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For further information... The univ rsity is located at South 121st Street and Park Avenue in suburban Parkland. Office hours are from 8:00a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday. Most offices are closed � r h pel on Munday, Wednesday, nd Friday from 10:30 to 11:00a.m. during the school year, and on Fridays during June, July and August all offices close at 12 noon. The university also observes all legal holidays. The University Center maintains an information desk which is open daily untiIIO p m. (I Ip.m. on Fri day and Saturday). Visitors are we\col11e at any time. Special arrangements for tours and appointme nts may be made th rou gh the Office of Admissions. ,

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT:

CONTACT THE OFFICE OF:

• General in te rests of the university, church relations, and community relations

The President

• Academic policies and programs, faculty

The Provost

Area code

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appoint me nts, curriculum de vel opment ,

ac ademi c ad vising and assistance, graduate programs, and international study •

General information, admission of students, pub l icat ions for prospec ive students,

Admissions

535-7151 1-800-274-6758 E-mail: admissions@PLU.edu

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freshman student registration, transfer, and advanced placement •

Transc ripls of records, schedules, and

The Registrar

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registration • Fi nancial ass i stance , schol arships , and loans •

Fees, nd payment plans

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Student AccoWlts .

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Financial Aid Se:rvices . . .

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The Vice President for Finance and Operations .

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• Campus parking, safet}', and info rmation

Campus Safety and lnfonnation ...... . 535-7441 .

Residence halls, counseling and testing health services, minority affairs, iot mational students, and extracurricular activities

The Vice President for Student Life ......... ... ....... . . . ..... 535-7191

• Gifts, bequests, grants, and the annual fund

The Vice President for Development and University Relations .. 535-7177

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• Work-study opportunities and student

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Student Employment Office ........ . . . 535-7459 .. . ..

employment •

Career options

• Su mme r sessions •

Alumni activities

• Worsh ip services and religious life at

the university

Career Development Summer Sessions

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Alumni and Parent Relations ..... . ...... 535-7415 . .

Campus Ministry

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535-7464


U NDE R G R AD U A T E AND

History .""",.....................................,,.,",.,',.,....... ,............... 84 Honors Program . .. . . . " .......... 87 Humanities , ,........ , ..............................................."............. 88 Individualized Major .. . . " .., ....... ,...... 89 Integrated Studies " ..........................................., .."........ 89 Interna tional Programs .. . 91 Languages and Literatures . ... . ... 94 Legal Studies . ... . . ,.............................. 98 Marriage and Family Therapy . . . . . . 98 Mathematics ..,"',....................................,....,...................... 99 Medical Technology . .. . . 102 Music ... . ,........................................."'" 103 Natural Sciences . . .... ,.. ,... ,".,... " ................................. 108 Nursing . . . .. ".,.,.. "...., ........................................ 109 Philosophy ... . . 118 Physical Education . . . .. . .... .. . . . . 120 Physics .. . ,......,',.................................... " .. ',................ 125 Political Science " " ,.., ...................................,..................... 127 Pre-Professional Studies .. . . .. 129 Psychology .. . .. . .. , 131 Publishing and Printing Arts ... ... 134 Religion . .... . "..................................... 134 Scandinavian Area Studies . . . . 136 Social Sciences . . ,..................... 137 Sociology and Social Work .... ... . . 137 Statistics .. . . "......................................................... 141 Women's Studies . . . . . 142 ..................................

G R AD U A T E C A T A L OG

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1996/1997

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Academic Calendar

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The University

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Mission Statement . . .. . 3 General Information . .. . .... 3 Admission .............................................................................. 6 Financial Aid . . . . . . 8 Tuition and Fees . . .. . 14 Student Life . .. .. . 18 .. . 21 Academic Procedures . ... . . . ...

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Academic;; Structure .. . . . ....... . 27 Majors and Minors .. ... . .. 28 Anthropology . . .. . . . . 29 Art 31 Arts, School of . . .. .. . . . 34 Biology . . . 34 Business . . . . . . .. 37 Chemistry ............................................................................ 43 Chinese Studies ... .... ... .. 46 Classics ........ . . 46 College of Arts and Sciences . . . . 47 Communication and Theatre ........ . 47 Computer Science . .. . . . . .. 51 Cooperative Education I nternships .. ... . 55 Economics . . . . . .. . . ... . . . . . . . . .......... . . . . . . . . . . ............................... . . . . 56 Education . .... . .. . . . . .. . 58 Engineering . . . ............. . . . . 72 English .. . . . 74 English as a Second Language . . . . 79 Enviro nmental Studies . . .. . . . . .. . 80 Geosciences ... . .. .. . 81 Global Studies . .. . .. . . . 83 .

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Graduate Studies Admission .. .. . . 144 Policies and Standards ...................................................... 145 Tuition and Fees .... ....... .. .... . . .. .. 147 Financial Aid . . ,.................................................. 147 Business ..... , .........................................,......... 147 Education .. . . .. ....,................................. 148 Nursing . ...... . . . .. . .. . .. ". 152 Social Sciences: Marriage and Family Therapy . . .. 153 ..........

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Administration / Faculty .. 155 University Guidelines . .. . ... 163 Campus Map , . . . .................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................. , .. ,"'" 165 Index .. . . .,........................................,......................... 166 ......................

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PACIFIC llJTHERAN UNIVERSITY Th路 information contained herein reflects an accurate picture of Pacific Lutheran University at the time of publication.

reserves the right to make necessary chan g es in procedures, policies, calendar, curriculum, and costs.

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H owe e r,

the

university

Listed in this cat alo g ore course descriptions and summaries of degree requirements for majors. minors, and other programs in the Coll e ge Arts and Sciences and the Schools of the Arts. Business, Education. Nursmg , and Physical Education. Detailed degree requirements. often including supplementary sample programs. are available in the offices of the individual schools and departments. Advising by university

of

personnel inconsistent with published statements is not binding.


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Academic Calendar 1997/1998

1996/1997 SUMMER SESSION 1996

SUMMER SESSION 1997

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Term I . ... . ........ ........ . ... ..... . .... ... .. .. Tuesday, lvlay 27-Friday, June 20 Term II ......................................... MC)l1 day, Junc 23- Friday July 18 Workshop Week ..... ......... .. . . . . . . ... .. Monday, July 21-Friday, July 25 Term 1II .. ... . . .... . . . ..... ............ ..... M mday, July 28-F r id ay, August 22

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Commencement ............................ J 0:30a.m., Saturday, August 23

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M.onda)" Junc 24-Prida), Jui)' ........ .... . . . },Ilonday, Jul y 22-Friday, July Term [II . . . ... . . . . . . . . . Monda)" Ju ly 29-Friday, AuguSI Comm 'ncem('nl ........ . . . . .. [0:30a.m., Saturday, Augusl

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FALL SEMESTER 1996 Orientation and Registration ...

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FALL SEMESTER 1997

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Classes resume nt 1 :45p.m. Mid-semester Break ........................................... Friday, October 25 T hanksg ivi ng Re eS5 Be gi ns . J :35p.m., Wednesday, Tovernber 27 Thanksgiving Rece ss End� ............ 8:00a.m.,

londay, December 2

lasses E nd ..................................... 6:00 p.m., Friday, December

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Mid- 'car .ommencement ... J 0:30a.m., Saturday , Dec mber Final Examinations ................................ Monday, December 16, to Friday, D mbcr 20 emcster End' (after last c:am) ..................... Fri day, December 20 ...

Orientation and Registration

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Classes B egi n ............................... 8:00a.m., Monday, S e p t e mbe r 8

Openlng Convoca t i o n ............... 10:30a.m., M o nd ay, September 8 Clnsses resume at I :4Sp. m. Mid-semester Break ........................................... Friday, October 24

Thanksgiving Recess Begins. [:3Sp.m., Wednesday,

ovem ber 26

Thank�giving Recess E nds ............ 8:00a.m., Monday, December 1 Classes End ..................................... 6:00p.m., Fr iday, December 12 :\II.id-year Co mmenc eme n t ...... [0:30a.m., Sa turday, D ece m ber 13 Fi n al

amina t ions . ........... . ... . . . . . . . . ........ Mo nd a)" Decen.1ber 15, to

JANUARY TERM 1998

SPRING SEM.ESTER 1997

SPRING SEMESTER 1998 Registration . . .. .. . ... . . . .... . . . .. Tuesday, February 3 Clas 5 Begin .............................. 8:00a.m., Wednesday, February 4 Presidents' Day Holiday ................................ Mo nd ay, February 16 Spring Break Begins ... ....... .. . . .. ... ... 6:00p.m., Friday, March 20 Spring Break End s ............................. R:OOa.m., Monday, l\'larch 30 Easter Recess Ilegins .. . . . . .... . . . . ... 8:00a.m., Friday, April 10 East r R cess Ends.. .. .... .... ... .. ... . . 3:40p.m., Monday, April 13 Jasses End ... . . . . ... . .. . . .. . .. . 6:00 .m., Friday, May 15 Final Examination, .... . . . . . ... Monday, May 18, to Friday. May 22 Semester Ends (after last exam) ............................... Friday, �IIay 22 Commencement ..................................... 2:30p.m., Sunday, M.ay 24

[olida)' ............... ..... . . . ......... Monda " February 17

s Begins . . 6:00p.m., Friday, 1arch pring Break/Easter Recess nds ..... 3:40 p,m., Monday, arch �lass('s End ... .. . ..... . . . ..... .... . . ... 6:00 p.m., Friday, May Final Examinations . ... . . . Monday, May 19, to Friday, May 'emester Ends (after last exam) ............................... Fr iday, May Comm n '('ment ....... . . . . . . ..... .. .. . 2:30 p.m., :unday, May

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Worship Service begins at 9:3011.111.

