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Graduate Catalog 2000/2

Undergraduate and


For further information ... Tht! univer�ity i located at South 12 J t tre r and Park Avenue in subUIban Parkland. Office hllurs are from :003.01. to 5: 00 p.m . Monday thro ugh Friday. Most offices are losed for chape! on Monday, Wednesday. and Friday from 10:30 to II :OOa.m. during the school y ear. The univc-rsit)' observ-.:s all legal holiday. The U ni v ers i ty Center maintains il1l information desk which is op en daily unti l [Op.m. (I I p. m. n Friday ant! Salurday), Vi. itors are weI orne at any lime. S pecial arrangements for tours and app oin tmen ts may bt' m ade through the Office of Admis ions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMAT10N ABOUT:

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

• G neral interests of the university. ch urch reJ.ati n , and co mm un .i ty reI tions

The President ... .... ..... .... .... . . ...... .... ..... .... 535-7101

• Academic policies and programs, faculty app intments, ilnd curriculum developmt'nt

The Provost .. ... ... .. . .... ..... ... . ............ ..... .. . 535-7126

Area cotle (253)

General information. admi' ion of students, publications for pro pective students, advanced placement, and freshman

Admissions

535-715 [ 1-800-274-6758 E-mail: admissions@PLU.edu

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and tran fer student regi traLion

• Financial assistance, scholarships, and

Student Services Center .. ... . .... . ... . . .. ..... 535-7 161

loans; fees and payment plan; transcripts

1-800-678-3243

of records, schedules, and registration

• Financial management and administrative ervices •

The Vice President for Finan.ce and Operations ...... .... ..... ... . 535-7121

Campus parking, safety, anJ information

• Residence hans, counseling and testing, hea lth ervices, min ori ty ffair, international students, and extracurricular

Campu Safety and Information ... ..... 535-7441 The Vice President for Student Ufe .... .. .. .... .. ... . . .. . . .. ..... .... 535-7 1 9 1

activities

ifts, beque

ts, grant, and

the annual fund

The Vice Pre ident for Development and University Relations . .... ......... .... 535-7177

• Academk advising

Academic Advising .. . . .. ......... . . .. .......... . .. 5 3 5-8786

lntcrnation I study

Center for Intemational Programs ... . 535-7577

• Graduate progran1S

Graduate Studies ... .. .... . . .. _ .. . . . ... ... . . .. .. .. . 535-8312

• Work-study opportunitie and student employment

Student Employmeot Office . .. .... .... ..... 535-7459

Career options

Career DeveJopment .... ..... ... .... .... .. ... .... 535-7459

• Summer ession

Summer Se sions . . .... ........ .... ..... ........ ... . 535-7129

• Alumni

Alumni and Parent Relations . ............ . 535·7415

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tivities

• Worship services and religious life at the un iversi ty

Campus Mi nistry . .... ..... . .. . . .. . . ... . ... ......... 535-7464


UNDERGRADUATE AND

History

GRADUATE CATALOG

H onor s Prog Ta m ................................................................. 79

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. . . ... . . 89 . . .. ... , ........... 92 Natural Sciences . .. . . . .... .. . 98 Nur sing ................................................................................ 99 Philosophy ... . .. . .. . . . .. . 105 Physical Education .. . . . . . . . 106 Ph y sic s ................................................................................ 110 Political Science . . . ...... .. . . . .... 112 Pre-Professional Studies . 114 Psychology . .. ... . . . .. . . . . .. 116 Publishing and Printing Arts .... . . ..... . .. . . 118 Religion .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . 119 Mathematics ... ...

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General Information

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2000/2001

Academic Calendar

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Scandinavian Area S t ud ies ............................................... 120 Academic Structure ............................................................. 29

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Chinese St ud i es ................................................................... 45

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Communication and T ht!at re ............................................ 47

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ngineerino ..... ........... 51

operative Education I ntero hips ................................... 53

Economics ........................................................................... 54 . .. Educati on . . . . .. . . . . . .. . .. 56 Engineering Dual Degree . . . .. . 66 English . . .. . .. . . . . .... . . . . . .. . 67 English as a Second Language . .. .. . . . . 71 Environmenta.l Stud ies ....................................................... 72 Geosciences .......................................................................... 73 Global Studies . . .. .. . . . . ... . . . . . . . 75 .

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...... . . 121 Statistics .. .. . . . ... . . . .... . . . . 125 Women's Studies . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . 126 V/ri ring ............................................................................... 127

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Admission .......................................................................... 128 Policies and tandards . . . .. . . . .... . . .. ... . 129 Tuition and Fees ................................................................ 131 Financial Aid . . . . ... . ..... . . . 131 Business . .. ... . . . . . .. . . . . 131 Education ........................................................................... 133 ursing . . . . . .. . . . .. 136 Social Sciences: Marria ge and PamilyTherapy .. .. 137 . . .

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Index

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PACIFIC l!JIHE RAN UNIVERSITY The informatioo

of Pacific l.utheran Universit), at the time of publication. However, the university policies, calendar, curriculum, and costs. Listed in this catalog are course descriptions and summnries of degree requirements for majors, minors, and other programs in the College of Art� and denees 'll1d the Schools of the Art • ilusiness, Educati n, Nursing) and Physical Education. Detailed degree re quirements, often induding supplementary sample program�, re available in the offices of the individual schools Jnd departments. Advising by Wliversity personnel inconsistent with published statements is oot bindi.ng. contained herein retleets an accurate picture

reserve. the right to make necessary changes in procedures,


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Academic Calendar SUMMER SESSION 2000 Term I ..................... . . . ... . .......... . . .. Tuesday, Ma y 30-Priday, j un 23 Term II ..... .................. .................. Mond ay, June 26--Eriday July 21 Workshop Week ...................... . .... Monda', Ju l y 24-friday, July 28 Term IT! .... ............................. .. . Monday, iuly 3J-Priday, AUgl t 25 Commencement ...... .. .......... . .. ... .... I O:30a�m., Saturday, Augu t 26

SUMMER SESSION 2001 Term I .......................................... Tuesday, May 29-Priday,

FALL SEMESTBR 2000

FALL SEM ESTER 2001

Orientation .................................................. Friday, September 8, to

Orientalion . .......... . ...... .......... .... . ..... ............ Friday. Septernb.:r 7, to Sundar: September 9 CIa es Begin ... .. .................... ... . 8:00a.m., Monday, September 10

Sunday, September 10 Classes Be gin ............................. 8:00a.m., Monday, September I I Opening Convocation ... .......... 10:30a.m., Monday, September 11

at 1:45p.nr. Mid-semester Break ............ Th ur sday and Friday, October 26-27 Thanksgiving Recess Be gin s . 1:35p.m., Wednesday, November 2 2 Thanksgiving Recess Ends ........ . 8:00a.m., Monday, November 27 Classes nd ..................................... 6:00 p.m., Priday, December 15 M id- year ommencement ...... 10:30a.m.,Saturday, ecember 16 Pinal Exam i nations .... . ........................... . Monday, December 18 to Frida y, December 22 Semester Ends (after last exam) ... .................. Pr iday, December 22 Classes

resrune

JANUARY TERM 2001 Classes Begin ...................................................... Monday, January 8

pening Convocation ............. 10: Oa.m., Monday, Sept ember 10 lasses resume at 1:45p.m.

Mid-sem ster Break ............ Thursday and Friday,

October 25-26

Thanksgi ing Recess Beg i ns . I : 3 5 p.m., Wednesday, November 21 Thanksgiving Recess Ends . .. . .. . .. 8:00a.m., Monday, Novembe r 26 Classes End .. . ..... .... . .... . ........ ... ... .. . .. 6:00p.m., riday. December 14 M i d- yea r Commencement ...... I 0:30a.m., Saturday. December 1 5 Final Examinations ................................. M ond ay, D e l'mber 1 7 to Friday. December 21 Semester Ends (after last xam) ..................... Friday, December 21

Martin Luther King, Jr., Bfrthday Holiday ..... Monday, January 15 Classes End ...,.. . ...... ............... . ....... ............ ..... . .... Friday, February 2

JANUARY TERM 2002 Classes Begin ..... ............... . . . ...... .... ... . . . . . . ... Monday, January 7 Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday Holiday .. . . Monday, j an uar y 21 Classes End F riday, February 1

SPRING SEMESTER 2001

SPRING SEMESTER 2002

Classes Begin .... .. .. .. ................... . 8:00a.m., Wednesday, Febru ary 7 Presidents' Day Hol iday ......... ... ...... .............. Monday, February 19 Spring Break Begins . ...... . . ..... .. ............. :OOp.m.,Friday, March 23 Spring Break Ends ................................. 8:00a.m., Monday, April 2 Easter Recess Begins ...... . . . ..... . ............. .... 8:00a.m., Fr iday, April 13 Easter Recess Ends .. ... ... ..... ........... ... .... 3:40p.m., Monday, April 16 Classes Ernd ..... ..... ... ....... .... . .. .. . . ... . . ........ . .. 6:00p.m., Friday, May 18 Final Examinations ........ ... . ... .. Monday, May 2l to Friday, May 25 Semester Ends (after last exa m) .. ............... .............. Friday, May 25 Commencement ............. .. .. .... .. .. ............ 2:30p.m., SLLnday, May 27 Worship Service begins at 9:30a.m.

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Term n ......................................... Monday, June 25-Priday J uly 20 Workshop Week .. ..... ... . . .......... ..... Monday, July 23-Friday, July 27 Term Ill .................................... Mon d ay, July 30-Friday, August 24 Commencement . . ... ... .. . . ... . ...... . .... . !0:30a.m., Saturday, ugust 25

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Presidents' Day Holiday ................................ M onday, P bruary

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Spring Break/Easter Recess Begins .... . 6:00p.m., Fr iday, March 22 Spring Break/Easter Recess Ends ..... .... 3:40p.m., M onday, April 1 Classes End ............................................... 6:00p.m .• Frida)r, May 17 Final Examinations ................. Monday, May 20 to Friday, May 24 Semester Ends (after last exam) ............................... Friday, May 24 Commencement ..................................... 2:30 p.m . , S unday, May 26 Worship Service begi lts a t 9:30a.m.


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MISSION STATEMENT z

Long commiHed to providing au cducalioll distinguished for qual ity, in the context of a heritage that is Lutheran and an environment that i' ecumemcally

hristian, PLU continues

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embrace its primary mi sion:

the development of knowledgeable person equipped with an understanding of the human condition, a critical awareness of humane and spiritual values. and a capacity for dear and effective, elf-expression. For all who choose to seek a PLU dcgrCL', the lJniversity offers opportunity to pur ue a variety of program. of academi worth and excellence. Its tandards of performance d mand a finely trained faculty as well a highly skilled admini lralive and 'upp rl -tail. In Its tn litutional emphasis on scholarship, the University views the l iberal art

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prov iding the m:ces ary and e sentiaJ foul1datit n for the tf-l'hmcal training-and

education in the prates ions wbich

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The University aim to -uillvale the ilHellc.:cl, nol [or its own sake me rely, but a� a tool of corucicncc and

ao inslrumt'nt for ser v ic ,The di rersity and variety of cultural programs and personal servLces offered b}, the University are intended to ta i 1 i ta te this positive development of the student as a whole person in order that our tudents might fun(."tion as members or sodet}

In other words, FLU affirms that realization 01 one's highest p Icntial as well a" fulfiUment of Life's purpose arises in the joy of ervice to otbers 10 did It ::.tudentc; in. haring thi' understanding, the Univer ity seek, 10 be a community in which there is a continuing and fruitful interadion between "hat i best i

education and

what is noblest in Chri tian edificalion. Thi deUberate and simultancnw; a tt cnti n to the: religioll dimension of the IOtal human experience and to the standards of scholarly obje tivity, coupled with clear recognition f the integrative impulse in e ch, is the essence of PLU.

General I nformation mSTORY

PLU's founding fa�..Jt)' Pacific Lutheran University was fo unded in 1890 by a group of mostly Norwegian LlIt.he.rans tro m tbe Pllget Sound area, They were led by the Reverend Bjug Harstad, wh became PLU's first p resident. In naming the univer ity, these pioneers recognized the im p orta n t role th at a Luth an educational i n stit ut i o n on the \ e tern frontier of A merica could play in th ern rging future of the region, They wanted the institution to help Immigrants adj ust to their new land and fmd jobs, but th y also wanted it to pro duce g raduates who would serve churcb and comm unit y. Education-and educating fo r ervice--was a venerated part of the candinav ia n traditions from whjch these pi neers came. Although f oun ded as a univ rsity, the in titution functioned p r im arily as an a cademy until 1918, when it closed for two years. It re op ened as the two-year Pacific Lutheran College, after me rging with CQl um b ia College, previously located in Everett. Fur th e r consolidations occurred when Spokane Co llege merged

with PLC i n 1929. Pour-year baccalaureate degree w re first offered in education in 193 and in the libera l arts in 1942. The ins titu t i o n was reorganized as a llniversity in 1 960, reclaiming its original name, It presently includes a ollege of Arts and Sci­ ences; pro fessional sch Is of the Arts, Business, Educat ion,

Nursing, :lnd Physical Edllcatiou; and both graduat and con ­ t inu ing ed uc ation program s , PLU has beetl closely and productively affil ia t ed with the Lutheran church th ro u ghout its h is tory. It is nO\ a un ive rs i ty of the vangel ic al Lutheran Church in Ame rica, owned by the more than six hluld r d congregations of Re gion I of the ELCA. Ma ny influences and indiv id ua l s have combined to s hap e PLU and its regi nal, nati nal, and increasingly in te rn a t i onal reputa­ Lion for teaching , servi e, and chol rsh i p. A dedicated facul ty has been an extremely important factor. The chool has enjoyed a st ron g musical tradition from Ih . beginning, as w e l l as note­ worthy alUD1ni achievemen ts in pubLi school eac h ing and admini stration , university t e ach i ng and scholarship, the pastoral m in i stry, the health sciences and healing arts, and business. At PLU the libeml arts and pre fessional education aTe dosel)' inlegrated and collal>orativc in their educational philosophies. activities, and aspirations.

ACCREDITATION Pacific lULheran niversity is fully (cred ited by the Northwest .Association of Scb ools and C oJleges as a four-year i nsti tuti on of higher education. In

addition the following progranls hold specialized accredi­

tations a nd approval

:

Business - AACSB - The International Associat io n for Management Educalion

Chemistry - American Chemi .al ety Computer Scien e (B.S.) - c<>mputing Sci n

Accreditation

Board, Inc

Education - National COWl il for the Accreditation of Teacher Education P

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COMPUTfNG AND TElECOMMUNICATIONS

Marriage and Family Therapy - Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family T he rapy Education of the American

Computing and Telecommunication Services provides for

Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

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campus-w i de communications and computing needs. The main

Music - National Association of Schools of Music Nursing - National.League for Nursing Social Work - Council on Social Work Education

bu i ld ing. This facility houses the university's central computing

Any current or prospec tive student may, upon request directed to the pr eside nt's office, review a copy of the documents per­ taining to the universi ty 's various accreditations and approvals.

and provide d atabase hosting, e-mail, and web services for the university.

GROUNDS

vated, enables students to: connect personal computers to the

offices are locate d in the basement of the Mort\<edt Library systems, including Compaq AlphaServer and VAX/VMS systems.

Located in suburban Parkland, PLU has a picturesque 1 26-acre

residence hall rooms; connect personal laptops in publicly

Pacific Northwest.

accessible stations in the library; connect to the PLU library and course resources from off campus; create a personal home page

ENROLLMENT

on the PL

3,152 full-time students; 450 part-time stude.nts

web site; and communicate with faculty and staff

through a rLU e-mail account.

fACULTY

Additionally, each residence hall roo m is equipped with an

237 full-time faculty; 90 part-time faculty

Ethernet data jack. This allows students with their own comput­

STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO

ers to connect to the campus data network and the Internet

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without a modem. Each residence hall room is also equipped with a d i gi tal telephone and voice mail ser vi ce.

ACADEMIC PROGRAM Pacific Lutheran University uses a

A large computer lab, located in the Unjversity Center, is equipped with IBM-PCs and Macintosh computers. These prov i de access to the campus network and Internet resources. A variety of software programs re available for the systems. The univers i ty has adopted standard software including word

4-1-4 calendar which consists

of two fifteen-week seme ters bridged by a four-week January term.

Course credit is computed by hours. The majority of courses are offered for 4 hours. Each undergraduate degree candidate is

processing and spreadsheets.

expe cted to complete 128 hours with an overall grade point

Information regarding the PLU ePass, telephone services,

average of 2 .00 . Departments or schools may set higher grade point requirements. Degree requirements are specifically stated in this catalog.

computer software standards and policies, and University Center Lab hours may be obtained by contacting Computing and Telecommunications Services' main office at (253) 535-7525 or

Each student should become familiar with these requir ments

visiting the departmental home pag at http://www.plu.edu/cats/.

and prepare to meet them.

The intentional, unauthorized entry into a computer system is a crime under the laws of the State oEW shington. Computer

LIBRARY SERVICES The Robert A.L. Mortv edt Library is a multimedia learning resource center 'erving the entire university community. Its

security programs and devices are llsed to manage and control access to programs and data. In the event of computer trespass, university officials arc authorized access to all data and messages

collections are housed and services provided in a modern bui.ld­ ing, which has study spaces for 850 600,000 bo

associated with the incident for use in its resolution.

tudents and a collection of

Voice messaging systems fall under the Telecommunica ti ons

, periodicals, microfibn, and aud i o- visual materi­

Act, which makes tampering with another person's voice mail or

als. The l ib rar y receives 1,870 current print magazines, j ournals,

making prank and obscene calls ill egal. The un iversi t y vigorously

and newspapers, and has access to over 8,000 titles a va ilable in full text via the Internet.

prosecutes these violations both criminally and via the student

In addition to its general col l ect i on of b oks and other materials, the lib ra ry has a special coUection de oted to the

WRITING CENTER

conduct system.

S can di navian Immjgr ant Exp erience and contains the universi ty archives; regional Lutheran church archives; and the Nisqually

The Writing Center, located in Ramstad Hall, provides a place for students to meet with trained student readers to discuss their

Plain. Collection, a local history collection. Other resources

academic, creative, and professional writing. Student staff

include the K-12 Curriculum Collection, Children's Literature

me mbers help writers generate topics, develop focus, organize material, and clarify ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed from the classroom setting, student readers and

Collection, maps, pamphlets, and access to on-line databases,

and t he Internet. A st aff of28 full and part-time Librarians, professionals, and

writers talk seriously about ideas and writing strategies. Most

assistants offer expert reference, infonnation, and multimedia

sessions arc

services. The reference staff provides begi n ni ng and advan ced

ne-hour meeting , but drop-in students with brief

e ays or q u es ti ons are welcome.

library instruction for all students. As part of their standard

The Writing Center is open Monday through T hursday from

reference se rvice, the library staff assists students in using elec­ tronic information sources in the Haley Information Center. As tile result of the l i bra r y 's extensive collection of on-line bibho­ graph i c tools, computer access to other collections, and elec­

8:00a.m. to 9:00p.m., Friday from 8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m., and

Sunday f rom 3:00 to 9:00p.m. These hours may vary slightly from semester to semester.

tronic m ail servic ,students and faculty have rapid acces to

ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE CENTER

materials which can be borrowed from other Libraries. Media

The Academic Assistance

enter provides students with trained, cer ti fi ed peer tutors and a comfortable environment where lea rn ing , risk taking, and discovery can occur. Registered PLU

Services pr vides video, CD, and DVD collections as well as access Lo multimedia equipment, tools, and supp ort . The Multi­ media Lab provides tools and training in using multimedia for teaching and learni ng. The L anguage Resource Center pr vides computers and resources for individual or class l anguage study. Direct loan service is avai l able to PLU students and faculty at Northwest College, St. M rtin's C ollege, S attle University, Seattle Pacific University, the University of P u ge t Souud, and other private college libraries in the Northwest.

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Students are provided with a PLU ePass which, when acti­ network (Internet, PLU library and course resources) from

campus, truly representative of the natural grandeur of the

w

These systems are for both academic and administrative purposes

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exp er ien ce. Tutoring takes place on campus, usually in the Academic Assistance Center located in Ram tad Hall. However, study and test-review sessions may oc ur in separate locations such as the

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scie nce

r m us ic buil ings , nd d ro p - i n math tu to r i ng is avai l­

able in the Appl e Pi Math

abo Thto rin g sessions are set up by advance ap p o i n t m e n t (drop­ ins may not find tutor available) . The Ce nte r, located in Ramstad 1 1 2, is open Monday thro u g h Thursday from 9:00a.m. u n ti l 9:00p.m., F riday from 9:00a.m. until 5 : 0 0p . m . , an d S un day from 2:00p.m. u nt.il 9:00p.m . Stud ents should stop by t h e office, call 535-75 8, Of e-mail learningctr@plu.edu. Our h o m e page provide i n f or m at ion OJ] tutoring and weekly updates on s t u dy ses ions: http://www. p l u.e du / aas t / .

CAMPUS RESOURCES Center for Public Service The Center far P u bli c Service onnecls the PLU campus to the surrounding communi ties y p rovi d in g op p o rt uni t i s for students, staff, and fa c u l ty to serve commun i ty needs as p ar t o f their u n iversity exp rie nce . here are many ways t ude n ' can be co me involved in service at PLU. Students an wo rk with children, ad ults and s en io r c itizens at the F a m ily and Children' C n le r, a coaliti n of social �ervice programs h o u se d toget her at East Campus and coordi­ nated by the Center for P u b l i c Service. St uden ts can also bec o m e involved in co m mun ity work through se rvi ce-learnin g c la sse s. The Cent e r fo r Publi ervice can h e l p students find out abollt th ese courses, ava i lable in many departments, which use serv ic e experience a an im p o r t nt part of the lear n i ng p roc Ind ividual s and t ude nt g roup s can also use the Volunteer Center, part of the Center for Public ervice, to browse th r o u g h l i sting of ve r 1 00 se r v ice

pportunities

on

and near the PL

amp us. Th es e oppo rtu n i ties range from one - t i me "Go- ' n-Do"

projec ts to longe r- term involvement. To find out mor about volunt ering and er i c e - le a rni ng at PLU, call the Cen ter far Public Service at 5 3 5 - 7 1 73.

KPLU-FM, National Public Radio KPLU at 88.5 FM is licensed by the Federal Commun ications Commission to the Un iversi t y Board of Regents. A me m ber station ofN tional P u Ii Radio, KPLU p ro vi d es m usic and news seven days a week, 24 hours a day, with a profes ionai staff augmented by qualified st uden ts. PLU is the o n ly independent u niversity in the Northwest o pe ra t i ng a ful l po wer NPR station.

The KP LU main tran mitt r o n West Tiger Mounta i n covers the Puget Sound area and translators cover t he m ajor population c e nte r, of we tern Wash ingt on from Bell i ng h a m to Cen tr alia and

m a n y fields. The summe r session consists of th ree discrete fo u r­ week t rms, and a one-week wo rkshop ses ion, and begins the la s t week of May. Many courses are taught i.n the evening, two n igh ts per week for nin week s, and Master of Busine s s Ad m i nis­ t ra t i o n courses are t, ugh t during two six- week terms, two n ight s per week. Designed fo r undergraduates and g ra du a te students al ike, th p rog ram serves teachers and admin istrators seeking credent ials and special courses, first-year s tude n ts desiring to in itiate college study, and others seeking s peci al studies offered

Malog,

outlining the cur ri cu l um

as weU s sp ial insti tutes, workshop s and seminars, is printed each sprin g and is ava ila b le by calling 535-7 1 29. MIDDLE COllEGE PLU offers a sp eci al six-week 'umme r program for high school ju niors and seniors and tor first-year col l e ge stud nts. CaJle d Midd le College, the program is de signe d to ease the transition from high school to college by s h a rp e ni n g learning skills that are

LATE-AFl'ERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES To provide fo r the profi ss io nal gtowth and cultural enrichment of persons u nab l e to take a t ra di t i o nal college course sc h ed ul e , the uni ersit y c ndu 1S late-afternoon nd even in g cia sse . T n addition t o a wide variety of offe rin g in t h e arts a n d sciences, there are s p ec ialized and gr a duate courses for teachers, adminis­ t:rators, and p ersons in busi nes s and i n dust ry. SUMMER SESSION An extensive summer school curriculum, of the same qual ity as that offered du r in g the reg ula r academic year, is available to all q ua li fied persons. In addition, summer session t y p ic all y is a time w he n the fac ult y o ffer i n n vatlve, exp erime n ta l COUf es wh i ch cover a b road range of conte m po ra ry issues and perspect ives i n

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co un sel i n g is to a ssess each tud nt's talents and i n tere st s in order to p rovide di rect io n and g o al s for th coUege ex perien ce. T h e acad em i c p ro gra m o ffers a chance t improve sp ec i fic learn i ng skil ls ess e nt ia l to college success. The classes, offered at seve.ral levels in severa l disciplines, are for M idd l e College students only, t he re by allowing mall class size and dose co nta ct between students an d faculty. All studen take a study skills course, which s rve as a core of the program. In ad d it i on , students may select two or th ree c ou rse s fro m among those offered each year. ueh student's p rO))'Tam is individual ized to promote maximum grow th . For information cal l 5 35-8786. PRO)BCl' PB.EVIEW Each se mes te r PLU offers Project Preview, a sp e c ial enrichment

afternoon. For i n formation call 535- 7 l 29.

is P LU st u dio- lah orat o ry fo r the publishing a rts . With the re ss ' large collecti n o f letterpress type and equipment , students design and p ro du ce printed texts using the han d- controlled te hniques that flouris h today in th e liv ly a r t form known as " fi ne pr in ting!' In addition to Its own p ubl i h i n g program, the Press houses a gr ow ing collection o f in novative boo k works and is a wo rk i ng muse u m , whe r visitors may watch and try the i r h a n d s , t the te h nology p io neered by Gutenberg. ss

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c un sel i n g and test i n g component. All students are thoroughly tested and evalua ted in privat ses ion with re ga rd to their read ing, w riting, verbal. and mathematical kil ls. Tn addition, c reel' co un s eling is p r ov i de d . The aim of Middle oll e ge

The Elliott Press The El liott Pr

::III »

essential to successful completion of a col lege or u n i ve rs it y program. Middle ol leg e has both an academic program and a

web at w\'IW.kplu.org.

Rece ntly KPLU in a u gura ted worldwide audio service on the

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program for high s ch oo l j uniors and sen iors. Desig ned t o com ­ p l em e nt h ig h school studic, . Project Prev iew allows students to earn one hour o f uni versi t y credit and to ex p e r ie nce c ol lege life and study. The topic of the course is differe n t e a c h seme ter. P roject Preview classes meet once a week for six weeks in the late

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by th e scho ls and departments. onmatriculat d s tud e. n ts who enroll for the summer session n ed on l y submit a letter of academic s ta ndi n g or give other evidence of be i ng p rep a red fo r college work.

A complete Summer Ses ion

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RETENTION Of FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS The rere n t io n of tudents entering a s freshmen has been

mon ito re d s i nce 1 9 72. Those data fo r the pa st decade are p resen ted in the fo ll owin g table:

Retention of Entering First-Year Students

1 986 1 987 1 988 1 989 1 990 1991 1 992 1 993 1 994 1 995 1 996 1 997 1 998

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To Sophomore Yea,/'

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80.6% 8 1 .7% 75.7% 80.9% 77.4(Yr, 8 1 . 3% 79.9% 79.8% 78.3% 7 .0% 84. % 83.3% 80.2%

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To Senior Year

6 . 2% 64.0% 62.7% 6.0% 63.5% 67.9% 68. 1 % 66.5% 64.8% 63.6% 69 .7%

71.1% 65.3% 65.4% 70. 1 % 66.0% 7 1 . 1% 73 .4°/(, 70.2% 67.8% 67.4% 74. 1 % 74.8%

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Students who bega n t b e i r higher education at ocher reg i o n.a ll y or Lln i versi tit:� are encourag�d to a p p ly for a d m ission w i t h ad v a n ced standi ng. vee 400 s tud ents transfer to the u n ive rsi t y each year wi th an average gmde po int i n exces s of 3 .00 ( 8 ) . Candidates must have go o d acad mic and personal stand i ng at the ins t i t u t i o n last J t tended ful l - lime. The m i n i m u m grade p o int average to be wru idered fo r adOli,sion as a transfer studen t is a 2.50 c u m u l ative grade p o i n t averagt: in college-level work from a regional ly accred i ted i nsti t ut i o n . In reviev i ng an applicant's file, the ad m issions office exami ne s the gradt' poi n t averlge, a cad e m ic p rogress, essay, and recommendations, For applicants with less than so p homo re s t n n d i n g (30 semester hours or 4S quarter hours ) , seco n d a r y �cho()l re c o r d s and standard ized tes t sco res w i l l also be considered.

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Admission

accredited co l leg

Pacific L u t he r a n Unive rsity welcomes applications from

at academ ic

students who have demonstrated ca pac ities for success

the baccal a u reate lev 1. App l icants who pre ' ent

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records a n d p

<

succeed

at

rsonal qualitIes that wiU enable them to

P LU and benefit fro m the uni ersity environ ­

ment will be offered ad m i ss ion . Appl icanls for ad missio n a re eval uated without rega rd to sex, race, creed, color, age, national origi n , or disablLng co nditio n . Select ion riteria i n clude grade point average, class rank, transcript patte rn, test scores,

an

essay, and reco m m en dations.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS (Freshmen I Trans fer Students ) In evaluating appl icatio ns the Office o f Admissions i nterprets

relalion tll thE' quality of t h e c u rr i c u l u m that the ap p l i c a n t has pllrslied in high sch ool and at the baccalau rea te level . For exam ple . n �tand<1 rd h igh :,chool program in p repa r a t i on for college should i Jldllde the follow i n g ;

rede.n t i:11s req u i red are:

1 . Formal Applim tio/!: Sub m i t t.he PLU AppLication fo r

gr a d e point average :lnd class ra n k in

English:

4 year

"Mathematics: 3 years ( algebra, 2 years, and geometry, 1 yea r ) »

Foreign Language: _ years Social Studies: 2 years Laboratory Sciences: 2 years Fine, Visual, o r Performing Arts: 1 year IDectlves: 3 years (selt!cted from the a reas l isted above, as co u rs �s in computer s cien ce, �-pee c.h, 3nd

as

debate. )

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� l'vlil1inmm Entra nce Re'llliremellts: 1. T ivo years of college prep a ra tory ma thema t ics (e.xdtlSive of computer science) with at! average grade ol e or higher, or ,m approved collrse at the oilege level, or demonstra ted equ ivalent proficiency.

of co llege p reparatory mathematics means two Ye:Jr> Igebm or one year of high school algeb ra and one year of h igh scho()l g�,)metry. Ta.k i ng th� aJgebra and/pr geo metry courses in middle or j un ior h igh school is acceprable provi ded the), a re high �chool level ccm rses. If ,; sludent is ddmittcd to l' LU with a dd'icill'ncv in mat hemal· ics, t hat deficiency (an be. removed by co mpleti()n '()f Intennediate Algebra a l P LU o r a n)' m h c r coUege or u.nivets i l) . ) f 2. Two years o oltc o reigll iang a age in h ig h scho o l, with an f average grade of C or h igher. £1r o n e year a t the college level, or demo llstm ted eil u iva/e n t p roficiellc J. NQI.£. La nguage ta ken ( 1\vo year�

of h igh school

before n i llth grade will l/ot fit/flll this req llirement.

Studen ts who have not satisfied 0111" o r /loth of the.se 1Bl"ircmellts may still be admitted but tlHlst make lip the deficiency as a ll Ad d i tio nal study of both mathematics and foreign language i s certain area, i n t h e arts a n d sciences a nd in some p rofessional p rogram 5. Th ose w ho follow the above preparatory

program will find most curricular o fferi n g s of the universi ty pen to them and may also quali!)! for advan ed placemen t in some areas. Students are a d m i t t e d to eit her the fall or spring semeste r.

postmarked by 0 embe r 1 5. tudents adrn i tted under the Early Ac t io n polic), recei c early notification of their accep ta.IlC� belween October I an d

ovembcr 30. hest s tude nts have first opport unity to request camp w, housing and register for fail cia ·ses. The re i� no fi nancial a i d be n e 6t or pe nalty for Ea r l y Action st u dents.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES ( F reshmen & Thansfer Students ) St udents plan n in g to en ter as fresh men may subm it a pp licat ion m ate ri a l s anyti me after com plet io n o f the j u nior year of h igh school . Admi ssio n decis ions are made begi n n ing December 1 u n le s s a request for Early Action is received. Cand idates are notified ot their status a s sOOn a the i r co mpleted a p p l ication has been received and eva l llated.

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a p t it ude , and fo r \ bo rn P L is a top choice. may apply fo r Early Act ion adm ission . Early Ac tion studen ts must m ee t each of t he follow i n g criteria: t p 2 5 % of bigh school cla, s , 3.60 or higher grade point average, a nd 1 1 00+ SAT or 24+ A T scores.

Ap p l icants may request Early Action by completing the regula r fre s h m a n admission n::quirem�nts a n d ch e k i n g Early Ac t i o n i.n box ! of the admission ap p l i cation. The applicat ion must be

Accep tan ce to the fa l l term carries permission to a ttend the p reviolls s u m m e r sessions. Spring acceptance approves enroll­ ment in the January term. Tbe fol lowi ng appl ication prio r i t ), dates are recom mended: Fall Seme.ster- I'ebrul.lry 15; Sprillg Semester-December 1 5.

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Fresh man applicants who exhibit above ave ra ge achievement and

a d v i sa b l e for

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$35. 00 Applicatio/l Fee: A $35 fee m u , t a c co m p a n y the a p p l ica­ tion or be m a i l e d sep arat ely. Th is nonrefundable service fee loe ' not applv to the student's account. Make checks o r money o rde r s p a yable to PLU OffIce of Admissions. 3. Tra n.scripts: Tra nscripts m ust be submi tted from high sch oo l a n d al i col l ege course wo rk. Tra nsc ri pts m u s t be sent d i rectly fro m t h e sc.hclOl to pr . c'''pted fresh men must s ub m i t a final h igh school transcript wh ich i n d i cates sa ti sfac tory c o m p l tion o f high :ic.hool and attainment o f d di ploma. The uillversity ;l c ce p t s tb� G neral Eq ui v a l e n c y Diploma ( GED ) for those students who m a y no t have comp leted a tra diti o n al h igh sehoul p rogram. 4. Recommen datioll: O n e reco mmen dat i o n m u s t be prepared by a p ri n ci pal . co u nselor, pastor, or other qualified p erson. The form is included in the appl icat ion packet. 5. Test Reclu irement: All en teri n g fres h m a n s tudents mus t submit sco res fTom e i ther the College Boa.rd. Scho last ic A sses ment Tes t ( SAT ) . or the American College Tes t .ssessmen t ( ACT) . Regisr ration p rocedures and fo r ms are ava i lable at h igh sch ool cou n seling offi ces. 6. Personal Essay: Using no more tha n two pages, write an es s ay o n one of the e [Wo top ics: 3. Describe an acad e m i c experie.nce that has significantly in fl uenced your life. b. If YOll could be a ny historical or fIctional cha.ra.cter fo r one day, who would you be and why? 7. Statement of Good Srallding ( t ra nsfers only). Early Action (Freshman

additiol1al degree req ll irement .

6

2.

Ad mission available fro m high school counselors or t he PLU O ffice of Adm issions. St 1.lde n ts may also apply o n - l in e a t www. p l u.ed u .

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Early Admission Qu al i fied

students i n te rested in accelerati ng thei r form a l begin work toward a degree after completion o f

education may

t h e j U lJ.ior year o r fus t semes(.e.r of the senior year o f h i g h school. Exce pt i ona l stude n t s who wi s h to en ro l l before co mpleti ng a l l requ i Jed u n i ts in h i gh s c h o o l m u s t have a let ter submi tted by a recogn ized school offi ci al which approves early colle g e admis sion


nd gives assurance that a high ch 01 dip l oma will be issued

Program are considered fre h m en with dvan ed standing. Students who participate in this p rogram will be arded college red it in a manner on istent with PL 's p o licy on tran fer of cred i t fTOm other institutio n . Credit will b e

after completion of speci fie d college work. Only students highly ree mmended fo r Early Admissi n wil l be considered. en rally n t h i gh th e se students rank near th e top of Ih ir cl ass and pr aptitud test scores. APPUCATJ ON PROCEDURES (International Students) T nte rnat io na l sludents who are q ua l ifi ed , cade m ical ly, finan­ cia ll y, a n d i n Jngl i.s. h profi ien cy are en o U l'aged to j in the un ive rs i t y ommun ity. Applicaton deaclli. nes are July 1 fo r fall erne ter and Tal1 uar y 1 for pring semest r. � redenti als requir d are:

l.

A completed International tudent Appiica tioll with a n o nrefun d able .S. 35.00 ap p li c at i n fee .

2. OFFICIAL TTallscripts with Ellglish transla tion from each: (a) secondary chool , (b) E ng l is h a' a e ond language program, (c) coUege o r u niversity att nded in t h United St ates, home coun try. o r other coun try. Transcripts m ust be ent d i rect ly from each in titution. Fa.xed cop ies are not acceptable. 3. Euglish Proficie ncy, measure d by one of the following: (a) tandardized English Profici ney Te t: TOEFL with a m i n imum scor ' of 550 ( aper test f rmat) or 2 1 3 ( computer-based) , or

(b) Two quarters Or one semester of c ll�ge-Ievel E n gl i sh writing with grades o f B or high r, or (c) Audit level completion of th e American

ultural

change

E ng l ish u nguage I nstitut e, located on the P L U c a m p us.

Arrangemen ts to take these tests can be made by caI l i ng the ACE Language In tilute, located at PL , ( 2 5 3 ) 535-7325. 4. On e Academic r ference fr m chool official or others in a p o sit ion t eval uate the st udent's ability to succeed in a baccala ureate p rogram. In add it i on , transfer tudents from

3.

awarded fo r ollege- I vel academic ourses de cr i be d in t h e catalog of an a ccred i te d Washington State com m unity coUege and posted on an 0 tlcial t r an sc d p t . Imern cltiOllcll Bacca lilurea te: A m aximum of 30 semester h o urs

may b gran ted for campI tion of the Diplo ma. St uden ts re advised to contact the Ad missi o ns ffice for sp c i fi c details. 4. Other Progra ms: St uden ts who have co mp le ted col lege courses wh i l in high school ma y r ceive c redit . The cours s mu s t be listed in the official co ll ege c a ta l og, be a p ar t of the regular coU ege curri uJum of a regio nally accredited co l lege or universi t y. and be posted on an official co llege or university

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transcript.

The u nivers i ty reserves the right t o make decisions on an individual ba is . Other Educational Experiences 1 . Credits earned in n onac.cred i t e d , chools are n t transferable. Students who ha e matriculated at Pacific Lut hera n Un i ve rs i ty may petition a department or school Lo wa i ve a particular rcquirenlent o n the basis of p re vi o u� nonac redi ted course work or may p etition a department or chool to rece i v c.redit by examination. 2. Th un iver it allows up t 20 em t r hours of SAFI/Dante credit, up t o

2 0 se meste r h urs fo r mil ita ry credi t, and up to

mester h ucs of CLEP c redit, p rov idi ng the t tal of the

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three does not exc eed

30 sem

st

r

h o ur .

3. The u niversity does not grant credit fo r college-level )ED a

U.S. ol leg e or un iversi ty must have a reference [rom the inter n at ional student adviser. 5. A c o mp let ed Internatiorlal Student Declam tioll of Fit ranees. 6. Personal Essay on one of two top i cs listed on th e essay form.

t·sts. 4. Por i n for m ation on the Co U ege Leve l :xaminaliol1 rog ra m (C P ) , refer to the secti n on Credi t by Examination under Academic Procedures (see page 25).

EVALUATION O F CREDITS D-ansfer of Credits from Other Universities

The Regis trar's Office evaluates ail lran fer reco rd s a nd p rov id s advi in ma terials designed to assist students to c o mp le t e u n iversity requir men . Tbese mater ial include a sum m, ry f co re requirements completed and the t tal hours accep te d . lndividual chool and departments determ ine wh i h courses atisfy maj r requirement .

1 . Courses comp l eted with a grade of C· or h ig he r at otl1 er reg ional ly a cc red i t cd c 1I get; or un iversit ie normally will be accep ted for graduation credi t with "P" grades, and will nol be calcul ted into the PL grade po in t average.

2. A st ude n t may transfer maximum of 96 semester O r 1 44 quarter hours. O f these, the max i m wn transferable fr rn a two-yc' r cho I is 'I semester r 96 quarter bour .

compl te the d i re t t ransfe r ass date degree from an accredited Washington tate community college before matriculati n at PLU will b adm itted with jun ior sta nd ing and w ill have satisfied Core I of the gene ral univer­ sity requirements except for 4 ho urs in rel igion ( fro m l ine 1

3. Stud nts wh

or 2) and

4 h urs in

er pect ives on Div rsity.

Transfer of Credits Earned While in High School The un iversity award credi t to high scho I students fo r urses o mp l eted before hi gh chool gradua tio n. The university may award transfer credit to high schoo l students who have com­ pleted courses in approved pr grams, as de crib ed below. 1 . AdvCI/lced Pmcement Progra m:

tud n ts who complete advan ed plac ent or cred it toward gr ad u a t i n through the examination pr gram of the CoUege B ard may receive redit for such courses. Inq ui ries should be addressed to the Office

of Admission .

2. RLinnirlg Stnrt Progra m: Accepted t udents who hay co ro ­ ple ted courses under the Wash ington State Running Start

FINALIZING AN OFFER OF ADMISSION I . Medical Requirement: Be6 re a tual em llmen t each n ew student rnLL�t submit a Health istory Form complete i t h a n accurate i mm un ization reco rd. This i n formation must be

acceptablt: I. the PLU Health l'rvice' Office. 2. AdvallCf! Pilymellt: A $ 20 0. 00 advance payment is necessar y i n order to onfirm an o ffer o f admission. T h i payment gu ran tees a place in the udenl b dy, reserve. h fng n campus i requested, holds financial assista n e wh ich may hav een awarded, a nd is I' qui red before la . r g ist rat i o n . It is credited to the st udent's ac unl and is ap pl i ed toward expenses f the fir t ·emester. Fall appl icantspffered admis­ sion hefor May I must PQSl m, r ths' paym nt by May I . I f circumstances necessitate callceUati n o f enrollm�nt and the A m iss io ns O ffice is n t ified in writing he� May 15. the

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$200.00 will be r fu n ded . The refund da te for lh January term is December 1 5 , and or spring seme ter, Ja n ua ry 1 5. 3. New Student Information Form: 111is fo rm must be co mp l eted by ill st ud ents and re tu rn ed with the adva n ce payment. 4. Residential L ife l n formation Fo rm : This fo rm must be co m pleted by .ill s t u de n t s and

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returned

with the adva n

An academically d ' ' m issed �tudenl may be reinstated after

one

semester if the s t ude nt I resents new e idence of

potential

academ i c success .

S t udents w h o have been d ropp ed fo r academic or di scipli n­

ary reasons a n d t hen reinstated must i de nt i fy a facul t y m e m be r w i l li n g to act as a SpOIL or , nd a dvi n.

e

payment. ACCELERATED UNDERGRA DUATE RE-ENTRY FOR ADUtl'S (AURA)

ea rs of age or Ider, wh() have not be n enrolled in a bac alaureate deg ree program w it h i n the l a s t five years, may seek a d anced placem nt up to the juni )r lev I through the URA P rogram. Those accepted i n to AURA are gra n ted o ne year' pro is i o nal ad m i sian. d u r i ng which time t hey must complete 1 2 cre dits at PLU ( i ncludi ng Psychol b')' 401) w i t h a cumulative grade point average of 2.S0 or hig her. Cr dit award. fo r prior lea r n i ng are based upon syst m a t ic assessment b, a faculty pa n el o f tbe adequacy and appropriate­ ness of knowledge an d kill · de m o n trated in a po rtfo l i o pre­ p a red b , t he student with taff a..-;sis tance. Credit awa rds may not exceed 48 sem ester credits les acceptable college trans fer credits. For d tails f the AURA Pr gTam, con tact tb> d i r 'cto r, AURA Progra m , 535-8786. Qualified adults, 30

Financial Aid Recognizing that many students wh

want to atte nd Pacific

Lutheran Un ive r ity would be u nable to meet all xpenses

of enrollment from per onal or fam ily sources, the u n iversity attempts to provi de fina ncial assista n ce to

all

elig ib le students. Any s tu den t ap proved for enrollmen t or

Approx i­ of the uni versity' tudents rece ive hel p i n the fo rlTl o f gift assistance ( that is, scholarship , artistic

currently enrolled lTlay re que st financial aid. mately 90%

ac h ieveme n t awa rds, or gran ts) , l ow i ntere t d [erred

employment. In many cases a financial aid award n of these forms of as istance. The offer of financial aid is bas ed n the cost of atten­ dance, which is th e university's eslimate of how m uch it co ts student s in various circ u m tances to attend PLU. A t ude n t ' reSOUices are s ubtracted from the projected

loans,

or

will be

a

com binat i

co ts to d et ermi ne fijlan cial need. Se veral different b udge ts are used, taking into account a student's marital statu , number of dependent , the cos t of books, suppl ies, hou ing, food, tra nsportation , and p e rso nal expenses. A paren t 's contribution is computed for all dependent

students by the federal processor. It is based on a federall establ ished fo rmula fo r determini.ng paren tal abil ity to co n t rib ute award a student's edue tiou . The u:niver ity als o

expects students ( and their pou es, i f married ) tCl toward expen es. All appl icants are offere d the maximum amo unt of aid

contribute RETURNmNG STUDBNTS

for which they qualify, as funds permit.

I . A student's a dm iss i o n to the Lilli ersi Ly is val i d for si:< years.

St udents

ho do

not

attend tb

that incl udes either a faL l

or

un iversity for

J

period of t i me

ter must apply t

sp ring scm

return to the un iver ity as de cribed below. Stude nts who w i sh to re turn within the six-year admission p e ri od reenter through the S tud en t erv i ces C 'nter. Reenter­ ing students m ust provide their c ur re n t addres , degree infomlation, and offi ial tr Il sc r i pts [LOrn any Ilege attended d u ri n g their a b se nce. Befo regis tering, reentering $tudents m ust reso lve prev i ous fina ncial obligations to the L1niv rs i ty and have a current h ealth clea rance from Univer· s i ty H l t h Services. • S tu de nts who wish to return to the un iversity after the ix­ year adm ission period e.xp ires must re a p p l y [or admission. Applicants for readm ission are req ui red to llbmit a com­ pleted appl ication and official tra nscripts fro m any college a tte nded d u.ring their a b sence. Appl ication forms may be obtained from and submit ted t t h e Office f Ad m iss ions . 2 . An academically dismisseJ stud n l m a y ap p ly fur reinstate­ ment by subm itt i ng a letter of peti t i o n to !.he d i re tor of dv isi ng. The p e t i t io n i' acted on by the Committee on Admission and Ret n t i o n of Stu d en t s . A st ude n t whose peti­ tion i. approved will be reinstated on pr ba tion md must participate in the probationary se m es t r plan. Rcftr to the Academic StaCIIs sectioll for a descriptioll of probation. s t ude n t whose petition is denied may apply aga i n for r i nsta te m e n t after one semester has elapsed unless i.nfonned o t h e r>v1se. A di mbsed. student Illay pe t i t ion fo l' rei nsLatement only once •

per semester.

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I f financial

circumstances change, students may conta ct

the Fin, nc ial Aid and Student Empl y ment Office to

dis c uss th ir situation with a financial aid admi nistrator at any ti me .

If studen ts or their families have unu ual circumstances (such as loss of empl oyme n t or major medical expenses)

that might affect the need for student fmancial aid, the F i nanci al Aid and Studen t E m pl oymen t Office sh o uld be contac ted . Unusual circumstances must be desc r i bed in writing , with the student's name, social security number, and all pert ine nt dollar amou n ts i nd ic a ted .

Students who receive schol a rsh ip c from sourc s o u ts ide the u niversity must info r m t he

Financial Aid and S tudent

Employment Office in wr i ti ng with the name of the scholarship and th e yearly

amount. Tn most cases , PLU financial aid package. Loans and work study will be adj usted fir t. Scholarships and grants will be adjuste d o nly as a l as t

may be required by federal regulat ion s to adjust a

resort . Fin ancial assistance is availab le to all qualifted tudents regardless of sex, race, c reed, 01 r, age. nat ional origin, or disabil ity. APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Studen ts must apply fo r financial aid am , car by complet ing

a

new PAFSA. R newal FAPSA or doing FAFSA on the Web. Need


based aid is not automatically renewable_ FAFSAs are generally available in December � r the up om i n g academic yea r. Applica­ tions mllst be submi t ted by the fol lowing priority-fund ing deadli nes for PLU to be considered for m ax i m u m funding_ APSA or do PAFSA on the Web no later t h a n !arwary 3 1 fo r the u p c o m i n g , eademic year.

Entering Freshman Students: Mail

Enterlng Transfer Sttldeots: Mail PAFS , Renewal P FSA, or do

F FSA on the Web no la t ac a de m i_c )'ear_

r

than !alll/ary 3 1 fo r the u p c o m i n g

PLU Cootinning Students: ail F SA, Renewal FAF$A or do PAP A on the: Web no l a ter than February 15 for the upcoming acad mi year.

For FAFSA on the

rb,go to http://\\,\ .vJafsa_ed .gov

An application for fin.mcial aid may be completed at any ti � e ,

but fa il u re t meet the priorLty date may result in a denial of aid even though n e ed is dem nstrated_ The F i n a n ci al id Office will consider al l applicants for any award fo r which they m ight be eligible. Aid awa rds are }llr OIle year alld most are renewable, p rovided reapplicatioN is comp leted 0 1 1 time, financial need CO I ' ­ tilmes, and satisfactory acade lll ic progress i s maill tained. A i d is /lot automat ically rellewed each yea 1-. NOTIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS I . Awa rd decisions for freshmen and transfer students who meet t h e February I campI tion date w i l l be m ad e in March, and

actual notification will be mailed the first week in April. 2. Fi nanc i al aid d ci ions f, r con t i n ui ng PLU students are made du rin g April and M ay_ Notifications are sent o u t beginning i n June. VALIDATING THE AID OFFER

Aid offers must be al i da ted by re t u r n i n g the signed Offer of inancial i d . Preslune-n a nd transfi r studen ts must als o submit the $200 advance payment req u i red by the Offic of Admis s ions. This should be done as soon as p ossibl , but must be r ceived b)' May I . No paymenl is req u i red from c ont i n ui ng stu de n t s. All students must complete :l satisfacto ry payment arrangement with the Stud nt S rvi C nter by Aligust I for fall seme ter and by January' 1 5 fo r sp ri ng semester to hold awards. Appli cants wh do nol rdu JI1 their acceptance of an a w a rd by the repl), date speci fied and who do not complete satisfactory payment arrangements will have th e i r award a n ce ll cd _ If an applica n t later decides to reappl y, the application w i l l b� revi wed with the grou p currently being processed. Aid, with the excepti n of ollege Work Study and Washing­ ton Stat Need rants, is reditd to ili student's account when all paperw'ork ha been o mpleted. Half of the award i s dis b u rsed each semester. P are n and studen ts are respon ible for the charges in excess of tbe award. In some ases a id is awarded in excess of d i rect university cha rges to help with living expenses. To expedite a re fu nd students can request remaining funds from their account by contacting the 'tudent Ser rices e nter. Under federal regulat ions, adjustments to an award p ac kag e OlU t be made if a student receives addition'll awards of aid from sourc s extetnal to the u n iversity. In every cas , however, Financial Aid and Student Employment wii l attempt t o allow the s t uden t t keep as much of tht' award packagt' as pos ible. B y t reati n g aid received from e:-.1ernru. ources i u III is way, additional awards from the university'S resources can be made to other qualified stud nts.

dditional T\ghts a n d responsibilities of financial aid rec i p i ­

ents include: I. Signing and retw-ll ul g each financial aid notice reeei ed. 2. Decl i n i n g at any time any po rt i on of an award.

z

Otifyulg the Srudent Servic Cent r in case of a dlang in cred i t hours attempted; a change in m a r i t a l status; a c h ange i n residence (c ff- ca mp us or a t h :>mc ) ; or receipt of addjt ional outside scholarships. 4. Providing a Ct)py of their parents' in ome tax retllIn (Form 1 040) andfur a copy of their own individual i ncome tax reru m if requested.

3.

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SATISFACfORY PROGRESS POUCY

The policy of the university i to allow st ude n t s to continue receiving financial assistanc as long as they are i n good stand ing. To do otherwise could cause a severe hards h ip on students who must dev te their ff, rlS to a c h .ie v in g satis(a tury grades. How­ ever, no institutional grant. wil1 be warded t stu den ts with cumulative grade point averages bel o 2.00. Moreover, federal regulations require that after fou r t e r m s or more of att mp te d enrol l ment, stude nts bel ow 2.00 cumulative grade point average will have their ft>deral Anancial aid revohd. Pa i fic Luth e r an University'S Schools of B usiness and Edu aLion require a mini­ m u m grade p o i nt average of 2.50.

To be g iven priority fo r most (- ),pes o f fina ncial aid, an appli­ callt must be enrolled as a ful l-t ime student. For Federal Finan­ cial Aid programs, a fu ll-t i me student i� defined as any per n

( 1 2 ) credit hours or more per semester. dj u tmeIlts in an award may be made during the year if an aid recipient has n t enrol led for a suffi c ie n t n umber o f credit hours. However, each fillancial a i d re c ipien t must maintain satisfactory a ca dem i c progre s i n the co ur t' of -wd), he or she is pursu ing in order to con t i n ue to reeeiv financial assistance awarded by Pacifi Lu t he ran n iversity tudent F ina n c i a l Aid Services. Tb. fo ll o wi ng requi remen ts are expec ted of each finan­ cial aid recipient; To make sali fa t o ry p ro g re s to ward a degree. an undergradu­ at t u d e n t must compl te 24 semester h o u rs 0 credit each a c ade m i c year. An academic year i s defined as the fall semester and the spring s ITt st e r Financial aid is awarded for 32 hours t o complete a bachelor's degree i n four years. For fuJI - time un dergrad uate :tudents receiving financial aid, the maximum nu mber of credit hour ' iliat m ay be attempted is 1 92 and the maximum ti meframe for completing a ba ccalau reate deg ree is six years. Even if a tudent changes his or her major or academic program, only 192 credit hours may be taken qual i f i n g for financial aid, and the maximum t irnefmme of six years for receiv ing a degree is en forced . Some financial aid prog rams ( e . g . , most un iversity gift aid programs a n d Was hington , tate Need Grants) allow ai to be awarded a maximum of four academic years for enterin.-:freshme n,and two ve rs f, r entering tran fe r students or a maximum of 1 44- hours. Por part-tim undergraduate students, a minimum of 1 2 credit h o u r s must b e completed each academic year and a degree must be achieved within a m ax i mum timefram of ten years. (The m ax im um numb r of c.redits allowable is 1 92_) enrolled fo r a m i n i mum of twelve

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y

Undergraduate Need-Based

Credit Completion Requirements Enrollment Status Ful l tim.: 314 time 1 /2 time L� than 1 /2 lim�'

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBIl.ITIl!S

The basic r sp onsiblJity for financmg an educa t i o n at PL rests with st ude n t s and t h e i r F. milies. In ad d ition to expected con Lrib ut ion s from par nts or guardi a n s student ar expected to assist by co n tr i but in g from t he i r savings and ummer earnings. F inancial as sis ta n ce fronl tl e university i s therefore supplementary to th efforts of a student's family. It is provided for Shldents who demo nstrate need.

