri,:u l um

(23 semester hours 544 Reseill ch ilnd Prngr,m Eval uil tilln (2) 550 Fducatl O rlJI .'\ d m i n istrdl ive rhe ry (3) 55 1 Sd1001 Ldll (2) 551 <' '''100 1 Finance: (2) 55_ Schf)oll 'ommWl it) Relations (2) 5 5 5 Curri ulu m D velopment (2) <; 5 8 I n Slrllctkm a l SUPCfI'lsiol1 (2) 559 P I! s(mnd ·1allagement (2) 5 9 5 I nternsh ip in f:d uc;ll ional Ad min i�tra [ iou (4) 596 Gradu,1t(! Seminar (2)

P

(3)

C H ( LOREN'S IADOLESCENT LITERATU RE

l io n ( 2 )

MA}OR AREA OF CO NCENTRATI ON:

fACUlTY L'OORDI

Issues in Litem,-) Educa t ion

(2)

''OJ S4..J 545 55 -

Ca n didak who

1 12

collaborati on am ong da�ro lJ l 11 teacher" schoul l i brarian" and

S I T Y

S fvice

()

(2)

I n formation Drga n i za tion , Ret rieval, and

5()� Pr i n ci pl es of ibl iograp hi c i\ n,l !vsi � Jnd A1l1 1 flll ( 2 ) 509 F Ll nda !i . os of �olle l I OIl l)evdopmt'nt (2) :; \ 7 l\ leoia and T ch n olngy fi)r Sd,"nl Library M ...dl,l

pecial i.ts ( 2 ) 3 3 8 �tratelSi <,s li l r Whole Literacy fnstructiun

( "'- 1 2 ) (2)

lU. Option 2 : Language a n d Literacy ( Reading EndorseJIlLDt)

( l l 'e llle't er hour�l

5 1 0 The A\'qu i �itio n d nd Li teracv

( 2i

. evdopmenl

t;lf Laugu.r ge <lnJ

5 1 l Sl.l'a tegi �. f r Llll lSuagc/ itcTacy Dc'vdopmc n L ! TI CI, SSl'oums (2) 538 St f.l tegle. fu r \I\' h ole Li teracv Instruction ( l-:- l � ) (2) 53() h i ldren'.; Writing ( 2 ) Ed ucatmn/Spcci;Jl Educa lion .'i 1 3 ang llagt:1 L i tcr,lL Y [)e\'cllop m�T tt: . Sl.! ss mcnt illl Inst ructlOlJ l ! ) or Option 3: Language and Literacy (Classroom Option) ( 1 2 semClitcr ho urs) ion .!Od De\' lllpmC::ll l of l.anguagc and Luer a cv ( 2 ) 538 Slr.l tcgi�s fo r Whol� Li teracy I nstruction ( [,,: - 1 2 ) (2) Educali(ln/Sp�.:ial Ed u":,H io n 5 1 3 L a llg uagclL i ter ,K Y Developme n l . i\sst:!'Sml'nt a n d [ns tf uct itm ( 4 ) PI/l�: A m i n im u m 0 1 · 1 se: m ' teT hours fr III edu nt ion courst' ll ff.:ri n t;s JeddeJ i n (On: t.lli()U with !h� maiof Jtivi sor.

_

10 Tht' Acqui� 1


ACADEMlC SUPPORTING AREA: ( m l ll i1l1u m of 6 seJnt\ ter j ours) FI 'di ves d<!cideu in -onsull auon w it h adv isor to S lIpport iiteracr educa tion , 1he " de t i ve may I l1c,l llde but are ndt i i m Jteti

to

Supporting Cour ework

hnur-,) - from (I / lSicit' 4. "ecif l l Etlllwt ioll (6)

(6 !,<!Olt!.'>ter Elecl i 't:>

"tlur�e� from :

An t h 1"<)110101:\)' Co mmunic atio n 'o ml'utt:r� i n EdU(d ti o n

Special Education Nut offere

tn

MA with Certification (Residency)

Psyciw\ugy Spe i.ll .Eu ucation

DIRECTOR: C Dnugla., Lunc r

(33 semester notmi)

2002-2003

FAClJ1JY COORDINATOR; Pauia H . Leitz, PhD CONCENTRATlON OBJECfIVE: The graduate concen tration 10

specia l edLlCll t ion i� d

for pdson' who seT

'('

igned 10 pmvide ild anced preparation

children and yo lh

wi t h

special need s i n

edu.:a t l onal settings. Two sera rate areas of specializa tiu n are

uftered: rhc Tn clll�i"e .Ia

�ro()m

and Earl) Chiltlhood Special

Fu u(ation.

PREREQUl ITES: A� p li ant. m u� t

meet

the following

requirements; I . Haw, t\\, yt.lr� ul tea hing !H related proft:

2. Have d >cure s

' i on ,1 1

grade p o in t avenge of at least 3.0 anJ

on

t h e .IRE or o th e r a.dmi:..., i

I

)(p�nence.

uhmi test

tc�t ,l ppnwed by th�

fac u l t y coorciin.ltor a n d co mp leted w ' th i n the past five rears ,

St u de nt s nl )! meetIng tht'�1! rt:ljllirt'ment, may b� gra n t<!J rro\ I:;ional t alu . 3_ Cmnp i e t e an interview With rhe facu l ty coordinator. CORE COlJ RSES A N D RESEARCH ( 7-9 �eml.', ter hours)

REQU l REM

Education .,,15 f\'l eth ()cb and -[echlll(l Ues of Research

S:

Requ.ircmenu:

in

11 im portant pro�rall1 component i� the complet i on of <1 yeal -Io ng in tern h! p In <I pu\lltc sch )(,1 . F OI I h e i n t m e s p erl ­

ef l ee, st uden ts ar du ster!;<.i a t � i tes sel ected by lhe un i ve rsi ty as

re presc'nt ative f I'rogrum. ' reflee 109 pt'ci rt' n t reOlb in middle- le v J cdUl:at i"n,

'pe(i<ll Ed ucat i on 535 I ncl u sioll and 5 t dent with Mild

(2)

Early CllUdhood Special Education (P-3) each ing Early Learners ( 2 ) Sp ecial Edu .11 10 11 538 1:; 'ue:. in Ea rl) Childhood Spe<:idl

Special Educ,lI lUn ·192 St raleg ies luI' EduC:;.ll i O I1 ( 2 )

d ucat io n 540 \dvanced Strateg ic:' .md Teel ni quts fo r

Tead1 in g in T'-3 SelL ing� ( 2 )

(2)

'1 I Assessment o f Infa nts and Preschool

mpJ et , .In i n q ui l1 pmj<:d culm i n.l ti ng in J t hesi� ,} well a� comp rehenSive exam i nu ti o ns thal ill iow MA candid l l tes to demnsl rate nt.lster) ,I t tIle program's ,lr.: va l l l es, rht: in q u i ry prolt!c t . a l empl ri�al study grounded in the in ternshi p exp.:ri 'nI:�. I , de�tgn.:d tl> Jssi I !'viA IAl1dJdall'S in b Lo ming f,\ mili�r with t h � p UT PII�cS, l h ur i >, ilnd pr().::e�ses of cd uc:lt iou.ll !Ilquiry, The i n tent IS to pru\ld� the op portun i ty for p r ogra m parti ci pa n t s to e)trior.: a n etlu a it nal tOPIC in a � -,­ tematic '''' ,Iy in rJ"r tll .:nrkh t he n un dcrstan di n� of the topic, and gene I " the strength� ;Ind li milat mlls (If �d u...a l illn <11 inqU Iry.

opt iOIlS:

(2)

Sjwci oi FduC<ltion

VI

c

[ i�abilitit!� ( 2 )

peci<

m

PROGRAM OVERV IEW: 'tu enb enrolled i n the MA w it h HI Program b egi n �tuJies in mid- ju n and c(l m plde pI' grail! retj u iremcnts t he 1()lIowing August. I n a dd it i on to courst! wurk reqUired fM tht: res iden c,' Lei tificate. st uJe n t�

Sperial l:u llc , l l Ion 5.'14 In clusion an u St ud ents WIt h BehaVIO r

Disab L i i li e -

o

Cenific.l l i

The Inclusive CJassyoom Special Ed uc <lti o n 530 Asse ssment of l udt: n . with Special Needs ( 2 ) ptlc i a l Ed uca ti on 533 In cl usi on und tudentl. w i t ll loderat

L hsorders

VI -i c:

i nqUIrers, anu cu rnl;uJumlin trllction,,! specialists. (.oU f\O;: work. ill th pn.lgr;l: 111 i s de-;il:.'ll eu .l W U d spccill them , thnt serve �s a focus for i nd l \'id ua l dnd group proj.: ts a n d II1 ter se �t wi th t he ftlllcll n: of lead t:r- a Ie. dl'rs i n q u i r r� > and curriculwnl i mtrn tJ ( ln.<11 �I'l' j 11i�t..

Special Ed ucation 555 Supc:rv l si ng Paraeducator in Sch 01 SeUi ng� (2) Specinl Educ.lIiOll 575 Coll aboratio n an d rc� m Building (2) Spc:clal du�.llion 5 7 7 [he Ind usi c � Cla%r om (2) Special l'd uc:'It i <ln 5MB Legal , Eth ical a n d d ministrative Issues Spe�ial Ed�lCal ion ( 3 ) S pcciil l Edu(Jli n 595 Spedill Ed ucation: I n ternship ( 2 ) Special Euucation 596 Tech nology and . peei a l Ed ucd tl Un ( 2 ) Ch oose o/le of lilt: followirlg

m

d �cl(IP u n Jent,ulding.� and �kjl ls fO l I heir funct ions as le;Jders,

(2)

0111 .' o( L ir e {u/folVillg ro!:;t'GI til opliolls: EJuc tilln 598 Stu ies in EduCJt ion ( 2 ) Education 599 TheSIS (J u r 4 ) OUTse

I'h D

CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: The p r i ma r y aim of the program is to eduwte tC'llclu!r� who ;l I e read)' to aSS llln e a dely ll f m le" in 2 1 h.l'l1 l u ry S-11IJ( ,I � . [\ll u ity wnrk \l i t h students to

Ollt' If til (ollow i ng: Education 5l-1S Cumpar:Hive Edllcatlon ( 3 ) E ucatinn !'i86 S I\.iology )f Edu cat ion ( 3 ) Ed uc a t i o n 5 S 7 Hi �tory of E d u ation ( 3 ) Educuion 'i 8 9 Ph i loso ph }' f . ucation (5)

Spcdal Education ( 1 1 �I!mestcr hours)

au"

I he M 1\ w ith Un i ficati on Progr:J11l is de:. i 'fled fo r qllal lfied c<lndidnks who flOSS � a hacw l. ll1 r�.l t ' degree in th t: l ibera l arL\ 1 . d 'leek a G1TecJ 0 1 ,erVICt" .l� l e'l d llr, . 1ll1fSC \\lo rk I ads to the Mllster o! Arts in Edu 'allon: Classru m Te-,I ching degree and Wash ington State Res idcl1C)' Teach l l iA Ce r t i ti cat.:: w i t h endorse­ me n ts i gri1tle� K· g ( Elen·ld1ta.ry I:ducll tion ) a n d g rade s 4- 1 2 (SlIhjcc t , -b tter S p ec:iiic). Calldidal� .::om piete <II internsh ip in grades 5-8 i" u l l t i m e studellts t:ntcr i [ l � lhe p rog r-.l m m.1Y expect to com­ p i t! e 01 1 1 reyuir.:mc l l t s in ! 4 month� ( fu l l - t i me ,tudt: n t loa ) A st rong empha"i/i in the- program i� placed 01 1 tl ev do ping the skil ls nect:l>sarr for I I .. ill lugrali on of curri.:uIulll a,:ro s grade l eve l ­ \ViiI spelific a t ten t inn 10 Iht middle levd (gra d 'S � 8 ). -I he program is dis l i nguished by ,ld I Vt: ,1II d ear l y mvnlveme t in the SdlO b and by membcr�hi p w i t h a cohort group of peers, 'itudc:nh en ler - ng the pmgr;l in t he sa m .: tc: r m wi ll progress thwugh cuurse> and practka togcthel- wh kh allows them (> sh are i n s i gh ts anu e. peri IKe�. Bec use 01 tfle in v(llvt! 1ll t in »ublk school programs, st ud en ts shollld be able to lake counes and �,;; rti Cip.ltt! i n pT.tct i d ring t h e Ja)'

n

c att

1 1 1 ion

to (II r­

PRERE.QUISITES: fur regular .ltl nllS� lUn, appllc<l11 tE must have a b .. K ca l ,lu reate dt: 'reI' fr m a ft'gio na l l) al:creci i tc d in�t i l l iu n of high!'r e Jul. a ti on , A m i n l lTlUm grad roint avenl e

compldeJ

of .to and o fii c ial scores from t he G ra d ua le Record EXillll ( G RE ) or othe r ad l i ��i n n �AaJ1li l lat it) f1 appro ed b)' the d irector are required. Appli� allt� are i n vit.:d to mee t w i t h Lht: pr gr. 11 d i rector beJeJr - �uhmttl ing the v)mp l eteu ap pl ication in order to darify qu <:s t io n ab(lut the rrogr,l ll1 and adm b ions procedures. canditiatcs should submit a pplication to P I ll\ (,rad uate Studies Prog r,1Tl1 S , AppJ i . t inn s <lrt dli.lil.lblt' l rum th Office of J\d mis IOns.