Martin Lu ther King, Jr., Birthday Holiday .. . Monday, Jan uar y 19 Classe End .......................................................... Friday, Jan uar y 30 ..

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Semester Ends (after la st exam) ..................... F r iday, December 19 Class s Begin ...................................................... M onda y, January 5

lass e s Begin .............................. 8:00a.m., We dn e. day, February 5

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Classe. Be in ...................................................... M o nday, J anuar y 6 arlin Luther Kmg, Jr., Birthday Holiday ..... Monday, Jan u a ry 20 lasses End ............... ... ........... ...... . . . . . . . . ............... Friday, J anu ary 3[ Registration ...................................................... Tu esday, F eb ru ar y 4

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JANUARYTERM 1997

Presidents'Day

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'"" The University

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MI S S ION S T A T EMENT -

lhl.: development

[knm'<ledgeabl per

critical ,H,"arencS5 of humant: and piritu

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Long committed to pr vi ding an e ducation distingui . bed for quality. in the context of a h ritage that is Lutheran and a n environment lha is cumenically Chri tian. PLU C llltlnlle 10 embrac its pri lary rnissi n: e

quipped With

o

understan ing of the human condition, a valnes, and a Wlp.1 ·IY for clear and effective !:Id f-expression .

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'or all who hOt e tl\ ,eek.\ PlU degree, the UnIversity offers p I't u n ity to ur lie a V. lI iet)' of progr ms of academi worth and cellcrIc·. II. stan dJ rds of perform nee dem,md a finely raincJ fa("ulty as well as highly skilled administrat..iv(, and .support 'taff. 11 Its institution.al empha.·;is LH s htll,lTSh i p. the UniversilY vic\vs Ibe liher ..lI art as providing the nece sary and essential roundatilln for the tcel n'cal training and edul.":i1tic I) In the profe� Ions which mod rn sooety requires. The Univcr ity aim" to cuJlivale the intellect, not fo r its 0">'11 sake mer ly, but as a t I)f Clm den e and an i Ilslrumenl for 'crvice. 1 he diver ity and variety of cultural programs and p erso na 'ervice" off; r d by the Univer ·ity are inkndctl to facilitate lM posi tive deve! pmellt uf tlw .ludenL as a .vh Ie person in order that our students might fundi 11 a mCl lbe r of' ciet} . I other word:., PLU affirms that re.lization of one' higb ·t p tential J I{ 11 a fulfillment flife's purpose arises in the joy of s<!rvke to o thers. To . id ils student' in sh ring th.is under ·tanding, the Uni I r ilr seeks to e a co m m un i t y in which th rc i: a contin ·ng and fru it fu l interac.tion between what i hest in education and what IS noblest in Christian etiifiultion. ThIS d el t herat e and simultaneolls attention to the religi us dimen ion of the total hum an experience and to the standards of scholarly objectivity, coupled with clear recognitiollllf lhe integrative impulse in each. is Ih(; essence of PLU.

General Information HISTORY

o z

with PLC in 1929. Four-year baccalaureate degrees were first offered in education in 1939 and in lhe liberal arts in 1942. The institution

\ as

reorganiuel

a,

a university 1960, re I iming its

orig inal name. It presently includes a CoLlege of Arts Jnd Sci­ ences' professional schools o f the Arts, Business, Ed uc ati on,

Nur ing" nel Physical Educalion; and both graduate and con­ tinuing edu alion programs.

PL

has been closely and productively affiliated wilh the

Lutheran church throughout its history.

the EvanueLical Lut he ran

hurch in

It is now

a

universi ty of

merica, owne I by the more

ongregat"ions of R egi on 1 of the ELCA. Many influences and ind i v idual have combined to shape PLU and its re gi on al. national, and increasingly international reputa­

than six hundred

tion for teaching, ·crvice. and scholarship. A :ledicated f aculty

has been an extremely i mp o r tant facror. The school has enj oyed

a trong musical tradition from t he beginning, a well as note­ worthy alullllli a hievements in p ublic 5cho Ilea hiug and administration, uni versit y teaching and scholarship, the pastoral ministry, the h ealth ·cienc!: ,md healing arts, and business. At

PLU, 10 I/I/ail/8 lilCui,y

Pacifi

Lutheran Uni ersit)" was fowlded in 1890 by a group ot

Scandinavian Lut he ra ns from the Pug t Sound area. They were

l-d by the Reverend .Bjug Harstad, who became PL 's first president. In namin the university. these pioneer. recognized the i porlunL [oil' that a Lutheran educational i nst. i t u t i 11 on the IN stern li'oJllier of m er ica could play in l.h emerging future of the region. They want e d the institution to he.lp immigrants adjust. to their ne\ land and find jobs, but they also \ anted it to produce graduates w ho w o u ld serve hurch and commun ity. Education-ano educating for ser 'ice-was a venerated part �)f the 'candinavian traditions from which these pioneers came. Although founded as a university, the institution functioned prim,lrily as an academy until I 18, wh n it closed for two years. It reopelled as the two-year Pacific Lutheran College. nfter me r g ing with o!umbia College, pr ev i ous l located in Ev ere t t.

PLU the liberal art and Pl'· fcssional ed u c at ion are closely integrated and collaborative in their edu(,nional philo ophies,

Jctivitics, and Jspirations.

ACCREDITATION Pacific Lutheran U niversi t y is fu l. ly <leer d it ed by th e Northwest AssQciat ion of Scho Is and C U ges as a four·year institution of higher edu ation. In addition the follow i llg programs hold specialized

ecredi­

tations and appro ols:

Busilless - American ssembly of Collegiate ·chools ofBusines Chemistry - American Chemical ociet Complller Science (B.S.) - Computiug ciences cred.itation Board, Inc.

[dUClJiioll - National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher

Edu cation

Further cons lidations occurred when Spokane College merged P

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Mll rl'iage alld Family Therapy - Commission on Accreditation for M ar r i age and Family Therapy Education of the American

Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Mllsic - National Association of Schools of Music Nu rsing - National League for Nu r sing Social Wo rk - ouneil on Social Work Education o

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Any current o r

prospective student may, upon request directed

to the p residen t's office, rev iew a copy o f the documents per­

taining to the u n iver ity's various a creditation and a p pro val s.