Miniml1D'l peT tcnn 12 9 6 All c'Tedits uuempkd

Minimum per year 2-1 18 12 All .:redi ls attempted

L= than 1 12 time cnra/lml'llt applies to uu, Pell Gmtlf Program !Wh. Less than 1 12 riNII' enroJllm ·"t !rill C/JUS U ;t"dellt's ival1 to be ,-a tlceierl atld t1/ay}copllrdiz(' deferment sl/Jlu,.

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Satisfactory p rogress is reviewed fM financial ajd p urpose after ule end f spr i ng semester. For Washington State Need Grants , the Was h in gton tate Work Study Program , EOG, Wa hingto n Scholars, Wave, Trio, and any other tate of Washington funded program, sa ti s fa c tor y progres is reviewed at the end of each semester. The follo ving grades do not indicate success fu l completion of academic credit applicable toward a degree: "E" Grades "1" I ncomplete ·'W" Withdrawal "EW" Unofficial Withdrawal ( recorded by Registrar) " F" Failure Any courses in which grades are received are, h wever, incl uded in the maximum number o f redits that may b attempted ( 1 92) and are considered to be within the maxi m u m Lime-frame al lowable fo r ach ieving a degree (six years . Al l credits earned by xam ination, which are applicable loward a degree, wi ll be included in the limitation on credits that can be altemp ted whil" eligible for finan ial aid. Once a cou rse has been co m ple te d s llccessfully, the credit hour earned are counted toward the maxi mum number o f hours which can be taken under financial aid eligibility. If a course is successfully completed more than nce, it i count d onl once t oward a studen t's degree requirements and toward the maxlmwn number of hours that can be taken under financial aid el igibility. The univer ity's GurriculLun in 'Iudes very few noncredi t courses or courses who e credit hOLUS ar not appl icable to a degree. If any su h COli es are taken by financial aid rec ipients, the hour will be ind uded in the limitation on cr dits that may be attempted and will be con sidered within the tim eframe allowab l for achievillg a degree. In the event that a student r. ils to me t the criteria for sati sfa cto ry pr gress du ring a particular se meste r, he r she will b p laced on academic probation. railure 10 reg,lin satisfactory academic status will result in the cancellation f financial aid. Once "unsatisfactory progress" has been determined, tudents rece ive official nolifi aLion. Termi nated students may apply D r reinstatement by submitti ng a letter of petition t the Registrar's Office and securing a faculty spon or. The petition and spon or­ ship letter are su b m it te d for action to the Fac ulty Committee on Admis ion and Reten tion of tudents. Students whos financial aid is term inat d may p tition fo r reinst,llemem of their aid in one of two ways:

I)

rbey mny complete one seme ter of rull- lime enrollmen t

ing their o wn financial Iesources, or 2) they may sub m it an appeal to the Faculty Committee on Admission and Retention of studen d cumenting the u nllSual ci rcu mstances whi h have made it im p ossi ble to make satisfactory progress during the seme�ter in que, tion. u

Summer sess ions may also be used as terms during which a student on financial aid p rob a t i on may regain satisfact ry acade m j c status. However, tudents enrolling in wn m e r sess i o n s for this p urpose must use their own flnancial resources and are ineligi le fo r financial aid thr ugh the univ rsity.

lYPes of Aid AID PACKAGES

Studen ts are usually eligible for several different types o f aid from vario us sou rces; therefore PLU o ffe rs a fin ncial aid " pa kage" 0 . funds. Fu nds offered depend on a number o f factor ', including status as a n undergraduate o r grad uate sludent, the funds available at the time a studen t appl ie s and the amou nt of financial need. An expe ted family contribution i s derived usi ng a federal formula appli d to FAFSA in fo rmation.

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SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS cholarships and gra.nts are funds that do not hav

to be repaid.

A s tud nt' · pack-age includes gift money whenever guidelines and funding levels permi t. Where applicable, the combination o f

tuition remission and/or other inst itutionally funded resou rces (e.g., lergy De pend e nt , Alumn i Dependent , Regen l ) will be awa rded to a maximum f PLU tuition cost. To receive PLU grant or scholarship assistance, students mu st be full-time, taking a minimum of 12 nonrepeatcd credit hours each term. PLU awards gift ssistance fo r 1 2- 1 7 hours per term for the acade.mic year ( fill/ pring) only. In addition,

unless otherwise noted, the scholar hil(sand lIran ts lisled belillt are need-based and are available to undergraduates only. Reci-pie nts must maintain sati sfactorY academic progress a� d efin e d in the catalog. 111stitll tio llally COl/ trolled schola rships alld grants are pro vided university dOllors. If it is determirled that

by the lIn iversity {lndlor all

or a portion

of a student's (, ward is provided by a designated or

named s ource, att updated offe r offi "cmciai aid will

b sent.

DONORS/FUNDED UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIP

PLU FUNDED

-

NON TEED FOR TIJITIO

EXPENSE-S

REGENTS' AND PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to fr hmen in r e c o g niti n of oulstandi n ' cademic achievement and service in high school and in n t.i ci p a t ion of contj nued excellen e at PL . Students who met the following basic req u i rements were invited to apply: application for admission post marked by January 1 0; 3.8 GPA; 1 2 00 SAT or 27 A T; and US citizen r obtaining citizenship. The Regents' c holarsh i p is awarded to cover the full cost of tuilion 24-39 '-Tedits fOr the academic year (fall and sprillg) . The President's Scholarship is a half-tuition award fo r the a ca demi c year. Both are renewable fo r th ree years provided a 3 . 3 0 cumulative PLU GPA is main ined. ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDS of S5,000 are ann u ally offered to entering freshmen in recognition of outstanding academjc excellence in high school and in anticipation f superior performance at PLU. To be a candidate, a student must have a strong h igh school grade point average, 3.75 or higher, and re eive an offer of adm ission by Marc.h 1 . Financial need is not a requisite and no other application is required. Renewable for three years provided a 3.30 cumulative PLU GPA is main­ tained. Receipt of a Re ge n ts ' or President's scholarship super­ sedes this award. ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS of $4,500 are annually offered to entering freshmen in recognjtion of outstanding academi achievement in high school and in anticipat ion of superior performance at PLU . To be a candidate, a s tuden t must have a strong high school g rade point average, 3.50 to 3.74 , and receive an of fe r of dmission by March I . Fi na nc ial need. is not a re uisite and no other appli tion i requ ired. Renewable for three years p rovided a 3.30 cumu.lati e PLU CPA is maintained. PROVOST'S MERIT AWARDS of $3,000 are granted to under­ graduate transfer t udents with a 3 .50 or h igher PA and 30+ semester hours (45+ quarte r hour ) f transferabk c Ilege cour es completed at the time of admission. Must be admitted by March I. A 3.30 cumula tive PLU GPA is r quired for re­ newal. Need is not a determ in ing factor. Renewable or one year. PHI THETA KAPPA SCHOLARSHIPS of $3,000 are granted to tTansfer tudent with a 3.60 r higher GPA, 45 + emester hours (60+ quarter hours) of transferable college course work, and proof of PTK membership. Students must be admitted by March I . The award is renewable for one year during the undergraduate period of tudy if a 3 .3 0 PLU GPA is maintained. Need js not a determining fa ctor. Three awards are gi en each year.


ALUMNI DEPENDENT GRANTS of $SOO/year for four years are avai lable to full-time depend ent s t ude nt s whos parent(s) at tended PL U (or PLC ) for two senl sters or mo re. Need is no t a determ i n i n g fa c to r. ALUMNI MERJT AWARDS 0( $ 1 ,500 per acadenlic year for four years are given to exce pt i o nal freshman students who are sons or daughters of PLU alu m n i / ae . - neeri ng fresh m en must have a cumulat ive high s hool GPA f 3 .75 or higher. Re n ewa l candi­ dates must have a m inimum c u m ul ative P L U GPA o f 3.30 to be eligible. Financial need is not a de te rmin i ng factor. FACULTY MERIT AWARDS a re available to 24 s tude n ts who h ave co mp l eted 45 r ed i t hours or more at PL U. No separak applica­ tion is necessary. Faculty w i l l recommend individual students to the selection c om m i tte e . Notifica.ti n is made i.n t he sprint' erne ter for the foUowi.ng year. The a\oJard is ren ewab le for one year d ur in g the undergraduate period of s t ud y . RIEKE LEADERSHIP AWARDS for up to $2,000 per year are

available to tud nt� witb 3.00+ GPA and demonstrated l ead e r­

ship or active i n vo lve m e nt in a m ul tie th n ic context. A separate app l i cation is requ i red . Conta c t Stude.nt I nvolvemen t and Le adersh ip at (253) 5 35 - 7 1 95 for more inrormatio n . CLERGY DEPENDENT GRANTS are ava i lable to dependent children of o rdain d ministers who ar actively se rvi n g a Christian co ng rega tio n full-time. The grant amo unt is $ LOOO per year ($SOO/semester) . A pp l ic a t i n d eadl i ne is December I for the curren t year; awards are m ade on a fll nds ava ilable basis th erea fte r.

ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS are available to full-t i m e u nde r ­ grad uates. St u d en ts must tIie a FAP A a.nd meet all PLU GPA stan dards. Up to full t u ition an d room/board po ssjble. Call PLU's ROTC office for i nformation (25 ) 535-8470. ROBERT C. BYJtD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to h igh chool senioTS who have demonstrated academi achievement. T he a ward may be rene\ ed [o r up to three y ars , pro ided t ha t funds arc ap p ro p ri a ted and the st ud en t remains el igible. Amounts 'ary. Applicatio n is made thr ugh the ap p rop ri a te educat ion assista.nce agency in a s t u de n t ' s home state. DELORES DAVIS LEADERSHIP i available to o ne adul t studen t ea ch year in the am o u n t of $ 1 , 000. Student must be 25 years old or older, have a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or higher, have a positive attitude, co ntri b u t e to t he adult st udent population at PLU, be com m i t t ed to both acad e m ic and personal go a ts , and exh ihi t l eade rs hi p q ua l i ties . Pacific Lutheran U n iversi ty taff a n d faculty nominate students each year. The award is for one year and is non- re newable. INTERNATIONAL GRANTS are a v. u la bl e to graduat- and under­ graduat e internationaL st ude n ts att ndlng Pacific L ut h ran University. The am oun t is 2,000 per yea r for four years. No appli t ion is necessary. T hese are awarded au to m ati cally and may be renewed an nuall y for qua l ifying sludents. THE AMERICAS GRANT i.'l available to citizens of countries in North, Central, and South Amen ' (excl uding rhe nited States) . The amo unt i s the qulvalent of a do u b l e occu'Pancy room and meals (except South Hall , wh t!re meals re n t included ). Students must live in a PLU residence hall. T his grant replaces the

Interna t ional Grants

WASHINGTON SCHOLAR'S AWARD is a ilabLe to students who arc "W -hington State Sch olars" in the amount of $3, 1 42 per year for fo ur years, s u h je ct to State Legislativ e djustment. To renew each year the ludent must ma intain a cumulative 3.30 PLU CPA. The W as hi ngt on Scholars Program honors three gradua t i ng high 'ch 01 se n i o r s from each legislative district eac h year. PACIFIC LU1MERAN UNIVERSITY MATOIING SCHOLARSHIP (PLUMS) provides financial assistan ce to students from c h u r c h congregations who at ten d Pac i fic Lutheran University. Through the PL UMS program PI. wiU match, dol lar-for-dolla r, scholarships from $ 1 00 to $ 1 ,000 p rovi ded by co ngregations or o rga n i z atio ns withjn a church to stude.nts att en d i n g P L U . Congr gation s are en co ur aged to have PLUMS p aym en t s made to PLU by ugust 1 so that the scholarship may be refle c ted in the s tuden t 's fall b i l l i n g. PLU will, however, match scholarshi p mo n i es received fTo m congregation s up to J a nuary I of the academ i c , ear. rn order to be ma tc h ed . fun ds must be sent directly to F i na ll ci al id and Student Employment a.nd not be give n to the student.

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lUfTlON REMISSION E m ployees of the uni er i t y are eligible for up to 90% and their de pe n de n ts re eligible for up to 75% tuition remi s si o n . Tuition remissio n i� a u n i vers i ty gift resource. Students reeei ing tuiti n remissio n may be awarded additional m erit and need-based insututional gift , but o nly up to tbe cost of tuition. Rece ipt of tuition r m ission may serve to adj ust or eliminate o the r institutional aid previously awarded.

PLU

FUNDED - NEED BASED

Q ClUB SCHOLARSHIPS are award e d to new fre shm e n and I ra ns fer on the b as i s of academic ach i eve men t and fillancial n eed . F r es h m e n must ha ve a 3.25 cu m u l at i ve GP . Tra nsfers are re u i red t h ave an entering c um u l at ive GPA of 3.00. Re n.ewa l wil l re q u i r e good academic st a n d i n g , a cumulative 3.00 PL U PA, t imel y rea p p l i c a t ion through the FAFSA, and demon t r a te d financial need. DOLLARS FOR SCHOlARS are available to students receiving scholarships from any Dollars fo r Sch o lars chapter. Pacific Lutheran U n ive rs i ty is , Co ll e gi a te Partner and matches Dollars for Sc h o l a rs cha ter awards, dollar for doUar, up to $ 1 ,000 per

student based on rmanci al need as fU Jlding p er m i t s. Dollars for Scholars is a prog ra m of Cit iz en s' Schol arsh i p FOWldation of America. NEED-BASED ARnSTIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS are g r a nt ed to students with finanCial need who h ave exceptional ab i l i ty in the fields of Art, Dance, Drama, Forensics, and M u ic. The award requires ree mmendat ion by a P U faculty memb r each year and is renewable on the basis of recommendation , participation, and rees tabl ished m.rn.

UNIVERSITY GRANTS aTe awarded to st ud e n ts with financial need ( who may not qualify for o th er institutional scholarships) and m.untain at least a cum ulative 2.00 PLU GPA.

NOTE: FAFSA must be submitted in " limely marmer each year '0 reesta blish evidence offinanciul 'Ieed for need-based aid.

FEDBIlAL AND TATE FUNDED

for such students.

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP a\vards are offered for 750$2,000 to NMSQT-PSAT final! ts ( National Meril Semi-finalist Q ua lifyi n g Test - Pre-Scholastic Assessment Test). Finalists t i on a l Merit S ch o l a rs h ip Co r po ra t i o n of 'hould in fonn the th if i n tention to enrol! at P L U . National M e ri t final ists are guar,lDt eed a total of $7,OOO through a combination of other institutional scholarsh ip reso urces. This amount in cl ud es the $7 5 0-$ 2,000 National M e ri t Scholarship .

.."

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDED GRANTS Federal PeD Grants are federal gTaJlt available to st udents who t ake at least I c re d i t hour per semesteT. Pell G ra nt s remai n an estimate u n t il veri fication is completed, if a student bas been selected. Students taking 1 2 hours or more per semester recei ve a full gra n t, 9- 1 1 hour rece i ve 3/4 grant, 6-8 hours 1 /2 g r an t , and II'S than 6 ho u rs a pproximately 1 /4 grant.

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Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are

p ro m i ssory note if accep t i ng the loan. If the prom isso ry note is

fed e ra U y funded grants awarded on t he basis of h i gh tl nan cial

n ot

need.

Studen t

Washington State Need Grants are available to eligible

of classes. All loans not s igned fo r wilJ be

< z

FEDERAl NURSING LOAN

tu it i on acc o rd i ng to Washington State law . tudents Laking 12 h ou rs or mOre per semes t e r receive a full granl; s t uden t s

EUglbUJty: in the

ta ing 9- 1 1 h o urs receive a th ree-quar er gmnt; students ar

Amount:

p to

of 5%. P rincipal and interest

payments begin 12 m on ths after the stud e nt grad u at e , with­

dra ws , or dro p s to les than half-tim

a re awarded to t ra nsfe r s tud ents with an Associate's D egr ee o r

jun ior st a ndi ng in the l, mollnt of $ 2,500 per year ( subje c t to

attendance.

Comments or Conditions: Recipients are re q mred t

s ign a

pr�) m i s sory note. The p romissory notes 'Nill be sent to the student

a tt en d ed Pacific

by certified mail; the student must sign and return the p ro m is ­

Lutheran U n i vers i ty before. Eli 'ible ap p li c a n t s must be

following Wa ' h i n gt o n State c o unt i es in

order to be eligible: B e nto n , Clark, Cowl itz , F ra n kl in , King, K its ap , Pierce, Skamania, S nohomish,

po ka n e , Walla Walla , Y ak ima and be placebound. Application mLlst be made to [ h e Hi gher Education Coord inating Boa rd of Was h ington who wj]] se l e c t the rec ip i e nt s . Students m ust be en ro l l e d at least () hours per term.

or

sory note if ac ce p ti n g the loan . If the p ro m isso ry note is not returned by c erti fied mail, then the s tud e nt mu t sign in th Student Services Cente r/Student Loan ffice after the tirst week of clas s e s . All l oans not s i gn d fo r will be ancelled. FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOANS

One or more of the Federa l Fam il y Education Loans may be li s ted on a fi nancial aid o ffe r. This mean s

st udent i . eli g i bl e to

a

WAStUNGTON AWARD FOR VOCATIONAL EXCELLENCE (WAVE)

appl y separat ely fo r these loans.

is available to students ho have co mpleted at least one year in a vocational program approved by the S tat e Boa rd for

that is cer t i fie d by t he Fi nancial Aid Office. It is impo rtan t that

C ommunit y and Tech nical

Federal I ans are ob ta i ned through a lender on a n appLication

a ppl icati ons be sent to the le.nder fo r prompt proce. sing. Delays

oLleges. The ap plicant must be a

Washin gton State reside n t and a h i gh sc h ool g ra d u ate, and must m a int a in

a

PLU GPA of 3.0 e ac h term. Th award i s fo r two

a

student account.

th e lenders. I t is re c o m m e n d ed that students choose lende r · who will pa rtici p a te in el e c troni c funds t ra ns fe r (EFT) with PLU, so

on state funding . PROMISE SCHOLARSHIPS are available to the top

in receiving out sid e loan fu nds may result in a d d itio nal in teresl ch a rges on

Loan checks are electronicaUy transmitted to t he u n i.versity by

years (4 semester ) and the amollnt varies eac h yea r dep e nd i ng

\ 5 % of

as to avoid h av i n g to stand in l i n e to s ign a paper check. C hecks

Wash ington State high sch o ol graduates fo r the s chool year 2000-200 I . Students must be e n ro lled a m inim u m of 6 h o u rs

must be signed by the bo rro we r within 30 days after they a re received by the univers i ty . In addition,

per semester.

I program. Recipients must dem !lStrate financial ne d. F un dj ng is l i m ited. TRI programs incl ude : p ward B und, Tale nt Se reh, and SMART. A TRIO award wi l l repla ce Wash ington State Need Grant eligibility.

All awards from federal and stMe 50llrce6 are mIld" llS$II m ing the

wi th a p ot en t ial loss of award. Eligibility: At least h a lf-t ime

students. Repayment:

expenses UJJtil baving completed theiL educat io n. loan obliga­

interest durin g

fres h men ; $3, 500 fo r sopho­

va ri able interest rate which ch a ng es a nn ual ly and

a

student's t ime of enrollme n t . The student is

resp o nsible for s ele c ti n g a le nde r from the

Lenders. A

FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN ( fun d i ng is limited)

(6 cr dit hours) un dergraduate or cred i t hours) gra duate . tu de n ts with high need. Amount: Up to $4,000 for each year of un dergraduate study and up to $6,000 fo r ach year of gr adu at e or pr o fessio n al stud y. Repa}'IDent: A fixed i n te re st rate of 5%. Principal and intere s t payment begin 1 2 months after the student grad ua t es , with­ draws , or drops t less th an balf-time attendance. Deferral s available for student sta t us , e c o n om i c hardshi p , and sel e c t volun teer se rvices. Comments or Conditions: Recip i ent s are req u ired to sign a p romissory n o te . The promissory not s will be sent to the student by certified m ail; the studen t must sign and return the Eligibility: At leas ha l f- time

(4

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r

Comments or Conditions: T h e federal governmenl pays the

NEED BASED LOANS

l

$2,625 per year [,

or d rop s to les tban half-time attendance.

tions are de scri b ed in th is section a nd in the promissory not

C

credit hours) u ndergraduate o r

ca n never exceed 8.25% and mon t h l y principal and i nterest pay­ ments begin six months a fte r the st udent grad uates, wit h draws,

Student loans allow stude n ts to postpone paying fo r college

I

(6

hours) graduate students.

mores; $5, 500 for j un io rs a nd seniors; an d $8,500 fo r grad uatt:

LOANS

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complete

SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAffORD lOAN

Amount Up t

occur, lfWards may be reduced or elimitlatw.

I

m u st

se ' ion will resul t in the l o an fU lld� bei ng returned to the lender

(4 c red it

anticipated funds will be available. Should a reduction in funding

C

student

rights and respo nsibilities will be discussed. Not attending a

who h ave completed any

P A

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an ent ra nce counseling session, during which a borrower's

TRIO - a State Need Grant Program is available to st ud e nts

12

$4,000.

Repayment: A fixed in terest rat

WASHINGTON STATE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS

residen ts of one of th

S t u d ents enrolled at lea t h a lf- t ime (6 cre d i t hours)

chool of N urs ing ( e x cep t pre-nursing) . Preference giv n

to LP! students.

t u den ts ta king

not eligible.

state fu ndi n g ) . Students may n ve r hav

th e first week

tiona l l oan cancellation condition. exis t.

Grants must be llsed � r educational expenses o t h e r t h an

6 hOllIS

r

el1ed. P ri o r i t y is

the d i s abled , or teaching i n a fed eral Head Start progra m. Addi­

lion Coordi nating Board's p o l i cies. Washington State Need

fewer t h a n

cal1

possi bl e fo r teaching in l ow income popul ation areas, tea c h i n g

grants are i n tend ed fo r stu den t s with high need. G ra n ts are awarded a t PLU in a c co rd anc wit h the Stat H igh e r Educa­

taking 6-8 ho urs r ceive a h al f gran t; and

enter/Studenr Loan Office aft

ervices

gi ve n to un dergradu ate students. Up to tot a l loan � rgi ve ne ss is

residents of the State of Wa hin gt o n who a t te n d PLU . These

u z

returned by certi fi ed mail, then the tudent must sign in the

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Preferred List of

s eparate loan application an d promis ory note will

then be mailed to the student from the selected preferred lender. Th e studen t submits the loan ap p lica t i on and p romisso ry note back to the lender fo r processing.

NON - N EED BA ED LOANS UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAffORD LOAN

EUgibUJty; Student attend i n g

at least half-time (

or a graduate student attending at least ha l f-ti me

credit hOUTS)

(4

credil hours)

who does not qualify fo r all or part of the maximum Subsjdized Fede r a l Stafford Loan. Amount: Up to $2,625 per year for fre h men; $ 3 , 500 for sopho-


mores;

5,500 for j unior a nd sen iors; and $ 1 0,000 for grad uate

s t u dents .

Repayment: A variable interest rate which change s annually and can never exceed 8.25% :l ild m on t hly principal payments begin six mo n ths after the s t u de n t graduates, withdraws , or dro p s to less than half- time attendun e. Uf/subsid ized m ea n s the student i responsible for the in terest o n the loan a moL U1 t while in school;

( I nte rest begins ac cr uing fr om the date the funds are first dI s bu rsed ) . however, the interest payment can be postponed.

Comments o r Conditions: F i nanc i al need i s no t a requirement. The student is respon s ibl e for s elect i ng a le n d er fr o m the Pre­

ferred List ofLerlder·.

A separate loan app l ic a t i on and promissory

note will then be mailed to the s t udent from the selected pre­ ferred lender. The student submits the loan application a nd promis ory no te back to th l; lender fo r pro ce sing. FEDERAL PLUS LOAN

Ellgibillty: Parents f dependent tudent. Amount: Parents m y borrow up to the full cost o f their student's college education minus the amo unt of any financial aid the student is receiving. Repayment: A variabl interest rate which changes ann ually and er exceed 9.00% and monthly principal and interest payments begin within 60 days after the final disbursement of funds. (In terest begins accruing from the date the funds are first disbursed.) can n

."

PRINCIPAL CERTIFICATE Students are not eLigible for Federal Stafford Loans according to federal regulations. Con ta c t the Student Services Center for information on alternative loans.

EMPLOYMENT r-

COLlEGE WORK STUDY

EUgibility: At least p a r t - ti m e students. Amount: Varies. Conunents 01' Conditions: On- campus jobs; students can apply for individual jobs th ro u gh the Financial Aid and Student STATE WDRK STUDY

least pa r t - t i m e students. Amount: Based on need. Comments 01' Conditions: Off-campus jobs; tudents m u s t

Eligibility: At

a p p l y for individual job s thro u gh the Financial Aid and Student

Employment O ffi ce .

VETERANS AFFAIRS Be VOCATIONAL REBABIllTATION Pacific Lutheran University's academic programs of s tudy are app roved by the Washington State H ighe r Education Coordinat­

ing Board's State App roving Agency (HECB/SAA) for enrollment

of persons eligible to receive educational benefits under Title 38

Reque t form can be obtained at the Student Services Center.

disabled veterans who wish to inquire about their eligibility for

Financial need is not a require n1 ent. Ei ther parent may borrow lender from the Preferred List of Lenders. A separate loan appli c a­ tion and p ro m i ss ory note wil l then be mailed to the parent from the selected preferred lender. The parent submits the loan a pp l i ­

and Title 10 USC. Veterans, widows, widowers, and children of deceased or benefits should contact the Regional Office of the Veterans Administration, Federal Building, 9 1 5 Second Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98 1 74. Pe rs o ns within the State o f Washington may telephone I ( 800) 827- L OOO. Students should gain admission to the university and see the

cation and prom issory note back to the lender for processing.

university's Veterans Affairs Coordinator before making

ADDmONAl UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

applicati o n for benefits. Students are required to register at the

EUgibWty: fndependent s tude n t or p aren ts are de n ied a P L U S loan.

dependent student whose

Amount! Up to $4,000/year for fr es hm en and sophomores and $5,000 fo r jun i o rs and eniors. Repayment: A variable interest ra te which changes ann ually and can never exceed 8.25°;\, and monthly principal payments begin six mont hs after the tudent graduates, w ithd raws, or drops to less than half-time attendance. UnslIbsidized means the student i s resp nsible for the intere t on the loan amount while in chool; however, interest paym ent may be p os t poned . ( Interest begins a cc ru ing from the date th fu nds are first disbursed . ) Conunents or Conditions: Financial need i not a req u i rem e n t . The student is responsible for selecting a lender from the Pre­ ferred List ofLellders. A separate loan application and promissory note will then be m ai l ed to the student from the selected pre­ fe rred lender. The student submits the loan appJic tion and promissory note back to the lender for processing. ALTERNATIVE LOANS

RUgibillty: All students.

Amount: aries. Comments and Conditions: V ario u s Alternative Loans are provided fo r all stude nt s, including those not qualifying for

Title rv aid. Additional infomlation is available in the Stude nt Services Center.

Veterans Affairs Coordinator's O ffice located in the Student Services Center ( Roo m 102, H a u ge Administration Build ing), before each term to insure continuous receipt of benefits.

NAMED ENDOWlIDIRESTRICfED SCHOLARSHIPS Aid

Association

fo r Lutherans Scholarship

Allenmore Registered

1

u rs l ng Scholarship

Alumn.i Scholarship Fund meri an Lutheran Church-North Pacific Dist ric t Scholarship Andy and Irene Anderson Endowed Scholarship for Nu rsi ng Arthur Anderson Scholarship Florence S p i nner Anderson Hazel

M.

Memorial

Scholarship

Anderson Endowed Music Scholarship

Julius and Jean Anderson Endowed Nu rsi ng S c hola rs hip

Tom and Kathryn Ander. on Endowed Scholarship William and Jeanie Anderso n S c holarship

Anenson S cho l arsh ip M. Ankrim/Lutheran ( Economi cs )

Ruth

Ernest

Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

An th ropology Alumni Award

Mary Jane Ara m Sc holars h i p

F u nd

Clifford and Lydia Arntson Scholarship in Entrepreneurship Clifford and Lydia Arntson Scholarship in Sales and Marketing Hedvig Arthur Memorial AURA/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship Marguerite and Wilmer Baer Scholarsh ip EIben

TEACHER CERTIFICATE

c

Employment O ffice .

Comments 01' Conditions: A Parent Plus Loan Request form is requirc:d by P cillc Lutheran University and the federal govern­ ment before this loan can be init iated. The Parent Plus Loan

this loan for the student. The parent is re s pon s ible for selecting a

z > z n

H., II

and Janice M. Baker Endowed Music Scho la rsh ip

The Bangsund Famlly Scholarship Don F. Bayer Memorial Nursing Scholarship

Students accepted into this program are el i gible to receive a

B.E.R-G. Minority Scholarship

Feder al S tafford Subsidized andlor Unsubsidized Loan up to $5,500. If a student is independent or is a dependent st u de n t wh ose parents are deni d a PLUS loan, the student is el i g ible for an additio nal Uns ubsidized Federal Stafford Loan up to $5,500 .

Peter and Lydia Beckman Endowed Scholarship Paul M . Bellamy Music Scholarsh ip

Clenora E. B e rge Nursing Sc holarship Bilb ro ugh F a m ily S cholarsh i p

Mfred and Alice Bishop/Lutheran Bro therh oo d Endowed Scholarship

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Olaf Halvorsen

u r i n g S c h o la rs h i p

Anne Biteman M e m o r ia l Bl ake-Webb� r Endowed

I. and live lewelle n Blandau Sch olarsh i p & Dillie Quale Boe Education Scholarshi p Erwin and Alice Bolduan S hol a rsh i p V.m d" Bonel l Endowed Scholarship Richard

Marcus Hansen Endowed Memorial Scho larshi p Hanson E ndowed Pre s id en t s Scholarship J ennie Lee Han�on Scho larsb i p Fund W. H . Ha.rdtke Semll1ary St udent S c holarsl:t ip Fund Brian H;H shmJn Memoria l cholarship Marv and Dorothy Harshman Scholarshi p ( C h u rch Leadershi p/Athletics)

and Loan Fund

Nels

Luther

u z

Scholarship

Joha n ne Marie Han en Endowed Mem ori a l Scholarship

cholarsllip

J mnie Lee

Havana Bradner Memo rial . cholarship roruBn Breiland Scholarship Fund

<

Agnes Brodahl Music "chowrs h i p

Bjug H aIstad Endowed Sc ho lars h ip

B e t t y Brown Scholarsh i p

WJJI� A. Heath

z

Iluchannn Family Endowed Sl.holarship

...

,rhardt and Virginia

Buchl1nck Endowed Sch ol a rsh i p

Tr us t

Douwas l ie rland Memorial Rowing 'd1Olarship (Crew)

in Edu ation

: hester Buhl E n dowed Voca l Music �cholarship

Earl and AsITid Hildahl P.n dowed Scho lar.;hi p

Dr. and Mrs. W. B.

The Hoover

Bums Fund

Burzlaff Memori al Sch olar, r up

Fa mi ly Endowed

Hopper Memorial

Dr. H ow ard Leywe.l ly n

Caroline

Cor,

Ed'V"a rd W. Huber Memori al

Byerly Mat h and Science du ation E nd ow me nt Kenn eth Carlson Memorial Scholars h ip H.G. " Bob" Ca rro ll MI! mo ria l SCho larship Pak J oe Chan Endowed Schularsh ip Chene)' FO ltl1da tio ll Educ at ion al Scholarship� W� l t e r H. Christensen Scholarship Ruth A. h ri s t ian End owed Scholarsh ip fo r Education K nn et h hri stoph crson/W Iter Pilgrim Endowed Scholarship in Religion Lyman H . Claridge/I.utheran Brotherhood Endowed Scho la rship loss or 1 9 67 En do wed Scholarshi p ( Descendants o f Class)

Ir�ne

Ly le

Ie M.

Joh n501Ji Ifsen

Liberal Arts

Doolittle MemortJI Sci.lol ar>hip

chol.ar 'hip Fund E ndo we d , cholarshi Brotherhood E nd owed Scholarship

Capt. W. Larry and Mrs. Jan i"" D. Eichler

Carl and Ethel Erickson/ l.utheran

cholarship

Lind B . K.tr�n Mu ic cholarsh i p Philip G. and Alice t.. Kayser Endowed S c ho larsh i p El iZ<lbelh B. KeUy E n d o wed S cho lar sh i p Anne Ken STud Memoria l Schola rsh i p Key Bank of Wash ingLD n Endowed S ch oo l of Business Schola rship Rev. Karl Kil i'lD M�rnorial Pund

Leif Eri kson Scholarship Gerry and Li.nda Anthony Faaren

l.

Evanson

lohnson . c hobrs h ip

Luther H Inhn so n/L utheran Brotherhood E ndowe d Busines SchOlars h i p N Johnson Nn i ns Schobr ' h ip Pearl N. Johnson/Lutheran B rotherhood Endowed Nursing S c h ol arship TL Johnson Sr./Lutheran Brotherhood P.ndowed Schol arship eJ and Doreen l uhn on/Lutheran Brotherhood E ndowed . chol ars hi p i n Natu ral Sciences Ted anti Doreen Johnsonll.uth ran B roth erhoo d Endowed Scholarship i n Phy ics Dr. Kenne tb A. Johnsron E nd owed Scholarship in Education Erna M . lorgensen Regents S hoLaLShi p Theodore O. H. and fletsy Karl nd wed S ch ol a rs h i p in Forensics fh eod ore O. H. and Betsy Karl Scandinavian Cult u ral Center Endowed

Earl E. a nd Martha 1_ I�d();t rom Endowed Scholarship EC o n om i s Excell ence En do we d Scholarship M . . E.E. Eidbo

E.

Pearl

Thomas Dixon Endowed Sdlolarship

and

cho larsh i p

Edwin R. lohnson Memorial Endowed Schol a rship

llrSing Scholarship

The Reverend

Scholarsh ip

Agnes Solem Johnson/Luther;ln B rotherhood N ursing Endowment

Judge B rlil

L Davis/I.utheran Brotb�rhood E n dowed cholarship Fu n d a nd Cbra Davis ScholarshIp 13. and Franc s ' . Daw�on/Lutheran Brot berhood Endowed in the

Jcnnest,ld Me morial

l o h o on/Larson Scholars h i p

Walter

Scholaf'hi p

E nd owed Scholarship

hobrship

Donald L. Jerke Leaders h i p Award

Carl Dalk Memonal S dlol ar�h i p Fun d

Ida A . Davis Fund Deal Fa m ily E ndow�d

and Iris Jacobs n

M i ke JacohsQ(l

Margaret Melver Daka n Endowed Sch olarshi p

Harold

uoing Schol arshi p

Kenneth and Stella Jacobs Scholarship

Nursi ng Scholarship I r<!lle O. ereso Merit ward. Professor David P. Dahl Endowed Music rhola rship E. John and Lorene E. D a h l berg Jr. Endowed Scholarship

I.

hola"hip ch ol arsh il'

Terry Irvin Sch olarsh ip

Doro thy and Powell Cone Memorial/Lutheran Brotherhood Endo\ved

George

Hul tgren

S

Endowed

Clement E. and Phyllis G. Hu nte r !:>cho larsh ip S u:tanne Ingram Memorial Scholarship

ocanower S holar'hip Endowment

Hulda

Hovland

Scholarship

Hurnanitie.� Scholarsh ip Endow ment

Computer Science Sc hol a rsh i p t.ndowment

Endowed Sch ola rsh i p

Eyring Liberal Am S chol a rs h ip

amily/L uthem n Dro therhoo d Endowed Scholarsh ip

Faculty Memorial Scholarship Fund

William Kilworth Poundation 'cholarship Fund

Fairhanks Lut heran C hurch Scholarship

Gundar Ki ng En dowed Scholarsh ip

Faith Lutheran Ch u rch of ThereS<! f'erguso n Endowe

Portland Sch o larsh i p S holarship

!.,ars

Fund

fo r High Achievers in At h le t ics and P hysi c al Education Scholarsh ip Glddys M. Knu tze n EnJowed Scholarship H i lda S. Kramer Musical Appreciation Sch olarship 1 loward, Eugen j" md Ion Kvi nsL'lI1 d Endowed Sch ola rship D:rwnelf wmb Sd101arship Louis and Leona Lamp 'cholarship Harry E. and lrene L Lang ' ndowed Scholarship eoege Lanning Memorial/Lutheran B ro tha hoo d E ndowed Scholarship Dr, Joh n O. LarsgaurdlLuthe.ran Hrotherhood E ndowed S c hol arship Dr. Charles Larso n/Lutheran B roth erh o od Endowed Sch olarsh ip Ebba and E. Art h u r l.. rson ursing Scholarship Ludvig and Cla ra Larson Scho larsh ip Charles Lauback Student lksearch Fund John and Mary Lee Endowed Organ Scholarship Orlandu and .1yrtle Lee/Lutheran B ro th e rhood Endowed Schola.rship Guy T. and ll ise Leesman 'cholarship

Elmer

. and KCrII,eth

L

Fobon

E n dowed Scholarsh i p

Fosness Memorial Scholarship in Leadership

L. .. Foss Memorial

S

holarship

Frank RU5seJl Company Endowed Fuch� f'oundation

Schohr>rup

cholars b i p

B u t ton .a�tz Nur ing Scholarsh ip E . •llld L orrain e K . Geiger Endowed

Henrietta Richard

Fund dlOlarohip

Alan a n d Bertha .ibson Scholarsh ip Bertha Gilbertson Scholarship

Joh n M. Gilbertson

FO ll ndat ion Scholarsbip

G'mn GoodchLid Sc.holarsbip

Edna M .

.•

orderfLutheran

Brotherhood

E ndowed

Educ.·Hilln Scholar h i p

Alice and Stewart Govig SdlObrship

Clarence A . and

Olga I.;rann Scholarship B ro therhood Endowed Sch lar h i p n James M . ( j ri hbon S h ola rsh ip Fern R . Grimm/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scho ln.rship Otis

J.

randcllutheran

Education

Pa lt l tiebelt Sc hol ars hip (Mathematics)

Lillie Endowed Scholarship Eme�1 and j�nnJe Liming & Art and Ethel Cummings Endowed Memo n," Scli larship M r. and Mrs. W. I -lilding Lindberg Endowed S c hol ars h ip Isabel Lindb erg '!'rust Robert and M;uie

Gulsrud Family Sch ola rship Arnold Hagen

Edurnrl

n Schol.af5hip

Maria I-Iagness Endowe d Scholarshi p

Frank H. a n d Ne l lie L .

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C

Haley Memorial Endowed Scholarship

L

nd owm en t

Knudsen Family Endowed

George and Carlotta. F link SCholarship Phylaine

and Alllena Kitt les on EnJowed Scholarship

Kluth

Patricia Fisk Scholarship

14

haritable

orman and VerQne Hcinsen Endowed Scho larshi p

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Hildred L i nder Endowment

R

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Richard E. a nd Anita Hi l lesland L ondgren/ Lutheran Brotherhood Endow

A l fred and

Bmtherllood Endow�d Scholarship En do wed Scholar hip LumlgaardfLuthcran Brotherllood Endowed

C harlot te and

choiJ"hip

B rot h e r h ood

Fund

for

Lutheran Studen t,;

hol a rshi p

S 'hoIJr�h ip Maoxwcl l Po undat ion ScfJula rsh i p

o

Gen eral 1'.I1dO\ ed Scholarship I ,Illel Ella Scheibner Endowed Scholarship Jo han n es and Aleen S ch i l le r ,ndowment cund Dr. Wal ter and Joan R. S chwind t Scholarship ShA "ms']' !lank Minority Scholarshi p Seattle Mortgage Bankers Association Scho larsh i p Dorothy I I . Sc:hn;lible Endowed 'cholarship Margaret s h i p ley Endowed Scho la rs h i p i l l Acco u n t i n g . ka ga Fa m i ly Endowed S holarship Dr. Ma u rice and Pa t r ic ia Skones cho l arsb i p ( Vocal Music) james R. Slater Endowed Scholarsh i p lrunes later Biolo gy - ROT . S chola rshi p France$ OTton ' m i t h Endow · d Scholarship

A i m ;:! Mei�nesl Endowment Fund Robert K. Merton P ri�e i n Sociol ogy Militmy Order of the Pu rple Heart Award Fred and C a rol yn M i.lJs Memorial ScholJ"hip Lila Moe Endowment , cholarship E u n ice Moller Enclowed Scholar,hip Monro� Scholar 'hip

Piano cholarship Wand a M rken Family Endowed Schol a rsh i p Ullian C. Morris Me mor ial ScholaJ.h ip Gladys Morlvcdt Voluntary Service Award M u rray- Danielson Management Award Mark B. :md Len o r � ;. Myers S c h ol R rsh i p Richard P. Nei l, Memorial Fund eorge and Alma Nelso n Endowed Scholarsh i p Fund Forestine Wi�e Monsen Memuria]

Donald and

Smith Endowment Sch lar hip Fund

and M rs, Charles Smithson Schol arsh ip aydene A. S nodgr:u; MemoriaJ Schularship Anne E. Snow Fo und a ti o n Society of the Arts Scholarstl i p T h e Soi ne Pam i ly EndOlvcd S c h o l " rsh i p Southeast Idaho I ncentive Scholarship Fund Haldor P. SponheiOl Schol'lrship l'und Will i a m and Astrid S tancer Endowed Scholarship i n Steele - Reese Scholarship Endowment GeJ)evieve Stelberg Endowed Scholarship Mr.

Endowed Scholarship

Lars Nerl and Norwegian Scholarship Milt n ,lnd Hazel Nel\vig International Stu den t chol�lr hip Thel ma Newt n ch olarshi p Me. and Mrs. Gus H. N ieman Memorial Scholarship Ma.-Claret istad '1crnorial Sch olars hip Robert A. Nistad Memorial Endowed Scholar hip Nan Nok leberg Memorial/Lu t her a n Bro tberhood Endowed Sch brship Northern Light. Fund Orvi lle Nupen Nuning Sch ol arship The dberg Fami ly Scholarsh i p & F Olson Fndowed �cholarship l ifford O. and E l l a L Olson Endowed Athletic/Music Sdlolarship 1'.. Goodwill and Dorou,)' U , Olson Endowed Scholarsh ip in Educat i o n Linda Olson/Lutheran B rotherho d ndowed Nursing S holarship Robe rt E. Ison Memorial

E ng i neering Science

Dora Strongland Me.morial Scholarship /vl , and Doris . Stucke E ndowed Schularship in Nurs i n g

esther

T"rrence

Shereen Parr Specia l ducalion cholnrship and S\JS;In Parr Sch ol arsh i p

tuhlmill 'r Endowed Scholarship and, Ltlyd H, Sutherland Scholarship Tacoma Rainiers Community Fund Scholarship Ron and Ei lcc'o 'leUef,on/ Lutheran Brotherhood E ndowed Harvey and Helen TengesdaJ Eodowed Scholarshi p Edvin Jnd Ida Tingelstad Memo rial c h o l ars h i p Leon and Don T i tus Endowed Scholanhip lice and Marie obiason Endowed S holarship Evel yn Torve n d Memorial Educati on Scholarship ilas and Ali e Torvend Endowed Scholars hi p Cliff and Ronni Tvedten Endowed Scholarship Tyler Memor ial Nursin g Scholarship

Katheri ne R. P�rri,h �"moriaJ

Karl Ufer Memorial Schobr " h ip

Iym p i c Resource Managemt:nt Scho larShip Iver Op�tad MmlU r i a l Schol'lTShlp

ur>ing Sch olars h ip ordon Pearson Memorial Arne and Gloria Ped�rS(ln Endowed cholarship O. M . and Emilie R. P"d uston _ndnwed cholarship Rena Stra nd berg Pellegrini Endowed Scholarship MaTvin J. and Ruby L. Penn ingt n Schola r;; h ip Pepsi-Coin Company Merit c:holarshi p The Barbara Perry- Haley and Ruth C. Perry Me.morial Sc h o larsh i p Mr. and M rs . Lester Peter Schularship ( O regon students) Gustof Peter, n Memorial ch 1,lrs h i p Sharon R. Peterson and Donllll L. isher Memorial Nursi ng ScholarshIp Sheryl Laubach Pete"on/Luther:m llratherh od Endowed Scholarship Theodore M. and Lill i.an L Peter son E.ndowed SchulJrship

Blanche Pfla um Scholarship

E. Bil l <lod Lu "iw Pihl

Scholarship

PLU Women 's Cl ub Scholarship

PLUS Business Schol a rs h ip ra

J.

Ponder S holar:ship Fund Foundation Scholarship osteo Scbolarsbip So u nd Bank Scholarship

Pug

.I

E m i l and Engelena Lyntle

David Ulleland Memorial

Scholarship

Sc ho l arsh i p

U n i ted Parcel Service Foundation Scholarship

US WEST D iver.sit y Scholarship Ellen Valle Memorial Scholarship Unda Van Beck Memorial cholarship ArtllLL r H. Vingerud Endowed Schol,,,,hip Fu n d Dr. Roy and loria Virak E ndowed S ho la r s h i p Wnde/Hinderlie S cho larsh i p Fu nd hobrshi p Ina H. Wake Memorial Sc

\ aslungton MUrllll l Minorities in ,ducation S holarship Washington State Automobik Dealers Asso iation Scho l arsh ip Wash i n g ton Software Association Scholarshi p Doc and Luc il l e Weat hers Endowed Scholars h ip Western Wa�hingto n Fair Association Scholarship Wick Famil y/ Lu t hera n Brotherhood ndowed chola[ship Margaret V/kkstrom Endowed Scholarship for International Students M bel Wing Sc hol arshi p Randall YOdkum

Presser Price

r-

M r ic Scheele

McIC1Y Sch olars h i p

H arol d and Syl via Nelson

»

Mark Salzman M�mofla l

1\'lathematic

Ka tha r ine E.

» z n

ward

Graduate Students

Joe Ma rch in ek Memorial Scholarship Fun d Edmund

z

S hOlars hi p

O. Rieke Endowed Scholars h i p (Students from Cash mere, l.eavenw( ) r l h , and Wenatch'e) Rogers High , chool Sch olarship S terl i ng and Marjorie Rose Sc h o l a rs hip Melville a n d Dorothy Rue Endowed Scholarship Mary Baker Russell Music S c holars h ip Dr. J oh n A. an d Virginia " j i mmie" 'aEfeJJ Endowed Scholarship for

ustaining Fund S c h o l arsh i p

Constance !l. Lyon �cholarsh j p L i nd say A. Maj(1vski endowed S James fl. Malyan SdlOlarsh i p

I' n dowed

Rice

William

Lut.heran Brotherhood Scholarship Lutheran Brotherhood

Lu cian

R ieke Leade rshi p

, race Lundberg

Gene and Mari a1] Lutheran

S i m o n a n d Marve.! Reinbold :-'cholarship E n dowment

Il hea Lund/lulheran

Cl a re nce a nd

."

1emorial S chola r hip

Kathryn Reese

d cholarsh ip

E ndowed Scholarship

Ralph and Celestene Yoder Memo rial Scholarship Sh i rl e , Zurfluh/Lutheran B

th e r hood

ndowed Scholarship (Bu,iness)

QFC/ oca Cola Award of Excellence The Edward Rrunsdale

cgents Scholarship

llinma R. mslad AW:lfd Elmer '. and Mary Louise Ramlu,�(ln Margaret L Rasmw;sen Scholarshjp Recreat iol l.a l Equipment, Ill e . ( REI )

Ander and

c h olarship

for Students

from

laska

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11'1 \AI \AI .....

Tuition and Fees for 2000-2001 The Undergraduate Tuition Model ( UTM) begins in the Fall o f 2000. T h e cost information is p rov ide d below.

Q Z 0(

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.

i-

lIh'•• '-'-'-'�

s..,..terrr.rm

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:::I:{C1 I :.!UIIJ!' I�UIIIII'l"'l lJ.'J. ' '1�"'ll'. .,., h'lIl � -�. '::,Creell t Koun

Attendl"9 Full TIme?

Cost

�'IL

:Z� �F ,:,-,-?"��

UNDERGRADUATE RATES

Fa ll or Spring

1 2-17 credit h o u rs

Yes

$8,400 per semester

Fa i l or Sp ri ng

More than

Yes

58,400 per semester + $525 per credit hour for each credit h ou r over 1 7

17 c redit hours

Fall or Spring

1- 1 1 credit h o u rs

)-Term ( N o addit i onal cost to Fu ll-ti me

Up to

S525 per cre d it h o u r

No

5 credit hou rs

Credit h o u rs over 5 a r e charged a t $ 525 per credit ho ur

F a l l or FuU·tlme Spring Stud e nts)

1 or more credit hours

J·Term (Not atte n d i n g F u l l ·time Fa l l or

AU

FuU- ti me Spri n g )

a r e charged at

$S25 per credit hour

. _.

1 o r more hours

GRADUATE RATES

All are charged at $525 per credit hour

NOTE: Off Campus Program stlldents pay a program fee (not PL U tuition) specific to the in dividllal program

sites.

Contact the Center for

In ternational Progra ms fo r co mplete details.

CREDIT BY BXAMINATION

TRANSCRIPT INFORMATION Unofficial and o fficial transcripts are p roce s s ed in the Student Services e n te r. There is a $5 fe fo r each official tra ns c ript .

Student wbo earn Credit by Examination are charged i n addition t o tuition.

3 semester ho urs . $3 75 4 semester h o ur s ....... $500

1 seme s t r hour . . . . $ 1 2 5 2 semester hours . . . . . $250 ..

.

.

.

.

Unofficial transcripts are issued at no charge. To request an

......

..

Official Tr a ns cr ip t ,

a

student may fiU out the Transcript Request

Form in the Student Services Center. Process i n g time i s 4 to 5

LATE REGISTRATION FEE tudents a dd i n g or withdrawing from courses after the last day of add/drop during a regul a r sem st er will be assessed a n

working day from th� date received. For i nformat ion to request

off campus, one may either call at (253) 535-71 35, or use the Internet at

an Offic i a l Tra nsc ri p t from Tran script Line

adm inistrative hand.ling fee of $ 5 0 for each transaction. These

wWlv.plll. edu/- nrel!ser_trall.h tml. Req u

dates are listed in the class schedule fo r eacb semester / term.

the

Is by e - m a i l c anno t be

processed because of the require me n t for a signature. Requests

COURSE FBES Some cour es requ i re addi tional fees that will be added to tbe tuiti n total. The class schedule for each term is av a il able in the Studenl Servic s e nter and provides i nfo rma tion bou t any ees that may affect an individual course. PRIVATE MUSIC LESSON FEE This fee is charged in addition to tuition. 1 credit hour . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 6 5

may also be faxed to (253) 535-8320. The following i n formation is required: •

$5.00 fee for ea ch Official Transcri p t ordered. If paying by bankcard, please i nclude the VIS

or MasterCard number and

expirati o n date, and yo ur zip code. Payment s may al so be made by c he c k , cash ier's check, or money order. Please do not mail cash. • •

2 o r more cre d it s per medium . ..... $300

EDUCATION PLACEMENT FEE one-time dZlCllfioll Place ment Fee of $45 is charged in the last semester of the B.A.E. program. HEALTH SERVICES FEES Health Services will charge a student" acco u n t, or a stude n t may pay directly, for immunizations, lab work, and prescriptions. ID CARD FBE fee of $1 5 is charged to replace lost or stol n student ID's. r I an ill card has been damaged, it must be bro ught to Lhe ID ard

A

O ffice and rep laced for a fee of $5.

Student's full name

Any a n d all former name (s) used

ldentification number (Social Security n u mber ) Date of birth

e

C ur r e n t address nd pho ne number

Approx:imate dates of attendance

N umber of tran cripts needed

• • •

Address(e ') to which the transcript(s) a re to be sent Signature (mandatory) If an account is n any t yp e of HOLD, the request will be ma iled back with i n formation re garding the appropriate office to contact. It is the s t u d e n t ' s responsibility to resolve the H O L D and res u b mi t the request.

SPECIAL INFORMATION

UNPAID FINES Unpa id fines s u ch as parking violations and overdue l ibrary books wil appear on the monthly bi lling statement. S t ud nts are encouraged to pay these fines as incurred to avo id late fees and

Optional student health and accident insurance is available throLlgh

an

i n dependent carrier. A brochure is available from the

Student Life Office. Parking p

rmits are free and required for all student vehicles.

They can be obtained in the C a mp us Safet}' Office. Failure to

bandling charges.

register may result in a fine.

ONE-TIME GRADUATION PROCESSlNG FEE A $30 fee is charged to baccalaureate and master's degree c a n di ­

PAYMENT OPTIONS/ FINANCING Students must pay at the time of regist r a ti on or be enrolled in an

dates upon submission of the G radu ation Application for m .

approved Parm n t Option Plan at the time of regist ra tion. There are fo ur P a ymen t Op tion Plans offered at the u niver· sity. It is r equired of all students to sign up for at least one of the

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fo ur Payment Option HOLD w ill be placed on t h e aCCOLUlt. H OLDS will re s l T i ct certain univ rsity priv ileg s, i n cl ud ing the right for further registration. Ar range m nts fo r pay men t s are

made th r o u o h the S t udent Services Center, Ha ug e Adm i n istra­

ti o n B uildi ng, Room 1 0 2

or

call ( 253) 535-7 1 6 1

or

(8 00) 678-

3243.

A $ 2 5 non-refundable s e t - u p fee.

c am p u s the pre viou s fall or n e x t pri n g semesters. T h e meal plan re qu i reme n t remains i n effec t fo r s t ud e nt s with active h o us i n g a s s i g n m en t s . )

Payme n t s are du September 1 5 t h ru u gh De c e mber 1 5 .

Pa ymen t s made after the 20 th of each month may be asses ed

4 Month Payment Option ( Fall)

• •

fo r nrollment in fall.

a $25 l a t e charge. The An n ual Perc en ta ge R t

is 0 % . Acco u nts 60 d ays d el i nqu e n t may b e t u r n ed over t o an o u t s i d e

agency. Addi t io n a l co llect ion cost may be a dded to t he

accoUll t .

P ayments are due JalHlary 15 th ro u g h Ap ri l 1 5 .

Pay ments made after the 2 0 t h of each m o n t h may be assessed a $ 2 5 late ch a rge . The Annual Perce n ta gl: Rate i s 0%.

Accounts 60 days d e l i nq uen t may be t u rned over to an o ut si de agency. Add it i o n al collection costs may be a dd ed to the

acc o u nt .

." m

and sp r i ng breaks.

VI

L i m i t ed h o u s i n g is available on a daily fee basis during w in t er

Financial aid and other res o u rc es cover total costs.

No set-up fee. Owing bal nces that are 30 d a ys past due may b e assessed a 1 . 5% monthly default c harge.

Acc o unt 60 days delinquent may be t u rn ed over to an o utside agen cy. Additional co l le ct i o n costs may be a dde d to the ac a u n t.

Payment in Full Option • Payment in full must be p a id on the first day of each sem e ste r/ a t te n ded .

O w i ng balances that are 30 days I ast due may be as se sse d a 1 . 5% m o rtt hl y default charge.

Accou n ts 60 days d elinq u en t may be t u rned over to an outside agen cy. Additional coil ct ion costs may be add ed to th account.

Applications fo r s i n gle rooms, and other s pec i a l ho us i n g

meal plan ;Ii I , # 2 , or

#3.)