ADMISSION PROCEDURES: lntt:r��te

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S� r eeni ng or applicants and admi s,5 i

11

to the incomi ng class w i l l

Lho:: class IS ful l . Enroll ment iun Program is li mHt!d a n d

begi n Ja n ua ry 3 1 a n d conti nue un ti l in t il

'I A ,�ith R �idl'nc)' Ct!rti fica

ad m ission t o t h e pro

am

is compe t i t ive, Application

Master of Science in N ursing

and

253.:>35 .7672

aJmi»si(ln procedure� include:

".J

1 . C o mp l eted app l i cat i o n will co nsi st of t h e following: <l. Graduate Appl it:atioll Fo m including: • Tw o rec()mmcndatioll� w i th at least Olle acad em i c r t"t-rence •

St.lt m c n t of (;oal s

Re�llrne

wW\\f,pl u.etlll/ " 1 1 I H "S Te rry W. l'vl ill.cr. P h D, Dean, Sdwol oi ,"/lrSi'1!! PU RPOSE: The p u rpo�e nf the gradu.lte program in n u rsi n g is a.. advanced pra t i ct: dinici. ns, .holars. Th e c u rri c u l um cOllsi;ts of " common core of ma-sr er's leve l c o u r�es ( t h eory, research a nd leadersh ip) ,1lullg with co u rses �elc c ti ve l )' (()eused for either of two co nc�n t l'atiLl ns of study : P,nnily \fu rse Practi l i oner or Care and utW T11 CS Ma nager. The graduate. program is d es i g n e d to faci li tatt: .\l l l - t i m e or par t-t i ne stud) . Fu ll- t i m e � u d e n t · can co m l'ktc ei ther (Qncc n tra tion of stud)' in two ,1 Ciidell1ic years.

to p rt:l'il r� prof, 'sional nu rse s

managers, Itta dcrs, ,lud

b. A pas�i llg �cl)r on Ih Wilshington Sk ills Test .Basic. , ix Ie t d ates are available d u r i ng the year; check the Scho l of EducatlO ll website for the dates. c.

[ra mcripts from all col l eges

au

nJed

d. Offic ial copies f t,RE o r 1vI.A: scores 2 . Appl icatiom win be reviewed hy ,I committee in tht: School of Educa t i o n . int�rvit:w where they will also

c o m p l e t e <I

s

ACCREDITATION: [hI;' pnl� " ;l m

applicant> w ill be invited to the campus for �I group

. . Seit-<:te

S C H OOL O F N U R S I N G

ational I.C'd '

writing :sam pl e .

tional

n i l>

l'

IS

full}

aLcr editcd

by the

for , lIr 'i ng, Accredi ting CllIn fl1i. iOll. I ns t ruc­

'atisfy the

A mer i can Nu rses

retlent ta l i n g Center's

pplic<lots will be n o t i fied of the ommit tee\ decision. S. An:c pkd a pp l i cJ n l will rt!turn ;l c0nfu'mJti n card and nonrefun dable $300.00 dep o. lI ,

a nd Clin ical t\urse �pecialist ce rtifica t ion exa mi n at i ons.

REQUIR.ED COURSES: Program req u ire ments include Sllccess­

P REREQUI SITES:

4.

didaLtic eligi b i l i t y req u irem e.l1t s for Family Nurse Pra d i tioncr

51 1 544 5� 6 .56()

!>lr,ltegies fo r Language!1 i te ra , y De\'c!op m nt Research and I rngrarn . v aluatio n ( 2 ) Sec nllary a nd �'1 iddle School Curriculum ( 3 ) PracticuIl1

co ur:e w rk. St udents

(2)

co m p uter skil l s lip

year of

(3) EU\.,ltiollal PSfchol, gy

(6)

din ic.ll experience \\' lt h i ll

the la�t

t \ ·o

year ' is recom­

, 1 \.u rrt!nl

u nr estr iett:d I tce n se to practice a s a regi steTed

a hinglol l; 2) h o l d a bacca l llLlreate de�r e I I I nursing. from

(3) .ue

ld

nurse in the Slat at "

560 C,)I1unu nicati n i n t h e Schools

urretH I

e xpec t ed to have fun damental

N lwing progra ms w i l l :

I) I

(3)

3)

Eucwoll : ul Psyc h ol g}' 566 Advanced 'og ilion, Development, and Learning

a re

em r )" t o t he progr3 rn . A minimllm of one

ADM ISSION: App liL,U1L� fo r ad m is�i'J11 to thl! Ma �t er of Scien Ct' In

5,}4 Th':5is

l"uc.: al iuhal Psych ulogy 583

III

men ded .

(2)

5 2 ,>ch oL 115 and 'iociet), ( 3 ) S f>3 ln tegrat i ng Seminar ( -4 ) ;564 The Art�, Mi u d, a n d Body (2) 565 The Art a n d Practice o f Te aching - 68 I n ternsh ip (6)

oompl ti II of a iJasic co urse in des c (iptive

II1 ferential statisti(� i, r':l[ u i red bt:fore begi n n i ng gradwte

all

ful co mple t ion of the fol l ow i n g course ':

in Exceptionality

(2-4)

3 r

gionally

accredIted seh III of nur''Ing; suhmit offiual tran s c r i p t� fo r a ll col lege / u n i vers i t y course wo rk; ,I min i m u m c u mu l a t i \'e lIndergradu,ne grade p o i n t avt'rag of 3.0 on a 4,0 ,caie is an acimissi(lll requirement; from th..: Graduate econ.! £.xam ina­ t i n n ( G RE) takt:n within t h e last five years; a n d co m p le te a prea d m i sio n i nter\'i\:w. In tt:rna t ional and ES T. srudl:nts s h ou l d refer to related Policies and Sln l7darris (I iOIl of Graduate Stlldies,

4 ) �llb mit ac:ce p ta bh: scores

S) 6)

APPlJCATION DEADLINE FOR FAll: Candidates are reguhul), a dmi tted Y(;"l rly. P r i o ri t y admis$ions .'vl a rch I for the fo l lmv i n g fa ll

a re

completed by

flH'stel. Early ap p lic a tion is

encoura ged for prIority staud ing rel ati e to ti nnn cial awards. Non-matricu lated c, ndida e5, if approved, may e nr o l l in up to 8 semester hours, b u t ac" not gu ara n t ee d :Id m issiofl. here are l imitations 011 the n u mb e rs of stud ents -a c ph:d i n to the family N u r,e P ra c t i t i on e r or Carl' and )utcomes 1\ tanager C on ce n lr al iOI1� each year. A pp i ic a n h ADVANCE DEPOSITl

accep ted into the vrogram afe reqUIred to make

$ 2 0 0 . 00 adwncc pay m e n t o

to

a

11 0 n - r (undable

confirm their ac eptance of

atl

offer

ad mJss io n within two weeks of th eir acceptance date.

ADVISING: The Coordinator of (J raduate Nursing Education typically :u mpl tes i n i t i al advising and pro g ram p l a n n i ng w ith

'aLh stuclen t.

PROGRA� REQl1lREM ENTS: All admitted students m u s t provide v"liJ do 'llll1cn t at ion of the fo ll.owing by betilre ..:n rol imen t

III

any pracl lCum/cli nical

ugllst 1 5 a n d

course:

1 . i lll lU m i za ion and h �l h h s t a t u s 2. P I ct:rti iica tion 3. professiol1:1l liability insLl n1 llcL 4. per�()na l ht!alth insut a n e . 'iI'il, ali mi n i ,t rat !ve, and cr i m i n al history i n W,lshingtoll State, as well as any o t her applicable Lak or countr)'

1 14

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MSN DEGRFJ! REQUl REMENTS: (36 semest er boars) MSN Core

h U lTI<ln services, psychology, SOCIology, social work, or the equivalent

(9 liemester hours)

525 fhl:un:t ical Fl1ul 1 da t.,m · e l l 5 2.6 Nursing Leader� h i r and Managclll �n t

52 7

are not required to meet any program prerequisites. Applican b who do not have a degree in any of these areas are required to complete a mll1 imom of 1 5 scmest<'r hours (22.5 quarter hOUT ' ) in familv social � ienc • human � rviccs, psychology, soc iology, or social work.

(3)

Eval uation and Outcomes Research D )

Famlly Nune Practitioner Conce.ntration:

(27

seme

ADMISSION: The M Ff program is looking for individuals wh

ler hours in addition to Ihe MSN Core)

518 Fam i l y 1 hCllr) in N u r; ing ( I ) 580 Aciv;1n "d Palhoph, itll ogy ( 3) 582 Acil"dnced H�d l rh :\")t"ssment a n d Health Promotion ( 5 ) 583 J i n i l\l l)harma(otberilpl:ul i(� ( 2 ) 5!\.). Fam ily N u rsl: P ractilioner 1 ( 6 ) 5115 Family Nurs .. Pra(til io!li!f I I (Ii) �90 Roll! (It t h e NUrse' P rad l t i o n er ( 2 ) 590 Semll1,lf ill Adv.lllLeJ Pract ice Nursi ng (2) Care and Outcomes Manager Concent ration:

(17 seme

PREREQUISITES: Ap p l icants who have II degrc i n family studies,

have professional goab consistent w i th the program, voltmteer or profe.<;;.jonal 1.''Xl'erience in the 'iocial senices, the a bility to handle the acaden dc ri go r of the program, and the personal q ua l ities re­ quired uf marriage and family th e rapi s '. To be' onsidered for ad1T1 lSl>10n, app lica nts must: have a bachelor's degree, subm i t , tran$cTJpts ot all undergraduat<: work, have a specific lilt Test in M FT, p n)yjde a current resume, obta in two letters of recommenda­ tion, co mpl ete an application, and prep a re ao autobiographical

CI :a > o c: > -I

m VI

-I c: o m \II

statement. The compreh<!Osive autobiographical statCIDellt (maximum of

ter bour in nddition to the MSN Core)

390 In rormJ tion M ,magcme n t ( 2 ) 529 Care IVI,mager Rol es 1. 3 ) 530 Re�ou r,e Managelnt'll t ( 4 1 5.3 1 Olre: Jnd ( u tCO !ll <;'S Praclicul I1 I ' 1 -3 ) 5 3 2 Care a n d Ou tcomc� l'radicum 1 1 ( 1-5) 538 Pmgr.l m Devdnprnl' l1 t ( 3 ) XXX Approved r\cclive I clatl?d to One's Focus ( 3 o r 4 ) 5% Schlll :trir I nqui ry i n 'ur i ng Practice ( 4 ) or 599 Tht'sis (4 1 - MJ)' b� rep ealed A m i n i m u m number or �tudc n b rn�y be required before a class is offered .

five duuble-spal.. ed typed pages) should address tbe fo ll owi ng ques­

tions:

1. vVh a t significant life even ts have m()st in t1 u en ced your p resen t deve lopm ent and your desire to be a family therapist? 2.

hat are ytlll r p rofessional career goals after completing yo ur

degree?

3 . What are your sttengths that will help you achieve your pro­ fessional goals?

4. What

0

you camider to be areas for personal growth thal a thera­

mal nt'ed the mOst attentiull du r i ng your training as

p ist ,1t Pacific Lutheran University? This , t:Ilement replaces the re q u i red goal statement on the ap pli­

cation for m .

DIViSION O F S O C i A L S C i E N C E S

Master of Arts Marriage and Fam i ly Therapy Davl<.1 H uehbetk , PhIl, O VlIl/, I J i visioll o( Social SciCIICt'S Cheryl Slmm , Ph D, Chair Dcpflrtmc:n ! ;,nv/arringe and Fam ily Themp),; crh,i, Direc/llr Teresa McDowel l, II.I A . V!SIIIIIg Prof.-Hol'

'�s 1 vis il wiL'h ln lems /rMII MFT progm ms, I realize what a superior educatiOlP I recLiI'ed from FL U other programs only tOllclJ 0 11 smaLl IJI1IOHtl fs of what we sTUdied . . . . . .

"

KATHLEEN MAXEY. MTI l�RADlJAIE

Based O i l a committee review o f ap p l i ca n t s' wriUen materials, a pool of applicants t(1 b e i nterviewed is established. '1 he primary pur

APPLI CATION D • •

a d van

500 Human Develop m ent (4) 5 0 3 Systems App roach t o Marriage li n d Pamily Therapy

5 0 4 Pamily Development (4) 505 Social Science Rese a rc h Methqds (4) 507 -<Impurative Marriage and Famdy Therapy (4)

o r families with a wid/! rJ.l1gl! of ment.l ! h eal l h p rt1blem • r:1llging from the chromcal ly mt'ntnll ' i l l to troubled chi ldren, from a marriagl' and family therapy pen.pective. , luucnll> partidp.llc! in an intensj\lt lO-hOltr-pcr-week. klur­ semester CWI lCal experien e whi( h inc l udes SOO hours of t herapy u nder do su per vbion in ,10 o D - ..;a m p us clinic and in a comm unity platemen The on-l";lmpu, cl i n i c and fo ur off-campus sites otfer all students 0 managed care clinical experie nce. Acad 1ic conrses are �cd�led .lt 3:00 p.m. tIl al lnw , tudt:nts to w(lrk full-time du r ing Uleir hr�1 academic year while they prepare lur thel clinical eJ!paience. Bt!(ausc fJ.cult )' re':'Qgllv.e that adult stu dents bring expl!rtisC witll them, �tudell ts arc highl) involved in learning via <::Xt!lcises, das.m)()m diSCUSSIOn, ;md real- i l le activit ie-. The program ib seculdr i n nator e and emphu.si70 the dp l ication of thcury to pra tice, rigoro s t'vllluati o n, lind direct supervisitm of one's cl i n ical

.5 l 0 H u ma n Sexuality and Sex

Therapy (2 )

Fa m i l), Therapy (4) 512 Professional Studies in Marriage and i"dIllily Therapy (3)

5 1 9 PracticuIll I

(2)

5 2 0 Theory 1 ( 2 )

5 2 1 Pract icum II ( 2 ) 5 2 2 Theury I I ( 2 ) 5 2 3 Pra tiC LIITI l i l ( 2 ) 524 fheOf}' I I I ( 2 ) 5 2 6 Developmen t o f a Personal Integrated Theory ( 2 ) 5 25 Pl'a(;ticll m I V (4) 5 2 7 Ext nded Prac ticu m V (2) E lective:

fully il c cre d i ted b)' the Com·

599 Thesis (it)

and Fam i ly T herapy Edu­ of M ,Jrriage d n d !\rn ily Ther.lp , (AAM FT) ,l o d a lso com p l t ,' S w i lh Wa�hmglon State ert i fi cation rtll u irem�nts fo r m a rriage a n d fam i l y therapists. un

(4)

5 1 l Psychosocia l Pathology: Relationship to Marriage and

'ompel�'nq.

