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Contact Information The universi t i. loca t ed at So u th 121st Street and Park Avenue in su b u rban p, rklancl. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p. m. Monday through Prid ay. Most offices are 10 ed for chapel on Monday, Wednesday,

n d Friday from 10:.0 to 11 ;00 a.m. during the school year. The university observes al l legaJ holidays. The University ent er maintains an information desk that is open daily from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

a

(9:00 a.m. to 7: )0 p . m.

011 Sa t u rd ay and Sunday). Visitors a re welcome at dll)' time. peci�1 arrangements for tours and app intments may the Ofnce or Admissi n .

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

rea

coile 253

TbePresident ........................ ............... 535.7101

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT: • General interests of the LJni ersity, church

pr idelI/@plu.edu The Provost

.

. .. .

.. ..... .

.

.. ... .

.. .. ...

........... 535.7126 prollost@plll.cdil

.....

Academic Advising ..... . ............. ........ .... 535.8786

relations, and commL1I1ity relations • Academjc policies 3J1d programs, facu l ty

appointments, and curriculum development •

aadv@pLu.edll

Admissions

.. . . .......................... ........ .......

-35.7151

Academic advising. developing academic go. Is, 0 ing a major, and class 'cheduling; support for acuity ad visor s ; first-year student registration

eh

1.800.274.6758 admissiollS@plll.edll Alumni and Parent Rd.alions . .. .......... 535.7415

be made through

General in fo rm lion, d m i ssi on of students. and publications for prospective st udents and advanced placement

Al w11 ni programs and services

hape l, S unday worship, and religious life at the university

Campus parking, safety, and information

C:Jreer op tion s

a/1111111i@piu.edli Campus Ministry ........... . .............. . ..... . . . 535.74 4 cfllil1@plu.edu Campus Safety and Information .. ...... 535.7441 campIIssa!ety@pl,l.edll Career Development

......

.... . . ...... .......... 535.7459 wreer@plll.edll

The Vice President for Development

and Uwver ity Relations ....... ............. . 535.7177

develnpillent@plu.edli

• Gifts, b que ts. g ra n t s, and the annual fund

Financial Aid and Student

Employment .. ...... . .......... ........... ... . ...... .. 535.71 4

fi llaid@p /u.ed u The Vice President for Finance and Operations

...................... 535.7121

.

.

.... .... .

..

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...... .

...........

535.7126

student

F i nan cia l management a n d administrative services

jillal1ce@plll.ed" Graduate Studies

F inan c i al aid, work study, and employment

. raduate

programs

provost@plll.edll Wang Center for international Programs/ Office of Off-Campus Programs ..... 535.7629

• International study

il1pr@pitl.eriu The R.egistrar ..... ........... ... .. ..... ...... ......... . 535.7131

• Transfer credit evaluation, advanced p lacemen t ,

graduation, c lass schedules, grades, c1as room sched u ling, institutional research

registrar@pLIl.edu The Vice President for Student Life

.

.

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................ ..... . ... . .... ... . . . . . .

535.7191

• Residence halls, COW1Se1ing and testing, health services, multicultural affairs, international students,

slif@pILl.edu

e.xtracurricular

Student Services Center

.

. 535.7161 I.HOO.678.3243

...... .............

..

Fi n an cia l, cholarship, and loan in for mation, and schedules, regist rati o n

Summer es�i()ns

1.800.678.8648 sp a cs umm er@plu. e d ll

P r further information, please visit th e PLU hom e page t www.plu.edu. c a t a lo g online, visit www.pl!l.edfllprintkatalog.

To access the PLU

and disability selvices

fees and pa rmcnt p lans, t r ans cripts

s5vc@plll.edll Sommer Sessions ............................. . ..... 535.7161

a ctivities,


UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE CATALOG

m

2002-2003

o .."

with PLU degree requirements, see Ge"eml Ulliversity Requiremellts on page 25.

To become familiar

To learn more about major and minor requirements. see specific department pages starting on page 36.

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o Z -t m

Table of Contents

z \1'1

Academic Calendar

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.2

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Individualized Major ............ .............................................. 71 International Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World ............... 72

Mission $loJtement

............................. ....................... .... 3

.......

.

bjectiv.:s ................................... .

Integrative Learning

.

General [nformation

..... ............... ...

..

.

. ........ ..

......

3

........................ 4

Admission .............................................................................. 5 financial

id .

. ........ . ................... ........... .........

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.

.

.

.

.. ........ 7

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Tuition, Fees, and Payment [ nformati o n .......................... L

Student Life and Campus R -ource, ..... . .......................... 16 .

Aca

emic Proc dures ................................................ ,......... 21

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Anthropology Art

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.................... ... . .. ........ ........ . . ....... . ....................................

Art.5ch 01 of th.' . .

Ar

34

.

Majors and Minors .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. ....... .

Ame.ricas

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..... ................... . . .. . . . . . ... .. ...... ... ........ ... 34 .

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37

..... . ....... ............................. ........ 39 .

and Sciences. C Ilege of

.

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.... ...... ...... . ..

.

...

.. 39

Biol ogy .................. , .............................................................. 40 f ............... . ..... ... ..... .. ........ .... ... ................ 41

Business, School

Chemi stry ............................................................................ 44

hinese Stud ie s ................................................................... 46 lassies

.

l ega l Studies ........................................................................ 77 .

Marriage and Fami ly Th e ra py ............................................ 77 Mathematics .... . ..... ............ .. ............................. ......... ... .. .. . 78 .

Music

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.

.............

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. ... ......

. . . .. .

Natural Sciences, Division of

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Nursing. School of . ...................

Philo,ophy .

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.

.. 84

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84

...,........ 90

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Physic. ... . Politica'! Sci

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Pre-Professional Studies .

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........ 93

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Publi5hing and Printing Arts

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95

.. ...................... 97

. ................

........

, .................................... 99

. . .... . ................. . ......................................... .. 99

........... .

Scandinavian Area S t udies ocial

.

... ....... ...... ... .... . .............. .

Psychology .. ... . . .. ..... ......... .......

Religi n

.

nee ... ............ .......................... .......................... 94

. . . ...

......... .. . . .

. ..................

cienccs, Division of ...... . ........ ....... .

........ 100

........... 10J

. ...........

So iology and So ial Work .... ............................... ... ........ , 10 I Statisti . ............................................................................. 103 Theatre

(

Communication and

ce

Theatre) ...................... 47

Women's Studie� ............................................................... 104 Writing ... . . .......... .................................................

..

. ............

105

. .. .... .. ... ... . . .. ... . ................... .... 46

................ . . . ........ . .. . . ...

Communication and Theatre

. ...... ,............. 47

.. . .. . .... .. ...... . ... .

oI11puter Engineering . ..... ..... . ... :;0

Computer S ienee and

.

ooperative Education Iuternships . .. ....... .

Econoll1ics ....

. ...... n.......

.

Education. Sc h o ol of.. . . .

...... .

..

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..

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.

.

English as a Second Envir nmt::nta'!

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Language .

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Admission .......................................................................... 106 Policies and Standards

..

....................................... ............. 107

Tuition and Fees ................................................................ 109

61

Financial Aid ......... ........ ....... .................................. ..... ... . 109

. 62

Mdster of Bu sin es Administration . . . , ............................ 109

. .

. . . ...... ........ .... .. .... .....

.......... . . . . ...... . . . .. .. . ... . . . ......... . .... . . ...... . ......... .

52

.............................................. 52

Engineering Dual Degree Program En glis h

.

... ... . . ...................

,

Academic Structure .................................. ...... .......... .. ..... .

..... 73

..

............... . .. . ................... .........

Languages and Literatures .......... ... . . . .................... ,........... 74

Physical Education. Sc h oo l of ............................................ 91

·COUrse. Offerfrigs· * -' D�grees .......... .

International Programs

.

. . . . 64

................ . . . . . . .... .. ... . ..

.

t udies . . . . . ......... . . . . . ........ ............................ 65

Geosc' nce .. ,....................................................................... 6

.

.

.

, ........ I II laster of Science in ursing ... . . . . .. .. . . 114 Master of Arts (Marriage and Family Therapy) liS M aste r of Arts in Education .... .... .. ...... . .... ........... .

..

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.

........... .

. . .......

.............

Global S t ud i es ..................................................................... 68 History . .......... . .................. .

Honors Program

...

... ...... ..................... .............. . 69

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.

.

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.

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....... ... ....... . ..... .... . . .. . .. . .......

Humanities. Division of

...... ........... . 70

.................................. ......... ...

....

.

..

71

Administration .. .. .. ..... ..................... ..........

... .. .. . . 116

. .............

.

University Guidelines ....... ............. ... .. ............................ 117 .

Index .. ... .

......................

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.

.

.. . ......... .....

. ......

.

........ 122

. .......... . .....

PACIFIC

IJJfHERAN UNIVERSITY The information contained herein r�n�u an ,l(Clirate picture of Pacific Luther:lIl Universit), at he time of publication. However. the university reserve the right to make necessary chant\es in procedures. poliCIes. calendar. curriculum. and costs. 1.lst d in this cat�log are course 3ml summarie, of degree requirements for rna'ors, minors, and other programs in the College of Arts and S 'ence� and the School. "f t he rts. Busin '5. Fdu ;!tion. ursins. and Physical E.ducation. Detailed degree requi rement. • often in I ding supplement,lry sample pr gram ••• re Available in the offices of the individu,li school� and departments. dv isi n g by university per onne! inconsiSlent w i th puhlished statemenlS is not binding.


er:: < a z w -'

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Academic Calendar SUMMER SESSION 2002

I ... . . . ... . . . . . . ... . . ... Tuesdav, MOl}' 28- alurday, JUlle 22 Ierm II ....... ...... ...... .. .......... IOllday, June 24-Salurday, July 20 Wo r kshop Week .... .... ... . . .... . Monday, July 22-Saturday. July 27 Term I I 1 . .. . .. ... .. . ... .. . Monday. July 29-Satl.1rday, August 24 August Commencement .... . ...... 10:30 a.m., aturday, Ugllst 24 Term

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FAll SEMESTER 2002 Orientation

Thursday, S ept e m be r 5Sunday, epternber 8

Classes Begin . . . . ....... . .... ............ 7:00 a.Ill., Momi3y, eptember'l Opening Convocation . .... ........ ... 9:00 a.m., Monday, September 9 Classe.< reSII"lt' at 11:30 a.lII. Mid-semester Break ........................................... F rid a y October 25 Than k. s g iving Rec 55 B gins .. J :35 p.m., \Vednesday, NoYt'l11ber 27 Thanksgiving Recess Ends ........ 7:00 a.m., londay, ecclllher 2 .

,

...

a.m., Saturday. December 14 la ses End .. . . .. .... .. .. ... .. 5:00 p.m., Saturda)'. December J 4 Final Examinations . ......... . ... .... ...... .. Monday. December 1 )­

December Commencement . .. 10:30 .

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Semester End." (aft r last eJ(lll11) ....

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Saturda)f, December

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7:00 a.m.,. onda . Ja nua ry 6 Martin Luther K ing Jr., flirthday Holiday ..... ivlolld�ly, January 20 . Cia es End ..... ... . . . ... . .... ..... 5:00 p.m., aturd"y, February I . .... . .. ..

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Begin ..................... ... .. . 7:00 a.m., Wedneday, February .

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Pre idents' Day Holida)' . ...... ...... .... .......... . Monday, February 17 Sprill' Brellk Hegi ns ........................ 5:00 p.m., Saturday, Ma.r h 22 Sprlng Br Jk Ends ............................ 7:00 a.m., Monday, March 3 1 Easter Recess Begins ................................ 7:00 a.m., Frida April 18 �$ter Recess En 1· ...... ................ . . 11:15 <l.m., Monclay, April 21 Classes End .. . .... ............ . . . .. ........ .. ... 5:00 p.m., Saturday, M ay 17 Final Examinations ................ M o nda lvI< 1 9- 5 aturda y, May 14 eme5lt:l' End� ( after I.lst t. am) .......... . .... . ......... Saturday, May 24 May C ommenceme n t ........................... 2:30 p.m., Sunday. May 25 W(1rsizip Service begins (/I 9:30 a. Ill. .

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Comme ncement .. .......... . 10:30 a.m., Saturday, August 23 .

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Orientation ................................................ Thursday, September 4-

Classes Begin . ..

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Opening Convocation

Classes

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at 11:30 (1.111.

resume

unday, S pte mb er 7 a m . , Monday, September 8

. . . . . . . . . ..... 7:00

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.. . 9:00

a.m . .

I'vlonday, September 8

Mid·semester Break ........................................... friday. October 24

Thanksgiving Reces� Begins

....

. 1:35 p.m., Wednesday,

December Commencement ... 10:30 a.m., Saturday,

C1a�s es End

Final

...... . . . . . . . . . . .... .. ... ...... .

a m i n a no ns

0

ember 26

a.m., Monda),. December I

ThanksgiVing Recess Ends . ..... . . .. . 7:00

December 13

5:00 p.m., Saturday, December

................................... Monday, Deccmber

13

15-

Saturda\', Deccmbcr 20

Seme ster Ends (after last exam)

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Classes B gin

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S PRING SEMESTER 2004

SPRING SEMESTER 2003

Clas

Tuesday, May 27-Saturda)', June 21

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. . ...................... Monda y June 23-Saturday, Ju ly 19 Workshop Week ....................... Monday JlUy 2 I-Satmday, July 26 Term III .. . . . .... ........ ... .. ... . Monda)f. July 28-S tu rday, August 23 ....

JANUARY TERM 2004

JANUARY TERM 2003 Classes Begin

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1i:rm II .... ..

FALL SEMESTER 2003

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SUMMER S ESSION 2003 Term I .... .... .................. . .. .. .....

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Classes Begin

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7:00 a.m., WedlH:":iday, F e bruary 4

. .. ............. Monday, Fcbruary 16 'pring Break Begins . ..... ... . . ..... 5:00 p.m., Saturday, March 20 pring Break Ends .... . .. ......... . 7:00 a.I11., M onday :Vlarch 29 Easter Recess Be ins .. . .. .. . ... 7:00 a.m., Friday, pril9 Easter He ess Ends .... ....... .. . . ........ Il:lS .m., Monda)" prill 2 Classe End .. . ........ . ....... . .... ... 5:00 p.m., Saturd, y, 'Iay 15 Final Examinations .. ... ........ Ivlonday, May 17-Sarurday, May 22 Scm st rEnds « fter last exam) . ....... . ..... . Saturday, May 22 May Commencement .. ...... . . .. . ....... 2:30 p.m., unday, May 23 Pre idt'nts' Day J---loliday ... .

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Service begins al 9:30 a.m.

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The University

c z <

MISSION

m

STATEMENT

:J:l

II'

Long commi\1ed to provi d i ng an education distingUIsbed for q ualit y in the context of a heritage that is ,

Luth ran an d an environment that is ecumenically Christian, PLU con tin ues to emb race its primary mission: f knowledgeable per ons equipped with an under. t ndi ng of the human condition, a critical awareness of hwnalll' and spiritual values, and a utpacity for clear and e f fe c t ive self-expression. For alL who choose to seek a PLU degree, the university o ffers opportunity to pursue a va riety of program, of academic worth and 'xcellence. Its standards of performan ce dema nd a finely trained fa culty as w II as highly skilled administrative and supp o rt staff. In its institutional emp hasi 11 s ho i arshl p the Univer Ity views the liberal an' as provid i n the necessary aod e sen ti al foundation for the I chni 'al trammg and education in the p ro fession s which model'll so cie ty requires. The unive rsity aims to cul L iva le the intellect, not fo its own ake merely, but as a t 01 of consci e n ce and an i nstr um ent for service. The diversity and variety of cultural PI' grams and per onal servi e' o(� red by the univ r ityart' intended tu facilitate Lhls positi v e dev lop ment of the student as a wh ole person in order Ihat the deve lopment

'

,

'

our students m i ght function a members of society.

highest potential a well as fulfil lment oflile's pu rpo e arise in the joy of servic to otbers. 11 aid its stud ent in sharing this understa ding, the university seek. to be I

a

othe r wor "PLU affirms that r ah zati

c omm uruty in wruch there

11

of on

'5

i a contill wn and fruitful inleraction bet 'leen what is best in education and

what is n ob les t in Ch ris t ian edihcation.

This deliberate al d simulta ne u atten.tion to the relig ious dimension of the lotal h um a n experience and to the 5t ndards of scholarl bjectiVlty, coupled wilh dear ret og nh . i on of the integrative i mpulse in each, is the essence f PLU.

INTEGRATIVE LEARNINGOBJECTIVES The goals of a PLU education

Critical Reflection •

• • •

consi der issues from multiple perspectives

evaluate assu mptions and consequ ence o f differenl perspectives in select sourc s of information u ing appropriate resear h methods

a ssessi

ng possibl sol u tion s to problems

understand and explain divergent viewpoin [S on complex issues, critically assess the support available for each, and defend one',

wn judgements.

Expression •

communicate de arly and

creat

adapt messages to variou au iences

(fecti ely in bOlh

ral and written forms

symbols of meaning in a va rie t y of expre si ve media, both verbal and no nve rbal

Interaction with Others •

work cre atively to identif)f and cl rify the issues of concern

de velop and promote effe live str a tegi e s and in te rp e rsonal relationships

acknowlege and respond to cont1 icting ideas and pric iples , and identi fy common i nterests

Valuing arti t late and assess sh ape them

oe's own values. with an awareness of the communities and tr adit i ns that have helped to

recognize how oth rs have ar ri ved at v al ues different from one's own

devel op a habit of aring for oneself, for o t he rs and for the e nvironment

a ppro

,

ach moral, spiritual, and inteUectual dev elo p ment as a life-long process

Multiple Frameworks •

rec gniz and understand how cultures profoun dly s hape different assumptions ,md behaviors

id en tify issues and problems facin g people in every culture

c ultivate respect for diverse cultures, pract ices and traditions ,

To see the Inte grat i ve Leaming Obj ctives document in its enti rety contact the Provost's Office at 253 .5 35. 7 126 or vi sit the web site at W\vw.plll.edu/�provost.

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E d u c a t ion-and cducating for serv ice-was a vencrated part o f

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General Information ACADEMIC PROGRAM Pac ific Lutheran L. n iversity uses a 4- 1 -4 calendar which co n s i s t s o f two 1 5- lwek sem�sters b r idged by a four-week J a n ua r , term. Course credit is com p u t e d by ho urs. he m aj o r i t y of cou rses art: offered for 4 h o u rs. Each u ndergrc) d u J t e degree candidate i s expect�d t o com p lete 1 2R hours w i t h a n llverall g r a d e p o i n t aveT­ ag� of 2.00. Depar t m e n t s or schools Illay set h igher g rad e point req u i re m e n ts. Degree requ i rements a re specific all)' s t at e d i n this cata log. Each stud�nt should be orne familiar with these re quire m e n t s a n d p rep a re to mcet t h e m . ACCREDITATION Pacific L ut heran Un iverSi ty i s ful l y ac c red i t ed by t h e Northwest Association of Schools a n d o l legcs as a fo ur-year i. n s t i t u t i o n of h igher educa t i o n . I n addition the fol l o w i n g programs h o l d special ized accredj­ t a t io n s and a pprovals: IlllSill ess - AA ,SH International- The Association to Adva nce Collegiate chools of Business Che/llistry ami BiucilellIistry - mer ica n C h e m i al So ci e t y COlllpllter Scie/lcc (B j - Co m p u t i n g Scien es Accred itation B o a rd., Inc. Edllc(! [ion - Natio nal C u n c il ro r the Accn:d.i tatiOIl of Tea c h e r Ed ucation

Marringe ami a m ily '1 'Izerap), m m ission on A creditation fo r Marriage and F,uni l y T henlpy Education o f the American

Associat ion for Marriage and Family Thera py

LATE-AFTERNOON, EVENING, AND SATURDAY CLASSES

Musi - National s s o c i a t io n of Schools o f Music 'lI rsillg - a t io n a l League for Nursing Socilll Work - o u n i l o n ociaJ \ ork Education

To provide fo r the p ro fess i o n a l growth and cultura.! enrichment

a t r a d i t i o n a l col lege c urse schedule, the u n iversity c o n d uc ts late-a ternoon, eve n i ng , and Saturday classes. In add i t i o n to a wide va r ie t y of offeri ngs i J) the arts and sciences, there a re speci al ized and g ra du a t courses for teachers, a d m i n is t rators, and persons in b usi ness a n d i n d u stry.

of pe rs o n s unable to take

A ny current or prospective student may, upon request d i re ct e d the p rl?sident's ofnc , reviev.. a copy of the documents per­ t a i n i ng to the u n iver 'i t y's varic us accre d i tations and approvals.

to

ENROLLMENT 3 ,0. 0 fu l l - t ime studt'nts; 3 7 6 par t - t i m e stude nts

RETENTION OF FJRST-YEAR STUDENTS The retention of student · entering as fi rst-year stllden � has b een monitored si nce 1 972. Th data fo r the past fifteen years is pr sen ted

ENVIRONS L cated in su b u rb a n Parkland, PL

the S ca n d i navian tradi t ions from which these pioneer. ca mE'. Although fo u nded as a u n i ve rs i t y, thl;: i n s t it u L ion fu nctioned primarily a an Jcade m)' unlil 1 9 1 8, when it c losed � lr two yea r s . It reo pe n e d ;1 S t h e two-year Pacific L u t h er a n 2ol lcge, after m e rg­ i n g with Coltmlbia C o l i ge, pr viously located in Everett. F u r ther consol ida t io n s occurred when Sp o ka n e Col lege m e r ge d w i t h PLC in 1 9 29. Four -year baccabu rea te deg rees wert' first offe red i n education i n 1 939 and i n the l i beral a r t s i n 1 942. The i ns t i t u t ion was reo rga n i z ed as a u n iversity in 1 960, rec l a i m i n g i ts o r ig i n a l name. It p rese n t l y i n c l udes a o l l e ge of A r t s a n d Sciences; profes­ s i o n a l schools o f the Arts, Busi ness, Educa t i o n , N u rs i n g , and P hysical Education; a n d b o t h grad u a t e and con t i n u i ng education p rogra m s . PL has b�en closely a n d p ro d uct ively affi l iated with t h e L u t h e r a n chu rch t h r o ug h out its h i s to ry. I t i s now a u n i ve rs i t y o f t h e Eva n ,ej ical LUlheran C h l i fch i n A m e r i ca ( ELC ) . owned by the m o re than six hundred co n g regations of Regi o n 1 of the ELCA. M a n y i n fluenccs and i nd iv id u a l s have co m bi ned to shape P L U a n d its re"iolla!, n a t io n a l , a n d i ncreasingly i nternational reputa­ tion fo r teach i ng, service, and scholarsl� i p . A dedicalL'd facult), has bee n an extremely important factor. The school has enjoyed a st ro ng l1l usical t ra d i t ioll frol11 t h e beg i n 11 i n g , as well as n o t ewor­ t h y alum n i ach ievem e n ts in public school t ea c h i n g a n d adm i n is ­ t ra t i o n , u n i E'fsity t e a c h i n g and scholarsh ip, the p a s t or a l minis­ try, t h e h ea l t h . ciences and heali n g arts, and busine '5. At PLU t he l ib er al arts a n d professional educa t i o n are dosely i n tegrated a n d col l abora t i ve i n t b e i r educational p h i l osophies, activiti " n d aspirations.

in the following table:

has a p icturesqu e 1 26-acrc

cam p us. The un iversity's geographical setl i ng affords students a

wide variety of both recre a t io n a l and cultural en tertainment options. Recreationa l l y, the g r a n d e u r f the Pacific No r t hwes t encourages p a r t icipation i n h i k i n g , campi ng, c l i m bing, s k i i n " , boati ng, <111d swimming. The m o s t co nspicuous n a t u r a l monument in the ar a is !VI I . Ra i nier. I n addition to M t . Rainier, the d i s t i n c t ive realms 0 tlu= Cascade and Olympic m o u n ta i n ranges and fo rests o f Douglas Fir complete one of the m ost n a t urally t r a n q u il enviro n ments in t h e Un ited State . Students an also enjoy t h aes t h e t i c o ffe ri ng s f ne:lrby Seattle and Tacom a . These c i ty centers h ost a va ri e t y of perf, rm­ i n g and re co rd i n g arts and p rovide dozens of gal lerie a n d m u�eums a s well a s unique shopping a n d d i n j ng experiences.

FACULTY 2 27 full-time faculty'; 1 0 1 part- t ime faculty *pcr AmericalJ Associa tioli or UNiversity

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

To Senior Year

80.9%

6 5 . 4% 70 . 1 °/c,

1 99 1

8 1 .3%

66.0% 71 .1%

1992

79.9%

6 '.1%

1 993

79 .8 % 78 . 3 % 78.0%

73.4% 70.2%

67.4%

66.5% 64 . 8 % 63.6%

83.3%

74.8%

69.6%

80.2% 80. 1 % 8 1 .8%

69 . 5%

66.5%

69.9%

1 9 94 1 9 95 1 99 6 1 9 97

75.7%

7 7. 4%

84 .3%

71.1% 65.3%

67.S

II

74. 1 '!Io

66.2% 6 4 . 0% 6 2 . 7% 66 . 0 % 63 . 5 % 67.9%

69.7%

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO 1 4: 1

the u n i versity, the e pioneers recognized

U

To Junior Year

80,6'1'0 8 1 . 7%

2 0 00

the im po r tant role that a Lut heran educational i n sti t u t i o n Oil the estern fron t ier of America could pia. in the e me rg i.ng future of the regio n . They wa nted the i ns t itution to help i Illm igran ts adjust to t h e i r new land and find jobs, but t hey a lso wa n t e d it to produce graduates who would se rve church a nd com m u n i ty. 4

To Sophomore Year

1 986 1 98 7 1 988 1 989 1 99 0

1 9 99

Pacifi C L u t h c l'an U n iversity was fo u n d ed in 1 890 by a g ro u p o f mo s t l y Norwegian Lutherans from the P uget Sound a re a . They w e re l e d by the Rcv"ren d Bj ug Har t a d . who becam PLU\ first nam i ng

Fall

1 998

Professors d [Initiol/.

mSTORY

president. In

Retention of Entering First-Year Students

Y

WRITING THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULUM PilcHic LUlheran n ivers i t y is a co m m u n i t y of scholars, a co m m u n i t y of readers and w r i te rs . Readi n g i n forms the intellect and l iberates t he i m aginat i o n . Wri t i ng pe r v a d es o u r acaclem ic lives as teachers a n d students, both as a way of com m u n i cl t i n g what w e l e a rn a n d as a means f shap i ng t h o ughts and ideas. Al l faculty Il1C m bHS s hare t he responsi b i l i ty for im proviIlg the


l iteracy of t h e r r s t u d t n b . F,l cu l t y i n eve r y d e p a r t m e n t a n d school

ave rage grade of C or It ighn, o r

make wr i t i ng a n esse n t i a l part o f t h e i r

rieli/o/1st rated C'q u i va icl7t pro/icil'nry. f:i.illt;.

c o u rses

a n d show ,tuci e n ts

how to ask quest i o n s appro p r ia te to tbe k i n d s of read i n g done i n t lw i r fiel d s . Students w r i t e b o t h fO I m a l papers a n d repo rts a n d i ll Jo r m ,, 1 no tes a n d essays i.1l order to master tbe co n t e n t li n d

methods o r t h e va rio m d i ci p l i n e . T h ey

a rc

enco uraged t o

p repare i m p o r tan t p apers i n m u l t i p l e d rafts.

0 1 1 1' yc;l1r a l

tlt� college level, o r

l> C

J.u ngllilge IlIken

hefore /Iill l l! grade wil! /lor (flUill this reqll iremen t . Iw it!//ts w h o IUlve / 1 0 1 sI1 1 isjied aile ()/' b U 1 1i uf these rf<j l l ireme/ils m a)' stIli be admit ted but mllst make lip the deficiel1CY as <111

s:

additio/lal degree rcqu irelllt:1I I.

o z

VI VI

Additional study o C both math e m a t ics and fo r� ign iJng-Llage is ad\'isable for cHtain Jreas in the

:1nd scie nce;; a n d ill some

a rt s

p rofessional programs, Those who 1'0 1 1 0\ the above preparatory program wi ll fijld most c u r r i c u l a r offerings ( ) f t he un ive;!fsi ty open to them and may Jlso ,Jua l i fy f,) r adv'Ulced place m e n t in some a rens. St udents

admitted to either the fal l or spring seme ter.

are

Acc('ptanc� tt) the hll term c a r r ies pcrmi�i()n to attend the prn'iolls summer sessions. Spring acceptatlcc app roves e.nro U menl i n the Janu. ry terrIl. The fol Jowi ng a p p lic a t io n priority daLt:l> m e nded: Fi lII Sef1lesti.'r-Felmwry 1 5;

Spril1g S1'lIle

are

n:com­

la-December 15.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES (First-year and Transfer Students) Student> p l an n i ng to e nler a., fi r�t - )'('ar s t ude n ts may s u b m i t a p p l ication material.s a nyt i me after co m p l e t i o n o ( t h � j ll 1J i or year o f h igh s c h ool. Ad m i s i o n dec i s i o n s arc made beg i n n i n � Octo b e r I . a n d i da te, a r e notified o f t h e i r s t a t us a s �oon a s t hei r c o m p leted appl icil t i o n> h ave been received a n d eva l uated.

S t l1licnts who began their h i ghe r e d u c a t i o n

a ccred i t ed colleges

the univer s i t y each year w i th an average grade p o i n t in excess o f

sta n d i n g a t t h e i nstit u t i o n last attended fu l l - t i me. T h e m i n i m u m grade p o i n t average to b e co n si dered fo r ad m issi on as a t ransfn

www.plll. edul-admi ut he ra n Universi ty welco mes a pp l i c a t ions from s t u d e n t s

w h o exh i b i t capac ities fo r s uccess a t the b a ccala ureate level. must

o t h er ['egiona,!ly

3 .00 (B). Ca n d idates m ll s t have g o o d academic a n d perso n a l

253.535 . 7 J 5 1 800.2 74 .67S R

Ap pl icants

ell

u n iversil' ies are enco u raged to app ly fo r

ad m i s i o n w i t h a d va n ced sta n di n g . Over 400 s t uden ts t r a n s fer to

Admission

Pac i fi c

or

p re5ent evidence of sch olast ic

biljty and

s tud e nt is a 2 . 5 0 cu m u la t ive grade p o i n t ave r,1" e in c o l l e ge - l e vel work from

it

regionally accredi ted i nsti t u t i o n . T n rev i ew i n g

an

a p p l i ca n t's fi le, t h e O ffice o f Ad m i ssion s exaI11I llCS t h e grade

wi t h draw a d m i s s i o n for a n y a p p l i c a n t / s t u d e n t based o n a n

point average, academic progr�s, es ay, and rec o m llle n d a t i o n s. for a pp L ican ts with les.. t nan soplwnlOre s t a n d i n g ( 30 sC'm<'srer hOllrs or 4 5 q u a r t e r h o u r s ) , seco ndary schoo l records a n d s tanda rd ized test score wi l l a l so b e c o n , i d e red.

i n d i v id ual' meeting t h e ' c r i te ri a . A p p l i c a t i o n s for a d m i s . i o n

Crede n t ial

a r e cval l.ulled w i t h o u t regard to race, col o r, creed , rel i g i o n ,

J . form a l App{;cotio n : S u b m i t fhe PLU A p p l i c a t i o n fo r

dem onst ra te q u a l i ties of good ch a rac ter i n order to be accepted fo r ad m iss i o n . B o t h the vice presiden t fo r ad mi ssio ns a n d d i rec t o r o f a d m i ss ions reserve t h e r i g h t t o a d m i t , d eny, o r

g e n d e r, n a t io n a l o rig i n . a g e , m e n t al or phys i ca. l d isabi l i t , ma ri ta l

Ad m issi o n ava i l a b l e fro m h igh schuul counselors or t h l:' P L U

s t a t u s , sexLlaI o r i e n t a t i o n , or a n y other s t a t u s p rotected by law.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS ( First- year/ Tra nsfer Students ) I n eval u a t i n g a p p l icat ion ' t h e Office of A d m iss i o ns i n terprets

Office o f Ad m i s s i o ns . S t u d e n t s m a y a l s o apply o n - l i n e

the c u r r i c u l u m t h at the a p p l i t;'l n t hds p ur s u e d i n h igh school a n l! program i n p r e p a r a t i o n fo r col lege s h o u l d i n c l u d e t h e fo l l ow i n g:

Englisb: 4 years " Mathematics: 3 years ( a lge bra, 2 years, and geo met ry, I yea r) *

Foreign Language: 2 years Social Studies: 2 years Laboratory Sciences: 2 years

Fine, Visual, or Performing Arts: 1 year Electives: 3 veal'S ( selected from the afei\S l isted above, as well ' as cou rses i n comp ute r science, sp eed1, and debate. )

*

Minimum Elll rance Req llire m c llts: 1. I}vo ),ears of co llege p repara tor), malhenwlics (exclusive of computer science) w it h 1m average grade of C o r h(,her; or a l l appro llltd co urse

nt

the c"o llege level, o r demo/1stmtcd eq u i valent

proficiency.

(1\vo years of col lege preparatory malhemaIic> means two years o f h igh sc hool algebra or one )'�a r of hIgh schoo l a l gebra <lnd one y e a r o f high school geometry. Taking the algebr� a nd/or geumetry cou rse� i n m id d l " o r j u n i o r high ,chool i, accep IablE- p rovided t hey a re 11 Igh-school-Ievel co u rses . If 3 <l u den l is a d m i t t e d to FLU with a d fic i c ncy in m a t hemat­ ics, thaI deficiency i, removed by oll1pletian of approl't'd courses a s determ ined by the PLU m a t h placement exal1l.) 2. 7lvo year, of olle foreign Illnguage ill high school, with an

at

www. p l u . e d u . 2 . $35.0(J Applica t w il Fee: A $ 3 5 f e m u s t accorn p a n y t he applica­ tion or be m a i led sep a r a tdy. T h Is no nrefu n dable servi ce fcc

g r ad e p o i n t average and class rank in rela t i o n to the q u a l i t y of a t t h e bacca l a ur e a te level. For exa m p l e , a s t a n dard h ig h s c h o o l

r>q l l i red are:

dot's n o t a p p l y to t h e st uden t's acco u n t . Ma ke checks o r m o ney orders paya b l e to P L O ffi ce of J\d m iss i o n.s. 5 . Ji"illlscripts: Tra n scri p t mll ' l be s u b m i t t e d fro m h igh ' c h o o l and all c o l lege co u rse wor k . Tra n sc ri p t s m ll s t be se n t d i r ectly from the school to PLU. Accepted fi rst-year st udents m ust s u b m i L 3 fi nal h igh school t ransc ri p t which i n d icntes sat isfac­ tory co m pl et i o n 0 h igh Sd1001 a nd attainment o f a d ipl o m a . The u n iversity acC';:p t the Gen tral Equivalency D i p l o m a ( E ) fo r t h ose studen ts who may not have c o m p l eted a traditional h igh school progra m . 4. Recom merIrhl lioll: O n e reconHllt'n dntion m u s t b e p r e pared by

a

p r i n c i p a l , w u n s l o r, pastor,

or

o th e r qual i fied pers o n .

The' fo r m i s i ndudt�d i n t h e a p p l ication packet .

5 . Test Req l l i rel1Ierrt�· All en ter i ng fi rst-year student s m u s t s u b m i t scores from e i ther t h e Co l lege Board , Scholastic Assessm e n t Test ( SAT ) , o r the Amer i cah Col lege "t s t (ACT) Asses ment. Registr lion procedures a n d fo rms are �wailable a t b i g h sch o o l cou nsel i n g o ffice:,.

6. Pcrso llnl £>.;(1)': U ing no m o re t h a n two pages, w r i t e a n essay o n o n e o f these two t o p i c s : a. Descr i be an academi c expe rience th at h a s ' ig n i fi can t ly i nl1uenced your life. b. If y o u co u l d be ,.ny h istor ical or fict i o n a l ch arac ter for one day, who would y o u be a n d why? 7. Stat ement of Good Standing ( t ransfe rs o n ly ) . P

A

C

I

F

I

C

l

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

II

S

I

T

Y

5


z o

Qualified s t ude n t s in terested in

11'0

education ma

11'0

Early Admission be gi n work

award transfer cre d i t to

accelerat i n g t. heir fo r m a l tow a rd a d eg ret' after cumpl l ion

h i gh school students who have co m ­ courSeS in appr oved p rog ra m s . as d.eKri bed be.low. l . Advanced P/ilcelllt'llt Progra lll: r u d en ts who co m pLete

pl ted

the j u n i o r year o r first semester o f the se n ior year o f hig h schoo\.

advanced placem 'lit or c re di t toward g ra d u a t i o n t h rough the

E x ce pt io nal s t udents who

req u i red

units i n

wish t o �nro l l befo re c m p l e t i ng a l l high scho I m u s t have a letter su b m i t ted b y a

recogn i zed sch o I ()ffi iill who appro

e�

c. a

e a rl y college admlssion

Registrar's

be issued n. l y students h ighly

and give assurance that a h igh sch o o l d i p l oma will

pkted co u r s es

standing. ' t u d en ts who a w a rd e d

2. OFF! IA L

of an accredi ted Wa s h ingt o n S t at e c o m m u n i t y coUege on a n o ffi c i a l t ranscript. 3 . In tcmatiolla! Bacm !a urcu k; A maximum o f 3D se me s t er hours may be g ra n ted fo r co Jll plet'ion o f the D i p lo ma . Students are advised to con tact the Registrar's O ffice fo r speci.fic details. Jnd posted

a

4. Other Programs: S t u de n ts who have c o mp l e t ed col l ege c o u r se s

3 5 .00 ap pl i c at i o n fee.

wbiJe i n

Transcripts with Ellglish tnll ls/atioll from each:

The u n ivers i t y re erves the right to make decisions on a n individ ual b asis.

Other FAucatio.nal Experiences 1. Credits ea rned in n o n accredited school are not t ra n s fer a b le . Students w ho have m o t r i cula ted at Pacific L u the r a n UniverSity may

sem ster

o f col l ege - level E ngl i s h or higher. or

E n gl i sh Lmgu3

'C

campus. 4. One academic reference fr om school o fficia ls or aLhers in a position t o eval {lat the s t u d e n t's abili!"y t succeed in a ba cca la ur e ate program. I n ad d itio n , transfer student · from U.S. co ll ege r u n ive rs i ty mu t ha c a reference fro m t he i n ternational s t u d nt advis

r.

6. Personal Essay on one

o f two

t o p i cs l i s t e d

on

2.

J

3. T h e uni

the essay fo rm .

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

to 30 semester

T

does

n o t grant credi t �

iploma (CEO)

e

r

c o l lcge-l vel

General

ts.

4. For info rmation on the C o l lege Level EX,l m ina tion Pro ' ram ( C LE P ) , refer to t he Credit by Fxa lll inat ioll section un der Acade m i c Procedures.

FINAUZING AN OFFER OF ADMISSJON 1. Meclien/ Req uiremellt: B�fo re actual e n ro l l m e n t each new st udt:nl m ust submit a Health Hi 'tory hJ l"jn cumplet with a n accuratE: immun ization record. This i n fo rmatio n mUSt b e acceptable t o the PL Heal t h Servic�s Office. 2. Advance Payment; A $200.00 adva nce payment is lle ce ss a r y i n o rder to confirm an offe r of admiss i o n . T h i s p ayment gllar:11lte s a p i a -e ill t he s t u d e n t body, res rves hO lls i n g on

campus

i f request e d , holds fil1an ial assistance which may

have bec:n awarded, <Ind is re q u i re d before

class registration. applied toward

It is credited 1'0 the studen t's acco unt and is

ex p enses of t he firs! 'emestcr. Fall applimllts offered adrnis­ sioll Ii fore May I / 1 1 /,/ t pas/'mark t he pllyll1eJ1t by May 1. If c i rc u m st nces necessi t a te cancel latio n of nrol l m e n ! and the O ffice of Adm is s i o ns is notified ill w r i t illg before May 15, the 200.00 will be r funded. The refund d, te for the January tenu is D ce mbe r 1 5 .• and for sp ri n g semester January 1 5 . 'lY , illden t bl ormatiorr Fa rm: This form must b e comp leted 3. b all ·tudents and returned wi t h t he ad\eance payment. 4. RcsiderJI1a / Lire Inf()rmatioll Form: This form mllst be completed b}' Ill! student s and returned w it h the adva nce

Transfer of Credits Earned While in U lgh School he u n i ve rs i t y awards credit to high school students fo r ou rses completed befo re hig h school g r ad uat io n. The u n iversity may

I

(' rs i t y

Equivalt!ncy

l . Courses c o m p l et ed with a gr-Jde o f - or higher at o t he r regionally accredi ted c oUeges or u n l er hies norm a l l wi l l be a cc ep te d for gr a d u a t i o n credit with pa s i ng !(f<l Ie and will n o t be calculated into the P L grad po int a v rag . 2. A student may t ra n � r a maximum of '!6 semester or 1 44 qu ar te r hours. Of tbe$e, t h e maximum transferable from a two-year s c h o o l is 64 semester or 96 quarter hO\lfs. 3. St ud en ts who complete t he d i re t transfer as s ocia t e degree from a n accredited Washington t a te com m u n i t y coUege before matricula.tion at PLU will b e admitted \- ith junior s ta n d i n g and will have s a t i s fied ore I o f the ge n e r a l un iver­ si t y r equ i re m e n ts except fo r 4 h o u rs in religion ( frOID l i n e 1 or 2) and 4 h o u rs in Perspectives on Diver:ity.

F

up

hours.

ofFillQIlCes.

requirements.

I

TES) credi t . up to 20

h ours o f College-Level l:'.xam i n a t i o n Program ( LEP) credit, pn viding t h e tl tal of the t hr e e dues n o t exceed 30 semester

requ i re me nt s c om p l et e d and the to t a l hours a epted. I n divi l u a l and depart ments dett' r m i n l" which co u rses SJti sf), major

C

20 semeste.r h ours of U n i t ed States ( lJ 'AFI )/Defensc Ac t iv it y o r No n ­

The uniwrsity a l l ow� u p to

se m e' re r hours fo r m i lit a r y cred i t , and

schools

A

school to waive a particular

Tra d i t ional Educa t ion S u p po r t (DA

ve rs i t y requiremen ts. These materials incl u d e a sum mary of core

P

by exa m i n a t i O ll. A rmed rorces Insti tute

EVALUATION OF CREDITS Transfer of Credits from Othe.r Universities The Re gi s tra r 's Office e a l u a te s all tra ns fe r re co rd s and prov ides a d v is i n g m a t e r ia ls de s i g n e d to assist students to wm p l e te u n i ­

6

or

basil> of

previous lll )naccredited course wo rk r may perition a de p a rtm e n t o r school to receive cre d i t

I nstitu te, loc, t d on the PLU

5. A co mp le ted IlZtema r iol1a/ Srudellt D ecla ra t io l l

p etiti o n a d e p a r t me nt

req u i reme n t on th

Audit level comp l e t i o n of the America n C u l t u r a l Exchange

(A E)

receive credi t . The courses m u st be a part of the reg u l ar

Il�ge ca tal o g , be

u n iver s it )" and be p os t ed o n an official co llege or u n iver s i t y

( c o m p u ter-based ) , o r wr iti n g w i t h g r ad es of B

c

t ra n s c r i p t .

3. fllglislt Projlciell cy, m e as ur e d by one of the fo l l owing: a. Test of English as a Fo re i g n La ng ua ge (TOEFL) w i th a m i n im um score of 550 ( p a p e r test format) or 2 1 3

c.

school may

co l l e ge curriculum of a regionally accredited col lege o r

cop ies are n o t acceptable.

one

h ig h

l i s ted in th� o ffi c i a l

a. secondary school, b . E n gl i s h as a sec on d language program, c . co l l ege or u n ive rsity attended i n the Un itt:d States, h o m e co unt ry, or other co u n t ry. Tr a n s c r i p t s must be sent d i re c t l y from ea ch institution . Faxt'd

b. Two quarters o r

p a r t ic i p at e i n this program w i l l be a m a nn e r consistent with PLU's

credit in

be awa rd ed fo r col lege- level a ca de m i c co urses described in the

s e m es t e r and J an u a ry 1 for � pr i n g semester. Cr 'de n t i a l s req u i re d a re : .

oUege

Gltaiog

un ive.rs i t y o m m u n i ty. App l i c aton deadlines are luly 1 fo r fa ll

U . S.

R u n n i n g Start

p o l i c )' on t ra n s fer of credit fro m o t he r i n s t i t u tions. Cred i t wi l l

cial ly, and in E ngl is h profic iency a r e e n c o u r a ge d t o join t h e

I n ternational Studen t App liwtioll with

under the Wash ington S t a t e

Program are con ' i dered fi rst - yea r st ude n ts with advanced

APPUCATION PROCEDURES (Inlemational tudents) I n ternational , t udents who are q ua l i fi e d aead m ic al l )', fUl a n ­

nonrefu ndable

nIce.

2. RUIII1illg S{(lr/ ProgrwlI: Accepted students who have co m ­

a fter c o m p let i o n of specified co l l e ge wo rk . recom m ended for E a r l y A d m i os i o n w i l l b e considere d . Generally t h e se students rank near tbe top of their clas� and present high ap t i t u d e test cores.

l . A co m plete d

prograllJ o f the College B oa rd may receive cred i t

m i n a tio n

fo r such courses. I n qu i r i es should be addressed to t h e

payment.

Y


------

RETURNlNG STUDENTS

I.

s t udent 's admission to the u n ive rsi t y i s valid for six years. SrudenLs wh o do not a tte nd rhe u n ive rsi t y fo r a p(:J'iod of time lhat incl udes e i th e r a fa l l or s p ri ng semestl'l" must apply to return to the u n i \'ers i t • as d escr i bed below. • ' tude nt s who \'\' i;;h tQ re t u rn \Vithin the six-year admission pe ri od reente r through t11c S t u den t Se rvices enter. Reen tering stu de nts must provide t h e i r c u r rent add res . , d gree informa ti on, Jnd official t ra n s cr i pt s from any co l lege a t t e nde d du ring t heir b. cnce. Bctllrl' reg-i. kring, rce. nter ing . t u de nt s must re olve p rcviou. rinan ci<11 ()bl i <lQ t i on s to the u n iv 'l"sity a n d have a cu rrent health cleara nce lrom n i ve r ity He a lt h Services. • S t ud nts who w is h t return to t h e univ rsity after the si x.-year adm iss io n per i od c. pires must reap p l y for admission. AppliL n t s for readmission are required to s u b m i t a wITIple ted appl icatioll and official t ran ripts from any college attended du ri ng their absence. Application torms may be obtained from and sub m i t ted to the

ffiet: o f Admi:;sions.

2. An academic a L l y di�m issed student may apply for r(,i nstatement by s u b rn i u i n g

a

letter o f p e t i t i o n to the d i rector of a dv isin g . The

petition is acted o n by the Cu mmit tet' on Admissiun and

Re te n t i o n of Studen ts. A s t ud e n t whose pet ition is a p p rove d will be rei ns t a t e d on p roba t ion and Illust pa rt ic ip ate in the pr o b ation ­ ary semeter plan. Refer to lhe A cad e m i c Status sect ioll for a de.,criptioIJ ofprohation A st udent whose pe t i t i on is denied mal' a p p ly agai n for rcinstakm nt after one >ernest r h3:; ('bp �ed : unless iJ1fo rmed otlH!rwise. A dism issed st u de n t may petitIOn for reinstatemrnt only on e p er ·emt'Slcr. An academ ically d i srn i ;;sed t u dent Q);)' be relnst, ted after one semester i t h e st-udent prese nts new e i dence of p o te n ti a l acade m ic •

S t ude n t s

su cess.

who h ave he en d rop p e d f o r academic or d i sc i p l i n ­

Jr y rea'ons and t hl'n reins tated m u s t ide nt i fy a fac u lt y membl'r w i l L i n g to .lC t as a sp(.l I1sor n n d ad visor.

Financial Aid

Z l> Z

2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 1 34

H/IVIV. plu. edul-Iaid

'"

Reco gn i zi ng t h a t m a ny s t u d e nt s \Vho w a n t to at t e n d b c i fl C L ut h e r an n i ve rs i t y wo uld be u n ab l e to meet a l l ex pe n s e s o f emo l l m c n t fro m p e rso n a l o r fa m i l y sources, t h e u n ivers i t y a t temp ts to p ro v i d e fi n�nci,l l ils s i s t a n ce to a l l e ligible s t ud e nt s . An)' stude n t ap p ro ve d fo r cnrollment or cu r ren tl y e n ro ll ed may re ques t fi n ancial a i d . A p p ro x i mately 90% o ( the u n i vcr s i t y's students receive he l p in t h e for m o f g i ft ass istance ( t h a t is, scholarsh i ps, a rt is t i dliev m 'nt awards, or gran ts) , l o w - i n t e rest de fe r re d loa n s , o r e mp loy m en t . I n man)' cases a financial aid award will be a co m b i na ti o n of these forms o f assi tance. The offe r of fi n a n cia l aid is based o n the cost ( r a t tendance, which i s the u n iversity's est i ma te o f how m u ch it costs stud nts i n various c i rc u m s tances to a t te n d PtU. A s t u d e n t 's r s o u rce arc subt racted from the p roje c t e d costs to de te rm i n e fi nancial n ee d . Several d i ffe rent budgets a re used, t ak i n g i n to acco u n t a studen t's tu i t i o n , the cost of books, su p pl i es , housi ng, foo d , tra n s p o r t a t i o n , a n d pe r s o n a l exp e n ses.

l>

,..

c

Pan.'nl" c o n t r i b u tion. a rt' com p u t ed fo r a l l d e p e n d e n t

students by the fe deral processor, I t is b a se d on a fede ral ly

established fo rmula fo r dete r m i n ing p a re n ta l ab il i ty to con t r i b ­ ute toward a st u d e n t ' s educa t i o n . The un ivers i t y a l s o expects students (and their spouses, if married) to contribute toward

e x p e n se . .

. . All app l i c a n ts a re o ffered the maximum amount of aid tor

which t h e y q u al i fy, as f'u nds p e r m i t .

I f fi na n c ia l ci rcu m s ta n ces c h a nge, s t u d e n t s may c o n t a c t t h e

F i n anci J l A id and S t u d e n t Employment

ffice to discuss t h e i r

s i t u a t io n w i t h �l fi n a ncial a i d a d m i n i s t ra t o r a t any t i m e .

If s tud en ts or t he i r fa m i l ies hay

a s l o ss o f empl oy men t o r m a j o r

u n usual c i rc u m stances ( such

m e d i c al

expenses ) th�l t m i g h t

a ffec t the need for s t u de n t Gnancial aid, t h e F i nancial A i d and S t udent m p loymen t O ffice s ho u ld be co n t acted . U n u sual c i rc u mstances m ll st be described in w ri t ing , with the s tudent's name, s tu d e n t ID numher, and all p ert inen t dollar a mo u n ts ind icated.

St udents who rece ive scholarsh i p s from s o u rce s o u tside the

ulliversit v m us t i n fo r m the Fi nan c ial Aid and S t u de.nt E m p lo

-

ment O ffi ce in w r i t i ll" with t h e name of the s c ho la rs h i p a n d the ye a r ly a m o u n t . I n m o� t cases, PLU may be requ i re d by fecit:ral

reg u la t io ns to ad j ust a financial aid package. Loans and work

s tudy w i l l be adj us ted t:i rst . Sc h o lars h ip s and gra n ts w i l l be a dj us t ed o n l y as a las t re s o r t .