GROUNDS Located in suburban Parkland, PL has n p ic turesq u e J 26-a cre camp us, trul y representat ive of the natural grandeur of the Pacific Northwest. z

ENROLLMENT 3,029 full-time students; 550 part-time students FACUlTY 23 J full-time facu.lty; 88 part-time fa c u l ty STUDENTlFACU lTY RATIO I ).3: I ACADEMIC PROGRAM Pa c i Ie Luth ran University uses a 4- 1 -4 calendar which consists of t wo fi fteen -week se mest e rs bridged by a fo ur-week January term. ourse cred j t is computed by hours . The majority of cours � offered L r 4 hours. Each undergrad uate degree candidate is exp ec t e d to complete 1 2 8 hours with an overall g T ad e point average of 2.00. De p a rtm e nt s o r schools may set higher grade point requ i rements. egree re q ui rements are spec ifically stated in this atalog. Each student should become familiar with these requirements and prepare to meet them. UBRARY SERVICES The Robert

.L. Mort edt Library is the central multi-media lea rning resource center crving th e n t i re un iversity community. It. collections are housed and services provided i n a modern functional buildi ng which has study spaces for 850 students a nd shelving for 500,000 books, pe rio dic al s , m icrofilm, and audioisual m <l t er i als. The l i brary receives ()ver 2,000 cu rrent maga­ zines, journals, and newspa pers. In addition to its general collection o f hooks and other mate­ rials, t he l i b r ary has a special collection dev ted to the Scandi na­ ,,-jan I m m igmnt E ' p e r i c n ce and c.ontains the university and re g i o n al Lutheran church archives. Other resources include the Education Curric u l u m Collection, t b e microfiche collection of col Jege catalogs, map , pamphlets, national and t rade hibliogra­ ph ies, D - ROM indexes, and access to o nl i ne databas . A taf!" of 28 fu ll and part-time l ib rarians and assistants o ffer e-.... pert reference, i n formation, and me d ia 5 r vice s . The refi renee sta ff p rovides beginning and advanced l i b rary i nstruction for all tudents. In addition to standard r e fe ren ce ervice, the l ibrary staff also offers co mputerized bibliographic i n fo rm a t ion service. As the re.sult of the lib rary'S extensive col lect ion o f bibliogra p h i c t o ls, computer access to ot he r collect i o n s , and electronic mail service, students and facu l t y have rap id access to ma terials which can be bo rrowed from other librarie,. D i rect loan service is available to PLU students and faculty at Northwest Co l J cge , t . Martin's College, Seattle Universi t y, Seattle Pacific Univ rsity, and the U n iv rsity of Puget Sound. 3

COMPUTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS Computing and Teleco m m u nications Services p ro v i d es for campus wide commun ications and computing needs. The m a i n o ffices are located in the southeast corner of the lower floor o f the M o rtvcdt Lib rary building. The fa c i l i ty houses the uni rsity's AX 4000-700 and DEC 3000-400 Alpha computers. The Alpha is u�ed primarily for academ ic purposes and p rovides a cess to the Internet. A large computer lab, located in the 4

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University Cen ter, p ro v i d es access to the Alpha, IBM -PCs, a n d Macintosh computers. T h i s l a b is o p e n seven days a week du ring each term. Add i t ionally, each residence hall room is equipped with a special data jack. This allows students with their own computers to connect to the campus da ta network without a modem. Through the campus network, students have access to the PLU l ibrary's on-l i n e public access catalog (as well as o thers througho ut the world), electronic mail, a nd other Internet research tool . Each residence hall roo m is also equipped with a d i g i tal telephone and voice mail service. A variety of software programs and programming l a nguages a re ava i l a ble for the systems. The university has adopted standard software incl uding word processing and spread sheets fo r PCs , nd M.acintosh computers, and data bases and statistical software fo r pes. Information regarding telephone services, computer software standards and policies, and University Center Lab hours may be obtained by contacting Computing and Telecom mu nicati()ns Services main o ffice at 5 35-7525 o r by visiting the office during normal bus iness hours. The i n tentional, unauthorized entry i nto a computer system is a crime under the laws of the State o f Washington. Computer security programs a n d d e vices are used to ma nage and control access to programs and data. In the event of computer trespass, u n ivers i ty officials are authorized access to all data and messages associated with the incident for use in its resolu tion. Voice messCiging systems fall under the Telecommu nications Act which makes tampering with ano ther person's voice mail or making p rank and obscene calls illegal. The uni ve rs i t y vigoro usly prosecutes these violations both criminally and via the student conduct system.

WRITING CENTER The Writing en ter, located in Ramstad Hall, provides a place for students to meet with trai ned student readers to discuss their academic, creative, and professional writing. Student st�ff members help writers generate topics, develop focus, orga n ize material, and clarify ideas. In an atmosphere that is comfortable and removed fro m the classroom set ling, s t u d e n t readers and writers talk seriousl)' about ideas and w ri ti ng strategie . Most sessions are o n e - h o ur meetings, but drop-in students with brief es!;ays or questio ns a re welcome. The Wri ting Center is o p e n MondJ)' through Friday from the b eginning ()f period two ( MWF 9: 1 5 ; TR 9:55) until 4:30 d ur i n g t h e d a y a n d Sunday through Friday fro m 7:00 u n t i l 9:00 i n the e ve n i n g. ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE CENTER At the Academic Assistance Center, studen ts are provided ser­ vices to i n crease their knowledge, su p pl e m e n t ciJssroom activi­ ties, and develop effective learning and study strategics. In a setting w h e re learni ng, risk taki ng, and discovery occur, students meet with trained, certified peer tutors. The word "tutor" conj ures up images of the private tutor in the English Manor who is actually there to d r i l l and i mpart o r "download" knowledge t o students. T h e dictionary defines peer as " a person who has equal standin g with a nother, as in rank, class, o r a ge ." At the Academic Assistance enter the peer t utor functions as t h e lea r n i n g guide, implying that peer tutor and tute alike both b ri ng a measure of a b i l ity, exp rtise, and i n for­ m a t i o n to the enco u nter. Through collaboration students are encou raged to l e a r n from one another and are em p owered and e n c o ura ged to use their own th i n k ing skil l · and resources. AJ.l ervi .es are free to registered PL students. Tutoring takes p l a ce on campus usually i n the Academic Assistance Center i n Ramstad Hall. While tutoring sessions are set u p by appoint­ ment, d rop-in students are we l c o m e . The Center, located in Ramstad 1 J 2, is 0 en Monday through Thursday from 9:00a.m. u n t i l 9:00p.m., Friday from 9:00a . m . until 5 :00p.m. and Sunday from 2:00p.m. until 9:00p.m .. Students in terested i n a n appoi n t­ men t should stop by or call 5 3 5 - 7 5 1 8 .

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CAMPUS RESOURCES Center for PubHc Service

The Center for Publ ic Service co nnect s rh ' PL ca mpus to the ommunities by pro iding opportun.ities for students, 5t ff. and facuity to �erve co m m u nity needs as p a r t o f th i u n iyer ity expe ri n -e. There are many ways student.s can become i nvolved in service a t PLU. Students c n work with d1ildren, .dults and senior Citizens (It the family and Chi ldren's CeIlter, a coa l i t i on of s oc i al service program� housed toget her a t East ampLl� and coordi­ nated h)' the Cenler fo r Puhlic Serv ice. Students can al s o be ome involved i n com m u n it y work through service-learning classes. The Cen ter for Public er ice can help tud 'nts find out abollt these ,'o ur'es, avallable in many depa rt m en ts , which lise s er ice exper ience as an i m p or t a n t part of the learning pro es�. I ndjviduals .md �tudent group can also u e the Volunt er enter, pa rt f the emer for Public Servi e, to browse through l ist i ng of oyer 100 erv; e opport u n i t ies o n ,1I1d near the PL c:1mpus. These op po rt u n iti e ran ge from o n e - t i m e " 0- 'n- Do" p ro jec ts t lo ng er- te rm involveme.nt. To find out more ahout vol UJlteering and � 'rvic '-led ning at p V, . II the enter for Public Service a t )5 -7 1 73 . s u rrou n d i ng

KPLU-FM, National Public Radio P U at 88.5 M is ti en sed by the Fede ra l Commuoications

um mi ion t the niver ity Board of Regents. A member stat ion of Natio nal Public Radio, K PLU provi de s music and news seven days a week, 24 hours a day, with d profe iona.i staff a ugm e n ted by qualifi d students. PLU i� the only i n depe n d en t u n ive rs i ty in the Northwest o pera ti ng a ful l power PR ·tati on. e K P L U main tran mitter rom West Ti ge r M u n tai n covers the Puget .)ound area a nd translators cover the:: maj r pop u! t ion cen te rs o[ western Washin gton froIll Bel l ingham to Vaneou er. The Elliott Press

P ress is PLU's st ud io- laboratory for the p u b l i s h i n g a rt s. With the Press' large colle tion of let terpress type dlld equi ment, 'I udents design ;lnd pI' duce printed texts using the hand-controlled techniques that flourish t od ay in the live! 3rt o r m known as " ti n p r i n t i n g." In addition to its o w n pu b l i h i n g program, the Press houses a g ro wi n g collection of i nnovative book works and is a working museum, where visitor- may watch and try their hands at th e tech no lo gy pionee r d by G u tenberg.

The Elliott

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LATE AFl'ERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES

for the pmfes i n al growL h a n d c ul tu ra l en richment of persons unable to take a fu ll-time college c urse, the univer­ � i L Y co nd u c t s lare-a ftcrn o n and evening Ia 'ses. In addition to a wide variety of offerings i n the arts and s iences. there 3 r t! �peci ali1.ed ami grad ua te CO llf es for teachers, adm i n i s t rators, and p rson. in bus i ne ss and i nd u �t ry.