A�cred l luLio n fur Marriage

cation of the ,4,rn ('rt�,1 n AS:;(lL iati (

payment to confirm t he i r acceptance of an offer of ad­

REQUIREM ENTS: (45 semester ho urs)

, unseling b Lidreli, ..ldult�. cllupk:

mis�ion

e

mission withi n three weeks of their acceptance date.

(MF I ) program I � to u\li n cliruClans interested in

ACCREDITATION: The pn)gr,11l1 i

DLINE FOR FALL:

Appl ica t i on tll e completed in Office of Admissions: January 3 1 I n terview N It'itication: M i d February th ro ug h end of Apri l. Inte rview date: To be a nnou nced.

ADVANCE DEPOSIT: Accepted a pp licants must make it $300.00

PURPOSE: Th�' l'rimary nbje ti ,·\: of the Marri ge and Fami y

Therapy

se

of the in terview is to determine the fit between the appl.icants' pro­ fessi0l1.l1 goals and the p u r pose and mission uf the MITT program.

II

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z o f­

eI: 0:: f­ III

z

The Board of Regents OWNERSHIP, SUPPOR1; GOVl\RNMl!NT: The u niwrsit), is owned aJld operat ed hy

IDVI O RY - PW

David Huclsbeck, Dean, Division o J Social

Karln Anderson, Assistant to the President David Aubrey, ViI:<: Pre icknt for

Cbristopher H. Spicer. Dean, School of the

Del' Lopm�nt 3nd

U n i ver,ity, ln ., a Washington \vhosc purpose i� to rnainlai.n a Christian in 'titution of higher kami n g. With the � r matio n of the Eva ngel ica l Lutheran Church in merica (ELCA) n jal1Ll<1rY I, 1 988, the PLU Pacific Lutheran

corporation

'orporation was reconstituted. The corporation

a n nually on the PI.U cam p us to elect re­ ge nts and to c o nduct other bU:iiness. The corpo­ ration consis t s of 34 regen ts and \ 25 delega tes fro m the six synods of Re gion I of the Eva ngelical Lutheran Church in America. The B o ard of Rc"e n!s includes eightee n re prese ntativcs fTom t he Alu m n i Association, three bishops from the �ynods of Reg ion I , and the L1ni rsity president. .[ he poli�-y-Inaking and governing body of the unive.r it), is the Board of Regcnts. On the basis of recomm<:ndations m ade by the presi dent, it chart5 a course for the development of the total program

meets

nivers-ity Rela tions

l.aurn MaJovski, Vice President alld Dean for Student Lift' Tames L Pence. Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies Laura Polcyn. Vice President for Admi.s:;ions and Enrollment Serv ices Rev. Richard Rouse, Executive Director of ,hurch Relations Sheri TODD, Vice President for Finance and Operations

Scien es

AIts

Donald R. Bell, Dean, School of Business

Lynn G. Beck, Dean, Sch ool of Educatioll

TerryW. Mlller, Dean, Scho o l of Nurs ing Paul £. Hoseth, Dean, School of Physical Education and Athletic Department;

A t h letics Directo(

Cbri Ferguson, Dean. I n formation Resources

Michael Butanen, Dean, S pecial Academic

Progr ams and Summer Sessions

Cbades Berpnan, English, 'amlt), Michele Crayton, Biology, FaCIlity

Douglas Lamoreaux, Director, First-year

Susan Carnine, ASPLU Presidmt, S/I{ric"t Hmily Brown, A PI. Vice Pre. ident, t llrielll Chd!lAnderson, ASPL D i rec tor of Finance, 5f!1dcM

leslie Foley, Director, Ac ad emic Assistance

Anthony Evans, Physical Educa tion, Fawlty

Pro g ram

Patricia Roundy, D i rector, Aca dem ic Advising

of the un ivers ity and strives to provide essential

CHURCH OFFICIALS

fuculty have non­ voting repre;cntatives who mee t \ 'tll the board.

Eval/gel/wl LlIIllcrall Churdl j" America

Janet Rasmussen, Director, Wang Center for Int�rnarional Programs lone S. Crandall , o'i rector, Center for Public Service Maxine Hubert-Hill, Director, Co o perative

OFFICERS

Bishop Mark S. Hanson Addie J. Bntler, i(<,-President

Ju lia Pomutnk, Registrar

Cynthia Edwards, Vice Chair

Richard L McAuliffe, Treasurer

S.ERVICES

fund�. The student body and the

Gary Seva;son, 01air

Rev. LoweD G. Almen, Secretary

James Hushagen, Secreta ry

[)il'i.<nll or

EX-OFFICIO Loren J. Anderson, PL

Preside n t

1999-2002 TERM Neal L Arntson, POrtla nd, OR, £LCA Richard L Bauer, Boi,e, [D, ELeA Anne Hafer, Wheaton, I L, RagcIlHlt-Larg< Kurtis K.Mayer, Tacoma, WA, Regelll-tll-Large Donald Morken, [lellcvue,V A, Regent-at-Large Hev. RidJard OmJand, Billings, MY, ELeA Jeffrey Rippey, Portland, OR. Regellt-al-Large Rev. rohn L Vaswig, Edgewood , WA, a A Rev. Dean Wigstrom 0, Silverton, OR, fLeA 2000-2003 TERM

Cynthia EdWlU'd5, Un iversity Place, \VA, ( I!ice Chair)

fLCA

, R egt'll t- at - La rge pple Valley. MN, Regem-at-Large

William Foeg�, Allanta,

Roe lIlIt.Len,

Anne Long, Bel levue, WA, ELCA

R�v. Larry Nub, Fenton, MO, Regellt-tU-Largc Karen Phlllips, Mercer [ slan d . WA, ELCA Martin Pihl. Ketchikan, AK, F.L A Gerry Anne Sahlin, Bow, \VA, ELCA ,im Stauffer, Nt issoula, M1� FLeA S\lSWl Stringer. Bellevue, \VA, AIlIlIllli Bishop Martin Wells, Spokane, INA, Bishop HCA

2001-2004 TERM DanJeI L Alsaker, Spokane, WA, [l.CA Becky Bund, SaLl FrJnc is((), CA, AiwlIlli Robat Gomulldewicz, Red mond, INA, RegCl1r-ar-Large Roberta Goodnow, Bellevue, INA. . Regent-at­

Ltlrge

Ken Hartvigson, Ir., Seattle, \VA, l:.LCA Bishop Robat Hofstad, TJcollla, \VA, Bishop f:1.(J\ Kathleen Jacobson, Bend, OR, ELCA Katherin� JOhnsOD, S ilo rd in e, WA, ELeA wnllam W. Krippaelme, Jr., Seattle, \VA, El.CiI MkheDe Y; Long, Cypress, TX, RegPl1t-at-Large Gary SeYerson, K irkl an d , WA, Reg , I t-Clt -Large (Chair) Rev. Rebecca Ludy ShJerven. (jig Harbor, WA, fL( . 116

For JaclIlty listi,,' 5, vi$it tl,e PLU wtlliog (Julille a t www.p l u .cdu/print/cJtaJog.

Ad m i n istration

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l lighr FdllC<1tiMI (J/lrl . cllools

Raymond Bailey, Fort Col l i ns, CO Dean Baldwin, Erie, PA Rev. Timothy r. BeUger, Lancaster, PA Rev. Susan Brlehl, Spokane, WA

'anet F.. Greenleaf, Bu hlehell1, PA Rev, Sherman Wcks, \ ashi nglon, D C Kristine Hughey, W8J1in�ford, PA Jeffrey Kane, Manch�ter. NI l Rev. Gwendolyn . King, Ha nover, N H Rev. Linda J. Kraft, Staflord Spring, CT Jenny Peterson, Austin, TX Rev. Stepben Samuelsoo, Racine, WI Rod Schofield, Colorado Spr i ngs. CO Diane Scholl, D corall, IA Alycone M. Scon, Fremont, E Rey. Ernest 1.. Simmons. Moorehead, MN Gay S. Steele, Colurnbus, I i Teke!ite Teclu, Ceder Falls, [A Rev. Paul Thielo, I nlst d Fa Lls. 0 1-1 Rev. Jayne M . Thompson, Manhattan, KS leonai'd Schulze, Exc� utiw Dlrector Am.e Selbyg. Dire tm for 'olkges and

niversities

Education

ADMlSSIONS AND ENROLLMENT

Laura J. Polcyn, Vice Presid en t David Gunovich, Director, Admissions Charles Nelson. D irector of [nternational Admi ions

Kay Soltis. D i rect o r, financial Aid and Student Employ m en t Su� Drake, Man ager, Student Services Center

DBVIlWPMENT AND UNIVERSITY REl.AfIONS

David G. Aubrey, Vice Presi de n t Lruralee Hagen, Director, Alumni and Parent Relation ·

Greg Brewis, Executive Di rector, University Communications

James Plourde, Executive Dirc'Ctor of Develop­ ment Martin J . Nero, General Manager, KPLU Alliso n Robe:rt&, Director, Advancement Service, FlNANCE AND OPERATIONS

Sheri ,. TODD, Vice President Robert Riley, Co n t ro l l e r usan Mann, D i rector of Human Resou rce

Loren J. AnderliOn, President Karin K. Anderson, Assi sta n t to the P resid e n t Vicky 1.. WInters, Exet: u t ivc f\ssociate to tile. President

Scrvi(�e:-; David Kobler, Director of Plan t Services Erin Sigman, D i rec to r of Din i n g Services Mark Mulder, Director of Auxiliary Service s Angie Zureber, Director of Bookstore Jennifu Wamoold t, Manager, Environmental Health and a fet),

Cmnpll$ Mir l ' 'try

STUDENT U FE

Administrative Offices PRESIDENT

Nancy Connor, Campus Pastor

Laura R Majovsld, Vice President and Dean

Church Re/<1tiolls Richard W. Rouse, Executive Director of

Jeffrey C. 'Ol'dan, Dean for Campus Life ThoOlllS Huelsbeck, Di rector, Residential Life Kathleen FarreD. Di rector, Srudent Involvement

Datnis Seppu. Campus Pastor

Church Rdations

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

rames 1.. Penc;e, Provost and Dean of radu::HC Studies

William R, Teska, A '(Kiare Pmvost Barbara Temple-Thurston, Uean, Division of

Hu 111 a uiLies John Carlso n, De;J I1, Division of Natural .':iciences U N I V E R S I T Y

for SUldent Life

and Leadership

Wall Huston, D i recto r, Campus Safety and Information

Beth Ahlstro m, Di rector, Career Development

Guy Minetti, Director, Co unseli ng and Testing Sue Mkrtichian, Director, Heal t h Services


c

U n iversity G u idel i nes

z < '"

Family Education Rights and Privacy Ad In accordan ce with the fam i l y Educational Rights a n d

P r i vac y Act

1 9 74, the acro n ym of

po p u la rly knO\ n a s the " B u ckley Amen dmen t" a n d c a rryi ng "PERFA," Pacific L u theran Un ive rsi t y has adopted a po l icy to protect the p r ivacy 0 e d ll�at ion records. Thi, ,Ict also c,tabhshe" the rights 0f parents and curren tly enr Ued, eligible s t uden ts to inspec t ,[nd review their educa­ t i o n records; nd prov l d es guideJine� for t he correc tion o f i naccu rate o r m isleJding d a r a t h ruugh i n fo r m al a n d form a l hearings. Parents and cur­ re n t l y e nrolled ,

a n n ually

by

eligible st u dent s w il l be not ified of their FER PA r ig h ts

p ublica t ion in the Student Hand hook . I n t e rested parties may

review the policy in the

ffice for . tudent Li fe, Hauge Ad mi nistration

II>

PR.l!AMBLE: Pacific Lutheran Univers i t y is c o m mi tte d to p roviding an educa t ional and empi o ;'m e n t envi ron men t which i s fair, consistent, c ar in g and supportive

-I -<

of professional and personal growth. The Un ivers it y is

fu rther com m i t ted to p rotect i ng the ri 'hls of it, com mu n i ty member' to

ideas

engage in d ial ogue a n d expr�

in an e. n vi ron men t whidl i, free from

h a rass men t , discr i m i n a t i o n and explo i tation . freedom of e .x p r�sio n does

freedom

not en ta i l

to th.reaten . in t imi d a te, harass o r assault. The Univers i t y

o

co mm un ity w i j l not a . n d dot'S not t o lera te s u c h behaviors. Fi n al ly, the

U n ive rs i ty is com mi t ted

B uildi ng, Room 1 05.

