Page 1

Graduate Catalog 2000/2

Undergraduate and


For further information ... Tht! univer�ity i located at South 12 J t tre r and Park Avenue in subUIban Parkland. Office hllurs are from :003.01. to 5: 00 p.m . Monday thro ugh Friday. Most offices are losed for chape! on Monday, Wednesday. and Friday from 10:30 to II :OOa.m. during the school y ear. The univc-rsit)' observ-.:s all legal holiday. The U ni v ers i ty Center maintains il1l information desk which is op en daily unti l [Op.m. (I I p. m. n Friday ant! Salurday), Vi. itors are weI orne at any lime. S pecial arrangements for tours and app oin tmen ts may bt' m ade through the Office of Admis ions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMAT10N ABOUT:

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

• G neral interests of the university. ch urch reJ.ati n , and co mm un .i ty reI tions

The President ... .... ..... .... .... . . ...... .... ..... .... 535-7101

• Academic policies and programs, faculty app intments, ilnd curriculum developmt'nt

The Provost .. ... ... .. . .... ..... ... . ............ ..... .. . 535-7126

Area cotle (253)

General information. admi' ion of students, publications for pro pective students, advanced placement, and freshman

Admissions

535-715 [ 1-800-274-6758 E-mail: admissions@PLU.edu

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and tran fer student regi traLion

• Financial assistance, scholarships, and

Student Services Center .. ... . .... . ... . . .. ..... 535-7 161

loans; fees and payment plan; transcripts

1-800-678-3243

of records, schedules, and registration

• Financial management and administrative ervices •

The Vice President for Finan.ce and Operations ...... .... ..... ... . 535-7121

Campus parking, safety, anJ information

• Residence hans, counseling and testing, hea lth ervices, min ori ty ffair, international students, and extracurricular

Campu Safety and Information ... ..... 535-7441 The Vice President for Student Ufe .... .. .. .... .. ... . . .. . . .. ..... .... 535-7 1 9 1

activities

ifts, beque

ts, grant, and

the annual fund

The Vice Pre ident for Development and University Relations . .... ......... .... 535-7177

• Academk advising

Academic Advising .. . . .. ......... . . .. .......... . .. 5 3 5-8786

lntcrnation I study

Center for Intemational Programs ... . 535-7577

• Graduate progran1S

Graduate Studies ... .. .... . . .. _ .. . . . ... ... . . .. .. .. . 535-8312

• Work-study opportunitie and student employment

Student Employmeot Office . .. .... .... ..... 535-7459

Career options

Career DeveJopment .... ..... ... .... .... .. ... .... 535-7459

• Summer ession

Summer Se sions . . .... ........ .... ..... ........ ... . 535-7129

• Alumni

Alumni and Parent Relations . ............ . 535·7415

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tivities

• Worship services and religious life at the un iversi ty

Campus Mi nistry . .... ..... . .. . . .. . . ... . ... ......... 535-7464


UNDERGRADUATE AND

History

GRADUATE CATALOG

H onor s Prog Ta m ................................................................. 79

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. . . ... . . 89 . . .. ... , ........... 92 Natural Sciences . .. . . . .... .. . 98 Nur sing ................................................................................ 99 Philosophy ... . .. . .. . . . .. . 105 Physical Education .. . . . . . . . 106 Ph y sic s ................................................................................ 110 Political Science . . . ...... .. . . . .... 112 Pre-Professional Studies . 114 Psychology . .. ... . . . .. . . . . .. 116 Publishing and Printing Arts .... . . ..... . .. . . 118 Religion .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . 119 Mathematics ... ...

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2000/2001

Academic Calendar

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Scandinavian Area S t ud ies ............................................... 120 Academic Structure ............................................................. 29

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Communication and T ht!at re ............................................ 47

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ngineerino ..... ........... 51

operative Education I ntero hips ................................... 53

Economics ........................................................................... 54 . .. Educati on . . . . .. . . . . . .. . .. 56 Engineering Dual Degree . . . .. . 66 English . . .. . .. . . . . .... . . . . . .. . 67 English as a Second Language . .. .. . . . . 71 Environmenta.l Stud ies ....................................................... 72 Geosciences .......................................................................... 73 Global Studies . . .. .. . . . . ... . . . . . . . 75 .

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Admission .......................................................................... 128 Policies and tandards . . . .. . . . .... . . .. ... . 129 Tuition and Fees ................................................................ 131 Financial Aid . . . . ... . ..... . . . 131 Business . .. ... . . . . . .. . . . . 131 Education ........................................................................... 133 ursing . . . . . .. . . . .. 136 Social Sciences: Marria ge and PamilyTherapy .. .. 137 . . .

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PACIFIC l!JIHE RAN UNIVERSITY The informatioo

of Pacific l.utheran Universit), at the time of publication. However, the university policies, calendar, curriculum, and costs. Listed in this catalog are course descriptions and summnries of degree requirements for majors, minors, and other programs in the College of Art� and denees 'll1d the Schools of the Art • ilusiness, Educati n, Nursing) and Physical Education. Detailed degree re quirements, often induding supplementary sample program�, re available in the offices of the individual schools Jnd departments. Advising by Wliversity personnel inconsistent with published statements is oot bindi.ng. contained herein retleets an accurate picture

reserve. the right to make necessary changes in procedures,


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Academic Calendar SUMMER SESSION 2000 Term I ..................... . . . ... . .......... . . .. Tuesday, Ma y 30-Priday, j un 23 Term II ..... .................. .................. Mond ay, June 26--Eriday July 21 Workshop Week ...................... . .... Monda', Ju l y 24-friday, July 28 Term IT! .... ............................. .. . Monday, iuly 3J-Priday, AUgl t 25 Commencement ...... .. .......... . .. ... .... I O:30a�m., Saturday, Augu t 26

SUMMER SESSION 2001 Term I .......................................... Tuesday, May 29-Priday,

FALL SEMESTBR 2000

FALL SEM ESTER 2001

Orientation .................................................. Friday, September 8, to

Orientalion . .......... . ...... .......... .... . ..... ............ Friday. Septernb.:r 7, to Sundar: September 9 CIa es Begin ... .. .................... ... . 8:00a.m., Monday, September 10

Sunday, September 10 Classes Be gin ............................. 8:00a.m., Monday, September I I Opening Convocation ... .......... 10:30a.m., Monday, September 11

at 1:45p.nr. Mid-semester Break ............ Th ur sday and Friday, October 26-27 Thanksgiving Recess Be gin s . 1:35p.m., Wednesday, November 2 2 Thanksgiving Recess Ends ........ . 8:00a.m., Monday, November 27 Classes nd ..................................... 6:00 p.m., Priday, December 15 M id- year ommencement ...... 10:30a.m.,Saturday, ecember 16 Pinal Exam i nations .... . ........................... . Monday, December 18 to Frida y, December 22 Semester Ends (after last exam) ... .................. Pr iday, December 22 Classes

resrune

JANUARY TERM 2001 Classes Begin ...................................................... Monday, January 8

pening Convocation ............. 10: Oa.m., Monday, Sept ember 10 lasses resume at 1:45p.m.

Mid-sem ster Break ............ Thursday and Friday,

October 25-26

Thanksgi ing Recess Beg i ns . I : 3 5 p.m., Wednesday, November 21 Thanksgiving Recess Ends . .. . .. . .. 8:00a.m., Monday, Novembe r 26 Classes End .. . ..... .... . .... . ........ ... ... .. . .. 6:00p.m., riday. December 14 M i d- yea r Commencement ...... I 0:30a.m., Saturday. December 1 5 Final Examinations ................................. M ond ay, D e l'mber 1 7 to Friday. December 21 Semester Ends (after last xam) ..................... Friday, December 21

Martin Luther King, Jr., Bfrthday Holiday ..... Monday, January 15 Classes End ...,.. . ...... ............... . ....... ............ ..... . .... Friday, February 2

JANUARY TERM 2002 Classes Begin ..... ............... . . . ...... .... ... . . . . . . ... Monday, January 7 Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday Holiday .. . . Monday, j an uar y 21 Classes End F riday, February 1

SPRING SEMESTER 2001

SPRING SEMESTER 2002

Classes Begin .... .. .. .. ................... . 8:00a.m., Wednesday, Febru ary 7 Presidents' Day Hol iday ......... ... ...... .............. Monday, February 19 Spring Break Begins . ...... . . ..... .. ............. :OOp.m.,Friday, March 23 Spring Break Ends ................................. 8:00a.m., Monday, April 2 Easter Recess Begins ...... . . . ..... . ............. .... 8:00a.m., Fr iday, April 13 Easter Recess Ends .. ... ... ..... ........... ... .... 3:40p.m., Monday, April 16 Classes Ernd ..... ..... ... ....... .... . .. .. . . ... . . ........ . .. 6:00p.m., Friday, May 18 Final Examinations ........ ... . ... .. Monday, May 2l to Friday, May 25 Semester Ends (after last exa m) .. ............... .............. Friday, May 25 Commencement ............. .. .. .... .. .. ............ 2:30p.m., SLLnday, May 27 Worship Service begins at 9:30a.m.

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Term n ......................................... Monday, June 25-Priday J uly 20 Workshop Week .. ..... ... . . .......... ..... Monday, July 23-Friday, July 27 Term Ill .................................... Mon d ay, July 30-Friday, August 24 Commencement . . ... ... .. . . ... . ...... . .... . !0:30a.m., Saturday, ugust 25

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Presidents' Day Holiday ................................ M onday, P bruary

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Spring Break/Easter Recess Begins .... . 6:00p.m., Fr iday, March 22 Spring Break/Easter Recess Ends ..... .... 3:40p.m., M onday, April 1 Classes End ............................................... 6:00p.m .• Frida)r, May 17 Final Examinations ................. Monday, May 20 to Friday, May 24 Semester Ends (after last exam) ............................... Friday, May 24 Commencement ..................................... 2:30 p.m . , S unday, May 26 Worship Service begi lts a t 9:30a.m.


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MISSION STATEMENT z

Long commiHed to providing au cducalioll distinguished for qual ity, in the context of a heritage that is Lutheran and an environment that i' ecumemcally

hristian, PLU continues

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embrace its primary mi sion:

the development of knowledgeable person equipped with an understanding of the human condition, a critical awareness of humane and spiritual values. and a capacity for dear and effective, elf-expression. For all who choose to seek a PLU dcgrCL', the lJniversity offers opportunity to pur ue a variety of program. of academi worth and excellence. Its tandards of performance d mand a finely trained faculty as well a highly skilled admini lralive and 'upp rl -tail. In Its tn litutional emphasis on scholarship, the University views the l iberal art

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prov iding the m:ces ary and e sentiaJ foul1datit n for the tf-l'hmcal training-and

education in the prates ions wbich

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The University aim to -uillvale the ilHellc.:cl, nol [or its own sake me rely, but a� a tool of corucicncc and

ao inslrumt'nt for ser v ic ,The di rersity and variety of cultural programs and personal servLces offered b}, the University are intended to ta i 1 i ta te this positive development of the student as a whole person in order that our tudents might fun(."tion as members or sodet}

In other words, FLU affirms that realization 01 one's highest p Icntial as well a" fulfiUment of Life's purpose arises in the joy of ervice to otbers 10 did It ::.tudentc; in. haring thi' understanding, the Univer ity seek, 10 be a community in which there is a continuing and fruitful interadion between "hat i best i

education and

what is noblest in Chri tian edificalion. Thi deUberate and simultancnw; a tt cnti n to the: religioll dimension of the IOtal human experience and to the standards of scholarly obje tivity, coupled with clear recognition f the integrative impulse in e ch, is the essence of PLU.

General I nformation mSTORY

PLU's founding fa�..Jt)' Pacific Lutheran University was fo unded in 1890 by a group of mostly Norwegian LlIt.he.rans tro m tbe Pllget Sound area, They were led by the Reverend Bjug Harstad, wh became PLU's first p resident. In naming the univer ity, these pioneers recognized the im p orta n t role th at a Luth an educational i n stit ut i o n on the \ e tern frontier of A merica could play in th ern rging future of the region, They wanted the institution to help Immigrants adj ust to their new land and fmd jobs, but th y also wanted it to pro duce g raduates who would serve churcb and comm unit y. Education-and educating fo r ervice--was a venerated part of the candinav ia n traditions from whjch these pi neers came. Although f oun ded as a univ rsity, the in titution functioned p r im arily as an a cademy until 1918, when it closed for two years. It re op ened as the two-year Pacific Lutheran College, after me rging with CQl um b ia College, previously located in Everett. Fur th e r consolidations occurred when Spokane Co llege merged

with PLC i n 1929. Pour-year baccalaureate degree w re first offered in education in 193 and in the libera l arts in 1942. The ins titu t i o n was reorganized as a llniversity in 1 960, reclaiming its original name, It presently includes a ollege of Arts and Sci­ ences; pro fessional sch Is of the Arts, Business, Educat ion,

Nursing, :lnd Physical Edllcatiou; and both graduat and con ­ t inu ing ed uc ation program s , PLU has beetl closely and productively affil ia t ed with the Lutheran church th ro u ghout its h is tory. It is nO\ a un ive rs i ty of the vangel ic al Lutheran Church in Ame rica, owned by the more than six hluld r d congregations of Re gion I of the ELCA. Ma ny influences and indiv id ua l s have combined to s hap e PLU and its regi nal, nati nal, and increasingly in te rn a t i onal reputa­ Lion for teaching , servi e, and chol rsh i p. A dedicated facul ty has been an extremely important factor. The chool has enjoyed a st ron g musical tradition from Ih . beginning, as w e l l as note­ worthy alUD1ni achievemen ts in pubLi school eac h ing and admini stration , university t e ach i ng and scholarship, the pastoral m in i stry, the health sciences and healing arts, and business. At PLU the libeml arts and pre fessional education aTe dosel)' inlegrated and collal>orativc in their educational philosophies. activities, and aspirations.

ACCREDITATION Pacific lULheran niversity is fully (cred ited by the Northwest .Association of Scb ools and C oJleges as a four-year i nsti tuti on of higher education. In

addition the following progranls hold specialized accredi­

tations a nd approval

:

Business - AACSB - The International Associat io n for Management Educalion

Chemistry - American Chemi .al ety Computer Scien e (B.S.) - c<>mputing Sci n

Accreditation

Board, Inc

Education - National COWl il for the Accreditation of Teacher Education P

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COMPUTfNG AND TElECOMMUNICATIONS

Marriage and Family Therapy - Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family T he rapy Education of the American

Computing and Telecommunication Services provides for

Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

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campus-w i de communications and computing needs. The main

Music - National Association of Schools of Music Nursing - National.League for Nursing Social Work - Council on Social Work Education

bu i ld ing. This facility houses the university's central computing

Any current or prospec tive student may, upon request directed to the pr eside nt's office, review a copy of the documents per­ taining to the universi ty 's various accreditations and approvals.

and provide d atabase hosting, e-mail, and web services for the university.

GROUNDS

vated, enables students to: connect personal computers to the

offices are locate d in the basement of the Mort\<edt Library systems, including Compaq AlphaServer and VAX/VMS systems.

Located in suburban Parkland, PLU has a picturesque 1 26-acre

residence hall rooms; connect personal laptops in publicly

Pacific Northwest.

accessible stations in the library; connect to the PLU library and course resources from off campus; create a personal home page

ENROLLMENT

on the PL

3,152 full-time students; 450 part-time stude.nts

web site; and communicate with faculty and staff

through a rLU e-mail account.

fACULTY

Additionally, each residence hall roo m is equipped with an

237 full-time faculty; 90 part-time faculty

Ethernet data jack. This allows students with their own comput­

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO

ers to connect to the campus data network and the Internet

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without a modem. Each residence hall room is also equipped with a d i gi tal telephone and voice mail ser vi ce.

ACADEMIC PROGRAM Pacific Lutheran University uses a

A large computer lab, located in the Unjversity Center, is equipped with IBM-PCs and Macintosh computers. These prov i de access to the campus network and Internet resources. A variety of software programs re available for the systems. The univers i ty has adopted standard software including word

4-1-4 calendar which consists

of two fifteen-week seme ters bridged by a four-week January term.

Course credit is computed by hours. The majority of courses are offered for 4 hours. Each undergraduate degree candidate is

processing and spreadsheets.

expe cted to complete 128 hours with an overall grade point

Information regarding the PLU ePass, telephone services,

average of 2 .00 . Departments or schools may set higher grade point requirements. Degree requirements are specifically stated in this catalog.

computer software standards and policies, and University Center Lab hours may be obtained by contacting Computing and Telecommunications Services' main office at (253) 535-7525 or

Each student should become familiar with these requir ments

visiting the departmental home pag at http://www.plu.edu/cats/.

and prepare to meet them.

The intentional, unauthorized entry into a computer system is a crime under the laws of the State oEW shington. Computer

LIBRARY SERVICES The Robert A.L. Mortv edt Library is a multimedia learning resource center 'erving the entire university community. Its

security programs and devices are llsed to manage and control access to programs and data. In the event of computer trespass, university officials arc authorized access to all data and messages

collections are housed and services provided in a modern bui.ld­ ing, which has study spaces for 850 600,000 bo

associated with the incident for use in its resolution.

tudents and a collection of

Voice messaging systems fall under the Telecommunica ti ons

, periodicals, microfibn, and aud i o- visual materi­

Act, which makes tampering with another person's voice mail or

als. The l ib rar y receives 1,870 current print magazines, j ournals,

making prank and obscene calls ill egal. The un iversi t y vigorously

and newspapers, and has access to over 8,000 titles a va ilable in full text via the Internet.

prosecutes these violations both criminally and via the student

In addition to its general col l ect i on of b oks and other materials, the lib ra ry has a special coUection de oted to the

WRITING CENTER

conduct system.

S can di navian Immjgr ant Exp erience and contains the universi ty archives; regional Lutheran church archives; and the Nisqually

The Writing Center, located in Ramstad Hall, provides a place for students to meet with trained student readers to discuss their

Plain. Collection, a local history collection. Other resources

academic, creative, and professional writing. Student staff

include the K-12 Curriculum Collection, Children's Literature

me mbers help writers generate topics, develop focus, organize material, and clarify ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed from the classroom setting, student readers and

Collection, maps, pamphlets, and access to on-line databases,

and t he Internet. A st aff of28 full and part-time Librarians, professionals, and

writers talk seriously about ideas and writing strategies. Most

assistants offer expert reference, infonnation, and multimedia

sessions arc

services. The reference staff provides begi n ni ng and advan ced

ne-hour meeting , but drop-in students with brief

e ays or q u es ti ons are welcome.

library instruction for all students. As part of their standard

The Writing Center is open Monday through T hursday from

reference se rvice, the library staff assists students in using elec­ tronic information sources in the Haley Information Center. As tile result of the l i bra r y 's extensive collection of on-line bibho­ graph i c tools, computer access to other collections, and elec­

8:00a.m. to 9:00p.m., Friday from 8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m., and

Sunday f rom 3:00 to 9:00p.m. These hours may vary slightly from semester to semester.

tronic m ail servic ,students and faculty have rapid acces to

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE CENTER

materials which can be borrowed from other Libraries. Media

The Academic Assistance

enter provides students with trained, cer ti fi ed peer tutors and a comfortable environment where lea rn ing , risk taking, and discovery can occur. Registered PLU

Services pr vides video, CD, and DVD collections as well as access Lo multimedia equipment, tools, and supp ort . The Multi­ media Lab provides tools and training in using multimedia for teaching and learni ng. The L anguage Resource Center pr vides computers and resources for individual or class l anguage study. Direct loan service is avai l able to PLU students and faculty at Northwest College, St. M rtin's C ollege, S attle University, Seattle Pacific University, the University of P u ge t Souud, and other private college libraries in the Northwest.

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Students are provided with a PLU ePass which, when acti­ network (Internet, PLU library and course resources) from

campus, truly representative of the natural grandeur of the

w

These systems are for both academic and administrative purposes

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exp er ien ce. Tutoring takes place on campus, usually in the Academic Assistance Center located in Ram tad Hall. However, study and test-review sessions may oc ur in separate locations such as the

Y


scie nce

r m us ic buil ings , nd d ro p - i n math tu to r i ng is avai l­

able in the Appl e Pi Math

abo Thto rin g sessions are set up by advance ap p o i n t m e n t (drop­ ins may not find tutor available) . The Ce nte r, located in Ramstad 1 1 2, is open Monday thro u g h Thursday from 9:00a.m. u n ti l 9:00p.m., F riday from 9:00a.m. until 5 : 0 0p . m . , an d S un day from 2:00p.m. u nt.il 9:00p.m . Stud ents should stop by t h e office, call 535-75 8, Of e-mail learningctr@plu.edu. Our h o m e page provide i n f or m at ion OJ] tutoring and weekly updates on s t u dy ses ions: http://www. p l u.e du / aas t / .

CAMPUS RESOURCES Center for Public Service The Center far P u bli c Service onnecls the PLU campus to the surrounding communi ties y p rovi d in g op p o rt uni t i s for students, staff, and fa c u l ty to serve commun i ty needs as p ar t o f their u n iversity exp rie nce . here are many ways t ude n ' can be co me involved in service at PLU. Students an wo rk with children, ad ults and s en io r c itizens at the F a m ily and Children' C n le r, a coaliti n of social �ervice programs h o u se d toget her at East Campus and coordi­ nated by the Center for P u b l i c Service. St uden ts can also bec o m e involved in co m mun ity work through se rvi ce-learnin g c la sse s. The Cent e r fo r Publi ervice can h e l p students find out abollt th ese courses, ava i lable in many departments, which use serv ic e experience a an im p o r t nt part of the lear n i ng p roc Ind ividual s and t ude nt g roup s can also use the Volunteer Center, part of the Center for Public ervice, to browse th r o u g h l i sting of ve r 1 00 se r v ice

pportunities

on

and near the PL

amp us. Th es e oppo rtu n i ties range from one - t i me "Go- ' n-Do"

projec ts to longe r- term involvement. To find out mor about volunt ering and er i c e - le a rni ng at PLU, call the Cen ter far Public Service at 5 3 5 - 7 1 73.

KPLU-FM, National Public Radio KPLU at 88.5 FM is licensed by the Federal Commun ications Commission to the Un iversi t y Board of Regents. A me m ber station ofN tional P u Ii Radio, KPLU p ro vi d es m usic and news seven days a week, 24 hours a day, with a profes ionai staff augmented by qualified st uden ts. PLU is the o n ly independent u niversity in the Northwest o pe ra t i ng a ful l po wer NPR station.

The KP LU main tran mitt r o n West Tiger Mounta i n covers the Puget Sound area and translators cover t he m ajor population c e nte r, of we tern Wash ingt on from Bell i ng h a m to Cen tr alia and

m a n y fields. The summe r session consists of th ree discrete fo u r­ week t rms, and a one-week wo rkshop ses ion, and begins the la s t week of May. Many courses are taught i.n the evening, two n igh ts per week for nin week s, and Master of Busine s s Ad m i nis­ t ra t i o n courses are t, ugh t during two six- week terms, two n ight s per week. Designed fo r undergraduates and g ra du a te students al ike, th p rog ram serves teachers and admin istrators seeking credent ials and special courses, first-year s tude n ts desiring to in itiate college study, and others seeking s peci al studies offered

Malog,

outlining the cur ri cu l um

as weU s sp ial insti tutes, workshop s and seminars, is printed each sprin g and is ava ila b le by calling 535-7 1 29. MIDDLE COllEGE PLU offers a sp eci al six-week 'umme r program for high school ju niors and seniors and tor first-year col l e ge stud nts. CaJle d Midd le College, the program is de signe d to ease the transition from high school to college by s h a rp e ni n g learning skills that are

LATE-AFl'ERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES To provide fo r the profi ss io nal gtowth and cultural enrichment of persons u nab l e to take a t ra di t i o nal college course sc h ed ul e , the uni ersit y c ndu 1S late-afternoon nd even in g cia sse . T n addition t o a wide variety of offe rin g in t h e arts a n d sciences, there are s p ec ialized and gr a duate courses for teachers, adminis­ t:rators, and p ersons in busi nes s and i n dust ry. SUMMER SESSION An extensive summer school curriculum, of the same qual ity as that offered du r in g the reg ula r academic year, is available to all q ua li fied persons. In addition, summer session t y p ic all y is a time w he n the fac ult y o ffer i n n vatlve, exp erime n ta l COUf es wh i ch cover a b road range of conte m po ra ry issues and perspect ives i n

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co un sel i n g is to a ssess each tud nt's talents and i n tere st s in order to p rovide di rect io n and g o al s for th coUege ex perien ce. T h e acad em i c p ro gra m o ffers a chance t improve sp ec i fic learn i ng skil ls ess e nt ia l to college success. The classes, offered at seve.ral levels in severa l disciplines, are for M idd l e College students only, t he re by allowing mall class size and dose co nta ct between students an d faculty. All studen take a study skills course, which s rve as a core of the program. In ad d it i on , students may select two or th ree c ou rse s fro m among those offered each year. ueh student's p rO))'Tam is individual ized to promote maximum grow th . For information cal l 5 35-8786. PRO)BCl' PB.EVIEW Each se mes te r PLU offers Project Preview, a sp e c ial enrichment

afternoon. For i n formation call 535- 7 l 29.

is P LU st u dio- lah orat o ry fo r the publishing a rts . With the re ss ' large collecti n o f letterpress type and equipment , students design and p ro du ce printed texts using the han d- controlled te hniques that flouris h today in th e liv ly a r t form known as " fi ne pr in ting!' In addition to Its own p ubl i h i n g program, the Press houses a gr ow ing collection o f in novative boo k works and is a wo rk i ng muse u m , whe r visitors may watch and try the i r h a n d s , t the te h nology p io neered by Gutenberg. ss

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c un sel i n g and test i n g component. All students are thoroughly tested and evalua ted in privat ses ion with re ga rd to their read ing, w riting, verbal. and mathematical kil ls. Tn addition, c reel' co un s eling is p r ov i de d . The aim of Middle oll e ge

The Elliott Press The El liott Pr

::III »

essential to successful completion of a col lege or u n i ve rs it y program. Middle ol leg e has both an academic program and a

web at w\'IW.kplu.org.

Rece ntly KPLU in a u gura ted worldwide audio service on the

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program for high s ch oo l j uniors and sen iors. Desig ned t o com ­ p l em e nt h ig h school studic, . Project Prev iew allows students to earn one hour o f uni versi t y credit and to ex p e r ie nce c ol lege life and study. The topic of the course is differe n t e a c h seme ter. P roject Preview classes meet once a week for six weeks in the late

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by th e scho ls and departments. onmatriculat d s tud e. n ts who enroll for the summer session n ed on l y submit a letter of academic s ta ndi n g or give other evidence of be i ng p rep a red fo r college work.

A complete Summer Ses ion

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RETENTION Of FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS The rere n t io n of tudents entering a s freshmen has been

mon ito re d s i nce 1 9 72. Those data fo r the pa st decade are p resen ted in the fo ll owin g table:

Retention of Entering First-Year Students

1 986 1 987 1 988 1 989 1 990 1991 1 992 1 993 1 994 1 995 1 996 1 997 1 998

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To Sophomore Yea,/'

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80.6% 8 1 .7% 75.7% 80.9% 77.4(Yr, 8 1 . 3% 79.9% 79.8% 78.3% 7 .0% 84. % 83.3% 80.2%

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To Senior Year

6 . 2% 64.0% 62.7% 6.0% 63.5% 67.9% 68. 1 % 66.5% 64.8% 63.6% 69 .7%

71.1% 65.3% 65.4% 70. 1 % 66.0% 7 1 . 1% 73 .4°/(, 70.2% 67.8% 67.4% 74. 1 % 74.8%

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Students who bega n t b e i r higher education at ocher reg i o n.a ll y or Lln i versi tit:� are encourag�d to a p p ly for a d m ission w i t h ad v a n ced standi ng. vee 400 s tud ents transfer to the u n ive rsi t y each year wi th an average gmde po int i n exces s of 3 .00 ( 8 ) . Candidates must have go o d acad mic and personal stand i ng at the ins t i t u t i o n last J t tended ful l - lime. The m i n i m u m grade p o int average to be wru idered fo r adOli,sion as a transfer studen t is a 2.50 c u m u l ative grade p o i n t averagt: in college-level work from a regional ly accred i ted i nsti t ut i o n . In reviev i ng an applicant's file, the ad m issions office exami ne s the gradt' poi n t averlge, a cad e m ic p rogress, essay, and recommendations, For applicants with less than so p homo re s t n n d i n g (30 semester hours or 4S quarter hours ) , seco n d a r y �cho()l re c o r d s and standard ized tes t sco res w i l l also be considered.

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Admission

accredited co l leg

Pacific L u t he r a n Unive rsity welcomes applications from

at academ ic

students who have demonstrated ca pac ities for success

the baccal a u reate lev 1. App l icants who pre ' ent

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records a n d p

<

succeed

at

rsonal qualitIes that wiU enable them to

P LU and benefit fro m the uni ersity environ ­

ment will be offered ad m i ss ion . Appl icanls for ad missio n a re eval uated without rega rd to sex, race, creed, color, age, national origi n , or disablLng co nditio n . Select ion riteria i n clude grade point average, class rank, transcript patte rn, test scores,

an

essay, and reco m m en dations.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS (Freshmen I Trans fer Students ) In evaluating appl icatio ns the Office o f Admissions i nterprets

relalion tll thE' quality of t h e c u rr i c u l u m that the ap p l i c a n t has pllrslied in high sch ool and at the baccalau rea te level . For exam ple . n �tand<1 rd h igh :,chool program in p repa r a t i on for college should i Jldllde the follow i n g ;

rede.n t i:11s req u i red are:

1 . Formal Applim tio/!: Sub m i t t.he PLU AppLication fo r

gr a d e point average :lnd class ra n k in

English:

4 year

"Mathematics: 3 years ( algebra, 2 years, and geometry, 1 yea r ) »

Foreign Language: _ years Social Studies: 2 years Laboratory Sciences: 2 years Fine, Visual, o r Performing Arts: 1 year IDectlves: 3 years (selt!cted from the a reas l isted above, as co u rs �s in computer s cien ce, �-pee c.h, 3nd

as

debate. )

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� l'vlil1inmm Entra nce Re'llliremellts: 1. T ivo years of college prep a ra tory ma thema t ics (e.xdtlSive of computer science) with at! average grade ol e or higher, or ,m approved collrse at the oilege level, or demonstra ted equ ivalent proficiency.

of co llege p reparatory mathematics means two Ye:Jr> Igebm or one year of high school algeb ra and one year of h igh scho()l g�,)metry. Ta.k i ng th� aJgebra and/pr geo metry courses in middle or j un ior h igh school is acceprable provi ded the), a re high �chool level ccm rses. If ,; sludent is ddmittcd to l' LU with a dd'icill'ncv in mat hemal· ics, t hat deficiency (an be. removed by co mpleti()n '()f Intennediate Algebra a l P LU o r a n)' m h c r coUege or u.nivets i l) . ) f 2. Two years o oltc o reigll iang a age in h ig h scho o l, with an f average grade of C or h igher. £1r o n e year a t the college level, or demo llstm ted eil u iva/e n t p roficiellc J. NQI.£. La nguage ta ken ( 1\vo year�

of h igh school

before n i llth grade will l/ot fit/flll this req llirement.

Studen ts who have not satisfied 0111" o r /loth of the.se 1Bl"ircmellts may still be admitted but tlHlst make lip the deficiency as a ll Ad d i tio nal study of both mathematics and foreign language i s certain area, i n t h e arts a n d sciences a nd in some p rofessional p rogram 5. Th ose w ho follow the above preparatory

program will find most curricular o fferi n g s of the universi ty pen to them and may also quali!)! for advan ed placemen t in some areas. Students are a d m i t t e d to eit her the fall or spring semeste r.

postmarked by 0 embe r 1 5. tudents adrn i tted under the Early Ac t io n polic), recei c early notification of their accep ta.IlC� belween October I an d

ovembcr 30. hest s tude nts have first opport unity to request camp w, housing and register for fail cia ·ses. The re i� no fi nancial a i d be n e 6t or pe nalty for Ea r l y Action st u dents.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES ( F reshmen & Thansfer Students ) St udents plan n in g to en ter as fresh men may subm it a pp licat ion m ate ri a l s anyti me after com plet io n o f the j u nior year of h igh school . Admi ssio n decis ions are made begi n n ing December 1 u n le s s a request for Early Action is received. Cand idates are notified ot their status a s sOOn a the i r co mpleted a p p l ication has been received and eva l llated.

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a p t it ude , and fo r \ bo rn P L is a top choice. may apply fo r Early Act ion adm ission . Early Ac tion studen ts must m ee t each of t he follow i n g criteria: t p 2 5 % of bigh school cla, s , 3.60 or higher grade point average, a nd 1 1 00+ SAT or 24+ A T scores.

Ap p l icants may request Early Action by completing the regula r fre s h m a n admission n::quirem�nts a n d ch e k i n g Early Ac t i o n i.n box ! of the admission ap p l i cation. The applicat ion must be

Accep tan ce to the fa l l term carries permission to a ttend the p reviolls s u m m e r sessions. Spring acceptance approves enroll­ ment in the January term. Tbe fol lowi ng appl ication prio r i t ), dates are recom mended: Fall Seme.ster- I'ebrul.lry 15; Sprillg Semester-December 1 5.

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Fresh man applicants who exhibit above ave ra ge achievement and

a d v i sa b l e for

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$35. 00 Applicatio/l Fee: A $35 fee m u , t a c co m p a n y the a p p l ica­ tion or be m a i l e d sep arat ely. Th is nonrefundable service fee loe ' not applv to the student's account. Make checks o r money o rde r s p a yable to PLU OffIce of Admissions. 3. Tra n.scripts: Tra nscripts m ust be submi tted from high sch oo l a n d al i col l ege course wo rk. Tra nsc ri pts m u s t be sent d i rectly fro m t h e sc.hclOl to pr . c'''pted fresh men must s ub m i t a final h igh school transcript wh ich i n d i cates sa ti sfac tory c o m p l tion o f high :ic.hool and attainment o f d di ploma. The uillversity ;l c ce p t s tb� G neral Eq ui v a l e n c y Diploma ( GED ) for those students who m a y no t have comp leted a tra diti o n al h igh sehoul p rogram. 4. Recommen datioll: O n e reco mmen dat i o n m u s t be prepared by a p ri n ci pal . co u nselor, pastor, or other qualified p erson. The form is included in the appl icat ion packet. 5. Test Reclu irement: All en teri n g fres h m a n s tudents mus t submit sco res fTom e i ther the College Boa.rd. Scho last ic A sses ment Tes t ( SAT ) . or the American College Tes t .ssessmen t ( ACT) . Regisr ration p rocedures and fo r ms are ava i lable at h igh sch ool cou n seling offi ces. 6. Personal Essay: Using no more tha n two pages, write an es s ay o n one of the e [Wo top ics: 3. Describe an acad e m i c experie.nce that has significantly in fl uenced your life. b. If YOll could be a ny historical or fIctional cha.ra.cter fo r one day, who would you be and why? 7. Statement of Good Srallding ( t ra nsfers only). Early Action (Freshman

additiol1al degree req ll irement .

6

2.

Ad mission available fro m high school counselors or t he PLU O ffice of Adm issions. St 1.lde n ts may also apply o n - l in e a t www. p l u.ed u .

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Early Admission Qu al i fied

students i n te rested in accelerati ng thei r form a l begin work toward a degree after completion o f

education may

t h e j U lJ.ior year o r fus t semes(.e.r of the senior year o f h i g h school. Exce pt i ona l stude n t s who wi s h to en ro l l before co mpleti ng a l l requ i Jed u n i ts in h i gh s c h o o l m u s t have a let ter submi tted by a recogn ized school offi ci al which approves early colle g e admis sion


nd gives assurance that a high ch 01 dip l oma will be issued

Program are considered fre h m en with dvan ed standing. Students who participate in this p rogram will be arded college red it in a manner on istent with PL 's p o licy on tran fer of cred i t fTOm other institutio n . Credit will b e

after completion of speci fie d college work. Only students highly ree mmended fo r Early Admissi n wil l be considered. en rally n t h i gh th e se students rank near th e top of Ih ir cl ass and pr aptitud test scores. APPUCATJ ON PROCEDURES (International Students) T nte rnat io na l sludents who are q ua l ifi ed , cade m ical ly, finan­ cia ll y, a n d i n Jngl i.s. h profi ien cy are en o U l'aged to j in the un ive rs i t y ommun ity. Applicaton deaclli. nes are July 1 fo r fall erne ter and Tal1 uar y 1 for pring semest r. � redenti als requir d are:

l.

A completed International tudent Appiica tioll with a n o nrefun d able .S. 35.00 ap p li c at i n fee .

2. OFFICIAL TTallscripts with Ellglish transla tion from each: (a) secondary chool , (b) E ng l is h a' a e ond language program, (c) coUege o r u niversity att nded in t h United St ates, home coun try. o r other coun try. Transcripts m ust be ent d i rect ly from each in titution. Fa.xed cop ies are not acceptable. 3. Euglish Proficie ncy, measure d by one of the following: (a) tandardized English Profici ney Te t: TOEFL with a m i n imum scor ' of 550 ( aper test f rmat) or 2 1 3 ( computer-based) , or

(b) Two quarters Or one semester of c ll�ge-Ievel E n gl i sh writing with grades o f B or high r, or (c) Audit level completion of th e American

ultural

change

E ng l ish u nguage I nstitut e, located on the P L U c a m p us.

Arrangemen ts to take these tests can be made by caI l i ng the ACE Language In tilute, located at PL , ( 2 5 3 ) 535-7325. 4. On e Academic r ference fr m chool official or others in a p o sit ion t eval uate the st udent's ability to succeed in a baccala ureate p rogram. In add it i on , transfer tudents from

3.

awarded fo r ollege- I vel academic ourses de cr i be d in t h e catalog of an a ccred i te d Washington State com m unity coUege and posted on an 0 tlcial t r an sc d p t . Imern cltiOllcll Bacca lilurea te: A m aximum of 30 semester h o urs

may b gran ted for campI tion of the Diplo ma. St uden ts re advised to contact the Ad missi o ns ffice for sp c i fi c details. 4. Other Progra ms: St uden ts who have co mp le ted col lege courses wh i l in high school ma y r ceive c redit . The cours s mu s t be listed in the official co ll ege c a ta l og, be a p ar t of the regular coU ege curri uJum of a regio nally accredited co l lege or universi t y. and be posted on an official co llege or university

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transcript.

The u nivers i ty reserves the right t o make decisions on an individual ba is . Other Educational Experiences 1 . Credits earned in n onac.cred i t e d , chools are n t transferable. Students who ha e matriculated at Pacific Lut hera n Un i ve rs i ty may petition a department or school Lo wa i ve a particular rcquirenlent o n the basis of p re vi o u� nonac redi ted course work or may p etition a department or chool to rece i v c.redit by examination. 2. Th un iver it allows up t 20 em t r hours of SAFI/Dante credit, up t o

2 0 se meste r h urs fo r mil ita ry credi t, and up to

mester h ucs of CLEP c redit, p rov idi ng the t tal of the

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three does not exc eed

30 sem

st

r

h o ur .

3. The u niversity does not grant credit fo r college-level )ED a

U.S. ol leg e or un iversi ty must have a reference [rom the inter n at ional student adviser. 5. A c o mp let ed Internatiorlal Student Declam tioll of Fit ranees. 6. Personal Essay on one of two top i cs listed on th e essay form.

t·sts. 4. Por i n for m ation on the Co U ege Leve l :xaminaliol1 rog ra m (C P ) , refer to the secti n on Credi t by Examination under Academic Procedures (see page 25).

EVALUATION O F CREDITS D-ansfer of Credits from Other Universities

The Regis trar's Office evaluates ail lran fer reco rd s a nd p rov id s advi in ma terials designed to assist students to c o mp le t e u n iversity requir men . Tbese mater ial include a sum m, ry f co re requirements completed and the t tal hours accep te d . lndividual chool and departments determ ine wh i h courses atisfy maj r requirement .

1 . Courses comp l eted with a grade of C· or h ig he r at otl1 er reg ional ly a cc red i t cd c 1I get; or un iversit ie normally will be accep ted for graduation credi t with "P" grades, and will nol be calcul ted into the PL grade po in t average.

2. A st ude n t may transfer maximum of 96 semester O r 1 44 quarter hours. O f these, the max i m wn transferable fr rn a two-yc' r cho I is 'I semester r 96 quarter bour .

compl te the d i re t t ransfe r ass date degree from an accredited Washington tate community college before matriculati n at PLU will b adm itted with jun ior sta nd ing and w ill have satisfied Core I of the gene ral univer­ sity requirements except for 4 ho urs in rel igion ( fro m l ine 1

3. Stud nts wh

or 2) and

4 h urs in

er pect ives on Div rsity.

Transfer of Credits Earned While in High School The un iversity award credi t to high scho I students fo r urses o mp l eted before hi gh chool gradua tio n. The university may award transfer credit to high schoo l students who have com­ pleted courses in approved pr grams, as de crib ed below. 1 . AdvCI/lced Pmcement Progra m:

tud n ts who complete advan ed plac ent or cred it toward gr ad u a t i n through the examination pr gram of the CoUege B ard may receive redit for such courses. Inq ui ries should be addressed to the Office

of Admission .

2. RLinnirlg Stnrt Progra m: Accepted t udents who hay co ro ­ ple ted courses under the Wash ington State Running Start

FINALIZING AN OFFER OF ADMISSION I . Medical Requirement: Be6 re a tual em llmen t each n ew student rnLL�t submit a Health istory Form complete i t h a n accurate i mm un ization reco rd. This i n formation must be

acceptablt: I. the PLU Health l'rvice' Office. 2. AdvallCf! Pilymellt: A $ 20 0. 00 advance payment is necessar y i n order to onfirm an o ffer o f admission. T h i payment gu ran tees a place in the udenl b dy, reserve. h fng n campus i requested, holds financial assista n e wh ich may hav een awarded, a nd is I' qui red before la . r g ist rat i o n . It is credited to the st udent's ac unl and is ap pl i ed toward expenses f the fir t ·emester. Fall appl icantspffered admis­ sion hefor May I must PQSl m, r ths' paym nt by May I . I f circumstances necessitate callceUati n o f enrollm�nt and the A m iss io ns O ffice is n t ified in writing he� May 15. the

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$200.00 will be r fu n ded . The refund da te for lh January term is December 1 5 , and or spring seme ter, Ja n ua ry 1 5. 3. New Student Information Form: 111is fo rm must be co mp l eted by ill st ud ents and re tu rn ed with the adva n ce payment. 4. Residential L ife l n formation Fo rm : This fo rm must be co m pleted by .ill s t u de n t s and

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returned

with the adva n

An academically d ' ' m issed �tudenl may be reinstated after

one

semester if the s t ude nt I resents new e idence of

potential

academ i c success .

S t udents w h o have been d ropp ed fo r academic or di scipli n­

ary reasons a n d t hen reinstated must i de nt i fy a facul t y m e m be r w i l li n g to act as a SpOIL or , nd a dvi n.

e

payment. ACCELERATED UNDERGRA DUATE RE-ENTRY FOR ADUtl'S (AURA)

ea rs of age or Ider, wh() have not be n enrolled in a bac alaureate deg ree program w it h i n the l a s t five years, may seek a d anced placem nt up to the juni )r lev I through the URA P rogram. Those accepted i n to AURA are gra n ted o ne year' pro is i o nal ad m i sian. d u r i ng which time t hey must complete 1 2 cre dits at PLU ( i ncludi ng Psychol b')' 401) w i t h a cumulative grade point average of 2.S0 or hig her. Cr dit award. fo r prior lea r n i ng are based upon syst m a t ic assessment b, a faculty pa n el o f tbe adequacy and appropriate­ ness of knowledge an d kill · de m o n trated in a po rtfo l i o pre­ p a red b , t he student with taff a..-;sis tance. Credit awa rds may not exceed 48 sem ester credits les acceptable college trans fer credits. For d tails f the AURA Pr gTam, con tact tb> d i r 'cto r, AURA Progra m , 535-8786. Qualified adults, 30

Financial Aid Recognizing that many students wh

want to atte nd Pacific

Lutheran Un ive r ity would be u nable to meet all xpenses

of enrollment from per onal or fam ily sources, the u n iversity attempts to provi de fina ncial assista n ce to

all

elig ib le students. Any s tu den t ap proved for enrollmen t or

Approx i­ of the uni versity' tudents rece ive hel p i n the fo rlTl o f gift assistance ( that is, scholarship , artistic

currently enrolled lTlay re que st financial aid. mately 90%

ac h ieveme n t awa rds, or gran ts) , l ow i ntere t d [erred

employment. In many cases a financial aid award n of these forms of as istance. The offer of financial aid is bas ed n the cost of atten­ dance, which is th e university's eslimate of how m uch it co ts student s in various circ u m tances to attend PLU. A t ude n t ' reSOUices are s ubtracted from the projected

loans,

or

will be

a

com binat i

co ts to d et ermi ne fijlan cial need. Se veral different b udge ts are used, taking into account a student's marital statu , number of dependent , the cos t of books, suppl ies, hou ing, food, tra nsportation , and p e rso nal expenses. A paren t 's contribution is computed for all dependent

students by the federal processor. It is based on a federall establ ished fo rmula fo r determini.ng paren tal abil ity to co n t rib ute award a student's edue tiou . The u:niver ity als o

expects students ( and their pou es, i f married ) tCl toward expen es. All appl icants are offere d the maximum amo unt of aid

contribute RETURNmNG STUDBNTS

for which they qualify, as funds permit.

I . A student's a dm iss i o n to the Lilli ersi Ly is val i d for si:< years.

St udents

ho do

not

attend tb

that incl udes either a faL l

or

un iversity for

J

period of t i me

ter must apply t

sp ring scm

return to the un iver ity as de cribed below. Stude nts who w i sh to re turn within the six-year admission p e ri od reenter through the S tud en t erv i ces C 'nter. Reenter­ ing students m ust provide their c ur re n t addres , degree infomlation, and offi ial tr Il sc r i pts [LOrn any Ilege attended d u ri n g their a b se nce. Befo regis tering, reentering $tudents m ust reso lve prev i ous fina ncial obligations to the L1niv rs i ty and have a current h ealth clea rance from Univer· s i ty H l t h Services. • S tu de nts who wish to return to the un iversity after the ix­ year adm ission period e.xp ires must re a p p l y [or admission. Applicants for readm ission are req ui red to llbmit a com­ pleted appl ication and official tra nscripts fro m any college a tte nded d u.ring their a b sence. Appl ication forms may be obtained from and submit ted t t h e Office f Ad m iss ions . 2 . An academically dismisseJ stud n l m a y ap p ly fur reinstate­ ment by subm itt i ng a letter of peti t i o n to !.he d i re tor of dv isi ng. The p e t i t io n i' acted on by the Committee on Admission and Ret n t i o n of Stu d en t s . A st ude n t whose peti­ tion i. approved will be reinstated on pr ba tion md must participate in the probationary se m es t r plan. Rcftr to the Academic StaCIIs sectioll for a descriptioll of probation. s t ude n t whose petition is denied may apply aga i n for r i nsta te m e n t after one semester has elapsed unless i.nfonned o t h e r>v1se. A di mbsed. student Illay pe t i t ion fo l' rei nsLatement only once •

per semester.

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I f financial

circumstances change, students may conta ct

the Fin, nc ial Aid and Student Empl y ment Office to

dis c uss th ir situation with a financial aid admi nistrator at any ti me .

If studen ts or their families have unu ual circumstances (such as loss of empl oyme n t or major medical expenses)

that might affect the need for student fmancial aid, the F i nanci al Aid and Studen t E m pl oymen t Office sh o uld be contac ted . Unusual circumstances must be desc r i bed in writing , with the student's name, social security number, and all pert ine nt dollar amou n ts i nd ic a ted .

Students who receive schol a rsh ip c from sourc s o u ts ide the u niversity must info r m t he

Financial Aid and S tudent

Employment Office in wr i ti ng with the name of the scholarship and th e yearly

amount. Tn most cases , PLU financial aid package. Loans and work study will be adj usted fir t. Scholarships and grants will be adjuste d o nly as a l as t

may be required by federal regulat ion s to adjust a

resort . Fin ancial assistance is availab le to all qualifted tudents regardless of sex, race, c reed, 01 r, age. nat ional origin, or disabil ity. APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Studen ts must apply fo r financial aid am , car by complet ing

a

new PAFSA. R newal FAPSA or doing FAFSA on the Web. Need


based aid is not automatically renewable_ FAFSAs are generally available in December � r the up om i n g academic yea r. Applica­ tions mllst be submi t ted by the fol lowing priority-fund ing deadli nes for PLU to be considered for m ax i m u m funding_ APSA or do PAFSA on the Web no later t h a n !arwary 3 1 fo r the u p c o m i n g , eademic year.

Entering Freshman Students: Mail

Enterlng Transfer Sttldeots: Mail PAFS , Renewal P FSA, or do

F FSA on the Web no la t ac a de m i_c )'ear_

r

than !alll/ary 3 1 fo r the u p c o m i n g

PLU Cootinning Students: ail F SA, Renewal FAF$A or do PAP A on the: Web no l a ter than February 15 for the upcoming acad mi year.

For FAFSA on the

rb,go to http://\\,\ .vJafsa_ed .gov

An application for fin.mcial aid may be completed at any ti � e ,

but fa il u re t meet the priorLty date may result in a denial of aid even though n e ed is dem nstrated_ The F i n a n ci al id Office will consider al l applicants for any award fo r which they m ight be eligible. Aid awa rds are }llr OIle year alld most are renewable, p rovided reapplicatioN is comp leted 0 1 1 time, financial need CO I ' ­ tilmes, and satisfactory acade lll ic progress i s maill tained. A i d is /lot automat ically rellewed each yea 1-. NOTIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS I . Awa rd decisions for freshmen and transfer students who meet t h e February I campI tion date w i l l be m ad e in March, and

actual notification will be mailed the first week in April. 2. Fi nanc i al aid d ci ions f, r con t i n ui ng PLU students are made du rin g April and M ay_ Notifications are sent o u t beginning i n June. VALIDATING THE AID OFFER

Aid offers must be al i da ted by re t u r n i n g the signed Offer of inancial i d . Preslune-n a nd transfi r studen ts must als o submit the $200 advance payment req u i red by the Offic of Admis s ions. This should be done as soon as p ossibl , but must be r ceived b)' May I . No paymenl is req u i red from c ont i n ui ng stu de n t s. All students must complete :l satisfacto ry payment arrangement with the Stud nt S rvi C nter by Aligust I for fall seme ter and by January' 1 5 fo r sp ri ng semester to hold awards. Appli cants wh do nol rdu JI1 their acceptance of an a w a rd by the repl), date speci fied and who do not complete satisfactory payment arrangements will have th e i r award a n ce ll cd _ If an applica n t later decides to reappl y, the application w i l l b� revi wed with the grou p currently being processed. Aid, with the excepti n of ollege Work Study and Washing­ ton Stat Need rants, is reditd to ili student's account when all paperw'ork ha been o mpleted. Half of the award i s dis b u rsed each semester. P are n and studen ts are respon ible for the charges in excess of tbe award. In some ases a id is awarded in excess of d i rect university cha rges to help with living expenses. To expedite a re fu nd students can request remaining funds from their account by contacting the 'tudent Ser rices e nter. Under federal regulat ions, adjustments to an award p ac kag e OlU t be made if a student receives addition'll awards of aid from sourc s extetnal to the u n iversity. In every cas , however, Financial Aid and Student Employment wii l attempt t o allow the s t uden t t keep as much of tht' award packagt' as pos ible. B y t reati n g aid received from e:-.1ernru. ources i u III is way, additional awards from the university'S resources can be made to other qualified stud nts.

dditional T\ghts a n d responsibilities of financial aid rec i p i ­

ents include: I. Signing and retw-ll ul g each financial aid notice reeei ed. 2. Decl i n i n g at any time any po rt i on of an award.

z

Otifyulg the Srudent Servic Cent r in case of a dlang in cred i t hours attempted; a change in m a r i t a l status; a c h ange i n residence (c ff- ca mp us or a t h :>mc ) ; or receipt of addjt ional outside scholarships. 4. Providing a Ct)py of their parents' in ome tax retllIn (Form 1 040) andfur a copy of their own individual i ncome tax reru m if requested.

3.

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SATISFACfORY PROGRESS POUCY

The policy of the university i to allow st ude n t s to continue receiving financial assistanc as long as they are i n good stand ing. To do otherwise could cause a severe hards h ip on students who must dev te their ff, rlS to a c h .ie v in g satis(a tury grades. How­ ever, no institutional grant. wil1 be warded t stu den ts with cumulative grade point averages bel o 2.00. Moreover, federal regulations require that after fou r t e r m s or more of att mp te d enrol l ment, stude nts bel ow 2.00 cumulative grade point average will have their ft>deral Anancial aid revohd. Pa i fic Luth e r an University'S Schools of B usiness and Edu aLion require a mini­ m u m grade p o i nt average of 2.50.

To be g iven priority fo r most (- ),pes o f fina ncial aid, an appli­ callt must be enrolled as a ful l-t ime student. For Federal Finan­ cial Aid programs, a fu ll-t i me student i� defined as any per n

( 1 2 ) credit hours or more per semester. dj u tmeIlts in an award may be made during the year if an aid recipient has n t enrol led for a suffi c ie n t n umber o f credit hours. However, each fillancial a i d re c ipien t must maintain satisfactory a ca dem i c progre s i n the co ur t' of -wd), he or she is pursu ing in order to con t i n ue to reeeiv financial assistance awarded by Pacifi Lu t he ran n iversity tudent F ina n c i a l Aid Services. Tb. fo ll o wi ng requi remen ts are expec ted of each finan­ cial aid recipient; To make sali fa t o ry p ro g re s to ward a degree. an undergradu­ at t u d e n t must compl te 24 semester h o u rs 0 credit each a c ade m i c year. An academic year i s defined as the fall semester and the spring s ITt st e r Financial aid is awarded for 32 hours t o complete a bachelor's degree i n four years. For fuJI - time un dergrad uate :tudents receiving financial aid, the maximum nu mber of credit hour ' iliat m ay be attempted is 1 92 and the maximum ti meframe for completing a ba ccalau reate deg ree is six years. Even if a tudent changes his or her major or academic program, only 192 credit hours may be taken qual i f i n g for financial aid, and the maximum t irnefmme of six years for receiv ing a degree is en forced . Some financial aid prog rams ( e . g . , most un iversity gift aid programs a n d Was hington , tate Need Grants) allow ai to be awarded a maximum of four academic years for enterin.-:freshme n,and two ve rs f, r entering tran fe r students or a maximum of 1 44- hours. Por part-tim undergraduate students, a minimum of 1 2 credit h o u r s must b e completed each academic year and a degree must be achieved within a m ax i mum timefram of ten years. (The m ax im um numb r of c.redits allowable is 1 92_) enrolled fo r a m i n i mum of twelve

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y

Undergraduate Need-Based

Credit Completion Requirements Enrollment Status Ful l tim.: 314 time 1 /2 time L� than 1 /2 lim�'

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBIl.ITIl!S

The basic r sp onsiblJity for financmg an educa t i o n at PL rests with st ude n t s and t h e i r F. milies. In ad d ition to expected con Lrib ut ion s from par nts or guardi a n s student ar expected to assist by co n tr i but in g from t he i r savings and ummer earnings. F inancial as sis ta n ce fronl tl e university i s therefore supplementary to th efforts of a student's family. It is provided for Shldents who demo nstrate need.

Miniml1D'l peT tcnn 12 9 6 All c'Tedits uuempkd

Minimum per year 2-1 18 12 All .:redi ls attempted

L= than 1 12 time cnra/lml'llt applies to uu, Pell Gmtlf Program !Wh. Less than 1 12 riNII' enroJllm ·"t !rill C/JUS U ;t"dellt's ival1 to be ,-a tlceierl atld t1/ay}copllrdiz(' deferment sl/Jlu,.

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Satisfactory p rogress is reviewed fM financial ajd p urpose after ule end f spr i ng semester. For Washington State Need Grants , the Was h in gton tate Work Study Program , EOG, Wa hingto n Scholars, Wave, Trio, and any other tate of Washington funded program, sa ti s fa c tor y progres is reviewed at the end of each semester. The follo ving grades do not indicate success fu l completion of academic credit applicable toward a degree: "E" Grades "1" I ncomplete ·'W" Withdrawal "EW" Unofficial Withdrawal ( recorded by Registrar) " F" Failure Any courses in which grades are received are, h wever, incl uded in the maximum number o f redits that may b attempted ( 1 92) and are considered to be within the maxi m u m Lime-frame al lowable fo r ach ieving a degree (six years . Al l credits earned by xam ination, which are applicable loward a degree, wi ll be included in the limitation on credits that can be altemp ted whil" eligible for finan ial aid. Once a cou rse has been co m ple te d s llccessfully, the credit hour earned are counted toward the maxi mum number o f hours which can be taken under financial aid eligibility. If a course is successfully completed more than nce, it i count d onl once t oward a studen t's degree requirements and toward the maxlmwn number of hours that can be taken under financial aid el igibility. The univer ity's GurriculLun in 'Iudes very few noncredi t courses or courses who e credit hOLUS ar not appl icable to a degree. If any su h COli es are taken by financial aid rec ipients, the hour will be ind uded in the limitation on cr dits that may be attempted and will be con sidered within the tim eframe allowab l for achievillg a degree. In the event that a student r. ils to me t the criteria for sati sfa cto ry pr gress du ring a particular se meste r, he r she will b p laced on academic probation. railure 10 reg,lin satisfactory academic status will result in the cancellation f financial aid. Once "unsatisfactory progress" has been determined, tudents rece ive official nolifi aLion. Termi nated students may apply D r reinstatement by submitti ng a letter of petition t the Registrar's Office and securing a faculty spon or. The petition and spon or­ ship letter are su b m it te d for action to the Fac ulty Committee on Admis ion and Reten tion of tudents. Students whos financial aid is term inat d may p tition fo r reinst,llemem of their aid in one of two ways:

I)

rbey mny complete one seme ter of rull- lime enrollmen t

ing their o wn financial Iesources, or 2) they may sub m it an appeal to the Faculty Committee on Admission and Retention of studen d cumenting the u nllSual ci rcu mstances whi h have made it im p ossi ble to make satisfactory progress during the seme�ter in que, tion. u

Summer sess ions may also be used as terms during which a student on financial aid p rob a t i on may regain satisfact ry acade m j c status. However, tudents enrolling in wn m e r sess i o n s for this p urpose must use their own flnancial resources and are ineligi le fo r financial aid thr ugh the univ rsity.

lYPes of Aid AID PACKAGES

Studen ts are usually eligible for several different types o f aid from vario us sou rces; therefore PLU o ffe rs a fin ncial aid " pa kage" 0 . funds. Fu nds offered depend on a number o f factor ', including status as a n undergraduate o r grad uate sludent, the funds available at the time a studen t appl ie s and the amou nt of financial need. An expe ted family contribution i s derived usi ng a federal formula appli d to FAFSA in fo rmation.

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SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS cholarships and gra.nts are funds that do not hav

to be repaid.

A s tud nt' · pack-age includes gift money whenever guidelines and funding levels permi t. Where applicable, the combination o f

tuition remission and/or other inst itutionally funded resou rces (e.g., lergy De pend e nt , Alumn i Dependent , Regen l ) will be awa rded to a maximum f PLU tuition cost. To receive PLU grant or scholarship assistance, students mu st be full-time, taking a minimum of 12 nonrepeatcd credit hours each term. PLU awards gift ssistance fo r 1 2- 1 7 hours per term for the acade.mic year ( fill/ pring) only. In addition,

unless otherwise noted, the scholar hil(sand lIran ts lisled belillt are need-based and are available to undergraduates only. Reci-pie nts must maintain sati sfactorY academic progress a� d efin e d in the catalog. 111stitll tio llally COl/ trolled schola rships alld grants are pro vided university dOllors. If it is determirled that

by the lIn iversity {lndlor all

or a portion

of a student's (, ward is provided by a designated or

named s ource, att updated offe r offi "cmciai aid will

b sent.

DONORS/FUNDED UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIP

PLU FUNDED

-

NON TEED FOR TIJITIO

EXPENSE-S

REGENTS' AND PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to fr hmen in r e c o g niti n of oulstandi n ' cademic achievement and service in high school and in n t.i ci p a t ion of contj nued excellen e at PL . Students who met the following basic req u i rements were invited to apply: application for admission post marked by January 1 0; 3.8 GPA; 1 2 00 SAT or 27 A T; and US citizen r obtaining citizenship. The Regents' c holarsh i p is awarded to cover the full cost of tuilion 24-39 '-Tedits fOr the academic year (fall and sprillg) . The President's Scholarship is a half-tuition award fo r the a ca demi c year. Both are renewable fo r th ree years provided a 3 . 3 0 cumulative PLU GPA is main ined. ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDS of S5,000 are ann u ally offered to entering freshmen in recognition of outstanding academjc excellence in high school and in anticipation f superior performance at PLU. To be a candidate, a student must have a strong h igh school grade point average, 3.75 or higher, and re eive an offer of adm ission by Marc.h 1 . Financial need is not a requisite and no other application is required. Renewable for three years provided a 3.30 cumulative PLU GPA is main­ tained. Receipt of a Re ge n ts ' or President's scholarship super­ sedes this award. ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS of $4,500 are annually offered to entering freshmen in recognjtion of outstanding academi achievement in high school and in anticipat ion of superior performance at PLU . To be a candidate, a s tuden t must have a strong high school g rade point average, 3.50 to 3.74 , and receive an of fe r of dmission by March I . Fi na nc ial need. is not a re uisite and no other appli tion i requ ired. Renewable for three years p rovided a 3.30 cumu.lati e PLU CPA is maintained. PROVOST'S MERIT AWARDS of $3,000 are granted to under­ graduate transfer t udents with a 3 .50 or h igher PA and 30+ semester hours (45+ quarte r hour ) f transferabk c Ilege cour es completed at the time of admission. Must be admitted by March I. A 3.30 cumula tive PLU GPA is r quired for re­ newal. Need is not a determ in ing factor. Renewable or one year. PHI THETA KAPPA SCHOLARSHIPS of $3,000 are granted to tTansfer tudent with a 3.60 r higher GPA, 45 + emester hours (60+ quarter hours) of transferable college course work, and proof of PTK membership. Students must be admitted by March I . The award is renewable for one year during the undergraduate period of tudy if a 3 .3 0 PLU GPA is maintained. Need js not a determining fa ctor. Three awards are gi en each year.


ALUMNI DEPENDENT GRANTS of $SOO/year for four years are avai lable to full-time depend ent s t ude nt s whos parent(s) at tended PL U (or PLC ) for two senl sters or mo re. Need is no t a determ i n i n g fa c to r. ALUMNI MERJT AWARDS 0( $ 1 ,500 per acadenlic year for four years are given to exce pt i o nal freshman students who are sons or daughters of PLU alu m n i / ae . - neeri ng fresh m en must have a cumulat ive high s hool GPA f 3 .75 or higher. Re n ewa l candi­ dates must have a m inimum c u m ul ative P L U GPA o f 3.30 to be eligible. Financial need is not a de te rmin i ng factor. FACULTY MERIT AWARDS a re available to 24 s tude n ts who h ave co mp l eted 45 r ed i t hours or more at PL U. No separak applica­ tion is necessary. Faculty w i l l recommend individual students to the selection c om m i tte e . Notifica.ti n is made i.n t he sprint' erne ter for the foUowi.ng year. The a\oJard is ren ewab le for one year d ur in g the undergraduate period of s t ud y . RIEKE LEADERSHIP AWARDS for up to $2,000 per year are

available to tud nt� witb 3.00+ GPA and demonstrated l ead e r­

ship or active i n vo lve m e nt in a m ul tie th n ic context. A separate app l i cation is requ i red . Conta c t Stude.nt I nvolvemen t and Le adersh ip at (253) 5 35 - 7 1 95 for more inrormatio n . CLERGY DEPENDENT GRANTS are ava i lable to dependent children of o rdain d ministers who ar actively se rvi n g a Christian co ng rega tio n full-time. The grant amo unt is $ LOOO per year ($SOO/semester) . A pp l ic a t i n d eadl i ne is December I for the curren t year; awards are m ade on a fll nds ava ilable basis th erea fte r.

ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS are available to full-t i m e u nde r ­ grad uates. St u d en ts must tIie a FAP A a.nd meet all PLU GPA stan dards. Up to full t u ition an d room/board po ssjble. Call PLU's ROTC office for i nformation (25 ) 535-8470. ROBERT C. BYJtD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to h igh chool senioTS who have demonstrated academi achievement. T he a ward may be rene\ ed [o r up to three y ars , pro ided t ha t funds arc ap p ro p ri a ted and the st ud en t remains el igible. Amounts 'ary. Applicatio n is made thr ugh the ap p rop ri a te educat ion assista.nce agency in a s t u de n t ' s home state. DELORES DAVIS LEADERSHIP i available to o ne adul t studen t ea ch year in the am o u n t of $ 1 , 000. Student must be 25 years old or older, have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher, have a positive attitude, co ntri b u t e to t he adult st udent population at PLU, be com m i t t ed to both acad e m ic and personal go a ts , and exh ihi t l eade rs hi p q ua l i ties . Pacific Lutheran U n iversi ty taff a n d faculty nominate students each year. The award is for one year and is non- re newable. INTERNATIONAL GRANTS are a v. u la bl e to graduat- and under­ graduat e internationaL st ude n ts att ndlng Pacific L ut h ran University. The am oun t is 2,000 per yea r for four years. No appli t ion is necessary. T hese are awarded au to m ati cally and may be renewed an nuall y for qua l ifying sludents. THE AMERICAS GRANT i.'l available to citizens of countries in North, Central, and South Amen ' (excl uding rhe nited States) . The amo unt i s the qulvalent of a do u b l e occu'Pancy room and meals (except South Hall , wh t!re meals re n t included ). Students must live in a PLU residence hall. T his grant replaces the

Interna t ional Grants

WASHINGTON SCHOLAR'S AWARD is a ilabLe to students who arc "W -hington State Sch olars" in the amount of $3, 1 42 per year for fo ur years, s u h je ct to State Legislativ e djustment. To renew each year the ludent must ma intain a cumulative 3.30 PLU CPA. The W as hi ngt on Scholars Program honors three gradua t i ng high 'ch 01 se n i o r s from each legislative district eac h year. PACIFIC LU1MERAN UNIVERSITY MATOIING SCHOLARSHIP (PLUMS) provides financial assistan ce to students from c h u r c h congregations who at ten d Pac i fic Lutheran University. Through the PL UMS program PI. wiU match, dol lar-for-dolla r, scholarships from $ 1 00 to $ 1 ,000 p rovi ded by co ngregations or o rga n i z atio ns withjn a church to stude.nts att en d i n g P L U . Congr gation s are en co ur aged to have PLUMS p aym en t s made to PLU by ugust 1 so that the scholarship may be refle c ted in the s tuden t 's fall b i l l i n g. PLU will, however, match scholarshi p mo n i es received fTo m congregation s up to J a nuary I of the academ i c , ear. rn order to be ma tc h ed . fun ds must be sent directly to F i na ll ci al id and Student Employment a.nd not be give n to the student.

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lUfTlON REMISSION E m ployees of the uni er i t y are eligible for up to 90% and their de pe n de n ts re eligible for up to 75% tuition remi s si o n . Tuition remissio n i� a u n i vers i ty gift resource. Students reeei ing tuiti n remissio n may be awarded additional m erit and need-based insututional gift , but o nly up to tbe cost of tuition. Rece ipt of tuition r m ission may serve to adj ust or eliminate o the r institutional aid previously awarded.

PLU

FUNDED - NEED BASED

Q ClUB SCHOLARSHIPS are award e d to new fre shm e n and I ra ns fer on the b as i s of academic ach i eve men t and fillancial n eed . F r es h m e n must ha ve a 3.25 cu m u l at i ve GP . Tra nsfers are re u i red t h ave an entering c um u l at ive GPA of 3.00. Re n.ewa l wil l re q u i r e good academic st a n d i n g , a cumulative 3.00 PL U PA, t imel y rea p p l i c a t ion through the FAFSA, and demon t r a te d financial need. DOLLARS FOR SCHOlARS are available to students receiving scholarships from any Dollars fo r Sch o lars chapter. Pacific Lutheran U n ive rs i ty is , Co ll e gi a te Partner and matches Dollars for Sc h o l a rs cha ter awards, dollar for doUar, up to $ 1 ,000 per

student based on rmanci al need as fU Jlding p er m i t s. Dollars for Scholars is a prog ra m of Cit iz en s' Schol arsh i p FOWldation of America. NEED-BASED ARnSTIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS are g r a nt ed to students with finanCial need who h ave exceptional ab i l i ty in the fields of Art, Dance, Drama, Forensics, and M u ic. The award requires ree mmendat ion by a P U faculty memb r each year and is renewable on the basis of recommendation , participation, and rees tabl ished m.rn.

UNIVERSITY GRANTS aTe awarded to st ud e n ts with financial need ( who may not qualify for o th er institutional scholarships) and m.untain at least a cum ulative 2.00 PLU GPA.

NOTE: FAFSA must be submitted in " limely marmer each year '0 reesta blish evidence offinanciul 'Ieed for need-based aid.

FEDBIlAL AND TATE FUNDED

for such students.

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP a\vards are offered for 750$2,000 to NMSQT-PSAT final! ts ( National Meril Semi-finalist Q ua lifyi n g Test - Pre-Scholastic Assessment Test). Finalists t i on a l Merit S ch o l a rs h ip Co r po ra t i o n of 'hould in fonn the th if i n tention to enrol! at P L U . National M e ri t final ists are guar,lDt eed a total of $7,OOO through a combination of other institutional scholarsh ip reso urces. This amount in cl ud es the $7 5 0-$ 2,000 National M e ri t Scholarship .

.."

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDED GRANTS Federal PeD Grants are federal gTaJlt available to st udents who t ake at least I c re d i t hour per semesteT. Pell G ra nt s remai n an estimate u n t il veri fication is completed, if a student bas been selected. Students taking 1 2 hours or more per semester recei ve a full gra n t, 9- 1 1 hour rece i ve 3/4 grant, 6-8 hours 1 /2 g r an t , and II'S than 6 ho u rs a pproximately 1 /4 grant.

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are

p ro m i ssory note if accep t i ng the loan. If the prom isso ry note is

fed e ra U y funded grants awarded on t he basis of h i gh tl nan cial

n ot

need.

Studen t

Washington State Need Grants are available to eligible

of classes. All loans not s igned fo r wilJ be

< z

FEDERAl NURSING LOAN

tu it i on acc o rd i ng to Washington State law . tudents Laking 12 h ou rs or mOre per semes t e r receive a full granl; s t uden t s

EUglbUJty: in the

ta ing 9- 1 1 h o urs receive a th ree-quar er gmnt; students ar

Amount:

p to

of 5%. P rincipal and interest

payments begin 12 m on ths after the stud e nt grad u at e , with­

dra ws , or dro p s to les than half-tim

a re awarded to t ra nsfe r s tud ents with an Associate's D egr ee o r

jun ior st a ndi ng in the l, mollnt of $ 2,500 per year ( subje c t to

attendance.

Comments or Conditions: Recipients are re q mred t

s ign a

pr�) m i s sory note. The p romissory notes 'Nill be sent to the student

a tt en d ed Pacific

by certified mail; the student must sign and return the p ro m is ­

Lutheran U n i vers i ty before. Eli 'ible ap p li c a n t s must be

following Wa ' h i n gt o n State c o unt i es in

order to be eligible: B e nto n , Clark, Cowl itz , F ra n kl in , King, K its ap , Pierce, Skamania, S nohomish,

po ka n e , Walla Walla , Y ak ima and be placebound. Application mLlst be made to [ h e Hi gher Education Coord inating Boa rd of Was h ington who wj]] se l e c t the rec ip i e nt s . Students m ust be en ro l l e d at least () hours per term.

or

sory note if ac ce p ti n g the loan . If the p ro m isso ry note is not returned by c erti fied mail, then the s tud e nt mu t sign in th Student Services Cente r/Student Loan ffice after the tirst week of clas s e s . All l oans not s i gn d fo r will be ancelled. FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOANS

One or more of the Federa l Fam il y Education Loans may be li s ted on a fi nancial aid o ffe r. This mean s

st udent i . eli g i bl e to

a

WAStUNGTON AWARD FOR VOCATIONAL EXCELLENCE (WAVE)

appl y separat ely fo r these loans.

is available to students ho have co mpleted at least one year in a vocational program approved by the S tat e Boa rd for

that is cer t i fie d by t he Fi nancial Aid Office. It is impo rtan t that

C ommunit y and Tech nical

Federal I ans are ob ta i ned through a lender on a n appLication

a ppl icati ons be sent to the le.nder fo r prompt proce. sing. Delays

oLleges. The ap plicant must be a

Washin gton State reside n t and a h i gh sc h ool g ra d u ate, and must m a int a in

a

PLU GPA of 3.0 e ac h term. Th award i s fo r two

a

student account.

th e lenders. I t is re c o m m e n d ed that students choose lende r · who will pa rtici p a te in el e c troni c funds t ra ns fe r (EFT) with PLU, so

on state funding . PROMISE SCHOLARSHIPS are available to the top

in receiving out sid e loan fu nds may result in a d d itio nal in teresl ch a rges on

Loan checks are electronicaUy transmitted to t he u n i.versity by

years (4 semester ) and the amollnt varies eac h yea r dep e nd i ng

\ 5 % of

as to avoid h av i n g to stand in l i n e to s ign a paper check. C hecks

Wash ington State high sch o ol graduates fo r the s chool year 2000-200 I . Students must be e n ro lled a m inim u m of 6 h o u rs

must be signed by the bo rro we r within 30 days after they a re received by the univers i ty . In addition,

per semester.

I program. Recipients must dem !lStrate financial ne d. F un dj ng is l i m ited. TRI programs incl ude : p ward B und, Tale nt Se reh, and SMART. A TRIO award wi l l repla ce Wash ington State Need Grant eligibility.

All awards from federal and stMe 50llrce6 are mIld" llS$II m ing the

wi th a p ot en t ial loss of award. Eligibility: At least h a lf-t ime

students. Repayment:

expenses UJJtil baving completed theiL educat io n. loan obliga­

interest durin g

fres h men ; $3, 500 fo r sopho­

va ri able interest rate which ch a ng es a nn ual ly and

a

student's t ime of enrollme n t . The student is

resp o nsible for s ele c ti n g a le nde r from the

Lenders. A

FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN ( fun d i ng is limited)

(6 cr dit hours) un dergraduate or cred i t hours) gra duate . tu de n ts with high need. Amount: Up to $4,000 for each year of un dergraduate study and up to $6,000 fo r ach year of gr adu at e or pr o fessio n al stud y. Repa}'IDent: A fixed i n te re st rate of 5%. Principal and intere s t payment begin 1 2 months after the student grad ua t es , with­ draws , or drops t less th an balf-time attendance. Deferral s available for student sta t us , e c o n om i c hardshi p , and sel e c t volun teer se rvices. Comments or Conditions: Recip i ent s are req u ired to sign a p romissory n o te . The promissory not s will be sent to the student by certified m ail; the studen t must sign and return the Eligibility: At leas ha l f- time

(4

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r

Comments or Conditions: T h e federal governmenl pays the

NEED BASED LOANS

l

$2,625 per year [,

or d rop s to les tban half-time attendance.

tions are de scri b ed in th is section a nd in the promissory not

C

credit hours) u ndergraduate o r

ca n never exceed 8.25% and mon t h l y principal and i nterest pay­ ments begin six months a fte r the st udent grad uates, wit h draws,

Student loans allow stude n ts to postpone paying fo r college

I

(6

hours) graduate students.

mores; $5, 500 for j un io rs a nd seniors; an d $8,500 fo r grad uatt:

LOANS

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complete

SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAffORD lOAN

Amount Up t

occur, lfWards may be reduced or elimitlatw.

I

m u st

se ' ion will resul t in the l o an fU lld� bei ng returned to the lender

(4 c red it

anticipated funds will be available. Should a reduction in funding

C

student

rights and respo nsibilities will be discussed. Not attending a

who h ave completed any

P A

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an ent ra nce counseling session, during which a borrower's

TRIO - a State Need Grant Program is available to st ud e nts

12

$4,000.

Repayment: A fixed in terest rat

WASHINGTON STATE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS

residen ts of one of th

S t u d ents enrolled at lea t h a lf- t ime (6 cre d i t hours)

chool of N urs ing ( e x cep t pre-nursing) . Preference giv n

to LP! students.

t u den ts ta king

not eligible.

state fu ndi n g ) . Students may n ve r hav

th e first week

tiona l l oan cancellation condition. exis t.

Grants must be llsed � r educational expenses o t h e r t h an

6 hOllIS

r

el1ed. P ri o r i t y is

the d i s abled , or teaching i n a fed eral Head Start progra m. Addi­

lion Coordi nating Board's p o l i cies. Washington State Need

fewer t h a n

cal1

possi bl e fo r teaching in l ow income popul ation areas, tea c h i n g

grants are i n tend ed fo r stu den t s with high need. G ra n ts are awarded a t PLU in a c co rd anc wit h the Stat H igh e r Educa­

taking 6-8 ho urs r ceive a h al f gran t; and

enter/Studenr Loan Office aft

ervices

gi ve n to un dergradu ate students. Up to tot a l loan � rgi ve ne ss is

residents of the State of Wa hin gt o n who a t te n d PLU . These

u z

returned by certi fi ed mail, then the tudent must sign in the

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Preferred List of

s eparate loan application an d promis ory note will

then be mailed to the student from the selected preferred lender. Th e studen t submits the loan ap p lica t i on and p romisso ry note back to the lender fo r processing.

NON - N EED BA ED LOANS UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAffORD LOAN

EUgibUJty; Student attend i n g

at least half-time (

or a graduate student attending at least ha l f-ti me

credit hOUTS)

(4

credil hours)

who does not qualify fo r all or part of the maximum Subsjdized Fede r a l Stafford Loan. Amount: Up to $2,625 per year for fre h men; $ 3 , 500 for sopho-


mores;

5,500 for j unior a nd sen iors; and $ 1 0,000 for grad uate

s t u dents .

Repayment: A variable interest rate which change s annually and can never exceed 8.25% :l ild m on t hly principal payments begin six mo n ths after the s t u de n t graduates, withdraws , or dro p s to less than half- time attendun e. Uf/subsid ized m ea n s the student i responsible for the in terest o n the loan a moL U1 t while in school;

( I nte rest begins ac cr uing fr om the date the funds are first dI s bu rsed ) . however, the interest payment can be postponed.

Comments o r Conditions: F i nanc i al need i s no t a requirement. The student is respon s ibl e for s elect i ng a le n d er fr o m the Pre­

ferred List ofLerlder·.

A separate loan app l ic a t i on and promissory

note will then be mailed to the s t udent from the selected pre­ ferred lender. The student submits the loan application a nd promis ory no te back to th l; lender fo r pro ce sing. FEDERAL PLUS LOAN

Ellgibillty: Parents f dependent tudent. Amount: Parents m y borrow up to the full cost o f their student's college education minus the amo unt of any financial aid the student is receiving. Repayment: A variabl interest rate which changes ann ually and er exceed 9.00% and monthly principal and interest payments begin within 60 days after the final disbursement of funds. (In terest begins accruing from the date the funds are first disbursed.) can n

."

PRINCIPAL CERTIFICATE Students are not eLigible for Federal Stafford Loans according to federal regulations. Con ta c t the Student Services Center for information on alternative loans.

EMPLOYMENT r-

COLlEGE WORK STUDY

EUgibility: At least p a r t - ti m e students. Amount: Varies. Conunents 01' Conditions: On- campus jobs; students can apply for individual jobs th ro u gh the Financial Aid and Student STATE WDRK STUDY

least pa r t - t i m e students. Amount: Based on need. Comments 01' Conditions: Off-campus jobs; tudents m u s t

Eligibility: At

a p p l y for individual job s thro u gh the Financial Aid and Student

Employment O ffi ce .

VETERANS AFFAIRS Be VOCATIONAL REBABIllTATION Pacific Lutheran University's academic programs of s tudy are app roved by the Washington State H ighe r Education Coordinat­

ing Board's State App roving Agency (HECB/SAA) for enrollment

of persons eligible to receive educational benefits under Title 38

Reque t form can be obtained at the Student Services Center.

disabled veterans who wish to inquire about their eligibility for

Financial need is not a require n1 ent. Ei ther parent may borrow lender from the Preferred List of Lenders. A separate loan appli c a­ tion and p ro m i ss ory note wil l then be mailed to the parent from the selected preferred lender. The parent submits the loan a pp l i ­

and Title 10 USC. Veterans, widows, widowers, and children of deceased or benefits should contact the Regional Office of the Veterans Administration, Federal Building, 9 1 5 Second Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98 1 74. Pe rs o ns within the State o f Washington may telephone I ( 800) 827- L OOO. Students should gain admission to the university and see the

cation and prom issory note back to the lender for processing.

university's Veterans Affairs Coordinator before making

ADDmONAl UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

applicati o n for benefits. Students are required to register at the

EUgibWty: fndependent s tude n t or p aren ts are de n ied a P L U S loan.

dependent student whose

Amount! Up to $4,000/year for fr es hm en and sophomores and $5,000 fo r jun i o rs and eniors. Repayment: A variable interest ra te which changes ann ually and can never exceed 8.25°;\, and monthly principal payments begin six mont hs after the tudent graduates, w ithd raws, or drops to less than half-time attendance. UnslIbsidized means the student i s resp nsible for the intere t on the loan amount while in chool; however, interest paym ent may be p os t poned . ( Interest begins a cc ru ing from the date th fu nds are first disbursed . ) Conunents or Conditions: Financial need i not a req u i rem e n t . The student is responsible for selecting a lender from the Pre­ ferred List ofLellders. A separate loan application and promissory note will then be m ai l ed to the student from the selected pre­ fe rred lender. The student submits the loan appJic tion and promissory note back to the lender for processing. ALTERNATIVE LOANS

RUgibillty: All students.

Amount: aries. Comments and Conditions: V ario u s Alternative Loans are provided fo r all stude nt s, including those not qualifying for

Title rv aid. Additional infomlation is available in the Stude nt Services Center.

Veterans Affairs Coordinator's O ffice located in the Student Services Center ( Roo m 102, H a u ge Administration Build ing), before each term to insure continuous receipt of benefits.

NAMED ENDOWlIDIRESTRICfED SCHOLARSHIPS Aid

Association

fo r Lutherans Scholarship

Allenmore Registered

1

u rs l ng Scholarship

Alumn.i Scholarship Fund meri an Lutheran Church-North Pacific Dist ric t Scholarship Andy and Irene Anderson Endowed Scholarship for Nu rsi ng Arthur Anderson Scholarship Florence S p i nner Anderson Hazel

M.

Memorial

Scholarship

Anderson Endowed Music Scholarship

Julius and Jean Anderson Endowed Nu rsi ng S c hola rs hip

Tom and Kathryn Ander. on Endowed Scholarship William and Jeanie Anderso n S c holarship

Anenson S cho l arsh ip M. Ankrim/Lutheran ( Economi cs )

Ruth

Ernest

Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

An th ropology Alumni Award

Mary Jane Ara m Sc holars h i p

F u nd

Clifford and Lydia Arntson Scholarship in Entrepreneurship Clifford and Lydia Arntson Scholarship in Sales and Marketing Hedvig Arthur Memorial AURA/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship Marguerite and Wilmer Baer Scholarsh ip EIben

TEACHER CERTIFICATE

c

Employment O ffice .

Comments 01' Conditions: A Parent Plus Loan Request form is requirc:d by P cillc Lutheran University and the federal govern­ ment before this loan can be init iated. The Parent Plus Loan

this loan for the student. The parent is re s pon s ible for selecting a

z > z n

H., II

and Janice M. Baker Endowed Music Scho la rsh ip

The Bangsund Famlly Scholarship Don F. Bayer Memorial Nursing Scholarship

Students accepted into this program are el i gible to receive a

B.E.R-G. Minority Scholarship

Feder al S tafford Subsidized andlor Unsubsidized Loan up to $5,500. If a student is independent or is a dependent st u de n t wh ose parents are deni d a PLUS loan, the student is el i g ible for an additio nal Uns ubsidized Federal Stafford Loan up to $5,500 .

Peter and Lydia Beckman Endowed Scholarship Paul M . Bellamy Music Scholarsh ip

Clenora E. B e rge Nursing Sc holarship Bilb ro ugh F a m ily S cholarsh i p

Mfred and Alice Bishop/Lutheran Bro therh oo d Endowed Scholarship

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Olaf Halvorsen

u r i n g S c h o la rs h i p

Anne Biteman M e m o r ia l Bl ake-Webb� r Endowed

I. and live lewelle n Blandau Sch olarsh i p & Dillie Quale Boe Education Scholarshi p Erwin and Alice Bolduan S hol a rsh i p V.m d" Bonel l Endowed Scholarship Richard

Marcus Hansen Endowed Memorial Scho larshi p Hanson E ndowed Pre s id en t s Scholarship J ennie Lee Han�on Scho larsb i p Fund W. H . Ha.rdtke Semll1ary St udent S c holarsl:t ip Fund Brian H;H shmJn Memoria l cholarship Marv and Dorothy Harshman Scholarshi p ( C h u rch Leadershi p/Athletics)

and Loan Fund

Nels

Luther

u z

Scholarship

Joha n ne Marie Han en Endowed Mem ori a l Scholarship

cholarsllip

J mnie Lee

Havana Bradner Memo rial . cholarship roruBn Breiland Scholarship Fund

<

Agnes Brodahl Music "chowrs h i p

Bjug H aIstad Endowed Sc ho lars h ip

B e t t y Brown Scholarsh i p

WJJI� A. Heath

z

Iluchannn Family Endowed Sl.holarship

...

,rhardt and Virginia

Buchl1nck Endowed Sch ol a rsh i p

Tr us t

Douwas l ie rland Memorial Rowing 'd1Olarship (Crew)

in Edu ation

: hester Buhl E n dowed Voca l Music �cholarship

Earl and AsITid Hildahl P.n dowed Scho lar.;hi p

Dr. and Mrs. W. B.

The Hoover

Bums Fund

Burzlaff Memori al Sch olar, r up

Fa mi ly Endowed

Hopper Memorial

Dr. H ow ard Leywe.l ly n

Caroline

Cor,

Ed'V"a rd W. Huber Memori al

Byerly Mat h and Science du ation E nd ow me nt Kenn eth Carlson Memorial Scholars h ip H.G. " Bob" Ca rro ll MI! mo ria l SCho larship Pak J oe Chan Endowed Schularsh ip Chene)' FO ltl1da tio ll Educ at ion al Scholarship� W� l t e r H. Christensen Scholarship Ruth A. h ri s t ian End owed Scholarsh ip fo r Education K nn et h hri stoph crson/W Iter Pilgrim Endowed Scholarship in Religion Lyman H . Claridge/I.utheran Brotherhood Endowed Scho la rship loss or 1 9 67 En do wed Scholarshi p ( Descendants o f Class)

Ir�ne

Ly le

Ie M.

Joh n501Ji Ifsen

Liberal Arts

Doolittle MemortJI Sci.lol ar>hip

chol.ar 'hip Fund E ndo we d , cholarshi Brotherhood E nd owed Scholarship

Capt. W. Larry and Mrs. Jan i"" D. Eichler

Carl and Ethel Erickson/ l.utheran

cholarship

Lind B . K.tr�n Mu ic cholarsh i p Philip G. and Alice t.. Kayser Endowed S c ho larsh i p El iZ<lbelh B. KeUy E n d o wed S cho lar sh i p Anne Ken STud Memoria l Schola rsh i p Key Bank of Wash ingLD n Endowed S ch oo l of Business Schola rship Rev. Karl Kil i'lD M�rnorial Pund

Leif Eri kson Scholarship Gerry and Li.nda Anthony Faaren

l.

Evanson

lohnson . c hobrs h ip

Luther H Inhn so n/L utheran Brotherhood E ndowe d Busines SchOlars h i p N Johnson Nn i ns Schobr ' h ip Pearl N. Johnson/Lutheran B rotherhood Endowed Nursing S c h ol arship TL Johnson Sr./Lutheran Brotherhood P.ndowed Schol arship eJ and Doreen l uhn on/Lutheran Brotherhood E ndowed . chol ars hi p i n Natu ral Sciences Ted anti Doreen Johnsonll.uth ran B roth erhoo d Endowed Scholarship i n Phy ics Dr. Kenne tb A. Johnsron E nd owed Scholarship in Education Erna M . lorgensen Regents S hoLaLShi p Theodore O. H. and fletsy Karl nd wed S ch ol a rs h i p in Forensics fh eod ore O. H. and Betsy Karl Scandinavian Cult u ral Center Endowed

Earl E. a nd Martha 1_ I�d();t rom Endowed Scholarship EC o n om i s Excell ence En do we d Scholarship M . . E.E. Eidbo

E.

Pearl

Thomas Dixon Endowed Sdlolarship

and

cho larsh i p

Edwin R. lohnson Memorial Endowed Schol a rship

llrSing Scholarship

The Reverend

Scholarsh ip

Agnes Solem Johnson/Luther;ln B rotherhood N ursing Endowment

Judge B rlil

L Davis/I.utheran Brotb�rhood E n dowed cholarship Fu n d a nd Cbra Davis ScholarshIp 13. and Franc s ' . Daw�on/Lutheran Brot berhood Endowed in the

Jcnnest,ld Me morial

l o h o on/Larson Scholars h i p

Walter

Scholaf'hi p

E nd owed Scholarship

hobrship

Donald L. Jerke Leaders h i p Award

Carl Dalk Memonal S dlol ar�h i p Fun d

Ida A . Davis Fund Deal Fa m ily E ndow�d

and Iris Jacobs n

M i ke JacohsQ(l

Margaret Melver Daka n Endowed Sch olarshi p

Harold

uoing Schol arshi p

Kenneth and Stella Jacobs Scholarship

Nursi ng Scholarship I r<!lle O. ereso Merit ward. Professor David P. Dahl Endowed Music rhola rship E. John and Lorene E. D a h l berg Jr. Endowed Scholarship

I.

hola"hip ch ol arsh il'

Terry Irvin Sch olarsh ip

Doro thy and Powell Cone Memorial/Lutheran Brotherhood Endo\ved

George

Hul tgren

S

Endowed

Clement E. and Phyllis G. Hu nte r !:>cho larsh ip S u:tanne Ingram Memorial Scholarship

ocanower S holar'hip Endowment

Hulda

Hovland

Scholarship

Hurnanitie.� Scholarsh ip Endow ment

Computer Science Sc hol a rsh i p t.ndowment

Endowed Sch ola rsh i p

Eyring Liberal Am S chol a rs h ip

amily/L uthem n Dro therhoo d Endowed Scholarsh ip

Faculty Memorial Scholarship Fund

William Kilworth Poundation 'cholarship Fund

Fairhanks Lut heran C hurch Scholarship

Gundar Ki ng En dowed Scholarsh ip

Faith Lutheran Ch u rch of ThereS<! f'erguso n Endowe

Portland Sch o larsh i p S holarship

!.,ars

Fund

fo r High Achievers in At h le t ics and P hysi c al Education Scholarsh ip Glddys M. Knu tze n EnJowed Scholarship H i lda S. Kramer Musical Appreciation Sch olarship 1 loward, Eugen j" md Ion Kvi nsL'lI1 d Endowed Sch ola rship D:rwnelf wmb Sd101arship Louis and Leona Lamp 'cholarship Harry E. and lrene L Lang ' ndowed Scholarship eoege Lanning Memorial/Lutheran B ro tha hoo d E ndowed Scholarship Dr, Joh n O. LarsgaurdlLuthe.ran Hrotherhood E ndowed S c hol arship Dr. Charles Larso n/Lutheran B roth erh o od Endowed Sch olarsh ip Ebba and E. Art h u r l.. rson ursing Scholarship Ludvig and Cla ra Larson Scho larsh ip Charles Lauback Student lksearch Fund John and Mary Lee Endowed Organ Scholarship Orlandu and .1yrtle Lee/Lutheran B ro th e rhood Endowed Schola.rship Guy T. and ll ise Leesman 'cholarship

Elmer

. and KCrII,eth

L

Fobon

E n dowed Scholarsh i p

Fosness Memorial Scholarship in Leadership

L. .. Foss Memorial

S

holarship

Frank RU5seJl Company Endowed Fuch� f'oundation

Schohr>rup

cholars b i p

B u t ton .a�tz Nur ing Scholarsh ip E . •llld L orrain e K . Geiger Endowed

Henrietta Richard

Fund dlOlarohip

Alan a n d Bertha .ibson Scholarsh ip Bertha Gilbertson Scholarship

Joh n M. Gilbertson

FO ll ndat ion Scholarsbip

G'mn GoodchLid Sc.holarsbip

Edna M .

.•

orderfLutheran

Brotherhood

E ndowed

Educ.·Hilln Scholar h i p

Alice and Stewart Govig SdlObrship

Clarence A . and

Olga I.;rann Scholarship B ro therhood Endowed Sch lar h i p n James M . ( j ri hbon S h ola rsh ip Fern R . Grimm/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scho ln.rship Otis

J.

randcllutheran

Education

Pa lt l tiebelt Sc hol ars hip (Mathematics)

Lillie Endowed Scholarship Eme�1 and j�nnJe Liming & Art and Ethel Cummings Endowed Memo n," Scli larship M r. and Mrs. W. I -lilding Lindberg Endowed S c hol ars h ip Isabel Lindb erg '!'rust Robert and M;uie

Gulsrud Family Sch ola rship Arnold Hagen

Edurnrl

n Schol.af5hip

Maria I-Iagness Endowe d Scholarshi p

Frank H. a n d Ne l lie L .

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C

Haley Memorial Endowed Scholarship

L

nd owm en t

Knudsen Family Endowed

George and Carlotta. F link SCholarship Phylaine

and Alllena Kitt les on EnJowed Scholarship

Kluth

Patricia Fisk Scholarship

14

haritable

orman and VerQne Hcinsen Endowed Scho larshi p

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Hildred L i nder Endowment

R

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Richard E. a nd Anita Hi l lesland L ondgren/ Lutheran Brotherhood Endow

A l fred and

Bmtherllood Endow�d Scholarship En do wed Scholar hip LumlgaardfLuthcran Brotherllood Endowed

C harlot te and

choiJ"hip

B rot h e r h ood

Fund

for

Lutheran Studen t,;

hol a rshi p

S 'hoIJr�h ip Maoxwcl l Po undat ion ScfJula rsh i p

o

Gen eral 1'.I1dO\ ed Scholarship I ,Illel Ella Scheibner Endowed Scholarship Jo han n es and Aleen S ch i l le r ,ndowment cund Dr. Wal ter and Joan R. S chwind t Scholarship ShA "ms']' !lank Minority Scholarshi p Seattle Mortgage Bankers Association Scho larsh i p Dorothy I I . Sc:hn;lible Endowed 'cholarship Margaret s h i p ley Endowed Scho la rs h i p i l l Acco u n t i n g . ka ga Fa m i ly Endowed S holarship Dr. Ma u rice and Pa t r ic ia Skones cho l arsb i p ( Vocal Music) james R. Slater Endowed Scholarsh i p lrunes later Biolo gy - ROT . S chola rshi p France$ OTton ' m i t h Endow · d Scholarship

A i m ;:! Mei�nesl Endowment Fund Robert K. Merton P ri�e i n Sociol ogy Militmy Order of the Pu rple Heart Award Fred and C a rol yn M i.lJs Memorial ScholJ"hip Lila Moe Endowment , cholarship E u n ice Moller Enclowed Scholar,hip Monro� Scholar 'hip

Piano cholarship Wand a M rken Family Endowed Schol a rsh i p Ullian C. Morris Me mor ial ScholaJ.h ip Gladys Morlvcdt Voluntary Service Award M u rray- Danielson Management Award Mark B. :md Len o r � ;. Myers S c h ol R rsh i p Richard P. Nei l, Memorial Fund eorge and Alma Nelso n Endowed Scholarsh i p Fund Forestine Wi�e Monsen Memuria]

Donald and

Smith Endowment Sch lar hip Fund

and M rs, Charles Smithson Schol arsh ip aydene A. S nodgr:u; MemoriaJ Schularship Anne E. Snow Fo und a ti o n Society of the Arts Scholarstl i p T h e Soi ne Pam i ly EndOlvcd S c h o l " rsh i p Southeast Idaho I ncentive Scholarship Fund Haldor P. SponheiOl Schol'lrship l'und Will i a m and Astrid S tancer Endowed Scholarship i n Steele - Reese Scholarship Endowment GeJ)evieve Stelberg Endowed Scholarship Mr.

Endowed Scholarship

Lars Nerl and Norwegian Scholarship Milt n ,lnd Hazel Nel\vig International Stu den t chol�lr hip Thel ma Newt n ch olarshi p Me. and Mrs. Gus H. N ieman Memorial Scholarship Ma.-Claret istad '1crnorial Sch olars hip Robert A. Nistad Memorial Endowed Scholar hip Nan Nok leberg Memorial/Lu t her a n Bro tberhood Endowed Sch brship Northern Light. Fund Orvi lle Nupen Nuning Sch ol arship The dberg Fami ly Scholarsh i p & F Olson Fndowed �cholarship l ifford O. and E l l a L Olson Endowed Athletic/Music Sdlolarship 1'.. Goodwill and Dorou,)' U , Olson Endowed Scholarsh ip in Educat i o n Linda Olson/Lutheran B rotherho d ndowed Nursing S holarship Robe rt E. Ison Memorial

E ng i neering Science

Dora Strongland Me.morial Scholarship /vl , and Doris . Stucke E ndowed Schularship in Nurs i n g

esther

T"rrence

Shereen Parr Specia l ducalion cholnrship and S\JS;In Parr Sch ol arsh i p

tuhlmill 'r Endowed Scholarship and, Ltlyd H, Sutherland Scholarship Tacoma Rainiers Community Fund Scholarship Ron and Ei lcc'o 'leUef,on/ Lutheran Brotherhood E ndowed Harvey and Helen TengesdaJ Eodowed Scholarshi p Edvin Jnd Ida Tingelstad Memo rial c h o l ars h i p Leon and Don T i tus Endowed Scholanhip lice and Marie obiason Endowed S holarship Evel yn Torve n d Memorial Educati on Scholarship ilas and Ali e Torvend Endowed Scholars hi p Cliff and Ronni Tvedten Endowed Scholarship Tyler Memor ial Nursin g Scholarship

Katheri ne R. P�rri,h �"moriaJ

Karl Ufer Memorial Schobr " h ip

Iym p i c Resource Managemt:nt Scho larShip Iver Op�tad MmlU r i a l Schol'lTShlp

ur>ing Sch olars h ip ordon Pearson Memorial Arne and Gloria Ped�rS(ln Endowed cholarship O. M . and Emilie R. P"d uston _ndnwed cholarship Rena Stra nd berg Pellegrini Endowed Scholarship MaTvin J. and Ruby L. Penn ingt n Schola r;; h ip Pepsi-Coin Company Merit c:holarshi p The Barbara Perry- Haley and Ruth C. Perry Me.morial Sc h o larsh i p Mr. and M rs . Lester Peter Schularship ( O regon students) Gustof Peter, n Memorial ch 1,lrs h i p Sharon R. Peterson and Donllll L. isher Memorial Nursi ng ScholarshIp Sheryl Laubach Pete"on/Luther:m llratherh od Endowed Scholarship Theodore M. and Lill i.an L Peter son E.ndowed SchulJrship

Blanche Pfla um Scholarship

E. Bil l <lod Lu "iw Pihl

Scholarship

PLU Women 's Cl ub Scholarship

PLUS Business Schol a rs h ip ra

J.

Ponder S holar:ship Fund Foundation Scholarship osteo Scbolarsbip So u nd Bank Scholarship

Pug

.I

E m i l and Engelena Lyntle

David Ulleland Memorial

Scholarship

Sc ho l arsh i p

U n i ted Parcel Service Foundation Scholarship

US WEST D iver.sit y Scholarship Ellen Valle Memorial Scholarship Unda Van Beck Memorial cholarship ArtllLL r H. Vingerud Endowed Schol,,,,hip Fu n d Dr. Roy and loria Virak E ndowed S ho la r s h i p Wnde/Hinderlie S cho larsh i p Fu nd hobrshi p Ina H. Wake Memorial Sc

\ aslungton MUrllll l Minorities in ,ducation S holarship Washington State Automobik Dealers Asso iation Scho l arsh ip Wash i n g ton Software Association Scholarshi p Doc and Luc il l e Weat hers Endowed Scholars h ip Western Wa�hingto n Fair Association Scholarship Wick Famil y/ Lu t hera n Brotherhood ndowed chola[ship Margaret V/kkstrom Endowed Scholarship for International Students M bel Wing Sc hol arshi p Randall YOdkum

Presser Price

r-

M r ic Scheele

McIC1Y Sch olars h i p

H arol d and Syl via Nelson

»

Mark Salzman M�mofla l

1\'lathematic

Ka tha r ine E.

» z n

ward

Graduate Students

Joe Ma rch in ek Memorial Scholarship Fun d Edmund

z

S hOlars hi p

O. Rieke Endowed Scholars h i p (Students from Cash mere, l.eavenw( ) r l h , and Wenatch'e) Rogers High , chool Sch olarship S terl i ng and Marjorie Rose Sc h o l a rs hip Melville a n d Dorothy Rue Endowed Scholarship Mary Baker Russell Music S c holars h ip Dr. J oh n A. an d Virginia " j i mmie" 'aEfeJJ Endowed Scholarship for

ustaining Fund S c h o l arsh i p

Constance !l. Lyon �cholarsh j p L i nd say A. Maj(1vski endowed S James fl. Malyan SdlOlarsh i p

I' n dowed

Rice

William

Lut.heran Brotherhood Scholarship Lutheran Brotherhood

Lu cian

R ieke Leade rshi p

, race Lundberg

Gene and Mari a1] Lutheran

S i m o n a n d Marve.! Reinbold :-'cholarship E n dowment

Il hea Lund/lulheran

Cl a re nce a nd

."

1emorial S chola r hip

Kathryn Reese

d cholarsh ip

E ndowed Scholarship

Ralph and Celestene Yoder Memo rial Scholarship Sh i rl e , Zurfluh/Lutheran B

th e r hood

ndowed Scholarship (Bu,iness)

QFC/ oca Cola Award of Excellence The Edward Rrunsdale

cgents Scholarship

llinma R. mslad AW:lfd Elmer '. and Mary Louise Ramlu,�(ln Margaret L Rasmw;sen Scholarshjp Recreat iol l.a l Equipment, Ill e . ( REI )

Ander and

c h olarship

for Students

from

laska

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11'1 \AI \AI .....

Tuition and Fees for 2000-2001 The Undergraduate Tuition Model ( UTM) begins in the Fall o f 2000. T h e cost information is p rov ide d below.

Q Z 0(

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.

i-

lIh'•• '-'-'-'�

s..,..terrr.rm

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:::I:{C1 I :.!UIIJ!' I�UIIIII'l"'l lJ.'J. ' '1�"'ll'. .,., h'lIl � -�. '::,Creell t Koun

Attendl"9 Full TIme?

Cost

�'IL

:Z� �F ,:,-,-?"��

UNDERGRADUATE RATES

Fa ll or Spring

1 2-17 credit h o u rs

Yes

$8,400 per semester

Fa i l or Sp ri ng

More than

Yes

58,400 per semester + $525 per credit hour for each credit h ou r over 1 7

17 c redit hours

Fall or Spring

1- 1 1 credit h o u rs

)-Term ( N o addit i onal cost to Fu ll-ti me

Up to

S525 per cre d it h o u r

No

5 credit hou rs

Credit h o u rs over 5 a r e charged a t $ 525 per credit ho ur

F a l l or FuU·tlme Spring Stud e nts)

1 or more credit hours

J·Term (Not atte n d i n g F u l l ·time Fa l l or

AU

FuU- ti me Spri n g )

a r e charged at

$S25 per credit hour

. _.

1 o r more hours

GRADUATE RATES

All are charged at $525 per credit hour

NOTE: Off Campus Program stlldents pay a program fee (not PL U tuition) specific to the in dividllal program

sites.

Contact the Center for

In ternational Progra ms fo r co mplete details.

CREDIT BY BXAMINATION

TRANSCRIPT INFORMATION Unofficial and o fficial transcripts are p roce s s ed in the Student Services e n te r. There is a $5 fe fo r each official tra ns c ript .

Student wbo earn Credit by Examination are charged i n addition t o tuition.

3 semester ho urs . $3 75 4 semester h o ur s ....... $500

1 seme s t r hour . . . . $ 1 2 5 2 semester hours . . . . . $250 ..

.

.

.

.

Unofficial transcripts are issued at no charge. To request an

......

..

Official Tr a ns cr ip t ,

a

student may fiU out the Transcript Request

Form in the Student Services Center. Process i n g time i s 4 to 5

LATE REGISTRATION FEE tudents a dd i n g or withdrawing from courses after the last day of add/drop during a regul a r sem st er will be assessed a n

working day from th� date received. For i nformat ion to request

off campus, one may either call at (253) 535-71 35, or use the Internet at

an Offic i a l Tra nsc ri p t from Tran script Line

adm inistrative hand.ling fee of $ 5 0 for each transaction. These

wWlv.plll. edu/- nrel!ser_trall.h tml. Req u

dates are listed in the class schedule fo r eacb semester / term.

the

Is by e - m a i l c anno t be

processed because of the require me n t for a signature. Requests

COURSE FBES Some cour es requ i re addi tional fees that will be added to tbe tuiti n total. The class schedule for each term is av a il able in the Studenl Servic s e nter and provides i nfo rma tion bou t any ees that may affect an individual course. PRIVATE MUSIC LESSON FEE This fee is charged in addition to tuition. 1 credit hour . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 6 5

may also be faxed to (253) 535-8320. The following i n formation is required: •

$5.00 fee for ea ch Official Transcri p t ordered. If paying by bankcard, please i nclude the VIS

or MasterCard number and

expirati o n date, and yo ur zip code. Payment s may al so be made by c he c k , cash ier's check, or money order. Please do not mail cash. • •

2 o r more cre d it s per medium . ..... $300

EDUCATION PLACEMENT FEE one-time dZlCllfioll Place ment Fee of $45 is charged in the last semester of the B.A.E. program. HEALTH SERVICES FEES Health Services will charge a student" acco u n t, or a stude n t may pay directly, for immunizations, lab work, and prescriptions. ID CARD FBE fee of $1 5 is charged to replace lost or stol n student ID's. r I an ill card has been damaged, it must be bro ught to Lhe ID ard

A

O ffice and rep laced for a fee of $5.

Student's full name

Any a n d all former name (s) used

ldentification number (Social Security n u mber ) Date of birth

e

C ur r e n t address nd pho ne number

Approx:imate dates of attendance

N umber of tran cripts needed

• • •

Address(e ') to which the transcript(s) a re to be sent Signature (mandatory) If an account is n any t yp e of HOLD, the request will be ma iled back with i n formation re garding the appropriate office to contact. It is the s t u d e n t ' s responsibility to resolve the H O L D and res u b mi t the request.

SPECIAL INFORMATION

UNPAID FINES Unpa id fines s u ch as parking violations and overdue l ibrary books wil appear on the monthly bi lling statement. S t ud nts are encouraged to pay these fines as incurred to avo id late fees and

Optional student health and accident insurance is available throLlgh

an

i n dependent carrier. A brochure is available from the

Student Life Office. Parking p

rmits are free and required for all student vehicles.

They can be obtained in the C a mp us Safet}' Office. Failure to

bandling charges.

register may result in a fine.

ONE-TIME GRADUATION PROCESSlNG FEE A $30 fee is charged to baccalaureate and master's degree c a n di ­

PAYMENT OPTIONS/ FINANCING Students must pay at the time of regist r a ti on or be enrolled in an

dates upon submission of the G radu ation Application for m .

approved Parm n t Option Plan at the time of regist ra tion. There are fo ur P a ymen t Op tion Plans offered at the u niver· sity. It is r equired of all students to sign up for at least one of the

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fo ur Payment Option HOLD w ill be placed on t h e aCCOLUlt. H OLDS will re s l T i ct certain univ rsity priv ileg s, i n cl ud ing the right for further registration. Ar range m nts fo r pay men t s are

made th r o u o h the S t udent Services Center, Ha ug e Adm i n istra­

ti o n B uildi ng, Room 1 0 2

or

call ( 253) 535-7 1 6 1

or

(8 00) 678-

3243.

A $ 2 5 non-refundable s e t - u p fee.

c am p u s the pre viou s fall or n e x t pri n g semesters. T h e meal plan re qu i reme n t remains i n effec t fo r s t ud e nt s with active h o us i n g a s s i g n m en t s . )

Payme n t s are du September 1 5 t h ru u gh De c e mber 1 5 .

Pa ymen t s made after the 20 th of each month may be asses ed

4 Month Payment Option ( Fall)

• •

fo r nrollment in fall.

a $25 l a t e charge. The An n ual Perc en ta ge R t

is 0 % . Acco u nts 60 d ays d el i nqu e n t may b e t u r n ed over t o an o u t s i d e

agency. Addi t io n a l co llect ion cost may be a dded to t he

accoUll t .

P ayments are due JalHlary 15 th ro u g h Ap ri l 1 5 .

Pay ments made after the 2 0 t h of each m o n t h may be assessed a $ 2 5 late ch a rge . The Annual Perce n ta gl: Rate i s 0%.

Accounts 60 days d e l i nq uen t may be t u rned over to an o ut si de agency. Add it i o n al collection costs may be a dd ed to the

acc o u nt .

." m

and sp r i ng breaks.

VI

L i m i t ed h o u s i n g is available on a daily fee basis during w in t er

Financial aid and other res o u rc es cover total costs.

No set-up fee. Owing bal nces that are 30 d a ys past due may b e assessed a 1 . 5% monthly default c harge.

Acc o unt 60 days delinquent may be t u rn ed over to an o utside agen cy. Additional co l le ct i o n costs may be a dde d to the ac a u n t.

Payment in Full Option • Payment in full must be p a id on the first day of each sem e ste r/ a t te n ded .

O w i ng balances that are 30 days I ast due may be as se sse d a 1 . 5% m o rtt hl y default charge.

Accou n ts 60 days d elinq u en t may be t u rned over to an outside agen cy. Additional coil ct ion costs may be add ed to th account.

Applications fo r s i n gle rooms, and other s pec i a l ho us i n g

meal plan ;Ii I , # 2 , or

#3.)

