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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

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The university is lo cated at South 121st Street and Park Avenue in suburban Parkland. Office hours are from 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday. Most offices are closed for chapel. on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10:30 to 11 :OOa.m. during the school year. The university observes all legal holidays. The University enter maintains an information desk which is open daily untill0p.m. (11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday). Visitors are welcome at any time. Special arrangements for tours and appointments may be

made through the Office of A dm issions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT:

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

Area code (253) •

General interests of the university, church

The President . ........................................ 535-7101

relations, and community relations •

Academic policies and programs, faculty

The Provost ............... ,............................ 535-7126

appointments, and curriculum development •

General information, admission

of students,

publications for prospective students,

advanced placement, and freshman and transfer student registration •

Financial assistance,

scholarships, and

Admissions

.. . . .. ... ,.................................. 535-7151 1-800-274-6758 E-mail : admissions@PLU.edu .

StudentServices Center .....

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loans; fees and payment plans; transcripts of reco rds, sched ules, and registration •

FinaJlcial management and administrative

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The Vic;e President for .

ampus parking, safety, and information Residence halls,

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1-800-678-3243

Finance and Operations . . ................

services •

.. . . . . 535-7161

cou ns eling a.nd testi n g,

health scr ices, minority affairs,

535-7121

Campus Safety and Information ........ 5.35-7441 The Vice President for Student Life ..... .

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. ... ..... . .. . 535-7191 .

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international students, and extracurricular activities •

Gifts, bequests,

grant.s, and the annual fund

The Vice President for DeveJopment .

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535-7177

AcademicAdvising ... . ....................... ..

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535-8786

and University Relations .

- Academic advising

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-International study

Center for International Programs ... . 535-7577

• Graduate programs

Gradu.ateStwlies ............. ................ . ...

535-8312

Student funployment Office .. .. . ..

535-7459

Work-study opportunities and student

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employment -

areer options

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Career Development

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535-7459

S u mmer sess ions

Suouner Sessions .

Alumni activities

Alumni and Parent ReJations ............ 535 -7415

- Worship services and religious life at the u.niversity

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Campus Ministry ....... . ............. .

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THE UNIVERSITY

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Long commiued to pro viding an educ3li m dist ingu ished for quality, in the conlext of a he r i tage that is Lutheran and an environment thai i ecum enic all y Christian, PLU continue to embrace its primary mis ion: the d"velopment afknowledgeable persons eq uipped with an understanding of the human

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dition. a rilical awarene of h uman e and spiritual values, and a capacity for dear and effective self-expre ion. For all who c ho os e LO seek a PLU degree, the University offers opportunity to pursue a variety of programs of academic worth and excellence. Its standards of performance demand a finely trained faculty as well a highly skilled administrative and support stall In its institutional empha is on scholar hip, the University views the liberal arts as prov i din g the necessary and essen ti al foundation for the technical training and e ducatio n in the professions which modern ocicty req uir es. The UnivedlY aims t o cultivate the inteUect, not for its own sake merely, but as a tool of conscience and an in trument for en·ice. The ul ve rs ity and va ri ety of cultural programs an d per ona) ervices offere d by the University are inlended to faci lit ate t hi" positive d e vel opment of the student a a whole person in order that ow ludents mighl function as membe rs of so del y. aD

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In ot her words. PLU affirms that realizaHon of on e's highest potential as well as fulfillment of life's purpose arises in the joy of service to olhers. To aid its students in sharing thi understanding, the University seeks to be a community in which there is a continuing and fruitful interaction between what is best i n education and what is noblest in Chri tian edification. This deliberate and simultaneou attention to the religiou di m en si on of the total human experience and to the standard of scho lar ly objectivity, coupled with clear re cogni ti o n of the integrat ive impulse in each, is the essence of PLU.

General Information HISTORY

with PLC in 1929. Four-yea r baccalaureate degrees w e re fu t

o ffered in ed u cation in 1939 and in the liberal arts in 1942. The as a university 1960, recl ai mi ng its original name. It pres ntly inclu des a C liege f Arts and Sci­ ences: professional s chools of the Arts, Business, Education,

i nstitut i n was reorga nized

N u rsing, and Ph ysica l Education; and both gr a du at and con­ tin uing ed ucation program s . PLU has been closely and p roduc tivel y aftiliated with the

Lutheran church througho ut it s h istor y. It is now a u niver si ty of

the Evangelical Luthe ran Church in America. owned by the more

than six hundred con gregations of Region 1 of t h EL A.

Many influences and individuals have combined to shape PLU

and its regional, na tional, and i ncreasingl y international reputa­

rion fOT teaching, ser ice, and schol rship. A dedi

ed faculty

has been an extre mel y im por t a n t factor. The schoo111;1s enjoyed

PLU'. !o"ndi'lg faOllty Pacific Lutheran University- was founded in 1890 by a group of mostly Norwegian Lutherans fr m the Puget und area. They were I d by the Reverend Bju Harstad, who becalll PLU's first president . In n ming the university, th e p ione TS recognized the impo r tan t role that a Lutheran ed ucat i OI1lll instituiion on the western frontier f America c ould play in the emerging future of the regio J L They wanted th i nstitu t i on to help imm igra n ts adjust to their new land and fInd jobs, but they also wa nte d it to produce graduates who would serve church and community. Education-and educating fo r service-was a venerated part of the Scandinavian traditions from w hich these p.ioneers came. Although founded as a university, the institut ion functi ned primarily as an academy until 19 18, when it closed r two years. It reopened a the two-year Pacific Lutheran College, after

merging with Columbia College. pre vIOu sly located in Evere.tt.

a strong musical traditi n fr m the b eginni n g, as weLL as note­ worthy alumni achievements in p uhlic scho I teaching and ad m ini ttation , un iversity teaching and scholarshi p, th pa toral ministry, the health sciences and healing rts. and business. At PLU the liberal arts and profess io na l education are 10sel y i ntegra ted and collaborative in thei r educational philosophies, activities, and aspirations.

ACCREDITATION Pacific Lu t heran University is fully accre dited by the Northwest Assoc iation of Schools and Col le ges as a fo ur - ye ar institution of higher education. In addition th e fo llowing programs hold specialized accredi­ tations and approvals: Business - AACSB - The International Association for Man a gem ent Edu cation

Chemistry - American Chemical Society Computer Sciellce

Education - National Council for the Accreditation ofT! acher Education

Further consolidations occurred when Sp kane College merged P

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(B.S.) - Co m putin g Sciences Accreditation

Board, Inc.

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Marriage and Fa mily Therapy - Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Fami ly Therapy Education of the Am e rican Association for Marriage and Family Therapy MI4Sic - National Association of Schools of Music Nursing - National l eague for Nu rsing Social Work - Council on Social Work Education

Any cu rrent or prospective student may, upon request directed

to the p resident 's office, review a copy of the documents per­

tai n ing to the uni vers ity's various accreditations and approvals.

GROUNDS

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Located in suburban Parkland, PLU has a picturesque

126- acre

well.

Additional ly, eaeh resid en ce hall room is e quipped with an Ethernet data;ack- This allows s tuden ts with their own comput­ ers to conne t to the campus data n.etwork and the fnternet with out a modem. Through the campus network, students hay

campu s , t ruly representative of the natural grandeur of the Pacific Northwest.

access to the PLU l ibrary's on-line public access catalog (as well as oth er throughout the worf ), elecrr nic ma il , and other

ENROLLMENT

Internet search tools. Each residence hall room is also eq u i pped with a di gi t al telephone and voice mai l se rvice . The main offices are located in the southeast comer of the lower floor of the Mo r tvedt Li b rary bu ildin g. This facility houses

3,259 full-time student s; 425 part-time student s FACUIIY

229 full-time faculty ; 107 p art-time faculty STUDENT/fACULTY RATIO

the university's central computing systems, induding Compaq Alpha Server and VAX/VM S systems. These sys t em s are used for

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b oth academic and administrative purposes a nd provide

ACADEMIC PROGRAM Pacific lutheran University uses a 4-1-4 calendar which consists of two fifteen-week semesters bri dged by a fOUI-week January term. Course credit is computed by hours. T he maj o ri t y of courses are offered for 4 hours. Each unde.rgraduate degree candidat e is exp ected to com plete

128 hours with an overall grade point ave.rage of 2.00. D epartments or schools may set highe r grad e poi nt requirements. Degree requirements are specific al ly stated in this ca talog. Each stu dent should become familiar with these requirements and prepare to meet them. LIBRARY SERVICES The Rob er t A.L. M ortvedt Library is a mo1timedia lear ni ng resource cen ter serving the entire university commun i ty. Its collections are h oused and services provi ded in a m odem build­ ing, which has st u dy spaces for 850 studen ts and a collection of

500,000 books, period icals, microfilm, and a udi o- visual materi­ als. The library receives 1,870 cur rent magazines, j ou rnals , and newspapers.

in a dditio n to its general collection of books and other materiais, the library has a special collect ion devoted to th e Scan dinavian Immigr ant Experience and contains the university archjves; regi o nal Lutheran church archives; and the Nisqoally Plains Co llect ion, a local hi story collection. Other resour ces include the K-12 Curriculum Collecti n, Children's Literatme Collection, maps, pam phle ts , and access to on-line databases , and the Internet. A staff of 2 8 full and p art-time librarians, pr fessio nals, and assi stants offer expe.rt referen ce , information, and media services. The reference staff pro vi des beginning and advanced library i nstruction for all students. In additi n to standard reference

service, the lib r ar y staff also offers compu ter iz ed information services. As the r esu lt of the library's extensive collection of on-line b ibl io graphic tools, computer access to other ollections, and electronic mail ser vic e, students and faculty ha ve rapid access to materials which can be b or rowed from other libraries. Media Services provide s video and CD

collections as well as

access to multimedia equip ment , tools, a nd supp ort.

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A large computer lab, located in the Uni v er sity Center, is equipped with IBM-PCs and Macfntosh computers. These provide acees' to the campus network and Inte rne t resources. A variet y of software programs a re available for the systems. The university has adopted st a nda rd software inc luding word proc essin g and sp re adsheets. This lab is open seven days J week du r ing each term. Several d ep a rt m ent s have computer labs as

database hosting, e-mail, and web services for the university. Information regarding telep hone services, computer software standards an d polici es , and UniverSity C enter Lab hOlliS may be obtained by c ntacting Computing and Te lecommunications Services' main ofnce at 253/535-7525 or vi sit in g the de p ar tmen­ tal home page at http://vlww.pJu.ed u/cats/. The intentional, unauthorized entry into a comp uter system is a crime under the laws of the State of Washington. Compu ter security programs and devices are used ta manage and control access to programs and data. rn the event of computer t respass, uni versit y officials are authorized a ccess to all data and messages as s ocia ted with the i ncid ent for use in its resolution. Voice messaging ystems fall under the Te leco mm u ni c atio ns Act, which makes tamp ering with another person's voice mail or makin g pran k and obscene calls illega l. The university vigorously p ro secutes these violations both cr iminally and via the studen t conduct system. WRITING CENTER The Writing Center, located in Ramstad Hall, provi des

a

place for

students to meet with t rain ed student read ers to discus s their

academic, creative, and professi.onal writing. Student staff members help writers generate topics, develop focus, rganize material, and clarify ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed from the class room setting, student readers and writer talk seriously about ideas and writing t rate gies. Most

sessions are one-hour meetings, but d rop -in students with brief essays Qr q u esti n are welcome.

The Writ in g Cmter is open Monday throug h Thursday from 8:00a.m. to 9:00p.m., Friday from 8 : 0 0a . m . to 6:0 0p. m., and Sunday from 3:00 to 9:00p.m. ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE CENTER The Ac ade mic Assistance Center provides s t udents wi trained, certified peer tut o rs and a comfortable learning environment where learning, risk taking, and discovery Ocelli. Registered PLU stu dents use the free services of the Center to develop effective study strategies and supplemen t and reinforce their clas room experience. The peer tutor serves as a learnin g guide, enabling both the tutor and student a cha nc e to b r ing ability, exp er tise, and information to the session. Through collaboration, students

Direct loan service is available to PLU students and faculty at Northwest Colle ge, St. Martin's College, Seattle University, Seattle Pacific University, the Uni ver si t y of P uget Sound, and other private colle ge libraries in. the Northwest.

are en couraged to lea:rn from one a noth e r and are empowered to use their own thinking kills and reSOUIces. Tutoring t kes place on campus, usually in the Academic Assistance Center located in Ramstad Hall. However, other meet­

COMPUTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS Compu ti n g and Telecommunications Services pr ovi des for campus-wide communications and comput in g needs.

or t he Mathl Apple Pi Lab.

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the Music Building

Most tut oring sessions are set up by appoin tm ent, but drop­ in students are welcome. The Center, loca ted in Ramstad 112, is


open Monday through Thursday from 9:00a.m. until 9:00p.m., Friday from 9:00a.m. until 5:00p.m., and Sunday from 2:00p.m. until 9:00p.m. Students interested in scheduling an appointment should stop by the office or e-mailleamingctr@plu.edu, or call 535-7518. Our home page provides information on tutoring and daily updates on study sessions: http://www.plu.edu/aastl. CAMPUS RESOURCES

Center for Public Service

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The Center for Public Service connects the PLU campus to the surrounding communities by providing opportunities for students, staff, and faculty to serve community needs as part of their university experience. There are many ways students can become involved in service at PLU. Students can work with children, adults and senior citizens at the Family and Children's Center, a coalition of social service programs housed together at East Campus and coordi足 nated by the Center for Public Service. Students can also become involved in c mmunity work through service-learning dasses. The Center for Public Service can help students find out about the e courses, available in many departments, which use service experience as an important part of the learning process. Individuals and student groups can also use the Volunteer Center, part of the Center for Public Service, to browse through listings of over 100 service opportunities on and near the PLU campus. Tbese opportunities range from one-time "Go-'n-Do" projec ts to longer-term involvement. To find out more about volunteering and service-learning at PLU, call the Center for Public Service at 535-7173. KPW-FM, National Public Radio

KPLU at 88.5 FM is licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to th University Board of Regents. A member station of National Public Radio, KPLU provides music and news seven days a week, 24 hours a day, with a professional staff augmented by qualified students. PLU is the only independent university in the Northwest operating a full power NPR station. Tbe KPLU main transmitter from West Tiger Mountain covers the Puget Sound area and translators cover the major population centers of western Washington from Bellingham to Centralia and Chehalis. The Elliott Press

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The Elliott Press is PLU's studio-laboratory for the p ublishing arts. With the Press' large collection of letterpress type and equipment , students de sign and produce printed texts using the hand-controlled t hniqu s that flourish today in the lively art form known as "fine printing." In addition to its own publishing program, the Press houses a growing collection of innovative book works and is a working museum, where visitors may watch and try their hands at the technology pioneered by Gutenberg. LATE AFTERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES

To provide for the professional growth and cultural enrichment of persons unable to take a full-time college course, the univerity wnducts late-afternoon and evening classes. In addition to a wide variety of offerings in the arts and sciences, tbere are specialized and graduate courses for teachers, administrators, and persons in business and industry. SUMMER SI!SSION

An extensive summer school curriculum, of the same quality as

that offered during the regular academic year, is available to all qualified persons. In addition, summer session typically is a time when the faculty offer innovative, experimental courses which cover a broad range of contemporary issues and perspectives in many fields. The swumer session consists of three discrete four足 week terms, arid a one-week workshop session. and begins the last week of May. Many cour es are taught in the evening. two nights per week for nin e weeks. and Ma ter of Business Adminis足 tration courses are taught during two six-week terms, two nights

per week. Designed for undergraduates and graduate students alike, the program serves teachers and administrators seeking credentials and special courses, first-year students desiring to initiate college study, and others seeking special studies offered by the schools and departments. Non-matriculated students who enroll for the summer session need only submit a letter of academic standing or give other evidence of being prepared for college work. A complete Summer Session Catalog, outlining the curriculum as well as special institutes, workshops and seminars, is printed each spring and is available by calling 535-7129.

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MIDDLE COLLEGE

PLU offers a special six-week summer program for high smool juniors and seniors and for first-year college students. Called Middle College, the program is designed to ease the transition from high school to college by sharpening learning skills that are essential to successful completion of a college or university program. Middle College has both an academic program and a counseling and te ting component. AlJ students are thoroughly tested and evaluated in private sessions with regard to their reading, writing, verbal, and mathematical skills. In addition, career counseling is provided. The aim of Middle College counseling is to assess each student's talents and interests in order to provide directi n and goal for the college experience. The academic program offers a chance to improve specific learning skills essential to college success. The classes, offered at several levels in several disciplines, are for Middle College students only, ther by allowing small class size and close contact between students and faculty. All students take a study skills cour e, which serves as a core of the program. In addition, students may select two or three courses from among those offered each year. Each student's program is individualized to promote maximum growth. For information call 5 3 5-8786.

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PROJECI PREVIEW

Each semester PLU offers Project Preview, a special enrichment program for high school juniors and seniors. Designed to com足 plement high school studies, Project Preview allows students to earn one hour of university credit and to experience college life and study. The to pic of the course is different each semester. Project Preview classes meet once a week for six weeks in the late afternoon. For information call 535-7129. RETENTION OF FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

The retention of students enlering as freshman students has been monitored since 1972. Those data for the past decade are presented in the following table: Retention of Entering Rm-Year Students Fall

To Sophomore Year

1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997

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77.6% 75.7% 78.5% 81.5% 80.6% 81.7% 75.7% 80.9% 77.4% 81.3% 79.9% 79.8% 78.3% 78.0% 84.3% 83.3%

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60.1% 59.8% 65.9% 68.8% 71.1% 65.3% 65.4% 70.1% 66.0% 71.1% 73.4% 70.2% 67.8% 7.4% 74.1%

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To Senior Year 54.6%

58.2% 58.8% 67.3% 66.2% 64.0% 62.7% 66.0% 63.5% 67.9%

68.1% 66.5% 4.8% 63.6%

E RSITY

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notified of their

their high er education at other reg ionally accredited colleges or universities are enc urag ed to appl y for admis sion with advan ced �1:al1ding. Over 400 students tnnsfer to the univ rsily each year with an averaoe gra de point in exc s of 3.00 (B). Candidates mllst have goo d academic and pe rsonal standing at the in titutionlast attended full-time. The minimum grade point average to be considered for admission as a tr ansfe r

Pacific Lutheran University welcomes applications from students who have demo nstrated c apa cities for success at the baccalaureate level. Applicants who present academic record s and personal qualities which our experience indicates will enable them to succeed at the university and benefit from the environment will be offered admis­ sion. Applicants for admission are evaluated without regard to sex. r a ce. creed. color, age. national origin, or disabling condition. Selection criteria include grade point average, class rank, tr a n s c ript pattern, test scores, an essay,

a 2.50 cumulative gr a de point average in college-level work from art accredited instit ution. in reviewing an applicant's flie, the admissions office examines the grade point av erage,

student is

academic progress, essay, and recommendations. Por applicants

than soph o mo re standing (30 se mest er hours or 45 quarter hours), secondary school records and standardized test

with Ie. s

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS (Freshmen/Transfer Students) In e valuating applicat io ns the Office of Adm is ions interprels

rank i n relation to the quality of the curriculum which the appl icant has pursu d in high school and ar the baccalaureate level. or exam ple, a srandard high school program in pr par ati on for college should include th e following:

English: 4 years "Mathematics: 3 years ( algebra, 2 years, and geometry, 1 yea r) "ForeJgnLanguage: 2 years Social Studies: 2 years Laboratory Sciences: 2 years Fine. Vl8ual, or Performing Arts: 1 year med:ives: 3 years (selected from the areas Listed above, as well as courses in c omp uter science, speech , and d bate.) 1. Tko years of college preparatory mathematics (exclusive of computer science) w ith an av rage grade ofC or higher, or an

approlled course at the baccalaureate level, or demonstrated equivalent proficiency.

of college prepara tory mathematics mean, two years hool algebra or ne year of high school alge bra and one ye r of high school geometry. Taking th algebra and/ or g omelTY courses in middle or jWlior high schuol is acceptable Ilrovided they are high schoall�ve1 courses. If a student is adm itted to PLU with a deficiency in mathemat­ ics, that deficiency can be removed by completion of Intermediate Algebra at PLU or any oth r coLlege or university.) (Two years

of high s

2. Two years oj" one foreign lang1lllge ill high school, with an average grade oj C or higher, or one year at tile baccalaureate leve� or demol1Strated eq1Jivalent proficiency. NOTE: Lallguage taken before ninth grade will not fulfill this requirement.

Additional study of both mathematics and foreign language is certain areas in the arts and ci nee and in some prof ession al programs. Those who f ollow the above preparatory program will find most c ur r i ular offe r-ings of the un ive rsity open t o them and m ay also quali fy for advanced placement i n advisable for

some ar eas.

rod nts Jre ad mitt ed to either the fall or s pr ing semester. Acceptance to the fal l term carries permission to attend the p re vious summer sessions. pring acceptance pproves enroll ­ ment in the January term. T he following appl ica tion priority dates are recommended: Fall Semester-FebrUtlry 15; Spring Se mester-December 1 5.

APPUCATION PROCEDURES (Freshmen I Transfer Students) Stu dents plal111ing to enter as freshmen may s ub mit application materials anytime aft r completion of the junior year of high school. Admissio n decisions are made beg in ni ng December I unl ess a request for Early Action is re ceived. Candidates are

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one of these two topics:

Desc ribe an academic experience that has sign ificantly influenced your hie.

b.lf you could be any historical or fictional character for one day, w ho would YOll be and why ?

who have not satisfied one or both ofthese require­ ments may still be admitted but must make lip the deficiency as an additiollal degree requirement.

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money orders payabl to PLU Office of Admissions. 3. Transcrip ts: Tran cr i pts mu t be submitted fr m high school and all college course work. Transcripts must be sent directly from the school to PLU. Accepted freshmen must ubmit a final high school tr anscr ipt which indicat sati - factor y c mpletion of high school and attainment of a diploma. The univer ity accepts the General Equ ival ency Diploma (GED) for those st udents who may not have co mpleted a traditional high school program. 4. Recommelldations: One recommendation must be prepar ed by a principal, counselor, pastor, or other qualified per son. The form is i.nclud ed in the application packet. 5. Test Reqr�iremellt: All entering fre hman students must submit scores from eith er the College Board, Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT), r the Am erican C ol lege Test A ssessment (ACI'). Regi Irati n procedures and form are available at high school cOllnseJing offices. 6. Persollal Essay: Usin g no more than two pages, write an ess a y a.

Students

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Credentials required are:

does not apply to the student's account. Make checks or

"Minimum Entrance Reqllirements�

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scores will also be considered.

1. Formal Application: u bmit the PLU Appheation for Admis ion available from higll school c un elor s or the PLU Office of Admissions. Beginning in Sept e mbe r 1999, students ma y also apply o n- Line at www.plu.edu. 2. $35.00 Application Fee: A $35 fee must acc mp, ny the applica ­ tion or be mailed s eparately. This non-refundable service fee

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status as soon as their comp leted application has

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Early Action ( fresh man Only) F reshman appli ants who exhibit above avera ge achievement and aplitude, and for whom PLU is a top choice, m ay apply for Early Ac t ion admission. Early Action s tu dent s must meet each o f the following criteria: top 25% of high school class,

3.60 or higher

grade point average, and 1100+ SAT or 24+ ACT scores. Applican ts may request Early Action by completing the regular freshman admission requirements and checking E arly Action i:n box 1 of the admission application . Tb_e application must be po st mar ked by November 15. St udents admitted under tbe Early Action p olicy receive early not ification of their acceptance between Octo be T 1 and November 30. These students have first opportunity to request campus hOll ing and re gister for fall classes. There is no financial aid benefit or p enalty for Early Action s tudents. Early Admission Qualified stude nts interested in accelerating their formal education m y begin work t ward a degree a fter completi n of the junior year or first semester of the senior year of high school. Exceptional students wh wish to enroll be� re compl eting all required units in high school must have a letter submitted by a


recognized school offi ial which approves early col lege admission and gives assurance that a high school diploma will be issued after completion of specified college work. Only tudent highly recommended for Early Admission will be considered. Generally these students rank among the top students in their class and present high aptitude test scores. APPUCATION PROCEDURES (International Students)

International students who are qualified academically, finan­ cially, and in English p roficiency are en uraged to join the university community. Applicaton deadline are July 1 � r fall semester and January I for spring semester. Credentials required are: 1 . A completed Inlernati Tlal Studellt Application with a non­ refundable u.s. $35.00 application fee.

2. OFFICIAL Transcripts with English translation from each: (a) secondary scho I, (b) English as a second language program, (c) college or university attended in tbe United States, bome country, or other c untry. Transcripts must be sent directly from each in tituti n. Faxed c pie are n t acceptable. 3. English Proficiency, measured by one of th e following: (a) Standardized English Proti iency Test: TOEFL with a minimum score of 550 (paper test format) or 2 1 3 (computer-based), or (b) TWo quarters r one semester of college-level E nglis h writing with grades of"B" or h igher, or (c) Audit level completion of the American Cultural Ex hange English Language Institute, Located on the PLU campus. Arrangements to take these tests can be made by calling the ACE Language Institute, located at PLU, (253) 53 -7325. 4. One Academic reference from school officials or others in a positi 0 to evaluate th ·tudent's ability to succe d in a baccalaureate program. In addition, tra fer students from a U.S. college or university must have one reference from the international student adviser. 5. A completed International SIt/dent Declaration ofFinances. 6. Personal Essay D De of two topics listed Il the essay form.

2. RI41111 ing Start Program: Ac erted student who have com­ pleted courses under the Washington State Running Start Program will be awarded transfer credil. uch (Ourses ust be described in the catalog of an accredited Washington State Community College and posted 00 an official transcript. 3. International Baccalaureate: A maximum of 30 semester hours may be granted for completion of The Diploma. Students are advised to contact the Admissions Office for specific details. 4. Other Programs: Students who have ompleted college courses while in high sdlOol may receive credit. The courses must be listed in the official college catalog, be a part of the regular college curriculum of a regi nally accredited college or university, and be po ted on an official college or univer ity tran cripl. The univer ity reserves the right to make decision individual basis.

III III

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n an

Other Educational Experiences 1. Credits earn d in non-accredited scho Is ar not transferable.

Students who have matriculated at Pacific Lutheran University may petition a department or school to waiv a particular requirement on the basis f previ liS non-accredited coure work or may petition a departmen t o r school to receive credit by examination. 2. The university allows up to 20 seme ter hours of USAFlIDante credit and up to 20 semester h urs for military credit, provid­ i ng t he total of the lWo does not excee d 30 emester h llrs. 3. The university does nOl grant credit for ( liege level GED t ts. 4. For information on the College Level Examinati n Pr gram (CLEP), refer to the section on Credit by Examinati n under Academic Procedures (see page 25).

EVALUATION OF CREDITS 'li"ansfer of Credits from Other Univenities

The Registrar's Office evaluates all transfer records and provides advising material d igned to assist students to complete university requirements. Tbese materials include a sun1mary of core requirements completed and the total hours accepted. Individual school and departments determine which c ur es atisfy major requirements. 1. Courses completed with a grade of C- or higher at other accredite colleges or universities normally will be accepted for graduation credit with "P" grades, and will not be ca]Cll­ lated into the PLU grade point average. 2. A student may transfer a maximum of 96 semester or 1 44 quarter hours. Of these, t h e m . mum trnosferable from a two-year chool is 64 semester or 96 quarter hours. . Students wh complete the dire t transfer as 0 iate degree from an accredited Washington State community coLI ge before matriculation at PLU will be admitted with junior standing and will have satisfied Core I of the general univer­ sity requirem nrs except for four hours in religion (from line one or two) and four hour in Perspectives on Diversity. _

Transfer of Credits Earned While in Wgh Sch o o l

The university awards credit to high school students for courses completed before hig h school graduation. The university may award transfer credit to high school students wh have com­ pleted courses in approved programs, as described below. l . Advanced Placement Program: Students wh complete advanced placement or credit toward gradu ti n through th examination program of the College Board may receive credit for such cour es. lnquirie howd be a dressed to the Office of Admissions.

FINALIZING AN OFFER OP ADMISSION

I . Medical Requirement: Before actual eor

llment each new student must submit a Health History Form omplete with an accurate immunization record. This informati n must be acceptable to the PLU Health Services Offic . 2. Advance Payment: $200.00 advance payment is necessary in order to c nfinn an offer of admission. Th' payment guarantees a place in the stJdent body, re erves h o us i ng on campu if requested, holds financial assistan e which may have been awarded, and is required before class registration. It is credited to th student's account and is applied toward expenses of the fir. t sem ter. Fall applicants offered admis­ sion before Mav 1 must postmark the payment byMay l . If circumstance necessitat cancellation of enrollment and the Admissions Office is notified in writinG before May 1 5, t he $200.00 will be refund d. The refund date for the January term is December 1 5 , and for spring semester, January I S .

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3. New Student Ill/ormation Form: TIlis f rm mLlst be com p le ted by ill.! s t ud c n and retu rne d with the advance p aym en t . 4. Res id en tial Life Information Form: This form mLlst be omp le t ed by .ill s t ude nts and re turned with the a dva n ce p aymen t .

one sem es ter if the student presents new evidence of p o te n t i al academic success. • S tu d e nts who have been d ro p p ed for academic or d iScip l i n ­ ary reasons and then re - admi t te d mus t i d e ntify a faculty member willing to act as a sponsor a n d a dvi ser.

ACCELERATED UNDERGRADUATE RE-ENTRY FOR ADUIl'S (AURA) Qualified adults, 30 year ' of acre or ol der, who have not bee n enrolled in a baccalaureate degree progr a m within the last five

Financial Aid

y ars, may seek advanced pl.acement up to t he jwuor I vel through the AURA Program . Those accepted i n to AURA are

gr an ted one year's provisional adm i ss ion , during wh ich time they m ust complete 1 2 cred it s at PLU (including Psycho lo gy 40 I ) with a cu m ul a tive grade p oin t average of 2.5 or hi gheL Credit awards fo r prior learning are based upon syst enla tic assessm nt by a farul ty panel f the adequ a cy and approp ria te­ ness of knowledge and skills demonstrated in a p or tfol io p re ­ p ared by the student with staff assis ta n e. Credit awards may not exceed 48 e meste r credits less a ccept able c oll e ge t ran sfe r credits . For details f the AURA Program, co nt ac t the director, AURA Program, 535-8786.

RE-ENTRY STUDENTS Re-Entering the University 1 . A student's ad m i ss i on to the univers i ty is valid for six years. Students who do not a tte nd th W 1 iver sity for a peri od of tinle that i ncludes either a fall or pring semester must apply to re ­ enter the L1ni ersit y as descri bed bel w. •

Students who w is h to r turn w i th in th e s i x -year admission p e r io d re-enter through the Studen t St:rvices Center. Re­ ent er i ng students m u s t provide their current address, degree informa tion, and official transc ripts from a ny college attended durin g their a b s ence . Before regis teri ng , re - ente r ing stu d ent m u st r esolve previ o u ' fmandaI obl ig a t io n s to the university and have a cu r re n t health clearance from Univer­

si t y Health Services. •

Students who wish to return to the university after the six­ year admission period exp ires must re - app ly for admi ssi o n . AppLicants for re-admission are req u i red to s ub mi t a comp leted pplication and official t r a nscr i pts from any college attended unog their absence. App lica t io n forms may be ob t a in ed from and submitted to the Office of Adm i s si o n s .

2. An a ca demic ally dismissed tudent may apply for rein tate­ ment by su bm it t in g a 1 tter f p e t it io n to the director of advising. The p e t it io n is acted on by the C om mi tt ee on Admission and Retention of Student . A stude nt whose peti­ tion is a p proved will be readmitted on probati n a nd must p articip a te in the p rob ati o nar y semester plan. Refer to the A cade m ic ta tus sectioll for a description ofprobation. A s t u d en t whose petition is d enied may apply again for re-admission after one semester bas elapsed unless i n fo rme d otherwise. A d ismisse d student may pe t i tion for re-admission only once per semester. 8

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An academically di smisse d student may be reinstated after

Y

Recognizing that many students who want to attend Pacific Lutheran University would be unable to meet all expenses of enrollment from personal or family sources, the

u n iversity attempts to provide financial assistance to all eligible students. Any student appr ved for enrollment or cu r rently enrolled may request financial aid. Approxi ­ mately 80% of the university's st udents receive help in the form of gift assistance (that is, scholarship s, artistic achievement awards, or grants ) , low interest deferred loans, or employment. In many cases a financial aid award will be a combination of these forms of assistance. The offer of fmancial aid is based on the cost o f atten­ d ance, which is the university's estimate of how much it costs students in various circumstances to attend PLU. A student's resources are s u bt rac ted from the projected costs to determine financial need. Several different budgets are used, which take into account a student's marital status, num be r of dependents, the cost of books, supplies, housing, food , transportation, and perso n al expenses. A parent's contribution is compu ted for all dependent students by the federal processor. It is ba ed On a federally established fo r m ul a for detennining parental ab i l i ty to contribute toward a student's education. The u nivers i ty also expects students ( and their spouses, if married) to contribute toward expenses. All applicants are offered the m axim wn amount of aid for which they qualify, as funds permit. If financial ci rcumstances change, students may contact the Financial Aid and Student Employment Office to discuss their situation with a financial aid a d m i n i strator at any time . If tud en ts or their families have unusual circumstances ( such as loss of employment or m ajor medical expenses) that might affect the ne d for tudent financial aid, the Financial Aid and Student Employment Office hould be contacted. Unusual circ umsta nc es must be described in w r itin g , with the student's name and social s ec ur i ty number and all pertinent dollar amounts indicated. Students who receive schol arsh i p s from sources outside the univers i ty must inform the Financial Aid and Student Employment Office in w ritin g with the name of the scholarship and the yearly amount. In most cases, PLU may be required by federal regulations to adjust a financial aid package. Loans and work study will be adjusted first. Scholarships and grants will be adjusted only as a last resort. Financial assistance is available to all qualified students regardless of their sex, race, creed, color, age, national origin, or disability.


....

APPUCATION PROCEDURE:

earnings. Financial assistance from the university is therefore

Student must apply for fi n anc i al aid each year by completing a

supplementary to the efforts of a student's family. It is provided

new FAFSA, Renewal FAFSA or doing FAFSA on the Web . Need

for students who demonstrate need.

based aid is not automatically renewable. FAFSAs are generally

ay i1able i

Dee mber for the upcoming academic year. AppLica­ tions must be submitted by th following priority-funding deadlin s for PLU to be considered for maximum funding.

Entering Fre hman Students:

Mail FAPSA or do FAFSA on the

Web no later than Ja n u a ry 31 for the upcoming academic year.

Entering 1ra.osfer Students;

Mail FAFSA, Renewal FAFSA,

FAFSA on the Web no later than January

31

PLV Continuing Stud.ents: Mail

Additional rights and r es p nsibilities of fi nancial aid recipi­ en ts i oelude:

1 . Signin g and re turn i.ng ea h financial aid notic received. 2. Declining at ny time any portion of an award. 3. Notifying t he

fo r the upcoming

FAFSA, Renewal FAFSA or do

f a change in

,...

residence (off-campus o r a t home); or receipt of additional out ide scholarships.

4. Providing a copy of their parents' income tax retmn ( Form 1 040) and/or a copy of their own i n di vi dual income tax retmn

c

if requested.

FAFSA on the Web no later than Fehruary 15 for the upcoming

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS POllCY

academic year.

FAFSA on the Web: http://wwwfaG<a. ed,goy

The

An app lication for financial aid may be completed at any ti me , but failure to meel the priority date may result in

tudent Services Center in case

creclit hours attempted ; a change in marital status; a change i n

r do

academic year.

z }> z n

a

denial of aid

even though need is demonstrated. The Financial Aid Office will

consider all app h c. l n t s for any award for which they might be eligible. Aid awards are for one yea r and most are renewable, provided re-app lication is completed on time, jillancial need con­ tinlles, a/Ui satisfactory acade mic progress is maintained. Aid is /lot automa tically renewed each year.

NOTIFICATION OF AWARD DECISIONS 1. Award de isions for freshmen and transfer students who meet the February 1 completion date will be made i n March, and actual notificatio n will be mailed the first week in April. 2. Financial aid decisions for conti nu i ng PLU student are made dunng April and May. Not ifications are sent out beginning in June.

VALIDATING THE AID OFFER Aid offers must be validated by returni n g the signed O ffe r of Fi n anc ial Aid. Freshmen and transfer student must also submit the $200 advan ce payment required by the Office of Admissions. This sh ould be done as soon as possible, but must b e received by May I. No payment is requir d from continuing students. All students must complet a sat isfactory paym e nt arrangement

with the Stu den t Services Center by August 1 for fall semester and by January 1 5 for spring semester to hold awards. App licants who do not return their acceptance of an award by the reply date sp ecified and who do not complete satisfactory payment arrangements will have their lI\vards ca ncell ed . If an applicant later decide to reapply, the application w.ill be reviewed with the gr up curren tly being processed . Aid, with the exception of College Work-Study and Washing­ ton

tate Need Grants, is credited to the student's account when all p ap erwo rk has b ee n com pleted. One -h al f of the awa rd is disbursed each semester. Parents and students a re resp o nsibl e for

the charges

in exces ' of the 3w'l rd. In some cases ai d is awarded in excess of direct university charges to hdp with living expenses. To expedi te a refund students can request remaining funds from their accou nt by contacting the Student Services Center. Under f, deral regu la tio n , adjustments to an award package m ust be made if a student receives additional awards of aid from sources external to the u niversity. In every case, however,

policy of the

university is to allow students to continue

receiving fmancial assistance as l ong as dl ey a re in good standing. To do otherwise could cause must devo te their e ffo r t s to

a

severe h a rdsh i p on students who

achieving satisfactory grade s.

How­

ever, no institutional grants will be awarded to students with cumnlati e grade point averages below

2.00. Moreover, federal

regulati o ns require that after four terms or more of attempted enrollment, students below 2.00 cumulative grade point average will have their federal ftn anc ial aid denied. Pacific Lutheran University's Schools of Business and Education require a mini­ mum grade point verage of 2.50. To be given priority for most types of financial aid, an appli­ cant must be enrolled as a fu ll- tim

student. For Federal Finan­

cial Aid programs, a full-time student is defined as a ny person enrolled for a minimum of twelve ( 1 2) creclit hours or m re p

r

emester. Adjustments in an award may be made during the year

if an aid re c i p ie n t has not enrolled for a uffic i ent number

f

credit hours. However, each financial aid recipient must main tain sati sfactory academic progress

in the course o f study he or she

is

receive financial assistance awarded by Paci fi c Lutheran niversity. The following require­ ments are expected of each financial aid recipient: To make satisfactory progress toward a degree, an undergradu­ ate student must complete an ave rage of 24 semester hour o f credit each academic year. An acade m ic year is defined as tbe fall semestc.r and the spring semester. Financial aid is awarded fo r 32 hours to complete a bachelor's degree in fo ur years. Fo r fuLl-time undergraduate students receiving financial aid, the maximum numbeT of credit hours that may be attempted is 1 92 and the maximum time-frame for completing a baccalaure­ ate degree is ix years. Even if a student chan ges his or her major or academic program, only 1 92 credit hours may be t a ken quali­ fying t r flnancial aid, and the maxmlunl lime-frame of six years for receivi ng a degree is en� reed . Some financial aid pro­ grams ( e.g. , most university gift aid programs Jld Washington St ate eed Grants) allow aid to be awarded a ID.llA!rn U m of four

pursuing in order to

ntinue t

academic years. For p rt-time un dergraduate students, a minimum of 1 2 credit hams must b e co m p l eted each academic year and

a

degree

must be achi ved within a maximum time-frame of ten years. (The maximum nu mb er of credits allowable

is 1 92.)

Undergraduate Need-Based Credit Completion Requirements

Financial Aid and Student Employment will attemp t tu a ll ow the

Enrollment Status ull- time 3/4 time J /2 time Less (h.m 1/2 time"

student to keep as much of the award package as possible. By treat ing aid received from external sources in this way, additional awards from the university's resources can be made to other qualified students.

Minimum pet term

Minimwn per year

12

24

9

18

b All

12

credit attempted

A l l credit atlempt�d

· Ll!Ss th ilrl 112 time tm rollm....,1/ applies to tile Pe ll rant Program m. Lrs5 tlla.,. 1/2 time I!llrollmellt will <'ause (I sruden t', IOlll1 to be carr e led and may jeopardize deferment $ta�II�.

RIGHTS AND RESPONSmILITIES Th basic responsibility for financing an education at PLU rests with students and t heir families. 111 addition tu expected contributi ns from parents p r guardians, students are ex pected to assist by contributing from their savings and summer

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ati s facto ry progress is reviewed for fm and al a id purposes after the end f spring semester. Por Wa h in gto n State Need Grants and the Was hington State Work St ud y Program, ati fac­ tory progress is reviewed at the end of each semester. The following grades do n ot indicate successful co mp l e tion of academic credit applicable t oward a degree: "E"

Grades Inco mplete .oW" Withdrawal "EW" Unofficial Withdrawal ( recorded by Regis trar ) " F" Fail ure Any cour es in which g r ad es are received arc, however, included in the maximum nwnber of credi ts that may be attemp ted ( 1 92 ) and are con idered to be within the maximum time-frame allowable for ilchi ving a d egree (six year ). All credits earne d by examrnation, which are applicable toward , degree, will be included in the limi tat i on on credits that can be a ttem p ted whi le elig ib le fo r financial aid. Once a course has been co m pleted successfully, the credit hours earn e d are counted toward the maximum number of hours which can be taken under financial ai d e ligibility. If a co urse is su cess fu Ily comp leted more than once, it is counted only once toward a student's degree requi reme nt · and toward the maximum number of hours that can be taken under financial aid eligibility. The un iveni ty's curriculum includes very few non-credit courses or courses wh o e credit hours are not a pp l i cab le to a degree . If any such courses are taken by fi n a n c ial aid recipients, the h o urs will be incl ud ed in the limitation on c redits that may be attempted and will be c�lnsid red within the tim e- frame allowable fo r a ch ievin g a degree. In the event that st ud ent mils to mee t the criteria for s a ti sfa c­ tory prog ress duri ng a p ar t i c ular semester, he or she will be pl aced o n academic p robation. Failure to regain satisfactory acad em ic tatus will result in the canccllal ion of financial aid. Once "u nsatisfactory progress" has b een determined, students receive official notificati n. Terminated st u dents may apply for reinstatement by subm itting a le t ter of petition to the direct r of advising a n d securing a fa culty sponsor. The p eti t ion and spon so rsh ip letter are subm itted fo r ac tio n to the Faculty Com m itte e on Admission and Reten tion of Students. Students whose financial aid is terminated may petition fo r reinstatement of their aid in one of two ways:

"I"

for this purpose must use their own financial resou rces and are in eligi ble for financial aid through the university.

lYpes of Aid AID PACKAGES Studen ts are usually eligible for several d i ffe ren t types of aid fr m various sources; th erefore PLU offeIs a financial aid "packa e' of funds. Funds offe red depend on a number f fact r5, in cludin g status as an undergraduate or graduate student, the funds avai Jable at the time a �t uden t applies and the amo unt of financial need. An expected family co ntri bu tio n is d erived using a federal formula applied to FAFSA infomlation. Scholarships and grants arc gifts that do not have to be rep id. A student's p a ckage includes gift money whenever gu ideli nes and fundi ng level s perm i t. Where ap p l ica ble, the combination C

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PLU FUNDED

- NON NEED

REGENTS' AND PRESIDENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to freshmen in rec gnition of outstanding academic achieve­ ment and servi i n hi gh school and in a n t i ci pa tion of contin ­ ued exce.llen ce at FLU. St uden ts who met the foll ow in g basic req ui reme nt s were i nvi ted to p p ly: admitted by January 1 3 ; 3.8 GPA; 1 200 SAT o r 2 8 ACT; top 1 0% o f high school c lass; and US citizen or obtaining citizenship. The Regent s ' Sc.h ola r shi p is awarded to cover the full co s t of tu i ti on up to 3 2 credits for the a cade m i c year (fall and spring). Th President's Scholar­ ship is a $ 6 ,50 0 award for the academic year. Both are renewa bl e for three years p rovi ded a 3 . 30 cu.mulative GPA is maintained. ­

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDS of $5 ,000 a re

annually

o ffered to e n ter i ng freshmen in recognition of o uts t a ndi n g

academic excellence in h ig h school and in anticipation of s up er i or p er form an ce at PLU. To be a candidate, a stu dent must h ave a s tro n g high school grad e point aver age, 3.75 or higher, and receive an offer of admission by M a rch I . Financial need is not a requisite and no

th e r application is requi red. Renewab le for th ree years provid d a 3 .30 cumulative GPA is maintained. ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS ra ng i ng between $3 , 500

and $4,500 each are annu Lly awarded to entering freshmen i n

application i s required. Renewable for thIee years provided a cumulative GPA is maintained.

3 .3 0

NOTE: Only one of Ihe above merit awards/scholarships received during Ihe same award period.

elm

be

PROVOST'S MERIT AWARDS of $3 , 000 are granted to un de r­ graduate t ransfer students with a 3.50 or h igher G PA a nd 30 semester hou rs (45 q uart er hours) of transferable co llege cours es co mpleted at the time of adm is sion . Must be admitted by March I . 3.30 cumulative GPA is required for renewal. Need is not a de ter m in i ng factor.

of $3,000 are gra nt e d to transfer students with a 3 . ° GPA upon entering PLU and with pro f of PTK membership. The awar is ren ewa ble for o n e year during the undergraduate period of study if a 3 .30 GPA is maintained. Need is not a de te rm i n i n g fac to r. PHl THETA KAPPA SCHOLARS HIPS

ALUMNI DEPENDENT GRANTS

of $500lyear for four y

at.

a.re

ava ilable to full-time st u d en ts whose par nt(s) atten de d PLU ( PLC) for two semesters or more . Need is no t a determining factor. Application deadline is Dec mber 1 for the cu rre n t year; awards are m ad e on a funds available b asi s therea fte r.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS

A

DONORS/FUNDED UNIVERSITY DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIP

and in an t ici p a tio n of superi r performance at PLU. To be a candidate, a st uden t mus t have a trong high school gr ad point average, 3.50 or higher, and rece ive an offer of ad m i s ion by Ma rc h 1 . Financial need is not a requ is i te and no other

Sum mer sessions may als o be used as terms du ri ng which a student on financial aid probati on may regain satls.factory acad emic tatus. However, students enrolling in su mme r sessions

P

Institutionally controlled scholarsh ips and grants are provided by the university andlo r u niversity donors. If it is detemlined that all or a portio n of a student's awa rd is provided by a designated or named sou rce, at! updated offer offinancial aid will be sel/t.

recogn itio n of outstanding academic achievement in h igh school

1) they may co mpl ete one s m este r of full-time en ro l l m nt using their own financial resources, or 2) they may submit an ap peal to the Faculty Committee on Ad m is sion and Re te n ti o n of t ud e n ts documenting the un usual circums ta nces which h ave made it imp oss ib le to make sat i sfa tory pTogress dur i n g he seme ter in questio n .

10

of tuition remission and lor other i nstitutionally fu.nded resources (e.g., Clergy Depend en l, Alumni Dep ndent, Regen ts) will be awa rd ed to a maxim um of PLU tuition cost. To receive PLU grant or scholarship assistance, students must be full-time, taking a minimum of 1 2 non-repeated credit hours each term. PLU awa rd B gift assistance for up t o 32 ho u rs for the academic year ( fan, January term, spring) only. In add i t io n , unless otherwise noted, thescholarsb.i;ps and� listed below are need-based a n d are available to und e rgrad u ates only. Recipients must majnt in satisfactory academic progress as defined in the catalo!:.

Y


ALUMNI MERIT AWARDS of $ 1 ,500 per a cad emi c year fO r four years ar e gi en to exceptional st ud en ts who are Ons and/or d aughte rs of PLU al u m n i/ ae. En te ri n g freshmen m ust have a cumulative high school GPA of 3 . 7 5 or high e r . N o n- fre s h me n an d renew al ca ndida te s m ust have a m i n i m u m cumulative collegiate GPA of 3 . 30 to be e l ig i bl e. Financial need is not a determining fact r and c o mp .l et io n of a sp cial p p l icati o n is recommended. FACULTY MERIT AWARDS are avaiLable to 24 ' l u den ts who have comp let e d 45 c red it hour or more at PLU. No eparate appl ica ­ tion is necessary. Fa cul ty will reco mme nd individual students to the s electi on commi ttee , Notification is made in the s p ri ng semester for the following yea r. The award is r e newab l e for one

year du rin g the undergraduate period of s tud y . RIEKE LEADERSHIP AWARDS for u p t $2,000 per year are available to · t uden ts with 3.00-1- GPA and dem o ns tr a ted leader­ ship or active involvement in a multi-ethnic con text . To be re n ewed each year r a pplica tion is re q uired. CLERGY DEPENDENT GRANTS are available to de p e nde n t ch ildren 0 ordained mi n iste r s who are ac tiv el y serving a Christian co ngreg a tio n full - ti me. The grant am u n t is $ 1 ,000 pe. r year ($ OO/semester) . A pp L i cat io n d ea dlin e is D ece m be r 1 for the cu rrent year; awards are made on a fu nd s a 'aUable ba "is thereafter. ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS are available to full-time u nder­

gra du a tes. Students must file a FAFS a n d meet aU P LU GPA s t an dard s . Up to full tuition and room/board poss ible . CaU P U's ROTC office for i nfo rm ation (253 ) 535- 84 70. ROBERT C. BYRD HONORS SCHOLARSHIP is awarded t

h i gh school seniors wh o have demonstrated academic achievement. Th e ' wa rd may be r e n ewed for up to L h ree years, provided that funds are a pp ropria t ed and the student rem ain s eligible. Amounts vary. Ap p l i catio n is made through the ap p ro priate education a.ssistance agen cy in a student's home stale. DELORES DAVIS LEADERSHIP is available to o n e adult student each year in the amount 0£ $ 1 ,000. Student m ust be 25 yea rs old or older, have a c u mu lat ive GPA of 3 .30 or highe r. ha ve a positive at titude, contribute to th e adult student p o p ul a tio n at PLU, be comm itted to bo th academic and p rso na l goa ls, and exh ibit leadership q ua l i ties . Pa ci fic Luthera n Diversity staff and facult y nominate students each year. The awa rd i� for one yea r and is

reflected in the student's fa ll billing . PLU will, however, m a t ch schol a rsh i p momes received from congregations up to J an ua ry 1

of the academic year. III order t o be m a tc h e d , funds m ust be sent di re c tl y to Financial Aid and Student E m ploym en t and not be given to the s t u d e nt .

TUmON RfMISSION E m p l oyee s of the unive rs ity are e l igible for up to 90% a nd their depe nd en ts are el i gi b l e for up to 75% tuition remi ion. Tuitio n re m i ss i on is a university g ift resource.

eli m in ate

PLU FUNDED - NEED BASED

Q CLUB SC::;H OLARSHIPS are awa rded to new freshmen and tr a nsfe rs on the b a s is o f a cadem i c a h i evement and financial

nee d. Freshmen m ust hav e a 3 . 2 5 urnulative G PA and test results re fl e c t i ng high scholastic ap tit u de . Tr a n s fe rs are requ i r e d to h ave an en teri n g cumulative GPA of 3.00. Ren ewal

will require good academic st an din g, a urnula t iv e 3. 00 GPA, timely re app li cati o n through the FA FSA , and d emo ns tra ted financial need.

DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS are available to s t u d en ts receiving scholarshjps from a ny Dollars for S cho la rs chapter. Pacific Lutheran University is a C ollegi ate Partner and matches Dollars for Sc h ol ars chapter awards, d o llar for dollar, up to $ 1 ,000 p er studen t based on financial n I'd as funding permits. Do ll a rs for Scholars is a progr am o f C itizens' Scholarship F ound ati on of America. ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS are gra n te d to st ud e n t s with fina n c ial need who have exceptional abil.ity in the fields of Art, Dance, D ra m a , Forensics, and M usi c. The award requir s recommendation by a PLU faculty member each year and is renewable on the basi s of recom mendation, participation, and reestablished need. UNIVERSITY GRANTS are awa r d ed to students with financial need (who may not qua lify for ot h er institutional sc h ol a rships )

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS in the amount of $750-$2,000 are ava ilable to NMSQ T-PSA T fm al ists (National Merit Semi­ finalist Qualifying Test - Pre-Schola tic Assessment Test ) .

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDED GRANTS

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY MATCHING SCHOLARSHIP (PLUMS) pr vides fmancial assistance to s t ud e n ts from church ongregat i o ns who attend Pacific Lutheran Un iversity. T h r ough the PLUMS prog ra m PLU wil l ma t ch , d llar-for-dollar, scholar-

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ther instit ut iona l aid p revio usly aw a rded.

NOTE: FAFSA must be subm itted in ll timely mllnntT ellch "eM to

holars Program h onor s thr e gr ad uat i n g h igh sch 0 1 sen io rs from each legisl a tive d istri c t each yea r.

,...

of tui tion . Receipt of tui ti on remission may serve to adjust or

INTERNATIONAL GRANTS are available to international students a tten di ng Pacific Lutheran U ni ver s ity. The amount is $2,000 per year for fou r years. No a pplic ation is necess ary. These are awarded auto malically and may be renewed annually fo r qualjfying tudents.

The Wash i ngton S

� z n

Stude n ts receiving tuition remission may be aw ard ed additional merit and need-based i ns t it ution a l gifts, but only up t o the cost

and maintain at least a cumulative 2 .00 GPA.

WASHINGTON SCHOLAR'S AWARD i s available to students who are "Washington State Scholars" i n t he amount of $ 3 , 1 4 2 per year for four years, su bj ect to S tate Legi sl a tive adj us t m en t. To renew each year th e student must main tain a cumulative 3.3 0 GPA.

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made to PLU by A ugu s t 1 so th at the scholarship may be

no n- renewable.

F inalists should inform the National Merit Scholarship C or p o r a ­ tion of their in ten t i on 0 e n roll at PLU. PLU -spo nsored National Merit finalists are gua ranlee d a t otal of $7,000 thr ugh a co mbination of instjtutional sc hola rsh i p resources. This amount includes the $750-$2,000 N a ti o n al Merit S ch o lars h i p .

."

shi p s from $ 1 00 t $ 1 ,000 p ro vid ed by c o n gr e ga tion s o r o rganiza tior s wi t h i n a ch urch to students a tte.n ding PLU. Co ngregation s are e n co urag e d to h ave PLUMS paym en ts

reestabluh evidmce

offinandlll Ileed for need-bas ed (lid.

FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDED

Federal PeD Grants are federal gr a nts available to st u dents who take , t least 1 credit hour per semester. Pei! Grants remain an estimate un til verification is c om p le ted , i f a s tu d e n t has been se lected . Students taki n g l 2 h U IS or more per s emest e r receive a full g ra nt, 9-1 l h ou rs receive 3/4 g ra nt, 6-8 h ou rs 1 1 2 grant, and

II'S th an 6 hours pp roxi mate Jy 1 /4 gra nt .

FedenJ Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are fede raLly fu nded grants awa r ded on the ba sis of high financial n eed .

Washington State Need Grants re available to eligible r esi dents of the St a te of W a shi n gt o n who atten d PLU. These grants are i nt e nde d for st ud e n t with high need. Grants are awarde d at PLU in cco r d a nce with the State Higher E duc a ­ tion Coordi nating

Boa rd' s policies. Wa sh i ng to n

State Need

Gra nts must be used fo r edu ca t i o nal expenses oth e r than tuition acco rdi ng to Was hi ng to n State law.

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WASHINGTON STATE EDUCATlONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT

FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCAnON LOANS

i awarded to transfer students with an Associate's Degree or ju nior standing for the amount of $2,500 per year ( subject to state funding ) . Students can never have attended Pacific

One or more of the Federal Family Education Loans may be listed on a financial aid offer. This means a student is eligible to apply separately for these loans. Federal loans are obtained through a lender on an application that is certified by the Financial Aid Office. It is inlportant that applications be sent to the lender for prompt proce ing. Delays in receiving outside loan funds may result in additional interest charges on a student account. Loan checks are electronically transmitted to the university by the lenders. It is recommended that students choose lenders who will participate in electronic funds transfer (EFT) with PLU, so

Lutheran University before. Eligible applicants must be residents o f one of the following Washington State counties i n ord er t b e eligible: Benton, Clark, Cowlitz, Franklin, King, Kitsap , Pierce, Skamania, Snohomish, Spokane, Walla Walla, or Yakima and be p laceboun d. Application must be made to the Higher Education Coordinating Board of Nashington who will select the recipients. Applications available in the Finan­ cial Aid and Student Employment Office are due to the Higher Education Coordinating Board o f Washington by March l . WASHINGTON AWARD FOR VOCAnONAL EXCELLENCE (WAVE)

is available to students who have completed at least one year in a vocatio nal program app roved by the Stat Board for Commu­ nity and Technical Colleges. The applicant must be a Washing­ ton Sta te resident and a high school graduate. and must main­ tain a GPA of 3.0 each term. The award is for two year (4 semesters) and the amount varies each year depending on state

as to avoid having to stand in line to sign a paper check. Checks must be signed by the borrower wi thin 30 days after they are received by the university. in addition, a student must attend a n entrance counseling session. during which a borrower's rights and responsibilities will be discussed. Not attending a ses ion will result in the loan funds being returned to the lender with a potential loss of award. SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

Student loans allow students to postpone paying fo r college expen es until having completed their education. Loan obLiga­ tions are described in this section and in the promissory notes.

Bligibllity: At least half-time (6 credit hours) undergraduate or (4 credit hOUTS) graduate students. Amount: Up to $2,625 per year for freshmen; $3,500 for sopho­ mores; $5,500 for juniors and seniors; and $8,500 fo r graduate students. Repayment: A variable interest rate which changes annually and can never exceed 8.25% and monthly principal and interest pay­ ments begin six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or drops to less than half-time attendance. Comments or Concl1tions: The federal government pays the interest during a student's time of enrollment. The student is responsible for selecting a lender from the Preferred List of Lenders. A separate loan application and promissory note will then be mailed to the student from the selected preferred lender. The student submits the loan application and promissory note back to the lender for processing.

NEED BASED LOANS

NON-NEED BASED LOANS

funding . Applications must be made to the State of Washington. TRIO - a State Need Grant Program is available to students

who have completed any TRIO program. Recipients must demonstrate financial need. Funding is limi ted. TRIO programs include: Upward Bound, Talent Serach, and SMART. An award of a TRIO will replace Washington State Need Grant eligibility. All awards from ft4eral and state Sf}UTCeS are made ass"ming the anticipated funds will be available. Shf}"ld a reduction in funding occur, awards mar be red"ct4.

LOANS

FEDERAL PERKJNS LOAN

E1iglbDity: At l east half-time (6 credit hours) undergraduate or (4 credit hours) graduate students wi th high need. Amount: Up to $3,000 for each year of undergraduate study and up to $5,000 for each year of graduate or profession al study. Repayment: A fixed interest rate of 5%. Princ ipal and interest payments begin 12 months after the student graduates, with­ draws, or drops to less than half-time attendance. Deferrals available for student status, economic hardship, and select volunteer services.

UNSUBSIDtzED FE.DERAL STAFfORD LOAN

Eliglbility: Student attending at least half-time (6 credit hours) or a graduate student attending at least half-time (4 credit hours) who does not qualify for all or part of the maximum Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan.

FEDERAL NURSING LOAN

$2,625 per year for freshmen; $3,500 for sopho­ mores; $5,500 fo r junior and seniors; and $ 1 0,000 fo r graduate students. Repayment: A variable interest rate which changes a nnually and can never exceed 8.25% and monthly principal payments begin six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or drops to less than half-time attendance. Unsubsidized means the student is responsible for the interest on the loan amount while in school; however. the interest payment can be postponed. (Interest begins accruing from the date the funds are first disbursed) . Comments o r Conditions: Financial need is not a requirement. The student is responsible for selecting a lender from the Preferred List of Lenders. A separa te loan application and promissory note

EUgibilitr- Students enrolled at least half-time (6 c redit hours) in the School of Nudng (except pre-nursing, second bac helo r's degree, or graduates) . Preference given to LPN students.

will then be mailed to the student from the sele ted preferred lender. The student submits the loan application and promissory note back to the lender for processing.

Amount: Up to

FEDERAL PLUS LOAN

Comments or Conditions: Recipients are required to sign a

promissory note in the Student Services Center/Student Loan Office after the first week of classes. Priority is given to under­ graduate stude nts. Up to total loan forgiveness is possible fo r teach ing in low i ncome population areas, teac hing the disabled, or teachi ng in a federal Head Start program. Additional loan cancellation conditions exist.

4,000.

Repayment: A fixed interest rate of 5%. Principal and interest

payments begin 12 months after the student graduates, with­ draws, or drops to less than half-time attendance. Comments or Concl1tions: Recipients are required to sign a pr missory note in the Student Services Center/Student L an Office after the first week of classes. Limited fun ding is available.

Amount: Up to

Illi gibllity: Parents of dependent student. Amount: Parents may borrow up to the full cost of their student's

college education minus the amount of any financial aid the student is receiving. Repayment: A variable interest rate which changes annually and can never exceed 9.00% and monthly principal and i nterest payments begin within 60 days aft.er the final disbursement of

fund . (Interest begins accruing from the date the funds are first disbursed.)

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COJIUIleJlts or Conditions: A P rent Pl us L oa n

Req ues t form is required by Pacific L uth e ra n University and the fedentl g vem­ ment before thi l oa n can be i n i ti a t ed. The Parent Plus Loan Request fo rm can be ob ta i n ed at the Student Se rvice s Center. Financial need is not a requirement. Either parent may borrow this loan for the student. The parent is re s p nsible for se l ecting a len der from the Preferred L ist of Lenders. A separate loan app l ica ­ tion and promissory note will then be mailed to the parent from the selected preferred le nder . The parent submits the loa n appli­ cation and prom is so ry note back to the l en der for processing. ADDITIONAL UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAffORD LOAN

EUgiIrllity: I n depen de n t student or d ep en den t student whose parents are den ied a PLUS loa n .

t $4,OOO/year for freshmen and sophomores and $5,000 for juniors a n d seniors. Repayment! A var iab l e interest rate wh ich ch a nges annually and can never exc ed 8.25% and monthly p r inc i p al payments begin six mo n ths after the student graduates, withd raws , or dro p s to less t h a n half-time attendance. Unsubsidizetl mt!aDS the student is responsible fo r the imerest on the loan am o un t while in school; however, interest payment may be p ostp o ned. (Interest begins accrui ng from the date t he ftmds are first disbursed.) Comments or Conditions: Financial need is not a req u i remen t . The student is resp on ibl for selecting a lender from the Pre­ ferred List ofLenden A separate loan application and prom issory note will then be mailed to the student from the selected pre­ ferred lender. The student submits the loan appLi ation and Amount: Up

ing Board's State Approving Agency (HEC B/SAA) for enrollment of persons el i g i bl e to receive educational benefits under Title 38 and Ti tle 10 USc. Veterans, wi d ows, widowers, and children of deceased or disabled veterans who wish to i nq u i re about their eligibility for benefits should contact the Regi on al Office of the Veterans A d m i n j 't r a ti o n , Fed ral Building, 9 1 5 Second Avenue, Seattle, Wa sh i n gto n 981 74. Persons within the State of Washington may tel ep h o ne 1 -800-827- 1 000. St udent s sh o uld ga i n admission to the university and see the univers ity's Veterans Affairs Coordinator before making application for benefits. S tu d en ts are req u i re d to registeT at the Vet rans A ffa i rs Coord inator's Office located in the Student Services Center (Room 1 02, Hauge Administration Build ing), be for e each term to insure continuous recei p t of benefits.

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Aid Association for Lutherans Scholars hip

A1len more Registered N u rsing Sch larship Alumni Schola rship Fund American Lut h e ra n Church-North Pacific Dis t ri ct S c holarsh i p Andy and I rene Anderson Endowed Scholarship for Nursing

Haze.! M. Ander on Endowed M u sic Scholarship

Comments and Conditions: V ari ous Alternative Loans are

p rovided for all students, i nclu di ng lhose n t quali fyi ng for T itl e IV aid . Additional i nformation is ava ilable in the S tuden t Services Center.

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A ckerle y Communications Merit Award

ALTERNATIVE LOANS

aries.

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NAMED ENDOWED/IUlSTRICfIID SCHOLARSHIPS

Ar t h ur Anderson Scholarship

Amount:

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Pacific L uthera n University's academic p rogr am s of study are app roved by the Washington State Higher Education Coordinat­

p ro missory note back to the lender for processing. Eligibility: All students.

...

VETERANS AFFAIRS &: VOCATIONAL RBBA1ULlTATION

Florence Sp in ner Anderson Memorial Scholarship

Julius a n d Jean Anderson Endowe d Nursing Scholarship Jeanie An derson Scholarship Ruth Anenson S chol ars h i p

William and

Ernest M. Ankrim/Lutheran Brot herhood Endowed Scholarship

( E conomics)

An th ropology Alumn; Award

Mary Jan Aram S c h olars h ip Fund

Arntson Scholarship Hcdvig Anhur Memoria l

Students accepted into this program are el ig i bl e to receiVe

Federal Stafford Subsidized andlor Unsubsidized Loan up to $5,500. If a student is i ndep e n dent or is a dep en de n t tudent whose parents are denjed a PLUS loa n, th tuden t is eligible for an additional Unsubsidized Feder al Stafford Loan op to $5,500.

AURA/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship Aw ard of Excel lence (Pa ifie Coca-Cola Bottl i n g Co.) Margutrite and Wilmer Bacr Scholarship

Elbert H., IT and Janice M. Baker Endowed Mus i c Scholarship

The Bangsund Family Sc hol arship Don F. B ayer Memorial

ursing Scholarship

B.E.R.G. Minority Scholarship

PRINCIPAl. CERTIFICATE

Students are not eligible for Federal Stafford Loans accord ing to fede ra l regulations. Contact the Stu den t Se rvices Center for i nform ation o n al te rna t ive loans. EMPLOYMENT COLLEGE WORK STUDY

Eligibility: At teast part- t ime students.

Amount: Varies. Comments o.r Conditions: On-campus jobs; students an apply [or i ndi vid ua l jobs through the Financial Aid and Student

Employment Office. STATE WORK STUDY

EUgibiIity: At least part-L i m e students.

Amount: B ased on ne d.

Comments o.r CondJtions: Off-campos j ob s; students must

apply for individual j ob s th rough the F inancial Aid and Student Employment Office.

Peter and Lyd ia Beckman Endowed S cholars hip

Paul M . Bellamy Music Scholars h ip Clenora E. Berge Nursing Scholarship

Bilbrough Family Scholarship AlfTcd and Ali c Bishop/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship Anne Bi te ma n Memori al Nursing Schola[ship Blake-Webber Endowed Scholarship

r. and Olive Lewellen Blandau Scholarship and Loan Fund Dillie Quale Boe Education Scholarship Erwin and l ice Bolduan Scholarship Vanda Bortell Endowed Sc holarsh ip Havana Bradner Memo rial S c ho la rs h ip Jorunn Breiland Scholarship und Agnes Brodahl Music Sch o l ar. hip Bett y Brown Sch olarshi p B uchanan Family ndowed Sch ola rship Erhardt and Virginia Buchfinck Endowed Scholarship in Edu c a t ion Chester B u h l Endowed Voca l Music Scholarship Richard

Luther

Dr. and Mrs. W. B. Bu r ns Fund

Burzlaff Memorial S chol a rship Cory Kenneth Carlson Memorial Scholarship Pak Joe

Ch a n Endowed Scholarship

Cheney Foundation Educational Scholarships hevron Mer;t

Awards

Walt r H. Christensen Scholarship

Kenneth Christopherson/Walter Pilgri m En dowe d S c hola rs h ip

in Religion

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Lyman H .

Claridge/Lutheran Brotherhood E n dowe d Scholars h ip

Indrebo Music S c hol ars hip

Class uf 1 967 Endowed S cho larsh ip (Dese 'ndants of Class) Hulda Cocanower S c hol ars hi p E n dowmen t Computer Science Scholar h i p End owme n t Do rot hy and Powell Cone Memorial/Lutheran Bro th e rh oo d Endowed

S u zan ne Ing ra m Memorial Schc)larship

Terry Irvin S cholarsh i p

Ken neth and St 11a Jacobs Schol rshi p Lyle a n d I r i s Jacobson E ndowed S chol arsh i p

Mike Jacobson S c hola r hip

NursingScholarship

Cou n se li n g M a s ter and ida t c S cho b rsh ip rane Fund for Wido\ aod hildre n Irene

. Creso Merit Award

E. JOM

and

chol:m h ip Donald Jerk Leadershi p Award Judge Ber t il E. Johnoon c hola rs hip

Ole M. Jennestad Memorial

L orme E. Dahlberg Jr. Endowed Scholarship Memo r i al Scho la rsh ip Fund George 1.. Davis/Llltheran B ro th e rhoo d E n dowe d Schola rship Fund J. Wal te r and Clara Davis cho l arship

Johnson/ AIfsen Scholarship

Carl D al k

Johnson/La rson Scholarship

Agne s S ol em Jo h n so n /Lut h er an Brot h er hood Nu rsi ng En dowment Luther H. Johmon/Lutheran Bro ther ho od Endowed Business Scho l a rsh. ip

Harold B. and Frances S. Dawson/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Nu rsi ng Sch larship

Pearl N. lohnson/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Nurs i ng Sc hol ars hi p

Arts A. Davis fund Doo li ttle Memor i al S chol a rs hip Earl E. and Martha 1. Eckstrom End owed c hol a r sh lp Economics Ex eHence Endowed Scholarship

T . L . Johmon Sr.lLutheran Brotherhood Rndowed Scholarship Ted and Doree n John 'on/Lut heran Brotherhood Endowed Schularship in Natu ral S knees

Deal Pa mily Endowed Scholarship in the Liberal Ida

apt. W. Larry and Mrs. Janice The Reverend and Mrs. Endowment

Ted and Dore n J u hn so n /Luthe ran Brotherhood Endowed Schol a rship in Physics

D. Eichler S chol arship Fund

Erna M.

E.E. Eidbo Endowed Scholarship

Regents Scho la rship

Karl Enduwed Scholars h ip in F ore n s i cs Theodore O.l-L and Betsy Karl S ca n di n av ian Cul tur al enter Endowed

C ha l le nge Grunt

Carl and Ethel EricksonfLuther n Brotherhood Endowed Sch ol a rs hi p Leif Erikson S c ho la rsh i p Gerry and Linda Evanson Endowed Schol arsh i p

S holarsh ip

Lind B. Ka rl se. n Music S cholarsh ip

L. Kayser Endowed S c hola rs h ip Elizabeth B. Ke l ly ndowed S cho l arshi p

Ph il ip C . and Alice

I. Eyring l.ibC!.ral Art1 Scholarship Faaren Famil y/Luth eran B rot her hoo d Endowed S chol arsh i p Fa ul t y Memorial S cholarsh i p Fund

Key Bank of Wash ington Endowed Scho I ,f Business

Fairbanks Lutheran Church Schol ars hip

Rey. Karl Kilian Memorial Fund

A n thony

Anne Kensrud Memorial Scholarsh ip

Faith Lutheran Church of Portlan d Sch olars h ip Fund Theresa Fe rglls on Endowed Scholar shi p Patricia isk Sch ol arsh ip George and Carl o tt a Flink S chol a rsh i p Phylaine V. and Ken net h L. Polson E ndowed Schol a rsh i p Elmer Fosn ess Mem orial Scholarship LC. Foss M e mo rial Scholar 'hip Prank Russ el l Company Endowed S chol a r sh ip Fucns Fou.ndation S c hol a rsh ip Henrietta B u tton aet'1. Nursing S ch olar s hip fund Astrid Ness

William Kil wor th Foundation

cholarship Fllnd

Klnth Endm me n t for High Achievers in Athletics and Physica l

E d uc at i on

Knudsen Family Endowed Scholarship Gladys

M. Kn ut ze n Endowed Schola rshi p

Hilda S. Kralll e r Musical Appreciation S c ho l a rsh i p

H oward , Eu ge n i a and Jon Kvinsland Endowed Dawnell Lamb Scholarship

Scho l ars hip

l.ouis and Leona Lam p S chola rs hi p

H a r r y E. and Irene

austad Scholarsh ip

Geo rge

Alan and Bertha Gibson Sc holarshi p

1. L a n g Endowed S c holarship

Lanning Me mori al /Luth e r a n

Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

O. Larsgaard/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed S cholarsh ip Dr. hades L a rs on / L ut he r a n Brotherhood En dowed Scholarship Ebba and E. Arthur Larson Nu rs i ng Scholarship

Dr. John

Bertha G ilbert on Scholarship John M. Gilbertson

Scholarship

cholarshi p

Gundar Kjng Endowed

E. and L orrai n e K. Geiger Endowed Scholarship

Richard

FoundaLion Schol a rsh i p

arett Goodchild Sc holar sh i p

Ludvig and

G order/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Edu ation Sc holarshi p

Clara

rson S cholarsh ip

Clarence A. and Olga Grahn Scholarship

Charks Lauback Student Research Fund Orlando and Myrtle Lee/Lutheran B ro ther hood Endowed S cholarsh ip

Otis ]. Grande/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed

Guy J. and Louise Leesman Schol ar sh ip

Edna M .

cho l a rsh i p in E d u catio n James M . ribbon c hol ars h i p Fern R. Grim m/Luthe ra n Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

RobeH and Maxie Lillie Endowed Sch olarship

Gulsrud Family Schol a r 'hip

Erne st alld Jennie

Paul Liebelt S c hol a rs h ip Life

Arnold Hagen Educati n Scho l arship

Richard E. and

lansen Endowed Memo rial Schol ars hip

Clarence and

S cho larsh ip

Marv and Dorot hy Harsh man Scholarship (Church Lea de rsh i p/

Lutheran Brotherhood fund for Lu thera n Students

Athletics)

Llltheran Brotherhood Scholarship

Bjug Harstad Endowed Scholarsh ip

Lutheran Brotherhood Sustai ni ng Fund Schol arship

. Heath Chari table Trust

Norman and Verone

H e i n se n

Constance B. Lyon Scholarship

En dowed S c ho lar sh ip

James B. Malyon Scholarship

D o u g l as I erland Memoria Rowing S olarship (Crew) Hoover Family En dowed S c ho l a rs hip

Joe Marchinek Memurial Scho l arship F u nd M ath e ma t ic s Sc ho la rship

The

Edmund Maxwell Foundation Sc holarship

Hopp er Me mo ri al Caroline Hovland Endowed

c ho l arsh ip

McKay Sc holarsh i p

W. Huber Memorial Scholarship

Alma Meisnest Endowment Robert

Humanitie.s S cho l ars h i p Endowment Clement E. and Phy l li s G. Hunter Sc holarshi p

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fund

K. Mertun Prize in So ciology Military Order of the Purple Heart Award Fre d and Carolyn Mil ls M emori al Sc hol lfrsh ip

Irene Hultgren Nursing Scholarshi p

C

ndowed Scholarship

race Lundberg Endowed Scholarship

Gen a n d Marian LundgaMd/l.utheran Brotherhood E ndowed

Brian Harsh man Mem ori al Schol ars h ip

A

Anita Hillesla nd Londgren/Lutheran Brotherhood

AIfl'ed a n d Althea Lund/Lutheran Brothe.rhood

w.R. Hardtke Seminary Student Scholarship Fund

P

& Art and Ethel Cummings Endowed

Endowed Scholars h i p

Jennie le e Hanson Endowed P resident s Schola rsh ip Jennie Lee Hanson holarship Fund

Edward

imjng

rlildrd Linder En dowmen t

lohanne MllIie Hansen Elldowed Memorial S chol a rs hi p

Walter

(Mathematics)

cholarship

Mr. and Mrs. W. hIding U ndbc rg Endowed Scholar hip Isabel L indbe rg Twst

Nellie 1. Haley Memorial Endowed Scholarship Olaf H alvorse n Scholarship Prank H . and

Nels Marcus

arc Foundation

Memorial Scholarship

Maria Hagness Endowed S ho l M 'hip

14

Jorgensen

Theodore O. H. a n d Betsy

U

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Lila Moe Endowment Scholarship

Dr. Mauri ce and Patricia Skoncs Scholarship (Vocal Music)

Eunice Mol l r Endowed Scholarship

James R. Slater

Kathari ne E. Monroe S holarship

James Slater Biology - ROTC Scholarship

Memori a l P i ano Scholarship

Monsen and Wanda Morken Family Endowed Scholarship Lillian C. Morrh Mem or i a l Schol r hip

F<>re5t ine Wi, e

Anne E. Snow Foundation

Mark E. and Lenore G , Myers Scholarship

So iety of the

r-

Arts Sc ho lar hip

The Soine Family Endowed Schola rship

Fund

Geor� and Alma Nelson Endowed Scholarship Fund

Southeast Idaho Incentive Scholarship Fund

Lars Nerland Norwegian Scholarship

Elhel S qu ires Scholarships

Harold and Sylvia Nelson Endowed Scholarship

Haldor P.

and Hazel Nesvig International Student Scholarship

ponb.eim Sch

J arship Fund

c

William and Astri d Stancer En dowed S holarship in Engineering Science

Thel ma Newton Scholarshi p Mr. and Mrs. G

Z n

Scholarship Fund Mr. and Mr. . Charles Smithson Scholarship Naydene A. S nodgrass Memorial Sch larship

Murray-Danielson Management Award

Milton

)00

Frances Norton Smith Endowed Scholarship

Gladys Mortvedt Voluntary Se rvi ce Award

P. Ne i .ls Memorial

z

Smith En dowme n t

Donald

Richard

S t e1e . Reese Scholarship Endowment

H. Nieman Memori al Scholarship

Genevieve Stelbe.rg En dowed Scholarshi p

M argaret Nistad Memorial Scholarsb.ip

Dora Srrangland Memori al Schola rship

Robert A. Nisrad Me.morial End wed Scholarship

Esther M . and

Nan Nokleberg Memorial/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed S h larship Orville Nupen Nursing Scholarship

ori.� G. Stucke Endowed Scholarship in Nursing

Emil and ngelena Stuhlm iller Endowed Scb larship

Lynne and Loyd Suther land Scholarship

The Odberg Fa.mily Scholarship C Be E Olson En dowed Scholarship

Fund Scho brsh ip and Eileen TeUefson/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Sehal

Tacom a Rainie . Community Ron

Cliffo rd O. and Ella L. Olson Endowed AthleticfMusic Schol a rship

Harvey and Helen Tengesdal Endowed Scholarsllip

I..inda Olson/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Nursing Scholarship

Leon a nd

Roben E. Olson Memorial

Ali e and Marie Tobiason Endowed Scholar.<hip

Ol ym pic Reso urce Ma nageme nt Scholarship

Evelyn orvend Memorial Education Sc holarship

Goodwin a nd

0 rothy Olson Endowed chola rsh ip

liff and Ronni Tvedten E.ndowed Scholarship Tyle r Memorial N ursing Scholarsh ip

. Parrish Memorial N u rsing Schola rsh ip

Karl U fer Memorial Scholarship

D av i d Ulleland Memorial Scholarship

Gordon Pearson Memorial

Arne and Gloria Pederson Endowed Scholarship

United Parce l Service Foundation SCholarship

R. Ped.ersen Endowed Scholarship

US WEST Diversity

Rena St randberg Peltegrini Endowed Schola rs h ip Marvin

I. and Ruby L. Penninglon S holarship

L . Perry-Haley and Ruth C. Perry Memorial Scholarship

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Peter Scholarship ( Oregon stu

cholarship ola rship

Ellen Valle Memo rial S

Pepsi-Cola Company Merit Scholarship

The B arba ra

Don Titus Endowed cholarsh ip

Silas and Alice To rvend Endowed Sc.holarsh.ip

Shereen PaEf Speci a l Education Scholarship Terrence a n d Susan Parr Sch I.arship

O.M. and Emili

hip

Edvin and Ida Tingebtad Mem ori al Scholar'hip

Iver Op lad Memor ia l Scholarship

Katheri ne

-n

Endowed cholarship

nts)

Peterson/FISher Memorial Nu rsi ng Scholarship Gustaf Peterson Memori al Schol a rship Sheryl I.. aubach Peter on/Lutheran BrotheThood Endowed cholarship Theodore M. an Ullian L. Peterson Endow d Scholarship B1an he Pflaum Scholar hip E. Bill and LoUtse Pihl Scholarship

Lind V n Beck Memorial Schol rship Arthur H. Vingerud Endowed Scholarship Pund D r. Roy and Gl ori Vi.rak Endowed Sc hola rshi p Wa de/ H i nderlie Scholar. hip Pund

Ina H. Wake Memorial Scholar�ltip Washington Mutual M inorit ies in ·ducation Scholarship Wash ington Sta te A ut omobile Deale , Association Scholarship WashIngton Software Association Scholarship Doc and Lucille Wea the r ' En dowed Schola rsh ip

Western Washi ngton Fair Association SchoLtrship

PLU Women's Club Schol rship

Wick Familyr uthetan Brotherhood E.ndowed Scholarship

PLUS Busmess Scholarship

Mabel WIng Scholarship

Presser Foundation Scholarship

Ralph and

Nora J. Ponder S h ola r hip Fund

Randall Yoa1cwn Endowed

Pri eCostco Scholarship Pugel Sou n d Bank Scholarship QFC/Coca Cola Award of Excellence

choiarship

le�ten Yoder Memorial Scholarship

Shirley ZurOuhfLutheran Brotherhood Endowed Schola rship (Business)

T he Edward Ramsdal e Regent, Sch larship Anders and Emma Ramstad Award

Elmer nd Mary Rasmuson Endowed Scholarship L. RasnlUssen Scholar 'hip

Margarel

RecreatIOnal Equipment. Inc. (REI)

Kathryn Re Sf Memoria l

5 holarship Marvel Rrinbold Scholarship End wment Char lotte and Lucian Rice E n dowed Scholarship

Simon and

Rieke Leadership Award William O. Rieke EndO\"ed Scholarship (Students from Cashmer Leavenworth,

and Wenatchee)

Rogers High Schoo! Scholuship Sterling Melville

and Marjorie Rose Scholarship and Doro thy Rue En dowed Scholarship

Mary Baker Russell M usic

cholarship

Mark S h,man Memorial Marie Scheele Gen

ral Endowed Scholarship

AI and Ella Scheib ner Endowed Scholarship Johannes

and Alee n S :hiller Endowment Fund R. Schwindt Scholarsh i p

Dr. Walter and Joan

SEAFIRST Bank M inori ty S holarship Seattle Mongage Banker Associalion Scholarshi p Dorothy

H. Scb naible Endowed Scholarship

Margaret Shipley Endowed Scholarship in Acco u n ti ng

P A C I F I e

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lit III III

Tuition and Fees for 1 999- 2000

....

UNDERGRADUATE/ GRAD UATE RATE ($507 l'u credll

hour)

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An u ndergr aduate taki ng over i 6 hOllIS in the fall, over 4 bours in the Tanuary t erm , or over 16 hours in the p ri ng will be

«

cha rged $253 for any ad d i t io nal hou rs on

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Pall! Spring Semesters

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m ay also be faxed to (253) 535-83 20 with t h e fol l owi ng i nfo rmat i o n : • $5.00 fee for ea ch Official Tra n s c r i p t ordered. If p ayi ng by bankc a rd , p le as e in clude the VISA or MasterCard n umbe r and

term by term b as is.

January Term

Credit Hr.

Credit Hr.

1 . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . ... $507.00 2 .......... .... .... ........ $ l ,0 1 4.00 3 . .... . ....... . . .. . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,52 1 . 00 4 ......... ..... ............ $2,028.00 5 .......................... $2,535.00 ... . ... . . . . . ... . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . e t c.

I . . . .. . .. .. .. .. . ..... ....... . . . . . $507.00 2 ..... .... .................... $ 1 , 0 1 4.00 3 . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ... . $ 1 , 5 2 1 .00 4 . ..... . ................ .. . . . . $2,028.00 NOTE: Hours rakell fo r Jalluary term ill excess of 4 credit hours are charged tit a rare of$253.00

NOTE: Hours rake,! eirher fall or spring in excess of 1 6 credit /rollrs are charged Il t a rate of $253.00 peT credit. (Under­

per credit. (Undergraduate only)

5 . . .. .. . . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . $2,28 1 .00 6 .. .... . ... .. . . . . . . . . ....... .. $ 2,53 4.00 7 .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,787.00 . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . et c .

graduate oIlly)

NOTE: Off Camp lIS Program students pay a program fee (not PLU

tuition) specific to the individual program s ites. Contact the Center fo r International Programs fo r complete details.

CREDIT BY HXAMINATION Studems who test out of a cl as s (Credit by Exanlin a t ion) will be charged 2 5 percent of regular tuition for that class ( $ 1 26.75 per

credit hour).

• • • • • • • • 10

COURSE PEES Some courses req uire additional fees th at will be a dde d to the tuition to tal . The class schedule for each term is available in the Student Serv ic es C e nt e r a n d p rovides in� r m a t i on about any fees that may affect an individual course . Music and education students should n te: The Private Music Lesson Fee is $ 1 65 for one cred it or $240 for two or more credits per m ed ium and is charged in add i t ion to tuition. A one-time Education Placement Fee of $40 is cha rged i n the las t s em ester o f the B.A.E. program.

Appeals may b e a d dres sed to the Res iden ti al Life Office. Room Double Room .............. . . . . . . . . ........ $ 1 ,236.00/semester Single/S i ngl e R oom ..... . . . . ............ $ I , 536.00/semester Single/Double Room . . . . .. ... . . . .. . . .. $1 ,636.00/semester •

enCOUr ag ed to pay th ese fines as incurred to avoid late fe es a n d handling charges .

charged to bacca laureate

an d mast r's deg ree c a ndi d at es. A fe e of $ 1 5 is c harg d to rep lace lost, damaged, or stolen student ID 's. if an ID c ard has been dam aged , it must be brought to th e ID card office a nd rep la ed fo r a fce of $5. TRANSCRIPT INFORMATION Unofficial and official tr anscrip ts are pro essed i n t he Stud nt Sem es Center. Th re is a $5 fee fo.r each official transcript nd uno ffic i a l transcripts are issued at no cha rge. To request an Official Transcrip t. a student may fl.ll out th e Transcript Request Form in the Student Services Center. Processing t ime is 4 to 5 working days from the date rece i ve d. For information to reques t an Offlcial Tran cri p t from off campus, one may either call the I

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the req uest will be

1. If one lives at home with p are nt ( s ) , legal gua rdian ( s ) , spouse, or c h i ld ( ren ) 2. If o ne turns 20 before S ep tember 1 ( fo r the academic ye ar) or F eb r u ary 1 ( for s p ring semester) 3. If one has attain ed jun i or status (60 semester hours) on or before Septembe r 1 ( for the academic yea r ) or Feb r ua ry 1 (for sp r ing semester) .

C

If an account is on any type of HOLD,

t h ro u gh an independent c arri er. A bro chu r e is ava il ab le from the Student Life O ffice . Parking permits are free a n d req u i red fOT all student vehicles. They can be obtained in the Ca m p u s Safety Office. Failure to register may resul t in a fine.

are required. Unpaid Fines such a ' parking violations and ove rdue l ibrary bo o k s will appear on the mon th ly biiling s ta tem e nt . S tu d en ts are

A

Signature (mandatory)

SPECIAL INFORMATION Optional st uden t health and accident insurance is available

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Any fo r m er name(s) used I den tific a tion number (Social Sec ur i ty number) D at e of birth C u r ren t addre s and p h one number App roxi m a te dates of attendance Number of t ran cripts needed Address( e.s) to which the t ra ns c ri p t ( s) are to be sent

mailed back with i nfo rm a t io n .regarding the appropriate o ffi ce to contact. It is the st ude n t 's responsibility to resolve the HOLD and re ubmit the req n es t .

MISCELLANEOUS PImS Health ervices will charge a s t u de n t's account, or a student may pay directly, fo r i m munizations, la b work, and pr e sc ri p tion s that

A one-time Graduation Fee o f $30 is

exp i rati o n date. Payments may also be made by check, cashier's check, or money order. Please do not mail cash . S t ude n t 's full na me

ROOM AND MEALS Students who are under age 20 and a re taking 1 2 or m o re credit hOllIS must live an d eat meals on campus. There are exceptions:

REGISTRATION CHANGES AFTER ADD/DROP DEADLINE Students add in g or withdrawing from courses aft r the last day of add/d ro p d u r in g a reg ul ar semester will be assessed an administrative handling fee of $50 for eac h t ransaction. These dates are Listed in the class s ch edu le for each semester/ term.

16

Transcrip t Line at (253) 535- 7 1 35, or use the I n t met a t h ttp:// www.plu. ed u!-a rel!ser_ t ra rz.html. R equests by e-mail cannot be p.rocessed because of the require me nt fo r a si gnature. Requests

v

A l imi ted number of ingle roo m s are available. Special housing requests may be addressed to the Re idential Life Office at 253/535-7200.

Continuing st uden ts (students who l ive on ca m p us for fall, January term, and sp ri ng) are no t charged fo r room du ri ng

the January term. S tu den ts who att.:: nd only the January term will be charged $275.00 for room (see below fo r meals). A h ous i ng dep osi t (to be paid only by continuing eudents) of $200. 00 will be credited to one's student a ccount on the e p te mber b il l i ng for fall, and the February billing for sprin g - unless forfeited by the Re si den ti a l Life Office.

limited hou ing is available d u ring winter and spr ing breaks at a cost of $ 1 0. 7 5 per day.

Meal Plans Residential (on-campus) students ma y select from the fi rs t three meal pl an s listed below:

Plan # 1 : 20 meals/week . . . . . $ 1 . 1 50.00/semeste r Plan #2: 15 meals/week ....... . .. $ 1 , I 1 0 .00/semester Plan #3: 1 0 m eal s/ week ...... ....... $950. 00/semester Plan #4: 5 meals/week ... ...... ... . .. $520.00/semester .

... .

Platl #4 available only to studen ts living in alternative housing and

to

com muter studen ts.


EleIible PLUs PLot $ 1 60.00 A bl ock of 25 meals to be used before May 3 1 , 2000. The meals may be us a all Board Plan venues. S tude n ts m ay p u rch a se as many blocks f 25 meals as they wish, bm once p urchased , they are non-refundable u nl ess the st u d e nt formally withd raws fr m th e u niversi ty. This plan is f, r n on ­ . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

residential students o nly . •

If one live o n-camp us d u ri ng the J an ua ry Term, meals will cos t as foUows: Plan # 1 : 20 meals/week ............. $266.00 Plan #2: 15 m eals / week ............. $255.00 Plan #3: 10 meals/week . . . . .. ... . . . . $235.00 Plan #4: 5 meals/week ............... $1 27.00

ADVANCE PAYMENT New student5 need to m a ke a $200 a dva n ce payment t confirm lh e i r offer of admission. The payment is r efu n da b l e until May 15 for faU , December 1 5 for the January te rm, and Ja nua ry 15 f' r s pring. Requests for a refu n d must be ma de in wT i ti ng to the Admissions Office. Returning student'S wanting to reserVe a room for t he following Housing Contract. Can celJat i ns, without pen alty, must be submitted in writing to the Resid enti a l Life Office by July 1 . Cancellations received b e tween J uly 2 and Allgu st I will be su bje c t to a $ [ 00.00 p /laity ch a rge . Cancella­ tions received between August 2 and S ep tembe r I will be subj ec t to a $200.00 penalty cha rge .

year must sign

L

FlNANClAL AID Scholarships, grants, artistic achievement awards, and loans awarded by PLU's Financial Aid and S tude n t Employment O ffic e, and outside aid (from fraternal org aniza t i o ns , h igh schools, churches, etc.) sent d i rectly to PLU are credited to t he student's aceounl Awards over $ 1 00 will be equally d iv id ed between fall and Ja nua ry term/spring emesters. Award ' under $ 1 00 w ill be applied to o n e semester only. Outside aid will not be applied to the account u nt il the funds are received by PLU. NOTE; B£CDusefina�"ial aid is equally divided between fall and January tenn/rpring semes'ers, 'he cos, is gnll�rally higher for rI,,�

Ja nuary term/spring semester if one regis'er's fOT a January

'erm

course

and eats on campus.

Perkins and Nu rsing Stu dent Loan rec i p ient s are required to sign for th ei r loans in the St ud en t Services Center at the begi n ni ng of the academic year. Federal Family Edt/ cational Loan Programs (FFELP) ( t he se are Fe de ra l Stafford, Unsubsidized Fed e ra l Stafford and Fed era l Parent Plus), ob t ained th ro ugh banks and other len d i n g institu­ tions, will be appl ied after the proper en d orsement by tbe student or pa re nt Funds not en dorsed within 45 days of rec.eipt will be re turn ed to the lending institution as de fined by federal regulations. A 4 perce n t processi. n g fee i s subtracted from the loan by the lending i nstitution. .

Sta te ofAlaska Loans m us t be endorsed in the Stude n t Services Center before the fun ds can be d e po s i ted in the st ud ent's acc ou n t. Recipients of the following funds must go to the Stu de nt Services Cen te r to pick up lheir check. The check is made p aya bl e to the student. T h o se funds are: Wash i ngto n State Need Grant, Washington Scho l ars, NUT ing Co n d it i o nal , E aul Dou glas Scholarship, Ed u cat i on al Opportunity Grant, and Future

Teacher . Students who secure part-time employment as p a rt f t heir financial aid (work stud y) receive man thl payc hecks based on wo rk performed. Paychecks may be picked up at the cash ier 's window at the Business Office on p a yd ay nd may be app li ed to unpaid student acco un t balances. It is the student's responsibility to inform the Student Services Center of any ch a nges in financial sta t us Additional funds or benefits from any source ( such as free or partlal room and .

p ro mised , before or fter a student is awarded t be reported. Actual class regi stration that p r o d uces a lower tui ti on rate than a n t ici p a ted may reduce a financial aid award. By Law, Student Fi na ncial Aid Services is requi red to make adj u st m nts to p reve nt over awards. meals) received or

aid from PLU, mu

PAYMENT OPTIONS/FINANCING Students m us t pay at the ti m e of regi st ra ti o n or be enrolled in an approved Paym e nt Opt i o n Plan a t the time of registration. There are four Payment Op ti o n Plans offered at the univer­ sity. It is req uired of all student to sig n up for at lea t on e of the fo ur Paym e nt Opt i o n Plans offered or a Payment Op ti on HOLD w ill be p l aced on the acc ou nt . This will restrict certain university privileges, i n cl ud i n g the right for furth er registra tion . Arrange­ ments for p yments are made t h ro ugh the Studenr Servi ces

o z » z o .... III III '"

Ce n te r, Hauge Ad min istration B u ild i ng, Room 102 or call (25 3 ) 535-7 1 6 1 or 1 -800-678-324 . 8 Month Payment Option •

• •

8 e q u al payments for enrollment in Pal l andlor Tanuary Term and Spring Semesters A $50.00 non- refundable set- up fee Payments are due Septem be r 1 5 th ro ugh pri! I S

4 Month Payment Option • 4 equal paym e nts for enrollment for Fall a ndl o r J anua r y Te rm onl y • $25.00 non-reftUldable set-up fee • Paym e nts are due September 1 5 thr ough December 1 5 • • •

4 equal payments for enro ll ment fo r S pri ng only A $25.00 non-refundable set-up fee Payments are due January 1 5 t h ro ugh April 1 5

Financial Aid and Other Resources Cover Costs Payment Option • Financial aid and other resou rces cover total costs •

No set-up fee

Payment In FuU Option Pay m en t in full is due the first day of classes for each • se mes te r / t enn Lute Bude. Discount • $75.00 d i scou n t from tui ti on a n d oth er co ts • N p r ior ow in g bal ance to the uni vers i ty • If fi na n cia l aid covers the studen t' total co st , the st u den t is not eligible • O ut of pocket expenses, incl uding tu it ion , ro m and board, sp e c i al course fees minus any a p pl i c ab l e financial aid for a semester, must be $3 , 000.00 or more to be el ig ib l e • Applications fo r a "Lute Buck Discounl" are senl out in the Jun and Nove mber Billing statements. The app l icatio n out lines the specific criteri a fo r eIigibi bty of the discount. BOW TO MAKE PAYMENTS

Mail paym nts with statement r: �ntitt anc e stub to PLU, Seattle, WA 98 1 1 l -3 1 67, o r deliver payments to lh e PLU Busine s O ffice in the Ha uge Administration Buildi ng, Room I tO. Checks should be made p aya bl e to Pac i fic Luthe ra n Univer­ s i ty. The student's n a me and lD number should be in cl uded with all paym nts. A $ 1 5 fee is charge o n all returned che cks. VISA and MasterCa rd are accepted. One may call the secured line 253/53 5 -8376, 24 hours a day, to make a payment. Ii one wo uld L ike to make a u tom at i c bankcard payments and has s elec ted the 4 or 8 mont h Paym t O p t ion s, this should be indicated in the spa ce provided on the Payment Option forms. No a ddi ti o n a l fee is ch a rged fo r t h is service when added t a Paymen t Option . Please DO T mait cash. A p e r i od i c al ly adj usted discount rate will be cba rged agai n st Ca n adi an u rr e ncy. Box 2 1 16 7,

Interest and Late Fees A 1 .5 monthly default in teres t cha rge is added on all ow i ng

balances 30 days past due. P

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4 Month Payment Option /8Month Payment Option - Payments received after the 20th of each month w il l be assess ed a $25.00 pe r month late fee. Missed Payments •

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Failure to make minimum monthly payments as agreed will re ult in removal from t he 4 or 8 Month Pay ment O ption and the account will be pl aced on financial hold. Fail u re to submit all loan applicat ions and any finan ci al aid verificati on forms (if applicable) by the d tes p ecified on the Payment Opti on worksheets for each acade mic year will result in the removal from Financial A i d and Other Resources Cover Costs Payment Opt io n. Th accoun t will be p laced on a FInan ial hold. Failure to make a payment in full by the due date will re s ult in removal from Payment i n Full Optio n and the account will be placed on a financial ho ld . Student accoun ts 60 days delinquent may be turned over to an outside collection agency.

Unearned Title N FHntis: The amount of gr an t and Loan assi st a nce awarded under Title r v that has not been e arned by the s t udent . The L aw states that earned Title IV fu nds arc to be used to cover o nly the lengt h of time the student was enrolled before withdrawing, unearned Title IV aid must be r e tur n ed to the programs.

The re t u rn of Titl e IV fun ds if a s tud ent wi thdraws depends on when du rin g the p e r i od of enrollment the student witl1draw . Withdrawal date is defin ed as one of t he following: Th e date the s tudent began the withd rawal process; • The date the student otherwise provided the school with •

Financial Bold

I f a student account is pa st due, it will be p l aced on a "fin anc ial hold." Basic un ivers ity privileges will be denied until the ac ount is s ettled, including the rig h t to registe r, re cei ve copies of a transcri p t or diploma, or cash chec ks . Academic Bold

The Regi strar, Student Li fe Office, or Residential Life Office can plac e an account on "acad mi h Id." Registration for classes is p recl uded until any pending matter with th ose offices is settled.

Pacific Lutheran University will: I . D e term i ne date of withdrawal 2. Calculate the per ce n tage of Aid Ea r n e d 3. Calculate the percentage of Aid Unearned 4. D e te rmi n e if Title IV aid should be disbursed to the stude nt

or returned as unearned. 5. Determine the amount of Unearned Ti tl e IV aid due from schoo! .

Medical Hold A "medical hold" prevents a student from regi s t ring because Health Se rvices has n ot recei ed the Medical History Form or because the student does no t have the necessary immuniz, tions.

Order of Return of Title IV Funds

Rights and Respooslhlllties

4.

1 . Unsubsidized Federal Sta ffo rd lo ans

2. Subsidized Federal Sta ffo rd loans

Upon registration, the s tuden t and h is or her parents or legal gu rd ia n , agree to accept the respon ' iblli ty and l egal oblig ati on to pay all t uition costs, room and meal fees, ' nd other spe iaI fee s incurred or t be incurred for the studen t's e d ucat i on . The uni versit y agrees to make available to the stude n t certain ed ucational programs and the use of cer tai n university fa c il it ie s, as applicab le and as described in this catalog. A fa il ure to pay when due all university bills shal! re lea se the university of any obl igat io n to continue to provi de the appl icabl e educational benefits and services, i ncluding , but not l i m ited to, statements of honorable di s m i ssa l. grade reports. transcript of records, diplom as , or preregistrations. The student �hall a l s o be denied admittance to classes and the usc of unive rsi ty facili ties in the eve nt of a default.

(Complete WithdrQws) Pacific Lutheran Univers i ty calculates and returns Title IV funds acc ord i ng to Federal Ti tle IV poHcy 34CRF 668.22. The amount of Ti tl e IV funds (oilier than FWS ) that must be returned to the Tide rv pr og rams is based s ole ly on the I ngth of time the student was enrolled before withdrawing. This pol icy is effective for complete or full wi t h drawals from a p eri o d of enrollment in which a student receives Tide IV federal funds. Definitions

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fuLl re fun d of "tuition an d fees." After th e second week of instruction, refunds ar g iven for ful l /complete withdrawals only (a student must withdraw fro m all classes to receive a refund ) .

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TUITION REFUND (Total Withdrawal

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ROOM/MEALS REFUND

Before first day of class

100%

1 00 %

First day of class to 2 weeks

100%

100%

3 weeks

75%

75%

4 weeks

50%

50%

5 weeks

25%

25%

6 weeks

25%

25%

7 we ks

25%

25%

8 weeks

25%

25%

9+ weeks

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0

NOTE: Howing deposits are not covered by Federal Fillancial Aid and

are not refundable.

must

be given in writ i ng to the R gis t ra r,

Pacific L uthe ran University a n d received before the deadline

costs according to the length of time the student was enrolled be fo re w i th dra wing. The a m ou nt of funds earned is di rect ly propo r ti on a l to the time enrolled, through 60% of the term ( pe ri od of enroll ment). After 60%, the student is considered to have earned all aid. e

I n o rdi n a ry circumstances, a t ude nt who with dr aws on or before the first two weeks of i n st ru c tio n in a e mes ter receives a

Notice of withdrawal

Earned Title N Funds: Title IV funds used to over education al

II.

Institutional Refund Policy

WITliDRAWAL

POliCIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS IF A STUDHNTWlTBDRAWS

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3. Perkins Loans Federal P LUS loans 5 . Direct PLUS loans 6. Fede ral Pell Grants fo r the repayment peri o d for which a r eturn of funds is required. 7. FSEOG for th e paym ent per iod for which a retu rn of fu nds is req u ired. 8. Other assistance under this Title for whi ch a return of funds is re q u ired.

DAn OF

Credit Balance If a credit bal an ce oc<:urs on a student's account, the un ive rs it y will r efu nd it accordin g to pertinent federal or state regu l tions. Credit balances are proce sed in the Student Service Center.

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official n tification of the intent to withdraw; or For the student who does not be gi n the school's withdrawal process o r notify the sch oo l of t he intent to with draw, the m i d - po i nt of the payment per i od or per i od of enrollment fo r which Ti tle IV assistance was disbursed ( unless the institution an d o c u m en t a later date); If attendance is take n, the withdrawal date is dete rmi n ed from the attendance re co rds.

ab ove. Oral requests are not acceptable. Charge will r emain on th e acco lUlt u n t il written notice is received.

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Unofficial Withdrawal Tn the cases of u noffi c i al withd rawal, the dro p out date ( defined as the l as t recorded day of c lass attendance as documented by the insti t u tio n ) will be used

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ca l c ui at e a refund.

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Medical Withdrawal Students may also c o m p l etely withd raw from al l classes fo r a term fo r medi cal reasons. The student must provid e written evidence from a p hysi c ia n to the vi ce president and dea n fo r student life. The gr ade of "WM" will appear on the student's grade report and t ra nsc ri p t .

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Procedures for Obtaining a Refund 1 . St u dent re uests withdrawal a p proval from the Regi stra r via the Student Services Center, u s ing a withdrawal form. 2. Financjal Aid wi l l process t h e student" re uest for withdra\'lal ac c o rding to Ule Pede ral Title IV poH c y 34CFR 668.22. Aid wi Il be revised ac cor di n g to pu b l i shed federal ollcy. 3. The Business Office will give a tui tio n adj us tment to t h e st uden t 's ace u n t for the per cen t age of tuition allowed to be refunded for that lime p eri od dur i n g the term ( a ' determj ned by the Registra r's Office and the Un iversity Refun d P ol i cy) . 4. Examples of the "Return of Ti tl e IV F u n ds if a Student Wi thdraws " are available in th e Finane' I Ajd and St udent E mplo ym en t Oftlce. NOTE: Plense be aware that a refu,"l due 10 withdrawal from rile university am adversely affect what is owed to the ulliversity by the student. A tuitioll adjustmtllt is applied tq th� student account, bu. aid is also reduced, somlltimes eren ting a larger owing balance. Students should c1Ieck widl Financial Aid and Student Employment to research the effecl a withdrawal will have on their student ace"un'.

Student Life The quality of l i fe cultivated a n d fostered within the uni­ versity is an essential component of the academic commu­ n ity. The environment produc d is conducive to a li fe of vigorous an d creative scholarship. It also recognizes th at liberal education is for the total person and that a comple­ mentary relationship exists between students' inteUectual development and the satisfaction of thei r other i ndivi dual needs. Interaction with persons of differing life styles, application of classroom knowledge to per so nal g oal s and asp irat i o n s, and co-curricular experiences are all avail ble and total components of education at PLU. In a t i me when there is a need for meaningful commun jty, the campus facilitates genuine relationships among members of the university from diverse religious, racial, and cultural b ack­ grounds. All of the servi es and facilities p rovide d are in tended to complement the academic program. The services provided r e fl ect chan gi n g ·tudent needs, and the opportunities for student part icipation include vir tu ally all aspects of the university. Individual attention is given to ' s tude n ts concerns, i n cl u din g a variety of specific services outlined here. CAMPUS MINlSTRY Pacific Lutheran Univers i ty by its very nature is a place fo r the interaction between fai th and reason. Opportun ities for tile mutual celebration of that faith on campus are rich and diverse. Chapel wors hip i s h el d M o nday, We d nes day, and Fr iday mornings duri ng each semester for all who wish to p art i ci pate . The Un ive r s ity Congregation meets in reg u l ar worship an d celebrates the Lord's Supper e ach Sunday. Pas tora l servic.es of the university pastors are available to all students who desi re them.

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Several denominations and rel ig i o us groups have org a ni z a­ tions on campu s, and th er e are numerous ,tuden t-initiated Bible s tud y and fel lowsh ip groups. The Campus M i n is t ry Council, an elected s t udent and fac ul ty com mittee, coordinates the e act i vi ­ ties in a sp irit of openness and mu t ual respec t. CAMPUS SAFETY AND INFORMATION T he pe rsona l safety f the PLU commtmity i the number one goal of Campus Safet y and Information. Cam pu s sa fe ty officers are available to es co rt students within the estab l i s h d zone, to p rov ide ve hicle j um p starts, to unlock i nadvertently I cked vehicles, to as s i s t in changing tires, to respond t o medi cal e me r­ gencies and fire alarms, an d to p ro vide gen e ral telep ho ne infor­ matioo s rvic . Visitor info r mation and vehicle registration for p a rki ng on campus are available t h rough the Campus Safety offic 24 h o urs a day, seven days a week. The Ca m p u s Safety p h one number is

(253 ) 535-744 1.

RESPoNsmn1T1ES OF COMMUNITY LIFE Wit h i n a ny com m u nity certain regulations are necessary. Pacific Lu t hera n Un ivers ity ad o p ts o nly those standards believed to be reasonably necessary and adm i ts students wi th the expectation t ha t the y will comp l y with tho e st �U1 da rds. All members of the u n ivers ity community a re expected to respect the r i gh ts and

i n teg rit y of oth e rs. Conduct which is de t r im ental to · tuden t s, fa cu l ty, staff, or the un iversity, or which violates l o c al , state, or federal l aws , may be gro unds for s a n ct i o n s or for dismissal. The university p rohib i t the possession or c o n s um ption of alcoholic beve ra ges on ca mp us and limits the hours whe n students may have visit IS f the opp osi te sex i n t he ir res idence hall rooms. The Student Halldbook co nta i n s the Code a/ Conduct for aU students. NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION New student ori n ta t i on endeavors to assist students and t.heir families with the t ra ns i ti on to PLU. The three-day faU p rogram introduces students to many dllnensions of PLU life. Pall or ie n ­ tation includ . meeti ng wi t h a fac ul t y adviser, ta lking in small groups with other new s t udents, b e c o m i ng acquainted with cam p us services, and havi ng ome relaxed t i me with other s tudents before classes begin. Special activities are also planned wh i ch re p ond to concerns of fam i l ies of new student . Wh i le

Jan ua ry and spring o r i ent a tio ns are more con den sed, they also provide new students with a n i ntroduction to ac ad emic life and co-curricular activit.ies. Phone 253/535 -7452 for mOTe informa­ tion about new student or ie nta tion .

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ACCESSIBILITY The u n ive rsity omplies with S ec tion 504 of t h e Rehabilitation Act and prov ides reasonabl accommodalion ' to students with h an d ic aps and/or disabilities. C<>ordination f servi es is ha n dl ed by the Co u n s eling and Testing S e r vices . The Student Needs Advocacy Panel provid es an avenue for tudent concerns. RESIDENTIAL llEE

The unjversity requires that all full - ti m e ( 1 2 or mor semester hours) student live and cat on campus un less the student meets o n e of the three following conditions: I ) is l iv ing at home w i th parent( s ), legal gua rd i an ( s) , spouse or child(ren ) ; 2) is 20 years of age or o l der on gr before S ep te m be r 1 for the academic year or feburary 1 for s p r i ng semester; or 3 ) has attained junior status (60 semester hOllTS) o n or before Se pte mbe r 1 for the acad em i c year or Feb r u ar y 1 for spring sem teL As a residential c am pu s, Pacific Lutheran University offers stud ents a val uabl e experience in co m m uni t y living. he univer­ sity recognizes the i mportance of non-classroom activities in pr ovidi ng an education . The aim of residential l iving is to hel p students grow per on a l l y, socially, c u l t u ra ll y, and sp i r it uall y. Campus residences are org anized into communities in which each individual counts as a person. New knowledge shared with friends in the r eside n ce halls takes on a very p e rso na l me a ning . Men a n d wom en o f ma ny b a ckg r ounds and cultures live on campus; therefore, studen ts in res i d nce have u n i qu e opportu­ nity to bro ade n thcir cultural horizons. The university cares about the quality of l ife on campus. The attractive and comfortab l e residence halls enn h the quality o f life and enhance t h e learning process. The lmiversity offers s tud ents high-quality ho using op por tunities including student leaders hip experience, formal and informal programs. and peer associations. The student gove.rn i n g bodies are stro ng and ac­ t ively participate in campus l i fe. A s el ect io n of modern, attractNe halls, each with its own trad itions and unique a dvant ages, offers s tuden ts the opp o r u­ nity to establish a comfortable living pattern. Al l halls i nc lude informal lounges, study rooms, recre at i on area " and c o mm o n kjtche n and l au nd ry facilities. Most of the hall are co-educational Alth o ug h they are housed in separate wings, men and women in co-ed halls share loun ge and recreation facil ities and comm o n residence govern­ ment, and parti ipat jointly i n all hall activities. One all­ women's hall is available for those wo men who desire this l ivi ng experien ce. An all single-room hall has been establ ished fo r those 2 1 years of age or older, or who h ave attained senior or gr a d uate status. This i ndepen de n t living environment is intended to meet the n eeds of the older student. Further information regarding residence halls can be obtained from the Residential Life Office: 253/ 535-7200.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES Student activities are regarded as essential factors in h igh er education. Some are related to courses of i nstruction such as dr a ma, music, and physi cal education; others are conn ec ted more closely to recreational and social life. Involvement in student activit! s provides practical experience and at the same time d evelo ps an understan di n g of self in relation to other s. Co -curricular progr a m s i nclude s tu de n t government (Associated Students a.nd Res.i denc e Hall Asso ci ation ) , sports activities (varsity, i ntra mu ral, and club sports), s tuden t media ( newsp per, yearbook. artistic magazi n e, radio, and television), st uden t clubs and organizations, and com m un ity service programs. With over 1 00 student activities in wbich to become i nvolved, there is ure t o be at least one which will enr ich a person's coU e ge experience. Contact the Student lnvolvement and Leadership Office 253 / 535 - 7 1 95 fo r more information.