;lQ

Policies on Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Adion, ADA, and Sexual Misconduct

'"

tu . xpan d ing a n d ma i n tai n i n g diversit), in i t s

r-

s tuden t , faculty, staff a n d adm i n i st rato r p op u lati ons and to accommodate,

persons with disab i l i t ies. To h o nor a n d implemen t these com mi t llH'l1ts, the Un iversity Board o f Regents has adupted p ol icies o n ' q u a l O p po rtun i t y, Affirmatrve Action a n d Acco m modat ion o f Persons with Disahili ties as well as a polic)' proh ib i t in g Sexuol Misconduct, incl u d i ng sexual harassm en t , 5e>r u a l assau l t , and ce rt a i n consen. u I exual rela t ionsh ips. The �ucceS$ of these p o l ic i es requires the co o pera t ion o f every mem b er of the Un iversit), com mu n ity. Spe i fical l y, each membe r <If the n ivers i t y c om m u n it y i5 expe c ted to read the policies and follow the di rectives set forth t herei n . The process o f wh.e.Mv�r pos ible,

Policy on Non-Discrimination Pacific

Lutheran University does not dis riminate o n the basis of race,

creed, religion, ge nd e r, nati o n al

color,

M i g i n , •ge, me.ntal or p hysical di¥<lbil it y, m a r i tal status , sexual orientation, or any o t her sta t us protected b)' law in t.he edu cati o n al programs Or activi ties which it operates, and is req ui red by Tit.le IX of the Education Amendments of 1 9 72 and lhe regulutions adopted

pursuant therdo, by Tit le VI dnd Ti tle V I I of the Civil Rights I\ct and by

S

et i on

504 of

the Re.habilitation Act of

1973

(If 1 964,

not to discriminate in

such man ner. The requirements not to discri m inate in educat ional programs and actiVIt ies exten ds to c:mploymen t t h erei n and to admission thereto.

conn:ming the a pp l icat i o n of ,aid ac!. and published r sula­ to thls u n iversity may be referred to; The D irector o f Human Resource Scrv i c , Pacific L u t h eran Un iversity, telephone 535- 7 1 85, for matters relnti ng to em ploy m en t poLicies and pract ices, promotio�, fringe benefits, trai.n i n g, a nd grievanc" pr edures fo r staff employed by the university. Th. Associate Provost, Room 1 04 , Huuge Admini stration B ui ld i n g , Pacific Lu theran U llivers ity , telephon. 535-7 1 26, for [flatters re lati ng to s t ude n t admissions, cll rnc ulmn, �md fi n�l11 c la� aid. The Student L i fe O ffice, Room 1 05 , Ha u ge Administration Bu ild i ng, Palific Luthemn UJ liv.r�i t)', tel e p h o n e 5 3 5 - 7 1 9 l , fo r m a tte rs regard i ng a d m i n i�t rativc pol ic ies rela ti n g tn st uden ts a n d s t u d e n t services. The Director of Coul1>el i n g and Testing Services, Room 1 06, Ram st a d H a l l , Paci6c Luther;Jl1 U n iversi ty, telephone 535·7206 , for matters r ela t.i ng to the application of Seclion 04 of the Rehab i l i tation Act. The Oean for Campus Life, Un iversi t y Center, Padlic Lu theran Univer­ ity, t elepho ne 5 3 5 - 7 1 95 , for matters relilti n g to the student g r i eva n ce Inquiries

tion I.

2.

3.

4.

5.

procedure.

ivi l l ights, U.S. Depa r t m e n t of Educa­ Switzer Bui ld ing, 330 C Street S.W., Wash ington, D.C. 20202.

6. O r the Assistan t SecrdMy fo r tion,

Policy on Equal Educational Opportunity Pacific Luthe ran education for a l l

n i ve rsi r y is com m itted

to

p rov i d ing

eq ual

ruden h ,,,ith ou t regard to " per on\ race, ,0IM, n at ion al

origin, creed, religIOn, age , gender.

sexual

ment<ll or p hysic a l dis bilit")', or any other �t3tuS protected by law. The univen;iry comm un i t y will not t lerate any discrimination, harassment, or abus,' of or toward an)' member 0 the univer. i ty co m m un ity. The un i versity holds as basic the i ntegri t y and we ll bei n g 0 evet)' person in the community. I t is committed to pro vid ing an ed u Gltional environrnCilt which is fair, co nsistent. caring, anli supp rti ve of intcllectual and pc o n a l growth. Further, it is com m i t ted to prok ing the rights "f its comlllunit m"mbers to engage in di alog and to eltprc�s id e a. in a n e nvi n)nment which o rien tation,

is free from bar3 sment, discrimination, and exploitat ion. This freedom of

express io n does not, h ,,,e ver, en ta il the freedom to th rea ten , intimidate, harass, or abu c. The u n iversity proh ibi t s any activities whi ch cause or threaten p hysical or mental harm. s u fferi ng, or ex h austion ; willell demean the d i gn ity and personhood of any individual; or w h i c h i n terfere with one's academic progres . Elwm pl e. of " uch ac tio ns are verbal threats O r ab use, haraS5ment, in ti m idat ion. t h rea tened or .!Ctual physical a>sault, or con,istent d isregard of t h e rights a n d welfare of o t hers. In p art ic u la r, the university w i l l see a a vi olat i o n of t h is pol i cy, any behavior whidl comm u nicates . message that is t h re a ten i ng, i n t i m idating, Or oemeaning Or \ h i e h callSe physicnl h rm to 0

person

or to pe rsons

bt:'

<lust:

of rae\..'. , � lor.

nat i onal ori gi n,

(re d, religi o n ,

age., ge n d er, m ar i t a l status, s�xual orien tati o n , rn"nt�1 or p h ys i c al d i ,ab i li ty, or any other �lal,US protected by rederal, state, or local law. Any person or persons \

ho

ar�

found to have violated thi� p licy will be subject to d i sci­ and in c lu di n g ,u.pen,ion, exp ul sio n , or term i nat i on.

p l inary action u p to

In II>

providing equ a l emplo),ment a n d educa tiollal oppo rtun i ty 0 ' well as pro v i ding working, l�arning and

living environ me nrs free of h a ra ss men t, that every member of the Un iversi t), community respect !he right> o f others and report v iolati o ns of the Universiry" polic ies. Failure to report violations ma), i n h ibi t the

dis ri mi nat io n and i n t i m idation requires

University's abil i ty to take prompt. corrective action.

Thro u g hout these policies, references to "Employee(s)" sh a l l mean any

regular or temporary member of the University's workforce i ncl ud i n� facult)" adm in i stratio n , and staff.

Equal Opportunity Policy Pacific Llllheran University

is co m mit t ed to p rov i di n g "<Ilia I o ppo r t u n i t y i n

em p loyme n t a n d i n education for a l l members of t h e Un i ve rs i t y co mm uni t y \\'i tho ut rega rd t o a n i ndividual's race, colof, cre�d) rel i gion) g ndcr, national origin, age, mental o r physi(:;.d disabi l i ty, marital statu" sexual

orientation

or

any othtT s t a t us protected by law. This equa l o pp ortu n i t y po l .i cy shall apply to all aspects o f empLoyment. i ncl uding h i r i ng, co m pensi.ltion.

benefits,

transfers, promotions, t rain i ng,

ed uCOl t io n, reduction- i n -force and term i natio n . To the ".K ten t p e r m i t ted by

Lutherans or other Ch ri,tians or a d m i n i s t rat i ve positi o n s whenever s u c.h choices a.re dee m ed necessary for carrying out the educational and reU gi o us goals consi stent with Article II Qf its A r t icles of Incorpo ratio n and Art icle V, Section 2 of the Univers i t y's 1l )I- Law> . P L U fu r t her r�,erves the right to make em p loym en t decisions based on an ind ividual 's j o b performance, merit andlor .Ippl ic.lble la\\', P I.U re,trves the r igh t to h i re for fa c ul t y

qual i ficatiollS.

oppo r tun i ty i n

z

This

equal

oppo rl u nit y

po licy s h a l l s i m i l a rly appl)' to all as p ects of

educational opporlu n i t)l, i ncl udi ng rec r u i t me n t , e n rol l men t,

ad

a"ce m e n t

and cvaluario n . T h e Un ivers it y "'ili n o t tolerate a n y d isc ri m ination or harassmen t toward o r by a n)'

of its Em p lo)lees or students.

Any w r i t ten, oral, physical o r visua l

(ommllnication t h a t i demenn i ng, degrading, i nt i m id a ti ng) or o therwise di rected at a persall o r persons

he.callse

of race,

co l or,

gender, natio n a l

o rigi n . marital status, age. rel igion , mental or physical disabil ity, veteran

tat us, se..'<uaJ ori e nta ti o n or any other status tha t Is p r o t ected by federal,

state or local law lilL be co nsidered a violation of t h is policy. A n y person, or pe rsons. who ar e found to haw vioLated d isciplinary act ion , up

to, and

thi

pol i

.' rnay

be subject to

induding, suspension , expulsion and/or

termination.

Individual, who believe

that they have been

ubject to discri m inatory

action or h:tI'assTll � n t or bel ie ve that discrirni natory act i o n or co nd u c t has

taken place, are strongly encouraged to contact an)' member of the U n i\'Cr�i ty G r ievance Com mi ttee or their supervisor. The Unrversity stri c tl y pro hi b its thrcat�, i n t imidation or re t aliati on of any kind aga i nst a person who reports a violati o n of th is non-di scrimination pol ic}' or who cooperates w i t h an i nvestigation of alleged violation. Any such conduct w il l i tsel f co nst itut e a violation ot this p ol icy and may s u bject the offender(s

to

disciplinary action.

Affirmative Action Policy Pacific Lut h era n UnivCI"s i t y is committed I"t:prt.'sentiltion of cthn ic1 gende r, ( u l t llral

to en largi ng una m ai n tain i ng the

and t:(onc,Hnic d iversi ty among its

E m plo)'e" , as well a , among i t s tudent population. P LU

i- fu rth er

c o m m itted t o the accom modation of per"",s with disabilities, whether

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students o r Employees. I n fu rtherance o f these

goal, J n d i n accordance

with

For the p u rposes of thi. policy.

sexual hara�sment is ddined a5 for se, lIal fNors or other verbal or

...

s t a t e a n d federal law. Pacific Lutheran

z

Action Plan t h a t reflects its i n t e n t to provide applicant>. Employees, and

phy,ical conduct of a "xual n a t u rt when:

students e q u a l opportun ity in all aspec t5 of e m p loyment and education and

Sub m i ssion

...I ...

o

u n welcome scxuol . dv n n e.�, roque.t

n iversit"), h a s adopted an Aflirmative

to provide a working and learnin� environment free from unlawful discrim ination and harassment_

progre

[ n accordance with the plan. the University has appointed all Affirmative Action

omc"" who

i" res ponsible fo r i m plementing and monitoring the

11\ II: ...

necessary to provide acceso t

:::)

such

As

the

Univcr.sity fac i lities according to

age.

; l p pearanc or status.

recom mendations a n d requirements o f tbe A DA . Where .I st udent , a p p l i c a n t

be obligat d t o need� of thal i ndivi dua l, unless provide "" dut hardship to the Univenit y.

provide reaso nable a comm odCltion to t h e

Reasonable accommodation may include )010 restructuri ng. part-ti mt' o r

(;lmpu

of

b"hJvio

The

conln

ffice.

ha

I n d i v i duals who believe this policy

been

viol

ted may

l i;Jbil i t y

tn accordance with its equal opportunitf polic")', Pa i n,' Luthe.r�n

The

environment in which students und Employees can work. live and study

')(uol misconduct h a s a seriOl!>

nt:gativc i m pact on the quality of the educalion and work t'xperiencc. The range of s .ual misconduct includes sexual harassment, i n t i m i d a t i o n .

a cornprehensi e edu ca t i o n program to promote 3' arene S of acceptable This policy is intended to meet

fh�

a n y other

membe r and

a

when

tudent b d y o r

har:u;sment in the workplace. i n the campu, re-idential environment. a n d in

E.mpl oyee population.

This

!l-uua/ I\S$(IIt/( Sexual 3-&sault

Sexual

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h : l ug i ng hUll�ing and academic s i t u�ltiQns i f such

Pursuit o f Jisciplinar

action through th e

!liver"it Student Conduct System as •

Pur uit

a,

uf

Paci fic Lutheran o u t l i ned in Section 4 ( b ) ;

nction v i a the University Griev71r1ce Policy J n d Procedure '

o u t l i n ed in Sect ion 4 ( c ) ;

lbe

pursuit o f criminal a n d/or civil charg�s w i t h i n

Pie rce Co u n ty a s outlin ed in

Y

niversity services

have the right to:

h""ge are reaS n J I)I)' available;

A

R

;lilY o f the l

below.

n t ia ! coun<clr ng;

A<.< isra nce i n

haras�ment.

U

u t l i ned in this policy. This

to outside medical resomcts;

ct of

harassment if it is fou n d to exi. t 'lIld take mea,ure; to ensu re " wurking

L

in<"ident to ap p ropr iate

medicaj as sist a n ce. w h i h may in lude testing for tran,mitted d i seases. H [V a n d presnanc)' as well as referral

Assistance in

by stlte and ederal law to invest igate those allegations. stop the

C

RIG HTS A N D assa u l t victims

CouJid

1 964, T i t l e [ X of t h e 1 9 72 E<lucation Amendment and the laws o f the Stare of Wash i ngt o n . \'Vhcn the U n iversit y heco mes aware of a l legat ions of sellual harass m e n t , It IS bound

I

( b ) . and (c) SERVICES

". " ,I lly

Sexual harass me n t is a form of s ex discri m i nation whi<:h is prohibited h y

F

3�sauh

On -campus

if th,' conduct or the campus com m u n i t y. inc-Iuding

C. Sexual Harassmwt

I

that wiU not not only an

Res pectfu l tre"tl1l�nt from all campus "uthoriti�s;

but not limited to any o f the harmfu l effects encompassed by the

C

rights and dignity

niver,it)'. SexuaJ assault i�

as

all ruelllbcrs of the campus community-students and �5 t o any lIKid"flt� which occm on ca m p u or in c nnec­

I. VI C T I M

rganiz.tion, program or activity, or

of .exu,,1

be reported a s soon

community. For these I' ",onS. Pacific Lutheran Uni versity stTongl)'

defi n i t i o n of sexual haras . .nent.

A

of i n d ividual

en "u rages v i d i m ., to I' port .<,- xu,,1

on Un iversity premises or in connc<.:tlQIl with a per$on\, paftitipation i n �'

and learning enviro nment that is free

violation

s e t fonh i n Sections [ [ a ) ,

The University ma)' i m pose san tioru; if t h e prohib ited conduct oem!'s

P

is a

be tolerated by Pacific Lutlleran

1 tak\':' corrective action)

propriate behavior. Therefore, i t

Univc..' rsit), setting m a y se.ek aSSistance from

non-menlber of tbe student body or Emp loyee popula­

VlI o f t h e Civil Rights

ina

University co m m u n i t y who are sexually ass.aulted i n an off-campus, n o n ­

em p l oyer, i n ternship supervisM. prospectiv" sludent or volunt�e r.