Plan I]; 2 0 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .......... . . . . . . $ 1 , 2 1 3/semester Plan #2 : 1 5 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . ...... . . .... $ 1 , 1 70/semester

Plan #3:

$265 January Term 1 0 meals /week .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . $ 1 ,OOO/semester

Flexible PLUs Plo.n

. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

of p u rc has ing blocks of 25 meal s . Meals may be u se d at all meal pl a n venues and are a va i. l a bl e fo r use unril May 3 1 , 200 l . S t ud e nt s m ay p u rch as e as many blocks o f 2 5 meals as th ey wish, but o nc e p u rchased, they are non·refLllldable unless th e s t u de n t form a l ly withdraws from th e u niversity. ADVANCE PAYMENT New sludents need to make a $ 2 00 advance payment to cOflfirm th e i r offer of admission. The p ay ment is refundable until May 1 5

fo r fall, D e cem b r 1 5 for the 1anuary ter m , and Ja n u ar y 1 5 fo r s p r i n g. Re q ues t s for a refwld must be m a de in w r i t i ng to the

Return ing students wanting to reserve a room fo r the fo llow i n g

A $75 discount fro m tuition and other costs.

No pr i or owing balanc

I f financial aid cov e rs the s tude n t 's total cost, the student is not eligible.

O ut o f pocket ex penses , i n cl ud ing tu j l i on , TO

year must sign a H o u s in g Contract. Cancellations, without

to lhe un ivers ity.

111

and m e al s,

pecial c o urse fee minus an y applicable fi na n c i al aid for a sem ester, m ust be $3 ,000 or more to b elig ible.

penalty, must be sub m i t te d in

w r i t i ng

Augu t 1 will be

u b j ect to a $ 1 00.00 pe n a l ty charge. Cancella­ ti ons received between August 2 and Sep t e mbe r I will be s ubj e ct to a $ 2 00.00 pe n a l t y ch:u ge.

Applications for a "Lute Buck Dis co u n t" are sent o ut in the

HOW TO MAKE PAYMENTS

billing stat ment in July an November. D ea dl i ne dates a re postm rk by August 1 5 or fal l , and

Box 2 1 1 6 7, Seattle, WA

December 15 fo r s p ri n g . The appl i ca t i on ou tl i ne s s pe cific criteria for e l i gi b i l i t y of the discount.

Mail payments with statement remittance stub to PLU, 8 1 1 1 - 3 1 67, or deliver pay me nt s to the

PLU Busi nes Office in the Ha u ge Ad mini stration B u i ldi n g , Room 1 1 0. Checks should be made payable to Pa c i fi c Lutheran Univer­

All s i n gle full·time ( 1 2 c redi t hours) students m us t l i ve on c a m pu s in u n i ve rsi t y h using u ll l e ' s they are: a) l i v i n g with

si ty. The student's name and ID number s h o u l d be included with alJ payments. A $ 1 5 fee is charged OIl all returned ch ec k s. VLSA and M as ter Ca.rd are accep t ed . One may call the secured line 2 5 3 / 5 3 5 -8376, 24 ho ur s a day, to make a payment. To make

t h e i r parent, legal guardian, or child, o r b) at least 2 0 years old

aut matie bankcard payment toward the 4 mo n t h ( fall or

ROOM AND M1lALS

o r h ave c o mpl ete d 60 semester credit hours b y eptember 1 ( for the next fall e rn est er ) , or Feb ruary I ( for th e next s p r i n g semester) •

to the Residen tial Life

Office by JuJy I . Cancellations received between J u l y 2 and

$ 1 83

Co m muter st udents and residents of South Hall have the op t i o n

Ad m iss ions Office.

LUTE BUCK D ISCOUNT

m

$ 2 4 5 J a n u a ry Te rm Plan #4: 5 meals/week ........... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ............ $5 50/semester $ 1 3 5 January Term Meal Piall #4 is available orlly to commuter students and students living ill Kreidler or South Halls.

Financial Aid and Other Resources Cover Costs Payment Option

apartment sizes, s t yl es , and costs. Contact the Residential Life O ffice fo r i n form ation and ap p l i c a t i o ns .

$ 2 74 Janua ry Term

term

c

South H al l is a n alternative residential o p t i o n with various

Meal Plans (Students l i v i n g in trad i t i o nal residence halls m ust choose from

l> z

( 2 5 3 ) 5 3 5-7200 or e - m a i l ed to reslife@plu. edu.

o z

requests s h o uld be add ressed to th e Residential Life O ffi c e at

4 Montb Payment Option (Spring) 4 eq u a l payments for enrollment in spring. A $25 non-refundable set-up fee.

-t

There i s no r oo m charge for J -Term fo r students liv i ng o n

• 4 equal payme n t s •

-t C

Room Charges Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . ... . . .. . $ 1 ,300 /semester Design e d Sin gl e Room ......... . .. .. . . . . ............. . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,650 /sel11e ·t er D ouble Room u sed as si n gl e ......... . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,750 /semcster H o using for January Term on l y ............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . $285

Excep t for res i de n t s o f South H al l, all s t u de n t s with an active

housing assignment are required to be e nrol l ed ill meal pla n

a

university

sprulg) Paym e n t

p ti o n , this sh ou ld b i n d i c at ed in the sp a ce

p rov i ded o n the Payme n t Option fo rms. No a d d i t i o n al fee is

ch arg ed fo r t hi s service w h en added to a P aymen t O pt i on .

01' milll cash. A pe r i odi c ally adjusted d i s co u nt

Please DO

rate will be cha rged aga i n st C a na di an cu rren cy.

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OIl W

Interest and Late Fees •

.... ....

Q Z <C z o

No Ad.dres-s Hold

A 1 . 5 mo n t h ly default charge may be added on an owi n g ba lances o f students w h o have enrolled i n the Fi nanc i al Aid

All st udent s are req u i re d to keep a

and Other Resources Cover Costs Pay ment Op t ion and

hold will be p l ace d on th e account. Basic un iversity privtleges

Payme n t in Full Op t ion Plan.

will be de n ie d such as, b ut n o t l i m i t ed to, tbe right to register,

A $25 J ait· charge may be added to a 4 Month ( fall/sp r i ng) Payment O p t i o n i f p ay ment is made aCrer the 20th o f each

rece ive copies of o fficial t ra nsc ri p t s o[ d i ploma, or cash checks.

Academic Hold

mo nth.

The Re g i st ra r, Student Life O ffice, or Residential Life Office can

place an acco unt o n "aca dem ic hold." Regi t rat ion for classes is

Mlssed Payments •

Fa ilure

Ol a k m i n i m u m m o n t hl y payments as agrl'ed w i l l

to

result i n removal from the ·1

precluded u n t i l any pend i n g matte!" with those office is set tled.

110 nth ( fa l l/spring) Payment

O p t i o n nnd the account w i l l be p l aced on

a

Medical Hold

F inancial H O LD.

A "medical hold" prevents

Tbe owi ng balance becomes due and p a y� b le i m med i ately. •

F ilu re to sub m i t all loan ap p l i c at i o n s and any financial aid

b e cau

Payme n t O p t ion wo rksheets fo r each aeadernie year will resul t i n the removal from Fi nancial Aid and O t h er Resources Cover Total Costs Payme n t Opt io n. The acco unt will be p laced on

a

fi na nc ial HOLD. The owing bal ance becomes due and payable imm d i n , e ly. a

payment in ful l by t he d u e d a te will res u l t i ll

removal from Payment i n Ful l O p t ion and the acco u n t will b e

a

financial HOLD. The o wi ng bala nce becomes due

and payabl e i m.med iately. Student accounts 60 days deli nquen t may be turned over to a n o ULside col lec Lio n ag ency. Add i t i o na l collection costs may be

HOLDS ON ACCOUNTS

TYP"ES O F HOLD

OFFICE

. . . . . .... . . . . . . Admissions .

.

Academic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academ i c Advisi ng Collectio n . . . . . . .. . . . . . Accounts Receivable Exit I n terview .. ... . . ... Perki ns/Nursing i nancial ........ . . . . . . . . ........ Acco u n ts Receivable International ... . . . .. .. . . I n ternat i onal Student Se rvices Jun io r Review . . . . . . . . Registrar Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Health Se.rvices Medical Expiration . . .. Heal th Services o Address . . . . . . . . .. . . . Studen t Serv ile� :enter Payment Op tion . . .. ... . Student Servi ces Center Residential Life . . ..... . .. . Residenti al L l fe Student Li fe ...... ... .. . Student L i fe Wri te-Off . . . . . . . . . . Accou n ts Receivable .

.

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to pay all tuition c os ts ,

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educational programs and the use o f cer ta i n univer,ity fac i l ities, as

descr ibed i n this catalog. A fai lu re to pay

benefi ts and services, including, but not l i m ited t , s t a t e m e n ts of ,

classes and the use of university facil it i es in the

admittance t

event of :t defa u l t .

Credit Balances rf a c red it balance occurs on a stude-nt's acco u n t , the un iversity will refund i t according to perti n e n t federal, state, and un ive rsity regu latio ns . Credi t b al ances are p r o cesse d thro u gh t h e Student Services Center.

F ede ral Title IV p o l icy 34CR 668.22. The amount

time the student was enrolled be fo re withdrawing. T h is policy is e ffective for complete

.

p rog ra m s is ba.sed solely on t h e l e n gth of or

full withdrawal from

a

semester in

which a studen t receives Title l V federa l funds.

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If a stud e nt el apsed ,

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a

\

ithd raws

€'fore 60°/.) of the semester has

perct'ntabre o f Title IV funds will be returned to the

federal program b as ed o n the length of time the student was on

en rolled before w i th d rawal. For example, i f a tu d e nt w ithdraw

a " fi na nci al

PaymeDt Option Hold

when

_

0%, of the semester has el, psed, 50% of Title IV fu n ds will

be returned to the federal p rograms. After 60% of the semester

ba el ap sed the st udent i s cons idered to have used aU aid ,

received for the semester. The re t u rn of Title rv fund .s is dependen t upon lhe date

All student are required to enr II in a Payment O p tion for each academ ic year they attend. The B i l li ng Confirmation and Payment Options can be obtai ned through the Studen t Services enter. If a s t uden t fails to enr !J in a Paymen t Option , a hold wi ll be placed on the aCCo wl t which will den y the st uden t basic university privileges such as, but not lim ited to, the right to register, recei e copies of o fficial t ransc r i p ts or d ip lom a, o r cash

a

s tudent withd raws during the semester. Withdrawal date is def med • •

as

one of the fol l owing:

The date the student b ega n the w ithdrawal process; The date the student otherwise p rov id ed the school with official notification o f the intent to withdraw;

checkB.

or

For the student who doe n ot begin the u n iversity's with­ d rawal process o r n o t i fy the school o f the i ntent to withd raw, the mid- p o i n t of the paymen t pe riod or perio d oT enrollment

Collection Hold Any studen t who has p reviously been sent to collections must pay in full before classes begin. The colle c t i on s hold will •

permanently remai n on the account. If

a stude n t fa ils to pay on the first day of classes, his/her enrollment will be terminated.

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as

obl igation to co nti nue to p rovide the ap p l icabl e educational

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a pp l icable a nd

when d ue all un i e rsi ty b ills shall release the un .iversi ty of any

returned to the Title I

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u niversity agrees to make avai lable to t he student certa i n

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hold." Basic u n iversi ty privi leges will be denied lwtil the acc un! is settled. including the right to register, receive copies o f o fficial transcripts or dip l om , or cash chec.ks.

A

a nd meal fees, a nd ot her s p e c i a l

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Tf a s tuden t accoun t is past due, it will be p laced

P

ro o m

( f Title IV funds ( o th er than Federal Wo rk St udy) that must be

Financial Hold

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parents Or legal

fec incurred or to be incu rred for the st ude n t s education. The

accordi n g to

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student and h is or her

Upon registrat ion, t he

guard i a n , agree to accept the respon s i b i lity and le g al o b l i ga ti o n

Pacific Lutheran Un iversity calculates a nd returns Title IV fu nds

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RJghts and Responsibilities

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE RETURN OF TITLE IV AND INSTITUTIONAL FUNDS IF A STUDENT WITHDRAWS FROM THE UNIVERSITY

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the student does not have the n ecessa ry i mmLlnlzations.

d iplomas, or p re regist rati ons. The s tud e n t shall also be d e n ied

There are 1 4 types of h o l ds that can be placed on student re co rds for diffe rent c i rc umstances. Each hold p reve n t s cert a i n privileges at the university. list d b low are the ypes of holds that can be p laced on accounts , nd tbe offices respol1sible for the m .

...

e

honorable dismjssal , grade reports, tr an scr i p t of re c o rd s

added to t he acco unt.

Ad m issio ns

s t uden t from registering because

'

Fail u re to m ake placed on

a

Health Services has not received the Medical H isto ry Form o r

verification fo m1s ( i f a pp l icable) by the dates specified o n the

u rren t perman e n t address

with the u n iversity. I f m a il becom'5 undeLi.ve rable, an add ress

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for wh ich Tjtle I V assistan ce was disbursed ( unless the u n iversity can d oc u m e n t a later d a te ) ; I f attendance i s taken, the withdrawal date is determi ned from the a ttenruwce records.


PacHk Lutheran University wiD: [ . Determine date of withdrawal 2. lculate the percentage o f aid deemed

NOTE: Please be aware tllllt a

to have been used by

the srudent 3. Calculat th percentage o f aid not used by the student, which must be returned to federal programs.

11\

refu nd dlle to withdrawal from the

university can adversely affect what ;s owed to tile IIniversity by tile student. A tuition adjustmen t is applied to t/ll� stlldent aceormt, but aid is also reduced, sometimes crea ting a larger owing balance. Students should c/reck with Financial Aid Imd Student Employment to research

� c: o m

the effect a witlrdrawal will lrave on their student nccolmt.

Order of Retu rn of Title IV Funds

If the withdrawal date results in a percentage of Title IV aid not used by the student, then the return of Title IV aid will occur in the following orde.r: I. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans 2. Subsidized Federal Stafford loans 3. Federal Perkins Loans 4. Federal PLU loans 5. Direct PLUS loans 6. Federal Pell Grants 7. Federal S OG Grants 8 . Other assistance under this Title for which a return of funds is required.

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University Refund Policy

In ordinary circumstances, a student who withdraws on or before the first two weeks of instruction in a semester re eives a full refund of "tuition and fees." After the second week of instruction, refunds are given for full/complete withdrawals only ( a student' must withdraw from all classes to receive a refund). Tuition refunds are 100% tllrougl. the last day of the Drop/Add period. After that, tuition refunds a re prorated on a da Uy basis until 60% of the semester I,as elapsed (Example: November 1 1, 2000, for fa ll semester, April 15, 200 1 , for spring semester), a t which point there ; s no tuition refu n d. Refunds from university housing fire also prorated on a daily basis, with meals refunded on a weekly basis. Howing deposits are not covered by Federal Financial Aid and are not refundable. NOTE:

Notice of withdrawal must be given in writing to the Student Services Center, Pacific Lutheran University and received before the deadline above. Oral requests are not acceptable. Charges will remain o n a student's acco unt until written notice is received. Unofficial Withdrawal 10 the cases of unofficial

withdrawal, the drop out date ( defin d as the last recorded day of class attendance as documented by the university) will be used to calculate a refund. M edical Withdrawal

Students may also completely withdraw from all classes for a term for medical reasons. The student must provide written e\'idence from a physician to the vice president and dean for student l i fe. The grade of "WM" will appear on the student's grade report and transcript. In cases of medical withdrawal, all

tuition charges for that semester will be removed. Beca use ti,e student is not being charged tuition in this case, all university gran ts alld scholarships are removed from ti,e student's account. Federal Title N aid will be refullded O il a prorated basis, depending on the time of withdrawaL However, once 60% of the semester has elapsed, the aid for the entire semester will be considered used and will remain on the student's account. Procedlll'es {or Obtaining a Refund

I . Student requests withdrawal approval from the Registrar via

the Student Services Center, using a withdrawal form. 2 . Financial Aid will process the student's request for withdrawal according to the Federal Title IV policy 34CFR 668.22. Aid will be revised according to published federal policy. 3. The Business Office will give a tuition adjustment to the student's accou nt for the percentage o f tuition allowed to be refunded for that time period during the term (as determined by the Registrar's Offi e and the University Refund Policy). 4. Examples o f the "Retum of Tit! rv FW1ds if a Student Withdraws" are available in the Financial Aid and Student Employment O ffice.

Student Life The quality of life cultivated and fo stered within the uni­ versity is a n essential component of the academic commu­ nity. The environment produced is conducive to

a

life of

vigorous a n d creative scholarship. It also recognizes that l iberal education i s for the total person and that a comple­ mentary rela tionship exists be tween s t uden ts' intellectual development and the satisfaction of their other individual needs. Interaction with persons of diffe ri ng life styles

.

application of classroom knowledge to personal goals and aspirations, and co-curricular experiences are all available and total components o f education at PLU, In a time when there is a need fo r meaningful co m m u nity, the campus facilitates genuine relationships among members of the un ive rsity from diverse religious, racial, and cultural back­ grounds. All of the services and facilities provided are intended to complement the academic program. They ref} ct changing student needs, and the opportunities fo r student part icipatio n i nclude virtu ally al l aspects of the unive rsity. I ndivid ual attention is given to student ' con­ cerns, including

a

v a rie ty of specific services outlined here

and o n rhe web at plll.edu/-slifi. CAMPUS MINISTRY

Pacific Lutheran University by its very nature is a place for the interaction between faith and reason. Opportunities for the mutual celebration of that faith on campus are rich and diverse. Chapel worship is held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings during each seme. ter for aU who wish to participate. The University Congregation meets in regular worship and celebrates the Lord's Supper each Sunday. Pastoral services of the university pastors are available to all students who desire them. Several denominations and religious groups have organiza­ tions on campus, and there are numerous student-initiated Bible

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W lAo

study an

fel lowshi p groups. The

Campus M j ni stry Council, an

...

ties i n a sp i r i t of open ness and m utual respec t . The Campus

I­ Z

at plu.edu -c min/.

Mi nistry Office can be reached at

CAMPUS SAFETY AND INFORMATION

Q ::I I­

The p erso n al sa fe ty of the P lU community i s the number o n e goal of Cam pus Safety a nd Information . Campus safety officers

are avail ab l e to e sco r t students, to provide veh i cle j u m p sta rts, to unl o c k inadvertentl y locked vehicles, to a sist in ch a ng i n g t i res,

to re.spolld to medical eme rgencit'S and fire alarms, and to p r ov id e ge n e r a l te lep h o ne information services. Visitor info r m a t io n and ve h icle reg i ' t ra t ion for pa rk i ng on cam p us are available through t he Campus Safery [fice

24

i n formal lou nges, study

a week . The Campus Safet • p h one number is (253) 535 -744 1 and the website is plu.edu-sl itics/index.html1.

TO

ms, recreation areas, and common

kitchen and lau nd ry facilities. Most of th h al ls

are co-educational. Although

they are

h o used in separate wi ng , men and women in co-ed h al ls share

RESPONSmILITIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE Within any co mm unity ce r tai n reg ul at i o n s are necessary. Pacific Luthe ra n Universit)· adop t s o nly those sta ndards believed t o be

lo unge and recreation fac.ilities and common residence go ver n ­

ment, and participate j o i n tly in all h all activities.

ne all­

wo m en's hall is ava ilable for those women who desire tms l iv i n g

students with the exp ec tation that they will co m ply with th se standards. All m te m bers of the university co m mu n i ty a rc exp e cte d to respect the rights and

ad m it s

exper i en ce.

An all . i ng l e - roo m hall ha s been established for those 2 1 years of age or o l der, or who have attained senior or graduate status.

i n tegrity of others. Co n d uc t which is detrimental to students,

h is in de end e n t uvi ng environment is i n ten ded t o meet the

facuity, staff, or the university, or which violates local, state, or

n eed s of the older s t uden t .

federal laws, may be g roun ds for s a n ctio n s or for d ism i s saL

An apartmen t - style residence hall, ope n i11g Fall 2000, is

The university p rohibits the po s session or consumption o f

designed for s tu d e n ts w h o

alcoholic beverages on campus a n d l imits t h e hours w h e n stu­ dents may have visitors o f the opposite sex in t hei r residence hall rooms. The Studellt Ha ndbook contains the code of co n d u ct for

all s t uden ts.

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION New student o r i e n t a t i o n ende avors to ass ist student s and their familie with the t ra ns i ti o n to P LU. The th ree -day fall program introduces st u dents to many d i mensions of PLU life. Fall orien­ tation in c l udes m eeti n g with a faculty ad v i ser, talk i n g in ' mall groups w i th oth e r new students, beco m i ng acquainted with cam p u s services a n d having s o m e re l axed t i me with other st udents be fore cla ss e s beg i n. ' p ec i a l activ ities are also planned which respond to concerns of families of new s tuden ts. While Jan u a ry an spri ng orientation ' ar more condensed, they also pro vi d e new students wi th a n i n t ro d u c tio n lD academic li fe and co - curri c ular activ ities. Phone 253 /535-7452 fo r more in fo r m a­ tion about new st u de nt orientation or che ck the website at

are 20 e a r of ag e or older, or who have attai ned a minim um of j u n io r s t a t us. This living o p t ion will provide for so me added i n dependence wh i1e con t i n u i ng the many benefits o f campus living. Further information reg ardi n g residence haLl� can be o b tai n ed from the Residential Life Office : ( 2 5 3 ) 5 3 5 -7200 or on t h e web at

plu .edu/- r1 if/ .

STUDENT ACIIVITIES Student activities are re g ar ed as ess n t i al factors in h igh er education. Some are related to cou rse s of i n s t ru c ti o n such as drama, music, and physical education; others are c n n e cted more cl o sely to recreational and ocial l ife. Involvement i n stud e n t acti v iti es pr ov ides p ractical experience and a t the same l ime develo p s an uud rsta n ding of self in relation to others. Co-curricular programs include student government ( Ass o c ia ted

Students

f PI and Residence H a l l A s iano n ) , ports activi­ tie (varsity, intramural, a n d cl ub s ports ) , student m dia ( news­

m agazine, rawo, and television)

plu. du-slif/ .

paper, yearbook, artistic

ACCHSSmnlTY The un i ersity complies with the American with Disabilities Act and Section 504 o f the Rehabilitation Act a n d p rovid s reason­

over 1 00 student activities

able acco mmodations to students with wsabiljties. Coordination

(253 ) 53 5 - 7 195 for more i nformation or check out the web s i te at

of services is through the Counseling and Te ting Office

535-7206. Information

dubs

and

organ i zation s , and community ser v ice

(253)

ence.

ontaet t h e Student I nvol em nt and Leadership Office at

ing webs ite at plu.edu-slif/ct/inde . .htrnL

VOLUNTEER CENTER

RESIDENTIAL LIFE The u n iversity req u ires that all full-lime

Center for P u bl i c

PLU's Vo lunLeer CenLer,

( 1 2 or more semester at

h om e with

20 yea rs of age or o lder on or before September 1 fo r t h e academic year or Feburary 1 fo r spring semester ; or 3) has attained j u n i o r pare n t( s) , legal guardian( s) , s p ouse o r child( ren ) ; 2 ) is

s tatus (60

semeste r hour ) on or bdore Sep tem be r

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by s tudents and housed in the

rdinato rs who help m atch studen t. s with organizations. Class

projects, residence hall gr up ac t iv i t je

, on

day or several, the

Vol unteer Cen ter can help yo u help ! Drop b y or ph o ne ( 535-

As a re s ide n tial campus, Pacific L u the r a n Un iversity o ffe rs s t uden t s a va l uabl e eJq>eri ence in co m rnu r uty living. The un iver­ sity recognizes the i m p orta nce of non lass room activi ties i n providing an educati o n. Th e ai m of residential l iving i s t o help studen t s grow personally, social ly, culturally, and spiritual ly. Campus residen I' are organized i n to communities in whi h each individual counts as a pe r so n. New kno wledge shared with A

run

ervi e, seek, to give students op p o rt un i ties to

put to work their d rea ms for a better world. Tb Vol u nte er Center has lis ti n gs fo r over J 00 organ izations who n e e d volun­ tee rs. ' t 1.lde nts c a n stop by and b rowse through the p la cem e n t lists, or make an a p po intm nt with o n e of t h e Volunteer Center co

a c ade m i c year or February 1 for sp r ing semester.

P

in which to become involved, the-re is

p l u . edul -sl if/s il index/h tml.

is available on the Co unse l ing and Test­

one of the three foHowing con d i t ion : 1) is living

stu de n t programs. With

�ure to be at least one which will enrich a pe rs on's college e xp e ri ­

hou rs ) students l ive and eat on campus unless the studen t meets

20

of many

nity to estab lish a com fortable l iving pattern. All halls include

h urs

a day, seven days

reaso nably necessary and

halls takes on a very p e rso nal mean.i n g.

backg ro \. ds and c ul t u.re s live on campus; t h e refore , studen ts in residence haVE' a unique opportu­ n ity to b roaden t heir cultural horizons. The un iversity cares about the qual i t y of l i fe on ca mpus . The attract ive and comfortable resi d ence haUs enrich the quality of life and enhance the learni n g p r ceSs. The university o ffe r students high-qualit I h o u s ing opportunities including s t ud e n t lea ership experience , fo rmal and informal p rograms, a n d p eer il ·sociat io ns. The student govern in g bodies a re strong and ac­ tively participate in campus l i fe . A sele tion of modern , attractive ball s , ea c h with its own t radi ti os and unique advantages, o ffers st u den ts the opportu­ Men and wome n

(253) 535 - 7464 01' on the web

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III

friends in the re ideoce

elected st udent a n d fa cu lty committee, coordi n ates these activi­

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and discover bow easy it is t o make a big diffe rence i n l i fe!

WOMEN'S CENTER The Women's C n t e r provides services, referral s, and support to

all students, facult y, and staff of the un iversity. The climate of the center is such that all pe r onS are valued and mp we red to pursue their i nd iv i d ual and collective g al . The Center offers

p eer- upport groups, educational resources, and p rogra ms

which


celebrate the talenLs and creat ive expressions of women. T h e

Wo m e n's Center also is t h e main p mor of W men' History M on th activities held every March . The Wo men's Cen t e r is lo ca ted at 1 0U4 l 24th St reet S.

MUIl'IETHNIC RESOURCES Multiethnic Resou rces s erve s st udents of color. S pe ci a l activities, peer me n tenn g and advising, le a der sh i p opportun i t y, and other supp rt e rv i es are available. Clerical as istance and other services are also available to support spe c ial proj e ct s and re ­ search fi c u si n g n national race-related iss ues. Multiethnic Resou rces is housed in Stude.nt Involvement and Leadership, located on t h e lower level of the ni ve rsi ty Center. The web si te is pl u.ed u/ - slif/ mr/ i ndex/ ht ml .

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES i nte rnational Student Services p rov i d .s assistance to interna­ tional students i n a dj ust ing to the uniwf ity a n d in meeting bot h ed uca t i o n \ ca reer ) and personal need s . Services include o r ienta­ tion. reg i tration, a nd on-campus liaison with other u n i ve rs i ty offices. Assistance with immigration an d government regulations as well as imm igrat ion p ro ce dures rega rd i n g temporary travel, work applications, and extensions of stay is avail able. OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT SERVICES! ADULT STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES The Office of St u de nt I nvo l ve m en t and L e ad e r s hip (SLL) p ro ­ v i d es adm i n istrative 'upport and services to assi st off- campus and aclul st ud en ts. Students who commute t the ca mp u s can find sp eci al serv ices and re so u rces to make their time at PL sati ty ing and productive. The Associ a t d student Go ver n me nt ( ASPLU ) has a d i rect or of off-almpus st u den t relations and fi st ud en t serIate position dedicated to representing the interests and needs of co mm utin g tudents. Students may s ig n up ror an off camp us student list serve to st ay abreast of programs and infor ma tio n dir cted to all tudents. An off-campus newsletter is available m o n thly on tILe AS PLU we b site ( and st ud e n ts may have -

-

p ri nt version sent t

their homes by igning up at

SPLU). The

ASPLU web s i te i s p lu.edu/-asplu/. tudents n eedi ng to establ is b emergency contact while on ampus can usc the SIL Cam pu Locator Ser vi e and " loca l use" telepho ne. To register, b ri ng clas schedule and o n- ca m pus work informat ion t th St ud e n t lnvolvement and L ea dership Office, C 1 53 . Additionally, the associated student government dire tor of off- ampus student relations ser ves as an advocate fo r

adult

stu de n t lo ung s are avail able in

tudent needs. Off-cam p

the U n iverS i t y Center, Hauge Administration Building, and R ieke

Science Center.

mat i o n testi ng and treatment; o ll sul t.ation s fo r travel guideli. nes a n d immunizat ion , ea t ing d iso rde rs substan ce abuse, and to b acco usage; and h eal t h ducation on a wide va r ie ty of health ,

,

concerns.

Sickness and Acdd.ent Insarance is available to all tudents o n a vol un ta r y basis, Health 'ervices s tr ongly urges all s t u d e n t s to have medic I insu rance. Th" G ro u p Acc iden t and ickness Plan offers coverage 24 h ours a day, 1 2 mo n t h s a yea r anywhere i n the world. This plan is ava ilable througho unhe year Inform ation about the insurance p licy can e fowlli on the Heal th Services

11> � c: c m

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web ite listed below.

The Immunization PoUq s ta tes that ali tudents born after De c e mb e r 3 1 , 1 956. are required to p rov i de on the u n i vers it y health history form an immu nization record of hvo measles,

m u m p s rubell a v cc i n ati ons ( MMR) after the lrst b irthday. Thi information m u st be on file befo re a tu de n t is permitted to regis te r. .

-

International students, facultr and scholars from cowltries at risk will be r qrlired to halle 1/ tullerculosis skill test (p urified protein deriva tive-ppd). This test will be done at the Health Services after arrival at tll e university. The cost is $15. 00. Docu­ mentatioYl of tetan us-diphtheria imrmlllization is {lisa reqrlired. Quest ions about the i m m u n ization pol i cy should be d irected to Health Serv ic s at 253 -535-7337 or on the web at p lu . ed ul - sl i f/hsl i ndex. h tm!.

Counseling and Testing Services assists student i n co p i ng with develop m e ntal issues. Trained and experienced ps ych logists and counselors o ffe r i ndividual a sses sm en t s an d a c ons ul ti n g psy­ chiatris t is available f( r evaluations and possibl medications. A variety of personalityl interest inventories and psycll ological tes ts are available to assist students with care e r pi n n i ng, educational adj ustmen t and pers nal problems. oo rdination of s e r v i ces for ,

,

.

tlldents w ith d isabi lit i es is also available.

DinlDg Services, owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran n iversity, is available to all st ud e n t s faculty, staff, and their guests. Stude nts l iv ing n campus are re quired to be o n a meal pla n. rab and Go" i tems are availab le during peak lunch hours. No ded ucti ns are m ade fo r st ud en ts ea t i n g f wer meals than previously con t rac ted for u n le ss granted by the director of d in in g s ervices esiden tial s tude nts are o ffered 3 meal optio ns : A ny 2U, 1 5, or 10 m ea ls per week. Students l ivi ng off-campus are e ncouraged to select on o f t h ese meal la n s or the flexib le meal plan offered ,

"

.

nIl' to off-cam p u s students. St udents witb spec i a l d ie tary requireme nts, specifically ap­ p rove d ill wr it i n g by a physician, can in m o s t case be accommo­

ENVIRONS The university' ge ograp h ica l sett i ng affords s t u d ents a wide variet y of both recreationa l a nd cul tural entertainment op tions. Recrea tionally, the gra n de ur of the PacifiC Northwest enco urages p artici pa t ion in h iking ca m p i n g cl i m b in g skiing, boating, and ,

,

,

swi m ming.

nle most conspicuous na tlual monwnent in tbe a rea is M t. Rainjer. In addition to R ai nie r, t he distinctive realms of tbe Ca cade an d Olympic m o un ta i n ranges a nd for sts of Douglas Fi r omplete one of the most n at u ra l l y tranquil environments in the United tate s . Students can als o enjoy the a stbetic o fferings of nearby Seattle and Taco ma. These city centers host a variety of perfo r m­ ing a n d recording arts and provide dozens of garreries and museums as weil as unique shopping and din ing experiences.

STUDENT SERVICES Health Services is staffed with two n ur se practit ioners and one phy s ician assistant. A ph ys ici an is available fo r consultation and referral. Services available include outpatient primary c are , immunizations, aUe.rgy shots , preve n tive he alt h care, pap smear , testicular and breast exams. birth control, pregnancy testing and

d a ted by contacting the d i n i n g serv ices director. T h is service is pro vi ded at no extra cost. Visitors may eat in any o f the facilities.

Schedullng Services [or meet ing rooms are mai ntained i n the Un iversi ty Cen ter. All university act iv i ties must be scheduled through th i s office. Scheduling a tivities is a joint responsibility

of the requesti ng group, sched u l i ng s i t y Center

co

rd i na t o r, and the Un iver­

ffice .

PLU Bookstore is owned and o perated b Pacific Luther a n

University for the be nefit of students, faculty,

nd staff. The

b o okst o r sells textbooks required fo r classes. S up plies , gifts, cards, and co nvenience store i tems are also available. C om p ut e r

software at d i & cou n ted prices is avai lable

r can be special o r ­

dered. Apple and Gateway comp uters at educational prices c an

be purchased through the bo ok store. pecial book orders are welcome. PLU Northwest is a unique gift sh o p located t 407 G a rfi eld Street in historic Parkland. Feat u ri n g 1 rt hwest pottery. cloth­ i n g , and fo ds, thl:' s tore also offers bo 1 s an d gifts dep i ct i n g orthwe t themes a nd auth ors .

See t h e websit :s t plu.edu/-bkst and plu.edu/-bkst/ nw.

counseling. Also offered are: sexually transmitted d i seas e infor-

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R 5 r T v

21


III W Ill:

:I C w u o Ill: 4.. u

w C c( v c(

Caree:r Development ( h ou sed with cadem ic Advis i n g for students' convenienc ) strives to p rovide a program of career develop ment and life planning. Students are assisted in integrat­ i ng their personal values and apt itud es with career choices through individual counsel ing, workshops. re5idence hall resen ­ tations. a n d a computerized career guidance program. The office staff assi ! students and first-year al um ni in devel p i ng job­ search tech n iques by p roviding a n extensive career l i b ra ry of opportLtnities in specifi majors, industry directories, and empl y m e n t forecasts. Additionally, the office coordinates 3 sc hed u le of recruiters from i ndustry, business, go ver nme n t , md graduate sello Is. The center rdinates and promotes all p art - t im e and fu l1 time employment opportunities for L Udents . i n d ud i ng listings of local job , nation -wide i nternships, and �ummer employment op po r tu n i ties . Specialty s elected forums throughout the year also br i ng students and employers together, in order to help st uden ts find work that is both financially and personally rewarding. A more comprehensive list of services is o utl i ned on the center's w b�ite ( www.plu.edu/-slif/cdli ndex.html ) i n cludi n g a li n k to the online program. eRecruiting. This program is a fully in tegrated employment and recruiting service available to tu­ de nts 24 h o u rs a day, seven days a week. Students may a c cess job listing, post their resumes, and contact employer) from any computer with an Internet connection. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES Policies and procedures at the u n iversi ty a re intended to main­

tain an o rde rl y educational envi ronment cond ucive to s t uden t learning and development. In order to fulfill institutional re­ sponsibility and at the same time follow p roced u res that are fair, consistent, and protective of each person's rights, appropriate grievance procedures b ave been established. If a student has reason to believe that an academic or administrative a ctio n is unjust. ca p r icio u • or discriminatory, these p rocedures are ava i la ble fo r th e s tudent to seek redress. Th e un ivers i t ) has a team of gr ieva n e officers to facil itate th e grievance process. The grievan ce o fficers are Susan Mann (535-7 1 87) , Patri ia Ro un d y ( 535-8786) , Richard S e e ger ( 53 5 8786 ) . and William Yage r ( 53 5 -8722 ) . Any of the gri vance officers may be contacted to receive assistance. Copies of grievance procedures are a allable for review at the office of each grievance officer.

Academic Procedures Advising The u niversity expects th at all t ud e nt , · t ne ti m e or another, will need assistance in planning academ ic programs consistent with their needs and goa l s . Both to help students make their i n i t i al a djustme n t to th academic load a t PLU a n d to p rov i de occasional counsel throughout t h e i r academic ca ree rs , the un iversity has established (l n et wo r k of faculty adviser' an d an Academ i c Advising O ffice .

Faculty Advisers - All " tudents enrolled in deg ree p ro g ra m s

have fa ulty advisers whose overall responsi b ilit y is to gu i de academic progress. In tbeir work with individual students,

advi ers have tbe as istan e of pe rso nn el in a n u mb r of student services offi es: tb Academ i c Advising ffiee. th e adem i c Assi t(lnce Center, the Career Development Office, Counseling and Test i n g Services, the Mu.ltiethnic Resource Center. the Campus M i nistry, t he international s tudent adviser, and residenc hall dir ctor and resid ent a istants. Tmnsitional Advisers: At the time of entry, each tudent is assigned a transitional adviser, usually according to interests expressed br the student. St udents who wish to explore the general c urriculum betore ch oos i ng a major program are ass i gned to e p lo ra lory advisers ( professional adv i sing or counsel ing tarf or es p e c i ally trai ned faculty) w ho will help them to make education al p la n s appropriate to their interests and talents. Tran itional advi ers are supported by ed uc ali o n al plann i ng workshops and by Psychology 1 1 3 a ree r and Educa­ tional P lan ni n g . During a student's first sem ster, and advi ing file is created for the student's adviser. and a " B i g Envelope," an adviSing gu i d e and record-keeping � Ider, i:; issued to each s t ud nl. Major Advisers: Upon � rmal declaration of a majo r, stud Ilts are assig n ed major adv isers to replace their general advisers. Major adv isers g u id e students' p rogress toward their c ho s n degree go al .

Students may c h a n ge advisers as appropriate or necessary, using a simp le adviser chdllge forn1. Studen ts and advisers are expected to meet regularly, th oug h the actual number o f m e e tin g will vary according t o individual needs. M i r u m a lly, th fe mee tings are required d u ri n g the freshman year and one each ear th e re afte r, thou g h all stude n ts are encouraged to meet with their advisers as often as seems necessary or useful.

Registration The Student Serv ices Center provides man

services for stu den ts and alumni. The center serves as a focal po i n t for all matters concerning enrolling in courses, co n firming schedules, an d issuing official and unofficial transcripts.

EAR.lX REGlSTRATION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS Students who pla n to return are encouraged to pre-register. Returning studE!l1 s will receive registration time appointments

to pre- register for tall and summer terms and fo r J-term and spring term. Reg i s t ra tion d les are det r m i n d by the number of hOUTS, incl ud i ng transfer hours) completed by the student. Student may register for each new term or summer session on or aft r the de ig nated da te. EARLY REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR ENTERING STUDENTS Ea rly registration for entering students occurs d uri ng June or January, depe nd i ng on whether students begin in the fa l l or s prin g semester: Early registration is condu c t e d by the Admis­

sions Office. Regist ration materi als are se nt to a l l accepted e n tering srudents well in advance of the i r arrival on campus for their first semester.

22

P

A

C

,

F

'

C

l

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y


Mo t stude n ts haw the opportunity to work per onally with an adviser as they plan their s hedules. A l im i te d number of student> may register by mail, Gnd their ourse sdections are verified by a cOlmselor.

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES Students may regi ter by using the computerized Ide- registra­ tion system acces ible from any o ne - generating telephone or by usi ng Banner Web. an onl i ne registration ystem . In addition to registering, tele- regislrnt io n and Banner Web also offer students the ability to add or d rop a dass, check thei r schedules. and access fmal grades. The p h o n e

n u mber for tele-r gistration is 2 53/ 35-8935. Banner Web rna be accessed th rough the PLU h o me page ( ww.p l u.ed u) . Students may contact the Stude n t Service Center wit h r gist ral i o [] que lions. tude ntli are not o ffi c ia l ly enrolled until their registration has been cleared by lhe Stu de n t Accounll om e. St ude n ts are resp n s ib le for se lec tin g their courses. Advisers are availabl e to a-si t with planning and to make su ggest ions. Stude n ts sh ould be th o ro ughly a cqua im e d witb all registrat ion mate ri a ls, in luding the current catalog and special i nforma t i n sent by the Admissions Office. S tud en t are also encouraged to study ca refu lly the requiremen ts of all academic programs in which they may �ve ntua Uy declare a major. •

8 hours. A normal course load during the J a n uary term •

section of this catalog for application procedures. •

Students who wish to regis ter fo r 18 or more hours in a semester are require d to have at least a 3.00 grade p oi n t average or consent of the provost. St ud e n t s e n g a ged i n considerable oL llside work may be restricted to a reduced academic load.

An unde rgraduate student may repeal any cour ·t. The cumula ­ tive g rade point average is computed usi ng th e highest of th gra des earned. Credit toward graduation is allowed o n l y once. a mathemat ics or a forci!,," l angua g course listed as a prerequisite i f taken after a higher-level c urse. For xample, a student who has co mp let ed Spanish 201 cannot later receive credit � ( Spanish 1 02.

Students are grad ed acco rdi ng to the foll owing designations: Grade

A-

4.00 3.67

Yes

3.00 2.67 2.33

Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

3.33

B+ B

�it Awarded

Points per Hour

Excellellt

A

Good

BC+ C Satisfactory 2.00 1 .67 C1 .3 3 D+ Poor 1 .00 D

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE if a student does not wish to co nt in ue a course after the add/ d rop peri od, the student must w i t hd raw from the COlLeSe. Tuition

0E

Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

0.67 0.00

Fail

No

The grades Ii ted below are not u I'd in �alcul ting grade point ave rages. No grade points ar earned u nder these designations. Grad.

Description

Credit Awardad

P

Pass Fail I ncomplete I n Progress Aud it With d rawal

Yes

WM

M dical W ith drawal

No

UW

Unofficial Withdrawal

No

F I

IP AU

W g rad e will appear on the student's grade report and transcript.

See the January term alld slimmer en ta logs for the last dares to

with draw durillg

W

those terms.

0

No No No No

Pass (P) and FaD ( F) grades are awarded to students who select the pa s/fa i l option or wh{, are enrolled in exclu jve pas s/ fai l courses. These grades do not affect a student's grade point

determined that a student neva attended a course, the r e gi stra­

average.

tion will be cancelled without notation on the trans- r i p t.

(1) grades indi ate that st ud en t did not complete their work be�ause of ircumstances beyond their control. To receive credit, an incomplete must be converted to passing g rade within th first · i:x weeks of the followi ng semester. Incomplete grades that are not conve rted by removal are chan ged to the gr ad e indicated by the in l ructor when the incomplete was s u bm itted. An i ncom p lete is not a permanent g ra de . An incomplet does not entitle a tudent ro attend class again witllOut reregiste ring.

WITHDRAWAL PROM THE UNIVERSITY

Studen ts are entitled to withdraw honorabl y from the university if their record is satisfactory and all finandal obligati on s are satisfied. Partial tuitio n re funds are availahle. Refcr to the " Ttlition and Fees" sectioll

of this catalog for mo re illformation.

Medical Withdrawal: Stude n t s may also completely w ith draw from the university for a term for medical reasons. The student

must provide written evidence from a physician and a personal explanation to the vice president and dean for student l ife. This

m us t be co m p l eted in a timely manner and in no case later than the last day of class in any given term. If g ra nted . the grade f WM will appear on the student's g ra de repo rt and transcrip t. STUDENT COURSE LOADS

The normal COUIse load fo r undergraduate students during fail and spring semesters is 13 to 1 7 h ours per semester. includ i ng physical education. The minimum full-time course lo ad is 1 1 hours. he m inimum full - time l oad for graduate students i

"0 :ID

THE GRADING SYSTEM

add i ng nd droppi ng can be acco lp[i hed usin g tele-registration r Banner Web. See tlte !aulUlry term and summer cata logs for th addldrop periods for those ferms.

UnoffidaJ Withdrawal: A student w ho stops attending a course before the end of the twelfth week but does not withdraw may receive an lll10fficial withdrawal. The g ra de of UW will appear on the student's gr ade report and transcript. If it catl be

n

o C :ID m VI

Credjt is not all wed for

d rop pe d and tuition will be refu n ded in full. In most cases,

Official Withdrawal: To w ithdraw official ly, the student n eed s to obta in a withdrawal form from the Student Serv ices Center, fill in the form, bave the instructor sign the for m , and submi t the co mp let ed form t o the Stud e n t Services Center. Withdrawal forms must be submitted be fo re the end of the twelfth week. A

> n » o m

o n 1ft

CREDIT RESTRICI10NS

Adding or Dropping a Course: A st udent may add or drop a our e at any time during t h e fir t ten da of class du ring a full­ length semester. During the add/drop p e r iod . course may be

i not refunded. A $50 administrative fee i charged for any registration change after th add/ d ro p period.

is

hou rs with a maximum of 5 hours. in o rd e r for a student to take a ful l .ourse load, the student must be form al ly admitted to the university. See tlte "Admissio ll"

4

In(:omplete

Medical Withdrawal (WM ) is entered when a course is not co m p l eted due to medical cause. A medical wi tl, drawal does not affect a studen t 's grade poi n t a ve rage. See Withdrawn /from the Un iversi ty. previously listed. In Progress (rp) signifies progr s in a cou rse which norma lly runs more than one semester to o mp le tio n . f n Progress carries no credit until replaced by a permanent grade.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

23


The Registrar's O ffice reserves two grade desi gna ti ons for

ACADEMlC STANDING POLICY The fo l lo win g t rm s ar u cd to d e s c rib acaJem i st a ndi ng at PLU. Academic stan d ing is d te rm i ned by the C ommi t tee fo r the Ad missi o n a.nd Reten t ion o f Studen ts, whjch re s e r ve s the right to review any stlld�l1 t'S record to de te rm i n e academic standing.

excep t ion al circumsta nces. These special Regist rar's O ffice no ta tions are de scr i b e d below:

Oti<rlptlon

Grad ..

NG

w

u

w

Credit Award.,d

Grade Submitte d

No

no fficia l Withdrawal

UW

U o II: �

o

No

Good Standing: A l l s t llden e n ro l l ed at the un ivers ity arc expected to s tay i n good academic stanJing. Good s ta n d i ng req u i res a semester grade p oi n t average of 2.00 or higher fo r the

No Grade (NG ) is a te mpora ry grade en tered by the Reg ist ra r's O[fi e hen no grade h as been submitted by the established deacUin .

im med.iare past

Unofficial Withdrawal ( UW) may be enLered when a co u rse is nut co m pl e te d because of a s t uden t 's non t te nd a nce i n the days before the withd rawal deadli ne. See With drawal from the UII;versity, p r ev i o u s l y l i s t e d .

at tem p ted i ll

The Pass/Fall Option: The pa s s/fa il op t io n p e rm it s snldents to exp lor e s u bj e ct a re a s o u t s i d e t h ei r kn own abi l it ie by e x p e r i en c ­

revi e w for academic s t atus those st u d en ts who fai l to m a i n t a i n satisfactory ac ade m i c progress. Th . co m m ittee h al .! rcgul rly

f study. Grade of A+ th ro u g h

- are

The pass/fail option is l i m ited to

8

Only one ourse may be taken p ass/fai l in fu l fi ll ment of ge n e ra l L1ni ersity or c o re requir m e n t s or of the College of Arts and he pa s/fai l option may not be app l i ed to a co urs taken fo r fulfillment of a major or m i nor prograllL An excep tio n to this a llowed f-or one course in t he major or mino r field if it was

the eighth week. he pa�s/ fail opt io n is L i m i te d to u n dergraduat

s t ud d 1 ts only.

Exclusive Pass/ Fall Courses: Some co urses only award pass/fail grades. The goa l s of these courses are typically co ncerned with ap precia t ion, value co mmitment, or crea tive ach ievement. Exclusive pas / fa i l cou rses do not m eet major or un iversity re q ui remen ts without fac ulty ap proval. If a t ud e n t takes an

excl us ive pass/fai l course, the student's individual pass/ fa i l

option is not affi:cted . CLASS A'ITENDANCE The u n iversity assume that a ll re g istered s tud e n t s have free l y

accep ted personal re 'pon ibUily for regular lass atte ndance.

Cours grades re fle c t the quality of studen ts' aca d e mi c perfor­ m a nce a s a whole, which normally i ncludes re g u i ar part i c i pa tio n i n t he t t al class experience a n d is evalu a ted acco rd i ngly. Absences m I' lead to a reduction of a stud nt's fi nal grad . In the event of un avo idabl e ab ence, s t ud e n t s are expected to

i n form t h e i n t ru c to r. A ign m ent of make-up

\

o rk , if any, is a t

the ruscrerion of t h e instructor.

A.CADEMIC HONESTY Both t h e value and the s Ll cce ss of any academic act i v i ty, as well a t b e n t i re acad e mi C enterprise, have depended for ccnluri s on tbe f�undamen ta l p r i n c i p le of absolute honesty. The u n ive rs i t y

e..'qJect al l i ts fac ul t y and st ud e nts to hOllor this princi p le scrupulously.

ince academic dishonesty is a se.rious b reach of the u n i ve r­ s al ly recognized code of academic ethi c s , it is every faculty member's obl igatio11 to i mpose approp r i ate sanction fo r any demonstrable i nst ance of such m iscon du ct 011 the part of a stude n t .

The un i versity's p olicy o n academic

i.ntegrity and its p roce­

d ures for d e alin g with academic m is cond u c t are detailed in th e

Student Hcmdbo ok .

po i n t average was less than 2.00, whose cumulat ive g r ade poi nt average is 2.00 or h igher, a n d who e academic progress is satisfa tory are p l ace d on

A

C

I F I C

c ademi c wa

n in g a nd se nt wa rn i ng

letter . Stu de n ts whose cumulative and semester grade p o i n t av rage are below 2.00 at the e nd

f t h ei r first 'emester a t P LU

are also p l ace d on academic warn i n g.

Probation: S tu den ts other than first semest r s t ude nt s ar p l aced on probation if their cumula.tive grade p o i n t a e rage fails below 2 .00, or if they have been on warn i ng in t he p re v i ous

seme.ster and have fa i led to return to goo d academic sta D d i ng , o r ( a t the discretion o f t h e Committee for th e Admission and

tudents) if th y hal' faile I to mainta i n satisfactory academ ic progress. Probationary s t ud ents must meet with th . director of advising b e fo re th tenth day of a probationar y semester to draw up a plan for improving the i r academic work. Academic probation is noted on the t ranscr i p t. Fa i lu re to satisfactorily c o m pl e t e each co u rse attempted in a probationary semester may result i n dismi ssal from the un iversity. Fa i l u re to co mplete i ncludes wi thd rawals, i n compl.etes, and grades o f E or F. A proba tioll plm! lila), specify requ irements agreed all by the str/(lellt ilnd director ofadvis1ng: assign mell t to i< probationary adviser, specified COli tact with the advis r, iimitlltiotl ofcredit loa d, limitation Oil work or activit ies, registratioll ill a study sk ills class, elc. Capii!5 oJ the agreement a re sellt to tire slIlriel1t GIl d probationary adviser. At the el1d of the semester, the adviser retums one copy to the director of advisitlg h!dicatil1g whether o r tlot the student has ma de an effort to meet the terms of the probat ionary agreement. This copy is filed itl the Office of the Registrar and may be used to make decisions regardirlg comin­ lied probatiol1 and academic dismissal. Reten tion o f

Continued Probation: Students who se cumulative gr a de point averages ar e still b e l ow 2.00 after a p robationary se mes t er, but whose l ast sem ster g rade p oi nt averages are above a re otherwi

e

2.00 and who

in go d standing, rna be granted one a d di ti o nal

semester of p ro ba t ion at the ruscretion of tbe

Co mm i tte e for the

Admission and R ten tion of Stud nts. Such stud nt must participate in the p robationary semester p rog ra m . Fail ure to

satisfacto rily co m plet e each cOll1'se attempted in a probationary s emeste r may re sul t in

di

missal from the university. Fail u re to

complete includes withdrawals, incompletes, and grade s of E or F.

P

the seventh w e e k of each fal l a nd

s

Academic Warning: S t udents whose mo st rec nt semester g ra d e is

taken before the majo r or mi n o r was c1edar d. • Students must fill' the i r intention to exercise the passlfail option with the Student Service. Ce nt e r no later tban t he mid­ po i nt of t h e cours . I n a full-length semes t e r, this is last day of •

In

mester, instructors may choose to se nd w a m i ng letters to students do i n g work below level ( 2.00) in their c lasses. No transcript n r a t ion is made, and a adem i c stancling i s not a ffec ted . sp ri ng

ciences req uirement.

iden t i fy uell studen ts, review their records, consider ex te n uat i ng ircurnstances, aud decide whether or not the · t u d e n t s shall be

M idterm Advisory Letters:

redit hours ( re ga rdle s o f

repeats, pass or fail . •

a ca d e m ic year. Failure to complete i n chl des

placed on academic prob, t io n .

regarded a pass; b rrades of D+ th rough E are rega rded as ra j!. Pass/fail gra d es do not affec t the gra d e poi n t aver age . •

an

wid1drawals, incom p letes, a n d grades of • or P. Th Co m m i ttee for th Ad m ission and Retent io n of Srllde.nts re.senfes t h e right to

ing courses without co mp et i n g di rect l y with students who are

special izing in those areas

24

semester, a nd s a t i s factory academic progress.

Satisfactory Academic Progress: Sa t isfac tory academ ic p rogress shal l be defined as co mpletion of at least 75% o r cred i t hours

l U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I V E R 5 I T Y


Academic Dismissal; Student not in good �tnoding at the end J

probati onary semest e r are dis missed from th e un iversity.

They ma . apply for reinstatement by peti ti ning the o m m i t le e for the Ad m ission and Retent io n of Students ( i n c a re of the

dire c t o r

of adv'

ing). If the pe t i t i

n

is app ro ved, the rei n stated

student is on p robati n a nd must partic ipat

in t h e probationary emester program. If the petition i ' d e n ied , tbe stu den t may petition aga i n after one 'emester u nless otherwise i n formed. Students a re d ism issed for academic reaso ns after each fa ll and spring sem e otero

Second Academic Dismissal: A read m i t ted st u d en t wh o fai l s to attain a

2.00 cum ulati

e grade poin t · erage in the sem e ster after

rei nstatemen t. but whose sem ste g r ade point verage is above

2 .00.

m ay be granted

additional semester of p ro b at ion at the di cret ion of th Com m i ttee for the Ad mi 'sion a n d Retention of S t ude n t s . If a semester gr ade p oi n t average of 2.00 is not earned in the p robationary sem ter. or if a tudent fails to achieve a 2.00 cumula tive grade poi n l average aft r a S cand p robationary se mest e r, the student is di m is s ed a se co n d time and may not ap p l y for re i nstat m e n t until one ful l se mester has passed , and then only l( new e v i de nce is presented indicating the student's p robable . u e S . Tbis rule also appl ies to a r eadmi tte d stude nt who attains g (l d standing and is th ... n d ism is ed a second t i me for academic reasons. ant'

I!LlGmillTY FOR STUDENT ACTMTIES ( 1 2 hours or mo re) is eligible fo r participation in un ivers ity activities. Limi tation on " studen t's a ct ivit ies based upon academic performance may be se by in dividual sch oo l s, d epar t me nts , or o rganizati ns. A stu de n t on acade mic p r o b at ion is not eligible fo r ce rtlfication

Graduation HODors: Degrees w i t h h o n o rs of Cllm laude. magl1a cum laude. and summa wm laude are g ra n te d. A student mLlst

earn a cumulative g rade point average of 3. -0 fo r fo r magna

participation in othe r ext racurricular activit ies.

Dean's List: A De' n' List is created To be eligible.

recogn ition

Non -Deg ree Ullde rgmduates: undergrad uate ludent who are attending part - t i me for

maximum of B hours but are n o t

officially admitted to a degree p ro gra m.

a

a

semest r grade

mi n i mum of 12 graded hours.

of a s tu den t's co mmitment to the liberal arts was

m o

or gan iz ed i n 1 969 by Phi Beta Kappa

c:

members o f t h e fac ulty to encou rage and recognize excel le n t scholarsh ip in tbe liberal

3. 70;

• •

high grade p i nt ave rag e ( fo r seniors, normally above for j uniors, n oml al ly above 3.90) ;

at t ai n e d a

completed l l O credi t hoUts in l iber al studies; demonst rated the equivalent of two years of col lege work in forei gn lan guage ;

completed ne year of college mathematics

( including statis tics

or computer scienc ) o r fo ur ears of col leg pre parat ry math­

ematics in high scho o l and one college •

co mp l ted

a

mathematics COllrse;

and

m in i m u m of thre e seme ters in res iden ce at the

un iversity. The univ rsity a l so has c hapters of

a

number of national

honor societ ie.� on campus, i n cluding th e following:

AJpha Psi Ome ga ( D r a m a )

B eta Gamma S i gm a (B u sin ess ) -Iu Phi Epsil n ( Music) P i Kappa Delta (Forensics)

Omicron Delta Epsi l o n ( Eco nomics ) igma Theta Tau (

u rsi n g )

Undergraduate Fellows: A l imit d number of u n d rg raduate fe l lows

a re a p p ointed an n uall y. These appoin tments are g ive n to encouraging reci p i ­

outstanding sen io r students with a view t

en ts to consider co l l ege teach ing a s a career. A n lmdergra dua te fellow is given a variety of opport u nities to sample the profes­ sio n a l life and work of a faculty memb . r in h is or her major d iscipl ine . A tuit ion credit accompanies the appo i n t ment.

Students are p enni t te d , wi t h i n li mits, to obtain c red it by exa mi ­ n at io n in l ieu of regul ar

officially ad mi t ted to a degre program.

more th a n 30 semester hoLUS may be co un ted toward gra dua­

HONORS Pr gram to

st udents seeki ng a sp eci al academic cha l ienge i n classes with

equally capable pe rs. Inc m ing fr shmen may apply for a cou rse of study that i: ncl ud es

a min imwn f 26 hours o f honors- level

gram cente rs

the theme ''Taking Respons i bil­ ity: Matters o f the M ind, Matters of the Heart" nd integrates academic and experiential lea rning opportuni ties . with the obj ect i e of preparing p a rt ic ipants for l ives of serv ic e and servant leadershi p. See the "HOllars Progra m" section of this ourses. The p

'"

junior are more st r in gent . Students must have:

attend ing par t-t ime for a maximum o f 9 hou rs but are not

university Honors

m

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION (CHALLENGE)

NOli-Degree G raduate St udents: graduate tude nts who are

Honor Program: PLU offers its

::a:I

rt�. St u de n t members a re elected by

the fa ulty fe l l ows of th society each sp r i ng. Both j unior and seniors are el i gi b l e; however, the qualificat ions fo r election as a

requirements and have been a ccepte d into t he D ivision of

student must have a tt a i ned

w o rk . The s oc ie t y

Graduate Studi es.

m

n

the e.nd of each semester.

at

together with a reco rd of high ach,ievement in relevant course

Freshmen: stu d ents who h ave met freshman entrance

}rmi{)rs: stud.cnt� who have satisfactorily comp let ed 60 hours. "eniors; stu d en ts who have sati factorily co m pleted 90 hours. Gradullte Stude"ts: studen ts who h ave met graduate en t rance

3.75

HODor Societies: Ekct i o n to the Arete Society is a sp ' c ia i

ms.

a

p i n t average of 3 . 5 0 with

CLASSIFICATIONS OF STUDENTS

30 h

laude.

ing g r ad ua t i on honors.

Sophomores: sr uden ts who have sat isfactorily compl ted

cum

for Sl�mma cum lallde. All transfer

Physical education activity co Llrses are not included ill determin­

requi rements.

3.90

laude. iln d

g rades are combined with PLU grad s to determine eligibili ty.

Any re g u l ar l y enrolled, full- rime tudent

in intercollegi te co mpet i t i n and may be a dvi ed to cur ta il

ml1l

on

cata/o, for further details.

Honors at £ntrance: These hon o r s are confe r red ar Open ing Convocation on the most highly q ual ified entering fresh men .

ertificates. which are mailed in early M y to h igh scho o ls for presentat ion to recipients, recog n ize o u t standi ng high sch ool achievement a nd anticipate l1 peri or pe rformance at the un iversity level . These awards have no m netar y val ue and do not cons t it ut e accep tance into the H o nors Program.

n w l l ment and cia

attendance. No

tion, whether from the Collegt Level Exa m inat i on Program (CLEP) or any otb e r exam ination. Exceptions to this rule for ertain gr ou p s

f t udents o r p rograms may be made, subject to

reco mmendation by th appr val by th

Educati onal Poli ci

Co m m i ttee and

fa culty. C r edit by exam i nation is open to

formally aJmitt d, regular ta tus "ludent.

illy and does not

cou n t toward the residency requirement for gradua ti n. To rece ive redit by e amination . . tud nts must complete Credit By Exanlination Regis t ration Form avail able in the

a

S t udent S e rvi ces Cen ter. obtain the signature of the res pec tive depart men t chair or

d

an, and arrange for tht! exa m i nat i

tbe appropriate i nst ructor.

n with

he c mp leted for m must be

returned to the Student Se rvices Cen te r befo re the examination is taken. G rades fo r credit by exam ination will be

su bmitted by

the instructo r along with aLI other grades at the end of the term. EP g neral exam imHions are

given el ctive c redit only. The

various schools. division', and departments det er m i ne the peci­

fi CLEP ubject exa m i n atio n s whidl may fulfill requirements for maj ors, p rogram s , or general univerSity reqllireme n ts in t h e ir rcsp ctive a ademic areas. These exa mi nat io n s are su bj ec t to

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nun n da t it 05 by t he Educational Policies Co m m i ttee and approval by t h e faculty. The m i n i m u m passing l evel. for CL.EP exa mi na t io n s taken at Padfic Lut hernn n.iversiry is th fift i et h percell t il e. 'L P creilits gran ted by other un iversit ies, colleges, and commu nity col leges, wruch are earned hefore entrance, a re h onored by Pa jlic LuthC'ra n U n ivers i ty. The appl ication of those c red i ts towa rd m aj ors , p rog ra ms , a nd gene ral university requirements is co nsiste n t with sc hool , divisional , and d ep a rt ­ ment policies and standards. h e un iwrsi ty does not grant credit for college-level gen ral equivalency d i p l o m a ( ED) tests.

ree

NON-CREDIT INFORMAL STUDY

w o

To nco u rage l i be ral learn in g of all ki nd s, above and beyon d

c( u

univer i t y offers

c(

enrollment in co urses lead.ing toward fo rmal d grees , the

var i ety of opportwlities for in formal study:

Guest of University Status: ea hers and o fficials f ather institutions, visiting scholars a nd arti 'ts, nd ather p ro fessi o n al persons who wish to use university faci l ities for indepen den t study may apply to the provost for cards desi gn a ti ng guests of the u n ivers ity.

ud, persons,

them as

f academic a nd per on al writing, to

read different ki n d s of texts m o re crfectively, and t

organ ize the powers of dear thought a n d expression. The un iversit y's co m m i t me n l to exc lIent wr i ti n g i r Ae ted in the Writing enter, Ivhere t ra i ned s tudent consul tan ts from a var i e t y f d is c i pl i n es help studen ts o f va ry i ng abil itie b y read i ng and responding to paper s still in draft. All fac u lty members share the res p onsibility for improv i ng the l i teracy of lheir tuden ts. Fa ulty in ev ry d e pa r t m e n t and school make wr i t i ng all essent i al pa rt of thei r cou rses a n d show st ude n ts how t ask q ues tio n s a pp rop r i a te to t h l;! k inds of read in g done in the i r fi el d s . Students write both formal papers and rep o r t s and informal fl otes and essays i. n order to master t he conten and m thod of th va rio us discip l i ne . They are e nco u raged to prepare i mpor tant paper in m ultiple d raft s . Be , li se errors are a d.istraction and a symptom of care l e ss ­ nes in aLI d iscip l i n 5, tude n ' in all cour 'S a re ex pec ted to observe the conven tio n s o f formal E ngl isb i n their finished work. But l iteracy is m o re tb n co rrectness. t Pacific ulheran Un i ve rsit y re a d i n g and wr i t i ng are part o f the pro ess of libe ral education.

in their use of facilities,

will defer La the needs of students and raculty members.

Auditiug Courses: To audit a co u r se is t.o emoli, with t he pe rm iss i o n of the in tructor, on a n o n - c red it basis. An a uditor is encou raged to pa rt ici p a te ful l y in class a ct iv i ti es bot is not held

Genera l Un iversity Requirements The un iversity is comm it ted to pro iding a base for all i t ba

S

o ug l i beral arts

alauIeate degr't' procrrarns. A cc o rd i n g l y, i n

accountable fo r exam inations or other written work a nd does n ot receive grade. [f th i nstru c t r approve', the co ur, e m ay b entered upon the tramcript as AudiL W i th the app roval of the instructor or [he department. the student may gai n credit or an a udited course by pas i n g an exam i nat ion se t by the instructor or the d epar t m en t . Audit fees are the same as credit fees.

add ition t o fulfilling certa in m i n i m u m requirements, " undergraduate students must satisfactori ly compLete a l l general university r quirements ( GURs) . No cour e usc I to satisfy one GUR may be used to satisfy another, excep t l imited such use in the Perpsective on Diversity req u i rem nrs.

Visiting Classes: M embe rs of the academic co m m u n ity are encouraged to visit cl a sses wh ich i nterest th e m. No fee is charge

DEGREES

� r lht: privilege. Because regularly enrolled tudents m ust b given fi rs t consideration, p e rso n $ desiring to visit cl asse s are required to ask pe rm i ss i on of the instructor. Visi to r s are guest s of the classe and must conduct t hemselves accord i ngly.

GRADUATION Students expecting to fulfil l degree re qu i rem en ts with i n he academ i year ( incl ud in g

August )

Ie re qu i red to file

n

app licat ion (or grad ua tion with the Office of the R gistrar

accord i ng to the following: DEGREE COMPlET10H

BACHELOR'S AND MASTER'S DEADUNE

l, 2000

May 200 1

N . vem b r

A ugust 200 1

March 1 , 200 I May \ , 200 \ May 1 . 200 \

D etember 2001 January

2002

the December commencement. T h e act ual dat e of graduation

transfer back to Pacific Lutheran

University or a degree (math. physic , engineering programs) must apply for gr ad u ation b for or d u ri ng th

semester of their j un ior year so that defic iencies may be met before th ey leave ca m p us . first

WRITING THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULUM Pacific Lu th eran Un.iversity i a co m m u nity of scholars, a

community of reade rs and writers. Read i ng informs the intellect and liberate the imagination. Wr i ting pervade our academic

lives as teachers and students, both as a way of om m unica t ing what we l earn and a s a means o f s api n g thought n d ideas. COLIC

s designed to ful fill

tbe un iversity wr i ting requi rement, cou rses in which students

P

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F I C

L U T H E R A N

T h e Examined Life: [nto Uncertainty a nd Beyond The freshma.n ye r p rog ra m provide a s u p po rti ely challe.ng­ ing context in which to be gin the ques t or, ancl adventure of, a larger vision for life. n ive rs i. ty edu ation is about more than skills; at PL i t is about lib 'rati n g students for c r i t i cal and commhted l iv i n g, combining well- developed c ritical capacit ies with co mp assion nd vision for service in a m u lticu ltu ral, ideologi al l y plural world. [n add it i o n Lo o r ie n r ation and advising p ro g ra ms, the fres h man year program is composed o f tb ree cour es. One f tne two e m i nars must be taken in the studen t's tir t semester. Fres h m an year progra m requirement m ust be co m p lete d

These e m i nars focus on writing, thinking, speak in g , and

will be r co rded on the pennanen t reco rds.

Our emphasis on li teracy begi ns wi th

1. The Freshman Experience

I a. Inqui ry Seminar: Wri ting ('1 hour)

fall emester. January, and pri n g semester). Degrees are f< rmally conferred at Augu t, December, and May comm emcnts. Studen t� with J,ll1 uary degree dates are exp cted to take part i n

Students who p l a n to

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS - ALL BACCALAUREATE

during the rodent's freshman y ar.

There are fo u r degree-comple l ion dates (end of s u m mer Sf. si n,

26

learn to u e var i o u s kinds

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reading. They involve w rj t i ng a a wa I of thinking, of learn i ng , and o f discovering and orderin g ideas. Ta ught by faculty from the un iversity' various departme n ts and sc h oo l . , these semi nars are organized around topics that ngage stu den ts and faculty in dialogue and provide the opp rtunity to examine i ss ues [rom a variety of pe rspe tives.

NOTE: Credits earl/eli by AdvQ llcai PilICt'r'lT <" lI-English ilnd Internalionn/ Bacca/au reate-Ellglish '/0 IlOt satisfy tilis req l,ircment, though they may be uJed for elective credit. SllIdCU15 with officially rrallsCTipted college writi Ng course;, hre/wiillg those in \'VCIS/J illgton StClte's Run ning Slnrr program, are /lOl1ctlteiess eii "ible to enroll ill the IVritil1g st'milrar/ur credit, or they II/ny chaos!! to ILse their previolls credirs to satisfy th writing semillar n.:quirement. I b. Inq uiry Seminar: Crilicnl Canversa t ion (2 bo urs ) These se m in ars involve l ea r ni ng how to p art i c ipat e in the exch a nge of ideas through the expe r ience of art ic ulatin g ques t i on s , l isten i ng for meaning and nuance in what others w ri te and say, seeing ideas a nd po itions i n c ntext, arguing, moving to consensus, and l iving wilh conll icL Like the la


FRESHMAN EXPERIENCE

CORE R E QU I R E M E NT S

OTHER G U Rs

! 1 0-1 2 HOURS)

EITHER CORE I OR COR E II

(20 28 HOURS)

WRIT 1 0 1 - Inquiry Seminar. Writing (4) CRIT 1 1 7 - C rit ical Conversation (2 or 4) Freshman }anuary Term (4)

Core I - Distributive and Disdplinary (32 hours)

Art, Music, Theatre (4) literature (4) Philosophy (4) Religious Studies (8) Anthropology, History. or Poli ica l Science (4) Economics. Psychology,

SOCio logy, or Social Work (4)

Core I f

Intemallonal Core: of the Contemporary World (28 hours) INTC 1 1 1 - AuthOrity and

Sci e nce and the Method 4)

-

Liberty and Power (4)

Four 200-level t hem a t IC courses ( 1 6) One 300-level Course (4)

Natural Sciences, Computer Science. or Mathematics (4)

w r i t i ng seminar , th ese semin, rs are taught by faculty from various dep a rt men ts and s c hoo l s . All are numbered 1 1 71 1 9 i n t.heir resp ctive departm . nts. "'''h en t a ug h t in J a n ua ry, these seminars are 4 hours. I c. Freshman ]£l IlIIary Term (4 hours) These co u rses fulllJ l one of the other ge ne ral u n iver itv requirements a n d are desi g n ed both for fre h man students and t o take advantage of the format of th January term.

2. One of two Alternative Cores: Core I or Core D Core I: TIle Distribt4 1 i ve Core (32 /zours) a. Arts/Literatu re (8 hours, 4 from each L in e ) I. Art, Mu sic, or Theatre 2. Literatu e (Engli.sh or Languages and Literatures) b. Phil s op h y (4 hours) NOTE: Log il" collrses do !lorfulfill this req"iremellt. c. Religious tudies (8 hours, 4 from eac h f two l i n e s) I . Bib lical St die.s 2. Christian Thought, H i s to ry, and Exp ri.:nce 3. l ntegrative and Comparative ReL i gi ou s Studies NOTE: Trr",s!er studel/tj filtering as jUl/iors or seniors !Ire rl!iJllired to take 4 semester hours of religion (from lilies I or 2) unless prese/lting Ii tran fer hours of re1ig iorl from ntlre r a crtditu/ cnlleges or universrties.

d. Social Sciences (8 hour , 4 fro m each l i ne ) J. An th ropolog y, H i story, or Pol itical Science 2. Econo m ics, Psychology, S ciology, or Social Work e. Natural Sciences, Co m p u t r Sci en ce, Mathematics (4 hours) Cor IT: The Tntematiollal Core: In tegrated Studies of the Co trtemporary a..

World (28 Iwurs)

INTC 1 1 L , 1 1 2 O r ig i ns of the Contemporary World

(8 hours) b. Four 200-level INTC cour es ( J 6 hou rs ) . Normally take n in the second and th i rd years. May include app roved prograrn of s t u d y abroad. Students select four cou rses subject to ap proval of the I nternati onal Core Committee. c. On 300-level lNT COIlIse (4 hours) 3. Mathematical Reasoning (4 ho urs) A co u rse in mathematics or application of mathematics, with e mp h asis o n n u mer ical and logi cal reason i n g and on using appropriate methods to formulate and sol ve pr blems. This req u irem en t may be satisfied by any 4 hours from mathemat­ ics (excep t Math 91 or M a th 99) or by Co mp ute r Science 1 1 5 or b y Statistics 2 3 1 . This requireme.nt may als b e sa tisfied by t he completion (with at lea s t a B average) of the e qu iva le n t of fo ur yea rs of c liege preparatory matllemaLics ( through mathemati al a n alysis or ca l c u lus or equivalent ) . I n fulfil l in g the mathematical reasoning requirement, s t u dent s with d o umented d i abilities witi b e given reasonable ac ommoda­ tions as deter-mined by th e coordinator [or students with

(4)

Scientific

n

Wr iting (4). unless taken In freshman year Perspectives on Dlv rsity (6-8 ) Alternative Perspectives Cross-Cultura I P erspect ives Physical Ed ucatio (4) Senior Seminar/Project i n Major (2-4)

Djscovery (4)

111

m

Mathematica l R eason i n g

-

Integrated Stud ies

INTC

» n » o

disabili ties and the appropriat

'"

o c � m III

faculty member in consu.lta­

ti n with th� s.tudent

4. SdCDGe and the Scientific Metbod (4 hours) sci nce course th at teaches the metl.ods tlf science, illus­ trates i ts ap plica t ions a n d limitations, and i ncl udes a labor a ­ tory component. Al leas t o n of the courses taken to meet line 4 or � (Core I, e) must be ;] course in which Lhe subject is natural scien es, i.e., p h ysi l or biological seien e. S. Writing Requirement (4 hours) All s t ude nt s mu ' l co mp lete 4 cred i t ho urs i n an 3 ppro ved writing course. Fr hmen sat isf)' Ihi requ iremen t t hrough th e Inquiry Seminar: Writing.

6. Perspectives Oa Divers.lty (6-8 hours) A ourse in e eh of the fol lowi n g (wo l i n es . fhe o n ly 2-hour courses that can sati 'fy eil r tlf the fol lowi n g roe .. co mpl etel y . are the treshman Critical Conversation se m. i n a rs ( 1.B) . a.. Alternative Perspectives (2-4 hours): A course w h ich creates an awareness and u nderstanding of diversity i n the Unit ed , tates, dir ctly addressing issues such as cth 11 icity, gender, di ability, r aci sm , o r poverty. b. Joss- Cll itu mi Pe rspectI ves (2-4 ho urs): A course tll t e n ­ hances cross -cul tural understandi ngs t h ro ugh exarninatio n of o th er cultures. This require m en t may be s at isfied in one of t hree ways: (i) a course focus ing on the uit ure of n o n -Eu ro- America n societies ; ( i i l a 201 or h igh e r-l evel course in a language used to satisfy the admiss ion require­ ment, or 8 credits in a la ngua ge not previously studied , except sign language (Th ese language co urses may also be used il/ sa tisfying the Arts ami Scierrces Requiremerrt. Options

[ or II); o r (iii) participatio n in an appr ved semester- long st ud y abroad pr gram ( J anuary term p ro gr a ms are evalu ated individually).

NOTE: 2-4 /lOurs 01 Perspectives on Diversity courses may be used ro fUlftll Ilnother general unil'ersity requirement, The remain i"g 4 Irours must be a course that dol!S not simultaneously fulfill any otlll:r

general unil'ersity reqllirement. TI,ese 4 hours may, however, satisfy a req uirement ill tire major.

Junior al/d senior trat/sfer s/udt:rlls shall dther tab one Perspectives a ll Diversity course (4 credit hours) at PLU rlrat does not simullJJl/eously fulfill anot/,er general unil'ersity req uirement, or tlrey shall show tlrat they have satisfied botll tire allenrative

perspectives and cross-cultural perspectil'e5 /illes 0/ tl.t requirement.

7. Physical Educatioa

(4

hours)

Fom d i fferent p hys ical ed ucation act ivi ty courses, i nc l ud i n g PHED 100. One hour of cred it may be earned through a pp roved sports participation. All activi t i es are graded on the basis of , Pass, or Fail.

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ac cepted by transfer from an accredited com m u n i ty college. All community college cou rses are transferred as lower­ division credit.

O. Physical Education Cou rses: No more than eigh l l -hour physical "ducation activity

1 . Foreign Lang uage Req uirement: A l l candidates for B.A., B . S . ,

Ullder5llmdi nfS Re.gardjnfAllReauircment,. (l) Consult particular departmentlll sectiom of tire calnlogfor detailed specificatioll of courses that count for these reqrliremcmts. (2) For tlJOse lilies of tire general university require-mellls IVlliclt refer to academic disciplin es or units, selected courses olltside those Imits may COll11t for t/.e require­ ment IVhen approved botll by ti,e units and by tlrt committee overseeillg the gmeral university reqliiremMb.

r abo

b

take�n at PLU. :

The final 32 sem e teT h

t ra ns fe r credit may be applied during

c.

upper­

urs of a

a student 's linal 32

ho u rs in a de gree program. ( Spec ial progra ms such as 3- 1 . 3-2 nd em ster and January term exchange study a r

xduded

fro m t h is limitatio n . )

4. Acndelllic Major: A majo r m ust b e complete I a s d eta il ed by each scho l or department. At least 8 se m ester hours must b t aken

in residen

c.

5. Grades fo r Major Courses: Al l courses counted toward major or m i no r m ust b co m p leted with grades of C- or h igh�r nd with a cumulati e g r ade poin t average of 2 . 00 or h igh e r in

cour es. Dep rtments, divisions, h i g h er g rade requirement .

6.

r

Is may set

sell

44 Hour Limit: Not mo re than 44 ho u rs earned in o n e a plied to the B. A . or B. . egree . 7. Mus ic Ensem bles: Non- music maj rs may count toward gra d u atio n req uirements not mor than 8 sem ter h urs i n mu si c ensemble . departm en t may be

28

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ecrrespotldencelExtenslO1Z

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COll rses: A maximum of 24 hours in accred i ted correspondence or ension studies may be credited toward degree requirements, contingent on approval by the registrar.

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the Co l lege o f Arts and Science� (all B

., B.S . , B.A.

e e .,

B.A.P.E.,

p t io n I, ll, or IT! below:

.ompletion of one fo reig n lan g ua ge through the seco nd year

n. Complet ion th ro ug h the first year of co l lege level of a foreign language other than that used to sat isfy the foreign la nguage ent rance requi rement . Thi s o p ti o n may also b me t by satisfactory scores on a pr fi c i e n c y eX'aminatilln ad m i nis ­ tered by the PLU De pa rt men t of Languages and L i te r, tu res, lao Four semester hours in h i s to r y, literature, or la ngua ge ( a t the 20 [ l evel , or at any leve.! in a language olb r than that us d to satisfy the fo re i g n language en trance re qui reme n t ) in addition to co urses applied to th e general univedty require­ ments, alld fou r semester hours in symb oli c logic, math ­ ematics (courses numbered 1 00 or above), computer s ience, or ·tatistic in addition to cou rses ap pli e d to the general un iversit y requirements. o p tion s High school lal1guage used to sati fy any f the abo m us t have been completed with grades of ' o r higher. Courses used to satisfy e i ther category of Opti n I I I of th oll e ge of Arts and Sciences requi rernen may not also be used to

Departments, division , or .. hool5 may set

h i g h e r res ide n cy requL r menrs.

th se

language, or demonstrated eq uiva l e n t proficiency) , candidates i n

c o m plet ion of four years of high school study in ne foreign l a n guage or by . atisfactory scores on a profi iency examina­ tion ad m i n ister d by the PLU D partm nr f Lang ua <>e and Literatures .

tudent's p ro g ram I11U t be co mpl >ted in re idenc at PLU.

N

In addition to m eet ing the e n t rance re q uire ment in foreign

l an g u age ( two years of h i g h school languag�, one year o f all gc

of college level. This r q u i rernent may also be satisfied by

division regardless of subjec t mat ter parallels. At [east 20 of the minim um 40 se m este r hour of u ppe r-d iv Lion work mu s t

3. Filial Year i n Residellc

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS

I.

1 . To tal HOlm and Cu muia tilre C PA: A m in im u m of 1 2 8 semester hours m Llst be com pleted with a g ra d e point average of 2.00 ( 2 .50 i n the Schools f Business and Educat ion) . .2. Upper-Division (J u rses: A m i n imu m of 40 se m este r hours must be completed from courses numbered 300

B.A.P. E . , B.A.Ree., or B.S.P.E. deg rees m u st co mp le! one of three o p t io n s i nvo lv i ng a fo reign la nguage or speci fied al te rnat ive . See above and under College of11 r ts and Sciences.

and n.s.p.E. de g ree s) must meet

GENERAL REQUIREM ENTS AND UMlTATIONS - ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES: (All c redi t hours re� r red to in l istin g s of requirement are semester ho urs. )

Courses fro m two - year institutions are flot consi d e r d

courses may be coun ted toward

graduation.

capsto ne courses such as the Global Studies Research Sem ina r or the Honors Prog r, m Chal lenge Experience may ful fi H t h is req u i re m e nt .

cc: A. u

9. JOl11l1l unity College Cou rses: A m ax i m um of 64 hours will be

Senior Seminar/Project (2-1 hours a s des i g nated by- the academic unit of t he tudent's maj o r) A substantial p roj e c t , paper, p r ac t icum , or i n ternship t h at culminates and advances the program ,)f an acadt!mic majo r. The end pr duct I11U t be p re s e nt ed to an o p e n audience and c ritically eval ua ted by facult y in t h e student's field . With appr val of Ih s t udeIlt's ma jo r department, i n terdiscipl inary

Y

sati fy general u n ive rs it y requirem ents. Any college-level foreign l anguag course numbered 20 [ or above used to satisfy Option r and any co mpl e t i o n of college-level l a nguage th ro u g h [ 02 used to satisfy Option ll may also be used to s t is fy the Perspe rives on Diversity re q ui rement in Cro. s - Cu ltura l Perspecti es. Candidates for t h e B.A. in Englis h , for the B.A. in Ed ucati on with co n centration in Eng l is h , fo r the B.A. in Global Stud i es, fo r the B.B,A. in I n ternational Business, and for ele c t i on to t he Arete Society mu s t meet Option 1 above.


c m

m m

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Deg ree a nd Cou rse Offeri ngs Academic. Structure College of Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities

I

,

Division

'.

" of '0

Anthrop ology Ec o nomics History

R

Ma.rria� and Family Therapy

Chemistry

Political Sc ience Psychology So ciology and Social Work

Co mpu te r Science and Computer E.ngineering Ge05c i ences Mathematic;

Physics

School of the Arts Art

1

Degrees Offered Bachelor's Degrees

Languages nd Li teratur

Iigion Division of Natl.IrClI Sciences Bio logy

- �

ia/ Sciences

English Philosophy

_.�

Master's Degrees Master f Arts in Education M aster of ArtS in ducation with Init ia l Certification Master of Arts (Marriage and

Ba hel r of Arts

Bache lor of Science Bachelor of Arts in .ducalion Bach lor of Art in Physical Education

Family Therapy)

Bachelor of Arts i n Recreation Bachelor of Bus i ness

Busin ess Admini tration Master of Science in Nursing

Ma.ste r of

Adminislration Bachelor of Fine Arts B ,helor of Music

Bachelor of Music Educa t ion Bachelor of Musical ArtS Ba chelor cif Science in Nur ing Bachelor of Sc ience in Phys ical Edu cal ion

Co mmu nicati o n and Theatre Music

School of Business School of Education School of Nursing School of PhySical Education

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II' a:

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Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

The Americas

Electrical Engineering

Anthropology

Computer Science

Physics

Anthropology

English

Art

Economics

Political Science

Art

Literature

Coaching

Biology

English

Psyc hology

Biology

Pllblishing and

Darice

Chemistry

French

Rdigion

Business

Chinese Studies

Geosciences

Scandinavian Area

Chemistry

Classics

German

Studies

Communication

History

Chi nese Studies

Individualized

Social Work Sociology

Communication

Mathematics

Spanish

Critical Commun ication

II'

a:

o

Studies

Chinese (language)

Critical Comm. Stl/dies

Aquatics

Prin tillg Arts Writing

Exercise Scierlce Health

English as a Second Language Environmental Studies French

Health alld Fitrless Managemwt Recreatioll Sports Administration

Geosciences

Physics

German

Political Science

Global Studies

Psychology

Print/Broadcast JOLirnalislll

J\'!usic

P/lblic Relations

Norwegian

Pllblic Relations

Theatre

Philosophy

Computer Science Economics

Greek

Public Affairs

Education

History

Religion

Information Science

Sociology

Bachelor of Sclena! (B.S.) (3-2)

Applied Physics

Engineering Science

Biology

Geosciences

Chemistry Computer Engineering

Mathematics P hysics

Early Childhood

Computer Science

Psychology

Special Education

Legal Studies

English as a Second

Mathematics

Statistics

Crass Disciplinary Studies

Majors ill:

Anthropology

French

Physics

Art

German

Political Science

Biology

History

Psychology

Chemistry Drama

Journalism

Science

Latin

Earth Sciences

Mathematics

Social Studies Sociology

Economics E nglish

Music

Spanish

Norwegian

Special Education

Physical Education

Speech

nglish/Language Arts

only. If, during the last semester of the senior year, a candidate fo r a baccalaureate degree finds it possible to complete all degree requirements with a registration of fewer than 16 semester hou rs of undergraduate credit, registration for graduate credit is permissible. However, the total registration for undergraduate requirements and elective graduate credit shall not exceed 1 6 semester hours during the semester. A memorandum stating that all baccalaureate requirements are being met during the curre路nt semester must be signed by the appropriate department chair or school dean and

New

Venture Management I n fo rmation Management

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Art

presented to the dean o f graduate studies at the time of such registration. This registration does not apply toward a higher degree unless it is later approved by the studen t's adviser and/or advisory

Communication (Broadcas t i ng, Theatre)

Bachelor of Music ( B.M.) Piano

Instrumental Composition

committee. "NOTE: Lower-division students

Voice

Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.1L)

COURSE OFFERINGS Most listed courses are offered every year. A system of alternating upper-division courses is practiced in some departments, thereby assuring a broader curriculum. The university reserves the right to modify specific course reqo irements, to discontinue classes in which

Bachelor of Musical Arts (B.M.A.) Music

the registration is regarded as insufficient, and to withdraw courses.

Bachelor of Science 10 Nurslog ( B.S.N.) Nursing

EXPLANATION OF SYMBOLS

Most course路s have the value of 4 semester hours. Parenthetical numbers immediately after the course descriptions indicate the semester hour credit given.

Bachelor of Sciena! in Physical Education ( B.S.P.E.) Concentrations in: Exercise S ienc

Other symbols are explained as follows:

Health and Fit ness Management Pre-therapy

Complementary Majors Global Studies Women's Studies

C

I

F

I

C

I

Cou rse offered first semester

II

Course offered secolld semester f Course of eredfirst and second semester in sequence

I , II I II

Envi ronmental Studies

A

may enroll in upper-division courses

i/prerequisites have been met.

K- 1 2 Choral K- 1 2 Insr rumentaJ (Band) K- 1 2 I n strumental (Orchestra)

P

Ph ilosophy

Generally open to juniors and seniors unless otherwise specified.* Also open to graduate students, and may be considered part of a graduate program provided they are not specific requirements in preparation fo r graduate study.

Marketing Resource Management

Organ

Women's Studies

Technology

500-599 Graduate Courses: Normally open to graduate students

Entrepreneurship and

International B usiness

Theatre

300-499 Upper-Division Courses:

Bachelor of Bnsiness Admloistration (B.B.A.)

Hum an Resource Management

Music Norwegian

1 00-299 Lower-Division Cou rses: Open to freshmen and sopho颅 mores unless otherwise restricted.

Rec reation

Mana gement

Course offered either semester

J

Course offered

G

Cou rse may be used in graduate programs

in the January term

Course ofered in the summer S f a/y Cou rse offered in alternate years als Course offered in alternate summers

L

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T

H

( No n-Teaching)

COURSE NUMBERINGS

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation (B.A.Rec.)

Professional Accou nting

Special Education

Reading

Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (B.A.P. E.)

Financial Re ou rces

Latin

Special Education

Ph ical Education

Concentratio ns in:

Instructional Te chnology Spanish

Imtructio nal

La nguage

B achelor of Arts in Education (B.A.拢.)

30

Physical Education

E

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The Americas

Anthropology

T h is interdisciplinary minor focllses on the comparat ive

Anthrop

histories,

wo rld 's people in to human

cultur and c ntempo rary i lies shared by the two continent in the Western He m jsp here. In in tegrati ng selected informat ion about the United States. i relle t the reality that this c untry i an in tegral part of the culturally •

di verse and increasingly interconnected contemporary world. FACUI:I'Y: Olu f ,

Program Adviser; Ahna, Brown, B rusco, p, DVlyer-Sh ick, Kelle her, Killen, Klei n, Marcus , P red m o re , Ro w e,

Temple-Thur ton, T. Williams. MINOR: The min r con sists of 20 h urs, including o ne required

and four elective courses compl eted with a grade of C or h igh er. Students also must take the Composition and Conversation course, or its equivalent, in a lan guag e ok n in the Ameri ca:; other than their native language. Parti cipation in J relevan t off campus program is highly re com m ended . Students may not apply more than one 4 credit co ur s in the minor to fulftll any other requirement, such as general uni ersity core, major, or minor req uirements. REQUIRED COURSE: Political dence 282 - Introductio n to the Americas

ELECTIVE COURSES: Students must cho se at least one course w i th North American content a the primary t!mphasis, and one cou rse with Central or South American co ntent as the primary em p hasis. Anthropology 336 - People, of Latin America Anthropology 330 - ,ultures and Peop les of Nat ive North America Anthropology 334 - The Anthropology of Con temporary America Business 495 - International Business: Modern Latin America o m m u n ication 337 - News Media of t.he Western Hemisphere nglish 232 - Women's Literature: Worn n Writers of the Americas

French 34 1 - rench L itera ture and Elilm of the Americas History 220 - Modern Latin Am rican History

History 305 - Slave ry in the Americas History 335 - Latin American H i s tory: Central America a n d t h e Caribbean History 337 - The History of Mexico I isto ry 344 - The Andes in L tin American Hist ry Polit Lcal Science 373 - Civil ights and .ivil Libe rties Re.l igion

227

J gy as a discipline tries to b r i ng all of the f, cus. Though anthropology does look at "stones and bones," it also examines the poli ­ tics, medicines, families, arts, and religio n s of peop les and cultures i n vari us pl aces and ti mes. This makes the study of nthrop logy a complex task, fo r it i nvolve aspects of many discipline , fro m geology and b i o l ogy to art" and

> Z -4 J: ::11 o ."

psychology.

A n thropology i s composed of f,

elds. Cult ural or

ur

o ,...

social anthropology stud ies living human cultures in order to create

a

o CI -<

cross-cultural underst n d i ng of h uman

behavior. Archae logy h as the same goal, but uses data from the p hysical remains of the pa t cultures to reach it. Linguistic anth ropology tudies human la nguage. Physical 311thr pology studies the emergence

and subsequent bio­

logical adaptations of h u man i ty s a sp ci '.

FACULTY: Kl e in,

Vaughn.

Chair; Brusco, Guldin . Hasty, Huelsb

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

ck,

6 . em ester hours.

Required: 1 02 , 1 03 , 480, 490. Choose: 1 0 1 or 1 04; lour hour

from 330-345 (peoples c urses ) ; four hours from 3 50-465 (top ics co urses ); eight additi nnl hours

i n anthru p logy, at lea t � ur ( f which mt! t be above 3 2 1 . MINOR: 2 0 sem ester h O llr�.

Require d: 1 02 . Choose: 1 0 1 or 103 o r 1 04; fo ur hours from ourses listed 330--3 4 ; fo u r hours fr m 3 50-4 90; and fI ur addi t io na l hours i n anthropology. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recogniti n of utstanding work, the designation with Departnze1ltal HOllars may be granted by vote f the a n thropology faculty based on the student's per­ formant: in the � llowing areas: 1 . Anthrop logy cou rse work: 3. 5 minimum g.p.a. 2. Demonstration of active i nt erest in an thropologica l p roj as and ac tivities outside of clas� work. 3. Completion of a senior t hesis. paper describing indepen­ d en t r search must be o nd uc ted under th upervi ion o f depa rtme ntal fJculty. proposal m � t b e pproved b y the faculty by the third week of cia 5 of the fall semeste r for May nd summer graduates. and the third week of class of th spring emester for De ember gra d uates .

- Christian Theology: lJberation Theology, Q[

Re lig i n 334 - Theological Studies: Liberation Theology Religion 36 1 - Church H is to r y Studies: Canada, Lar in Americas , and the United States Spani h 322 - La t in American Civilizat ion and CuItur Span ish 341 - Latino Experiences in the Un ited Slates Spanish 4 3 1 - Latin Ameri ca Lite ratur , 1492-l 888 Spanish 432 - Twentieth Century Latin American Literature Spani h 433 - Sp cial Topics in Latin American Literature and Culture

Course Offe rings 101 Introduction to HumlUl Biological Diversity Introduction to biological ant hro pology with a s p eci al focus on human evol ut io n, the fossil evidence for huma.n development, the role of culture in human evol u t ion, , nd a compari son with the development and social life o f the non-hwnan primat es. (4) 102 Introduction to Buman Cultural Diversity In troductio n to social -cultural a. nthropology, c ncen t mting on the expl rati n of the infi nite variety of hu m an en deavor in all aspects f culture and all t yp e s of ltocietie j relig ion, politks, law, kin ship an d art. ulfills cross- cultural line in the Perspe ct ive n Diversity requiremen t. ( 4 ) 1 03 Introduction to Arcbaeology and Wo rld Prehistory lntroduct ion to the id a:; and prac t i e of a h aeo l o gy used lo examine the sweep o f h uman p rehistory from the earliest stone eveIopment of agriculture and metallurgy and to t ols to th en rich our unders ta ndi ng of ext i n c t societies. (4)

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1 04 introduction to Language in Society

338 Jewish Culture An expl o rati o n of American Jewi h culture thro u g h i ts roots i n the Lifewa)'s of Eastern European A hk naz i c Jews and its t ransfo r mati o n in thE' U n i te d Stales . E m p h a si on Jewish h is to ry, rel igio n , literatme, m usic, and hu.mor as reflec t i on s of basic Jewish cultural themes. Ful611s alternat iv e line in the Pers pec t ives on D iver. i ty requ i re m e n t . (4)

Introduction to an thropo l og ical li. n gu i st i c s and symbolism, i nclu d i n g t he o r igi n o f l a n guage ; sound systems, stru l u re and

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mea n i ng; la nguage acquisition; the social context o f speakin g ; la n gua ge chan e; no nve rb al commun ication; and sex d i ffe ren ces in l an gu age use. (4)

192 Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past and Present

Fulfi l l s freshman J a nuary Term requi rement a n d the alternat ive

340 Anthropology o f Africa Study of Africa's d iverse c u l t u res. F lCUS on e a r l y :tudie o f v ill ages and topi s su ch as ki n sh ip, religion, and so c i a l structure, and on more recent tudie o f urban ce n ters, the impact of colon ialism, p o p ul a r culturo:', and p st- co lo n i al politics. (4)

210 Global Perspectives: The World i n Change A surve)' of gl o ba l issues: mod rnization and de velopme n t ; e co n o m i c ch ange and in ter n a t ional trade; d i mi n is h i ng resources; war a n d revolution; pea e a.nd j us t i ce ; and ultural d i v er s i ty.

343 East Asian Cultures A survey of the cultu res and peoples of Eas ter n Asia, concentrat­ ing on Ch i n a but with comparative reference to Ja p a n , Korea, and ietnam. Cul t ura l si milarities as we.1l as d i ffe.rences between t he se nations are stressed. Top ics incl u d e religion, art, poli tics,

Fulfills cross-cultural Ii.ne in th e Perspectives on Div rs. ity re ­

h is tory, kinship, a n d eco nomic .

qu i re men t. ( Cross-referenced w i t h HIST 2 1 0 an d POLS 2 1 0) (4)

Perspe lives on Diversity requi re ment . (4)

St u dy of Makah Culture t h ro ugh a rc h aeo logy a n d h i st o ry and by i n te r a c t ing with the Maka h.

ct ive and service learning in Neah

Bay, vi it i n g the M aka h Nation . . onsent of i nstructor req u i red . l i ne in the Persp e c t ives on D i ve rs i t y re q u i rem e n t .

(4)

220 Peoples of the World

345 Contemporary- China

Exploration of th

An i m m rsion into the culture and society of the Pe o pl e's

world's cultures through anthropological

films, novel s, and eyewitness a cco u n ts. ase studies chosen from Africa, Nat i e America, Asia , the Pacific. a nd Euro-America p ro v i de a n i n s ider's v ieW' of ways of l i fe di feren r from our o w n .

R p ub l i c of China; contemporary p o l i t ics , kin h ip, olk rel ig i o n , human r lations; p ro bl ms and prospects of dev l o p me nt and

(2)

on Diversity requ irement. (4)

225 Past Coltmes of Wasbington State Nativ Americans have l ive d in Wash i n g t o n State fo r at l eas t the last 1 2 ,000 years. Cult ures of the peopl e i n oastal and interior W: hi ngto n eginning with the firs t northwesterners. An ex am i­ nation o f the ways that cultu res change th ro ugh time until the em e r ge n ce o f the distinctive cultures observed by the earliest E uro pe an visitors to tbe area . ( 2 )

350 Women and Men in World Cultures An o ve rv iew of the var iation of sex ro les and behav i ors thro ugh ­ ll ut the wo rld ; theories of m a tr i a rc hy, patriar hy, mo th e r go dd es ses , in nate i ne q ual it ie ; marriage pattern , i mp a c t o f European patterns ; ega l i tar i a n i s m t femini m . Pulfills cross­ c u lt u ra l line in th Perspect ive on Diversity requ i rement. (4)

230 Peoples o f the Northwest Coast A s u rvey of the ways of life of th nat i v peoples of c o ast al Wa h­ i n gto n, British Columb ia, and Southeastern Alaska from E.uro­ pe an ntact to con temporary t imes , including traditio nal meth­ ods of fi sh i ng , a r ts , p o t la tch 5, sta tus systems. a n d wea l t h and t he ir impact o n the modern life of the regi o n. Fulfills one-half o f t h e a l t.mative line in the Perspectives on Diversity requi rem nt. (2)

People, Places and Prospects Explorat ions of hOI s o c iet i es in North America and a ro u n d the w o rl d have ada p ted to their varied h u m a n and phys i c al environ­

rapid s oc ia l change. Fulfills cross-cul t u ral l i ne in the Pe rspe c tives

354 Geography and World Cultures:

m e n ts. Cases drawn from widel y d i fference e nvi ronme n t s. Global patt ms of variation i n life styles and so c i a l o p portuni ties. Kn o wl edge of loca t ions and map rea d ing w ill be emphasized. P rerequi s i t e: 1 02 or consen t of i nst r u c t o r. (4)

3 5 5 Anthropology a n d Media Exp l o r at io n 0 mass media pro du ce d and consumed in diverse

330 Cultures and Peoples o f Native North America from A co m p a ra t i e st udy of at i v North American cultur their a r r i va l o n the co n tinent through toclny. -xamination of U.S. and Ca n a d ian laws, p ol ic i es, and conflie , issues of sovere ig nty, and rel igi ous ri gh ts. Ful fills alte rnative L i ne in the Perspectives o n D ivers i t requirement. (4)

cultural contexts. Examination of how mass media cultivate fo r m s of ge.ndered, ethnic. reli gi o us, and racial iden tities, and h o w different fo rm of media engage with the dynamic forces o f po p ul a r culture and t h e p ol i t i c a l agen d as of states and p o l i t i ca l

332 Prehistory of North America

360 Ethn1c Groups

l o gi cal r construction of eco nom ic, social, political, and rel i gio u s life in o rt h AnI ri ca from the t i me the first settlers e n te r d th e con t i n e nt du r i ng the Ice Ages to the Mound Bu il ders of l a t e r times and ulti mately [0 the first c on ta ct with

Exam i nes t he nature of ethn ic groups in America and ab ro ad ; the va ry i n g bases of et h n ic i t y (culture, religion, t r ibe, "race;' etc.); p roblems of group i de nti ty and b ounda ry maintenance; ethnic sym b o ls ; ethnic politics; ethn i c neighborhoods; and e th nic htunor. F ulfiLl alternat ive line in t h e Perspectives o n D ivers i ty req u i re m o:' n t . (4 )

An archae

Eu ro pea n settlers. (4) 334 The Anthropology of Conlemporary America An investig ation of A m e r i c a n social patterns a.nd prob lems designed to give insights from a e ro s - c ultur a l perspec tive; expl o ra ti o n of American so l u t io ns to cornman human p ro b l e m s; a determination of what i s unique about the "American Way." Fulfill al te rn a tive l i ne in t he Perspectives on Diversity re qu i re ­ ment. ( 4 ) 336 Peoples o f Latin America Millions of Americal1s h ave nev r b en north of th eq uato r. Who a re these "other" A m e r i can s? TIlls s u rvey course familiar­ izes the student with a broad range of L tin American p eoples and p ro blems. Topics ran ge from visi o n s of th sup ma.tural to problems of ec o nomi c develop m ent . Ful.fills cross-cultural line i n the Perspectives o n Di versity requirement. (4) 32

ulfills cross - cultural li ne i n the

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361 Managing Cultural Diversity P ract ical gui d eli n e s 00 how to a p p ro adl p e o p le of other cultures with sensitivity a n d empathy and with an eye toward m u t ual ly rewa rd i n g interact ion. Learn how to avoid neg at ive attitudes toward cultural d ive rs i ty an d d e vel o p a positive cur io s i t y about the glo ba l d iversity rep res e n te d i n wo rkpl a ces, schools, and neighborhoods. ( 2 ) 365 Prehistoric Environment and Technologr. .Lab Methods in Archaeology La bo rato ry int r pret a t i o n of archaeological m a te r i al s . Tech­ n iques used in i n ter p re t i ng past human eco log y, technology, and economy. A na l yti ca l p ro ced ures for bone, s t o n e, ceramic, and

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metal art ifacts; analy 'is of deb ris from food processing activities. Analysis of material from ar haeological it s.

(4)

370 The Archaeology of Ancient Empires rigins of agriculture, writin , ities, and the stak in many great civil izations of antiquity, includ i ng Mesopotamia, Egypt , l n d ia, A ia, M uam rica, and South America. Fulfills cross-cultural

Th

parts of the w rId, comparing and contrasting th

line i n the Perspectiv<

on D i ve rsi ty requirement. (4)

Art I n this time

processes of trad i t ional and contemporary 'ocieties; concepts f I ader hip, factio n al ism and fe u ds , power, J.uthority, revol ution, and o t he r reactions to col o n ization; law and confliCl res o l u t i o n; conflicts of national and local-level legal systems. Ful dls cr cultural line i n the P rs pect i es on Diver it)' requirement. (4)

fl xibility fo r the signer. Students with profes 'ional con-

on a ariet o f exper ience and creati e artist and the d e ms

315 Law, Politics, and Revolution A tudy of politics and l aw through the p o L i t ic al truct ures and

f rapidly changing concepts and an almost

daily emerg nee of new media, empha is must be placed

must be p repared to meet the modern world with

The

both tech nical ski l ls and the capac i ty for innovation.

depa rtment's program th refofe stresses i ndivid ualized developm nt in the use of mi nd

nd hand.

Student may choo e among a general ized program leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree; a more specialized program fo r th

Bachelor of Fine Arts, in which each

380 Sickness, Madness, and Health A cro -cultural examination of systems of curing pract ices and

cultural views of physical and m e n ta l health; pre ve n ti o n

and

healing; nature and skills of urers; defin iti ns f disease;

ariation i n dise ases; impact of modern medical a nd psychologi足 cal practitioners. Fulfills cross- cultural l in e in the P rsped ives o n Diversit

requirement. ( 4 )

385 Marriage, F amily, and Kln.sbip Explores the nature of domestic groups cross-cultural ly, including the wa),s in which rel i g io n , myth, magic and folkl ore serve to arti wate a n d control dom stic l ife ; how changing systems of p ro du ct io n affect marriage and domestic form ; and h

w

clas and gender systems int rtwine with kin h ip, dome tic

fo rms, and the mea n i ng of "family." ( 4 )

388 Applied Anthropology Expl o rati o n of the llses of the anthropol gical approach to improve human conditiom. -ocus o n anthropologi t ' i nvol (;'足 ment and roles i n applied p r oj e cts . Review of th oretical , ethical, and practical i ss ues . Field component. ( 4 )

392 Gods, Magic, and Morals Anthrop logy

f religion; humanity'S concepts o f and relatio n足

hips t o the up rn at u ral ; examination of p rsonal and group fu n tions that rel igions ful fill ; expl ration of religi ons both

"primitive" and historical; origins of reli ion. ( ro s- refer n ed with REU

392) Pulfills cross-cultural line in the P rsp ctives on

Dive rs i t y requiremen t. (4)

archaeol gical site, w i th empha is on basic

exc av a ti on

skills and

record keeping, field ma p p i n g , drafting, and p hotography. The laboratory cover s artifact p rocessing and prel i m i nary analysis. onsent of instructor. ( 1-8)

Historic and thematic study of the

th oretical fo undations of

so iocultural anthropology; research met hod ; h w theory and r

estabLish a n t h ropological knowle dge.

Requi red of majors in their j u nior or senior year.

(4)

a degree

Some stude nts go di rectly from the un iversity i n t o their field of interest. Ot hers find it desirable and appropriate to attend a graduate schoo!. Ma n)' l u m n i have been accepted into pr

tigious graduate programs, both i.n th i s country

and abr ad. The various field.

f art are comp 'titive and demanding

i n temlS of commitment and effort. N net heless, ther

is

Reading in specific areas or i sues of a n t h ro p o l

highly i maginative or, ideal ly, both. The department's program st resses both, attem pting to

h Ip each student

reach t h a t ideal. In structio nal reso urces, when co u p led with dedicated and energetic students . have resulted in an unu uaLly high percentage of graduates being able to

FACULTY: Hallam, Chair; Cox, Gel ler, Gold. Keyes. To msic. The d ep a rtmen t has sought to minirniz prerequisites, enabling s tudents to elect courses relating to their i nterests as earl

a

possible, but majors are urged to fo llow c Llfse sequences closely. I t is recommended that s tudents in tere ted i n m ajo r ing in art

49 1 Independent Study: Undergraduate Readings y under

supervision of a fa cul t y member. Prerequisite: departmental consenL

or

education for teach ing on several Ie e1s.

satisfy their vo . ' on al obj ctives.

480 Anthropological Inquiry

methods are used

ar t

always a place fo r those who are extremely skillful or

465 Archaeology: The Field Experience A field cl a ss i nvolvi ng the excavation f a historic or prehistoric

Prerequisite:

ca ndidate develops some area of c mpetence; p rogran1 in

( 1 -4)

492 Independent Study: Undergraduate Fieldwork tudy of specific areas or issue in an thropology t h rough field methods of analy is and research supp rt d by appropria te

declare their major early to in ure p rop e r adv ising. Tra n s fer

stud e nt ' status 'h all b determined at tbeir tim of e n t ra nc e . The department rese rves the right to retai n, exhlbil. and reproduce st uden t work submitted for credit in any of its urses or programs, including th e senior exhibiti n . A LlSe or material, fee is required in c rtain ourses.

Examine anthropological methods and apply anthropological

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR.: M i n i mum of 34 s eme s te r hours, includmg 1 60, 250, 230 r 350, 365. 370, 490, a nd the art hi tory e uen e ( 1 8 0 , L 8 1 , 380); 1 1 6 or ourses in teachiug methods m y not b applied to the major. maximum of 40 hour may be applied toward tbe d eg ree . Candidates are registered i n the

theory to an inve tigarion of a

College of Art 揃 and Sciences and m List satisfy gen ral university

reading under su p e rv is i on of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental cons nl. ( 1-4)

499 Seminar in Anthropology leer d topi . in con t rnporary

an thropology. Required of majors in their j unior or senior year.

requirements,

Prerequisite fo r other stud nt

an

:

departmental approval.

(4)

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i ncluding a core curriculum

(

ore I or Core

11),

t h e opti n requirement. A

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: M ini m um of 60 semester 1 60; _26; e ither 230 r 25 0; the art hjstory seq ue nce 1 80, l S I , 380}; 8 additional hours in 2-dimensional media. additional hours in 3 -di mensional media, an d 4 ho u rs i n art rustory or theory (390, l)r as approved by the de p a rtm nt f'llcuIty) ; req ui rements and electives in area of emphasis' and 490 ( serno !" exhi b i tio n) . 1 1 6 or courses in tea c h i ng me thods may not be i ncluded. Ca n d i dates are registered in tb S chool of th hours, i ncl ud i n g

Arts and m ust satisfy general u n iversity requ irements. i nclu d ing a core curricul um (Core l or Core ll).

B.FA. .in 2-Dimensional Media Areas of e m ph a i s : a minimum of thre�

re q uired in

cou rses

one area .

Drawing/Painting: 160 Drawing

365 Painting I 46 5 Painting II (R)

260 l ntermediate Drawing 360 Life Drawi ng (R) Printm a k i ng: 70 Pri ntmaking I

470 Printmaking II ( R) Fi/m A rts; 2 2 6 Black and Wh i te Photograp h 326 Co lor Photography 426 Electronic Imagi ng [nril'pelldcllt Study (may be applied to tiny area): 4 9 1 Special Proj�cls (R) 4 9 Stu dio Projects

( R)

( R) - may be rep eated for credit f three courses requLred in

one area.

Cera mIcs: 230 Ceramics [ 330 Cerami cs I I 430 Ceram i cs I I I ( R ) Sculpture: 250 Sculpture 1 350 Sculpture II ( R) IlHiepenJellt St1ldy ( may be applied to any area):

1 16 Design In the Contemporary World

An exam i nation of contemporary de ign wi t h a focus on t rends in advertising. fashion, automo t ive. prodilct and interior des i gn. Includes a section on color theory and pe rcep tion and the basic e l e ments f d sign. Req u ires no artistic/design backgro u n d. ( 4 )

49 1 Sp ecial Projects ( R ) 499 Studio Proj cts ( R ) ( R ) - m ay be rcpea ted for cred it

160 Drawing A course deal i ng with the basic techniques and media of

B.FA. In Design

drawing. ( 4 )

Required basic 5eql�ellce: 1 96 Desjgn I: Fundamentals 296 De ign 11: Concepts Elective courses: 398 Drawin g: I l l ustration ( R) 496 De. igo: G ra p r ucs £ 1 ( R ) - may b e rc peated for cred i t

396

Design : Graphics I

492

180 History of Western Art I

A survey tracing the development of Wes tern art and architec­ t ure from prehi t ry to the e nd of the M.iddle Age . (4)

esign: Workshop

1 8 1 History 01 Western Art II A survey f W tern art and arcrutecture from the Renaissance to

the 20th century. (4)

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

1 96 Design I: Fundamentals

See School of Edt/catiol/.