Plan I]; 2 0 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .......... . . . . . . $ 1 , 2 1 3/semester Plan #2 : 1 5 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . ...... . . .... $ 1 , 1 70/semester

Plan #3:

$265 January Term 1 0 meals /week .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . $ 1 ,OOO/semester

Flexible PLUs Plo.n

. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

of p u rc has ing blocks of 25 meal s . Meals may be u se d at all meal pl a n venues and are a va i. l a bl e fo r use unril May 3 1 , 200 l . S t ud e nt s m ay p u rch as e as many blocks o f 2 5 meals as th ey wish, but o nc e p u rchased, they are non·refLllldable unless th e s t u de n t form a l ly withdraws from th e u niversity. ADVANCE PAYMENT New sludents need to make a $ 2 00 advance payment to cOflfirm th e i r offer of admission. The p ay ment is refundable until May 1 5

fo r fall, D e cem b r 1 5 for the 1anuary ter m , and Ja n u ar y 1 5 fo r s p r i n g. Re q ues t s for a refwld must be m a de in w r i t i ng to the

Return ing students wanting to reserve a room fo r the fo llow i n g

A $75 discount fro m tuition and other costs.

No pr i or owing balanc

I f financial aid cov e rs the s tude n t 's total cost, the student is not eligible.

O ut o f pocket ex penses , i n cl ud ing tu j l i on , TO

year must sign a H o u s in g Contract. Cancellations, without

to lhe un ivers ity.

111

and m e al s,

pecial c o urse fee minus an y applicable fi na n c i al aid for a sem ester, m ust be $3 ,000 or more to b elig ible.

penalty, must be sub m i t te d in

w r i t i ng

Augu t 1 will be

u b j ect to a $ 1 00.00 pe n a l ty charge. Cancella­ ti ons received between August 2 and Sep t e mbe r I will be s ubj e ct to a $ 2 00.00 pe n a l t y ch:u ge.

Applications for a "Lute Buck Dis co u n t" are sent o ut in the

HOW TO MAKE PAYMENTS

billing stat ment in July an November. D ea dl i ne dates a re postm rk by August 1 5 or fal l , and

Box 2 1 1 6 7, Seattle, WA

December 15 fo r s p ri n g . The appl i ca t i on ou tl i ne s s pe cific criteria for e l i gi b i l i t y of the discount.

Mail payments with statement remittance stub to PLU, 8 1 1 1 - 3 1 67, or deliver pay me nt s to the

PLU Busi nes Office in the Ha u ge Ad mini stration B u i ldi n g , Room 1 1 0. Checks should be made payable to Pa c i fi c Lutheran Univer­

All s i n gle full·time ( 1 2 c redi t hours) students m us t l i ve on c a m pu s in u n i ve rsi t y h using u ll l e ' s they are: a) l i v i n g with

si ty. The student's name and ID number s h o u l d be included with alJ payments. A $ 1 5 fee is charged OIl all returned ch ec k s. VLSA and M as ter Ca.rd are accep t ed . One may call the secured line 2 5 3 / 5 3 5 -8376, 24 ho ur s a day, to make a payment. To make

t h e i r parent, legal guardian, or child, o r b) at least 2 0 years old

aut matie bankcard payment toward the 4 mo n t h ( fall or

ROOM AND M1lALS

o r h ave c o mpl ete d 60 semester credit hours b y eptember 1 ( for the next fall e rn est er ) , or Feb ruary I ( for th e next s p r i n g semester) •

to the Residen tial Life

Office by JuJy I . Cancellations received between J u l y 2 and

$ 1 83

Co m muter st udents and residents of South Hall have the op t i o n

Ad m iss ions Office.

LUTE BUCK D ISCOUNT

m

$ 2 4 5 J a n u a ry Te rm Plan #4: 5 meals/week ........... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ............ $5 50/semester $ 1 3 5 January Term Meal Piall #4 is available orlly to commuter students and students living ill Kreidler or South Halls.

Financial Aid and Other Resources Cover Costs Payment Option

apartment sizes, s t yl es , and costs. Contact the Residential Life O ffice fo r i n form ation and ap p l i c a t i o ns .

$ 2 74 Janua ry Term

term

c

South H al l is a n alternative residential o p t i o n with various

Meal Plans (Students l i v i n g in trad i t i o nal residence halls m ust choose from

l> z

( 2 5 3 ) 5 3 5-7200 or e - m a i l ed to reslife@plu. edu.

o z

requests s h o uld be add ressed to th e Residential Life O ffi c e at

4 Montb Payment Option (Spring) 4 eq u a l payments for enrollment in spring. A $25 non-refundable set-up fee.

-t

There i s no r oo m charge for J -Term fo r students liv i ng o n

• 4 equal payme n t s •

-t C

Room Charges Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . ... . . .. . $ 1 ,300 /semester Design e d Sin gl e Room ......... . .. .. . . . . ............. . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,650 /sel11e ·t er D ouble Room u sed as si n gl e ......... . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,750 /semcster H o using for January Term on l y ............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . $285

Excep t for res i de n t s o f South H al l, all s t u de n t s with an active

housing assignment are required to be e nrol l ed ill meal pla n

a

university

sprulg) Paym e n t

p ti o n , this sh ou ld b i n d i c at ed in the sp a ce

p rov i ded o n the Payme n t Option fo rms. No a d d i t i o n al fee is

ch arg ed fo r t hi s service w h en added to a P aymen t O pt i on .

01' milll cash. A pe r i odi c ally adjusted d i s co u nt

Please DO

rate will be cha rged aga i n st C a na di an cu rren cy.

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OIl W

Interest and Late Fees •

.... ....

Q Z <C z o

No Ad.dres-s Hold

A 1 . 5 mo n t h ly default charge may be added on an owi n g ba lances o f students w h o have enrolled i n the Fi nanc i al Aid

All st udent s are req u i re d to keep a

and Other Resources Cover Costs Pay ment Op t ion and

hold will be p l ace d on th e account. Basic un iversity privtleges

Payme n t in Full Op t ion Plan.

will be de n ie d such as, b ut n o t l i m i t ed to, tbe right to register,

A $25 J ait· charge may be added to a 4 Month ( fall/sp r i ng) Payment O p t i o n i f p ay ment is made aCrer the 20th o f each

rece ive copies of o fficial t ra nsc ri p t s o[ d i ploma, or cash checks.

Academic Hold

mo nth.

The Re g i st ra r, Student Life O ffice, or Residential Life Office can

place an acco unt o n "aca dem ic hold." Regi t rat ion for classes is

Mlssed Payments •

Fa ilure

Ol a k m i n i m u m m o n t hl y payments as agrl'ed w i l l

to

result i n removal from the ·1

precluded u n t i l any pend i n g matte!" with those office is set tled.

110 nth ( fa l l/spring) Payment

O p t i o n nnd the account w i l l be p l aced on

a

Medical Hold

F inancial H O LD.

A "medical hold" prevents

Tbe owi ng balance becomes due and p a y� b le i m med i ately. •

F ilu re to sub m i t all loan ap p l i c at i o n s and any financial aid

b e cau

Payme n t O p t ion wo rksheets fo r each aeadernie year will resul t i n the removal from Fi nancial Aid and O t h er Resources Cover Total Costs Payme n t Opt io n. The acco unt will be p laced on

a

fi na nc ial HOLD. The owing bal ance becomes due and payable imm d i n , e ly. a

payment in ful l by t he d u e d a te will res u l t i ll

removal from Payment i n Ful l O p t ion and the acco u n t will b e

a

financial HOLD. The o wi ng bala nce becomes due

and payabl e i m.med iately. Student accounts 60 days deli nquen t may be turned over to a n o ULside col lec Lio n ag ency. Add i t i o na l collection costs may be

HOLDS ON ACCOUNTS

TYP"ES O F HOLD

OFFICE

. . . . . .... . . . . . . Admissions .

.

Academic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academ i c Advisi ng Collectio n . . . . . . .. . . . . . Accounts Receivable Exit I n terview .. ... . . ... Perki ns/Nursing i nancial ........ . . . . . . . . ........ Acco u n ts Receivable International ... . . . .. .. . . I n ternat i onal Student Se rvices Jun io r Review . . . . . . . . Registrar Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Health Se.rvices Medical Expiration . . .. Heal th Services o Address . . . . . . . . .. . . . Studen t Serv ile� :enter Payment Op tion . . .. ... . Student Servi ces Center Residential Life . . ..... . .. . Residenti al L l fe Student Li fe ...... ... .. . Student L i fe Wri te-Off . . . . . . . . . . Accou n ts Receivable .

.

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to pay all tuition c os ts ,

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educational programs and the use o f cer ta i n univer,ity fac i l ities, as

descr ibed i n this catalog. A fai lu re to pay

benefi ts and services, including, but not l i m ited t , s t a t e m e n ts of ,

classes and the use of university facil it i es in the

admittance t

event of :t defa u l t .

Credit Balances rf a c red it balance occurs on a stude-nt's acco u n t , the un iversity will refund i t according to perti n e n t federal, state, and un ive rsity regu latio ns . Credi t b al ances are p r o cesse d thro u gh t h e Student Services Center.

F ede ral Title IV p o l icy 34CR 668.22. The amount

time the student was enrolled be fo re withdrawing. T h is policy is e ffective for complete

.

p rog ra m s is ba.sed solely on t h e l e n gth of or

full withdrawal from

a

semester in

which a studen t receives Title l V federa l funds.

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If a stud e nt el apsed ,

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a

\

ithd raws

€'fore 60°/.) of the semester has

perct'ntabre o f Title IV funds will be returned to the

federal program b as ed o n the length of time the student was on

en rolled before w i th d rawal. For example, i f a tu d e nt w ithdraw

a " fi na nci al

PaymeDt Option Hold

when

_

0%, of the semester has el, psed, 50% of Title IV fu n ds will

be returned to the federal p rograms. After 60% of the semester

ba el ap sed the st udent i s cons idered to have used aU aid ,

received for the semester. The re t u rn of Title rv fund .s is dependen t upon lhe date

All student are required to enr II in a Payment O p tion for each academ ic year they attend. The B i l li ng Confirmation and Payment Options can be obtai ned through the Studen t Services enter. If a s t uden t fails to enr !J in a Paymen t Option , a hold wi ll be placed on the aCCo wl t which will den y the st uden t basic university privileges such as, but not lim ited to, the right to register, recei e copies of o fficial t ransc r i p ts or d ip lom a, o r cash

a

s tudent withd raws during the semester. Withdrawal date is def med • •

as

one of the fol l owing:

The date the student b ega n the w ithdrawal process; The date the student otherwise p rov id ed the school with official notification o f the intent to withdraw;

checkB.

or

For the student who doe n ot begin the u n iversity's with­ d rawal process o r n o t i fy the school o f the i ntent to withd raw, the mid- p o i n t of the paymen t pe riod or perio d oT enrollment

Collection Hold Any studen t who has p reviously been sent to collections must pay in full before classes begin. The colle c t i on s hold will •

permanently remai n on the account. If

a stude n t fa ils to pay on the first day of classes, his/her enrollment will be terminated.

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as

obl igation to co nti nue to p rovide the ap p l icabl e educational

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a pp l icable a nd

when d ue all un i e rsi ty b ills shall release the un .iversi ty of any

returned to the Title I

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u niversity agrees to make avai lable to t he student certa i n

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hold." Basic u n iversi ty privi leges will be denied lwtil the acc un! is settled. including the right to register, receive copies o f o fficial transcripts or dip l om , or cash chec.ks.

A

a nd meal fees, a nd ot her s p e c i a l

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Tf a s tuden t accoun t is past due, it will be p laced

P

ro o m

( f Title IV funds ( o th er than Federal Wo rk St udy) that must be

Financial Hold

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parents Or legal

fec incurred or to be incu rred for the st ude n t s education. The

accordi n g to

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student and h is or her

Upon registrat ion, t he

guard i a n , agree to accept the respon s i b i lity and le g al o b l i ga ti o n

Pacific Lutheran Un iversity calculates a nd returns Title IV fu nds

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RJghts and Responsibilities

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE RETURN OF TITLE IV AND INSTITUTIONAL FUNDS IF A STUDENT WITHDRAWS FROM THE UNIVERSITY

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the student does not have the n ecessa ry i mmLlnlzations.

d iplomas, or p re regist rati ons. The s tud e n t shall also be d e n ied

There are 1 4 types of h o l ds that can be placed on student re co rds for diffe rent c i rc umstances. Each hold p reve n t s cert a i n privileges at the university. list d b low are the ypes of holds that can be p laced on accounts , nd tbe offices respol1sible for the m .

...

e

honorable dismjssal , grade reports, tr an scr i p t of re c o rd s

added to t he acco unt.

Ad m issio ns

s t uden t from registering because

'

Fail u re to m ake placed on

a

Health Services has not received the Medical H isto ry Form o r

verification fo m1s ( i f a pp l icable) by the dates specified o n the

u rren t perman e n t address

with the u n iversity. I f m a il becom'5 undeLi.ve rable, an add ress

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for wh ich Tjtle I V assistan ce was disbursed ( unless the u n iversity can d oc u m e n t a later d a te ) ; I f attendance i s taken, the withdrawal date is determi ned from the a ttenruwce records.


PacHk Lutheran University wiD: [ . Determine date of withdrawal 2. lculate the percentage o f aid deemed

NOTE: Please be aware tllllt a

to have been used by

the srudent 3. Calculat th percentage o f aid not used by the student, which must be returned to federal programs.

11\

refu nd dlle to withdrawal from the

university can adversely affect what ;s owed to tile IIniversity by tile student. A tuition adjustmen t is applied to t/ll� stlldent aceormt, but aid is also reduced, sometimes crea ting a larger owing balance. Students should c/reck with Financial Aid Imd Student Employment to research

� c: o m

the effect a witlrdrawal will lrave on their student nccolmt.

Order of Retu rn of Title IV Funds

If the withdrawal date results in a percentage of Title IV aid not used by the student, then the return of Title IV aid will occur in the following orde.r: I. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford loans 2. Subsidized Federal Stafford loans 3. Federal Perkins Loans 4. Federal PLU loans 5. Direct PLUS loans 6. Federal Pell Grants 7. Federal S OG Grants 8 . Other assistance under this Title for which a return of funds is required.

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University Refund Policy

In ordinary circumstances, a student who withdraws on or before the first two weeks of instruction in a semester re eives a full refund of "tuition and fees." After the second week of instruction, refunds are given for full/complete withdrawals only ( a student' must withdraw from all classes to receive a refund). Tuition refunds are 100% tllrougl. the last day of the Drop/Add period. After that, tuition refunds a re prorated on a da Uy basis until 60% of the semester I,as elapsed (Example: November 1 1, 2000, for fa ll semester, April 15, 200 1 , for spring semester), a t which point there ; s no tuition refu n d. Refunds from university housing fire also prorated on a daily basis, with meals refunded on a weekly basis. Howing deposits are not covered by Federal Financial Aid and are not refundable. NOTE:

Notice of withdrawal must be given in writing to the Student Services Center, Pacific Lutheran University and received before the deadline above. Oral requests are not acceptable. Charges will remain o n a student's acco unt until written notice is received. Unofficial Withdrawal 10 the cases of unofficial

withdrawal, the drop out date ( defin d as the last recorded day of class attendance as documented by the university) will be used to calculate a refund. M edical Withdrawal

Students may also completely withdraw from all classes for a term for medical reasons. The student must provide written e\'idence from a physician to the vice president and dean for student l i fe. The grade of "WM" will appear on the student's grade report and transcript. In cases of medical withdrawal, all

tuition charges for that semester will be removed. Beca use ti,e student is not being charged tuition in this case, all university gran ts alld scholarships are removed from ti,e student's account. Federal Title N aid will be refullded O il a prorated basis, depending on the time of withdrawaL However, once 60% of the semester has elapsed, the aid for the entire semester will be considered used and will remain on the student's account. Procedlll'es {or Obtaining a Refund

I . Student requests withdrawal approval from the Registrar via

the Student Services Center, using a withdrawal form. 2 . Financial Aid will process the student's request for withdrawal according to the Federal Title IV policy 34CFR 668.22. Aid will be revised according to published federal policy. 3. The Business Office will give a tuition adjustment to the student's accou nt for the percentage o f tuition allowed to be refunded for that time period during the term (as determined by the Registrar's Offi e and the University Refund Policy). 4. Examples o f the "Retum of Tit! rv FW1ds if a Student Withdraws" are available in the Financial Aid and Student Employment O ffice.

Student Life The quality of life cultivated and fo stered within the uni­ versity is a n essential component of the academic commu­ nity. The environment produced is conducive to

a

life of

vigorous a n d creative scholarship. It also recognizes that l iberal education i s for the total person and that a comple­ mentary rela tionship exists be tween s t uden ts' intellectual development and the satisfaction of their other individual needs. Interaction with persons of diffe ri ng life styles

.

application of classroom knowledge to personal goals and aspirations, and co-curricular experiences are all available and total components o f education at PLU, In a time when there is a need fo r meaningful co m m u nity, the campus facilitates genuine relationships among members of the un ive rsity from diverse religious, racial, and cultural back­ grounds. All of the services and facilities provided are intended to complement the academic program. They ref} ct changing student needs, and the opportunities fo r student part icipatio n i nclude virtu ally al l aspects of the unive rsity. I ndivid ual attention is given to student ' con­ cerns, including

a

v a rie ty of specific services outlined here

and o n rhe web at plll.edu/-slifi. CAMPUS MINISTRY

Pacific Lutheran University by its very nature is a place for the interaction between faith and reason. Opportunities for the mutual celebration of that faith on campus are rich and diverse. Chapel worship is held Monday, Wednesday, and Friday mornings during each seme. ter for aU who wish to participate. The University Congregation meets in regular worship and celebrates the Lord's Supper each Sunday. Pastoral services of the university pastors are available to all students who desire them. Several denominations and religious groups have organiza­ tions on campus, and there are numerous student-initiated Bible

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W lAo

study an

fel lowshi p groups. The

Campus M j ni stry Council, an

...

ties i n a sp i r i t of open ness and m utual respec t . The Campus

I­ Z

at plu.edu -c min/.

Mi nistry Office can be reached at

CAMPUS SAFETY AND INFORMATION

Q ::I I­

The p erso n al sa fe ty of the P lU community i s the number o n e goal of Cam pus Safety a nd Information . Campus safety officers

are avail ab l e to e sco r t students, to provide veh i cle j u m p sta rts, to unl o c k inadvertentl y locked vehicles, to a sist in ch a ng i n g t i res,

to re.spolld to medical eme rgencit'S and fire alarms, and to p r ov id e ge n e r a l te lep h o ne information services. Visitor info r m a t io n and ve h icle reg i ' t ra t ion for pa rk i ng on cam p us are available through t he Campus Safery [fice

24

i n formal lou nges, study

a week . The Campus Safet • p h one number is (253) 535 -744 1 and the website is plu.edu-sl itics/index.html1.

TO

ms, recreation areas, and common

kitchen and lau nd ry facilities. Most of th h al ls

are co-educational. Although

they are

h o used in separate wi ng , men and women in co-ed h al ls share

RESPONSmILITIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE Within any co mm unity ce r tai n reg ul at i o n s are necessary. Pacific Luthe ra n Universit)· adop t s o nly those sta ndards believed t o be

lo unge and recreation fac.ilities and common residence go ver n ­

ment, and participate j o i n tly in all h all activities.

ne all­

wo m en's hall is ava ilable for those women who desire tms l iv i n g

students with the exp ec tation that they will co m ply with th se standards. All m te m bers of the university co m mu n i ty a rc exp e cte d to respect the rights and

ad m it s

exper i en ce.

An all . i ng l e - roo m hall ha s been established for those 2 1 years of age or o l der, or who have attained senior or graduate status.

i n tegrity of others. Co n d uc t which is detrimental to students,

h is in de end e n t uvi ng environment is i n ten ded t o meet the

facuity, staff, or the university, or which violates local, state, or

n eed s of the older s t uden t .

federal laws, may be g roun ds for s a n ctio n s or for d ism i s saL

An apartmen t - style residence hall, ope n i11g Fall 2000, is

The university p rohibits the po s session or consumption o f

designed for s tu d e n ts w h o

alcoholic beverages on campus a n d l imits t h e hours w h e n stu­ dents may have visitors o f the opposite sex in t hei r residence hall rooms. The Studellt Ha ndbook contains the code of co n d u ct for

all s t uden ts.

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION New student o r i e n t a t i o n ende avors to ass ist student s and their familie with the t ra ns i ti o n to P LU. The th ree -day fall program introduces st u dents to many d i mensions of PLU life. Fall orien­ tation in c l udes m eeti n g with a faculty ad v i ser, talk i n g in ' mall groups w i th oth e r new students, beco m i ng acquainted with cam p u s services a n d having s o m e re l axed t i me with other st udents be fore cla ss e s beg i n. ' p ec i a l activ ities are also planned which respond to concerns of families of new s tuden ts. While Jan u a ry an spri ng orientation ' ar more condensed, they also pro vi d e new students wi th a n i n t ro d u c tio n lD academic li fe and co - curri c ular activ ities. Phone 253 /535-7452 fo r more in fo r m a­ tion about new st u de nt orientation or che ck the website at

are 20 e a r of ag e or older, or who have attai ned a minim um of j u n io r s t a t us. This living o p t ion will provide for so me added i n dependence wh i1e con t i n u i ng the many benefits o f campus living. Further information reg ardi n g residence haLl� can be o b tai n ed from the Residential Life Office : ( 2 5 3 ) 5 3 5 -7200 or on t h e web at

plu .edu/- r1 if/ .

STUDENT ACIIVITIES Student activities are re g ar ed as ess n t i al factors in h igh er education. Some are related to cou rse s of i n s t ru c ti o n such as drama, music, and physical education; others are c n n e cted more cl o sely to recreational and ocial l ife. Involvement i n stud e n t acti v iti es pr ov ides p ractical experience and a t the same l ime develo p s an uud rsta n ding of self in relation to others. Co-curricular programs include student government ( Ass o c ia ted

Students

f PI and Residence H a l l A s iano n ) , ports activi­ tie (varsity, intramural, a n d cl ub s ports ) , student m dia ( news­

m agazine, rawo, and television)

plu. du-slif/ .

paper, yearbook, artistic

ACCHSSmnlTY The un i ersity complies with the American with Disabilities Act and Section 504 o f the Rehabilitation Act a n d p rovid s reason­

over 1 00 student activities

able acco mmodations to students with wsabiljties. Coordination

(253 ) 53 5 - 7 195 for more i nformation or check out the web s i te at

of services is through the Counseling and Te ting Office

535-7206. Information

dubs

and

organ i zation s , and community ser v ice

(253)

ence.

ontaet t h e Student I nvol em nt and Leadership Office at

ing webs ite at plu.edu-slif/ct/inde . .htrnL

VOLUNTEER CENTER

RESIDENTIAL LIFE The u n iversity req u ires that all full-lime

Center for P u bl i c

PLU's Vo lunLeer CenLer,

( 1 2 or more semester at

h om e with

20 yea rs of age or o lder on or before September 1 fo r t h e academic year or Feburary 1 fo r spring semester ; or 3) has attained j u n i o r pare n t( s) , legal guardian( s) , s p ouse o r child( ren ) ; 2 ) is

s tatus (60

semeste r hour ) on or bdore Sep tem be r

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by s tudents and housed in the

rdinato rs who help m atch studen t. s with organizations. Class

projects, residence hall gr up ac t iv i t je

, on

day or several, the

Vol unteer Cen ter can help yo u help ! Drop b y or ph o ne ( 535-

As a re s ide n tial campus, Pacific L u the r a n Un iversity o ffe rs s t uden t s a va l uabl e eJq>eri ence in co m rnu r uty living. The un iver­ sity recognizes the i m p orta nce of non lass room activi ties i n providing an educati o n. Th e ai m of residential l iving i s t o help studen t s grow personally, social ly, culturally, and spiritual ly. Campus residen I' are organized i n to communities in whi h each individual counts as a pe r so n. New kno wledge shared with A

run

ervi e, seek, to give students op p o rt un i ties to

put to work their d rea ms for a better world. Tb Vol u nte er Center has lis ti n gs fo r over J 00 organ izations who n e e d volun­ tee rs. ' t 1.lde nts c a n stop by and b rowse through the p la cem e n t lists, or make an a p po intm nt with o n e of t h e Volunteer Center co

a c ade m i c year or February 1 for sp r ing semester.

P

in which to become involved, the-re is

p l u . edul -sl if/s il index/h tml.

is available on the Co unse l ing and Test­

one of the three foHowing con d i t ion : 1) is living

stu de n t programs. With

�ure to be at least one which will enrich a pe rs on's college e xp e ri ­

hou rs ) students l ive and eat on campus unless the studen t meets

20

of many

nity to estab lish a com fortable l iving pattern. All halls include

h urs

a day, seven days

reaso nably necessary and

halls takes on a very p e rso nal mean.i n g.

backg ro \. ds and c ul t u.re s live on campus; t h e refore , studen ts in residence haVE' a unique opportu­ n ity to b roaden t heir cultural horizons. The un iversity cares about the qual i t y of l i fe on ca mpus . The attract ive and comfortable resi d ence haUs enrich the quality of life and enhance the learni n g p r ceSs. The university o ffe r students high-qualit I h o u s ing opportunities including s t ud e n t lea ership experience , fo rmal and informal p rograms, a n d p eer il ·sociat io ns. The student govern in g bodies a re strong and ac­ tively participate in campus l i fe . A sele tion of modern , attractive ball s , ea c h with its own t radi ti os and unique advantages, o ffers st u den ts the opportu­ Men and wome n

(253) 535 - 7464 01' on the web

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III

friends in the re ideoce

elected st udent a n d fa cu lty committee, coordi n ates these activi­

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and discover bow easy it is t o make a big diffe rence i n l i fe!

WOMEN'S CENTER The Women's C n t e r provides services, referral s, and support to

all students, facult y, and staff of the un iversity. The climate of the center is such that all pe r onS are valued and mp we red to pursue their i nd iv i d ual and collective g al . The Center offers

p eer- upport groups, educational resources, and p rogra ms

which


celebrate the talenLs and creat ive expressions of women. T h e

Wo m e n's Center also is t h e main p mor of W men' History M on th activities held every March . The Wo men's Cen t e r is lo ca ted at 1 0U4 l 24th St reet S.

MUIl'IETHNIC RESOURCES Multiethnic Resou rces s erve s st udents of color. S pe ci a l activities, peer me n tenn g and advising, le a der sh i p opportun i t y, and other supp rt e rv i es are available. Clerical as istance and other services are also available to support spe c ial proj e ct s and re ­ search fi c u si n g n national race-related iss ues. Multiethnic Resou rces is housed in Stude.nt Involvement and Leadership, located on t h e lower level of the ni ve rsi ty Center. The web si te is pl u.ed u/ - slif/ mr/ i ndex/ ht ml .

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES i nte rnational Student Services p rov i d .s assistance to interna­ tional students i n a dj ust ing to the uniwf ity a n d in meeting bot h ed uca t i o n \ ca reer ) and personal need s . Services include o r ienta­ tion. reg i tration, a nd on-campus liaison with other u n i ve rs i ty offices. Assistance with immigration an d government regulations as well as imm igrat ion p ro ce dures rega rd i n g temporary travel, work applications, and extensions of stay is avail able. OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT SERVICES! ADULT STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES The Office of St u de nt I nvo l ve m en t and L e ad e r s hip (SLL) p ro ­ v i d es adm i n istrative 'upport and services to assi st off- campus and aclul st ud en ts. Students who commute t the ca mp u s can find sp eci al serv ices and re so u rces to make their time at PL sati ty ing and productive. The Associ a t d student Go ver n me nt ( ASPLU ) has a d i rect or of off-almpus st u den t relations and fi st ud en t serIate position dedicated to representing the interests and needs of co mm utin g tudents. Students may s ig n up ror an off camp us student list serve to st ay abreast of programs and infor ma tio n dir cted to all tudents. An off-campus newsletter is available m o n thly on tILe AS PLU we b site ( and st ud e n ts may have -

-

p ri nt version sent t

their homes by igning up at

SPLU). The

ASPLU web s i te i s p lu.edu/-asplu/. tudents n eedi ng to establ is b emergency contact while on ampus can usc the SIL Cam pu Locator Ser vi e and " loca l use" telepho ne. To register, b ri ng clas schedule and o n- ca m pus work informat ion t th St ud e n t lnvolvement and L ea dership Office, C 1 53 . Additionally, the associated student government dire tor of off- ampus student relations ser ves as an advocate fo r

adult

stu de n t lo ung s are avail able in

tudent needs. Off-cam p

the U n iverS i t y Center, Hauge Administration Building, and R ieke

Science Center.

mat i o n testi ng and treatment; o ll sul t.ation s fo r travel guideli. nes a n d immunizat ion , ea t ing d iso rde rs substan ce abuse, and to b acco usage; and h eal t h ducation on a wide va r ie ty of health ,

,

concerns.

Sickness and Acdd.ent Insarance is available to all tudents o n a vol un ta r y basis, Health 'ervices s tr ongly urges all s t u d e n t s to have medic I insu rance. Th" G ro u p Acc iden t and ickness Plan offers coverage 24 h ours a day, 1 2 mo n t h s a yea r anywhere i n the world. This plan is ava ilable througho unhe year Inform ation about the insurance p licy can e fowlli on the Heal th Services

11> � c: c m

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web ite listed below.

The Immunization PoUq s ta tes that ali tudents born after De c e mb e r 3 1 , 1 956. are required to p rov i de on the u n i vers it y health history form an immu nization record of hvo measles,

m u m p s rubell a v cc i n ati ons ( MMR) after the lrst b irthday. Thi information m u st be on file befo re a tu de n t is permitted to regis te r. .

-

International students, facultr and scholars from cowltries at risk will be r qrlired to halle 1/ tullerculosis skill test (p urified protein deriva tive-ppd). This test will be done at the Health Services after arrival at tll e university. The cost is $15. 00. Docu­ mentatioYl of tetan us-diphtheria imrmlllization is {lisa reqrlired. Quest ions about the i m m u n ization pol i cy should be d irected to Health Serv ic s at 253 -535-7337 or on the web at p lu . ed ul - sl i f/hsl i ndex. h tm!.

Counseling and Testing Services assists student i n co p i ng with develop m e ntal issues. Trained and experienced ps ych logists and counselors o ffe r i ndividual a sses sm en t s an d a c ons ul ti n g psy­ chiatris t is available f( r evaluations and possibl medications. A variety of personalityl interest inventories and psycll ological tes ts are available to assist students with care e r pi n n i ng, educational adj ustmen t and pers nal problems. oo rdination of s e r v i ces for ,

,

.

tlldents w ith d isabi lit i es is also available.

DinlDg Services, owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran n iversity, is available to all st ud e n t s faculty, staff, and their guests. Stude nts l iv ing n campus are re quired to be o n a meal pla n. rab and Go" i tems are availab le during peak lunch hours. No ded ucti ns are m ade fo r st ud en ts ea t i n g f wer meals than previously con t rac ted for u n le ss granted by the director of d in in g s ervices esiden tial s tude nts are o ffered 3 meal optio ns : A ny 2U, 1 5, or 10 m ea ls per week. Students l ivi ng off-campus are e ncouraged to select on o f t h ese meal la n s or the flexib le meal plan offered ,

"

.

nIl' to off-cam p u s students. St udents witb spec i a l d ie tary requireme nts, specifically ap­ p rove d ill wr it i n g by a physician, can in m o s t case be accommo­

ENVIRONS The university' ge ograp h ica l sett i ng affords s t u d ents a wide variet y of both recreationa l a nd cul tural entertainment op tions. Recrea tionally, the gra n de ur of the PacifiC Northwest enco urages p artici pa t ion in h iking ca m p i n g cl i m b in g skiing, boating, and ,

,

,

swi m ming.

nle most conspicuous na tlual monwnent in tbe a rea is M t. Rainjer. In addition to R ai nie r, t he distinctive realms of tbe Ca cade an d Olympic m o un ta i n ranges a nd for sts of Douglas Fi r omplete one of the most n at u ra l l y tranquil environments in the United tate s . Students can als o enjoy the a stbetic o fferings of nearby Seattle and Taco ma. These city centers host a variety of perfo r m­ ing a n d recording arts and provide dozens of garreries and museums as weil as unique shopping and din ing experiences.

STUDENT SERVICES Health Services is staffed with two n ur se practit ioners and one phy s ician assistant. A ph ys ici an is available fo r consultation and referral. Services available include outpatient primary c are , immunizations, aUe.rgy shots , preve n tive he alt h care, pap smear , testicular and breast exams. birth control, pregnancy testing and

d a ted by contacting the d i n i n g serv ices director. T h is service is pro vi ded at no extra cost. Visitors may eat in any o f the facilities.

Schedullng Services [or meet ing rooms are mai ntained i n the Un iversi ty Cen ter. All university act iv i ties must be scheduled through th i s office. Scheduling a tivities is a joint responsibility

of the requesti ng group, sched u l i ng s i t y Center

co

rd i na t o r, and the Un iver­

ffice .

PLU Bookstore is owned and o perated b Pacific Luther a n

University for the be nefit of students, faculty,

nd staff. The

b o okst o r sells textbooks required fo r classes. S up plies , gifts, cards, and co nvenience store i tems are also available. C om p ut e r

software at d i & cou n ted prices is avai lable

r can be special o r ­

dered. Apple and Gateway comp uters at educational prices c an

be purchased through the bo ok store. pecial book orders are welcome. PLU Northwest is a unique gift sh o p located t 407 G a rfi eld Street in historic Parkland. Feat u ri n g 1 rt hwest pottery. cloth­ i n g , and fo ds, thl:' s tore also offers bo 1 s an d gifts dep i ct i n g orthwe t themes a nd auth ors .

See t h e websit :s t plu.edu/-bkst and plu.edu/-bkst/ nw.

counseling. Also offered are: sexually transmitted d i seas e infor-

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R 5 r T v

21


III W Ill:

:I C w u o Ill: 4.. u

w C c( v c(

Caree:r Development ( h ou sed with cadem ic Advis i n g for students' convenienc ) strives to p rovide a program of career develop ment and life planning. Students are assisted in integrat­ i ng their personal values and apt itud es with career choices through individual counsel ing, workshops. re5idence hall resen ­ tations. a n d a computerized career guidance program. The office staff assi ! students and first-year al um ni in devel p i ng job­ search tech n iques by p roviding a n extensive career l i b ra ry of opportLtnities in specifi majors, industry directories, and empl y m e n t forecasts. Additionally, the office coordinates 3 sc hed u le of recruiters from i ndustry, business, go ver nme n t , md graduate sello Is. The center rdinates and promotes all p art - t im e and fu l1 time employment opportunities for L Udents . i n d ud i ng listings of local job , nation -wide i nternships, and �ummer employment op po r tu n i ties . Specialty s elected forums throughout the year also br i ng students and employers together, in order to help st uden ts find work that is both financially and personally rewarding. A more comprehensive list of services is o utl i ned on the center's w b�ite ( www.plu.edu/-slif/cdli ndex.html ) i n cludi n g a li n k to the online program. eRecruiting. This program is a fully in tegrated employment and recruiting service available to tu­ de nts 24 h o u rs a day, seven days a week. Students may a c cess job listing, post their resumes, and contact employer) from any computer with an Internet connection. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES Policies and procedures at the u n iversi ty a re intended to main­

tain an o rde rl y educational envi ronment cond ucive to s t uden t learning and development. In order to fulfill institutional re­ sponsibility and at the same time follow p roced u res that are fair, consistent, and protective of each person's rights, appropriate grievance procedures b ave been established. If a student has reason to believe that an academic or administrative a ctio n is unjust. ca p r icio u • or discriminatory, these p rocedures are ava i la ble fo r th e s tudent to seek redress. Th e un ivers i t ) has a team of gr ieva n e officers to facil itate th e grievance process. The grievan ce o fficers are Susan Mann (535-7 1 87) , Patri ia Ro un d y ( 535-8786) , Richard S e e ger ( 53 5 8786 ) . and William Yage r ( 53 5 -8722 ) . Any of the gri vance officers may be contacted to receive assistance. Copies of grievance procedures are a allable for review at the office of each grievance officer.

Academic Procedures Advising The u niversity expects th at all t ud e nt , · t ne ti m e or another, will need assistance in planning academ ic programs consistent with their needs and goa l s . Both to help students make their i n i t i al a djustme n t to th academic load a t PLU a n d to p rov i de occasional counsel throughout t h e i r academic ca ree rs , the un iversity has established (l n et wo r k of faculty adviser' an d an Academ i c Advising O ffice .

Faculty Advisers - All " tudents enrolled in deg ree p ro g ra m s

have fa ulty advisers whose overall responsi b ilit y is to gu i de academic progress. In tbeir work with individual students,

advi ers have tbe as istan e of pe rso nn el in a n u mb r of student services offi es: tb Academ i c Advising ffiee. th e adem i c Assi t(lnce Center, the Career Development Office, Counseling and Test i n g Services, the Mu.ltiethnic Resource Center. the Campus M i nistry, t he international s tudent adviser, and residenc hall dir ctor and resid ent a istants. Tmnsitional Advisers: At the time of entry, each tudent is assigned a transitional adviser, usually according to interests expressed br the student. St udents who wish to explore the general c urriculum betore ch oos i ng a major program are ass i gned to e p lo ra lory advisers ( professional adv i sing or counsel ing tarf or es p e c i ally trai ned faculty) w ho will help them to make education al p la n s appropriate to their interests and talents. Tran itional advi ers are supported by ed uc ali o n al plann i ng workshops and by Psychology 1 1 3 a ree r and Educa­ tional P lan ni n g . During a student's first sem ster, and advi ing file is created for the student's adviser. and a " B i g Envelope," an adviSing gu i d e and record-keeping � Ider, i:; issued to each s t ud nl. Major Advisers: Upon � rmal declaration of a majo r, stud Ilts are assig n ed major adv isers to replace their general advisers. Major adv isers g u id e students' p rogress toward their c ho s n degree go al .

Students may c h a n ge advisers as appropriate or necessary, using a simp le adviser chdllge forn1. Studen ts and advisers are expected to meet regularly, th oug h the actual number o f m e e tin g will vary according t o individual needs. M i r u m a lly, th fe mee tings are required d u ri n g the freshman year and one each ear th e re afte r, thou g h all stude n ts are encouraged to meet with their advisers as often as seems necessary or useful.

Registration The Student Serv ices Center provides man

services for stu den ts and alumni. The center serves as a focal po i n t for all matters concerning enrolling in courses, co n firming schedules, an d issuing official and unofficial transcripts.

EAR.lX REGlSTRATION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS Students who pla n to return are encouraged to pre-register. Returning studE!l1 s will receive registration time appointments

to pre- register for tall and summer terms and fo r J-term and spring term. Reg i s t ra tion d les are det r m i n d by the number of hOUTS, incl ud i ng transfer hours) completed by the student. Student may register for each new term or summer session on or aft r the de ig nated da te. EARLY REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR ENTERING STUDENTS Ea rly registration for entering students occurs d uri ng June or January, depe nd i ng on whether students begin in the fa l l or s prin g semester: Early registration is condu c t e d by the Admis­

sions Office. Regist ration materi als are se nt to a l l accepted e n tering srudents well in advance of the i r arrival on campus for their first semester.

22

P

A

C

,

F

'

C

l

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

5

I

T

Y


Mo t stude n ts haw the opportunity to work per onally with an adviser as they plan their s hedules. A l im i te d number of student> may register by mail, Gnd their ourse sdections are verified by a cOlmselor.

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES Students may regi ter by using the computerized Ide- registra­ tion system acces ible from any o ne - generating telephone or by usi ng Banner Web. an onl i ne registration ystem . In addition to registering, tele- regislrnt io n and Banner Web also offer students the ability to add or d rop a dass, check thei r schedules. and access fmal grades. The p h o n e

n u mber for tele-r gistration is 2 53/ 35-8935. Banner Web rna be accessed th rough the PLU h o me page ( ww.p l u.ed u) . Students may contact the Stude n t Service Center wit h r gist ral i o [] que lions. tude ntli are not o ffi c ia l ly enrolled until their registration has been cleared by lhe Stu de n t Accounll om e. St ude n ts are resp n s ib le for se lec tin g their courses. Advisers are availabl e to a-si t with planning and to make su ggest ions. Stude n ts sh ould be th o ro ughly a cqua im e d witb all registrat ion mate ri a ls, in luding the current catalog and special i nforma t i n sent by the Admissions Office. S tud en t are also encouraged to study ca refu lly the requiremen ts of all academic programs in which they may �ve ntua Uy declare a major. •

8 hours. A normal course load during the J a n uary term •

section of this catalog for application procedures. •

Students who wish to regis ter fo r 18 or more hours in a semester are require d to have at least a 3.00 grade p oi n t average or consent of the provost. St ud e n t s e n g a ged i n considerable oL llside work may be restricted to a reduced academic load.

An unde rgraduate student may repeal any cour ·t. The cumula ­ tive g rade point average is computed usi ng th e highest of th gra des earned. Credit toward graduation is allowed o n l y once. a mathemat ics or a forci!,," l angua g course listed as a prerequisite i f taken after a higher-level c urse. For xample, a student who has co mp let ed Spanish 201 cannot later receive credit � ( Spanish 1 02.

Students are grad ed acco rdi ng to the foll owing designations: Grade

A-

4.00 3.67

Yes

3.00 2.67 2.33

Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

3.33

B+ B

�it Awarded

Points per Hour

Excellellt

A

Good

BC+ C Satisfactory 2.00 1 .67 C1 .3 3 D+ Poor 1 .00 D

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE if a student does not wish to co nt in ue a course after the add/ d rop peri od, the student must w i t hd raw from the COlLeSe. Tuition

0E

Yes

Yes Yes

Yes Yes

0.67 0.00

Fail

No

The grades Ii ted below are not u I'd in �alcul ting grade point ave rages. No grade points ar earned u nder these designations. Grad.

Description

Credit Awardad

P

Pass Fail I ncomplete I n Progress Aud it With d rawal

Yes

WM

M dical W ith drawal

No

UW

Unofficial Withdrawal

No

F I

IP AU

W g rad e will appear on the student's grade report and transcript.

See the January term alld slimmer en ta logs for the last dares to

with draw durillg

W

those terms.

0

No No No No

Pass (P) and FaD ( F) grades are awarded to students who select the pa s/fa i l option or wh{, are enrolled in exclu jve pas s/ fai l courses. These grades do not affect a student's grade point

determined that a student neva attended a course, the r e gi stra­

average.

tion will be cancelled without notation on the trans- r i p t.

(1) grades indi ate that st ud en t did not complete their work be�ause of ircumstances beyond their control. To receive credit, an incomplete must be converted to passing g rade within th first · i:x weeks of the followi ng semester. Incomplete grades that are not conve rted by removal are chan ged to the gr ad e indicated by the in l ructor when the incomplete was s u bm itted. An i ncom p lete is not a permanent g ra de . An incomplet does not entitle a tudent ro attend class again witllOut reregiste ring.

WITHDRAWAL PROM THE UNIVERSITY

Studen ts are entitled to withdraw honorabl y from the university if their record is satisfactory and all finandal obligati on s are satisfied. Partial tuitio n re funds are availahle. Refcr to the " Ttlition and Fees" sectioll

of this catalog for mo re illformation.

Medical Withdrawal: Stude n t s may also completely w ith draw from the university for a term for medical reasons. The student

must provide written evidence from a physician and a personal explanation to the vice president and dean for student l ife. This

m us t be co m p l eted in a timely manner and in no case later than the last day of class in any given term. If g ra nted . the grade f WM will appear on the student's g ra de repo rt and transcrip t. STUDENT COURSE LOADS

The normal COUIse load fo r undergraduate students during fail and spring semesters is 13 to 1 7 h ours per semester. includ i ng physical education. The minimum full-time course lo ad is 1 1 hours. he m inimum full - time l oad for graduate students i

"0 :ID

THE GRADING SYSTEM

add i ng nd droppi ng can be acco lp[i hed usin g tele-registration r Banner Web. See tlte !aulUlry term and summer cata logs for th addldrop periods for those ferms.

UnoffidaJ Withdrawal: A student w ho stops attending a course before the end of the twelfth week but does not withdraw may receive an lll10fficial withdrawal. The g ra de of UW will appear on the student's gr ade report and transcript. If it catl be

n

o C :ID m VI

Credjt is not all wed for

d rop pe d and tuition will be refu n ded in full. In most cases,

Official Withdrawal: To w ithdraw official ly, the student n eed s to obta in a withdrawal form from the Student Serv ices Center, fill in the form, bave the instructor sign the for m , and submi t the co mp let ed form t o the Stud e n t Services Center. Withdrawal forms must be submitted be fo re the end of the twelfth week. A

> n » o m

o n 1ft

CREDIT RESTRICI10NS

Adding or Dropping a Course: A st udent may add or drop a our e at any time during t h e fir t ten da of class du ring a full­ length semester. During the add/drop p e r iod . course may be

i not refunded. A $50 administrative fee i charged for any registration change after th add/ d ro p period.

is

hou rs with a maximum of 5 hours. in o rd e r for a student to take a ful l .ourse load, the student must be form al ly admitted to the university. See tlte "Admissio ll"

4

In(:omplete

Medical Withdrawal (WM ) is entered when a course is not co m p l eted due to medical cause. A medical wi tl, drawal does not affect a studen t 's grade poi n t a ve rage. See Withdrawn /from the Un iversi ty. previously listed. In Progress (rp) signifies progr s in a cou rse which norma lly runs more than one semester to o mp le tio n . f n Progress carries no credit until replaced by a permanent grade.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

23


The Registrar's O ffice reserves two grade desi gna ti ons for

ACADEMlC STANDING POLICY The fo l lo win g t rm s ar u cd to d e s c rib acaJem i st a ndi ng at PLU. Academic stan d ing is d te rm i ned by the C ommi t tee fo r the Ad missi o n a.nd Reten t ion o f Studen ts, whjch re s e r ve s the right to review any stlld�l1 t'S record to de te rm i n e academic standing.

excep t ion al circumsta nces. These special Regist rar's O ffice no ta tions are de scr i b e d below:

Oti<rlptlon

Grad ..

NG

w

u

w

Credit Award.,d

Grade Submitte d

No

no fficia l Withdrawal

UW

U o II: �

o

No

Good Standing: A l l s t llden e n ro l l ed at the un ivers ity arc expected to s tay i n good academic stanJing. Good s ta n d i ng req u i res a semester grade p oi n t average of 2.00 or higher fo r the

No Grade (NG ) is a te mpora ry grade en tered by the Reg ist ra r's O[fi e hen no grade h as been submitted by the established deacUin .

im med.iare past

Unofficial Withdrawal ( UW) may be enLered when a co u rse is nut co m pl e te d because of a s t uden t 's non t te nd a nce i n the days before the withd rawal deadli ne. See With drawal from the UII;versity, p r ev i o u s l y l i s t e d .

at tem p ted i ll

The Pass/Fall Option: The pa s s/fa il op t io n p e rm it s snldents to exp lor e s u bj e ct a re a s o u t s i d e t h ei r kn own abi l it ie by e x p e r i en c ­

revi e w for academic s t atus those st u d en ts who fai l to m a i n t a i n satisfactory ac ade m i c progress. Th . co m m ittee h al .! rcgul rly

f study. Grade of A+ th ro u g h

- are

The pass/fail option is l i m ited to

8

Only one ourse may be taken p ass/fai l in fu l fi ll ment of ge n e ra l L1ni ersity or c o re requir m e n t s or of the College of Arts and he pa s/fai l option may not be app l i ed to a co urs taken fo r fulfillment of a major or m i nor prograllL An excep tio n to this a llowed f-or one course in t he major or mino r field if it was

the eighth week. he pa�s/ fail opt io n is L i m i te d to u n dergraduat

s t ud d 1 ts only.

Exclusive Pass/ Fall Courses: Some co urses only award pass/fail grades. The goa l s of these courses are typically co ncerned with ap precia t ion, value co mmitment, or crea tive ach ievement. Exclusive pas / fa i l cou rses do not m eet major or un iversity re q ui remen ts without fac ulty ap proval. If a t ud e n t takes an

excl us ive pass/fai l course, the student's individual pass/ fa i l

option is not affi:cted . CLASS A'ITENDANCE The u n iversity assume that a ll re g istered s tud e n t s have free l y

accep ted personal re 'pon ibUily for regular lass atte ndance.

Cours grades re fle c t the quality of studen ts' aca d e mi c perfor­ m a nce a s a whole, which normally i ncludes re g u i ar part i c i pa tio n i n t he t t al class experience a n d is evalu a ted acco rd i ngly. Absences m I' lead to a reduction of a stud nt's fi nal grad . In the event of un avo idabl e ab ence, s t ud e n t s are expected to

i n form t h e i n t ru c to r. A ign m ent of make-up

\

o rk , if any, is a t

the ruscrerion of t h e instructor.

A.CADEMIC HONESTY Both t h e value and the s Ll cce ss of any academic act i v i ty, as well a t b e n t i re acad e mi C enterprise, have depended for ccnluri s on tbe f�undamen ta l p r i n c i p le of absolute honesty. The u n ive rs i t y

e..'qJect al l i ts fac ul t y and st ud e nts to hOllor this princi p le scrupulously.

ince academic dishonesty is a se.rious b reach of the u n i ve r­ s al ly recognized code of academic ethi c s , it is every faculty member's obl igatio11 to i mpose approp r i ate sanction fo r any demonstrable i nst ance of such m iscon du ct 011 the part of a stude n t .

The un i versity's p olicy o n academic

i.ntegrity and its p roce­

d ures for d e alin g with academic m is cond u c t are detailed in th e

Student Hcmdbo ok .

po i n t average was less than 2.00, whose cumulat ive g r ade poi nt average is 2.00 or h igher, a n d who e academic progress is satisfa tory are p l ace d on

A

C

I F I C

c ademi c wa

n in g a nd se nt wa rn i ng

letter . Stu de n ts whose cumulative and semester grade p o i n t av rage are below 2.00 at the e nd

f t h ei r first 'emester a t P LU

are also p l ace d on academic warn i n g.

Probation: S tu den ts other than first semest r s t ude nt s ar p l aced on probation if their cumula.tive grade p o i n t a e rage fails below 2 .00, or if they have been on warn i ng in t he p re v i ous

seme.ster and have fa i led to return to goo d academic sta D d i ng , o r ( a t the discretion o f t h e Committee for th e Admission and

tudents) if th y hal' faile I to mainta i n satisfactory academ ic progress. Probationary s t ud ents must meet with th . director of advising b e fo re th tenth day of a probationar y semester to draw up a plan for improving the i r academic work. Academic probation is noted on the t ranscr i p t. Fa i lu re to satisfactorily c o m pl e t e each co u rse attempted in a probationary semester may result i n dismi ssal from the un iversity. Fa i l u re to co mplete i ncludes wi thd rawals, i n compl.etes, and grades o f E or F. A proba tioll plm! lila), specify requ irements agreed all by the str/(lellt ilnd director ofadvis1ng: assign mell t to i< probationary adviser, specified COli tact with the advis r, iimitlltiotl ofcredit loa d, limitation Oil work or activit ies, registratioll ill a study sk ills class, elc. Capii!5 oJ the agreement a re sellt to tire slIlriel1t GIl d probationary adviser. At the el1d of the semester, the adviser retums one copy to the director of advisitlg h!dicatil1g whether o r tlot the student has ma de an effort to meet the terms of the probat ionary agreement. This copy is filed itl the Office of the Registrar and may be used to make decisions regardirlg comin­ lied probatiol1 and academic dismissal. Reten tion o f

Continued Probation: Students who se cumulative gr a de point averages ar e still b e l ow 2.00 after a p robationary se mes t er, but whose l ast sem ster g rade p oi nt averages are above a re otherwi

e

2.00 and who

in go d standing, rna be granted one a d di ti o nal

semester of p ro ba t ion at the ruscretion of tbe

Co mm i tte e for the

Admission and R ten tion of Stud nts. Such stud nt must participate in the p robationary semester p rog ra m . Fail ure to

satisfacto rily co m plet e each cOll1'se attempted in a probationary s emeste r may re sul t in

di

missal from the university. Fail u re to

complete includes withdrawals, incompletes, and grade s of E or F.

P

the seventh w e e k of each fal l a nd

s

Academic Warning: S t udents whose mo st rec nt semester g ra d e is

taken before the majo r or mi n o r was c1edar d. • Students must fill' the i r intention to exercise the passlfail option with the Student Service. Ce nt e r no later tban t he mid­ po i nt of t h e cours . I n a full-length semes t e r, this is last day of •

In

mester, instructors may choose to se nd w a m i ng letters to students do i n g work below level ( 2.00) in their c lasses. No transcript n r a t ion is made, and a adem i c stancling i s not a ffec ted . sp ri ng

ciences req uirement.

iden t i fy uell studen ts, review their records, consider ex te n uat i ng ircurnstances, aud decide whether or not the · t u d e n t s shall be

M idterm Advisory Letters:

redit hours ( re ga rdle s o f

repeats, pass or fail . •

a ca d e m ic year. Failure to complete i n chl des

placed on academic prob, t io n .

regarded a pass; b rrades of D+ th rough E are rega rded as ra j!. Pass/fail gra d es do not affec t the gra d e poi n t aver age . •

an

wid1drawals, incom p letes, a n d grades of • or P. Th Co m m i ttee for th Ad m ission and Retent io n of Srllde.nts re.senfes t h e right to

ing courses without co mp et i n g di rect l y with students who are

special izing in those areas

24

semester, a nd s a t i s factory academic progress.

Satisfactory Academic Progress: Sa t isfac tory academ ic p rogress shal l be defined as co mpletion of at least 75% o r cred i t hours

l U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I V E R 5 I T Y


Academic Dismissal; Student not in good �tnoding at the end J

probati onary semest e r are dis missed from th e un iversity.

They ma . apply for reinstatement by peti ti ning the o m m i t le e for the Ad m ission and Retent io n of Students ( i n c a re of the

dire c t o r

of adv'

ing). If the pe t i t i

n

is app ro ved, the rei n stated

student is on p robati n a nd must partic ipat

in t h e probationary emester program. If the petition i ' d e n ied , tbe stu den t may petition aga i n after one 'emester u nless otherwise i n formed. Students a re d ism issed for academic reaso ns after each fa ll and spring sem e otero

Second Academic Dismissal: A read m i t ted st u d en t wh o fai l s to attain a

2.00 cum ulati

e grade poin t · erage in the sem e ster after

rei nstatemen t. but whose sem ste g r ade point verage is above

2 .00.

m ay be granted

additional semester of p ro b at ion at the di cret ion of th Com m i ttee for the Ad mi 'sion a n d Retention of S t ude n t s . If a semester gr ade p oi n t average of 2.00 is not earned in the p robationary sem ter. or if a tudent fails to achieve a 2.00 cumula tive grade poi n l average aft r a S cand p robationary se mest e r, the student is di m is s ed a se co n d time and may not ap p l y for re i nstat m e n t until one ful l se mester has passed , and then only l( new e v i de nce is presented indicating the student's p robable . u e S . Tbis rule also appl ies to a r eadmi tte d stude nt who attains g (l d standing and is th ... n d ism is ed a second t i me for academic reasons. ant'

I!LlGmillTY FOR STUDENT ACTMTIES ( 1 2 hours or mo re) is eligible fo r participation in un ivers ity activities. Limi tation on " studen t's a ct ivit ies based upon academic performance may be se by in dividual sch oo l s, d epar t me nts , or o rganizati ns. A stu de n t on acade mic p r o b at ion is not eligible fo r ce rtlfication

Graduation HODors: Degrees w i t h h o n o rs of Cllm laude. magl1a cum laude. and summa wm laude are g ra n te d. A student mLlst

earn a cumulative g rade point average of 3. -0 fo r fo r magna

participation in othe r ext racurricular activit ies.