To p rov i d e

SUMMER SESSION

An extensive summer school curriculum, of the same quality �s that offered during rhe r gular a ademic year, i s ava i lable to all qualified per$ons. I n add i t i on , summer sessi on typically is a time wben t he fac u l t offer i n novative, eX1}cri mentaJ cour es w hi cll cover a br a d range of contemporary is ucs a n d perspect i cs in many fields. T h e summer session consists of three (bc rete fo ur­ wee.: terms. a n d a one-wee k workshop 5 ssion, a n d begins the last week of May. Marry cou rses are ta ugh t in the evening, two nights per week or n i n e weeks. and Master of Business Adminis­ t rati o n C llrSCS a r t a u gh t d u r i ng two sL -\ eek term , two night5 per week. Desl ned for undergraduates and graduate students al ike, the: p rogr am er es teacher ' a n d admlnistrators seeking cr>dentials an special courses, firs t - year students de iring to iniliatecoliege stu d " and other seeking s p ecia l �tudies offered by the chool an d dcpa. r tments. Non- matri ulated s tudents who enroll for the summer sess i o n need o nl y submit a le tter o f academic :tanding or give lther e ,iden e of being prepal"\:d fo r .:ol lcgc work.

A co m plete SLlmlller Sessioll Catalog, outlining the curriculum a. well as sp ec ial institutes. wo rksh o ps and eminars, is printed each spring and is available hy calling 535-7 1 29.

SUMMER SCHOLARS

For the last three weeks o f ] ul eacb summer, PLU pre 'c nts a pe ial program, called t he Summer Scholar� Program. for academ ically gifted high school sophomores and j uniors. Admission is co mpetitive. and studen ts earn fo ur cred i ts for thelr uccessfu l com pleti o n of an i n t nsive co urse in ei ther the natura l sciences or writing. For i n formation and appl ications contact the Office of ' pecia l Academic P ro g r a ms, 5)5-7 1 29.

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MIDDLE COLLEGE PLU offers a s p ec ia l six-week su mmer program for high school j u niors and seniors and for first-year collecre students. ,aBed M iddle College, the program is d e s i g n e d to case the transition fr o ll l h ig b s hool to college by 'barpeni n g learning skills that are essential to successful completion o f a college or u niversity program . Middle Col lege h as both a n clcademic program a n d a cou nseling and testing comp nent. All s t ud e n t s n re thoroughly tested and evaluated in private sessions wiLh regard to thei r reading, wr i t i n g, verbal. and mathematical s k i l ls. In adilition. career co unseling is provided. The aim of M iddle Col lege co uU5e l in g is to a ss ess ea h studen t's talents and i n terests i ll o rder to pro ide direction and goals for the (oUeUe expe rie n e. The ac a demic p rogram offers a chanc� to i mprove spe ifi learning kill essential to coUege success. The classes, offered at several levcls i n everal dis ip line5 , arc f, r Middle olleg students only, ther by allo\ i n g small class size and close contact between studenlli and faculty. All students lake a study skills course, which serves as a core o f the program. In addition, stud nts m a y select two or three cou rses fro m among those o ffe red each year. Each s tudent's program is individualized to promote maximum g row t h .

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PROJECT ADVANCE

Each semester PLU offers Project dvance. a special emi h mcnt program for h igh s c ho I juniors <tnd seniors. Designed to com­ p leme n t high scbool s t u di es , Pr ject Advance allows students to earn one hOllr of u n i vers i t y credit and t o experience oUege l i fe and t uel),. The topic of the cou rse is d i fferent each emester, a n d fall topics a re usually chosen t o coincide \ i t h t h e high school Nat i o n a l Debate Topic. Project Ad\'ance classes meet once a week for six we�ks in the l a t e afterno n. RETENTION OF FlRST-YEAR STUDENTS

The re te n t i o n of students entering as freshman students has been m o n i t o red since 1 972. Those d a t a for the past decade arc presented i n the fo l lo w i ng ta bl e : Retention of Entering First-Year Students To Senior Year

To Junior Year

To o phomore Year

Fall

54 . 6 % 5 8 . 2% 58 . 8 % 67.3% 66.2% 64.0% 62.7%

1 98 2 1 983 1 9R4 1 98 5

77. % 75.7% 78.5% 8 1 .5%

J 986

80.6%

1 987 1 98 8 1 989 19 0 J 99 1 1 992 1 993 1 994

8 1 .7% 75.7%

60. 1 % 59.8% 65.9% 68.8% 71.1% 65.3 % 65.4 (Vu

80.90/0

70 . 1 %

66.0%

77.4% 8 1 .3% 79.9% 79.8% 78.3%

66.0% 71.1% 73.4% 70.2%

63.5% 67.9% 68 . 1 %

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applicants with less than sophomore standing (30 semester hours or 45 quarter hours), secondary school records and standardized test scores will also be considered.

Admission Pacific

Luther

n

University welcomes applications from

Credentials required are: 1 . Formal App lication: Submit the PLU Application for Admission available from high school counselors or the PLU Office of Admissions . 2. $35.00 Application Fee: A $35 fee must accompany the applica­ tion or be ma iled separately. This non-refundable service fee does not apply to the student's account. Make checks or money orders payable to PLU Office of Admissions. 3. Transcripts: Transcripts must be submitted from high school and all college cou rse work. Transcripts must be sent directly from the school to PLU. Accepted freshmen must submit a final high school transcript which indicates satisfactory co mpletion of high school and attainment of a diploma. The u n iversity accepts the General Equivalency Diploma (GED) for those studenl$ who may not have completed a tradit ional high school program. 4. Recommendations: Two recommendations must be prepared by principals, counselors, pastors, or other qualified persons. Forms are included in the application packet. 5. Test Requirement: All entering freshman students must submit scores from either the College Board, Scholastic Asse.ssment Test (SAT) , or the American College Test Assessment (ACT) . Registration procedu res and fo rms are available at high school counseling offices. 6. Personal Essay: Using no more than two pages, write an essay on one of these two topics: a. Discuss a significant influence on your personal and intellectual development. This might be an i nteraction with another person, a personal experience or achievement, an educational experience, or involvement ,"ith an issue of local, national, or global concern. b. What do you consider to be your personal/academic/ professional goals and objectives? How do you expect your experience at Pacific Lutheran University to help you achieve them?

students who have demons t rated ca p acities fo r success at

who p resent academic and personal q ua l ities which our experience

the baccalaureate level. Appl icants rec ord s

indicates wiU enable them t

'ucceed at the u n iversity

and benefit from th environment will be offered admis­ s ion .

ppl icants fo r admi s i o n a re evaluated without

regard to

s ex , race,

creed, color, age, nat ional origin, or

disabling condition. Selection criteria i n clud grade point average, class rank, t ranscript pattern, test scores, an essay,

and

re

.om mendat ion s .

ENTRANCE REQUI REMENTS (Fresh men & Transfer Students) In evaluating applic;1tiol1s the Office of Admissions i nterprets grade point average and class rank in relation to the quality of the c ur riculum which the applicant has pursued in high school and at the baccalaureate level. ror example, a standard high 'chool p rogram i n preparation for college should include the following: English: 4 yea rs ""Mathematics: 3 years (algebra, 2 years, and geometry, I year) Fonigo Language: 2 years Social Studies: 2 ea rs Laboratory Sdences: 2 yea rs Fine, Visual, or Performing Arts: I yea r Electives: 3 year (selected from the areas listed above, as well a s courses in computer . cience, speech, and debate.) •

Millim ulIl Elltrallce Req1liremcms: 1. Two yt'ars of college p repara tory mathematics (exclusive of

computer science) with a/l average grade of C o r higher, or all

app ro ve d course at the b a cca la u rea t e level, or demo rlstrated equivalel/t proficie ncy.

2. T ivo years of olle foreigll la nguage in high school, with (In a verage grade of C or higher, o r aile year at the uaccala u reate level, or demonstrated eq1livalent proficiency.

Studellts who have /lot satisfied a l i t o r both of these req u i re ­ ments may still be adlll itted bUl must make up the defic ifllc), as a n additional degree requirement.

Additional study of both mathematics and foreign language is adv isable for certain areas in the arts and science and in some professional programs. Tbose who follow the above preparatory program will find mo. t curricular offerings of the university pen to them and may also qualify for advanced placement in some a reas. Students are admitted to either the fall or spring semester. A ceptance to the fall term ca rries permission to attend the prev iou ' summer sessions. Spri.ng acceptance approves enroll­ ment i n the January term. The following application priority dates (Ire reco mmended: Fa ll Sell1ester-February I S; Sp ring Semester-December 1 5.