An totroduction to de 'ign through the study of basi t ech n i ques, color theory, and compo itio n. (4)

MINOR IN STUDIO ART: 20 se mester hours, i ncludi ng 380, 4 hOUT in 2·dimensionaJ media, 4 h llr"" in -dimensional med i a. and 8 hours of studio art electives drawn from upper division courses. Cou rses in teach i ng methods (34 1 , 440) may not be ap pli ed t the minor.

22(; Black and White Photography A studi o class in ph o t grap h y as an art � rm. Primary conce n tra ­ tion in basic camera and darkroom techniques. Students p rod u ce a portfol io of pri nts with an emphasis on creative exp ress ion and experimentation. (4)

MINOR I N ART H ISTORY: 24 se mester hours. including 1 80 and 1 8 1 , 1 2 hours in art histor ftheory electives, and 4 hOUTS in stu dio electives. Non-con en tra don cours ( 1 16), p rac t i cal design co urs es ( 1 96. 296. 396. 98, 492, 496 ) . and courses in teaching methods ( 34 1 , 440) ma y not be appl ied to the minor.

230 Ceramics I Ceramic material and techniques includ i ng hand-b ui lt and wheel- th rown methods, clay and glaze formation . I ncludes a

PUBUSBlNG AND PRlNTING ARTS MINOR: The Pub l is h ing and P rint i ng Arts min r is cross- referen ced with the Depart ment of that min r under Publi hing and Printing Am.

of English. See the desc r ipt io n

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STUDIO 160 Drawing 196 Design I: Fundamenta1s 226 Black and White Photography 230 Ceramics I 250 Sculpture I 260 Intermediate Drawing 296 Design 0: Concepts 326 Color Photography 330 Ceramics n 341 Elementary Art .Education 350 Scu.lptnre n 360 Life Drawing 365 Painting I 370 Printmaking J 396 Design: Graphics I 398 Drawing: ruustration 426 Electronic I maging 430 Ceramics m 465 Painting n 470 Printmaking 0 49() Senior Exhibition 491 Special Projects/l ndependent Study 492 Design: Workshop 496 Design: GraphiC$ U 499 Studio Projects/Independent Stndy HISTORY AND THEORY 1 16 Design In the Contemporary World I SO H istory of Westem Art I 1 8 1 History of Westun Art II 3SO Modem Art 390 Studies in Art H istory 440 Seminar in Art Education 497 Research in Art Hi tory-Theory

B.F.A.. in 3-Dlmensio.nal Media Areas of emphasis: a mirurnum

Course Offerings

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survey of ceramic art. (4)


250, 350 Sculpture I, I I Concentration on a particular medium of sculpture including metals, wood, or synthetics; special secti ns emphasizing work from the human form as well as opportunity for mold making and casting. 250 must be taken before 350; 350 may be taken twice. (4,4) 260 Intermediate Drawing

Drawing taken beyond the basics of 1 60 . Expansion of media forms, and solutions to compositional problems. Possibility of pursuing special individual interests, with permission. Prerequi­ site: 1 60 or consent of instructor. (4) 296 Design I I : Concepts An investigation of the process of creative problem solving in a methodical nd organized manner. Includes projects in a variety of design areas. Prerequisite: 1 96 or consent of instructor. (4) 326 Color Photography Exploration of the issues of both painters and photographers. Students learn to make color prints and process color negatives. Includes a historical survey of color photography as well as perspectives of contemporary artists. (4) 330, 430 Ceramics n, III Techniques in ceramic construction and experiments in glaze formation. 330 must be taken before 430; 430 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 230. (4,4) 331 The Art of the Book I See English 3 1 3. (4) 34 1 Elementary Art Education A study of creative growth and development; art as studio projects; history and therapy in the classroom. ( 2 ) 350 Sculpture n (See 250) 360 Life Drawing An exploration of human form in drawing media. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 160 or consent of instructor. (2)

365, 465

Painting I, IT

Media and techniques of painting in oil or acrylics. 365 must be taken before 465; 465 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 1 60. (4,4) 370, 470 Printmaking I, II Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and photo processes involving lithographics, intaglio and screen printing. 370 must be taken before 470; 470 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 160 or consent of instructor. (4,4) 380 Modem Art The development of art from 1 900 to the present, with a brief look at European and American antecedents as they apply to contemporary directions. (4) 390 Studies in Art History A selected area of inquiry, such as a history of American art, Asian art, the work of Picasso, or similar topics. May be repeated for credit. (4)

the ethical issues of this new technology. Emphasis on creative exploration and problem solving within the Macintosh environ­ ment. Prerequisites: 226 and 326 or consent of instructor. May be taken twice. (4) 430 Ceramics III (See 330) 440 Seminar in Art Education A study of instruction in the secondary school including appropriate media and curriculum development. a/y ( 2 )

465

Painting IT

(See 365) 470 Printmaking U (See 370) 490 Senior Exhibition

Students work closely with their advisers in all phases of the preparation of the exhibition. Must be taken in the student's final semester. Prerequisites: declared major in art ( B.F.A. or B.A.), senior status, reasonable expectation of completion of all department and un iversity requirements for graduation. Meets the senior seminar/project requirement. ( 2 ) 491 Special Projects/Independent Study Exploration of the possibilities of selected studio areas, including experimental techniques. Emphasis on development of indi­ vidual styles, media approaches, and problem solutions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: junior status, minimum of two courses at 200 level or above in affected medium with minimum 2.5 CPA, consent of instructor and departmellt chair. (2 or 4) 492 Design: Workshop A tutorial course whi h may deal with any of several aspects of the design field with particular emphasis on practical experience and building a portfolio. May be taken twice. ( 2 ) 49 6 Design: Graphics II

(See 396) 497 Research in Art mstory-Theory A tutorial course for major students with research into a particular aspect of art history or theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: senior status, consent of instructor, and program approval by department faculty. ( 1-4) 499 StudJo Projects/Independent Study

A tutorial program for students of exceptional talent. In-depth individual investigation of a particular medium or set of techni­ cal problems. Only one project per semester may be undertaken. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: declared major in art, senior status, consent of instructor, written proposal, program app roval by department faculty. Students meeting the above requirements but with less than a 3.0 GPA in the major may be required to present additional evidence of eligibility. ( 1- 4 )

396, 496 Design: Graphics I , I I Design and execution of printed materials; emphasis on technical procedures and problems in mass communication. 496 explores advanced techniques with multiple color, typography, and other complex problems. 396 must be taken before 496. Prerequisite: 160 and 296 or consent of instructor. (4,4) 398 Drawing: illustration Advanced projects in drawing/illustration. Exposure to new con­ e pts and techniques adaptable to fine art and commercial appli­ cations. Prerequisites: 1 60 and 196. l\1ay be repeated once. (4) 426 mectroruc Imaging An introduction to computer-assisted photography in which stu­ dents learn applications, develop aesthetic strategies, and engage

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School of the Arts The

Biology

chool of the Arts is a community of arti sts and schol­

ars - students, faculty, and staff - dedicated to the ful­ fillment of the human spirit through creative expression and careful s chol arship. The School of the Arts offers pro­ fessional education to artists and commun icators within the framework of a liberal arts education. The School en­ courages all of its members to pursue their artistic

and

scholarly work i n an environment that challenges compla­ u.

o o o x v III

cency, n u rtures personal growth, and maintains a strong culture of collegial integri ty. Members of the School of the Arts strive to create art and scholarship that acknowledges the past, defines the

present, and anticipates the future. Art, communication, music, and theatre are mediums o f understanding and change which reward those who participate i n them, whether a s artist, scholar, learner, or audience. Perfor­ mances by students, faculty, and guests of the School en­ hance the cultural prosperity shared by Pacific Lutheran

University and its surrounding environs. The School pro­ motes venues for collaboration between artists and schol­

ars, among artistic and intellectual media, and between the u n ive,rsity and the community. FACULTY: Spicer, Dean; faculty members of th Art, Commu nication and Theatre, and Music.

Departments of

BACHEWR OF ARTS or BACHEWR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: needs and special interests o f students. For either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree the student must take the

theatre; the B.M. ( Bachelor of Music), the B. M.A. ( Bachelor of

Arts); the

principles of biology sequence

B.M.E. ( Bachelor of Music Education ) . Stu­

dents may also earn the B.A. ( B achelor of Arts ) , but this degree is awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences. Candidates

another institution) is required before upper division biology completed with a grade of C- or h igher. Cour es not designed fo r biology majors ( I I I , 1 1 3, 1 1 6, 2 0 1 , 205, 206) ordinarily cannot

the specific requirements of the Dep artments of Art, Com muni­ cation and Theatre, or Music.

be used to satisfy major requirement s. Independent study ( 49 1 )

For details about the B.A.E. ( Bachelor of Arts in Education) i n art, communication and theatre, or music, see the

( 1 6 1 , 162, 323). Completion of

this sequence (or an equivalent general biology sequence at courses can be taken. Each of these courses must have been

for all degrees must meet general university requirements and

and cooperative education may be used for no more than

School of

4 of

the upper division biology hours required for the B.S. degree,

Education.

and for no more than

For course offerings. degree requ irements, and programs in the School of the Art , see

FACULTY: Car/son, Chair; Alexander, Crayton, Ellard-Ivey, Garrigan, Gee, Hansen, Kenn edy, Lerum, Main, D.T. Martin, Matthias, McGinnis, Teska. The major in biology is designed to be flexible in meeting the

DEGREES OFFERED by the School o f the Arts include the B.F.A. ( Bachelor of Fine Arts) in art and communication and Musical

To learn biology is more than to learn facts: i t i s to learn how to a 'k and answer questions, how to develop strategies which might be employ d to ob tai n answers, and how to recognize and evaluat the answers which emerge. The department is therefor dedicated to encouraging students to learn science in the only way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to independently question it, probe it, try it out. exper iment with it, experience it. The diversity of courses in the curriculum provides broad coverage of contemporary biology and a llows flexibJe planning. Each b i ology major completes a three­ course sequence i n the principles o f biology. Plann ing with a faculty adviser, the student chooses upper division biology courses to meet individual needs and career objectives. Faculty members are also comm itted to belping students investigate career opportunities and pursue careers which most clearly match their intere ts and abilities. Stude nts are invited t use departmental facilities for independent study and are encouraged to partic ipate in ongoing faculty research.

2 of the upper division biology hours

required for the B.A. degree. Students who plan to apply biology

Art, Communication and Theatre,

credits earned a t other institutions toward a PLU degree with a

and Music.

14 hours in biology, 324 or higher and including 499, must be earned in

biology major should be aware that at least n umbered

Course Offering

residence at PLU. Each student must consult with

biology

tional and career goals. Basic requirements under each plan for

Methods and proced ures for integrating the arts ( m usic, visual, drama, dance)

a

adviser to discuss selection of electives appropriate for educa­

341 Integrating Arts in the Classroom

in the classroom and across the curriculum. Of­

the major are listed below.

fered for students preparing for elementary classroom t aching.

Bachelor of Arts: 34 semester hours in biology, including 1 6 1 , 162, 323, and 499, plus 2 0 additional upper division biology hours. Required supporting course, : Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 2 5 ) and

Meets state certification requirements in both music and art. II

(2)

1 40. Recommended supporting courses: Physics 125 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 2 6 (with laboratory 1 36 ) .

Mathematics

Bachelor of Science: 4 2 semester hours i n biology, including 1 6 1 , 162, 323, and 499, plus 28 additional upper division biology

1 2 0 {or 1 25), 232 234), and one additional upper division chemistry course with labora tory; Mathematics 1 5 1 or Math­ ematics 24 1 ; Physics 1 2 5 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 136), or Physics 1 53 (with laboratory 1 63) and Physics 1 54 (with laboratory 164).

hours. Required supporting courses: Chemistry (with laboratory

BACHELOR O F ARTS I N EDUCATION: Students interested in this degree develop their biology program through the Biology Department in conj unction with the School of Education. Such students should have a biology adviser. See the School of

36

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l:ducation section of the catalog for recommended biology cour e and olb r pertinent information. t least 20 seme ter hours selected from any biology courses. A ade of C- or high r must be earned in each course, and total GPA must be at Least 2.00. Course prerequisites must be met un .less written permission is granted in advance by the instructor. ppli bility of non-PLU biology courses will be determined by the department chair. At least 8 of the 20 credit hours in biology must be earned in residence at PLU; fo r stud nt applying only 8 PiO bi I gy hours toward th minor, those hOllrs cannot include independent study ( 49 1 ) or coopera­ tive education hours. MINOR!

Course Offe rings J 1 1 Biology aDd the Modem World An

intr duction to bioi gy designed primarily for non- biology majors. Fundamental concepts chosen from all areas of modern biology. Lecture, laboratory, and discussion. I (4) 1 13 The Human Organism

A study of biological principles using the biology of humans as the model and focal point for discussion. Topics include cellularity, h redity, structure and function, reproduction and development, evol ution, global environmental concerns, and bioethics. ttenti n to the connections between biology and medicine, law, politi , technology, hunger, and culture. L cture and la oratory. or non-majors, satisfies the Core I natural scien es requiremen t . J (4) 1 16 Introductory Ecology

324 Natural Wstory oIVertebrates

Classit1cation, natural history, and economic importance of vertebrates with the exception of birds. Field trips and labora­ tory. Prerequisite: 323. I (4) 326 Animal Behavior

Descripti n, classification, caLIse, function, and development of the behavior o f animals emphasizing an ethological approach and focusing on comparisons among species. Includes physi­ ological, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Prerequisite: 323 or consent of instructor. II (4)

o

327 Ornithology

The study of birds inclusive of their anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and distribution. Special emphasis on those attributes of birds that are unique among the vertebrates. Labo­ ratory emphasis on field identification, taxonomy, and anatomy/ t pology. Prerequisite: 323 or consent of instructor. II (4) 328 Microbiology

The structure, physiology, genetics, and metaboli m of microor­ ganisms with emphasis on their diversity and ecology. The laboratory emphasizes design, implementation, and evaluation of both descriptive and quantitative experiments as well as isolation of organisms from natural sources. Prerequisite: 323; one semester organic chemistry recommended. II (4) 332 Genetics

Basic concepts considering the molecular basis of gene expres­ sion, recombination, genetic variability, as well as cytogenetics, and population genetics. Includes tutorials and demonstration sessions. Prerequisite: 323. II (4)

A study of the interrelationsbips between organisms and their

340 Plant Diversity and Distribntioo

exami ni ng concepts i n ecology that lead to understanding the nature and structure of ecosystems and how humans impact ecosy tem . Includes bborato ry. Satisfies the Core I nat ural science/mathematics/computer science require­ ment. r (4)

A systematic introducti n t plant diversity. Interaction between plants, theories of vegetational distribution. Emphasis on higher plant taxonomy. Includes laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: 323. II (4)

environme n t

161 Principles of Biology 1: Ceu Biology

Cellular and molecular levels of biological organization; cell ultrastructul' and physiology, Mendelian and molecular genetics. en rgy transduction. Includes lab ratory. Co-registration in Chemistry ( 1 04, 1 20, or 1 25) recommended. [ (4)

162 Principles of Biology l l ; Organismal Biology

An introduction to animal and plant tissues, anatomy, and physiology, with spe ial empha is on flowering plants and vertebrates as model systems, plus an introduction to animal and plant dev elo pment. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 1 6 1 . II (4) 201 Introductory Microbiology

The tructure, metabolism, growth, and genetics of microorgan­ ism , esp cially bacteria and viruses, with emphasis on their roles in human d' ease. Laboratory focuse on cultivation, identifica­ tion, and comrol of growth of bacteria. Prerequisite: CHEM 105. I (4) 205, 206 HUIIlIlU Anatomy and PhysIology

First seme ter: m tter, ells and tissues; nervous, endocrine. skeletal , and muscular systems. Laboratory includes cat dissec­ tion and experiments in muscle physiology and reflexes. Second semester: cir .ulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory. and reproductive systems; metaboLism, temperature regulation, and stress. Laboratory includes cat dissection, physiology experi­ ments, and study of developing organisms. 205 ( I ) prerequisite to 206 ( I I ) . (4,4 ) 323 PrincJples of Biology In: Ec410gy, Evolution a.nd Diversity

Evolution, ecology, behavior, and a systematic survey of life on earth. Tn ludes lab ratory. Prerequisite: 162 o r consent of

348 Advanced Cell Biology

Deals with how ceLls are functionally organized, enzyme kinetics and regulatory mechanisms, biochemistry of macromolecules, energy metabolism, membrane structure and function, ultra­ structure, cancer cells as model systems. Laboratory includes techniques encountered in cellular research: animal/plant cell culture, ceLl fractionation, use of radiot racers, biochemical assays, membrane phenomena, spectrophotometry, respirometry. Prerequisite: 323 and one semester of organic chemistry or consent of instructor. II (4) 35 1 Natural History of the Pacific Northwest

Introduction to the natural history of the Paci fic Northwest: geology, climatology, oceanography, ecol ogy, common life forms, and human impact. Includes local one-day field trips and three­ day trips to the Olympic Peninsula and the Columbia Gorge and Basins. Prer quisite: 323 or consent of instructor. S (4) 361 Comparative Anatomy

Evolutionary history of the vertebrate body i ntroduction to embryology, and extensive consideration of the structural and functional anatomy of vertebrates. Includes laboratory dissec­ tions following a system approach. Mammals are featu red plus some observation of and comp arison with human cadavers. Prerequisite: 323. II (4) 364 Plant Phys iology

Physiology of plant growth and development. Emphasis on seed­ plants. but includes other plant groups as model systems. Topics include: photosynthesis. secondary plant metabolism including medi inal compounds, hormones, morphogenesis. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 323. Organic chemistry recommended. II (2)

department cha ir. I (4)

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441 Mammalian Physiology

365 Plant Anatomy Tissue orga n ization

nd cellula r details of stem s ,

rO O lS,

An i nvestigation of t h e p r i n ciples of physiological regulation.

and

leaves o f seed pla n ts. willl emphasi o n devel o p men t and function. Includes laboratory. P rerequ i site : 323 ( 2 )

Pa r t I: fu ndamental cellular, neural, and hormo nal mechan i. ms of homeostatic control; Part I I : interactionB i.n the cardiovascu­ lar, pulmonary, renal , and neuromuscular organ systems.

<.II

403 Developmental Biology The embryonjc a n d l arval development of m 1d ticel l ula r

W

o r ga ni sm

z

popular co ntemporary modeJ systems, a.nd the emphasis is

<.II

( p rinurlly an i mals) . Exa mples are

cellular and

cho

L ab o ra to ry allows direct observation of physiological re g ul a t ion in living a n i m a ls . Pre re q u i si t es : 323 and CHE M 1 20. Anatomy

en from

and biochemistry re com m e nd ed . I

on

448 Immunology

molecular aspec ts ,� f development. The l ab o ra to r y

Consideration of the biology and chemistry of i m mu n e

i n cludes desc ri pt ive and quant i totive exp e r i m e nts, as well as

st udent-planned pr

(4)

jects. Prerequ isi te: 323. I (4)

response. i n cl u d i n g theoretical concep ts, exp e r im e n t a l s t rategies and i m m unochemical applica tions. Prerequisites: Any two o f the

407 Molecular Biology

An i n t ro d u c t io n to molecular biology, em phasizing the cen t ral role f D A: Structu re of DNA :md RNA, structure and expre ss i o n of genes , genom!' organ ization and rea rrangement , meth o d ology ,uld appl ica tions of reco m b inan t D A teclmol o g y. Laboratory fealures basic recombinant DNA l!'chniques. l' rereq u i s i t e : 323 . 11 (4)

foll ow i n g courses in B iology: 328, 332, 348 , 403, 407, 4 1 1 , 44 1 .

1 (4 ) 475 Evolution

Evolutio n as a p ro ce ss: so u rces of v a r iati on ; forces overco m i ng ge n e t i c inertia in population ; spec iation. Evo l u t io n of genetic

systems a n d o f life in rdation to ecological t h e o r y and earth h istory. Lecture and discussion. Term paper a n d m i n i- se m i n ar re q u i red. P re re quiSi t e: 323 . I (4) 49 1 ludependent Study lnvestiga t ions or research in a reas of spec ial i n terest not covered by re g u lar courses. Open to qualified j u n io r and se n io r majors. Prerequis ite: written p ro po siu fo r

the p roject app roved by a I I I ( 1-4)

fa culty sponsor and the d e p a r t m e n t chair. 499 Senior Seminar The goal of t h i s course is to ass ist

students in

p rese nt a tio n o f a paper concerning

a

the writing and

topic w i t h i n biology which

wo u l d integrate vari ou s elements i n the major p rogram. A p roposal fo r the topic m Ltst be p re s en te d to the d epa r tm en t early in the spring term of the j unior year. The s e m i nar may be linked to, but not repl aced by, laboratory independent study or intern­ s h ip experience. Satis fies the senior semi n a r re q wTem e n t . T 1I(2)

School of Business The purpose of the PLU Schoo l of Business is to be a b r i dge connecting students with the future by integrating competency-based business education, en gagi n g a diverse, globalized society, using tech nologi es that improve learning, and exempli fying lives of service.

4 1 1 Histology

M i c rosco p i c study of normal cells. tissues, organs, and organ systems of verteb rates. The emphasi� is mam malian . This study is both structurally a nd physiologi cally oriented. In ludes l abora t o r y. Pre req u is i te: 323. I (4 ) 424 Ecology

Objectives of the Undergraduate B us in ess Program

Organisms in relati n to their environ men t , i nclucling

organ ismal adaptations, popu lat ion growth a nd interactions, and ecosystem structu.re and function . P rereqwsite : 3 23 . r

42 5 Biological Oceanography The ocean as environ men t for plant a nd ani TIl al l ife;

(4)

knowledge o f how these organization" function and equipp ing t he m with the necessary competencies to

an introduc­

include 1 ) leader­ 2) critical/creative th inking, 3) effective co m m u n i ­ cation , 4) Learn effectiveness, and 5) taking ini tiative and m an a gi n g change. To help students see the i ntercon nections among the

work effectively. These competencies

tion to t be structure, dynam ics, and history of marine ecosys­

sh ip,

tems . Lab, field trips, and term project in addition to lecture. Prerequisite: 323. II ( 4 )

426 Ecological Methoc15 An exam ina tio n of m eth o do l ogy used for discerr ung struct u re and function of natu ral ecosystem s: description of the p hysical

many aspects of their world by integrating the liberal arts with pr fessional bus iness education

environment, es ti mat ion of population size, quantifying com­

munity structure, and m easurement of product ivity. f n cl u des an in troduction to general statistical Ie hniques. Wr i t ing of sci e n t i fi c p ape r s and a focus on accessing the scientific Htera ture . Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Prerequisite:

for positions in commercial and organizations by providing them the basic

To prepare students n o t - for- profit

323 or consen t

To identify

and c hall en g e students to a dopt h igh

standards for ethical p r a c t i c e and professional conduct •

To prepare students for lives of ervice to the

To prepare students to use co n tem p o r a r y technologie$

commWlity

of i n s t r uc to r. II ( 4 )

and to embrace the changes caused by tech nol ogica l innova t ion •

38

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To inculcate a global p erspective in students


FACULTY: Bell, Deatl; Ahna, Al bers, Bancroft, B rnowe, Berniker, Finnie, Gibson, Heg tad, Lee, MacDon ald, C. Miller, Moreland , Myers, Ramaglia, Sepic, Simpson, Thrasher, Van Wyhe, Yager.

ADMISSION: The profess io nal Bachelor of Business Ad minls­ tration degree p rog r a m is composed of an upper division bu iness urriculum with

a

strong base in liberal arts.

To be admitted to the chool of Busi ness, a student must: I. Be officially ad mitted to the universi ty, and 2. Rave cam pi ted at least 32 semester credit hou rs, and 3. Have 'uccessfully com leled wi th a minimum grade of C- (or be currently enroUed in) MATH 1 28, C CE 1 20, ECO 151-

1 52, STAT 23 1 and B U A 20 1 , o r their equivalents i n another colleg or univer ity, and 4. Have a minimum cumulative grade point av erage of 2.50, and 5. Declare a major or minor in business thro ugh tbe School of Business. Access to upper division busi ness courses is lim ited to students who have b en admitted to the School of Busi ness with a

4

4 4 4 2 2 4

I:I1II c:: II> z

4

tration program. The concentration, which is not d on the

st udies by permission of the School of Business.

AFFILIATIONS: The Sch oj of Business of Pacific Lutheran niversity is a m mber of the AAeSB - The lntcrnational Association for Mana ge ment Education. The B.B,A., M. B.A ., and accounting programs ar n tion.a1 ly accredited by the Accred ita· have a

student chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, the national business hon rary society recogniz d by tbe AACSB. Pacific Lutheran University is accredited regionally by the Northwest Association of School and Col leges.

DEGREE REQtJIREMENTS: T he Bach elor of B iness Ad minis­ tration degree p rogram consists of a minimum of 1 28 semester hoUl's completed with an ove r- all grade p i n t average of 2.50 or above as well as a 2.50 grade point average separately in b iness courses. C- is the m in imal acceptable grade fo r business cou rses. At least one-half of the m in i mum total degree requirements

stud nt's transcript, must be completed with at least a 3 .00 grade point average. C- is the minimal acceptable g rade � r concen tra­ tion courses. minimum of 8 semester hours of the total re­ quired for a concentration must be laken in residence at PLU. School of Business intemships, ( B USA 492, Applications of Business Knowledge in Field Setling) will be graded as pass/fail only. A limit of one internship in any concentration will be ac­ cepted, not to exceed 4 credit hours. An end prod uc t may be requir d, as determined by the sponsoring instru tor.

24 sem. hrs. 4 4 4

Financial Resources Management BUSA 335 inancial I nvestments BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace B SA 437 Financial Analysis & S trategy

One of the following:

4

ECON 3 5 1 In termediate Macroeconomics Analysis ( 4 ) ECON 361 Money & Banking (4) Eight semester hours from tile foLlowing:

are taken in fields outside the School of Busi ness. At least 40 semester hours are taken in reqnired an elective business rubj cts. A minimum of 20 semester hours in busi ness must be

8

BUSA 3 2 1 Intermediate Accou nting I ( 2 )

taken in res idence at PLU. Business degree and concentration requirements are established at the time of major declaration. Students w i th a declared major in bu, ine who have not attended the university for a period of three years or more will be held to the business degree requ irements in effect at the time of re-entry to the u.niversity.

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

Required foundation courses; MATH 128 Li near Models

nd Cal cul us, an I ntrodu cr i o n 4 or (MATH 1 5 1 ) 4 CSC! 220 Compu!erilcd lnformation Systems (Tll/armarioll Management students may subs/irue eSC! !44 for 220) 4/4 EeON 1 5 1 - 15 2 Macro/M icro Ewnomies

Minimum semester hours in foUll dation courses:

4

CONCENTRATIONS: A student may elect to complete one or more concentrations within the Bachelor of Business Adminis­

Student with majors outside of the School of Business may gain ccess to specific busi nc courses that support their major

STAT 2 3 1 Int roductory Statistics P H I L 325 Business Ethies COMA 336 ffective Business Presen tations

4

4

40

Minimum semester hours in business courses:

cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above, and who have met the required p re requisites.

tion Council of the AACSB. The School is priv ileged t

Required bllsi"ess COllrses: B U SA 201 alue Creatjon in the Global Enviro nment BUS A 202 Financial Accounting BUSA 203 Managerial Accoun ting BUSA 30 1 Managin Careers and Human Resources BUSA 302 Managerial Finance BUSA 305 Creating and Lead.ing Effec tive rganizations BUSA 308 Princip les of Mnrketing BUSA 309 M naging Value Creating Operations BUSA 3 1 0 Information Systems BUSA 400 Busines Law or BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace or BUSA 406 Law of the Workp lace: Empl yces, Employers, Their Rights a n d Responsibilities or BUSA 407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Co rn panie , and Pr ducts or B USA 408 International Business Law BUSA 490 Capstone Sem inar: Strategi M o agem e n t

4 4 4 28

BUSA 3 2 2 Intermediate ccounting I I ( 2 ) BUSA 3 2 3 C o t Accou n t ing & Control Systems ( 4 ) BUSA 430 Entrepreneurial Finance ( 4 ) BUSA 438 Financial Re earch & Analysis (4) BUSA 492 Internship ( 4 hours max.imum) ECON 344 Economet rics (4)

28 sem. hrs. Professional Accounting 4 BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace 4 BUSA 320 Financial Information Systems 2 BUSA 32 1 tnt rmediate Accounting I BUSA 322 Intermediate Accounting I I 2 2 BUSA 422 Consolidations and Equity Issues BUSA 423 Acco u n ting for Not- for- Profi t and Governmen tal Entities 2 BUSA 323 Cost Accounting and Control Systems 4 BUSA 327 Tax Accounting I 2 BUSA 427 ax Accounting I I 2 4 BUSA 424 Auditing Human Resource Management 24 sem. hrs. BUSA 406 Law of the Workpla c e : Employees, Employers, 4 Their Righ . and Responsibili ies BU A 342 Managing Human Re�ources 4 ECON 3 2 1 Labor c numics 4

Three of the followiNg (af least two from B SA):

12

BUSA 343 Managing Reward Syst m ( 4 ) BUSA 4 4 2 Leadersh ip and Organizational Development (4)

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BU 'A 445 Q u al i t y I m p r ove me n t S t ra tegi es ( 4 ) SA 4 4 9 Cu rren t Issues in Human Res ou r ce Management (4) B SA 492 I n tl!ms h i p (4) COMA 435 rganiz< ti o n al Communication (4) COMA 4 7 Advanced I n terp ers o na l Communication (4) PSYC 450 Psychological Testing (4) PSYC 461 Psycholog of Work (4) B

VI VI &OJ

Z

International Business BUSA 408 I n t er n at i nal Bus iness Law ECO 3 3 1 Interna tional Econom ics

20-34 sem. hrs.

4 4

BUSA 352 Global Ma nage me n t BVSA 355 Managing

4 4 4

Global O p e r a t i on s

Olle of the following: An approved

are a

course from POLS ANTH, or HIST (4)

Q[ BU ' A 4 6 0 In ternational M arke ti n g (4)

Must also com plete either Option I of the Co lleg e of Arts and Sciences fo reign language requirement Q[ one erne tel" 0- 1 6 of study ab ro ad Marketing Resource Management BUS A 407 Law of the Marketplace: Co mp a n ies, and Pr(lducts

24 sem. hrs.

onsumers, 4 4

B SA 467 M a rke t i n g Research BUSA 468 M a r ke tin g M a n agem ent

4 12

Three of the jc)llowillg (at least two from BUSA): B A 363 onsumer Beh av i o r & Promotional Stra te gy ( 4 ) B S A 365 Sal es & Sale ' Ma n age m en t (4) B SA 460 lnt m a t ional Mar ke t i ng (4) B A 492 Internship (4) COMA 271 Media Literacy ( 4 ) EeON 33 1 I n t e r n a ti on a l Economics (4) ECON 3 4 4 Econometrics ( 4 ) PSYC 4 6 2 Consumer Psychology ( 4 )

1'wo of the follawing (one must be B U. A): BUSA 3 2 3 Cost (co unting (4) BUSA 438 Fi n a n c i al Research and A na lys is (4) B SA 3 5 S al es and Sales Management (4) B A 442 Leade rs hi p and Organizational Devel opm e nt (4) BUSA 467 Marketing Research (4) ECON 37 1 t n d u s t r ia l Organization a n d Public Po l i cy (4) ECON 361 Money a n d Banking (4)

8

BUSA 376 Ethical Issues in I n fo r ma t io n Ma nagemen t BUSA 478 information M a n a ge m ent Seminar Twelve elective hotlrs from the following: B USA 377 Data Base Applications in Bus iness (4) B U S 378 lec tron i c Commerce (4) B S 492 Internship (2-4) Any Up p er L el C{)m p uter Science Course

2

4 12

ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: The a cco u n ti n g certificate program is ;lVadable fo r studen s who hold a baccalau­ re ate degree ( a n y field) a J1d wish to co m p l e te the educational require me nts to s i t for the C. P.A . examination. nract the School of B us i n ess for further information. I

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2 0 1 Value Creation in the GlobaJ Environment nderstanding business e co no m ic va lu e , c re a ti n g activities and the d e m an ds o f s take h o l de rs in competitive markets and the gl ob a l environment. Designed for s t u de n ts who a re ta k in g a first

look at the role of b u si ne ss in socie ty a n d who have not had extensive st u d y in e co no m i cs , business law, o r political science. (4) 202 Financial Accounting Ac cou n ti ng for financial p e r form a n ce for t h e use of external decision-makers c o n si de ri n g investment in a business o rg aniz a ­ tion. Origins and uses of financial information; acco u n ti n g concepts and principles; l ogi c, content, and format of financial sta te m e n t ; acco u n t i ng issues in the U.S. and o t he r nat ions. Prerequisites: sophomore s t a n d i n g ; MATH 1 28. (4) 203 Managerial Accounting I n t roduction to the use of accounting

d a t a for decision making, rial p l a nn i ng, and op e r a t i ona l control. To p i c s include cost-volume-pro fit relationshi ps, cost acco u nting methods, b ud geti ng , a nd p e r forman e evaluations. Pam iliarity with Micorsofl Excel or o the r sp readshl!et software is r e qu i r ed . Pr requisites: B U SA 202; CS E 1 20 (4)

3 0 1 Managing Careers and Human Resources An explora tion of individual a n d o rganizational p r a c tices and responsibilitie related to organizational entry, com pete n c y d eve lopment, and p e rfo r m an ce i m p r ove m en t as careers u n fold.

(4)

302 Managerial Finance P rinciples and p r o cedu res p er ta i n i ng to b u si n es investment ac tivi ty, financial decision- making, financial st a te m e n t analysis, val ua t io n, financial planning, ca p i t al asset a c qu i si t io n , cost of capital. fi n an ci ng s t r at e gies . P rer eq u i s ite s : B SA 202; CSCE 220; ECON l S I , 1 52: MATH 1 28; STAT 23 1 . (4)

changing internal and e:< ternal demands and t!xpectations, w i t h a on competencies and p ractices which en ha n c e

strong emphasis

teamwork. (4) 308 Prinrlples of Marketing A study of ma rke t i n g concepts, principles, and co n te m po ra ry

issues in small a n d l a r ge businesse , as well as non-profit o rga n i ­ zations. Pa r t i c u l a r attention to service-related concept" prin­ c i ples , and issues found t o p re. do m i n ate in these organizations. (4) 309 Managing Value Creating Operations study of the or g a n iza t i o n and m a n age me n t of econo m i c

1 2 s e mes te r hours must be upper division, and at least 8 semester ho u rs must be c ompl eted in res iden ce.

C

105 PersonaJ Financial Planning and Consumer Law

Basic financial and legal d cision ma k i n g. I ncludes an i nt rod u c­ tion to elementary co n ce pt s ill finance, economics, law, and consumer psychology. ( 4 )

The

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMIN1STRATION: A minimum of 20 semester hours in bu s i n ss courses, including B USA 2 0 1 - Value reation in the Global Environment. All co u r ses must be com­ p l eted .... <jth a grade of , - or higher. A c u m u la tive grade p o i n t average of 2.50 for all cou rses i n the min r i s req ui red. At least

A

Course Offerings

305 C.reating and Leading Effective Organizations A s tu d y of how to organize and m a nage in to d ay's context o f

Information Management 22 sem. hrs. B USA 375 Introduction to I. n fo rm ati on M a n a ge me n t 4

P

S e Graduate Studies.

manag

Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management 24 scm. hrs. 4 BUSA 405 Law of the financial Marketplace BUSA 358 En trepreneurship 4 4 BU SA 430 Entrepr neurial Finance BU S A 492 I nt er n s h i p 4

40

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

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value p rod uc i ng processes in service and manufacturing busi­ nesses. Prerequisites: MATH 1 28 ; EC N l S I , 1 52 . (2) 3 1 0 Information Systems I n troduction to information technology and i n fbrrnation sys­ tems fro m a management perspective. E m phas i s on st r a t e g i c use of technology and sy tern. , and im pacts on corporate strategy, competition, o rg a n iza t i o n a l structure, and the firm's va l ue cre­ ation process. Prerequisite: CSC E 1 20 . ( 2 ) 320 FiDanciaJ Info rmatioD Systems S tu dy of the flow of informa -'on through an enterprise, the sources and na t u re of documents. and the controls necessary to


insure the a curacy and reliability CSCE 1 20, BUSA 302. ( 4 )

0

informat ion.

Prerequis i tes:

3 2 1 Intermediate Accounting I

ncentrated study of the co n cep tual franlework of accounting,

ment and the information economy i n c l u din g such areas as business processes, the h ierarchy of systems from t ransaction process ing through decision support systems, and the impacts of n e two r ks and the I nt ernet . ( 4 )

valu tion th ories, asset and in com e measurement, and financial

376 Ethical Issues i n Information Management

statement d i s c l o sures in t h e

Focus on the ethical p r i nciples and po we r relationships that

.S. and abroad. Prerequ isites:

S E l 20j BUSA 202. ( 2 )

til

relate i n formation management and decision making to society.

322 Intermediate Accounting II

Additional s t udy of valuation t he or y. Advanced issues i n asset and income measu rem nt and fi nancial sta t e m e n t disclosure. i ncludes evaluat ion of U.S. positions relative to those o f o ther nations and in te rn a t i o nal agen ies. Prerequi 'itc: B SA 32 1 . ( 2 ) 323 Cost Accounting and Control Systems

A critical examulation of systems for cost account ing and mana­ gerial ontrol. E mph as i s o n deve lo p ment

f skills to c ri t iqu e cost

an d control ystem and to understand the dynamic relationship

Discussion of t h e major tensions among business, economic, and social obje c ti ves as re l a t e d to the use and m i s u se o f info rm a t i o n 377 Data Base Applications i n Business

'"

The concepts, strategy, and features of data base des ign and ma na ge m e n t fo r a p p licat i o ns in economic organizations. Focus on how data base a p p l icat i o ns s u pport decision processes. ( 4 ) 378 Blectronic Commerce

327 Tu Accounting I

400 Business law

Study of i n c o m e tax concepts, re gula t i o ns and tax p l a nnin g p r i n c i ples. Emphasi on individual income ta x a t io n . ( 2 )

ploration of the le g al issues inherent in t h e busin s environ­ ignated sections of this course w il l in Iud emphases which are ali g n e d with the Sc h oo l of Business concentrations. These incl ude: ,lCco unt ing/finance, marketing, human resource

m e nt . D

management, i n formation management, and international business. ( 4 ) 405 Law o f the Finandal Marketplace

BUSA 302. ( 4 )

342 Managing Human Resources Detailed coveralTe of personneilhuIJ1an resource p rocedu res in the . . and other ·ountries. Prerequisite: BUSA 30 I . ( 4 ) 343 Managing Reward Systems Detailed ex:amination of reward system development and prac­

tices. Prerequisi tes:

z '"

betwee n sys tems, operations, strategy, and p e r fo rma nce evalua­ tion. P re req u i s i tes: CSCE 1 20; BUSA 202. (4)

I n -depth exploration of fu ndamental pr i n c ip l es go ve r n i n g the v a l uat i o n o f particular se c ur i t i es , and knowledgeable construc­ tion, m an ageme n t, and eval u at ion of port.folios. Prerequ is ite:

'"

m

technology. ( 2 )

The managerial, organizational, and technical d1aUenges o f electronic tra nsact i o n a n d com munication systems among customers, distributors, and su p p l i ers . ( 4 )

335 FinandaJ Investments

c:

SCE l 2 0 , E OJ

I S l I 1 5 2, BUSA 30 1 . ( 4 )

352 GlobaJ Management

I n te g rat e d study of decisions and challenges faced by ma nage r s in large and mali compani a they do b us i n e s s globally. Com­ petencies involved i n c omm unica t i n g and ne go tiat i n g across cultures. Pr re qu i s i te : ECON 3 3 1 . ( 4 ) 355 Managing GlobaJ Operations Study of practical issues in o p e ra t i n g globally u s i n g case studies.

Prerequ is it e : BU A 352. ( 4 )

406 Law of the Workplace: Employees, Employers. Their

Rights and RespGnsibillties Explora t i o n o f legal issue which a rise in the workplace. Analysis of the i m p a ct of employment- related statutes and cases on busi­ ness. (4)

-«17 Law of the Marltetplace: Consumers, Companies,

and Products Legal is ues fo und in mark et i n g practices and the regulatory frame work smrounding them. ( 4 ) 408 International Business Law

An overview o f the law i n vol ved in co nducting

a

world b usin e ss .

(4)

358 Bntrepnnenrship I n tensive study of iss ues and challenges associated with start-up,

growth, and maturation of a ne w enterprise. mphasizes reduc­ t i o n o f risk thro u g h p la nni ng for and asse s s i n g possible fu ture co n diti o n s . ( 4 ) 363 Consumer Behavior and PromotionaJ Strategy St udy of how buyers gain awa reness, estab l is h p urch asing crite­ ria, screen info rma t i o n , and make de cisi o n s. Promotion to p i c s includ d fi n i ng target audicnc , message design, media selec­ tion, b udget i ng , evaluating the p ro m o t io n mix, and a field

422 Consolid.ations and Equity Issues Con entrated study of eq uity measur ment i ncluding t h e ac­ counting aspects of partnerships, corporations, and consolida­

tions. Also includes cco u n t i n g for multinational co r p o rat io ns. Prerequisites: BUSA 3 20, 3 2 1 , 3 2 2 . ( 2 ) 423 Accounting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Entities

Study of fund accounting, including its co n ceptual basis, i t s institutional standard setting, framewo rk, and cu rrent principles and p r a c ti ce s . Prerequisi tes: CSCE 1 20 i BUSA 202. ( 2 ) 424 AlIditing

p roject. (4)

365 Sales and Sale s Management Pro fess io nal selling-p ro s p ect i ng , active list ning, benefit pre­ s en tat io n , obj e t i o n h and l i n g, clos i ng and te r r i to ry management. Also covered are terr i t o ry des ign , h iring, mo t i vating , and evalu­ ating sales pe rsonnel. ( 4 ) 367 Marketing o f Business Services Man a g i ng the service expe r ie nce for business

Designed fo r students whose. interests are in finance, acco u nt in g , personal financial management, or im ilar fields which demand an und e rstand in g o f th laws affec t i ng financial transactions. (4)

c u s to mers . Cre,l t ­

Comp rellen ive study of audi t i n g concepts and p roc ed ure s.

Pre requ is i t es: BUSA 320, 3 2 1 , 3 2 2 . ( 4 ) 427 Tu Accounting U

oncentrated study of i n co me tax concepts, regulations, a n d tax p l a n ni ng p ri n ci p les . Emphasis on business t a xa tio n . Prerequi­ sites: CSCE l 20; BUSA 202, 3 2 7. ( 2 )

43 0 Entrepreneurial Finance

ing a n d retain ing business relationshi ps ill a customer- focused organization th ro u gh ma rketing strategies. I n - field ass i g nment s give insigh IS in to s p e c ific business ervices. ( 4 )

Finan ial strategies unique to the creation a nd/ o r expansion of small, closel)'-held businesses. P re re q u i s ite: BUSA 302. (4)

375 IntrGductiOD tG Information Management

Inte rmediate treatment of managerial finance topics. P re re quis i te: BUSA 302. ( 4 )

Focus on the basic concepts and models of information ma n age-

437 FinanciaJ AnaJysls and Strategy

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438 Finandal Research and Analysis

504 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

Seminar course diIected at CWTent issues and de velop m e n t s. Prerequisite: B SA 302. and at lea s t one u pper division BUSA prefix e1e tive from the list f Financial Reso rces Management concentration courses. (4)

B a ckgr o und for understanding and act i ng upon the legal and ethical issues de ision makers in the bu si ness world face today.

(4 ) 505 Managing Effective Organizations

Examines how leaders manag four sets of factors to achieve organiza tional effectiveness: the organization's internal environ­ ment, the organization's e nv i ro n me ntal context, cultural differ­ ences, and cha nge. (4)

442 Leadership and Organizational Development

E ,' perientiaJ cour"e design d to explore the principJes of organi­ zational develo p ment. Preparation of tudents to be leaders i n effective. systematic planned change programs. Prerequisi te : B USA 3 05. (4)

5 1 1 Managerial AcCOlIDting

Focuses on t he trategic and upporting roles of management acco u nting in the measu rem en t of economi per fo rm a nc and i n monitoring and deliv ring value t o customers. Pre requisi tes : ECON 500; BUSA 503. (4)

445 QU.ality Improvement Strategies Examination of quality im pro vement strategi es used by

American businesses to meet custo m er requirements and im­ prove corporate perfo r m a nce. Prerequisite: B USA 305. (4) 449 Current Issues in Human Resource Management

5 1 2 Vallle Creation: Operations & luformation Systems

Seminar course focused on current issues and d velopm nts in managing human resom es. Advanced business students, in consultation with the instructor, will elect appropriate topics fo r research and discussion. Prerequisite: BUSA 30 1 . (4)

An integrating fram�work o f how operations and information sys tem create value in a business and impact the fi rm' s value chain and extended enterpr i se. Prerequisites: EC N 500; BU A 503. (4)

460 International Marketing Introduction to m a r keti n g probl ms and op port u ni ti es in an international con text. Investigation of e co nom i c, cultural, and busi ness forces that require ch a nges in m a r ket in g plans D r inter­ national com panies. Prer quisite: ju nior sta n d i ng. (4)

5 13 Marketing & Value Creation

467 Marketing Research

Investigation of tech niques and uses of m rket i ng research in the business decision-making process. Research design, survey meth od s , sampl i n g plam, data analys is, and field projects. Prerequisite : STAT 2 3 1 , CSCE 1 20, B SA 308. (4)

535 Financial Investments

468 Marketing Management An inte g r at d application of marketing mix concepts in a com­ petitive busines imulation. App l ying marketing strate gies. developi ng a busin S5 p l an. and constructing an annual repo rt .

In-dep th examination f risk-return r lation hips in the con­ stmctionlrevision of rea l asset portfolios and associat d financ­ ing strategies. P rerequ isi te: ECON 500; BUSA 503. (4)

E mph as is on co ncep t s , p rin c iples , and issues rela t ing to indi­ vidual securities. Prerequisites: ECON 500; B USA 503 . (4)

537 Decision Models and Strategies for Financial Managers

PI' requisites: B USA 308 and one u pper division marketing class.

( 4) 478 Information Management Semioar

Advance in information t chnology and their im pact on organi­ zational and bu iness strategi s with particLLlar emph as i on th challenges of pr ject design and implementation. (4) 489 Study Abroad

PLU-sponsored academic or experienti a l st udy ill other coun­ tries. Prerequisite: jun ior st nding. ( 1-32) 490 Strategic Management Study of managing organiza t ions from the perspective of st[ategic decisi n ma kers. Formulat i n. implementations, and assessment of strategies and PQt ic le imed at integrating a ll organizational fu nc t i ons in su p port of major objectives. Satisfies the Senior Seminar/Project requirement. Prerequisites : BUSA

302, 305, 308, 309, 3 1 0; senior standing. (4) 49 1 Directed Study

540 Effedive Negotiations App roaches negotiation from a co m p lex orga n iz a t ional vi w­ poi nt i n a g l obal economic context rather than solely a buy-sell approach. In an integra ting approach, demonstrates the t rateg ic nature of how to think like a negotiato r. Prerequisite: SU A 505. ( 4) 541 Managing Innovation and Technology Cbange

Focus on the planning and imple me ntat i o n of m ajo r new technologies, proc ses. or systems which pose sign i fi cant uncer­ tainty and the neces ity for fundamental cha.nge in the organi­ zation's d es ig n , culture, and ind u stry stm lure. Prereq uisite: BU A 505. (4) 542 Management of Change Detailed exam ination of te chniques for diagnosing opportunities req u i ring change. Plann ing. i mplementing. in t erve ning, and evaluating c ha nges. Emphasis on the probl e m assessment skills of i' n t ernal change age nts . Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2) 54S ColltinUOWl Improvement Strategies Focus on manag in g for quality, i ndu di ng organizational a nalysi s , p rocess development, arid selec t ion of i.rnprovernent to o l s.

Individualized studies in cons ulta tion with an instructor. Prerequisites: j u nior standing and instructor approval. ( 1 -4)

Prerequisite: B USA 50S. ( 2 )

492 Internship

Applica t io n of business k nowledge in field setti ng. Credit granted determined by hours spent in work i ng environment and depth of proj ct associated with the o urse of s t udy.

549 Contemporary Human Resource Management Se mi nar addressi ng current issue in human resource manage­

495 Spedal Seminar

5 5 3 Transnational Management

Seminar on specifically selected t op i cs in business.

Examination ot ways in which traditional ap p ro a ch es to globalization-multinational ada p t ation, worldwide tech nology transfer, and global standardiza�ion-may be ynthesized into t ransnational strategy and pr act ice . P re requisit e : BUSA 505. ( 2 )

503 Understanding and Managing Fmandal Resou.rces

Integ r ated study f fmancial decisi on -ma k i n g variables (both bo k and market) , the relationships among them, and relevant decision theories/models. Prill1ary p erspec tive is that of the manager, rather than the a cc o untant or the external investor. (4)

42

Marketing in a contemporary busin ess, treat in g m ar ke ting strat­ egy and decisions re quired to create v a l n e and fulfill the objec­ tives of traditional ( m a n ufactur i ng) , service, nd e-commerce businesses in a global context. Prer q uisites: ECON 500: BUS A 5 03. ( 2 )

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ment. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2)


558 New Venture Management Examines the entrepreneurial s kil l s and o n ci it io n s needed for effective new bu si n ess s t art- ups w he t he r independent or within l a rge r organ i za t i o ns . P r req u isi t e: BUSA 503. (4)

564 Managing Services Marketing Services now c o n st i t u te more than 75% of domestic G D P and em p lo y mt: n t . Consideration of the demand and characteristics of services, fo c us i n g and p o s i ti o n i n g t h e ser v i ce or g a n i zat io n , lis ten ing a nd responding to the service cus to m e r, im pl ic a tions o f e-com merce, and challenges to imp rov i ng se H i c e . P re requ i sites :

ECO

m

500; BUSA 503. (4)

5 66 Developing New Products and Services St udy of the process req ui red fo r devel op ing a new p ro d u c t

service. P re req ui sit e : BUS

or

506. (4)

574 Advanced Service and Manufacturing Delivery Systems

Managerial a.nd ope r at i o n al c h al l e n ges of adva n ced service and manufacturing ystems. Ptl requisite: BVSA 506, 507. (2) 575 Electronic Commerce

Electronic commerce as a critical d el ivery system for pro d ucts and services th rou g h o u t the en tire busi ness e c osyste m . Man age­

rial, te hnologicaI, and organizational cha l l e n ges of estab li sh i n g and d oi ng b usiness in the d igi ta l economy. Prerequisites: ECO

500, 520. (4) 577 Project Management Study of the un i que con d it io n s, c ha l l e n ges , requirements, a n d techniques ass o c ia ted with de s ig n i n g and managing m aj or non­ rep e t it ive un dertakings. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2) 578 Management of Information Technologies and Systems Focus on i n form at i o n technology, i n t er ne t , i n formation systems design, and applications to business pro ble m s. P rerequis i t e s :

BUSA 503, 505. ( 4 ) 579 Techno logy CommerclaJ.iza.tion &: fiansfer Nature, process and i m p ac t of com m ercializing n e w technolo­ gies and t cbnology transfer. Exp l ore s the framework for "ge t t i ng the mind to market" - exa m ini n g successes and fa i l u res of vari us co m pa n ies . Prerequisites: ECON 500, 5 20; • nd BUSA

505. ( 2 ) 580 Technology Strategy &: Competitiveness Concepts an d me th od fo r co mpe t it i ve st rat eg y fo r organiz ation s in hyper-co mpetitive environments, with short p ro d uc t life cycles and short ti m e to market. Emphasis n s t ra te gic choices that create sustainable advantage. P re requ is i te : ECON

500, 520;

BUSA 503 , 504, 505, 5 1 1 , 5 1 2, 5 1 3. 590 Strategic Management in a GlobaJ Context t r at gy formulation and im ple ­ mentatio n under conditions of continuing e co n o mi c, techno­

An i nt eg ra ted study of basines

logical. and com pe t iti ve change i n t he gl obal m ar ketp la ce . xp lo res in dustry, competit ive, and company anaJysis. P rerequi ­ sites: BUSA 503, 504, 505, 5 1 1 , 5 1 2 , 5 1 3 . (4) 59 1 Independent Study

Individualized reading and studies. Minjrnum supervision aft er initial planning of s t ud e n t's work. Re quires prior approval by M.B.A. program d i rec t o r and co nse n t of in t ru cto r. ( 1 -4 ) 592 Internship

Ap plication of business knowledge in a field setting. G rad e d pass/fail only. Req u ires prior a pp rova l by M . B.A. program dire c to r and consent of i n stru ct o r. ( 1-4) 595 Seminar Selected advanced top ics .

(2-4)

Chemistry Chemistry s ee ks to understand the fundamental nature of matter, as well as how it co m p sition nd en e rg y content change. Use of th is k n owled ge influences our lives in many profound way . Whether interested in the chemicaj profes­ s ion itself, i n cl ud in g bjochemistry, polymer c h emistry, raw t io n chemistry and ther specia l ities, or in chemistry io conjuDction w ith other fields such as busi.ness, the ' oci al sciences, and the h um ani t i es , stu den ts will have suitable programs available to me t their in terest at PLU. Diversity in career p ia ruling is a key concept in the chemistry de­ partment. P ro g ra m s are available which are broadly appli­ cable to the health, biological, physical , environmental behavioral, and fu ndam e nta l c h em i c al sciences . The chemistry departm nt's courses, curriculum, fac­ ul ty, a.nd facilities are approved by the American Ch emical Society. The depart m nt u es numerous scienti.fic instruments in t he lab r a ori es . Research and tea c hi n g equipment i nclude: 300 MHz Fourier transfonn nuclear m a gn e tic resonance , Fo uri er lran fo rm jnfrared, ultra-violet, v i s ible, em ission , and electron spi.n resonance spectrometers; X - r ay c rystallographic canleras; gas and liquid chromato­ graphs; gas duomatograph/ mass spectrometer; elect ro ­ phoresis; precision refractometer; cli polometer; short path clistillat i o n apparatus; scintillation co u nter; zone refiner; f1uoromete.r; C-H -N analyzer; ICP-OES ; and two SGI worksta tions . Faculty research proj ects involve undergraduate participation,

FACULTY: Fr yhle, Chair, M rdis, Rink, J. Schultz, Swank, To nn , Waldow.

Stud nt dec. i di ng to m ajor

in chemistry hould

their lntent as soon a possible and

fficiaUy declare

n ot later than after h avi n g

completed Cbem istry 232 and after consultation with a faculty a dv ise r in the chemistry d ep a r tme n t . Transfer students desiring

to major in c h e m i s try h uld consult a dep a rt men t al adviser no later than the beginning of t h e i r j u n ior year. The che m i st r y d epa r tment considers computers to be importa nt too l s and strongly re co m men d s that a student p l a n n i ng to maj r in d1emistry take a t leas t one two-credit hour course in co mp uter science .

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BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 490. Required supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 ; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64 .

( three alternatives) : Genera l leads t o American Chemical Society certification; hem is try 1 20 or 1 25 , 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344, 405 or 450 or 456, 4 1 0, 435, 490; Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2; Physics 1 53 , 1 54, 1 63, 1 64. For American Chemical Society certifica­ tion, 450 and either 405, 440, or 456 are required. 2. Biochem istry emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 343, 403 , 405, 4 1 0, 435, 490; Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323; four hours selected from Biology 326, 328, 33 1 , 346, 359, 385, 407, 44 1 or Chemistry 342; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; Physics 1 53,

BACHELOR O F SCIENCE MAJOR

I.

'" x v

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ations include the extent and quality of extracur ricular work done in background reading, independent study, and research; assisting in laboratory preparation, teaching, o r advising; any other chemistry-related employment, on campus or elsewhere; and participation in campus and professional chemistry­ related organizations. The departmental honors designation will appear on a graduat­ ing chemistry major's transcript. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION: Students interested in this degree develop their chemi try program through the department in conjunction with the School of Education. See School of Education section.

1 54, 1 63, 1 64. 3. Chem ical-physics emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332 , 334, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344, 490; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64, 33 1 , 3 32, 336, 3 56.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING:

Generalized Chemistry Curriculum fo r the B.S. Degree

MINOR: 22

FAU

Students interested in pur ing studies in chemical engineering sh aId see th course utlin iJ1 the Engineering Sciwce section of this catalog. he department chair should be consulted for assignment of a program adviser. semester hours, including 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334 or 336, 338, and 4 hours of additional 300 o r 400 level

SPRING

chemistry course(s) completed with grades of C or higher.

Fresh man ( 1 )

hemistry 1 2 0 or 1 2 5 Math 1 5 1 Critical Conversation or Writing Seminar Core course PE 1 00 or activity

hemistry 232, 234 Math 1 52 Physics 1 53, 1 6 3 ( 2 ) Writing Seminar or Critical Conver ation PE 1 00 or activity

Prerequisite and corequisite req uireme nts are strictly enforced.

Course Offerings 104 Environmental Chemistry

Basic principles of chemical structure and reactions, with appli­ cations to human activities and the natural environment. No prerequisite; students without high school chemistry are encouraged to take [04 before taking 1 05 or 12 0. Also suitable for environmental studies, general science teacher ', B.A. in geo­ sciences, and general university core requirements. l ( 4)

Sophomore

Chemistry 332, 334 (or 336) Physics 1 54, 1 64 ( 2 ) Biology 1 6 1 ( 2 ) Core courses

Chemistry 338 Biology 1 62 ( 2) Core courses

Junior

1 05 Chemistry of Life

Chemistry 342, 344 Chemistry 4 1 0

Chemistry 3 4 1 , 343 Core courses

Basic organic and biochemistry applied to d1emical processes in human systems; suitable for liberal arts students, nursing students, physical education majors, and prospec tive teachers. Students who have not completed high school chemistry recently should take 104 before taking 105. II ( 4 )

Sellior

Chemistry 490 Electives

Chemistry 490 Ch mistry 435 Electives

120 General Chemistry

1 . Refer to the Division of Natural Sciences section of this

catalog for other beginning curriculum options. 2. The department stresses the importance of taking physics during either the freshman or the sophomore year. This permits a better understanding of chemistry and enables a student to complete degree requirements with no scheduling difficultie in the junior and senior years. Students interested in the Bachelor of Science with biochemistry emphasis should plan to take biology in the alternate year. 3. Students desiring to fulfill the Conege of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement under Option I, or who desire to attain or maintain a language proficiency, should take a language course as part of their optional selections. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recognition of outstanding work the designation with Departmental H0710rs may be granted to Bachelor of Science graduates by vote of the faculty of the chemistry department, based on the student's performance in these areas: 1 . Course work: The grade point average in chemistry courses must be at least 3 . 50. 2. Written work: From the time a student declares a major in chemistry, copies of outstanding work (e.g., laboratory, semi nar, aJld research reports) wiJI be kept for later summary evaluation. 3. Oral communication: Students must evidence ability to communicate effectively as indicated by the sum of their participation in class d iscussi n seminars, help session leadership, and teaching assistantship work.

44

4. Independent chemistry- rela ted activities: Positive consider­

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An introduction to energy and matter, atomic and molecular theory, periodic properties, nomenclature, states f marter, chemical c.alculations, solution propertie , acids and bases, equilibrium, and kinetics. Includes laboratory. One year of high school chemistry is required. Students with no high school chemistry or a weak mathematical backgrowld hould take Chemistry [04 before this course. Corequisite: MATH 1 40 or math placement in a course higher than 1 40. I (4)

125 Advanced General Chemistry An advanced presentation of thermodynamics, atomic structure, valence bond and molecular orbital theories, complex: equilib­ rium, kinetics, macromolecules, and coordination chemistry. Includes laboratory. Designed for those who desire to pUT ue studies beyond the bachelor's degree. An outstandi.ng record in a one year high school chemistry course or advanced high school chemistry is required. Coreqllisite: MATH 1 5 1 . I (4) 210 Nutrition, Drugs, and the Individual

An introduction to basic metabolic interacti ns, general endocrinology, mind and body interactions, and roles f drugs in modifying biological and behavioral functions. Prerequisites: one year of high school chemistry or equivalent suggested. Meets general university core requirements. I ( 4 ) 232, 332 Organic Chemistry

An interpretation of properties and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds on the basis of current chemical theory. Prerequisite: 1 20 or 1 25, 232 for 332. oreqllisite : 234, 334. II, I ( 4 , 4 )

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234, 334

Organic ChemJstry Laboratory

Reactions and conventional and modern techniques of synthesis, separation, and analysis of organic compounds. Microscale techniques. Must accompany 232, 332. Prerequisite: 234 for 3 3 4. II, I ( 1 , 1 ) 336

Organic Speclal Projects Laboratory

Individual projects emphasizing current professional-level methods of synthesis and property determination of organic compounds. This course is an alternative to 334 and typically requires somewhat more time commitment. Students who wish to prepare for car rs in chemistry r related areas should apply for departmental approval of their admission to this course. I I 338

Analytical Chemistry

Chernical methods of quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental methods. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 1 20 or 1 2 5 and MATH 1 40. n (4) 341

Physical Chemistry

A study f the relationship between the energy content of systems, work, and the physical and chemical properties of matter. Classical and statistical thermodynamics, thermochemis­ try; solution properties, phase equilibria, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 1 20 or 1 25 , MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54 . 1 (4) 342

Physical Chemistry

A study of the physical p r perties of atoms, molecules and ions, and their correlation with structure. Classical and modern quantum mechanics, bonding theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy. Prerequisite : CHEM 1 2 0 or 1 25, MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54. I T (4) 343, 344

Physical Chemistry LaboratoTY

Experiments in thermodynamics, solution behavior, and molecular structure designed to acquaint students with instru­ mentati n, data handling, correlations with theory, computa­ tional analysi and data reliability. Corequisite or prerequisite: 34 1 , 342, 343 or consent of instructor requi red for 344. 1 II ( l , 1 ) •

Biochemistry I An overview of the structures, fUllction, and regulatjon of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, and an introduction to metabolic and regulatory cellular processes. Majors are encouraged to take both 403 and 405 for a compre­ hensive exposure to biochemical the ry and techniques. Prerequisites: 332, 334. I (4) 403

40 5

Biochemistry n

A continuation of 403 that provides further insight into cellular metabolism and regulation, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms of catalysis, protein synthesis, nucleic acid chemistry, and biotech­ nology. oncepts introduced in Physical Chemistry and Bi.ochemistry I will be applied to this course. Laboratory designed to stimulate creativity and problem-solving abilities through the use of modern biochemical techniques. Prerequi­ sites: 332, 334, 3 4 1 and/or 342 or permission, 403. 11 ( 3 ) 410

Introduction to Research

An introdu tion to laboratory research techniques, lise of the chemical literature, including computerized literature searching, research proposal and report writing. Students develop an independent chemical research problem chosen in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Students attend seminars as part of the course requirement. ll (2) 435

Instrumental Analf5is

Theory and practice of instrumental methods along with basic electronics. Special emphasis placed n electronics, spectropho­ tometric, radiochemical, and mass spectrometric methods. Prerequisites: 338, 3 4 1 and/or 342, 343. II (4)

440 Advanced Organic Chemistry Students will develop a repertoire of synthetic methodology and a general understanding of a variety of organic reaction mechanisms. Synthetic organic strategies and design, the analysis of classic and recent total syntheses from the literature, and advanced applications of instrumentation in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: 332. a/y II ( 2 ) 450

Inorganic Chemistry

Polymen and Biopolymers

A course presenting the fundamentals of polymer synthesis, solution thermodynamic properties, molecular characteriza­ tion, molecular weight distribution, and solution kinetics. Free radical, condensation, ionic, and biopolymer systems, with emphasis on applications. The one-credit laboratory examining polymer synthesis through experiments is optional. Prerequisite: 34 1 ; Corequisite, 342. a/y I I ( 3 ) 49 1

::J: z

Techniques of structural determination (JR, UV, VIS, N M R, X- ray, EPR), bonding principles, non-metal compounds, coordination chemistry, organometallics, donor/acceptor concepts, reaction pathways and biochemical applications are covered. Laboratory: Synthesis and characerization of non-metal, coordination and organometallic compounds. Prerequisites: 332, 34 1 ; Corequisite 342. a/y II ( 3 ) 456

n

m III m III -I c: C m III

Independent Study

Library and/or laboratory study of topics not included in regularly offered courses. Proposed project must be approved by department chair and supervisory responsibil­ ity accepted by an instructor. May be taken more than once. I 11 ( I ,2, or 4) 497

Research

Experimental or theoretical investigation open to upper division students with consent of department chair. May be taken more than once. Generally consists of an expanded study of the research project developed in 490. I II ( 1 ,2 or 4) 499 Seminar

Senior capstone course. Presentation by students of knowledge gained by personal Library or laboratory research, supplemented with seminars by practicing scientists. Participation of all senior chemistry majors is required and all other chemistry-oriented students are encouraged to participate. Seminar program will be held during the entire year but credit will be awarded in the spring semester. I I I ( 2 ) 597, 598

Graduate Research

pen to master's degree candidates only. Prerequisite: consent of department chair. I II ( 2-4)

Chinese Studies The Chinese Studies program is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to provide students interested in China a broad fo undation

in Chinese language, culture,

and history, and an opportunity to focus on the religious­ philosophical world v iew and the economic and business structure of China. The program requires that major and minor students complete coursework in at least t h ree different disciplines: Chinese language, history, and anthropology, with optional work in political science, the arts, religion, business, and other disciplines. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the university's China exchange programs (currently at Sichuan University and Zhongshan University) and may request that credits earned through these programs be counted toward the major or m i nor. With the approval

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of the program director, selected January-term, summer,

Classics

and exp erimental courses may be included in the major or m i nor. II' U II' II>

The Classics Program i s a cooperative effort among the

FACULTY: A committee of faculty admin isters this program: Benson, Chair; Barnowe, Byrnes, Dwyer-Shick, Guldin, Ingram, Jensen, McGinnis, Warner, Yie, Youtz. Mr. Sidney Rittenberg serves as honorary adviser.

Departments of Languages and Literatures, Histo ry,

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours (24 required, 8 elective ) ; students must take at least one Chinese history course. Required Courses: (24 semester hours) Anthropology 343 East Asian Cultures Chinese 201 Intermediate Chinese Chinese 202 Intermediate Chinese History 339 Revolutionary China Religion 233 Religions of China

lish this trin ity of themes with the visual exp erience of art.

Philosophy, Religion, and Art. Its goal is to unite the "heart o f the liberal arts" with the mind, through history and philosophy, and the soul, through religion, and to embel足

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Chinese Studies 490 The Senior Project (4) A project, thesis, or internship which demonstrates compe足 tence in language and other dimensions of Chinese Studies. Must be a p proved in advance by chair of the Chinese Studies Program; tally card required. Upon prior application of the student, seminars in other departments or programs may substitute for this course. ELectives: (8 semester hours) Anthropology 345 Contemporary Chinese Culture Business 352 Global Management* Chinese 2 2 1 Appreciating Things Chinese Chinese 301 Composition and Conversation Chinese 3 7 1 Chinese Literature in Translation Chinese Studies 200 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies History 338 Modern China History 496 Seminar: The Third World (A/Y on China ) * * Music 1 0 5 J - The Arts o f Chi na Nursing 397 Health Care Practices in China, India, and Tibet"" Political Science 3 8 1 Comparative Legal Systems -

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MINOR: 20 semester hours (8 required, 12 elective) Required Courses: (8 semester hours in Chinese Language) Chinese 1 0 1 Elementary Chinese Chinese 1 02 Elementary Chinese (or one equivalent year of university level Chinese, upon approval of the program chair) Electives: (12 semester hours from at least two additional departments) Anthropology 345 Contemporary Chinese Culture Chinese 2 2 1 Appreciating Things Chinese Chinese 37 1 Chinese Literature in Translation Chinese Studies 200 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies History 338 Modern China History 339 Revolutionary China Music 105 J - The Arts of China Religion 233 Religions of China "" These courses may count for program credits only when the

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Students are expected to become familiar with the reading list for that part of the program (art, literature, history, philosophy, or religion) in which their interest lies. The program is designed to be flexible. In consultation with the Classics Committee, a student may elect a course or courses not on the classics course list. All core classics courses are taught out of the Department of Languages and Literatures.

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student's course project is focused on China and is approved by the program chair. History

496 may be counted toward program requirements orlly when itfoeuses specifically a/I Chirla.

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coordinator.

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from the list below in consultation with the program

Latin 10 I - I 02 Elementary Latin 201 -202 Intermediate Greek 1 0 1 - 102 Elementary Greek 201 -202 Intermediate Art 1 1 0 Introduction to Art Art 1 80 History of Western Art I Art 386 Imagery and Symbolism Classics 23 1 Masterpieces of European Literature Classics 250 Classical Mythology Classics 3 2 1 Greek Civilization Classics 322 Roman Civilization Natural Sciences 204 History of Science Philosophy 3 3 1 Ancient Philosophy Religion 2 1 1 Religion and Literature of the Old Testament Religion 2 1 2 Religion and Literature of the New Testament Religion 2 2 1 Ancient Church History Religion 330 Old Testament Studies Religion 3 3 1 New Testament Studies Independent Study Courses Selected Januar),-term Courses

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46

year of one of the classical languages ( Greek and Latin) and two of the other. The remaining courses are selected

CLASSICS COMMITTEE: Snee, Coordinator; Arnold, Jansen, E. Nelson, Oakman.

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This interdepartmental Classical Studies major requires the completion of 40 semester hours, including at least one

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Col lege of Arts and Sciences

I I . Completion throu 'h the first year of col lege l evel of a foreign language o th r than that used to ati fy th fore ig n language e nt ran ce requiretllent. his option m ay a lso be met by s a t is ­ fa tory co res

Division of Humanities

n a p ro fic ie ncy examination a dmin i stered by the PL Department of Languages and Literntu res. Ill. Four semester h o u rs in history, literature, or l a ng uage ( the latter at the 20 1 level, or at any Ie eI in a lang u age ther tll n that used to satisfy the fo reig n language entrance require­ ment) in addi t i on to cou rses applied to t he general university requiremen ts, and

English Language and Literatures P h ilosop hy

Rellgion Division of Natural Sciences Biology

Four semester hours i n symbolic logic, mathematics ( courses

Chemistry

numbered 1 00 or above ) , computer scie n ce,

statistics in addition to courses appl ied to the gen eral u niversity reg ui remen ts.

Comp uter Science and Computer Engineering Geosciences Mathematics

n o � � c: z

or

Hig h school l a nguages used to atisfy any o f the above options

Physics

m ust have been co mpleted with g rades of C or h ig h e r.

Courses used to sat isfy eithe r line of Opt ion ill

Division of Social Sciences Anthropology Economics History Marriage and Fam ily Therapy Political Science Psych 01 gy Sociology and Social Work

DEGREES OFFERED: B ach dor of Arts, Bachelor of Sc ietl ce

r the College o f Arts and Sciences requ i rement may not a lso e used to salisfy ge n e ra l un iversity requirements. AllY college-l evel foreign language cour e nu mbered 2 0 1 or above used to sat is fy Opt ion I a n d any completion of college - level l ang uage t h rou gh 1 02 u 'ed to sati fy pt io n II may Iso be used to s a tis fy the Perspect ives on Div rsi t y re.quir m ent in Cros -Cultw-al Perspectives. Candidates for the B.A. in Engl ish, fo r the B.A. in Education with concetltrati n in Engl ish , for t b e B.A. L O Global Stud ies, for the B.B.A. in Internat ional Business, a nd for ejec t i o n to the Arete Society must meet Option I above.

o z l> Z C -I :z: m

MAJOR REQUIREMENT: A major is a sequence of cou rses in one area, usually in one department. A maj o r sh uld be selected by the eJld of the so p h o m o re year. The choice mu t be approved by the d partment chair (or in case of special <lead mic p ro­ grams, the p ro g r a m coordinator) . Major requiremetlts are specified in this catalog. The q u a li t y of work must be 2.00 l)r

better. D grades may be coun t ed toward graduation but not toward a m ajor.

RECOGNIZED MAJORS: Global Studie

Anthr pology plied Physi c s

Econom ics

History Individualized Study Mathematic.s Musi c Norwegian P hil oso p h y Phy ics Political 'c.ience Psychology Rel i g ion

En g in eer in g Science ( 3-2)

Scandi navian Area Studies

English Environmental Studies

Soci a l Work Sociolo gy

Prench

S pa n i s h

Geosciences

Theatre

German

Women's Studies

Arr Bio l og y Che mist ry Ch.inese Studies Classics

Communication Computer Engineering Computer Sc ien ce

Not more than

44 se mest e r

hours earned in one department may

Communication and Theatre The faculty of t he Department of Communication an Theatre is committed to a philosophical perspecti ve on communication as the proce s by which hared under­

be applied toward the bachelor's d eg ree in the Coll ge.

standings are

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCmNCES REQUIREMENTS:

symbols . Implicit within this under ·tanding is agreemen t

eated among aud iences lhrough the use of

In addition to meeting t h e entrance r quirement in foreig n

on the assumption t h a t people interact w i t h o n e another

language ( two years of high school lallguage, one year of COllege

for the purpose of achieving outcomes, and that this

l a n gu age, or demonstrated eq u iv a l ent proficiency), candidates in the College of Arts a n d Sciences ( all B.A., B.S. , B.A.Rec., B.A.P. . and B.5.P.E. degrees) mast meet Op tion r. n , or I I I below:

interaction is accomplished th rough a variety

1.

Completion of one fore i g n language t h ro ug h t h e second year of college l evel . Thi s req u i re m en t may al so be -atisfied b y completi n of four years of h i gh school st u dy in one fore ig n language or by satisfactory score s on a proficiency examina­ tion administered by the PLU Dep a r t m en t of Langua ges and Literatures.

f media.

We focus our c urricul um and education on four ability groups that all student th i n

houJd master. First is the ability to

and reflect criticaIJy. Students should b e able to

observe, analyze, perceive relationships, reason, and make i nferences about their l ives and world. Second, students should be able to express themselves effectively using verbal

and non -verbal techniques. Third. students should

be able to interact with one another and their environP

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au ac ...

<

au l: ...

ment. F i n ally, studen t s should d velop an ability t value themselves, their environment, and ot h ers a diverse and important facets of o u r so cial live . Wit h the learning of these abilities comes a responsibility to com munity and social service. FACULTY: Inch, Clwir; Bartanen, Becvar, Fe ll e r, Harney, L i so ky, Rowe, S pi ce r.

lapp.

Ehrenhaus,

CORE REQlJIREMENT: O n l y the fol lowing co urse s fro m ommunication an d Th atre may be used to meet t h e gen e m l u n i ver s it y co re req uirem e n t in the a rts: 1 5 1 , 1 60, 162, 1 63, 24 1 ,

z

3 58, 3 59 , 363, 364, 4 5 8. No course b e g i nn in g with the prefix COMA counts toward the un ivers ity core requirements.

<

COMMUNICATION CORE SEQ UENCE: Pri nt / b roadcast

z

j our n al i sm , critical co m m u n i c a t io n studies, and public relations m j ors m us t take an init ial core of cou rse as follows: 1 2 3, 27 1 , 284, 285. OTE: 1 23 and 27 1 hould no t be taken conc u rrentl),.

o

o ... < u z ;:) :i: :i: o u

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: S t udents who wa nt to declare

a

Students who co mple te 1 2 3 witb a

2 . 5 0 or higher grade may provisio nally un ti l 'uccessful completion of the core.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJORS: Maximum of 44 semester

hours in any of the areas of concentration: 1 . Critical Com m u n ication SWdies - requ ired courses: 1 23 , 27 1 , 284, 285, 328 , 330, 333, 433 p l us 1 2- 1 6 add it ional ho urs from 300 and 400 l e ve l communication course. selected after consultation with adv iser. Requ i red s up p o r t i ng areas: 3-4 h ou rs in ec o n o Ol i , 4 hours in statistics or r earch me thods , and 1 2 h o urs in so ci al sciences or a minor app ro ve d by a n adviser.

2. Prillt/Broadcast Jo u nla/islIl - required cO l l rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 384 o r 3 78 , 480, plus 24 a d d i t i on a l h urs from 300 and 400 l evel communication courses selec ted after consu i tation with advis r. Required s uppo r t i n g a rea : 3-4 h o urs i n economics, 4 hours i n s t at i s t i cs or re s ea rc h methods, and 1 2 h ou rs i n so c i al sciences ill a minor a pp ro ve d by a n adviser. 3. Public Relatio lls - required cO ll rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 385, 435, 378 or 384 or an app roved w ri t i n g course, p lus 1 6-20 additional h o u rs fro m 300 and 4UU level co m mu n i ca t i on courses selec ted after consultation with advis r. R qu i red supporting area : 3-4 hour. in economics, 4 hOl rs in statist ics or research meth od s, and 12 h o ur s in social sc i en ce s QI a minor approved by an ad iser. 4. Theatre - ActillglD irecting Emphasi: - reqlj ;red co u rses: 1 5 1 , I 0, 225, 250, 352. 35 7, 363. 364, 425, plus 6 h o urs from com­ mW1ication an theatre co ur ses in consult lion with adviser. Theatre - Design/Tech nical Emphasis - required courses:

151, 1 60, 225, 250 or 454, 352, 356, 363, 364, 425 , 452 or 453, plus 6 h ou rs from c mm u n i ca t io n and the tre c o u rs es in co nsulta­ tion with adviser.

All candidates for th

B.A. d egree must satisfactorily coml lete a hours under the ' u p e rv is io n

formal internship of 1 to 8 semester

of

faculty memb

r.

111 a ddi tio n to re q u i re men t s listed above, candidates for the B.A. degree mu t m et

the o pt i on requirements ill t he

CoLlege of

Arts a n d Sciences. BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: At least

54

emesLer hours

in any of the two areas of c ncentration: I . omrmmica tiofl - requ i red cu u rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 4 hours in e a ch ability gro u p, nd 8 hours in exte rn a l re uire ments. 48

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

151, 1 60, 24 1 , 250, 352, 357, 363, 364, 454, plus 1 8 h o u rs selected in consultation with adviser. 3. Th ea tre - Design/Technical Emphasis - req uired co urses: 1 5 1 , 225, 250 o r 454, 352, 356, 363, 364, 415, 452 or 453, p lu s 1 8 h our s selected in consultation w i th a d v i se r. All candidates for tl1e B.F. A . degree m u s t s a tis fac t orily c o m p le te a fo r mal internship of 1 to 8 s em es t er hOUIS under tbe su p e rvi­ sion of a fa c u lty me mb er . BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: ee Sch o o l oI Edllcatio1!.

1.

h igher.

5.

Theatre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - required courses:

MINORS:

cOOl Olunication m ajo r with < n emphasis in print/broadcast j ur n a lism , riti al communication studies, or public relations: I . Wil l , a t tbe t i me of dec\(lrat ion, h ave a Clll1Ulative g ra de po in t average ()f at least 2 .50. 2. Will have suc ce s s ful l y co mp le ted the Communication Core ( 1 23, 2 71 , 284, 2 85 ) w i t h a grade po i n t average o f 2.S0 or

declare

2.

U N I V E R S I T Y

ritical Communication Studies: 20 se mes t er hours, in c l u din g 1 23, 284, 185, 330, 333 or 4 3 , 328 or 436. 2. Pu bl i Rela tions: 20 semestt'r h our s , i n cl u d i n g 1 23 , 2 7 1 , 284, 285, 385, plus 4 h o u rs from 300-400 level communication courses selected in c oo s ul t a tion with adviser. 3. Theatre: 20 Se01ester hours, i n c l u di ng l S I , 1 60, 24 1 , 250, plus 4 hours from co m m u n i c a t i o n and theatre cou rse sele c t ed in co n sul t atio n with adviser.

4. The Da 'lCe Minor is cross -referenced with Physical E d u ca t io n.

See [he description of

the School o f

that mi no r

under

Physical Educa tioH.

5. The Pu blish i ng and Pri n t i ng Arts Millor is cross-referenced with the De pa r t m n t of English. See the d e scr i pt i on of that mi no r under Publishing mId Prin ting Arts.

Course Offerings: Communication 123 Communication and Theatre: A Way of Seeing, A Way of Sharing Introduces the s t udy of communication and th e a t re . Sur ve y s the contexts and a pp l ic ati o n of study in these d i sc i pl i n es. Intro­

duces the use of rhetorical theory as a communication behavior. (4)

means of

u nde rs t a nd i n g

225, 425 Communication Practicum One se m es t er hour credit may be earned each semester, but only 4 em es t e r hours may be used to meet un i ve rs i t y requirements. Stu dents put cia room th eo r y to p ract i c al appl ication by iJ1divid ually completing a project re la ti ng to an aspect of co mmunication. An i n st r uc to r approve the p r oj ect and

i n the area of i n teres t must agr ee to p rovide g u i d an ce .

234 Introduction to Research in Communication The study of m et ho ds of ga th eri ng , i nterp re t ing, and eva l ua ti n g data in Lhe study of h u m a n communication. Both qu a n t i t a t i ve

and q ua li t at i ve research methods. ( 2) 27 1 Media Literacy Introduces the critical study of mass communication. Su rveys how th e technical, economic and behavioral elements of m e d i a

influence its structure and content. Surveys si.gnificant trends and issues in b o th domestic and international me di a contexts. (4) 284 Communication as Process: Speaking Seminar Introduces t h e basic te ch n i q ues of public spe ak ing. Students complete s v ral speeches and lea rn the basic skills of speech rnaki ng, in dud i ng topic selections, res ea rch , organization, a u d i e n e analysis, and de l iv ery. (2) 285 Communication as Process: Writing Seminar Introduces the p r o c ess of communication wirting. Su r ve ys copy fo rmats and s tyl e rules for

w r i t i n g in communication-related co mp l e te a nu mb er of diverse w rit i n g a ss i g n ­ ment to appreciate the mech a n i c s of w r i ti n g and the role o f a udi e nc es. (2)

careerS. St ud ents

32 1 The Book in Sodet}' ee English 3 1 1 . (4)


381 Media Law BDd Principles

322 PubHshing Procedures See English 3 1 2. (4)

The theory and a p p l ication of law in news gathering, p ub l ishing, and broadcasting. Will cond u c t legal research. ( 4 )

324 Nonverbal Communication Foc lls on the nonverbal aspects of comm unic tion within the framework of i n te r personal interaction. Prerequisite: Communi­ cat ion core or consen t of instructor. ( 2 )

384 AdvRDced News Reporting Reporting of politics and police, courts and other governmental fu nctions, investigative reporting and writing. Blend o f field trips and wri ti.ng exercises. Prerequisite.: Communication core or

326 Group CommunicatJon

385 Introduction to PubUc Relations

group p e rformance and interaction. ( 4 )

relations. Emphasizes technical a n d analytical skills. Prerequisite:

s:

COre

Stud ies how people use reasoning giving in social decision­

388 EditorlaJ Writing Research and writing of editorials and commentaries for

P C llS is on me t ho d s of reati ng, understanding, and crit icizing argumen ts. ( 4 )

newspapers and broadcast. Function of the ed itorial a n d

on

i m p roving kill in p ublic speaking. In troduces

delivering

a

5

ts. Prov ides �x-perience through w riting and

range o f d i fferent kincli; of p ub l i c speeches. ( 4 )

l> o

ethical issues involving those engaged i n communication p ro fessions s u ch as journa.lism, p u bl i c relations, broadcasting,

m

interp erso nal and mass communication. Stud ies the role o f

(4)

theories in providing practical understanding o f the communi­

391 , 392, 393 Communication Abroad: Studies In Culture

cation process. Emphasizes the role o f em p i rical resea rch in

.Exploration of communi.cation systems and environments

broadening und ers tanding o f commwlication.

Z

Studies the basic principles of moral philosophy and explores

ethical dilemmas and develop strategies for dealing with them.

I n troduces the theo ries and research tools used to study

(4)

m

beyond the university i n in ternational cult ural con texts. 0 - 4 ) 433 RhetoricaJ Theory

334 Gender RDd Communication At te m pts to a.n, lyze and understand the relationship between

In t rod u ces the theories and research tools used to study

gender and com munication behavior. Comparison and co n t rast

communication from a rhetorical perspective. Analyzes the role

o f male and fe ma l e com munic t ion styles, s i milarities and

of rhetoric as a crucial means of human problem-solving.

d .i fferences in language usage, in terpersonal dialogues, group

Emphasizes the role o f crit ical research in understanding the

discussion,s and listening in p erso n al and professional aren as. ( 4 )

rhetorical significance of messages. (4)

435 Organizational CommllDication

335 InterculturaJ Communication Workshop Designed to acquaint st udents with the influence of cultural

Studies the role of communication in fo rmal organizations.

backgrounds, perceptual systems, social o rganization, language,

Provides i nsight into how organizations use and misuse com­

and nonvt!rbal messages i n intercultural commun ication.

(2)

336 Communicating in Bwiness RDd the Professions on

z

and advertising. Stude n ts use case studies to learn to recognize

333 Foundations of Communication Theory

Focuses

o

m e d i a . Prerequisite: Communication

390 Ethics in Communication

thee fies and techniques for effectively participa ting in various speaking cont

editorial pages i l l the ne,

core or consent o f instr u ctor. (4)

330 Public Speaking

z

or consent o f instructor. ( 4 )

making. Analys i s o f genres, fo rms, and techn iques of arguers.

Focuses

c

In troduces the theories, methods, and practice of public Co mmunication

o s:

consent o f instruc tor. (4)

Stud ies how people i n teract in gro u p s . In troduces theoretical constrn cts regarding the role of gro u p s ill orga nizational and soc ial set t ing, . Provides expe.rience i n analyzing and improving 328 Argumentation

1"'\

the natu re of com m u n ication processes in organiza­

m unication techniques i n accomplishing their ends. Emphasizes the in terrelationship o f theory and case studies in understanding the complex nature o f con temporary organizat·ions. ( 4 )

t ional ettings. Students deal with in terpersonal communication,

436 Persuasion

in terviewing techniques, informative and persuasive speaking,

The study of persuasion as a means of personal and social

working in group , and basic b us i n ess writing skills. (4)

influence. Examines the theoretical fo undations and explores the e thical and social i m plications of contemporary persuasion. ( 4 )

373 Audio Production Ele ments of audio p roduction, analysis o f program design,

43 7 Advanced Interpersonal CommunicatioJl

sCI'ip ting, and production tools a nd techniques. Lecture and

Studies the role of communication as the basis for how pe.opIe

laboratory. Prerequisite:

i n teract with each o ther. I n troduces the various theories helping

ommunication core or consent of

t o explain the success and fa ilure people experience i n i n terac­

inst ructor. ( 4 ) 314 Video Production Analys i s and a p plication of p rogram design, writing

tion. Emphasizes the i m portance o f learning to diagnose a n d

and

provide solution

[0

common co mmunication d ifficul ties. ( 4 )

p roduction tools a nd tech niques. Lecture and laborato ry.

43 8 Advanced Public Relations

Prerequisite: Commun ication core or consent of ins tructor. ( 4 )

Examination of public relations issues such as campaign

378 Broadcast Jonrnalism Technique s of broadcast ;ournali.srn. Applications of news gathering, writing, and reporting in a broadcast context. R a dio, television, and news production assignments using broadcast equipment in the Held fu"1d studio. Prerequisite: Communication core or consent o f instructor. (4) 380 Newspaper Editing, Layout, RDd Design Selection and editing of news copy and headline writing. Sel etion, sizing, and cropping of photos. FW1ctions of layo u t .

plannillg, crisis management, theoretical foundations, and ethics. Prerequisite: 385 or consent (If instructor. (4) 439 Intercultural COIDDlWlication S t udies the n a ture of communication among people of diverse cultures. The course examines contemporary theory and research and examines a variety of cult ural variables including: cultural backgrounds, percep t. io n , social organization, language, and nonverbal aspects o f messages. Prerequisite: Communication core. or consent o f instructor.

(4)

Principles of newspaper des i g n and their pract ical a p plicat ions.

440 Conflict RDd Communication

Prerequisite: Comm u nication core or conSent of instructor. (4)

S t udies the role of communica t ion in the development and management o f human co n flict. Use o f the theories o f promi­ llent conflict and peace scholars and significant case studies to

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develop a method fo r better understanding the nature and resolution of o oflict . Prerequisite: Communication core o r consent of instructor. (4 )

w II:

l­ e( w

o

and learned kills; exercises in memo ry, imagination, and observation; i m p rovis a t i o n s and sce ne from modern plays. (4) 351 Stage Makeup Specialized work in pla n n i n g

450 Workshop i o Effective PubUc Speaking Audience analysis. to p i c selection, o rgan iza tio n of idea for

and appli

t i o n of techniques from !lal, and pecial

stra igh l makeup through ag i n g, three dirnensi

effects. ( 4 )

v ariou s audiences, types of speeches, u se of visual aids, and d el ivery. Desi g ned for both novices an d those who have bad some experi ence as speakers. (2)

352

Stage Management

All of the facets of managing a t h eatr ica l production: p lan n i n g, schedulino, rebearsal process, documentati on, and interpersonal relationships. (4)

475 Advanced Media Production P rod ucing, scri p ti n g, d i rect i n g , pe r formi n g , and eval uati n g so­ phisticated audio an d video progra mming. Prere quisite: 3 74. (4)

356 Stage Lighting

480 In-Depth and lnvestigative Reporting

Stage l i ght i n g from the deve lo p me n t of el ect r ici ty and ligh t i n g

Group re po rti n g in dep t h on a si ngl e issue for both n ewsp ap er

instruments to the complete d esign of l ightin g a show. (4) Practical experience in the art of the acto r through performance

485 Interdisciplinary Perspectives i n Communication P rOVI des senior- level com municatio n and theatre students with the o p po rtu n i t y to sy n t hes ize thei r st udy through discove ri n g

e( u

co n texts . Al low

z e( z o

and te levisi on . Prere4 ui�ites: 380, 3 78 or 384. (4)

357 Intermediate Acting, The Actor AI Work

of scenes [ro m plays of the modern theatre, emph is on the impo r tan ce of pIa analysis by the actor, and exam in a t i on of current actin g theOf )'. Pr requisite: 250. (4)

f er s5- a pply in g theories and practices in various t n d e nts to experience s t u dy in a se m i n ar a tmo s phere. Al l ws stud e nt s t o co mpl ete. a res rch paper or p rojec t in thei r area of in t ere st . (4) means

358 Advanced Acting tudy of the work of an ac tor; character analysis and embodi­ ment, using scenes frOl p lays ; includes tyles of a ct i ng as defined by histor ical p er iod. P re re qui si te: 35 7. (4)

49 1 , 4.92, 493 Special Studies i n Communication I nvest igations or research in area of sp ec i al interest not covered

359 Acting (or the Non-Actor Speci ficaU y des ign e d for those who have n ou ri s he d

by regula r courses; open to qualified ju n i or or senior students.

A st ud en t houJd not beg i n regist ratio n for inde p ndent tudy until t he specific area for in estigation has been app roved by a d ep artm en tal sponsor. ( 1 - 4 )

363 History of the Theatre: Aeschylus Through Turgeniev Th atre as it evolved from its primitive ori g i n through re p rese n ­

A look at commun ication pr cesses in o rgan iza t ions with develop ment of spe c i fi c communication skills; includes pub l i c peaking tecb niques, info rm a tive and persuasive communicat ion , i nterviewi ng strategies, a n d the role of l i sten i n g . (2)

tative so c i e t i es; Ancient Greece, Rome, Eu-wpean, and Amer ican .

452 Scenic Design Deve l op men t of arti tic and techn ical a bil i t i es in the field o f

Course Offerings: Theatre

scenic desig n incorporating many per i o ds

1 5 1 Stage Technology

of costume des i gn i nc o rp rat i n g history, pat te r n s , and re nde r­

(4)

ings. (4)

160 Introdu.ction to Theatre

numerous o ffshoots (e.g., film, te levision, rock concerts) th rou g h audience participatio n and per cnal co n t ac t . ( 4)

theatre a n d its

454 Play Direction

The role of the di re ctor, hist rieatly and crit ically; an intensive study that is both practical and t heoreti I in its approach to t he art of the play director. E ac h student is required to direct scen es from plays repre entativ of all p er i ods of thea tr hi sto ry. A final p roj e ct , cons ist i ng of a con te mp orary scene, will c ulm i n a te the cou r se . Prere uis ites: 1 5 1 , 2 50, and junior st at us. (4)

162 History of American FUm Concen trates o n the develo pm e n t and growth

0 the motion Sta t es from 1895 to th e present. (4)

163 Histo.ry of the Foreign FUm

458 Creative Dramatics

Conce ntrates on the de ve lo p me n t and growth of inlernational

Designed to ac quai n t t he student w it h mate r i al s, tech n i que s , and

(4)

225, 425 Theatre Practicum One emester hour c red it may be ea rn ed each semester, but only

4 semeste r hoUTs may be used to meet un iversity

reqttirements.

Students pllt clas s ro o m

theory to p ra ct i cal a pp l i ca t i o n by i nd ividuall y completi ng a proj ect rel at in to an aspect of theatre. An instructor i n the area of interest m ust approve the p roj ec t and agree to pro vi de gtl i dan t!. 241 Oral Interpretation of Uterattue The art of commun icating the esse n ce f a piece of l i te rat ure to

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school teachers or prospect ive teachers, theatre majors, reli g i us l ea de rs , youth and camp coun se l o rs, day c are workers, social and psychological worke rs, and commu n i ty theatre lea de rs in terested in wo r ki n g with ch ildren. S (4)

junior h igh

49 1, 4.92, 493 Special Studies in Theatre Investigations Or re earch in area of sp ec i al interest not covered by regular co urses ; o pe n to qu ali fied junior or senior s tu d en ts .

( 1 -4 )

experientially, \obrically, and emo­ gro up performance. (4)

596-598 Research in Theatre

250 Fundamentals of Acting An exa m i nation of the work of actors and actresses, their natural P

theories of r ative dranl at ics. l nten ded for ele mentary and

Re qu i re s pre-regist ration ap p roved by a dep a.rtmental sponsor.

an audience; i nterpret i ng it

50

(4)

453 Costume Design Deve l o p me nt of a rt isti c and technical abilities in the field

the a tre, co tw nes, scenery, p rops, Li gh t s, make up , and manage­

t io n al l y. Ind.ividual and

nd styl es a s well as

preparation of m o d els , renderi ng, and d ra fti n gs.

Basic theory :md procedure of all ba ck st a ge elements in the

film.

Ren aissa n e, Modem

(See description for 363 . ) (4)

For gradua te students only. ( 1 -4)

picture in the United

(4)

364 History of the Theatre: Ibsen Through to the Present

596-598 Research in Communication

Exposu re to

c u r i os ity to

a lack of kn w ledge o r p r ior experie n ce . Not open to theatre m ajo rs or m inors. (4)

500 Effective Communications

ment.

a

ex plore the art of ac t in g but have been i nt i midate d by

T

Y

For g rad u a te students only.

( 1-4)


computer Science and Computer Engineering Computer Science Computer science deals with the theory, design, and appli­ cation of computing systems and the study of the storing and manipulation of i nfo rmation. The program at Pacific Lutheran University provides a broad base core of funda­ mental material that stresses analysis and design experi­ ences with substantial laboratory work, including software de clopment. In addition, students are exposed to a variety of programming languages and systems. Students can choose from a number of upper level courses which insure a depth of knowledge and an understanding of current developments in the field. The Bachelor of Science degree in computer science has been accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Commissio n o f the Computing Sciences Accredi tation Board, Inc. Computer Engineering Computer engineering is a relatively new engineering sped Ity that has grown out of rapidly evolving micro­ and mini-computer technology. The curriculum consists of essential and advanced elements from computer science and electrical engineering, developing both hardware and software expertise. Electives permjt concentration in areas such as integrated circuit design, microprocessor applica­ tions, computer design, application software development, and artificial intelligence.

FACUlTY: Hauser, Chair; Blaha, Brink, Chung, Fofanova, Kakar, Murphy, Spillman, Wolff. BEGINNING CLASSES: There are several beginning level classes in computer science designed for students with various needs: Compllter Science and Computer Engineering 1 15: Solve it with the Computer!

Especially for students with little or no background in com­ puter science who wish an introduction to the use of the computer for problem solving. Not recommended for students with strong mathematics backgrounds. This course also satisfies the Mathematical Reasoning requirement. Computer Science and Computer Engineering 120: Compu terized Information Systems

Especially appropriate for business majors and other students wi hing an introduction to the computer and applications of

software packages. Computer Science and Computer Engineering 144: Introduction

to

Compllter Science

For students majoring in computer science, computer engi­ neering, mathematics, and most science majors, as well as others wishing a strong experience i n computer programming. Computer Science and Computer Engineering 270: Data Structures

This is the second course i n the major. With departmental approval, students with a strong programming background may receive advanced placement into this course.

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT: All students have unlimited access to the university Computer Center's user-room facilities. The Department of Computer Science and Computer Engineering also maintains a Solaris server and laboratories of its own. The upper level lab contains Macintosh, Linux, and Windows work­ stations. The other lab is used as a teaching laboratory and open lab; it has fifteen Windows NT workstations and computer pro-

jection equipment. All machines are on the Ethernet, are acces­ sible through the campus network, and have full access to the Internet.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS: Students majoring in com­ puter science may choose to earn either a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Arts program is the min.imum preparation suitable for further professional study and is often combined with extensive study or a second major in an al1ied field. The Bachelor of Science is a strong, scientific degree that contains additional courses in computer science, mathematics, and science and serves both students going directly into employment on graduation and those going into graduate programs. Both degrees are based on the same core courses: Computer Science and Computer Engineering 1 44, 270, 346, 380, 490, Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52, and 245. Students should begin Computer Science and omputer Engineering 1 44 -270 and Mathematics 1 5 1 - 1 52 early in their program. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: At least 26 semester hours of computer science and engineering including 1 44, 270, 346 or 380, and 490. The remaining hours are from computer science and engineering courses numbered above 329 (excluding 449 ) . Up to 4 hours may be substituted from Math 34 1 , 345, and 356. Required supporting: Math 1 5 1- 1 5 2 and Math 245. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 semester hours in com­ puter science plus 30 hours of supporting courses in mathemat­ ics and science. The 40 semester hours of computer science must include 1 44, 270, 343, 346, 375, 380, 490, and 14 additional credits of approved elective courses, one of which must be from 367, 420, 436, or 444. Elective courses submitted for approval are to be selected from the computer science courses numbered above 329 (except 345, 434, 449 and 50 1-509 ) , or hours from Math 356 not counted toward the 30 hours of required support­ ing courses. The 30 hours of supporting courses in mathematics and science must include: 1. Math l S I , 1 52, 245, 230 (or 3 3 1 ) , 345 (or 3 4 1 ) . 2. A minimum of 1 2 hours of approved science courses which includes a year's sequence of a laboratory science (Physics 1 53 - 1 54 with 1 63-164, Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25 and either 232 or 338, Biology 1 6 1-1 62, Geosciences 1 0 1 , 1 02, or 103; and 201 ) . 3. Approved sciences courses are: any Biology except 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 ; any Chemistry except 1 04, 105, 2 10; any Geosciences except 1 04; any Physics except 205; Computer Science and Engineering 345 or 434. 4. The remaining hours, if any, may be chosen from any math course numbered above 329 ( except 446 ) or any approved science course.

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MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: 20 semester hours includ­ ing Computer Science and omputer Engineering 1 44, 270, and eight additional hours of upper division computer science courses (excluding 322 and 449 ) . Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 28, or equivalent. MINOR IN INFORMATION SCIENCE: 20 semester hours including Computer Science and Computer Engineering 1 44 and 367, at least four hours from computer science courses numbered above 250 (excluding 322 and 449 ) , and Business 202. Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 28, or equivalent. SECONDARY TEACHING MINOR: See description under School of Education.

ELEMENTARY TEACHING MAJOR: See description under School of Education.

STATE ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS: See description under School of Education.

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING: Computer Scienc and Computer Engineering

1 3 1 . 245. 345. 346. 490; Mathematics 1 5 1 . 1 52, 245, 2 3 . 340 or 34 1 and one of 230, 3 3 1 , or 356; Computer Science and Co m­ puter Engineering 1 44, 2 70, 380, 480; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 163, 164; Chemistry 1 20 or 1 2 5; at least fo ur semester hours chosen fro m Physics 233, 234, 333, 334, 336, or Chemistry 34 1 ; 1 0 additional

343 Programming language Concepts A study and comparison of features fo und in different computer languages. Imperative object-oriented, functional. and declara­ tive languages will be studied. Programs written in several of the languages. Prerequisite: 270. II (4)

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semester hours from any upper level Computer Science and Computer Engineering course (except 449 or 503 ) .

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and Computer Engineering 1 3 1 , 245, 345. 346, and 1 44 or 240. Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, and 245 or 253; Chemistry

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ing. and problem solving techniques. Conside ration of the ethi­ cal and social dilemmas posed by AI. The programming language LISP will be taught and used in several projects. Prerequisite: 2 70. MATH 245. aly 1 998-99 1 (4)

MINOR IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING: Computer Sc ience

1 20 or 1 2 5 ; Physics 1 2 5 , 1 26, 1 35 , 1 36 or 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64.

345 Analog Electronics

An introduction to analog integrated circuit design techniques, including single and multistage amplifiers, frequency response and feedback method . Lahoratory work is part of the course. I (4)

Course Offerings

346 Digital Electronics

A grade of C or higher is strongly recommended in all prerequisite courses.

Analysi of digital design techniques. including a review of combinational logic. flip flops, registers. counters, and timing circuits. Prerequisite: 144. I II (4)

1 1 5 Solve It With the Computer

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Teaches how computer use can be combined with mathematical reaso ning to solve problems. Spreadsheet package and other computer tools to solve p roblems from elementary statistics, fmancial transactions, and other areas where mathematics and data are used in every day life. Prerequisite: fulfillment of the PLU entrance requirement in mathematics. I I (4)

348 Modellug and Simulation An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematical modeling and computer simulation. The course will cover build­ ing and validating abstract models and simulating them using simulation languages. Prerequisite: 1 44. Recommended: 270 and either MATH 34 I or 345. aly ( 4 )

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1 20 Computerized Information Systems

367 Database Management

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Introduction to computers including management information systems development, telecom munications, operating systems, spTeadsheets, graphics, and database management. Includes a computer laboratory component. Prerequisite: MATH 1 28 or 1 40 or equivalent. I II (4)

An introduction to the fundamental concepts necessary fo r design, use. and implementation of da tabase systems. The entity­ relationship and relational models are studied in detail. Indi­ vidual. organiZation. and societal concerns related to accuracy and privacy o f d tao Major small group project. Prerequisite: 144 Recommended: 270. II (4)

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1 3 1 IntroductioD t o Bngineering

An introduction to the engineering profession and development of basic skills important to the p rofession, including problem solving, engineering design, graphics, use of computers, com­ puter programming, engineering economics, and ethics in engineering. Prerequ isite: Completion o f college-preparatory mathematics. I ( 2 ) 144 Introduction t o Computer Science

Elementary data structures reviewed fo r efficiency under differ­ ent conditions. Analysis of problems associated with searching and sorting. Study of fo rmal models of computation ( finite automata, pushdown automata. and Turing machines). Study of fo rmal language concepts such as regular expressions and gram­ mars. Prerequisite: 270. MATH 245. 1 (4)

An introdu tion to computer science including problem solving, algorithm design, structured programming, nume rical and non­ numerical applications. and use of data files. Ethical and social impacts of computing. Prerequisite: 4 years of high school math­ ematics or MATH 140 or equivalent. T Il (4)

Analysis of advanced data structures including B-Trees, Hash Tables, and Red-Black trees. Study of algorithms for graph theory. heuristic search. databases, file systems. and other topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: 371 . II (4)

371 Algorithms, Machlnes, and Grammars

199 Directed Reading

380 Assembly language and Computer Organization

Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or interests, primarily for students awarded advanced placement in computer science. Admission only by department invitation. ( 1-2)

omputer assembly langu ge applied to various problems. Topics include data and instruction formats. addressing. linking, macro definition. and computer architecture. Prerequisite: 270. Strongly recommended: 346. (4)

24S Electrical Circuits Intr duction to the fundamental concepts of DC circuits includ­ ing Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws and the fun ction of inductive and capa itive elements. Prereq uisite: PHY 1 54. I (4)

385 Computer Architecture An introduction to the structure and operation of large com­ puter systems. Topics include data representation, memory structure. I/O processing. multi-processing systems such as parallel, pipeline. and stack machines. Examples of the architec­ ture of several large systems are analyzed. Prerequisite: 380. MATH 245. ( 2 )

270 Data Structures

Study of object-oriented programming techniques and fu nda­ mental data structure abstractions and implementations includ­ ing list, stack, queue, and trees with applications to sorting. searching. and data storage. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or higher in 1 44. I II (4)

191 Independent Study Prerequ isite: consent of department chair. ( 1 --4)

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nication. Topics include system topology, message and packet switching, bus structures and data-link transmission. Prerequisite: 1 44 . Recommended: 270. 346. MATH 34 1 or 345. 39 1 Problem SGlving and Programmin g Seminar

An introduction to concepts of artificial inteUigence, including expert systems, natural language processing, image understand-

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386 Compnter Networks

An introduction to computer networks and computer commu­

aly (4)

330 Introduction to Artificial lntelligeoce

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37 1 Design and Ana1ysls of Algorithms

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Designed to imp rove advanced problem solving and program­ ming skills, including advanced data st ructures. A goal of the course is participation i n the regional ACM progra mming Y


competition. Pass/Fail o n l y. Students may take this course more than once. Prerequisite: 270 or consent o f i n struc to r. 1 ( I ) 400 Topl£s In Computer Science

480 M icroprocessors

Study of mi roprocessors and their use in microcomputer systems. Pr requ isites : 346, 380. I ( 4 )

Selected topic fro m the list below or topic of c u r ren t interest

491 Independent Study

i n the discip l i ne. Frequent t o p i cs a re : Co mputer Sec u rit y,

Prerequi ite : consen t of departmenl c h ai r. ( 1 -4)

Parallel Com p u ti n g , G r a p h ic al Use.r I n te rfac e Programming, Par allel Processing Topologies, Genetic Al g ori t h ms , and Neural Networks. J S a/y ( 1-4) 4 1 0 TopJcs in Computer Engineerlog Se l ected t op i c from the list below or lopic of current interest in the d isc i p li ne. Frequ nt topic s are: Computer Security, Parallel Co m pu ting , T r aph i cal User I n terface P rogra m mi n g, Parallel Proce i ng Topologies, Genetic Al go r it h m s , and Neural Networks. J 5 a/y ( 1-4)

412 Computer Graphics

A s tudy of the techniques and t heo r y u d to ge ne ra te comp uter graph ics. Both two-and three-dim n sion a l rep res en ta t io ns will be coveTed. Course work i nc l udes several programming as ignments plus a p rojec t . Prerequ isites: 270 and MATH 2 30 or 33 I . a!y ll ( 4 )

420 Software Engineering An e n g ineer i ng approach to the develo pment of large software

packages. To pics i n cl ude so ftware req ui re ments definiti o n , structured programming, software design, s p ecifications, a n d software test ing . Consideration o f societal and e th ica l issues

surrounding software engineering. M ajor small gToup project. Prerequisite: 270, MATH 245. a/y II

(4)

434 Transport: Momentum, hiergy and Mass

495 Computer Science Research I nvolve ment in an o ngo i ng research p roJec t in computer 'dence

under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: cons e n t of instruct T . ( 1 -4)

499 Capstone Seminar Written and oml p rese n tatio n of a p roject in a topi c of interest by th e student under the supervision of fac ult y member. Discussion of the skills needed for go o d research and technica l communication of that re e.arch . S tudy of th social im pl i aLions of computing. Com plet io n f t h is course tisfies the core requirement for a sen io r cap s ton e sem i nar/pr ject. Lasts two mesters beg i n n i ng in the fall ernester; May gradua tes should start tbe course in the fal l of their senior year and December graduates should begin the course in the faJ I f their j u n ior year. Final presentation s are given during the sprillg seme ter. here are 2 credits given each term for a total of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Senior Computer Sciene or Computer En gine e ri ng m ajor or consent of department chair. ! II ( 2 ) 503 Workshops in EducationRl Tedmology Wo rks h op s d esi gn ed to cxp, nd teach er s ' k nowledge about the app l i cati o n o f new comp u te r and related technology in educa­ t i o n a l s e tt in gs Does not cou n t toward degrees i n computer science. ( 1-4)

Co ncept s and equ a tions of c lass i al omi nuum fluid mechanics: momentL1Jl1, energy, and mass transport, transport coeffici ,ot

43 6 Pattern Recognition The use of th e co mputer to re cogn ize p a t ter ns i n data. Top i c s i n cl u de a rt ific ia l int e l l ig nce, clu s t e r a nalysis a l go r ith ms , lea rn i ng a l gor i thms, and patlern p roce s si ng . L sues associated w it h making deci sions fro m d a ta a n al yze d by machines a. n d the societal and privacy im pl ica tions and ethical co n ce r n s i nvolved in tho e kinds of decisions. M aj o r smal l group p roj ec t . Pre requi ­ s ites: 270, MATH 245. a/y II ( 4 ) 438 Expert Systems

The devel o p ment of Al system which op erate at the l evel of a human expert. St udents will expl ore the structure of expert sys­ tem s and use an expert system d evel o p men t tool. Prerequisite: 330 o r consent of instructor. a/ y n (4)

444 OpeJ"ating Systems An introducti n to co mp ut e r perating systems inclu ding process scheduling, memory ma na g emen t , and me sys t e m s . Major small gro u p proj ect . P rere q u i s it e : 380, MATH 245. I ( 4 ) 446 VLS J Design An introduction to t h e design of very l a rge- sc a le i nt eg rate d systems u s i n g compute r-aided de s ig n method . P re re qu is i te: 346.

If ( 2 ) 44 9 Computer Science In the Secondary School Methods and materials i n seconda ry school computer science teaching. LOGO, PI LOT, etc., may be co n si dered . Does not count toward a major in comp ut e r science. Pr r qui site:

144 .