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VOLUNTEER CENTER PLU's Volunteer Center, run by stud en ts and housed in the Ce nt e r fo r Pub l ic Service, eeks to g i ve students opp ortu n i t ies t o put to work t h eir dreams for a better world. The Volunteer Ce nt e r has listi n gs for ver 1 00 organizations who need voLun­ teers. Students can stop by and browse thr oug h the p lace m e n t l ists, or make an appo in tment with one of the Vol unteer Center coordinators who help match students with organiza tions . Class projects, residence hall group activities, one day or several, the Vol u nteer Center can help you help! Drop by or p hon e (x83 1 8) and discover how easy it is to make a bi g difference in life! WOMEN'S CENTER The Wom e n's Center provides services, referrals, and support to aU studen ts, faculty; and staff of the u ni versity. The climate of t h center is such that aU p e rso n s are valued and em powered to pursue theiT individual and collective go als . The Cente r offers peer-support groups, educational res urces, and p rogr am s whic h ce le br te the talents and creative express ions of wo m en . The Women's Center also is the m a i n spons r of Wom en's H i tor y M nth activities held every Marcb. The Women's Center is located at 1 004 1 24th Street S. MUITI-ETHNIC RESOURCES Mu lt i - E th n ic Resou r ces serves stud ents, fa cul ty, and staff of col r. For students, special acti v i t ies, peer mentorin" and advis­ ing, l eadership o ppo r t u n i ty, and ot her sllpport services are available. For fa c u l ty and staff, Mul ti-Ethnic Resources is a locat ion for teaching and lea r n in g material on the subject of r aci al and eth n ic diversi t y. Clerical assistance and o ther services are also available to u ppo rt special p roj ect s and research focus­ ing on national race-r elated issues. Multi- Ethn ic Re ourc es is housed in S tu d en t l nvolvement and Leader s hip, located n the lower I vel of the Uni ve r sity Cente r. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES The Center for I nternational Programs/Internat ional tudent Services pr ovi d es assistance to international students in adj ust­ ing to the university and in meetin g both education ( career) and per so na l needs. Services include orientation, regist ration, and on-campus li a is on with oth r university offices. A sistance with i m m i g ra tion nd government reg ul atio n as well as i mm igrati on procedures re ga rdi n g temporary travel, work applications, and exte n sions of stay is available. COMMUTER STUDENT SERVICES I ADUIl' STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Students who commute to the ca m pus can find speci a l services and re urces to make thei r time at PLU sa t isfyin g a n d pro d u c tive. The Associated Student Government (ASPLU) has a direc­ tor of off campus student rei t i o ns and five student s e nate posit i o ns dedicated to rep resenti n g the i n terests and needs of commuting stud en ts . Students may sign up for an off ca m p us student list serve to 'tay abr ast of p ro gr ams and informatio directed to all students. An off campus newsletter is av Hable mon thly on the ASPLU web site (and st ndents may have a pri n t version sent to their homes by signing up at ASPLU). ­

Adult Student Support Serous The Office of Stude n t Involvement and Lea der sh i p p rov ides a dmirustrative support and services to assist adult students. In that office, adult students may make local calls, re gi st er for e merge ncy campus locator, or just get a cup of hot c ffee. Add i t io nall y, the associated student govern ment director of off campus student rel ations serves s an advo ca te for adult stude n t nee ds . C o m m uti ng s tude n t l o unges are av ilable in the University Center, Hauge Adm i n ist ration Building, and Rieke Science Center. ENVIRONS The university's geographical setting affords students a wid variety of bo th recreation al and cu l tural entertainment options.


Recreationally, the gra nde u r of the Pacific Northwest encourages pa rtici pation in hiking, camping, climbing, skiing, boating, and swimming. The most conspicuous natural monument in the area is Mt. Rainier. In addition t Rainier, the distinctive realms of the Cascade and Olympic mountain ranges and forests of Douglas Fir c mplete one of the most naturally tranquil environments in the United States. Students can also enjoy the aesthetic offerings of nearby Seattle and Tacoma. These city centers host a variety of perform­ ing and recording arts and provide dozens of galleries and museums as w 11 as unique shopping and dining experiences.

STUDENT SERVICES

Health Services is staffed with two nurse practitioners and one phYSic ia n assistant. A phy ician is avaUable for consultation and referral Services available include outpatient primary care, immun izations, allergy shots, preventive health care, pap smears, testicular and breast exams, birth control, pregnancy testing and counseling. Also ffered are: sexually transmitted disease infor­ mation, testing and treatment; con sul tat i on s for travel guidelines and im m un ization s . eating disorders, substance abuse, and tobacco usage; a n d health education on a wide variety of health o ncer n s. Sickness and Accident lnsw:ance is

available to all students on a voluntary basis. The Health Service strongly urges all students to have med ica l insurance. Th Group Accident and Sickness Plan offers c.overage 24 hours a d ay, 1 2 months a year, anywhere in the world. This plan is available throughout the year. A brochure ou tli ning the program is available from the Student Life Office and from Health Services. The Immunization PoUcy st at e s that all students are required to provide a university health history form with accurate immuni­

zation records of measles, mumps, rubella, and tetanus-diphthe­ ria to Student Health services. Students born before January I , 1 957. must provide docu mentation for tetanus-diphtheria (Td) booster with.in the last ten years. This information must be on file before a student is permitted to register. All international students, faCIlity, and scholars will be required to have a hlberculosis sk i n rest (purified protein derivative-ppd). This test will be done at t h e Health Services after arrival at tlte university. The cost is $1 0. 00.

S tudents with questions and concerns about the immuniza­ tion policy shou ld ontad Health Services at 253/535-7337. Counseliog and Testing Services

assists studen ts in coping with developme nta l issues. Trained and experienced psychologists and cowlselors offer individual assessments, and a consulting psy­ chiatrist is a ilable for evaluations and possible medications. A vari ty of personality/interest inventori s and psychological tests are available to assist students with career planning, educational adjustment, and personal problems. Coordination of services for students with disabilities is also available. Dining Services, owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran Univer sity, is ava ila ble to all students, faculty, staff, and their

guests. Students living on campus are required to be on a meal plan. "Grab and Go" items are available during peak lunch hours. No deductions are made for students eating fewer meals than previously contracted for unless granted by the associate director of Dining Services. Residential students are offered 3 meal options: Any 20, 1 5, or 10 meals per week. Stud nt living off-campus are encouraged to select one of thes e meal plans or the flexible meal plan offered o nly to off-camp us students. Students with special dietary requirements, specillcally ap­ p roved in wr i ting by a p hysician, can in most cases be accommo­ dated by contading th Din ing Services associate director. This service is provided a� no extra cost. Visitors may eat in an�' of the facilities.

Scheduling Services

for meeting rooms are maintained in the University Center. AJJ university activities must be scheduled through this office. Scheduling activities is , joint responsibility of the requesting group, scheduling coordinator, and the Univer­ sity Center Office.

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PID Bookstore is

owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran University for the benefit of students, faculty, and staff. The bookstore sells textbooks required for classes. Sl1pplie" gift , cards, and convenience store items are also available. Computer software at di counted prices is available or can be special or­ dered. Apple computers at educational prices can be purchased through the bookstore. Special book orders are welco me. PLU Northwest is a unique gift shop located at 407 Garfield Street in historic Parkland. Featuring N rthwest pottery, cloth­ ing. and foods, the store also offers books nd gifts depicting Northw st themes and authors. Car«r Development

(housed with Academic Advising for students' convenience) strives to provide a program of career development and life planning. Students are aSSisted in integrat­ ing their personal values and aptitudes with career choices through individual counseling, workshops, residence hall presen­ tations, and a computerized career guidance pr gram. The office staff assist students a nd first-year alumni in developing job­ search techniques by providing an extensive career library of opportun ities in specific majors, in dustry directories, and e m ploymen t forecasts. Additio nally, the office coordin t es a schedule of recruiters from industry, business, government, and graduate schools. The center coordinates and promotes all pa rt - time and full­ time employment opportunities for students, induding i is t i ngs of local jobs, nation-wide internships, and summer employment opportunities. Specially selected forums throughout the year also bring students and employer together, in order to h el p students find work that is both financially and personally reward ing.

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GRIEVANCE PROCED URES

Policies and procedures a the university are inten cd to main­ tain an orderly educational environment conducive to student learning and development. In order to fulfill instituti nal Je­ sponsibility and at the same tim· follow procedure s th, t are fair. consistent, and protective of each person's rights, appropriate grievance procedures have been established. If a tudent bas reaSon to believe that an academic or adminis trative action is unjust, capricious, or discriminatory, these procedures are available for the student to seek redress . . The university has a team of grievance officers to facilitate the grievance process. The grievance ofncers are Kathleen Farrell (535-7200) , Cristi·na Fridenstine (5 35-7 159), Susan Mann (535- 7 1 8 7 ) , Patricia Roundy (535-8786), and Richard Seeger ( 535-8786) . Any of the gri vance officers may be contac ted to receive assistance.. Copies of grievance procedures are available for review at the office of each gri vance officer.

Academic Procedures Advising The university expects that all studenrs, at one time or another, will need assistance in planning academic programs consistent with their needs and goals. Both to help students make their initial adjustment to the academic load at PLU and to provide occasional counsel throughout their academic careers, the university has established a network of faculty advisers and an Academic Advising Office. Faculty Advisers - AJI students enrolled in degre e programs have faculty advisers whose overall responsibility is to guide academic progress. In their work with individual students, P

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advisers have the assistance of personnel in a number of student services o ffi c s; the Academic Advising Office, the Academic Assistance Center, th Career Development Office, Counseling and Testing Services, the MuIti-Ethni Resource Center, the Campus Ministry, the international student adviser, and residence hall directors and r ident assistants. Transitional Advisers: At the time of entry, each student is assigned a transitional adviser, usually according to interests expressed by the student. Students who wish to explore the general curriculum before choosing a maj r program are assigned to e.·ploratory advisers (professional advising or counseling st aff or especially trained faculty) who will help them to make educational plans appropriate to their interests and talents. Transitional adviser ar supported by educational planning workshops and by Psycho logy 1 1 3 Career and Educati nal Planning. During a student's fLrst em ster, and advising file is created for the student's adviser, and a " Big Envelope," an advising guide and record-keeping folder, is issued to each student. Major Advisers: Upon formal declaration of a major, students are assigned major advisers to replace their general advisers. Major advisers guide students' progress toward their chosen degree goals. Students may change advisers as appropriate or necessary, u ing a simple advis r change form. Students and advisers are expected to meet regularly, though the actual number of meetings will vary according to individual needs. Minimally, three meetings are required during the fresh man year and one each year thereafter, though all students are encouraged to meet wit h their advisers as often as seems necessary or usefuL

Registration The Student Services Center provides many services for students and alumni. The center serves as a focal point for all matters concerning enrolling in ourses, confirming schedules, and issuing official and unofficial transcripts. Students who plan to return are encouraged to pre-register. Returning students will receive registration time appointments to pre-register for fall and spring semesters and the January term. Registration dates are determined by the number of hours, including transfer hours, completed by the tudent. Students may register for e eh new semester or session on or after the designated date. fuUUX RE��ON PROGRAM FOR �G STUDENTS

Early registration for entering students occurs during June or Jan uary, depending on whether students begin in the fall or spring semester. Early regi tration is conducted by the Admis­ sions Office. Registration materials are sent t all accepted entering students well in advance of their arrival on campus for their first semester. , Most students have the opportunity to work personally with an adviser as they plan their schedules. A limited number of tudents may register by mail, and their course selections are verified by a counselor. •

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

Students may regi ·ter by using the computerized tele-registra­ tion system accessible fro m any tone-generating telephone or by using Banner Web, an I nternet-based registration system. In addition to registering, tele-registration and Banner Web al a offer students the ability to add or drop dass, check their schedules, and access fin al grades. The phone number for tele­ registration is 253/535-8935. Banner Web may be accessed through the PLU home page (www.plu.edu). Students may contact the Student Services Center with registration questions.

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Students are not officially enrolled until their registration has been cle.ared by the Student ACQunts Office. Students are responsible for selecting their courses. Advisers are available to assist with planning and to make suggestions. Students should be thoroughly acquainted with all registration In terials, including the current catalog and special information sent by the Admissions Office. Students are also encouraged to study carefully the requirements of all academic programs in which they may eventually declare a major.

Adding or Dropping a Course: A srudent may add or drop a

COllI e at any time during the first ten days of class during a full­ length semester. See the January term and SLimmer catalogs for the add/drop periods fOT those sessions. During the add/drop period, courses may be dropped and tuition will be refunded in full. In most cases, adding and dropping can be accomplished using tele- registration or Banner Web. WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE

If a student does not wish to continue a course after the add/ drop period, the student must withdraw from the course. Tuition is not refunded. A $50 administrative fee is charged for any registration change after the add/drop period. OffidaJ Withdrawal: To withdraw officially, the student needs

to obtain a withdrawal form from the Student Services Center, fiJI in the form, have the in true tor sign the form, and submit the completed form to th Student Ser ices Center. Withdrawal forms must be submitted before the end of the twelfth week.

See the January term and sum mer catalogs for the las! dates to withdraw during those sessions. A "w" grade will appear on the student's grade report and transcript. Unoffidai With.drawal: A student who stops attending a course before the end of the twelfth week but does not withdraw may receive an unofficial withdrawal. The grade of"UW" will appear on the student's grade report and transcript. If it can be determined that a stud nt never attended a course, the registra­ tion will be cancelled without notation on the transcript. WITHDRAWAL FROM 1'BE UNIVERSITY

EARLY REGISTRATION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS

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Students are entitled to withdraw honorably from the university if their record is satisfactory and all financial obligations are satisfied. Partial tuition refunds are available. Refer to the

"Illitiorl and Fees" sectioll of this catalog for more information. Medical Withdrawal: Students may also completely withdraw

from the university for a tenn for medical reasons. The student must provide written evidence from a physician nd a personal explanation to the vice president and dean for student life. This must be completed in a timely manner and in no case later than the last day of class in any given term. If granted, the grade of "WM" will appear on the student's grade report and transcript. STUDENT COURSE LOADS

The normal CQurse load for undergraduate students during fall and spring semesters is 1 3 to 1 7 hours per semester, including physical education. The minimum full-time course load i ' 12 hours. The minimum full-time load for graduate students is 8 hours. A normal course load during the January term is 4 hours with a maximum of 5 hours In order for a student to take a full course load, the student must be formally admitted to the un iversity. See the "Admission" .

section of this cntalogfor application procedures. •

Students who wish to register for 18 or more hours in a semester are required to have at least a 3.00 grade point average or consent of the provost. Students engaged in considerable outside work may be restricted to a reduced academic load.

CREDIT RESTRICTIONS An undergraduate student may repeat any course. The cumula­

tive grade point average is computed using the h ighest of the grades earned. Credit toward graduation is allowed only once.


m a the m ati cs or a foreign la n gu age p re re qu is ite if taken after a hIghe r- level cour e. For exam ple, a s lude n t who has co m pl eted Spa n is h 20 1 ca nnot Later receive credit fo r Sp an ish 102. Credit is not allowed for a

course listed al; a

Stu de nt s are grad ed ac co rdi ng to Grade Points per Hour

'--

A A-

Excelletl t

B+

Good

B BC+ C

the

4.00

A+

following de s i gna t io ns:

Credit Awarded

4.00

Yes

3.67

Yes

3 " .J 3.00

Ye

2.67

Yes

Satisfactory 2.00

Yes

D+

1 . 33

Yes

D Poor D-

l .00 0 .6 7

Yes

No

The grade s hsted below are not

used in cal c ulati ng grade point

. No g rade po int s are earned under these designations.

Gnocle

DHcriptlon

P

Pass

}I s

F

Fail

No

I

In com p lete In P ro gress A u d it

No No

Withd rawal

No

Me<lka! Withdrawal

No

TP

AU W WM

Credit Awarded

Incomplete

(I) grad e

No

indicate that s tudents

did

not

c om p l ete

thei r work because of c i rc u msta n ce s beyond their co ntrol . To

receive credit, an i nc o m p l ete must be converted to a passing grade within th e first six weeks of the fo ll o wi ng sem est er. I nco m plete grades that are not conve rted by removal are

o n ly award pass/fail gr ad es . The goaJ� of these c urses are typically concemed wi t h appreciation , va lue commitment, or c reat ive acbievement. Students will be informed if a course is excl u iwly p ass/ fail before t hey regis t r for the COlIrSe. Exdusive pass/fail courses do not meet major or UI\iversity requirements ithout fa c u lty approval. If a s tuden t takes an exclus ive p as sffa i l co urse, the student's indiv id ua l passffail op tion is not a ffected.

signifies p rogress in a co urse which

expc ts ali its faculty

In

norm all y

Pro ress carri es

grade.

The Regis tra r's Office reserves several

sp ec ial gr ade d es ign ati ons for exceptional c ircu m sta.n ce s. These sp cial Reg istra r's Office notation are described be l ow : eMit Awarded

Description

NG

No Grade Sub m itted

No

UW

Unoffic ia l Wi thd ra wal

No

and students to honor this principle

e

aca demic dishonesty

is

a

ser io us breach of the un iver­ it is every facul ty

m mber's o b li ga t ion to imp se appropriate sanctions for any demonstrable instance of such misconduct on the part of a

studen t.

Tbe university's po l icy n academic in teg rity and its proce ­ dures for dealing with a c ade mic misconduct are detailed in the Student Handbook.

ACADEMIC STANDING POllCY The follo wi ng terms are used to describe ac adem i c tanding at PLU. A c ademic s tan di n g is determ in ed by the Co mmj ttee for the Admission and Retention of Students, wh ic h reserves the ri ght to review any s tu dent's record to determine ac ade m i c st an d i n g. Good StandJng: All tudents enrolled at the un i er ity re academic tan di n g. Go d sta nd i ng requir e s a cumulative grad e p oi n t average of 2.00 or h igher and

dea d l ine .

Unofficial Withdrawal (UW) may be e n tere d when a cour e i s not completed be c ause of a student's nonattendance in the days before the withdrawal de adl ine. The Pass/Fail OptJoru The pa ss f fa i l op t i n perm i ts students to explore subject areas outs ide thei r known a b il i t ies by experienc­ ing courses witho ut competing direc tly with t uden ts who are

in those areas of study. Grades of A+ thro ugb C-

Sin

expected to stay in good

No Grade (NG) is a te m porary gra de entered by the Registrar's Office when no gra de has been submitted by the establ ished

specializing

c

on the fundam ental p rin cip le of absolute h on est y. The u niversity

Medical Withdrawal ( WM ) is entered when a course is not com p leted due to medi ca l cause. A m d ical w ithdrawal does not affect a student's gra de p o in t ave r age .

G,.de

o n m

Both the value and the su�ss of any academic a c t iv i ty, as well as of the enti r e academic enterp ri se, have depe n ded for cen tu ri es

sally reco gni zed code of academic ethics,

p erma ne nt

"V ;:Ill

ACADEMIC HONESTY

incomplete was submitted. An in co mple te is not a permanent gra de . An in co mplete does not entitle a s tu de nt to attend class again withou t re- regi-te.ring .

no credit u ntil rep la c ed by a

n

in the total class exp e ri en ce and i evaluated accord i ng l y. may le ad to a redu tion of a s tude nt's final g ra de. In the eVCIlt of unavoidable absence, students are expected to i n fo rm the instructor. As s i gn m en t of make- up work, if any, is at the d is c reti o n f the instructor.

scrupulously.

runs more than one semester to completion.

m

Absences

cbanged to the grade ind icated by the i n st ruc to r wh en the

In-Progress (LP)

o

CLASS ATTENDANCE The un iversity assume that all regi ster ed stude n ts h ave freely ccep ted personal responsibility for reg u l a r class atte nd an . Course grad es refle ct the quality of students' aca de mi c perfor­ mance as a whole, which n ormally i n cludes regular pa rti ci pa ti n

Pus (P) a n d Fall (P) gr ades are awa rded t s tude n ts who select the p ass ffa il ption or wh are enrolled in exclusive passffail courses. These grades do n t a ffe ct a student's gra de po i nt average.

)00

c: ;:Ill m 11'1

The p as s/ fail op ti on is lim ited to undergradu ate students onl y.

Exclusive Pass{Fail Courses: S om e courses

Ye s

0.00

The p assf fa il op tion is li mi ted to 8 credit hours (regardless f r epea ts, pass or fail) . O n ly one course may be taken passffail in fulfillm e n t of general university r ore requ i rem en ts or of the College of Arts and S c ience s requirernen Th e p assffail op ti on may not be a ppl i ed to a course taken for fulfillment of a majo r or m i no r program. An excep ti on to this is allowed for one course in the major or m in o r field if it as taken before the maj r or m i n or was declared. Studen ts m ust file their in ten tio n to exercise the passffai l option with the Student Services Ce n ter no l ate r than tbe mid­ poin t of the course. In a full-length se mest er, this is last day of the eighth week.

Yes Yes

1 .67

averag

Yes

2.33

Fail

}I s

E

THE GRADING SYSTEM

)00 n

re ga rded as " p ass " ; grad of D+ thr o ugh E arc regarded as " fa il ." Passffail grades d not affect the grade point average.

are

sa tis fa cto ry academic progress.

Satisfactory Academic Progress: Satisfactory aca dem ic progress shall be defmed as co mp le tion of at l ea st 75% of credit hours at t e mpte d in an academic yea r. Failure to campI te includes withdrawals, incompletes, and grades of E

r F. The Com m ittee

for tbe Admission and Reten t io n of Students reserves tht' r igh t to

fo r aca demic status those students who fa il to maintain satisfa ctory academi progr s . The Committee shall regula rly iden ti fy such students, review their record , con icier exten uating circumstances. and deci de whether or not th e students shall be placed on a cade mic p ro ba ti o n. review

P

A

C

I

F

i

e

l

U T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

23


Midtemt Advisory Letters: In the seven th week of each fal l and spring se mester, in ·tructors ma y choose to se nd warning letters

on a s tude n t 's activities based upon academic p e r formanc e may be set by inruvidual schools, departments, or organizations. A st u dent on academic pr ob at i on is not el igib le for certification in inter-collegiate competitions and may be a dvi sed to curtail parti c i p a t io n i n ot h er extr a - curri cul a r a c t ivi t i es .

to students do ing work below C level (2 .00) in th ir classes. No tra n s cript notalion is made, and academic sta nd ing is not

'" u o

affected.

Academic Warningl S t ude n ts whose most r ecen t semester grade po in t average wa less than 2.00, whose cumulative g r ade p o i n t h i ghe r, an

whose a ca de m i c progress is

a::

average is 2.00

a...

satisfacto ry, a re placed on ac ad em i c warning and se nt warn in g

u

Q c( u c(

r

letters. St u d en t s wh

e cum ulative and semester grad e point averages are below 2.0 at the end o f th ei r first semester at PLU ar also pl aced o n a ca de m i c wa rni n g .

Probation: Stu de n t s , other than first se mest e r students, are placed on pr bation if their cu mul a tive g r ade point average falls below 2.00, or if th ey have been on wa rn in g in th p reviou ' semester and have failed to re t u rn to good academic s t a n d i ng , or (at the discret ion o f the Com mittee for the Admission and Rele ntion of Stude n ts ) if they have failed to mai ntain sa tj s facto r y academic progre s. P ro bationa r y tudents must meet with the

CLASSIFICATIONS OF STUDENTS Freshmen: stu de n t s who have met entrance requirements. Sop h o m ores: s tuden t s wh o h ave sat i s fa c t or i ly co mpleted 30 hours. Junio rs: students who have sa ti sfa ct or ily completed 60 hours. Senio rs: students who have satis fac to r i l y co mpleted 90 hours. Graduate Swderzts: students who h a ve met entrance req u irements and have been ac cep t ed into the Division of Graduate S tud i es . Non-Degree Undergraduates: un dergraduate s tu d e n ts who are a tte nd in g pa r t- t i me fo r a maximum o f 8 se mes t er hours but are not o ffici ally admitted to a degree program. NOli-Degree Graduate Students; g r a d u a te students who are a tt end i n g part-time but are no t offic i ally admitted to a d egree progr a m .

di recto r of advising be ore the tenth day of a p ro bat ion ary semester to draw up a pl a n for i mprov i n g their academi c work.

Acade mic p rob at i o n i ' noted on th transcript. A probatiotl plan may specify req uirements agreed on by the student and dire.ctor of advising: ass ign men t to a probationary ad\'iser, specified contact with the adviser, lim i ta tion of credit load, limi ta tio n on work or activities, reg istration in a study skills class, etc. op ies of the agreem e nt are setlt to the studen t and probationary adviser. At th end of the semester, the adviser returns one copy to the direc to r of advising in dica ting whether or not the student has made an effort /0 mee t the terms of the prob ationary agreement. Th is copy is filed in the Office of the Registrar and may be used to make dec is i o ns regarding contin­ ued probation and academic dismissal. Continued Probation: Student wh ose cumulative grade point ave rages are still below 2.00 after a p ro ba t i o nary semester, but whose last semester grade p o in t averages are above 2.00 and who are otherwise in goo d s tanru n g , may be gran t e d one a dd i ti o n al semester of probat io n at the discretion of the Committee for the Admission and Re t noon of Students. Such stu den ts must p ar ti c ipat e in the proba tionary semester program.

Academic Dismissal: Students not in good sta n d i n g at t h e end of a probat ion ary semester are dis m i ss ed from the u n i v rsity. They may apply for re insta t men t by pe t i tion ing the Committee for the Ad missio n and Reten tion of S t ud nts ( i n care of the d irecto r of adv is i ng ) . If the pet i tion is approved. the reinstated student i on probation a nd mus t p a rt i c i p ate in the probationary se m ester program. If the pet ition is denied, the student may pe titi o n again after one semester unless otherwise informed. Students are dismissed for a cade m i c reaso ns after each fa l and spring semester. Second Academic Dismissal: A readm itted s t ude nt who fa, ils to attain a 2.00 cum u lative g ra de p o i n t average i n the semest er after rei ns tatement, but whose em ester gra de point aver age is above 2.00, m ay be gr anted aile add i t ional semester of probation at the discretion of the Committee for the Admission and Re t en t i on of

Students. I f a sem es te r gr ade point average of 2.00 is not earne d in the probationary semester, or i f a st ude nt fails to ach i eve a 2.00 cumulative grade p oi n t average after a second p robat i o n a ry semester, the s t ude n t is dismissed second time and may n o t app ly for re instatemen t until one full sem ter has passed and then only if n ew evidence i.� presented i.n d ic at in g th student's probable s uccess. Th is rule appl i e s also to a read m it t ed student w ho attains good t a ndi ng and is then d i smi s sed a s eco nd time ELIGmlIJTY FOR STUDENT ACTIVITIES Any regul a r l y enrolled, full-time student ( 1 2 h o ur s or more) is eligible for p a rt i c i pat i o n in un ivers i t y activities. Limitations

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

Honors at Ilntranu: Th ese honor are con ferred at Openjng

Convo cat io n o n the mos t h i ghly qualified en teri n g freshmen. Certificates, which are mailed in early May to h igh chools for p r esen t ati o n to I"ecipients, re co gnize outstanding high school achievement and anticipate s uperi or perfo r mance at the

unjversity leve l . These awards have no monetary value and do not consti tute acceptance into the Honors Program . Graduation Honors: Degrees wi t h honors of cum laude, magna cum la l lde, and summa cum laude are gr a n t ed. A s t u de n t must earn a cu mulative average of 3.50 fo r ctlm laude, 3.75 fo r magna cu m la ude, and 3.90 for summa ClWl laude. All transfer grades are combined with P LU g rad es to determine e li gi bi l ity. P hysi c al edu c a t io n activit y courses are not inc l ud e d i n dete rm i nin g g ra du ati o n honors. Dean's List: A Dean's List i s created at the end of ea ch

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

po i n t average of 3 .50, with a minimum o f 12 g raded h ours .

Honor Sodeties: Election to t he Arete Sodety is a sp ec i al re c ognit i on of a stu dent ' s commitment to the liberal arts toget h er with a re co rd of high achievement in relevant cou rs e wor k. T his s oc ie t y was o rganiz ed in 1969 by Phi Beta Kappa members of th fa cu lt y. Its fu n d amen t a l purpose is to en courage a n d r e cogn i z e exce ll e nt sc holarsh ip in the liberal ar t s . Student memb rs ar e elected by the fa culty fenows of the s o ci et y ea ch sp r ing . B o t h jun i or s and s eniors are el i gi bLe; the qualifications for election as a junior are more str i nge nt . Students must h ave: •

• •

attained a h igh gra de p int average ( for seniors, no r m a lly above

3.70; fo r jun i o rs , normally above 3.90); co m pl et ed 1 1 0 cr edit hours in liberal s tud ies; demons t r a t ed the equ ivale n t of two years of college work in fo rei g n language; c om pl e te d one year of college mat h emat i c s ( i ncluding statistics or computer science) or fo ur years of c oll ege preparatory math­ em a t ics in high sch ool and one college mathematics course; and completed a m inimum of th re e semest rs in re si den ce at t h e universi ty.

Y

mester.

To be eli g ib l e , a stud e nt must have attained a semester grad e

for aead ruc reasons.

24

HONORS Honors Program: PLU offe rs its univer ity Honors P ro gram to students seek i ng a special aca demi c challenge in classes wi th eq u al ly ap able peers. Incoming fres h me n may apply for a course of s t ud y that incl udes a mi n i mum of 26 se m est e r hours o f h ono r s-l evel courses. T h e pro g ra m centers o n the theme " Taking Responsibility: Matters f the Mind, Matters of the H ea rt," and i n tegr ates a ca de m i c a nd exp eri en ti al lea r n i ng pportlmities, with the o bjec t ive of prepar in g part i ci p an ts for lives of se rvice and servant le ade rsh ip . See the "Hunors Progra m" section of this catalog for furth er details.


The univers i ty has chapter' of a n u m be r of n at i o nal bonor societies on campus, incl u d i ng the fol lowi ng : • Alp h a Psi O m e g a ( Dra m a ) • Bet· Ga mm a igma ( B us i n s) • • • •

Mu Phi Ep sil on ( Musi c ) Pi Kappa Delta (F o re nsic s ) O m icro n Del t a Ep si lo n ( E conomi cs ) Sigma Thet a Tau ( Nur si ng )

Undergraduate FeUow5.l A limited number of Und erg ra d u a te Fellows ar e appoi n te d an nually. These a ppoi n tm ents ar e given to o u t st an d in g se nior st u d ents wi th a view to encourag i n g r e ci p i ­ ent to consider college t eac h i n g as a career. An und e rg radu ate fellow is give n a va ri ety of o p por t uni t i es to s a m pl e the profes­ sional life and work of a fac ult y member in his o r her maj or dis cip line. A tui t i o n credit accompanies t h e a p p oi ntme n t . CREDIT BY l!XA.MINATION (CHALLENGE) Students are perm i tted, within limits, to obtain credit by exa m i ­ nation in lieu o f reg ula r enrollment and class at ten dance. 0 m re th an 30 sem es ter hours may be cou n t d toward gr ad ua ­ tion, whether from the College Level Examination Pro g ra m (CLEP) or any other examination. Except ions to this rule for certain groups of st ud e n t or p rog ram s may be made, s ubj ect to recommendation by the Educational P olic ie s Committee and approva l by the fac ul ty. Credit by exa minatio n is o pen to

for m al l y a dm itt ed, regula r s t at us stu d ents only and does not count toward the residency requiremen t for g r a dua t i on . To receive credit by examination, students must c omplet e a Credit By Examination Reg i str at i on Form available in the Student Services Center, obtain the signature of th e respective de partment chair or de an and arrange for the examin ation with the appr opr i ate instruc tor. The co mp l e ted form must be ret u r n ed to the Student Services Center before the examination is t aken . Grades for credit by exa mi n a t ion will be submitted by the instructor along with all o ther g ra des at the end of the term. C LEP general exa m ina ti on s are given elective credit only. The various schools, divisions, and dep art m e n ts determine the speci­ fic CU�P subject examinations whi h may fulfill requirements for majors. programs, or ge ner al university req uiremen ts in their respective academic areas. The e exanlinations are subj ec t t recommendations by the Educational Policies Committee and approval by the fa cul ty. The minimum pas in g h�vel for CLEP examinati ns taken at Pac ifi c Lutheran University is the fiftieth percentile. CLEP cre djt s granted by other universities, coll eg es, and community colleges, which are earned before entrance, are honored by Pacific Lutheran University. The a p p l ica t i on of those c red i ts t ward maj ors, programs, and ge ne ra l university re qu iremen ts is consistent with sch o ol, divisional, and depart­ ment policies and standards. The universi ty does not grant credit for college-lev 1 gen e ral eq u ival en cy dip lo m a (GE ) tests. ,

NON-CREDIT IN IIORMAL STUDY To en co ur a ge l iberal lear n in g of all kinds. over and beyon d enrollment in course l e ad i n g to ward for m al degree s, the unive rs ity offers a variety of o pp ortu nit i es for informal study: Guest of Uoiversity Status: Tea cht'fs and officials of other i nsti t ut ion s, vis i ti ng scholars and artists, and othe r pro fessio n al per ons who wish to use u.niversity fa cilities for in de p e nd en t study may apply to the provost for cards desi gn at ing them a s

Guests o f the Un iversi ty. Such persons, in the i r use o f facilities, will d efer to t h e needs of st u de n t s and faculty members.

instructor or the dep a rt men t, the student may gain credit for an a u d i te d course by pas sin g an examination set by t he i nstruct r or th e department. Audit fees are the same as c rl' di t fees.

> "

M emb ers of the academic co mm u ni ty are encour aged to visit classes which in t ere s t them. No fee is c h a rge for the p r ivilege. Because regularly e nro ll ed students must be given first consideration, persons des ir ing to visit das es ar re qu i red to ask permission of t h e instructor. Visitors are gu ests of th e classes and must conduct thems elves accordin g ly.

o m

>

Visiting Classes:

"CI :a

GRAD UATION

o " m

Students expe c ti ng to fulfill degree requirements WITHIN THE ACADEMIC YEAR ( i nc l u din g August) are required to file an ap plica tion fo r gr ad ua t i on with the Office of the Regi s trar according to the following: DEGR.EE COMPu:nON

BACHaoR'S AND MA$JER'S DEADUNE

December 1 7 , 1 999 January 28, 2000 May 19, 2000 August 24, 2000

S ep tember 18, 1 999

C c :a

October l , 1999 November I, 1999 March 1 , 2000

There are four degree-completion d ate s ( third Slimmer sessio n, end of fall semester, J a n u a ry, and pring semester). D egrees are fo rm al ly conferred at August, December, an d May commence­ ment s. Students with January d eg ree dates are expe ct ed to take part in the December commencement. The actua l date of gradu a t io n will be reco r ded on the permanent rec o rds. Students wh plan to tr ans fe r back to Pacific Lutheran Un iver sit y for a degre e ( math , p hysic s. en gin eeri ng progra ms ) m us t a pp ly for gr ad ua tion before or during the first semester of thei r juni r year so that de fi c i e nci e' may be met before they leave campus. WRITING THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULUM Pacific Lutheran Univer sity is a comm uni ty of scholar , a community of read er s a nd w r i ter s . Rea ding informs the intellect and liberates the imagination. Writing pervades our academic lives as teachers and students, both as a way of communicating what we learn and as a mean s of shaping th o u g h t and ideas,

O ur e mp hasis on l i te ra cy beg in s w it h cou rses de s igne d to fulfill the u nive r s ity w rit i ng require ment, courses in which tudents learn to use various kinds of ac ad em ic and person a l wr iti n g, to read different kinds of texts morE: effec t ively, and to o rga ni ze the powers of clear thought and exp ress i on. The u njvers ity's commitment to exc ell ent writing is reflected in the Writing Center, wher tra in ed stud ent co n su l ta n t s from a variety of disciplines hel p students of v aryi ng abilities by reading and r ponding to papers s ti ll in draft. All faculty me m bers share the responsibility for improving the literacy of thei r st u d ents. Fa cu l ty in every de p ar tm en t and school make w ri t in g an essential part of th ir courses and show students how to ask questions appro p r iat e to the ki.nds of rea d i n g done in t h e ir fields, Students write both � rmal papers and reports and infoffilal n o tes and essays i n o rder to m aster the con ten t and methods of the various di s cipl i nes . They are enco uraged to prepare i mp o r tant papers in m ul t i ple drafts. Because errors are a di s trac tio n and a symptom of ca reless ­ ness in all d isc i p I i n e� , students in all courses are expected to observe the co nven t io ns of for ma l English in their finished work.. But li tera cy is m ore than correctness. At Pacific Lutheran Univer ity rea din g and writing are part of the process o f liberal ed uc a ti o n .

Auditing Courses: To audit a cou r se is to en roll , with the permission of the in st r uc tor, on a non-credit basis. An anditor is

encouraged to p arti cipate fully in class activities but is no t held accountable for examinations or othe r wri tte n wo rk an d do es not r e ce ive a grade. If the instructor approves, the course may be entered upon the transcr i pt as "Audit." With the ap p r ov al of the

A e

l

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L

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5

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25


III IoU II: :;)

o IoU U

FRESHMAN EXPE RIENCE ( 1 0 12 HOURS)

(OftE RE QUIRI!MENTS EtTHER CORE I QR CORE II

WRIT 1 0 1 - Writi ng Se m i nar (4)

Cote I - Distributive and

CRIT 1 1 7

o

- Critical Conversa ti on

(4) Freshman January Term (4)

II: �

OT"£" GURs 12() 28 HOLI RS) Core II - In1ernational Core:

Disciplinary (32 hours)

Art. MusIC. Theatre

(4)

literature (4) Religiou� Studies

(8)

Anthropology. History.

Political Scient:e

Economics,

w

o

(4)

(28 hours)

Writ i ng (4). un less taken in freshman year

INTG 1 1 2 - liberty and Power (4)

or

Psychology.

Sociology. or Sodal Work

c( u

SCience and the Scie ntific

INTG 1 1 1 - Authority and Discovery (4)

Philosophy (4l

u

Mathemat ica l Reason ing (4)

Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World

Method C4}

Perspectives on Diversity

Four 200-level thematic cOUrse

( 1 6)

(4)

Nat ura l Sciences, Computer SCIence. or Mathematics (A)

IIIIiG 3 1 7 -- The Interdisciphnary

Conversation - a concluding

seminar

(4)

(6-8)

A lt ern a t i ve Perspect ives Cross-Cultural Pers pect ive s

Physical Education (4) Senior Semi nar /Project in Major (2-4)

c( freshman stu d ent s and to take adva n ta ge of the format of

General University Requirements The universi ty is committed, i n p r in c iple as well as h is to ri ca l ly, to p rovidin g a st ro ng liberal arts base for all its baccalaureate degree programs. Accordingly, in a ddi t io n to fulfilling certain m inim u m req uirements, U u n de r g radu a te students must satisfactorily c om pl e te all ge ne ral university requi rements. SPECIFIC REQUIlU!MENTS - ALL BACCALAUREATE

The Exami ned Life: Into Uncertain ty and Beyo lld

The freshman year program p rovi des a upportively challeng­ ing context in which to begin the quest for, and a dvent u re of, a larger vi i n for l ife. Univer ity education is about more than skill s ; at PLU it is ab ut liberating s t ud e nts for critical and co mm i tted l iving . combining well-developed critical cap ac:iti with compassion and v i s io n for s ervi ce . in a multicultural, ideologically plural world. In ad di ti on to or ie nt at ion and advis ing programs . t h e freshman y r program is c omposed of three courses . One of the two seminars mu t be take n in the student's first semester. Freshman year program requirements must be comple ted d u r i n g the student's freshman reaL lAo Inquiry Seminar: Writ ing (4 hours) These emi.n.1rs focus o n wri ting , thinking, speaking. and reading. They involve wr i ti n g as a way of th i n ki ng, of learn­ ing, and of di sco ve r ing and order in g ideas. Taught by faculty in any departm ent or school, these seminars are organized around topics that en age students and fac ul ty in di logue and provide the opportunity to examin e issues froIll a vari ty of perspectives_ NOTE: Credits eamed by Advanced Placemen t-English do not sa risfy this requiremellt. though they may be used for elective credit. Students with officially transcripled college w riting cOlmes. indudillg t/lose ill Wa.shirlgton Statt�'s R I UWitlg Start p rogram , are nonetheless eligible to e1Iroll ill the wflling semi n a r fo r credit, o r they mlly c/wose to Use their previous LTedits to st1tisfy the writing semi"ar requirement l B. Inquiry Seminar: Cri tical COllversation (2 h o u rs ) These semina rs involve lea rn i n g how to participate in the exc ha n ge of ideas t h r o ug h the experienc of articu lating questions, l i sten ing for meaning and nuance in whal other write and say, seeing ideas and positions in context, arguing. moving to consensus, and living with conflict. Like th lA w riting seminars. these seminars are ll1ught by fa cul ty fro m var i o us departments an d schools. All are numbered I J 71 1 9 in their respecti ve departme.nts. When taugh l in January, these seminars are 4

hours.

(4 hours) f th e

re quirements (line 1 -4 and 6)

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hours)

a. Arts/Literature

( 8 hours, 4 from ea ch line) L Art, Music, or Theatre 2. Literature ( Engl is h or L ng ua ge s and Literatures) b. Philosophy (4 hours) Religious S t u d i es (8 h ours , 4 fro m each of two l in e s ) L Bibl ic al Studies 2. Christian Thought , Hi s tory, a n d Expe rie n ce 3_ Integrative and Comparative Rel igiou s Studies NOTE: Transfer stlldcnts entering as juniors or seniors are req uired to take 4 semester hours of religion (from lines I or 2) unless presenting 8 transfer hOllrs ofreligion from other accredited colleges or universities. d Soci al Sciences (8 ho u rs, 4 from each Line) L An th ro po l ogy. H ist o ry. or Political Science 2. E co no mi cs, Psy c holo gy, Sociology, or So c ia l Work e. Nat ura l Sciences, Computer Science. Math em a ti cs (4 h o urs)

Co

1. The Freshman Experience

These courses fulfill one

Core 1: The Distributive Core (32

NOTE: Logic co u rses do not fulfill this req uiremellt.

DEGKEES

l C . Freshman Jmwary Term

t h e January tem1.

2. One of Two Alternative Cores: Core I or Core n

R

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other general unive rsity and are designed both for N

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Core II: The International Core: bttegrated Sf udies of the

Contemporary World (28 hOllrs)

a.

INTG 1 1 I , 1 1 2 Origins of t he Contemporary World

(8 h urs) b. Four 200-level ISP cou r ses ( 1 6 hours). Normally taken in the second and third years. May include approved program of study ab roa d. Students select four cours ubj e c t to approval of the International Core Committee. c. INTG 3 1 7: The Interdisciplinary Conversati n (4 ho ur s) 3. Mathematical Reasoning (4 hOUIS) A c ourse in ma thematics o r a p plic ations of mathematics. wit h e mp hasi s on numerical and logical reaso ni ng and on using approp riat e met h ods t o fo rm u late an d solve pr oblem s . This requirement may be s tisfied by any 4 h o u rs [.rom math matics (except Math 91 or Math 99) or by Computer Science 1 1 5 or by Statistics 2 3 1 . Th is requirement may also be sati sfied by the co m p le t i o n (with at least a B aver age) f the eq uiv al e n t of four years of col! ge preparatory mathe m a t ics (th roug h ma th e ma t i­ cal analysis or calculus or equivalent) . In ful fill i ng th m th­ ematical reasoning re quire m e n t , students with docu mented disabili ties will be gi n rea so na bl e accommodations as dete r­ mined by t h e coordinator for students with disabil ities and the app r pri te fac ul t y member in ons ul ta tio n with the student. 4. Science and the Scientific Method (4 hours) A scie nce co urs e that teaches the m eth ods of science. illus­ t rat es its applications and li mi tat ion s, and in cl ud es a labora­ tory o mp one n t . At least one of the courses taken to meet line 4 o r 2 ( Core I. e) must be a course in which the subject is n a tur al sciences, i. e., p hys ic al or biological science.


hours) All students must complete an approved, 4-credit-hour writing ourse. Freshmen satisfy this requirement through the [nquiry Seminar: Writing.

5. Writing Requirement ( 4

6. Perspeaive On Diversity (6-8 h urs) A course in each of the f< !lowing two lines. The only 2-hour

courses that can satisfy either of the following lines completely are the freshman Critical Conversation seminars ( 1 B) . a. Alternative Perspectives (2-4 hours): A course whjch creates an awa reness and understanding of diversity in the United tates, directly addressing issues �uch as ethnicity, gender, di ability, racism, or poverty. b. Cross-Cultural Perspectives (2-4 hours): A course that en­ hance:; cross-cultural understandings through examination f other cultures. Thi requirement may be satisfied in one of three ways: ( i) a course focusing on the culture of non-Euro-American societies; (ii) a 201 or higher-level cour e in a language used to satisfy the admission require­ ment, or 8 credits in a language not previously studied, except ign language (These language cOlmes may also be IIsed in satisfying the Arts and Sciellces Requiremem, Options l or ll); or (iii) participation in an approved semester-long study abroad program. NOTE: 2-4 hours of Perspectives on Diversity courses may he used to fulfill another general university requirement. The remaining 4 hours must he Il coune that does not simultaneo usly fll lfill any at/,eT general university requirement. These 4 IlOurs may, however, satisfy a requirement in the major. lunior and senior transfer students shan either talec one Perspectives on Dillersily course (4 credit hours) at PLU that does not simultaneously fulfill ano tller general university requirement, or they shall sllOw tllld they hay s{dis/ied both the alternative perspectives and cross-cultural perspectives lines of ti,e requ irement,

7. Physical Education ( 4 hours)

8.

Four different physical education activity courses, ineluding PHED 1 00. One hour of credit may be earned through appr ved sp rts participation. All activities are graded on the basis of A, Pass, or Fail. SeniOT SemioarlProject (2-4 hours as designated by the academic unit of the student's major) A substantial project, paper, practicum, or i nternshjp that culrojnat s and advances the program of an academic major. The end product must be presented to an open audience and critically evaluated by faculty in th student's field. With approval of the student's major department, interdiscipLinary capstone courses such as the Integrated Studi C neluding Seminar, the Global Studjes Seminar, or the Honors Pr gram Challenge Seminar may fulfill this requirement.

UndeTltandinis Re�arrlinlAnReguirements. (I) COIlSul, particular departmental sections of tile catalog for detailed specification of courses that count for these requirements. (2) For those lines of the general ImilleTsity req uirements which refer to academic disciplines or units, selected courses outside these units may COUlltfor the require­ ment wilen approved both by the unils and by the committee overseeing ti,e general university requirements.

G£NERA.L REQUIREMENTS AND LIMITATIONS - All BACCALAUREATE DEGREES: (All credit hours referred to in

listings f requirements are semester hours.) 1. To tal HOlm and Cumulative GPA: A minimum of L 28 semest r hours must be completed with a grade point average f 2.0 (2.50 in the Schools of BlI ine and Education) . 2 . Upper-Division Courses: A minimum o f 4 0 semester hours must be completed from courses numbered 300 or above. Courses from two-year institutions are not considered upper­ division regardless of subject matter parallels. At least 20 of the minimum 40 semester hours of upper-division work must be taken at PLU. 3. Final Year in Residence: The final 32 semester hours of a student's program must be compLeted in residence at PLU. No transfer cred.it may be applied during a student's final 32 hours in a degree program. (Special programs such as 3-1, 3-2

and semester and January term exchange study are excluded from this limitation.) 4. Academic Major: A major must be completed as detailed by each school or department. At least 8 mester hours must be taken in residence. Departments, divisions, or schools may set higher residency requirements. 5. Grades for Major Courses: All courses counted toward a major or minor must be completed with grades of C- or higher and with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher in those courses. Departments, divisions, or schools may set higher grade requirements. 6. 44 Hour Limit: Not more than 44 hours earned in one department may be applied to the B.A. or B.S. degrees. 7. Music Ensembles: Non-music majors may count toward graduation requirements not more than 8 semester hours in music ensembles. 8. Correspondence/Extension Courses: A maximum of 24 hours in accredited correspondence or extension sturues may be credited toward degree requirement ) contingent on approval by the registrar. 9. Community College Courses: A maximum of 64 hours will be accepted by transfer from an accredited community college. All community college courses are transferred as lower­ division credit. LO. Physical Education COlmes: No more than eight L-hour physical education activity courses may be counted toward graduation. L L . Foreign Language Requirement: All candidates for B.A., B.S., B.A.P.E., B.A.Rec., or B.S.P.E. degrees must complete one of three options involving a foreign language or sp cified alternative. See above and tmder College ofArts and Sciences.

» n » o m

n ." ;:q o n m o c: ;:q m VI

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIHNCES REQUIREMENTS

In addition to meeting the entrance requirement i n foreign language (two years of high school language, one year of college language, or demonstrated equivalent proficiency) , candidates in the College of Arts and Sciences (all B.A., B.S., B.A.Rec., BAP.E., and B.S.P.E. degrees) must meet Option I, II, r 111 below: 1. Completion of ne foreign language through the second year of college level. This requirement may also be sati fied y completion of four years of high school study in one foreign language or by satisfactory scores on a pr ficiency examina­ tion administered by the PLU Department of Languages and Literatures. II. Completion through the first year of college level of a foreign language other than that used to satisfy the foreign language entrance requirement. This option may also be met by satisfactory scores on a proficiency examination adminis­ tered by the PLU Department of Languages and Literatures. III. Four semester hours in history, literatu re, or language (at the 201 level, or at any level in a language oth r than that used to satisfy the foreign language entrance requirement) in addition to courses applied to the general univer ity require­ ments, and four semester hours in symbolic logic, math­ ematics (courses numbered LOO or above), computer science, or statistics in addition to courses pplied to the general university requirements. High school languages used to satisfy any of the above options must have been completed with grades of C or higher. Courses used to satisfy either category of Option ill of the College of Arts and Sciences requirement may not also be used to satisfy general university requirements. Any college-level foreign language course numbered 201 or above used to satisfy Option I and any completion of college-Ie el L nguage through 1 02 used to satisfy Option I I may also be used to satisfy the Perspectives on Diversity requirement in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Candidates for the B.A. in English, for the B.A. in Education with concentration in English, for the B.A. in Global Studies, for the B.B.A. in International Business, and for election to the Arete Society must meet Option I above. P

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o u a z < .... ....

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DEGREE & CoURSE OFFERINGS Academic Structure

Degrees Offered

CoOege of Arb and Sciences Divis ion ofHmTla'lities

Divisio'l of Social Sciences

Master's Degrees

Bachelor of Arts

Master of Arts in Education

Master of Arts in Educatiun

English

Anthropology

Bachelor of Science

E.:ono mics

Bachelor of Arts in Education

Philosophy

History

Bachelor of Arts in Physical

Master of Arts in Social

Pol it ical Science

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation

Master of Bus iness

Biology

Psychology

B achelor of Business

Chemistry

Sociology and Social Work

Religion

E d ucatio n

/vlarriage and Family Therapy

Bachelor of Fine Arts

c

Geoscienc s

Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Mu si Education

M athema tics

Bachelor of Musical Arts

Physics

B achelor o f Science in Nursing

Computer Engineering

Bachelor of Science in

School of the Arts Art

Physical Education

Communication and Theatre Musi

School of Business �ool of Education School of Nursing School of Physical Education

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with Initial Certification Sciences

Administration

Computer Science and

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Bachelor's Degrees

Languages and Literutu res

Division of Natural Sciwces

28

_

Administration

Master of Science in Nursing


Majors

Minors The Americas

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Anthropology

mputer Science

Philosophy

EconomiQ

Art Biology

En gl i s h

C hemistry

Environmental

Physics

Studies

Prillt/Broadcasr JOlmraliml Public Rela tiolls l1rtatre

Psychology Religion

Chinese Studies

Geosciences

Scandinavian Area

German

Studies

History

Soci a l Work

IndividuaIized

So iology

Mathematics

Spanish

Chemistry

Mathematics

Computer I!ngineering

Physics Psychology

E ng ineeri ng Science

Comp ute r Science

( 3 -2)

Anthropology Art

French

Physics

German

Political Science

B iology

Hl.story

Psychology

Chemistry

Journalism

Sc ien e

Drama

latill

Social Studies

Earth Sciences

Economics

Ma themat ics Music

English

Norwegian

Special Education

Physical Education

Speech

y Socio log S pa n ish

Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education (B.A.P-E.) Physical Ed ucation Bachelor of Arts in Recreation (B.A.Rec.) Recreation

Bachelor of Business Administra tion (B.BoA.) Concen trations in: Finandal lkource Management

Marketi ng Resource Managemen t Entrepreneurship and

New

Ve ntur Management

internation al B u:; i ness

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Art Commun ication

(Broadcasting, Theatre)

B.chelor of Music (B.M.) Pian

Instrumental

Organ

Composition

Voice Bachelor of Music EdUQltiOD (B.M.E.) K- I l Choral K-12 Instrumenta! (Band)

K - 1 2 In tru menla l (Or hemal

Bachelor of Musical Arts (B.M.A.) MusIC Bachelor of Science in Nursing (U.S.N.) NUrsing

Bachelor of Scieuce in Physical Education (B. S.P.E.) Concentrarions in: Exerdse Health

Scien e and Fitness Management

Pre-therapy

Complementary Majors Environmental Studies GLobal

Studies

Women's Studies

Physic-al

Aquatics

Literotllre

PublisiJing mId Pritl ting Arts

Communication omputer Science

Economi s E d uca tion Cross Discip lina ry Special Educa tioll

Engli h as a Second

age

age

tudies

Environmental French

o

Dance Exercise Science Health Health and Fitness

English as a Secon d Lan

ducauon

Coaching

l'vfarragement Recreation

"" 11\

> Z o

Spo rts Ailministration

Geosciences German

Physics

Global Studies

Political Science

Greek

P ycholo gy

History

Public Affairs Science

Information

Religion

z o "" 11\

Instructional Techn logy So iology S panish

Latin

Sp cial Education

Legal Studie Instrlleriollal Technolugy Mathematics Rea di ".'! Music Non cgian Specirli Educatioll Electrical "Enginee.ring Ph ilosophy

Bachelor of Arts in Education (B.A.E.)

Profe�sional Accounting Human Resource Management

Chern" try

Lan

E ngl ish

Writillg

Swdies Early hildhood

Music

Geosciences

English/Language Arts

Bi o logy

French

BameLor of Science (B.S.) Applied Physics B io lo g y

Majors in:

Arl

Bus iness

tudie

CritiCtlI CQmmrmicatiOIl

Anthropology

Political S ience

Chinese Studies

Classics Communication

Norwegian

( Non-Teaching) Statistics Theatre

Women' Studies

COURSE NUMBERINGS 100-299 Lower-Division Courses: O p e n to freshmen and soph om ore unless oth e nvise restricted. 300-499 Upper-Division Calmes: Generally open to juniors and

se. niors unless otherwise specified: ' Also open to gra d uate students. and may be considered p ar t of a grad ua te p rogra m pr Ovi de d t hey are not specific requ irem en ts in pre p ara ti o n for graduate s tud y. 500-599 Grade/ate Courses: Normally open to graduate students onl y. If, during the last semester of the senior year, a candidate for a baccalaureate degree finds it p ssibl to co mp l ete all degree requirements with a registration of fewer th a n I semester hours of undergraduate credit, registration for g rad u ate cred it is permissible, However, the toral registration for undergraduate requirements and el e ct ive graduate credit shall no t exceed 1 6 semester hours during the emester. A mem randum stating t h a t all baccalaurea te requirements are being met during the current se mester must be signed by the a p p ro p ria te department chair or school dean and pre "eo ted to the dean of graduate studies at the time of such registration. This registration d es not apply toward a higher degree unless it is later a pp roved by the student's a dviser and/or advisory committee.

"NaTE: Lower-division .tudents may enroll in u.pper-division cOllrses

ifprerequisites have been rna.

COURSE OFFERINGS Most listed courses are offered every year. A system of al ter n a t i ng upper-division courses is practiced in som departments, t he reby assuring a broader curriculum. The university reserves the right to modify specific course requirements, 10 discontinue lasses in which the registration is rega rd ed as insuffiC ient, and Lo withdraw courses. EXPLANATION OF SYMBOLS Most co urse s have the value of 4 semes ter hours, Parenth tical numbers immed i at ely after the course descriptions indicate the semester hour c red it given. Other symbols are explained as follows: I n I, II 1n J S

Cou rse offered first semester Co urse offered second semester Course offered first and second semester ill seq uence

Course offered either semester Co urse offered in the Ja nuary term

Course offered in the Slimmer

aly Co urse (Jffered ill alternate years al s Course offered in alternate summers

Course may be used hi graduate p rogra ms

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The Americas

« u II: III

Anthropology

This in terdisciplinary minor focuses on the comparative h is to r ie s, cultures, and contemporary issues hared by the two con tine nts in the Western H e m is phe re . In in teg rat in g selected infor ma tion about the United St ates, it reflects the reality that this country is an integral part of the cul tural ly diverse and increasingly interconnected contemporary world. FACULTYI Gro sven o r, Program Adviser; Ahn a , Brown, B rusco, Carp, Dwyer- Sh ick. KeUeher, Killen, Klein, Marc us, Predmore,

III

Rowe, Templ e-Thurston, T. Williams.

MINOR: The minor co ns i st s of 20 hour ', i nc l udin g o ne re q uired and four elective courses completed with a grad e of C or hi g he r. Students also must take the Compo s it i n and Conversati n course, or its equival e n t , in a language spoken in the Americas other than their native lan guage. Participation in a rele vant off campus program is highly recommended. Students m ay n t app ly more than one 4 credit c ou rs e in the minor to fulfill any other requ irement, s uc h as general un iversity core, maj or, or minor requirements.

all of the world's people into human fo cus . Though anthropology

Anthropology as a d iscipline tries to b ri ng

does look at "stones an d bones," it also examines the poli­ tic , medicines, families, arts, and re li gio ns of peoples and

cult u res in various places and times. This m akes the s t ud y

of anthropology a complex task, for it involves aspects of many disciplines, from geology and biology to art and psychology. Anthropology is co m p ose d of four fields. Cultural or social anthropology stu d i es living human cultures in order to create a cross-cultural under tanding of human b eh avi o r. Archaeology has the same goal, but use data from the physical remains of the past cultures to reach it. Li ng uistic an t h ro po logy studies human l ang uage . Physical anthropology studies the emergence and subsequent bio­ logical adaptations of humanity as a sp ecies. FACUIIY: Huelsbeck, C/Juir; Brusco, Gargan -Ray, Guldin, H as ty, Klein; ass is ted by Stoner.

BACBEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hours.

REQUIRED COURSE: Political Scien ce 282 - Introduction to the Am er icas

ELECTIVE COURSES: Students must choose at least o ne course with N or th American content as the primary empbasi , and one course with Central or

South American c o n tent as the p rima ry emphasis. An thro po logy 336 - Peoples of Latin America An thro p olo gy 330 - Cultures and Peoples of Native North Ame ric a Anth rop ol og y 334 - The An thr op ol og y of Contemporary

Required: 10 2, 103, 480, 490. Choose: 1 0 1 or 104; four hours from 330-345 ( p eop l es courses ) ; four bo u rs from 350-465 ( to p ics courses); eight a ddi t i onal bours in an th ropo l ogy, at least four of w h i ch must be above 32 l.

MINOR: 20 semester ho urs .

Required: 1 02. Choose: 1 0 1 or 103 or 1 04; fo ur hours from courses lis ted 330--345; four h o ur from 350-490; and four additional hours in anthropology. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recog ni tion of o utstan di n g work, the designation with Departmental Honors m ay be g r anted by vote of the anthropulogy fa c ulty based on the student's per­ fo rma n ce in the fo Howi ng a reas:

America Business 490 - International Business: Modern Latin America Communi ation 33 7 - New Me dia of the Western He misphere E ngl i sh 232 - W m e n s Literature: Women Wr iters of the

1 . Anth ro po lo gy course work: 3.5 m ini mum g.p.a. 2. Demonstrati n of act ive inter ,t in anthro pol o gic al projects and a ctivities o ut si de of class work. 3. Completion of a senior thesis. A paper descr ibing indepen­ de nt research mu st be c onduc ted under the s u pe r vi sio n of dep ar t m ental fa cult y. A p rop osal must be app roved by the faculty by the third week of class o f the fall semester for May and summer graduates, and the th i rd week of class of the spring s em es te r fo r D e ce mbe r gr ad u tes.

Amer i c as French 34 1 - French Literature and Film of the Americas Hi s tory 220 - M odem Latin American H is to ry Hi 'tory 305 - S l avery in the Am ericas H i s to ry 335 - Latirl American History: Cen t ral America and th e Ca ri bb ea n Hist ry 337 - The His t or y of Mexico History 344 - The Andes in Latin Ameri an History Pol itical S c i e nc e 3 7 - Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Rel i gio n 227 - Ch ri st ian Th eolo gy : Liberatio n Theology, Q[ Religion 334 - Theological Studies: Liberation Th eolo gy Relig io n 36 1 - Ch urch Hist )ry S tu dies : Canada, latin Am ericas, and the United States S pa ni sh 322 - Latin American Civilization and Culture Spanish 34 1 - Latino Exper ience s in tb United States Spanish 43 1 - Latin Am e rican Literature, 1 492- 1888 Spanish 4 2 - Twentieth Ce ntury Latin American Literature S pa nish 433 - Special Top ic s iII Latin American Literature and Cultu re

Course Offerings 101 Intl'oductioD to HWIllUI Biological Diversity Introduction to biolo gi cal anthro p olo g y with a s p e c ia l focus on human evol ution, the fossil evidence for human d veloprnent , the

role of culture in human evolution, and a comparison with (4)

the devel pment and social life of the non-human pr im a tes.

102 Introduction to HWIllUI Cultural Diversity Intr d uc t i o n to social-cultural anthrop ology, concentrating o n the expl ratio n of the infinite variety o f human e n deavo r in all aspects of culture and all typ es of societies; rel ig i on, p oli tics, law, kinship and ar t. Fulfills c ro ss-cu lt u ral line in the Perspectives on Dive rs i ty re qu i re me nt . (4) 103 lotrodoction to Archaeology and WOI'ld Prehistory In troduction

to the id ea s and practi ce of arc h a eO l ogy used to

examine the sweep of h um a n prehistory fro m the ea rl i e s t stone tool s to the develop me n t o f agri cu lture and m etallu rg y and to en ri ch our understanding of extinct s u c ie tie s . (4)

30

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104 Introduction to Language in Society I ntroduction to antbropo logical linguistics a nd symbolism, inc lu din g the origin of l anguage; sound systems. structure and meaning; la n gua ge acquisition; the social context of speaking; lan guage challge; no nver bal communication; and sex differences in language use. (4) 192 Practiclng Anthropology: MaJcah Culture Past and Praent

tudy of Makah Culture through archaeology a nd history nd by interacting with the Makah. Active an d s ervice l ea rning in Nea b Bay, visiting the Makah Nation. Consent of instru c tor required. Ful1il1s fre h man January Term req uirement and the altemative line in the Persp e c t i ves on D iversity

requirement. (4)

the lifeways of Eastern European Ash kenazi c Jews and its transformation in the United States. Emphas is on Jewish history. religion , literature, music. and humor as reflections of basic Jewish cultural themes. Fulfills alternative line in the Perspectives on Diversity requ irement. (4)

340 Anthropology of Africa Study of Africa's diverse cultu res. FOCl.l on early stu d ies of vil lages and topi such as kinship, religion, and social stru cture. and on more recent tudies of urban centers, the impact of co l onialism, popular culture, and post- co l onial politics. (4) 343 Bast Asian Cultures

Ful fills cross-cultural li ne in the Persp ective s on Diversity re­ q uirement . ( Cross-referenced with HIST 2 1 0 and POLS 2 10 ) (4)

A survey of th c ultures and peop l es of Eastern Asia, concenl rat ­ ing on Ch i na but with compar ati ve reference to Japan, Korea, and V i etnam. Cultural simila ritie as well as differences between these nations are stressed. Topics include religion, art. politics, hi story, kinship. and economics. Fulfills cross- c u ltu ral line in the Perspec ti ves on Diver·ity req u iren1 ('n 1. (4)

220 Peoples of the World

345 Contemporary China

Exp lora tion of the world's c u ltures th ro ugh anthropolo gical film . novel , and eyewitness acc un ts. Case studies chosen from

Africa, Native America, Asia, the Pac .ifi c , and Euro-America provide an insider's view of ways of life different from our OWD.

(2)

An i m mersion into the culture and society of the People's Republ ic of Chi na; contemporary po litics, ki ship, folk religi on, human relat i ons ; problems and prosp ects of develop ment and rapid social change. Fulfills cross-cultural Line in the Perspectives on Diversit y requirement. (4)

225 Past Cultures o f Washington Slate

350 Women and Men in World Cultures

Native Americans have lived in Washing ton State for at least the last 12,000 years. Cultu re s of the peop l e in coastal and int erior Wash ington beginning with tbe firs t northwesterners. An exami­ nation of the ways that cultures cha nge thro ugh time un t il the emergence of the distinctive cultures observed by the earliest European visitors to the area . (2)

An overview o f t he variation f ex roles and behaviors t hro u gh­ out the world; theor ·e f m atriarchy, pa t ria rchy, mother goddesses, innate inequ alities; marri age patterns, impact of Euro pea n p ttems; egalitarianism to femi nism. Ful fills cross­ cultura l line in the Pe rsp ec tives on Diversi ty requ i r men t. (4)

230 Peoples o f the Northwest Coast

Explora tion s of how soc ietie s ill North America and around the world have a dapted to thei r varied human a nd physical environ­ ments. Cases drawn from widely difference environmen ts. Global pa tterns of variat ion in life tyl es and s cial opportunities.

210 Global Perspectives: The WOTld in Change A survey of global issues: moderniz.ation and deve lop men t; economic ange an d international trade; di mi nis hing resources; war and re olution ; peace and justic e; and cultural dive rsity.

......

338 Jewish Culture An exploration of American Jewish culture through its roots in

A sur vey of the ways of li fe of the n ative peopl e s of coas tal Wash­ ington. Br i tish Columbia. and Southeastern Alaska fro m Euro­ pean contact to contemporary times, including t radi tional meth­ ods of fishing, arts, p otlatches, status systems. and wealth and their impact on the modern life of the regi n . Fulfills one -h a lf of the altemativ line in the Perspectives on Diverity requirement.

(2)

330 Cultures and Peoples of Native North America A c omparative study of Native North American cultures from their arrival on the continent through to day. Examinati n of u.S. and Canadian laws, policies, and conflicts, issues of sov ereignty, and r Ug i o us ri gh ts. Fulfills alternative line in the Perspectives on D ivers ity requirement. (4)

332 Prehistory o f North America

An archaeological reconstru ct ion of econom i c, social, political, and religio us life in North America from the time the first se ttl ers entered lhe continent dur i n g the Ice Ag ' to the MOWld Builders of late r times and ultim a tely to the fIrst contact with European settle r . (4)

334 The Anthropology o f Contemporary America An invest i gat ion of Amer i ca n so cia l pattern and probl ems

designed to give insight from a cross-cultural perspec tive; exploration of Am erican solutions to common hu man problems;

355 Anthropology and Media Ex p lorat ion of mass media produced and consu med in diverse c ult ural contexts. Exa mi nation of how mass media cultivate forms of gendered, ethnic, reIigiou , a nd racial identities. and how different forms of med ia engage with the dynamic forces of p opular cul t ure and the poLitical agendas f stales and political opposition groups. (4)

360 Ethnic Groups Examines the n ature

f ethnic groups in Ame.rica and ab road ;

th varying bases of et h nicity ( culture, religion, tribe. "race." etc.) ; p roble ms of group identity and boundary ma .intenance; ethnic symbols; ethnic pol it ics ; ethnic neighborhoods; and ethn i c humor. Fulfills alternative line in the Perspectives on D ive.rsity r quirement. (4)

361 Managing Cultural Diversity

Practical guidelines on h ow to approach people of other cultures with sensitivity and empathy and with an eye toward mutually

Millions

365 Prehistoric Environment and Technology: Lab Methods in Archaeology Laboratory interpretation of archaeo l ogical mater i als. Tech­ ni ques used in interpreting past human eco l ogy, technology, and

f Americans have never been north of the equator.

Cl -<

Kn owledge of locations and map reading will be empbasized. Prerequisite: 1 02 or consent of instructo r. (4)

rewa rding intera ct i on. Learn bow to avoid negat ive at t it udes towa rd c ultural diversiLY and develop a posi tive curi sity about the gl bal d ivers i ty representfd in workplaces. chool s, and n eig h bo rhood s . (2)

Who are these "other" Americans? This su rvey course familiar­ izes the student with a broad range of Latin Am erican p e oples and problems. Topics range from visions of the sup e rn a tu ra l to problems of economic deve lopm ent. Fulfills cro ss- cult ural line in the Perspe ct ive s on Diver sity r eq uirem e nt . (4)

o

354 Geography and World Cultures: People, Places and Prospects

a determination of what is uniqu e about the "American Way." Fulfills altern at ive line in the Perspect ives on Dive rsi ty require­ ment. (4)

336 Peoples of Latin America

o ,...

econom . An alyt ica l p rocedures for bone, stone, ceramic, and

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metal artifacts; a n alys is of debri fro m food processing activit ies. Analysi s of m terials from archaeological si tes . (4)

Th� Archaeology of AncieDt Empires The origi ns of agricult ure, writing, cities, and the state in many parts of the wo rld, co m pa ring and contrasting the great civilizations of antiquity, induding Mesopotamia, Egy pt , India, Asia, Mesoamerica, and South America. Fulfills cross-cultural line in the Perspectives on Diversity requir em e nt . (4) 370

In this t i m e of rapidly changing concepts and an al most daily emergence of new media, e mph asis must be pla ced on a variety of experiences and creative flexibili ty for the artist and the des igne r. St udents with cer ns

375 Law, Politia, and Revolutioo A study of politics and law th ro ugh the poli ti ca l structures and pro cesses of traditional and contemporary societies; c ncepts of leader�bip, factionalism and feuds, power, authority, revol utio n, and o ther reacti ns to colonization; law and conflict resolution; conllicts of n at i nal , nd local-level I gal syst e m . FuLfills cross­ cultural Line in the Perspectives on Diversi ty requirement. (4) 380

Art

p ofessioDal COA­

must be prepar ed to meet the modern worl d with

both technical skills and the c apa city for innovation. The depart men t's program therefore stresses ul dividualized d evel opme nt i n the use of mind and hand. Studen may choose among a generalized program

l ea din g to a Bachel r of Arts degree; a more specialized program fo r the Bachelor of Fine Arts, in whi ch each

SicJmess, Madness, and Health

A cross-cultural exami na t io n of systems of curing prac tic es and

cultural views of physic a l and mental hea lth ; prevent io n and healing; nature and skills of curers; definitions of disease; variation in diseases; im p a ct of m dem medical lld psychologi­ ca l practitioners. Fulfills cross-cultural line in the Perspectives on Divers i ty requ i reme n t. (4) 385 Marriage, Family, and Kinship Explores the nature of domestic groups cross-culturally, including the ways in which religion , myth, magic and fo lore serve [0 articulate and control domestic Life; how changing systems of production affect m a rr i age and domestic forms; and how class and gender system s intertwin w i th kinship, d me s t i c forms, and the meaning of "family." (4)

388 Applied Anthropology Exploration of the uses of the ant h ro p olo gi cal a ppr oach to improve human condition . Focus on anthropologists' involve­ ment and role in applied projects. Review of th retical, ethical,

and pr a cti ca l i sues. Field component. (4)

392 Gods, Magic, and Morals Anthropology of rel igi o n ; hu manity's concep ts of and relation­ s hips to the su p ern a tural ; exanlina Lio n of p e rson a l and gro up functions that religions fulfill; exp l ora t ion of re lig i o n s both

"primitive" and historical; origins of religion. (Cross-referenced with RELI 3 92 ) Fulfills cross-cultural line in the Perspectives on Diver ity requirement. (4) 46 5 Archaeology: The Field Experience A field cia s involving the cavation of a historic or pr e h is toric archaeological site, with emp hasis n basic excavation kills and record ke p i n g, field mapping, drafting, and photography. The la bo r ator y covers artifact processing and preliminary a n a l ys is. Prerequisite: Consent of i nst r uct o L ( 1-8)

Anthropological Inquiry Historic and thematic study of the t heo r tical foundations of sociocu.ltural anthropology; researc1 methods; how theory and methods are used to establish anthropological knowledge. Required of major in their junior or senior year. (4)

480

FACUIIY: Hallam, Chair; Cox, Geller, Gold, Keyes, Tomsi

.

491

The department has so ught to minimize prerequisites, enabling students to ele ct courses relating to their interests as early as possible, but maj o rs ar urged to follow co urse equences clo s e ly, It is recommended that students interested in maj ring in art declare their major earl)' to insure proper ad vi sing . Transfer students' status sball be determined at their tim of entrance. The department reserve s the right tu re t ain , exh ibit, and reproduce stud ent work s ubmi tted for credit in any of it co urses or programs, induding the senior exhibiti n. A use or materials fe e is requ ired in c rtain courses.

492 Independent Study: Uoderp-sduate Fieldwork Study of sp eci fi c area or issues in ant h rop ol ogy t h rough field methods of analysis and research s up p o r ted by appropriate reading un d er s upe r visi on f a faculty me m ber. Prerequisite: departmental consent. ( 1-4 )

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 34 emester hours, inc lud i ng 1 60. 250, 230 or 350, 365, 370, 490, and the a rt history sequence ( / 80, 1 8 L , 380); 1 1 6 or cuurses in teaching methods may not be applied to the major. A m ax im u m of 40 hours way be app li e d toward the degree. Candidates are registered in the C olleg of Arts a n d Sciences and must satisfy general university requirements, i n c l uding a core curriculum (Core I or Core lI), and the option requirement.

490 Seminar in Anthropology Examine anthropological methods and app ly anthropologi al th eo ry to a n investigalion of a selected topic in con temp rary anthrop logy. Required of majors in their junior or se nio r year. Prerequi ite for other students: d pa rtm e nta l approval. (4)

Independent Study: Undergraduate R�adings Reading in specific areas or issues of anthropology under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental consent. (1-4)

32

candidate develops some area of competence; or a degree program i n art educat ion for teaching 011 several levels. Some stude nts go directly from the un iversity into their field of interest. Other find it desirable and ap p ro priate to attend a gr aduat e 'choot Many alumni have been accepted into prestigious gra dua te program , both in this co un try and abroad. The various fields of art are co m pet it ive and demanding in terms of commitment and effort. Nonetheless, there is always a place for those who are extremely skillfu l or highly imaginative or, i deally, both. The department's program stresses both, attempt ing to help each student reach that ideal . Instructional resources , when coupled with dedicated and energetic students, have resulted in an unusually high percentage of graduates being able to satisfy their vocational object ives .

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BACBEWR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 60 emester hours, i n cludi ng 1 60; 226; either 230 or 250; the art h i stor y sequence ( 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380) ; 8 additional ho urs in 2-dimensional

media, 8 additional hours in 3 -d im e ns i ona l media, and 4 bours in art history or theory (390, or as app roved by the departm ent faculty); requirements and eIective.s in area of empha sis; and 490 (senior exhibition). 1 16 or courses in tea ch ing methods may not be include Candidates are registered in the Scho I of the Arts a nd must satisfy- general university requirements, including a core curriculum (Core I r Core 0) . B.FA. m 2-DimensionaI Media

Areas of emphasis: a minimum of three course s required i n one area.

Drawing/Pai1l ting: 365 Painting I 1 60 D rawing 465 Painti ng II (R) 260 Intermediate Drawing 360 Life Drawing (R) Printmaking: 370 Printmaking I 470 Printmaking n ( R) Film Art$: 226 Black and White Photography 326 Color Photography 426 Electronic Imaging Independent Swdy (may be applied to any area): 49 1 Speci al Projects (R) 499 Studio Proj ec ts ( R) ( R)-may be repeated for credit

STUDIO

160 1 96 226 230 250 260 296 326 330 341 350 360 365 370 396 398 426 430 465 470 490 491 492 496 499

Drawing D esign I: Fundamentals Black and White Phot ography CenunJcs I Sculpture I Intermediate Drawing Design D: C o ncepts Color Photography Ceram.ics n Elementary Art Edu.cati on Scu.lpture n Life Drawing Painting I Printmaking I Design: Graphics 1 Drawing: D1u.stration Electronic Imaging CeramIcs ill Painting D Printmaking n Senior Eshibiti on Spedal Projects/Independent Study Design: Workshop Design: Graphics n Shldlo Projec:ts/Independent Shldy

mSTORY AND THEORY

B.RA. in 3-Dimensional Media

Areas of emphasis: a minimu m of three courses required in one area .

Ceramics: 230 Ceramics I

330 Ceramics I1 430 Ceramics ill (R) Sculpture: 250 Sculprure r 350 Sculpture II (R) Indepertderll Study (may be applied t o any area): 491 Special P rojects (R) 499 Studio Projects ( R) ( R)-may be repeated for credit

1 1 6 Design in the Contemp orary WorJd 1 80 History of Weatem Art I 1 8 1 History of Western Art n 380 Modern Art 390 Studies iD Art History 440 Seminar m Art Education 497 Research in Art HIstory-Th e ory 1 1 6 Design in the Contemporary World An examination of contem p orar y design with a focus 011 tre nds in advertising, fashi on, automotive, product and i nterior design. Includes a ection on coL or theory and perception and the basic elements of d esign. Require no artistic/design background. (4) 160 Drawing

A course dealing with the basic techniques and media of drawing. (4)

B.FA. in Design

Required basic sequence: 1 96 Design I: Fundamentals 296 Design I: Concep ts Elective courses: 398 Drawing: illustration ( ) 49 Design : Graphics n

Course Offe rings

396

esign: Graphics I

492 De ign: Workshop

(R)- may be rep eated for cred it

BACHELOR OF A.KI'S IN EDUCATION: See School of Education. MINOR IN STUDIO ART: 20 seme ter hours, including 380,

4 ho ur in 2 -dimensional m edia , 4 hours in 3 -d imensi ona l media, and 8 hours of studio art electives d rawn from upper division courses. Courses in teaching method.s (34 1 , 440) may not be app lied to the minor.

24 erne ter bours, including 1 80 and 1 8 1 . 1 2 hours in art history/theory electives, and 4 hours in MINOR IN ART HISTORY:

studio electives. Non- concentration courses ( 1 16), practical design courses ( 196, 296, 396, 398, 492, 496) , and course s in teaching method.s (341 440) may not be app l ied to the mino r. PUBUSBlNG AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR: The Publi hing and Printing Arts minor is cross-referenced with the Department of English. Sec the descrip t ion of that minor under English.

180 BJstory of Western Art I A survey tra cing the deve lop me nt of Western art and archi te c ­ ture from prehi t ry t the end of th e Middle Ages. (4) 1 8 1 History o f Western Art 11

A survey of Western a rt and archi tec ture from th e Renaissance to the 20th ce nt u ry. (4) 196 D e�jgn I : Fundamentals An introduction to des ign dlfough the study of basic techniques, color theory, and comp sition. (4) 226

Black and White Photograpby

A studio class in photography a s an art form. Primary concen tra tion in basic camera and darkr om techniques. Students pr duce a portfolio of prin w i th an emphasis on creative exp ressi on and experimentation. (4) ­

230 Ceramics I Ceramic materials and techniques including hand-built and

wheel-thrown meth ds, clay and gl aze forma tion. Includes a s urvey of ceramic art. (4)

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ISO, 350 Sculpture I, II Concen tration on a p a rtic u lar medium of sculptrne including me tals., wood, or synthetics; speciaJ section s e mph asizin g work from the human form well as opportunity for mold makin g and casting. 250 must be taken before 3 50; 350 may be t aken twice. (4,4)

the ethical issues of this new technology. Emphasis on creative exp l ora t io n and prob le m solving within the Macintosh environ­ m e nt . P rerequi s i tes: 226 and 326 or consent of i ns tructor. May be taken tw i ce . (4)

260 Intermediate Drawing Drawing taken b eyon d the basics of 1 60. Exp ansi o n of me dia forms, and solutions to co mposition al problems. Poss ibil i ty o f prnsuing special i ndividual interests, with p e rmiss io n. Prerequi­ site: 1 60 or consent of instructor. (4)

440 Seminar in Art Education A s t ud y of i nst ru c ti o n in the seco ndary schooL ind u d ing ap p rop r i ate media and curriculum development. a/y (2)

430 Ceramics m (See 330)

465 Painting n

296 Design II: Conupts An investigation of the process of creative problem solving in a methodical and orga nized manner. I ncludes p roj ec ts in a variety of d es ign areas. P re requi s ite: 1 96 or consent f in st r ucto r. (4) 326 Color Pholography Expl or a tion of the i s s ues of both pain ters and photographers. Students learn to make color prints and process color n e g at ive s. In cl udes a histor ical survey of co l o r ph o tography as well as pers p e c tives of contemporary artists. (4) 330, 430 Ceramics II, ill Techniques in ceramic construction and exp e ri m ents in glaze fonn ati o n. 330 must be taken befOIe 430; 430 may be taken twice. P re req ui s i t e: 230. (4,4)

341 mementary Art Education

A s t udy of creative growth and developm Dt; art as tudio

492 Design: Workshop A t u to rial course which m ay deal with any of several a s p ec ts of the design field with particular emphasis on practical experience and buil ding a portfolio. May be t ake n twice. ( 2 )

projects; history and the rapy in the classroom. (2)

350 Sculpture II (See 250) 360 ute Drawing An exp lora t io n of IlUman form in d rawi n g media. May be repeated for credit. P re requ isi te: 1 60 r c o n se n t of instructor. (2)

365, 465 Painting I , n Media and techniques of painting in oil or crylics. 365 must be taken before 465; 465 may be taken t'.vice. Prerequ:isite: 1 60. (4,4)

370. 470 Prlntmakiog I, n Methods and media of fine art pr in tma king; both hand and photo processes involving litbogra p h ics , intagli and creen printing. 370 must be taken before 470; 470 may be taken twice. Prerequisite: 1 60 or co n ent of instruct r. (4,4) 380 Modern Art The develop men t of art from 1 900 to the present, with a brief 10 k at European and American ant cedents as th y apply to co ntemp o r ary directions. (4) 390 Studies in Art History A selected area of inquiry, ·uch as a history of American art, Asian art, the work of P i c a sso , or similar to p ics . May be r ep ea ted for c red it . (4) 396, 496 Dell ign: GrapbJcs I, n Design and execution of pr inted materials; emphasis on te ch n i c al p ro c ed ures and problems in mass communication. 496 explores a dvan ced t e ch n iq ues with multiple color, typ og r aphy, and othe r complex pro bl ems. 396 must be taken before 496. Prerequisite: 1 60 and 296 or consen t of in s tru ctor. (4,4) 398 Drawin� D1ustratioD Advanced projects in drawing/illustration. Exposure to new con­ cepts and te ch ni ques adaptable t fin art and commercial appli­ cations. Pre requisites : 1 0 and 1 96. May be repeated once. (4) 426 mectrooic Imaging An i n t ro du ctio n to comput r-assisted photography in which stu­ dents learn applications, develop aesthetic strategi es, and engage

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490 Senior Exhibition Students work cl os ely with their a dvis e rs in all phases of the p rep a r a tion of the exhibition. Must be taken in the st u den t 's fInal semester. P rereq ui s ites : declared major in art (B.F.A. or B.A . ) , sen io r status, reasonable expectation of com pl et i o n of all d ep a rtm ent a nd u niver si ty req u i rem e n ts for gr adua t io n . Meets the s e n i or seminar/ project req u i rem e nt. (2) 491 Special ProJectsflndependent Study Expl orat ion of the pos sibil ities of selected studio areas, including exp e rim e ntal techniques. Emphasis on develop m en t of indi­ vid ua l s t yles, media approaches, and p robl em solutions. May be rep eat ed for cred i t. Prerequisites: junior s tatus , m i nimum of two courses at 200 level or above in affected m ed i u m with minimum 2.5 GPA, consent of instructor and department chair. (2 or 4)

331 The Art of the Book I See Engl i sh 3 1 3. (4)

34

(See 365)

470 Prinboaking n ( S ee 370)

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496 Design: Graphics II (See 396) 497 Research in Art History-Tbeory A tutorial course for major s tuden ts with research into a par tic ular aspect of art h i sto r y or theory. May be rep ea t e d for credit. Prerequisites: senior status, consent of instructor, and program a p p roval by dep a rtm en t faculty. ( 1-4) 499 Studio ProjectslIndependent Study A tutorial program for students of except ional talent. I n - dep th individual investigation o f a p ar t i c ul ar medium or set of techni­ c al p ro blem s . Only on project per emest er may be undertaken. May be rep ated for cred i t . Prerequisites: declared major in art, senior status, consent of instructor, written p ropo sa l , program approval by departme n t fac u lty. Students meeting the above requirements but with l ess than a 3.0 GPA in the major may be requir d to present additi nal evidence of el ig i bi l i ty. ( l-4)


School of the Arts

Biology

The School of the Art is a community of artists and schol­ - students, faculty, and staff - dedicated to the fuI­ fillme n of the human spirit through creative expre sion and careful cholarship. The School of the Arts offers pro­ fessional education to artists and communicators within the framework of a liberal arts education. The Scho I en­ courages all of its members to pursue their artistic and scholarly work in an environment that challenges compla­ cency, nurture personal growth, and maintains a strong culture of coUegial i n tegrity. Members of the Scho I of the Arts strive to create art and cholarship that acknowledges the past, defines the present, and anticipates the future. Art, ommunication, music, and theatre are mediums of understanding and change which reward those who participate in them, whether as artist, scholar, leamer, or audience. Perfor­ mances by students, faculty, and guests of the School en­ hance the cultural prosperity hared by Pacific Lutheran University and its surrounding environs. The School pro­ motes venues for collaboration between artists and chol­ ars, among artistic and intellectual media, and between the university and the community.

To learn biology is more than to learn facts: it is to learn how to ask and answer questions, how to develop strategies which migh be employed to obtain an wers, and how to recognize and evaluate the answers which emerge. The department is therefore dedicated to enco uraging students to learn science in the only way that it can be effectively made a part of their thinking: to independently question it, probe it, try it out, experi ment with it, experience it. The diversity of courses in the curriculum provides broad coverage of contemporary biology and aUows flexible planning. Each bioi gy maj or completes a three­ cour e sequence in the principles of biology. Planning with a faculty adviser, the student chooses upper division biology courses to meet individual needs and career objectives. Faculty members are also committed to helping students investigate career opportunities and pursue career which most clearly match th ir interests and abilities. Students are invited to use departmen tal facili t ies for independent study and are encouraged to p a rtic i pate in ongoing faculty research.

ars

FACUlTY: Spicer, Dean; faculty members f th Depar tments of

ElLard-lvey, Garrigan, Gee, Gregory, Hansen, Lennn, Main, D.J. Martin, Matthias McGinnis. BACBBLOR OF ARTS or BACBBLOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR.:

DEGREES OFFERED by the School of the A rts include the B.F.A_ ( Bachelor of Fine Arts) in art a.nd communication and theatr e; the B.M. (Bachelor of Music) , the BMA ( Bachelor of

The major in biol o gy i designed to be flexible in me eti ng the needs and sp ecial interests of students. S ever al options for major programs are avail able. In e ach plan III student must take the principles of biology sequence ( 1 6 1 , 162, 323). Completion of this sequence (or an equ ivalen t gen er al b i o l o gy sequence at anoth e r institution) is requ i red before upper division bi ology courses can be taken. lt is expected that these courses will have been completed with a grade of C- or bigher. Cowses not designed for biology majors ( I l l , 1 1 2, 2 0 1 , 205, 206) o rdina rily cannot be used to satisfy major requirements un l ess those cowses are taken before completion o f Biology 1 6 1 ; under no circumstances can more than 8 h o ws from courses de s i gned for no n - majors be counted toward completion of major require­ ments. Independent s tudy (49 1 , 492, 495) and cooperative education may be used for no more than six of the upper division biology hours re qui red for the B.S. degree, and for no more than four of the upper division biology hours required for the B.A. degree. At least 12 hOlUS in bi ology must be earned in resid ence at PLU. Each student must con ult with a biology adviser to discuss selection of electives app ropri ate for educa­ tional and career goals. Basic requirements unde r each plan fo r the major are listed below.

den ts may also earn the BA ( B achelor of Arts), but this deg ree is

awarded through th.e College of Arts and ciences. Candidates for all degree ' must meet general u n ivers ity requ irem .ots and

th e specific requirements of the Departments of Art, Commun.i­ cation and Thea tre , or Music. For details about the BAE. ( Bachel or of Arts in Education) io art, communication and theatre, or music, see the School of

Edllcatioll.

For course offerings, degree requirements, and programs in

the School of the Arts, see Art, Communication and Music.

and Theatre.

Course Offe ring 341 Integrating Art! in the Clusroom Methods and procedures for integrating the art ( music, visual, drama, da nce ) in the classr oo m and across th e curriculum. Of­ fered for students preparing for elementary classroom tea ch i ng . Meets state certification requirements in both music and art II

(2)

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FACUU'Y: Carlson, Chair; Alexander, Crayton, Dolan,

Art, Communication and Theatre, and Music.

Musical Arts); the B.M.E. ( Bachelor of Music Education) . Stu­

o

Plan I-Bachelor of Arts: 34 sem es t er hours in biology, includ ­ ing 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323, and 490, p lus 20 additional hours. Required supporting courses: Ch em istry 1 05 or Chemis try 1 20 (or 125) and M a th 1 40. Recommended supporting courses: Physics 1 25 (with laboratory 1 35) and Physics 1 26 (with l aboratory 1 36). Plan U-Bachelor of Arts-Comprehensive: 38 emester ho urs in biology, including I 1 , 1 62, 323, and 490, plus 24 additional hours. Required supp rting co urses : Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25) and Math 1 40. Re com m ended s up po r ti ng courses: Chemistry 232 (with laboratory 234 ); Phys ics 1 25 (with laboratory 135) and Physics 1 26 (with laboratory 136). Plan m-Bachelor o f Art...chemistry Emphasis: 30 semester hours in biology, including 1 6 1 , 1 6 2 , 3 2 3 , and 490, p l us 1 6 additional ho urs . Req ui red sup p o r ting courses: Chem istry 120 (or 125), Chemistry 232 (with la bora to r y 234) , Chem i s try 332 (with laboratory 334), and either Chemistry 338 or Chenlistry

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o II)

403; Math 1 40. Recommended suppor tin g courses: Physics 1 25 ( with lab oratory 1 35) and Physics 1 26 ( wi th laborat ry 136).

plant devel pment. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: 1 6 1 . n (4)

Plan IV-Bachdor of Science; 42 semester hours in biology,

201 Introductory Microbiology

includin g 1 6 1 , 162, 323, and 490, plus 2 8 additional ho urs. Required s upp o rt i ng courses: Chemistry 1 20 (or i 25) and Chemistry 232 (with I borat ry 234); Math l S I ; P hy ics 1 25 (with la bora to ry 1 35) and P hysics 1 26 (with l aboratory 1 3 6 ) , o r Physics 1 53 (with l aboratory 163) and Physics 1 54 (with laboratory 164).

The structnre, me taboti m, growth, and genetics of microorgan­ isms, especially bacteria and viruses, with emphasis o n their roles

vertebrates as model systems, plu an introduction to anima] and

in huma n disease. Laboratory focuses on cultivatiol1, identifica­ tion, and control of growth of bacteria_ Prere q u isite: CHEM 105.

1 (4) 205, 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology First semester: matter, cells and tissues; nervo lls, endocrine, s kele tal , and muscular systems. Lab o ra tory includes cat dissec­ tion and experime.nts in muscle physiology and reflexes. Se co n d semester: circulatory, respiratory, diges tive, excretory, and rep roductive system ; metab lism, temperature regulation, a nd stress. Laboratory includes cat dissectio n. p h iology experi­ ments, and study of de velo ping organisms . 205 ( l ) prerequisite to 206 (I l). (4,4)

Plan V-BacbeloT of Science-Research Emphasis: 42 semester hours in bioi gy; in cluding 1 6 1 , 1 62, 3 23, 490, and 495, plus 26 additional hours. Re q uired supporting c ourses: Chemistry 120 (or 1 25), Chemistry 232 (with l a boratory 234 ) , a nd Chemistry 332 (with l a boratory

334) ; Math 1 5 1 ; Physics 1 25

( with labora­

tory 1 3 5 ) and Physics 1 26 ( with lab ratory 1 36) , or Physics 1 53 (with la boratory 1 6 3 ) and Physi c s 1 54 (with laboratory 1 64) .

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: Studen ts interested in this degree develop th ei r b iology p rog ra m throug h the Bi logy Department in conjunction with the School of Education . Such students should have a biology adviser. See the School of Education section of the catal g for recommended biology courses and other pertinent i nformation.

323 Principles of Biology ill: Ecology, Evolution and Diversity Ev lution, ecology, behavior, and a systemati survey of life on earth. Includes l abo ratory. Prerequ j ite: 1 62 or con eDt of deparnnent chair. I (4)

MINOR.: At least 20 semester hours selected from any biolo gy

324 Natural History of Vertebrat.es Class ification, natural h is t ory, and economic importance of vertebrates wi th the excep tion of b irds. Field trips and labora­ tory. Prerequisite: 323. r (4)

courses. A grade of C or higher must be earned in each course. Prerequisites must be met unless written perm is ion is g ran ted in advance by the instructor. Applicability of non-PLU b iology credits will be determined by the department chair. At least eigh t credit hours in b iology must be earned in residence at PLU. C o nsult the department chair fo r assign men t of a minor advis er.

Course Offe rings I I I Biology and the Modern World An intro duction to biology design ed primarily for non-biology majors. Fundamental concepts chosen from all area of modern biology. Lecture, laboratory, and discussi n. r n (4)

1 1 2 Humanistic Botany

1 13 The Homan Organism A tudy of biological principles us ing the biology of humans as the model and focal point for discussion. Topics include ce llul ar i ty, heredity, structure and fun c ti o n , reproduction and bioethics. Attention to the connections between biology and medici ne , law, pol itics, techn ology, hW1ger, and culture. Lecture

34{1 Plant Diversity and Distribution A systematic introduction to plant diversity. lnteractio n between

1 16 Introductory Ecology A study of the interrelationships between organis ms and their environment examining concepts in ecology that lead to

plants, theories of vegetational distribution. Emphasis on highe r plant taxonomy. Includes labo rato ry and field trips.

un der s t anding the nature and st r ucture of ecosystems and how

Prerequi ite: 323. n (4)

humans iropa t ecosystems. Satisfies the Core I natural science! mathematics!computer s ience requirement . 1 (4)

345 Mycology: Basidiomycotina (Mushrooms) A systematic ap pro ach to Basidiomycotina diversi ty and identification with emphasis on the taxonomy of fleshy gilled

161 Principles of Biology I: Cell Biology Cellular an d molecular levels of biologjcal o rgan izatio n ; cell

recom mended . I

musbroom and cursory consideration of other major groups o f Eumycota. Laboratory will use macroscopic, microscopic, and histological techniques and basic techniques for cloni n g and tissue culture. Includes field trips . Prerequisite: 323, or consen t of instructor. 1 (2)

('1)

162 Principles of Biology D: Organismal Biology An int ro d uction to animal and pla nt tissues , anatomy, and phys i ol ogy, with special emphasis on flowering plants and

36

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top logy. Prerequi site: 323 or consent of instructor. II (4) 328 Microbiology The structure, p hysiology, genetics, and metabolism of microor­ ganisms with empbasi on their diversity and ecology. The laboratory emphasizes design, implementation, and evaluation of hoth descriptive and quantita tive experim ents as well as isolation of organisms from natural sources. Pr erequisite: 323; one semester organic chemi stry recommended. II (4)

and population genetics. Includes tutorials and demonst ration sessions. Prerequisite: 323. U (4)

and la bo r a to ry. For non-majors, satisfies t he Core I natu ral sciences requirement. (4)

1 20)

The stud of b irds inclusive of their anat my, physiology, behavior, ecology and distribution. Special emphasis o n those attributes of birds that are unique am ng the vertebrates . labo­ ratory empha is on field identification, taxon my, and anatomy!

332 Genetics Ba ic concepts considering the molecular hasis of gene expres­ sion, recombination, genetic variahil i ty, as well as cytogeneti s,

development, evolution, globa l environmentaJ co ncerns, and

Co - registration in C hemjstry ( 1 04 or

Description, classification, cause , function, and development of the b ehavio r of animals emphasizing an ethological approach a nd focusin g on comparisons among species. Includes physi­ ological, ecological, and ev lutionary as pects of behavior. Prerequisite: 323 o r consent of instructor. IT (4)

327 Ornithology

An introduction to the basic principles of biology with an em­ phasis on pla n ts and their impact on people. Top i included are: basic plan t structure and function; poi so nous plants; medicinal plants; food p la n ts ; p ropagation f house plants; home care of plants; plant identifi c a t io n . I ncludes laboratory. S (4)

ultras t ruct ur e and physiology, Mendelian and molecular genetics, energy tr ansduction. Includes l abor atory.

326 Animal Behavior

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348 Advanced Ceo Biology Deals with how cells are functi o nally r ga n ized, enzyme kinetics nd regu lal ry mechanisms, b i o chemi 'try of macromolecules, energy metabolism, me mbrane structure and fu n c t io n, ultra­ structure, cancer cells as mode l systems. Lab or a tory includes tech niqu es encountered in cellular resea rch : anim a l/ p lan t cell

culture, cell fractionation, use of radiotracers, biochemical assays, membran e phenome na, spectrophotometry, respi ro met ry, Prerequisite: 323 and one semester o f o rg an ic chem istry or consent of instructor. II (4)

351 Natural History of the Pacific Northwest lntroduction to the natural h is to ry of the P a ci fi Northwe t: geology, cl im atology, oceanography, ecol ogy, common l i fe forms, and human impa ct . Includes local one- day field trips and three­ day trips to the Olympic Peninsula and the Columbia Gorge and Bas i ns . S (4)

m et hodo logy and ap p l ic a tions of r eco m bi nant DNA tec h nology. La b or a tor y features basic recombinant DNA tech nique s. Prere quisi t e: 323. n (4)

411 Histology Microscopic s tudy of normal cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of ver tebra tes . The empha is is mammaban. This st udy is both st ru ctural ly and physiologically oriented. In cl ude laboratory. P rerequ isite: 323, 1 (4) 424 Eoology O rga n is m s in rel a t i on to their environment, including organism al adaptations, population growth and intera tions, and e cosystem structure and function. Prere q u is ite : 323. 1 ( 4)

o r-

o CI -<

425 Biological Oceanograpby The o c e an as environm ent for plant and ani ma l life; an i nt rod u c ­ tion to the structure, dynamics, and h i s to ry of m arine ecosys­ tems. Lab, field trips, and term project in a d di t i on to lecture. P rereq ui site : 323. II (4)

426 Eoological Methods An examina t ion of m e thod ol ogy used for d iscernin g structure a nd function of n a t ural ecosyst ems : desc rip tio n of the p hysi al environment, estimation f p o p ulati on size, qu a n tifyi ng co m ­ muni ty structure, and mea urem ent of p roduc tivi ty. Includes an introduction to ge n eral s tat i s ti cal te c hniq ues . Writ i n g of scientific papers and a focus on ac ce ss in g the scientifi literature. Lecture, lab ralory, a n d field work. Prerequisite: 323 or con sent of instructor. II (4) 441 Mammalian Physiology An investigation of th p ri n ci p le s of phys i ol ogi c al regulation. Part I: fu n dam ent a l cellular. neural, and h or m onal mechanisms of homeostatic cont ro l ; Part II: interactions in the cardiovascu­ lar, pulm on ary, renal, and neuromuscular organ systems. La bor a to ry allows direct observation of physiological regula tio n in l ivi ng animals . Prereq uis i tes: 323 and CHEM 1 20. A na tomy a nd bio ch em istry recommended. 1 (4)

361 Comparative Anatomy Evolut io nar y h i sto r y of the vertebrate body, int rod uc ti o n to embryol ogy; and ext ns ive consideration of the structural an d functional ana tomy of vertebrates. Include l ab o r atory dissec­ tions following a systems app roach . Mammals are featured plus so m e observation of a nd com parison wi th human cadavers. Prerequisite: 323 . II (4) 364 Plant Physiology Physiology of p lant growth and development. Em p hasis on seed­ pl ants, but includes other p la n t groups as model sys tems. To p ics include: p hoto syn the-is , second a ry p la nt m e tabolism inclu d ing medicinal com po u nds, honn o ne. , mo r ph oge nes is. I ncl udes

l abo ra to ry. Prerequis ite : 323. Organic chemis try recommended. n (2)

365 Plant Anatomy Ti ssu e o rganiza tion and cellular details of s tem s, roots, and leaves of seed plants, with e mp h asis on development and function, Includes labo rato ry. P rereq ui s i te : 323 (2) 403 Developmental Biology The develo p men t of multicellular organisms, emphasizing cellular and m o lecular aspects of animal d evelopment . with an emphasis on con temp rary m odel systems. Includes laborato ry. Prerequisite: 323. 1 (4) 407 Molecular Biology An in troducti on to molecular biology, emph asizing the central role of DNA: S t ruc t ure of DNA and RNA, st ructu re and expression of genes, genome organization and rearrangement,

448 Immwaology Consideration of t h e biology and chemistry of immune response, incl u ding theoretical concepts, expe r i mental strategies and immunochemical applications. Prerequ is i tes : Any two o f the follow in g courses in Bi ology: 328, 33 1 , 348, 403, 407, 4 1 1 , 44 I .

1 (4) 475 Evolution Evolution as a process: sources of variation; fo rc es overcoming geneti c i nertia in p opula t ions; sp ec ia t i on . Evolution of genet ic

systems and of life in relation to ecological theo r y and earth h is tory. Lecture and discussion. Term paper and mini-seminar required. Prerequisite: 323. I (4)

490 Senior Seminar The goal of this course is to assi t students in th e wr iting and

presentation of a p ap e r con cernin g a topic within biology which would integrate various el em en ts in the major program. A prop osa l for the topic must be presented to the department early in the s p ring term of the j un i or year. The seminar may be linked to, but not re pla ce d by, laboratory inde p en dent study or intern­ ship experien ce. Satisfies the senior seminar requirement.

(2)

491, 492 IndependeDt Study Investigations or research in areas of s p e c ial interest not covered

by regular courses. Open to qua li fi ed j uni or and senior maj or s . P rere q uisi te: written p rop osal for the p roj ect approved by a fa culty sponsor and the dep art m ent chair. l II ( I -4)

495 Directed Study O ri gi n al experimental or theoretical research op n to upper divis ion students intending to gra dua te with a Bachelor of Science- Research Emphas is. Requ i res a written p ropo sal a pp roved by a faculty sponsor and the dep a r tmen t chair. ( 2 )

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BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINlSTRATION:

Required fa ,mda tion courses.'

School of Business develop ment and ongoing improvement of the whole

11\

co mmunities we serve by provid ing relevant, innovat ive, and quality business education in the libe ral

W

arts spirit.

E ON 1 5 1 - 1 52 Macro/M icro Economics STAT 23 1 Int roductory Statistics PHlL 325 Business Ethics (Prerequisite: PHIL 1 0 1 or 125) COMA 3 3 6 Effective Business Presentations

Through co mpetency-based degree programs, students

essential skills to meet the de mand s of an ever-changing environ men t S t udents master the fundamentals of in the School,of Business develop the

help busi ness

management to help them become successful leaders

in

FACUlTY: Bell, Dean; Ahna, Albers, Bancroft, Barndt, Bamowc, Bemiker, Finnie, Gibson, Hcgstad, Kratochvil, Lee, MacDonald, C Miller, Moreland, Myers, Ramagl ia, Sepic, Simpson, Thrasher, Van Wyhe, Yager, ADMISSION: The professional B achelor of Business Adminis­ tration degree program is composed of an upper division business cu rricul um with a strong base in liber al arts. To be admitted to the Sch o ol of Business, a student must: 1 . Be officially admitted to the university, and 2. Have at least sopho more stand ing , a nd 3. Have a minimum cumulative grade p o in t average of 2 . 50, and 4. Have successfully com pi ted BUSA 20 1 ; and 5. Declare a major or minor in business. Access to upper divis ion business courses is l imited to students with a cumulative grade point average o f 2.50 o r above who have met the required prerequisites, AFFILIATIONS: The School of B usiness of Pacific Lutheran University is a member of the AACSB - The Int rnational Association for Management Education. The B.B.A" M.B.A., a nd accounting programs are nationally accredi ted by the Accredita­ tion Council of the AACSB. The School is p r iv ileg ed to have a student ch a p ter of Beta Gamma Sigma, the national business honorary society recognized by the AACSB, Pacific Lutheran University is accredited re gi o nal l y by the Northwest Associ at ion of Schools and Colleges. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: The B ac h e l o r of B us in ess Adminis­ tration degree p rogram consists of a minimum of 1 28 sem ester hours completed with an over-all grade point average of 2 .5 0 or above as wel l as a 2.50 grade p o int average sep a rate.ly ill business courses. C- is the minimal acce ptabl e grade for busi ness courses. At least one-half of the minimum total degree requirements are taken in fields outside the School of Business. At least 40 semester hours aIC taken in requi red and elec tive b usiness subj cts. A minimum o f 20 semester hours in b usiness must be taken in residence at PLU. Business degree and concentration requirements aIe est a b­ lished at the time of major declaration. Students with a declared major in bus in ess who have not attended the university for a period of three years or marc will be held to the business degree requirements in effe ct at the time of re-entry to the university.

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CONCENTRATIONS: A student may elect to complete one or more concentrations within the BachelOi of Business Adminis­ tration program, (Courses taken to fulfill concentration .require­ ments Ivill a.lso meet general B,B.A- requirements,) The concen­ tration, which is n o ted on the student's transcript, must be com­ pleted with at least a 3 ,00 grade point average. C- is the minimal acceptable g rade for concentration co u rses , A minimum of e ight semester hours of the total required for a concentration must be taken in residence at PLU. School of Business internships, (BUSA 4 92 , Applicat ions of B usin es s Knowledge in Field Se ttin g ) will be graded as pass/fail only. A limit of one internship in any concentration will be accepted, not to exceed 4 credit hours. An end p roduct may be req u i red , as determined by the sponsoring instructor. Financial Resource8 Management BUSA 3 3 5 Financial M anagement BUSA 405 Law of th e Financial M arketp lace BUSA 437 F in an cial Analysis & S trate gy

22 sem. hn. 4 4 4

One of the following:

4

ECON 3 5 1 Interme d iate Macroeconomics Analysis (4) ECON 361 Money & Banking (4) Eigh t semester hours fro m

thefollowing:

8

BUSA 3 2 1 Intermediate Accounting 1 (2) BUSA 322 Intermediate Accounting 11 (2) BUSA 323 Cost Ace unting & C ntrol Systems (4) BUSA 430 Entreprenemial Finance (4) BUSA 438 Financial Research & Analysis (4) BUS A 492 Internship (4 hours maximum) ECON 344 Econometrics (4)

BUSA 3 2 1 B USA 322 BUSA 422 BUSA 423 Entities BUSA 323 C

4

Minimum semester hours in business courses:

B USA 320

A

2

BUSA 2 0 1 The Business Enterprise in Global Perspective BUS A 202 Assessing and Managing Financial Performance I B USA 3 0 1 Managing Careers and Human Resources BUSA 302 Assessing and Managing Fin ncial Performance II BUSA 305 Creating and Leading Effective Organizations BUSA 306(307 Managing the Value Chain III! B USA 400 Business L aw or B USA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace or BUSA 406 L aw of the Workplace: Employees, Employers, Their rughts and Responsibilities or BUSA 407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Companies, and Products or BUSA 408 International Business Law BUSA 490 Strategic Management Upper division business or economics electives

Professi onal Acc ounting BUSA 405 Law of the! Financial Marketplace

P

4

Minimum semester hours in foundation courses:

business organizations and in the community.

38

4/4

Reqtlired busitleSs co u rses:

teamwork, communication, technology, problem-solving,

leadership, multi-cultural management, and change

4

(Information Management sttltients may sllbsritue esC! 144 for 220)

perso n and

z

4

Linear Models and Calculus, an Introduction or ( l S I and 230) CSCl 220 Computerized Information Systems MATH 1 28

The m i ssio n of the School of Business is to stimulate the

18 sem. hrs. 4 4

Financial I nfor mation Systems Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate ccounting II ConsoJjdatioIlS and Equity Issues Accounting fo r Not-for-Profit and Governmental

2 2 2 2

Cost Accounting and Control Systems

4


2 2

BUSA 327 Tax Accounting I BUSA 427 Tax Accounting n BUSA 424 Auditing

4

Human Resource Management 24 sem. hn. BUSA 406 Law of the Workplace: Employees, Employers, Their Rigbts and Responsibilities 4 BUSA 342 Managing Human Resources 4 ECON 32 1 Labor Economics 4 Three of the following (cr t least two from B USA): 12 BUSA 343 Managing Reward ystems (4) BUSA 442 Leadership nd Organizational Development (4) BUSA 445 Quality Improvement , trategies (4) BUSA 449 Current Issues in Human R SOurce Management ( 4 ) BUSA 492 Internship (4) COMA 435 Organizational Communication (4) COMA 437 Advanced lntcrpersonal Communication (4) PSYC 46 1 Psychology of Work ( 4 ) PSYC 450 Psychological Testing (4) International Business

20-34 sem. hrs.