F i nancial assistance is a va i l a b le to all qU�ll ified students

regardless

of

race, color, creed, rel i g i o n , ge nder, national o rigin,

age, men tal or p h ysical disab i l i ty, marital s tat u s, o r sexual

orienta t i o n . , or any other s ta t us p rote c te d by law. APPUCATION PROCEDURE

Studen ts must a p p l y fo r fi n a .n c ial aid e a ch year by compl e t i ng a

new Free Ap p l ic a t i o n fo r Fede.ral ludent Aid ( FA F S A ) , Renewal FA FSA, o r d o i n g FAFSA on the Web. Need based aid i s n o t H utO l1l atl a l l ), re newa b l . FA FSA s a r ' genera l l y available i n Dece mber f() r t he upco m i n g academic year. A p pl i c a t i o n s m u s t be s u b m i t ted by t he fo l lo w i n g p r i o r i ty-fu n d i n g dead l i nes for PLU to

be considered for m ax i m u m fu n d i ng .

Entering First-year Students: inil FAFSA or d o FA FSA o n the

" cb

no

later than January 3 1

EoteTing Transfer Student

:

for th e upcoming acad e m i c year.

Mail FAFSA, R e n waI FAFSA, or do

FAFSA on the We b no later than

JaIJlIary 3 1

fo r t he upcoming

academic year.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

I.

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

7


o

Pro Continuing tudents: M a i l F FSA, Re n ewal FAFSA

do

or

SATISfACTORY PROGRESS POLICY

AF A on th e Web no l a te r than February 15 for the u p co m i ng

The p o l. i c y of the u n i ver i t)' is

academic year.

receivin g fi nan i a l assistance

For FAFSA o n the Well, go [ 0 u z � z ...

ing. To do otherwise coul d

h t tp://www.jilfsa.ed.gov.

An a p p l ica ti o n fo r financial aid may be com p l et d at any t i m e , a i d even th oug h need i s demonstrated. T h e

i na nc ia l Aid a n d tudent EmploymeDt Office w i l l cODsider all app lic an t s fo r any awa rd fo r which they m i gh t be t'ligibl . A id awa rds are fo r olle year alld most a re rellewable. provided reapplica t ioll is colI/pleted all time. ji nanrial l/eed mll-liHues, !/nd sa tis(a clOry Qcndemrc p rogress is maintained. Aid is IlO t alltomat ically renewed each year.

NOTIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS 1. Award dec i sio n s for ri rst - ye a r and tra n s fer s t u den t s who meet the F eb ru a ry 1 c o m ple t i o n date. w i l l be made in Mar h, a n d

en ro l l e d fo r a m i n i m u m of 1 2

ffers must be valid at ed by returning t h e signed O ffer o f

r and tran fer st u d n ts m ust also submit the $200 advance p ay m e n t req u i red b y the O ffice of Ad m iss ions. Fina ncial A id . Fi rs t - y

as

poss i ble . bu t m ust be recei ed by

May 1 . No ad va n ce payment is req u i re d from co n t i n u i n g students. A l l s t u d e n ts m u st om plete a sa t i s a c t o r y paym e n t arra nge m e n t w i t h the St ude n t Servi e s Center w i t h i n t\ 0 weeks

of rece i v i n g th ei r o r ig inal offer of fin a nc i al aid to h ol d awa rds. the re ply d a te s p ec i fied a n d wh

sh e i s p u rsu i ng i n awa rde d by P a c i fi c L u t heran n ivcr ity F i na ncia l Aid and St u de t Employ­ m en t Office. Tbe fol lowing requ i remen ts <1 re expected of each fi n a n c ia l aid re c i p i ent : To m a ke satisfactory p rogress towa rd a degre , an under­ g r a d u a t � student mnst complete 24 semester h O llr of cre d i t c< ch academic year. For t h is purpose, an ac. demic year is defined , the fall sem es t er and the prino semester. Fi na n ial aid is a w ard ed for 32 hou rs to co mple.te bachelor's degree in four

ton ' t a te

eed

1 92 and the max i m u m t i me fr me fo r co m p leting a b a cc a la u re­

o r a c a de m i c p ro g r a m , only

tud)' a n d Washing­

rants, i<; cred i te d to the st udent's ac c o u nt

hen

\

each semester. P,J rents and s t u d en ts ,He respo n s i b le' fo r the

charges in excess o f the award. I n some cases aid i awa r ed in excess of d i rect u n ive rs i t y c harges to h el p with l i v i ng exp e ns s. 0 ex p e d i t e a refund students can request re m a i n ing funds from their account by

en ter.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES The basic responsibility for fi n a n c i n g an educatio n at PI. rests with t uden ts and t h e i r families. In additioD to expected contributions fro m parents or gua r dian s , stu d e n ts a r e exp e c ted to assist by c o n t r ibuting fro m their savi ngs and s u m m e r

Opport unity

l.

ign i n g , n d retur n i n g each fi nancial aid n o t ice received. 2. D ecl i n i ng at any tiITIe an)' port ion of an aw a rd . 3. o t ifyi n g the Student Services Center in case o f a cha n ge i n red i t ho u rs a t te m p t ed ; a change i n marital status; a change i n r e idence ( o ff-camp us or a t home); or receip t of a dd it io na l out ide cho l a rs h ips . 4. Providing a co p y of t he i r parenLs' income tax retu r n (Form J 040) a n d lor a copy of th e i r 0\ n i ndividual i n co me t a x re t u r n if req u e s t ed . H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

Enrollm.ent Status Pull-time 3/4 time 1 12 lime Le:,s Ihan 1 /2 lime'

Minimum per te r m

Minimum per year

12

24

All

9

18

6

12

L"Tt:dit .tll'mpted

All

r.'dits att.;rnpkd

,rants, the Was h i ngton State Work S tudy Program , ,duca t i o na l

Add itio nal rights and res p o n s i b i l i ties of fi n a n c i al aid

T

Undergraduate Need-Based Credit Completion Requirements

Satisfactory p rogress is rev iewed for fi nancial a id p u rpose s

rec i pien t s i n cl u de :

U

max i m ulll t imt: fra m e o f I () years. f c rrd i ts al lowable is J 9 2 . )

after t he end of spri ng se.me ter. For Wash in ,t n -tate , eed

demonstrate need.

L

a

(The maxi m u m n um b e r

Less thall l i2 time £lI rol/ment applies to the l' 11 Gram l'ra�mm�. L,:s$ IIIm1 1 /2 rime , ·Ilml/m en! will m/ls� ,1 5111dn., I ', [oa1l tu be canceled and m,lY }eop,ndize rlc{er/ll"llt 5/,H"5.

supplementary to the e ffo rts o f a st uden t's fa m i ly. It is p ro v i d e d

C

must be a c h i eved w i t h i n

earn ing . Fi n a nci a l assistance fro m the u n ivers i t ), is therefore

I

for receiving a degree is e n fo rced . Some fi nJnciaJ aid progrnms ( e . g . , most u n i v� rs i t y gi ft aid p rogra m s a n d Was h i n gton tate Need G r a n t s ) a l l ow aid to b� awarded .1 mllXilll!llll o.lJolir acn­ demic years for entering jirst-year studCIlt5, alld two years for entering transfer students or a maxim um of 144 hours.

For part - ti me undergraduate s t u d ents , a m i n i mu m of 1 2

qualified st udents.

F

ho u rs mal' b e taken quali ­

c red i t hours must b e co m p l e ted each a c ade m i c year and a de g ree

Under federal regu latio ns , adjustments to an awa rd package must be made if a studeDt re ceiv e s additional awards o f a i d from sources ex:ternal to the u n i r ' i l )'. I n eve ry case, however, F i nanc ial Aid a nd Stud e nt E m p l o )' m e n t w i l l attem pt to allow the s t udent to keep a s much o f the award p a c k age as p oss i ble . By treating a i d received Tom external sou rces in l l l i s way, additional avvards from the u n ivers ity" reso u rces can be made to o t h e r

for students who

1 9 2 cred i t

fy i n g fo r fi n !lei'll d i d , a n d t h e m ax i m u m t i me frame of i x yea r s

all p a perwork h as been co m p le ted . Half of the award is d is b u rse d

co nt ac ti ng the Student . rv i ce

e

ate degree is six ye a rs . E en if a s tudeD t ch a nges h is or her maj o r

revi e we d with the group currentl y b e i n g p ro cessed . Aid, w i t h the e xce p t io n of C o llege v\fo rk

or

ssisun

the maximum number of cre d i t hour · t h a t rna)' be t templed is

payment arrang ments will have their awards cancelled. If an

I

sufficient num be r of cre dit hours,

For ful l - t i m e un d e rg r a duate tuden ts receiv i ng fin a nc i I a id ,

do not complete satisfactor),

a p p l i cant later decides to rcap p l y, the application w i l l be

C

a

years.

A pp l ica n ts who do not return their acce p ta nce of an award by

A

redit h ur or m re per emester.

aca dem ic p rogres. in t h e c o u rse of st u d y he

T h i s should be done as soon

n �rudents

ard Jl1 y be made d urin g t h e year i an a id

o r d er t o conLinue t o receive fin a n ial

VAilDATlNG THE AID OFFER

P

t he r are in good stand­ re h a rdsh i �

However, each fi na ncial aid rec ip ien t mLlst m a in t a i n satisfucto ry

e.nt ouL beg in n i ng

i n June.

8

an a\

rec i pi nt has n o t enro lled fo r

2. F i n a n c i al aid decisions for co ntinuing P LU studen ts are mad e

Aid

a

u s e a �ev

However, no in t i tu t i mal grants w i l l b awarded to s t u d en ts with CU L11 U lal ilre gr ade poi n t averages below 2.00. Mo reover, federal regu l a t ions re q u i re thal after fo ur term. or rn re f at tem p ted enrol l ment, st u d e nts below 2.00 c u mu la t i e grade p o i nt average w i l l have their federal tin,lIlcial aid revo ked . Pa i fi c Lutheran n ilrcrsity' Schools of B usines dTI I E d uca t i o n requi re a m. i n i m u m g ra de po i n t erage of 2 . 50. 1 0 b e g i v e n p r i o rity for mo t types 0 financial a i d , a n a p p l i ­ ca n t must be e n rol le d as a fu l l - t i me snldenl. Fo r Federal Pinan­ c i a l Aid p rogram" a fu l l -t i m e student is deoned as any perso n Adj ustments i n

a c tual notification will be m a i led the fi rst we k in Ap r i l . are

a l low st u d en ts \0 cont i n ue

l u ng

who mu t devote th ei r efforts Lo ac h i e vi ng satisfact o ry grades.

bu t failure to m eet the priority date may re u l t i n a red uct io n o f

du ring Ap ril a n d May. No tifica tions

to

<],

S

I

T

Y

ra n d ( EOG). Washi ngt

D

Scholars, v ave, TRIO,

an I aoy other S ta t e of

ashi ngto n funded pr gram, sali facto r y progress is rev iewed at the en I of each semester. The fo l l ow i ng grades do n t i nd i c a t successful co mpletion of acade m ic credit ap p li ca b l e toward a d grec.: i n c o mpletes ( T ) ,

w ith d ra wal ( W ) , u noffi c i al withdrawals (UW) , a n d g rades of E and F. Any co u rses i n wh ich r ades a re rec e ive d are, however, incl uded in t h e m a l<i m u . m n u mbe r l) credit · that may be attem pted ( 192) and a re coDsidered Lo be within the m ax i m u m


t i me frame a i l wable for a c h iev i ng

a degreto (six )/ears) . All credits ear ned by exa m i nation, whi h are applicable

toward , deg r e, w i l l I'll' incl uded in the li mi.tation on credit t ha t can be at te m pt ed w h i le eligible for fi nancial aid. Once a cour. c has been comp l ted sue es s fu lly, the c r d i t hours earned are c:ow1ted t w ard the max i m u m n u mb er o f hours w h i.ch c a n be taken under financ ial aid el ig i b i l i t y. I f a cou rse is s ucce ssful l l com let d mo rc rhan o nce, it is c o u n ted onJy O1lCe rowa rd a � tude nt 's deg ree req u i reme nts and toward the m, imcm n u m ber c f hours that can be ta ke n under fi n a nc i al aid el igi bil ity.

urriculum i nc lude very few [.J nc r e di t es whose c r dit hO llrs are nQt app l i ca b le to a degree. If a ny s u ch -o urses are taken by financial a id reci p i e n ts , tht! h urs w i l l be included i n the l i m ita tio n on c r d its tha t may be attempted and will be co ns i dc re d within the time fr a m e al lowable fo r a ch iev ing a d ree . In the event th aI a l u de n t fails to meet th criteria fo r sa tisfactll ry progress d u r i ng a po rt ic u la r se m este r, he or she will be placed on financial aid p ro bation . F a il u re t o regJ i n satisfac­ tory financial aid academ ic s t a t u s w i l l re wt in the cancellation () fi nancial aid . nee lUlsati s fact ory fi na nc i , I ai d p ro gress has b e en dt:ter­ mined, stud n ts receive offi ial l1o ti fication. Students wh o have had their aid den ied due to u nsa ti sfa to ry progress may ap pl)' for r i nsta te m e n t by s u bm it tin g a le tter of pe ti t i on t the Fi nan ial Aid and t u den t Em ployment O ffice . St uden ts w h os e fi nanc ia l aid ha. b n d nied may petition fo r re insta tem en t of their aid i n one of two ways: 1. they may co mp lete ne semester of full - ti me enroli meJ1t using their ow n financial resources, or 2. they may s u b m i t nIl appeal to the Fi nancial Aid and ludent Emp loy menl Office documenting the u n us ua l ci rcumstances which have made it i m p os ible to make sat i s fa c to ry progress Ju r i ng tilt! se mest e r in ue tion. The u n ivers ity's

CO l1 r�e$

or

eour

u m m e r s e SiOl1S m y a ls o be use d as terms duri n g which a student on tinanc ial aid proba tio n may re ga i n satisfactory academic tatlUo. However, tudents enrolling in s u m m er sessions fo r t h is purpose mList use t h e i r own fin a n ci a l reso urces a nd are inel i' i ble fo r fi na n cial aid through the u n i ve r s i ty.

AID PACKAGES t ud e n ts are u�unlly e.ligible for seve ral di fferent types o f a i d from v a riou s aurces ; there fo re PLU offe rs a fi na n cial aid package of fun ds . F u nds offered de pend on a number of fa c t or s , in dudi ng st a t us as an u nd e r g r a du ate o r g ra d uat e student, t h e funds available at t h e t i me 3 student ap p l i es and the am o u n t of Gnanci I need. A n expect ed famil. contribution is derived usin g a federal orrnula app lie d to FAFSA i n formation.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS Sc hu l ar h i ps und grants are funds t h at do not have to be re p a id . A t uden t 's pa cka ge i n c l u des g i ft monc y w h enever gu id e l i n es and fu nding levels perm i t. Whe re applica ble, the co m b i n t i on of tuition rem i s icm and/or the[ ins t i t u t i o nally funded resources (e.g., lergy Dependent, A l u m n i De pe nd en t , R eg e n ts ) will be aw rded to a maxinHlm of PLU t u i t i o n cost. To receive PLU grant or scholarship a sistance, stl1dents m I1St be full-time, taking a m in i m um of ) 2 nonrepeated cred it hol1I's each term. P L aw ard s gift ass i sta nce for 1 2 - 1 7 hours pe r term for the acade m ic year ( faU and s pr i n g ) o n ly. In addi t ic n, unless Qtherwise no ted, the schol arsh ip. and grants listed below art! necd-based and are available to firs t- degree under�rad uat e.s only. Recipienl must l11;}i nt , in sa t i fa tory academic pro�ress as defined in the carill o\: bv I�in nc i al id. Institutionally con trolled scholarships alld 'ra nts are pro vided by the university a n d/o r university dO llurs. If it is determined tllar all o r a portioTl of a s t u dent ' award is pro vided by a de s ignated o r named SOl/ree, a n updated offer offtnan ial aid will b e sent.

Z l> Z n

PLU FUNDED - NON-NEED FOR TUITION EXPENSES REGENTS' AND PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to

first-year students in re c o g ni t i on of outs tanding academic achievement , s e rvi ce in high s c ho o l and in anticipation o f

continued excellence

at

. Students who met the fo l low i n g

PL

basic reqlI i rements are invited to a p pl y : a p plication fo r ad m i ss i o n postmarked by December 3 1 ; 3.80 GPA at t h e t i m e of admission;

c

1 2 5 0 SAT or 28 A::T; an d U.S. citizen or o b ta i ni n g ci t i zen sh i p. The Rege nt s' Scholarship is awarded to cove r the ful l cost of tuition lip t o 17 em estcr hours per term ( fa l l and · pr i ng) fo r t h e

5 cred its in J- ter m . The P resi d ent 's Scholar­ ship i a h I f tuition award for the academic year. B o t h a re renew.lble fo r three years provided a 3 . 3 0 c u m u l a t i ve PLU G PA is academjc year and

mai n tained.

PLU ACADEMIC SCHOlARSHIPS o f $ 500 to $6,000

a r e a wa rd ed to a d m i t t ed firs t - yea r and t r a nsfe r students, based on a ca de m i c standing a t the t i mt! o f , d mi ssi o n . Students must be . 5. citizens a nd receive an o ffe r of a d m i s s i o n by March 1 . A 3 . 30 PLV GPA is req uired fo r renewal. Fina ncial need is not a d ete rmi n i n g factor.

PHI THETA KAPPA (PTK) SCHOLARSHIPS of $3 ,000 are g ra n te d to transfer students with a PA o f 3 . 0 o r higher, 4 5 + s e m es te r

hours

(60+ q u a rt er hours)

of tra nsferable col le g e co urse work,

alld p roof of PTK m embers h i p. Students must be a d m i t t ed by March l . The award is re n ew a b l e fo r one yea r during the u ndergraduate p er i o d o f s tudy i f a c u m ul a t i ve 3.30 PLU J PA is maintained. F in a n cial need i s not a de te r m i n i ng fa ctor. Three awards are gi ven each year.

ALUMNI DEPENDENT GRANTS of $500 per year for fou r years

a re available to full-time d ep en d e n t s t u den ts wh o se pa r e n t ( s )

attended PLU ( o r Paci fic Lu theran Co l le ge ) fo r tw more. S t u d en t m u s t b e a

.

s em e s t ers o r

. c i t i ze n . Financial n e ed is n o t a

determining factor. re available to

FACULTY MERIT AWARDS

24

st u d en ts who have

c om pl eted 45 s mester ho urs or more al P LU. No s ep a r a te application is necessary. P L stndents fo r sele t i on .

l)'pes of Aid

.."

DONORS/FUNDED UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIPS

facult y recommends in d iv i d u a l

otification is m ade in th

spring semester

for the following year. The award is renewable fo r one year d u r i ng the undergraduate p riod of s tu d y. Financial need is n o t a d et e r m i n i n g fac to r. RIEKE LEADERSHIP AWARDS fo r up to $2 ,000 per year a re

PA and d e m on s t rat e d

ava i labk to s tud e n t s with a 3 .00+

leader hip Or active i nvolvement in a m u l t iethnic co n t ex t . S e p a r a te applic.ltion reqll i red. Con tact Student Involvement and Leadership, 2 5 3 . 53 5 . 7 1 95 .

F ina n c i a l need is n ot a dete r m i n i ng

fa ct o r. CLERGY DEPENDENT GRANTS are ava il a ble to dependent children of o rdain ed mill i sters who are a ct i ve ly 'erving a Christian c o ng re ga t io n full-time. The gra n t amount is $ 1 ,000 per

year ( $ 500 per semester) fo r fo ur years. Financial need is not a d e t e r m i n i ng fa c to r. ARMV RESERVE OFFICER TRA I N ING CORPS (ROTC) SCHOLAR· SHIPS are available to ful l - t i m e u ndergraduat file a

FAFSA

.

t udents must

and m eet all PLU G PA st a n dard s . Up to full t u i t i o n

and ro o m and meals p oss i b le .

all PLU's ROTC , ffic e fo r

i n fo r m a t i o n at 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 8 7 4 0 .

ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS a r e granted t o st udents who have exce p t i o na l abil ity in t h e field of a r t, dance, drama, forensics, and music. TI1e aw ard requires recommendation

by a

PLU faculty m em b er each year and is renewable on t he basis of recomm endation

and parti c i p a t i o n . F in a n ci al need is not

a

deter m i n i n g factor.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

R

S

I

T

Y

9


c

INTERNATIONAL GRANTS are av a i l a ble to gr adu a te a nd

u n de rgrad u a te i l1ternati{.lIl � 1 stude n t s a t ten d i ng Pacific L u t htTan ...J

u z « z

...

Un ive rsity. The a m o u n t is $� ,OOO per year fo r fo u r yea rs . Award d automati c a l l y a n d may be renewed a n n ually fo r qu a l ifyi ng students. F i n a n cial need i not a d et e rm i n i ng factor.

Note: FAFSA

THE AMERICAS GRANT is ava i la b le to citizens o f count. ries i n

[ orth, Central, and South America ( excl uding

States). The

n ited

(except South Hall, where m e als live i n

a

are

not i n cluded ) . Students m ust

r e m a i n :1 I1 es t i m a t e u n t i l ve ri fic a t i o n is compl tec!, i f a s t u d e n t elected.

Stud en ts taking l 2 hour

h al l roO Ill and select d meal plan. Awa rded a u tomati­ to

timely trlmlller eadl year to offillf/tlcia/ need Jar tleed-b(jjed aid.

FEDERAL AND STATE FUN DED

has been

The amount is the equival e n t of a double-occupancy PLU cally and renewed a n nually

;P

Federal PeJi Grants are federal gra n ts a va i l a b l e to s t u d e n ts

orway, or Sweden who are attending PLU ful l - lime. e

holars h i p s ) . S t u d -n t.

2 . 00 PL

who take a t [east 1 cred i t h o u r per semester. P e l l Gr a n ts

NORDIC GRANT is available to c it izens of Den m a r k, Finland,

residen

u mu l at ive

s

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDED GRANTS

FLU residence hall. T h is gra nt re pla ces the I n ternational

1 eland,

d

ith fi n a n c i a l need ( w h o

\

""1$1 be submilted i " (/

reeslab/is/I e"idellce

am o u n t is the equivalent o f a double-occupancy room a nd meals

tndents

m a y not qualify for o the r i n s t itutiona l m ust ma i n ta i n at l east

'ra.n ts. Financial need is n o t a determ i n i n g fa ctor.

grant,

a d m i t ted ful l- t i m e · t u de n t · for a

9- 1 1

less than

maximuIll of fo u r years. S t udent m u s t live in a PLU reside nce

or m o re per semester rece ive

a

fu l l

h o u rs receive 3/4 gra n t , 6-8 h o u rs l / 2 gra n t , a n d h o urs ap prox i m ately

1 /4.

gran t.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are rederally funded grants a w a rd ed o n t h e b a s is of h i gh fi n a n c i a l need.

h a L l . This gra n t repla ces the I n ternational Grall t . Fin a n cial need is nor a dete r m i n i n g fa ctor. NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP a w a rd s are offe red for $ [ ,000$ 2,000 to NMS T- P SAT ( ati n a l Merit Semj-final ist Q u a l i fy­

Wasb ington State Need Grants are a v a i l::lble to e l i g i b l e residents o f t h e St:lte of Was h i ngton w h o a t t e n d PL . These

should i n form tbe Na tional Merit Scholar h i p Corporat i o n of

awarded at PL

i n g Te t - P re-Scholastic Assessmen t 11 t) fi n al i sts . hnali sts

their i n t e n t to en ro l l at P LU.

gua ra l!teed a

1

atiOlw! Merit fi nalists

gra n l" S

llTt?

total of $7, 000 through CI (ombi;ation of a t her

not

st udents frO I11 church

ongr gation. who attend Pacitlc Lutheran

niversity. Through the

'I S program, Pl.U will match, dollar-for-dollar, scholarships from $ 1 00 to $ J ,000 provided by congregations or organizations with i n a church [0 students attending PLU. Students and/or congregations may reserve their m a tchin g fu nds ea rly by submitti ng a PLUMS application for an an t icipated chur h , dlolarship. The PLUMS program' l imited funding will be a wa rded on a fi rst-come, must receive all PLUMS

payments by September I :> . Funds m u t be sent directly to Financial MS

TUITION REMISSION: E m p loyees of the u n iv e rs i ty a re e l i gible fo r

75% t u i t i o n re m is s i o n . Tu i r i o n rem i s s i o n is a u n iversity g i ft reso urce. Stud n ts receivi n g t u i t i o n remission may be awarded ad d itio nal merit and n eed-ba s ed i n s t i t u t io n a l g i fts, but o n l y up to t h e cost of t u i t ion. Rec ei p t of t u i t io n remission may serve to adju t r elimi n a te o th er i nstitu t i o n a l aid previously awarded. F i n ancial need is not a deter m i n i ng fac t o r. to

to

a

3 . 2 5 c u m u lative

h ave an entering

Commu n i ty and Technical C o l leges . App l i ca n t m us t be

a

h e aW<lrd is fo r two years

(

·ee

S a t i s factory Acadernic Progress. ) Download

P ar t n e r and

have completed any TRI

progra m . Reci pi ents mu st demon­

strate fi n a ncial need. F u n d i n g is l i m i ted . nuo p r o g ra ms i n ­

clude: Upward Bound, Ta lent S�arch, a n d SM ART . i\ TRIO

3.00. Re newal wilJ req u i re good a cade m i c 3.00 P L U PA, t i mely reap p l i ca t i o n

awru'd will replace \ ash ington

t:lte

eed

rant el igib i l i ty .

ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to h igh

school s n i ms who have demon s- l m ted acade mic achievement. The award lllay be renewed fo r u p to tl1 ree year , provided that fu nds are ap p rop r i ated and the student remains el igible.

matches D o l la rs

A m o u nts vary. App l ic a t i o n is made through t he

program of C i tizens' Schol a rs h i p Fo undation of

America.

I

year in a vo ca t i o nal progra m appro ed by l h e State Board fo r

www. hecb.wa.gov/ p ay i ng/i ndel(.. h t m l .

stude nt based o n financial need and as fun d i n g permits. Dollars

C

from v,Iww.h ecb . wa.gov/ pa}'i ng/:1i dp rogram s.h t ml.

TRIO - a State Need Grant Program is available t o s tuden ts who

fo r Scholars chapter awards, d o lla r fo r dollar, up to $ 1 ,000 per

A

e d uca t io n assistance ag<'ncy i n

a

appropriate

�t udent' home state.

WASHINGTON SCHOLARS AWARD is availabl e to s t uden ts who

are VVashington State Scholars for fo u r years, s u bject to state

F i e

L U T H E R A N

be

appro p r i a t i o n s by th e Was h ington Sla te Le gisl at ure . To inquire

scholarships from a ny D o l lars fo r Scholars chapter. Pac i fic

P

kamania,

PROMISE SCHOLARSHIPS are ava ilable p e n d in g co nti n u i ng

A F$A, a n d demonstrated fi n a n c i a l need .

a

Pierce,

(See Sa t isfactory Academic Progress. ) D ow n l o a d appl icatio n s

state fu n d i n '.

DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS are avail able to studenb receiving

for S h o l a rs is

owlitz, Frankl i n , King, Kitsap,

Snohomish, Spokane, T hu rst o n , Wal l a W,t/ la , or Ya k i m a and

a p p l i at·ions [rom www.wtb.wa.gov.

standi ng, a c u m u l ative

Lutheran U n h·crs ity is a Col le g i a te

Benton, Cla rk,

( fo u r semesters) a n d the a m o u n t vari es each year depe·n d i n g on

t u d e n t s o n the basis o f acade m i c achievement and

t h ro ug h the

of t h e fo llowing \·Vas h i ngton state co u n t ies i n orc!er to be eligible:

o n th e slatus ()[ fu nding or to down./oad an a p p l ication visit

fin a n c i a l neec!. F i rs t - y e a r s t u d e n t s m us t h a ve c u m u l ative GPA o f

Il1U t apply p r io r to at! nd i ng Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. E l i gi b le ::l p p l icants m u s t be residents of one

m a i n t a i n a PLU G PA o f 3 . 0 each t e rnL

Q CLUB SCHOLARSHIPS ar e awarded to new fi rst-year and

GPA. Transfe r s t u d e n t s are requi red

or j u n i or standing in t he a m o u n t of $2,500 per year ( subject to s t a te fu ndi ng) . StudCllts

'Wa, h i ngton state resident. a h igh school graduate, a n d must

PLU FUNDED - NEED BASED tran sfer

(EOG) are aw,mied to t r a n sfer �ludents w i t h an associa te's degree

(WAVE) i s available to students who have co m pIer d at least one

de t e rmin i ng factor.

90'Vo a n d their d epe n de nts arc e l i gible for up

j 2 h o urs

o r m o r e p er sem ter receive a fu l l gr a n t ; s t u d e n t s laking 9- 1 1 h o u rs r e c e i v e a 3/4 gra n t ; s t u d e n t s t a k i n g 6-8 h o u rs re e i ve a

WASHINGTON AWARD FOR VOCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

application for match ing funds are requi re d. Financial need is not a

up to

accord i n g to Wa s h ington S t a t e law. S t ud e n t s l a ki ng

placebo u n d . S tu d e n t s Illust be enroll ed at least 6 hours per terill.

first-se rve basis; however, al/ match i n g funds dpplications must be

Aid and Student Employment; 1I0t be given to the student. PL

eed G r a n t s

WASHINGTON STATE EOUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS

PL

received by August l 5 . In ad dition, PL

i n accor(hnce with the State H igh e r E d u c a t i o n

1 1 2; a n d s t u d e n t s t a k ing fewer t h a n ) h o u rs a re not e l i g i b le.

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY MATCHING SCHOLARSHIP

financial as istance t

i n ten ded fo r ,t udents w i th h i gh need. Gra n ts are

m u s t be used fo r ed ucat i o na] expenses o t h e r t h a n t u i t io n

a determ i n i ng fa ctor. (PLUMS) provid

are

Coord i n a t i n g Boa rd's policies. Wa shi ngton S t a t e

illstil l lfiorlaj scholarship resou rces. This a m o u n t incllldes the $ 1 , 000 to $2,000 "{a tiollal Meri t Scholarship. Financial need is

10

PLU GRANTS a re a war d ed to

U N I V E R S I T

Y


legislative adjust ment. To renew each yea r the student must ma i ntai n a umulat i 3.30 PLU JP . The Was lt i n 'ton Scholar Program honor t h ree gradu at ing h igh chool seniors from each I g i s l a t ivt: district each year. For more information v i it www.hech.wa.gov/paY lng/ index.html. A l l awards from federal alld Slale sources are made asslltllillg the allticipated fulld, will be available. Should a reductio" ill fu"dillg occur, awards may be reduced or elim; mued.

pr ees in g and delivery of your loan funds. (Please note: If you signed , Mast r Promissory ote "Of 2000-200 I or 200 1 -2002 Federal Fa mily Educational Loans P r og ram loan, you will not need to 'ign an othe r p ro m is ()f)' note and none will be mai led to yo u,) Loan fu nds are electron ically t rnnsmitted to the univers i t y by all knders fo un d on o L i r lender list. VV stro ngly reco mmend you choose a lend 'r from this l ist to avoid h av i ng to sli nd in l i n e i n t h e Student Services ,enter to end rse ( 'ign) yo ur paper check. ,he ks must be endorsed within 30 days after be ing received by the un iversity. I n add it i on ,

LOANS

» z n »

I""

» c

lenders not on our lender list m ay not offer you repayment

Student loans allow 'ou to postpone paying for college expenses until you h ave complet d your education. Loan obligati n s are described i:n t h i ' section a n d i n the prom issory note . Please read

incentives, wh ich could reduce th overall cost of your loan. If you are borrowi n g the FFELP fo r the fliSt time , you must complete an entrance counseling session before loan funds can be released to yo u r

carefully so you un d rsta nd all your re ponsibilities before y u accept a loan.

a

COWlt.

ot completing a session will result

in the loan funds being returned to your lender, causing a pos ible d el ay in settling your account and p os s ib l y i ncurring additional finance c h a rges .

NEED BASED LOANS FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN ( funding is limited)

SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

credit ho urs) undergr.tduate o r (4 credit ho u r ' ) graduate s t udents with h igh n ed. Amouot: Up to $4,000 fo r each yea r o f undergrad uate study and u p to $6,000 � r each 'ear of graduate or profession 1 tudy. Repayment: A fi, ed in terest rate of 5%. Th e rc is a 9- mon t h grace pe r io d after t h e student graduates, w i t hdraw , or d r op s t o

Ellgibillty: At lea t half- t i m e

Eligib lUty!

." z

t lea s t half-time

(6

less than half-Lime art ndance. Principal a n d i n t rest payments begin at 1 2 mo n ths. Dc� rrals avaUable for student s tat us , economic h ard 'hip, 'elect vol u n teer services and p re-ca ncella­ tion borrowers. Comments or Condjtions: Recipient are req u i red to si n a pr mi s o ry note. The promissory not s w i l l be available for ncw borro\ ers to pi ck up in the Student Ser v i ces Center after the fi rst veek f c1as · e.. The student mllst s ign the pro m issor y not ., complete a n o n l ine entrance interv iew, a n d return tl1(, p rom i s­ sory note if a cepl i n g the I an . Con t i n u i ng st ud e n t s w i l l be sent a n o t i ce C r a n a p p o i n t ment to go to t h Student Services Center/Student Loan Office to sign a p ro m issor y notc. All loans n t s i g n ed fo r will b nee/led. Pri r i ty i given to u n de r gr adu­ a t studcn ll. The total loan may be fo rgi en for tea hing in low­ income population a rea , te ach i n g t he di)abled, or teach ing i n a federal H ead Start pr gram. Add iti onal loan cancell tion con d i t ions e x is t . FEDERAL NURSING LOAN ( fu n d i ng I l i m i t ed )

Eligibility: Stud nt enrol led at le3 t half�time

(6 cred it hours)

in

School of N u rsin g ( c.'Ccep t pre- nu rsi ng) . Preference iven to LPN student , Amount: Up to $4 , 0 00

fi.xed in terest rate 0 5%. There i a 9- 111onth grace period aft r the ludent graduat s, withdraws, or dr o p ' to less than hal - time attendance. Pri n cip al and in terest payment beg i n d t 1 2 months. Comments or Condition : Reci pients are requi red to sign a promissor' note. The promissory Dotes wi l l be JvaiJable for new borrowers to pi k up io the Student Service. �enter a ft e r the first week of cl asses. The ,tudent mll5t s ign the prom isso ry note, com plete a n on l in e entrance in terview, and return th > prom is­ sory note if accepting the l oa n . Continuing . t udents will be sent a no t ice fo r an appointment to go to the , l u d e n t Scr ices Center/Student Loa n Offi e t o sign pro missor y notc. All loans not signed fo r will bl' cancelJed. Priority is given to undergradu­ ate st udents. Repayment:

FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOANS

ne or more of the Federal amily Education Loans may be Ii t d on y ur 0 e r. This mean ' y IU may accept r r je t h se 10 n e p a rately. Federal 10 n. ar o bt a ined from a lender (list available i n the Financial Aid a nd Student Empl yment Office) via an clectroni ap pl ication certified by F i na nci al Aid and Student Employmenl. I t is im p or t a nt that when you receive your appli ati n/pro m i ssory note, you mail it back fo r prompt

(4

(6 credit hours) u n dergraduate or cred il hours) graduat student .

Up to $ 2,6 25 per year f r first-year studen ts' $3,500 fo r sophom res; $5,500 fo r j u n i rs and seniors; and $8,500 for

Amount:

graduate students. Repayment� A a riable i nterest rate which hanges an nually and cannot exceed t .25% an d month l), principal an d i n terest payments begin s i x months after the tudent graduates, with­ draw , or drops to les than h a l f-t i me attendance. Comments or Conditions: The fe d e ra l gove rnment p a ys the i nt er 51 on you r loan o n your be h a l f until you enter repaym ent. Yo u are re ponsible or 'e1ecting a l en d e r from the lender l i s t ( list available i n the Financial Aid and Student Emplo)'m n t Office ) . Y(I U h a e t h e o p t i o n t o select a lender n o t o n t h e l is t . However, be aware that doing 0 w i l l usuall delay rece i p t of your loan fu nd" r q uire YOll t o t'I1dorse a paper check in the Student Service Cen ter, and yo ur l o a n is unl ikely to have the financial repayment incentives avai.lable through our lenders.

NON·NEED BASED LOANS UNSUBStDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

(6 credit

Eligibility: Studen t attend i n g at least half-time

ho urs)

or a graduate tu dent attending at lea t half- t i m e (4 -redit hours) who does not qualify for all o r part o f the maximum Subsidized Fedt:ral Stafford Loa n .

p t o $2,62 p e r year fo r first-y a r students; $3,500 fo r sophomores; $5.500 fo r jun iors and seniors; and $ 1 0,000 for

Amount:

grad uate students. Repayment: A \'ari hie i nter t rate which cha nges an nually and ca nnot exceed 8.25% and monthly prin cipal payments begin six months aft r t he tudenl gr adu a t , w i t h d raws, o r drops below half- l i me attt:ndanc('. UlIslI bsidized means you are responsible fo r the accruing i n terest on t he loan, wh ich begins on the date the loan is disbursed; h wev r, i n terest payments may b e deferred untU yOLi enter repa ment. Comments or Conditions: Finan i al need is not a requirement. 'O LI are responsible for s el e c t in g a le nd er from t h e lender list ( list available i n the Fina ncial Aid and Student .mp loyment Office ) . Yo u have t h e o p tion t select a l e n r n t o n the list. However,

be aw a re that doing so \ i l l usually de l a y rece ipt of your loan fu nds, r q u i re you to endorse a p a pe r check i n the S t udent Ser ices Center, and your loa n i s unl ikel ro hav the fi nancial repayment incen t ives avn ilable through our lender . FEDERAL PLUS LOAN Eliga"illty: Parents of dependent ·tuden !. Amount: Parent mil borrow u p to the full cost of their

stude nt's

lIege d ucation m i n u s the amount of any financial

aid the studenr is receiving. Repayment: A variable i n t erest rat which changes an nually and cannot exceed 9.00% a n d m o n thly p rincipal and i nterest P

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paym e n t s b eg i n w i t h i n 60 (l<1 ),s a fter the final d i s b u rsement o f

fu n ds. ( I n t eres t begin s acc ruing [ro m t he date th

YBTERANS AFFAmS AND VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

fll nds a re first

Pacific Lu t he ra n

J i�bursed. P a re n t Plus Loan Request fo rm i s r eq ui re d b y Pa i f i Lutheran Un iversity ilnd the federa l govern­ ment b 'fore this loan , n be i n i t i aled. The Parent P l u s l .a, n Request fo rm can be ob tai ned at the • tuden t Servi ', e n ter. F i n a ncial ne<:: d is not a r quireme.nt. E. i t h er paren t may borrow tbis l o a n for the student. The p a r e n t is resp o n si b l e for sele Ling a lender fr m the le nder l i s t (U t ava i l able in the F i na n c i a l Aid and Stude nt Empl yment file). A separ a t l o a n applicati n a n d p ro m isso ry note wi ll then be mailed to the pa ren t. The parent will t h e n mail back the I an a p p l ic.ltion a n d prom issory note m the ret u rn 'nvel ope provided f, I' p rocessing. Comments or Conditions:

u Z < Z

p to

a

P

l oa n ,

$4 ,000 per year for first- year

'tudents and

so phomores alld $5,000 fo r j u n iors and seni ors.

Repayment.: A variable in teres t rate wh i d} changes a n nually and cann t exceed 8 . 2 5 % and m o n t h ly p r i ncipal payments begin S L X

NAMED ENDOWED/RESTRICTED CHOLARSH l PS

m o u ths after th . t udent g ra duate , w i t h d r aw , or d ro p s to 1 ('S5 than h a l f- ime attcncLmce. UI/subsidized means you ar� respon­ sible for t h e acc r u i n g i n terest on lhe loan. which heg i n s on t,he date the fu nds are first disbursed; h oweve r, i n tere t pay rnent­ may d fcrred u n t il you enter repaymell t . Comments or Conditions: Financi<ll need is n o t a requireme n t . You ,ue resp on ihle � r s ICC li n g a lender from t h e lender l ist ( l ist Jvailable in th e Fi nancial Aid ,l I l d St uuen t E m p l o y ment O ffict' ) . You have the op tion to selec t a I ' n d e r not on the list. Howt:!ver, be 3 \ are that dOLn� so w i L l Ll slIal l y delay re eipt o f your IOJn fW1ds, re quir you lO endorse a paper check in t h e St udent Serv ic '� "enter, and yo u r l o a n may n o r ha e t h e f i n a n cial incenLives a ailable w i t h ollr I nd rs whik you are i n re payment.

For the Ii t of Named EllifowedlRestricted ScholcL rsiIips, visit the PLUcarn log online tlt www. p lu.edu/prin trcatalog.

ALTERNATIVE LOANS Eligibil ity: II tud n ts Am.o unl! Varies Comments and Condjtions: Various alt Illal ive loan are

prov ided for a l l sl lIdeJ1ts, i n d u d i n 7 those not qual i fying for Title I V aid. Please inqu ire i n the Student Services 't:!nter fo r informJtion. TEACB£R CERTl FJC.ATE are el igible to receive a Fed eral St, ffo rd Subsid ized a n d /o r Unsubsid ized Loan up t $5 , 500 . I f a stud nt is i ndependen t or is a de p e n d e n t ludent whose pare n t s a r e denied a P L S loan, the student is el i gi ble fo r all add.itio nal Un s u b s i d ized Fede r,!1 Stafford Loan up to 5,000.

Students accepted i n to this program

PRINCIPAl. CERT1Fl

ATE

Stud nts are not d i g i hle fo r Federal Sta(f(lrd L o a ns accord ing to tederal regula tions. Contact the S tud ent Se rvi ces Ce n t e r fo r

information o n al te.rn a t i

e

loans.

EMPLOYMENT COLlEGE WORK STUDY EligibiUtr- At least parHime stlld en ts. Amount:

arie

based nn need,

n-campus johs; studen1s Lan p p l )' t h rough the Financial Aid and Student Employm nt Offic .

Comments or Conditions: for i n d i v i d ual

jobs

STATE WORK STUDY Eligibility! At lea t part-t i m e stu dents. Amount: Varies bJ ed (,In need.

Off-cam pus jo s; student� must apply for ind.ividual jDbs th rough the F i n a n c. ial Aid and tudent Em ployment Office.

Comments or Conditions:

12

S t u d nts sh o u l d gain a d mi ssio n to t h e u n ivers i t y a n d sec t h e

ffairs .oo rd inator before m king JPplica­ tion fo r benefits. :tudent are req u i re d to re ' ist e r Jt the Ve t e r a ns Affairs Co rdinator'.; Office l o ca te d i n the St ud en t Serv ices Center ( Room [ 0 2 , Ha uge Ad m i n islration B u i ld i ng ) . before each term to i nsure con t i n u ous r ceipt of benefi t s .

I!ligibllity: I n dep nelen l s t ud e nt or dependent tudent who e

parents arc den ied

t e l ephone 800.827. 1 00 0 . u n iversity's Veterans

ADDITIONAL UN SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

Amount:

n iversity's aca d e m i c p ro gr a m s of study are approved by the Wa shi ngton State Higher Ed uc a t io n Coord i n a t ­ i n g Boa rd's State p p rov i n g Agency ( ill e B/SA ) fo r enrollment o persom eligible t o r ' ceive ed ucational benefits under T i t l e 38 and T i t l e 1 0 U " Ve terans, widows, w i d owers, a n d children of deceased or dis abled vet rans whu wi sh to i n q u i re abo ut t he i r eligibiLity fo r benefits should co n t a t the Regional O ffice of the Ve terans , d m inistra t i o n , Fede , I Buildin", 9 1 5 Second Avenu e . Seattle, Washington 98 1 74 . Person s within the ' t a t e o f Was h ington may

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Tuition, Fees, and Payment Information for 2002-2003

LIJ....L:I�{C'I;f�UllJ'.!'I� 111111 IJ.. 11',[1 Il:t..Ilfll.',11 TII!f''''

, -

CredIt MOLIn

Full TIm ..

Cost

UNDERGRADUATE RATES 17

-

59, 250 per se m este r

Yes

Fa l l or S p r i n g

U n dergraduat e Tuiti o n Model (UTM) Fa l l or Spring

M o re than 1 7

Unde rg raduate T u ition Model (UTM) J-term (no additional cost up to 5 credit h o u rs)

1

-

5

Per credit ho ur Herm, or Sp r i n g

1

-

11

Studenh charged per (redit ho u r F a l l , J-term, or Spring

1 or m o re

GRADUATE PROGRAM RAYES

1

» z o

59, 250 per semester + $ 578 pe r hour for each credit over 1 7

Yes

,red it

Cred it hours over 5 are c h a rged at $ 5 78 per credit h o u r S 5 7 8 p e r credit hour for any courses Fa l l, Herm, o r Spring

No

Fall,

NOTE:

.., m m VI

-

12

U ndergraduate Tu ition M o de l (UTM)

o z

taken

$578 per credit hour for any courses Fall. Herm, or Spring

ta k e n or

S578 per credit hour for any courses taken Fall. J-term. or Spring

more

If- call1ptis st udents pay (/ program fec (not PLU t u i tioll)

specijic to the illdividuill p70gmrn 5ires. Contact l/7e

Willig Cr!rtlcrfur

hlLematio/llll Progra ms f o r complete details.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

Stu dents wh earn Credit b Exa m i n a t i o n are charged the follow i n g i n d d dit io n ( 0 t u i t i o n . 3 emester hours . . . . . . . $450 1 semester ho m . . . . . .... $ 1 50

2 se mes t r ho u rs ... ..... 300

4

se m e ter hours . . . . . . . $600

LATE REGISTRATION PEE S t u den t s add i n g o r w it h d ra w i n g fTom courses a f t r t he l a s t d a )1 of add/drop dur ing a term w i ll be assessed an adm i n istr:tt ive handl in g fee of $ 5 0 for each t ransact ion . These el a tes a re l i sted i n t h e class chedu.!c [l) r e a h term.

COURSE FEES Some c o u rs es require class

additional

ees t hat w i l l be assesse d . The

h te r m is ava i lable i n the Student Services

hedule for e

enter and provides

i nformat ion about

any fees that may a rtect

an individual course.

brought to campus. Reg i s t ra t i o n is

date . T h e fee is charged to the st ude n t the application i ' s u b m i t ted.

TRANSCRIPT INFORMATION 2 5 3.535. 7 1 3 5 www. plu. cdu/- '5vc/t raJ/script . h lml

U n o t [ c i a l and official t r a n , cript s a re rocessed i n t h e t u d e n t Services Cen ter. There is a 5 fee fo r each o ffi ial lT a n script . U n o ffi c ia l t r a n s c r i p t s ( u p to t w o a t a t i m e ) are issue.d

a t no

charge. 'It) ('equest an o ffi c ial t ra n s cr i p t , a s t u d e n t may fi L l o u t the Tra n sc r i p t Request l'orm i n t h ludent ervice Center or

$5 fee or each official transcript o r d red . I f pa y i ng by bank card, include the VIS o r MasterCard n u m be r and expiration date, a n d yo m zip code. Payment may also b e made b y check, cashier's check, or m o n ey ord r. Please do n o t mail cash . Student's ful l name Any and all fo rmer name(s) used Social Secu rity n umber a n d / o r PLU iden t i fication number Da t e of b i r t h urrent a d d res s a n d p h o n e n u m b e r Approximate d a t e o f l a. s t of anendance

EDUCATION PLACEMENT FEE

( BAE ) p rogram.

H EALTH SERVICES FEES Health S rvices wi ll charge a stu den t 's acco u n t . or a st u de n t may a n d p rt!s ri pt io ns .

pay directly, fo r immun izations, lab wo rk.

LUTECARD FEE A fee of $ 1 5 is b arge d to replace 10 t or t len s t u d e n t 1 D:. Lf an

Number of transc r i p ts needed

I D card has been damaged, ir must Desk and rep la ced for a fee of $ 5 .

Signature ( mandatory)

Addre ses to which the t ra n scr ip ts are t

be brought to t he Lutecard

UNPA I D FI NES

np<lid fi nes u c h a s those for p a r k i ng iola tions a n d overdue l ibrary materials w il l be charged to the st udent account. tudents as

is

T h e fo l low i n g i n formation is req u i red:

A one-time Educatio n Placemen t Pee of $45 is charged i n t h e la s t

i nc u r red to , void l a te fees

be e n t

Transcripts that need to be sent b y Federal Express ( Fed Ex) m us t h ave the followi ng: • Contact number of the recipie n t of transcrip t ( s ) • Physical address (mu t i n clu d e street n u mber) · Domesti co st is $ 1 0 .50 in add i t ion to fe o f $5 per t ran sc r i p t (may change) •

I n ternational cost is $20.50 i n add i t i o n to fee o f $ 5 per t r a llsc rip t ( ma), c ha nge)

PARKING REGISTRATION Parkmg on the PLU campus is by decal o n l y. Students m u s t es

d u r i n g the term

faxed to 2 5 3.538.2545 wi t h a signature.

I credit h ou r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 6 5 2 o r m o re credits p e r m d i u m ...... $300 or 2 003- 2 004 : I c re d i t h o u r .. . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... $ L 7 5 2 o r more credits e r medium . . . . . . $350

regi ler t he i r vehi

a co u n t

because o f the requirement for a "ignature. Requests m ay be

For 2002-200 :

,erne ter of t h e B a chel ors of Art's in Educa t i o n

o z

ONE-TIME GRADUATION PROCESSING FEE $55 fec i s charg d to ba alaureat a n d master's d eg r ee Ciwdi­

recei\' d . Requests by e-mai l or p h o ne cannot be p roces ed

This fee i ch arge d in addition to t uit i o n .

ou ra�ed to pay t h ese fines and handling c ha rges.

tor th� y�ar. Fail ure to

do w n l o ad a co p y of the · rm a t the \ ebsite l isted a b o ve. Processing t i me is five workin g days from th e date the request

PRIVATE MUSIC LESSON FEE

are en

' 20

regi tel' w i J I re u l t in a fi n e .

O n l y two

c

pi

5

L

U

per Fed

Ex

request

within 48 hours of t h e vehicle bein g P

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Requests will be returned u n p rocessed to the sender if: • Rl:q u i re d in ormation is m i s s i n g •

Form i, illegibl

Payment is

venues and are available fo r use until May 3 1 , 2003. t ude nt s may purchase as ma n y blocks of 25 meals as they wish, but once purch ase d , they are no nrefundable unless the s tu de n t fo rmally wit h d raws fro m the university.

IlOt i n c l uded

[f an a c co u n t is on any type of hold, the request will bl:

FINANCIAL OBUGATION/PAYMENT INFORMATION

mailed back w i t h

information regardi ng the appropr iate student's res ponsibility to resolve thl: h o ld and res ub mit he request. Official t ra nscri pt s can be made avajlable within 24 hours of rece ipt of re q uest. The fcc fo r th e 2 4 - h ou r o ffi cia l t rans cr i p t s is $5 per c py and an a dditional ad m i nis t r a t ive fee of $20 p e r request. I f the transcript(s) needs to be sent via Federal Ex p re s s

A d m is sio n to o r regis tr a t i o n with the university obligates students fo r pay m en t of all tuition a nd fees. [n a d d i t i o n , all s t u de n t s are req uired to sign a payment contract w i t h the un ive rs ity. This contract will i n fo rm t h e u n i ve rs i t y of which payme n t method has been chosen. If a p a ym e n t contract is n o t signed and received by t h e un i ve rs i t y, then t h e student w i l l

office to c ntacl. [t is the

I­ Z w

:E > -t Go o Z -t "" w W

...