• /y

I I (2)

4SS CompUers An intro du c tion to the organ iz a t i o n , specification and a nalys i s of programm i ng l anguages , incl u d i ng sc annin g, pars i ng , o bj e ct ode, run-time mach i n structllre.s and optimization. P re requ i ­ site: 380, MATH 245. a/y 1 998-99 (2)

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- vi scosi t y, thermal conductivity, mass diffusivity - inviscid and laminar flows, boundary layers, experimental and numerical modeling of transport proces ses . Prerequisite: PHYS 333 or conse n t of instructor. I I (4)

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Cooperative Education Internships C oo pe rat ive education is a unique prog r am that offers "hands-on" job expe rie nc e ( cal led experiential education). Through intem ships studen ts c a n weave opportunities for work and 1 arning at the same time. Th e program features systematic c oo pera t io n between the university and an extensive number of employers in the Puget ound community. Although the program's career-related advantages are obvious, its main benefits are ducational. Students gain an appreciation of the relationship between theory and application, and may learn, both early and first-hand, about new developments in a particular field. Cooperative education p rov i d es timely and extended 0 portunities for developing commu nication skills orally nd i n writing. A cooperative education program can enable students to become aware of 0PP rtWlities to contribute creatively to tbe changing dimensions of work in present-day society. FACULTY: Phelps,

Director.

lWO MODHLS: The Coo p er a tive Education Program accom­ modates both pa r t - t i me and full-ti.me work modes. Part-time work which allows students the 0PP rtunity to t ake on-campus courses concurrently is labeled the "Parallel Model." A full-time work exper ien ce fits under the "Al te rna t ing ModeL" In most

cases, s tu d e n ts will fullow one or the otber, but some de p a rt ­ ments or schools may develop sequences that combine both parallel and a l te r n ati n g work modes, ull·time summer work, for ex a mp l e , would be classified as perience, and many an alte rnat in g cooperative educat io n summer j obs p rovide for learning that relat to s lude nt.!T aca­ demic o bj e ct i ves.

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THE PROCESS FOR STUDENTS: To be eligible for admission

Economics

into the Cooperative Education Program a student mu t have completed 30 semester hours and be in good standing.

"Want is a grow ing giant whom rlre coat of Have was never

Students who wish to participate apply to either the Co-op

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Office in Harstad Hall or to a Co-op faculty coordinator or

la rge enough to cover."

sponsor serving this function in specified departments, divisions,

Economics is the , tudy of how people establish social arrangements for producing and distributi.ng goods and sel'vices to sustain and enhance human life. Its majn objective is to determine a wise use of lim ited economic resources s that people receive the maximum benefit at the lowest cost. The economics disci pline embraces a body of tech­ n iques a nd conceptual tools that are useful for u nder­ standing and analyzing our complex econom.ic system.

or schools. Both written application and personal in terview are required to determine eligibility, terms for placement, areas of interest, academic requirements, and kinds o f positions available. Students are responsible for their learning activities during their cooperative education position. Each student must seek out and arrange for academic supervision from a faculty coordinator or sponsor. Faculty are responsible fo r insuring that the work experience provides appropriate learning opportunities for helping to establish the learning agreement, and for deter­

mining a grade.

Learning is facilitated through:

(I)

use of a "Learning

Agreement"; ( 2 ) completing an academic project; contact with the faculty sponsor;

(4) attendance at one work­

The learning agreement, developed by each student with the assistance of a fa culty sponsor, lists learning objectives with measurable indicators of learning, and also i ncorporates supplementary resources such as reading materials and partici­ pation i n work-related training sessions. The learning agreement is signed by the student, the fa culty sponsor, the program

substituted fo r Economics 152 for purpos s o f major and minor

director, and the work supervisor, each of whom receives a copy. Contact between the faculty sponsor and the student must be sufficient to allow the sponsor to serve as a resource and provide academic supervision. Typically, this can be accomplished during one or two site visits. Stude.nts i n a "parallel" cooperative educa­

requirement . Econom ics

requirement.

499 meets the senior eminar/project

For students planning graduate work in economics or

business, additional math pre.paration will be necessary. For specific courses, consult your major adviser.

tion program may arrange to meet with the sponsor on campus.

HONORS MAJOR: Outstanding students may choose to pursue

some distance from

graduating in economics with honors. In addition to meeting all

campus may maintain contact through periodic phone confer­

other major requirements, in order to be granted departmental

ences, when site visits are impractical.

honors a student must: CA) have an

Employers are responsible to: ( 1 ) provide opportunit ies for

point average of 3. 50 or better;

students to achieve their learning objectives within the limits of

standard major in

their work settings; (2) help students develop skills related to

(B)

verall university grade take fo ur hours bey nd the

495, Honors Thesis (

tudents app ly for

admission to this cour e in the second semester of their junior

the contextual aspects of the work world ( such as relationships

year. The department grants a d mis s ion

and (3) facilitate students' integration into

based on the student's pri

their work setting so that their employment proves valuable and

r

to 495, Ho nors Thesis,

work in economics and the quality

of the general research pro posal .) ; (

productive.

) present the results of the

work completed in 495, Honors Thesis, at a meeting of Omicron

Students are required to register for at least one credit hour after accepting a Co-op position. Throughout an undergraduate

Delta Epsilon (the economics honorary ) .

academic career a student may receive a maximum of

MINOR: 24 s em es ter hours, including 1 5 1 , 1 52, 35 1 or 352, and 12 additio nal hours of electives, 4 of which may be in statistics.

16 semes­

ter hours of credit in cooperative education.

ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCIETY: The department offers membership in Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Econom i cs Honorary Society, to qualifie majors. For specific criteria, see any departmental faculty member.

Course Offe rings 376 Work Experience I A supervised educational experience in a work setting. Requires the completion of a Cooperative Education Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor.

for advanced level of responsibillty. Requi res the completion of a Cooperative Education Learning Agree ment in consultation with a faculty sponsor.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See

Education.

( I- 8 )

416 Work Experience U A supervised educational experience in a work setting providing

( [ -8)

477

International Work Experience A supervised educational experience in another country. Requires completion of the International Cooperative Education Agreement, completion of a clearance checkl ist, and an approved

School of

Course Offerings 1 30 Global and Environmental Ecooomic Priodples Analysis of public po licy and privat behavior; appropriate pricing, resource valuation, taxes and subsidie , trade policies, sustainable development, and income gtowth and distribution. Students cannot take both 1 3 0 and 1 52 fo r credit. ( 4 )

1 5 I Principles o f Macroeconomics

plan of reporting in consultation with a faculty sponsor. ( I - 1 2 )

I ntrod uces the economy as a whole and major issues such as

576 Work Experien.ce m A supervised educational experience at the graduate level.

t rade.

inflation, unemployment, economic growth , and international

In troduces the study of economic decision making by firms and

consultation with a faculty sponsor a n d the student's graduate program adviser. P

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1 5 2 Principles of Microeconomics

Requires completion of a Cooperative Education Agreement i n

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BACHELOR OF AlITS MAJOR: (A) Minimum of 40 semester 35 1 , 352, 499, 1 2 ho urs of electives in economics, 4 hours selected from tat istic 23 1 or Mathematics 34 1 , and 4 hours selected from Economics 344 (if not used as economics electives)' Business 202 or 302, Mathematics 348, or up to 4 hours in computer scienc.c, ( B ) A grade point average of 2.50 in all classes included in the 40 seme ste r hours toward the m ajor. With departmental approval, conomics 1 3 0 may be hours, i n cluding 1 5 1 , J 52 ,

who accepts the responsibility to function in a resource role.

with co-worke rs ) ;

ALOO EMER ON

RALPH \

FACULTY: Re im an , Chair; Brue, R. J ensen, Nugent, N. Peterson, Terada, Travi. , Wen tworth.

( 3 ) periodic

shop during the work experience; and (5) an on-site supervisor

Those involved in "alternating" programs

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Y


individuals. Econom i tool and co n ce pt s such as markets,

352 Intermediate M icroeCODomic Analysis

su pply

and demand, and efficiency appl ied

Theory

issue .

4)

to contemporary

3 2 1 Labor Economic8 AnalysiS of l ab o r markets and labor marker is�ues; wage deteT­

m in a tion ; investment in human capital. u n io n ism and coUective ba rgai n i n g; l aw a n d p u b l i c pol icy; discrunination; labor

of consumer beh av ior ; product and factor prices

u nd e r

conditions of mo n o p o ly, competit io n, and in termediale markets;

economi . Prerequisites: 1 30 or 1 52, or consent 0 i nstructor and MATH 1 28, 1 0, or 1 5 1 . (4)

welfare

III n

36 1 Money and Banldng The n ture and

role of money; monetary theory; tools and implementation of m n tary policy; regulation of i ntermediar­ ies; banking activity- in financial m rkets; in ternali nal conse­ quen ces of and con st rai n ts on m o ne ta ry policy. Prerequisites: 1 5 1 or consent of instructor.(4)

o z

congestion and the common-prop rty basis for environmental degraciation, and the valuation of environmental amen it ies . The second part of the course develops analytical models for the LISe of renewable a nd exb aus ob le reso u rces ove r t im e. P rereq u isi te : 1 30 or 1 52, o r consent of instructor. (4)

362 Public Finance

n III

331 International EconomLcs Reg io n a l and international specialization, comparative costs.

37 1 Industrial Organization and Public Policy

mobility; earning� i nequality, unemployment, and wages and

inflation. Prerequisites: 1 30 or 1 5 2 , or co nsen t

0

i nst r uc to r. ( 4 )

330 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics The fir ·t h al f of the course examines the th

ory of external i t ies,

international payments and exchange ra tes ; national policies that promote or reslrict trade. Prerequisites; 1 30 or 1 52, or consent of i ns t ructor. (4)

o s:

Public taxation and expenditure at all govemmental le Is; the incidence of taxes . the pu b l ic debt and the provi io n of public goods s uc h as national defense. education , pure air. and wa ter. Prerequisites: 1 30 r 1 52 . or consent of instructo r. (4) An analysis of the struct ure. cond uct , and pe rfo rm an ce of American i ll d ust ry and publi pol ic ies that foster and alter industrial structure and behavior. Prerequ isites: no or 1 5 2, or c o n se n t of instructor. ( 4 )

38 1 Comparative Economic Systems An analysis and omparis n of contemporary ec nomic systems. Prerequisites: l S I or 1 52, or consent 0 instructor. F u l fills ero s­ cultural l i n e in th Perspect ives on Diversity requ i rem nt. (4) 399 Internship A resea r h and writing

project in con n ect i o rt with a t ude n t's Prerequisites: sophomore standing plus one course in economics. and co nsen t of the departmellL approved off-campus ac tiv ity.

( 1- 4 ) 49 1 . 492. 493 Independent Struly

Prerequisite: consent of the depa rtm en t and co mp letion of either 3 5 1 or 352. ( 1-4) 495 Honors Thesis In dep e n de n t research supe

ised b one or more faculty Research p roposa l and topic developed by the st uden t in the junior year. A p p l i ca tion to e n ro l l is m ade in the second semester of the juni r year. Prerequi itc; ec no m ics majoT and consent of the depa rt men t. (4)

member .

34 1 Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies Analysis of t he theoretical fram ework or devel op me n t w ith applications to alternative economic development st rategies LlSed in the newly- emerging cleve! ping countries. E mp hasis on com par ison between countries, assessments of tbe relative importance of c ul t ural values, historical experi e n ce . and g vern ­ mental policies in the devel o p m ent process. Ful fills CIOSS­ cultural line in the Perspectives on iversil req uireme n t. Prereql1 isites: 1 30 or 1 5 1 , or consent of i nslructor. (4) 343 OperatioD Research Quantitative III thods fo r dec ision problems. E m p has i s on linea r programming and o th er determin isti models. Prereq u isi te : STAT 231 or equivalent . ( 2 ) 344 Econometrics In troduc t io n 10 the methods and to I of c onom tries a s t h e basis for applied research l l1 eco oom ics. Specitication, estimation iUld testi ng in the c lass ica l linear regression model. P rerequi site : S AT 23 1 or equivalent. (4) 345 Mathe.matical Topics In Economics An i n t roduction to basic applications of mathe ma t ical tool LlSed in economic analysi s . Prerequisi tes: I 0 or 1 5 1 or 1 52. or con se n t of instructor.

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351 Intermediate MacroecoDomic Analysis

National income determinat ion in cl uding policy i m pl ica t io n s within the inst itu tio nal framework f the U.S. economy. Prerequisites: 1 30 or I S ] ' and MATH 1 28 or 1 40 or I S ! . (4)

496 Seminar Seminar in economic pro b lems and poli cies with empha�i o n encouraging

the student to i ntegrate problem-solving method­ of econom ic a nalysis. Topic ( s ) selected by class and i n st ru ct o r. Pr requisi te: consent of inst ructor.

ology with to ols participants

( 1 -4) 499 EvolutioD of Economic Thought

Economic thought from

times; em ph a s i s on Keynes; the classical econom ists, the socialists, the marginalists. Lhe neocJa�sical econom ists, and the Keyne ians. Prerequ is ite: 35 1 C)r 3 2 (may be taken con unen t l y ) . Meets the senior seminar/ p roject req uirernent. (4) the period

from Adam

.wcient to modern

Smith to J. M.

500 Applied Statistica1 Analysis An intensive introd u c t io n

the application

to statl. tical methods. E m pha si s on of inferential talistics to concrete ituations. (4)

50 1 Analytical Methods for Dedsion-MaJcing he co ncepts of probability, sa m p l i n g , statisti al de c is io n theory. li n ear pr g ram m i n g, nd ther determ inisti m dels app l ie d to man age r ial p roble m s . Prereq u is ite: 500. (4)

520 Economic Policy Analysis An intensive introduction to the c ncepts of macroeconomics and microeconom ics with an e m ph a si s on within a gl bal framework. (4)

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School of Education The School of Education offers programs of study leading z o I­ < u :;) c

to certification fo r elementary, secondary, and special education teachers, admin istrators, reading specialists, and

is de igned to provide with a blending of the li b e ra l arts and a variety of guided field experiences beginning early in the educa­ school librarians. The curricul u m

graduates

tional sequence. The faculty is committed to the develop­ ment of educational personnel sensitive to the varied individual needs of learners.

FACULTY: Beck, Dean; Baughman, Associa te Dean; Lamoreaux, Barritt, Byrnes, hastain, Gerlach, Hillis, Leitz, Lewis, McGraw, Minetti, Mulder, Reisberg, Shanton, Wentworth, G. Williams, Yerian, Yetter.

Director of Graduate Studies;

PROGRAMS OFFERED: The chool of Education is accredited by the ational Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the orthwest Association of Schools and Colleges, and the Washington State Board of Education for the prepara­ tion of elementary and secondary teachers, principals, program administrators, and special education teachers, with the Master of Arts in Education the highest degree approved. The accredita­ tion gives PLU graduates reciprocity with many other states. Programs for the preparation of school administrators and school librarians are available. The School offers coursework toward the conversion, renewal, or reinstatement of teaching certificates. For preparation of school nurses, see School of Nursing section of this catalog. The School of Education offers graduate degrees in Class­ room Teaching, Educational Administration, Literacy Education, Special Education, and the master's degree with Initial Teaching Certification. Information regarding these programs is available from the director of graduate programs in the School of Education ( 535-7272 ) . HLlGIBnlTY REQUIREMENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL STUDlES (Undergraduate or Certification Only): Students seeking to register for Education 302 or for Educational Psychology 26 1 /Education 262 must apply to the School of Education, in order to receive a registration number. Official transcripts of all college/university work, writing samples, and official documentation of college admission test scores must be submitted to the School of Education by the first Friday in October or March before being admitted to the School of Education and allowed to enroll in education courses the following term. Requirements include: 1.

Evidence of verbal and quantitative ability as illustrated by one of the following test scores:" a. cholastic Aptitude Test ( SAT) Verbal 425 or above; Total 1 040 or above.... b. Washington Pre-College Test ( WPCT) or (TETEP) Verbal 48 or above; Total 1 03 or aboveH c. American College Test Assessment (ACT) Verbal 20 or above; Composite 23 or above** All applicants who have rIOt takerz SAT, ACT, WPCT or TETEP must submit a TETEP score.

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Test score requirements are set by the State of Washington and a re subject to change.

2. Sophomore standing ( 3 0 or more semester hours) 3 . Cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 4 . Psychology 1 0 1 : grade of C or Iligher 5. Writing 10 1 : grade of C or higher

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Application forms and procedures for admission to p rofes­ sional studies in education are available from the 'chool of Education. Students who do not meet aU the requ.irements may exercise the appeal process for admission to Education 302 or Educational Psychology 261 /Education 262. Admission appeal process forms are available from an adviser in the School of Education. All students admitted to Education 302 or Educational Psychology 2 6 1 /Education 262 are admitted provisionally to a program of professional studies, subject to conditions and procedures identified in the Elementary/Secondary I nitial Level Certification Handbooks, available in the School of Education. Continuation in the program of p rofessional studies is subject to continuous assessment of student development and performance.

BAB and/or CERTIFICATION RHQIDREMENTS: Students become candidates for certification when they have successfull)' completed the following: 1. All course work with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above. 2. Professional Education Sequence for elementary or secondary tea hing. 3. An approved teaching major(s) o r concentration(s) (see requirements as listed under Academic Preparation). 4. All courses in education and in major and minor fields with grades of C or higher ( for secondary education, B-or higher required in education courses ) . 5. Achievement of proficiency in writing a n d math skills. 6. Anthropology 21 O/History 2 1 0 or Anthropology 1 02 for secondary teaching and Anthropology 1 02 for elementary teaching. 7. Coursework or courses on the issues of abuse, as approved by the School of Education (SPED 480). 8. A student teaching experience. S tudents must complete all application procedures by the last Friday i n March for fall student teaching or the last Friday i n October for spring stlldent teaching. 9. A valid first aid card. TEACH ER CERTIFICATION lnidal Teaching Certificate: Students who successfully complete a program of professional studies in the School of Education, and who meet all related academic requirements for a degree or a certificate, will be recommended by the School of Education for a Washington initial teaching certificate. Additional state re­ quirements for the certiEcate include a Washington State Patrol check, an FBI fingerprint check, and a passing score on state entry-to-practice tests. Information regarding all state require­ ments and procedures for certification is available in the School of Education. S ta te requirements are subject to im mediate change. Students should stay ir1 close corztact with their School ofEducatiorl advisers for upda tes in program or application requirements.

Initial Teachiog Certificate Renewal: Under state regulations in effect at the publication of this catalog, the Initial Certificate is valid for four years, and may be renewed for an additional three years by meeting the following requirements: l. In order to be eligible to renew or have an initial certificate reissued, an individual must have completed all coursework requirements for continuing certification or have completed 1 0 semester ( I 5 quarter) hours of study since the issuance of the MOST RECENT initial certificate in the role for which renewal or reissuance is being sought ( WAC 1 80-79-065) ( 1 ) (a). The individual must also meet the recency requirement described below. In some cases the same credits may apply to both the renewallreissuance requirement and the recency requirement. 2. In order to be eligible to obtain, renew, or have an initial certificate reissued, the individual must have completed 1 0


semester ( 1 5 quarter) hours within th seven years preceding application for the initial certificate. The recency requirement does not < pply to individuals who are seeking the continuing certificate. (W 1 80-79-06 5 ) ( 3 ) 3 . A n individual must co mplet e the renewal application form and send it to the School of Education, with the $ 1 5 renewal fee (check made payable to Pacific Lutheran Un iversityJ. 4 . An individual must h ave a copy of his or her I n i t i a l Certificate on fue in the School of Education. Converting to the Continuing Certificate: At the time of pu lication of this catalog, state requirements illclude: I . 30 semester hours of upper division or graduate level post­ baccalaureate study. 2. 1 80 days of full- time teaching, of which 30 days must be with the same employer. 3. 'lWo endorsements. 4. Coursework in issues of abuse. Although the master's degree is no longer required, any School of Education M.A.E. degree can be used to meet the academic re­ quirements for the continuing certificate. Other means by which the School of Education can help persons meet continuing certi­ fication requir ments will be con idered as they become known. tiLEMENTARY PREPARATION General requirements: In addition to the general u niversity and core requirements in all curricula, certain specific requirements i.n general education must be met. 1. Anthropology 102 , Explorulg Anthropology; Culture and Society ( recommended) or Anthropology 2 1 O/History 2 1 0, Global Perspect ives , or the equivale n t must be taken. 2. Mathematics 223 or equivalent must be taken. 3. Biology I I I or life science. 4. Natural Scien ces 206 or physical science.

State Endorsement Requirements: Program shall be comprised of the appropriate pedagogy courses and field experiences/ intern hip as well as the following subject areas: I ) Language literacy ( reading strategies, writing process, communication, language skills, child and adolescent literature); 2) Mathematics ( number sense, measurement, geometric sense, probabilitr & st atis t ics , algebraic sense); 3) Science (life, physical, and lab) ; 4) Social studies ( U.S. history, geography, economics, civics) ; 5 ) The arts ( music, visual arts, drama, creative movemen t ) ; 6) Healtblritness ( fo undations of health, fitness, and safe living); 7) p edagogy; 8 ) field experien es. SECONDARY PREPARATION General requirements: In addition to the general university requirements in all curricula, certain specific requirements for geneTal edu a t i o n must be met. 1 . Anthropology/History 2 1 0, Global Perspectives ( recom­ mended) or Anthropology 1 02, Culture and Socie ty, must be taken. 2. Computer cience 322, Microcomputers in the Classroom, must be taken ( Physical Education and Music Education degree m ajors excepted). 3. Minimum grade requirements include a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 � r the following: a. Entrance to professional sequence. b. Enrollment in any course in professional education. c. Graduation and/or certification . 4. Grades of C or higher in the following: a. All courses in majors and minors. b. Writing 1 0 1 , Psychology 10 I, Anthropology/History 210 or Anthropology 1 02 . c. Computer Science 3 2 2 .

ACADEMIC PREPARATION: All students desiring to teach i n Secondary Schools (4-1 2) must co mplet e a minimum of one of the primary endorsements l isted below. They may also opt to complete (a) a second primary endorsement, (b) one or more supporting endorsements, (c) a university major or minor that does not result in a teaching endorsement. The teaching endorsements listed below have been revised because of changes in the Washington Administrative Code. These endorsements a ffect all students \vho are admitted to the university after August 3 1 , 2 000. PRINCIPAL'S AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR'S CERTIFICATE: Preparation programs leading to certification at t h e initial and continuing levels for school and district-wide program administrators are available through the School of Education. Specific requirements for the certificates are identified in handbooks available upon request. Master's degrees in educational administration are described in the Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

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CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL NURSES: Educational Staff Associate certification for school nurses is individually designed through the School of Nursing. For information regarding school nurse certification, contact the School of Nursing (535 -8872 ) . TEACHING ENDORSEMENTS: Students preparing to teach in the elementary schools (K-8) will complete a program in the School of Education which meets the endorsement requirements al ready listed under Elementary Preparation. They may opt to include an additional primary or supporting endorsement from those that follow. Students preparing to teach in the secondary school (4- 1 2) will complete a program in the school of Education as described in handbooks prepared by the School of Education and they will also complete a minimum of one of the primary endorsements that follow. They may opt t() include an additional primary or supp rting endorsement from those that follow or a university major or min r as listed elsewhere in the catalbg. The following teaching endorsements reflect the current req uirements listed in the Washington Administrative Code for all tho e who graduate after August 3 1 , 2000. Elementaryl See e n d orse men t requirements already listed under Elementary Preparation and specific requirements given by the School o f Education. Teaching Endorsements

ARTS - VISUAL ARTS ( 1 ) Skills and techniques in multiple media ( painting, sculpture, d raw i ng , computer, photography); (2) Composition and production using design pri n ci p les ; ( 3 ) Analysi s and interpretation of art; (4) Social, cultural and historical contexts and connections; ( 5 ) Material, equipment and facilities safety. All levels - primary - 34 semester hours. Art 1 60, 226, 250, 365 ( 1 , 5 ) ; 1 96 ( 2 ) ; 296 ( 3 ) ; 1 80 or 1 8 1 ( 4 ) ; 34 1 , 440. State elldorsement requiremellts:

All levels - supporting - 20 semester hours.

Courses to be selected in consultation with adviser in Art and Education. BIOWGY

( I ) Botanyllab; ( 2 ) Zoologyllab; ( 3 ) Genetics; (4) Microbiology or cell biology/lab; (5) Chemistry/lab; (6) Ecology; (7) Evolution; ( 8 ) Lab safety, practice, and management; (9) Lab, inquiry-based experience, ( 1 0 ) Contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues and concepts.

State endorsement req uirements:

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SecOII(/ary - prima ry - 32 semester h o u rs. B io l ogy 1 6 1 ( 1 . 2, 3, 4, ( 0 ) ; 162 ( I , 2 , 1 0 ); 323 (2, 6, 7); 340 ( ! , 9); 33 2 or 407 (3, 9, 1 0 ) ; 328 or 348 ( 1 , 2, 3, 4, 9); 424 (6, 1 0) or 475 ( 7, ( 0 ); Chem istry 1 05 or 1 20 (5, 8, 10).

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Secondary - sLLpp ort illg - 20 eme,Ster hOllrs.

Iliology 1 61 ( 1 , 2 , 3. 4. 9); [ 6 2 ( 1 , 2 , 9); 2 0 1 or 328 (4); 323 (6, 7, [ 0); ,hemi t ry 1 0 5 Or J 20 ( 5, 8, t o ) .

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224, 225, 227, 326, 328 ( 2 ) ; o m mullicario!1 284 and 285 or 330 (3); La ngu a ge 44 or English 40 ( 4 ) ; E nglish 24 1 ( 5 ) ; 4 hours from E n g l is h 333 , 334, Educati n 428, 429; 4 h o urs from En gl i sh 2 J 5, 2 1 6, 2 1 7; 4 hours from English 2 3 0 232, 2 33 , 234 . ENGUSHffiNGUSB LANGUAGE ARTS

CHEMISTRY State n do rSCllletll req u ireme1l ts: ( I ) General p r i n c ip les of ch e m is t ry - i norgan ic . physical, and analytical/lab; ( 2 ) Organi ch roi t ryl lab; ( 3 ) Quantitative anal i s/lab ; ( 4 ) Biochem istry/lab; ( 5 ) Physics; (6) Laboratory sa fe ty, pr actice. and management; (7) Lab i nquiry-based experience; (8) Relati nship of the co n ce p ts of science to contemporary hi s to ri cal , tech nologieal. aJld societal issues. Secondary - prima ry - 50 semester hours.

Che mi stry 1 20 or [ 25 ( 1 . 6. 7); 232/332 , ltd 234/334 (2, 6, 7); 338 ( 3 ) ; 34 1 , 342, 343, 344 ( I , 6, 7 ; 403 (4 , 5 , 8 ) ; Physics [ 53,

( I ) Acti ng skills; (2)

ESL - all levels - 16 semester hours.

Theatre

Anlhrop ' lob'Y 1 02 (2); LlnJuage 445 ( 2. 5) ; 446 ( 1 , 2); 470,

d esi g n and const ruction; (3) Directi ng; ( 4 ) Stage m an age ­ m nt; ( 5) Analyis a.nd criticism; (6) Equipment, m a ter ials ,

475 ( 2. 3 4 ) . BF.AITHfFlTNESS

wd facil ities safety. Ali i vels - stlpporting - 20 se mester hours. NOTE: Students who "major" in Drama will only rec ive a "Supporting Elldorsemlmt" allti must still complete a "Primary Etldorsemellt" Thea tr 250 r 458 ( l )j 8 hour from 1 5 L , 352, 356, 452 (2. 4,

5. 6 ) ; 454 (3); 358 r Communicat ion [ 23 (5).

EARTH SCIENCE State

ndo rse men t requ irements: ( 1 ) Physical geolo gy; ( 2 )

f-listorical geology; (3 ) Environm nta l i sues related t o ea rt h science; (4) Occwography; ( 5) Astronomy; ( ) Meteo r logy; ( 7 ) Lab safety. practi e. a n d management; (8) Lab, inquiry­ base d exp er i e nce: ( 9) Relationsh ip of lhe concepts of science to contempora ry. h istorica l , tech nol ogical, and societal issues. fcolldary - prima ry - 32 se mester hours eoscience 20 1 ( 1 , 2); 1 03 or 1 04 (3, 7, 8); 1 02 (4, 7 , 8 , 9 ) ; 105

6, 7, 8); Physics 1 1 0 ( 5. 7, 8); 4 hours from Math t 4 0 or higher or ne course from Com p u ter 'cience an Computer En g i neeri ng 144 or 2 20; 1 2 hours from upper division geoscie nce cou es; he m i st ry 1 04 r 1 20; PhY 'i s J 25, 1 35 .

Secondary - support ing - 2 0 semester hOllrs Geoscience 201 ( 1 , 2); 1 03 or 104 ( 7, 8); 1 02

(6, 7, 8 ) ; Physics I J O (5, 7, 8).

(4, 7, 8, 9 ) ; 1 05

ENGLISH State elldo l'Si!nlent req uiremellts: ( I ) Readi ng: ( 2 ) Writing; ( 3 ) Com municali n -, peak in g , liste n i n g. and analyzing; (4)

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Hist ry 460 ( 1 , 4, 5, 6); 8 hours from H i sto ry 25 1 , 252. 25 3 ( 2 , 4 , 5 , 6); J 6 ho u rs (at least 4 up pe r division ek tives i n U. 'J European and 4 upp . r d i v is i o n elec tive. in non-WI stern hist ry, from 1 0 7 or 108 and 2 1 5, 335, 337, 338, 339, 340, 344 ( 3, 4. 5, 6) ; 30 I ( 2 , 4, 5, 6).

'ccondary - support illg - 16 se mester hOll rs. History 46 ( 1 , 4. 5, 6); 4 hours from 25 1, 252, or 253 ( 2 , 4 , 5 , 6 ) ; 4 hotlfS from 1 07 , 1 08, or 2 1 5 (3, 4, 5. 6); 4 upper division

req uirements: ( 1 ) Geometry ( E u c l i dea n and ( 2 ) r ba b i l i ty and staLi st ics; ( 3 ) alculus ( i n te gral wd differentia l) ; (4) Discrete mathema tics; ( 5 ) Logic and problem o l vi ng ; (6) H i story of math or founda tion of

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hours.

( 3. 4) ; 3 ) 7 (4, 5) ; 3 2 1 ( l , 2 ) ; 33 1 ( 5 ) ; 3 4 1 ( 2 ) ; 433 (5); 35 1 o r 356 o r Physics 1 53, 1 63 ( 3 ) . Ma th 1 5 1 , 1 52 ( 3) ; 2 03 ( 6 ) : 2 5

MUSIC Choral m usic. General m u si [nstrum n tal M u i See requirements under Music.

K-8 - pri m li ry - 3 1 -32 sem' fer h o rm. Student� p re par i ng to teach in K-8 may pt to take the fo l low i ng courses for a primary endorsement in En gl i sh . Engl i h 2 14 , 2 1 5 , or E du catio n 408 ( I ) ; 4 hours fro m En gl i sh I

history; n it ed States h isto ry; ( 3 ) World bistory; ( 4 ) Civics/ po liti cal science/Uni ted States gov mment; ( 5 ) Geography; 6) Econom ics.

(2)

n on - Euclidean) ;

Secondary - support ing - 24 semrster ho urs. Engli h 2 1 4 or 2 1 5 ( 1 ) ; Engllsh 328 ( 2 ) : Co m mun ica i n 284 and 285 o r 30 3) ; Eng l i h 4 03 (4); English 241 a nd 2 5 1 (5).

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State endorseme n t req lli rcments: ( 1 ) Pacilic No rt hwes t

State endorsemell f

tudents must have fo ur years of h igh sch oo l foreign language in one language or co u rses through 2 0 1 and 202 at the u niver ity in one fo reign l a ng ua ge: E n sJis h 2 1 4 or 2 1 5 ( 1 ); 4 hours from 216, 2 t 8, 23 0, 233 , 343 ( 1 , 5 ) ; 328 ( 2 ) ; 403 (4 ) ; 24 1 , 25 1 30 1 ( 5 ) ; Comm un ication 330 (3); 4 h ou rs from 2 l 4 , 22 L , 234, 325, 32 7, 34 J , 374.

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Secont/ary - primary - 36 semrster hours.

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tate endorsement requirements: ( l ) Foundations of health and fime S; ( 2 ) Sa fe liv ing, in luding first aid and P Rj ( 3 ) Scien tific fO\J nd�tioos for health and fitness ( anatomy, exercise physiol g , kinesiology/biomech nics, p. ych mo tor matura­ t ion and development, and motor learning) ; ( 4 ) Movement, activi ties, and application with a rt u t i on to s pec ia l n eeds populatiollS; ( 5 ) C ord inat d health ed ucat io n ( alcoh I and o th er drugs, diseases, injury preven lion , human relationships, nutrition, HIV p r eve nt i on . and abuse preven tion ) . Please see requirements Wider Physical &lucal'ioll.

hours from 335. 337 , 338, 339, 340, 344 3, 4, 5, 6) .

Language: ( 5) Literature - American, British, world, a nd multicultural.

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nglish 2 1 4 or 2 1 5 ( 1 ) ; 4 hours fTom Engli sh 224, 225, 227, 26, 328 (2); Com mun i cation 284 and 285 o r 330 (3); Language 446 or E nglis h 403 (4); nglish 24 1 , 2 1 , 30 I ( 5 ) ; Theat re 250 O f 4 5 8 ( 1 . 3, 4, 5); 4 hours from . ng l i s h 2 16. 2 1 8, 2 30, 233, 343 ( 5 ) ; 4 hours (rom English 22 1 , 325. 327 34 1. 374 ( 5 ) .

( 2 ) Cross-cu ltural Leaching and learn i ng stra tegi es; ( 3 ) Literacy development ( readi n g. WT it ing, l isteni ng, speaking); (4) History and theory of ESL; (5) ill truct io n al strat gies Ii r ESL.

6, 7): 403 ( 4 , 5 , 8 ) .

State endorsemeTlt requirements:

eco ndary - primary - 40 semeste r hours.

ENGUSH A S A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESt) State en do rse me n t req uirements: ( 1 ) Lang ua ge ac q u i si t i o n t he ory ;

1 54, 163, and 164 ( 5 ) ; Req u i red �u pp ort i n g: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Seamdary - supporting - 2 2 �emester hours. Chemistry 1 20 ( 1 . 6, 7 ); 232 / 332 , 234/334 (2, 6, 7); 338 ( 2 , 3, D RAMA

( l ) Re ad i ng; ( 2 ) Wr i t i ng: ( 3) Com mun icatio n ; (4) La nguage; ( 5 ) America n , BriLish, world, multicultoral, and ad olescent l i terature.

Sta te endorsenHmt req u i re mel lts :

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340, 344 (3, 4, 5, 6, 7); Political Science 1 5 1 ( 5 ) ; 8 hours, 4 each from two of the three disciplines - any an thropology course other than 1 02 or 2 1 0; any psychology other than 1 0 1 ; Sociology 1 0 1 o r 330 ( 6 ) ; 4 hours from .Economics 1 30 1 5 1 ,

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SPECIAL EDUCATION Scate endorsemCllt req uirements:

0

(I)

Exceptionality; ( 2 ) Curricul u m modification and adaptation; (3) Inclusion; (4) Assessment including behavior analysis, IEP, accommodations; ( 5 ) Legal issues; (6) Specially designed instruction in all content areas; (7) Pro-social skills and behavioral problems; (8) chool, family, community partnerships; (9) TrallSition; ( 10 )

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Organization and management systems; ( I I ) Methods in early childhood education; ( 1 2 ) Collaboration with para-educators.

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AI/ levels - primary - 35 semester ho urs

( 1 , 5 ) ; 301 ( 2 , 4, 5 , 6, 1 0) ; 350 (3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9); 355 (2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, ( 0 ) ; 404 ( 1 2); 405 ( 2 , 3, 4, 5, 6); 407 (2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 10); 480 ( 1, 5, ( 2 ) ; 492 ( 1 , 2, I I ) ; 440 ( 1 - 1 2); 408 (8, 9 ) ; 438 0r 439 ( 1 - 1 2) .

Special Education 200

WORlD LANGUAGES

(1)

PHYSICS

State endorsement requirements:

of scienc to con temporary, hi, torical, technological a.nd societal iss ues. Secondary - primary - 38 se mester hours. Phys ics 1 53 and L 4 ( 1 ) ; 163 and 164 ( J , 2, 3); 223 ( 1 , 4) ; 33 1 and 336 and 354 ( ! ) ; Math I S J , 1 52, and 25 . . Seco llda ry - supporting - 26 semester hours. P hysics 1 5 3 or 1 25 ( I ); Physi cs 1 54 or 1 26 ( I ); 1 63 or 1 35 ( I , 2, 3); 1 64 or 1 36 ( 1 , 2, 3); 223 ( 1 , 4 ) ; Mat h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 , and 1 53 .

Chinese - aI/ levels - supporting - 27 semester hours.

READING

State erldorsement requirecmen ts: ( I ) Assessment nd diagnosis of reading skills and de fi c ien c ies; ( 2 ) Strategies of how to teach (3) La nguag acquisition/integ ration; ( 4 ) Sod II ( 5 ) Reading process including decoding, e ncodin g , and student respo nse to child and adolescent l i tera t u re ; (6) Beginning li t e r cy (r ad in g, writing, spelling, a n d communi atio n ) ; (7) Reading i n the content areas; (8) Li te r cy for a second l anguag learner; ( 9 ) Meta足 cognitive st rategies; (0) Risk fuctors for r ailing difficu l ti es and i ntervention strategies for . tudents e lCpe r ie nc i ng reailing reading;

cu l t u ral contexts for literacy;

d ifficulties. All levels - 5upporring - 1 7 s mester hours.

Education 408 ( I , 2, 5, 6, 8, , 1 0) ; 4 1 1 (2, 3, 6, 8, 9 ) ; 4 1 3 ( 1 , 3, 9); 4 3 8 (3, 4); 490 ( 3, 8, 1 0) ; 4 hours fro m 426, 427, 428, or 429.

SCIENCE

State ndorsemellt reql4irements: ( 1 )

a primary eJldorsement i n biology, che m ist ry, I!arth science, or physics (as described under desig n ate d s iences ) ; (2) a minimum of one course from ach of the other de ignated sciences. Secondary - primary - 44-52 semester hmm. Students opting to be endo rsed in the g e n e ral sciences should . me t with an adviser in dences and education .

SOCIAL STUDIES

State endorsement

(2)

req tliremerlts: ( 1 ) Pacific Northwest history; United States h isto ry, induding chronologie 1, thematic,

multicul tural, et hn ic and women's h is tory; (3) world. reg i on al , or country history; (4) Geography, (5) Po lit ical scien e, civics, or government; ( 6) A!lthropology, psychology, or sociology;

(7) Economi .s.

Secol1dary - primmy - 40 semester hours.

H istory 460 ( 1 , 4); 4 h urs from 25 1 , 252, 253 ( 2 , 4); 4 hours from 1 07, 1 08 ( 2 , 4, 5 , 7); 4 hours from 335, 337, 338, 339,

Communiction - speaks,

understands, reads, and writes in a variety of contexts and situations; (2) Culture; (3) InterdisciplinaIY integration; (4)

State endorsement req uirements: ( I ) General principles o f physics/lab; (2) Lab s a fety, p r actice and m an ag ment; (3 ) Lab, inquiry-based experien e; (4) Relationsllips of the concepts

Language acquisition theory; (5) Methodological study. hinese 1 0 1 , 1 02, 20 1 , 202, 30 1 ( 1 , 2) ; 371 (2, 3, 4); Language 445 (3, 4, 5). French - aI/ levels - primary - 3 1 semester hours. Fre.nch 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( 1 ); 3 2 1 (2, 3 ) ; 42 1 , 422 ( 1 , 2 ) ; Language 4 4 5 ( 3, 4, 5). French - all levels - supporting - 23 semester hours. French 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( I ); 3 2 1 ( 2 ) ; Language 445 ( 3 , 4 , 5 ) . German - aI/ levels - prim ary - 3 J semester hours. German 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( 1 ) ; 3 2 1 ( 2 , 3 ) ; 4 2 1 , 422 Language 445 ( 3 , 4, 5). German - all levels - supporting - 2 3 semester ho urs.

( 1 , 2);

German 2 01 , 202, 30 1 , 302 0 ) ; 3 2 1 ( 2 ) ; Language 445 (3, 4, 5). Norwegian - aI/ levels - primary - 3 1 semester hours. Norwegian 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( 1 ) ; 4 hours from upper division electives in Scandinavian cu lt u re (2, 3 ) and 8 homs from upper division elective in Scandinavian literature ( 1 , 2, 3 ) ;

Language 445 ( 3, 4, 5). Norwegian - all levels - supporting - 23 semester ho urs. Norwegian 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302

( I ); 4 hours from upper division

electives i n Scand inavian culture (2, 3 ) ; Language 445 (3, 4, 5 ) . Spanish - all levels - primary - 3 1 semester hours. Spanish 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 0 ) ; 32 1 (2); 8 hours from 42 1 , 422, 43 1 , 432 (2, 3 ) ; Language 445 (3, 4, 5 ) . Spanish - all levels - s upporting - 2 3 semester hO llrs. Spanish 20 1 , 202, 301, 302 ( 1 ) ; 32 1 (2, 3); Language 445 (3, 4, 5 ) .

Course Offerings 262 Foundations of Education Introduction to teaching; historical, philosophical, social, poli足 tical, ethical and legal foundations. Federal and state legislation fo r special populations. Prerequisites: WRIT 1 0 1 , PSYC 1 0 1 , test scores, sophomore standing, cumuLative GPA of 2.50. ( 3 ) 263 School Observation

Graded observation in schools. Concurrent with 262. ( 1 ) 302 Human LeanUog: Growth and Development Overview of theories of human development emphasizing the individual cognitive, linguistic, socio-cultural, emotional, and

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phys i ca l develop ment of children and adolescents in and out of

4 1 0 Science/Health in K-8 Education St ra t e gi es fo r t e ac h ing

p ro g ra m ; p er m i s si on re q u ire d . (Co ncurrent w i t h 303 . ) (3)

p roblem-solving t echn iq ues will be emp l o yed to explore

interactive curricula from an environmental point of view. Issues

303 Field Observation z o

.... e( U :I Q w

of nutrition and health. Prerequisite: 357. ( Conc u r re n t with 400,

b erva tion of tb developmental nature o f g rowth in learners

40 1 , 4 1 2.) ( 3 )

in various settings i nclu d i ng K - 8 schools. Emphasis on the

development of the skill of observa tion and i n fo rm a l men t. (Concurrent with 302.) ( 1 )

assess­

4 1 1 Strategies ior LanguagelLiteracy Development ross- referenced with 5 1 1 . ) ( 2 )

322 Microcomputers in the Classroom

412 Social Studies in K-8 Education

I ntrod uc tion to t he lise of m i c r computers in ducational set­ tings. Pre or co - req u is ite : ED U C 262 or 302. Does not count to wa rd d grees i n co m p ut er scien . (2)

studies curricula and the lived experiences of human lives.

Focus on drawing connections be twe e n the content of social

P re re q u is i t e : 357. (Concurrent with 400, 40 1 , 4 1 0. ) ( 3 )

3 4 1 Philosophy o f Vocational Education

413 Language/IJter cy Development: Assess.ment and Instruction (Cross- referenced with 5 1 3.) ( 4 )

O bj ective s of high school business ed ucation programs, the business curricul u m, layout and fac ilities planning, the eva lu a­ t ion of business teachers and co m p e te n ce for b u s i nes occupa­

t io n s . ( 2 )

426 Special Topics 10 Child..ren's Literahlre (Cross-referenced w i t h 526.) (2)

342 Method o f Teaching Typing App l ic a t i on or research findi ngs and psy h I g i c al princi p l es to the tea h i ng of typmg. Prerequ i ite: ad va n ced typing. ( 2 )

427 Multicultural Chlldren's Uterature (Cross- re ferenced w i t h 527.) ( 2 ) 428 Children's literature in the K-8 Curriculum (Cross- referenced with 528.) ( 2 )

343 Methods o f Teaching Bookkeeping Application of researc h findings and psychological pr i n c ip l e.s to

the tea c h i ng of bookkeeping. Prerequisite: B

281. ( I )

S

429 Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum ( Cross-referenced wi th 529.) (2)

344 Method of Tea ch1ng Gene.ral Business Subjects Ap p l ica tio n 0 r esearc h fin dings and psychological p ri nci p les to the teachi ng of genera l business, consumer economics, cono mics, b usi n ess law. business mathemati s, and bus iness communications ubjects. Prereq u isites: ECON L 5 1 - 1 52 and BUSA 28 1 . ( l )

430 Student Teaching in K-8 Education Teaching in classrooms of local p ub l ic schools under the direct s u p er v i s io n of School or Education fa cu l t y and classroom t each ers . Prerequisite: EDUC 400, art, mu s ic and p hys i ca l

education methods. 2.50 G PA. Con u rr e n t enr !lment in 435. ( Meets senior seminar/project req u i rement.) (9)

345 Methods of Teaching Secretarial Subjects

434 Student Teach1ng - Elementary (Dual)

a t i o n o f res e a r h finding ' and psychological pr i n c iples to the teach ing of shorth, nd, om c pr a c t ice , s imul ation , word processi ng , and related su bj ects. Prerequisi lCS: advanced typing and adva nc ed horthand. ( 2 )

Appli

Designed fo r persons who do dual tudent te a c hi n g. Ten weeks

f t eac h ing in classrooms of l o c a l pu bl i c schools u n der the direct Ed uca t io n faculty and lassTOorn reachers. Prerequisite: 400, art, musi , and p h ys ic a l education methods. 2.50 PA. Concurrent en ro l l me n t in 435. ( Meets enior eminar/project requiremen t . ) (9)

supervision of School of

357 MecUe and Technology in K-8 Classrooms Con iderat ion of the role of m edia ill loday's s clety and i potential in the l ea rn i n g p ro cess as a way of faci li tating learner empowerment. Prerequisit : EDUC 302. ( Co nc urre nt with 3 58,

435 Topics 10 Elementary Education Classroom: Prac.tice in the Context of Educational Foundations

406, 408.) ( 2 )

Sch ol- based elO;: erience will be explored in t h e context of the

358 Practicum I

Extended exp e ri en ce and pa rt i cipa t i on in

historical, socio-c ul tu ral , political, le g al , fi nancial , ethical, al1d

assigned public 5ch 01 classroom. P re requ i si te : £DUe 302. (Concurrent w i t h 357, 406, 40!l . ) ( l ) an

ph i l oso ph i cal foundations of ed uc at i on . Prerequisites: 302, 303,

357, 358, 406, 408. (Concurrent with 430.) (3)

(36 Alternate Level Student Teaching - Elementary

400 Topics in I!leme.ntary Education: Classroom Issu.es and Instructional Strategies

A course designed to give some knowledge, unde rst a ndin g , and study of c hildren, su bj ect matter fields, and materials in the student's alternate t eac h in g level p l u s student teaching on t hat level. Students who have completed s e c o n da r y preferred level studen t teaching should en ro ll i n this co u rs e . (6)

f current t h eory i nto pm tke as pertin 'nt to

Consideration

effe ct ive tea ch i n g and learning, i nc l udin g classroom manage-

m nt, or ga n i z at io n of classroom environ me n ts , and me eti n g the 357. ( Concu rren t wi t h 401 , 4 1 0, 4 1 2 .) (3) needs of diverse l ear n e rs . Prerequisite:

437 Alternate Level Student Teaching - s«ondary A course d eS i gned to give som knowl dge , u nd erst a nd i n g, and study o f c h i l dr en , subject matter field s, and m a terials in the student's alternate t e a c hi ng level plll tudent t e a c hi ng on that

401 Practicum U Extended e xp eri en ce and particip at ion in an a ssi gn ed p ub l ic

school class ro o m focus ing on ap pli cat ion of content methods

level. S t u d e n t s who have c o mpl e te d elementary p re ferr e d level

courses. I ncludes collection of video lessons. P re requis i te : 357. (Concurrent with

s tuden t teaching s h o u ld enroll in this course. Independent s t udy

400, 4 1 0, 4 1 2.) ( I )

c a rd req ui red . ( Meets se nio r seminar/project r e q ui re m en t .) (6)

406 Mathematics in K-8 Educatioll Expl oration of mathematical principles

438 Strategies for Whole Lit.eracy In81rru:tio n (K - 1 2) ( Cross- re ferenced with 538.) (2)

nd prac t i ces co ns is t nt

with NCfM cu rri cul um standards. Pr erequ isi te : 302 . (Concur­ rent with 357, 358, 408. ) ( 3 )

408 Uteracy in K - 8 Education Pa rti cip a t i on in the development of ap pro p r i a te cu rr i c u l a r s t rate g ies and in stru c tio nal D1 thods for supp r t i n g the d ive rsi ty of learners' language/literacy growth. Prerequisite: 302. ( Concur­ ren t with 3 57, 358, 406.) ( 3 ) 60

science b)' u s in g i n q ui r), methods and

school. I nitial course in EI me n ta ry Educati n certification

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44X Subject Area Methods I nstructio nal stra tegies, l o n g and short range planning, c u rric u­ l u m and other considerations specific to the d i sci p l i nes . Prerequisi tes: 262, 263, EPSY 2 6 1 , 3 6 1 , SPED 362


440 Art in the Secondary School ( 3 ) 444 English In the Secondary School ( 3 ) 445 Methods o f Teaching Foreigo Languages and EngU h as a Second Language ( Req u i red for forei g n language endorsement and ESL minor.) ( 3 ) 446 Mathematics in the Secondary School ( 3 )

447 Sdence In the Secondary School (3) 44 8 Sodal Studies In the Secondary School ( 3 ) 449 Computer Science ill the Secondary School ( 2 )

456 Storytelling A c mb in atio n of d is c ove r y a n d p ra c t ic um in the a r t of story­ telling. Investigates the a l ues and background of storytelling, the various types of and forms of st or ies , t ech n i qu es of choosing and of telling stories. Some off-campus practice. Demonstrations a nd joint s to ry telling by and with instructor. ( 2 )

457 The Arts, Media, and Technology Students use a v arie ty of techniques, e qu ip men t , and ma te r ials to explore ways of se ei ng a nd exp ressing how th ey see and ex pe ri ­ ence their environmen t. (2)

461 General Teaching Methods - Secondary Skill and un de rs ta n dings rel a te d to d eci si o n- mak i n g , instruc­ tional techniques, evaluation and tes ti ng , classroom manage­ ment, and d i s ci p line . Prerequisites: 262, 263; concurrent with

462. ( 3 )

462

Teacher Assisting � Secoadary Guided instructional assistance and tutoring in s c h ool s ;

concurrent with 46 1 .

( 1)

Student Teaching - Secondary ( Dual) Des ig ne d for pe rs o ns who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks

of te achin g in the publ i c schools under the direction and super­

visio n of classroom and u n i ershy teachers. P rerequi s i te : 2.50

Taken concurrently with SPED 439. (8)

467

1WaIuation Evaluation of school exper ie n ces ; p rob lem s in connection w ith

dev elop men t, o rgan i zati o n, and admi nis tr at ion of tests (stan­ dardized and t acher-ma de) . Re uired of fifth - yea r students. P re requ i ites: student tea ch ing o r teaching experience; 262, 253, EPSY 36 1 . May b e taken concurrently with studen t teaching.

G (2) 468 Student Teaching - Secondary Teaching in public schools under the d irec tion of cl ass ro o m and university teachers. Pre re quisi tes : formal ap p l icati o n ; se n i or strul d i ng ; cumulative G PA of 2 .50 or high r. ( Mee ts senior seminar/proj ect requ ireme n L ) (9)

46 9 Semin ar - Secondary A s em in ar for econdary s tudent teachers. Concurrent with 468. (3) 470 Curriculum. Materials and lostruction for Teaching English u a Second Language Ap p l ica tio n of language t eac hi ng m et hodology to va rio u s instruction I si tua t i ons. (4)

497 Spedal Project

c: n

Individual study and research on e d u ca ti on problems or

a d d i t iona l laboratory experience in public school cl a ssro om s . P re r e q uis ite : consent of the dean.

:to �

( 1 -4)

501 Workshops

503 On-Campus Workshops In Education On -cam pus gr ad ua t e wo rksh ops in education for varying len gths of time; e n r ollme n t s ubj ec t to adviser's ap p roval .

505 Issues in JJteracy Education Initial course required for all students in the m as te r's program in literacy education. Overview of historical and cu rre nt theo ry, p rac t i e, definitions, and research in language and l i tera cy acquisition and de vel o pm e nt in a n d out of schools. R equ i red of any track option s e le cted . ( 2 )

506 Foundations o f School Library Media Center Management Functions of the school library media center with p ar t ic ul ar emphasis on the roles and re spon s i bili t i es o f t he school library media s p eci al i s t within i ns truction a l and adm i n is tr a t ive arenas.

507 Principles o f Information Organization. Retrieval, and Service Exp lora t i on of a broad range of data and information in primary and seco n dary sources, i ncl u di ng document, bibliography, full­ text , sta tistical, visual, and recorded formats. ( 2 )

508 Principles o f BibJiograpbJc Analysis and Control

The orga niza tio n

and str uc ture of a broad range o f information

fo rmats with an emphasis on the analysis of st a nda rd bibli graphic com p onen ts p re sc ri bed by national bibliographic databa "es.

(2)

509 FoundatioDs of Collection Development The ph ilosophical bases and pa ra me ters of collection develop­ m en t in the school library media center. ( 2 )

5 1 0 The Acquisition and Development o f Language and Literacy Investigation of how young children acqu i re their first language and what they know as a result of this learnin g . ( 2 )

5 1 1 Strategies for Language/Uteracy Development The de velo p m en tal nature of lit er ac y learning with emphasis on the vital role of language and the interrel at e dness and interde­ pendence of li stening, s peak i ng, reading, and wr it i n g as language processes. Pre requi si te: 5 1 0. ( 2 ) 5 1 3 Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction

Extended exper i en ce and p a rt i cipat io n in an assigned ESL setting. Prereq u i si t e : LANG/EDUC 445 (C nCUITellt with

The p re pa ra tion and sh ar ing of selected to p ics related to the

48S

(2)

470) . ( 1 )

Understanding of a

515 Profe8&ional Seminar; Continuing Level. Teachers m in i mum generic standards needs of the in div id ual p ar ti c i p a n ts. Required for the continuing level certi fica t ion of teache rs . ( 2 )

The Gifted CbiJd

A tu dy of the gifted child, ch a ra ct e ri st i cs and p roblems, and school p rocedu res designed to further develo pment. G ( 2 )

490 Acqnisitlon and Development o f Language (Cross- referenced w it h 5 1 0.)

z

0 - 4)

475 Practiaun In Teacbi.ng £ngUsb a s a Second Language

I ssu s and skills im p orta n t in c onfe re nc i n g and parent-teacher

LANG/EDUC

o

Graduate wo rkshops in special fields fo r va rying lengths of ti me .

wide v ar iet y of s t rateg ies and tools for assessing and fa c i lit at in g students' development in reading, writing, l is te n in g , and spe aki ng . Prerequ i s i te: 5 1 0; highl y recommended to be taken at the end of th e track sequence. (4)

473 PareDt�Teach.er Relationships relati onships.

"' c

(2)

4.66

GPA .

496 Laboratory Workshop Practical course us i ng el em entar y- age children in a classroom si t uati on wo rki ng out s p e c ific p ro b l e m s ; p rovi s io n will be made fo r some active pa r t ici pati o n of the u nive rsi ty students. Prereq­ uisites: conference with the instructor or the dean of the School of Edu c at i on.

5 1 6 Teacher Supervision

Identification and development of s uperv i sory skills for teachers who work w it h other adults in the classroom. ( 1 )

(2) .

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526 Special Topics in Chlldren's Literature

554 Principalship V

Students explore the various themes of social issues fo und in

The principal as a change agent. Study of current issues in

children's literature through discussion groups and the construc­

administration.

tion of text sets and thematic units used in elementary and z o

l­ e( v ;:)

Q w

middle school classrooms. ( 2 )

560 Practicum Guided instructional assistance and tutoring in schools. Designed for MA/Cert Program. ( 2 )

527 MultJcultural Children's Literature Exploration of multi-cultural issues in the context of children's literature. ( 2 )

562 Schools and Society Individual and cooperative study of the socio-cultural and

528 Children's Literature i n K-8 Curriculum

cultural, political, legal, historical, and philosophical foundations

Investigation of genres of contemporary children's literature and

of current practices o f schooling in America. Prerequisite:

development of a personal repertoire for classroom use. ( 2 )

Admission to the MA/Cert Program or consent of instructor. ( 3 )

529 Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum

563 Integrating Seminar

Genres in adolescent Literature and exploration of strategies fo r

Students work cooperatively and individ ually to integrate educa­

integration of young adult materials across the middle and

tion co ursework, field experience, and individual perspective

secondary school curriculum. ( 2 )

throughout the MA/Cert program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA/Cert program.

530 Children's Writing

( 1-4)

Current theory and practice in the teaching and learning of

564 The Arts, Mind, and Body

writing in elementary classrooms. ( 2 )

An expl ration of methods to facilitate creativity and meaning­ making in the classroom through visual, musical, non-verbal!

537 Media and Technology for School LIbrary

physical movement, and dramatic arts. ( 2 )

Media Specialists The management of media and technology services in the school

565 The Art and Practice o f Teaching

library media center. Special emphasis on emerging technologies

Through application projects, micro-teaching experiences, and

used in K - I 2 instructional programs (CD-ROM, i"nteractive

reading representing d i fferent perspectives, participants will

video, distance learning, computer technologies) . ( 2 )

practice and assess a variety of options for designing, imple­

538 Strategies for Whole LIteracy lnstruction (K-12) The use o f language as a tool for learning across the curriculum, and the roles of language in all kinds of teaching and learning in

menting, and assessing lessons and units that integrate math­ ematics, science, social science, language arts, and physical education in K-8 classrooms.

(6)

K - 1 2 classrooms. Strategies for reading/writing in content areas,

56 8 Internship in Teaching

thematic teach ing, topic study, and integrating curriculum. ( 2 )

Internship in classroom settings. Fourteen weeks of teaching under the direct supervision of cooperating teachers and

544 Research and Program Evaluation Knowledge of evaluation techniques, including portfolios, and of research design; ability to interpret educational research; to

university supervisors. Designed for students in the MA/Cert program.

(6)

identify, locate, and acquire typical research and related litera­

585 Comparative Education

ture; to use the results of research or evaluation to propose

Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems

program changes and write grants . ( 2 )

of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying knowledge for greater understanding of the d iverse populations

545 Methods and Techniques of Research Seminar in research methods and techniques in education with

in the K- 1 2 educational syste m .

(3)

emphasis on designing a research project in the student's area of

586 Sociology of Education

interest. Required fo r M.A. Prerequisites: Admission to the

Viewing the educational system as a complex and changing

graduate program;

social institution. Emphasis on value orientations from d iverse

544; minimum of 24 semester hours of

coursework leading to the M.A.; consultation with student's

human populations and their impact on K- 1 2 education and

adviser. (2)

educational issues. ( 3 )

550 Principalship I

587 History of Education

Introduction to the role and function of the principalship with

A study of great men and women whose lives and writings have

emphasis on team building and interpersonal professional

shaped and continue to shape the character of American

relationships and ethical decision-making. Prerequisite:

education.

Admission to the graduate program or permission of graduate adviser. ( 3 )

(3)

589 PhIlosophy of Education Philosophical and theoretical foundations of American educa­

55 1 Prindpalship I I

tion as well as the social philosophy of growing diverse popula­

The principal a s a n instructional leader who oversees curricu­

tions in the K- I 2 schools. (3)

lum, student achievement, and assessment, and supervises teachers in their work.

(4)

590 Graduate Seminar A workshop for all Master of Arts candidates in the School of

552 Priodpalsblp m

Education. Candidates should register for this seminar for

The principal as a manager of resources and community

assistance in fulfilling requirements. No credit is given, nor is

relations. Local, state, and federal issues in school finance and

tuition assessed.

communicating with school stakeholders the m i services of the school.

ion and

(4)

595 Internship in Educational Administration Students will register for 2 semester hours in each of two

.553 Prlndpalship IV

semesters. Internship in educational administration jointly

The principal as a developer of personnel. Study of contempo­

planned and supervised by the School of Education and public

rary federal, state, and local statutes, regulations, and case law

and/or private school administrators in full compliance with

related to working with personnel issues, including legal

state requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate

principles in hiring, firing, in-service and staff develop ment, support services, and contract negotiation. (4)

educational administration concentration; consultation with

program or to the credentialing program; completion of adviser. ( 2 , 2 )

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596 Graduate Seminar Stud nts regist r � r 1 se m e ter hour in ea c h of two emesters. Pro fes si o n al seminars are scheduled and p resen ted by candidates, their u wve rsi t ), p rofessors , and pr fes sio na l coUeagues in the schools in partner hip. Prereq ui ite : Com p le t i o n of cour ework in ed ucat ional adm inistratioll concentration.

(2)

597 �dependent Study Projects of varying l engt h related to e d u cat ional issues or cone ms of the individua l par t i c ip a nt and ap p roved by an appropriat tacuIty m em ber and the dean. ( [ -4) 598 Studies in Education A research paper or project on an ed ucati on al issue selected j intly by the st ude n t and t.h.e g ra du at e adviser. Prere quisites: Admission to the gra d u te p rogr a m ; 544, 545; m in i m u m of 26 h our of course-work le adi n g to the M.A.; consultation with t he st u de n t" adviser. ( 2 ) 599 Thesis The thesis problem will be ho se n from the candidate's maj r

field o f concentration and ITllLSt be approved by the andidate's graduate committee. Candidates are exp e c ted to defend the ir thesis in a final o r al examination conducted by t heir comm ittee. (3-4)

Educational Psychology

26 1 Human Relations Development Study and lab orat o ry experien es i n th develop men t of human r la t i ons 'kills, esp ec ially t hose skilli need d to facilitate p roblem -solv i ng and pers onal, social, and moral development. i n cl uding both healing and growth. Prereq uisites: WRIT 1 0 1 , P SYC 1 0 1 , test sco res , sophomore s ta n din g , cum ulative GPA of 2.50. (3) 361 Psychology for Teaching Pri nciples and research in h u m n development and l ea rning , esp ec iaUy related to teaching and to the psyc h olog ica l growth, rela tionships, and adjlLStme nt of individ uals. Prerequisites : EDUC 262, 263; EPSY 2 1. (3) 368 Educational Psychology Principles and res earch in human lea r ning and thejr im pl i ntions for curriculum a n d instru ct ion. Prerequ isites: EDVC 25 1, 253. ( 4) SO l Workshop! Graduate work h ps in special fields for varying lengtbs of t im e.

( 1 -4) 5U Group Process and the tndividual A human i nt erac t ion I b ratory to facili t ate the exploration of the self concept th rough tll mechanisms of i nterpe rson a l interaction s and fe e db ack . Em phasis placed on the acqu isition of skill in self-exploration , ro l identi ficati on, and clim ate - m ak i n g. G (2) 535 FGundations of Guidance The focus is on developing an understan din of the services an d processes available to assist in d iv iduals in ma k i ng pl a n s and decision according to their own I i � pattem. (4)

536 Affective Classroom Techniques Explo ra t io n of va r i o us techniques designed to facilitate u n d er­ s tan d ing of elf and ot bers; method for working with students. Prerequisite: student teach i n g Of g rad uate status. Lab ralory exp e r i nee as ar ra n ged . G (2) 550 Beginning Proctkum Learn and p r ac tice the basic counsel ing sk i l l s in a structured and lose1 y s uperv i sed environment. Cl ien ts used in (his pra cti c um will be rela t i ely high functiolllng and w ill us ua ll y be seen in a n observation room. (3)

555 Practicum In ddition to th ose skills learned in Begin n ing Pract icu m , learn and practice variolIs c o u nseli ng pproa.:h s, sk i l ls a nd tech ­ niques w i th individuals fr m d i verse populations in commun ity or various school setti ngs. Prerequisites: EPSY 550 a nd 561 . (3)

m

560 Communication in Schools The study of t h e theories and co ncep t s of ttlOse h elpi ng skill needed to fa ci l itat e problem-s Iving and personal and , cademk grow th with applications to the classroom and to i n t eracti o ns with profes s i o nal colleagues. Prerequi ' i te: Admissio n ro M ICer t program. ( 3 )

o C 1"\ 1> -i o

56 1 Bask RdatiollSbips i n Couuse1iog A st ud y of the theory, process. te ch n i qu t::s , and charac ter is t ics of the counseling relationsh i p . ( 4 )

z

563 Practicum in Group Process IUld Leadership A human interacti n labor at o ry which eK p lo res i nterp erso n al operations in groups and fa ci l it a te s the development o f se. lf­ insight; emphasis on l ead e rshi p and development of skill i n d i a gn o sin g individual, group, a nd organiz tional be havior patterns and influences. St uden ts will o-facil.itate a la boratory group. P re requ i s i te : EP Y 5 1 2 . ( 2 ) 565 AdvlUlced Human Development A comparat ive stud y of h uman deve l op m e n t at va r io us levels th ro ugh observa t iona l asse SOl nts u i n g non- tandardized in s tru me n : e.g., sociometric scales. aUl obiograp hie , in! rvi w , in teraction analysis, and other a pp ro pr i at e measurement . A practicum (a mi n i m u m of one hour each week) is required in (l school or ap pro p ria te agency. Prereq u isite : ifth year or gra d u a te

stat us. ( 4 )

5 66 Advaoc�d Cognltlon, Developmeut, IUld Leaming The study of p ri nci ples and current t h o u g h t and resea rch i n cogn ition . develop ment, and lea min g . Prerequisite: Admission to the M AlCert progra m or consent of i n.t ructo r. ( 3 ) 569 Career Guidance A stud y of careers, theories of choi e, nd gu ida.n ce tech n iq ues.

(4)

570 Fieldwork in Counseling and Guida.oce A cu lm ina t i ng practicum of field experienc in sch ols or agencies us ing th eory, skills, and t ech niques p rev iously learned. tudents i ncorporate consultation ex p er ie n ce followino the Adlerian model. ( 4) 575 Mental Health Basic m enta l health principles a) related to interpersonal relation h ip s. Focus on self-understan d i ng. Lab ratory exp er i­ en ces as a rr a nged . (4) 578 Behavioral Problems Adlerian concept. pr vide the basis for observation , mot ivation, mod i lication, and life style assessment. Skills fo r assisting peo p le in deve l opin g respon ibility tor their own behavior. La borat ry experience as arran ged. (4) 583 Current Issues In Exceptionality The characteristics of exce pt i o n al stude nt� and currellt issues invo lv ing the e d uca to r's role in dealin: with Lheir spec ial needs. G (2-4) 597 lndependent Study Projects of v ar y i ng length related to ed ucational issues o r conc er n s o f the individual p rtidram a n d a p p roved by an ap propriate faculty member and the dean. ( 1 -4) 598 Studies in Education A research pap�r or pr ject on an educational issue selected jo in Lly by the student and the g r ad ua te adviser. It will be revie wed by the s t udent's graduate com mittee. ( 2 )

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S99 Thesis The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's maj or field o f c nc ntration and mt t be approved by the candidat '5 g r ad ua te committee. Candidates are expected to defend their thesis in a final o ra l examination conducted by their committee. ( 3-4)

396 Students with Special Needs in the Inclusive Classroom Exam ination of specific techn iq u es that promote p o s itiv e classroom environments within inclusionary s p ec i al education set t i n gs Prer q u isi te : SP D 292. (2) .

Special Education

195 Individuals with Disabilities An i nt ro d u ct o ry course focusing u p o n persons with d i sab iliti es Intended for students outside the S c h oo l of Education. ( 4 )

.

200 lodividuals with Special Needs I n t ro d u ct i o n to the needs and c h a racterist ics of individuals w i t h s p ec ia l needs. Fede r a l and state l e g i sl a t i o n , current issues, and servic� delivery systems will be in cl u ded. P re r e qui s i te for all S P E D a n d E l eme n tary Cert i fication co ursewo rk ( 2 ) .

20 1 Observation in Special Education Programs bservation i n p e c i a l edu a l i o n programs, sc hoo ls, and co m m u n ity s e tt i n gs . ( I )

399 Practicmn in Special Education Experience with children an d yo u t h who have s p eci a l needs. I hour rcdit g i ve n a fte r su cce ss fu l com p le t i o n of 4 5 clock hours a nd sp ecific course competencies. P re requ is i t e : consent of instructor. ( 1- 2 )

40 ] Instruction for Leamers with Mild DisabUlties Examination of kn ow l dge

and skills needed fo r academic mild d i sa bil i t i es

instruction and remediation o f students with

.

Prereq u isite : SPED 292. ( 3 )

402 Practicum: Leamers with Mild Disabilities Experience w i th c h ild re n and youth who

292 Assessment in Special Education Examination of knowledge and skills used in fo r m a l and informal asse sment. Includes examination o f co r i n g proce­ dures, i ssue s in validity and reliability, and th role of asse ss m e n t in de i ion making. (2)

h ave mild d i sabi l it i es.

Must complete 45 c lo c k hours in an educational se t ti ng and take concurrently with

SPED 40 1 . ( 1 )

403 Puent/Professional Partnership in Special Education Methods fo r com m u nicating efl'ectiv ly with pare n t s of spec ial need s children. ( 2 )

296 Educating the Physically Challenged and Medically Fragile The co u rse focuses on me ting the p sycholo g i ca l , social, and educational needs of in d i vi du al s who are p hys ical ly challenged and/ or me d i ca l l y frag i le ( 2 )

404 Communication and CoUaboration Focus on kno wl ed ge and skill ' necessary for effective collabora­ tion and s up e rvisi o n w i th p aren ts p r o fess io n a ls and para­ educators. ( 3 )

N OTE: PREREQUI S ITE FOR 300/400 LEVEL SPECIAL EnU ATI N: £DUC 302 o r EPSY 26 I! ED C 262 o r consent of instructor. Students no t majoring i n educaLion may be . used from t h i s requirement.

Examination of kn owledge and skills needed for teach i ng academic, social, and ada p t ive skills to learners with spe ial needs. Includes writing IEP's, data based i n s truct io n task analys is, and computer as s i st ed i nstruc ti on . P re re q u isite: EDUC 400 and SPED 292, 390, 39 1 or 393, 394 and 40 1 . ( 4 )

.

338 Issues in Early Childhood Special Education Current iss ue s related to young children with , pecial needs. (Cross-listed w i t h SPED 538.) 340 Advanced Strategies and Tecbniques for Teaching

in P-3 Settings Current pract ices in educational s tra te g ie s and curriculum mo d i fi ca t i o ns to meet the need of the early learner. Pre re q ui ­ sites:

SPED 399, 490, 492. (Cross-listed wilh SPED 540.)

341 Assessment of Infants and Preschoolers Pormal and i n fo r m a l assess ment t e ch n i qu e s used to meet the needs of c hil d re n and their families in in t egra te d se t t i ng s . Prerequisites: PED 399, 490, 492. (Cross-listed with SPED 5 4 1 . ) 362 Teaching for lodividual Differences - Secondary The roles of classroom manag ment, effc tive i ns t ru ct io n and curriculum modification in meeting t h e needs of diverse learners. (4) ,

,

,

407 Curriculum, Instruction, and Technology ,

40 8 Transitions from School to Community Exa m i nation of knowledge and skills rel a te d lo career vo c at i o na l t ra n s i t i o n a n d l i fe a djus tme n t . ( 2 )

438 Student Teaching in Elementary School Te a ch i n g in spe c i al ed uca t ion programs under the direction a n d s u p e r vi s i o n of schoo! and u ni versi t y p e rs o n n el ; 8 we e k s . ( 5 ) 439 Student Teaching in Secondary School Tc a c h i n g in s p eci al d llcation programs under the direction and supervision of school and u n ivers i t y personnel; 8 wee k s ( 5 ) .

440 Student Teaching Seminu A se m i n ar which meets can urr ntly with studt n t tea c h i n g and enhances skills and knowl e d ge req u ire d fo r teach i ng ( 1 ) '

.

475 Supervising Para-Professionals and Volunteers Emphasis on the e ffec t ive management of para-professionals and volunteers in the classroom. ( 1 )

390 Instructional Strategies for Learners with Moderate Disabilities Examination of s p ec i fi c interventions to e n ha n ce the a cq uisiti o n of kn ow l e d ge and kills fo r those students who need additional support to meet their l e a r ni n g potential. ( 2 )

480 Issues and Problems of Child Abuse and Neglect Issues and problems of child abuse, neglect, domestic violence, substance abuse, and harassment. Includes identification and re p o rt i n g pro c edures and the legal and profes ional respo nsibil i­ ties of the manda ted reporter. ( 1 )

39 1 Practicum: Learners with Moderate Disabilities Taken con c ur r en t l y with SPED 390. ( 1 )

485 The Gifted Child

393 Teaching Students with Behavior Disorders Exami n at i o n of k n owled g e and skills r ela ted to the instruction and management of le a r n e rs with b e h av i o r disorders. ( 2 )

394 Practicum: Students with Behavior Disorders Exp er ience with ch i l d re n and yo u t h who h ave beh avior p ro b ­ lems. Must c o m p le te 45 clo c k hours in an educational se t t i n g and take co nc u rr en t ly with SPED 393. ( 1 ) 64

395 Introduction to Language Development and Disorders Int rod u cti o n to l an g u a ge disorders. assessment, and interven­ tion. Focus on theori s of language develop ment and normal language acquisition. ( 2 )

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A stud y of the g i ft e d learner's characteristics and needs. Focus on instruct ional p ro ce d u re s designed to further d eve l o p ment . (2) 490 Development in Early Childhood Special Education Im p l i c a t i o n s of normal and a typ i cal c h il d d eve lop me nt fo r the learning process, i n c l u d i n g hands-on exper.iences i n EC/SPED s e t tin gs ( 2 ) .


492 Strategies for Teaching Early Learners

530 Assessment o f Students with Special Needs

Early c h i l d h ood methods, materials, curriculum, and t ech n i q ues for teach ing ch il d re n with s p ec i a l needs. Prerequis ite:

PED 4 90

nsent of ins truc to r ( 2 )

or c

.

beam ines th

use

of a. sess men t informati n (o r making

educa t io n al d ci i on s about students. Prere q ui site: SPED 292 or

consent f in tructor. ( 2 )

494 Computer Application in Special Education

53 1 Severe and Profound Disabilities

An i n t rod u ct i o n i n to the application of computer tech nology for

I n t rodu ti o n t

l e a rn ers with special needs. Focus on curre n t issues and u

e.

of

co m put e r t ch n olo gy including computer assis ted in truction, software evaLuat ion, pupil and d a ta manageme nt, and a sis t i ve

devices. ( 2 )

497 I ndependent Study

Project ·

of varying length re la t ed to t rends and issues in spec i a l

education and a p pro ve d by an a p p ro p ri a t e farulty member and th e dean. ( 1-2)

m

the physical, Qual, and education needs of indiv iduals w i t h sever.: and p ro fou nd disabil ities. ( 2 )

o c: 1"1

532 Education and li'aining o f IndividuaJs with Severe and Profound DisabUities

I n-d pth study of ed u c tional prescription aDd programming for I a rn e rs who are severely and p ro fo u ndly disabled. Emphasis on t eac hi n ' st rateg ies ;lnd c urd ulum m d ificati o n as they apply to tl'lis population. (2)

> -t o z

499 Teaching for Individual Differences - Elementary Designed

to

gi e pre-service teachers skills and knowledge in t h e

areas of assessment, i nstru c tion, and management of learners

w i t h pecial needs. Prerequisite: 200. ( 2 ) 50 1 Off-Campus Workshops in SpeclaJ Education

ff c a m p us g ra du a t e wo r ks h o ps in p cial ed u c a t i o n fo r v a ryi ng f time. ( 1 -4) -

.

le ngt h '

503 On-Campus Workshop i n Special Education

On-campus graduate workshops in special ed u c a tio n for varying len gths of time. ( J -4) 5 1 3 language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction See EdUCa tion

5 1 3.

520 Teaching Students with SpeciaJ Needs in Elementary Programs

nd overview f se rvices fo r t ud e nts with spec ia l needs in elementary p rogram . Include. procedural and su bs t a n t ive legal issues in sp ec ial education, program modifica­ t io n and class roo m management. (2)

i n troduction

.

,

521 Teaching Students with Special Needs i n Sec�ndary Programs I n t roduction a n d overview of services n eeds in se c on d a r y programs. I nc!ud

for

t udc nts with special

procedural and s ubs tan ­

tive legal i sues i n spe ial education, program modification, and classroom m an ageme n t . (2) 522 The Role o f Health Professionals i n Special Education This cours introduces health pro fessionals in the sch ool to l ear ners with sp ec i a l n eed s Top i cs includ roles of par nts as well as medical concerns, early intervention , teaming, s ubsta nc e abuse, and suicide pr v ntion. (3) .

533 Inclusion and Students with Moderate Disabilities

A f, cus on mee r i n g the academic and adaptive beh av i o r skills of students wi thin tJ1e regular ed u ca ti o n classroom. (2) 534 Inclusion and tudents with Behavior Disorders A fOCllS on manage ment p rocedures for s t ude nt s with behavioral d isorde rs in inclusive dassr o ms. (2) 535 In.clusion and Students with MUd Disabilltles

A focus

on

instructional p roce d ur es fo r s t u de nts with m i l d

d isab ilities in the inclu.�ive classroom. (2) 537 Issues in Language Acquisition and Disorders Cu r re nt issues and approaches in asse ssi ng and remediating

children's la n gu a ge di sorder . (2) 538 issues i n Early ChUdhood Special Education

523 Educational Procedur-es for Students with

Current issues related to young ch i ld ren with special n eeds (2)

Mlld Disabilities

539 Administration o f Early Childhood/Speclal Education

An i nt ro d u ct ion to t e a ch i n g procedures fo r s t ud en t with mi l d disab ilities. Includes concepts in characteristics, assessment, and

instructional pra tices.

(3)

Programs In -depth study of the ad min istratio n of early ch.ildhood

programs. ( 2 )

524 Educational Procedures for Students with Developmental Disabilities

An e x am i n a t i o n of th emotional > s o c i a l physical, and mental ,

characteristics of i nd iv id ua l s with m o de r a te disabi l i t ies. Includes asse ss m en t and inst ru tion from med i cal psychological, social, and edu t i o nal viewpoints. (3) ,

525 Procedures for Students with Behavior Disordas

An examin tion of in t ructio nal and management proce d ure s fo r l ea rn rs with behavior d iso rd er s . Includes slUdy of academic and behavioral characteristics of th ese stud e nts. ( 3 ) 526 Advanced Practicum in Special Education

Exper ie n e with ch i l d re n and youth w ith pecidl n eeds. Credit given aft r successful co m p le t io n of 90 clock hours and specific co ur e competencies. P re re q u is i te : SPED 520/52 1 or equivalent. (2) '

.

540 Advanced Strategies and Techn.lques for Teaching in P-3 Grade Settings Cu rrent practice in educati nal s tra tegi es and curriculum modificatio ns t<J meet the needs of the earty learner. Pre req ui si t e :

SPED 399 , 490, 492. ( 2 ) 541 Assessment i n Early CblldhoodJSpeciaJ Education

Ponnal and informal a ssessm e nt tec h n iq ues e to III ct t h e needs of :h iL dren and their fum i l i s in integrated setti ngs. Prerequisi te : SPED 399, 490, 492. (2) 555 Supervising Paraeducators in School Settings

Exami nes the role ar i d responsibilites of slIpervi ors of paraeducators and su pp o r t stan: J:!.mphasis OIl ethical, profes­

sional, and legal re;ponsib il ities 0 the 'upervi or. Discussion of administrative practices t hat i m p ro v team ork and staff development.

(2)

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568 Internship in Special Education T n te rnsh i p in sp e c ial education settings. Fourteen weeks tea ch i ng under the direction and supervi -ion of co op er at i ng loll w

Q

teachers and univers ity MAl ert pr gra m . (6)

supervisors. De

igned fo r students in the

575 CoUaboration and Team BuJlding Examines the communication skills necessary fo r effective . collaboration in regular and �p cia! ed u ati n. To pics include p rofess i nal teams, co- tea hi ng concepts, staff development, scheduling, coordinati ng, p rob lem solving, and conflict m ana ge­ ment in . d uca t io nal ttings. ( 2 )

<

576 Communication Skills for CoUaborative Consultation in

::I

SpecIal Education E m p h as is on the int rp erso n al skills n ecessary for the consulting teach er in s p ec i al education. The course will explore the v riables i n vo lve d in developing co p e ra t io n between profes­ sion I ed uc at o rs . ( 2 )

Q I!' Z II: w w

z I!' Z w

577 The Induive CJassroom I n trod uc t i on to the p r in ci p l e and pract ices of inclusive ed ucat ion . ( 2 ) 583 Current Issues in Exceptionality The characteristics of excep tio n a l student and current issues invo lvi n g thl' ducator's r ol e in dealing with thei r spe c i a l needs. (2-4 ) 588 Legal. Ethical. and Aclministrative (ssues in

tion. ( \ ) Project.

provides students with the opportunity to combin a liberal arts education with rigorous study in Universi ty

e ngineering, Students who omplete the program earn

two

fro m PLU a n d the other from an e ngi n er­ ing school. For the well - pr ep ared studen t , d1 t tal l engtb

degrees -

on e

of study i five year - three years at

PLU ad two years at

th engineer ing school, and the program is

to as th "T h ree -Two Engi neer ing Program:'

ften referred

Most subdisciplines of engineering a re avai lable to students in th dual -degree program. Formal agreements eill with Columbia University in New York City and Wa h i n gton Un iversity in St. Louis. At b th schools, three­ two students fo rm a com munity. They share residence facil ities and often are e n rolled in many of Lh same courses. P LU students who have participated in the three­ two progra m report thei r rich cultural and academic experiences at bot h scho is, and are routinely very pl eased

THE PLU PROGRAM:

be t r uee - t wo student is awa rded

a

PLU

when th PLU req uire me n t s are satisfi d and the progT a m of study at the engineering sc hoo l is completed. Tbe PL Y d egree that typically is awarded to thre -two . tudents is the Bachelor of Arts in physics. The BA in physics is well-recognized by engi­

degr

I'

the most freq uent ly-awarded degree by fo ur-year sch o ols with th re e-two p rogram . The pbysi cs degree can be selected by t h ree- l wo students in all engineering subdjsci­ pl ine s, but students w i sh ing to st udy chemical engi neering may wish to con sider the o ption of obtaining t h e B.A. in chemis t ry

neeri.ng schools and i

educa­

595 Special Education: internship

( 1 -4)

The en gineering dual- degree p rogram at Pacific Lutheran

with their d cision to have participated in the t h ree - t w program.

Special Education Investigati n of sp ec ial education admin istrative practices, pupil pl dce men ( p rocedures, studenl sta ffin g, p rogra m reimbur'emen t procedures, and federal fu nding models. (2)

590 Research In Special Education Review of curr nt res ea r h on selec ted topics in sp ec ial

Engi neering Dual Degree Program

of varying l e n gth eclat d to issues in sp eci al education .

fro m PLU, Occas io nally, PLU studen ts choose to t ra ns fer

Lo a n ngi­ neering school that does not parti cip ate in the three-nvo pro­ gram. PLU nonethe1cs� recognizes th se s t u dc nt,s participants in the lhr e.- two program and awa rds them t he appropriate B.A. degree upon successful com plet ion of their program at the

596 Technology and Special Education Examines technol g ica l advanceme ts as t hey apply to the e duca t io n of learners with s p ec ia l needs, ( 2 ) 597 Independent Study Projects of va ry i ng l en gth rel ated to t ren ds and iss ues i.n s pec ia l education an d appr ved by an ap prop r i at fa culty member and

en gineer i n g sch oJ. I.ndividual de partments do not provide ad v ice on the dual­ de gre e pr gram. All prosp ect i ve dual-degree students, rega rdl es s of their in tended engineering subdiscip l ine, should consult w ith

the dean. ( l-4)

598 Studies in Education

the three-two director ( in the Physics Department) very early in their a cad e m i c p rogra m. LV a n d the pa rticipating eng ineer i n g schools recom mend

A research paper or project on an educa ti naJ issu e sel cted jointly by the st ud ent a n d the gra du ate advLer. It will be reviewed by the student's gra d u a te co m m ittee. ( 2 )

that three-two stud ents tlse their t i m e at PLU to sec ure thei r acad mi fo u n dat io ns in mat h emat ics, phy'ic , and chemistry. Math skil l s are particularly im ortant to d evelo p , and poor math

599 Thesis The thesis pr ob lem will be chosen fTom the candidate's majM field of concentration and must be ap pr oved by the c ndidate's g ra d u a te com m itt1 e. Ca n d i dat - are xpec ted to efe nd the.ir t hes is in a final oral examination con d uc ted by their co m m i t tee.

skills are the

most frequent

reason prospective engi n eering

students fail to succ ee d in the program . PLU REQUIREM ENTS: In order to ea r n a PLU d egree i n the

( 3-4 )

dual-degree p rogra m, the follow i n g requi re me nts must be

satisfied: I)

Completion of the fo llowi ng science a nd mathematics cou rses ( 44 hours): Mathematics ( 1 6 hours): 1 5 1 , l 52, 253, and 3 5 1 or PHYS 354; Pllys i s ( 1 4 hours) : 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 164, and 223; Che. m i st ry (8 hours): 1 20 Qr J 2 5, 33 8; Computer Sc ience. a n d Ca m p Ite r ngineer i ng (6 hours ) : 1 3 1 and 1 44.

2a) For

the B . A.

i n physics: completion f an addi t i o nal 12 h o u r nd mathematic from the follOWi ng

of e l ective in c ie ne courses: MA'rH 33 1

356; PHYS 233, 33 1 , 333, 334, 336; C CE 245. HEM 34 1 may be s u bs t it u te d for PHYS 33 3 . The particular courses chosen wLll depend on the i n te n ded

66

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subdiscipline and the engineering school's entrance require­ ments. Students should consult with the program director before choosing their electives. 2b) For the B.A. in chemistry: completion of organic chemistry ( HEM 232, 234, 332, 334) and physical chemistry ( C H EM 3 4 1 , 342, 343 ) .

3) Completion o f the general u niversity requirements a s speci­ fied i n the catalog, except that the following general require­ ment are waived for all dual-degree students: (a) comple tio n of a minimum of 1 2 8 semest r hours o n the PLU transcript; (b) completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours from courses numbered 300 and above; (c) the requirement that at least 20 o f the m inimum 40 semester hours of upper division work must be taken at PLU; (d) the requirement that the final 32 semester hours of a student's program be completed in residence at PLU; (e) the requirement that the senior sem inar/project be completed at Pl.u. Senior proj ects from the engrneering school (a characteristic of ABET-accredit d schools) will satisfy the PLU senior project requirement for dual- degree students upon approval of the project by the appropriate PLU department chair. THE ENG INEERING SCHOOL PROGRAM: The course o f

study at t h e engineering school will depend on both t h e school and the subdiscipline. Between Columbia University and Wash­ ington University, approximately QNenty different engineering subdisciplines are available to dual-degree students. These include the more common subd isciplines (civil, chemical, elec­ trical, mechanical) and others such as operations research, applied mathematics, geological engineering and systems science. Detail are available from the PLU program director. ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS: For admission to their engi.neer­

ing program, both Columbia University and Washington Univer­ sity require a cumulative PLU grade point average of 3 .0 or higher and grades of B or better in pertinent mathematics and science courses. Students who do not meet these requirements are considered on a case-by-case basis. Although students who choose to transfer to another engineering school may be able to gain admission with slightly lower grades than those required by Columbia University and Washin.gton University, all prospective engineering students are well-advised to use the higher standard as a more realistic indication of what will be expected of them i n the engineering school.

ENGLISH MAJOR ( EMPHASIS ON LITERATURE): The

English major with an empha is on literature introduces stu­ dents to the great literary tradition of Britain, North America, and the En glish-speaking world. The major in literature places cou rses organ i zed by historical period at the heart of the student's program, allowing stude.nts t read the great works that define the periods, and to explore the ways in which cultural contexts impinge upon the lit.erary imagination. Students who select the emphasis on literature can expect to learn how sensi­ tive reader ' engage tex:ls through their own speaking and writing, following their insights into the rich pleasu res of literary lan­ guage and growing more sophisticated in constructing effective literary arguments. They will also be introduced to the ways i n which major critical traditions frame ur approaches t o litera­ ture and define the issues that keep literature meaningful and rei evan t in our lives. Studenrs considering English with an empha is on literature as a major, but who are still undecided, might begin with a 200level course. Even though no 200-leve l course is required for majors, students may request that onc p p ropriate 200-level course be substituted for one similar Periods and Surveys course at the 300 level. Students are encouraged to take Shakespeare early in the major. Correspondence courses and indepen dent studies may not be used to fulfill general university or core requirements.

Langu age Requi remellts, Optiotl

following lines): l.

exp ression . Business, government, education, and pub­ lishing are areas where our graduates frequently make their careers . Our p r gram offers emphases in li terature and writi ng ,

as well

as

concentrations in children's literature and

publ ishing. The English Department also supports the study abroad programs, and we offeT study tour to such places as Europe, Australia, and the Caribbean. FACULTY: Temple-Thurston, Chair; Albrecht, Beech, M. Benton,

EARLY 3 5 1 , English Medi val Literature 352, Chaucer 353, English Renaissance Literature

2. MIDDLE 36 1 , English Re toration and 1 8th Century 362, English Romantic and Victorian Literature 3 7 1 , Studies in American L i terature, 1 820- 1 920 3. LATE 367, Twentieth-Century British Literature 3 72, Twentieth-C ntury American Poetry 3 7 3 , lWenti th-Century American Fiction and Drama 4. LITERATURE AND D l F FERENCE 3 4 1 , Fernini t Approaches to Literature 343, Posl- olonial Literature and Theory 3 74, American Ethnic Literature

English offers excellent preparation fo r any future requir­

aesthetic values, and the processes of critical and creative

I).

Major Requirements: At least 36 and up Lo 44 hours in English beyond Writing 1 0 1 , at least 20 hours of which must be upper d ivision. The foHowing course distributions ar r quired of majors with an emphasis on literature: A. Shakespeare (4 hours) 30 1 , Shakespeare B. Pe rio ds alld Su rveys (at lelm 4 hours fro m each of the

Engl ish ading, an appreciation of hum n experience and

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complete at lea. t two years of a foreign language at the university level, or the equivalent (see College of A,·ts and Scien ces Foreign

the Department of Physics or vis it the program website at www. nsci.plu. eduI3-2program.

ing in teg rative thinking, skill in writing, discernment in

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Foreign Language Requirement: All English majors must

For more information, contact the dual-degree p rogram director in

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C. Seminar (at [east 4 hours) 428. Seminar: Cri tical Theory 4 5 1 , Seminar: Author 452, Seminar: Theme, Genre Serlio r Seminar Project: The senior seminar project is a general university requirement in all programs and majors. Students will customarily satisfy this reqLlire ment in English in their semin r course a.s a culminati n of their undergraduate education, in the senior year. Under certain circumstances, students may substitute an appropriate 300-level course. D. Writing (at least 4 hours ofallY writillg course at the 200 to 400 levels).

E. Electives (8 hours)

P. Benton, Bergman, Carlton, Campbell, Eyler, Jansen, Jones,

Lovelace, Marcus, D. M. Martin, Rahn, D. Seal.

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ENGLISH MAJOR (EMPHASIS ON WRITING): The wr i t i ng emp h as i s at PLU has be en desi gn ed for a broad s pectr um f s t udents, fro m t h o se w i s h i n g to fo cu s on fiction and p o e try, to th ose interested in more p ragm at i c types o f writing, to those set

on expl o ri ng theoretical issues in rh et o ri c and composition. ng l i s h m aj ors must

Foreign Language Requirement: All

..J

co m p l ere at l e as t two yea rs o f a fore ig n l an g u age at rhe university l eve l, or the equ i va l en t ( ee College ofArts and Sciences Foreign

Majol' Requlrements: At l e as t 36

Co mpa ra t i ve lite rature: one co u rse

h o u rs in English ( exdud i ng

( 2 1 4, 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 232, 233, 3 4 1 , 343, an appropriate

Wri t i ng 1 0 1 ) , distributed as follows:

se mi nar)

(a t least 20 hours in writing. with at least 12 hours upper division) 1. At least 1 2 hours, fro m at l ea s t two of the fo ll owi n g l i ne s : a. I m a g i native Writing 227, Imaginative Writing I 327, I m a g i n at i ve Wr i ting 1 1 326. Writing for Children b. Expos i tory Writi ng 22 1 . Research and Wr i t i n g 323, Writing in a Professional Se t t i n g 3 2 8 , Adva n ce d C mp osi t i on fo r Tea ch er s c . C re at i ve Nonfiction 224, Travel Writing 225, Autobiogra ph ical Writing 324, Free-lance Wr i ting 3 25, Personal E s s ay 2. Senior ProjectJ Seminar (at l e ast 4 hours in the followi ng) 425, 426, Writing on S p ec i a l Topic s 427. Imaginative Wri t in g 1Il 428, Seminar: Cr i tical T h eo ry 3. Elective ( a t least 4 hours from l i n es I r 2 above) B. Literature (12 hours, with at least 4 hours upper division) S t u de n ts are encoura ged to take l ite ra t u r e courses wh ic h contribute to their goals as writ rs, and w h i ch expand their exp e r ience with the h ist o r y and gemes of writing. C . Blective (at least 4 elective hours in English beyo n d 1OJ)

Linguistics or s tr uc t ur e of l an g u ag e: one c o u r e (403)

A. Writing

. Wr i t i n gJC

Li ter ature in th E n g l is h

Elementary Education: S t ude n t s preparing to te a ch i n

must take 24 h o urs minimum in English, an d are advised to follow the st r u c t ure o f th En gli s h major in satisfying state certification requirements. on ult your adviser in the School of Education.

Course Offe rings All literature

Th foil w i ng cours w re designed fo r students who are not En gl is h majors, and for students co nsider i ng a n English m ajo r, to satisfy the g e ne ra l univ rsity requirement in l i t erat u re. Upper d iv is io n courses i n literature offered by the Depar t m en t o f English will sa t isfy t h e general university req ui re me nt i n l i t era ­ ture as weil, bu t the fo llowing muses are particularly rec o m ­ mended. These lower div is ion courses in l i t e ratu re gi e p r i m ar y attention to the act of read i n g in d ifferent context and genres. The cou rses emphasize or tudents the ways in whiclL framing the rea d i ng experience by different kinds of questi ns reveals di ffe re n t texts, and enriches the i m agin a t i v experience of rea d­ ing, leading more t o i ns ig h t on th e part of the reader than final answers. A. Topics

Renaissance

Secondary Education: Students prep a r ing to tea ch in j u n ior a B ach el r of Arts in ngli 11 w i t h certification fro m the Sch oo l of Education, or a

or senio r high school may earn either

Bachelor of Arts in Education with a t ea ching m aj or ioO n­ glish. The <nglish major with an emphasis in l i terature and the English major w ith an e m p h asi s in writing may both be pursued by prospective te ac h ers. Secondary education stu­ dents must fulfill all requirements for t h e E ng lish major: Option 1 of the Foreign Language Requirements (2 years of a

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n tern p orary L ite r atu re 2 3 1 , Masterpieces of European Lit er a ture t h ro ugh the

232, Women's Li ter at ure 2 3 3. Post- Co l on i al Literatur 234, Environmental L i te ra tme 2 4 1 . A me ric an Trad itions in Li tera ture 2 5 1 , British Tr ad i ti on s in Literature

a nd Education. Please also see th e School of Education section of this catalog.

C

2 I S, Drama 230,

in secondary schools should arrange for an adviser in both English

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2 13 , To pi cs in Literature: Th m s and Authors B. Gen res 2 14, Poetry 2 1 5 , Fiction 2 1 6 , Fiction: Cross-Cul tural Emphasis 2 1 7, Fiction: Altemativ Persp ect ives Emphasis C. Traditions

PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Swdellts preparing to teach English

F

flilfill the general ull iversity core requirement

I. Lower Division Courses

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON PUBLlSHlNG AND PRINTING ARTS): S e eparate lis t i ng u nd r Publishing and Printitlg Arts.

I

co II rses

in litera ture.

MINOR ( EMPHASIS ON WRITING): 20 semester ho urs (ex­ c l udi ng 1 0 1 ) , with at least 1 2 hours in upper division . dist ributed as foll ows : 1 2 h o urs in w ri t i n g, 4 hours in l i tera tu re , 4 hours o f elec ti ve .

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maj o r.

dolescent econdary C urric ul um , as an elective in the

el em entary schools followlng t h e La nguage Arts curriculum,

Requirements"), and 8 ho ur s of electives.

A

p osi tio n: one course (328 i es p ecially

Pro sp ect i ve teachers may take Edu cati o n 529,

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON UTERATURE): 20 semester h o u rs ( excl u di ng 1 0 1 ) , d i st ri b uted as fo ll o ws : 4 hours f Sh akespe a re, 8 h o urs from "Periods and Surveys" (see literatl re " M aj o r

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recommended)

CH ILDREN'S LITERATURE: Students co m p le tin g 333 nd 8 hours fr o m 326, 334, 335 or other a pp ro ve d courses ( al l with grades of B or higher) will be re co gn i z ed for sp e c i al competence in hildren's l i te rat ure.

68

.E n gl ish IiI rature: ne o u rse American literahl!e; one course

Language Requiremen ts, Opt io n 1) . w

fo rei gn l a ng u age at the university level, or the equ iv a l en t ) ; at least 36 and no more than 44 credi t hours in En gl ish; and all th specific requirements for the m aj or either in l ite ra t ure or in w ri t ing . State certification for tea ch ers also mandates the following requirement�, whi h are an o verl ay to the maj o r. Co urses taken to satisfy the m aj o r can al s o be co u r s es that satisfy the state cer tification re qu i r em en ts .

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II. Upper Division Courses

22 1 Research and Writing

Des ig ned particularly for upper division students, usuaLly but

Strategies for writing academic research papers are practiced, including developing appropriate research topics, locating and using a variety of relevant sources, substantiating generaliza­ tions, and using paraphrase and citation accurately. (2 or 4 )

n

t exdu ively with the major in mind. A. British Litemtllre 30 I, Shakespeare 35 I , English Medieval

l.iterature

352, Chaucer 353, English Renaissance Literature 36 1 , Re toration and 1 8 th Century l.iterature 362. English Romantic and Victorian Literature 367. 20th enrury British Literature B. American

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Writing about travel, while traveling or upon return. Students keep travel journals, produce short travel e says, and read se­ lected travel writers. (4)

CI I"'"

225 Autobiographical Writing

Reading autobiography and writing parts of one's own. with an emphasis on how writing style and personal identity comple­ ment each other. (4)

Lite l'll /ure

37 1 , Studies in American Literature 1 820--1 920

372. 20th Century American Poetry

373, 20th Century American Fiction and Drama 374, American Ethnic Literature

227 Imaginative Writing I

A beginning workshop in writing poetry and short fict.ion. Includes a study of techniques and forms to develop critical standards and an understanding of the writing process. ( Prereq­ uisite: 101 or its equivalent, Advanced Placement, or consent of instructor.) (4)

C. Special IlJdies

34 I , Feminist Approaches to Literature 343, Post-Colonial Literature and Theory 333, Children's Literatur 3 34 , Special Topics in Children's Literature 335, Fantasy and Fairy Tales 428, Seminar: Critical Theory 45 1, Seminar: Author 452, S minar: Them , Genre 49 1 , 492, Independent Reading and Research 597, Gr duate Research

230 Contemporary Literature

Emphasis on the diversity of new voices in American fiction such as Toni Morrison, Leslie Silko, Nicholson Baker, Joyce Carol Oates, ormac McCarthy, and Amy Tan, from the emergence o f post-modernism t o the most important current fiction. ( 4 ) 23 1 Masterpieces of Europea.a Literature

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renais­ sance literature. (Cross- referenced with CLAS 23 1.) (4)

m. Writing, Language, and Theory

1 0 1 , Inquiry Seminar: Writing for Discovery* 22 1 . Resear h and Writing" 224, Travel Writing* 225, Autobiographical Writing* 227, Imaginative Writing I 323, Writing in Professional Settings* 324, Free-Lance Writing* 325, Pe.rsonal Essay" 326, Writing for Children 32 7, 427, Imaginative Writing II, III 328, Advanced Composition for Teachers* 403, The English Language 42 1 , Tutorial in Writing 425, 426, Writ ing on Special Topics 4 2 8 Seminar: Critical Th ory

232 Women's Literature

An introduction to fiction. poetry, and other literatures by women writers. Includes an xploration of women's ways o f reading and writing. (4) 233 Post-Colonial literature

Writer from Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada. and the Caribbean confront the legacy of colonialism from an insider's perspective. Emphasis on fiction. (4) 234 Environmental Literature

,

.. Indicates courses that can fulfill the general un iversity writ ing req uirement.

Examines representations of nature in literature, and the ways in which humans define themselve and their relationship with nature through those representations. Focuses on major texts from various cultures and historical periods. Includes poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. (4) 239 Environment and Culture

Study of the ways in which environmental issues are shaped by human culture and values. Major onceptions of nature, includ­ ing non-western perspectives and issues in eco-justice. Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual framewo rks, history, and sprituality. (4)

IV. PuhUsbiog- and Prmtiog Arts 311,

m

224 'li'avel Writing

Book in Society

3 1 2, Publi hing Procedures 3 1 3, Art of the Bo k I 3 1 4, Art of the Book II

2 4 1 American Traditiom in Literature 2 1 3 Topics in Utaahue: Tbemes a n d Authors

A variable-content cour e that focuses on the act of reading and interpreting texts. (4) 2 1 4 Poetry

A st u dy of poems and conventions of poetry from the clas ics to modern projective verse. (4) 215 Fiction

Examines the development of short fiction, concentrating on themes and techniques of the genre. Stresses the Euro-American tradition . ( 4 ) 2 1 6 Fiction: Emphasis o n Cross-Cultural Perspectives

(4)

Selected themes that distinguish American literature from British traditions, from colonial or early national roots to current branches: for example, confronting the divine, inventing selfhood, coping with racism. (4) 25 1 British Traditions in Literature

Selected themes that define British Literature as one of the great literatures of the world, from Anglo-Saxon origins to post­ modern rebellions: for example, identity, society, and God; love and desire; industry, science, and culture. (4) 30 1 Shakespeare

Study of representative works of the great poet as a central figure in the canon of English literature. (4)

2 1 7 Fiction: Emphasis on Alternativ� Perspectives (4)

3 1 1 The Book in Society

2 1 8 Drama

A critical study of the role of books in our history, society, and daily lives. (4)

An inU'od uction to the basic elements of drama (plot, character,

language) and on tbe traditional genres (tragedy, comedy). (4) P

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3 U Publishing Procedures

353 Engli h Renaissance Literature

p ublishing , involving stude.n ts in deci sions about what to p u bl is h and how to p ro d uce it. (4)

Wyatt to Marvell, including Sid n ey, Sp e nse r,

A worksh o p i n troduction to the world o f b o o k

studio course and sem inar explo res the vi s ual pr perti es of langu a ge . (4) The co mbi nation

(4)

Su rveys the livel y drama, neoclassical po try, go t h ic fiction, and early novel o f a period marked by rel igious co ntroversy and philoso ph ical optimism.

I nd i v idu a l p roj e c t s to exp lore further t y p ogra phy and fine b oo km aki ng. (4)

(4)

362 RDmantic and Victorian Literature A s u r vey of the ri hly varied w r ite r s o f 1 9th - ce n tu ry England

323 Writing in Professiona1 Settings

seen in the context o f a rapidly changing sodal real ity-from rom an tic revolutionaries and dreamers to earnest cultural critics

Students working in pro� s sional settings analyze the rh tori c al demands o f their job - rel ated writing. (4)

and m yth-makers.

324 Free-Lance Writing

(4)

367 20th-Ccntury British Literature

rk s hop in w r iti n g fo r publication, with p r i ma ry mphasi s

A survey of England's literary land s ca p e from the rise o f

on the feature a r ticle . ( 4 )

modernism th ro ug h mid- entury reactions to con tem p orary innovation . (4)

325 Personal Essay

Students write essays on top ics of their choice, work ing p arti cu­ larly o n voice and style. (4)

371 Studies in American Uterature, 1820- 1 920

3Ui Writing for Children

in ideaLism, real. ism , and naturalism. ( 4 )

The mutual in fluen c e of lilerar)' tradition s and American cult ure

riti ng fi t ion and non-fiction for children and teenagers, with an in tro duct io n to the varieties of co nt em p o ra r y children's literature. ( 4 )

A workshop i n

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327, 427 Imaginative Writing n, ill

An advanced wo rksh o p i n wri t ing poetry a n d s h ort fiction. o rn e attent ion will be give n t o p roced u re s for sub m i tt i ng manuscript for p u blication . Students may enroll i n this course a second time as 427. (4) Students are in trod u ced to philosop h i cal,

ISSues confronting teache rs of writing. by the Sch oo l of Education. (4)

s

Major voices in American poetry fr m Frost and Eliot, Williams and Pound, th rough the post-war generation to recen t pOets.

Major auth o rs and forms, both conventional a n d exper imental.

(4 ) 374 American Ethnic Uteratures

Native Americans and Chicano/as. (4)

403 The English Language Studies in the struct u re and

h ist ory of EngEsh, w i tb emphasis on (4)

syntactical analysis and issues o f usage .

An introduction to a r i m l i terJry tradition, with anal ysi s in depth of su ch authors as H.C. Anderson, Tolkien, Lewis, Pot ter,

42 1 Thtorial i n Writing

(4)

Guided work in an individual w r i t i n g project . A

Content va r ies each year. Possible top ics include genres, themes,

( 1-4)

historical period s , and traditions. May be repea ted for red it

425, 426 Writing on Special Topics

with different topic. (4)

Wr it i ng

thei r papers to

Fairy t ales are told and i n terpreted; in te rp re t i ve mode l an d

as story. (4)

428 Seminar: Critical Theory Issues in Lite r ary studies and in rhetorical theory ace discussed in

34 1 Feminist Approaches to Literature

rela t io ns h i p to infl u ential

variety of fe m ini s m s in contemporary theor y

for prospecti ve

109 traditional l ite ra t ure fro m feminist positi o n s . ( 4 )

I n t ro duces perspectives of p os t -colo n i al theorists a s a framework for understanding the relatio n shi p of colo n ial i s m and its l e gacie s to th e works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and other ex­

(4)

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mance

Sir

Everyman. ( 4 )

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m aj o r

Concent rated study of a major lite rary theme or genre, as it m i gh t appear in vari us p e r iods , authors, a n d c u lture s . The framing of critical approa ches th rough literary

social, and politi cal circumstances of their production in four­ te e nth - cen tu ry England. (4) e

a

project. ( 4)

course includes careful attention to pra ctica l -riti:ism, the

352 Chaucer A s t udy of Geoffrey Chaucer's maj o r works, especially The

, A e l F t

autho r to cultural con texts, the fra ming o f crit ical app roache s

452 Seminar: Theme, Genre

ud Middle Engli s h , ra n ging

Criseyde, and

re p utat ion o f a major author in th e English-speaking wo rld. The course includes careful atte n tion to the relations of the

w ri t i ng

Gawain and the Green Knigh t to th e begin ­

Canterbury 7illes a nd Troi/us and

Con entrated s tudy of the work, li fe, influence, and critical

th ro u gh l i tera ry theo ry, substantial hbrary research, and

351 English Medieva1 literature A surve y of the fi rst two p eriods of E ngl i sh Literature: Old En­

nings of E n gl ish drama in

graduat e tudents. (4)

45 1 SemJnar: Author

343 Voices of Diversity: Post-Colonia1 Literature and Theory

from the

movements such as rea de r- res p nse,

cultural st ud ies, fem in i m, and deconstruction. Recomm nded

as fr am �wo r ks for reading feminist Literature and for app roach -

Beowulf,

t the rheto r ica l demand. of publications

m ee

relevant to th e ir academic or professional future. ( 4 )

theo r i es from se ve ral ps ych ological traditions are xplored. Fantasy is looked at both as image a n d

glish , i n cl u d i n g the ep ic

in a wide range of aca d e m i c and creat ive genres deter­

m i ned by their pa r t icular edu catio n al goals , students will sha p e

335 Fairy Tales and FIlIItaBy

colonial territories.

plan of study for the co urs e .

must be appro v ed before the student m ay register

334 Specia1 Topics in Children's Literature

lJltroduction to a

(4)

373 20th-Century American Piction and Drama

ethnic commullitie . Includes African and Asian Ameri ca ns ,

oc ial , and pragmatic

Requi red for certi fication

333 Children's Literature

Wilder, and LeGuin.

372 20th-Century American Poetry

Attention to the liter lures and popular traditions of America's

328 Advanced Composition for Teachers

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Donn e , and Jonson; s elected pl ayw ri gh ts from Kyd to Webster;

36 1 Restoration and 1 8th-Century Literature

3 1 4 The Art of the Book n

wo

nglish lit e ratu re. Selected poets from Shakespeare,

selected p ro se from More to Bacon and Browne.

313 The Art of the Book I

A

Studies the Golden Age of

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tia l l ib r a r y research, and a major

wr it i n g

th ory, substan­ (4)

p roj ect.