BUSA 408 International Business Law ECON 3 3 1 International Economics BUSi\. 3 5 2 Managing in the Multinational Environment BUSA 355 Global Operations

One of the fallowing:

4 4 4

4 4

An a pproved area course from POLS, ANTH, or I-lIST (4)

M BUSA 460 International Marketing (4) Option 1 of the College of Arts and S iences foreign language requirement !2I one semester of study abroad 0-1 6 Mlll'iceting Resource Management

24 sem. bra.

BUSA 407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Companies, and Products BUSA 360 Applied Marketing BUSA 467 Marketing Research BUSA 468 Market.ing Management Two ,,[ the following (at /east om from B USA): BUSA 363 Consumer Beh avior & Promotional Strategy (4) 8USA 365 Sales & Sales Management (4) BUSA 4{)0 I nternational Marketing (4) COMA 27 1 Media Li teracy (4) ECON 33 1 International Be n mics (4) ECON 344 &onometrics (4) PSYC 462 Consumer Psychology (4) Entrepreneurship and New Venture Managemaat

BUSA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace BUSA 358 Entrepreneurship BUSA 430 Entrepreneurial Finance BUSA 492 Internship

4

4 4 4

8

24 sem. hn. 4

4 4 4 8

Two ofthe foUawing (one must be B USA): BUSA 323 Cost Accounting (4) BUSA 438 Finan ial Research and Analysis (4) BUSA 365 Sales and Sales Management ( 4 ) BUSA 442 Leadership and O rganizational Development (4) BUSA 467 Marketing Research (4) ECON 371 Industrial Organization and Publ ic Policy (4) ECON 361 Money and Banking (4) Information Management

7\velve hOl4rs of tile following: BUSA 377 Data Base Applications in Business (4) USA 378 Electroni c Comm rce (4) BUSA 492 Int rnship ( 2 - 4 ) Any Upper Level Computer Science Course

ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: The accounting certificate program is available for students who hold a baccalau­ reate degree (any field) and wish to com plete the educational requirements to s i t for the C.P.A. examination. Contact the School of Business for further information.

DI c: 11\ z m 11\ 11\

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: See Graduate Studies.

Course Offerings 105 Personal Finandal Planning and Consumer Law Basic financial and legal decision making. Includes an introduc­ tion to elementary concepts in fillance, economics, law, and consumer psychology. (4) 201 The Business Enterprlse in Global Puspective Introduction to the st udy of how business interacts with its environment. Designed for students who are taking a first I ok at the role of business in society arid who have not had extensive study in economics. business law, or political science. (4) 202 Assesis ng and Managing Finan dal Performance 1 Integration of a c co un t in g and finance topics from the perspec­ tive of external investors. Origins and uses of financial informa­ tion; accounting concepts and principles; logic, content, and format of financial statements; nature of m ket values; valua­ tion theories in the U.S. and other nations. Prerequisites: sopbo­ more standing; MATH 1 28. (4) 301 Managing Careers and Human Resources An exploration of individual and organizational practices and responsibilities related to organizational entry, competency development, and performance improvement as careers unfold. No prerequisite. but suggest taking simultaneously with 305. ( 4 ) 302 AsseSSing and Managing Finandal Performance n Perspective of manageri I decision makers. Principles and p rocedures pertaining to busine's investment activity, financial decision-making, financial statement analysis, valuation, financial planning, capital asset acquisition, cost of capital, financing strategies. Prerequisities: BUSA 202; CSC! 220; ECON 1 5 1 , 1 52; MATH 128; STAT 23 1 . (4) lOS Creating IlIId Leading Effective Organizations A study of how to organize and manage in today's context of

changing internal and elCl:ernal dema nds and expectations, with a strong emphasis on competencies and practices which enhance teamwork. No prerequisite, but suggest taking simultaneously with BUSA 30 1 . ( 4 )

22 sem. hn.

BUSA 375 rntroductioo to Informati n Management BUSA 376 Ethical Issues in Information Management BUSA 478 Information Management Seminar

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMIN1STRATlON: A minimum of 20 semester hour in business courses, inciuding 13 USA 20 1 - The Business E nterprise in Global Perspective. All courses must be completed with a grade of C- or h igher. A cumulative grade point average of 2 . 50 for all courses in the minor is required. At least 12 semester hours must be upper division, and at least 8 semester bours must be completed in residence.

4 2 4

12

306 Managing the Value Chain I Identifying what customers value and the processes that produce value using modern approaches to marketing and operations. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; MATH 1 28 (or MATH 1 5 1 & MATH 230); ECON 1 5 1 1 152; computer spreadsheet competency. Co-requisite: BUSA 202, STAT 23 1 . (4) 307 Managing the Value Chain n Focus on (0 measuring and ma naging economic perfonnance using management accounting tools and concepts, an d ( ii ) the role of integrated infonnation systems in supporting business operations. Prerequisite: BUSA 306. (4)

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w z 11\ CD

320 Financial I nformalion Systems

367 Marbling of Bnsiness SeTVices

Study of the flow of information through an enterp rise, the

Managing the seTvice experience for business customers. Creat­

sources and nature of doclIJlJel1ts, and the controls necessary to

ing and retain i ng business relationships in a custome.r- focused organization through marketing strategies. In-field assignments

insure the accurac a nd reliability of infonnatio n. Prerequ is i tes : CSCl 220, BUSA 3 03 ( r B SA 202). (4)

give insights into specific business services.

32 1 Intermediate Accounting I

375 Introduction to Information Management

Concen rated study of the concep tual framework of accounting, valuation theories, asset and income measurement, and fi nancial st at emen t disclosures in the U.S. and abroad. Prerequisites: CSCI 220; BUSA 202. (2)

Focus on the basic concepts and models of i nformation manage­ ment and the information economy including such areas as processes, the hierarchy of systems from transactio n

processing through decision support systems, and the impacts of net\'1orks and the Internet.

322 Intermediate AccounliDg n

(4)

Additional study of valuat i on theo ry. Advanced issues in asset nd in come measurement and fin an i I sta tem nt disclosure. Includes evaLuat ion of U.S. positions rda tiv e to those of other

376 Ethi.caJ Issues in lDfoTJDation Management

nations and i ntern a tio n al agencies. Pr ere q ttisi te : B USA

Discussion of the major tensions among business, economic, and

Focus on the ethical principl

A critical examination

and power relationships that

relate information management and decision making to society.

32 1 . ( 2 )

social objectives as related to the use and misuse of information

323 Cost Accounling and Control Systems f systems for cost accounting nd mana­

gerial control. Emphasis o n d velop m ent of skills to

i tiqu e cost

and control systems and to understand the dynamic relati nship between system ,

technology.

(2)

377 Data Base AppUcations in Business The concepts, strategy, and features of data base design and

per t ions , strategy, and perfo rman ce evalua­ tion. P re req ui sites : CSCI 220; BUSA 202. (4)

on how data base applications support decision processes.

327 Tax Accounting I

378 Electronic Commerce

management for applications in economic o rga nizat ions. Focus

Stud y of i ncome tax concepts, re gula tions and ta x- plann in g p rin cip l es . E m phasi s n ind iv id u a l income taxation. ( 2 )

(4)

The managerial, organizational, and technical challenges of electronic transaction and communication systems among customers, distributors, and suppliers.

335 Financial Investments

(4)

In-d pth expl o ration of ftmdamental principLes governing the valuation of particular sec uriti , and knowl d a ble construc­

400 BWI.iness Law

tion , management, and evalu at i BUSA 302. (4)

ment. Designated sections of this course will include emphases

n

Exploration of the legal issues inherent in the b usi ness environ­

of p ortfoli os. Prerequisite:

which are aligned with the School of Business concentrations. These include: accounting/finance, m arke ting, human resource management, and international business. (4)

342 Managing Humao Resources Detailed coverage of personnel/human resource p rocedures in the u.S. and other c un tri.cs. Prerequisite: BUSA 305. (4)

405 Law of the Flrumdai Marketplace Designed for students whose interests are in finance, accounting,

343 Managing Reward Systems

perso nal financial management, or similar fields which demand

Detailed examination of reward system development and prac­ tices. P rere qu is ites: CSCI 220, ECON l S I l 1 52, BUSA

an understanding of the laws affecting financial transactions.

305. (4)

I n e gr ated study of decisions and challenges faced by managers in large and small companies as t hey do business globally. Com­

Exploration of legal issues which arise in the workplace. Analysis of the impact of employment-related statutes and cases on busi­

p ete nc ie involved in communicating and negoti ati ng across cultures. P r erequi i : eCON 33 1 . (4)

ness.

and Products

Study of practical iss ues in opera ting globally us.ing case studies. P rereq ui sit e: BUSA 3 5 2 . ( 4 )

Legal issues found in marketing practices and the regulatory framework surrounding them.

358 EntrepreDeurship Intensive study of i ssue s and challen ges associated with start-up, growt h, and m a turat ion o f a new en terp rise. Empha iz s redu tion of ri sk t hro ugh planning for and assess ing p o ssi ble future

tional functions in support of major objectives. Satisfies the

Senior Seminar/ Project requirement. Prerequisites: BUSA 302,

305, 306, 307; senior standi ng. (4) 422 Consolidations and Equity Issues Concentrated study of equity measurement including the ac­

Study of how buyers gain awarenes · , e tablish p urchasing crite­

counting aspects of partn rships, corporations, and consolida­

ria, screen information, and make decisions. Prom tion topics

tions. Also includes accounting for multinational corporations.

i nclud e defin i ng target audience, message des ign , media selec­ t ion , budge ti ng, ev alua tin g the promotion mix, a nd a field p rojec t . (4)

Prerequisites: BUSA

423 Aa:OUDting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Enlities institutional standard setting framework and cuTTent principles

Professio nal selling-prospecting, active listening, benefit pre­ sentation, objection handling, closing and territory management.

Also covered are territory de sign, hi ring, motivatin g, and evalu­ at i ng sales p ersonn e.!. (4) I

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320, 3 2 1 , 322. (2)

Study of fund accounting, including its conceptual basis, its

365 Sales and Sales Management

F

(4)

ment of strategies and policies aimed at integrating all organiza­

363 Consumer BehavioT and Promotional Strategy

I

An overview of the law involved in conducting a world business.

gic decision makers. Formulation, implementation, and assess­

cepts, principles, and issues fou nd to predominate in these organ iza tio lL�. (4)

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408 Internalional Business Law

Study of managing organizati ns from the perspective of strate­

A study of ma rket ing concep ts, principles, and contemporary issues in sma ll and large businesses, as well as non-profit o rganiza t i o ns . Particular att ention to the service-related c on­

A

(4)

409 Strategic Management

(4)

360 Applied MarkeliDg

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(4)

407 Law of the Marketplace: Consumers, Companies,

355 Managing Global Operations

conditions.

(4)

406 Law of the Workplace: Employees, Employers, TheiT RJghls and Responsibilities

352 Global ManagemeDt

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busine

(4)

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and practices. Prerequisites: CSCl 220; BUSA

202. (2)


Audiling Co m p r ehe n s iv e t udy of auditing concepts and procedures. Pr er eq uis i te s : BUSA 320, 32 1 , 322. (4)

424

427

503

Tax Acco unting D

Concentrated study f income tax concepts, reg u l a ti o ns . and tax plan n il1 g p li n cip l es . Emphasis on business taxat i o n . Prerequ i ­

Entreprenewial Finance

F in a nc i al s t rategi es u n iq ue to the creation a n d/ o r expa n s i o n of small. c l o sel y-h el d businesses. Prerequisite: BUSA 302. (4)

Financial AnalysIs and Strategy Intermediate treatment of m a n a ge ria l fi na nce top i cs . P rere q u is i te : BUSA 302. (4)

437

438

(both

book and m arket), the rel ati on ships among them, and relevant decision t h e ries/m dels. Primary persp 've is that of the man ager, rather th an the accountant or the external investor. (4) 504

Legal and Ethical Environment of Business

V:I C 11'1

B ac kg round for lU1d rstanding and acti n g upon the lega! n d ethical issues decision makers i n the busin s world face t oday.

sites: CSCI 220; BUSA 202, 327. ( 2 ) 430

Understanding and Managing Financial Resource

I ntegrated s tudy of fina nc ial decisio n- making variables

Financial Research and Aualysis

(4)

z

Managing Effective Organizations Examines how leade rs manage fo ur set s of factors to ac h ieve organizational effectiveness: the orga nization's internal nviron­ ment. t11e organization's e nv i ro n me nt al context, cultural d iffer­ en c e s . and ch a nge . (4) 505

m 11'1 11'1

Seminar course directed at curre n t issues and d evel op me n ts . Prerequisite: BUSA 302, and at least one upper division BUSA

p refi x elective from the list of Financial Re so u rces M an ag emen t concentration courses. (4) 442 Leadership and Organizational Development Experiential course des i gn ed to expl o re the p r inci p l es o f orga n i ­ za ti on a l d ev el o p me n t . Prepa r a t i on of stude.nts to be leaders in effective, sys tem a t i c p l an ne d cha nge p rog rams . P rereq uisite :

BUSA 305. (4) 445

Quallty Improvement Strategies

Examination of qu ali t y i m p rove m ent stra tegies used by Am er ican businesses to meet custom er re qu i re m e n ts and im­ prove corpo rate pe r fo rm ance . Pre req u i s i t e: BUSA 305. (4) 449

Current Issues in Human Resource Management

Seminar course focused on current issues and de vel opments

in

managing human resources. Advanced business students, i n consultation with the

instructor, will select app ropri ate top i cs res earc h and discussion. Prer eq uisi te : BUSA 305. (4)

for

460 lute.malionaL Marketlug In troduction to ma r ke ti n g p robl ems and op p o r t un i t i e s in an international co n te xt . I n ve s t i gati o n of eco no m ic . cultural, and bo ine forces that require ch a nge s in m a rk et i ng p lan s for inter­ na tio n al c o mpa n ie s . P re r eq ui s i t e : j un ior st and i n g . (4) 467

Muketiug Research

Investigation of techniques and us es of m arket i ng research in the bus in e ss decision-making process. Research desi gn , su rvey methods. sa mp l i n g plans. data analysis, and field p roj ect s . Prerequisites: STAT 23 1, CSC1 220. (4) 468

Markeling Management

An i n te gr at ed ap pl i cat i o n of ma rk e t i n g mix co n cep ts in a com­ p et i t ive business simulation. App lyi n g ma rketin g st ra t egi es , develo p i n g a bu s i n ess p lan , and co ns tr uc t i ng an annual rep o r t . Prerequisites: BUSA 306 and one u pp e.r divi si o n ma rket ing class.

(4) 478

Information Management Seminar

Advances in information technology and their i m p ac t on o rga ni­ zational and business strategie s with p a r t i c ular em phas i s on the

challenges of proje c t

de s i gn and implementation. (4)

Study Abroad PLU-sponsored academic or exp er ie n t i al s t u dy in ot h er coun­ tries. Prerequisite: j unior st and i ng . ( 1- 3 2 )

489

491

Directed Study

Individualized studies in consultation with an in struc t or. Prereq uisites: ju n io r st anding a n d in st r uctor a p p r oval . ( 1 -4) 492

Internship

A p p l icati on of bu s i ness knowl ed ge in field s et ti n g . Cred i t g r an ted determined by ho u rs pent in wo r ki ng environment and dep t h of pr oj e ct associated wi!h the cou rse of stu dy. 495

Spedal Seminar

506

Managing the Value Creation Process I

Focuses on customer value aIld the op rating and marke t t ng processes that p rod uce that va lue. Prerequi sites: ECON 500,

ECON 50 1 , BUSA 503. (4) 507

Man ging the Value Creation Proce8.'l II

Focuses on the stra te g ic :lnd supporting roles of management accou nting in measu rement of econo mic p erform a nce and of i nfo r ma tion sy tern s in m o n i t ori ng and de l i veri n g value to cus to mers . Prerequis ites: ECON 500., ECON 5 0 1 , BUSA 503,

BUSA 506. (4) 510

Strategic Management of Technology

imp lementing com­ pet itive strategy in a global c nt xt . Addres es how to inte gra te te hnol gy with the firm's strategy, and the key internal and e xt ern a l fo rces that determine the evo lution of s tr a tegy. Prereq­ Concepts and methods for formulati ng and

uisites: 503, 504, 505, 506, 507. (4) Piuancial Investments E m p ha s i s on concepts, p r i n i p l es, and issues relating- to i n d i ­ vidual secu rities. Prerequisites: ECON 500; BUSA 503. (4)

535

537

Decision Models and Stra.tegies for Financial Managers

I n - d e pth exam in ati n f ri s k- re t u rn relationships i n the con ­ structionirevision of real a s et po rt folio s and as ocia ted financ­ ing st ra teg ies . Focus is l o n g- ter m . Prere.qui sit : BCON 500;

BUSA 503. (4) Managing IunOvatiOD and Technology Change Focus on the planning and imp le.m en tation of maj o r new tec h no logi s, processe • or S terns which pose ign ifican t uncer­ tainty and the necessity for fundam en t al chan ge i n the or ga n i­ zat ion's design, culture, and indu try s tructure. PI requis ite: BUSA 505. (4)

541

Seminar on specifica.lly selected topics in b usi n ess. P

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S42 Management of Change Detai led examination f te hniques for diagnosing opportunities requiring ch ange. Pla n n in g, implementing, i ntervening, and eval ua t i ng ch ange . Emphasis on the proble m assessment skills

Chemistry seeks to understand the fundamental nature of

as how its co mposition and en ergy content c h an ge. Use of this knowledge influences our Lives in many p rofound ways. Whether interested in the che mic al profes­

of i n ternal ch ange age nt s. Pr ere quisi te: BUSA 505. (2)

matter, as well

543 Designing Reward Systems Explor tjon of reward system philosop h ies and strategies. Prerequisi : BUSA 505. ( 2 )

w :z:: u

sion itself. including biochemistry, polymer chemistry,

S4S Continuous Improvement Strategies Focus on managing for qual ity, including organ izational analysis, process development, and selection of improvement tools. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. ( 2 )

radiation chemi stry, and other specialities, or

i n chem ist ry the soc ial

in conjunction with other fields such as business,

sciences, and the h um a nities, students will have suitable

program s available to meet their int rests at PLU. D iversity in career planning is a key concept in the chemistry de­

S49 Contemporary Human Reso urce Management Se minar addressing current issues in human resource manage­ men t. Prerequisi te: BU A 505. (2)

partment. P rograms are available wh ic h are b roadly appli­ cable to the health, b iological, physical , environmental beha vioral , and fundamental cherrucal sciences.

553 TransDational Management

The chemjstry department's courses, curriculum, fa c­

.Examination of ways i n which tradit io na l a pp ro ache s to global izatio n-multinationa l adaptation, worldwide technology

ulty, and facilities are app roved by the American Chem ical So c iety.

transfer, and global stan dardization-may be synt h esized into tr an snational strategy and practice. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. (2)

The department uses numerous scien tific instr uments

in the laboratories. Research and tea ch ing equipment

New Venture Management Exa mines the entrepreneu rial skills and condit io ns needed for effective n ew b usiness start-ups whether independent or within larger organizations. Prerequ isi te: BUSA 503. (4) 558

include:

300 MHz Fourier transform nuclear magneti c ultra-violet, visible,

resonan ce, Fourier transform infrared,

emission, and electron spi n resonance spectrometers; X- ray crystallographic cameras; ga and liquid chromato­ graphs ; gas chromatograph / mass spectrometer; electro ­

560 Global Marlc.eting Management De ignin g and ma naging marketing ac tivities across national bo unda rie s. P rereq u i s ite : BUSA 506. (4)

phoresis; precision refractometer; dipolometer; short path

566 Developing New Products and Services Study of the process required for developing a new product or service. Prerequisite: BUSA 506. ( 4 )

fluorometer; C-H-N analyzer; ICP-OES; and two SGI workstations. Fa cu l ty research p rojects inv ol ve un de rgra duate

567

distillation apparatus; scintillation counter; wne refiner;

Assessing Marketing Opportunities

participa tion.

Learning to identify and analyze marketi ng opportunities. Applying market research te ch n iques to ach ieve corporate

FACULTY: Fryhle , Chair; Huestis, Rink, J. S c h u l tz, Swa nk, Tonn,

objectives. Prerequisite: BUSA 506. (4) 574

Waldow.

Advanced Service and Manufacturing Delivery System8

Students deciding to major in chemistry should officially declare their intent as soon as possible and not later than after having completed Chemistry 232 a n d after consultation with a faculty

Managerial and operation I challenges of advanced service and manu facturing systems. Prereq uis ite: BU A 506, 507. ( 2 )

adviser in the chemistry department. Transfer students desi r i ng to major in chemistry should consult a departmental advis er no later than the be g in n i n g of their junior year.

577 Project Management Study of the u ni q ue conditions, challenges, requirements, and tech ni ques associated with designing and managing major non­ repetiti e u ndertakings. Prerequi si te: RUSA 505. ( 2 ) 578

The chemistry department considers computers to be imp rtant tools and strongly recommends that a student planning to major in c he m i str y take at lea t one two-credit hour course in computer science.

Management o f InfoJ'mation Technologie8 and Systems

Focus on inform ation technolo gy, internet, information systems design, and applicatio ns to business pr blerus. Prerequisites: RUSA

503, 505. (4)

BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: Chemistry 1 2 0 or 1 25, 232, 234,

590 Business Strategy in a Global Context An int egrated study of business strategy formulation and imple­ mentation under conditions of continuing econom ic, techno­ logical, and competitive change in the gl bal marketplace.

tion, 450 and either 405, 440, or 456 a re required. 2. Biochemistry emphasis: Chcmi ' tr y 1 20 or 125, 232. 234. 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 343, 403 , 405, 4 1 0, 435, 490; Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323; fo ur hours selected from Biology 326, 328, 33 1 . 346, 359, 385, 407, 44 1 or Chemistry 342; Ma th l S I , 1 52; Physks 1 53 , 1 54, 163, 164. 3. Chemical-physics emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 34 1 , 342 , 343, 344. 490; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253; Physics 153, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64, 33 1 , 332, 336, 356.

(4)

59 1 Inde'pendent Study I ndividualized reading and studies. Minimum supervision after initial planning of student's wo rk . ( 1-4)

592 Internship Application of business knowledge in a field setting. Requires prior app roval by M.B.A. progra m director and co nse n t of i nstructor. ( L -4)

595 Seminar Selected advanced top i c s . (2-4)

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BACHEWR OF SCmNCE MAJOR ( three alternatives) : Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 33 2, 33 4, 338. 34 1 , 342, 3 43, 344, 405 or 450 or 456, 4 1 0, 435, 490; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; Physics 1 53. 1 54, 1 63, 1 64. For American Chemical Society certifica­

petitive advant a ge. Prerequisites: BUSA 503, 504, 505, 506, 507.

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332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 343, 490. Required supporting cOwses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; P hys i c s 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 164. 1 . General - leads t o American Chemical Society certification;

Exp lores indu try. co mpet i tive , and company analysis and other importan t co n sidera ti o ns in developing and s us tainin g a com­

42

Chemistry

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Generalized Chenrlstry Curriculum for the B.S. Degree FAlL

Freshman ( 1 ) Chem istry 1 20 o r 1 2 5 Math 1 5 1 Critical Conversation or

Writing Seminar Core co urse PE 1 00 or activity

SPRING

MINOR: 22 semester hours, i nc l udi ng 1 2 0 or J 25, 232, 234, 3 3 2 , 334 or 336, 338, and 4 h urs of add i t i o nal 3 0 0 or 4 0 0 level ch e m istr y course ( ) compl eted wi th grade of C or higher.

Chemi try 232,

Prerequisite and corequisite requirements are strictly enforced.

234 Math 1 5 2 Physi c s 1 5 3, 1 6 3 ( 2 ) Writi ng Seminar or Cri tical Conversation PE 1 00 or ac tivity

Sophomore

Chemistry 332, 334

Chemi tIy 338

Physics 1 54, 1 64(2)

Bi o logy 1 62(2)

Biology 1 6 1 ( 2 )

Co re co ur ses

Core courses Junior Che m ist ry 34 1 , 343 Co re courses

Ch e m ist ry 342, 344

Chemistry 4 1 0

Sellior

Ch em i stry 490 El ectives

Che m ist r y 490 Chem is t ry 435

Electives

1. Re fe r to the Division of Nat ur al Sciences sect ion of this

catalog for other beg in ni ng curr i c ulwn op ti o ns . 2. The d partment s tresses the irnportance of taking phys i cs during either the fre shma n or the s opho m re year. This penn its a bette r understanding of chemi try and e na b les student to co mple t degree requirement with no sch e dulin g difficulties in the junior and seni o r years. Students i nterested in the B ach elo r of Science with biochemistry e mp ha sis should plan to take b io lo gy in the a ltern at e ye ar. 3. Stude ts de iri ng to fulfill the College of A rts and Sciences fore ign l an gu age requirement under Option I, r who des ire to att ain or ma intai n a la ngua ge proficiency, should take a language conrse as part of their op ti o na l s ele c tion ' .

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In rec gnitio n of outst and i ng work the designation with Departmental Honors may be gr ant ed to Bachelor of Sc i en ce grad uate by vote of t he faculty of the che m jstry de pa rt men t , based on the s tu d e nt 's performance in these areas :

Course work: The grade p oi nt average in che mistry COU Ises must be at least 3.50. 2. Written work: From the time a st ud en t declares a major in chemistry, copies of outstanding work ( e.g . , l aborato ry, seminar, and research rep orts) will be kept for later summary evaluation. 3. Oral communication: S tudents must evidence ability to communicate effectively as indicated by the sum of their participation in class discussion, seminars, help session leadership, and teaching assistantship work. 4. Independent chemistry- related activities: Posi tive consider­ atioDs incl ud e the extent and quality of extracurricular work done in background reading, independent study, and research; assisting in la borato r y p reparation, te achi ng, or advising; any other ch mistry-related e m ployment, on campus or elsewhere; and p artici p atio n in campus and p ro fess ion al chemistry­ rel ated organizations. The dep ar t men ta l honors designation will appear on a grad ua t­ ing ch em is try m ajor's tran scrip t. I.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: St ude nts interested in

th i s degree d evelo p the ir ch emis try progr a m throug h the dep artm ent in co nju n cti on with the School of Education. See

School of Edllcatiorl section.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING: Student interested

Course Offerings 104 Environmental Chemistry

m

Basic pri nci ples of chem i ca l structure and reactions, with a p p li ­ cations to human a c t ivit i e s and the natural environment. No prerequisite; stu d ents wilhout h igh school ch e m istry a re e n co u raged to take 1 04 before taking 1 05 or 1 20. Also suitable for environ mental studies, ge. ne ral science teachers, B.A. in geo­ sciences, a nd g en eral university core re q u i rem e nls. J (4)

105 Chemistry of Life Basic rganic and biochemistry ap pl ied to chem i c a l pro cesses i n the human o rgani s m; suitable for l ibera l arts students, nursing students, and p ro sp ect ive teachers. Students who ha ve nol completed high school ch em istry rece ntly should take 104 before tak ing 1 05. I I ( 4)

120 General Chenrlstry An

introduction to energy and matter, atomic and molecular theory, p e ri od ic propert ies, nomenclature, states of matt , chemical calc u lations , solution pro p e rties , acids and bases. eq uilib ri um , and kine tics. Includes laboratory. O ne year of hi gh school ch emistry is required. St ud en t s with no high school chemistry or a weak mathemati cal backgr o u n d s ho uld t a ke C h emi s try 104 before this c urse. Corequi · ite; MATH 140 or math p lacement in a cours e higher t han 1 40. I (4)

125 Advanced General Chemistry

An advanced p rese nt a tion of thermodynamics, ato m ic structure, valence bond and m lecular orbital theor ies, com p lex equilib­

rium, kinetics, macromolecules, and coordinati n ch e mis tr y. Includes laborator y. D esign ed for th o se who desire to pursue studies b eyo nd the bachelor's degree . An o u tst anding record in a one year hi gh scho ol che mistry course or advanced high scho ol che mis t r y is requ i red . Corequisite: MATH 15 J . I (4)

210 Nutrition, Drugs, and the Individual An int ro d u cti on to bal ic metabolic interaction , general

endocrinology, mind and body interactions, and roles of drugs in modifyin biological and behavio r al fu n ctions. Prerequisites: one year of high school ch emistry o r equ ivalen t sugge s ted . Meets ge neral university core requiremen ts . I (4)

232, 332 Organic: Chemistry

An interpretation of p roperties and react ions of a liphatic and aromatic compounds on the basis of curr en t chemical theory. Prerequisite; 1 2 0 or 1 25 , 23 2 for 332. C or equis ites: 234, 334. n, I (4, 4 )

234, 334 Organic: Chemistry Laboratory

Reactions and co nv ention al and m odern techniques of synthesis, sep arat ion , and analys i s of o rgan i c comp ounds . Microsca1e techniques . Must accompany 232, 332. Pre requis i te : 234 for 334. n, I ( 1 , 1 )

336 Organic: Special Projects Laboratory Individual projects e m p ha s iz i ng current profession al-level methods of synthesi s and property detemlination of or ganic compounds. This co urse is an alternative to 334 and typically requires somewhat more time commitment. Students who wish to pr pare for careers in chemistry O f r la ted areas should apply for depar t me n tal a p p roval of their a dmissio n to this course. II

338 Analytical Chemistry in p u rsuing

studies in chemical engineering s h oul d see lhe course outline in

the Engineering Science section of tlUs catalog. The department ch air should be consulted for a ss ign m ent of a p rogra m ad vis er.

1 methods of quantitative analysis, i n cl uding volumetric, gravimetric, and selected instrumental methods. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: 120 o r 1 2 5 and MATH 1 40. II (4) Chemi

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\1\ w

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341 Physical Chemistry A study of the relationship between th e n e rgy content of systems, work, and the p hysi cal and chem ical p rop er tie s of matter. Classi al an d statistical therm dynam ics, t hermoch em i s­ try, solut ion properti es, phase equili b r ia, and chem ical kin etics . Prere qui site: CHEM [ 20 or 1 25, MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54. 1 (4)

342 Physical Chemistry A study of the phys i cal prop e rt i es of atoms, mole cules and io ns , and their correlation with structure. Classical and mo dern quantum mechanics, bonding the ory, atomic and m o l ecu lar structure, spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 1 20 or 125, MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54. I I (4)

343, 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory

491 Independent Study

Li b ra ry and/or la bo rator y s t ud y of topics not included in regularly offere d courses . Propo ed project must be a pp roved by dep a rt m ent chair and s upe rvis o ry respon si b ili ty accepted by an instructor. May be t ake n more than on ce . I n ( 1 ,2, or 4)

Expe rim ent s in thermodynamics, solution behav ior, and

497 Research

molecular structure design ed to acqu aint students with instru­ mentation, data handling, correlations with th eor y, computa­ tional analySis, an d data reliability. Corequisite or prerequisite: 34 1 , 342, 343 or consen t of instructor required for 344. I n ( 1 , 1 )

Experimental or theoretical investi gati o n open to upp er division students with consent of dep artm en t chair. May be take n more than once. G en eral l y consists of an exp anded study of the resea rch project deve loped in 490. I II ( J ,2 or 4)

403 BiochemJstry

597, 598 Graduate Research Open to master's degree candidates only. Prerequisite: conse nt of d e p art men t chair. I II (2-4)

An overview,.induding b i ochemi cal structure, mechanisms of

reactions, metabolism, and the b i o ch em istr y of the cel l . Majors are encouraged to take both 403 and 405 for a more co m p lete understanding of biochemistry. Pre re qui s i tes: 332, 334. 1 (4) 405 Biochemistry A study of chemical rea ctions and Str u ct ures in li v i ng cells . Enzyme k i n eti cs and mechanisms of catalysis, and metabolism. Co nce pt s introduced in p hysi cal ch e m istry and bi oche m istry will be applied in this course. Laboratory d e s igned to s timulat e creativity and problem -solving abil ities t hro ugh the use of modern biochemical tech n iques . Prere qu is ites : 332, 334, 34 ] andlor 342 or pe T rn i ss ion, 403. II ( 3 ) 410 Introduction to Research An introduc;tion to l abo ratory research te chniq ues, use of the chemical literature, in clu din g computerized literature sea r hing, research proposa l and report wr i ti n g . St u d e nts develop an i ndepen de nt chem ical re searc h pr blem chosen in consultation with a member of the che m is t ry fac ul t y. Students attend seminars

as

part of the course requirement. II (2)

435 Instrumental Analysts Theo ry and prac t i ce of in strum en ta l methods along with basic electron ics. Speci al e m pha sis placed on electronics, s p ectro pho ­ tometric, rad iochemical, and mass spe c trom e t ric methods.

Prerequ isites: 338, 3 4 1 and/or 342, 343. II (4)

440 Advanced Organic Chemistry Students will deve lop a r epe r to ir e of syn th etic met hodo l og y and a gen eral understanding o f a va riety of organic react i on mechanisms. Synthetic organic st ra tegies and design , the an a lys i s of classic an d recent total syn theses fro m the literature, and adv anced app lic atio ns of instrumentation in organic che mis try. Prerequisite: 332. aiy D (2) 450 Inorganic Chemistry Te h n iqu es of str u ctural determination (IR, VV, VIS, NM R, X-ray, EPR) , bon d i n g p ri n ci ple s, n on- m etal com po unds , coordi ­ nation che m istry, organometallics, donor/acceptOT concepts, react i o n pat hways and biochemical applications are covered . Laboratory: Synthe sis and cha racerization of non -met al , coordinatio n and organometallic om po un d s. Prerequisites: 332, 34 1 ; Corequ isi te 342 . aly 11 (3)

456 Polymers and Bi.opolymers A course presenting the fu ndamentals of poly m er synthesis, solution ther m odyn a m ic properties, molecular characterization,

molecular we i ght distribution, and so lution kin e ti cs. Free radical , condensation, ionic, a nd bio p oly me r systems, with emp h as is on app li ca ti on s. The one-credit la bo r atory examining polymer synthesi s t hro ugh experiments is op t i nal. P re req u is i te : 34 1 ; Co re quis i t e, 342. aly II ( 3 ) 44

490 Seminar Se n ior capstone course. Presentation by students of kn owl e d ge gained by pe rso n al I.ibrary or lab ratory research , supplemented with seminars by pra cticing scientists. Participation of aU se ni o r chemistry majors is re qu i red and all oth e r chemistry-oriented students are encouraged to pa r ti c ip teo Seminar program will be hel d du r i ng the entire year but c red it will be awarded i n the sp ri n g se m est r. I IT (2)

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Chinese Studies The Chine e Studies program is an interdisciplinary program which is designed to provide students interested in China a broad foundation in Chinese language, culture, and history, and an opportunity to focu� on the religious­ phi losophical world view and the economi and business structure of China. The program requires that major and min r students complete coursework in at least three different disciplines: Chinese language, history, and anthropology, with optional work in political science, the arts, religion, business, and other disciplines. Students are strongly encouraged to partiCipate in the university's China exchange programs ( currently at Sichuan University and Zhongshan University) and may request that credits earned through these programs be counted toward the major or mi nor. With the approval of the program director, selected Jan uary-term, summer, and experimental courses may be included in the major or minor. FACULTY: A co m m it tee of fac ulty a dm i n iste rs th is p rogram: Guldin, Chair; Barnowe, Be n so n, Byrnes, Dwyer-Shick, Ingram, Jensen, McGinnis, War n er, Yie, Y, utz. M r. S idn ey Ri tte nbe rg erves as honorary adviser.

BACHELOR Of ARTS MAJOR: 36 se m es t er hours (24 required, 12 el e cti ve ) ; students mu.�t take at least ne Chin ese h istor y co u rse . Reqljired Cou rses: (24 semester hours) Anthropology 343 - East Asian Cultures Ch inese 1 0 I - Elementary Chinese Chinese 102 - Elementary C hin ese Chinese 20 1 - Intermed iate Ch inese Chinese 202 - Intermediate Chinese

Chinese Studies 490 - The Senior Project (4) A project, thesis, o r i n te rnsh ip which demonstrates compe­ tence in multiple di men sion s of Chinese Studies. Must be app roved in advance by chair of the C h i n ese Studies Program; tally ca rd required. Upon p rio r ap pl i cat ion of the student, seminars in ot her dep tments or programs may substitute

for this course.


Electiyes: ( 1 2 semester hours) An th r po lo gy 345

Conte mporary Ch in ese Culture Business 352 - Global Managem ent" Business 355 - Managrng G l oba l O perations" Chin e 3 0 1 - Comp sili n and Conve rsa t i on Chi nese 371 - Chinese Literature in Tra ns l at io n History 338 - Modern China H istory 339 - evolutiona ry China Histo 496 - Seminar: The Third World ( AfY n China)** Music 1 05 J - The Arts of China Rel igion 233 - Religions of China""" In tegrated Studies 3 1 7 - The rnterdisci plin ry Conversation* -

MINOR: 20 se m ter hours (8 required, 1 2 elective)

Required Co urses: (8 semester ho urs in Chi/lese language) Chinese 1 0 1 - Elemen t. ry Ch in ese Chinese 1 02 - Elementary Chinese (or one equivale n t year of un iversity lev I C hi nes e, up on approval oI the program chair)

Electives:

(12 seme.ster hours from at

departmen ts)

n o r­ r­ m

Students are expected to become familiar with the readin g list for tha t par t of tlle program (art, l iterature, history, philo ophy, or religion) in which their interest lies. The program is de igned to be flexible. In consultation with the Classics Committee, a student may elect a course or courses not on the classics course list. All re classics courses are ta ugh t out of the Depa rt m en t of Languages an d Literatures.

CI m

o ."

least two additiol/al

Anthropology 345 - Contemporary Chinese Culture Chinese 371 - Chinese Literature in Translation Histo ry 338 - Modern China Hi tory 339 - Revo lutionary China Mus i c 1 05 I - The Arts of China Rel i gion 233 - Religio ns of China"·" Business 352 and 355 and lrl tegrated SWdies 3 1 7 may COllllt for program redits only when the student's course project is focused on Chilla and is approved by tile p rogra m chair.

**

Classi s 322 - Roman Civiliza tion Natural Sciences 204 - History of Science Ph ilosophy 33 1 - Anc ien t Ph il osoph y Rel igi on 2 J 1 - Religion and Literature of the Old Tes ta m e nt Religion 2 1 2 - Religion and Literature of the New Testament Rel igi on 22 1 - Ancient Church Hj tory Religion 330 - Old Testament Studies Re l igi on 3 3 1 - New Testament Studies Independent Study C o u r es Selected January-term Courses

History 496 may be counted toward program retluiremellts only wilen it jOCllses specifically on China alld is app roved by the progra m chair.

,.,. .. Religion 132 may be substitured with the permissiotl program ch air.

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College of Arts and Sciences

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Division of Humanities

II> n

English Languages and Literatures Philosophy Religion

m Z n m

Division of Natural Sciences

II'

Biology Chemistry Computer Science and Computer Engineering Geosciences Mathematics Physics

of the

Division of Social Sciences

Anthropology Ec nomics History Marriage and Family Therapy Political dence Psychology Sociology and Social Work

Classics The dassics Program is a cooperative effort among the Departments of Languages and literatures, History, Philosophy, Religion, and Art. Its goal is to unite the "heart of the li ber al arts" with the mind, through history and p hilosophy, and the soul, through religion, and to embel­ lish this trinity of themes with the visual experience of art. This interdepartmental Classical Studies major requires the completion of 40 semester hours, in cl u ding at least one year of one of the dassical languages ( Greek and Latin) and two of the other. The remaining courses are selected from the list below in consultation with the program coordinator. The Classical Languages major requires all 40 seme ter hours in language study.

DEGREES OFFERED: Bachel r of Arts, Bachelor of Science

MAJOR REQUIREMENT: A major is a sequence of courses i n one ar a, usually in o ne dep art m en t . A major sh ou ld be selected by the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be ap p rove d by the dep art m en t chair ( or in case of sp ec ial academic pro­ grams. the program coordinator). Maj o r requirements are specified in tbis ca talog. The q ua li ty of work must be 2.00 r bert r. D g rades may be counted toward gra d ua ti o n but not toward a major.

CLASSICS COMMl'ITEl!: Snee, Coordinato r; ArnoLd, lansen,

E. Nelson, Oakman. Latin 10 1 - 1 02 - Elementary La ti n 2 0 1 -202 - Intermediate Greek 10 \ - 102 - El em e n t ary

Greek

20 1 -202 - In termed iate

Art t t O -

Introduction to Art History of Wes te rn Art T Art 386 - I magery and Symbolism Classics 23 1 - Masterpieces of European Literature CLassics 250 - C l ass ical Mythol ogy Classics 32 1 - Greek Civilization Art t80 -

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RECOGNIZED MAJORS:

II: I­

« III

:z: Ic z « z o I­

« u Z ::I :!: :E o u

Anthro p ology

G lobal Studies

Applied Physics Art

History

Biology Chemist ry Chi nese Stucties

Mathematics Music No rwegia n

Classics

P hilosop hy Physics

Individualized Study

Communication Com p ut er Engineering

P litical Science Psychology

Com p uter Sc ien ce Economics

Religion

Engineering Sc i enc e (3-2) English

Scandinavian Area S t ud ies Social Work

Environmental Studies Fre n ch

S oc i ology Spanish

Geosci nces German

Theatre Women's Stucties

Not more th an 44 semester hou rs earned in one department m ay be ap pl ied toward the ba .helor's degree in the College.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS: In ad di t ion to meeting the entrance requirement in foreign language (two years of high sc hool language, one year of co llege language, or demo n stra ted equivalent proficiency) , candidates in the College o f Arts and Sciences ( a ll B.A., B.S.) B.A.Rec., B.A.P.E. and B.S.P.E. degrees) must meet Option T, n, r III below: I . C omp let ion of o n e fo reig n language thro ugh the second yea r of college level. This req u i rement may also be sa t isfie d by co m p leti o n of four years of high school stud y in one foreign language or by satisfactory scores on a proficiency examina­ ti o n administered by the PLU D epartmen t of La ngu ages and Literatures. II. C omp letio n through the first year of coll ege level of a foreign language other than t hat used to sa t isfy the fo reign language entrance require m en t . This o pt ion may a lso be met by satisfactory co res on a p roficiency examination adminis­ tered by the PLU Department of Languages and Literatures. Ill. Four semester hours in history, literature, or language (at the 201 l evel , or at any level in a language other than that used to sa tisfy the foreign language en trance requirement) in addi­ tion to courses applied to the general university require­ ments, and Four semest er hours in symbolic logic. mathematics (courses numbered 1 00 or above) , computer science, or s tatistics in addition to courses applied to the general university

requirements.

The faculty of the Departmen t of Communication and Theatre is co m m i tted to a philosophical perspective on communication as the process by which shared under­ standings are created among audiences through the use of sym b ols . Implicit within this under tan ding is agreement on the assumption that people interact with one another for the p u rp ose of achieving outcomes, and that t his in teraction is accomplished through a variety of media. We focus ou r curriculwll and educatio n on four ability groups that all students should master. First is the ab il i ty to think and refle ct criti c ally. Students should be able to observe, analyze, perceive relationships. reason, and make inferences about their lives and world. Seco nd. students should be able to express themselves effectively using verbal and non-verbal techniques. Third, students should be able to interact with one anotber and their environ­

ment. Finally, st ude n ts hould develop an ability to value themselves, their environment. and others as diverse and

important facets of our social lives. With the learning of these abilities comes a responsibility to community and social service.

High school languages used to satisfy any of the above opt io n s must have been completed with grades of C or higher.

FACUlI'Y: Inch, Ch(lir; Bartanen, Becvar, Davidson. Ehrenhaus,

Courses used to satisfy e ither line of Option III of the College of Arts an d Sciences requirement may not also be used to ' a ti sfy general university requirements. Any college-level foreign

CORE REQUIR1!MENTI Only the following courses from

language course numbered 2 0 1 or above used to sati fy Op t io n I and any completion of collegel- level language through 102 used to sati sfy Op t ion II may also be used to sat isfy the Perspectives on Diversity requ ire ment in Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Candidates for the BA in Engl ish , for the B.A. in Educatio n with concentration in English, for the B,A. in Global Studies, for the B.B.A. in In te rnational Business, and for election to the Arete Society must

46

Communication and Theatre

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Harney, Lisosky, Parker. RadID, Rowe, Spi er.

Communication and Theatre may be used to meet the general university core requirement in the arts: 1 51 , 1 60, 1 62, 1 63, 24 1, 358, 359, 363, 364, 458. N o course beginning with the prefix C OMA counts toward the university core requirements .

COMMUNICATION CORE SEQUENCE: Prin tlbroadcast journalism, criti cal communication studies, and public relations maj ors must take an initial core of cOllr es as follows: 1 2 3, 27 1 , 284, 285. NOTE: 123 and 271 s houl d not be taken concurrently.

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: Students who want to declare a communication major with an empbasis in printlbr adcast journalism, crit ical communication stud ies, or public re la t ions: 1 . Will , at the time of declarat ion , have a cumulative gra de point average of at least 2.5. 2. Will have successfully compl eted the Communication Core ( 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285) with a grade point verage of 2.5 or bigher.

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BACBEWR OF ARTS MAJORS: Maximum I 44 sem e s te r hours in any of the areas of concentration: 1. Critical COlllttllmication Studies - requ ired CO!lrses: 1 23 , 27 1 , 284, 285, 328, 330, 333, 433 p l us 1 2 - 1 6 ad di ti ona l hours from 300 and 400 level communication courses selected after cons u l tati o n with adviser. Requi red s u p p orti ng areas: 3-4 hours in economics, 4 ho u rs in stati tics or research m eth ds, and 12 hours In social sc i en ce s QI a m i no r approved by an

adviser. 2. Prill t/Broadcast Journalism - required cou rses: 1 23, 2 7 1 , 284, 285, 384 or 378, 480, p l us 24 addi tion al hours fro m 300 and 400 leve l commu n i cati n courses se l ec ted after con s ul tati n with adviser. R eq ui red supporting areas: 3-4 hours in economi s, 4 ho u rs in st ati s ti cs or res earch methods, and 1 2 hours in social sciences or a minor approved by an adviser. 3. Public Relations - required courses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 385, 435, 378 or 384 or an approve d writing course, plus 1 6-20 ad di tio n a l hours from 300 and 400 level communication courses selected after consultation with adviser. Re qui red supporting areas: 3-4 hours in economics, 4 hours in

s t a ti sti cs or research methods, and 1 2 hours in so c i a l sciences or a minor ap proved by an adviser.

4. Theatre - ActinglDi recting Emphas is - required co u rses: 1 5 1 , 1 60, 225, 250, 352, 357, 363, 364, 425, plus 6 ho urs fro m com­ munication and theatre courses in co nsul tatio n with adviser. 5. Thea tre - Designrrechnical Emphasis - req uired courses: 1 5 1 , 160, 225, 250 or 454, 352, 356, 363, 364 , 425, 452 or 453, plus 6 hours from co mmunic ati o n and th ea t re courses i n consulta­

tion with adviser. All can d ida tes for the B.A. de gree must satisfactorily c om pl ete a forma l internship o f I to 8 se m ester hours under the supervision of a faculty member. In a ddi ti on to re quire men ts listed above, candidates for th e B.A. de gre e must mee t the op ti on requirements in the Coll e ge of Arts and Sciences.

Course Offe rings: Communication 123 Communication and Theatre: A Way of Seeing, A Way of Sharing Introduces the study of communication and t h ea tre. Surveys the contexts and app lica t ion s of st ud y in t he se discipUnes. Intro­ duces the use of r he tor i cal th e o r y as a mean of understanding communication behavior. (4)

o

22S, 41S Communication Practicum

3:

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Introduces the critical study of mas s communication. Surveys influence its structure and con len t. Surveys si gn i fic a nt trends and issues in both d o m e st i c and international med ia co ntexts.

(4)

284 Communication as Process: Speaking Seminar Introduce the basic techniques of public speaki ng . S tud e n t s c o m p l ete several speeches and learn the basic skills of speechrnaking, in c l u di ng topic se l ec ti ons, research, o rg an izati on , audience analysis, and d el ive ry. ( 2 ) 285

See En gli h 3 1 2 . (4)

324 Nonverbal Communication peets of c o m m un ic ation within the fran1ework of interperson al i n ter acti n. Prerequisite: Commu.ni­ cation core or con se nt of instr uctor. ( 2 )

Focus on the nonverbal

326 Group Communication.

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

con st ru cts rega rdi n g the role of groups in organiz a ti nal and

2. Public Relations: 20 semester hours, i n cl u d ing 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 385, plus 4 hours from 300-400 level communication courses selected in consultation with adviser.

Theatre: 20 se me ster hours, including 1 5 l 1 60 24 1 , 250, pl us 4 hours from comm u n ic ati on and th ea tre course s leet d i n consul tation with adviser. 4. Tire Dance Minor is c ross- refere n ced with the School of P hysic al Education. See the d esc ri pt i on of th at minor under 3.

Physical Educatio n.

5.

The Publishirlg and Prin ting Arts Minor is cross-referenced with th e Department of En glish. See th descr ipt i on of that minor under English.

c

how the tecllll ical , e con omic and behavioral elements of m e d i a

All .a ndid ates for the B.F.A. degree must sa t isfacto rily om p le te a formal intern sh ip of I to 8 se meste r hours un de r the s upervi­ sion of a faculty member.

I. Critical Communication Studies: 20 semester h ours, in cl udin g 1 23, 284, 285, 330, 333 or 433, 328 or 4 36 .

Studies how people int e rac t in groups. I n trod uc es th eo re t i ca l s od I settings. Pro vides experience in analyzing and i mp r ov in g g roup perfor m a n ce and interaction. (4)

328 Argumentation Studies how p eop le use rea o ni n g giving in social decis ion ­ m aking. Analysis of ge nres , forms, and tec h niques of arg ue rs . Focus is o n methods of creating, understanding, a n d criticizing argu m e n ts . (4)

330 Public Speaking Focuses on imp roving skil l in p ublic s p ea ki n g. I n trod uces th eori es a n d te ch n ique s for e ffectiveJy p articipa ti ng in various speaki ng contexts. Provides experience t hrough wT i tin g and de l ive ri n g a range of different kinds of pu bl ic speeches. (4)

333 Foundations of Communication Theory Introduces the t h eori es and research t o Is used to s t udy i nterpersonal and mass com mun i ca tion . Studies the role of theories in p rov i d i n g pract i cal u n de rstand in g of the com mu n i ­ cation process. Emphasizes the role of em p i r i ca l research in bm aden i ng u n derstanding of communication. (4) P

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271 Media literacy

322 Publishing Procedures

MINORS:

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a nd q ual ita tive research methods. ( 2 )

2. Theatre - Acti ng/Directing Emp hasis - required courses: 1 5 1 , 1 60, 24 1 , 250, 352, 357, 363, 364, 454, p lus 1 8 hours selected

See School o/Edu cation.

o

d ta in the s t ud y of human communication. Both quantitative

321 The Book in Society See En gli sh 3 1 1 . (4)

225, 250 or 454, 352, 356, 363, 364, 425, 452 or 453, plus 1 8 h ou rs seJectcd i n consultation with adviser.

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234 Introduction 10 Research in Communication The s tud y of meth ds of gat h ering, interp reti ng , and evaluating

1. Commu nicatioll - req uired courses: 1 23, 27 1 , 284, 285, 4 hours in each ability grou p, and 8 h ours in external req uire me n t s.

3. Theatre - Design /Tech n ical Emphasis - re'l !.ired courses: 1 5 1 ,

c

Students put classroom lheory to prac tical ap pl icat io [l by indi vid u al ly co m p let i ng a project relating to an aspect of co mmunic ati on . An i nstr u ctor in the area of interest m us t approve th project a n d agree t o p rov ide guidance.

in any of t he two areas of concentration:

in consultation with adviser.

3:

One se mes te r hour credit may be earned each se m ester, but only 4 semester hours may be used to meet u n iver sity requ.irem en ts .

Communication as Process: Writing Seminar Introduces the process of co m m u nica ti o n wirting. Surveys co p y formats and style rules for writing in communication-related car [s. Students c o mp l et e a n um ber of diverse wr iti ng a ign­ ments to apprec ia te the m ec ha n ics of wr iti ng and the role of a udie nces . (2)

BACHEWR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR; At least 54 se m e ste r hours

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334 Gender and Communication

433 Rhetndcal Theory

Attempts to

a nalyze and un dersta n d the relationship bet1.veen ge nd er and co m m u n i c a t io n behavior. Comparison and contrast of male an d female communication styles, sim ila rities a n d diffe rences in langu ag e usage, in te rp ersonal di alogu es, group discussi os a nd l ist ning in personal and profess io n al arenas. (4)

Introduces the th e o ries and re search tools lIsed to sttldy commwlicalion from a rh et orical perspective. Analyzes the role of rhetoric as a crucial mean s of hu man problem-solving. Em p h asizes the r Ie of cri tical research in understanding the rhetorical significance o f messages. (4)

335 Intercultural Communication Workshop

435 Organizational Communication

Desi gn ed to ac quai n t students with the influe.nce of caltura!

S tudies

the role of comm uni ca tio n in for mal organizations. Provides insight int how organizat ions use and mi use com­ m u n ication techniques in accomplishi ng their ends. Emphasizes

ba ck gro u nds ,

an d

perceptual systems, social organiz.ation, langu age, nonverbal messages i n intercultural communication . ( 2 )

336 Communicating i n Business and the .ProfessioDs

n a ture of com mu n ica ti on p rocesses in organiza­ communication, interv i ewin g te ch n i qu es , i n for m ative an d pe rs uas iv e spea ki ng , working in grolrps, and basi business writing skills. (4)

Focuses on the

Q Z < z o t­ < u

tional s ett in gs. Students deal with i nte rp erso nal

373 Audio Production Elements of audi o p ro du ct io n , analysis of program design, s cr i pt in g, an d p rod uc t io n tools and

c s and fa i l u re people exp erience in interac­ tion. Emphasizes the im po rt an c of learning t d ia gnos e and p rovi de solutions to common communication difficulties . (4)

writing an d and laboratory. or conSent of instructor. (4)

of program de s i gn,

438 Advanced PubUc RelatioDs Examination of p u bl i c relations issues uch a ca mp aig n p l a nni ng, crisis

378 Broadcast Jou.rnalism

Selection and editing of news copy and he adli ne writing. Sel ecti on , sizing, and c rop pin g of p hotos . Functions of layo ut . Principles of newsp aper des ign and their practica l applications. Prerequ isi te : Communication c ore or consent of i nst r uct or. (4)

ConOJct and Communication

role of co m m u n i c. a t io n in the d evel op men t and ma n age m en t of human conflicl. Use of t h e theories of promi­ nent con flkt and peace scholars and si gn ifica n t case tud i e s to devel op a method for better understanding the nature and r sol u t io n of conflicL P re req u is ite: Communication core or Studies the

The t heo ry and a pp lication of law in news gather ing, publishing, and broadcasting. Will cond uct legal research. (4)

384 Advanced News Reporting Reporting of p ol i t i cs and police, courts and other gover n me nt a l functions, i nvestigative rep rt in g and writing. Blend of field trips

core or

385 Introduction to PubUc RelatioDs Introd uces the theories, meth ods, and pr ctice of public relat ions. Emp hasizes technical and analytical skills. P rer eq u isi t e: Co mmunic ati o n co r or consent of instru ctor. (4)

388 Editorial Writing

conse nt of instr uctor.(4)

450 WOl"kshop in Effective PubUc Speaking Audienc analysis, to pi c selection, organiz ti n of ideas for various audiences, types of peeches, usc of visual aids, and delivery. Designed for both n ov i ces and those who have had some c.--q>erience as speak 15. (2) 475 Advanced Media Production

P rodu ci ng, scrip ting, directing, per fo nning , a nd eval ua tin g so­ p h ist icated audio and video pr grarnming. Prereq u isit e : 3 74. (4) 480

Resear h and

writing of ed i tori als and commentaries for newspapers and b ro a dcas t. Func t i on of th editorial and editorial pages i n the news media. Prerequisite: Communication co re or consent of instructor. (2)

In-Depth and Investigative Reporting

Group reporting in

depth on a single is ue for both newspaper and television. Prerequisites: 380, 378 or 384. (4)

485 Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Communication Provides senior-Ie el communication an d theat re students with the op portun i t y to syn t he s ize their s t udy through discoverin g means of cross-applying theories and practices in various contexts. Allows stude nt s t experience study i n a eminar atmosph rc. Allows s t udents to complete a research paper or proj ec t i n their area of interest . (4)

390 Ethics in C{tmmunication Studies the basic p ri n ci pl es of moral philosophy and explores et h i cal iss ues i nvol v ing those en gage d i n c mmunicatio ll professions 'uch as jo ur n a l i s m , publ ic rel a ti o ns, bro adca st i ng , and a dver t is in g. Students use case studies to le ar n to r ecogn ize ethi al dilemmas and de velop strategies for dealing wi th them.

(4)

491, 492, 493 Special StudIes i n Communication [nvestigations or research in area of special in terest n o t covered courses; open to q u alified j u n ior or senior stu de nts. A student should not b eg in reg ' · t r a t ion for independ e. nt st udy un t i l th e sp ec i fi c area for investigation h as been approved by a depar tmental sponsor. ( l -4)

39 1, 392, 393 Communication Abroad: Studies in CUlture

by regular

Exploration of communication systems and environmen ts

beyo nd the un ive rs i ty in international cultural contexts. ( 1 -4)

A

of d i ver se cultures. The co u rse examines contemporary theory and research and exam ines a variety of cultural variables in l u di n g: cul tural b ackg ro u n ds, p ercept io n , sociaJ org an i za ti on , lang ua ge, and n o nve rb a l aspects of mess ages . Prere quisi te: Communication core or consent of instruc to r. (4) 440

381 Media Law and Principles

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and ethics.

(4)

Studies the nature of co mm unicat io n anlong people

380 Newspaper Editing, Layout, and Design

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fo un da t i o ns,

439 Intercultural Communication

Prerequ is ite : Communicatjon

and writing exercises. Prerequisite: Comm u n icat ion consent of i nstru tor. (4)

management, theoretical

Prerequi s it : 385 or con sent of in st r uc to r.

Te chniques of b roadc as t journalism. Ap pl ica t io n s of neWs ga the ring , w ri t i n g , and reporting in a b To ad cas t context. Radio, te levisi o n, and n ew s produ c t i o n assignm nts using broadcast

equipment in the field and studio. core or cons en t of instructor. (4)

w people

to expl a in the su

production tools a n d te ch n i qu e s . Lecture Prerequ i s ite : Communicati on core

The st udy of per 'uas i o n as a means of perso nal and social influence. Examines the theoretical foun dations and explores the ethical a nd social impl ications of contemporary persuas io n. (4)

i nteract with each other. Introduces the various theori s hel p i n g

374 VJdeo Production

app l ic ation

436 Persuuion

437 Advanced Interper80naJ Communication Studies the role of communication as the basis for h

techn iques. Lecture and

l abor a tory. Prerequisite: Communication core or consent of i n stru c to r. (4) Analysis and

the interrelationship of th eo ry and case studies in un de rs t an di ng th complex nature of contemporary organizations. (4)

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500 Effective Communications A look at commullication proce e. in rganizations with deve lop men t o f sp e c ifi c com muni cat i on skills; includes publ ic speaking te hniques. inD rmative an persuasive commun ica­ ti n. in terview i n g strategies, and the role of listening. (2) 596-598 Research in Communication For g ra d ua te stud nts only. ( 1 -4)

363 History of the Theatre: Aeschylus Through Thrgenlev Theatre as it evolved from it s primitive origin throug h represen­ tative societies; Ancient Greece, R me, Renai sance, Mo em Eu rop ea n , and American. (4) 364 History o f the Theatre: Ibsen Through to the Present ( See desc ri p t i o n for 363.) (4) 452 Scenic Design Develop ment of artistic a nd te c h n ica l abilities in the field of sc ruc de ign incorporating many periods and styl es as weU as p reparation of models, renderi ng, and drafti n gs . (4)

Course Offe rings: Theatre lSI Stage Technology

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453 Costume Design

Basic theory and p roced ur e of all backstage elements in t h e

theatr , costwne , scenery, p rop s, l ig h ts , makeup, an d manage­ ment. (4)

160 Introduction to Theatre Expo�ure to thea tre and its n um ero us offshoots ( .g., film , tel ev i si on , rock concerts) through audience pa rti c ip ati on and personal contact. (4) 162 History of American Film Concentrates on the d evelop men t and growth f the motion p icture in the Un i te d States from 1 895 to the p resen t. (4) 163 History of the Foreign Fllm Concentrates on the development and grow th of international

film . (4)

225, 425 Theatre Practicum One semestl'I hour c red it may be earned each semester, but only 4 semester hours may be used to meet un i ve rsity requirements. Students pu classroom t h eo ry t practical appl ica t ion by individually compl e ti n g a pr ject re l ati ng to an aspect of th eat re . An instructor in the area of in terest must a p prove the project and agree to provide g uida nce. 241 Oral Interpretation of Uterature The art of commun icati ng th e essence of a p iece of litera ture to an audience: in te rp ret i ng it exp erient ially, logically, and emo­ tionally. Ind ividual and group perfor m nce. ( 4 )

Development of art' tic and technical abilities in th field of costume des i gn incorpo ra ti ng histo ry. patterns, and rende r­ ings.

III

(4)

454 Play Direction The role of th e d irector, h istori cally and cri tically; an intensive study that is both p ra ct i cal and th eo re t ica l in its ap pro a ch to th e art of the p lay director. Each tuden t is req u i red to di rect scenes fro m p l ays rep resent ative of all pe ri od s f theatre h is to ry. A final project, consi ti n g of a con te mporary scene, will cul m i n ate the cou rse. Prerequi si tes: 1 5 1 , 250 and jUllior s tatus . (4) 458 Creative Dramatics Des ign ed to acq ua i nt the student with materials, techniques. and theories of creative d ramatics. I nt en de d or 'elementa ry and ju nior hjgh seho I te ach ers or prosp ective teachers, theatre major , re l igio us leaders, youth and camp counselors, day care wor kers, social and p sychological workers, and c om mun ity theatre leaders i nterested in wo rkin g with children. S (4) 491, 492, 493 Special Studies in Theatre lnvestig dons or research in area of sp ec ial interest not covered by regular c urses; open to qualified j uni or or sen i or studen ts. Requires prc-registration approved by a dep artm en t al sponsor. ( 1-4)

(4)

351 Stage Makeup Sp ec i al ized work in p l an ni ng and a pp l i cati on of techn iques from straigbt make u p th r ugh aging , three dimensional, and special effects. (4) 352 Stage Management All of the facets of man aging a t he atr ica l p rodu tion : planning, scheduling, rehears al process, doc u m en t tion, and i nterperso na l re l at i on h ip s. (4) 356 Stage lighting Stage l ighting from the d evelo pme n t of el ectric ity and li gh t ing

instruments to the complete design o f lighting a show. (4)

357 Intermediate Acting, The Actor At Work Practical experience in the art of the actor thro ug h performance of scenes from pl ays of the modern theatre, emphasis on the i m p ort anc e of pl ay analysis by the actor, and exam i n a tion of cu rrent acting theory. Prerequisite: 250. (4) 358 Advanud Actiug Study of the work of an act o r ; character analysis and embodj­ ment, u sing scenes from pi YSi includes styles of aCling as de fin ed by historical p er i od . Pre requisite: 357. (4) 359 Acting for the Non-Actor Specifically de s ig ne d for those who have nourished a curiosity to explo re the art of ac ti ng but have been intimidated by a lack of knowledge or p rior experience. Not open to th eatre m jo rs or m i no rs. (4)

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596-598 Research in Theatre For gradua te students o nly. ( 1-4)

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An exami nation of the work of a ct or s and actre sses, their natural

and learned skills; exe rci ses in memo ry, imagination. and

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observation; improvisations and scenes from modern plays.

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computer Science and Computer Engineering

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Computer Science Computer science deals with the theory, design, and appli­ cation of computing systems and the tudy of the storing and manipulation of information. The program at Pacific Lutheran University provides a broad base core of funda­ mental material that stresses a n alysis and design experi­ ences with substantial laboratory work, including software development. In addition, students are exposed to variety of programming languages and systems. Students can choose from a number of upper level cour es which insure a depth of knowledge and an understanding of current developments in the field. The Ba helor of Science degree in computer science has been accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Commission of the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc.

Computer Engineering Computer engineering is a relatively new engineering specialty that has grown out of rapidly evolving micro­ and mini-computer technology. The curriculum consists of essential and advanced elements from computer dence and electrical engineering, developing both hardware and P

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software expertise. Electives permit concent ration in areas such as integrated circuit de ign, microprocessor applica­ tions, computer design, appli cati o n software development, and artificial intelligence. " z II! w w

FACULTY: H a user , Cllair; Blaha, Brink, Fofanov, Kakar, Murphy, Rose nfel d, S p illm a n , Wolff. BEGINNING CLASSES: There are several be ginni ng level classes in computer science desi gned for students with various needs: Co mpu ter Scie nce arId Errgirreeri'lg 1 1 5: So lve it with the Computer!

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udents with little or no b ackgrou nd in com­ puter scie.nce who wish an i ntroduc tio n to the use of the computer for problem solving. Not recomm en ded for st ude n t s with strong mathe.matics backgrounds. This co u rse also sa tisfies the Mathematical Re.asoning requiremenL Especia lly for s

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Computer Science and Engineering 220:

Compu terized [nformation Systems Especially appropriate for business majors and other st udents wis hi ng an introduction to th e computer and appl ications of software packages. Computer Science and Engineering 144:

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science, computer eng i ­ neeri ng, mathematics, and most science majors, as well as others wishing a stro ng experience in computer p rogramming. Computer Science and Engineering 270:

This is the second cou rse in the maj r. With departmental ap p r val, students with a strong p rog ra m mi ng ba ckgrou nd may receive adva nced pLacement into this course.

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or equivalen t. MINOR IN ELECTRICAL ENGINl!F.RING: Computer Science and Engineering 1 3 1 , 245, 345, 346, an d 1 44 or 240. Reqllired supporting: Math 1 5 1 , J 52, and 245 or 253; Ch emist ry 1 20 or MINOR IN INFORMATION SCIENCE; 20 semester hours including CompUter Science and Engineering 144 and 367, at least fou r hours from computer science courses nu mbered above 250 (excluding 322 a nd 449), and Business 202. Required sup­ porti n g: Math 1 5 1 , 1 28, or equ i vale nt .

COMPUTER EQUIPMENT: All students have lmJ i m i ted access to the univer ity Compu ter Ce n ter's user-room fa c il it i es . The Department of Computer Science and Co mp ute r Engineering also ma i n tai ns laboratories of its own. Tbe upper Level lab con­ tains NeXT, Macintosh, SUN, an d Win dows workst atio ns. The other Lab is used as a tea c h i n g La b or ato ry and open lab; it

SECONDARY TEACHING MINOR.: See descript io n under

has fifteen Windows NT workstations and computer p rojectio n equip ment. All machin are on the Ethernet, are accessible through the campus network, and have full access to the I n ter ne t.

STATE ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS: under School of Education.

School of EducaJiorz.

ELEMENTARY TEACHING MAJOR.: S ee description under Scllool of Education .

COMPUI'ER SCIENCE MAJORS: Students m aj o r i n g in com­ puter scien e may c hoose to earn either a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science degree. Th e Bachelor of Arts program

is the minimum preparation suitable for further p rofessional is often combi ne d with ext ensive study or a second major in an all ied field. Th Badl lor of Science is a strong, scientific degree that contains add i tio n al courses in co mpute r scie nce, mathematics, and sc ience and serves both students going di rectly into e mp loyme n t on g r adua t ion and those going illto graduate programs. Both degrees are based on the same core c urses: Computer Science and Engineering 144, 270, 346, 380, 490A, M athematics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, and 245. St udents houJd begin Computer Science and En gin eeri ng 1 44 -270 and Ma th em at i 1 5 1-1 52 ea rly i n th e ir progra m . study and

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: At least 26 semester hours of computer sci ence a nd en gin eeri ng i nclud ing 144, 270, 346 or 380, an d 490A. The remaining hours are from computer science and engineering courses num bere d above 329 (excluding 449). Up to 4 hours may be su bstituted from Math 34 1 , 34 5, and 356. Required supporting: Matb 1 5 1 or 1 2 8 and Math 245.

50

and 20 1 ).

3. A pproved sciences cour es are: any Biology except 1 1 1 , 1 1 2; any C he m ist ry except 1 04, 1 05, 2 10; any G eosci e n ce s except 104; any Physics except 205; Computer Science and Engineering 345 or 434. 4. The r emai ni n g hours, if any, may be ch os en from any math course numbered above 329 (except 446) or any app roved science course.

125; Physics 1 25, L26, 1 35, 1 36 or 153, 1 54, 163, 1 64.

Data Structllres

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to be selected from the compuler 'cience courses numbered above 329 (excep t 345, 434, 449 and 50 1 - 509), or hours from Math 356 n ot coun ted toward the 30 hour ' of required support­ ing courses. The 30 hou rs of supporting co urses in mathematics and science must in.c!ude: 1. Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 230 (or 33 1 ) , 345 (or 341 ) . 2 . A minimum o f 1 2 h o u rs o f a ppr oved science courses which in cl udes a year's sequence of a la bo ra tory science (Physics 1 53-154 with 163-164, Chemi try 120 or 1 25 and e ith er 232 or 338, Biology 1 6 1 - 1 62, Geosciences 1 0 1 , 102, or 103;

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: 20 semester hours includ­ ing Computer S ience and Engineering 1 44, 270, and eight additional hours of up p er division computer science courses (excluding 322 and 449 ) . Requ i.re d supporting: Math 1 5 1 , 1 28,

Introduction to Computer Sciellce For students majoring in computer

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367, 420, 436, or 444. Ele c tive courses submitted for approva l are

See des cription

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING: Computer Science and Engin cring 1 3 1 , 245, 345, 346, 490B; Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 253, 345 or 34 1 and o ne of 230, 33 1 , or 356; Comput r Science a n d Engineering 1 44, 270, 380, 480; Physi cs 153, 154, 163, 1 64; Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25; at least four semester b urs chosen from Physics 233, 234, 333, 334, 336, O T Chemjstry 34 1 ; 12 additi o na l semester hours ( 1 0 if Co m pute r Science and Engi neeri ng 490B is taken for 4 credits) from any upper level Computer Science and

E ngin eerin g course

(except 449 or 503).

Course Offerings A gra de of C or hig h er is stron gly recommended prerequisite courses.

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l I S Solve It With the Computer

Teaches how computer usc can be combined with ma t hematical reasoning to sol ve problems. Spread s h eet package and other computer tools to solve problems from elementary statistics, fi nancial tr a ns a ct io n s, and other area where mathematics and data are used in every day l ife. Prerequisite: fulfillment of the en tr a nc e requi rem ent in mathematics. (4)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 semester hours in com­

131

puter science plus 30 hours of upporting courses in mathemat­ ics an d science. The 40 semester h urs of computer science must include 144, 270, 343, 346, 375, 380, 490A, and 1 4 additional credits of ap p roved elective course s , one of which must be from

to the engin eer ing profession and d evelopment of basic skill impor tant to the profession, i ncludi ng p roblem s ol ving , engineering design, graphics, use of co mp ute rs, COlTI-

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Introduction to Engineering

An introduction


purer p rogramming, engi n eer i n g ecoDomics, and ethics in engi neeri ng. Prerequisite: Comp letion of college-preparatory mathe m ati cs. I (2) 144 Introduction t o Computer Science An i ntrod ucti o n to computer sc i ence i nc l ud i ng p ro bl em so lv in g , al go ri th m d ign, structured p rogra m ming , numerical and nOD­ numerical ap p licatio ns, and use of da t a fIles. Ethical and socia l i mpacts of com p uti n g. Prereq u isi te : 4 ye ars of high school m ath ­ ematics or MATH 140 or eq ui vale n t. I IT (4)

199 Directed Reading Supervised r udy of topi s selected to mee t the i ndivi dual's needs o r int erests, pr im arily for s tuden ts aw a rded adva n ced p lace men t in comp uter science. Admission only by dep artm e nt invi a ti o n . ( 1 -2) 220 Computerized Information Systems I ntroduction to computers includ ing management information syste m s evel op ment, telecommun ications, operating systems, spreadshee ts. grap hics , and database ma n a ge me n t . Incl udes a computer labora tor y component. Prerequisite: M ATH 1 28 or

1 40 or eq uivalen t. I II (4) 240 FORTRAN Prognmming An accelerated in tr du cuo n to the FORTRAN programming langu age, in c l ud ing i n put/ o u tp ut, com p utation, bran ch in g, loop i n g, data types, and sub prog ra ms. Numer ic an d non­ numeric pr blems will be solved. Some previous exp erience with p ro gr am ming is recommended. Prerequisite: MATH 1 28 or 140 or equivalent. a / y ( 2 )

242 COBOL Program.m.i.ng Presentation and ap p l icatio n of tbe COBOL p rog ra m m i n g lan ­ guage to business prob lems. Pre r eq uisi te : 144 or consent of instructor. a/y II ( 2 )

243 C Programming A wo rk sh o p in the C p rog rarnmin g language for exp er i ence d programmer of other high-level l angu ages . P rer equisite : 270 or equivalent kn owl e dge of a h igh level programming language . 243 and 343 ca n n o t both be taken for credit. 11 ( 1 ) 245 Electrical Circuits Introductjon to the fundamental concepts of DC cir cuits includ­ ing Ohm's an d IGrchho ff's Laws and the function of in ductive and capacitive elements. Prerequisi te : PHYS 154. 1 (4)

270 Data Structures Study of obje ct -or ien ted p rogramming techniques and funda­ mental data structure abs tracti ons an d im ple mentati on s includ­ ing list, stack, queue, and trees with ap p lications to sorting. searching. and datil storage. Prerequis ite: a gr ade of C- or higher in 144. I II (4) 291 Independent Study Prerequisite: consen t of d ep artment chair. ( 1-4) 322 Microcomputers in the Classroom Introduction to the use of microc omp uter s in educational s ettin gs in clu ding : 1 ) The com pute r as a teacll er tool us in g word p ro cess i n g , s pre ad sh ee t. and gradi ng programs. 2) C omp ute r assisted instruction, 3) Software evaluat io n . 4) Integ rating soft­ ware i n to the cu r ri c ul um , 5) Cop yright laws and p u bl i c domain software, and 6) Software cu rr entl y used in education set ti ngs . Pre or co-requisite: EDUC 253 or 2 6 2 . Does no t cou nt towa rd deg re es in comp u ter science. ( 2 ) 330 Introductiou t o Artifidal Intelligence An intro duct i o n to c o ncep t s f artificial i n te Ui genc , in cl ud i ng exp er t syste m . n a t UTai la n gu age p ro ces si n g, image understand­ ing. and p ro blem so lv in g tech n iq u es. Consider a t ion of th e ethi­

cal a n d social dilemmas posed by AI. The p rog ram m i ng language LISP will be taught and used in several pr ojects . Prerequisite: 270. MATH 245. a ly 1 998-99 r (4)

343 Programming Language Concepts A s t udy and compar i son of feat ures found in different computer languages. Imperative object- oriented, fu nctional, a nd dec l ar a ­ tive l a n gu ag es will be tudied. Programs written in seve r al of tbe l a ngu ages. Prere qui site: 27 0. II (4) 345 Analog Electronics An i n troduc tion to an al o g in t eg ra ted circuit design techniques, including single and multis tage am p l ifier s , frequency response and feed b ac k methods. Laboratory work is part of t h e course.

I ( 4) 346 Digital mectronics An al ys is of digital d esign techniques. i nclu d i n g a review of combt national logic. flip flops. registers, counters, and timing ci rcuit s. P re req ui si te: 144. 1 II (4)

348 Modeling and Simulation An introd uct i o n to tll fundamental co ncep ts of mathematical m od elin g and com p uter simu lation. The course will cover build­ ing and va lida ting abstract mod el s and imulating tbem using si mulatio n l angu ag es . Prerequ isite : 1 44. Recom mended: 270 and either MATH 34 1 or 345. a/y ( 4 )

367 Database Management An i nt rod uc t i on to tbe fundamental concepts neces sa ry fo r de sign, usc. and i m p lemen tat ion of database systems. The entity­ relationship and re lational models re studied in de tail. Indi­ vidual. organization, and soc i e tal concerns rel ated to accuracy a n d pdvacy of data. M aj o r sm al l g ro u p p roj e c t . P re requi s ite: 144 Recommended: 270. IT (4)

37 1 Design and Analysis of Algorithms El em e nta ry data tructures reviewed for e ffi cie nc y under differ­ ent c ond i t i o ns . Analysis of problems associated w it h searching and so r ting . Study of formal models of co mp uta t i o n ( fmite automata, pushdown automata, and Tu ring machin es) . S tu dy of formal l angu a ge concep ts such as re g ul ar ex pr ess io ns and gram­ mars. P rereq ui s i te : 270, MATH 245. I (4)

372 Advanced Algorithm Design and Analysis An alysis of advanced data tructures in cl u di ng B- Trees, Hash Tables, and Red-Black tr ee s. Study of algorithms fo r gr ap b

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theory, he urist ic search. databases. file systems, and other to p ics selected by the instructor. P rerequisite: 270, MATH 3 7 1 . 11 ( 4 )

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380 Assembly Language and Computer Organization Co m pute r assemb l y lan guage applied to various problems. Topics in cl u de data and in str uc tion form ats . addressin g, li nkin g, macro definition, a n d computer arch itecture. P re req uisite: 270. Strong l y recommended: 346. (4)

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385 Computer Architecture An i ntrod ucti on to the structure a nd ope rati on of l a rge com­ puter system s. Topics include data representation, mem ory structure, 110 pr ocess i ng, multi-processing systems su ch as parallel, pipeli ne . a n d st ack m achi nes. Exa m ple s of the architec­ ture of several l arge systems are an lyzed. Pre requis ite : 380, MATI! 245. (2) 386 Computer Networks An introd uction to computer networks and computer commu­ n i ca t io n. Topics i nclud e system topology, m essag e and packet sw itch i ng , bus structures and data-link transmission. P rer equ is ite :

1 44. Recom m ende d: 270, 346, MATH 341 or 345.

aly (4)

391 Problem Solving and Programming Seminar D esign ed to imp rove advanced p ro bl e m solv ing a nd p ro gram­ m i ng skills, i nc lud i ng advanced data structur .. A goa l of th e course is participation in the reg ional ACM prog r a m mi ng competition. P as s lPaii only. Sm de nts may ta ke this course more th an o nce. P rereq u i 'it : 270 or c nsent of in st ructo r. I ( 1 )

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NP-ccmpleteness, and the halting probl em . Prerequisites: 270,

400 Topics in Computer Science

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Sel ec ted topic from the list below or topic of current interest in the di cipline. Frequent topics are: Computer Security, Parallel Compu li ng, G raphical User I n terface Programming, PaTaUel Processing Topologies, Genetic Algori thm s , and Ne ura l Networks. ( 1-4) 410 Topics in Computer Engineering Selected t pic from the list bel w or to p ic of current int rest in the disci pline. Frequent topics are: Comput r Security, Parallel Computing, Grap hica l User Interface Programming, Paralle l Processing Top o logies, Genetic Algorithms, and Neural Networks. ( 1 -4) 412 Computer Graphics

A study cf the techni ues and theory used to. generate computer graphics. B oth two-and three-d i m ensional r epresen tatio ns will be covered. Ccurse work includes everal p rogramming assignments plus a project. Prerequi 'ites: 270 and MATH 230 or 33 1 . aly (4) 420 Software Engineering

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An e ngi n eering approach to. the devel op ment of large software packages. Topics include software requirements definition, st ruc tured prcgramm ing, software design, specificatio ns , and scftware testing. Consideration of societal and ethical issues sur rcunding software engineering. MajDr s ma ll group project. Prerequis ite : 270, MATIl 245. aly n (4) 434 Traruporo Momentum, Energy and Masa Concepts and equations cf classical rontinuurn fluid mechanics: momen tum, energy, and mass transport, transport cDefficien ts - visrosity, thermal ro nductivit y, mass diffusivity - inviscid and laminar flows, boundary layers, exp rime n tal and numeric al mcdeLing cf transpDrt processes. Prerequisite: PHYS 333 or co nse nt of i n structo r. n (4 ) 436 Pattern Recognition The use of the computer to. recognize patterns in data. Topics include artificial intelligence, cluster a nal ysi s algDrithms , learning algorithms, and pattern processing. Issues assDciated with making decisions frDm data analyzed by machines and the SDCietal and privacy implicaticns and ethical cDn ce rns involved in t hose kinds cf decisions. Major small gr ou p project. Prerequi­ sites: 270, MATH 24 5. aly IJ (4) 438 bpert Systems The develDpmen t of Al systems wh ich operate at the level of a human expert. Student will explDre the st r ucture Df exp ert sys­ tems and use an expert system development to I. Prerequisite: 330 or ronsent of instructor. aly IT (4)

444 Operating Systems Al1 lntroduction to cDmpuler operatin g systems in cl udi n g process scheduling, memDry managenl el1 t, and file systems. M aj or small grDup prDject. Prerequisite: 380, MATH 245. I (4) 446 VlSI Design An in troducticn to the design of very l arge-scale in tegra ted systems using computer-aided desi gn m thods. Prerequisite: 346. II (2)

449 Computer Science in the Secondary School Methods and materials in secDn dary SChDDl compute r sci ence

455 Compilers An intrDductiDn to th organization , specificatiDn, and a n a lys is Df programmi ng languages, including scanning, parsing, object code, run-time machine st mctures and Dptimization . Prereq ui ­

MATH 245. a/y

1 998 -99 (2)

41 5 Tbeory of Compndng Study of the basic fDundations Df all computing: Turing machines, fDrmal languages, recursive theory, c rnplexit y, 52

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490 Capstone Seminar Written and Dral p resenta ti o n of a proj e ct in a top ic of in terest by the student und er the supervision o f a facul ty member. Discussion Df the skills n ee ded fo r goo d resea rch and te<hnical ccmmunication of that research. Study of the sDc i al imp l icatiD ns of computers and their use today. Ccmpletion of t h i course satisfies the core requirement for a senior capstDne seminarl project. La ts two semesters beg inni n g in the fall semester; May gr aduates shDuld start the course in the fall of thei r senicr year alld December gra d ua tes should begin the course in the fall of th ei r j unior year. Final presentations are given during the spri ng semester. Prerequisite: Computer Science and Engineering maj or.

I II (4)

491 Independent Study Prerequis ite: ronsent of department chair. ( 1-4) 495 Computer Science Research

I nvolvement in an ongoing research prDject in computer science under the supervi si D n of a faculty membe r. Prerequisite: consent of instr uCtDr. ( 1 -4) 503 Worksbops in Educatioual Technology Workshops designed to exp a n d teachers' knowled ge about the application of new co m pu ter and related technDlcgy in educa ­ tional settings DDes n t CDunt toward degrees in cDmputer sc i e nce. ( 1-4)

Cooperative Education Internships Cooperative education is

a

unique p rogram that offers

"h ands-on" job experience ( called experiential education ) . Through internships st udents can weave opportun it ies fo r work and learning at

the same time. The program features

systematic cooperation between the un iversity and an extensive number of empl oyers in the Puget Sound community. Although the program's career-related advantages are obvious , its main benefits are educational. Students gain an appreciation of the relationsh.ip between theory and application, and may learn, both early and first-hand, about new develop ments in a part icular field. Cooperative education provides timely and extended opportunities for developing communication skiBs orally and in writing.

A coo perative education p rogram can enable students to become aware of opportunities to contribute creatively to the changing dimensions of work in present- day society. FACULTY: Phelp , Director.

teaching. LOGO, PIWT, etc., may be cDnsidered. Does not count toward a m ajo r in computer science. Prerequisi te: 1 44. aly II (2)

site: 380,

MATH 245. a ly (4)

480 Microprocessors St udy of microproc sors and their use in micr computer syste m . Prerequisites: 346, 3 80. I (4)

T Y

TWO MODRLS; The Cooperative Edu cat iDn Program ac.CDm­ modates both par t-t im e and full-time work mDdes. Part-time wDrk which allows studen ts t h e opportunity to take on-campus courses concurrently i s I beled the "ParaH I MDdel" A full - ti me work expe rie nce fits under the "Alternating MDd e\." In most cases, students will follow on or the Dther, but SDme depart ­ ments or schools may de velo p sequences that rombi ne both parallel and alternating work modes. Fuji-time summer work, for example, wculd be classified as an alternating CD operati ve education experience, and many summer jobs provide for learni n g that relates to. students' a ca ­ demic obj ectives.


THE PROCESS FOR SI'UDENTS: 11 be e ligib le for admi ss ion into the C oo pera tive Education Program a student must h ave comp l eted 30 se mester hours and be in g od standing. Students who w· h to pa rt icipate ap ply to e i the r the Co-op Office in Harstad Hall or to a Co -o p facu l ty coordinator or spo nsor serving this function in spe itied departments, divi ions, or sc ho ol s. Both written a p p t i ca t ion and perso nal interview are re quired to determine eligibil ity, ter m s for p l ac e m e nt, areas of i nterest , academi requirements, and kinds of p sitions ava ilabl e . Students are respons ib l e for their l earning activities during their cooperative educ at ion position. Ea ch student must seek o u t and arran ge for academ ic supervisiOll frOID a faculty coordinator or sponsor. Faculty are responsi bl e for i ns u ri ng that the wor experien e provid es appropriate le ar ning opportu niti es for hel pi ng to establish the learni ng agreement, and for deter­ mini ng a grade. Learning is facilitated throug h : ( I ) use of a " Leaming Agreement" ; (2) com p leti ng an academ ic project; (3) peri odi c

contact with the faculty sp onsor ; (4) at t enda n ce at o ne work­ sh op during the work experience; and (5) a n on-si.te superv i sor wh accepts the responsibility to function in a resourc role. The l ea rn in g agTeement, deve lop e d by each stlldent with the assistance of a faculty sp on sor, l ists learning obj ectives with measurable i.ndicators of tearning, and also incorporates su pp leme ntary resources such as read i ng materia ls and p ar tic i ­ pation in work- r lated train i ng e ' ions. The learning agreement is signed by t he student, the facIDty spo nso r, the program director. and the work supervisor, each of whom receives a copy. Contact between the faculty spon so T and the studen t must be sufficient to all ow the s p onso r to serve as a resource and pr ovi de academ ic supeIvision. Typically, this ca.n be acco mpl is he d d u r i ng one or twO lte vi sits. Students in a "parallel " coo p er ative educa­ tion program m ay arrange to meet with the spo nsor on campus. T hose i nvol ved in " al tern ting" programs some d is t an ce from cam p u s may m a i n t a in contact th rough pe ri od IC p h o n e confer­ ences, when ite visits are impra.ctical . Employers are resp onsi bl e to: ( I ) p rovi de pportunities for students to achieve th ej r le arn in g obj dives within the. l i m i ts of thei r work se tti n g ; ( 2 ) help tndcnts develop skills related to

the contextual aspects of th e work wor l d ( su ch as re lat ions hips with co-workers) ; and (3) facilitate stud nts' in tegration into their work setting so that their e m pl oym en t proves valuable and p roductive. S t uden ts a re requi red to regi ster for at l eas t one credit hour after accepting a Co-op po sit ion . Through out an unde rgradua te academic career a student may rece iv e II maximuOl of 1 6 se m e s­ ter ho u rs of credit in cooperative education.

Course Offerings Work Experience I A supervi ed educational experie nce in a work se tting. Requires the comp l etion of a C{)operative Ed ucatio n Lea rnin g Agreem ent 316

in consultation with a faculty sponsor. ( I -8)

Economics . " Want is

a

growing giam whom the coat of Have was never

large enough to

cover." - RALPH WALDO £MERSON

Economics is the study of how people establish social

m n

arrangements for producing and di strib u ti ng goods and services to sustain an d enhance human life. Its maIn objective i s to determine a wise use of limited economic reSOUIces so that people receive the maximum benefit at the lowest co st The economics discipli ne embraces a body of tech­ niques and conceptual tools that are useful for under­ standing and analyzing OUI complex economic system.

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FACUIIY: Rei ma n . Chair; Brue, R . le n s n, Nugent , N. Peterson, Travis, V i nj e , Wentworth, Xu. BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: (A) Minimum of 40 semester h ou rs , i nclud i n g 1 5 1 . 1 52, 35 1 , 352, 486, 12 hou rs of electives i n econo m i cs , 4 hours se1ected from S tati tics 231 or Mathematics 341 , and 4 hours selected from Ec on o mi cs 244, 343 (if not used as economics e l ectives ) , Bu iness 202 or 303, Mathematics 348, or up to 4 h ours in computer science. (Bj A grad e poi nt average of 2.50 in aU classes inclu ded in the

40 seme teI ho urs t

ward

the m aj or. With departmental ap p ro val , Econom ics 130 may be substituted fo r Economics 1 52 � r purposes of major and minor

requirem ents. E co n omics 486 me ets the senior seminar/proj ect requirement. For st uden ts planning graduate work in ec o n om ic s or b usines s , additional math p rep aratio n will be ne e ssary. For s p ecific courses, co n s ul t your major adviser.

HONORS MAJOR: Outst an di ng students may choose to pursue gra duat ing i n eco nom ics with honors. In addi tion to meeting all o th er major requirements. in o rder to be gran ted deparLmental honors a student must: (A) have an overall uni rsi ty grade p oint average of 3.5 or better; (B) take fo ur hours beyond the standard maj or in 495, Honors Th esis ( S tu de n ts ap p ly for a dmiss io n to this cou r 'e i n the second semest r of lh ir junior year. The dep artmen t grants admission to 495, H on o rs Thesis, based on the st ude n t's prior work in econ o mi cs and the q ual ity of the ge. ne ral re se arc h pr oposa l . ) ; (C) p res en t the resul ts of the work completed in 495, H onors Th esi s, at a m ee tin g of Omicron D el ta Ep si lon (the ec on o m ic s honorary) . MINOR: 24 senlester hours. including 1 5 1 , 1 52, 3 5 1 or 352., and 1 2 addit ion al hours of electives, 4 of which m ay be in stati stics. ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCIETY: The department offer m em bership in Omicron Delta Ep s ilo n , the International E conom ics Ho n orary Soc ie t y, to qualified majors. For s pe cific criteria, see any dep a rt menta l facul ty m em ber. BACHEWR OF ARTS lN EDVCATION: See School of

Education.

476 Work Experience n A supe rvi sed e du ca tio nal e xperi en e in a wo rk setting prov idi ng

for ad van ced level of responsibility. Requi res the com p ietion of a Cooperative Educa tion Lea m ing Agreement in cons ulta tio n with a faculty sponsor. ( \ -8)

477 lntemational WOJ:k Experience A supervi sed e du ca t io nal experience in an othe r country. Requires ca mp i tion of th e Inte rnational Cooperative Education Agreement, co mpieti on of a c lea ran ce checklist. and an approved plan of reporting in o n sultation with a fac ulty sponsor. ( I - 1 2)

516 Work Experience III A st:lpervised educational exp e.rience at the gradua te level . Requires comp letio n of a Cooperative Edu cation Agreement in conswtation with a faculty sponsor and the student's graduate

Course Offerings 130

Global and Environmental Economic Principles

Analysis of p ublic policy and private behavior; a pp r priat e

p r ici ng, resource val uatio n , taxes ad s u b sidi es, trade policies, sustainable deve l opm en t. a n d i nc o me gr owth and dis r ibution . Students cannot take both 1 30 and 1 52 for cred i t. (4)

151 Principles of Macroeconomics I ntroduces th e economy as a whole an d major issues su ch as

inflation, u n em ploymen t, economic growth, nd intern ational

trade. (4) 152 Principles of Microeconomics Introduces the study of economic decision making by firms and

program adviser. ( 1-4) P

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indi viduals. Economic tools and concepts such as markets,

371 lndustrial Organization and PubUc PoUey

supp ly and demand, a nd e ffi c ie ncy a pp l ie d to contemporary

An an a lysis

i ss ues .

of the structure, co ndu c t, and perfomlance of that fost er and alter industrial structure and behavior. P rere qui sit es: 1 30 or 1 5 2, or consent of i ns t ruc tor. (4)

(4)

Anlerican indu try and pu bl i c pol ic i es

321 Labor Economics

Analysis o f l a b r markets and labor market issues; wage deter­ mination; i nvestment in human ca pi tal , unionism and collective

381 Comparative Economic Systems

ba rga i ning; law and pu bl i c p o licy; discri m ination; lab or

inflation. Prereq uisi tes: 1 30 or 1 52, or consent of instructor. (4)

An analysis and co mp a r i s on of contemporary ec nomic systems. Prerequisi tes: 1 5 1 or 1 5 2, or consent o f i nstructor. Fulfi lls cross­ cultural line in the Perspectives on Diversity req ui re men t . (4)

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330 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

399 InterDship

The lir st half of the course examines the t heory of externalities,

A rese arc h and writing project in co nnec ti on with a studen t 's approved o ff- ca nlpu a ct i vity. Prerequisites: sop h o m o re s tandi ng p lu s one course in economics, a nd consent of the department. ( 1-4)

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mobiUty; ea rnin gs inequ al i ty, un empl yment, and wages and

congestion and the common-property basis for environmental de gradat ion , and the valuation of enviro nm ent al amenities. The second part of the course devel op s analytical models for the use of re newa ble and exhaustible resources over ti me. Pre req uisi t e : 1 30 Or 1 5 2, or consent of in tructor. (4) 331 International Economics

Regi onal and int e rn a ti o na l speciali zatio n , com para tive costs, inte r na t ional payments and exchange rates; national policies th a t promote or restrict t rade. Prerequisites: 130 or 1 52, o r consent of instructor. (4)

490 Evoluti.on of &onomic Thought Economic thought from ancient to modern ti mes; emphasis on the pe r i od from Adam Smith to J.M. Keynes> the clas sic al economists, the so cial i s ts , the ma rgi n a iis ts , the neoclassical economists, and the Keynesians. Prerequisite: 35 1 or 352 ( may be taken con currently). Meets the senior seminar/project requ i rem e n t . (4)

341 Economic Development: Comparative Third World

Strategies Ana l ys is of the theo retic al framework for de ve l o p m ent w it h ap plic a t i on s to alternative eco no m ic de velo pm ent strategies used in the newl y emerging devel o p ing countries. Emphasis on co mp a rison between cou ntries, assessments of th e relative importance of cultural values, historical experi en ce , and gove m ­ mental po li ci es in the develop m en t process. Fulfills cross­

cultural Line in the Perspectives on Diversity requirement. Prerequisites: 1 30 or 1 5 1 , or co n se n t of instTuctor. ( 4) 343 Operations Research

Quantitative methods for decision probl ems. E m phas i s o n l in ea r p rogra mm ing and other d eter m in i sti c m odels . P r e req uisite: STAT 23 1 or eq uivale nt. (2) 344 Econometrics

Introduction to the methods and tools of econ ometrics as the basis for ap plied research in eco nom ics. Specifica tion, estima ti o n and testi n g in the classical li n ea r regression model . Prerequisite: S TAT 2 3 1 or equivalent.

(4)

491, 492, 493 Independent Study

34S MatheDUItical Topics in EconomJcs An introd uctio n to basic applica t ions of mathematical tools used in economic an alysis . Prerequis ites: 1 3 0 or 1 5 1 or 152, o r consent of

irutructor. (4)

members. Research pro p o sa l and to pic develop ed by the student in the jWlior year. Application to enroll is ma de in the sec ond seme ter of the junior year. Prerequisite: economics major and consent of the dep artmen t . (4)

National income dete rmination in cl uding p ol i cy im pl ica ti ons within the institutional framework of t he U.S. ec on omy. Prerequisites: 1 30 or l S I , and M ATH 1 28 or 14 0 or 1 5 1 . (4)

496 Seminar

352 Intel'lDediate Microeconomlc Analysis Theory of consumer behavior; product and factor prices under

conditions of monopoly, co mpetition, and intermediate markets; welfare economics. Prerequis i te s: 1 3 0 or 1 52 , or consent of

instructor and MATH 1 28, 1 40, or l S I . (4) 361 Money and Banldng

501 Analytical Methods for Dedsion-Maldng

The c ncepts o f p ro bability, sampling, statistical deci si on t heo ry, l in ea r p rog ra m ming , and other d e t er m i n isti c m od el s a ppl ied to m anage r ial problems. P re requisi t e: 500. (4)

362 PubUc Finance Public taxation a nd exp end itur e at all governmental levels; the incidence f taxes, the pubJi deb t and the provi s i on of p ub li c goo ds such as national defense, education, pure air, a nd water. Prerequisites: 1 30 or 152, or conse nt of in st ruc tor. (4)

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Seminar in eco nomi c problems and poli c ie s wi t h emp h asi s on encoura ging the stud en t t o in tegr at e problem-solving method­ olo gy with tools of economic anaJys is. Top ic ( s ) selected by class participants and i nstructor. Prerequisite: consen t of instructor. ( 1-4) 500 Applied Statistical Analysis An i n tensive introduction to s tatistical methods. Empha is on the ap plica tion of inferential statistics to conc rete situations. (4)

The nature a nd role of m ney; monetary th eo ry; to o l s and im p l e men tation of monetary p ol i cy; regulatio n of intermediar­ i s; banking a ctivity in fin anci al markets; i n t ernat io n al conse­ que nce s of and constraints on m o n etar y policy. P rere quis it es : 1 5 1 or on sen t of instructor.(4)

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495 Honors Thais

Independent research s up ervis ed by one or more faculty

351 Intermediate Macroeconomic AnBlyais

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Pre re quisite: consent of the depa r tment an d c omp letion of e i th er 351 or 352. ( 1-4)

520 &onomic Polley Analysis

An intensive in troduction to the concepts of macroeconomics and microeconomics with an e m p has is on p ol icy form ation within a gl ob al framework. (4 ) Y


School of Education The School of Education o ffers programs of study leading to certification for elementary, secondary, and special

education teachers, administrators, reading specialists, and school lib r a r ians . The curriculum is design d to provide graduates with a blending of the l iberal arts and a variety

of guided field experiences beginning early in the educa­

deveLop­ sensitive to the varied

tional sequence. The faculty is committed to the ment of educational personnel individual needs of learners.

FACUll'Y: Beck, Dean; B au ghm a n, Associate Dean; Lamoreaux, Director of Graduate Studies; Yerian , Director of Undergraduate Stlldies; Byrnes, Collay Gagno n, Gerlach, Hillis, Leitz, Lewis, McGraw, Minetti, Mulder, Reisberg , Shanton, Wentworth, G. William , Yetter. The School of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accredi tatio n of Teacher Educatio n (NCATE), the Northwest Association of Schools and Col leges , and the Washin gton State Board of Education for the pr ep aration of elementary and seco nd ary te ach ers, princi p al s , program administrators, and s pecial education teachers, with th e Master of Art s i n E du ca tio n the highest degree approved. The accreditation gives PLU graduates reciprocity with many other states. Prog r ams for the preparati on of school administrators and school librarians are available. The School offers coursework toward the conversio n, renewal, or reinstatement of tea ch i ng certificates. For p reparation of sch ool nurse , see School of Nursing se tio n of this catalog. The School of Education offers graduate degrees in Classr om Teaching, Edu cational Administration, Literacy Education, Special Education, and the master's degree with I n i ti a l Teach ing Certification. Information regarding these programs is av ai l ab le from the djrector of gr ad ua t e progranls in the School of Education (535-7272).

EUGml UTY IlEQUIREMENTS FOR PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (Undergraduate or Certification Only): tude n ts seeking to regi ster for Ed uca t ion 302 or for Educational Psychology 26 1 / Edu ca tion 262 m ust apply to the School of Educat ion , in ord to receive a reg istrat i o n number. Official transcripts of aU colJege/univer ity wo rk , writing sa mp les, and fficial do cumenta ti on of co llege admission test scores must be su bmi tt ed to the School of Ed ucation by the first Friday in October r March before being ad m i tted to the School of Ed uca t io n and allowed to enroll in ed uc ati on courses the following term. 1 . Evidence of verbal and quantitative abi l i ty as illustrated by one of the foll owing test scores:� a. Schol ast ic Aptitude Test (SAT) Verbal 42 5 o r above; Total 1 040 or above.. .. b. Washi n gton Pre-College Test (WPCT) or (T ETEP ) Verb I 48 r above; To t al 1 0 3 or a bove .... c. Am e r ica n Co ll ege Test Assessment ( ACT)

Verbal 20 r above; Composite 23

or

above�*

.. All applicallts who have not taken SAT, ACT, WPCT aT TETEP must su bmit a TETEP score. � .. Test score requirements are set by the S ta te a/ Washington and ar subject to change. 2. Sophom ore ta nding (30 or more semester hours) 3. Cumulative gr ade point average (GPA) of 2.50 4. Psychology 10 I: g rade of C or h igher 5. Writi ag 1 01 : grade f C or hig h e r Application fo rm s and p ro ced ures for ad m issi on to profes­ s

in educati

III

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BAE and/or CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: S tudents become c an di da te for cer tific a tio n when they have succes- fully compl e ted the following: 1. AU co u rs e work with a cumulative grade point average of 2 . 50 or above. 2. P rofession a l E du ca t i o n Seq uence for elementary or se co nd ary te ac hi ng . 3. An app roved teaching major(s) or concentrati n(s) (see requirements as listed WIder Academ ic Preparation ) . 4 . All cou e s i n edu ca t i on and in major and minor fields with grades of C or h i gher (for secon d a ry education, B-or h i gh er required in educntion courses). 5. A hievement of p ro fic iency in writing and math sk ills . . An thro polog y 2 10/History 2 1 0 or Anthropology 102 for secondar}' tea ching and Anthropology 1 02 for elemen t a ry t eachin g . 7. Coursework or co urSes on the i 'sues of abuse, as a p p roved by the Schoo l of Educati on (SPED 480). 8. A student te a chin g experience. Students mll t compl ete all app lication pr c dures by the last Fr id ay in Marc h for fall st u den t teaching or the last Friday i n O ctobe r for sp r i ng stude nt teaching. 9. A vaLd first aid card.

TEACHER CER'I1FICATION lnitial Teaching CertiJicate: St uden ts who su ccessfully complete a prog ra m of professional st u d ie s in the School of Education, and who meet all related academic requirements for a degree r a certificale, will be recommended by the Sch 01 of Educati n for a Wash in gt on initial te aching certificate. Additi nal state re­ quirements for t he certifi ate i n cl ude a Washington State Patrol check, an FBI fin ge rp r int check, and a passing score on state entry-to-practice tes ts. Information regardi ng all state require­ ments and p rocedu re s for certi ficati o n is available in the School of Ed u cat i o n. tate requirements are subject to immediate change. Students should stay ill close call tad with their School of Education advisers for updates itz program or applica tion requirements.

Requ irlWlents include:

sional stu di

Education. Students wh do not meet aU the re q uirem ents may exercise the ap pe al proe . for a dmi ssio n to Education 302 or Educational Psyc hol o gy 261 /Education 262. Admission ap pea l process forms are available from an adviser in the Schoo l of Education. All students admitted to E du ca tion 302 or Educational P ychol ogy 26 1 /Education 262 are ad mit ted provi ionally to a program of p r ofession al studies , ubj ect to conditions and procedures identified in the ElementarylSecondary Initial Level Certification Handbooks, available in the School of Education. Continuation in the program of p rofes s iona l studies is subject to continuous assessment of stu dent development and performance.

[J

are available from the School of

Inltial Teaching Certificate Renewal: Under st te regulations in e ffe ct at the publ icati on of this ca ta log , the Initial Certi fica te i valid for fOUI years, and may be renewed for an add it io n I th ree years by meeting the � U wing re qu ire men ts: 1 . In order to be eligible to renew or have an initial certificate reissued, an individ ual mu s t h ave co mp leted aU coursework requirements fo r continuing ce rtific ation or have com plet ed

1 0 se meste r ( 15 quarter) hours of st udy inee the issuan ce of the MOST RECEN T initial certificate in the role for which renewal or reissuance is being sought ( WAC 1 80-79- 5) ( I ) (a). The individual must also meet the recency r equireme n t desc ribed below. 10 so m e cases the s am e credits may app ly Lo both the renewa l/reissuance requirement and the recency requirement. 2. In o rder to be elig i ble to obtain, renew, or have an init i a l certificate reissued, the individual mw; have completed 1 0 semester ( 1 5 quar ter) h urs within the s ven years p reced i ng application for the initial certifi a te. The recency requirement does not apply to individuals who are seeking the continuing certificate. (WAC 1 80-79-065)(3)

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3. An individual rnu t o m pl ete th renewal application form and send it to the Schoo l of Education, with the 1 5 renewal

Term II:

fee (check made payable to Pacific Lu theran Un iversity). Certi fi ca t e

4. An individual must have a c py of h is or her Initial 011 ille in LIlt: Schoo l of Education.

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Converting to the Continuing Certificate: At th lime 0 f publication of tilis cal alog , stale r equi re m ents in clude : I . 30 semester h urs of u pp er division or graduat e level post­ baccalaureate study.

Term III: EDUC 400 EDUe 401 EDUC 4 1 0 EDUC 4 1 2 SPED 499

2. 1 80 days of full -time leaching, of which 30 days must be with the same employer. 3. 'TWo endor ements. 4 . Coursework in issues of abuse.

ELEMENTARY PREPARATION Generol requirements: In addition Lo the general university and core requirements in all curricul , certain specific requirements in ge n eral education must be met.

1. Anthropology 1 0 2 , Exploring Anthropology; Culture and Society ( reco mm e nd ed) o r An th ropology 2 1 O/Ristory 2 10, Glo b al Perspectives, or the equivalent must be taken.

Individuals with Special Needs ( 2 ) H um an Learning: Growth and Deve lop me nt ( 3 )

(I)

SPED 499

Media and Techn o logy in K-8 Cl a ss room s (2) Practicum I ( 1 ) Top ics i n Elementary Edu ca t ion : Classroom Issues and I nst ructional St r at egi es ( 3 ) Pra cticum I I ( 1 ) Mathematics in K-8 Education ( 3 ) Li teracy i n K-8 Education ( 3 ) SciencelHealth i n th e Elementary School ( 3 ) Soc i al Studies in the E le mentary School ( 3) Srudent Teaching in K-8 Education (9) (or EDUC 434 fo r dual student teaching) Top ic s i n Elementary Educati n: C las sroo m Prac­ tice in the COllte:rt of Educational Foundations (3) (EDUC 4 3 0 a n d 435 meet the s eni r seminarl project req uirement) Tea ching for Individual Differences-Elementary (2)

ART 34 1 and MUS1 34 1

Music in the Eleme n t a ry School ( 2 )

EOUe 408

£DUC 4 1 0 muc 4 1 2

mue 430 WUC 4 3 5

(required urlly for n o n special educmion majors and minors) E leme ntary Art Ed uca t ion ( 2 )

Integrating Arts in t he Classroom ( 2 ) Physical Eclucation in Elementary Schools ( 2 )

ELEMENTARY SEQUENCE (Regular and certificatioD oolf):

Human Learning: Gr wth and Deve lop m e nt

E UC 302 EDUC 303 SPED 200

Field Observation ( I ) Speci a l Needs learners (2)

MUSt 34 1 SPED 480

Music for Classroom Teachers ( 1 -2 ) Child Abuse ( 1 )

(3)

The following courses must be taken after Term 1: PHED 322 PE in Ele.mentary School ( 1 -2) ART 341 Elementary Art Edu tion ( 2 )

56

P A C I F ,

( reqrliremwt by State of Washington) C

l U T H I: R A N

U N I V E R

5

I

4. Teaching HogUm as a Second Language ( 16 hours required) A TH 1 02 Exploring Anthropology: Culture and Society (4) LANGlEDUC 445 Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages and English as a Second Language Theories of Language Acquisition (4) LANG 446 LANG/EDUC 475 Practicum in Teaching Englisb as a Second Language ( I ) LANG/EDUC 470 Curriculum, Materials and Instruction for Teaching English as a Second Language (4) 5. Instructional Technology ( 1 6 hours .required) Computerized Information Systems (4) CSC! 220 Instructional Tec h nology in K- 1 2 Schools EDUC 449 (2) Library Media and Technology ( 2 ) EDUC 537 One of CSC! 1 1 7 Critical Conversation (4); COMA 271 Media Literacy (4) ; or muc 457 The Arts, Media and Technology (2) One of EDUC 357 Media and Technology in K-8 Classrooms or CSC! 322/EDUC 493 Microcom puters in the Classroom (2) Electives (4-6 hours)

Courses must be take n in thi& seque nce: Term [;

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MINOR: Studen ts preparing for elementary classroom teaching should choose one of the following four options: 1 . CToss-DisdpUnary Studies ( 12 hours required) Select 12 h o u rs from: Children's Literature Computers in Education Child Develop ment Speech Geography Special Education

literature electives.

OT

SOTA 34 1 PR E O 322

EDUC 435

Student Teaching (9) ( EOUC 434 for dual student teaching) Topics in Ele m entary Education: Foundations (3)

3 . Reading EndQrsement ( 1 6 hours required) EDUC 408 Literacy in K-8 Education ( 3 ) EOUC 493/ 5 1 0 The Acquisition and Development of Language and Literacy ( 2 ) EDUC 4 1 115 1 1 Strategies for Language/Literacy Devel op­ ment ( 2 ) EDUC 4 1 3/ 5 1 3 Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction (4) EDUC 438/538 Strategies for \"Ihole Literacy Instruction K- 1 2 ( 2 ) Chi ld re n 's Literature Courses EDUC 426/526 Special Topics in bildren's literature ( 2 ) EDUC 427/527 Multicultural Children's Literature ( 2 ) EDUC 428/528 Children's Literature i n t h e K - 8 Curriculum (2) EDUC 429/529 Adolscent Literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2) ""May subsritute ENGL 333 or 334 or e q uivalent 4-hol<r children's l i teratu re course for EDUC 428/528 alld the children's

Professional Education: Elementary Program

EDUC 401 EDDC 406

Term IV: EDUC 430

2. Spedal Education ( 18 hours requiTed) ( see listing under Special Education K- 1 2 )

2. Mathematics 223 or equivale n t must be taken. 3. Biology I I I or l ife sc ien ce. 4. Nat ura l Sciences 20 or pbysical science.

Field Observation

Topics: IssueslStrat egi e s (3) Practicum II ( 1 ) Elementary Science Methods ( 3 ) Elementary Social tudies Methods ( 3 ) Teaching for Individual Differences - Elem. ( 2 ) (reqr, ired only fo r non -special education majors alld m ino rs)

Although the master's degree is no lon ger required , any S hool of Education M. A.E. degree can be used to meet the academic re­ quir emen ts for the continuing certificate. Other means by which the School of Education can help persons meet continuing certi­ fication requirements will be considered as they become known.