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automatically be selected t o p a y i n full a.ll tuit ion and fe es b y the

add the fee l i st d above.

dates listed below. It is requi red of a l l students to e l ec t one of

INSURANCE

the three payment o p t ions or

Student h ea l t h and ac c iden t i n s urance is available through an

student acco unt. Holds restrict c erta i n uni ver s it y p r ivileges,

independent carrier. Brochures are available from the St udent

including the ri g h t fo r fu rther registration. For pa yme n t

Iealth Center or o n l i n e at www. pl u . ed u/

Life O ffice a n d the

arrangements, please see the S t ud e n t Services Center in the

- s l i f/hs. All students are s t ro n gl y advised to have medical

Hauge Administration B u i l d i n g , Room 102 or call 2 5 3 . 535 .7 1 6 1

i n s u ra nee.

o r 800.678 .3243.

Medical wit hdrawal in surance is a vai lable to all students t h rough a n independent carrier. App l i c a t io ns are available i n the Student Life O ffice and must b� s u b m i tt ed to the carrier prior to the start of classes .

HOW TO MAKE PAYMENTS Payme n t may be made by cash, check, wire, m o n e y order, VISA, o r Ma ste r Ca rd . VISA or MasterCard paym ents may be made 24 h o u rs a da y b y calli n g the .B u s i n ess Offi ce se c u red line a t

253.5 5.8376.

ROOM AND MEALS

Mail payments with b i L l ing statement re mi ttance stub to Pac i fic Lutheran Universi ty, Bu i ne�s Office, T�lcoma, W 98447-3 167 or deliver payment to the PLU Busines� ['fice in the Hauge Ad min istration Build i ng, Room 1 1 0 . Please d o not mail ca s h becks hould be made p ayab l e to Pa ifi Lutheran University. The s t udent's name and PL U ID nu m b e r sh o u l d be i n clud e d with all payments. $30 fe e i.-; charged on all ch e ck s returned due to nonsufficient fu nds.

All i ngle full-t ime ( 1 1 semester ho urs) students must live on ca mp us in un iversity housing unless t hey are: (a) l ivin g with t hei r pare�lt, I gal guard i a n , or hild, or ( b ) at least 20 years o l d r have completed 60 semester cred it hours by Se p t em be r I ( fo r the next fall emester) , or Februar )' I « (or tbe next spring ,eme ·ter)

I-

ElCC pc fo r reside n t s of

.

ollth Hall, all students w i t h an active

ho us i n g ass i gn m ent a re r e q u i re d to be e n ro l l ed in a un.iversity meal plan.

LUTE BUCK DISCOUNT A $75 discount, p e r se mester ( fall and s pr i n g ) , from tuition and other costs wlll be applied to the tudent a count if the speci fi c

Room Charges Dou b l e Room (2 or more people) . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. $ 1 ,440hiemester Single! ingle ( I pe

o n in a I person room) $ 1 ,8 I 5/semester S i n g l e/ D o ub l e ( 1 person i n a 2 pe rso n room) . $ I ,9 1 5/ semester ....

criteria fo r eligibility of the discount is met. The Lute Buck Discount

.

fo rm is mailed with the Student

Although there is no room ch arge fo r I-te rm for t u d c n t s residing on ca m p u_ the previ uS fall or spring semesters, tudents must ancel their J · ter m h o u s i ng if they are not resi di ng o n c a m p u s for more t h a n even days during J - term. Students who have not cance l l e d their h o us i n g for J - term must have a meal plan. onta t l h e Residen tial L i fe O ffice fo r co s t info r m a t io n

Eligibility Criterill: • Out- of-pocket expenses, i ncl ud i n g tuition, room and meals, and special course fee. m i nus any a p plicable rl nancial a id and other resou rces for a semester must lotal �3,OOO or more.

P ayment and the Lute Buck Discount form must be subm itted/ postmarked by July 25 for fall semester and ecember 25 for spring

izes, s t yl e s, and co s ts . �o n tact the Resid ential Life

semester.

Office fo r inC rmation am a pp licat ions . L i m ited housing is , v'l i lable on a da il y fee basis du r i ng win ter and s prin g bre aks . Application. for s i ng!

rooms and other s p ecia l h ou s i n g requests sho u ld he a dd r es se d to t h e Residential Life Offi ce a t 25 .535.7200 or e-mailed to rliJ@plll.edll.

. . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . $ 1 , 29S/semester

J an ua ry term

. . . . . . . . .. . . , ........... . . . . .. . . .. . $ ! , I Os/semester

Plan #4: 5 mea ls/ week .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60s/se mester $ 1 4 0 Ja.nuary term living in Kre idl er

or

nly to commuter students and students

outh Halls.

Flexible PLUs Plan . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $195 Commuter srudents and r idents of So u t h Hall h ave the option of purchasing b l o ck) of 25 mea.ls. Meals may be used at all Board Plan P

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A 1 .5% mon t hly interest charge will be a sses sed on owing student (cou.nt bala.nces (hat are 30 days past d ue.

All t1nancial aid and other resources must be applied to the st udent account by October 15 fo r fall and March 1 5 fo r spring. A 1 . 5% monthly interest charge will be assessed 011 owing student aCCQWlt bala nces that re 30 days past due.

$ 275 January term

Me al Pla.n #4 i availa ble

must be applied to the student

$300 Jan uary term

....

resou rces

11. Financial Aid and Other Resources CoWl Costs

Plan # 1 : 20 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . $ 1 ,34S/semester

Plan #3: 10 meals/wc:: ek

All financial aid and other

account by October 15 fo r all and March 1 5 for spring.

meal p l a n # 1 , -#2, or #3.)

$295

Payment in full mus t be made by the 25th of the month preceding

each term.

(St udents living in t r a d it i o nal residence halls must choose from

..

PAYMENT OPTIONS I. Payment in FuU •

Meal Plans

Pian #2: 1 5 me al s/week

No prior owing bala nce to the university.

·

So u t h H a l l is an altern live residen tial o p t i o n with various ap a r t m e n t

Bill ing Statemenrs i n July and

November.

.

14

a hold will be p la c e d on the

Y

1lI. Monthly Payment • Interest-free mo n t hl y pay ments with Twtion Management S ys tem s ( IS), a th i rd - p a rt y administrator. • Payments are made d i rec t l y to T M S. • E n ro ll ment fee for the 8 or 10 monthly annLlal plan is $75. • E n ro l l men t fee for the 4 or 5 m o n thl y semester plan is $50. • All financial aid and other re so u rces must be applied to the student accoLlnt by October IS for fuJI and March 1 5 fo r s p rin g. • F a il u re to make payment as agreed in the paym(�nt co nt ract will


cash check .

-t c:

has prev iously b 'en sent to collec t i o n s by t h e pay i n ful l before classes be'" i n . The collec t i o n s

o z

result tn removal from the Mo n t h ly Pay m e nt Plan O p t ion. I n terest of 1 . 5% p<:r month will b as essed on owing �tu(kllt �cco u n t balan es 30 days after removal from t h l? plan .

Collections Hold

MISSlID PAYMENTS

Any s t u d e n t who

Failure to make pa, ment as agreed upon i n rhe payment contract

will re'ult in a fina.ncial hold being pIa d 011 t h student ace unt. I t is the st udent's responsibility to see that all fi n �l I lc ial aid accepted on the O ffer of Fi nancial Aid i' cred i ted t their tudent account. Pinn ncidl aid i n d ud('� but i . nOl l imited to loan applications, verifica t i o n fo rms, en trance counsel in", etc., a n d nlust be applied to the t ud en t de . Wlt by October 15 for fall sem este r and March 1 5 •

for ·pring semester. • ' t u d cnt accoun ts that are 60 days deli nquen t from the due date, tated in the IXl)'ment cont ract may be referred to a t h i rd-party c

Uect ioll agency.

"

tudent . currently enrolled who have been sen t to a collec t i o n

agency w i l ! b e withdrawn froIll the

wl ive rs i l y

effective i mmedia tely.

Students wi l l receive a W grade on their transcripts. All collection cos , a t torney fees, and in terest inclIrred and allowable under federal a n d 'Was h i n gto n state statutes and laws will be cha rged to t he student br the collection agen y and a re the responsibility o f t he ..tudent to pay. •

ADVANCE PAYMENT I cw studeIJts need to m ake a $200 advance p,lynlent to co n fi nll thei r ()frer If admissi o n . The paynlent is refundable u n t i l Iv!a)' 1 5 It)r £.1 11, December l - for the january term, and january 1 5 for spri ng. Reque-ts or a refund lll ust be made in wri t i ng to the Adm issions Office.

RCllImillg stlidC/II; wan t i ng to reserve a room for the following year must sign a Housing Contr;)ct. anccUations, w ithout peoalty, must be ubmitted in wri t i ng to the Residt'lllial Li e Office by June I . a n dlations received between June 2 and July I w il l be suhject to a $200 penal ty cha rge. Cancellations received between July 2 a n d August 1 w i J l be �ubject to a $400 penalty c h a rge.

STUDENT HOLDS are 1 4 types of ho lds that can be p l a ced on s t u de n t records

Ther

fo r differe n t c i rc umstan es. Ea h h o l d p reve n ts certa i n p r i v i leges a t the ll nivcr� i t y. L i s t d below a re the t y pes of holds t h a t can be placed o n accounts and the o ffices responsible fo r them.

TYPES O F HOlD .... . . .... . ......... ... . OFFICE Admi sions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . d m i ssions Academic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R gistrar's, Stude n t Life , o r Residen t i a l L i fe Academi c S t a n d i n g . . . . . . . Regi t rar's ol lection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F i nan c ia l . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

tlr. i n g

( co u n ts Receivable

I n ternat ional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , I n ternational Student Serv ices

Junior

R

view . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . R gist rar's

No Address Hold All stu d e n ts are requ i red to

V\

keep a cu r re n t pe r ma nen t add ress

w i t h the u n iv rsi ty. If m a i l becorn

s

u ndeliverable, a n a ddre s s

l> Z o

hold w i .! l be placed on t h e acco u n t. B:1 S i c lI niversiry p riviJeges wiLl b t� d e n ied such

as,

b u t no t l i rn i ted

t\>,

register,

t h e r ig h t t

receive copie:; of offi c i a l t ra n s c r i p t s or d i p l o lTla, or cash checks.

Academic Hold The Reg istra r 's

ffice, S tud e nt L i fe

ffice, or Re i d e n t i a l L i fe

O ffice carr place an acco u n t on academic h o l d . Reg i s t ra t io n fo r

c la s s e, is precluded

un t i l

a ny p e n d i n g, m a t ter w i t h t hose o ffices is

settled.

Medic:aJ Hold A medical hold p revents a stu lent from r eg i s te r i n� because Hea lth Se.r ire h� not recei cd the because t h e s t u dent dot:s n o t h a

e

l h e nece sar)' i n l lllllil iza tions.

acce p t

t h e: res['o m i h i l il y a n d legal

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:II

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U p o n regis t ra t i o n , the st u den t and h is or her pare n t s o r l egoll guard i a n , a gre e t o

m

Z .." o

Ie l ieal History Form o r

Rights and Responsibilities

-I

b l i :a t i o n

t o p a y a l l t u i t i o n costs, room a n d m e a l fees, a n d o t he r pec i ,\ l

o z

fees i n c u rred or t o be i nc u r red fur t he s t udcnt's educa t i o n . The lli1iversity dg rees to make av,l ilable t n the s t u d c n t c�rtain educational p rograms and the use o f cer t a i n u n ivers i t y fac i l i ties, as applicable and as described in this catalog. A fa i l ure to pay wh n due all ulliversity bills shall rclea�e the ulliv rsi l y o f all)' obliga t i o n to co n t i n u e to I)rov idc t h e a p p l icable eduC<ltillnal

benefits ,lJld serv i ccs, i n c l u d i ng, but Ilot l i m i t e d to, statements of

h o n o rable d i s m issaL g r'l de rep()rt�, t ranscript o f record s, ,ii p l o lll a s , o r prereg i s t r a t i o n s .

Th

st udt:n t shall a L so be denied

a d m i t t a n c e to classes ,1I1d the use o f u n ivers i t y fac i l i t ies in the

eve n t o f a defa u l t .

Credit Balances If a cred it b a l a n cc occurs on a s t u de n t 's acco u n t, L ilt' un ivers i t y w i l l refund i t accord i ng to per t i n e n t federal, state. and ll n i e r s i t y

regul a t ions. 'r el i t balances a r e proces 'ed t h rough t h e St udent en ter.

Servin'S

Pacific L u theran Un ivcr�ity calculates and ret u rn , ' i t l t! I V fu nds accord i n g to Fede ral Title I V p ol icy 34C1U: 668.22. The amol l n t

t i m e t 11 > stude n t

\ as

en rolled b e fo re w i t h d rawi n g. Th is policy is

which a student receives T i t le I

t udent l.ife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' tuclent L i fe

'

semester i n

a

federal funds.

0% of the sem ster has f fide IV fWlds w i l l b returned I the fcd ral program based OIJ t h e length o f t i me t h qudcnt was If a student w i t h d raws before

elap .. ed, a percent age

cco u n ts Rece iva b le

Fioandal Hold I f a st uden t acc o u n t is past due, it wi l l be p l aced on

.." m m

term i nated.

effect ive for co m p lete o r full w i thd rawal from

Veteran 's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S tuden t Services

ff .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

hold will perm n e n t l y rem a i n 0 1 t h e (lC O ll n l. I f a s t u den t fai l s to

pay 011 the fir t day of clas es, his/her e n rol l men t will be

ol T i t k IV funds ( o t her t l la n l-edera l Vlork S t udy) t h at must he ret u rned to t h e Title IV p rogra m s i ba'ed solei), on t he length tlf

Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Health S rvices tudent 'ervices � 'nler Payment O p ion . . . . . . ..... . Student S rvic . Center Residential Life . . . . . . . ....... Residen t ial Life

No Address .. ..... .. .. . . . . . . .. .

Wr ite-

u n iversity must

or

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE RETURN OF TITLE IV AND INSTITUTIONAL FUNDS IF A STUDENT WITHDRAWS FROM THE UNIVERSITY

cco u n ts Receivab le

£,"dt I nte rv iew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perkinsl

s uch as, but Ilot l i m i ted to, t h e r i g h t to register, receive cop ies o f official t ra nsc rip t s o r d i p l o m a ,

a

financial

h o l d . Basic u n i ve rs i t y privi leges wil[ be d en ied until the acco u n t is settled , i n c J u d i n g the right t o register, receive cop ies o f o fficial transcripts o r d i p l om a , or c;) h checks.

Payment Option Hold All ·tudent are requ i red to sign a pa)rment co n t ract or sele t d pa 'ment option for t:ach academic year they a t tend, The Payment Con t ract fo rm may be o b t a i ned through the tucient Se rv ic s Cen ter. If a t u dent fails to sign a Payment C o n tra c t and sele t a payment option, a hold will be placed on the st udent account wh ich 'wi l l deny the st udent basic u n iversity p r i v ileg s

enrolled b e l�)re w i t h d rawa l . I'or exa m ple, if a student w i t hdra\ when 50% of t he seme,t"r has elapsed, 500;(, of TitlE' IV funds w i l l be re t u rned to the federal programs. After 0% of the semester has elapsed, the s tudent i s co n idered t o have used aLl aid received fo r th�

seJ1lester.

The ret u rn of Title I V fu nd. i dependent upon the date

,l

student w i t h d raws d u r i n g the se mes e_r. \Vi t h d raVl'al date is detined as

ne of the followi ng:

The d a le the student began t h e withdrawal process; . he date t he sr uden r otherwise provided the school \ i t h official n o t i fication o f t he i n t n t to w i t hdraw; P

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r the st ude n t who does no t be g i n the university s w i t h ­

or n o t i fy the sch 01 of the i n t e n t to wi t h dr a w, the midpo i n t o f the payment p erio d or period of enroLlmen t for which Title IV assistance was dis b u rsed ( unless the university can d o cu m e nt a later date) ; I f a t t e n d a n ce is t a ke n , the withdrawal date is d e te r m i ne d from drawal p ro ce ss

for t he perccntage of l u i t iun all we d to be d ur i n g t h e term (as determined by the Regis t rar' s [fice ilnd th niversity Re fu nd Policy). 4. Example of t h e Return of Title IV F u ncb i f a Student Withdraw' are a ail able in the Fi nancial Aid an d S tu den t a c c o u nt

refu nded fo r tha t l im t' period

E m ployment O ffice,

the a t te ndance records . Pacific Lutheran University will:

l . De te r m in e date of w i t hdrawal 2. alculate the percentage of aid deemed to have been used by the student

3 . Calculate the percentage of aid not used by the student, which mllst be ret u rned to federal p r grams.

Nore: Please be aware that a rejil11d dlle to withdrawal from til e 1I11iversity W I I adversely affe t what is owed to tire wliversit), by the sh,delTt. A tllillOn ad;lIstmerrt is applied to the stu de n t account, bllt aid is a lsll reduced, SOIl1 times creating a larger owing balance. SlIIdents s ho uld check with Fil1<l11ciai Aid and lllri.ent Employ melTt to research tire

effict a

IVlr irdrmval will h a ve

011

rheir st udent acco unt.

Order of Return of Title IV Foods If the

wi t h d r aw al date result in

a

percentage of Title IV aid not

lIsed by t he student, then the retu rn of Title IV aid w i ll

occur

in

the fo l l owi n g orde r:

l . Unsubsidized F ed era l Stafford luans 2. Sub idized Federal Stafford loans

11\

3. Federal Pe rk i m lo a ns

... ...

4. Fe d e r a l PL S loans 5. Direct PLUS loans 6. Federal Pell grants

z o

8 . O t h e r assistance u n de r

...

s tu d e n t ' s

7 . Federal SEOG grants

this Ti t le fo r which a re t u rn (")f fu nds

is re q ui r ed . University TUition and CoW'

e Fees Refund Policy I f a s t u d e n t does not w i s h to co n t i n ue a cou rse after the add/ drop p e r io d, the s t u de n t must withdraw from the course. S t u de n t must obtain the instructor' signature on an add/drop

form and s u b m it it to the Student ervice's Cen ter. A $50 is charged fo r ea ch transaction after the last day to a d d /d rop . a d m i n i s t rative fe

Student Life a nd

Tldtion refullds are 1 00% through the last day of the drop/a dd , 2002, February 5, 2003 for spring semester J AIrer that, tu i t io n refu nds are prora ted Oil a daily basis IIIllil 6U% of the semester has elapsed (Example: November 9, 2002 for fall semes ter, April 1 4, 2003 for spring sem ster) , lit which po in t th ere is 110 tuition refll nd. Refu nds from ulliversity hot/sillg are also pro rated 0 1 1 a daily bllSis, with meals refu llded all a weekly

Campus Resources

p er iod ((o r fa ll semester September

basis.

Student

The Academic ertifit:d

ssista nce

e n te r p rov ides tud nL with trained.

peer t u t o rs and a comfortable en v i ro n m e n t where

discovery can occur. Registered PLU of t h e center tu develop effe c t ive tudy tr a t egies and to s u p p l e m t:: n t or r e in fo rce their classroom

students use the free servi ces

Services Cen ter, Pacifi c Lutheran U n i versi ty and received befo re the d ea dl i n e above.

Oral requests are not accept ble. Charges

experience.

will r e m ai n on a stude n t ' s account u n t i l written n o t i ce is

TU.toring takes plact: o n can1pus,

u s u a l l y in t he cademic enter l o ca te d in Ram tad Hall. However, s t u dy and tes t - review sessions may OCClll" in separate locations su h a .s the sciellce or music b u i ld i n g ' , and d r op -i n math t u t o ri n g is avail­ able in the Apple Pi Math Lab , located in Memo rial Gym t o I . t uden ts taking foreign lan gu ag es c a n a ttend wee.k1y i n fo rmal conve rsat i c n groups led by o u r language tu to rs . All a bi l it y levels are welcome at t h ese co nversations. Tu toring es, io ns are et up b}' advance appointment ( d ro p ­ i ns may n o t fi nd tutors ava i lable ) . Durin" fal l a n d s p ri ng semes­ ters, the cen t.er, located in Ramstad 1 1 2 , is open Mond y th rou g h T h u rs d ay fro m (:00 3.m, un t i l 9:00 p.m., Fr i day fro m 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p,m., and unday from 2:00 p . m . until 9:00 p.m. Hours and ser vices are l i m ite d durin ' J-term a n d sum mer sessions. Stu­ dents should stop by the office, cal l, or e-mail to learn more abo u t ollr services or req uest an ap p oin t m e n t . The Academic ssistance websit provides i n formation on t u t o r i n g and weekly u pdates on st udy ses ·ions.

received.

Assista nce

Note: Adva nce Tuitioll Pa yments are Ilot co vered by Federa l Fillall cia l Aid a nd a rc not reJill1da.ble. Unoffidal Withdrawal In the cases of u no fficial w i t h d ra wa l, the last recorded dav o f cl a ss attendance will be used to calculate a refu nd . Medical Withdrawal:

tu d en t s m a y also comp l e tely

\.

i t hd raw

from the u n iversity for a term fo r m edi ca l reasons. The s tudent

must prov ide written evidence from a p hy s ici a n and a p e rso n a l explanatiun to t h e vice p re s ide n t a n d d e a n fo r student l i fe. Th i must be co m p l eted in a

timely m an n e r and in no case la ter than

the last day of c la s s in any given term. I f g r an t ed , the grade of WM will appear on the student's transcri p t . Procedures for Obtaining a Refund

tudent requests withdrawal app roval fro m the Registrar's Office via the S t u de n t Services Center, us i ng a withdrawal form.

ACCESSmIUTY

2. Financial Aid wi l l process the st ud e n t ' s request for w i th­ drawal according to the Federal Title IV pol i c y 34CFR 668.22. Aid w i l l be revised a ccor d i n g to p ub l i s h ed federal p o l i cy . 3. The Re g is tra r' s Office will gi v e a tuition adjustment to the 16

25 3 . � 35T 1 8 wlVw. p lll. edu/- aast

learn ing, risk taki ng, a nd

Not.ice of withd rawal m u s t be gi ve n i n writ ing to the

l.

ACAD EMIC ASSISTANCE CENTER

253.535.7206 www.p!u.edu/-sliflct Th

uni

r ity ol11p l ies with the Ameri an

wi

t h Di ab i l i t i es Act

and Se c ti o n 504 of the Reha i l i t at i o n A t and p ro vi de s reason­ able ccommodation.s to st ud e n ts with disabilities. oordination of services is through the Counseling and Te st ing Office.

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A comprehensive list of services is outlined on the center's

PLU BOOKSTORE 253. 53 5 . 7665

website including a link to the online program, plu.e.recruiting.com.

www. luteworld.plll.edu

This program is a fully i ntegrated employment and recruiting

he PLU B o kstore is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran

service available to studenrs 24 hours

a

day, seven days a week.

University for the benefit of students, faculty, and staff. The book­

Students may access job l istings, post their resumes, and contact

store sells textbooks required for classes. Supplies, gifts, cards, and

employers fro m an)' computer with an Internet connec tion.

convenience store items are also available. Computer software at discounted prices is availab le or can be special ordered. Personal computer systems at educational pric

can be p urchased through

the bookstore. Special book orders are welcome. PLU Northwest is a unique gift shop located at 407 Garfield Street in historic Parkland. Featuring Northwest pottery, clothing,

-oj c: o ,., z -oj r-

COMPUTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

"

(see Information Resources)

m

CONFERENCES AND EVENTS 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 745 0 IVWW. plll. edll/ -events

and foods, the store also offers books and gifts depicting Northwest

Conferences and Events schedules university fa i l i t ies for da nces,

themes and authors. Visit the online store at lu tewo rld.plu.edll and

concerts, fil ms, events, conferenc s, and meetings held on

shop 24 hours a day. Stop by to see our new line of Scandinavian

campus. Students i n terested i n sched uling and event must first

gifts.

CAMPUS MINISTRY 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7464

n > :!:

work with Student I nvolve ment Jnd Leader hip ( 253.535.7 1 95 ) t o develop a n event plan prior t

> z o

"tI

rese rving faci l ities.

c:

VI

www.plll.edtil-cmin

COUNSELING AND TESTING SERVICES 2 5 3 . 53 5 . 7 206

Paci fic Lutheran University b)' its ver)' nature is a place for the inter­

www.plll.edll/-slif/ct

rn

a tion between faith and reason. Opportunities for the mutual cel­ ebration of that faith on campus are rich and diverse. Chapel worship is held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday morn­ ings during each semester. The University Congregation worships and celebrates the Lord's Supper each Saturday evening and Sunday morning. The University Pa tors are available to provide care, sup­ port, and spiritual direct ion to the u n iversity co mmuni ty. Seyeral denominations and religious groups have organiza­ tions on camp us.

umerous studen t - i n i t iated Bible s t u dy and

fellowship groups are offered. The Campus M inistry Office is availabl

to provide resources or to connect individuals with

organizations that can meet a variety of m i n istry needs. The Campus M i nistr y

<>uncil, an elected student and faculty

committee, coordinates the e activit ies i n a spiTit o f openness and mutual respect.

www.plll . edl//-slif/cs

The pers nill safety of the P LU community is the n u mber one a m p u s Safety and I n formation. Campus safety o fficers

are available to escort students, p rovide veh icle j u m p starts, u n l ock inadvertently locked

v

hides, assist i n changing tires,

r e s p o n d to medical emergencies and fire alarms, and p rovide general telephone i n formation services. Visitor i n format ion is available 24 hours a day seven days a

week through the Campus afety O ffice. Veh i cle registration fo r

o c: ;II

personal and developmental i sues. Trained and ex.perienced psychologists o ffer i n d ividual assessments and coun seling, and a consulting psychiatrist is available fo r evaluation

and possible

medications. A variety of interest and perso nality inventories are available to assist students with

aree r plann ing, educati nal

n m

VI

adjustment, and personal problems , nd issues. Serv ices [o r students wit h disab i L i t ies are also available.

DINING SERVICES 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7472 www.plll.edll/-di,lillg

D i ning Services, owned and o p e rated by Pacific Lutheran U n i ­ versity, is available to all students, fac u l t y, staff, and thei r guests. Students Living on campus are required to be on a meal pl a n . deductions are made for students eating ewer meals than previ­ ously contracted fo r unless granted by the director of d i n i n g services. Resi dential students are offered three meal o p t ions: any 20, 1 5, or 1 0 meals per w e k . Students l iving o ff -l mp lls a r e encour­ aged to select one o f these meal plans ur the flexible meal plan offe red only to o ff-campus studen ts. Students with spec ial dietary requirements, specifical ly ap­ proved in writing by a physician, can in most cases be ac

O ffice 7:00 a . m .-4 :00 p . m . Monday-Friday. Lutheran University is private property and the

mmo­

dated by contacting th d i n i ng services director. This service is provided at no extra cost. Visitors may eat in any of the facilities.

parking on campus is available through the Ca mpus Safety Pacifi

VI

Counseling and Testing Services assist student i n coping with

"Grab and Go" items , re availab le during pe k l u nch hour . No

CAMPUS SAFETY AND INFORMATION 253. 535. 744 1

goal o f

;II

DIVERSITY CENTER 2 5 3 . 535.8750

university reserves the right to res trict access to the campus and

wlVw.plu. edu/-dcenter

buildings.

Pacific Lutheran University is committed to the mission of provid­

CAREER DEVELOPMENT 253.535.7459

PLU are people capable of effective Ii e s i n an expanding, divers

w ww.plu. edu/ -slif!cd

Career Development (housed with Academic Advising for students' convenience) strives to p rovide a program of career development and life planning. Students are assisted i n integrating their personal values and aptitudes with career choices through ind ivid ual counsel­ ing, workshops, and reside.nce hall p resentations. The office staff assist students and first-year alumni in developing job-search techniques by providing an extensive career l ibrary of opportunities in pecific majors, industry directories, and employment forecasts. Additionally, the office coordinates a schedule of recruiters from industry, business, government, and graduate schools. The center coordinates and promotes full-time employment and nonacademic internships. These listings include local, national, and international openings. Specially selected forums througho ut the yea r also bring students and em ployers together, in order to help students find work that is both financially and personally rewarding.

ing a diverse and inclusive education fo r all students. Graduat world. Every student at PL

of

is required to take a course in Alterna­

tive Perspectives and in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. MuLticul­ turalism, outside of the classroom, is experienced through social and educational programming from a variety of sources. The Commit­ tee fo r Educational and Cultural Program ming, ASP LU,

rver-ity

Coalition, and different student clubs and organizations that sup­ port underrepresented populations at PLU all work together to

('re­

ate a campus climate that is welcoming of all students_

An Associate Director for Multicultural Affa i rs and Diversity Advocates staff PLU's Divers ity �enter. D iversity

dvocates are di­

verse PLU students working together to bring m u l t icultural aware­ ness to our campus and surrounding cOl11l11 uniti '. They provide support to students and clubs that work with d iversity-rc.lated iss ues and raising and sustaining general awareness on campus about cur­ rent educational, political, and social issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, age, and sexuality. They are available to help all sruden ts, P

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staff, and faculty who h ave interest in areas of multiculturalism. The

T h i s i n fo rm a t i o n mllst be on fl le befo re a st udent is permitted to

Diversity

register.

enter is located on the ground floor of the University

Center, across from Campus M inistry.

Internatiollal studellts, fa culty, and scholars from coul1tries at risk will be req uired to Itave

the Offi e

protein deriva ti ve-ppd). This test will be dOHe at Ihe Health ,e1ltcr

f Srudent Involvement and Lea de rship helps different

dubs and organizations thai support the efforts of

formal position of the Direcror of Diversit)" who, along with th� student-comprised Diversity Coalition, programs events both so ial and educational for the entire student body on a variety of

multicultural issues; and the Un iversity Diversity tional and

ommittee and the Co mmi ttee for Edu­

u1tural Programm ing both further the u n iversity's

miss io n of multicultural i. m through policy review and event planning on both

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www.plll. cdll/- lib r Information Resources ( l R)-computing and l ibrary brought together i n to one organlzation-is here to help students be successful. Most IR services are located in �Irortvedt Lib ra r y, but 011

the lower level o f the

located on the second floor o f the Hauge

life.

dministration Building .

Persona lized assista nce in co m p u t ing, l i b ra ry, and mul t i media services can be ob tained fro m IR i n formation p rofessionals i n a

253 .535. 724 1

variety of ways. Here a re some good starting points:

IV IVW. p lll. refli/ -ppa

The E l l i o t t Press is PL 's stud io-laboratory fo r the publishing ru-ts. With the pre s's la rge collec t i o n o f let terpress type and

For assistance with comp uter accounts, email, supported

software, and related resources, stop b)' the User , upport help desk i n the lower level o f the l i b ra ry, call the student help desk at

eq u i p m e n t , student design and p roduce prin ted texts using the

2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 5 3 9 8 , email them at comptelc@pl u.edu, o r visit http ://

h a n d - o n t rolled techn iques t h a t nourish today in the l ively art

w'v\'w.plu .edu/-comptelc/.

fo r m known as fi n e print i ng. I n addition to i t s own publ ishing

program, t h e press hou,es a growing co Llection of i n novarive

effective research � t rategies, go to the reference desk on the main

book works and is

level o f the l i b rary, call 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 .7507, send email to ref@ p l u . ed u ,

a

working museum, where visitors may watch

For help o b t a i n i n g the best i n formation on a topic or learning

and try their hands at the technology pio neered by Gutenherg.

or v i s i t h t t p://w\>\'·w. plu.edu /- libr/l i b i n folref. h t m l .

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

http://'I''''w. plu.ed u / - media.

tain an orderly educat i onal environment condu cive to student

Comp llter accounts are essent i a l fo r all PLU students. PLU

lea rn i ng and developmen t . In o rder to fulfill i nstitutional re-

ePass accou n t s a re automatically set up fo r new students,

ponsibility and at t he same t i me follow procedures that are fair,

including an acco u n t username and password. After receiving

on5 1sten t, and protectil'e o f each person's rights, appropriat e

the account n a m e and prel i minary password, activate the

grinr<1 nce procedur s have been established. I f a student has reaSOD to bel ieve that an academic o r admin istrative action is

u n j ust,

acco u n t and change the password. This all ows acces ePass sys tem , which enables

a ' p riciou s, or d iscrimiJ1ato ry, these p rocedures are

Th u nivers i t y has a t e a m of grievance officers to fadI i tate the grievance process. The grievance o fficers are Kathleen Farrell lISan 1'v1a n n ( 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 1 8 7 ) , Patricia Roundy

( 2 53.53 5 . 8 78 6 ) , a n d M d i n S impson ( 2 5 3 . 535.8779). Any of the

resources, the Language Reso urce Center fo r fo reign lang uage

The Health C nter is sta ffed with n urse pract i t ioners and one

aud io, and video technologies. Business,

Rieke Science Center, and education maintain other computer

including pap smears; birth c o n t ro l ; and

labs and technology-rich classrooms, fo r which access may lle

pregnancy tes L i n g and counse l ing. Also o ffered are allerg), shots;

l i m i ted to specific departments or programs.

i m m u n i za tions; ,ex ually t ransmi tted disease i n formatio n ,

Residenc hall rooms all have Ethernet network connectio ns. To

t i ng, and treatment; co nsultations on eat i n g diso rders,

substance ab use, tobacco usage, t ravel gui deli nes and i m m u n iza­ ducation on

a

wide va riety of health concerns.

Sickness and Accident Insurance is available to all students on a volu n ta r y basis. The Health Center strongly u rges all students to

Off-campu:; swde1lts need a

December 3 1 , I ' 56 are required to p rovide o n the u n iversity

modem and an Internet service

entails a monthly charge. Ad d i t i onal i n formation o n co n necting

m u mps, rubella ( M M R) vaccinations after their first birthday.

to the PLU network from off c a m p u s can be fo und a t h ttp:// www.plu. edu/-w mptelc!sllppo rl/access_internet. html

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

computer

provider ( I SP) in addit ion to the PLU ePass. An ISP usually

health history fo rm an i m m u n ization records o f two measles,

L

a

Bookstore.

Immunization PoUcy tates that all students born a fter

e

campus co nnections. For i n fo r m a t io n on setting up

desk. Ethernet cards for most computers a re available a t the PLU

Center websi t l isted above.

i

n i cation software a r e needed on the studen t's c o m p u t e r i n addition t o ePass access. Modems are needed o n l y fo r o ff­

inst ructions i n the ResNet handbook or contact the student help

n i versity group i n s u rance policy can be ro und on the Health

F

connect to the network, an Ethernet card and network c o m m u ­

fo r residence h a l l access to t b e network ( ResNet ) , fo llow the

h ave medical insura nce. I n formation about the Pa c i fic Lutheran

I

o m m u n ication a n d

theat re, a r t , psycholo gy, nursiug, computer science, m a t hemat ics,

refe rral. Serv ices available i n c l u de ca re for i l l ness and injury;

C

i t h the barcode on the back

lea rning, and the Multimedia Lab fo r wo rking with digital web,

physician as,�istant. A phys ician is ava i lable fo r consultation and

A

especially the Haley Center fo r work with electronic i nfo rmation

www.plll. edu/-sliflhs

P

books and multimedia collections a lld equipmem with

to sec i f computers arc avai lable before students set out fo r the

2 53 . 535 .73 3 7

t io n . ; and health

aLiI

lab. The l i b rary has concentra t i o n of comp uters as well,

THE HEALTH CENTER

t

Check

Co mputer rooms are located t h rougho u t campus. The largest is

o f g ri.:va nce p rocedure� a re available fo r review a t the

exa m s,

exclus ive use of the PLU commu n i t y.

in University �enter and may be viewed t h rough a live webc3m

office of each gr ieva nce officer.

physical

PLU's

serves as a PLU l i b rary card.

grievance o ffice rs may be contacted to recei\7e assistance. s

to

of email, an expa n d i n g set of

sources and tools, and other services and resources for the

yo u r student I D card. This card

( 2 5 3 .535 .8786 ) , Kathy Russell ( 2 5 3 . 53 5 . 7 64 3 ) , Richard Seeger

Copi

u e

onl ine student service ', a rich collec t i o n of electro n ic research

avail ble fo r the stud nt tel seck redress.

(253.535.887 1 ) ,

F o r assistance with m u l t i media col l ections, e q u i p m e n t , a n d

services, ca1l 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 5 0 9 , send e m a i l to med ia@plu.edu, or v i s i t

nd proc dur s at the un ivers ity are in te nded to main­

Pol icies

'8

(Library and Computing Services) 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7 500

Un iversity Center, and Television Service a nd Audio Services are

THE ELUOTT PRESS I­

INFORMATION RESOURCES

the main public computer room is

social and educational l evel in the area of

multiC1llturalism that in tegrates both the academe and student

....

is $15.

to the Health Center.

tudcnts of Pacific Lutheran University ( ASPLU) has

a

e,

cost

Questions about the i m mu nization polic)' should b e directed

PLll ommuni t)'; Associated

11

after arrival at the u n i versity. The

underrep rese nted pop ulations programs and work within the

Q Z c(

tlIberculosis skil1 test (p u r ifi e d

Other campus resources in the area of mult iculturalism are:

5

I

T

Y


Special library collections, in a d d i t ion to a l a rge collection f books and a rt i cle s in b ot h p r i n t a n d digital fo rmat, include the Sc a n d i na vi a n I m m igrant Experience Collec t i o n , regi o n a l Lutheran c h u rch archives, a n d the Nisqually P l a i ns Collection­ al l in t h e Arch ives a n d S p e c ia l Collections Depart m e n t . Else­ where in the l i b ra r y arc a K- 1 2 cur ri c u l u m collection and a children's l i tera t u re co l le c t ion .

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES 2 5 3 .535.7 [ 94 II'lI'w.plll. edul-admilil1ternatl. html International Student Services pro vides assistance to i n terna­ tional students i n adj usting to the u n ive r s i t y and in meeting both education and personal needs. Services i nclude orientation, registration, a n d on-campus l iais o n with other u n ivers ity offices. Assistance with im m i grat io n and go vernm e nt regulations as well as immigration p ro c edu res regarding temporary travel, work applications, and extensions of stay is available.

KPLU-FM, NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO 253.535.7758

www. kplu.org KPLU is a p u b l ic radio station l icensed by the Federal Commu­ nications Commission to the Board of Regents o f Pacific Lutheran University in the acoma/Seattle area at 88.5 PM. With a network of e igh t booster signals, KPLU extends its service throughout Western Wash ington. Public radio stations are au­ thorized by the federal government as noncommercial to o ffer alternat ive p rog r a m m i ng not fo u nd on commercial ra d i o . Recognized fo r i t s progra m m i n g excellence, KPLU 88.5, Na ­ tional Publi Ra d i o (NPR) , is one of the nation's lead i n g p ub l i c radio stations. KPLU broadcasts NPR news, local and regional news, and jazz to more than 280,000 listeners per week. The KPLU news tea m files h u nd reds o f stories fo r national broadcast with PR each ye ar. KPLU stre a m s its exclusive, a w a rd - w i n n ing jazz, b l ues , and news 24 ho u rs a day on its website. KPLU i s a l so now a leader in wo rld w i d e jass I i t e n i ng.

PLU is the only i n dependent u n i versity in the N ortbwe st opera t i n g a ful l - power N P R member s ta t i o n .

LIBRARY SERVICES

( see

Informa t ion Resources)

MIDDLE COLLEGE 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 .7643 WIVW.pl!l. edul - m ideal PLU offers a s p ec ia l six-week summer program for high school jun­ iors and eniors an d for fi rs t - year college students. Called Middle liege, the p rn g ra m' i ' designed t o ease the transi t i o n from high school to college by sh a rpen ing learning skills that are essen tial to suce ful completion of a college or un iversity program. Middle ollege has both an academic program and an a dv is ing and testing comp nent. All students are thoroughly tested and evaluated i n p rivate sessions with regard to their reading, w r iti ng , verbal, and mathematical skills. In addition, career advising is pro­ vided. The aim of Middle College advising is to assess each stud nt's talents and interests in order to provide direction and goals for the college experience. The academic program offers a chance to improve specific learn­ ing skills essential to college success. The classes, offered at several levels in s eve ral disciplines, are for Middle College students only, thereby allowing small class size and close contact between students and fa Cll l t y. All students t a ke a s t ud y skills course, which serves as a core of the p rogram . In addi t io n , students may sel ec t two courses from among those offered each year. Each student's program is indi­ vidualized to promote maximum growth.

NEW STUD ENT ORIENTATION 253.535 . 7 [ 95 www.plu.edul-sliflorient New stude n t orientation endeavors to ass i s t students and t h e i r fam i lies w i t h the t r a n s i t i o n to PLU. The fo u r- d ay fal l p_rogram

introduces students to many dimensions of PLU l i fe. Fall or i en -

11\

t a t i o n incl ude meeting w i t h a fa ulty ad\'i

·01', t<ll king in sm a ll b ecomi ng acq uai nt 'd with ca m p u s services. a nd h av i n g some relaxed t i me with other students bdor lasses begi n . pe ial d tivitie are also plan ned that resp o nd to co n ce r n - ' of fam i l i � f new s tu de nts . Wh il January and spring ricn t a t i o n ar mo re cond�nsed, they also p ro v id e n..:w · t udents w i th an i n t Todu tien to academic lift' and cocurricuiar a ct iv i t ies .

groups w i th oth r new �tud n

-I c: C m Z -I

,

" m

OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT SERV ICES

2 5 3 .535.7 [ 95 www.p[u.edul-o!(camp

l> Z C

Student I nvolvemen t and Leadership ( SfL) p r o vi d e s o ff-ca mp u s students with a relaxing office and sup portive staff. O ff- campus st u d e n t s are invited to seek involvement, resou rces, and support t h ro ugh this o fl1ce. [L partners with ASP L to coord i n , te co m m u nication and programming and to a d vocat e fo r n o n res i ­ d e n t i al students. I n a d d i t i o n , the fo l lo w i n g resources are ava i la b l e : • Lou nges: e pecially designed fen off-campus s t u den t :; , on the lower level of t h e Uni ersity Center, the u per leve l o f the Ha uge Ad min istration B ui ld i llg, the fi rst floor of Riek Science enter, and the Un i ve rs i t y Gallery ill I n gram H j J • Meal plans: PLU' FlexPlan ( 25 meals p e r ,lcad<:mic year) a n d L u t e Po i n ts are n v e n i c nt a nd <,coIlomical meal options fo r otT­ campus s tud e n ts

A message center: open from 8 a.m._r p . m . Monday t h ro u gh Friday i n the S t u d en t Involvement a n d Leadersh ip Of Ice, is provided for students who wi'h to remain ,\ ( ess i hle w h ile attending c l a ss on campus. ff-campus housing: If yo u are looking fo r o ff-campus housing, check th l)rr-CJmpus not eb o o k s in Residential L i fe and the bull e t i n bO�Hds in the Uc. •

;Q

m

11'1

o c: ::0 n m 11\

A S P LU : Fo ur el<'�kd members o f AS P LU student government

arc off-cam p u s senators.

PROJECT PREVIEW 2 5 3 . 535.8648 Each se m e st e r PLU o ffe rs P ruj ec t Prev iew, a special enrichment

program for high s c h o o l j u nior a nd sc n i o rs . De igned to co m ple m e n t h igh sch oo l sturu

, Pr jeLl Preview allows student ·

to earn one h o u r of u n i c' rsi t), cred i t and to

ex p e r i e nc e

col l ege

l i fe and s t u d y. The r o p i c of the c o u rs e is d i fferent each semester.

Pr oj e c t Preview dasses meet

o n c e .l

week

for six I

eks i n tile l a te

a fternoon.

CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 .7 1 73 2 5 3 . 5 3 5 . 7652 The Center fo r P u b l ic S e r lr i ce co n n ects t h e PLU cam p u ' to the s u r ro und i n g com m u n i ties by provid i n g o p p o r t u n i t ies fo r s t u ­ den ts. staff, a n d faculty to erve commun i ty needs as part of t he i r u n iver5ity exp ri nee. There axe many ways FLU p e o p l e can become i n volved i n co mmu n i ty ervi c at P LU . The y a n work w i t h a l l ages­ preschoolers t h rou gh enior cil izclls--a t- t h c Fa m i ly and Children's Cen ter, a coa l i t i o n of social sC TV i t agencies h o u s e d together in PLU's East Cam ' th at dosdy coop er at e s with the Center fo r PubLI Service. Srudents can also become i n volv d in community work through a dem ic servi -e - Iearning las e that explore the relationship between an ac a dem ic subj ct and com­ munity service experience. The enter fo r P u b l i c Service is a resource to faculty teaching t he e cou rses, vhich are available in m a n y depa r t m e n t s , and can help students find out about them. For 3. va r ie t y of vol u n teer work , i ndiviJual and -tudent �OllpS can also use the Vol u ll teer ent r, part of the enter for Public en·ice, to b ro w s e t h rough l istings o r o ve r 1 00 volunteer oppor­ t u n i t ie on and nea.r the PLLf ampu. and to learn about resi ­ dence hall or student-club . erv i c e pro) Cl�. To find o ut more , b til h IV ro bl!co me engaged in the com­ mun i t y, call t h e enter for P uhli c ervice, or stop by HaT t ad

Hall Room [ 05 . P

A

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I

F

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19


VI w U

RESlDENTIAL LIFE

prov ides p r�l t i cal t:xperien e <l nd a t the sam e t i me deve l o p s an

253.535.7200

unders tanding of �el i.o rei tion to o t h e r ' . ocurricular p ro­ gram ' i n clu de student govern m e n t ( ssociated Students of PL m : d Residence HaJl As o c i a t i n ) , port.:; activities (varsi ty, i n t r�l­ mural, an d club s p o rts) , student media ( newspa per, yea rbook, a r t isti magazioe, rad io, and telev ision), student lubs and orga­ n izations, and com m u n i t y service progra ms. With owr 100 s t u ­

a:

www.plli.edl il-slifirliJ

:::l o VI w a:

The u D iversity requires that all fllJ l - t im�

VI :::l Q.

:!: <

u

o z < w ...

I­ Z ....

o :::l

I­ VI

hours) s t. u dents li ve and one of th

eat on

(12

or more

t hree fol lowin� o n d i t ions:

(I)

or o lder

on

tel'

i ' Living nt home with

pare n t ( s ) , le ga J guardian(s), spouse . or child ( r of ag

seme

ca mpu ... u n ks the student meets

r before September

1

'11); (2)

is

20 years

d e n t activities in which to become i nvolved, the re is sure to be at

for the academic year

or Feburary 1 fo r spri.ng

least one w h i ch will e n r i c h a perso n's col lege exper ience.

status

STUDENT LIFE

mcs r e r ; or ( 3 ) has .Ittainect j un ior (60 semester hours) on or beror September 1 or the

academic year or Fwruary 1 for >11 r i ng 5eme ,\.{'r.

2, 3.535.7 1 9 1

As a res ident ial a m p u , Paci fi c Lutheran Univers i t y oFfers stude n ts a valuable elCperience in c o m m u n i t y l iv i ng. The u nive r­

lVww,plu. erllll-

sity recogn izc� the i m portance of non la� Toom HC l. i vi ties i n

an essen t i a l co m p o n e n t of the aOldellli

p r o v i d i n g a n ed uca t ion. The aim ( 1 f res id e n t ia l l iving i to help stude n t s grow p e r so n ally, sociaUy, ( u l t u ral ly, �nd spiri tllull '.

amp liS resi d e nc e are

rga n i2 d i n t o com mun i t ies in w h ich

each i ndiv idua l cou n t s as a person .

.

ew kn owledge s hared W i l h ve l , personal mea n i n g .

friends i n t h e residenc� h a l l s takes o n a Men and

\.

omen of ma ny ba ckground - <lnd c u l t u res live on

campUSi lhere fort:: , student in res idence h u l l s have a u n i q uc op portu n i ty to broaden theLr "ultural h o r i z I I , . The un iversi t y (<Jres about the qual i t y of l i fe 011 cam p lls. lb� attract ive ,lnd com fortablt:: residence h a l ls en ric h the qual it o r l i fe and enh ance the learn i. ng process. T h ' univ rs i t y offers opport u n ities for studen t leader hip :p�r icncc, fo rmal and info rmal programs, and peer as. oc.iar ions. Th� student gove rning bodie <Ire s t rong and activ Iy participate in cam pus l i fe.

A dection of modem , a t t ract ive halls, each w i t h its ow n traditions and u n ique advcl I1tag " o(fers . tudents the opportu­ n i t y to establi ' h a comfortabk l i v i n g p a t te rn . A l l h a l l s i nclude i n formal l o w1gc s, 'rudy rooms, recre a t i o n areas, and common

An a l l siogle-room hall has bCC11 t'.Stubti shed fo r t h ose 2.0 y a rs of j u n i o r

RESPONSrBlUTIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE Withio any com m u n i t y er ain reg u l a t i ons are necessary Pacifi

i n g busi .nes� o n a stude n t 's b h a l f w i l l need t h e P L U and PI

omply wi t h t.hose s t a n d a r d s . Al l members of t h e the rights and int eg r i t y of others. ,o n d u c t which i s detrimental to students, fa cul ty, staff, or the univers i t y. or which vi olates loca l , state, o r fede r a l laws, may be gro u n ds fo r s a n c tions or for d ism issal. The u n iversity p ro h i b i r s the p o s s ess i o n o r c o n s u m p t i o n of that they will

that o ffered d u r i n g the reg u l a r . caM m i e year, is <tvailable to al l

rooms. The code of co nduct fo r aU stude.nts is a v a ilable o n l i ne at

cover

a

broad range of -on temporary i ss u . and perspectives in

eek terms and a one- week workshop sess i o n and begi.ns

mus ic, and p hysical ed lcation; o t h e r s are ounected more closely

E

R

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the last

taught i n t he evening, two n i gh ts

per week fo r nine week" a n d Ma ter of B u s i ness A d m i n i s t ra t i o n

to recrea tional and social l i fe. I nvolvement in student acr iv ities H

are

cou rses are tanght during two ix- week terms, two n i g h ts per

Student <lctivitics are rega.rd d as essen tial fac t o rs in higher edu­

T

on5. In addition, su mmer session typically is a time

week of May. M a n y cou rses

cation. Some are related to cou rses of i nstruction sudl as drama,

U

per

when the fa c u l t y offer i n n ovative, experi men tal courses, which

\

WWw.pill.ed ulprirI tlhalldbovklll ctivilY. il t l l l l

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q u alified

m�ny fields. The summer sessi o n consists of three discrete (o ur-

STUDENT ACTMTIES 253.53 5.7 1 9 5

C

number

WWW.plll.edlll-su771111Gr

www.pl u.edu/p r i n t /handbook/conduc t . h t m l .

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relea s ed.

An extensive s li m m e r school cu rriculum, of the same quality as

may have vi ' i t ors of the opp osite sex i n their residence ha ll

F

he

253.535.8648

alco h o l i c beverages on ca mpus a nd l i m i t s the hOLlrs when · t u ­

I

or i n formation will not

SUMMER S ESS10N

un iver i t y co m m un i t y are expe tcd tl,) reo pe

C

tomer service and

their p,uents and sign ificant ot hers fo r access. An yone transac t ­

adopt only tbose s t a n d ards bel ieved to be

reas onably neces ary a nd a d m i ts st udents w i th the expe t o tion

A

eu

number alll! Pers on al Identification umbers ( PI N ) . A P I N is a igned to each s l u de n t attending P LU . 111[S s curity is p a r t of t h e u n iversity's pol i c y regarding Fa m i ly Educational Right and Pri\racy Act ( FERPA ) of 1 9 74, Stude n t s may give lhi� n u mber to

campus l.iving.