49 1 , 492 Independent Reading and Research

An in tensjve ourse i n readi n g. May in cl u de a thes i s . I ntended for upper d iv i s io n majors . (4) 597 Graduate Research (4)

cieney requi rements for a d miss i on can be ati . fled w it h a

recommendation from the A.C..E. director. Studen ts who m a i n ­ tain good a tten danc e and earn a g r ade f A r B in a l l Profi­ cie n cy level classes qualify for th is recom mendati on . m

Engl ish as a Second Language An interdisciplinary minor in Teaching Eng l i sh as a Second Language is available. Th i . program

can

be used to

Course Offerings

Z

Hlgb Beginning Level

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Rea d i ng and Wr i ti ng Co mmuni ca t io n Skills Listening Vocabulary and Sentence Bui.lding

Re ad i n g and Writing Movie List enin g and Vo cabula ry

leads to an add i tion a l endorsement for lemen tary or

Gramm

foreign languages i n the College

majo ring i.n

o f Arls nd Sci ences may

also find this m inor a usefu l addition to their program . TEACHING ENGliSH AS A SECOND .LANG lJAGE

( 16 hours req ui red ANTH

1 02

Exp lor in g Anthropology: Cultl l Tc and S()ciety ( 4)

C 445 Meth ds � r Teaching Fore ig n Lan gua ges and Engli h as a Second Lan gu ag e ( 3 ) Theories or language Acq uisiti n (4) LAN 446 LANG / EDUC 475 Prac Licum in Tea ch in g EngLish as a Second La n guage ( I ) LANG/ED

LANG/ED

C 470

urriculu m, Materials and InstrucLion for Teac hing En 11 ish as a Second Language (4)

. Language l nstitute (operated by th American Cultural Exchange) is an

affi liate of PLU offering intensive

English classes, which are designed to p repare in terna­ tionaJ students for studie.<i in U.S. col leges and universities, or for professiona l work req u iring Bngli h proficiency. FACUIJ'Y: Coghla n, Progmm Director; Bigg

The fa culty at A.C.B. Language Institute

, Re isman.

has extensive training

nd experience in tea ch i ng English as a S eco nd Language, an d all hold the terminal deg ree of M.A. in TESt or its equivalent. Having l ived, traveled, and t augh t Engl ish in many co u n tr ies throughout the wo rld , both the fa culty and staff h a e gained an awarenes. of oth er peoples . their l an g u ages , and their cultures. a

A.c.B. CUlUU CULUM: The A.C.E. curriculum is an intensive

multi-Jevel p rogra m from High B egi n n in g � Pr fi ien .y. Stude n ts study reqillred ourses for 20 ho u rs per week and can

ch ose an additional 5 h o u r f p ract i ca l skills classes. The A. .E. curriculu m is base on co nten t and experiential learning which allows students to i mprove thei r la ngu age proficiency while learn ing about new topics and exploring the local community. U pon arrival, st udents will tak a placement lest to determine tht:ir st arti n g leveL Ea h l.:vd requ ire one semester t o complete. CERTIFICATES AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Certificate of General Engl1sh: Students who successfu l l y

co m p lete the Advanced Level ( l evel 5 oC

) will b e aWaIded I b Cert ifica te o f Completion for General engl ish ,

Certificate of Academic Proficiency: , tudents who u ccessfully com pl ete the Proficicmcy Level ( level 6 of 6) wiU be awa rd d the Cert ifica te of Complet ion for Academk Proficiency. Director's Recommendation: PLU's English language prof!-

>

\II

Intermediate Level

meet the minor requ i rement in Elementary Education and secondary ducation students. Stud en

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Communication Skills

IDgh Intermediate Level

o

Reading and Wr it i ng

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Culture and Comm un ity In terac t io n Curr nt Issues Listening and Dis liSsion Pronun iation

o r-

>

Advanced Level

Z

Rea di ng and Writing Research and ral Presentat ion

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Academic Li s teni n g G ra m m a r

>

C Ci\ m

Proficiency Level

Academ ic Skills G ra m ma r and Wri ti ng Read i n g and Discus sio n Skills S peaki n g Ski l ls Credit Courses: Q u al i fied dvanced level stude nts may request

permission to take re g ular university classes for credit. This option provi des studenls an oppor tu nj t )f to earn credits towar d their degree while completing their advanced course in E n gl i sh as a second langu ge.

To enha 1 1ce fo rmal educatio na l experience, the

I l owi n g are also

available to A.C .E . Language I n titute students: HOST FAMILlES: C.E . L an gu ag e I nstitute ha a long­ establ ished community- based host family program for stu de n ts wh wish t o live:: w ith a U . . fam i ly for one or more semesters.

The Am r ica n famili s--all , creencd by th Institute-provide st u de n ts with room or room and board at reasona bl e rates. In add it io n to the . tand ard bedr om furniture, tht: rooms a re provided with a de

k,

chair, and good ligh t ing; f.l m i ly r ul . are

agreed upon in advance and a fo rmal ,vrilten a greem ent is dra w n

up. The s t uden t completes a questionnaire th a t indicates preference such as: children i n fami ly, u rba n r s ub u r ba n

set ting. likes and d isl ikes , et . Th e h st fam ily is al '0 g i ve n a ll

opportunity to e.;:press prefer('n cs or expeclat i on . Trus information i the n used to place st udents in th home most

sui table (o r both par ·es. Weeken d an d/or hol iday vi its w i t h an Arner i ca J1 fam ily ca n also be arranged.. .E . angu agt: Institute assist its st ude nts wi th career choice , co llege placemen t, im m igrat ion mat ters, medical and dental referrals, and personal concerns.

COUNSEUNG; A.

ACIIVITIES: Special cultural and socl3l act ivities are plan n ed

regul r1y for studen ts. In a.ddilio n, fie l d tT ips ad d igni ficantly to cultural e nrich m e nt . St udents lUld staff take tr i ps to Mt. Rain ier, local m useu ms of nat u ral h istory. rt gnllc ries , ZOO ' , ch i l d re n' da y care centers, ret ireme nt homes. th Ports f Taco ma a n d Seatt le, and the Sea n It: Cen ter. Students can also p aT tidp a te in

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intra m ural sports activitie

such as soccer, volleyball, and

arguments, the in terpretation of data and relationships in

basketba ll. Six tennis court�, a golf course, a swi m m i ng pool, and

the n a t ural worid, and the scien t i fic context o f environmen­

several gymnasi u ms giv stu dents additional opportuni ties for

tal issues. The COllrses must b e from d i fferent departme nt : Biology 1 1 6

recreation. U.I

LANGUAGE MENTORS: Language m e n tors are U.S. students

W

and adults who a re i nteres te d in engaging i n ternational students

Q ::J I­ U'I ....

� I­

in

free conversation one-on-one or in small gro ups.

AMERICAN UFE PROGRAM: The A . .. E. L1 nguage I nstitute o ffers many o p portunities for students to lea.rn about the

sions. The courses m�t be from d i fferent departments:

volunteer services whUe i n Tacoma .

Economics

students who demonstrate fi nancial need.

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i m plementation and impl ications o f enviro n menta.l dec i­

also provided to students who \Nant to join groups or take part in

w

II:

environmental decisions are made and investigate the

i n terac t i o n with the local ind ividuals and insti t u t i o ns. Help is

SCHOLARSHIPS: Available after the fi rst session fo r those

� z o

Students select two courses from t h e following, which focus o n the understanding of the i nsti t u tions w i thin which

surroundi ng communi ty. Several requ i red classes include

Z

1 30 - Global and Environmental Eco nomic

Principles Economics

The A . C. E. La nguage /11s titu te is located 011 Park Ave/rue just north of 121 sl Street.

330 - Environmental and Natural Resource

Economics PoEtical Scjence

346 - Environmental Politics and P01icy

C. The Environment and Sensibility (4) Snldents select one course from the following, which exam­

Telephone Number: (253) 535-7325 FA X NW"/lber: (253) 535-8794

ine the ways i n which nature e.'tists i n h u m a n consciousness,

values, and perceptions. Students rece ive guidance i n careful

E- mail: coghlaea@plu.edu

reading, though t ful writing, and sensitive attent iveness to nature a.nd to environmental iss ues:

w

rel ationshi :p between h u m an s

the broad

minor

link environmental themes

they s elec t in their co m p l ement ary major or m i nor. The program is overse e n by an interdisc i plinary faculty comm i t tee. Student i nt ere sted i n the Environmental

Studies maj or or minor sho u ld

Students select o n e co u rse that integrates a n d a p pl ies environ­ mental concep� within a special top i c area. This course should be selected i n consultation with their progra m adviser: Integrated Studies Integrated Studies

meet with the

chair of the

Wh i t m a n , Chair; B ergman, Hansen, Hansvici<, Kapla.n, Mutchler,

J. Sch u l tz, Stivers, Yerian.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 36 seme ter hours, completed with

one

a

m u l t idisciplinary

a nd i n tegrated approach. These cou rses i.nvolve the co nstruction and interpretation o f arguments from a variety of perspec tives:

Environmental Stud ies/Geosciences 1 04

-

Conservation o f

Natural Resources Engl ish/Religion 239

-

objectives

4. Advanced Integrative Courses ( 8 ) A l l majors must complete L h e following courses. I t i s expected that they w ill have completed all of the other requirements before these final ourses. Environ mental St udies Environmental Studies

requ i red to take

courses

that p rovide an in-depth

A. The Environment and Sdmce ( 8 ) Students select two courses from the foliowing, which emphasize the u n derstanding o f scientific reasoning and

L

490 - Capstone Project

Additional Requirements: A complementary minor or major in another discipl.ine. An i nte rns h i p is req u i red, e i t h er for the Capstone project or as a sep arate experience. Students must receive a pp roval for

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A minimum of 20 hours o f u p per division credits is required i n the major.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 20 semester hours, completed with grade of C or h ig h er.

I . Environment and Science ( 8 ) Students select two courses from the following which examine the scientific fo undations o f environmental problems:

1 04 - Conservation of

Natural Resources

study and exposure to envi ron men tal is ucs within disciplines.

e

3 50 - Environmental 1ethods of

Environmental Studies/Geoscienc.es

u lture

Ellvironment and

2. Disdplinary Breadth

i

464 - nvironmental Psychology 425 - Spec ial Top ics i n

Environmental Studies

of the following courses, which introduce

students to environmental issues through

F

Po pulation, H u nger, and Poverty

their interns h i p by the chair of Environmental Studies.

1 . Foundations (or Environmental Studies (4)

are

Energy, Resources, and Pollution

-

or additional a p proved co urses that meet outcomes/

grade o f C or h igher.

Students

-

lnvestigation

FAClJIJ:'Y: A com m i ttee o f faculty administers this program:

Students select

24 1 242

Env i ro n m e n tal St udies

Environmental Studies Committee.

Olufs, Rowe,

(Environmental

3. Elective Courses ( 4 )

in

tudies. S tu den ts h ave the opportun i ty to to any area of the cu rriculum

E nviron mental

365 - Christian Moral Issues

Stllcients l11 1/s1 notify the itlstructor of thei r intent to complete a ill Envirof1ll1CfJtai Studies 50 that they Cil n fows the i r inde­ pendent work ill the col/rse 011 iln ellviWll mClltal theme or isslIe.

liberal arts

objectives of the u niversity, offers a m ajor or a

Free-lance Writing"

Psychology

The program, in keeping with

C

Environmental Literature

-

major

of study.

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324

and the e nv i ro nm en t

through a wide v a rie ty of perspectives w ith i n the w1iver­ sity curriculum. The integrative a pproach of the pro g ram , essential to the devel opment of a n understand ing of the glob a l imp ac t of human civilization on the natural envi ­ ronment of our plane t, encourages students t blend many perspec ti ves on en viron m en ta l issues into their program

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234

Engl ish

"Ethics only)

exa mines the

The Envi.ronmental Stu dies Progr m at PL

English

Religion

Environmental Studies

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Introductory Ecology

-

424 - Ecology Chemistry 1 04 - Environmental Chemistry Geosciences 334 - Hydrogeology B. The Environment and Society ( 8 ) Biology

5 I T Y

Biology

1 1 6 - I n t roductory Ecology 1 04 - Envi ronmental Chemistry

Chemistry

Stucients majoring in a n a tllral science discipline a rid who have taken

level Chemistry collrse ( 1 20 or above) wiil be allowed to it, consultation lVith the El1vironmental Committee.

a h ighe.r

SlIb5till< te ano ther course Srudies


2. linvironment and Society (4) Students select one co urse from the following which pursue the tudy of inst itutions

and po l i c ies

are

where envlronmcn tal perspec t ives

The geosciences a re d isti nct from other natural sciences.

applied:

Ecollomics 1 30

-

Global and E n i ronmental Economic

-

Environmental and Na t u ral Resource

Principles Economic 330 Econom ics Pol i tical Scie nce

346 - Environmen tal Pol i t ics

and Policy

3. Environment and SensibiHty ( 4 ) Students select o n e course from t h e fo llowing w h i c h examine

val ue , perception, and expression as t hey relate to

environ­

mental issues: English 234

-

239

-

Env i ro n m e n t and Culture

Eng l ish 324

-

Free-lance Wri t i ng'

I n tegrated

tudies 24 1 - Energy, Resources, and Po l l u t ion

Psych ology 464 Religion 365

-

-

Environmen tal Psycho logy

Chr istian

-f oral Issues ( Environmen tal

Ethics only)

"StlUieJ1ts m u s t IlOti1>' the instructor of their i n te,,! to complete a minor ill Erlviromllclltal Stlidies $0 that they Catl Jows their illde­ pendell/ work ill the collrse 011 an ilJIvirollmental theme

The study of d1e earth is i nterd isciplinary a n d h istorical, bringing knowl edge from m a ny other fields to help solve

problems. Geoscie n tists i n ve st i ga te cont inents, oceans, a n d the

atmosphere, and emphasize both the processes that

have changed a n d

are

or iss ue.

4 . Environmental Studies 350 - Environmental Methods of Investigation (4)

Course Descriptions

Our fa st r isi ng human population is depe n dent u p o n t h e -

earth fo r food, water, shelter a n d energy a n d m i neral

VI

products i n the fi e ld a n d i n the laboratory, merge diverse data, develop re a so n i n g skills t h a t apply t h rough geologic

maps. The field goes beyond researdl science, and includes app l ied topics l i ke t h e relationships o f natural events such as ea rthquakes a n d

t ime and create and i n terpret p u re

volcanoes with h u m a n societies .

of Geoscien c es recognizes that it is n o to h ave kn owledge of t h e fa cts of the field; successful students must h a e quantita tive skills a n d be a bl e to communicate d e a r l y t h rough w r i t i n g and The Department

longer sufficient j ust

speakin g. Laborat ry el(p riences are an i n t egral part of all i n cluding the departm ent's scann i n g e l ectron microscope.

used i n most courses to h elp students

Computers are

understa n d fundamental p h e no men a obtain c u rre nt ,

350 Environmental Methods of Investigation

i n fomlation, a n d communicate results. Field trips are

S t udy o f a watershed u s i ng and i n tegrating techn iques and

included in many courses.

ics, and ethics. Include laboratory. Prerequisites: Lines # 1 -3

Pacific Lut heran Uni ersity is located at the leading edge of western North America, i n the Puget Lowland, between

completed or consent of instruc tor. ( 4 )

the dramatic scenery of t he Olympic Mountains and the

399 Internship in Environmental StucUes

Cascade Range P ierce County has d iverse geology, w h ich

An i n ternship with a p r ivate or p u b l i c sector agency, organiza­ tion, or company involved in env i ronmental issues. By conse n t o f the chair o f Envi ro nmen t al S t udies o nly. (4)

425 Special topics 10 Environmental Studies Selecled topics

as

annoll nced by the program. Course wiLl

address current interd isci pl inary issues i n environmental studies.

( 1-4)

.

is reflec ted in elevations that range from sea level to m o re

than 1 4,000 feet. Geoscience graduates

who elect

to

work after complet­

i ng a PLU degree are employed by the u.s. G e olog ica l Su rvey, resou rce compan i es,

governmental agenci es and ,

p rivate-sector firms. Many graduates are currently em­ ployed i n geotechn ical and environmental fields. Gradu­

490 Capstone Project

ates who c o m b i ne geoscienceoS with

An i n terd isc ipli nary research project of the student's design that

ployed i n

incorporates materiaJs and methods from earl ier courses and has a focus reflecting the specifi.c i n terest of the student. A substan­ tia! project and Prerequ isite:

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ability to i n tegrate . Geo l ogi st s observe processes a n d

courses. Many courses involve t h e use of m icroscopes,

principles o f env i ronmental sciences, political science, econom­

m

m

Study i n t h e geoscien ces requires creativity a n d t h e

Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of o u r referenced with Geosciences 1 04 ) . (4)

o

1"\

104 Conservation of Natural Resources resources w i t h s p e c i fi. c reference to the Pacifi.c Northwest. ( Cross­

m

changing t h e earth through time a n d

the results of those p rocesses, s u c h as rocks a n d sed imen t s .

resources.

Environmental Literature

English/Religion

Geosciences

a

public presentation of the results are required .

ENVT 350. ( 4 )

49 1 Independent Study Opportunity to fo cus on specific topics or issues in environmen­

tal studies under the superv ision o f a faculty member. ( 1 -4)

education are em­ primary and secondary educ tion.

Careers i n geosciences often req u ire post-g raduate degrees. Many

B. S. majors ha ve been successful a t major

re ea rch graduate schools.

FACULTY: Benham, Chair; Faustini, Foley, Lowes, Whi t man. The Bachelor of Science degree is i ntended

as

a pre-professional

degree, fo r students in terested in gradua te school or working i n geosciences.

The

Bachelor of Arts degree i s the minimum

p reparation appropriate for the field, (lnd is best combined with other degree programs, such as majors i n social sciences or the minor i n E nv i ro n men tal Studies . The department trongly recommends that all students complete Math 1 40 or higher be fore enrolling in 300 level and higher courses in geosciences. Students should also note that upper division courses are o ffered on a two-year cycle. Early declaration

of majors or minors

in geosciences will facilitate

development of individual programs and avoid sched u l i ng conflicts .

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U'I II.!

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 44 sem ster hours in Geosciences; oo rses i nc l ude: one from 1 0 1 , 102, 1 0 3 , 1 04 or 1 05; 201 , 324, 325, 326, 327, 3 29, 3 35 and 425; plus two from 323, 328, 33 0 , 334, 34 1 , 350, or 360; one credit of 390; 490; at Ie t one credit of 495. Necessa ry 'opp rting courses incl ude: Chemistry I 20 0r 1 25; Physics 1 25, 12 ( 1 35 and 1 36 labs) (or Physics 1 53, 1 54 and l abs); M athema t ics 1 5 1 and eitb r 1 52 or Co mputer Science 220. At least one additional chemistry course i recom ­ mended for preparation for g raduate school. B iology 3 2 3 and additional courses are reco m mended when paleontology is a maj r interest.

2 semester hours m Geo ­ science.s ; course includt:: 201 plus at le a st two l ower d ivision from 1 0 1 , 1 02, 1 03, 1 04, 105 ; eight credit from 324, 325, 326, 327. 329; eight credits from 3 2 3 , 3 2 8 . 33 0, 334, 33 5, 34 1 , 350, 360; one cred i t of 39 0; 490 and ne r dit of 495. 425 r commended . Required supp rting courses include: Ch mistry 104, 1 20 ur 1 2 5. Options reflect a student's interests and are discussed with an adviser.

BACHELOR Of ARTS MAJOR:

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of ,dllc" t io ll. M INOR: 20 semester bo urs of cour es in geoscienc s, completed with grade of C or higher. Req uire d: 20 1 and at leasl lhree upper diVision courses (a min imum 0 8 upper-division credit hours). D EPA RTMENTAL HONORS: I n r cogni tion of outstanding work the designatio n with Departmental HOllors may be granted

102 General Ouanography Ocean graphy and its relat ionsh ip to other fields; physical , cb emical . biological, climatic. and geological aspects of the sea. Include labs and field trips. I, U (4)

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325 Structural Geology The fo rm and spatial relat ionsnips of various rock masses and

328 Paleontology A systematic study of the fossil record , ombining principles of evolutionary development, paleohabitats and preservation, with practical xperience of specimen identification. Includes labs. 'Prerequisi t : 1 3 1 , 20 1, or consent of instructor. a/y 1 1 998-99 (4) 329 MetamorphJc Petrology Consideration of the mineralogical and textural chang s that rocks undergo d u rin" orogeruc episodes, including p hys i c al ­ chemical param ters of lhe nvironment as deduced from experimental stud ies. Includes labs, Prerequisites: 1 3 1 , 20 1 , 26, o r c nsent of instructor. a/y 11 ( 2 )

334 Hydrogeology Study of the hydrologic cycle. investigati ng surface and ground­ water flow, resource evaluati on and developmen t, wells. water quality and geothermal reso urce . mphasis o n water problems in the Puget Sound area, with addi t ional examples from div Tse geologic environments. I ncludes labs. P rerequ isite: 1 3 1 , 2 0 1 , or consent of instructor. Iy II 1998-99 (4)

104 Conservation of Natural Resources Principles and problem� of public and private tewa rdship o f our re ources with special reference to the Pacific Northwest. Includ . labs. I, II (4) I

324 Igneous Petrology Applied an d t heoretical study of the gen sis, nature, a n d distrLbution o f igneous rocks, at m icroscopic to global cales. In tudes lab '. Prerequisites: 1 3 1 , 20 1 , 326, or consent of i nst ruct or. aly I I ( 2 )

330 Maps: Images o f the Earth Maps as a basic lool for comm wucatmg in formation . An introduction to computer-based Geograph ic Information Systems, Global Positioning Systems, digital maps, rell1otely­ sensed images and aerial photographs. Includes labs. Prerequi­ site: pr vious cience (geoscience preferred ) , math or computer science course or con sen t of inst ructor. aiy fI 1 999-2000 (4)

103 Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Geologic Hazards Study of the geologic environment and its relationsh i p to humans, with emphasis on geologic features and processes that create hazards when encroached upon by hLUnan activity, including earthquakes, volcan ic eruptions. landslides and avalanches. a.nd solutions lo pro bl e ms created by the e hazards. Indudes labs. [ (4)

C

323 MiouaJogy rystallugraphy and m i llerJlogy, both are and rock-forming minerals. Prerequ isites: l 3 1 , 2 0 1 or onsent of i nstructo r. Includes labs. a/y J 1 99 (4)

327 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation , Formational principles of su rface-accumulated rocks, and their i ncorporation in the stratigraphic r curd. Tbis subject i s basic to field mapping and st ructural in terpretation. Prerequisite: 2 0 1 or onsent of in tu re ro r. aly T ( 4)

101 Our Cbanging Planet Exploration of earth systems, including cycles in and connec­ tions among the l ithosphere. hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Disucssion of changes in and h uman i mpacts to these systems that have taken place through time. Incl udes labs. 1 (4)

A

A survey of geologic processc as tbey apply to the evolut ion o f the North American co nti nent, includ ing the mteraction of humans with their geologic environment. Stu dents parti ipate actively in classes that in tegr te laboratory and field study f rocks, m inerals, fossils, maps and cnvir nmental aspects of g ology and empha ize deVeloping basic skills f geologic inquiry. h is course meets Slate education certification require­ ments fo r content in physi 'al and hi t rical geol )gy. 1I (4)

326 Optical Mineralogy Theory and practice of mineral studies using the pel ograph i microscope, including i m m rsion oil tech niques , production of thin sections, and det min t ion of minerals by m ean of their ptical p ro perties . Includes labs. Prerequisite: 1 3 1 , 20 1 , or consent of instructor. aly I ( 2 )

Course Offe rings

P

2 0 1 Geologic Principles

a n introduction to rock defo r m a tion; consideration of basic p roce 'ses to understand mounta.in building and cont inental formatiun; laboratory emphasizes practical tecllniques which enable stud,cnts to an alyze regional tructural patterns. Pre­ requ isite: 1 3 1 , 20 I , or consent of instructor. a/)1 II L 998-99 (4)

to Ba helor of S iencc graduates by a vote of the fa ulty of the Department of Geosciences, based upon the student' perfor· mance in these areas: I . Co urse woric The grade poi nt average i.n geoscience cour es must be at least 3.50. 2. Written wo rk: From the time a student declares a major in geo ciences, copies of utstanding work (e.g., laboratory reports, po ·ter presentations, written reports) will be kept for later summary evaluation. 3. Oral co mmun ication: Students must evidence ability t communicate effectively as indicated by the sum of their part icipation in das discussi ns, seminars, bel p session , and teaching assistantship work. 4. Other llCl ivities: Po ilive considera tions for honor include involvement i n the department, doing independent research, geo cience-r lated employment> and p rticipati n in pfofes­ si nal organizations.

74

105 Meteorology A full, bala nced, and up-to-date C()ver,lge of the basic principles of meteorology. ami nation of the impacts of severe weatll er on hu mans and the environment. No prcrequi ites. lncludes lab . J (4)

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335 Geophysics Stud)' of the ph)'sical n a t u r e of the earth, its p ro p e rt i es and

pro esses, mplo)'ing techniques from s e is mol o gy, heat flow, gravity, mag net i sm, and electrical conductivi ty. Emphasis on understanding the earth's formation, structure, and plate tectonics pro esses as well as geoph)'sical exp lo r a t i on techniques. I n c l udes l abs . P rer e q u isi tes : 1 3 1 or 20 1 , one s emes te r of calculus, physics ( h igh school level or above ) , o r c o n s e n t o f instructor. aly 1 1998-99.

(4)

G lobal Studies The Global Studie Program is a response to global trends that increasingly a ffect our lives. The p rogram focuses on the formation and emergence of the modern world and its growing economic, cultural. political, and ecological in ter­

....

dependence. By combining academic learning with lan­ guage skills and practical exp erience, the Global Studies

34 1 Energy and Mineral Resources for the Future A s u rve y of the wo r l d" energy and mineral resources comprising the raw materials o f ind ust r ialized s o c i e t ie s . Includes labs.

Program provides students with the knowledge, perspec­

....

tive , and s k ills they need to understand and to fu nction

VI

effectively in today's world.

-I

350 Marine Geology tudy of t h e 70'),'" of the earth heneath the oceans, focusing on the c}""!:ensive discoveries of th past few decades. Emphasis on m a ri ne sedim nts, sediment r processes, pl a t e tectonic processes, and the histori al geology of the oceans. I ncludes lab s . PrerequisiLe: 1 02, 1 3 1 , 20 I , or consent of instructor. aly I I (4)

FACULTY: The Global Studies Committee, mad u p of faculty members and s taff from the Center fo r I n ternat ional Pr og r ams , administers this p rog ram : Hames, Chair; EUard- Ivey, Kelleher, Mo o r e , Predmore, Yager.

360 Geology o f Washington The minerals, row, geological tructures and geological history of Washington, with mphasis on the region from the Columbia Plateau to the Pa ific Ocean. Includes labs and field trips. P r e re q u is i te : previous g oscience or consent of instructor. (4)

a second major in addition to a regular disciplinary major. Students electing the Global Studies major are required to de­ clare a traditional disciplinary major before they declare a Global Studies major. The Global Studies major is multidjscip linary, drawing both its cour es and faculty from departments of the Divisions of Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences and from the Schools of the Arts and Business. Becau e the program is designed to draw on a variety of disci­ plinary perspectives to explain and understand global trends, no more than two courses ( 8 semester hours) can be taken in any one discipline to fulfill the requirements for the issue concentra­ tion for the lebal Studies major. In addition, students may not apply more than two courses (8 semester hours) from their p rimary major or from courses taken to fulfill general university core r eq u i rem ents to the complementary major.

Prerequi ites: 1 3 1 , 20 1 , o r conse nt of instructor. aly 1 (4)

c: o m VI

GWBAL STUDIES COMPLEMENTARY MAJOR: The Global Studies major is t e r med a " com pl e m entar y" major because it is

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: A.

Global Studies Core ( 1 6 sem ester hours) 1 . Anthropology/Hisrory/Political Science 2 1 0, Global Perspectives (4)

2. Select two courses from the following three:

390 Field Trip Field and on-campus study of major geo lo gic sites in western U.S. Tri ps take place during spring break o r a t end of spring semester. Prerequisite: 1 3 1 , 20 1 , or consent 0 instructor. ( 300level geology courses preferred.) ( 1 ) 425 Geologic Field Mapping Combining a survey of regi o nal field geology with a series of I cal mapping p roj ec ts , this course introduces field te ch niq u es of geologic map-making. I ncluded are t raversing and data

assembly, map construction, section measurements, structural analysis, and chronological synthesis. Graphics te chniques are also covered. Prerequisites: previous 300-level geology courses and consent of instructor. S (5)

a. Anthropology 1 02. Eqlorlng Anthropology! Culture

and Society ( 4 ) b . Economics 1 30, Global and Environmental Economic Prlndples

B. Issue Area

Concentrations ( 1 6 semester hours) Four courses must be taken from one of the five concentra­ ti o n s outlined below. Upon approval of the program ch a i r, students may choose to take three courses from one c o nce n ­ tration and one from another.

C. Language

Student mll t demonstrate p roficiency in a language relevant to their cours work and at a level consistent with O p t i o n 1 o f the College of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. This may be accomplished through a proficiency examination or through the equivalent of 16 semester hours of coursework.

491 Independent Study Investigations o r research in areas of special interest not covered by regular courses. Requi res regular supervision by a faculty memb f. ( 1 -4) 4.95 Seminar

Selected topi research. ( 1 )

in geosciences based on l i terature andlor original

D. Experiential Comp onent

Majors are t rongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program overseas, although local internships related LO an area concentration may also be approved. Pre-approved credit equivalent to 4-8 semester hours may be obtained i f students participate in a PLU approved study-abroad semester-long program.

497 Research Exp e ri m en t al or theoretical inve tigation, in close cooperation with a faculty member. Open to upper division students. ( 1 -4) 499 Capstone Seminar

Senior experience in library or laboratory research and career­ integrating seminar, including p rese n ta ti on of research results.

(4)

History 2 1 5 , Modena World History (4) 3. G lobal Studies 4 1 1, Research Seminar (4) c.

E.

Senior Research Project The senior p roject is

a general university requirement in all programs and majors. Students will normally satisfy this

n (2)

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requirement by completing a research project or paper in Global Studies 4 1 1 .

4. Global Environmen t a. Required: Biology 1 1 6 - Introductory Ecology QL Biology 424 - Ecology QL Chemistry 1 04 Environmental Chemistry

ISSUE CONCENTRATIONS: 1. Comparative EthnldtJes

-

a. Required: Anthropology 360 - thnic Groups b. Electives: At least two electives must be upper division courses. Anthropolob'Y 336 - P ople of Latin America Anthropology 343 East Asian Cultures Anthropology 350. - Women and Men in World Cultures Anthropology 375 - Law, Politics and Revolution Anthropology 380 Sickness, iadness, and Health Anthropology 385 - Marriage, Family and Ki.nship Anthropology 392 - Gods, Magic, and Morals (also Religion 392 ) English 2 1 6 - Fiction: Cross-Cultural Perspectives English 233 Po st-Colonial Literature French 22 1 - French Literature and Film of the Americas French 432 Francophone Literature Global Studies 399 - Global Studies Internship History 1 09 East Asian Societies History 335 Latin An1erican History Languages 272 Literature and Social Change in Latin America Music 1 20 - Music and Culture Political Scien e 38 1 - Comparative Legal Systems Religion t 3 1 Religions of South Asia Religion 1 3 2 - Religions of East Asia Religion 247 Christian Theology Religion 344 - Theological Studies Religion 390 Studies in the History of Religions Religion 392 Gods, Magic, and Morals (also Anthropology 392) Spanish 322 - Latin American Culture and Civilization

III ...

Q :::J I­ III

and

Geosciences 1 04 - Conservation of Natural Resources or Integrated Studies 2 4 1 - Energy, Resources, and Pollution b. Electives: Anthropology 354 Geography of World Cultures Biology 424 Ecology ( if not taken as a required cour e) Economics 330 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics Geosciences 34 1 Energy and Mineral Resources for the Future Global Studies 399 Global Studies Internship Integrated Studies 2 4 1 Energy, Resources, and Pollution ( i f not taken as a required course) I ntegrated Studies 242 Population, Hunger, and Poverty -

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5. International Relations a. Required: Political Science 33 1 - International Relations b. Elect ives: Anthropology 375 - Law, Politics, and Revolution Economics 331 - International Economics Economics 381 - Comparative Economic Systems Global Studies 399 Global Studies Internship History 2 2 1 - The World Since 1 945 History 356 - American Diplomatic History Political Science 338 - American Poreign Po licy Political Science 4 3 1 - Advanced International Relations

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Note: Studellts plallllillg to pursue graduate study il! International

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RelatiollS are strollgly advised to take Statistics 23 l1Ma thematics 3 4 1

-

(a course which also satisfies a general ulliversity requiremellt ill Ma thematical Reasolling.)

2. Development Issues a. Required: Integrated Studies 245 The D evelopment of Third World Underdevelopment Economics 34 1 - Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies b. ElecN ves: Anth ropology 3 5 1 Women, Colonization, and D evelopment English 233 Post-Colonial Literature Integrated Studies 242 - Population, Hunger, and Poverty integrated Studies 246 Cases in Third World Development History 496 - Seminar: The Third World Global Studies 399 - ,lobal Studies Internship One area-studies course which focuses on a developing region or country of particular student interest ( for example, French 34 1 , History 335, History 338, History 339, Languages 272, Spanish 3 2 2 ) . 3 . Global Business a. Req uired: Business 3 5 2 Global Management Economics 3 3 1 - l ntemational Economics b. Electives: Business 355 Global Operations Business 408 International Business Law Business 460 - International Marketing conomics 3 7 1 - Industrial Organizati n and Public Policy Political Science 33 1 - International Relations Political Science 347 - Political Economy Global Studies 399 - Global Studies Internship -

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MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 20 semester hours, including two

core courses (ANTH/HIST/POLS 2 1 0 and GLST 4 1 1 ) ; and three courses from the approved list of courses for an issue concentra­ tion that appears in the "Major Requirements" section above. Those seeking a concentration in Global Business must take Economics 3 3 1 as one of the three r maining electives . Concen­ trators in International Relations must take Political Science 3 3 1 a s one of the three remaining electives.

Course Offerings 399 Internship A project, usually undertaken during a study-abroad experience and supervised by a PLU faculty-member, that combines field experience, research, and writing on issues related to the student's issue concentration in Global Studies. Local internships that involve transnational issues and constiluencies will also be considered. Prerequisite: prior consent of the chair of the Global Studies Committee and of the supervising PLU faculty member. (4)

411

Research Seminar

Required of all students majoring and minoring in GI bal Studies, this is a capstone seminar that culminates in the writing of an extensive research paper. Prerequisite: ANTH/HIST/POLS 2 1 0. ( 4 )


Course Offerings Courses in the Department of History are offered in the foUowing fields:

AMERICAN FIELD 251 CoionJal American History 252 Nineteenth-Century American History 253 Twentieth-Century American BiBtory 294 The United States Since 1945 305 Slavery in the Americas 352 The American Revolution 355 American Popular Culture 356 American Diplomatic History 359 History of Women In the United State 381 The VietnlUR War and American Society 451 American Legal History 460 West and Northwest 47 1 Histo ry of American Thought and Culture 494 Seminar: American History

H istory Through the s t udy

of h is t o ry at Pacific Lutheran Un iver­

si t y students gain an un derstand ing and appreciation of the

historical perspective. Opportunities for developing

ana lytical. and interpret t ive skills are provided t h rough re sea r c h

and writing p rojects, in ternships, class presenta ­ and study tours. The practice of the historical method leads st u dents off campus to their hometowns, to Eu rope o r Ch i na o r the Al erican West, and to com m u nity institutions, both p rivat e and public. The dep a r t m ent tio ns,

emphasizes indi vidual advi si ng in relation to bot h self­ directed studies and

regular courses. The u n iversity library in American,

h tdi ngs ind ude significant co llect i on s

European , and non-Western history. The Nisqually Plains Room of the lib rary specializes in Pacific Northwest comm unity studies. Career outlets for majors a n d mino rs are either direct or supporti ve in business law, tea c h ing , public

service, news media, and other

FACULTY: Kraig, Chair; Benson , Mutchler, Nordquist.

occupations.

a rp, Ericksen, Hames, K raig,

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M inimum of 32 semester hours, including 4 bours-American field, 4 hours- European field, and 4 hours-noD-Western field. Students are expected to work closely with the cl partmen t's faculty advi sers t insure the most personalized programs and instruction possible. M ajo rs a re urged t meet the fore. ign language requirement of the College of Arts and Sciences under either Opt io n I or Option n. Those maj ors wh o a re preparing for public school teaching can meet the state h istory req uirement by enrolli ng in History 460. All maj ors are requi red to take four hours of historical methods and research and four hours of Seminar credit. Completion of the Seminar course satisfies the core requirement j)� r a senior seminar/proje t. For the major at least 16 semester hours must be completed at P LU, including History 30 1 and 494 or 495 or 496� a m i nimum of 1 2 hours from co urs s n umbered above 300. The minor in h istory emphasizes a " p rog ram focus" and a "p rogra m plan:' which is arranged by the student in consultation with a d p rtmen tal adviser. For the minor al least 1 2 semeste r hours m ust be completed at PLU, including 8 hours of uppe r division courses.

MINOR: 20 se mester hours with

VI -t

o ;lQ -<

EUROPEAN FIELD 1 07, 108 History of Western Civilization 321 Greek Civilization 322 Roman Civilization 323 The Middle Ages 324 Renaissance 325 Reformation 328 Nineteenth-Century Europe 329 Europe and the World Wars: 1914- 1945 332 England: Thdors and Stuarts 334 Modem Germany, 1 848- 1945 360 Holocaust: Destruction of the European Jews 495 Seminar: European ffistory NON-WESTERN FJELD 109 East Asian Societies 205 IslamJc Middle East to 1 945 2 1 0 Globai Perspectives 2 1 5 Modern World History 220 Modern Latin American H istory 310 Contemporary 'apan 335 Latin American History: Central America and the Caribbean 336 Southern Africa 331 The History of Mexico 338 Modern China 339 Revolutionary China 340 Modern Japan 344 The Andes in Latin American History 380 Asian American ffistory and Culture 496 Seminar: The Third World ALL FIELDS

301 Introductif)n to Historical Methods and Re earch 401 Workshops 492 Independent Study 499 Internship 107, 108 History of Western Civilization Analysis of institutions and ideas of selected civilizations. Meso­ potamia, Egypt, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, the rise of Chris­ tianity, and Medieval Europe in the first se m es ter ; Europe from the Renaissance to the present in the second semester. I II ( 4, 4) 109 East AsJan Societies A historical overview of the traditional cultures, traditions, and

lives of the people of China and Japan. Discussion of the l ives of peasants, emperors, m e rchants , and warriors in each society. (4)

BACBEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

See School of Education.

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205 Islamic Miildle East to 1945 An introductory surv y course on the history of the Middle Ea t

fr m the time of Muhammed in the 7th century through Wo rld War I I . (4)

Europe from the disintegration of the Roman Empire to 1 300; reading and research i n medieval materials. (4) 324 Renaissance

Europe in an age of transition - 1 300 to 1 500. (4)

2 10 Global Perspectives: The World in Change

A survey of global i sues: modernization and development; economic change and international trade; diminishing resources; war and revolution; pea e and j ll tice; and cul tural diversity. (Although cross-referenced with 'TH 2 1 0 and POLS 2 1 0, students may receive history credit only when this course i� scheduled as a history class.) (4) 2 1 5 Modem World History

325 Reformation

Political and religious crises in the sixteenth century: Lutheran­ ism, Zwinglian ism, Anglicanism, Anabaptism, Calvinism, Roman Catholic reform; Weber thesis, the beginnings of Baroque arts. (4) 328 Nineteenth-Century Europe

The expansion of European civilization from 1 800 to 1 9 1 4. (4)

Surveys major features of the principal existing civilizations of the world since 1450: East Asia, india and southern Asia, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, 'v estern civilization, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin Anlerica. ( 4 )

World War I; revolution and return to "normalcy"; depression and the rise of fascism; World War U . (4)

220 Modern La tin American History

332 England: Tudors and Stuarts

Introdu tion t mod the present. (4)

334 Modem Germany, 1948-1945

rn

329 Europe and t h e World Wars : 19 14-1945

Political, social, economic, legal, and cultural developments. ( 4 )

Latin Am rican history, from 1 8 1 0 to

The Revolutions of 1 848 and unification of Germany; Bisma rckian and Wi.lhemian empires; Weimar Republic and the rise of National Socialism; the Third Reich. (4)

251 Colonial American History

American institutions from colonial times to the 1 790s; the growth of the colonies and their relationship to the British imperial system. (4)

335 Latin American History: Central America and the Caribbean

252 Nineteenth-Century American History

rom Jefferson to Theodore Roosevelt; i n terpretation of era from social, political, economic, and biographical viewpoints. (4) 253 Twentietb-Century American History

Trends and events in domestic and foreign a ffairs since .I 900; affluence, urban growth, and social contrasts. (4) This seminar exam ines selec ted topics i.f1 recent .S. hi tory such the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Women's Movement, Watergate, and the han-Contra Affair. Enrollment restricted to freshmen and sophomores. (4) as

301 Introduction to Historical Methods and Research

Focus on historical m thod logy, research techniques, and the writing of history from a wide range of hiStorical primary sources. Required for all history major before taking the senior Seminar. ( 4 )

310 Contemporary Japan

Major domestic, politi aI, economic, and socio-cultural developments since 1 945. Special attention given to U.S.-Japan interactions. (4) The political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to th Hell nistic period. Special attention to the literature, art, and intellectual hist ry of the reeks. (Cross­ referenced with CLAS 32 I ) (4) 322 Roman CivUization

The history of Rome from the foundation of the city t A.D. 33 7, the death of Constantine. Emphasis on Rome's exp, nsion over the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Attenti n to the rise of Christianity within a Greco-Roman conte.xt. (Cross­ referenced wi th CLAS 3 2 2 ) ( 4 )

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339 Revolntionary China

Beginning in 1 9 1 1 , an examination of the course of the Chinese revolution, China's liberation, and the changes since 1 949. (4) 340 Modem Japan

Study o f how Japan became the modern "miracle" in East Asia. Primary focus on traditions that enabled Japan to change rapidly, the role of the challenge of the West in that change, the industrialization of Japan, the reasons for war with the U.S., and the impact of the war on contemporary Japan and its social and economic institutions. (4) 344 The Aodes in Latin Americao History

3 2 1 Greek Civilization

f

337 The History o f Mexico

The political, economic, social, and cultural changes that have taken place in Mexico from 1 3 50 to the present. (4) he beginning of China's modern history, with special emphasis on the genesis of the Chinese revolution and China's position in an increasingly integrated world. (4)

305 Slavery i n t h e Americas

1

Examination of the history of pre-colonial African kingdoms, Western imperialism, settler colonialism, and the African struggle for independence. Emphasis on the period since 1 800. (4)

338 Modern China

Th e comparative h istory of slavery in Africa, the Ca ribbean, and the Americas with special attention to tbe United States. Comparative perspectives n Atlantic slave trade, the origins of slavery and racism, slave treatment, the rise of anti lavery thought, the maturation of plantation society, slave revolts, selection conflict and war, and the reconstruction of soci ty after emancipation. ( 4 )

P A C

Survey of the major aspects of Central American and Caribbean history from colonial to modern times. Use of selected case studies to illustrate the region's history. Study in i nter-American relations. (4) 336 Sonthern Africa

294 The United States Since 1 945

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323 The Middle Ages

Y

The history of the Andean countries (Peru, Bolivia, Equador) from the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. (4) 352 The American Revolution

The American Revolution as a series of essentially political events stretching from the Seven Years War in 1 76 3 through Thomas Jefferson's defeat of John Adams in the Presidential election of 1 800. (4) 355 Amuican Popular Culture

Study of motion pictures, popular music, radio and television programs, comic strips and paperback fiction. Insights into the values and ideas of American culture from watching it at play. No prerequisites. (4)


356 American Diplomatic History The prac t i ce , function , and structure of Amer ican foreign potie)' with particular emplusis on the lwen t i e th centu ry. ( 4 )

359 History o f Women in the Unlted States A focused, lhe rna lic ex.amiJlation of issues and evidence re lated to w men 's exp erie nces from the colonial period to the presen t.

(4) 360 Holocaust: Destruction of the European Jews Invest igat ion of the development of modern <l I1ti·semitism, i ts to fascism the rise of H itler, the st ructu re of the German dicta torship, the evolut io n o f azi jewish p o l i cy, the mechan ics of the Final Sol ution , the nature of the perpetrators, the experlence and res p o n se of t he v icti m s, the reaction o f the o utside world, and the post-war a t te mpt to deal wi t h an unparalleled crime th rough tra d i l ional j udicial p rocedures. (4) rela t io nsh i p

Honors Program The Honors Program at Pacific Lutheran Universi ty ce n ters on

the theme "Taking Responsibility: Matters of the

Mi nd, Matters of the Heart." It i ntegrates acade mic and experien ti al leaming opportunities, with the objective of preparing part icipants fo r lives of serv i ce and serv a n t leader hip. The program emphasizes t h e i mportance of student-di rected l ea rn i n g , and

;:u

culminates in an experie.n­

\1'1

tial p roj ect that students design, implement, and evaluate ( with facu l ty support) . TOTAL HONORS CREDITS: 2 6 ( all but eight o f which ful fi l l o t h e r university requirements)

380 Asian American H istory and Culture An introductory s urvey of Asian American h i story and culture, fOCUSing on Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filip ino, Asia n I n d i a n ,

HONORS STUDENTS: Selected on the bas ts o f g r a d es and scores

tndochinese, and Pacific Islander e.x.pe rie nces in the period

c o m p lete PLU with a

1 840- 1 990s. (4)

381 The Vietnam War and American Society Exa m i nat ion of Ameri .11'S i nvo lveme nt in the Viet n am War from

Tru mao to ·Oco n . (4)

399 Internship A research and writing project i n connec tion with a st u d en t ' s app roved off-campus work or travel a cLi v i t y, or a d i mens io n of it. Pre requisite: so phom o re standi ng plus one course in h i s to r y, and con ent of the department. ( l -6)

401

Workshops Worksho-ps i n specia l fields for varying p e ri od s of time. ( 1 -4)

45 1 American Legal ffistory Dimen ions of American law a is rdates

to

changin g historical

per iods. (4) 460 We t and Northwest The American West in the ) 9th and 20th centuries. Frontier a n d regional perspectives. Interp ret ive, illustrative h istory, and opportu n ities for off·ca m p us resea rch. ( 4 )

47 1 History of American Thought and Culture D i mensions of America n soc ial and intellectual h i st o r y. ( 4 ) 492 lodependeot Study

( 1-4)

494 Seminar: American History ( 4 ) 4.95 Seminar: European History (4)

496 Seminar: The Third World This r earch sem i nar alternates its focus fro m East As.ia one year to the Caribbean/Latin America the next. (4)

x o z o

( h igh school grade point average of 3.80 and 1 2 0 0 + SAT scores) , reco mmendat ion s, a n d co m m i t m e n t to p rog ram theme. Must m i n i m um

o f 3 .50 g r a d e p o i n t ave rag e .

Freshman Year - All en te ri n g freshman honors students take t he Freshman Honors E xp erience:

A. Honors Core sequence: "Ident ity, Com mun ity, Legacy, and Fa i t h " HONR 1 1 5 - l den t ity, Com m un ity, Legacy, and Faith ( fall; 4 h o u rs ) HON R 1 1 6 - Id e n tity; �ommullity, L e g a c)" and Faith (sp ring; 4 h urs) B. Honors Cr itical Conversa tion: "Experience and Knowledge" H O N R 1 1 7 A - Experience and Kn owle d g e ( fall; I ho ur) HONR I 1 7B - Exp e r i e nce and Knowledge ( s p r i n g ; I hour)

Note: At the end of the fi"eshman year, studen ts ill the HOllars core ch o os e 10 enter Core I or Core II. The eight credits ill the Freshman HOlla rs Experiwce will have equivalencies in both cores. Sophomore and Junior Years A Duri n g the sophomore and junior years s tudents take fou r on e -credi t Virt ue Seminars ( HON R 30 1 - 308 ) , or p refe rab ly

one each semester (or mu l t i p l es in a semester to acco mmodate st udy abroad or ot her s ch e d u l i n g co nflicts) . C o n t i n u i n g the focus o n "Tal.. --i n g R(;sponsibil ity," the seminars fo c us on those qua l i t i e s necessary to respo n 'ible leadersh ip. Using di fferen t "vir tues" a s a centering them e, s tud en t s consider ea ch virtue fr o m several perspectives, including classical, conte mporary, and n o n - w es te rn perspect ives. What does it meal l to be a person who a ;ts wise l )'? co urageously? with hope? j ustly? These sem inars p r ovide students with a weekly (lPPOrhlIlity to interact with t h ei r in tellectual peers around a u ni fy i ng theme and readings.

B. Participation in january-

rm

s t u d), abroad/ ff-campus

co urses is st ro n gly enco uraged but not required. Most p a r t i ci­

pants in the J- Term <lbroad will be sophomores or j u n iors, but freshmen and seniors may go as w ell. e. H o n o r s students t,lire two fOltr-cred i t hours COlJ fses usually during th sopbo more and/or junior years. The)' may take Honors - by - Co n t ract cou rses , whose "added dimensio ns" to c onve rt them to honors are ag reed upon in a contract b tween p rofesso r and stud e n t , by the fol l ow i n g mea n s: 1) take a regularly chedulecl u r c which, by contract, explores the topic throu g h gr t�r d ep t h o r breadth, or 2 ) do an i ndependent study or research p roj e c t ( may do only one o f these) whose f m ished p ro du ct is of p o tenti al l y publishable qual i t y. Senior Year - Senio� take HONR 490; Honors Challenge Experi­ ence (4), (lffe Ted in January-Term. T h i s semi nar, i n cluding aca­ demic analysis and a1 1 exper iential component, bri n gs a sense of closllre to the program theme of responsibil i t y, and is calle d "Responsibilit y in Ac tion." e

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a division within the CoLlege of Art a n d Sciences , the Div i s i o n of H uma.nities o ffers programs in ea ch consti tuent d epar t m en t kading to the B . . degree. Course o fferi ngs and degree requiremenL� are l i sted und e r :

For-eign Language - S t ud e nt s co m pleti ng the p rogrJ.m and graduating with un iver ity honors mu,t have met O p t i o n I or [I of the Coll g e o f Arts a n d Sciences l anguage r quirement; o n l y mus ic .:ducation majo rs are exempted from t h is req uireme n t .

As

English

11\ w

Languages and Literatures Phllosopby Religion

Course Offerings l i S and 1 16 Identity. <Ammunity, Legacy, and Faith Social , c u l tu ral, i ntel lect ua l , and piritua.i tradi tio ns o f Eur pe

See also the sec t ions of t h is ca t al og on

and North Amer ica, with attention to relevant interactio ns and comparisons between western and no n-western civilizations. (4, 4)

Environm ntal St udies, Globa.l St u d i

a

lassies,

I nternational Core: Integrated St ud ies o f the Con temporary

W rid , I nterna tional Programs, Legal Studies, Publishing and Printing Arts, andinayian Area Studie , and Wo m e n's Studies.

1 17A and J 17B Experience and Knowledge Explo res the co n n ectio ns between und rstan d i n g

hinese Stu dies,

, Honors Program, the

elected is

tr a d i t i o n a l ac de m ic study and u nderstand­ i n g the same i sue or pr blem through ex-perience. ( 1 , 1) F u lfil l s freshman critical conversation re q u i re me nt . or problem through

30 1-308 Virtue Seminars Co n t in u i n g it� focus on "Taking R es ponsibi lity;' the Honor5 Program offers se mi n a rs that focus on th ose qualities n ces ary to respo n s ib l e leadership. ( 'ach semi n ar is one credit; honors st uden t s are requi red to c mpl te four.) (I h o u r each ) 301 Charity 302 o urage 303 Faith 304 Ho p e 305 J u st i ce 30 Self-Restra int

Supervised by th Faculty Cou ncil fo r In dividuali zed

lsdom

307

308 Compassion 490 Honors Challenge Experience: Responsibility in Action As the cul m i na t i ng lement of th H o n o r Program , H O N R 490 presents the opportu n i ty to " take respon ibil ity" by e m p has i:z.i n g the significance of bringing toge t h . habits of scholar hip and

ha bi t s of comm i tted citizen h i p-of l inkin g the acad m ic com po ­ nent of research, s tudy, and writing in a pp L ied experi ences in p u b l i c venues. (4)

Division of Humanities The Departments of E n g l i sh , L a ngua ges and Literatures, Philo op h y. and Rel igion c o m p ri se the Df vision of H um a nities . They sha.re a ce n t r al concern about language, literature, a nd world views. As academ ic m ajors and minors, and in support of profess. i nal programs and preparation for ot h er fields, studies in humanities are at the heart of a li bera l education. They serve generally as a m ea ns to realizing excel len ce in onc's own l i fe , a nd they expose o ne to a wide va r i ety of different p e r ' pective s o n cult u re, mea n i ng, and val u e . The ch arg� of the h u m anit ies is to think and act percept ively, hu m an Iy, and c reat ivel y i n a co m pl ex a n d ever changing soci e ty. he div ision is comm itted to uper h undero raduate teaching. C la sses e m phasize com m un ication skills, r i goro us analysis of texts and i deas . critical asses sm en t of arguments, and th ou g h t ful ref1 ect i n. The pote n t ia l fi r crea tive service to the com mun ity is nurt u re d in a riety of ways i nc lu di ng i nternsh ips in Pu b l is hing and Pr in tin g Arts (a mi n o r in En gl ish ) , the outreach programs of the Scandinavian Cu lt u ra l Center, ;l nd collaborative projects with local school districts. FACULTY: Coop er, D ea n; faculty members of the Departme nts Literatur > Philosophy, and Religion .

of English, Languages and

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I ndividualized Major

Y

Majors. this progra m oft r j u nior and senior tudents the opport un ity to develop and c o m p l ete a p rso na Uy de­ s ign e d , interdisciplinary, lib eral arts majo r. The cou rse of study culm inates in a senior thesis, to be ag reed on by the Council, the st u dent, and his or her adviser. Succe sful a p pl ic a nt s to this program will n orm ally have a c u m ulative grad e point average of 3.30 or higher, although in exceptional cases, they may demonstrate t hei r potential in o t he r ways to the Fa cu lt y Council fo r indi­ vid ualized Maj o rs . Admission to th e program is g ranted by the Council on the basis of a detailed plan of study, p rop osed and w ri t ten by t h e s tude nt , and submitted to the Co u ncil any t j me after the b egi rUl i n g of the s eco nd semester of th e student's s oph o m o re year. The proposal mu st outline a co mp lete pl a n of stu dy for the ti m

rem a inin g until the g r a nti n g of a

degree. Study pl a ns may include any of the traditional ele­

ments from a standard B.A. or B.S. deg ree p rogr a m . Once approve d by both the facult y sponsor a n d the Fa u lty Council for Individualized 11ajors, the study p l a n s up p l a nt usual degree requirements, and, wh e n com­ plet d , I a d s to conferral of the B.A. degree with S p eci al Honors. STUDY PROPOSAlS MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

1 . A Statement of Objectives. in which the student describes what the degr e is expected to represent and why the individu­ alized course of study i s m o re appropriate than a traditional degree program. 2. A Program of Study, in whi h the student describes how the objectives wi ll be at t a i ned through sequences of courses, reading programs, regular cou rse work, ind pendent s t udy, travel, off-campus inv IVement, personal con ultation with faculty mem be rs, or ot he r means. 3 . A Progra m of Evaluation, i n which the student describes the crite.ria to be used to measur a ch i eve m e n t of the objectives a nd sp cifie the t op ic of the s en ior thesis. 4. A Statenrerlt of Review, in wh ic h th st ud e n t describes how prev i ous cour e work and l i fe experiences have prepared him or her for the individualized s t ud y p rog r am . 5. Letters of Recommendation. The study pr opo s al must be written in dose consultation \vit h the chair of the Faculty o uncil fo r Ind ivid u alized Majors and with a fa cu l ty member who agre s to act as primary sponsor and dv i ser to the student t h roughout the cou rse of s t u d y. The faculty s pon so r must c o mm e nt on the feasibility f the proposal and on the


student's ability to carry it out. It is strongly recommended that a secondary faculty sponsor be asked to co-sponsor and endorse the proposal.

2 . Students i n the I nternat ional Core are strongly encou raged to study abroad. With p rior approval, an appropriate combina­ tion of courses abroad supplemented \vith an integrative project may take the place of one or more of the 200-level International Core courses. 3. Students may switch from Core n to Core I at any time by requesting the dean for special academic programs to apply their International Core course credit to Core I requirements. 4. All International Core courses are open to Core I students as space i s available ( Core II students have p riority in enrollment) .

All subsequent changes i n the study plan or the senior thesis must be submitted in writing to the Faculty Council fo r individualized Majors fo r approval.

Further information is available from the Provost's Office.

The International Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World porary Wo rld is designed as an alternative way to s a tisfy c re curriculum requirements. Consisting of a constella­ tion of interdisciplinary and team ta ug h t cou rses, the program explo res contemporary issues and thelr historical fo undations using an in tegrated appro ac h in an in terna­ tional context . The program stresses critica l thinking and

m ::a:I Z » ..... o

( 1 l 1 -1 I 2) Origins of the Modern World

z

Explores from a global perspective the roots of contemporary values and traditions, with an emphasis on Europe and the Americas.

»

,...

I I I Authority and Discovery

Considers new social and political ideas, the renewal of the arts, religious reform, and the emergence of modern science up to and during the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenmen t. I (4)

m

1 12 Liberty and Power

wr i ting.

Selected from Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chem istry, Earth Sciences, Economics, English, History, Languages, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political 5 .ience, Psychology, Religion, and Sociology. International Core Com m i l 1ee: St ivers, Chair; R. Brown, Grosvenor, Kelleher, Killen, Kraig, Starkovich, Bartanen ( acting director). FACUI:fY:

INTERNATIONAL CORE COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Developments in literature, science, politics, and industr ializa­ tion are exp lored through the Enlightenment, the American and French Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, Romanticism, Darwinism, Socialism, and imperialism. I I (4) 22 1 The EIperience of War

A n international su rvey of twentieth century warfare, drawing on poetry, novels, war mem irs, art, music, and film, and stressing the experiences and decisions of people who have participated in war as combatants or civilians. (4) 222 Prospects for War and Peace

(7 courses, 28 hours)

1. INTC 1 1 1 - 1 1 2; rigins of the Contemporary World (8 hours) orrnally taken in the first year. 2. Four 200-level International Core courses ( 1 6 hours) Normally taken in the second and third y an. May include approved program of study abroad. Students select fou r courses, subject t o the ap proval of the International Core Committee. 7-8 o f the following courses, o r similar new courses, are offered each year: 22 1 - The Experience of War 222 - Prospects for War and Peace 225 - Violence and Nonviolence 23 1 - Gender, Sexuality, and Culture 232 - Topics in Gender 233 - Imaging the S If 234 - Imaging the World 24 1 - Energy, Re ur es, and Po l l u t ion 242 - Population. Hunger, and Poverty 245 - The Development of Third World ndrrdevelopment 246 - Cases in Th ird World Development 24.7 - Cultures o f Racism 3. ne 300-level course (4 hours) normally taken after or with the last 200-level course. 326 - The Quest for Global Justice: Systems and Reality 327 - Core II onversations

stud Ilts usually take the required 1 1 1- 1 1 2 sequence i n their first year, before taking 200-level courses. Excep tions can be made for students with heavy first-year loads, for transfer students, or for students who shift from Core 1 .

.....

Course Offe rings

The International Core: I n tegrated Studies of the Contem­

POLlClES AND GUIDELINES FOR CORE II: 1. To acquire a comIDon background, lnternational Core/Core

z

A study of the international institutions and situations (political, economic, religious, psychological, historical) that keep the modern world on the brink of war and make a stable, just peace so elusive. II (4) 225 Violence in t h e United States

Considers examples of violence in domestic and international contexts such as war, racism, families, prisons, and hate groups; and major proponents o f nonviolence such as Jesus, handi, Dorothy Day, King, and Mother Teresa. (4) 23 1 Gender, Sexuality, and Cultnre

Use of interdisciplinary, multicultural, international, and feminist perspectives to examine i sues such as socialization and stereotypes, relationships and sexuality, interpersonal and institutional violence, revolution and social change. A strong focus on U.S. contexts complemented by selected comparative examples from international contexts. (4) 232 Topics in Gender

Current topics in feminist studies of gender centering on U.S. conte;xts with selected comparatiVt' examples from international con texts. (4) 233 Imaging the Self

A serie of exercises in the visual and literary arts drawn from different cultures that reveal how the self is discovered and constructed through images, dreams, costumes, and songs. (4) 234 Imaging the World

II

An exploration o f how humans in different parts of the world perceive, int rpret, and shape their own worlds. II (4) 241 Energy, Resources, and POUutiOD

Considers worldwide usage of energy and natural resources, and the degradation caused by pollution using scientific, social scientific, and ethical approaches. (4)

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242 Population, Hunger, and Poverty Exa mine p opul a t ion gr owth , food su p ply, and poverty as they relate to gLob 1 env iron mental probl e m s . (4)

GWBAL STUDIES: Studerl interes ted i n diverse cultures and international, global i sues may undertake a multi-disciplinary m ajo r or m i no r p rogram designed to reAect their geographic, thematic, or disciplinary interests. Major: The Global Studie maj r is termed a " complementa ry" major because it is taken as a second major in a dd iti on to a re gul ar discipl inary major. For specific information see the J/ob a l Studies section of this catalog. lVfinor: The theoret ical o rie ntat ion and requirements parallel those for the major and are deta i le d in the lobal Studies sectiun of th is c ta log.

245 The Development of Third World Underdevelopment rigms and gr ow t h of th e concept "Third World" and the models. v iews, contexts, and approaches i n i n te rp re t in g t h is p h en o m eno n . (4)

Tr aces the

246 Cases in Third World Developnrent How people in the Th ird Wo rl d think and act to bring a bo ut social change , and th value they give it is t he focus in this

course. (4)

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SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES: The S ca nd i nav i an Area Studies major i a fiex.ible program in wh i ch the study of Scandinav ia is n h a nced through a cross-discip l in ary approach. For specific informati on see the SC(4lldillUvian Area StC/dies se tion of this catalog.

247 The Cultures of Racism Exam i n s different forms of ra is m and thei r manifestations in tw coun tr i es with t ro u bled histories: t h e Un i ted States of America and th Rep ubl ic of South Africa. ( 4 ) 326 The Quest for GlobaJ Justice: Systems and Reality Uses 'ystems (holist ic) m ode ls to comprehend the sea rch for j us.t i ce by humankin d in tbe past, in the present, and for the fu t u re.

Off-Campus Programs: To eac urage tudents to expand t h ei r v isi ons of the wor ld, PLU makes availa ble vari us o p po r t u n itie s t o s t u dy and travel in other co w ltries. S t ude n are encouraged to spend the summer,

(4)

327 Core n Conversations Group explorati n of a selected top i c to exerc ise and further develop eth ical, multicultural, interdisciplinary, and ritical thinking skills. Pra ct i ce of ab ility to understand texts , reflect upon them, react crit i ca ll y and creativel)' to t h em , and partici­

seillester, ]anualy terUi, Of fldlficadellliL yeard:broad. '[heCenter

for lntemational Progranl has information to assist student in selectin g and p rep arin g for study a broad programs. The i nte r­ dependence of a l l nations of the world and the need to gai n ba ic kn ow led ge of p eopl e, t he i r cullure , and t hei r i nterrelationships ca n no t be overemphaS ized in the 2 1 s t century. With this focus .in min , PLU s up p rt veral catego ries of p rograms.

pate in group discussion about them and Lhe issu s t h ey raise.

(4)

SECTIONA: PID-Spo nsored Programs

I nternational Programs PLU's international progra m s en co u rage students to

their und

expan d

rstanding

tion in a changing and

of humanity'S globa l condi­

increasingly interdependent world.

Mul ti - ti cused i n ternational programs provide o ppo r t u n i

­

ties fo r on -campus study of global issues and of the world's regions. cultures, and societies. G lobal i sues incJude, fo r examp l e, modernizat io n and development;

globa l resources and t ra de; and peace, j ustice, and

human

r ights. Cultural foc i a re Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin

program.

America, the M i ddle Easl, and Scan d i navia. Study of bese

i ' sues and regi

ns i made p ossib le by diverse off-campus

study opportl.D1ities a n d

in em at io na l stude

t exchange.

To pur ue. a program in i nternational or intercultural tudies. students may enroll in cour es o ffe red by depart­ ments such as Languages, Political Science., and History, or choose among the special multi -disciplinary p rogram listed be l

w wh ich offer m ajors and minors in

interna ­

tional studies. is available from the Center fo r I n t e m a t ion , I Programs, n the

website www. plu.edu/- itlpr.

THE AMERlCAS: his interdisciplinary minor ruses on the co m para t ive hi torie , cultures, and contemporary issues shared by the two c nli nenls in the western hemisphere. For specific information see The Americas sec t io n of this catalog. CHINESE STUDIES: The Ch i nese Studies program is an i nterdisc iplinary program design d to p rov i de students in t er­ ested in China a b road fo undation in l anguage, culture, a n d h is tory. or peeifle i nfo rm a tion see the Chinese Stlldic; seclion of this ca t al og.

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b. January-Term: PLU also offer courses during th e lanuary­ term. Interest m eet ings tor January-term off-cam p us pro­ grams are announced in early spring fo r t he following January. Students apply fo r these programs in May. Ja nuary- term program sites for 2001 in cl ude the fo l l owi n g int rnational l ocati o n : Australia (2), C hi n a, Costa Rica. Cuba, Hong Kong, France ( 2 ) , I n d ia, Israel/Jordan, Janlaica, London, New Zealand and Sc tland. Domestic off campus sites include: Arizona (2), Neah Bay, New Mexico dnd Tacoma.

RECIPROCAL PROGRAMS: PLU curren tly offe rs four active ese academic programs p r ovi de a l imited exchange pro�,'rarns. number of exch an ges each yea r. In all cases, the PLU tudent i s integrated into the local uni ersi t a n d cullure. a. People's Republic of China.-Zhongshan University: PLU students may pend a ful l year or semester in lhe People's Republic of China through an exchan ge with Zh ng h an n iversity in G uangzholl ( Canton ) . At Zh on gshan, st u de nt s live in lIni" rsity ho us ing and take i n ten sive studies in Ma n d a r i n hinese. Students s ho u l d have had at least one year o f h i nese language before applying. b. Tanzania: [n a co n sort i u m effort with tber colleges and un ivers ities of the Lut h eran Cllur h, PL offers a five- mo n th exchange opportunity at the n ive rsi ty of Dar es Salaam in Ta nzan i . Students stu dy Swab iii language and select three or

More i n formation about PLU's international p rograms

Harstad Hall, or

PLU FACUlTY DIRECTED PROGRAMS: a. Carlbbeao CuJture and Sodety: January- term and spring semester in Tri nidad provides students a u n i que op p o rtun i ty to e xpl o re the island a n d learn abou t the varied heritages of this multicultural society. During January tenn a PLU faculty member accom pa nies the group to Trinidad and teaches one co urse, which varies from year t ycat'. D uring the sp ri ng teml students take the core course, "Caribbean Cu l tu re and S ci ty" and cho os e two to three addit ional c ourse s from the regular course offerings at the Uni ersity 0 the West Indies. Stud en ts earn 1 6- 2 0 semester h o u rs credit for the Ianua ry -May

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four courses from the wide offering of courses at the Univer­ sity of Dar es Salaam. All university course are taught in English. This is a fall semester program. People's RepubUc of China - Sichuan University: Students may spend a semester or year at Sichuan University (SU) in Chengdu. At SU, i n addition to classes in Mandarin and Chinese culture, students m a y take organic chemistry or general physics courses that are ta ught in English. Often a PLU p rofessor will accompany the g ro u p and teach one of t h e courses. Extensive s t u dy tours are included. Fluency in Mandarin is not required.

d. Stockholm Institute of Education - Stockholm, Sweden: Education maj ors may spend either fall or spring semester in Sweden. St u d en t s continue their regular School of Education requirements wh ile at the institute. All courses are pre­ approved by the PLU School of Education before departure. INDEPENDENT LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES ABROAD: These programs are hosted by the Independent Liberal Arts Colleges Abroad ( ILACA), a consortium of Pacific Northwest schools including PL , Gonzaga University, the University of Puget Sound, the U n ivers ity of Portland, and Willamette University. a..

England: T h i s fall or s p r i n g semester program in London provides students with a study experience in one of the most e xc i ti ng cities of the world. Courses taught both by Northwest professors and by na ti ve British professors make extensive use

of museums, cultural activities, and sites of London. Students live with British families and commute by subway to classes. Several excursions take students outside London for a look at other parts of England. b. Spain: Th i s fall or spring semester program in Granada provides an excellent set ti n g for advanced study in Spanish language and cu l ture . A minimum of two years of college-level Spanish language study is required for participation. Students live with Spanish families, and take special classes at th e Centro de Lenguas Modernas at the University of Granada. DENMARK'S INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (DIS) p rov i des for semester or year-long study in English in Copenh age n The instructors are Danish, representing faculty from nearby universities and schools. This program is Europe's largest study center for American students, al lmv i ng a wide va r i et y of course offerings in liberal arts, international bu s ine ss, architecture and design, and marine biology. A rich immersion in Danish cu l t ure .

is p rovided through living with the Danes, daily contact with

Danish faculty, and optional language instruction. Scholarships are available for qual i fied students. INSTITUTE FOR CENTRAL AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT STUDI ES (ICADS) offers programs in Costa R i ca dur i ng Lhe fall and spring. Students choose from either the "Semester I nter n ­ ship and Research Program" or the "Field Course in Resource M an agemen t and Sustainable Development." LIVING ROOTS, FlNDHORN COMMUNITY SEMESTER:

This fall or s p rin g program is offered by the Findhom Founda­ tion in Forres, Scotland, and Living Roots. Students live in Findhorn h o u s i ng and contribute to the daily op er at ion of the community. The academic content of the program includes: Art - Learning to See, Learning to Draw; Psychology - Psychology of Community; Poli ti c al Science - H u m an E co lo gy; Writing ­ Reflections on Community. Students earn 1 6 semester h ours of credit for the program. INSTITUTE FOR THE INTERNATlONAL EDUCATlON OF STUDENTS (IES) offers semester, year-long, or summer study at various centers throughout the world. PLU students may choose to st u dy in London, E n gl and; Dijo n, Paris, or Nantes, France; Milan, I t a ly; Madrid or Salamanca, Spain; Freiburg or Berlin,

G er m a ny; Vienna, Austria; Tokyo or Nagoya, Japan; Adelaide, Australi.a; China; and Argentina. Studies include a combination of local university courses and classes taught expressly for Institute students. Courses are taught i n the language of the country where the center is located, except in Tokyo, Vienna, and the European Common Market program i n Freiburg, where instruction is in E n g l ish In all other cases, PLU students need to be conversant in the language of the country. Living arrange­ ments vary from full room and board to ind epen d ent housing. Each center allows for integration into the local culture through h o u s i n g , student activities, field trips, and travel. Scholarships are available to qualified students at all IES centers. .

UNIVERSITY OF OSW, .oSLO, NORWAY: Applicants must have one year of college Norwegian at the program start date. " The "Oslo Year" incorporates Norwegian language, literature , and culture and is an excellent opportunity for the Scandinavian Studies s tud ent.

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UNIVERSITY OF LANCASTER, LANCASTER, ENGLAND:

This semester or full year program allows students to be integrated into a British university. There are over 500 courses offered by the university. Students can easily continue thei r business, science, humanities, and social science studies at Lancaster. SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAMS: The International Par tnershi p for Service-Learning provides semester, January term, full year, or summer programs in I srael, E n gl an d Scotland, Mexico, Ecuador, Jamaica, Czech Republic, F ra n c e, South Dakota, and India. Through ti es with several universities and educational programs, the Partnership programs unite academic study and community service. Sophomore standing is required. ,

SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES: SFS offers environmental

semester programs in Costa Rica, Kenya, Palau, the Caribbean, Mexico, Australia, and British Columbia. Students take fou r courses in clu di ng e co logy, resource management, socio­ economic or applied anthropology, and a directed research project. Prerequisite for t h i s program is a t least one co ll ege level ecology or biology course. Sophomore s t and ing is required. CENTER FOR GL.oBAL EDUCATI.oN: Augsburg College's Center for Global Education offers semester programs in Me xico and Central America an d Southern Africa. Programs in Latin American require one semester of col l e ge Spanish. INSTITUTE FOR STUDY ABROAD: The Institute for Study Abroad, Butler Unive rs i ty offers fully integrated semester and full year study abroad programs in England, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and Costa Rica. Students p ar t ic i pat in g in these programs are admitted to foreign universities and take regular university courses. Junior standing is required as a prerequisite for these programs. AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR FOREIGN STUDY: AIFS o ffers semester, full year, and summer programs for studen in Argenti.na, Australia, Austria, Britain, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and Spain. At some study sites students are integrated into a foreign university and are required to have language profi c ien cy in the host language. Many programs in non-English speaking coun tries do not require prior language training and i n s t r uc tion is in English. Programs are open to students with sophomore standing. COLLEGE YEAR IN ATHENS: Ancient Greek Civilization and M e d i t e rra ne an Studies are the focus of this semester or full year program in Athens. Students can take courses in classic al languages, archaeology, art history, l ite rat ure history, philosophy, ,

religion, ecology, and economics. Junior standing is recom­ mended for this program.

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SUMMER: Many PLU-sponsored st u dy abroad programs have

summer options. Additionally, off-camp us programs fo r summ e r are a n n ounce d in the summer sessions catalog.

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langua es other

I . In ad dition to the PLU-sp onsored programs, there are countless other opportu n it ies for s t u dy abroad. Many U. colleg e s and wliversities have programs throughout the world, and PLU stud e nts may study t h ro u g h these programs by special arrangement. Informati n and appl ic a ti o n forms for several programs are available in the Ce nte r for Internationa.1 Programs. Credits awarded by an accredited U.S. college or university are transferable to PLU. However, direct aid from PLU cannot be transferred to other colleges. 2. P LU students who p la n to study directly in a foreign schoo l (not in a program s po nso re d by a college in the U.S.A.) mus t be sure to file a letter of i ntent with the C nter for Interna­ tional Programs and with the chair o f their m aj o r department before leaving PLU. T h i s letter must include what classes will be taken. where and fo r what len g t h of t ime they w i l l study

citizenship, and appreciation of their own language and cul t ure The depart ment offers

a wi.de range of co urse s not I vels, but also i.n cultures, litera­ tures, and hngui tics, b oth in the original language and in .

.

only in languages at an

English translation . Lnstruction is als o given in American Sign Language. Language students pate in

are

strongly enco uraged to partici­

the n umero llS stu dy abr ad courses offered during

th e Jan uary -Term as well as fall and spring semes ters. For further information, see the

Interrzational Programs section

a record of le c t u res at tended a n d examinations completed,

Chair; R. Brown, M. Jensen, Lacabe, Martinez­ Carbajo, M i randa, Nadine, E. el so n Predmore, Swen on, So suls ki Warner, T. Williams, Webster; assisted by Curtis, K. Han son and Yaden. FACULTY: Snee,

tudents are advised to save all papers and oth er materials rel a t i ng to coursework

,

.

taken abroad. All credit transferred to PLU will be pass/fail. PLU reserves the right to re q u ire examinations covering the subjects studied.

.

APPLICATION PROCESS: All PLU spo nsored program

application must be pre-approved by the Center for I n terna­

tjonal Programsbefore theyare mailed to the program assocjats! (Le., rES, AIFS, Butler University. etc ) . Students are asked to submit completed program applications and have an official transcript and faculty recommendations sent to the Center for the review process. General deadEnes for pr ogra m a pp l i ca t ions

are: January 1 5 fo r Ta nzania, February I for summer programs

and Semester I programs in Australia and New Zealand, March for fall and full year programs, and October 1 5 for spring

I

semester programs. CREDITS: PlU awards PLU credit for all programs l.isted in

SECTION A: PLU-Sponsored Programs. All courses tak e n on a PLU-sponsored program will be listed on the PLU t ra nscri pt with appropriate department numbers assigned. Letter grades will a l s o be po s te d, although they wi ll not be i n clud ed in the PLU cumulative g rad e point average. Grades for study abroad are calculated for honors at graduati n. PROGRAM COSTS AND FINANCIAL AID FOR PLU-SPONSORED PROGRAMS:

Reciprocal Exchange Programs:

Semester charg

are

based on the

PLU tuition ra te for 14 credits plus the cost of on campus

h ousi ng and a full meal plan. Other PLU- ponsored Programs: Program fees are calculated at the base price of th e program plus arr administrative fee of $700 per semester. Each of the PLU-sponsored program s will, therefore, have a d ifferent prog ra m fee. The minimum semester program fee for the academic year 2000-0 1 will be $8,400. On PlU-sponsored programs, students eligible for state and federal financial aid may transfer their aid awards (with the exception of work study) to their student accounts. Students may also apply their university grants and scholarships as well as governm ent loans on selected sponsored prog rams The Cent er for International Prog rams has detailed in fo rm atio n on "Study Abroad a nd Financial Aid." Tuition exchange benefits do not .

apply to study abroad.

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ac ademic credit may be given by PLU.

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gaining p ro ficiency in a language, students develop cri t ical ae t h eti c and creative sensibilities necessary fo r gl o bal

abroad, and how the international experience will relate to

their academic program. On t h e basis of t h is infomlation, p lu s

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f world cultures and an ability to speak than one's own are hallmar of today's college graduate and of a su cessful career person. Lan­ guage study at FLU is a seri us academi c enterprise. While An understanding

SECTION B: PLU-ApprovedStudyAbroad Programs

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Languages and Literatures


COURSES THAT M EET CORE I REQUIREMENTS: Literature Requirement, A-2: All de p art m e n ta l literature c urses, offer.:d both in the o r igi nal l ang ua g e and in E ngli sh trill1siat ion,

meet

this requiremen t .

Perspectives on Diversity, Cross-Cultural Perspectives (6-D): All langu age courses n u m bered 2 0 1 and above ( t wo semesters) and nlJ fi rst - year courSes of a foreign language not p rev io lls ly

stuctied (two semesters ) , as well as Chinese 37 j , L an g u a ges 272 ( L itera l u re and Social Change in L atin Am r i c a ) , a n d French 3 4 1 meet this requ irem ent.

Course Offe rings COllrses in the Departm nt of Languages are o ffered in the following ge n era l fields in add it io n to eleme n tary, in termediate. and advanced lan guage : CUI.:rURAL HISTORY A. In English

Classics 250 - Cia ieal Myth ol ogy Classics 3 2 1 - Greek Civ i l izatio n Classics 3 2 2 - Roman Civ il izati n Scan 1 5 0 - Introduction to Scandinav ia Scan 322 - C nte mporary SCill1di nav ia S can 3 2 3 - The Viki ngs Scan 324 - he Em igrants Spanish 34 J - The La t i no Experiences i n the U.S.

Perspectives in Diversity, Alternative Perspectives (6-A): Span i h 34 J and Sign 1 0 1 and 1 02 meet this re q ui re m en t . BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJORS AND MINORS: The dep a r t ­ ment offers maj ors in h ine se Studies, lassics, French, Ge rm a n ,

Norwegian, cand inav ia n Area , tudie , and S p an is h . Minors are offered in Chinese, Ch inese S tu d ies . French, German , Greek. Lat i n . orwegia n , and S p a n ish . II majors must complete Language 490: Se n io r Project. M aj o rs must complete at l ea s t 1 2 semester hours i n re idence at PL • four o f which must be taken either in the senior year r upon return from a stud y abroad program. Minors must co m p l et e at least eight hours in re si de n ce .

Specific requirements (and variations from the above) for s pe ci fi c majors a nd minors are l i s t d below.

LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTER: The l an g uage curriculum at alI I vels fea ture s use o f PL 's tate-of- the·art m ult i m t: d ia Language Resou rce Ce n te r, locat d in the Mortvedt Lib ra r y. Advwced s t u de n ts h ave the op p ort un i ty to co nduct resea rch at

>

B. In Re pective Language

Languages 272 - Literature and So ' al Latin America

sLlldents who may teach E nglish a b ro ad , t hrough Fulbright Awards or service opportunities, are strongly encour­ aged to pursue this opportunity. The two requ i red departmental courses are Languages 445 (Methodologies) and Languages 446 ( Theories of Language cqui iti n ) . See the School of Ed ucat io n sect ion for a full d escri p tion of the minor.

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hange i n

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in Tra nsla t ion

VI

French 22 1 - French Literature and Film of th e Americas

Scan 422 - Twent ieth-Cent ury Scandinavian Literature

B. In Respective Language

French 4 2 1 , 422 - Masterpieces of French Literature F ren c h 43 j . 432 - TWentieth-Century French Literature G erm a n 4 2 1 - German L i te r at u re from the En l i ghten m ent . to Realism German 422 - Twentieth-Century Gennan L i te ra t u re Spani h 302 - Introduction to Hispa nic Literacy S tu d i es S p a n i sh 421 - Masterpieces of S p a nis h Li te r ature S p a n i s h 422 - Twentieth- Cent ury Literature o f Spain Spa n is h 423 - Special To pi cs i n S p an i sh i ter atur e a n d Cul t u re S p a n i s h 43 1 - Latin American L i t e ra t u re, 1 492- 1 888 Spanish 432. - Twentieth -Centm), L a t i n American L i ter a ture Spanish 433 - Special To p ic s in Latin American Literature and

junior or seni o r h i gh sch 01 may

well

VI

Scan 250 - Masterpieces of Scandinavian Literature

forei g n language enro l l in 490 c o n c u rren t ly with an o t h er upper-level course in the majo r. The instructor of the latter course norm al l y su p erv ise s the stude nt' senior proj ect: a. resear h paper. int rnship, o r ot h er app roved project. The student p resen t s a summary of the completed assignm nt at an o p e n departmental forum. I II ( 2 )

MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: In co o p era­ ti n with the School of Educat io n , the d partment o ffe rs a minor in En g l i s h as a Second Lang ua ge. Pr spective teachers as

m

m

Chinese 37 1 - Chinese Li tera tu re

SENIOR PRO}ECf: S tudents majoring in

tion. See the School of Edt/CCltion s e ct i on of this catal g for

C\

»

Scan 42 I - Ibsen and Stri n db e rg

cerlification req u i rem e n t s and the Bachelor of Arts in Ed u c a t i o n requirements.

»

LITERATURE A. In English La n gua ges 2 7 1 - Lileratllre a n d Soci ty in Modern Europe

PLACEMENT Ll'If LANGUAGE CLASSES: St udents are encour­ aged to obtatu as much high school preparation in l a ng u ages as

PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Students prepar ing t o teach in a cam either a Bachelor of A r ts degr in French. German, Norweg ia n, or S pani sh along wi t h cerLificati n from the Schoul of Education, or a Bachelor of Ar t s in Education degree w i th teaching major or minor in French, G e rman , Norwegian, or S p a n ' h. Secondary teach i n g m in rs a re also available in Ch i nese and La t i n . Elementary teach i n g majors are available in all of th abo l anguages. All t u de n ts are required to lake La ng uages 445 ( Meth od lo g ies ) for certifica­

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selected Web sit es, a s wel l as to work a assistants in the Ce n ter, gaining computer expe rtise wh ile accelerating their la n guage skills.

To determine app rop riate course p l ace me n t at PLU, all students with p revio u s experie nce in a languag take the pl ace m e nt exa mination, a dm i n istered during fres h m a n registra­ tioo, orie n ta t i on week. antI throughout the year by sp e c i a l arrangement. St udents qual i fyi ng for advanced pl ace m e n t may be a llowed to waive ce rtain m aj o r or minor requirement .

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- French Civilization and Cult u re German 3 2 1 - German Jv ilization to 1 750 German 322 - German ivilization inee 1 750 S pa n i s h 321 - Civil ization and Cul tu re 0 S pa i n S pa n is h 322 - La tin American Civilizat ion and C u ltu re

French 32 1

Classics 23 I - Masterpieces f Eu rop ean Literature Cla ss i cs 250 - Classical Mythology

p ossibl e .

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lllture

Languages 27 1 Literature And Society in Modern .Europe

Reading and disc ussion of wo rks in English t r a nsl ati on by a ut hors like FLaub e rt . Ibsen. and Th. Mann often enriched through se l ec ted film adaptatjons. Em p h a s is on social themes, indu.ding life in i ndm t ria l society. the changing s ta t u s of women, and class conflict. No prerequisite. (4)

272 Literature and Sodal Change in Latin Amedca Reactin g in Engl ish tra nslation f fiction from modern Latin America. Discussions focus on o c ial and historical ch a n ge and on li t era r y themes and fo r m s in works by authors uch as Carlos Puentes and Gabriel Garcia M a rquez. No prerequisite. (4) 445 Methods for Teachlng Foreign Languages and Eogllsh lIS a S«ond Language Theories and related t mniqlle5 � r leaching l ang u a ges K - 1 6 within their cullural conlex.t, including d i rect methods, cootent­ based inst r u ct io n , proficiency orientatiolls, wd th integration of technologies. Attention g ive n to variations in approach for

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those teaching English as a second language. No prerequisites. Required for teacher certification in a language and for minor i n English a s a Second Language. Strongly recommended for elementary major in a language. II ( 3 ) Principles of language acquisition with specific classroom applications. Special attention given to the needs of different lan guage groups in acqu.iring English. Comparison of sound systems and structures of languages ESL teachers are most likely to encounter. No prerequisites. Required for minor in English as a Second Language. (4) 49 1 , 492 Independent Study ( 1 -4 )

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Greek

Minor in Greek: 20 semester hours, which may include 1 0 1 - 1 02 .

44 6 Theories o f lAnguage Acquisition

....

490 Senior Project

1 0 1 , 102 Elementary Greek

Basic skills in reading classical, koine, and patristic Greek. I II (4, 4 ) 20 1, 202 Intermediate Greek

Review of basic grammar, reading in selected classical and New Testament authors. [ II (4, 4) 490 Senior Project ( 2 )

597, 598 Gradoate Research ( 1 -4 )

( l-4)

491, 492 lndependent Study

Chinese

Minor ill Chinese: 20 semester hours which may include 1 0 1 - 1 02. The major and minor in Chinese Studies are described in thei.r own section of this catalog. 1 0 1 , 102 Elementary Chinese

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese. Basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Laboratory practice required. I II (4, 4)

Latin

Mill or in Latin: 20 semester hours, which may include 1 0 1- 1 02. 101, 102 ffiementary Latin

Basic skills in reading Latin; an introduction to Roman l iterature and culture. I II (4, 4 ) 20 1, 202 lntennediate Latin

Review of basic grammar; selected readings from Lati n authors.

I II aly (4, 4 )

201, 202 Intermediate Chinese

Develops further the ability to communicate in Mandarin Chinese, using culturally authentic material. Laboratory practice requi red. Prerequisitt:: 1 02 or equivalent. I II (4, 4 ) 3 0 I Composition and Conversation

490 Senior Project ( 2 ) 49 1, 49 1 Independent Study

( I -4)

French

Review of grammar with emphasis on idiomatic usage; reading of contemporary authors as models of style; conversation on topics of student interest. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I ( 4 )

Major irz French: A m inimum of 34 semester hours beyond 1 011 02, including 20 1 -202, 3 0 1 - 302, 32 1 , 490, and three 400-level courses, one of which must be completed in the senior year. Minor in French: 20 semester hours, excluding 1 0 1- 1 02 and includi.ng 2 0 1 -202, 30 I , and two additional upper division courses.

3 7 1 C hinese Ute.rature i n Translation

An introduction to the most important works and writers of Chinese literary traditions, from early times to the modern period. Poetry, prose, drama, and fiction included. Film presentations supplement the required readings. No knowledge of Chinese required. (4)

1 0 1 , 1 02 Elementary French

Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Lab attendance req uired. I II (4, 4)

49 1 , 492 Independent Study ( 1 - 4 )

20 1 , 202 I ntermediate French

Review of basic grammar, development of vocabulary and emphasis on spontaneous, oral expression. Reading selections which reflect the cultural heritage and society of the Francophone world. Lab attendance required. I II (4, 4)

Classics

The major in classics is described in this catalog under Classics. 23 1 Masterpieces of European .Literature

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renaisance literature. Fulfills gen ral university core requirement in literature. (Cross-referenced with ENGL 23 1 . ) I (4)

221 French Llteratme and FUm of the Americas

250 Classical Myth.ology A study of mythology originating in the texts of such Greek and

Roman authors a Homer, Hesiod, Virgil, and Ovid. All readings are io English, but tudents with other language abilities are encouraged to use them. Satisfies the general university core requirement in literature. (4) 321 Greek Civilization The political, soc.ial, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from

the Bronze Age to the He.I.Ie.nisti period. Special attention to the l iterature, art, and in tellectual history of the Greeks. (Cross­ referenced with HIS 32 1 . ) (4) 322 Roman Civilization

Th history of Rome from the foundation of the city to A.D. 395, t h e death of Theodosius the Great. Emphasis on Rom 's expansion over the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Attention to the rise of Christianity within a Greco­ Roman context. (Cros�-referenced with HIST 322.) ( 4 ) 86

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Through literature and film, a study of the experience of migration, integration, conflict, and ethnicity in the Americas from a Francophone perspective. To include to day's geographical areas of Quebec, Nova Scotia, United States, Haiti, Martinique, and Guadeloup . Special attention given to issues of gender, color, historical heritage, language, and economic status of French and Creole speakers in the Caribbean and North America. Class conducted in English. All literature translated into English; ftlms with English subtitles. No prerequisites. Meets general university l i terature and cross-cultural diversity requirements. (4) 301, 302 Composition and Conversat ion

Advanced gram mar, stylistics, composition, and conversation within the historical context of Francophone culture, history, and literature. Prerequisit : 202. I I I (4, 4 ) 32 1 Civillzation and Culture

Development of French society from early times to the present., as portrayed in art, music, politics, and literature, within their socio-historical context. Prerequisite: 202. (4)


421. 422 Masterpl«es of French LIterature

Sodal and aesthetic importance of works representati ve of major per iods from the M idd l e Ages through the nineteenth cco wry. May inc l ude Ch.ristlnf.' de P i zan, Rabeiais, Mo n tai g n e , M l jere, Pascal , Voltai re, Rousseau. Hugo. and Baudelaire. Prerequisite: 302. [ II aly (4, 4 ) 43 1, 432 20th-Century French Uterature

writer from France and o t he r francopho l1e count ries. M y i nc lude Gide, Camus, Sa me, Beckett, Ajmee esa i re , Miriarna

Ba, Ousm a n e �embene. Prereql.lis i te: 352 . r I I aly

(4, 4)

49 1 , 49 1 Independent Study ( 1 - 4 )

German

Major ill German: A m inimum of 34 Se 111 es te r hours beyon d 1 0 1-1 0 2 , including 20 1 -202. 30 1 -302, 3 2 1 -322, 495 , a n d two 400-level course Minor in Germm/: 20 s em ester hours. exclud i ng 1 0 1- 1 02 and including 20 1-202 , 3 0 1 , and two add i t ion al upper d ivision courses . 10 1 , 1 02 Elementary German

Basic sk i l ls of o ral and written co m m un icat ion in classroom and labo ratory p ractice. Use of materials re fl e c t in g conte m p o rary German l ife. r II (4, 4) 20 1, 202 Intermediate Genoan

Conti n ued p ract i ce in o ra l a n d written commun ication in class­

reflect contempo­

rary lJ fe as wel l as the German cultural h e r i tage . [ I f

Intensive review of g ra mma r wi th emphasis on i d ioma tic wiage ;

use of contem porary auth o rs as models o f style. Con e rsa t i o n on topics of student i ntere t. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent.

I n ( 4, 4 ) 32 1 German Clvllization to 1 750

From th e Middle Ages to the n ligh ten m en t . A ' urvey of German culture and its expressio n in creative works of art, m u s ic alld l itera ture , with p a rticu l a r emphasis o n Marti n Luther and the P rotestant Reformation . Prerequisite : 2 0 2 . I a/y ( 4 ) 3 2 2 German Civilization Since 1750

From the Enlighten ment to the present. This urvey covers repIes ntative works and Lreods i n Gernlan pol itics, philosophy, Iiteralure, art and music, with emphasis on the Age 0 Goethe and Beethoven. Prerequisite: 202. 11 a/y (4) 40 1 Advanced Composition a n d Conversation

Emphas is on id ioma 'ic Ge r m a n using newspa pe rs and other

c u rrent sources for texts. Stro n gly recom mended for students plan n i n g t obtain a creden t ial to teach German in pub l ic

take th is course in the ju nio r

421 German Literature From the Bnlightenment to Realism Representative works of Germa n l i tera t u re from abou t 1 750 to 1 890, incl ud i n g Sturn. uod Drang, Classicism and Romant i c is m . Read in g will include suc.h au t h o rs as Goethe, S chiller, Buch ner, and Kel ler. Prerequis ite: 352 . r a/), ( 4 ) 422 20th-Century German Literature

Representative works from Natura l i s m to t he p resent , including

Expressionism and Socialist Realis m . Wo rks from both eas t and and will i nclude such a u t h o rs as B re ch t , Kafka, Thomas Mann , Rilke. and egbers. Pre requ isite : 302. 1 1 aly (4)

wes t ,

491, 492 Indepen�nl Study 490 SenJor Project

(2)

( 1 -4)

,... » z Ci'l c » Ci'l III

Develops a c m m a n d of the l a n g uage while fu rt h er acqUaint i ng students with t h e Norwegia n cultural heritage. Reading elec­ tions in troduce No rweg ian folklore and daily l ife. I II (4. 4 )

VI

3 0 1 Conversation and Composition

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1n creast:s s t ude n t ab i l it y for sclf-expre5siol1, both orally and in

,...

wri ti. ng. Contempo rary ma te. r ial . are ele ted ab models of sty l e and usage. Prerequ i .s i te : 202 or equivalent. 1 ( 4 )

-I III ;lO

302 Advanced Conversation and Composition

Em phasizes the fi ner poi n ts of st r uc t u re, tyle. and good t aste . Prerequisite: 35 1 or equivalen t. TI (4) 49 1 . 492 Indepmdent Study

490 Senior Project

l> -I C ;lO III VI

( 1 -4)

(2)

Scandinavian

Major in SCaTldillav ian A.rea Stlldies: 40 se mc ter hours: A cross­ discipl i nary approac.h to tht: tudy o f candinavia. ee al sec. t i o n of th is c a ta log on Scall(iinclvicm llrea ShuiiRs.

(4, 4)

30 1, 302 Compo ition and Conversation

secondary s chools . Studen t� sh ould or sen ior year. Prerequisite: 302. (4)

int roduces we slUden ts to the pleasure of spe a k n i g , readi n g. and w r i t i n g a fo reign language. These sk i l ls are developed througb a conversationa.l approach, u si ng ong and ot h er cul t ural ma terials. [ II (4. 4) 2 0 1 , 202 Intermediate Norwegian

(2)

room and laborato rr- Use of materials which

ing 1 0 1 - 1 02 , 20 1 -202, 30 1 -302, and Scanilinavian 42 1 o r 422. Millor i1l Norwegia,,: 20 se m ester bours, which lTLIy include 1 0 1 -1 02. 101, 102 Elementary Norwegian

Social and aesthetic i mportance of s el ec te d twen Lietll ce n t ury

490 Senior Proj«t

Norwegian

Major ill Nonvegian: A minimum of 34 se m este r hours. includ­

the

150 Introduction to Scandinavi

A n overv ie w (,r the No rdic count r ies, h igh l igh ting contributions

in art and music and the cultural l i fe ll f De n m a rk , Fi ruanu, Ice l a n d , Norway, a.nd Swede n . The roads to parliamentary demo­ cracy and c urren t iss ue in the five natiom are also Ol.lt l i n d . ( 2 ) 250 .Masterpieces o f Scandinavian Litet'alUre

A survey

0

m ajor a u t h o rs and wo rks

from the Scand.inavian

countries, b eg i n ni n g w i t h t he prose and p oe try of the Viking

Age. All readings in English t ransla ti o n . Satisfies the gen eral u n ivers ity core requirement in li terature. ( 4 ) 322 Contemporary Scandinavia

Neut ral ity a nd occupati o n ; t h e emergence of the welfare state;

social refo rms, plan ned econ mie , and cu ltural pol icies; Scandinavia and the European commun ity. Readings i n the or ig in al fo r m aj ors; class cond ucted in English. aJy ( 4 ) 323 The Vikings

The wo rld of lhe V ikin gs; terri torial expan. ion; interaction or th e

Viki ngs with the rest of Eu rope. in -ngli.h.

(2)

324 The Emigrant

The mass em igration from Scandina.via L North America; reasons for the exodus; life in tbt! new h o me land . In Engl i �h. ( 2 ) 42 1 Ibsen and Strlndherg

The great dramatists of 1 9th-cenLUry S candin avi an litera t ure--­ Hen rik Ibsen and August Strindberg-a re tudied gllin l lh\! backdrop of heir t i m e and the work �1r olher Ju thors who co n t ributed to the breakthrough of modern fo rn.s and themes. Clas conduckd in English; readi ngs in transiali()n for nan­ majors. Satisfies lhe general wl i ver ity core requirement i n litera t ure. aly (4) 422 20th-Century Scandinavian Literature

Rece n t r re nds it1 Scand i nav ian l i tera(Ure a re i l l llsLraled by lead­ ing wri tITS like l s a k Di nesen, Tarjci Ve�aa�. lInd Par Lagt'Tkvi t.

Empha

is on prose fie lion and poelry.

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341 The Ladno Experiences in the u.s.

English; readings in translation for non- majors. Satisfies the general u n iversity core requirement in literature. a/y (4)

Exploration of th histories, experiences, and contributions o f t h e Latino peoples in t h e United States a s they appear i n Latino

49 1 , 492 Independent Study 0-4) VI

490 Senior Project I

literature and film. Course content is enriched thro ugh related

II (2)

service learning experience. Readings are in English. Satisfies core requirement in Altern ative Perspectives or Literature. May co unt toward major, but not toward minor i n Spanish.

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Sign Language

o prerequ isites. (4)

1 0 1 , 102 Sign Language

An introduction to the structure of American Sign Language and to the world of the h aring impai red. Basic sign i ng skills and ...J

W ...J

sign language vocabulary; fingerspelling; the particular needs and problems of deaf people. I II (4, 4 )

Study of Spanish at the most advanced level wit h an emphasis o n syntactical differences between English a n d Spanish. Strongly recommended fo r those who plan to teach Spanish at the secondary level. Prerequisite: 302 ( 4 ) 42 1 Masterpieces o f Spanish literature

Spanish

Major ill Spanish: A

mini mum of 34 semester hours beyond 20 1 , including 202, 30 1 , 302, 3 2 1. 3 2 2 , and three 400- level courses. In addition, students must complete Languages 490. At least two 400 level cou rses--{)ne focusing on Spain and another on Latin America-must be completed at PLU. One 400-level

43 1 Latin American Literature, 1492-1 888

1 0 1 , t02 Elementary Spanish Essentials of pronunciation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Lab attendance required. I, II (4, 4 ) 20 I , 202 Intermediate Spanish

A continuation of elementary Spanish; reading selections which reflect the Hispanic cultural heritage as well as contemporary materials. Lab attendance required. I, II (4, 4 ) 23 1 , 33 1 lotensive Spanish in Latin America

An intensive Spanish course o ffered in a Latin American co untry and geared to students at the intermediate (equivalen' to 201 or 202 ) and advanced (equivalen t to 30 1 ) language level. Course

tent with

alternative ap proaches to the study of law from the aca­

302 Introduction t o Hispanic literary Studies

Acquaints students with techniques of Literary analysis. as applied to examples of narrative, poe try, drama, and essay in the Spanish and Latin American literary traditions . .Reading, writing, and speakjn g-i ntensive. Ongoing review of advanced grammar. Prerequisite: 3 0 1 . II (4)

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functions of law, the mutual impacts of law and society,

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of law. Students completing a m inor in

involved in making, enforcing, interpret ing, and commu­ nicating "the law" in contempo rary American civil socie ty. FACUUY: Arnold, Chair; Ahna, Anderson, Brue, Dwyer-Shick, Hasty. Jobst, Kaurin, Klein, Lisosky, Mac onald, Rowe.

Historic, artistic, literary. sociological, and geographic elements shaping the development of the Latin American region. Prereq­ uisite: 3 0 1 (or concurrent enrollme n t ) . I I (4)

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phasize the development o f a critical understanding of the

directed research, and internships in offices and agencies

322 Latin American Civilization and Culture

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the Schools of the Arts, Business, and

Education. The faculty teaching within the program em­

Legal Studies pursue these objectives through courses,

Development o f Spanish sod ty from early times to the present as reflected i n architecture, painting, and literature, within their socio-historical context. Prerequisite: 30 1 (or concur rent enrollment ) . I (4)

U

demic framework of the Divisions of Social Sciences and Human ities and

and the sources

321 Civilization and Culture of Spain

L

tile p u rposes of the American Legal Studies

Association, the Legal Studies Program at PLU provides

literary selections. Prerequisite: 202. I ( 4 )

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433 SpedaJ Topics i n latin American Literature and Culture This co urse offers an opportun ity to p u rsue an in-depth study of a specific aspect o r topic in Latin American literature and culture, such as Lathl American women writers, Latino narrative, or Latin American film and literature. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: 302. (4)

foc using on the nature o f law and j udicial process. Consis­

Adva nced grammar, stylistic.s, and composition; conversati n based on everyday situations, current events, and pertinent

I

Development of the literature of Mexico, ent ral and South America fro'm the " Modern ista" movement ( 1 88 8 ) to the present. Prerequisite: 302. (4)

Legal Sludies is an interdisciplinary program of study

30 1 Composition and Conversation

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432 20th-Century Latin American Literature

Legal Studies

Pre requisites : Spanish 1 02 o r the equivalent. J ( 4 )

I

A study o f representative genres from the colonial period to the end of the 1 9th century. Prerequ isite: 302. (4)

490 Senior Project (2)

includes fo ur and a half hours of class per day for a fou r-week period, a homestay. a service project, excursions, and guest lectures on a variety of topics related to the history and culture of the host count ry. Placement at the 2 3 1 or 3 3 1 level is deter­ mined by the studenes backgro u nd and experience in Spanish.

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Drama, novel, essay, and poetry of Spain fro m the "Generation

This course offers an opportunity to pursue all in -depth study of a specific aspect or topic in Spanish literature, such as Spanish women writers or the relationship of film to other types o f cult ural production. May b e repeated fo r credit with different topic. Prerequisite; 302. ( 4 )

during their senior year. Minor in Spanish: 20 semester hours, including 202, 3 0 1 , 302, and two additional upper division courses.

A

422 20th-Century Literature of Spain

423 Special Topics i n Spanish literature a n d Culture

Spanish faculty. Majors may not normally fulfill the require­ ments for the major through the election o f 300-level courses

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A concentrated study of major writers and movements i n Spanish Literature fro m i t s origins to 1 898. Prerequisite: 302. ( 4 )

o f 1 898" to the present. Prerequisite: 302. ( 4 )

course must be completed i n the senior year. Majors are strongly encouraged to pursue at least one semester of study in a Spanish-speaking country o n a p rogram approved by the

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401 Advanced Spanish Grammar

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MINOR: 20

semester hours, including Political Science 1 70,

Philosophy 328, and

1 2 addit ional credit- hours, selected in

consultation with the p rogram's chair.

ANTH 375 BU A 400 BUSA 405 BUSA 406 BUSA 407 BUSA 408 OMA 38 1 ON 3 7 1 HJST 45 1 PHIL 3 2 8 P LS 1 70 p LS 3 7 1 P LS 372 POLS 373 POLS 374 POLS 38 1 POL 4 7 1 PSYC 4 7 1 SOC! 3 5 1

S l l Psychosocial Pathologyl Relationship t o Marriage and the Family Exploration of the treatment techn iques and assumptions o f

Law, Pul itics, and Revolution

leading famil), therapists regarding s u c h psychosocial dysfunc­

General B u sin ess Law Law of the Financi 1 Marketplace

symptoms, drug addiction, and disturbed adolescents. Prerequi­

law o f the Wo rkplace Law of the Marketplace

tions a divorce, fam i ly violence, delinq uency, p sy chosomatic site: 503. (4)

S 1 2 Professlooal Stlldies in Mauiage and Family Therapy

In ternational Business Law Media Law

Study of pro fessional ethics and Washington State laws which

Industrial Organiza tion and Public Policy

and interpro fessional cooperation. ( 3 )

Leg al

H is to r y

Philosoph ical lssue in the Law I n t r duction to Le ga l Studies Judicial Process Constitutional Law Civil Liberties Legal Studie Re earch Comp arative Legal Systems

affect clinical prac tice , including family law, legal responsibilities,

m

5 19 Practicum I (2 )

P rereq uisite : 5 0 3 , 5 0 7 a n d 5 1 2 may b e t aken concurrently when s che d ule allows. 5 1 2 may also be taken concurrently with 52 1 , P ract icu m I I , with faculty approval. 52 1 Practlcum II (2) 523 Practicum ill (2)

I ntcrn5hip in Legal Stu d ies

525 Practicum IV ( 4 )

Psych logy a n d t b e Law

The fo ur semesters of practica are part of a continuous process toward developin g speci fic therapeutic competencies in work

Sociology of Law

with m a rri a ge s and fam il ies. The p ractica present a competency­ based program in which each student is evaluated regarding:

1)

Marriage and Family Therapy The M arr i age and Family Therapy program is a gr a du a t e program lea din g to the M .A. i n Social Sciences. 45 semes­ ter hours are required in the program. For further infor­ mation, see the Gmduate Studies section of this catalog. The Marriage and Family Therapy program is a ccred ­ ited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and F am i ly Therapy Education of the American Ass iation fo r Marriage and Family T hera py (AAMFT) . FACULTY: Yo rk, Chair; St orm, Clirzic Director; and p rac tica sup ervisors: Lewis, Phair, Tschimperle .

m a na gem e n t skills; 2) relationshi p skills; 3) perceptual 4) concep tual skills; 5) structuring skills; and 6) profes­ sional developmen t skills. P ract ica requirements include 1 00 hours of supervisio n of 500 cl ient contact hours. Faculty are case

skills;

AAMFT-approved supe rvis o rs and use live supervision and video tapes o f student sessions as the primary methods of clinical u pervi,ion.

520 Theory I ( 2 ) 522 Theory n ( 2 )

5 24 Theory m ( 2 ) T h e three semesters of theory taken in conjunction with 5 1 9,

52 1 , and 523 constitute an in-depth study of one a p proach toward marriage and family therapy with an emphasis on applyi n g theory in p ract i ce .

590 Graduate Seminar Selected topics

Course Offe rings

as

instructor. ( 1-4)

500 Human Development Individual personality development, normal and abnormal manifestations, over the l i fe span. (4)

503 Systems Approach to Marr.lJlge and Family Therapy An i n tro duc ti on to the systems p a xadigm and post-modern ideas for t reatm en t strate.gy and i n t e r ve n t io n . (4)

announced. P re requis ite : consent of the

591 DirectOJ: Study ( 1-4) 595 Graduate Readings independent study card required. (4)

598 Research Project (4) 599 Thesis ( 4)

S04 Family Development The course ex p l ore s how family li fe cycle stages are affected by divorce, remarri age, ethnic it y, ferni n i t is ues, and other unplanned even ts.

(4)

505 Research Methods in Marriage Bnd Family Therapy Basic research concepts including formulating research questi ns, research design, analysis of data, and theory construction. Emphasis on understanding and evaluating rather than conduct­ ing

research. (4)

507 CGmparative Marriage and Family Therapy Intensive comparative study

f the t h e retical rationale of the

prominent schools o f thought wit hin the field of marriage and fam i ly th e rapy. P rere q u isite: 503.

(4)

510 Buman Sexualityand Sex Tberapy An o ve r v ie w of the nature of s exual health and th treatment of common sexual dysfunctions. Prerequis i te or co-requisite: 503.

(2)

Mathematics Mathematics is a many-faceted s u bj ect that is extremely useful in its a pp lic a t i o n , but at th e same time is fa sci n a ti n g and bea uti ful in th e abstract . It is an in di spe nsabl e t oo l for in d ust ry, science, government, and the business world, while the legance of its logic and beauty of form have i ntrigued scholars, p h i l osoph ers , and artists since earliest

t imes. The mathematics program at PLU is designed to serve five main objectives: ( 1 ) to provide backgro unds fo r o t h e r d i sc ipli ne s, (2) to provide a comprehensive pre- pr o fes ­ sional pr gram for tho se directly ent er i n g the fields of te ac h i n g and a ppli e d mathematics, ( 3 ) to prov i de a

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MATHEMATICS AND THE COLLEGE 01' ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENT (see page 26): With th excep tio ns of Math 9 L and Ma t h 99 II m a t hema t i cs courses w i l l sat isfy the logi , math matics, computer scie nce or statisti s p rt of Option I I I o f the Co l lege of Arts and Sci en ces requirement. A c urse

o

cannot si multaneously sa tisfy Opt i on

r r r of the College

Arts and Sciences requ ireme.n t and the genefal university

requirements.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT: T he policy of the D e pa rt m en t of Math e ma t ics with r peet to AP a lcul us Exam resu lts is as follo� : AB EXAM: If a s l ude n t rece ives a .� or higher on the AB exam th e. n th

student is given advanced p l acemen t inlo ei ther

Math 1 52 or Mal h 230 with c r 'dit (4 cred its-grad e Pass) given for Math I S [ up n completion (grade C

or Math

230. If a

tudell L receives

a

r h i gh e r) of Math 152 5 (the maxi mum ) on the A S

exam then the student may b e e lig ibl e for advanced

nucleus of essential

co u rses

which

will develop the breadth

and maturity of mathematical thought for conti n ued s tudy

at the g raduate level, (4) to develop the � r the crea tion, analysis, and critique oC mathem tical topics, and (5) to provide a view of m a t h matics ill a part of hum ani tic behavior.

of math m a ti c s

mental skills necessary

FACUlTY: BenkhaltJ. Cht1lr; Bl essi nger, B. Domer, C. Dorner, Farid, Meye.r. Ne udil ue r, Thur ma n, Wu , Yiu, Zhu.

BEGINNING CLASSES: Majo rs in math

matics, computer

sc ie nce and engineering, lInd o ther sc.iences usually take Math

151

152 (calculus). Math 1 - J is also ap prop riate for any

a nd

s tude n t

whose high s chool mathematics

p repa ra t i o n is strong.

Tho 'e who h,lVe had calculus in high school may omit Math 1 5 1

( ee Advanced Placement se ction ) and enroll i n Math 1 52 after consultalion with a mathematics faculty

y

m ember.

Those who

have less mathemdtin background ma b eg in with Math 140

before ta king 13lh l S I . Math 1 1 1 and 1 1 2 provide p repa ratio n for Math 1 40. Business major O1a)' satisfy the mathematics re q u i re me n t for

th a t degree i n any of th ree ways. Those with strong mathematics backgro und may take Math 1 5 1 followed either by Math 230

i

or

satis

fy the mathematics requirement for business. Math

servc..�

as

pr of, linea r algebra, abstract a l geb ra , anaJy ·is. geo me t ry . differential equations, statisti cs and nu merical analysis. See the nd the major ( either Bachelor of A rts

or Bache.lor of Science) for more detail. Stud ents majoring i n mathematics should disc uss s ched u l i ng o f these cou rses wi th

III

p rep ar ati on fo r Math 1 28 for those whose high school

th 'iT adviser. For example, Math 490 extends over L IVO seme tee

backgro und is not strong.

or tuderus who plan unly one mathematics course, a choice from Ma t h 1 05, 1 07, 1 28, 140, 1 5 1 is adYi ed , depending on

beginning in the fal l semester; May graduate begin this capston e exp erie nce cou rse in t h e fuJJ s em est e r o f t h e senio r yea r, while

December graduates must begin LhG; course in the fall scm ster of their j u n ior year.

interest a n d preparation.

Re medial: Math 9 1 ( Intermediate Algebra ) is available for

those who are not ready for other c1 asse. . Math 9 1 does not count toward grad ua ti o n requirements.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 34 semester hours of mathema t ics, 4 h urs . u pportin g.

PLACEMENT TEST: A placement test and backgro u nd su rvey e gi n i n mathematics c ou rs es wh ich are app ropriate to their preparation an d abilities. Enrollment is not permitted in a ny of th e beg i n ni ng mathcm t­ ics courses ( Math 9 1 , 99, lOS, 1 0 7, I I I . 1 1 2, 1 28 , 1 40, 1 5 1 ) until

Requ ired: M at h 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253, 3 1 7 , 33 l , 34 1 , 433, 455, 490. Reql/ired support ing: Co mp ute r Sc ience and E n gineering 1 44, WID h should be taken in the fresh m a n year. Physics t 53- 1 6 3 o r Computer cicnce a n d Engineering 375 o r Eco n om ics 345 is strongly r commended .

the

BACHELO R OF SCIENCE MAJOR.: 42 semester hours of mathema Lics, 8-9 hou r supporting.