APPUCATION PROCEDURES (Fresh men 6- Transfer Students) Students plann i ng to enter as freshmen m ay submit application materials anyti me after completion of the junior year of high school. Admission decisions are made beginni ng December 1 unks a request for Early Action is received. Candidates are notified of their status as soon as their completed application has been received and evaluat d. Students who began their higher educat ion at other regionally accredited colleges or un iversities are encouraged to apply for admission with adva n ced standing. Over 400 students transfer to the univers ity each year with an average grade point in excess of 3.00 ( B ) . Candidate must have good academic and personal sta ndi ng a t the institution la. t attended full-ti me. Although it does not guara ntee ad mission, a grade point average of 2 . 5 0 in all college work attempted is usually required fo r admission. For 6

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Early Action High school students who are ranked in the top 25% of their class and who have decided upon PLU as their first choice may be offered admission as early as October I of their senior year. To be considered fo r Early Act ion, applicants must in dicate their choice in Section Ic of the application form and postmark all required admission credentials by Qvember 1 5. SAT or ACT scores from the previous May or July are acceptable. Early Action students are given first consideration in campus housing and financial aid. Students not accepted under the Early Action program may still be considered fo r regular admission. Early Admission Qualified students interested in accelerating thei r fo rmal education may begin work toward a degree after completion of the ju nior yeur or first semester of the senior year of high school . Exceptional students who wish t o enroll before completing all required units in high school Olust have a letter submitted by a recogn ized s hool official which approves early college admission and gives assurance that a high school diploma will be issued after completion of specified college work. Only students highly recommended fo r Early Admission will be considered. Generally these students rank among the top students in their class and present high aptitude test scores. APPLICATION PROCEDURES (bltemational Studen ts) Interna tional students who are qualified academically, finan­ cially, and i n English proficiency are encouraged to join the u niversity community. Applicaton deadlines ar July I for fal l semester a n d January I fo r spring semester. Credent ials required are: I. A completed Intematiollal Stude-m Application with a non­ refundable U.S. $35 .00 application fee.


2. OFFl '[.11. Tm llscripl.< with secon da r y scho ol , (b) ( c ) college

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or

F.nglislz tra llslm io n from eac h : ( a )

ngl i s h as a second language pro ' m m ,

1.

u l1 iversity att cc n ded i n the United State , home

c u n try, or o t her co un tr y. Transcripts must be se n t d irec t ly from each in t i tllt i o n . Fax.ed copil: are n o t acce pt able. 3 . Jivu refafllces from s h o ol offic.ials or o t hers in a pos i t i o n to evaluate t h e s t udent 's abi lity to su (eed in a baccal.Jureat.: program. Tr a nsfe r s tu d nts from ::t U . S. college or u n i vers ity must h , we t h ei r international st u den t adviser prov ide a reference ( fo rm s prov ided ) , 4. Standa rdized English Proficiency Test res ults. Ei t he r (a) TOEFL ( Test of Engl ish as a Forei gn Lan ua ge ) . Nlin im u m total score of 550 is re q ui re d . ( b ) Mid i g ;J n Te t Scores for both nglish Language P ro fi c i e ncy and Au ra l Comprehension. M i n i m u m coreS of 85 a re required on ('adl t �t. Arrangements tn take these te s t can be made by calling t.he A.C.E. Languilge In titute, l o c n t e d at PLU, ( 206) 535-7325. S. A com p leted Illtemn t iO ll al . t H lte"t D ecl a ra ti o n of Fillallces. 6. Per.�olla l Essay on one of two topi . l isted on the e s sa y for m .

1-

Other Educational Experiences redits earned i n unaccredited schol)l are no t. t ransferable . Students who have n13triculatcd at Pac ific Lu theran Umversi t y may p e t i tio n a depa r t m e n t or ·c.llOol to w ai

e

a partic ula r

c s: VI

re q u i reme n t on the basis ()f previous unacCTedited c u rse

VI

work or rna)' petition a d e pa rt men t or sc h oo l to receive cr e d i t by exa m i nation .

2. The univ rsity allows up tu 20 se meste r hours of U SA Fl/ Dan te red it and up to 20 semester hours fo r m i l i t ary credit, prov id ­ ing the total of the two doe n o t exceed 30 s em es t r hours. 3. The u n iversit y d oes not gr a n t cred i t ('or col l ege leve l CED

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test .

4. For in format ion on the o llege Lt:vel E.. xami nation P rogram ( CLEP), refer to t he s ec tio n on C red i t by Ex a m in at io n WIder A ademic P r oced ures (see page 23). FINALIZING AN OFFER OF ADMlSSION

1. Medico/ Requirernell t: Before a

t ual enrol l men t ea

h new

st udent m Llst submit a Heallh H i story Form co m plet e ", i t h an accurate i m m u ni za ti 11 reco rd . Th is in lo rmati()11 m\tst be acceptable to the PLU Heal th Services Office.

EVALUATION OF CREDITS Tran fer of Credits from Other Universities Th Regist rar' O ffice evaluates all t ransfer record and pro ides ad v i si ng mater ials designed to assist st ude nts tel c om pl et e un iversit y req ll i re nwn ts. These materials include a s u.m m ary of

ore requ i re me nts completed and the total hours a cep ted.

I ndiv i d u a l sc hools and depart men ts de t e r m i n

sat i sfy major re q u i rements. 1. Co urses complete d wiLh

a

w hich

coLir es

grade of C- o r h i g he r a t other

ae redited .:ol legt:s o r u n iversities normally will be accepted

for grdd u3tion credit with l a ted into the PL

"P"

g r ;J d es , and will n o t be calcu­

grade po i n t average.

2. A st u de n t may tra nsfer a maximum of 96 :;emester or 144 q u a r te r hO Li rs . Of th es e , the maxi m u m transferable fro m a two-year school i s

64 . 1:01 ter or 96 qua r te r h u u rs.

3 . St udents who complete t h e d i rect transfer asso iate deg ree

fro m an ac reditcd Wa sh ingto n tate com m u n i ty co l lege b fore ma tricu lat ion at PLU w i l l be a d m itt ed � i t h j un io r s t an d i n g and will h ave satistied Core I of t h e gen era l univerit)' requ i rem en ts i;'xcept fil r fo u h o u rs in re l ig i o n ( from line iver ity. onc or two) an d ro u r ho urs in Per pect ives on

Transfer of CredIts Earned While in High School he Wliversity award� cred i t to h i g h school . t u dc n t s fo r courses efore high school graduation. The u n iversity Ill U)f to high s ch oo l s t ude nts who have com­ pl e te d co u rses i n ap proved prog ra m , a s described below.

completed

awa rd t ra nsfer c re dit

1 . High S hool CO llrs£?': tudents who complete adVJ IlCed placement o r c redit toward grad ua tion th rough t he exa m in a ­ t ion program of th Colleg Bo a rd may receive c red i t for >

such cour�es. lnqui ries should be a ddr 'sscd to the Office of

Adm issions. 2. RUtlllillg S/a l'( Program :

(cepted students who have com­ ashington tate R u nn i ng St< rt Pr g ram will b a ward ed transfer credit. Such courses must be

pleted co u rs t'S und e r the

\

described in the atalog of an accredi te d Wash i ng t o n State

Co m m u n i t y College and must b e po ted on an o ffidaJ t r a n ­ scri p t . . ltltal1LlIiona/ Baccalaureate: A ma, unum of 30 se mester ho u rs may be gra n ted

f()l' c:om pktion

f The Di ploma . Students arC'

a dvi sed to co n ta c t tilt! Registrar's Office for spedfic d e tails.

4. Otller Programs: Students who have comp l ted col lege cOllrse� whi le i n h igh �chool may recei e credit. The courses lllust be offered on a coUege ca m p us , be l isted in the o fficial college catalog, and be '1 P,l r t of the regular college cu rriculum l)f a r gi o n al ly accredited col lege or university. The u n i vers ity

rese rves

the r ighr to TIl kt: dec i , io ns on an indi­

idual ba. is. S t ud en t s are advised to ask tJ1C Regist rar's

c.lari fi c a t i Oll before registe ring.

ffice fo r

c Paymellt: $200. 00 .ldvance pa men! is l1eee 'a T}' i n ord r to confirm an o ffer 0 ad mi ss i o n . h is payment guaran tees a p lace i.. n the t u denL body, reserve housing on cam p u s if r quested, h (, ld , fi na n cial ;\SSI�tan e hich may ha e been awa rded, a n d is req ui red before c.la s reg i l rat i on . I t i� redited t o t h e ·tudent's :ICC�) Un t d n d i s applied l U I ard exp nses f the first s <: m e ter. fall appl ic.an lS alTered adm is­ sian before Mal' l must po st mark t he payment by MOlY I , I f cir umstances t1e es itate cancella ti on of enrollment and t he dean of admissio ns is noti fied i n wr i t i ng before May lS, t h e $200.00 wiU be refunded. Till! rcfWld ci.al for the r,\f1uary term i s D ece m be r 1 5 , a n � r spring semester, Ja n uary 1 - . 3. New Student Illformat ion Form: Th i s fo rm mu st be om pleted by ill!. s t u d e n t s a n d returneu with tJl adva n ce pa ' ITI · n l . Tbe form a l so i n c l ud es the app l i c at ion for hous i ng .