SPED 200 DUC 302 EOUC 3 0 3 EDUC 357 EDU C 3 5 8 EDUC 400

EDUC 357 Media/Technology in the Classroom ( 2 ) EDUC 358 Practicum ! ( I ) EDUC 406 Elementary Math Methods ( 3 ) EDUC 408 Literacy in K - 8 Education ( 3 )

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6. Early Childhood Special Educatiou (18 bours required) Development in Early Childhood Sp ecial SPED 4-93 Education ( 2 )

SPED 34 1 /541 SPED 3 3 8/53 8 SPED 395

Practicum in Special Education ( 1 ) Assessment in EC Sp ec i al Education ( 2 ) Issues i n E C S peci al Education (2) Language Developmen t (2) or SPED 490/ 5 1 0 Language Develop ment (2)

SPED 296/596 SPED 404

Educa t ing the Physically Challenged (2) Communication and Collaborati on (3)

SECONDARY PREP�ON General requirements: In addition to the general university requirements in all curricula, certain specific requirements for general education must be met. 1. Anthropology/History 2 L O, Global Pe rspectives ( recom­ mended) or Anthropology 102 , Culture and Socie ty, must be taken . 2. Computer Science 322, Microcomputers in the Classroom, must be taken (Physical Education and Music Education degree maj or s excepted ), 3. Minimum grade requirements include a cumulative grade

point aver age of 2.50 for the following: Entrance to professional sequence.

b. E nrollmen t in any course in professional education.

c. Graduation and/or cert i fication. 4. Grades of C or high er in the following: a. All courses in majors and minors. b. Writing 1 0 1 , Psych ology 1 0 1 , Anthropology/History 2 10 or

An t h ro p ology 1 0 2 . c. Computer Science 322.

Professional Education: Secondary Program (minimum of 30 semester bours): EPSY 2 6 1 EDUC

2 62

Human Relations Development (3) ( Prerequisite: Admission to the sequence) Foundations of Education (3) ( Prerequisites: Admission to t h e sequence and conc urrent enroll­

EDUC 263

ment in EPSY 26 1 ) Sch o ol Observation ( 1 ) ( Prerequisites: Admission

EPSY 3 6 1

E D U C 262) Psychology for Teaching ( 3 ) (Prerequisite:

to the sequence and concurrent enroIlrnent i n

SPED 362

EPSY 26 1 ) Teaching for Individu al Differences - Secondary (4) ( Prerequisites: EDUC 262/263, EPSY 26 1 ) (N t

required for special education major r minors) EDUe 44X Su bj ec t Area Methods ( 3 ) ( Prerequisites: EDUC 262/263, EPSY 261 , 3 6 1 , SPED 362) EDUe 46 1 General Teachin g Methods - Secondary ( 3 ) (Prerequisites: EPSY 2 6 1 , EDUe 2 6 2 , concurrent

EDUC 462

enrollment in EDUC 462) Tendler Assisting - Seco nd ary ( 1 ) (Prerequisites: EPSY 2 6 1 , EDUC 2 62 , concurrent enrollment in

EDUe 46 1 ) ED UC 468

EDUC 469

Undergradu ate

Student Teaching - Secondary ( 9 ) (Prerequisites: EPSY 26 1 , 36 1 , EDUC 262, 263, 461, 462, SPED 362, senior standing, cumulative GPA of 250 or higher; a valid first aid card must be on file before student teaching placement can be finalized) (EDUC 468 meet s the senior seminar/project requirement) Seminar - Secondary

tudents

EPSY 2 6 1 , E DUC 2 62 , 263 .... ... ......... ... ............................ 7 hours EPSY 36 1 , S PED 362 . . .. . .. . . . . .. .. . . .... . .... ... . ... . . ... . . .. . . . . . .. . . .. .. .. 7 hours

Stra t egies for Teaching Early Learners (2)

SPED 492 SP D 399

a.

Recommended Sequences:

£OUC 46 1 , 462, 44X . . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . ....... . .... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . 7 hours E DUC 468, 469 . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . .. . ... . ... . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 1 2 hours

Graduate Students (with B.A./B.S. degrees) EPSY 26 1 , EDUC 262, 26 . . . .. . . . . . .. .. ... . .. 7 hours EPSY 3 6 1 , EDUC 46 1 , 462, SPED 362 . . ... . . . ... .. . . . .. . 1 1 hours EDue 44X , 468, 469 . .... . ... ............ ................. .... .... ......... 1 5 hour .. . . . . . .

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ACADEMIC PREP�ON: A major from those listed must be co mpleted Completion of a teaching ma 'or/minor in a .

m o c: n > -I o z

second academ ic area is s tr o ngly recommended. (Students do not major in ducation) . Teaching majors are offered in the

following areas: anthropology, art, biol ogy, chemistry, dr ama , earth sciences, economics, English. French, German , history, jo urnalism, la nguage arts, ma themati , music, Norwegian, physical education, p hysics , political science, p sych olo gy, science, social studies, sociology, Spa nish , and speech. Minors only are available in Chinese, computer science, health, and Latin. The majors and minor in the elemen tary and secondary education p rograms have been rev ised because of changes in the Was hington Administrative Code. Except in the are a of English/ language arts, science, social studies, phys i ca l education, and fo reign language , the elementary major fultiUs areas of study required by the State for endorsement. See an education advi s er for current information.

PREPARATION FOR SENIOR WGH SCHOOL TEACHING: Students preparing for senior high teaching must omp J ete approximately 32-69 semester hours in the acade mic area in which they plan to tea ch. A minor in a second teaching area is recommended. Students may al so find it advantageou s to their career goals to 1 ) develop skills i n one or mor co achi ng areas in response to Title IX legislation, 2) devel op comp e te nc ies in special ed ucation in response to federal special education legislation. and 3) develop proficiency in one or more languages, particularly S pan is h and sian languages. In all cases, students must discuss their program with an adviser from the School of Education.

PREPARATION FOR K-12 TRACHlN� St udents preparing for K- 1 2 teaching in rt, music, fo re i gn language, or physical education must have student teaching experience and course­ work in methodology on both the elementary ' nd secondary levels. Detailed i nfo r ma tion regarding K - 12 certification is available in the School o f Education office. A Scho I of Educa­ tion adviser is required in ad dition to an adviser in art, music, or physical education .

SPECIAL EDUCATION (K-12): The 32 semester hour teaching major and 1 8 semester hour minor must be taken in conjunc tion with an academic teaching major. Students completing this major along with the requ i red professio nal education sequence fo r elementary or secondary teachers will be r eco m mended for an e n do rsement in special education. S tuden ts nOl majoring in ed u cation may be excused from the requi reme nts o f taking Education 302 or Educational Psychology 26 1 /Educa tion 262.

Major (32 hours minimum) Required Co urses (minimum of 21 /Jours): SPED 200

SP E D 292 SPED 390 SPED 3 9 1

SPED 393 SPED 394 SPED 396 SPED 40 I SPED 402

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Individual ' with Special Need ' ( 2 ) or equivalent As essment in Special Education ( 2 ) Teaching Life and ocation sl Skills ( 2 ) Practicurn in Life Skills ( 1 ) Teaching tudents with Behavior Problems (2 ) Practicum in Behav io r Problems ( 1 ) Instructional Management ( 2 Academic In,structional Strategies for Leamer with S pecial Needs ( 3 ) Practkum in Instructional Strategies ( 1 )

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SPED 404 SPED 407 SPED 480

Communication and Collaboration ( 3 ) Curricul um, Instruction, and Technology (4) Child Abu"e ( 1 )

SPED 296 SPED 408 SPED 492

Medically F ragi l e (2) Transitions from School to Community ( 2 ) Meth ds of Teaching Young Childr n ( 2 )

Principl s of Information Organization , Retrieval, and Service ( 2 ) EDUC 508 Principles of Bibliographic Analysis and Control ( 2 ) EDUC 5 0 9 Foundations o f Collection Development ( 2 ) EDUC 5 3 7 Medja and Technology for School Li b rary Media Specialists (2) EOVC 538 Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction ( K- 1 2) ( 2 ) EDUC 5 5 5 Curriculum D evelopm e nt (2)

EDUC 507

Ol1e of the following courses:

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Plus Student Teaching;

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SPED 438 Student Teaching - Elementary ( 5 ) SPED 439 Student Teaching - Secondary ( 5 ) SPED 440 Student Teaching Seminar ( 1 ) (SPED 438, 4 3 9, and 440 meet the senjor seminar/ p rojec t requirenH'nt)

Electives - aile of t h e fo llowing:

Minor (18 hours minimum) SPED 200 Individu Is with Sp ec ia l Need (2) or equivalent SPED 292 Assessment i n Special Education ( 2 ) SPED 390 Teaching Life a nd Vocational Skills ( 2 ) SPED 3 9 1 P ra ct icum i n Life Sk ills ( 1 )

PRINCIPAL'S AND PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR'S CERTIFICATE: Preparation programs leading t certification at the initial and con t i nuing levels for school and district-wide program administrators are available. through the School of Education. pecmc requirements for the certificates are identified in handbooks available upon request. Master's degrees in educational administration aTe described in the Graduate Studies secti o n of thls catalog.

{ SPED

Children's Literature in K-8 Curriculum ( 2 ) EDUC 5 2 9 Ado le sc en t Literature in the Secondary Curriculum (2) EDUC 456 Storytelling ( 2 )

EDUC 528

or

3 93 SPED 394 SPED 396 SPED 401

Teaching Students with Behavior Problems ( 2 ) Pra cti cum in Behavior Pr oblems ( j ) Instructional Management ( 2 ) A ademic Instructional Strategies for Learner with Special Needs ( 3 ) Practicum in Instructional Strategies ( 1 ) Curriculum, Instruction, and Te chno l ogy (4) Cb.i!d Ab use ( l )

SPED 402 SPED 407 SPED 480

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL NURSES: Education I Staff Associate certification for school nurses is i ndividually designed thro u gh the School of Nursing. For i nform at io n r garding school Durse certification, contact the School of Nursing (535-8872) .

Please note: Special Education 200 is a prerequisite to ALL specia l

edu cat io)! coursework. Education 3 02 or Educational Psychology 2611Educatio n 262 is a prereq uisite fo r ALL 300 or 400-level Special Edtlcation cou rses. Students 110t majoring in education may

be excused fro m this req l4irement.

Non-Teaching Minor ( I 8 hours minimum) Required Co urses (12 hO llrs); SPED 195 Individuals with Disabilities (4) SPED 2 0 1 Observation in Special Education Programs ( 1 ) SPED 404 CQmmunicalion and Collaboration (3) SPED 480 Issues i n Child Abuse and Neglect ( 1 ) SPED 399 Pra cti cwn in Spec ial Education ( 1 ) SPED 408 Transitions from School to Community ( 2 )

Tea ch i ng Life and Vocational Skills ( 2 ) Practicum in Life Skills ( 1 ) Teaching Students with Behavior Disorders ( 2 ) Fracticum for Behavior Problems ( j ) E ar ly Learning Experience fo r Special Needs Children (2) Assessment in Special Education ( 2 ) Educating the Physically Challenged and Medically Fragile (2) I ntroduction t Language Developmen t and Disorders ( 2 ) Supervising Para-Professionals and Volunteers ( 1 ) The Gifted Child ( 2 ) Computer Application in Special &:Iucation (2) Independent Study ( 1 -2)

SPED 292 PED 296 SPED 395 SPED 475 SPED 485 SPED 494 SPED 497

(VI) Instructional methods in art. K-12 teach ing major: 34 semester hours required. Art 1 60 ( II I ) ; I 6 ( f I ) ; 226 (V); 230 ( V ) ; 250 (IV); 365 (II); 341 ( VI); 4 hours from: Art 296, 326, 370; 4 hours fr om Art 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380 ( I ) . Art m inor: 2 semester hours required. Art 1 60 (nI); 196 (II); 250 ( V ); 365 (rv); 3 4 1 ( I I ) ; 4 hours from Art 230, 326, 370 (V); 4 hours from Art 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380 ( I) . Elemelltary A rt major; Same a s art mi nor.

LIBRARY LEARNING RESOURCE SPECIALIST: Preparation of School librarians ( 16 8CDlest.er hours) tudents interested i n p r paring for the respon ibil ity o f administering a school library may meet suggested standards through th following program: Prereq llisite;

EDUC 253 or EPSY 26 1 /EDUC 262, or teacher certification.

Required:

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Sta te endorsement r fjll irements; (I) Cultural Anthropology, ( I I ) Physical Anthropology, (rII) Archaeology. S eco nda ry teaching major: 32 semester hours required.

ART State elldo rsement req l4 iremen ts: (I) Art history ( I I ) Aesthetics or ph ilosophy of art, ( I I I ) Drawing, ( IV) Painting, (V) Sculpture,

EARLY CHILDHOOD - SPECIAL EDUCATlON See GradUlLte wdies.

EDUC 506

ANTHROPOLOGY

Anth 1 0 1 ( TI l; 102 ( 1 ) ; 354 (11); 480 ( I ) ; 4 hours from Anth 220, 225 ( 1 ) . 2 30, 330, 336, 345, 343; 4 h ours from Anth 2 1 0, 350, 360, 375, 380, 392, 490 ( 1 ) ; 8 h o u rs from : Anth 103, 332, 36 -, 370, 465, ( 3 3 1 + 370) (II, lIT ). Secondary tea ch ing mi/lor: 20 semester hours required. Anth 1 0 1 (ll); 102 0 ) ; 8 ho urs from Anth 2 1 0, 220, 225, 230, 330, 336, 343, 345, 354, 490 ( I ) ; 4 hours from Anth 1 03, 332, 365, 370, 465, ( 3 3 1 + 370) ( II, I l l ) . Ele men tary teaching major: 24 semester h UJ required . Anth 1 0 1 ( I I ) ; 1 02 ( I ) ; 354 (II); 8 hours from Anth 2 10, 220, 330, 336, 345, 354, (343/225 + 490) ( I ) ; 4 hours from Anth 1 03, 332, 365, 370, 465 (33 1 + 370) (IT, Ill).

COllce ll trations (ch oose 6 1r0llTS fro m the following):

SPED 390 SPED 39 1 SPED 393 SPED 394 SPED 490

Teaching Major/Minor Requirements

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BIOWGY

(1) Genetics, (IT) Ecology or evol uti onary theory, (ill) Bota ny, including laboratory experience, (IV) Zoology, including laboratory experience, (V) Laboratory management and safety, ( V I ) Science technology and society or bioethics. Secondary teach ing major: 40 seme teT hours required. Biology 1 6 1 ( I ) ; 162 ( I, ill, rv); 3 2 3 (ll, IV, VI); 340 or 359 (nI); 20 1 or 328 ( I ) ; 424 o r 475 ( II); 324 or 326 or 361 (IV); 331 or 407 ( I, VI); 4 hours of e1ectjves from Biology 205 or above. Re qu ired su pp orting: Cbemistry 1 05 or UO. State endorsement req u iremen ts:


Secondary teach ing minor: 24 semester hours required. Biology 1 6 1 (1); l 62 (I, In, IV); 323 (II, IV, VI); 8 hours of electives from Biology 2 0 ) or ab e. Required supporting: Chemistry 1 05 or 1 20. Elemen tary teach ing major: 24 semester hours required. Same as

ENGUSH

State endorsement reqllirements: ( I ) Writing/composit ion, ( I I ) American literature, ( I l l ) Wo rld literature representing a variety of diverse cultures, including B i . h lit ature, ( IV ) Linguistics or structure of language. Secondary English majors must complete at least two years of a foreign language at the.

Foreign Language requirement:

secondary teaching minor.

CBEM1STRY

State endorsement requirements: (I)

Organic chem istry, including laboratory exper ien ce , ( U ) Inorganic chemistry, including labo ratory experience, (ill) Analytic chemistry including laboratory experience, (IV) Phy 'ieal chemistry. (V) Labora­ tory man agement and safety.

Secondary teaching majo r: 50 sem

ter hours required.

Chemi try 1 20 or 1 25 (Il); 232 (1); 234 (I); 332 (1); 334 (1); 338 (ill): 341 ( IV); 342 (IV); 343 (IV); 344 ( I V ) ' 403 ( 1 ) . Required supporting: Math 1 5 1 . 1 52; Physics J 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64. Secondary teaching minor: 22 semester hours required. Chemistry L 20 or 1 25 (II); 232 (I); 234 (I); 332 ( 1 ) ; 334 (I); 338 (Ill); 4 hours of electives from Chemistry 34 1 ( IV) or above.

Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Chemistry 1 04 (1, fI); 105 (I); 120 or 1 25 ( II ) ; 2 1 0; 8 hours of elec tives from one or more of the followi ng: Chemistry 232 r above; Biology; Geosciences; Natural Sciences; or Physics 1 1 0

CHINESE State endorsement requirements: (1) Writing/composition in the designated foreign language, ( r I ) Conversation in the de ignated foreign language, (Ill) Reading in the designated fo reign language, foreign language.

(IV)

History and culture of the designated

semester hour required. Ch inese 1 0 1 , 1 02, 2 0 1 , 202, 301 , 37 1 . Also required: LANG/

Secondary teaching minor: 24 EDUC 445.

Elemen tary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as secondary teachi ng minor.

DRAMA State endorsement requirements: (1) Acting skills, (1I) Theatre p roduction, (m) Theatre histo ry or hi tory of drama, ( IV) Creative drama, (V) Theatre directing. Secondary teaching major: 32 semester hours required. Theatre 1 5 1 ( II ) ; 1 60; 241 (l & IV); 250 ( I & IV) ; 352 (II & V) ; 357 (1 & IV); 363 o r 364 (IV); 454 (III). Secondary teaching minor: 20 semester hours required. Theatre 1 5 1 ( I I ) ; 250 (I & IV); 4 hours from Theatre 1 60, 3 63, 364 (III ) ; 8 hours from Theatre 351 (Il), 352 (D & V) , 454 (nI), 458 ( I I & IV) . Elementary teachi ng major: 24 semester hours required. Theatre 1 5 1 ( I I ) ; 1 60 (III); 250 (1 & IV); 8 hours from Theatre 3 5 1 (II), 352 (II & V), 454 (ill), 458 ( I I & IV); 4 hours of electives.

ECONOMICS

State endorsement requirements: (1) Macroeconomics, (II) Microeconomics, (llI) History and/or development of economic thought. semester ho urs required. Economics 1 30 (II) or 1 5 1- 1 52 (I); 35 1 (1); 352 (II); 486 ( I I I ) ;

Secondary teaching major: 32

8 ho urs from Econom ics 343, Sta tist ics 23 1 , Math 34 1 , Busi­ ness 202, or an elective in computer scienc ; 8 hours of eLec­ tives in econ< mics, 4 hours of which may be statistics and/or including Economics 399, 490, 492, 493 for variable credit. Secondary t aching mitIor: 20 semester hours required. Economics 130 (II); 3 5 1 ( l ); 352 ( I I ) ; 4 8 ( I l I ) ; 4 hours of electives in economics which may include statistics. Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as secondary teaching minor with 4 additional hours of elect ives in ec nomics or statistic .

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university level.

Secondary teaching major: 36-44 semest

r bours required b yond

Wr iting 1 0 J . English 24 1 ( II ) ; 2 5 1 ( Ill); 3 0 1 ; 328 ( 1 ) ; 403 (IV); 4 hours from English 2 1 6, 233, 343 (TIl); ducation 429;

( 1 2 hours from periods and surveys) ; 4 hours from Senior Seminar. Secondary teaching minor: 18 eme ter hou rs required beyond

Writing 1 0 1 . English 24 1 (II), 2 5 1 (ll), 328 (1), 403 (IV); 4 hours from English 2 1 6, 233, 343 or Education 429 ( Ill). Elementary teaching major: 24 s e m ter h o u r required beyond Writing 1 0 1 . English 2 4 1 , 25 1 , 28, 403; 4 hours from English 333, 334 r Education 428 or 429; 4 h urs from Communica­

c: n J> ....

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tion 1 23 , 330, 450, Theatre 24 1 . or 458.

ENGUSH/ENGLISB LANGUAGE AKfS

State endorsement requirements: ( I ) Writing/compositi

n,

( I I ) American literature, (ill) World lit rature. ( IV) linguis ­ tics or structure of language, (V) Drama, (VI) Speedl, ( VII) Journalism. Secondary teaching major: 44 semest r 11 urs required. English 24 1 ( I I ) ; 2 5 1 (III); 327 or 328 (1); 403 ( N ) ; 4 hours from English 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 23 1 , 334 ( I I I ) ; 8 hours in Speech and Communications 1 23, 328, 330, 436. 450; Theatre 24 1 (VII); 8 hours drama from Theatre 15 1 , 250, 352, 458 (VI); 8 hours in journalism from Co mmunication 283, 380, 38 1. 388, (VIII). Elementary teaching majo r: 24 semester hours required. English 2 4 1 (II); 2 5 1 ( fU ) ; 327 or 328 (I ); 4 hours fro n� English 403 or Languages 200 (IV); 4 hours from Engltsh 333, 335 ( III) ; 4 hours fr m Commun ication 1 23 ( V ) . 330 (VI ) , 4 5 0 ( V I ) , Theatre 241 (VI), 4 5 8 (V). FRENCH

Writing/compositi n in the designated for ign language, (Ll) Conversation in the designated fo reign langu age. ( III) Reading in the designated foreign language, (IV) History nd culture of the designated

State etldorsement requirements: ( 1 )

foreign language.

Secondary teaching major: 34 semester hours required beyond

French 1 0 1 - 1 02 . French 2 0 1 (II. III, IV); 202 (D, III, IV) ; 3 2 1 ( I V ) ; 3 0 1 ( I & I I ) ; 302 (1 & I I ) ; 421 (In ) ; 422 (ill); 43 1 or 432 ( I I I ) ; 495. Also required: LANG/EDUC 445. Secondary teaching minor: 20 semester hours beyond ·l 0 1 - 1 02. French 2 0 1 (II, III, IV) ; 202 (n. In, rv)j 3 2 1 (IV); 301 (1 & I I ) ; 302 ( I & 1 1 ) . Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours beyond 1 0 1 - 1 02. Same as secondary minor plus 4 hours from upper division electives.

GEOSCIENCES

State endorsement reqlliremen.ts: ( I )

Physica l geology,

(II )

Historical geology, ( I I I ) Environmental ge logy. (IV) Oceanography, (V) Astronomy, (VI ) Meteorology Secondary teaching major: 45 s mester hours required. Geosciences 2 0 1 (1, I I ) ; 1 03 or 104 (III); 1 02 ( IV); 105 (VI); Physics 1 1 0 (V); 1 2 hours from Geoscience courses at the 300 level or higher; Chemistry 1 04 or 1 20. Physics 1 25, 1 35. 4 hours from Math 1 40 or higher or one course {rom Computer Science and Engineering, 1 44

r 220.

Secondary teach ing minor: 20 semester hours

required. Geosciences 201 (1, I I ) ; 1 03 or 1 04 ( r r I ) ; 1 02 ( IV ) ; 1 05 (VI); Physics 1 1 0 (V). Elemen tary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as secondary teaching minor with 4 additional bours f Geosciences at the 300 level or h igher.

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GERMAN State e n do rse men t requir ./llellts: ( I ) Wri ting/ com p osi ti n in the designated foreign language, (II) Conversation in the designated forei gn language, (m) Reading in the designated for ign language, (N) Hi tory and culture of the designated foreign language. Secondary tea ch ng major: 34 semester hours required beyond 1 0 1 - 1 02. German 2 0 1 (I & H); 202 (I & I I ) ; 3 2 1 (IV); 322 (IV); 30 t (I & rI); 302 ( I & II); 42 1 (III) ; 422 (III ) ; 495. Also required: LANG / ED UC 445. Secondary teaching minor: 20 semester hours required beyond German 1 0 1 - 102. German 2 0 1 ( I , I I ) ; 202 ( I & I I ) ; 3 2 1 or 322 (IV); 3 0 1 (I & Il); 302 ( I & II). Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required beyond German 1 0 1 - 102. Same as econdary minor plus 4 hours from upper divi ion German elective. REALm

State efldorsemetlt req u i rem e n ts; ( I ) Substance use and abuse, (II) Wellness and illness, ( III) Nutdtion, (IV ) Human phy iology, (5) Safety education. Secondary teaching m inor. 1 6 semester hours required. Health 260 ( III) ; 270 (ll); 292 (V); 295 (II); 3 2 1 ( rV); 3 23 ( 1 1 ) ; 3 2 5 ( I I & HI) ; 3 2 7 (I); 2 hours o f electives approved b y health co rdinatoL Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as secondary t aching minor, and 8 hours of electives in health education. HISTORY

State endors em en t requirements:

( I ) Washington State or Pacific Northwest history and government, (II) United State. history, ( III ) Wo rld, Weste rn, or Pacific Rim history or civilizations. econdary teaching m ajo r; 32 semester hours required. 8 hours from History 251 , 252, 253 (II); 1 0 7 or 108 ( I II ) ; 460 o r 46 1 (1); Senior Seminar; 4 hours of electives from non足 Western history ( 205, 336, 338, 340, 380) ( lU ) ; and 8 hours of upper division electives in history. Seco ndary tea ch i ng m inor: 20 semester hours required. 4 hou rs from History 2 5 1 , 25 2, 253 ( I I ) ; 1 07 or 108 (Ill ) ; 460 or 46 1 (T); 4 hours of electives from non-Western history (205, 336, 338, 340, 380) (III); and 4 hours of upper division electives in history. Elementary teach ing major: 24 semester hours required. arne as secondary teaching minor. Anthropology 354. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (Computer Scienu) ( I ) Tecillloiogy and society, i.e., ethical use, (II) Computer networks and telecommunication systems, e.g., Internet, (ill) Instructional hardware usage and classroom applications, (IV) Instructional software, iJ1Cluding word processing, data base managem ot systems, preadsheets and use of multimedia tools, e.g., sound, video, hypertext, and graphics, (V) Development of student learning activities which integrate technology tools and telecommunications. Elementa ry and Seco ndary teach in g minor: 1 6 semester hours. Computer Scienc 220; Education 449; 437/537; o ne of Computer Science 1 17, Communication 2 7 1 , o r Education 457; one of Education 357 or Computer Science 322/Education 493; 4-6 hours o f electives.

State endorsement requirements:

JOURNAllSM State e ndorsemerzt req llirements: ( I ) News and featur wntmg, (II) Copy editing, ( TIl) News pr duction, (N) Co py makeup and desi gn , (V) Legal rights and liabilities of th press.

Secondary teaching major: 32 semester hours required. Communication 1 23; 27 1 ; 283; 3 33 ; 380 (n, HI, IV); 381 ( V ) ; 384 ( 1 ) ; 3 8 8 ( I ) ; 4 hours of electives. Seco ndary reaching minor: 20 semester hours required. Communicati n 1 23; 2 7 1 ; 283; 380 (IT, Ill. IV); 38 1 (V). Elementary teaching m ajo r: 24 s e mes ter hours required. Same as secondary teaching minor plu 384 (1); 388 ( I ) . 60

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LATIN

(T) Writing/composition in the designated foreign language, ( I I ) Con ersation in the designated foreign language, (ill) Reading in the d signa ted fo rei gn language, (IV) H istory and culture of the designated foreign languag . Sec o lT dary teaching m irlOr: 24 semester hours required. Latin 1 0 1 (m); 1 02 ( III); 20 1 ( 1 , II); 202 (r, l l). Classics 250 or 322 (IV); 4 bours from upper division Latin electives. Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Latin 1 0 1 (ill); 1 02 ( m ) ; 20 1 (r, I l); 202 ( I, TIl; Classi 250 (IV); 322 (TV) . State endorsement requirements:

MATHEMATICS State endorsement requ irements: (1) E ucl id ean geometry, ( i l ) Non-Euclidean geometry, (III) Differential calculus, (IV) Integral ca lc ul us, (V) Discrete mathematics (a combination of at least two of the following: probability, stat istic ', combina足 tories, business applications, logi set theory, functions) . S ec o n da ry tear;h ing major: 4 1 semest r hours required. Math 1 5 1 (m, IV); 1 52 (lIl. IV) ; 203; 3 1 7 (V); 321 ( 1, I I) ; 3 3 1 ( V ) ; 3 4 1 (V) or 433 (V); 4 hours of electives numbered above 250. Required supporting: Computer Science and Engineering 1 44; Physics 1 53; 1 6 . Seco ndary teaching minor: 2 2-24 semester hour required. Math 1 5 1 (lIl, IV); 1 5 2 ( ID, IV) ; 3 1 7 (V); 32 1 ( I, II); Comp u te r Science and Engineering 1 44 a n d 4- hours from Math 230 (V); 253 ( I I I , IV); 331 (V); 340 (V) ; 3 4 1 (V) . Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as secondary teaching minor. MUSIC State endorsement requirements: (I) Score reading, (II) Music theory, (m) Music history and/ or culture, ( IV) Conducting, (V) Ins tructional music, (Vl) Instructional methods in general music. K- 12 Teaching Major (m 14sic sp ecialis t): See the requirements for the degree Bachelor of Music Education (B.M .E.) as listed under Music in thi s catalog: B.M.E. - K- 12 Choral B.M.E. - K- 1 2 Instrumental (Band Emphasis) B.M.贈. - K- 1 2 Instrumental (Or hestra Emphasis ) Ele m en ta ry teaching major: 24 semest r b UTS required. See music minor ( general ) requirements listed under Music in this catalog, plus , {usie 34 1 . NORWEGIAN State en do rsemul t reqllirements: (0 Writing/compositi n in the designated foreign language. (11) Conversation in the designated foreign language, (m) Reading in the designated foreign language, (IV) History and culture of the designated foreign language. Seco n da ry teaching major: 3 4 semester bours required. Norwegian 1 0 1 (1, I T, ITI); 102 (1, II, IIi ) ; 201 ( TI) ; 202 (ll ) ; 3 0 1 (1 & I I ) ; 302 ( I & IT); 4 hours from upper division electives in Scandinavian culture and 4 hours from upper division elective in Scandinavian literature (IV); 495. Also required: LANG/EDUC 445. SecoruJary teach ing minor: 24 semester hours required. Norwegian 1 0 1 (1, II, IIl); 1 02 (1, II, Ill); 2 0 1 (TI); 202 (II); 301 (l or II); 4 hours from upper division electives in Scandinavian culture (IV). Elemelltary teaching major: 24 semester hours r eq uired . Same as secon ary teaching minor. PHYSICAL EDUCATION

(1) Care and prevention of student injury, including first aid, ( I I ) Kines iology, (Ill) Exercise physiology, ( N ) Sch 0 1 physical education, sports, or athletic law, (V) Sociology and/or psychology of sports, (VI) Instructional methods in physical ed uc at io n for the handi足 capped, (V1I) Instructiona.l methods in physical education.

State endorsement requirements:


K- 12 teaching major: 52 semester hours required.

SCIENCE

Biology 205; 206: Health Education 2 8 1 ( I ) ; Phys i c al Educa­ tion 277 ( V ) ; 279 (VII) ; 293 ( VII); 294 (VI I ) ; 297 (VII); 298 ( VII ) ; 322 (VII); 326 (VI); 344 (N); 389 (V) ; 478 ( V ) ; 4 8 0 ( I T ! ) ; 486 ( I I ) ; 490 (VII ) ; Recreation 296 ( V I I ) . K-12 reaciJillg minor: 19 semester ho urs requ i re d . Health Ed uca tio n 2 8 1 (1); Physical Education 279 (VlI); 3 2 2 (VIl); 326 (VI); 334 ( II & lJI)j 344 (IV); 389 (V); one course from among t he following: Physi c a l Education 293, 294. 297. 298 o r Recreation 296 (VI I ) . Elemen ta ry academic major: 25 semester hours required. He alt h Ed ucati on 2 8 1 , Phys i cal Education 279, 322, 326, 334, 344, 389. and 490 plus 2 h ou rs of elec tives selected from Physical Education 293, 294, 2 97, 298, and Recreation 296.

State endorsement requirements: (I) C hemistry, ( I I ) P hy i , ( Ill) Biology, (N) Earth Sci n e. Secondary teaching major: 50--58 senlcstcr hOlliS req uired , d ep en d in g on minor selected. Biology 1 6 1 ( I I l ) , 1 62 (Ul), 323 (HI), Ch em ist ry 104 or 120 or 125 ( I ) , Geosciences 103 or 104 ( IV ) , 2 0 1 (N), P hy s ic s 125 (n), 1 2 6 (II), 1 35 ( I l ) , 1 36 (ll) or 1 53 ( I I ) , 1 54 ( I I ) , 1 63 (II), 164 ( n) ; A secondary teach ing minor in one of the following subject areas is required: biology, chem i st ry, geosciences. or physics. Elementnry teaching major: 24 semester hours requ i red, including 8 hours in life science, 8 hours in p hysi cal science, and 8 hours of electives.

PHYSICS

State endorsement requireme7lts: (I) Economic , (II) An th ro po l ­ ogy, so ci o lo gy, or psychology, ( I ll ) G eo graphy, (IV) Pol i t ical sci nee, (V) History - A. ) Washington State, B. ) Un i te d States, C . ) World, Wes te r n or Pacific Rim, (VI) Am er ic a n government. Seco ndary teaching major: 44 semeste r hours requ i red. An t hro polo gy 354 ( m ) , Ec onomi cs 130 ( I ) , History 1 07 or 1 08 (V-C), 25 1 or 252 or 253 (V-B , 460 (V-A), Political Sc ienc e 1 5 1 (VI), Soc io logy 1 0 1 (IT); 4 hours in non-We ste rn history (V-C) ; 4 ho urs of upper division po l i ti al sc ienc e (IV); 8 hours of upper d ivisiu n electives chosen trom two of the following disciplines: anthropology. eco no m i cs . psychol­ ogy, or sociol gy. Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required . Anthropology 354 (il l), H i story 251 or 252 or 253 (V-B), 460 (V-A); 4 hours trom History 1 07 or 1 08 or non-Western ( V-C); 8 hours of electives from anthropology, economics, political s ci en e, ps yc h log y, or sociology (I, II, IV).

State endorsement requirements: ( I ) Mechanics inc l uding laboratory experience, (II) Electricity and m agne ti s m , in c luding l ab or a t o ry experience, (I II) Light and s o u nd , including lab or ator y experience, (IV) Thermodynamics, modern physics, r astronomy. Secondary teacl/ing major: 42 semeste r hours req u i red. Phys ics 1 53 ( I ); 1 54 (11, III); 1 63 ( I ) ; L 64 (II, III); 223 (IV); 3 3 1 (II ) ; 333 ( IV ) ; 336 (I); 354; Math 151; 1 52; 253. Secondary teachillg minor: 26 semester hours req u i red . P hysi cs 125 ( I ) or 153 ( I ) ; P hys ic s 1 3 5 (0 or 163 ( 1 ) ; Physi cs 1 26 (II, I I I ) o r 154 ( I I , III ); Physics 1 36 or 1 64 (II, Ill) ; Physics 22 3 ( IV ) ; Physics 1 1 0 ( N ) or 3 3 3 ( I V ) o r Chemis try 34 1 ( N ) ; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52. Elemel'tary teaching major: 26 semester hours requ ired. Same as se conda ry teaching minor.

POLmCAI. SClENCE Stare endorsement require me nts: ( I ) American government, (II) Interna tional relations or st ud ies, (III) C ompa ra t ive govern­ ment or pol.itical systems, (N) Po l i ti caJ theory. Secondary teaching major: 32 s e m es ter hours req ui red . Political Science 1 0 1 , 1 5 1 (I); 4 hours from Political Science 2 3 1 , 33 1 , 338; 4 hours from Political Science 2 1 0, 38 1 , 384, 385, 386, 387 (UI) ; 4 h o urs from Political Science 325, 3 26 (N ); 8 hours from Pol itica l Science 345, 354, 57, 36 1, 363, 364, 368, 37 1 . 372, 37.:>; 4 hours of ele tives in political science. Secondary t.caching minor: 24 semes ter hours re q ui red. Political Science 1 0 1 , 1 5 1 (1); 4 hours from 345, 354, 357, 36 1 , 363, 364, 368, 37 1 , 372, 373; 4 hours from Political Science 23 1 , 3 3 1 , 338 (II); 4 hours from Po l i ti ca l Science 2 1 0, 38 1 , 384, 385, 386, 387 (HI); 4 hours from Pol i t i c al Science 325, 326 ( N ) . Elementary tca chi ng major: 24 s em este r hours required. Same as secondary te ac h i n g mi no r.

PSYCHOWGY State elldorsemen t requirements: ( I) Human behavior, (II) Learning the ries, ( JIl) Dev lop mental ps ych ol ogy; (IV) I n terperson al psychology. Secondary teaching major: 32 semester hours require d . Psychology 1 0 1 (I, N), 242 , Statistics 23 1 ; 4 hours from Psychology 342 ( w ith 343), 348 ( wi t h 349) (II, IV); 4 hours from 352, 44 2, 444, 446 ( III, IV); 4 hour from 22 1 , 325, 3 54, 454, 456. 461 , 462, 47 1 (IV); 8 h o u rs of electives in psychol­ ogy. Seconda ry teach i ng minor: 24 semester hours req ui red . Psych olo gy 1 0 1 ( I , N), 242, Statistics 23 1 ; 4 hours from 342 (with 343 ) , 348 ( wi t h 349) (II, IV); 4 hour from 352 or 444 (ill, N); 4 hours from 325, 462, 47 1 (N). Elementary teach ing major: 24 semester h o u rs req u ired. Psychology 1 0 1 (1, I V ) , Statistics 23 1, Psyc ho lo gy 352, 444 (m, N), and 8 h o urs of e1eciives detemlined in consultation with elementary education adviser (suggestions include Psychology 342 (with 343 ) , 348 (with 349), 350, 440, 450, 453, and specialty courses offered through the department) .

SOCIAL STUDIES

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SOCIOLOGY State endorsement requirements: ( I ) Group behavior, (II) Social institutions, (m) Social process, (N) Theory and h istory of sociology. Secondary teaching major: 32 se me ster hours required. So ci ol ogy L O I (0 , 396 ( IV ) , 397 (N); 8-1 2 hours from 240, 326, 336, 386, 440, 473 (m); 8-12 hours from 324, 330, 35 1 , 391, 434 (II). Secondary teachillg minor: 20 hour requi red. Soc iol o gy 1 0 1 (1), 396 (IV), 397 (N); 4 hours from 330, 35 1 , 39 1 (II ) ; 4 hours from 240, 3 3 6 , 386, 440 (ill). Elemen tary teaching major: 24 semes t er hours required. Same as secondary teac hin g minor with 4 a d d it i on al hours of electives in ociology.

SPANISH State endorsement requirements: ( 1 ) Writing/composition in the designa ted foreign l a n gua ge, ( II ) Conversation in the d e s ign a ted fo re ign l a ng uage., ( m ) Rea di ng in the de si gn a ted foreign language, (IV) History and culture of the d esi gn ated fore ig n language. Secondary teaching major: 34 semes te r hours required beyond Spanish 10 1-102 . Span ish 202 (III, N), 3 2 1 (N), 322 (IV), 301 (I, II), 302 ( I , II) ; 1 2 hours from 42 1 , 422, 43 1 , 432; 495. Also required: LANGlEDUC 445. Secondary teach ing mitior: 20 semester ho urs req uire d beyond 1 01 - 1 02. Sp a nis h 201 (III, N), 202 ( TIl, IV), 32 1 or 322 (M, 301 (I, II), 302 (1, I J ) . Elementary teaching major: 2 4 semester hours req u i re d beyond Spanish 1 1 -1 02. Span isll 201 ( I l l & N), 202 ill & I V) . 3 2 1 ( IV) , 3 2 2 ( IV) , 301 (J & I T ) , 302 (l & I I ) .

SPECIAL EDUCATION

State endorsement requirements: (T) Ex c ptionality, ( II) Alt ma­ tive delivery sy tem and s trategie s for special education, (ITI ) Student assessment and evaluation, (IV) Pro ce d ura l and substantive le gal is ues in spec ial educ�tion, (V) Instructional methods in special education.

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K-12 teaching m ajo r:

processing, and related subjects. Prerequisites: advanced typing

32 semes ter hours required. Spedal Ed u ation 200 (I, II, IV) , 292 (ID), 3 0

(V), 3 9 1 (V), 393 (IV, V), 394 ( V) , 3 96 C-v), 40 1 (V), 402 (V), 404 (D), 407

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and a dv a n ced shorthand.

(III, IV, V), 480 (IV), on e of the following: 296, 408, 492, 438 or 439, 440. K- 12 teaching minor: L 8 semes ter hours required. Special Ed ucation 200 (1, II, IV), 292 (m), 3 90/ 3 9 1 or 393/394 (V), 396 (V), 401 (V), 402 (V), 407 (III, IV, V), 480 (rV). SPEECH

req uirements: (T) Public sp eaking . ( I l) Debate (III) Group process (IV) I n t rper s on a l communication. Secondary teachillg major: 34 s em este r hours required. Communication 1 23 (IV), 283 ( I ) , 326 (rn), 328 ( I I ) , 330 (I), 333 (IV), 435 (III), 436 (II). Secondary teaching millor: I S sem ester hours requi red. Commu­ n i ca tion 123 (IV), 326 (ID) . 32S ( l I ) , 330 (1), 333 (rV). Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as sec ndary teaching minor with 6 additional hours

Practicum I

40 I Practicum n Extended experience and participation in an assi gn ed public school classro m fo cu si ng on application of content methods courses. Includes colle tion of video lessons. Prerequisite: 3 57. (Concurrent w i t h 400, 4 10, 4 12 .) ( 1 )

FoundatioDs of Education

tical, ethical and legal foundations. Federal and state legis latio n for sp ed I populations. Prerequisites: WRIT 1 0 1 , PSYC 1 0 1 , test scores, sophomore standing, c u mul at ive GPA 0[ 2. 50. ( 3 )

406 Mathematics in K-8 Education Ex pl o r a tion of mathe matical principles and practices consistent with NCTM c ur r icu lu m standards. Prerequisite: 302. (C o ncu r­ rent with 35 7, 35S, 40S.) (3)

School Observation Graded observation in schools. Concu rrent with 262. ( 1 )

263

Literacy in K�8 Education Pa rtici p atio n in the develop me nt of ap p ropri a te curricular strat gies and instructional methods for supporting the diversit y of learners' l anguage/literacy growth. Prerequisite: 302. (Concur­ rent with 357, 358, 406.) (3) 408

Human Learning: Growth and Development Overview of theories of human development emphasizing the i ndividu al cognitive, linguistic , socio-cultural, emotional, and pbysical develo pment of chi l d ren and adolescents in and out of school. Initial course in Elementary Educatio n c ertifi ca tio n p ro gra m ; p er m ission required. ( Conc urrent with 303.) ( 3 ) 302

410

Science/Health in K-8 Education

Strategies fo r teach i ng science by using inquiry methods and proble m-solving techniques will be employed to explore interactive curricula from an environmental point of view. Issues of nutri ti on and health. Prerequisite: 357. ( Concurrent with 400,

Field Observation

O bservation o f t h e developmen tal nature of growth in learners

in vari ous settings i n cl udi ng K-S schools. E mph as is on the development of the skills of observation and i n for m al assess­

40 1 , 4 1 2.) ( 3 )

ment. (Concurrent with 302 . ) ( 1 )

Strategies for Language/Literacy Development (Cross-referenced with 5 1 1 . ) (2)

411

Microcomputers in the Cluaroom Introduction to the use of microcomputers in e d u cat io nal set­ tings. Pre or co -re qu i site: EDUC 262 or 302. Does not cou n t toward degrees in computer science. (2) 322

412

Social Studies i n K-8 Education

Focus on drawing connections between the content of social studies curricula and the lived exp eriences of human lives. Prerequisite: 357. ( o ncurrent with 400, 401 , 4 1 0.) (3)

Philosopby of Vocational Education

Objectives of high school business education programs, the

Language/Liuracy Development: Assessment and Instruction (Cross-referenced with 5 1 3 .) (4)

413

b us in ess curriculum, layout and facilit ies plan n i n g, the evalua­ tion of business teachers and competence for business occupa­

tions. ( 2 )

Special Topics in Children', Literature (C ross - r e fere nc e d with 526.) ( 2 )

426

Methods o f Teaching Typing

Appljcation of research finding and psychological principles to the teac hing of typing. Prerequisite: advanced typing. (2)

427

Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping Ap plic at io n o f res ea rch fin d i n gs and p sych ol ogi ca l prin ciples to the teaching of b okkeeping. Prerequisite: BUSA 28 1 . ( 1)

428 Children's Literature in the K-8 Curriculum (Cross-refere.nced with 528.) (2)

Multicultural Children' lJteratnre ( ross-referenced with 527.) (2)

343

429 Adolescent Literature i n the Secondary Curriculum ( ross-referenced with 529.) (2)

Methods of Teaching Geueral Busines Subjects Application of research findings an d psychological p rin ci ples to the tea c hi ng of general b usine ss , consumer econo mi(;S, eco no m i cs , business law, business m a t hemat ics , and business com m u ni c tions subjects. Prerequisites: ECON 1 5 1 - 152 and BUSA 28 1 . ( i ) 344

430 Student Teachiug in K - 8 Education Teaching in iassrooms of local public schools under the direct superv isi on of School of Education faculty and classroom teachers. Pr requisite: EDU 4 00 , art, music, and ph, ical education methods. 2.50 GPA. Concurrent enroll ment in 435. ( Meets seni r seminar/project r e quirem ent . ) (9)

345 Methods of Teaching Secretarial Subjects Application of research findings and psychological pr i n c i ples to the teaching of shorthand, office prac tice, simulation, word

62

358

Topics in IDem.entary Education: Classroom Issnes and Instructional St1'lltegies Consideration of current theory into pr ac t ice a pertinent to effe c tive teaching and l ear ni n g, including cI ssrOOm m an ge­ me nt, organization of cl a ssro o m environments, and meeting the ne eds f diverse learners. Prerequisite: 3 5 7. (Concurrent with 40 1 , 4 10, 4 1 2. ) (3)

Introduction to teaching; historical, philosophical, social, poli­

342

406, 408.) (2)

3 57, 406, 408.) ( 1 )

Course Offerings

341

potential in the l earning process as a way of facilitating l e arne r empowerment. Prerequisite: EDUC 302. (Co ncu r re nt with 358,

400

of electives.

303

Media and Technology in K-8 Classrooms Cons iderati o n of the role of me di a in t o d ay's society and its

357

Extended experience and participation in an ass igned p ubli c school classroom. Prerequisite: EDUC 302. (Concurrent with

State endorsement

262

(2)

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434 Student Teaching - Elementary (Dual) Designed for persons who d dual student teaching. Ten weeks of tcaching in classrooms of local p ublic schools under the direct s up er v i sio n of School of Education faculty and classroom teach r . Pr req uisite: 400, a rt, music, and physical education methods. 2.50 GPA.. Concurrent e nroll m ent in 435. ( Meets senior seminar/project requirement.) (9)

467 Evalnation Eval uati n of school experiences; p r obl ems in connection with development. organizati n, and administration of tests ( stan­ dardized and teacher-made) . Required of fifth-year students. Pre requi s ites : student teaching or te ac h i ng exp erien ce ; 262, 25 3 , EPSY 36 1 . May be taken con c ur re n tly with student tea ch in g . G (2)

435 Topics in Elementary Education Classroom; Prac:tice in the Context of Educational FonndatioJl8 Scho I-based experiences will be expl red in the context of the h is to r ical, socio-cultural, political, leg al, fmancial, ethical, an d ph il osoph ical foundations of education. Prere qui sites : 302, 303, 357, 358, 406, 408. ( C o nc u rren t with 430.) (3)

468 Student Teaching - Secondary Teaching in pu blic sch oo ls under the direction of classroom and

44X Subject Area Methods Instructional st ra tegi es , long , nd bort range planning, cu rr ic u ­ lum and other considerations sp ecific to the d i sci p l ines.

SPED 362

Arl in the Seconciary School ( 3 )

444 English in the Secondary School ( 3 ) 445 Methods o f Teaching Foreign Languages and EogliBh Second Language ( Required for forei gn language en dorsement and ESL min o r. ) (3)

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470 Curriculum, Materlals and Instruction for Teaching English as a Second Language Application of la n g ua ge tea hing me th od o logy to various instructional situations. (4)

438 Strategies for Whole literacy Instruction (K-U) (Cross-referenced with 538.) ( 2 )

440

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469 Seminar - Secondary A seminar for second a ry student teachers. Concurrent with 468. (3)

437 Alternate Level Student Teaching - Secondary A course des i gn ed to give some knowledge, u nd e r tan d i n g, and study of children, u bj ec t matter fields, and materials in the studen t 's alternate teaching level plus student teaching on that level. Studen ts who have completed el em enta ry p referre d level student tea chi n g should enroll in th is course. Independent s tud y card required. (Meets senior seminar/project requiremenL) (6)

Prerequisites: 262. 263, EPSY 26 1 , 3 6 1 ,

c

university teachers. Prerequisites: formal application; senior standing; cumul ative GPA of 2.50 or higher. (Meets senior se mi na r/p roject requirement.) (9)

436 Alternate Level Student Teaching - Elementary A course d es igned to give some know led ge . u nd er ta nd ing, and study of ch ild re n, subject matter fi d d s . and m ate r i als in the student's alternate teaching level plus student teaching on that level. Students who have completed seconda r y preferred l evel s tudent teaching should enroll in this co ur s e. (6)

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446 Mathematics in the Secondary School (3)

447 Science in the Secondary School ( 3 )

443 Social Studio in the Secondary School (3 )

449 Computer Science in the Secondary School (2) 456 Storytelling A combination of discovery and practicum i n th e art of story­ telling. Investigates th values and ba kground of storytell in g, the various types of and for ms of stories. techniques of ch oosi ng and of telling stories. Som off-campus practice. Demonstrations and joint storytelling by and with i nst ru c t T. ( 2 ) 457 The Arts, Media, and Technology Students use a va ri ty of techn iques , equipment, and materials to explore ways of seeing and express ing how they see and expe r i ­ ence their environment_ (2) 461 General Teaching Methods - Secondary Skills and un de rstan d in gs related to decision-making, instruc­ tional techniques, evaluation and te ting, classroom manage­ ment, and di sci pline . Prerequisites: 262, 263; co nc ur re n t with 46 2 . ( 3 )

462 Teacher Assisting - Secondary Guided instruction I assistance and t utori n g in schools; concurrent with 46 1 . ( l ) 466 Student Teaching - Secondary (Dual) Des igned � r persons who do dual student te a chin g. Ten weeks of teaching in the public schools under the direction and super­ vision of classroom and W1iversity teach ers . Pr re qui si te: 2.50 GPA. Taken concurrently with SPED 439, (8)

473 Parent-Teacher Relationships Issues and skills im po r tan t in nferencing and parent-teacller relati o nsh i p s . ( 2 ) 475 Practicum i n Teaching EngUsh as a Second Language Extended exp rience and participation i n an ass ign ed ESL se tti ng . Prerequisite: LANG/EDUC 445 ( Co n c u rre n t with LANG/EDUC 470). ( 1 ) 485 The Gifted Child A study of the gifted child, characteristics and problems. and school proc e d u res designed to further developm en t . G ( 2 ) 490 Acquisitio.n and Development of Language (Cross-referenced wi th 510.) ( 2 ) 496 Laboratory Workshop Practical course using elementary-age children in a dassr om situation wo rkin g out specific p ro bl ems; provision will be made for some active participation of the university s tude nt s . Prereq­ uisites: conference with the instructor or the dean of the School of Education.

497 Special Project Individual s t u dy and research OIl education probl ems or additional l a b orato ry experience in public s ho I clas roo ms . Prerequ.isite: consen t of the dea n . ( 1-4)

50 1 Wodcshop Graduate workshops in sp ecial fields for varying lengths of time.

( 1 -4)

503 On-Campns Workshops in EdUcatiOD O n - c ampus gra d ua t e workshops in edu catio n for varying le ngt h s of tim e ; enrollm ent subject t adviser's approval . 505 Issues in literacy Education Initial cours e re qui red for all st u d ents in the mas ter 's progranl in litera cy education . Overview of h i s tori cal and clurenl theo ry, p ra c tice, definitions, and rese ar ch in langua ge and literacy acquisition and develo p m ent in a n d out of schools. Requi red of any track option selec ted . (2)

506 Fonodations of School Library Media Center Management Functions of the school lib r a ry media center with parti cul ar emphasis on tbe roles and resp o n ibilities of the school library media s p eciali s t within instructional and administrative arenas. (2) S07 Prlnclples of Information Organization, Retrieval,

and Service Exploration of a broad range of d a ta and information in primary and sec on da ry sources, including docunl nt, bibliography, full­ text, s tat i sti cal , visual, and re co rde d formats. ( 2 ) P

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508 Prlndples of Bibliographic Analysis and Control The orgaruzat i n and structure of 3 broa formats with an emphasis on the analysi

ture; to use the

range of informa tion f standard biblio­

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509 Foundations of Collection Development The philosophical ba es and parameters of colle ction develop­ me nt in the school library media center. (2)

510 Th e Acquisition and Development of Language and Literacy

550 Educational Admln.lstratlve Theory

Investigation of how young children acquire their first langu age and what they know as a result of this learning. ( 2 )

Introduct ion to the role and fun tion of the principalshi p with emphasis on team building and interpersonal professional

51 1 Strategies for Language/Literacy Development The developmental nature of li teracy learning with emph a siS on

relationships and ethi cal decision-making. P rerequi site: Admi sion to the graduate program or permission of gnduate adviser. ( 3 )

the vital role of language and the interrelatedness and interde­ pendence of I' ten ing, speaking, reading, and w riting as Ian uage processes. Prerequisite: 5 1 0. (2)

513 Lan guage/Literacy Development: Assessment and Instruction

551 Educationai Law Study of contempo rary federal, state, and local statutes, reg ul a ­ tions, a nd case law and their a pplication to public and private schools ( K- 1 2) . Prerequi sites : Admissio n to the graduate program; 544. (2)

nderstanding of a wide variety of strategies and tools for assessi ng and facilitating students' development in reading,

552 Scbool Finance

writing, listening, and speaking . Prerequisite: 5 10; highly recommended to be taken at the end of the track sequence. (4)

Local, state, and federal contributors to school fi n a nce , its phiJ osophy and development; the devel pment and administra­

515 Profess lonal Seminar; Continuing Level, Teachers

tion of a school budget. Prerequ isites: Admission to the graduate progra m; 544. ( 2 )

The preparat ion a nd shar ing f selected topics related to the minimum generic standards needs of the individual participants. Required for the contin uing level certification

f teachers. (2)

516 Teacher Supervision Identifica tion and development of supervisory skills for teachers who wo rk with other adults in the cla sroom. ( l ) 526 Special TopiQ i n Children's Literature S tudents explore the various themes f social issues found in chil dren' literature through discussion groups and the construc­ tion of text sets and themati c units used in elementa ry and middle school classrooms. ( 2 )

521 Multicultural Children's Uterature

553 School/Community Relations Knowledge and skiU d evelopment for communication pa tter in the school settin g a nd with associated agencies, including medical, legal, and social services, as well as with students, parents, and staff. Prerequisite: Admission t the graduate

program. (2)

554 Seminar in Educational Administration The preparation and sharing of elected presentations related to needs of i ndividual participants. .qui red for continuing certi­ fication of principals and program administrators. Registra tion must take place in the fall SeIne ter and participat io n will be continuous for the academic year. ( 2 )

Exploration of multi-cu1tural issues i n the context of chi ldren's

555 Curriculum Development

I jterature. (2)

528 Children's Liter8.hlre in K-8 Curriculum

Investigation of genres of co ntemporary children's literature and development of a personal repertoire for classroom use. ( 2 )

529 Adolescent literature in the Secondary CUrriculum

Types of curriculum o rganizat ions , programs and techniques of curr i culum development. P re requisites : dmissions to the grad­ uate progr a m, 544. (2)

556 Secondary and Middle School Curriculum

Genres in adolescent literature a nd expl o ration of strategies for integration of young adult materials across the middle and secondary school curri culum . ( 2 )

A variety of facets of secondary and middle school programs: finance, curriculwn, discipline, evaJuation, classroom manage­ ment, the basic education bill, legislative cllanges , and sp ecial education. Critical is ue in the education scene today. ( 3 )

530 Children's Writing

558 Instructional Supervision

Currenl lheory an practice in the teaching and kaming of writing in elementary classrooms. (2)

Differentiated models of supervision, incl u d ing techniques in clinical supervision, teacher evaluation, d isciplinary action and dism issal . Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program, 544.

531 Media and Technology for School library Media Specialists The management of media and technology services in the school library media center. Sp ci 1 emphasis on emerging technologie used in K- 1 2 instructional programs ( C D- RO M , interactive video, distance learning, computer technologies ) . ( 2 )

538 Strategies for Whole Utency Instruction (K- 12) The use of language as a tool for learning across Lhe curriculum, and the roles of language in all kind · of teaching and I arning in K- 1 2 classrooms . Strategie for reading/writing in content areas, them ati c teaching, topic study, and integrating curriculum. ( 2 ) 544 Research an d Program Evaluation Knowledge of evaluation tech niques , including portfolios, and of research design , ability to interpret educati nal research; to id.entify, locate, and aeq uice typical research and related LiteT8-

64

or evalua t ion to propose

S4S Methods and Teclm.iques o f Research Seminar in research methods and tech niques in ed u c a tion with emphasis on design in g a research project in the stude nt ' s area of interest. Required for M .A. P rerequis ites: Admission to the graduate program; 544; minimum of 24 semester hours of cotUsework l ding to the M.A.; comultation with student's a dviser. (2)

graphic comp Ol!nts prescribed by natio nal bibliographic database s . ( 2 )

o

results f research

program changes and write grants . ( 2 )

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550, 55 3 . ( 2 )

559 Personnel Management Knowledge and skill development in workin g with perso nn el issues, including legal prin cipl in hiring, firing, i n-service and staff deve1 pment, support services, and contract negotiation. P rereqaisites: Admission to the graduate program 544, 550, 553 . (2 )

560 Prll.cticum Guided instructiona l ass istance and tutoring in schools. Designed for MA/Cert Pro gram. (2)

562 Schools 8Jld Society Individua l and cooperative study of t h e socio-cultural and cu1tur I, political, legal, hisLOrical, and philosophical foundations of current practices of schooling in America. Prerequisite: Admission t the 1v1A/Cert Program or consent of instructor. ( 3 ) Y


563 Integrating Seminal' S tu de n t s wo r coope r atively and individually to integrate educa­ tio n coursework, field exp erienc e, and individual perspective through out the MA/Cert program. May be repeated for credit. Pr erequisi te: Admission to the MNCert p rogra m. ( 1 - 4 ) 5 64 The Arts, Mind, and Body An explor ati on of methods to facilita te c re at ivi ty and me an i ng maki ng in the classroo m through visual, musical, no n-verb all ph ysi cal move ment, and dr amati c arts, (2)

­

565 The Art and Practice of Teaching Through app li c at i o n p rojec ts, m icro - tea ch ing exp er i ences. and reading re prese ntin g different perspectives, part ic i p a nts will practice and assess a variety of options for de signin g, i mple­ ment in g, a n d a ssess i ng lessons and un i t s tha t inte gr ate math­ ematics, science, social s cien ce, lan gu age arts, and p hys i c al educ ation in K-8 class rooms . (6)

598 Studies in Educatio:n A resea rc h paper or project on an educational issue 'elected j o in tly by the tu d e nt and the grad ua te adviser. Prerequisites : Admission to the graduate program; 544, 545; minimum of 26 hours of coursework lead i ng to the M.A.; consultation with the stud en t's adviser. (2)

"' o

599 Thesis The thesi s p roblem will be chosen from the candidate's major field of con centr at i on and must be ap p roved by the candidate's gra duate committee. Candidates are expected to defe n d their thes is in a final oral examination co nducted by their committee.

c: n :P -4

( 3-4)

o z

Educational Psychology

568 Internship in Teaching I nte rnsh ip in classroom settings. Fourteen weeks of teaching under the direct s up e rvis i o n of cooperating tea ch e rs and university supervisors. Designed for s tude n t s in the MAICert program . (6)

261 Hwnan Relationa Development Study a nd lab or ato ry exper.i e nc es in the d eVel o pment of human relations skills, especi al l y those skills needed to facilitate problem-solving and pe rson al, social, and moral development, including both healing and growth. Prere qu i si tes : WRlT 1 0 1 , PSYC 101, test scores, soph omo re stan di ng, cumwative GPA of 2.50. (3)

585 Comparative Education Co m parison and i nves t igatio n of materia.is and cultural systems of education thro ughottt the world . Emphasis on applying kn owle dge for greater un de rsta n ding of th e diverse po pulat i o ns in the K- 1 2 educational sys te m. (3)

361 psychology for Teaching Prin ci ple s and research ill human deve l op me nt and lear ni ng , espe tally related to t each i ng and to the psychological growth , rela t ions hips, and a dj ustment of i ndividuals. Prerequ isites : EDUC 262, 263; EPSY 2 6 1 . ( 3 )

586 SodoJogy of Education Viewing the educational system as a c o mplex and changing social institution. Em phasi s on value orientations from diverse hu m an pop ulatio n s and their imp act on K- 1 2 e du c a tion and

368 Educational Psychology Pri n ci p les and research in hum an learning and their i m plica tio n s for curriculum and i nstruc tion . Prerequisites: EDUC 25 1 , 253.

edu

tional issues. ( 3 )

587 History o f Education

A study of great men and women whose lives and writings have shap ed and continue to shape the charact T of Amer ican ed ucati on . ( 3 ) 589 Philosophy o f Education P hi losop hical and theoret ical foundations of American ed uca ­ tion as welJ as the soci al p h ilo s ophy of growing diverse popula­ tio ns in the K- 1 2 schools. ( 3 ) 590 Graduate Semlna.r

A workshop for all Master of Arts ca ndi dates in the School of Education. Candidates should register for thi ' seminar fur assistance in fulfilling req u i rem e nts. N credi t is given, nor is twtion assessed .

595 Internship in Educational Administration Students will register fo r 2 semester hours in each of two semesters. Interns h i p in educational administration j ointly plann ed a nd supervise d by the S hool of &lucation and public andlor private school adm i n istrators in full com p liance w it h state requirements. Prerequisites: Admissi o n to the graduate program or to the crede nti aling p r ogram ; co m p letio n of education al admini 'tration co nce n tration ; co nsul tatio n with adviser. (2,

2)

596 Graduate Seminal' Stu den ts regist er for 1 emest er hour in each of two semesters . Professional seminars are sched uled and presented by candidates, th ir u n ive rs i ty professors, and pr fessional colleagues in the schools in partn rshi p . Pr requisites: Completion of c u rsewo rk in educational admi nistration concen tration. ( 2 ) 597 Lmdependent Study Projects of varying len gth related to edu ca ti nal issues or conc ern s of the in dividual participant and a pproved by an app rop ria te fac ulty member a nd the dean. ( 1-4)

(4)

501 Workshops Gr ad u ate worksh ops in special fields for varying lengt hs f t i me.

( 1-4)

512 Group Process and the Individual A h u m an interaction labo ratory to facilitate the e xp lorat io n of the self concept through the mechanisms of i n te rp erson al interactions and feedback. Em p h a si s p la ced on the acquisi t io n of skill in self-exploration, Ie i de nt ifica tio n , and climate-making. G (2) 535 Fouodationa of Guidance The focus is on devel op ing an understanding of th e services and processes ava ilab le to ass i st individuals in making plans and decisions according to their own life pattern. G (4) 536 Affective ClaSllroom Techniques Exp l or a t i on of vari uS techniques d es i gn ed t facilitate under­ st an di ng of self and others; methods for wo rkin g with students . Prerequisite: tu d.e nt teach in g or gra d u ate status. L ab ora tory experience as arra nged. G (2) c

550 Beglnn:ing Practieum Learn and pra cti ce the basic coun d in g skiLls in a structu red and closely sup e rv i se d environmenL C l ients wed in this practicum will be relatively high functioning and will usually be se e n in an observation roo m . (3) 555 Prameum In a ddi ti on to th os e skills learned in Beg i nnin g Practicum , learn and practice various coun seJ in g app roaches , skills and tech­ n iques with individuals fro m dive rs e p op ulati ons in co mm unity o r various school settings. Prerequ is ites: EPSY 550 and 56 1 . ( 3 ) 560 Communication in Schools The study of the theories and concep t s of those helping skills n eeded to fa cil itate pro ble m- so lving a,nd pe rs on al and a ca demi c growth with a ppl ica t ion s to the classroom a n d to in terac tions with professi nal colleagues. Prerequisite: Ad mi s 'ioD to MA/Cert pro gra m . ( 3 )

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561 Basic Relationships in Counseling

special needs. Federal an d ' t ate l egisl ation , current issues, a n d

A study of the th e ory, pro ess, te ch n i ques , a nd characteristics of

service delivery sy tems will b included. P rerequi s ite for aU SPED and Elementary Certification coursework. ( 2 )

the coun sel i n g rela tion sh i p. (4) 563 Practiaun in Group Process and Leade1'Ship

201 Observation iD Spedal Education Programs O bservation in special education programs, schools, and com m un i ty settings. ( 1 )

A human intera ctio n l ab ra l ory wh ich expl ores interpersonal

z o ... '" V ::::I o w

operations in groups and facilitates the develop men t of self­ insight; empbasis on leadership and deve l opm e n t of skill in diagnosing individual, group, a nd o rganizati o nal behavior patterns and influen es. Studen will co-facilitate a l ab orato ry gTOUp. Prerequ i s it e: EPSY 5 1 2 . (2) 565 Advanced BUIIUUl Development A com parat ive study of human development at va ri ous levels thro u gh observational assessments using non-standardized in st r u men t s: e.g., soc i ometr ic scales, autobiographies, interviews, int raction analysi s , and other ap p ropr i a t e measurements. A practicum (a minimum o f one hour each week) is requi red in a school or appropriate agency. P rere qui si te : Fifth year or graduate

status. (4) 566 Advanced Cognition, Development, IlDd Learning The study of principles and current tb o ugh t nd research in cognition, devel o pm ent , and learning. Prerequisite: Admission to the MA/Cert p rogram or consent of instructor. (3) 569 Career Guidance A study of careers, theories of choice, and guidance techniques. (4)

296 Educating- the Pbysically Cballenged and Medically Fragile The course focuses on meeting the psychological, so c ial , and educational needs f individuals who are physicaUy challenged a n d/ o r medicaUy fragile. ( 2 ) NOTE: PREREQUISITE FOR 300/400 LEVEL SPECIAL EDUCATION: EDUC 302 or EPSY 2611EDUC 262 or c o n sen t of instructor. Students not m aj o r i ng in e d uc at io n may be excused from this requi re m ent .

338 Issues in Early Childhood SP«ial Education Curre nt issues related to young children with sp eci al needs. (Cross-listed wit h SPED 538.) 340 Advanced Strategies and Techniques for Teaching in P-3 Settings Cur rent p r actices in educational st ra t egies and curriculum modifications to mee t the needs of the early leamer. Prereq ui ­ sites: SP E D 399, 490, 492. (Cross-listed with SPED 540.)

570 Fieldwork in Counseling and Guidance A cul min ating p ract icum of field experience in schools or agencies using theory, skills, and techniques previously learned. Students incorpora te consultation experience foUowing the

Adlerian model. (4)

341 Assessment of Infants and Pl'esdloolers Formal and informal assessment techniques used to meet the needs of children and their families in in tegrated ettings. Prerequjsites: SPED 399, 490, 492. (Cross-listed with SPED 54 1 . )

575 Mental Health Basic mental heal th principles as related to interpersonal rel ationsh i ps. Focus on self- understanding. Laboratory exp eri­ ences as arran ged. (4) 578 Behavioral Problems Adlerian concepts p rovide the basis for observation, m tivation, m odifi catio n, and life styl e asse ssm e n t . Skills for assisting peop l e in develop ing resp o nsibil ity for their own behavior. Laboratory exp e ri e n ce as arr a nged . (4) S33 Current Issues in Exceptionality

The characteristics of exceptional students and current issues involving the educa t r's role in dealing with th e ir sp ciaJ needs. G (2-4)

362 Teaching for Individual Differences - Secondary The roles of classroom management, effective instr ucti o n , and curriculum modification in meeting the needs of diverse learners. (4) 390 Instructional Strategies for Learnen wi.th Moderate Disabilities Examination of specific interventions to enhance the acquisit ion of knowledg and skills for those students who need addi ti o n al support to meet th ir l ea rni ng potential. (2) 391 Practicum: Learners with Moderate Disabilities Taken co ncu rrently with SPED 390. ( 1 )

597 Independent Stndy Projec of varying length related to educati nal issues or concems of the individual p artic i p ant and approved by an approp riate fa culty m mber and the dean. ( 1-4)

393 Teachin g Students with Behavior Disorders Examina tion of knowledge and skills related to the i nstr uct ion and management of learner with behavi r di orders. ( 2 )

598 Stndies in Education A resea rch paper or p rojec t on an educational is sue selected jointly by the student and the graduate adviser. It will be reviewed by the student's graduate committee. (2)

394 Practicum: Stndents with Behavior Disorders Experie nce with children and yo uth who have behavior p rob ­ lems. Must co mplete 45 clock hours i n an educational setting and take concurrently w it h SPED 393. ( 1 )

599 Thesis The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's maj r field of conce nt rat ion and must be approved by the candi date's graduate comm itt ee. Candidates are expected to defend their thes is in a final o ral examination conducted by their committee. (3 -4)

395 lntroduction to Language Development and Diso.rders Introd uct i o n to l a n g u a ge disorders, assessment, and interven­ ti on . Focus o n theories of language d evel o pment and normal language acqui irion. (2) 396 Stndents with Special Needs in the Inclusive Classroom Exa m in atio n of pecific tecbniques t hat promote posi tive classroom environments w ithin i nd usi ona r y spe c i a l e duc a tio n set ti ngs . P re req u isite: SPED 292. (2)

Special Education 195 Individuals with Disabilities An introductory course focusing upon persons with disa bilit i es . Intended for students outside the School of Education. (4)

200 Individuals with Special Needs Introduction to the needs and characteristics of individuals with 66

292 Assessment in Special Education Examinati n of knowledge and skills used in fo rm al and informal assessment. Includes examination of sco rin g proce­ dures, issues in validity and reliability, and the role of assessment in decision m a king. (2)

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399 Practiaun in Spedal Education Experience with children and you th who h ave special needs. 1 hour credit given after succ es s ful completion of 45 c l oc k hours and specific co urse competencies. P re requisite: consent of instructor. ( 1-2)


401 Instruction for Leamers with Mild Disabilities Examination of knowledge and skills needed for academ ic instruction and r mediation uf s tudents with mild di bilities. Prerequisite: SPED

292. (3)

402 Practlcu.m: Learners with Mild Disabilities Experience with chil dren and youth who have mild disabilitj es. Must com p lete 45 clock hours in an edu catio na l setting and take concu rren tl y with SPED 4 0 1 . ( 1 ) 403 Parent/Professional Partnership in Special Education Me t hod s for comm unicating effectivel y with parents of spe cial need children.

(2)

499 Teaching for Individual Differences - Elementary Des igned to give pre-service teachers skills and knowledge in the areas f assessment, instruction, and management o f learners with s pe cial needs. Prerequisite: 200. (2)

501 Off-Campus Workshops in Special Education O ff- ca mp us gradua te workshops in s p e ci al ed ucatitln for varying lengths of time. ( 1-4) S03 On-Campus Workshops in Special Education On-campus grad uate wo rkshops in speci a l edu ca t i on for va r yi ng le n gth s of time. ( 1-4)

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404 Communication and Collaboration Focus on knowledge and skills necessary for effective collab o ra­ ti on a nd s u per v is io n with par nts, professionals, and para­ educators. (3) 407 Curriculum, Instruction, and TedlOology Rumination of knowledge and skills needed for teach i ng academic, social, and adaptive skills to learners with sp ecia l needs. Includes writing IEP's, data based instmction, task analysis, and co mpu ter assisted instruction. Prereqllisite: EDUC 400 and S PED 292, 390 391 or 393, 394 and 40 1 . (4) 408 Transition. from School to Community Examination of knowledge and skills related to ca reer vocational transition and life adjustment. (2) 43 8 Student Teach.iog in Elementary School Teaching in special education programs under the d i rec tio n and s u pervision of school and university pe rsonnel ; 8 weeks. ( 5 )

439 Student Tea.dtin g i n Secondary School Teaching in special education programs under the direction and supervision of chool and univers ity personnel; 8 weeks. (5)

5 1 3 Laoguage/Litecacy Development: Assessment and Instruction See Education 5 1 3 .

440 Student Teach.iog Seminar A seminar which meets concurrently with student teaching and enhances skill s and knowledge required for teaching. ( 1 )

520 Teaching Students with Spedal Needs i n Elementary Programs

475 Supervising Para-Professionals and Volnoteers Emphasis on the effec t ive management of para-professi nals and volunteers in the clas s room . (1)

substantive l egal issues in s pecial educati n, program modifica­ tion, and classroom m a nagemen t . ( 2 )

480 Issues and Problems of Child Abuse and Neglect Issues and problems of child abuse, neg lect , domestic violence, substance abuse, and harassment. I n cl udes identifica tion and rep o r t ing procedures, and the legal a nd p rofe ssional responSibili­ ties of the mandated reporter. ( 1 )

485 The Gifted Child A study of the gifted learner's characteristics and needs. Focus o n instructional procedures designed to further develo p men t . (2) 490 Development i n Iluly Childhood Special Education Implications of normal and atypical child de velopm en t for the le arning process, including ha nds - on experi ence s in EC/SPED se tti n gs. ( 2)

492 Strategies for Teach.iog Early Learners Early childhood metho ds, materials, curriculum, and techniques for teachin g children with s pecial needs. Prere wsite: SPED 490 or consent of instructor. ( 2 ) 494 Computer Application in Spedal Education An introduction into the appli a t ion of omputer techno L ogy fur learners with spec i a l needs. Focus on current issues and uses of computer technology including comp ute r as 'isted instruction, softw are evaluation, pupil and data management, and assist ive devices.

(2)

497 Independent Study Projects of va ryi ng length related to trends and issues in special education and app roved by an app ropriate faculty member and the dean.

( 1 -2)

Introduction and overview f services for students with sp ec i al needs in el ement ary programs. I ncludes procedural and

52 1 Teaching Students with Special Needs in Secondary Programs Introduction and overview of services for students with p e c i al need in secondary programs. Includes procedu r al and substan­ tive legal issues in spec i al ed u cation , program n1 odifica t ion, nd classroom management. (2) 522 The Role of Health Professionals in Sp«ial Edncation This course introduces heal th professionals in the s chool to learners with special needs. Topics include .rol

of parents as

weU as medical oncems, early intervention, teaming , substance abuse, and suicide prevention . (3)

523 Educational Procedures for Students with Mild Disabilities An intro duction to teaching p rocedure s f, r s tud en ts with mild disabilities. incl u des concepts in cha racter istics , assessment, and instructional p rac tices . (3) 524 Bducationai Procedures for Students with .Developmental Disabilities An exan1ination of the emotional, social, phY'ical, and m ent al characteristics of ind ividuals with moderate disabilities. includes assessment and instruction from medical, psych ologi ai, s o c i al, and ed uca tio n al viewpoints. (3) S25 Proudures for Students with Behavior Disorders An examination of instructional and management proce dures for lea r ners with behav ior disorders. Includes study of a ca demic and behavioral characteristics of these students. (3)

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Communication Skills for Collaborative Consultation in Special Education Em phas i s on the in terperso n I skills n e cessar y for the c o n s ultin g teacher in s pec i al educ tion. The course will expl re the 576

526 Advanced Practicum in Special Education Exper ie nce wi th ch il d r en and you th wit h s pecial needs. Credit given after successful co m plet i n of 90 clock hours and specific course co mp e tencies. Prerequisite; SPED 520/52 1 or equivalent. (2) 11/ V Z

11/ V 11'1

530

variables involved in devel opin g cooperation between profes ­ sional educators. (2)

Assessment of Students wi th Spedal Needa

Examines the use of assessment information for making educational decisions about stude n ts. Prere q ui ite; SPED 292 or consent of instructor. (2)

577

Severe and Profound Disabilities Introducti n to the physical. so cial , and education needs of i ndi viduals with severe and p ro fou nd disabilities.(2)

S83 Current Issues in Exceptionality The characteristics of excepti o n al students an d ur re nt issues

The Inclusive Classroom

Introduction to th e prin cip les and pract ices of i n cl usive

education. (2)

53 1

i n volvi ng the edu tor's role in dea li ng with the ir special needs. (2-4)

a: 11/ ...

Education and Thainlng of Individuals with Severe and Profound Disabilities In - dep th st u dy of educational pre r ipti on and programming for l e arneTS who are severe ly and profoundly disabl ed . E m phasis on tea chi ng st rategies and curriculwn modification as they apply to

z

this population. ( 2 )

Legal, Ethical, and Administrative Issues in Special Education Invest i ga ti on of spec ial education administrative practices, pupil p l a cem ent proce dures, student staffing, program reimbursement p ro ced ures, and federal fund i ng models. ( 2 )

11/

533 Inclusion and Students with Moderate Disabilities A fo s on meet in g the academic and adaptive behavior skills o f students within the regular education classroom. ( 2 )

S 90 Research in Special Education Review of curr nt research on selected top ic s in special e duc a­ tion. ( 1 )

534 Inclusion ad Students with Behavior Disorders A focus on management procedures for tudents with behavioral disorders i n i n clu sive classrooms. ( 2 )

595 Spedal Education: internship Projects of varying l ength re l a ted 0 issues in special education. ( L -4)

532

535

596

Inclusion and Students with Mlld Disabilities

Issues in Language Acquisition and Disorders

597 Independent Study Proj ec ts of va ryin g l en gth related to trends and issues in special education and approved by an approp r ia te fa culty member and the dea n. ( L-4)

Current issues and approaches in assessing and remediati ng children's language d i s o rde rs . (2) 538

I.ssues In Hady Childhood Special Education

Current issues related to young children with special n ee d s . (2)

S98

reviewed by the

p rogr am s. ( 2 )

S40

Advanced Strategies and Techniques for Teaching in P-3 Grade Settings Current pra ctic es in educational strategies and curriculum modification to meet th e needs of the early learner. Prerequisite: SPED 399, 490, 492. ( 2 ) 541 Assessment In Early ChlldhoodlSpedal Education Fo r ma l and informal assessment techniques use to m eet the needs of children and their families in integrated sett i n gs . Prerequisites: SPED 399, 490, 492. (2)

University provides students with the opportunity to combine a liberal arts education with rigorous study in en gin eering . Students who complete the program earn two degrees - one from PLU and the o ther from an engineer­ ing s choo l . For the well-prepared tudent, the total length

Intern&b.ip In Spedal Education

Intern hip in special educa ion settings. Fo ur teen weeks of teaching under the direction and supervision of c o p e r a t i ng teachers and university s up ervi sor s. Designed for s tud ents in th e MA/Cert program. (6)

515 CoUaboration and Team Building Examines the communication skills necessary for effective collab o ra tio n in reg u Lar and s pe c ia l education. Topics i nc l ud e p rofes sion al team s, co - tea c hi ng co ncep ts, st a ff developm e nt ,

sch duling, co ordina ti n g, p rob le m solv in g . an c nilict m anage ­ ment in ed u cat i on al settings. (2)

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5 99 Thesis The thesis problem will be chosen from th candid ate's major field of co n centr a tion and m us t be app roved by the can di d ate 's graduate committee. Candidates re expected to defend their thesis in a final o ral examination conducted by their committee. (3-4)

The engineering dual-degree program at Pacific Lutheran

devel op m en t. (2)

P

stud ent 's grad ua te committee- ( 2 )

Engineering Science

555 Supervising ParaeducatoJ:s in School Settings Examines the roles and responsibilites of su p erviso rs of paraeducators a nd support staff. E m phasis on ethical, profes ­ sional, and legal responsibilities of the s upervi so r. Discussion of a dmin istrative practices that i m pro ve teamwurk and staff

68

Studies in Education

A research paper or p roj ect on an ed u ca t io nal issue selected jointly by the student and th gradua te adviser. It will be

Adminhtration of Early Childhood/Special Education Programs I n- d ep th stu dy of the adm i n istr a tio n of early ch i l dh o d

539

568

Technology and Special Education

Exam i nes techno logic al a dvan cemen t s as they apply to the education of lea r ners with spec i a J needs. (2)

A focus on inst ructio n al p r ocedures for students w i th mild disabilities in the inclusive classroom. ( 2 ) 537

588

Y

of s tu d y is five years - three years at PLU and two years at the engineering school, and the program is often referred to as the "Three- Thro Engineering Program:' Most subdisciplines of engineering are available to students in the dual-degree program. Fonnal agreements exist with Columbia University in New York City and Washington Univers i ty in St . Louis. At b th chools. three­ two students form a community. The y share resideoce facilities and often are enrolled in many of the same courses. PLU stu dents who have participated in the three­ two program report their rich cultural and academic


experiences at both schools, and are routinely very pleased with their decision to have p arti ipated in the three-two program. THE PLU PROGRAM: The three-two student is awarded PLU degree when the PLU requirements are satisfi d and the program of study at the en gin eer in g school is completed. The PLU degre e that typically is awarded to three- two t u d ents is the Bachelor f Arts in physi cs. The B.A. in physics is well-recognized by engi­

......

neering sch ools and i the most frequently-awarded degree by four-year schools with three-two prog ra ms . The physics degree can be selected by three-two students in all en gi neering subdisci­ plines, but students wishing to study chemical engineering m ay wish to consider the option of obtain ing the B.A. in chemistry from PLU.

Occasi nally, PLU students choose to transfer to all engi­ neering school that does not p a rtici pate in the thr e-two pro­ gram. PLU nonetheless recognizes these students as p a rt i cipants in the tnree-two program and awards them the appropriate B.A. degree upon successful completion of tlleir program at the engineering school.

Individual dep artments do not provide advice on the dual­ degree program . All prospective dual-degree students, regardless of their intended engineering subdiscipline, sho uld onsult with the three-two director (in the Physics Department) very ea rly in

their acadenlic progra m. PLU and the participating engineering scho ols recommeud that three- two students use their time at PLU to secure their academic foundations in mailiematics, physics, and chemistry. Math skills are p a rti cularly important to develop, and poor math skills are the mo t frequent reason prospective engineering students fail to su c cee d in the p rogra m . PLU REQUIREMENTS: In order to earn a PLU degree in the dual-degree program, the following requirements mus t be satisfied :

1 ) Completion of the following science and mathematics co urse (44 hour ): Mathematics ( 1 6 hours): 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253, and 35 1 or Pl-IYS 354; Physics ( 1 4 hours): 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64, and 223; Chemistry ( 8 h o urs) : 120 or 1 25, 338; Computer 'cience and E ngin e erin g (6 hours) : 1 3 1 and 144. 2a) For the B.A. in physics: co mpleti on of an additional 12 hours of electives in science and mathematics from the following courses: MATH 3 1 , 356; PHYS 233, 3 3 1 , 333, 334, 336; CSCE 245. CHEM 34 1 may be substituted for PHYS 333. The pa rticul ar courses chosen will dep e. nd 011 the intended sub discipline and the engineering school's entrance require­ ments. Students should consull with the program director before choosin g their ele ctives. 2b) For the B.A. in chemistry: co mpl et io n of organi c chemistry

(CHEM 232, 234, 332, 334) and physical che mi. try ( HEM 34 1 , 34 2, 343).

3) Completion of the general un iversity requirements as speci­ fied in the catalog, except that the following general require­ ments a re waived for all du al - de gr ee student : (a) completion of a minimum of 1 2 8 semester ho urs on the PLU transcript; (b) complet ion of a m in im u m of 40 semester hours from courses numbered 300 and above; (c) the requirement that at least 20 0 the minimum 40 semester hours of upper divi ion work mu t be taken at PLU; (d) the requirement that the final 32 semester hou r of a s t ude n t' s program be completed in residen ce at PL i (e) the requirement that the senior seminar/project be c m p leted at PLU. Senior projects from the engineering school ( a characteristic of ABET-accredited schools) will satisfy the PLU senior proj ct requi rement for d ual - degree students upon approval of the project by the appropriate PL department chair. THE ENGINEERING SCHOOL PROGRAM: The course of study at the engi n eerin g school will depend o n both the school and the su bd isc iplin e . Between Columbia UniverSity and Wash -

ington University, approximately twenty different engineering subdisciplines are available to dual-degree students. These include the more common subdisciplines (civil, chemical, elec­ trical, mechanical) a nd others such as operations research, applied mathematics, geological engineering and systems science. Details are available from the PLU program d irector.

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ACADEMIC EXPECI'ATIONS: For admission to their engineer­ ing pr gram, both Columbia University and Was h in gt on Univer­

sity require a cumulative PLU grade point average of 3.0 or higher and grades of B or better in pertinent ma!hematics and science courses. Students who d o not meet these requirements are considered on a case-by-case basis. Although students who choo se to transfer to another engineering school may be able to gain admission with slightly lower grades than those required by Columbia Univer s ity and Washington University, all prospective engineering students aJe well-advised to use the higher standard as a more realistic indication of what will be expected of them in the engineering school.

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For more illformatiOlI, contact the dual-degree program director in the Department ofPhysics or visit the program website at www. nsci.plu.eduI3-2p rogram.

Engl ish English offers excellent preparation for any fu ture req uir­ ing integrative thinking, skill in writing, discernment in reading, an appreciation of human experience and aesthetic values, and the processes of critical and creative expression. Business, gover n me nt , education, and pub ­ li shi n g a r e are as whe re our graduates frequently make their careers . Our program offers emphases in literature and writing, as well as concentrations in children's literature and publishing. The English Department also supports the study abroad programs, and we offer study tours to such places as Europe, Australia, and the Caribbean. FACUlTY: Temple-Thurston, Chair; Albrecht, M. Benton, P. Benton, Bergman, Carlton, Campbell, Eyler, Jansen, Jones,

Lovelace, Marclls, D. M. Martin, Rahn, D. Seal. ENGLISH MAJOR (EMPHASIS ON UTERATlJRE): The English major with a n emphasis on literature introduces stu­

dents to the great literary traditions of Britain, North America, and the English-speaking world. The major in literature places courses o rga nized by historical period at the heart of the student's program , all owi n g students to read the great works that define th e p eriods, and to explore the ways in whi ch cultural contexts impin c up o n the literary imagination. Students who select the emphasis on literature can expect to learn how sensi­ tive readers engage texts through their own speaking and writing, following their insights into the rich pleasures of li t er ary lan­ guage and growing more s op his ticated in constructing effective literary arguments. They will also be introduced to the ways in which major critical traditions frame our ap p ro ac hes to litera­ tu re and define the issues that keep literature meaningful and relevant in our live . Students considering English with an emphasis on literature as a major, but wh are stili undecided, might begin with a 200level course. Even though no 200-level course is required for majors, students may request that one appropriate 200-level course be substituted for one similar Periods and Surveys course at ilie 300 level. Students are encouraged to take Shakespeare early in the major. Correspondence courses and independent studies may llQ!; be used to fulfill general university or core requirements.

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Foreign Laoguage Requirement: All English majors must complete at lea t two years of a fo re ign lan gu age at the university level, or the e q u ival t>n t (see College ofArts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirements. Option

I).

Major Requirements: At least 36 and up to 44 hours in Engl is h % 11\

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b eyond Wr iting 1 0 1 , at least 20 hours of which must be upper division. The following course distributions are required of m aj ors with an emphasis on literature: A Shakespeare

(4 ho u rs)

30 1 , Shakespeare B. Periods and Surveys

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE: tudents co m pl e t i ng 333 and 8 hours from 326, 334, 335 or other a pp rove d courses (all with

(at least 4 hours from each of the

follow ing lines):

1. EARLY 35 1 , E ngl ish Medieval Literature 352, Chaucer 353, Englis h Renaissance Litera tur e 2. MIDDLE 36 1 , Eng lis h Restoration an d 1 8 th Cen tury 362, English Romantic and Victorian Literature 3 7 1 , Studies in American Literature, 1 820-1920 3 . LATE 367, Twentieth-Century Bri tis h Literature 372, Twentieth-Century Ame r i can Poe t ry 373, Twentieth-Century American Fiction and Drama 4. LITERATURE AND DIFFERENCE 3 4 1 , Feminist Approaches to Literature 343, Post-Colonial Li t erature 374, Ame ri can Ethnic Literature

grades of B or higher) will be re cognized for special competence in c hildren' s li tera t u re.

428, Seminar: Critical Theo ry 45 1 , Seminar: Au thor 452, Seminar: Theme, Genre

this catalog.

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON LITERATURE) : 20 semester hours (excluding 1 0 1 ), dis t ribu ted as follows: 4 hours of hakespeare, 8 hours from " Pe rio ds aod Surveys" ( see lit er at ure "Major Requirements " ) , and 8 h ours o f electives.

MINOR (EMPHASIS ON WRITING): 20 semester hours (ex足 cluding 1 0 1 ) , with at least 1 2 hou rs in upp er division, distributed as follows: 12 hours in writing, 4 hours in li ter at u re , 4 hours o f

elec tive . MINOR (EMPHASIS ON PUBllSRING AND PRINTING ARTS): See s epar a te listing under Pub lish i ng and Printing Arts. PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Students preparing to teach English in secondary schools should arrange for art adviser in both English and EdlKation. Please also see the School o f Education section of

C. Seminar (a t least 4 hours)

Secondary Education: Students p repa ring to teach in j un ior

Senior Sem inar Project: The senior se minar p roj ect is a g en eral

university re q uirem en t ill all p rograms and m ajors . Students will customarily sa t isfy this requirement in E nglis h in t h e ir seminar course as a cul m i n a t ion of their und ergrad u at e education, in the senior yea r. Under certain circumstances, students may substitute an appropriate 300 - leve l cOUrse.

D. Writing (at leas t 4 hours of any writing course at the 200 to 400 levels). E. Electives

(8 hours)

ENGUSR MAJOR (EMPHASIS ON WRITING); The wr it ing em phasis at PLU has been designed for a broad spe c t rum of stu d ent s, from those wishing to focus on fi ct i on and poetry, to th os e interested in more pr agma tic types of w riting, to those set on exploring t he ore tic a l issues in rhetoric and compos it ion .

Foreign Language Requirement; All E n glish majors m ust comp lete at least two years of a foreign language a t th e university level, or the e q u ival ent (See College of Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirements, Option

Writing 1 0 I ) , di s tr i bu ted as follows: A. Writing (at least 20 h011rS in writing, with at least 12 hours upper division)

I. At least 1 2 h o urs, from at least two of the following lines: a. I ma gi native Writing 227, Imaginative Writing I 327, Imaginative Writing Il 326, Writing for Children b. Exp os i tory Writing 2 2 1 , Research an d Wri ting 323, Writing in a Professional Setting 328, Advanced C om p o s i tion for 11 achers c . Crea t ive Nonfiction 224, Travel Writing 225, Auto b i ogr a ph i cal Wr it ing 324, Free - l an ce Writing 325, Pe rs onal Essay

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or senior high school may earn either a Bachelor of Arts in English with certification from the School of Education, or a Ba c h elor of Arts in Education with a teachin major in En足 gl ish. The English major with an e mpha sis in l ite rature and t h e English m aj or with an emph asis in writ ing may both be pursued by prosp ec t ive teachers. Se con d a ry education stu足 dents must fulfill all r eq uirem ents for the English major: Option I of the FOTeign Language Requirements (2 years of a foreign language at the un ive rsi ty level, or the equivale nt ) ; at least 36 and no more than 44 c re di t hours in English; and all the specific req ui re men t s for the major either in L iterature or in writ ing . State certifi c ation for teachers als mandates the following requirements, which are an overlay to the ma 揃or. Courses taken to sa t isfy th m aj or can also be courses that satisfy the state certification req uireme nts. English hterature: one course American literature: one course Comparat ive literature: one c urse

(2 1 4, 2 16, 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 232, 233, 34 1 , 343, an appropriate seminar) Linguis tics or structure of language : one course (403) Wr i t in g/ Compo s ition: one course (328 is es pecia lly recom mend ed ) Prospective teachers may take Ed u cat ion 529, Adolescent Li teratu re in the Secondar, Curriculum, as an elective in the English major.

I).

Major Requirements: At l eas t 36 hours in Engl i s h (exc l udin g

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2. Senior Project/Seminar (at le ast 4 hours in the following) 425, 426, Writing on Special Topics 427, Imaginative Writing III 428, Seminar: Critical Theory 3. Elective (at lea t 4 hours from lin s 1 or 2 above) B. Literature (12 hours, with at least 4 hours upper division) St ud e nt s a re e nc ouraged to take literature courses which contribute to their goal s as writers, and which expand their exp er ien ce with the his tory and genres of writin g . C. Elective (at least 4 e lective hours in English beyond 101)

Elementary Education: tudents p repa r ing to teach [n

elementary schools following the Language Arts curriculum, must take 24 hours minimum in English, and are advised to follow the structure of th Engl ish maj o r in sa tis fying state certification requ ire men ts . Consult your adviser in the School of Education.

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323, Wr i ti n g in Professional Settings'

Course Offe rings

324, Free-Lance Wr i t ing" 325, Personal Essay*

AI/ literature cOllrses fillfill tile general un iversity core reqIlirerne,zt

326, Writing for Childr en

ill litera ture.

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L lower Division Counea The following COUIses were d e sig n ed for students wllo are not Ellglisll majors, and for students co nsi de ri ng an Engl is h m aj o r, to satisfy t he general u n ive rsi ty requirement i n literature. Upper division course� in literature offered by the Depa r tme nt o f E ngl i sh will sa tisfy the gener al univerS i t y requirement in litera­ ture as well, but the fo llow in g co u rses a re p a r ticul a rly recom­ mended. These lower division c o urses in literature give p ri ma r y attention to the act of reading ill d iffer en t contexts and ge n res. The courses e m phas ize for t uden ts the ways in which fra mi ng t h e read ing experience by different kinds of que tion reveals d iffere n t texts, a n d enri ches the imaginative experience of rea d ­ ing, l ead ing more to i nsig h t on the part of the reader t h a n final

327, 427, Imaginative Wri t i ng II, III 328, Advanced Composition for Teachers' 403, The English Language 42 1 , Tutorial in Writing 425, 426, Writing on Special Topics 428, Sem in a r: Critical Theory

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'" llldicates courses that can fulfill the general university w ritiNg req u iremellt.

IV. PubUshing and Printing Arts 3 1 1 , Book in Society 3 1 2 , Publish ing Procedures 3 1 3 , Art of the Book I 3 1 4, Art of the Book II

answers.

A. Topics 2 1 3 , Topics in Literature: Themes and Authors B. Genres

2 14, Poetry 2 1 5, F i ct io n 2 1 6, Fictio n: Cross-Cultural Emphasis 2 1 7, Fiction: Alt erna t ive Pe r s pec tive s Em p h as i s

2 1 8, Drama

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C. Traditions 230, Contemporary Literature 23 1 , Master p ieces of Europ e an Literature through the Renaissance 232, Women's Literature 233, Post-Colonial L it eratu re 234, Envi ro n m ental Literature 2 4 1 , American Traditions in L iter at u re 2 5 1 , .British Tra itions in Li tera h .rre

II. Upper Division Coanes Desi gned pa rticular ly for upper division students, usually but not exclus ive ly with the major in mind.

A.British Literature 3 0 1 , Shakespeare

3 5 1 , En glish Med i eval Literature

352, Chaucer

353, English Renaissance Li erature 36 1 , Restoration and 1 8 th Century Literature 362, English Ro m a n t i c and Victor ia n Lite ra tu re 367, 20th Century B r i t i s h L i t e ra t ure

B. American Literature 371, Studies in American L i terat u r e 1 820- 1 920 372, 20th Cen tury American Poe try 373, 20th Century Am eric an Fiction and Dra m a 374, American E th n i c Litera ture C. Special Studies 34 1 , Feminist p pro aches to Literature

343, Post-Colonial Literatme 333, Cbildren's Literature 334, Special Topics in Children's Li ter a t u re 335, Fantasy a nd Fairy Tales

428, Semina r. Crilica! Theory 45 1 , Seminar: Author 452, Seminar: Theme, Genre 49 1 , 492, Independent Read ing and Res earch 597, Graduate Research

m. Writing, Language, and Theory 1 0 1 , Inqui r y Seminar: Writing for Discove ry* 221, Research and Writinl( 224, Travel Writing" 225, Autobiographical Writing" 227, Imaginative Writin g J

2 1 3 Topics in LiteratlUe: Themes and Authors A variable-content co urs e that foc uses on the act of read ing a n d in terp ret i n g texts. (4) 2 1 4 Poetry

A tu dy of p o e m s and conventions of p oe tr y from the cl ass i cs to modern proj ective verse. (4) 2 15 Fiction

Examines the development oi short fiction, co nc e n t r ating on them es and t ec hni que s of lhe genre. Stresses the Euro-American tr ad iti o n . (4) 216 Fiction: Emphasis on Cross-Cultural Perspectives (4) 217 Fiction: Emphasis on Alternative Perspectives (4) 2 1 8 Drama An introduction to the basic elements of drama ( pl o t, c har acter, langu age ) and on the t rad i tion al gen res ( t ragedy, comedy). (4)

22 1 Research and Writing Strategies for wr i ting academic research pa p e r s are prac ticed , including developing appropriate research to p ics , locating and using a variety of relevant sources, substantiating gen eral i za ­

tions, and using paraphrase and

citation ac c ur a tely. (2 or 4)

224 Travel Writing Writing about travel, while trave ling or upon r tu m . Students keep travel jo urnals, pro d uc e short tra vel essays, and read se­ lected travel wri ters . (4) 225 Autobiographical Writing R ead in g autob i ogra phy a nd writing part of one's own, with

an

em ph as is on how writing style and pe r s on a l identity comple­ me n t each otber. (4) 227 Imaginative Writing I A beginning workshop in wr i t ing poetry and short fiction. In c l udes a s t udy of techn i q ues and forms to develop c r i tic a l standards a nd an understanding of the writing p rocess. ( Prereq­ uisite; 1 0 1 OT its equivalent, Advanced Placement, or co ns en t of instructor.) (4)

230 Contemporary Ilterature Emph a sis on the d ive rsity of new voices in Amer i can fiction such as To ni Morrison, Leslie Silko, Nicholson Baker, Joyce Carol

Oates, Cormac McCarthy, and Amy Tan, from the emergence of post-modernism to the most important current fiction.

(4)

231 Masterpieces of Eumpun Literature Representative works of classical, medieval, and e arly Renais­ sance literature. ( C ross-referenced w ith CLAS 2 3 1 .) (4) 232 Women's Literature An introduction to fiction, poetry, and other literatures by women writers. Includes an exp lo rat io n of women s ways of reading and wri ting. ('1) P

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233 Posl-Colonial literature

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333 Children's literature

Writers from Africa , India, ustralia, New Zealand, Canada, and the Caribbean confront the legacy of colon i a l ism from an in ider's perspective. Em phasis on fiction. (4)

An in troduction to a rich literary tradition, with ana lys i s in depth of such authors as H.C. Anderson, Tolkien, Lewis, Potter, Wtlder, and LeGuin. (4)

234 Environmental Literature

334 Special Topics in Children's literature Content vari each year. Possible topics include genres, themes, historical periods, and traditions. May be re peated for credit

Examines representations of n at u re in l i tera ture, and the way ' in which hwn ans define themselves and their rel at io nsh ip with

nature through those representations. Focuses on major texts from various cultures and historical periods. Includes poetry,

with different top ic.

335 Fairy Tales and Fantasy Fairy tales are told and interpreted; i nter p re tive models and

fiction, and non-fiction. (4) 239 Environment and Culture

theories from s everal psychological trad i t io ns are explored. Fantasy is l ooked at both as i m a ge and as story. (4)

Study of the ways in which enviro nment al issues are shaped by human cul ture and values. Major conception of nature, includ­ ing no n-weste rn p e rspect ives and issues in eeo-justice. Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, co n ce ptual frameworks, history, a nd s p ri t ua lity. (4)

341 Feminist Approaches to literature Introduction to a variety of feminisms in contemporary theory as fra me wo rks for reading fe mi nist literatuTe and for approach­ i n g traditioJlal literature from feminist pos itions. ( 4 )

241 American 1i"aditions in Uterature Selected t h eme s that distinguish American literature from British traditions, from colonial or early national roots to current branches: for example, confronting the divine, inventing se l fho o d, coping with raci sm. ( 4 )

of the great litera tures of t he world, from Angl - axon orig i ns to post­ modern rebellions: for exa mp le , iden t ity, society, and G d; l ove and desire; industry, science , and culture. (4) 301 Shakespeare Study of represe ntative works of the g rea t poet as a central figure

in the canon of English literature. (4) 3 1 1 The Book in Society A critical study of the role of books in our history, society, a.nd daily lives. (4)

invo lving students produce iL (4)

in decision

abo

of book publi s hing,

ut what to publish and how to

o n the p o l iti cization of art that the s truggl e against imperialism precipitat ed. (4)

352 Chaucer A st udy of Geoffrey Chaucer's major works, e s pecia l ly The Canterbury Tales an d Troilus and Criseydc, and of the intellectual, social, and pol ilica l circumstanc s of their produ c t i o n in four­ teenth-century En gl an d . (4)

Wyatt to Marvell, inc luding Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Don ne, and Jonson ; selected playwrig hts from Kyd to Webst er; selected prose from More to Bacon and Browne. (4) 36 1 Restoration and 18th.Century Literature Surveys the l ivel y drama, neoclassical poetry, goth ic fieti n, a nd

The comb ination studi c urse and seminar explores the visual p rop e r t i es of l anguage . (4)

early novel of a period marked by rel ig ious eontroversy and p h ilo opb i cal op t i m ism.

314 The Art of the Book n

(4)

362 Romantic and Victorian literat'W'e

I ndividual projects to explore furthe r typography and fine

A s urve y of the richly var i ed writers of [ 9th-century En gland

(4)

seen in the co n ten of a r apidl y c han g i ng s oc ia l rea lity-fro m romantic revolutionaries and dreamers to ea r nest cultural critics and myth - makers . (4)

323 Writing in Professional Settings

Students working in profess io na l settings analyze the rheto.rical demands of lheir job-related writing. (4)

367 2Oth-CeDtury British literature

324 Free-Lance Writing A workshop in writing for p ublication, with primary emp asis on the feature article. (4)

A survey of E ngland 's literary landscape from the rise of

325 Personal Essay

371 Studies in Amerlcan Literature, 1820-1920 The m u tua l influence of li terary traditions and American culture in idealism, realism, and naturalism. (4)

modernism through mid-century reactions to c ntemporary innovations. (4)

Students write essay on topics of their ch o ice, workirlg p a r t i c u­ larly on voice and style. (4) 326 Writing for Chlldren A workshop in wri t ing fiction and non-fiction for children and teenagers , with an introduction to the varieties of contemporary

372 20th-CeDtW'y American Poetry

ch i l d ren's literature. (4)

373 20th-Century American Fictioo and Drama Major authors and forms, both conventional a n d experimental.

327, 427 Imaginative Writing n, ill An advanced wo rks hop in writi ng poetry and short fiction. Some atten t ion will be given t p roced ures for subm itti ng manuscript for p ublication . Srudenrs may enroll in this course a seco n d time

as 427. (4) 328 Advanced Composition for Teachers Studenrs are introd uce d to philosophical, social,

and p ragm at ic

issue confronting teachers of wr i t i ng. Required for certification by the Schoo l of Ed ucat i n. (4)

72

fo c u se s

353 English Renaissance literature Studies the Golden Age of English literature. Selec ted poets from

3 1 3 Th e Art o f tbe Book I

bookmaking.

343 Voices o f Diversity: Post-Colonial literatore and Theory Using the theories of Fan o n , Gates, and others, this co u r e

351 English Medieval literature A s urvey of the first two periods of Engl ish literature: Old En­ glish, i n cl u ding the epic Beowulf, a n d Middle Engli h, ranging from the romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to th e begin­ ni n gs of E nglish drama in Everyman. (4)

251 British 1i"aditions in literat'W'e Selected themes that define British L iter a tur e as o n e

3 1 2 Publishing Procedures A workshop intro uction to the world

(4)

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Major voices in American poetry from Frost a nd Eli t, Williams and Pound, through the post-war generation to recent poets. (4)

(4) 374 American Ethnic Literatures Attention to the literatures and popular traditions of Ameri ca's ethnic communities. Includes Mr i c an and Asian Americans, Native Americans and Chicano/as. (4)


403 The English Language Studies in the ·tructure and h isto r y of Eng li sh , with e mp hasis on I analysis and issues of usage. (4)

syn t act i

421 Tutorial in Writiog Guided work in an individual wri tin g project. A plan of study must be app roved before the student may register for the course. ( 1-4)

English as a Second Language PLU Minor An interdisciplinary minor in Teaching English

as a

425. 426 Writing on Special Topics Writing in a wide range of academic and c rea t i ve genres deter­ mined by their particular edu ca tio nal g als, stu dents will sh ap e their p a per to meet the rhetorical demands of publications re levan t to their academ ic or professional fu ture . (4)

Second Language is available. This program can be u sed to meet the minor requirement i n Elementary Education and leads to an additional endorsement for elementary or secondary education students. Students majoring in foreign languages in the College of Arts and Sciences may also fi n d this minor a useful addition to their prog ams.

428 Semlnar: Critical Theory

TEACHING ENGUSB AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Issues in Literary s tud ies and in rhetorical theory are discussed in

relationship to influential movements such as reader-response, cultural studies, fem i nis m, and deconstruction. Rec o mmen ded for prospective graduate st udents. (4)

451 Seminan Author Concentrated study of l he work, life, i nfluence, and critical re putat io n of a m aj or author in the English-speaking world. The co urse indudes careful a tte n ti on to the relations of th e author to cu l tu r a l cont xts, t h e fra ming of c r iti cal approaches th ro ugh l iterary theo ry, substantial l ibrary research, and a m aj o r writing project. (4) 452 Seminar. Theme, Genre Concentrated s tudy of a major l ite ra ry theme or genre, as it might appear in various pe r iods , authors, and cultures. T h course includes careful a tten t io n to pra c tica l criticism, the fram i n g of c r itical approaches th ro ug h l i t era ry th eo ry, substan­ tial library research, and a major writing p roj ec t . (4) 491, 492 Independent Reading and Research An in tens ive course in read i ug . May include a thesis. Intended for upper division maj ors. (4) 597 Graduate Research (4)

( 1 6 h ours required)

Exploring An th ro p I gy: Culture and Soc i e ty (4) LANG IE D C 445 M ethod s fo r Teachin For eign Languages and Eng lish as a Second Lan gu age ( 3 1 LANG 446 Theor i es of La ngu age Acquisition (4) LANG/EDUC 475 Practictlm in Teac h i n g English as a Second

ANTH 1 02

Language ( l ) LANG lEDUC 470

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urriculum, Mate r i als and Instruction for Teaching E n g l i sh as a Seco nd L an gu ag

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(4)

A.C.E. Language Institute The A.CE. Language Institute (operated by the American Cultural Exchange) is an affili ate of PLU offering intensive English classes, which re designed to p repare interna­ tional students for stu cUes in U.S. colleges and universities, or for professional work requiring English p roficiency.

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FACUI:rY: Coghlan, Progra m Director; Biggs, Mufioz, Rejs m an . The faculty at A.CE. L an guage Institute has extens ive training and experience in teach i ng English as a Second Language, and all hold the terminal degree of M. A. in TE L or its equivalent Having l ived , travel d, and ta ught English in many countries throughout the wo rld, both the facul ty and staff have ga i n e d an awareness of other peoples, their l an gu ages , and th ei r cultures.

A.C.E. CUIUUCULUM: The A .C.E . curriculum is an i n te ns i ve multi -level progr am from Hjgh BegillIling to Proficiency. Students st ud y req ui r d cours s for 20 hours per week an d can c hoo se an additional 5 hours of practical sk ill s classes. The A.C .E . curriculum is based on co nt e nt and expe rie n tial lea rn i ng which allows studen t · to improve their l an gu age profi ien cy while learning about new t op i cs and exploring the local community. Up on arr 'val , students will lake a placement test to determine th ei r st a rt ing level. Each level re quire s one semester to com plete . CERTIFICATES AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Certificate of General English: S t uden t s wh o successfuUy co mp le te the Advanced Le vel ( level 5 of 6) wil l be awa rd e d the Certificate of Completi n for Gen e ral "English. Certificate of Academic Proficiency: Students wh o su c c ss full y co m ple te th Proficiency Level (level 6 of 6) win be awarded the Certificate f Completion for Academic P r o fi c ie ncy. Director's Recommendation: PlU's Engli s h language profi­ c i ency requ irements for admission can be satisfied with a re comm en dat io n from the A .C . E . d i rector. Students who maintain good attendance and earn a gra de of A or B in all Proficiency level classes qualify fo r this recommendation.

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Seattle, and the Seattle Center. Studenls can also participate in intramural sports activities um as soccer, volleyball, and basketbal l. Six tennis courts, a golf course, a swim m ing pool, and several gymnasiums give students additional opportunities for recreatio n .

Course Offerings

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High Beginn.iDg Level Reading and Writing Communication Skills Li stening Vocabu l ary and Se nten c e Building

lANGUAGE MENTORS: La n guage mentors are U.S. tudents and adults who are interested in engaging i nternational students in free conversation one-on-one or in small gr o u p s .

Intermediate Level Reading and Writing Movie Listening and Vocabulary Grammar Communication Skills

AMERICAN UFE PROGRAM: The A. C . E . Language I nsti tute offers many opportunities for students to l earn about the

surrounding co m munity. Several required classes include interaction with the local individuals and institutions .. Help is also p rovided to students who want to join groups or take part in volunteer services whi l e in Tac om a .

High Intermediate Level Reading and Writing Cultur and Comm unity Interaction Current Issues Listening and DisclIs ion Pronunciation

SCHOLARSHIPS: Available after t h e fir t session for those students who demonstrate financial need .

The A.C.E. Language Institute is located on Park Avenue just north of 12lst Street.

Advanced Level Reading and Writing Research and Oral Presentation Academic Listen i ng Grammar

Telephone Number: (253) 535-7325 FAX Number; (253) 535-8794

E-mail: coghlaea@plu.edu

Proficiency Level Academic Skills Grammar and Writing Reading and Discussion Skills Speaking Skills

Environmental Studies

The Environmental Studies P rogram at PLU examines the

Credit Courses: Q u alifi ed advanced level students may re quest permission to take regular university c las ses for credit. This option p rovides students an opportunity to earn cr di ts toward their degree while completing their advanced courses in English as a second la n g uage .

relationship between hu mans and the environment through a wide variety of perspectives w i thin the univer足 sity curriculwn. The integrative approach of the program, essential to the development of an understanding of the global impact of h uman civilization on the natural envi足

To enhance formal education al experience, the following are also available to A.C.E. Language Institute s tudents:

RESOURCE CENTER: Students are encOluaged to take advantage of the resource c.enter, which is eq ui pp ed with audio and video tapes and equipment, text bo ks, and r ' ding mat rials to help students work on their language skills outside of the regu l a r classroom assignments. A professional tutor is availabLe 5 hours per week to guide students with th ir study goals. Community members can also make lise of the resource center for a m on th l y fee . HOST FAMILIES: A.C.E. Language Institute has long足 established commu nity-based bo t family pr gram fo r students who wish to Ii e with a U.S. family for one or mor semesters. The American families-all screened by the Institute-p rovide students with room or roo m and bo ard at reasonable rates. I n addition t o the s tanda rd bedroom furniture, the rooms are provided wi th a desk, chair, and good lighting; family rules are agreed upon in advanc and a fom1al written agreement is drawn up. Tbe s t udent completes a ques600naire that indicates preferences ucb as: children in family, orban or suburban selting, l ikcs and dislikes, etc. The host fa mily is also g iven an oppor tunity to express p refere n ces or expectations. This information is thcn used to p lace students in the home m o s t suitable for both part i es . Weekend andlor holiday v isits with an American farniJy can also be arranged. COUNSELlNG: A.C.E. Language Institute assi 15 it s stud nts with car er choices, college placement, im.migration matters, medical and dental referrals, and peTS nal c ncerllS. ACI'MTmS: Special cultural and social activities are pla n ned

regularly for s t ude nts . In addition, field trips add significantly to cultural enrichment. Students and staff take trips to Mt. Rainier,

local museums of natural history, 3rt galleries, zoos, children's day care centers, retirement homes, the Ports of Tacoma and 74

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ronment of our planet, encourages students to blend many perspectives on environmental issues into their program of study. The program, in keeping with the broa

liberal arts

objec tives of the university offe rs a major or

a

minor i n

Environmental Studies. Students Uave t h e opportunity to link environmental themes to any area of the u rricu)u m they select .in. their complementary m ajor or minor. The program is overseen by an interdisciplinary faculty com mi ttee. Studen

interested in

th E nvironmenta l

Studies major or minor should meet with the chair of the Environmental Studies Co mm ittee.