Jre used to help insure thal students

placeme n t test and background

'u ey are com pleted.

MA1'HEMATlCS AND GENBRAL UNIVERSITY REQUIRE·

MENTS (sec page 26): With the exceptions of Mat h 9 1 and Math 99 al[ mathematics courses will satisfy (he mathem ati cal

reasoning reqUlfemenl ( l i ne 3 or Lhe general un ivn ity requi Te­ ments). At leasl 4 hours are needed. With the exceptions of

Math �I an d Math 99 all mathematics courses will satisfy line

fulfillin g th mathemallcal reasoning requirement, students w i th docu mented disabititie ' w il l be given reasonable accom moda­

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School ofEdl/calion eetion of t his calalo ' . MINOR IN MATIlEMATICS: 20 'emeste r h u r of mathema tics course s , i nclu d in g 1 5 1 1 52 , 2 53 or 245 and 8 hours of u ppe r division mathem, tics courses excl u d ing 446.

with di sa bd i t ies and the appropriate faculty m em ber in consul[ation with the student. tions as determined hy the coordinator for studen

P

Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 2 53 , 3 1 7, 33 1 , 34 1 , 433 , 455, 490. 8 m o re hOllrs from: Math 32 1 . 342, 348, 3 5 1 . 3 5 6 , 3 8 1 , 480. Requ ired supporting: Com pUler Saenc and Engineering 1 44 and one of Physics 1 53 - 1 63 o r Computer clenee and Engineeri ng 348 or Comp uter Science and n gin ee r i n g 3 7 5 or Economic 345 .

ore 1: The Distr ibutive Core. At lcast 4 hours are need ed.. A course OI n not 'im uJLaneou�ly . tisfy l ine 2e a n d l i oe 3. In 2e of

90

MATHEMATICS MAJOR; The founda t ion of the mathematics program for majors is the three semester seq uen c e of ca l cul us ( Ma th 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 2 5 3 ) , introduc iOIl to proof Math 3 1 7), and li near algebra ( M a th 3 3 1 ) . Students wiLh a calculus backgro und in h igh s hool may receive adv need pIa e men! into the approp riate cours in th is sequence. pper d i v ision work includes cou rses in i n t ro d uc t i on to

Jcscripfion of th e ourses

by both Math 1 52 and 33 1 . Alternatively, Math l 8 alone will

pl a cem en t

i n to M ath 253 upon consu l tation with e ither the M< tb 253 i n tructor or the department dlair. If the student completes Math 2 53 with a grade of or h igh e r t h n c red it ( 8 cred it grade Pass) is given fo r Math 1 5 1 and Math [ 52 . BC EXAM: If a st ude n t rece ives a 3 or 4 on the Beexam then dle [ude.n t i s treated the same :ls one wh receives a 5 on the AB exam. I f a s t u de nt receive a 5 on the BCexam then the s tu den t is g ive n advanced placement into Math 253 w i th credit <'rive n for both ath 1 5 1 nd M th J 52 (8 cred i ts-grad e Pas ) if Math 253 is completed w i t h a gra d e of C or high er. I f a student h a s taken calc u lus i n high school and did not take an AP exa m , then the stude nt may moll in Math 152 after cou ull tiOD with a mathematics faculty me mb er. In this case no credi t is given fo r MatJ1 1 5' 1 .

Y


MINOR IN STAl'lSTICS: A minimum of 1 6 seme ter ho urs to

and mathematical writing are emphasized. Prepares students for

include Stat istics 34 1 , at least 8 hours from among the other

calculus. Prerequisites:

statistics courses and Computer Science and ,omputer Engi­

materi al . I n ( 4 )

neering 220 or 1 44 . See the Stl/ tistics section of this catalog for more detail.

III

and 1 1 2 or equivalent high school

15 1 Introduction t o calculus Functions, limits, derivatives and i n tegrals with applications.

Students wh o have taken calculus in high school but do l10t have

Emphasis on derivatives. Prerequisite: Math analysis or pre­

credit for Math 1 5 1 do 110/ need to take Math 1 5 1 fo r the math­

calculus i n high school or Math 140 or equivalent. I II ( 4 )

ematics major or mmor. However, they still need to comp lete the number of hours in ma thematics stated in the requirements.

Course Offe rings A grade of

or

hjgher is requ i red in aU prerequisite courses. A

placement test and background su rvey are requ ired before r

g ist e ring for beginning mathematics courses if prerequisites

152 calculus n Continuation of 1 5 1 . Te.chniques and applications of integrals,

m

improper integrals, ordinary differential equations and power

series, with applications. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I II ( 4 )

> -I

203 History of Mathematics A study in the vast adventure of ideas that is mathematics from

have not be n completed at PL .

cepts

91 Intermediate Algebra A re i ew of high school algebra; solving linear a nd quadratic

which they arose. Prerequisite: Math 1 5 1 or equivalent or con ­

equatio ns, factoring, simpli fying expression, exponents and graphing. D esigned for students whose mathematical prepara­ tion is i nadequate for Math I

I I . Does not count toward

graduat i on r e quirem e n ts . I (4) Designed for students who need further help with the basics in m a themati cs to prepare them for higher level courses. Enroll­ ment by arrangement with instructor. Does not count toward graduation requirements. S only ( 1 -4)

branches of mathematics i n the contexts of the varied cult ures in sent o f instructor. a l y I I ( 4 )

230 Matrix Algebra A s urvey of matr ix algeb ra with applications, such as linear programming. A first look at abstract methods including some

2 4 1 Applled Statistics for Scientists An introduction to the basic tech n iques of statistical analysis witb application to the b iological and physi cal sciences. Covers probabil ity, data organiz.ation and summary, random variables, distributions, hypothesis tests, non-parametric methods, linear

105 MathematiCli of Personal Finance E.mphasizes financial transactions i mportant to individuals and families : annu ities, loans, insurance, i n terest, investment, time value of mon ey. Prerequisite: PLU math entrance requirement. J (4)

regression , and analysis of variance. Case studies in d i fferent disciplines will be llsed to illustrate the application of each topic. M I NITAB statistical software will be used. Prerequisite: 1 28 or 1 40. ( 4 )

245 Discrete Structures

1 0 7 Mathematical �Jorations M athematics and modern society. Em p hasis on numerical and

logical reasoning. Designed to increase awareness of application s of mathematics, to enhance enjoyment of and self-confidence i n mathematics, a n d t o sharpen critical thought in mathematics. Topics selected by the instructor. Prere quisite : PLU math en­ requirement. ( 4 )

H I College Algebra A review of algebra emphasizing problem solv i ng shllls. Appro­ priate as preparation for Math 1 28 or 1 1 2 (and then 1 40) . Pre­ requisites: two years of high school algebra or Math 9 1 . I II ( 2 )

1 12 Plane Trigonometry Trigono metric , inverse trigono met ric, logarit hmi

and exponen­

tial functions, id ntities, graphin g, solution of triangles. For

Sets, relations, functions co mbinator i cs, and graph theory and their relation to topics in com puter science and engineering. Techniq u es fo r logical reasoning incl u ding methods of quanti­

fied logic, deduction, induction, and contradiction will be taught and appl ied. Prerequisite: 1 52 . II ( 4 )

253 MultivariabJe Calcwus An i n t rod uction to vectors, partial derivatives, multiple in tegrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisite: 1 5 2. I I I ( 4 )

2 9 1 Directed Study Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or interests; primarily for students awarded advanced pl a cemen t. Admission only by depart mental invitation. ( 1 -2)

317 Introduction to Proof in Mathematics

students who are p roficient in algebra but do not know trigo ­

Introduces the log i c al methods of proof and abstraction in

no metry. P rerequisite : I I I or at least t\'lO years of high school algebra. I I I ( 2 )

empha sized while investigating a variety of topics in discrete

1 2 3 Modern EJementary Mathematics Concepts underlyi ng t rad itional computational techniques; a systematic an alysis of arith metic; ao intuit ive app roach to algebra and geometry. I n tended for elementary teaching majors. Prerequisite: a qualifying score

on

the math placement test or a

grade of C or higher in Math I I I or eq uivalen t .

I

II (4)

1 28 Linear Models and Calculus, An Introduction Matrix theory, linea.r programming, and introduction to

mode rn mathematics. Critical logical analysis and expression mathematics. Prerequisite: 1 5 2 . I ( 4 )

321 Geometry Foundations of geometry and basic t heo ry i n Euclidean , projective , and non- Euclidean geometry. Pre req u isite: 1 5 2 or consent of instructor. ! (4)

331 LInear Algebra Vectors and abstract vector spaces, matrices, inner produ c t spaces, linear transformations. Proofs w ill be em p hasi zed.

calculus. Concepts developed stressi n g applications, particularly

Prerequisite: 1 52 and one of 230, 245, 253, or 3 1 7 . I n ( 4 )

to business. Prerequisites: two years of high school algebra or

340 A Brief Introduction t o ProbabiJity

Math I I l or equivalent. Cannot be taken for credit if Math 1 5 1 (or the equivalent) has be n previously taken with a grade of C or hi gh er. 1 I I

11\

f number, measurement, demonstration, and the various

techniques of proof. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I n ( 2 )

99 Directed Study In Fundamental Mathematics

tranc

n

ancient cultures to the 20th centu ry. The evolution of the con­

(4)

140 Analytic Geometry and Funmons Different types of fu nction , their p roperties and graphs, esp cially trigonometric functions. Algebraic ski ll , problem solving,

Concepts from p robability and statistic that are part ic ularly relevan t to computer sci e nce a nd engineering. Top ics are combinatorics, cond.iti o nal probabili ty, inde pe n dence, d iscrete and conti nuoll distributions, mean and variance. 340 can not be taken for credit after 34 1 . Prerequisites: 1 52 and CS E 1 44 . Recommended: Math 245. I I ( 2 )

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project. L a st s two semesters b e gi nn i ng in the fall st: mesre r; May

341 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics Data descr ip t ion , probability, discrete a n d ()ntinuous random

gra d u a tes should start the course in the fa ll of their senior year

variables, expectation, special distributions, st a teme n ts of law of

u

larg numb rs and cen tr al limit theorem, s a mpl i ng dist ributions, t heory o f p oi nt estimators, confidence intervals, hypothesis t sts, regression ( t i m e per m i t t i ng ) . Prereqll .i s ite: 1 52 . I ( 4 )

342 Probability and Statistical Theory Conti nuation of

341 .

and De emb e r graduates s ho u l d begin the COUIse in the fa ll of their ju nior year. Final pres e n tatio n given during s p r ing semester. Prerequisite: senior ( o r second semester jUJ)ior) math major.

I n (2)

597, 598 Graduate Research

Topics may include; j o i n t and c ondi tiona l

Open to master's degree candidates only. Prerequisite: consent o f

d i t r ib ut ion s, correlation, fu nction s of ra ndom var ia ble s,

dep a rt ment chair. I U

( 1 -4)

m o me nt ge ne ra t. in g fu nctions, inference in reg re ssi o n and one­ way AN OVA,

B ayes ian

and non-parametric inference, conver­

gence of distributions. Pre requ isi te; 34 1 . a/y II (4)

Music

348 Applied Regression Analysi and ANOVA Linear and m u l t i p l e regression w i th i n ference and dia g no stics ; a n al ysi s of variance; experimental design with randomization and bl ockin g . Substantial li se o f stat istical so ftwa re and e m p h a sis

o n exp l o ra to ry data an a lysi s . Prerequisite: 34 1 or co n sen t of i nst r u c tor. a/y I T (4)

ensemble participation to

core cO liises to fou r distinctive two academic minors. N e arly one quarter of the u nde rgraduates at PLU participate in music an n ual ly. The program is fully accredited by the National Association of Sd100ls of Music and its graduates go on to distinguished and satisfying careers in teaching and p erforming. Facilit ies fo r exploring the musical ar ts are outstanding. The Mary Baker Russell AJusic Cen ter, with its exq uisite Lagerquist Concert Hall, provides state -of-th e - a rt focus to music study at PLU. Media rich cl assrooms and labs aug­ ment studios and individual p ra ctice spaces. Private study in keyboard is available in piano, orga n , and harp sich rd. Other p rivate study includes voice a nd aU string, wind, and percussio n instru ments, taught by regularly performing m icians. Professional-quality experien ce is avai lable to qualified per formers i n band, orchestra, choir, jazz, and chamber e nsem bl es .

academic majors an

An int ro du cti. on to d i fferent ial equations emphasizing t he a p pl ied a pect. Fi rst and s econd o rd r differential equations, systems of differential eq uat i o n s , power serie solu tions, non­ linear d i ffe re ntial equ a t i o n s, n u mer ical methods. Pre requisite:

253. II a/y ( 4 )

356 Numerical Analysis N u m e rical theory and appl.ication in t he co ntext of solutions of lin ea r, nonlinear, and differential quations, ma t r ix l ht!ory, interpolation, ap p roxim ations, n u meri cal differentiation and i n tegration and Fo ur ier transforms. Prereqlli it s: l 5 2 a nd CSCE 1 44. all' II (4)

381 Seminar i n Problem Solving a dvanced

problem so lvi ng skills. A goal is

participatjon in the Putnam Competition. Pass/Fail o n l y. Ma y be taken more tha n once fo r c red it. Prerequisite: 1 52 or con 'ent

of i ns tru cto r. I ( I )

433 Abstract Algebra The algebr

of axiomatically defined objc ts, SUcl1 as groups,

ri ngs and fields with emphasis on theory :Ul

student at the u n iversity with a mean ingful and enriching arts experience, ranging from l1on-maj r private lesso ns or

351 Differential Equations

Desi ned to i Il1 p ro e

T h e music program a t PLU st r ive to provide every

FACULTY: Rob b i n s, )lair; Bradley, Farner, F ro hnm ayer,

proof.

Grieshab r, Ho ffma n, Holloway, Jo yn e r, Kracht, Nance, Poppe,

Prerequisite: 33 1 . 1 (4)

Sparks, Va u g h t Farner, Youtz; assisted by

446 Mathematics in the Secondary School

Boughten, Box, B ra n dt , Campos, Chagnard, Cline, Erickson ,

Methods and materials in secondary school math teaching. Basic mathem t ical c ncep ts; pri nciples of n umb e r operat ion, relation, proo f, and problem solving i n the ontext f rith m et i c , algebra, and geomet ry. Prerequisite: 253 or 33 1 or eqillvalent.

Fi Id, Fukashima, an u n g , Geronymo, Habedank, Harry, Hill, H o us to n , B. JohnSOJ1, S. Knapp, La rse n, Nierman, Ott, F. Pe ter so n , Phillips, Reitz,

eeb erger, Shapiro, Spicciati, Sulliva n ,

Te rp n n i ng, V n ii, Wo oster.

1 (3)

For introduc

455 Mathematical Analysis

tions of Mus ic 1 0 1 , 102, 1 03, 1 04, [05, 1 06, and 1 20.

calculus. Prereqill ite: 2 5 3 and 3 3 1 and

f 3 1 7 or

o m:

43 (with

cons e nt of instructor 433 may be taken concurren tly ) . 1

ry co ur ses to the field of m u si c, see the descrip­

Studen t s i n tending to major in music ho uld begin til e maj r music sequences in the fi rs t year. Failure to do so m ay mean a n extra semester o r year t o co m p l ete the program. Following is the progra m fo r all e n teri ng freshmen who

Theoret ical tTeatment of topics introduced in el ementary

('I)

430 TopIcs in Ma thematics Selected top i cs of current interest or from: combinatoric , co mp lex analysis. dynamical systems chaos and fractals, graph theory, group repre entations, number theory, operations

intend to major in music:

M usic Fundamentals ' : I l l , 1 1 3

research, partial differential equa ti ns, topology, transf< rm

Music and Culture: 1 20;

methods, abstract algeb ra, a na lysis . May be taken more tha n

Theory: 1 24

once for credit. Prereqill. ites vary depending

Ear Tra ini ns: 1 25 , 1 26 Key board ing: 1 1 5, 1 1 6,

n the top ic .

Prerequisit : consent of departmen t hair. 1 I f

( 1 --4)

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499 Senior Seminar

Discussion of method;; fo r co mmunicati ng mathematical kno wl e dge. Satisfies the re quireme n t for a sen ior

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These courses are prereq uisite to Theory 124. All freshmell

S

Ha lf-semester c o u rses.

) Class size limited.

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meeting, and,

based orl the test o u tcome,

srl/dellts will be plac.ed ill either 1 24, 1 1 3

i ndividual research under the d i rect io n of a n assigned i ns tru c tor.

C

4

should register for 1 1 1 and 1 13 . A. placemen t test will be given during the first class

Oral and written presentation of in fo rmation learn ed i n

A

2'+22

(per pl ace ment)

491, 492 Independent Study

P

SPRING

FALL

COURSES,

l! ( 1-4)

92

gen t , Baldw in, Bliss,

or

retained in I I I .


MUSIC MINOR: G neral: 22 semes te r hours, in uding Mu'ic L 20; one of the fol low i n g: Music 1 1 5, 1 1 6, l 2 1 , 1 22 o r 202 ( 1 credit); 1 24, 1 25 , 1 2 ; 4 hou rs of Private Instruction ( M u s ic 20_-2 1 9 ) ; 4 ho urs of E nsemble (Mu i 360-384-); on of t h e foil wing: Music 10 I - I 06, 234, 333, 334; 0-1 h o ur of music el e ctive. Specia lized: 32 sem ster h o u rs , inc l udin g urses r q uir .d in the Genera l M i nor (22 h ours ) p l u s 4 additional hours of Private Instructi n ( Music 40 1 -4 1 9) a nd one of the Co nce n t ra t ion Modules (6 hour. ) lis t d under the Bachelor o f Music in Performance deg ree (see I i ting next page) .

The M u s ic core is fundamental to the p ursuit of the music major and should be completed i n the following sequence: YEAR 1

Fall

ENTRANCE AUDmON: To be a dmi t ted to

a

I 1 5/ 1 2 1 Spring

1 2 1 Keyboarding I

1 22

_2<1

( 1)

per placement

(I) ( 1 ) per placement Jazz Theory Lab ( 1 )

Keyboarding I I

234 History 1 ( 3 ) 2 2 6 E a r Traini n g I V ( 1 )

be YEAR :I

Fall 333 His t ory I I ( 3 ) pring 334 20th Century Musi c (3) Music Core requ i re m ents must be fulfilled b y e n roll m e n t i n

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: Students i n ter ted i n majo ri ng in music should complete an acad mic contract declaring a music major d u r in g their first semest r of enrollm n t in the p ro g ra m . They wil l be a ssigned a music faculty adviser who will assure that the student r eives he l p in e, p lo r in g the van us m aj o rs nd i n sc hed ul i ng music st udy in the most efficient and conom ical manner. Majors can always be ch a n ged lat e r.

ENSEMBLE REQUIREMENT: Music majors ar requi red to par t ic i pate each sem te r in a music ensemble. KEYBOARD PROFICIENCY: Basic keyboard skills are required in all mus i c majors ( 8.M., 8.M.E., B.M .A. , B.A.) . A tta i n me n t of ade qua t e keyb o ard skills is a ) a dj u d icated by the Keyboard Proficiency Jury, dmini te red e h term and b ) a gradu tion req u i r e m e n t. Stude nts are strongly encouraged to complete this require me n t by the end of the i r sophomore year. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT: Vocal performance majors are requi red t ta ke at l ea st one year of language study in French or Gemlan (see department handbook) .

specific courses a n d may n o t b e t aken b y means of independent s t u dy.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Maximum of 44 semester hours including m us ic core (26 h ours) , plus 4 hours of e n se mble; 4 hours (2 couIses) from 336, 337, andlor

338; 4 hours of private 2 0 2 2 1 9; 2 h ours of private instruction from 40 1 -4 1 9; 490 (2 credits ) . Keyboard proficiency required. I n instruction from

addiL ion t o requirements listed above, candidates for the B.A. (Option I, n, or

Requked Co�poneab Music Education Core: All B .M . E . degrees include the following m u si c education core co urses: 240 - Foundations of Mu s ic Education ................. . . . .. ... ........... 3 340 - Fundame ntals of Music Education

345 - Conducting I

348 - Practicum in Music Education . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .

446 - Conduc t i ng rv . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . 1 46 9 - Stu dent Teach i n g S r n i na r .w • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • 2

Scl/oot ofEducarion Sequence: In add i tio n to the music courses listed bel w, aU music ed uca t io n maj o rs are required to take t he following courses in th Sch ool of Education: EDUC 262 -

Foundations of Education ......................... .. ........ 3 . . . . . ... . . .......... 3 EPSY 3 6 1 - Psychology for Tea c h i ng ........................................ 3

EPSY 2 1 - Human Re lat i ns Development

. . . ... . .

.. . . .

. . . . . .. . . .

.

..

. .

.

.

.

.

5 i n Child Abuse ana Neglect .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 1 rouc 468 - Student Teaching .. ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... . ............ 1 0

SPED 480 - 1ssu

.

.

.... ...

SPED 200 - Individuals with Sp ecial Needs ................ . ....... . . . . . 2

i n aU music

Music and Culture: 1 2 0 ....................................................... . 4 hours Keyboarding: 1 2 1 , 1 2 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. . . 2 hour Theory: 1 24, 223, 224 . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . .. . . . .. 7 ho urs Music Hjst ry: 234, 333, 334 ............. ................................... hours Ear Train in g : 1 25, 1 26, 225, 226 ................ . . ......................... 4 hours .. . . .

1

445 - Conducting In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ....... . . 1

.

re q u i red

1

347 - Adaptive Music .............. . . . . .... .. .................. ... .... ..... . ....... ... 1

assessmen t will not be allowe d to continue in the music p rog ram (see department h a nd book) MUSIC CORE: The following 'ore is degree p rograms:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . .. . . .... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .

346 - Conducting I I .................................................................... 1

MUSIC MAJOR ASSESSMENT: S tu de nts pu rsuing Bachelo r of Mu ic ( 8M ) , Bache! r of Music Educati n ( BME ) , Bachelor of Musical Arts ( BMA) r Bachelor f Ar t s in music ( A) degrees

mad by the musjc fac ulty via progress reviews, juries, a nd pubUc

................................. 2 .. 2

343 - Materials and Methods for Se o ndar y General Mus i c

music courses ( p r ivate lessons and ensembles excluded) to rem ai n in the p r gmm ( see dep artm ent handboo k ) .

p resentations. Outcomes are P ' ss/ fai l ; students who fail an

lIT).

BACHEWR OF MUSIC EDUCATION: Bachelor of Music Education: K-1 2 Choral Bach lor of Music Education: K- 1 2 Instrumental (Band) Bachelor of Music Ed u cat i on : K-1 2 Instrumental ( Orchestra)

a ca d e m i c

will have their progress and p oten t i a l assessed at the end of the freshman, sop h omo re, junior, and senior y aT. . A s sments are

·

degree must meet College of Arts and Sciences requirement

GRADES AND GRADE POINT POLICY: 1 ) Only grades of C or h i gher in m us ic ourses may be cou n ted t ward a music maj r. Co urs e s i n whic h the student receives l o wer than a C must be re p eated. 2 ) M jors m ust maintain a 2.5 cumulat ive

..

per placement

2 2 5 Ear Trai n ing I I

authorized b)' the dep a rtm e nt..

....

lass ( 1 )

c: 11'1

2

Spring

O n ly gr ades of C o r h ighet' in music cou rses may be cou ntcd toward a music major. Cou rses in wnich t he stud nL receives I wer than a must be r peate d lIn l ss substitute course work is

.

1 24 Theory 1 ( 3 )

3:

223 Theory I T ( 3 )

faculty.

.

per placement

(I)

1 26 Ear Training n ( I )

music maj o r

M u s ic m aj ors should fill out a declaration of major fo rm during their first sem tcr o f enrollm nl in the p rogram and assigned to a m usic faculty adviser.

(I)

Keyboard Class

1 1 6 / 1 2 1 Keyboard

Fa ll

p rogram, p rospec tiv students m llst audi tion for LIle m u s i c

gra de po i n t average in

Fundam nta l s - prerequisite to 1 24 1 20 Music and ulture ( 4 ) (if preferred, call take 1 2 0 Music alld Culture spring semester)

1 2 5 Ear Train in g I

YEAR

Undergraduate Music Major Degrees:

I I 1/ I 13

School of Education Sequence:

.

22 credits

26 ho urs P

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BACHELOR OF MUSICAL ARTS:

Music Education Curricula K- 12 Choral (Elementary or Secondary Emplra.sis)

u

.

.............

62 credits Keyboard p roficiellCY reqL'ired.

music requiremcnts reqllircd prior to studellt teach illg.

Schoo/ of Educa tion sequence required. .. Consecu tive fall/spring semesters.

.

..

. . . ...

62 credits Freshmart, Sophomore, junior and Senior assessments req uired. ..... Senior Project: presentation ill a pu blic forum In a cogllate field ollrside of music, an academic minor or second major required.

BACHELO R OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE:

Music Core . . ........................ . . . . . . ................................................ 26 Music 370, 3 7 1 , 380 - Large Ensemble . .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . 6 Music 202-2 1 9, 402-4 1 9, 490** Private Instruction: Princi pal Instrumen t .... . . . . . . . . . 6 ( 6 sem. ) r-,·1 usic Education Core .............................................................. 1 5 Music 24 1 - String Lab ............. ........................................ .......... 1 Music 243/244 - Woodwind Laboratory ( I , I ) 4 Music 245/246 - Brass Laboratory ( I , I ) Music 247 - Percussion Laboratory ( I ) Music 447 - Methods for School Band Music .......................... 2 Music 448 - Materials for School Band Music ......................... 2 ..

... . . . . . .

.

.

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...

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}

..... .

.

.

.

.

. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .

62 credits Keyboard proficiency required. Freshman, Sophomore, junior and Senior

assessmellts reql4ired.

Completion of al/ ml/sic requirements reql4ired prior to student teachi tlg. School of Educatioll sequence required.

Music - Core ................................................................................. 26 Music - Private Ins truction (see concentratiONS below) .... . 22 (8 sem."') Music - Ensemble (see cot/wl/ralions below) . . .. ..... .... 8 Music 336 - Making Music ............................................................ 3 Music 337 - Analyzing Music ........................................................ 3 Music 338 - Researching Music .................................................. ... 3 Music 390 or 3 9 1 - Intensive Performance Study ........................ 4 Music - Concentration Module ( see below) . ...... . 6 Music Electives .......... . . .............................................. ...................... 5 .

......

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.

.....

.

..........

............

.....

. . .....

80 credits Keyboard proficiency req uired. Fresh man. Sophomore, jWl ior and Senior assessmwt required.

(see above) COllsecutive fall/spring semesters; coIHit,UOUS non-jazz study

For vocal performance: language study required *

through out the p rogra m req uired.

Concentrations: Instru men ra l - private instruction: 205- 2 1 9/490 (Senior Project:

* Consewtive fall/spring semesters

.

H

. .

Keyboard proficie,n'Y reqr, ired.

** Sellior Project: Half recital.

K-1 2 1nstrumental (Ba'ld)

.

..

'" Consectu ive fall/spring semesters.

Freshman, Sophomore, jUllior alld Sellior assessments req uired. Comp/etioll of al/

Music - Core 26 Music - Large Ensemble ......... . . .. . .............. ............. .... .................... 8 Music 202-2 1 9 Private Instruction . . . . . . . . . 4 (4 semesters*) Music 40 1-4 1 9 Private Instruction ...................... 4 ( 2 semesters* ) Music 3 3 6 - Making Music ....... .................................................... 3 Music 337 - Analyzing Music ........... ............................................. 3 Music 338 - Researching Music .... ................................................. 3 Music 390/391 - In tensive Performance Study ............................ 4 Music 490 - Senior Project"" ........................ ............. .................... 4 Music Electives ........................... ..................... ................................ 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

Music Core ...... .... . ... ........ ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ................................. 26 Music 360-363 - Large Ensemble ............ ................................. . 6 Music 204/404/490* * - Private Instruction Vo ice .... 6 (6 sem .") Music Education Core .............................................................. 1 5 Music 248 or 366 - Guitar Lab or Opera Workshop . . I Music 42 1 - Advanced Keyboard (private study) ...... .............. 2 Music 440 - Methods and Materials for K-9 Music I .............. 2 Music 443 - Methods for Secondary Choral Music ................. 2 Music 44 1 or 444 Methods and Materials for K-9 Music II or Materials for econdary Choral Music ........................... .. .... 2

Senior Project: half recital

K-12 lnstrllmental (Orcllestra)

Music are ............. ...... ............................................................. 26 Music 370, 3 7 1 , 380 - Large Ensemble ........... . ............. ............. 6 Music 202-2 1 9, 402-4 1 9 , 490*'- Private Instruction: Principal Instrument .............................................. 6 ( 6 sem ."') Music Education Core .............................................................. 1 5 Music 24 1 1 242 - S tring Lab ( I , I ) ............................ . . ..... .......... 2 MClsic 243/244 - Woodwind Laboratory ( I , 1 ) ........................ 2 Music 245 - Brass Laboratory ( I ) . . . .. . . . . .. . .... .. . . 1 Music 457 - Methods and Materials for Elementary Strings .. 2 Music 458 - Methods and Materials for Secondary Strings .... 2 .

.. .

..

. ..

..

.

. ............

62 credits Keyboard p roficiwC)' required.

full recital) ( 1 2), 40 l/405-4 1 9 ( 1 0 ) , including 490 ( Senior Project: full recital) ; ensemble: 370, 37 1 , 380; module: 345, 346, 358, 3 8 1 ( 2 ) , music elective ( 1 ). Orga n - private instruction: 203/403/490 (Senior Project: fuji recital) (22); ensemble: including 38 1 ; module: 2 1 9, 345, 346, 352, 3 58; music elective ( I ) . Piano - private instruction: 202/402/490 (Senior Project: full recital) ( 1 2 ) , 2 0 1 14011402 ( 10); ensemble: large ( 2 ) , 3 5 1 ( 2 ) , 3 8 3 (2) piano elective (2) ; module: 2 1 9, 358, 4 3 0 , 43 1 , 4 5 1 , 452. Vo ice - private instruction: 204/404/490 (Senior Project: full recital) (22); ensemble: 360-363; module: 353, 358, 366, 453. Compositioll - private instruction: 327/490 (Senior Project) ( 1 6 ) ; p rincipal instrument 202- 2 1 9/4 0 1 -4 1 9 ( 8 ) ; ensemble: large (4); module: 345, 346, music electives (4).

Freshman, Sophomore. femior alld Senior assessmellts reqllired.

Completion of all music requiremellts required p rior to student teaching. School of Education sequence requi red. * Consecutive fall/spring semesters. �.

Course Offe rings 101 Intl'Oduction to Music

Senior Project: half recital

Introduction to music literature with emphasis on listening, structure, period, and style. Designed to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of music. Not open to majors. 1 (4) 1 0 2 Understanding Music Through Melody

Introduction to the musical arts through exploration of melody as a primary musical impulse in a variety of musical styles. Designed to enhance th enj yment m , d understanding of all music through increased sensitivity to melody ot open to majors. II (4) . •

] 03 History of Jazz

Survey of America's unique art form: jazz. Emphasis on history, listening, 'tructure, and style from early developments through recent trends. Meets Core I requi.rement in arts/literature, line 1 . I I (4) 94

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104 Music and Technology u rvey o f t h e i m p of techno l gy on the mu i al arts, from the vol u t ion of m ical instrum nts and the ' c ustie s pace th ro ugh lht" audio/video/computer te c h no l ogy of today. Meets Core I n:quir menl in arts /l i terature, l ine l . I (4) 105 The Arts of China Exp lo ra ti n of a number of h i nese art forms, p r i ma r i ly music but als i n Luding LLi g rap hy, pain l i ng , tai chi, poetry, Beiji ng opera, film and cuisine. Meets freshman January term, Co re 1 Arts/ Li terature requirem e nt (2 . Core J : A. I . ) , and/or Cross Cultural PerspcClivc requirement (6.B. ) aly J (4) 106 Musk of Scandlnavia u rvey o f candinavian mu ic from the Bronze Age to th� prese n t, with primary � cus on the music of orway, Sweden , and Denmark. Meets freshman Ja n u ary term, Core I A rts/ iterature re u i re m e n t (2. Co re I :A. I .) , an d/ o r ro Cultural Perspective requirement (6.B.) a/y (4)

U l Keyboarding I Develo p m en t of ke yboardi n g s kills, i n cl udi n g si ght- read ing, group p r fo rma nce , and h rmonizati n f simple melodies. Prerequ i ite: 1 16 or consent of i ns tru ct o r. I ( I )

1 22 Keyboarding D A ontinuation of 1 2 1 . Prerequisite: 1 2 1 or co ns en t of i nstr u t. r. II ( 1 ) 124 Tbeory l An in tro d uct io n to th e workings f mu ie, i nc l u d in g common­ p ra ct i ce harmony, jazz the ry, and t1ementary formal analy is. P re req uis i te: 1 1 3 r co nsen t of instru c t r. 1I ( 3 ) 1 2 5 Ear Thainiog I Development of aural skill s , i nclud i n g interval r cognl lion, s ight- s i n g i ng , rhythmic, mel odi c an h ar mon ic d ict, tion. I ( I ) 126 Ear Traioiog n Continuation of 1 25. Pre requ is ite: J 25 or consent of instruct r. Il ( I ) 201 Private Instruction: Jazz ( 1-2 ) Prerequisite: two semes ter s of non-jazz study ( 202-2 1 9) o r p e rmi s s ion o f t h e Direct r f Jazz Studies. 202 Private Instruction; Piano ( 1-4.) 203 Private Instruction: Organ ( 1--4) 204 Private and CJass Instructiom Voice ( 1--4) 205 Private Instruction: VioUnlViola ( 1 --4 ) 206 Private instruction:· Cello/Bass ( 1 -4 ) 207 Private Instruction: Flute ( 1 ) 208 Private Instruction: Oboe/Engli h Horn ( 1-4) 209 Private Instruction: Bassoon ( 1 -4 ) 2 1 0 Private Instruction: Clarinet ( 1 -4) 211 212 213 2 1 4.

1 ) 1 Music Fundamentals 1 Beginning skills in readin g and notating music. Rudiments of music theory: key ignatures, clefs, and major cales. Requ i res no p revio us musica.l experience and par t i a l ly fult1ll s t he general u n ivers i t y requ i reme nt in arts; may be combined with 1 13 i n a i n g lc se m ester to co m plete the general university requirement in ar ts . I (2) 1 13 Mwi.c Fundamentals U A continuati n of 1 1 1 . Minor scales, intervals, triads and diatonic 7tb hords. Partially fulfiI..lJ; the ge nera l u n iver ity requirement in rts; may be combined with I I I in a single semester to co m p l et e the general u n iversity requ i rem en t in arts. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 r co n ent of inst ructo r. II (2) 1 15 Introduction t o Keyboarding Beginn i ng skills in keybo ard per Om1Jnce. Requires no previous keyboard experience. Pr re ui ite for Mu i 1 16; intended for music major or m inor i n p repa ra t i o n f, r keyboa.rd require­ ment · i n the mu ic core. Co nse n t 0 i n tructor required. 1 ( 1 )

1 16 Basic Keyboarding A continuation of I J 5. PrerequI s i t e: J 1 5 o r consent of instructor.

II ( I )

1 20 Music lind Culture lntroduction to et hn o m usico log ica l considerations of a variety of music tradit i n , focusing on calypso. European court music, and Chine e court musi . Requ ires n previous music t:xperience and fulfills t b e general u n iver � i ly requiremen t in arts and d ive rs ity ; req ui red for music majors and minors; prert;quisite course for 1 24; co - req u is ite ( fall term) : 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 or consen t o f de pa rt ment chair. r (4)

Private instruction: Saxophone ( 1 -4) Private Instruction: 1i1lmpet ( 1 -4) Private Instructiom French Born ( 1-4) Private Instruction: Trombone ( 1-4 )

2 1 5 Private I nstruction: Baritone/Toba ( J -4) 2 1 6 Private Instruction: Percussion ( 1 -4) 217 Pl'ivate and Class Instructlon: Guitar ( 1-4) 218 Private Instruction: Harp ( 1-4) 2 19 Private Instruction: Harpsjchord ( 1-4) 1 credit

Fail nd Spring Se mes te r : One half-h ur private o r two o ne h ur clas lessons per week ( 1 2 weeks) in addition to dai.ly p ractice. January: Two 4S-minute lessons per week in add i t i o n to daily practice. Summer: 6 h urs of i n s t ruct i o n TBA in addition to dai ly practice. S t ude n ts i n p i ano, voice, and guitar may be as­ s i g ned to cia i n struct i n at the di sc ret i n of the mu ic faculty. 2� credits all an d Spring Semesters. Two half-bour lessons per week ( 1 2 weeks) i n add it io n to da i ly p ract i ce . Summer: 1 2 hours of instruction TBA in add i t i n to daily p rac ti ce . Specia l fee in addition to tHition.

221 Keyboard PTo6dency Development f keyboard literacy and skills rcqui ite fo r majori ng in music; foeu ed preparation for de partmen t keyboard p ro fic ie ncy exami nation. Private lesso n ; special fce in addi t i o n t t u i t i on. ( 1 ) 223 Tbeory ll A cont i nu at io n of 1 24. P rereq u i s i t e: 1 24 o r consent of instructor. [ (3) 224 Jazz Theory Laboratory Introduction to jazz harmony, structure, style, and i m p rov isa­ tion. Preretluisite: 223 or consent of instructor. [J ( I )

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225 Ear Training m A co n t i n ua t i on of 1 26. Pre req u i s i te: 1 26 or consent of instructor. I

u

(1)

226 Ear Training IV A continuation of 225. Pre re q u is i te : 2 2 5 or consent of ins truc tor. II ( I ) 234 History I The evol ution of Western music from the ea rl y Christian era through the Middle ges , Rena i s san c e, a nd Ba roqu e eras. Prerequisite: 223 o r con ent of i n s t ructor. II ( 3 )

Introduction to basic p a tter ns , ges tu res, and co nd ucti ng

t e ch n i q ue s .

I (1)

3� Conducting 11 Continuation of 345; observation of advanced co nd uc tin g studen ts in l a bo ra tory ensemble. II ( 1 )

Introd uction to the basics of te ac h ing m u si c , i nc l u d i ng ph iloso­ phy, content, s tude n t characteristics, and the nature a nd o r ga niza t i on of musical le a r n i n g . For students pr p a r i n g to

I (3)

347 Adaptive Music

241-242 String Laboratory

Techniques and stra teg ies to meet the needs, i n terests, limita­

Methods and materials of teaching and playing s t r ing instru­ ments in the public schools. aly I n ( l , 1 )

their mus i ca l a ct i v i ty. al y

tions, and c a pa c i t ies o f studen ts who have res t ricti o ns pl a c ed on

243-244 Woodwind Laboratory Methods and materials of t e a ch i n g and pla y i n g woodwind i nst r w n en t i n the public schools. aly I I I 0, 1 ) Methods and materials of tea chi n g and playing brass instru­ ments i n the p u b l i c s c hoo l s . a l y I I I ( 1 ,

1)

247 Pe.rcussion Laboratory

349 Electronic Music Practicum

Methods and materials of teac h i ng and p l ayi n g percussion instruments i n the public s ch oo ls . aly

Application of electro nic te ch ni qu es to compositional process.

(1)

Assigned

248 Guitar Laboratory

35 1 Accompanying Practice in accompanying r�p resentative vocal and instrumental

327 Composition A systematic a p p ro a ch to contemporary mus ic al co m p os it i o n ; students create and notate w o rks fo r solo, small a n d l a rge ensembles. May be r p e a ted for additio nal cre d i t . P r i vate i n st ru cti o n ; s pe c i a l fee in addition to t u i tio n . ( 1-4)

solo literature from all p riods. Special fee in ad di t i o n to t u i ti o n .

(I) 352 Organ Improvisation Basic tech ni qu es

333 ffistory II

tuition. Prerequisite: consent of in struc to r. ( 1 )

353 Solo Vocal Uteralure Su rve y o f so lo vo cal l i t er at u re . a ly J[ (2)

234 or co nsent of in st ruc to r. I ( 3 )

334 1Wentieth Century Mnsie The evolution of Western a r t music in the twent ieth century in res p nse to new theoretical const ructs, new tech no lo g ie s , and popul a r and cross-cultural i n fluences. Pr req uisite: 333 or consent of inst ruc tor. II ( 3 )

354 History of Music Theater

A gen e ral surv ey of the e vo l u t io n of "Drama per Musica" from opera to musical comedy i n cl udi n g in-depth s t ud y of s elec ted

scores. aly I ( 2 )

358 Early Music Laboratory Explor a tio n of solo and small ensemble l i terature from the Baroque period and earl ier, focusing o n ra n ge of repertoir , performance p ra ct i ce s , and period instrume nt,s. Rehea rsal and performance a u g m e n ted by li st en i ng , res arch> and writing. Prerequisite: 333 or consent of instru ctor. al y U ( 1 )

336 Making Music Con ti nued study, dev el op m ent a n d ap pl j ca t ion of m us i c skills

th ro u g h composition, co unterpoint, i m p rov i sa t io n , conducting, and orch es tration. Prerequisi te: 224, 226, o r consent of instruc­ tor. aly 1 ( 3 )

337 Analyzing Music

kn owl edge toward de velop ing

anal 'tical skills in a variet y of musical cult ures, style s , and gen re.

Prerequisite: 224 o r consent of instructor. a/y I (3)

338 Researching Music Introduction to the main research tools avai la b l e for gat her i ng information about music. Appli lion s in formal r ese ar ch , criticism, program and liner notes, and verbal p res en t at ions e xp lo red . Prerequisite: 1 20, 124, o r consent of instructor. aly I

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360 Choir of the West A study of a wide va r ie t y of c h o r a l literature and te c h n i q u e thro ug h rehearsal and p e rfo r ma n ce of both sacred and secular m us ic . Auditions a t the beginning of fa ll semester. ( 1 )

36 1 University ChoraJe A study of choral l i t er at ur e and technique through rehearsal a n d p e r fo rma nce of both sa c red and secular music. Audi t ions at th e begi n n i n g of fall semester. ( 1 )

340 Fundamentals o f Music Education Detailed planning of cu rr i cul a for v a r i o us musical skjJls at different g rad e levels, including weekly improvisation l a bo ra to r y. Prere q u i si te : 240. I I ( 2 )

P

f improvisation, part icularly a re la te d to

hymn tunes. Private instruction: s p e c i a l fee in addition to

The evolution o f Weste r n m usic in th e Classic and Romantic

Application of theoretical

studio time on a reg ul a r b a s i s . S pecia l fee i n addi t i o n to

tuition. Pre requ i s i te: consent of instructor. ( 1 )

Methods and materials of teac h i ng and playing g u i t a r in the p ubli c schools. I ( 1 )

e r a s. Prerequisite:

(1)

348 Practicum i n Music Education Field experience teach i ng in middle or ju n ior h igh sch oo l ; prov i d es l a b o r a to ry exp er ienc e in t each i n g p rior to full student te a ch i n g exp e r i en ce. P re re q u i s i t e: 340; recommended: co m p l e ­ t io n of School of Education sequence ( EDUC 2 6 2 , EPSY 2 6 1 , 3 6 1 , SPED 200, 4 8 0 ) ' and enroll fall s e m es ter preceding student tea ch i ng. I ( I )

245 Brass Laboratory

96

343 Methods and Materials for Secondary General Music Methods and materials for te ach i ng general music i n t he se co n d a ry chool. ( 2 ) 345 Conducting I

24 0 Foundations o f Music Education

become music spe c i a li s ts ( music education majors on ly ) .

341 Music for CIllS8room Teachers Methods and procedures in te a c h i n " elementary school music as well as i n fusing the arts i n the curriculum. O ffered for students p r ep ar i ng fo r e l eme nt ar y classroom teach i n g ( n o n-mu si c education majors) . U (2)

Y

362 University Men's Choyus The study and pe rfo r ma nc e of reper toi re fo r men's voices. Emphasis on individual vocal and musical development. ( l ) 363 University Singers The study and performance of re p e r t o i re for women's voices. Emphasis on i n d iv i dua l vocal and musical d evel o p me nt. 0 )


( 1 -4)

365 Chapel Cho.ir

409 Private Instructio.n: Bassoon

Re p e r t oi re , p e r i en ee with ap pro p r i ;l t e literature � r ngo i ng church music p rograms of a l iturg i cal n a tu re. Regu l a r perfor­ mances for u n iversity chapel wo rs h ip . Participation without

4 1 0 Private Instructio.n: Clarinet ( 1 -4)

c re d i t available.

(I)

4 1 2 Private Instruction: Trompet

Production o f bamber p e r a and opera cenes. Part icipation i n a l l facets of produ c t io n . P rere qu i ite: c o n se nt o f ins t r u ct o r. ( I ) 368 Cho.ral Unio.n

nd pe r fo r m an ce of major works in the cho ra l l orchestral re pe rto i re . Open to th eomm uJlity a \ elJ as PLU s t u d e n ts ; membership by audition. Special fee in add ition to t u i t io n . ( I ) Re hea rs a l

370 Wmd Ensemble

S t ud y and performance of selected wind and percussion l iterature using va r io us size ensembles. Membe r s h i p by audition. ( I ) 3 7 1 Co.ncert Band

tu d y f selected band l i te ra t u re t h rough rehearsal and perfor· ma n c e . Designed for the general un iversity student. Prere q uisite: havi n g played instruction through at least j u n ior year of high school r consent of ins truc t o r. ( I)

375 University Jazz Ensemble

kd big band l i ter at u re th rou gh r hearsa.l and e. Member�hjp by , ndition. ( J )

S tudy of sele

376 Jazz Labo.ratory Ensemble

hldy of the basic st y l e of p l ayi n g jazz through reh ea r sa l and by audition. ( 1 )

performance. Members h i p 378 Vo.cal Jau Ensemble ' tu dy of selected vocal

jaa literature th rough rehearsal and perfu rmancc . Membershi by audition, co n c u r ren t registration in 3 0, 3 6 1 362 or 363 requ i red . ( I ) 380 University Sympho.ny Orchestra

4 1 4 Private Instructio.n: Trombone ( 1-4 ) 4 1 5 Private lnstructio.n: BadtonelTuba ( 1 -4 ) 4 1 6 Private Instructio.n: Percussion ( 1 -4 ) 4 1 7 Private Instructio.n: Guitar ( 1 -4 ) 4 1 8 Private instructio.n: Harp ( 1-4 ) 4 1 9 Private instructio.n: Harpsichord ( 1 -4)

I credit

Fall a n d pring eme,ter : One half-hour private lesson per week ( 1 2 weeks) in dd it ion to dail p r act j ce . )aJluary: Two 4S - mi nu t e lesson per week in addition to daily practice. Summer: h o urs of instructio n TBA in addition to dail)' pr ac t ic e. 2-4 credit Fall a nd S p r i ng emesters. Two ha l f- ho ur lessons per week ( 1 2 weeks) in additi n to daily pract ice. Summer: 1 2 ho urs o f instruc tion TB in addition t o d, i J y practice.

. periaifee i n additioll to

tll itioll.

42 1 Advanced Keybo.ard Skills

FocLlsed study of spec ial ized keyboard skills re qu ire d in various mu. i major programs. Private i n s tr uctio n: special fee in additio n to tuition. May be repeated fo r ad d itio nal cred it. Prerequisite; Successful com p l et io n of Keyb ard Proficien • Jury a n d B.M. or 13.M.E. Jury. ( 1 ) 427 Advanced Orchestratio.n/Arranging ontinuation of 336 on an in d i v idua l basis. Prer eq u i

ite; 336 or consent of inst ructor. May be repeated for additional cred it . Private in t r Ll c t i on : special fe e in add i t ion to t u i t io n . ( 1 -2)

430 Piano. Literature I

of representative piano re p erto ire from the 1 8th and carly 19th c nlury. all' I ( [ )

Study of sele t d orche t ral Uterature through rehearsal and performance. Membership by audition. ( I )

Study

381 Chamber Ensemble

43 1 Piano. Literature II

Readi n g , rehearsal, and performance 0 sele ted instrumental c h a mb er m usic. Prerequisite: co nse nt of i n struc t o r. ( I ) cction A - Strin ' ; Section B - Brass; Section C - Wo odwind ; Section - uitar 383 Two. Piano Ensemble

a n d practice in the p erform ance of two-piano and piano d uel l i ter a ture ; i ncl udes sigh t re ad ing and program p l a nnin g. ( 1 )

Techniques

390 i ntensive Perfo.noance Study: Ensemble To.ur

In tensive study a n d rehearsal of yo u r reper toire ; off-campus t o u r of major perfo rmance venues; p e ci a l fee in ad dit i o n to tuition. Pre requi ite: consent of instructor. J ( 4 ) 39 1 Intensive Perfo.nnance Study: Co.nse rvato.ry Experience

p rac t ice of solo repe rtoire; speci al fee in tuit ion. Pre req u i si te: consent of instructor. J (4)

lntensive study and

addition

to

40 1 Private I nstructio.n: Jazz ( 1 - 4 )

Prerequisi te: two semesters of non-jazz study ( 2 02-2 1 9) or pe r m ission of the Director of Jazz Studies.

402 Private Instruction: Piano. ( 1--4 )

( 1 -4) Private Instruction: Vo.ice ( 1-4 )

403 Private Instruction: Organ 404

405 Private Instruction: Vio.linlVio.la ( 1 -4) 406 Private Instruction: CeUo./ Bass

( 1 -4 ) ( 1-4 )

4 1 3 Private I nstructio.n: French Ho.rn

366 Opera Worksho.p

performan

4 1 1 Private Instructio.n: Saxo.pho.n.e ( 1-4)

( 1 -4 )

407 Private Instructio.n: Flute ( 1 -4) 408 Private Instructio.n: Obo.e/English Ho.rn ( 1 -4)

St ud y of

20th

presentative pian

r

ce n t u rr. aly II

compositions of the late 1 9th and

(I)

440 Metho.ds and Materials fo.r K·9 Music I

St lldy of skiU acq uisi t i()ns . music concepts, and an a l yzi n g the rang of available reso mecs , including et h nic music and comp ater assisted instruction. ffered for mus! cduc t ion majors only. Prerequisite: 240. 340. I ( 2 )

44J Metho.ds and Materials for K-9 Music I I Continuation o f 440, in c l u di ng e m ph as i s 011 Orff-Schulwerk a n d Kodaly techniques. Offered ror music wucation majors only.

Pr req u is i te : 440. I I ( 2 ) 443 Materials o. f Secondary Cho.ral Music

The organiz ation and adm in ist ration of tbe secondary s c h o ol choral pr gra m. P rerequ i�i te; 340. aly I ( 2 ) 444 Metho.ds for Seco.ndary Cho.ral Music 1 1 urvey o f chor"l l iterature approp r iate fo r the various age a n d experience levels o f st ud en t. in grades 4- [ 2, including sources

and research tec hniques. PrerequiSIte: 340. all' I l ( 2 )

445 Conducting i l l

Refinemen t f pllttern " gestu. res, :llll.l co n d u c ti n g techniques; application to approp riate vocal and i n strume ntal scores. Prerequ isite : 346 or consent of in tructar; Section A-Instru­ mental; Secti n B,-Ch o ra l . I ( I ) 446 Conducting IV

Continuation of 445; application and d v el op men t of �k i l l s i n laboratory ensemble. I re requ i ite: 445 o r co n sen t o f instructor; Sect ion A - In str u menta l, Section B - Choral. n ( I )

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447 Methods of School Band Music The organ iz�ttioll and a d m i n is t r a t i o n of the secon cla ry dlo o l band progra m . Prerequisite: 340. a/,! I ( 2 )

D ivision of Natural Sciences

448 Materials for School Band Music Survey of wind - percussion l itera t u re ap propriate for the various age and experience levels of students i n grade s 4 - 1 2, i n c l u d i n g sou rces a n d research techniques. Prereq ui site: 340. aly n ( 2)

451

Piano Pedagogy ]

Teach ing tec h n iques for prospective teac hers of piano, inclu di ng

u

tec hn i ques fo r indivi dual and gro u p instnlCtion .

VI

materials fro m beg i n n .i ng to i n termeci iatt: l evel.. aly r ( l )

Me th o d s and

«

Teachi ng tech n i q u es for p rosp ec t ive teachers

II::

tech n i q u es for i ndividu a l and gro u p instrucrion. Meth od and

::I

mate rials from i ntermed iate to advanced levels . J./)'

452 Piano Pedagogy II

....

c( z

of p ia no, i ncl udi ng

II ( I )

453 Vocal Pedagogy Phys iologi cal. psycholog ic al, Jnd pedagogica l

aspects of ingi ng.

co u rses ad dress

al)r 1 ( 2 )

457

Methods and Materials for Elementary Strings

science as well as aD apprec iation fo r i ts ben fits. Co u rses also attempt to p l ace science a n d technology in its la rger

340. a / y r ( 2 )

socio - cu lt u ral con text, connecting

458 Method and Material for Secondary Strings The organizatio n a n d a d m i n i t r a t i o n of the seconda ry school orchest ra program . Prereqlli�ite: j4 0 . a/), I ( 2 )

development in one

discipline with those i n anot her and w i tb i n f1uences out­ s i de the ciences,

Rega rdl es of their major, s t udents wiLl fi n d in the Natu­

46 9 Student Teaching Seminar

ral Sciences Div isio n

Sluden l lca ch i ng �perie n ces h a red and a nal yzed; expl ' ra t i o n

a faculty devoted to teac h i n g. Oppor­

t u n i t i es for c l ose i n ter act i on s a b o u nd , and U1e develop­

o f rdated issues regarding en ter ing t h e p ub l i c sch oo l music teachl ng profession. Concurren t enrol lment wi t h

the basic philoso p hy and meth o do log i es o f

science. This encourages an awareness of the limitations of

The organ ization ant! adm i n ist ra t io n oi the e l e m en ta l")' school

stri ng program . Pre req uisite:

The D i v ision of N a t u ral Sciences fu lfiUs a two - fol d p ur ­ pose, prep ar wg i ts m a j ors fo r c a reers as science p ro fess i o n ­ als a n d provid i n g all st udents gro l1n d jng in the scientific aware n e 'S vital for p a r t i c i p a t i n i n a de moc ra c y. To meet the fi rst purpose, the six depart ments in t h e divisio n offer r igoro us p rog ra ms in bi oi gy, chemistry, geo s cie nce s, physics, mathem at i cs, and com p u ter science and compute r eng i neer i ng. Inquiry- based l ea rn i n g i em­ ph asized i n laboratories, research courses, and caps to n e p rojects. The d ivision -wide un dergraduate research pro­ gram supports one-on - one i n ves t igat i ns with faculty in wh ich students are immersed in all aspects of act ua l l y " do ing" scien ce. . To meet t h e econd purpose, bou1 major a n d n on - m aj o r

men t of the who l e person is

rouc 468

a

cen tral concem .

required . ( 2 )

FACUU'Y: Y i u , Dean;

490 Senior Project A culm inating pwj t of uh,tantial proport ions. p rese n ted i n a

R io l o gy , Chem ist ry, Co m p u ter Sc ience i ng, Geosciences.

p u b l i c fo r u m , u ndertake n in the senior yea r. For t h e B a chelo r of ArIS degree, the p ruj ect in tegrate m us ical st u die� with a broader l ibera l arts con text; [o r th Bachelor (I Musiml Arts degree, the project integrates musical studies with the cognate field; fo r Barh elor of M,�sic EdlwHiml and Bllelldor of Music degrees. t he project consists o f a j u r ied recital. F ulfills the sen i o r seminar! proiect req uiremen t . Pri vate instruction; special fee in addition to t u i tion . Prerequisite: consent of in t r uctor. ( 1 -4 )

491 lndependent Study Prerequisi te: co nsen t of in,t ructor. May be repealed D t ional crcdiL.

( 1 -4)

r

addi­

faculty memb rs of the Departmen ts o f

and C o m p u ter i: n g i n eer­

tfath c ma tics, and Physics.

As a d ivi s i o n within tbe Co I lege o f Arts and Scie.nces. the Divi­ sion o f Natu ral Sciences offers major programs i n each de p a r t ­ menl lead i ng to B.A. and B . S. degrees. minor p rogram , and (Ore cou r ses which ful ftll general u n i versi ty requiremcrlt�. The de­ pa rt ments pro ide s up p ort i n g co urses for inte rd iscip l i na ry p rograms wi t h i n the sciences and (or other schools of the u n iver­ Sill'. Co urses for B.A. in Educa t ion degrees w it h maj ors and minors i n the natura l sciences are available; see the Education section of t h i s catal g fo r spe ific d eg ree requi rement . See also the sec t i o ns o n Environmelltal Studies and o n the Health Sciences ( under Pre-PI'()fessional Programs) for related p rogra ms.

Descriptions of speci fic course o ffering and degr

e

requ i re­

ments offered within the N t ural Sciences a rc l isted under:

Biology

Geosciences

Chemistry Computer Science and Computer Engineering

Mathematics Physics

Course Offerings The followi ng course is o ffered under Na t LlIal Scien ces. Other course ' suitable fo r sati fying gener l u n i ver s· i t y requirement.

or

CORE 1 req u L remen ts may be fo und i n t he L istings for each of the depart me n ts in the d iv ision .

2 10 Natural mstory of Hawaii The Ha waii a n i slan d s are an active museu m of geolog)' and tropica l island plan t and 3 n i mal l i fe . The i s la n ds, the most iso­ lated in t he wo rl d , have native pla nts and animals-9 5 % of wh ich occ u r nowh«re else. t u d e n t s are expec ted to p a r t i c i p a te actively i n daily I�c tu res and fieldwo rk i.nvolving the geologic

for mat i o n of Hawaii and its subseq uent popuJation b)' p la nts and a n i m als, srressing the impact of human interven tion. J (4)

98

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is available that p rovides cr ed it by examination o p t ions for

School of Nursing

lice n sed pract ical nurses . Both u n dergraduate pro g rams p r ovide

Th School of Nursing is a profession a l school that com­

bines nursing 'cience with a st ro n g foundation in the liberal art and the h uman ities to prepare undergraduate tu de nt for generaJi t nU T i. ng p ra ct ice ; builds upon un­ dergraduate nurs i n g educat ional experiences to p repare nurses for advanced pract ice in spe . fie specialt ies; and re sp on ds to o n goi ng education and echnological l earning needs of practicing nurses to remain curren t, co m pe te n t practitioner or to revise the focus 0 the ir practic . The school e xempl i fi s the un iversity's miSliion of ed u c at i ng for l ives of se rv ice in an envi ronm ent tha encourages ques­ tioning. debate, cliver ity, lifelong learning, and spirituality as vital el e me nt i n the h um a n q u est (o r wholeness, Its continuum of educational programs employs dynamic learning opport unities that c ha l l e n ge students to develop s kills. a tt i tu de s , values, and ro l es which facilitate i n d i v idu ­ als, families. nd co mmunities to meet heir health a n d welln e..�s needs. Degree p rogram within the Sch J of ( ursing i nc l ude the B ac he lo r of Sc i ence in Nursing for b a ic nursing stu­ dents and licensed p ract i c a l nurses, the RN to MSN pr gram fo r registered nurses, and the M aste r of Sc i e nce i n Nursing wit h Care and Outcome ' Man ager a nd Family urse Practitioner area of concen trati on . A program l e a d ing to Ed uca t i onal taff Associate certi fication is available for sc h o ol nur e t h ro ugh the Center for C nt i n u i n g Nu rsin g Education. Cou rs w rk is offered in co ll a bor atio n w ith the O ffice of the Washingt n State Superi ntend n t of Public I ns truction . Wo rks h ops and short courses for muses and others involved in health care are al-'o offered through the Center. Als i n t eg ra l to the School of N ur s i n g is a Well ness Center th at i n cl ude s a nurse manage d practitioneT-staffed clinic and a First Steps ma t e r n ity 'upport progr a m . Th e Cent er provides n ursing serv i ce s to t he co mm un i t y as we ll as se rv i n g as a p ractice site for undergraduate and grad uate students.

a fo undation for graduate ·tudy in nu rs i ng .

Under the di rect sup rvi io n of its fae-w t)' lllemb TS, t h e S h o 1 use ho p i ta ls, health agencies, and sch ools in th COIll­ m u n ity, as wel l as the P LU Wel l n c s Ce nte r, to prov ld<! optimal c1inical learning experiences for i ts students.

z

IDGH SCHOOL PREPARATION: I t is strongly recom men d ed thaI , p p [ i ca n ts complcte a p ro g ra m in nigh chool that includes: English, 4 years; m at hema t i c s , 2 yea rs ( p referably alge bra and geometry); social sciences, 2 years; one fo re ign language, 2 ye a rs , laboratory sc i en ces , 2 years ( i n cl udi ng chemistry); electives,

z

ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY: App l i a n m us t be ac­ ce pted by tbe un ive r i before c nsideration for cceptance by the chool o f Nursi ng. Pacific L utheran U n iver si ty welco mes applications from all tudents who have de mon st ra t d ca pa ci tie s fo r s uccess at the ba a l a urea te level. S t u de n ts who prese n t appropriate a c ad em i c record and personal qual i t ie are ad m i t ­ ted ei t h er fall or sp rin g semester. Appl ication p ro ced u re and

ot her d et a ils are D und e lsewhere in

this c a t alog.

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF NURSING: S t u d e n t s seek­ ing a dm i ss i on to tbe basic progra m , the LPN to BSN sequen . e , or the RN to MSN sequen-e m u s t make fo r m al application to both t h e u n iversity and the School of ursi ng. Applications for admission to the nurs i ng maj or are available from tile School of

NlIf si n g . All a p pl i catio n materials, i n cluding o ffi c ia l transcripts, ur sin g Undergraduate Ad m i s ­ sions and A de mic P ro gress C m mitt e and evalua t ed accord­ ing to stated admission cri ter ia. B asic stud n ts are a d m i t t e d to th c h oo l of Nurs i ng to begin nu rsing courses in e ith e r the fall or sp ri n g semester. Students ad mi tte d to tht' LPN sequence begin are reviewed b t he Scho l of

in fal l o nly.

Under graduate students des i r i n admission to e i t h e r fall or spring semeste r of the foll o w i ng acad mic year mu t submjt thei r applications by March I . The number of available spaces each Semest . r in the Sch 01 r urs ing is l i m i ted; t herefo re , the selection f t u den ts for admi sion i s competitive. St uden ts desir in ' t begin the n u rsing sequen ce in ei the r fall or s p ri ng sem ·ter, and who have pplied by th March [ d ea d li n e , are noti.fied in early p ri L Students are adm i ued t the term of t h eir choice in so fa r as it i possi ble. [f th re are more applicant· for the two sem esters

f t he academ ic ear than can be acco m mo ­

dated , qualified candidates are pla ced on a wa i tin g list fo r

Scha me r, Sch ul tz. To mko , Woeh rle , Woo d, Yie, Za ichkin; by Rinehart and Ok i t a .

been admitted for s p r i ng but who reque ted .ill pl ace ment are

ss i ted

ACCREDITATIONS AN D AFFILIATIONS: Tne Scho I of ursing at Pacific L u the ra n Unjversity i� a member of the American Ass o ciat ion or Colleges of Nursing. Th BSN pro gr a m i a pp ro ve d by the Wash i ngto n Stllte Nursing Com m iss i o n and. accredited by the Nal ionaI League fo r mission. 6 1 Broadway, New Yo rk , ext. 227; le lefax

ursi n g Accrediting Com-

[ 00 1 4 ( l - 800-669-965b,

2 [ 2- 8 1 2 - 039 0 ) . The MSN progra m also

accredited by the NLNAC. · he Schou I is part

0

is

Psi Chapter-at­

Large of S igma Theta Tau Inte rnat ional. the honor soci ety o f nursing.

Undergraduate Programs The basic u llderg rad uate prog r a m is desig ned for st u den t s who do n t hold l icensu re i n p ract i c al or regist ered nursing. ra d u ­ ates who s uccessfully com p lete the p rogram w il l hn e e rned the

u rsi ng degree . and are eligible to write the NCLEX xamination fo r Ii ens u re as re gi s te red nurses. ' hey

Bachelor of cience in

are p re p ared for b egin ni ng pr o fessi naJ nu rsi n g pos itions in

hosp i tals and other health agen ies. A s pec ial sequence of stu dy

"

3 years.

FACULTY: T. M i l ler, Dell n; Ai ki n , Beebe. B rad s h aw, M. C ar r,

Driessnack. Dybbro. FesleT. Gasp ar, Geo rge , Goodwin, Ka p lan , Kli ch, Ma l o n e y, J. M il l er, L. O lso n, Pet tinalo, Renaud, Robinson,

c: :lI III

adm ission to the spring class jf sp aces become ava il able. I f

vacancies occur fo r the fall semester, th ose ludents wh

gi ven first priority.

F ol lowin g the i n itjal ad m i ss i on s cycle ( tvla r c h

1

have

dea d l i n e ) ,

individual whose app li cat ions have been recdved b y the b eg i n ­ n i ng of each month will be not ified of ace p Ia nee S t a t us by the

first of th f llowing m nth . Appl ications rece ive d after Septe m ­ ber [ are reviewed wh en recei cd and. if the a p p l i can t i q u al i fi ed, he or s h e is ad de d 10 the spring waiting list. Persons on t h e wa ili n g Ii t for the year w h o arc n o t adm itted because of 3 lack of space, but who con ti nue to deme admis io n to the n ursing m jor, must request, in writ ing, t h a t their applications lw considered fo r the followi ng fall. All prosp ecl iv e or prll-n u rsi n g tu de nts a re u rged to seek early aead mic advisement from the admission ' co rdinat I' in the chool of I\ursing i n order to e n rol l fo r appropriate p rereq u i sites and a void un neces:;ar y I ss of t im e . The chool of Nursing reserves rhe right of curricu hml modijiwtioH lll1d revision as long as it does /lot significan tly hinder stlldwts' progress toward gradlla tion. ADMISSION CRl1'ERlA' M i n i mum criteria fo r admissiun to the School of Nursing indud :

l. Ad m is s io n to Pa c i fi c Lu thera n U nivers i ty. Applicants must

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R S I T Y

99


I!) z \1\ a: � z

have been admitted to Pacific Lutheran n iversity before consideration of tbeir application to the School of Nursing. Admission to the university does not guarantee admission to the School of Nursing. 2. Satisfactory completioll, or pending satisfactory completion, of 30 semester credit hours of specified prerequisite course work at P LU, an ac redited community college or another accredited u niversity. omparable courSe listings are available on request, including Psychology l O t ( Introduction to Psy­ chology) , Biology 205, 206 ( Human Anatomy and Physiology I and I I ) , and Chemistry [05 ( Chemistry of Life ) . LPNs should also have completed P ychology 352 ( Development: Infancy to Maturity) and Biology 201 ( Introduction to Microbiology), to fulfill requirem nts for the nursing sequence within the described time frame. 3. A minimum grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in each nursing prereq­ uisite cour e . 4. A minimum PLU cumulative grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. ( For transfer students who matriculate to PLU and the School of Nursing simultaneously, the cumulativ transfer G PA as determined by the Registrar's Office is used.) 5. ompletion of the university math entrance requirement (intermediate algebra at the college level with a grade of C or h igher or completion of two years of college preparatory [ high school] algebra with average grades of C or higher, 2.0 on a 4.0 scale) . 6. Physical health and emotional stability sufficient to meet the demands of nursing and provide safe patient care. 7. Fluency in speaking, reading, and writing English. 8. Washington State Patrol Criminal History clearance relative to Child/Adult Abuse Information Act as required of health care workers. 9. Submission of all documents to the School of Nursing by the designated deadlines. *

5. Incomplete grades in nursing courses musl be converted to a passing grade (2.0 on a 4.0 scale or above) before the first day of class of the ubsequent semester. 6. Students taking medical or other withdrawals from nursing courses may return to the School of Nursing in accordance with policies listed in the ndergraduate [ursing S tudent Handbook on a space available basis. 7. The School of Nursing reserves the right to request withdrawal of nursing students who fail to demonstrate academic or clinical competence or who fail to maintain professional con­ duct. Unsafe and/or unethical practice constitutes grounds for immediate dismissal from the clinical component. ursing students are responsible for maintaining optimal health and are teachers of health. Physical examinations, X-rays, and immunizations are required before admission to the program, and periodically thereafter, and are the responsibility of students. All students must carry personal health/accident insurance.

HEALTH:

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY: A certain level of English proficiency

is necessary for academic success in nursing as well as for patient afety. Students who are identified by the university as needing the ESL sequence of courses will be required to take the ESL ourses before entrance to the School of Nursing or to take the TOEFL and score at least 550. All students for whom English is not their first language must also take and pass pecifie t sts of English pronunciation, comprehension, grammar, and fluency. uidt'lines and policies can be obtained from the School of Nursing. ESL students should also be aware that they may not be able to complete the program of study within the described time frame. Individual advising is available and is directed toward assisting students to be successful.

vVhen the n umber of qualified applica nts exceeds the enrollment limits, the following factors are used to prioritize the admission decisions: cumulative gmde point average of all college-levcl work u ndertaken, prerequ isite science CPA, number ofprerequi­ site course rcq uirements completed, and admission date to the u n iversity. Although it does not guara n tee admission, a cuIIZ u la­ tive grade point Ilvcrage of 2.5 on a

4.0 scale ill all college work

a ttempted makes one eligible to apply fv r adm ission to the School of Nursing. Preference is given to applican t's who elltered PLU as freshmen. Applica n ts who have chronic health cQnditions or disabilities which require alterations to the progra m of study as approved by the Wash i ngton State Nursing Comm issio1l, 01' which prevent the practice of n u rsing with reaso nable skill and safety, should be aware of the possibility that they may not be eligible to sit for the

N LEX liceming examination or obtain a license to practice n u rsillg. Questions should be addressed directly to the Washing­

ton State Nursing Commission Assista n t Nurse Practice Manager at

(360) 236-4725.

NON-MA,ORS ENROLLED IN N U RSJNG COURSES: Studen ts

CONTINUATION POLICI ES:

1. Completion of approved PR class - adult and pediatric ­ before beginning nursing classes, with yearly updates. 2. Completion of approved first aid course before beginning nursing classes (waived for RNs, LPNs, EMTs, paramedics ) . 3 . NUrsing courses a l l have prerequisites a n d must b e taken in sequence and/or concurrently as identified in the curricu­ l um plan. 4. A minimum grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale (C) must be achieved in all required nursing courses. A student receiving a grade of less than 2.0 in any course which is a prerequisite to another nursing course may not continue in the nursing sequence until the prerequisite course is repeated with a grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or above. ( O ther policies regarding progression/continu­ ation can be found in the Undergraduate Nursing Student Handbook.) 100

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who have not been admitted to the nursing major but who wish to enroll in nursing courses must obtain permission of the School of Nursing Undergraduate Admission and Academic Progress Committee or the dean. ADDmONAL COSTS: In addition to regular u niversity costs, students must provide their own transportation between the u niversity campus and the clinical areas beginning with the first nursing course. Public transportation i l imited, so provision for private transportation is essential. Students are required to carry p rofessional liability insurance in specified amounts during all periods of clinical experienc . For basic students, this insurance is available under a group plan at a nomina.! cost to the student. Physical examination fees, student uniforms and equipment (wristwatch , scissors, stethoscope, BP cuff, and reflex hammer) are also the responsibility of the student.


A fee of $55 per se m ester is cbarged t cover pract i ce and co m puter labonHory m aterials , eq uipment and suppl.ies available ente r. The � t all nur sin g s tu de nts in the learn in g Resou rc is identified with speci fi c courses and is payab l e to the Busi. ness ffice along with u ni v ersit y tuition.

TItird Year First Semester Nu rsing 320 - Nur 'ing N u r si ng

......... ... .......

jmwary Term

PREREQIDSITE COURSES TO NURSING MAJOR: Prerequisite courses to he completed before en rol lment in the nursi ng sequen ce in cl ud e:

Second Seme:;ter

E lec ti ve

CREDIT

Intermediate Algeb ra . ... ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ....... . . . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . .... ..... ... 4

( i f two ye.'U's coll ge p rep math not com pl e ted in high school w'i t h average grades o f C or h i g her) B i ology 205, 206 ( A na t omy and Physiology I and [I) . . . . 4, Biology 20 I ( I n t l'Oduction to Microbiology)' . . .. . .. . .. . Ch emi stry 105 ( Ch e m i try of Life) . . .. . . Psychology ( 0 1 ( I n t roduction to Psychology) . . . . . . . . ...... . Ps yc h o! o gy 352 ( Develo p ment: I n fancy to Maturity)" . . . . . . . Statistics 2 3 1 ( Introductory S t at ist i 5 ) < .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .

.

.......

... .

.

.

.

. . . . . . . . . ...

4

...........

.. . ...

......... ......... .. . .

.

...

...

...

..

4

.... .

'l

... . . .

....

... . ...

. ....

.

.

.. . .

.

.....

"'Basic s t udellts - coreq uisite - see curriculum pla n .

4

Prereq uisite cou rses m a y be taken at PLU or at m o s t accred ited

and Phys io!ogy W

.

.. .

.

. .

.

...

. .

. . . .. .

.

..........

4 4

P hys ical Educa tion ............ . ... . . .... . . .................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . . . . . . I

Second Year

First Semester

...

....

.. . ... . . ..

.

.

.

.

.... . . .... .

..

.

... .

. .

..

....... . ....

4 4 4

I

Nur in g 2 1 5 - Theoretical Fo unda tio ns of N ursi ng ............... . . ... 2

220 erm

GURICore

.........

u rs i n g C o mpete ncie s I

.. . .

.. .

.

. .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .... .. .. . .

4

Nu

ing

225

- Critical Thinking i n Nursing .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

263 - Health Assessme n t . . . . . . . . ......................................... 2

Nursin g 264 - Health Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ........... . . . . . .. . .... 4

283 - Pathological H u m a n Processes . . ..... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Phys ical Education ................................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... I Nursing

.

.

..

......

........

.........

..

454 - N ursi ng Situations with Communities

. . . . . . . . . .....

.

. ..

.

.

.... . . .

.

. . . . . . . . ..

.

....

.

Term

fml liary

R / C o re

nd Political Con t

ts fo r

- Nursi n g Synthesis . . . . . . � . . . . . . . . ..

..

.

.

u rsi ng ...... . . . . . . 2

....

. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

.. .................. . . .... ........... ........... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................... 4

Prereq uisite, completed with a grade of2. 0

min i mum of

(C) or higher

of 2.0 (C) or h ighe r

1 28 s e mes ter credit hours is required for the

baccalaureate degr e. The sequmc of required nursing courses

c omp r is es 63 semester credi t hours. BSN SEQUENCE FOR UCENSED P RACTICAL NURSES: This sequt:nce of stud ' is des igned to provide career mobilit y fo r th exp rie nced licensed p ractical nurse desi ring the Bachelor of Sc ience i.n Nursing degree. The p rogram allows stud nr. the opportunity to validate pri or knowledge and clinical co m pe­ tence, enabling p rog res ion th rough the BSN curri c u l u m \.,jthin a 24-month peri o d fol l o wing o m ple t i o n of p rerequisite courses,

when enrolled full - ti me . Prospective students are encouraged to s�ek early advi ment to reduce time spent in c o m pleti ng p rerequ isites J nd facil itate p rogr

s.

LPN s tuden ts are stro n gly en co urag d to make

before begi .n n in g t h nu rsin

..

. .

.

.

. .

equence.

AdmJssion/Traosfu: Ad m ission to PLU is required before consideration is gi en [or aJmission to the School of Nu !' ing. S t udents desi rio g ad m ission D r th fall seme"rer of the following academi ' year mu t su bm it an application by March 1 . For LPN s tud nts a pp!yi ng to the J\1'vffi DO (Army) or M ECP ( Navy) programs , and who req uire early admission, the ap plication deadlin e i.s S p ternber I of the yea r preceding the des i red e n t ry year ( e.g., September I, 2000, for ad m i ss ion in the fal l of 200 I ) . Licensed pract i cal n u r

Seco nd Semester Nurs in g

.. .

.....

maximum p rogress toward completing u n iver.i lY requi.rements

B i o logy 20 1 - Introduction t o M ic ro b iolog � " ......................... ... Psyc h ology 352 - Development: I n fancy to Matu r it y"" .............. tatistics 23 1 - Introductory Statistics... �· . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physical Education . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .... . . ..... . .. . . Nursing

.....

CI

b efore enrollment i l l Nil l'-illg J92, Nursing Research.

Cri tical Conversation .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... 2

ja nl/ary

.

....

z

befo re begin ning 2nd semester of I1 tH'sirtg pr gram . .,.. . Co-requisite, completed with a grade 0 2. 0 ( ) or higher

.. . . . . . . . . 4

... . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

.........

Co-re q uisite, compl ted with a grade

. ..

. . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

..... ..........

bejC)re ell tering 11l1rs i ng progra m.

e January Prorr ra m ) . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

105 - Che m i s t ry of Life" GUR/Co re . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .

..

...

4 4 Writing 1 0 1 - Inqui ry Seminar: Writin g ....................................... 4 Phys ical Education 100 - Perso nal ized Fitness Pro g ram . . . .......... (

eh mist r y

. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

425 - I ntroduction to Leadersh i p and Manage me n t . . . 3 . . .. . 6 u rsi ng 46 1 - Nursing Situation ' n Sem i n a r . . . . . . . . . .. . I ·u rsi ng 4 4 - ursing Sit uations n . . ....... . ... . . .. . . . . . ... . . . 5

Nursing N u rsing

G

Biology 205 - Human Anatomy and Physiology 1* . ... . . . . . . . ... ..... . .

11

..

ituations I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fourth Year First Semester

A

Secolld Semester B iol o g y 20 - Hu m an Anato my

.

Nu rsi ng 475 - Social

ment the curriculu m "e ne rally follows the fall semester format.

GURICore ( F resh m an Experi

-

. . .. . . . . . . . .

Nursing 47

First Year - Pre Nursing First Semester

ja/luary Term

364

ecol1d Semester

Nursing courses must b e taken concurren tly a n d in equen ce as i.ndicated in th e sample curriculum. and, if enrolled full ti me, normally exten d over six e m esters. For 'pring semester e n ro l l ­

..........

lIrsing

1 5 N u r' i ng 365 - Cult urally Congrue n t Health Care ....................... 4 ursing 392 - N u rsing Research . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 2 GU R/Core . . . . .. . . . . ... . . . . ... . . . . . . . . 4

sity requireme nt s .

.

urs i ng Situations T Seminar

ursi ng

Nursing 4 7 1 - N urs i n g ynt hes i.s Semi na r .................. ........ . . . . . . . . . . I

BSN BASIC PROGRAM: he curriculum plan and its i m ple­ mentation are designed to fo�ter gr wth a n d to e ncourage in itiative and self-direction on the part of st uden ts. In addit ion to nur i ng requ i rements. students are e xpected to meet LLniver­

1 0 1 - Introduction to Psychology" ....... . . . . . . .

urs i n g 361 -

4

z C :=0 VI

Possible Elective

un iversities and c o mmu n ity colle ges .

Psychology

...........

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...

4 4

.

2

rnilies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Nur ' i ng 63 - P harma ology for ursing . . . . . . 3 GUR/Core ......................... ............ ............... . . . . . . ......... ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Programs of Study

COURSE

o rn peten cies U . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

344 - Nurs i ng Situations with F

es

o ther a c redited colle ges

who began their higher education at or

u n iversities may ' pply for admis ion

with advanced standing. A cumulat ive grade p o i n t average of 2."

on a 4.0 scaJe is requ i red before consideration for admission. Tb uni ersity math en t rance req ui re m,t: nt (successful c o m ple­ tion n f two years o f college prep ma th or a n app roved mat h course at the baccalaureate level) must be met b e fo re co ns ider­ ation fo r admission.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y

101


Transfer Credlt:

m i n i m u ll1 !jrade "[ 2.0 on a

4.0

scale (

call 'ge courses is required fo r t ransfer of nursin<T c re d i t . who

Mt'

a d m i tted with j u n i o r standin g

) in tudents

(60 semester credit

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSlNG:

hours) w i l l be re qu i red to take one rel igio n co urse. A max i m u m of 64 semestcr ( 96 quarter) cred i t h o u rs of com m u n i t y col lege work ca n be t ransferred. 0 q ual lfy as degree candidates, tu­ dents must take the final 32 semester hours in residence at PLU.

section of this catalog fo r d e ta i ls

SCHOOL NURSE CERTIFICATION: Co nta ct the School o f Nurs i n g Centa fi r Co n t i nu i n g

urs i n g Educati n (535-7 83) .

WORKSHOPS AND SHORT COURSES: Co n t ac t

urs i n g Center for Con tinuing N u rs i n g Education

th

S bool of

(535-7683).

TIre information conlained herei,. refleC:l$ a n accurare piewr/! of rile prol."ams of study lerulirrg to a Badldor of Sc ience in Nursing degree from Padfrc: [utJlIUlm University ", tIle lime ofpull/lell /ion. Howpvl.'r, tl'I! Imiversity reserves rl,e rig/ll lO mtlke ,receSSlfT)' dlanges i" procedure.s, policies, calendar, curricululI/, atld cosu.

Nursing: A cepted student. may receive credil by e x am i n at i o n for sel ected cours s. Each st u de n t i individually [ u nsel ed regarding the appropriateness of s ee ki n g such credit. Eligi b i l i t y

fo r t h e cli n ical p ro fi c ie ncy examinati n i. del rm i ne d by the facu l t y and is based o n documentation of s i gni fi ca n t work and/ or , tudent experience in the specific rea. Exams must be successfuJly passed to receive the cre d i t .

Course Offeri ngs

First Year Credit by EXOIll innliul/

220 - Nu rsi n g Competenc ies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 (Complete during sprillg o r Slimmer before beginnillg classes) Fall Semester NurSing

Nursing 2 1 5 - Theoret ical Fou n dations of Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

u rs in g .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Nursing 263 - H.e alth A ssessm en t ........................... " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

u rsin g 264 - Health Prom{)tion . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . .. . . .

4 ......................... 4

203 Ethics and Health Cafe Design ed to expand studen ts' abilities to iden t i fy ethical d ile m ­ mas and p a rt i c i p a t e in the iden tification of resolutions. mpha­ sis on c ase s related to t h e allocation of s carce resources. pen to

( J -2)

non-majors.

215 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing he s t ud y of n u rs ing as a profession and discipl i .lle. lnduded are hi s t o ri c a l perspective , 'e1ected n urs i ng con c e p t ual frameworks, phil s o p h ic al fo undati ns o f carin g, and patterns of knowing. (2)

Spri71g Semester

N u rs i n g 320 - Nu rsi ng Co m p e ten c i es I T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . 2 u rsing Situations with F, m i l i es . . . ......... . . . . . . . . . 6 N u rs i ng 363 - Pharmacology for N u rs i n g .... . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 tatistics 23 1 - I n t roductory Statistics . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Nursing 344 -

.

220 Nursing Competencies ] I n t rod ucticH1 to and p ractice of competencies of carin g , t h e ra ­

peu ic co mm u n ica t ion , and psychomotor kill s associated With

he. l th management. P rere q u i s i te : Pri o r or concurrent enroll­

Second Year

m en t i n 2 1 5 . ( 2 )

Fall Semester Nur� i og 36 ! - Jun i or n Semi nar ............ . ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nursing 364 - Nursing S it u ati on s I . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Nursing 365 - Cu l t ural ly Congruent Hea l t h are . ... . .... . . . . . . . . . . 4 Nursing 392 - ursin g Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

2 2 5 Critical Thinking in Nu.rsing Application of th inking and reasoning skills to n u rsing s i t ua ­ tions. The n u rsin g p rocess is i n tro d u ced as a fr a m ewo r k fo r th i n ki ng a nd ca r i ng . Pr requisite: Pr io r r co n c ur re n t enroll­

Sprillg Semes/.er a de rs h i p a n d Manageme n t ursing 425 - I ntroduction to N u rsing 454 - u rsin g Situations wid1 Comm u n i ti es ............ Nursing % 1 - enior I e m i n ar . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N u rs i ng 464 - N u rs i n g Situations IT . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . .

3

6 1 5

Summer SessiOlI N u rsi ng 47 1 - Senior IT Sem inar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I u rsing 475 - S cia I a n d Po l it i cal ontext for ursing . . . . . . . . 2 N ursin g 476 - Nur s i ng Sy n t h esi s ....................................... . ....... 6 Gener I un iversity a nd other pecific requiremeT1t� needed fo r

ment i n 2 1 5 .

( 2)

263 Health Assessment A ses m e n t of b i o l ogi c a l , psychological, social, c ul t u ral , and s pi r itua l dimensions of h u m a n p e rso n s across the life span. Prere q uisites: 2 1 5 , 220 and prior or co ncmrent e nroll m e n t i n

225. ( 2 ) 264 Health Promotion Throughout the life Span Examines the role of tb n urse in promo ting health through the life span and the impact of b iological, psychological , sodal, spi r itu a l, and cui r ural i n fluences on health. Pre req u isi te: Prior or

co ncurrent enrollmen t in

completion of the baccalaureate de ree a re not li�ted here. Applicants to the LPN to BSN sequen

e are strong l y encouraged PN to BSN c o rd i n ator for as sista nce with their compl ete prog rams of study.

to cck advising from t h e

RN TO MSN SEQUENCE FOR LICENSED REGISTERED NURSES: De igned for lhe RN wit! at least one year of cUrect

283 Human Pathological Processes F c uses on und rstanding the underlying patholog ical p rocesses cli n i cal manifi stati os of I cted p, thological co nd i tio ns that affect physical and psychosocial wel l-bei ng. Open to non­ m aj ors with co n se n t of i n s t r u tor. Pr requ isi t e for majors: 2 1 5 .

and

320 Nursing Competencies U Advan ed a nd co m pl ex psychomotor a n d interactional skills for caring, asepsis, and h eal th restorat i o n . Prereq uisit s: 263, 264, 283. ( 2 )

3 44 Nursing Situations with Families . ·u rs in g care of f m ilies ac ross the life span. Appl ication of developmental, fam ily, and nursing theories to care o f fam i l ie s in transi tions and uis ites: 263,

P

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I

F i e

l

U

T

H

E

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A

N

U

N

I

V

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5

I

T

263. (4)

(4)

care exp er ien ce , tbi ' p rog ra m is truct ured to allow students to ea rn both a bachelor's degree CBS ) and a ma ster 's d gree i n n urs i n g (MSN . The next RN to MSN co h o rt is scheduled to begin in the fall of 200 1 . (No �tuJ Ilts will be admi ted to the program in the 2000-0 i acad e m i c year. Student ar strongly encouraged to con tact the Schoo l of N urs i n g for poLicies, proced u res, and early advisement.)

102

hool

ursing G ra d ua te Program ( 5 3 5-7672).

of

Non-Illlrsillg: Advanced p l,\ce me n t may be ava i lable thr ugh na t i o n a l tandardized o r d ep a rt m D t al exami nation . Inqui ries sh o u l d be c U rected to th Office of A dm i ss i ns or the dep a r t ­ ment or school of� r i n g the particular subje t.

N urs i n g 283 - Patholo i ca l Human Proce ses

Con s u l t the graduat e

of th e program l ea d i ng to the

degree of Master o f Sc i e n ce in Nmsing a n d/o r contact th�

Advanced Placement:

Nu rs ing 225 - Criti al Thjnking i n

Graduate Programs

Y

perienc i ng acute and c h ro n i c il l n esse . Pr req­

264, 283. (6)


361 Nursing Situations

1 Seminar

Explo ration a n d i n tegration of concepts identi fied in in g on recogni t ion of com monal i ties and d i fferences multiple n ursi ng s i tuat io n

in 364. ( l )

en ro l l ment

. Prerequ isite:

Pr ior

364, fo cus­ aCross

or co n cu r re n t

454, 46 1 , 464. (2)

majo rs: 4 2 5 , i n s t ructor.

Open

[0

no n - maj or s w i t h conse n t o f

476 Nurslng Synthesis Syn thesis of n urs i n g knowledge, c r i tical thinki ng, decisio o making, and technical and leadersh i p competen cies in nursing

363 Pharmacology for Nursing

s i t u a t ion� mentored by 3. professional n u rse prece p tor. Pre req u i ­

Pllarmacoki netics, p h a r m aco dyn a m ics , mechanisms of action, ide effect� , and c l ient teacJl i ng re late d to maj()r d rug e1as es .

s i tes: 4 2 5 , 454, 46 1 .

Genetic and sociocult u ra l factors that a ffect drug use. Prerequi-

ires: 263, 28 3.

(3)

z c: :0 VI

464. ( ) )

480 Applied Case Studies ln Nurslng SItuations Students i n t e g ra t e t heoret ical knowledge and cli nical n u rsi n g

Z

s i tuations from a variety of spe c i a l t y a reas. Development o f

364 Nursing Situations I

crit ical t h i n ki ng skill� a n d strategies for syn thesizing n ursiug

Theory a n d c l i n ical ap pl i cation of u ni fy i ng concepts in

knowl edge. Prerequisites: 47 1 . 476. ( 1)

a v a ri et y of pract ice setti n gs w i t h cl ients th ro u ghou t the l i fe spa n that faci l itate health restora tio n , hea l t h m a i ntenance, or death with d ign i t y. Prerequisites: 32(}, 344, 363 . ( :5 )

365 Culturally Congruent Health Care

49 1, 492 Independent Study

G'I

deJl1. ( 1-4)

Prerequisite: Pe r m i ss i o n of the 493 Internship Abroad ( 1- 4 )

A t ranscu l t u ra l compara t ive ap p r o a ch is use d to e x p l o re d iversity and Ll nive rsal i t y in providing c u l turally congruent care for p e rso n s from d iverse cul tural g ro up . Fulfills the a l ternatrve line in the Perspecti ves on D i ve r s i t y requiremenL Open to n

n -majo rs. Prereq u is ites for majors:

current s tate of thear)' development. Analy. i s and evaluat io n of

An examina tion of technologies and da tabases suppo rtive to i nfo rmed n u rs i n g pr a c t i ce in a rapidly ch a n gi ng health care deli ery system . P rerequisite: RN, or B , or consent of

(2)

Emphasizes th e research p rocess, i mp o r tance o f nur s i n g research to the discipline of n ursu.1g, eva l uation of n Llrsing

and application of 11tlrsing re earch

10

r s

arch,

p ract ice. P re r e quis i tes :

STAT 23 1 , prior or con c urren t e n ro l lment in 36 4 . ( 2 )

399 Nursing Portfolio Workshop t\ co urse in p o r l foli.o writi ng designated to p repare reg i stered a portfoli d o c u me n ti n g p r ior exp e rie n tia l to MSN learning acqu i red in nursing pract ice. O p en to R nu r. es to complete

(4)

AnalY£is of pro fessio n al sitllJtions, r o l es and functio ns in t h e c h anging hea l t h care d el i ve ry system , i n c l u d i ng e va l u ation of t h e impac t upon the nursing p ro fe ss io n . P rere q u i s i te s : 36 1 ,

364, 365,

392 . (3 ) 454 Nursing Situations wlth Communities Assessment, planni ng, and in terven tio ns that p romo te a health usi ng nmsing and p ublic health the o ret ical pers p ectives. P rerequ i site: Prio r or co n c u rre n t enrollmen t in 425.

co m m un i ty ' s

(6)

Bxpl o ratio n and i n tegTatiu n of comp lex concepts to capital ize o n experiences gained i. n cl i. n ical set t in gs. Focuses o n recog n i t i o n o f com mon a l i t ies and d i fferences ac ross m u ltiple nursing s i t u a ­

tion . Prerequ isite: Prior o r co nc urrent e n rollment in 464 .

(1)

464 Nursing Situations II c l i n ic a l

app licatio n of complex i n tegrated co ncep ts

in a variety o f practice set ting u isite: 364. ( 5 )

to MSN cand idates only. Components

(4)

5 1 1 Applied Nursing Research

of evaluat ion and outcome candidates only. C o m po n e n t s

w i t h emphasis on design and use

re earch. Open to R N to MS. integrated w i t h 5 2 7 .

(4)

5 1 2 Nurse a s Leader and Manager: A nalysi s of p r i nc i p l es and processes of leadership a n d manage­ ment w i t h i n t h e co n texl of co m p l ex and dynamic health care systems. Open t o R. to MSN citrl d ida te s o nly. Components integrated with

526. ( 4 )

525 Theoretical Foundations Lise

t h ro ugh o u t the life span. Prereq­

47 1 Nursing Synthesis Seminar Critical evaluation of roles as p ro fessional n u rses u s i ng emp i ri­ cal, aeslhetic, perso nal , and ethical knowledge o f ocial a n d political real it ies . Prerequisites: Pri o r o r concurre.nt en roll m e n t in 475 a nd 476. ( I )

475 Social and Political Contexts for HeaJth Care Ana l ysis of the soc ial , p ol i t ic al , lega l , and economic factors t h a t in fl uence health care, inc l udi ng trends in h e a l t h policy a n d eth ical issues relevant t o heal th c are delivery. Prereq uisi tes for

of a ra nge o f

relevant theories that p rov i d e guiding persp ectives for tlle p rovision of c l ient -cen tered, c l i n ically meas u rab le advanced nursing practice.

(3)

S26 Nursing Leadersbip aud Management I n t roductio n to pol icy, orga n ization , and financ i ng of health c a r e . Preparation for p rov ision o f qua l i ty cost -effect ive care, participation in t h e design a n d i mp lemen tation of c are , a n d ass ump t i o n of the l ea de r s h ip role i n managing r so u rces. ( :, )

527 Evaluatiou and Outcomes Research Preparat ion fo r the crit ique and use o f new

NUl'Sing Situations II Semin.ar

Theory and

i n tegrated w i t h 525.

Pre p arat io n fo r critique, eval u a t i o n , a n d

425 lntroductioD. IO Leadership and Management

461

t h eo ries w i t h d iscussion of the i r re l eva n ce to nu rsi n g sciencE' an

p ract ice . Open to RN

xami nation of t h e research p rocess a n d re.. s earch meth odolog ies

392 Nursin g Research

candidates only.

510 Nursing Foundations, Models and Theories The study of n u rsi ng as a p rofeSS io n and disc i p l i ne, a n d n u r s i ng's

320, 344, 363. (4)

390 Information Management i n Nursing

in�tructor.

Graduate Course Offerings

knowledge to

provide, c h a n ge, a n d eval uate advanced nursing pract ice focused on client-cen tered, cl inically demonstrable carc.

(3)

528 Panilly Theory in Nursing Critical �U 1alysis of n urs ing a n d family theories and models a p p l ied to t hree levels o f fa m ily nu rsing p rac t ice. ( I )

529 Care Manager RoIe5 Advanced practice role deve l o p m e n t i ncl udi ng co n t i n ui t y of care managemenl, consul tation, ed ucat io n , and research. Develop­ m e n t o f role s p e c i fi c posi tion descrip t ion s w i t h i n interdiscipli­

nar y enviro nments.

(3)

530 Resource Management Management of �sou rces in t h e p l a n n i ng, coordination, and/or

delivery of hea l t h care with a n outcome pers pecti ve at t h e system level. Pinancial and hu ma n reso u rce a n d sy. tems ma nagement w i l l be exami ned from a qu al i t y pe rspeclive. Prerequ isite: 53 l .

(4)

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584 Family Nurse Practitioner I

53 1 Care and Outcomes Practicum I D i rec t a nd lor indirect

c a re

Application of theory and research in the man a gemen t of family

given i.n a defined spe ial t y setting

with focus on ev al ua t i o n and outcomes. P rerequ is i t e:

529. ( 3)

health p roblems.

532 Care and Outcomes Practicum n

VI a:: ::::I z

and 583. (6)

Dir ct care or i ndi rec t c l i n i , I management, s up e rv i si o n , o r ed ucati o n t o ach i eve client goals b y i m p le ment ing ap proac h , interventi ons, ou tcomes. and ev al uati n met hods . Prerequisite: 538. (5)

585 FamiJy Nurse Practitiooer U p pl icat io n of theo ry and research in the management of i ncreasi ngly complex fa mily health problems. Demonstration o f d iag no st ic reaso ning for a w i d e range o f acute and chro n i c

538 Program Development

ond iti ns.

I n tegra te t heoretica l models, cl in i c I paramet rs, and p rogram pla n n ing p ri nc i ples t hro u g h Lhc

c o ns t ru c t ion

progrum fo r c a re and outc

management.

and pre req u is ite 5. I .

ro

emin ar and cl i nical . P re requ i s i te: 584.

(6)

586 Women's Health Nur e Practitioner 1 App l i c at io n of resear h and theory in tbe p ro v i sio n of wo m en's health c are. Demonstration of d iagnostic re a so n i n g in t he management of women's heal t h problems. S em in ar Jnd clin icaL C o h o rt dependent. Prerequisites: 582 and 583. (6)

of J d tailed o -requ i si te 530

(3)

543 Health and CuJturally Diverse Populations Co mp a ra ti ve a n alys is of health beliefs and care p ractices of wes ter n and non-wester n cul tu res wi t h em p h asi s on t h eo retica.l and pra c t i ca l dimensions, ap pl ied to profes s ion al p ractices. ( 2 )

587 Women's Health Nurse Practitioner n

Ap p l ica t io n of research and the o ry in the h o l is t i c care of women experiendng n o rmal pregnancy. Demon stra tion of i nde p enden t

545 Life, Death, and PubUe PoUer

and collaborat ive management of variations and complications.

Ii e a n d death which i m p act on or are impacted by p u b lic pol icy. Analysis of pro fes ­ sional r spon i b il it y and decision - maklng in rel at ion to the i ss ues . ( 2 ) Exploration of ri t i caI i sues re l a ted

c m on s tra t io n of diagnost ic rea s on i ng related

to health care cond i ti o ns . Seminar and clin ical. Prerequisites: 582

to

Seminar and cl inica l. Cohort dependent. P rerequis i te: 586.

(7)

588 Gerontology Nurse Practitioner J App l i ca t io n of th eo ry to advanced p ra ctice and demonstratio n of mana geme n t of common client health pro bl e m s seen in older person . Differentiation of normal agi ng and pathol ogy. Seminar and c l ini ca l . Cohort d epen dent . P re re q ui s i t

: 582 and

583. (6)

589 Gerontology Nurse Practitioner U nd demonstration of diagno � t ic reasoning to the

A p p l ica t io n

mana!lement of common and simple health care problems in older persons in primary and long term care. S emi nar and

un ical. C o ho rt dependen t . Prerequisite: 588. 6) 590 Role of the Nurse Practitioner Fa ihtates the t rans i tio n into the advanced nurse pra ct i ti o ner role through the analysis of I gal, ethi c al , profc sional, social, and

pr a c t ical p ersp ect i ves. Completion and subm i s sion of paper fo r p u bli ca t i o n or of a p ractice r b ted p roject. Co- requisite or prerequisite:

584 or 586 or 588. (2)

590A Seminar in Advanced PractIce Nu.rsing Integra tion of theory, res ea r c h , and l eaderhip in advanced pr a ct ice n urs i ng .

- req u isi te or p rere qui s i t e: 585 or 5 8 7 or

Ca ps to n e ourse D r nurse p ra ct i t i o ner concentration. ( 2 )

Exa m inat ion of th theory and p ra ct i

592 Independent Study

of urr iculu m planni ng,

development , and evaluation. Co hor t dependent. ( 2 )

tudent's

Theo retical and philos phical principles of th

t ach i llg1le rning

A nalysis o f adult teaching s r ra tegies and the p roce ss of sel f and stud en t eval uation . C o h o rt dependent. ( 2 )

process.

f intere s t . Con sen t o f i n st r uc tor re qu ir ed.

rea

pra ct i ce. Prerequisite: co mp l tion of aU core requlrements.

red i t )

( variable

Foc uses aD normal physiol gic and pa tholo gi c mechanisms of disease. Pri ma ry co mponen of th e fo undat ion for l i n i ca l assess ment , decision making, and manag e me n t. ( 3 )

597 Computer Application in Nursing Research Decision-making and lise of sele ted software programs for data man ageme n t and analysis relevant to clinical pract ice and

nursing research. Prerequi s i te: 527. Leawing ResoLUces Fee: $55.

582 Advanced Health As essmenl and Health Promotion Develo pment and perfor ma nce of the sk i.lls ne d d fo r advanced

(I)

h.ealtb assessment and health p ro mot i on of i n div i d u a l s , fam ilies,

598 SchoLarly Inquiry in Nursing Practice

or co m m un it ies th roug h o ut the l i fes p a n . Identification of he alth s the develo p m en t

of diffe rent ia.! diagn oses fo r common h eal t h problems. Prerequi­ he.1lLh assessment sk i l l . L ear n i ng resource fee: $55 .

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area of specialization based on an evaluat io n and

Facul ty guided appl icat ion of the research process.

Focuses on the p h rm acokine t ic basi fo r and pharmacothera­ peutic management of si mple and com pl ex d isease proccs es . I n cludes ethical, legal. and p ro ced ura l aspects of p rescr ip tive authority. Pre- or co -requisi te: 580. (2)

C

related 10 on

ou t com es model. Co-requisite or prerequisite: 532. C a ps ton e

(4)

5 99 Thesis

583 COnical Pharmacotherapeutics

A

Devel o pmen t a nd sub m i s i n of profe.ssi nal pa per or p ro je ct

course for care and o u t co mes manager concentration.

(5)

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593 Advanced Specialty Practice Application of advanced p r acti ce nu rsi ng in clinical specialty

5 80 Advanced Pathophysiology

protective st rategies and healtb risks as well

589.

Opport u n i ties fo r advanced tudy in selected topic related to

549 Teaching in Schools o f Nursing

1 04

_

548 CurrieuJum Development for Nursing

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repl icat i on of previous t udy, secondary a n a lys is of re search data, an eva l uat i on proj ect , or an or i g i nal investigation. Prerequis ites: co mplet ion of core courses, c n ent o f advi er.

Y

(4)


Phi losophy Philosophy is the parent academic discipline that gave birth to taday's variety of a rts and sciences. It examines basic issues i.n all fields and explores connections amo n g diverse areas of iife. In phi loso phy the most fundamental and endu r lng of questions are addressed: How can human gain k n owl e d ge about their worl d? What l i m its are there to that knowledge? What is the ultimate nat ure of the universe? I n particular, what is the nature of the human person, and what role or purpose is ours? How

s h ou ld we live? Are there moral, aestheti , and religious values that can be adopted rationally and our

u ed to guide

decisio ns? Study in philosop hy acquaints students with

major ri val views of the world , encow-ages them to think

precisely and systemat ical ly, .md helps them to see l i fe critically, appreciatively, and whole.

FACULTY: McKenna, Chair; Arbaugh, Arnold, Cooper, Kaurin, Memel, Nordby.

G. J ohnson,

USES OF PHILOSOPHY: Courses in philosophy help students who ( 1 ) recognize p h ilosophy as a central element in a quality liberal art<; education; (2) wish t support their undergraduate work in other fields, such as literature, history, political science, religion, the sciences, education, or business; ( 3 ) plan to use their study of p hilosophy in preparation for graduate study i n law, theology, o r medicine; o r ( 4 ) are considering graduate work in philosophy itself, usual ly with the intention of teaching in the field. Undergraduate study in philosophy is not meant to train specifically for a fust job. I nstead, i t serves to sharpen basic skills in critical th inking, problem solving, research, analysis, interpre­ tation, a nd writing. It also p rovides critical pe.rspective on and a deep appreciation of ideas and issues that have intrigued h umanity throughout the ages, including those centrai to the Western in tellectual heritage. This prepares students for a great variety of positions of re ponsibility, especially when coupled with specialized training in other disciplines. Those with the highest potential for advancement generally have more than j ust specialized training; rather, they bring to their work breadth of perspective, intellectual flexibility and depth, and well-honed kills in critical thought and communication. UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENT: The Core I requirement of fou r hours in philosophy may be satisfied with any course offered e.xcept for 233 Formal Logic, 323 Health Care Ethics, 325 B usiness Ethics, and 3 28 Philosoph ical Issues in the Law. The initial course i n ph ilosophy i customarily 1 0 1 , 1 25, or a 200level course that provides a more focused topic but is still at the introductory level ( 2 20, 228, 253 ) . 300-level courses are suited for s tu dents with particular i nterests who are capable of working at the u p per division level. Correspondence courses and independent studies may not be used to fulfill the core require­ meJ:I t in philosophy. MINOR: 16 semester hours of approved philosophy courses; for transfer students, at least 8 hours roust be taken at PLLI. Students considering a minor should discuss their personal goals with depart mental faculty. BACHEI.OR OF ARTS MAJOR: M inimum of 32 semester hours, includ illg 233 Formal Logic, 499 Advanced Seminar, and two from among the following five courses: 33 1 Ancient Philosophy, 333 Early Moder n Ph ilo ophy ( must take at least one of those two), 335 T he Analytic Tradi tion, 336 Pragmatism and American Philosophy, 338 Existen tialism and Conti ne.n tal Philosophy. On approval of the department, one course (4 hours) in another field of study may be used for a double major in philosophy if it

has a direct relationship to the student's philosophy program. Transfer students will normally take 16 or more of their 32 hours at PLLI. Students i ntending to major in philosophy should formall y declare this with the department chair and choose a departmental adviser. HONORS MAJOR: In addition to the above requirements for the major: 1 . 493 Honors Research Project, including an honors thesis written under the supervision of one or more faculty members and presented to the department. 2. Completion of the departmental reading p rogram of primary sources. Honors majors in philosophy are expected to com­ plement their regular courses by reading and discuss.ing 3-4 important works under the personal supervision of depart­ ment faculty. The reading list should be obtained at a n early date from the department chair. It i ' best that the reading program not be concentrated into a ingle semester, but pursued at a leisurely pace over an extended period. 3 . At least a 3.3 grade point average in p hilosophy courses, including at least a B in 493.

'V :r:: ,...

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o 'V :r:: -<

Course Offerings 1 0 1 PhilosopbJca1 Issues Perennial philosophical issues, systems, and thinkers. Emphases vary depending on instructor, but include the study of ethical values and the nature of rationality, and development of skills in critical and systematic thinking. (4) 125 Moral Philosophy Major moral theories of Western civilization, including contem­ porary moral theories. Critical application to selected moral issues. (4)

220 Women and Phnosophy An exa mination and critique of historically important theories from Western philosophy concerning women's nature and place in society, followed by an exa m i na tion and critique of the writings of women philosophers, historic and contemporary. ( 4 ) 228 Social and Political Philosophy An examination of major social and political theories of Western

philosophy ( includi ng Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, M arx). Includes feminist and non-Western contributions and critiques. (4) 233 Formal Logic Principles of sound reasoning and argument. evelopment and practical use of formal logical systems, with a focus on symbolic logic. Includes a n introduction to inductive and abductive reasoning. Not for ph ilosophy core requirement; counts toward O p tion I I I of the allege of Arts and Sciences requirement. (4) 253 Creation and Evolution

Examination of the con troversy surrounding the origin of life. Includes a historical introduction to the controversy; investiga­ tion into the nature of science, faith, evidence, and facts; and critical evaluation of three major origin theories: creationism, theistic evolution, and nontheistic evolution. (4) 323 Health Car e Ethics

Application of moral theories and perspectives of relevance to the health sciences. Examination of underlying values and assumptions in such specific topics as informed consent and paternalism, death decisions, and the distribution of scarce resources. Not for philosophy c re requirement. ( l -2 ) 325 Business Ethics

Application of moral theories and perspectives of relevance to b usiness practices. Examination of underlying values and assumptions i n specific business cases involving, e.g., e.mployer­ employee relations, advertising, workplace contlict, and environ-

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mental and social respons ibi lities. No! fo r philosophy core requirement. Prerequisi te: 1 0 [, 1 2 5, or q u iva l en l . ( 2 )

School of Physical Education

328 Pbilosophical lssues in the Law z o l­ e( u :;,

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The u n iversity'S p hysical educatio n program see ks to

An t'Xamination of phi losophical issu� in law usin g actual case as well as philo ophical writi ngs. To pics include the nature o f law. judicial rea n ing rights, liberty, responsibi lity, and punishm nt. NOl for phllosophy core requirement . (4)

ing r ain i n each stud e nt

a

fundamental respect for

the role

of physical ac t iv ity in living.

33 1 Andent Pbllosopby

Instrueti n is o ffered in approxima tely 30 di fferent phY ' ical ducation a ct ivities. The activ it)' p ro gr a m is

The development of ph l losophical t h ought and method from the Presoc rati period t the end o f t he fo urth century A.D. Emphasis on Plato and Arist otle. (4)

i nterests in re creatio nal o p portUl1 ities available in the Pacific Nor thwest.

uniquely cha racterized by a ti mely res po ns e to tudent

The school's profess ional pr grams p rep a re prospective

333 Early Modern Philosophy

leaders for career in physical education, heal th , rec reation ,

Th devcl pment of Europ an an d B r i tish philosophy frOIll the seve nteent h thro ugh the early n ineteen th centuries. Figures llIay includ De cartes, Spinoza. Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, H u me, and Kant. ( 4 )

we a t h er 400 meter t rack,

335 Th e Analytic Tradition

pool , six lighted t

athletics,

nd therapeut ics.

Out t a n ding modern sports facilitie include an all­

The deve lopm e nt of Angl O - Amer ica n philosophy from the late n i neteenth cent ury to the m id- twen tieth ce n tur y. F ig ures include Moore, Russe ll, Aye!, and Wittgenstein. Prereq uisite: one previous p h i losophy course. (4)

336 Pragmatism and American Phllosopby An examination of such tJgures as Peirce, J a me s , and Dewey, as well as exten ions and critiques of pragmat ism (such as Alain Locke, Jane Add a m s , Jos iah Royce , Alfred . Whitehead ) . Links with current fem i n is t and continental th o u gh t will be explored.

an

Olympic- tyle swim ming n i ne- ho l e goU' cou rse, two

ni cou rts, a

gymnasiums. racquetball and

s q u a sh

FACULTY: Hoset h, Dean; Evans, Ha ker, Kluge, McCo n n el!,

o re, M. Seal, Tannehill, Te mplin, F. We tering; assist d by Adachi, Amido n , Applegate, Cino tto, Dawso n, Freitag, Gard, Haroldson, J. Johnson, Mar, hall, M Cord, Myer�. Nicholson, No ren, Poppen. R ice, Rigell, Ryan, S h inafelt, Scott. Wcs tering, Susan Westering. UNIVlm.SITY REQUlREMENT:

(4)

ourts, a fit ness

center, and an all - purpose astro -turf field house.

our one-hour courses

( l 00- 2 5 9 ) , including 1 00 , are requi r d for gradua t io n. Ei gh t

3 38 Existeotialism and Co.ntinental PhJJosopby Focus on main themes of Exist ntialism ( including the thought of K ierkegaard) and contemporary Continen tal p h ilos oph y. Their relationship to other p h i losophical traditions , as \ ell as to theology, li tera ture, and psychology. ( 4 )

one-ho lr activity c urses may be cOLlnted toward graduation. Students are encouraged to select vari ety f activities at appro­ priate skiU levels. Ajl physical education activity courses are graded on the basis of "A," " Pass ," r "Fail" and are taught on a coeducational basis .