2. Advan

ACCELERATED UNDERGRADUATE RE-ENTRY FOR ADULTS (AURA)

QualitJed adul ts, 30 yea r

f age

Qr

older, who h,lVe not been

enrolled in a baccala u reate degree program within the last five

years, may eek advanced pla(ement up to l h t! j u n ior level th rough the AURA Program . Th se ac ep ted into A RA are granted

Oil

yea r

'

provi i o n al adm issi on , dur ing wh ich t.ime 1 2 credit at P L ( i nclud ing P�yc ho logy

they rnu t complete P

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40 1 ) with a cumulative grade point average of 2 . 5 or h i gher.

Financial Aid

Credit awards fo r p rior learning are based upon syste matic assess ment by a fa culty panel o f the adequacy and ap propriate­

Recogn izing that many students who want to a ttend Pacific

ness of knowledge and skills demonstrated in a portfolio pre­ pared by the student with staff assistance. Cred it awards may not

u z < z

exceed 48 semester credits less acceptable coUege transfer cred its. For details of the AURA Program, co ntact the director,

URA

Program, 5 3 5 -8786.

u n iversity a ttempts t o p rovide financial assistance to all eligible students. Any student approved fo r enroll ment or currently enrolled may request financial aid. Approxi­

RE-ENTRY STUDENTS Re-Entering the University

m a tely 80% o f the uni versity's st udents rece ive help in the

1 . A student's admission to the u n iversity is valid for six years. Students who do not attend the university fo r a period of time that inclu des either a fall

or

spring semester must apply to re­

fo rm of gift assistance ( t h a t is, 'cholarsh ips, tal ent awards, or grants ) , low i n terest d eferred loans, or employment. In m a ny cases a fin ancial aid award will be

en ter the un iversity as described below. •

Lutheran University would be unable to meet all expenses of enrollment from personal or fa mily sources, t h e

a

combina tion of

these fo rms o f assistance.

Stude n ts who wish to return within the six-year admissi on

The quant ity and compos i t ion of a n award i s based

period re-enter through the Registrar's Office. Re-entering s tudents must provide their current address, degree i n forma­ tion, and o fficial transcripts from any college attended during their absence. Before registering, re-entering students

upon demonstrated financia.l need, academic achievement, test scores, and other personal tal ents and in terests. Need is determi ned from analys i s o f the Free Application fo r

(F FSA ), wh ich is

st a tem en t o f

must resolve previous fi nancial obligations to the u n iversity

Federal Stu d e n t Aid

and have a curre n t health clearance from University Health

financial co ndition. Analysis of the FAFSA d e term ines an

Services.

a

expected contribution for coUege expenses from the stu dent and parent(s) or guard i a n ( s ) . " F inancial Need" is defined a the difference between total student expenses fo r an academic ye ar and the expected s tudent/fa m il y co n t r i b u t ion a n d is a pr ima ry fa c tor i n d e t rmining el igibi l i ty fo r most available aid. Financia l assistance is available to all qualified students

regardless of their sex, race, creed, color, age, national origin, o r disabili ty.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Fresill1/(Hl Students ond Tm llsfers

1 . Complete a Free App lication fo r Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by January 3 1 . 2 . Submit application materials fo r admission by February 1 5 so as to b e offe red admis�ion no later than March L 3. S u b m i t a PLU Financial Aid Ap p l ication (app l ies only to r r a n s fer students and is available upo n reQuest). 4. Submit a Financial Aid Transcri p t from , II prior institutions at tended (transfers only) . COl l t i n u ing Students •

Stude nt s who wish to return to the un iversity after the six­

1 . 'omplete a Free A p p l i cation for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

year admission period expires must re-apply fo r a d mission. Applicants fo r re -admission are required to submit a

by March 1 . 2 . S u b m i t a PLU Financial Aid Applicat i o n .

completed a p p l ication a n d official transcripts from any

An ap plication for fi nancial aiel m a y be

college attended du ring their absence. Application fo rms may be obtained from and submitted to the Office of Admissions.

2. An academically dismissed student may apply for reinstate­

completed 017 ti me, financial and s'ifis[actory acadelllic progress is maintained. Ai d is not a l l/oma lically renewed ench year. rene woble, provided re-appliwtioll is

Admission and Retention of Students. A tudent whose peti­

need colltin ues,

probation and must

p a r ticipate in the probationary semester plan. Refer to the Academic Staws section for a descrip tiOIl ofprobotiol1.

A

student

whose petition i s denied may apply again fo r re- a d m ission after one semester has elapsed u n l ess i n fo r med otherwise. A

who meet

actual no tification will be mailed the first week i n April.

per semester.

2. Financial aid decisions for co n t i n u i ng PLU ·tudents are made

A n academically dismissed student may be reinstated a fter

d u ring April and May. Notifications are sent out begi n n i n g in

one semester jf the student presents new evidence of

May.

poten tial academic success.

VALIDATING THE AID OFFER

Students who have been dropped for academic or discipl i n ­

NOTIFICAl'ION OF AWARD DECISIONS 1 . Award deci ions fo r freshmen and tra nsfer stu dents

the february 1 completion date w i l l be made in March, and

dismissed student may petition fo r re-admission only o n ce •

even tho ugh need is demonstrated. Student l' inan cial Aid m ight be elig ible. Aid a wards ore for olle yea r a lld most are

advising. The petition is acted o n by the Committee on 011

mpleted at a n y time,

Services will consider all applicants fo r any award for which they

ment by submitting a letter of petition to the director of

tion i, a p p roved w i l l be readmitted

c

b u t fai l u re to meet th prio rity d te may res u l t in a denial o f aid

Aid offers must be validated by returning the signed Offer of

ary reasons and the n re-ad mitted m u s t identify a faculty

Financial Aid. Fres hmen and transfer students must al

member willing to act as a s p onsor and adviser.

0

submit

the . 200 advan ce payment required by the C. ffice o f Admissions. This should be done as soon

as

possible, but must be received by

May 1. No payment is required from con tin uing students. students mllst complete

8

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AU

satisfactory payment arrangement


Center by August I fo r fall se m e s te r 15 for s pr i n g semester to hold a wa r d s . A pp l i c ants wh o do n o t ret u r n their accep tance of an award by the reply d a te pecified <lnd who do not com p l e t e sa t is fa ct o ry payment a rrangements wi l l have their awards cancel led. If an a p pl ic a n t later decides to re a p ply, the application w i l l be rev iewe d with the group currently b e i n g processed. i d, with the exce p t io n of Co l l e ge Wo r k - S t u dy and Wa sh i n g­ ton S tate e ed G ran t , is credited to the student's acco u n t when aU paperwork has b ee n com p l e te d . One-half of the award is

with the S t u dent Se rvi ces

a n d by Ja n u a r y

d is b u rsed each se m e ster. Parents and st udents are responsible fo r

the c h a rge s

in excess of

the award. In some cases a id is awarded i n excess of direct university cha rges to h e l p with l i i ng expenses. To e x p e d ite a refu nd students can request remaining funds from their acco u n t by co nt a c t i n g the St u d e nt S e rv i c e s C e n t e r. nder federal regulation , adj ust ments to an aw ar d packa ge must be made if a s t ud e n t receives additional aw a rd s of aid from s o u rces ex ter na l t o the u n i ve r s i t y. In every case, however, S t u dent Pi nancial Aid Se rv i c e s will a tt e m p t to a llow the student to keep as much o f the awa rd pa c ka ge a s possible. By t rea t i n g aid rec e i ved from external source, in this way, a d d i t i o na l awards from the u n iver ity's resources can be m a d e to other qual i fie d s t u de n t s .

fall semester and the spring semester. Financial aid is awarded for 32 h o u rs to complete a bachelo r's degree in fo u r ye a rs . For fu l l- t i m e u n d e r g r ad u a te students receiving financial aid, the maximum numbe r of credit h o u rs that may be attempted is 1 92 a n d the maxi m u m t i m e - fr a m e for co mpleting a baccalaure­ ate d egree is six years. Even if a stud ent changes h is or her major o r ac a d e mic program, only 1 92 c re d i t hours may b e taken quali­ f)'ing for financial aid, and the maxi m u m ti m e- fra me of six years for rec eiv i n g a degree is e n fo rce d . Some financial aid programs (e.g., most un iversity g i ft aid pr og ra ms and Washington State N ee d G r an t s ) allow aid to be awarded a maximum of fo ur aca­

demic vears.