Title

not know a b o u t

tion with a n y Un iversity-sponsored a c t i v i t y or event . Members o f the

the prohibited conduct occurs betW'�en a

poses a risk of h a rm to any mernhl'r

doe.

ho w�v e r, when it

E.mpl o . ees

populati(ln a n d

tion. ouch as an off-campus vendor, i n dependent <;o n t rac to r, work-st"dy

university-spon sored

I'ohcy.

de dicated to the preve n tion and elim ination of sexual

pol Icy appLies to

when the conduct prohibited by t h is policy occurs

member of t h "

policy also applies

is

uni er 'it) a n d �v " " rn m e ntal authorities as

between any meml>er of the student bod)' or E m plDyee

is

personal

act of violence, aggressio n o r COer illil a!p i n s t a single individual, b u t it is

University's intent to follow appLicable law.

Po/ie)' S opc This policy appl ies

community

also an attock on h u m a n digll l t y. " value essential t o the U-niversi t y

requirement of applica b le fe deral

and state law. [f t h i s policy is inconsistent with any applicable law. it i s the

B.

U niversiry

the i e a r n i ng environlD t! o l . Tht: Un iver�ily CJnll

[1.

of its students or Employee.. 1'he

University will work to prevent and e l i m i n ate sllch be havio r by providi.ng

and non-acceptable behaviors,

of its

i f they fai l t

possible.

As �et forth below, the University does n o t and wil l not tukrate sexual

b)' or agajnst any

tolerated.

committed to providing all members

i s very important t hat violations at t h i pc,l icy

coercion. sellual assault, a n d certain consensua l sexual relation hips. m isconduct

is

olhers tn rc tal i a!,· also ,'iolates thi

is com m i t ted to provluing all

,nducL S

be

and ,;rill not Univ rsity

instaoce�

University pro h i b i t• .1ny discrimination in education or employment o n

free from aU types of seJrUal m ise

the

take "ppropriate action hen they become aware of of sexual h a ras:;men t. Re taliation against anyone reporting o r th o ught to have reported sexual ha rassment i, pro hi b ite d . Such retaliation is c o n s idered a serious violation of thi, p"licy and will b e '-on sitlerni independently of whether a harge or i nfonH,,1 C<lmp l ainr of sexual ha ra;" m e n t is substantiated_ Encouraging

ontoct a

Poucy 00 Ses;ual Misconduct Illtroductioll

PL

of repTisal.

particularly essen t ia l for persons in supervi,ory rules who may fa

A.

Moreover.

uf employment o r expulsion from JctllJ I (If i m p lied. whether acad em ic or

pcnsi<H). term i n at i n

fo rm

damaging consequences alld procedures for h a n d l i n g complaints_ Tra i n ing

m�m bel' o f the L1ni crsity Gri,'van e Com mi t te e or their supervisor.

the basis o f gender.

nl'

with education a. n d training about t J1e nature of sexual ha rass ment. its

accommod atio n

s h o u l d contact the Coord i n ator for Students w i t h Disabilities in t h e Counseling a n d To sting

o f su

related ! o emp loy me nt, will be treated as an aggravation 0 prohibited

Illt'dicall ' recogni zed a n d do(umented

f1ice. S t ud ents in need

du ution. work o r

iOiatlOll of these polici", ,hall result in di, i p l i n Clr)' action including the

Universi ty.

disabilit ies md who are in need o f special acmmnHldal ion, have "-n

shuuld

0(' o t her s i n the

aendel11ic or work performance or environment. joke,. comment . gestures Jnd n o n - ve r n a l conduct. Anyo n e , ho i uncertain as to whethe.r particular conduct violate. t his polic)' should con tact any of the people or resources named i n the exu"l Assau l t paragraphs of this poli c),. I n d ividuals who believe t h is policy '" - been v i o lated, or who observe potential viohllions. are I I'IJ n g l )' <! nco ul'lIge l to eek red re of t h e i r CQIKCmS by contacting , I n y member o f t h e Uoi-vtrsity Grievance o m m i ttec possi b i l i t )'

obligation to notify the Universi t y of t hei r needs. Pmployees

occurs w i t h o u t respect to

I nterferi ng with ano tller's

training/course ma terials o r policies. Reason,ihlc :JLLommouation will be determined on a w,�e-b)'-case basis.

It

Ill". ()cqlr between persons of the ·ame

SeJUla l l y harns,ing LUnduct can indude unw3nted

o r by conta c t i n g t h e i r supervisor.

modification of special equ i p m e n t o r devices. modi/leati n of examinations.

the Human Resource S<l'vice,

an

res i den ti a l e nviron ment ha. t h e pu rpose o r effect of substantiall),

moditled work/class schedu le. r assignment, trans leI', p u rchase o r

with

It

sex, I t m a r occur if th" �exual cun l u c l

part of i t s long­

o r employee with a disab i l it), is a b l e to perform the essent ial u n tiOllS of the

Students and employees

of in terfering with

i l ) creale$ a n i n t imidating. hostile or o ffensive

a- c o - workers. colleagues a n d peers.

gender.

job or academic/program requirements, t he Un iversity ll 1 ay

118

has the pu rpose or etfect

is usc:-d as the basis

Sexu,,1 ha ra ss men t may a o U r when there i, a d i fference in instillltionul

range plan, the Universi ty has co m m i t ted the financial und human resources

such acco mmodat i on would

nctivity

alnhority between persons . I t may occur between persons in equal positions.

University will n o t di,criminate against any s t u d e n t . applicant or empl oyee

z

or ,Kti

Such conduct

e.

because of the presence of a mental or physical disabili ty.

conduct or

working, h.:3 rning or campus rf:;idcllt i a l environment.

Pollcy 0 0 Accommodation of Persons with DlsabUilles As stated in the equal opportunity policy• • nd in a cordanc" with the Americans with Disabilitie Act o f 1 990 ( "A DA" ) . P ac i fic Lu tJ,e rCl n

>

ur s u ch

i ndividua l ' · emplo)'ment <lr cdu ational perfOrmJflC< (U advdnce m e n t ; o r

with the Univ rsity' affi rmat ive

L ffi

;

Such conduct Or "ctivit

action goals. The current Affi rmative ACtion Plan may be reviewed .. t a n y time by c o n t a c t i n g t h c' Human Re,ourct' Service,

_ _

for e m p l o y m e n t or e""luation;

regularly reviewed and may be modified from t i m e to t i m e to sen'e the

PLU com m u n i t ), consistent

conduct or ac t ivity is made either explicitly or

Subm ission to or rejcd ioll

goals set forth i n the Aftirmative A non P lan. T he Affi rnati,'e Action Plan is needs o f the

to such

1Inplicitly " term o r condition of a n individual', e m ployment or academic

victim'· advo

ate.

e(tion 4 ( d ) ;


4. REPORTtNG S"-XV,\L Al; S A ULT Pacific Lu t heran University strongl y encourages victi m., of ,.xu"l assault to reporl incidents. Filing a report with Pacific L uth eran

a. On - Campus Student Services:

Students

who have been vicl ims of s<xual assa u l t are enti tled to a

variet)' of services on and off Campus. The following campus offices are available t o provide v i c t. i m services:

Criminal. civil and University a c tion

< m ;Ia 11'1

systems, a d ifferent result may occur.

Gl

Center of Pierce County is n o t a commitment to press charges.

Cam pus M i n istry

occur independe n t ly; .1 vic t i m may pursue action i n one or bot h systems con c urrent l y. The lJllIversit )' is not required to delay on-campus proceedings pendin results in the cri m inal or civil svstems. Because the definitions of sexual assault and the burden of pro�f required for respon sibil ity are different in the campus, criminal and civil systems, an a lleged perpetrator m,,), be found respons ib le on campus, whlle in the criminal or civil justice

Co u nseli ng and Testing

G r ievance Officers S t udent life Office Reside n t i a l Life Student Conduct Coordinator Student J-Iealth Center

Women 's cnter b.On- ampus F cult, and Staff Services: A n E mployee who has been the victim of a sexual as;ault event, by a me.mbcr of the

PLU

co m m i tted

Victims o f sexual assault which occurs on campus o r i n connection with

com m u n ity, i s s t rongly encouraged

to co n tact Campus Saft'ty and I n formation, Human Resource

the following: Campu ' Safety

enter of Pierce Cou nty offers a 24 - hou r crisis,

victims of sexual assault and abuse, thei r fam i l ies and friends. Legal and medical advocacy is available. as well as support groups for victi m. , their friends and 253.274.0448. The Center exists to , erve

Pacific Lutheran University is committed to respectmg pers o nal keeping with the law. Employees outside of the above · referenced Resource Services (as to al l others) of any

a

brough t to their attention. Such

iden t i fication o f t h e individual(s) involved. b. Student Conduct Procedure.s A student mal' pursue action through the a victi m

which may offer them physical and emotional support. consultation

c. Grievance Policy .lIld Procedure.s

the vi lim knows his or her assailan t , such as in the case of

tact, Including forced sexual contact, a n d ( 2) forced sexua l penetra­

concert with others. NUII-collsellsllal sexllal contllct, illclwlillg jim:ed exUlII cOli/act. includes any harmful, rnsul ting or non -consensual ph sica! con tact

the alleged assault was committed on ",mpus or i n connect lO[]

with

a University-sponsored activity or event by another

the

An E m ployee who has been sexually assaulted by anotbl'l' the U n iversity Grievance Policy a nd Procedures. To

nother person without

facilitator : Susan Mann (253.535.7 l87), Patricia Roundy

(253.535.8786), Richard Seeger (253.535.8786). Or Merl i n Simpson (253.535.87791.

intimidating a person to touch another per on's intimate parts shall also constitute non-consensual or forced sexual contact.

d. Off-

( vaginal penetra tion ) ,

to seek assistance from any of tbe followi ng resources:

of force. t h reats, coercion o r by taking advantage of a v i c t i m's

Campus Safety and I n formation Scrvkes, 25.1 . 53 5 , 7 9 1 1

hel plessness .

P ierce County Offices, 253.597.6424 24· H o u r Crisisllnrormation and Referral wne. 153A74, 7 2 7 3 o r 800.756.7473. TTY 253 .274.0448

Sex.ual Assault

University hopes to educate the com m u n i t y in order to

Alcohol andlor other drug usc. intoxication o r a ny I m p a i nnent of the accused does n o t absolve one o f responsibility fo r sexual

Pierce Cou n ty Sheriff, 253.53 5 . 79 1 1

assault.

Tacoma

( i i ) For purpose of this policy, "consent" means that at the time of

5.

actual words or condu c t indicating freely given agreement to

University, up to and including uS pension

r""ist sexual advances due to alcohaliother drug use or other

and termination for Employees.

impairments. the accused will be held responSible for sexual

E. Consensual Sexual R eitrl i orrships Primary responsibility for maintaining high standards of conduct

( i i i ) force or coercion is defined as:

with faculty , nd supervisors, since

The use of phys i cal force or physical violence; or

power over

Tbe use o f threat . including but not l i m ited to, physical another when the victim

a b ili ty to execute such threats; or

be1.ieve�

rc,ides

a u th o ri ty and

or administrator) and a student. or between a supervisor and "

there is an

subordinate Employee, does not necessarily involve

sexual

sexual ha

, ssment or

m iscon d uct . In such circ.u mstan ces, however, the Universit}" s

The use o f verbal comments or n o n - verbal behaviors or

responsibilities to its students and Emp loyees are potentially om pro ­

believes that there is a presen ,

Consequentl y, this policy strictly prohibits con se ns ual sexual

gest u res to i n t i m idate the victim or anot h er when the victim

(iv)

others.

they exercise significant

A consensual sexual relationship between a n Employee ( faculty, staff,

threat>, abdu tion, extortion Or retaliation d i rected against

or

Un iversit)"s action by the or expubion fo r ,tudcnts

ban on sexual assault will be subject to strict disciplinary

where the victim is incapable af giving consent. or is unable to

the v icti m

PENALTIES PO R SEXUAL ASSAULT

Members of the Universi t y community who violate the

h Ve sexual intercourse or other sexual contact. In situations

under such dr .tIlTIstances.

Pol ice , ext. 253.535.79 1 1

Local Pol icy Agency (if away from camp us)

the act of sexual in tercourse o r other sexual contact there are

assault. Silence w i l l not be considered as evidence of consent

risis Center of

Ad m i n istrative

p revent violations of this polity, it should be understood Lhat:

(il

ampus Reporting

Victims who wish to pursue crimi.nal or civil action are enco u C'ged

sodomy, oral copul at ion or penetration with any object by the use

the

pursut such

action , helshe shoulcl contact any of the UniveC ' iry grievance

actual or implied force, t h reat, coercion o r helplessness. Forcing or

e

niversity com m u n i t y may pu r,ue action through

member of the

his!her (Onsent, including any such act a complished by m ea ns of

Ikcau

lTlc!lniJe[ o r

P LU commun ity.

o f a sexual nature ( including touchin g, fondl ing, exposure,

c.

p u rsue

action t h rough the U niversity Grievance Pol icy and Procedu res if

tion. and may occur by a person indiviclually or in

Forced se.:cuai penctnrtioll includes i n tercou rse

to

As an alternat ive to ( b ) abow, a student may choose

rape. At Pac.ific Lutheran University, .exu al

assault includes. b u t is not limited to ( 1 ) non -consensual sexual co n ­

b.

rrghrs a fforded

o ndllet S. tern are

o utlined in the Pacific Lutheran Univ'ersity Student H a n dbook.

per pc t l'ated by an assailant not known to the victim, or Illay occur

d is robin g, etc.) that is c o m m itted agail! t

Should

to pur ' ue a disciplinary hearing through the

victims and all eged perpetrators in the Student

Sexual assault can occur against both males a n d females a n d m a y be

a.

choose

Conduct Coordinator. The hearing procedures and

TERM[NOLOGY

da te

condu t syste m if

student conduct ystem, helshe should contact the Student

andlor referral.

n

student

the alleged assault was ( om mitt" d by another I'LU st udent.

as ap p ro p r i ate . Such individuals arc also en ti tled to PLU services

acqua in tance or

to st uclen ts ) or Hll m a n sexual assault matk" rcporting may be done without

departments must i n fo r m Student Li fe ( as

Procedures M a n ual and University Grievance Policy and Procedures,

\ h

enter

H u m a n Resource Services

digni ty and w i ll m a i n t a i n confidentiality as appropriate Jnd in

families.