Dean's List: A De' n' List is created To be eligible.

recogn ition

Non -Deg ree Ullde rgmduates: undergrad uate ludent who are attending part - t i me for

maximum of B hours but are n o t

officially admitted to a degree p ro gra m.

a

a

semest r grade

mi n i mum of 12 graded hours.

of a s tu den t's co mmitment to the liberal arts was

m o

or gan iz ed i n 1 969 by Phi Beta Kappa

c:

members o f t h e fac ulty to encou rage and recognize excel le n t scholarsh ip in tbe liberal

3. 70;

• •

high grade p i nt ave rag e ( fo r seniors, normally above for j uniors, n oml al ly above 3.90) ;

at t ai n e d a

completed l l O credi t hoUts in l iber al studies; demonst rated the equivalent of two years of col lege work in forei gn lan guage ;

completed ne year of college mathematics

( including statis tics

or computer scienc ) o r fo ur ears of col leg pre parat ry math­

ematics in high scho o l and one college •

co mp l ted

a

mathematics COllrse;

and

m in i m u m of thre e seme ters in res iden ce at the

un iversity. The univ rsity a l so has c hapters of

a

number of national

honor societ ie.� on campus, i n cluding th e following:

AJpha Psi Ome ga ( D r a m a )

B eta Gamma S i gm a (B u sin ess ) -Iu Phi Epsil n ( Music) P i Kappa Delta (Forensics)

Omicron Delta Epsi l o n ( Eco nomics ) igma Theta Tau (

u rsi n g )

Undergraduate Fellows: A l imit d number of u n d rg raduate fe l lows

a re a p p ointed an n uall y. These appoin tments are g ive n to encouraging reci p i ­

outstanding sen io r students with a view t

en ts to consider co l l ege teach ing a s a career. A n lmdergra dua te fellow is given a variety of opport u nities to sample the profes­ sio n a l life and work of a faculty memb . r in h is or her major d iscipl ine . A tuit ion credit accompanies the appo i n t ment.

Students are p enni t te d , wi t h i n li mits, to obtain c red it by exa mi ­ n at io n in l ieu of regul ar

officially ad mi t ted to a degre program.

more th a n 30 semester hoLUS may be co un ted toward gra dua­

HONORS Pr gram to

st udents seeki ng a sp eci al academic cha l ienge i n classes with

equally capable pe rs. Inc m ing fr shmen may apply for a cou rse of study that i: ncl ud es

a min imwn f 26 hours o f honors- level

gram cente rs

the theme ''Taking Respons i bil­ ity: Matters o f the M ind, Matters of the Heart" nd integrates academic and experiential lea rning opportuni ties . with the obj ect i e of preparing p a rt ic ipants for l ives of serv ic e and servant leadershi p. See the "HOllars Progra m" section of this ourses. The p

'"

junior are more st r in gent . Students must have:

attend ing par t-t ime for a maximum o f 9 hou rs but are not

university Honors

m

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION (CHALLENGE)

NOli-Degree G raduate St udents: graduate tude nts who are

Honor Program: PLU offers its

::a:I

rt�. St u de n t members a re elected by

the fa ulty fe l l ows of th society each sp r i ng. Both j unior and seniors are el i gi b l e; however, the qualificat ions fo r election as a

requirements and have been a ccepte d into t he D ivision of

student must have a tt a i ned

w o rk . The s oc ie t y

Graduate Studi es.

m

n

the e.nd of each semester.

at

together with a reco rd of high ach,ievement in relevant course

Freshmen: stu d ents who h ave met freshman entrance

}rmi{)rs: stud.cnt� who have satisfactorily comp let ed 60 hours. "eniors; stu d en ts who have sati factorily co m pleted 90 hours. Gradullte Stude"ts: studen ts who h ave met graduate en t rance

3.75

HODor Societies: Ekct i o n to the Arete Society is a sp ' c ia i

ms.

a

p i n t average of 3 . 5 0 with

CLASSIFICATIONS OF STUDENTS

30 h

laude.

ing g r ad ua t i on honors.

Sophomores: sr uden ts who have sat isfactorily compl ted

cum

for Sl�mma cum lallde. All transfer

Physical education activity co Llrses are not included ill determin­

requi rements.

3.90

laude. iln d

g rades are combined with PLU grad s to determine eligibili ty.

Any re g u l ar l y enrolled, full- rime tudent

in intercollegi te co mpet i t i n and may be a dvi ed to cur ta il

ml1l

on

cata/o, for further details.

Honors at £ntrance: These hon o r s are confe r red ar Open ing Convocation on the most highly q ual ified entering fresh men .

ertificates. which are mailed in early M y to h igh scho o ls for presentat ion to recipients, recog n ize o u t standi ng high sch ool achievement a nd anticipate l1 peri or pe rformance at the un iversity level . These awards have no m netar y val ue and do not cons t it ut e accep tance into the H o nors Program.

n w l l ment and cia

attendance. No

tion, whether from the Collegt Level Exa m inat i on Program (CLEP) or any otb e r exam ination. Exceptions to this rule for ertain gr ou p s

f t udents o r p rograms may be made, subject to

reco mmendation by th appr val by th

Educati onal Poli ci

Co m m i ttee and

fa culty. C r edit by exam i nation is open to

formally aJmitt d, regular ta tus "ludent.

illy and does not

cou n t toward the residency requirement for gradua ti n. To rece ive redit by e amination . . tud nts must complete Credit By Exanlination Regis t ration Form avail able in the

a

S t udent S e rvi ces Cen ter. obtain the signature of the res pec tive depart men t chair or

d

an, and arrange for tht! exa m i nat i

tbe appropriate i nst ructor.

n with

he c mp leted for m must be

returned to the Student Se rvices Cen te r befo re the examination is taken. G rades fo r credit by exam ination will be

su bmitted by

the instructo r along with aLI other grades at the end of the term. EP g neral exam imHions are

given el ctive c redit only. The

various schools. division', and departments det er m i ne the peci­

fi CLEP ubject exa m i n atio n s whidl may fulfill requirements for maj ors, p rogram s , or general univerSity reqllireme n ts in t h e ir rcsp ctive a ademic areas. These exa mi nat io n s are su bj ec t to

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nun n da t it 05 by t he Educational Policies Co m m i ttee and approval by t h e faculty. The m i n i m u m passing l evel. for CL.EP exa mi na t io n s taken at Padfic Lut hernn n.iversiry is th fift i et h percell t il e. 'L P creilits gran ted by other un iversit ies, colleges, and commu nity col leges, wruch are earned hefore entrance, a re h onored by Pa jlic LuthC'ra n U n ivers i ty. The appl ication of those c red i ts towa rd m aj ors , p rog ra ms , a nd gene ral university requirements is co nsiste n t with sc hool , divisional , and d ep a rt ­ ment policies and standards. h e un iwrsi ty does not grant credit for college-level gen ral equivalency d i p l o m a ( ED) tests.

ree

NON-CREDIT INFORMAL STUDY

w o

To nco u rage l i be ral learn in g of all ki nd s, above and beyon d

c( u

univer i t y offers

c(

enrollment in co urses lead.ing toward fo rmal d grees , the

var i ety of opportwlities for in formal study:

Guest of University Status: ea hers and o fficials f ather institutions, visiting scholars a nd arti 'ts, nd ather p ro fessi o n al persons who wish to use university faci l ities for indepen den t study may apply to the provost for cards desi gn a ti ng guests of the u n ivers ity.

ud, persons,

them as

f academic a nd per on al writing, to

read different ki n d s of texts m o re crfectively, and t

organ ize the powers of dear thought a n d expression. The un iversit y's co m m i t me n l to exc lIent wr i ti n g i r Ae ted in the Writing enter, Ivhere t ra i ned s tudent consul tan ts from a var i e t y f d is c i pl i n es help studen ts o f va ry i ng abil itie b y read i ng and responding to paper s still in draft. All fac u lty members share the res p onsibility for improv i ng the l i teracy of lheir tuden ts. Fa ulty in ev ry d e pa r t m e n t and school make wr i t i ng all essent i al pa rt of thei r cou rses a n d show st ude n ts how t ask q ues tio n s a pp rop r i a te to t h l;! k inds of read in g done in the i r fi el d s . Students write both formal papers and rep o r t s and informal fl otes and essays i. n order to master t he conten and m thod of th va rio us discip l i ne . They are e nco u raged to prepare i mpor tant paper in m ultiple d raft s . Be , li se errors are a d.istraction and a symptom of care l e ss ­ nes in aLI d iscip l i n 5, tude n ' in all cour 'S a re ex pec ted to observe the conven tio n s o f formal E ngl isb i n their finished work. But l iteracy is m o re tb n co rrectness. t Pacific ulheran Un i ve rsit y re a d i n g and wr i t i ng are part o f the pro ess of libe ral education.

in their use of facilities,

will defer La the needs of students and raculty members.

Auditiug Courses: To audit a co u r se is t.o emoli, with t he pe rm iss i o n of the in tructor, on a n o n - c red it basis. An a uditor is encou raged to pa rt ici p a te ful l y in class a ct iv i ti es bot is not held

Genera l Un iversity Requirements The un iversity is comm it ted to pro iding a base for all i t ba

S

o ug l i beral arts

alauIeate degr't' procrrarns. A cc o rd i n g l y, i n

accountable fo r exam inations or other written work a nd does n ot receive grade. [f th i nstru c t r approve', the co ur, e m ay b entered upon the tramcript as AudiL W i th the app roval of the instructor or [he department. the student may gai n credit or an a udited course by pas i n g an exam i nat ion se t by the instructor or the d epar t m en t . Audit fees are the same as credit fees.

add ition t o fulfilling certa in m i n i m u m requirements, " undergraduate students must satisfactori ly compLete a l l general university r quirements ( GURs) . No cour e usc I to satisfy one GUR may be used to satisfy another, excep t l imited such use in the Perpsective on Diversity req u i rem nrs.

Visiting Classes: M embe rs of the academic co m m u n ity are encouraged to visit cl a sses wh ich i nterest th e m. No fee is charge

DEGREES

� r lht: privilege. Because regularly enrolled tudents m ust b given fi rs t consideration, p e rso n $ desiring to visit cl asse s are required to ask pe rm i ss i on of the instructor. Visi to r s are guest s of the classe and must conduct t hemselves accord i ngly.

GRADUATION Students expecting to fulfil l degree re qu i rem en ts with i n he academ i year ( incl ud in g

August )

Ie re qu i red to file

n

app licat ion (or grad ua tion with the Office of the R gistrar

accord i ng to the following: DEGREE COMPlET10H

BACHELOR'S AND MASTER'S DEADUNE

l, 2000

May 200 1

N . vem b r

A ugust 200 1

March 1 , 200 I May \ , 200 \ May 1 . 200 \

D etember 2001 January

2002

the December commencement. T h e act ual dat e of graduation

transfer back to Pacific Lutheran

University or a degree (math. physic , engineering programs) must apply for gr ad u ation b for or d u ri ng th

semester of their j un ior year so that defic iencies may be met before th ey leave ca m p us . first

WRITING THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULUM Pacific Lu th eran Un.iversity i a co m m u nity of scholars, a

community of reade rs and writers. Read i ng informs the intellect and liberate the imagination. Wr i ting pervade our academic

lives as teachers and students, both as a way of om m unica t ing what we l earn and a s a means o f s api n g thought n d ideas. COLIC

s designed to ful fill

tbe un iversity wr i ting requi rement, cou rses in which students

P

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F I C

L U T H E R A N

T h e Examined Life: [nto Uncertainty a nd Beyond The freshma.n ye r p rog ra m provide a s u p po rti ely challe.ng­ ing context in which to be gin the ques t or, ancl adventure of, a larger vision for life. n ive rs i. ty edu ation is about more than skills; at PL i t is about lib 'rati n g students for c r i t i cal and commhted l iv i n g, combining well- developed c ritical capacit ies with co mp assion nd vision for service in a m u lticu ltu ral, ideologi al l y plural world. [n add it i o n Lo o r ie n r ation and advising p ro g ra ms, the fres h man year program is composed o f tb ree cour es. One f tne two e m i nars must be taken in the studen t's tir t semester. Fres h m an year progra m requirement m ust be co m p lete d

These e m i nars focus on writing, thinking, speak in g , and

will be r co rded on the pennanen t reco rds.

Our emphasis on li teracy begi ns wi th

1. The Freshman Experience

I a. Inqui ry Seminar: Wri ting ('1 hour)

fall emester. January, and pri n g semester). Degrees are f< rmally conferred at Augu t, December, and May comm emcnts. Studen t� with J,ll1 uary degree dates are exp cted to take part i n

Students who p l a n to

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS - ALL BACCALAUREATE

during the rodent's freshman y ar.

There are fo u r degree-comple l ion dates (end of s u m mer Sf. si n,

26

learn to u e var i o u s kinds

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reading. They involve w rj t i ng a a wa I of thinking, of learn i ng , and o f discovering and orderin g ideas. Ta ught by faculty from the un iversity' various departme n ts and sc h oo l . , these semi nars are organized around topics that ngage stu den ts and faculty in dialogue and provide the opp rtunity to examine i ss ues [rom a variety of pe rspe tives.

NOTE: Credits earl/eli by AdvQ llcai PilICt'r'lT <" lI-English ilnd Internalionn/ Bacca/au reate-Ellglish '/0 IlOt satisfy tilis req l,ircment, though they may be uJed for elective credit. SllIdCU15 with officially rrallsCTipted college writi Ng course;, hre/wiillg those in \'VCIS/J illgton StClte's Run ning Slnrr program, are /lOl1ctlteiess eii "ible to enroll ill the IVritil1g st'milrar/ur credit, or they II/ny chaos!! to ILse their previolls credirs to satisfy th writing semillar n.:quirement. I b. Inq uiry Seminar: Crilicnl Canversa t ion (2 bo urs ) These se m in ars involve l ea r ni ng how to p art i c ipat e in the exch a nge of ideas through the expe r ience of art ic ulatin g ques t i on s , l isten i ng for meaning and nuance in what others w ri te and say, seeing ideas a nd po itions i n c ntext, arguing, moving to consensus, and l iving wilh conll icL Like the la


FRESHMAN EXPERIENCE

CORE R E QU I R E M E NT S

OTHER G U Rs

! 1 0-1 2 HOURS)

EITHER CORE I OR COR E II

(20 28 HOURS)

WRIT 1 0 1 - Inquiry Seminar. Writing (4) CRIT 1 1 7 - C rit ical Conversation (2 or 4) Freshman }anuary Term (4)

Core I - Distributive and Disdplinary (32 hours)

Art, Music, Theatre (4) literature (4) Philosophy (4) Religious Studies (8) Anthropology, History. or Poli ica l Science (4) Economics. Psychology,

SOCio logy, or Social Work (4)

Core I f

Intemallonal Core: of the Contemporary World (28 hours) INTC 1 1 1 - AuthOrity and

Sci e nce and the Method 4)

-

Liberty and Power (4)

Four 200-level t hem a t IC courses ( 1 6) One 300-level Course (4)

Natural Sciences, Computer Science. or Mathematics (4)

w r i t i ng seminar , th ese semin, rs are taught by faculty from various dep a rt men ts and s c hoo l s . All are numbered 1 1 71 1 9 i n t.heir resp ctive departm . nts. "'''h en t a ug h t in J a n ua ry, these seminars are 4 hours. I c. Freshman ]£l IlIIary Term (4 hours) These co u rses fulllJ l one of the other ge ne ral u n iver itv requirements a n d are desi g n ed both for fre h man students and t o take advantage of the format of th January term.

2. One of two Alternative Cores: Core I or Core D Core I: TIle Distribt4 1 i ve Core (32 /zours) a. Arts/Literatu re (8 hours, 4 from each L in e ) I. Art, Mu sic, or Theatre 2. Literatu e (Engli.sh or Languages and Literatures) b. Phil s op h y (4 hours) NOTE: Log il" collrses do !lorfulfill this req"iremellt. c. Religious tudies (8 hours, 4 from eac h f two l i n e s) I . Bib lical St die.s 2. Christian Thought, H i s to ry, and Exp ri.:nce 3. l ntegrative and Comparative ReL i gi ou s Studies NOTE: Trr",s!er studel/tj filtering as jUl/iors or seniors !Ire rl!iJllired to take 4 semester hours of religion (from lilies I or 2) unless prese/lting Ii tran fer hours of re1ig iorl from ntlre r a crtditu/ cnlleges or universrties.

d. Social Sciences (8 hour , 4 fro m each l i ne ) J. An th ropolog y, H i story, or Pol itical Science 2. Econo m ics, Psychology, S ciology, or Social Work e. Natural Sciences, Co m p u t r Sci en ce, Mathematics (4 hours) Cor IT: The Tntematiollal Core: In tegrated Studies of the Co trtemporary a..

World (28 Iwurs)

INTC 1 1 L , 1 1 2 O r ig i ns of the Contemporary World

(8 hours) b. Four 200-level INTC cour es ( J 6 hou rs ) . Normally take n in the second and th i rd years. May include app roved prograrn of s t u d y abroad. Students select four cou rses subject to ap proval of the I nternati onal Core Committee. c. On 300-level lNT COIlIse (4 hours) 3. Mathematical Reasoning (4 ho urs) A co u rse in mathematics or application of mathematics, with e mp h asis o n n u mer ical and logi cal reason i n g and on using appropriate methods to formulate and sol ve pr blems. This req u irem en t may be satisfied by any 4 hours from mathemat­ ics (excep t Math 91 or M a th 99) or by Co mp ute r Science 1 1 5 or b y Statistics 2 3 1 . This requireme.nt may als b e sa tisfied by t he completion (with at lea s t a B average) of the e qu iva le n t of fo ur yea rs of c liege preparatory matllemaLics ( through mathemati al a n alysis or ca l c u lus or equivalent ) . I n fulfil l in g the mathematical reasoning requirement, s t u dent s with d o umented d i abilities witi b e given reasonable ac ommoda­ tions as deter-mined by th e coordinator [or students with

(4)

Scientific

n

Wr iting (4). unless taken In freshman year Perspectives on Dlv rsity (6-8 ) Alternative Perspectives Cross-Cultura I P erspect ives Physical Ed ucatio (4) Senior Seminar/Project i n Major (2-4)

Djscovery (4)

111

m

Mathematica l R eason i n g

-

Integrated Stud ies

INTC

» n » o

disabili ties and the appropriat

'"

o c � m III

faculty member in consu.lta­

ti n with th� s.tudent

4. SdCDGe and the Scientific Metbod (4 hours) sci nce course th at teaches the metl.ods tlf science, illus­ trates i ts ap plica t ions a n d limitations, and i ncl udes a labor a ­ tory component. Al leas t o n of the courses taken to meet line 4 or � (Core I, e) must be ;] course in which Lhe subject is natural scien es, i.e., p h ysi l or biological seien e. S. Writing Requirement (4 hours) All s t ude nt s mu ' l co mp lete 4 cred i t ho urs i n an 3 ppro ved writing course. Fr hmen sat isf)' Ihi requ iremen t t hrough th e Inquiry Seminar: Writing.

6. Perspectives Oa Divers.lty (6-8 hours) A ourse in e eh of the fol lowi n g (wo l i n es . fhe o n ly 2-hour courses that can sati 'fy eil r tlf the fol lowi n g roe .. co mpl etel y . are the treshman Critical Conversation se m. i n a rs ( 1.B) . a.. Alternative Perspectives (2-4 hours): A course w h ich creates an awareness and u nderstanding of diversity i n the Unit ed , tates, dir ctly addressing issues such as cth 11 icity, gender, di ability, r aci sm , o r poverty. b. Joss- Cll itu mi Pe rspectI ves (2-4 ho urs): A course tll t e n ­ hances cross -cul tural understandi ngs t h ro ugh exarninatio n of o th er cultures. This require m en t may be s at isfied in one of t hree ways: (i) a course focus ing on the uit ure of n o n -Eu ro- America n societies ; ( i i l a 201 or h igh e r-l evel course in a language used to satisfy the admiss ion require­ ment, or 8 credits in a la ngua ge not previously studied , except sign language (Th ese language co urses may also be used il/ sa tisfying the Arts ami Scierrces Requiremerrt. Options

[ or II); o r (iii) participatio n in an appr ved semester- long st ud y abroad pr gram ( J anuary term p ro gr a ms are evalu ated individually).

NOTE: 2-4 /lOurs 01 Perspectives on Diversity courses may be used ro fUlftll Ilnother general unil'ersity requirement, The remain i"g 4 Irours must be a course that dol!S not simultaneously fulfill any otlll:r

general unil'ersity reqllirement. TI,ese 4 hours may, however, satisfy a req uirement ill tire major.

Junior al/d senior trat/sfer s/udt:rlls shall dther tab one Perspectives a ll Diversity course (4 credit hours) at PLU rlrat does not simullJJl/eously fulfill anot/,er general unil'ersity req uirement, or tlrey shall show tlrat they have satisfied botll tire allenrative

perspectives and cross-cultural perspectil'e5 /illes 0/ tl.t requirement.

7. Physical Educatioa

(4

hours)

Fom d i fferent p hys ical ed ucation act ivi ty courses, i nc l ud i n g PHED 100. One hour of cred it may be earned through a pp roved sports participation. All activi t i es are graded on the basis of , Pass, or Fail.

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ac cepted by transfer from an accredited com m u n i ty college. All community college cou rses are transferred as lower­ division credit.

O. Physical Education Cou rses: No more than eigh l l -hour physical "ducation activity

1 . Foreign Lang uage Req uirement: A l l candidates for B.A., B . S . ,

Ullder5llmdi nfS Re.gardjnfAllReauircment,. (l) Consult particular departmentlll sectiom of tire calnlogfor detailed specificatioll of courses that count for these reqrliremcmts. (2) For tlJOse lilies of tire general university require-mellls IVlliclt refer to academic disciplin es or units, selected courses olltside those Imits may COll11t for t/.e require­ ment IVhen approved botll by ti,e units and by tlrt committee overseeillg the gmeral university reqliiremMb.

r abo

b

take�n at PLU. :

The final 32 sem e teT h

t ra ns fe r credit may be applied during

c.

upper­

urs of a

a student 's linal 32

ho u rs in a de gree program. ( Spec ial progra ms such as 3- 1 . 3-2 nd em ster and January term exchange study a r

xduded

fro m t h is limitatio n . )

4. Acndelllic Major: A majo r m ust b e complete I a s d eta il ed by each scho l or department. At least 8 se m ester hours must b t aken

in residen

c.

5. Grades fo r Major Courses: Al l courses counted toward major or m i no r m ust b co m p leted with grades of C- or h igh�r nd with a cumulati e g r ade poin t average of 2 . 00 or h igh e r in

cour es. Dep rtments, divisions, h i g h er g rade requirement .

6.

r

Is may set

sell

44 Hour Limit: Not mo re than 44 ho u rs earned in o n e a plied to the B. A . or B. . egree . 7. Mus ic Ensem bles: Non- music maj rs may count toward gra d u atio n req uirements not mor than 8 sem ter h urs i n mu si c ensemble . departm en t may be

28

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ecrrespotldencelExtenslO1Z

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COll rses: A maximum of 24 hours in accred i ted correspondence or ension studies may be credited toward degree requirements, contingent on approval by the registrar.

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the Co l lege o f Arts and Science� (all B

., B.S . , B.A.

e e .,

B.A.P.E.,

p t io n I, ll, or IT! below:

.ompletion of one fo reig n lan g ua ge through the seco nd year

n. Complet ion th ro ug h the first year of co l lege level of a foreign language other than that used to sat isfy the foreign la nguage ent rance requi rement . Thi s o p ti o n may also b me t by satisfactory scores on a pr fi c i e n c y eX'aminatilln ad m i nis ­ tered by the PLU De pa rt men t of Languages and L i te r, tu res, lao Four semester hours in h i s to r y, literature, or la ngua ge ( a t the 20 [ l evel , or at any leve.! in a language olb r than that us d to satisfy the fo re i g n language en trance re qui reme n t ) in addition to co urses applied to th e general univedty require­ ments, alld fou r semester hours in symb oli c logic, math ­ ematics (courses numbered 1 00 or above), computer s ience, or ·tatistic in addition to cou rses ap pli e d to the general un iversit y requirements. o p tion s High school lal1guage used to sati fy any f the abo m us t have been completed with grades of ' o r higher. Courses used to satisfy e i ther category of Opti n I I I of th oll e ge of Arts and Sciences requi rernen may not also be used to

Departments, division , or .. hool5 may set

h i g h e r res ide n cy requL r menrs.

th se

language, or demonstrated eq uiva l e n t proficiency) , candidates i n

c o m plet ion of four years of high school study in ne foreign l a n guage or by . atisfactory scores on a profi iency examina­ tion ad m i n ister d by the PLU D partm nr f Lang ua <>e and Literatures .

tudent's p ro g ram I11U t be co mpl >ted in re idenc at PLU.

N

In addition to m eet ing the e n t rance re q uire ment in foreign

l an g u age ( two years of h i g h school languag�, one year o f all gc

of college level. This r q u i rernent may also be satisfied by

division regardless of subjec t mat ter parallels. At [east 20 of the minim um 40 se m este r hour of u ppe r-d iv Lion work mu s t

3. Filial Year i n Residellc

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS

I.

1 . To tal HOlm and Cu muia tilre C PA: A m in im u m of 1 2 8 semester hours m Llst be com pleted with a g ra d e point average of 2.00 ( 2 .50 i n the Schools f Business and Educat ion) . .2. Upper-Division (J u rses: A m i n imu m of 40 se m este r hours must be completed from courses numbered 300

B.A.P. E . , B.A.Ree., or B.S.P.E. deg rees m u st co mp le! one of three o p t io n s i nvo lv i ng a fo reign la nguage or speci fied al te rnat ive . See above and under College of11 r ts and Sciences.

and n.s.p.E. de g ree s) must meet

GENERAL REQUIREM ENTS AND UMlTATIONS - ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES: (All c redi t hours re� r red to in l istin g s of requirement are semester ho urs. )

Courses fro m two - year institutions are flot consi d e r d

courses may be coun ted toward

graduation.

capsto ne courses such as the Global Studies Research Sem ina r or the Honors Prog r, m Chal lenge Experience may ful fi H t h is req u i re m e nt .

cc: A. u

9. JOl11l1l unity College Cou rses: A m ax i m um of 64 hours will be

Senior Seminar/Project (2-1 hours a s des i g nated by- the academic unit of t he tudent's maj o r) A substantial p roj e c t , paper, p r ac t icum , or i n ternship t h at culminates and advances the program ,)f an acadt!mic majo r. The end pr duct I11U t be p re s e nt ed to an o p e n audience and c ritically eval ua ted by facult y in t h e student's field . With appr val of Ih s t udeIlt's ma jo r department, i n terdiscipl inary

Y

sati fy general u n ive rs it y requirem ents. Any college-level foreign l anguag course numbered 20 [ or above used to satisfy Option r and any co mpl e t i o n of college-level l a nguage th ro u g h [ 02 used to satisfy Option ll may also be used to s t is fy the Perspe rives on Diversity re q ui rement in Cro. s - Cu ltura l Perspecti es. Candidates for t h e B.A. in Englis h , for the B.A. in Ed ucati on with co n centration in Eng l is h , fo r the B.A. in Global Stud i es, fo r the B.B,A. in I n ternational Business, and for ele c t i on to t he Arete Society mu s t meet Option 1 above.


c m

m m

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Deg ree a nd Cou rse Offeri ngs Academic. Structure College of Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities

I

,

Division

'.

" of '0

Anthrop ology Ec o nomics History

R

Ma.rria� and Family Therapy

Chemistry

Political Sc ience Psychology So ciology and Social Work

Co mpu te r Science and Computer E.ngineering Ge05c i ences Mathematic;

Physics

School of the Arts Art

1

Degrees Offered Bachelor's Degrees

Languages nd Li teratur

Iigion Division of Natl.IrClI Sciences Bio logy

- �

ia/ Sciences

English Philosophy

_.�

Master's Degrees Master f Arts in Education M aster of ArtS in ducation with Init ia l Certification Master of Arts (Marriage and

Ba hel r of Arts

Bache lor of Science Bachelor of Arts in .ducalion Bach lor of Art in Physical Education

Family Therapy)

Bachelor of Arts i n Recreation Bachelor of Bus i ness

Busin ess Admini tration Master of Science in Nursing

Ma.ste r of

Adminislration Bachelor of Fine Arts B ,helor of Music

Bachelor of Music Educa t ion Bachelor of Musical ArtS Ba chelor cif Science in Nur ing Bachelor of Sc ience in Phys ical Edu cal ion

Co mmu nicati o n and Theatre Music

School of Business School of Education School of Nursing School of PhySical Education

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II' a:

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Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

The Americas

Electrical Engineering

Anthropology

Computer Science

Physics

Anthropology

English

Art

Economics

Political Science

Art

Literature

Coaching

Biology

English

Psyc hology

Biology

Pllblishing and

Darice

Chemistry

French

Rdigion

Business

Chinese Studies

Geosciences

Scandinavian Area

Chemistry

Classics

German

Studies

Communication

History

Chi nese Studies

Individualized

Social Work Sociology

Communication

Mathematics

Spanish

Critical Commun ication

II'

a:

o

Studies

Chinese (language)

Critical Comm. Stl/dies

Aquatics

Prin tillg Arts Writing

Exercise Scierlce Health

English as a Second Language Environmental Studies French

Health alld Fitrless Managemwt Recreatioll Sports Administration

Geosciences

Physics

German

Political Science

Global Studies

Psychology

Print/Broadcast JOLirnalislll

J\'!usic

P/lblic Relations

Norwegian

Pllblic Relations

Theatre

Philosophy

Computer Science Economics

Greek

Public Affairs

Education

History

Religion

Information Science

Sociology

Bachelor of Sclena! (B.S.) (3-2)

Applied Physics

Engineering Science

Biology

Geosciences

Chemistry Computer Engineering

Mathematics P hysics

Early Childhood

Computer Science

Psychology

Special Education

Legal Studies

English as a Second

Mathematics

Statistics

Crass Disciplinary Studies

Majors ill:

Anthropology

French

Physics

Art

German

Political Science

Biology

History

Psychology

Chemistry Drama

Journalism

Science

Latin

Earth Sciences

Mathematics

Social Studies Sociology

Economics E nglish

Music

Spanish

Norwegian

Special Education

Physical Education

Speech

nglish/Language Arts

only. If, during the last semester of the senior year, a candidate fo r a baccalaureate degree finds it possible to complete all degree requirements with a registration of fewer than 16 semester hou rs of undergraduate credit, registration for graduate credit is permissible. However, the total registration for undergraduate requirements and elective graduate credit shall not exceed 1 6 semester hours during the semester. A memorandum stating that all baccalaureate requirements are being met during the curre路nt semester must be signed by the appropriate department chair or school dean and

New

Venture Management I n fo rmation Management

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Art

presented to the dean o f graduate studies at the time of such registration. This registration does not apply toward a higher degree unless it is later approved by the studen t's adviser and/or advisory

Communication (Broadcas t i ng, Theatre)

Bachelor of Music ( B.M.) Piano

Instrumental Composition

committee. "NOTE: Lower-division students

Voice

Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.1L)

COURSE OFFERINGS Most listed courses are offered every year. A system of alternating upper-division courses is practiced in some departments, thereby assuring a broader curriculum. The university reserves the right to modify specific course reqo irements, to discontinue classes in which

Bachelor of Musical Arts (B.M.A.) Music

the registration is regarded as insufficient, and to withdraw courses.

Bachelor of Science 10 Nurslog ( B.S.N.) Nursing

EXPLANATION OF SYMBOLS

Most course路s have the value of 4 semester hours. Parenthetical numbers immediately after the course descriptions indicate the semester hour credit given.

Bachelor of Sciena! in Physical Education ( B.S.P.E.) Concentrations in: Exercise S ienc

Other symbols are explained as follows:

Health and Fit ness Management Pre-therapy

Complementary Majors Global Studies Women's Studies

C

I

F

I

C

I

Cou rse offered first semester

II

Course offered secolld semester f Course of eredfirst and second semester in sequence

I , II I II

Envi ronmental Studies

A

may enroll in upper-division courses

i/prerequisites have been met.

K- 1 2 Choral K- 1 2 Insr rumentaJ (Band) K- 1 2 I n strumental (Orchestra)

P

Ph ilosophy

Generally open to juniors and seniors unless otherwise specified.* Also open to graduate students, and may be considered part of a graduate program provided they are not specific requirements in preparation fo r graduate study.

Marketing Resource Management

Organ

Women's Studies

Technology

500-599 Graduate Courses: Normally open to graduate students

Entrepreneurship and

International B usiness

Theatre

300-499 Upper-Division Courses:

Bachelor of Bnsiness Admloistration (B.B.A.)

Hum an Resource Management

Music Norwegian

1 00-299 Lower-Division Cou rses: Open to freshmen and sopho颅 mores unless otherwise restricted.

Rec reation

Mana gement

Course offered either semester

J

Course offered

G

Cou rse may be used in graduate programs

in the January term

Course ofered in the summer S f a/y Cou rse offered in alternate years als Course offered in alternate summers

L

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T

H

( No n-Teaching)

COURSE NUMBERINGS

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation (B.A.Rec.)

Professional Accou nting

Special Education

Reading

Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (B.A.P. E.)

Financial Re ou rces

Latin

Special Education

Ph ical Education

Concentratio ns in:

Instructional Te chnology Spanish

Imtructio nal

La nguage

B achelor of Arts in Education (B.A.拢.)

30

Physical Education

E

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The Americas

Anthropology

T h is interdisciplinary minor focllses on the comparat ive

Anthrop

histories,

wo rld 's people in to human

cultur and c ntempo rary i lies shared by the two continent in the Western He m jsp here. In in tegrati ng selected informat ion about the United States. i relle t the reality that this c untry i an in tegral part of the culturally •

di verse and increasingly interconnected contemporary world. FACUI:I'Y: Olu f ,

Program Adviser; Ahna, Brown, B rusco, p, DVlyer-Sh ick, Kelle her, Killen, Klei n, Marcus , P red m o re , Ro w e,

Temple-Thur ton, T. Williams. MINOR: The min r con sists of 20 h urs, including o ne required

and four elective courses compl eted with a grade of C or h igh er. Students also must take the Composition and Conversation course, or its equivalent, in a lan guag e ok n in the Ameri ca:; other than their native language. Parti cipation in J relevan t off campus program is highly re com m ended . Students may not apply more than one 4 credit co ur s in the minor to fulftll any other requirement, such as general uni ersity core, major, or minor req uirements. REQUIRED COURSE: Political dence 282 - Introductio n to the Americas

ELECTIVE COURSES: Students must cho se at least one course w i th North American content a the primary t!mphasis, and one cou rse with Central or South American co ntent as the primary em p hasis. Anthropology 336 - People, of Latin America Anthropology 330 - ,ultures and Peop les of Nat ive North America Anthropology 334 - The Anthropology of Con temporary America Business 495 - International Business: Modern Latin America o m m u n ication 337 - News Media of t.he Western Hemisphere nglish 232 - Women's Literature: Worn n Writers of the Americas

French 34 1 - rench L itera ture and Elilm of the Americas History 220 - Modern Latin Am rican History

History 305 - Slave ry in the Americas History 335 - Latin American H i s tory: Central America a n d t h e Caribbean History 337 - The History of Mexico I isto ry 344 - The Andes in L tin American Hist ry Polit Lcal Science 373 - Civil ights and .ivil Libe rties Re.l igion

227

J gy as a discipline tries to b r i ng all of the f, cus. Though anthropology does look at "stones and bones," it also examines the poli ­ tics, medicines, families, arts, and religio n s of peop les and cultures i n vari us pl aces and ti mes. This makes the study of nthrop logy a complex task, fo r it i nvolve aspects of many discipline , fro m geology and b i o l ogy to art" and

> Z -4 J: ::11 o ."

psychology.

A n thropology i s composed of f,

elds. Cult ural or

ur

o ,...

social anthropology stud ies living human cultures in order to create

a

o CI -<

cross-cultural underst n d i ng of h uman

behavior. Archae logy h as the same goal, but uses data from the p hysical remains of the pa t cultures to reach it. Linguistic anth ropology tudies human la nguage. Physical 311thr pology studies the emergence

and subsequent bio­

logical adaptations of h u man i ty s a sp ci '.

FACULTY: Kl e in,

Vaughn.

Chair; Brusco, Guldin . Hasty, Huelsb

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR:

ck,

6 . em ester hours.

Required: 1 02 , 1 03 , 480, 490. Choose: 1 0 1 or 1 04; lour hour

from 330-345 (peoples c urses ) ; four hours from 3 50-465 (top ics co urses ); eight additi nnl hours

i n anthru p logy, at lea t � ur ( f which mt! t be above 3 2 1 . MINOR: 2 0 sem ester h O llr�.

Require d: 1 02 . Choose: 1 0 1 or 103 o r 1 04; fo ur hours from ourses listed 330--3 4 ; fo u r hours fr m 3 50-4 90; and fI ur addi t io na l hours i n anthropology. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recogniti n of utstanding work, the designation with Departnze1ltal HOllars may be granted by vote f the a n thropology faculty based on the student's per­ formant: in the � llowing areas: 1 . Anthrop logy cou rse work: 3. 5 minimum g.p.a. 2. Demonstration of active i nt erest in an thropologica l p roj as and ac tivities outside of clas� work. 3. Completion of a senior t hesis. paper describing indepen­ d en t r search must be o nd uc ted under th upervi ion o f depa rtme ntal fJculty. proposal m � t b e pproved b y the faculty by the third week of cia 5 of the fall semeste r for May nd summer graduates. and the third week of class of th spring emester for De ember gra d uates .

- Christian Theology: lJberation Theology, Q[

Re lig i n 334 - Theological Studies: Liberation Theology Religion 36 1 - Church H is to r y Studies: Canada, Lar in Americas , and the United States Spani h 322 - La t in American Civilizat ion and CuItur Span ish 341 - Latino Experiences in the Un ited Slates Spanish 4 3 1 - Latin Ameri ca Lite ratur , 1492-l 888 Spanish 432 - Twentieth Century Latin American Literature Spani h 433 - Sp cial Topics in Latin American Literature and Culture

Course Offe rings 101 Introduction to HumlUl Biological Diversity Introduction to biological ant hro pology with a s p eci al focus on human evol ut io n, the fossil evidence for huma.n development, the role of culture in human evol u t ion, , nd a compari son with the development and social life o f the non-hwnan primat es. (4) 102 Introduction to Buman Cultural Diversity In troductio n to social -cultural a. nthropology, c ncen t mting on the expl rati n of the infi nite variety of hu m an en deavor in all aspects f culture and all t yp e s of ltocietie j relig ion, politks, law, kin ship an d art. ulfills cross- cultural line in the Perspe ct ive n Diversity requiremen t. ( 4 ) 1 03 Introduction to Arcbaeology and Wo rld Prehistory lntroduct ion to the id a:; and prac t i e of a h aeo l o gy used lo examine the sweep o f h uman p rehistory from the earliest stone eveIopment of agriculture and metallurgy and to t ols to th en rich our unders ta ndi ng of ext i n c t societies. (4)

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1 04 introduction to Language in Society

338 Jewish Culture An expl o rati o n of American Jewi h culture thro u g h i ts roots i n the Lifewa)'s of Eastern European A hk naz i c Jews and its t ransfo r mati o n in thE' U n i te d Stales . E m p h a si on Jewish h is to ry, rel igio n , literatme, m usic, and hu.mor as reflec t i on s of basic Jewish cultural themes. Ful611s alternat iv e line in the Pers pec t ives on D iver. i ty requ i re m e n t . (4)

Introduction to an thropo l og ical li. n gu i st i c s and symbolism, i nclu d i n g t he o r igi n o f l a n guage ; sound systems, stru l u re and

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mea n i ng; la nguage acquisition; the social context o f speakin g ; la n gua ge chan e; no nve rb al commun ication; and sex d i ffe ren ces in l an gu age use. (4)

192 Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Past and Present

Fulfi l l s freshman J a nuary Term requi rement a n d the alternat ive

340 Anthropology o f Africa Study of Africa's d iverse c u l t u res. F lCUS on e a r l y :tudie o f v ill ages and topi s su ch as ki n sh ip, religion, and so c i a l structure, and on more recent tudie o f urban ce n ters, the impact of colon ialism, p o p ul a r culturo:', and p st- co lo n i al politics. (4)

210 Global Perspectives: The World i n Change A surve)' of gl o ba l issues: mod rnization and de velopme n t ; e co n o m i c ch ange and in ter n a t ional trade; d i mi n is h i ng resources; war a n d revolution; pea e a.nd j us t i ce ; and ultural d i v er s i ty.

343 East Asian Cultures A survey of the cultu res and peoples of Eas ter n Asia, concentrat­ ing on Ch i n a but with comparative reference to Ja p a n , Korea, and ietnam. Cul t ura l si milarities as we.1l as d i ffe.rences between t he se nations are stressed. Top ics incl u d e religion, art, poli tics,

Fulfills cross-cultural Ii.ne in th e Perspectives on Div rs. ity re ­

h is tory, kinship, a n d eco nomic .

qu i re men t. ( Cross-referenced w i t h HIST 2 1 0 an d POLS 2 1 0) (4)

Perspe lives on Diversity requi re ment . (4)

St u dy of Makah Culture t h ro ugh a rc h aeo logy a n d h i st o ry and by i n te r a c t ing with the Maka h.

ct ive and service learning in Neah

Bay, vi it i n g the M aka h Nation . . onsent of i nstructor req u i red . l i ne in the Persp e c t ives on D i ve rs i t y re q u i rem e n t .

(4)

220 Peoples of the World

345 Contemporary- China

Exploration of th

An i m m rsion into the culture and society of the Pe o pl e's

world's cultures through anthropological

films, novel s, and eyewitness a cco u n ts. ase studies chosen from Africa, Nat i e America, Asia , the Pacific. a nd Euro-America p ro v i de a n i n s ider's v ieW' of ways of l i fe di feren r from our o w n .

R p ub l i c of China; contemporary p o l i t ics , kin h ip, olk rel ig i o n , human r lations; p ro bl ms and prospects of dev l o p me nt and

(2)

on Diversity requ irement. (4)

225 Past Coltmes of Wasbington State Nativ Americans have l ive d in Wash i n g t o n State fo r at l eas t the last 1 2 ,000 years. Cult ures of the peopl e i n oastal and interior W: hi ngto n eginning with the firs t northwesterners. An ex am i­ nation o f the ways that cultu res change th ro ugh time until the em e r ge n ce o f the distinctive cultures observed by the earliest E uro pe an visitors to tbe area . ( 2 )

350 Women and Men in World Cultures An o ve rv iew of the var iation of sex ro les and behav i ors thro ugh ­ ll ut the wo rld ; theories of m a tr i a rc hy, patriar hy, mo th e r go dd es ses , in nate i ne q ual it ie ; marriage pattern , i mp a c t o f European patterns ; ega l i tar i a n i s m t femini m . Pulfills cross­ c u lt u ra l line in th Perspect ive on Diversity requ i rement. (4)

230 Peoples o f the Northwest Coast A s u rvey of the ways of life of th nat i v peoples of c o ast al Wa h­ i n gto n, British Columb ia, and Southeastern Alaska from E.uro­ pe an ntact to con temporary t imes , including traditio nal meth­ ods of fi sh i ng , a r ts , p o t la tch 5, sta tus systems. a n d wea l t h and t he ir impact o n the modern life of the regi o n. Fulfills one-half o f t h e a l t.mative line in the Perspectives on Diversity requi rem nt. (2)

People, Places and Prospects Explorat ions of hOI s o c iet i es in North America and a ro u n d the w o rl d have ada p ted to their varied h u m a n and phys i c al environ­

rapid s oc ia l change. Fulfills cross-cul t u ral l i ne in the Pe rspe c tives

354 Geography and World Cultures:

m e n ts. Cases drawn from widel y d i fference e nvi ronme n t s. Global patt ms of variation i n life styles and so c i a l o p portuni ties. Kn o wl edge of loca t ions and map rea d ing w ill be emphasized. P rerequi s i t e: 1 02 or consen t of i nst r u c t o r. (4)

3 5 5 Anthropology a n d Media Exp l o r at io n 0 mass media pro du ce d and consumed in diverse

330 Cultures and Peoples o f Native North America from A co m p a ra t i e st udy of at i v North American cultur their a r r i va l o n the co n tinent through toclny. -xamination of U.S. and Ca n a d ian laws, p ol ic i es, and conflie , issues of sovere ig nty, and rel igi ous ri gh ts. Ful fills alte rnative L i ne in the Perspectives o n D ivers i t requirement. (4)

cultural contexts. Examination of how mass media cultivate fo r m s of ge.ndered, ethnic. reli gi o us, and racial iden tities, and h o w different fo rm of media engage with the dynamic forces o f po p ul a r culture and t h e p ol i t i c a l agen d as of states and p o l i t i ca l

332 Prehistory of North America

360 Ethn1c Groups

l o gi cal r construction of eco nom ic, social, political, and rel i gio u s life in o rt h AnI ri ca from the t i me the first settlers e n te r d th e con t i n e nt du r i ng the Ice Ages to the Mound Bu il ders of l a t e r times and ulti mately [0 the first c on ta ct with

Exam i nes t he nature of ethn ic groups in America and ab ro ad ; the va ry i n g bases of et h n ic i t y (culture, religion, t r ibe, "race;' etc.); p roblems of group i de nti ty and b ounda ry maintenance; ethnic sym b o ls ; ethnic politics; ethn i c neighborhoods; and e th nic htunor. F ulfiLl alternat ive line in t h e Perspectives o n D ivers i ty req u i re m o:' n t . (4 )

An archae

Eu ro pea n settlers. (4) 334 The Anthropology of Conlemporary America An investig ation of A m e r i c a n social patterns a.nd prob lems designed to give insights from a e ro s - c ultur a l perspec tive; expl o ra ti o n of American so l u t io ns to cornman human p ro b l e m s; a determination of what i s unique about the "American Way." Fulfill al te rn a tive l i ne in t he Perspectives on Diversity re qu i re ­ ment. ( 4 ) 336 Peoples o f Latin America Millions of Americal1s h ave nev r b en north of th eq uato r. Who a re these "other" A m e r i can s? TIlls s u rvey course familiar­ izes the student with a broad range of L tin American p eoples and p ro blems. Topics ran ge from visi o n s of th sup ma.tural to problems of ec o nomi c develop m ent . Ful.fills cross-cultural line i n the Perspectives o n Di versity requirement. (4) 32

ulfills cross - cultural li ne i n the

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361 Managing Cultural Diversity P ract ical gui d eli n e s 00 how to a p p ro adl p e o p le of other cultures with sensitivity a n d empathy and with an eye toward m u t ual ly rewa rd i n g interact ion. Learn how to avoid neg at ive attitudes toward cultural d ive rs i ty an d d e vel o p a positive cur io s i t y about the glo ba l d iversity rep res e n te d i n wo rkpl a ces, schools, and neighborhoods. ( 2 ) 365 Prehistoric Environment and Technologr. .Lab Methods in Archaeology La bo rato ry int r pret a t i o n of archaeological m a te r i al s . Tech­ n iques used in i n ter p re t i ng past human eco log y, technology, and economy. A na l yti ca l p ro ced ures for bone, s t o n e, ceramic, and

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metal art ifacts; analy 'is of deb ris from food processing activities. Analysis of material from ar haeological it s.

(4)

370 The Archaeology of Ancient Empires rigins of agriculture, writin , ities, and the stak in many great civil izations of antiquity, includ i ng Mesopotamia, Egypt , l n d ia, A ia, M uam rica, and South America. Fulfills cross-cultural

Th

parts of the w rId, comparing and contrasting th

line i n the Perspectiv<

on D i ve rsi ty requirement. (4)

Art I n this time

processes of trad i t ional and contemporary 'ocieties; concepts f I ader hip, factio n al ism and fe u ds , power, J.uthority, revol ution, and o t he r reactions to col o n ization; law and confliCl res o l u t i o n; conflicts of national and local-level legal systems. Ful dls cr cultural line i n the P rs pect i es on Diver it)' requirement. (4)

fl xibility fo r the signer. Students with profes 'ional con-

on a ariet o f exper ience and creati e artist and the d e ms

315 Law, Politics, and Revolution A tudy of politics and l aw through the p o L i t ic al truct ures and

f rapidly changing concepts and an almost

daily emerg nee of new media, empha is must be placed

must be p repared to meet the modern world with

The

both tech nical ski l ls and the capac i ty for innovation.

depa rtment's program th refofe stresses i ndivid ualized developm nt in the use of mi nd

nd hand.

Student may choo e among a general ized program leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree; a more specialized program fo r th

Bachelor of Fine Arts, in which each

380 Sickness, Madness, and Health A cro -cultural examination of systems of curing pract ices and

cultural views of physical and m e n ta l health; pre ve n ti o n

and

healing; nature and skills of urers; defin iti ns f disease;

ariation i n dise ases; impact of modern medical a nd psychologi足 cal practitioners. Fulfills cross- cultural l in e in the P rsped ives o n Diversit

requirement. ( 4 )

385 Marriage, F amily, and Kln.sbip Explores the nature of domestic groups cross-cultural ly, including the wa),s in which rel i g io n , myth, magic and folkl ore serve to arti wate a n d control dom stic l ife ; how changing systems of p ro du ct io n affect marriage and domestic form ; and h

w

clas and gender systems int rtwine with kin h ip, dome tic

fo rms, and the mea n i ng of "family." ( 4 )

388 Applied Anthropology Expl o rati o n of the llses of the anthropol gical approach to improve human conditiom. -ocus o n anthropologi t ' i nvol (;'足 ment and roles i n applied p r oj e cts . Review of th oretical , ethical, and practical i ss ues . Field component. ( 4 )

392 Gods, Magic, and Morals Anthrop logy

f religion; humanity'S concepts o f and relatio n足

hips t o the up rn at u ral ; examination of p rsonal and group fu n tions that rel igions ful fill ; expl ration of religi ons both

"primitive" and historical; origins of reli ion. ( ro s- refer n ed with REU

392) Pulfills cross-cultural line in the P rsp ctives on

Dive rs i t y requiremen t. (4)

archaeol gical site, w i th empha is on basic

exc av a ti on

skills and

record keeping, field ma p p i n g , drafting, and p hotography. The laboratory cover s artifact p rocessing and prel i m i nary analysis. onsent of instructor. ( 1-8)

Historic and thematic study of the

th oretical fo undations of

so iocultural anthropology; research met hod ; h w theory and r

estabLish a n t h ropological knowle dge.

Requi red of majors in their j u nior or senior year.

(4)

a degree

Some stude nts go di rectly from the un iversity i n t o their field of interest. Ot hers find it desirable and appropriate to attend a graduate schoo!. Ma n)' l u m n i have been accepted into pr

tigious graduate programs, both i.n th i s country

and abr ad. The various field.

f art are comp 'titive and demanding

i n temlS of commitment and effort. N net heless, ther

is

Reading in specific areas or i sues of a n t h ro p o l

highly i maginative or, ideal ly, both. The department's program st resses both, attem pting to

h Ip each student

reach t h a t ideal. In structio nal reso urces, when co u p led with dedicated and energetic students . have resulted in an unu uaLly high percentage of graduates being able to

FACULTY: Hallam, Chair; Cox, Gel ler, Gold. Keyes. To msic. The d ep a rtmen t has sought to minirniz prerequisites, enabling s tudents to elect courses relating to their i nterests as earl

a

possible, but majors are urged to fo llow c Llfse sequences closely. I t is recommended that s tudents in tere ted i n m ajo r ing in art

49 1 Independent Study: Undergraduate Readings y under

supervision of a fa cul t y member. Prerequisite: departmental consenL

or

education for teach ing on several Ie e1s.

satisfy their vo . ' on al obj ctives.

480 Anthropological Inquiry

methods are used

ar t

always a place fo r those who are extremely skillful or

465 Archaeology: The Field Experience A field cl a ss i nvolvi ng the excavation f a historic or prehistoric

Prerequisite:

ca ndidate develops some area of c mpetence; p rogran1 in

( 1 -4)

492 Independent Study: Undergraduate Fieldwork tudy of specific areas or issue in an thropology t h rough field methods of analy is and research supp rt d by appropria te

declare their major early to in ure p rop e r adv ising. Tra n s fer

stud e nt ' status 'h all b determined at tbeir tim of e n t ra nc e . The department rese rves the right to retai n, exhlbil. and reproduce st uden t work submitted for credit in any of its urses or programs, including th e senior exhibiti n . A LlSe or material, fee is required in c rtain ourses.

Examine anthropological methods and apply anthropological

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR.: M i n i mum of 34 s eme s te r hours, includmg 1 60, 250, 230 r 350, 365. 370, 490, a nd the art hi tory e uen e ( 1 8 0 , L 8 1 , 380); 1 1 6 or ourses in teachiug methods m y not b applied to the major. maximum of 40 hour may be applied toward tbe d eg ree . Candidates are registered i n the

theory to an inve tigarion of a

College of Art 揃 and Sciences and m List satisfy gen ral university

reading under su p e rv is i on of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental cons nl. ( 1-4)

499 Seminar in Anthropology leer d topi . in con t rnporary

an thropology. Required of majors in their j unior or senior year.

requirements,

Prerequisite fo r other stud nt

an

:

departmental approval.

(4)

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i ncluding a core curriculum

(

ore I or Core

11),

t h e opti n requirement. A

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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: M ini m um of 60 semester 1 60; _26; e ither 230 r 25 0; the art hjstory seq ue nce 1 80, l S I , 380}; 8 additional hours in 2-dimensional media. additional hours in 3 -di mensional media, an d 4 ho u rs i n art rustory or theory (390, l)r as approved by the de p a rtm nt f'llcuIty) ; req ui rements and electives in area of emphasis' and 490 ( serno !" exhi b i tio n) . 1 1 6 or courses in tea c h i ng me thods may not be i ncluded. Ca n d i dates are registered in tb S chool of th hours, i ncl ud i n g

Arts and m ust satisfy general u n iversity requ irements. i nclu d ing a core curricul um (Core l or Core ll).

B.FA. .in 2-Dimensional Media Areas of e m ph a i s : a minimum of thre�

re q uired in

cou rses

one area .

Drawing/Painting: 160 Drawing

365 Painting I 46 5 Painting II (R)

260 l ntermediate Drawing 360 Life Drawi ng (R) Printm a k i ng: 70 Pri ntmaking I

470 Printmaking II ( R) Fi/m A rts; 2 2 6 Black and Wh i te Photograp h 326 Co lor Photography 426 Electronic Imagi ng [nril'pelldcllt Study (may be applied to tiny area): 4 9 1 Special Proj�cls (R) 4 9 Stu dio Projects

( R)

( R) - may be rep eated for credit f three courses requLred in

one area.