I . Sign i n g

a n d returning each fi n a n c i a l a i d notice rece i ved. 2. Declining at a ny time any p or t i o n o f an award. 3. NO lii)' i ng the S t u d e n t Services enter in case of a cha nge in credit hours a t t e mpte d; a ch a n ge i n ma rital statlls; a cha nge in res iden ce ( o tl'- camp us or at h o m e ) ; o r r ece ip t of additional

pa r t - t ime u n d e rg ra d uate students, a m i n i m u m of 1 2 year and a degree m u s t be achieved w i th i n a m a x i m u m time-frame o f ten years. (The maximum num b er of cre d i ts allowable is 1 92 . ) Undergraduate Need·Based Credit Completion Requirements

Enro l lmen l Status

cial aid recipient:

To make sat ist�lctory p ro g re s s toward a de gree , an u n d e r ­ grad uate tudent m u st c o m p l et e an a ve r ag e of 24 semester hours o f credit each academ ic yea r. A n acade m i c year is defined as the

9 h All credits attempted

II2 time Less than 1 12 t i me' •

Minimum per year 24 18 12 All credits attempted

12

514 time

Less than 112 tillle mroilment applies to thr Pell Grallt Prog ram Q.!l.{x.

/12 time CIIWlllllfMt will calise a Stile/wI's loall to /J� CIlllce/ee/ alld m'l}' jCtlpllrdize defemlelll stailis.

Le5s tlul1l

S at i sfacto ry progress is reviewed

for financial ai d p u rposes end of s p r i ng semester. For Was hi ngton State Need a nd t h e Washington S tate Work Study P r o g r a m , satisfac­

after the Gr a n ts

tory progress i s reviewed a t the end o f each semester.

The

fo ll o wi n g g ra des do not indicate successful co mpletion of

a ca de m ic

cre d i t

a pp l ica b le toward a d e gre e:

"E"

Grades

"I"

I n co m pl e te

"w"

Withdrawal

" EW " U no ffic ia l " F" Failure

Withdrawal ( recorded

Any courses in which grades

by Registrar)

are r ec e ived

are, howe ver,

included in the maxi m u m n u m ber of credits t h a t may b e

a ttemp te d ( 1 92) and

are considered to b e within t h e maxi m u m

t i m e - frame a l l owable for achieving

a degree ( s i x ye ars) .

All cred its earned b y examina t i on, which are a pp l i ca ble

SATISFACTORY PROGRESS POlley

Th e p ol i c y of the u n ive rsity is to a l low students to continue receiving financial assistance as l o n g as t h e y are in good stand­ ing. To do o th erw i se could cause a severe hardship on students who must devote their fforts to achieving sa t i s fact or y g r ad e s . Ho� ever, no i n s t it u t io na l grants will be awarded to students with cum u lati e g rad e point a erages below 2 . 00. Moreover, federal regulations re q u i re that after four terms o r more o f altempted enrollment, students below 2 . 0 0 cumulative g r a d e point average w i l l have their federal fi nancial a i d denied. Pacific Lu t h e ra n U n ive rs ity's Schools of Business and Ed uc a t i o n req u i re a m i n i m u lD grade p oi n t average o f 2.50. To be gi ve n p r i o r it y fo r most types o f ti nancial aid, an appl i­ cant lDust b e en ro l led as a ful l - t i me s t u dent. For P ed e ra l F i n a n ­ c i al A i d p ro gr a ms , a fu l l- t i m e student is defined as a n y person enrolled for a m i n i m u m o f twelve ( 1 2) cre di t hours or more per semester. Ad j u s t ment s i n an award may be made d u r i n g the year if an aid rec i p i e n t has not e n roll e d for a s u ffi ci e n t n um ber of credit hours. However, ea ch fi nancial aid recipient m Ll s t m a i n ­ t a i n satisfact o r y a cademic p ro g ress in t h e course of ·tudy he or sh e is p u rsuing i n o rd e r to c o n t i n u e receive fI nancial assistance awa rded by Pacific Lutheran University Student Financial Aid Servi es . The fo ll o wi n g re q uirements are xpect d o f ea c h fi nan­

Minimum per term

Full-time

ou tside s holarships.

4. Providing a copy of their p a re nts ' i uc o m e tax re t u r n (F o r m 1040) and/or a copy of their own i n d ividual income tax retum if re qu es te d .

o

For

with students and their families.

recipients in clude :

z l> z n

c red i t h o u rs m u s t b e completed each aca d em i c

RIGHTS AND RESPONSLBl l.lTIES The basic responsibility fo r fi n a n c i n g an e d u c a t i o n a t PLU rests

In a d d i t i o n to ex p e c te d co ntrib utions from parents or gu ard i a n s , student. are ex pe c ted to assi t by contributing from t h ei r savi ngs and summ e r earnings. F i n a n cia l assistance fro m the u n i ve rs i t }, is therefore supplementary to t he efforts of a stud ent's fam ily. I t is pro v ided fo r st uden ts who demonstrate need. Ad d i t i o n al r igh t s and responsibilities of financial a i d

"T'I

toward a degree, will be incl u ded i n the l i m i ta t i o n on credits that can be a t t e m p te d while e l i g ib le

for financial aid.

Once a c o u rs e has been com plete d s uc cessful l y, the cred it hours earned are counted toward the m a xi m u m

n u m b e r o f hours a course is s u cces sfu l ly com p l e te d more than once, i t is counted only once toward a student's deg ree requi re m e nts and toward the maxi­

which can be taken u nder financial aid el igibil ity. If

m u m n u mber o f hours that can b e taken u nder financial aid eligib i l i ty. The u niversity's

curriculum i n cl udes very few

no n-credit

courses or courses whose credit h o u rs are not a pp l ic ab l e to a

de g ree. If any sllch courses a re taken b y financial aid rec i p ie n t s , the hOll[s \v i l l be i n cl ude d in the l i mitation

on credits that may

be attem pted and will be considered within the t i m e - frame allowable fo r a c h i ev i ng

a

degree.

In the event that s t u d en t fails to meet the criteria for satisfac­ tory p ro g re ss

d u r i n g a p ar t ic u l ar semester, he or she will be

p laced o n a c a demic pro ba ti o n. F a i l u re to regain satisfactory academic status will res ult i n the cancellation of fi nancial ai d .

Once "unsa tisfactory p ro g re ss" has been determ ined, stud ents

receive official n o t i fication. Te r m i na t e d students may

ap p l y for reinstatement b y s u b m i ttin� a l e tt e r of p eti t i o n to the d ire c to r of a dv i s i ng and sec u r i n g a f;\Culty sponsor. T h e p etiti o n and sponsorship letter ar e s u b m i tted for action to the Faculty Com m i t tee on Admission and Retention of St udents. P

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Students who

c

e

finan illl a.i

is lerml nated may 0 ways:

etition for

rei nstatemen t of their ai d in one of

1) 2j u z <t z

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

Eligibility: F resh m e n with 3 . 5 0-3.74 GPA a d m i tt e d by M a rch 1 . Amount: $ 3, 000-' 4,0001),car fo r fo u r years Comments or Conditions: Renewa ble thr e years if a 3 . 3 0 GP

t h ey may co m p l ete one seme ter of fnll- t i m e enrol l ment usi ng t h ei r own fi nanc i a l resou rces, or th ey may sub m i t an appeal to the Fac u l t y Comm i t tee on Admls ion and Retention of s t u den ts do cu men ti ng t h e unusual dr umst an ce s which h ave made i t i mp o sible to make at isfac tory pro gress d uring the emcster i n qu . s t i o n .

is maintai ned. ALUMNI MERIT AWARDS

Eligib i l ity: Ex

a

academic status. I lowever, st ud e n ts enro l l ing in s u m m e r e

ions

e

must

use

t hei r own financial

n.:sou rces

and arc

'v ARDS F

R U N O ' R G RA D U ATF

renel

or

more

Awarded by Student Fin ancial id latches a church holars h i p , dol lar fo r dollar, up to $500 ( mi. n i mulll of $ I OO) per year. Chur h scholarship money must be re e ived b }, January 1 5 each year t he st u d en t at tends to be m a tc h d.