P

so u rces. We provide in novative

i n q u i ries, schedules, etc, students must have th ir i de n tifi cat ion

added indep ndence while con t i n u i 1\g t he m a ny bene fi ts of

20

'loa o s , acco unt fi n a n c i n g, veteran's assistance, :lI1d other u n iver­

To aCcess info r m a t i o n on " student's fin anc i <l.l aid, b i l l i n g

atta i u ed a

m i n i mu m of j u n i o r status. This l i v i ng option prov i de' for :ome

de n t

ists st uden ts, fam i lies, a n d t h e PLU

a ademic p rocess with finan ial ass istance and reSOUTces.

S o u t h Hal l , an apartment-style residt'nce, i s designed for

n i versir

s

dedicate ou rselves to assist and rducate st udents through the

the needs o f t he older s t u d e n t .

Lutheran

cogni zes

c o m m u n i r y w i t h r<:gistration, fi n a n c ial a i d , P rkins/Nurs lng sity

status. T h i s indepen d e n t l i v i ng environment is i n tended to med

e

r

t h a t liheral education i s for the total person and that a comple­ mentary rel a t i o n s h i p exists between st udents' i n tel lectual dcvelopment and the satisfa c t i o n o( thei r o t h e r ind .ivid uaJ needs. Interaction w i t h persons of differ i n g l i fe expe riences, a p p l ication of classroc)1TI knnwkd g to personal goals a nd aspir tions, and C cu rric u lar experiences are a l l available a nd t o tal compon nt. of ed ucat ion at PLU. In a time when there is 11 need fo r m a n i n g­ fu l commun ity, t11e campus faci litates g 'llll i n e relations h i ps among m � m bt:rs of the university from d i verse rel i.g io us, rac i a l , Jnd cultural backgro u nds. All o f the se.vic..:s and fa c i l i t ies provided are in tended to compleme n t the acad c m ic program. The services reflect changing student n eeds, and the oppor t u n i ­ t ies fo r tudent p'l rt i ci pat io n i n c:lude irtually a l l aspects o f the u nivt:rs i t )'. I n d i v i d ual attention is given to st udents' concerns, i n cluding a \r.!ridy of specifIC serv ices out l i ned here and on the

B u i l d i ng. room 1 02 "

expe r i e n ce.

stude n t s who are 20 year' l)( age or o l der, or wbo h

l i fe of \rigorous dnd

The Student Services Cen ter, located in Hauge Adrnini.s t ration

[or those women who desi re tl1is livi ng

a m i n i m um

niversity also

www. p l u . t'du/-ssvc

ment, and participate j o i n t l }' in all hall acti itie . O ne all­

of age or older, or who h ave attained

creatiw schohHs h i p . Paci fic Luther.an

253. " 35.7 1 6 1 800.678.3243

lounge dnd rt"rea t i on faci J i t i�s and common resi de nce govern­ av a i l a b l e

a

STUDENT SERVICES CENTER

I though t ht!)' are

housed i n separate wings, men <Jnd wo men i n co-cd h a l b share

wo men's hall i

community. The

enviro n ment produced i s conducive to

web at plu.edu/ - s l i f! .

kitc h e n and l aundry fa c i l i t ies. Most of the h a l l s are co -�ducationa l .

lif

The q u a l i t y of l i fe cult ivated and fo stered w i t h i n the un ivers i t y is

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

week. Designed � t 11

I'

llnd rgntd uate a n d graduate students a l i ke,

program serves teacher and ad min i s t ra t o rs see k i n g creden­

tials and spc ia l courses. first -year students desiring to i n i tiate


co l l ege �tud y, a n d ll t her� see k i n g special t u ci i e o ffe red by the scho o ls and dep a r t m e n ts. Non mat ricuJated s tu d e n t <; \ ho enroll for t h e summer session need o n l y s u b m it J letter o f acade m i c stand i ng o r give o ther e\rid�nce of [x i ng llre pared for co l lege work .

A complete SlImnrer Sessioll Cn ra/ug, o ll t l i n i n g the curriculum as w 1 J a sp cial i n s t i t u t $ , wo rkshops, and 'emi nal's, i� p r i n t ed

eadl spring and i s avai lable by cal l i ng or by v i ew i n g it o n l i n e .

VOLUNTEER CENTER

l>

Academic Procedures

n

ACADEMIC HONESTY Both the value and t h e s u cces of a ny academic act ivi t )', as well as the en t i re acade m i c en t e r p ri s e , h ave d epe n d e d fo r cen tu r i e s on Lhe fu n d a mental principle o f absolute h o n e s t y. The u n ive r s i t y expects a l l its fac u l ty a n d st uden ts to honor this p r inciple scrupulously.

S i n ce a c a d e m i c dis h o n es t y is a se ri o u s breach

o f the u n iver­

25 .535.83 1 8 WWIV. pllJ. cdlll- volll lllr

sal l y recogn ized code o f academic

PI.

demonstrable i ns t a nce of s u c h m iscond uct on t he pa r t of a

e t h ics,

it is eve ry fa c u l ty

m e m b e r's o bligati o n to i m pose a p p ro p r i a t e s a n c t io n s for a ny

s Vo l un tee r Ce n t 1', run by slud nt and housed i n t he Center for Public �ervice, eeks to give students oppo r tu ru t i es to put to work their dreams for better wo rld . The Volu n tee r Ce nter has l ist ­ i ngs for over 1 0 0 org<lni7..ations who need volunteers. Students (an stop by and browse through the p l ace ment l i st s, 01' make an ap­ p oint ment ""rjth o ne of t he Volunt er Center cuordinators wh o help mat ch students with organ izaL i o n '. Class projec ts , resi de nce hall group activities, one da)' or several, the Vol unteer Center (, n hel p students helpl

WOMEN'S CENTER

student. The u n i versity" policy on academic i n tegrity and i t s p roce­ dures fo r deal in g w i t h academic misconduct are detailed in t h e

Stl/dent

m

n � ;;J;/ o n 1ft

o c: ;;J;/ m

VI

Halldbovk.

ADVISING The un ive rsi t y expects that all st u d e n ts , at o n e t i me or another, w i l l nced assis tance in p la n n i n g academic p rog ram s consistent w i th their needs and goals. B oth to h el p students make their

i n it i a. l adj ustment to the a c a d e m i c load a t PLU a n d to p rov i d e

253.535.8759

counsel through o u t t h e i r academic careers, the u n i ve rs i t y has

www.plu.edu/-wvluellcen

established

a

Adv i si ng

ffice.

The \¥omen's Center i .In n-cam us re o ur,.e center thal serves 5tudents, staff, and fa cu l t y. Located on lower campus in Lhe l i t l l e b l u e house next to t h e softball field ( l 04 l 24 ,h Street 'outh) , t h e center pr vides adv cacy, r e S O ll r , and educJtional prog ra m ­ ming for a n d ab ut women a n d gc n d r e q u i t y. Both wo m e n and men are welcome to u e the re ource� of the Women' C nter and encourag ed t o take advanta 'e of the safe, supportive, and confidential a t mosphere for supp ort o r network �roups. he staff at the Wome n's enter uffers o l l fi d n t i a l s u p port and a. s i s ­ lance in dea l i n g wi L h sexual hara ssmen t , rape o r ex u a l ass a u l t , a n d dating/relation s h i p iss ues. Throughout t h e yt"ar, the center also p ro v i es a variety of ()PPl1 rtu n i t ies fo r ga t h e r i n g and cd­ ebrat ion.

WRITING CENTER

253.535.8709

lVww. p Ju. edul- wl'iling

The Wr i t i ng Cen ter, 10 ated in Ramstad Hall, p ro v id

> C

s a

place fo r

�t u de n ts to meet wilh trained student readers to discu s their ac d e m i c , creative, a n d professional \ r i t i n g . Student staff mem­ b�rs help writers generate topics, develo p focus, organize m a t e ­ rial, and clarify ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed from the classroom set t i ng, student readers dud w ri te rs talk s riou Iy about ideas a n d w r i t i n g st rategi . lost ses i o n s are one-hour meet i n g" but d rop- i n students w i th brief essays or que L i o n s are welcome. The Wr i t i ng Cen ter is o p e n Mond ay t hro ugh T h urs d a y from 1) :00 a. m . to 9:00 p. m . , FT ida y from 8:00 a.m . to 6:00 p.m., and Su nday from 3:00 to 9:0 p. m. T hese hours may vary sl igh t l y from semester t o serne te r.

network of fa cul t y advisors and a n Acade m i c

Faculty Advisors All s t ud e n t s enrolled i n deg ree p rogra m s have facul ty a d v i s o rs \ h ose overal l resp onsibility is to guide academ i p rogress. I n theLr work w i t h i nd iv i d u al student., ,ldvisors have th dssistance of personne l i n a number of student serv ices offices: Aca de m ic Advising, Academi ssistance e nter, Car er Development,

Counseling and Testing , ervices. Diver ity en ter,

ampus Mi nistry,

international student advisor, and residence hall directors a n d resident assistants.

Trallsilional Advisors: At the t i m e of ent ry, each studenl is assigned a transitional a d v iso r, us u a l l y a ccordi ng to i n teres ts exp ressed by the s t u d e nt . Students who wish t() ex p l o re th e genera l cu r ri c u lu m be fore c hoosi ng a m aj or program are assigned to ex pl ora to r y advisors ( p rofessional advising or co u nse l i ng staff or e pe ially t rained facu l t y ) who wiLl he lp them to make ed u cati o na l plans approp r i a te to thei r interests and talents. Tran itional advi ors are s u ppor t e d by educational pl a n n i ng workshops and by Psych ol o gy 1 1 3, Ca ree r and Educational Plan n i n g . Du r ing a student's fi rs t semester, an adv i si n g fde is c reated fo r the student' advisor, and a Big E nvelop e, an a dvi s i ng g u ide and record-keeping folder. is ' lled to each student.

Major Advisors:

pon formal declara t io n of a major, st ud en ts are ass i g ned major advisors to replace their transitional advisor�. Major

advisors guide students' progr

S5

toward their chosen degree goals.

Studenls may chan ge advisors as appropriate or necessary, usin a simple adv isor c h an ge form. Students and advi. ors are expected to meet regu l arly, t h o ugh the actual number of meelings will vary according to i nd i vidu al needs. Fi rs t - ye a r and so phom o re students are required to meet \vith their advisors before registration for each semester. All students are encouraged to meet wi t h their advisors

periodically.

ACADEMIC STANDING POLlCY The t() l lowi n g t e rms arc u se d to describe a c adem i c s ta nd i n g a t PLU. Academic st an di n g is determined by t h e om m i t t e e for t h e Admission and Re ten t i o n o f S t ud e n t s , which reserves the ri gh t to review a ny s t udent's record to determ i n e ac a dem i c s ta n d i n g .

Good. Standing: A l l students e nro l l ed at the u n iversity a re expected to stay in good academic stand i ng. Good s t a n d i ng requi res a semester grade poi n t average of 2 .00 or h i gh r fo r the i m mediate past sem ester, and satisfactory academic p rogress . Academic Warning: S t u d e n t s whose most recent mes ter grade p o i nt average was less tha n 2.00, whose c u m u l a t ive grade po i n t ave.ra ge is 2.00 or h i gh e r, an d wh o I' a c a d e m i c p rogress is P

A

C

I

f

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

t

V

E

R

S

t T Y

21


\I) ....

II:: � o ....

u o CJ: Q. u

s a t i Ca ctor y a re p l ac ed

i de n t i fy sud] st ud en t , review t he i r records. consider e xte n u at i ng

n academic warning a n d sen t warning

letters . Stude n ts whose cumulative and semesks gr ad e p oi n t

circu m s t a n ces, Jnd decide wheth 'r o r n o t the students shall be

averag e are bel ow

pla ced

are

also placed

)n

_.00 at the end of t hei r first semester at PLV acade'mic wa rn in g.

EUgibllity for Student Activities:

Probation: Student ' o t he r t h an firs t semester students are p la ced

n probalion if t il 'ir cumulative' g r act l! point veTage fal l s b 'Iow

the Com m i t tee for U1C Ad m i ss ion and Retention of

progress. Probation ary s t u dents must meet with the director o f

advising before the te n t h da)1 o f a probationary s e me s t e r to draw up a p lan fo r i m p roviIlg their ac a de m ic work. Academic p roba t i o n is noted on the transcript. failure to a t isfactorily compl et e each dismissal fro m t h e un iver ity. Failure to co mp l e te in l u de s

se

s

A

C

I

F

I

C

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

' me s t er a fter

to complete includes

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

e

free l y

Course grades reflect t h e qua l i ty of students acad e m ic perfor,

ma n ct' as a whole, which normally includes r e g ula r participation ill the total class exp erience and is elral1l3led acc o rd i n g l y. Absences ma y lead to a red uctiun of a s t ud e n t ' s final grade. (n the eve nt of u ll3voiable a bs e n ce, st udents ar expected to i n fo rm the i n true tor. Ass i g n ment of make-up w rk, if any, is at the discr t i on of the i n s t ructo r. CLASSlFICATlONS OF STUDENTS

:

st udents w h o have sat i factorily co mpleted

G raduate Stud i es.

p oi n t a vera ge is above

U

ha

requirement and have been a 'cepted i n to t h e D ivi ion o f

o m ple ti n of at least 75% of the cr�dl t hours

L

nt�

ho ufs.

for t jle Ad m i '. inn a n d Retention of ' t ud e n t r s e r ves the r ig h t to rev it:I" for academic sta t u s Lhose s t u de n t \ 110 fa il to mai n ta i n sa t is f:lct or y a c a de m ic progres. . The com mi ttet: sh a ll reg u l ar l y P

The L 1 n i ersity assum s t h a t ,lL! registered stud

a ccep t e d persona! respon i b i l i t y for r gu la r lass a t ten d a n ce .

Gr(l(il late Stllde'l ts: students who have met graduate entrance

wit hd rawal s, i ncomp ldes, and grades of E or F. The Com mitt e

22

CLASS ATTENDANCE

hours.

Sotisfactory Academic Progress: Satisfacto ry a c a de m i c progress h a l l be defi l1ed

is not affected.

'el1 iors: s t u de n t who htlve satisfact rill' co mp leted 90 s e m e s ter

2.00, may be gra.ntt>d (Ji ll? add it iona l se m est e r or prob a t i o n at th e iliscrelitJn of the Co mm i t tee fo r the Ad m iss io n and Ret e n t i o n o r St u dents. (f a e m es t er grade p in t aver.1ge of 2.00 is not earned in the p n ) b ationary semester, or if a :; l u d e n t fai l s to a c h i ev e a 2 .00 c u m ulative g rad e point a erage after a second r bationary eme ter, the s t u de n t i di m issed , second time and may not a pp ly for reill t, tement u n t i l onc full se m e ste r has passed, a n d then nly i n ew evi fence i s presented i n d i c at i n rr t h e stude n t 's p robabl e . uccess. Th is rule a l so appLie to a r ad m i t t e d student who atta i ns good s t anding and is then d i sm i ssed a second t ime for academic reaso ns.

a t tempted in iln a ca de m i c year. Fa i l w'

( 2.00) in their classes. No

JUJliors: s t u d e n t s who have sat isfact o r i l y compl eted 60 'cmester

re� d m i tted st ud en t w h o fa i l s t o

rei n t alement, but whose semester gra d

level

30 semester hour,.

ter. po i nt average i n t h e

sp rin g semester, inst ru cto r may choose to end wa r n i n g letters to

requirem nl .

of a prohilt ionM Y semester a re di�m issed frol11 t he u n ive r�i t)'. They may 3pply for reinsta tement )' p t i t i o n i n g the :olllm ittee fo r the Ad m i - 'iOll and H.etention of hl d c n t s ( i n c a re of the d i rector of ild i s i ng) . I the p e t i t io n is approved, the reinstated ludent i s on p robation a n d m List partici pate in the p ro b a t i o n a ry semes t r prugram. If th peti tion is de n ied , the student may pet i t ion aga i n aft r one semester unle · s o tb envisc i n for m ed , Students are d is m issed f, r a adem i c reaso n s a fter each btl and

2.00 cumulative grade

Midterm Advisory Letters: I n the seventh week of each fall and

Sopholllore

Academic Dismissal: Students not i n goo d s t a n d i n g at the end

econd Academic Di missaJ:

giate com pe t i t ions and may be adv ised to curtail p a r t icip ati o n i n other e x t r a c u rr i ular activities.

First -year: _ t ucl e n ts who h a ve met firs t-yea r- ent rance

c u m u l a t i e grade p oi n t averages ar still bdow 2.00 after a p ro bat ion a ry semes ter, b u t w hos ' last sei ne te r grade point <IV r ages a re aboV'� 2 .00 a nd who ure ot h e r w ise in good s t a ndi n g , may be gr:ll1ted olle additional se me ler of pr b ut i o n a t the discretion of the Cornmi tt�e fo r the Ad mis sion and Retent io n of S t u d c n t s. Such ludents must par tic i pate i n the p ro ba t i o na r y scme>ter program. Failure to sa t isfa I nily o m p let e each c ou rs e a t t e m p ted i n a probationar y semester may re s u l t i n d i s m i ssa l from t h e u n i ersi ty. rail urc to wmplete i n cl udes withdrawal., in�ompktc , and grades 0 E or F.

attain a

A st u d en t on

for ertification in i n t rcoUe­

tran s c ript Dotation i s mad , .md academic standing

withdrawals, incom pletes, a n d gra des o f t or F. A probcl tio ll pllln may specify reqll iremellts agreed on by the sludcllt {llld director of advising: assignment to II proba t ionary adviso r, specifi ed co ntact with the advisor, limitatioll of credit load, limitation on work o r aC1ivitie , regist rt1 tioll ill {l study skills class, etc. Copies o[ llie agracmeltl are sent to the s t udellt and problHiol1ary adviso r. ill the em! o[ the semesler, the advisor retll ms aile copy to the director af adt!ising illdicating whetlrer o r not tire stur/em has made a l l effo rt t o IlIce! tire terms o f the probatiollilry agreement. Thi; copy is fi led ill rhe Offi�e of the Registra r li nd mny be II cd to make decisions rega rdillg COllrin­ Iled probariOIl and acadelllic dismissal.

se m e .

in dividual chool , depa rtments. or organizations.

students d o i n g work be l ow

course attempted in a p robationa ry se m e s t e r may result i n

p r i ng

nrolled, ful l ,

activities based u pon acad m i c p er fo rman ce m ay be set by academic p ro ba ti o n is n t d ig i b l

Stude n ts ) i f they have fa i le d to main tain satisfactory academic

Continued Probation: Students wh

ny regularly

student ( ( 2 semester h o u rs or more) is eligible v I p ar t ic i, p a t i o n in u n iversity activ i t i e · . Li m i tations on a st ud ent 's ti me

2 .00. or if the r have been on wa rning in the previ uS semester and have fail e d to ret u rn to guod acade m i c standing, or (at the discretion

n a c a d e m ic pr bati n .

Y

NOli-Degree Ulldergrndlill tes: tl nclergradu3t · st ude n t s who are atte n d i ng p a rH i me for a max i m u m of 8 s mester h o u rs but are no offici a l l y a d m i t ted t o 3 degree program. NO li - Deg ree radliMe S/ridellls: graduate � t u d e n t s w ho are a t t e n d i ng part - r i me (or a m ax i m um of <;) semeste r hours b u t a r e nOt o[ficially adm itl\:d to a degree program. COURSE LOADS

The norll1�1 course load � r u ndergraduate students d u ri n g fal l a n d s p ri ng 'erne�ters is L 3 to 1 7 h o u rs per se m e s t e r, i n c l u d i ng phys i ca l E· d u c a t i o n . The m i n i m u m fuJ I - t i me course l o a d is 1 2 h o u rs. The m i n i m u m fu J I - t j me load fo r graduate st uden t s i s 8 h o u r s . A n or m a l wurse l o a d during the J:1ll Uilr y te r m is 4 hours w ith a m a x i m u m u f 5 holLl's. ' I n order fo r :l s t u d e n t to ta e J full cou rse load, t h e student must he form a l l y a d m i t t ed to tht: u n i vers i t y . See the Ad mi ' si o n sectioll oj" this ((Ita/agIor appliciltiotl p roced u res . ' S t u dents who wish to register Cor 1 8 or 1110re hours ill a s e m ester 3 re requ i re d to have at least a 3 .00 grade p oi n t average or c o n se n t of t h e provost. ' Students en gaged i ll co n s i d erab l e outside work Illay be res t r i c t e d to a reduced a cademic load. CREDIT BY EXAMlNATION ( CHALLENGE) S t u dents are perm i t te d , wiLhin l im i t s , to ob t a i n credit b y e xam i ­ n a t io n in lieu of regular e n rollment a n d c l a s s a t tendanc . No m o re t h a n 30 s e m e stt'r h O llI'S m ay be co un t e d toward g ra du a­ t i o n , w h e t h e r [rom the College Level Exa m i na t io n Program ( ·'UP) or a ny t her exa m i n J t io n. Exce p t ions to t h i s rule fo r certa in groups of st udt:nts or p rograms may be made, subject to recommendation by t h e Educational Policies Com m i t tee Jnd a pproval by the facu lt y. Cred i t b y exa m i n a t i o n is o p e n to


fo rmaUy a d m i tt e d , regular-status students onl and does n o t cou n t tow::trd t. h e resi de n c y re q ui remen t for graduation. To r ive credit by x a m i n a t io n , ·tudents m ust c o m p l e t e a � , redit By E xa m i n a ti o n Regis t ration Form ava i l able in t h e tud"nt ervi ccs "enter, ob t a i n th e sig n a tu re o f t h e res p ec ti ve de p a r tm ent d,air or d ea n , and a rr a nge for the exa m i nat i o n w i th the , ppropriate in s tru c to r. The c o m pl e ted fo rm m u s t be re t urne d to the S t u d e n t Services Cent r b efo r e t he eXJ m i na t ion i s taken . G rades for c re d i t by exa m i na t i o n will be s u b m i tted by

the in · l ructor a l o n � w i t h a l l other g r ad e s at the e n d of the ter m .

e x p e r i e n c i n g courses \ [thout c o m p e t i ng d irec t l }' w i t h students who are specializing in t hose areas o f s t udy. G ra d es o f A through C- are rega rd ed as pass; grades o f D+ t h ro u g h E . re regarded as fa il. Pass/fail grades do [lot affect the grade po i n t avera g e . ' Th e pas / fa i l o p t i o n is l i m ited to 8 cred i t h o u rs ( rega rdless of repea t s , p a ss o r fa i l ) . On ly one co u rse m a y b e taken pass/fa i l i n ful 6 1 l me n t o f ge ne ra l u n i v ersi ty or core req u i rements or of the ollege of Arts a nd S cie n ce s re qu i re me n t . The p a s s / fa i l o p t i o n may n o t be a pp l i e d to a c o u rse t a ke n fo r •

CLEP general ex a m i n a t ions are gi ve n el ec ti ve c re d i t on l y. The

l.E.P

subject eXJ m i na t i o n s

fu l fi l l men t of a maj o r or m i n o r p rogram. An exce p t ion to t h i s is a l l owe d fo r one c o u rse in Lhe maj o r or m in o r field i f it was

take n before the maj o r or m i nor

which may ful fi l l requ irements

fo r ma jo r s, program , o r gen e ral u n iversity requirements in t h e i r

de l a red.

was

S t u d e nt s must file t h e i r i n tent ion to exercis

the pas s/ fa i l e n ter no later than the m i d ­ In a full-length 'emester, this is last day o f

respect ive academic a reas. These exa m i n .l t ions a r e s ubj e c t t o

o p t ion with t he Student Services

recommend<ltions hy th Educational Pol ic ies C o m rn i tt

point of the (our. e. t h e eigh t h week. The pass/fa i l o p t io n is l im ited to undergraduate �tlldents o n l y.

e

and

a p prova l by t h e fac ul ty. he minimum passing leve l for CLEP exam i na t i o ns taken a t

Pacific Lutheran

niv rsi t y is the fifl ietb per entile.

Cl'

red it · g ra n ted b}' o t h e r lInivers i t ie , colleges, and com m u n i t y co i l ge , which are earned before entrance, are honored by Pacific Lutheran n i ve rs i ty. The app l i cat i o n o f those redits toward m a j o rs, programs, and general u n iversity re qu i rement s i s co n s i t n t wi t h school, d iv i s i on a l , and depart­ ment policie a n d s t an d a rds . The u n .ivers i ty does not g r a n t credit fo r college - l evel genera l equivalency d i p l o lTla

(G D) tests.

;:I re

typically co ncern ed with

Exc l u s ive p a ss / fa i l

COLUses d

n o t meet maj o r or u n i ve rs i t y

requ i rements w it h o ut fa cu lty appro v a l . exclusive pass/fa i l

co u rs e,

I f a s t ud e n t

t'lk .

an

t h e s t uden t's i n d i v idua.l pa s s / fa i l

op t i o n is not a ffected.

lncomplete ( I ) g ra des i n d ica te that st u d e nts did no t complete t hei .r work because of c ircu tnst<l nccs beyond their control. To receive

An u n derg r a d u, It s t udent may repeat any c o u rse. The C U lTl u l a ­

recorded within the fi rst six weeks of the fo l low i n g semester. The

i � c o m p u t e d u s i n g the: h ighest o f the

grades earned. Credit toward g ra du a t i o n is allowed o n l y u nce. �redit is not a l lowed f o r a m a t h e m a t i c s o r a fo reign langu a ge as a

p re r lj u is i t ' if t a ken a ft e r ,1 h i gher- level cou rse.

For e�x ample. a . tuden t w h o has com pl eted Spanish 2 0 1 c a n no t l a t e r rece i ve credit fo r S p a n i s h 1 02 .

GRADING SYSTEM Students are graded a cco rd i n g to the following designations: Point5 per Hour

Grade

A B+ B

Excel/em

4.00

Good

3.67 3.33 3.00

B-

2.G7

C+

2.33

C cD

D Poor DE

Credit Awarded

Yes

Yes Yes

Fil ii

0.67

The! grades l i s t e d below a r e not used i n calc ulat i n g grade p o i n t earn

d un d er

these

Grade

Description

Credit Awarded

p

Pass

Yes

F I

fail I n co m p l e te

IP

In Progr

AU W WM UW TG

desi 'nat ions.

S5

Au d it Withdrawal Mcdi c<ll W it hdrawa l n o ffic ial W i t h d rawal Grad

S u b m i tted

completed are cha nged to thc defuult grade i n dicated by t h e instructor when tbe i ncompkte IVa :ubl1litted. An i n co mplete is n o t a pe r m an e n t g ra de. An incomplete does not cntitle a s t ud e n t to

at te n d cla ss again without rer gisttT i ng.

In Progress (IP) si 'nifies progreSi. in a urse which normally ru ns more than one term to co m p l e t i o n . In Progress carries no cred it until rep la ced by a pe rm a n en t gra de .

dead l i ne .

i 0

averages. No g r a d e p o i n ts ar'

fu ll ow i n g tht' I, \ hich remains

on the record ( tor example Il3+ ) . Incomplete g ra des tbal are not

No Grade ( N G ) i s a tem porary grade e n t e red by t h e Regis trar's O ffice w h e n no grade has been s u b m i tted by the 'stahlished

Yes

0.00

pas. i n g grade

Unofficial Withdrawal ( UW ) may be ente.red when a c o ur se is n o t c o m p l e ted because of a s t uden t's nona ttendance in the days before the w i t h d rawal d ea d l i n e. See Withdrawal from the University, pre v i o usly l is te d .

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

133 1 .00

earned grade is recorded immediat I,

a

Medical Wltbdrawal ( W M ) is entered when a cou rs e is not co m ple ted due to medicJI co u se . A medical withdrawal does not a ffect a stu den t's grade p oi nt .Iveragc. See lVit.hdrmval from the University, p rev iously l is ted .

Ye Yes

Siltis/acrory 2.00 1 .67

:xl o f'I m o C :xl m 11\

a p prec i a t i o n , value com m i tment, o r c rea t i ve achieve m e n t .

c red i t , an i nco m p le t e must be co mplete d and

course l ist e d

-0

Exclusive Pass/Fail Courses: So m e co urses oilly aware! pass/ fail grade. . The go als of these co u rse s

CREDIT RESTRICTIONS t i ve g rade p o i n t ;,l\ .rag

m

vario us seho Is, d iv is i o ns , and de p a r t m e n l s dete r m i n e the speci­

fic

» f'I » o

No

Pass ( P ) a nd Fail ( ) gr, des are awarded to st udents who select the pass/fail option or who arc enrolled i n exclusi e pass/fail co u rses . These grades do not a ffect a student's g rade po i n t average. Pass/Fail Option: The pass / fail option permits stu dents to exp l D re subject a re a s o u ts ide t h e i r known a b i l i t ies by

GRADUATION S t u d ents exp ec t i ng to ful fi l l degree reqllLrements w i t h i n the academic year ( i n c lud i n g Au g u st ) a re ro: q u ired to fi l e an a p p l i ca t i o n fo r gra d ua t i o n w i t h t h e Regi t rar's Office accord ing to the followi ng: DEGREE COMPLETION

BACHELOR'S AND MAST£R'S DEAD L I N E

Ma 2003 August 2003 December 2003 Ja n u a ry 2004

November

1 , 2002 March 1 , 2003 May 1 , 2003 May 1 , 2003

There are fo u r degree- completion dates ( e n d o f s u m mer session,

fal l semester, J an ua ry, and spring semester) . Degrees are fo rm a lly

cunferred a t Augus t , Decem ber, and �vlay com mencements. S t udents w i t h january d eg re e d a te s a

e

ex p e c t e d to take part i n

the December com mencemen t . T h c ac t u a l datc o f g ra d u a t io n will be recorded on t h e pe r m a n e n t re o rds. Students who p lan to t r a ns fer back to Pa c i fi c Lutheran University for a d eg re e must ap ply fo r g ra dua t i o n P

A

e

l

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

before or

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

23


<1\

"" II:

'::I o "" u o

0:: a..

u w

o « u «

du ring the first semester of their j u n ior year so t.hat de fic i e n ci es

NON-CREDIT JNFORMAL STUDY

may be met before t hey leave campus.

To encou rage l i b e r al l ea rn i n g of all ki n d s . above and be 'and enrollment in cou rses lead in g t oward fo rmal degrees. the

HONORS

u n ivers i ty o ffe rs a va r ie t y 0 01 p o r l u n i t i s for in� rmaJ stud)!:

Honors Program: PLU o ffers its un ivers ity Honors Program to

studen ts seek i n g a spec ial a c ade mi c challenge in class w i th qually capable peers. Incoming fi rst - ye a r students may apply for a course of s t u dy that i n cludes a m i n imum of 1 6 hours o f honors-level courses. The p rogr a m centers o n the theme " Tak i ng Re ponsibility; Matters of the M ind, Matters o f the Heart" and i ntegrat es academic and experiential lea rn ing opportun ities, with the objective o f preparing partici pants fo r l ives o f s e rv i ce and servant l e ad e rship . See the Honors Pr o g ra m section of this catalog for fu rt h e r details.

Members of the academ ic community are e n c o u ra ged to v isit class!' which i n terest th em . No ee is barged for the p riv i l ege . D ing SL> re q u i res the perm ission of the instructo r. REGISTRATION PROCEDUlUlS S t u dents re u i te r by using Ba nn e r Web, a n o n l in e reg i s t r a t i o n

system. [ n a d d i t i on l O registering, B a n n e r Web a l so o ffe r s t u dents

ODors: D e g r e

grades are comb i n ed with PLU grades to determine eligibility. Physica.1 e d u c a t i o n a ct i v i t y course are not included in determin­ ing gra d u a t i o n honors. Dean's List: A D ea n's List is cre at e d at the end of each emester.

To be eligible, a stu den t must have attained a semester grade point average of 3.50 with a minimum of 1 2 g rad ed h ou rs. Honor Societies: E l ection to the Arete Society is a s pec ia l

recognition of a s tuden t's co mmit ment to the liberal arts to ge the r with a re c u rd of high achievement i n relevant course work. The society was o rgan ized in 1 969 by P h i Beta Kappa schularship in the l i beral arts. Student members are elected by the fac u l t y fellows o f the society each spring. B t h juniors an d se n i ors a re e lig i bl e ; h owever, the qualifications fo r election as a

j un i o r are more stri ngent. Students mu s t have: • attained a high gra de point average ( for se n i rs, normally above

3.70; for jun iors, normally above 3 .90); c o m p leted 1 1 0 credit hours in liberal s t u d i es ; dem unstrated the equivalent of two yea rs of c o l l e ge work in

forei g n la n gua ge ; co m plet e d on year of college mathematics ( i ncluding statistics or computer science) or fo ur years of college preparatory malh­ e m a t ics i n h i g h school and one college mathematics o u rse; and • completed a m i n im u m of th re e semesters in re s i nee at the

university.

Phi Alpha ( oc ial Work)

Pi Kappa Delta ( Forensics)

Ps i

• • •

oc cu rs d ur in g June or whetl,er s t u de n t s hegin in lh fal l or spring semester. Early regis tra lio n is o n d u c t e u by the Advi s i ng Office. Registf<ltion m ate ri a b are ent t all a.:cepted e nte ri ng students well in ad ilnce of t h ei r arri aI on c a m p us fo r their first semester. Most students meet i n person with registration c o u ns e l o r as they regi s ter fo r cou rses. S t ud e n l s may also regi s t e r by phone.

If a · t u de n l doe not wi h lO conti nue a course after th e add/ drop period, tb ·tudent m ust wilhdraw from t he com. t:. Tui t i on

iooal life and work o f a faculty member in his r her major discipline. A tuition credit a ccompa n ie s the appointment. I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

on

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE

Sigma T h e ta Tau ( Nursing) S igm a Xi ( c i e n ti fi c R esea r ch )

C

EARLY REGISTRATION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS Students � ho plan to re tu rn are encouraged to register. Ret u rn ing students will recei ve regist rat ion l i me appoint ments to reg ister or summer and fa U terms and for J -term and p ri ng term . Regislration dates a re determined b the number of hou rs. induding t ran f, r hours. co m pleted by the stu d e n l . S t udenLs may regis ter fo r eadl new term or summ r ses ion on or afte r th desi gn a ted da te.

January, depending

hi ( Psychology) Omicron Delta Epsilon ( Economics)

A

terms.

E a r ly re g islr a t i l) n fo r e n te ri ng s t uden t s

fellows are a ppo i n te d ann ually. These appointments are given to o u tstan d i ng se n i o r s tu d e n ts wi t h a view to encouraging rec ipi­ e n t s to c o n s i d er colle ge teaching as a career. An undergraduate fellow i s given a variety o f opportu n i t ies to sampl e the profes-

P

for those

STUDENTS

Undergraduate Fellows: A lim ited number of undergraduate

24

a

co u r�e at any t i me dur i n g the first len days �lr cia;; d uri n g a fu ll­ len g t h semest r. D u r i ng t he a d cl/d r ) p eriod, cou rse may be d rop p ed and tuition w il l be re fu nd ed in fu ll . In mos t cases, a dd in g a nd dropping Cdn be accom pl i -hed us i n g Ban n e r Web. See the Jan l lary term (lllrE SlI lIlI1Wr cata[og5 for the acid/drop periods

EARLY REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR ENTERING

The u n ive rsit y also has c h a p te rs of a n u mbe r of national honor soc ie t i e s o n campus, i n d u d i n g the following: • Alpha Ka p pa Delta ( Sociology)

a ccess final

Adding or Dropping a CoOl'se: A s l ude n t may add or dr

mem b ers of the faculty to encou rage and re c o g n i ze excellent

Alpha Psi Omega (Drama) Beta Gam m a Sigma ( B usiness) M u Phi Epsilon ( Music)

a class, check t hei r schedul s, :Ind grades. B ann e r Web may be ac cessed th ro ug h the PLU home page ( wwlI'.pill.erEu) . Stude nts m�y co nt a c t the S tu de n t Services Center w i t h regi strat i on qu e s l i o n . • tuuenls afC not offici a l ly enrolled u n t i l their regi tration has been cleared by the Sl ud.cIl l A cco u n t s O ni ce. • Stll del1t� re re,pon�ible fo r electing their oll rses . Advi so rs are available to as ist with phnning and w make ugges tlo ns . • Stu d e n ts should be t.horoughly a q uai n t cd w i t h a l l registra t ion h� d u le . m a t rials, in l ud i ll g the cu rre n t cata log a n d da Studenl , re abo e n co uraged t study carefu lly lh� r quire­ ments of all 'K ademic programs in which th ey may even tually decl, re a major.

the ab i l i l y to add or drop

3.50 fo r CIIm /aude, 3 . 7 5 for magna cum lau de, a n d 3 .90 fo r s u m m a C I I tr/ la ude. All transfer

designiJti ng lht'm a s guests o f t h e un i vers i t y.

same as credit fees.

ea rn a cumulative grade poi n t av rage of

fo r car

Visiting Classes:

with honors of cu m laude, mag /la cu m /au de, and s u m m a cu m laude are granted. A s tu de nt must

v os t

pe rm iss i o n of the i n s truc to r, on a n on - redit hasis . An auditor is no t held accoun table fo r exa m i na t i ons or oth r written work nd does not receive a rade. l f the i n stmctor ap p roves , the course may be entered lIpon the r a ns c ript as Judit. Auwl fees are t h e

Convocation o n the most highly q ua l i fi ed e n teri n g freshmen. Cer t ificate , which are mailed i n early May to high schools for pr entation to rec i p i e n t s , recog n ize ou ts t an di ng high school achievement and a n t ic ip a te sup e rio r performance at the university level. These awa rds have no mo ne ta ry value an d do n ot con s ti t u te a cep t a n ce into the Honors Program.

to use u n iver s it y fa d l i t ies fo r i ndepende nt �tudy rna apply t o the pr

Auditing Courses: 10 audit a cou rse is to e n ro l l , with the

Honors at Entrance: These honor are conferred at Opening

Graduation

Guest of Universil:}' Status: Any professional p�rson who wish

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

is not refunded. A $50 ad m i n istrat ive fe e i s c h a rged for any reg i s t r a t io n c ha n ge ft r lhl! a d d / d ro p peri od. Medical Withdrawal: St uden ts may also

co m p l e t el y w ithdraw from the un iver i t )' fo r a term fo r medi al rea ons . The s t ud e n t must provide written e i de n e from · ph YS i c i a n and J personal


exp lanatio n to tht' vice p l'esickn( and dean for student li fe . This

the last cia ' of las, i n any given term. If grail ted, t h e g rade of WM w i l l appear on the s tudt�n t's t ra n s c r i p t .

Official Withdrawal: To w i t h d raw offi ciall)" t h e �tude n t needs to obt ai.n u w ithdrawal [orm fro m the S t ude n t Services Center, fi l l in t b e fo rm, have t ilt! i nst ructo r �ib'l1 t ile fo r m, dnd s u b m i t the c o m p l e t d fo r m t' l I he S tudent Serv i c s C 'nter. Withdrawal forms must be 5L1brn itlt.'ci before th e end of the 1 2 th week. A iN grad\: will app ar n the studen t ' Lranscript. See the Jail/wry term and sulllmer cGla/ogs for the last date' 1 0 withdraw during those rerms.

Note: Credits earned by Advallced Placement-EllglisT, and tiollaT Bacmlaureate-English

the student's trauscript. I f i t can be ddcrmi neci that a student n ver attended a co ur e. the reg isL r a t i n will be cancelled witllout notation on the (Tanscript.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY

t u dt:n ts are enti tled to wi l bdr aw hono rabl)' from the un iversity i f I h ir rcwrd is sati fnctory an d all fi n a ncia l obl igati ns are sa tisfied , Partia l t uit i on refunds arc available. Refer to the Tu ition , m d Pees sectio n or this m ralog jor more injomlaticm.

2.

General University Requirements The u n iver i t y is comm iued t o pro iding a trong liberal arts base fo r all i ts ba c ca l a u re a t e degree progra ms. Acco rd i ngl y, i.n add i t i on to fulfilling ce rt a. i n minimum reqlLir m e nts , aU u ndergraduate student must atisfa to r ily co mple t e all general un ivers i ty requirements (G Rs l . 0 co urse used t o sati fy one GUR may be u d to satisfy ano t her, except l i m ited such use i n the Perpsect ive o n Diversity requiremen ts.

thl: student'> first year. This requireme nt must be met by all students entering PLU w i th fewer than 20 semester hou r . 1 a, lIlq u i ry Selllinar: Writillg (4 hours) - FW, WR:

though

may be usedfor elective credit, Studellts with officially writing COLlrses, including those in Washington State's RUI1I1ing Start program. ar� nonetheless eligible to enroll ill the writing seminar for credit. or they /JIay choose to lise their previuus credits to ;atisfy the writillg ;ell/illar requiremellt, l b. 1I1quiry Seminar (4 hours) - F : I nq ui r ), Seminars a r e courses specially desi gned for first­ year students, which will in troduce students to the methods and topics oJ study within a particular academic discipline or field. Inquiry Seminars also emphasize tbe acadmic skills that are a t the center o f the First-year Experience Program, Worki ng with other fi rst-year students i n a small-class setting that promotes act ive, seminar-s t),le learning, students p ractice fu ndamental skills o f l iteracy, thinking and community as they operate within that particular discipline, I n add i tion to ful filling major and m i no r requ i re ments, an I nquiry Sem i na r ma), ful fi l l no more than one G U R. Ie. Fir5t-year Jail ua r)' Residency Requiremellt (4 hours ) : All first-year students must e n roll i n a c urse during J-term, In addition to ful filling major or minor req u i rements. a course taken during J - term used to fulfill this [esidene), require ment ma), ful fill no more than one G UR ,

on

The Exumilled Life: I n to Un(erraillty (/1111 BCY(J lld The fi rs t - year p rogram provides a sup p ortivel ' ch a l l e n g i n g context in w b i h 0 begin the que t fo r, and ad e n t ure o f, a larger ision for l i fe , University educaLion i� about more than skills; a t P LU i t is about li b e ra t i ng t uden ts for crid al and com m i t ted Ii i ng, ombi ni ng we l l d vcJoped critical capacities w i th com passion and v is i o n for service in a multi cultural, ideologically plur I � odd. I n ad di t ion to orient t i n and adVising programs, the first -year program is c mposed of three req ui rements, One o f the two seminars must be taken i ll 1 111: student" first semester. F i rst-year program reqUlrements must be completed du ri ng

[l/teY/111-

do IlOt ..utisfy this requirelile-lIt,

transcripted college

wilildrawal The grade o f UW will appear

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS - ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 1 . Tbe First-year Experiencc

m

they

Unofficial Withdrawal: studenr who st ps attending a course before the end f the 1 2th week but does not withdraw ma), reeei e an un I ffidaJ

> ,., > o

These seminars focus on writing, th inking, speaking, and reading,The), i nvolve writing as a wa), of thinking, 0 learning, and of discovering and ordering ideas, Taught b)' ra Cldt)' fr0111 the un iversity's various departments and schools, these seminars are organ ized around t op i cs that engage students and faculty i n d ialogue and provide the opportunity to exa mine issues from a variel)' of perspectives,

m us t be comple ted i ll ' t i rn e J )' mall nl:[" and in no case latC[ than

"'II ::III a ,., m

o C ::III

m

..,.

Mathematical Reasoning ( 4 hours) - M R A course i n mathematics or applications of mathematics, w i th emp hasis on numerical and logical reaso ning and on using appropriate methods to fo rmulate and solve p ro b lem s. This requireme n t may be satisfied by a n)' 4 hours from mathemat­ ics (except Math 91 o r Math 99) o r by Computer Science 115 or b)' Stat istics 2 3 1 . This requirement may also be satisfied by the completion ( wi th at least a B average) of the equivalent o f fo u r years o f college preparatory mathematics ( t h rough mathematica l a na l y s i s or calculus o r equivalen t ) . In fu l fi ll i n g the mathematical reason i ng req u i re ment , students with documented d isabilities w il l be given reasonable accommoda­ tions as determined by t h e coordi nator for students with d i sa b i l i t ies and the appropriate fa ulty m mber i n consulta­ tion with the student. I n fulfi l l i n g the Math Reaso ning Requirement, students with documented disabili ties will be given reaso nable accomodations as determi ned by the Coord i n ator fo r Students with Disab i l i t ies and the approp riate t:lcult), member in consultation with the srudent.

3. Science aDd the Scientific Method (4 hours) - SM A science course that tea hes the met hods o f science, i llus­ trates i ts appl ications and l i m itations, and i n c l u d e s a l a b ora ­ tory component. At least o n e of the courses taken to meet l i n e 4 or 2 ( Core I , e) m u s t be a course i n which t h e ubject is natural sciences, i,e., physical or biological science.

4. Writing Requirement (4 hours) - W R All students m u t compl e te 4 cre d i t hours i n an approved w r iting course. F i rs t-year st ud e nt s sa t i s fy this requir ment through the I nquiry Seminar: Writing. S . Perspectives On Diversity ( 8 hours) A course in each o f the following two lines, a. Aiterllative Perspectives (4 hours) - A : A course that creates an awareness and understanding o f d iversity in the United States, d i rectly addressing issues such as ethnicity, gender, disabili ty, racism, or poverty. b. Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4 hours) - C: A course that en­ hances cross-cultural llnderstandings th rough exa m i nation P

A

C

I

F

i

e

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

25


11'1 w ac: ::::J C

CORE REQU I R E M E NTS ErrHER CORE ' Qa CORE II

FIRST-Y EAR E X PER IENCE (1 0- 1 2 HOUBS)

w

U o

WRIT 1 0 1

D..

I n q u i ry S e m i n a r (4)

-

I - Distributive and

Core

I n q u i ry S e m i n a r :

Disciplinary

W r i t i n g (4) - FW. W R

ac:

Art, M usic, Theatr \teToWH! Vi - :Ii

-F

fl{<,t-'jeoI �o UiWj ��s\d�n(.� t\equlTement t�)

Core II

(32 hours) (4) - AR

w

C <t u «

MR Science a n d the Sc i e ntific

(IS hours)

IN.'C. ' "

Wlet'rlod �4) - SWI Writing \4). u n less taken i n fi rst

INTC 1 1 2 - Li erty and Powe r

Pers pectives on Diversity

- Jl,uthmit'J and D i scovery - 1 1 (4) (4)

A nth ropo logy, H istory. or Political

M athematical Reason i n g (4) -

Contemporary World

l'hil osop'rly {I\) - 1'1-1 Re l i gious Studies (8) - R 1 , R2. R3

:E

- Internatlonal Core:

Integrated Studies of the

-11

Four 200-level thematic courses (1 6) - 12 One 3 00-leve l c o u r se (4) - 13

Science (4) - S 1

Economics, Psychology. S o c i o l ogy. or Soci al Work (4) - S2

year - WR

Cross-Cultural Perspectives

c. Rel igious Stud ies (8 h o u r s , 4 from each of two l i n es )

o f t h ree ways :

L B i b l i c al S t udies - R I 2 . C h ristian T h oug h t , H ist o r y, a nd E x p er ie n ce - R2 3_ I n tegrat ive and o m p arati ve Rel igiou' Studies - R3

focusing o n the cult ure of n o n - E u ro-American

societies; ( ii) a fore i g n l a n g uage course n u mbered 20 1 or above ( not sign l a nguage) used to satisfy the entrance re q u irem e nt , or c o m p l e t i on t h r o u gh the first year of college level of a foreign language ( not s i gn language) other than that used to sati -fy the f re i gn language entran e req u i re m e n t . (A forclgn language co m p l e te d t h roug h the second year of colleg level may also be u se d to - i l11 u l taJ1eously s a t i s fy O p t i o n l, or a co m p l e t i o n of a fo re ign language t h rou g h the first year o f col lege level may also be used to s i m u l t a n e ou s ly sa t isfy O p t i Q n I I of the C o l l c ge of Arts a n d Sciences req u i re me n ts [see bt'low j ) i or ( i i i ) p a rt ic i p a t i o n in a n a p p roved semester-long study a b road p rogram ( J a nu a r y term p ro g r a m s are eva l u a ted i nd ividually. ) Notr: 4 hOllrs of Perspectives 011 Diwrsit), courses I1/(lY be lIsed tn (" Ifill

Note: Transfer tlldellr;- fllterillg <lS jUlliors or se/1ior arc rcquirrd to take 4 selllrster hOllrs of religiOIl (fro III lilies I or 2) IIIlicss preswtillg 8 transfer !tollrs of religioll /rolll <ltlter reg iollally tlccredilcd college.; o r 1Illiversilies.

d. Social Sciences ( 8 h ou r s, 4 from each l i n e )

L Anthropology, H i s t o r y, or Political S c i ence - 5 [ 2 . Eco n o m ics, Psy ch o l o gy, Socio logy, o r Social Wo rk - 52 e_ Natural Sciences, Co m p uter Sc i e n ce, M J t h c l11 a t ic�

( 4 hours)

Contemporary \'\iurld

ulliversity reqll irell1ent. The (emaillillg 4 hOllrs must be

The511 4 hOllrs IIWY, ho we ver, satisfy (/ rClj llircl1/C/l r in the or m i l l or_ jllllior and SCllfor t m n�rer studellts sholl either tllke OIlC Perspectives 011 Diversity colll's e (4 credh IlOlIrs) II I PLU thllt does I l o t silllullilllcolIsly fu ljill (Hlollzer gellem l un i versity requircmellt, or they shall sholV thot they h(lve sOlisfied I,oth the A l terJ1lI Iive Pa,pectivcs I1lld Cross - Cllltumi i'erspectivl'S lilies o f the rflj uircl7lellt. major

GENERAL REQumEMENTS AND L I MITATI ONSALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES: ( I I cre d i t h o u r referred to in l istings of re q u ire men ts are eme -ter homs.) L Total HOllrs and Cumlliative CPA: A min�imu m of 1 2 8 ernester hours mllst be co mple t e d with a gra d e point average of 2.00 ( 2.50 in t h e Schools of Business and Educat ion ) _ 2 . Upper-Divisio/l oL/ i-ses: A m i n im u m of 40 se m es t e r h o u rs m u s t be completed from co u r se s n u mbered 300 or a b o ve . Cou rses fro m two-year i n s t i ­ tutions a re not c o n s i d e r e d u p p e r - d iv i s i o n rega rdless o f ubject matter p a r a l le l s ( regardless of major mine r excep t io n s ) . At least 2 0 of the m i n i m u m 40 emester hour o f u pper-division work m u s t be take n a t PL . 3. Final Year in Residence: The final 32 semester hours o f a tu d en t 's program IllUst be con1pleted in residence at PL . No t ransfer credit ma)' be a p p l ie d during a tuden t's fi nal 3 2 hours i n a d e gree p ro g r a m . ( S p ec i a l p rograms s u c h as 3 - 1 , 3 - 2 an d semester a n d J an u a ry term exchange s t u d )' a re exc l u d e d fro m t h i s l i m i tat i o n . )

0_ Physical Education (4 hours) - PE Four d ifferent ph ys i cal

education a c t i v i ty courses, including Ph ys i c al Education [ 00. O ne hour of credit may be earned through a pp ro ve d sports p a rticipation. A l l activit ies are g rad ed on the basis of A , Pass, o r Pail. 7_ Senior Seminar/Project ( 2 h o u r s as designa ted by the academic u n i t of the stud�!1 t's major) - 'R A substa n t ial p roject, paper, p ra c t i c u m , o r i n t c rn s h i p tbJt culmina tes a n d a d va n ces the p ro gram of an a ca d e m i c major. The end pro d u c t must be pres e nted to an o p en aud ience and cr i t ica l ly eva l ua ted by facu l t y i n t h e .tuden t's field_ \Vith a p p roval f the st udent's m aj or d part m en t, interdiscipLinary

capstone courses such as the lobal Studies Research Seminar or the Honors Program Challenge Experience mal' fulfill this requirement. 8 . One of Two Alternative Cores: Core l OT Core 11

4.