FACULTY: A co m m itte e of faculty admi nisters this program: Whitman, Cftair; Bergman, Foley, Hansen, Hansvick, Ka p l a n , Olufs, Rowe, J . Schultz, Stivers, Tonn, Yerian.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 36 semester hours, completed with grade of C or bigher. 1 . Foundations for Environmental Studies ( 4 ) Students select o n e of the following c o u rses, which introduce students to environmental issues through a multidisciplinary and i ntegrated approach. These courses invol e lhe construction and interpre.tation of arguments from a variety of perspectives: Environmental Studies/Geosciences 104 - Conservation of Natural Resources English/Religion 239 - Environment nd Culture 2. Disciplinary Breadth Students a re required to take courses that p rovide an in -depth study and exposUJ'l! to envir o mental issues within disciplines. A. The Environment and Science (8) Students se.lect two c ou rs e s from the following, which emphasize the un d er st a nd ing of scientific reasoning and


arguments, the interpretation of data and relationships in the natural world, and the sci ntific context of environmen­ lal issues. The courses must be from different departments: Biology 1 1 6 - Introductory Ecology Bio logy 424 - Ecology Chem jstry 1 04 - Environmental Chemistry Geosciences 334 - Hydrogeology

B. The llnvimnment and Society (8) Students select two courses from the following, which focus on the understanding of the institutions with in which envir nmental decision are made and investigate the impleme nt at i o n and implications of environmental deci­ sions. The courses must be from different departments: Economics 1 30 - Global and Environmental Economic Principles E onomics 330 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics Political Science 346 - Environmental Politics and Policy C. The Environment and Sensibility (4) Students select one course from the following, which exam­ ine the ways in which nature exists in human con ciousness, values. and perceptions. Students receive guidance in careful reading, thoughtful writing, and sensitive attentiveness to nature and 0 e nvi ronmental issues: English 234 - Environmental Literature English 324 - Free-lance Writing" Religion 365 - Christian Moral Issues ( E nvironmental Ethics only) St!ldlmlS 1111151 notify Ihe instructor of their intent to co mplete il major ill Environmental Stlldies so that they can focus their inde­ pelldent work ill th e course 011 a n environmental theme or issue. •

3. Elective Courses (4) Students select one course that integrates and applies environ­ me nt al c ncepts wit hin a special topic area. This course should be selected in consultation with their program a dvi ser: Integrated Studies 241 - Energy, Resources, and Pollution Integrated Studies 242 - Population, Hunger, and Poverty Psychology 464 - Enviro nmental P ycho[ogy Envir nmental Studies 425 - Special Topics i n Envirollmental Studies or additional approved courses that meet outco mes l objectives

4. Advanud Integrative Courses (8) AU majors must complete the foll owi n g courses. It is expected that th y will have completed all of the other requ irements before these final courses. Environmental Studies 350 - Environmental Meth ds of Investigation Environmental Studies 490 - Capstone Project Additionai lleqWrements: A compl mentary minor or major in another discipline. An internship is required, either for the Capstone project or as a separate experience. Students must receive approval for thcir internship by the chair of Environmental Studies. A minimum of 20 hours of upper division credits is required in the major. •

2. Environment and Sodety (4) Students select one course from the following which pursue the study of institutions where environmental perspectives and policies are applied: Economics 1 30 - Global and Environmental Economic Principles Economics 330 - Environmental and Natural Resource Ec nomics Political S ience 346 - Environmental Politics and Policy 3. Environmeot and Sensibility (4) Students select one course from the following which examine values. perception, and expression as they relate to environ­ mental issues: English 234 - Environmental Literature English/R \igion 239 - Environment and Culture English 324 - Free-lance Writing" Integrated Studies 24 1 - Energy, esources, and Pollution Psychology 464 - Envir nmental Psychology Religion 365 - Christian Moral Issues (Environmental Ethics only) *

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Students must ,ratify tire instrllctor of tlreir intent to complete a

minor in Environmelltal Srudies so thil t they can focus their inde­ pendent work i'l the collrse on

"

all envirotlmentnl theme or isslle.

4. Environmental Studies 350 - Environmental Methods of Investigation (4)

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Course Descriptions 104 Conservation of Natural Resources Principles and problems of public and private stewardship of our resources with specific refer nce to the Pacific Northwest. (Cross­ referenced with Geosciences 1 04). (4) EnviroDDlentai Methods of Investigation Study of a watershed using and integrating techniques and principles of environmental sciences, political science, econom­ ics, and ethj s. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: Lines # 1-3 completed Of consent of instructor. (4)

350

3.99 lnternship in Environmental Studies An internship with a private or public sector agency, org a n iz a ­ tion, or ompany involved in environmental issues. By consent of the chair of Environmental Studies only. (4) 425 Special topiCS in Environmental Studies

Selected topics as announced by the program. Course will address current interdisciplinary issues in environmental studies. ( 1-4)

490 Capstone Project An interdisdplinary research project of the student's design that incorporates materials and methods from earlier courses and has a focus reflecting the specific interest of the student. A substan­ tial project and a public presentation of the results are required. Prerequisite: ENVT 350. (4) 49 1 Independent Study Opportunity to focus on specific top ics or issues in environmen­ tal studies under the supervision of a faculty member. ( 1-4)

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 20 s mester hours, completed with grade of C or higher.

1. Eovironment and Sdence ( 8 ) Students select two courses from t h e following which examine the scientific foundations of environmental problems: Environmental StudieslGeosciences 1 04 - Conservation of Natural Resources Biology 1 1 6 - Introductory Ecology Chemistry 1 04 - Environmental Chemistry Studen ts majorillK ill n natural sci ence discipline and who have taken n lrigher level Chemistry CUlIrse (120 or above) will be illlolved to slibstitlite another course in consultiltion with the Ellvironmental Studies Committee. P

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Geosciences VI W U Z w u VI o w

The geosciences are distinct from other natural sciences. The study of the earth is interdisciplinary and historical, bringing knowledge from many other fields to help solve problems. Geoscientjsts i nvestigate continents, oceans, and the atmosphere, and emphasize both the processes that have changed and are changing the earth through time and the results of those processes, such as rocks and sediments. Our fast-rising human population is dependent upon the earth for food, water, shelter and energy and mineral resources. Study in the geosciences reqllires creativity and the ability to integrate. Geologists observe processes and products in the field and in the laboratory, merge diverse data, develop reasoning skills that apply through geologic time and create and interpret map . The field goes beyond pure research science, and includes applied topics like the relationships of natural events such as earthquakes and volcanoes with human societies. The Department of Geosciences recognizes that it is DO longer sufficient just to have knowledge of the facts of the field; successful students must have quantitative skills and be able to communicate clearly through writing and speaking. Laboratory experiences are an integral part of all courses. Many courses involve the use of microscopes, including the department's scanning electron microscope. Computers are used in most courses to help students understand fundamental phenomen a, obtain current information, and communicate results. Field trips are included in many courses. Pacific Lutheran University is located at the leading edge of western North America, i n the Puget Lowland, between the dramatic scenery of the Olympic Mountains and the Cascade Range. Pierce County has diverse geology, whi ch is reflected in elevations that range from sea level to more than 1 4,000 feet. Geoscience graduates who elect to work a.fter complet­ ing a FLU degree are employed by the U.S. Geological Survey, resource companies, governmental agencies, and private-sector firms. Many graduates are currently em­ ployed in geotechnical and environmental fields. Gradu­ ates who combine geosciences with education are em­ ployed in primary and econdary education. Careers in geosciences often require post-graduate degrees. Many B.S. majors have been successfuJ at major research graduate schools.

Options reflect

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a

stu den t 's interests and a re discussed with an

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: See

School of Education.

MINOR: 20 semester hours of courses in g osciencc , com pier d with g r ad e f C or h i g h er. Required: 201 and t least three upper division courses (a minimum of 8 upper-divi ion credit hou rs) . DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recognition of o u tsta nd i ng work th des ig n a t i on with Departmental Hon ors may be granted to Bachelor of Science graduat s by a vot of the faculty of the Department of Geosciences, based upon tbe studen t's perfor­ mane in these areas: 1 . Course work: The gr ade point average in ge osc ience courses must be at least 3.50. 2. Written work: From the time a student declares a major in g osciences, copies of outstanding work (e.g., laboratory reports, poster pr entations, written reports) will be kept for later summary evaluation. 3. Oral communication: Students must evid en ce ability to communicate effe ct ively as i n d i ca t e d by the sum of their

4.

pa r ti c ip a tio n in class discussions, seminars, help sessions, and teaching assistantship work.

O th e r activities: Pos it ive considerations fo r bonors i n clud e involvement in the department, doing i ndependent research, geoscience-related employmen t , and participation in p rofes­

Our Changing Planet

102 General Oceanography OceanogTapby and its relationship to other fields; physical, ch mi cal, biological, cl i ma t i c , and geological aspects of the sea. Includes labs and field lrip . 1, 1 1 (4)

r working in

103

Earthquakes, Volcanoe5, an.d Geologic Hazards

Study of the geologic environment and its rela tio n sh i p to h wnans, with e m ph as is on geologic fea tures and pro cesses that c reat e l1azards when e ncro a ched upon by human activity, including earthquakes, volcanic enlpt i on s, landslides and avalanches, and solutions to problems created by these hazards. Includes labs. 1 (4)

minor in Environmental Studies. The department strongly recommends that aU students complete Math 1 40 or h i gher before enrolling in 300 l eve l and hig he r courses in geosciences. Students should also note that

upper d ivisi o n courses are offered on a two-year cycle. Early declaration of majors or minors in geosc ie n ces will fa cilitate development of individual programs and avoid s heduling

104

Cooservation of Natural Resources

Pr in c i ples and problems of public and private stewa rdsh i p of our re ources with sp ec i al reference to the Pacific

conflict .

I

Includes labs. I, n (4)

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om mended.

and connec­ tions among the lithosphere, hydrospbere, atm phere and b io spbe re. Disucssion of changes in and human impacts to these systems that have take n place through t i me. Includes labs. 1 (4)

other degr ee programs, such as majors i n social sciences or the

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425 fe

Required s uppor ting courses include: Chemistry 1 04, 1 20 or 1 25.

101

preparation appropriate for the field, and is best combined with

A

327, 329; eigh t credits fro m 323, 328, 330, 334, 335, 34 1 , 350, 360;

o n e credit of 390; 490 a nd one redi t of 495.

Expl ration of e ar t h systems, including cycles in

geos cie nces. The Bachelor of Arts degree is the mininllUD

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from 1 0 1, [ 02, 103, 1 04, 1 05; eight credits from 324, 325, 326,

Course Offerings

The Bachelor of Science degree is i n ten d ed as a pre-professional

76

BACHEI.OR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 s e meste r hours in Geo­ sciences; courses i nclude: 201 plus at least two lower divisi n

sional organizations.

FACULTY: Foley, Chair; Benham, Lowes, Whitman. degree, for students interested in gr a d uate school

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 44 semester h ou rs in Geosciences; co u rs e ' include: one from 1 0 1 , 102, 1 03, 1 04 or 1 05; 20 1 , 324, 325, 326, 327, 329, 335 and 425; plus two from 323, 328, 330, 334, 34 1 , or 350; one redit of 390; 490; at least one redit of 495. Necessa r y suppor ting courses i nclude: Chemistry 1 20 or 125; Physics 1 25, L26 ( 1 35 and 136 Jabs) (or Phys i cs 1 53, 1 54 and J abs ) ; Ma th emat i cs 1 5 1 and either 1 52 or Computer Sci nee 220. At least one additional chemistry course is recommended for prep ration for graduate schooL Biology 323 and addi t i o n al courses are recomme.nded whe n paleontology is a major interest.

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105 Meteorology A full. balanced. and up -to - date coverage of the basic p r in c ip l es of meteoro logy. Exam ination of the impacts of evere weather on humans and the environment. No prerequis ite s . Includes labs .

J (4)

201 Geologic Prindples A survey of geologi c processes as they ap p l y to the evolution of th North American continent, i n clu di ng tbe i nte ra cti on of hu mans with th ir geo lo g i c environment. Students participate activel y in classes that integrat labo ratory and field study of ro ck s . minerals, fossils, maps and env i ro nmen tal aspects of geology and emph as i ze devel o p i ng b sic s ki l l s of geologic in qu i ry. This course m eets state education certification require­ ments for content in p hys ical and historical geology. n (4) 323 Mineralogy C�taJJography and mineralogy. both ore and rock-forming mlnerals. Prerequisites: 1 3 ) , 20 I or co n sen t of instructor. In ud es labs. a/y J 1 999 (4)

324 Igneous Petrology

341 Energy and Mineral Resources for the Future A survey of the world's en ergy and m ineral resources comprising the raw ma ter ials of industrialized soc ie iI'S. In c l ud es labs. Prerequisites: 1 3 1 , 2 0 1 , or co n sen t of instructor. aly 1 (4) 350 Marine Geology Study of t h e 70% of the. earth beneath the oceans, fo c u s ing on the exte ns i ve discoveries of the p ast few dec a des . Emphasis on mar in e sediments, sedimentary processes, pl a te tectonic processes, a nd the historical geology of th oceans. Incl ud es labs. Prere qu isi te. : 1 02, 1 3 1 , 20 I, or c onsen t of instructor. al y n (4)

Applied aod theoretical stu dy of th e genesis. natuTe. and distrib ution of igneolls rocks. t microscopic to gl oba l scales.

360 Geology of Washington

Includes labs. Prerequisites: 1 3 1 . 20 I, 326, or consent of

of "'las bington, w i th emp ha sis on the region from the Columbia Plateau to the Pacific Ocean. Includes l abs and field tr i p s . Prerequisite: previous geo science or consent of instructor. (4)

instruc to r. aly Il (2)

325 Structural Geology The form and sp at i al re la ti o nship s of various ro ck masses and an introduction to rock deformation; con ideration of basic processes to understand mountain b ui l ding and continental fo rmati o n; lab orat o ry e mpha sizes p ra ctical te c h n iq ues which enable students to analyze regi on a l structural pa tterns. Pre­ req u isite : 1 3 1 , 20 1 , or consent of instructor. a l y ll 1 998-99 (4)

......

335 Geopbysics S tudy of the p hysical nature of the earth, i ts p rop e rties and processes, e m ploying t echn i ques from seismology, heat flow, gravity, magn et is m , and electrical c ond uct ivi ty. Emp h as is on understanding the earth's form ation, structure, and plate tectonics p rocesses as well as geop hys i ca l exploration te ch n iques. Includes labs. P re requis it es : 1 3 1 or 20 1 , one s e me s ter of calculus, physics ( high school level or above), or consent of in s tructor. aly I 1 998-99. (4)

326 Optical Mineralogy Theory and pra c t ice of m ineral studies using the petrog raphi c micr scope, including i m mersion oil techniques, production of t hin sections, an d determination of mi n eral s by mean.s of their o pt i cal p ro pe r t ies. Includes labs . Pre req ui site: 1 3 1 , 201, or consent of i nstructor. aly I (2) 327 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation Fo r m ationa l p rin ci pl es of surface-accumulated rocks, an d their incorporation in the stratigraphic record. Th is subj ec t is basic to field mapp ing and structural interpretation. Prerequisite: 201 or consent of insturctor. aiy r (4) 328 Paleontology A systematic s tudy of th e fossil record, c mb i n in g principles of evolutionary develop m e nt . p ale o h a bi ta ts and preservation, with p rac tical expe rience of s pecinle n identification. Includes labs. Prerequlsite: 1 3 1 , 2 0 1 , or consent of instructor. aly I ) 998-99 (4) 329 Metamorphic Petrology Consideration f the m i neralogical and textural cha nges that rocks undergo during orogenic ep i sodes, in cl uding physical­ chemi cal param eters of the environment as ded uce d from experi ment al stu dies. Includes lab s . Prerequisites: 1 3 1 , 2 0 1 . 326, or c on sen t of i n s tru c tor. aly Jl (2)

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The minerals, rocks, geological s tr uct u res and geo l og ic a l history

390 Field Trip Field and on-campus study f majo r geo log i c sites in western U.S. Trips take pl ace duri ng sp ri ng break or at end of spring s e m este r. Prerequ isite: 1 3 1 , 201, or consent of instructor. (300level geology course p referred. ) ( 1 ) 42S Geologic Field Mapping Co mbi n in g a survey of re gi o nal field geology with a series of local mapping proje ts, this course introduc s field techniques of geologic map-making. I n clu ded are traversing and data asse mbly, map construction, s ection mea ur ments, structural analysis, and chrono l ogic al synth es is. Grap hi cs techniques are also covered. Pr erequ isi tes : p revi o u 300-levcl geology co urs es and co n se n t of instructor. ( 5 )

4 90 Capstone Seminar Senio r exper ien ce in l ibrary or laboratory research and career­ integrating sem i nar, including p resentation of research results.

Jl (2)

491 Independent Study Investigations or research in areas of speci a l interest not covered by regular courses. Requ i re s regula r sup er v ision by a fac ul t y m ember. ( 1-4) 495 Seminar Selected topics in ge os c ience s based on literature andlor ori gi n al

research. ( 1 ) 497 Research Exp e rim enta l or theoretical investigation, in close cooperation wi t h a faculty member. Open to upper d iv ision students. ( 1 -4)

330 Map : Images of the Earth Maps as a basic tool for commun icating i nfor ma ti o n. An introd uc t io n to com p uter -based Geographi c Information Sy terns, GI bal Positioning Systems , d igital maps, remotelyensed i mages and aerial photographs. I n c lud es labs. Pre requi­ site: pr vi o us science (geoscien e preferred) , math .r c m p uter science c ou rse or consent of i n tructor. aly IT 1 999-2000 (4) 334 Hydrogeology Study of the hyd ro log ic cycle . investigating surface and ground­ water flow, resou rce evaluation and de vel op me n t, weJIs, water qual it y and geothermal res ourc es . Empbasis on water p robl e ms in the Puget Sound area, with addition al examples from diverse geologic environments. Includes labs. Pre re qu isi te: 1 3 1 , 2 0 1 , or consent of instructor. a ly II 1998-9 (4) , ---

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ISSUE CONCENTRATIONS: 1 . Comparative Ethnicities

Globa l Studies

a. Required:

The Global Studies Program is a respon

e

Anthropology 360

to global trends

that increasingly affect o u r live . The program focuses on

11\

the formation and eme rgence of the modern world and its

w

growing economic.

cultural, political. and ecological inter­

dependence. By combining academic learning with lan­

Anthropology 350 Anthropology 375

guage skills and practical experience, the Global Studies Program provides students with the knowledge, perspec­

« a:a

o

....

effectively in roday's world.

English 2 16 French

Schools of the Arts and Business. Because the program is designed to draw on a variety of disci­ plinary perspectives to expla in and understand global trends) no more than two coqrses (8 semester hOllr ) can be taken in any on e discipline to fulfill the re qui rem nts for the issue concentra­ tion for the Globa l Studies major. [n addition, students may not apply more than two courses (8 Semester hOUTS) fr m their primary major or from courses taken to fulfill general un iversity core requirements to the complementary major.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS:

A. Global Studies Core ( 1 6 semester hours) I . Anthropology/History/Politlcai Science 210, Global

Four courses must be taken from one of the five concentra­ tions utlined below. Upon approval of the program chai r, students may choose t take three c lU es from one concen­ tration and one from another.

2. Development Jssl1es a. Req uired: Integrated Studies 245

the Col lege of Arts and Scien es foreign language requirement. This may be accomplished through a proficiency exa mination or through the equivaJent of 1 6 semester hours of cOLITsework. D. Experiential Component

area concentration may also be approved. Pre-approved

credit equivalent to 4-8 semester hours may be obtained if students participate in a PLU approved study-abroad semester-long progran1 .

Ant h ropology 3 5 1 - Wo men, Colonization, and Development English 233 - Post-Colonial L iterature Integrated Studies 242 - P pulation, H unger, and Poverty I ntegrated Studies 246 - Cases in Third World Development

U T H E R A N

a.

Req uired:

Business 352

-

Ec n mics 3 3 1 b. Electives:

Global Management -

International Economics

B usiness 355 - GI bal O perations Business 408 - International Busi ness Law

a. Req uired: Biology 1 1 6 - wtr ductory Ecology ill: Biology 424 - Ecology ill: Chemistry 104

-

Envfronmental Chemist ry

and

Global Studies 4 1 1 .

L

History 496 - Seminar: Tbe Third World Global Studies 399 - Global Studies Internship One area-studies course which focuses on a developing

4. Global Environment

E. Sel1ior Research Project The senior project i ' a general university requi remen t in all programs and majors. Students will normally satisfy this requirement by co mpleting a research project or paper in

e

The Development of Third World

Business 460 - rntemational Marketing Economi cs 371 - Industrial Organization and Public Pol icy Political Scienc 3 3 1 - I ntern ational Relations Political Science 347 - Poli tical Economy Global Studies 399 - Global tudies Internship

Majors are trongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program overse s, although local internships related

i

-

nderdevelopment Economics 341 - Economic Development: Compar ative Third Wo rld Strategies b. Electives:

3. Global Business

Students must demonstrate p roficiency in a language relevant t their coursework and at a level consistent with Option I of

F

Francophone Literature

region or country of pa r ti cular student interest (for exampl e, french 34 1 , History 335, History 338, History 339, Lan guages 272, Spanish 322).

C. Language

I

-

Religion 392 - Gods, Magic, and Morals (also Anthrop ology 392) Spanish 322 - Latin American Culture a nd Civil ization

Perspectives (4) 2 . Anthropology 102, Exploring Anthropology: Culture and Society (4) 3. Economics 130, Global and Environmental Economic Principles (4) 4. Global Studies 41 1. Research Seminar (4) B. Issue Area Concentration ( 1 6 emester hours )

C

431

Poli tical Science 381 - Comparative Legal Systems Reli gio n 1 3 1 - Religions of South Asia Religion 1 3 2 - Religions of East Asia Rel igion 247 - Christian Theology Religion 344 - The I gical Stud ies Religio n 390 - St ud ies i n the History of Religions

i ts courses and faculty from departments of the D ivisi ons of Humanities, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences and from th e

A

Fiction: Cross- Cult ural Perspectives

Languages 272 - Literature and Social Change in Latin America Music 1 20 - M usic and Culture

clare a traditional discipli nary major before they decla re a lobal Studies major. The Global Studies ma jor is multidiscipl inary, drawing both

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Global Studies 399 - Global Studies Internship History 1 09 - East Asian Societies History 335 - Latin American History

tudies major is termed a "complementary" major b ecau se it is a second major in addition to a regul ar disciplinary majo r. Students electing the Global Studies major are requir d to de­

78

Women and Men in World Cultures Politics and Revolution

- Law,

English 233 - Post-Coloni al Literature

GLOBAL STUDIES COMPLEMENTARY MAJOR: The Global

an

-

(also Religion 392 )

FACUI;[Y: The Global Studies Committee, made lip of faculty members and s taff from the Center for Int rnational Programs, administers this program: T. Williams, Chair; ArnoW, Ellard-Ivey, Ham , Kelleher, Moore, Predmore, Yager.

to

Ethnic G roups

Anthropology 380 - Sickness, Madness, and Health Anthropology 385 - Marriage, Family and Kinship Anthropology 392 - Gods, Magic, and Morals

tives, and skills they need to wlderstand and to fullction ....

-

b. Electives: At least two electives must be upper divis ion courses. Anthropology 3 36 - People of Latin America Anthropology 343 - East Asian Cultures

Geosciences 1 04 - Conservation of Natural Resources or Integrated Studies 241 - Energy, Re ources, and Pollu.tion

U N I V E ll S

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Y


h. Electives: An thropolo gy 354 - Geography of World Cultures Biology 424 - E col ogy ( i f n ot taken as a required course) Economics 330 - Environmental and Na tu r a l Resource Economics Geosciences 34 1 - Energy a n d Mineral Resources for the Future Global S tudi es 399 - Global Studies Internship l nteg rate d Studies 241 - Energy. Resources. and Pollution (if not taken as a required course) I n tegra ted Studie ' 242 - Pop ulation. Hunger, and Poverty

VI -t

o

5. International Relations a.

Required:

Political Science 33 1 - International Relations b. Elective.>: Anthropology 375 - Law. Politics. and Revolution E c o n omi cs 3 3 1 - International Economics &o n o m ics 3 8 1 - Comparative Economic System Global St ud i es 399 - Global Studies I nt er ns hi p Hi st o ry 2 2 1 - The Wo rl d Since 1945 History 356 - American Diplomatic H i s tory Political ci en ce 338 - American Foreign Policy Political Science 43 1 - Advanced International Relatio ns Note: Students planning to purstle graduate study in Illternational

Relatiolls are strongly advised to take Statistics 23 1/Matltematics

341

(a course which also sarisfies a general ,mi versity requirement In Mathematical Reasoning.)

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: 20 seme tee hours. i n clu d ing two core courses (ANTH/HIST/POLS 2 1 0 a nd GLST 4 1 1 ) ; and three courses from the approved list of co u rses for an issue co nce n t ra­ tion that appears in the <'Mtljor Requirements" section above. Those seeking a co n c en t rati on in Glob I Business must take Ec-O nomics 33 1 as o ne of the three remain ing electives. Concen­ trators in International Relations must take Political S c ie n c e 3 3 1 a s o n e o f the three remaining electives.

Course Offerings 399 lDtel"DBhip

A proj ect , u uaJly undertaken during a study-abr ad experience and supervised by a PLU faculty-member. that c m b i n es field experience. resea rch. and writing on issues related to the student's iss ue concentration in Glo bal Studies. Local internships that involve transnational issues and con tituencies will also be considered. Prerequisite: p rio r consent of the chair of the Global Studies Com m i ttee and of the supervising PLU faculty member. (4) 4 1 1 Researdl Seminar Required of all tudents maj o r i n g and mi noring in Global Studies. thi s is a cap stone seminar that culminat in the writing of an extensive research paper. Prerequisite: ANTH/HIST/POLS 2 1 0. (4)

History Through the study of history at Pacific Lutheran Univer­ sity students gain an understanding and appreciation of the h istorical perspective. Opportunities fo r d evel opi ng analytical and interpretative skills are provided through research and writing projects, intern hips. class presenta­ tions. and study tours. The practice of the h is to r ic al method lead students off campus to th ir h metowns. to Europe or China or the American West. and to comm uni ty institutions. both private and public. The depart ment emphasizes individual advis ing in relation to b o th self­ directed studies and regular courses. The univer ity library holdings include si gn ifi ca nt collections in American, European. and non - Western history. The Nisqually Plains Room of the Ubrary sp cializes in Pacific Northwest commu nity st udies. Career outlets for majors and minors are either direct or . upportive in business law. teaching, public service, news media, and other occupations.

JlACUIJ'Y: Kraig. Chair; Bens n. Carp. Ericksen. Hames. Kraig. Mutchler. Nordquist. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M ini m u m of 32 semester hours. including 4 hour '-American field. 4 hours- European field. and 4 hours-non-Western field. Students are expected to work closely with the de pa rt men t's faCilIty advis ers to insure the most p er so nalized programs and instruction p o ssi b le . Majors are urged to meet the fo rei gn lang uage requirement of the oUege of Arts and Sciences wlder either Option I or Op t i on n. Those majors who are pr ep ar i n g for public school teaching can meet th e state history requi rement by e n roll ing in History 460. All majors are requir d to take fo ur hours of historical methods and research and four hours of Seminar credit. Completion of the Seminar course satisfies the core requirement for a senior seminar/project. For the m jor at least 16 sem es te r hours must be co m ple ted a t P LU, including History 3 0 1 and 494 or 495 or 496. MINOR: 20 semester hours with a m i n i mu m of 1 2 hours from courses nu m bered above 300. Th e m i no r i n history em phasizes a "program focus" and a "program plan." which is ar r a nged by the student in consul tation with a dep rtmema! adviser. For the minor at least 1 2 semest r h o urs must be completed at PLU. i nc lud in g 8 hOllrs of upper d iv is i on co urse s . BACHELOR OF AlITS IN EDUCATION: See School of Educatioll.

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205 Islamic Middle £ast to 1945 An introductory survey course on the his tory of the M iddle East from the ti me of M uhamme d in the 7th century th ro ug h World War II . (4)

Course Offerings Courses in the Department o f H istor y are offered in the following fields: AMERICAN FIELD > a: o I­ VI

251 252 253 294 305 352 355 356 359 381 451 460 47 1 494

2 1 0 Global Perspectives: The World in Change A s u rvey of gl bal issues: modernization and development; economic cha nge and international t rad e ; di m in ishi ng resources; war and revolution; p ea ce and j usti c e; and cul tural diversity. (Although cross-referenced with ANTH 2 1 0 and POLS 2 1 0, students may receive history credit only when thi course is scheduled as a histo ry c lass. ) (4)

Colonial American History Nlneteenth-Centnry American History Twentieth-Century American History The United States Since 1945 Slavery In the Americas The American Revolntion American Popular Culture American Diplomatic History History of Women In the United States The Vietnam War and American Sodety American Legal History West and Northwest History of American Thought and Cultu.re Seminar: American History

215 Modern World History S urveys m ajor features of th e principal existing civilizations of the world since 1 450: East Asia, India and southern Asia, the Middle East, Eastern Eu ro pe , Western civilization, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. (4) 220 Modem Latin American History Introduction to moder n Latin American h istory, from 1 8 1 0 to the p resent. (4)

EUROPEAN FlELD 107, 108 History of Western Civilization 321 Greek Civilization 322 Roman Civilization 323 The MJddle Ages

324 325 328 329 332 334

251 Colonial American History American ins t itu t ion s fr m colonial ti m s to the 1 790s; th e growth of the colo n i es and their rel at ion ship to the British imperial system. (4)

Renaissance

252 Nineteenth�Centu:ry American Wstory From Jeffer on to Th eo do re Roosevelt; interpretation of era from social, po l i ti c al , economic, and biogra phical viewpo i n ts . (4)

Reformation Nineteenth-CeDtury Europe Europe and the World Wars: 1914-1945 England: Tudors and Stuarta Modern Germany, 1848- 1945 360 Holocaust: Destruction of the European JeW8 49S Seminar: European History

253 Twentieth-Century American HIstory Trends and events in domestic and forei g n affairs since 1 900; affluence, urban growth, and social co n t r a sts . (4) 294 The United States Since 1945 This seminar examines selected t opi cs in re cent U.S. h.istory such as t he Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, t he Vietnam War, the Women's Movement , Wa tergat e, and the Iran-Contra Affair. Enrollme n t restricted to freshmen and sophomores. (4)

NON-WESTERN FIELD 109 East Asian Societies 205 Islamic Middle East to 1945 2 1 0 Global Perspectives 115 Modem WOl'Id History 220 Modem Latin American History 3 10 Contemporary Japan 335 Latin American Hi torr. Centtal America and the Caribbean 336 Southern Africa 337 The History of Mexico 338 Modern Chin.a 339 Revolutionary China 340 Modern Japan 344 The Andes in Latin American History 380 Aa:ian American History and Culture 496 Seminar: The Third World

301 Introduction to Wstorical Methods and Research Pocus on h i st or i cal meth o do logy, research techniques, and the writing of hi s tory fr m a wide range of historical pri mary sources. Requi r ed for all h is t or y m aj o rs before taking the senior Sem ina r. (4) 305 Slavery in the Americas The comp a rat ive his tor y of slavery in Africa, the Ca r ibb ea n, and the Americas with special atten ti o n to the United Sta t es. Co mpa r ative perspectives on Atlantic slave trade, the or ig ins of slavery and racism, sl ave treatment, the rise of an t i s lavery th o ug bt , the ma tura t ion of pl a nt a t ion so cie ty, slave revolts, selection conflict and war, and the reconstruction of society after ema nc ipa tio n . (4)

ALL FlELDS 301 Introduction to Wstorical Methods and Research 40 1 Workshops 492 Independent SbIdy 499 Internship

310 Contemporary Japan Major domestic, p oliti c a l , economic, and socio-cultural d vel o pme nt s since 1945. p e d al attention given to U.S .-Japan interactions. (4) 321 Greek Civilization The po l it ical , social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece from the Bronz.e Age to the Hellenistic p e r iod . Special attent i on to the literature, art, and intellect ual history of the Greeks. (Cross­ referenced with CLAS 3 2 1 ) (4)

107, 108 History of Western Civilization Analys i s of i nst it utions and ideas of se lec ted civilizations. Meso­ potamia, Egypt, the H eb rews, Greece, Rome, the rise of Chris­ ti anity, and Medi val Europe in the first semester; Europ e from the Renaissance to the present i n the second semester. I II (4, 4) 109 East Asian Societies A historic al overview of the traditional cultures, traditions, and lives of the p eople of China and lapan. D isc uss io n of the lives of peasants, emperors, merchants, and warri rs in each s oci e t y. (4)

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322 Roman Civilization The history of Rome from the foundation of the city to A.D. 337, tbe death of Constantine. Em p ha sis on Rome's exp ansion over the Mediterranean a nd on its co n stit ut ional history. Attention to the rise of Christianity within a Greco-Roma n context. (Cross­ referenced with CLAS 322) (4)


323 The Midd.le Ages Europe fr m the disi ntegration

of the Roman Empire to 1 300; reading and research in medieval materials. (4)

356 American Di.plomatic mstory The practice, function, and structure of American foreign policy with particular emphasis on the twentieth century. (4)

324 Renaissance

359 History of Women in the United. States

Eur

pe in

an

age of transition - 1300 to 1 500. (4)

325 Reformation

Political and religious crises in the sixteenth century: Lutheran足 ism, Zwingl ianism, Anglicanism, Anabaptism, Calvinism, Roman C tholic reform; Weber thesis, the beginnings of Baroque arts.

( 4)

328 Nineteenth-Century Europe

The expansion of Europea n civilization from 1 800 to 1 9 1 4. (4) 329 Europe and the World Wars: 1914-1945

World War I; revolution and return to "normalcy"; depression and the rise of fascism; Wo rld War II. (4) 332 England: Tudors and Stuarts

Political, social, ec nomic, legal, and cultural developments. (4) 334 Modern Genrumy, 1948-1945

The Revolutions of 1 848 and unification of Germany; Bismarckian and W!l.hemian empires; Weimar Republic and the rise of National Socialism; the Third Reich. (4) 335 Latin American History: Central America and the Caribbean

A focused, thematic examination of issues and evidence related to women's experiences from the colonial period to the present.

(4)

360 Holocaust: Destruction of the European Jews

Investigation of the development of modem anti-semitism, its relationship to fascism, the rise of H itler, the structure of the German dictatorship, the evolution of Nui Jewish policy, the mechanics of the Final Solution, the nature of the perpetrators, the experience and response of the victims, the reaction of the outside world, and the post-war attempt to deal with an unparalleled crime through traditional judicial procedures. (4) 380 Asian American BJstory and CUlhue An introductory survey of Asian American history and

culture, focusing on Chinese, Japanese. Korean, Filipino, Asi311 Indian, Indochinese, and Pacific Islander experiences in the period 1 8 40-1990s. (4)

38 1 The Vietnam War and American Sodety

Examination of America's involvement in the Vietnam War from Truman to Nixon. (4) 399 Internship

Survey of the major aspects of Central American and Caribbean history from colonial to modern times. Use of selected case studies to illustrate the region'S history. Study in inter-American relations. (4)

A research and \'lTiting project in connection with a student's approved off-campus work or travel activity, or a dimension of it. Prerequisite: sophomore standing plus one course in hist ry, and consent of the department. ( 1-6)

336 Southern Africa

40 1 Worksbops

Examination of tbe history of pre-colonial African kingdoms, Western imperialism, settler colonialism, and the African struggle for independence. Emphasis on the period since 1 800. (4) 337 The History of Mexico

The p litical, economic, social, and cultural changes that have taken place in Mexico from 1350 to the present. (4) 338 Modern Cbina The beginning of China's modern history, with spe<.;.ial emphasis on the genesis of the Chinese revolution and China's position in

an increasingly integrated world. (4)

339 Revolutionary China

Begi nning in 1 9 1 1 , an examination of the course of the Chinese revolution, China's liberat ion, and the changes since 1 949. (4) 340 Modern Japan

Study of how 1apan became tbe modem "miracle" in East Asia. Primary focus on traditions that enabled Japan to change rapidly, the role of the challenge of the West in that change, the i ndustrialization of Japan, the reasons for war with the U.S., and the impact of the war on contemporary 1apan and its social and economic institutions. (4)

Workshops i n special fields for varying periods of time. ( 1-4) 451 American legal Hlstory

Dimensions of American law as is relates to changing historical periods. ( 4 ) 460 West and Northwest

The Amman West in the 1 9th and 20th centuries. Frontier and regional perspectives. Interpretive, illustrative history, and opportunities for off-campus research. (4) 471 History of Americ,m Thought and Culture

Dimensions of American social and intellectual history. (4) 492 Independent Study ( 1- 4) 494 Seminar. American History (4) 495 Seminar: European mstory (4) 496 Seminar. The Third World This research seminar alternates its

focus fr m East Asia one year to the Caribbean/Latin America the next. ( 4)

344 The Andes in Latin American mstory

The hist ry of the Andean countries (Peru, Bolivia, Equador) from the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. (4) 352 The American Revolution The American Revolution as a series

of essentially political events stretcbing from the Seven Years War in 1763 through Thomas Jefferson's defeat of John Adams in the Presidential election of 1 800. (4) 355 American Popular Culture

Study of motion pictures, p pular music, radio and television progr InS, comic strips and paperback fiction. Insights into the values and ideas of Ameri<.:.an culture from watching it at play. No prerequi ites. (4)

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Honors Program The Honors Program at Pacific Lutheran University centers on the theme "Taking Responsibility: Matte[s of the Mind, Matters of the Heart" It integrates academic and experiential learning opportunities, with the objective of preparing participants for lives of service and servant leadership. The program empbasizes the importance of student -directed learni n g , and culminates in an experien­ tial project that students design, implement, and evaluate (with faculty support) . III a:::

TOTAL HONORS CREDITS: 2 6 (all but eight o f which fulfill

o

other un iversity re q uirements)

:2

o :z::

HONORS STUDENTS: Selected on the basis of grades and scores (high s hoal grade poinl average of 3.80 and 1 200+ SAT scores), recom mendations, and commitment to program theme. Must

complete PLU with a minimum of 3 .50 grade point average. Freshman Year - All entering freshman honors students take the

Fresh man Honors Experience:

FOTeign Language - Students completing the program and graduating with u niversity honors mu t have met 0plion l or II of the College of Arts and Sciences language requirement; only music education major are exempted from this requirement.

Course Offerings 1 1 5 and 1 16 Identity, Community, Legacy, and Faith

Social, ultural, inteLl ctual, and spiritual traditions of Europe and North America, with attention to relevant int ractions and comparisons between western and non-western civilizations.

( 4 , 4) 1 17A and 1 1 78 Experience and Knowledge

Explores the connections between understanding a selected issue or problem through traditional academic study and under tand­ ing the same issue or problem fur ugh xperience. ( I , I) Fulfills freshman critical conversation requirement. 301 -308 VIrtue Seminars Continuing its focus 011 "Taking Responsibility;' the Honors Program offers seminars that fOCllS on those quaJities necessary to responsible leadership. (Each seminar is ooe credit; honors students are required to complete fOUL) ( 1 hour each)

301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308

A Honors Core sequence: "Identity, Community, Legacy, and Faith" HONR 1 1 5 - Identity, Community, Legacy, and Faith

( fall; 4 hours) HONR 1 1 6 - Identity, Community, Legacy, and Faith (spring; 4 hours) B. H nors Critical Conversatio n: "Experienc and Knowledge" HONR 1 1 7 A - Experience and Knowledge ( fall; 1 hour) HONR 1 1 7B - Experience and Knowledge (spring; 1 hour) No te: At the end of the fresh man year, students in the Honors

core choose to enter Core [ or Core II. The eight credits in the Freshman Honors Experience will have eqllivalellctes in both cores.

Sophomore and Junior Years

. During the sophomore and junior years students take four one- credit Virtue Seminars ( HONR 301-308 ), or preferably o ne each semester (or multiples in a semester to accommodate study abroad o r other scheduling confllets) . Continuing the focus on "Taking Responsibility," tbe seminars focus on those qualities necessary to responsible leadership. Using diff rent "virtues" as a centering theme, tudents consider each virtue from several perspectives, including classical, contemporary, and noo-western perspectives. What does it mean to be a person who acts wisely? courageously? with hope? justly? These seminars provide students with weekly opportun ity to interact with their intellectual peers around a unifying theme and readings. B. Participation in January-Term study abroad/off-campus courses is strongly enco u raged but not required. Most partici­ pants in the J- Term abroad will be sophomores or juniors, but freshmen and seniors may go as welL C. Honors students take two four-credit hours courses usually during the sophomore and/or junior years. They may take Honors-by-Cootract courses, wh se "added dimensions" to c onve r t them to honors are agreed upon in a contract between professor and student, by the followi ng means: I) take a regul arly scheduled course which, by contract, expl ores the topic through greater depth or breadth, or 2) do an independent study r research project (may do only one of these) whose fi nished product is of potentially p ublishable quality. Senior Year - Seniors take HONR 490: Honors Challenge Experi­ offered in January -Term. Tills seminar, including aca­ dem ic analysis and an experiential component, brings a sense of closure to the program theme of responsibility, and is called "Responsibility in Action." ence (4),

82

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U N I V E R S I T Y

Charity Courage

Faith Hope Justice Self-Restraint Wisdom Compassion

490 Honors Cballenge Experience: Responsibllity in Action

the culminating element of the Honors Program, HONR 490 th opportunity to "take responsibility" by emphasizing the significance of bringing together habits of scholarship and habits of committed citizenship-of linking the academic compo­ nents of research, study, and writing in applied expe.riences in public venues. (4) As

presents

Division of Humanities The Departments of English, Languages and Literatures,

Philosophy, and Religion comprise the Division of Humanities. They share a central concern about language, literature, and world views. As academic majors and

minor" and in support of professional programs and preparation for other fields, studies in humanities are at the heart of a liberal education. They serve gene rally as a means to realizing excellence in one's life, and th ey expose one to a wide var i ety of different perspectives on culture, meaning, and value. The charge of the humanities is to think and act perceptively, humanely, and creat ively in a complex and ever cbanging society. The division is c mmitted to superb undergraduate teaching. Cla sse emphasize communicati n skills, rigorous analysis of texts and ideas, critical assessment of arguments, and thoughtful reflection. The potential for c r e a t ive service to the commwlity is nurtured in a variety of ways including internships i n Publishing and Printing Arts (a minor in English), the o utreach programs of th e Scandinavian Cultural Center, and collaborative projects with local school districts. FACUllY: Cooper, Dean; faculty members of the Departments of English, Languages and Literatures, Philosophy, and Religion.


As a division within the College of Arts and Sciences, the Division of Humanities offers programs in each constituent department leading to the BA. degree. Course offerings and degree requirements are listed under:

English Languages and Literatures Philosophy Religion See also the sections of this catalog on Chulese St udies , Classics, Environmental Studies, GI bal Studi s, Honors Program, Integrated Studies, lnternational Education, Legal Studies, Publishing and Printing Arts, Scandinavian Area Studies, and Women's Studies.

studen t' ability to carry it out. It is str ngly recommended that a econd ry fa culty spons r be asked to co-sponsor and endorse the proposal.

All subsequent d1anges in the study plan or the senior thesis must be submitted in writing to the Faculty Council for Individualized Majors for approval.

Z -t m :u

Further information is available fro m the Provost's Office.

Z > -t

The International Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary World

o z

Individualized Major

The In ternational Core: In tegrated Studies of the Contem­

> roo

Supervised by the Faculty Council for Inclividualized

porary Wo rld is designed as an alternative way to satisfY core curriculum requiremen ts. Consisting of a constella­ tion of interdisci pl i nary and team taught courses, the

n

Majors, this program offers jun ior and senior students the oppo rtunity to develop and complete a personally de­

signed, interdisciplinary, liberal arts maj or. The course of study cul minates in a senior the is, to be agreed on by the Council, the student, and his or her adviser. Successful applicants to this program wiU normaUy have

a c umulative grade point average of 3.30 or h igher,

although in exceptional cases, they may demonstrate their potential in other ways to the Faculty Council for Indi­ vidualized Majors. Admission to the program is granted by the Council on the basis of a detailed plan of st udy, proposed and wri tten by the student, and submitted to the Council any time after th begi nning

f the second semester of the student's

sophomore year. The proposal must outline a complete

program

fo undations using an integrated approach i n an i nterna­ tional context. The program stresses critical thinking and writi ng. FACUI.l'Y: Selected from Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science , Econ m ics, English, H istory, Languages, Mathematics, Music, Ph ilosophy, Phy ics, Political Science, Psych logy, Religion, and Sociology. In tegrated Studies Co mmittee: Stivers, Chair; R . Brown, Grosve nor, Kelleher, KlUen , Kraig , Starkovich, Carr (dean ) .

INTERNATIONAL CORE COURSE REQtJllUiMENTS: (7 oourses, 28 hours) 1 . INTG 1 1 1 - 1 1 2 : Origins of the Contemporary World ( 8 hours)

plan of study for the time remaining until the granting of a degree. Study plans may include any of the traditional ele­ ments from a standard B.A. or B.S. degree program. Once approved by both the faculty sponsor and the

Faculty Council for Individualized Majors, the study plan supplants usual degree requ irements, and, when com­

Normally taken in the first yea r. 2. Pour 200-level Tnt mati nal Core courses ( 1 6 hours) Normally taken in the second nd third years. May include app roved pro ram of study abroad. StudeJ1ts select four ourses, subject to the approval f the I n tegrated Studies Program Committee. 7-8 f the followi ng courses, or simil Ll w courses, are ffered each year: 2 2 1 - The Experience f War 222 - Prosp ects for War and Peace 225 - Violen e and Nonviolence 23 1 - Gend r, Sexu ality, and Culture 232 - Topi in Gender 233 - Lroaging the Self 234 - I maging the World 24 1 - Energy, Resources, and Pollution 242 - Population, Hu nger, and P verty 245 - The Development of Third Wo rld Underdevelopment 246 - Cases in Third World De el pment 247 - Cultures 0 Racism 3 26 - The Quest for Global Justice: Systems and Reality

pleted, leads to conferral of the B.A. degre with Special Honors.

STUDY PROPOSALS MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: L A Statement of Objectives, in which the student describes wh at the degree is expected to represe nt and why the individu­

alized urse of study is more appropriate than a traditional degree program. 2. A Program of Study, i n which the student describes how the objec tives will be attained through sequences of COLUses, reading programs, regular course work, independent study, travel, off-campu involven1 ent, personal consultation with faculty members, or other means. 3 . A Program of Evaluation, in which the student describes the ed t ria to be used to measure achievement of the objectives and specifies the topic of the senior thesis. 4. A Statement of Review, in which the student describes how previous course work and li fe experiences have pr pared him or her for the individualiz d study program. 5. Letters of Recommendation. The study p roposal must be written in dose consultation with the chair of the Faculty Council for Individualized Majors and with a faculty member who agrees to act as primary sponsor and adviser to the student throughout the course of study. The faculty sp r must comment on the feasibility of the proposal and on the

explores contem porary issues and their historical

o :u m

3. INTG 3 1 7: The Interdisciplinary Cover ation (4 h urs) Taken after or with the last 200-level course

POLICIES AND GUIDELINES FOR CORE D: I . To acquire a common background, International Core/Core I I students usuaUy take the required 1 1 1- 1 1 2 sequence i n their first year, before taking 200-\ vel cou rses. Exceptions can be made for students with heavy first-year loads, for transfe r students, o r fo r students who shift from Core I . 2 . S me 200-level lnternational Core courses are ffered in rwo­ semester sequences; others are designed for single sem ester. Courses offered as a faIl -spring sequence should be taken in

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3.

VI

4.

s.

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order if possible. ingle-semester courses and the fall -spring sequences themselves can be taken concurrently and in ny order. Students in the International Core arc strongly encouraged to study abr ad. With prior approval, an appropria e combina­ tion of c urses abroad supplement d with an int gTati e proje t may take the place of one or more of the 200-level International Cor courses. The Interdisciplinary Conversation ( 3 1 7 ) is taken as the concluding International Core course, either after or concur­ rently with the last 200-leveL course. Students may switch from Core n to Core I at any time by requesting the dean for special academic programs to apply their International Cme course credit to Core I requir ments. All International Core courses (except the seminar) are open to Core 1 students as spac is available (Core II students have priority in enrollment ) .

Imaging the World An exploration of how humans in different part of the world perceive, interpret, and shape their own worlds. II (4)

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Energy, Resources, and PoUution Considers worldwide usage of energy and natural reSOtlfces, and the degradation caused by pollution using scientific, social scientific, and ethical approaches. (4)

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Population, Hunger, and Poverty Exami nes popula tion growth, food supply, and poverty as they relate to global environmental problems. (4)

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24S The Development of Third World Underdevelopment Traces the origins and growth of t he concept "Third World" and the models, views, contexts, and approaches in interpreting mis phenomenon. (4)

Course Offerings

246 Cases in ThUd World Development How people in the Third World think and act to bring about social change, and the value they give it is the focus in thi course. (4)

( 1 l 1 -l l2)

Origins of the Modern World Explores from a global perspective the roots of contemporary values and tradition ', with an emphasis on Europe and the Americas.

The Cultures of Racism Examines different forms of raeism and their manifestations in two countries with troubled histories; the United States of America and the Republic of South Africa. (4)

I I I Authority and Discovery Considers new social and pol itical ideas, the renewal of the arts, religious reform, and the emergence of modern saen up to and during the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. 1 (4)

The Quest for Global Justice: Systems and Reality Uses syst IDS (holisti ) models to comprehend the search for justice by humankind in the past, in the prese.nt, and for the future. (4)

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Concluding COllrse

Uberty and Power Developments in literature, science, politics, and industrializa­ tion arc explored through tlle Enlightenment, the American and French Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, Romanticism, Darwinism, Socialism, and Imperialism. II (4) 112

221

The lnterdisciplinary Convenation Group exploration of selected mullicultural texts to exercise and further develop interdi.sciplinary and critical skills. Practice of ability to understand tell.1:s, reOeet upon them, react critically and creatively to them, and participate in group discussion about them and the is ues they rai se. (4) 317

The .Experience of War

An international survey of twentieth century warfare, drawing on poetry, novels, war memoirs, art, music, and fil m , and stressing the experiences and decisions of people who have

parti ipated in war as combatants or civilians. (4)

Prospecta for War and Peace A study of the international institutions and situations (political, economic, religious, psychological, historical) that keep the modern world on the brink of war and make a stable, just peace so elusive. IT (4) 222

PLU's international programs encou rage students to expand their un der st andi ng

f hwn anity's global condi­

tion in a changing and in creasingly interd ep endent world. Multi-focused international programs prov ide opport uni­

VIolence in the United States Considers examples of violence i n domestic and international contexts such as war, racism, familjes, prisons, and hate groups; and major prop nents of nonviolence such as Jesus, Ghandi, Dorothy Day, King, and Mother Te res a . (4)

ties for on- ca mpu s st udy of global issues and of the

231 Gender, Sexuality, and Culture Use of interdisciplinary, multicultural, int rnational, and feminist perspectives to examine i sues such as socialization and stereotypes, relationships and sexuality, interpersonal and institutional violence, revolution and social cha nge. A strong focus on U.S. contexts complemented by selected comparative examples from international (;ontexts. (4)

America, the Middle East, and Scandinavia. Study of these

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world's regions. cultures, and societies. Global issues include, fo r example , modernization and development; glob al resources and trade; and peace, j ustice, and human rights . Cultural foc i are Africa, Asi a, Europe , Latin

232 Topics in Geuder Current topics i n feminist studies of gender centering on U.S. contexts wilh selected comparative examples from international contexts. (4)

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To pursue a program in international or

intercultural

studies, students may en roll in courses offered by depart ­ ments such as Languages, Polit ical Science, and History, or cho ose among the special multi-disciplinary programs listed below which offer major and minors in interna­ More information

about PLU's internat ional programs

is available from the Center for I nternational Programs,

Imaging the Self A series of exercises in the visual and literary arts drawn from different cultures that reveal how the self is discovered and constructed through images, dreams, costumes, and songs. (4)

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issues and regions is made possible by diverse off-campus study o pp ortunities and international student exchange.

tional studies.

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International Programs

Harstad Hall , or on the

website www.plu.edul-inpr.

THE AMERICAS: Thi interdisciplinary minor focllses on the

comparative histories, cult ures, and contemporary issues shared by the two continents in the western hemisphere. For specific information see The Americas section of this catalog.

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levels), and "Indep ende nt Study: Conducting Busine i n China." T h e semester followi ng the China exp erience. students participate in an internship arranged with the assistance o f

CHINESE STUDIES: Th Chinese Studies program is an i nterd is ciplinary program de signed to provide students inter­ ested in China a broad fo undation in language, culture, and hi story. For !>l'eci fic information see th Chinese Studies ection of this catalog.

GI.OBAL STUDIES: Students interested in divers e cuituTes and international, global issues may u ndertake a multi-di ciplinary major or minor program designed to reflect their geographic, thematic, or disc iplinary int e rests .

t h e World Trade Center of Tacoma. No prior language training is required to participate in this program. (Not offered every

year.) e. January-Term: PLU also offers courses during the January­ term. Interest meetings for January-term off-campus pro­ grams are ann oWlced in early spring for the following Janua ry.

Major: The Global Studies

Students apply for these program in May. January-term program sites fo r 2000 inclu de: Arizona ( An thropology/ Nursing nd Business), Australia (C mmunity Studies

major is termed a "complementary" m jo r because it is taken as a econd major in addition to a regular disciplina ry maj o r. For specific information see the Global Stl/dies section of th is c at al og.

(Integ rated Studies) . Holden Vil.lage ( Re l igio n ) , India ( History, Sociology or Religion ) . Israel and Jordan ( Religion) , Italy (Econom ics ) , Jarnaica ( Sociology) , London and Paris (Music) , Mexico (Education), New Zealand ( Phys ical Educ tion ) , Norway ( L a ngu ages) , France (Art and Languages) , Hawaii ( Natural Sciences), and J-Te rm on the Hill ( Sociology, meets the Al. temative Perspect ives and the Freshman J -Term

se ction of this catalog.

SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES: The Sca ndinavian Area S tud ies major is a nexible program i n which the study of Scan dinavia is enhanced th rough a cross-discip lin ry approach. For specific information see the section of this catalog.

Scandinavian Area Studies

Off-Campus Programs� To encou rage stude n to expand their visions of the world, PLU makes availa Ie various opportwlitie s lO stu dy and travel i n other countries. Students are encouraged t o sp end th summer, semester) January term, or ful l academic y ea r abroad . The Cen ter for I nternational Programs has information to assist students in selecting and prepari ng for st udy abr ad program s. The in ter­ depe nd e n ce of all nati on s of the world and the need to gain basic knowledge of people, their c ultures, and th.eir interrelationships ca n not be overem p hasized as we enter the 2 1 st century. With this focus in min<l, PLU supports several categ ties of pr grams.

and contribule t o t h e da ily operation o f t h e c mmunity. The academic content of the program includes: Art: Learning to See, Learning to Draw, Psych o logy : Psychology of Com munity, P litical Science: Human Ecology, Writing: The One and the

thi multicultural society. During January term a PLU faclllty member acco mpan ies the group to Trinidad and teaches one course, which varies from year to year. During the spring term stud nts take the core co urse, "Caribb an Culture and Society" and choose two to three additional co urses from the regular course offe rings at the University of the West I ndies. Students earn 1 6-20 semester hours credit for the Janua ry-May program. c. Nursing in Tobago: This spring s e m ester, six-week program, is designed to provide Senior II nursing students with a firsthand exp erien ce working with health care professionals in a developing country. following PLU's spring break (about the first of April ) , st udcnt� return to PLU to complete their sem ester's stud ie s. A PL U Nursing faculty member accompa­ nies the gr up and is the principal instru tor for the p rogram .

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number of exchanges each year. In all cases, the PLU srudent is integrated into the local un iversity and culture. 11'1

a . People's Republic of Chlna-Zhongshan Universitr. PLU student� may spend a full year or semester in th e People's Re public of China thruugll an exchange with Zh ngshan University in Guangzhou (Canto n) . At Zh ngshan, students l ive in university housing and take intensive studies in Mandarin Chinese. Students should have bad at least one year of Chinese language before applying. b. Tanzania: In a consortium effort with other colleges and universities of the Lutheran Church , PLU o ffers a five -month exchange opportunity at the University f Dar es Sala m in Tanzania. Students study Swahili language and select three or four courses from the wide offering of courses at the Univer­ sity of Dar es Salaam. All university courses are taught in E ngl ish. This is a fall semester program. b. People's Republic of China - Sichuan University: Students may spend a semester or year at Sichuan University (SU) ill Chengdu. At SU, in addition to classes in Ma ndarin and Chinese culture, students may take organic cll mistry or general physics co urSes that are taugh t in English. Often a PLU professor will accompany the g ro up and te ach one of the courses. Extensive study tours are included. Fluency i n Mandarin is n ot required.

Many. S tude n ts eam 1 6 semester hours of credit for the progra m . b. CanDbean Culture and Sodetr. lanuary-term and spring semest er in Trinidad provides student. a un i que opportunity to explore the isl and and lea r n about the var ied h er i tages of

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RECIPROCAL PROGRAMS: PLU currently offers three active exchange programs. These academic programs p rovide a limited

PW EACUIIT DIRECfED PROGRAMS:

Community Studies Program: This fall or spring program is offered by the Findhorn Foun dation in Forres, Scotland, and Pacific lu theran University. Students live in Findhorn housi.n g

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requirements ) .

SECTTONA:PLU-Sponsored Programs a.

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Program) , China ( Biology ) , Costa Rica (Languages), Cuba

Minor: The theoreti ca l orie nt ation an d requirements parallel those for the m ajor and a re detailed in the Global Studies

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INDEPENDENT UBERAL ARTS COUEGES ABROAD: These programs are hosted by the Independent Liberal Arts Colleges Abroad ( I LACA), a consortium of Pacific Northwest schools including PLU, Gon2ag a Un iversi ty, the University f Pu get Sound, th University of Portland, and Wil l amette

Unjversity. a. England: This fall or spring sem ester program i n London provide students with a study experience in one of the most exc iting cities of the world. Courses ta llg h t both by Northwest professors and by native British prof, sors rna e extensive use of museums, cultural activities, and sites of london. Students live with British fa milies and commute by subway to classes. S vera! excursions take students outside London for a loo k a t other parts of England. b. Spain: This spring semester program in Granada provides an excell n t setting for advanced study i n Spanish langu age and culture. A minimum of five semesters of Spanish l a n guage study is required for participation. Students l ive with Spanish fan1ilies, and take speci al classes al the Centro de Lenguas Modernas at the University of Granada.

d. ChIna Buslness Studies: This pr gram i coordinated by the School of Busi ne ss during fall semes ter. The core courses

include: "Preparing fo r Business in China," "China's Business Environm ent;' Chi nese Language ( begi nn ing or in termediate

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DENMARK'S JNTERNATIONAL STUDIES (DIS) provides for

AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR FOREIGN STUDY: AIFS offers

semester OT ye ar- l o ng slady in Englisb in Copenhagen. The i n struc tors are Danish, rep rese n ting faculty from nearby universities and schools. This program is Europe's largest study center for Arner i a.n stud ent s , allowing a wide variety of course offerings in l iberal a rts , interna tional business, architecture and design, and marine biology. A rich immersion in Danish culture is p rovided through Ii 'ng with the Danes, daily contact with Danish fac u lt y, and optional I n ouage instruction. cholarshjps are available for quilifi ed students.

semester, full year, and um m er pr grams for students in Argentina, Australia, Austria, Britain, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South A fr ica , and Spain. At some study sites students are integrated into a foreign university and are required to have lan gu a ge proficiency in the host language. Many programs in non-English speaking countries do not re quire prior language training and instruction is in English. Programs a.re open to students with sophomore standing.

INS1'I'I'O'fE FOR THE INTERNATIONAl. EDUCATION OF STUDENTS (IllS) o ffe rs semester, year-long, Or summer study at

COLLEGE YEAR IN ATHENS: Ancient Greek Civilization and

various centers throughout the world. PLU students may choose to tudy in London, England; Dijon, Paris, or Nantes, France; Milan, Italy; ! 1adrid or Salamanca, Spain; Freiburg or Berlin, Germ any ; Vienna , Austria; Tokyo or Nagoya, Japan; Adelaide, Australia; China; and Argen tin a . Studies include a combination of local un ivers it y course ' and classes taught expressly for I nstitute students. Courses are taught i n the language of the country where the center is located, except in Tokyo, Vienna, and the European Co mm on M a rke t program in Freiburg, where instruction is in English. In all other cases, PLU students n eed to be conversant in th e language of the country. Living arrange­ ments vary from full room and board to indep endent housing. Each center allows for integration into the local culture through hOUSing, student activities. field trips, and travel. Scholarships are available to qualified s t ud e n ts at all IES centers.

program in Athens. Student can take courses in c.Jas ical lan­ guages, archaeology, art h i st ory: literature, history, philosophy, religion, ecology, and economics. Junior standing is recom­ mended for this program .

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO, OSLO, NORWAY: Applicants must h ave o ne year of college Norwegian at the program start date. The "Oslo Year" incorporates No rwegi an language, literature, and culture a n d is an excellent opportunity for the Scandinavian

Studies student.

UNIVERSITY OP LANCASTER, LANCASTER.. ENGLAND: This semester or full year p rogram allows students to be a British unjversity. T h ere are over 500 courses offered by the univer ity. Students can easily continue their business. science. humanities, and social science studies at Lanca�1:cr.

integrated into

SERVICE LEARNING PROGRAMS: The International Partnership for Service- Learn ing provides semester, January term, full year, or s ummer programs in Israel. E ngl a n d, Scotland, Mexico, Ecuador, Jamaica, Czech Republic. Prance, South Dakota, and I ndia. Through ties with several Wliversities and educational p rograms, the Partnership programs Wlite academic study and community service. Sophomore st andin g is required.

Mediter ranean Studies are the focus of this semester or full year

SUMMER.: Many PLU-sponsored study abroad programs have summer optic ns. Addi tiona lly, off-campus programs for summer are announced in the summer sessions catalog.

SECTION B:

FLU-Approved St!ldyAbroad Programs

1 . In addition to the PLU-sponsored programs, there are countless other o pport un iti es fo r study abroad. Many U.S. colleges and Ull iversities have programs throughout the world, and PLU students may study through these programs by special arrangement. Information and application forms for several programs are available in tlle Ccrrter for International Programs. Credits awarded by an accredited U. . college or university are transferable to PLU. However, direct aid from PLU cannot be transferred to other olleges. 2. PLU students who plan to study djrectly in a foreign school (not in a program sponsored by a college in the U.S.A.) must be sure to flle a letter of intent with the Center for Interna­ tional Programs and with the chair of their major department befor leaving PLU. This letter must include what classes will be taken, where and for wh at length of time they \vill study abroad, and how the international experience will relate to their academic program. On the basi of this information, plus a record of lectures attended and examinations comple ted, academic cre dit m y be given by PLU. Students are advised to save all papers and ot her m (('rials relating to coursework taken abroad. All credit transferred to PL will be pass/fail. PLU reserves the right to require examinations covering the subjects studied.

APPliCATION P ROCESS: All PLU sponsored program

SCHOOL FOR FIELD STUDIES: SFS offers environmental semester p ro gr <lms in Cost a Rica, Kenya, Palau, the Cari bb ean,

Mexico, Aust ralia, and British Col umbia. Students take four courses including eco logy, r source management, socio­ ec o n o m ic or appl ied an thr o p o logy, and a dire ted research project Prereq uisi te for this program is at least one college level ecology or biology cou rse . Sop homore standing is required.

CENTER FOR GLOBAL EDUCATION: Augsb u rg College's Center for Global Educat ion offers seme ter programs in Mexico and Central America and Southern Africa. Programs in Latin American req uir e one senlest r of college Spanish.

INSTITUTE FOR STUDY ABROAD: The Institute for Study

applications must be p re- ap p roved by the Center for lnterna­ tional Programs before they are mailed to the program associate (i.e., IES, AIFS, Butler University, etc). Students ate asked to submit completed program applications and have an official transcript and faculty reco m mendations sent to the Center for the review p rocess. General deadlines for program applications are: January 15 for Tanzania, Fe b ru ary 1 fo r summer programs and emester I programs in Australia and New Zealand, March I for fall and full year programs, and October 15 for spring semester programs.

CREDITS: PLU awards PLU credit for all programs listed in SECTION A: PLU-Spo nsored Programs. All courses taken on a PLU-sponsored program will be listed on the PLU transcript

Abroad, Butler University offers fully integrated semester and full year study abroad programs in England. Scotland, Ireland, Australia. New Ze aland, and Costa Rica. Students participating in these p rog r ams are admitted to foreign universities and take regu lar un ive nity courses. Jlmior standing is required as a p rereq ui s i te for these program .

with ap propriate depaItment numbers assigned. Letter grades will also be posted, al th oug h they will not be included in the PLU cumulative grade point average.

PROGRAM COSTS AND FINANCIAL AID FOR PLU-SPONSORED PROGRAMS: Reciprocal Exchange Programs: Se me ster charges are based on the

PLU tuition rate for 1 4 credits plus the cost of on campu housing and a full meal pla n .

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Other PLU-Spansared Programs: tudents are charged a program fee which does nOl aceed the base co t of the program plus an adminislrat i e fee of $700 p er cmester. Each of th PLU-sponsored p rogra m s wi l l , the refore, have a different program fee.

On PLU -sponsored p rograms, students eligible � r state and federal financial aid may transfer their aid awards (with the

exception of wo rk study) to their studen t ace unts. Students may also app ly th ir univer sity g rants and scholarsh ips as well as governm en t loans on sel ect ed sponsored programs. The Center

for Intemati nal Programs ha s det ailed information on "Study Abroad an d Financial Aid." Tu ition exch ange benefits do not appl y to study abroad.

COURSES THAT MEET CORE I REQUIREMENTS: literature Requirement. A-2: All departmental literature courses, offered both in the original language and in E nglish tr ansla t i o n, meet this requirement.

Penpectives on Diversity, Cross-Cultural Perspectives (6-B): All language courses n u mbered 201 and a b ove (two semesters) and all fir t-year co urses of a fo reign l an g uage n ot p reviou s ly studied (two semesters), as well as Chi nese 3 7 1 , Lan gu a ges 272

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(Literat Ire and Social hange in Lat i n America), and French 341 meet this requirement.

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Perspectives in Diversity, Alternative Perspectives (6-A): Spanis h 34 1 and S i gn 1 0 1 an d 1 02 meet this re q ui renlen t.

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BACHEWR OF AKI'S MAJORS AND MINORS: The depart­ ment offers majors in Chinese Studies, Cia ' ics , French , Ger ma n , Norwegi an, Scandinavian Area tudies, and Span ish. Minors are ofti red in Chinese, Chinese St ud ies, French, erman , Greek, Latin, Norwegian, and Spanish. Al l maj or s must complete Langu ag 490: Senior Project. M ajo rs must com plete at least 1 2 semester hours i n residence at PLU, fo ur f which m u st be take n either in the senior year or up on return from a stu dy abroad p rog ranl . Minors must compl te at least eig ht hours i n res ide nce. Specific req ui rements (and variations from the above) for s pecific majors and m ino r ' are listed below.

LANGUAGE RESOURCE CENTER: The la ng ua ge curriculum at all levels features use of PLU 's state- of- the-art multimedia Language Resou rce Cen ter, located in th e M or tvedt Libr ary. Advanced students h ve the opportuni ty to conduct research at selected Web sites, as well as to work as assistants in the Center, gai n i n g c o mp ut er exp r ti s e while ac celer a t i ng their la ng ua ge

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skills.

PLACEMENT IN LANGUAGE CLASSES: S tude nt s are en cour­

aged to obtai n as much h i g h school preparation in la n gu oes as possible. To determine a p p ro pr iat e course placement at PLU, all st uden ts with pl ·ous experience in a l ang uage take the p lacemen t xarnination, ad m in istered during freshman registra­ t io n , orientation week, and throughout the year by special arrang ement. Students q u alifying fo r advanced p lace m nt may be allowed to waive certain major or minor requirements.

SENIOR PROmcr: Stu d en t s majoring in a f re ign lan guage

Languages and Literatures An understanding of world cultures and an ability to speak

languages other than one's own are hallmarks of today's college graduate and of a successful career person. Lan­ guage study at PLU is a seriou academ ic enterprise. Wh ile gaining proficiency in a language, students develop critical, aesthetic, and creative sensibilities necessary fo r global citizenship, and appreciation of their own language and culture. The department offers

a

wide range of courses,

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only in languages at ali level,s, but also in cuitu-res, litera­ tures, and linguistics, both in the original l an guage and in Engl ish translation. I nstruction is also given i n American Sign Language. Language t uden ts are strongly encouraged to partici­ pate in the numerous study abroad courses offered during the January-Term as well as fall and spring semesters. For fu rther information, see the

Intematio1lal Programs section

of this catalog.

FACUll'Y: Snee, Chair; R. Brown, M. Jensen, Khan, Lacabe, Martinez- Ca rbaj o, Menzinger- Sj oblom , E. Nelson , Predmore, Swenson, Tove n, Warner, T. Wi ll i ams, Webster; as isted by Curtis,

e n rol l in 490 con curre n t ly with another upper-level co urs e in the m aj o r. The instruclor of the latter course normally supe n 'ises the student's senior pT ject: a res e arc h paper, internship, or other ap p roved p roject. The st u den t p resents a summary of the completed assignment at an open departmental fo rum. I IT ( 2 )

PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Students p re pa r i ng to teach in a junior or se ni or high school may earn either a B a c h elo r of Arts degree in French, GenTIan , Norwegian, or Spanish along w ith certi.fication from the Sch ool of Education, or a Bachelor of A rt s in Ed u ca tion degree with a teac hing major or minor in French, German, Norwegian, or Span' h. Secondary te ac h i n g min r are also available in Ch inese and Latin. Elementary teach ing majors are vai lable in all o f the above languages. All students are required to take languag s 445 ( Me t hod l ogies ) for rtifica­ tion. See the School of Education eetion of this catalog for certification requi rem en ts and the B chelot of Arts in Education requireme nts.

MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: Tn cooper lion with the Scho I of Edu

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tion, th

department offers a a Second Language, Pros p ective teachers as

minor in English as wel l as students who may teach Engli h abroad, through Fulbright Awards o r servi :e opportunities, are strongly encour· aged to pursue this opportunity. The two required d partrnental courses ar Languages 445 (M th o d logies) and Languages 446 ( . heories of La ngu age Acquisition). See the Sci1001 of Education the minor. section for a full description

K. Hanson, and Yaden.

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Re quired fo r teacher certification i n a la ngua ge and fo r minor in

Course Offe rings

En gli s h as a Second Language. Strongly re co m mended for

Cou.rses i n the Department of Languages are offered in the

el ementary major in a language . II ( 3 )

foll ow i ng gen eral fields in ad d i tio n to e le m en t ary, i n t er m ediate, an d ad vanc ed la ngua ge; III W II: ::I I­ « 0:: w I-

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491, 492 Independent Study ( 1 -4 ) 597, 598 Graduate Research ( 1 -4) Chinese

Mi nOT in Ch inese:

20 se m es ter hours which may i n c l ude 1 0 1 - 1 02 . The major a n d minor in Chinese Studies are described i n their ow n section of this catalog .

UTERATURE

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A. In Engllsh Languages 2 7 1 - Literature and Society in Modern Europe La nguages 272 - Literature and Social han ge in Lati n America Chinese 71 - Chinese Literature in Translation Classics 23 1 - M aster p ieces of E u r op ean Literature

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Pri nc i p les of la. nguage acqui si t io n with specific class room applications. Sp ecial a ttention g ive n to the needs of di fferen t language groups in acquiring English. Comparison of sound systems and str uctu res o f l a ng uage s ESL teachers are most likely to en c oun ter. No p rerequisi tes. Req uired fo r minor in English as a Second L a n guage. (4)

CUD'URAL mSTORY A. In Eoglish Classics 250 - Classical Mythology Classics 3 2 1 - Greek Civilization Classics 322 - Roman Civilization Scan 150 - Introduction to S c an di n avia Scan 322 - Con tem porar y Scandinavia Sca n 323 - The Viki n gs Scan 3 24 - The Emigrants Span i s h 341 - The Lati no Experiences in the U.S. B. In Respective Language French 32 1 - French Civi l iz t io n and Culture German 32 1 - German C iv il iza t io n to 1 750 German 322 - German Civilization Since 1 7 5 0 Spanish 32 1 - Civilization and Culture f S p ai n S pani s h 322 - Latin A m er ica n Civilization and Culture

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446 Theories of Language Acquisition

101, 102 Elementary Chinese Introduction to M a n dar i n Chinese. Basic skills i n lis te nin g, sp eaki n g, reading, and wr it i n g. Laboratory p r ac tice re qui red . I II (4, 4) 201, 202 Intermediate Chinese Deve l o p s fur ther the ability to commun icate in Mandarin

Chi nese , usi n g cul tu rally authentic material . Laboratory practice re quire d. P rere q u is i te: 1 02 or equivale n t . I I I (4, 4 )

301 CompOSition and Co nversation Review of grammar w i th emp h a s is on idiomatic usage; reading of contemporary authors as mo del s of s tyle; conversation on

Classics 250 - Classical Mythology

French 2 2 1 - french Literature and Film of the Americas Scan 250 - Masterpi ces of Scandinavian Literature Scan 4 2 1 - I b sen an d Stri ndb erg S an 422 - Twentieth-Century Scandinavian L i te ra ture

topics of student in terest. Conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite:

202 or equ iva len t . I (4)

B. In Respective Language French 42 1 , 422 - M as terp ie ces of Fren c h Literature French 43 1 , 432 - 1\'Ienti eth C en tury French Literature German 4 2 1 - German Literature from the Enlightenment to Realism German 422 - Twentieth-Century Gennan L i te ra tu re S pa n is h 302 - Intr d uction Lo H i s p an i c L i te racy Studies Spa nish 42 1 - Masterpieces of Spanish L ite ratur e Spanish 422 - Twentieth-Century L i te r at ur e of Spa i n Spanish 423 - Special Topks in Spanish L iter atu re and Culture Spa n i s h 43 1 - Latin Am e r i ca n Literature, 1 492-1 888 Spa n ish 432 - Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature S pa n ish 433 - Special To p ics in Lat i n American Literature and Culture -

Languages

27 1 Literature And Society in Modem Europe Re, ding a nd discussion of works in English translation by authors like Flaubert, Ibsen, and Th. M a nn often enriched through selec ed film adap tati o ns . Emp h as is on social themes, including life in industrial soc ie ty, t h e ch a n gi ng status of women, and class conflict. No prerequisite. (4) 272 Literature and Social Change in Latin America Readings in E ng l is h translation of fiction from modern Latin America. Discussions fo cus on social and historical cha nge and on l i te ra ry th mes and fo r m s i n works by authors such as Carlos Fuentes and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. No p rerequisite. (4) 445 Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages and English as

a Second Language Theories and related tec h n iques for tea c h i n g lan gua ges K- 1 6

within t h e i r cultural context, i ncl udi ng direct methods, content­ based instruction, p rofi c iency orientatjon , and the i n tegr a ti on of technologies. Attenti on given t o va r ia ti o ns i n approach for those teaching Engli h as a second language. No prerequ isites. 88

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37 1 Chinese Literature in Tranalation An int r oduc tio n to the mo s t i m po rt an t works and writers of Chinese li t erary traditions, from early tim s to the modern p e ri od. Poetry, prose, d r a m a , and fiction included. Film prese n t a tio n s supplement the requ i re d readings. No knowledge of Chinese r equi r ed . (4) 491 , 492 Independent Study ( l -4) Classics The major i n classics is des cribed in this c a ta lo g under Classics.

23 1 Masterpieces of European Literature Representative wo rks of cl ssical, medieval, a nd earl y Renais­ sance literature. Fulfill g en er al un iverSi ty co re req ui rem en t in literature. (Cro '-referenced with ENGL 2 3 1 . ) I (4) 250 Classical Mythology A stu dy of myt holo gy origi na tin g in the texts of such G re ek and Roman authors as Homer, Hesiod, Vi rgi l, and Ovid. All r ea d i n gs are in Ellgl i h, but stude n t s with other language abilities are encour aged to use them. Satisfies the gen e r al u niversi t y core requirement in li te rature. (4) 32 1 Greek CivilhatioD The political, s oc ial , and cultural h ist or y of Ancient G reece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic p er i o d. Sp ec ia l attention to the

li t era tu re , art, and intellectual history o f the Greeks. (Cross­

referenced with HJST 32 1 .) (4)

322 Roman Civilization The h is to ry of Rome from the fOW1dation of the dt y to A.D. 395, the death of Theodosius the Great Emphasis on R o m e's expansion over the Mediterranean and on its constitutional history. Att ent i n to the rise of Chr i stian ity within a G re co ­ Roman context. (Cross-referenced with HIST 322.) (4)


490 Senior Project Greek Minor in Greek: 20 s emes ter hours, which may include 1 0 1 - 1 0 2.

101, 102 Elementary Greek Basic skill s in reading classical, koine. and pa tr ist i c Greek.

IU

(4 4)

201, 202 Intermediate Greek Review of basic grammar, reading in selected classical and New Testament authors. I I I ( 4, 4)

42 1, 422 Masterpieces of French Literature So cial and aesthetic im por t an ce of works representati¥ of m aj o r p er io ds from th e Middle Ages th ro ugh the nineteenth century. May include Christine de Pizan, Ra b el ai s , Montaigne, Moliere, Pascal, Voltaire, Rousseau, Hugo. and Ba udelaire.

IT aly (4, 4 )

P re requisite : 302. I

,.. �

431, 432 2Oth-Century French Literalnre Social and aesthetic i m po rt a nce of selected twentieth century writers from France and other fra nc o pb o ne countries. May

490 Senior Project ( 2 )

i n c lu de Gide, Camus, Sartre, Beckett. Aimee C esaire, Miriama Ba. Ousmane Semb en e. Pr ere quisi te: 352. I IT aly ( 4, 4 )

49 1, 492 Independent Study ( 1 -4)

49 1, 491 Independent Study ( 1-4)

Z C\ c: � C\ m

490 Senior Project (2)

11\

Latin Minor in Larin: 20 semester hours, which may include 10 1 - 1 0 2.

German

� z

101, 102 Elementary Latin Basic skills in r eadin g Latin; an i ntrod ucti o n to Roman literature

Major irz German: A minimum of 34 se me ter h o ur s beyond

c

and culture. I Il (4, 4 )

Mirzor irz Germall: 20 sem est e r hours excluding 1 0 1 - 1 02 and i.n cl udin g 20 1 -202, 30 1 , an d tw'O additi nal upper division

20 1, 202 Intermediate Latin Review of basic grammar; selected rea dings from Latin authors.

1 0 1 -102, in clu d ing 20 1-202, 30 1-302, 3 2 1 -322. 495, and two

courses.

I II aly (4, 4)

490 Senior Project ( 2 ) 491 , 49 1 Independent Study ( 1 -4)

French Major in French: A minimum of 34 s mester hours bey nd 1 0 1-

1 02, including 20 1 -202, 3 0 1-302, 32 1 , 490, and three 400-level courses, one of which must be co m pl e ted in the senior year. Minor in Frenc1r: 20 se m e ster hours. excluding 1 0 1 - 1 0 2 and i ncluding 20 1-202, 3 0 1 , an d two a dditi o nal up p er d ivi s i o n cou rse s.

101, 102 IDementary French Essentials of pronun iation, intonation, and structure; basic skills in listening, speaking , re ading, and wr iti ng. Lab attendance required. I II (4, 4)

201, 202 Intermediate French Review of basic grammar. development of vo ca bu l ar y a nd em phasis on spontane us, oral expression. Rea d ing selections which reflect the cultuJal heri ta ge and society of t he Francophone world . Lab attendance req ui red . I II (4. 4 )

221 French Ilterature and Film of the Americas Throug h literature a n d film, a study of the experien ce of migr a ti o n. integration, conflict. and ethn icit y in the Americas from a Fran cophone perspective. To include today's geogra ph ic a l areas of Quebec, Nova Sc ot i a, United States, Haiti, Mar t inique , and Gu ad el o up e. Spec i al attention given to issues of gender, color, hjstorical h e ritage, la ng u age . and economic status of

French and Creole speakers in the Ca ri bbe an and No rt h America. Class conducted in English. All li t er atu r e translated into English; films with E ngl i sh subtitles. No prerequisites. Meets ge ne ral university li tera t u re and cross-cultural dive r sit y requirements. (4)

301, 302 Composition and Conversation Advanced grammar, stylistics, composition, a nd conversation within the hist o rical context of Francophone culture, history, and literature. Prerequisite: 202. I I I (4, 4) 321 Civilization and Culton Development of Fren c h society from early times to the present, as po rtr ayed in art, mu s i c , p olit i cs, and literature, within their socio-historical c o n text. Prerequisite: 2 02. (4)

,..

400-level courses

101, 102 Elementary German Ba ic skills of oral and written communication in classroom and laboratory pr acti ce . Use of materials re fle cti ng contemporary Ger man life. I IT (4, 4)

m III

201 , 202 Intermediate German Continued pra ct i ce in oral and written c m mun ication in class­ ro om and la b o rato r y. Use of materials which refle t co ntemp o­ rary life as well as the German cul tu r al heritage. I IT (4, 4)

30 1, 302 Composition and Conversation Intensive review of gr amm ar with e mp h a sis on idio matic u age; use of contemporary authors as models of styl e. Conversation o n topics of student intere t. Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. I II (4, 4)

321 German Civiliz.a:tion to 1 750 From the M i d dl e Ages to he Enlighterunent. A survey of Germ a n culture and i ts exp ress i o n in neative wo r ks of art, music an d literature. with part i cu liu: emphasis on Martin Luther and the P ro tes ta nt Refo rmation. Pre requisite: 202. I air (4) 322 German Civilization Since 1750 From the Enlightenment to the present. Tilis survey covers repr sentative works and trends in German p oli tics . ph i lo so phy, literature, art and music, with em p h asi s on the Age of Goe Lhe and Beethoven. Prerequisite: 202. II air (4)

401 Advanced Composition and Conversation Emph asis on idiomatic G erm a n u s i ng newspapers and other current sources for texts. Strongly recommended for students planning to ob tain a credential to teach German in pu b l ic se co n da ry schools. Students should take this course in t h e j u n io r or senio r year. Prerequisite: 302. ( 4 ) 421 German Ilterature From the Enlightenment to Rea1i&m Representative works of German lite r ature from a bo u t 1 750 to 1 890, i nclud ing Sturm and Drang, CIa sicism and Romanticism. Reading will i n cl ude such au th o rs as Goethe. Schiller, Buchner, and Ke ll er. Prerequisite: 352. I aly (4)

422 20th-Century German Literature

Representative works from N at u r ali s m to the present, i ncluding Exp ressionism and Socialist Rea li sm . Works from both east and west, and will indude such authors as Br echt, Kafka, Thomas Mann. Rilke, and Seghers. Prere qu is i te : 302. 11 a/y (4)

491, 492 Ind.ependent Study ( 1-4) 490 Senlor Project (2)

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Norwegian

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Major in Norwegian: A m i nimum of 34 semester hours, includ­ ing 1 0 1 - 1 0 2, 20 1 -202, 0 1 -302 , a nd Scandinavian 42 1 or 422. l'.1f;nor in Norweg ian: 20 se mest e r hours. which may include 1 0 1 - 1 02.

...

101. 102 Elementary No.rwegian

III::

I ntroduces th e studen ts to the pleas ure of s peaking , reading, and writing a fore ign language. These ski Us are developed thro ugh a conver a l io na! app ro ach , using songs and other cul tural matt�ri Is. I n (4, 4)

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.... c( III::

201, 202 Intermediate Norwqpan

.....

Develops a co mmand of the l an g u a ge while fu rth e r a cq uain t in g students with the Norwegian cultural heri tage . Reading selec­ tions introduce Norwegian folklore and daily life. [ n (4. 4 )

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301 Conversation and Composition

Z

Increases student ability for self- expression, both orally and in writing. Contemporary m a terials are selected as models of style and usage. Prerequisi te: 202 or equivalenL 1 (4)

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<C III W

490 Senior Project I II (2) Sign Language

101, 102 Sign Language An introduction to the struct ure of American S ig n Language and to the world of the h ea ring impaired. Ba sic signing skills and sign language voca b ulary; fi n ger sp ell i ng; the particular needs and problems of deaf people. ] II (4, 4)

Major in Spanish: A minimum of 3 4 semester h o urs beyond 20 I , in cl ud i n g 202, 301, 302, 32 1 , 322, and th re e 400-levcl courses. In add i t io n , students must complete Language.� 490. At least two 400 level COUTses--{)ne fo c us in g on Spain and another on Latin America-mu t be co mpleted a t PLU. One 400-1 vel course must be co m pl e te d in the senior year. Majors are strongly encouraged to p ursue at least one semester o f study in a Spa n i s h-sp eaking country on a p rogram approved by the Spanish faculty. M aj o rs may not normally fulfilJ the re uire ­ ments for the major thr ugh the el ec t io n [ 3 00 - l evel courses

E m ph a sizes the finer points of structure, style, and good taste. Prerequisite: 3 5 1 or equivalent. n (4)

491 , 492 Independent Study ( 1-4) Senior Project (2)

during their senior year. Minor i1l Spa nish: 20 semester hours, including 202, 3 0 1 , 302, and two additional upper division courses .

Scandinavian Major in Scandinavian Area Stlldies: 40 semester hours: A cross­ d isci plinary approach to the study of Scandinavia. See also the sec t ion of this catalog on Scandinavia'i Area tlldies.

150 Introduction to Scandinavia of the Nordic cou ntrie s, highlighting contributions

101, 102 Elementary Spanish Essentials of pronunciation, int nation, and str uctur ; basic skills in l i steni n g, s peakin g , r eading , and writing. Lab attendance required. T, 11 (4, 4)

An overview

201 , 202 Intermediate Spanish

in art and music and th e cultural l ife of Denmark, Finland,

Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The roads to parliamentary demo­ cracy and current issues in the five nations are also outlined. ( 2 )

A continuation of elementary Spa n ish ; reading selections which refl cl the H isp an ic cu l tu ra l h er ita ge as wel l as contemporary materials. Lab attendance required. 1, U (4, 4)

250 Masterpieces of SQmdinavian Uterature

231, 33 1 Intensive Spanish .in Latin America

A survey of major authors and works fro m the Scandinavian countries, beginning with the pr se and poetry of the Viki ng Age. All readings in E nglis h translation. Satisfie tbe gent'ral universi ty c re requ i rement UI literatu re. (4)

An intensive Spanish course offered i n Latin American country and geared to students at the i n te rme di a te (equivalent lo 20 1 or 202) and advanced (equivalent to 30 1 ) l an guage Level. Course includes four and a half hours of ciass per day for a four-week perio d, a homestay, a service project, exc urs i ons , and guest lectures on vari ty of topics related to the hist ry and c ul t ur e of the ho st c untry. Placement at the 231 or 331 level is d ter­ mined by the student s ba ckgrou n d and experience in Spanish. Prerequis ites: Spani h 1 02 or the equivalent. J (4)

322 Contemporary Scandinavia Neutrality and occupation; t he emergence of the wel fare state;

social reforms, p l a nn ed economi s, and cultural policies; S can di navi a and the European commu n i ty. Readings in the o ri gin al for majors; class conducted in English. aly (4)

30 1 Comp�sition and Conversation

323 The VIkiDgs The world of tbe Viking ; terri to rial expansion; interaction of the Vikings with the rest of Europe. In En gli sh. (2)

324 The Emigrants

Acquaints students with tec hni que s of literary an alysis , as ap pli ed to examp l es of narrative, poetry, drama, and essay in the Spanish and Latin American literary traditions. Rea ding, writing, and speaking-intensive. Ongoing review of advanced grammar. Prerequisite: 30 1 . II (4)

42 1 Ibsen and Strlodberg The great dramatists f 19th-century Sca ndinavi an lit rature­ Hen rik Ibsen and August Strindberg-are studied against the b ac kd r p of their time and the work of other auth rs who contributed to the br eakth ro ugh of m dem forms and themes. Class conducted in English; readings in translation fo r non­ majors. Satisfies the gen er al university core requir ment in literature. aly (4)

321 Civilization and Culture of Spain

Develop ment of Spanish society from early times t o the pre enl as reflected in architecture , painting, and literature, within their socio -historical con text. Prerequ isite: 30 } (or COncurrent en rollmen t) . I (4)

422 20th-Century Scandinavian Literature Recent trends in Scandinavian literature are illustrated by lead­ ing writers like Isak Dinesen, Tarj ei Ve 'aas, and Par I..agerkvist. Emp h as i s on p ros e fiction and poetry. Class conducted i n

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Advanced grammar, styl istics, a nd compo ition; conversation based on everyday situations, cu rren t events , and pe r tine nt l iterary selecti ns. Prerequi site : 2(}2. I (4)

302 Introduction to Hispanic Uterary Studies

The mass e mi gr ation from Scandinavia to North America; reasons for the exodus; life in the new homeland. ln English. ( 2 )

90

49 1, 492 Independent Smdy ( 1 -4)

Spanish

302 Advanced Conversation and Composition

490

English; readings in translation for n on -m aj o rs. Satisfies the general university core requ irem en t in literat ure. aly (4)

322 LatiD American Civilization and Culture Historic, artistic, literary, so ci olog i cal , and geo g ra ph ic elements shaping the development of the Latin American region . Prereq­ ui si te : 301 ( or concurrent enrollment). II (4)

Y


Exploration of th e histories, exp rien es, and contributions of

MINOR: 20 semester hours, including Polit ical Science 1 70, Philosophy 328, and 12 ad di tio nal credil-hours, sel ected i n

the Latino peo ples in the United S tates as dley appear in La tin o

consultation with the program's hair.

literature and film. Course

ANTH 3 75 BUSA 400 BUSA 405 BUSA 406 BUSA 407 BUSA 408 COMA 3 8 1 ECON 3 7 1 HIST 4 5 1 PHIL 328 POLS 1 70 POLS 3 7 1 POLS 372 POLS 373 POLS 374 POLS 3 8 1 POLS 47 1 PSYC 4 7 1 SOC I 3 5 1

341 The Latino Experiences in the U.S.

ntent is enriched through related service learning experience. Readings are in EngIi�h. Satisfies core requirement in Alternative Perspectives or Literature. May rount toward major, but not toward minor in Span ish . No prer quisires. (4)

401 Advanced Spa.n:ish Gnmmar Study f p a D is h at th most advanced level with an em ph a sis on syntactical di ffe rences between English and Spanish. Stron gly recommended for those who pl a n to tea ch Spa nis h at the se co ndary level. Prerequisite: 302 (4) 421 Masterpieces of Spanisb titeratore A concentrated study of major writers and m vements in Spanish L iteratu re from its origins to 1 898. Prerequisite: 302. (4) 422 20th.Century Literature of Spain Drama, novel, ess ay, and poetry of Spain from the "Generation of 1 898" to the present . Prerequisite: 30 2 . (4) 423 Special Topics 10 Spanish Literature and Culture This course offers an oppo rtunity to pursue an in-depth study of a sp erific aspect or topic in Spanish l iterature , such as Spanish women writers or the relationship of film to other types of cultural production . May be repeated for credit wiili different topic. Prerequisite: 302. (4)

43 1 Latin American Literature, 1492-1888 A s tudy of r presentative genres from the colo nial perio to the end of the 1 9d1 century. Prerequisite: 302. (4) 432 20th-Century Latin American Literature Development of the literature of Mexico, C e n t ral and S o ut h Ame rica from th e "Modernista" movement ( 1888) to the present.

Prerequisite: 302. (4)

433 Special Topics in Latin American literature and Culture pp o rtun i ty to pursue a n in-depth study of a sp ec i fic aspect or top ' c in Latin American literature and culture, suc h as Latin American wom en writers, Latino narrative, or L a ti n American film and literatW'e. May be repeated for credit with di fferent top ic. Prerequisite; 302. (4)

This co urse offers an

490

Senior Project (2)

Law, Politics, and Revolution General Business

Law

Law of the Financial Ma rketp l ace Law of the Wo rkplace Law of ilie Ma rketplace Internatio nal B usin e ss Law

M ed i a Law Industrial Orgaillzation and Public Policy Legal History Philosophical Issue in the Law Introduction to Leg a l

m

tudies

l>

Judicial Proces Constitutional Law

Z

Civil Liberties Lega l Studies Research

."

o

Compa rative Leg al Sys tems I n ternshi p in

L g al Studies Psychology and the Law Sociology of Law

...

The Marriage and F amily Therapy program is a graduate program lea d ing to the M.A. in Social Sciences. 45 semes­ ter ho u rs are req u ired in the program. Fo r further infor­ mation, see

the Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

The Marriage and Family Therapy program is a ccred ­ ited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marr iage and Family Therapy Education of the American Associ ation for Marriage and Family Th erapy

(AAMFT).

FACUlTY: York , Chair and Clinic Director; Storm; and pra Lica supervisor ; Lewis, Phair, Tschimperle.

Course Offerings 500 Human Development Individual personality devel opme nt , nor mal and abnormal manifestations, over the Jjfc span. (4)

Legal Studies

503 Systems Approach to Marriage and Family Therapy

Legal Studies is an interd iscip linary program of study

for treatment strategy and intervention. (4 )

focusing on the nature of l aw and judicial process. Consis­

504 Family Development The course explores how family life cycle stages a re affected by

An int ro d u c ti on to the systems paradigm and po t-modern ideas

tent with the purposes of the American L gal S tudies

As ociation, the Legal Studie, Program at PLU p rovi des

divorce, remarriage, ethnicity, feminist issues, and other

alterna tive approaches to the study of law from the aca­

unplanned events. (4)

demic framework of the Divisions of Social Sc ie n ces and Humanities and the SdlOOls of the Arts, Business, and Education. The faculty tea ching within the program em­ phasize the development of a critical un der sta ndi n g of the functions of law, the mutual impacts of law and society, and the sources of law. Studen ts com p le ting a minor in Legal Studies pursue these objective through c ourses , directed research, and internships in offices a n d agencies involved in maki n g, enforcing, in terpret ing, and com m u ­ nicating " t he law" in contemporary American civil society.

505 Research Methods in Marriage and Famlly Thuapy Basic r esearch conc ep ts in clu ding formulating research ques­ tions, research design, a n alys is of data, and theory co nst r u ctio n .

FACUU'Y: A r n ol d,

hair; Alma, Anderson,

m

Marriage and Family Therapy

Brue, Dwyer-Shick,

Hasty. Kaurin, Klein, Lisos ky, MacDonald, Rowe.

Emphasis on understanding and evaluating rather than conduct­ ing research . (4)

507 Comparative Marriage and Pamlly Therapy

Intensive comparative study of the theoretical rationale of the prominent schools of thought within the field of m arr ia ge and fa m ily therapy. Prerequisite: 503. (4)

510 Human Sexuality and Sex Therapy An overview of the nature of sexual heal th and the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions. Prerequisite or co-requisite: 503. ( 2)

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91


Mathematics

Mathematics is a many-faceted subject that is extremely useful in its application, but at the same time is fascinating and beautiful in the abstract. lt i.s an indispensable tool for industry, science, government , and the business world, while the elegance of its logic and beauty of form have

5 1 1 PsychollOCiai Pathology: Relationship to Maniage and the Family Expl o r ation of the treatment techniques and assumptions of l ea ding family thera p i s ts re ga r di ng such psychosocial dysfunc­ tions as divorce, family viole n ce, delinquency, psychosomatic symptoms, dr ug addiction, and d ist urb ed a do les ce nts . P rereq ui

i ntrigued scholars, philosophers, and artists since earliest t imes. The mathematics program at PLU is d es i g ned to serve five main objectives: ( 1 ) to provide backgrounds for other disciplines, (2) to provide a comprehen jve pre-profes­ sional program for those di re ctly e ntering the fields of teaching and applied mathematics. (3) to provide a nucleus of essential courses which will develop the breadth and maturity of mathematical thought for continued study of mathematics at the graduate level, (4) to develop the mental skills necessary for the creation, analysis, and critique of mathematical topics. and ( 5 ) to provide a view of mathematics as a part of humanistic behavior. ­

FACUlJ'Y: Benkhalti, hair; D as, B. Domer, C. Do rner, Meyer, Neudauer, Th urm a n , Wu, Yiu, Zhu .

site: 503 . (4)

512 Professional Studies in Marriage and Family Therapy Study of professional ethics and Washington State laws which affect clinical practice, i nc lu d ing family law, le gal responsi bilities,

and interprofessi nal co peT ati on .

(3)

519 Practirum 1 ( 2) Prerequisite: 503, 507 and 5 1 2 may be taken concurrently when schedule al lows. 5 1 2 may also be taken concurrently with 52 1 , Practicum il, wilh facul ty app roval. 521 Practirum n ( 2 ) 5 13 Practirum m ( 2 ) 525

Practicum IV

(4)

The four se m esters of pra ctica are part of a co ntinu ous process towa rd d evel op i ng spe ci fic therapeutic competencies i n work with marriages and famil ies . The practica pre ent a competency­ based program in wh i ch each student is eva l ua te d regarding: 1 ) case m an ag eme nt skills ; 2) rela ti o n s hi p skills; 3) perceptual skills; 4) concep t ua l skills; 5) structuring skills; and 6) pro fes ­ sional de velo pm en t skills. Practica r quirements indude 1 00 h urs of supervisi n of 500 clie nt contact hours. Fa cu lt y are

AAMFT-approved supervisors and use live supervision and ideo t ap es of student sessions as the p ri ma ry methods of clinical supervjsion.

520 Theory I (2)

PLACEMENT TIlST: A p lacement test and bac kgro u nd survey are used to h el p insure that students beg in in mat hemat ics courses which are ap propr i ate to their preparation and bilities. Enr Ument is not pem1.itt cd io any of the beginning ma t hema t ­ ics courses (Math 9 1 , 99, 1 05, 10 7, 1 1 1 , i ll, 1 28 , 1 40, 1 5 1 ) until the placement test and background survey are c o mpl eted.

522 Theory U (2) 524 Theory m (2) The three semesters o f t he or y taken in conjunction with 5 1 9, 52 1 , and 523 constitute an in -d ep th tudy of o ne ap p roa ch toward marriage and family therap y with an em p hasis on ap plyi ng theory in practice. 590 Graduate Seminar Selected topics as announced. Prerequisite: instructoT. ( 1 -4)

MA11IRMA11CS AND GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIRE­

MENTS (see page 26): With the excepti o ns of Malh 91 and Math 99 all mathematics c u rs es will satisfy th mathemat ical rea so ning requirement (li ne 3 of lh ge n eral u n ive rsity require­ ments ) . At least 4 hours are need ed. With the exceptions of M ath 91 and Math 9 an math maties c ur es will satisfy line 2e of Core I: The Distrib utive Core . At l eas t 4 hours are needed. A course cannot simultaneously satisfy line 2e and line 3. In fulfilling the mathematical reasoning re uirement, students with documented disabilities will be g iven reasonable acc o m mo d a ­ tions as determined by the coo rdinato r for students with dis abili tie s and the a pp ro p r iate fac ult y member in cons ultat io n with the student.

co nse n t of the

591 Director Study ( 1 -4) 595 Gra.duate Readings Independent stu dy card required. (4) 598 Research Projed (4) 599 Thesis (4)

92

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BEGINNING CLASSES: Majors in mathematics, co mp uter engineering, and other sciences usually take Math 1 5 1 and 152 (calculu ) . Math 1 5 1 is also ap pro pri ate for any stu dent whose high s�hool ma th em a t i cs preparatio n is strong. Tho e who h ave had calculus in high Scil 01 may omil Math 1 5 1 (see Advanced Place ment s ectio n ) and enroll in Math 1 52 after consultation with m a th em atics � culty member. Those who have less mathematics background may begin with Math 1 40 before taking Math 1 5 1 . Ma th 1 1 1 and 1 1 2 p rovid e p reparat ion for Math 1 40. Bu iness major may s at i sfy the mathematics requirement for that degree in any of three ways. Those with strong ma the mati cs ba ckgro un may take Math 1 5 1 followed either by Mat h 230 o r by both Math 1 52 and 331. Alternatively, M a th 128 alone will satisfy the mathematics requi reme n t for business. Malh 1 1 1 serves as p re par a ti on for Math 1 28 fo r those whose hig h school background is not strong. Por students who plan only one mathematics course, a ch oi ce from Math l O S , 1 07, 1 28, 140, 1 5 1 is advised, depending on i n terest and p re pa ra t ion . Remedial: Math 91 (Intermediate Alg ebra ) is available for those who are not re,ady for other classes. Math 91 does not count t owa rd graduation reqllirements. science and

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MATHEMATICS AND THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENT (see page 26): With t he excep t io ns of Math 9 1 and Ma th 99 aU matht".matics courses will sat isfy th e logic. ma th emati cs , computer cience or statistics par t of Option In of the Colle e of Ar ts and Sciences require m ent . A cour e cannot simult aneo usl y satisfy Op tion ill of he College of Arts and Sciences requirement and the genera l un iversi ty requireme n ts. ADVANCED PLACEMENT: The p licy of the Department of Mathematics with respect to AP Calculus Exam results is as follows; AB EXAM: T f a stud ent receives a 3 orhigher on the AB ,exam th en the student is given advanced placem en t into ei th er Math 1 52 or Math 230 wi t h credit (4 credits-grade Pass) given for Math 1 5 1 upon compl etion (grade C or hi gh er) of M a t h 1 5 2 or Math 230. I f a student receives a 5 ( the maximum) on the AB exam then the s tud en t may be eligib l e for adv a nce d placement into Math 253 up n consu l ta tio n with eith er the Math 253 i nstr u cto r or the depart ment chair. If the studen t c ompl etes Math 253 with grade of C or hi gher then credi t (8 credits­ grade Pass) is given for Math 1 5 1 and Math 1 5 2 . DC EXAM: If a student receiveS a 3 or 4 on the BC exam then the student is treated the same as one who receives a 5 on the AB exam .. If a student receives a 5 on the BCexam then the student is given advanced placement into Math 253 with c red it given for both Math 1 5 1 and Math 1 52 (8 credits-grade Pass) if Math 253 is completed with a grade of C or higher.

If a s t udent has taken calculus in high school and did n ot take an AP exam, then the s t u den t may enroll in Math t 5 2 after consul tatio n with a mathematics fa c ul ty member. In this case n cred i t i given for Math 1 5 1 .

MATHEMATICS MAJOR: The foundat ion o f the mathematics program for majors is the three semes ter sequen e f calc Ius ( Math 1 5 1 , 152, 253), introductio n to p roof (Math 3 1 7) , and linear algebra (Math 3 3 1 ) . S tuden ts with a calculus backgr o und in high sch ool may receive advanced placement into the appropriate course in this sequence. Upper division work incl u des co urses in introd u cti on to proof. linear alg ebra, abstrac t algebra, analysi s, ge o metry,

d ifferential equati ns, statistics and numeri al an alysis. See the description of the courses and the maj or (either Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) for more detail. Students major ing in mathematics should discuss schedu l ing of these course with their adviser. For examp l e , Math 490 extends over two semesters b eginning in the fall semester; May gr aduates begin this capstone exp rience cou r 'e in the faU se mester of the senior year, while December gradua tes must begin this c o urs e in the fall semester of their junior year.

BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR: 34 semester hours o f mathematics, 4 hours s u pp o r ting . Requi red: Math 1 5 1, 1 52, 2 53, 3 17 . 3 3 1 , 3 4 1 , 433 , 455, 490. Required supporting: Computer S cie nce and Engineering 1 44 , which should be taken i n the fres hman yea r. Physics 153-163 o r Computer Science and Engineering 375 or Economics 345 i s strongly recommended.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 42 senle ster hours f math e ma ti cs, 8-9 hours sup po rti ng . RetJuired: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253, 3 17, 3 3 l , 341 , 433, 455, 490. 8 mare hours from: Math 3 2 1 , 342, 348, 3 5 1 , 356, 38 1 , 480. Required supporting: Co m puter Scienc and Engineering 1 44 and one o f Phys ics 1 53-1 63 or Computer Science and Engineering 348 or Computer Sc ien ce and Engineering 375 or Econ I1lics 345. BACHEWR OF ARfS IN EDUCATION: See School of Education section of tlUs catalog. MINOR IN MA.TllEMATICS: 20 semester hours of mathematics courses, including 1 5 1 , 1 52, 253 and 8 hours of upper division m athematics courses excluding 446. St rongl y recommended: Computer Science and En gineering

MINOR IN STATISTICS: A m in i m um of 16 se mest er hours to include Statistics 3 4 1 , at le ast 8 h o urs from among the o ther statistics courses and Comp u te r Science and Engineering 220 or 1 44. See the Statistics s ectio n of this catalog for more detail. Students who have taken calculus ill h igh school but do not have credit for Math 151 do no/ lteed to take Ma th 1 5 1 for the math­ ematics major or minor. Ho wever, they still need to complete the number of hours in mathematics stated irr the re q uirements. In

Course Offerings A grade of C or high er is stro ngly recommended in all prerequi­ site courses. A placement test and background urvey a re req uired before registering for beginn i ng mathematics courses i f prerequ i si tes have not been compl eted at PLU.

Iotermediate Algebra A review of high school algebra; solving linear a nd qu adratic equa tions , fact oring , si m plifying expressio n , expo llents and gra phing. De sign ed for students whose mathematical prepara­ tion is inadequate for Math I l l . Does not count toward gradu tion requ ire me n ts . I (4) 91

99

n 11\

Directed Study in Fundamental Mathematics

De si gn ed for s tud en ts who need fu rther hel p with the b a sics in mat h em a t ic s to p repare them for h igher level courses. Enroll­ ment by arrangement wi th instructor. Does not count toward gradua tion requireme nts. S only ( 1 -4)

105 Mathematics of Persooa.l Finance Empha sizes financial transactions important to individuals and families; annui ties, loans, i nsurance , interest, investment, time value of mon ey. Prerequisite: PLU math entrance require m ent .

J (4)

107 Mathematical ExpLorations

Mathematics and modern society. Emphasis on numerical and logical reasoning. Des i gned to increase awareness of app licati o ns of mathematics, to enhance enj oym e n t of and self-confidence in mathematics, and to sharpen criti c al thought in mathematics.