340 Philosophy o f Science

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The general charaet r, fundame.ntal concepts. met hods, and significance and limits of science, with a focus upon the natural sciences. [mpli < tions of science and scientific methodo log)' fo r value system . ( 4 )

(D.S.P.E.): 69-76 h )urs, including completiM of p rogr m core

requirements and one of th ree concentrations. Core 'Requirements: 4 1-50 hours including Chem istry 1 20, 232,

234; Chemistry ( l 04, 1 05 ) " ; Stati tics 2 3 1 ; BioI gy ( 1 6 1 , 1 2)" -, 205, 206; Physical Education 277, 499 ( 8 hour ) , 480, 486, and

350 Philosophy o f Religion Classi cal and c ntemporary views of traditional issues regarding the nature and rationality of religioLls bel ief, w i t h a focus on mo notheistic religi o n s and a unit on religio us plurali m. Prerequi ite: one previou course in philosoph)' or religion. ( 4)

Psychology 1 0 1 . • AIte mate Ch elllist ry req l;iremellt fo r Exercise Science Co ncentration alld Health a n d Fitlless Management Concentration. n Not reqt;;red for Healtil a/ld Fitness Ma nagemen t COll celltration. Exercise Science Concentntiom 1 9 hours, incl u d i ng Physical

353 Special Topics P cus on one particular area of ph ilosophy sucb as v alue theory, aesthetic., metaphys i ' , epistemology, or logic, o r on important ph.ilosophi al issues, majo r t h i nk< r • or develo p ing t r en ds . Topic to be decided in c ns ul tat io n w i t h students. (4)

491 Independent Reading and Research Prerequ isi te: departmen Lal onsent . ( 1 - 4 )

493 Honors Research Project

Education 326, 380, 3 8 1 , 478 ; Math 1 28 or 1 40; P�'Ychology 352. An upper division bio logy course is stro ngly reco m mended .

24 hours, including Physical Educatjon 293, 344, 380, 38 1 , 389; Recreation 296, 33 0 or 483; Business 05; plus 4 hours of electives from physical education, health education , busi ness, communication, or psych logy. A Firt Aili c a rd and CPR certificate are ruso required. Health and Fitness Management Conce.ntration:

The writi ng of a n honor thesil and final completion of the reading program in pri mary sources req uired o r the b nors major. Present tion of thesis to department majors and acuity.

Pre-Tberapy Concentration: 26 hou rs, including Health Education 28 1 , 382: B io l og y 2 0 1 or 323 or app roved a1t mate; Math 1 28 or 1 40; Physics 1 1 5 , 126, 1 35, 1 3 6; and Psych ology 352 or 453.

499 Advanced Seminar in Philosophy

I n addition t the requirements li ted above, candidates for the B.S.P. E. degree must meet the � re i g n language option require­ men t as stated by the College of Arts aud clen es.

(4)

Exploration in a seminar fo r ma t of an important phi losop h ical issue, thinker, or moveme.nt. Topic to b announced at the time ur e is offered. P rerequi ite: three previolls philosophy courses or consent of instn c tor. May be rept!ated one r. r redi t . ( 4 )

DACHELOR OF ARTS IN RECREATION (D.A. Rec.):

46 hours

including Psychology

1 0 1 , 3 52 ;

Physical Education 2 7 7 ,

279, 389, 344; Recreati on 296, 330, 360, 4f13, 499 (8 hours); Busin s 305; C mmun ication 336; plus 2 h urs of ap pro ved

electives. [n ddition to the requirements Ii ·te d a bove, students are strongly encouraged to complete a minor in a r lated field.

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Students must have a current fir t A i d and CPR certific ate Can d idat for the B. . Recreation de­ gree must meet the fore ig n l anguage requirement as stated by the allege of Arts and Science.�.

before their in t rnsh ip.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICAl. EDUCATION (B.A.P.E.) WITH CERTIFICATION: To meet the state endo rsement i n H eal t h and FiLOCS , 66 hour incl udi n g Bio lo!:., y 205, 206; Health E d ucation 2 0, 2 70., 28 1 , 292, 295, 3 2 1 , 3 2 3 , 3 2 5 , 3 27 , or ele tive; Physical Educat ion 2 77, 279 , 293 , 294, 297, 2 9 8 , 3 22 (4 ho u r ) , 3 26 , 344 , 389, 478, 480 , 486, 490; Rec reatio n 2 96 . I nit ial K- 1 2 teacher certification in Health and F i t ness must

!11 et

the req u i remen t<1blished by the School of Education for teac her 'ertiGca tjon i n arlrution to the ab ove r quirements for the B. A.P.E. W il h ct!rtifkation. 33 h o urs incl u d i n g Engl i s h 1 0 I ; Psychology 1 0 1 ; An th ropology 1 02/2 1 0; Special Ed u cat ion 200, 480; Ed u c;) t io n 262 , 263, 486 ; Educational P SydlOl ogy 2 I , 3 6 1 ; plus a valid fi rst a id card. Students receiving a B.A.P E. wi t h certificaLi n are n ot req ui red to fulfi l l the l a n g u a ge req u i r mcnts as sta ted by the CoUege of Arts and Sciene s. All course� i n the major and m i no r Gelds are used for teacher certi fication mu�l have grad es of C or r ugber.

BACHEWR OF ARTS I N PHYSICAL EDUCATION (B.A.P.B.) WITHOUT CERTIFICATION: 5 2 hour. i n cl u din g Biology 205, 206; Health Ed uca t io n 2 8 1 ; Physical Education 277, 279, 293,

EXERCISE SCIENCE M INOR: 1 7 h o urs, in cl udi ng P hy s ical ducation 360 , 380, 38 1 , 480, 4 86, 499 (4 hour ) . Biology 205206 is reqll ired as prerequisite to 480. D signed p ri ma ri l}' for

b iolo gy majors and st uden t pu rsu ing B .A . P. E. Not de igned for education o r B.S.P.E. majors. First aid card and C P R cer t i Gcate requi red.

ATHLETIC TRAINING (Specializ.atlon) : 25 h o u r s , including Hi logy 205, 206; Health E duca t io n 260 a n d 2 70 or 3 2 7 , 28 1 , 3 8 2 ; Physical Ed ucatio n 3 26 , 344, 480, 486. Reco mmended: A te ac h ­

ing major w it h the Prof ss i o n a l Education Sequen ce and com­ requirements ti)r t he I n itial Teaching -erti ficate.

pletion of all

SPORTS ADMINlSTRATION M INOR: 1 6 hours, i n c l udirlg P hysical Education 344, 3 8 9 , 499 ( 8 ho ur ) , 4 1 0; H ea l t h Educa­ tion 292. St uden ts lUust have a major in b u s in ess , communica­

Childbirth and Beyond Food and Health The Aging Experience Stress Without Distress Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care

FOR PHYSICAL BDUCATION: 33 bours, i ncl u di n g E n gl i sh t o l ; nthropol gy 1 02/2 1 0 ; S p ec i al Education 200,

327 360 382 425

48 0 ; Education 262, 263 , 468; Educatio nal Psycho logy 26 1 , 36 1 ;

plus valid first

a id card .

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MINOR: 1 9 h o urs, i n c l u ding Health Erlll t ion 28 1 ; Physical Education 279, 334, 389, 3 2 . 322

( 2 hours ) , 344; o n e c o u r e [rom 297, 298, Rec reat io n 296 ) .

among the fo llowing (293, 294,

F irst Aid School Health Family ute and Sex Education Emotional Health/Disease Preveution Substance Use and Abuse Professional Practicum I njury Prevention-Advanced

Health Promotion/Wellness Intervention Strategies 49 1 Independent Study 499 Internship RECREATION 296 Teaching Methods: Recreation Activities

HEALTH (4- l 2) M I NOR: 1 6 hours includ i n g Health Ed ucat ion 2 60 , 2 7 0 , 292, 2 5 , 32 1 , 3 2 3, 325, 32 7, and 2 hours of elec t ives approved by the program coordinator. ( � S t udent s not p u rsuing

330 Recreation Programming and 1.eadership 360 Professional Practicum 483 Recreatlon .Administration

an ed ucatio n

491 I ndependent Study 499 Internship

RECREATION MINOR: 1 7 hours, i n cl ud i ng Pbysical Ed ucatio n 2 77, 344; Recreation 296, 330, 483, and 4 9 (4 hours).

1 17 Movement and Mind

endorsemen t wiil be required to take 2 additional hours of approved e lect ives LO re p l ace this cour e. )

AQUATICS MINOR: 16 hours, including Physical Education 2 7 5 , 3 1 , 344 , 499 (4 hours ) , Health Education 292, Bus i n ess 202 , plus at leasl 1 ho ur f elec t i es approved by tbe aqua t i cs rur ctor. COACHING MINOR: 1 6 hours, i n cl uding Physical Edu ca t i o n 334, 344, 360, 370-379 ( 2 hours), 390, 4 1 0, and Health Education 28 1 ; p l u s 1

hour of a p p roved ele

tives.

First aid and CPR card

requi red. IlEALTH AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT MINOR: 1 7 h ou rs, incl uding Phy ical Ed uca t i n 293. 2 6 . 334, 344, 360, 380, 3 8 1 , 499 ( 4 hours) . Fir t aid card and CPR certificate req u ire d. Practicum and in tern s h i p mu t be in Heal lh and Fitn ss

Management areas. Primarily B.A. Recrea t io n students.

for business, biolo gy, B.A.P.E. , and

DANCE MINOR: 1 9 hours, i ncl u d i n g Physical d uc a t ion 22 2 , 230 or 2 3 2 , 250, and 462. Electives: 1 4 ho u r s from Physical Education 360, 40 L , 49 1 , Theatre

o z

In:AIJ1l EDUCATION

325 Consumer Hetlth

Psychology 1 0 1 ;

Education are offered i n the

� lImV'ing areas:

EDUCATION (K- 12) CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

the B.A.P.E.

-t

the School of Physical

Tn addit ion to the requi rements l iste d above, candidates for degree without teach r certi ficatio n must meet the fo reig n la nguage requirement a ' stated b the Col lege of Arts an d c i e n C� a nd a Senior eminar ( P R ED 499 - 4 hour ) .

hour ) , 326, 344, 3 8 9 , 478, 480, 486, 490;

Recreation 2 96.

c c: n >

Course Offe rings

1 17 260 265 270 28 1 292 295 321 323

294, 297, 298, 322 ( 4

m

t i on , or eeon trucs.

Courses in

n > r-

356, Music 2 4 5 , 249. Summer

cou rses may be i ncluded as electives w i t h the dance oordinato!.

approval of the.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

W fer Safety Instruction Foundations of Physical Educat ion Introduction to Teaching Physical Education Teaching Methods: Fitnes Activities Teaching Methods: Invasion Games Teaching Methods: Net Games Teaching Methods: Target and FieldJng Games Sports Motivation Socioeconomic Influences on Health in America Body Image Tramping the Tracks of New Zealand Physical Education in the .Elementary School Adapted Physical Activity Aqnotics Management Sdentific Basis for Training 344 Legal Aspect of Physical Activity 360, 36] ProfessionaJ Procticum, Coacbing Practicum 362 Healing Arts of the Mind and Body 370-379 Coachlng Tbeory 380 Exercise Testing and Prescription 381 Foundations of Health fitness Management

275 277 279 293 294 297 298 308 3] 0 315 319 322 326 33 1 334

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389 Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity 390 Applied Sport Psychology 40 ] Workshop

200-21 9 Aquatics

4 1 0 Coaching-the Person and the Profession 462 Dance Production 478 Motor Learning and Duman Performance 480 Exercise Pbysiology 486 Applied BiomecbanicslKinesio1ogy 490 CUlTiculum Organization, Administration and Evaluation 491 I ndependent Study 499 Internship

2 1 0 ( In termediate Swi m mi ng) , 2 1 2 ( Co n d it i o n i ng Swimming) , 2 1 4 ( Ad v anced SwimmLng), 2 1 7 (Lifegu< rd rai n i ng and New Methods ) , 2 1 8 (Kayaking) .

200 ( I ndividualized Swim Instruc t i o n ) , 203 ( Synchronized Swimmin g ) , 205 (Skin and Scuba Diving), 207 ( Basic Sail i n g ) ,

220-240 Rhythms 220 (Movement Technique 1 ) , 2 2 1 ( Tai Ch i) , 222 ( JaZz Dance Level l ) , 223 ( Yo ga ) , 224 (Current Dance ) , 225 ( Ballroom

Dance ) , 226 (Folk and Social D an ce ) , 227 ( L ine Dance ) , 2 3 0 ( M ovement Techn i q ue I I ) , 2 3 1 ( roup Challenge O utdoors ) , 232 ( ja7.z D a n e Level I I ) , 2 3 4 (Relaxation Tec h n iques ) .

100 PersoJl81ized Fitness Programs

24 1 -259 Team Activities

To timulat student interest i n funct ional personal1>' d si gned

< u

tivity; ass e ss m en t of physical co ndition

p rograms of physical

a n d skills; re omm nda ion of pecifi p ro gra m s � r main ta i ning and i m p rovi ng physical h a J th . Should be taken as a fres h ma n.

Ac tivity).

t H O)

260 Food and Health

1 17 ( HEED) ChIldbirth and Beyond

A st udy of the basic requirements necessary to maintain opti mal

Addresses issues and choi es in the fo llOW i n g areas : pregnancy,

health through wise food choices. I I I ( I )

la or and del ivery, n ut rition , anesthesia, VBAC, postpartum, c i rc u mcision, bre

st feed ing, m idwi D ry,

270 Stress Without Distress

fa mily plann ing, infant

onsideration of stress, what p e o ple hould know about stress,

care and re la ted topics. Ful fills freshman Ja nuary t rm and

how to reduce the harmful e ffec ts o f suess, and the rel ationsh ip

onvcrsation req u i rements. J (4)

Critical

24 1 ( Basketball and Softball ) , 243 (Soccer and Vo lleyb a l l ) , 2 4 4 ( Co-ed Vo lleyball ) , 2 4 5 (Team Handbal l ) , 247 ( Lacross e ) , 250 ( Di rected � p orts Pa rt icipation ) , 259 ( I ndependent Stu d y/

of increased s t ress to disease problems. II ( I )

1 17 (PRED) Movement a n d Mind

275 Water Safety Instruction The American Red Cross Wa t r Safe ty Instructor's Course.

A criti al conversation course which a na lyzes movement a5 a tool for language in da.nce p rforman . and music. How

Prerequisite: swim test required. II ( 2 )

movement is connected to alternati e healing L h erapies . U ( 2 )

277 Foundations o f Physical Education The relationship of physi ca l education to ed ucation ; the biolo­ gical, sociological, psychological, and mechanical pri nciples underlying physical education and athleti cs. Shonld be the i n i t ial p ro fessional course taken in the School of Physical Education. II

(2) .

279 Introduction to Teaching Physical Education ourse content in a physica l e d u cation se tti ng will incl ude: Meth o dology; teaching styles and strategies; classroom manage­ ment; observation techniques; skill anal ys i s; and group process issues. Should be taken before or concurrently with EDU

262.

[ ( 2)

28] Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care Preven tion, t re a t m en t , and rehabilitation of all common injuries �ustained in athletics; physical therapy by em ployment of electri­ city, massage, exercise. light, ice, and mechanical devices. I II

(2)

292 First Aid This cour

e

meets req u i rements fo r the American Red Cross

1 5 0 Adaptive Physical Activity

Standard First Aid and Personal Safety. I 1I ( 2 )

An individuali2ed ac tivity p ro f,'Tam designed to meet the needs

293 Teaching Methods: Fitness Activities

interests, l i m i tatio ns , and capacities of stud nts who have had restrictions placed

on

Overview, a p p l ic tion and evaluation o f fitness activites, such as:

the i r physical act ivity.

aerobics (water, high and low i m p a c t, step. slide), weight training, calisthe nics circuits, c n t inuous interval t raining.

1 5 1-1 99 Individual and Dua1 Activities 1 5 1 ( Beginning Gol f), 1 5 3 ( Archery), 1 5 5 ( Bowling) , 1 5 7 ( Personal Defense) , 1 6 2 ( Be gi n n ing

Tennis),

Prerequisite: 279. 1 1 ( 2 )

1 1 3 ( Beginning

294 Teaching Methods: Invasion Games

Badmin ton ) , 1 64- ( P icklebal l ) , 1 65 ( Racquetball/ quash ) , 1 6 6

( Racquetball / Pickleball) , 1 7 (Roller Skating) , 168 ( Ice Skating), 1 70 ( ki i n g ) , 1 7 1 ( anoeing), 1 72 ( Backp ekino), 1 73 ( Ba sic Moun ta ineer i ng ) , 1 74 (. Equitlllio n ) , 1 75 ( S now- bo ardi ng) , 1 77 (Weight 1hining) 1 78 (B ody oni ng ) , 1 8 0 ( B icycl i n g ) , 1 8 2 ( Low I m p act Aerobics ) , 183 C Power Ae robics) , 1 84 ( Water Aero bi c s) ,

Garnes in which a team tries to invade the other team's side or

te r ri t ory by putting an implement i n to a goal. Ac tivit ies will includ . Basketball, soccer, lacrosse, hockey, and football. Prerequisite: 2 79. I ( 2 )

295 School Health Health conc epts which relate to the total school h ea l th p ro gram ,

1 86 (Step Aerobics), 1 9 1 ( I n termediate Golf), 1 92 ( I n termediate

i n cludi n g in truction, servie s, and environment; relationships

Ten ni s) , 1 93 ( I n t rmedi te Badminto n) . 1 94 ( interm ed iate Equit at i on ) , 1 95 ( l nt rmed i ate Racquetballl quash) , 1 97

between heal th and all levels of education. I I ( 2 )

( Advanced Weight Training).

296 Teaching Methods: Recreational Activities Lea rn i ng to plan and implem n t a variety of r creational activities, including outdoor education. P re r e qu is ite : 279. I ( 2 )

1 08

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297 Teaching Methods: Net Games

Players a t te m p t

to send

an

object into the playing area on the

other side o f a net or ba rr ie r. c t ivities include volleybal l . ten nis , bad m in to n , pickleball, n d racquetba l l . Prerequisite: 2 79. ! ( 2 )

298 Teaching Methods: Targ t and Fielding Games

train ing. Topics include the develo pment of m uscular strength and endura nce, and the rel a t ionship o f n u t r i tion, environment,

sex, age, and ergogenic aids to athletic pe rfo rmance. I ( 2 ) 344 Legal As-pects o f Physical Activity Role of law in sp o r t and physical activity, negligence, tort and

Pa rticipan ts strike, h i t, kick, o r th rmv at ta rgets or objt:c ts. Act i itie include golf, bowling, a rchery, s o ftball, kickball, and track and field. Prerequisite: 2 79. II ( 2 )

risk manageme n t as it relates to legal issues i n school, sport, and

308 Sports Motivation

Students work under the supervision of a coach, teacher,

recreational settings.

I II ( 1 )

360, 361 Professional Practicum. Coaching Practicum

Concept! include: m odels of w i n n i n g, closing the potential

recreat i o n supervisor, or health care provider. Prerequisite:

performa nce gap, buildin g winning atti tudes, and setting goals. Fulfills coach. i ng m inor requiremen t . J ( 2 )

d.epartmental a pproval.

310 Socioeconomic Influences o n Health in Amerlca

Designed to i n t roduce alternative therapies of m ind-body

Exam i nat ion of the c ul t u re, socia! enV" ironme nt , a nd pressures th;}t create a hea l t h v u L ner a bi l it y w i t h the Am eric a n population.

several therapies a n d practices. Fulfills the alternat ive line i n the

I I I ( 1-2)

....

362 Healing Arts of the Mind and Body

m

p w cesses. History, roots, practice, and c u l t ural significances of

J (4)

J (4)

Perspect ives on Divers i t y requirement.

315 Body Image

370-379 Coaching Theory

Topics incl ude: the connection between wo men a nd food, c u l t ural defini tio ns of beau ty, eati ng diso rders, n ut r i t i o n , and bio soc ial factors a ffecting weight con trol. FulfLlls Lhe alter n ative l i ne in the Pe rspect ives on D ive rs i ty requirem e n t . J (4)

Techniques, systems, training methods, s t r a te.gy, and psychology o f coaching;

3 70

( Basketbal l ) ,

Cou ntry/Track a n d Field ) ,

3 7 1 ( Footbal l ) , 372 ( Cross

3 74

( Socce r ) ,

3 78

( Softball/ Basebal l ) .

I II aly (2)

319 Tramping the 1racks of New Zealand

380 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Backpacking several of New Zealand's world renowned track and hiking up ancient volcano craters, to glacial mountain lakes, a nd alo n g san dy ocea n beaches. J ( 4 )

conduct safely a variety o f exercise test i n g techniques used to

321 family Life and Sex Education

38 1 Foundations of Health and Fitness Management

A Study of a n a tom y a n d p hysi o l o gy, sexual roles, reproduc t i o n ,

Provides an overview of fitness and workplace health promotion

res p onsi ble rela tionships, respect for elf and others, and p h)' kal and emo t ional \vcll-bei ng. Evaluation o f school cu niculu m models. II ( 2 )

Provides the theoretical and practical background necessary to assess co mponents o f physical fitness. l1

managem ent.

( 2)

1 (2)

382 Injury Prevention-Advanced A n advanced study in the recognition and treatment of specific

322 Physical Education In the Elementary School

athletic inj uries and vulnerable body structures, with em phasis

O rganiz tion and ad m in istrat ion o f developmental program for grades K-6; sequential and progress ive progra m m i ng; large repertOire of ac tivit ies. Observation and/or practicum in p ub l i c schools requ i red . 1 ( 2 ) ; J ( 2 ) ; I I (4 )

o n evaluation, modalities o f treatment, rehabilitation, and

323 Emotional Health/Disease Prevention Topics include i.nterpersonal communic lion, cooperat ion, valllu1g techniques le ad i n g toward a h ea l th i er l i festyle th ro ugh p reventive medici ne, and re l a ted disease pro ble m s. I I (2)

current issues. Prerequisire:

28 1 . I I ( 2 )

389 Social Psychology o f Physical Activity Questions of how social psychological variables influence motor behavior and how physical a c t ivity affects the psychological m aJee up o f a n individual will be explored. II

(3)

390 AppUed Sport Psychology A practical, i ndividually-orien ted course designed to teach

325 Consumer Health

a thletes, t ra i ners, coaches, and teachers a c o m p rehensive variety

Information about consump tion as it a ffects personal health . Exam i nation of consuming h ab i t s to achieve g re a t e r control over

o f skills and techniques aimed a t enhancing sport performance.

total health status. I

se tting, self-confidence, attention c o n t rol, injury interventions,

(2)

Emphasizes the

theory and p ract i ce of adaptatiou in teaching

st rategi es, cur r iculum, and ser ice deliv .ry fo r a l l person s with

psychomotor problems, not just

those l abel ed "disabled." I I ( 3 )

327 Substance Use and Abase A study of drug

use

Psychological topics include: IV!anaging anxie ty, imagery, goal self-talk strategies, and team building.

326 Adapted Physkal Activity

and ab use and the e ffect on the h u man body

and m ind. J ( 2)

(4)

4{)1 W�rksbop Workshops in special fields for varying p eriods.

( 1-4)

410 Coachinit-The Person and the Profession

Personal and p ro fessi o n al requisites o f successful sports programs. r I l ( 2 )

42 5 Health Promotion and Wellness Intervention Strategies

330 Ret:reation Programming and I.e dershlp

Exa m i. n a t i o n of strategies for i m p roving the state of wellness

Examines the p ri nc iples, procedures, techniq ues, and .�trategies essen tial to p r o gram l ei s ure services successfully a n d to lead recreat.ion experiences for diverse pop ulatio n s in a va r i e t y of settings Prerequisite: 277 or co nsent of i n s t ru ct o r. r (4)

through healthier lifestyles.

331 Aquatics Management Topics include t rai n i n g and upervising per anne!, financing, prog ramm ing, pool main tenance and o p e ra t i o n , swim meel ma nage me n t , and sa fe ty and e me rgen C)' proced ures. Study o f pool chem istry, filter operations, and m a i n tenance. Visitation to local pools. a/y (2) 334 Scientific Basis for Training Presen ts physi ologic and kinesiologic applica t i o ns to phys ical

o z

( 2)

462 Dance Production An advanced choreography course combining choreogra phy,

co stu m e design, staging, and publicity techniques fo r producing a

major dance concert.

II (2)

478 Motor Learning and Human Pe.rfonnance Provides basic theories, research, and p ra c t ical i m plications for

m tor learning, motor con t rol, and variables affecting skill acqu isition. I

(4)

480 Exercise Physiology Scientific basis fo r t r a i n i ng ,llId physiological effect of exercise on t he human body. Lab required. Prerequisite: BIOL

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205-206. r (4) E

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1 09


483 Recreation Administration Exami n s t h pr i nc i F les, pro cedu res , t ch n iqu es , , nd sl ral g i cs essential to th e suc essf"ld ma n age me nt of l e isure services. P rere4 u i . ites: R EC R 330, 360, PHED 344. 0 (4) 11'1 U 11'1 > J: a..

A t yp ic al B.S. ph ys i cs m aj o r program is as follows: P hys ic s 1 53, 1 63 Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 Sophomore P hys i c 1 54 , 1 64, 2 2 3 , 354 Math 253

Freshman

486 Applied Biomechanics/Kinesiology O ppo rtunity to iflcT�e knowledge and understanding ab o u t the b u m a n body and how tbe basic laws o f me ha n ics are i n t egrat ed in efficient motor performance. [[ ( 3 ) 490 Currkulwo Organization, AdmJn.istration, and Evaluation

An i n t e g ra te d approach to cltrriculum o rga n iza ti o n , adm i n istra­ tion, and evaluati n w i l l be emphasized before the st udent te ach in g experience in ph ysic al educa tion. IT (6)

Ju nior Se�/ior

P hysi c s 3 3 1 , 332, 336, 356 C h e m ist ry 120 Physics 333, 401 , 406, 490A, 490B

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Physics 1 5 3 or 1 25, 1 54 or 1 26, 1 63 or 1 35 , 1 64 or 1 36, 223, 490A, 4 OB, p l u s 8 additional, uppe r division hours in p hys i cs . Required s u p p o rt i n g COllfses: Math

1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 2 5 3 . MINOR: P h ys ic s 1 53 or 1 25 , 1 54 or 1 26, 1 6 3 o r I 5 , 1 64 or 1 36, p l u s 1 2 additional hours in p hys ics (excluding Ph ys i cs 1 1 0 ) , of

49 1 Independent Study Prerequisite; con enl of the dean. M ay be taken a P hys i 1 Educatio n, Health Educa t ion , or Recreation cred i t . I II S ( 1 -4)

which at least 8 must b

499 Internship Pre - p r fes 'ional exp riences do ely re l a t e d to sludent's career and acade m i interests . Prerequisi tes: de claration o( maj r, I l east so pho m o re statu , and co m p let ion of at least 1 0 h ou r s in

Also availabl

Applied Physics is a major in Ap p l i ed P h ys i c s , wh i c h i n c l u d e s a substantial se l e c t i o n of courses from engi neering to p rov i d e a challenging and h i gh l y vers at il e de gree . Appl ied P hy si c s can l e ad to rese a rch or advanced study in such areas as robotics-wi th ap p li ca t i o n in space ex p l o r a t i o n o r jo i nt and l i m b p ros t he li ; grow t h o f si n gle - c ry tal m e ta l s, which would be- t ho u sa n d s of

t h e major. May be taken as Physi aI Education, Health Educa­ tion, or Recreati on c redi t . ( 2-8)

501 Workshops ( 1 -4)

times stronger than the best steels now available; mechanics of mat e r i al failure, such a s me ta l fa t ig ue and fracture; turbulence in

560 Practlcum ( 1 - 2 ) 59 1 Indepen.dent Study ( 1-4)

flu i d flow; p h o t o vo l tai c cell res ea rc h for solar e n rgy d velop­

599 Internship ( 1 --4)

men!; or app l i c a ti o n s of fluid flow and thermodynamics to the

study of p la n et ar y atmospher s a n d 0 ean cur r e n t s. While many Applied P hys i cs g rad uat es pu rsue professional careers i n i nd u st r y i m me di a te l y a ft er g r ad ua t ion from PLU, the program also provides excellent preparation for g r a d u at e s tudy in ne a rl y all fields of e ng i ne e ri ng .

Physics Physics i s the

cientille study o f t h e ma te r ia l un iverse a t its most fundamental Ie el: the mathematical description of space a nd time, and the behavior of matter from the e lem e n tary partic l es to th un iverse as a whole. A ph ys ici st might tudy the inner work i n gs of atoms and nuclei, t h e size and age of the u n iverse, the beha ri r of h igh ­ temperature uperconductors, or the life cycles of tars. Physicists me hi gh - e nergy accelerator to sear h for q u a rks; they design new laser sys te ms for application in m edi c i ne and commW1ications; t.hey heat hydrogen ga es to tem p eratures higher than the sun's core in the attempt to develop nuclear fusion as an energy resource. F rom astrophysics to nuclear phy 'ics t optics and crystal structu re, physics encompasses s ome of t he most funda­ mental and exciting ideas ever considered.

BACHEWR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN APPLIED PHYSICS:

P hys i cs 1 53, 1 54, 1 6 3, 1 64, 223, 33 1 , 334, 354, 356, 490A, 490B; CSCE 1 3 1 plus fo ur co u r ses , one of which must be u p p e r d ivision, sel ct ed from: Ph y s i c s 233, 234, 333, S E 24 5, 345, 346. P h ys i cs 336 may be substitu ted for Phy ics 234; Ch e mi s tr y 341 m ay be substituted for P hys i cs 333. Req u ired su pport i n courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253; h em is t r y 1 20 0r 1 2 5 ; Co mp ut e r Science 1 44 or 240. A typ ic al a p p l i ed ph :s i pr gram is as follows: Physics 1 53 , 1 6 3 SCE 1 3 1 Math l S I , 1 5 2 Sophomore Physics 1 54 , 1 64, 233, 234, 354 Math 253

Freshman

Junior

Phys i c s 223, 333, 356 C h e m i stry 1 20 C o m p u te r Science 1 44

hair; L ars o n , Louie, Starkovich., Ta n g .

ree nwoo d ,

FACULTY:

upper division.

Senior

Physics

Physics 33 1 , 334, 490A, 490B S E 245

T h e p hys ic maj or o ffer a c hal l en g i ng program em phasizing a low

student-teacher ralio and the opporturtity to engage in

Course Offerings

i nd ep ndent research proj cts. There are h'lo introduc tory

ourse sequence , Co ll ege Physics and Gener I P hysics; the Physics se q u e nce inco q> orates c a lc ul us , and is req ui red for the Bachelor of S i t'n ce major.

1 10 Descriptive Astronomy

G n eral

cosmol ogy,

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: Physics 1 53, J 54, 1 6 3 , 1 64,

490A, 490B. S t ro n gl y recolTI­ Physics 40 I a nd 406. he m is t r 34 1 may be substituted fo r Physics 333. Required su pp orting c o u rse s : Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 253j Cb'mistry 1 20 or 125.

223 , 3 3 1 , 332, 333, 336, 3 54, 356, mendt'd:

1 10

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and l arger structures, a nd the sola r system. Em p h a is on observational evidence. Ev e n i n g o bse rv i n g sessions. No p re re qu i ite ourses in sc ie n ce or mathematics. Fulfills Na t u r a l Sciences core re q u i re ­ ment (CORE 1 , e) or S c i e n ce and the Scientific Method requ ir e ­ ment. 0 prerequisites. I (4) Stars an d their evolution, galaxies

y

125. 1 26 College Physics These cour es provide an in trod u c t ion to the funda mental topi c s of physics. It is a non-calculus se qu en ce , involving o nl y the use


of t rigonomet ry a nd col lege algebra. Con un nt reg is t rat ion in (or p reviou completion of) Physics 1 3 5 is requ i red for 1 2 5 ; co ncu rren. t regi st ra t ion in ( or previous completion of) Phy. i s 1 3 6 is required for 1 26 . Prerequ isites: Math 140 ( o r e quivalen t by placement exam ) is req u i red for J 25; P hys ics L 2 5 i required for 116. 1, [J (4, 4)

135, 136 CoUege Phy ia Laboratory Basic laboratory ex

the

12

im rus are perform d in conjun Ii n with ollege Phy its sequence. Conc u rrent registration in 1 2 5 , is req ulred . [, II ( 1 , 1 )

1 53, 154 General Physics A calculus-l evel urvcy of tbe ge n er al fields of physics, including classical mechanics, w, v e Ol ot i o n , electricity and maf:,rnet ism, and optics. Concu rrent registration in (or previous co m p l e t ion of)

Physics 1 63 is requ i red for 1 53; concurren t registration i n (or p reviou completion of) Physics 1 64 is required for 1 54. Prer quisites: Math 1 5 1 for 1 53; Math 1 52 a nd Phy ics 1 5 3 fo r 154. I I l (4, 4)

163, 164 General Physics Laboratory Basic l ab oratory experiments are performed in co nju n c ti o n with the Ge ne ral Phy ic sequence. Co ncu rrent registrati n in 1 5 3 . 1 54 is required r I I ( J , I )

223 Elementary Modern Physics A seJe ted t re at me nt of various p hys i I p henom ena which are i nadequately described by cia ieal methods of physics. Interpre­ tations whieh have b een developed tor these phenomena since approx im te ly 1 00 a re p resented at an e l e m entary level . PrereqUIsite: 1 54 a n d MATH 253. [ J ( 4 )

336 Classical Mechanics Fo u nd, Lions of cia 'sical mecha n ics with

a n emphasis 0 .11 applicat io ns to astronomy and cel est ia l mechanics. Top ics include appli Lions of Newton's law to part i c l e m tion i n i nertial a n d non i nertial fTames; sys te ms o f par t i cle n d rigid body dyna m ics; calculus of variations, Lagrange 's equations and the H m i lton i a n formulati n f mechanics. Prere q uis i tes : 1 54 , 3 5 4 o r M AT H 35 1 ( o r o n se n t of i nst ructo r ) . II ( 4 )

354 Mathematical Physics I e q uat i on s , Lap lace transforms, fun lion of a c mplex va riable, and contour i n tegrati o n are develop ed i n the

233 Engineering Statics

O rd i na ry differential

Engineering tatie using vector algebra; conditions fo r equilib­ rium, resultan t force �'Ystems, centroid and center o f g ravi t y, methods of virtual work, frictio n, kinematics of part ides . Prerequisite: 1 53. 1 ( 2 )

co ntex t of exa mp les from the fiekb of electromagnetism , waves, transport, vibrat ions, and mec h a n ics. P rerequisites: 1 54 and MATH 2 5 3 . II (4)

234 Engineering Mechanics o f Solids Mechanics of d efo r m a b le soLid bodies, deformation, tress, constitutive eq ua t io n for elastic materials, thcrmoe!ast icity, tension, flexure, torsion, s tab i l i ty of equilibri u m . Prereq uisites: 1 54 and 233 . 1I ( 4 )

33 1 Electromagnetic Theory Elect rostatics, d ipole fie l ds , fields in dielectric materials,

l eet ro m a gn e t i c induction, magnetic p ropert ies of m at ter, in conjunct ion with the development of Maxwel l 's eq u ati ons. Pre requis i tes: 1 53, 1 54 and MATH 253. 1 (4)

332 Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics Pro eeding from Maxwell's equations, t he generaLion and

356 Mathematical Physics II Fourie r a oalysis, b o un dary-value pro b le ms , spe c i I fu nct ions, and eigenvalue p roblems are devel o pe d and illust rated through applications in phy i . Prerequisite: 354. 1 ( 4)

40 1 Introduction to Quantum Mechanic The ideas and te c h n i q ues of qua n tu m mt:charucs are developed. Corequisite: 3 5 6 . a/ 1 2000- 0 1 (4) 406 Advanced Modern Physics Modern theo ries are used to describe top ics of con tem porary importance such as atomic and sub-atomic phenomena, plasmas, sol id-state, a n d astrop hysical events. Prerequisite: 40 I . a/y 2000-0 I n (4)

propagation of electromagnetic waves is developed with particular em p h as is o n their application to physic I optics. Prerequisite: 3 3 1 . 11 aly 200 1 -02 ( 4 )

490A Advanced Laboratory I

333 Engineering Thermodynamics

meets the senior seminar/project requiremenL Corequis ite: 33 1 .

lassical, m acroscopic therm od ynamics with applications t physics, engineer i ng, and chemistry. Thermodyn mic sta te variables, cycles, and potentials; flow and non-flow systems; pure sub tan eS, mixtures, and solutions; ph a se transitions; i ntroduction to s ta tis t i c al thermodyn am ics . Pre requisi tes : 1 54 and MATH 2 53. 1 (4)

334 Engineering Materials Science Fundamentals of e ng i nee r i ng materials includ ing mechanical, chem ical , tnermal, and electrical propertie associated w i t h metab, ceram ics, polymers, composites, and sen1iconductor . Focus on how useful ma ter i al properties an be engineered through coot r I f micro�tructllre. Prerequisites: 1 4; CHEM 1 20 or 1 2 5 . 11 (4)

Selected experiments from both classical a n d moder n ph y�ics are p e rform ed u ing tate of the art instru men ta t io n . With 490£ 1

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490 B Advanced Laboratory U Con tin uation of 490A with en1 pbasis on desi gn ;U1d i mp lemen ­

tation o f a proj e c t under the guidance of the physi s s taff. With 490A meets the se n ior sem i na r/ project req u i re m nt. Prerequisite; 490A. I I ( l )

491 Independent Study ( 1 - 4 ) 497, 498 Research ( 1 -4)

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Pol itical Science Political science addresses one of the most difficult, yet w

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fundamentally important human endeavors, the gover­ nance of p eo p l e and societies. The student

of politics seeks

Lo understand how governments are organized and structured, how

political processes are employed , and the

relationship of structures and processes to societal purposes. Recognizing that government and political activity may embody and reflect the full range of human values, the study of politics must endeavor to understand the realities of politics while at the a rne time asking how well political systems work, what purposes are and ought to be served, and what effects result from political phe­

nomena. Political science encou rages a critical understand­

o

ing of government and politics in the be1i f that a knowl­ edgeable, interested, and aware citizenry is the root strength and necessity of a democratic society.

FACUIl'Y: Olufs, Chair; Dwyer-Shick, Grosvenor, Kelleher, Milton, p e nc er.

Courses in political science explore va rious t op ic s in m eri can government an d p o l iti cs , international relations an d fo re ig n p oli cy, co mpara t i ve government and area studies, p o li t i c al philosophy and the o ry, and public policy and law. The depart­ ment provides pre-professional training leading to careers in teaching, law, government, and related fields. The study of po l i t ics touches upon o th er disciplines, wh ich i n q ui re into human behavior and d evel opmen t , ranging from h istory and ph i l osop h y to psychology, communication, and cross-cultural studies. Students of po l it ica l science have the opportunity to combine the ac ade m i c study of government and p o l it i cs with practical experience by pa rticipati on in one of th e intern sh ip programs sponsored by the department. The department sponsors or otherwise encourages active student participation in political life through class activities and through such campus organizations as the Young Republicans and the Young Democrats. There are no prerequisites for political science co u rs es , except as noted. Prior consultation with the instructor of any advanced co urse is invited. Students wi s h i n g to pursue a major or m inor i n po li tical science are requested t o d e c la re the major o r min or with the d ep a rt ment chair as soon as possible. BACHELOR Of ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hours. Required courses: 1 0 1 , 1 5 1 , 325, 490 ( 1 6 semester ho u rs) . Distributional req uirement: One course from each oi Group A and Group B (8 semester hours). Group A - American Government and Public Policy: 345, 346, 354, 36 1 , 363, 364, 368, 3 7 1 , 372, 373. Group B - International Relations, Comparative Government, and Political Thought: 326, 33 1 , 338, 347, 38 1 , 382, 383, 385, 387.

Minimum of 1 2 semester hours selected from the Political Science curriculum. Maj o r programs should be p l a n n ed in co n sul tati o n ith a departmental adviser. In some instances, an internship (450, 458, 464, or 47 1 ) may be substituted for 490; however, students must plan this option with the appropriate faculty intern su p erviso r, in consultation with the departmental c h a i r.

Electives:

MINOR: M in imum of 20 semester hou r s i nc l uding 1 0 1 and 1 5 1 . Minor programs should b e planned i n consultation with a departmental adviser.

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CONCURRENT ATTAINMENT: No more t h a n 8 semester hours taken to sati fy other major or minor requirement may also be a p plied to the p oli ti cal science major. more than 4 such semester hours may also be applied to the political science minor. RESIDENCY: A minimum of 1 2 semester hours fo r the major and 8 semester hours or the minor must be taken i n residence. M INOR IN THE AMERICAS: See Americas. MINOR IN PUBUC AFFAIRS: 24 semester h o urs , including 345 ( required) a nd 20 hours from p o l it ica l science, economics, s oci olo gy, and busi n S5 or statistics . This m inor offers an interdisciplinary study designed to support many major programs whose content has implications for public affairs and is particularly useful to tudents contem­ plating careers in pub l ic service or graduate study in public admini. tration, public affair ' , and related p rogram . The Public Affairs m i nor includes the follo w i n g require­ ments: I ) Po l i t i c al S ience 345, overnment and Public Policy; 2) at least five additi o na l courses fro m three of the fol l owi ng groups (courses which are taken a s p a rt of a m aj o r program may no t also count toward th Public Affairs minor):

(min imu m of 8 h ou rs if t h is group is selected) 1 5 1 - American Government 354 - State and Local Government 363 - Politics and the Media 364 - The Legislative Process Eco nomics ( m i n i mu m of 8 h o ur s if th i s group is selected) 1 5 1 - t52 - P rinc i p l e s of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics (or 1 3 0 - Global and Environmental Eco.nomic Pr i n c i p les ) 32 1 - Labor Economics, Labor Rel ations, and

Politica.l Science

Human Resou rces

362 - Public i nance 3 7 1 - Industrial Organization and Public Po l icy Sociology (minimum of 4 h urs if this group is elected) 240 - Social Problems 386 - Equality an d I nequality 4 1 3 - Crime and S o cie t y Statistics ( minimum of 4 h o u rs ) 23 1 - I n trod ucto r y S tatist i c s On a pprova l by the Public Affairs advi se r, up to 8 h o urs may earned through parti ipa ti o n in an in tern s h i p program as a s u b s ti t ute for courses listed above ( except Po lit i cal cience 345). be

Internship opportunities are offered through sev ral depart­ ments and p rovi de students with actual work experience in state and local legi slative and administrative a ge ncies. Students interested in internships are urged t consult with their academic advisers and with intern fac ult y advisers at an e arly date. Students interested in the Public Affairs minor �hould declare the min o r in t he Department of Political Science and consult with the d ep rtmenr's Public Affairs a dv iser. MINOR IN LEGAL STUDlES: 20 semester hours. For additional information, see Legal Studies.

PRE-LAW: For information, see Pre-professional Programs.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: For information, see School of Education.

Course Offe rings 101 Introduction to PoliticaJ Science An i nt rod u ction to the major concep' , theorie , ideas, and fields of s t u d y relating to politics and governmental s ystem s . (4) 151 American Governm.eot A survey of the constitutional foundations of the American p oli t ical system and of institutions, processes, and practices


rel at i n g to p rticipation, deci s ion - m,l k i ng , a nd pu bli c pol icy in American national governme nt . 170 Introduction to Legal Studies pani i p a n l roles in the l ega l ·ystem. (4)

210 Global Perspectives: The World in Change A urvey r g l bal issues: mod er n i z at io n and de l o p me nt ; econ mic change a n d international trade; di m i n i s h i n g resourceSi war and res l u t i n; peace and ju t i c e ; and c u l t ural d iversi t),. ( Cro s- referen ed w it h ANTH 2 1 0 and H l ST 2 1 0.) (4) 23 l Current International Issues A s u rve y course in international reldtions with emp ha s is on

cur re n t events. (4) 282 Politics in t h e Americas A co m p a r ative st udy of the contemporary politi of th we st e rn h e m i sph e re, covering the nited S tates , Canada, Lat i n America, an d the Caribbean , Key themes are government I yst m , polit ica l c ult ure, ecollomi development, and the historical background to current conflict and cooperation. (4) >

325 Political Thought A su rve y of the or ig in and volution of major p ol i t ical concepts in ancient, m ed ieval. and early m de rn times. ( 4 ) 326 Recent Polltical Thought A critical exam ination of the maj o r i deo lo gies of the modern

world. (4) 331 I nternational Relations A sys te ma t ic a nal ys is of the international sys t e m h ig h l i gh t i n g p tterns in state interaction. ( 4) 338 American Foreign Policy U ni ted States in international affairs. An ana lysis of tbe m. jor factors in the fo rmulation and ecu t ion of the n i ted St a tes fo re ig n p o l i c y and its i m pact on other powers, (4)

The role of the

345 Government and Public Policy An int gr a ted a p pro ac h to the n ature of p ublic p o li c y, with em phasis on subs tanti ve p ro bl ems, tl1e development of I o l i cy r ponses by p o L i t ic a l institutions, and the imp acts of policies. (4) 346 Environmental Polltics and Pollcy An examination of en v i ron m en t al problems from poEtical perspect iv , in clud i ng international nd domestic political con tt:x ts and methods of evaluating p o l i ci es. (4) 347 Political Ec.,nomy An exa m i na t i o n of the ways that p o l i t ic s and economics coi n c ide. To pics i ncl ude the development of ca p it a l ism , socialist ap p roac he s, international issues , regional 'x amp l es, and methods of study. Prerequi it e: L O l o r ECON 1 5 1 -1 52 (or 1 30) . (4) 354 State and Local Government and reg io nal levels of the

, p rocesses, and p o l icy at the state, local,

merican system. ( 4 )

36 1 PolitJcaL Parties and ffiectlons St ud y of party and el c to r 1 ystem with p a r ticul ar emphasis on American pa rt i es and elections. Exam i n at i o n of p arty roles in elc lions and govern m ent; party financing; i nte rest groups and p o l i t ical action committees; and vot i n g behavior.

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36 3 Politics and the Media The role of mass m dia in A me r ica n government, politics, and po l i y. At t en t io n to political culture, public opinion, polls a n d surveys, pre s freedom and responsibili ty, and gove rn me.nta l regulation , secrecy, and ma n ipul at i o n .

Study of the nati n' high st po l it i

l offi e in t rms of the rol

and expectations of the office, st yl es of lead er s h i p, Presidential

An e xa mi nation of the n at u re of law, ju di c ia l p rocess, and

Gov rnm ntal stTuctur

3 68 The American Presidency

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personality and in st i t uti o n . (4)

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37 1 Judicial Process An xamination of leg a l processes i n various djudicatory settings. Primary attentiun g ive n to judicial processes focusing on American civil and c ri minal ldlY. (4) <

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372 Constitutional law The c o n s t i tu ti o n al basi of gov rnmental powers i n the nited States with special emphasis gi en to judicial rev i ew, separation of powers, federalism, i n te rsta t commerce, and p Ii ti ca l and constituti nal re t rictions on gove r nment al power. (4) 373 Civil Right and Civil Liberties The cOllStitutional basis of r i gh ts and l ibert ies in th Un ited tates with spec i al emphasis gi ven to freedo m of e xpressio n and ass ciatiol1, re l i g iou s freed o m , rig h t in cr i m j n al pr ce e d i n g-, due process, a nd equal p rotect i on . (4)

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374 Legal Studies Rescuch Introduction to various met hods of I gal an al ),sis, r s earch , and w rit ing. (4) 38 1 Comparative Legal Systems Study of legal systems aro u n d the worl d as they ac t ua l ly work within thei r respective p ol i ti c al , economic, 0 ial, and cultural context . (4) 382 .East Asian Politics A comparative an alysis of the politics of Japan, hina, Korea, Malaysia, Indone, ia, a nd VieU1am . om p ar at i v themes i n clu de the regional context, cons t i tu tio n s a nd i n st i tu t io ns, po l i t ic al culture, p o l i ti cal power, and economic and social p ol i cy. (4) 383 Modem European Politics A st ud y of the o r igin s and deve l op me n t of the European Un ion and an examinatjon of t he go e rn m e n t al system .llld political cultures of key European states, i ncludi ng Ta nce , e r man y, I ta l y, and the United Kingdom, (4) 385 Canadian Government and Politics The go ve r n me n tal system and p olit ical Life of Ca n a da, with s p eci a l attention to the constitution, p o l i t ic a l p a r t i es , national­ ism and s e p ar a t i sm i n uebee, elf-government of native peoples, and comparati\le study of Canadian and U.S. p o E t ic al cultures. ( 4 ) 387 The Middle East Contra ts t h history and aspirations of the Arab at i o ns with the reality of European do min a nc e and it I gacy, the for ma tion of the present Arab states and Israel. ( 4 ) 401 Workshops and Special Topics ( 1-4)

43 1 Advanced International Relation Examines various theories of inte rn a tion al conflict management, including i n - d ep th analysis of historical exa m p l . The develop­ ment of i n t e rn at i o n al law and international go ernm n tal organizations are also considered. Prerequisite: 33 1 . (4) 450 Internship in Politics Internship in the p ol i t i ca l dimensions of no n-go ve m m nla] o rgani za tio ns . By d par tm cn t al c nsem only, (4- 1 2 ) 458 Internship In PubUc Adm1nJstration An internship with a governme nt dep a r t ment or a ge n cy. By d part mental consent only. (4-1 2 )

464 Intern hip in the Legislative Process An opportunity to t udy the pro ess from the i n s id e by working

364 The Legislative Process A st udy of the ry, organization, and p ro ced u re of th( Co ngre s s and other le g is l A t ive bodies in the United States,

decision- making, p owe rs and lim itations, and the i nteractio n o f

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dire ctl y with l egis l at ive pa r t i c ipa n ts at the tate or local level. By department consent only. ( Intrrnships with the \Nashington

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State Leg islat ure are open only to j u n io rs and seniors w i t h al least one yea r at P LU who have t a ke n or take c o n c u r r e n t l y 3 4. )

PHARMACY: l t h o ugh t he p re - p h a r ma c y requi r ments for i n d i v i d ua l schools vary (check wi th a health science adviser) , t h e fol lowing c o u rses are usually requi red: one year of ge nera l chemistry; one year of o rg an i c chemi t ry, with laboratury; coi­ lege level mathematics (often including calculus) ; o n e car o f E n g l ish composition. Other courses u ften r qui red i nclude m icrobiology, a n a l y t i c a l chem istry, and i n troductory courses in commun ication, e co n o m ics , and po l i t i ca l sc ience. Fo r e..'{ u : nple, the Universi ty of Was h i n g to n School of Ph armacy h as a p proved the fo ll owi n g co urses as being equivalent to t h e first two years o f i t s program leadi ng to t h e Doctor o r P h a rmacy degree: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 20 1 or 328; h e m ist ry 120 (or 1 2 5 ) , 2 3 2 (with labora­ to r y 234 ) , 332 (with l a b o r a tor y 3 3 4 ) , and 33$; Wri t i ng 1 0 1 and a s e co n d CO UIse in w r i t i n g; Mathematics 1 28 or 1 5 1 ; Sta tis t ics 23 1 ; ele c t i ve s from humanities and soc ia l sciences. Total credits should not be less than 60 semester hours.

( 4- 1 2 )

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4 7 L Internship i n Legal Studies An internshi p with a p ri va te or public sector agency or office engaged in legal re�('arch, L itiga60 n , o r law en forcement. By depar t me n t a l consent on l y. ( 4 ) 490 Senior Seminar I ntensive study into topi s , con cepts, issues, and methods o f inquiry in p ol it i c a l science. E m p h as i s o n student r 'ea rch, \w i t ing , and p r sentation. By de p a r tme n t a l consent only. (4) 49 1, 492 Independent Reading and Resurdl By dep a r t m en t consent only: ( 1- 4 )

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Pre-professional Studies The fa llo willg pre-profes;io nal studies do /lot cOllstitlAte academic majors, bllt are programs of study desig/led to facili t a te further

graduate or professional work after completion of a regular discip lillary m aj or a t PLU

a: A.

Health Sciences The Division o f N tu ra l Sciences hea l l h s c i e n c e committee advi ses students asp i r i n g to c a reers in the h ea l t h scienc.es. Stu­ dents having s u ch in terests are en co u r a g e d to o h t a i n a health sc iences dv i s e r early in their p rogram. Su mmarized below are pre-p rofes ional requirements for many health s c i e n c e areas; ad d it io nal i n fo rmation is a v a i la b l e thr()ugh the h e a lt h science comm ittee. Catalogs and b roc hu res fo r m a ny schools and p ro ­ grams are a va i l . ble to students in the Rick Science C e n te r. DENTISTRY, MEDl�AND VET.ERINARY MEDICINE: The overwhelming majority of students e n t e ri ng the professional schools for t h ese careers have earned baccalaureate d e g re e s , s ecur i ng a broad educational b a c kg rou n d in the p roce s s . This b ackgro und include a th oro ugh p re pa rati o n in the sciences as well as study in lhe so c i a l sciences and the humanities. T h e r e are no pre-professional m a j o rs at P LU ; rather st u d e n t s sh uld s e l e c t the major which best matches t h e i r i nterests and which best prepares them for a l ter n a t i ve careers. I n addition to the gen eral u n iversity requirements and the courses needed to complete the s t u de n t 's major, the fo l l ow i n g are generally required for ad m i s ­ sion to the professional program: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62 , 3 2 3 ; Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) , 232, 332, and 338 ( w i t h a U la b o ra to r i e s) ; Mathemati cs 1 40; Physics 1 2 5 and 1 26 or P hys i c s 1 5 3 and 1 54 (with a p p r opr i a te laborato ries) . Check with a health science adviser fo r excep t ion� or for additions suggested by s pe c i fi c professional schools.

OPTOMEl'RY: Although two y e ar s of p re-opto metry tudy is lhe minirmun required , most students accepted by a school of optomet.ry have co m p l e t e d at least three years of un de rgr adu a t e work. A large percentage of st u de n ts accepted by s c h o ols of optometry have e a r n e d a ba cc al au re a te degree. For those students who have not co m p l eted a ba cc al a u rea t e degree, completion of suc h a d egre e must be don e in c o nj u n c t i o n with optom try professional studies. The requirements fm admi.ssion to the schools of o p to me t r y vary. However, the basic science and m a t h e m a t i cs requirements are generally u n i fo r m nd i nclude: Biology 1 6 1 , ] 62, 323; Chem ­ istry 1 20 (or 1 2 5 ) , 232 , 3 32, an d 3 3 8 (with all laboratories); one year of co l l e g e m a th em a t i cs , i n cl u di n g calculus (at l eas t through M athem a t i cs 1 5 1 ) ; Physics 1 2 5 and 1 26, or Physics 1 53 and 1 54 (with a p p ro p ria te laboratories) . In addition, each s ch oo l of optometry h as i ts o w n specific requiremen ts; check w i t h a health science adviser. 1 14

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PHYSICAL THERAPY: Acceptance to s hools of physiGll the r a py has become i nc re asingly compe6tive i n recent years, an d students interested in p h ys i c a l therapy are s t ro ng ly encouraged to meet with a health s c i enc e adviser as early as pos s i bl e to determine pre re qu i s i tes for s p e c i fi c schools. Most phYSical t he ra py programs afe master's deg r ee p ro g r a m s . T h e re fo re , p o te nt i a l a p p l i c a n t s s h o uld p l a n on completing a ba cc al au re a t e degree in c o nj u n c t i o n with satisfying admission requ i remen ts, T h e re q u i rement s for admission to scbooLs of p bysic al t h e rap y vary. However the b as i c science and mathematics requirements are generaJly u n i fo rm and include: B i o logy 1 6 1 , 1 ' 2 , 3 23; Ch e m is t r y 1 20 , 232; Mathematics 1 40; Physics 1 25 and 1 2 6 ( with laborato ries) . In addition to the p r i n ci p le s of h i o l ogy sequence, a p pl i c a nts m us t co m p l e t e courses in a n a tomy and phys i o log y. This admission requ i rement is met by e i t h e r the combination 205 and 206 o r the co m b i n a t i o n 36 1 and 4 4 1 ; biology maj or should take 3 6 1 and 44 1 , the clear p re fe re n c e of seve ra l schools o f p h ys i c a l th e ra py. In a dd i t ion to the science and mathemat-ics requirements, the va ri o us 'chools have speci fi c social science a n d humanities reqlLirements. Check with a health sc i en c e adviser reg ard i ng these requirements.

Pre-Law is an advi s i n g s)'stem, not a pre cri bed m aj or or curriculum. The p ri m a ry reason fo r such an approach i s t h a t admissions committees at American law s c h ools recom mend that a p p li ca n ts be we ll and b ro a d l y educated. that sllccessful ap p l i ca n t s be literate and numerate, that they be c r i t i c a l thinkers and articulate communicatOrs. In other words, exac t ly what a sound l iberal arts education p rovides-indeed, requi res. There­ fore, reg a rdl e ss of their de cl a red majors and minors, studen t s con s i d e r i n g a p p l y in g to law :;chool are e. n cou rage d to d em o n ­ st ra te p rofi c i e n cy in co u rses selected from across the disciplines and s c h o o l s while an undergraduate at PLU. In rece n t years, g r ad u a t e s of P LU who were successful a ppli­ cants to law schools l o c a t ed t h ro ughout the U n i ted States had taken courses in the anth ropology of contemporary Amer i a and social science research methods, A m e r i ca n p o p ul a r c ulture a nd English Renaissance l it e r a t ure , newswriting and argumentation, recent p ol i t i c al t h o u g h t and i ntern ati o n a l rela tion,S, free-l ance \ r it i n g and i n t e rm ed i ate Germa n , a n i mal b e h a v i o r and humao neuropsychology, m arket i n g systtm1s and p u bl i c finance, logic and m o ra l ph il o s o p h y. It is also re com me n d ed , however, that student thinking about go i n g to law scbool rake two or t h ree c o u rses, chosen in c on su l ta t i o n with t h e pre-law adviser, wh i c h will h e l p them to identify. develop, a n d exp lore perspectives on t h e character of A m e r i c a n l aw. For example, PLU graduates who have gone o n to law school h ave fre q uen t l y ind Icated that courses in Am e r i c a n government and h ist ry, j udicial and legis­ lative p rocess, research materials and m e t h o ds , and internships were useful. pa r t i c ul a r l y in t h e i r firSt year. Finally, students are e n couraged to consider partici pating in the activities of PLU's "Pre- Law" at PLU


hapter of Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, Int m at ional , a professional service organ i7.atio n co mp o sed of law and pre-law students, I gal edu ator�, attorneys, judges, and go ver n m ent o ffi c ia ls .

tudenls intere ted in pre-law advising and acti'vit ies are invited to regist r with th e Pre-Law C ntcr in the Department of Political Sc ience. Open to any and ,ill majors.

Theological Studies P r -theologi al st u de n t s �hould co mplete the requirements fo r

the Bachelor f Art degree. Besides the general degree require­ ment , the Asso ialion of Thcological , chools recommends the fol low ing:

English: literature, co mposition , speech, and related studies. At least six seme tef". Hist()ry: ancient. modern European, and American. At least three semesters. Philosophy: )rien ta tion i n history, content, and methods. At least

three semesters. Nillt/ral Sciellces.: preferably physics, chemistry, and b iology. At least two semesters . 'ocla! Science': psych o logy, so c iolog y, economics. p ol itical science, and education. At 1 ast six seme ters, in duding at l eas t o n e :;emester of psychology. Foreig r l L,mgl/ages - one or m ore of the follo wing: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, French. Studen ts ... ho anticipate post­ graduate studie ' are urged to undertake these disci pl ines as ear ly as possible (at least fou r semesters) . Religion: a thorough knowledge of Biblical content together with an introduction to major religious traditions and theological probl ms in th context of the p rincipal aspects of human clliture as outlined above. At least three semesters. Students may w II eek counsel from the seminary o f their choice. Of the possible majo rs, Engl ish, philosophy, religion and the social sciences are regarded as the most desirable. Other areas are, however, accepted. faculty adviser will assist students in the selection of courses ne 55ary to meet the requirements of the theological school of their choice. At t.he present time, increasing numbers of women a re enrolli ng at 'elected Protestant seminaries in pursuit o f the Master o f Divinity degree. Consult the Religion Department chair for fu rther information.

Military Science (Anny ROTC) The o bj ec t i ve of the m il itary science i n str u c ti o n within Army ROTC ( Reset"V Officer Training Corps ) is to prepare academ i­ cally and physically qualified college women a o d men for the rigor a n challenge of serv ing as a n officer in the United , tates Army A tive, . atio nal Guard, o r It serve. To that end, the program stresses service to country and com munity through the development and I!Il hanc:ern .Ilt of leadership competencies \Vh ich support and build on the concept of "service. leadership." Army ROTC i offered to PI-U students on campus. The lower division courses are open to all stud nts and are ao excellent source of leadership and ethics training for any career. They do not require a m i l i tary commitment for non-scholar hip students. The upper diV"ision courses are open to qualifie.d students. R TC is traditionally a four- year p rogram; however, an individual may complet th program i n three o r two years. Contact the PL ItO 'C Department for details. Financial assistance in the form of two, th ree, and fo ur-year scholarshi ps is available to qualified applicants. cholarships warded are fo r $ 1 6,000 for tuition plus a bo k allowance and a monthl sti pend of 200. Students in upper division courses not Oll scl10larsh ip also receive a $200 stipend. To be! co mm iss io ned an officer i n the United State Army, a graduate mLlst complete the military science curriculum, _.

including successful completjon of a five-week advanced ca m p during the s u mmer before the senior year. Additional informa­ tion on the Army ROTC program may be obtai ned by writing Army ROTC, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, 98447, by cal ling 253/535-8740, or b)' e- m ai l to PLU4R OrC@ llOtmail.col11. or by visiting the web page at lVww.plllrotc. com. FACULTY: Major B ro uiUette, Officer-i n-Charg e

" ::a m

The Basic ourse consists of two hours of academic i n s tructio n and military training per week each semest�r of the freshman and sophomore years. Students beginn ing the course a, sopho­ mores can compress the Basic Course by a t te nd i ng additional academic instructio n . There i s no mil.itary co mm itment for non­ scholarship st u d e n t s i n the Basic Course. The Advanced Course consists of additional ac.ademic instruction and physical conditioning plus a five-week advanced summer camp at Fort Lew i s, Washi ngto n . Students a r e fu rnished with uniforms and most textbooks for military science courses.

"'V ::a

BASIC COURSE:

\II

MS I l l . 1 12 Introduction to Military Science An i n t roduction to the United States Army. Includes an i n t ro ­ d u ct i on to mil itary scien ce and its organization, leadership, land navigatio n , map rea di n g , operatio n oTd rs, and the traditions of

the United States Army. Pro ides a look at the mil ita ry as a p r ofessio n and its ethical base. Course includes Army Physical Fitness Test and train.ing. ( 2 )

o ." m \II \II

o z » r-

-4 c: o m \II

M S 2 1 1 , 2 12 Introduct ion to Leadership

A continuation of basic officer skills. Areas o f emphasis are team

building, squad tactics, operations orders, land navigation, ethics and professionalism, total fitness and mi.litary first aid. ( 2) ADVANCED COURSE: MS 3 1 1 . 3 U Leadership and Management

A su rvey 0 leadersh ip/management and motivational theories. An orientation on the competencies req u i red fo r the small unit lead r. I ncludes ta tic , commun ication , and land navigation. ( 3) MS 41 1 . 4 1 2 Professionalism an.d Ethics Cov rs Army v a l ues , ethic�, and professionalism, responsib ilities to subordinates, self, and country, law of land warfare, and the resolution of eth.ical/value d ilemmas. Also covers logistic and justice systems a.nd the i nteraction of special st ff a nd co m ma nd functions. ( 3 ) NOTE: A ma, i m u m o f 24 semester hours earned in ROTC

programs may be applied toward a baccalaureate d gree at PUJ. Students receiving more than 12 semester hours of ROTC credit toward a PLU d egre e are requ i re d to take one o f the fi II wing: ore 221 - The Experience of War (4 ) International Core 222 - Prospects for WaJ: and Peace (4) Philosophy 1 25 - Moral Philosophy Philosophy 353 - SpcdaJ Topics: Focus on Milita rY' Ethics or War (4) Religion 3 5 - Christian forai issues (4) International

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MINOR: 20 semester hours. of which at least 8 h o urs must be taken in residence. Statistics 2 3 1 ( o r equivalent) may be used as

Psychology

part of the 20 hour requiremen t .

Psych o l ogy is a scientific discipline that seeks to un de r ­

>­ Cl o ..... o :r: v >­ VI a.

stand

human and nonhuman behavior. Psychology is also ion t h at seeks to c ha n ge beha ior for the better­

a p rofe

men t of humankind. Th ro ugh

its cur ri cuJ um . research

The major in p sych ol og

r

(a)

senior

-" o r hi gher m u s t have been

sem i n a r/ p roj ct r q u i rement w h e n

a

p roj ect/p aper is

pa p e r i n a n o the r ui t a b le course.

sc ient ifi c methods of psychology, to th eo r ies and research

and to the

h i tory of psych ol gyi ( b ) p ro v i des st u den ts wi th opportu­

n ities t e)'l'lore adva nced topics i n scientific and p ro fes iona l psychology, c o nd uc t psychologica l research, and

Course Offerings 1 0 1 Introduction to Psychology An i n troduction to the scientific stu d y of behavior; scien t i fic m et h o ds

for st u d y i n g the be h avio r of l iv i ng o rgan isms ; to p ics

gai n

exposure to the practice of psyc hol ogy in community se tti ngs; (c) helps prepare students for postgraduate work

such as mot iva tion. learning. e m ot i o n . intell igence. personality,

in psychology or in related professions, such as s o c ia l

no Study Skills E ffe.ct ive t e c h n i q u es for coll ege 'Iudy. Note- making, study methods, exa m i n a Lion kills, t i me man gemt'l1 t. e u c at iona l pla n n i n g . Class work s upplemented by individual cou n se l i n g . (May not be a p p l ied to core. l a n g uag e . o r psyc hol o g y muj r or m i n o r requirements.) I I I ( I )

education, med i i ne, l aw, and b usiness. The m ajor is excellen t gene ra l preparation for employment i n

work. an

variety o f sett i ngs. The p sych o l o gy p rog ram is designed to 111 et the n eds of a variety of students. To

this end, two m aj o rs are

offered: the Bac helor of Arts and the B ad1 el or of Science. Either degree prov ides a solid fo u ndat ion an d either can serve

in psychology,

s preparation for postgraduate study

or employmen t . However, for tho e st u de nts who i ntend to pursu

the doet rate i n psych logy fol lowing graduation

from PLU, the Bachelor of Science degree provide an

e

pecially str ng preparation.

is likely to h e Bachelor of

Science degree il also an excel! nr p re- p r fessi n al degree for those st u de n t s who plan to enter the fields of de n tis t ry. medicine ( all branches, i n cl u d i ng p sych iatry) , public health, or veterinary medicine. M any in busin ess, educa­ tion, nursing, and so c i a l work find a double major with

psychol ogy 0 be a valuable ad ditio n t their t ra i ning. FACUI:fY: M o r its ugu , Chair; Ander on. Broeckel. R.M. Brown, Ha nsv ick, Kim . eTcun , Moon. Shore. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 se m es te r h lirs in ps ych ol ogy including 1 0 1 ; 242; 493; one of 340, 342, 346, 348; o ne o f 350, 35 2, 354; p l u 1 6 h o u rs o f e l e t i v e psy hology w urses. In additi n to the 36 h o ur in ps ych o logy, Stati Ii 23 1 ( psychol­ o gy section ) and , 'companyin lab are re q u i re d . ­

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 se m este r h o u rs in psych o l ogy including 1 0 1 ; 242; 493 ; 340 or 342; 3 4 6 or 348; one lab se ct i o n selected from 34 1 . 343. 347, 349; one of 350. 352, 354; 48 1 ; p l u s 12 hour o f cIecti psyc h o l o gy courses. In ad d i t i on to the 4 0 h o u rs in psychology, Statistics 2 3 1 ( psychoiogy sec t io n ) and accompanying Jab a nd at l eas t 20 semester h o urs in mathemat ics and n tural science a re required. Of the 20 h o urs, at leasl 4 hours must be in mathematics a n d t least 8 h o urs in b iology. Those students who. after graduating (rom PLU, plan to enter schools of dentistry. medicine. p ublic health. or v e te r i na ry medi int should note the specific pre- professional m a t he ma ti cs and science requ i remen in the app ro p riate ections of this catalog.

p chology is designed to . u p p lemen t another major in the libera l rts or a d egre e program in a pro fess i o nal school. su c h as business, education. or n urs i ng .

The minor in

116

Cou r se pre re qui s it e s : A g r a d e o f "

a d d e d . Students may p et i t io n the d e p a rt m nl to do the proj ec t/

i n trod u ces student s 10

fi ndings from the co re areas of psychology,

1 1 3 do n o t co unt to ward the major o r

Psychology 493. a l ready required of all majors, also meets the

as a sc ienti fic discipline and

p rofession .

I l l , and

mi nor.

earned in a cou r se i n order fo r i t to qualify as a prerequisite.

activities, and use of com m u nity r sourc s, the Depart­ ment of Psy hology prov ide s students with a balanced exposure to psychology

Psych o l o gy 1 1 0 ,

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a dj u st m e nt. and 'ocial beh avi or. I II

(4)

) 1 1 CoDege Reading Improv ment of col l e ge - leve l read i ng kill . Pr vi wing, skimming. ca n ni ng , ra p i d readi n , cntic,ll rea d i n g , and study

reading. ( May not be applied to c re. lan ua major or m i nor requ i re me n ts ) . I iI ( 1 )

e.

or p�,.ych ology

] 1 3 Career and Educational Planning: Finding Your Way Pe rson a l decision-making p rocess a p p l ie d to career a n d educational cho ices, self- sessment. exploration of the wor l d of work. edu c at i o n a l pl a n ni n g, reality te st illg , and b u i l di n g career­ related experi e nce . Does not meet ge n e ra l u n iv rsity requ i re ­ ments or ps ych ology m aj o r or minor requirements. ( 1 )

221 The Psychology of Adjustment Problems in p e rsonal adj u s t m e n t to everyday is ues. Exp l or a t io n o f po s s i b l e cop i n g solutions. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . ( 2 ) 242 Advanced Statistics and Research Design A cont i nua ti o n of Statistics 2 3 1 and accompan y ing

lab ta ugh t b y

members of tbe psychology d e part m e n t . Top i cs include single and m u l t i - fa c t o r experimental de igns and a n alyse s o f variance. mul t i p le re g ress i o n , qua. i - experiments. surveys, c ase studies,

archival research , smal1-N re, carch, ancl non-parametric ta t i s ti ­

ca.l techniques. Students will learn to use co m p u ter programs to c arr y o u t statistica.l a nalys e s , and will have the o pp o rtu n i t y to co n d u c t tbeir own r e s earch study. Lectmt and STAT 2 3 1 and accompanying I b tau gh t by members of th e p syc h ol o gy de p a r t men t or con sent of instruc­ tor at leaSl two m o nths before the be g i n n i n g of th semester. (4)

design and

la b o r at o ry. Prerequisi!e:

325 Bnma.n Sexuality

S t u d y of the psychological. biological, and cu l tu r a l components o f hu m a n sexual and em o t i o n al behavior. Topics includ sexual identity, ty p i c a l and atypical sexual b eh avi or, re p rod uct i on , co u r t sh ip . and a ffection. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . ( 4 )

3 40 Human Neuropsychology The study of brain-behavior re l a t i onships . Topi s i n cl ude neuro­ anatomical and neuro-physiological mechani�ms u n derlyi n g human behavior; psychological e ffec t s of brain da m a ge; p hysio­ logical correlates of l an gu a ge . sensory a nd motor functions. and emo tion; electrical sti mulat i on of the b rain. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 242 (or e qu ivalen t); o r consent o f i n s t ru ctor. (4)


341 Experimental Research Laboratory in Neuropsychology

Experiments and demonst ratio ns related to neuropsychological phenomena. Emphasis on methodology in research on the brain and behavior. Prerequisite: 340 (or concurrent enrollment in 40) . aly ( 2 ) 342 Learning: Research and T�eory A critical overview of the research data on human and animal learning, and of the theore tical attemp ts to understand those data . Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 242 (or equivalent); or consent of instructor. (4) 343 Experimental Researdl laboratory in Learning

Experiments and demonstrations related to conditioning and learning in h uman ' and animals. mphasis on methodology in learning research. Prerequisite: 42 (or concurrent enrollment in 342) . aly (2) 346 Perception

The study of our in teractions with t11e physical world and the nature of our wlderstanding of it. Includes such topics as color vision, dark adaptation, hearing music nd speech, taste, smeLl, pain, and sensory physiology. Prerequjsites: 1 0 1 , 242 (or equivalent) ; or consent of instructor, (4) 347 Experimental Reseatch Laboratory in Perception Experiments and demonst rations of p e rceptual events. Emphasis

on methodology in percepti n r search. Prerequ isit concurrent enrollment in 346). a/y (2)

:

346 (or

348 Cognitive Processes

discussed. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (4) 395 Research Laboratory

Experience i n evaluating and conducting research in a designated area of psychology; may be offered from time to time as an elective to accompany various 300-level courses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. ( 2 ) 399 Internship

A practicum experience in the community in the clinical, social, andlor experimental areas. Classroom focu s on case conceptuali-zation and presentation. Prerequisite: sopho­ more standing plus one course in psychology and consent o f the department. ( 1 -6)

,...

o C'I

401 Workshop

-<

Selected topics in psychology as announced. 402, 403 I ndependent Study

A sup rvised reading, field, or research project of special interest for advanced undergraduate or graduate students. Prerequisite: departmental consent. ( 1-4) 405 Workshop on Alternative Perspectives Selec ted topics in psychology as announced which help fulfill the university requirement in alternative perspectives. 440 Psychology of language The study of language a a means of communication and

structured human behavior. Topics include: biological foundations of language, psycholinguistics, speech percep­ tion and production, sentence and discourse comprehension, nonverbal communication, language acquisition, bilingual­ ism, language disorders. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (4) 444 Adolescent Psychology

Physical development, mental traits, social characteristics, and i nterests of adolescents; adjustments in home, school, and community. Prerequisite: 352. ( 2 ) 450 Psychological Testing

Survey of standardized tests; methods of development, standardization; l imitations and interpretations of tests. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 , STAT 23 1 (or equivalent); or consent of instructor. (4) 4 5 3 Abnormal Psychology

Models of psychopathology. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behaviors. Prerequisite: J 0 I . (4) 454

The study of human mental activ ity. Topics include attention, perception, consciousness, memo ry, language, conceptual behavior, de elopmental aspects of cognition, individual differ­ ences, and applications. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 , 242 (or equivalent); or con cnt of instruct r. (4) 349 Experimental Research Laboratory in Cognition

Experiments and demonstration ' related to human cognition. Emphasis n meth d llogy in resear h on cognition. Prerequi­ site: 348 (or concurrenl enrollment in 348) , aly (2) 350 Personality Theories Strategies for the tudy of per 'onal ity. Review

Community Psychology

Intervention strategies which focus primarily on communi­ ties and social systems. Particular stress on alternatives to traditional clinical styles for promoting the well-being of communities and groups. Prerequisite: 10 1 . (4) 456 Theories and Methods of Counseling and .Psychotberapy

Introduction to basic methods of counseling and psycho­ therapy, and examination of the theories from which these methods derive. Prerequisites: 350, 450, 453, o r 454; or consent of instructor. (4)

Physical, intellectual, social, and emotional growth from infancy thro ugh adolescence to maturity. Prerequjsite: 1 0 1 , (4)

461 Psychology of Work Integrating career planning into the study of hllman behavior in work settings. Application and extension o f psychological principles to t h e individual operating within an organization con text-including measuring and facilitat­ ing job performance, worker motivation, human factors, and group processes. Prerequisite: 10 L (4)

354 Sodal Psychology

462 Consumer Psychology

theories and research. Discussion of impl i.:a l io ns for counseling. Prereq uisite: 10 I . (4) 0

352 Development: Infancy to Maturity

Research and theory concerning the i n teraction bet ..... en groups and the individual. language, attitudes, aggression, leadership, person perception, and related topics are examin d and their rela tionship to various types of social change and influences are

Social psychological principles applied to consumer attitude­ formation and decision-making-e.g., perception of advertisements, influence o f reference groups and opinion leaders, and learning effects upon repeat purchasing.

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F.m h a s i s 00 audience, me ssa ge , and me d i a factors. Prereq uis ite: 1 0 1 . (4)

464 Environmental Psych ology Human behavior r I ted to the phy. i al en ironment. Behavi ral 11\

basi' ro r designing environ ments-i nclud ing territorial

I­ IX

behavior; env i ro n mental attitudes and perceptIOns; and st ressors.

«

to th e wilderness. Prerequisite: ] 0 1 .

Appl icat i on to b u i l t and natum l settin gs rang i ng fro m rooms

An i n t rod u cti o n to the i sues, r sear h, professional and j ud ic i I p racti es generated by the growi ng mutual innuence b e t we e n the law a nd psych o logy. Prerequisite: 1 0 1. ( 4 )

" z

Prerequisi tc: 1 0 1 . (4)

his si x- course

studl:nts wit h talent a n d i. nterest

language a nd the written word, majors such as En gl i h ,

Explorat ion of psycholo g ical is ues p er tin e n t

women. In cludes

to

such top i c as sex d i fferences; psychological ram ification of menarche, chi ld bea ri n g , menopause. sexual harass ment , and sexuality, and psycho1 gical d isorders. Prerequ i i te:

ve

1 0 1. (4)

ing.

and

Psychology Research Seminar

nd grap hic design. But student majoring in

a

wide

provides a ri che r understanding of the complex roles that

design and conduct ongOing researcll and review cu rren t re­

writt en co mm un icat i o ns

-earch in p yeh logy. Directed toward he l p in g s t u d.en ts perfo nn

of all sorts pl ay i n o u r lives and

i n our mod rn world.

research studies that may be suita bl for �ubmis 'ion to journals or presen tations at confere nc es . Strongly re co m men d ed in the

PUBUSHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR:

junior year for studen ts with an interest in graduate st ud i s. To

Three core co u rses are req uired:

max i m ize the effec t iveness of the CO ll� e, tudeots are encour­ aged to !-,rive advan t: con. iderat i o n to areas and d es igns for

Eng l i sh 3 1 1 /

o m m u nicati n 32 1

- The

Bo o k in

ociety

English 3 1 2/CorTl m u n ieation 3 2 2 - P ub l i s h i n g Procedures

poss ib le research. Prereq uisites: 1 0 1 , 242 ( r equival ent) , and

English 3 1 3/ Art 3 3 1

(2-4 )

-

The Art of the Book I

In addition to t h is 1 2- h o u r core, s t udent s take th ree elective selected fr()m at least two of the fol!( wing categories; wr it ing/edi ting, marketi ng/ ma nagement, and design/production.

courses ( 1 2 hou rs )

483 Seminar Selected topic i n p yeh logy as announced. Prerequisite: co nsen t of instructor. ( 2-4)

Writillg/Editing: All En glish writing

History and Systems of Psychology

w u rses

b eyo n d 1 0 1 ,

i n cl u ding 403; approved co urses i n Co m m un i cati on ( 2 8 ,

H istorical developme nt , eonlemr orary fonns, and basic

assumptions of the major psychological t heor ies and lradi t i

Meets the s e n ior seminar/ peoje

lan gu a ges , educatio n , pub l i c relations, jo u r n ali s m , market­

spectrum o f disciplines - fr m b io l ogy to music to rel ig i n - have d iscover d the v al ue of a publ ish ing and p ri nt i n g arts m i nor. too. It both help to connect them to pubIJ h i ng career oppo rt un i t ie in tho. e fie l d and

An advanced course p rovid i n g tudent. the opport unity to

493

founda t io n of a liberal arts education.

into the world of publishing and a b road varie ty profes io ns . h e Pu bl ish i ng and Pri n ting Arts program is a n especia lly valuable omplement t o majors c o ncern ed with

474 Psychology of Women

co n. ent of i n st ru cto r.

t n Publi h ing and Pr i nting Arts ( PPA ) i h i gh ly respected the co un try because it combines pre p rofessional kills an d experience wi t h the solid

by employers a rou nd

of related

treatment. l'he role of psychologists in the heal th care system .

481

of nly a few such progra ms in Lhis d istin ctiv interdisci plinary curricu l um

career ill publ i h in g . One

in writing, graphic design, communication , or business a

behavior pattern ) . Psychosocial i mpa c t of illness 311d it s

rape; women's experiences with work and achievement, I ....

way to h el p s tu de nt s

head start

oci al factors i n fl ue n c i n g health ( e . g . , t ressors, persona.liry,

«

a

translate a " l ove of book " into an exciting p rofessi.onal

m in o r i. designed to give

472 Psych ology and Medicine An introduction to the field of heal t h care p sych ology. Psyc h o -

o z

For more than twenty years Pacific Luthe r a n Un i ve rsi ty ' Department of En gl i sh has offered

the co untry .

(4)

47 1 Psychology and the Law I­ Z

Publishing and Printing Arts

3 84, 480 ) .

ns.

Ma rkel ing/Man agement; Ap p roved co ur s es in B us i nes ( 2 03, 308, 3 09 , 3 1 0 , 3 65 , 467 , 468 ) o r C o mmu ni cation ( 38 1 , 385,

re q ui rem en t when a project/

paper is added. Prerequisi tes: 1 0 1 ; 242 (M eq uivale n t ) ; one o f

390, 438 ) .

340, 34 2, 346 , 348 ; o n e of 350. 35 2, 354. ( 4)

495 Research Laboratory Experi ence in ev al uati ng and co n d uc ti ng research in a desig­ naled area of psychology; may b� offered from time to tim e as an elective to accom pany various 4{)O-l evel courses. Prereq u isit :

Design/Produ cliof1: Approved

C O lli

e s Ul E n g l ish ( 3 14),

ommunication ( 38 0 ) , or Art (2 26 , 326, 3 70 , 396. 398. 426, 496). U p to two

COlli

es (8 hours) can be cou n ted toward both

a

Publi 'hi llg nd ri n t i n g Arts m i n or and o ther requi rem nts, such as general univer ·ity requJremen ts, another minor, o r a

consent of inst ruclOr. (2 )

major. To ea rn a minor in P ublish in g and Printing Arts, s t u den ts must demonstrate co m puter skil Ls and acqui re some fo rm o f

practical expe ri en ce i n publ ishing-related work gained outs ide the classroom.

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Rel igion

Course Offe rings

Re l igio n is a n attempt to understand the m ea n in g of h u ­ man e x isten ce. F o r hristians m ea n i n g i ' revealed in the love of God in Je us Christ. The Department f Reli g io n tands within and a ffi rm s this C h r i st i a n cant xt. In a u n i ve r ity se tt i ng this mea n s the erious academic stud y of th e Bible, of the h is tory of t h e Christian tradition, of C h ris ti an theology, and of world rel i gi o us t rad it ions. Cr i tical study calls for open a nd a u t hentic dialogue with

Emphasizes the Bible as a whole; elected passages i n terpreted in

other religious t ra d itio n and eeks to

understand a com­

mon humanity as each traditi n add, its unique con tri bu­ t i o n . It call t r a critical yet constructive interchange with contemporary society. F inally, it call fo r a sh ring of in­ sights w ith other d isciplines in th un iversity as each sheds light on the human condition. To these e nd s the D e par t me nt of Rel igi o n offers a wide range of co u rse and opportunities, F urthe rmore it calls students, majors and non-majors alike, to cons ide r ques­ tion ' f mean i n g , purpose, and value in a society wh ich all t 0 often neg lects t hese questi ons .

I I I Biblical Literature: Old and New Testaments contemporary co n texts, such as religion and health care. (4)

121 The Christian Trad ition f scI cted theological quest i o ns and fo rmulations

The study

examined in th ei r social and historical contexts. (4)

1 3 1 The ReUgions of South Asia

Hinduism, Buddhism, Jai n i s m , and Sikhism - their o rigins �lJ1d

o

devel op m en t , expansion, and c o n temporary iss ues . ( 4 )

1 3 2 The Religions o f East Asia onfucianism, Taoism, Chinese and Japanese

z

B udd h ism , S h i u to,

and the "new r el i gi o ns" of Japan - their origins, develop me n t , and c on t mporary issues. ( 4 )

133 The Bible and Culture Opens a window onto the " s t ra n ge new wo rld" in the Bible. B uilds on social scien hfic studi" of the Bible ,

Mediterranean antiquity; sho\

s

s

a document o f

the distinctiveness o f biblical

cul t u re and h ow a reader's own cult ure sh ap es an understanding of the Bi ble. ( 4 )

P e te rse n, St ivers, Torvend,

2 1 1 Religion and Literature of the Old Teslament L i te ra r y, h istorical, a n d theo l ogical d i mensions f the Old Te sta ­ ment, i ncl u d i .ng perspectives n contemporary ISSU , (4)

UNlVERS1TY CORE REQUIREMENTS: 8 s e m es t r h ours for students e n ter i n g as freshmen or sophomores. Four l ower divi-

Literar

FACUIl'Y: Oakman, Cha ir; Batten, Gov i g , Gross, I ng ram , Kille n,

i n hours sh al l be taken before the end of the soph more year.

4 hours may be selected from most of the other o ffe ri n g s in the religion curricu l u m. Transfer students e nter i ng as juniors or sen i o r. are required to tak 4 emes te r ho urs o f re l i g i o n ( from lines I or 2 ) , unless presenting 8 transfer hours of reli gio n fr m other accredited col leges or universities. Corre­

The second

sponden e courses nd i ndepe.ndent studies may not be used to

fulfill the core requ irement in Rel igi ous S tu d ie s. TI1e Core I requir ment i n Re.ligious Studies (8 hour s) speci­ fies that 4 hours mus t be taken from each of t 0 lines, as follows: L Bibl ical ludies - 1 1 1 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 3 30, 3 3 1 , 332. 2. Chr ist ian Thought, H istory, a n d Exper ience - 1 2 1 , 2 2 1 , 222,

2 23, 2 24, 225, 226, 2 27 , 360 , 36 [ , 362, 364, 365 , 367 , 368 . 3. l.n tegralive and C o mpa rat i ve Religious St udies - 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 1 3 3 , 23 1 , 2 32, 2 33, 2 34 , 23 5, 237, 390, 39 1 , 3 9 2, 393. PERSPECfIVES ON D IVERSITY REQUIREMENT: 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 232, 233, 2 4, 235, 2 7, 24 7, 34 1 , 344, and 34 7 fu lfill the cross­ c ul t ural l ine.

25 7, 35 1 , 354, 357, and 368 ful fill th alternative

tine.

BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

32 semester hours with

a t leas t

4 hours in each of the thre lines plus 490. 1 6 of the 32 ho u rs for the major must be taken in u p p er d ivision courses ( n um bered 300 or higher) , Transfer maj o rs will normally take 20 hours i n resid nee. M jors s ho ul d plan their p rogram early i n co ns ult a­ tion with depart mental faculty. C lose! ' related cou rses tau gh t i n o th e r departments may be co n s i d ered to a p p l y t ward the reLi ­ g i o n m aj or i n consultaticln w i t h t h e chair o f t h e depar t me nt MINOR (TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION)I 24 s e me s t er hours; at least 4 hOUTS i n each of the three l ines. Trm fer minors under this op t io n norm ally take 1 6 hours i n r es i de nc e. Intended

212 Religion and Literature of the New Testament , hist ori cal , and theological dimensions of the ew Tes tam ent, i n cl ud in g perspect ives o n co ntemporary issue . (4) 221 Ancient Church H istory rigins, tho ug ht, and exp a. n s ion of the Ch ristian Chun;; h i r ise of the Papacy, e xp a n s i o n in Europe and the 'rowLh of Christian

involv men t in culture, to t he end of the Pap cy of ,regory I (604 ) . (4) 222 Modern Chu.rch History Beginning with t he Peace f Westpha l i a ( 1 64 ) , interac tio n of the Christian faith with mode rn polit ics, science, and phil so­ phYi expansion in the world, modern movements.

(4)

223 American Church H istory lnteract ion of re l igious and soc i a l fo rc es in A m e ri ca n h isto r , especially their i m p a c t on religious communi.lies. ( 4 ) 224 The Lutheran Heritage Lu thera n ism

as

a movement within l he church a t ho li : i ts

hi tory, d ctrine, and wo rship in the tic and se ular world,

(4)

ontext of loda y's pluralis­

225 Faith and Spirituality Reflecti o n on C h ris t ian ! i fest les, bel iefs, and commi tments. ( 4 ) 226 Christian Ethics Introduction to t h e pe rso n al and social ethical di men ' ions of

hristian life and though t wi t h att n t io n to primary th eo logical

po s i t ions and specifi problem a reas. ( 4 )

227 (247, 257) Christian Theology Survey of sele ted top ics or mo ements in Christian theology designed to intro d u c the t hem s a nd met ho dologi s of Ih . discip l i ne. (4)

23 1 Myth, Ritual, and Symbol

Education.

The natur e of myth and its expre sion through sy mbol and rit ual . (4)

MINOR; 16 se m este r hours with no more t ha n 8 ho urs in one of t h e lines listed above. Tran s fer m i n o rs under this op ti o n m u st take at least 8 hours in residence.

232 The Buddhist Tradition Introduction to the history and p rac t i ce of Buddh ist t radition in its Soulh A, ian, East A i a n, and We st ern cul t ura l con texts. ( 4 )

primarily for parochial chool teachers enrol1ed in the S ch oo l of

233 The Religions o f China I n troduct ion to the major r el i gio us movements of C h ina. (4)

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234 The ReUgions of Japan

368 Feminist and WomaDist Theologies A st11dy of m aj o r theolog ical t h e me a n d issues th ro ug h global women's perspec t i es o n gt!ll der. (4)

I n t roduction to the r e l igious traditions of J a p an . ( 4 )

235 Islamic Traditions An i n u'oduction to the hi to ry, teachings, and practices

VI W

o :J I­

VI

( 4)

f Islam.

H i sto r i cal st ud y of s pe � i 6 trad i t i o n s of I n dia and

237 Judaism Historical development of Judaism's fa ith a nd omm itment from early Biblical tim e s

to the p rese n t . (4)

Study of the way in which environmental issues are s h ap e d by

h u man c ul t w and values. Major co nc e p tions o [ nature, includ­ ing non -western perspect ives and issues in eco- j ustice.

rit i ca l

Z <t > <t Z

I in rel a t i o n

1O

thei r social setti ngs with parricular atten t i o n

t o new fo rms o f rel i gion i n America. ( Cross- refer need w i t h S

CI 39 1 .) (4)

392 God, Magic, and Morals A n t h ro po logy of rel igion . ( Cros s - re6 ren ed W i lh ANTH 392).

e aluations of li t rature, arts, ethic , cone ' p tu a l frameworks,

and s p i r i t u al it y.

l100- h r i s t. ian re lig io n such as th e

h i n a , Judaism, and Isla m . (4)

39 1 Sociology of ReUgion Multi-cultural inv s ti g a l i o n of religious ex p erience, belief, and

riru

239 Environment and Culture

h istor y,

390 Studies in History o f Religions

(4)

(4)

330 Old Testament Studies

393 Religion and the Life C}rcle

Major areas of inquiry: the prophets, psalms, wisdom l i ter�lturt',

mythology, t h e o l o gy, o r biblical a rc h e o logy. ( 4 )

Selected per iod s co ns ide red from a religious and social scienti6c vi ew p oi n t. ( 4 )

490 Research Seminar

331 New Testament Studies Major ar as of inquiry: i n tertestamental, syno pt ic, Johannine,

or

Pauline literature, or New Testament theology. (4)

o Z

Di scllssion o f common rea d i ngs and a major research and writ­

wilh p u b l i c p resentation around the s t uden t 's area of int rc t. Meets the apstone seminar/project requ ire ment. (4)

i n g p roject

49 1 Independent Study I n tended fo r re lig i o n majors, ad

<t u VI

a nce d and graduate students;

consen t of the departmen t i s requir d.

( [ -4)

Scandinavian Area Studies is a t1 xible program w h ich draws on many univ rsity departments. Tt offers a broad perspecti e on Scandi navia past and p resent , while developing useful analytical and commull icative skills. The program reflects bot h the Scandinavian heritage of the wlivers ity and t he dynamic profile of Sc a n d i navia wi t h. i n the world co mmun ity toda . Scand inav ian Area S tu d i es

332 The Life o f Jesus

Historical su rvey of "Life of Je sus" re earch ; form and reda c t i o n criticism of the go s p e l tradition; the rdigiou dimemions of

Jes us' life and th o u ght . conse nt of i n structor.

Prerequisite: one

lower d i vi sion course or

(4)

360 Studies in Church Ministry The church in human service: the congregation, the chur h­ relat d college, contemporary con texts of world mis iOll. (4)

361 (34 1 , 35 1 ) Church History Studies Selected

area

of inquiry. uch as American-Scandinavian church

h istory, religious experience among A me rican m inority commu­ n it ies, and the ecumen.ical movement. ( 4 )

362 Luther The man and h i s t imes, with major e m p has is on creative theology.

h is writing and

(4)

Of

move m en t within Chri ti an theology. (4)

365 Christian Moral Issues In-d pth expl tion from the perspectiv of Christia n ethics of selected moral issues such as peace and violence, t h e environ­ ment, sexua l i ry, political and economic systems, h u n ge r, and poverty. (4)

367 (347, 357) Major Religious Tbtnkers, Texts, and Genres In-depth study of major fig u res , texts, or genres in h r i st i an and no n -Ch ris t ia n r ligiolls traditi ons, foc u s i n g especially on the tbeo logy and re ligious th o ught of t h e s e traditions. Fulfills either

line 2 o r 3 as appropriate. Pre requi ite: consent of inst ructor. (4)

1 20

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Students enrolled i n the S ca n d i na v i a n Area Studies program are expected to demons trate the eq uiv al e nt of nlfo years of Nor we­ gian, Swedish, or Danish l a ng uage instruction ( 1 6 bOUT ) . To ga i n a baslc understan ding of the reg i o n , they als o take 6 hour in candinavian cultu ral history and 4 hour i n Scandinavian lite rature.

Majors choose additional Scandinavian and cross-discipl inary

courses in accordance w i th pers onal i n tere s ts and goals and in consultation with the program d i rector (4 hours in cross­ disciplinary ourse, 2 h urs in a en i r project , and electives) . A total o f 40 semester hour� is

r

8

h

UL

of

quired. With the

app roval of the Sca n d l n avi a n St udies director, selec ted Ja nuary­

364 (344, 354) Theological Studies Selected topic

SCANDINAVIAN STUDIES COMMITTEE: oven, Chair & Program Director; M. Benton. Hegsta d, R. Jensen, Myrbo,

U N I V E R S I T Y

ex pe ri m en tal courses may be in cluded in the se mes te r h o u rs may be offered to meet both the candinavian Are a Stud ies major and general university requirements or req u i re m e nts fo r , secon d major.

term, sum mer, .lll d

major program. No more tha n

Such cro ss -applicat ion of courses must be ap p ro ved by t h e Scanciilla ian Studies dire lor. The cross-d isciplinary courses listed below offer an opportu­ nity to view the S ca ndinavian countries in comparison with other world r�gions. They are regu l a r depart mental

fferings in w h ich students enrolled in the Scand i nav i an Area Studies major fo cus their reading and work a signme nts to a si gni1i.canl extent OIl S ca n d i nav i a . Students must consult witb the p rogram director concern ing re g is tr a t i on for these course .


tudents are encouraged, thuugll not required, to st udy ill SWlldillavia as part of tlleir progra m. Study opportun i t i e s are a vai.lahlc at a variety of institutions in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Appropriate coursework completed abroad should be

s ub m i t ted to the Sca n d i navian Studies d i rector fo r approval toward the major. Students i n terested specifically in Norwe gi a n language study are referred to the description of the Norweg i a n major under the Department o f L a ngua ges and Literatures. All core Sca n d i navian

in other i nterd iscipli n a r y programs including Chinese Studies, Wo men's Studies, and Environmental Stud ies. Also admini stered within the d ivision, the Center fo r Economic Ed ucation serves to broaden knowledge of economic princi ples a mong K - 1 2 teachers a n d their students in the Pacific Northwes t.

o n

FACULTY: Huelsbeck, Dean; fac u l ty members o f the Depart­ ments o f Ant h ropol o gy, Econom ics, H istory, Marriage and

o

courses a re t a ug h t out o f this department.

Family Therapy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and

SCANDI NAVIAN COURSES

Social Work, and programs in Legal Studies, Global Studies, and

Languages:

the Americas.

o r we gi a n 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 - E lem enta ry

D i vision o f Social Sciences o ffe rs progra ms i n each constituent

orwegian 3 0 l

-

Conversation and Compo s i ti on

orwe gian 302

-

Advanced Conversation and Composition

Cult ural History: Contemporary Scandinavia

23 - The Vi ki n gs

Scandinavian

-

The E m i gra nts

Scandinavian 2 5 0

-

Masterp ieces of Sca ndinavian Literature

421 422

-

Ibsen and Strindberg

S c a n d i navian 3 24

L i t era tu re: Scandinavian Scandinavian

-

'we ntieth -

department l ea d i ng to the B.A. degree. Add i tionally, a B.S. d e g ree is offe red in psychology and an M.A. degree is o ffered in

en tury Scandinavian Lit e ra tu re

CROSS-DISCIPLINARY COURSES SOMETIMES APPLICABLE TO THE SCAND I NAVIAN AREA STUDIES MAJOR: C ons u l t with the program d i rector t o determine

> Z C

m a rriage and fa m ily the rapy. Cou rse offerings and degree

S candinavian 1 5 0 - Introduction to Scandinavia -

o G'I -<

As a d ivision within the College of Arts and Sciences, the

Norwegian 2 0 1 , 2 0 2 - I n te rmed i a te

Scandinavian 322

r-

requ i rements are listed under

VI

Anthropology Economics History M l1I'l'iage and Family Therapy Political Science Psychology Sociology and Social Work

o n

See al

0

r-

::E o

sections specific to a fftli<ltcd degrees and p rograms fo r

Chinese tud ies, Global S tudies, and Legal Stuuies.

app l icab i l i t y.

Economics 3 8 1 - Com p a r a ti ve Econ omic Sys tems E ng l i s h 3 3 J

-

The Art o f t he Book I

Eng l is h 364 - p ecia l Top ics in Ch ildren's Li terature

Social Work

Hi story 323 - The Middle Ages H istory 3 2 5

-

Reformation

Philosophy 338 - Existentialism a nd Co nti nental Philosophy

See Socio logy and Social Wo rk immed iately fo llowing.

Pol itical Science 3 3 1 - I ntern a t i o n a l Relations Political Science 383

-

Modern European Politics

Religion 223 - American Church H istory R e l i gi o n 224 - The Lutheran Heritage Religion 36 1

-

Sociology and Social Work

C h u rch H i sto r y Studies

Sociology a n d social work, as d istinct d isci plines, are co n­

Course Offering

cerned with u n d e rs tanding contemporary social issues,

499 �nior P roject A re se a rc h paper, i n ternsh i p, or o ther app roved project. For

policies, and solutions. While sociology emphas izes re ­

Scand inavia.n Area Studies maj o rs . I II ( 2 )

i n te rven tio n and pract ice. The d i sciplines h a r ' an i n terest

search, interpretation, and analysis, social work empha izes in human relationsh i ps a n d e x p e rienc e , contemporary

family life and fam i l y policies, e t h n i c d iversiLY and race relations, poverty and social stratification , social justice

D ivision of Social Sciences The faculty with i n the D ivision

of Social Sciences

seek to

p ro v ide a challenging ed u ca t i o n in t.he social sciences that

c r itically analyzes the past and t h e present social history

and stru tures of human in teraction. Instruct i o n i s vibrant and r levanL to the time and world i n which we live and e ncou rages r�sponsible citizenship ro r today and tomor­

row. T h ro ug h classroom learn i n g and a pplied setting such

as s u pe rv i s e d i n ternships, students in he social ci nces

acq u i re an u ndersta n d i ng of society wh ile d e v e l o p i ng the

which to provide solutions to a of social pro ble ms . The D ivisio n of Soc ial Scien ces ful l y su p p orts i nterdisc i ­ pinary programs. The pr og ra ms i n the A meri ca s , lobal S tu d ies, a.nd Legal Stud ies a re h o used w i t hi. n th e divisio n . I n ad di t i o n, Social S iences fa culty also participate a c t ive ly

analytical tools w ith diverse ra n ge

and community organizati o n . Bot h discipli nes

nco u rage

, i nte rnsh i ps ,

hands on learning th ro u g h field placemen a nd service learni ng pr jeets. Students may major i n

i L her sociol og y or social

mi no r in sociology, or complete a

work,

double major in soc i ol ­

ogy and social work . Soci I work majors arc e nco u ra ged

to

minor in so c i ology. FACULTY: McDade, Chair; Biblarz, H igginson, Jobst, Ke l l e r

(Social Work Pro ' ra m Director), Leon -G uerrero, Russe l l Work Field Coo rrliIll1l0 r) , Szab o.

(Social

Socio logy S o c io lo gy exa.mines the p rocesses a n d stru c t u res which . h<lpe sl)ci J .l groups of all s i z e s , i n c l udi ng fr iends , fa mil ie" workplaces, anu na t i on s . The st ud)' of so ciology provide. students w i t h u n ique in t e r p r et i ve tools fo r understanding the msel ve s and

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others in a changing wo rld. Sociology has broad appeal to those who are interested in d e v el o p ing practical skills and a nalytica.l t alents. Some. of the p ractical p u r su i ts e.nabled by sociological training a re in the areas of program development, counseling, research, criminal justice, management, and ma rketing. The academic preparation is valuable to those interested tn pu rsuing degrees i n law, administrat iu n, social wurk, theology, or the social sciences. The department's curriculum o ffers a variety of courses i n sociological analysis while permitting an op ti o nal concentration in the specialized areas of family/gender o r crime/deviance. The cu rric ul um is deliberately flexible to p e r m it students to study individua l subject areas, or to p ursue majors or minors i n the field. S t u dents majoring in business, nursing, education, and co m p u te r science find the sociological minor particularly useful for broaden ing their u nderstanding of social rules and relation­ ships, programs and solutions, and continu ity and change. The faculty is attentive to the individual needs o f students in their effo rts to provide academic excel lence to a diverse student body. BACHELOR OF ARTS:

semester hours, including 1 0 1 , 240, 3 3 0 , 3 9 7, plus 12 semester ho ur, in suci o l ogy approved by the departme n t at the 300 und 400 levels; and Statistics 23 1 . Major with Concentra t ion i n Fo m i ly/Genrier: 40 semester hours i n cluding 1 0 1 , 3 3 0 , 3 9 7 , 440, 496, 499; p l u s 1 2 semester h o u rs in sociology cho:;cn in consultation with the department; and Statistics 2 3 1 . Majo r 'with Concentratioll ill Crime/Deviance: 4 0 semester hours induding 1 0 1 , 3 3 6 , 397, 4 1 3 , 496, 4'19; plus J 2 semes ter hours of sociology chosen in consul tation with the department; and Statistics 2.3 1 . ,el/eral A1aJor: 40

496, 499,

Revised req uirements for those majoring in both sociology and social work: 8 0 s e m e s t er

hours i ncluding Social \Vork 275, 323, and 499; Sociology 1 0 1 , 397, 496, 499, plus 1 6 elective credits ( recommended courses i nclude S oci o lu gy 3 3 0, 362, 386 and 462 ) ; Statistics 23 1 ; Psychol­ ogy 1 0 1 ; and Biology 1 1 1 .

3 8 0 , 3 8 5 , 472, 4 7 3 , 475, 476, 4 8 5 , 486,

NOTE: 1 0 1 o r consent o f in t ructor are p rerequ i site to all 300

and

4 0 0 level

courses.

M INOR: 2 0 semester hours, i ncluding 1 0 J and 1 6 semester

hours of sociology chosen in consultation with the department. Statistics 2 3 1 may b e included in the minor. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

See

equ ivalent to Sociology 1 0 1 (American Society or Intro­ duction to Sociology) and Sociology 240 ( Social Pro b lems). If students wish to have additional cou rses considered for transfer to either their maj o r or m inor requirements, they must fi rst meet willl the department cha i r. The student should bring to t h is initial meeting the following: 1 . college/university transcripts 2. colleg e catalogs 3 . course syllabi a nd other supporting materials Declared majors/minors will be required to fill out one petition per transfer course. co u rses

Course Offe r ings 101 Ame.rican Society

An introduction to the discipline of sociology. Features a n a na1ysis of contemporary A merican society with emphasis on the i n terconnections of race, class, and gender. Sociologica l concepts i nclude sociali"ation, social roles, stereot ypes, power,

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1 17 Critical Conversation

An an a l ysis of selected social issues and problems with a special em phasis o n critical thinking and communication skills. Top ics vary. O pen to 6 .rst year students only. No p rerequisites. ( 2 ) 240 Social Problems

Critical examination of poverty, discrimination, drugs, crime, homdes. ness, violence, family b reakdown. Cou rse add resses contemporary ocial problems, an analysis of their soc ial roots, and an evaluation of the policies designed to eradicate them. Fu lfills the alternative l i n e in the Perspectives on D iversity requ i rement. ( 4 ) 302 Topics in Sociology

S C' l e cte e! topi cs as announced by the department. departmenta l consent. ( 1 -4 )

Prerequisite:

326 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

An examination of juvenile d li nqucncy in relation to the family, peer groups, co m m u n i t y and i nstitutional structure. I ncludes consideration o f processing of the del i nque n t by formal agencies of control. Prerequisitc: 1 0 1 or consent of instructor. a/y ( 4 ) 330 The Family

An exa m i n a t i o n o f t h e institution o f the family from h istorical, multi-cultural, an d contem porary perspectives, with em pha s is on how fam i l ies ane! family l i fe are affected by social forces such as the economy, race and ethuieity, religion, and law. Top ics i nclude: Rel a t ionships, l<.lVC, authority, confl ict, sexuality, gender issues, child rearing, communication patterns, and violence in the context of fam i ly life. Prerequ isite: 1 0 I , PSYC 335 o r consent of instructor. ( 4 ) 336 Deviance i\ gcneral introduction to a va riety of nonconforming, usually

secretive, and illegal behavior, such as corporate crime, d rug deal ing, p rostitution, i ndust ri'll spyi ng, child abuse, and suicide, with emphasis on the conflict of values and l i fe-experiences within a society. Prerequ isite: 1 0 1 o r consent or instructor. ( 4 ) 351 Sociology of Law

An examination of the social control of law and legal institu­ tions; the influence of culture anJ social organization on law, legal change, and the administration of justice. Includes examples of how law functions within the major theoretical models. Prerequisite: J O J or consent o f instructor. ( 4 ) 362 Families in the Americas A cross-cultural exami n a t ion u f fam il y l i fe in the United S tates,

School of EduCII l ioll.

TRANSFER STUDENT POUCY: The department accepts, for tr a n sfe r credit from a nother college or u n ivers i t y, only those

122

and stratification. Fulfills the a lternative l ine i n t h e Perspectives on D iversity requirement. ( 4 )

U N I V E R S

I T Y

Canada, Central a nd South America, and the Caribbean, with a special emphasis on how social forces such as the economy, culture, and religion shape family l i fe. Includes discussions of race/ethnicity, social class, Jnd sexual orientation. Prerequisite: SOCI 1 0 J , ANTH 1 02 or consent of instmctoL (4) 386 Equality and lnequality

An examination of the nature, origins, forms, and consequences of social equalities and i nequalities. Focus on material circum­ stances, lifestyles, and life changes in social classes, including racial groups a nd other m i nori ties. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 or consent of instructo r. a/y ( 4 )

391

Sociology of Religion

An in estigation of the American religious scene with particular emph asis on the new religious movements, along w ith atten tiun to social settings and processes which these new religions refl ect and produce. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , one p revious religion course, or consent o f instructor. ( Cross referenced with RELI 3 9 1 ) . a/y ( 4 ) 397 Research Methods

An overview of the methods to explore, describe, and a nalyze the social world. General i s sues in the design and im plementation of research projects, as well as specific issues that a rise in conduct-


ing i nterviews and field observations, constructing a n d adminis­ tering s urveys, a nalyzing existing data, and planning program evalu at io ns. Required fo r ju nior sociology and social work majors. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , j unior status, or consent of i nstructor.

(4) 399 lnternship Student receive co u rse credit for working in comm u n ity orga nizations a nd i ntegrating their experien ces i nto an academic project. Placements are usually arra nged by the student and may include the p u b l i c sch 01 system, private and public social service organizations, criminal justice system agencies, local and state governmental agencies, and businesses. Departmental consent is requ i red. ( 1 - 4 )

4 1 3 Crime and Society An examination of cri minal behavior in contemporary society i n relat ion t o social structure and the criminalization process with particular attention to the issues of race, gender, and clas�. Prerequisite: L O I , 336, or consent of instructor. (4) 418 Advanced Data Applications

An opportunity for advanced majors to co nduct i n d iv idual research and data analysis projects. Focus on quantitative or qualitat ive data collection and analysis. Prereq uis ites: STAT 2 3 1 and S 1 397. Depa rtmental consent i s required. (2-4)

440 Sex, Gender, and Society An analysis of sexuality and gender from i ndividual and cultural perspec tive.s. Gender stereotypes and socialization; transexuaIity and cross·gender systems; commu nicatio n and rel,l t io nships; sexual attitudes, behaviors, and l i festyles; work and fa mily issues; violence; gender stratification and feminism. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , WMS1' 1 0 l. , or consent o f instructor. Fulfills the alternative line i n the Perspectives o n D iversity requi rement and is a core course for Wo me n's tud ies m i no rs. (4) 462 Suidde An examination of the different aspects of suicide and s u icidal behavi r. Begins with a cross-cult u ra l and historicJI overview, looking at variations and changes in att itudes toward suicide. Review of the scope o f the problem and careful a nalysis o f I h ories that at t e mpt t o explain why people co mmit suicide. Discussions of intervention in s uicidal behavioral and the question of the right to suicide. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 and consent of instructor. (4) 49 1 Independent Study Readings or fieldwork in specific areas or issues of sociology u nder supervision o f a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmen­ tal consent. ( [ -4) 496 Major Theories An analysis of inOuential sociological theories of the 1 9th and 20th cent uries with attention to the classic theories of Marx, Du rkheim, and \Veber, to the rec nt co nternporary schools, d nd to the u nd erlying patterns of thought which both unite and d iv i de the sociological tradition. Requ ired for senior majors. Prere q uisite: 1 0 1 , senior declared major/minor, or conse nt of instructor. (4)

499 Senior Seminar Capstone experience for sociology majo rs. Students in tegrate materials from previous sociology courses through addition a l re adin g s, r search, a n d discussion. Through formal presentations and research, students critically assess their sociological under­ standing. Prerequisite: Senior status or departmental c ment. (4)

Social Work Within a program that is fi rmly based in the liberal arts, the social work major is designed to p repare students for beginning professi nal social work practice. Social work bas both a heavily

multidisciplinary-based b o dy of knowledge and its own continu­ ously developing knowledge base. The complexity of social issues and social problems that co n fro n t the modern-day social worker require this broad theoretical perspective. Social wor kers are involved in areas that are influenced by political, economic, social, psychological, and cultural factors. To that end, the pro­ gram stresses an u nderstanding o f social science theories and methods. The curriculum provides a fou ndation fo r u nderstan d ­ i ng t h e interaction of indiv idual, fam ily, and co mmunity sys­ tems, as the basis for generalist practice. Students learn a multi­ method approach to sucial work practice that enables them to address a wide range of ind ividual, fa mily, group, and commu­ nity needs. Students enhance their com m itment to in formed action to remove inequities based o n race, ethnicity, culture, gender, social class, sexual orientation, d isab ility, a nd age . T h e social work faculty place a high value on t h e integration o f acad mic and experiential learning. The program provides fi eld work experience i n community sett i ngs. Social work majors have access to a rich variety of social service agencies in Ta coma and Pierce Co unty that provide field learning sites. S tudents work with experienced, caring supervisors who help make these placements valuable learning experiences. Social work majors sho uld consult with a departmenta l adviser to p l a n their course o f study. T h e faculty encourage students to take advantage of learning opportunities that empha­ size multicultural awareness and d iversity. The social work program is accredited by the Council o n Social Work Educatio n.

o t"I o ....