Cera mIcs: 230 Ceramics [ 330 Cerami cs I I 430 Ceram i cs I I I ( R ) Sculpture: 250 Sculpture 1 350 Sculpture II ( R) IlHiepenJellt St1ldy ( may be applied to any area):

1 16 Design In the Contemporary World

An exam i nation of contemporary de ign wi t h a focus on t rends in advertising. fashion, automo t ive. prodilct and interior des i gn. Includes a section on color theory and pe rcep tion and the basic e l e ments f d sign. Req u ires no artistic/design backgro u n d. ( 4 )

49 1 Sp ecial Projects ( R ) 499 Studio Proj cts ( R ) ( R ) - m ay be rcpea ted for cred it

160 Drawing A course deal i ng with the basic techniques and media of

B.FA. In Design

drawing. ( 4 )

Required basic 5eql�ellce: 1 96 Desjgn I: Fundamentals 296 De ign 11: Concepts Elective courses: 398 Drawin g: I l l ustration ( R) 496 De. igo: G ra p r ucs £ 1 ( R ) - may b e rc peated for cred i t

396

Design : Graphics I

492

180 History of Western Art I

A survey tracing the development of Wes tern art and architec­ t ure from prehi t ry to the e nd of the M.iddle Age . (4)

esign: Workshop

1 8 1 History 01 Western Art II A survey f W tern art and arcrutecture from the Renaissance to

the 20th century. (4)

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

1 96 Design I: Fundamentals

See School of Edt/catiol/.

An totroduction to de 'ign through the study of basi t ech n i ques, color theory, and compo itio n. (4)

MINOR IN STUDIO ART: 20 se mester hours, i ncludi ng 380, 4 hOUT in 2·dimensionaJ media, 4 h llr"" in -dimensional med i a. and 8 hours of studio art electives drawn from upper division courses. Cou rses in teach i ng methods (34 1 , 440) may not be ap pli ed t the minor.

22(; Black and White Photography A studi o class in ph o t grap h y as an art � rm. Primary conce n tra ­ tion in basic camera and darkroom techniques. Students p rod u ce a portfol io of pri nts with an emphasis on creative exp ress ion and experimentation. (4)

MINOR I N ART H ISTORY: 24 se mester hours. including 1 80 and 1 8 1 , 1 2 hours in art histor ftheory electives, and 4 hOUTS in stu dio electives. Non-con en tra don cours ( 1 16), p rac t i cal design co urs es ( 1 96. 296. 396. 98, 492, 496 ) . and courses in teaching methods ( 34 1 , 440) ma y not be appl ied to the minor.

230 Ceramics I Ceramic material and techniques includ i ng hand-b ui lt and wheel- th rown methods, clay and glaze formation . I ncludes a

PUBUSBlNG AND PRlNTING ARTS MINOR: The Pub l is h ing and P rint i ng Arts min r is cross- referen ced with the Depart ment of that min r under Publi hing and Printing Am.

of English. See the desc r ipt io n

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STUDIO 160 Drawing 196 Design I: Fundamenta1s 226 Black and White Photography 230 Ceramics I 250 Sculpture I 260 Intermediate Drawing 296 Design 0: Concepts 326 Color Photography 330 Ceramics n 341 Elementary Art .Education 350 Scu.lptnre n 360 Life Drawing 365 Painting I 370 Printmaking J 396 Design: Graphics I 398 Drawing: ruustration 426 Electronic I maging 430 Ceramics m 465 Painting n 470 Printmaking 0 49() Senior Exhibition 491 Special Projects/l ndependent Study 492 Design: Workshop 496 Design: GraphiC$ U 499 Studio Projects/Independent Stndy HISTORY AND THEORY 1 16 Design In the Contemporary World I SO H istory of Westem Art I 1 8 1 History of Westun Art II 3SO Modem Art 390 Studies in Art H istory 440 Seminar in Art Education 497 Research in Art Hi tory-Theory

B.F.A.. in 3-Dlmensio.nal Media Areas of emphasis: a mirurnum

Course Offerings

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survey of ceramic art. (4)


250, 350 Sculpture I, I I Concentration on a particular medium of sculpture including metals, wood, or synthetics; special secti ns emphasizing work from the human form as well as opportunity for mold making and casting. 250 must be taken before 350; 350 may be taken twice. (4,4) 260 Intermediate Drawing

Drawing taken beyond the basics of 1 60 . Expansion of media forms, and solutions to compositional problems. Possibility of pursuing special individual interests, with permission. Prerequi­ site: 1 60 or consent of instructor. (4) 296 Design I I : Concepts An investigation of the process of creative problem solving in a methodical nd organized manner. Includes projects in a variety of design areas. Prerequisite: 1 96 or consent of instructor. (4) 326 Color Photography Exploration of the issues of both painters and photographers. Students learn to make color prints and process color negatives. Includes a historical survey of color photography as well as perspectives of contemporary artists. (4) 330, 430 Ceramics n, III Techniques in ceramic construction and experiments in glaze formation. 330 must be taken before 430; 430 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 230. (4,4) 331 The Art of the Book I See English 3 1 3. (4) 34 1 Elementary Art Education A study of creative growth and development; art as studio projects; history and therapy in the classroom. ( 2 ) 350 Sculpture n (See 250) 360 Life Drawing An exploration of human form in drawing media. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 160 or consent of instructor. (2)

365, 465

Painting I, IT

Media and techniques of painting in oil or acrylics. 365 must be taken before 465; 465 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 1 60. (4,4) 370, 470 Printmaking I, II Methods and media of fine art printmaking; both hand and photo processes involving lithographics, intaglio and screen printing. 370 must be taken before 470; 470 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 160 or consent of instructor. (4,4) 380 Modem Art The development of art from 1 900 to the present, with a brief look at European and American antecedents as they apply to contemporary directions. (4) 390 Studies in Art History A selected area of inquiry, such as a history of American art, Asian art, the work of Picasso, or similar topics. May be repeated for credit. (4)

the ethical issues of this new technology. Emphasis on creative exploration and problem solving within the Macintosh environ­ ment. Prerequisites: 226 and 326 or consent of instructor. May be taken twice. (4) 430 Ceramics III (See 330) 440 Seminar in Art Education A study of instruction in the secondary school including appropriate media and curriculum development. a/y ( 2 )

465

Painting IT

(See 365) 470 Printmaking U (See 370) 490 Senior Exhibition

Students work closely with their advisers in all phases of the preparation of the exhibition. Must be taken in the student's final semester. Prerequisites: declared major in art ( B.F.A. or B.A.), senior status, reasonable expectation of completion of all department and un iversity requirements for graduation. Meets the senior seminar/project requirement. ( 2 ) 491 Special Projects/Independent Study Exploration of the possibilities of selected studio areas, including experimental techniques. Emphasis on development of indi­ vidual styles, media approaches, and problem solutions. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: junior status, minimum of two courses at 200 level or above in affected medium with minimum 2.5 CPA, consent of instructor and departmellt chair. (2 or 4) 492 Design: Workshop A tutorial course whi h may deal with any of several aspects of the design field with particular emphasis on practical experience and building a portfolio. May be taken twice. ( 2 ) 49 6 Design: Graphics II

(See 396) 497 Research in Art mstory-Theory A tutorial course for major students with research into a particular aspect of art history or theory. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: senior status, consent of instructor, and program approval by department faculty. ( 1-4) 499 StudJo Projects/Independent Study

A tutorial program for students of exceptional talent. In-depth individual investigation of a particular medium or set of techni­ cal problems. Only one project per semester may be undertaken. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: declared major in art, senior status, consent of instructor, written proposal, program app roval by department faculty. Students meeting the above requirements but with less than a 3.0 GPA in the major may be required to present additional evidence of eligibility. ( 1- 4 )

396, 496 Design: Graphics I , I I Design and execution of printed materials; emphasis on technical procedures and problems in mass communication. 496 explores advanced techniques with multiple color, typography, and other complex problems. 396 must be taken before 496. Prerequisite: 160 and 296 or consent of instructor. (4,4) 398 Drawing: illustration Advanced projects in drawing/illustration. Exposure to new con­ e pts and techniques adaptable to fine art and commercial appli­ cations. Prerequisites: 1 60 and 196. l\1ay be repeated once. (4) 426 mectroruc Imaging An introduction to computer-assisted photography in which stu­ dents learn applications, develop aesthetic strategies, and engage

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School of the Arts The

Biology

chool of the Arts is a community of arti sts and schol­

ars - students, faculty, and staff - dedicated to the ful­ fillment of the human spirit through creative expression and careful s chol arship. The School of the Arts offers pro­ fessional education to artists and commun icators within the framework of a liberal arts education. The School en­ courages all of its members to pursue their artistic

and

scholarly work i n an environment that challenges compla­ u.

o o o x v III

cency, n u rtures personal growth, and maintains a strong culture of collegial integri ty. Members of the School of the Arts strive to create art and scholarship that acknowledges the past, defines the

present, and anticipates the future. Art, communication, music, and theatre are mediums o f understanding and change which reward those who participate i n them, whether a s artist, scholar, learner, or audience. Perfor­ mances by students, faculty, and guests of the School en­ hance the cultural prosperity shared by Pacific Lutheran

University and its surrounding environs. The School pro­ motes venues for collaboration between artists and schol­

ars, among artistic and intellectual media, and between the u n ive,rsity and the community. FACULTY: Spicer, Dean; faculty members of th Art, Commu nication and Theatre, and Music.

Departments of

BACHEWR OF ARTS or BACHEWR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: needs and special interests o f students. For either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree the student must take the

theatre; the B.M. ( Bachelor of Music), the B. M.A. ( Bachelor of

Arts); the

principles of biology sequence

B.M.E. ( Bachelor of Music Education ) . Stu­

dents may also earn the B.A. ( B achelor of Arts ) , but this degree is awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences. Candidates

another institution) is required before upper division biology completed with a grade of C- or h igher. Cour es not designed fo r biology majors ( I I I , 1 1 3, 1 1 6, 2 0 1 , 205, 206) ordinarily cannot

the specific requirements of the Dep artments of Art, Com muni­ cation and Theatre, or Music.

be used to satisfy major requirement s. Independent study ( 49 1 )

For details about the B.A.E. ( Bachelor of Arts in Education) i n art, communication and theatre, or music, see the

( 1 6 1 , 162, 323). Completion of

this sequence (or an equivalent general biology sequence at courses can be taken. Each of these courses must have been

for all degrees must meet general university requirements and

and cooperative education may be used for no more than

School of

4 of

the upper division biology hours required for the B.S. degree,

Education.

and for no more than

For course offerings. degree requ irements, and programs in the School of the Art , see

FACULTY: Car/son, Chair; Alexander, Crayton, Ellard-Ivey, Garrigan, Gee, Hansen, Kenn edy, Lerum, Main, D.T. Martin, Matthias, McGinnis, Teska. The major in biology is designed to be flexible in meeting the

DEGREES OFFERED by the School o f the Arts include the B.F.A. ( Bachelor of Fine Arts) in art and communication and Musical

To learn biology is more than to learn facts: i t i s to learn how to a 'k and answer questions, how to develop strategies which might be employ d to ob tai n answers, and how to recognize and evaluat the answers which emerge. The department is therefor dedicated to encouraging students to learn science in the only way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to independently question it, probe it, try it out. exper iment with it, experience it. The diversity of courses in the curriculum provides broad coverage of contemporary biology and a llows flexibJe planning. Each b i ology major completes a three­ course sequence i n the principles o f biology. Plann ing with a faculty adviser, the student chooses upper division biology courses to meet individual needs and career objectives. Faculty members are also comm itted to belping students investigate career opportunities and pursue careers which most clearly match their intere ts and abilities. Stude nts are invited t use departmental facilities for independent study and are encouraged to partic ipate in ongoing faculty research.

2 of the upper division biology hours

required for the B.A. degree. Students who plan to apply biology

Art, Communication and Theatre,

credits earned a t other institutions toward a PLU degree with a

and Music.

14 hours in biology, 324 or higher and including 499, must be earned in

biology major should be aware that at least n umbered

Course Offering

residence at PLU. Each student must consult with

biology

tional and career goals. Basic requirements under each plan for

Methods and proced ures for integrating the arts ( m usic, visual, drama, dance)

a

adviser to discuss selection of electives appropriate for educa­

341 Integrating Arts in the Classroom

in the classroom and across the curriculum. Of­

the major are listed below.

fered for students preparing for elementary classroom t aching.

Bachelor of Arts: 34 semester hours in biology, including 1 6 1 , 162, 323, and 499, plus 2 0 additional upper division biology hours. Required supporting course, : Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 2 5 ) and

Meets state certification requirements in both music and art. II

(2)

1 40. Recommended supporting courses: Physics 125 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 2 6 (with laboratory 1 36 ) .

Mathematics

Bachelor of Science: 4 2 semester hours i n biology, including 1 6 1 , 162, 323, and 499, plus 28 additional upper division biology

1 2 0 {or 1 25), 232 234), and one additional upper division chemistry course with labora tory; Mathematics 1 5 1 or Math­ ematics 24 1 ; Physics 1 2 5 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 136), or Physics 1 53 (with laboratory 1 63) and Physics 1 54 (with laboratory 164).

hours. Required supporting courses: Chemistry (with laboratory

BACHELOR O F ARTS I N EDUCATION: Students interested in this degree develop their biology program through the Biology Department in conj unction with the School of Education. Such students should have a biology adviser. See the School of

36

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l:ducation section of the catalog for recommended biology cour e and olb r pertinent information. t least 20 seme ter hours selected from any biology courses. A ade of C- or high r must be earned in each course, and total GPA must be at Least 2.00. Course prerequisites must be met un .less written permission is granted in advance by the instructor. ppli bility of non-PLU biology courses will be determined by the department chair. At least 8 of the 20 credit hours in biology must be earned in residence at PLU; fo r stud nt applying only 8 PiO bi I gy hours toward th minor, those hOllrs cannot include independent study ( 49 1 ) or coopera­ tive education hours. MINOR!

Course Offe rings J 1 1 Biology aDd the Modem World An

intr duction to bioi gy designed primarily for non- biology majors. Fundamental concepts chosen from all areas of modern biology. Lecture, laboratory, and discussion. I (4) 1 13 The Human Organism

A study of biological principles using the biology of humans as the model and focal point for discussion. Topics include cellularity, h redity, structure and function, reproduction and development, evol ution, global environmental concerns, and bioethics. ttenti n to the connections between biology and medicine, law, politi , technology, hunger, and culture. L cture and la oratory. or non-majors, satisfies the Core I natural scien es requiremen t . J (4) 1 16 Introductory Ecology

324 Natural Wstory oIVertebrates

Classit1cation, natural history, and economic importance of vertebrates with the exception of birds. Field trips and labora­ tory. Prerequisite: 323. I (4) 326 Animal Behavior

Descripti n, classification, caLIse, function, and development of the behavior o f animals emphasizing an ethological approach and focusing on comparisons among species. Includes physi­ ological, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Prerequisite: 323 or consent of instructor. II (4)

o

327 Ornithology

The study of birds inclusive of their anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and distribution. Special emphasis on those attributes of birds that are unique among the vertebrates. Labo­ ratory emphasis on field identification, taxonomy, and anatomy/ t pology. Prerequisite: 323 or consent of instructor. II (4) 328 Microbiology

The structure, physiology, genetics, and metaboli m of microor­ ganisms with emphasis on their diversity and ecology. The laboratory emphasizes design, implementation, and evaluation of both descriptive and quantitative experiments as well as isolation of organisms from natural sources. Prerequisite: 323; one semester organic chemistry recommended. II (4) 332 Genetics

Basic concepts considering the molecular basis of gene expres­ sion, recombination, genetic variability, as well as cytogenetics, and population genetics. Includes tutorials and demonstration sessions. Prerequisite: 323. II (4)

A study of the interrelationsbips between organisms and their

340 Plant Diversity and Distribntioo

exami ni ng concepts i n ecology that lead to understanding the nature and structure of ecosystems and how humans impact ecosy tem . Includes bborato ry. Satisfies the Core I nat ural science/mathematics/computer science require­ ment. r (4)

A systematic introducti n t plant diversity. Interaction between plants, theories of vegetational distribution. Emphasis on higher plant taxonomy. Includes laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: 323. II (4)

environme n t

161 Principles of Biology 1: Ceu Biology

Cellular and molecular levels of biological organization; cell ultrastructul' and physiology, Mendelian and molecular genetics. en rgy transduction. Includes lab ratory. Co-registration in Chemistry ( 1 04, 1 20, or 1 25) recommended. [ (4)

162 Principles of Biology l l ; Organismal Biology

An introduction to animal and plant tissues, anatomy, and physiology, with spe ial empha is on flowering plants and vertebrates as model systems, plus an introduction to animal and plant dev elo pment. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 1 6 1 . II (4) 201 Introductory Microbiology

The tructure, metabolism, growth, and genetics of microorgan­ ism , esp cially bacteria and viruses, with emphasis on their roles in human d' ease. Laboratory focuse on cultivation, identifica­ tion, and comrol of growth of bacteria. Prerequisite: CHEM 105. I (4) 205, 206 HUIIlIlU Anatomy and PhysIology

First seme ter: m tter, ells and tissues; nervous, endocrine. skeletal , and muscular systems. Laboratory includes cat dissec­ tion and experiments in muscle physiology and reflexes. Second semester: cir .ulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory. and reproductive systems; metaboLism, temperature regulation, and stress. Laboratory includes cat dissection, physiology experi­ ments, and study of developing organisms. 205 ( I ) prerequisite to 206 ( I I ) . (4,4 ) 323 PrincJples of Biology In: Ec410gy, Evolution a.nd Diversity

Evolution, ecology, behavior, and a systematic survey of life on earth. Tn ludes lab ratory. Prerequisite: 162 o r consent of

348 Advanced Cell Biology

Deals with how ceLls are functionally organized, enzyme kinetics and regulatory mechanisms, biochemistry of macromolecules, energy metabolism, membrane structure and function, ultra­ structure, cancer cells as model systems. Laboratory includes techniques encountered in cellular research: animal/plant cell culture, ceLl fractionation, use of radiot racers, biochemical assays, membrane phenomena, spectrophotometry, respirometry. Prerequisite: 323 and one semester of organic chemistry or consent of instructor. II (4) 35 1 Natural History of the Pacific Northwest

Introduction to the natural history of the Paci fic Northwest: geology, climatology, oceanography, ecol ogy, common life forms, and human impact. Includes local one-day field trips and three­ day trips to the Olympic Peninsula and the Columbia Gorge and Basins. Prer quisite: 323 or consent of instructor. S (4) 361 Comparative Anatomy

Evolutionary history of the vertebrate body i ntroduction to embryology, and extensive consideration of the structural and functional anatomy of vertebrates. Includes laboratory dissec­ tions following a system approach. Mammals are featu red plus some observation of and comp arison with human cadavers. Prerequisite: 323. II (4) 364 Plant Phys iology

Physiology of plant growth and development. Emphasis on seed­ plants. but includes other plant groups as model systems. Topics include: photosynthesis. secondary plant metabolism including medi inal compounds, hormones, morphogenesis. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 323. Organic chemistry recommended. II (2)

department cha ir. I (4)

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441 Mammalian Physiology

365 Plant Anatomy Tissue orga n ization

nd cellula r details of stem s ,

rO O lS,

An i nvestigation of t h e p r i n ciples of physiological regulation.

and

leaves o f seed pla n ts. willl emphasi o n devel o p men t and function. Includes laboratory. P rerequ i site : 323 ( 2 )

Pa r t I: fu ndamental cellular, neural, and hormo nal mechan i. ms of homeostatic control; Part I I : interactionB i.n the cardiovascu­ lar, pulmonary, renal , and neuromuscular organ systems.

<.II

403 Developmental Biology The embryonjc a n d l arval development of m 1d ticel l ula r

W

o r ga ni sm

z

popular co ntemporary modeJ systems, a.nd the emphasis is

<.II

( p rinurlly an i mals) . Exa mples are

cellular and

cho

L ab o ra to ry allows direct observation of physiological re g ul a t ion in living a n i m a ls . Pre re q u i si t es : 323 and CHE M 1 20. Anatomy

en from

and biochemistry re com m e nd ed . I

on

448 Immunology

molecular aspec ts ,� f development. The l ab o ra to r y

Consideration of the biology and chemistry of i m mu n e

i n cludes desc ri pt ive and quant i totive exp e r i m e nts, as well as

st udent-planned pr

(4)

jects. Prerequ isi te: 323. I (4)

response. i n cl u d i n g theoretical concep ts, exp e r im e n t a l s t rategies and i m m unochemical applica tions. Prerequisites: Any two o f the

407 Molecular Biology

An i n t ro d u c t io n to molecular biology, em phasizing the cen t ral role f D A: Structu re of DNA :md RNA, structure and expre ss i o n of genes , genom!' organ ization and rea rrangement , meth o d ology ,uld appl ica tions of reco m b inan t D A teclmol o g y. Laboratory fealures basic recombinant DNA l!'chniques. l' rereq u i s i t e : 323 . 11 (4)

foll ow i n g courses in B iology: 328, 332, 348 , 403, 407, 4 1 1 , 44 1 .

1 (4 ) 475 Evolution

Evolutio n as a p ro ce ss: so u rces of v a r iati on ; forces overco m i ng ge n e t i c inertia in population ; spec iation. Evo l u t io n of genetic

systems a n d o f life in rdation to ecological t h e o r y and earth h istory. Lecture and discussion. Term paper a n d m i n i- se m i n ar re q u i red. P re re quiSi t e: 323 . I (4) 49 1 ludependent Study lnvestiga t ions or research in a reas of spec ial i n terest not covered by re g u lar courses. Open to qualified j u n io r and se n io r majors. Prerequis ite: written p ro po siu fo r

the p roject app roved by a I I I ( 1-4)

fa culty sponsor and the d e p a r t m e n t chair. 499 Senior Seminar The goal of t h i s course is to ass ist

students in

p rese nt a tio n o f a paper concerning

a

the writing and

topic w i t h i n biology which

wo u l d integrate vari ou s elements i n the major p rogram. A p roposal fo r the topic m Ltst be p re s en te d to the d epa r tm en t early in the spring term of the j unior year. The s e m i nar may be linked to, but not repl aced by, laboratory independent study or intern­ s h ip experience. Satis fies the senior semi n a r re q wTem e n t . T 1I(2)

School of Business The purpose of the PLU Schoo l of Business is to be a b r i dge connecting students with the future by integrating competency-based business education, en gagi n g a diverse, globalized society, using tech nologi es that improve learning, and exempli fying lives of service.

4 1 1 Histology

M i c rosco p i c study of normal cells. tissues, organs, and organ systems of verteb rates. The emphasi� is mam malian . This study is both structurally a nd physiologi cally oriented. In ludes l abora t o r y. Pre req u is i te: 323. I (4 ) 424 Ecology

Objectives of the Undergraduate B us in ess Program

Organisms in relati n to their environ men t , i nclucling

organ ismal adaptations, popu lat ion growth a nd interactions, and ecosystem structu.re and function . P rereqwsite : 3 23 . r

42 5 Biological Oceanography The ocean as environ men t for plant a nd ani TIl al l ife;

(4)

knowledge o f how these organization" function and equipp ing t he m with the necessary competencies to

an introduc­

include 1 ) leader­ 2) critical/creative th inking, 3) effective co m m u n i ­ cation , 4) Learn effectiveness, and 5) taking ini tiative and m an a gi n g change. To help students see the i ntercon nections among the

work effectively. These competencies

tion to t be structure, dynam ics, and history of marine ecosys­

sh ip,

tems . Lab, field trips, and term project in addition to lecture. Prerequisite: 323. II ( 4 )

426 Ecological Methoc15 An exam ina tio n of m eth o do l ogy used for discerr ung struct u re and function of natu ral ecosystem s: description of the p hysical

many aspects of their world by integrating the liberal arts with pr fessional bus iness education

environment, es ti mat ion of population size, quantifying com­

munity structure, and m easurement of product ivity. f n cl u des an in troduction to general statistical Ie hniques. Wr i t ing of sci e n t i fi c p ape r s and a focus on accessing the scientific Htera ture . Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Prerequisite:

for positions in commercial and organizations by providing them the basic

To prepare students n o t - for- profit

323 or consen t

To identify

and c hall en g e students to a dopt h igh

standards for ethical p r a c t i c e and professional conduct •

To prepare students for lives of ervice to the

To prepare students to use co n tem p o r a r y technologie$

commWlity

of i n s t r uc to r. II ( 4 )

and to embrace the changes caused by tech nol ogica l innova t ion •

38

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To inculcate a global p erspective in students


FACULTY: Bell, Deatl; Ahna, Al bers, Bancroft, B rnowe, Berniker, Finnie, Gibson, Heg tad, Lee, MacDon ald, C. Miller, Moreland , Myers, Ramaglia, Sepic, Simpson, Thrasher, Van Wyhe, Yager.

ADMISSION: The profess io nal Bachelor of Business Ad minls­ tration degree p rog r a m is composed of an upper division bu iness urriculum with

a

strong base in liberal arts.

To be admitted to the chool of Busi ness, a student must: I. Be officially ad mitted to the universi ty, and 2. Rave cam pi ted at least 32 semester credit hou rs, and 3. Have 'uccessfully com leled wi th a minimum grade of C- (or be currently enroUed in) MATH 1 28, C CE 1 20, ECO 151-

1 52, STAT 23 1 and B U A 20 1 , o r their equivalents i n another colleg or univer ity, and 4. Have a minimum cumulative grade point av erage of 2.50, and 5. Declare a major or minor in business thro ugh tbe School of Business. Access to upper division busi ness courses is lim ited to students who have b en admitted to the School of Busi ness with a

4

4 4 4 2 2 4

I:I1II c:: II> z

4

tration program. The concentration, which is not d on the

st udies by permission of the School of Business.

AFFILIATIONS: The Sch oj of Business of Pacific Lutheran niversity is a m mber of the AAeSB - The lntcrnational Association for Mana ge ment Education. The B.B,A., M. B.A ., and accounting programs ar n tion.a1 ly accredited by the Accred ita· have a

student chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, the national business hon rary society recogniz d by tbe AACSB. Pacific Lutheran University is accredited regionally by the Northwest Association of School and Col leges.

DEGREE REQtJIREMENTS: T he Bach elor of B iness Ad minis­ tration degree p rogram consists of a minimum of 1 28 semester hoUl's completed with an ove r- all grade p i n t average of 2.50 or above as well as a 2.50 grade point average separately in b iness courses. C- is the m in imal acceptable grade fo r business cou rses. At least one-half of the m in i mum total degree requirements

stud nt's transcript, must be completed with at least a 3 .00 grade point average. C- is the minimal acceptable g rade � r concen tra­ tion courses. minimum of 8 semester hours of the total re­ quired for a concentration must be laken in residence at PLU. School of Business intemships, ( B USA 492, Applications of Business Knowledge in Field Setling) will be graded as pass/fail only. A limit of one internship in any concentration will be ac­ cepted, not to exceed 4 credit hours. An end prod uc t may be requir d, as determined by the sponsoring instru tor.

24 sem. hrs. 4 4 4

Financial Resources Management BUSA 335 inancial I nvestments BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace B SA 437 Financial Analysis & S trategy

One of the following:

4

ECON 3 5 1 In termediate Macroeconomics Analysis ( 4 ) ECON 361 Money & Banking (4) Eight semester hours from tile foLlowing:

are taken in fields outside the School of Busi ness. At least 40 semester hours are taken in reqnired an elective business rubj cts. A minimum of 20 semester hours in busi ness must be

8

BUSA 3 2 1 Intermediate Accou nting I ( 2 )

taken in res idence at PLU. Business degree and concentration requirements are established at the time of major declaration. Students w i th a declared major in bu, ine who have not attended the university for a period of three years or more will be held to the business degree requ irements in effect at the time of re-entry to the u.niversity.

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

Required foundation courses; MATH 128 Li near Models

nd Cal cul us, an I ntrodu cr i o n 4 or (MATH 1 5 1 ) 4 CSC! 220 Compu!erilcd lnformation Systems (Tll/armarioll Management students may subs/irue eSC! !44 for 220) 4/4 EeON 1 5 1 - 15 2 Macro/M icro Ewnomies

Minimum semester hours in foUll dation courses:

4

CONCENTRATIONS: A student may elect to complete one or more concentrations within the Bachelor of Business Adminis­

Student with majors outside of the School of Business may gain ccess to specific busi nc courses that support their major

STAT 2 3 1 Int roductory Statistics P H I L 325 Business Ethies COMA 336 ffective Business Presen tations

4

4

40

Minimum semester hours in business courses:

cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above, and who have met the required p re requisites.

tion Council of the AACSB. The School is priv ileged t

Required bllsi"ess COllrses: B U SA 201 alue Creatjon in the Global Enviro nment BUS A 202 Financial Accounting BUSA 203 Managerial Accoun ting BUSA 30 1 Managin Careers and Human Resources BUSA 302 Managerial Finance BUSA 305 Creating and Lead.ing Effec tive rganizations BUSA 308 Princip les of Mnrketing BUSA 309 M naging Value Creating Operations BUSA 3 1 0 Information Systems BUSA 400 Busines Law or BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace or BUSA 406 Law of the Workp lace: Empl yces, Employers, Their Rights a n d Responsibilities or BUSA 407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Co rn panie , and Pr ducts or B USA 408 International Business Law BUSA 490 Capstone Sem inar: Strategi M o agem e n t

4 4 4 28

BUSA 3 2 2 Intermediate ccounting I I ( 2 ) BUSA 3 2 3 C o t Accou n t ing & Control Systems ( 4 ) BUSA 430 Entrepreneurial Finance ( 4 ) BUSA 438 Financial Re earch & Analysis (4) BUSA 492 Internship ( 4 hours max.imum) ECON 344 Economet rics (4)

28 sem. hrs. Professional Accounting 4 BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace 4 BUSA 320 Financial Information Systems 2 BUSA 32 1 tnt rmediate Accounting I BUSA 322 Intermediate Accounting I I 2 2 BUSA 422 Consolidations and Equity Issues BUSA 423 Acco u n ting for Not- for- Profi t and Governmen tal Entities 2 BUSA 323 Cost Accounting and Control Systems 4 BUSA 327 Tax Accounting I 2 BUSA 427 ax Accounting I I 2 4 BUSA 424 Auditing Human Resource Management 24 sem. hrs. BUSA 406 Law of the Workpla c e : Employees, Employers, 4 Their Righ . and Responsibili ies BU A 342 Managing Human Re�ources 4 ECON 3 2 1 Labor c numics 4

Three of the followiNg (af least two from B SA):

12

BUSA 343 Managing Reward Syst m ( 4 ) BUSA 4 4 2 Leadersh ip and Organizational Development (4)

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BU 'A 445 Q u al i t y I m p r ove me n t S t ra tegi es ( 4 ) SA 4 4 9 Cu rren t Issues in Human Res ou r ce Management (4) B SA 492 I n tl!ms h i p (4) COMA 435 rganiz< ti o n al Communication (4) COMA 4 7 Advanced I n terp ers o na l Communication (4) PSYC 450 Psychological Testing (4) PSYC 461 Psycholog of Work (4) B

VI VI &OJ

Z

International Business BUSA 408 I n t er n at i nal Bus iness Law ECO 3 3 1 Interna tional Econom ics

20-34 sem. hrs.

4 4

BUSA 352 Global Ma nage me n t BVSA 355 Managing

4 4 4

Global O p e r a t i on s

Olle of the following: An approved

are a

course from POLS ANTH, or HIST (4)

Q[ BU ' A 4 6 0 In ternational M arke ti n g (4)

Must also com plete either Option I of the Co lleg e of Arts and Sciences fo reign language requirement Q[ one erne tel" 0- 1 6 of study ab ro ad Marketing Resource Management BUS A 407 Law of the Marketplace: Co mp a n ies, and Pr(lducts

24 sem. hrs.

onsumers, 4 4

B SA 467 M a rke t i n g Research BUSA 468 M a r ke tin g M a n agem ent

4 12

Three of the jc)llowillg (at least two from BUSA): B A 363 onsumer Beh av i o r & Promotional Stra te gy ( 4 ) B S A 365 Sal es & Sale ' Ma n age m en t (4) B SA 460 lnt m a t ional Mar ke t i ng (4) B A 492 Internship (4) COMA 271 Media Literacy ( 4 ) EeON 33 1 I n t e r n a ti on a l Economics (4) ECON 3 4 4 Econometrics ( 4 ) PSYC 4 6 2 Consumer Psychology ( 4 )

1'wo of the follawing (one must be B U. A): BUSA 3 2 3 Cost (co unting (4) BUSA 438 Fi n a n c i al Research and A na lys is (4) B SA 3 5 S al es and Sales Management (4) B A 442 Leade rs hi p and Organizational Devel opm e nt (4) BUSA 467 Marketing Research (4) ECON 37 1 t n d u s t r ia l Organization a n d Public Po l i cy (4) ECON 361 Money a n d Banking (4)

8

BUSA 376 Ethical Issues in I n fo r ma t io n Ma nagemen t BUSA 478 information M a n a ge m ent Seminar Twelve elective hotlrs from the following: B USA 377 Data Base Applications in Bus iness (4) B U S 378 lec tron i c Commerce (4) B S 492 Internship (2-4) Any Up p er L el C{)m p uter Science Course

2

4 12

ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: The a cco u n ti n g certificate program is ;lVadable fo r studen s who hold a baccalau­ re ate degree ( a n y field) a J1d wish to co m p l e te the educational require me nts to s i t for the C. P.A . examination. nract the School of B us i n ess for further information. I

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2 0 1 Value Creation in the GlobaJ Environment nderstanding business e co no m ic va lu e , c re a ti n g activities and the d e m an ds o f s take h o l de rs in competitive markets and the gl ob a l environment. Designed for s t u de n ts who a re ta k in g a first

look at the role of b u si ne ss in socie ty a n d who have not had extensive st u d y in e co no m i cs , business law, o r political science. (4) 202 Financial Accounting Ac cou n ti ng for financial p e r form a n ce for t h e use of external decision-makers c o n si de ri n g investment in a business o rg aniz a ­ tion. Origins and uses of financial information; acco u n ti n g concepts and principles; l ogi c, content, and format of financial sta te m e n t ; acco u n t i ng issues in the U.S. and o t he r nat ions. Prerequisites: sophomore s t a n d i n g ; MATH 1 28. (4) 203 Managerial Accounting I n t roduction to the use of accounting

d a t a for decision making, rial p l a nn i ng, and op e r a t i ona l control. To p i c s include cost-volume-pro fit relationshi ps, cost acco u nting methods, b ud geti ng , a nd p e r forman e evaluations. Pam iliarity with Micorsofl Excel or o the r sp readshl!et software is r e qu i r ed . Pr requisites: B U SA 202; CS E 1 20 (4)

3 0 1 Managing Careers and Human Resources An explora tion of individual a n d o rganizational p r a c tices and responsibilitie related to organizational entry, com pete n c y d eve lopment, and p e rfo r m an ce i m p r ove m en t as careers u n fold.

(4)

302 Managerial Finance P rinciples and p r o cedu res p er ta i n i ng to b u si n es investment ac tivi ty, financial decision- making, financial st a te m e n t analysis, val ua t io n, financial planning, ca p i t al asset a c qu i si t io n , cost of capital. fi n an ci ng s t r at e gies . P rer eq u i s ite s : B SA 202; CSCE 220; ECON l S I , 1 52: MATH 1 28; STAT 23 1 . (4)

changing internal and e:< ternal demands and t!xpectations, w i t h a on competencies and p ractices which en ha n c e

strong emphasis

teamwork. (4) 308 Prinrlples of Marketing A study of ma rke t i n g concepts, principles, and co n te m po ra ry

issues in small a n d l a r ge businesse , as well as non-profit o rga n i ­ zations. Pa r t i c u l a r attention to service-related concept" prin­ c i ples , and issues found t o p re. do m i n ate in these organizations. (4) 309 Managing Value Creating Operations study of the or g a n iza t i o n and m a n age me n t of econo m i c

1 2 s e mes te r hours must be upper division, and at least 8 semester ho u rs must be c ompl eted in res iden ce.

C

105 PersonaJ Financial Planning and Consumer Law

Basic financial and legal d cision ma k i n g. I ncludes an i nt rod u c­ tion to elementary co n ce pt s ill finance, economics, law, and consumer psychology. ( 4 )

The

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMIN1STRATION: A minimum of 20 semester hours in bu s i n ss courses, including B USA 2 0 1 - Value reation in the Global Environment. All co u r ses must be com­ p l eted .... <jth a grade of , - or higher. A c u m u la tive grade p o i n t average of 2.50 for all cou rses i n the min r i s req ui red. At least

A

Course Offerings

305 C.reating and Leading Effective Organizations A s tu d y of how to organize and m a nage in to d ay's context o f

Information Management 22 sem. hrs. B USA 375 Introduction to I. n fo rm ati on M a n a ge me n t 4

P

S e Graduate Studies.

manag

Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management 24 scm. hrs. 4 BUSA 405 Law of the financial Marketplace BUSA 358 En trepreneurship 4 4 BU SA 430 Entrepr neurial Finance BU S A 492 I nt er n s h i p 4

40

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

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value p rod uc i ng processes in service and manufacturing busi­ nesses. Prerequisites: MATH 1 28 ; EC N l S I , 1 52 . (2) 3 1 0 Information Systems I n troduction to information technology and i n fbrrnation sys­ tems fro m a management perspective. E m phas i s on st r a t e g i c use of technology and sy tern. , and im pacts on corporate strategy, competition, o rg a n iza t i o n a l structure, and the firm's va l ue cre­ ation process. Prerequisite: CSC E 1 20 . ( 2 ) 320 FiDanciaJ Info rmatioD Systems S tu dy of the flow of informa -'on through an enterprise, the sources and na t u re of documents. and the controls necessary to


insure the a curacy and reliability CSCE 1 20, BUSA 302. ( 4 )

0

informat ion.

Prerequis i tes:

3 2 1 Intermediate Accounting I

ncentrated study of the co n cep tual franlework of accounting,

ment and the information economy i n c l u din g such areas as business processes, the h ierarchy of systems from t ransaction process ing through decision support systems, and the impacts of n e two r ks and the I nt ernet . ( 4 )

valu tion th ories, asset and in com e measurement, and financial

376 Ethical Issues i n Information Management

statement d i s c l o sures in t h e

Focus on the ethical p r i nciples and po we r relationships that

.S. and abroad. Prerequ isites:

S E l 20j BUSA 202. ( 2 )

til

relate i n formation management and decision making to society.

322 Intermediate Accounting II

Additional s t udy of valuation t he or y. Advanced issues i n asset and income measu rem nt and fi nancial sta t e m e n t disclosure. i ncludes evaluat ion of U.S. positions relative to those o f o ther nations and in te rn a t i o nal agen ies. Prerequi 'itc: B SA 32 1 . ( 2 ) 323 Cost Accounting and Control Systems

A critical examulation of systems for cost account ing and mana­ gerial ontrol. E mph as i s o n deve lo p ment

f skills to c ri t iqu e cost

an d control ystem and to understand the dynamic relationship

Discussion of t h e major tensions among business, economic, and social obje c ti ves as re l a t e d to the use and m i s u se o f info rm a t i o n 377 Data Base Applications i n Business

'"

The concepts, strategy, and features of data base des ign and ma na ge m e n t fo r a p p licat i o ns in economic organizations. Focus on how data base a p p l icat i o ns s u pport decision processes. ( 4 ) 378 Blectronic Commerce

327 Tu Accounting I

400 Business law

Study of i n c o m e tax concepts, re gula t i o ns and tax p l a nnin g p r i n c i ples. Emphasi on individual income ta x a t io n . ( 2 )

ploration of the le g al issues inherent in t h e busin s environ­ ignated sections of this course w il l in Iud emphases which are ali g n e d with the Sc h oo l of Business concentrations. These incl ude: ,lCco unt ing/finance, marketing, human resource

m e nt . D

management, i n formation management, and international business. ( 4 ) 405 Law o f the Finandal Marketplace

BUSA 302. ( 4 )

342 Managing Human Resources Detailed coveralTe of personneilhuIJ1an resource p rocedu res in the . . and other ·ountries. Prerequisite: BUSA 30 I . ( 4 ) 343 Managing Reward Systems Detailed ex:amination of reward system development and prac­

tices. Prerequisi tes:

z '"

betwee n sys tems, operations, strategy, and p e r fo rma nce evalua­ tion. P re req u i s i tes: CSCE 1 20; BUSA 202. (4)

I n -depth exploration of fu ndamental pr i n c ip l es go ve r n i n g the v a l uat i o n o f particular se c ur i t i es , and knowledgeable construc­ tion, m an ageme n t, and eval u at ion of port.folios. Prerequ is ite:

'"

m

technology. ( 2 )

The managerial, organizational, and technical d1aUenges o f electronic tra nsact i o n a n d com munication systems among customers, distributors, and su p p l i ers . ( 4 )

335 FinandaJ Investments

c:

SCE l 2 0 , E OJ

I S l I 1 5 2, BUSA 30 1 . ( 4 )

352 GlobaJ Management

I n te g rat e d study of decisions and challenges faced by ma nage r s in large and mali compani a they do b us i n e s s globally. Com­ petencies involved i n c omm unica t i n g and ne go tiat i n g across cultures. Pr re qu i s i te : ECON 3 3 1 . ( 4 ) 355 Managing GlobaJ Operations Study of practical issues in o p e ra t i n g globally u s i n g case studies.

Prerequ is it e : BU A 352. ( 4 )

406 Law of the Workplace: Employees, Employers. Their

Rights and RespGnsibillties Explora t i o n o f legal issue which a rise in the workplace. Analysis of the i m p a ct of employment- related statutes and cases on busi­ ness. (4)

-«17 Law of the Marltetplace: Consumers, Companies,

and Products Legal is ues fo und in mark et i n g practices and the regulatory frame work smrounding them. ( 4 ) 408 International Business Law

An overview o f the law i n vol ved in co nducting

a

world b usin e ss .

(4)

358 Bntrepnnenrship I n tensive study of iss ues and challenges associated with start-up,

growth, and maturation of a ne w enterprise. mphasizes reduc­ t i o n o f risk thro u g h p la nni ng for and asse s s i n g possible fu ture co n diti o n s . ( 4 ) 363 Consumer Behavior and PromotionaJ Strategy St udy of how buyers gain awa reness, estab l is h p urch asing crite­ ria, screen info rma t i o n , and make de cisi o n s. Promotion to p i c s includ d fi n i ng target audicnc , message design, media selec­ tion, b udget i ng , evaluating the p ro m o t io n mix, and a field

422 Consolid.ations and Equity Issues Con entrated study of eq uity measur ment i ncluding t h e ac­ counting aspects of partnerships, corporations, and consolida­

tions. Also includes cco u n t i n g for multinational co r p o rat io ns. Prerequisites: BUSA 3 20, 3 2 1 , 3 2 2 . ( 2 ) 423 Accounting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Entities

Study of fund accounting, including its co n ceptual basis, i t s institutional standard setting, framewo rk, and cu rrent principles and p r a c ti ce s . Prerequisi tes: CSCE 1 20 i BUSA 202. ( 2 ) 424 AlIditing

p roject. (4)

365 Sales and Sale s Management Pro fess io nal selling-p ro s p ect i ng , active list ning, benefit pre­ s en tat io n , obj e t i o n h and l i n g, clos i ng and te r r i to ry management. Also covered are terr i t o ry des ign , h iring, mo t i vating , and evalu­ ating sales pe rsonnel. ( 4 ) 367 Marketing o f Business Services Man a g i ng the service expe r ie nce for business

Designed fo r students whose. interests are in finance, acco u nt in g , personal financial management, or im ilar fields which demand an und e rstand in g o f th laws affec t i ng financial transactions. (4)

c u s to mers . Cre,l t ­

Comp rellen ive study of audi t i n g concepts and p roc ed ure s.

Pre requ is i t es: BUSA 320, 3 2 1 , 3 2 2 . ( 4 ) 427 Tu Accounting U

oncentrated study of i n co me tax concepts, regulations, a n d tax p l a n ni ng p ri n ci p les . Emphasis on business t a xa tio n . Prerequi­ sites: CSCE l 20; BUSA 202, 3 2 7. ( 2 )

43 0 Entrepreneurial Finance

ing a n d retain ing business relationshi ps ill a customer- focused organization th ro u gh ma rketing strategies. I n - field ass i g nment s give insigh IS in to s p e c ific business ervices. ( 4 )

Finan ial strategies unique to the creation a nd/ o r expansion of small, closel)'-held businesses. P re re q u i s ite: BUSA 302. (4)

375 IntrGductiOD tG Information Management

Inte rmediate treatment of managerial finance topics. P re re quis i te: BUSA 302. ( 4 )

Focus on the basic concepts and models of information ma n age-

437 FinanciaJ AnaJysls and Strategy

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438 Finandal Research and Analysis

504 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

Seminar course diIected at CWTent issues and de velop m e n t s. Prerequisite: B SA 302. and at lea s t one u pper division BUSA prefix e1e tive from the list f Financial Reso rces Management concentration courses. (4)

B a ckgr o und for understanding and act i ng upon the legal and ethical issues de ision makers in the bu si ness world face today.

(4 ) 505 Managing Effective Organizations

Examines how leaders manag four sets of factors to achieve organiza tional effectiveness: the organization's internal environ­ ment, the organization's e nv i ro n me ntal context, cultural differ­ ences, and cha nge. (4)

442 Leadership and Organizational Development

E ,' perientiaJ cour"e design d to explore the principJes of organi­ zational develo p ment. Preparation of tudents to be leaders i n effective. systematic planned change programs. Prerequisi te : B USA 3 05. (4)

5 1 1 Managerial AcCOlIDting

Focuses on t he trategic and upporting roles of management acco u nting in the measu rem en t of economi per fo rm a nc and i n monitoring and deliv ring value t o customers. Pre requisi tes : ECON 500; BUSA 503. (4)

445 QU.ality Improvement Strategies Examination of quality im pro vement strategi es used by

American businesses to meet custo m er requirements and im­ prove corporate perfo r m a nce. Prerequisite: B USA 305. (4) 449 Current Issues in Human Resource Management

5 1 2 Vallle Creation: Operations & luformation Systems

Seminar course focused on current issues and d velopm nts in managing human resom es. Advanced business students, in consultation with the instructor, will elect appropriate topics fo r research and discussion. Prerequisite: BUSA 30 1 . (4)

An integrating fram�work o f how operations and information sys tem create value in a business and impact the fi rm' s value chain and extended enterpr i se. Prerequisites: EC N 500; BU A 503. (4)

460 International Marketing Introduction to m a r keti n g probl ms and op port u ni ti es in an international con text. Investigation of e co nom i c, cultural, and busi ness forces that require ch a nges in m a r ket in g plans D r inter­ national com panies. Prer quisite: ju nior sta n d i ng. (4)

5 13 Marketing & Value Creation

467 Marketing Research

Investigation of tech niques and uses of m rket i ng research in the business decision-making process. Research design, survey meth od s , sampl i n g plam, data analys is, and field projects. Prerequisite : STAT 2 3 1 , CSCE 1 20, B SA 308. (4)

535 Financial Investments

468 Marketing Management An inte g r at d application of marketing mix concepts in a com­ petitive busines imulation. App l ying marketing strate gies. developi ng a busin S5 p l an. and constructing an annual repo rt .

In-dep th examination f risk-return r lation hips in the con­ stmctionlrevision of rea l asset portfolios and associat d financ­ ing strategies. P rerequ isi te: ECON 500; BUSA 503. (4)

E mph as is on co ncep t s , p rin c iples , and issues rela t ing to indi­ vidual securities. Prerequisites: ECON 500; B USA 503 . (4)

537 Decision Models and Strategies for Financial Managers

PI' requisites: B USA 308 and one u pper division marketing class.

( 4) 478 Information Management Semioar

Advance in information t chnology and their im pact on organi­ zational and bu iness strategi s with particLLlar emph as i on th challenges of pr ject design and implementation. (4) 489 Study Abroad

PLU-sponsored academic or experienti a l st udy ill other coun­ tries. Prerequisite: jun ior st nding. ( 1-32) 490 Strategic Management Study of managing organiza t ions from the perspective of st[ategic decisi n ma kers. Formulat i n. implementations, and assessment of strategies and PQt ic le imed at integrating a ll organizational fu nc t i ons in su p port of major objectives. Satisfies the Senior Seminar/Project requirement. Prerequisites : BUSA

302, 305, 308, 309, 3 1 0; senior standing. (4) 49 1 Directed Study

540 Effedive Negotiations App roaches negotiation from a co m p lex orga n iz a t ional vi w­ poi nt i n a g l obal economic context rather than solely a buy-sell approach. In an integra ting approach, demonstrates the t rateg ic nature of how to think like a negotiato r. Prerequisite: SU A 505. ( 4) 541 Managing Innovation and Technology Cbange

Focus on the planning and imple me ntat i o n of m ajo r new technologies, proc ses. or systems which pose sign i fi cant uncer­ tainty and the neces ity for fundamental cha.nge in the organi­ zation's d es ig n , culture, and ind u stry stm lure. Prereq uisite: BU A 505. (4) 542 Management of Change Detailed exam ination of te chniques for diagnosing opportunities req u i ring change. Plann ing. i mplementing. in t erve ning, and evaluating c ha nges. Emphasis on the probl e m assessment skills of i' n t ernal change age nts . Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2) 54S ColltinUOWl Improvement Strategies Focus on manag in g for quality, i ndu di ng organizational a nalysi s , p rocess development, arid selec t ion of i.rnprovernent to o l s.

Individualized studies in cons ulta tion with an instructor. Prerequisites: j u nior standing and instructor approval. ( 1 -4)

Prerequisite: B USA 50S. ( 2 )

492 Internship

Applica t io n of business k nowledge in field setti ng. Credit granted determined by hours spent in work i ng environment and depth of proj ct associated with the o urse of s t udy.

549 Contemporary Human Resource Management Se mi nar addressi ng current issue in human resource manage­

495 Spedal Seminar

5 5 3 Transnational Management

Seminar on specifically selected t op i cs in business.

Examination ot ways in which traditional ap p ro a ch es to globalization-multinational ada p t ation, worldwide tech nology transfer, and global standardiza�ion-may be ynthesized into t ransnational strategy and pr act ice . P re requisit e : BUSA 505. ( 2 )

503 Understanding and Managing Fmandal Resou.rces

Integ r ated study f fmancial decisi on -ma k i n g variables (both bo k and market) , the relationships among them, and relevant decision theories/models. Prill1ary p erspec tive is that of the manager, rather than the a cc o untant or the external investor. (4)

42

Marketing in a contemporary busin ess, treat in g m ar ke ting strat­ egy and decisions re quired to create v a l n e and fulfill the objec­ tives of traditional ( m a n ufactur i ng) , service, nd e-commerce businesses in a global context. Prer q uisites: ECON 500: BUS A 5 03. ( 2 )

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ment. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2)


558 New Venture Management Examines the entrepreneurial s kil l s and o n ci it io n s needed for effective new bu si n ess s t art- ups w he t he r independent or within l a rge r organ i za t i o ns . P r req u isi t e: BUSA 503. (4)

564 Managing Services Marketing Services now c o n st i t u te more than 75% of domestic G D P and em p lo y mt: n t . Consideration of the demand and characteristics of services, fo c us i n g and p o s i ti o n i n g t h e ser v i ce or g a n i zat io n , lis ten ing a nd responding to the service cus to m e r, im pl ic a tions o f e-com merce, and challenges to imp rov i ng se H i c e . P re requ i sites :

ECO

m

500; BUSA 503. (4)

5 66 Developing New Products and Services St udy of the process req ui red fo r devel op ing a new p ro d u c t

service. P re req ui sit e : BUS

or

506. (4)

574 Advanced Service and Manufacturing Delivery Systems

Managerial a.nd ope r at i o n al c h al l e n ges of adva n ced service and manufacturing ystems. Ptl requisite: BVSA 506, 507. (2) 575 Electronic Commerce

Electronic commerce as a critical d el ivery system for pro d ucts and services th rou g h o u t the en tire busi ness e c osyste m . Man age­

rial, te hnologicaI, and organizational cha l l e n ges of estab li sh i n g and d oi ng b usiness in the d igi ta l economy. Prerequisites: ECO

500, 520. (4) 577 Project Management Study of the un i que con d it io n s, c ha l l e n ges , requirements, a n d techniques ass o c ia ted with de s ig n i n g and managing m aj or non­ rep e t it ive un dertakings. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2) 578 Management of Information Technologies and Systems Focus on i n form at i o n technology, i n t er ne t , i n formation systems design, and applications to business pro ble m s. P rerequis i t e s :

BUSA 503, 505. ( 4 ) 579 Techno logy CommerclaJ.iza.tion &: fiansfer Nature, process and i m p ac t of com m ercializing n e w technolo­ gies and t cbnology transfer. Exp l ore s the framework for "ge t t i ng the mind to market" - exa m ini n g successes and fa i l u res of vari us co m pa n ies . Prerequisites: ECON 500, 5 20; • nd BUSA

505. ( 2 ) 580 Technology Strategy &: Competitiveness Concepts an d me th od fo r co mpe t it i ve st rat eg y fo r organiz ation s in hyper-co mpetitive environments, with short p ro d uc t life cycles and short ti m e to market. Emphasis n s t ra te gic choices that create sustainable advantage. P re requ is i te : ECON

500, 520;

BUSA 503 , 504, 505, 5 1 1 , 5 1 2, 5 1 3. 590 Strategic Management in a GlobaJ Context t r at gy formulation and im ple ­ mentatio n under conditions of continuing e co n o mi c, techno­

An i nt eg ra ted study of basines

logical. and com pe t iti ve change i n t he gl obal m ar ketp la ce . xp lo res in dustry, competit ive, and company anaJysis. P rerequi ­ sites: BUSA 503, 504, 505, 5 1 1 , 5 1 2 , 5 1 3 . (4) 59 1 Independent Study

Individualized reading and studies. Minjrnum supervision aft er initial planning of s t ud e n t's work. Re quires prior approval by M.B.A. program d i rec t o r and co nse n t of in t ru cto r. ( 1 -4 ) 592 Internship

Ap plication of business knowledge in a field setting. G rad e d pass/fail only. Req u ires prior a pp rova l by M . B.A. program dire c to r and consent of i n stru ct o r. ( 1-4) 595 Seminar Selected advanced top ics .

(2-4)

Chemistry Chemistry s ee ks to understand the fundamental nature of matter, as well as how it co m p sition nd en e rg y content change. Use of th is k n owled ge influences our lives in many profound way . Whether interested in the chemicaj profes­ s ion itself, i n cl ud in g bjochemistry, polymer c h emistry, raw t io n chemistry and ther specia l ities, or in chemistry io conjuDction w ith other fields such as busi.ness, the ' oci al sciences, and the h um ani t i es , stu den ts will have suitable programs available to me t their in terest at PLU. Diversity in career p ia ruling is a key concept in the chemistry de­ partment. P ro g ra m s are available which are broadly appli­ cable to the health, biological, physical , environmental behavioral, and fu ndam e nta l c h em i c al sciences . The chemistry departm nt's courses, curriculum, fac­ ul ty, a.nd facilities are approved by the American Ch emical Society. The depart m nt u es numerous scienti.fic instruments in t he lab r a ori es . Research and tea c hi n g equipment i nclude: 300 MHz Fourier transfonn nuclear m a gn e tic resonance , Fo uri er lran fo rm jnfrared, ultra-violet, v i s ible, em ission , and electron spi.n resonance spectrometers; X - r ay c rystallographic canleras; gas and liquid chromato­ graphs; gas duomatograph/ mass spectrometer; elect ro ­ phoresis; precision refractometer; cli polometer; short path clistillat i o n apparatus; scintillation co u nter; zone refiner; f1uoromete.r; C-H -N analyzer; ICP-OES ; and two SGI worksta tions . Faculty research proj ects involve undergraduate participation,

FACULTY: Fr yhle, Chair, M rdis, Rink, J. Schultz, Swank, To nn , Waldow.