Ar.L£GeO PSRPETRATOR SIlll V[CES Members of the PLU co m m u n i ty who are alleged to have comm i t ted exual ass a u l t against another member of the PLU com m u n i ty are en t i t l ed to all rights given w i t h i n the PLU Student Code of Conduct, Paculty Constitution and By- Laws. PLU Person n d Policies and

Women's

Health Center

Threat is defined

ability to execute such

o m rz m V'I

Student Life

Counseling and Testing

information and referral line at 253.474.7273 or 800.756.7273, TTY

of

Residential Life

Campus Ministry

ff- .. am pus Assistance:

ULT

University·spo nsored activity or event are encouraged to

including faculty members andlor Em ployees of a nt' or mOr'

assistance program.

J . SEXUAL Ass

a

report the inciden t , as soon as possible, to campus "fllei"ls,

Services and/or counsel ing through the University's Employee

2.

C

a. O n - a m p u s Reporting

o n campus or in canne 'ti o n w i t h a University-sponsored a c t i v i t y o r

The Sexual Assa u l t

z

University, the Pierce C o u n ty Sheriff or the Sexual Assa u l t Crisi,

Campus Sufety

c.

c

m ised by the likelihood or even the appearance of a confl ict " f interest.

threats.

as a n expressIOn o f intention to hurt, d estroy

hltioll­ i, in

ships between an Employee and a student wbenever the Em ployee

or p unish the victim, another person. or their p ro per ty.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

a

Y

119


VI

position

of p rotess iooal

responsibility with respect to t h e student. This

p u l i cy, fw,ther, , t ,- i dl y 1'''lJhibil� 'oru;en ,ual

W

a ,uperl'i",,.

Z

For

,1llJ

n ,Lrect wborrlin, k

t he pll rpos�> of this POliCY, an

professIo n al responsibility with

sex-oni

re lationships b e t wee n

m plo)'ee. mployee is in

res p ect

a

position of

lIlT"" tl)' i n a p <1 ,i r i on t., mah o r i n O u enc-c a decision or to confer o r w i t h ho l d a benefit relnting to the student's education, employ me n t , or L "m pU$ �poo>ored actIvity, This inc lud.·s, but is not l i mited to, staff!

c

st ud en t. facu l ty/student, coach/player, s up c rv iS rlstudent worker, and

atlvi ",r/advi&ee rdat ionships. hlr the p u rp o e. of this p ol i cy,

"n Employee is in a d i rt'c t s ubo rdin a te

rdation h i p with a su per vi s or if the Emplol'u reports to the supervisor, if the superv i so r "valuat", or d irec t s the Employee's work. o r

supervisor

is

i

the

i n the direct ebin of command of the ptrson to whom the

Employee reports.

11\ r:c w >

as those between an Emp loyee and a s[Udent ( even in the a bs<: nc e of

a C U lTent p ro fess i ona l responsibilit

with re pe e t to the student) a n d

'n " f J c u l t y member o r supervisor and an - mployee in a position (e l'en in the Jbscnce of a d i rect report in g relationship as ddinnl "bl)vc ). While th i s pol icy does not probibit consensual sexual r dat i o n.< hi ps Udl ll> these. they are s t ro n g l y disc"ur.g�d. llecause all Wtb rt'i.tlit>/uhip 1"'�I1tU1h UlI'olo? " rioklion of<'qUill 'I'f'OrtunilT '''11', i t mal n,: dim ult, if flllt impossible, in an)' . ubsequen t p roc ee d i n g to b"

I

" less authority

de end agai n sl u ,e){u,I1 ha r as s m e n t charge where t h e defe nse IS based on

the co m pl a l na n t's cons.,n t to the relationship. Moreover, those persons

inv<,lvcd in ,uch rL'i Jrion, hips must

be awar" dlat the

relationship may be

vi"w�d by (Jther5 as e xpl o i tat i v e or a c rea t i n g actuJI () r a p p are n t conflicts

of In tere,t. thereby CT e- I t i ng potentiol

difficulties (or o n e or both parties.

support, the

for in the grievance procedure set forth in Article I I I of the Faculty

di spu tes or c o m p l ai n ts rela ti ng to discrl m i n ation und sexual harassmentl

t

sholl

be

h a n d l ed in accordance with the following

procedures. Neither vo l un tar y n M inv o l u nt ary ter m i nations

be

administrative personnel may

is co m m ittE'.d

The Uni versity

to resol vin g aU grievances arising un der

theSe procedu res, including complaint of sexual harassment and/or

i

m i scondu c t at the e a rl c s t a n d most informal leve l .

A. lafOrrn;ll Griemna Resolution A gri vant may pursue an)' o f the

fol l ow i ng oprions for i n formal

r eso l u tio n :

I . Direct Ue;oIIlCioll. The gr i eva n t may discus d irec t l y with the res p o n d e n t the allegations of the g r i ev a n ce and wo rk with the respondent to resolve an)' con ems.

2 . SlIpervisor Resollliiort.

If the action sug

'C

' tcd i n par agra p h I is

gr ie van t is concerns wit], the su p ervisor

unsuccessful, ill-advised o r otherwise inappropria re. the

dis

uss

h is

r her

or department chair who i, re.'ponsible fo r t,lking ap p rop ri ate

efforts of facully, st udent ', s taff, a n d ultur,

action,

administrators to

I

If

the grievonc c d ire ctl y i n v o lves t h e supervisor, t h e grievant

ma tter If a

may go to the next level of u p ervi s i on or may bring the d irec tl y

on d i t iollS w h ich have made

h gui del i ne. i lltq�ral to contemporary la ng uage u�e. One .;e t of g u i de li nes \lft h e ""a ngelical Lutheran 'hurch in meriea ("Gu idelines fo r Inclu�lve sc 01 the En�1i h Lan guage ," 1 98\1), which p rov ides examp les of lnngu age that indude and J crlrmS g rou p s which have often been lD is rep re­ "" n ted in or left out of di,course. Inclusive langlUge avoids ; t ereot pes o r bia,e ,"dl a til< c based on gender, race, physical abi l ity, ,exual orienla­ t lon, ciass, nationaLlY, rel igion. family, and status. Inclusive lnngu ge directs our ue ot i on to the nu a nces of social reference ond calls us tCl add r es s all 5l!

respect.

to

the

;rievnnce

griev:lnce directly Pn'sitlent,

that

D

C o m m i t tee 3$ set

forth below.

i llvolves an individual a l tJ,e level of Vice

a n , P r ovos t or President, the grievant should b r i n g the

m a t te r direcLly to the Grievonce Committee. The m a tte r concluded by mutual consent at

t hiS

point.

mal' be

upervisors a n d c ha i rs

must i n fo r m the Grievance Com m i t tee I"hen h a nd l i n g grievances

invulw potential v i ol ati ons o f the Un ive r.ity'$ polic)' on sexual misconduct. 3. CrievIl nce C07IJmittee. I f thLTe is no mutually satisf<lctory re sol utio n at an earlier stage, or if the gr i eva n t does not wish t" bring the whi ch

discrimination, sexual harassment o r

mattLT to the chair ur supervisor, the grievant may cont'act any

me m b er o f the

C n i ve rs i t )' Grievance Comm i ttee to seek res o lu tio n .

Student Right-lo-Know and Campus Security Ad

The Grievance Committee mal' d i cuss options for i n formal

Th. S t udcnt R is ht-To - Know and Campu. Securit}' Ad, Public Law 1 0 1 -542, pr(Jvidc� th.!l irut it u tio ns of higher <' d uca ti o n disclose information about campus safety poirele, and p roc ed ure; to c urrent and pro spec ti ve students and em ployees. Pursuant to tha t requirement. Pacific Lutheran Un i ve r s ity has dr el"l'cd , j Campus Safety and Crime Prevention Guide that reports in ,t i t u rion al , (ul'ity policies and crime rat' tic . The c ur rent report is av arlable o n the I'LU website at ""vw.pl u .ed uf-s l if/cslr ndex,h tm l .

handling of the gr i e v an c e . make

Introduction 1 he Un iversit, is committed

also

attempt to resolve t h e problem Ihrough mediation.

notificat'ion to the

rievance Committee that the situation is resolved

or that no further University a c ti on is deSired. The Grievance

omm ittee will retain re orcIs of informal g ri ev a n c es fo r a mi n im u m

of three ( 3 )

y , rs,

Co m m i t tee,

l1

has app o i n te d a n iv""r ity Grievanc C o m m i t t ee which indudes represtn t-, 'tivcs from the t,,,ulty, student l i fe admi Il isrra t io n , h u man resources 3 d m i nis tr o ti o n and J dCnllC admi nistration. The om rn i tt ee appo illlments shall "Jch be fo r a minimum Iwo-ye:u term. I t i, I n ' intent thaI the Grievance Co m m it t e e be lhe �entral body for rhl(c$.,i ng .tli Srievances except those that relate to facult, tenure or di�cj pl l Jll' Or ,,,hICh otherwise aris e under the faculty cOllS titution and

Such request shall automat icall), suspend i n formal procedures. At such time, the Grievance C o m m ittee, or allY subcommittee thereof, sh a l l ,

within five day., hold a me e t in g with both parties to discuss o p t ions fo r i n formal resolu tion, i n c l ud i n g

mediation. If

fail, then either part)", or the Committee. may reque st that the

set

forth in

Sectlon ll, be lol". Pro edur<

Filing the Writtell

GnevGl/Ce. G rievants for whom the matter has not

been s a t i sfa c to r il y re.olved t h ro ugh the i n fo r m a l proce;;s may file a

writkn grievance with

the

r i e va nc e Comm ittee wilhin five

working da)', after termination of the i n formal process. If no

I

F

I

C

L

hall have the right to bring 3 grievance a n d shall

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

(5)

informal resolutIon was sOllght, written g r ieva nces must be filed

\ ithiD

30 wo rki n g

da ys

of the

alleged incident. The g.rievance s ha ll

includ ' the g r ieva n t's written statement describ ing t he a lleged

ina p propriate ,Iction or misconduct. Upon receipt. the grievance sh"ll be marked with the date received.

2 . Deterllli,wti()71 of Wh ther 'rieVIJIlCe .>i SlIbject to prQcetiure1. WiLllin five (5) working days of the g(ievanct til ing d a te, the Grievance Committee shall determine whether the fa ts <1 l J eged i n the grievanc fall within the purview of these procedures. [I' not, the griev"nt hall be so notified in writ.ing. No appeal rna)' be taken internally of such determ i n a ti u n .

C

be

grievance proceed in ac ordance with t h e formal g r ie va n ce pr o ce du res

1.

hal acce.. to the g r ie v an ce p ro c edures established by the n iversi ty (,ric\'JI1Ct cOll1mitt�e. C ; r ie va nccs rn:ly be i n i t i_ated by conlocting any III 'ml er I f the C o m m i t tee. G ri �l' a n( �s lir,t repClrted e lse", h«e in the dl l 1Hn U ill' ,11"uld be ref'ened to the , o mm i t t e e 1'0 1' reso lu ti o n . except for �""v;U<v. Jrising under t h e fac u l ty c o n s t i tution and by-l aws. If, ul all)' t i llle during n griev an ce proc""di ng under th""" p ro ce du res , a

A

no agreement can

r eac he d a s to informal means of res ol u t io n or i r informal proc e dure s

B. Formal Griev;ll1cc

bylnws. The Com mittee shall h.ve aurhority tu tablisb ,eparnte polici s JJlcl pro dUle� I(ll' ccrtdil' ),pt's of grievanc�s. Subject t fa,'ult)' approval, the Com m i t tee �ha l J 31'0 have a u t ho r it y 10 enact s pecia l policies and proc.edurcs for resolution of l(r adc disputes and i ssues of 'Iendemic dishofle,ty. E very member n f the Un i l'ersi t ), c o mmu n i t y, whelher faculty. student,

P

resolution process, either par ty, or

Illay request tlHIt i n formal resolution efforts

be termin ated and that the formal grievance proc�dures be initiated. to the intanal resol u t i o n of d isputes ar isin g

w i t h I n the lIn ivcrsit) comm u n i ty. To lhat end, t h e Pre�ident

• •

to a pp ropr i a te resources

At an)' po i nt in the pro eS5, th e grievant may send written

the Grievance

I.

...lmlnistra tol· or ,tnt

ref rrals

and suppOrt services, a n d . w i t h the permission of a l l parties, may

A t ,my time du ri ng the i n fo r m .

Grievance Policy and Procedures

120

of .taff a n d

gri ved nor ore they subject to these

a d m i n i s t ra t ive p roce d ures .

encouraged to first

or disc i p l i nes, and tn I' fleet upon the

in<llviduals w i th

the grie ance involves or

Constitutional Bylaws. All other ma lte r" i n c l ud in g, but no t limited to,

em pl oy .ll1d all 'ment the ind us ive language gu idelines of their p rofe 'ions

i

that

Committee, that member will be

n. General Administrative Procedures The following a d m i n is trative p ro ce d u re s shall apply to 011 grievances, with th� excep t io n of grade di,;pute , al legatioru; of academic dishonesty, st u d en t conduct issues overed by the student ode of Co n d uc t and fac ulty grievances rela ting to tenu re, discip l ine Jnd ot her issue, expressly provided

Inclusive Language PL

of the

excused fro m a n y further involvement in the grievance pro ceed i ng s. The g r i e van ce policy and procedure, will be published b i - a n nually and d is t ri b u t e d 10 nIl members of rhe U ni l t'rs iry community.

sexual llllScondu

rhe U n i ve rsi t y strongly discourages consensual sexual relationships

,uch

con fl i ct or the appeMunce of a c on n ic t, or po t e n t ial l y involves a member

to <1 student when the Employee i"

niversit,. Grieva nce Co m m i t tee has a

pa r ti cipa n t bel ieves that a member of

Y


3.