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ADMlSSION TO T H E SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM: Students

seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Work must first apply and be accepted i n to the program. The social work program welcomes diversity and invites interest and appL ications fro m persons who eek to participate i n a professio n co mmitted to helping people. now and in the future. Students will be admitted to the Social Wo rk Program fo r fall semester only. The priority date for applications is February 1 5 , tho ugh applications w ill be accepted until available positions are filled. Enrullment is competitive. Admission is determi ned by bCllIty evaluation of student applications on the basis of the following criteria: I . transcript that documents the completion of at least 40 semester hours of prescribed cour c work with a minimum grade point average of 2 .7 5 . In addition, the student must show successful completion of the following prerequisites: Writing 1 0 1 , Psychology 1 0 1 , Sociology 1 0 1 , Biology 1 1 1 , Anthropology 102, anti the PLU math entrance requ irement. ( Note: grades below C- do not transfer); 2. a personal essay which addresses (a) i n terest in social work as a career, (b) life experiences shaping a n i nterest in social work, (c) professional social work goals, and (d) an evaluation o f personal strengths a n d limitations (details may be obtained from Social Wo rk Program); 3. a summary of work and volu n teer experience; 4. two letters of reco mme ndation that eval u a te and document the applicant's potential for success in social work education and practice; 5. Washi ngto n State Patrol Crimina l History clearance ( ppli­ cants w i th a criminal record will be urged to explore their prospects for registering as a counselor or later being certified as a social worker with the State of Wa shingto n ) ; 6 . written agreement to comply with t h e National Association of Social Workers' Code of Ethics (a copy of which is avaiiable from the Social Wo rk Program); 7. personal i nterview ( may be requested). Any falsification in the applica t ion for adm ission i s grounds for dismissal from the program . Applicants who are not admitted to candi dacy fo r the degree may reapply without prejud ice.

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Appli c a t i on materials are available directly from the Social Work Program in Xavier Hall, or may be requested by calling

535-7294.

CONTINUATION POLICIES:

To remain in the program, a student must: I ) ma int a i n a 2.75 grade point average in s oc i al work courses and a 2.50 overall grade p o i nt average; and 2 ) demonstrate behavior which is consistent w i t h t h e A S W Code of Ethics and U n i ve rs ity _ode of Conduct. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36

u o o z « >­ " o

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semester hours in social work, including 275, 323, 380, 385, 472, 473, 475, 476, 485, 486 and 490; 12 semester hours in s o cio logy, i n clu din g 1 0 1 , 397 and fou r elective credi ts. Additional r e q u i r em e nts include Anth rop o l ­ ogy 1 02 or 334, Statistics 2 3 1 ( m u st be completed at PLU ) , Psychology 1 0 1 , a n d Biology I l l .

Course Offe rings 101 Introduction to Sodal Work An introduction to the field of social work. Provides an overview of the practice settings, theoretical models, and value base of the p rofess i o n of social work. Students have the opportunity to visit several different settings and meet with current social work practitioners. A volunteer experience i n the field is a re qui re d omponen t of the course. 1 (4) 201 January on t h e Bill An i ntense e:'Cpe r ien ce of comm u n i ty work o n Ta co m a 's H i ll t o p District and/or Tacoma's east side where s t udents lear n first hand about poverty a nd p art ici p ate in com m u n i t y proj e ct s . Fulfills the alternative line in the Pe rspec t i ve s on D ivers i t y requirement and th e JanUaT)' term req u i r e m e n t . J (4) 275 Sodal Policy I : History of Sodal Welfare Social p olicy course required of a1l soc i a l wor k m aj or s . Ex p l o ra ­ tion of i nterd ep enden ce of social, cultural, po lit i cal, and economic factors in the history, theory, and p ractice of s oc i al w e l fare , w i th sp e c i a l reference to the develo p me nt of the social wo r k p rofess i o n in response to social problems. Examination of the rdati n s h i p among the s ocia l welfare systems, the problems and iss u es addressed by social services, and the role of the p r o fes s i o n al social worker i n se rv i ce a reas and setti n g s such as ag i n g, chi l d wel fare, health and mental health, income mai nte­

narlce and services to women and m i n orities. Opportunities to meet w i t h practitioners in t h e fiel d . Prerequisites: No n e . r (4) 323 Sodal Work Practice I: I nterviewing and InterpersonaJ Helping

An in t ro d u c tor y practice course w hich p rov ides students with the co nce ptu a l framework of generalist social wo rk practice. Application of the ec o l og i ca l systems pe rspe c ti ve to di rec t practice. Prov id s s t ud en t s ith the ()ppo r t u n i r y to learn i n tenti onal in terv i ew i ng skiJls and ap pl y those skills w i t h i n various models of practice. Assists st uden ts t owa rd ma tery in a. scs ' mcnt, goal s e tti ng , contrac t i ng , d velo pment o f i n terven ­ tion p l an s based on t h e o r y and assessmen t i nfo rmatio n , eva l u a t ion, and termination. Must also 'omplete lab. Prereq u i ­ sites: 275, 380. I I ( 4 )

380 Hnman Behavior and the Sodal Environment Exami n a t i o n of the b i o l ogical, p sy c h o lo g ic a l, cultural, and social influences on human dcvelt p m en t . An ecological p erspe c tive fo r s t u d y i n g the theory and development of individuals, fa milies, group , institutions, organizations, and comm u nities with i mp l i cat io ns for generalist social work practice. Special emphasis on gender, e t h nicit y, and other aspects of human diversity. Impact of social and economic forces on individuals and social systems as well as way in which systems enhance or hinder healthy human development. Volunteer experien ce is a r eq u i re d component of the course. P rereq u i sites ; one. 1 (4)

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385 Social Policy II: Social PoUcy Analysis A n in - de p th examination of social we l fare s t r u c ture , fun c t i on s , p ol i cy, and p rogra m s . The i n fl u en ce that economic, p o li t i c al , and cultural s ys tems hav e u p o n s o cial p o l icy and th e way i n which the values operating in these systems impact social policy. A n e xami n at i on of t h e impact of adm ini s trative a n d organizational structures at various gover nm e n t al levels on social policy implementation, es p ec i a ll y � s they affect services to vulnerable p o p ul a t i o ns . Introduces students to applications o f theo re tica l frameworks to social work p o l ic y i n such areas as income ma intenance, health, mental health, child welfare, and housing and homelessness. Prerequisite: 275. I I (4) 399 Special Topics in Social Work Selected topics as a nnou nced by the department. Top ics relevant to current trends and issLles i n the field of social work. ( 2-4) 472 Social Work Practice 11: Families and Groups The s eco nd so ci a l wo r k p r a c t i ce course which teaches theoretical models and practice skills for i n t e rve nt i on with fa m i l i es and groops. I n cl u de s a n un d e rsta n ding o f cult u r a l ly se n s i t ive p rac t i ce . p l o res d iv e r se fa m i ly forms. Introduces students to grou p dyn a mic s and group d evelo p m ent . P rereq u i site s: 275, 323,

3 80 , 3 8 5 . I (4) 473 Social Work Pracljce I l l : Macropractice A conc e p tu al framework based on et h i c s and values consider­ ations and requ i s ite skills for social work p ractice with groups, o rga ni z a t i o ns , and co m m u n i ties. E m p h a si s on macropractice asses s m en t, intervention, and ch a n ge s tr a t e g i e s at the organ i z a ­

community, and larger system level. Prerequisites: 275, 3 2 3 , 380, 3 8 5 . 1 1 (4) tion,

475 Field Experience 1 Students are a ss i g ned to a social service agency and p art i c ip ate, under su p erv i s i on , in the delivery of social work services. P rere qu i s i tes : 275, 323, 380, 3 8 5 ; to be taken concurrently with 472 and 485; req u i re s consent of i ns t r u c tor. 1 ( 3 ) 476 Field Experience I I Continuation of 4 7 5 . Students receive more advanced fIeld a ss ignm e nt s in a social service age nc y s et t i n g . 1ust be ta ke n concurrently with 473 and 486. II ( 3 ) 485 Field Experience Seminar I

o pp o rt u n it y to learn about he intake and a ss e s s m e n t process at va ri o u s social service agencies. Enables s t udents t o moni to r thei r progress in their fieJd experi n ce s e t tin g . Must be taken co n c u rre n tly with 475. I ( I ) T h i sem in a r prov i de s students with the

486 Field Experience Seminar 11 I n th is sem i nar, students learn about t h e strengths perspective as it rela tes to social wo rk p ra c t ice and present a case from their field s e t ti ng . Students will continue to develop skills i n e valuat ­ i n g their own pr act i c e and learn about the appli ability of research to social work p ra c t i ce . Must be taken concurrently with 4 76. II ( 1 ) 490 Senior Seminar In this capstone experience, students examine the evolution of their own personal style o f social work p ra ctice , the theories and models fo r practice which they have developed, the ethical and value foundation which underlies social work, and how these are integrated with their personal and p ro fes s i o na l exper i e n ces and p r ior coursework. The product of this final synthesis is pre­ se n te d to the class and is o p e n to others within the u n ive r s i ty community. P rereq ui s i t es : 275, 323, 380, 385, 4 7 2 , and 475. It (4) 491 Independent Study

Prerequisite: Consent of i nstructor. ( 1 -8)


Statistics Statistics, a branch of applied mathematics, stud ies the methodolo gy fo r the collection a n d analysis of data and

the use of data to make inferences under cond itions of uncertai nty. 'ta tistics plays a fundamental role in the social cl nd natura l sciences, as well as in busi ness, indus try, and

government. Statistical practice i ncludes: col lection, exploration,

summarization, and display of data; design of experiments and sampl ing s u rveys; drawing inferences and making decisions based on data and assessing the un certa int y of such i n ferences and decisions; and the

construction of

math ma tical models fo r analysis of random processes. Probabil ity forms the conceptual fo u n dation a n d math­ ematical l a nguage for the i n ferential aspects of statistics. The statistics program is offe red cooperatively by the Departments of Economics, Mathematics, Psycholo gy, and So iology. The p rogram is administered by an In terdisci­

pl i na ry Statistics Co mmittee headed by the Statistics Program director, who is appoi n ted by the dean of the Division of So ial Sciences. The statistics minor is admin­

istered by the Department of Mathematics. Studen ts interested i n a statistics minor are e n couraged to discuss com e selection with a statistics faculty member from any discipline.

FACULTY: Selected faculty from the Depart ments of Economics, Mathematics, Psychology, and Sociology. STATISTICS M l NOR: A m i n i mum of [ 6 semester hours to

include Statistics 34 1 , at least 8 hours from among the other statLstics courses (Statis tics 23 [ and Statistics 24 [ cannot both be counted toward the m inor) , and Comp uter Science and Computer Engineering 1 44 or 220. The statist ics courses chosen fo r a statist ics minor will vary with the interests of the stud nt. Some typical p rograms leading to a s t a t ist ics minor are listed below; a computer science course mll s t be added to each list. Fo r stu dellts interested in lIlaLhematics, gwduale or professional

work in statistics, 01" an actllarial wreer:

Statist ics 34 [ , 342, 348 1'01" stlldents in terested in econom ics o r busilless: Statisti 2 3 1 or 24 [ , 34 1 . Economics 344 or Statistics 34 1 , 34 2 ,

Economics 344 For stlldellts il/ terestcd in other social sciellces: Statist ics

23 [ or 24 [ , 34 [ , Economics 344 or Statistics 2 3 1 students should take designated sections of 231.)

(Psyc h o l ogy

Statisti

s

Fo r students interesteel i n lIalUrill sciences:

Statistics 34 1 , 342, 348 or Statistics 23 1 or 24 [ , 34 [ , 348

probability, data organization and summary, random variahles, distrib utions, hypothesis tests, non-parametric methods, linear regression, and analysis of variance. Case studies in different discipli nes will be used to illustrate the application of each topic. M I NITAB statistical software will be used. Prerequisi te: Math 1 40 or Math 1 2 8. I ( 4 ) 341 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (MATH 341) Description of data (univariate a n d bivariate), in troduction to probabil ity (axioms, d iscrete and co ntinuous random variables, expectations), special distributions (binomial, Poisson, normal, gamma ) , statements of law of large numbers and central l i m it theorem, elements of experimental design (control, randomiza­ tion, blocking), sampling d istribu tions, point esti mators (b ias, efficiency, methods of moments and maximum likel ihood ) , confidence in tervals, hypothesis tests, regress ion ( i f time permits ) . Prerequ isite: MATH 152. I ( 4 )

II' -I ("\ \1'1

342 Probability and Statistical Theory (MATH 342) Continuation of Math/Stat 34 1 . Topics may include: j o i n t, marginal and cond itional distributions, correlations, distribu­ tions of functions of random variables, momcnt generating functions, Chebyschev's inequality, convergence in probahility and limiting d istributions, introduction to infercnce in rcg[f;!s­ sion and one-way analysis of variance, introduction to Bayesian and non-parametric statistics, power test and likelihood ratio tests. Prerequisite: MATH/STAT 34 1 . a/y II ( 4 ) 343 Operations Research (ECON 343) Quantita tive methods for decision problems. Emphasis on linear programming and other deterministic models. Prerequisite: STAT 231 or equivalent. II ( 2 ) 344 Econometrics (ECON 344)

In troduction to the metbods and tools of econometrics as the basis for ap plied research in economics. Specification, estima­ tion, and te st i ng in the classical li near regression model. Extensions of the model and applications to the analysis of economic data. Prerequisite: ST T 23 1 or equivalent. ( 4 ) 348 AppUed Regression and Analysis and Anova (MATH 348) Linear, multiple and nonlinear regression, regression d iagnostics and violat ions of model assumptions, analysis of variance, exper­ i mental design includ i ng randomization, and blocki ng, multiple comparisons, analysis o( covariance. Substantial use of a stati­ stical co mputer package and an emp hasis on exploratory analysis of data. Prerequisite: 34 1 or consent of instructor. a/y II ( 4 ) 49.1 Independent Study ( 1-4) 5 00 Applied Statistical Analysis ( ECON 500)

( WiIJ not co u n t for Statistics Minor) An intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students who have not p reviollsly taken Introductory Statistics. Emphasis on the application of inferential statistics to concrete situatio ns. To pics cov�r('d i nclude measures of location and variation, probability, est i mation, hypothesis tests, and regression. ( 4 )

Course Offerings 231 Introductory Slat ist ics D scriptive st atistics: measures of central tendency and disper­ sion. I n fe re n t ial statistics: generalizations abo ut populations from sample by parametric and no nparamctric techniques. Methods co ered will include estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression, chi square, and ANO A analysis. Indud s a requ i red comp uter lab. Students should register for the lab corresponding to their lecture section. ( May not be taken for credit a fter STAT 34 [ ha ' been taken. ) I I I ( 4) 24 1 AppUed Statistics for Scientists (MATH 24 1 ) An introd uction to the basic techniques o f statistical analysis with application to the biological and physical sciences. overs

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Women's Studies Women's Stud ies is a mult idisciplinary program that

<1\ W

enriches the traditional liberal arts curriculum b y adding new perspectives on women's lives and accomplish m ents. Based on the study of wo m e n i n cult ure, society and history, the p rogram incorporates gender into other basic categories of analysis i n cluding the dynamics of social change, the creation and transmission of culture and the

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arts, the legacy a nd cultural construction o f our physical a n d intellectual characteristics, a n d the origins and n a t u re of current theories and social issues. Women's St udies broadens the education o f both m a le and fem a l e students and enhances their career prepa ration and profess ional opportunities wherever there is need to u nderstand women and the new role that they p lay in soci ety.

Women's Stud ies Executive Committee: Marcus, Ch ilir; Br u sc o , Ehrenhaus, Ellard - Ivey, Hames, Killen, K luge, Kraig, McDade, Ne n d aue r, Ye r i an .

FACULTY:

MINOR: 20 sem es t e r hours, i n c l u d i ng one Wo me n 's Studies core course (4 hours), two p rogram core courses (8 hours) from depa r t men ts i n d iffe re n t d i v i s i o n s or schools; and two e l e c t ive cou rses (8 hours) from two d ifferent divisions or s c hools . \. Women's Studies Core Course (required - 4 hOllrs)

WMST 1 0 1 - I n t ro d u c t i on to Wo men ' s S t ud i es ( 4 ) 2. Program Core Cou rses ( 8 hours) Students choose t wo courses from the fo l lo wi n g p rogram core courses which i n t roduce wom n's studies in respective d i s ci p l in e s . Selections must be fro m two d i fferent d ivisions or schools: Anthropology 350 - Women and M en in World Cultures (4) E n glish 232 - Women's Lite rature (4) nglish 34 1 - Feminist Approaches t o Literature Hi s to ry 359 - Hi s to ry of Wo m e n in the United States (4) I n te gTa ted S tudies 2 3 1 - Gen der, Se xu a l i t y, and Cu lture (4) I n tegra te d Studies 2 3 2 - To p i cs in G e nd er (4) ( pending approval o f to p i c) Philosophy 220 - Wom e n a nd Philos o ph y (4) Physical E d u c at i o n 3 1 5 - Body Image (4) Psychology 474 - Psychology of Women (4) Re lig i o n 368 - Fem i n ist and Womanist Theologies (4) So ci olo gy 440 - ex:, G e n d e r, and S oc i ety ( 4 ) 3. Elective Cou rses ( 8 hours) Students choose two courses from the fol lowing o p t i o n s . Selections mllst b e from two d i fferent divisions or schools. a. Add itional course from t h e program core cou rses. b. o u r ses from an a p p roved list p u b lished i n the class s c h ed u l e . c . C our s e s from allY d is ci p l in e for which part of the cou rse requ i rements can be fulfilled w i th a research paper on women o r women's issues. Th is allows the i n tegration of Women's Studies perspectives i n to courses that are not e x p l i c i t l y or entirely s t r u c t u red aro u n d t hose p e rs pectives. Consent of i n s t ructor is req u i re d . Students s h o u ld consult the Wo m e n's Studies cha i r p rior to enrolling for the course a nd are re q u i re d to submit the syllabus, research paper, a n d o t h er re l e va n t ass ign me nts to the Women's S t u d i es Executive Committee fo r app ro v al u po n c o m p l e ti on of the co u rse. MAJOR: The Women's Stud ies major is a m u l t i d i sc i p l i nary and int e rdiscipl ina ry complementary major. Conferral of a baccalau足 reate degree with a major in Women's Stud ies re qu i res c o mple足 tion o f a second major from any d isc i p l i n e i n th e u n iversity. S tude n ts a re encouraged to declare both majors simultaneously

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and to p l a n a program aware of the p os s ib i lities for applying i ndiv i d u a l cou rses to both majors. The Women's S t u d ie s m a j o r allows a p plicatio n of courses Crom the second major and for general u n iversity requirements ( Co re I a n d Core I f ) to the Women's Studies major. 36 semester h o u rs, including Women's S t u d ies 1 0 1 and co n 足 curren t enrollment in Wo m e n 's Studies 490 and 49 1 (8 h()urs); fo ur courses from the a pproved list of program core courses from tIVO d i fferent divisions or schools ( 1 6 ho u rs ) ; two elective co u rs e s from two diffLTl'nt d ivisions or schools ( 1\ ho u rs ) ; one service learning course ( 4 h o u rs ) . '; i u d c n ts a rc required to complete a minimUln of [ou r upper division cou rses in the program core and electives. \. WO /l1en's Sl lidics 10 I - I ntroduction to Women's Stud ies (4) 2. Progra/l1 Core Cou rses ( 1 6 hours) Students choo,;c fou r courses from t h e fol lmving p rogram core COlll::es that in troduce Women's Studies in respective d i sc i p l i n es . Selections must be from two d i ffe re n t d ivisions o r s c hools. Anthropology 350 - Wom en and Men i n World Cultu res (4) Engl i s h 232 - Women's Literature ( 4) E n gl i sh 3 4 1 - Feminist A ppro a c h es to Literature (4) His t o r y 3 5 9 - H is t o r y of Wo men i n the United S t a t e s (4) I n teg rat e d Studies 23 1 - Gender, Sexuality, and Culture (4) I n t e g ra ted Studies 232 - Top ics in G e n der (4) ( pending approval of topic) Ph i lo s op h y 220 - Women and P h i l o s o p hy (4) Ph ys i c al Education 3 1 5 - Body I m age (4) Psychology 474 - Psychology of Women (4) Re l i g i on 368 - Feminist and Womanist T heol og i e s (4) S ocio l o gy 440 - Sex, Gend er, and Society (4 )

3. Electi ves (H h o u rs ) Students choose two cou rs e s fr om t h e fol lo w i n g o p t ions . Selections must be from two d i lTerm t divisions o r schools. a. Add i t i o n al courses from the p rogram core course . b. Courses from an approved l i s t p ub lis h ed in t h e class sch e d u l e . c. Co u rse s from any d i s c ipl in e for which p a rt of the course requirements can be fulfilled w i t h a re s e a rc h paper o n wo me n or women's issues. This allows t he i n t eg r at i o n o f Women's Studies perspectives i n to courses that a.re not exp l ic it ly or e n t i rely struct u red around t h o s e perspe c t ive s . Consent of the instructor is re q u i red. Students should consult the Women's Stud ies chair before e nrolli n g for the course and a re required to submit the sy l l a b u s, research p aper, and other releva n t a s s i g n m e n t s to the Women's Stud ies Executive Committee for a pproval upon completion of the cours e .


4.

Sel- v iCl' Leal'lling/lll temsizip

(4

h o u rs)

Stud nts must enro ll for e i t b e r a service l earni ng course i n cooperation w i t h t h e Center for Public Service o r a n intern ­ ship through \No men's

tud ies and Cooperat ive Educat i o n .

I n ternships required fo r the second maj o r m a y be applied t o the Women's Studies major. I n ternsh ips s h o u ld be app roved by t he chair of Wo men's St udies. When t h i � c o u rse is sched­ uled i n the St'mestcr con t i n u o u s with the semester i n which s t u dents enroll fo r Women's Stud i "

490/49 1 ,

one-year service

lea.rning placements or i n t e rnships may be a r ranged, hu t are

z

not required.

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5. Caps /olle J:,"xp eriellce (4 hours): Women's Stud ies 490 Sem inar in Women's S t u d i es (2 hours) and 'No men's Stu dies 49 1

-

I n dependent Shldy

(2

h o u rs)

Majors are req uired in their final semester of course work to e n ro l l concurren t l y fo r

both Women's S t u d ies

49 1 .

490 and

Majors may enroll for Women's Studies 49 1 ( I ndependent Study) with either the instructor fo r Wo men's Studies

490

(Semin;lr i n Wo men', Studies) or a fac u l ty member whose area of �xperl ise qualifies her or him as a consuhant fo r the resear h project or inter n s h ip planned for Women's St udies 490,

Requests for credit toward the Wome n's S tu d ies major and m i n o r from tr a nsfer co urse s must be approved by the Women's ludies Exec u t ive o m m i t t e , , ub m i t syllabus and course as­ signments to the Wo men's S t u d ies chair. At least 17 h o u rs o f the m aj or an d [ 0 hou rs of the minor must be completed at PLU.

Course Offe rings 101 Introdul;tion to Women's Studies xplo res the rich ness and diversity of women's l ives and e..x periences fro m a variety of perspectives, i n duding the social sciences, h umanities, and arts, Open

to

all students.

0

prerequ i ­

s i tes, M ay be used t o fulfill the alternat ive l i ne in the Perspect ives on

ivcrsity

r

quirement.

( 4)

490 Seminar in Women's Studies A se m i n a r for �t udents who will do e i t h er an intemship or a research project in 'Nom 'n's S tud ies.

(2)

4 9 1 In dependent Study: Undergraduate Readings

of Wo men's ( 1-4)

ReaJing in specific Jrea� or i ssues supervi,'ion o f a faculty member.

' tudies u n der the

Writing 1 0 1 Inquiry Seminars: Writing See Gel/eral UI/iversity Requiremel1ts, The Fresh mall Experience.

(4) 20 1 , 202 Writing Seminars for International Students Orga n i? d thematically, these cou rses e mphasize b o t h the mecha nics and p rocess of writing. Students the o th e r exa m .

on

are

placed in one or

the basis o f TO FL scores a nd a w r i t i ng placement

(4, 4)

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w

G ra uate Stud -es This section contains information about Pacific Lutheran

w

l­ e:( :::I

graduate courses are included in the undeTgraduate section of the catalog - within the spedfi.c departm nt or school.

C « IZ:

The Office of Graduate Studies coordinates and i n tegrates

I.!l

ale education is to further the basic objectives of the uni­

Refer to page 1 05 ""l.'iN progra m.

graduate level i n struction. The general purpose o f gradu­

sio nal degree prog ram s. Specifk objectives are: ( I ) to increase the breadth and depth of unders tanding of grad­ uate stu ents in the l iberal arts;

( 2 ) to increase students' in th ir field of concen­

knowledge of research being don tra tion ; I II

( 3 ) to develop students' at ilities to do independent

Iy a nd research; and (4) to enhance students' profes­

sio nal abili ties. MASTER'S DEGREES OFFERED

The Master of Business Administration program enhances the managerial effectiveness of leaders in business, government, and non-profit organizations. Individuals of a l l educa t ional and working backgrounds a re encouraged to a p p l y. The program i s accredited by AACSB - Thc In ternational Association for Management Education. The Master of Arts in Education meets the needs of educators

by offe ing five concentra tions: I . The Classroollt Teaching conc n u·a t i o n p ro v id e s advanced p rep ara ti o n i n subjc t ma t t er and p ro fe ss ional educa t i o n fo r e l e me n t ary and secondary classroom t eacher s . 2. Educational Adlll illistrotion is design ed to prepare p ro fess i on ­ ills to become e lem en t ar)' and secondary sc hoo l p r i n c i pa l s a n d pr gram dm i nis t r a t o r . The degree i s o p e n to quali fied p ro­ fes s i o nals not seeking pri ncipal's creden t i a ls, as well. 3. T h e L iteracy Ed14ca tioll c o ncen t ra t i o n prepares educators to e n co u rag e literacy ,l Cljui s i t i on nd development appropriate to st u d e n ts ' needs and intere. ts. The importance of children's literature, information literacy, and technology are empha­ Sized t hro u g h o u t, in both t heo ry and practice. 4 pecial Edllcalioll reks to ' pand the qualifications of persons who serve special needs children and youth in a variety of educational or rehabilitative settings. Some of these roles and settings might include self-contained and resource room teachers, special education consulta nts, s u p p o r t pe rs o nn e l, or <

coordinators.

5 . Initial Certifica tion is dc:signed to prepare q u a l i fi e d teachers with endorsements i n K-8 ( Elementary E d u c a t i on ) and 4- 1 2 ( u bj e c t M at ter S p e c i fi c ) . The Me ter of Science in Nursing

offers an i n tegrated a p p ro a ch dge and clinical c om p e tenci es advanced nu rs i n g pract i ce . Pro ams o f study

tl thE' acquis i t i ) n o f knowl essent ial to

i ncl ude two concen trations:

1 . The Nu rse Practitioner concentration prepares n u rses for roles a p r im a ry are p rovi de rs . Subsequent to national ce r t i ficat ion , gra u da l es a re awarde RNP licensure as Faml1 Nurse Practitioner ' whose scope f advanced n u rsing pra c t i ce i ncludes p re ve n t i ve , p ro motio n al, d iagnost ic, and pre c r i pti ve services in primary care se t t ings . 2. The Care alld Olltcomes Manager concentrat i()n p r<'pares nurses for , n ad < need n u rsing practice role in a variety of

positions within the emerging managed hea l t h care yslcm. StudenLS focus on case management and the development of a P A C I F i e

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in this catalogIo r ill/anltation related to the

fiN 10

The Master of Arts (Marriage and Family Therapy) is designed to deve lop professional s k i l l s and clin ical competence hy means of a systcms approach to fa mi l y therapy with a ri g o ro us pra c t i cum component. The program is accredited by the Comm i ss io n on Accred itation fo r M a r r i age and Family Therapy Education of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

the work o f the schools and departments that provide

versity by providing graduat level academi c and p rotes­

1 28

skill set that assures the clinical and managerial competence needed to function as ut i l i z a t i o n review coordinators, risk managers, n u rse ed uc a to rs , nurse administrators, school nurses, clinical specialists, or nurse a d m i n is t rators.

University graduate programs. Course descriptions for

Y

Admission Students seeking admission to any graduate program must hold a bachel r's degree from a regionally accredited college or university. A cumulativc undergradu;lte grade p o i n t average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is req u i red for admission as a regul a r status graduate studcnt. Those students w i t h a n average o f less than 3.0 may be gra n te d p ro l' is i o na l status and w i l l not be considered for adm iss i o n to reg u l a r s t a t u s until they have demonstra ted their ability to do g r a d uate work by com p l et i n g a m i n i m u m of eight semester hours of work with a cum uiJ t i ve grade po i n t average of at le as t 3 . 0 . All a p p lica t ion cvaluations are based o n sch olastic qu a l i fic a ­ tions, a statcment of pro fe ss i ona l goals, letters of recommenda­ tion, and preparation i n t he p roposed field of study. Some grad­ uate p rograms may a ls o req ui re au t o b i ogra p hical statemen ts, personal interviews, stand;Hdized tests, or other evidence of p ro fessiona l 'JCcomplishment. I.istings fo r each program detail t hes e additional admission re q u i re m ents. The dean of g ra d u ate s t u d ies may deny admission if ap p l i c a nts ' scholastic records a re u nclistinguished, if p repara­ tion is judged inadequate as a foundation for graduate work, or if the p rograms a re already filled to capacity. Admission decisions are made by the dean of graduate studies upon recommendation by the graduate committee o f the re s p ec t i ve academic unit. Students applying for admission to graduate s t u d y must submit ::t completed application form, a statement of goals, a re s u me , and a n o n - refu ndable a pp l i c a t i o l l fee of $3 5 . 00. Applicants must request from e<Jch pre vi ou slv attended i n s t it u t ion of h ighe r l e a rn i ng ( u n d e�lJ!g.1!.at e and gra d u a t e ) a n offi cial transcript to be sent by the in s t i t u t i o n d i r ec t!Y-1Q.lb_� Qffi ce o f Adm i ss io ns at P l .U. Further sup po rt i ng cvid.�nce in t he fo rm o f pe rs o na l recom­ me n d a t i ons a re re q u i red from those persons named by the ap p l ica n t on t h e a p p l i ca t i o n form. Refer to i n d iv id ua l programs for a p [J lica t io ll deadlines. A p l l ica t i o n p a c ke ts a re available from the Office of Admis­ ions, 2 5 3 / 5 3 5 - 7 1 5 1 .

I n s u mma ry, the following item must be O I l file i n the bt'fore all appl icant will be considered tor

fficc of A d m i ssi o ns admission: 1.

The completed application form. statement of professional and educational goal

2. 1\

3.

.

re lim .

4. The $35 .00 non-refundable application fcc. S. An ot'ficial t r a ns cri pt from each institution of h i g her l ea rn i n g att nde . A l l t ra nsc ri p ts must be se n t di re c t l y to the Office

of Admissions a t PLV [rom transcript.

the

institution

p rov i clin g the


6. Two recommendations. 7. TOEFL test scores fo r all international students (sec interna­ tional student section for details ) . 8. Additionally, speed·lc programs require t h e following: 1aster of Business Administration: GivlAT score. Master of Arts in Education: MAT or G R E score; personal i n tervicw with program director. Master of Arts in Social Sciences (iVbrriage and family Th erapy) · Autobiographical statement; personal inter view. 'laster o f Science in Nursing: eRE score; personal interview with program director. •

Please contact the Counseling and Testing Office at 253/5357206 for i n formation o n the GMAT, the M AT, and the GRE. II records become part of the applica nt's official file and can be nei ther returned nor duplicated for any purpose. An offer of admission is good for one year in most programs. Admitted students who have not enrolled in any course work fo r one year after the semcster they indicate they intend to begin their program must reapply.

Policies and Standards INTERVIEWING OF APPLICANTS: Before admission to a graduate program, it is advisable for an applicant to seek an interview with the program director in the subject area of interest. In certain programs, a personal interview is a require­ ment as part of the appl ication process. See specific p rogram requirements for details. CLASS I F I CATI ON OF STUDENTS:

A student may be admitted

to a graduate program with regular or provisional student status,

and may enroll as a ful l-time or half-time student. Regular Those students approved un reservedly fo r admission to graduate study are granted regular status. An undergradu­ ate grade point average o f 3 .0 or higher is required fo r regular status. Provisio/Jal - I n some p rograms, newly admitted students are assigned provisional status un til certai n program prerequisites have been met. Students who fa il to qualify for regular status because of grade point average or lack of completion of specific prerequisites may be granted provisional status. NOTE: Students who have applied for graduate school before completing their undergraduate work may be admitted as regular or provisional status students with the condition that work cannot begin until they have successfully completed th i r bachelor's degree and official transcripts with the degree ha ve been received by the O ffice of Graduate Studies. I n ternational students lacking adequate English skills will not be admi tted cond itional ly. -

Students holding the bachelor's degree who wish to pursue course work with no intention of qualifying for an advanced deg ree at PLU are classified as non-matriculated students. A non-ma tricuL"lted student may take a maximum

NOIl -matriclIlated

-

of nine �emester hours of SOO-Ievel courses.

,raduate students enrolled fo r eight or more mester hours in fal l or spring semester arc considered full­ time. Hal/� tillle Graduate students enrolled for at least four but less than eight semcster hours in fall or spring semester are considered half-time.

Full- time

-

s

-

CHANGE O F STUDENT STATUS: Student status will be changed from provisional to regular after the fol lowing condi­ tions have been met: satisfactory ful fillment of course deficien­ cies; satisfactory completion o f eight semester hours of graduate work with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher; or satisfactory completion of departmental or school requirements. Studcnt status will be changed from IWII-lI1atriwlated to regula r/prov isional after the non-matriculated student completes the normal applica tion process and is accepted i n to a regular

degree program. Credit earned during non-matric ulated classification may count toward a graduate degree, but only as recommended by the faculty advisory committee and app roved by the dean of graduate studies after the student has been admitted to a degree program. No such credit can be counted that carries a grade lower than B-. In all cases, a letter indicating change of status will be forwarded to the student, with a copy to the adviser and/or program di rector.

Gl

Students from abroad are subject to all the requirements fo r admission established by the Office of Admissions. To allow ample time for visa and other departure procedures, the applicant should have his or her application and all sup­ porting documents on file in the Office of Admissions no Less than four months before a proposed date of ent ry. The fo llowing documents are necessary BEFORE an application can be processed. l. Formal application for admission and statement of goals with the $35.00 non-refundable application fee (which cannot be waived for any reason ) . 2 . A n offic ial transcript from each institution of higher learning attended. A l l t ranscripts must be sent directly to the Office of Admissions at PLU from the institution providing the transcript. 3. Two letters of recommendation from school officials or persons of recognized standing. Applicants transferring from an American college or university should request their i n ternational student adviser to send a recom mendation. 4. Demonstra ted proficiency in the English language through attaining a m i n i mum score of 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language ( TOEFL) or a minimum of 85 on the written section and 85 on the oral section of the M ichigan Test. Conditional acceptance will not be gran ted for interna­ tional students lacking adequate English language skills. s. Official scores from specific tests as required for certain programs or concentrations. See individual master's programs for fur ther i n formation.

VI

;;0

» c c: » -t m

TNTERNATIONAL STUDENTS:

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International students are required to submit a $300.00 ad­ vance payment following an offer of admission. This payment is t he student's acknowledgment of acceptance, and is credited to the student's account to be applied toward expenses of the first term of enrollment. If circumstances necessitate cancellation of enrollment and the Office of Graduate Studies is notified i n writing thirty days in advance of t h e anticipated date of enroll­ ment, the $300.00 will be refunded. An 1-20 form ( Certificate of eligibility for Non-immigrant Student Status) will be issued only after all documents have been received, the application has been reviewed, the student has been o ffered admission and accepted, a certification of finances has been received, and the $300.00 advanced payment has been received. Certification fro m banks and embassies is permissible. A financial statement form is available from the Office of Admissions upon request. The 1-20 form should be taken to the U.S. Consulate when requesting a visa to come to the United States for a graduate program. 1-20 forms issued by the Office of Graduate Studies are for master's degree programs only and not fo r intensive English language study. I n ternational students are required by immigration regula­ tions to enroll as ful l-time students (a m inimum of eight credit hours per semester). They are also required to have a physical examination and to submit the appropriate medical forms to the un ivt'rsity's Health Service. Before enroll ing for classes, all international students are req uired to have health and medical i nsurance, which is obtained through the u n iversity after a r rival on campus. I n ternational graduate students must also report to the Center For International Programs, 2 5 3 / 535-7 1 94, upon reg-

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a nd e le c t i ve g ra d ua t e credil shall not exceed 1 6 semester hours

istration for purposes of i m m igration and u n iversity record­ keeping. This must be done at the t i me of registration ( Harstad Hal l , first floor).

during th e semester. A memorandum stating that a l l baccabure­ ate req u i re m en ts are being met during the current semester must be signed by the appropriate department chair or school dean an d presented to the dean o f graduate stud ies a t the t i me of such re gist rati o n . This registration does not apply toward a higher degree unless it is later app roved by the student's adviser and/or advisory com m i ttee.

FACULTY ADVISING: Upon admission ea ch student will be assigned a faculty adviser responsible for assisting the st u dent in determining a p rogram of study. When appropriate, the adviser will chair the student's advisory committee. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisers early in their pro grams. HOURS REQUlRBD FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE: A mini­ mum of 32 semester hours is required. Individual programs may require more than the minimum number of semester hours, depending upon prior preparation and specific de gre e require­ ments. Any prerequisite courses taken during the graduate program shall not count toward ful fillment of g ra d u at e deg re e requ iremen ts.

It is the student's respo nsib i lit y to fo rm all y petition the dean of g radua te sludies for t ra ns fer credit, change of program or adviser, or any exception to policy. Petition forms may be obtained from advisers or from the graduate p rogram coordinator in the Graduate Studies Office.

PETITIONS:

Graduate work from another institu­ tion may be accepted fo r transfer upon petition by the student and approval by the program d irector. :ight semester hours may be transferable to a 32 semester hour program. I n degree p rograms requiring work beyond 3 2 semester hours, more than eight se mester hours may be transferrt>d. [n allY ca se , the stude n t must complete at least 24 semester hours o f TRANSFER OF CREDJT:

t h e degree program a t Pacific Lutheran University. TIME DMIT: A l l requirements to r the master's degree, i ncl u d i ng

c redit earned before admission, must be completed within seven years. The seven-year l i m i t covers all courses applied to th e master's degree, credit tran s ferred fro m another institution, comprehensive exa m i natio n s , research, and fi n al oral ex a m i na ­ tion. The seven-year limit begins with beginn ing date of t he first course applicable to the graduate de g ree . (See also "Sat isfactory Prog ress Pol icy.") RESI DENCY REQUI MENT: All candidates for the master's degree must complete 24 semester hours of Paci fic Luth e ra n University courses.

STANDARDS OF WORK: The mi n i mum s tandard acceptable

for the master's d e gre e is a gr ade point average of 3.0 i n all graduate work. Graduate l ev e l credit cannot be given fo r any class i n which the grade earned is lower than a C-. A student whose grade point average fa lls below 3.0 is subject to dismissal from the p rogram. In such inslances, the recommen­ dation for dismissal or continuance is made by the student's advisory committee and acted upon by the dean of graduate studies.

All graduate students are required to provide a u niversity health histof)1 form with accurate immunization records of measles, mumps, rubella, and tetanus­ diphtheria to Health Services. Students born b e for e January I , 1 957, must provide documentation for tetanus-diphtheria ( Td ) booster w i t h i n t h e last t e n years. All international students are required also to have a tuberculosis skin test ( p urified protein derivative-ppd) . This test will be done at Health Services after arrival at the university. The cost is $ 1 0.00. Students with questions or concerns about the immun ization policy should contact Health Services a t ( 206) 535-7337. I MMUNIZATION POLICY:

COURSES TAKEN ON A PASS-FAIL BASIS: I f a graduate student's program i ncludes a course where students may elect a letter grade or the pass-fa i l option, graduate stu den t s must opt for the letter grade.

500n u mbered courses described i n this catalog are graduate level. In some graduate programs, a l i m i ted number of 300-level and 400-level courses may be a cce p te d fo r graduate cred it. (See Degree alld Course Offerings for graduate course descr i pti o ns . ) A maximum of 4 semester hours of c o nti n uin g education credit may be accepted toward a master's degree. This a p p l i e s to continuing education credi t taken at PLU or transferred from a nother university. All courses ac c e p ted for the master's degree are subject to the approval of the program director and the dean of graduate studies.

COURSES ACCEPTABLE FOR GRADUATE CREDIT: All

If, during the last semes­ ter of the senior year, a candidate for a baccalaureate degree finds it possible to com p l e te all degree requirements with a registration of fewer than 1 6 semester hours of undergraduate credi l, registration for graduate credit may be permissible. However, the total re g i s t r a ti on for undergraduate requirements

GRADUATE CREDIT FOR SENIORS:

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A student pursu ing the master's degree who fails to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 may be placed on academic p robation. \Vhen such action is taken, the student will be notified by letter from the Office of the Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies. A graduate student on probation who fails to attain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the next term of enrollment may be dismissed from the program. A graduate s t ud e n t cannot earn a master's degree with less than a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in all graduate level work.

ACADEM IC PROBATION:

Y

S t u de n ts are required to present evidence of ability to do independent research. This can be demonstrated in three ways. See each p ro­

THESIS AND RESEARCH REQUJREM ENTS:

gram section for explanation of research options w i t h i n each g r ad u a te program. The first method i s a thesis. Those students writing t h e ses must s ub m i t their original theses for binding and microfilming by University M icrofilms of A n n Arbor, M ichigan. I n addition, a UM I D issertation Services p u b lis h i n g form ( M-Form) and a n abstract of 1 50 words o r less must b e submitted w i t h the publishing fee, to the O ffice of G raduate S t udi es, no later than three weeks before gra du a t i o n . Fees for microfilming, publishing abstracts, and binding o r i g i n al theses tor the permanent P I .U l ibrary collection are paid by students (see Tu itiol1 and Fees sectio n ) .


The second method is a research paper. If a program req uires or st udents elect research paper options, one original paper must be subm itted to the Office of Graduate St udies with an abstract of 1 50 words or less. Research papers will be microfil med at PLU and placed in the PLU library collection. M icrofilming fees are paid by students. Theses and research papers must be in the Office of Graduate Studie� not later than three weeks before rhe end of the semester. All theses and papers presented must be clean, error-free, and follow the A PA Style Manual. Details are available from the Office of Graduate Stud ies. The third method of fulfil ling research requirements in some programs is through paper presentations or cul minating p rojects i n specific courses. These courses arc designed to in tegrate the program material while promoting independent research and study. EXA M I NATIONS: \Nritten comprehensive examinations and/or oral examina t ions are requi red in all graduate programs except the Master of Business A d m i n istration progra m. Procedures for these exa mi n a t ions vary for the different programs. Where appli­ cable, t hese examinarions over t he student's program of studies are conducted under the direction of the major adviser and/or the st udent's advisory co mmit tee and normally will be scheduled no later than 3-6 weeks before commencement. I n any case. the final written comprehensive examination must be passed no later than four weeks before commencement. The oral examination over the thesis or research is conducted under the direction of the student's advisory com mittee and must be completed successfully no later than three weeks before commencement.

All courses must be completed, exa minat iolls passed, and thesislresearch requirements fulfilled in order to qualify for graduation. Graduate students must apply for grad uation by the begi n n i ng of the semester in wh ich they are planning to graduate. Appl ication forms are available in the Registrar's Office. Students planning to take part in com mencement exerc ises must also fiJi out all order form for a cap, gown, and hood. GRADUATJON:

RESP ONSIBI LITIES AND DEADLINES: [t is the responsibility oi each graduate student to know and follow the procedures outlined in this catalog and to abide by established deadlines. See ind ividual master's programs and concentrations for specific degree requirements. •

Upon acceptance, Illeet with the assigned adviser as soon as possible to establish the program of stud),. Register for thesis or research paper as required. Deadline: the last acceptable registration date is the semester in which the student expects to receive hi� or her degree. App[y for graduation. File your application for graduation with the Registrar's Office. Yo ur cap and gown order will be sent to you. NOTE: If a sllulerrt fa ils to complete tire necessary requirements fo r grllduatilllr, the applica tion fo r gradllatiorr wiII not automat ically be

forwardl'd to the next commencemcrrt date.

Tire stllderrt m"st make a

secolld app/icatio rr. •

Take comprehensive written and/or oml examination under the direction of the major adviser or advisory com mittee. Deadline: no later than four weeks before commenceme nt. Subm i t thes�s and research papers in final fo rm to the O ffice of Graduate Stuwes. At this time the bindi ng/microfilming fee mllst be paid. Deadlines are: Gra duation Date

Graduation Application Due

Th@sis Due

Decembe r 2000

May 1 . 2000

December 1 . 2000

May 1 , 2000

December t. 2000 April 30. 200 I july 3 I . 200 1

'llD.uary 200 t

May 200t August oot

Nove mber 1 . 2000

March 1 . 200 1

NOTE: Tire thesis/res£'<Irch pap er (s) must be signed by the mlljor adl'iser allli have been read by tire tll l ire committee before srrbmission III tIre

Tuition and Fees Tuition charges for graduate students are determined by the n u mber of semester hours for which a student registers and are based on a semester hour ra te. Tu ition per semester hour for 2000-200 I .. . . . . $52 5.00 Thesis binding/microfilming (subject to ch:mge) ..... .......... $70.00 Thesis copyrighting ................................................................ $35.00 Research paper or project microfilming ............................... $ 1 0.00 Graduation fee $30.00 Library fee for unenrolled students (per semester) ............. $25 .00 ......... ........

.

.

. . . . .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

m � C o

Financial Aid Fina ncial assistance for graduate students is available in the fo rms of Perkins ( as fu nding permits) and Stafford Student Loans, graduate assistantships, and scholarships. Students must be adm itted to a graduate program before a loan can be granted. Applications and loan i n formation may be obtained from Financial Aid, 2 5 3 / 535-7 1 6 1 . A limited number o f graduate assistantships are available. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies fo r appl ications and i n formation. The priority date for submission of applications for tbe academic year beginning in September is April I .

m '"

Graduate and profes­ sional students m ust meet the same satisfactory progress requirements as undergraduate students in order to continue receiving financial assistance. with the following exceptions:

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS POLICY:

l. M i n i m u m grade point average: Each graduate program

monitors the grade point average of its students. [n general. graduate students must maintain a m i n i m u m grade point average of 3 .00. 2. M i n i m u m credit requirement fo r graduate financial assista nce: ENROLLMENT STATUS

MINIMUM/TERM

MINIMUM/ YE AR

8 6 4

16 12 8

Full-time 3/4 time 112 time

NOTE: Less than 1/2 time enrollmen t will cause a student loan to be cancelled and may jeopardize deferment status.

3. Maximum graduate time allowed: a) The maxim u m nu mber of fu ll-time graduate credi t hours that may be attempted is 72, and the maximum time allowed to complete a graduate degree is 4.5 rears. b) The maxi m u m number of part-time graduate credit hours that may be attempted is 72, and the maximum allowed to complete a graduate degree is 7 years.

S C H O O L OF B U S I N E S S

Master of Business Admi n istration Donald R. Bell, Ph. D., Dean, School of Business Catherine Pratt, M.A Assis t a l l t Dean and Director, M.B.A. .•

Program, School of Busi ness M.B.A. PROGRAM: The M . B.A. program is centered on the skills and knowledge required for professional management, provid ing a strong foundation for responsible leadership in business, government, and non-profit organizations. The M.B.A.

program offers both evening al1d weekend progra m options to serve the lVorkillg comllll/l1it)'. The classroom environment is en hanced by a balance of full and part-time students, as well as students

'ffice of Gra(/Ilale Sludies.

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with diverse backgrounds. Students may enter the program at semesters/terms throughout the year.

THE GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TEST:

M.B.A. WITH EM P HASIS IN TECHNOLOGY AND I NNOVA­ TION MANAGEMENT (MBA-TIM):

In addition to the

general

1 B.A. program, PLU offers an M . B.A. with an emphasis in

Technology and In novation iVlanagement. Thi s program focuses on technology and i n novation management issues and skills within a high quality M . B.A. curriculum. It is designed for technical and non-technical employees who want a deeper appreciation of managing in technology oriented and/or fast­ moving i n novative organizations. Students may enter the evening program ilt semesters/terms throughout the year. The MBA-TIM emphasis is offered in the evening and i n a two year Saturday only format to a cohort of students who begin the program in the fall semester only.

To p repare students for management positions in commercial and not-for- profit organizations by providing them the basic knowledge of how these organ izations function and equ ipping them with the necessary competencies to work effectively. These competencies include 1. leadership, 2. critical/creative thinking, 3. effective commun ication, 4. team effectiveness, and 5. taking i n i t iative a n d managing change. 10 give students a n i ntegrated perspective of the i nterconnec­ tions among the functional area of businesses and the contex­ tual environment that a ffects them. '10 identify and challenge students to adopt high standards for lhical practice and p rofessional conduct. To prepare students for lives of service to the community. To prepare students to use contemporary technologies and to embrace the changes caused by technological i nnovation. To inculcate a global perspective i n students.

Students who hold bachelor's degrees in any field from regionally accredited universities or colleges and who have uemonstrated their ability or potential to do high quality academic work on a consistent basis are encou raged to a pp ly for admission to the Master of Business Administration program. Consultation about the program is available from the School of Business M .B.A. director by cailing 253/ 535-7250 before filing the application for admission. For th e evening M . B.A. p rogram and the evening M . B.A.!TIM p rogram students may begin studies any term. Applications are accepted for courses beginning September, January, February, May, or July. The Saturday M .B.A.! TIM p rogram has a priority application deadline of June 1 . Appl ications received after the application deadline will be evaluated and qualified applicants may be admitted. All appl icants are required to submit scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT ) . To b e admi tted t o the M.B.A. program, candidates must show potential to complete the M .B.A. curriculum successfully. Criteria used to evaluate a p pl icants a re : I . a 2.75 or higher cumulative grade point average i n a l l college­ level coursework before application; 2. a score of at least 470 on the Craduate r.,'lanagement Admis­ sion Test ( GMAT ) ; 3. a formula score of at least 1 ,050, computed by multiplying the grade point average by 200 and adding that p roduct to the G I AT score. 4. Evidence of managerial and profess ional potential through statement of goals, recommendations, and p rior experience. An interview with the M .B.A. director may be requested. Applicants are evaluated i ndividually, based on a p resentation of factors i ndicating equivalence to admission standards, a promise of success i n graduate school, and potent ial contribu­ tions to the educational mission of graduate study. ADMISSION:

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The M . B.A. director advises all M . B.A. students a nd should be contacted for assistance in p lanning course work.

ADVISING:

M.B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS:

OBJ ECTIVES OF THE M.B.A. PROGRAM •

The Graduate Management Admission Test ( C M AT ) is a test of aptitude rather than a test of business knowledge per se. The GMAT is a computer-adaptive test that is available, year-rou nd, at test centers throughout the world. Candidates are examined in three major areas: verbal, mathematical, and analytical writing skills. A score is earned i n each area, and candidates receive a total score, which ranges between 200 and 800. I n formation about the GMAT may be obtained from the Counseli ng and Testing Center at ( 2 5 3 ) 535-7206, by cal li ng GMAT directly at 800-462-8669, or by visiting the web site at

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(48 semester hoW's)

(30 semester hours ) C O M A S O O - Effective Communications ( 2 ) ECON 500 - Applied Statistical Analysis ( 4 ) ECON 520 - Economic Policy Analysis ( 4 ) B U S A 503 - Understanding a n d Managing financial Resources ( 4 ) BUSA 5 0 4 - Legal and Ethical Environment of Business ( 4 ) B SA 5 0 5 - Managing Effective Organizations ( 4 ) B A 5 1 1 - Managerial Accounting (2) BUSA 5 1 2 - Value Creation: O perations and I n formation Systems ( 4 ) B U S A 5 1 3 - Ma rketing a nd Val u e Creation ( 2 )

M.B.A. Core

1J'trategic Management ( 4 semester hours) 1 BUSA 590 - Strategic Management in a Global Context (4) Q[ BUSA 580 - Technology St rategy a n d Competitiveness ( 4 ) Note:

B USA 580 is

required for students

il1 ti,e

Technology "nd

In1l01Jation Nlallogelnellt concentratio11.

M.B.A. Electives ( 1 4

semester

Select from the following:

hours )

BUSA 535 - Financial I nvestments ( 4 ) B U SA 537 - Decision Models and Strategies for Financial Managers ( 4 ) BUSA 540 - Effective Negotiations ( 4 ) BUSA 54 1 - Managing I nnovation and Technology Change ( 4 ) B USA 5 4 2 - Management of Change ( 2 ) BUSA 545 - Continuous I m p rovement Strategies ( 2 ) BUSA 549 - Contemporary Human Resource Management ( 2 ) BUSA 5 5 3 - Transnational Management ( 2 ) BUSA 5 5 8 - New Ven ture Ma nagement ( 4 ) B U S A 5 6 4 - Managing Services Marketing ( 4 ) B U S A 566 - Developing New Products a n d Services ( 4 ) BUSA 5 74 - Advanced Service and Manu.t�lcturing Delivery Systems ( 2 ) I3USA 5 7 5 - Electronic Commerce ( 4 ) BUSA 5 7 7 - Project Management ( 2 ) BUSA 5 7 8 - Management of Illformation Technologies and Systems ( 4 ) BUSA 579 - Tech nology Commercialization a n d Transfer ( 2 ) BUSA 5 9 1 - I ndependent Study ( 1-4) BUSA 592 - l n rernship ( 1-4) BUSA 595 - Seminar: Special Topics ( 2-4)


M.B.A. CONCENTRATION IN TECHNOLOGY A

Cl

tions a n d test scores from appropriate screening tests. Students

D

may be requi red to have a personal i n terview with t h e director of

INNOVATION MANAGEMENT (TIM) DEGREE

tions for tests and prerequisites specific to t h e concentra t i o n . )

» o

M.B.A. Core ( 30 semester hours)

Students admitted provisionally must ful l fi l l t h e following

c

( I'e above fo r lVf. B./\.. Core requ irements)

requirements i n order to be granted regular status:

» -f

REQUlREM ENTS:

graduate programs before admission. (See individual concentra­

(48 semester hours)

St rategic Management

(4

semester hours)

B SA 580 - Technology Strategy and Competitiveness

(4)

M.B.A. TIM Concentration Courses ( 1 4 semester hours )

Required ;,p ecinfizn tions Courses:

R USA

(4) I3USA

54 1

(8

A. Completion of

exa m i nation over course work. This exa m ination is to be

R U SA 542 - Management of Change ( 2 )

B S 4 5 - C o n t i n uous I m p rovement Strategies ( 2 ) BUSA 549 - Contemporary H u m a n Resource Management (2)

RUSA 566 - Devel oping New Products and Services

(4)

Advanced Service and M a n u facturing Del ivery

ystems ( 2 ) -

Electronic Commerce (4)

579 - Technology

:ommercialization a n d Transfer ( 2 )

Select I dependent Study ( 59 1 ) , I n ternships seminar courses

(595)

are usually given o n the second Saturday of November, April, An oral exa mination over course work and/or research may be scheduled at the discretion of the studen t's advisory commit­ tce no later than three weeks before commencement.

Classroom Teaching (32 semester hours)

BUSA 577 - Project Management ( 2 )

13USA

scheduled through the studen t's adviser n o later than two weeks before the exa mi nation is given. Comprehensive examinations and Ju[y.

}jUSA 5 5 8 - New Ven t ure Management (4)

B U A 575

m '"

EXAMINATIONS: Students m llst take a comprehensive written

Select from the followillg:

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o

hour requirement

Systems ( 4 )

I U SA 574

'" -f C

I . A course in their major, determined by the adviser 2 . A foundations course ( Education 585, 586, 587 or 589) 3. Education 544 4. Other hours determined by the adviser to meet the eight

Techn logies and

hours)

m

ll. Courses generally i n clude:

- Managing I n nova tion a nd Technology Change

Specializatio/l Electives: (

hours of graduate course work with a

m i n i m u m grade point average of 3.0.

semester hours )

578 - M a n agement of I n formation

8

(592), and

app roved fo r T[M. See course

desc riptions under Business.

FACULTY COORDINATOR: C. Douglas Lamoreaux, P h . D. CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: This program is designed to provide advanced preparation in subject matter a n d p rofessional education fo r elementary and secondary teachers. PREREQUISITES: Beyond the general prerequisites, a p p l i cants must hold a valid teaching certificate and should ordinarily have

S C H O O L O F E D U C A T I O N

Master of Arts in Education Lyn n G. Bec k, P h . D. , Dean, School of Education

C. Douglas Lamoreaux, P h . D . , Director of Graduate SlIIdies, School of [�dllcntion

successfully compl eted one year of teaching or related profes­ sional experience. A grade point average of at least 3.0 and Miller Analogies Test, G R E or other admission test approved by t h e fa culty coord i nator and completed i n t h e p a s t fi v e years a r e required. Students not meet i n g s o m e of these requirements m a y be granted provisional status. GENERAL REQUIRE M ENTS AND CORE COURSES:

PURPOSE: The purpose of the graduate program in education

( 7-9 semester hours)

is to provide quali fied persons with opportunities to develop

EDUC 545

their skills in teaching or to p repare themselves for educational dmi nistrative Jnd service positions that requ i re advanced provide maximum flexibility in an experience-oriented environ­

i n £OUC 545. ) ( 2 )

01/e of the following:

585 Comparative Education ( 3 ) 586 - Sociology of Education ( 3 ) EDUC 587 History of Education ( 3 ) E D U C 5 8 9 - Phi losophy of Education ( 3 ) EDUC

Tea h i ng, [ nitial Certification, Educa tional Admi nistrat ion, Literacy bducation, and Special Education. Requirements for

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Olle of the following:

· t udenls hold i ng an I n i tial or Residency Certificate may req u i rements fo r Continuing or Professional Cert i fication. Grnduate students pursuing the Continuing or Profess ional Cert ificate should discuss their programs with the program C

ordinator or their adviser i n the School of Education. Students

i n te nding to work toward a master's degree must complete formal application for admission to the Office o f Admi ssions. Students i ntending to complete requ i rements fo r the Profes­ sional Ce rtificate must complete a fo rmal application to the Scho I of Education. ADM ISS ION: F r regular admission to master's degree pro­ grams and to p rofess ional certificate programs, applicants must have compIet d a B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited

598

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Studies i n Education ( 2 )

E D U C 599

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Thesis ( 3 -4)

EDUC

AND PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: coordinate the l\1[ aster of Arts in Education degree with the

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EDUC

each concentration are listed separately following t h is section. COORD INATING MASTER'S DEGREE WITH CONTINUING

Methods and Techniques of Research (2)

EDUC 544 Research/Program Eva[uations before enrollment

preparation. The major fields of concentration arc designed to m e n t. Graduate co ncentrations are offered i n Classroom

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( I t is strongly recommended that students complete

CONCENTRATION REQUlREMENTS:

( I 0- 1 8 semester hours) Courses are determined in consultation with the major adviser. All courses accepted for the master's degree are subject to the approval of the candidate's adviser or the candidate's advisory committee. Co urses may be selected from the fol lowing areas: Education, Educational Psychol ogy, and Special Education. ACADEMIC SUPPORTING AREA: ( 8 - [ 6 semester hours) [n t h is concen tration, n o more t h a n 16 semester hours may be appl ied from Educational Psychology or Special Educa tion. Th is req u i rement assumes a prerequisite background in the support­ ing area. The courses shall be upper division or graduate level

institution of higher educa tion a n d must suhmit recommenda-

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courses. Approval of courses to fi.llfill this requirement shall be obtained from the student's a d vi s ory committee. The student's supporting area may be chosen from one of the following: Art Language Arts Biology Mathematics and Computer Science Business Music Chemistry Communication Physical Education Economics Physics Educational Psychology Political Science English Psychology General Science Social Sci ences Geosciences Sociology H istory Special Education

EducationaJ Administration (32 semester hours) FACULTY COORDINATOR:

Myra Baughman, Ed.D.

CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: This program is designed to prepare elementary and secondary school principals and program administrators.

Beyond the general pre re q uisi tes applicants must hold a valid teaching or E.S.A. certificate and should o rdinarily have successfi.d l y comp le ted two years of teaching or related experience.' A grade point average of a least 3.0 and scores from either the Miller Analogies Test, GRE or other admission test approved by the faculty coordinator and com­ ple ted within the past five years are required for regular PREREQUiSITES:

,

admission.

" Candida tes for art administrative crede/Hial must have completed

three

Literacy Education (35 semester hours) FACULTY COORDINATORS: Jan

Lewis, Ph.D.; Ky l e Shanton,

Ph.D.; and Cathleen Yetter, Ed.D. CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: The l i teracy education

program reflects current thought and practice where l anguage a nd l i teracy are viewed as tools for learning across the curricll­ l um. The principal goal is to prepare educators�specifically classroom teachers, school librarians, and reading specialists� to encourage l i teracy acquisition and development appropriate to students' needs and interests. The i mportance of children's l i terature, information l iteracy, and technology within l iteracy tasks is emphasized throughout both theory and practice. The collaboration among classroom teachers, school librarians, and reading specialists emphasized within this program is i ntegral to the underlying philosophy. general p re req u i s i tes , applicants must hold a valid teaching or ESA certificate, have completed undergraduate education courses in the teaching of reading and PREREQUISITES: Beyond the

the teaching of language arts and have successfully completed two years of teaching or related experience. A grade point average of 3 . 0 and submission of test scores on the Miller Analogies Test, GRE or other admission test approved by the faculty coordinator and completed within the past five years are required for regular admission. Students not meeting these requirements may be granted provisional status.

yea/'s of teaching or related experience before issullnce of the administra­

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE COURSES:

tive credential.

( 1 3- 1 5

semester hours) EDUC 505 Issues i n Literacy Education ( 2 ) EDUC 544 - Research a n d Program Eva luation ( 2 ) EDUC 545 Methods and Techniques o f Research ( 2 ) EDUC 5 5 5 - Curriculum Development ( 2 ) -

Candidates who possess a master's degree may apply for the Educational Administration C e rti fi ca t io n Only p rogram.

-

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE COURSES:

hours) Methods and Techniques of Research ( 2 )

( 7-9 semester

EDUC 545

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Ol1e of the fa I/o w ing:

EDUC 585 - Comparative Education ( 3 ) EDUC 5 8 6 Sociology of Education ( 3 ) E D U C 5 8 7 - History of Education ( 3 ) EDUC 5 8 9 - Philosophy of Education ( 3 )

One of tire fol/owing:

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EDUC 585 - Comparative Education ( 3 ) D U e 5 8 6 Sociology of Education ( 3 ) E D U C 5 8 7 - History of Education ( 3 ) RD UC 5 8 9 - Philosophy of Education ( 3 ) -

Olle of the follow ing:

EDUC 598 - Studies in E d uca t i o n ( 2 ) E D U C 599 - Thesis ( 3-4)

Olle of the following:

EDUC 598 - Studies in Education ( 2 ) E D U C 599 - Thesis ( 3 -4 )

CHILDREN'S/ADOLESCENT LITERATURE

semester hours) EDUC 544 - Research and Program Ev al u a tion ( 2 ) EDUC 5 5 0 - Educational Administrative T h e ory ( 3 ) EDUC 5 5 1 - School Law ( 2 ) E D U C 5 5 2 School Finance ( 2 ) EDUC 5 5 3 - School/Communiry Relations ( 2 ) E D U C 5 5 5 - Curricul u m Development ( 2 ) E D U C 5 5 8 - Instructional Supervision ( 2 ) E D U C 5 5 9 Personnel Management ( 2 ) E D U C 595 - I n ternship in Educational Administration ( 4 ) E D U C 596 - Graduate Seminar ( 2 )

MAJOR AREA OF CONCENTRATION: ( 23

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PROGRAM OPTIONS IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRA­ TION: Interdiscipl inary

program options for applicants seeking

d i ffering credentials must be determined at the beginning of the

candidate's program in consultation with an adviser. For instance, candidates seeking the M .A. in Educational Adminis­ tration and principal's credential will take different options from those taken by candidates seeking the d egree without the credential. Likewise, those with i nterests i n business manage­ ment or in administering and coordinating spec i a l programs may choose options to their course of studies which will enhance 134

their professional development interests. In all cases, the c o urses must be chosen and agreed upon in consultation with the candidate's adviser, and must meet the credit hour requirement.

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semester hours) EDUC 528 - Children's Literature i n K-8 Curriculum ( 2 ) , and

REQUIREMENTS: ( 4 One of the followillg:

EDUC 456 - Storytelling ( 2 ) EDUC 526 Topics in Children's Literature ( 2 ) . DUC 529 - Adolescent Literature in the Secondary Curriculum ( 2 ) -

INFORMATION AND LITERACY: Option 1: ScllOOI Library Media/LLRS Endorsement ( 1 2 seme s te r

hours)

L i bra ry Media Center Management ( 2 ) E D U C 507 Principles of Information Organization, Retrieval, and Service ( 2) EDUC 508 - Principles of Bibliographic Analysis and Control (2) E D U C 509 - Foundations of Collection Development ( 2 ) EDUC 5 3 7 Media a n d Technology for School Library Media Spec i a l i s ts ( 2 ) E D U C 5 3 8 - S t rategies for \Vhole Literacy Instruction ( K- 1 2 ) ( 2 ) EDUC 506 - Foundations o f School -

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QL Option 2:

nguage and Litel'acy (Readiog Endorsemeot)

( 1 2 semester hours)

ED C 5 1 0 The Acquisi tion and Development of Language and LitE'r<lcy ( 2 ) ED . 5 1 1 - Strategies for Language/Literacy Development i n lassrooms ( 2 ) EDUC 5 3 8 - Strategies for Whole Literacy I nstruction ( K- 1 2 ) ( 2 ) EDUC 5 3 0 - Children's Writing ( 2 ) E O U C/SPED 5 1 3 Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and I nstruction ( 4 ) -

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or

Option 3 : Language and Literacy (Classroom Option)

( 1 2 semester hours)

EDUC S I D - The Acquisition and Development of Language and

Literacy ( 2 ) ED UC 5 3 8 - S trategies for Whole Literacy Instruction ( K - 1 2 ) ( 2 ) EDUC/SPED 5 1 3 - Language/ Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction ( 4 ) PillS: A m i nimum of 4 semester hours from education course offerings decided i n consultation with the major adviser. ACADEMIC SUPPORTIN G AREA:

( minimum of 6 semester hours) Elec tives decided in consultation with adviser to support literacy education. These electiws may include but are not l imited to courses from: nthropology r.ommunication Special Educ<ltion

Special Education

English Compu�� in EduQt�n Psychology

(33 semester hours)

FACULTY COORDINATOR: Pa ula Leitz, Ph.D. CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: The graduate concentration

i n special education is designed to provide advanced preparation for persons who serve children and youth with special needs in educational SNtings. Two separate areas of specialization are offered: The I nclus ive Classroom and Early Childhood Special Education. PREREQUISITES: Applicants must meet the following

requirements: 1 . Have two ye<lrs of teaching or related professional experience. 2 . Have a grade point average of at least 3.0 and submit test scores on lvl iller Analogies Test, CRE or other admission test approved b)' the faculty coordinator and completed within the past five years. Students not meeting these requirements may begranted provisional status. 3. Complete an interview with the faculty coordinator. CORE COURSES AND RESEARCH REQUI REMENTS:

( 7-9 semester hours ) E D U C 545 Methods a n d Techniques of Research ( 2 ) -

Olle of tli .fo llowing: EDUC 585 - Comparative Education ( 3 ) E U ' 5H6 - Sociology of Education ( 3 ) EDUC 587 - Hist ory of Education ( 3 ) E D C 5 8 9 - Philosophy of Education ( 3 ) Olle o f tlie following research options: E D UC 598 Studies in Education ( 2 ) EDUC 599 Thesis ( 3 -4 ) -

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SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE REQUI REMENTS:

( 2 1 semester hours)

SPED 5 5 5 - Supervising Paraeducators in School Settings ( 2 )

S P E D 5 7 5 - ollaboration a n d Team Building ( 2 ) SPED 5 7 7 - T h e Inclusive Classroom ( 2 ) SPE 5 8 8 Legal, Ethical and Administrative Issues i n Special Education ( 3 ) SPEI 595 - Special Education: I n ternship ( 2 ) S P E D 596 Technology and Special Education ( 2 ) -

Choose aile of the following options: The Inclusive Classroom

S P E D 530 - Asscssment of Students with Special Needs ( 2 ) S P E D 533 - I nclusion a n d Students with Moderate Disabilities ( 2) SPED 534 - I nclusion and Students with Behavior Diso rders (2) SPED 535 Inclusion and Students with Mild Disabilities (2) -

m

Early Childhood Special Education (P-3)

SPED S PED SPED P-3 SPED

492 - Strategies for Teaching Ea rly Learners ( 2 ) 538 - Issues i n Earl), Childhood Special Education ( 2 ) 540 Advanced Strategies and Tech niques for Teaching i n Settings ( 2) 54 1 - Assessment of I n fants and Preschoolers ( 2 ) -

Supporting Coursework

II' -f C C m II'

(6 semester hours)

Electives - Irom outside af Speciai Educatiol! (6)

M.A. with Initial Certification D IRECTOR: C. Douglas Lamoreaux, P h . D.

The M.A. with I ni tial Certification Program is designed fo r qualified candidates who possess a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts and seek a career of service as teachers. Course work leads to the Master of Arts in Education: Classroom Teaching degree and I n itial Washi ngton State Teaching Certificate with endorsements in grades K-8 ( Elementary Education) and grades 4-1 2 ( Subject Matter Specific) . Candidates complete an intern­ ship in grades 5-8. Full, time students entering the program may expect to com­ plete all requirements in 14 months ( full-time student load). A strong emphasis in the program is p laced on developing the skills necessary for the integration of curriculum across grade levels with specific ,lttention to t h e middle level (grades 5-8 ) . The program is disti nguished by active and early involvement i n the schools and by membership with a cohort group of peers. Students cntering the p rogram in the same term will progress through courses and practica together, which allows them to share insights and experiences. Because of the involvement in public school programs, students should be able to take courses and participate in practica during the day. CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of the program is to educate teachers who are ready to assume a variety of roles in 2 I st century schools. Faculty work with students to develop understandings and skills for their functions as leaders, i nquirers, <lnd curricul u m/i nstructional specialists. Course work in the program is designed around specific themes that serve as a focus for individual and group projects and intersect with the functions of teachers as leaders, i nquirers, and curriculum/ instructional specialists. PROGRAM OVERVIEW: Students enrolled in the M.A. with

I nitial Certification Program begin studies i n mid- June and complete program requirements the following August. In addi­ tion to course work requi red for initial certification, students complete an inquiry project culminating i n a thesis as well as comprehensive examinations that allow �"I.A. candidates to demonstrate mastery of leadership, curriculum, and instruc­ tional skills. The i nquiry project, an empirical study grounded i n the internship experience, is designed to assist M.A. candidates in becoming fam iliar with the purposes, theories, and processes of educational inquiry. The intent is to provide the opportunity for program participants to explore an educational topic i n a sys­ tematic way in mder to enrich their understanding of the topic, and generally, the strengths and limitations of educational inquiry.

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An importa n t program component is the comp letion o f a year-long i n ternship in a public school. For t h e i n tern experience, students a re clustered at sites selected by the un iversi t y as repre­ sentative o f programs reflecting specific a ttention to current

Master of Science in N ursing

trends i n middle level education.

Terf)'

PREREQUISITES: For regular admiss i o n , appl icants must have w

S C H O O L O F N U R S I N G

co m pl e ted a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited i n s t itut ion of higher education. A m i n i m u m grade poi n t average of 3.0 <lnd offic i<ll scores from the Graduate Record Exam ( G R E ) , M iller Analogies Test ( MAT) , o r other admission examination approved by the director are required. Applicants are invited to meet with the progmm director before submitting the completed application i n order to clarify questions about the program and admissions procedures.

ADMISSION PROCEDURES: Interested candidates sho uld submit application to PLU's Graduate Studies Programs. Applications a re available from the Office of Admissions. Sc ree n i ng of applicants and admission to the i ncoming class will beg in January 31

a nd

continue until the class is full. E n rollment

i n the M.A. with I n i tial Certification Program is l i m ited and admission to the program is competitive. Application and admission procedures include:

W.

M i ller, P h . D. , Dea n , School o.f Nursillg

PURPOSE: The purpose of the graduate program in u ursing is to prepare p rofessional nu rses as advanced practice clin icians, managers, leaders, and scholars. The curriculum consists of a common core of master's level courses ( theory, research and leaders h i p ) along with courses selectively focused fo r either of two concentrations of study: Family Nurse Practitioner or Care and Outcomes t-.'Ianager. The graduate program is designed to facil itate fu ll-time or part- time study. Full-time students can complete either concen trat io n of study i n two academic years. Courses are scheduled during late afternoon, eve n i n g and/or weekend hours to accommodate the working nurse.

ACCREDITATION: The program is fully accredited by the National League fo r N u rsing Accrediting Com m ission. I n s t ruc­ tional units satisfy the American Nu rses Creden t ialing Cente r's didactic e l igibLlity requirements fo r Family Nurse Practitioner or Case Management certification exa mi n a t ions.

PREREQUISITES: Completion of a basic course i n descript ive

1. Completed <lpplication will consist of the following:

and i nfe ren t ial statistics is required before begi n n i n g graduate

a. Graduate Appl ication Form including:

course work. Students are expected to have fu ndamental

Two reco m mendations w i t h a t least one academic

Statement of Goals

year of clinical experience within the last two years is required.

Resume

ADMISSION: Applicants fo r admission to the Master of Science

reference

b. Two School of Education Supplemental Forms i ncluding: •

Self-Assessment: course work and experiential background

Questionnaire

d. O fficial copies o f GRE or M AT scores Education. 3. Selected applicants will be invited to the campus for a group a

writing sample.

4 . Applicants will be notified of t h e com m i t tee's decision. 5. Accepted applicants will return a co nfi rmation card and nonrefu n dable $300.00 deposit.

School of Nursi ng;

3) submit official transcripts fo r all college/ u n iversity course work; a mi n imu m cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3 . 0 on a 4.0 scale is a n admission requirement; 4 ) submit scores from the Graduate Record Exa m ination ( G R E ) taken w i t h i n t h e last five years: a combined average score of 850 from any two of the t h ree test components is a n admission requirem e n t ; and

REQUIRED COURSES: Program requirements incl ude success­

5 ) complete a preadmission interview with faculty who teach in the graduate program.

ful completion of the following courses: EDUC 5 1 1

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Strategies for Language/Literacy Development ( 2 )

E D U C 544

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Research a n d Program Eval uation ( 2 )

E D U C 5 5 6 - Secondary a n d Middle School Curric u l u m ( 3 ) EDUC 560 - Practicum ( 2 )

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR FALL: Candidates are a d m i t ted

011

a yearly basis. Priority admissions are co mp leted by

March I for the following fall semester. Early application is encouraged fo r priorit), standing relative to financial awards.

E D U C 5 6 2 - Schools a n d Society ( 3 )

ADVANCE DEPOSIT: There are limitations o n the IlLlmbers o f

E D U e 563

-

I n tegra t i n g Seminar ( 3-4)

EDUC 564

-

The Arts, M ind, and Body ( 2 )

students accepted i n t o t h e Fa m i ly N u rse Practitioner or Care and Ou tcomes Manager Concentrations each year. Applicants

E D U C 5 6 5 - Tbe A r t and Practice of 1eac h i n g ( 6 )

accepted i n to the program are required to make a non-refundable

E D U C 568 - Internship ( 6 )

$200.00 advance payment to confirm their acceptance of a n o ffe r

EDUC 5 9 9 - Thesis ( 3 ) -

I ) hold a curre nt license to practice as a registered nurse i n the 2 ) hold a bnccalaureate degree i n nursing from a n accredited

2. Appl.ications will be reviewed by a committee in the School o f

EPSY 560

in Nursing programs will: State of Washington;

c. Tra nsc r i p ts from all colleges attended

i nter v ie w where th ey will also complete

compu ter skills upon e n t ry to the program. A m i n i m u m of one

of admission within two weeks of their acceptance date.

Communication in the Schools ( 3 )

EPSY 5 6 6 - Advanced Cognition, Development , and Lea r n i ng ( 3 )

ADVISING: The D i rector o f Graduate Nursing Education com ­

EPSY 5 8 3

pletes i n i t i a l advising and program planning w i t h each student.

-

Current Issues i n Exceptionality (2-4)

Upon a r t iculation i n to course work students are assigned to a faculty member who teaches in their area of concentration for subsequent assistance in planning course work.

P RO G RAM REQUIREMENTS: Before enrol l m ent i n c 1 i n ical/ p racticum course work students will b e req u i red to provide evidence of cu rren t :

I ) i m m u n ization and h e a l t h status 2) CPR certi fication 3) professional liability insurance 4 ) personal health i n s urance 5) Was h ington State Patrol criminal history clearance

1 36

P A C

I

F i e

L U T H E R A N

U N

I V E

R 5 I T Y


PREREQU1SITES: A p p l i c a n ts who have a deg re e i n psychology,

M .S.N. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: (36 semester bours)

sociology, social work, h uman services, fa m il y s tudies, or the equivalent are n o t required to meet a n y p rogram p rereq u i s i t s .

M. .N. Core (9 enJester hours) N U nS 525 - Theoretical Foundations ( 3 ) u rsing I.eadersbip a nd Management N U R 526

A p p l i ca n t s w b o do not have a degree in any of t h e s e areas a re

NURS 5 2 7

quarter

-

-

Eva l u a t i o n a n d Outcomes Resea rch

(5) (3)

requi red to co m ple te

N U RS 528 - l' a m i l y 'T'heory in Nursing -

(1)

have p ro fess i o n a l goals cons istent w i t h

Promotion (5)

spe c ific i n terest in M FT, p rovide a current resume, obtain two letters of recom mendation,

{

XXX

-

Outco mes Pra c t i c u m I

develop ment and your d es i re

(5)

ThCl.IS

3 . What are you r strengths t h a t will h el p you ach ieve your p rofess ional goals?

(4)

4 , What do you co nsider to

be

a p p l i ca t i o n fo rm.

Master of Arts Marriage & Family Therapy

Based on a comm i t tee review o f a p p l icants' w r i tten materials, a pool of a p pl ican ts (

o(Socia/ Sciwces Chair, Departl1len't a/Marriage and

APPUCATION DEADLINE FOR FALL: A p p l i ca t i on fi le co mpl eted in Office o f Admissions: January 3 1

"As T visit with illtems from MFT programs, I realize what a

small all/ou n ts of what we studied, . . KAT H I .f.I·

ADVANCE DEPOSIT: Acc ep ted a p p l i cants must make

"

M XEY, �IFT GRADUATE

advance payment

train cli n ici a n s i n terested in cou n sel i ng c h i l d re n , adults, couples,

M PTH SOO

-

Human Development (4)

Therapy (4) M T H 504 - F a m i l y Development (4) M FTH 505 - Social Science Research Met hods (4)

which i nc l ud es 500 "nuTs of therapy under close super v i sion in ,111 o n -c a m p us cl i n i c ,tnd in a commu ni t y placement. The o n ­ ca mp us c li n ic is affil iated w i t h Good S a m a r i t a n Behavinral l lealth Care, which all ows t h e p rogram to offer all 't uden ts a

M FTH 5 0 7 -

.ompara t ive Marriage and Fa m i l y Therapy ( 4 )

M FTH 5 1 0 - H u m a n Sexuality a n d S e x Therapy (2) M FT H 5 1 1 - Psychosocial Pa t hology: Rela t i o n s h i p to Marriage and F, m i l y T I 1 rapy (4)

c l i n i cal experience. Academic cou rses are sched­

M F TH 5 1 2 - Profess ional Studies in Marriag e and Fa mily

u led a t 3 : 00p.m. to allo stude n t · to work ful l - t ime during their tir�t at, de m i c year while they p r e pa re fo r t h e i r clin ical experi ence. Beca use faclIlty pcognize th'lt adult tud en ts brina .:xpertlse w ith t h e m , s t udents ar h ighly inv l\'Cd i n lea r n i n g via cxer i)fs, classro om d i scuss i o n , and rea l-Ii e activities. {'he program I S sec u l a r in nat u re and e m p h a izCl. the appl ica tion of

Therapy ( 3 )

­

M FrH 5 1 9 - Prac t i c u rn 1 ( 2 ) MJ 'T r-I 5 2 0 - Theory I ( 2 ) MfTH 5 2 1 Practicll l11 11 ( 2 ) -

MJ.!TH :5 2 2 - Theory n ( 2 )

1 · '1-1. 523 Prac t i c u m rII ( 2 ) MTT H 524 The ry [j[ ( 2 ) iVI FTH 5 2 5 - Pracricllm I V ( 4 ) i

l heory tc pra ct ice, rigorous evaluation, a n d d i rect sup e rvis io n of

,I

$300.00

M PTf-I 503 - Sy, tems Appro'lCh to ivlarriage a n d Fa mily

a

m:l r riJge and fa m i l y therapy perspective, Students p a r t i c i pate i n

oll e's dini

a

confirm t h e i r acceptance o f an o ffer of

REQUIREM ENTS: (45 semester h o u rs)

wide range of mental health p roblems, ranging

a n i n t nsive _ 0 h o ur p e r week, fo u r �emestcr c l i n i cal experience

care

to

ad m ission w i t h i n t h ree weeks o f their acceptance date.

PURPOSE: Til primary object ive of the M r p rogram is to

from the -hron ieally mentally ill to t roubled ch ildren, fro m

In terview N o t i fication: M id February through end o f April. I n terview date: To be a n nou nced.

superior educatioll 1 received ji'om PLU . . . other programs

m a ll , g ed

between the

MFT program.

,he r)'1 Storm, Ph.D., Clinic Director

a

fit

a p p l i ca n ts' professional goals and the p u rpose a n d mission o f the

ril ll/il)' Tlremp),

or fa m i l ies with

be interviewed is established. The primary

p u rpose o f the in terview is to determine t h e

David Huelsheck, Ph . D. , Deall, [)ivision

011

University?

T h i s statement replaces the req u i red goal statement on t h e

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

only couch

areas fo r perso n a l growth that

the most at ten t i o n d u ring your training as a

therap ist at Pacific Lutheran

. Yo rk, I h . D. ,

be a fa m ily therapist?

degree?

may need

h a rles

to

2 . What arc your p ro fessional career goals after completing your

(5)

RS 598 - Scho larl y Inq u i ry ( 4 ) Q[ -

typed

pages) s h o u l d address the fo llowing questions:

A p p roved [Iect ive Related to One's Focus ( 3/ 4 )

RS 599

an a p p l ication, and p repare

graph ical statement ( ma x i m u m o f five double-spaced

N U R S 532 - - re a n d O u tcomes Practicum I I ( 5 ) J

complete

an autobiograph ical stateme n t . The c om p rehens i v e autobio­

I . What significant l i fe events have most i n fl uenced your present

N URS 5 0 - I{eso u rce M anagemen t ( 4 )

R S 5 3 8 - Program Development

-t

m

d egr e e, submit trans c r i p ts of a l l un dergraduate work, have a

N U R, 52 9 - Care Ma nager ( 3 )

N

'"

C

q u a l i t i es req uired of mar riage and fa m i l y therapists. To be

Care and Outcomes Mansger Concentration: (27 emester hours in addilion to the M.S.N. Core)

and

m

C

personal

considered fo r a dmission, applicants must: have a bachelor's

-

Care

program, vol u nteer or

handle the academic r igor of t h e p rogram, a n d the

NU R S 5 8 3 - Cl in ical Pharmaco t herapeutic: ( 2 ) I U R, �84 - Pamily urse Practi tioner 1 (6) N RS 58 5 Fam ily Nurse P ra c t itIOner I I (6) N I�S 5 0 - Role of the Nurse Pra c t i t ioner ( 2 ) I U RS 9 0 - e m i n ar i n Advanced Practic� N ursing ( 2 )

-

the

p rofessional experience i n the social servic s, the a b i li t y to

N U R S ]82 - Adva nced Health Assess ment a n d He a l t h

N U RS 53 1

m i n i m um of 1 5 semester hours ( 2 2 . 5

ADMJSSION: The M FT p rogram is looking for i n d ividuals who

Piltho phys iology ( 5 )

Advanced

a

fa m i l y social sciences, h u man services,

psychology, sociology, o r so c i al work.

Family Nurse Prlu;titioner Concentration: (27 semester hours in addition to the M.S.N. Core) N U RS 580

hours) in

c m p e t e ncy,

-

-

ACCREDlTATlON: The program i� fully accredited by the C rt'l11lission o n Accredi tation fo r Marriage and Fa mily T h er a py :ducation 0 the American ssoc i a t i o n o f MMriagc and Fam i l y T h e rap y ( AAJvIl- ) a n d a 1 0 co mplies w i t h ash i n gto n State Ccrt i ficat io n rcquir menls for ma rriage a n d fa mily therap ist� .

Elective: IvlFTI I "99

P

A

C

I

F

i

-

e

Thesis ( 4 )

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y

.,31


> I­ ....

Adm i n istration I Facu lty

u..

The Board of Regents

z

OWNERSHIP, SUPPORT, GOV RNMENT:

o

The u n iversity is ow n ed and operated by

I­ <I: a: I­ VI

corpomtion whose p urpose is to maintain a

z

Bishop Mark Ramseth, 4604 Audub on Way, Blllll1gs, MT 59 1 0 6 , Bishop HCA

Rev. John L. Vaswig, 3505 1 22nd Ave. E.,

ELCA Rev. Dean Wigstrom, I I, 5 1 0 Edgewood D r. , Silve rton , 0 R 9738 1 , ELCA Edgewood, WA 98372,

Pacific Luthera n U n i versi t y, Inc., a Wash i ngto n

Dr. Cynthia Edwards, 3 806 West Sou ndview

the formation of the Eva nge.l ica l Lutheran

Church i n America

( ELCA)

Dr., University Place, WA

o n January 1 , 1 98 8 ,

( Vice Chair)

th e P L U Co r pora t i o n w a s reco n s t ituted. The

Atlanta, G A 3034 5 , Regent-Ilt-La rge Val le)', MN 5 5 1 24 , Regellt-at-Large

LX synods of Re­

App l e

g io n 1 of t h e Evan ge lical Lutheran C h u rch i n

Mrs. Anne Long, 1 7520 SE 60th S t . , Bellevue,

Alisociation, th ree b i s h o p s from t h e s y n o d s o f

Bishop Donald Maier, 55 1 9 P h i n nev Ave ' No r t h , Seattle, ,VA 98 1 03 , Bishop fLCA

WA 98006, ELCA

America. T h e Bo a rd o f Regents i n cludes e i gh teen re p re s e n t a t i ves from the A l u m n i Reg i o n I , and

Rev. Dr. Larry

th e u n ive rsity p re s ide n t .

dent, 1I

made by t h e p r

1 564 f'encorp Dr.,

Mrs. Karen Phillips,

t h e u n iversity is the Bo a rd of Regents. On t h e

basis o f reco mmendations

eeb,

Fe n t o n , MO 6 3 0 2 6, Regent-at-Large

The polic y- m a k i n g a n d governing body of

9740

35th Place SF.,

M e rce r I s J a n d , WA 98040, [L

e si ­

A

Mr. Martin Pilil, 2 7 2 0 S eve n t h Ave.,

harts a co u rse for the d eve l o p m e n t of

Ketch ikan, AK 9990 1 ,

the total program of the u n iversity a n d strives

HeA

to provide essential fu nds. The s t u d e n t body

Mrs. Gerry Anne Sahlin, 1 1 369 Blue Heron

who meet with th e b oa rd.

Mr. Jim Stauffer, 2635

OFFICERS

Mrs. Susan Stringer, 4 5 5 3 1 69th Ave . Sf,

and t h e fa c ul ty h ave n o n - vo ti n g represe n ta t i ves

Rd., Bow, ,AlA 98232,

MT 59803, ELCA

Dr. Cynthia Edwards, Vice Chai r

Ms. Karin Aoderson, Assistan t to the

EX-OFFICIO

President

Dr. Loren J. Aoderson, P re s iden t , PLU,

Mr. David Aubrey, Vi ce President fo r

Tacoma, WA 98447, PLU

Develo p m e n t and Univers i t y Relations

Dr. Laura Majovski, Vice Pr es id en t

1998-2001 TERM Mr. Daniel L. Alsaker, PO Box 1 4 646 ,

a n d Dean for Student L i fe Dr. Paul Menzel, Provost a n d Dean o f

Spokane, WA 992 1 4 , ELCA

Graduate S t u d i es

M rs. Becky Burad, 2206 Hyd e Sr., S a n Francisco, CA 94 1 04,

Dr. Laura Polcyn, V ic e President fo r

Alumni

A d m iss ions a n d

Mr. Ken Hartvigson, Jr., 9 7 0 9 3 rd Ave. NE #302, Seattle, WA 9 8 1 1 5 , ELCA Mrs. Kathleen Jacobson, 234 5 1 B u t terfie.ld

Dr. Sheri TODD, Vice Pres i d e n t for Finance

U n i o n Squa re, Seattle, WA 9 8 1 0

Dr. Linda Olson, N u rsing, FaCIlity

Dr. Norris Peterson, Economics, Faculty Mr. Jason Weber, A S P LU President '

1 5 25 O n e

Student

I, ELCII

Mr. Keith Pranghofer, ASPLU Vice President,

Rev. Rebecca Lu�ky, 4 1 1 5 N. 1 8th S t . , lacoma,

Student

WA 98406, ELCA

Ms, Aimee Sieverkropp, ASPLU D i re ct o r o f

Mr. Gary Severson, 6 1 3 1 1 28th Ave. NE,

Finance, Student

Kirkland, WA 9803 3 , Regent-at-I,llrge (Chair)

Bishop David Wold, 420 1 2 1 st 5 t . S . , T�lCollln,

CHURCH OFFICIALS

98444, Bishop ELCA

EVa/lgdical LIItheran Church ill America Bishop H. George Anderson, 8765 W.

1 999-2002 TERM Mr. Neal L. Arntson, 3246

H i gg i n s Rd . , Chicago, II 60(i3 1

N • B roa dway,

Ms. Addie J. Butler, Vice-President

Por t l a n d , OR 97232, ELCA

Rev. Lowell G. Almen, Secretary

Mr. Richard L. Bauer, 3790 Gra m a rcy La n e , Boise, ID 83703, ELCA

Mr. Richard L. McAuliffe, Treasurer

Divisoll for Higher Educa tion and Schools

Mrs. Lindu M. Evanson, 2 8 1 2 M a r i e t ta , Steilaco o m , WA 98388,

Rev. John Andreasen, I'argo, N D

ELCA

Mr. Raymond Bailey, Fort Collins, C O

Ms.Aon.e Hafer, 2 6 W I 4 2 Waterbury Ct., Whea to n , I L 60 1 87, Regellt-at-Large

Mr. Dean Baldwin, Erie, PA Ms. Donna Coursey, Seattle, WA

Mr. James Hushagen, 1 20 I P a ci fic Ave., Suite 1 200, Taco m a , WA 98402, ELCA (Secretary)

Mr.

Kurtis K.

Rev. Sherman Hicks,

A

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F

I

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H

E

R

A

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Washington, D C

Ms. Kristine Hughey, Wall i n gford , PA

Mayer, 1 4022 S p a n awa y Loop

Rd., Tacom a , WA 98444, Regell t-at-Large

P

and O p e ra t i o n s

Dr. Michele Crayton, B io l o gy, FaCtllty

Oaks Dr.,

S h o review, M N 5S 1 26, Regenl-nt-Largc

Mr. William W. Krlppaehne, Jr.,

Se rv i ces

Relations

Ms. Katherine Johnson, 402 NW 1 63 rd St.,

Shoreline, WA 98 1 77 , £LeA Dr. Mark Knudson, 1 309 W. Roya J

E n ro l l m e n t

Rev. Dr. Richard Rouse, Director of Ch urch

Trail, Bend, O R 97702, ELCA

Mr. Jeffrey Kane, M a n c h ester, NH Rev. Linda J. Kraft, Staffo rd Spring, CT

U

N

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S

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Rev. Elizabeth Platz,

College Park, M D

Mr. Bolivar Roman, San Ju a n, P R

Rev. Stephen Samuelson, Racine, WI Ms. Patricia Schibler,

Van Wert, OH

Y

lA Col umb u s , O H M s . Martha Taylor, Madisun, WI Rev. Paul Thielo, O l m s ted Falls, OH Rev. Jayne M. Thompson, " J l an h a t t J n , Dr. David Wee, Nu r t h t, e l d , M N Ms. Diane Scholl, D e co ra h , Mr. Gay S . Steele,

KS

Dr. Leonard Schulze, Exccuti\·,: D i rector

Dr. Arne Selbyg, D i rectur fo r ( :o l l cgcs and U n i vers i t i es

Administrative Offices PRESIDENT Loren J. Anderson, President Karin K. Aoderson, Assistant to the President

Campus Ministry Nancy Connor, Campus Pastor Dennis Sepper, Campus Pastor

Church RelatioIIS Richard W. Rouse,

Director of Church

Rel a t i o n s

ADVISORY - PLU

Mr. James Hushagen, Secretary

WA

ELeA C ardina l Dr., Misso ula,

Bellevue, WA 98002, Alumni

M r. Gary Severson, Chair

1 38

H n n o ve r C t . ,

Mr. Roe Hatlen, 1 3 1 4 1

ness. The c o rp or a tion consists o f 3 4 rege nts a n d 1 25 delegates from tht:

�8466, ELeA

Dr. William Foege, 2 1 9 1 Eldorado D r. ,

co rpora ti on meets a n n uallv o n the PLU c a m ­ ' pus t o elect regents and to conduct other busi­

New Brau n fels, TX

Mr. Rod Schofield., Colorado S p r i ngs, CO

2000-2003 TERM

Christian institution of higher lea rnin g . With

Ms. Jennifer Peterson,

Rev. Walter Pilgrim, Steilacoom, WA

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Office of the Prol'Os!

Paul T. Menzel, Provost

and

Dea n o f

Graduate Studies

William R. Teska, Assoc iate Provost

Special Academic Programs alld Summer Sessiolls

Judith W. Carr,

lJean

Office ofilliemalional Progra ms Janet Moore, Director

Charry Benston, As s i s t a n t D i reclor

IJivisolI of Humanities Keith J. Cooper, Dean Susan Young, Administrative Assistant

Divisioll ofNa/ural Sciences Chang-Ii Yiu, Dean Anita Wahler, Adm i n istrative Associate Michele Folsom, Systems / N e two r k

Ad m i n i s trator Terrence Nicksic, La b ora t o ry Supervisor, Chemistry

Division of Soc ill I Sciences David Huelsbeck, Dean

School of the Arts Christopher H. Spicer, Dean Linda Miller, Ad m i n is t r a t i ve Associate, Music Pamela Deacon, Manager o f Music

Perfo r m a n ce a n d O utrea ch School ofBlisiness Donald R. Bell, Dean Susan Martensen, D i rect o r o f Commun ica­

tions and External

Relations

G inger Moriya, Coord inator of Undergraduate

P rogra ms Catherine Pratt, As sist a n t

Dean; Di rec to r,

M . B.A. P ro gra m Bruce Wilkins, Director, Center fo r E xecut i ve De ve lo p me nt


School of fOduCiltion Lynn G. Bed<, Dean Myra J. Baughman, Associate Dean School of Nursillg

KPLU-FM

Cool'emtive fdllwtion Heike Phelps, Di rector

Martin J. Neeb, General M a n a ger Joseph Cohn, Assistant Manager,

Cellter for Public Service

Progra m m i ng

lone S. Crandall, D i rector

Nancy Knudsen, Associate Director of

Tcrry W. Miller, Dean

Patsy Maloney, Di r�ctor, Center fo r Con t i n ued ursing Lea rn i n g Ruth Schafnel', Learning Resources Center Coordinator Audrey Cox, Advi ser, Admissions Assistant

Lynn Okita, Lab Preceptor Sally Ann Rinehart, Lab Preceptor Schoo l of Physical EduCil tion a n d Atilletic Department Paul

£. Hoselh, Dean; D irector o f Athletics

Larry Marshall, Assistant D i rector of Athletics

Nick Dawson, Sports Informa t i o n Director Bruce Haroldson. Men's Basketball Coach James Johnson, D i rector of Aquatics Craig McCord, Ath letics Coachllns tructor

Gary Nicholson, Athletic Trainer

Gilbert RJgell. Athle tics Coachllnstructor Scolt Westering, Athletics Coachllnstructor Library Leon Reisberg, Dean of I nformation Resources GaIl EgbC1's, Associate Professor, Library Susan J. M cDo nald, Assistant Professor, Libmry Patricia O'Neill, Assistant Professor, Library Francesca Lane Rasmus, Assistant Professor, Library Patrick Seigler, Instructor, Library

Sharon G. Chase, Manager, Circulation Jeanine Barndt, M a n ager, Technical Services Layne Nordgren, Director, Mu ltimed i a /

Library Systems Kirk IsJlkson, D i rector, Multimedia Production Kerstin Rin gdahl. Archivist a n d Curator of Spe ial Collections

Bridget Yaden, Coordinator, Language Resource

'en ter

Informat ioll Resour es - Computing and TCiecu lllltlurlication Sel'vices David Allen,

etwork Manager

Erik DeBower, Progra m mer Ana lyst Kei th Folsom, D i rector, Systems a n d o m m u nication David Gri mber g, Systems Anal yst Gordon Bait,

NT Systems Manager

Jonathan Johnson, Software Support Specialist

'0 MlJler, Progra mmer Analyst David Moylan, Teleco m m u n ications Manager

Mark Noll, Sen ior Systems Analyst Chris SllDders, D irector, A d m inistrative Computing Lennie Sutton , S)'stems Analyst

Margaret Worley, D i rector, Academic/User Support

ADMISSIONS

Operations and New Media

David Gunovich, Di rector

Angela Bigby, Graduation Ad m i n istrator ffilloah Creigh, Scheduling Administrator

Le ann Dahl, Evaluations A d m i n i s trator Laura Medrud, Evaluations A d m i n i s t rator

Acadelllic Advising/Retention Richard Seeger, Director, Academic Advising Patricia Roundy, D i rector, AURA Program Academic

Assi5/ance

Christine Benton, D i rector, Academic

Holly Hoag, Manager o f Corporate Support

Admissions

Kathleen Morris, Corporate Support

Kari Leppell, Associate D i rector

o

Executive

Brian Miller, Ass i s t a n t D i rector

z

Jeffrey Bauman, Manager of I n formation

Jennifer Wrye, Assistant Director

Resources

Heather McDougall, Ad missions Counselor

'T1

Mary Kaiser, Corporate Support Executive

John Eussen, Admissions CouIlseior

l>

Debbie Callahan, Corporate Support

Sarah Groesch, Admissions Counselor

Execu tive

Aaron Jacobs, Admissions Counselor

"

Katherine Gardella, Major Gifts Manager

Abby Wigstrorn, Admissions Counselor

C

Caryl Zenker, Assistant Man ager, Develop­

David Gerry, Coord i n a tor of I n ternational

ment and Marke t i n g

St udent Services

-I

Ardys Curtis, Ad min istrative Associate

-<

FINANCE A N D O PERATIONS

financial Aid and Student Employment

Sheri J, Tonn, Vice President

Kay Soltis, D i rector Ron Noborikawa, Senior Associate Director

Ginger Peck, Assistant to the Vice President

Joan Riley, Associate D i rector

Busilless Office

Lorie Staab, Associate D i rector

Robert Riley, Controller

Tayah Lin Butler, Financial Aid A d m i nistrator

Patricia A. O'Donnell, Assista nt Controller

Barbara Fulkerson, Financial Aid

Plant Services

Admini strator

David Web mhoefer, D i rector of Plant

Katherine Walker, Financial Aid Ad m i n istrator

Services

Student Services Center

William Rasmussen, Assistant D i rector of

Sue Drake, Ma nager

Pla n t Services

Bonney Atwood, Counselor

Human Resource Serv ices

Marcia Pecchia, Counselor

Susan Mann, Director of H u m a n

Neshelle Henkel Chabot, Ve terans

Resou rce Services

Coord. ina tor

Alina Urbanec, Associate Director

Lisa Hendrix, Counselor Jacki Lantz, Counselor

Auxiliary Services

Lisa Stee ver, Cou nselor

Mark Mulder, D irector of Auxil i a r y Services

DEVELO PMENT

Angie Zurcher, D i rector of Bookstore

Erin Sigman, Director of D i n ing Services David

Gary Cinotto, Golf Course Manager

G. Aubrey, Vice President

Janet Goehren, A d m inistra tive Associate

STUDENT LIFE

Development

Office of Student Life

Edgar Larson, Executive D irecto r ­

Laura

Charitable Estate P l a n ning

Associate

Gift Planning Monica Hurley, Development D i rector ­

Campus l.ife

Major G i fts

Jeffrey C. Jordan, Associate Dean fo r

Doug Page, Senior Devel opment D i rector ­

Campus Life

Gift Pbnning

Campus Safety

James Plourde, Development D i recto r ­

Walt Huston, Director

Major G i fts

John Grant, Operations Supervisor

Louise Tieman, Development D i rector -

Daniel Nielsen, Supervisor

M aj o r Gifts

Alumlti

F. Majovski, Vice President a n d Dean

Phyllis L. Meyerhoff, A d m i n istrative

Brian Hall, Senior Development D i rector ­

Career Development

Sharon I. Harr ison, Di rector

Ad m i n istrator

Lowell Kiesow, Chicf Engineer

Charles Nelson, Director of International

Advancement Services

Kerri Fletcher, Institutional Data

Nick Morrison, Music D i rector/Host

Kerry A. Swanson, Assistant M a n ager,

AdmissiUl1s

Julia Pomerenk, Registrar l n s- t i t utional Data

Erin Hennessey, News D i rector

Laura J. Polcyn, Vice President

Registrar Marie Wut7j(e, Assistant Registrar for

z

Devel o p m e n t

& ENROLLMENT SERVICES

Beth Ahlst rom, D i rector Pam Martin, A d m i nistrative Assistant

6- Parent Relations 6- Annual Giving

Counselillg and Testing Services

LauraJee Hagen, Oirector of Al u m n i a n d

Gary Minelli, D i rector/Psychologist

Parent Relations

Alene Klein, Associate Director/Coordinator,

Darren Kerbs, Associate Oi rector of Al u m n i

Services for Students with Disabilities/

and Parent Relations

Coord i nator, Tes t i n g Services

Kara Fleharty, Associate D i rector, Annual

Shannon Ledesma Jones, Psychologist

G i v i ng a nd Q C l u b

D ana Myers, Psychologist

University Commun ica tions

Heil ith Services

Greg Brewis, Executive D irector Kathy Berry, Associate D i rector Printing

Sue Mkrtichian, Di rector/Phys ician's

&

Assistant

Mail Serv ices

Ann Miller, As s o ciat e D i rector/Nurse

Chris Tumbusch, As.,ociate Di rector,

Practitioner

P h otographic Services

Sherwin Ferguson, Nurse Practitioner

A.ssistance

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

1 39


Residen tial LiJe

l;ylUl

Nancy Martin,

Residential Facilities

Andrew Gray, Resident D i rector

Shelley Griffith� Resident D i recto r

z o

Dawn Melton,

Re ident D i rec tor

Man

Residen t ial C o m m u n i t y

z

S o u l h Florida, 1 997, 1 999.

of Kansas,

B . A . , S t a n ford U n iversi t y, 1 967; M . A . ,

1 974; D . N . S . , I n d i a na University, 1 98 2 ; M.Sc.,

of C a l i fornia, I.os Angeles, 1 9X I .

University o f Vic loria, 1 9 9 5 .

Stanley L. Brue, 1 97 1 -, ProJessor oj Fconomics;

tate Un iversity, 1 ':168; P h . D. ,

2000-, Visitillg Instnletor oj University o f West Alabama,

Blisilless; B.A.,

ProJesso r oj

I n d ia n a

oj Eng lish ; B.A., Am herst College, 1 985; M . A . ,

P rofess o r of English; Un i ve rsi t y, J <)76.

Approfondies, Doctoral d e

John T. Carlson, 1 975-, ProJesso r of Biology;

Carlton

o f Pau, f - r a n ce ,

1 9 8 1 , 1 983, 1 986.

Colkge, 1 97 1 ; M.A., Butler Universi ly, 1 982;

Megan Benton, 1 986-, Associate P raJess o r oj Ellglish ; B . A . , PacifIC Lutheran

U niversit y,

George E. Arb au gh . 1 959-, ProJesso r oj Philosophy; B.A., Augustana College , Rock

Paul

P. Benton, 1 969-, Associate ProJessor oj' Ellglis!l; B . . , \Nh itworth Col lege, 1 965; P h . D . , P ri n cet o n U n ive r.s i t y, 1 9 70.

U n ive rs i t y of Iowa,

1 958, 1 959.

Denis G. Arnold, 1995-, Assislilllt ProJesso r oj Philosophy; B.A., Lewis & Clark College. 1 988; M.A., P h . D. , University of M i n ncSOI,\, 1 99 1 ,

Charles A. Bergman, 1 977-, P roJess o r oj

1 995.

P h . D . , University of M i n nesota, 1 9 73, 1 977.

David G. Aubrey, 1 9 95-, Vice Presidellt Jo r

Eli Berniker, 1 982-. Professor oj Busilless; B . S . ,

English; B . A.

(Econ o m jcs) , B.A.

l.utheran Seminary, 1 9 7 1 .

Arturo BibllllZ, 1 977-. Professo r oJ So ciology;

D. Stuart Bancroft. 1 <)67-68, 1 971-, Pmfcssor M . B.A., Arizona State University, 1 9 6 3 , 1 965; M . A . , Ph.D., Un i ersity o f Pen n�ylva n i a , 1 9 7 1 , 1 9 73 .

oj B "silless; B,S.,

t Judi t h W. Carr, I Y79-. Oeall fiJI' Special Acad/J/lIic Progra ms and S u m l ner Studies; A.S., Pacific Lutheran U n ivers i l y, 1 970; P h . D. , University o f \'Vashi ngto n , 1 974.

Mary Ann Carr, 1 907-, Clillical A ss i stant

Los Angcle"

Business; B.A., Univers i t y of San Francisco, 1 966; M.A . . P h . D . , University o f M i c h igan, 1 9 7 1 , 1 97 3 .

Matthew Barritt, 1 999--, Visitillg Assistallt

B.A. , Macalester Col l ege,

n iversity of l'vt ichigan,

Pennsylvania, 1 97 1 ; Maryl a n d , 1 9 75;

University of America, 1 99 5 .

Patricia Chastain, 2UO()-, AssistclIlt Professor

1985.

o( Edl lce l t ioll;

B.A., M. A., Ph.D. , Univ�rsity of Califo rn i a , Los Angel es, 1 9 5 5 , 1 96 , 1 9 6 8 .

Sam Chung, 2000-,

Kenneth D. Blaha. 1 989--.

B.E.C. ' . , Kyong Pook

COlllputer Sciencr

/\sso(inte Professor

B.A" U n iversity of M i n nesota, Murris, 1 9 7 8 ; M.S. ( 1athematics), M.S. ( C o m p u te r Sc ien ce) , P h . D. , n iversity of O re go n , 1 98 1 , 1 984, 1 9 89 . Todd Blessinger. 20()O-, Visitillg Assistallt ProJessor oj Mathell/atics; B.S., ni ers i ty o f Notre Dame, 1 992; P h .D. , University o f

ProJesso r oj' Nul'5illg;

S c h o o l of Then lo g y, 1 9 92 , 20 00 . Myra J. Baughm.ao, 1 9 70-, ProJessor oj Ed�lca­ tion; B.A. , Pacific Lutheran U n i versi ty, 1 962; M . E d . , Weste rn Washi ngton U n i versity, 1 9 9; Ed . D . , University o f Nebraska, L i n col n , 1 9 75.

To ronto

B.S.N., SeaLtk

20()O-,

Visil'illg AS$istfllrt

ProJessor of Sociology; B.A., U n ivers i t y o f

1 98�; tvI . A . , P h . D . , I rv i n e , 1 '192, 1 9 9 4 .

Wash i ngton, California,

, James E. Brink.

University of

1 970-, ProJessor oj Comp uter

cience; A . B . , Hope C o l l e ge, 1 965; M.S., P h . D. ,

Iowa State University, 1 967, 1 9 70.

L U T H

E R A N

U n i vc'rs i L y,

1 973; M.N" University of Was h i ngto n, 1 9 8 4 .

Devon D . Brewer.

U N I V E R S I T Y

niversity,

Keith J. Cooper. 1 984-, Assacitlte Profess o r oj

Dean, Divisioll oj 1 l1ilIla" iti�s; B . A . , M .T. S., Gordon­ Conwell Theological S e m i n a rv. 1 97 Y ; M . A . , Ph . D . , U n iversi I y of Wisconsi n , M3d ison, Ph ilosoph)';

G o r d o n Col