I: Tile DistTjLnl t�ive Core (32 hOtlrs)

Arts/Literat ure

(8 h o ur s , 4 fr m

each

(4 h o u rs ) - PH

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

m aj o r must be co m p l e t e d a detailed by each school or d e p a rt men t . At least 8 semester h ou r s mllst be t ak e n i n residence. Depa r t m en ts, d i v i s i o n s , or s ch o o l s m.1Y s e t h igher re si d enc y requirements_

LT

5. Grades for Major Cou rses:

Note: Logic courses d o II at flilfill

26

Academic Major: A

line)

1 . A r t , Mus ic, o r Theatre - R 2. L i terat u re ( E ngl ish or Languages and L i teratures) b. Ph ilosophy

(28 h o u rs )

a. INTC I I I , 1 1 2 Origins o f the Contemporary World (8 hours) - I I b. Four 200-level INTC co u rs e s ( i 6 hours) - 1 2 : N o r m a ll y taken in the second and t h i rd years. May include ap p ro ve d program o f study abr ad. S t u d e n t s select fo u r courses subject to ap p rov a l o f the I n ternational Core ,orn m i tlee. c. One 300-level l TC c o u rse ( 4 h o urs) - 1 3

l-eqllirC/IIent.

3.

- NS

Core II: The Interna t io n a l Core: In tegra ted Stlldies of the

a (all"" t/ml do> IlOt sil/witollcollsly fulfill OilY otlrer general liniversity

ore

PE

(2-4) - SR

o f other cul t ures. T h is req u i re m e n t may be s a t i s fi e d in one

another general

(4) -

S e n i o r Sem i n a r/P roject

Selenc s. (omputer Science. or Mathematics (4) - NS

C O U fse

-(

Physical Education

Natur a l

( i) a

R

th is A

AJI course s counted toward a major or minor must be

rC(/l(iremeHt. N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

(6-8)

A lte r n a t ive Perspectives - A

T

Y


comp leted w i t h grades

f

.-

or

h i g h e r ;lnd \\Iilh

a

cU l11uliltivc

grade po i nt average of 2 .00 or high r in t h o se courses. D parl ments, J ivision�, O f schools may set h igher grade

REQ UIREMENTS ALTERNATIVE PERSPECTIVES

requ i remen ts.

6. 44 Hour Limit: Not more than 44 hours e a rn e d i n one deparl ment ma}' 10 the SA or B d grees.

AI rH A. n-f ANT[-1 ANT[ 1

be

applied

7. Mllsir EIIsembLes: Non-music majo rs fil ay count toward graduati n requi re

m e n t n t more t h a n 8 st.lneste r hours in music ensembles. R.

orrCSpOlI(iellce/[x/(,IISioll

c u rses:

A m a x im u m of _4 hours i n accred i ted corresp o n de n ce o r extension studies lll ay b e cred i te d tOlV a rd degree requ i rem e n ts , co n t i ngen t on a p p roval by t he Reg istra r's ffiee. 9. CO lll m /miry College Cou rse;: A maximum nf 64 h o u rs w i l l be accepted by tran fer from a region al ly accred i ted community col lege. All

co m m u n i t y

l,;ollege co u rse;, a re transf rred as lower-di i s i o n

1 0 . Physicol Educa tion

toward

LII

ph

ical t:du arion activity courses

[excluding

B PE wit h certifi cat ion ] , and B PE degrees) m u s t m e e t Option I . i l , o r IU below. a lHlida t�s fo r the BA i ll ngl i s h , for t h e BA in Education w i th c n ce n t ration in English, for the BA i n Globa l Srudie�, for the BBA i n I nterna t i o nal B us iness, and fo r elect ion to the Arete So iet )' lllUSl mcct O p t i o n 1 . ompletion o f n e oreign bnguage t h rough the . econd year

may ,l isa be met by complet ion f fo u r yea rs of high school ·tudy in ne fo reign language or h igher, or by sat i s factory scores on a with g ra d e s of profi iency examinati n administ(;r(;d by the PL Depart­ m n t f Language. a n d Lit rat U re5. of coUege level. T h is op tion

II.

o m p l e t i on of one fo r<'ign Iall"uage other t h a n t h a t llsed to sat isfy th

oreign language

the first year

0

entrance

req u i rc:'ment t h rough

col lege level. T h is o p t ion may also be met by

sat isfactoqr scores

on a

p roficien cy

exa m i nat ion adminis­

tered by the PLU Depa r t me n t o r Languages a n d Litera t u res.

m. Completion of 4 se mester hou rs in h istory, l i terature, or lan guage ( at the 20 1 leve l , or at ,In)' level i ll a language ollter than t h a t used to ilt isfy the foreign l a nguage e n t rance requirement ) in J d cl i t i o n to course ap l i e d to the general u n iversity requ irc:'men ts, (wJ 4 semester h o u r., in ymbolic logic, mathematics (courses numbered l OO or above), cc mp uter cience, or st , t i s r i cs in add i t i o n to courses app l i ed to the gener 1 wliV\!r ity requirements. o u r es us d to s t isfy e i th e r category of Opt ion II I of the CoUege of ArtS and S iCllce rey uircmcnI rna n t also 11(' used t o sat isfy general u lciversity req u i re.mel1 l s .

Lnflguage merit:

Co,u-s,�work alld (he Perspect i ve.; a l l DiversilY Req u il"

A fo reign la nguage course n u m bered 2 0 1 0 1' a b o e u s e d r u

at is fy p l i o n I , or comple t io n of a fore ign lan g u age th rough the fir�t ye�u of college levd w.cd 0 sati �' O p t i o n I I , may h lIS d s i m ultaneously to sati,fy the Per,pect h'es on D ivers i r )! requ i re­

ment.

cou rse i n

.1Il t urc P. M .1I1d of I he N!)rlJ1IVcSt 0 ·t �ullures a n I Peoples of :Iti"" Mlh Americ.t Native Americ"n H"altb The A n lhro p o l ogy of Contemporary America Jew ish Cultu r e 1 lo'ikt.,; C u l t u n d [ ) j :\l.ov�q in I l nwa j i E!ll nie Grou!'s /<'lil l1<lging Cu ir u r;i1 f) i ver�il )' ender , I l 1d Commul1ic; l t ion

Ameri a n ign Language m a y b.:

'ed to s a t i fy t h e Alternative Perspec t i es line, and fureigll lanouar:;r COlll''C ( S ) ( n t sign) may b e used to s at i s fy t h e ross-Cu l t ura l Perspectives u

line Cee above).

e m p hasis on

F '

FD 365

H I 5T 357 H I ST 359

HIST <\60 I NTC 2 3 1 INTC 247 NURS 365 P H FD

10

Body I mage

P H E D 362

Healing

PHI L 220

Wom e n and Phi losoph)'

Arts of I h e

o n IT! o c: ::u IT! VJ

M i n d a n d Body

Worksh p on Alternative Psychology of \ Omen

PSYC 40S

PSYC 4 74 R E Ll 257 R ELl 35 1 RFLl 354 RF.Ll 357

Perspective.

hristiall Theolo )'

inrrch

H islor), Studies

Theological Stu .Iics Major Rdif.lOUS

R E LI 368

fClnini51 and

Sll;N 1 0 1

Sign language

5 1 �N 1 02

Si;!n Language

Thinke.rs. Texts, Jnd ( ;enres Tlwo]og ie.

Womanist

Am rican SocictT Social I'robkm F a m i l ies i n the Americas SCX� Gendt'r, �lnd Society Ja n u a r y o n the H i l l T h e Latino Experiences i n

SOO 1 0 1

240 50(1 362 SOO 440 S CW lil l S PA N 34 1 SP!' ! ) 1 9 5 WMS 1 0 1 SOC[

.S.

I n d i v i ci l l a i s with Disabi[ilies I n t r o d u c t i u n to \

omen'> Studie,

ART. MUSIC, OR TH EATR E - AR

ARTD

H i tory of 'v estern

Art 1 or W�,tern An I T De�ign 1 : Fundam nt.Lls Black and W h i te P ho tograph y Cera m i I

AI TD 1 80

I l isrory

ARTO 1 96

A RTD 226

ARTD 231)

ARTD 250 A RT D 260 ARTD 296 A RTD 26 A R rll 330 ART D 3 3 1 A RTD .,50 A R m 300

J"uJplllr. I

I )raw i n g Dc�ign I I : Co ncept CQlor Pho tograpl,y lntc rmcdiate

Cer;]mics I I

The

rt of t h e H o o k I

' C li l pt uro: I I

Life Drawi n g

ART0 365

Pa i n t i n g I

ARTD

Prin t m a k i ng

370

Modem

ARTD _

I

Art

Sllldic� i n A r t Hbtory

90

Ullders/<Itldillgs Regarding All

A RT I ) J98

L Je,ign: I l l ustration

A RT ! ) 426

E!cClroni

IJnaging

A RT l l 4.10 A tnD �rJ5

Ceramic, I I I

MU l l 470

Pr i n t:ma.k ing I I

Pai n t i n g

j \ RT I l 4 9 1 A R lU 492 M SI IOI P

A

C

I

rld

Drawing

ARTtJ 1 8 J

ARTO

'ontempnr:u,' \\I,

Design i n lhe

J t6

ARTD 1 60

departmental sec/ions of Ille

tlu lin its (illn by till' con/lnitta overst'ci/lg lIlt' glHlfrni lltlivas i ty ""111ir�­ If1mts, (3) CO/lrses offered throllgh carrf!5[>ollricn.c. nfl- litle, lind indepm­ dellt swdie3 are !lo t accepted to .lii/fill the care rC</llireJII!!1/t III Litaatll re. Philosophy, or Rdigious Stlldies.

." ::u

I't livl's

itcrnat i ve Per

J>HED 3 1 5

rksign: G raphic, I

ollrside 'hose 11//1£5 may COIIll ' lor tIle rcquirelllCIIl w/,,'n app roved botll lIy

n

Fcrni llbl I'proJ hes to Li tl'fature AmeriCiln [thnic Literatures Big Fat Lies The Aginll Experience Slave r )' in lhe Americas Afric<ln meri an Hi'lr>r H i. tory of Wo!l1¢n i n the n i ted State> I lolocaust: Destruction of the European Jews Wesl and Non hw<'>t Gender. Sexual i t )'. and Culture The C u l tures of Rac ism Cultu rally Congruc:. n t Heal t h Care 50 iocc o n o m i (' I nfl uences on Health in America

I . 34 1

ENGL 374

ARTD 396

Rcqu ircl1It'nls: ( J ) COHsult prmiw/nr atfilor? fur detaIled spccijiallioll of (OUI'S(,S ,ilM corm' for ,hese r q "ircment . (2) For t/II'tSC lirl�s of /he gl'lternl llll i versity requir.:mell's lViii,,, refer 10 academic discipline or Ill/irs, selected CO",. es

m

nt

Pr

Wom£ n's l . i lt.:raturc

H I H 360

the Co!! g or Arts a nd . cie oces ( a l l BA, as, BARe . BAPE

A

Peoples

HIST 305

graduat io n .

-

P racticing Anthropology: Makah

rielioll:

H

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS In addition to m ee t i n g th e n t ra n c e requ i re me n t in fo r ign Iangua'l:' ( two years 0 high school lan guage, o n e yea r of college language, r demonstra ted e q uivalent p roficienc y ) ' ca n d ida tes in

I.

1 9� 230 33U 3 3 II TH 334 A NT H 338 A 1 1 34 1 A l' l ; 360 ANTH 30 1

HEED 162

d it.

DImes:

No more than ei"ht l -h may be counted

r

l> n l> o

COURSES THAT M HET THE UNIVERSITY-WIDE

Spcc ial

II

Projecbl f ndependcn t S t u. d y

Design: Workshop I n t rod u c l i o n F

i

e

L

U

T

to M u_ i c

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

1

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

27


'"

w cc �

Q

w

U 0 cc

M US I 1 02

Mu,ic ,Inu Technology The Arts of

I n t rod u c t i o n to

16

Bas ic Musi

M U' 1 1 2 1 M USI I 2 2

Th e ory I

Keyboarding

S[ 1 24

I:.ar

M U S I 1 26

Ear Tr a i n in g I I

I

MU 1 20 1 -2 1 9

Priva tl' l nSlIuction

M USI 22 I

Keybo a rd Pro IClency

M U 1 225

Th e ory I I J :uz Theory Laborotory Ear Tra L n in g I I I

M U S I 226

Ear Tra i n i n g I V

M U S I 2 34

History I

M US I 223 M US[ 224

M US l 3 2 7

History I I

M U . I 334

20th-Century Music

MUSI 336

Making Music nalyzing Mu,ic Fundamentals of Musi

M USI 34 5

Co nd uct i ng I

M USI 346

Conduct i n g I I

01111 a n )'i n g

Ac

MUSI 352

Organ I m p rovi5J tion Hi,tor

M US)

Ea r l y

358

M USI 36 0

M US I 36-

n ive rs i t y S i nge " C ha p I Choir

M U 1 361i

O p ra Workshop

M US! 368

Choral

niversit)' Jill.7. Ensemble

M US I 3 7 8 M U S I 380

Unive rs i t y Symphon>' Orchestra

MUSI 38 1

Chamber

M

SI 383

I n tensiv I'

MUSl 390 M US I 39 1

Intensive Performance

l ' nva te I nst ru c t i o n

M U S I 'IOI-4 1 9

Ad

MUSI 4 2 1 M U 1 427

an ced

K tboan.l

dvanced

M US! 430

P i an o Li ter a t ure I I

M USI 445

Co n d u c t i n g I I I

MUSI 446

Co nduct i ng [V

Piano

Pedago gy I

M

Piano

Pedagogy I I

5] 4 5 2 MUSI �53 THEA 1 5 1 T H EA 1 62

Oral I n terpretation

250 THEA 35 1 THEA 3 5 2

Adv�nced Acting

FR E N 4 3 2 '

20th-

Eleme n tary Cerman

20 1 '

I n term dinlC

GERM 202'

I n termediate.

G I:. R I' ,1 10 1 '

COlTIl'osi[ion

THEA 359

Acting for

THEA 363

History of

F

t

C

L

U

T

-H I '

422' 20 1 '

109

Work

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

Y

onver�;Jtion

G�rman Civili7al ion Since 1 750 Adva nced Comp o , i t i on and Convcr;ution , 'rman Literature From the Enlightenment lOth- �entury Li e. rm a n Literature El m ... n t a ry Gree.k I ntermediate Greek East Asian 'OC idie.. I s l a m ic M i d dle.

EaSt lO

Worl l

H I ST 336

Southern Afri a

H I ST 3 3 7

The Hist

338 339

l iST 34-1

IN

245

INT

246 272 101, 102'

1 94

Perspec tives: The

H I ST 220 H I ST 2 3 1 I I lST 335

r

to Rea l i s m

I n term'ti i clll! Greek

Mndem WMld I l istor)'

I.AT

T

ompo!'i l ion anll

G rman -ivilizatinn to 1 750

HI T 2 1 5

LANG

the T h e a t re : Aeschylus t h ro u g h Turgcniev

ennun ,,"d Conversation

G lobal

HIST 4%

the Non - Actor

H

21'

erman

H I�T 2 1 0

I

Actor at

of � rrnc h Li teratU Tc rrend1. Litera t u re ,('nfury I ren h I.ikral lire

G E RM 1 0 1 , 1 02 '

HIST 340

I ntermediate Acting, The

M" te r l ' i ccc s

_Olh- enlury

I l IST

Stage L i h ri ng

Ma t rpi ce, of Frcn h Li terat u re

rREN 43 1 '

HI

tage Makeup

357 TI-f THEA 358

I

of Literature

Stage M onagem e n t

THEA 356

C

Fil m

Fu n da men t a ls of Acting

T I IEA

A

CiVIlizat ion und LliltUl"e

REK

History of American F i l m

THEA 24 1

P

32 1 '

I

H i ' to ry f Fo re ign

Third World

French L iteratu re and Film of t he Americas

42 1 '

I I

THEA I 3

tive

Inter mcdi,lte French

FRE

' R EK 202'

In t roductio n tn Theatre

Tl i EA I 60

Cl1TTlpar

StTategics

FRE

G R E K 1 0 1 , 1 02'

Stage Te h nolngy

ransla t i o n

lo pm en ! :

ompos i t io n and C(l\1ver�ation

CE M

Vocal Peuagogy

[ onomie Dc"

COmposit i o n a nd CqnvcrsatiCln

H I ST .05

MUSI 4 5 1

:1",-1 C()nvers.l!ion

302'

P ia no Literature I

M US I 43 1

22 1

GERM

rchest ration/Arranging

os it i o n

hinese L i terature i n

FREN 30 1 '

Ij E R 1 40 1 '

Skills

Pe.-,.pectiw. on Chinese him

Com

I nkrmedia te rrendl

R E N 20 1 "

,ERM 122'

E. n se m ble Tou r Study: Co nserva t o ry Ex p " r ic n cc

r n lt-r mcd ia te Ch i llest

FREN 202'

, L 43

GHR 1

rfo r m a n ce Stuc.Jy:

MilrriJge, Fum i l y,

FREN l O t , 1 02 '

G 'HM 302 '

Ensemble

P i a no Ensemble

Si ckness,

F i ct io n : Em p h a s i s on Cro,s- u ltu ra l Pers p ec t i ves Post- '<lIon i:t I I it 'ra t u re V()ic� of Diver ity: Post- -"Ionial L itera t u re ,,"d Th en r y Elementa ry h nch

G ERM

Laboratory nsernble Vocal Jazz E.nsemble Jau

M V S I 376

34 1

FRfN 422"

nion

Cnncert Band

MUS! 375

37 1

H�E

W i nd Enseml le

<\US1 370 M US I 3 7 1

27 1

rRE

n i versi t )' 'horille

M U S I 363

CHI

I

ni v er Sl ty Men's .horus

M U51 362

n c iellt F m p i re

J n termediule -h lnese

E

' h o i r of the West

61

of

202'

E G 2[6

M us i c L a ho ra to ry

rc h aeolo!',)

Politic". a n d Revo l u l i o n

CH I

LNGL 233

of Mu, i "I Theater

La\\",

Mad l1l'_ ', and Health .I nd K i l1S h i p Gods, Mugi c, and MImI., E lementa ry Chinese

HI

010 Vocal L i terature

M US I 354

M U S!

Education

A n rh ropol ogy and Media Th

A N T H 380 NTH _ 8 5 A T I r 3::12 CI [ I ( 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 " C H ) ' lll l '

C H i t1 00 I '

PracLicum

MUSI 3 5 1 MUSI 3 5 3

1 1 370

ECON

Electronic Musl

349

355

TH

ANT!" 1 3 7 5

Research i n g Music

M USI 3 40

M 51

A A

Composition

M US l )33

M U SI 3 37 M U S I 3 33

28

Training

M US I 1 2 5

Creative Dwmallcs

C ' Sl udent' m w o m 'el the -ros�-c u l t u ra l l" rspcctiv('s req u i re. m e n t 1.»' takin� a 2 0 1 or h igher�le.vel , uu rse in t h e l a n gu,ISl' llbed to satisfy tbe a d m i$si o n req uirement . or � cred i l5 In " lanF;uage 1I0t prev iou ,ly st ud ied. TH 1 0 2 IJll roullcri l1l 10 Human Cultu r,,1 i)i r.i l y TI I 2 1 0 Glub,,1 Per'rec r i vcs: The Wo rl d i n Ch a nge Peo p l es ot latin America TH 3 3 6 TH }40 The nrhropology f Mri ,I Pacific hl a nd ultllre, ANTH 42 I::il5 t _" a n ultures NTH 343 ANTI I 345 ntempordry (hinJ A l n-H 350 WOlllen and Men ill Wor l d C u l t ures

Keybo a r d i n g

M

P!.IY D i rec l ion

CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPEcnVES -

Keyboardilll!

clnd Cu l t u re I Ke ybo a rd ing [ I

M

458

TI I F A

I

Fund,ltllcntais I I

Musi

51 1 20

MUS I 1

Q « u «

candinavia

Music of

I'vlusic Fundamentals

no

:E

454

MU 1 1 06 51 1 1 3

I"he;Jt re: Ibsen t h rough to the Presc nt

o�t ume [ lc.�igl1

hina

M USI I I I IU I 1 15

of the

cenle Desl�n

M USI 1 04

'1

Hi.tory

H i.story of Jau

M U S I 1 05

U

w

nderstanding t-Iusic th rough ,"kln d y

M U S I 1 03

Modern La t i n

War

in Change

mcrican H istory

I I In

h i n" and

Lat i n American H story:

and

World

Japan,

1 93 [ - 1 945

e n t ral America

the Caribbean

q

of Mexi 0

10dern Ch i na Revo l u t ionary C h i n a Modem Japan

The ndl!!> In Lati n A me rican History Se m i n ar. The Tl l l rd World H istory ,Ind I'er>pectives on D ·velnpme n t Cases i n [ evelopmelll I .i tera t u r and oci,11 Change in Lat.in .'\ lllericJ E I ITIcntary Llt i n


LA!" 20 1 ' LM 2 0 2 ' ' IUS I 1 0 5 I USI I 06 .\- I U S I 1 2 0

I n lermediate· Latin I n ler mcd i a t

[ il l i n

of Ch i na Mu" jc nf SClOdinavia Mu,jc .1 nd Cll I t t I TC

The Arts

Comparative Legal System>

..

The

RELI 1 3 2 R E U 232 REU 233 REI.! 234

The Religion, of East A. i n

Tht' B u d d h i s t Tra d i t ion Th� Rel i gi ons l,f China Tht: Re l i ions of Jap:ln

RE Li 2 3 5

I s l o m i' Trad i l ions

RE U 237 RLU 392

Judaism Guus Magic, and Moral,

�OC1 3 1 0

l a ma i c a n So� ie[}'

- PA N 20 [ ' SI'A

202 '

Elementary

j.lan i sh

I'REN 421 FREN 4 3 1

S pan ish

SPAN 32 1 '

Civilization

SPAN 322" S PAN 325' SPA, 3 3 1

L .iviliul l iol1 and . u l t ur e IntroOutiion to H i spanic Literary StllJics I nt� tlsive S pa n i s b in L a t i n l\maiC' J A dvanced Sp.Il1; ,h Grammar Mas ter pieces of pani,h I i l c ra i llre 2 0t h -Cent ury L i teratu re nf �pain Special loplcs i n pan,sh LlIc.rdt u rc anJ C u lt ure Latin American l . i tera l i re, 1 '192- 1 8 88

SPA

42 1 '

SPAN

·L2

SPAI SPA

423' 4

I'

SPAN 433'

I ntens i ve

:lllJ C Tllpus i t ion and C : u l t t1 r� 0 Spelin

Crammar

Lalin American

FRESHMAN WRITING SEMI NAR - FW " R I l I !) 1

Inquiry Semi l13 N Wri l i n g

INQUIRY SE MINAR -

F

the

Co urses that meel l his req uiremem arc i ndicated in

Class . c h e dul e .

INTERNATIONAL CORE: ORIGINS Of THE MODERN WORLD

III l NTC 1 1 2

I NTC

lnd Pa-vcr

INTERNATIONAL CORE: 200-LEVEL COURSES

INTC 2 2 1

-

Authority and Dis-owry I . i hert)'

-

perience ofW"

The

12

Prospects iM War a n d Pea G nder, S�,u ;ili ty, Topics

in Gender

and C ul t u re

INTC 242 [NTC 244 C 245 I NTC 246 I

TC 247

En f8Y,

World

nntl Pollution Hunger, and P(lVe rt)'

Post -Colo nia l Issues

l-fist,)ry "-nd Per,pe ,·tive� Case� in D"vd o p ll1e n t The Cu ltu res 01 Racism

on Development

- 13 Sy,tems and

INTERNATIONAL CORE: 300-LEVEL COURSES

lNTC 326 I C 327

he

Qu es t for

' ; I "hal Justice:

Rt',.l i i l )·

Core I I Conve�ation.'

E GL 2 1 3

TGL 2 1 4 ENGL 2 1 S ENG L 2 1 6 E N� L 2 1 7 E GL218

Chine,e Lilerature i n Tra l1,Lr t i o n Mast er pic eS

of EU ru�WJ1) Ijlcr,!lurc

Class ic a l M yth o log y l' pies in Lite r a t u re: Themes JnJ

tion Fiction: f'll p hasis u n Cruss,Cultural Perspectiv � Fiction: E mp ha�i , on .ltnn" t i v ' Per>peC l i ves Fi

Drama

ENG L 230 E. G L D I NGL 2 3 2 E GL 2 3 3

COn1empor,uy u t c Ia t u re

GI. 134

Env iron men ta l Literature

E

uthors

Pnetr

�astcrpieces

of

Eu ropea n Litera t ure

Wome n's J .iler3 l u re Post-Col o n i al utero t ure

." ;a o n m C c: ;a m VI

Chaucer En gl ii>h Renaissance l . i u.'rn l uI T

Re,tor,lIi n ,lnt! 1 8r h - .cntury Lite ra t u re RomanLic,nd ic to n a n I iter-li ure 20"'-Cel1tu r y 13 ri t ish L i tera t u re

Stud ies in

A m e ric a n Literature.

20th -Cen tu ry

American

t 820- 1 920

lootry

20th-Ce n t u r y A m e r ic"n Fiction and Dram" Am""ic"n Ethnic L i terature.,

Scminar: Author Seminar: Theme, Genre French Litt:ru t u r < und F i l m s nf the

Americas

Ma"t<!rl'iecc of French Utern t u re

Masterpie es 0 French L i ter" t u re 20'" · :entuc), French Li t�rutur 20'b-Cen l u r y French Literature (;erma n l .it era l ure From the F.nlisht� n nlcnt to 20'"·Cen t ur ), G erma n L i terature Lit erature J n d SOC 'E't)' in ,\i !olienl E urope Li ter;rture and Sod,li Change in L1tin J\mt:riGl

Realism

Masterp,eces of ' can dj n av ian Literature

Ibsen

a !lei StrinJberg

201 -

e n ( u r- y ) a n d i n�l\' j a n Literaturt:

i n t rod Uctio n I n Hisp�nic Litera r y Studies The b t i n " Experiences in t he U.S. \I'l terpi ces of Span�h L iLeratur< 2()' , C en t u r \' Literature of Spa,n SI" 'i,,1 '[('pies in S J' a n i sh l.iter a t u re and Cu l t u re L a t i n }\l1lerican L i terat ure, 1 49 2- 1 8� H

20ltl-Century L a t i n American Literature Special 'Iilpics "l I i n American l.ilera t u re . nd Culture

MATH E MATICAL REASONING - M R

E ll ECO 343 M ATH 105 MATH 1 0 7 1ATI I I I I

Col Jege Mgebra

M AT I I I 1 2

PI�ne Trigonometry

S()lve I t Wit h th" o ll1 J.l uter Ope r a t i o ns Resea rch

CS

Mathematics or P 'rsonal Fi na nce Mathematical

123

Explorations

Modern Elcl11enl<lry Mathematics

and ell ulus, All I n t ro d u ction ,Nmetr), anu Fundi n

Linear Models Analytic

I n t roduct,on t o CaIC1d u s

MATH 1 52

C a l c u l u s fl

M AT H 20)

His\ O r )'

or /VLrlhcl11aticS

M ATH 230 M Ti l 241 .\1ATH 245 MATH .53 M An ... 1 7

Ma trix Algeb ra

M .\TH 3 2 1

Geometry

1 'II-!

Ap pli ed

Stari,ri

s fo r Scienti.sts

O i , c rc l e Stru tun: Mult ivariable Calcul us I n l To u u c r i o n to

Proof in

Linea r Algebra Ilrief IntroduUio"

33 1

340 M 1'H 34 1 1 TI l 34 2 \01 JH 3411 ;-'·I ATH 35 1 M:\TH 356 "lATH 1R 1 (VI A n i B J to.1AIH 455 MATH 4S0 STAT 2 3 1 M ATH

LITERATURE - LT BIN 3 7 1 'LAS 23 1 CLAS 250

11

n

rh�()ry

English Medieval L i l e r a t ur e

M ATH 1 2 8 'I ATH 1 4 0 M TH 1 5 1

Resour <5,

Pnp ula t io n ,

�nd

S PI\ I 4 2 2 SPAN 423 S P,\ 4 - ' I ·Pt\. . 4 3 2 SPAN 4jJ

1I\ I " H

I masin g the Self lmaging the

Voices

S PAN 4 2 1

Spedal lopic s i n lali n ,\merican Li tera ture a n d C u l t u re

Approilches tn L iter.llure of Diversi t y : Post-Colon ial L ite ral u re

Femini;.t

FREN 43 2 C ER NI ,!2 1 ( ; ERM 422 l.. ANG 27 I LANG 272 S ,AN 250 SCA. 4 2 1 'lCAN 422 Sf> .N jL5 S P IN 34 1

in L ati n .\ mrrica

Adva" c

40 [ '

421

I ntermediate Spa njsh

SPA N 2 3 1 SPAN 30 1 '

SPA

22 1

m

FJir), Tal." �nd h , n l JS),

362 ENG!. 67 EN<'; 3 7 1 E NG L 372 ENGI 373 ENG I 374 E GL 4' I ENGL 452 FR E

J> n J> C

� pcci " 1 TOJli c.� in �hild rel1's Lile ratu re

G l 311 1

FREN

i n I . i t er a t u re

Lirera l u re

Ch ild ren', l ite ral u , e

ENL�L

p'll1ish

I ntermedi .Jte

Rritish I ra d i t i ons in

ENC L 343

Rel'gions of Suuth Asia

RElI 1 3 1

1 0 1 . 1 02 '

Sn'lkespc,rr c

FN � I 15 1 EN<;L 352 ENG!. 353

I n termediate

SPAN

ENG L3 0 1

Nnn cgian Norwe� ian Con .... ersatiun �InU 'ornposition Ad\' ;tn�cd . , l I ,vers,n ion and CO!l1pu,ition C u l t u re and Health in Jama i ca Global Perspect ive>: The Wor l d in 'hangc I n lu medi " ,

i'orL RS 395 POI1 2 1 0 POLS 3 8 1

A I Tlt'Jic:ln Tr3r lil iYIl:'

lO r G [ 333 I� N G I jJ4 F. (-;L 3.15 E CL 34 1

Norwegi'l n

ElementM

I,. G I 24 1 ENGI 25 1

l 'robab i l it )' and Stat i S l icri Theory A p p l ied Regression Analysis

N u mer i c a l

A na l ys i s

Ab�tract Alg e b ra Malh cl11;} t i c,,1 Auolysis OpiC6 in

M .l I J 'C1l1a l ics

I n t roductory Sta t ist i cs Applied Statistics

I

VA

Sem i n a r in Problem .'o l v i n g

l n t rodu

C

and A

D iJfcre n t ial Equalio",

STAT 24 1

A

1 0 Probability

I n t roduction t o Mathematical Statistics

STAT 34 1 STAT 342 ST T 343 STAT 344

P

Mathema t' i c s

for Scien tisLS

tion to M�th t'l1latical Statiltic.s

Probabi l i t ), Op erations

and ';tali ,Li ca l Re'ea rch

Theo ry

EC{) [1ometri s

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

29


VI

W CIC

STAT 3 4 � Sf 1 49 1

Appl ied

R�g:rt"" i( )n JoJ S i udy

N OVA

Anal y,is anJ

::)

NATURAL SCIENCES, MATH E M ATICS, OR COMPUTE R

o w U o

SCiENCE - N S

RIO/. I I I 81 L 1 1 3 [ \ 1 )[, 1 1 6

g.

1110

CIC

u

1 02

205

B IOL 2116

o < u «

324 B / u t 3 25 Il [ O L 3 2 6 B I O I . 327 BIOI. 3 2 0 BIOL 329 B [ O L 332 I:lIOI. 34 0 B I O L 34R BIOL lS I 13 1 0 L 36 1

I I u m a n A I1 J l l lJll�! i.It1J I'hy�io!ogy I l u M1.l O Analom ), und Phy.iu]ogy Pri nciples <'l Bi()logy i i l : Ecology, Ev ol u t io n N�tu ra .! H i!lorv o l- Verrci' J .l te< atun I Histo ry of' Chma

BIOL 323

BIOI

Anima'! Ilehuvi"r

�) rn i tJl01(lSY

B[0L 365 8 1 0L 403 B IO L 407 RIOL 4 1 1 BIOL 424

Ecolog)'

BIOL 425 I1[OL 44 1

Biologi\,.il Oceauogra phy Ecological Meth ods MetYllm l ia ll � h)'�iology

Il i 0 I .

! m rnu n o l ot;J'

448 BIO I . 475 O IEM 1 04

�helll istry

CHEM 1 05

C H E N! C H EM CHEM

1 20

1 25

232, 2 .J4 CflEM 3 32, 334 C H E M 336 C HEM 3J � CI [.eM 34 I, 3-13 CHEM 342 , 3'14 C H I::M 4U3 CH EM 405 eliE M '135 CHEM 440 C H EM 450 . H EM 456 cseE 1 1 5 CSeE 1 2 0 CSCE J ) [ CseE 144 eSC!; 245 C:SCE 170 CSCE 3 30 CSeE 3 4 3 CSeE 345 CSeE 3 4 6

Ch�m ist f)' Polymers am I Blopolyrners Soh'e It With the Co m l)u tcr C(lmpll t<!rizd f n fo rm :l liOIl

I n l [()ci u U i o n

CSCE 37 1 C�CF 372 C SCE J80 C SCE 3 85 GS E 386 (se[ 39 1 CSCE 400 CSeE 4 1 0 G\ . CE

412

C S · 420 CSC E �34 CSCE 436

30

P

A

C

I

M o m e n l um, Energy, Pattern Recogn ition

Tran�f'0rt:

I

C

L

U

T

College Algebra

I 12

1 28

H

E

R

A

N

U

Jnd

N

t

V

E

R

S

T

Y

Introduction to Calc u l u s

M ATH 203 MATH 230

l\'fa t r i x Algebra

24 1

H is to r y o f M a t he m a t i cs

A)Jplied S t a t istics fo r Scientists

M AT H 2 4 5

/)iscrele ' t ru c t u res

M ATH 2 5 3

M u l t ivariable Calculus

317

I n t ro d u c t i o n to Proof i n

321

Ceometry

340

Mathematics

LineH Algebra A Brief I n troduclion to Probab i l i t y

MATH 34 1

i n t roduction to M a t h e m a t ical S t a l i s t ics

M ATH 3 4 2

Prclba b il i ty and S t a t i stical Th e o r y

M ATl-1 348

Applied Regression AnJ lysis and A NOVA

MATH 3 5 1

Differential Equations

M AT H 3. 56

N u merical Analysis

M AT H 3 8 1

Seminar i n Problem Solving

l"IATH 4 3 3

Abstract Algebra

480

/vfathcmatical Analysis -topics i n Mathematics

NSCI 2 1 0

Natural History of Hawa i ' i

PHYS 1 1 0

Astronomy

1 26 1 53

College Phys i c s

C o l l e ge Ph ys i c s Genera I Physics

P H YS 1 54

General P h ysics

PHYS 2 2 3

Elementary Modern Physics

PHYS 233

Engineering Statics

P H YS 2 3 4

Engineering Mech a n i c s of Solids

PHI'S 33 1

Electromagnetic T h e o r y

P H I'S 3 3 2

Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics

PHYS

I

Linear Model, a n d Calculus, An I n troducti.on Analytic C;t'Ometry and ['unctions

Calc u l us 1 1

PHI'S 3 3 3

Mass

Plane Tr igo n o m etry

Modern Elementary M a t h e m a t i c s

:VIATH 1 52

PHYS

C""lept>

Softwa re &ngiI1e{Cr i ng

F

Mathematics Expl ora tio n s

1

PHYS

An.1log £)cc l ronics D igi (,r1 E I�l tro n ics Modeling and :ii mulution D.ltaba>e Management Design ,t nd An.l l ysis of AJ"eri r h r l 1 S Algorith m>, Machi nC5, nnd G r a m m a rs Asse mbly LInguage .wd Co m p u t er Organization C o m p u ter A r"h i tec\ u r� Com p uter 'er wQ rks Prol,lem Solv ln s and Prog ra m ming Se mina r Top ics in Computer Science Topics 111 (ompuler �En);lIl"err ng Computer G ra p hics

CSCE 367

M a t hematics o f Pe r so nal F i n a nce

MAT H 1 07

PHYS 1 2 5

10 A r t. i iicial In tell igence

P rogram m i ng LJ nguage

CSCE 348

Capstone: Seminar

tvLATH 1 05

1\,1 AT 1-1

Daw Sl ruc t u res

Se m i n a r

GEOS 499

M ATH 455

Engineeri ng I n t ro d u ction to CO I11[' u I< r Scit l1ce F lectrica l Ci rcu i t> I n t roduction to

Energy and M i neral Re so u rce s for the F u t u re

Ficld Tri p

M Ar H

'{Ste l11' '

Hydrogeology

G e o p hysi cs

Geologic Field M a ppi n g

M AT H 3 3 1

I n organ ic

M ap s : i m ages of the &rth

G EO S 425

MAJ1-! M ATH

Advanced Organic Chem i st ry

M eta mor p h ic Pet rol o gy

GEOS 390

lvf AT I !

l ion 1 0 Re'"J r h instrumellt.ll An Jlysis

P a le o n t o l o gy

M a r i ne Geology

M Al ' I -I 1 5 1

I nl rodu

S t r at i g r a p hy and Sedimentation

G eo l ogy o f Was h i ngton

MATH 1 4 0

B i ochcrniM ry I I

Geology

O p tical M ineral o gy

GEOS 3 6 0

498

Resou rces

rg n eoll� Pe t ro l og y Structural

G E O S 3 50

M AfH

IJ ,ochemistry I

C H EM 4 1 0

M i n e ralogy

1\1 AT H I 2 3

Null- i Li. ol1. D r u �r'}, <l IlC! the 1 l1dividuJ! Org<lJl l c (�hcmiM r )' .m el Lab O rg�!lic Chemist ry J nd Lob Organ i c Special Proj� t s Labo r a t o r y An alylic:r1 ChemisLJ), Ph)" iQlj Ch em ist ry ; } n et Lab Phy� ica l cm i ,r f Y ,I nc! Lab

Ci I EM

("cologie P ri nci ples

G E OS 3 23 GEOS 3 2 4 GEOS 325 GEGS 326 , EO S 327

...1ATH 1 1 1

!\d v;lIlced (�eneral C h em i s tr y

210

GEOS 201

GEOS

u l l l r�

of Na tu ra l

Mct eo ro l <l� )'

,EOS 3 4 1

( jeneral ChL' m i s t r y

_ean o g ra ph)'

Ea rthquakes, Volcanoes, a n d eeologic H a z a rd s

Conservation

G EOS 335

ChemistrY

E.lnri r()l1 nH:·n t�ll

Gene,,)1

C En s 1 0 5

MATH

E\,o l uti tJ n

O u r Changing Planet

CEllS 1 04

G EO S 334

H iStology

BIOL 426

1 03

GEllS 330

Gent!l. ic.s Plan t Diver,i t)' and D ist r ibul io n AdvunceJ Cell Diol()!;y �lu f t,1 H i s to ry of the rac i iie Non]l\"",t -oml'ara tive Anatomy Pbn t Ph) i<dugy PleLnl A nalo m), Develop rnenta l Biol ogy Molecu [a r Biol ogy

A I ClI, 364

10I

G EO S 3 2 9

Entomology

ign

!v1 icroprocessors

GEOS 328

Mic robiology

Dc

Com)Jilers Conserva t io n of Natural Re.sou rce."

GEOS

a n d Diversity

VLSI

ENVT 1 04

, E O S 1 02 Aiolngy

E�pen S ys te ms

Ope ra ti ng Sys tems

CSCE 480

l i EOS

I n l rod u c tur)' lVi lc robi ul<)gy

Ill 0 J 2 (J 1

:E

w

B i o logy " lId t l t e Mocil'fl\ World Ihe H u m a n ( )rg;lll i,nJ I n t roductorv I:,col()gy Pri nciple, o f Bi(.loSY l : C1'II Biolo�y I'r i ncipk. o f Bioll}g), I I : Orgun iSn1a l

llIOJ I 6 1

[lIOI

CSCE 438 CSCI: 444 CS ' E 446 CS ' 4 5 5

I l1dqwnJ<' r l l

334

Engineering Thermodynamics Engineering Materials Science

P H YS 3 3 6

Classical Mechanics

P H I'S 3 5 4

M a themati

P H I'S 356

Mathematical Physics !l

31

Ph ysi c s I

Me

P H YS 4 0 1

In troduction to Q u a n t u m

P H YS 406

Advanced Modern Physics

STAT 24 1

Applied S t a t ist ics for Scientists

hanies


PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY COURSE - PE

1'1 l ED

1 00

Personalized I' it n css Program

P H E D 1 50

Adaptive Ph ys i c,, 1 Activity

P H E D 1 5 1 - 1 99

Individual and Du,,1 Activities

I'H ff) 200- 2 1 9

Aquatics

PI I ED 220- 14 0

!'HED 24 1-259

Rhythm. Team

PHED 3 1 9

TraJll p l n g the [racks o f New Zealand

Ac ivities

PH I L

P ililo$ o p h i cal rSSllCS

1 25

P h i l os ph)'

Moral

[>H l l 2 2 0

Womcn and Plulosophy

P H I L 2 2 _,

Biomed ical E t h ic.:.

P H l l 228

'oeial and Po li ti .1 P h i lo.ophy

P H I L 325

Busine" Ethics

PHIl. 331

A n , e n t Ph ilosop hy

PHil 333 PHIL 3 PHI 36

'

PHIL 338

Exi,tentialism a n d Continental P h i l o s o phy

P H I l 340

PH IL .150 PH[l 353

\ od ern Ph ilosophy

Early [ he

,

nalYlic Tradirion

Prag ma t i�m und Ame£lc�n P h ilo s o phy

Ph il o s ophy

of Scien

e

Ph ilosop hy of Relig i on

S p eci J I Top i cs

RELIGION: BIBLICAL STUDIES (LINE 1) - R 1 REU I I I

Bihlic,d Literatu re: Old and

and

ew Tcstamcnts

RELI 2 1 1

Re lig ion

RELI 2 1 2

Religion and I itenllure o f the

RELl 330

Old Testam en t Studies

"ELl 3 3 1

New Te�tal1lent Studies

RELl 332

Th Li�' of Je>us

Litcr.lturc o f t h e Old Testament ew Testament

RELIGION: CH RISTIAN THOUGHT, H I STORY, AND EXPERIENCE (LINE 2) - R2

RELI 1 2 1 1<1'. 1 . 1 22 1

RELf

222

RELI

223

R E LI 2 2 4

KELI

225

The (hri.:; ti"n TraJi t io n An i e n t Ch urch Histo ry Mode rn

C h urc h

I' he Lutheran Heritase

Faith and Sp i r i t u al i t y

I< ELI 2 2 7

eh ri st ia n Theolos)'

RELf 2 4 7

h r i , t i a n Theology

257

Ch ri.ti n Theolo gy

Rr:U

REU 3 44

RELI

347

RELI 3 5 1 RELI 354

RCLI 357 RFLr 360 R E I [ 36 1 RELl 362 RP.LI 3M

T h eologica l

tudies

Major Rel i gio u

Tbinkers, 1�xts, and

'hurch Histor, Studi

s

Mojor Rel igi Q I• . Th i nkers . Tex t s , "nd Genres

Studies in Ch u rch M i ni s t r y

Church Hi.story ::'tudies luther

Theologi .u � t u d ies C h ri st ia n r lora I Issues

R F LI

Femi n i st

Rr:L1 367 368

Ge nres

Thcological Studies

RELI 365

Introductory

SIOl 205

Human Anatollly and Physiolog

1ajor Relig io u s T h i nkers. T",ts, and Genres

Human A n a tolllY and Physiolog

1lI 0 l 323

P ri nci p les of Biolot'y I I I : E co l og y. Evol u t ion, and

BI0L 327

O rni t h o lo gy

BIOI. 328

M i c r o b i ology

S I O l 329

En to m o log y

SIOl 332

Genetics

B I O l 340

P l a n t D iversi t y and D i s t r i hu t ion

B I O l 348

Advanced

B I O I. 3 5 1

Natural History of the Pa c i fi

361

Il I Ol 403

Dnrelo pmen tal Biolo!;)'

B I O I 407

Molecular Bi ology

BIOl 4 1 1

H istology

B I O l 424

Eco logy

B[OL 425

B iol ogica l Ocea nography

B[OL 42 6

Ecological M.cthocis

CHEM 1 04

E n v i ro n mental Ch em ist ry

tJ[Ol 44 1

'!al11malian Physiology

C H EM 1 05

hcmistry of L i fe

C H Ei'v1 1 20

G e nera l Chem i · t r y

CHEM 1 25

Advanced Ge ne ral C h e m i

C H H"j 2 1 0

Nut r iti on . D r ugs, and the [ndividual

O rgan i c C h e mi s tr y

CHEM 3 3 2 . 334

Organ i c Chem i stry and Lab

and Lab

CHEM 336

O rga n ic

CHf.M 338

Andl yt i cal

-

h e mi s t ry

C H E M 34 1 , 343

Physical C he nl l s r r y and

C H EM 342. 344

Physical C hem i s try and Lab

C H E M 403

llioche mi,try I

CH EM 405

B ioc he mi stry I I I n o rganic Chem istry

CHEM 456

Pol ymers and B i opolymers

ENVT 1 04

Conserva t i o n of Nat u ra l RC-'>()urces

G EOS 1 0 1

Our C han gi ng Pla net

GEOS 1 0 2

General

GEOS 1 0 3

Earthquakes. Vol

no es , and Ge ,logic H, Lards

GEOS 1 04

Con,crva t i o n of

atural

GEOS 1 05

Meteorology

G F.OS 20 1

Geol o gic Principle

G EOS 3 2 3

0 ea nography

I gn eous Petrology

GEOS 3 2 5

S tr u ct u ral Geol ogy

GEeS

O p t i ca l :--'1 i ncralogy

326

GEOS 327

Stratigraphy a n d S diment"t",n

GEOS 3 2 8

Paleontology

GEOS 3 2 9

Met a m or phi c Petrolo y

GEOS 3 3 0 G EO S 3 3 1

Maps: I m ages

of

the .arth

Hydrogeology

(LINE 3) - R3

G EOS 360

Geology of Wash i ngton

G EOS 425

Geologic Field Mapping

R it ual. anJ

Resources

Mineralogy

GEeS 324

Marin� Geology

The Bible and Culture

Lab

I ns t r u mental Anal ysi s

450

Energy Jnd M i neral

Rt.LI 1 33

iAlboratory

peeial Projed

GEOS 350

t Asi�

try

CHEM 232. 234

RELIGION: INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE RELIGIOUS STUDIES

The Religion of E.

Northwest

Comparative Anatomy

Geo phys i cs

T h e Religiuns of uuth Asi&

NSCI 2 1 0

Res

)u rees for the Future

at ural History of Haw" i ' i

PHYS [ 1 0

Descri ptive Astronomy

PHYS 1 2 5

Col kge Physics

RELI 2 3 2 !lELI 233

1 he Buddhist Tr adition

PHYS 1 26

Col legt· Physics

The Reli gi ons of C h i n �

PHYS 1 5 3

The R ligion of Ja pan

P H Y S 1 54

General P hys ics

REI

Islamic Tradi t ions

CAPSTONE: SENIOR SEMINAR/PROJE CT - SR

REL I 23 1

I 234

RELI 235 R E U 23 7 REU 239

Myth.

Symbol

J u da ism

A

Envi ron ment JJ1d

u J t u re

R F L I 390

St u di es in

R E Ll 3 9 1

Socio l o gy o i Rel igion

l I i s to ry of Rel igio ns

RE.LI 391

God" MJgic. anJ Moral

RELI

Reilgion d nd

393

the life Cycle

SCIENCE AND SCIENTIFIC METHOD - S M H 101

l ode r n Wo rld

Biology and the

mUl l 1 3

Th"

mOL 1 1 6

I n t roductory Ewlog)'

I I u ma n

Orga ni�m

J ner "I Physics

TH 199

Capstone: Sem i n a r in A n th ropolog)'

A RTD 499

Capstone: Se nior Exh. i b i t i o n

Se ni or

B I O L 499

Capstone:

BUS

Capstnne: St ra tegi c Management

499

eminar

Ca ps tone: Se mi na r

C H EM 499

Ca pston e: Se n i o r P roj ec t

C H I N 499 CHS P 499

apstone:

I.AS 499

I n t roduction to Hu ma n Bio logka l Diversity

13101 I I I

." ;lO o 1'"\ m o C ;lO m VI

ell Biology

GEeS 3 4 1

mani s t Theologies

RELl l I RfLI 1 32

Org<lnislllal Biology

'Iicrobiulo!lY

G E e S 335

and W

ell B io lu gy

11 '

B I O l 206

CHEM

Am<!r! :1I1 Church I-!l.>tory

C hr i s tian Ethics

S101. 2 0 1

CHEM 435

H i story

R E l . I 226

Princi plc� of Biology

BIOL

rcation J nd Ev o l u t io n

P I III 253

Pri nci p les o f Bi o lo gy I :

S I Ol l ti 2

Di v ers i ty

PHILOSOPHY - PH PH l l I O I

SIOl 1 6 1

enlOr Project

Capstone: Senior Project

OMA 480

I n -depth and lnve tigative Repor ting

C O MA 485

Co m m u n i ca t i o n and Socia l Activi.1111

COMA 499

C ap s to ne : C o m m u nication

P

A

C

I

F

i

e

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N t

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y

31


F 499 [CO 499

CS

. '1 'I EUliC 437 I.'.DUC 41>6 E ( )UC 'l0R E GI. 125 ENe 427 E r L 428 eN L 4 5 1 F.N , I 4 5 2 ENVT 499 FR' ; 499 GFO 499 C F R M 499 I' D

.... o « u «

ANTH 392

Cap,tone:

t\NTH

Senior �el11 i n a r St ude n t TC<IC hillg in K-R EduC<ltion luden t Teach i n g-Element:!ry ( D ual) Alternate Level Stlldent Tea c h i ng-Secondary

EDli ' 430

u

Capstoll.: Sem i na r

AN'f'H 480

H IST

rili ng

Author enre

apstone: .,�minar

Cap t o ne: Sen io r Project Capstone: Rose."