Stud nt dec. i di ng to m ajor

in chemistry hould

their lntent as soon a possible and

fficiaUy declare

n ot later than after h avi n g

completed Cbem istry 232 and after consultation with a faculty a dv ise r in the chemistry d ep a r tme n t . Transfer students desiring

to major in c h e m i s try h uld consult a dep a rt men t al adviser no later than the beginning of t h e i r j u n ior year. The che m i st r y d epa r tment considers computers to be importa nt too l s and strongly re co m men d s that a student p l a n n i ng to maj r in d1emistry take a t leas t one two-credit hour course in co mp uter science .

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BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 490. Required supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 ; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64 .

( three alternatives) : Genera l leads t o American Chemical Society certification; hem is try 1 20 or 1 25 , 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344, 405 or 450 or 456, 4 1 0, 435, 490; Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2; Physics 1 53 , 1 54, 1 63, 1 64. For American Chemical Society certifica­ tion, 450 and either 405, 440, or 456 are required. 2. Biochem istry emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 343, 403 , 405, 4 1 0, 435, 490; Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323; four hours selected from Biology 326, 328, 33 1 , 346, 359, 385, 407, 44 1 or Chemistry 342; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; Physics 1 53,

BACHELOR O F SCIENCE MAJOR

I.

'" x v

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ations include the extent and quality of extracur ricular work done in background reading, independent study, and research; assisting in laboratory preparation, teaching, o r advising; any other chemistry-related employment, on campus or elsewhere; and participation in campus and professional chemistry­ related organizations. The departmental honors designation will appear on a graduat­ ing chemistry major's transcript. BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION: Students interested in this degree develop their chemi try program through the department in conjunction with the School of Education. See School of Education section.

1 54, 1 63, 1 64. 3. Chem ical-physics emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332 , 334, 34 1 , 342, 343, 344, 490; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64, 33 1 , 3 32, 336, 3 56.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING:

Generalized Chemistry Curriculum fo r the B.S. Degree

MINOR: 22

FAU

Students interested in pur ing studies in chemical engineering sh aId see th course utlin iJ1 the Engineering Sciwce section of this catalog. he department chair should be consulted for assignment of a program adviser. semester hours, including 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334 or 336, 338, and 4 hours of additional 300 o r 400 level

SPRING

chemistry course(s) completed with grades of C or higher.

Fresh man ( 1 )

hemistry 1 2 0 or 1 2 5 Math 1 5 1 Critical Conversation or Writing Seminar Core course PE 1 00 or activity

hemistry 232, 234 Math 1 52 Physics 1 53, 1 6 3 ( 2 ) Writing Seminar or Critical Conver ation PE 1 00 or activity

Prerequisite and corequisite req uireme nts are strictly enforced.

Course Offerings 104 Environmental Chemistry

Basic principles of chemical structure and reactions, with appli­ cations to human activities and the natural environment. No prerequisite; students without high school chemistry are encouraged to take [04 before taking 1 05 or 12 0. Also suitable for environmental studies, general science teacher ', B.A. in geo­ sciences, and general university core requirements. l ( 4)

Sophomore

Chemistry 332, 334 (or 336) Physics 1 54, 1 64 ( 2 ) Biology 1 6 1 ( 2 ) Core courses

Chemistry 338 Biology 1 62 ( 2) Core courses

Junior

1 05 Chemistry of Life

Chemistry 342, 344 Chemistry 4 1 0

Chemistry 3 4 1 , 343 Core courses

Basic organic and biochemistry applied to d1emical processes in human systems; suitable for liberal arts students, nursing students, physical education majors, and prospec tive teachers. Students who have not completed high school chemistry recently should take 104 before taking 105. II ( 4 )

Sellior

Chemistry 490 Electives

Chemistry 490 Ch mistry 435 Electives

120 General Chemistry

1 . Refer to the Division of Natural Sciences section of this

catalog for other beginning curriculum options. 2. The department stresses the importance of taking physics during either the freshman or the sophomore year. This permits a better understanding of chemistry and enables a student to complete degree requirements with no scheduling difficultie in the junior and senior years. Students interested in the Bachelor of Science with biochemistry emphasis should plan to take biology in the alternate year. 3. Students desiring to fulfill the Conege of Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement under Option I, or who desire to attain or maintain a language proficiency, should take a language course as part of their optional selections. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recognition of outstanding work the designation with Departmental H0710rs may be granted to Bachelor of Science graduates by vote of the faculty of the chemistry department, based on the student's performance in these areas: 1 . Course work: The grade point average in chemistry courses must be at least 3 . 50. 2. Written work: From the time a student declares a major in chemistry, copies of outstanding work (e.g., laboratory, semi nar, aJld research reports) wiJI be kept for later summary evaluation. 3. Oral communication: Students must evidence ability to communicate effectively as indicated by the sum of their participation in class d iscussi n seminars, help session leadership, and teaching assistantship work.

44

4. Independent chemistry- rela ted activities: Positive consider­

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An introduction to energy and matter, atomic and molecular theory, periodic properties, nomenclature, states f marter, chemical c.alculations, solution propertie , acids and bases, equilibrium, and kinetics. Includes laboratory. One year of high school chemistry is required. Students with no high school chemistry or a weak mathematical backgrowld hould take Chemistry [04 before this course. Corequisite: MATH 1 40 or math placement in a course higher than 1 40. I (4)

125 Advanced General Chemistry An advanced presentation of thermodynamics, atomic structure, valence bond and molecular orbital theories, complex: equilib­ rium, kinetics, macromolecules, and coordination chemistry. Includes laboratory. Designed for those who desire to pUT ue studies beyond the bachelor's degree. An outstandi.ng record in a one year high school chemistry course or advanced high school chemistry is required. Coreqllisite: MATH 1 5 1 . I (4) 210 Nutrition, Drugs, and the Individual

An introduction to basic metabolic interacti ns, general endocrinology, mind and body interactions, and roles f drugs in modifying biological and behavioral functions. Prerequisites: one year of high school chemistry or equivalent suggested. Meets general university core requirements. I ( 4 ) 232, 332 Organic Chemistry

An interpretation of properties and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds on the basis of current chemical theory. Prerequisite: 1 20 or 1 25, 232 for 332. oreqllisite : 234, 334. II, I ( 4 , 4 )

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234, 334

Organic ChemJstry Laboratory

Reactions and conventional and modern techniques of synthesis, separation, and analysis of organic compounds. Microscale techniques. Must accompany 232, 332. Prerequisite: 234 for 3 3 4. II, I ( 1 , 1 ) 336

Organic Speclal Projects Laboratory

Individual projects emphasizing current professional-level methods of synthesis and property determination of organic compounds. This course is an alternative to 334 and typically requires somewhat more time commitment. Students who wish to prepare for car rs in chemistry r related areas should apply for departmental approval of their admission to this course. I I 338

Analytical Chemistry

Chernical methods of quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental methods. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 1 20 or 1 2 5 and MATH 1 40. n (4) 341

Physical Chemistry

A study f the relationship between the energy content of systems, work, and the physical and chemical properties of matter. Classical and statistical thermodynamics, thermochemis­ try; solution properties, phase equilibria, and chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 1 20 or 1 25 , MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54 . 1 (4) 342

Physical Chemistry

A study of the physical p r perties of atoms, molecules and ions, and their correlation with structure. Classical and modern quantum mechanics, bonding theory, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy. Prerequisite : CHEM 1 2 0 or 1 25, MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54. I T (4) 343, 344

Physical Chemistry LaboratoTY

Experiments in thermodynamics, solution behavior, and molecular structure designed to acquaint students with instru­ mentati n, data handling, correlations with theory, computa­ tional analysi and data reliability. Corequisite or prerequisite: 34 1 , 342, 343 or consent of instructor requi red for 344. 1 II ( l , 1 ) •

Biochemistry I An overview of the structures, fUllction, and regulatjon of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, and an introduction to metabolic and regulatory cellular processes. Majors are encouraged to take both 403 and 405 for a compre­ hensive exposure to biochemical the ry and techniques. Prerequisites: 332, 334. I (4) 403

40 5

Biochemistry n

A continuation of 403 that provides further insight into cellular metabolism and regulation, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms of catalysis, protein synthesis, nucleic acid chemistry, and biotech­ nology. oncepts introduced in Physical Chemistry and Bi.ochemistry I will be applied to this course. Laboratory designed to stimulate creativity and problem-solving abilities through the use of modern biochemical techniques. Prerequi­ sites: 332, 334, 3 4 1 and/or 342 or permission, 403. 11 ( 3 ) 410

Introduction to Research

An introdu tion to laboratory research techniques, lise of the chemical literature, including computerized literature searching, research proposal and report writing. Students develop an independent chemical research problem chosen in consultation with a member of the chemistry faculty. Students attend seminars as part of the course requirement. ll (2) 435

Instrumental Analf5is

Theory and practice of instrumental methods along with basic electronics. Special emphasis placed n electronics, spectropho­ tometric, radiochemical, and mass spectrometric methods. Prerequisites: 338, 3 4 1 and/or 342, 343. II (4)

440 Advanced Organic Chemistry Students will develop a repertoire of synthetic methodology and a general understanding of a variety of organic reaction mechanisms. Synthetic organic strategies and design, the analysis of classic and recent total syntheses from the literature, and advanced applications of instrumentation in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: 332. a/y II ( 2 ) 450

Inorganic Chemistry

Polymen and Biopolymers

A course presenting the fundamentals of polymer synthesis, solution thermodynamic properties, molecular characteriza­ tion, molecular weight distribution, and solution kinetics. Free radical, condensation, ionic, and biopolymer systems, with emphasis on applications. The one-credit laboratory examining polymer synthesis through experiments is optional. Prerequisite: 34 1 ; Corequisite, 342. a/y I I ( 3 ) 49 1

::J: z

Techniques of structural determination (JR, UV, VIS, N M R, X- ray, EPR), bonding principles, non-metal compounds, coordination chemistry, organometallics, donor/acceptor concepts, reaction pathways and biochemical applications are covered. Laboratory: Synthesis and characerization of non-metal, coordination and organometallic compounds. Prerequisites: 332, 34 1 ; Corequisite 342. a/y II ( 3 ) 456

n

m III m III -I c: C m III

Independent Study

Library and/or laboratory study of topics not included in regularly offered courses. Proposed project must be approved by department chair and supervisory responsibil­ ity accepted by an instructor. May be taken more than once. I 11 ( I ,2, or 4) 497

Research

Experimental or theoretical investigation open to upper division students with consent of department chair. May be taken more than once. Generally consists of an expanded study of the research project developed in 490. I II ( 1 ,2 or 4) 499 Seminar

Senior capstone course. Presentation by students of knowledge gained by personal Library or laboratory research, supplemented with seminars by practicing scientists. Participation of all senior chemistry majors is required and all other chemistry-oriented students are encouraged to participate. Seminar program will be held during the entire year but credit will be awarded in the spring semester. I I I ( 2 ) 597, 598

Graduate Research

pen to master's degree candidates only. Prerequisite: consent of department chair. I II ( 2-4)

Chinese Studies The Chinese Studies program is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to provide students interested in China a broad fo undation

in Chinese language, culture,

and history, and an opportunity to focus on the religious­ philosophical world v iew and the economic and business structure of China. The program requires that major and minor students complete coursework in at least t h ree different disciplines: Chinese language, history, and anthropology, with optional work in political science, the arts, religion, business, and other disciplines. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the university's China exchange programs (currently at Sichuan University and Zhongshan University) and may request that credits earned through these programs be counted toward the major or m i nor. With the approval

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of the program director, selected January-term, summer,

Classics

and exp erimental courses may be included in the major or m i nor. II' U II' II>

The Classics Program i s a cooperative effort among the

FACULTY: A committee of faculty admin isters this program: Benson, Chair; Barnowe, Byrnes, Dwyer-Shick, Guldin, Ingram, Jensen, McGinnis, Warner, Yie, Youtz. Mr. Sidney Rittenberg serves as honorary adviser.

Departments of Languages and Literatures, Histo ry,

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester hours (24 required, 8 elective ) ; students must take at least one Chinese history course. Required Courses: (24 semester hours) Anthropology 343 East Asian Cultures Chinese 201 Intermediate Chinese Chinese 202 Intermediate Chinese History 339 Revolutionary China Religion 233 Religions of China

lish this trin ity of themes with the visual exp erience of art.

Philosophy, Religion, and Art. Its goal is to unite the "heart o f the liberal arts" with the mind, through history and philosophy, and the soul, through religion, and to embel足

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Chinese Studies 490 The Senior Project (4) A project, thesis, or internship which demonstrates compe足 tence in language and other dimensions of Chinese Studies. Must be a p proved in advance by chair of the Chinese Studies Program; tally card required. Upon prior application of the student, seminars in other departments or programs may substitute for this course. ELectives: (8 semester hours) Anthropology 345 Contemporary Chinese Culture Business 352 Global Management* Chinese 2 2 1 Appreciating Things Chinese Chinese 301 Composition and Conversation Chinese 3 7 1 Chinese Literature in Translation Chinese Studies 200 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies History 338 Modern China History 496 Seminar: The Third World (A/Y on China ) * * Music 1 0 5 J - The Arts o f Chi na Nursing 397 Health Care Practices in China, India, and Tibet"" Political Science 3 8 1 Comparative Legal Systems -

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MINOR: 20 semester hours (8 required, 12 elective) Required Courses: (8 semester hours in Chinese Language) Chinese 1 0 1 Elementary Chinese Chinese 1 02 Elementary Chinese (or one equivalent year of university level Chinese, upon approval of the program chair) Electives: (12 semester hours from at least two additional departments) Anthropology 345 Contemporary Chinese Culture Chinese 2 2 1 Appreciating Things Chinese Chinese 37 1 Chinese Literature in Translation Chinese Studies 200 Selected Topics in Chinese Studies History 338 Modern China History 339 Revolutionary China Music 105 J - The Arts of China Religion 233 Religions of China "" These courses may count for program credits only when the

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Students are expected to become familiar with the reading list for that part of the program (art, literature, history, philosophy, or religion) in which their interest lies. The program is designed to be flexible. In consultation with the Classics Committee, a student may elect a course or courses not on the classics course list. All core classics courses are taught out of the Department of Languages and Literatures.

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student's course project is focused on China and is approved by the program chair. History

496 may be counted toward program requirements orlly when itfoeuses specifically a/I Chirla.

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coordinator.

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from the list below in consultation with the program

Latin 10 I - I 02 Elementary Latin 201 -202 Intermediate Greek 1 0 1 - 102 Elementary Greek 201 -202 Intermediate Art 1 1 0 Introduction to Art Art 1 80 History of Western Art I Art 386 Imagery and Symbolism Classics 23 1 Masterpieces of European Literature Classics 250 Classical Mythology Classics 3 2 1 Greek Civilization Classics 322 Roman Civilization Natural Sciences 204 History of Science Philosophy 3 3 1 Ancient Philosophy Religion 2 1 1 Religion and Literature of the Old Testament Religion 2 1 2 Religion and Literature of the New Testament Religion 2 2 1 Ancient Church History Religion 330 Old Testament Studies Religion 3 3 1 New Testament Studies Independent Study Courses Selected Januar),-term Courses

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46

year of one of the classical languages ( Greek and Latin) and two of the other. The remaining courses are selected

CLASSICS COMMITTEE: Snee, Coordinator; Arnold, Jansen, E. Nelson, Oakman.

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This interdepartmental Classical Studies major requires the completion of 40 semester hours, including at least one

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Col lege of Arts and Sciences

I I . Completion throu 'h the first year of col lege l evel of a foreign language o th r than that used to ati fy th fore ig n language e nt ran ce requiretllent. his option m ay a lso be met by s a t is ­ fa tory co res

Division of Humanities

n a p ro fic ie ncy examination a dmin i stered by the PL Department of Languages and Literntu res. Ill. Four semester h o u rs in history, literature, or l a ng uage ( the latter at the 20 1 level, or at any Ie eI in a lang u age ther tll n that used to satisfy the fo reig n language entrance require­ ment) in addi t i on to cou rses applied to t he general university requiremen ts, and

English Language and Literatures P h ilosop hy

Rellgion Division of Natural Sciences Biology

Four semester hours i n symbolic logic, mathematics ( courses

Chemistry

numbered 1 00 or above ) , computer scie n ce,

statistics in addition to courses appl ied to the gen eral u niversity reg ui remen ts.

Comp uter Science and Computer Engineering Geosciences Mathematics

n o � � c: z

or

Hig h school l a nguages used to atisfy any o f the above options

Physics

m ust have been co mpleted with g rades of C or h ig h e r.

Courses used to sat isfy eithe r line of Opt ion ill

Division of Social Sciences Anthropology Economics History Marriage and Fam ily Therapy Political Science Psych 01 gy Sociology and Social Work

DEGREES OFFERED: B ach dor of Arts, Bachelor of Sc ietl ce

r the College o f Arts and Sciences requ i rement may not a lso e used to salisfy ge n e ra l un iversity requirements. AllY college-l evel foreign language cour e nu mbered 2 0 1 or above used to sat is fy Opt ion I a n d any completion of college - level l ang uage t h rou gh 1 02 u 'ed to sati fy pt io n II may Iso be used to s a tis fy the Perspect ives on Div rsi t y re.quir m ent in Cros -Cultw-al Perspectives. Candidates for the B.A. in Engl ish, fo r the B.A. in Education with concetltrati n in Engl ish , for t b e B.A. L O Global Stud ies, for the B.B.A. in Internat ional Business, a nd for ejec t i o n to the Arete Society must meet Option I above.

o z l> Z C -I :z: m

MAJOR REQUIREMENT: A major is a sequence of cou rses in one area, usually in one department. A maj o r sh uld be selected by the eJld of the so p h o m o re year. The choice mu t be approved by the d partment chair (or in case of special <lead mic p ro­ grams, the p ro g r a m coordinator) . Major requiremetlts are specified in this catalog. The q u a li t y of work must be 2.00 l)r

better. D grades may be coun t ed toward graduation but not toward a m ajor.

RECOGNIZED MAJORS: Global Studie

Anthr pology plied Physi c s

Econom ics

History Individualized Study Mathematic.s Musi c Norwegian P hil oso p h y Phy ics Political 'c.ience Psychology Rel i g ion

En g in eer in g Science ( 3-2)

Scandi navian Area Studies

English Environmental Studies

Soci a l Work Sociolo gy

Prench

S pa n i s h

Geosciences

Theatre

German

Women's Studies

Arr Bio l og y Che mist ry Ch.inese Studies Classics

Communication Computer Engineering Computer Sc ien ce

Not more than

44 se mest e r

hours earned in one department may

Communication and Theatre The faculty of t he Department of Communication an Theatre is committed to a philosophical perspecti ve on communication as the proce s by which hared under­

be applied toward the bachelor's d eg ree in the Coll ge.

standings are

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCmNCES REQUIREMENTS:

symbols . Implicit within this under ·tanding is agreemen t

eated among aud iences lhrough the use of

In addition to meeting t h e entrance r quirement in foreig n

on the assumption t h a t people interact w i t h o n e another

language ( two years of high school lallguage, one year of COllege

for the purpose of achieving outcomes, and that this

l a n gu age, or demonstrated eq u iv a l ent proficiency), candidates in the College of Arts a n d Sciences ( all B.A., B.S. , B.A.Rec., B.A.P. . and B.5.P.E. degrees) mast meet Op tion r. n , or I I I below:

interaction is accomplished th rough a variety

1.

Completion of one fore i g n language t h ro ug h t h e second year of college l evel . Thi s req u i re m en t may al so be -atisfied b y completi n of four years of h i gh school st u dy in one fore ig n language or by satisfactory score s on a proficiency examina­ tion administered by the PLU Dep a r t m en t of Langua ges and Literatures.

f media.

We focus our c urricul um and education on four ability groups that all student th i n

houJd master. First is the ability to

and reflect criticaIJy. Students should b e able to

observe, analyze, perceive relationships, reason, and make i nferences about their l ives and world. Second, students should be able to express themselves effectively using verbal

and non -verbal techniques. Third. students should

be able to interact with one another and their environP

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au ac ...

<

au l: ...

ment. F i n ally, studen t s should d velop an ability t value themselves, their environment, and ot h ers a diverse and important facets of o u r so cial live . Wit h the learning of these abilities comes a responsibility to com munity and social service. FACULTY: Inch, Clwir; Bartanen, Becvar, Fe ll e r, Harney, L i so ky, Rowe, S pi ce r.

lapp.

Ehrenhaus,

CORE REQlJIREMENT: O n l y the fol lowing co urse s fro m ommunication an d Th atre may be used to meet t h e gen e m l u n i ver s it y co re req uirem e n t in the a rts: 1 5 1 , 1 60, 162, 1 63, 24 1 ,

z

3 58, 3 59 , 363, 364, 4 5 8. No course b e g i nn in g with the prefix COMA counts toward the un ivers ity core requirements.

<

COMMUNICATION CORE SEQ UENCE: Pri nt / b roadcast

z

j our n al i sm , critical co m m u n i c a t io n studies, and public relations m j ors m us t take an init ial core of cou rse as follows: 1 2 3, 27 1 , 284, 285. OTE: 1 23 and 27 1 hould no t be taken conc u rrentl),.

o

o ... < u z ;:) :i: :i: o u

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: S t udents who wa nt to declare

a

Students who co mple te 1 2 3 witb a

2 . 5 0 or higher grade may provisio nally un ti l 'uccessful completion of the core.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJORS: Maximum of 44 semester

hours in any of the areas of concentration: 1 . Critical Com m u n ication SWdies - requ ired courses: 1 23 , 27 1 , 284, 285, 328 , 330, 333, 433 p l us 1 2- 1 6 add it ional ho urs from 300 and 400 l e ve l communication course. selected after consultation with adv iser. Requ i red s up p o r t i ng areas: 3-4 h ou rs in ec o n o Ol i , 4 hours in statistics or r earch me thods , and 1 2 h o urs in so ci al sciences or a minor app ro ve d by a n adviser.

2. Prillt/Broadcast Jo u nla/islIl - required cO l l rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 384 o r 3 78 , 480, plus 24 a d d i t i on a l h urs from 300 and 400 l evel communication courses selec ted after consu i tation with advis r. Required s uppo r t i n g a rea : 3-4 h o urs i n economics, 4 hours i n s t at i s t i cs or re s ea rc h methods, and 1 2 h ou rs i n so c i al sciences ill a minor a pp ro ve d by a n adviser. 3. Public Relatio lls - required cO ll rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 385, 435, 378 or 384 or an app roved w ri t i n g course, p lus 1 6-20 additional h o u rs fro m 300 and 4UU level co m mu n i ca t i on courses selec ted after consultation with advis r. R qu i red supporting area : 3-4 hour. in economics, 4 hOl rs in statist ics or research meth od s, and 12 h o ur s in social sc i en ce s QI a minor approved by an ad iser. 4. Theatre - ActillglD irecting Emphasi: - reqlj ;red co u rses: 1 5 1 , I 0, 225, 250, 352. 35 7, 363. 364, 425, plus 6 h o urs from com­ mW1ication an theatre co ur ses in consult lion with adviser. Theatre - Design/Tech nical Emphasis - required courses:

151, 1 60, 225, 250 or 454, 352, 356, 363, 364, 425 , 452 or 453, plus 6 h ou rs from c mm u n i ca t io n and the tre c o u rs es in co nsulta­ tion with adviser.

All candidates for th

B.A. d egree must satisfactorily coml lete a hours under the ' u p e rv is io n

formal internship of 1 to 8 semester

of

faculty memb

r.

111 a ddi tio n to re q u i re men t s listed above, candidates for the B.A. degree mu t m et

the o pt i on requirements ill t he

CoLlege of

Arts a n d Sciences. BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: At least

54

emesLer hours

in any of the two areas of c ncentration: I . omrmmica tiofl - requ i red cu u rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 4 hours in e a ch ability gro u p, nd 8 hours in exte rn a l re uire ments. 48

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

151, 1 60, 24 1 , 250, 352, 357, 363, 364, 454, plus 1 8 h o u rs selected in consultation with adviser. 3. Th ea tre - Design/Technical Emphasis - req uired co urses: 1 5 1 , 225, 250 o r 454, 352, 356, 363, 364, 415, 452 or 453, p lu s 1 8 h our s selected in consultation w i th a d v i se r. All candidates for tl1e B.F. A . degree m u s t s a tis fac t orily c o m p le te a fo r mal internship of 1 to 8 s em es t er hOUIS under tbe su p e rvi­ sion of a fa c u lty me mb er . BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: ee Sch o o l oI Edllcatio1!.

1.

h igher.

5.

Theatre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - required courses:

MINORS:

cOOl Olunication m ajo r with < n emphasis in print/broadcast j ur n a lism , riti al communication studies, or public relations: I . Wil l , a t tbe t i me of dec\(lrat ion, h ave a Clll1Ulative g ra de po in t average ()f at least 2 .50. 2. Will have suc ce s s ful l y co mp le ted the Communication Core ( 1 23, 2 71 , 284, 2 85 ) w i t h a grade po i n t average o f 2.S0 or

declare

2.

U N I V E R S I T Y

ritical Communication Studies: 20 se mes t er hours, in c l u din g 1 23, 284, 185, 330, 333 or 4 3 , 328 or 436. 2. Pu bl i Rela tions: 20 semestt'r h our s , i n cl u d i n g 1 23 , 2 7 1 , 284, 285, 385, plus 4 h o u rs from 300-400 level communication courses selected in c oo s ul t a tion with adviser. 3. Theatre: 20 Se01ester hours, i n c l u di ng l S I , 1 60, 24 1 , 250, plus 4 hours from co m m u n i c a t i o n and theatre cou rse sele c t ed in co n sul t atio n with adviser.

4. The Da 'lCe Minor is cross -referenced with Physical E d u ca t io n.

See [he description of

the School o f

that mi no r

under

Physical Educa tioH.

5. The Pu blish i ng and Pri n t i ng Arts Millor is cross-referenced with the De pa r t m n t of English. See the d e scr i pt i on of that mi no r under Publishing mId Prin ting Arts.

Course Offerings: Communication 123 Communication and Theatre: A Way of Seeing, A Way of Sharing Introduces the s t udy of communication and th e a t re . Sur ve y s the contexts and a pp l ic ati o n of study in these d i sc i pl i n es. Intro­

duces the use of rhetorical theory as a communication behavior. (4)

means of

u nde rs t a nd i n g

225, 425 Communication Practicum One se m es t er hour credit may be earned each semester, but only 4 em es t e r hours may be used to meet un i ve rs i t y requirements. Stu dents put cia room th eo r y to p ract i c al appl ication by iJ1divid ually completing a project re la ti ng to an aspect of co mmunication. An i n st r uc to r approve the p r oj ect and

i n the area of i n teres t must agr ee to p rovide g u i d an ce .

234 Introduction to Research in Communication The study of m et ho ds of ga th eri ng , i nterp re t ing, and eva l ua ti n g data in Lhe study of h u m a n communication. Both qu a n t i t a t i ve

and q ua li t at i ve research methods. ( 2) 27 1 Media Literacy Introduces the critical study of mass communication. Su rveys how th e technical, economic and behavioral elements of m e d i a

influence its structure and content. Surveys si.gnificant trends and issues in b o th domestic and international me di a contexts. (4) 284 Communication as Process: Speaking Seminar Introduces t h e basic te ch n i q ues of public spe ak ing. Students complete s v ral speeches and lea rn the basic skills of speech rnaki ng, in dud i ng topic selections, res ea rch , organization, a u d i e n e analysis, and de l iv ery. (2) 285 Communication as Process: Writing Seminar Introduces the p r o c ess of communication wirting. Su r ve ys copy fo rmats and s tyl e rules for

w r i t i n g in communication-related co mp l e te a nu mb er of diverse w rit i n g a ss i g n ­ ment to appreciate the mech a n i c s of w r i ti n g and the role o f a udi e nc es. (2)

careerS. St ud ents

32 1 The Book in Sodet}' ee English 3 1 1 . (4)


381 Media Law BDd Principles

322 PubHshing Procedures See English 3 1 2. (4)

The theory and a p p l ication of law in news gathering, p ub l ishing, and broadcasting. Will cond u c t legal research. ( 4 )

324 Nonverbal Communication Foc lls on the nonverbal aspects of comm unic tion within the framework of i n te r personal interaction. Prerequisite: Communi­ cat ion core or consen t of instructor. ( 2 )

384 AdvRDced News Reporting Reporting of politics and police, courts and other governmental fu nctions, investigative reporting and writing. Blend o f field trips and wri ti.ng exercises. Prerequisite.: Communication core or

326 Group CommunicatJon

385 Introduction to PubUc Relations

group p e rformance and interaction. ( 4 )

relations. Emphasizes technical a n d analytical skills. Prerequisite:

s:

COre

Stud ies how people use reasoning giving in social decision­

388 EditorlaJ Writing Research and writing of editorials and commentaries for

P C llS is on me t ho d s of reati ng, understanding, and crit icizing argumen ts. ( 4 )

newspapers and broadcast. Function of the ed itorial a n d

on

i m p roving kill in p ublic speaking. In troduces

delivering

a

5

ts. Prov ides �x-perience through w riting and

range o f d i fferent kincli; of p ub l i c speeches. ( 4 )

l> o

ethical issues involving those engaged i n communication p ro fessions s u ch as journa.lism, p u bl i c relations, broadcasting,

m

interp erso nal and mass communication. Stud ies the role o f

(4)

theories in providing practical understanding o f the communi­

391 , 392, 393 Communication Abroad: Studies In Culture

cation process. Emphasizes the role o f em p i rical resea rch in

.Exploration of communi.cation systems and environments

broadening und ers tanding o f commwlication.

Z

Studies the basic principles of moral philosophy and explores

ethical dilemmas and develop strategies for dealing with them.

I n troduces the theo ries and research tools used to study

(4)

m

beyond the university i n in ternational cult ural con texts. 0 - 4 ) 433 RhetoricaJ Theory

334 Gender RDd Communication At te m pts to a.n, lyze and understand the relationship between

In t rod u ces the theories and research tools used to study

gender and com munication behavior. Comparison and co n t rast

communication from a rhetorical perspective. Analyzes the role

o f male and fe ma l e com munic t ion styles, s i milarities and

of rhetoric as a crucial means of human problem-solving.

d .i fferences in language usage, in terpersonal dialogues, group

Emphasizes the role o f crit ical research in understanding the

discussion,s and listening in p erso n al and professional aren as. ( 4 )

rhetorical significance of messages. (4)

435 Organizational CommllDication

335 InterculturaJ Communication Workshop Designed to acquaint st udents with the influence of cultural

Studies the role of communication in fo rmal organizations.

backgrounds, perceptual systems, social o rganization, language,

Provides i nsight into how organizations use and misuse com­

and nonvt!rbal messages i n intercultural commun ication.

(2)

336 Communicating in Bwiness RDd the Professions on

z

and advertising. Stude n ts use case studies to learn to recognize

333 Foundations of Communication Theory

Focuses

o

m e d i a . Prerequisite: Communication

390 Ethics in Communication

thee fies and techniques for effectively participa ting in various speaking cont

editorial pages i l l the ne,

core or consent o f instr u ctor. (4)

330 Public Speaking

z

or consent o f instructor. ( 4 )

making. Analys i s o f genres, fo rms, and techn iques of arguers.

Focuses

c

In troduces the theories, methods, and practice of public Co mmunication

o s:

consent o f instruc tor. (4)

Stud ies how people i n teract in gro u p s . In troduces theoretical constrn cts regarding the role of gro u p s ill orga nizational and soc ial set t ing, . Provides expe.rience i n analyzing and improving 328 Argumentation

1"'\

the natu re of com m u n ication processes in organiza­

m unication techniques i n accomplishing their ends. Emphasizes the in terrelationship o f theory and case studies in understanding the complex nature o f con temporary organizat·ions. ( 4 )

t ional ettings. Students deal with in terpersonal communication,

436 Persuasion

in terviewing techniques, informative and persuasive speaking,

The study of persuasion as a means of personal and social

working in group , and basic b us i n ess writing skills. (4)

influence. Examines the theoretical fo undations and explores the e thical and social i m plications of contemporary persuasion. ( 4 )

373 Audio Production Ele ments of audio p roduction, analysis o f program design,

43 7 Advanced Interpersonal CommunicatioJl

sCI'ip ting, and production tools a nd techniques. Lecture and

Studies the role of communication as the basis for how pe.opIe

laboratory. Prerequisite:

i n teract with each o ther. I n troduces the various theories helping

ommunication core or consent of

t o explain the success and fa ilure people experience i n i n terac­

inst ructor. ( 4 ) 314 Video Production Analys i s and a p plication of p rogram design, writing

tion. Emphasizes the i m portance o f learning to diagnose a n d

and

provide solution

[0

common co mmunication d ifficul ties. ( 4 )

p roduction tools a nd tech niques. Lecture and laborato ry.

43 8 Advanced Public Relations

Prerequisite: Commun ication core or consent of ins tructor. ( 4 )

Examination of public relations issues such as campaign

378 Broadcast Jonrnalism Technique s of broadcast ;ournali.srn. Applications of news gathering, writing, and reporting in a broadcast context. R a dio, television, and news production assignments using broadcast equipment in the Held fu"1d studio. Prerequisite: Communication core or consent o f instructor. (4) 380 Newspaper Editing, Layout, RDd Design Selection and editing of news copy and headline writing. Sel etion, sizing, and cropping of photos. FW1ctions of layo u t .

plannillg, crisis management, theoretical foundations, and ethics. Prerequisite: 385 or consent (If instructor. (4) 439 Intercultural COIDDlWlication S t udies the n a ture of communication among people of diverse cultures. The course examines contemporary theory and research and examines a variety of cult ural variables including: cultural backgrounds, percep t. io n , social organization, language, and nonverbal aspects o f messages. Prerequisite: Communication core. or consent o f instructor.

(4)

Principles of newspaper des i g n and their pract ical a p plicat ions.

440 Conflict RDd Communication

Prerequisite: Comm u nication core or conSent of instructor. (4)

S t udies the role of communica t ion in the development and management o f human co n flict. Use o f the theories o f promi­ llent conflict and peace scholars and significant case studies to

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develop a method fo r better understanding the nature and resolution of o oflict . Prerequisite: Communication core o r consent of instructor. (4 )

w II:

l­ e( w

o

and learned kills; exercises in memo ry, imagination, and observation; i m p rovis a t i o n s and sce ne from modern plays. (4) 351 Stage Makeup Specialized work in pla n n i n g

450 Workshop i o Effective PubUc Speaking Audience analysis. to p i c selection, o rgan iza tio n of idea for

and appli

t i o n of techniques from !lal, and pecial

stra igh l makeup through ag i n g, three dirnensi

effects. ( 4 )

v ariou s audiences, types of speeches, u se of visual aids, and d el ivery. Desi g ned for both novices an d those who have bad some experi ence as speakers. (2)

352

Stage Management

All of the facets of managing a t h eatr ica l production: p lan n i n g, schedulino, rebearsal process, documentati on, and interpersonal relationships. (4)

475 Advanced Media Production P rod ucing, scri p ti n g, d i rect i n g , pe r formi n g , and eval uati n g so­ phisticated audio an d video progra mming. Prere quisite: 3 74. (4)

356 Stage Lighting

480 In-Depth and lnvestigative Reporting

Stage l i ght i n g from the deve lo p me n t of el ect r ici ty and ligh t i n g

Group re po rti n g in dep t h on a si ngl e issue for both n ewsp ap er

instruments to the complete d esign of l ightin g a show. (4) Practical experience in the art of the acto r through performance

485 Interdisciplinary Perspectives i n Communication P rOVI des senior- level com municatio n and theatre students with the o p po rtu n i t y to sy n t hes ize thei r st udy through discove ri n g

e( u

co n texts . Al low

z e( z o

and te levisi on . Prere4 ui�ites: 380, 3 78 or 384. (4)

357 Intermediate Acting, The Actor AI Work

of scenes [ro m plays of the modern theatre, emph is on the impo r tan ce of pIa analysis by the actor, and exam in a t i on of current actin g theOf )'. Pr requisite: 250. (4)

f er s5- a pply in g theories and practices in various t n d e nts to experience s t u dy in a se m i n ar a tmo s phere. Al l ws stud e nt s t o co mpl ete. a res rch paper or p rojec t in thei r area of in t ere st . (4) means

358 Advanced Acting tudy of the work of an ac tor; character analysis and embodi­ ment, using scenes frOl p lays ; includes tyles of a ct i ng as defined by histor ical p er iod. P re re qui si te: 35 7. (4)

49 1 , 4.92, 493 Special Studies i n Communication I nvest igations or research in area of sp ec i al interest not covered

359 Acting (or the Non-Actor Speci ficaU y des ign e d for those who have n ou ri s he d

by regula r courses; open to qualified ju n i or or senior students.

A st ud en t houJd not beg i n regist ratio n for inde p ndent tudy until t he specific area for in estigation has been app roved by a d ep artm en tal sponsor. ( 1 - 4 )

363 History of the Theatre: Aeschylus Through Turgeniev Th atre as it evolved from its primitive ori g i n through re p rese n ­

A look at commun ication pr cesses in o rgan iza t ions with develop ment of spe c i fi c communication skills; includes pub l i c peaking tecb niques, info rm a tive and persuasive communicat ion , i nterviewi ng strategies, a n d the role of l i sten i n g . (2)

tative so c i e t i es; Ancient Greece, Rome, Eu-wpean, and Amer ican .

452 Scenic Design Deve l op men t of arti tic and techn ical a bil i t i es in the field o f

Course Offerings: Theatre

scenic desig n incorporating many per i o ds

1 5 1 Stage Technology

of costume des i gn i nc o rp rat i n g history, pat te r n s , and re nde r­

(4)

ings. (4)

160 Introdu.ction to Theatre

numerous o ffshoots (e.g., film, te levision, rock concerts) th rou g h audience participatio n and per cnal co n t ac t . ( 4)

theatre a n d its

454 Play Direction

The role of the di re ctor, hist rieatly and crit ically; an intensive study that is both practical and t heoreti I in its approach to t he art of the play director. E ac h student is required to direct scen es from plays repre entativ of all p er i ods of thea tr hi sto ry. A final p roj e ct , cons ist i ng of a con te mp orary scene, will c ulm i n a te the cou r se . Prere uis ites: 1 5 1 , 2 50, and junior st at us. (4)

162 History of American FUm Concen trates o n the develo pm e n t and growth

0 the motion Sta t es from 1895 to th e present. (4)

163 Histo.ry of the Foreign FUm

458 Creative Dramatics

Conce ntrates on the de ve lo p me n t and growth of inlernational

Designed to ac quai n t t he student w it h mate r i al s, tech n i que s , and

(4)

225, 425 Theatre Practicum One emester hour c red it may be ea rn ed each semester, but only

4 semeste r hoUTs may be used to meet un iversity

reqttirements.

Students pllt clas s ro o m

theory to p ra ct i cal a pp l i ca t i o n by i nd ividuall y completi ng a proj ect rel at in to an aspect of theatre. An instructor i n the area of interest m ust approve the p roj ec t and agree to pro vi de gtl i dan t!. 241 Oral Interpretation of Uterattue The art of commun icating the esse n ce f a piece of l i te rat ure to

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school teachers or prospect ive teachers, theatre majors, reli g i us l ea de rs , youth and camp coun se l o rs, day c are workers, social and psychological worke rs, and commu n i ty theatre lea de rs in terested in wo r ki n g with ch ildren. S (4)

junior h igh

49 1, 4.92, 493 Special Studies in Theatre Investigations Or re earch in area of sp ec i al interest not covered by regular co urses ; o pe n to qu ali fied junior or senior s tu d en ts .

( 1 -4 )

experientially, \obrically, and emo­ gro up performance. (4)

596-598 Research in Theatre

250 Fundamentals of Acting An exa m i nation of the work of actors and actresses, their natural P

theories of r ative dranl at ics. l nten ded for ele mentary and

Re qu i re s pre-regist ration ap p roved by a dep a.rtmental sponsor.

an audience; i nterpret i ng it

50

(4)

453 Costume Design Deve l o p me nt of a rt isti c and technical abilities in the field

the a tre, co tw nes, scenery, p rops, Li gh t s, make up , and manage­

t io n al l y. Ind.ividual and

nd styl es a s well as

preparation of m o d els , renderi ng, and d ra fti n gs.

Basic theory :md procedure of all ba ck st a ge elements in the

film.

Ren aissa n e, Modem

(See description for 363 . ) (4)

For gradua te students only. ( 1 -4)

picture in the United

(4)

364 History of the Theatre: Ibsen Through to the Present

596-598 Research in Communication

Exposu re to

c u r i os ity to

a lack of kn w ledge o r p r ior experie n ce . Not open to theatre m ajo rs or m inors. (4)

500 Effective Communications

ment.

a

ex plore the art of ac t in g but have been i nt i midate d by

T

Y

For g rad u a te students only.

( 1-4)


computer Science and Computer Engineering Computer Science Computer science deals with the theory, design, and appli­ cation of computing systems and the study of the storing and manipulation of i nfo rmation. The program at Pacific Lutheran University provides a broad base core of funda­ mental material that stresses analysis and design experi­ ences with substantial laboratory work, including software de clopment. In addition, students are exposed to a variety of programming languages and systems. Students can choose from a number of upper level courses which insure a depth of knowledge and an understanding of current developments in the field. The Bachelor of Science degree in computer science has been accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Commissio n o f the Computing Sciences Accredi tation Board, Inc. Computer Engineering Computer engineering is a relatively new engineering sped Ity that has grown out of rapidly evolving micro­ and mini-computer technology. The curriculum consists of essential and advanced elements from computer science and electrical engineering, developing both hardware and software expertise. Electives permjt concentration in areas such as integrated circuit design, microprocessor applica­ tions, computer design, application software development, and artificial intelligence.

FACUlTY: Hauser, Chair; Blaha, Brink, Chung, Fofanova, Kakar, Murphy, Spillman, Wolff. BEGINNING CLASSES: There are several beginning level classes in computer science designed for students with various needs: Compllter Science and Computer Engineering 1 15: Solve it with the Computer!

Especially for students with little or no background in com­ puter science who wish an introduction to the use of the computer for problem solving. Not recommended for students with strong mathematics backgrounds. This course also satisfies the Mathematical Reasoning requirement. Computer Science and Computer Engineering 120: Compu terized Information Systems

Especially appropriate for business majors and other students wi hing an introduction to the computer and applications of

software packages. Computer Science and Computer Engineering 144: Introduction

to

Compllter Science

For students majoring in computer science, computer engi­ neering, mathematics, and most science majors, as well as others wishing a strong experience i n computer programming. Computer Science and Computer Engineering 270: Data Structures

This is the second course i n the major. With departmental approval, students with a strong programming background may receive advanced placement into this course.

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT: All students have unlimited access to the university Computer Center's user-room facilities. The Department of Computer Science and Computer Engineering also maintains a Solaris server and laboratories of its own. The upper level lab contains Macintosh, Linux, and Windows work­ stations. The other lab is used as a teaching laboratory and open lab; it has fifteen Windows NT workstations and computer pro-

jection equipment. All machines are on the Ethernet, are acces­ sible through the campus network, and have full access to the Internet.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS: Students majoring in com­ puter science may choose to earn either a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Arts program is the min.imum preparation suitable for further professional study and is often combined with extensive study or a second major in an al1ied field. The Bachelor of Science is a strong, scientific degree that contains additional courses in computer science, mathematics, and science and serves both students going directly into employment on graduation and those going into graduate programs. Both degrees are based on the same core courses: Computer Science and Computer Engineering 1 44, 270, 346, 380, 490, Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52, and 245. Students should begin Computer Science and omputer Engineering 1 44 -270 and Mathematics 1 5 1 - 1 52 early in their program. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: At least 26 semester hours of computer science and engineering including 1 44, 270, 346 or 380, and 490. The remaining hours are from computer science and engineering courses numbered above 329 (excluding 449 ) . Up to 4 hours may be substituted from Math 34 1 , 345, and 356. Required supporting: Math 1 5 1- 1 5 2 and Math 245. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 semester hours in com­ puter science plus 30 hours of supporting courses in mathemat­ ics and science. The 40 semester hours of computer science must include 1 44, 270, 343, 346, 375, 380, 490, and 14 additional credits of approved elective courses, one of which must be from 367, 420, 436, or 444. Elective courses submitted for approval are to be selected from the computer science courses numbered above 329 (except 345, 434, 449 and 50 1-509 ) , or hours from Math 356 not counted toward the 30 hours of required support­ ing courses. The 30 hours of supporting courses in mathematics and science must include: 1. Math l S I , 1 52, 245, 230 (or 3 3 1 ) , 345 (or 3 4 1 ) . 2. A minimum of 1 2 hours of approved science courses which includes a year's sequence of a laboratory science (Physics 1 53 - 1 54 with 1 63-164, Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25 and either 232 or 338, Biology 1 6 1-1 62, Geosciences 1 0 1 , 1 02, or 103; and 201 ) . 3. Approved sciences courses are: any Biology except 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 ; any Chemistry except 1 04, 105, 2 10; any Geosciences except 1 04; any Physics except 205; Computer Science and Engineering 345 or 434. 4. The remaining hours, if any, may be chosen from any math course numbered above 329 ( except 446 ) or any approved science course.

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MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: 20 semester hours includ­ ing Computer Science and omputer Engineering 1 44, 270, and eight additional hours of upper division computer science courses (excluding 322 and 449 ) . Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 28, or equivalent. MINOR IN INFORMATION SCIENCE: 20 semester hours including Computer Science and Computer Engineering 1 44 and 367, at least four hours from computer science courses numbered above 250 (excluding 322 and 449 ) , and Business 202. Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 28, or equivalent. SECONDARY TEACHING MINOR: See description under School of Education.

ELEMENTARY TEACHING MAJOR: See description under School of Education.

STATE ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS: See description under School of Education.

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING: Computer Scienc and Computer Engineering

1 3 1 . 245. 345. 346. 490; Mathematics 1 5 1 . 1 52, 245, 2 3 . 340 or 34 1 and one of 230, 3 3 1 , or 356; Computer Science and Co m­ puter Engineering 1 44, 2 70, 380, 480; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 163, 164; Chemistry 1 20 or 1 2 5; at least fo ur semester hours chosen fro m Physics 233, 234, 333, 334, 336, or Chemistry 34 1 ; 1 0 additional

343 Programming language Concepts A study and comparison of features fo und in different computer languages. Imperative object-oriented, functional. and declara­ tive languages will be studied. Programs written in several of the languages. Prerequisite: 270. II (4)

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semester hours from any upper level Computer Science and Computer Engineering course (except 449 or 503 ) .

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and Computer Engineering 1 3 1 , 245, 345. 346, and 1 44 or 240. Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, and 245 or 253; Chemistry

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ing. and problem solving techniques. Conside ration of the ethi­ cal and social dilemmas posed by AI. The programming language LISP will be taught and used in several projects. Prerequisite: 2 70. MATH 245. aly 1 998-99 1 (4)

MINOR IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING: Computer Sc ience

1 20 or 1 2 5 ; Physics 1 2 5 , 1 26, 1 35 , 1 36 or 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64.

345 Analog Electronics

An introduction to analog integrated circuit design techniques, including single and multistage amplifiers, frequency response and feedback method . Lahoratory work is part of the course. I (4)

Course Offerings

346 Digital Electronics

A grade of C or higher is strongly recommended in all prerequisite courses.

Analysi of digital design techniques. including a review of combinational logic. flip flops, registers. counters, and timing circuits. Prerequisite: 144. I II (4)

1 1 5 Solve It With the Computer

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Teaches how computer use can be combined with mathematical reaso ning to solve problems. Spreadsheet package and other computer tools to solve p roblems from elementary statistics, fmancial transactions, and other areas where mathematics and data are used in every day life. Prerequisite: fulfillment of the PLU entrance requirement in mathematics. I I (4)

348 Modellug and Simulation An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematical modeling and computer simulation. The course will cover build­ ing and validating abstract models and simulating them using simulation languages. Prerequisite: 1 44. Recommended: 270 and either MATH 34 I or 345. aly ( 4 )

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1 20 Computerized Information Systems

367 Database Management

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Introduction to computers including management information systems development, telecom munications, operating systems, spTeadsheets, graphics, and database management. Includes a computer laboratory component. Prerequisite: MATH 1 28 or 1 40 or equivalent. I II (4)

An introduction to the fundamental concepts necessary fo r design, use. and implementation of da tabase systems. The entity­ relationship and relational models are studied in detail. Indi­ vidual. organiZation. and societal concerns related to accuracy and privacy o f d tao Major small group project. Prerequisite: 144 Recommended: 270. II (4)

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1 3 1 IntroductioD t o Bngineering

An introduction to the engineering profession and development of basic skills important to the p rofession, including problem solving, engineering design, graphics, use of computers, com­ puter programming, engineering economics, and ethics in engineering. Prerequ isite: Completion o f college-preparatory mathematics. I ( 2 ) 144 Introduction t o Computer Science

Elementary data structures reviewed fo r efficiency under differ­ ent conditions. Analysis of problems associated with searching and sorting. Study of fo rmal models of computation ( finite automata, pushdown automata. and Turing machines). Study of fo rmal language concepts such as regular expressions and gram­ mars. Prerequisite: 270. MATH 245. 1 (4)

An introdu tion to computer science including problem solving, algorithm design, structured programming, nume rical and non­ numerical applications. and use of data files. Ethical and social impacts of computing. Prerequisite: 4 years of high school math­ ematics or MATH 140 or equivalent. T Il (4)

Analysis of advanced data structures including B-Trees, Hash Tables, and Red-Black trees. Study of algorithms for graph theory. heuristic search. databases, file systems. and other topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: 371 . II (4)

371 Algorithms, Machlnes, and Grammars

199 Directed Reading

380 Assembly language and Computer Organization

Supervised study of topics selected to meet the individual's needs or interests, primarily for students awarded advanced placement in computer science. Admission only by department invitation. ( 1-2)

omputer assembly langu ge applied to various problems. Topics include data and instruction formats. addressing. linking, macro definition. and computer architecture. Prerequisite: 270. Strongly recommended: 346. (4)

24S Electrical Circuits Intr duction to the fundamental concepts of DC circuits includ­ ing Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws and the fun ction of inductive and capa itive elements. Prereq uisite: PHY 1 54. I (4)

385 Computer Architecture An introduction to the structure and operation of large com­ puter systems. Topics include data representation, memory structure. I/O processing. multi-processing systems such as parallel, pipeline. and stack machines. Examples of the architec­ ture of several large systems are analyzed. Prerequisite: 380. MATH 245. ( 2 )

270 Data Structures

Study of object-oriented programming techniques and fu nda­ mental data structure abstractions and implementations includ­ ing list, stack, queue, and trees with applications to sorting. searching. and data storage. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or higher in 1 44. I II (4)

191 Independent Study Prerequ isite: consent of department chair. ( 1 --4)

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nication. Topics include system topology, message and packet switching, bus structures and data-link transmission. Prerequisite: 1 44 . Recommended: 270. 346. MATH 34 1 or 345. 39 1 Problem SGlving and Programmin g Seminar

An introduction to concepts of artificial inteUigence, including expert systems, natural language processing, image understand-

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386 Compnter Networks

An introduction to computer networks and computer commu­

aly (4)

330 Introduction to Artificial lntelligeoce

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37 1 Design and Ana1ysls of Algorithms

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Designed to imp rove advanced problem solving and program­ ming skills, including advanced data st ructures. A goal of the course is participation i n the regional ACM progra mming Y


competition. Pass/Fail o n l y. Students may take this course more than once. Prerequisite: 270 or consent o f i n struc to r. 1 ( I ) 400 Topl£s In Computer Science

480 M icroprocessors

Study of mi roprocessors and their use in microcomputer systems. Pr requ isites : 346, 380. I ( 4 )

Selected topic fro m the list below or topic of c u r ren t interest

491 Independent Study

i n the discip l i ne. Frequent t o p i cs a re : Co mputer Sec u rit y,

Prerequi ite : consen t of departmenl c h ai r. ( 1 -4)

Parallel Com p u ti n g , G r a p h ic al Use.r I n te rfac e Programming, Par allel Processing Topologies, Genetic Al g ori t h ms , and Neural Networks. J S a/y ( 1-4) 4 1 0 TopJcs in Computer Engineerlog Se l ected t op i c from the list below or lopic of current interest in the d isc i p li ne. Frequ nt topic s are: Computer Security, Parallel Co m pu ting , T r aph i cal User I n terface P rogra m mi n g, Parallel Proce i ng Topologies, Genetic Al go r it h m s , and Neural Networks. J 5 a/y ( 1-4)

412 Computer Graphics

A s tudy of the techniques and t heo r y u d to ge ne ra te comp uter graph ics. Both two-and three-dim n sion a l rep res en ta t io ns will be coveTed. Course work i nc l udes several programming as ignments plus a p rojec t . Prerequ isites: 270 and MATH 2 30 or 33 I . a!y ll ( 4 )

420 Software Engineering An e n g ineer i ng approach to the develo pment of large software

packages. To pics i n cl ude so ftware req ui re ments definiti o n , structured programming, software design, s p ecifications, a n d software test ing . Consideration o f societal and e th ica l issues

surrounding software engineering. M ajor small gToup project. Prerequisite: 270, MATH 245. a/y II

(4)

434 Transport: Momentum, hiergy and Mass

495 Computer Science Research I nvolve ment in an o ngo i ng research p roJec t in computer 'dence

under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: cons e n t of instruct T . ( 1 -4)

499 Capstone Seminar Written and oml p rese n tatio n of a p roject in a topi c of interest by th e student under the supervision of fac ult y member. Discussion of the skills needed for go o d research and technica l communication of that re e.arch . S tudy of th social im pl i aLions of computing. Com plet io n f t h is course tisfies the core requirement for a sen io r cap s ton e sem i nar/pr ject. Lasts two mesters beg i n n i ng in the fall ernester; May gradua tes should start tbe course in the fal l of their senior year and December graduates should begin the course in the faJ I f their j u n ior year. Final presentation s are given during the sprillg seme ter. here are 2 credits given each term for a total of 4 credits. Prerequisite: Senior Computer Sciene or Computer En gine e ri ng m ajor or consent of department chair. ! II ( 2 ) 503 Workshops in EducationRl Tedmology Wo rks h op s d esi gn ed to cxp, nd teach er s ' k nowledge about the app l i cati o n o f new comp u te r and related technology in educa­ t i o n a l s e tt in gs Does not cou n t toward degrees i n computer science. ( 1-4)

Co ncept s and equ a tions of c lass i al omi nuum fluid mechanics: momentL1Jl1, energy, and mass transport, transport coeffici ,ot

43 6 Pattern Recognition The use of th e co mputer to re cogn ize p a t ter ns i n data. Top i c s i n cl u de a rt ific ia l int e l l ig nce, clu s t e r a nalysis a l go r ith ms , lea rn i ng a l gor i thms, and patlern p roce s si ng . L sues associated w it h making deci sions fro m d a ta a n al yze d by machines a. n d the societal and privacy im pl ica tions and ethical co n ce r n s i nvolved in tho e kinds of decisions. M aj o r smal l group p roj ec t . Pre requi ­ s ites: 270, MATH 245. a/y II ( 4 ) 438 Expert Systems

The devel o p ment of Al system which op erate at the l evel of a human expert. St udents will expl ore the structure of expert sys­ tem s and use an expert system d evel o p men t tool. Prerequisite: 330 o r consent of instructor. a/ y n (4)

444 OpeJ"ating Systems An introducti n to co mp ut e r perating systems inclu ding process scheduling, memory ma na g emen t , and me sys t e m s . Major small gro u p proj ect . P rere q u i s it e : 380, MATH 245. I ( 4 ) 446 VLS J Design An introduction to t h e design of very l a rge- sc a le i nt eg rate d systems u s i n g compute r-aided de s ig n method . P re re qu is i te: 346.