Topics selected by the instructor. Prerequ i site: PLU math en­ t ra nce requirement. (4) I I I College Algebra A review of algebr a em p has izing problem solving skills. Appr o ­ priat e a s p re p a r ation for Math 1 28 or 1 1 2 (and then 1 4 0 ) . Pre­ requi sites: two years of high school alge bra or Math 9 1 . I II ( 2 )

1 12 Plane Trigonometry

Trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, logar i thm i c

and exponen­ tial functions, identities, graphing, solution of triangles. For students who are p roficient in algebra but do not know t rig o­

nometry. Prerequisite: I I I or t least two years of high chool algebra. I II (2) 123

Linear Models and Calculus, An lntroduction

Matrix theo ry, linear progr amm ing, and introduction to calculus. Concept devel op ed stre Sing applications, particularly to b usine ss. Prerequisites: two years of high school alg ebr a or Math i l l or equi va lent. Cann o t be taken for credit if Math 1 5 1 (or the eq uiva l ent) has bee n previously taken with a gr ade of C or hi gh er. I II (4)

140 Analytic Geometry and Functions

Different types of functions, their pro perties and gr apbs, espe­ cially trigonometric function . Algebraic skil l , probl em solving,

an d mathematical writing are e m ph asi zed , Pr pares st ud ents for calculus. Prerequisites: I I I and 1 1 2 o r equivalent high school material. l II (4) lSI Iotroduction to Calculus Functions, limits, derivatives a n d in tegrals with applications. Emphasis o n derivativeS. Prerequisite; Math an alys i s or pre­ calcu lus in high s ch ool or Math 1 40 or equivalellt. l Il (4)

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152 Calculus n

348 Applied Regression Analysis and ANOVA

Continuation of 1 5 1 . Te c hn i ques :lid applications of integrals, i m prop e r i nteg ral s , ordinary d iffer en t ial equa tions and power series, with a pp licati ns. Prerequisite: 1 5 1 . I n (4)

Linear an d multiple re gr ess ion with infer e n ce and diagnostics; an alys i s of varia n ce ; experi mental de ign with randomization and blocking. Substantial use of st atisti ca l software and emphasis on exp l o ratory data analysis. Prerequis ite : 341 or consent of

203 History of Mathematics VI U

::a

A study in the vas t adventure of ideas that is mathematics from 3n i Dt cul tu re s to the 20th century. Tbe evolution of the con­ cep ts of numb er, measurement, demonstration, and the various bra nches of math e ma t i cs in the contexts of the varied cultures in which t he y arose. Prerequi si te : Math 1 5 1 or equivalent or con­ sent of i ns t ru c tor. aly II 1 998-99 (4)

:r

223 Modern Elementary Mathematics

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e( ::a

35 I Differential Equations An int rod u c tion to diff; rential equations emphasizing the applied aspect. First and second order differential e qu ati o ns, systems of differential equati ns, power series sol ut i o n s, non­ li n ea r differential equations, n ume ri c al methods. P rereq u is ite : 253. II aly 1 998-99 (4)

Concepts und e rl yi n g traditional computational te ch niqu es ; a

356 Numerical Analysis

sys t em a t ic a nalysis of arithmetic; an i nt u it ive a p proach to algebra and geometry. Intended for el em e nt ary teac h in g m aj o rs. Prerequisite: co ns en t of instructor. I II (4)

Numerical theory and a pp li c a tion in the co n te xt of solutions of linear, nonlinear, a n d differential equalions matrix theory, i n terp o la t ion, ap p roxim a t io n s, I umeri ca l differentiation and i nteg ra ti on and Fou r ie r transforms. Prerequisites: 1 52 and CSCE 144. aly 1 999-2000 II (4)

230 Matrix Algebra A surve y of matrix algebra wi th applications, such as linear prog ra mmin g. ftrst look at abstract methods i n clud i ng some techn i qu es of p roof. Prerequi ite: 1 5 1 . 1 II (2) US

381 Seminar in Problem Solving

Discrete Structures

Sets, relations, fu nctions combinatorics, and graph theory :lid th ir relation to opies in com p u ter science and eng ineeri n g. Techniques for logical reasoning in clu di ng methods of quanti ­ fied logic, deduction, induction, and contradictio n will be t au gh t and a pp lie d. Prerequisite: 1 52. II (4 )

253 Multivariable Calculus

An i n tro d uc tion to vec to rs, partial derivatives, m u ltip le i ntegrals, and vector a n al ys i s. Pre.r quis i te : I 2 . [ II (4)

291 Directed Study S up ervis ed stu dy of t o pi s selected to meet the individual's needs or interests; pr ima rily for students awarded advanced placem e nt Admission only by d ep a rt men tal invitation. ( 1 -2)

Designed to improve advanced pr ob lem solving skills. A goal is p articipati o n in the P utna m Competition. PasslFail only. May be taken mo re tha n once for credit. Prerequisite: 1 52 or consent of instru tor. 1 ( 1 )

433 Abstract AJgebra The algebr a of ax iom a t ic ally defined obj e c t s, such as groups, rings and fie lds with em ph as is on theory and pro of. Prerequi s i te : 331 . I (4) 446

Mathematics in the Secondary School

Methods and materials in secondary school math t e ach i ng . Basic mathematical c o ncep ts ; principles of nunlber o pe rat i on, relation, proof, and pro ble m so lving in the context of arithmetic, algebra, and geo metry. P re requi si te; 253 or 3 3 1 or equivalent. r (3)

4S5 Mathematical AnalysJs

317 Introduction to Proof in Mathematics

Theoretical trea tm ent of t op i cs introduced in eleme nta r y

cal c ulu s. P rere quiS ite : 253 and 33 1 and one of 3 1 7 or 433 (with consent of in tru ct r 433 may be taken con c ur ren t ly) . r (4)

Introduces the 1 g ical methods of p roof and ab s t ract ion in modern m a themat i cs. Cr i ti cal lo gi c al analysis :lid expres sio n em pb as iz d while inves ti ga ti n g a va rie ty of t op i cs in di ·c ret e mathematics. Prerequisite: 1 52. I (4)

480

Topics in Mathematics Selected topics of current interest or from: combina torics, com plex analysis, dyn a mic al systems chaos and fractals, gr ap h theo ry, group representations, numb er theory, o p er a t ions res e a rch , p ar tial differential equations, topology, t ra nsfo rm method , abstract alg ebra. analysis. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisites vary depend i ng on the topic. H ( 1-4)

321 Geometry Foundations of geometry and basic th ry in Eu idean, proje tive, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: 1 52 or consent of instru ctor. 1 (4)

331 Linear Algebra Ve ctors and abst ra ct vector spaces, mat r ice s, iWler product spaces, linear t ransformations. Proofs will be emphasized. Prerequishe: 1 52 and one of 230, 245, 253, or 3 1 7. I II (4)

490 Senior Seminar

Data de s crip ti on, pro b ab ili ty, discrete a nd continuous random

Oral and written presentati n of information learn ed in in dividua l research under the direction of an assigned instructor. Discussion of methods for commWlicating mathematical kn owl e dge. Satisfies the require m ent for a senior se mi na rl project. Lasts two e meste rs beginning in th e fall semester; May graduates should start the course in the fall of their senior year and December graduates hould begin the course in the fall of their junior year. Final p res en ta t io n s given du ring spring semester. Prerequisite: sen io r (or econd s emeste r junior) math maj o r. I II (2)

variables, exp ec tat io n , sp eci al distributions, tatements of l a w of

491, 492 Independent Study

340 A Brief Introduction to Probability Concepts from probability and stati tics tbat aTC pa rt icul a rl y relevant to c o mpu te r science and engineering. Topics are combinatorics, conditional probability, i nde p e nd en ce, discrete and continuoll distributions, mean and vari ance . 340 ca nn o t be taken for re dit after 341 . Prerequi�ites: 152 and CSCE 1 44. Recommended: M a th 245. II (2)

341 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics

lar ge numbers and cen tral limit theorem, sam p l in g dist rib u t io n s , theor y of point est i m a t rs, confi denc e intervals, hypothesis tests, regression (time pennitting ) . Prerequisite: 1 52. 1 (4)

342 Probability and Statistical TheoTY Continuation of 34 1 . Top ic s may i ncl ude: j oint and cond it io n ai distributi ns, correl ti on , function o f r n dom vari bl e s, moment gene r ati ng fu nc tions , inference in regress io n and one­ way ANOVA, Bayesian and non-parametric in fere n c e, conver­ gence of distributions. Pr requisite: 341 . aly 1999-2000 I I (4) 94

instructor. all' 1998--99 II (4)

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P rereq u i s i te : consent of de p art ment chair. I n ( 1-4)

597, 598 Graduate Research Open to master's d eg r ee candidates on l y. Prere q uis ite : consent of d epart m e nt (hair. ! II ( 1-4)


3. Mathematics

Medical Technology

Medical Technology i a professional progra m in clinical laboratory science for which the univ ersity provides pre­ professional preparation as well as a Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology (B.S.M.T ) . This degree is customarily awarded as a second baccalaureate degree in addition to a degree in either biolo gy or chemistry afte r comp l etion of one year of clinical training in a program accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the Am er ican Medical As socia tio n in addit ion to the fulfillment of pre-professional requirements. Upon completion of the combined academic and cli ni cal pro­ gram, the stud ent is eligible to take the medical technology certificate examination given by the Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American Society of Clinical Pa thologis t s. Since most of th e h o p ital schools in the State of Wash­ ington have closed, students may have to combine earning a bachelor's degree in biology or chem is try with comple ­ tion of a community co llege -bas ed year of clinical trai ning in an approved medical l abora tory technician (MLT) pro­ gram . Eligibility re quirements for taking the ASCP medical technology examination can be met with the combination of a b ac he lo r ' degree, MLT certification (ASCP) . and three years of full-time acce ptable clinical la boratory experience. Information about other alternatives for meeting certifica­ tion r equiremen ts can be obtained from the health sci­ ences advisers. Although the minimum req u ire men ts for medi c al tech­ n ology are as outlined below, many of the clinical intern­ ship programs require or strongly recommend a baccalau­ rea te deg ree in biology or in chem istry before admjssion to clinical training. Therefore, a s tude n t should consider first ear ning a ba ch elor's degree with either of these majors. The minimum academic requirements for entry into clinical training as published by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences ( AACLS) are 1 6 semeste r hours each o f biology a n d che mistry and one course in co ll ege level mathemati or the equivalent. The biology courses must include microbiology and immunol­ ogy. The c hemistry must include at least o n e course in organic chemistry or bi oc hemistry. Both the biology and chemistry courses must be considered accep table toward majors in those fiel ds. The mathematics req u irement must be met by co urses re co gnized as prerequisites for admi sion to physics courses. In a d ditio n to these specific re­ quirements. the student must have quired a mi n i m u m of 90 sem ester hours of academic credit before admission to c l inical training. Students can also satisfy pre-medical technology re­ quirements at PLU and then transfer to another u niversity for com pletion of clinical tr ai n i n g.

Mathematics 140 - An alytic Geometry and Functions Very strongly recommended:

Physics 1 2 5, 1 26, 1 35, 1 3 6 - General Phys ics Also recommended:

Biology 3 3 1 - Genetics Biology 348 - Cellular Physiology Biology 441 - Mammalian Physiology Ch em is try 403 - Biochemistry The remainder of the requirements for a major in bi logy or

chemistry sh ould also be fulfilled .

Music The music program at PLU strives to p rovide every studen t at the u ni versity with a meaningful and enriching arts experience, ranging from no n -majo r private lessons or ensemble particip ation to core courses to four disti nctive academic m ajors and two academic minors. Nearly ne qu arter of the undergraduates at PLU participate in mus ic annually. The program is fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and its graduates go on to disti n guished and satisfying c.areers in teaching and perfo r m in g. Facilities for expl ring the music al arts a re outsta nding. The Mary Baker Russell Music Center, with its exquisite Lagerquist Concert Hall, provides state-of-the-art focus to rnu ic study at PLU. Media rich classrooms and labs aug­ ment studios and individual practice spaces. Pr ivate study in keyboard is available in piano, organ, an d h a rpsichord. Other private study includes voice and all string, wind, and pe rcussio n instruments, taught by re gula rly perform ing musicians. Professional-quaUty experie nce is available to qualified per� flnerS in band, orc he stra, choir, jazz, and chamber ensembles.

FACUI:rY: Robbins, Chair; Br adley, Dahl, Farner, Frohnma yer, Grieshaber, H offm an , Holloway, C. K n a p p , Kracht, Nance, Sp rks, Vaught Farner, Youtz; ass is te d by Agent, Baldwin, Bliss, Bo u ghten , Box, Brandt, L.R. Campbell, Campos, Cline, Erickson, Field, Fukashima, G:l11 ung, Geronymo, Habedank, Harkness, H arty, Hill, Houston, B. Johnson, S. Knapp, D. Knutson, Larsen, Nierman, Ott, F. Peterson, Poppe, Seeberg er, bapiro, Spicciati, Terpenning, Turner, Vancil.

For introductory cou rs es to the field of m us ic, see the descrip­ ti ons of Music 1 0 ) ' 102, 1 03, 1 04, 1 05, 1 06, and 1 20. Students intending to major in music should begin the major musi sequence ' in the first year. Failure to do 0 may m ea n an extra semester or year to complete the program. Following is the program for all entering freshmen who intend t maj o r in music; COURSES:

Music Fundamentalsl; 1 1 1 , 1 3 Music a n Culture: 1 20/Theor : 1 24

Ear Tnrining: 125, 1 26

REQUIREM.ENTS FOR THE D.S.M.T. DEGREE: 1 . Biology

(per pia I

3 1 1

ement)

Th e courses are prereql�isite to Theory 1 24 . All freshmen should register for 1 1 1 and 1 13. A placement test will be given during the first class meeting, and, ba.led on the test outcome,

2. Chemistry Chemistry 1 20 - General Chemistry Chem i s try 338 - Analytical Chem istry Chemistry 232, 234, 332, 334 - O rga ni c Chem i try

SPRING

Keyboarding: 1 15, 1 1 6, 1 2 1 , 1 22

Biology 161, 162, 323 - Princip les o f B iolo gy I, II, III B iol ogy 328 - Microbiology Bi logy 407 - Molecular Biology Biology 448 - Imm uno logy

FAll.

21+2' 4 1

students will be placed in either 1 24, 1 1 3 or retained in 1 1 1 .

2 Half-semester cou rses.

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The Music core is fundamental to the pursuit of the music

MUSIC MINOR;

major and should be completed in the following sequence:

General: 2 2 semester hours, including Music 1 2 0; one of the

following: Music 1 1 5, 1 1 6 , 1 2 1 , 1 22 or 202 ( 1 credit); 1 24, 125, 1 26; 4 hours of Private Instruction (Music 202-2 1 9) ; 4 hours u

of Ensemble (Music 360-384); one of the following: Music 1 0 1 -1 06, 2 34, 3 33, 334; 0-1 hour of music ele ctive. Specialized: 32 semester hours, including courses required in the General Minor (22 hours) plus 4 additional hours of Private Instruction (Music 4 0 1 - 4 1 9 ) and one of the Concentration Modules (6 hours) listed under the Bachelor of Mus i c in Performance degree (see listing next page).

YEAR 1

Fall

1 1 1/ 1 1 3 Funda me nt als - prerequisite to 1 24 1 2 0 Music and Culture (4) 1 1 5/ 1 2 1 Keyboard Class ( I ) per placement 1 2 5 Ea r Trainin g 1 ( 1 )

Spring

1 24 Theory I ( 3 ) 1 16/121 Keyboard Class ( 1 ) p e r placement 126 Ear Training n ( 1 )

VEAR 2

Fall

ENTRANCE AUDITION: To be admitted to music major p rogram, prospective students must audition for the music

Spring

faculty. Music majors should fill out a declaration of major form during their first semester of enrollment in the program and be a ss igned to a music faculty adviser. Only grades of C or higher in music co urs es may be counted

Fall

YEAR l

Spring

DECLARATION OF MAJOR.: Students in terested in majoring in music should c mplete an academic contract declaring a music major during their first semester of enrollment in the program. They will b assigned a music faculty adviser who will assure that

study.

the student receives help in expl o ri ng the various majors and in scheduling music study in the most efficient and economical ma nner. Majors can alway be changed late r. ENSEMBLE REQUIREMENT: Music m aj o rs are required to participa te each semester in a music ensemble. KEYBOARD PROFICIENCY: Basic keyboard ·kills are required i n aU music majors ( B.M., B.M.E., B.MA, B.A . ) . Attainment of adequate keyboard skills is a) adj udica te d by the Keyboard Proficiency Jury, admin istered each term and b) a graduation requireme n t . Students are strongly encouraged to complete this

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT: Vocal perform nee majors are required to take at least one year of language st udy in French or Gemlan ( see department handbook) . GRADES AND GRADE POINT POllCY: 1 ) Only grades of C or higher in music courses may be counted toward a music major. C ourses in which the ·tudent recelves lower than a C must be repeated lVl1ess ubstitute course work is authorized by the dep a rt me nt 2) Majors must maintain a 2.5 cumulative grade .

point average in academic music co urses (private lessons and ensembles excluded) to remain in the program (see department handbook).

MUSIC MAJOR ASSESSMENT: Students pursui ng Bachelor of Music (BM), Bachelor of Music Education (BME) or Bachelor of Musical Arts ( BMA) degrees will have their progress and poten tia l assessed at the end of the freshman, sophomore. junior, and e ru or years. Asses ments are made by the m us ic faculty via progress reviews, juries, and public presentations. Outcomes are pass/fail; students who fail an assessment will not be allowed to

continue i n the music program (see department handbook) . MUSIC CORE: The following core is required in all music degree p rogr a ms : Music and Culture: 1 2 0 . . . . . . . .. . .... ............. ........ .... .... . .... .... .... 4 hours Keyboarding: 1 21 , 1 22 ........ .... ... .............. ............................. 2 hours Theory: 12 4, 223, 224 . .. .. . ... . . .. . .... .... .... .......................... .. .. . ... 7 hours Music His tory: 234, 333, 334 . .. .. . . . . . .. . . . . 9 hours Ear Training: 125, 1 26, 225, 226 . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. 4 hours .

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26 hours

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333 History I I ( 3 ) 3 3 4 20th Century Music ( 3 )

Music Core requirements must be fulfilled b y enrollment in specific courses and may not be taken by means of indepen de nt

BACHEWR OF ARTS MAJOR; M axim u m of 44 semester hours including music core (26 hours), plus 4 hou rs of ensemble; 4 hours (2 courses) from 336, 3 37, andlor 338; 4 hours of private instruction from 202-2 1 9 ; 2 hours of private instruction from 40 1 -4 19; 490 (2 credits). Keyboard proficiency required. In addition to requirements listed above, candidates for the B.A. degree must meet College of Arts and S ·ences requirement ( O pt io n 1, II, or III ) . BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION: Bachelor of Music Education: K-1 2 Choral Bachelor of Musi, Education: K-1 2 Instrumental (Band) Bachelor of Music Education: K-1 2 Instrumental (Orchestra)

Required Components

f their sophomor e year.

..

2 2 5 E a r Training I I ( 1 ) 1 22 Keyboarding l i ( 1 ) per placement 224 Jazz Theory Lab ( 1 ) 234 History 1 (3 ) 226 Ear Tr aining N ( 1 )

t owa rd a music major. Courses in which the student receives lower than a C musl be repeated unless substitute course work is authorized by the d e p ar tm en t .

requirement by the end

1 2 1 Keyboarding I ( 1 ) per pi cement 223 Theory II ( 3 )

Undergraduate Music Major Degrees:

Y

Music Education Core: All B.M.E. degrees i nclu d e the following music education core courses: 240 - Foundations of Music Education ....... .... ......... ............ .... 3 340 - Fundamentals of Music Education . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 343 - Materials and Methods for Sec on da ry General Music .. 2 345 - C ond u ctin g I .. . . .. . . .. . . ... .. .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. 1 346 - Conducting II . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . .... .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ... . . .. .. .. . . .. 1 347 - A dapt ive Music . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . I 348 - Practicum in Music Education ................... .. .. . ............ . . . . 1 445 - Conducting III . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . .. . .... . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. 1 446 - Conducting IV . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . .. .. .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . I 469 - Student Teaching S minar .. . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... . . . 2 Music Education Core: 1 5 credits School of Education Sequence: In a d di tion to the musi, courses

listed below, all music ed ucat ion majors a re required t o take the following courses in the School of Education: EDUC 262 - Foundations of Education .. ........... . . ................ .. .. EPSY 2 6 L - Human Relations Development ................. .. .... ..... EPSY 3 6 1 - Psychology for Teaching .............................. ... . ...... SPED 200 - Individuah with Special Needs . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . .... . .•

3 3 3

2

SPED 480 - Issues in Child Abuse and Negle't ........................ 1 EDUC 468 - Student Teaching .. ..... .. ......... .. . ..................... .... .. 1 0 School of Education S eq ue nce: 22 credits


Music Education Curricula K- 12 CllOral (Elementary or Secondary Emphasis) Music Core . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 26

Music 360-363 - Large Ensemble ......... :.................................... 6 Music 204/404/490"" - Private Instruction Voice .... 6 (6 sem. " ) Music Education Core .............................................................. 1 5 1 Music 248 o r 366 - Guitar Lab or Op era Workshop .. . .. . Music 4 2 1 - Advanced Keyb ard ( private study) . .. . . . . . . . 2 Music 440 - Methods and Matl'rials for -9 Music I 2 Music 443 - Methods for Secondary Choral Music . .. .. . 2 Music 44 ( or 444 Methods and M ater ial s for K-9 Mus ic II or Materials (or Secondary Ch o ral Music . ... . . . . . .. .. . . . 2 . .. . .

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BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE: Music - Core . . . . . . .. . ... . .. . .. . .. . . . . . .. . . ... ..... .. . . ... . . 26 Music - Private In�1.ruction (se< ru''''enr ra Lio rrs below) 22 (8 sem. · ) Musi - Ensemble (sec co",:mtrariolls ',dow) . . .. . . . . . .. . . 8 .._ . .

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Music 336 - M a king Music ............................................................ Music 337 - Analyzing Musi c ......... ............................................... Music 338 - Researching Music ................ . ................................. ... Music 390 or 39 1 - Intensive Performance Study . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . Music - Concentration Mod u le (see below) . .. . . .. . .. Music Electives .. ................... .... ....................................................... ..

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80 credits

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Keyboard proficiency required.

62 credits

F,eshmall, Sop ho/1Jo re, /u"loT awl Senior assessmenTS reCJuired. For vocal performance: la ngu a ge study retju ired (sec above) " COllSeclltive faJIIspring semesters; conti/llNll� 'lOll-jazz study

Keyboard proficiency required. Freshman, SopiJonl()re, junior and Senior assessmen ts required.

throughout tile program required.

Completion of an music req ll;remellts required prior to stllaent teaching.

SdlOol of Education sequence required. � Consecutive fall/sprillg sem

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fers.

... SCllior Project: Half recital.

K- 12 Instrumental (Ba nd) usic Core . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . 26

Music 370, 3 7 1 , 380 - Large Ensembl e ...................................... 6 Music 202-2 1 9, 402-419, 490 Private Instruction: Princip al Ins trument . . . _ . . . .. . . . . .. . . _ . . .. .. . . . . . . . .. .. .... . . ... . 6 (6 sem.-)

Music Education Core . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . _ . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 Music 24 1 - S tring Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . I Music 243/24 - Woodwind Laboratory ( I , 1 )

Music 245/246 - Brass Laboratory ( I , 1 ) . . .. . 4 Music 247 - Percussion Laboratory ( I ) Music 4-47 - Methods for School Band Music .......................... 2 Music 448 - Material for School nand Music . . . . . . . . .. 2 ................... . . .

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62 credits Keyboard proficiellCY retjuired. Frl!5hmllll. Sophomore, !!IIl;Or alld Senior asst:Ssments reqrlired.

omplerion of 1111 mllsic requirements required prior School ofHduCiltion seqlmlce required. � COl/secl/rive f all/sprillg semesters.

to

student reaching.

K- 12 lnstrurnental (Orchestra)

Music Core .............................................................................. .. 26 Music 370, 37 1 . 380 - Large Ensemble .. . .. . . . 6 Music 202 - 2 1 9. 402-4 1 9, 490 Pr ivate In truction: Principal I nstru ment .............................................. 6 (6 sem! ) Music Education Core . . . .. . . . . .. . ... .. 1 5 Music 24 1 /242 - String Lab ( 1 , 1 ) .......................... ................... 2 Music 243/244 - Woodwind Laboratory ( 1 , 1 ) 2 Music 245 - Brass La boratory ( 1 ) . . . . . . . . .. 1 Music 457 - Methods and Mate rials for Elementary StrLngs . 2 M usic 458 - Methods and Materials for Secondary Strings .. . . 2 .......... . ..... ...

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62 credits Keyboard proficif!:/rcy required. Pre.shmlm, Sophomore, JUII;or alld Senior C/ssessmelHS required.

Complerio" of aI/ music req rtlremellts reqrlired p rio r to student reaching_ School ofEducatioll seqrlflll:e retjuired. • Consecutive f a ll/sprillg jelllest",S.

BACHELOR OF MUSICAL ARTS:

Music - Co re

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Mu ic - La rge Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .................... . 8

Mu 'ic 202-2 1 9 Private Instruction . . .. . . . . . ... . 4 (4 semesters") Music 401-4 1 9 Pri vate Instruction ...................... 4 (2 semesters" ) Music 336 - M aking Music ........................................................... 3 Mosic 337 - Analyzing Music ........................................................ 3 MUSic 338 - Research ing Mu.�ic ..................................................... 3 Music 390/391 - Inte n sive Performance Study . . . ..... .. ..... . ... . . 4 Music 490 - S nior Proje ct *'- ......................................................... 4 . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . ... . . . .. .... . . . . . .. . 3 Music Electives . .. .. . . . . . . ..

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62 credits

Fresh/llan, Sophomore, /ullior 'lIId SCI/ior (ISSl!Ssments retj uirea. Consectuive fall/spring semestf'rs.

Concentrations; InstTumental - private instruction: 205- 2 1 9 ( 1 2), 40 1 1405-4 1 9 ( 10). including 49 (Senior Project: full recital) ; ensemb le : 370, 37 1 > 380; mod ul e: 345, 346, 358, 38 1 ( 2 ) , music elective ( 1 ) . Organ - private instruction: 203/2 1 9/403/4 1 9 ( 2 2 ) including harpsichord and 490 (Senior Project: full recitai) ; e nsemb le: including 38 1 ; modul . 345, 346, 352, 358; music electives ( 2 ) . Piano - private instruction: 202/2 1 9 ( 1 2 ). 40 1 1402/4 1 9 ( 1 0 ) i ncluding harpsichord a nd 4 9 0 (Senior Projec t : full recital) ; ensemble: large (2) , 35 1 ( 2 ) , 3 83 (2); piano elective ( 2 ) ; nlodule: 358, 430. 43 1 , 4 l . 452, music electi ve ( 1 ) . Voice - private instruction: 204/404 22) in d ud i ng 490 (Senior P roj ect: full recital ) ; ensem b le : 360-363; module: 353, 358,

366 , 453 . Composition - private instruction: 327 ( 1 6), includin g 490 (Senior Proj e ct ) ; pri nc ip al instrument 202 -2 19/40 1 -4 1 9 (8); en emble : large (4); module: 345, 346, music electives (4 ) .

Course Offerings 1 0 1 IutroductioD to Music

Introduction to music literature with emp hasis on listening, structure, period, and style. D e s ign e d to enhance the enjoyment and understanding of music. Not open to majo r . 1 (4 ) 102 Understanding Music Through Melody Introduction to the musical arts through exploration of mel ody as a primary musical im p ulse in a variety of musical style . D es i gned to enhance the enj oyment and understandlng of all mu ic through increased s nsitivi ty to melody. Not open t major '. n (4)

.... Senior Project: preselltatioll ill a puulic forum Err a cognate field olltside of /IIusic, atl academic minor Of second major reqllired. P

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126 Ear 'fiaining II

103 ffistory of Jazz

Survey of America's u n iq ue art form: jazz. Em p h a s i s on history; l i sten ing, structure, and s t yle from early deve l op m e n ts t h rough recent trends. Meets Core I re qu ire ment in arts/literature, hne I.

Continuation of

II ( 1 )

20 1 Private Instruction: Jazz ( 1 -2)

II (4) u

Prerequisite: two se mesters o f non-jazz study ( 202-2 1 9 ) or permission of the D irector of Jazz Studles.

104 Music and Technology Survey of the impact of technology on the musical arts, from the evo lutio n of musical i nst rume n ts and the acoustic space thro ugh ule audlolvideol omputer lechn ology of today. Meets Core I re q ui re m en t in artsll iterature, Line 1 . I (4)

105 The Arts of China Exploration of a n u mb er

f Chinese art fo rms, primarily musi c

but also including call igrap hy, p ainti n g , tai ch i, poetry, Beijing op era, film and cu isine. Meets fTeshman January term, Core I Arts/li terature requirement ( 2. Core 1 : A. 1 . ) , and/or Cross

Cultural Perspect ive requi re men t

2 1 0 Private Instruction: Clarinet ( 1-4) 2 1 1 Private Instructio:n: Saxophone ( 1 -4) 2 1 2 Private Instructio:n: Trumpet ( 1-4) 213 Private Instruction: French Horn ( 1 -4) 214 Private Instruction: Trombone (1-4)

Perspective req ui rement (6..8.) a/y ( 4)

I I I Music Fundamentals J l

Private Instruction: Organ ( 1-4) Private and Class Instruction: Voice ( 1-4) Private Instruction: VioUn/Viola ( 1-4) Private Instruction: CeUo/Bass ( 1-4) Private Instruction: Flute ( 1-4)

209 Private Instruction: Bassoon (! -4 )

( 6. B.) a iy J (4)

Survey of Scandinavian m usic from the Bronze Age to the present, with p ri ma ry focus on the music of Norway, Swede n , and Den mark. Meets fresh man J a n u a r y lerm, Core I Artsl L i teratu re req u i remen t ( 2. Core I :A. ! . ) , and lor rOS5 CII ltura l

Beginning s ki l s .in

202 Private In tructioru Piano ( 1-4) 203 204 20S 206 207

208 Private Instruction: Oboe/English Horn ( 1 -4)

106 MusIc of Scandinavia

read ing and notating music. Rudlments o f

music theory; key signatures. c l efs , and major scales.. RequiTe

no

rreviou s musical experience a n d p a rt ia l ly fulfills the general

215 216 217 218

Private Instruction: BaritonefI'uba ( 1 -4) Private Instruction: PercuSliion ( .\ ·4) Private and CIll8s lnstrllction: Guitar ( 1-4) Private Instruction: Harp ( 1-4)

219 Private Instruction: Harpsichord ( 1-4) 1 credit

university re q ui reme nt in arts; ma y be combined wi t h 1 1 3 in a

Fall and Spring Semesters: One baLf-hour p rivate or tvro one· hou r clas l esso ns per week ( 1 2 weeks) in additi on to daily p ractice. J an ua ry: Two 45·minute lessons per week in addition t o dai l y practice. Summer: 6 hour of instruction TEA in addi t i on

s i ngl e semester to co mplete the general un iversi t y requ i remenl in arts. I ( 2 )

l l3 Music E!undamentals n A c ont i n u a tion of 1 1 1 . Minor scales, i n tervals, t riads an diatonic 7th chords. Part ia l l y fulfills the genera] un ive rs i ty requirement in arts; may be combined with I I I in a single semester to complete the gener a l university requirement in arts.

to daily practice. S tude nts in piano. voice, and guitar may be as­ signed to class instruction al ilie discretion of the mu s i c faculty.

1 15 Introduction to Keyboarding

2-4 credits Fall and S p ri ng Semesters. Two half-hour lessons per week ( 1 2 weeks) in addit ion to da ily practice. Summer; L 2 hours of instruction TBA in addl t ion to daily practice_

Beg innin g skills in keyboard performance. Requires no previous

Special fee itl additio n

Pre req uisit e: 1 1 /

or co nlie n t of i nstructor. IJ ( 2 )

keyboard experience. Prerequisite fo r Music 1 1 6; i n tended for music major or minors i n p re par ati o n for keyboard reqillre·

De velo pment of keyboard literacy and skill requis.ite for m

1 16 Basic Keyboarding A co n t in ua tio n of ! 15. Prereq uisite: 1 1 5 or consent of instructor. II ( 1 ) 120 Music and Culture

Introduction to ethnomusicological consider ti o n s of a variety of music tradltions, foc using on c, lypso, E urop ea n court music, an d Chinese cOllrt music. Requ i res no p revious music experience and fulfi l ls the general university r equi re m ent in arts and

diversity; re q uired for music majors and minors; prerequisite course for 1 24; co-re uisite (fall ter m ) ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 or conse nt of

121 Keyboarding I

Il ( 1 )

124 Theory I An i nt rod uc t i on to the wo rkings of music, including COlll lllo n· practice harmony, jazz theory, and elem e n tary formal analys is . Prerequisite; 1 I 3 or consent f instructor. Il ( 3 )

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234 History I The evo lu tion of Western m us i c from the ea rly Christian era thr ugh the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Ba roq u e eras. Prerequisite; 223 or consent of i n s tr u ctor. II ( 3 )

phy, content, student characteristics. and the na ture a n d

organization of musical lea mi ng . For studen ts p re p ar ing to become music spec ial i st s (music education majors only) . 1 (3)

sight ·singing, rhythmi c, melodic and harmonic dlcta t ion. I ( 1 ) F

225 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to the basics of teaching m usic , including philoso­

125 Ear Training I

I

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240 Foundations o f Mosie Education

Development of a u ral skills , including interval recognition ,

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224 Jazz Theory Laboratory Introduction to jazz harmony, structure, style , and imp rov i a· tion. Prerequisite : 223 or consent of instructor. II ( 1 )

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ll2 Keyboarding n A continuation of 1 2 1 . Prerequisite: 1 2 1 or consen t of instructor.

A

223 Theory II A contin uation of 1 24. Prerequisite; 1 24 or co nsent of instructor. I ( 3)

22� Ear Training IV A continuati n of 2 2 5 . Prereq uis ite :

includi n g sight-reading,

gTOUp performance, and harmonization of simple melodies. Prerequisite: 1 16 or consent of instructor. I ( 1 )

P

jo r i ng in m usic; focused p repar a t io n for d ep a rt m en t

keyboard p roficiency examination. Private lesson; s p e c ia l fee in a ddi ti on to ttrition_ ( ! )

225 Ear Training m A continuati on of 1 26. Prereqwsite: 1 26 or consent of i ns t ructo r. 1 ( 1)

dep artment chair. 1 (4)

Development of keyboarding skills,

to t!lition.

221 Keyboard Profidency

ments in the music co re. Consent of instructor re q uired. I ( 1 )

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1 25. P rerequisi te: 1 2 5 or consent of instructo r.

Y


241-242 Strlng Laboratory Methods and ma teri a ls of teach i ng and playing string instru­

347 Adaptive Music Techniques and s t ra tegic to meet the needs. interest s, limit -

ments in the pub lic scho I . aly I [I ( 1 , 1 )

tions . and cap a cities of stu de n t s wh their musical activi ty. a/y ( 1 )

26-244 Woodwind Laboratory

Methods and m ateri als of teaching and p laying w instruments in the p ubl ic schools. aly I Il ( I , 1 )

348 Practicum in Music Education

dwind

24.5 BrlUi8 Laboratory Methods and ma te rials of teaching and pl ayin g brass instruments in the publ ic chools. aly r II ( 1 , I ) 247 Percussion Laboratory Meth ds and materials of teach i ng and p layi ng p ercussi o n instruments in the public schools. a/y ( 1 )

Field experience tea ch ing in m i ddl e or junior high s chool ; p rovi des laborat ry experience i n tea ching prior t o full student t ea ch ing experience. P re requ i ite: 340; recom mended.: comple­

3:: c: VI

tion of School of Education sequence (£DUe 262, EPSY 26 1 . 36 1 , SPED 200, 480) , and enroll fall s emest er preceding student teaching . I ( I ) 349 Electronic Music Pra.cticum Ap plic a tion of electronic lechniques to co m posi tion a l process. Assigned studio time on a reg ul a r basis. Special fee in add ition to

248 Guitar Laboratory

Meth ds al1d materials of teaching and playing guitar in the

tuition . Prereq u i si te : consent of instructor.

p ubli c schools. l ( I )

(I)

351 Accompanying

327 Composition

Practice in accompanying rep resentative vocal and instr ument al solo hterature from all peri ods . Special fee in addition to tui ti o n .

A system atic a pproach to contemporary mu sic I comp os iti on;

(I)

students create and notate works for solo, small n d large ensembles. May be repeated for additional credi t. Private

352 Organ Improvisation Basic tech niq ues of improvisation, particularly as related to

i nstruction; special fee in add itio n to ttdtion. ( 1--4) 333 History II The elf lut ion of Western music in the Classic and Prerequisite: 234 or consent of instruc tor. I (3)

have rest rictions placed on

ornantic eras.

hymn tunes. Private inst ruct ion: special fee in a dditio n to tuit ion . Prerequisite: co nse n t of instructor. ( 1 ) 353 Solo Vocal Literature

334 Twentieth Century MWlic

Survey of sol vocal L iterature. aly II ( 2 )

The evolution of Western art music in the twentieth century in respo nse to new theoret ical constructs, new technologies. and popular and cross- c ultu r al influe nces. Prerequisite: 333 or on sent f instru ctor. II (3)

A general survey of the evoluti on of " Drama per Musica" from

336 Making Music Continued study, develo pm ent and application of music skills

358 Early Music Laboratory

through co mpositio n, counterpoint, im p rovi sati n, co nduc t i n g , and orchestration. Prerequisite: 224. 226, or con sen t of instructor.

a/y 1 (3) 337 Analyzing Music Application of th e ore tical knowledge toward develop ing analytical skiUs in a var iety of mus ical cultures, ·tyles, and genre. Prere quis i t : 224 or con ent of instruct f. a/y I (3) 333 Researching Music Introduction to the m in research tools available for gathering information abo ut mu sic. A p pl ica t ions in formal research,

opera to musical scores. aly 1 (2)

medy incl uding i n -dep t h study of se lected

Exploration of solo and small ensemble literature from the Baroque pe ri od and earlier, foc using on range of reper toi re, p erform a nce p ra ct ices , and period instrumenlS. Rehe ars al and performance augmented by listening, research, an w rit i ng . P rereq ui site: 333 or consent of instructor. a/y n ( I ) 360 Choir of the West A s l udy of a wide variety of choral literature an d tec h n ique thro ugh rehearsal and p e rfor mance of both sacred and music. Audi tions at the beginning of faU sem es ter. ( 1 )

secular

361 University Chorale A st udy of choral literature and technique through rehearsal and

criticism, program and liner notes, and verb al presentations explored. Prerequisite: 1 20, l 24, or conse n t of instructor. aly I

354 w tory of Music Theater

(3)

pCrfOml3ll Ce of both s acre d and secu la r music. Au d i ti on s at the

begin n ing of fall semester.

(1)

340 Fundamentals o f Music: Education D e t ailed p l a nning of curri cula fOT va r i ous musical skills at differ nt grade levels, in c ludi ng weekly improvisation labo r atory. Prerequisite: 240. 11 ( 2 )

362 University Men's Chorus The stu dy and performance of r pertoire for men', voices. Emphasis on individual vocal and musical development. ( 1 )

3 4 1 Mosie fOJ: Classroom Teachers Me thods a nd pro ced ures in te ach i ng el e men ta ry school mus ic

The study and per fo rma nce of repertoi re for women's

363 University Singers as

well as infusin g the arts in t he curriculum. Offered for students preparing for el e m ent a ry classroom te ach i ng ( non- music ed uca tion majors) . II (2) 343 Method!! and Materials for Secondary General Music Methods and m a terials for teaching gene ral music in the

secondary chooL (2) 345 Conducting I I ntroduction to bas i c patterns, gestures, and conducting tech­ ni ques . I ( 1 ) 346 CoO(wcting II Continuation of 345; observation of a dvanced conducting students in laboratory ensemble. IT ( 1 )

Emphasis on indivi dual

voi es. vocal and m:usica deve! pmem. ( 1 )

365 Chapel Choir

Repertoire experience with a pprop ria te literature for o ng oin g church m usic programs of a l i tu rg ica l nature. Regular perfor­ mances for u n iversi ty chap el worship. Parti c ipation without credit available. ( 1 ) 366 Opera Workshop

Prod uction f ch a m ber opera a n opera scenes. Partici p lion i n all face ts o f p roduc t i on. Prerequisite: co nsen t o f instructor. ( 1 ) 368 Choral Union Rehearsal and performance of major IV rks in the choTall orches t ral repertoire. Open to the community as we ll as PL students; me mbe rsh ip by audition. Special fee in addition to

tui tion .

(1)

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370 Wind En emble Study an d performance of selected wind and percus ion literature using variou ize ensemble . Membership by audit i o n.

(1)

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371 Concert Band Study of selected band literature through reheaTsal and perfor­ mance. Designed for th general university s tuden t . Prerequisite: having played instruction through at least junior year of high scho l or consent o f instructor. ( l )

2-4 credits FalJ and Spring Semesters. Two half-hour lessons per week ( I 2 weeks) in addition to daily p ractice. Summer: 12 hours of instructi n TBA in additi n to daily practice.

Special fi e in addition to tuition. 42 1 Advanced Keyboard Skills Focused study of specialized keyboard skills required in various music major programs. P r iva te instruction: spe . I fee in addition to tuition. May be repeated for additional credit Prerequisite: Successful mmpietion of Keyb oard Proficiency Jl1IY and B.M. o r B.M.E. Jury. (I )

375 University Jazz Ensemble Study of selected big band literature through rehearsal and performance. Membership by audition. ( I ) 376 Jazz Laboratory Ensemble Study of the basic style of playing jazz through rehearsal and performance. Memhership by audition. ( 1 )

427 Advanced OrchestrationlAmmging Continuation of 336 on an in d iv id ual basis. Prerequisite: 336. May be repeated for additional credit Private instruction: special fee in addition to tuition. ( 1-2)

378 Vocal Jazz Euaemble Study of selected vocal jazz l iterature through rehearsal and performance. Mcmbersl\ip by a ud itio n , concurrent registration in 360, 3 6 1 , 362 or 363 req ui red . (1)

430 Piano Literature I S ud y of represen tive piano repertoire from the 1 8th and early 1 9th century. aly I ( l )

380 University Symphony Orchestra Study of selected orchestral literature thr ugh r h arsal and pertormallce. Membershi by audition. ( 1 )

431 Piano IJtuature n Study of represent rive piano compositions of the late 1 9th and 20th century. aly II ( 1 )

381 Chamber Ensemble Reading, rehearsal, and performance of elected instrumental chamber music. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. ( 1 ) Section A - String; Section B - Bras ; Section C - Woodwind ; Section D - Guitar

440 Methods and Materials for K-9 Music I Study of kill acqui itions, music concepts, and analyzing the range of avail ab le resources, in cl ud i ng ethnic music and computer assisted instruction. Offered for music education majors only. Prerequisite: 240, 340. I (2)

383 Two Piano Ensemble Techniques and pract ice in the performance of two- piano and piano duet literature; incl udes sight reading and program planning. ( 1 )

441 Methods lind Materials for K-9 Music D Continuation of 440, including emphasis on Orff-Schulwerk and Kodaly tedmi ues. Offered for music education maj r o nly.

390 Intensive Performance Study: Ensemble Tour Intensive s t udy and rehearsal of your repertoire; off-ca mpus tour of rnaj r performance venues; special fce in addition to tuition. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. J (4)

443 Matuials of Secondary Choral Music The organization and administration of the secondary school choral program. Prerequisite: 340. aly I ( 2 )

�1 Private Instruction: Jazz ( 1 -4) Prerequisite: two emesters of non-jazz study (202-2 1 9 ) or permlssion of the Director of Jazz Studies. 403 Private Instruction: Organ ( 1-4) 404 Private 10 truction: Voice ( 1-4)

446 Conducting IV Continuation of 445; application and development of kills in l abo rato ry ensemble. Prerequisite: 445 or consent of instructor; Section A - lmtrumental, Section B - Choral. IT ( l )

40S Private Instruction: ViolinlViola ( 1-4) 406 Private Instruction: CellolBus ( 1-4 ) 407 Private irutruction: flute ( 1-4) 408 Private Instruction: Oboe/Englisb Horn ( 1 -4)

447 Methods of School Band Music The organization and administration of the secondary school band program. Prerequisite: 340. aly I (2)

409 Private Instruction: Bassoon ( 1 -4) 410 Private Instruction: Clarinet ( 1-4) 41 1 Private Instruction: Saxophone ( 1-4 )

448 Materials for School Band Music Survey of wind-percussion literature appropriate for the variou age and experience levels of students in grades 4 -1 2, including sources and research techniques. Prerequisite: 340. aly U ( 2 )

412 Private Instruction: 1ru.mpet ( 1-4) 413 Private Instruction: French Horn ( 1-4) 414 Private Instruction: 1rombone ( 1-4) 415 Private Instruction: Baritonefl'ob. ( 1-4)

45 1 Piano Pedagogy l Teaching techniques for prospec tive teachers of piano, including te hniques for individual and group instruction. Methods and materials from beginning to i n term ed i a te level. aly r ( I )

416 Private Instruction: Percussion ( 1-4) 417 Private Instruction: Guitar ( 1-4) 418 Private Instruction: HIU'p (J -4) 419 Private Instruction: Harpsichord ( 1 -4) J credit Fall and Spring Semesters: One half-hour privale lesson per week ( 1 2 weeks) in addition to daily pract ice. January: Two 45-minute

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445 Conductiog m Refinement f p a tte rns , gestures, and conducting techniques; appli ca t ion to appropriate vocal a n d in trumental scores. Prerequisite: 346 or consent f instructor; Section A-Instru­ mental; Section B--Choral. I ( I )

402 Private Instruction: Piano ( 1-4)

P

Prerequisite:

444 Methods for Secondary Choral Music ll Survey of choral literature appropr' te for the various age and experience levels of students in grades 4 - 1 2, including sources and research te ch n iq ues . Prerequisite: 340. aly 11 ( 2 )

391 Intensive PerfoTJDlln1:e Study: Conservatory Exp�rience In tensive study and practice of solo repertoire; special fee in addition to tuilion. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. J (4)

100

I 'sons per week in addition to daily practice. Summer : 6 hours of instruction T BA in addition to daily practice.

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452 Piano Pedagogy D Teadli ng techniques for prospective teacher of piano, in luding techniques for individual and group instruction. Meth ds and materials from i ntennediate to advanced levels. aly n ( 1 )


453 Vocal Pedagogy Physiologi cal , psychological, and pedagogical aspects of singing. aly 1 (2)

451 Methods and Ma.teriAls for Elementary Strings

The organization and administration of the e l e m e n ta r y school strin g program. Prerequisite: 340. aly I (2)

Descriptions of sp ecific course offerings and degree require­ ments offered with i n the Natural Sciences are listed under: Biology Chemistry Computer Science and Eogineering

Geosciences Medical Technology Mathematics Physics

458 Methods and Materials for Secondary Strings The organization and administration of the secondary school

Course Offerings

469 Student Teaching Seminar

The following courses are offered under Natural Sciences. Other courses suitable for satisfying general u nive r ity requirements or CORE I requirements may be fou nd in the listing for each of the

orche tra program. Prerequisite: 340. aly I

(2)

Student teadling experiences shared and analyzed; exploration of related issues regarding entering the publk school m usic teaching profession. Concurrent enrollment with ROUC 468 requir d. (2)

490 Senior Project A culm i nati ng project of substantial proportions, undertaken in the senior year. For t he Badlelor ofArts degree, the p roject integrates musical studies with a broader liberal arts con text ; for the Bachelor of Musical Arts degree, the project integrates musical studies with the cogna te field and in Iud a presentation in a publicd forum; for Bachelor ofMusi Education and Bachelor of

Music degrees, the project consists of juried recital. Fulfill s the senior seminar/project requirement Private instruction; special fee in addition to tuition. Prerequisite : consent of instructor.

depart ments

in the division .

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204 History of Science

A survey of the history of science fron ancient times to the

present. (4)

210 Natural History of Hawaii The Hawaiian Isla nds are an active museum of geology and trop ical island plant and animal life. Th e islands, the most iso­ laled in the world, have native plants and animals-95% f which occur nowhere else. Students are expected to partici p ate a c tively in daily lectures and fieldwork involving the geologic formati n of Hawaii and its subsequent p op ulati n by pla nts and animals, stres s ing the impact of human intervention. J (4)

( 1-4) 491 Independent Study Prerequisite: consent of instru cto r. May be repeated for addi­ t iona l credit ( 1-4)

Division of Natural Sciences The Division of Natural Sciences fulfill s a two-fold pur­

pose. It provides preparation for future science profession­ als and creates a critical scientific awareness vital to any

well-educated citizen. The division offers strong programs

-

in the sciences, mathematics, and engineering, providing both pre-professional preparation and undergraduate majors. The study of natural sciences encourages all students to expand their horizons in the liberal arts, and fosters a concern for the larger questions of human values. Facts provide a foundation for science, but the study of science includes more than learning facts. The science student learns to use available resources so that established facts and new observations related to any chosen problem can be obtained and interpreted. The science student learns to solve problems creatively. FACUlIY: Yiu, Dean; faculty members of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science and Co m puter Engineer­ ing. Geosciences, Mathematics, and Physics .

-

As a division within the College of Arts and Sciences, the Div i­ sion of Natural Sciences offers major programs in each dep.ar t· ment leading to B.A. and B.S. degree s, minor programs, and core courses whidl fulfill general university require m ents. The de­ p a rt ments provide supporting cou rs es for interdisciplinary programs within th e sciences and for other sdlools of the univer­ sity. The .B.S. degree in Medical Tedmol gy is al so offered. Courses for B.A. in Education degree with majors and minors in the n tural sci n es are available; see the Education ection of this catalog fOT sp e . fie degree requirements. See also the sec­ tions on Environmental Studies and on tbe Heal t h Sciences (under Pre-Professional Program.s) £ r related progra m -.

School of Nursing The School of Nursing is a professional school that com­ bines nursing science with a strong foundation in the liberal arts and the humanities t prepare undergraduate students for generalist nursing practice; builds upon un­ dergraduate nursing educational experiences to prepare nurses for advanced practice in specific specialties; and responds to ongoing education and tech.nological learning needs of practicing nurses to remain current, competent practitioners or to revise the focus of their practice. The school exemplifies the university's mission of educating for lives of service in an environment that encoUIages ques­ tioning, debate, diversity. lifelong learning, and spirituality as vital elements in the human quest for wholeness. It continuum of educational programs employs dynamic learning opportunities that challenge students to develop skills, attitudes, values, and roles which facilitate individu­ als, families, and communities to meet their health and wellness needs. Degree progran1s within the School of Nursing includ the Bachelor of Science in Nursing for basic nursing stu­ dents and licensed practical nurses, the RN to MSN pro­ gram for registered nurses, and the Master of Science in Nursing with Care and Outcomes M an age r and Family

Nurse Practitioner areas of concentration. A program leading to Educational Staff Associate certification is available for school nurses through the Center for Continuing Nursing Education. Course work is offered in collaboration with the Office of the Washington State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Workshops and short courses for nurses and others i nvolved in health care are also offered through the Center.

Also integral to the School of Nursing is a Wellness Center that includes a nurse managed practitioner-staffed clinic and a First Steps maternity support program. The

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Center provides nursing services to the community as

sem ster, and who hav e app l ied by the M arch 1 dea dlin , are

well as serving

notified by A p r i l ! . Students are admitted to the term of their cho i ce insofar as it is p ossib le. If there are more app l ica nt s for the two semesters of t h e academic year than can be ac ornrno­

as

a practice site for wldergraduate and

graduate students. FACUI:I'Y! T. Mill c, Deal1; M alo n ey, Ass ociat Deal1; Van c in i , Director, Graduate Ntlrsing Educatiol1; Aikin, Alle n , Bradshaw, M. Carr, D riessna ck , Gas pa r, George, Goodwin, Jett, Jo h nso n , Kap l a 'o , KIis h, Levinsohn , M alon ey, J. M i ller, 1. O l son, Pass, Pettinato, Renaud, Robins o n , Schaffler, Schultz, Wood, Yie Zai ch ki n ; Assisted by Rinehart and Okita.

dated, qualified candidates are placed on a wai t i ng list for a d m is s ion to the spring class if spaces become available. If

ACCREDITATIONS AND AFFII.IATIONS: The S ch oo l o f Nursi n g at Pacific Luthe ran U niversi ty is a member of the Amer i ca n Ass o ia tion o f Colleges of N ursi ng . The BSN p rogram

is a p p roved by the Washington State Nurs ing Commission and accredited by the National League for ur sing cc re diting om­ mis ion, 61 Br a dwIIY, N w York, NY 10014 ( 1 -800-669-9656, ext. 227; telefax 2 1 2-8 1 2-0390 ) . T he MSN p rog ram also is accredited by the NLNAC. The , cho I is pa r t of Psi Cba p ter - a t ­ Large of S i gma Theta Tau International, the bonor s oci et y of nursing.

Undergraduate Programs Tbe basic uud rgraduate program is d esigne d for s t u deIlts with no previous p repara t i o n in n u r ing. G radua tes who successfully c mpl et e the program are eligib l e to write the NCLEX examina­ tion for licensure as registere d nurses. They are p rep a red for beginning professional nursing p osi ti ons in h os p i ta l s and o t her health agencies. A s p e ci a l sequen e of study is available that

amin tio n options for licens·d p r acti cal nurses. Both uudergraduate programs provide fo u ndation for grad uat e study in nursin g. Under the direct su p ervisio n of its faculty mem bers, the S ch ool uses h os pi ta ls, h ealth agencies, and ' h ols in the com­ m un it y, as we l l as t he PLU WeUness Center, to provid ptimal p rovi des credit by

vacan cies occur for the fall semester, those students who have been admitted for spring but who req ues ted fal l p lac eme nt are given first p ri ori ty. Following the initial a d m i s sio ns cycle ( M arch 1 dea dl in e ) , ind ividuals whose appl icati on � have b n received by the begin ­ ning of each month will be no t ifi ed of a c cep t a n c e status by the first of the following month. A pp licat i o n s after ep temb er 1 are reviewed wh 1 r c ived a nd , if the a ppl ic an t is qual ified , he or she is added to the s p r ing wa iting list. Persons on the wa i t in g list for th e year who are nol admitted because o f a lack of space but who continue to desi re admission to the nursing m ajor, mllst request , in writ i ng , that their applications be considered for the fo l lowing fall. All potential or pre-nursing students are urged to seek e a rly academic advisement from the admission s co o rdi na to r in the Schoo l of Nurs in g in ord er to enroll for a pprop r iate prerequisites and avoi d unnecessary loss of time. The School of Nursing re5 eTves the right of curriculum mo dificatiOl! (md revision

include:

1. Admission to Pa . fie Lutheran niVeIsity. Ap pl i ca nts must have been adm i tted to Pacific Lu th e ra n Uuiversity be� re consideration of their a ppli c atio n to the School of N u rsi ng. Admission to t he university does not g u ara nt e adm i s sio n to

2.

PLU, an a cc red ited community col lege or another accr ed ited un iver s i t y ( co m p a r abl e course lis t i ngs ar availab le on request) includ i ng Psyc h o l o gy 1 0 1 ( Intro d uction to Psychol ­ ogy) , B i o lo gy 205, 206 ( Hum n Anatomy and P hysio logy I and

4 year ; mathemat ics, 2 yea rs (pref Tably a l gebra an d geom e t ry) ; social sciences, 2 ye ars ; one foreign l a nguage, 2 years, labo ratory

ll ), and Chem istry 1 05 (Chemistry of Life) . LPNs should a l so h ave comp let ed Psychology 352 ( Development: Infancy

science , 2 years ( i ncl uding chemistry) ; electives, 3 years.

Matur i ty) and Biology 201

ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY: Pacific Luth ran U nive r­ sity welcomes ap plicat io ns from an stud en t s who have demon­ strated c a p a c ities for success t the baccalaureat level. St udents wbo present appropriate academic rec ords and personal qu a li ti es

are admitted either fall or spring semester. Application procedure and o th er details are found eI ewhere in this ca t al o g. ( tudents must be accepted by the un iversity before consideration for acceptance by th e School of Nursing.) ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF NURSIN&. Stude nts seek­ ing adm issio n to the bas ic program, the LPN to BSN sequ e nce, or th RN to MSN sequence must. make formal a p pl icatio n to b o th the univer ity a nd the School of Nursing. Applications for a dmissi o n to the n urs ing major are available from the cho I of Nurs in g. AU ap p l i ca tio n ma t er ial , i ncl udi n g official traO$ccipts,

5.

7. 8.

Committee and ranked. accordmg

begin in fall on ly.

admission to either fall or

their applications b y March 1 . T h e number of available ' pace s

each semester in th S ch ool of Nursing is li m ited; therefore, the sel ect io n of students for admission is competitive . Students

d es i ring to begin the nursing sequence in ei the r fall

or

spring

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hi g he r. Com letion of tbe u niversity math entrance requirement (iJltermediat algeb ra at the col J e ge level with a grade of C or hig her or complet ion of two years of coll ege prepa rato r y [high scho ol ] algeb ra with average g rades of C or h igh e r 2.0 on a 4.0 scale). Physi cal health and emotional stability su fficient to meet the de m a n d: of nursing and p rovi de safe patient care. F l uency in speaki n g , rea d i ng, and writing E nglish. Wa hin gto n State Patrol Criminal History le ar an ce rdative to Child/Adult Abuse Information Act as requ i r ed of health care workers. Submission of all documents to the School of N urs i ng by the designated deadlines.

*

When tiJe nu mber of q ua lifi ed applica nts exceeds the enrollment II sed to prio ritize the admission decisions: CIImlllative grade point average of nil college- level work undertaken, prerequisite sciellce GPA , tltl mbe r ofprerequ i­ site co urse req l l irements completed, nnd a dmissioll date to the university. Although it does 1lOt guararrtee ndm ission, a cumula­ tive grade 1'oilll average 0/2.5 0 '/1 (I 4.0 scale il1 all college work attempted mak one eligible to apply for admission to the School limits, the following factors are

spring semester of the fo l l ow ing academic year must submit

Y

to

icrobiology) to

4. A curuulativ grad point ave rage of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale or

6.

to stated admission criteri . Basic stud en ts are admitted to the S hoo l of N urs i ng to begin n ursing courses in e i t h r the faU or sp ring semester. tudents enrolled in the LPN seque.nc ge n era l ly

( Introduct ion to

fulfill requiremeIlts for the n u rsing sequence within the des crib d lime fr a me. 3. A minimum grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 seal in each n u rs i ng p rereq­ ui s i te co urse.

are reviewed by th e School of Nu rsi n g Undergraduate Admis­

102

the School of Nursing. Completion, or p end i n g sa tisfa cto ry com p l et io n of 30 semeste r credit hours of sp ecifi e d prerequisite co u rse work at

ADMISSION AND CONTINUATION POLICIES: High Sch o o l Prepa rq tion: It is s t rongly re ommended that appli­ c ant complete a program i n rugh sch 01 that i ncl u des : English,

Undergraduale students des i r i ng

IOllg as it does

ADMISSION CRITERIA* Minimum criteria for a d m ission to the School of N ur s ing

cli.nical leaming experiences for its students.

sions and Academic P rog ress

a'

no t significa ntly hinder students' progre5s toward graduation.


ofNursing. Preference i5 given 10 applicants who en tered PLU

NON-MAJORS ENROLLED lN NURSING COURSES: Students

11S fresh men.

who have not been admitted to the nur ing major but who wish to enroll in nursing courses must obtain p er m is s io n of t he School of NUIsing Undergraduate Admission and Academic

Applicants wllo },ave chronic lIealth conditiolls or disabilities which require alterations to the program of study as approved by the Washington State Nursillg Co mmissio n, Or which prevellt the practice or nll rsing with reasonable skill and safety, slrould be aware of IIle possibility that they may IIOt be eligible to sit for the NCLEX licensing examination or obtain a license to practice

lIursing. Questions should be addressed directly to the Washing­ ton State Nursing Commissioll Assistallt Nurse Practice Manager

at

(360) 236-4725.

CONTINUATION POUCIES: I . Com ple tion of approve CPR class - adult and pedialric ­ b efore beginning nursing cl asses , wi th yearly updates. 2. Com plet ion of approved first aid course before beginni ng nursing classes (waived for RNs. LPNs, EMTs, paramedics) . 3. Nu rs ing courses all h ave prerequisites an d must be taken in sequence and/or co ncurre n tly as i den l ified in the curricu­ Iunl plan.

4. A mi nimu m grade of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale ( C ) must be achieved in ali required nursing courses. A student receiving a grade o f less than 2.0 in any course whic.h is a p re requisite t o a nother nur ing course may not conti n ue in the n ur ing sequence until the pre requ i site course is repeated with a grade of 2.0 on a 4.Q scale or abo�. (Other polic ies rega rding progression/continu­ a t ion can be found in the Undergraduate Nursing Student Handbook.) 5. Incomplete grades in n u r ing co urses m t be converted to a passing grade ( 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or above) before the first day of das of the subsequent semester. 6. St uden ts taking medical or otber withdrawals from nursing co u rses may return to the School of Nursing in accordance with p o licies listed in the Undergraduate Nursing Student Handbook on a space available basis. 7. The School of NU Tsing reServes the righ t to request withdrawal of nursing studen ts who fail to demonstrate academic or clinical competence or who fail to maintain professional con­ duct. Unsafe andlor u nethical p ract ice constitutes grounds for inlmediate dismissal from the cl i n i cal component. IIEAIl'II: Nursing students are responsibl e for maintain ing optimal health and are tea ch e rs of health. Physical exami nati o n s , X- rays, a nd i m m un i zations are required befo re admission to the program, and p erio d ically thereafter, an d are the resp nsibitity of s tudents . All students must carry personal health/accident in sura nce.

ENGUSB PROFICIENCY: A certain level of English proficiency is necessary for academic success in nursing as well as for patient safety. Students who are identified by the university as needi ng the ESL sequence of courses will be required to take the ESL COUTses before entrance to the School of NUIsing or to take the TOEFL and score at least 550. All students for whom English is their second l anguage must also take and pass the SPEAK test before admission to the nursing major. The test is given Lhrough the American Cultural Exchange Language Institute at the university. Co t of the test is the responsibility of the student. The test cons ists of eve n sections measuri ng pronunciation. grammar, and fluency. A minimum score of 2.2 (out of a pos�ible 3) in each of the four area of pronunciation, grammar, .fl uency, and comprehensibil­

ity, a nd a minimum 2.0 in all the pronunciaLion sections is

considered passing. S tude nts scoring below the e levels on pronunciation will be reqnired to ob tai n additional cOlUsework or a ssi s ta n ce before retaking the SPEAK. ESL students should also be aware that t hey may not be able to complete the program of s tudy within the described Lime frame. Individual advising is available and is directed toward ass ist ing students to be successful.

Progress Committee or the de

n.

ADDITIONAL COSTS: In add it i on t o regu l a r university costs, students must p rovid e their ow n transportation between the university ca m p us and t h e clinical a reas beginning with the fust nursing course. P ublic transportation is limited, so p rovi s ion fo r pr ivate transpo rta ti on is es entia!' Students are required to carry professional liability insurance in s pecified amounts during all periods of clinical experience. For basic s tude nts , this insurance is available under a gro up pl a n a t a nominal cost to the student. P bysical exam ination fees, s tu dent un i form s a nd eq u ipm e nt (WTistwatch, sci sso rs, stethosc p c , BP cuff, a n d reflex hammer) are also th e responsibility of the student. A Learning Resource� fee of $60 per semester is c har g ed to cover practice and computer laboratory materials, equipment and supplie . The fee is identified with spec ifi c courses and is payable to th Business Office along with university t u it io n .

z C :10 \II

Programs of Study PREREQUISITE COURSES TO NURSING MAJOR: Prerequisite co urses to be completed before enro l l ment in the n ursing sequence include: COURSE

CREDIT

Biology 205, 206 ( An atomy and Physiology I and II) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 4 Biology 2 0 1 ( Int roduction to Microbiology) · . . . . . . . . . ....... . . ... . .... . . . . 4 Chemistry 105 (Chemistry of Life) ... .. . . .. . ... ... 4 P ycbology 1 0 I (Introduction to Psychology) . . . . . .. .. . . 4 Psychology 352 ( Development: Tnfaney to Maturity) ' . . . . . . . . . . ... ... 4 Statistics 23 1 ( Introductory Statistics) � .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 4 intermediate Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 (if two years college prep math not com pl e ted in high school with average grades of C or higher) ...........

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....

Basic studen ts - corequisite - see curriculum plan.

Prerequisite courses may be take n at PL U or at most ac�redited community colleges. BSN BAS]C PROGRAM: The curriculum plan and i t s imple­ men tatio n are de igned to foster b'TOwth and to encou rage initiative and self-direction on the part of students. In addi t ion to our ing requirements. students are expected to m et univer­ sity requirements.

NUIsing courses m u st be taken concu rrently and in seq u en ce indicated in the sample curriculum. and, if enrol led full time, normally extend over six se me s te rs . For spring semester enroll­ ment, the curriculurn generally follows the fall semester format.

as

fint Year - Pre NursiDg First Semester Psychology lOl - Introduction to Psychology" ............................ 4 Biology 205 - Hum.an Anatomy and Physiology P ... .. ... . .. .... . . . . . . 4 Writing 1 0 1 - Inqu iry Sem i n ar: Writing . ... . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ... .. . ... . ..... . 4 Physical Education 1 00 - Personalized Fitness Program . . . . . . . .. .. .. 1 Jan uary Term GURfCore ( Fres hman Experienc January Progra m) ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

econd Semester

Biology 206 - Human An tomy and Physiology Il� . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Chemist ry 105 - Chemistry of Life" .. . ...... ...... . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. ... . .. . .... . . 4

GURlCore Critical Conver ation

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. ............ .... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . ...... . . ..... . . . . . . . . .. . ... . . .. . .

4

. .. . . .. ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ._ . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 2 Pbysical Education .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . ...... . . . ... . . ._ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ... . ... . . . . .. . .. . ... 1 . . . . ..

Second Year Pi rs t Semester Biology 20 I - Introduction to Microbiology"" . . . ... . .. . . . ..... . .. . . . . . . .. 4 Psychology 352 - Development: Infancy to Maturity'" . . . . ...... . .. . 4

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Statistics 23 1 - ln t tod ll ct ry Statistj.,;s" . . . . . . . . . Physical Education . ............ .... . . . . . ........................ ............................ Nu rsi n g 2 1 5 - Theoretical F lmdati n ' of N u rsing .................... Nur sin g 220 - Nursing Competencies I . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ..

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ja nrH�ry Term GUR/Core . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . .. . .. .... . . . . . . 4 .

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Second emester N ursi n g 225 - Critical Thinking in Nursing ................................. 2

Nur s i ng 263 Health Assessment ................................................. Nur ing 264 Health Promotion . .. .. .. .. Nursin g 283 - Pathological Human Pro cess es ........ ........ ............. Physical Education ......................................................... ................. -

-

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Third Year First Semester

Nursing 320 - Nursing Competencies n . . . . . .. . . Nu r si ng 344 Nursing Situations with Families . . . . . . . . . ... . Nursing 363 - Pharmacology for Nursing . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . GUR/Core . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .

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ja nuary Term

Elec tive

SIXo1ld Semester Nurs ing 3 6 1 - Nursing S it ua t i o ns I Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 N u rsing 364 - Nursing itu tio ns I . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . . ... . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 5 N ur si n g 365 - Culturally Congruent Health Care . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . 4 Nur si n g 392 - Nu r sin g Research ......... .... .............. ... . ... ................. 2 .

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Fourth Year First Semester Nursi n g 425 - Introduction to Leadership and Management .._. 3 Nursing 454 - Nursi n g Situations with Communities .... . . . . . . . . . .. . 6 Nurs in g 461

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Nur si n g 464 -

Nursing Situation� n Se m i na r .................. .. ...... .... 1 Nursing Sitllatio ns 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... .. . . . . 5 . .

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Nurs in g 4 7 1 -

Nur in g ynthesis Seminar . . . . . 1 Nu rs i ng 475 Social and Political Contexts for Nu rsing .. .......... 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. 6 Nur s ing 476 - ursing Synthes is GURICor . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Prerequisite, comp leted witll II grade of2.0 (C) or higher befo re entering nursing program. Co- requisite, completed with a grade of2.0 (C) or higher before beginning 2nd semester ofnllrsing program. Co· req ll isite, completed with CI grade 012. 0 (C) or higher befo r beginning 4th semester of mming program.

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Aclvaoced Placement: No n-nursing: Advanced p la cemen t may be av.Hable through

national standardized o r departmental examinations. Inq uiries should be d ir ec ted to th Office of Adm iss io ns r the depar t · m en t or sc ho o l offer in g the particular subj ect Nursing: Accep ted t uden ts may receive cred i t by examination for select d co urs es Each student is inclividually counseled regarding the appropriat eness of seeking such c r edit Eligibility for the clinical p ro fi c ie ncy examination is determin ed by the faculty and is based on documentation of s ign i fi c an t work andl or stud ent exp erien e i n the sp ecifi c area. Exams mus t be su c cessfully passed to r eceive the credit. .

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First Year Credit by Exam illa tion

Nursing 220 - Nursin g Competencies I . ... . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 2 (Com plete dllrillg spring or Slimmer before begi/mitlg classes)

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2 1 5 - Theoretical Foundations of Nursing . . . . . .. - Critical Thinking in N ursing . ............. .... ..... ..... . . Nu rsi ng 263 Health Assessment . . . . . . Nursing 264 - Heallh Promotion . . . . . . . ... . . .. . .. . . Nursing 283 Pathological Human Processes . .. . . . . . . Nursing

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Nu rsing 320 - Nursing Compete nci es n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nursing 344 - Nursing Situ. tions with Families . . . . . Nursing 363 - Phar ma cology for Nur sin g ................................ Statistic 2 3 1 - Introductory Statisti .. . . . . . .. .

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Second Year Fall Semester

Nursing 36 1 - Junior I I S minar ..................................... .......... 1 Nursing 364 - Nursing Situations 1 . .. . .. " ........................ ........ .. 5

AdmissiooJ1.ranafer: Admissi o n to PlU is required before consideration is given for admission to the School of Nursing. Students d siring admission for the fall semester of the following academic year must submit an application by March I . For LPN stud ents applying to the AMEDD (Army) or MECP (Navy) I

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C

Transfer Credit: A minimum gr a de of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale ( C) in college courses is required for transfer of nursing credit. S tu de n t s who are admitted vt'ith junior standing (60 se m est er credit h urs) will be required to take one religion cou rse A maximum of 64 seme ste r (96 q ua rter) credit hours of community co l le ge work can be transferred. To qualify as degr e candidates, s t u · dents must take the final 32 semester hours in residen ce at PLU.

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BSN SEQUENCE FOR LICENSED PRACTICAL NUllSES : This sequence of stu dy is designed to p rovide career mobility for the exp erie nc ed licensed p rac ti cal nurse desiring lhe Bachelor f S c ie nc e in Nursing degree The program allows students the o ppor tuni ty to validate prior knowledge and clinical compe· lence, enabling progress i o n through the B SN curriculwn within a 24·m n th per i d fo l lo wing compl eti on of prerequisite courses, when enrolled full-time. Pwsp ective students are encouraged to seek early advisement to reduce time pent i n co mpl ting prerequisites and facilitate progress. LPN st ud en ts are strongly enco uraged to make maximum progre s toward completing u nive r sity requirementS before beginning the nursing sequence.

A

Sep tem ber I , 1999, fo r admission in t h e fall of 2000) . Lic ensed p ractical nurses who bega n their higher ed uc a t io n at o th er accredited colleges or uruversitiCl may apply fo r admission with advan c d s ta nd i n g. A cumulative grad e point aver ag e of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale is required before consideration for admission. The university math entrance requirement (successful comp l e · tion of two years of col leg e prep math or an approved math co u rse at the baccalaurea te l ev el) mu · t be met before consider­ ation (. r admission. year (e.g.,

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baccalaureate de gree. The seq uen ce of requ i re d nursing courses c om p ri se s 63 semester credit hours.

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Spring Setn ter

A minimum of 1 28 semester credit hours is required for the

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early ad m ission the appLicabon

Fall Semester

Possible Elective Seco1ld Semester

programs, and who require

deadline is September 1 of the year p reced in g lhe desired entry

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Nur ing 365 - Culturally Congruent Nursing . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . 4 Nursing 3 9 2 - Nur ' ing Re earc h ........................... . ................... 2 Spring Semester Nursing 425 - I ntroduction to Leadership and Management 3 Nursi ng 454 - Nursi ng . ituations with Communities .. . .. . . . . . .. 6 Nursing 461 - Senior I Seminar . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . ... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . 1

Nursing 464 - Nursing Situations n . . .. . .. . .. . . . . .-......... .............. 5 .

Slimmer Session Nursing 47 1 - Senior II S emi n ar ........... ..... ... . . ....... ................... 1 Nur ' i n g 475 - Social and Poli t ica l Contexts fur N urs i n g .... .... 2 Nurs ing 476 - Nu rs ing Synthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . 6

General university and other s pe cific requirements needed for completion of the baccalaureate degree are not listed here. Ap pl i ca nts to the LPN to BSN equence are · tTongly enco urag ed to seek adv ising from the LPN to BSN coordinator for assistance wit h their complete programs of s t udy .


RN TO MSN SEQUENCE FOR LICENSED REGISTERED NURSES: Des i gne d for the RN with at leas t one ye ar of d i rect care exp er i en ce, this program is stra tured t allow students to earn both a bach el or's degree (BSN ) and ma ste r' s degree in nurs i ng (MSN) . One a pplica tio n cove rs th e en t ire p rogra m . E ligible students are us ually admitted to the un iversity with junior stan di ng; and up to 30 a d dit i nal up p e r divis ion credits are awarded for documentation of prev iou s RN em ploy m en t experience. A full-time stu de nt c an co m pl ete the e n ti re program in l ess than three calendar years. Classes are scheduled on e day a week d ur in g the first yea r to a cco mmo da te the worki ng nurse. In the fi rst year of th e RN to MSN program students take the cou rses requi red fo r completion of the BSN degree while si mu ltaneo Iy com pl et i ng 12 semester c red i t hours of stud y toward their MSN. Upon co m p l eti on of the BSN degree students who have maintained a 3.0 grade point ave rage an d successful ly com p l eted the G ra du ate Record Examinalion (GRE) wiU p rogress to the M SN program. Prospec tive st uden t s are e nco u raged to seek e ady advi sement to ass i st in timely co m p l eti on of any outstanding ge ne ral u ni versity requirements or nurs ing p rerequ isites . While there is open enrollment, th ere aTe li m its on thO" n u m be r of ap pli can ts a ccep ted each year. The deadline for pr io ri ty admissi n fo r the fo llow in g fall is March 1 . Early ad mission is also advised for priority s tat us related to com p et itive financial aid re u rces.

Graduate Programs MASTER. OF SCIENCE IN NURSING: Con sul t the grad uate section of thi ' cat alog for de tails of the program l ea d i n g to the de gre e of Master of S cie nc e in Nurs i ng and/or co n tact the Scho o l of N u rs i ng Graduate Program (535-7672).

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SCHOOL NURSE CERTIFICATION: Co n tac t the School of Nursing Cen ter for C o nt i n u i n g Nursing E d u ca t i o n ( 535-7683). WORKSHOPS AND SHORT COOR.SES: Co ntact th School of Nu rsing Center for Continuing Nu rs i ng Education (535-7683) .

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The informntiQ7I cOlltnincd herein rcflurs un .,((urate picture of

I/II! programs of study lending to

0 Bachelor

of Science ill Nursing

degrel!/rom Pacific Lutheran Ull iv�rsily at Ihe rime ofpublication. HOlVever, tile uni versity reSer\le5 the rig/It to mllke necessary dra ngts ;1I procedures, po/jcW, rnlemJar. currie/dum, and costs.

Course Offerings 203 Ethics and Health Care

De signed to elCp a nd students' abilities to identify eth ical dilem­ mas and participate in the i de ntificatio n of res ol ut i on . Empha­ sis on cases related to the al l o cat ion of scarce resources. Open to non-majors. ( 1 -2 )

Admission Policy: Ad mis s i o n to PLU precedes a dm i ss i on to the S ho o l of NUI s i ng . Criteria for ad m issi on to the RN to MSN progr a m i n cl u de: 1) Cum ula ti ve GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale � r p revi us .oLlege

2 1 5 Theoretical fOUDdations of Nursing

The tudy of n ur s i n g as a p ro fessi o n and discipline. Incl uded a re h istorical perspectives. selected nUIsing co n cep tu al frameworks, philosophical fo u nda tio n s of cari ng, and pattems of knowing.

course work

( 2)

2 ) N t i ce ns ure in

state of Washington 3) M inimum of one year of d i rect care RN exp rience in the last two years 4 Completi n of u niversity entrance requi rements. general universi ty req u i re m e n ts, and n ur si ng prerequ is i te s before fall admission to the program

'li'ansfu Credit: Regis te red nurses may apply for tran fer G'edit for COUIse wo rk completed at other accre dited co ll ege s and/or

universi ties. A grade of C or higher in co Uege course work is reqnired fo r transfer credit .. A total f 128 semester credi t hou Ts a re requ ired for the BSN. A maximum of 64 semester (96 quar­ ter) credit hours of community college work can be transferred. To qualify as BSN degree candidates, :tudents must take the final 32 semester h ou r f baccalaureate (OUIse work at PLU. First Year of Study in RN to MSN Program: (All courses ill major m rlSt be co mpleted with grades ol "e" or higher; millimum of 3.0 cumulative grade poillt al/erage on a 4.0 scale reqrlired fo r con tirwat io lJ to post-baccalaureate study. ) Semester I (Fall) N urs i ng 264 - Health Promotion " . .. .. .. .. .. .. ..... ........ .... .... .... . . . ... 4 Nursing 399 - N urs ing Portfol io Workshop"" .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . .. 4 Nu r sing 5 1 0 - Nursing Foundations" . ... . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . . .. .. . . . .. . 4 January - Term Nursing 225 - Critical Th i n ki ng . . . . . ....... ... . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . 2 Nursi ng 365 - eul u r al l y Co n gr u e nt Heal thcare . . . .. . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . 4 Semester II

(Spring)

Nursing 344 - Nursing Situations with F a mi l ie s . .. .. .... .. ..... ... .. 6 N u d ng 5 1 I - Nursing Res e a rch W . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. .. .. . . .. . . ... . . .. . 4 Rel ig i o u Stu.dies, 300-level . . . .. . . .. . . . .. . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . . 4 Religion -

Semester IT1 (Sum mer) Nursing 390 - lnfor ma ti o n Ma n ageme n t ......... .. .. .. ...... .. ....... . . . Nu rsing 454 - Nurs i ng Situalions w i t h Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . Nursing 475 - Social an d Political Contexts . . ... .. . ... . . . ... .. .. . .. . . .. . N u rs ing 5 1 2 - Nu rs es as Le ade rs and Managers" ....................

2

6 2 4

.. Graduate Credit * .. 1\ yea r IOllg portfolio writing course.. In order to co mplere the bacc/.IlllUre­ ate degree, RN-MSN studen ts may earn lip ro a maxImum of 30 upper divisiorl s�mester credit h ours III th� bnccaiallreate lIursing level far documentatioll ofprior p rofession al pracrice.

220 Nursing Competencies I

Introduction to and pra ct ice of co m pe ten cie s of caring, thera­ pe uti c o m mu n ic a l ion , an d ps yc h om ot o r skills associated with health management. Prerequisite: Pri o r or concurrent enrol.l­ ment in 2 1 5. (2)

225 Critical Thinking in Nursing Application of th.i nk ing and rea oning skills to nursing situ tions. The nursing process is introduced as a fra m ew ork for th in ki n g and caring. Prerequisite: Pr i o r or concurrent enroll­ ment in 2 1 5. ( 2 ) 263 Health Assess ment Assessment of b iol ogi cal , psychological, social, cu l tu r al , and sp i r itua l dimen ions of h u man persons across the life span. Prerequisites: 2 1 5, 220 and p r i or or co nc ur re nt enrollment in

225. ( 2 )

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264 Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span Examines the role of the nurse in promoting health Lhrough the life span and the impact of biological. psychological, social, spiritual, and cultural influences on health. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in 263. (4)

454 Nur ing Situation with CommunitIes Assessment. plan ni n g, and interventions that promote a com mun ity' s health u .ing nur ing and public health theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrolJment in 425.

283 H IIIIWl Pathological Processes Focuses on understanding the underlying pathological p rocesses and clinical ma nifestations of selected pathologic.al conditions that affect physical and psychosocial well-being. Open to non­ majors with consent of instructor. Prer eq ui si te for majors: 2 1 5.

461 Nursing SituatioDs lI Seminar Exploration and i ntegration of complex concepts to capitalize on experiences g ined in clinic.al settings. Focuses on recogn ition of

( )

commonalities and differences across multiple nursing situa­ tions. Prerequisite: Prior or conculTent enrollment in 464. ( I )

(4)

464 Nursing Situations U

320 Nursing Competencies U

Theory and clinical application of co mplex imegrated concepts in a variety of practice settings th roughout the life span. Prereq­ uisite: 364. (5)

Advanced and complex psychomotor and interactional skill for caring, asepsis. and health restorat ion. Prerequisites: 263, 264,

283 . (2) 344 Nursing Situations wi th Fa.mille Nursing care of fam ilies across the life span . Application of developmental. family, and nursing theories to care of famil ies in transitions and experiencing acute and chronic illnesses. Prereq­ uisites: 263, 264, 283. (6) 361 Nursing Situations I Seminar Exploration and integration of concepts identified in 364, focus ­ ing on recogn i tion of com monal ities and differences across multiple nur' ing situations. Prerequisi te: Prior or concurrent enrollment i n 364. ( 1 )

471 Nursing Synthesis Seminar Critical evaluation of roles as professional nurses us ing emp iri­ cal, aesthetic, personal, and etbical knowledge of social and poli tical realities . Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enroll ment in 475 and 476. ( 1 ) 475 Social and Political Contens for Health Care Analysis of the social, political . legal, and economic factors that influence health c are, including trends in health policy and ethical issues relevant to h a.lth care delivery. Prerequi.si tes � r majors: 425, 454. 46 1 . 464. Open to non -majors with consent of instructor. ( 2 )

363 Pharmacology for Nursing Pharmacoki net ics, pharmacodynami s, mechanisms of action, ide effects, and client teaching related to major drug classes. Genetic and sociocultural factors that affect drug use. Prerequi­ sit : 2 3, 283. (3)

476 Nursing Synthesis Synthesis of nursing knowLedge, critical thinking, decision

364 NurSing Situations I Theory and cli nical application of unifying concepts in a variety of practice settings with clienls thro ugbou t the life sp an that facil itate health restoration, health maintenance, or death with dignity. Prerequisites: 320, 344. 363. ( 5 )

480 Applied Case Studies in Nursing SituatiollS Students integrate theoretical knowledge and clinical nursing situatio n ' from a variety of specialty areas. Development of critical thinking skills and strategies for syn t hesizing nursing knowledge. Prerequisites: 47 1, 476. ( 1 )

making, and technic.al and leadership competencies in nur ing situations meotored by a professional n u rse preceptor. Prerequi­ sites: 425, 454, 461 , 464. (6)

365 Culturally Coogrnent Health Care A tran 'cultural c.omparative approach is used to expl re diversity and universality in providing culluraIJy congruent c:ue for persons from diverse cultural groups. F ulfills the alternative line in the Perspect ives m D iversity requiremenL Op n to non-majors . Prerequisites for majors: 320, 344, 363. (4) 390 Information Management in Nursing An e mination of te h nologies and databases supportive to in� rmed nursing practice in a rapidly changing health care del ivery system. Prerequi ite: RN, or BSN, or cons enl of instructor. ( 2 )

Graduate Course Offerings 5 1 0 Nurs.lng Foundations, Models and Theories

and a p plicati o n of nursing research to practice. Prerequisites: or

con urrent enrollment in 364. (2)

399 Nursing Portfolio Workshop A course in portfol io w ri ti ng designated to p repare regi tered nurses to complete a portfolio documenting prior expeTiential learning acquired in nursi ng practice. Open to RN to MSN candidates only. (4)

current state of theory development. Analysis and evaluation of theories with discussion of their relevance to nursing scien ce and practice. Open to RN to MSN candidates only. Components i n tegrated with 525. (4) 51 1 AppUed Nursing .Research Exam ination of the research process and research methodolOgies wilh emphasis on design and use of evaluation and outcome research. Open LO RN to MSN candidaLes only. Components integrated with 527. (4) 512 Nurse as Leader and Manager Analysis of prindptcs and processes of l eadersh ip and manage­ ment with i n the context of complex and dynamic health care

42S Introduction to Leadership and Man.qemeot Analysis of profe ional 'ituations, roles and functions in the changi ng health care delivery system. induding eval uation of the impact upon the nursing profession. Prerequisites: 36 1 , 364, 365,

392. (3)

systems. Open [0 RN to MSN candidates only. Components integrated with 526. (4) 515 Theoretical Foundations Preparation for critique, evaluation, and us 0 a range of relevant theories that provide guiding perspectives for tbe provision of client-centered. clinically measurable advanced nursing practice. ( 3 )

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f the dean. ( 1 -4)

493 Internship Abroad ( 1-4)

The study of nursing as a profession and discipline, and nur ing's

392 Nursing Research Em phasi zes the res ear h process, importance of nursing research to the disc.ipline of nursing, evaluation of nursing research, STAT 23 1 , prior

49 1, 492 Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission

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526 Nursing Leadership and Managemmt Introduction to policy, orga njzation , and fi na n ci ng of heal th care. Prepar a tion for provision of qu ali ty cost-effective care. part i cipation in the design and implementation of are, and assum p t ion of the l eade rsh i p rol.e in managing resources. (3) 527 Evaluation and Outcoma Research Prep ar at ion for the cr i tique and use of new knowledge to provid e. cba nge. and evaluate advanced nursing pra ct ice focused on client-centered, clini cally demon s tr ab l e care. (3) 528 Family Theory in Nursing Cri tical a nalysis of nu rsi ng and fumily theo r ies and models

app l ied lO three levels of fam i ly nursing p racti ce. ( I )

529 Care Manager Roles Advanced practice role dev el op m e nt incl uding ontinui ty of care

management, c.o nsulta t i n, education. alld research . Devel op ­ ment of role sp ec ifi c pos iti on descriptions within in terdiscip l i ­ nary envi ro n m en ts. ( 3 ) 530 Resource Management Managemen t of resources in the plan n ing, co o rd i n ati o n , a n d/ o r deli very of he al L h c.are with an o ut co m e perspectiw at the system level. F i nancia l and human resources and systems manageme n t will be exam ined from a quality perspective. Prereq uisite : 53 1 . (4)

53 1 Care and Outcomes Practic;um I D i rec t a nd/ or in d irect ca re gi ve n in a defined specialty setting with fo c us on eva luation and outcomes. P re req uisit e : 529·. (3) 532 Care and Outcomes Practicum n Direct care or i nd irec t clinic 1 m a nageme n t , supervision, or education t a ch ieve client goals by i mpleme n ting a p p roache s , interventions. ou t com s, and evaluation methods. Prerequ isite: 538. (5) 538 Program Development Integrate the o ret i ca l models, clinical parameters, and program plan ni ng princ iples through the construction of a detailed program for care and outco mes management. C o - requ isit e 530 and prerequ i si te 5 3 1 . (3) S43 Health and Culturally Diverse Populations Co mp a ra tive analys is of health bel ie fs and care prac t i c es of weste rn and non -weslem ultures with em pha sis on theoretical and p r actica l dimensions, app li ed to professional p rac t ic es . ( 2 )

545 Life, Death, and Poblic Policy Exploration of critical issues relat d to life and death which im p act on or are i m pac ted by public poli cy. Analysis of pro fes­ si on al respo nsibi lity and decisio n- m aking i n rel a t i n to th issues. (2) 548 Curriculum Development for Nursing Examination f the theory and p ra ctice of curriculum p l an ni ng , development, and evaluati on . Cohort dep ende n t. (2) 549 Teaching in Schools of Nursing Theoretical and philosopltical principles of the teaching/learning p r ocess. Analy is of aduL t teaching s tr at eg ies and the proce ss of self and student eva lu atio n s. Cohort de pe nden t. (2)

580 AdVllDced Pathophysiology Focuses on normal physiol og ic and pathologic mechanisms of disease. P rima ry com ponents of th e foundation � r linical asseSSlllent, decision making, and management. (3) 582 AdVllDced IIea.Ith ABsessment and Health Promotion Development and perfo rm an ce of th e skills needed for advanced health as essment nd health promo tio n of individuals, famil ies, r c mmunities t h rough o u t the li fespa n . Identification of health pr tective st r ategies and health risks as wel l as the development of differential diagnoses fo r comm o n health p roblems. Prereq ui ­ sites: Basic health assessment skills. Lea r ning resource fee: $55.

583 Clinical Pharmacotherapeutics Focus s on the pharrnacokinetic basis fo r a n d pharmacothera­ p eu t ic management of simple and com plex disease processes. Includes et h i ai, legal, and procedural aspects of pr scriptive au t ho r ity. Pre- or co-requisite: 580 . ( 2 )

5 84 Famlly Nurse Practitioner I Ap p Ucation of theory and resea rch in the management uf family h ealth problems. Demons tration of d i agnostic reasoning related to health C3re condit i o ns . Se mi nar and clin ical. Prerequ isi tes: 582 and 583. (6) 585 Famlly Nurse Practitioner n Appl icat i on of theory and research in th e management of i ncreasingly complex family h eal t h pr blems. Dem onstration of diagnostic reas oning for a wide ran ge of acu t e and chronic condiri ns. Semin r and clinical. Prer uisite: 584. (6)

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586 Women's Health Nurse Practitioner J Application of res e arch and theory in the provision of women's

h e alth care. Demon tra tion of dia gno stic reasoning in the management of women's heal th problems . Seminar and clinical. Cohort dependent. Prerequi sites: 582 and 583. (6)

587 Women's Health Nurse Practitioner n Applicaliun of res ea r ch and th eo ry in the h ol i stic care of women exper ienci ng normal pregnancy. Demonstration of i ndepend e n t and co ll abo rative managemen t of variations and compli cati ons . Seminar Jnd c l i nic al . Cohort dep e n dent . Prerequi it : 586. (7) 588 Gerontology Nurse Practitioner I Application of th ory to advanced p racti ce and de m o nstr a t i on of ma na geme nt of common client health problems seen in older p e r 'ons. Di fferen t j ation of normal agi ng and pathology. Sem inar and cl i n ic a l . Cohort dep end e n t . Prerequisites: 582 and 58 3 . (6) 589 &:rontology Nurse Practitioner n Application and de m onstr at i on f diagno tic r easo nin g to the management of common and si m ple health care p rob l em s in older pe rso ns in primary and lon g term care. Sem i na r and clin ica l. Co hort dependent. Prerequ isite: 588. ( ) 590 Role of the Nurse Practitioner FaciJjta�es t he t ransi tion into the advanc d nurse placti tioner role th.r ugh the analys is of l egal, ethical, p ro fe s s io n al, social, and p ra ctica l perspectives. Completi n and sub mission of paper fo r p ub l i c at ion or of a practice related proje ct . Co-requi ite o r prerequisite: 5 8 4 o r 586 or 5 88 . ( 2 ) 590A Seminar i n Advanced Practice Nursing Integr at ion of theory, research, and leadership in advanced p ra cti ce nu rs ing. Co-requisite or p re req u i s i te : 585 or 587 or 589. Capstone c ou r e for nurse practitione.r con entration. ( 2 ) 592 Independent Shldy Oppo rfilllities fo r adva nced study in selected topi c related to student's area of interest Consen t o f i nstructor re q u i re d. ( 1 -4) 593 Advanced Specialty Practice Ap p li c ation of advanced pr ac ti ce nursing in clinical specia lty pra ice. P rer equis i te : completion of all cor requirements.

(variable credit)

597 Computer ApplicatioD in Nursing Research Deci ion- making and use of selected software p rog ra ms for data management and anaLySIS relevant to clinical p rac t ice a n d n ursi ng researc h . Pre re q u i si te: 52 7. Learning Resources Fee: $55. (1) 598 Scholarly Inquiry in Nursing Practice Development and submis io n of professional paper or pr oj e c t related to one's a re a of sp eci alizati o n based on an evaluation and

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outcomes model. Co - req uis i te or p rere qui si te: 532. Capstone course for care and out omes m a na ger concent ration. (4)

599 Thesis Facul ty gui de application of the research process. May inv I e rep l i cat io n of p re vi o us rudy, se co nd a ry a n a l ysi s of research data, an evaluation project, or an or igin a l investigation. Prerequisites: co m plet io n of core courses, co ns ent of ad vi ser. (4) o III

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Ph ilosophy Phil osophy is the parent academic discipline that gave birth to to day's vari ety of arts an d scie ces. It exam ines basic issues in all fields and explores c on ne ctio ns among diverse a reas of life. Tn philosophy the most fundamental and end u r i ng of questions are addressed� How can humans gain knowledge about their world? What limits are there to that knowledge? What is the ultim at e nature of the universe? In p arti cul a r, what is the nature of the human person, and what role or pmpose i ours? How should we live? Are there moral, aesthetic, and religio us values that can be adopted rationally and used to guide our decisions? Study in philosophy acquaints s tude nts with major rival v iews of t h e world, encourages them t think pre ci se ly and syste matically, and helps them to see l ife cr it i c ally, appreciatively, and wh ole .

FACULTY: Coo per, ctirlg hair; Arb ugh, Arn o ld , G. J oh nson , Kaurin, McKenna, Menzel. No rdby. USES OF pmLOSOPBY: Courses in philosophy help students

who ( l ) recognize philosoph y as a central element in a qual ity li beral arts edu cat i n; (2) wi sh to support their undergraduate

work in otheT fields, such as l i terature, history, poli t ical science, reli g i o n. the sciences, education. or b us iness ; ( 3 ) plan to use their study of p hilos op hy in p rep ara tio n for gra duate study in law, theology, or med ici ne; or (4) are c ons i de ri ng gr adua te work in philosophy itself, us ual l y with the intention o f tea chi n g i n the field. Undergraduate study in p hiloso p hy i not meant to train specifically for a fi rst job. Instead, it serves to sha rp e n basic ,kills in critical thinking, p rob lem olvin g. research , an alys is , interpre­ tation, and writing. It also provides critical p ersp e rive o n and <i deep a ppreci ati n of i dea s and issues that have intrigued h uma n i ty t h ro ughou t the ages, incl udin g those central to th e Western inteUectual her i tage. This prepares students for a great variety o f po s i t io ns f responsi bility, esp ea all y wh n coupled with pecialized trai n in g in other discipli nes. Th ose with the hig hes t p o tenti al for advan cem e nt generally have more than just sp ec i ali zed t rain ing; rather, they br i ng to their work bread t h of perspective, intellectual flexibility and depth. and well-honed skills in cr i tical t h ought and communication. UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENT: The Cort 1 requirement of four hours in p hiloso p hy may be satisfied with any course offered except for 233 Formal Logi c, 323 Health Care Ethics, 325 Business Ethics, and 328 Phi loso p hi cal I sues in th e Law. The initial course in philosophy is custo m a rily 1 0 1 , 1 2 5 or a 200level course that p rovides a more focused topic but is ti l l at the i ntroduc to ry level (220, 228, 2 5 3 ) . 300-level cou rses are suited for st ud ent s with pa rt ic ul ar interests who a re capable of wo rking

at the upper division level . Correspondence courses and independent stud ies may not be used to fulfill the core require­ ment in ph il op by.

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MINOR: 1 6 semester hours of approved philosophy co u rses ; for transfer . tudents, at least 8 h ours must be taken at P LU . Students c nsideri ng a minor should discuss their p ersona l goals with departmental faculty.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum f 32 se m est er hours, i ndudj ng 233 Formal Logic, 435 Advanced Sem inar and tw from am ng the following five c urses: 33 1 Ancient Philosophy, 333 Ea.rly Modern Philosophy (must take at least one of those two). 3 35 The Analytic Tradition, 336 Pragmatism and American Philosophy, 338 Existentialism and Continental Philosophy. On approval of the department , one course (4 h o ur s ) in an ther field f study may be u se d for a doubl e m aj o r in p hil os ophy if i t has a direct relationship to the student's philosop hy program. Transfer students will normally take 1 6 or m ore of their 32 hours at P LU. Students i n tending Lo major in phil os phy sho uld for m ally declare lhi with the depart m e nt chair and ch o os e a departme n tal adviser. HONORS MAJOR: In ad d i t i on to the above requiremc!nts for the major: 1. 493 Honor ' Research Proj ect, including an honors th esis wr i tt en under t h e s u p erv is ion of one or more faculty m embe rs and pr sented to the de p a rtm ent. 2. Completion f the departmental reading p rogram of p rimary sources. Honors majors in philosophy are expected to com ­ plemen t the ir regu lar courses by reading and d i sc ussing 3 -4 imp or tan t works under the pe rson al sup rvision of d ep ar t ­ me n t fac ulty. The reading list s ho ul d be obtained at an early d te from the departm e nt chair. It is best iliat the rea ding progra m not be concen tra ted into a i ng l e semester, but pursued at a leisurely pace over an exten d ed period. 3. At least a 3.3 grade po in t average in philos phy courses, incl uding at least a B in 493.

Course Offerings 101 PhllosophlcaI Issues p hi l osop h ical i sues. systems, and th in ker s . Empbases vary dep e nd i n g on i n stru cto r, but include the stI.\dy of ethi I values and tbe nature of rationality. and develop m en t of skills in critical and systematic thinking. (4) Per en n ial

125 Moral Philosophy Maj or moral ilieories of Westem civil ization, i.ncluding contem­

porary moral theories. Critical a ppl icat i o n to selected moral issues. (4) 220 Women and Philosophy An examination and critique of b isto rical ly i mportant theories from Westem phi losophy co n ce m i ng women's nature an d pl ace in so ci e ty, folJowed by an exa mi n at io n an d cri ti que of the writ i ngs of women philosophers. h isto r ic and co n te mp o r ary. (4)

Social and PoUtiQl] PhHosophy An examination of majo r social and political t h eo r ies of West ern philosophy ( including Pla to, Hobbes, Locke. Rousseau, M il l , Marx). lncludes feminist and non-W tern contributions and cr iti ques . (4)

228

233 Formal Logic P rinci p les of sound reasoni.ng and argumenl. D evel o p m en t and practical use of formal logical systems, with a focus o n s y mboli c logic. Includes an introduction to i nductive and abductive reaso n i n g. Not for p h ilosophy core requirement; counts toward Option ill of the College of A rts and Sciences re quiremen t. (4) 253 Creation and Evolution Examination of the controvl"rsy surrounding the origin of l i fe . In udes a historical introduction to the controversy; investiga­ tion into the nature of science, faith, evidence, a nd facts; and cr itical evaluation of three maj o r o ri gin theories: cTeationism, th eis ti c evolution, and nontheistic evolution. (4)

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323 Jlealth Care Ethics

495 Advanced Seminar in PhU080phy

Application of moral theories and per pecti ves of relevance to the health sciences. Exa mi n tio o f unde rly ing values and assum ptions in such specific topics as info rm e d conse nt an d

Exploration in a s emin ar fonnat of an important pbilosoph i ca l issue, thinker, or movemenL Topic to be annou nced at the time

paternalism , death de cisions, and the d istribution of scarce resources. Not for philosophy core r equir em en l. ( 1 -2)

course is offered. Prerequisite: th ree p revi o us philosophy courses or conse n t of in tructor. May be repeated once for credit. (4)

"II :t:

325 Business Ethics App lic ation of moral meories and perspectives of relevance to busine ss practices. Exa mination of under lying values and assumptions in specific business cases invol vi ng, e.g., employe r­ employee relations, adverti ing, workp lac e conflict, and environ ­ mental and socia l responsibilities. Not for philosophy core requ irement. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 1 25, or eq ui val en t (2)

328 Philosophical Issues in the Law An examin ation of philosop h i ca l issues i n law nsin g actual cases as well as philosophical wr i ti ngs . 11 pics include the nature of l aw, judicial reasoning, rights , liberty, rl': ponsibility, and pun ishment Not for ph ilosophy core requirement (4)

331 Ancient Philosophy The development of pb ilo op b i cal tho ught and method from th Presocratic per iod to the end of the fo urth cen tury A.D. Emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. (4)

333 Early Modem Philosopby

The developmen t of European and Britis h p h il o sop hy from the seventeenth through the early n i n ete en m centuries. Figu res may include Descartes, SpinCYla, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. (4)

335 The AnaIytlc Thadltlon The development of AnglO-American philosophy from th late ninete nth century to the m id-twentieth century. Pigures include Moore, Russell, Ayer, and Wittgenstei n. Prer equ i site : one previous ph ilosophy course. (4)

336 Pragmatism and American Philosophy An ex:arnination of such figures as Pei rce, James, and Dewey, as well as extension s and ritiques of p ragm ati sm ( such as Alain Locke, Jane Addams, Josiah Royce, Alfred N. Whiteh ad) , Links with current feminist and continental th ought will be explored.

(4) 338 Existentialism and Continental Philosophy Focus on main themes of Existentialism ( i n cludi ng the thought of Kierkegaard) and c onte mpora ry Conti nental philosophy. Their relationship to other philosophical traditi o ns , as well as to theology, literature, and psychology. (4)

340 PhD080Phy of Science

The general cha racter, fundamental concepts , meth od s, and significance and limits of s cience. with a � cus upon the n atu ral sciences. Im pl ications of scie n ce and c ientific meth odo logy for value systems. (4)

350 Philosophy of Religion CIas ical and contem orary view of traditional i sues reg rding

the nature and rationality of religious b el ief, with a focus o n m o notheistic religions and a unit on religious pluralism . Prerequisite: one p revious course in philosophy or religion. (4)

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School of Physical Education

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univers ity's physical education program seeks to i n g rai n in each student a fundamental respect for the role of phys i caJ activi ty in living. Instruction is offered in approximately 30 different physical education activities. The activity p rogram is uniquel y characterized by a timely response to student i nte res t s in recreational opportu n i tie available in the Pacific Northwest. The school's professional program. prepare prospe ct ive leaders for careers in physical education, health, recreation, a thletics, and therapeutics. Outstanding modern sports facilities include an all ­ weather 400 meter track, an Olympic-style swimming pool. six l ighted tennis courts, a nine-hole golf course, two gymnasiums, racquetball and squash courts, a fitness center, and an all-purpose astro-rurf field house. The

UNlVERSITY REQUlREMENT: F ur one-bour co u rses ( l 00-259 ) , incl u d ing 1 00 , are required for graduiltion. E ight one-hour activity co u r ses m ay be counted towa rd graduation. Students are enco uraged t selec t a variety f activities at appm­ p riate skill levels. All phys ical education ac£iviry courses are graded on the b as i " of "A," " Pass:' or " Fa il" and are taught on coeducational ba. is.

a

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (D.S.P.E.): 73-76 ho ur s , in luding om pletion of p rog ram COTe requirement. a n d one of t h ree concentrations. Core Requirements: 4- l -50 hour. including Chemi try 1 20, 2 3 2 . 234; Chemistry ( 1 04 , 105 ) ' ; Stat istics 23 1 ; Bi ology ( J 6 1 , 1 62 ) H, 205, 206; Physical Education 277, 499 (8 hours), 480 , 486. and

Psychology 1 0 1 ·- , ,. fVternat e Chemistry requirement for Exercise S c iel!ce Conce ntration and Health and Fitlless Management Concentration . ,. .. Not requ ired or Health alJd FitlJess Management Collcmtration.

Exercise Science Concentration: 1 9 hours, induding Physical Education 326, 380, 38 1 , 478; Math 1 28 or 1 40; Psy hoi gy 35 2 . An upper division biology cou rs e is s tro ngly recommended.

Health and Fitness Management Concentration! 24 ho urs, including Physica l Education 293, 344, 380, 38 1 , 3119; Recreation 296, 330 or 483; Business 305; plus

to be dec ided in consultation with students. (4)

4 hours of electives from physical education, heal th edu catio n , business, communicatio n, or ps ychology. A First Aid card and CPR certificate are also requ ired.

491 Independent Reading and Research

Pre-TherapyConcentration: 26 hours. in cl uding Health

The wr it i ng of an hon rs thesis and fmal completion of the r ead ing program in primary source re qu ired for me honors major. Presentat ion of thesis to department majors and faculty.

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McCon nel l, Moor , M. Seal, Tannehill . Th m p l i n, F. We teri ng; assisted by Ada chi . Amidon , Applegate, Cin otto, Dawson, Freitag, G ard , Ha roldson, r. lohnson, Marshall, McCord, Myer , Nich Ison, Noren, Popp en , Rice. Rigell. Ryan , Shinafelt, Scott Westering, Susan Weste r i ng.

Poc us on one particular area of pbil osophy uch as va l ue theory, aesthetics, metaphys ics, e p is temology, or logic, or on important philosophical issues, m jor think ers , or develop ing trends. To pic

493 Honors Research Project

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FACUlTY: Hoseth, Dean; Chase , Evans, Hacker, Kluge,

353 Special Topics

Prerequisite: depar tmental coruenl. ( 1-4)

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Education 28 1 , 382; Biology 201 o r 323 or approved alternate; Math 128 or 140; Physics 1 25, 1 26, 1 3 5, \ 36; and Psych logy 352 or 453. In additio n to the requirements listed above, candidates for the

B.S.P.E. degree must meet the forei gn language option requi re­

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RECREATION (BA Rec.):

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46 hours includ ing Psyc h ology 1 0 1 , 3 52; Physi cal Education 2 77, 279, 389, 344; Recreatiun 296, 330, 360, 483, 499 (8 hours); Business 305; Communication 3 36. In ad di t ion to the req uiremen ts listed above, s l ud en ts are strongly encouraged to co m ple te a minor in a relat d fi el d . Students must ha ve a current First Aid and CPR c er tificate before th ir inter hip. Can dida tes for the B.A. Recreation de­ gree must meet the fo rei gn language req uire ment as tated by the C Ll ege of Arts and Scien BACHEWR OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION ( B.A.P.E.): 52 hours including Biology 205, 2 06; Health Education 28 J ; Physi cal Educatio n 277, 279, 293, 2 94, 297, 298, 322 (4 hours),

326, 344, 389, 478, 480, 486, 490; Recreation 296. In a ddj ti o n to th e requ i rements l isted above, candidates for the B.A.P.E. degree with out teacher certification must m eet the foreign l angu age requi rem nt as sta ted by the Col leg e of Art.s and Sciences and a Senior Sem ina r ( P HED 499 - 4 hours).

pl us at least 1 ho u r of electives approved b y t he a q ua tics

di rec to r.

COACHING MINOR: 1 6 h urs, i n c l ud in g Physical Education 334, 344, 360, 370-379 (2 hours), 390, 41 0, and Heal th Educ a tion 28 ] ; plus 1 hour of approved electives. Fi rst aid and CPR c ard required.

HEAll'B AND FITNESS MANAGEMENT MINORJ 1 7 hours, including P hy ical Ed ucati o n 293, 296, 334, 344, 360, 380, 3 8 1 , 499 (4 ho u rs ) . First aiel card and CPR certificate requ i red . Practicum and in tern sh ip mu t be in Health and Fitness Managem en t a re as . P rima r ily for b usin ess, biology, B.A.P.E., and B.A. Re crea tio n students. DANCE MINOR: 19 hours, including P hys i c al Education 222, 2 3 0 or 23 2, 2 50 , and 462. El e c ti ve : 14 h o urs from Physical Educa t i o n 360, 40 1 , 4 9 1 , Theatre 3 56, M u s i c 245, 249. Summer cou rse s may be in c l u ded as e lec t ives with the approval of the

Initial TeadUng Certificate in Physical Education (K-12): Students wi s hi ng to recei e an In itiaJ Teac h ing Certificate in Physical Edu Lion ( K- 1 2 m ust meet requirements establishe

dance coordinator.

1 7 h ou rs, i n clud ing Physical Ed u ca t ion 361 , 380, 38 1 , 480, 486, 499 (4 nOllrs). Bi logy 205206 is req ui red as a prerequisite to 480. Designed primarily for biol ogy majors and students pu rs ui ng B.A.P.E. Not designed for education or B.S.P.E. majors. First ajd card and CPR cer tificate req ui re d.

EXERCISE SCIENCE MINOR:

by the School of Ed uca t io n for 1< cller Certification in addition to the requireme n listed for the B.A.P.E. At least on supporting endorsement ( m ino r ) is strongly recommended. Students recciving a B.A.P.E. with certification are not re qu i red to fulfill the l a nguage requ irements as stated by the C o llege of Arts and Sc ien es. All co u rses in m aj or and minor 6.eJds used fo r teacher certification must have grades

AQUATICS MINOR: 1 6 hOUIS, in cl uding P hys i ca J Education 275, 3 3 1 , 344, 499 (4 hOUTS) , Health Educati n 2 92, Busi ness 202,

f C or h igher.

ATHLETIC TRAINING (SpedaJization): 25 h ms, i ncluding B io logy 205, 206; Health Ed ucation 260 a nd 270 or 327, 28 1 , 382; P hysicaJ Education 326, 344, 480, 486. Also re q uire d are 1 ,500 hours of dinicaJ exp er ie nce, which may in clude a practicum or in te mshj p as requi red by N.A.T.A. Recommended: A teach i n g m ajor w i th tbe Professional Education S equence and completion o f all req ui rem en ts for the In ilial Teachi ng Certificate. SPORTS ADMINISTRATION MINOR: 1 6 hours, .includ i ng Phy icaJ Ed ucat i on 344, 389, 499 (8 h urs), 4 1 0j Health Ed uca­ tion 2 92 . Students must have a major in bu ioess, communica­ tion, or economics.

Course Offerings Courses in the c h ool of P hysical Education a re offered .in the following areas: IlEAD'H EDUCATlON

EDUCATION (K-12) CERTIFICATI ON REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 33 hours, i n c l ud i ng EngJi h 1 0 1 ; Psychology 1 0 1 ; Anthrop logy 1 0 2 /2 10; Special Edu ca t io n 200, 480; Education 262, 2 3 486; Educational Psychology 26 1 , 36 1 ; plus valid first i d card.

Ed ucat i on 28 1 ; Physical Educ a t i on 279, 334, 389, 326, 322 (2 hours), 344; one COUT e from am ong the followi n g (29 , 294, 297 298, Recreation 296 ) . HEAI.l'B (4- 12) MINOR: 1 6 hours including Health Edu ca tion 260, 270, 2 2, 2 95*, 32 1, 323, 3 5, 327, and 2 hours of elective a p proved by the p rogram coordinator. (It Students not pu rsu i ng an ed uc at io n e ndorsem nt will be required to take 2 add i ti on a l hours of a pp roved electives to re pi:tce this co urse . )

277, 344; Recreation 296, 330, 483, and 499 (4 hours).

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295 321 323 325 327

School Health Family llie and Sex Education Emotional Bealth/Disease Prevention

382 425 491 499

Injury Prevention-Advanced Health PromotionlWelloess Intervention Strategies Independent Study

The Aging Experience Stress Without Distress Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care 292 First Aid

lntern.ship

RECREATION

lUlCllEATION M INOR: 17 hou ts, in duding Phys ical Educat ion

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Childbirth and Beyond Food and Health

Consumer Health Snbstance Use and Abuse 360 ProfessIonal Practicum

PHYSICAL EDUCATION M INOR: 19 bOUTS, i nc l uding HeaJth

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1 17 260 265 270 281

Y

296 330 360 483 491 499

TeadUng Methods: Recreation Activities Recreation Programming and Leadership Professional PractiClIlIl Recreation Administration Independent Study Internship


PHYSICAL .EDUCATION

1 17 Movement and Mind 275 Water Safety [ustruction 277 Ponnciations of Pbysical Education 279 Introduction to Teaching Pbysical Education 293 Teaching Methods: Fibless Activities 294 Teaching Methods: Invasion Games 297 Teaching Methods: Net Games 298 Teaching Methods: Target and Fielding Games 308 Sports Motivation 310 Socioeconomic Inflneoces on Health in America 3 1 5 Body Image 31e) fiampiDg the Tracks of New Zealand 322 Pbysical Education in the Elementary School 326 Adapted Physical Activity 331 Aquatics Management 334 Sclentific Basis for Training 344 Legal Aspects of Pbysical Activity 360, 361 Professional Practicum, Coaching PrBcticum 362 Healing Arts of the Mind and Body 370-379 Coadling Theory 380 Burdse Testing and Prescription 381 Fonndations of Health Fitness Management 390 Applied Sport Psychology 401 Workshop 4 10 Coachiog-the Penon and the Profe8sion 462 Dance Production 478 Motor Learning and IIwnan Performance 480 Exercise Pbysiology 486 Applied Biomechanics/Kinesiology 490 Curriculum Organization, Administration and Evaluation

491 Independent Study 499 Internship

100 Personal.i7..ed Fitness Programs To st im ulate student interest in fu nctional p e rso n ally designed

programs of physical activ i ty ; assessme nt of physical condition and skills; recommendation of s p eci fic programs for ma in ta in i ng and i mp rovi n g physical health. Should be taken as a fresh m an . I IT ( I )

1 17 (HEED ) Cbildbirtb and Beyond

Addresses issues and choices in the following areas: pregnancy, labor and de live ry, nutrition, anesthesia, YBAC, postp ar tum ,

circumcision, breast feeding, midwi fery, fam ily p l an ning, infant ca re and related topics. Fulfills fres h man January term a nd Crit ical Conversation requirements. r (4)

117 (PRED) Movement and Mind A critical conversation course which analyzes movement as a tool for language i n dance performance and music. How

m oveme n t is co n n ected to al te rn at i ve healing th rap ies. II ( 2 ) 150 Adaptive Physical Activity An i ndi idualized activity p ro gra m designed to meet the needs i nterests, limitations, and capacities of students wh o have had restrictions p laced on their physical activ ity. 1 51-199 Individual and Dual Activities 1 5 1 ( B eg i n n i n g Golf) , 1 53 ( Archery ) , 1 55 ( Bowli ng ), 1 57 ( Personal Defense) , 162 ( B eg inni ng Tennis ) , 1 63 ( Beginning Badminton ) , 164 ( Piddeball ) , 1 65 ( Rac!juetball/Squash) , 166 ( Racquetball/PickJeball , I 7 (Roller Ska tin g) , 1 68 ( Ice Skating) , 1 70 ( Skiing/ Snowboarding) , 1 7 1 ( Ca noeing) , 1 7 2 ( Backpacking ) , 1 73 ( B asic Moun taineer ing) , 1 74 (Equitatio n) , 1 75 (Snow­ board i ng ) , 1 7 7 ( Weight Training) , 1 78 ( Body To n i n g) , 1 80 ( Bicycling) , 1 82 ( Low Impact Aerob ics ) , 1 83 ( Powe r Aerob ics), 1 84 (Water Ae rob ics ) , 1 86 (Step Aerobics) , 1 9 1 ( I n termediate Golf), 1 92 (Intermediate Ten nis), 1 93 (Intermediate Badmin­ ton) , 1 94 ( I n terme di ate qui tatio n ) , 1 95 ( I n te rm edia te Racquet­ ball/Squash), 197 ( Adva nced Weight Training) .