Capstone: e n i (l r

h Se m i na r

Project

Semin"" The T h ird \11/ rid

Islamic Middle

East to 1 945

Global Perspectives:

H I ST 2 1 5

Modern World H istory

World \i ar

H IST

Colonial American History

251

H I ST 252

1 9 t h - Cent u ry American History

H I ST 253

10th-Ce.ntury American HistOl)'

H [ST 294

The

H I ST 3 0 1

I n troduction t o H istorical Methods and Resea rch

Unite.d State, · ' i nc.e 1 94 .5

H I ST 305

S lavcqr

H I ST 3 1 0

Contemporary Japan

in

t h e Americas

H IST 322

Roman

H I ST 323

The M iddk Ages

Greek Civilization

Civilization

Rcn;.lissallce

C3p;lon,,: Senior Project

H I ST 324

Capstone: Senior S e m i n a r

H I S T 325

R efo r m a tion

Projcd

H [ ST 327

The Vikings

apstom:: Senior Project

H I ST 328

1 9 t h -C e n t u r y Europe

H[ST 3 2 9

fu rope and the World Wars: 19 I 4-45

H I ST 3 3 2

England: Tudors and St ua rt s

HJST 334

Modern Germany, 1 1148- 1 945

Capstone:

N u rsing Syn t h e s i s

I ntem�hi" Capstone:

e n i o r Seminar

C a pst()n� : Adv an c e d S e m i n a r in Philosophy

Capstone: Ad\'an�ed

H IST 335

L,b I I

h o l ogy

Research

La t i n American History:

Cen t ra l America and

Caribbean H IST 336

.,apstone: Senior Sem i n a r

Psy

H I ST

Semlnar

Hiqof)' � n d Systems of P ychology

337

H I ST 338

I nternsh ip aps to ne : Senior Sem inar p H o n e: IZeesear h • c m i na r

H IST 339

Capstone: Senior Project

Capstone: Sen i o r Seminar Capstone; Se n ior S e m i n a r a p sto n e: Senior Project pstone: S e m i n ar in Women'., S t ud i e

Southern A frica

The H i s tory o f Mexico M od e r n

C h i na

Revo l u t io na r y China

H IST 340

Modern Japan

H IST 344

The Andes i n Latin American H istory

H IS"!" 3 5 2

The American Revolution

H l ST 3 5 5

A m e r i can Popular Culture

H I ST 3 5 6

American D i pl o m atic History

H [ ST 357

H I ST 359

A frica n American History

History o f Women in th� United S t a te,

of the

H I ST 360

H olo ca u s t: Destruction

POLITICAL SCIENCE) - S 1

H [ ST 370

Environmental H i s t o f )' o f the

AN'I H /\NTH

HIST 3 8 1

The V ie t n a m War and

H IST 4 0 1

Workshops

SOCIAL SCI ENCES, LINE

I nlro d u cl ion 10 Archaeology a n d World Prehistory

1 0.1

· Iobal

NII 1 2 1 0

Per pec tives: The

or t he No r th wes t O[\st , u l t u res a n cl Peoples o f Na t i ve North America Preh �,!ory o f I orrh America at lve American Health The A n th ropology o f C o n t e m p o ra r y f\ mcrica People, or l a t i n A m e rica Jewish u l t urc Anthropology o f Mrica

342 ANTI 1 34J ANTfI 345

East Asian C u l t ures Contemporary

Women

'H 3-4

hin.

a n d Men i n

World

Ceogrnphy and World Prospects

A NTH 3 5 5

A nthropology

[tJ, n ic G.ro ups

36 A Tl I '6 1 ANTH 305

A NT I !

uhures C"I L U res: I' ople. Pl aces and

lanaging C u l t ural Divers i t )'

Prehistoric E n v iro n men t

and Technology

Ma rriage, Family, and K i n , h i p Appl ied A n t h ropology

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

Northwc, t

History of Wes t and Northwe,t

H i sto ry or American Thought and C u l t u re Seminar: American Hi tory

Seminar: Eu ro pean H i sto ry

POLS 1 0 1

I n troduction to Polit ical Science

T h i rd Wo rl d

POLS 1 5 1

A me r ic a n

POLS 1 70

Introduction to Legal Studies

POLS 2 1 0

Global Perspectives: The

G o ve rn m e n t

Wo rld

POLS 282

Politics in the A me r icas Polit ical Tho ught

POLS 326

Recent Political

OLS 3 3 1

I n ternational Relations

T ho ugh t

POLS 3311

American Forei gn Po l i c y

POLS

(�overn ment a n d Public Polic)'

Environmental Politi s and Policy

POLS 347

Political Economy

POLS 3 54

State and

POLS 36 1

Political Parties and Elections

Lo ca l

Government

POLS 363

Politics and the Media

POLS 364

The Legislative Proce&.s

368

i n Change

Current I n ternational Issues

P O L S 325

POLS

The Archaeology of Ancient E m p i res Law, Politics, Jnd Revolu.tion Money, Power, and E , change Sickne�, Madness, and Health

TH 370

AN1l1 375 ANTH 377 ANTI-t 380 NTH 385 ANf!- 1 31!8

A me r i c a n L<!gal H i s to ry

West Hnd

Seminar: Th e

345

States

American Society

H I ST 496

POLS 346

a n d Media

European Jews

United

H .l ST 495

P O LS 23 1

Pacific 1.lund -ul t u res

N T I 1 3S0

I

H I 5T 4�4

Peoples

NTH

C

H IST 47 1

Wo rld in Change

Pa�t Cult u re.s uf Wa h i n � ton State

ANTH 230 ANTH 3 3 0 ,\NTH 332 ANTH 333 ANTT· 1 334

A

H I S T 46 1

Peoples o f the World

220

AN TI 1 225

P

H [ ST 460

P rac ti ci ng Anlhro p ology: IVlakah C u l t u re Pa s t and Prfsen t

A

!-!1ST 4 5 1

Intro d uction to Language i n Socier-y

A NT H 1 9 2

ANTH

1 (ANTHROPOLOGY, HISTORY, OR

Introduction to Human Cult ural Dlversily

N T H 1 04

Cha nge

! ! i n China a n d Japan, 1 9 3 1 - 1 94 5

H I ST 3 2 1

'ap,tone: Senior

1 02

in

Modern Latin American History

H IST 2 3 1

S('min,lr: European History

n Conversations

The World

H IS"!" 2 1 0

Capstone: Honors Challenge Experience ore

32

20

H IST 220

Cap,lon e : Senior Pro 'ecl

T 499

Civ i lilalio n

East Asian Societies

Top i cs III

Special

�crn i nar: Ame rican History

"VM

H i s tory o r Western

H IST 1 09

on

Sem i n a " Theme,

SPA, 499

1 07

History of Wes t e rn Civilization

Cap t on e : Senior Project

SCA, 499 SO -1 499 'iC CW 499

Roman Civilization

H I ST 1 08

Semi nar:

Rill 499

Greek Civilization

CLAS 322 H IST

tudent Te a c h i ng-Sec o nd ary

�emina r: Critical Theory

M Al i- I 499 M U 1 499 RW 499 lJRS 499 PHPD 495 P H E . u 499 PI IlL 499 P I-IYS 499B POLS 499 PSYC 48 1 PSYC 493 RECR 495 RE R 499

Anthropological I n q u i ry

CLAS 3 2 1

St udent '!';;,lCh i ng-SeC\lndJ ry ( D u a l )

I m a gi n at i ve

G L,T 499

Gods, M a g i c , a n d Morals Archaeology: The Field Experience

Writing

GREK 499

465

The Am eri ca n Presidency

POLS 3 7 1

J u d icial Process

PO l.S 3 7 2

Const i t u tional Law

POLS 373

Civil Rights and

POLS 3 7 4

Legal Studies Research

POLS 381

Compara tive Legal Systems

POLS 3 8 2

East Asian Politics

i v i l Liherties

the


POLS 3 8 3

Modern Eurorean Politics

SOCW 385

Social Policy II: Social Policy Analysis

POLS 385

Canadian Government and Politics

SOCW 399

Special Topics in Social Wo rk

P

>

"

The M iddle East

SOCW 472

Social Work Practice II: Families and Groups

P O L S 40 1

Worbhops and Special Torics

SOCW 473

Social Work Practice I l l : Macropractice

P

Advanced International Relations

WRITING REQUI REM ENT - WR

L S 387 LS 43 1

POLS 450

Intern hip i n Politics

POLS 458

I n ternshir in Public Admin istration

P

Internshir in the Legislative Process

LS 464

POLS 4 7 1

Internship in Legal Studies

S CA N 3 2 7

The Vikings

Research a n d Writing

ENGL 224

Travel Writing

ENGL 225

Autobiographical Writing

."

Imaginative Writing I Writing in Professional Settings

SOCiAl SQfNCES, LINE 2 (ECONOMICS, PSYCHO LOGY,

ENGL 324

Free-Lance Writing

SOCIAL WORK, OR SOCIOLOGY) - S2

ENGL 325

Personal Essay

E ON

1 30

Global and Environmental Economic Principles

ENGL 326

Writing fo r Children

ECO

151

Pri nciples o f Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics Labor Economics

321

ECON 3 2 2

Health Economics

E ON 3 3 0

Environmental and Natural Resou rce Economics

ECON 3 3 1

I n ternational Economics

ECON 3 4 1

Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies

EC

N 34 4

ECON 3 4 5

Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis Intermediate Microeconomic Analy i

hC N 361

Money and Banking

E ON 362

Public Finance

ECO. 371

Industrial Organization and Public Policy

ECON 495

Internship

ECON 498

Honors Thesis

ECON 499

Capstone: Senior Seminar

P$YC 1 0 1

Introduction to Psychology

PSY

The Psychology of Adj ustment

PSYC 3 2 5

Human Sexuality

PSYC 340

H u m a n Neuropsychology

PSYC

Lea rning: Research and Theory

PSYC 346

Perception

PSYC 348

Cognitive Processes

PSYC 350

Personalit), Theories

PSYC 352

Development: Infancy to Maturity

PSY

Social Psychology

354

PSYC 405

Workshop on Alternative Perspectives

PSYC 440

Psychology of Language

PSYC 444

Adolescent Psychology

PSYC 450

Psychological Testing

PSY , 45 3

Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 454

Community Psychology

PSYC 456

Theories and Methods of Counseling and Psychotherapy

PSYC 4 6 1

Psychology of Wo rk

PSYC 462

Consumer Psychology

PSY

Environmental Psychology

464

PSYC 4 7 1

Psychology and the Law

PSYC 472

Psychology and Medicine

PSYC 474

Psychology of Wo men

PSYC 483

Seminar

OCI I O I SO C I 240

Social Stratifica tion Jamaican Society The "Family

sao 336 SOCI 3 5 1 SOCI 362 SOC I 3 9 1

Deviance

Sociology of Religion

,

Research Methods

CI 397

Advanced Composition fo r Teachers

ENGL 4 2 1

Tutorial in Writing

ENGL 425

Writing on Special Topics

ENGL 427

Imagi native Writing III

WRIT 1 0 1

Inquiry Seminars: Writing

c:: :lII

m

'"

WRIT 2 0 1

Writing Seminars fo r I n ternational Students

WRIT 202

Writing Seminars for International Students

Sociology of Law Families i n the Americas

rime and Society

SOCI 4 1 8

Advanced Data Applications

SO 1 44 0

Sex. Gender. and Society

50CI 462

Suicide

50CI 496

Major Theories

SOCW 1 0 1

Introduction to Social Wor k

SOCW 20 1

January o n the Hill

SOCW 275

Social Policy I : History of Social Welfare

SOCW 323

Imaginative Writing I I

ENGL 328

Delinquency and Juvenile Just ice

SOC I 330

SOCI 4 1 3

0

ENGL 327

Social Problems

SOCI 3 IO 326

"

m

American Society

SOCI 296

SOC I

0

Econometrics

ECON 3 5 1

342

:lII

Mathematical Torics i n Economics

E ON 3 5 2

221

m

"

ENGL 323

ECON 1 5 2

0

ďż˝

ENGL 2 2 1

ENGL 227

ECO

>

Social Work Practice I: I nterviewing and I n terpersonal Helping

SOCW 380

Human Behavior and the Social Environment P

A

C

i

f

i

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

33


\1'1 � z ex:

w ...

...

o uJ \1'1 ex: :::l o U o z < w w ex: � w

o

Deg ree and Cou rse Offerings CoUege of Arts and Sdences Divisiun of HLI",a"iri�s Engli.h Languages and Literatures Ph i losophy Re l igion Vivisioll 0 Nalllrill Sciellces Biolo;;y

Bachelor's Degrees

Division of Slicial 5 iellCCS Anthropology Economics History I'vlarriage

of 1\ rts Il,lchdor o r Scicncc Bachelor of Arb in Educa t ion [l,lCheior of Arts i n Physical P.ducafion Bachel r .of f\ rl S i n R� rc fiem B achelor uf Busin' S Bachelor

,md Family Ther,lpy

Polit ical Science Psychulogy

Soc iology a n cl Soci,,1 Work

Chemistry

Science and C o m p u t e r Engi neeri ng Geosci en ces

Ad m i n i . t ration

C o m p l l ter

Ba.:hclor o f Fine Arts Bachelor of M Ll"ic Bac.helor t, ( Music Educatioll Bachelor ()f MusicaJ A rts flachelor or , cienc in Nur, i n � t>Jchclor o r cit�nce i n Physical Educa t i o n

Mathematics

Physics

School of the Arts Art CI)l11mU n i c a t i o n and Theatre

Musi c

School of Business School of Education School of Nursing School of Physical Education Special Academic Programs Mili tary � cience

34

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

Master's Degrees i\laster of Arrs in E d u c a t i o n

Md ter 0\ Ans cD Educa t i o n with Initial 'ni fic a r ion Master of Arts ( Marr iage a n d F a m il y T h e ra p y ) Master of Busi ne�� l\dminiSI�'ati('ll

Master of ' ience in ' u rsinI'


o m

Majors Bachelor of Arts (BA) Anthropology Ar t

English

Environmental Studies

Biology

Fren

'hemistry

C h i nese S t u d ie s lassies

Political Science

Anthropology

Psychology

Art

Religion

Studies

Ge r ma n

S o c i a l Wo rk

ommu nication

H i s to ry

Sociology

Commlwicariol1 St.udies

Iodivid ualized Mathematics

Pnnt/Broadcast JOli rnalislIf

S pa n i s h

Music

IIImt

P h i loso p h y

Economi

Physi

Chinese ( la n g uage )

Biology

(3-2)

Geo··ciences

Computer Engi n ee rin g .omputer Sc i en ce

French German History journalism Mat hematics Music Non cgi a n Physical Education P h ys i c s

Biology

Economic;

Eng l i s h English/Language Arts

Political Science Psrchology

Science Soc i a l Studies Sociology

S peech

Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (BAPE) Phy i ca l Education

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation ( BARec) Rec reat io n Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)

CoIICf1ltratioliS i ll:

E n t repreneurship and New

Ve n t u re Management Fina ncial Resources Management H u man Resource Management

I n formation Management

International Busi ness

Marke t i n g Resource M a n a g e m e n t

Professional Acco u n t i ng

Bachelor of Fine Arts ( B FA) Art

3S a Second

ommlm ication o n d

Social Actil'i_<l1I

Tlreatre Bachelor of Music (BM) Piano

I nstr u m e n t al

o

..,

Science

..,

l.egal tl/di�s Polit i II cicncc

m

::a

PI/olic AfJairs

z C\

I's)"cholog), Re l i g i o n Sociology

Le g al Srud ies Mathematics

\II

Spanish

S p cci;1 1 Educatiun

Actllarial Sriwce llila thematin;

(

oIl-Teach i n g )

Women's StuLiil's

Statistics Music No r weg i a n

'Pel/dillg approval

Health Sciellces

sophomores u nlt!ss otherwise restricted.

300-499 Upper-Divisiotl Courses:

G e n er a l l y op<'/1

to j u n i o rs a n d grad u J te s t u d e n t s , a n d may be considered part of a g r ad u ate pmgr" m p ro v i d ed they a re n o t specific req u i rem e n t s i n p re p a ra t io n fo r grad uate _ I u d )'. seniors unless otherwise specified.' A l s o open

to

500-599 Graduate Courses: Normally open to grad uate s t udents o n l y. I f, d u ring the last semester o f the s en i o r yea r,

a

a n d i d a te for

a

baccalaureate degree fi nds it. possible to complete a l l degree

16

requirements with a registration of fewer than

semester hours of

u ndergraduate credit, registration fo r g rad u a te credit is p nni ·sibJe. However, the total registration for undergraduate req u irements and the semester. A memorandum stating that all baccalaureate

must he dean and presented to the dean of graduate studies at t he t i me o f such registra t ion. This registration d o es n o t apply toward a h ig h e r d e g ree u nless it is later ap p roved by the stude n t 's advisor a n el / o r adv isor)!

requirements are being met during the current

Voic�

com m i t tee.

Bachelor of Music Education ( BME) K- I 2 C h o r al

*Note: LO lVer-aivisioll sllldeltts may e n ro ll pre req u is i tes have been //let.

K- I 2 l nst rumental ( Ba n d )

(Orchestra)

Bachelor of Musical Arts (BMA) Music Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Nursing Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (BSPE) ollcentratiolls in: Exercise Science

Fitness Manage m e n t

Pre-athletic Trailllng P r e - t hera p y

Complementary Majors Global Stud ies

se m es te r

by the appropriate department chair or sc hon l

Organ

Women's Studies

Polit ical

COURSE NUMBERINGS 1 00-299 Lower-Divisioll Courses: Open to fi r st - rear students J n d

signed

Composition

Health a nd

IlIJrr Physics

elective graduate credit shall n o t exceed 16 semester hours during

o m m u oica ti o n

K- 1 2 I n s t ru me nt al

\II m

Sports Ad'llilllstrtl

N u r s ing

Cross-Disciplinary Studies

f"'I o c ::a

Sporr Psychulogy

La t i n

Education

» z o

Reamtiolt

His to ry

Economics

S p e c i a l Ed u c a t i on

En g l i s h

m

1trl1(Jgelllel1t

Wri/iltg

Greek

Dance C o m p u t er Science Computer Science Electrical Eltgilleerillg In/ormarioll Science

S pan i s h

Li te ra t u re

Global Studies

Theatre Commwlicntioll Film Thea t re

Physics

Majors h,:

Ch emist ry Dra m a Earth Sciences

Communication and

Psychology

Bachelor of Arts in Education (BAE)

Art

Chinese S t udies

M a t h ema t i c s

Che m is t r y

Enginee r i n g

E n g lish

Environ mental S t u d i e s F re n ch Geoscience Ge r ma n

Chemistry

E n g i n ee ri ng Science

E le c t rica l

Language

M{I/"keting'

5

Bach.elor of Science (BS) pp l i ed Physics

Ant h ropolo g y

Sptei,,1 EdllCil tiol/

Btlsiness Admillistra· lion Finance" [n/orlllatioll Manage·

m

_

A lit/eric Trlli" ;lIg Coadllllg Dlllite Bxercise SciclIce r lea/th Henlilt alld Fit ness

Readillg

B u s i ness

Norwl'giHn

'omputer Science

AqlJati

Tedl/lology

Studio Art

;:III

P hysi ca l Education

[n;frltctiolla/

l3iologr

C\

Ph il oso p h }

LangllClge

Art History

Scandinavian Area

h

Geosciences

Public Relatioll5 Tlretltre

Early Child/lOod English CIS a Secol/(i

The Americas

ill upper·division COIl/SCS if

COURSE OFFERINGS Most listed courses are o ffered every ye ar. A system o f a l terna t i n g

upper-division courses i. pract iced in some departments, the reby assuring a broader curriculum. The u n iversity reserves the right to mod i fy specific course requirements, to disco n t i n ue classes in which the registration is regarded as insufficient, a n d to withdraw cou rses.

GUR KEY A

Aiternatil'e Perspectil'es Art, Music, or Theatre C Cross-Cultural Perspectives F illquir), Seminar FW Inquiry Seminar: Writillg II International Core: O r igins of the Modem International Core: 200-level CO tlrses 12 13 International Core: Concluding ourse LT Literature MR Mathematical Reasoning AR

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\II

c( u II:: w

Natllrlll Scicnces, /VIat /H'I/Hl l ie.<, (II" Comp u ter Sciwee N. p ' Physical [dllCil t i OIl !\("til'ity Cour:'C PH Phi/osop /I)' ru Rf'iigion: Biblica! tlldies (Li/lt? I ) R2 Religioll: Cliristilill Thought, l Iistory, alld ' p - eriellct' (!.ine 2) R3 I�eligioll: lIl fegra tive (llld COII/p a m l iv/' neligiolls Sl l/dies ( l ine ') . M Science (//1(/ Scientific Met/lOci SR Capstone: SCliiOt' Seillillur/Project SI • oeial , eimec; Line I ( A l l i lirol'o[ogy, History, or Political Sciwed S 2 Sociol Sciences Li lle 2 (Economics, Psychology, Social Work,

or

w % I-

"VI'

Anthropology 253.535.7595 WWIV.p/ l l . cdlll� a /l t " ro

AntlHopolo S)' as a d i s c i p l i ne tries to b ri n g a l l of the world's people i n t o hu man foem. T h o u gh a n t hropology d lC, lo o k at "s t o n e s and bone. ," i t ;llso e x a m i n es the p o l i t ics, medicines, fa mil ies, a rt s , aud rel i g i o n s o f peoples Jnd c ul t u r e s in va rious pIa es and t i mes. This mak , th '[udy of ;l n t h ropology a com­ pie.: t<lsk, fo r i t invo lves Jspects of many d i s c i p l ines, fro m geol­ ogy and b io logy to a rt and psycholo g),. Allt b r o p o l ogy i s compo. t' d of fo u r fie lds . Cultural o r so c i a l a n th ro p o l ogy stud ies l i v i n ' human cultures in o rd e r to c re at e a eros -cu l t llr(11 u nders tJJ)din g of h u m a n b havior. Arc h a eo l og y

ocialog),)

Wri ling Reqlliremenl

The Americas

has t h e

www,plu, edul-pols This interdisc ipli nary mi n o r fO(lls

s an

the comparative histo­

in the Western Hemisphere. In in tegr<l t i n !?, scleded in fo r­ m a t i o n about the n i ted States, it rd1ects the rea l i t y t h a t th is co u n t ry is an L n tegral part of t h e c u l t u ra l l y d i ve rs e :md increas­ i n gly i n te rconnected co n temporary wo r l d . nents

Thurston, T. Williams.

MINOR; The m i n o r consists o f 20 h o u rs , i n cluding o n e req u i red and fo ur elective co urses compll'ted with a g rad e of or h i g h e r. Students also m us t t a ke the Co m po s i t io n a n d Conve rsa t i o n l a n guage s po ke n in the A m ericas

MINOR: 2 0 semester h o u rs . aeq Il ired: 1 02 . Choose: 1 0 1 o r 1 03 or 1 04 ; 4 h o u rs fro m courses l i s t e d 330-3 4 5 ; 4 h o urs fro m 3 50-499; a n d 4 a d d i t i o n a l hours in an­ thwpology.

[n re co g n i ti o n o f o u t s ta ndi n g Departlllental Honors may be gra nted

o t he r than t heir n a t i v e l a n guage. Part icipation i ll a relevant of[­

DEPARTMENTAL H O NO RS :

c a m p u s p rogram is h i g h ly rc comme ndt'd. Studen ts may not ap p l y more than one 4 - c re d i t course in the m i n o r to ful fill any other req u i rem e n t , such as geueral u l l i v rs i ty core. m a 'or, o r m in o r requi reme n ts .

work, the d es i gn a t io n W i l h

by vo t e of the a n th ro p o i o 'y fa c u l t y based o n the s t ud en t's per­ formance i n th fo l lo w i n g a reas: I . A n th ro po l o gy course work: 3 . 5 m i n i m u m GPA. 2. Demons tration of active interest in a n t hrop'Olo 'ical

REQUIRED COURSE: cience 282 In trod uction to the A m e ri c a s - S 1

projects <rod activi ties

Pol i t i cal

ELECTIVE COURSES: m u s t choose at lea st

S t u d e n ts

one

the Caribbean -

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www. pLu.edll/

1 0 1 rntroductioD to Boman BiologkaL Diversity - SM (4)

1 02 Introduction to Human Coltura! Diversity - C, S 1 (4) 1 03 Introduction to A rchaeology and World Prehistory - SI

( 4)

1 04 Introduction to Language in Society - SI (4) 192 Practicing Anthropologr- Makah Cnlture Past and Present - A, SI (4) Prerequisite: co n sen t of i n st ruc to r.

2 1 0 Global Perspectives: The World in CJumge - C, S 1 ( 4 ) 220 Peoples o f the World - S I ( 2)

'. nada, L a t i n

U

Semester for De e m b ' r a n d Jallu3 f)' graduates.

Course Offerings

225 Past Cu.ltures of Washington State - S I (2) 230 Peoples of the Northwest Coast - A, S 1 (2) 3 3 0 Cultures and Peoples of Native North America - A, S I (4)

332 Prehistory of North America - S 1 (4) 333

Culture - LT A

fac u l t y by the th ird week of class of t he fa ll semester for the s p r i n g

A me rica s , and the Un i te d -tate - R2 S p a n ish 322 I- at i n Am rican Civ i I izatiOfl a n d Culture S p a n i s h 3 4 1 Lat i n o Experiences in tbe Uilited States - A, IT pa n i h 43 1 L a t i n Am ri an L i t e r a t u re, 1 492- 1 888 - 1..:1' pan ish 432 20th-Century La t in American Literature. - U Spa n is h 433 S p e c ia l Topics in Latin A mer ic. a n Lileratur and P

departmental facll ity. A p roposal m u;t be approved by the May a n d Aug u s t graduatcs, and the t h i rd week of clas of

, S1

hurch H istory Studies:

rk.

dent research must be conducted u nde r the s u pervision o f

co urse w i t h North A m er ica n

History 3 3 7 The H is to r y of M ex ico - C. $ [ History 344 The ndes i n Llt i n American Fl istor)' - C , S I Pol itical Seiene ' 373 CivLl Rights and Civil Liberties - S I Religion 227 Christian Theology: L ib e r at i o n Theol ogy - R2, o r Re l i g i o n 3 3 4 Th eol o g i cal Stud ies: Liber3tion 1'h alogy - R3 Religion 36 1

o ut s i de o f cl ass w

3 . Com pletIon of a sen ior t he s i . . A paper des c rib i n g in depe n ­

conteJ1 t as the pr im a ry emp hasis, a n d one course with Central S O U U 1 A merica n Ct)!1tent as t h e p ri mary e m p h as i s . nlhro p logy 330 u l t Ires and Peo p les () at ive orth merica - 5 1 A n th ro po l o g y 33 4 TIle A n thro p o l o g y of on t-.:mporary Americ3 - A, S I Anth ro po l o g y 336 Peoples of L a t i n Am rica - C, S I. Business 495 I n te rn at i on al Business: Modern Lat i n America Co m m u n ication 337 ews Med ia of the \' estern He m isp here English 232 Women's Literature: Wo m en Writer o f the Americas - A , LT History 220 Modem L a t in American H ist ory - , S I His t o ry 305 Slavery i n the A m ericas - , S I History 335 La t i n . merican History: Cen tral America and

36

BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hOLl rs . 1 03, 4RO, 499. Chou5e� 1 0 1 o r [ 04 ; 4 h o u rs from 330-345 ( peoples cou rses) ; 4 h o u rs from 50-4 6 5 ( topics courses); 8 a d d i t io n a l hours i n a n t h ropology, a t least 4 o f which m u st b e a b o ve 3 2 1 . RccJ l l i red: 1 02 ,

FACULTY: Olufs, Prog ra1l1 A dvisor; Brown, B rusco, Carp, Dwyer­ Shick, Kelleher, K i l l e n , K l e i n , Marcus, P redm ore, Rowe, Temple­

a

goal, b u t u ses d3ta from the p h ys i c a l remains of th e

FACULTY: Klein, '!lilir; B ru s co , Culw n , H ast )', f-luelsbeck, Vaugh n .

rie , cu l tures, a nd contemporary issucs s hared by t h e two co n t i ­

co u rse , or its equiva l e n t , in

s'1lll\e

past c u l t u res to reach i t . ting ui tic a n t luopology s t ud i es human language . V hysiea l a n t h ro p ology studies the e mergence a n d subsequent b i o l og i c a l adaptations of h u m a n i t y a s a species.

253.53: .8727

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Native American Health - A, S I (11)


334 The Anthropology of Contemporary America - A, S I ( 4 ) 336 Peoples o f Latin America - C, SI ( 4 )

Art 253.535.7573

338 Jewish Culture - A, SI ( 4 ) 340 A nlh ropo logy of Africa - C, S I ( 4 ) 34 1 Ho'ike: Cultural Discovery i n Hawai'i - A ( 4 ) 342 Paci6c Island Cultures - C, S I (4) 343 East Asian Cultures - C , S I ( 4 ) 345 Contemporary China - C, S I (4)

lVWlV.plu.edu/-nrt d

In t h i s time of ra p id l y changing co n ce p ts and an almost daily emergence of new me d ia , e m p h a sis IIl Ust b placed on a varie ty of exp e r i e n c e s and creative fl ex i bil i t y for the a r t i. t and the d esig n er. Stude n ts with p rofessio nal concerns must be prepared to meet the modern wodd with both technical skills and the capacity fo r innovation. The d partment's

p ro gra m thert'fore stresses individu­

350 Women and Men in World Cultures - C, SI (4)

alized development in t he

of mind and han d .

354 Geography a n d World CulllJres: People, Places and Prospects - S J ( 4 )

a Bachelor of Arts d eg ree ;

P rt:req uisite : 1 02 o r

onsen t f i nstructo r.

355 Anthropology and Media - C, S I (4) 360 Ethnic Groups - A, SI ( 4 ) 36 ) Managing CoJtural Diversity - A, S I ( 2 ) 365 Prehistoric Environment and Technology: Lab Methods in Archaeology - S 1 (4) 370 The Archaeology of Andent Empires - C, 51 ( 4 ) 375 Law, Politics, and Revolution - C, S I ( 4 ) 377 Money, Power. a n d Excbange - S I ( 4 ) 380 Sickness, Madness. and Health - C . S I ( 4 ) 385 Marriage. Family, and KinshJp - C, S I ( 4 ) 3 86 AppUed Anthropology - S 1 ( 4 ) 392 Gods, Magic, and Morals - C, S I ( 4 ) 465 Arc.haeology: The Field Experience - SI ( I-S) P re req u is i te : onsent of in t r ue tor. 480 Anthropological loquiry - S l (4) Required of major in th e i r j lLnior

or se n i o r year.

491 I ndependent Studies: Undergraduate Readings ( 1 , ) Prerl!qu i ile: d ep a r t me n ta l consent.

492 Independent Studies: Undergraduate Fieldwork ( 1 --4) Prerequisite: depa r t men tal consent. 499 Capstone: SemJoar in Anthropology - SR ( 4 ) Required of rnajors in t hei r j u nior o r senior year. Prerequisite � r o t h e r students: depart men tal

approvaJ.

lise

among a genera.lized p rogram l ea d i n g to a m o rt specialized program fo r the B achelo r of Fine A r t s, i n which each cand idate develops s o m e a rea )f com pe tence; or a degree program in a r t education fo r teaching on se era ] levels . Some · t ndents go d i recLly from t he u n i ersi t y into t h e i r field o f i n t eres t . thers find it desirable and appropriate to a tt e n d a gra d ua te school. M a ny a l u m n i have beell accepted i n t o p res t i ­ gious 'raduate program • • both in t h is cou n t ry and abroad. The var i o us fields of ar t are com p titive and d e ma n d i n g i n terms o f co m m i t ment and effort. lonet lleless, t h ere is a l ways a p la ce fo r th e who a re e t re m e l y skil l ful or h ighly i maginative or, i d ea l ly, boLll. The departme nt's p rogram s t resses bOLh, attem p t i n g to help each . tudent r ach that ideal. Instruct ional resources, when co u p l e d w i t h dedicated and energetic students, have re ti l ted in a n u n us ua l l y h ig h p ercen tage of g ra d u a t s being able to satisfy t h e i r vocational objectjves. S t udents m a y chonse

FACULTY: Hal l a m , Chair; Cox Geller, ,old, Keyes, Tomsic. The de part m e n t h a s sought to m i n i mize p n:rl:<,juisites, en<1bling studen ts to el cc t courses re la t i ng to t he i r in terest� as early as p ossi b l e, but majors are u rged to fo llow course sequences closely. It is recommended that · t u d e n t s i n terested i l l m ajo r i n g ill a r t proper a dv i s i n g . Tra ns fer students' st at u s shall be dete r m i ned at their time o f e n t ra nce. The department r serves the righ t t e retai n, exh i h i t , and reprodtt e st llde n t work s u b m i tte d fo r c re d i t i n any o f its c o u rs es or p rograms, i n c l u d i n g the senior exh i b i tion. A lise or m a t er i a l s fee is req u ired in certain courses. declare their major early to i ns ure

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n im u m of 34 sem e s t er hours, including 160, 250, 2 0 or 350, 365, 370, 499, a n d tbe a n h i s t o ry sequence ( I SO, 1 8 1 , 380); 1 1 ) or courses in t ac h i n g methods may not be ap p l ied t o t he m aj o r. maximum of 40 hours Jllay

be applied toward the degr

e. Candidates llre

enrolled in the

College of rts a nd Scien es and mlIst sa t isfy ge ne ral univers i t y requirements, including a core c u r r i c u l u m (Core I or Core r I ) ,

and the option req u i reme n t .

f 60 se m es te r o r 250; the art h istory sequence ( \ 80, 1 8 1 , 3 S 0 ) ; 8 ad(L it i o na l ho urs i n 2 -d imc nsional media, 8 a d d i tional h o u rs i n 3 - d i mens ional media, a n d 4 hours in art h istory or t heor y (390, o r as approved b y t h e department faculty); requi reJllen ts a n d electives i n area of e m phas i s ; and 499 ( apstone: Senior Exhibitio n ) . Art 1 1 6 or cou r � i n te <1 c h i n g me t h od s may not be included. C a n d i d ate s are e n ro l.l ed in the School of t he Arts and must satisfy ge n e ra l u n iversity requirements, i n cl u d i n g a core c u r r i cu l u m ( ore I or Core I I ) . BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m

hours, including 1 60; 226; either 2 3 0

BFA in 2-Dimensional Media Areas of e m p h as i o ne

: a

m i n i mum

of three courses required i n

area.

Drawi ng/Pa in t ing:

1 60 Drawing 260 I n termed ta te D rawing 360 Life D rawiJlg ( R )

365 Pa i n t i n g I 465 Painting n ( R)

Printmaking:

370 Prin tmakil1" I 470 Printmaking 1 I (R) P

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Film Arts:

230 Ceramics I - AR ( 4 )

226 Bl a c k and Whi tt' Photography 326 Color Pho togrJp hy 4 26 Elect ron ic I m agi n g l足 II: <

250 Sculpture I - AR ( 4 )

[lItiepelldcl I / Study (//lay be applied to C1 l 1y area):

49 1 S p e c i a l P rojects ( R) 498 S t ud i o P roj e ts ( R) ( R )-may be repeated for credit

296 Design II: Concepts - AR (4) Prerequisite: 1 96 o r consent of inslructor.

BFA in 3- Dimensiortal Media Areas of e m p h asis ; a min i m u m of three courses req u i red in o ne a rea.

330 Ceramics I I - A R ( 4) P re req ui . ite: 230.

Ceram ics:

341 Elementary Art Education ( 2 ) 350 Sculpture n - A R (4)

SClilptllre:

M ay be ta ke n twice. Prerequisite: 250.

250 Sculpture I 3 5 0 Sealptm n ( R)

Independent St lldy (may be applied to any a rea):

4 9 1 Special Projects ( R) 498 tudio Projects ( R) ( R ) - may be re p e a ted for credit

370 Printmaking I - A R ( 4 ) Prerequ isite: 1 60 or consent of instructor.

BPA in De ign

1 96 Design I: Fundamentals 296 D e s ig n 11: Concepts 39 De si g n : r a ph i c s I

380 Modern Art - AR ( 4 ) 390 Studies i n Art H istory - A R ( 4 ) May b e repeated fo r cre dit .

Elective courses:

398 Drawing: I lius t rJtion ( R) 4.92 Desi g n : \ orkshop 496 Design: Graph ics I I ( R) - may b e re p e a te d fo r credit

396 Design: Graphics I - AR ( 4 ) Prereq uisite: 1 6 0, 296, o r consen t of instructor.

398 Drawing: Wustration - AR ( 4 ) May be rep e a ted one . Prereq uisites:

BACHEWR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Educat icm.

MINOR IN STUDIO ART: 20 semester hours, including 380, 4 hours in 2 - d imensional media, 4 hours i n 3 - d i mensillnal media, and 8 h o u rs of studio a r t eJectives drawn from upper足 division courses. Courses Lll teac h i n g methods ( 3 '1l , 440) may n o t be app l i e d to the m i nor. MINOR IN ART mSTORY: 24 s e m e s t e r hours, including 1 80 and 1 8 1 , 1 2 hour s in art history/theory elect ives, and 4 h o u r s i n studio electives. Non-concentration courses ( 1 1 6 ) , p ractic a l design c o u rs e s ( I 6, 296, 396, 398, 492, 4 6 ) , and c u rse in teaching methods ( 34 1 , 440) may not be a ppli ed to the m inor. PUBUSHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR: The Publishing and P r i n t i n g Arts m i n o r is e ra slisted with the Department of nglish . See t h e d e s cr i p t ion o f t ha t m i nor u n d e r Pllblishing a n d Printing Arts.

Course Offe rings For collrse descripriol1s, Fisit the PLU catalog online at www.plu.edu/

p ri nt/ catal og. STUDIO

1 60, 196, 226 , 230, 250, 260, 296, 326, 3 30, 34 1 , 3 50, 360, 365 , 3 70, 396, 398, 426, 430, 465, 470, 49 1 , 492, 496, 498 HISTORY AND TH EORY 1 1 6, 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380, 390, 440, 497

1 1 6 Design in the Contemporary World - A R ( 4 ) Re q ui res n o artistic/design background. 160 Drawing - AR ( 4 ) 1 80 Hi tory of We tern Art I - A R (4) 1 8 1 History of Western A r t I I - AR ( 4 ) 196 Desjgn I : Fundamentals - AR ( 4 ) 226 Black a n d White Photography - A R ( 4 ) L U T H E R A N

3 60 Life Drawing - AR ( 2 ) May b e re p e a ted for cre d it . Prere q u is i te : 1 6 0 o r conse n t o f instructor. 365 Painting I - AR ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 1 60.

Required basic sequence:

P A C I F I C

326 Color Photography - AR ( 4 )

331 The Art of the Book 1 - A R (4)

230 , e r a m i c s I 330 eramics I I 4 3 0 eramics I I I ( R )

38

260 Intermediate D rawing - A R ( 4 ) Pr requisite: 1 60 or consent of instructor.

U N I V E R S I T Y

1 60 a n d 1 96.

426 Electronic Imaging - AR ( '1 ) May be taken twice. P re r ' l] u i s i les: 226, 3 2 6 , or consent of

instructor. 430 Ceramics m - AR ( 4 ) May be taken twice. PrerequLsite: 3 3 0 . 440 Seminar i n Art Education

(2)

465 Painting n - A R ( 4 ) May b e t a ke n twic". Prerequisite: 365. 470 Printmaking I I - A R ( 4 ) May b e taken twice. P re re qu i s i t e : 370. 491 Independent Studies: Special Projects - AR (2 or 4) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: j u n io r status, mini足 mum of two courses at 200 level or above tn affected medium with m i nimum 2.5 PA, con cnt of instructor and de p ar tm ent chair. 492 Design: Workshop - AR ( 2 ) M a y be taken twice. 496 Design: Graphics U ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 396. 497 Research in Art History-Theory ( 1 - 4 ) May b e repeated fo r credit. Pren:quisit . : senior status, consent of i ns t r uc to r, and program a p p roval bl' department fa cul ty. 498 Studio Project Iindependent Study - SR ( l- 4 ) O nly one p roj e ct p r e m es te r m a y be u nd er t a k en . M a y b ' repeated fo r credit. Prerequisites: dec l a red major Ln art, senior statu:, conse n t of inst ructor, written p roposal, p rogram approval by department facul ty. Students meeti n g the above req u i rements b u t with less than a 3.0 GPA in the major m ay be re q u i red to p rese nt additio nal ev id en ce of eligibility. 499 Capstone: Senior Exhibition - SR ( 2 ) Must b e taken i n the student's final semester. Prerequisites: declared maj r i n <l.rt ( B or BA), senior s t a t us , reasonable expectation o f com p let i o n of all departmen t and un iversity req u i re m e n ts for g rad uatio n .


School of the Arts

Division of Social Sciences A n t h ro p o l og y

Economics History M a r r iage and Fam i l y Therapy Political Science Psychology Soci ol o gy and Social Wo rk

253.535.7 1 5 0

www.p{lI.ed/l/-sota

The School of the Arts is a community o f arti:ts a n d schola rs­ s t u de n ts, fac u l ty, and ta ff-dedicated to the fu lfi l l m en t of the human sp i r i t thro ug h creative exp res s ion and careful scholar­ s h i p . he School of the Arts o ffers p rofessional ed ucation to a r t ists and com municators within the framework of a l iberal a rts ed u c ati o n . The school enco u rages all o f its mem bers to p u rs ue their a rt i st i c and 'chobrly work in a n e n viro nm e nt t h a t c h al ­ l e n ges c o mp l ace n cy, n u r t u re p e rs on a l g rowt h , and maintains a strong cult ure of coll egi a l integrity. Members o f t he School of the Arts strive to create art and scholarsh i p that acknowledges the past, defines the present, and anticipates the future. Art, communication, music, and theatre are medium of understanding and change which reward those who participate i n them, whether as artist, scholar, learner, or audience. Performances by students, faculty, a n d guests of the school enhance the cultural p ro perity shared by Pacific Lutheran Unive rsi t y and its su rro un d i ng environs. The school promoles venues for c o l la borat i o n between a r t i s t and scholars, among anistic and i n tellectual media, and between t h e u n iver­ sity a nd th . c o m m u ni t y.

DEGREES OFFERED: Bachelor o f Arts, Bachelor o f Science MAJOR REQUIREMENT: A major is a sequence of courses i n o n e area, usually in one department. A major should b e selected by the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be approved by the department chair (or in case of s p ec ial academic pro ­ grams. t h e program coordi nator). Major requirements a re specified in this catalog.

Course Offering For course descriptiolls, visit the PLU catalog olliine at www.plu.edu/

print/catalog. 341 Integrating Arts in the Classroom (2)

Col lege of Arts and Sciences Divisioll of Humanities

Engl ish Languages and Literatures P hilosophy Re l i g i o n Divisioll ofNa/ural Sciences

m z n '"

Global Stud ies H istory Ind ivid ualized S tudy Mathematics Music o rwegian P h ilosophy Physic.s Pol i tical S c ienc.e Psychology Re l i g io n Scandinavian A re a tudies

Classics Com m u n ication C om p u t er Engineering C omp ute r Science Eco nom ics En g i neer i ng Science ( 3-2) E n g l ish Env i ronmen tal Stud ies French G eo s c ien ce s

DEGREES OFFERED by the School of the Arts i n clude the B F A ( B a c h e l o r o f Fine rts) in art and co m m u n i cation and theatre; the BM (Bad1 e l o r of M us i c ) , t h e BMA ( B ac h e l o r o f Musical

Fo r cOllrse offerings, degree requirements, and p rograms in the S hool of the Arts, see Art, JOl1l1llwl icatioll alld Theatre, ;md Mllsic.

n

m

Anthropology Ap p l i ed Physics Art B iology Che m i st r y Chinese S t u d i es

FACULTY: S p i ce r, Dean; facu l ty members of the Depart ments o f o m m u n i c at i on a n d T h ea t re, a n d Music.

Educa tioll.

'"

RECOGNIZED MAJORS:

Art.

Art s ) ; the B M E ( Bachelor o f Music Education ) . Students may also earn the BA ( Bachelor o f A rts) , but this degree is awarded t h ro u g h the C o l l ege of Arts and Sciences. C a nd id ales fo r a l l de g re e s must meet general uni ersity re qui re m en ts and the s pe c i fi c re q u i reme n t s of the D e par t me n ts o f Art, Commu nica­ tion a nd Theatre , or Music. For details about t h e BAE ( Bachelor of Arts i n Education) in art, communication and theatr , or music, see the School of

» z o

Social Wo rk Sociology Spanish Theatre Women's Studies

German

Not more than 44 semester hours earned in one department may be applied toward the bachelor's degree in the college. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQU1REMENTS In addition to m ee ting the entrance re q u i re me n t in fore i g n language (two years o f h igh school language, one year of co ll ege language, or demonstrated equivalent p rofi c i en cy ) , candidates i n

the College o f Arts and Sciences (all BA, BS, BARec, BAPE [ excluding BAPE with certification ] , and BSPE degrees) must meet Option I , I I , or I I I below. Cand idates fo r th BA in English, for the BA in _ducatioD with concentration i n English, fo r the B A in Global Stud ies, for the B BA in Interna tional B usi ness, and for election to the Arete Society mList meet Option I. C om plet i o n of one fo reign language t h ro u g h the seco nd year o f c o l l ege level. This option m ay also be met by completion of fo u r years o f h igh school study i n one fo re ign language wit.h grades of C or hig her, or by satisfactory sco re s on a p rofi c i e ncy exam i nation admi nis tered by the PLU De p a rt ment of Languages and Literatures . II. Completion of one foreign language other than that used to satisfy the fo reign language e n t ra n c e requirement through the first year o f college level. This option may also be met by satisfactory scores on a pr o fi cie n cy exam ination adm inis­ tered by t h e PLU De p a r t m e nt of Languages and Literatures.

I.

I l l . Completion of 4 semester hours in history, literature, o r

language (at t h e 20 1 level, o r at a n y level in a language other than that used to satisfy the foreign language entrance requirement) inaddition to courses applied to the general u n iversity requirements, alld 4 semester hour- in symbolic logic. mathematics (courses n u mb e red 1 00 o r above), computer s ience, or st a t ist i cs in addition to co u rses a pp l i ed to the general u n ive r s it y requirements. C o u r ses used to satisfy either category of Option I I I of t h e C ol l e ge of Arts and Sciences requirement may not a l s o be used to satisfy ge n er al u n iversity requirements.

Biol o gy Chemistry Co m p u t e r S c ie nc e a n d C o m pute r Engineering

Geosciences Mat h e ma ti cs Phy ics

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MINOR: At least 20 semester hours selected from

Biology 253.535 .756 1 www. nsci.pll4.edl4/biol >

" o

..... o III

To learn biology i s more than to learn facts: it is to learn how to ask and answer questions, how to develop strategies which might be em ployed to obtain answers, and how to recognize and evaluate the answers which emerge. The department is therefore dedicated to encouraging stude.nts to learn science in the only way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to independently question it, probe it, try it out, experiment with it, experience it. The diversity o f courses in the curriculum provides broad coverage of contemporary biology and allows flexible planning. Each biology major completes a three-course sequence in the principles of biology. Planning with a faculty advisor, the student chooses upper-division b iology courses to meet indiv idual needs and career objective . Faculty members are also committed to helping students investigate career opportunities and pursue careers which most clearly match their i nterests and abilities. Students are invited to use departmental faciJities for indepen足 dent study and are encouraged to participate in ongoing faculty research. FACUITY: Alexander, Chair; Auman, Crayton, Ellard- lvey, Garrigan, Gee, Hansen, Hesse, Lerum, Main, D.J. Martin, McGinnis, Smith, Teska.

ny biology courses. A grade of C- or h igher must be earned in each course, and total G PA must be at least 2.00. Cour e prerequisites must be met un less written permission is granted in advance b y the instructor. pplicability of non-PLU biology courses will be determined by tbe department chair. At l ast 8 of th 20 credit hours i n biology must be earned in residence a t PL ; for students applying only 8 P LU biology hours toward the minor, those hours cannot include independent study (49 1 ) or coopera足 tive education hours.

Course Offe rings For cou rse descriptiollS,

I I I Biology and the Modern World - NS, SM

116

(4)

Introductory Ecology - NS, S M ( 4 )

1 6 1 Principles o f Biology I: Ceo Biology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Co-registration in Chemistry ( 1 04, 1 20, o r 1 25 ) recommended. 162 Pr incip les of Biology n: Organismal Biology - NS, SM (4) P rerequisite: 1 6 1 . 201

Introductory Microbiology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: HEM 1 05.

205 Human Anatomy and Physi.ology - NS, SM (4) Not designed for biology majors.

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: The

major in biology is designed to be flexible in meeting the needs and specia1 interests of students. For either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree the student must take the principles of biology equence ( 16 1 , 162, 323). Compl tion of this sequence (or an equiva1ent genera1 biology sequence at another institution) is required before upper-division biology courses can be taken. Each of these courses must have been completed with a grade of C- or higher. Courses not designed for biology majors ( I l l , 1 1 3, 1 1 6, 20 1 , 205, 206) ordinarily cannot be used to satisty major requirements. Independent study (49 1 ) and cooperative education may be used for no more than 4 of the upper-division biology' hours required for the BS degree, and for no more than 2 of the upper-division biology hours required for the BA degree. Students who plan to apply biology credits earned at other institutions toward a PLU degree with a biology major shouJd be aware that at least 14 hours in biology, numbered 324 or higher and including 499, must be earned in residence at PLU. Each student must consult with a biology advisor to discuss selection of electives appropriate for educationa1 and career goals. Basic requirements under each plan for the major are listed below.

206 Human Anatomy and Physiology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Not designed for biology majors. Prerequisite: 205.

323

Principles of Biology Ill: Ecology, Evolution,

and Diversity - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 1 6 2 or consent of department chair.

324

Natural History of Vertebrates - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 2 3 .

326

Animal Behavior - N S (4) Prerequisite: 323 or consent of instructor.

327

Omithology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323

or

consent of instructor.

328

Microbiology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 323; o n e semester organic chemistry recommended.

329 Entomology - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 323.

332

Genetics - NS (4)

Prerequisite: 323.

340

Plant Diversity and Distribution - N S , SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323.

Bachelor of Arts: 34 semester hours in biology, including 1 6 1 , 1 62,

323, and 499, plus 20 additional upper-division biology hours. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) and Math足 ematics 1 40. Recommended supporting courses: Physic 1 25 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 1 36 ) .

348 Advanced Cell Biology - N S , S M ( 4 ) No scientific methods credit or l a b for spring 2003 and 2004.

BachelOl" of Science: 42 semester hours i n biology, incl uding 16 1 , 162, 323, and 499, plus 2 8 additional upper-divi ion biology hours. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) , 232 (with laboratory 234) , and one additional upper-division cbemistry course with laboratory; Mathematics 1 5 1 or Math足 ematics 24 1 ; Physics 1 2 5 (with laboratory 1 3 5) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 1 36), or Physics 1 53 (with laboratory 1 63 ) and Physics 1 54 (with laboratory 1 64 ) .

35 1 Natural History of the Pacific Northwest - NS, SM ( 4 )

BACHELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION: Students interested in

Prerequisite: 3 2 3 .

this degree develop their biology program through the Biology Department in conjunction with the School of Education. Such students should have a biology advisor. See the School of Edl4cation section of the catalog for recommended bi logy courses and other pertinent information.

403

Prerequisite: 323 and one semester of organic chemistry or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: 3 2 3 or consen t o f instructor.

361

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Comparative Anatomy - NS, SM ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 3 2 3 .

364 Plant Physiology - NS, S M ( 2 ) Prerequisite: 323; organic hemistry recommended.

365 Plant Anatomy - NS, SM ( 2 ) Developmental Biology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323.

407

MolecuJal" Biology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequi ite: 32 .

411 40

visit the Pl.U catalog online at www.plu.edu/

print/catalog.