If ( 2 ) 44 9 Computer Science In the Secondary School Methods and materials i n seconda ry school computer science teaching. LOGO, PI LOT, etc., may be co n si dered . Does not count toward a major in comp ut e r science. Pr r qui site:

144 .

• /y

I I (2)

4SS CompUers An intro du c tion to the organ iz a t i o n , specification and a nalys i s of programm i ng l anguages , incl u d i ng sc annin g, pars i ng , o bj e ct ode, run-time mach i n structllre.s and optimization. P re requ i ­ site: 380, MATH 245. a/y 1 998-99 (2)

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- vi scosi t y, thermal conductivity, mass diffusivity - inviscid and laminar flows, boundary layers, experimental and numerical modeling of transport proces ses . Prerequisite: PHYS 333 or conse n t of instructor. I I (4)

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Cooperative Education Internships C oo pe rat ive education is a unique prog r am that offers "hands-on" job expe rie nc e ( cal led experiential education). Through intem ships studen ts c a n weave opportunities for work and 1 arning at the same time. Th e program features systematic c oo pera t io n between the university and an extensive number of employers in the Puget ound community. Although the program's career-related advantages are obvious, its main benefits are ducational. Students gain an appreciation of the relationship between theory and application, and may learn, both early and first-hand, about new developments in a particular field. Cooperative education p rov i d es timely and extended 0 portunities for developing commu nication skills orally nd i n writing. A cooperative education program can enable students to become aware of 0PP rtWlities to contribute creatively to tbe changing dimensions of work in present-day society. FACULTY: Phelps,

Director.

lWO MODHLS: The Coo p er a tive Education Program accom­ modates both pa r t - t i me and full-ti.me work modes. Part-time work which allows students the 0PP rtunity to t ake on-campus courses concurrently is labeled the "Parallel Model." A full-time work exper ien ce fits under the "Al te rna t ing ModeL" In most

cases, s tu d e n ts will fullow one or the otber, but some de p a rt ­ ments or schools may develop sequences that combine both parallel and a l te r n ati n g work modes, ull·time summer work, for ex a mp l e , would be classified as perience, and many an alte rnat in g cooperative educat io n summer j obs p rovide for learning that relat to s lude nt.!T aca­ demic o bj e ct i ves.

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THE PROCESS FOR STUDENTS: To be eligible for admission

Economics

into the Cooperative Education Program a student mu t have completed 30 semester hours and be in good standing.

"Want is a grow ing giant whom rlre coat of Have was never

Students who wish to participate apply to either the Co-op

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Office in Harstad Hall or to a Co-op faculty coordinator or

la rge enough to cover."

sponsor serving this function in specified departments, divisions,

Economics is the , tudy of how people establish social arrangements for producing and distributi.ng goods and sel'vices to sustain and enhance human life. Its majn objective is to determine a wise use of lim ited economic resources s that people receive the maximum benefit at the lowest cost. The economics disci pline embraces a body of tech­ n iques a nd conceptual tools that are useful for u nder­ standing and analyzing our complex econom.ic system.

or schools. Both written application and personal in terview are required to determine eligibility, terms for placement, areas of interest, academic requirements, and kinds o f positions available. Students are responsible for their learning activities during their cooperative education position. Each student must seek out and arrange for academic supervision from a faculty coordinator or sponsor. Faculty are responsible fo r insuring that the work experience provides appropriate learning opportunities for helping to establish the learning agreement, and for deter­

mining a grade.

Learning is facilitated through:

(I)

use of a "Learning

Agreement"; ( 2 ) completing an academic project; contact with the faculty sponsor;

(4) attendance at one work­

The learning agreement, developed by each student with the assistance of a fa culty sponsor, lists learning objectives with measurable indicators of learning, and also i ncorporates supplementary resources such as reading materials and partici­ pation i n work-related training sessions. The learning agreement is signed by the student, the fa culty sponsor, the program

substituted fo r Economics 152 for purpos s o f major and minor

director, and the work supervisor, each of whom receives a copy. Contact between the faculty sponsor and the student must be sufficient to allow the sponsor to serve as a resource and provide academic supervision. Typically, this can be accomplished during one or two site visits. Stude.nts i n a "parallel" cooperative educa­

requirement . Econom ics

requirement.

499 meets the senior eminar/project

For students planning graduate work in economics or

business, additional math pre.paration will be necessary. For specific courses, consult your major adviser.

tion program may arrange to meet with the sponsor on campus.

HONORS MAJOR: Outstanding students may choose to pursue

some distance from

graduating in economics with honors. In addition to meeting all

campus may maintain contact through periodic phone confer­

other major requirements, in order to be granted departmental

ences, when site visits are impractical.

honors a student must: CA) have an

Employers are responsible to: ( 1 ) provide opportunit ies for

point average of 3. 50 or better;

students to achieve their learning objectives within the limits of

standard major in

their work settings; (2) help students develop skills related to

(B)

verall university grade take fo ur hours bey nd the

495, Honors Thesis (

tudents app ly for

admission to this cour e in the second semester of their junior

the contextual aspects of the work world ( such as relationships

year. The department grants a d mis s ion

and (3) facilitate students' integration into

based on the student's pri

their work setting so that their employment proves valuable and

r

to 495, Ho nors Thesis,

work in economics and the quality

of the general research pro posal .) ; (

productive.

) present the results of the

work completed in 495, Honors Thesis, at a meeting of Omicron

Students are required to register for at least one credit hour after accepting a Co-op position. Throughout an undergraduate

Delta Epsilon (the economics honorary ) .

academic career a student may receive a maximum of

MINOR: 24 s em es ter hours, including 1 5 1 , 1 52, 35 1 or 352, and 12 additio nal hours of electives, 4 of which may be in statistics.

16 semes­

ter hours of credit in cooperative education.

ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCIETY: The department offers membership in Omicron Delta Epsilon, the International Econom i cs Honorary Society, to qualifie majors. For specific criteria, see any departmental faculty member.

Course Offe rings 376 Work Experience I A supervised educational experience in a work setting. Requires the completion of a Cooperative Education Learning Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor.

for advanced level of responsibillty. Requi res the completion of a Cooperative Education Learning Agree ment in consultation with a faculty sponsor.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See

Education.

( I- 8 )

416 Work Experience U A supervised educational experience in a work setting providing

( [ -8)

477

International Work Experience A supervised educational experience in another country. Requires completion of the International Cooperative Education Agreement, completion of a clearance checkl ist, and an approved

School of

Course Offerings 1 30 Global and Environmental Ecooomic Priodples Analysis of public po licy and privat behavior; appropriate pricing, resource valuation, taxes and subsidie , trade policies, sustainable development, and income gtowth and distribution. Students cannot take both 1 3 0 and 1 52 fo r credit. ( 4 )

1 5 I Principles o f Macroeconomics

plan of reporting in consultation with a faculty sponsor. ( I - 1 2 )

I ntrod uces the economy as a whole and major issues such as

576 Work Experien.ce m A supervised educational experience at the graduate level.

t rade.

inflation, unemployment, economic growth , and international

In troduces the study of economic decision making by firms and

consultation with a faculty sponsor a n d the student's graduate program adviser. P

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1 5 2 Principles of Microeconomics

Requires completion of a Cooperative Education Agreement i n

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BACHELOR OF AlITS MAJOR: (A) Minimum of 40 semester 35 1 , 352, 499, 1 2 ho urs of electives in economics, 4 hours selected from tat istic 23 1 or Mathematics 34 1 , and 4 hours selected from Economics 344 (if not used as economics electives)' Business 202 or 302, Mathematics 348, or up to 4 hours in computer scienc.c, ( B ) A grade point average of 2.50 in all classes included in the 40 seme ste r hours toward the m ajor. With departmental approval, conomics 1 3 0 may be hours, i n cluding 1 5 1 , J 52 ,

who accepts the responsibility to function in a resource role.

with co-worke rs ) ;

ALOO EMER ON

RALPH \

FACULTY: Re im an , Chair; Brue, R. J ensen, Nugent, N. Peterson, Terada, Travi. , Wen tworth.

( 3 ) periodic

shop during the work experience; and (5) an on-site supervisor

Those involved in "alternating" programs

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Y


individuals. Econom i tool and co n ce pt s such as markets,

352 Intermediate M icroeCODomic Analysis

su pply

and demand, and efficiency appl ied

Theory

issue .

4)

to contemporary

3 2 1 Labor Economic8 AnalysiS of l ab o r markets and labor marker is�ues; wage deteT­

m in a tion ; investment in human capital. u n io n ism and coUective ba rgai n i n g; l aw a n d p u b l i c pol icy; discrunination; labor

of consumer beh av ior ; product and factor prices

u nd e r

conditions of mo n o p o ly, competit io n, and in termediale markets;

economi . Prerequisites: 1 30 or 1 52, or consent 0 i nstructor and MATH 1 28, 1 0, or 1 5 1 . (4)

welfare

III n

36 1 Money and Banldng The n ture and

role of money; monetary theory; tools and implementation of m n tary policy; regulation of i ntermediar­ ies; banking activity- in financial m rkets; in ternali nal conse­ quen ces of and con st rai n ts on m o ne ta ry policy. Prerequisites: 1 5 1 or consent of instructor.(4)

o z

congestion and the common-prop rty basis for environmental degraciation, and the valuation of environmental amen it ies . The second part of the course develops analytical models for the LISe of renewable a nd exb aus ob le reso u rces ove r t im e. P rereq u isi te : 1 30 or 1 52, o r consent of instructor. (4)

362 Public Finance

n III

331 International EconomLcs Reg io n a l and international specialization, comparative costs.

37 1 Industrial Organization and Public Policy

mobility; earning� i nequality, unemployment, and wages and

inflation. Prerequisites: 1 30 or 1 5 2 , or co nsen t

0

i nst r uc to r. ( 4 )

330 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics The fir ·t h al f of the course examines the th

ory of external i t ies,

international payments and exchange ra tes ; national policies that promote or reslrict trade. Prerequisites; 1 30 or 1 52, or consent of i ns t ructor. (4)

o s:

Public taxation and expenditure at all govemmental le Is; the incidence of taxes . the pu b l ic debt and the provi io n of public goods s uc h as national defense. education , pure air. and wa ter. Prerequisites: 1 30 r 1 52 . or consent of instructo r. (4) An analysis of the struct ure. cond uct , and pe rfo rm an ce of American i ll d ust ry and publi pol ic ies that foster and alter industrial structure and behavior. Prerequ isites: no or 1 5 2, or c o n se n t of instructor. ( 4 )

38 1 Comparative Economic Systems An analysis and omparis n of contemporary ec nomic systems. Prerequisites: l S I or 1 52, or consent 0 instructor. F u l fills ero s­ cultural l i n e in th Perspect ives on Diversity requ i rem nt. (4) 399 Internship A resea r h and writing

project in con n ect i o rt with a t ude n t's Prerequisites: sophomore standing plus one course in economics. and co nsen t of the departmellL approved off-campus ac tiv ity.

( 1- 4 ) 49 1 . 492. 493 Independent Struly

Prerequisite: consent of the depa rtm en t and co mp letion of either 3 5 1 or 352. ( 1-4) 495 Honors Thesis In dep e n de n t research supe

ised b one or more faculty Research p roposa l and topic developed by the st uden t in the junior year. A p p l i ca tion to e n ro l l is m ade in the second semester of the juni r year. Prerequi itc; ec no m ics majoT and consent of the depa rt men t. (4)

member .

34 1 Economic Development: Comparative Third World Strategies Analysis of t he theoretical fram ework or devel op me n t w ith applications to alternative economic development st rategies LlSed in the newly- emerging cleve! ping countries. E mp hasis on com par ison between countries, assessments of tbe relative importance of c ul t ural values, historical experi e n ce . and g vern ­ mental policies in the devel o p m ent process. Ful fills CIOSS­ cultural line in the Perspectives on iversil req uireme n t. Prereql1 isites: 1 30 or 1 5 1 , or consent of i nslructor. (4) 343 OperatioD Research Quantitative III thods fo r dec ision problems. E m p has i s on linea r programming and o th er determin isti models. Prereq u isi te : STAT 231 or equivalent . ( 2 ) 344 Econometrics In troduc t io n 10 the methods and to I of c onom tries a s t h e basis for applied research l l1 eco oom ics. Specitication, estimation iUld testi ng in the c lass ica l linear regression model. P rerequi site : S AT 23 1 or equivalent. (4) 345 Mathe.matical Topics In Economics An i n t roduction to basic applications of mathe ma t ical tool LlSed in economic analysi s . Prerequisi tes: I 0 or 1 5 1 or 1 52. or con se n t of instructor.

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351 Intermediate MacroecoDomic Analysis

National income determinat ion in cl uding policy i m pl ica t io n s within the inst itu tio nal framework f the U.S. economy. Prerequisites: 1 30 or I S ] ' and MATH 1 28 or 1 40 or I S ! . (4)

496 Seminar Seminar in economic pro b lems and poli cies with empha�i o n encouraging

the student to i ntegrate problem-solving method­ of econom ic a nalysis. Topic ( s ) selected by class and i n st ru ct o r. Pr requisi te: consent of inst ructor.

ology with to ols participants

( 1 -4) 499 EvolutioD of Economic Thought

Economic thought from

times; em ph a s i s on Keynes; the classical econom ists, the socialists, the marginalists. Lhe neocJa�sical econom ists, and the Keyne ians. Prerequ is ite: 35 1 C)r 3 2 (may be taken con unen t l y ) . Meets the senior seminar/ p roject req uirernent. (4) the period

from Adam

.wcient to modern

Smith to J. M.

500 Applied Statistica1 Analysis An intensive introd u c t io n

the application

to statl. tical methods. E m pha si s on of inferential talistics to concrete ituations. (4)

50 1 Analytical Methods for Dedsion-MaJcing he co ncepts of probability, sa m p l i n g , statisti al de c is io n theory. li n ear pr g ram m i n g, nd ther determ inisti m dels app l ie d to man age r ial p roble m s . Prereq u is ite: 500. (4)

520 Economic Policy Analysis An intensive introduction to the c ncepts of macroeconomics and microeconom ics with an e m ph a si s on within a gl bal framework. (4)

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School of Education The School of Education offers programs of study leading z o I­ < u :;) c

to certification fo r elementary, secondary, and special education teachers, admin istrators, reading specialists, and

is de igned to provide with a blending of the li b e ra l arts and a variety of guided field experiences beginning early in the educa­ school librarians. The curricul u m

graduates

tional sequence. The faculty is committed to the develop­ ment of educational personnel sensitive to the varied individual needs of learners.

FACULTY: Beck, Dean; Baughman, Associa te Dean; Lamoreaux, Barritt, Byrnes, hastain, Gerlach, Hillis, Leitz, Lewis, McGraw, Minetti, Mulder, Reisberg, Shanton, Wentworth, G. Williams, Yerian, Yetter.

Director of Graduate Studies;

PROGRAMS OFFERED: The chool of Education is accredited by the ational Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the orthwest Association of Schools and Colleges, and the Washington State Board of Education for the prepara­ tion of elementary and secondary teachers, principals, program administrators, and special education teachers, with the Master of Arts in Education the highest degree approved. The accredita­ tion gives PLU graduates reciprocity with many other states. Programs for the preparation of school administrators and school librarians are available. The School offers coursework toward the conversion, renewal, or reinstatement of teaching certificates. For preparation of school nurses, see School of Nursing section of this catalog. The School of Education offers graduate degrees in Class­ room Teaching, Educational Administration, Literacy Education, Special Education, and the master's degree with Initial Teaching Certification. Information regarding these programs is available from the director of graduate programs in the School of Education ( 535-7272 ) . HLlGIBnlTY REQUIREMENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL STUDlES (Undergraduate or Certification Only): Students seeking to register for Education 302 or for Educational Psychology 26 1 /Education 262 must apply to the School of Education, in order to receive a registration number. Official transcripts of all college/university work, writing samples, and official documentation of college admission test scores must be submitted to the School of Education by the first Friday in October or March before being admitted to the School of Education and allowed to enroll in education courses the following term. Requirements include: 1.

Evidence of verbal and quantitative ability as illustrated by one of the following test scores:" a. cholastic Aptitude Test ( SAT) Verbal 425 or above; Total 1 040 or above.... b. Washington Pre-College Test ( WPCT) or (TETEP) Verbal 48 or above; Total 1 03 or aboveH c. American College Test Assessment (ACT) Verbal 20 or above; Composite 23 or above** All applicants who have rIOt takerz SAT, ACT, WPCT or TETEP must submit a TETEP score.

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Test score requirements are set by the State of Washington and a re subject to change.

2. Sophomore standing ( 3 0 or more semester hours) 3 . Cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 4 . Psychology 1 0 1 : grade of C or Iligher 5. Writing 10 1 : grade of C or higher

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Application forms and procedures for admission to p rofes­ sional studies in education are available from the 'chool of Education. Students who do not meet aU the requ.irements may exercise the appeal process for admission to Education 302 or Educational Psychology 261 /Education 262. Admission appeal process forms are available from an adviser in the School of Education. All students admitted to Education 302 or Educational Psychology 2 6 1 /Education 262 are admitted provisionally to a program of professional studies, subject to conditions and procedures identified in the Elementary/Secondary I nitial Level Certification Handbooks, available in the School of Education. Continuation in the program of p rofessional studies is subject to continuous assessment of student development and performance.

BAB and/or CERTIFICATION RHQIDREMENTS: Students become candidates for certification when they have successfull)' completed the following: 1. All course work with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above. 2. Professional Education Sequence for elementary or secondary tea hing. 3. An approved teaching major(s) o r concentration(s) (see requirements as listed under Academic Preparation). 4. All courses in education and in major and minor fields with grades of C or higher ( for secondary education, B-or higher required in education courses ) . 5. Achievement of proficiency in writing a n d math skills. 6. Anthropology 21 O/History 2 1 0 or Anthropology 1 02 for secondary teaching and Anthropology 1 02 for elementary teaching. 7. Coursework or courses on the issues of abuse, as approved by the School of Education (SPED 480). 8. A student teaching experience. S tudents must complete all application procedures by the last Friday i n March for fall student teaching or the last Friday i n October for spring stlldent teaching. 9. A valid first aid card. TEACH ER CERTIFICATION lnidal Teaching Certificate: Students who successfully complete a program of professional studies in the School of Education, and who meet all related academic requirements for a degree or a certificate, will be recommended by the School of Education for a Washington initial teaching certificate. Additional state re­ quirements for the certiEcate include a Washington State Patrol check, an FBI fingerprint check, and a passing score on state entry-to-practice tests. Information regarding all state require­ ments and procedures for certification is available in the School of Education. S ta te requirements are subject to im mediate change. Students should stay ir1 close corztact with their School ofEducatiorl advisers for upda tes in program or application requirements.

Initial Teachiog Certificate Renewal: Under state regulations in effect at the publication of this catalog, the Initial Certificate is valid for four years, and may be renewed for an additional three years by meeting the following requirements: l. In order to be eligible to renew or have an initial certificate reissued, an individual must have completed all coursework requirements for continuing certification or have completed 1 0 semester ( I 5 quarter) hours of study since the issuance of the MOST RECENT initial certificate in the role for which renewal or reissuance is being sought ( WAC 1 80-79-065) ( 1 ) (a). The individual must also meet the recency requirement described below. In some cases the same credits may apply to both the renewallreissuance requirement and the recency requirement. 2. In order to be eligible to obtain, renew, or have an initial certificate reissued, the individual must have completed 1 0


semester ( 1 5 quarter) hours within th seven years preceding application for the initial certificate. The recency requirement does not < pply to individuals who are seeking the continuing certificate. (W 1 80-79-06 5 ) ( 3 ) 3 . A n individual must co mplet e the renewal application form and send it to the School of Education, with the $ 1 5 renewal fee (check made payable to Pacific Lutheran Un iversityJ. 4 . An individual must h ave a copy of his or her I n i t i a l Certificate on fue in the School of Education. Converting to the Continuing Certificate: At the time of pu lication of this catalog, state requirements illclude: I . 30 semester hours of upper division or graduate level post­ baccalaureate study. 2. 1 80 days of full- time teaching, of which 30 days must be with the same employer. 3. 'lWo endorsements. 4. Coursework in issues of abuse. Although the master's degree is no longer required, any School of Education M.A.E. degree can be used to meet the academic re­ quirements for the continuing certificate. Other means by which the School of Education can help persons meet continuing certi­ fication requir ments will be con idered as they become known. tiLEMENTARY PREPARATION General requirements: In addition to the general u niversity and core requirements in all curricula, certain specific requirements i.n general education must be met. 1. Anthropology 102 , Explorulg Anthropology; Culture and Society ( recommended) or Anthropology 2 1 O/History 2 1 0, Global Perspect ives , or the equivale n t must be taken. 2. Mathematics 223 or equivalent must be taken. 3. Biology I I I or life science. 4. Natural Scien ces 206 or physical science.

State Endorsement Requirements: Program shall be comprised of the appropriate pedagogy courses and field experiences/ intern hip as well as the following subject areas: I ) Language literacy ( reading strategies, writing process, communication, language skills, child and adolescent literature); 2) Mathematics ( number sense, measurement, geometric sense, probabilitr & st atis t ics , algebraic sense); 3) Science (life, physical, and lab) ; 4) Social studies ( U.S. history, geography, economics, civics) ; 5 ) The arts ( music, visual arts, drama, creative movemen t ) ; 6) Healtblritness ( fo undations of health, fitness, and safe living); 7) p edagogy; 8 ) field experien es. SECONDARY PREPARATION General requirements: In addition to the general university requirements in all curricula, certain specific requirements for geneTal edu a t i o n must be met. 1 . Anthropology/History 2 1 0, Global Perspectives ( recom­ mended) or Anthropology 1 02, Culture and Socie ty, must be taken. 2. Computer cience 322, Microcomputers in the Classroom, must be taken ( Physical Education and Music Education degree m ajors excepted). 3. Minimum grade requirements include a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 � r the following: a. Entrance to professional sequence. b. Enrollment in any course in professional education. c. Graduation and/or certification . 4. Grades of C or higher in the following: a. All courses in majors and minors. b. Writing 1 0 1 , Psychology 10 I, Anthropology/History 210 or Anthropology 1 02 . c. Computer Science 3 2 2 .

ACADEMIC PREPARATION: All students desiring to teach i n Secondary Schools (4-1 2) must co mplet e a minimum of one of the primary endorsements l isted below. They may also opt to complete (a) a second primary endorsement, (b) one or more supporting endorsements, (c) a university major or minor that does not result in a teaching endorsement. The teaching endorsements listed below have been revised because of changes in the Washington Administrative Code. These endorsements a ffect all students \vho are admitted to the university after August 3 1 , 2 000. PRINCIPAL'S AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR'S CERTIFICATE: Preparation programs leading to certification at t h e initial and continuing levels for school and district-wide program administrators are available through the School of Education. Specific requirements for the certificates are identified in handbooks available upon request. Master's degrees in educational administration are described in the Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

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CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL NURSES: Educational Staff Associate certification for school nurses is individually designed through the School of Nursing. For information regarding school nurse certification, contact the School of Nursing (535 -8872 ) . TEACHING ENDORSEMENTS: Students preparing to teach in the elementary schools (K-8) will complete a program in the School of Education which meets the endorsement requirements al ready listed under Elementary Preparation. They may opt to include an additional primary or supporting endorsement from those that follow. Students preparing to teach in the secondary school (4- 1 2) will complete a program in the school of Education as described in handbooks prepared by the School of Education and they will also complete a minimum of one of the primary endorsements that follow. They may opt t() include an additional primary or supp rting endorsement from those that follow or a university major or min r as listed elsewhere in the catalbg. The following teaching endorsements reflect the current req uirements listed in the Washington Administrative Code for all tho e who graduate after August 3 1 , 2000. Elementaryl See e n d orse men t requirements already listed under Elementary Preparation and specific requirements given by the School o f Education. Teaching Endorsements

ARTS - VISUAL ARTS ( 1 ) Skills and techniques in multiple media ( painting, sculpture, d raw i ng , computer, photography); (2) Composition and production using design pri n ci p les ; ( 3 ) Analysi s and interpretation of art; (4) Social, cultural and historical contexts and connections; ( 5 ) Material, equipment and facilities safety. All levels - primary - 34 semester hours. Art 1 60, 226, 250, 365 ( 1 , 5 ) ; 1 96 ( 2 ) ; 296 ( 3 ) ; 1 80 or 1 8 1 ( 4 ) ; 34 1 , 440. State elldorsement requiremellts:

All levels - supporting - 20 semester hours.

Courses to be selected in consultation with adviser in Art and Education. BIOWGY

( I ) Botanyllab; ( 2 ) Zoologyllab; ( 3 ) Genetics; (4) Microbiology or cell biology/lab; (5) Chemistry/lab; (6) Ecology; (7) Evolution; ( 8 ) Lab safety, practice, and management; (9) Lab, inquiry-based experience, ( 1 0 ) Contemporary, historical, technological, and societal issues and concepts.

State endorsement req uirements:

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SecOII(/ary - prima ry - 32 semester h o u rs. B io l ogy 1 6 1 ( 1 . 2, 3, 4, ( 0 ) ; 162 ( I , 2 , 1 0 ); 323 (2, 6, 7); 340 ( ! , 9); 33 2 or 407 (3, 9, 1 0 ) ; 328 or 348 ( 1 , 2, 3, 4, 9); 424 (6, 1 0) or 475 ( 7, ( 0 ); Chem istry 1 05 or 1 20 (5, 8, 10).

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Secondary - sLLpp ort illg - 20 eme,Ster hOllrs.

Iliology 1 61 ( 1 , 2 , 3. 4. 9); [ 6 2 ( 1 , 2 , 9); 2 0 1 or 328 (4); 323 (6, 7, [ 0); ,hemi t ry 1 0 5 Or J 20 ( 5, 8, t o ) .

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224, 225, 227, 326, 328 ( 2 ) ; o m mullicario!1 284 and 285 or 330 (3); La ngu a ge 44 or English 40 ( 4 ) ; E nglish 24 1 ( 5 ) ; 4 hours from E n g l is h 333 , 334, Educati n 428, 429; 4 h o urs from En gl i sh 2 J 5, 2 1 6, 2 1 7; 4 hours from English 2 3 0 232, 2 33 , 234 . ENGUSHffiNGUSB LANGUAGE ARTS

CHEMISTRY State n do rSCllletll req u ireme1l ts: ( I ) General p r i n c ip les of ch e m is t ry - i norgan ic . physical, and analytical/lab; ( 2 ) Organi ch roi t ryl lab; ( 3 ) Quantitative anal i s/lab ; ( 4 ) Biochem istry/lab; ( 5 ) Physics; (6) Laboratory sa fe ty, pr actice. and management; (7) Lab i nquiry-based experience; (8) Relati nship of the co n ce p ts of science to contemporary hi s to ri cal , tech nologieal. aJld societal issues. Secondary - prima ry - 50 semester hours.

Che mi stry 1 20 or [ 25 ( 1 . 6. 7); 232/332 , ltd 234/334 (2, 6, 7); 338 ( 3 ) ; 34 1 , 342, 343, 344 ( I , 6, 7 ; 403 (4 , 5 , 8 ) ; Physics [ 53,

( I ) Acti ng skills; (2)

ESL - all levels - 16 semester hours.

Theatre

Anlhrop ' lob'Y 1 02 (2); LlnJuage 445 ( 2. 5) ; 446 ( 1 , 2); 470,

d esi g n and const ruction; (3) Directi ng; ( 4 ) Stage m an age ­ m nt; ( 5) Analyis a.nd criticism; (6) Equipment, m a ter ials ,

475 ( 2. 3 4 ) . BF.AITHfFlTNESS

wd facil ities safety. Ali i vels - stlpporting - 20 se mester hours. NOTE: Students who "major" in Drama will only rec ive a "Supporting Elldorsemlmt" allti must still complete a "Primary Etldorsemellt" Thea tr 250 r 458 ( l )j 8 hour from 1 5 L , 352, 356, 452 (2. 4,

5. 6 ) ; 454 (3); 358 r Communicat ion [ 23 (5).

EARTH SCIENCE State

ndo rse men t requ irements: ( 1 ) Physical geolo gy; ( 2 )

f-listorical geology; (3 ) Environm nta l i sues related t o ea rt h science; (4) Occwography; ( 5) Astronomy; ( ) Meteo r logy; ( 7 ) Lab safety. practi e. a n d management; (8) Lab, inquiry­ base d exp er i e nce: ( 9) Relationsh ip of lhe concepts of science to contempora ry. h istorica l , tech nol ogical, and societal issues. fcolldary - prima ry - 32 se mester hours eoscience 20 1 ( 1 , 2); 1 03 or 1 04 (3, 7, 8); 1 02 (4, 7 , 8 , 9 ) ; 105

6, 7, 8); Physics 1 1 0 ( 5. 7, 8); 4 hours from Math t 4 0 or higher or ne course from Com p u ter 'cience an Computer En g i neeri ng 144 or 2 20; 1 2 hours from upper division geoscie nce cou es; he m i st ry 1 04 r 1 20; PhY 'i s J 25, 1 35 .

Secondary - support ing - 2 0 semester hOllrs Geoscience 201 ( 1 , 2); 1 03 or 104 ( 7, 8); 1 02

(6, 7, 8 ) ; Physics I J O (5, 7, 8).

(4, 7, 8, 9 ) ; 1 05

ENGLISH State elldo l'Si!nlent req uiremellts: ( I ) Readi ng: ( 2 ) Writing; ( 3 ) Com municali n -, peak in g , liste n i n g. and analyzing; (4)

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Hist ry 460 ( 1 , 4, 5, 6); 8 hours from H i sto ry 25 1 , 252. 25 3 ( 2 , 4 , 5 , 6); J 6 ho u rs (at least 4 up pe r division ek tives i n U. 'J European and 4 upp . r d i v is i o n elec tive. in non-WI stern hist ry, from 1 0 7 or 108 and 2 1 5, 335, 337, 338, 339, 340, 344 ( 3, 4. 5, 6) ; 30 I ( 2 , 4, 5, 6).

'ccondary - support illg - 16 se mester hOll rs. History 46 ( 1 , 4. 5, 6); 4 hours from 25 1, 252, or 253 ( 2 , 4 , 5 , 6 ) ; 4 hotlfS from 1 07 , 1 08, or 2 1 5 (3, 4, 5. 6); 4 upper division

req uirements: ( 1 ) Geometry ( E u c l i dea n and ( 2 ) r ba b i l i ty and staLi st ics; ( 3 ) alculus ( i n te gral wd differentia l) ; (4) Discrete mathema tics; ( 5 ) Logic and problem o l vi ng ; (6) H i story of math or founda tion of

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hours.

( 3. 4) ; 3 ) 7 (4, 5) ; 3 2 1 ( l , 2 ) ; 33 1 ( 5 ) ; 3 4 1 ( 2 ) ; 433 (5); 35 1 o r 356 o r Physics 1 53, 1 63 ( 3 ) . Ma th 1 5 1 , 1 52 ( 3) ; 2 03 ( 6 ) : 2 5

MUSIC Choral m usic. General m u si [nstrum n tal M u i See requirements under Music.

K-8 - pri m li ry - 3 1 -32 sem' fer h o rm. Student� p re par i ng to teach in K-8 may pt to take the fo l low i ng courses for a primary endorsement in En gl i sh . Engl i h 2 14 , 2 1 5 , or E du catio n 408 ( I ) ; 4 hours fro m En gl i sh I

history; n it ed States h isto ry; ( 3 ) World bistory; ( 4 ) Civics/ po liti cal science/Uni ted States gov mment; ( 5 ) Geography; 6) Econom ics.

(2)

n on - Euclidean) ;

Secondary - support ing - 24 semrster ho urs. Engli h 2 1 4 or 2 1 5 ( 1 ) ; Engllsh 328 ( 2 ) : Co m mun ica i n 284 and 285 o r 30 3) ; Eng l i h 4 03 (4); English 241 a nd 2 5 1 (5).

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State endorseme n t req lli rcments: ( 1 ) Pacilic No rt hwes t

State endorsemell f

tudents must have fo ur years of h igh sch oo l foreign language in one language or co u rses through 2 0 1 and 202 at the u niver ity in one fo reign l a ng ua ge: E n sJis h 2 1 4 or 2 1 5 ( 1 ); 4 hours from 216, 2 t 8, 23 0, 233 , 343 ( 1 , 5 ) ; 328 ( 2 ) ; 403 (4 ) ; 24 1 , 25 1 30 1 ( 5 ) ; Comm un ication 330 (3); 4 h ou rs from 2 l 4 , 22 L , 234, 325, 32 7, 34 J , 374.

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Secont/ary - primary - 36 semrster hours.

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tate endorsement requirements: ( l ) Foundations of health and fime S; ( 2 ) Sa fe liv ing, in luding first aid and P Rj ( 3 ) Scien tific fO\J nd�tioos for health and fitness ( anatomy, exercise physiol g , kinesiology/biomech nics, p. ych mo tor matura­ t ion and development, and motor learning) ; ( 4 ) Movement, activi ties, and application with a rt u t i on to s pec ia l n eeds populatiollS; ( 5 ) C ord inat d health ed ucat io n ( alcoh I and o th er drugs, diseases, injury preven lion , human relationships, nutrition, HIV p r eve nt i on . and abuse preven tion ) . Please see requirements Wider Physical &lucal'ioll.

hours from 335. 337 , 338, 339, 340, 344 3, 4, 5, 6) .

Language: ( 5) Literature - American, British, world, a nd multicultural.

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nglish 2 1 4 or 2 1 5 ( 1 ) ; 4 hours fTom Engli sh 224, 225, 227, 26, 328 (2); Com mun i cation 284 and 285 o r 330 (3); Language 446 or E nglis h 403 (4); nglish 24 1 , 2 1 , 30 I ( 5 ) ; Theat re 250 O f 4 5 8 ( 1 . 3, 4, 5); 4 hours from . ng l i s h 2 16. 2 1 8, 2 30, 233, 343 ( 5 ) ; 4 hours (rom English 22 1 , 325. 327 34 1. 374 ( 5 ) .

( 2 ) Cross-cu ltural Leaching and learn i ng stra tegi es; ( 3 ) Literacy development ( readi n g. WT it ing, l isteni ng, speaking); (4) History and theory of ESL; (5) ill truct io n al strat gies Ii r ESL.

6, 7): 403 ( 4 , 5 , 8 ) .

State endorsemeTlt requirements:

eco ndary - primary - 40 semeste r hours.

ENGUSH A S A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESt) State en do rse me n t req uirements: ( 1 ) Lang ua ge ac q u i si t i o n t he ory ;

1 54, 163, and 164 ( 5 ) ; Req u i red �u pp ort i n g: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Seamdary - supporting - 2 2 �emester hours. Chemistry 1 20 ( 1 . 6, 7 ); 232 / 332 , 234/334 (2, 6, 7); 338 ( 2 , 3, D RAMA

( l ) Re ad i ng; ( 2 ) Wr i t i ng: ( 3) Com mun icatio n ; (4) La nguage; ( 5 ) America n , BriLish, world, multicultoral, and ad olescent l i terature.

Sta te endorsenHmt req u i re mel lts :

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340, 344 (3, 4, 5, 6, 7); Political Science 1 5 1 ( 5 ) ; 8 hours, 4 each from two of the three disciplines - any an thropology course other than 1 02 or 2 1 0; any psychology other than 1 0 1 ; Sociology 1 0 1 o r 330 ( 6 ) ; 4 hours from .Economics 1 30 1 5 1 ,

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SPECIAL EDUCATION Scate endorsemCllt req uirements:

0

(I)

Exceptionality; ( 2 ) Curricul u m modification and adaptation; (3) Inclusion; (4) Assessment including behavior analysis, IEP, accommodations; ( 5 ) Legal issues; (6) Specially designed instruction in all content areas; (7) Pro-social skills and behavioral problems; (8) chool, family, community partnerships; (9) TrallSition; ( 10 )

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Organization and management systems; ( I I ) Methods in early childhood education; ( 1 2 ) Collaboration with para-educators.

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AI/ levels - primary - 35 semester ho urs

( 1 , 5 ) ; 301 ( 2 , 4, 5 , 6, 1 0) ; 350 (3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9); 355 (2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, ( 0 ) ; 404 ( 1 2); 405 ( 2 , 3, 4, 5, 6); 407 (2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 10); 480 ( 1, 5, ( 2 ) ; 492 ( 1 , 2, I I ) ; 440 ( 1 - 1 2); 408 (8, 9 ) ; 438 0r 439 ( 1 - 1 2) .

Special Education 200

WORlD LANGUAGES

(1)

PHYSICS

State endorsement requirements:

of scienc to con temporary, hi, torical, technological a.nd societal iss ues. Secondary - primary - 38 se mester hours. Phys ics 1 53 and L 4 ( 1 ) ; 163 and 164 ( J , 2, 3); 223 ( 1 , 4) ; 33 1 and 336 and 354 ( ! ) ; Math I S J , 1 52, and 25 . . Seco llda ry - supporting - 26 semester hours. P hysics 1 5 3 or 1 25 ( I ); Physi cs 1 54 or 1 26 ( I ); 1 63 or 1 35 ( I , 2, 3); 1 64 or 1 36 ( 1 , 2, 3); 223 ( 1 , 4 ) ; Mat h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 , and 1 53 .

Chinese - aI/ levels - supporting - 27 semester hours.

READING

State erldorsement requirecmen ts: ( I ) Assessment nd diagnosis of reading skills and de fi c ien c ies; ( 2 ) Strategies of how to teach (3) La nguag acquisition/integ ration; ( 4 ) Sod II ( 5 ) Reading process including decoding, e ncodin g , and student respo nse to child and adolescent l i tera t u re ; (6) Beginning li t e r cy (r ad in g, writing, spelling, a n d communi atio n ) ; (7) Reading i n the content areas; (8) Li te r cy for a second l anguag learner; ( 9 ) Meta足 cognitive st rategies; (0) Risk fuctors for r ailing difficu l ti es and i ntervention strategies for . tudents e lCpe r ie nc i ng reailing reading;

cu l t u ral contexts for literacy;

d ifficulties. All levels - 5upporring - 1 7 s mester hours.

Education 408 ( I , 2, 5, 6, 8, , 1 0) ; 4 1 1 (2, 3, 6, 8, 9 ) ; 4 1 3 ( 1 , 3, 9); 4 3 8 (3, 4); 490 ( 3, 8, 1 0) ; 4 hours fro m 426, 427, 428, or 429.

SCIENCE

State ndorsemellt reql4irements: ( 1 )

a primary eJldorsement i n biology, che m ist ry, I!arth science, or physics (as described under desig n ate d s iences ) ; (2) a minimum of one course from ach of the other de ignated sciences. Secondary - primary - 44-52 semester hmm. Students opting to be endo rsed in the g e n e ral sciences should . me t with an adviser in dences and education .

SOCIAL STUDIES

State endorsement

(2)

req tliremerlts: ( 1 ) Pacific Northwest history; United States h isto ry, induding chronologie 1, thematic,

multicul tural, et hn ic and women's h is tory; (3) world. reg i on al , or country history; (4) Geography, (5) Po lit ical scien e, civics, or government; ( 6) A!lthropology, psychology, or sociology;

(7) Economi .s.

Secol1dary - primmy - 40 semester hours.

H istory 460 ( 1 , 4); 4 h urs from 25 1 , 252, 253 ( 2 , 4); 4 hours from 1 07, 1 08 ( 2 , 4, 5 , 7); 4 hours from 335, 337, 338, 339,

Communiction - speaks,

understands, reads, and writes in a variety of contexts and situations; (2) Culture; (3) InterdisciplinaIY integration; (4)

State endorsement req uirements: ( I ) General principles o f physics/lab; (2) Lab s a fety, p r actice and m an ag ment; (3 ) Lab, inquiry-based experien e; (4) Relationsllips of the concepts

Language acquisition theory; (5) Methodological study. hinese 1 0 1 , 1 02, 20 1 , 202, 30 1 ( 1 , 2) ; 371 (2, 3, 4); Language 445 (3, 4, 5). French - aI/ levels - primary - 3 1 semester hours. Fre.nch 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( 1 ); 3 2 1 (2, 3 ) ; 42 1 , 422 ( 1 , 2 ) ; Language 4 4 5 ( 3, 4, 5). French - all levels - supporting - 23 semester hours. French 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( I ); 3 2 1 ( 2 ) ; Language 445 ( 3 , 4 , 5 ) . German - aI/ levels - prim ary - 3 J semester hours. German 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( 1 ) ; 3 2 1 ( 2 , 3 ) ; 4 2 1 , 422 Language 445 ( 3 , 4, 5). German - all levels - supporting - 2 3 semester ho urs.

( 1 , 2);

German 2 01 , 202, 30 1 , 302 0 ) ; 3 2 1 ( 2 ) ; Language 445 (3, 4, 5). Norwegian - aI/ levels - primary - 3 1 semester hours. Norwegian 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 ( 1 ) ; 4 hours from upper division electives in Scandinavian cu lt u re (2, 3 ) and 8 homs from upper division elective in Scandinavian literature ( 1 , 2, 3 ) ;

Language 445 ( 3, 4, 5). Norwegian - all levels - supporting - 23 semester ho urs. Norwegian 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302

( I ); 4 hours from upper division

electives i n Scand inavian culture (2, 3 ) ; Language 445 (3, 4, 5 ) . Spanish - all levels - primary - 3 1 semester hours. Spanish 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302 0 ) ; 32 1 (2); 8 hours from 42 1 , 422, 43 1 , 432 (2, 3 ) ; Language 445 (3, 4, 5 ) . Spanish - all levels - s upporting - 2 3 semester hO llrs. Spanish 20 1 , 202, 301, 302 ( 1 ) ; 32 1 (2, 3); Language 445 (3, 4, 5 ) .

Course Offerings 262 Foundations of Education Introduction to teaching; historical, philosophical, social, poli足 tical, ethical and legal foundations. Federal and state legislation fo r special populations. Prerequisites: WRIT 1 0 1 , PSYC 1 0 1 , test scores, sophomore standing, cumuLative GPA of 2.50. ( 3 ) 263 School Observation

Graded observation in schools. Concurrent with 262. ( 1 ) 302 Human LeanUog: Growth and Development Overview of theories of human development emphasizing the individual cognitive, linguistic, socio-cultural, emotional, and

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phys i ca l develop ment of children and adolescents in and out of

4 1 0 Science/Health in K-8 Education St ra t e gi es fo r t e ac h ing

p ro g ra m ; p er m i s si on re q u ire d . (Co ncurrent w i t h 303 . ) (3)

p roblem-solving t echn iq ues will be emp l o yed to explore

interactive curricula from an environmental point of view. Issues

303 Field Observation z o

.... e( U :I Q w

of nutrition and health. Prerequisite: 357. ( Conc u r re n t with 400,

b erva tion of tb developmental nature o f g rowth in learners

40 1 , 4 1 2.) ( 3 )

in various settings i nclu d i ng K - 8 schools. Emphasis on the

development of the skill of observa tion and i n fo rm a l men t. (Concurrent with 302.) ( 1 )

assess­

4 1 1 Strategies ior LanguagelLiteracy Development ross- referenced with 5 1 1 . ) ( 2 )

322 Microcomputers in the Classroom

412 Social Studies in K-8 Education

I ntrod uc tion to t he lise of m i c r computers in ducational set­ tings. Pre or co - req u is ite : ED U C 262 or 302. Does not count to wa rd d grees i n co m p ut er scien . (2)

studies curricula and the lived experiences of human lives.

Focus on drawing connections be twe e n the content of social

P re re q u is i t e : 357. (Concurrent with 400, 40 1 , 4 1 0. ) ( 3 )

3 4 1 Philosophy o f Vocational Education

413 Language/IJter cy Development: Assess.ment and Instruction (Cross- referenced with 5 1 3.) ( 4 )

O bj ective s of high school business ed ucation programs, the business curricul u m, layout and fac ilities planning, the eva lu a­ t ion of business teachers and co m p e te n ce for b u s i nes occupa­

t io n s . ( 2 )

426 Special Topics 10 Child..ren's Literahlre (Cross-referenced w i t h 526.) (2)

342 Method o f Teaching Typing App l ic a t i on or research findi ngs and psy h I g i c al princi p l es to the tea h i ng of typmg. Prerequ i ite: ad va n ced typing. ( 2 )

427 Multicultural Chlldren's Uterature (Cross- re ferenced w i t h 527.) ( 2 ) 428 Children's literature in the K-8 Curriculum (Cross- referenced with 528.) ( 2 )

343 Methods o f Teaching Bookkeeping Application of researc h findings and psychological pr i n c ip l e.s to

the tea c h i ng of bookkeeping. Prerequisite: B

281. ( I )

S

429 Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum ( Cross-referenced wi th 529.) (2)

344 Method of Tea ch1ng Gene.ral Business Subjects Ap p l ica tio n 0 r esearc h fin dings and psychological p ri nci p les to the teachi ng of genera l business, consumer economics, cono mics, b usi n ess law. business mathemati s, and bus iness communications ubjects. Prereq u isites: ECON L 5 1 - 1 52 and BUSA 28 1 . ( l )

430 Student Teaching in K-8 Education Teaching in classrooms of local p ub l ic schools under the direct s u p er v i s io n of School or Education fa cu l t y and classroom t each ers . Prerequisite: EDUC 400, art, mu s ic and p hys i ca l

education methods. 2.50 G PA. Con u rr e n t enr !lment in 435. ( Meets senior seminar/project req u i rement.) (9)

345 Methods of Teaching Secretarial Subjects

434 Student Teach1ng - Elementary (Dual)

a t i o n o f res e a r h finding ' and psychological pr i n c iples to the teach ing of shorth, nd, om c pr a c t ice , s imul ation , word processi ng , and related su bj ects. Prerequisi lCS: advanced typing and adva nc ed horthand. ( 2 )

Appli

Designed fo r persons who do dual tudent te a c hi n g. Ten weeks

f t eac h ing in classrooms of l o c a l pu bl i c schools u n der the direct Ed uca t io n faculty and lassTOorn reachers. Prerequisite: 400, art, musi , and p h ys ic a l education methods. 2.50 PA. Concurrent en ro l l me n t in 435. ( Meets enior eminar/project requiremen t . ) (9)

supervision of School of

357 MecUe and Technology in K-8 Classrooms Con iderat ion of the role of m edia ill loday's s clety and i potential in the l ea rn i n g p ro cess as a way of faci li tating learner empowerment. Prerequisit : EDUC 302. ( Co nc urre nt with 3 58,

435 Topics 10 Elementary Education Classroom: Prac.tice in the Context of Educational Foundations

406, 408.) ( 2 )

Sch ol- based elO;: erience will be explored in t h e context of the

358 Practicum I

Extended exp e ri en ce and pa rt i cipa t i on in

historical, socio-c ul tu ral , political, le g al , fi nancial , ethical, al1d

assigned public 5ch 01 classroom. P re requ i si te : £DUe 302. (Concurrent w i t h 357, 406, 40!l . ) ( l ) an

ph i l oso ph i cal foundations of ed uc at i on . Prerequisites: 302, 303,

357, 358, 406, 408. (Concurrent with 430.) (3)

(36 Alternate Level Student Teaching - Elementary

400 Topics in I!leme.ntary Education: Classroom Issu.es and Instructional Strategies

A course designed to give some knowledge, unde rst a ndin g , and study of c hildren, su bj ect matter fields, and materials in the student's alternate t eac h in g level p l u s student teaching on t hat level. Students who have completed s e c o n da r y preferred level studen t teaching should en ro ll i n this co u rs e . (6)

f current t h eory i nto pm tke as pertin 'nt to

Consideration

effe ct ive tea ch i n g and learning, i nc l udin g classroom manage-

m nt, or ga n i z at io n of classroom environ me n ts , and me eti n g the 357. ( Concu rren t wi t h 401 , 4 1 0, 4 1 2 .) (3) needs of diverse l ear n e rs . Prerequisite:

437 Alternate Level Student Teaching - s«ondary A course d eS i gned to give som knowl dge , u nd erst a nd i n g, and study o f c h i l dr en , subject matter field s, and m a terials in the student's alternate t e a c hi ng level plll tudent t e a c hi ng on that

401 Practicum U Extended e xp eri en ce and particip at ion in an a ssi gn ed p ub l ic

school class ro o m focus ing on ap pli cat ion of content methods

level. S t u d e n t s who have c o mpl e te d elementary p re ferr e d level

courses. I ncludes collection of video lessons. P re requis i te : 357. (Concurrent with

s tuden t teaching s h o u ld enroll in this course. Independent s t udy

400, 4 1 0, 4 1 2.) ( I )

c a rd req ui red . ( Meets se nio r seminar/project r e q ui re m en t .) (6)

406 Mathematics in K-8 Educatioll Expl oration of mathematical principles

438 Strategies for Whole Lit.eracy In81rru:tio n (K - 1 2) ( Cross- re ferenced with 538.) (2)

nd prac t i ces co ns is t nt

with NCfM cu rri cul um standards. Pr erequ isi te : 302 . (Concur­ rent with 357, 358, 408. ) ( 3 )

408 Uteracy in K - 8 Education Pa rti cip a t i on in the development of ap pro p r i a te cu rr i c u l a r s t rate g ies and in stru c tio nal D1 thods for supp r t i n g the d ive rsi ty of learners' language/literacy growth. Prerequisite: 302. ( Concur­ ren t with 3 57, 358, 406.) ( 3 ) 60

science b)' u s in g i n q ui r), methods and

school. I nitial course in EI me n ta ry Educati n certification

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44X Subject Area Methods I nstructio nal stra tegies, l o n g and short range planning, c u rric u­ l u m and other considerations specific to the d i sci p l i nes . Prerequisi tes: 262, 263, EPSY 2 6 1 , 3 6 1 , SPED 362


440 Art in the Secondary School ( 3 ) 444 English In the Secondary School ( 3 ) 445 Methods o f Teaching Foreigo Languages and EngU h as a Second Language ( Req u i red for forei g n language endorsement and ESL minor.) ( 3 ) 446 Mathematics in the Secondary School ( 3 )

447 Sdence In the Secondary School (3) 44 8 Sodal Studies In the Secondary School ( 3 ) 449 Computer Science ill the Secondary School ( 2 )

456 Storytelling A c mb in atio n of d is c ove r y a n d p ra c t ic um in the a r t of story­ telling. Investigates the a l ues and background of storytelling, the various types of and forms of st or ies , t ech n i qu es of choosing and of telling stories. Some off-campus practice. Demonstrations a nd joint s to ry telling by and with instructor. ( 2 )

457 The Arts, Media, and Technology Students use a v arie ty of techniques, e qu ip men t , and ma te r ials to explore ways of se ei ng a nd exp ressing how th ey see and ex pe ri ­ ence their environmen t. (2)

461 General Teaching Methods - Secondary Skill and un de rs ta n dings rel a te d to d eci si o n- mak i n g , instruc­ tional techniques, evaluation and tes ti ng , classroom manage­ ment, and d i s ci p line . Prerequisites: 262, 263; concurrent with

462. ( 3 )

462

Teacher Assisting � Secoadary Guided instructional assistance and tutoring in s c h ool s ;

concurrent with 46 1 .

( 1)

Student Teaching - Secondary ( Dual) Des ig ne d for pe rs o ns who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks

of te achin g in the publ i c schools under the direction and super­

visio n of classroom and u n i ershy teachers. P rerequi s i te : 2.50

Taken concurrently with SPED 439. (8)

467

1WaIuation Evaluation of school exper ie n ces ; p rob lem s in connection w ith

dev elop men t, o rgan i zati o n, and admi nis tr at ion of tests (stan­ dardized and t acher-ma de) . Re uired of fifth - yea r students. P re requ i ites: student tea ch ing o r teaching experience; 262, 253, EPSY 36 1 . May b e taken concurrently with studen t teaching.

G (2) 468 Student Teaching - Secondary Teaching in public schools under the d irec tion of cl ass ro o m and university teachers. Pre re quisi tes : formal ap p l icati o n ; se n i or strul d i ng ; cumulative G PA of 2 .50 or high r. ( Mee ts senior seminar/proj ect requ ireme n L ) (9)

46 9 Semin ar - Secondary A s em in ar for econdary s tudent teachers. Concurrent with 468. (3) 470 Curriculum. Materials and lostruction for Teaching English u a Second Language Ap p l ica tio n of language t eac hi ng m et hodology to va rio u s instruction I si tua t i ons. (4)

497 Spedal Project

c: n

Individual study and research on e d u ca ti on problems or

a d d i t iona l laboratory experience in public school cl a ssro om s . P re r e q uis ite : consent of the dean.

:to �

( 1 -4)

501 Workshops

503 On-Campus Workshops In Education On -cam pus gr ad ua t e wo rksh ops in education for varying len gths of time; e n r ollme n t s ubj ec t to adviser's ap p roval .

505 Issues in JJteracy Education Initial course required for all students in the m as te r's program in literacy education. Overview of historical and cu rre nt theo ry, p rac t i e, definitions, and research in language and l i tera cy acquisition and de vel o pm e nt in a n d out of schools. R equ i red of any track option s e le cted . ( 2 )

506 Foundations o f School Library Media Center Management Functions of the school library media center with p ar t ic ul ar emphasis on the roles and re spon s i bili t i es o f t he school library media s p eci al i s t within i ns truction a l and adm i n is tr a t ive arenas.

507 Principles o f Information Organization. Retrieval, and Service Exp lora t i on of a broad range of data and information in primary and seco n dary sources, i ncl u di ng document, bibliography, full­ text , sta tistical, visual, and recorded formats. ( 2 )

508 Principles o f BibJiograpbJc Analysis and Control

The orga niza tio n

and str uc ture of a broad range o f information

fo rmats with an emphasis on the analysis of st a nda rd bibli graphic com p onen ts p re sc ri bed by national bibliographic databa "es.

(2)

509 FoundatioDs of Collection Development The ph ilosophical bases and pa ra me ters of collection develop­ m en t in the school library media center. ( 2 )

5 1 0 The Acquisition and Development o f Language and Literacy Investigation of how young children acqu i re their first language and what they know as a result of this learnin g . ( 2 )

5 1 1 Strategies for Language/Uteracy Development The de velo p m en tal nature of lit er ac y learning with emphasis on the vital role of language and the interrel at e dness and interde­ pendence of li stening, s peak i ng, reading, and wr it i n g as language processes. Pre requi si te: 5 1 0. ( 2 ) 5 1 3 Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction

Extended exper i en ce and p a rt i cipat io n in an assigned ESL setting. Prereq u i si t e : LANG/EDUC 445 (C nCUITellt with

The p re pa ra tion and sh ar ing of selected to p ics related to the

48S

(2)

470) . ( 1 )

Understanding of a

515 Profe8&ional Seminar; Continuing Level. Teachers m in i mum generic standards needs of the in div id ual p ar ti c i p a n ts. Required for the continuing level certi fica t ion of teache rs . ( 2 )

The Gifted CbiJd

A tu dy of the gifted child, ch a ra ct e ri st i cs and p roblems, and school p rocedu res designed to further develo pment. G ( 2 )

490 Acqnisitlon and Development o f Language (Cross- referenced w it h 5 1 0.)

z

0 - 4)

475 Practiaun In Teacbi.ng £ngUsb a s a Second Language

I ssu s and skills im p orta n t in c onfe re nc i n g and parent-teacher

LANG/EDUC

o

Graduate wo rkshops in special fields fo r va rying lengths of ti me .

wide v ar iet y of s t rateg ies and tools for assessing and fa c i lit at in g students' development in reading, writing, l is te n in g , and spe aki ng . Prerequ i s i te: 5 1 0; highl y recommended to be taken at the end of th e track sequence. (4)

473 PareDt�Teach.er Relationships relati onships.

"' c

(2)

4.66

GPA .