200-2 1 9 Aquatics 200 ( Individualized wim I n stru c t io n) , 203 (Synchronized Swimming), 205 ( Sk i n an d Sc ub a D iv i n g ) , 207 ( Basic Sail i ng ) , 2 1 0 ( r ntermediate Swi m m ing ) , 2 1 2 (Conditioning Swim ming), 2 1 4 ( Advanced Swimming) , 2 1 7 (Lifeguard Trai ning and New Methods ) , 2 1 8 (Kayaking) .

220-240 Rhythms 220 ( Mo vem e n t Technique I), 2 2 1 (Tai Chi ), 222 ( J azz Dance Level I ) , 2 23 ( Yoga), 224 (Current Dance), 2 2 5 (Ball room Da nc e ) , 226 (Folk and Social Dance), 227 ( Line D nce), 230 ( Mo ve m e n t Technique 11), 23 1 (Group C ha lJ enge O utdoo rs ) , 232 ( razz Dance Levcl l l) , 234 (Relaxation Te ch n i que s ) . 24 1-259 Team Activities 241 ( Basketball and oftbalL) , 243 ( Soccer and Voneyball ) , 244 ( Co -ed Volley b a l l ) 245 (Team Handball ) , 247 (Lac rosse ) , 250 ( Di rected sports Participatio n) , 259 ( I n dep en den t Study/

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Activity) .

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260 Food and Health A study of th e basic requirements necessary to maintain opt i m al health through wise fo od ch oi ces . I IT ( I )

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270 Stress Without Distress Consideration of tress, what people should know about stre s, how to reduce the harmful effects of stress, and the relationship of inc reased stress to disease problems. Tl ( 1 )

275 Water Safety Instruction The American Red Cross Water Sa fety Instructor's Cou rs e. Prerequisite: swim test re qu i re d. [I ( 2 ) 277 Foundations o f Physical Education The r ela ti o ns hi p of p hysi ca l educatio n to education; the biolo­ gi c al, sociological, psychol gical, and mechanical p ri nc ip le un de rly i ng physical ed ucati on and athletics. Should be the initial p rofes sio nal course taken in the School of Phy 'ical Edu ca tion . II ( 2 ) 279 Introdnction to Teaching P hysical Education Course con te nt in a physical edu c a tio n setting will include: Me th od ol ogy; teach ing styles and stra tegies; classroom manage­ ment; observation techniques; sk il l analysis; and group process issues. Should be taken bef, re or co nc u rre nt ly with E D U C 262.

1 ( 2)

281 Injury Prevention and Therapeutic Care Prevention, treatment, an d rehabilitation of all common inj u r i es sustained in athletics; p hysi c al th er a py by employment of el e ct ri ­ city, massage, exercise, ligh t, ice, and mech a n ica l devices. I II (2) 292 First Aid This co u rse meets requiremen for the Am e r ica n Red Cross Standard First Aid and Person I Sa fety. I n ( 2 ) 293 Teaching Methods: Fibless Activities Overview, application alld eval uati o n of fitness activites, such as: aerob i c!; ( water, h igh and low impact, step, slide ) , weight training, calisthenics c i rcui ts, continuous interval trai n i ng . Prerequisite: 279. II ( 2 ) 294 Teaching Methods: Invasion Games Garnes i n which a team tries to i nvad e the other team's side or territory by p ut t ing an im p leme n t into a goal. Activities w i l l include: Basketball , soccer, lacrosse, hockey, and footbalL Prere quisite: 279. I (2) 295 School Health Heal th co n ce p t s which relate to the to ta l scho(l! health progr am, inc l uding i nstruct ion, services, and enviro nment; relati onsh ips betwee n bealth and all levels of edu cation . II ( 2 ) 296 Teaching Methods: Recreational Activities Learning to plan and implement a variety of recreational activities, i n cl uding outdoor education. Prerequisite: 279. I (2)

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297 Teaching Methods: Net Games

334 Scientific Basis (or 'fi-aining

P layers attempt to send an object into the playing area on the other side of a net or barr ier. Activities include volleyb all , ten nis, badm inton, p i c kl eball, and racquetball. Prerequi'ite: 279. r (2)

Presents p h ysiologic a n d ki nesiologic a p pl ica ti on s ro physical training. Topics incl ude the deve lop ment of muscular stre ngth and end uran ce, and the relationship of nu t ri t i on , environm nt, sex, age, and e rgo gen i aids to athletic per ormance. I (2)

298 Teaching Methods: Target and Fielding Games

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Participants strike, hit, kick, or th row at targets or obj e cts. Activities include golf, bowling, archery, softball, lcickb all, and track and field. Prerequisite: 279. II ( 2 )

344 Legal Aspects of Physical Activity

Role of law in sport and physical activity, negligence, tort and r i sk management as it re lates to legal issues in school, sport, and recreational settings. I Il ( I )

308 Sports Motivation

Concepts include: models of w inn i n g , cl osing tbe potential

360, 361 Professional Practicum, Coach1og Practicum

Fulfills coach i n g minor requirement. J (4)

Students work under the supervision of a coach, teacher, recreatio n superv isor, or heaith care provider. Prerequi ite:

perfor mance gap, building winning a tt i t ud es , and setting goals.

dep artm e nt I approval. I II

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310 Socioeconomic Influences on Health in America

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Exam inat io n of the cu i tu Te, social environment, and pres ures t.bat create a health vulnerability with the American population.

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J (4) 3 1 5 Body Image Topiq; include: the connection between women and food, cultural defmiti ns of beauty, eating disorder , nu t riti o n, and bio odal factors affec t ing weight control. Fulfills the a lte rna tive line in the Perspectives on Diversity requirement. J (4) 319 Jramping the Trac.b of New ZeaJand

362 Healing Arts of the Mind and Body Designed to introduce alternative therapies f m i nd路b dy processes. History, roots, p ra ctice, and c u lt u ra l significances of several therapies and pract i ces. Ful.fills the al tern ative l ine in the Pe rspectiv es on D ive rs i ty requirement. J (4) 370-379 Coaching Theory

Techniq ues, systems, training methods, 路trategy, and psychology of coach ing; 370 (Basketball ) , 3 7 1 ( Footbal l ) , 372 (Cross Co u n t rylTrack and Field), 374 (Soccer) , 378 ( Softball/Basebal l ) . I n aly (2)

Ba ckpacking several of New Zea land 's world renowned tracks and hiking up an cie nt volcano craters, to glacial mountain lakes , and along sandy ocean beaches. J (4)

380

3 2 1 Family Life and Sex Education A Study of anatomy and phy iology, sexual roles, reprodu ctio n, responsible relati onships, resp ect fo r self and other', and physical and emotional well-being. Evaluat i o n of schoo l curriculum m dd s. II (2)

3 8 1 Foundations o f Health and F itness Management

322 Physical Education in the Elementary School

382 Injury Prevention-Advanced

Exercise Testing and Prescription

Provides the theoretical an d p r a ct ical backgrou n d necessary to conduct safely a variety of extrci e testing te chn i q ues u ed to assess com p one n ts of physical fitness. II (2) Provides an over v i ew of fitness and wo rkp la ce health pro m ot io n rnanagement. I (2)

O rga n ization and administration of a developmental progra m for g rades K-6; se quential and progressive program ming; Large repertoir of activities. Observation andlo r prac t i cu m in publ ic sch oo l s requ ired. l (2); J ( 2 ) ; II (4)

An adva nced study in the re cogni tion and treat ment f specific athletic i n juries and vulne rable body structures, with mphasis on evalua tion , modalities of treatment, rehabilitati on , and current issues. Prerequi site: 28 1 . n (2)

323 Emotional Health/Disease Preve otion Top ics include interpersonal communication, cooperation, valuing tech n i q ues leading toward a healthier l i festyle through preventive medicine, and rdated disease p rob lems. II (2)

390 Applied Sport Psychology

325 Coosumer Health

Information about consumption as it affects p ersonal health. Examination of consuming habits to achieve greater control over total health status. I (2) 326 Adapted Physical Activity

A practica l , individually-oriented course desi g ne d to teac h athletes, t rai n ers, coaches, and teachers a comprehensive vanety of skills and tech niq ue s aimed at enhancing sp rl performan e. Psych o log i cal top ics i nclude: Managing anxiety, imagery, goal sett i ng, self-confidence, att.ention co n trol , injury interventions, self-talk strateg ies, and tea m b ui lding. (4) 40 1 Workshop

Wo rkshop s in sp eci al fields fo r varying per io ds . ( 1-4)

Em pha sizes the theory and practice of ad apt at i on in teach i n g strateg i es , curriculum , and ervice deuvery for all persons w ith psych o motor p roble ms , not just t hose labeled "disabled." I I (3)

4 10 Coaching-The Person and the Profession Personal and professio n al re q uisi tes of successful s port s programs. I II (2)

327 Substance Use and Abu8e A study of drug use and abuse and the effect on the human bo dy and mind. J (2)

425 Health Promotion and Wellness Intervention Strategies Exam i n at ion of st rategies for improving the state of welluess through healthier lifestyles. ( 2 )

330 Recreation Programming and Leadership

462 Dance Production An advanced choreo gra p hy course combining choreograp hy, costume de sign, sta g ing, and publ i c ity teclmiques for producing a maj or darlce concert. n (2)

Examines the p rinciples, procedures, tech niq ues, and strategies essent i al to program lei sur e services successfully and to l ea d recreation experiences for diverse populations. in a variety of settings Prerequisite: 277 or consent of instructor. I (4) 33 1 Aquatics Management

Topics include training and upervising pe rsonn el, finan i n g, progral1lIDing, pool maintenance and operation, swim meet man age me nt , and 路afety ,md emergency p roced ures . Study of pool chemistry, filte r operations, and maintenance. Vi i tation to local po ols . a/y (2 )

1 12

( 1 -2 )

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478 Motor Learning and Human Performance

Provides basic th eori es, research, and pr ctical implication s ji r moto r learning, motor con t ro l and var iables affecting skill acquisition. 1 (4)

480 Eurdse Physiology

Scientific basis for traini ng and physiological effe ct of exercise on

the hu ma n body. Lab requi red . Prerequis ite: BTOL 205-206. 1 (4)


483 Recreation Administration Examines the p rinci ples, pTo ce d u res , techniques, a nd strategies e ' ent ial to the ucce s ful management of lei s u re servi es. Prerequisites: RECR 330, 360, PHED 344. II (4) 486 Applied Biomechanics/Kinesiology

A typ ic al B.S. physi cs major p rogra m is as foUows: P hY ' i cs 1 53, 1 63 Math 1 5 1 , 152 Sophomore Physics 1 54 , 1 64, 223, 354 Math 253 Freshman

Opportun i ty to in crease kn w ledge and understanding about t he hu ma n bo dy and how the basic laws of mechanics a re i ntegr at ed in effi c i e nt mot or performance. II ( 3 )

Junior

Ph ysi cs 33 1 , 3 3 2 , 3 36, 356 Chemi stry J 20

"0

Senior

PhY 'ks 333, 40 1 , 406, 490A, 490B

490 CUu.kulum Organization, Administration, and Evaluation

BACHELOR OF AR'fS MAJOR: Phy ics 1 53 or 1 25, 1 54 or 1 26, 1 6 3 or 1 3 5, 1 64 or 136, 223, 490A. 490B, plus 8 a d d i ti o nal, upper division b o u rs i n physics. Re q ui red s upport i ng courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52.

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An in teg ra ted a pp roa c h to curriculum organization, administra­ tion, and eva l u a tion will be emphasized before the st ud en t teach in g experience in phy ical e du ca tio n. II ( 6 )

491 Independmt Study Prerequ i site : co nsent of the dean . May be taken as P hys i cal Education, Health Edu ca ti on , or Recreation redit. I II S ( 1 -4) 499 Internship

P re - p rofes s ional exper iences closely rel ated to studen t's career

and academic interests. Prerequisites: d eclaration of major, at least sop homore status, and com pl tion of t least 10 hours in the m ajor. May be taken as P hysi c al Education, He al th Educa­ tion, or Recrea t i on crediL ( 2-8)

501 Workshops ( 1-4) 560 Practicum ( 1- 2) 59 1 Independent Study ( 1 -4)

599 Internship ( 1-4)

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MINOR: Physics 1 53 or 1 2 5, 1 54 or 1 26 , 163 o r 1 35, 1 64 or 1 36, pl us 12 additional hours in ph y sics ( excluding Physics 1 1 0) . of which at least 8 must be uppe r div i sion .

Applied Physics Also avail a ble is a major in Appl ied Physics, which i n c l ude s a substantial sel c ti on of courses from e n gi neeri ng to p rovide a ch allengL ng and highly versatile de gree . App l ie d Physi s can lead to research or advanced s t udy in s uc h areas as robotics-with appl i ca tion in sp ace exploration or j oi n t and limb p rosthet ics ; grow th of ing le-crystal metals, which would be thousands of times stronger than the best st ds now available; mecha nics of m ateri al failure, such as m eta l fati g ue and fract ure ; turbulence i n fluid flow; p hotovoltaic cell research for solar I.' ne rg y develop­ ment; or applkations of flu id flow and thennod),nan1 ics to the study of pla ne tary atmospheres and ocea n c ur rents . While many Applied Phys ics graduates p ursue professional in in dustry imm ediately after g rad u ation from PLU, t he p rogram also provi de s exc l.'lIent p rep ar at ion fo . gra duate study in nearly all fields of engineering. careers

Physics

Phys ics is the scientific study of the material un ive rs e at its most fundamental leve1: the mathematical description of space and time, and the behavior of matter from the elemen tary particles to the universe as a whole. A physici t mi gh t study the in oe r workings of atoms and nuclei, the size and age of the universe, the behavior of hlgh­ temp eratu re superconductors, o r the life cycles of stars. Physicists use h igh - e nergy accelerators to search for quarks; they design new laser system s for applications in medicine and com munications; they heat hydrogen ga es to temperatures higher than the sun's core in the attempt to develop nuclear fusjon as an en ergy resource. Pr m a stropby ics to nudear phy ics to optics and crystal structure, physics encompasses some of the most funda­ mental and exc iti n g ideas ever considered.

FACUIXY: G ree nwood , Chair; Louie, Mayer, S t ar kovi c h , Tan g .

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN APPLIED PHYSICS: P hysi cs 1 53 , 154, 1 63, 164, 223, 33 l, 334, 3 54, 3 56, 490A, 490B; CSCE 1 3 1 plus four cou rses, one of wh ich m u s t be uppe r divis i on , sel ected from : P hy ics 233, 234, 333, CSCE 245, 345, 346. Physics 336 m ay be sub s tit u ted for Physics 234; C he mi s t r y 3 4 1 may be substituted for Phys ics 333. Requ i red supporting cours : Math 15 1 , 1 52, 253; Ch em i try 1 20 or 125; C{) mp u te r Science 1 44 or 240. A typical applied physics program is a. follows:

Physics 1 53, 1 63

Freshman

CSCE 1 3 1 Math 1 5 1 , 152 Sophomore

Physics 1 54, 1 64, 233, 234, 354

Math 253 Junior

Phys ics 223, 333, 356

Senior

Computer Science 1 44 PhY'i cs 3 3 1 , 334, 490A, 490B CSCE 245

Chemistry J 20

Physics The physics major offers a cha Ileng i ng p rogram em p ha si zin g a

low student-teacher ra t io and th e opportuIlity to engage in i nd ep en de nt re sea rc h p roje cts . There are two introductory course sequences , C o llege Physics an d General Physics; the General P hysics sequence in orporates calculus, a n d is req u i r ed for the Ba chelo r of Sci en ce major. BACBEWR OF SCIBNCE MAJOR: Pbysics 1 53, 1 54, 1 63, 1 64, 22 3, 33 1 , 332, 3 33, 3 36 , 354 , 3 56, 490A, 490B. Strongly reco m­ ml.'nded: Physics 401 and 406. Ch emi stry 34 1 may be substituted for Physics 333 . Required su pp o r t i ng courSI.'S: Math 1 5 1 , 152, 253; Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25.

Course Offerings 1 1 0 Descriptive Astronomy Stars and lheir evo lution , gala.xies a n d La rger structures, co sm o l og y, and the o la r �'Ystem. Emphasis on observation 1 evidence. Evening bserving sessions. No prereq i ire courses in sc ience or mathematics. Fulfills Natura l S ien ces core require­ ment (CORE J, e) o r Scil.'nce and the Scientific Me t h od require­ m ent. No prerequisites. [ (4) I25, 1 26 College Physics These cour es provide an inLroduction to the fundamental top i c s of physics. It is a non - calcul us sequence, i nvo lvin g only the use

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of tr igo nom e t r y and c oll ege al gebr a . Co n cu rren t r egi st rat i o n in (or p revi o us co mpl e tio n of) Physics 1 3 5 is r equired for 1 25; c oncurrent registration in (or previous completion of) Physics 1 36 is requ i red for 1 26. Prerequi si tes : Math 40 ( or eq u ival e nt by placement exam) is req ui re d for 125; Physi cs 1 2 5 i s r qu ire d for 1 26. 1 I I (4, 4)

Us. 136 CoUege Physics Laboratory Basic laboratory ex p e r im ents are p er fo r me d in conj u nct i on with the College Ph ysics sequence. Concurrent re g ist ra ti o n in 1 25, 1 26 is re quired . I II ( J , I )

153, 154 General Physics A ca l c ul u -level s urvey of the gen er a l fields of physics, including classical mechanics, wave motion, ele c tr i c i ty and ma gne tism , and opti cs . C on cu rren t reg ist ra tion in (or pre iOllS co mple t ion of) Physics 163 is re q u i red for 1 5 3; concurrent reg i st r ation in (or p revious co mple ti o n of) Physics 164 is requ i red for 1 54. Prere quis ites : Math 1 5 1 for 1 53; Math 1 5 2 and Physics 1 5 3 for 1 54. 1 II (4, 4) 163, )64 General Physics Laboratory Basic laborat ry experiments are performed in conjunction with the General P hys ics s eq uence . Co nc ur re n t regis tr atio n in 1 5 3, 1 54 is requi red 1 I I ( I , 1 ) 223 I!lementary M odern Phrsics A sel ected t reatment of various p hysi ca l p h e no men a which are i na de qu at el y described by classical. methods of physics . I n te rp re 足 tations which have been d evelop ed fo r these ph en o m en a since ap p rox:imately 1 900 re presented at an el e me n t ar y level. Prerequ isi te : 1 5 4 and MATH 253. II (4) 233 Engineering Statics Engineering sta ti cs using ve c to r algebra; condi t i ons for equ i l ib 足 riunl, res ul tant fo rce systems, ce nt roid and ce n t er of gravi t y,

methods of virtual work, friction, kinematics of pa rticl es. Prerequisite: 1 5 3 . I (2)

401 IDtroduction to Quantum Mechanics The i d eas and t chn iques of quantum mecha nics re developed. C oreq uisi t e: 356. a/y r (4)

33 1 mectromagnetic Theory Electrostatics, d ip ol e fields, fi el ds in dielectric ma terial. s , electromagnetic i nd ucti on , magnetic pr opert ies of mat te r, in co nju n ctio n with the develop m ent of Maxwell's e quat ion s . Prerequisites: 1 53 , 1 54 a.nd MATH 253 . 1 (4)

406 Advanced Modem Physics Mod Tn th orie s are used to describe to p ics of contemp rary i mpo r ta n ce such as atom ic and sub-atomic p he no men a, plasmas , s oli d - s tate, and a trophysica1 events. Prerequisite: 40 1 . a/y U (4)

332 Electromagnetic Waves and Physical Optics Proce ed in g from Maxwell's equ a t i ons , tbe ge ne ra t i on an.d propagation of electromagnetic waves is d evel ope d with parti cula r emphasis on their app l icati on to p hys ica l optics. Pre requisite: 33 1 . II (4)

490A Advanced Laboratory I Selected experiments from both classical and modern physics are p er fo rm ed us i ng state of the art instrumentation. With 490B meets the senior semi nar/project requirement. Corequisite: 33 1 .

I

333 Engineering Thermodynamics Classical, macroscopic thermodynamics witb ap p li cat ions to physics, engineering, and ch e m is try. T he rmo dy na m i c state variables, cycles, and p oten t i a l s; flow and non-flow systems; puce substances, mixtures, and solu t i o n s; phase t ransitions; introduction to stati st ical thermodynami cs. Prerequisites: 1 54 and MATH 253. 1 (4)

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(1)

Laboratory n Continuation of 490A with emphasiS on design and i m ple me n足 tation of a project under the guidance of the p hysi cs staff. With 490A meets the seni or seminar/proje t requirement. P rerequis ite: 490 . II ( I )

490B Advanced

49 1 Independent Study ( 1-4)

334 Engineering Materials Sdence Fundamentals of e n gi n ee r ing materials including m echa ni cal, chemical, thermal, and electrical p ro per ti e s associated with metals, cera m i cs , polymer , co mposi tes, and semiconductors. Focus on how useful material p rop e rti es can be engineered through o o tr ol of microstructure. Prerequisites: 1 54; CHEM 120 or 1 25. II (4)

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354 Mathematical Physics J O rd in ary d i ffer en ti al e q uati on s, Laplace t ra nsfo rms, functions of a complex variable, and contoUT i. ntegr a ti o n are developed in the context of examples from the fields of Ie romagn et is m , wave , transport, vibrations, and m echani cs. Prerequisites: 1 54 and MATH 253. I I (4) 356 Mathematical Physics n Fourier analysis, boundary-value probl ems, s p ec ia l functions, and e jg e nv al ue problems are developed and iUu t ra ted through applications in p hys ics. P rerequ i s i te: 354. I (4)

234 Engineering Mechanics of Solids Mechanks of deformable solid bodies, deformation, stre ss , co nst i t u t ive eq uat i o ns for el asti c materials, thermoelasticity, tension, flexure, torsion, stabil i ty of equilibri um. Prere qu isites : 1 54 and 233. II ( 4 )

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336 Classical Mecban1cs Founda tions of cla ssical mechanics with an em ph asi s on a pplk a t i ns to astronomy and celestial mechanics. To pics include app licatio ns of Ne wto n's laws to particl mo t ion in in e rt ia l and noninertial frames; systems of particles and rig i d body dynamics; calculus of variations, L agra nge's equations and the Hamiltonian formulation f mechanic . Prerequisites: 1 54 , 354, or MATH 3 5 1 (or consent of i nstr uctor ) . 1 (4)

497. 498 Research ( 1 - 4)

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Pol itical Science Political science addresses one of the most di fficult, yet fundamentally important human endeavors, the gover­ nanc of people and ocieties. The student of politics seeks to understand h w governments are organized and , tructured, how political proces es are employed. and the relationship of structures and processes to societal purposes. Recognizing that government and poli ieal aetiviry may embody and reflect the full range of human values, the tudy of politic must en deavor to understand the realities of politics while at the same time asking how well political y terns work, what purpose are and ought to be served, and what effects re uLt from political phe­ nomena. Political science encourages a critical understand­ ing of government and politi cs in me belief that a knowl­ edgeable, i nterested, and aware citizenry is the root strength and necessity of a democratic odety.

PACULTY: Dwyer-Shick. Chair; Grosvenor, elleher, Olufs, Spencer; as isted by Bricker. Courses in political science explore vari us topics in American government and p lities, in ternational relations and foreign p l icy, comparative government and area studies, political philosophy an theory, and public policy and law. The depart ­ ment provides pre-professional training leading to careers i n teaching. law, governmen t, and related fields. The study of politics tou es upon other d.i'ciplines, which inquire in to hu ma n behavior and development, ranging from history and philo ophy to psychology, com mun ication, and cross -cult ural studies. Students of politi 1 scien e have the opportunity to combine the academic study of government and politics with practical exper ie nce by participation in one of the internship programs sponsored by the department. The department sponsors or otherwise encourage active student participation ill po litical l i fe through cia s activities and through such campus organizations as the Young Republicans and the Young Democrats. There are no prerequisites for political science courses, except as noted. Prior con ·uJtation with the instructor f any advanced c illS is i nvi ted . Students wishing to pursue a major or minor in po l iti ca l science are requested to declare th major or minor with the departtnent chair as soon as possible. BACHELOR OF ARl'S MAJOR: 36 semester hours. Requir d courses: 1 0 1 , 1 5 1 , 325, 490 ( 1 6 semester hours). Distributional req uirement: One co urse fro m each of G roup A

and Group B (8 semester hours ) , Group A - American Government and Public Pol icy: 345, 346, 354, 36 1 , 363, 364, 368, 371 , 372, 3 73 . Group B - International Relations, Comparative Government, and Political Thought: 326, 33 1 , 338, 347, 3 8 1 , 382, 383 , 385, 387. Electives: Minimum f 12 semes ter hour selected from the Political Science curricuJum. Major programs should be plan ned in consultation with departm ntal adviser. [n some instances, an i nternship (450, 458, 464, or 47 1 ) may be substituted for 490; however, students mll t plan this option with the appropriate faculty intern supervisor, i n con ·uJtation with the departmental chair.

CONCURRENT ATI'AINMENT: 0 more than 8 semester hours taken to satisfy other major or m inor requirem ts may als be applied to the political science major. No more than 4 such semester hours may also be applied to the political science minor. RESIDENCY: A minimum of 1 2 emesler h urs for the major and 8 sem ster hOUIS for the minor must be taken in residence. MINOR lN TIIE AMERICAS: See Arneri

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MINOR IN PUBUC AFFAlRS: 24 sem ster hours, i n cl ud i ng 345 (required) and 20 bours from political science, economics sociology, and business or statistics. This minor offers an interdi ciplinary study designed to support many major programs whose content has implications for public affairs and is particularly useful to students contem­ plating careers in public service or graduate study in public admini tration, publi affair , and relate pr grams. The Public Affairs minor includes th follOwing require­ ments: 1 ) Political Science 345, Government and Public Policy; 2) a t least five additional courses from three of the following groups ( courses which are taken as p a r t of a major program may not also count toward the Public Affairs minor): Political Scien e (minimum of 8 hour if thls group is selected) 1 5 1 - American Government 354 - tate and Local Government 363 - Politics and the Media 364 - The Legislative Process Economics (m inimum of 8 h urs if this group is sel ec ted ) 1 1-1 52 (or 1 30) - Principles of Macr economics and Microeconomics (Global and Envir nmental Economic Principles) 321 - Labor Economics, Labor Rela.tions, and Human Resources 362 - Public F inance 371 - Industrial Organization and Public P Licy Sociowgy ( minimum of 4 hours if this gr up is sel ec t ed) 240 - Social Problems 86 - Equality and Inequality 4 1 3 - Crime and Society Business/Statistics ( m inimum of 4 hours if this group is selected) BUSA 202 - Assessing and Managing Financial Performa.nce r STAT 23 1 - Introductory Statistics

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On approva.l by the Public ffairs adviser, up to 8 hou rs may be earned through participation in an intern hip program as a substit ute for courses li sted above (except PoLitical Science 345 ) . Internship pportunities are offered t h r ug h several depart­ ments a.nd provide students with actual work exp e ri e nce in s t at e and local legislative an administrat ive ag ndes. Stu d en ts interested in int m hips ar · urged to consu lt with their academic advisers and with intern faculty advisers at an early date. Students intere ted in the Pu l ie Affairs minor should decl are the minor in the D epa rt men t of Political Science and consult with the depa rtment's Public Affairs adviser. MINOR IN LEGAL STUDIES: 20 s('mester hours. For additional information, see Lega l Studies. PRE-LAW: For i nformation, see Pre-professional Progra ms. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: For information, see School of Education.

MINOR: Minimum f 20 semester h urs including 1 0 1 and 1 5 1 . Minor programs sh u1d be pl an n ed in consultation with a departmental adviser.

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363 Politics and the Media

Course Offerings 1 0 1 Introduction to PoJiUcal Science

An introduct ion to the major conceptl>, theories , ideas, and fietds of st udy relati ng to politics and govern me n tal systems. (4) w u Z IoU

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364 The Legislative Process

151 American Gove nuuent A survey of th e constitutional � u n datio ns of the American political system and of institutions, processes, and practi ces re lating to particip ation, decision- making, and public pol icy in Anlerican na t ional governme n t.

A s tudy of theory, o rganiz a tion and procedure of the Congress and other legislative bodies in the United States. (4)

170 IntroouctiOll tO Legal Studies An exami w tion o f the nature o f law, judicial process , and part icipant roles in the legal ystem. (4)

368 The American Presidency Study of the n ation's highest p oli tical office in terms of the ro les and expectations of the office, styles of leadership, Presidential dec ision - making, power and linutations, and the inte.raction of persona lity and i n titution. (4)

2 1 0 Global Perspectives: The World In Change

371 Judicial Process

A survey of global issues; modernization and development; econ o m ic c hange and in ternational trade; dimi nishing res tlfce ; war and resolution ; peace and justice. and cultural diver sity. ( Cros - referenced with ANTH 2 1 0 and HIST 2 1 0.) (4) 23 1 Curren t International Issues

A survey course in i n temation currenl events. (4)

relations with emphasis on

282 PoJitics in the Americas A comparative study of the contemporary politics of tJle western he m isphere, cove ri n g the Un ited States, Can ada , Latin America,

An examinatio n of l egal processes in various adjudicatory settings. Primary at tention give n to judicial processes focusing on American civil an d crimi nal law. (4) 372 CollStitutiollal Law

The constitutional basis of governme nt al powers in the United States with special emphasis give. n to ju dicial review, separation of powers, federalism , interstate commerce, and politi I and cons ti tuti o nal restrictions on governmental power. (4) 373 Civil Rigllts and Civil Liberties

background to current con flict and cooperatio n. (4)

The constitution al basi s of r ights nd liberties in the Un ited freedom of expres sion and States with special emphasis given associa tion, religiOUS freedom, rights in criminal proceedings, due proces an d equal protection. (4)

and the Caribbean. Key themes are governmental systems, pol itical cul t ure, econ omic d eve lopment, and the historical

Legal Studies Re�arch

325 Political Thought

374

A survey of the orig i n and evolution of major pol iti cal concepts in anci en t, medieval, a n d ea rl y modem "meso (4)

writing. (4)

326 Recent Political Thought

381 Comparative Legal Systems

I ntroduction to various methods of l C<7a1 ana lysis, research. and

Study of legal systems around the world as t hey act ual ly work within their respective politica l, economic, social, and cultural

A critical exa m i nation of the major ideologies of the modern world. (4)

contexts. (4)

331 International Relations

382 East Asian Politics

A systematic analysis of the international system highligh ting patterns in state interaction. (4)

A comparaliv anal ysis of the politics of Japan , Chin a. Korea, Malaysia, I ndone s ia, and V iet n am. Comparative themes include the regional context, con stit ution s and in titut ions, polit ical c ultu re, political power, and economic and s ocial pol icy. (4)

338 American Foreign Policy The role of the United States i n intemational affairs. An analysi s of the major factors ill the formulation and execution of th United States forei gn policy and its impac t on other powers . (4)

383 Modern European PoJitks

A tudy of the origi. ns a n d devel proent of the E urop ea n Union a n d an examination of the governmental systems and pol i tical cultures of key European states, including France, Germany. Ttaly, and the United Kingdo m . (4)

345 Government and Public Policy

An integra ted ap proa ch to the nature of public policy, with emphasis on llbstantive problems. the develop me nt of policy r esp o nses by p olitica l institution, • and the im pacts of policies.

385 Canadian GGvernmellt and Politics

(4)

The gove rnmen tal system and poli t ical life of anada, w ith s p ecial attention t the c nst it u tion, political parties, nation a l­ ism and sepa ratism in Q u ebec, self-gove rnment of native p oples, and compa rative study of Canadia n and U.S. political

346 Environmental Politics and PoJicy An exam ination of environmental probl ems from political perspective including international and do m estic political contexts and metbod.� of evaluating p lides. (4) •

cul tures. (4)

347 Political Economy

An e:<a m ina t io D of the ways that pol i t ics and econo mics coincide. To pics i ncl ude the evelopment of capitalism. oci ali st app roaches , international issues, regional examples, and methods of study. Prerequ isi�: 1 0 1 or ECON 1 5 1 - 1 52 ( o r 1 30). ( 4 ) 354 State and Local Ciovernmellt

Governmental structures, processes, and policy at the state. local. and regio nal levels of the American system. (4)

361 Political Parties and Elections S t udy of pa rty and elec toral systems with p ar ticular empha s is on American parties a nd elections. Examination of party T oles in electi ons and government; party financing; interes t groups and political action committees; and voting behavior.

116

The role of mass media in America n govern ment, poli ti , and p ol icy. Attention to p liLica.l culture, pu lie op in ion, poUs and su rveys, p ress freedo m a n d res p onsi bility. and gover nmental regulation, secrecy, and manipulation. (4)

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387 The MIddle East

Contrasts the bistory and aspirations of th Arab Nations with the reality of Europ ean dominance and i t s legacy, the fo rm ation of the p rese nt Arab states and I srael. 4) 40 1 Workshops and Special Topics ( 1-4) 43 1 Advanced International Relations

Examines various theories of i nternational contlict management. including in-dep th analysi.s of historical examples. The develop­ ment of internation al law and international gove r nmental organiza t i ons are also considered. Prerequisite; 33 1 . (4) 450 Internship In Politics

Internship in t he political dimensions of non-governmen tal organizations. By d epartmen tal consent on ly. (4-1 2)


458 Internship in PubUc Administration An i ntern sh ip with a gover run en l department or agency, By departmental consent on ly. (4-1 2) 464 Internship in the LegWative Process An 0 p ort'U n t ty fo study the p rocess from t h e i nside by working direc tly with legi s l a t ive p a rt icip a nt s at the state or lo ca l level. By de pa rtmen t cons en t on ly. ( I nternships with the Washi ngto n State Leb>lslarure are open on l y to ju niors and seniors with at least one year at

PLU who have taken or take conc urrently 364. )

(4- 1 2 ) 471 Internship in Legal Studies An i nte rnshi p with a private or public sector ag en cy or offil;!! engaged in lega l research , l i tig a t io n , or law en fo rcem en t . By depar t m e n taJ consent only. (4)

490 Senior Seminar

I nten sive study into topics, concepts, iss ues, and methods of in qui ry in po lit ical s ci ence. E m p hasis on student research, writing, and prese nt at ion . By de pa r tment al co n sen t on ly. (4) 491, 492 Independent Ruding an d Research By department consent only. ( 1 - 4)

Pre-professional Studies Tire following pre-prof, ional studies do rIOt constitute academic majors, bllt are programs ojstlldy designed fo facilitate further gradtllHe or professional work after completion oj a regular disciplinary major at PLU.

Health Sciences The Division of Natural Science health science committe advises students asp irin g to ca re ers in the health sciences . Stu­ dents having such interes ts are e ncouraged to blain a health scien<:es adv ise r early in their program. Summarized below are pre- professional req u i rem e nt s for many health sc ien ce areas; additional information is availa ble through the h allh science committee. Catalogs and brochures for many s choo ls and pro­ grams are avai lable to s tu dents in the Rieke Science Center. DENTISTRY, MIlDlClNE, AND VETERINARY MEDICINE:

--

The overw h el m in g m ajo r ity of students en te. ri n g the p rofessio uaJ schools for these ca ree rs have earned baccalaureate degrees. securing a broad educational a ckgroun d in the p rocess. This background includes a thorough prep ara t i on in th e sciCllce as well as s tudy in the social sciences and the h um a ll itj es. There are no pre-professional majors at PLU; ra t be r students should select

the major which best ma t ch es their i nterests and wnicn bes t prepare them fo r al te rnative careers. In addition to the ge n e ra l university requ i rements and the courses needed to co mp l et e the student's ma j or, the foHoffing ,Ire generally r equired for ad mis ­ sion to the pr fessional program: B io logy 1 6 1 . t62. 323; Che mis try 1 20 (or 1 25 ) , 2 3 2 . 332, and 338 (ffith an lab ratories); Mathematics 1 40; Physics 1 25 and 1 26 or Physics 1 53 and 1 54 (with a pprop r i a t e laboratories). Check with a health s ience adviser for excep tion or for additions , ug geste d by sp ecifi c profess ional

schools.

OPTOMETRY: Although two years of p re- o p t om etry study is the minimum require d. m ost tu den ts a c cept ed by a scho I of optometry have c m p let ed at least three years of u n de rgrad uate work. A l a rge percentage of students a cepte d by schools of

optometry have earned a baccalaur at de gree . For those studen ts wh o have not compL eted a baccalaureate degree , co mple tion of su ch a degree must be don e in conju nction wi th op tometry p ro fessi on al studies. The req u i rements for admission to the schools of optometry vary. However, the basic science and mathematics re quirements

a re ge nerall y uniform and include: Biology 1 6 1 , 162, 323; Cnem­ ist.ry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) , 232, 332. and 338 (with all laboratoJies); on e year of co U ege mathem a t i c s , incl ud i ng calculus (at least through Mat hemati cs 1 5 1 ) ; Phys ic s 1 25 and U6, or Physics 1 53 and 1 54 (with appropriate laboratories). In addi ti on , each school of op tom et ry has its own s pe ci fic requirements; check with a he Ith science adviser.

." :lII m

MEDICAL TECHNOWGY: The univ rsity provide s academic preparation - uitabl e for tuden who ch oose to cnter schools of med ic aJ technology. S tu den t s may also prepare for post­ bachelor's degree traini ng in specialty programs le adi ng to certification in hematology or cli nical c he m ist ry. The minimum requirements for admission i n t o m edical t echn ology training are de sc ribed under Medical Techn o logy and can be obtained from the health sci ence advi s er.

." m II' II'

PHARMACY: Although the pre-pharmacy requirements for

individual schools vary (check ffi th a health science adviser), the followi ng COUI es are usually requ ired: one year of gene ral chemistry; one year of organic chemistry, with lab ratory; col­ lege level mathemati c s ( ofte n i ncluding calculus ) ; one yea r of English composition. O the r courses often required i n cl ude microbi logy, ana lyti al c he m i s tr y, and introduct ry co ur s es in communication, economics, a n d poli t ical science. For example, the Un iversity of Wa shi ngto n S ch ool o f P harm ac y ha s app roved the following courses as be in g equiva lent to the first two years of its 5 -year program leading to the Ba ch elo r of Scien ce degree in p ha rmacy: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 20 1 or 328; Chemistry 1 20 (or 1 25 ) , 232 (with l a bo rat o r y 234), 3 3 2 (with labo rat ory 334), a n d 338; Wri t in g 1 0 1 a nd a second co urse in writing; Mathematics 1 28 or 1 5 1 ; Statistics 23 1 ; el cl ives fTom humaniti . and s o c i al sciences Total c re dit s sh uld not be less than 60 semester hours. .

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PHYSICAL TlII!.RAP¥: Accep t an ce to school s of phys ic al thera py has b ecome i ncre as ingly competitive in recent years , and

students interested in p hys i cal t hera py are strongly encomaged to meet with a h ea l th science adv i se r as early as poss ibl e to determine prerequisites for specific schools . Most phys i I t herapy programs are master's degree programs. Therefore, poten tial applicants should p la n on completing a baccalau reate d eg ree in conjun ction w it h s at i sfy i n g admission requi rements. The requirements for ad m is sio n to school of physical t he ra py vary. Howeve r the basic sc ience alld mathematics re q u i rem en ts are ge nera Uy uniform and indude: Biology 1 6 1 , 162, 323; Chemi try L 20. 2 2; Mathematics 1 40; Phy ics 1 25 and 1 2 6 (with labora tories). In additio n to the pr i nci p les of biology sequence, appli c an ts must compl te cour es ' n anatomy and phys iolog y. This ad m iss io n requirement is met by e i th er the co m bi n ati o n 205 and 20 or the combination 36] and 44 1 ; b iolog y majors should take 36 1 and 44 l , the clear preference of se ve ral schools of p hysicaJ therapy. I n ad d i ti on to t h e science a n d m ath em ati cs requ i r em en ts , the various schools have �l'ecifi social science a nd humanities requirements. Check with a health science adviser rega rd i ng these requ i reme nt s .

Pre-Law

"Pre- Law" at PLU is an advising sys t e m , not a pres cribed maj or or c urric ul u m , The primary re a son for such an ap pro ac h is tbat

a dm issions co m m ittees at American l aw scho ols recommend that a pp li c an ts be well alld b ro adly educated, that successful a pp l ic a nts be literate and numerate, that they be critical thinkers and articulate communicators. In other words, exactly wh a t a s ound liberal arts education prov ides-indeed, requires. The re ­ for , reg a rdless of their declared majors and minors, students c on s id e r ing applying to law school a re en co urag ed to dem on ­ s t ra te pro ficie ncy in courses elected from across the di sci pl i nes and schools while an undergraduate at PLU.

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Tn recent yea.rs, grad u a t

of PLU wh() were s u cessful appli­

can ts to law sch ols located thr ugh out the United S t ates had

taken courses in t h e anthropol gy of cont emp ora r y America and earch methods, American p p ula r culture and English Ren:ussance li terature, newswrit ing and argu mentation, rece n t p ol i t i cal thought ilnd international r el a t i ons , free-lance writing and i ntermediate German, an imal beh avi o r and human neur psychology; marketin systems and public fi n anc e, logic and m oral philosophy. It is also recommended, however, that students thinking about going to law chool take two or three courses, chosen in consul tat i o n with the pre-law adviser, which will help them to identify, develop, and exp l ore pe rsp ect ives on the character of Am eri ca n l aw. For example, PLU gr adua tes who have gone on to law sch o 1 have freque nt ly ind icated that courses in American government and h isto ry, j ud ici al and le gis ­ lative process, research ma te rials and methods, and i nte r n s hips were useful, particularly in th ei r first year. finally, s tudents are encouraged to consider participating in the activities of PLU's Cbapter of Ph i Al ph a Delta La, F rnte r ni ty, International, a professional service organization co mpos ed of law a nd p re-l aw students, legal educators, attorneys, judges, and government social rien e r

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officials. Student interested in p re - law advising and activities are invited to regi ster with the Pre-Law Center in the Department of Political Sc i e n ce. Open to any and all major .

and mil i ta ry t rai ning per week each semester of the fresh man

Pre- theological tude n ts should co mp le te the requirements for

a nd s o p h omo r e years. Students begi nn ing the course as sopho­

the Bachelor of Arts degree. Besi des t h general degree requ ir e­

mores can

ments, the Assoc: i a tio n of Th eologi c al schools recommends the

English: l iterature, compo ition. speech, and related studies. At l east be; semesters. History: ancient, modern European, and A meri c a n . At least three

semesters. Philosophy: orientation ill history, content, and methods. At least th ree semesters. 1 atuml Sciences: p refe rabl y p hys ics , chemistry, and biology. At least two semeste.rs. Social ciences: psychology, sociology, e onomics, political sci ence, and education. At l east ix semesters, in cl ud ing at least one semester of psychology. Fo reign La nguages - one Dr more of the [ol/owing: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, French. S tude n t s wh

(at

to

a n tic ip a te post­

under take these disciplines as

least four semesters ) .

Religion: a thorough knowledge o f Bib lical content together with an introduct ion to major re l ig ious traditions and theologic al problems i n tbe context of the pr inci pal aspects of human

culture as o u tl i ned above. At least three semesters. Students may well seek counsel fro m the se min ar y of their ch o ice .

Of the possible majo rs, English, philo op hy; religi o n and the soci al sciences are regarded as the most desirable. O the r areas are, however, accepted. A faculty adviser will assist students in tlle selection of courses necessa ry to meet the requir ments of the theological sch ool of their choice. At the present time, i n c reasi n g numbers of women ar enrolli n g at selected Protestant seminaries in pursuit of the Master of Divinity degree. Consult the Religion Depar t m e nt chair for further informatio .

The objective of the military sc ie n ce instruction within Army ROTC (Reser" Officer 1'raining Corps) is to prepare aca demi ­ cally and physically qualifi ed college women and men for the rigor and ch allenge of serving as an officer in the United State s Army - Active, Nation al Guard, or Reserve. To tha t end, the

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mp ress the Basic Course by attending additional

scholarship students in the Basic Course. The Advanced Course consists of additional academic instruction and p hysical conditioning plus

a fiv -week advanced summer camp at Fort Lewi , Washington. Students are furnished with uniforms and most textbo ks for mil i tary science courses.

BASIC COURSE: MS 1 1 1, 1 1 2 Introduction to Military Science AIl int rod uction to the Un hed States Army. Includes an intro­ duction to military s ci enc e and it organization, leadership, land

navigation, map reading, o p eration orders, and the traditions of

the United Stales Army. Provides a look at the m il it a r y as a profess i o n and its e th ical base. Discussions of small uni t lead er ­ sh i p and briefmgs, based on U. S. Army poli c i es and procedures. Leadership nd management experience is gai n ed alld less ns are le a rned th rough the t rai n i ng exercises on campus a nd at Fort Lewi s , WA. Course includes Army Physical Fitness Test and training. ( 2 ) MS 2 1 1 , 2 12 Introduction to Leadership A continuation of ba 'ic officer skill s . Areas of emp h asi s are team bui lding, s quad tactics, operations orders, land navigation, et hics and p rofess i o n alis m , total fit ness alld mililar-y first aid. (2) ADVANCED COURSE: MS 3 1 1 , 3 1 2 Leadership and Management A survey o f leadership/management and motivational theories. An orientation on the competencies required for the small unit teader. I nc l udes tactics, communications, and land n av igat io n .

(3)

MS 41 1 , 4 1 2 Professionalism and Ethics

Covers Army values, ethics, and professionalism, responsibilit ies to subordinates, self, aJld country, law of l and warfare, and the reso l u t ion of ethical/value dilemmas. Also covers log i sti c and justice systems and th e i nteract ion of s pec ial staff a nd command functions. (3)

Mil itary Science (Army ROTC)

118

co

academic i nst ruct io n . There is no military commitment for non­

fol lowing:

early as poss ible

FACULTY: Major Brouill tte, Officer-In-Charge The B as ic Course consists of two hours of a cad emi c i.nstruction

Theological Studies

graduate studies are u rge d

program stresses service to country and community t hr ough t he devel opm ent and enh a n cement of le a d ership compete ncies wbich supp or t and build on the co ncep t of "service l e aders hip." Army ROTC is offered to PLU students on campus. The lower divis io n courses are o p n to 11 student an d are an excellent sou rce of l ea d e rsh ip and ethics tra i ni ng for any career. They do not require a m ili t ary commitment for non-scholarship students. The upper division courses are open to qu al ified stud nts. ROTC is traditionally a four-year program; how ever, an individual may complete the p rogr am in three or two years. Contact the PLU ROTC Department for details. Financial assistance in the form of two, three, and four-year scholarships i ava i lable to qual ified ap p l ica nt s. Scholar hip s awarded are for $1 6,000 for t ui ti on pl us a b ook allowance and a mont hly stipend of $ 150. S t ude n ts in uppe r division courses not on scholarsh ip also receive a $ 1 50 st ip e n d . To be co mmissio n ed an officer in the United States Ar m y, a graduate m ust co mplete the m i li tary science cur riculu m , in c l u d i ng successful com p l etio n of a five - wee k advanced camp during the summ r before the senior year. A ddi tio na l in formation on th e Army ROTC p ro gr m may be obtained b y w r it i n g Army ROTC, Pacific Luthe ran University, Tacoma , WA 98447, by ca l li ng 253/535-8740, or by e-mail to sch nockd@r1Isll.com. or by visiting the web page at www.plu.edlll- rotci

Y


NOTE: A

maximum of 24 semester ho urs earned in ROTC programs may be appl ied toward a baccalaureate degree at PLl .

Students receiving more th an 1 2 semester ho urs f ROTC credit toward a PLU degree re requ i red to take one of the Ilowing:

enter schools of dentist ry, medicine, publ ic health, or veterinary

medicine should note the spe ific pre-professional m a the mat i c s and sci ence requ i rem ents in the appropriate secti os of this

I ntegraled Studies 2 2 1 - The Experience of War (4) I ntegrated Studies 222 - Prospec ts for War and Peace (4)

catalog.

Philosophy 1 25 - Moral Philosophy Ph ilosop hy 353 - Special Top i cs: Focus on Military Et h ics or Wa r ( 4 )

The minor in psychology is designed to sup p lemen t anot her major in the liberal arts or a degree p rogram in a p rofes ional school, such as business, education, or nursing.

Religion 365 - Christian Moral Issues (4)

"-

at least 4 hours m u st be in mat hem ati cs and at least 8 hour in bio logy. Those students who, after graduating from PLU, plan to

"CI 11\

MINOR: 20 semester hours, of whi ch at least 8 hours must be taken in resi dence. Statistics 23 1 (or equivalent) may be used as part of the 20 hour require ment .

Psychology

Psycho logy 1 10, 1 1 1 , and 1 [3 do not count toward tbe major or

Psychology is a scientific discipline that seeks to under­ stand human and nonhuman behavior. Psychology is also

Course prerequisites: A grade of "C-" or higher must h ave been earned i n a course in order for it to qualify as a prerequisite.

a profession that seeks to change behavior for the better­ ment of humankind. Through its curriculum, research activities, and use of community resources, the Depart­ ment of Psychology provides students with a balanced exposure to psychology as a scientific di sc ip l i ne and profession.

The major in psychology (a) introduces students to scientific methods of psychology, to theories and research findings from the core areas of psychology, and to the history of psychology; (b) provide tudents with opportu­ nities to explore advanced topics in scientific and profes­ sional psychology, conduct psychological research. and gain exposure to the practice of psychology in community settings; (c) helps prepare students for p tgraduat work in psychology or in related professions, such as social work, education, medicine. law, and business. The major is an excellen t general preparation for employmen t ill a . variety of settings. The psychology program is designed to meet the needs of a varielY of studen ts. To this end. two majors are offered : the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. Either degree provides a olid foundation in psychology, and either can serve as preparation for postgraduate study or employment. However, for tho e students who intend to pursue the doctorate in psychology following graduation from PLU, the Bachelor of Science degree is likely to provide an especi ally strong preparation. The Bachelor of Science degree is also an excellent pre-professional degree for those students who p lan to enter the fields of dentistry, medicine (all branches, including psychiatry) , public health. or veterinary medicine. Many in business, educa­ tion, nur ing, and social work find a doubJe major with psychology to be a valuable addition to their training. PACUI:l'Y: Moritsugu, Chair; Anderson , R.M . Brown, Hansvi ck , Lara, Lejeune, Moon. Nolp h , Sh oTe. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hou rs in psychol­ ogy including 1 0 1 i 242; 493; one o f 340, 342, 346, 348; one of 350, 352, 354; plus 1 6 hOlliS of elective psychology courses. In addition to the 36 ho u rs in psychology, Statistics 23 l ( psychol­ ogy section) and accom pa nying lab are required . BACBEWR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: 40 semesteT hours in psychology including 1 0 1 ; 242; 493; 340 or 342; 346 or 348; one l ab ection selected from 3 4 1 . 343, 347, 349; one of 350, 352, 354; 48 J; plus 1 2 hours of elective p yeho l gy courses. In addition to the 40 hours in p syc ho logy, Statistics 2 3 ] (psychology section) and ac ompanying Lab an d at least 20 semester hOUTS in mathematics and natural science are required . Of the 20 hours.

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minor.

Psych ology 49 , al ready requ ired of all majors. also meets the senior semi nar/ proj ct requir men t when a proje t/ pap e r is added . Students may petitio n the dep a rtment to do paper in another suitable co u rse.

the project!

Course Offerings 101 Intl'oduction to Psycl1ology the scienti fic study of behavior ; scientific methods for studyi ng the behavior of l ivi n g organisms; topics such as motiva tion , l earning , emotion, intelligence, personality,

An in t roduct ion to

adjustment, and social beh a vi or. I U

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Study SldIls Effective techniq ues for college study. No t -making, stu dy methods, examination skills, time management, educ at ional p lanning . Oass work supplemented by individual cou nsel ing . ( May not be applied to core. language, r p sychology majo r or minor requirements.) I U ( l J I I I College Reading

Improvement of coUege- level

reading skil ls. Previewing, skimm ing . scanning, rapid read i ng, CTi tical reading, and study reading. (May not be app lied to core, language, or psych logy major or minor requj rem ents ) . 1 n

(1)

1 1 3 Career and Educational Planning: Finding Your W.y Personal deci s ion - m aki n g p ro cess ap plied to caree r and educational choices, self-assessment. expl ra tion of the wor! of work, ed ucat ional p Lanning, reality testi ng, and buildi ng career­ related experience. Does not m t gen eral wl lversity require­ ments or psychology major or m i nor requirem en ts. ( 1 ) 2 2 1 The Psychology of Adjustment Problems in persomd adjustmenl to everyday ' sues. of possible copi ng sol uti ns. Prerequisile: 1 0 1 . ( 2 )

Exploratio n

242 Advanced Statistics and Researcl1 Design A con tinuation of Statistics 23 1 and accompanyi ng lab ta ugh t by members of the psychology depa rt ment. Topics include s ingle and multi-factor experimental design and analyse ' of vaTiance, multiple regression. quasi-experiments. surveys, case srudies, arch ival research, mall-N research, and non - para me tric statist i­ cal tec h n i ques . Students will leam to use comp u ter p rogram s t o carry out statistical analyses, and will have the opportunity to

de ign and condu t their own research tudy. Le tur and labo rator y. Prerequisite: STAT 23 1 and accom p anyi ng lab taughl by members of the psychology depanment or consent of instruc­ lor at least two months before the beginn ing of the semester. ( 4 )

3 2 5 Human Sexuality Study of the psycllological, biological, and cultural c mponents of human sexual and em tiona l behavior. pics i n clude sexu al identity, typical and atypical exual behuvior, reproduction , courtship, and affection. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (4)

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340 Human Neuropsychology

40 1 Workshop

The study of brain-bebavior relatio nsh ips. Topics indud

Selected topics in psychology as announced.

neur anatomical and Ileuro-physiological mechanisms underlying human behavio r; psychological effects of brain damage; pbysio­ logical correlates of languag , sensory and m oto r function , and emotion; electrical stimulation of tbe brain. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 ,

A supervised r ead ing, field, or research project of sp ec i al interest

fo r advanced undergraduate or graduate students. Prerequisite: de p a r t menta l consent.

242 (or e quiva le nt ) ; or consent o f ins tr uc tor. (4)

Selected topics in psyc hology as ann un ced which help fulfill the university requi re men t in alternative pers p ec ti ves .

Experiments and demonstrations related to neurop sychological

11'1 A.

phenomena. Emphasis on m eth odol ogy in research on the b rain

440 Psychology of Language

and beh avi o r. P rerequisite: 340 (or concu rrent enrollment i n 340 ) . aly (2)

The study of language as a means of communication and structured human beh avior. Top ic s ulelude: biological founda­ tions of l a ng uage , psycho lingu istics, speech p e r eption and

342 Learning: Research an d Theory A critical overview of the research data n human and ani ma.! learning, and of the theoretical attempts to tmderstand those d tao Pre req ui si t e :

p ro d uc t io n, sent nee and discourse comprehensi 11, nonverbal communication, language acquisition, bilingualism, language

1 0 1 , 242 (or equivalen t); or consent of

disorders. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (4 )

instructor. (4)

343 Experimental Research Laboratory in Learning Exper i men ts and demon · t r at ion s related to cond it ion ing and

learning in humans and animals. E mphasis on methodology in learning resear h . Prerequisite: 342 ( or concurrent enrollment In

342 ) . aly (2)

444 Adolescent Psychology Physical development, mental traits, social characteristics, and interests of ad lescents; adjustm nts in home, school, and community. Prerequ is ite : 352. (2)

450 Psychological Testing Survey of slandardized tests; methods of devel opment, standard­

346 Perception

ization; limitations al1d i nterpretations of tests. P rerequisites: 1 0 1 , STAT 23 1 (or equivalent ) ; or consent of instructor. (4)

Th e study of our i nteraction s with the physical world and the

nature of our understa nd i ng of i t . l nclu.des uch topics as color

453 Abnonnal Psychology

vis ion, dark adaptation, hearing music and speech, taste, smell,

sensory p hysiology. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 , 242

equivalent); or cunsent of i nstructor. (4)

Models of psych pa thology. Diagnosis and t reatm en t of abnormal behaviors. Prerequisite: 1 0 I . (4-)

347 Experimental Research Laboratory in Perception

454 Community Psychology

E.xperiments and demon s t rati o ns of p er ce p tual ev nts. Emphasis o n methodology in perception research. Prerequisite: 346 (or concurrent enrollment in 346). aly (2)

and social systems. Particular stress on alternatives to tra i tional

pai n, and

(or

348 Cognitive Pro�

r ntegrating ca re r planning into the study of h uman beh avi or in work settings. Applicat ion and e xt e n s io n of p ychological

Emphasis on methodology in research on cugni tion . Prerequi­

prin ip le� to the individua.! operating within an organiZation

site: 348 (or concurrent enrollment in 348 ) . a/y (2)

context-including m asuring and fa cilitating job performance, worker motivation, human factors, and group processes.

350 Personality Theories Stra tegies � r the tudy of persona.lity. Review of t he u ri es and

resea rch. D iscllssion of implications for counsel ing.

Prere qu is i te : 1 0 1 . ( 4 )

462 Consumer Psychology

P re req uisite: 1 0 1 . (4)

352 Development: Infancy to MatuJ.'ity Physical, intellec tual, so ci a l , and emotional growth fro m infancy th rough adol escence to maturity. P rereq ui s i te : 1 0 1 . (4)

354 Social Psychology

leadership,

discussed. Pr ereq uisite: 1 0 1 . (4)

395 Research Laboratory Exp erience in evaluating and conducting research in a desig­ naled area of p sychology; may be offered from time to time as an elective to accompany variuus 300-1 vel courses. Prereq uisite:

(2)

399 InternsbJp A p ra ct i cum experience in the community in the clin ical, social, andlor exp er i m enta l areas. Class room fo cu s o n case concep tuali­ zation and p r es e n ta t i o n. Pr requisite: sophomore stand ing p lus one cou rse in psycholugy and co n sen t of the d epa rtm e nt . ( J -6) F

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Human behavior rela ted to the physical environment. Behavioral basis fOT des ig ni n g environm nts-including territorial behavioT; environ mental a ttitu des and percep tions; and s tress o rs . Appli ations to built and natural settings ranging from room to the wilderness. Prereq uisite: 1 0 1 . (4)

person perception, and related topics a re exami ned and their relationship to vario us types of socia.! chang and i.n flu ences are

I

oeial psych ological principles appli e d to consumer attitude­ and deci sion- making - e. g ., perception of advertise­ ments, influence of reference groups and opinion leaders, and learning effe ts upon rep ea t p u rchas i ng. E mphasis on audience, message, and m dia fact rs. Prerequisite: 10 I. (4) fo rm tion

464

Resea rch and theory concerning the i n tera c ti on between gro up s

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nsent of

. 461 Psychology of Work

Exper iments and demonstrations .related to human cognition.

A

(4)

derive. Prerequisites: 350, 450, 453, or 454; or instructor. (4)

349 Experimental Research Laboratory in Cognition

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groups. Prereq uis ite : 1 0 1 .

basic me thods of counseling and psychoth rapy, and examination of the theories from which these methods

or con sen l of instructor. (4)

consent of in st ru ct or.

clinical styles for promoting the well -be ing of communities and

Introduction t

perception, consciousness, memory, language, conceptual behavior, d eve.l o p me nt al aspects of cogn itio n , individual differ­ ences, and ap plica tio ns . Prerequisites: 1 0 1 , 242 (or eq uivalen );

and the individual . Language, attitudes, aggress i n,

Inter enlion strategies which fo cus p rim ari ly on communities

456 Theories and Methods of Counseling and Psychotherapy

The st udy of human mentaJ activity. Topics includ attention,

120

( 1 -4)

405 Workshop on Alternative Perspectives

341 Experimental Resurch Laboratory in Neuropsychology o :J: U >-

402, 403 Independent Study

Y

471 Psychology and the Law An introduction to t h e issues, research , prot ssional and judic ial practices generated by the owing mutua l i n fluenc e between tbe la and psychulogy. P rerequisite: 1 0 1 . (4)

472 Psychology and Medicine An introduction to the field of heal th c re psychology. P. ycho­ odal fa ctors influ ncing health (e.g., stressors, per onali ty,


behavior p tterns ) . Psycho so c ial impact of illness a n d its lreatmenl. The role of psychologists in the health care system. Prerequisite:

1 0 1 . (4)

474 Psychology of Women Exp lorati n of psych logical i ss ues p e r t inen t t wo men . Includes su h topics as sex differences; psychological ramifi ca ti ons of menarche, child bearing, menopause, sexual harassment, and rape; women's experiences with work and achievement, love and sexua li ty, and psych ological di orders. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 . (4)

431 Psychology Rese arch Seminar An advanced course p rov id i n g students the opportuniry to

des ign and c nduct ongoing resea rch and review cun nt re­ search in psych o lo y. Directed toward hel pin g students perform research stud ies that may be suitable for submission to j ournals or presentations at conferences. Strongly recomm nded in the junior year for students with an i ntere st in graduate studies. To maximize the effectiveness f the cou rse, tudents are encour­ aged to give advance c nside ra ti o n t areas and desi gns for possible research. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 , 242 (or equivalent), and con srnt of ins tru cto r. (2-4) 483 Seminar Sel ected to pics in psychology as announced .. Prerequis i te ; consent of instructor. ( 2-4)

493 History and SysteJllB of Psychology

Historical development, contemporary forms, and ba 'j, as sumptions of the major psydlOlogical theories and traditions. Meets th sen io r seminar/project req u i re m en t when a p roj ect/ paper is added. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 ; 242 (or equival en t ) ; one of 340, 342, 346, 348; one of 350, 352, 354. (4) 495 Research Laboratory Experien e in evaluating and. co nd u c t i ng research in a desig­ nated area of psychology; may be offered from time to time as an elective to accompany various 400-level courses. P rerequ isi te : consent of instructor. ( 2 )

Publ ishing and Printing Arts Por more than twenty years Pac i fi c Lutheran Un iversity's Department of Engli h has offered a way to help st ud ents tran late a "love of books" into an exc iting p rofession al career in p ubl ishing. One of only a few such p rograms in the country, this di s ti nctive interdisciplinary curriculwn in Publi shi ng and Pr i nt i ng Arts (PPA) is highly respec ted

by employers around the country because it combines prep ro fession a l skill and experience with the solid foundation of a liberal arts education. Thi six - course minor is designed to give student with talent and interest

in writing, graphic design , communications, r business a head start into the world of publishing and a broad variety of related pr o fess io ns. The Publish ing and Pri nt in g Arts program is an especially valuable complement to majors concerned with language and the wri tten word, majors such as English, languages, ed u cation , public rela tio n , journalism, market­ ing, and graphic design. But students majoring in a wide spectrwn of disciplines - from biology to music to religion - have discovered the value of a p u b lishi ng and printing arts minor, too. It both helps to connect them to publishing caree r opport uni t ies in those fields and provides richer understanding of the complex roles that written communications of all sorts play in our live and in our modern world.

PUBLISHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR: T h r ee core courses Jre re q uired : E ngl is h 3 1 1 /Communication 3 2 1 - The Book in Soci ety Eng lish 3 1 2/Communication 322 - Publishing Proced ures English 3 1 3/Art 3 3 1 - The Art of the Book I In add i ti on to this 1 2 -hour co rc, students take three elective cour es ( 1 2 hours) s lected from at least two of the foll owing c a tegories: writing/ editing , marketing/management, a nd design/production. Writing/Editing: All E ngl i sh writi ng courses beyond 1 0 1 , in cl u di n g 403 ; app roved courses i n C o mmu nica ti on ( 285,

::1:1 m r-

o z

384, 480). Marketing/Management: Approved courses in Busi ness ( 202,

306, 307, 363, 365, 467, 468) or Communication ( 3 8 1 , 385, 390, 4 3 8 ) . Design/Production: App r oved co urs es i n En gl ish ( 3 1 4) , Communication ( 3 80), or Art (226, 326, 370, 396, 398, 426, 496). Up to two courses

(8 h ou rs ) can be counted toward both a

Publishing and Pri nt in g Arts minor and otber requiremen ,

such as general university req uiremen ts , another minor, or a major.

To e a rn a m i nor ill Publishing Jnd Prin ti n g Arts, students m us t de m on strate wo rd pro cess ing computer skills and ac quj re some form of practical experie nce in publishing-related work ga in ed outside the classroom.

Rel ig ion Religion is an attempt to understand the meaning of hu­ man existence. For Christians meaning is revealed in the love of God in Jesus Christ. The Department of Religion

stands within and affirms this Christian context . In a u n ive ity sett ing this means the serious academic study of the Bible, of the history of the Christian tradition, o f C h risti an theolog y, and of world r eligi o us traditions. Critical study calls for open and a u t henti c dialogue with other religious t r adi tions and seeks to un de r s ta nd a com­ mon humanity as each traditi o n adds its unique contribu­ tion. It call s for a c riti cal yet constructive interchange with co n temporary so c ie ty. Finally, it calls for a sh a r in g of in­ sight s w ith other d i sci p lin e. s in the university as e ach sheds light on the human condition . To these ends th e Department of Religio n offers a wid e range of courses and opportunities. Furthermore it calls students, majors and non- maj ors alike, to consider ques­ t ions o f m eani n g, purpose, and value in a so ciety which all to o often negle cts these questions .

FACUI.:rY: Oakman , Chair; Govig, Gross, Howell, Ingra m , Killen, Petersen, Staley, tivers, Torvend. UNIVERSITY CORE REQUIREMENTS: 8 se mes ter hours for students entering as freshme n or sophomores. Four l owe r divi­ sion hours shall be taken before the end of the sophomore year. The second 4 hOUIS may be s dec te d from most of the other offer i ngs in the religion curricul u m. Tr an s fer students e n ter ing as juniors o r s en iors a re re q uired to take 4 sem es ter hours of religi n (fr m lines 1 or 2 ) , unless presen t i ng 8 t rans fer hours of religion from other accredi ted colleges or universities. Corre ­ sp o ndence COUIses and ind.e p en dent studies may not be used to fulfill the c ore re qui remen t in Relig i o us Studies.

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The Core I re qu ire m e n t in Religiou s Studies (8 hours) speci­ fies that 4 ho urs must be taken from each of two lines, as follows:

I.

Bib Jical , tud ies - I I I . 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 330, 331 , 332, 333. 2. Christia n Th ough t , His tory, and Experience - 1 2 1 . 22 1 , 222,

z o

224 The Lutheran Heritage

Lutheranism as a movement within the church catholic: its histo ry, doctrine, and worship in the context of today's luralis­ tic and secular world. (4)

223, 224 , 225 , 226 , 227, 360, 36 1 , 362, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369. 3. Integrat ive and Comparative Rel igi o u Studies - 1 3 1 , 1 32, 133, 23 J , 232, 233, 234, 23 5, 2 7, 390, 39 1, 392, 393. PERSPECfIVES ON DIVERSITY REQUIREMENT: 1 3 1 , 1 32, 232 , 233 , 234 , 235, 237, 24 7, 34 1 , 344, and 347 fulfill the cross­ cultmal line. 257, 3 5 1 , 354, 357, and 368 fulfilJ the alternative

225 Faith and Spirituality

Reflection on Christian life styles, beliefs, and commit ments. (4)

226 Christian Ethics Introduction to the personal and social ethical dimensions of Christian life and thought with attention to primary theological positions and specific prob l em areas. (4)

line.

227 (247, 257) Christian Theology

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 32 semester h urs with at least 4 hours in each of the three line plus 490. 16 of the 32 hours for

de signed to i n t ro duce the t hemes and methodologies of the

the maj

r must be taken in upper division courses (n umbered 300 or higher). Transfer majors will no rmally take 20 hours in residence. Majors should plan their program early in consulta­ tion w ith departmental fac ulty. Clo ely related courses taught in other departments may be considered to apply toward the reli­

Survey of selected topics or movements in C hristia n theol ogy discipline. (4)

231 Myth, Ritnal, and Symbol The nature of myth and its expression th rough ym bo l and ritual. (4)

232 The Buddhist 'fiadition

gion major in consultation with the ch air of the department.

Introduction to the history and practice of Buddhist tradi tion in

MINOR: 16 semester h ou rs with no more than 8 hours in one of the lines listed above. Transfer minors mu t take at least 8 hours in res idence.

its So uth Asian, Eas t Asian, and We tern cultural contexts. ( 4 )

233 The Religions of China Introductio n to the major religiou s movements of China .

(4)

234 The Religions of Japan

Introduction to the re l i gi ou traditions oOapan. ( 4 )

Course Offe rings 1 1 1 Biblical Literature: Old and New Testaments Emphasizes the Bible as a whole; selected passages interpreted in contempora.ry contexts, such a s relig io n and health care. (4)

235 Islamic Traditions

An introduction to the history, teachings. and practices of Islam.

(4)

1 2 1 The Christian Tradition The study of selected theological qu est ion and formul tions examined in their social and hi torical wntexts. (4)

237 Judaism

131 The Religions of SOllth Asia

239 Environme nt and Culture

Hinduism, Buddhi m, Jainism , and Sikhism - their orig ins and development, expansion, and contemporary issues. (4)

Study of the ways in which envi ronmental issues are shaped by human culture and value . Major conceptions of nature, includ­ ing non-western perspectives and -issues in eco-justice. Critical evaluations of literature, arts, ethics, conceptual frameworks, hi s tory, and spirituali ty. (4)

Historical development of Judaism's faith and commitment from

early Bibti ca1 Limes to the present. ( 4 )

132 The Religions of East Asia Confucianism, Taoism. Chinese and Japanese Buddh ism, ShinLo, and the "new religio ns" of Japan - their origins. development, and contemporary issues . (4) 1 33 The Bible and Culture Opens a window onto the "strange new world" in the Bible. Builds on social scientific studies of the Bible as a document of Mediterranean a ntiq uity; shows the distinctiveness of biblical culture and how a reader's own culture shapes an u nderstanding of the B ible. (4)

2 1 1 Religion and Literature of the Old Testament f the Old Testa­ Literary, historical, and theo logi c al di mens ion ment. incl uding perspectives on contem porary i ss ue s. (4)

330 Old Testament Studies Major areas uf i n q uiry : the prophets, psalms, wisdom litera ture, mythology. theol ogy, or biblical archeology. (4

331 New Testament Studies Major area of inquiry: interLestamental, synoptic. Johannine, or Pauline literature, or New Testament theology. (4)

332 The Ufe of Jcsus

Historical s urvey of "Life of Jesus" research; form and redaction criticism of the gospel tradition; the religious dimensions of

2 12 Religion and Literature of the New Testament

Jesus' life And thought. Prerequisite: one lower division cour e or consent of instructor. (4)

Literary, historical, and theol gical dimensions of the New

360 Studies in Church Ministry

Testament, including perspectives on contemporary issues. (4)

The cburch in human service: the congregati n , the cb urch ­ related colJege , contemporary contexts of world mission. (4)

22 1 Ancient Church History Origins, thought, and expa ns i on of tbe Chr ' tian Church; rise of tile Pa p acy, expansion in Europe and the growth of Christian

361 (341. 351) Church History Studies Selected area of inquiry, ncb

involveme nt in L"Ulture. to the end of th P pacy of Gregory I

as

American-Scandinavian church

(604). (4)

histo ry. reli gious experie nce among American minority commu­ n ities, and the ecumen ical movement. (4)

222 Modern Church History

362 Luther

Beginn i ng with the Peace of Westphalia ( 1 648), in teraction of the Ch ristian faith with modenl politics, science, and philoso­

The man and his rimes, with major emphasis on his wnting and creative theology. (4)

phy; exp a nsi on in the world, modem movements. (4 )

364 (344, 354) Theological Sludie Selected topic or movement within Christian theology. ( 4

223 American Church History Interact ion of religious and social forces in American history, especially their i mpa ct on religious c omm u ni ties . (4)

365 Christian Moral Issues In - depth exploration from the perspective uf Chris tian thics of selected moral iSliues such as peace and violence, the environ-

1 22

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ment, sexu al i t y, p

poverty. (4)

litical and economic systems, hunger, a n d

367 (347, 357) Major Religious Thinkers, Texts, and Genres I n - dep t h study of major figures, texts, or gen res in Ch ri s t i a n and non-Christian religious tradition" t cus i ng especially on t h e theology and religious thought of these traditions. Fulfills either line 2 or 3 as appr priate. Prerequi ite: c o ns en t of i nstru c to r. (4)

368

FenUnl.st and Womanist Theologies A study of major theological t h emes and ISsues through global women's p e r sp ectives n gender. (4)

390 Studies in History of R.eligions H isto ri cal s tudy of s p ecific nOD-Christian religions such as th e traditions of India a n d Chi na, Juda i s m, and 1 lam. (4) 391 Sociology of Religion Multi-cultural investigation of religious exp erien ce , belief, and ritual in rel ati on to their so c i a 1 settings wi t h par ti ular attention to new forms of rel i gion SOCI

39 1.) (4)

in Ameri ca. (Cross-referenced with

392 God, Magic, and Morals Anthropology of religion.

(Cross-referenced wi th ANTH 392 ) .

(4) 393 Religion and the Ufe Cycle Se le c ted pe r io ds considered from a rel igi o us and socia1 scientific viewp i n t (4) o

490 Research Seminar Discussion of comm n readings and a m ajor research and wr it­ ing project with p ubl ic presenta t i n around the student's area of interesL Mee ts the capstone seminar/project requi rem e n t . (4) 491 Independent Study Intended

for religion

majors, a dva nc d and gra d u a te students;

consent of the department is required. ( 1-4)

Scandinavian Area Studies Scandinavian Area Studies i a flexible program which draws on many university departments. It offers a broad perspe rive on Scandinavia past and present, while developing useful analytical and communicative skills . The program reflects b th the Scandinavian heritage of the university and the dynamk p rofile of Scandinavia wit h in the world c mmunity today.

SCANDINAVIAN STUDIES COMMITfEE: Toven,

hair &

Program Director; M. Benton, Hegstad, R. Jense n , Myrbo,

C. Nelson, Rin gdahl , Va ugh t

Farner.

Students enroll d in th

Scandinavian Area Studies program are expected to demonstrate the eq u ivalen t of two years o f Norwe­ gian, Swedish, or Danish langua ge i nstruct i o n ( 16 hours). To gain a basic un d ersta n di ng of the regi o n , th ey also take 6 ho u rs in Scandinavian c u l t ural histo ry and 4 h o urs in Scandinavian li teratu re . Majors choose additional candinavian and cross-disciplinary co u r es in accordance with perso n al interests and goals and in consu1tation with the program di rec tor (4 hou rs i n cross­ disciplina ry course, 2 hours in a senior project, and 8 h urs of electives). A to tal of 40 semester h ou rs is requi re d . With the approval of the S candi navi an Studies &rector, selected January­ term, su mmer, and experimental cou rses may be i ncluded in the major program. No more than 8 semester hour may be o ffere d to mee t both t he Scandinavian Area S tu d i e s m ajor and g en e r al university requ i rem ents or requirements fo r a second major. S uc h cToss-application of co urses must be approved. by the

Sca n&navian Studies di rec tor.

The cross-disciplinary cour es Ii

ted below offer a n opportu­

nity to view th e Scandinavian countries in compar iso n with other world regi ons . They are regular dep a rtmentaJ offerings in which students en rolled in the Scandinavian Area Studies maj or

focus their reading a nd work assignments to a significant ex ten t on S ca n d inavia . Students must consul t with the program direc tor concerning r gistration for these courses. Students are encouraged, thougl. not required. to study in

Scandinavia as part of their program. S tudy opport W l i ties are avaiLable at variety of institution in Norway, Sweden , a.nd Denmark. Ap p ro p r iate coursework comp leted abroad should be submitted to the Scandinavian Studies direc tor for a pp rovaJ toward the majoL

» ,....

Students int re s ted specifically in Norwegian lan guage study are referred to the description of the Norwegian major under the Dep ar t m en t o f Lan gu ages and Literatures . All core Scandinavian course are taught ut o f this d partment.

SCANDINAVIAN COURSES Languages:

11\ n m z n m 11\

No rweg i a n t o 1 , 1 02 - Elementary No rwegi a n 20 1 , 202 - Intermediate Norwegian 30 1 - Conversation and Com posi tion No rwegian 302 - Advanced C nversa ti on and Composition Cultural History:

Scandinavian 1 50 - Introduction to S o& navi a Scandinavian 322 - Contemporary S can dinavia Scandinavian 323 - The Vikings Scandinavian 324 - The Emigrants Literature:

Scandinavian 250 - Masterpieces of Scandinav' n Literature Scandinavian 42 1 - Ibsen and S t r in d berg Scandinavian 422 - Twentieth-Century Scandinavian Literature CROSS-DISCIPLINARY COURSES SOMETIMES APPUCABLE TO THE SCANDINAVIAN AREA STUDIES MAJOR.; Con sul t with t h e program &rector to determine a pp li c ab il i ty. Economics 3 8 1 - Co m para tive Economic Systems En gli sh 33 1 - Th e Art of the Book I E n gl is h 364 - Special To p i cs in Children's Literature History 323 - The Middle Age Hist ry 325 - Reformation P h iloso p hy 338 - Existentialism and Continental Phllosophy Po l i ti ca l Science 33 1 - International Relations Political Science 383 - Modern .European Polilics Rel igion 223 - American Church llistory Rel i gi o n 224 - The Lutheran H r i t age Re ligi on 3 6 1 - Ch urch History Studies

Course Offering 495 Senior Project A re search paper, internship, or other app rove pr oj ec t. For Scandinavi.an Area Stu d ies majo r . r 11 (2)

Division of Social Sciences The faculty within the Division of Social Sciences seek to provide a challenging education in the social sciences that critically analyzes the past and the present ocial history

and structure of human interaction. Instruction is vibrant and relevant to the time and world in which we live and encourages re ponsible citizens h ip for today and tomor­ row. Thro ugh classroom learning and applied settings such as supervised internships, students in the social sciences acquire an understanding of society while developing the P It e l F

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analyt ical tools with which to provide lutions to a diverse range of social p roblems. The Division of Social Sciences fully supports interdisci­ plinary programs. The programs in the Americas, Global Studies, and Legal Studies are housed within the division. In addition. Social Sciences faculty also participate actively in other interdisciplinary programs including Chinese Studies, Women' Studies, and Environmental Studies. Also administered within the division. the Center for Economic Education serves to broaden knowledge of economic principles am o ng K- 1 2 teachers and their students in the Pacific Northwest. u o o z « > " o

......

o v o VI

FACULTY: Kelle her, Dean; faculty member of th Departments of Anthropology, Economics, His tory, Marriage and Fa mily Thera py, Political Scie nce, Psychology, So c iology and Social Work , and programs in Legal S tud ies, Glob al Studies , an d the Americas.

As a division within the College of Arts a nd Sciences, the Division of S oci al Sciences offer programs in each constjtuent depa r t ment lead in g to the B.A. d egree . Additionally, a B.S. d egr ee i s o ffere d in psycho l o gy and an M.A. degree is offered in m ar riage an d family therapy. Cou rse o fferi ngs and degree requ irem e nts are l isted un der

Anthropology Economics History Marriage and Family Therapy Political Science Psychology Sociology and Social Work

Sociology Sociology exam ines the p rocesse s and st ructures willch sha pe social gro ups of all size , including friend . families. workplaces, and nations. The study of . o c io logy p rovi des students wi th unique interpretive tOols fo r u n derst a n ding themselve and others in a cha nging world. Sociology has broad appeal to tho e who are interested in developing p ractica l skills and analyt i cal tal nts. So m of the practical pursui ts ena bled by sociologi I training are in the areas of progr m development, counseli ng, res earch , crimmal j ustice, e mploym en t and management, and m arket ing . The academic prepa ratio n is valuable t those inter­ ested i n pnrsuin cr de grees in law, admirustrat ion, social work, theology, or the social sciences. The dep art men t's curriculum offer a var iety of courses in so cio l gical anal ysis while per mitt i ng an o ptio nal concentration in the spe cialized area of family/gender or crime/devianc . The curriculum is deliberately flexibL to permit students to s tudy individual ' ubjeC l areas, or to pursue majors or minors in the field. Students majoring in bu iness, nursing , e d uca tio n, and c mputer science find the sociological mi n o r particularly useful fo r broade nin g th ir understanding of s ci al rules an.d rdati n­ ships. programs and olutions, and continuity and change. The famlty is atte.ntive to the individual needs of students in their efforts to provid e a ademi excellence to a diverse student body. BACHEWR Of ARTS:

General Major. 40 semester hours, in c ludi n g 10 1 , 240. 330, 397, 496, 499. plus 12 semester hour in sociol og y approved by the de pa rt ment at th e 00 and 400 levels ; and Statistics 23 l . Major with Co ncentration in Family/Gender: 4 0 semest e r hours includi ng 1 0 1 , 330, 397, 440, 496. 499; p lu s 1 2 semesler h urs in socio lo gy chosen in co nsul tation with the de part me nt ; and S tatist i cs 23 1 . Major with Concentra tion i n Crime/Deviance: 4 0 semester hours in clu di ng 101, 336, 397, 4 1 3. 496, 499; plus 1 2 semes te r hours of

See also sections specific to affiliated degrees and programs for C hi nese Studies, Global S t udie , and Legal Studies.

sociology chosen in consultation with the department; and

Statistics 2 3 1 .

Social Work

Revised req l/irements Jor those majo ring ;1I both SQcio logy and social work: 80 semester ho urs incl ud ing Social Work 275, 323. 380, 385, 472, 473, 475, 476, 485, 486, and 499; ociology 1 0 1 ,

See Sociology and Social Work immediately following.

397, 496, 499, plus 1 6 elective c redi ts ( recommend ed cour ses i ncl u de 0 iol ogy 330, 362, 386 and 462); Statistics 23 1 ; Psychol­ ogy to I ; and B iol o gy 1 1 1 .

Sociology and Social Work

NOTE: 1 0 1 or c o nsen t of instructor are prerequis ite to al 1 3 00

Sociology and soci 1 w rk, as distinct disciplines, are con­ cerned with understanding contemporary ocial issues, policies. and solutions. While sociology emphasizes re­ search, interpretation, and analysis, social work empha izes intervention and practi ce. The disciplines share an intere t in hwnan relationships and experience, con temporary family life and family policies, ethnic diversiry and race relations, poverty and social stratification, social justice and community organizatjon. Both disciplines encourage hands on learning through field placements, internships, and service learning projects. Students may major in either sociology or social work. minor in sociology. or com plete a double major in sociol­ ogy and social work. Social work majors are encouraged to minor in SOciology. FACULTY: Leo n-Guerrero, Chair; Biblatz, Higginson . Job t, Keller (Social Work Program Director), McD ade, Russefl, Sza b o.

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and 400 level courses.

MINOR: 20 semester hours, including 1 0 1 and 1 6 emester hours of soc iology chosen in cons ulta tion with th dep artm ent .

Statistics 231 may be included See School ojEducation.

TRANSIlBR STUDENT POLICY: The d p artm en t accepts, for transfer cred i t from another college or univer ity, onl y tho e co u rse equiva len t to Soci logy 1 0 1 (Ame r ic an Society or Intro­ duc t io n to S ciology) and So cio lo gy 240 (Social Problems) . lf st ud en ts wish to have additional courses consid red for t ran sfer to eitheJ' their major or minor requirements, they must first meet with the department chair. The litudent shou ld bring to tills initial meeting the foHowing:

1. college/university transcripts 2. college ca talogs 3. course syllabi a nd oth r sop porting materials Declared majors/min rs will be required to frJ l out on petition per transfer course.

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in the m i no r.

BACHELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION:


Course Offerings 101 American Society An introduction Lo the discipline of ociology. Features an analysis of contemporary American society wjth mphasi on the interconnections of race, class, and gender. Sociological concepts include ocialization, odal roles, stereotypes, power, and stratification. This course ful fills the alternative line in the Perspective on Diversity requirement. (4)

1 11 Critical Conversation An analysi of selected social issues and problems with a special emphasis on critical thinking and communication skills. Topics vary. Open to first year students only. No prerequisites. (2)

240 Social Problems Critical examination of poverty. discrimjnati n, drugs, crime, home1e sness, viol nee, family breakdown. Cour e addresses problems facing the United States today, an analysis of their social roots, and an evaluation of the policie designed Lo eradi­ cale them. (4)

302 Topics in Sociology Selected topics as announced by the department. Prerequisite: departmental con ent. ( 1-4)

326 Dellnquency and Juvenile Justice An exam in tion of juvenile delinquency in relation to family, peer groups, community and institutional structure. Includes consideration of processing of the delinquent by formal agen ies of controL Prerequisite: 1 0 1 or consent of instructor. a/y (4)

330 The Family An examination of the instituti n of the family from h istorical, multi-cultural, and contemporary perspectives. wilh emphasis on how families and fumily life are affected by social forces such as the economy, race and ethniciry, rel igion, and law. Topics include: Relationships, love, authority. con flict, sexuality, gender issues, child rearing, comDlun ication pattern , and violence i n the con text o f family l ife. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , PSYC 3 3 5 or consent of instructor. (4)

336 Deviance A general introduction to a variety of nonconforming. usually secretive, and illegaJ behavior, such as corporate crime. drug dealing, prostitution, industrial spying, child abuse, and suicide, with emphasis on the conflict of values and life-experiences within a society. Prerequisite: Hll or co sent of instructor. (4)

3S 1 Sociology of Law

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An examination of the. ocial control of law and legal instilU­ tions; the iofiuenc� of culture , od ocial organization on law, legal change, and the administration of justice. Includes examples of how law function within the major the retical models. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 or consent of in tructor. (4)

362 Families in the Americas A cross-cultural examination of family life in the United States, Canada, Central and South Ameri • and the Caribbean. with a speciaJ emphasi on how social force u h as the economy, culture, and religion SM e family life. Includes discussions of race/elhnicity. social class. and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: SOCI 10 1 . ANTH 1 02 or consent of instruct r. (4)

386 Equality and Inequality Examination of the natur , origins, forms, and consequences of social equalities and inequalities. Focus on material circum­ stances, lifestyles. and life changes in s cial classes. including racial groups and other minorities. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 or onsent of instructor. a/y (4)

391 Sodology of ReJJgion An investigation of the American religious scene with particular emphasis on the new religious movements, along with attention to social settings and processes which these new religions reflect

and produce. Prcr quisite: 1 0 1 , one previous reli i n course, or consen t of instructor. (Cross referenced with REL1 39 1 ) . a/y (4)

391 Research Methods An overview of the methods to aplore, de cribe. and analyze the so ial world. General issues in the design and implementation of research pr jects. as well as specific i sues thal arise in conduct­ ing interviews and field ob crvations, constructing and adminis­ tering survey , analyzing existing data, and planning program evaluations. Required for j unior so i logy and social work majors. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , junior status, or consent of instructor. ( 4)

399 Internship Students receive course credit for working in community organizati ns and integrating their experi ce into an academic projecL Placements are usually arranged by the stud nt and may include th public school system, rivate and public social service organizations, criminal justice system agencies. local and state governmental agencies, and businesses. Departmental consent is required . ( 1 -4)

4 1 3 Crime and Society An examination of criminal behavior in contemporary society in relation to social structure and the criminalizalion proces . with parti ular allen lion to the issues of race, gender, and class. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 336, or onsent of instructor. (4 )

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418 Advanced Data Applications An opportunity for advanced majors to work individually with faculty members or the community on sp cial re earch and data analysis projec . as they becom available. Pr requisites: STAT 23 1 and SOC1 397. Departmental consent is required. (2-4)

440 Sex, Gender, and Society An analy is of sexuality and gender from individual nd cultural perspectives. Gender stereotypes a nd socialization; transexuality an ero -gender sy tems; communication and relationships; sexual attitudes, behaviors, and lifestyles; work and family issues; vi lence; gender lratification and feminism. Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , WMST 1 0 1 , o r consent o f instructor. Fulfills t h ternative Line in the Perspectives on Diversity requirement and is a core COtl e for Women' Studie minors. ( 4 )

462 Suicide An examination of the different aspects of suicide and suicidal behavior. Begin with a oss-cultural and h istori ] overview, I oking at variations and changes in altitudes toward suicide. Review of the s ope of the problem and careful analysi of theories that attempt Lo explain why people commit suicide. Discussions of intervention in suicida l behavioral and the question of the right to u icide. Prerequisites: 1 0 1 and consent of instruct r. (4)

491 Independent Study Readings or fieldwork in specific areas or issues of sociology under supervision of a faculty member. PrerequisiLe: departmen­ tal consent. ( 1-4)

496 Major Theories An analysis of influential sociological theories of the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to the classic theories of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, to the recent contemporary smools. and to the underlying patterns of thought wh i h both unite and divide the ociol gical trad ition. Required for enior majoT . Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , senior declared major/minor, or consenl of inslructor. (4) 499 Senlo.r Seminar Capstone elI.l'erience for SOciology majors. Students integrate theme from previous 'ociology courses through addi . nal readings. re earch. and discussion. Through formal presentations and research, students critically as ess their sociological under­ standing. Pre quisite: Senior tatus or departmental consent. (4)

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Any fal si ficatio n in the application for admi sion is grou nds fo r dismissal from t he p rogram. Applicants who. are oot ad mi t te d to.

Social Work Within a prDgram that is firmly based in the liberal arts, tbe sDcial work majo.r is designed to. prepare students fDr beginning prDfes s ion al so. ial wo.rk practi e. SDcial wo.rk bas b . th a heavily m ultidiscipl inary-based body Df knDwl dge and its ()Wll co.ntinu ­ o.usly developing kno.wledge base. The co.mp lexity o f s ocia l issues and so.cial problems th a t confront tbe mo.dern-day so.cial wo.rker

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require this broad tbeoretical perspective. Social wo.rkers are invo.lved in ar as that are i nUuenced by political, economic, so.cial, psycho.lo.gical, and cult ural factors. To that en , the pr gram stresses an understanding o.f so.ci I science theories and meth ods. Tbe curriculum pro.vides a fo. un dation for under land­

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ing the i nteract i Dn of i nd ividu al , family, and communi ty sys­ tems, as the basis for generalist practi e. Students learn a multi­ meth od a pp roach to. so cia l work pract.ice that e na bles th m to

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address a wide range of ind ividual, fa mily, grDup, an d commu ­ nity needs. Students enhance their commitment t informed action to remove inequities based on race, ethn i ci t , culture,

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have access to a rich va.riety of social service agencies in Tac oma and Pierce. County that provide field learning sites. Students work with experienced, caring supervisors who. belp make these placements valuabl learning expe riences. Socia l work majors sh ould consult with a dep rtmental adviser to p lan their COLT[ 'e of study. The faculty encourage students to take advan ta ge of leami ng opportunities that empha­ size multicultural awareness and diver ity. The social wDrk program is accredited by the Co.uncil Dn So cia l Wo rk Education.

ADMISSION TO THE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM: Stllde nts apply and be accepted into the p rogram. The sodal wDrk program welcomes diversity and invites illtere t nd applicatiDns

from persons who. seek to p artic i pa te i n a professiDn c o.mm itted t helping people, now and in the fur ur e. tudents will be admitted to th Social WDrk PrDgram for fall semester on ly. The priority date fDr ap pliOltiD n s is March 1 , th ugh applicati ns will be accepted until available pDsitions are f student

1. transcript that documents the completion of at least 40 semester hours Df p rescribed co.urse work with a minimum gra de Po.int ave ge of 2,75. In addition, the tudent must show successful cDmpletion of the fol lowi ng prerequisites: Writing 1 0 1 , Psycho. I gy I O J , So ciolo gy 10 1 , Bi ology I l l , and the PLU m a t h en trance r equireme nt . ( NDte: grades below C­ do. oot t ransfer) ; 2. a personal essay which add resses (3) inter s t i n social work as a career, (b) L ife experiences shaping an interest in social work, (c) pr fessional social work goals, and (d) an evaluation of per so. n al s trength s and li mitations (details may be ob ta in ed from Social W r' Program); 3. a su mmary Df wo rk and volunteer expe ri e nce; 4. two. letters of recomm en dat ion that evaluate and docu ment the app l i cant's potential for 'ucces in so cia l wOTk ducation and practice; 5. Washingt n Sta te Patrol Criminal HistDry clearance (Appli­ <;ants with a criminal recor d will be urged to. explore their pr ospects fDr register i ng as a counselor or later being c ertified as a so.cial worker with the State of Wash.ington) j 6. wr i tten agreement to cDmply with the National Associati n o f So(;ial WDrkers' C de of Ethics ( copy Df which is available from the Social Work Program); 7. personal interview (mu be requested) .

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5 35-72 94 .

CONTINUATION POUCIES: To remain in the p rog r a m , a

studen t must: I ) main ta in a

2.75 grade point verage in acial

work cour es and a 2.50 o.ve rall grade poinl average; and 2 ) demonstrate behavio.r whidl is consisten with the NASW Code of Ethics and Un iversity C de of Conduct.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester hours in social work, including 275, 323, 380, 85, 472, 473, 475, 476, 485, 486 and 490; 1 2 semester h DurS in sociol gy, including 1 0 1 , 397 and four elective credits. Addj tio. naI requirements include Anl hrD pDI­

Course Offerings

101 Introduction to Social Work

An int roduc ti o n to the field of social wo.rk. ProYides a n Dverview of the practice sett ings, lheDret icai mo.dels, and val ue base o f the p r fessioo of soci al wDrk. Students have the opportunity to visit several diffe.!' ot settings and meet with c urrent ocial work practitioners. A volunte er expe rience in the field is a required wmp nent of the COUIse. r (4)

201 January on the Hill An intense experience of co m m unity work on Tacoma's Hilltop District and/or Tacoma's east side wh re students learn fir t hand abDut poverty and participate i n community p roje cts . Fulfills the a1t mative line in the Perspe tives on Diversity reqllirement and

the January t

se eki ng the Bachelor Df Arts degree in Social WDrk mus t first

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Ap p licati on materials are available directly from the SDcial Work Program in Xavier HaD, or may be requested by calling

ogy 1 02 or 334, tatistics 2 3 1 ( must be completed at PLU), Psyc h o lo gy 10 1 , and Bi o logy 1 1 I .

gender, so. ial class, sexual Drien tation, disability, and age. The so.cial work faculty place a high vallle Dn the in t e gration Df academ ic and experiential learning. The prDgram provides field wDrk experience in (;ommunity settings. Social wo.rk majors

fille d. Enrollment is competitive. Admis i n is det rm ined by fawlty eval ua t io n applicat io ns on the basis of the fol l o.win g criteria:

<;andidacy for the degree may reapply wi t ho. u t preju ice.

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requ i remen t J (4)

275 Social PoUc;y I: History of Social Welfare Sod I policy c urse required f all social wo rk majors. Exp lo ra ­ tiDn of interdependence f social, cultural, po liti cal , and eCD nomi - factors in the histDry, th eory, and practice of soc ial welfare, with special reference to the develo. pm en t of the social work profession in resp Dnse to SDc ial problems. Exami nali n Df the rel atiDnship among the sDcial weLfare sy tems, the probl e ms and issues addressed by social ervi es, and the role of the p rofes sion a l social worker in service areas and se tti ng s sudl as aging, child we.lfare, health and mental h eal th , income maint e­ nance and services to women and m inoriti , Oppo.rtuni ties to meet with pra ct itioner in th field. Prerequisites: NDne. I (4)

323 Social Work Practice I: Interviewing and Interpersonal RelpiDg

An introductory pra tice course w hi h provides st u d ols with the con eptual framework of generalist social work practice.

Application of the ecol Dgical systems perspect ive to d irect p racti ce. Provides ,tudents with the opportun ity to learn intentional in t e rvi ewing skills a nd apply those skill s wi thi n various models of practice. Assists students t ward m aste lY i n assessment, goal e tting, contract ing, dey lopmeot o f int rven­ tion plans based o.n theD r y and assessment infoIDlation, evaluation, and termination . Must aJ si tes :

275, 380.

0

co mplete lab. Prerequi­

II (4)

380 Human Behavior and the Social Environment Exa m inatiD n Df the b iol ogical , psychDI gical, cultural, a nd social i ntl uences on hllffian developm en t . An ecol ogi ca l persp ective fDr

st udying the t he or y and develD pment of i ndiv id ua l s, families, gro u p s , institutions, or ganizatiD ns, and cDmmllflitie with inlp l ica t ions for generalist social wo.rk practice. Special emphasis on gender, ethn icity, nd other aspects of human diver ity. impact of sodal and eCDnDmic forces Dn individuals and social systems as well as ways in wh ic h system enhance Dr hin de r


healthy human development. VolW1teer experience is co m p onent of the course. Prerequisi tes: No ne. t (4)

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385 Social PoUey II: Social Policy Analysis An in -dep th examination of social welfa re structure, functions, policy, a nd p rogram s. The influence that economic, political, and cultural systems have upon soci al p oljcy and th e way ill which t he values operati ng in these systems impact so ial policy. An examination of the impact of a dm in istra tive and organizational structures at various governmen ta l levels on social p oli cy implementation, especially as they affect services to vulnerable po p ulati ons . lnaoduces students to applications of theoretical frameworks to socia l work pol icy in su ch areas as income maintenance, health, mental health , child welfare, and housing and homelessness. Prerequisite: 275. II (4) 399 Special Topics in Social Work. Selected topics as an noun ced by the depar tment . Topics relevant to current trends and issues in the field of social work. (2-4) 472 Social Work Practice n: Families and Groups Th seco nd social work practice course which teaches theoretical models and practice skills for intervention with families and gro u ps. Includes an understanding of culturally sen si tive pr actice. Explores diverse family fo rms. Intr duces students to group dynarni and group d evelop men t. Prerequis i les ; 275, 323, 380, 385. I (4) 473 Social Work Practice m: Macropractice A co nceptual framework based on et h ic s and values consider­

ations and requisite skills for social work p racti c e with groups, orga niza tio n s, a nd com m u ni ties. Emp ha s is on m acropractice

assessment, intervention, nd c ha nge st rategies at the org aniza­ tion. c mmunity, and l a rge r system I vel. P rer eq ui sites : 275, 323, 380, 385. II (4) 475 Field Experience I Students are ass i gned to a social service agency and p artici pate , under supervision, in the del ivery of ocial work services. Prerequisites: 275, 323, 380, 385; to be taken concurrently with 472 and 485; requires consent of i nstruct o r. I (3)

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476 Fidd fuperlence n Continuation of 475. Students receive mo re advanced field assignments in a social service agency setting. Must be taken concurrently with 473 and 486. 1I ( 3 ) 48S Field &perienc;e Seminar I This seminar provides students with the opportwl i ty to learn about the intake and assessment process al various social service agencies . Enables students to moni tor their progre ss in their field experience setting. Musl be taken concurrently with 475. I ( 1 ) 486 Field .Experience Seminar n In this sem inar. students learn about tbe strengths p ers pec t ive as it relates to social work practice and present a ca e from their field sett ing. Students will con ti n ue to devel op skills in evaluat­ ing their own p ractice and learn abo ut the ap p licability of research t soc ial work practice. Mus t be taken concurrently with 476. n ( 1 ) 490 Senior Seminar In this caps ton e experience, students examine the evolutio n of their own personal style of social work practice, the t heori es and models for p racti e which th ey have d evelop ed , the ethical and value foundation which underlie social work, a nd how these are i n tegrated with their p er 'onal and professional experiences and prior coursework. The product of this final ynthesis is pre­ sented to the class and is open to others within the universi ty community. Prerequisites: 275, 323, 380, 385, 472, and 475. II (4) 491 Independent Study Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ( 1 -8 )

Statistics Statistics, a branch of applied mathematics, studies the methodology for the collection and analysis of data and the use of data to make inferences under cond itions of uncertainty. Statistics plays a fundamental role in the social and natural sciences, as well as ill busilless, industry, and government. Statistical practice includes: collection, expl ration, summarization, and display of data; desig n of exper i me n ts and sampling surveys; drawing inferences and making decisions based on data and assessing the uncertainly of such inferences and decision ; and the construction of

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mathematical models for analysis of random processes. Probability forms the c oncept u al foundation and math­ ematical language for the inferential aspects of statistics. The statistics program i offered cooperatively by the Departments of Economics, Mathematics, Psychology, and Sociology. The program is administered by an Interdisci­ plinary Statistics Committee headed by the Statistics Pro gram direct r, who is appointed by the dean of the Division of Social Sciences. The statistics minor is admin­ istered by the Department of Mathematics. Students interested in a statistics minor are encouraged to discuss course selection with a statistics faculty member from any discipline.

FACULTY: Selected faculty from th e Departments of Economics, Mathematics, Psychology, and Sociology.

ST.ATISTICS MINOR: A minimum of 16 semeste r hours to include Statistics 34 1 , at least 8 hours from among the oth er statistics courses, a nd Co m p ute r Science 1 1 0, 220, or 1 44. The statistic courses ch en for a stati"ti' minoi will va ry with the interests of the st u den t. Some typical programs le ading to a s ta ti st i cs minor are li s t ed below; a comp uter science course must be added to each list.

gradu ate or professional actu a ria l career:

Fo r students in terested in math emati cs, work ill statistics, or

all

Statistics 34 1 , 342, 348 For students interested ill econo m i cs or bus i ness:

Statistics 23 1 , 34 1 , 244 or Statistics 3 4 1 , 342, 244 For students imeresteli in other social sciences:

Statistics 23 1 , 341, 244 or Statistics 23 1 , 3 4 1 , 348 (Psychology students should take designa ted sectio ns of Sta tis tics 23 1 . ) For students interested i l1 natural sciences:

Statistics 34 1 , 342, 348 or Statistics 23 1 , 34 1 , 348

Course Offerings 23 1 Introductory Statistics Descriptive statistics; measures of central tendency and disp e r­ sion. Inferential statistics: generalizations about populations from samples by parametric and non p ara m et ric techn i q u es . Methods covered will include estima.tion, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, regression, chi square, and ANOVA analysis. Includes a req u ired computer lab. Students should register for the lab corresponding to their lecture section. (May not be taken for credit after STAT 34 1 has been t aken. ) I II (4) 34 1 Introduction to Mathemati.atl Statistics (MATH 341 ) D escript ion o f data ( un iva ria te and bivariate), introduction to probability (axioms, discrete and con tinuo u s random variables, expectations), special dist rib u tion (binomial, Poisson, normal, gamma ) , statements of l aw of la rge numbers and cent ra l limit theorem, elements of experiment al design ( co ntrol, random iza­ tion, blocking), sampling distributions, point est i m ator ( bi as ,

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efficiency, methods of moments and maximum likelihood) , confidence intervals. hyp othesis tests, regressi o n (if time permits) . Pre requis ite: MATH 1 52. I ('1)

Women's Studies

342 Probability and Statistical Theory (MATH 342) Continuation of Math/Sta t · 34 1 . Topics may i nclude: jo i nt, marginal and c n d it iona l distributions, correlations, distribu­ tio ns f func t ions of random variables, mome n l generating functions, Chebyschev' inequality, convergeDc in probability and li m i t i ng dislributions. introduction to inference in regres ­ sion an d ODC-WilY a nal ys is of variance, introdu tion to B yes ian and non-parametric statistics, power lest and likelihood ratio tests. Prerequisit . MATHISTAT 34 1 . aly IT (4)

Women's Studies is a multidisciplinary program that enriches the traditional liberal arts curriculum by adding new perspectives on women's lives and accomplishments. Based on the study of women in culture, society and history, the program incorporates gender into other basic categories of analysi including the dynamics of social change, the creation and transmi i n of culture and the arts, the legacy and cultural construction of OUI phy ical and intellectual characteristics, and the origins and nature

343 Operation Research (ECON 343) Quantitat ive methods for decision problems . Emphas is on linear programming and oth e r detenninistic mod e l s. Prerequisite: STAT 23 1 or eq uivalent. IT ( 2 ) 3 44 Econometrics (ECON 344) Introduction t the methods and tool of econometrics as the basis for ap p lied research in econ mics. Specification, es ti ma ­ tion. and testing in the classical linear regres sion model . Ext nsions o f the model and a pp l icat io n s to the a nalysi s of economic data . Pre req u is i te: STAT 23 1 or equivalent. (4)

of current theories and social issues. Women's Studies broadens the education of both male and female students and enhances their c a reer preparation and professional opportunities wherever there is need to understand women and the new role that they play in ociety.

FACUlTY: Wome n's Studies Executive Committee: M a rcu s, Chair; B r usco, Ellard-Ivey, Ha c ker, Hames, Keller, Killen, Kraig, M ann . McDade, McGraw, Pettinato. MINOR: 20 semeste r hours, includ ing two Women's S tudies core

348 Applied Regression and AnaIy.is and Anova (MATH 348) Li n ear, multipl and nonlinear regression, regression diagnostics and violations of model assumptions. analysis of varia nce. exper­ imental design i ncl udi ng randomization. and blocking, mul ti ple comparisons, analysis of covari ance. Sub tantial u e of a stati­

stical comp uter package and an e m phasis on exp lo rato ry ana lys is of data. P re r quisite: 34 I or consent of instructor. Iy n (4)

49 1 Independent Study ( 1-4) 500 Applied Statistical Analysis (ECON 500) (Will not count fo r tati tics Minor) An intensive introduction to statistical methods for graduate students who have not previously taken I ntroductory Statistics. Emphasis on the appli alion of inferential stat isti cs to concrete situa t ions. 11 p ics covered include measures of lo c al ion and variation, p rob ab il i ty, esti mation, bypothesis tes ts, and regressiolL (4)

courses (4 hours), two program core cour�es (8 hours) from departments in different divisions or schools; and two el ec tive courses ( 8 ho urs ) from two different d ivisions or schools. 1. Women's Studies Core Courses (required - 4 hours) WM, T 1 0 1 - Introduction to Wo me n' Studies ( 2 ) WMST 4 9 0 - Seminar in Women's Studies (2) 2. Pro ram Core Courses (8 hours) Students choose two courses from th foU wing program core courses which introduce women's studies in respec tive disciplines. Selections musl be from two differenl d ivis ions r schools: Anthrop Jogy 350 - Women and Men in Wo rld Cultures (4) English 232 - Women" Li terature (4) English 34 I - Feminist Approaches to Literature History 359 - Histo ry of Women in the United States (4) I nte gr a ted Studies 23 1 - Gender, Sexuality, a nd Culture (4) I n teg rate d Studies 232 - Topics in Ge n der (4) (pending a p p roval of topic) Ph il os op hy 220 - Women and Philosophy (4) Ph ys ical Education 3 1 5 - Body Image ( 4 ) Psychology 4 7 4 - Psychology of Wo m e n (4) Religi o n 3 6 8 - Feminist and Wo rnanist Theologies (4) Sociology 440 - S , Gender, and Society (4 )

3, Elective Courses (8 hours)

Students choose two c ourses from the following opt i ons. Selections must be from two different divisions or school s . J. Additional c ourse from the p rogra m co re courses. b, Courses from an app rove d l ist p u bl i sh ed in the class schedule, c C ou rses from any disc ipline for which part of the course requirement can be fulftlled with a researc h paper on women or women's issues. T his allows the integration of Women's St ud ies perspe tives into cours s that a.re not explicitly or ent irely structured around those perspectives. Co nsent of instruc or is req u ire d . Students sh mid consult the Women's Studies chair prior to en ro ll ing for the co u rse and are requ i re d to submit the syllabus, research p a p e r, and other relevant as i gnme n t s to the Wo men's Studies Executive Conunittee f r ap p roval upon completion of the course.

MAJOR: The Women' Studies major is a multidisciplinary an d interdisciplinary comple m ntary major. C nferral of a baccalau­ reate degree with a major in Women's Studies requires comple­ t i o n of a se co nd major from any d iscipline in the university. Students are encouraged to de clare both maj ors simultaneously

1 28

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a nd t

pl a n a p rogram awa re of the possibilities for applying

Req ue s ts fo r credit toward the Women's Studies majo r and

individual co urses to both maj o r s. The Wo men's Studies major

minor from transfe r courses must be a ppro ved by the Women's

allows application of courses from the second major and for

Studies Executive Co mmi ttee. Submit syllab ll s and course

ge n eral un ivers i ty re qu ire men ts (Core

sign me n ts to the Wo men's Studies chair. At least

I and Core II) to the

Women's S t u d ies m aj o r.

34 ·emester hours, i n clu d in g Women's S tu di es 1 0 1 a n d con­ cu rrent enrollment in Wo m e n' s Studies 490 and 49 1 (6 ho u rs) ; fo ur co u rs es from the a p p ro ed li s t of program co re courses

from tI"I'O d i fferent divisions or sch oo ls

( 1 6 h o urs ) ;

two elective

cour es from two differe n l divisions or schools (8 hours); onc servi e I a r n i ng course (4 h ours) . Students are required to complele a mini m u m of fo ur upper division courses in t h e

program . ore and electives. Program

ore

Cou rses ( 1 6 h o u rs)

Students ·hoose fou r cou rses from the followi n g program

core c o u rses that introduce Wo men's Studies i n respective discipli nes . S el ec t i o ns must be from t wo different d ivisions or schools. A n thropology 350 - Wo men and Men in Wo rld Culrures (4) Engl i s h 232 - Women's Literature (4) Engli . h 34 1

-

and 10

as­

hou rs of the

hours o f the m inor must be co m p l eted at PLU.

Course Offerings 101 Introduction to Women' Studies Ex plo r es th e r ich n es s an d dive rsity of women's lives and e pe rience s from a variety of perspectives, including the social sciences, h u manities, and arts. Open to all studen ts . No prere q u i ites. May be used in part.ial fulfillment of the alternative line in

1 . WOlllen's Stl/dies 1 0 1 - I n troduction to Women's St u di e s (2)

2.

major

17

Z G'\

the Perspectives on D ivers ity requirement. (2)

490 Seminar in Women's Studies A seminar for students who will do either a n i nte rn s h i p or a research proj ect in Women's

Studies. ( 2)

49 1 Independent Study: Uudergraduate Readings Re a di n g in specific areas or issues of Women's Studi es under the supervision of :1 fa culty member. ( 1-4)

Fem i nist Approaches to Literature

H i sto ry 359 - History of Women i n the United Stat es (4) I nt eg ra ted S t u d ies 23 1 - Gender, Sexuality, a n d Culture ( 4 ) I ntegrated S t ud ies 2 3 2 - Topics i n G e n d e r

(4)

Writing

( p e nding approva l of topic)

Ph i l o s o ph y 220

-

Women Jnd Philosophy

Physical Ed u ca t io n

3 1 5 - Body I mage (4)

(4)

Psychology 474 - Psycho logy of Women (4)

Rel ig i o n 368 - Fem inist and Woma nist Th eo l o gies (4) Socio logy 44[) - Sex, Gender, a n d S ociet y (4) 3. Electives (8 hours) Students choose two courses from the following o p tion s. Selection:; must be from two d i fferent divisions or schools. . Additional courses fr0111 the p rogra m core courses.