Not ijicatiurl 1 0 Re,pondent. ff it is d eter mined the g r i evan ce fal ls , ithin the p urv iew of thes procedures, the Gri <lnee C om m i ttee

1 2. GrievIlnce lni/illud by Griev.lIlC<· Commi ttee. The Gri.v,wee Comm i t tee may i ni tiate a fo rmal grievance at any Li me wht'f(' a n individual dodine, t o purwc tbe formal gr ieva nce pro o SS u ndior where the o m m i t tee bel i eves the U n i veI'si tj"s Policie. on Eq ua l Opport un i ty, Affi r m a t il'e Actio n and S.)< uJ.! M iscondu t may l lave b<en violated. [n such c a se,. the grievance w i l l follol\' the arne noti!lcation and p r oce du res set fo r th above. -, he Grievance C o m m i t tee has the right, where appropriate, t o protect tl1e ide n t i t ), of a gric,'ant ;lnd to proceed with an ,l nOD)'mOUS gri"l',rnt. That

shall, within t h ree (3 ) working days of such dct�[Jt1 inat io n , pTovi dc a copy of the grievance to the res ponden t , to gether w i th a co py of th ese

procedures.

4. Wri/tCII Response Mil}' Be

Filed. Wi t h i n ten ( 1 0) work i n g day' a fter re e iv i ng a copy of the grie vJ.flce. tbe responde nt may s ub m it to the Grievance C om m i ttee w ritt e n response to the al leg a tio ns raised i n the gri eva n ce . The respondent is encou raged t o provide a written reSpollse, ho weve r, fa il u re to an,'Wer a cba rge or to participate in the i nve ' gat io n wi ll not preve n t the process from proce edi ng . Failure to resp o n d may result i n t h e invC$lI sat i on proceeding so lely on the

5.

basis 0 the grievan t 's test imony and evidence.

IrlYCSligatioN re

oj the

Grievallcc.

W i t h i n twenty

(20)

13.

wo rk i ng days o f

I lo t i fi c a t i o n Grievan ce ommittee or it di:Signees .haU co m p lete a n investiga t i o n \\ nich may include i nterview , with both parties and I. i t h those iden ti fi ed b)' the parties a. h av i n g p erso n a l knowledge of the fa ts re l a t ing to t h e grie ance; review al' wr it ten respo nses as appropriate; and/or re v iew of any docu.n1<!nt.s or o ther evidence sub m itte d by the parties or by per on. witb kno\ l ed ge . 6. Preiiminnr}, /{epWl llllti Re u1I1111cnd<1lioIlS. W i t h i n ten ( 1 0) wo rk i ng days after om p let ion of the i nvestigation, the G ri eva nc e Commit­ to re pondent, the

Committee. 1 4 . SIIIlCl ;urlS. The

JI1Y :>'"allctian,

given to the grievant a n d

Intem..nt>. Should ei th er

the grievant Or the respon d en t of t h e pr li m i n a , y rep(l r t or the recommenda­ tions, rebuttal staterntn t > may be filed with the Committee with i n five ( 5 ) working da)'s of rece i p t of the p rel i m i nar ), report. The Committee may review the rebu ttal st ate ments and shall have Ihe aut h ori t y to reopen its in tigation and a mend its p re l i m i n a ry in estigative re ort , if it J�em� s u c h a c t i o n apprnpriate. E it h er party ma), also suh m i t names of add ition a l wir nc>ses and a dd itiona l

I S.

16.

of the G r i evan ce Committee d i rectly Co m mit t ee w i l l

Dean o r P rovost , tIl<'

design ate an <llternate authority t o a SC5S the report a n d de te r mine

any respo nsive action. Such action, i f any, shal l be in accord with niversity policy. The g r ievant shall

be

in fo rm ed

of any

correct ive action taken involving the respondent.

10. Time Lim ils, Time l i mit.' S N extend.ed by the

forth in these p roced ures may be

' ricva ncc -om m i ttee upon request and s h ow i ng

of time. be' llran ted upon i n it i a t ion Th' Grievance C om m i ttee will

of good CBuse. Either part)' may s."k an exte nsio n Reasonable e x t ens ions

of t i me may

of the Committee ilt it discretioll_ not usually exten d t h e

t i me fo r

also

fi ling a wr i t ten grievance except for

tho se situatIOns in which the grit ,'" nt alleges v iol atio n

of the Ac t ion

niversit)" s Policies on Equal Opportunit)', Affirmative

and

When appropriate, time li m i t ' may also be exte n d.d from one schoo l year to the next. I I . rieVlI1lCe Tllitialed by A<imillislrnlion. The P res i de nt , Provost, or Sexual Misconduct.

an)' Vice Presid e n t may request that the

,rie vance Committee

conduct an invest igation withuut a form al

grievance

no

authority

the

rz

to impuse

m VI

sanc tions and other corrective Provost, as to fJ( u l t y ; the Vice President of S t ude n t Life, as to stude n ts ; a n d the appropriate adminis trative Vice Presi den t as to staff a n d ad m i n istrative personnel. The a u th ority i mposing sanctions shall report its ac tion t o the Grievance Committee in ,,-riting. FaI5jji�r1 Gr'evallCt'. Deliherately filing " gri e " a nce w i t h ,lise stalements is comid"rpd tn be serious miscon du ct and such offen ses wl1I be subjec t to the full ran ge o f disciplinary sanctions, including lem,ination andlor expulsion.

Righi oJ Appeal. E ither part )' may appeal to the Pre Uni\,er,it), t h e tindings a t he

ideot

of tlw

.rievance .omm ittec·s final

rievan ce Com mittee m r also rcqut'�l gr itv .1(e. Such appe, I must be filed in wri tin g t o the Pre5iden t'� ffi e w i t h i n t n ( [ 0) wurking days after CQmpldion nf review b)' the Vice President or Provost i n ac corda n ce with paragraph 9 above. lhe President may choose to accept , reject, accep t i n part, or rejec t ill part the invC5t igativ fi n<.l ings and reco m mendations.

Tile Pr esi den t shall have final

autbority.

17. Anomey•. These pTo c edures arc i n tended to be a means of lnternal resolution only. As s u c h , a t torneys will nof be allowed to participate d i rec t ly ill any phase rlf the,e grievunce procedures, nowev ·r. any party "ffected by d g r ie van ce is free to onsult with on attorney of his o r her cho ice at his or her own expense. 18. Hetalill/i()n ProhiiJitrd. The U n i versi ty eJ prcssly p ro hibits retal ia tion again st any person who hns filed a grievance, or in any ay pa rti c ip a ted in the � ricva n e proce.". Any pe on ,·ho yiol<lte, t h i s policy Jllay be subject to disciplinary -, e r i o n , inclll(lin� tCl'Imnation

tions, and take any re ronsive ac tion. fn the event the grievance

applicable

Itl'JY, a s

bo

at the dis retion of

that the Presiden t review a particular

i n formation, additional ev idence or d ocu me n t s, etc.

P res i de n t,

nowever, it

in vt!st i ga ti ve rt.'port. The

8. Fillul Report ami Recommellt/al iollS. Within ten ( 10 ) worki ng days of re e i p t of any rebuttal statements or addit ional i n formation, the Comm i ttee shall c om pl ete a fi nal i nvest i gative report and recommendat ions. I n the eve n t n o rebu t tal stateme n ts are su b mi tte d, th Comm ilt 'e's prel i m inar)' report sha l l b de e med final. Copies of the fi nal investigative re p O r t and recommendations sha l l be giv n to the gri evan t, t o the responden t .md to the appropriate vice pres ide nt, dean andlor dep art me n t h�ad. If the grievance involves a faculty memoer, a copy of the fi n a l r�p()rt s h all also be p rov i ded to the Provost. 9 . Hevi!?w by Apprnprin/e Superviso r. Within fiftee n ( 1 5) working days from com p le t io n of the Com m i t tee 's fi n"" report, the a pp ropr i�te Vice President, Dean or ProvOst shnll assess the re p o rt , revie, any written st a te nlen ts , d t E' rm i ne \vhel her to accep t the recommenda­ Ice

Com mittee

"'

ction and

action �h"1I re ma in w ith the

disp ut e the fin d ing,

involve a

Grievance

o

The actual autho ri ty to im pose

su mmariloes i nfo rn13 tio n received) ;)nd

andlor recommendations

"'

G"I C

part 0 its invtstiga t ive r�porl , (c(ommt.:nd n p art ic ul ar sanction or course of corrective Jction.

respondent.

7. Rebut/Ill

n iversit ), 's a ttol'll")'. The GTi�";)nce .A,m miltec i, th� custodian of all records d.evel opcd <.luring the i nvestigati on of " gricvanc . All recor d s of the Grievance mm ittee are co ns idered co n f i dential and will be re t a i ned by tne omm i t t .. fur a m i n i m u m of three (3) years . Records re lat ing to gr i t' vance, i n vo lving violatiolb of the

Record Retention.

Se x u al Misconduct Illay be kept indelllli tel y

presents t h e Commit tee" fa l ua l n n d i n �s an d recommenda i o n s .

shaU be

after c o nsu l tatio n w i th lb.

Univer i ty\ policies o n Equal Oppo r t u n i ty. Affi rm:ltive

tee will p repare a preliminary written report which details the

Copies of t he preliminary rtport

<

right sh oul d b� u;e<.l only in rare c i rc u mn,lnc-, taking inLo

i p t of t h e f<sponde.n t's written r�sp o n s� , or, i f th e re i s no

process,

z

consideration the i n h e ren t difllculty to t he respo ndent , and anI),

wri tte.n response, ,,� thin r>venry (20) wo r ki n g days of

i_Dvestigative

c

an dlor expUl s i o n .

III, Alternative Grievance Procedures e grievance procedUTes do n t su pe l nle exi .t i.[)g procedu res for reso l ution of grade d is p ute , a adernic dishones ty or m atte rs arising u n der the S t ud en t Code of Conduct or any grievaoc p roced u res ,c.t forth i n the Faculty Constitution and Bylaw,. Where a grie vance Illay be brought i n under an alternative procednrc. the grievant must 'kct at tilt' outset which form to use. I f a grievant nooses to proceed unde.r t he se a d m i n is t rat ive proce d u res in lieu of altemat int rnal g rievance procedure.s , thE'n the grieva n t m a y not subseq uen t l )' I,ursue t h e " Ilernate grievance procccllll'es for resol ut i on of the same gricvan e. imiLu'i.y, if a grievant de t s to l'" rSII,' a ll al te rn ate g.rievance p ro ced u re, t h e gric nt m a y n o t subsequentl), ,cck f a use these pro ced u res to resolve the same grievance. These administrative proce du res shall be thl' exclusive fo rum for res ol uti on of grievances al legin g v iol at i n n of the Univers i t y " Pulicic, e ll l Equa l Opportun ity, A ffi r ma tive A tion, ADA a n d Sexual Misconduct. Externa l remedies may be available t h ro ug h federal, state or local agencies

Th

or through the courts.

from any

individu.al . In such cases, the

P rovost or appl ic ahle Vice

P re,sident

will use the ,ame notification

and process guidel i nes as

outl ined i "

will act 3.5 t h e grievant. In t hose cases , the Grievance Com mittee the formal griev:tnce procedures.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

121


I ndex

Dance 9 [

Honors Program 24, 70

Dentistry

Hou s ing 1 4

A

Disui mination Poli cy 1 1 7

Dining

Di vers i t y

>sistan e Center 1 6

,"demi"

cadem ic Orga njzat i o n 34

En g l is h

English 64

Advanced P l ace ment 6

Iica tion Procedures 6 Early Ad miss ion 6 I n t� rn a t io naJ tudents 6

, Credi t Exerc ise Science 1 Expenses (see Co s ts )