496 Laboratory Workshop Practical course us i ng el em entar y- age children in a classroom si t uati on wo rki ng out s p e c ific p ro b l e m s ; p rovi s io n will be made fo r some active pa r t ici pati o n of the u nive rsi ty students. Prereq­ uisites: conference with the instructor or the dean of the School of Edu c at i on.

5 1 6 Teacher Supervision

Identification and development of s uperv i sory skills for teachers who work w it h other adults in the classroom. ( 1 )

(2) .

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526 Special Topics in Chlldren's Literature

554 Principalship V

Students explore the various themes of social issues fo und in

The principal as a change agent. Study of current issues in

children's literature through discussion groups and the construc­

administration.

tion of text sets and thematic units used in elementary and z o

l­ e( v ;:)

Q w

middle school classrooms. ( 2 )

560 Practicum Guided instructional assistance and tutoring in schools. Designed for MA/Cert Program. ( 2 )

527 MultJcultural Children's Literature Exploration of multi-cultural issues in the context of children's literature. ( 2 )

562 Schools and Society Individual and cooperative study of the socio-cultural and

528 Children's Literature i n K-8 Curriculum

cultural, political, legal, historical, and philosophical foundations

Investigation of genres of contemporary children's literature and

of current practices o f schooling in America. Prerequisite:

development of a personal repertoire for classroom use. ( 2 )

Admission to the MA/Cert Program or consent of instructor. ( 3 )

529 Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum

563 Integrating Seminar

Genres in adolescent Literature and exploration of strategies fo r

Students work cooperatively and individ ually to integrate educa­

integration of young adult materials across the middle and

tion co ursework, field experience, and individual perspective

secondary school curriculum. ( 2 )

throughout the MA/Cert program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA/Cert program.

530 Children's Writing

( 1-4)

Current theory and practice in the teaching and learning of

564 The Arts, Mind, and Body

writing in elementary classrooms. ( 2 )

An expl ration of methods to facilitate creativity and meaning­ making in the classroom through visual, musical, non-verbal!

537 Media and Technology for School LIbrary

physical movement, and dramatic arts. ( 2 )

Media Specialists The management of media and technology services in the school

565 The Art and Practice o f Teaching

library media center. Special emphasis on emerging technologies

Through application projects, micro-teaching experiences, and

used in K - I 2 instructional programs (CD-ROM, i"nteractive

reading representing d i fferent perspectives, participants will

video, distance learning, computer technologies) . ( 2 )

practice and assess a variety of options for designing, imple­

538 Strategies for Whole LIteracy lnstruction (K-12) The use o f language as a tool for learning across the curriculum, and the roles of language in all kinds of teaching and learning in

menting, and assessing lessons and units that integrate math­ ematics, science, social science, language arts, and physical education in K-8 classrooms.

(6)

K - 1 2 classrooms. Strategies for reading/writing in content areas,

56 8 Internship in Teaching

thematic teach ing, topic study, and integrating curriculum. ( 2 )

Internship in classroom settings. Fourteen weeks of teaching under the direct supervision of cooperating teachers and

544 Research and Program Evaluation Knowledge of evaluation techniques, including portfolios, and of research design; ability to interpret educational research; to

university supervisors. Designed for students in the MA/Cert program.

(6)

identify, locate, and acquire typical research and related litera­

585 Comparative Education

ture; to use the results of research or evaluation to propose

Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems

program changes and write grants . ( 2 )

of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying knowledge for greater understanding of the d iverse populations

545 Methods and Techniques of Research Seminar in research methods and techniques in education with

in the K- 1 2 educational syste m .

(3)

emphasis on designing a research project in the student's area of

586 Sociology of Education

interest. Required fo r M.A. Prerequisites: Admission to the

Viewing the educational system as a complex and changing

graduate program;

social institution. Emphasis on value orientations from d iverse

544; minimum of 24 semester hours of

coursework leading to the M.A.; consultation with student's

human populations and their impact on K- 1 2 education and

adviser. (2)

educational issues. ( 3 )

550 Principalship I

587 History of Education

Introduction to the role and function of the principalship with

A study of great men and women whose lives and writings have

emphasis on team building and interpersonal professional

shaped and continue to shape the character of American

relationships and ethical decision-making. Prerequisite:

education.

Admission to the graduate program or permission of graduate adviser. ( 3 )

(3)

589 PhIlosophy of Education Philosophical and theoretical foundations of American educa­

55 1 Prindpalship I I

tion as well as the social philosophy of growing diverse popula­

The principal a s a n instructional leader who oversees curricu­

tions in the K- I 2 schools. (3)

lum, student achievement, and assessment, and supervises teachers in their work.

(4)

590 Graduate Seminar A workshop for all Master of Arts candidates in the School of

552 Priodpalsblp m

Education. Candidates should register for this seminar for

The principal as a manager of resources and community

assistance in fulfilling requirements. No credit is given, nor is

relations. Local, state, and federal issues in school finance and

tuition assessed.

communicating with school stakeholders the m i services of the school.

ion and

(4)

595 Internship in Educational Administration Students will register for 2 semester hours in each of two

.553 Prlndpalship IV

semesters. Internship in educational administration jointly

The principal as a developer of personnel. Study of contempo­

planned and supervised by the School of Education and public

rary federal, state, and local statutes, regulations, and case law

and/or private school administrators in full compliance with

related to working with personnel issues, including legal

state requirements. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate

principles in hiring, firing, in-service and staff develop ment, support services, and contract negotiation. (4)

educational administration concentration; consultation with

program or to the credentialing program; completion of adviser. ( 2 , 2 )

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596 Graduate Seminar Stud nts regist r � r 1 se m e ter hour in ea c h of two emesters. Pro fes si o n al seminars are scheduled and p resen ted by candidates, their u wve rsi t ), p rofessors , and pr fes sio na l coUeagues in the schools in partner hip. Prereq ui ite : Com p le t i o n of cour ework in ed ucat ional adm inistratioll concentration.

(2)

597 �dependent Study Projects of varying l engt h related to e d u cat ional issues or cone ms of the individua l par t i c ip a nt and ap p roved by an appropriat tacuIty m em ber and the dean. ( [ -4) 598 Studies in Education A research paper or project on an ed ucati on al issue selected j intly by the st ude n t and t.h.e g ra du at e adviser. Prere quisites: Admission to the gra d u te p rogr a m ; 544, 545; m in i m u m of 26 h our of course-work le adi n g to the M.A.; consultation with t he st u de n t" adviser. ( 2 ) 599 Thesis The thesis problem will be ho se n from the candidate's maj r

field o f concentration and ITllLSt be approved by the andidate's graduate committee. Candidates are exp e c ted to defend the ir thesis in a final o r al examination conducted by t heir comm ittee. (3-4)

Educational Psychology

26 1 Human Relations Development Study and lab orat o ry experien es i n th develop men t of human r la t i ons 'kills, esp ec ially t hose skilli need d to facilitate p roblem -solv i ng and pers onal, social, and moral development. i n cl uding both healing and growth. Prereq uisites: WRIT 1 0 1 , P SYC 1 0 1 , test sco res , sophomore s ta n din g , cum ulative GPA of 2.50. (3) 361 Psychology for Teaching Pri nciples and research in h u m n development and l ea rning , esp ec iaUy related to teaching and to the psyc h olog ica l growth, rela tionships, and adjlLStme nt of individ uals. Prerequisites : EDUC 262, 263; EPSY 2 1. (3) 368 Educational Psychology Principles and res earch in human lea r ning and thejr im pl i ntions for curriculum a n d instru ct ion. Prerequ isites: EDVC 25 1, 253. ( 4) SO l Workshop! Graduate work h ps in special fields for varying lengtbs of t im e.

( 1 -4) 5U Group Process and the tndividual A human i nt erac t ion I b ratory to facili t ate the exploration of the self concept th rough tll mechanisms of i nterpe rson a l interaction s and fe e db ack . Em phasis placed on the acqu isition of skill in self-exploration , ro l identi ficati on, and clim ate - m ak i n g. G (2) 535 FGundations of Guidance The focus is on developing an understan din of the services an d processes available to assist in d iv iduals in ma k i ng pl a n s and decision according to their own I i � pattem. (4)

536 Affective Classroom Techniques Explo ra t io n of va r i o us techniques designed to facilitate u n d er­ s tan d ing of elf and ot bers; method for working with students. Prerequisite: student teach i n g Of g rad uate status. Lab ralory exp e r i nee as ar ra n ged . G (2) 550 Beginning Proctkum Learn and p r ac tice the basic counsel ing sk i l l s in a structured and lose1 y s uperv i sed environment. Cl ien ts used in (his pra cti c um will be rela t i ely high functiolllng and w ill us ua ll y be seen in a n observation room. (3)

555 Practicum In ddition to th ose skills learned in Begin n ing Pract icu m , learn and practice variolIs c o u nseli ng pproa.:h s, sk i l ls a nd tech ­ niques w i th individuals fr m d i verse populations in commun ity or various school setti ngs. Prerequisites: EPSY 550 a nd 561 . (3)

m

560 Communication in Schools The study of t h e theories and co ncep t s of ttlOse h elpi ng skill needed to fa ci l itat e problem-s Iving and personal and , cademk grow th with applications to the classroom and to i n t eracti o ns with profes s i o nal colleagues. Prerequi ' i te: Admissio n ro M ICer t program. ( 3 )

o C 1"\ 1> -i o

56 1 Bask RdatiollSbips i n Couuse1iog A st ud y of the theory, process. te ch n i qu t::s , and charac ter is t ics of the counseling relationsh i p . ( 4 )

z

563 Practicum in Group Process IUld Leadership A human interacti n labor at o ry which eK p lo res i nterp erso n al operations in groups and fa ci l it a te s the development o f se. lf­ insight; emphasis on l ead e rshi p and development of skill i n d i a gn o sin g individual, group, a nd organiz tional be havior patterns and influences. St uden ts will o-facil.itate a la boratory group. P re requ i s i te : EP Y 5 1 2 . ( 2 ) 565 AdvlUlced Human Development A comparat ive stud y of h uman deve l op m e n t at va r io us levels th ro ugh observa t iona l asse SOl nts u i n g non- tandardized in s tru me n : e.g., sociometric scales. aUl obiograp hie , in! rvi w , in teraction analysis, and other a pp ro pr i at e measurement . A practicum (a mi n i m u m of one hour each week) is required in (l school or ap pro p ria te agency. Prereq u isite : ifth year or gra d u a te

stat us. ( 4 )

5 66 Advaoc�d Cognltlon, Developmeut, IUld Leaming The study of p ri nci ples and current t h o u g h t and resea rch i n cogn ition . develop ment, and lea min g . Prerequisite: Admission to the M AlCert progra m or consent of i n.t ructo r. ( 3 ) 569 Career Guidance A stud y of careers, theories of choi e, nd gu ida.n ce tech n iq ues.

(4)

570 Fieldwork in Counseling and Guida.oce A cu lm ina t i ng practicum of field experienc in sch ols or agencies us ing th eory, skills, and t ech niques p rev iously learned. tudents i ncorporate consultation ex p er ie n ce followino the Adlerian model. ( 4) 575 Mental Health Basic m enta l health principles a) related to interpersonal relation h ip s. Focus on self-understan d i ng. Lab ratory exp er i­ en ces as a rr a nged . (4) 578 Behavioral Problems Adlerian concept. pr vide the basis for observation , mot ivation, mod i lication, and life style assessment. Skills fo r assisting peo p le in deve l opin g respon ibility tor their own behavior. La borat ry experience as arran ged. (4) 583 Current Issues In Exceptionality The characteristics of exce pt i o n al stude nt� and currellt issues invo lv ing the e d uca to r's role in dealin: with Lheir spec ial needs. G (2-4) 597 lndependent Study Projects of v ar y i ng length related to ed ucational issues o r conc er n s o f the individual p rtidram a n d a p p roved by an ap propriate faculty member and the dean. ( 1 -4) 598 Studies in Education A research pap�r or pr ject on an educational issue selected jo in Lly by the student and the g r ad ua te adviser. It will be revie wed by the s t udent's graduate com mittee. ( 2 )

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S99 Thesis The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's maj or field o f c nc ntration and mt t be approved by the candidat '5 g r ad ua te committee. Candidates are expected to defend their thesis in a final o ra l examination conducted by their committee. ( 3-4)

396 Students with Special Needs in the Inclusive Classroom Exam ination of specific techn iq u es that promote p o s itiv e classroom environments within inclusionary s p ec i al education set t i n gs Prer q u isi te : SP D 292. (2) .

Special Education

195 Individuals with Disabilities An i nt ro d u ct o ry course focusing u p o n persons with d i sab iliti es Intended for students outside the S c h oo l of Education. ( 4 )

.

200 lodividuals with Special Needs I n t ro d u ct i o n to the needs and c h a racterist ics of individuals w i t h s p ec ia l needs. Fede r a l and state l e g i sl a t i o n , current issues, and servic� delivery systems will be in cl u ded. P re r e qui s i te for all S P E D a n d E l eme n tary Cert i fication co ursewo rk ( 2 ) .

20 1 Observation in Special Education Programs bservation i n p e c i a l edu a l i o n programs, sc hoo ls, and co m m u n ity s e tt i n gs . ( I )

399 Practicmn in Special Education Experience with children an d yo u t h who have s p eci a l needs. I hour rcdit g i ve n a fte r su cce ss fu l com p le t i o n of 4 5 clock hours a nd sp ecific course competencies. P re requ is i t e : consent of instructor. ( 1- 2 )

40 ] Instruction for Leamers with Mild DisabUlties Examination of kn ow l dge

and skills needed fo r academic mild d i sa bil i t i es

instruction and remediation o f students with

.

Prereq u isite : SPED 292. ( 3 )

402 Practicum: Leamers with Mild Disabilities Experience w i th c h ild re n and youth who

292 Assessment in Special Education Examination of knowledge and skills used in fo r m a l and informal asse sment. Includes examination o f co r i n g proce­ dures, i ssue s in validity and reliability, and th role of asse ss m e n t in de i ion making. (2)

h ave mild d i sabi l it i es.

Must complete 45 c lo c k hours in an educational se t ti ng and take concurrently with

SPED 40 1 . ( 1 )

403 Puent/Professional Partnership in Special Education Methods fo r com m u nicating efl'ectiv ly with pare n t s of spec ial need s children. ( 2 )

296 Educating the Physically Challenged and Medically Fragile The co u rse focuses on me ting the p sycholo g i ca l , social, and educational needs of in d i vi du al s who are p hys ical ly challenged and/ or me d i ca l l y frag i le ( 2 )

404 Communication and CoUaboration Focus on kno wl ed ge and skill ' necessary for effective collabora­ tion and s up e rvisi o n w i th p aren ts p r o fess io n a ls and para­ educators. ( 3 )

N OTE: PREREQUI S ITE FOR 300/400 LEVEL SPECIAL EnU ATI N: £DUC 302 o r EPSY 26 I! ED C 262 o r consent of instructor. Students no t majoring i n educaLion may be . used from t h i s requirement.

Examination of kn owledge and skills needed for teach i ng academic, social, and ada p t ive skills to learners with spe ial needs. Includes writing IEP's, data based i n s truct io n task analys is, and computer as s i st ed i nstruc ti on . P re re q u isite: EDUC 400 and SPED 292, 390, 39 1 or 393, 394 and 40 1 . ( 4 )

.

338 Issues in Early Childhood Special Education Current iss ue s related to young children with , pecial needs. (Cross-listed w i t h SPED 538.) 340 Advanced Strategies and Tecbniques for Teaching

in P-3 Settings Current pract ices in educational s tra te g ie s and curriculum mo d i fi ca t i o ns to meet the need of the early learner. Pre re q ui ­ sites:

SPED 399, 490, 492. (Cross-listed wilh SPED 540.)

341 Assessment of Infants and Preschoolers Pormal and i n fo r m a l assess ment t e ch n i qu e s used to meet the needs of c hil d re n and their families in in t egra te d se t t i ng s . Prerequisites: PED 399, 490, 492. (Cross-listed with SPED 5 4 1 . ) 362 Teaching for lodividual Differences - Secondary The roles of classroom manag ment, effc tive i ns t ru ct io n and curriculum modification in meeting t h e needs of diverse learners. (4) ,

,

,

407 Curriculum, Instruction, and Technology ,

40 8 Transitions from School to Community Exa m i nation of knowledge and skills rel a te d lo career vo c at i o na l t ra n s i t i o n a n d l i fe a djus tme n t . ( 2 )

438 Student Teaching in Elementary School Te a ch i n g in spe c i al ed uca t ion programs under the direction a n d s u p e r vi s i o n of schoo! and u ni versi t y p e rs o n n el ; 8 we e k s . ( 5 ) 439 Student Teaching in Secondary School Tc a c h i n g in s p eci al d llcation programs under the direction and supervision of school and u n ivers i t y personnel; 8 wee k s ( 5 ) .

440 Student Teaching Seminu A se m i n ar which meets can urr ntly with studt n t tea c h i n g and enhances skills and knowl e d ge req u ire d fo r teach i ng ( 1 ) '

.

475 Supervising Para-Professionals and Volunteers Emphasis on the e ffec t ive management of para-professionals and volunteers in the classroom. ( 1 )

390 Instructional Strategies for Learners with Moderate Disabilities Examination of s p ec i fi c interventions to e n ha n ce the a cq uisiti o n of kn ow l e d ge and kills fo r those students who need additional support to meet their l e a r ni n g potential. ( 2 )

480 Issues and Problems of Child Abuse and Neglect Issues and problems of child abuse, neglect, domestic violence, substance abuse, and harassment. Includes identification and re p o rt i n g pro c edures and the legal and profes ional respo nsibil i­ ties of the manda ted reporter. ( 1 )

39 1 Practicum: Learners with Moderate Disabilities Taken con c ur r en t l y with SPED 390. ( 1 )

485 The Gifted Child

393 Teaching Students with Behavior Disorders Exami n at i o n of k n owled g e and skills r ela ted to the instruction and management of le a r n e rs with b e h av i o r disorders. ( 2 )

394 Practicum: Students with Behavior Disorders Exp er ience with ch i l d re n and yo u t h who h ave beh avior p ro b ­ lems. Must c o m p le te 45 clo c k hours in an educational se t t i n g and take co nc u rr en t ly with SPED 393. ( 1 ) 64

395 Introduction to Language Development and Disorders Int rod u cti o n to l an g u a ge disorders. assessment, and interven­ tion. Focus on theori s of language develop ment and normal language acquisition. ( 2 )

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A stud y of the g i ft e d learner's characteristics and needs. Focus on instruct ional p ro ce d u re s designed to further d eve l o p ment . (2) 490 Development in Early Childhood Special Education Im p l i c a t i o n s of normal and a typ i cal c h il d d eve lop me nt fo r the learning process, i n c l u d i n g hands-on exper.iences i n EC/SPED s e t tin gs ( 2 ) .


492 Strategies for Teaching Early Learners

530 Assessment o f Students with Special Needs

Early c h i l d h ood methods, materials, curriculum, and t ech n i q ues for teach ing ch il d re n with s p ec i a l needs. Prerequis ite:

PED 4 90

nsent of ins truc to r ( 2 )

or c

.

beam ines th

use

of a. sess men t informati n (o r making

educa t io n al d ci i on s about students. Prere q ui site: SPED 292 or

consent f in tructor. ( 2 )

494 Computer Application in Special Education

53 1 Severe and Profound Disabilities

An i n t rod u ct i o n i n to the application of computer tech nology for

I n t rodu ti o n t

l e a rn ers with special needs. Focus on curre n t issues and u

e.

of

co m put e r t ch n olo gy including computer assis ted in truction, software evaLuat ion, pupil and d a ta manageme nt, and a sis t i ve

devices. ( 2 )

497 I ndependent Study

Project ·

of varying length re la t ed to t rends and issues in spec i a l

education and a p pro ve d by an a p p ro p ri a t e farulty member and th e dean. ( 1-2)

m

the physical, Qual, and education needs of indiv iduals w i t h sever.: and p ro fou nd disabil ities. ( 2 )

o c: 1"1

532 Education and li'aining o f IndividuaJs with Severe and Profound DisabUities

I n-d pth study of ed u c tional prescription aDd programming for I a rn e rs who are severely and p ro fo u ndly disabled. Emphasis on t eac hi n ' st rateg ies ;lnd c urd ulum m d ificati o n as they apply to tl'lis population. (2)

> -t o z

499 Teaching for Individual Differences - Elementary Designed

to

gi e pre-service teachers skills and knowledge in t h e

areas of assessment, i nstru c tion, and management of learners

w i t h pecial needs. Prerequisite: 200. ( 2 ) 50 1 Off-Campus Workshops in SpeclaJ Education

ff c a m p us g ra du a t e wo r ks h o ps in p cial ed u c a t i o n fo r v a ryi ng f time. ( 1 -4) -

.

le ngt h '

503 On-Campus Workshop i n Special Education

On-campus graduate workshops in special ed u c a tio n for varying len gths of time. ( J -4) 5 1 3 language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction See EdUCa tion

5 1 3.

520 Teaching Students with SpeciaJ Needs in Elementary Programs

nd overview f se rvices fo r t ud e nts with spec ia l needs in elementary p rogram . Include. procedural and su bs t a n t ive legal issues in sp ec ial education, program modifica­ t io n and class roo m management. (2)

i n troduction

.

,

521 Teaching Students with Special Needs i n Sec�ndary Programs I n t roduction a n d overview of services n eeds in se c on d a r y programs. I nc!ud

for

t udc nts with special

procedural and s ubs tan ­

tive legal i sues i n spe ial education, program modification, and classroom m an ageme n t . (2) 522 The Role o f Health Professionals i n Special Education This cours introduces health pro fessionals in the sch ool to l ear ners with sp ec i a l n eed s Top i cs includ roles of par nts as well as medical concerns, early intervention , teaming, s ubsta nc e abuse, and suicide pr v ntion. (3) .

533 Inclusion and Students with Moderate Disabilities

A f, cus on mee r i n g the academic and adaptive beh av i o r skills of students wi thin tJ1e regular ed u ca ti o n classroom. (2) 534 Inclusion and tudents with Behavior Disorders A fOCllS on manage ment p rocedures for s t ude nt s with behavioral d isorde rs in inclusive dassr o ms. (2) 535 In.clusion and Students with MUd Disabilltles

A focus

on

instructional p roce d ur es fo r s t u de nts with m i l d

d isab ilities in the inclu.�ive classroom. (2) 537 Issues in Language Acquisition and Disorders Cu r re nt issues and approaches in asse ssi ng and remediating

children's la n gu a ge di sorder . (2) 538 issues i n Early ChUdhood Special Education

523 Educational Procedur-es for Students with

Current issues related to young ch i ld ren with special n eeds (2)

Mlld Disabilities

539 Administration o f Early Childhood/Speclal Education

An i nt ro d u ct ion to t e a ch i n g procedures fo r s t ud en t with mi l d disab ilities. Includes concepts in characteristics, assessment, and

instructional pra tices.

(3)

Programs In -depth study of the ad min istratio n of early ch.ildhood

programs. ( 2 )

524 Educational Procedures for Students with Developmental Disabilities

An e x am i n a t i o n of th emotional > s o c i a l physical, and mental ,

characteristics of i nd iv id ua l s with m o de r a te disabi l i t ies. Includes asse ss m en t and inst ru tion from med i cal psychological, social, and edu t i o nal viewpoints. (3) ,

525 Procedures for Students with Behavior Disordas

An examin tion of in t ructio nal and management proce d ure s fo r l ea rn rs with behavior d iso rd er s . Includes slUdy of academic and behavioral characteristics of th ese stud e nts. ( 3 ) 526 Advanced Practicum in Special Education

Exper ie n e with ch i l d re n and youth w ith pecidl n eeds. Credit given aft r successful co m p le t io n of 90 clock hours and specific co ur e competencies. P re re q u is i te : SPED 520/52 1 or equivalent. (2) '

.

540 Advanced Strategies and Techn.lques for Teaching in P-3 Grade Settings Cu rrent practice in educati nal s tra tegi es and curriculum modificatio ns t<J meet the needs of the earty learner. Pre req ui si t e :

SPED 399 , 490, 492. ( 2 ) 541 Assessment i n Early CblldhoodJSpeciaJ Education

Ponnal and informal a ssessm e nt tec h n iq ues e to III ct t h e needs of :h iL dren and their fum i l i s in integrated setti ngs. Prerequisi te : SPED 399, 490, 492. (2) 555 Supervising Paraeducators in School Settings

Exami nes the role ar i d responsibilites of slIpervi ors of paraeducators and su pp o r t stan: J:!.mphasis OIl ethical, profes­

sional, and legal re;ponsib il ities 0 the 'upervi or. Discussion of administrative practices t hat i m p ro v team ork and staff development.

(2)

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568 Internship in Special Education T n te rnsh i p in sp e c ial education settings. Fourteen weeks tea ch i ng under the direction and supervi -ion of co op er at i ng loll w

Q

teachers and univers ity MAl ert pr gra m . (6)

supervisors. De

igned fo r students in the

575 CoUaboration and Team BuJlding Examines the communication skills necessary fo r effective . collaboration in regular and �p cia! ed u ati n. To pics include p rofess i nal teams, co- tea hi ng concepts, staff development, scheduling, coordinati ng, p rob lem solving, and conflict m ana ge­ ment in . d uca t io nal ttings. ( 2 )

<

576 Communication Skills for CoUaborative Consultation in

::I

SpecIal Education E m p h as is on the int rp erso n al skills n ecessary for the consulting teach er in s p ec i al education. The course will explore the v riables i n vo lve d in developing co p e ra t io n between profes­ sion I ed uc at o rs . ( 2 )

Q I!' Z II: w w

z I!' Z w

577 The Induive CJassroom I n trod uc t i on to the p r in ci p l e and pract ices of inclusive ed ucat ion . ( 2 ) 583 Current Issues in Exceptionality The characteristics of excep tio n a l student and current issues invo lvi n g thl' ducator's r ol e in dealing with thei r spe c i a l needs. (2-4 ) 588 Legal. Ethical. and Aclministrative (ssues in

tion. ( \ ) Project.

provides students with the opportunity to combin a liberal arts education with rigorous study in Universi ty

e ngineering, Students who omplete the program earn

two

fro m PLU a n d the other from an e ngi n er­ ing school. For the well - pr ep ared studen t , d1 t tal l engtb

degrees -

on e

of study i five year - three years at

PLU ad two years at

th engineer ing school, and the program is

to as th "T h ree -Two Engi neer ing Program:'

ften referred

Most subdisciplines of engineering a re avai lable to students in th dual -degree program. Formal agreements eill with Columbia University in New York City and Wa h i n gton Un iversity in St. Louis. At b th schools, three­ two students fo rm a com munity. They share residence facil ities and often are e n rolled in many of Lh same courses. P LU students who have participated in the three­ two progra m report thei r rich cultural and academic experiences at bot h scho is, and are routinely very pl eased

THE PLU PROGRAM:

be t r uee - t wo student is awa rded

a

PLU

when th PLU req uire me n t s are satisfi d and the progT a m of study at the engineering sc hoo l is completed. Tbe PL Y d egree that typically is awarded to thre -two . tudents is the Bachelor of Arts in physics. The BA in physics is well-recognized by engi­

degr

I'

the most freq uent ly-awarded degree by fo ur-year sch o ols with th re e-two p rogram . The pbysi cs degree can be selected by t h ree- l wo students in all engineering subdjsci­ pl ine s, but students w i sh ing to st udy chemical engi neering may wish to con sider the o ption of obtaining t h e B.A. in chemis t ry

neeri.ng schools and i

educa­

595 Special Education: internship

( 1 -4)

The en gineering dual- degree p rogram at Pacific Lutheran

with their d cision to have participated in the t h ree - t w program.

Special Education Investigati n of sp ec ial education admin istrative practices, pupil pl dce men ( p rocedures, studenl sta ffin g, p rogra m reimbur'emen t procedures, and federal fu nding models. (2)

590 Research In Special Education Review of curr nt res ea r h on selec ted topics in sp ec ial

Engi neering Dual Degree Program

of varying l e n gth eclat d to issues in sp eci al education .

fro m PLU, Occas io nally, PLU studen ts choose to t ra ns fer

Lo a n ngi­ neering school that does not parti cip ate in the three-nvo pro­ gram. PLU nonethe1cs� recognizes th se s t u dc nt,s participants in the lhr e.- two program and awa rds them t he appropriate B.A. degree upon successful com plet ion of their program at the

596 Technology and Special Education Examines technol g ica l advanceme ts as t hey apply to the e duca t io n of learners with s p ec ia l needs, ( 2 ) 597 Independent Study Projects of va ry i ng l en gth rel ated to t ren ds and iss ues i.n s pec ia l education an d appr ved by an ap prop r i at fa culty member and

en gineer i n g sch oJ. I.ndividual de partments do not provide ad v ice on the dual­ de gre e pr gram. All prosp ect i ve dual-degree students, rega rdl es s of their in tended engineering subdiscip l ine, should consult w ith

the dean. ( l-4)

598 Studies in Education

the three-two director ( in the Physics Department) very early in their a cad e m i c p rogra m. LV a n d the pa rticipating eng ineer i n g schools recom mend

A research paper or project on an educa ti naJ issu e sel cted jointly by the st ud ent a n d the gra du ate advLer. It will be reviewed by the student's gra d u a te co m m ittee. ( 2 )

that three-two stud ents tlse their t i m e at PLU to sec ure thei r acad mi fo u n dat io ns in mat h emat ics, phy'ic , and chemistry. Math skil l s are particularly im ortant to d evelo p , and poor math

599 Thesis The thesis pr ob lem will be chosen fTom the candidate's majM field of concentration and must be ap pr oved by the c ndidate's g ra d u a te com m itt1 e. Ca n d i dat - are xpec ted to efe nd the.ir t hes is in a final oral examination con d uc ted by their co m m i t tee.

skills are the

most frequent

reason prospective engi n eering

students fail to succ ee d in the program . PLU REQUIREM ENTS: In order to ea r n a PLU d egree i n the

( 3-4 )

dual-degree p rogra m, the follow i n g requi re me nts must be

satisfied: I)

Completion of the fo llowi ng science a nd mathematics cou rses ( 44 hours): Mathematics ( 1 6 hours): 1 5 1 , l 52, 253, and 3 5 1 or PHYS 354; Pllys i s ( 1 4 hours) : 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 164, and 223; Che. m i st ry (8 hours): 1 20 Qr J 2 5, 33 8; Computer Sc ience. a n d Ca m p Ite r ngineer i ng (6 hours ) : 1 3 1 and 1 44.

2a) For

the B . A.

i n physics: completion f an addi t i o nal 12 h o u r nd mathematic from the follOWi ng

of e l ective in c ie ne courses: MA'rH 33 1

356; PHYS 233, 33 1 , 333, 334, 336; C CE 245. HEM 34 1 may be s u bs t it u te d for PHYS 33 3 . The particular courses chosen wLll depend on the i n te n ded

66

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subdiscipline and the engineering school's entrance require­ ments. Students should consult with the program director before choosing their electives. 2b) For the B.A. in chemistry: completion of organic chemistry ( HEM 232, 234, 332, 334) and physical chemistry ( C H EM 3 4 1 , 342, 343 ) .

3) Completion o f the general u niversity requirements a s speci­ fied i n the catalog, except that the following general require­ ment are waived for all dual-degree students: (a) comple tio n of a minimum of 1 2 8 semest r hours o n the PLU transcript; (b) completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours from courses numbered 300 and above; (c) the requirement that at least 20 o f the m inimum 40 semester hours of upper division work must be taken at PLU; (d) the requirement that the final 32 semester hours of a student's program be completed in residence at PLU; (e) the requirement that the senior sem inar/project be completed at Pl.u. Senior proj ects from the engrneering school (a characteristic of ABET-accredit d schools) will satisfy the PLU senior project requirement for dual- degree students upon approval of the project by the appropriate PLU department chair. THE ENG INEERING SCHOOL PROGRAM: The course o f

study at t h e engineering school will depend on both t h e school and the subdiscipline. Between Columbia University and Wash­ ington University, approximately QNenty different engineering subdisciplines are available to dual-degree students. These include the more common subd isciplines (civil, chemical, elec­ trical, mechanical) and others such as operations research, applied mathematics, geological engineering and systems science. Detail are available from the PLU program director. ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS: For admission to their engi.neer­

ing program, both Columbia University and Washington Univer­ sity require a cumulative PLU grade point average of 3 .0 or higher and grades of B or better in pertinent mathematics and science courses. Students who do not meet these requirements are considered on a case-by-case basis. Although students who choose to transfer to another engineering school may be able to gain admission with slightly lower grades than those required by Columbia University and Washin.gton University, all prospective engineering students are well-advised to use the higher standard as a more realistic indication of what will be expected of them i n the engineering school.

ENGLISH MAJOR ( EMPHASIS ON LITERATURE): The

English major with an empha is on literature introduces stu­ dents to the great literary tradition of Britain, North America, and the En glish-speaking world. The major in literature places cou rses organ i zed by historical period at the heart of the student's program, allowing stude.nts t read the great works that define the periods, and to explore the ways in which cultural contexts impinge upon the lit.erary imagination. Students who select the emphasis on literature can expect to learn how sensi­ tive reader ' engage tex:ls through their own speaking and writing, following their insights into the rich pleasu res of literary lan­ guage and growing more sophisticated in constructing effective literary arguments. They will also be introduced to the ways i n which major critical traditions frame ur approaches t o litera­ ture and define the issues that keep literature meaningful and rei evan t in our lives. Studenrs considering English with an empha is on literature as a major, but who are still undecided, might begin with a 200level course. Even though no 200-leve l course is required for majors, students may request that onc p p ropriate 200-level course be substituted for one similar Periods and Surveys course at the 300 level. Students are encouraged to take Shakespeare early in the major. Correspondence courses and indepen dent studies may not be used to fulfill general university or core requirements.

Langu age Requi remellts, Optiotl

following lines): l.

exp ression . Business, government, education, and pub­ lishing are areas where our graduates frequently make their careers . Our p r gram offers emphases in li terature and writi ng ,

as well

as

concentrations in children's literature and

publ ishing. The English Department also supports the study abroad programs, and we offeT study tour to such places as Europe, Australia, and the Caribbean. FACULTY: Temple-Thurston, Chair; Albrecht, Beech, M. Benton,

EARLY 3 5 1 , English Medi val Literature 352, Chaucer 353, English Renaissance Literature

2. MIDDLE 36 1 , English Re toration and 1 8th Century 362, English Romantic and Victorian Literature 3 7 1 , Studies in American L i terature, 1 820- 1 920 3. LATE 367, Twentieth-Century British Literature 3 72, Twentieth-C ntury American Poetry 3 7 3 , lWenti th-Century American Fiction and Drama 4. LITERATURE AND D l F FERENCE 3 4 1 , Fernini t Approaches to Literature 343, Posl- olonial Literature and Theory 3 74, American Ethnic Literature

English offers excellent preparation fo r any future requir­

aesthetic values, and the processes of critical and creative

I).

Major Requirements: At least 36 and up Lo 44 hours in English beyond Writing 1 0 1 , at least 20 hours of which must be upper d ivision. The foHowing course distributions ar r quired of majors with an emphasis on literature: A. Shakespeare (4 hours) 30 1 , Shakespeare B. Pe rio ds alld Su rveys (at lelm 4 hours fro m each of the

Engl ish ading, an appreciation of hum n experience and

II'l

complete at lea. t two years of a foreign language at the university level, or the equivalent (see College of A,·ts and Scien ces Foreign

the Department of Physics or vis it the program website at www. nsci.plu. eduI3-2program.

ing in teg rative thinking, skill in writing, discernment in

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Foreign Language Requirement: All English majors must

For more information, contact the dual-degree p rogram director in

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C. Seminar (at [east 4 hours) 428. Seminar: Cri tical Theory 4 5 1 , Seminar: Author 452, Seminar: Theme, Genre Serlio r Seminar Project: The senior seminar project is a general university requirement in all programs and majors. Students will customarily satisfy this reqLlire ment in English in their semin r course a.s a culminati n of their undergraduate education, in the senior year. Under certain circumstances, students may substitute an appropriate 300-level course. D. Writing (at least 4 hours ofallY writillg course at the 200 to 400 levels).

E. Electives (8 hours)

P. Benton, Bergman, Carlton, Campbell, Eyler, Jansen, Jones,

Lovelace, Marcus, D. M. Martin, Rahn, D. Seal.

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ENGLISH MAJOR (EMPHASIS ON WRITING): The wr i t i ng emp h as i s at PLU has be en desi gn ed for a broad s pectr um f s t udents, fro m t h o se w i s h i n g to fo cu s on fiction and p o e try, to th ose interested in more p ragm at i c types o f writing, to those set

on expl o ri ng theoretical issues in rh et o ri c and composition. ng l i s h m aj ors must

Foreign Language Requirement: All

..J

co m p l ere at l e as t two yea rs o f a fore ig n l an g u age at rhe university l eve l, or the equ i va l en t ( ee College ofArts and Sciences Foreign

Majol' Requlrements: At l e as t 36

Co mpa ra t i ve lite rature: one co u rse

h o u rs in English ( exdud i ng

( 2 1 4, 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 232, 233, 3 4 1 , 343, an appropriate

Wri t i ng 1 0 1 ) , distributed as follows:

se mi nar)

(a t least 20 hours in writing. with at least 12 hours upper division) 1. At least 1 2 hours, fro m at l ea s t two of the fo ll owi n g l i ne s : a. I m a g i native Writing 227, Imaginative Writing I 327, I m a g i n at i ve Wr i ting 1 1 326. Writing for Children b. Expos i tory Writi ng 22 1 . Research and Wr i t i n g 323, Writing in a Professional Se t t i n g 3 2 8 , Adva n ce d C mp osi t i on fo r Tea ch er s c . C re at i ve Nonfiction 224, Travel Writing 225, Autobiogra ph ical Writing 324, Free-lance Wr i ting 3 25, Personal E s s ay 2. Senior ProjectJ Seminar (at l e ast 4 hours in the followi ng) 425, 426, Writing on S p ec i a l Topic s 427. Imaginative Wri t in g 1Il 428, Seminar: Cr i tical T h eo ry 3. Elective ( a t least 4 hours from l i n es I r 2 above) B. Literature (12 hours, with at least 4 hours upper division) S t u de n ts are encoura ged to take l ite ra t u r e courses wh ic h contribute to their goals as writ rs, and w h i ch expand their exp e r ience with the h ist o r y and gemes of writing. C . Blective (at least 4 elective hours in English beyo n d 1OJ)

Linguistics or s tr uc t ur e of l an g u ag e: one c o u r e (403)

A. Writing

. Wr i t i n gJC

Li ter ature in th E n g l is h

Elementary Education: S t ude n t s preparing to te a ch i n

must take 24 h o urs minimum in English, an d are advised to follow the st r u c t ure o f th En gli s h major in satisfying state certification requirements. on ult your adviser in the School of Education.

Course Offe rings All literature

Th foil w i ng cours w re designed fo r students who are not En gl is h majors, and for students co nsider i ng a n English m ajo r, to satisfy the g e ne ra l univ rsity requirement in l i t erat u re. Upper d iv is io n courses i n literature offered by the Depar t m en t o f English will sa t isfy t h e general university req ui re me nt i n l i t era ­ ture as weil, bu t the fo llowing muses are particularly rec o m ­ mended. These lower div is ion courses in l i t e ratu re gi e p r i m ar y attention to the act of read i n g in d ifferent context and genres. The cou rses emphasize or tudents the ways in whiclL framing the rea d i ng experience by different kinds of questi ns reveals di ffe re n t texts, and enriches the i m agin a t i v experience of rea d­ ing, leading more t o i ns ig h t on th e part of the reader than final answers. A. Topics

Renaissance

Secondary Education: Students prep a r ing to tea ch in j u n ior a B ach el r of Arts in ngli 11 w i t h certification fro m the Sch oo l of Education, or a

or senio r high school may earn either

Bachelor of Arts in Education with a t ea ching m aj or ioO n­ glish. The <nglish major with an emphasis in l i terature and the English major w ith an e m p h asi s in writing may both be pursued by prospective te ac h ers. Secondary education stu­ dents must fulfill all requirements for t h e E ng lish major: Option 1 of the Foreign Language Requirements (2 years of a

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n tern p orary L ite r atu re 2 3 1 , Masterpieces of European Lit er a ture t h ro ugh the

232, Women's Li ter at ure 2 3 3. Post- Co l on i al Literatur 234, Environmental L i te ra tme 2 4 1 . A me ric an Trad itions in Li tera ture 2 5 1 , British Tr ad i ti on s in Literature

a nd Education. Please also see th e School of Education section of this catalog.

C

2 I S, Drama 230,

in secondary schools should arrange for an adviser in both English

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2 13 , To pi cs in Literature: Th m s and Authors B. Gen res 2 14, Poetry 2 1 5 , Fiction 2 1 6 , Fiction: Cross-Cul tural Emphasis 2 1 7, Fiction: Altemativ Persp ect ives Emphasis C. Traditions

PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Swdellts preparing to teach English

F

flilfill the general ull iversity core requirement

I. Lower Division Courses

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON PUBLlSHlNG AND PRINTING ARTS): S e eparate lis t i ng u nd r Publishing and Printitlg Arts.

I

co II rses

in litera ture.

MINOR ( EMPHASIS ON WRITING): 20 semester ho urs (ex­ c l udi ng 1 0 1 ) , with at least 1 2 hours in upper division . dist ributed as foll ows : 1 2 h o urs in w ri t i n g, 4 hours in l i tera tu re , 4 hours o f elec ti ve .

C

maj o r.

dolescent econdary C urric ul um , as an elective in the

el em entary schools followlng t h e La nguage Arts curriculum,

Requirements"), and 8 ho ur s of electives.

A

p osi tio n: one course (328 i es p ecially

Pro sp ect i ve teachers may take Edu cati o n 529,

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON UTERATURE): 20 semester h o u rs ( excl u di ng 1 0 1 ) , d i st ri b uted as fo ll o ws : 4 hours f Sh akespe a re, 8 h o urs from "Periods and Surveys" (see literatl re " M aj o r

P

m

recommended)

CH ILDREN'S LITERATURE: Students co m p le tin g 333 nd 8 hours fr o m 326, 334, 335 or other a pp ro ve d courses ( al l with grades of B or higher) will be re co gn i z ed for sp e c i al competence in hildren's l i te rat ure.

68

.E n gl ish IiI rature: ne o u rse American literahl!e; one course

Language Requiremen ts, Opt io n 1) . w

fo rei gn l a ng u age at the university level, or the equ iv a l en t ) ; at least 36 and no more than 44 credi t hours in En gl ish; and all th specific requirements for the m aj or either in l ite ra t ure or in w ri t ing . State certification for tea ch ers also mandates the following requirement�, whi h are an o verl ay to the maj o r. Co urses taken to satisfy the m aj o r can al s o be co u r s es that satisfy the state cer tification re qu i r em en ts .

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II. Upper Division Courses

22 1 Research and Writing

Des ig ned particularly for upper division students, usuaLly but

Strategies for writing academic research papers are practiced, including developing appropriate research topics, locating and using a variety of relevant sources, substantiating generaliza­ tions, and using paraphrase and citation accurately. (2 or 4 )

n

t exdu ively with the major in mind. A. British Litemtllre 30 I, Shakespeare 35 I , English Medieval

l.iterature

352, Chaucer 353, English Renaissance Literature 36 1 , Re toration and 1 8 th Century l.iterature 362. English Romantic and Victorian Literature 367. 20th enrury British Literature B. American

z

Writing about travel, while traveling or upon return. Students keep travel journals, produce short travel e says, and read se­ lected travel writers. (4)

CI I"'"

225 Autobiographical Writing

Reading autobiography and writing parts of one's own. with an emphasis on how writing style and personal identity comple­ ment each other. (4)

Lite l'll /ure

37 1 , Studies in American Literature 1 820--1 920

372. 20th Century American Poetry

373, 20th Century American Fiction and Drama 374, American Ethnic Literature

227 Imaginative Writing I

A beginning workshop in writing poetry and short fict.ion. Includes a study of techniques and forms to develop critical standards and an understanding of the writing process. ( Prereq­ uisite: 101 or its equivalent, Advanced Placement, or consent of instructor.) (4)

C. Special IlJdies

34 I , Feminist Approaches to Literature 343, Post-Colonial Literature and Theory 333, Children's Literatur 3 34 , Special Topics in Children's Literature 335, Fantasy and Fairy Tales 428, Seminar: Critical Theory 45 1, Seminar: Author 452, S minar: Them , Genre 49 1 , 492, Independent Reading and Research 597, Gr duate Research

230 Contemporary Literature

Emphasis on the diversity of new voices in American fiction such as Toni Morrison, Leslie Silko, Nicholson Baker, Joyce Carol Oates, ormac McCarthy, and Amy Tan, from the emergence o f post-modernism t o the most important current fiction. ( 4 ) 23 1 Masterpieces of Europea.a Literature

Representative works of classical, medieval, and early Renais­ sance literature. (Cross- referenced with CLAS 23 1.) (4)

m. Writing, Language, and Theory

1 0 1 , Inquiry Seminar: Writing for Discovery* 22 1 . Resear h and Writing" 224, Travel Writing* 225, Autobiographical Writing* 227, Imaginative Writing I 323, Writing in Professional Settings* 324, Free-Lance Writing* 325, Pe.rsonal Essay" 326, Writing for Children 32 7, 427, Imaginative Writing II, III 328, Advanced Composition for Teachers* 403, The English Language 42 1 , Tutorial in Writing 425, 426, Writ ing on Special Topics 4 2 8 Seminar: Critical Th ory

232 Women's Literature

An introduction to fiction. poetry, and other literatures by women writers. Includes an xploration of women's ways o f reading and writing. (4) 233 Post-Colonial literature

Writer from Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada. and the Caribbean confront the legacy of colonialism from an insider's perspective. Emphasis on fiction. (4) 234 Environmental Literature

,

.. Indicates courses that can fulfill the general un iversity writ ing req uirement.

Examines representations of nature in literature, and the ways in which humans define themselve and their relationship with nature through those representations. Focuses on major texts from various cultures and historical periods. Includes poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. (4) 239 Environment and Culture

Study of the ways in which environmental issues are shaped by human culture and values. Major onceptions of nature, includ­ ing non-western perspectives and issues in eco-justice. Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual framewo rks, history, and sprituality. (4)

IV. PuhUsbiog- and Prmtiog Arts 311,

m

224 'li'avel Writing

Book in Society

3 1 2, Publi hing Procedures 3 1 3, Art of the Bo k I 3 1 4, Art of the Book II

2 4 1 American Traditiom in Literature 2 1 3 Topics in Utaahue: Tbemes a n d Authors

A variable-content cour e that focuses on the act of reading and interpreting texts. (4) 2 1 4 Poetry

A st u dy of poems and conventions of poetry from the clas ics to modern projective verse. (4) 215 Fiction

Examines the development of short fiction, concentrating on themes and techniques of the genre. Stresses the Euro-American tradition . ( 4 ) 2 1 6 Fiction: Emphasis o n Cross-Cultural Perspectives

(4)

Selected themes that distinguish American literature from British traditions, from colonial or early national roots to current branches: for example, confronting the divine, inventing selfhood, coping with racism. (4) 25 1 British Traditions in Literature

Selected themes that define British Literature as one of the great literatures of the world, from Anglo-Saxon origins to post­ modern rebellions: for example, identity, society, and God; love and desire; industry, science, and culture. (4) 30 1 Shakespeare

Study of representative works of the great poet as a central figure in the canon of English literature. (4)

2 1 7 Fiction: Emphasis on Alternativ� Perspectives (4)

3 1 1 The Book in Society

2 1 8 Drama

A critical study of the role of books in our history, society, and daily lives. (4)

An inU'od uction to the basic elements of drama (plot, character,

language) and on tbe traditional genres (tragedy, comedy). (4) P

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3 U Publishing Procedures

353 Engli h Renaissance Literature

p ublishing , involving stude.n ts in deci sions about what to p u bl is h and how to p ro d uce it. (4)

Wyatt to Marvell, including Sid n ey, Sp e nse r,

A worksh o p i n troduction to the world o f b o o k

studio course and sem inar explo res the vi s ual pr perti es of langu a ge . (4) The co mbi nation

(4)

Su rveys the livel y drama, neoclassical po try, go t h ic fiction, and early novel o f a period marked by rel igious co ntroversy and philoso ph ical optimism.

I nd i v idu a l p roj e c t s to exp lore further t y p ogra phy and fine b oo km aki ng. (4)

(4)

362 RDmantic and Victorian Literature A s u r vey of the ri hly varied w r ite r s o f 1 9th - ce n tu ry England

323 Writing in Professiona1 Settings

seen in the context o f a rapidly changing sodal real ity-from rom an tic revolutionaries and dreamers to earnest cultural critics

Students working in pro� s sional settings analyze the rh tori c al demands o f their job - rel ated writing. (4)

and m yth-makers.

324 Free-Lance Writing

(4)

367 20th-Ccntury British Literature

rk s hop in w r iti n g fo r publication, with p r i ma ry mphasi s

A survey of England's literary land s ca p e from the rise o f

on the feature a r ticle . ( 4 )

modernism th ro ug h mid- entury reactions to con tem p orary innovation . (4)

325 Personal Essay

Students write essays on top ics of their choice, work ing p arti cu­ larly o n voice and style. (4)

371 Studies in American Uterature, 1820- 1 920

3Ui Writing for Children

in ideaLism, real. ism , and naturalism. ( 4 )

The mutual in fluen c e of lilerar)' tradition s and American cult ure

riti ng fi t ion and non-fiction for children and teenagers, with an in tro duct io n to the varieties of co nt em p o ra r y children's literature. ( 4 )

A workshop i n

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327, 427 Imaginative Writing n, ill

An advanced wo rksh o p i n wri t ing poetry a n d s h ort fiction. o rn e attent ion will be give n t o p roced u re s for sub m i tt i ng manuscript for p u blication . Students may enroll i n this course a second time as 427. (4) Students are in trod u ced to philosop h i cal,

ISSues confronting teache rs of writing. by the Sch oo l of Education. (4)

s

Major voices in American poetry fr m Frost and Eliot, Williams and Pound, th rough the post-war generation to recen t pOets.

Major auth o rs and forms, both conventional a n d exper imental.

(4 ) 374 American Ethnic Uteratures

Native Americans and Chicano/as. (4)

403 The English Language Studies in the struct u re and

h ist ory of EngEsh, w i tb emphasis on (4)

syntactical analysis and issues o f usage .

An introduction to a r i m l i terJry tradition, with anal ysi s in depth of su ch authors as H.C. Anderson, Tolkien, Lewis, Pot ter,

42 1 Thtorial i n Writing

(4)

Guided work in an individual w r i t i n g project . A

Content va r ies each year. Possible top ics include genres, themes,

( 1-4)

historical period s , and traditions. May be repea ted for red it

425, 426 Writing on Special Topics

with different topic. (4)

Wr it i ng

thei r papers to

Fairy t ales are told and i n terpreted; in te rp re t i ve mode l an d

as story. (4)

428 Seminar: Critical Theory Issues in Lite r ary studies and in rhetorical theory ace discussed in

34 1 Feminist Approaches to Literature

rela t io ns h i p to infl u ential

variety of fe m ini s m s in contemporary theor y

for prospecti ve

109 traditional l ite ra t ure fro m feminist positi o n s . ( 4 )

I n t ro duces perspectives of p os t -colo n i al theorists a s a framework for understanding the relatio n shi p of colo n ial i s m and its l e gacie s to th e works of writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and other ex­

(4)

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mance

Sir

Everyman. ( 4 )

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m aj o r

Concent rated study of a major lite rary theme or genre, as it m i gh t appear in vari us p e r iods , authors, a n d c u lture s . The framing of critical approa ches th rough literary

social, and politi cal circumstances of their production in four­ te e nth - cen tu ry England. (4) e

a

project. ( 4)

course includes careful attention to pra ctica l -riti:ism, the

352 Chaucer A s t udy of Geoffrey Chaucer's maj o r works, especially The

, A e l F t

autho r to cultural con texts, the fra ming o f crit ical app roache s

452 Seminar: Theme, Genre

ud Middle Engli s h , ra n ging

Criseyde, and

re p utat ion o f a major author in th e English-speaking wo rld. The course includes careful atte n tion to the relations of the

w ri t i ng

Gawain and the Green Knigh t to th e begin ­

Canterbury 7illes a nd Troi/us and

Con entrated s tudy of the work, li fe, influence, and critical

th ro u gh l i tera ry theo ry, substantial hbrary research, and

351 English Medieva1 literature A surve y of the fi rst two p eriods of E ngl i sh Literature: Old En­

nings of E n gl ish drama in

graduat e tudents. (4)

45 1 SemJnar: Author

343 Voices of Diversity: Post-Colonia1 Literature and Theory

from the

movements such as rea de r- res p nse,

cultural st ud ies, fem in i m, and deconstruction. Recomm nded

as fr am �wo r ks for reading feminist Literature and for app roach -

Beowulf,

t the rheto r ica l demand. of publications

m ee

relevant to th e ir academic or professional future. ( 4 )

theo r i es from se ve ral ps ych ological traditions are xplored. Fantasy is looked at both as image a n d

glish , i n cl u d i n g the ep ic

in a wide range of aca d e m i c and creat ive genres deter­

m i ned by their pa r t icular edu catio n al goals , students will sha p e

335 Fairy Tales and FIlIItaBy

colonial territories.

plan of study for the co urs e .

must be appro v ed before the student m ay register

334 Specia1 Topics in Children's Literature

lJltroduction to a

(4)

373 20th-Century American Piction and Drama

ethnic commullitie . Includes African and Asian Ameri ca ns ,

oc ial , and pragmatic

Requi red for certi fication

333 Children's Literature

Wilder, and LeGuin.

372 20th-Century American Poetry

Attention to the liter lures and popular traditions of America's

328 Advanced Composition for Teachers

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Donn e , and Jonson; s elected pl ayw ri gh ts from Kyd to Webster;

36 1 Restoration and 1 8th-Century Literature

3 1 4 The Art of the Book n

wo

nglish lit e ratu re. Selected poets from Shakespeare,

selected p ro se from More to Bacon and Browne.

313 The Art of the Book I

A

Studies the Golden Age of

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tia l l ib r a r y research, and a major

wr it i n g

th ory, substan­ (4)

p roj ect.


49 1 , 492 Independent Reading and Research

An in tensjve ourse i n readi n g. May in cl u de a thes i s . I ntended for upper d iv i s io n majors . (4) 597 Graduate Research (4)

cieney requi rements for a d miss i on can be ati . fled w it h a

recommendation from the A.C..E. director. Studen ts who m a i n ­ tain good a tten danc e and earn a g r ade f A r B in a l l Profi­ cie n cy level classes qualify for th is recom mendati on . m

Engl ish as a Second Language An interdisciplinary minor in Teaching Eng l i sh as a Second Language is available. Th i . program

can

be used to

Course Offerings

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Hlgb Beginning Level

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Rea d i ng and Wr i ti ng Co mmuni ca t io n Skills Listening Vocabulary and Sentence Bui.lding

Re ad i n g and Writing Movie List enin g and Vo cabula ry

leads to an add i tion a l endorsement for lemen tary or

Gramm

foreign languages i n the College

majo ring i.n

o f Arls nd Sci ences may

also find this m inor a usefu l addition to their program . TEACHING ENGliSH AS A SECOND .LANG lJAGE

( 16 hours req ui red ANTH

1 02