101 Inquiry Seminars: Writing See General University Requirements, The Freshman Experiellce. (4) 20 1, 202 Writing Seminars for Inte.rnational Students Organized themati c a l ly, these courses emphasiz

bOLh the

mechanics and process of writing. S t ll d en t s are placed i n one or the other on the basis of TOEFL scores a n d a writing placement

exam. (4, 4 )

b. C urses from a n approved list publL hed in the class schedule. c.

C o urses from any d isci p l ine fo r which p a r t of the course requirements ca n be ful fi l J ed with a re search paper on

women or wo m e n's iss ues . This allows the i n te g ra t i o n of Wo men 's Studies perspect ives in to courses that are not

explicitly or entirely st ructured around those perspectives. Consent o f the instructor is re q u i r e d . Students should consult the Wo men's Studies chair before enrolling for the c u rs e and are required to submit the syllabus, research paper, and other re lev a n t assignmen t s to the '-Yomen' s S ru d i es Exe utive Co m m i tt ee fo r approval upon completion of the course.

4. Service l.eami�lgl[l1tern ship (4 hours) S tudents must enroll for eilher a ser v ice learning course in coopera tion wi th the C nter lor Public Service or an int rn­ s h ip through ''''o men's Studie; and Cooperative Education.

Internships req uir ed fo r the second major may be appl ied to the Wo men's S t ud ie s m aj or. In ternsh ips s h o u ld be ap p ro ved by the ha ir of Wo men's Studies. When this course is sched­ uled in the semester co n t i n u ous with the s m es te r i n wh i ch studenb c moll fo r Women's S t udies 490/49 1 , one-year service le a r nin g pl acem e nts or i ll ternshi p s may be a rr a ng e d , but J re n t required. 5. Capstone Experience (4 hours); W men's Studies 490 e m i n a r in Women's Studies (2 hours) and Women's S t udies 49 1 - Indep ndent S t u dy (2 h o u rs ) Majors are re q u i re d i n their final semester of course work t o enroll concurren tly fo r b o t h Women's Studies 490 ,md 49 1 . Majors may enroll for Women's Studies 49 .1 ( I ndependent Study)

wi t h

either the inst ructor fo r Women's , tu di e s 490

( Sem i. na r in Women's Studies) o r a fa cu. l ty member whose area f exp

c r i s e qu alifies her or h i m as a consultant fo r the

re­

search proj e t or i n te r n s h i p planned for Wo m e n's Studies 490.

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GRADUATE STUDIES This ection contains information about Pacific Lutheran University graduat program . Cour e descriptions for graduate course are included i n the undergraduate section of

the catalog - within the spec ific departmen t or school.

The Office

of Graduate Studies coordlnates and i ntegrates schooL� and departments that provide graduate level instmcrion. The general purpose of gradu­ ate education i to further the basic obj ectives of the UDl ­ versity by providing graduate level a ademic and profes­ sio nal degree programs. Specific bjectives are: ( ) ) to increase the breadth and depth of un derstanding of grad­ uate students in the l iberal arts; (2) lO increase tudenl ' knowledge of research be i ng done in their field of concen­ tration; (3) to develop st udents' abil i t ie to do independent l u dy and research; and (4) to en hance st udlmts' profes­ the work of t he

sional abilitie .

he Master of Bu iness Administration p ro g ram w h ances the m J n a gl!fial effectiveness of l ea der s in business. governm ent. and n o n · p ro fit organizations. Individuals of all

uatt io n al and

e

working background..\ are en co ur aged Lo apply. The program i

accred i ted by AACSB - The Internatlona.l ASSOCiation for The Master of Arts in Education meets tho: needs of ed uc at ors by offering fiv!, conce nt ra t ions: I . The Class room Tenc/ring concentration provides advanceu prep, r tlon in subject ma tte r and pro f�s sio na l ed uC<l. l i n for e leme n t ar y and sccondury classroom le ach er s.

2. Education I Admillistmtioll i� de igned t p repare profession ­ als t become el l' menta r y and econdary 5c h 01 pr i n cipal, and progra m admm istrators. The d egre e is open 1'0 q ualified p ro­ fessionals not se ek i n g pri ndpal \ c ede:n t i a l ' , a we ll. 3 . The l.iteracy Educatioll co nce n t T L i o n prepares educat rs to encou rage IileI<KY a cquisi t io n and development approprilltt: 10 students' n tis and in ter ·SIS. The im ponan e of ch il d ren's literature, i nfo nn a tio n literacy, and t chno log y arc empha ­ su d lbmughollt. in both theory and practice. 4. Special BdllcatiOll seeks to c.· pand the qll <ll i fic l'ILion . of person whQ s erv e special n�cd" ch i l d re n and youth in a vanet of e duca t ion al r rehabili w.t iy; sell' gs. Some o f the e roles cl settin gs m ight include sel f-con tained and resource room teachers, special ed ucat lo n com llitants, �upp rt pl!fson nel , r co o rdinators .

5. J"iNal

ertijicat/oll is designed to prepare qualified teachers K-8 ( F!' ment:lry Education ) 1I , ld 4- 1 2 ( Subje ct Matter pec i IC).

with endorsements in

The Master of Science in Nursingers an integrated appn>ach to the acquisition of kn ow le d ge and clin ical competencies essent ial Lo acivanced nur 'ing practice. Prog rams oj study i ncl ude two onn:ntratlons: 1 he Nurse Practrtio ru" concentration repares 01.1rSeS for rol es as pr ima r y are pr vidcrs. Subsequent to nati on al certi t1ca­ tion , gra ud ates are awarded ARNP l ice ns u re as Family Nurse Practilio nl'rs whose cope of , dvanced ur mg p ract ice incl ud es prev� l ive. promotional, diag nost i c. and prescriptive .erv ict:s in primary Glre settings. 2. The Cart! ami Or/fromes NT/wager coucc[Jtrallon prepare:. nurses for an dvanccd nursing practice role i n a van ty 01 posil ions w it h in ! he emerging man aged ht! al t h care Y5tcm Students focus on . ;e management 3l1l.l the d vdopmen t of a

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ccreditalion for Marr i age and Family Therapy Ed uca t io n of the A mer ica n As�()ciation for M a rriage aud Family Therapy.

Admission Students eeking adrni . ion t

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any gr aduate program must h old

regionally accreilited college or UD.iv . ity. A cumulative undt rgraduJ tl: grade p oi nt ave rage 0 al least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale ) is required for a dmLsilln as regular a

statu graduate tudent. Those students wilh .In average of less th an 3.0 m y be gr.tnted pro 'isional statll� and wiU nOl be considered or ad mission to regular status u n ti l they h ave demomtrated the i r ability t� do gradua te work by co mpl eti ng a nnnimum of eigh t semester h o u rs of work With a c u mula tive

Management Educa t ion.

P

The Master of Arts in Social Sciences ( Marriagt' and flJIn ily

Therapy) is dCl>igned to d evelo p profession.ll sk ills and di nical competence by means of a systems approach to fum ily lherapy with :I TigOf9us praclicum co mp on en t . The program i. accred ­

a bachel or's degree from

MASTER'S DEGREES OEFERED

1 30

�kiJ\ set that as ures th c cUnical and managerial compt!tt'nce needed to fu nction as ul ihz at io n review coord.inator�, risk ma nage:r�, nu rse ed ILat fs, nurse a d m i n i tramrl'. sch Jo l n u rses, li n i c al specialists, or nurse adm illist rator:. Rcf�1 10 page 105 ill this wtd/Vg for mJrmnqtlO/I rdated to tile RN It> A1SN program,

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grade p oint average or at least 3.0. All applic.llion evaluat ions art: based lln schol..1.\lic qualifi tJOn ' , a stiltcment of pr fcssiO ll al goals, letters 0 recommend'l ­ lion. and prepara t ion i n the pr�posed fidd of study. (I me g rad­ uate progTams may al 0 requi re auto biographic I stat m n ts , pe rsonal i nterviews. standardized tests. or olher evidence of rofcssioJhlI .lccom[ 1i ·hment. Listi ngs for each program dctall these a dd i ti onal ;'\Jmission requirements. Th dean of gradt alt: s tu dies may d en y admission if applicants' sc h o l a sti c records a re un l ist i nguished. if pre par-. l ­ tion is judged in<ldeqllll tt: as a foundation for grad uate work,

or if the progrnm� are .urea y fi l l 'd to eapa ity. Admission d ecis i ons a re made by the de n of g radllnte studic_ u pon recom mendation by the grad ua te co mmittee I) the respective

academ i

un i t.

tudents apply in g s u bm it a

r admiSS Ion to graduate st ud y must

comp leted appl ication fo rm . a stale m �t of goals,

a

resume, and a non-refundable applicati n fee of $35.[)O. Applicants DlmL reqll e �L [rom each previously a1!enJed LOstillltio n of h igher lear 1 09 (ullder&rndlJ;}tc and gr aduate ) an officialtranscript to be scnr by tbe insti t u t io n d i rect l\' to the

Office of Ad m; �ion a t P LU . fmlhcr s uppo r t i ng ev i u ence in the torm of pen.onal recom­ me da t io l1� dr c required fr m those person� namcd by the ap pl ica n t on the n p p l icn t i n fo nn. Refer to i ndiVIdual prog r ams fo r pplicatio n deadli nes. Application pa ckets are avai labl e from the Office c Admis­ sions. 253 / 535 -7 1 - l . Ln sum mary. the foll wing ite m. must e on file in the Office of Admis ion before an ap pl i nt will be oonsidered for admission: I . Tile completed a p pl i ca t i o n form . 2. A sta teme n t of proJessional and educatiollill goab. 3. A resume 4. The $35.00 n n-refundabll' applica t i n fee. 5. An offiCial transcript from each instit ut ion of nigher l earni ng atte nd d. Al l transcripts must bt: sen t di rectly to the Office of Admissjons at PLU from tht> inst itution p rov id i ng ule Lr,tn�cripl .


6. Tw() <!commendations. 7 . TOEfL lest scores fu r all i n t ern .ll.i o na l stud nts (. ee i nterna­ t ional stu dent sedioll for details) . 8. AJ d i t imw l l y. p eci fi programs requ i re the fol l owing: • Ma�ter of Busmess A m i nistrat ion: G M AT score. \11 1\: or GRE .core; personal • Masler uf Arts In E d ucati 10: , i n t trvlO!w w i Lh p rogram director. • Master of A r ts i ll SOl :ial CIC!n ccs ( Ma r r i a ge and r-;am i ly fhera.py J : '\utobi grllphical �lateml'nt, persunal int rv i ew. • Master of S cien ce i n Nursing: GRE s co re; personal interv iew with program dIrector. (l lea�(' COlllact the Counsel ing a n d Te&ling Office at 153 /535 nOf\ fur i n formation on l hl' GMAT, [ h e M AT, and the (t R e. .'\11 recurd� become part of the applicant 's official lilt: and ca n be Ileir h 'r r.!tu rned nor d u p l icated for any purpo 'e. An offer of ,I(imission is goud for one year in most programs. Adm itted students wh o have not e n rolled in any course work (or nc year .1fter t he semester they i n d icate they i n tend to beg i n t h e i r program must reapply.

adm.i t ted to a degree (,I rri e

INTERVlEWlNG OF APPUCANTS: Befo re arlmi IS

i o n to a

a dv isab l e for an a pp lica n l to seek an

program dircl:tor in

the subj c area ,'f interesL In erla ill progra ms, a personal interVIew is a req u i re­ ment .l - pari of t he applic.ltio ll p r c e s. See specitl program requ irements for t.letuil:.

CLASSIFICATION OF SronffiVTS: A st uden l m ay be .tdm.itted t\1 J grad uate program with regular or proviSIonal st u de J U status, and may enroU as a ful l- timi: or hal - t i m e )tudcmt . Rt'gu/llr - Those stu den � approved u nrese rve d l : for adm is:; ion

Lo gra d uate study a re gra n ted regu lar status. An undergradu-­ ale grade p in t a\'erage of 3 . () or higher b req u i red for reg u l a r

statu . PmYlsirlTlaL - I n some programs, newly adm itted st uden t ar as_igned prOVisional stat u.� u n t i l certain progr m rrcreq\li'ite� have bc�n !'nct. S tud en ts who [., i l t o qual i fy tor reg u l a r slat us becau

(If grnde p(linl avcri\ge or lack of c m plrt ion of

spe�ilk prerequ isites may be granted provisional status.

NOTL Studcnl� who havc applied for gradu a te school before compleung their undergraduate work may b� adm i t ted a

regula r or prllvi iOt al status �tLldenb wit the condll ion I h.ll work cannot begin u n til they have successfully completed t heir pachel,)r' d eg ree and offici,ll l anscnplS with the degn�e: haye been received by the Office r G rad uate Studies. Tntemational s l lIden ts lacking a deq u ate En g l is h skil ls will oot be ad m i t ted condition all y.

NOIl-fllIl triClliarcri - tudents h o ld i n g the bach elo r ' - degree who \ is h LI) pursu.: course work w i t h n intc n t io n of qu a l i fy i ng for an advanced degree at PL are cia �ifled as rHln-ma t ricu lated · I ud 'nb A non-matriculated tudent may take a maximum of nine semester hour of SOO-Ievel courses. FIII/-rmlc - .raduatr l u den ts enrolled for eight or

ure emcstcr hour in fall or sp ri ng semester are on s id ered f 11-

Ume. Hal{-tim,,- Gradu.'\t e student en r tiltl1l eight semester hours in fal l

progran·\. No such cred i t can be counted

a

(NTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! tud l.'" I!i from abroad arc subject 10 an the requirl'rul:nt.� [or adm ission estnbl isht' by t h e Office of Admis�i n�.

To allow am pl e time for v i sa and other departure the app l icant should have Ius

or

III -! C o

roced res,

her app licat io n and all sup­

porting do.:umenlS o n File i n t he Offkc of Adm iss i ns no Ic;ss

t h a n r ur month fore ;) proposed d te of n t ry. The followi ng documents a re necessary B E FORE an a p p lication can he

m III

processed.

[.

o r m al app l icat i n for adnmslon and tatemel1 [ or goals w i t h the 35.00 n o n - refundable application fee ( wh ich can n Ol he

reason) .

2 . A n o fli ial transcript from eaci1 institution of higher lellr11i n g

Policies and Standards graduate p rogra m, It

;Q

> o c > -! m

gmut: lower [h"n B-. I n all cases, a leller i ndical i g change of tatm w i l l be lorwardeu to the student, wit h a opy to t he adviser andl r program direcror. that

waived (or a ny

i ntervic\� w i th the

"

de:!;re progra m . Credit carne du r in g non-matrkulatcd ci a , sifka t i /1 may (.:o un t toward a grad uate degr-ee, hut llnly a. recommended by the faculty advi s ory committee and approved b) the dean Jf gra ate s t ud ies afler t he �tlldent haJ, been

l ied for at l easl four but Ie s or spr i n g semester arc

consid er d half- t ime. CHANGE OF STUDENT STATUS: St udCllt statu wi ll be

changed from I'ronsioll(l/ to regu/Clr after the [ollowi n g condI­ t ions have been mel: satbfactury fulfillmen t of cou rse deficien ­ cies; sa listactory compleuon (If eight semestl"T hours f graduate work with .a c u mul.H ive gradt' poi nt av<:rage of .3.0 or highe r; or satbfa"( ry I:ompl t ion of departm � tal o r school requiremen ts. Student status w il l be cha n ged from nOIl -lllatriculated to rt'gu la r/pJOI,j iOt/1l1 after t he no n - matricu lated s tuuen ! completes the no r ma l app l ication p r o t: ss and is acce p tc I i n to .1 regular

auended. All t ransc r ipt... mUSl hI! .e nl directly t the Office f Alim i s it'lns at PLU rom the instil\) i on p rovid in g t he I ra n ·cript . ,. \vn I tte rs of recOTIlm endation I'Tom seh, 01 offici or ersons of recognized standing. App l ica nts t ransferr ing from an American coilt!gt! r un i ver - i ty sh o ul d req ues t lheir inlernaLi nal $tlluent dv i sc r to ' end a commenuation ·1. Demonst rated proficiency in th e Fngli h language through :maining a m i n i m u m score of 5-0 on the Test of FIl glish a f1'oreign Language (TOEFL ) or a minimum of 8S un the written st!cLion ,md 85 on the oral sec t io n f the M i higun Test. Conditional c.:cpt.mce ill nol be g ra n ted for interna­ t i on al students lacking adequate Eng l i h language ski l ls. 5 O fficial scores from specific I.e't as requ ire for ce r tain program or co n cen t rat i 4 ns. Sec mdivu.lu a l master's progra ms f, r furthe r information. I n ternational students are reqUi red lO sub m i t a $300.00 ad­ vance payment followlOg an ffe r (If ad mis iOIl. ThL-; payme n t � tbe student's acknowledgment of acceptance. and is c redi ted to th� :;tudt:Ilt'

aC(.;O ll n t to be , p plied Loward expcns� of the tiN term " r en rollment . If circumslane s nece sitat cancel LlIiun f

e n rollm ent and t h e Office of Graduate Studies is n ot ified I n wriling thirty days i ll advance c)f t h e anti c ipa ted Jate of enrol l ­ ment. the $300.00 ",HI be refunded. An [-20 form ( Certifica te of cligibi l i t y fo r J 'o n - imm i grant Stude[]t Sl.1Lus) w i ll be is ueu only art�r ;t l i uocu mcnts have been rr!cclved, the app lication has been reviewed, the student has been offered adm i�ion anti accepted , a cer ti fica l i n o f fi n a nces ha� been received. and the 300.00 advanced p ay m en t has been r�ceived. ertlfkaLkm from b.mk, and emb a.�s i es I� per m i - ibl.. . A financial staLement fo r m is ava ila b le Ii orn the O ffi� of Admissions upon request. T he 1 -20 for m should be taken to lhe U. " . Consula te when requesting a v i sa to co me to t h e U n i ted States for a gradua te program . 1 -20 fo rnls issueu by Ul Office of Gruduate Studie a re fo r [mIster' degree prograrn� only and no t for intensi c E n gl i s h l a ngu age study. I nternatIOnal students are req u i red by i m m igratIon su!a­ tion;; to e n rol l as fu l l - t i me student ( a m i nim u m of cig l t credit hours per seme ter). The y are also reqUIred 10 have a p hys i ca l e.xa minntion an J to suom i t the appropriate medi.:al fo 1 - t the uil iversily\ Heal t h Service. Before e n rol l i ng (or classes, all internat ional �tu dcn ts a rc: rcquirr.>d lo have Ile.1. l th an d ledical in�urance. which is oblai ned th ro\lgh the u n iverS I t y aft r arrival on ampUl;. I n terna t ion.al graduate stud Il ls mus t also report to the Ce n ter for Int rn at i on .l l rogram . 253 / 535 · 7 1 94 , upon reg-

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o :l I­ III w

l­ e( :l Q e( a! I!J

istration fo r purposes of i m m ig ra tio n and univc i t y rccorci­ keep i n g. This must be done at the time of registration ( Harstad Hall, fir t floor ) .

and elective g ra d uat e cred it shall n o t exceed [ 6 semester hours d urin g the sem ster. A memorand u m stating that aU bac al u re­ ate rcqui.rement are b e i n g met during the cu rrent eme�ter must be signed by the approp riate departmcnt cha i r o r school dean and pn.-,ented Lo the dean o f graduate st u d i e s at the time of �uch registra t ion. Th is registration docs not apply toward a higher degr e u n les s i t is laler ap p r ove d by the st udent's a dv is er an d / o r adviso r y c o m m i t tee .

FACUlIY ADVlSJN(}' Upon adJl1is ' ion each student will be assigned fa u l ty adviser re� p o nsi bl e for assisting t h e student in d ete ml i n i ng a program f ,-t udy. When appropriate, the ad iscr w i l l chai r th s tu den t " advisory comm itt . S tu d en ts .U'e en co u raged t meet w i t h t he i r advisers early in their p ro g r am s .

mini­ mum of 32 semest 'r hours i s required. 1 di v id u aJ prog rams may requ i re mo re t ha n the mi n i m u m n u mber of se m e� te r ho u rs, depending upon p r io r preparation and spec ific degree req u i re ­ ments. Any prerclJu is i tc courses t, en d u r i n g the grad ua ' program shall not co u nt towa rd ful fillment of gr ad ua te degree H O URS REQUIRED fOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE:

PETITIONS: [t is the stu den t's responsibil ity to fo rmally pe t. i ti on th .. dea n of gradua te tudies fo of progr

I )

tran�f\!J' c redi t, c h a ng e

or adv i - cr, or any exception to p hcy. Pe t i t i o n fO ID1S

m' y be b ta m e d from advisers or from t h e grad uate program 'oord inalo r in the ( , ra du a te Studic� O ffi ce .

re q ui rements. TRANSFER OF CRED IT: G r a d ua te work fro m a nllth er institu­

t ion may be a ceptcd for t ra n s fe r upon petition by the s t ude n t a n d ap prov,u by th pmgral d ire tor. Right s emes te r hours may be t ra nsti:rabk to a 32 semester hour p ro gram . I n degree p rogra ml> rCt1uirmg w rk be y o nd 32 �emes ter hours, more than eight e me stcr h()uL may be tr ansfe rred . In any cas c, the st ude n t must complete at least 24 · e mes ter hours of t he deg ree program at Pacific Luth ran U ni versity. TIME UM lT: All requi re mc nLs for the m a s te r 's degree, including crllcl i t 'a m ed befor admissi o n , m ust be completed w i th i n even year ' . The s ven-year limit C Q r� a l l cou rse appliecl lO the m rer ' de g re e , credit t ransfer red from a no t her institu t i o n , col11pr he n sive ex, m i nut io ns , research , an d fi nal o ral e. amina­ tion. rh e seven - yea r l i m i t begins w i t h b -gi n n i ng J a t e of t h e firs t c u rse appl icable to t he gradu:J tc de gree. (See al50 "Satisfactory

Progress Polity." J

RESID ENCY REQ UIREMENT: A ll ca nd idaLe� fo r the master's d�gre e mllst c mplcte 24 semester h o u rs

he m i n i m u m st�n dard accep tahle fo r the mast er 's d gr e is a grade po i n t average of 3.0 i n all graduate work. Gra d u a te lev I red i t can n o t be give n fo r any class in which the grade earned i s lower th a n a C-. A stude n t wh s e grade p o i n t aver ge fa lls be l ow 3 . 0 is s u bj e ct to dism issal from the program. I n s uc h in tances, lh recommen ­ da t io n fo r dismis sal or co nt i n uance is made by the stu de n t's advi ory committee , nd acted up )n by the dean of g rad ua t e s t u d i es . STANDARDS O F WORK:

f Paci IC Lu th e r a J1

Uruvcrsi ty courses. rMMUNI ZATION POUCY: All graduate

t pro ' icie

a

s

t uden t s are re q ui red

u n i versi t y he,lllh h i s t r y form with i1ccurate

i m m u n ization records of measles ,

mu mps, rubella, and tetan ­ tudenls born befo re J an uary I , 1 95 7 , must prov ide doc umc nta t i n for te anus- d i p h t heria (Td) booster within the last ten ye a rs. All in te rna ti o na l s t ude nt s arc required also ro have u tuberculos is ski n t es t ( p u r i fied protein deriv<l t i"�-ppd ) . This test w il l be d n e at H .11th Se r v ice a f t r arri v al at the univers i ty. T he co�t is $ 1 l.OO. Students w i t h que t io ns r concerns abou t the immu niza t i o n pol icy should con tact l Iea l t h �ervices at ( 2 0 6 ) 535-7 337. d iphth r i a to Health 'ervices.

ACADEMIC PROBATION: A student pursuing the master's

degrre wh o frIi l s to ma in tai n a cumulative grad point ave ra ge may be placed on academ i c p ro ba t i o n . When such action is taken. t h e student will be notifi d b y lett r from the Office of the Provost and Dean of G raduate Studies. A gr ad u a t e , tudent on probation who fa ils to attain a c u mulal ive gTade point ave ag of 3 . 0 i n t h e next term o f cnrollm nt may be d is m i.s e d from the proOntm. f graduate student ca n n o t cam a m aster's de gre with l es ' than ' 3.0 c u mu lat i ve g rade p o i n t average in a l l

of 3 .0

COURSES TAKEN ON A PASS-PAlL BASIS: [f a grad uate studen t's p rogram i n c l u d s a cour�e where ·tu dents may e le( [

a

l e tte r grade or the pass-fail option, gmcluate studen ts must opt

for the le t te r grade. 1 1 00gra dua te leveL I n

COURSES ACCEPTABLE FOR GRADUATE CREDIT: n umbe re d courses des c r ib ed in t h i s cat log

are

_

som graduate p n gram�, a l i m i ted n I m ber o f 300-level and 4 00· I<,vei CClurses may be accepted fo r graduate c red i t . ( See Degree wzd COl/rsc O(Jenllgs or g rad u a k course descrip tions . ) A ma " imum o f 4 . ern ster h l U I'S o f co n t i n u i n g education cre d i t may be nccepted toward a master's degree. T h is applies to con t i n ui n g ed ucation credit ta ke n a t P Ll' o r tra ns fer red frol11 ,ll1other lmiver · i t y. All 'ourst's accepted for rl e master's degree ' rc ubject to the a pp rova l F th prog r a m d irect or and the d�n or g ra J ua k �tudies. GRADUATE CREDIT FOR SENIORS: I f, d ur i ng the I;

t 'emes­

ler of the s en i or year, a cand idu te for J baccalarneate degree fi nd s i t p ossible to

\;

mplet all d gret: requirements w it h a

reg i st rat i o n 0 fewer than

1 6 semester ho urs of u n dergradua te credit, regi, tratian for grad uate cred i t may ue permissible. I Iowevt:l, the tO la l registra t ion for undergradullte req u i rements 1 32

P

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graduate

sect i 11).

Y

I

vel work.

THESIS AND RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS: St udents are required to p rese n t evidence of abi l i t y to do i d ep dl!nt research. ThLs can be demonst ratct in t h ree ways. See each pro­ gram t! t i o n � r expla n<ltion or r es ea r ch o p t ion s w i t h i n each glll d u ate program. The fi rst meth od is a t hesi. . hose st uden ts wr iting theses must s u bmit their or igi n al theses for binding a nd microfil ing by Un iversity M icrofilms (If A n n Arbor, Mich igan. I n addition, a UMI Disser tation Serv ices p ubli s hi n g form ( M-Form ) and an ab · tracl o r 1 50 word.� or less mll t be u bm it led with t h e p llblish i ng fcc, to the O ffice of G rad ua t e S t u d ies , 11 0 later t h an three weeks be re gradu at ion . Fees for mia fi l m i ng , publishing abstrac ts, and b ll1di n g original these� for t h pe r manen t PLU l i b ra ry col lecli\lI1 are pai by students (see Tllit ion and fees


-

Th e seco nd m ethod is a research paper. If d pro g ram req u i res or studen ts elecl r�scarch paper op t i O l1b. one o r i g i nal paper m u. t be subm itted t t he Office of . rad u a te Stud ies w i t h an ab t ract of 1 50 words or less. Researc papers will be m i c rofilmed at PLU and plated in the PL library collection. M i c ro fi l m i n g (ees are paid by stu den ts.

Thc�e_� a n I research papers m LC, t be i n lh� fficc of G ra du a te �L Ud ie� nOl lale! tha n t h re e weeks before the end of t h e sellles tt·r. A l l t heses (lnd papl!rs pre�e n ted I ust be clean, error-fre e, Jnd follow t h e APA Styl e M a n naL D e t a i ls a rc a v a i la b l e fro m the O ffice

of C.raduate Stud ies.

The t h i rd method o f ful fl l l i n g re�ear(h rc y u i rc men t s in p rogram s i s t h ro ugh papal' pres e n t ;l t i o n � or c u l m i n ating

Tuition and Fees Tui t i o n ch arge� for g r a d uate s t udents are dekrmined by the num b er o f semester ho ur s for w h i c h a student re gis t e rs and ar e based on a semester h o u r rate. Tu i t i o n per semester h

for

1 999-2000 . ........................ $507.00 . .. . $ 70.00 T hes i s co py righ ting . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . . . . . . . .. . $35.00 Research paper o r project m ic ro fi l m i ng . . . . . $ 1 0.00 raduat io n fcc, $30.00 Libra rl' fec: fo r uJ1c n rolled st uden ts ( per sem ester) . .. $25.00 ur

T h e s i s b i ndi n g/ m i c ro fi l m i n g (subj ec t to change) ..........

......

.. .. . . . .

.

...

..

..

.

. .. . . . . .

.....

...........

........

.

.. .

.

....

..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....

..

...

specific co urses. T hese c ou r�es are dl:signed t(1 i n tegrate lhe program ma lt'rial while p ro m o t i ng i ndepen de n t re5earch ,l ud st udy. EXAMINATIONS: Writte n c o m p reh nsive exa m i rwuorl; an lim

ral exam i n at ions a re requ i red i n all gr.lJ uate programs exce p t the Master of B u s i ness Admi nistrat i o n p rogra m . Procedures fo r these examinati on , vary for t h e d i fferent prog . I1l S. Where app l i ­ cal le, these (" x a m ul at i ns over the st udent's progr m of studies a re cond u c t.:d under the direc t ion or the maior adviser a n d / o r the �tu\ient's ad v i s o r y com m i l lee and norrn J l !y will e sched uled no laler th a n

3-6 weeks before com mcnceme nt In any C<l�e, th e

fi nal w ritlen cump rehemive t:xam i na tion m u �t l.Je pas�ed

Dl )

later

t h a n four week� beto n! ·o mmencemen L . T h e oral ex a m i na tion over the t h e' is or resea r h is co n d u cted tnder the di rectiu n of tlw tuden!'!; adv isory com m ittee .IlId must be com p l et e d successfully no l ater than t h ree weeks before com m encement. GRADUATION: All courses m u.,t be om pleted. exa m ination s

passed , Jnd

thesis/research

requi rem e n ts

fldfillcd i n order to

qua l i fy for grad uation . Graduate studen ts must apply for grad ua t ion by the hc:gi n n ing of lht' se n e ter in which the)' ,Ire p lanni ng

III

graduate.

, Upo n acceptance. meet with t h e as ig n ed ad v i s er pos.� ible to cst�lblish t h e pr gr a m of st udy. •

Appl y for graduat ion . Pile your

a ppl i c a t io n

r

Ap pl i ca t io n s a nd. loan information may F i n an cial t\i d,

il

l o a n can be g ran ted .

be ob ta i ned

from

253 /535-7 1 (� 1 .

A l i m i ted n u mber ll f gradua te ass istan tsh ips arc av a i lable.

Cont.lct the Office of G rad uate St udies for app l ications and i n forma t ion. The pri ori t y date for subm iss i o n e)f app l ica tions for the aC.ldem ic yea.r beg i n n i n g i n Septe mber is April I . rad u a te a n d profes ­ sa me . atis filCto ry progress requ i re m e n ts as u ndcrgra uate stud Ills in order to con t L lluC

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS POLlCY: s ionn l st uden t m us t meet th

receiving financial assistance, w i t h t lw fol lowi n g exce p t i o ns:

1 . /v l i n i m l m g rade p o i n t a ve r age Each grad lJute program m o n i t o rs t h e grade p o i n t a crage of i ts s t uden ts. I n general , grad ucl te s t u d en t s mu t m a i n ta i n a m ini m u m g rad e p�) in t average of 3.00. 2. M i n i mum cred it req u i re m e n t for gJ".t duatc fi n a n c i a l ass ist a nce : ENROLlMENT STATUS

MINtMUMIT£RM

MINIMUM/YEAR

S 6

16 12 8

f u l l - t i me

j/4 t i me 1 /2 t i m e

4

NOTE,: Less

titan 1 /2 time ellrollment will W liSC a sirldent loall

to be cailcelled Ilnd may jeopardize deferment stlltuS.

3.

'I aximum g r ad ua te t i mc a l lowed: a ) The m a d : m u m number o f fu l l - t i me graduate c red i t hours

soo n as

t h a t ma), be a t t empte d is

72, and

th e maxi mum time

al lowed to comp lete a g ra d u a t e degree

b ) The

in w h i c h the

is 12.$.ill��.

max i m u m n u mber of pa r t - t i m e graduate credit hours

that may be a t te m p te d is com plete a gradua

for g r a dua t ion

with t/1t: Rcgist!1lr's Oft] e . Yo u r cap and gpwn onit'r will be to you. NO'I'E: If" srI/dent foils to complete ,Ire I/eeess,,?, relJuirf'lIIeTll for g,aduflliOIJ, thf' IIpplicatioll for grmlu"t;o" ",ill 1101 ul/tomatictd/y be {orwardCiI ,o 'hI! II/!X' CD'/uIII1neemf'lIt tlt,l£. TI,e stud.. ", mllst milk/! II srco"d app/iell/ilm.

r

be a d m i t ted tl) .1 graduate program be f()f('

Regi, ter for th esis or rese, reh paper as required. Dea dline: the la t .w:ep l able reg ist rat ion date is t he semesl s t udent expec� to receive his or her degree.

as

11'1

g rad ua t e studt:nt is available i n the fo rms o f Perkins (a� flllll.li ng perm i t s ) and Staf� cd S t uden t Loans, graduate assistan tsh i ps , and scholarships. S t u d en t must F i nancial assistance �

i n the Re g ist ra r':; Office. 'itud cnll; pLan n i n g to take pa r t in com m ence m en t exercises m ust ulso fil l o ul an order form tl1r a cap, gow n , a nd hood.

degree requ i rement s.

m

Financial Aid

App l ica t ion forms a re a va i l abl

RESPONSLBILITIES AND DEADLIN ES: It U. the respo n s i b i l i ty of each graduate student to know a nd fol l ow the proced u re ou t l i ned in this catalog and to abide by estab lished dead l i nes. See i n d ividual master's p rog ra m and. co ncen trations for spe c i tl c

-4 C o

som�

projects in

\1\

e

72,

and the m a x i m u lll al lowed to

degree i s

7 \'Cars .

sen t

Tilk� (omprehen, ive \ itten a nd / o r o r a l exa m i nation u n der t h e d i rtc t i on of the major a J v i s er or adV iso r y com m i ttee. Dead l i ne: no later l ha n fou r �eeks before commencemen t . Sub m i t lhC!ses �nd resea rch papers in final fO lm to t h e OfticI: o f

S C H O O L O F B U S ! �I E S S

Master of Business Administration Progra m,

Graduate Stu res. At t h i� t i m e the bi nd i ng/ m ic ro film i ng fcc

must be paid. Deadl i nes are: Appl Ication Oil,.

GradlUlllon Oat..

Graduation

August 1999 D�P1ber 1 999 JlUlull.ry 2000 May 2000

March I , t999 Septem ber 1 8 , 1 999 Od o b�r I , 1 '199 Nl)v� m ber I , 1 999

Thesis Due

J u ly 3 1 , 1 999 November 24, 1 999 November 24. 1 999 April 28, 2UOO

NOTE: TIIf� 'Irl!5islres�III'''' paper(sJ "",st III! sig"cd by tire /IIdjor 1,«v0! been read by I/II! enc;re commiLtee b,'forl' submIssion to lire Office of Grndua/e SlIuii£S.

atll'isM and

11 1 1 . School of Business Assistant Dem; and Director. M.B.A.

Donald It Bel l, Ph. D., f) Ca t he ri ne Prat t, M.A . •

. cizool of BljSiness

M.B.A. PROGRAM: The 'I .B.A . program is cen tered

nn

Lhe

skills and k nowledge requi red fo r pro fes s i o nal mana g ement, providing a strong fo un d a tio n for rcsp nsiblc l ea d e r s h ip i n b usi ness, govern m en t, a n d 1I0 n -profiL orgHZllLat io!ls. The At B.A.

program offer, b J i ll L WIling (lnd weekend progmm options / 0 serve the working commwrity. The cl a ssroo m environment is enhan ed by a balanct" f fu ll-and pa rt - li me shldents, w i th d ivers!.' baL.kg rounds .

as

we l l as st uden ts

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VI ....

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT: I n ,l ddition to the general M . B. A. program. PLU offers an M . B.A.

vith

J

concentrati on in Tech nolog y a nd l nnl1va tio n MJTlagcment.

Th i s program ocuscs o n tec hn ol gy and i nn o vat i o D management l�sues .lnd kills with i n a high qual ity M.B A (urricul um. it is VI w

des ign ed for tech n i c I am i non - lee n ieal �mp l oyees who w

t a

TWO-YEAR SATURDAY M.B .A.ITIM PROGRAM: The M . B.A. progr.lIn with a .· p ec ia l i za ti o n 1 11 Techno logy and I nnovat iolT

Management ( TIM ) io <1,",0 available in a two-year S a t u rda) o n l y formal. The S.lI un!;l} program be� ins each fa J i ·emes ter. ADMISSION: Studt:rlts who h o l d hache! r's degre es in any field from regiona l ly ac redi teu UIliver f l ics O f co l l ege.-; and who have demon trated their a bi l i t y or p o tent i a l to do high qU.ll i ty academic work on a consl ·t 'nt baSIS a re encouraged to app! (or

All applicant� arc required t

space-avai lable basis.

ubmit Scores [rom lhe Graduate

o bI' adm i ued to the M.B.A. prugram, candi.dates must show

complete the M . B cu rr i culu m SUCCC5 iully. Criteria used to evaluate applica nt s are: 1 a 2.75 o r h i gh er cumulative grade poi nt average in oil col Ie.ge­ level wu rscwork before :1 1 p l ic at i o n ; .

Z. a score of at Icast 4 70 on the GraduJte M an age m c n t Admis­ s io n Tes t ( GMAT) ; 3. of fo mlula score of at I e:! \ 1 ,050, computed by m ul li p ly ing lht: grade poinl ave rage by 200 and a dd i ng that product to the GMA score. 4. Evidence of manageri a l and professional po ten tia l tllroUgh !.talemenl () goal , re mmendalions. and pr io r e; pcrirnce. An interview w i th the M.B.A. director may be requestcJ. NOTE: Exceplion� will be evaluated illdivulunlly, based on a preselllal;on offactors /Ildimlnlg all equ;vall.'IIu to admissia"

star/dill-tis, a promise 0/SUCCI!SS ;11 graduate scllool. alld porelltinl colltr;burions 10

G M AT is

a

a

f

test of b us i ness knowledge per se. The

com putcr-aJ,) p t ive te�t lhJI i

v ailable . year- round ,

a

at test centers throughout the w( .rid. Candidates arc exam i n e d in t h ree major afNS: verb al , m' t hemat ieai, an d ana ly t ica l w r i u n g skills. A core is c.rmeu in c:a.;h area, and candid, le� receive a t ot a l score, which ra nges between 2 0 and 800. l nformation ah u t t he GMAT m;!y be o btai n ed from the. COU11St: l ing Imd Tl'Sllng .enter at ( 2 5 3 ) 5 35 - 7 2 06. by calling (� f AT directly at

www.gllull.org.

1l00-'162-8669, or by vi it i n g the web site at

ADVISING: Th M. BJ\. direc tor advise II M.B. ' . students. and should be co ntacted fo r a si staocr I n planning course wor k . M .B.A. DEGREE REQUlIlI!M.ENTS : (48 semester hours) M .B.A. Core (�4 <[erne ter hours ) COMA 500 - Executive ' kill� I : E ffect ive Comm unications E C N 500 - Executive Skil ls II: A ppl ied

tatist i 's

(4)

(2)

E .ON 50 1 - A n al y t L c a l Methods fo r De(i� i n Making (4)

!:IU A 503 - Understanding and M a nagi ng Financial Res urces

1 34

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(4)

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tor Financial

BUSA 54 1 - Man;lging I n novation a n d feehnnl g y Chang.· (4) BU ' A 542 - Man age men t of .hange ( 2 ) BUSA 543 - esigning Reward Sy� te ms ( 2 ) B U SA 5 4 5 - C.ontinuous Tm provem e n t Strategies ( 2 )

BUSA :549 - Con It:rnpora ry Human R e

O lt re .:

(2) (4)

M an age m e nt ( 2 )

BUSA 553 - Transnational Manag men t

BUSA 5 5 8 - New Venture Management BUSA 560 - G loba l Marketing Management (4) B SA 566 - Develop i n g New Products/ServiCes (4) BUSA 567 - A:ise ssi ng M ar ke t i n g Oppurilln ilie (4) BUSA 5 7 4 - Advam.:ed Service and Manuf"..t uring Del ivery

Syst�ms ( 2 ) EUSA 5 7 7 - Proj ect M

nagelllcnt

(2)

ySlem�

(4)

nus

59 1 - Indtprnu�nt Study EU A 592 - Internship BUSA :95 - Semin a r M .B.A. CONCENTRATION rN TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT (TIM) DEGREE REQUIlU!M ENTS: (48 semester hours) M. B.A. Core (34 hours)

(see /eJI .f<1 f /'VI. B.A.

'ore ml l/irnl/cllts)

M.B.A. TIM Concentration Counes ( 1 4 hours )

Reql/ired Courses: (8 hou rs)

BUSA 54 I - t\'lanagil1g I n novat i un and Te(hnology Change

(4 BU A 578 - Managen\�ll of lnfarmat i on Ti!ch n l og i es anu Syste m s (4)

Eh'aillcs: ( . hour5) Select from tlte f'ollowiIIg;

the etiucnlioJUI/ Illusion of granullt/' stu/ly.

THE GRADUATE MANAGEMENT ADMISSION TEST: The Graduate Management Admis:iun Test (GMAT) i ' a te.sl a.pt itude rather tha n

M.B.A. Electives ( l 4- semester hours) Select froll1 th!' fonowmg: BUSA 535 - F inancial Inve..�tments (4) 5 U A 53 7 - Decision Models a n d Strategies

BUSA 5 7 8 - Management o f I n formation 1cchnolo gies and

Management Adm iss ion Tes t ( GMATL potenlial to

1 0 - Strategic Management of Technology ( 4) N()te� BU'1\ 5 1 0 IS ret/llin:tI for _'wdt!flts ill tile T(]c/l IIlJlogy (jt1d [/Jllovar iO/l J'v!l171ngemelH (oncentralion

Managers (4)

Jdmis ion to the Master of B u s i n ss Administratio n progra m. onsultation abollt the progra m is avail ab le from the S choo l of B u , i ne s M . B .A. director by cal l i ng 253/ 3 1- 7250 before fi ling the applicat ion [or dmissian. ror thc evening M B.i\ . program a nd tnl: evenmg M.B.A.! 1M program students may begi n studies rly term. Applica.t i\ln� ilr' accepted or co urse be.gi n ni ng ep tem b er, J a nuary, Pebruary, M ay, or July. rhe Sa t urday M . B. A.! T I M pro g r am has an application deJd l i n e of J u ne 1 Applica.tions received :l tter the appicalion d eadl ine will be evaluated and a

or

BUSA

deepe r appreciation of tt!chnical mana�ement issues.

qual ified applicants may be admitted on

{

BUSA <;04 - l .e ga l and Et hic Environmenl of BlTsil1�SS (4) BUSA 50 5 - Managing effect ive Organi7.atim . (4 ) USA 506 /507 - M !laging th e Value re a t ion Process ( 8 ) nUSA 590 - Bu incs, S t rategy in a Glob.al ConteXt (4)

Y

BU A 545 - .ontinuous I mp rovement Strategies ( 2 ) BUSA 549 - �on temporary Human Reso u rce Management ( 2 ) BUSA 558 - ew Venture M a nage me n t (4 ) EUSA 566 - Dew ll p i ng New Pn,d uc. /Serv ice s (4) B U S A 5 7 4 - Advanced Service and anufacturil1{; Del iv e r y Systems

(2)

BUSA 5 7 7 - Project M anagem en t ( 2 )


requi red.

SCHOOL OF ED U C ATIO N

Master of Arts in Education Lynn (, Bee , Ph.D. , Dellll .

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE COURSES:

Scl/ool oj Ed/lm/ioll

EDUC 545 - Methods and Tech niq ues of Research ( 2 )

i. 10 provi de qualifi ed persons wi th llpportun ities to develop ailinini�tr.l l ive anti service po�iticms that requ ire advanced

prepdraLion. The maje)r fidds of concentration are designed In pmvid' maximum Aeli:ibility m an experien e-orientcd envIron­ li\.Ssroom

Tea hing , I n i t ial C.ertification, Educational Ati m i n istrat ioll,

1 iteracy Edu ation. and pecial Educa tIon Rcquirc:mt'nts fo r each concentration , re listed sepa r.l tdr f lIuwi ng thi. sect ion COORDINATING MASTER'S DEGREE AND CONTINUING CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS: St udents holding an lnil ia!

degree wi t h the req uirements for

It: should

d iscuss t heir programs with tbe cerllfica llon adviser i n the

d1001

f EdU La l 1 n. St uden ts intending

10

wor k tOW<lrd

il

I e of Adm,SSIons.

ADMlSSlON: For regu lar ac.l m i·slon. aJlpl i ca n l� must have com­

p leted a B. \. •

OT

B. S. degre from a reg ionall ac redited

i nstitution 0 h igher education and must suhmit re ions and test scores from appropriate

m menda­

reeni ng tests. Stu dent

may be required to have a personaJ interview with the d i r ector of gr.!duatc program" b efore

admiss ion (Sec

Olle of t h e Jo/lolI'l/Ig: EDu · 585 - Cnmparar i ve Ed llc.1tion

(3) EDUC 586 - Soci nl g y of Education ( 3 ) E D C 5fi7 - Hh lU r y of ducati n (3) ED 589 - Fhilu. ophy of [dll t ion ( 3 ) Dill' of lite Jollowill ; FD C 598 - Stud ,es III E du c lion ( 2 ) C 599 - Thesis ()-4)

A. Completion

in iv itiulll .:on· ntr -

( 1 0- 1 8 se me ter hour )

f H b ou n.

f grJOUJt c course

... ork

ACADEMIC SUPPORTING AREA:

In I h i

requi re me nt assu

comprehe.ns.ive written

on the · eco n d Saturday of Novem he r, Aprd ,

An oral exami nation over cou rse wor k and/or research may c

clion of th e studen t's adv isory

lilter th,1I1 three weeks bel'

re

r graduate level

Art

Lan uage

Bi log '

M athematic and C mputer

rts

Science Musi Physica l Educat i

Ec nom i ' Educat i na.1 Psych !llg)"

Physics

Engl tsh

P. y__ 109} ocial (Ienees

1\

P I i ticaJ 'cience

Genera l :cienee Geo·cience.

Sociol gy

History

Special Education

Educational Administration

32 semester hours)

FACUllY COORDINATO R: Myra Rau g h man. E d. D.

CONCENTRATION OBJEcrrvE: ThL pr gram is desi oeO to

pr pare elcmentarr and secondary school prin c ip a l s and

a nd luly.

0

tio n . This

r �pecial Edu

prerequi site backgro und i n the support-

Com mu n icati n

before the examination is given. C mprcll nsiyc examInations

be ,heduletl a t the di

a

ob ta il1eu from the -tudent' advL�ory co m m i t tce. The stude nt 's support ing area may be chosen fr m ne of the following:

with a

ch eclt l c.I t h ro u gh the �I udent 's advl�er no later th il n two weeks

t ce

e:.

Bus i n ss lhem istry

ex,1 minatlOil over co urse work. This exa m i n a t i o n is to be

(8- 1 6 semester hours )

more than 1 6 ellle ter hour: m, y be

n, n

e au ses hall b upper div ision

ing area.

hour rCLJl irement

are usually gIVe

are,l�:

<.:OUIses. Approva l of ourses to fulfill th i s requ i remen t shall be

3. EduLation 544 4. Other hours deter m ined hy the adviser to meet the e igh t \

ti

ent

(0

applied from Lduc.at ionaJ Psychology

585, 5 6, 58 7 or 589)

EXAMINATIONS: S t uJc nts m us t take

co n sul t a t ion with thc major adviser.

committ e. 'our e mar be ciected fro m the ft lIowin

B. C ur · es should include : 1 . co u r e i their major. determ ined by the adviser 2. A foundations wu rse l:;ducatlO

III

approval of the candidate s advise r or the ca nd idate's a d visory

be granted regula r statu::

I l 1 ll1lrnUIl1 �rade p omt average of 3.0.

m 11\

CONCENTRATION REQU1.REMENT :

·tudent · admmt:d p rovisionally must fu ll ti II t he lo llowing to

o

<

1I0n� for cst· .lad prcrequi£iles speCific to the co ncl'nvati oJJ . ) requirements in order

VI -I C

Education , ' du :lUonal Psydlology, Jnd Spec ia l Educati n .

maste r's dc grec must \)mplete fo rmal appl ic.llion f r adm is�i n to the l

Resear� IFrogram Ev IUlltions before en ro llm en t

EDUC 545 ) ( 2 )

All c urses accepted fo r the m<l' ter 's degree are . ubject to the

ontinuing Certification.

erlifi

III

urses arc detemline

f Ar t · in Educa t iu n

Gradu.llc �lL1dent p lfSuing the Conti nuing

544

EDU

their skills in teachIng or 10 prepare themselves for educat i onal

Certi ficJte may coord i /lJtt: the Master

m mi t­

comm 'nc ment.

program adminisl ralo rs. PREREQUISITES: Beyond the gen e ral prerequis ites, .l plicants

m us t h Id a

a l id te ching ur

E.

. A certificate and :.hould

rdinaril, have sue ·s�[ull,· com pIe ed two yea r:. of teachinot

Classroom Teaching

related e.x pc:rie nc e. · A gr .ld t" p oi n t averag of a least

(32 semester hours)

scores fro m eit her the M iller A n al ogi es Test , adm i ' ion tesl appro

FACULTY COORD INATOR: C. f)ouglas Lamoreaux, Ph.D. CON CENTRATION OBJECTIVE: Tills program is designed

provi de adv.lnceu preparation in

su bj

10

t matter aod profe sional

t:ducauon lo r c:icmentary and secondary teachers. PR.£R.EQUI SITES: .Beyond the gc.: n cr al prerequisite , appl ica nts

must ho l d a valid tea ch ing certifi at

and sho uld

rdinarily have

uccClisful ly completed one year of teachmg o r related profcs-

least 3.0

u Miller Analogies '\est, GRE or other admission test approved by the

sionaJ xpcrience. A ""rad

point aver,lge of al

ra� u l t) (Oo rdinator and c mpleted in the

ast

» -i m

( I t i� �tr agly rt'comm ended that s t udents complete

PURPOSE: The p urpose o f the gradua te program in education

in

o c

(7-9 semester hours)

C. Voughl . Lamorea ux, Ph.D., Dlrl'ctl1 r of Grarlwzte Programs, ."IdUltJ/ (If EJII/ca/;oll

ment Graduate concentrati n arc offere

C\ :u »

tudents not meeting some of these reqUJrcrneJ1t. m ay

be granted provision. I status.

e

,

3. 0 and

or

E or other

by the fac lllty coordmat r .md c m­

pl �ted wi th i n the p ast five years are r

uired for rcguJa r

adll1bsion.

Cllllt/idtl te, Jo r

,1/1

tldmillis/ ratll'r credr/lt,aI tIIlllt have campI led three

yellrs oj reach ing or rcil/lt'd aperiellce b,:(orc iSJIUlIlCe oJ the admi"istra·

tive cr<,.JL'lIIilll.

Candidates who

osse ss

a

rna. ter s dogree may apply for the

Euul-at ional Ad min istra l ion Cerillicati

n Only program .

'Ie year� dre

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GENllRAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE COURSES: ( 7-9 semester hou rs ) o ::J ... VI w

... oCt ::J

Olle of the following: EDUC 585 Comparative Education ( 3 ) E D U 5 8 6 - S o c i olo g y f E du c a t i o n ( 3 ) EDUe 5 8 7 - H i s t o ry c)f Education ( 3 ) EDUC 5 8 9 - Philosophy of Education ( 3 ) _.

545 - lvlethods an d Tech ni q ue s of Rese a r ch ( 2 ) Olle oj" t h e following: ED C 5 8 5 - Co m par a ti ve Education ( 3 ) EOUC 5 8 6 - S o c io l o gy of Education ( 3 ) EDUe 5 8 7 - H i story o f Education ( 3 ) EDUC 589 - h i lo so phy of Education ( 3 ) I:: D U C

O n e o ( the follolVing: EDUC 598 - Studies in E du c a t io n ( 2 ) EDLJC -99 - Thesis (3-4)

O m' of the following: EDUe 598 - , lud ies i n Education ( 2 ) E D U e 5 9 9 - Thesis ( 3 -4 )

CHD.DREN'SIADOLESCENT LITERATURE

oCt II::

MAJOR AREA O F CONCENTRATION: ( 2 3 semes ter hours)

One o( the following:

10

5 5 0 - Educational Administrative Theory ( 3 ) EDU C SS l - Sellool w (2) EDU 5 5 2 - School Fina nce ( 2 ) E D UC 5 5 3 - School! o m m u n it y Rel a ti o n s ( 2 ) EDU e 5 5 5 - urriculum D e ve lopm en t ( 2 ) E D U C 5 5 8 - I n slructi o nal Su p erv i s io n ( 2 ) EDUC S 5 9 - Personnel Management ( 2 ) EDUC 5 9 5 - I n tern ship in E duc a tional Administration ( 4 ) E D U e 5 9 6 - Graduate Se m i n a r ( 2 )

o

REQUIREMENTS: (4 semester h o urs )

EDUC 5 2 8 - Children's Literature in K - 8 Curriculum ( 2 ) , anel

EOD � 544 - Researd1 and Program Ev alu a ti o n ( 2 )

456 - St o r y te l li ng ( 2 ) E D UC 5 2 6 - Topics in Children's Lit erature ( 2 ) E D U C 529 - Adolescent Literature i n t he Se co n d ar y Curriculum ( 2 )

EDUC

E DU C

INFORMATION AND LJTERACY: Option 1 : School Library MedialLLRS Endorsement

( 1 2 semester hours) E

506 - Foundations of School L i b r a r y I\1edia Cente r

' 507 - Principles of I nfor m a t i on Organization, Retrieval, <md Service ( 2 ) E D U C 5 0 8 - Principles o f B i b l i o g r a phic A na l ysis and Control ED

PROGRAM OPTIONS I N EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRA·

TI ON: I nterd isciplinary program options for a p p l ica n t s se ekin g d itTer i n g credentials must be deter m i ned at the be g i n ning of the c a n did a te's program in co n su lta t io n with a n adviser. For instan ce , L<lndidates seeking the M.A. in Educational Adminis­ t ra ti o n a nd p r i n cipal 's credential will take different o p t i ons from t hose taken by candidates s e eki n g the de g ree without the c redential. Likew i se , those with i n terests i n business manage­ m e n t or in administering and coo r d i n a tin g s pecia l programs may choose o p t ions to t h e ir course of studies which will enhance their professional development i n terests. In all case" the courses must be c ho se n and agreed upon in consultation with the c a n d ida t e 's adv iser, and must meet the credit 110m re q u irement .

(2)

EDUC 509 - Foundations 'If Collection Developm en t ( 2 ) E D UC 537 - Media <md Technology for S c 0 0 1 Libr a r y Media S pe c ialists ( 2 ) n D U e 538 - St r a te g i e s for Whole l i t e ra c y Instruction ( K- 1 2 ) ( 2 ) r Option

2: Language and Literacy (Reading Endorsement)

( 1 2 semester hours)

EDLlC 5 1 0 - The f cq ui s i tio n a nd D evel opme n t of La ngu a g e and L i te ra cy ( 2 ) D U e 51 1 - Strate. g ies for Language/Lileracy Develop ment i n �

Classrooms ( 2 )

E D U C 5 3 8 - St r aregies for Whole Literacy I nSLTuction ( K - 1 2 ) ( 2 ) EDUC 5 3 0 - Children', vVriling ( 2 ) EDUC/ 'PED 5 1 3 - Langl ag e/Lite ra cy Developmen t : Asses ment and Instruction ( 4 )

Literacy Education (35 Semestel' nours) FACULTY COORDINATOR: C athl e e n Yetter, E. d . D . CON CENTRATION OB}ECTIVE: The literacv education

' th o u g h t and pr ac tice where l a nguage l1nd literacy arc viewed as tools for learning acro ss the curriClI­ lum. Th e princi p al goal is to prepa re educa lor - speci fi cally c l a ssroo m teach e rs, s hool librarians, and rea d i n g pe c ial is ts­ to encourage l i teracy a cq u i s i t I o n and d eve l op men t a pp ro p r ia te to tuJ ents' net'ds an d i n terest . . The im po rt a n ce of children's lI terature, information li tera cy, nd t e ch nol o gy within literacy tasks is cmph, si:led thro u g h ul both theory and practice. The collaboratIon among classro o m te ac h ers , school librarians, Jnd reading specialists emphJsized w i t h i n t hiS program is integral to the u n derlying ph ilo s ophy. program reflects current

Q! Option 3: Language and LiteJ'acy (Classroom Option) ( 1 2 se m e st e r hou , )

EDU

5 1 0 - The Acquisition and De ve l op m ent o f L a nguage and

Literacy (2)

E.DUC 5 3 8 - St rate g ies for Whole Literacy I n" t ru ct io n ( K- 1 2 ) ( 2 ) ED U C/S PED 5 I j -

Language/Literacy Development: Assessment I nstru ct io n ( 4 ) PillS: A min i m um of 4 se m est e r hours from education course offeri ngs decided in consultation with the major a dv iser. and

ACADEMIC SUPPORTING AREA: ( m inim um of b semester hours )

Electives decided in comultation with advi�er lo s u p port l i tera cy

PREREQUlSITES: Beyo nd the g ene r a l p rere q u isite s , a p p l i ca n ts

education. These elect ives m a y include but u : e not l imite d lo

1 l I s t hold a alid t.:: a ching or ESA ce rt i f ca te , have co m pleted u nderg r ad u ate educa tion courses in the te a ching ()f re a di n g and the t e a ch i n g of lang u J ge arts and have successfully completed two years f teaching or related experience. A g ra d e point a verage of 3.0 and sub mission of test sco re s o n the Mil ler Analogie� fe.t, GRE or other ad m i :; s i on test apprQved by the facul ty (( ordinator a nd co m ple te d \ ' it hi n the past five ye,lr. a re requi red for regular admIssion. Students not me et i n g these requirem ents may be g ra n te d p ro v i si o nal sta tu s .

FACUI:rY COORDI NATOR: G re gOl I' Williams, Ph.D.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND CORE COURSES:

CONCENTRATION OBJ ECTIVE: The gr a d uate concentration

i

courses from: Anthropology Communication Sp e c ial E d uc a tion

i n s pe c ial education is desig 1ed to p ro vide advanced prep a rati on fo r perso ns who serve c h i l d re n and y o ut h with special neeJs i n educ a t io n a l sett i ng'. Two sep ar a t e areas of sp e ci a liz a ti o n arc o ffered: The Inclusive Cbssroom and Early hildhood S pe c i al E d uca t i o n .

E DU C 505 - Issues ill Liter<lcy E d u c a t i on ( 2 ) I C 5 4 4 - Researdl a n d Pmgram Ev a l uati o n ( 2 ) UC 545 - Methods and Tech n iques of Re s e a r 11 ( 2 ) F D U " 5 5 5 - C u rriculum Develop men t ( 2 )

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E ngl i s h omputcrs in Education P syc ho logy

Special Education (33 semester hours)

( 1 3- 1 5 semes ter hours)

1 36

ue

M. anageme n t ( 2 )

5

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PRHREQUISTTES: Applicants must meet th� following requ i�mcnt. : 1 . H:lVC two ye.lrs of teaching or related professional experien -e. 2. I IJve .a grade poi nt average of at leObl 3 .0 and submil lest scort>$ 011 Miller An. lugies T�Sl, GRE or ot her a d m ission test approved by the facllI l coordinator and completed w ithin the pa�l five years. ludents nOl e ting the e re lI iremenrs may begrantcd provisional status. 3. Complete an interview with the facu lty coordinator. CORE COURSES AND RESEARCH REQUIREMENTS: (7-9 e mes te )' hours) EDUe 545 - Method:. ami Techniques of Research (2)

CONCENTRATION OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of the progr,lI11 's to educate teachers who are ready t assume a var i ety o foles in 2 1 st ce.nt ury schools. Faculty work r i th students to develop unde rstand i ngs and skill fo r U, ir function. as Ic.1ders, inquirers, and curriculum/instructiona! special ists. Course work in the p rogram is de igned around -pecific theme!- that ser e as a focus fOl individual and group projects a nd intersect vith the II1clions f Leachers as leaders, inquirers, nd curriculum/ inst ructional specialists.

Olll' of the following:

PROGRAM OVERVIEW: Students enrolled

585 - Comparative Education ( 3 ) EDUC 586 - ociology of Edu a ion ( 3 ) ED C 5117 - History of Education ( 3 ) EDUC 5 8 9 - PhiloSQphy o f Education ( 3 ) EO

C

Om' of tIle following resea rch optiorts: EDUC 598 - 5!tudics in EducatIon ( 2 ) EDUe 599 - Thesi s ( 3-4 )

SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

(2 1

semester h ours) PED 555 - SupervIsing Pa educator in School Setting� ( 2 ) SPED 575 - Collaboration a n d Tea m B uildi ng ( 2 ) PED 5 7 7 - he Incluswe C l ass r ou m ( 2 ) :PED 588 - Legal. , [hie, I and Administra tive Issues in Special Education (3) SPEO 595 - pe 'dl Education: Internship ( 2 ) PRO "96 - Technology and Special Education (2) Choose oile of the follo willg optlOllS: The Inclusive Classroom

SP ED 530 - As ses s men t of Studenls wit - inclusi(ln a n Stud.mts with (2) P E D 534 - rnclusilln m : d Students with SPED 535 - Inclw;ion a m i Students w i t h

SPED 533

Special eeds ( 2 ) M(lt! . ralc Disabilities Behavior Dis rdC'r (2) Mild Disabilities (2)

Early Childhood Special Bducation ( P-3)

�PED 4 92 - S Lrat eg ies fnr Teaching Early Leamtrs ( 2 ) �PED 538 - Issues i n Early Childhood Special Education (2) SPED 540 - Advanced Strategie.5 a n d Technique for Teachi ng i n P-3 Settings (2) SPED 54 1 - Assessment of lnfants and Pre choo l e rs ( 2 )

Supporting Coursework (6 semester hours) EleLuves - Irom outside of pecia/ Edt/cation (6)

M.A. with I nitial Certification DIRECTOR:

C. Douglas Lamoreaux, Ph.D.

The M A. with Init ial C rtific lion Program i. utSigned for qualified candIdates who possess a baccalaureate degree in the

'--'

share in ighls and experimces. Becau e of thl! involvement in public school progr ms, students sh ltld be able to take courses and p a rticipat e in practica during the day.

liberal arts and seek a alecr of service as teachers. C urse work leatls to the Master llf Arts i n Education: CinsSTOom Teaching degree and I ni t i a l Washingto State Teachi ng Certificate with end rsements in g adt.>s K - 8 ( Elemenlary Edualt i n) and grades 4- 1 2 ( Subject Matter _ peeifle ) . Ca nilidates complete an i ntern­ shIp in grades -I t l-uli-t.ime students ent e r i ng the progrAm may expe � tt' com­ plt:te all requirements in 14 months (full-lime student load). A �LIong cmphasil; in the program i� pIa cd on developing the skills nece sary for the in tegration of cuni ulum across grade levels with spccific attenti n t the middle level (grades 5-8 ) . The program iJ distinguished by aclivc an early involvement in the schools and by membership with a cohort group of peers. St ude IS entering the p ogram in the same term w i l l progress Ihrough courses and p rac t i ca together, which allows them to

in the M .A . with Init ial Ceni cation Program begin studie in mid-Tune and complet program requir ments th.: f l10wing August. In audi­ tion to course work required for i nitial certification, students complele an inquiry project culminating in a thesi:. as wcll as comprehe ivc examinations that L10w M_A. andidates to dcmon,trate m stery of leadership, curriculum, and instruc­ tional skills. The inqu iry project, an empi rical s t ud y g rounded in the intern h i p c-x per ien cc . is designed to assist M .A. candidates i 1 becoming fa miliar w i t h the p lll'pOSes, theories. and p rocesses of educationul inquiry. The intent is to provide the 0pp0rlun ity for program p rtic i p a n ts to exp! re a n ed ll ca lional topic i ll a sys­ tematic way in order to en rich t heir u nderstanding of the topic, and gener Iy, the strengths and l i mit,J\ tom f educational inquiry. An important program component is the co mple t i o n of a year-long illtemsh i�l in a public 5cho I. for the intern experi­ ence, students are clustered at sites selected by the u iversity as repre enlative of programs it!O cting specific attention t cur­ rent t rends in middle level education. PREREQUISITES: For regular admission, applicants must

CI ::II > o c:: » -I m \II -I c:: o m 11'1

have

leled a baa:.alaurcate degree from a region,tlly accredited insti tuLion of higher education. A m i nimum grade point average of 3.0 a n d ofliciaJ scoreS from t he Gr adu a l Record Exam (GRE), Miller Analogies lest ( MAT) , or other admission examination approved by the director arc r qUl red . Appl icants are invited to meet W i lh the program director before �ubmitting the completed applicati on in order to clarify qutSli ns aboul Ihe program and com

admissions procedures.

ADMISSION PROCEDURES: I nterest d candidates should submit application to PL ' Gradual Studies Programs. Appli tions are .IV ilabk from the ffice f Admissions. Screening of applican . an admission t the incoming cbs� will begin January 3 1 and continue until the dabS is full. Enrollmenl in the M A with I ni tial Cl!Tl ifiati n Pr gra m is limileu and admission to the program is compClilive. Application and admis i D rocedures include: 1 . Completed applicaJ ion will call ist of the fullowing: a. G ra du a te Appli tion Form includi ng: wo recommendations with nt least one academic r ferenc' Stal ement ut Goa 5 •

·

• Resume

b. Two School of T:.ducat i n Supplement,'l F mlS including: • Self-Assessmen t: course work and experiential b ackg ro u n d ·

2. 3. 4. 5.

P

Queslio nn,l i re

c. Transcripts ITOm a l l <..O Jleges auenlkd d. Official COpl�S of G RE or MAT .cure� Applications will be reviewed br a cu m milt e i n the School of Education. eleete applican ts WIll b invited to the L m p w; � r a group interview where they will Iso mpJetc a writing sample. Applicants will be notified of the committee's dedsion . A (ept applicants will ret r a confirmati n card and non­ refundable $300.00 deposit. A

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VI W C :::I I­ III

REQUIRlID COURSES: Program requirements i n c i uck )u��c!'S­ co mplet i o n 0 th e fol lowing co urses :

ace ph:d into tbe program ar ' req u in.. d tll make a non-re fu ndable $200.00 advance paymllnt to lonfi rn, th ei r JccepWnce of .1Il uffer of admISsion w i t h i n two weeks of their accept.tnce date,

luI

EllUL 5 1 1

-

rnu

-

5 44

tr.ltcgics fo r La nguage/ Literacy De velop m en t ( 2 )

Program Eval uatio n

Research an

(2)

FDU

56() - PracticuOl

ADVlSfNG: Th e

(3)

C D U . 556 - SecundaI)' and Middl� Sch\)ul C urric ul u m

(2)

Upon articulation i n to course wor k students nrc 'lS. ign ed to

wue 562 - . hauls and Sodety (3) EllUL 563 - lntegr3ting el1'llOar (3-4) EDU 5M - The Am. Mind. a n d Bo dy (2) EDU<. 565 - The A rt and Practice o f T�aching (6) £J

1(' 56, - Internship

rDUC 599

-

ThL'Si� ( 3 ;

subsequent ass u .tan ce in planning 'ourse work.

PROGRAM REQUlB.EMENTS: Before enrollment

I II

cli n ical/

practicum ct)ur�c w(Jrk ludcJllS will be requ i red to p rovi de!

eVidence of current:

(3 )

EPSY 566 - Advanced Cognition, Ucvelop mc n t. a nJ Learnmg [1' Y 5113 - Current r. sue� in K' lccp ti na l i ty ( 2-4)

(3 )

I ) immunization

and healt h stJtw,

2) ( PIt certi fication 3) professwnal linbility i nsura nce 4) personal health in uranc� 5) Washington Stale Pa trol crimina ! hi. tory deatlIlC€

<; C H O O L O r: N U H S I N G

M.S.N. DEGREE REQtJlREMENTS: (36 seme tel' hour )

Master of Science i n Nursing

M.S.N. Core (9 semester hours)

Terry W. Mil h:: r. I h.D. Dellll . Sdwol

Mdrg.!fCI Va ndni,

Ph.D., D,,"tor,

of Nursing

'r(I(/rullt Educatio/l

managers. lead rs, and sc b olars. The c ur ri c ul u m consists of a

leaders h i p ) .ll ong wi l h courses selectively focused for eiUler of

URS 583

-

(5)

Cl inical Pharmacotherapeutics (2) ltf

N U RS 590 - Role of t h e

( Pr acliuoner

1 16)

ursc

Practttioner (2)

NURS 590A - S.:m i nar in Aciv.lIlce I Prad1c\: N ur si n g

weekend hour� to accommodate the working nurs . ACCREDITATION: The p rogra m is fully accred ited by the

Na lional Leagu fur Nu rs i ng Accretl iting Com mis�ion. I nstruc ­ entds

urse Practitioner or

La�e Ma na geme n t certification cxaminati n�.

{

.1Dd inferenllal sta tbt ics h required bo::fore beginning graduate ou rSt: wurk. S tud e n ts are e!{pc,-led to have fundamental

u p on ntry to the p rogra m . A m in im um ot' one

(2)

Care and Outcomes Manager Concentnation; (27 semI! fer bOUT In additioo to the M.S,N. Core) URS 529 - arc M.Jll agcr (3 ) URS 530 - Resource Management ( 4 ) NUHS 5 3 1 - Lare and O utcomes Pr.lcticum I ( 3) NURS 532 -

course in de cript ive

two

(3)

Evaluation and O u tco mes ltesearrn (3 )

URS 585 - family Nurse Praclit! nCT n (ti)

C urse� a re scheduled clu ring lale a fte r noon . evffii g iUld/or

yea r of c lm ic al experience with i n the last

-

NURS 584 - F. mily

faci l it.l tt· rull -time or part - t i me �t udy l' u l l-li me �tudenls can com p lele either concentration of study in two acac.h:mic years.

co m p ut er skills

NUl'lOg Leade r� h i p and Managpment

NURS 527

j

and )ulcomes Ma nage r . The gradu ate p ro gram is designed to

PREREQmsITES: Completion of a basiC

Theoretll.al Foundations ( 3 )

-

PrtJm t ion

L WO oncentrallOl1S of siudy ; FamIly NLlIse Pm t ilione r or Care

I

-

NURS 526

(27 semester hours in addition 10 the M.S.N. Core) �URS 528 - Family Theo r y i n Nursing ( 1 ) N U RS 580 - AliYan ed Pathollhy il)lo�y ( 3 ) N U R, 5-82 - Advanad Health ;\s, essment anJ Health

common (ore of master's level courses ( t he ory, resean:h and

Ilonal wli u . s a ti sl) !he American N urses Creden t i ling

N URS 525

Fllmily Nur e Practitioner Concentration:

PURPOSE: The p urpose of the grJtl uolle program in n u rsin g i ' to prep�re professional nurse� as advanced practice cl i n icians,

d ida tiL eligibility rt!quircm cnts for Fa m i ly

:I

fac ully m 'mber who leaches in tl eir a rea of con ce n tra tio n f r

(6)

Communication i n the 'i h{)ol�

EPSV 560

i rector of Graduate Nursing Education com �

plctc, i n it ial aJvising and program planning with ea ch student.

NUR

538

-

nrc

and Ourcomo.!s P rn ct icll m II ( )

Progr:un Development

(5)

XXXX - App roved E le ct ive Related t o One's I'o,:us (3/4 ) N U RS

598 - S holarly ln quiry (4) or 9 - Thesis ( J )

N URS 5 .

yean is reqUIred.

ADMISSION: Applic3 n L� for- admission to the M: stcr I Sdent'c i n Nursing programs will:

I ) holli .l c urrent l kem.e 10 praclice

as

State ofWashi ngron ;

2 ) huld ,j haccalaureate degree i n

a reg istered

nursing from

an

'eh 01 of Nursing;

nUI" e

in t c

D IVI S I O N O F S O C I A L S C I E N C E S

accredited

3 1 5 uhmit offi'lal transcripts fo r all college/university course wo rk; � minim u m cumulalive untIe raliuute grade poinl average of 3.0 on a 4.tJ scale is an adm ission req uirement; 4) ·ubmil. scores from the Graduate Remrd. Examination ( G RE ) taken wi th i n t h e la.l fi e yea rs: a comhined average �core or 850 rom a n y two of the three test components is a n admission requi re ment, anti

5 ) complcce a preadmission interview with faculty who

t

;.Ilh i n

Master of Arts Marriage & Fami ly Therapy Ann Kelleher. Ph. f)., VCilIl.

Film ily

Therapy

'Its I \·jsit willI ;Iltems from MFT programs, T realize whill tl

1IpLTior edu.cation I received Iroll! PLU . . . OIlIer progmrns �rily touch on small ClInormls of whllt we studied. . . "

l h e gradua te [1rogra m .

KM I l

APPUCATION D1!AD LINE FOR FALL: C.lIldidate..�

ad m itted on

yearly

a

Ma rc h I lor lh

basis. Priority Jdm issions are

folluw ing fall

St' l11cste r.

ar

ompleted by

En d y application is

. ar e

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5

I

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bj eclive of thi: MIT progra m

intere..'i t d i n counseling ch il d re n. adults,

b to

T

i l ie � with

c

uples,

a

m a ,-riage a n d fa mily t h erapy perspective. Students parti ipale in

a nJ

utcom es Manager C n ce n t ra ti o ns en h year. A ppl i c an ts

P

train dini

MAX£Y. M fT (;RAOt'A'TF

wide r a nge ,.) men ta l health prob lems, ra ng i ng from the ch ro nicall y m � n t all y i l l t t rou b le .:h il drcn, fTOm a

ADVANCE DIWO IT: There a re li mitations on th e n u mbers o f tudellt. accepted into the Family N urse Pr ( Li l ioner or

PURPO E: The p r i m ry ( r fa

encouraged tor priority s tan di ng relative to fi nancial awa rds .

1 38

Divisioll of�()cial Sciences Dcpdrtmmi Of Mnrriagt' (l iid

harles D. York. P h.D. . OW;I',

Y

an in te ns ive 2 0 h ou r pc week. fou r �eme�1er c 1 i n i <II expnienct' which

includes 500

hours of the ra py under d se superv is ion in


an un - campu s dinic and in a community pluceml:!nt. Acadl:!m lc

c Jur�cs � re �dll:!uult!d J fler 3:00p.m. to al l w , tudenls to wOlk full -time d ll ri ng their !trst a cadem i c vear while t h ey prepare for t h ir l in i II experien ce. Becaus!: faculty recognize th,lt adult �t utl n t l> ri n g e l'c.rti. e w i th them. SIUlknts are h i gh l y involved

in lea rn i ng via exerci)es. c1as!iroom di sc u s� i on . and rc.tl - l ife acllvilit!" 1 he program i ' sec u la r in nature and empha�ius the appucatlon oj theory to practice. r igorous evaluation. a nd dtrect supcrvisil1n of on e" c 1 i n tca l co m pere n q.

ACCREDITATION: The program i. hill v accrcliit.ed by lhe Co mm issum o n AccreditatIon tor Marriage a nd l'amily I'h erarY

Educ.!li n ( f the American ,\1soa.ll i o n /)1 \larriage and Fam i l )' 1 h<!fapy ( AMil n and also camp tie with WashUlg t l O State ertitication reqUtn:ml'nt . for marriag� and family thera i�ts.

PRRR.IlQ UISITES: ,\Pl'lka nts who have .. degree in rsych !logy, socinlogy. sllLlaI work, hum.l1l services. family studies, or the eq u ivwen t ar/.· not reqUired to meet any pmgram prc rcqui i tes. pl'liG\nt� who un not hav� a dt!grec i ll an} f thest· ,l rca art' req u i red to complete a mlllimum of 1 5 semester hours ( 22.5 'Iuarter helu rs ) in fumily so i..tI �cienc:es. h u man sen ices, ps ycilo l ogy, sod logy. ur SOCIal work.

ADM!

4. What d o yQU consid�r t a bt: area for p.er� o n a l gr wth that may need the most altcnticIU during yow' training 3 a therapIst at Pacific Luthera n Uiliversily?

> o c

applic:1I i n fornl .

Based

011

> -r m

a com m i ttee review of a p phcan ts wri tten materials, a

pool ( f pp l kants to be i n tervi ewe Li i5 e t.l bIt5hed . The prim.try

purp 1St! of the i n terview is to uelcm1 i n t! Ihe ilt hetwet!1l the aPr l ican t!;' pmfe 'sional goals and the purpose anLl m ission of the J\llF} program.

\II -r c

APPUCATION DEADUNE FOR FAll:

o

• •

Appl i ca t io n file completed in Office of Admission : Janu,t ry

m \II

inlervie\ otificati m; Mid February thr u gh end of Ap ril . I n tervi 'w date: To be announced,

ADVANCE D£PO IT: A.:,eptcd applicant· mu st make .1 $30(U)() auvance payment 1(1 confirm their acceptance of an utTer o f udm i5sio ll w i th i ll three we�ks 01 thei r ac cptancc date.

REQU IREMENTS: (45 �cm esler hour

)

M FTH 50() - HUman Development (4)

M ITI I 503 - Systems

ION: The M IT prot,'Ta m is l ooki n g for i n dividuals who

ppm. ch to M.lrr iagc anu FamIly

fherapy (4) MHH 504 - famlli' Development (4) t-I fH 505 - Social Science Research Methods ( l ) t FT H 507 - Comparatrv� M a rri ,lge a n d F(l m i ly TherJpy

Mrn T ; I 0

Il ual i t ic_ relju i r 'u 01 m a rri age anu family t he rap ists . To be

-

T Tuman Sexu,lltty 3nJ

' I'X

( .of )

Therapy ( 2 )

<.onsidcred for admission. ,lpplic a nts must: have a bachelo r" degree. �ubrnit tra nscr ip t 5 of ,I I I undergraduate work. have a

MFTH 5 1 1 - Psycho ocial Pathology: Relationshi Marri,tgc and ramil)' Therapy 4)

pccific i n te res t i n M IT. prov iLic a current resume , obtain two It!tters oj recl)mmcndauon, co mple te an app li cat io n , ;100 prcl';tre an autobiugraphical 'tatcment. The 'omprehensive .Iuto io­

M ITH 5 1 2 - Professional hcrapy (3 )

to

tuilles in Marriage a.nd family

M ITH 5 1 9 - Practicum 1 ( 2 )

M r-TH 5 2 0 - Theory I (2) M FTt-! 52 1 - Prac.licum [ ( (2) MFTH 522 - Theory n ( 2 ) MFfH 52_ - PrJ.l.. t ic �lm [II ( 2)

graphical statement ( maxi m u m of five double-spaced typed

) �h

;:J:I

rhis � latemen t rep l ace t he requ.ired goal s t a tement on t he

have prote�si(lna l b'Oals consistent with thl.' prob'1"aJll , volunteer or proti:s "tonal expenl.'ncc ill the social servicc�, the abIlity to hanJle th academic rigor f t he progr. 01 , and tht' pel on,l l

page

C'I

u1u address Ule fol lOWing que.stions�

I . \"'hat �i gni fkant life eve n t., have m lSI influenceJ your pr�senl development a nd your desire to be a family therapist?

Theory III (2) lITH 525 - Pracl lcum [V (4 )

M FTTI 524

2. What ar� your professional caretr �oab after ompleting your Jcgrl'L'?

-

Elee/h'e: MIT H 599 - Th esis ( "' )

3. What are your strengths th ,l t wi\[ help YOll ;tc hievt> you r prole sional goa l "

P

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139


AnAfINISTRATION/FACULTY ...

The Board of Regents

z

OWNERSHIP, SUPPOIU, GOVERNMENT:

o .... < II: l­ V! z

M r, Jim Stauffer. 2635 MT 5 9803 ,

Dr. Olto Stevens,

I nc. , a Wash i n gton corporati';ln whose p ur pose is to ma in ta I n a Ch r ist i a n institution of higher lea r n i ng. With the formation of the Eva ngeli cal Lutheran C h u rch in A m e r ica (ELCA) 0 1 1 J a nu ar y I, 1 98 8 , the PLU Co rporat i o n was reconstituted. The University,

corporation meets annually o n the PLU cam­

pus to elect

regents an d to cond Llct o t h er busi­

ness. The c o r p o ra t ion consists o f 34 regent and 1 25 delegates from the six synods of Re­ g ion I of the hv n ge l i c al Lutheran hurch in

the u ni ver si t y president. Tht' policy- making and go eming body o f lhe university i s the Board o f Regen . O n the

Region 1, and

for the development of of t h e univers i t }, a n d s t' ri vC5 to pruvide essential f un d s. The student body and the faculty have n o n - vot i ng represen t a t i ves it c b. arlS a course

whu meet with the board.

OFFICERS Mr. Gary Sennon, Chair Dr. Cynthia Edwards, Vice Chair

c e rc t ary

ML James Hushllgen, EX-OFFlCIO

Dr. Lo.reu J. Anderson, Pr('sident, heoma, WA 98447,

PL

3 88 , ELCA

I.,

Regrlll-nt-T..Ilrge Pacific Ave., Stute t 200, Taco ma , W 98402, .£LCA (Secretary) Mr. Kurtill K. Mayer, 14022 Spanaway Loop Rd,. Tac rna, WA 98444, Regen t-a t- Large Bishop Mark Ramseth, 4604 udu bo n Way, Bdlings, MT 59 t 06, Bis h op ELCA Rev, John L. Vaswig, 350_ 1 22 n d Ave. E., Edgewood, A 98372, EL II R£v. Dean W1gstrom, II, 5 1 0 Edgewoo d Dr., ilver on, OR 97 8 I. ELCA Dr. Cynthia Edwards, 3806 West Soundview

Place, WA 98466. EL CA

3 0345,

E ldo ra d o

D r. ,

Regen t-at- Large

ML Roe H.atJe:n, 1 3 J 4 1 Hanover

I., Apple Va l ley, MN 5 5 1 24, Regetl l-at-Large

Bishop Donald Maier, 55 t 9 Phinney Ave. North , Sea ttle , W �8 1 03, Dis /lOp ££,CA Rev. Dr. La.rry Neel>, 10300 Wat son Rd . , S t . Louis, M O 63 1 2 7, Rcge'l t -a t- u lrge Mr. Martin P ili l, 2720 Seventh AVt:., Kelch ikan, A 9990 l , EL A Mrs. Gerry Anne Sahlin, 1 1 369 Bi lle Heron Rd . , Bow, VIlA 98232,

140

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ELCA U

T

H

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A

for

n i versity Relations

Dr. Laura Majovski, Acting Vi

e

Pr esi de n t

and De,lI1 ror Studt'nt Li fe Dr, Paul Menzel, Pruvost and Dean o f

LIlW' Polqn, i e P re sid e n t fM Ad m i ss i o n s and Enrollment Services DT. Cristina Frldenstine:, Director, Student Involvement nd L �ad e rs hi p Office Rev. Dr. Richard Rouse , D i re c t o r of C hu rch Relatio ns Dr. Sberi Tonn, A ting Vi e President fo r Finance an d Operations Dr. Dennis M. Marlin, E ng lis h, Fll cully Dr. Leon Relsberg, Vice Chair oJ FaCLI/ty 0(. Linda Olson, Faculty At- La rge Mr. Roberl tar on, ASPLU Pres ident,

Student

Mr. Greg Pickel1, ASPLU Vice Presid e nt, Stlld�nt

I 997-Z000 TERM

Dr. WIlliam Foege, 2 1 9 1

iden!

Graduate Stud ies

Wheaton, l L 60 1 8 7,

At lan ta , G

55 1 26, Rcgenr-IU-Large

Krlppaehne, Jr., 1 52 5 ne nion Square. S ea tt le, WA 9 8 1 0 1 , £LeA y, 25 1 1 5 1 3 2 n d Ave. SE, Rev. Rebecca Lud... Kent, WA 9 80 4 2 , ELeA Mr. Gary SeverS6n , 6 t 3 1 1 28th . ve. NE, Kirkland, " A 9H033 , Regent- a t-Large (Chair) Bishop David Wold, 420 1 2 1 5t SI. S . , Tacoma, W 98444, Bishop ELCA

Dr.

Mr. James Husbagen. 1 20 1

Dr., University

' ho review, M

Development and

ELeA

Ms. Anne Hafer. 26W I 42 Wa terbury

t., San

Mr. William W.

Assistant

Mrs. LInda M. Evanso.D, 28 1 2 Marietta,

( ViCf Chair)

CA 94 1 09, Alumni

Mr, David Allbrey, Vice Pre

Portland, OR 972 3 2 . ELCA Mr. Ricbard L Bauer, 3790 Gramarcy Lane,

om. WA 9

1998-200 1 TERM Mr. Daniel L AIsaker, PO Box 14646, Spoka ne , v A 992 1 4 , ELCA Ms. Deborah Bevier, 8 0 1 2n d Ave., Stc. 1600, Seattle, WA 98 14 0, Regimt-ar- Largc

Ms. Karin Anderson, President's O ftice

1996-1 999 TERM

SteilaC!

Mr. Don Wilson, 1 3874 ' aylo r's rest Lane, Lake swego, OR 97035, EL A

ADVISORY - Pill

P LU ,

Mr. Neal L Arnt50n, 246 NE Broadway,

Boise, ! J ) 8 3 703,

Bel lev ue, WA 98002 , Alullllli

SE,

Mr. Xe.n Hartvlg$On. Jr., 9709 3rd Ave. NE 113 0 2, S a tt ie, WA 98 1 1 5, ELCA Mrs. Kathleen Jacoboon, 2345 J Butterfield Trail, Bend, OR 9 77 02 , ELeA Ms. Katherine Johnson, 402 1'1.'1'" 1 6 3 rd SL, -horeline, \ A 98 1 77 , ELCA Dr. Mark Knndson, 1 30 9 W. Royal Oaks Dr.,

Associa tion, three bishops from lhe synods of

the to ta l prog ram

Mrs. Su.sa.n Sum gel', 4553 1 6 9th Ave.

Francisco,

of Regents includes eighteen rep resentat ives from the A l umni

basi or recommendations made by the presi­

SL , Spokane, VIlA

Mrs. Becky Borad, 2206 Hyde

America. The Board

dent,

ardinal Dr., Missoula,

. 71 1 0 G

99208, ELCA

The universit}, is owned a n d operated by

Pacifi L u t he ra n

ELCA

N

Ms. Aimee Sieve.rkl'opp, A

finance, Student

PLU

Director of

Mr. Kenneth Erickson, Eugene, O R Rev. S. PhiJip Froiland, Wave rly, L A Rev. Sherman Hicks, Washington, DC

Ms. Kristine Hughey, Wallin

ford, PA

Mr. Jeffrey Kane, Manchester,

H

Dr. Ryan LaHurd, H i c kory, NC Rev. Nancy Anderson Milleville, Sn}'der,

[1\ Ms. Chickie J, Olsen, Pom p a no Beach, Rev. Walter Pilgrim, teila oom, WA

FL

Rev. Jillza.betb Platz, College Park, MD Rev. Stepben Samuelson,

Ms. Patricia Scbibler,

Racine. W I 01 I

a n Wer t ,

Ms. Kathryn Swanson, Thousand Oaks, CA Ms. Martha Taylor, Madison, W I Rev. Paul Thlelo, O I [Jlsted Falls, Dr. David We.e,

Northfield, MN

OH

Rev. W. Roberl Sorenson, Executive D irecto r Dr. Arne Selbyg, D i rector for

o l leges

nivcrsities

and

Administrative Offices PRESIDENT

Loren J. Anderson,

Pres ident P r es i de n t's om

Karm K. AndcHon,

ssis t a n t

e

Camp/ls Millistry

Nancy Connor, Ca m p us Pastor Dennis Sepper,

Church RelntiollS

ampus Pastor

Richard W. Rouse, Director o f Ch u rch Relations ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

OJfice ofthe Provost

Paul T. Men.ul, Pr ovost and G raduate DllVid

can of

tudies

C. Yagow, Associate Provo st Williams, Spec.i a l Assist,lOt to th

Tamara

Provost fo r I n terna tio na l Education

Special eademic Prog rams a/ld Slimmer essiol/s Judith W. Carr, Dean

Office oflntenrational Programs Janet Moore,

Director

Charry Benston, A ssi sta nt Director David Gerry. Coordi nator of International S tudent

Ser

ices

Divisoll oJ Hlltntlllilies Keith J. Cooper, Dean Susan Young, Ailini nistrative Assi>ra n t Divisioll

of Natural Sciences

Chang-Ii Yiu, Dean

CHURCH OFFICIALS

Anita Wahler, Administrative Associate Michele Polsom, ystems/Netwo rk

Bishop

Terren� Nicksk, La b o ratory Su pervisor,

Evallgelical L.utheran C/wrch ill America B. George Anderson, 8765 W. Higgins Rd_, C hi cago, II 6063 1

Ms. Addie J. Bntler, Vice-Pre�ident

Rev. loweD G. Almen, Secretary Mr. Ridtard L M<:Auliffe, Treas urer

Divisoll for Higher EduCiltioll and Schools Rev. John Andreasen, Fargo, ND Mr. Raymond Bailey, ['ort Co l l i ns, CO Mr. Dean Baldwin. Erie, PA Ms. Donna Coursey. Seat tle, WA

U N I V E R S I T Y

NY

Ms. Mary Mohr, Decorah,

Admi n istra to r

Chemistr,

DiyiSlon ofSacin[ Sciences Ann KeUeher, Dean

School of Ihe Arts

Christophel' H. Spi�r, Dean Linda Miller, Admin istraliv Associa te, M u s ic Pamela Deacon, Manager of 11usic Performance and Outreach


dwo/ o( Business R. BeD. Dean \U8J1 MmclUCD, Di rec tor of ommu nica­

Donald

lions and External Relations Ginger Modya, Coordinator of Undergraduate

Pr(>gram�

CAtherine Pralt, Assisrant Dean; Director, M . B.A.

rogram

Bruu WllIdnlI, Director,

Center for ElCecutive

Development

Sclloo/ ofEducotiol) Lynn G. Beck. Dean

Universiry Com,mmicat'ioll5 Greg Drewis, Executive Director Kathy Be:rry, Asso cia.l� Di re c tor Printing & Mail Services Uncia ED.loU. I irector, News & Information

Academic AdvisillglRcrentioft Richard Seeger, Director, A ademic Advising

Patricia Roundy. Dire

tor, AURA Prog ra m

ErIk DeBower, cademic Adviser

AClldpmir NsistoltC( ChrIstine Benton, Director, A(;jJemic Assistance

Laurel WiIlou.gbby. Assoc iate D ireclor, Ne ws

Cooperative Edtlcalirm

& Infomlation Servi es Chris Tumbllsch, Assoc iate Direc tor,

Heike Phelps, D i rec to r

PhOl graphic Service.s

Cell trr or PubLic Servu:e Imu S. CrandaD. DiTector

Myra J. Ballghman, Associate

[(PLU-PM Martiu J. Nub, General Manager

Dean

Joseph Cohn,

ADMISSIONS Be ENROLLMENT SERVICES

Dei1!l Patsy Ma lo ney, Di rector, Center for Continued Nu r sing Learning and Associate Dean

Laura J. Polcyn. Vice Pre ideal

Nancy Knudsen, Associate Director of

Admissiolts

Erln Hennessey, News Director

Rnth Schaff]u, Learning Re· urcts Center Coordinator

Alulrey Cox, Adviser, Admission

As, istant

Lynn Okita, Lab Prec plor Sally Ann Rinehart, Lab Preceptor

port5 Infunn3. tion Di

tor

Coach Di rector of Aquatics

Bruce Haroldson, Men's Basketball Johnsou.

CraIg McCord. A thletics

oacb/T n. truct r

Guy Nicholson. Athletic Trainer Gilbert RlgeD, AtWerics Coachllnslru tor Scon Westcring, Athletics Coachlln truetor

Library Sheri TonD, Dean of Information Resources Leon Re' beJ'l, A�sociate Dean Gat] Egbers., ASSIstant Professor,

Kerry A. Swanson, D irector of Operations

Admis�iofl5

and Technical Se rv i c s

Karl LeppeU, Associate Director

Library

Susan J. Mc;Donald, Assialant Professo r, LibrJ.ry

Patricia O'Neill, Assistant Professor Library Francesca LaDe RaOIllU, Assistant PrOfeSSl)r,

LibrJry Pltdck Se.lgleJ". lnstI'uctor, Library Sharon G. Cha 8C, Manager, Circul.lti n Jeanine Bundt, Manager, Tech ni ca l Services � Nordgren, Dire tor, Multimedia/ Libra.ry Systelm

Kirk Isabon. Director, Multimedia Production Kerstln Rlngdahl, Archiv ist and Curat r of Sped�1 CoUectiol)s Bridgef Yaden, Coordinator, Language Re. ource Center

Resoltrces - COlllpllliltg oncl TelecommltnJcotloll Services Eric ElIrJJu. Programmer Analyst

InJomturicll

Kalhlecm MorrIs,

Darld Grlmberg, S)'lItrms Analy�t Gordon Halt, NT Sy:;tems Manager Jonathan Johnson, Softwa re Support Specialist Mark NoD, Senior Systems Analy t Cheis Sandel'll, Director, Administrative Computing

.unrue Sulton, System. An, lyst

Margaret Wodey, Director, Academi c I ser upport

Regirrmr Julia Pomerenk, Registrar Made Wulzkr, Ass ista n t Registrar for In tituLionsl Data Kuri Fiddler, Institutional Data Ad m inistrato r Angela rughy, Graduation AdministTator HIDoab Crclgh, Sched u ling Administralor t.e.an Dahl. Ev l ua Lions Administrator UIU'8 Medrud. Evaluations Administrator

Resources

Mary Kahe:r. Underwr i ting Associate

CAryl Zenker, Director of Development

Financial Aid lind Student Emp/cymclII Kay Soltis, Director Joan Riley, Associate Director

FINANCE AND OPERATIONS Sheri J. TORR. Acting Vice Pre ident GIlIge.r Peck, �sistant t the Vice President

Lode Sbla.b. Asso ciate Director

BI/jiness

Mlcha.el. QWltIIoe, Ass date Dir ctor Student Employment Admi nistrlltor

Plal1t

Financial Aid Administrator l'rauy MarUn, Finan ial Aid Administrator Katherine WaIku, Finan ial Aid Adminim'ator Colby Morelli, Financial Aid Administrator

Services

Human Resotlrce Services Su.un Mann, Director of Human Re ource Services Alina Urbanec:., Asso c i ate Di rector

Student Services Center

Sue Drake, Manager

Bonney Alwood, Counsclor

Auxilillry Services

Mk.h.eI.lr Christianson, C uns lor

Jeffrey JcmIao.

Marcia Pec;dllll, Counselor

Director of Auxiliary S rvices

Ufe Erin Signum, Assoc iate Director (Dining S rvices) Mark Muldu, As:;ociate Director and Residential

NesheUe Henkel Chabot, Veterans C ordlnator

Judd LaDu, ou n�cl r Kritllin Davis, ounselo

( University Events and Scheduling) Anpe Zurcher, As ocia.te

DEVEWPMENT

President

Gary ClnoUe, Msociate Director (Golf

cutive Director of Mar or

Course)

Gift

STUDENT LIFE Office ofSrl/clerf r L ife Laun F. MaIOVllki, Acting Vice President and Dea n Phyllis L Meyerhoff, Adminislrative

Development

Faye Anduson, Dir�ctllr of Corporate and roundation Rdations Brian HaIl, Development Director ­ Major Gi fts

�socia le

Monica Hurley, Associate- Director Annual Giving Louise: Tieman, Dcvdopm nt Director ­ Major G i ft� Edgar Latson, Execut ive D i recto r for

Campus afcry Walt HnJIton,

Director

Adam Collins, Supervi so r Daniel N"uJsen, S u pe rv isor

Career Devclop," ett t

Planning

Advan(emrnt ServiCES Sharon L Hardson, DIrector Jocdyn MJllu, SystCI1l, Ad m i n i

Director

( Bookstore)

Janet Goehren, AJministralivc Associal�

Belh Ahlstrom,

irector

JennIfer SchoCD. Associate Director

&

COMdinator of Orientation

tr tor

COl//tSeting a/ld esri/lg Services

& Par�'1/ RellI/iom & Annual G ivillg lrector of Alumni and

Gill')' Minetti, Director/Psychologist

LaUJ'alee llagm,

arenl

ervices

David Webmhoefer, Di rec tor of Plant

Jeffrey Lackey,

AJene Klein, A,sociate Dire

Relations

Darren Kub

Office

Robert ROey, Controller Patricia A. O'Donnell. Assistanl Controller

Barbara Fulkerson, Financial Aid

Alumni

and

Marketing

Ardys Curtis, Adminis trative Asso(;iale

Charitable Est. te

Underwriting Associate

Jeffrey Bauman. Manager of Informatjon

Heather Mcl>Ollgall, Admissions Counselor

Deve lop mell t Doog hgc,

-i -<

HoDy Hoag, Manager of Corporate Support

Sarah WeJ'Dcr. Ad m i �iollS C unsdor Pam MuJlen. Adm i�$ions Counselor 1kyab Lin Buller. Admissions Counselor

David G. Aubrey. Vice

...

LoweD Kiesow, Chief Engineer

Julie MardIla, AdmisSIOns Counselor

Paul Il. Huseth. can; Director of Athletics I.azry Marshall, A�si! Lalit Dire tor or Athlet ics

> n c:

NIck MorrisoD, Musi Director/Host

tor of lnlern, tional

Jennifer Wtye. Senior Counselor

Alhl�tic Dep,urment

Jam

D i re

Brian MIller, A sistallt Director

Sc/Jl)O/ of PitY5i.'lli Edt/catiol! and

Nick D8WSOJl,

Development

David Gunovich. Director Charle5 Nelson,

o z

Direclor of Programming

S 11001 (Jf Nt/rsJug Teny W. Miller.

z

Servi es

Robert Holden, Di rector, Audio Services

Services for

, Ass rute Directo of Alumni

or/Coordinator,

rodents with Disa.bilities/

Coordinator, Testing Services

and Parcnt Rela tions

Shannou Leete rna Jone., P ychologist P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

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141


Dana Myers, Psychologi st

Mill' ba Cain, Psychi<llrist

Health Services S_e Laog, Phy 'ician's AssistantLDirector Ann Miller, Associa te DirectorlNurse ... .....

z o

1 9 7 1 , 1 9 73.

Michael D. BlU1tlneD, 1979-, Professor of

R�idential Life Li fe/Executive Director Auxilianes

ofAnth ropology; B . ., Boston UniverSity, 1974; M.A., H un ter ColIl!ge, 1 982; Ph .D., City University of Nc York, 1 986.

Profess o r of TIleI tre; B.A., Univers i t y of Northern Iowa , 1 96 1 ; M State Univers i ty of South Dakot a. J 964 ; Ph�D., Wllliam Becvar, 1973--,

esident Director

Univ rs ity of KanS35, 1 975.

ttldellt Illvolveme"t and Leadership Cristin. Fridemline, D irec tor Ridt Eastman, Associate D irect r

1 998-, Dean, School of Busilless; B .A , William J well College, 1 965;

Donald R. BeD,

M.A., Ph.D., UniveTsity of Iowa, 1 9 72, 1 980. Sleven R. Benham, 198_-.

Prof< sor of

Geosciences; B.S., Washlngtol) State Un Ive rsity,

Faculty

, 1 98 [ , 1 983, [ 98 6.

1 996-, Assistmu Professor

1 9 78.

California, Berkeley,

Sblrley l!. Aikin, 1 974-. AsSOCIate Professor of

Megan Benton, 1 986-, Associate Professor of

1 996.

ity,

1 976; MA, 'he College o r William and Mary, 1 9 I; Ed.S., Un iversity of Alabama, [ 984;

ofEllglish; B.A., Amherst College. [ 985 ; M.A.,

Ph.D., Unive rsi ty of C:I!ifomia, Berkeley.

P h . D. , Rutgers University, 1989, 1 995.

Paul F. Benton,

1997.

1 969--, A550ciarc Professor of

English; B.A., Whi tworth College, [ 965; Ph.D., Prince ton Universit y, [970.

University of California, Davis, 1 966; Ph. D.•

C1ulJ'les A. Be.rgmau, 1977-, Profmor of

English; 'B.A . (Econ mics) , B .A (English ) ,

Universil1' ofWash ington , [ 969, 1 970; M .A.,

Merrlly J. Alleu, 1982- 1 988, 1 991 , Associat

Ph . D . • Universi t y of Minn�sota, 1 973, 1 977.

B.S.N., M . N. , University

George F- Arbaugb, J 959-, Professor of

Island, 1 9 55; MA, Ph.D., Univt rs i ty of IOW'd,

of Compurer Science; B.A., University of

Kenneth D. Blaba, 1 989-, Associate Profcssor Minnesota. Morris, 1 978; M . . Or gon, [ 98 [ ' 1 984, 1 989.

· RaydeU C. Bradley, 1 992-, Assisrll n r Professor ofMlUic; B.M.E., M.A., Northea!iL Miss.ouri

State University, 1 98 1 , 1 986; D.M .A. cand.. University of Washing ton .

David G. Aubrey, 1995-, Viu Prendell t for

Development find University Relati!,"s; B.A . , Capital University, 1 967; M .Div., TrinilY

Mary C. Bradshaw, 1 999-, Clinical Assistallt Professor of Nllrsing;

Lutheran Se mina ry. [ 97 1 .

Univmity, 1 963, 1 965;

of Pennsylvania, Stephen

M.A., Ph .

1 97 1 , 1 973 .

.,

.

University

Iowa State University, 1967, 1970.

R. Mkh.d Browu., 1 982-, Professor of Psychology; B.A., S attle University, 1 967; M.Sc., Univcr. ity of Calgary, 1 972; Ph.D . . Uni­ versity of North Carolina, Chapel H1Il, 1 974.

E. Barndt, 1 978-, Professor ofBusiness;

B.S. , Washington M.BA. Ph.D.• [ 97 1 .

P A C

I F i

tate Universi ty, 1957; Oh io Stak Univer&ity, 1 967,

e

L

U

T

B.S.N., Seattle University,

1 9 73 ; M .N. , Universi ty of Washington, [ 984. Jamu E. Brlnlr:, 1 70--, Professor of Computer Scieuce; A.B_, H pe College, 1 965; M .. ., Ph .D.,

D. Stuart Bancroft, 1 967-68. 1 97/-, Professor of BIlsiness; B.S., M .B.A., Arizona S tate

( Math mati ) ,

M.S_ (Computer Science) , Ph.D., University of

1 995.

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

Ph.D.,

Berkeley,

[ 972, 1 973,

1 98 1 .

Deall for Special

Academic Programs and Slimmer Studies; B.S., Pacific Luthtlan Uuiver,ity,

1 970; Ph.D.,

Uni ersity o[ Washinglon, [ 974. Mary AIm Carr,

1997-. Clinical As�istallt

Pennsylvania, [ 97 1 ; M.S., Universi ty of M aryla nd, 1 97 5 ; D. N.S., The athu l i, Univer ity f America , 1 995 .

Gary A. Chase, 1 70--, Associate Pr ofessor of Phy i .al Educa tion; B.S., M.S., Washington Stale University, 19 2, [904. MicheDe CoDay,

1998--, Visititlg Associate B,A., Californ.ia State

Professor of Edtlcatiol1;

University, C h i co, 1 978; M . M . , Ph.D., University

of Oregon, 1 9H 2 , 1 988.

Keith ,. Cooper, 1 984-, Associate Pro/ma r of

Conwell Theological Seminary, 1 979; M.A., Ph.D., Universit y of Wisconsin, Madison,

Arturo Blblnz, 1 977....., PmfessO T ofSociology; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Univer it y of California, Los Angeles. I 55 , 1 960, 1968.

1 958, 1 95.9.

Co llege, 1 97 1 ; M .A. , Butler Univer ity,

Unive rsi ty o f California, Los Allgeles, 1 985.

Ph.D., Ohio State University, [ 9 74, 1 98 1 .

Denis G. AruoJcl, 1 995-, Assiltalll Professor of Philosophy; B.A., Lewis & Clark oUege, 1 988; M.A., Ph.D., Univers ity of Minnesota. 1 99 1 ,

of Minnc.-;ota, 1 976.

Su&ao Brown Carlton, 1 991-, Associate Profes,o r ofEnglish; B.A., Mount Ho l yoke

PhilasopllY; Dellll, Divisioll of Humanities; .B.A., Gordon College, 1 9 76; M .T_S. , Gordon­

1982-, Professor of BU5lrless; B.S., Wayne State University, 1 96 1 ; Ph.D. ,

Philosophy; 8.A., Augustana Col lege, Rock

Profess o r a/Biology;

. , Carleton College. 1 966; Ph.D., Un ivers i t y

Jlll Bemiku,

of Washi ngton , 1 '159, 1 984; D.N.S., Un iversity of San Di go, [ 990 . DIIJIIl D. Anderson, 1 984-, ProfwDr of Psychology; B.A., Antioch College, 1 971; M.A. ,

B,

Professor ofNllr,ing; B.S.N., Uni crsit y o f

English; B.A., Pacific Lutheran Un ive r

Un ivers i ty o[ Washington. 1 979.

101m T. CarlSOD, 1 975-,

Judith W. Carr, 197

of History; B.A., Colorado College, 1 983; M.A., lJldiana Univ ersity, [ 988; Ph.D., University of

Biology; B.S., Juniata College, 1 96 2; M.A. ,

1 984-, Associate Professo r of Ellglish; B .S., PhJ)., University l1 f Oregon , 1 968, 1 98 1 ; M .A., Portla n d tale Un iversity, 1 976 .

ThOma5 J. Campbdl,

Approfondies, Doctorat de !' Universite,

Carlton L Benson,

.. Angelie G. AJ.CDDdcr, 1 971-, Professor of

Uni ersity of Denver, 1 993 . •

BA, M .A., PhJ)_, Univ r�lyofCalifornia,

Barbua Ahna, 1 987-, Assisrmlt Professor of Busillf>S; B. A ., U n i versi t y of Oklahoma, 1 907; J.D., Univecsity of Puget 'oUJ1d S chool f Law,

'1lDlH M. Albrecht, 1997-, Assistallt Professor

California, Los Angeles, 1 984, [ 985; Ph.D ..

Rachld Benkbalti,

Univer$ity of Pau , Pr.m

N!ming; B-S.N., BA, M .A .• M .S.N., P ifi Lutheran University, 1 97 1 , 1 97 1 , [ 9 78, 1 996.

Assistant Professor

1 982; Purdll!: Un iversity, 1 99 1 . E. Wayne Carp, 1 986-, Professor of H,STOry;

University of Mi h igan, 1 9 7 1 .

Professor o[Nur5i/lg;

Rouald S. 8yma, 1 998-,

ofEdllcation; B .A. , M.Ed., University of

1 968; M_A-, Ph. D., Indiana University, 1 7 1 , 1979.

1 987-, Professor of Mathemat ics; Maitri e, Diplom D'Etudes

Loren ,. AndUlOn, 1 992-, Pr icitnt; B.A., Concordia College, M o o rhead. 1 967; M .A., M ichi gan State University, 1 968; P h. D"

142

[962;

n ivrrsity, 1969;

College, [ 974; M .A� Univer 'ity of M.ississippi, [ 9 76; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1 99 1 .

D irector Sa)tt Ethuton, Reliiden t Director Colin Folawn, Re s ident Director Shelley Griffiths, Resident Director

The

EUz.beth E. B ruac:o, 1 981h A ssocia t e Profe sor

LywI G. Bea. 1 999--, Professor ofBduCll tion; Dean, Seh 01 ofEducation; B.A., Belhaven

Manage r

Palls, 1 967;

Myra J. Ba ughman, 1 970-, Pmfessor ofEduca­

Ed.D., Unive rsity of Nebnska, Lincoln, [ 9 7 5 .

u.s. Doyle, Resident

, Siom

B.A., Augustana Colleg

Ph.D., University o f Nebraska, 1 9 7 1 .

M_Ed., Western W35hingto n

ResIdential Life/Conduct Coordinator

1 969; Ph.D., UniVeT$ily

Washington U niversity, 1 974, 1976; Ph.D.,

tion; B .A., Pacific Lutheran University,

TboJDAIJI Huebbed. Dire to r KIIthIun FarreU, Associate Director for

Dawn MehoD,

University of Oregoll,

of CaIiforni , Los Angeles, 1 98 1 . • Sta.Dley L Brue, 1 971-, Prof essor ofEcollomics;

University of Southern California, 1 98 1 .

Reliidential

B. Pal Dudley, Reliid�nce Hall Facilities

z

Roberta S . .Brown, J 979--, Professor of French; B.A" Stanford U niver ily, 1 967; M . A.,

CommlmicnriolJ; B.A. , M .A. , Welitern

Practitioner Jeffrey Jordan, Executive Director

,. Thaddeu.s Bamowe, 1 977-, Profe.sjor of BILSil1ess; B.A ., University or San Francisco, 1 966; M.A., Ph .D., UllIversity 0 Mi chigan,

I

V

E

R

5

I

'Ii

Y

1 98 1 , [ 988. Dennis L Cox, 1972-, AssociaTe ProfllSsor of

Art; B.A., Pacific Lutheran Unive rsi ty, 1 967; M .EA., Washington State

niversity, [972.

Michele A. Crayton, 1 977-, Professor of

Biology; B.S., M.S., Univer iry of Missouri,

K3nsas City, 1 967, 1 969; Ph.D., Orego n State

Un!ver 'ity,

I 74.

David P. Dahl, 1 969--,

Professor of A,fusic; B.A.,

Pacific Lu th ran Unive rsi ty, 1960; Asso iat -

ship, American Guild

oC Orsaoisl

, 19 1 ;

M.A . • Univers ity o ( W shing to n , 1 96 2 .

KIIustuv M. Du, 1998-, Assistant Professo r of

MMizcm£ltics; B.A ., V3-�sar College. 1 989; M.S. ,

Ph.D., California

Institute of Tech n ol ogy,

J8800 D1lYicisoo,

1 997-, Visitillg 111strtlclar of

1 99 [ , 1 994.

Comnmnication; B.S., B(adley UnivCT ily, 1 994; M.A. , Miami University, 1 995.

1 994-, Assistall t Professor of B i o logy; B .A . , M.A., StJte Univcrsit), of New Patricia l- Do1an,

York at Bu 'ruo, [ 9 76. 1 982; Ph.D., Kent Srale