AP - Math 78 Advising 2 1

mericas, The 36

F Facult y 4 Family Educatio n

qu a t ies M in o r 9 1

Financial Aid 7

AffLrmarive Action Policy I 1 7 [te rnoon Cl,\ StS, Late 4

Fore i gn

Re

ampus S a f�ty and

Center for Public Servi ce haJl enge E.'\ams 1 3 , 22 Ch emist ry 44 ChL n sc Cia ses 75

ollcge J3

Phy i

History 69

Physical Education, School of 9 1

orc II 26, 7 2

Ho n ors

Phys ical Th e rapy 96

Therapy 96

Physics 93 Policies, Institutional 1 1 7

History of the University 4

Political Science 94

24

Pre-Professional St ud ies 95

Dean's List 24

uition, Specia l Fees, Room

Health Sciences 95

Gradua t ion Honors 24

13

Law 96

Honors al E n t rance 24

ounseling a n d Test ing Services 1 7

M ili tar y Science 96

Honor Societies 24

1 3 , 22

T heological S t u dies 97

Individualized Major 7 1

o

P

al

ooperative Education 5 2 orc Req ui re m e nt s 26

1 22

P hilosophy 90

Pharmac}, 96

o mpu l i n ' Serv ices 1 8

E, ami n a t io n

Pharmacy 96

O p t ome t ry 96

onfe rcilces and Events 1 7

'redit by

Payment Op t io ns 1 4

M ed ical Technology 96

dence and ,omputer

and Meals

Pass/Fail Course> and Option 23

De ntistry 95

E n g in eering 50

Costs:

p

Health Sciences 95

omfllunic�tion and T h ea tre 4 7 mputer

Ownership a n d Suppor t 1 1 6

Health Insurance 1 8

ciences 39

Undergraduate Fell.ow 24

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

19

Orientation, New Student 1 9

Health Minor 9 1

E

R

S

I

T

Y

13

u V Ve t era n s A ffairs V is i ti ng Classes

12 24

Vocational Rehabilitation

Optometry 96

Health Center 1 8

lard Tests 6

'ollege of Am and

Off-Campus Student Servi os

91

oach jng Minor 9 1

Tuition, Pees, and Payment I n formation

o

13

Transfa Students 5

Nursing, School of 84

Health and Fit ness M an age me nt

] a s ics 411. 75

Tra n sc ript I n fo r m a t i o n

Nu m bering o f C o u rses 35

Harassment, Sexual 1 1 8 22

Theolog ical Studies 9 7

35

Non- Di cri mination Pol i cy 1 1 7

Harassment, Ra ial 1 1 7

56

o uns e li ng aud 1 7

Theat re, Com m n ications and 4 7

I orwegian Classes 76

Gu idelines 1 1 7

H

of St u d en t >

19

Natural Sciences) Division of 84

1 8, 1 20

1 16

Tes ting Services,

N

Guests of the Un iversity 24

46

lassi6cat ion

23

Summer Session 20

-leachcr Education!Certification

Medicine 95

M iss ion Statement 3

Grievance Policy and Procedures

19

Meal Costs 1 4

Colle ge

Study Abroad 73

T

M u s ic 79

Greek Classes 75

C3rter D e d o p m c n t 1 7

78

M iuo rs Available

Graduation Requirements

I n fo r ma t io n 1 7

Sluden t Serv ices 20

M ilitar y Science 96

Graduate Stud ies 1 06

Q u recs [ 6

Student Government 20 Student Life 20

M idd le

68

Gradi ng Syste m 23

mpus M i n ist ry 1 7

Spo rt P- ycholo gy Minor 9 2

Statistics 1 03

Master's Degrees O ffe red 34

niversity Requirements 25

76

Spor t s Admin;; tration 9 1

M a rri a ge and Fa mily Th e ra p y 77

German Ciasse 76

C ,a lendar 2

S pa ni s h Classes

Special Education Courses 60

Maj ors Available 35

Mathemati

Global S t u d ies

75

Degrees 26

Geosciences 66

1 02

S o c iolog y 1 0 1

M

G

4[

9fi

Socia l Work

Limit<.ltion� on B a cca la urea t e

First-year Registration 24

General

Social Sciences, D ivis i on of 1 0 1

Legal St u d ies 7 7

La ngu age

Sexual Misco n d u c t 1 1 8

Sign Language C i a ses 76

Library S e r v ices 1 8

First-year Experience 25

17

Broadcasting 4 7 Bu si n ess, S h o ol o f

'LmpU!

Latin Classes

Law

School Nurses 8 7 Sickness a n d Accident Insurance 1 8

Cl ass es 4

French Cl a sses 76

14

Scholar h i ps 9, 1 2

Late Afternoon and Evening

Re qu ireme nts 5 , 27

B Hachelor's Degrees O ffe red 34 BioloS, �o Board and Room Information Board of Regen t s 1 1 6

Scandinavian Area St u d i es 76, 1 00

Languages a nd Literatures 74

Foreign Study Opportunities 73

ud it ing Course; 2 4

5

L

Vocational Rehabilitation 1 2

39

Retention of First-Year Students 4 Room and Meals 1 4

19

Rights and

Residen t ial Life 20

Ru n n i n g S ta rt 6

KPLU-FM. N a ti o nal Public Radio

Veterans Affairs 1 2

Sciences, CoLlege of Alhletic Tra iLlL n g 9 1 At tendance, Class 2 2 Arts and

I n ternational Students 6, 1 9

K

13

Residence Halls 20

R igh ts and Responsibilities 1

broad 7 3

Journ a l ism 47

Scholar ttips 9, 1 2

Mt , School of the 39

100

January Term Fi rs t - yea r, 25

by 1 3 , 22

Re lax at i on 92

Requi reme n ts for Ent ra nce 5

J

Loans 1 1

TC 96

rt 37

Bookstore, PL

Study

A rea Stu d ies

of 1 1 6

Registration 24

Requi remen ts for Degrees 25

Engl ish Llll uage I ns l itu te 64

Sca n d i n avian

Recreation 9 1 Refunds 1 6 Regenls. B oard

Religion 99

Global Studies Program 68

Ap p licat i o n Procedure 7

et� S o i ty 24

3

6

International P rograms 73

Privacy Act 1 1 7

Anth ro pology 36

Army R

I n for ma t i on Resources 1 8

Ba ccala urea te I n ternational Core 72

Langu age

Exa m i n a t ion

Rea d in g Endorsement 5 8

I n teg rative Learn ing Object Lves

Evening Classes 4

6

Radio Station ( K PLU-FMl 1 9

I nform a tion . Ge neral 4

International

Eq ual Oppo rt u n i t y Policy 1 1 7

25

R

71

I n te gr ate d S tudi es Pro gra m 26, 72

Equal Educational Opportunity 1 1 7

Returni ng Transfer Students 5

AI' - En g li s h

62 as a Second

4

Publishing a n d Printing Arts 99

I nsurance 1 4 , 1 8

A dm iss i o n s) 5 E nv i ro nm e ntal Studies 65 E nv i rons 4

Retu rn of Pormer Students

Advanced P la ce ment

60

23

I n formal Study 2 4

Ent rance R equi re ment s (see

Ap

15

53

Engineering Dual Degree 6 1

116

Ps yc ho logy 97

Public Affairs Minor

laJor

lndividualiz.ed

Psychology Courses Eligibility for Activities 22 Elliott Press, The 1 8 Employmenl ( Stu d ent ) 1 2

caeditation 4

Project Pre'new 19

Lan g u age 1 20

I nco mp l et e Grades

Educational

A , C E , Language I nst it u te 64

e Pay me n t

Inclusive

Education, School of

Accident Ins urance, ' i ck n css and 1 8

Admls io n 5

24

Economic> 52

Acce5sibilil y 1 6

Prob a tion, Academic 22

Immunization 1 8

E

P r o b a t io n 22 Academic P r o ced u res 2 1 cad (' m ic St r uctu re 3�

ACJdemic

cliv ities, Stude nt 20 Admmislrah\c Oflic'

Clas s

P ri vacy Act I 1 7

Humanities, Division of 7 1

17

enter 1 7

D rop p i ng a

Ac adem i c Iio nesry 2 1

Adv,m

95 ervices

olunteer Center 2 1

12

W Withdrawal from a Cour,;e 24 Withdra\

I from the Uni\' r si t l' 25

Women's Center 2 1 Women's Sludjes 1 04 Work-Study Writing

12

enter 2 1

Writing .1, 1 05


Ca m p u s M a p' K n o rr H o u se .

Selected Campus Contacts

Area code 253 University Switchboard ...... .... . . . . ...... . . . . .

531 . 6900

Ca mp u s P ho ne I nform a6 o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 5 . 7449 Ca mpus Sa fety

Ac.ldemlc

( 24 hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 5 . 7 44 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 5 . 75 1 8

A" ist" r1ce

Ad miss ions

. 5 35.7 1 5 1

Alu m n i and P are n t R. e l a( i o n s Business O ffi ce . Ch u rch

......

. . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 5 . 74 1 5

.

Relati on. .

.. 5 3 5 7 1 7 1 . . . 5 3 5 .7423

.

.

C o nfere nce and Evenrs Cenrer

5 3 5 .7450

Develop mene . . . . . . . . . . . 535 . 7 1 7 7 Emergency . . . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . 53 5 .79 1 1 Studenr ServIce, . .

. 535 . 7 1 6 1

H e I th C e n ter .

Lutec.lrd and

. . . . 5 3 5 . 7 3 37

I nfo rm ation Desk

....

......

....

5 3 5 . 745 7

KPLU 8 8 . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 5 . 7758

. .... 535.7430

Nlt w� 3 . nd I n Fo rm ati o n . .

P re s ide n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 5 . 7 1 0 1 RegIStrar .

.. .. 5 3 5 . 7 1 3 1

S<u dent u fe .

.. . . . . 5 3 5 . 7 1 9 1

Su m mer S.ssio n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

........

TransFer Coord i n ato r .

5 3 5 . 8 64 8

... 5 3 5 . 7 1 38

Building Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. . . 3

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 34

Cemer fo r Learmng and Tech n o l ogy (future) Co l u m b i a Ce nter . East Ca m p u s

......

31

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

.......... ........

.

... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7

Eastvo l d C ha p e l / A u d Itorium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 . . ... .............. 4

Facu l ty Hom.

Foss ReS I dence H a l l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 ..

Harscad R c idenc. H al l .

Hauge A d m i n .is [r3(i o n Build ing Health Cenee r . .

Residence

. . . . . . .. . 1 3

.......

.........

.

.............

. . . . . 24

H al l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1

H u m an R e so urces . I ngram H a l l

... ... .......... 26

. ................. ................ 6

H l n dnl l . Re sidence H a l l H o ng

.... ............................

Keck Observatory . . .

Lilgerqul<t Co nc40 rt Lte H ou se (ROTC)

LeWIS House

.

Hall .

. . . 19

.

.. 7

..................

M a ti Servi ces,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

. . . . . . . ....

S h i pping a n d

.........

..

....... ..

Recei v i n g . . .

Mary Baker Russell M usic Center . .

....

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

....................... ..

10

. . . . . . . . . . . . 53

30

. . . . . . 29

Parking Legend

Accessi ble Pa r k t ng

V

Vi 5itor Parking by P e r m i t

R

R e s rved Stu de n t Park i ng Reserved F3cu l ty/Adm i n ./Staff Parking

F

Special Perm i t PockIng

. .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . 1 9

ViSito r/ P u b l I C Parking

M a th , C o m p uter Science) a n d C o m p u ter .

E nginee ring B u i l d i ng .

49

M cNabb House (ROTC ) . . . . . . . ... . . . . ... . . . . .. 42

Memorial Gymnas i u m .

14

Mortvedt LJ b rary/ Co m pu ee r Cente r .

. . . . . . 42a

Na mes Fi tness Ce-n re r . Nesvig A l u m n i Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olson A u d itori u m . .

.. . . . . . . . . .. .

. ............ 44

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Ordo l Resid e n ce H a l l .

........... . 1 1 ..

H o u se (ACE)

Park Ave n u

...........................

P� u ege r Reso den ce H a l l

.

PI am ServIces .

... . . . . . . ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

P L U North wes t (gift. s h o p ) Ra m stad Hall .

..

..

. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ............... 27

Ri e ke SCience Center . .

. ... 32

Ro'Sso H o us e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . .

18

Scand i n aVian C u l tu ral Cent�r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

S t u e n Resi d e nce H a l l

SwimmIng

......

Pool

........

34

.

58

. . . . . . . . . . ..

. .. . ................ . . . . . 1 2

...........

..............

. .. .

Ti ngel stad Residence H a l l Trin Ity HOllS

2

43

... 28

So uth Res i d e n c e H a l l ..

B l o m q u i st H u us. . . . Bookstore

. .. . ... .............. 5

Kreidl er Residence I��II .

.................... ... .. . . .

4 '1

51

...... 16

Trinity Lutheran C h u rch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 U n iversity Center .

.

U n'lver� 1 y Pri n t i n g and P u b l ications 'vVare h ouse

....

....

....

West H o u se . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .. 46

....... ...............

.

..

Xavier H all . *

. .. . . 29

. ... 29

.

\Alo m en ' s Center

,.4

.

47

. . . . . 22

O ffice o f D vclo p m e n t a n d U n I versity Relations

15 located

at

rhe. I n tersectio n o f GJrfii e. l d Street a n d

Pac i fic Ave nu e

o n t he east

side

Pac i fic Ave n u e S o u t h , Taco m a .

of Pacific

at 1 2 1 6 5

by permit

ViS i tor pi31!kiog b y permit only All visitors muSt obtain

"' il iror p..rking permit:

df

a

Cam p u s Sa rt (� lo(",l!e-d in t.ht:

bU�T1 en ( at {!-Ie north t'J,d of Hatlu.d Hilil R6.t.l"'Ved

dunng IlQI1-\'t'Qt'kmg a.m_' and un wt'C!hnd.!!i (iOmlll! 24 hour excep tlO n i Olre Indlated by SJgns) I f )-ou plan a.n extcndencd vi �tr, ytl l l m4ly obtain .. rempo�ry permit !Tom CAmpu Saf«l' pa,-k;ng slou may be us�d by Vl5i(rJrl

kourt'

(5

p . m . -7

VIsit PLU by Bus I e 's ea·y to v i S I t

Pl LJ

fro m an ywhere I n the P u ge.

S o u n d 3 rea� U 5� th e se direct b u� ro ur.� 5 r o . h e P a rk l a n d

Transit

rne PLU cam pus: R o ute 4 1 0

RO Lire 4 .5 Route 4 6

gtr r fJ lTo m

C enter, o n l y 'wo b l oc ks

S o u t h H i l l ( Pu)d l u p ) to Par k la n d O Ql.vntown Tac o m a to Par k l a n d

Downtown

Ta c o m a [0 P a r k l a n d

o r GriJ h a m to P ark l an d R o ute 2 0 4

Lakewood <0 Pa rkl . n d

Rouce 5 5

T co m a M a l l to Par k l a n d

a n d O l y m p ta routes req u i re a i n La kewood or d owntown Ta c o m a .

S e a tT l e

For help p l a n n i ng 253.58 1 .8000.

yo u r n i p , c a l l

t r a n s fe r


OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS Tacoma, WA 98447-0003 1 800 . 2 7 4 . 6 7 58 253.535.7 1 5 1 Fax: 2 5 3 . 536 . 5 1 36

admissions@p/u.edu www p/u. edu

Printed

August 2002

2002-2003 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog  
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