Y

Histology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisite: 323.


4.24. Ecology - NS ( 4 )

4. Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50, and

P r requisite:

5. Declare a major or minor in business through the School of Business. Access to upper div.ision business courses is limited to students who have been admitted t o the School of Business with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above, and who have met the re qu i red prerequis ites. Students with majors outside of the School of Business may gain access [0 specific business courses that support their major studies by permission of the School of Business.

4.25

323.

Biological Oceanography - NS, S M (4)

Prerequisite: 323. 4.26 Ecological Methods - NS, SM (4) Prerequ isi te: 323 or consent of in tructor. 441 Mammalian Physiology - NS, SM (4)

Prerequisites: 323,

recommen ded .

HEM 1 20; anatomy and biochemistry

448 lmmUlJology - NS (4)

Prere qui si tes : Any two )f the following cour

s

in Biology: 3 28 ,

332, 348. 403, 407, 4 1 1 , 44 1 . 475 Evolution - NS (4)

Term paper and mini-seminar required. Prerequisite: 3 2 3 . 491 lndepend.ent Studies ( 1 -4) O pen to

qualified junior and senior majors. Prerequisite: written

proposal for the project approved by a faculry sponsor and the departme nt chair.

499 Capstone: Senior Seminar - SR (2 ) A proposal fo r the t o p i c must be presented to the department early in spring term of the junior year. The s em i nar may be linked to, but not replaced by, laboratory independent study o r inter nship experience.

School of Business 253.535 .7244

til c: III

AFFI LIATIONS: The School of Busi ness of Pacific Lutheran University is a member of the AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The BBA, MBA, and accounting programs are nationally accredited by the Accreditation Co unci l of the AACSB. The school is privileged to have a student chapter of Beta amma Sigma, the national business honorary society recognized by AACSB. Pacific Lutheran University is accredited regionally by the Northwest Association of Schoois and Colleges. D.F.GR.I!E REQUIREMENTS: The

Bachelor of Business Adminis­ tration degre program consists of a minimum o f 1 28 semester hours com pleted with an overall grade point average of 2.50 or above as well a 2.50 grade p o i n t average separately in business courses. C- is the miuim al acceptable grade fo r business courses. At least one-half of the minimum total degree requirements are taken in fields outside the School of Business. At least 40 semester hours are taken in required and elective business subjects. A minimum o f 20 semester hours in business must be taken in residence at PLU.

IVww.plu. edll/-bllsa

Business degree and concentration requirements are estabUshed at the time of m aj or declaration. Students with a

The mission of the PLU School of Bu iness i s to be a bridge conn ecti n g students with the future by integrating competency­ based busin s e duca t io n , engaging a diverse, globalized society, using tcch nolog.ies that improve I arning, and e xe mplify i ng lives f service.

declared major in business who have not attended the university for a period of three years or more will be held to the business degree requirements in effect at the time of re-entry to the university. The use of pass/fail is available in any foundation course as defmed in the Pass/Fa il section of this catalog.

Objectives of rhe

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINIS RATION:

Ulldergraduate Business Progra m

To prepare students for positions in comnlcrcial and not-for­ p rofi t organizations by providing them the basic knowledge o f

how t h ese o rganizations function a n d equipp ing them with th necessary competencies to work effectively. bese com p etencies include ( 1 ) leadership, (2) critical/creative thi nking, ( 3 ) effective communication. (4) team effectiveness, and (5) taking in itiative and managing change. To help students see the interconnections among the many aspects of their world by integrating the liberal arts with professional busi ness education To i de n t i fy and cha l l e nge students to adopt h igh standards for ethical practice and professional conduct To prepare students for lives of s rvice to the comm unity To prepare students to use contemp rary technologies and to embrace the changes c a use d by tedmological innovation To in cul ca te a global perspective in . tudents

Z m III III

Requ ired fmllldation cou rses:

Comm unication 336 Effec t i v e Business Presentations Com puter Science 1 20 Computerized Information Systems - NS

4 4

(Informa tion Ivlallagemel1t stlldwts may substit14te CSCE 1 4 4 for

120)

Economics 1 5 1 and 1 52 Macro/Micro Economics - S2 Mathematics 1 2 8 Linear Models and Calculus, an Introduction (or Mathematics 1 5 1 ) - MR, NS Philosophy 325 Busines� Ethics - PH Statistics 23 t Introductory Statistics - M R

4/4 4 4 4 28

Minimum semester hours in foundation c ou rs es: Requ ired business co urses:

20t Value Creation in the Global Environment 202 Financial Accounting 203 Managerial Accounting 3 0 1 Managing Careers and Human Resources 302 Manageri I Finance 305 Creating and Leading Effective Organizations 308 Principles of Marketing 309 Managing Value Creating Operations 3 1 0 Information Systems 400 Business Law or 405 Law of th Financial Marketplace or 406 Law of the Workplace: Employees, Employers,

FACULTY: Bel l , Dean;

Pratt, Associate Dean; Albers, Ban roft, Barnow , Berniker, Chhabra, Pinni , Gibson, Hegstad, L e, MacDonald, Myers. Pbam, Ramaglia, Se p i c , Simpson, Thrasher, Van Wy he . Yager, Zabriske . The professional B, chelor of Bu iness Ad minis­ tration degree program is composed of an upper-division business curriculum with a strong base in liberal arts. To be admitted to the School of Business, a student must: 1. B e officially admitted to the university. and 2 . Have complet ed at least 32 semester credit hours, and 3. Have suc essfully completed with a minimum grade of C- (or be currently enrolled in) Business dministration 20 1 , C mputer 'cien e 1 20, Eco nomics 1 5 1-152, Mathematics 1 2 8 , Statistics 23 1 , o r their equivalents i n another college o r university, and ADMISSION:

P

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 4

Their Rights and Respons ibilities or 407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Companies, and Products or 408 International Busines, Law 499 a p st o ne Seminar: Strategic Management

4

Minimum semester hours in business courses:

40

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student may elect to co m p let e one or concentrations within the Bachelor of Business Adminis­ tration program. The concentra tion, wh ich is noted on t h e student' t ra n sc r i p t , must be co mp leted w i th at l e a s t a 3. 00 g ra d e point average. C- is the minimal acceptable grade fo r concentra­ tion courses. A minimum of 8 s m e ster hours of the total re­ qu i red for a co ncentration must be taken in residence at PLU. School of Busin internships ( Business 495) will be graded as pas ffail on ly. A l i mi t of one in ternship in any c o ncen t r ati o n will be accepted, not to exceed 4 cred it hours. An end p ro duc t may be required, as determined by the spon sor ing i n s t r u c tor. CONCENTRATIONS: A more

z

Business 335 Fi n a n ci a l I n vest m e n ts Busi ness 405 Law of the inancial Marketplace Business 4 3 7 Financial Ana l ys i s and Str a t egy One of the follo wing: Economics 35 1 Inter me d i a t Macro econo m i cs Economics 3 6 1 vI loney and B anki n g ( 4 ) .

Entrepreneu.rship IUl d New Ventu.re Management

20 sem. rull

Professional Acco unting

Business 320 Acco unting Information Systems Business 3 2 1 I n te r m ediat e Accounting I Busines 3 2 2 I ntermediate Accounting I I B usi ne s s 405 Law o f the Financial Marketplace

4 2 2 4

8 semester hOllrs }i"o m the following: Business 23 ost cco u n t ing and antrol Systems ( 4 ) B usiness 327 Ta A cc o u n ti n g I ( 2 ) Busi ness 4 2 2 .onsol i dat i o n s and Eq u i ty Issues ( 2 ) Business 4 2 3 ccounting for 'ot- for- Profit a nd lQvernmental E nt it i e s ( 2 ) B u i ness 4 2 4 A ud i t i n g ( 4 ) Business 4 2 7 Tax Accounting I I ( 2 )

8

24 sem. rus.

Hwnan Resoorce Management

4 B usi ne s s 34 2 l'v1 a na g i ng Human Resources Business 406 Law of the Wo rk p lac e : Employees, Employers, 4 T h e i r Righ t s and Responsibilities 4 Economics 3 2 1 Labor Economics 12 semester hours fram thefo/lowil1g (at least 8 from Business): 1 2 Business 343 Managing Reward S ys tems ( 4 ) Business 442 Leadership and O rg a n izati o na l D e ve l o pm e nt ( 4 ) Busi ness 445 Quality Improvement Strategies ( 4 ) Business 4 4 9 Cu r re n t Issues in Human anagemen t ( 4 )

Business 495 I n tern s hi p (4) Communication 4 3 5 Organizational Communication ( 4 ) Communication 4 3 7 Advanced I nter per so na l Communicatio n ( 4 ) Psych ol ogy 450 Psychological Tes t i n g (4) Psychology 46 [ Psychology of Wo rk (4) 20-24 sem. hrs.

international Busioess

lo ba l 1anagement Business 355 Managing Global Op e ra ti o ns Business 408 International Business Law Economics 33 1 International Ec o n o m i cs One of the fo llowing: An ap proved area course from Anthropology, Political Science ( 4 ) o r Bus iness 460 I nternational M a rk et in g ( 4 )

4

Busin ess 352

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liusine s 358 Ent rep re ne urs h i p 4 Business 405 La, of the Financia l Ma r ke t p la ce 4 Business 430 Entrepreneurial Finance 4 Bus iness 495 Internshlp 4 8 semester hOllrs 1;'0111 t h e followi11g (at least 4 from BI/siness): 8 Busi ness 323 Cost Acco u n t i n g ( 4 ) Business 365 Sales a n d 'ales iVlanagement ( 4 ) Business 438 Financial Research a n d A na ly si s ( 4 ) Busines. 442 Leaders h i p a nd O rganiza t ional Development ( 4 ) Business 467 Ma rket i ng Rese a rch (4) Eco n o m i cs 36 1 Monq' and Banking (4) Economics 371 Indu s t r i a l Organ ization and Public Po l i cy (4) Information Management

T h e mission o f t h e acc o u n t i ng fac ul ty is t o o ffe r a q uali ty b a cc a la u re a t e a cc o un t ing program designed to provide students wi t h a so l i d fo undation for develop ing a wide r a n ge of p r ofes ­ sional careers.

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Econom ics 3 4 4 ' conometric ( 4 ) Psychology 462 Co nsu mer Psyc h ology ( 4 )

8

Business 3 2 1 Intermediate A c co un ti n g 1 ( 2 ) B u in ss 3 2 2 In tcrmediat A ccou nting II ( 2 ) B usiness 3 2 3 C o t Accounting a n d Control S)'stems ( 4 ) B us iness 4 3 0 E n t rep re n e u r i a l Fi nance ( 4 ) Business 4 3 8 Fi nancial Re earch a n d A nal ysi s ( 4 ) Business 4 9 5 Internship ( 4 h o u rs maximum) E co no mi cs 344 Econometrics ( 4 )

12

ales Man a ge m e n t (4) B usi ness 369 I nternet M a r ke t i n g (4) Business 4 60 I n t e rna ti o nal Ma rketing (4) Business 495 I n ternship (4 ) Commun ication 2 7 1 M e d in LitenlC)' ( 4 ) Econo m ics 33 1 Internation,ll Eco nomics ( 4 )

4

(4)

4 4 4

tra tegy (4)

4

A n a l y sis

24 sem. hrs.

Business 365 Sales and

4 4

8 sel1lester hours from the f<lllowing:

42

Marketing Resoorce Management

Business 407 Law of t he rVlarkct place: Consumers, Companies, and P ro duc t s Busin ess 467 Ma rket ing Research Business 468 M a r ket i ng M anag em e n t 12 semester h o u rs frolll the follo wing (at least 8 from B usiness): B usiness 363 C on sum e r Behavior a n d Pro m o t i o n al

24 sem. hrs.

Financial Resou.rces Management

Resource

m llst co m p l et e either Option I of the Colleg of Arts and Sciences fo reign l ang ua ge require m e n t s or on e semester o f s t udy abroad 0- 1 6 And

22 sem. MS.

Business 3 75 I n t ro d u c t i o n to I n formation Management

4

B usiness 3 76 Ethical Issues in Information M a nage men t Business 478 I n fo r mation Management S e m in a r 12 semester hours ji-om the following: B usiness 3 2 0 Ac co un t i ng I n formation S y s t e ms (4) Busi ness 377 Data Base Appl ications in Business (4) Business 378 El ctronic Com merce ( 4 ) Busi ness 495 In tern s h i p ( 2-4 ) A n )' llpper-level computer science course ( u p to 4 c re d i t s )

2 4 12

GENERAL BUSINESS MINOR RULES: Al l courses must be c om p leted with a grade of C- or higher. A cumulative grade point a ve ra ge of 2 . 5 0 for a l l courses in the minor is re q u i red . At l e as t 1 2 semester hours must be upper division, and at least 8 sem<'stcr hours m ust be completed i n residence. MINOR IN B U SINESS ADMlN ISTRATION: A m i n i m u m o f 20 semester hour in husiness courses, including 20 1 . See General B usil1e", Aiillor Rules above. M I NOR IN FINANCE": A

minimum of 20 seme s te r hours, in cluding 20 1 , 202, 302, a n d 8 hours from the following: 335, 437, and 438. See Gelleral Busilless Mil10r Rules above. MINOR I N INFORMATION MANAGEM ENT: A mi ni m u m of

20 se mes te r hours, in c lu d i n g 20 1 , 202, 3 1 0, a nd 375, and one o f 377 or Co mp ute r Science and Co m p u te r ·ngineering 367, and 2-4 h ou r s from 376, 78, and 478. Prerequisite fo r minor: CSCE 1 20 o r C CE 1 44. See Gel1eral Busilless Minor Rules above. MINOR IN MARKETING*: A m i n i nlllm of 20 sem e s t e r hours, including 20 1 , 308, and 468, an d 8 hours from 363, 365, 369, 460, and 467. See General Business Minor Ru les above. *

Pending final approval.


ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: The accoun t ing certificat PI" gram i s a va i l a b le fo r students who hold a baccalau足 rea te de ree (any field) and wish to co m p l e te the ed u ca tio n a l req u i rement t

the Certified Public Acco untant (CP ) examinat ion: 24 credit from 202, 2 03 , 3 20, 3 2 1 , 322, 32 3, 32 7, 405 , 4 2 2 . 423, 427, 424. on tact the School of Business for fur足

tht'[ i n formati

s i t for

n.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: See Gradllate Stt u/ies.

400 Business Law ( 4 ) 405 L

w

of the Pinancial Marketplace ( 4 )

406 Law o f the Wo rkplace: Employees, Employers, Their Rights and Responsibilities (4) 407 Law o f t h e Marketplace: Consumers, Companie , and Products (4)

ca C

408 International Business Law (4)

Z m \II '"

422 Consolidations and Equity Issues ( 2 ) Prerequisites:

Course Offerings For course descriptiO/IS, vi it the PLU cata log onlille at www.plu.edu/ print/catalog.

320, 3 2 2 .

423 Accounting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Entities (2) P re re quisi t

: 202, CSCE J 20.

105 Personal Financial Planning and Consumer Law ( 4 )

424 Auditing ( 4 )

2 0 1 Value Creation i n the Global Environment (4)

Prerequisi tes:

202 Financial Accounting ( 4 )

427 Tax Accounting I I ( 2 ) Prerequisite s:

Prerequi it s: sopho more stand ing; M TH 1 28. 203 Managerial Accounting ( 4 ) F a m i l i a r i ty with M ic roso ft Excel o r (l t her spreadsheet req u i red. Prerequ i sites :

\II

320, 3 2 2 . 202, 327,

SCE 1 20.

430 Entrepreneurial Finance ( 4 ) w ft wa re

202, CSCE 1 20

is

Prereqlli. ite:

02.

437 Financial AnaIysls and Strategy

302. (4)

30 ) Managing Careers and Human Resource (4)

Prcreq lli.ite:

302 Managerial Finance (4)

438 Financial Research and Analysi ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 0 2 , a n d a t least (lne upper-d ivision Business prefix elective from the li t of F in a n cia l R sour es Managemen t con足

Prerequi ires:

202, CSC

1 20, ECO

1 5 1 , 1 52 , TAT 23 1 .

305 Creating and Leading Effective Organizations ( 4 ) 308 Principles of Marketing

(4 )

442 Leadership and Organizational Development (4)

Prerequisite: 05.

309 Managing Value Creating Operations ( 2 ) Pr requisi te : 202, E O l 1 , 1 52, M TH 1 2 8.

445 QuaJity Improvement Strategies ( 4 ) Prere q u i s i te:

310 Information Systems ( 2 ) Prerequisi tes:

202. C C

1 20 .

Prerequis ite:

Pr requisite: 202.

Prer quisi tes: 308, jllJlior st a n d in g .

202.

467 Marketing Researcb ( 4 )

Pre re qu is ite s : 3 0 8 , C S E 1 20, S TAT 2 3 1 .

322 Intermediate Accounting n ( 2 )

Prerequisit : 32 1 .

468 Marketing Management ( 4 )

Prerequisites: 3 0 8 a n d o n e u p per-division marketing class.

323 Cost Accounting and Control Systems ( 4 )

203.

327 Tax Accoonting I ( 2 )

478 Information Management Seminar ( 4 ) P re re quis i t es : 3 1 0, 3 7 5 .

335 Financial Investments ( 4 )

485 Study Abroad ( 1 - 3 2 )

Prerequi 'ite:

Prerequisite:

302.

junior standing.

342 Managing Human Resources ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 0 I .

486 Study Abroad ( 1 - 3 2 )

343 Managing Reward System ( 4 )

488 Special Topics ( 1 -4 )

P re re qu is i te :

P rere q ui s it e : 30 I .

jll n i(lr standin g.

489 Special Topics ( 1 -4 )

352 Global Management ( 4 ) P re requ i s i te: E N 33 1 .

491 Independent Studies ( 1 - 4 )

355 Managing Global Operations (4)

495 Internship ( 1 -4)

Prerequisite:

Prerequisites: junior standing a n d instructor app roval.

352.

358 Entrepreneurship

(4)

30 1 .

460 International Marketing (4)

321 lntennediate Accounting 1 (2 )

Prer q u i s i te:

305.

449 Current Issues in Human Resource Management

320 Accounting I nformation Systems ( 4 )

Prer quisites:

centration courses.

Pass/fail.

(4)

499 Capstone: Strategic Management - SR (4)

363 C o n umer Behavior and Promotional Strategy ( 4 )

Prerequisites:

365 Sales and Sale M anagement ( 4 )

503 Understanding and Managing Financial Resources ( 4 )

369 Internet Marketing ( 4 )

504

P r requisite:

505 Managing Effective Organizations ( 4 )

308.

375 Introduction to Information Management (4) 376 Ethical lssues in Information Manageme.nt 377 Data Base AppliatioDS in Business ( 4 ) 378 Electronic Commerce ( 4 )

(2)

302, 305, 308, 309, 3 1 0; enior s ta n d i n g.

Legal and Ethical Environment o f Business ( 4)

5 1 1 Managerial Acco unting ( 2 )

P re re quis i te s : 503, E C N 500. 5 ) 2 Value Creation: Operations and Information Systems (4) Prerequisites: 503, E ON SOO. P

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5 1 3 Marketing and Value Creation ( 2 ) P rl're l u i ' i tes: 5 0 3 , ECON 500.

Chemistry

535 Fin ancial lnvestments ( 4 ) Prerequisi te : 503, ECO 500. '" '" w

Z

253.535.7530 www.dlenl. p lll.edtt

537 Decision Models and Strategies for Financial Managers

(4)

Prerequ i s i tes:

503, , CO

Ch e m is try seeks toerstand the fu nua mental n a t u re of matt er, as

well as h ow its om po i t ion and e nergy content change.

500.

thi ' knowledge influcn

540 Effective Negotiadons (4) Prerequ isite: 505. Prerequisite: 505. 54.2 Man agement of Change ( 2 )

P re re q u i i te: 505.

(2)

P re req u isi te: 505. 54.9 Contemporary Human Resource Management ( 2 ) P r req u isite: 505. 553 Transnational Management ( 2 ) P re requ is i te : 50S. 555 Knowledge Management (-I ) Prereq u i s i te : 505. 558 New Venture Management (4) Prereq u isite; -03 . 564 Managing Services Marketing (4) Prerequ isites: 5 0 3 , F .O 500.

F a c ul ty research projects i n volve underg raduate pa r t i c i p a t i o n .

566 Developing New Products and Services

(4)

h air; Co t to n , M a rd is, Swa nk, To nn, Waldow.

FACULTY: Fryhle,

5 J 2.

Prere quisite :

St u de nt decid i n g to major in c h e m i s tr y should officially declare

574 Advanced Serrice and Manufacturing Delivery Systems ( 2) Prerequisites: 507, 5 1 2.

their intent a s ' oo n

as possi ble and

n o t later than 'l fter h av i n g

co mp leted Chemistry 232 and a fter co n s u l t at i o n with a faculty advi or in the

b c m ist r y department. Tra ns fe r lude nts desiring

d ep a r t m e nta l advisor no

575 Electronic Commerce (4) Prerequisites: ECON 500, 520.

to major in c h e m istry s h o u l d consu l t

577 Project Management (2) P rereq u i s i te: 505 .

i m p o rta nt tools and s t ro ngl y reco mmend' that a student

579 Technology Commercializ.ation and fiansfer ( 2 ) PrereqLl i si tes : 505 a n d ECON 500, 520.

c o u rse i n co mp uter science.

a

l a t er than the beginning o f thei r ju nior year. The c h e m is t r y dep a r t m nt

onsiders compukrs to be

pl a n n i ng to major in chem i s t r y take at least one 2 -cred i t h o u r

BACRELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry [ 20 o r [ 2 5 , 232, 234,

332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 499. Requi red supporting courses:

580 Technology Strategy and Competitiveness ( 4 ) P rerequisites : 504, 5 0 5 , 5 [ [ , 5 1 2, 5 [ 3 ; E ' ON 00, 520.

Math [ 5 [ , [ 5 2; Physics [ 53, [ 54, [ 6 3, [ 64.

587 Special Topics (2-4)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCB MAJOR ( t hree al t er nati ve s ) : l.

588 Special Topics ( 2 - 4 )

ene ral - Iead s to American Chemical

ociery ce rtifica tion;

Cht' m i stry

[ 20 or 1 25; 232, 2 3 4 , 332, 3 34, 3 3 8 , 3 4 [ , 342, 343, 344, 405 o r 450 or 456, 4 [ 0, 435, 499; Malh J 5 [ , [ 52; Physics 1 53, 1 54 , 1 63 , [ 64. For American h e m ical Society ce r t ifica ­ t i o n , 450 , nd ei t he r 405, 440, or 456 are r e quire d . 2. Bio clwmistry emphasi.l: hemistry 1 20 o r 1 25 ; 2 2 , 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 [ , _ 4 3 , 403, 405, 4 J O, 435, 499; B iology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323; 4 ho urs 'elected from B iol og y 328, 3 3 2 , 3 4 8 , 36 4 , 4 0 7 , 44 [ , 448 or C h emis t r y 342; M a t h l S I , [ 52; Physi 1 5 3 , [ 54, 1 63, [ 64. 3. Chemical-physics emphasis: Chemistr [ 20 or [ 25; 232, 234, 332, 334, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344, 4 9; Ma t h [ 5 1 , [ 52, 2 5 3 ; Physics 1 53 , [ 54, 1 63, 1 64 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2 , 33 , 3 56.

590 Strategic Management i n a Global Context (4) Prere qu i sites : 500, 504, 505, 5 [ 1 , 5 J 2, 5 [ 3 . 59 1 Independent Studies ( J - 4 ) Req ui res pr i o r approval by M B A p rogr a m d i rector a n d consent of i ns t ructor.

595 lnternshlp ( [ -4) Req u i res prior approval by MBA p ro g ra m d i rector and consent of i nst ruc tor. Pass!ra i l .

Generalized Chemistry Curriculum for t h e BS Degree SPRING

FAll

First-year (1) hcmistry 1 20 o r

1 25

Math 1 52

I n quir y Sem i n a r o r

Physi

Core course PE 1 00 or

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Chemistry

Math 1 5 [ Wri t i ng Sem inar

44

se o f

our l i ves i n many p ro fo u n d ways.

Whether i n terested i n the che m ica l pro� ssion itself, i n clu d i n g bioch e m istry, polymer chemi, t ry, radiation ch m i s t ry, 3nd o t her special i t ies, or in ch em i s t ry in conjunctio n with other fields such as business, the soc ia l sciences, and the h u m a n i t ies, s t udents w i l l have s u ita bl e programs ava i lable to m e e t t h e i r in terests at PL . D iversity i n career p l a n n ing is a key concept in the c he m i try department. Progra ms are ava ilable \ h i ch are broadly a pp lic a b l e to t h e heal th, biol ogical, phys i cal , ("I!vironmenlal b h a v io r a l , ami fu ndame ntal chemical s iences. The ch em i s t ry depa r t men t's coms 5 , cu r r ic u l u m , fac u l ty, a n d facil i t i es a re app roved b y t h e American Chemical Society, The. depa r t men t uses n u n1' roas scientific inst ru ments in the labonHories. Rese a rc h and te ach i ng equipment incl ude: 300 Mrl7 Fo ur i e r t r a nsform nuclea r magnetic reso nance, Fou rier t r a n s form inf.rar d, ultraviolet, visible, enl ission, and electron spin re� o n a nce spect ro meters; gas an d liquid chromatographs; gas chromatography! ma 'pec t romet ry; electrophoresis; prec i ­ sion refra lometer; dipol o mete r; sh rt path dist i l lation appara­ tus; sci n t il lation co un ter; zo ne refiner: fluorometer; C - H - N a na lyzer; I C P-AE$; an d t w o SC[ w o r k t a t i o ns.

54.1 Managing Innovation and Technology Change (4)

545 Continuou Improvement Strategies

es

activity

5

232, 2 3 4

1 5 3, 1 6 3 ( 2)

Inqu i ry Seminar or

Writing Seminar P E 1 00 or activity


105 Chemistry of Life - NS, SM ( 4 )

Sophomure

Ch e m i s t r y 332, 334 ( r . 3 6 ) Ph ys i c s 1 54 , 1 64 ( 2 )

C hem i st r y 3 3 8

S tudents w h o have n o t c o m p l eted hl�h s bool c.h e m i s t ry re ce n t l y

Bi logy

Biology 1 6 1 ( 2 )

s h o u ld take 1 0 4 beiore taking 1 05 .

Core courses

162(2)

Corc o u rse.,

Junior

Chemistry 34 1 ,

Core course

120 Gene.raJ Chemistry - NS, S M ( 4 ) of high school chemistry is requ i red. S t u d e n t s w i t h n o

O n e year

343

Chcmistry 342, 344

h e m i s t ry 4 1 0

Sellior h c m i s t r y 499

Elect ives

hemistr 499 h em i s t ry 4J5

Elecr ives I . Re fe r to the Divisioll vi Nal l l w i Sciell ces ,c c l i oll of t h i s catJlog fo r other b e gi n n i n g c u r ri c ul u m o p ti o ns . 2. T hE' d e p a r t m t'n t stres. the i m p (l I"tance of t,ll, i n g p h ysics d u r i ng e i t h e r the first ye,u or t he sop h o m o re year. T h i s p e r m i t s a b e l t r u ndersta ndinu o f c h e m i s t r y a n d enables a student to complete deg ree re q u i re m e n t s w i t h no s ch ed u l i n g d i fficult ies in t h e j u n i o r and s e n io r years. t u d e n t s i n t e rested i n th Ba c h el o r o f Science with bio hemistry e m p h a s i s sho u l d plan to rake b io l o gy in the al te rn ate y ar. 3. S t u d e n ts desirin ' to fu l fJl lhe College of rts a n d Sciences foreign I, nguage req ui rem nt under p t i o n I, o r who desire to attai n o r m a i nta i n a l anguage proficie ncy, should take a l a n gu a g<, ou rse as p a r t of t hei r oplional selections.

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recog ni tion 0 outsta n d i ng work the desi ·' nation willi Departmental HOI/()r; may be granted to Bachelor f S ience g r a d u a tes by vote of thl' facu t l y of t he chemistr dep a r t men t, based on the studen t's p er fo r m a n c e i n t h ese areas; I . COll rs/! work: he gf<lde p o i n l average in che m is t ry ou rses must be at least 3 . 50. 2. Written work: From the time a , l udent dedo res a majo[ i n c h e m i s t ry, copies o f o u tst a n d i n g work (e.g., l aborator y, sem i na r, and research re p o r ts ) w i l l be ke p t fo r later s u m m a ry eval ua t io n . 3. ral commrmica t l(}ll: ·tud n t s mu l evide.nce a b i l i l y t o co m m u n icate effectivel, as i nd icated b)· L. he SLI m of the.ir pa rtici p a t i o n in class di. cussi o n , sem i nars, help session leadership, and teaching assistantsb i p wo rk . 4. htrlepelldetll chemistry-related activities: Po si tive 'onsider­ atiollS i n cl ude th elCtenl nd qua l i ty of extrac u r r icular w rk done i n background readi ng, i ndependen t s t u dy, and research;

ass i s t i ng in laboratory p reparatio n , t each i ng , or advising; a n y other chemist ry-related e m p loym en t , on cam p U 5 or elsewhere; and particip a t i o n in campll� and p ro fessi o na l c h e m i s tr y­ rdated organ i1Cations. The depar t ment I honors design ation will appear on a graduat­

h igh school c h mistry o r

a

we ak mathemal ical backgro u n d

hould take .hemistry [04 before t hi cou rse. M AT H [ 40

or

m:1th pIa em en t in

125 Advanced General Chemistry - NS. SM ( 4 ) A n o u tstanding record i n a one year h igh school c hem ist r y c o u rse

or advanced high school che m istry is req u i re d .

.oreq ubi tc: M ATH 1 5 1 .

2 1 0 Nutrition, Drugs, and the Individual - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prercq ui.si leS: o n e y a r o f h igh school ch e m i s t ry o r equivalent recom mended.

(4) 234.

232 O rganic Chemistry - NS, SM Pre requ is ite; 1 20 o r 1 2 5 .

oreq uisit :

234 Organic Chemjstry Laboratory I - NS, SM ( I ) Coretl u is i te : 2 3 2 .

332 Organic Chemistry 1 1 - NS, SM Prerequ isites: 2 3 _ , 234.

(4)

Co req uis ite: 334 or 3 3 6 .

334 Organic: Chemistry Laboratory n - NS, S M ( I ) Prereq u i s i t e : 234. Con:quisite: 332.

336 Organic Spedal Projects Laboratory - NS, SM ( I ) Corequi i t e : 332.

338 Analytical Chemistry - NS, SM (4) Prerequ i s i tes : 1 20 or 1 25; J IA'1"1 I 1 40. 34 1 Physical Chemistry - NS, SM ( 4 ) Prereq u i s i te : .HEM 1 20 or 1 2 5, MATH 1 5 2, PHYS 1 54 . 342 Physical Chemistry - NS, SM PrerC'lu i s i te': CHEM

(4)

1 20 o r 1 2 , 1ATH 1 52 , PHYS 1 54 .

343 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory - N S , S M ( 1 ) P re req u i s ite or corequ is ite: 34 1 .

344 Physical Chemistry n Laboratory - NS, SM ( 1 ) Prereq uisite o r core q u i s i l.e: 3 4 2 .

403 B iochemistry I - N S , SM (4) P re requ i s i t e s : 3 3 2 , 3 3 4 .

405 Biochemi t ry n - NS, SM ( 3 ) P rerequ is ites: 34 1 and/or 342 o [ permissi o n ; 403. 4 10 Introduction t o Research - NS (2) Stude n t alt nd s m i n c1 rs as p a r t. of t h e course req u i re me n t . 435 Instrumental Analysis - NS. SM ( 4)

i ng chem i s t ry major's t r a n sc r i p t .

Prerequisi te ; 3 3 8 ; 34 1 and/or 342; 343 .

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: S t u d e n t s i nt re t ·d in this degree devel o p their c h em i s t r y progr;ut1. through the department in conj u n ction w i t h the chool of Educat ion. See Schoul ofEd,./wliol1 section.

440 Advanced Organic Chemistry - NS ( 2 )

CHEMICAl ENGINEERING: S t u d e n t s i n t e rested i n p u r s u i ng studies in chemical e n g i ne e r i n g shou l d sec the course o u tl i n e i n t h e Er lgillee r illg Science t ion of t h i s c,llalog. The d epart m e n t chair sh o u ld be consulted for assignment of a prog r a m a d v i s o r. MINOR: 22 semester h o u r s , i n c l u d i n g 1 20 or 1 25 ; 2 3 2 , 234, 3 3 2 , 3 3 4 or 3 3 6 ; 3 3 8 , an d 4 h o urs o f add i L i o m l 3 0 0 - o r 400-level c hem istry course ( s ) co m p l e ted w i t h gra d e s o f C o r h igher.

orequisi te:

co u rse h i gh e r than 1 40.

a

Prerequ i s ite: 3 32 .

450 Inorganic ClLemistry - NS. SM (3 ) Prerequisite:: 332. 34 1 ; Prerequisite or co n:qu i sit e :

342.

456 Polyme.rs and Biopolymers - NS, SM ( 3 ) Pre requ i s i te: 31 1 ; Prerequisite o r cmequisite: 342.

491 Independent Studies ( 1 , 2 ,

or

4)

Proposed p r o j ect Ill u s t be approved by department chair and su per v i s o ry respo n s i b i l i t y

accepted by an i ns t ructur. M a y be

t aken m o rc t h a n once.

Prerequisite and corequisite requirements are strictly Imforced.

497 Research ( l , 2 0 r 4) May be taken more t. h a ll o n c e .

Course Offerings

499 Capstone: Semjnar - SR ( 2 ) St udents attend s em i n a r s a s part o f t h e course requ i re m e n t .

For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog olllillt' at www.pJu.edu/ prin t/cataJog.

598 Non-thesis Research Project ( 2-4 ) Open to master's d e g ree candidates only. Prerequisite: consent of

104 Environmental Chemistry - NS, 8M (4)

de p ar tme n t ch a i r.

Studen t s w i t h o u t high chool chemistry arc encou raged to take

1 04 before taking 1 05 or 1 2 0.

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• These courses may co unt for program credits only when the stude/It's course project is fOCI/sed on Chilla and is approved by the program chair. ,. History 496 may be COUll ted toward program requiremellts ollly when it focuses specifically on China.

Chi nese Studies 2 53.535.76 1 9

www.pl.l.cdu/-csp III W

W III W Z

The Chi nese Studi pro"ram is an interdisciplinary program wh ich is designed to provide students interested in China a broad foundation in Chine e language, culture, and history, and an opp rtunity t o focus on the reljgious-philosophical world vie\ and the economic and business structure of China. The progr m requires that major and minor students complete course w or k in at least three different disciplines: Chinese lan­ guage, history, a n d anthropology, with optional work in political science, the art , religion, business, and other disciplines. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the univ rsity'$ China exchange programs (currently at Sichuan Univerity and Zhongshan Univers ity) and may request that credits earned through these programs be coun ted toward the major or minor. With the approval of the p rogram director, selected Janu­ a ry-te r m , ummer, and experimental courses may be included in the major or minor. FACULTY: A commi ttee of faculty administers this program: Youtz, "air; Ba rnowe, Benso n , Byrnes, Dwyer-Shick, Guldin, I ngra m, Jensen, Li, M a n fr e d i , McGinn is, Yie. Mr. Sidney Rittenberg erves a honorary advisor. BACHELOR O F ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours ( 2 4 required,

8 elective); studen t s

mu

t take at least one Chinese history

co u rs ' .

Required

CUll r5es: (24 semester hUllrs)

Anth ropol ogy 343 East Asian Cultures - C, 5 1 .hinese 2 0 I Intermediate Chinese Chinese 202 Intermedjate Chinese Hi tory 339 Rcv l ut io n a r y Chino Rel igi on 233 Religions of China hinese St udies 499 Ca p s to n e: Senior Project - SR Anthropology 345 Contemporary Ch ina - C, S I Busi.ness 3 5 2 Global Management' Chi nese 30 1 Compo ition and Conversation ,hinese 37 1 Chinese Literature in Translation - C, LT Chinese tuJies 2 7 1 Perspectives on Chinese Film - C Ch ines Studies 287 Sel cted Topics in Chinese Studies His t ory 338 Modern Ch.ina - C, S I Hi tory 496 Sen inar: The Th ird World (a/y on China) ... - C, I , SR Music 1 05 The rls of China - AR, C Political Sden e 3 8 1 Comparative Legal Systems - C, S I

(8 required, 1 2 elective)

Required ollrscs: (8 semester hOlln ill Chillese Irmguage) C hi n e s e LO I Elementary Chinese

Ch inese 102 Elementary Chi nese (or o ne equivalent year of un iversity-level Chinese, upon a p p roval of the program chair)

Electives: (12 semester hours from at least two additional departments)

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287 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies: Chinese PhIlosophy (4) 499 Capstone: Senior Project - SR (

1-4)

Classics 2 5 3 . 535.72 1 9

www.plu. edl//-lallg/c1assics. html The Classics Program is a cooperative e ffort among the Depart­ ments of Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy, Religion, and Art. I ts goal is to unite the "heart of the liberal arts" with the mind, through history and philosophy, and rhe soul, through religion, and to embellish this trinity of themes with the visual experience of art. This in terdepartmental Classical Studies major requires the completion of 40 semester hours, induding at least one year of one of the classical languages ( Greek and Latin) and two of the other. The remaining cours s are selected from the list below in consultation with the program coordi nator. The Classical Languages major require a l l 40 semester hours in language study.

Students are expected to become familiar with the reading list for that part of the program (art, literature, history, philosophy, or religion ) in which their interest l ies. The program is designed to be flexible. In consultation with the Classics Committee, a student may elect a course or courses not on the classics course Ii t. Al l core classics courses are taught out of the Department of Languages and Literatures.

Anthropology 345 Contemporary China - C, S I hinese 3 7 1 Chinese Literature i n Translation - C , LT Chin e Stud ies 2 7 1 Perspectives on Chinese Film - C Chi nese Stud ies 287 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies Hi tory 338 Modern China - C, S 1 Hi to ry 339 Revolutionary China - C, S I Mu ie 1 0 5 The Art of China - AR, Religion 2 3 3 Religions of China - C, R3

P

print/catalog.

27 1 Perspectives on Chinese Film - C ( 4 )

Latin 1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary Latin 20 I , 202 Intermediate Greek 1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary Greek 20 1 , 202 I ntermediate Art 1 80 H istory of Western Art I - AR Classics 2 3 1 Masterpieces of European Literature - LT lassies 250 Classical Mythology - LT Classics 3 2 1 Greek Civilization - S l Classics 3 2 2 Roman Civilization - S I atLtral Sciences 204 History of Science - NS Philosophy 3 3 1 Ancien t Philosophy - PH Religion 2 1 1 Religion and Literature of the Old Testament - R I Religion 2 1 2 Religion and Literature o f th Ne\ 11 stament - R I Religion 2 2 1 Ancient Church History - R2 Religion 330 Old Testament Studies - R I Religion 3 3 1 New Testament Studies - R I Independent Study Courses Selected January Term Courses

46

For course descriptions, visit the PLU catalog unLine at www. plu.edu/

CLASSICS COMMITTEE: Snee, Coordinator; Arnold, Batten, Jansen, E. Nelson, Oakman.

Electives: (8 se mest er hOIl rs )

MINOR: 20 semester hours

Course Offerings

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I . 'v\ i l l , a t t he t i me n f declara t i o n . hal' d (u l1lU i a t i v grade p o i n t a erage of 2.50 r h igh e r. 2. \Nill have ue e� s fl l L l )' co m p l led t ht! co m m u n i c a t io n core cour e s ( 1 23, 27 1 , 284. 285) wiLh a g ra d po i n t average o f 2."0 o r h igher. Studenh who o mp let 1 2 3 or 27 1 w i l h a grade p o i n t average of 3 . 0 or higher m a y declare p ro is i on a l J y u n t i l successful c l m p l d i o l 1 o f t h e core course ' 1 23 , 2 7 1 . 2 8 4 , 28 5 ) . Prospective m ajo r s w i t h g r adt' po i n t 8VtTagcs fro m 2. 50-2.99 h ve t h e o p t i o n to co m p l e te an a p p l i cation packet and m ay be ad m i r ted as . pac a l low s .

'" o s: s: c: z

COMM UNlCATION CORE COURSES: Com munjca t ion

Communication and Theatre 253. 35 . 776 l lIl1V 1V.plll. CI/I1/-tot h The fa u l t y or t he Department of Co mm u n i ati n and T heat re b c o m m i t te d to d p h i lo ophi(.,l per,pe tive on c mm u n i ca t io n as the pmcl: . . hy vhich � ha red understandings . r e (['rated amon ' audil!nces t h ro ug h tht: ust' uf s ' m bols. I m pl iciT w i t h i n thi� u ll(krst ,U1 d i n � is .lg rement on t he as s u m p t ion t h a t p pit: i t rera t w ith one an other or lhe p u r po 'C of a ch i e v i n g outcomes, an .1 t h a t t h is i n tc ract i ( n i accomplisht·J t h ro u gh a variet y of

media.

We focus our c u rr i c u l u m and education o n four abi lity gTOU ) tlut each . tudent sholl I ma ter. F i rs t i. th abi l i t )' t u th i n k a nd rc"tlC "t criti caily. S tu d e n t � hould b e able t o ob erve. analy-u, p .: rce i w relat ion sh i ps, reaso n , and m a ke i n ference� ab\lu t the i r liv ' and world" Second. s t u de n t s shoul j be able to express t h e mse l ve s effectively using v e r ba l a n d no nveroal techniques. T h i rd , . tudents s h oul d be a Ie to i n te r act with one am t h e r and their e n v i ro n m e n t . Final ly, s t uden t s should develop an ability to value t hemselves, t h ei r enV Iro n me n t , and oil er as d iver . ,lnd important fa cts of o u r s o c i a l l i ws . ith t he It:arning of the e a b i l i t i es comes a responsi h i l i t y to co m mu n i t ), and s o ci a l ser i

�t u(lics. Fil m , P r i n t l B roadcasL Jou rnalism, a n d P u b l i c Relations B ach e lQ r of rL. e m p h a s i s areas a n d the B a c h e l o r of Fine Arts conct:.ntraLiun i n Coml1l u n ication and Cl ci al lu t ice Il1U t campi tt: t he ollowing ore courses: 1 23 I n tro d u tion t< R he to ri c a l Co m m un i c a t i o n 27 1 'Ied ia L i te ra cy 284 C;pt:aking Sem i n a r 2 1) 5 \'\ riting Sem i n a r 4 9 5 I n t e rn sh i p 499 C"pstonc (t he B FA dc:grees usc 4 8 5 as t h e ca p s t on e)

BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAJORS: 40 -44 of the a reas of conce n t ra t i o n :

$

111

stcr ho ur, i n

l . COlll llllllliwl ; 0 1 1 SI I/dies - relt u i red co urses: ulll m u n i c a t i o n Core c o u rses plus:

4 cred i t s fro m : 3 7 8 Broadcast J o u rn a l is m 384 dvanced t'ws Re p o rt i ng 388 dvo a y VV r i t in g or a p p roved research course 4 creuits fro m:

326 81 385 433 435

, roup o ll1ll1 un ication M ed ia Law I n t ro du c t i o n to P u b l i c Relation s

437

Interpersonal Commu n ication

R h et ori al a n d Commu n ication Theory rgan izational Co m n llt n i e<1t i on 436 Per uasi o n on llic l and � o m 1l1 u n icat i o n or a p p roved

440

t he o ry (OULe 4 <-redits from:

.'28 3

rgull1t' n tatiol1

0

dVJllceJ Public. Spea k i ng ud io Produ ction ideo Prl dllction 380 Newspaper Editing. Layout, a n d Desi g n 43R dvanced Pub lic Relation ' 480 I n -de p t h and Invest igat ive Repo r t i n g or approwd a p p l i ca t io n comse

1 5 1 , 1 60. 1 62 , 1 63 . 24 1 , 3 58 . 3 :9 , 363 , 364 , 4 - 8. 'o cou rse MA co u n ls toward the u nivers i t y o re r q u i r m ·nls.

e m p b asis

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: t udents I ho wanl [ 0 d ec la re a major in co m m u n icat io n with an emphasi in 11 1 m , p r i n tl broadc<'l st, public rc lat io n. . or a Bachelor l)f Fine Arts in Soc i a l Justice a n d dvocdcy:

-I :t m » -I ::0 m

any

beg i n n i ng w i t h the prefIX

M I NOR REQUI REMENT: All Bachelor o f rlS e m p h a si s a reas re q u ire the l.'O m p l e t i o n of ei her " m i n r ppr ved by he major advi s r or a S 'If-direct d m i nor i n c l u d i ng th fo l l o w i n g areas: 3 or 4 seme ter hour in e ol1 urn i cs, 4 se m es te r h o u r in . ta t isti.:: or n: ea rc h method�. and 1 2 scme tcr h o u rs in social , (iell es.

o

439 I n terc u l t u ra l .o mmu n i c a t io n

FACUlTY: I nch, �"air; Bartanen, lkcvar, Clap p, L b renhu lis, Fel ler, H<lrnc , La nd , L i 0 ky, I 1 ielLke, Ro wt' , picer.

COMMUNICATION CORE COURSES: Ail 13 a c h el o r of Arts 1 , [ea: (Commu n i cation t ud i e ' , Pr i n t/B roa dcast Jou rnali 111 , F i l m, anJ Puhlic Rt'l at i o n :lnd Bachelor or Fine r t s (Co m m u nication ilnd 'odal Justice) must complete the fo llowi ng I' ,'ourse ': 1 23 , 2 7 1 , 284, 2R5; 3 34, 390. 39 1 , 92, 393, lr 43 ; 495, 49

» z

4 cred i t s u f " Va l u i ng" from : 3 3 4 Gender m m u n icatio n 390 o m m u n i ca t i o n Ethics 39 1 IfTlfTl un i c a t ion Ab ro ad 392 Com mun ication Ab ro a d 393 o m m u llication Abroad

e.

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREM ENTS: Only the fo llowing courses [rom Co mmunication and Theatre m a y be use 10 m et t h e ge neral ul 1 iversi core rc q u i rem nt in the a rt s:

o z

Plus

4 el e c t ive hour,.

2. Film Studies - reql / ired courses:

o m m u nicat ion Core courses pl u s : 374 Video Production 375 Film PI' ldu(tiun TH EA 162 History (,f A m e r i ca n Film T I I F A 460 Film Seminar Plus d ec t ive h o u rs from 00- <l nJ 400-level courses sele ted in c o n s u l ta t i o n wilh advi 'or. 3 . Prillt/Broa dcast jOllrtliliiSIN - reqllired course,:

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... a: �

c( ... :z: � Q Z c( z o

:,;ommunication Core courses plus: 480 In-Depth and Investigative Reporting 4 cr�dits from: 378 Broadcast Journalism 384 Advanced News Reporting Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in

1 6 credits from: 328 Argumentation 334 Gender Communication 433 Communication and Rhetorical Theory 436 Persuasion 439 Intercultural Communication (cannot be double­ dipped with other requirements) 440 Conflict and Communication (cannot be doubledipped with other requirements) 8 credits from two of the following categories: Speech and Debate, Service learning, Study Abroad, Foreign Language. Minor in one of the following areas: anthropology, environmen­ tal studies, global studies, legal studies, political science, psychology, social work, sociology, women's studies, or a self­ directed minor consisting of 3 or 4 hours in economics, 4 hours

consultation with advisor. 4. Public Relations - req uired courses:

Communication Core courses plus: 385 Introduction to Public Relations 435 Organizational Communication 4 credits from: 378 Broadcast Journalism 384 Advanced News Reporting Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

in research methods or statistics, and 12 hours in social science. 2. Thea tre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - req uired courses: 1 5 1 Stage Technology 160 Introduction to Theatre 24 1 Oral Interpretation of Literature 250 Fundamentals of Acting 352 Stage Management 357 Intermediate Acting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre II 454 Play Direction Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

5, Theatre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - req uired courses:

1 5 1 Stage Technology 160 Introduction to Theatre 225 Theatre Practicum 250 Fundamentals of Acting 352 Stage Management 357 Intermediate Acting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre I I 4 2 5 Theatre Practicum Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

3. Theatre - Design/Tech nical Emphasis - req uired courses: 1 5 1 Stage Technology 225 Theatre Practicum 352 Stage Management 356 Stage Lighting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre U 425 Theatre Practicum 4 credits from: 250 Fundamentals of Acting 454 Play Direction 4 credits from: 452 Scenic Design 453 Costume Design Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in

6. Theatre - Design/Techn ical Emphasis - requ ired courses:

1 5 1 Stage Technology 160 Introduction to Theatre 225 Theatre Practicum 352 Stage Management 356 Stage Lighting 363 History of Theatre I 364 History of Theatre " 4 credits from: 250 Fundamentals of Acting 454 Play Direction 4 credits from: 452 Scenic Design 453 Costume Design Plus elective hours from 300- and 400-level courses selected in consultation with advisor.

48

consultation with advisor.

In addition to requirements listed above, candidates for the BA degree must meet the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement.

All candidates for the BFA degree must satisfactorily complete a formal internship of 1-8 semester hours under the supervision of a faculty member.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: At least 54 semester hours

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

in any of the three areas of concentration:

See School of Educa tion.

1. Communication - Com m u n ication and Social Activism ­

MINORS:

req uired cou rses:

I.

Communication Core Courses plus: 4 credits from: 330 Public Speaking 425 Forensics Practicum 4 credits from: 384 Advanced News Reporting 388 Advocacy Writing 433 Rhetorical and Communication Theory 425 Journalism Practicum or approved research and writing course 4 credits from: 326 Group Communication 334 Gender Communication 440 Conflict and Communication or approved interaction skills course

271, 284, 285, plus 1 2 hours from 300- or 400-level communi­ cation courses selected in consultation with advisor. 2. Film: 20 semester hours, including Communication 27 1 , 374 or approved production course, Theatre 1 62 and 460, and 4 credit hours of upper-division electives from either Commu­ nication or Theatre.

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Minor in Communication: 20 semester hours, including 1 2 3,

3. Theatre: 20 semester hours, including 1 5 1 , 160, 24 1 , 250, plus 4 hours from communication and theatre course selected in consultation with advisor. 4. The Dance Minor is crosslisted with the School of Physical Education. See the description of that minor under Physical Education.

5. The Publishing and Printing A rts Minor is crosslisted with the Department of English. See the description of that minor under Publishing and Printing Arts.

Y


Course Offerings: Communication For course descnptions, visit the PLU ca talog olliine at www.plu.edu!

print! catalog.

Prerequisite: 374. 480 I n-Depth and Investigative Reporting - SR (4)

Prerequisites: 380, 378 or 384.

1 23 Introduction to Rhetorical Conmllmil;ation (4) 225 Communication Practicum ( 1 )

An instructor in the area of i n terest must approve the p roject and agree to provide guidance. 234

475 Advanced Media Production ( 4 )

Introduction to Research In Communication ( 2 )

27 1 Media Literacy ( 4 ) 284 Communication a s Proc�ss: Speaking Seminar ( 2 )

285 Communication as Process: Writing Semina.r ( 2 ) 321 The Book in Society ( 4 ) 322 PubUshing Proudures ( 4 ) 324 Nonverbal Communication ( 2 )

Prerequisite: Comm unication core o r consent o f instructor. 326 Group Communication ( 4 ) 328 Argumentation ( 4 ) 330 Advanced PubUc Speaking ( 4 ) 334 Gender and Communication - A ( 4 ) 335 Intercultural C-ommunication Workshop ( 2 )

485 Communication and Social Activism - SR

(4)

n

o

491 I ndependent Studies ( 1- 4 ) A student should n o t begin registration for inde p en d ent study until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a

:!: :!:

c: z

departmental sponsor. 4.92 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 )

n

A student should not begin registration fo r independent st udy until the specific area for investigation has been approved by a departmen tal sponsor.

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493 Independent Studies ( 1 -4 ) A student should not begin registration for in d e p ndent study until the specific area fo r i.nvestigation has been approved by Q

> z

departmental sponsor.

c

495 I nternship ( 1-8) 499 Capstone: Communication - sa ( 1 -4 ) 500 Effective Communications ( 2 ) 596 Research in Communication ( 1 -4 )

For graduate students only. 597 Re�arch in Communication ( 1-4)

336 Communicating i n Bus.iness and the Professions ( 4 )

For graduate stl dents o nly.

373 Audio Production ( 4 )

598 Re�arch in Communication ( 1 -4)

Prerequisite: Commun ication core or consent of instructor.

For graduate students o nly.

374 Video Production ( 4 )

Prerequisite:

ommunication core or consent of instructor.

378 Broadcast Journalism ( 4 )

Prerequisite : Commun ication core o r consent of instructor. 380 NeW5paper Editing, Layout, and Design ( 4 )

P rereq uisite: Communication core or consent of instructor. 38 1 Media Law and Principles (4) 3 84 Advanced News Reporting ( 4 )

Prerequisite: Communication core or consent of instructor. 385 Introduction to Public Relations ( 4 ) Prerequisite: Communication core or consent of instructor. 388 Advocacy Writing ( 4 )

Prerequis ite: Commu nication core or consent of instructor.

Course Offerings: Theatre FaT collrse descriptions, visit the PLU m tillog olllille at \Vww.plu.edu/

print/catalog. 1 5 1 Stage Technology - AR ( 4 ) 160 Introduction to Theatre - Aft ( 4 ) 1 6 2 History of American Film - Aft

(4)

163 History of the Foreign Film - A R ( 4 ) 225 Theatre Practi.cum

One semester hour credit may be earned each semester, but o n ly 4 semester hours may be used to meet un iversity requirem nt . An instructor in the area of i nterest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance.

390 Ethics in Communication (4)

241 Oral I nterpretation of Literature - Aft (4)

39 1 Communication Abroad: Studies in Culture ( 1-4)

250 Fundamentals of Acting - AR ( 4 )

392 Communication Abroad: Studies In Culture ( 1-4)

35 1 Stage Makeup - AR (4)

393 Communication Abroad: Studies in Culture ( 1-4)

3 5 2 Stage Management

425 Communication Practicum ( 1 ) An instructor in the area of interest must approve the p roject

3 56 Stage Ligbting - AR ( 4 )

and agree to provide guidance.

- AR

(4)

357 Intermediate Acting, The Actor At Work - Aft ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 250.

433 Rhetorical and C-o mmunication Theory (4)

358 Advanced Acting - AR ( 4 )

435 Organizational Communication (4)

Prerequisite: 3 5 7 .

436 Persuasion

(4)

437 Advanced Interpersonal Communication ( 4 ) 438 Advanced Public Relations ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 3 8 5 o r consent of instructor. 439 Intercultural Communication ( 4 )

Prerequ isite: Communication core o r consent o f instructor.

359 Actiog for the Non-Actor - AR ( 4 )

Not open t o theatre majors or minors. 363 History of the Tbeatre: Aeschylus Through Turgeniev

- AR ( 4 ) 364 History of the Theatre: Ibsen Through t o the Preseot - AR ( 4 )

440 Conflict and Communication (4)

Prerequisite:

ommun ication core or consent of instructor.

450 Wowhop in Effective Public Speaking (2) P

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(I) One seme t e r hour credit mal' be e a rn ed ea ch semester, but on l y 425 Theatre Practicum

<1 s meste r 11(,)u� may be u s e d t o meet u n i ver s i t y requirement,;. An instn. lcto r i n the area of in terest must approve the proj e c t and agree to p rovide gu id a nc e . w 0: r­ « w :r rQ z «

Comp uter

452 Scenk Design - AR ( 4 ) 453 Costume Design - AR

(4)

458 Creative Dramatics - AR

E spe cial ly a p p rop ri a t e fo r busin ess majors and other students wish i n g an in troduction to the com p uler and applications of software packages. Computer Science and COlllpu ter EIIgineering 1 '14:

(4)

460 FUm Seminar: Approaches to Film Theory - AR

I n t rod u c t ion to

neering, m at h em a t i cs, and most sci ence m aj ors , as well as others wishing a strong experience. in co m pu te r p rogra m m i ng.

( 1 -4)

z o

491 Independellt Studies

r­ « u

492 Independent Studies ( 1 --4)

CO lllpliter Scie/lce ami Co mputer Ellgineerillg 270:

'istration a p p r o v ed by a de p a r t m e ntal sponsor.

Da t(l Structll res

This is t h e second course in the major. With d epa r t me ntal

R q u i res p re- reg istration approved by a departmental sponsor.

a p p ro val , students with a t rong p ro g r a m m i n g ba c kg rou n d may receive a d va n c e d placement i nto this co urse.

493 lodependent Studies ( 1 -4 ) Req u i re!

pre-r gist ra ti o n approved by a d ep a r tm e nt al sp on sor.

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT: All s t u de n ts have u n l i mited access to the un iversity Computer Center's u er-room faci l ities. The Dep a rt m e n t of o m puter Seienc a n d ,oll1p uter En g in ee.ring also m a i n t a i ns a S laris server a n d 1 b o ratories of its own. The upper-level lab c o n t a i n s L i n u x , dnd 'vVi ndow. workstation:;. The other lab is used as a te a chin g laboratory a n d op n lab; i t has 1 8 Windows T wor . tations and co m p u ter p roject i o n eq ui p men t. All machines are on the E t h ernet, are accessible through the campus network, and have ful l a c c es s to the I n ternet.

( 1-4)

For gr ad u ate st uden ts on ly. 597 Research in Theatre ( 1-4) F o r graduate st u d en t s on ly.

( 1 -4) t ud e n ts on ly.

598 Research in Theatre

POI' grad u ,

te

253.535.7400 s.plu. edll

Computer Science �() mputer sc ience dea ls with the th eory, d e sign, and a pp l ication of computing systems a n d the s t u d y of the s to r i n g a n d m a n ip u­ lation o[ inform a t i o n . The p ro gram at Pacific Lutheran Un iver­ sity pr vides a broad base core of fu n damental m a terial t ha t st ress es analysi;; and des ign expe ri e n ce s w i t h substan tial labora­ tory work, inc l ud i n g software development. In addition, stu d en t s are expo ed to a variet y of pr ogr a m m ing la nguages and sys t e m s . St u den t can choose from a number of upp er-level courses wh ich i n s u re a depth of knowledge and an understanding of cu rrent d eve l p ments ill the fie l d . T h e Ba chel o r of S c i e n ce degree i n co m p ut e r cience has b ee n ac ft'd i t e d by the o m p u t i n g Accredita t i o n C o mm iss i o n o f

AB ET. Computer Engineering Comp u ter n gi n e e r i ng is a rel ative l y new e n g i n eeri ng s p ec i alt y lh, t has grown o u t 0 rapidly evoking m icro- and m i n i-com ­

pu ter tech nology. The c u rr i c ul um co nsi sts of essential a n d adDIKed e l e m en t s fro m co m pu te r science and elect rical e n gineer­ I ng, de vel o pi ng both ha rd wa re and oftware ex p e r t i s e . Elec t ive s pe r m it con entration i n are-'\!> s uch as i n t eg ra t ed circu i t design, m icroprocessor appl icat ions, com puter des i g n , a pp li ca tio n soft­ ware deve lopment, and artificial i n te l l igence. Blaha, Chair; Brink, Hauser, Kakar, Murp hy, pillman, Wo l ff.

FACULTY:

BEGINNl N G CLASSES: There a r e several beg i n n i n g-level classes

in co mp uter science desig n ed for students with various

needs: ompllter Science a n d Compllter Engineering 1 1 5:

Solve if with the CO lllpllter

50

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S tudents majo r i n g i n com­ p u ter science may ch oos e to earn either a Bachelor o f Arts d e g ree or a Bachelor of Sc i e n ce degree. The Bachelor of Arts p rog ram is the m i n i m u m p reparation suitable for further profess i on a l s tudy a n d is often combi.ned with extens iv{� s t udy or a second maj o r i n an a l lied field. The Bachelor of Science is a stron g , scien t ific deg re e that co n tains add itional c ou rs · s in co mputer science, math emat ics, a n d science a n d serves b o t h s t ud e n ts go i ng d irectly i n to em ployment o n graduation and those going into gr a du a t e pro g r am s. Both degrees are based on t h e same core courses: Co m p u t e r Science and :om p u te r Engineering 1 44, 270, 34), 380, 499, Mathematic 1 5 [ , 1 52, a n d 245. Students should begi n Com­ p u t er Science and o m puter Engineering 1 4 4 , 270 a n d Math­ ematics 1 5 1 , 1 52 e a r ly i n their progra m . A m i n i m u m g r ade of C - is required in a l l c o u rses ( i ncluding su p p o r ting courses) co unted fo r the major. COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS:

computer Science a nd Computer Engi neering lVWIV.

omp u ter Science

For stu d ent s majoring in co m pute r s c i e n ce, co m p uter engi­

(4)

Pre requ isite: 1 62 or i n s t Tllctor's p erm is si o n .

596 Research in Theatre

cience and Co mputer Ellg ill€crillg 1 20:

Compllterized Information Sys rems

454 Play Direction - AR (4) Prerequi ' i les: 1 5 1 , 250, and j un i o r status.

Requ i re' pre-re

E s p ec ia l l y fo r students with little or no b a c k gro u n d in co m­ who wi. h an i n t ro d u cti o n to the lise of the co m p u ter fo r p ro b l e m so lv i n g . ot r e c o m me n d ed fo r s t ude n ts with strong mathematics ba kg ro ll n ds. Thi course also sat i sfies the Mathe m a t i cal Reason i n g re qui re m e n t . p u te r science

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BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

t le a s L 26 se mester ho u r s of

com p u ter ci e n ce and (; n g i n ce r i ng i ncl u di ng

1 44 , 270; 346 or 380; and 499. The re ma i n in g hours are from com p u ter science and e n g i neer in g courses numbered above 329 (except 345, 449, and 50 1 -509 ) . U p to 4 hours may be subst i tuted from lath 340, 34 1 , and 356. R e qui red s u p po rti n g : �il a t h [ 5 1 , 1 5 2, and 245. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 44 semester h o u rs in c o m ­ puter seienc plus 30 h o u rs of sup p o r t i n g cou rse in ma t h e m a t ­ ics and science. The 40 sem est er hours of mmputer science must i n cl u de 1 44, 270, 343, 346, 37 1 , 372, 380, 499, and 14 addit iunal credits o f a p p roved e l ec t ive courses, one of w h ich must be from 367, 420, 436, or 444. Elective courses s u b m i t ted for app roval are t o be selected from the com p ut e r scicrlce cou rses nu mb e re d above 329 ( e xce p t 345, 449 and 5 0 1 - 509), o r hours from Ma t h 356 n o t cou n t ed toward the 30 hours of req u i red s upp o rt i n g co u rses. The 30 hours o f su p p o rti n g course in mathemat ics and science m us t i n cl u de: 1. Mat h 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 230 ( o r 33 1 ) , 340 ( o r 34 1 ) . 2. A m i n i m u m of 1 2 hour of npproved scien c o u rses which i n clu d e s a year's sequ en ce of a laborato ry science. P h ys ic s 1 5 3 , 1 54 with 163 , 1 64 are prefe rred. Chemistry 1 2 0 or 1 25 and either 2 3 2 o r 3 3 8 , Bi o l ogy 1 6 1 , 1 6 2, Geosciences 1 0 1 , 1 0 2, o r 1 03; and 20 1 are acceptable.


3. Approved sciences courses arc: any Biology except 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 ; any Chemistry except 1 04, 1 05, 2 1 0; any Geosciences �x.:epl 1 04 ; any Physics except 205 ; Computer Science and Engineering 345. 4. The remaI n i n g hours, if any; may be chosen from any Math­ ematics course n umbered above 329 ( except 446) or any ap­ proved science course.

330 Introduction to Artificial lntclUgence - NS 343 Programming Langnage Concepts - N S (4)

Prerequisite; 270. 345 Analog Electronics - NS ( 4 )

Prerequisite: 245

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: 20 semester hours includ­

346 Digital mectronics - NS ( 4)

ing Com puteT cience and Computer Engineering 1 44, 270, and 8 additional hours of upper-division computer science courses numbered above 329 ( except 345, 449, and 50 1-509 ) . Required suppor ting: Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 28 , or equivalent.

348 Modeling and Simulation - NS ( 4 )

MINOR I N IN FORMATION SCIENCE: 24 semester h ours

367 Database Management - NS ( 4 )

inc luding Computer Science and Com puter Engineering 1 44 and 367, Business 202, at least 4 additional hours from compu ter science courses numbered above 250 ( except 345, 449, and 50 1 509) , a n d at least 8 add i t ional hours selected from Business 320, 3 7 5 , 3 76, 378, or 4 7 8 .

(4)

Prerequisite: 270, MACH 245.

P rereq u isite: 1 44. Prerequisite: 1 44. Recommended: 2 7 0 a n d either MATH 34 1 o r 345. VI n

Prerequisite: 1 4 4 Recommended: 2 70.

'"

3 7 1 Design and Analysis of Algorithms - NS (4)

Prerequisite; 2 70,

MATH

Z

245.

f"I

m

SECONDARY TEACHING MINOR: See description under

372 Algorithms, Machines, a n d Grammars - N S ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 3 7 1 .

Scl100l of Educa tion.

380 Assembly Language and Computer Organization - NS ( 4 )

ELEMENTARY TEACHING MAJOR: See desc ription under

Prerequisite: 2 7 0 . Strongly reco mmended: 346.

STATE ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS: See description

385 Computer Architecture - NS ( 2 ) Prerequisite: 380, MATH 245.

under

386 Computer Network - NS (4)

School of Educa tioll.

School of Educa tion.

BACHELOR O F SCIENCE MAJO R IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING: Computer Science and Computer Engineering

1 3 1 , 245, 345, 346, 499: Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 253, 340 or 34 1 and one of 230, 3 3 1 , or 3 6; Comp uter Science and Com ­ puter Engineering 1 44 , 270, 380, 480; Physics 1 5 3, 1 54, 1 63 , 1 64 ; Chemistry 1 20 o r 1 25; at least 4 semester h o u rs chosen from Physics 233, 234, 333, 3 34, 336, or Chemistry 34 1 ; 1 0 additional semester h o u rs from arty upper-level Computer Science and Com puter Engineering course ( except 449 dnd 50 1 -509 ) . MINOR I N ELECI'R1CAL ENGINEERING: Computer 'cience

and Computer Engi mering 1 3 1 , 245 , 345, 346: and 144. Required supporting: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 2 5 ; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, and 245 or 253; Physics J 25, ! 26, 1 35 , 1 36 or 1 53, 1 54 , 1 6 3 , 1 64.

Course Offerings

Prerequisite: 1 44 . Reco mmended: 270, 346; MATH 34 1 or 345. 39 1 Problem Solving and Programming Seminar - NS ( I ) Pass/Fail only. Students m'lY take this course more than once.

P rereq uisite: 2 70 or consent o f instructor.

m

400 Topics i n Computet' Science - NS ( 1 -- 4 )

"

Prereq u isi tes: 2 7 0 and M AT H 2 3 0 O r 3 3 1 .

Z m m ;g

420 Software Engineering - NS ( 4 ) Prerequi i tes: 2 7 U , MATH 2 4 5 .

Z G't

4 1 2 Computer Graphics - N S ( 4 )

436 Pattern Recognition - N S (4) Prerequisites: 2 70, M ATI-I 245. 438 'Expert Systems - N S (4)

Prerequisite: 330 or consen t of im.tructor.

print/catalog.

444 Operating Systems - NS ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 380. MATH 245 .

1 1 5 Solve It With the Computer - MR, NS ( 4 )

Prerequisite: fulfill ment of t h e PLU ent rance requirement i n mathematics. 1 20 Computerized Information Systems - NS ( 4 )

P rerequisite: MATH 1 28 or 1 40 or equivalent. 1 3 1 Introduction to Engineering - NS (2) Pre requisite: Completion o f college-preparatory mathematics. 144 Introduction to Computer Science - NS ( 4 )

446 VLSI Design - N S ( 2 )

Prerequ isite : 346. 449 Computer Science in the Secondary School ( 2 )

n o t count toward a major in computer science. Prerequisite: 1 44 .

Does

455 Compilers - N S (2) 1 rerequi ites: 3S0, MAnl 245. 480 Microprocessors - N S (4)

Prerequ isites: 346, 380.

Prerequisite: Four years of h igh school mathematics or MATH 1 40 or equivalent.

491 Independent Studies ( 1 - 4 )

199 Directed Reading ( l or 2 ) Admis ion only by department invitation.

492 Computer Science Research ( 1-4)

245 Electrical Circuits - NS ( 4 ) Prerequisite: MATH 1 5 1 ; PHYS 1 54 or consen t of the inst ructor.

499 Capstone: Seminar - SR ( 2 ) The[e are 2 credits given each term for

270 D ta Structures - NS ( 4 )

Prerequisite: a grade of C- or h igher i n 1 44 . 29 1 Independent Studies - N S ( 1 -4 )

Prerequisite: consent of department chair.

Z

4 1 0 Topics i n Computer Engincering - N S ( 1 - 4 )

For course descriptions, visit the FLU catalog online at www. plu.edu/

A grade of C or higher is strongly recommended in all p rerequiSite courses.

:P Z C

Prerequisite: consent o f department chair. Prerequisite: con ent o f instructor. J total of 4 credi ts. Prerequisite: Senior Computer Science or Computer Engineering major or consent o f depart men t chair.

503 Workshops in Educational Technology ( 1 - 4)

Docs not count toward degree. in computer science.

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11\ Q. J: 11\ Z III: '" IZ

z o I­ <£ u :J Q w w

> I­ <£ III: w Q. o o u

Cooperative Education I nternships

Fo r Wll rse descripliolls, visit tJle PL

253.535.7324

priIlI!catalvg.

Course Offerings

IVWlv.pl I I . er/14 1 - C(lop e d Coopera t ive Educalion is

G

u n i q u e p ro ' ram t hat. o rre r.� h a n d s -o il

job , peri nce. Th rough i n te r ns h i ps students w ave work i n g and le a rn i n g tog�t ha. T h e p ro g r a m feat ure. sys temat ic cooperation between the u n i vers i t and an extensive munber o f employers i n the Pllgt!t

(lund com m u n ity, though

a

student m a y

,tuden15 ga i n an apprecia tion of the re l a t io n s h i p belw en th eo ry and app l ica t io n . and may learn, both early and first hanel, a bo u t new develop ments in a p ar t ic u l a r field. J\ co p ern t i ve

educJ t i o n experie nce enables s l u d en ts to become aware of the c hang ing d i l1l ensiom

f work. It is fa bric of i nves t iga t i e lea fll i ng.

a

376 Work Experience J ( 1- 8 ) Requ i re s the co m p le t i o n of a Cooperat ive ducalion L ea r nin g Agr eme nl in con u l l a t i o n w i t h a fa c ul t y sponsur. 476 Work Experience D

p ar ticipa te in a co- p ex perience a n yw he r' in th' world .

CII l aiog orJiille ar www,plu.edll/

( I- 3 )

Req u i re the comp l e t ion f a Coop erative Edu cation Lea rning Agreement in cons u l t a tion w i th a faculty sponso r.

477 International Work Experience ( 1 - 1 2 ) Requ i res c o m p l et i o n of I he L n terna t i ona l Co o pera t i ve Education Agree men l, comp l et iot1 of , · learJ.nce checkl ist , a nd a n a p p ro ved p l a n of report i n g i ll co n sul tat ion w i t h a facu l t y spon so r. 576 Work Experience ill ( 1-4) Requires c o m p l e t i c1 n , f a Coop rative E d u ca t i o n Agreement i n con u lt a l i o n with .1 fac u l ty sponsor and the s tude nt's g ra d ua te

kcy p ro g r3 m in PLU's

FACULTY: Herbert· H i l l . Di reCior TWO MODELS: The Coopera ti v e E d u c a t i o n Program acco m ­ m o d a t es bo th part- l i me a n d fu ll - t i m e wmk schedules. Part · t i me wo rk allows student to t.1k on-campu co u rses concurrently. A

program adv isor.

ful l -t i me work ex p erien ce requ i res s t u de n t s to dedic ate the ntjr term t o tht!ir co-op � mplt)}'111el l l. In mO$t cases , st uden ts will follow o ne or the () th er, but · n1l' dep a rl m� nt s or schools may develop seq ue n ces that co mbine b o t h full - t i m e a n d part-t i me work options.

THE PROCESS FOR TUDENTS: To be d i g i bl c fo r a' d m i s s i on into the Co ope rative Ed u c a t i o n Program a s t u d e n t mu t have completed 32 semester h O ll r� and b in good standing with the

u n i versity.

lude n l ' whn wish to en ro l l in Cooperative Ed u ca t i o n mllst ire t r o r t h e Co-op P rogram to determ in e' el igib ility, terms fo r pl ace m en t, a reas o f i n t rest, ac ade.m ic r� q uirements, and i nt ern sh i p o p ti o n s . Studen ts a re responsible for co m p le t i n g a learning agreement includi ng learnlll" objc rives, rel a ted a c t i v i t ie , and academi documentation of l ea rn in g d u ri ng t h e i r cooperative ed u ca t i o n exp erien c. Each s t u den l m u s t arra nge fo r acade m i c supervision from a fac u l t y p o n s o r. Fac u lt y a r c IT spo ns ib l e for in urin g t h a t the work experience provi des a pp ropr iate learning 0PP rtuni­ tic , f, r helping to establish the l ea r n i ng agreement, and fo r det r mi n i n g J grade. Lea rn i n g i ' ass essed t h rough a Lear n i n g Agreement, comp l e t ­ i ng a n acade mic p r oj ec t, per iod i canta t w i t h the fa cu l t y spo nsor, and a n on-site s u p e rv i s l' \.... ho acts as a pro� s� i o n a l role model , net m e n t o r. The lea r n i ng agreement, developed by each stud l1t with the dssistance t ) f a faculty s p onsor, L ists lea r n i n g obj ect ives, a descript ion of h o w t h o se objectives will be accom­ pLi b d, and how' s t u d e n t.o; wi l l do c u me n t what they have learned . The learning agree m en t is signed by the s t u d e n t , the fac u l t y poasor, the p rogram d i re c t o r , and the work s u per v i s o r , each of whom rece i C 5 a copy, �oIltact ( pe r o nal , phone, elec t ron ic, etc.) between thc fac u l t y spo nsor and the s tud en t must be s u ftlcient to allow the 'pomor to serve a s a resource and p ro v i d e academic supervis ion . Site vi its may be made by the fa cu l ty SpOIl o r o r the en-op program d i recto r i n agrecment w i t h t h e facul t y sponsor. Employers a re res p o n s i b l e to: ( l ) provide o p portu n i t i� s R r students to a ch i ev e the i r l e a rn i ng objective ' w i t h i n th e l im i ts o f their work elt i ng�; (2) h e l p stud nts develop ski l ls reI ted to the contextual aspects of the work w o r l d (sllch as rela t ionships w i th w - wo rkers ) ; and ( 3 ) fu c i l i t a t stud IIts' i n tegration i n to their work selling so thaI rheir emp loyme n t proves va l u a b l e and proehl l i ve. S t ude n ts are req uired to register fo r at least l cr ed i t hour after ac plin ' , c o - o p posit ion . Th rougho ut all undergraduate a cadell1ic car<!e:l" a student may receive a maximum of J 6 c red i t s i n coo p erative educa tion . c on tact their depa r t ment fa c u l t y or the

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Economics 2 5 3. 5 3 5 . 7598

w w w.p l l4. ec /t /l- ew ll "B)' vir/lie of exchange, one person's property is belleffcia/ to a/I others." -FRFDEIU("" I3AqlAT Econo mics is the st udy of how pc p i e e s ta bl i s h social a r range­

m e nt s for pro d uci n g a nd d i s t ributing goods and ser vices to susta in and enhance h u m a n l i fe. Its ma i n obj ect ive is to de t er­ m i n e .lll fficiellt use of l i m ited eco no m i c resou rces so that p oplc recei ve the 1l1Jximum h.:n tit at the lowest cost. The econom ics d i sc i p l i n e e m b races a body of t ec h n iq u es and co nce p t ua l too ls t ha t ar o u r c o m p lex ecollom i

usefu l for u nders ta nding and ana l yz i n g ystem .

FACULTY: R e i m an , Chuir; R. J e n�e n , N . Peterson, t Cla i r, Terada, Travis. BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: ( A l M i ni m u m of 40 semester h o u rs, i n c l u d i n g 15 J , l52, 3 5 1 , 3 5 2 , 4\19, J 2 h o urs of l'lectives in

eco nomics, 4 hours selected fro m Mathematics 34 l or Sta t i s t ics 23 l , and 4 h ours e l ec ted from Econo m i cs 344 ( i f llul used as economics electives) , Business 202 or 302, Mathematic; 348, o r u p to 4 ho urs i n o m p u t e r sci ence . ( B ) A g rade p o i n t a erage of 2.50 in all c l as s in d u d 'd in the 40 semester hours to\ ard the major. Wi th departmental ap proval, Econ om ics

J 30 may be s ubst i t u te d D r Economics 1 52 for p urpo es of major and minor requirements. Eco no m i c 499 meets the senior sem i n a r/project require m e n t .

For stu de n t s p la. n n i ng grad ua te work in e co n o m i c s or b usi ness , add itio nal mal h preparcltioll will be necessary. For speci.fic ou rSe!, onsult your maj r advisor,


3 44 Econometrics - S 2 (4)

CONCENTRATIONS: T he Economic, Department offers t he fo l l ow i ng concent rations:

Prereq u i s i t e : STAT 2 3 1 01' eq u ivalen t .

Dome!t ic E(QIIl) lllic Allalysis� 1 5 1 , 1 52, 35 1 , 3 5 2, 495, 499: 1 2 homs ch ose n from a mo n g : 32 1 , 322, 36 l , 36 2 . a n d 3 7 1 ; Polit ical Sci ence 345, 346; Stat istics 23 1 or 34 1 ; 4 h o u r s chose n from o m p ute r Science and ,Qm p u te r a m o n g B usi ness 202.

345 Mathematical Topics i n Economics - S 2

Prcreq u i,ites:

1 3 0, 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ,

or

(4)

consc'n t o f i ns t ructor.

3 5 1 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis - S2

or

Engineering 1 1 5 . or Math 348.

Prerequ.isites: 1 3 0 or 1 5 1 ; M ATH 1 28 , 1 40,

International Ecollomic A nalysis:

352 Intermediate Mkroeconomic Analysis - S2

1 5 1 , 1 52 , 5 5 1 , 3 5 2. , 495, 499; 1 2 ho.sen fro m a m o n g : 330, 3 3 1 , 33 5 , 3 38, 339, 34 1 ; Poli t i cal Scim ce 3 3 1 , 347; Stat isti 2 5 I o r 34 1 ; 4 hou rs chosen (rom among B us i ness 202, Co m p uter S c i e n ce a n d Co m pu ter Engi­ n eering 1 1 5, or Math 34u. hours

Ma rilema t ica / Eco numics: 1 5 1 , 1 52, ' 44, 345 , 3 5 1 , 352 , 4( 9;

hours o f l:-co no m ics electi es; Mat h

o r 34 1 .

The Modem

1 5 1,

8

1 52 , 25 3 ; S tat istic s 2 3 1

(4)

m

o c:: n » -I

151.

(4)

Prerequ i s i tes: 1 30, 1 5 2, o r c o ns e n t o f i n s t r. - uctOf; M T H 1 28, 140, or 1 5 1 . 353 Strategic Behavior - S2

o z

(4)

36 1 Money and Banking - S 2 ( 4 ) Prerequisite: 1 5 1 o r c o n e n t

f i n s t ruc tor.

362 PubUc Finance - S2 (4) P re re q u is i te s : i 30, 1 52,

Ecollomic Ellterprrsc: 1 5 I , 1 52 , 3 2 1 , 35 1 , 3 52, 3-3 ,

3 7 1 , 495, 499; 1 2 h o u rs of Bu s i ne s electiv s (200 Ie el () r h ighe r, 20 I reco m m ended ) ; Sta t istics 2 .3 1 or 34 1 . B u s i ness 492 may be s ubs t it u te d for Econom ics 495. HONORS MAJOR:

utsta. n d i n g studenrs may choo�e to p ursue

gra l uattng i n eco nom ics wit h ho nors, [n add i t i o n to mt!cti ng ;Lil ot h e r major req u i re ments, in o rder to bi:' gran ted departmen tal h ono rs a stude n t m u s t : ( ) have a n overal l u n iversity grade p o i nt average of 3 . 5 0 or be t t e r ; ( B } take 4 h o u r beyo nd the s ta n d a rd major in 498, HOIl rs Thesis ( Studen ts a p p l )· fo r a d m i.ss i o n to t h is c o u rse i n the seco nd semeste r of t h e i r junior year. The department gra n .!s a d m ission t () 498 , I l o n ors Thesis, based o n t he studen t's prior work in eco n o m i c s a n d the q u a l i t y of t h e gen era l re earch p roPiJ Sa l ) ; (C) p rcst: n t t h e res u l t s of till' work completed i n 498, Honors Thesis, a t a meet i n g of O m i c r u n Delta Epsilon ( the eco no m i c s ho no rary) . MJNOR: 24 sem e s te r hours. i n c I l l d i og 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 3 5 1

or

352,

a nd

1 2 add i t io n a l hour s of e l e c t i ves , 4 of w h i c h may be in statistics.

ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCI ETY: The de p a rt m e n t o ffers mem bersh i p in O m i c ro n Delta Ep s i lo n , the Inte rn at i o nal

Prerequis ites: co n s e n t o f the d ep a r t m en t a n d co m p l e t ion o f either 3 5 1 or 352. 495 Inte.rruhip - 52 ( 1 - 4 )

Pre re q u i s i tes: s o ph o mo re stan d i ng p l u s o n e co u rse i n eco n o m ics, ;1 n d consent of t h e depa r t m en t ,

498 Honors Thesi - S2 ( 4 )

Research p ro p os al a n d topic developed by t h e student i n the j u n i o r year. Application to en ro l l is m a d e in the second emester o f the j u n i o r year. P r e re q u i s i te: economics major , nd co n s e n t o f t h e de p a rt me ll t . 499 Capstone! Senior Seminar - 5R ( 4 )

P re reqU i s i te : 3 5 1 or 3 5 2 ( may be t a ke n concurre n tly) . (4)

School of Education

Por cOllrse descriptiul ls, visit the PLU catalog onlilJe

at

www. plu.edu/

print/catalog, 1 30 Global and Environmental Economic Principles - S2

S t Lldents ca nnot take bo t h 130 and 1 52 for cred it. 1 5 1 Principles of Macroeconomics - S2

('1)

1 5 2 Principles of M icroeconomics - S 2

(4)

(4)

2 5 3 , 53 5 .7 2 7 2 www,plu. edu/-educ

The School of

Education o ffe rs

u n d e r g r a d u ate and g ra d ua t e

p rograms of s tu d y l ea d i n g to ce r t i fica t i o n fo r elementary, seconda ry, a n d s p ec i a l ed u cat. ion teac h e rs,

administrator ,

rea d i n g spec.i al ists, a n d school lib rarians. The c u r r i cu l u m is d esi g n e d to p ro v i de g radua tes with a blend of t he

St udents c a n n o t take b o t h 1 3 0 a n d 1 S 2 for c redit.

and

a

l iberal arts

va r i ety of gu ided field experiences begi n n i n g early i n

the e ducat i on a l seq uence. T he fac l l l t ' i s c o m m i t ted t o t h e

321 Labor Economics - S2 ( 4 )

d e v e l o pmen t o f c a r i n g , c o m petent e d u c a t i o n a l leaders

Prereq uisi tes: 1 30, 1 5 2, o r c o n sent o f i nstru etuL

commi tted to l ive (Jf s e r vi ce . A co n s i s t en t em phasis o f a l l p rograms is t h e p r o m ot i o n o f s t ud e n t l e a rn i n g i n K · 1 2

322 Health Economics - S2 ( 4 ) 330 Environmental o.nd Natural Resource Economics - S2

o r c o nse n t o f inst ructor.

Prerequisites: 1 50 , 1 5 2 , or cunsen t o f i nst ructor.

338 Environmental EI:onomic PoUcy in Europe - S2

(4)

339 PoHtiod Economy of Hong Kong and China - S 2 ( 4 ) 34 1 Economlc Development: Comparative Third World

(4)

Prerequisites: 1 3 0 o r 1 5 1 , o r conse n t o f i n structor. 343 Operations Research - M R ( 2 ) Prerequ isi te: TAT 23 l o r equiva l e n t .

(4)

i nstitutions.

FACUIn: Beck, Deall; Lei tz, Associate Dean; L a m o rea ux , Director ofMA with "er ti(ica tiorl Program; Ba r r i t t , Byrne , Chasta i n , Gerl a c h , I-T i l l is, Lewis, McG raw, M i n e t t i , Mulder, Reisberg, G. Wi l l ia m s , Ye rian, Ye tter.

(4)

335 European Economil: I ntegration - 52 ( 4 )

Strategies - C, S2

P rerequ i s i te: 3 5 1 or 3 5 2 ( m ay b e taken concurren t l y ) . 49 1 l ndependent Studies ( 1 -4)

of Ee/lAmt iou.

Course Offe rings

33 1 International Economics - S2

486 E.volution of Economic Thought - SR ( 4 )

520 Economic PoUcy Analysis ( 4 )

mt'mber.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: Sec SciIool

Prerequ,isites: 1 30, 1 52,

371 Industrial Organization Il11d Public Policy - S2 (4)

Prerequ isites: 1 30, 1 52 , o r conse n t o f i n 'tTuc tor,

500 Applied Statistical Analysis

Eco n o m ics Hl)norary Socie ty, to qualified m aj o r s . f o r speci fi c c r i t<:: r i a , se� any dep a rt me n t a l fa c u lry

o r co n s en t o f i nst ructor.

PROGRAMS OFFERED: The S ch o o l o f

Educatio-n is National ,ouncil fo r Accred itation o f Tea c h e r Education ( NeATE), t h e o rthwest Asso c i a t i o n of S c h ou l s a n d Colle ges, and. the Washi n g t o n State Bo a rd o f E d ucat i o n fo r t h e preparat i o n of e l e m e n tar y, s e cu n d a ry, and s p e c i al ed ucation teachers, r ead i n g s p e c i a l i st s , school l ibrarians, and ad m i n is t ra to rs, w i th the Master of A r ts in Education the highest degree a p p r o ve d . T h e ac c re d i t a t i o n gi ves PLU gTaduates rec i p ro c i t y with many other states. accredited b y t h e

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z o I­ et u ;:)

Q ...

The School of Ed uc ati on (Iffers cou rsewor k towJrd ( h e c nver ' jun , renewa l , l l r rei nstatement of teJch i n � ce r t i fi c a t e s . I t orfer� various o p t ions t o a d d endorscments t(l c u r rt'n t c e r t. i fi­ catl!S, It .1J 0 ffers cO llrsework a n d support to i o d ividtds seeking \Va h i n gt()tl ta te Profess ional C c r t ifi ca t S O l' cerL i fic a ­ t ion u n de r t h e al iona l Board of Professi o n a l 1eaci1ing S t a n ­

RESIDENCY TEACHING CERTIFICATE: S t udents who

dards.

rt'qu irem nr:; i n t l u de

Current graduale program

in dude Maste r

successfully com ple te

ments

Ill lllended by t he c h ool r Educa t i o n c rl i fica t . A idition I ·tate Wa shington Stat Pat ro l check, an FBI

rt'G(

fo r a Washington re s i d e n cy teaching a

fi n ge r p ri n t check, and

a

pas, i n

score on state e n t r y-tll-pract ice

with Re:; i dtmcy Teacr ung Certific a t i o n ; C l assro o m Te Jching;

tes ts . I n fo rmation regard i n g aU sta te requirements and p roce­

C lassro o m Tea h i ng:

d u res fo r cenification l avai labl

rban Learners; L i ter ac y with options of

e ndor ements in Rea di n g , Library and Media Educat io na l A d m i n istration. The S hoal of

ervices; and

in t h e School of

ducarion is in the

ELEMENTARY CERTlFICAl'ION AND ENDORSEMENT OPTIONS: he basic u n d e rg rad u a t el m e n t ar y edu ation

dvi · i ng.

p ro g r a m consists of a fo u r- te rm program.

ElJGlBUTY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMlSSJON TO UNDER­ GRADUATE OR CERTIFICATJON-ONLY PROGRAMS: A l l enter an und rgraduate degree/cert i Ci ca ­

tion or cer t i fication-only program m ust a ply to the School Educali n. A completed School t ransc ripts

0

f Ed ucation application, o fficial

f a l l coLlege/univers i t y work. w r i t i n g samples,

o ffk i a l do .umentation of college a d m i s i o n o r o t h r a pp r o ved

March t o re e i e p r i r i t y consideration fo r adm i ssion

to the 5cho I of Ed u ca t io n fo r the followi n g te r m . I . Evidence o f ver h a l and quan t i t a t ive a b il i t y · . i l l u s t rated by a core

Qn the \; a.hi ngton Edu.cat ors Skills Tes t Basic. S i x

lest d.ttes are avaii Jl 1" du r i n g t h e year; check t h e School o f

5 . \ riting 1 0 1

( G PA) of 2 .S0 or h igher

Appl ical ion fo nns anu p ro c edu re s f,

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admission to profes­

appeal ule adm iss io l l process,

meet

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t1

in any p rogram

st ud y

0

are

dvi sing in

in t he School of

Educution is subjt'ct to co nt inu ous assessment o f student deve! 'p me nt ,Hld perfOfman e . S tu (knts a r required to demonstra te [he master of kn owledge, skil ls, professionalism, :miwde , Jnd d i position- re q u i re d fo r effectiw practice. Recnrds w i l l b e reviewed at t h e e t d o f e a c h St'mester 10 ensure s t uden ts are meeting standards th ro ugh out the proo ra m .

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support

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residency dcmcntary K-8 teach i n g certi ficate

ancl a K- 1 2 special edu ca t io n endorsement. T h i s req u i res the co m p l e t i o n of the p ro fes s io n a l edu

a ti on

sequence for

elementary education students, the co m pletion of coursework r.:qu i red for primar, endorseme n t i n spec ial t'd ucat io n , and the com pi rion of a

3 . They may earn

a

24-semester-hoLL[

academic emphasi�.

resi dency elementa r y K-8 teaching certi ficate,

a support i n g enJor., eme n t in a w n t e n t area and

a

waiver i n

spe ia l e d u c at i on t h ro u g h t h e com p le t i o n of a 1 1-seme ter­

incl u de : A n thropolo"y 1 02 or equivalent; M a th e m at i c s

i

m u l t i subjcct tea her. U nd r g r a d ua t e

sequcllce for c l m e n ta!'y education and 24-semester-hour acad e m i

hour p rogram (allowing fi t l1de nt s to team special ed uc a t i on after graduat ion or five yeMs under th

assu m p t i o n t h a t they endorsement i n p(> ci a l e d u ation tlu r i ng t h is t i m e period ) , and/or a u p po r l ­ ing ndor 'elUent i n readillg anJ/or Englis h as , Seco nd La ng u a ge . This requ ires the co mpletion of t h e professional

will

School of lhe Art 341 or Art 3 4 1 and !\usic 34 1 . For se cond­ ary edu c at i o n stude n ts t h ese include: Anthropology/ History 2 1 0; or Anthr po l ogy 102 o r e qu iv ale n t . A

educa tion (K-� )

This re q u i r e s t h e comple t ion of t.he p ro fe s s i o nal e d ucat i o n

1 23 or equ iva le n t (musL belaken prior La Education 406 ) ; Biology I I I odiC!' science equivalent; Natural Scie nces 206 or pby:.ical scicnce e' l uivulent; Phy ' k a l E du ca t io n 322 and

P

10

I . They may eMn a residen y elemcl1 tJr-y K-8 tea ch i n g cer t i ficate.

posted .

I'

4

profess i o n a l eel u a t i 1 n 'eq uence, includi ng:

2. All cou rsework in major and m i n or fields a n d a l l educa t i o n c u rs ' ork has been completed IVitb a grade 0 or bet ter. ( ec ndary educatio n rudents are req u i red t o earn a g rade of II- or better ill all educ,nion co urs wo rk. ) 3.AL 1 ndd it io nul cour es relnted to and requ ired for education program an d teachc.r certifica t i o n have been c o m pleted with the

4

students have several o p tio ns fo r b u i ldi ng a pro.'ram upon t h e

date s for certi fica tion when:

or

4

Education

t h e program for all ·t udcn t s seeking ee r Lficat lon as an elemen­

All ( o u r . e w rk is com pleted w i th a c u m u l a t i\'c grade p o i n t average of 2 . 50 or ab ov e and t h e st udent' d g r e c has b 'en

a grade ' f

Educ:ltion

The professional educa t i o n sequence forms the fo u n d at io n of

B A E and/or CERTIFICATION REQUIRBM.l!NTS: S t udents bee me

4

7 tl/ld S pecia l cduc. t ion 438 tu lent Te acbi ng in Element,uv $chool 5 Education 450 'I n q u ir y i nto Lea rni ng a n d Teaching: Re flective Practice and Sem i n .] [ 4 • If n o l colllpletcd i1l fl previoL/$ tenn.

the dlool of Educat ion O ffi ct'. o nLinuati

4

Educatic)n 4 4 S t udent Tea ch i ng - E le m e n ta q' ( D U'll )

a l l t he requi re men t s may

drnL�. ion appeal forms

Jvailable from the Coord i n aror o f

4

E ducation 408 l.iteracy i n a K - H Educ a t io n Ed uca tio n 4 24 I n q u iry i n to Teaching I: Diverse Learners

or

sional st ud ies in e ducation are avai lable from the Schooi of

Ed u ca t i o n . St uden ts who do not

2

Educat i o n 4 0 6 Mathemat ics i n K - 8 Education

Term [ V Educa t i o n 430 S tud e n t Teach i n g i n K - t\ E d u c a t i o n

eq u iv a l ent: g r a de o f C or high.:r

or

Teml II

4 1 0 S c i e nce/ H ea l t h i n K-8 Ed uca t i o n 4 1 2 Social S tu di es in K-8 Education Education 425 I n q u i r y i n t o Teach i ng 1 1 : D i verse Learners

2 . Sophomore s t a nd i ng ( 3 0 or more semester h o u rs) 3. Cllm u lat ive gmde po i n t average

and Neglect

Terlll 1Il

Educat ion web s i t e [or t h e dates.

4. Psymology 1 0 1 or equiva l e n t : grade of

h i l d Abuse

E d u c a t i o n 394 Technology and Te a ch ing: La bo ra tor y·

peeiJie refj lliremellts iI/elude: pas i ng

4 4

Spe c i a l Educat ion 4 i! O I s s u e s a n d Pro b l e m s of

u b m i tted to the ' ch oo l of E d u c a t ion by t h e first Friday i n or

Profess ional Educa tion Sequence TerllI I Educa t ion 3'10 I n q ui r y i n t o l.ea rn ing 1 : I nvest iga tion i n to Lea rn i n g and Devdo p ment Education 392 I n q u i l')' i nt o Lea rn i n g I I : I nvestigation i n to Lea rn i n g a n d Development

standard i zed test scores, a n d letters of reco m m endation m ust be

ctober

to

ttldent.s shortld meet with School of Edllcation advisors each semester a nd tile Cert ificillion Officerfor updates ill program or applica t io l t requ irements.

f redesig n in g i ts gr a dua te programs. For infor mation about a n t ic i p at ed o p t io ns that will be available beg i n n ing in 2003, contact t h e Sd1001 o f E d u ation's Coor d i nator o f Ad m i s ­

indivi d ua l s seeki ng t

from t h e Certification Officer

Ed u ca t i o n . State req uiremellts are su b;ect

immediate c h ange.

proce s

sions and

54

program of p rof ssiona l s t ud ies in t h e

m el ali related a ademic require­ for ;] degree o r a cer t ifi ca te , and who meet all state

require m e n t s w i l l be

Arts degre<!s

a

a

School of Educat ion, who

co m ple t e

education Y

coursewor k to ea rn a primar

quence fo r elementary education students, t h e


com pletion o f 24 semester h o urs in an academic are,\, and 1 6 semester hours i n special education and/or read ing and/or E nglish a s a second language. Note: Courses taken within the 24 semester hour academic support area must meet requirements for supporting content area endorsement as specified by state requirements. Information abo l / t all state endoTsemeli f-il fciuding those ill special eduCll tion, " eading,

anli English as II secolld Imlgl/age-fan be obtained fro m the oordil1ator of Adm iss ions a nd Advising ill the School of EduCll t ion. SECONDARY CE RTIFI CATION AND ENDORSEMENT OPTIONS: All u ndergraduate students seeking secondary

cer t i ficat ion in a content area ( except those seeking certification

i n music and p hysical education) are req�ui red to complete the following four-term p rogram of study. Professional Ed ucation Sequenc e Ti rm I

Education 390 I nquiry i ntu Learning I: I nvestigation into Learning and Development Education 392 I nquiry i n to Learning l l : I nvestigation i nto Learning and Development S pecial Education 480 Issues and Problems of Ch ild Abuse and eglect+

4 4

Term III O n e cou rse from Education 440-449

Education 4 2 5 I nquiry into Teaching I I : D iverse Learners

2 4 4 4 4

Terlll I V

Ed ucation 4 5 0 Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective Pract ice and Seminar Educat ion 466 luden! Teaching - Seco ndary (Dual) arId S p ecial Education 439 S tudent Teaching i n Secondary School

4 7 5

or

Edu ca tion 468 Student Teaching - Secondary •

If not completed ill

a

10

previous term.

The p ro fessio nal education sequence fo rnu the foundation o f t he program to r a U st udents seeking certification i n a content area ( except music and physical education st udents ) . Under­ graduate s tu d e nts seeking cert i fication/endorsement in a content area ( usually to teach in grades 4- ( 2) have several options for building program upon t h e profe sional education sequence, i ncluding: 1 . They may earn a residency secondary teach ing certificate with a primary endorsement in a content area. This requires th e com p letion o f the professional education sequence for secondary education students and a teaching major or academic m a j o r that meets s tate endorscme� n t requirements. 2 . They m ay e a rn a residency secondary teachi n g certificate with a p ri mary endorsement i n a content area and a primary endorsemen t i n s pecial education. This requires the comple­ tion o f the professional education sequence for secondary education students, teach ing major or academic major, and coursework requi red for endorsement in special educati o n . 3 . T h e y m a y e a rn a residency secondary teach ing certificate w i t h a primary endorsement i n a content area a n d a waiver i n special education through t h e completion of a 1 6 -semcster­ h o u r program (allowing students to teach special education after graduation for five ye.ars under the assumption that they will complete coursework to earn a p ri mary endorsement in special education during this time period), and/or a support­ i n g endorsetnent i n reading and/or English as a second l anguage. �

m

CERTIFICATION IN MUSIC OR H EALTH AND FITNESS:

o

Undergraduates have the option of completing p rograms that lead to bachelor's degrees in m u s ic or llcalth and fitness and residency teaching certificates. All individuals wish i ng to earn a Bachelor of Music Education or a Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education with a residency teaching certificate m ust ap ply and be accepted i nto the School o f Education� They must also complete the following courses. I . Musi c education m aj o rs must complete Education 3 9 1 ( o ffered every fal l ) , E d ucatio nal Psychology 36 1 ( o ffered every sp r i ng) , SpccLal Education 480, a n d all cou rse req u i re­ ments pecificd by the Department of Music. 2. Students seeking a Bachelor o f Arts i n Pbysical ducation m ust com plete Educa t i o n 390 a n d 392, SpeciaJ Education 480, and a l l requi rements specified by the School o f Physical Education.

c r.

l> -t o z

PREPARATION F O R TEACH ING IN C H RISTlAN SCHOOLS:

Term II

ducalion 3 9 4 Technology and Teach ing: Laboratory' Edu cation 424 Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners Educational Psychology 30El Educational Psychology

Note: Secondary teaching majors and m inors h ave been designed to align with state endorsement requi rements and to meet specific departmental standards fo r majors and m i nors. Cou rse and hour requirements for teaChing and/or academic majors vary according to departmental requ irements.

S tudents who may be i nterested in p repa r i n g to teach in priv<lte or Christian schools will begin t h e i r professi o nal preparation by all req u i rements fo r tht' Washington Sta te Teacher's Certificate. In addition, the), will take the Religion m i no r ( Teacher Educa­ tion Opt�io n ) noted under the Rel ig i o n deparl rnenl co u rse o fferings, and add a private chool p racticllm to tht' i r program. EARLY ADVISING OPTIONS: During fi rst o r sophomore ),e;1 [,

prospective education students planning to enter the S c hool o f Education s h o u l d m e e t w i t h the Cuordinator fo r Ad m issions a n d Advising and/or a facu l!)! m e m b e r i n the School o f Education to d iscuss the various options l isted above and to det.ermine their program o f study CERTIFICATION/ENDORSEM ENT OPTIONS FOR PER­ SONS WHO HOLD A BACCALAUREATE DEGREE FROM A REGIONALLY ACCREDITED INSTITUTION: Persons who

hold a baccalaureate degree (or h i gher) fro m a regionally accredited i n st itution and who wish to pursue teacher certifica­ tion should make an appoin tment with the Coordinator of Adm issions and Advising for a planning session. O p tions for these individuals i nclude: 1. They may e nroll in a cert i fication-only p rogram. ( Typically classes i n such a p rogram would be taken in the undergradu­ ate p rogram.) 2 . They may enro l l i n the Master o f Arts i n Education with Residency Cert i fication Progra m . This 1 4 - month cohort program l e a d s to an MA degree and K-8, multisubject certification with the possibility of content area (4- l 2 ) certification ( depending u p o n previous coursewo rk) . Participants move t h rough this fu ll-time program as a cohort. As a part o f their program, they complete a yea xlong i n tern­ ship with a cadre of colleagues in r m urb�\O m iddle school. PROFESSIONAL TEACHING CERTIFICATE: Certificate requirements i n Was h i ngton changed on August 3 I , 2000. The

following guidelines govern certificat ion a fter that date: 1. All teachers earning certification i n Was h ington after August 3 1 , 2000 will receive a Residency Teaching Certificate. This cert i ficate is valid fo r five years. ( WAC 1 80 - 79A- 1 4 5 ) 2 . With i n a five-year period, teachers i n 'vVashington must earn a Professional CertifIcate. ( 'vVAC I 80- 79A- 1 4 5 ) 3 . Qual i fications for t h e P ro fessional CertitI c a te i nclude: a. To qualify for a Pro f�e ssional ertifIcate, an individual must have completed p rovisional status as a teacher in a public school pursuant to RCW 28A.405.220 or th equivalent i n a state board of education approved p r i va t e school. b . Candidates fo r the Pro fessional Ce r t i fIcate must com plete an approved Professional ertificate p rogram, which has P

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