Services.

Eligibility: Awar d ed in recogn.i t ion of ou t�tanding acade m ic ervice.

ac h ieveme nt , leadersh i p , and

t u dents who meet the

fol lowing c riteria wi l l b e i nv i t e d to ap ply: appl icat ion mnterials

CLERGY'S DEPENDENT GRANTS

and 1 2 00+ SAT or 27+

pllst marked by J a nuary 1 0, 3. 80 lJP

Eligibility! Unmarried, de pend e n t chi ldren of' ordained, aCLive m i n iste r or m i ss ion ary o f C h rist i a n c h u rc h or orga n i za t io n . Parent 's \ h ose i n c o m e is fr o m church r e l a t e d work.

.5. cit izens h i p , and

or e l i g i b l e fc.)r

evidence of outstanding leade rship and service. Amount: Full t u i tion (32 c redits/ ea r ' fo r four years. Comments or Conditions: N ot b a sed on fi nancial need. R e ne w a b l e for t h ree years if a 3 .30 CPA is m a in t a i ne d . Th ree

Amount: S l .OOOl year for fo u r yea rs. Comments or CondJlions: No application

n

cess,uy, renewed

a n n ually.

awa rd ed a n nuall )' .

ARMY ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS

PRESI DENT'S SCHOLARSHIPS

Eligibility: Full-time undergraduates.

Eligibility: Same a s Regents' S hol a r�h i ps . Amount: $6 ,5 0U/ year for fo u r year . Comment or CondJtions: Rent: wab le for th ree ye a rs if a 3 . 30 CPA is maintai ned. Twe nty-tive :\\ ,l nled a n n u a l l y.

AmOWlt: p to ful l tu i t i on , room/board. Comments or CondJtions: aLI PL U 's ROTC inf, nnation,

Eligibility: Trcillsfer students with 3 .60+

GP

and 45+ semester

ur es. Must be adm itted Ily March 1 . $3,OOO/year fo r two years.

huurs of ollege l e ve l

No a ppl icat ion neass ry. reqLlires

for renewal. T\ enty

a wa rd

are

I

, wa ilah lt: .

'th 3.60 I- GP

and

a

Illul ti - ethn ic context.

Requires reappl icati n to be

I NTERNATIONAL STUDENT GRANT

Eligibility: IJJternational stude-nts.

45+

Amount: $2,000/year for fo u r year . Comments or Conditions: No appli

semester hours of c o l l e ge

CO U fSCl. Ad m i t t ·J Py M a rch t � ith pro o f o f PTK membership. Amount: $3,UOOlyear for tll'O years. CommenlS or CoodJtions: ' o t base on fina ncial need. a p p lialion requ i red , 3.30 G P fo r renewal.

a t io n

necessa r)'. Awa rded

aut o m a tically and re newed annuaiJy to qual ifying �tud nts. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP

FlJgibility: International student a d m i tte d by J u l)' I hef re the schonl year they attend.

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS

AmOllDt: p to $2,000 lyea r for fu m years. Comments or CondJtions: N ine a w a rd s al'

Eligibility: M QT-P AT fin. Lists ( ationa l Merit Semi­ fi n ali� t ualify i n g Test - Pre-Sc holasti Assessment Test ).

Amount: $750-$2 ,000. Comments or CondJtions:

ship or active in volvement in

renewed a c h year.

PHI THETA KAPPA SCHOLARSHIPS

Eligibility: Trans� r stude nts

office for fur her

Eligibility: Students with 3. 0+ G PA d11d demonstrated leader­

Amount: Up to $2,000. Comments or Conditions:

c

Amount: Comments or Conditions:

206/535-8740.

RIEKE LEADERSHIP AWARD

PROVOST'S MERIT AWARDS

n a ila b k each year b a se J on sc holas tic achil"vement. Renew;! Je for t hree years with a 3.3 0 GPA. No application fo rm requ i red. A wa rde d July L

F i n a l ist s h o u l d inform the

VETERAN'S BENEFITS

National Merit' Schol arshi p

orporalion of their intention to . Nat;or/QI Merit fillaLists are gila ra II teed II /V ial of $7,000 th rough a t'OlIIbillatioll of o t h er illstitllliollaL scholarship reSOl/rce,. Tilis a n/olin! incllldes tile $750- 2,000 Natiolull Merit Sd/Oll1 rslr ip.

EUgibility: M us t be veteran or spouse/child of deceased etera n . Amount: Varies. Comments or Conditions: Co n ta c t P L U veLe ran coordi nator at

cnroU a t PL

206/5 3 5 -83 1 7.

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDS

rum ON REMISSION

Eligibility: F r es b m e n with 3 . 75+ C PA adm i tted by M arc h 1 . Amount: 4, 5 00/yca r fo r fou r years.

dep�ndents are e l igible for u p to 7 5 % tu i t i o n re rn i � i ( ) n , a

Comments or Conditions: Ren 'wanle t hree

Eligibility/Amount: Emp loyees of the u n iversity and the i r

yeaL if 3 . 30 GPA is

maintained. P

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un i vers i t y gift resource. If a stud en t receiveS tllilion rem is. ion, he/sh may b

a w a rded additional m e r i t and need - based

i n st i t u ti o nal gifts up to the i

e

cd

Amount: $ 1 00-$ 500. Comments 0 1" CondJtions:

REGENTS' SCHOLARSHIPS

10

<lry,

Eligibility: S tu d en t receiving schula r 'hips of $ [OO con r�ga t ion.

Imiversity gift nssistatlce.

3.30 GP

.

for at

from any C h ri st i a n churc

NOTE: Ullle 5 otherwise noted, undergradullte aid r cipiellts must be filii- rime students ( 1 2 credits per semester ) to receive

c i t i zen

nec\!•

)

PLU MATCHING SCHOLARSHIPS (PLUMS)

STUDEI\TTS

ACel sco res , U.S.

application fo rm

for renewal.

least o n e year. Amount: $500/year fo r fou r years. Comments or CondJtions: _ () applicatio n a n n ual ly.

SCHOlARSHIPS Be GRANTS (GIFIS) ' ED BASED

GPA n eeded

Eligibility: tudents whose parent(s) attended PLU ( PL

Types of Aid -

reqwred, 3 . 3 0

PA and son or

ALUMNJ OEPENDENT GRANTS

i neli g ible fo r financi al aid t1u 'ough the Ll n i ersity.

o

o n a l sludents wi t h 3.75+

a lu m . Adm itted by March 1 .

AmOllDt: $ 1,500/year for fo ur years. Comments or Condition : No s p ec i al

'u mmer se�sio ns m ay al s o be use d as term. du ring wh i c h stude! t on financial aid prohat ion may rega i n satisfa t ry

fo r t h i s purpo

e p ti

daughter of PL

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cost

of t u i t i u n . Pc eipt of t u ition

-


remission may serve to adj u st

a i d p re vi o usly a\ arded.

or eliminate o t h er i ns t i tut i o nal

NAMED ENDOWED/RESTRICTED SCHOLARSHIPS

S c ho l a r s hi ps h ave been p rov id ed

by al u m n i

and friends of the

un ive rs i ty to ho nor and/or mem orial ize loved ones and to assist

wo r thy studen

. Also provided are schol a r sh i p s m ad e

po ssibl e b y E l igi bi lit y for many of t h e s e awards requires com p let i on of the reg u l a r financial aid a p p l i ca ­ t ion, attainment of sop h om ore st a n di n g , and d ecl a r at i o n of a major. Further i n formation on e l ig i bi l i t y is available on request. co rp o ra t i o n s, fo u n d at i o n s , an d t rus ts .

-

See complete listing on page 12.

NO TE: Unless otherwise no ted, undergraduate aid recipients

(12 credits per semester)

to receive

un iversity gift assistance.

Q CLUB SCHOLARSHIPS Eligibil ity: Awa rd e d to fu l l - t i m e new st u d e nt s based o n a c a d em i c achieve m e n t ( 3 .30 for fre s h me n and 3 .00 for tra n s ­ fe rs) a n d fi n an ci al need. Q Club is a g r o u p of over 2 ,000 fr i e nds and a l u m n i c o m m i t t ed t o mak i n g PLU accessible to d se rvi n g studen ts. Amount: Varies, d e pe nds on need. Comme nts or Conditions: R ene w al will re qu i re 3.00 GPA, AFSA re a pp l i c a t i o n p o s t m arke d by Marc h 1 an d evidence of fi nancial n e e d . UNIVERSITY GRANTS

\..-

Eligibility: Full-time s t u d ents. Amount: Varies, d e pe n d s o n n ee d . Comments (u Conditio ns: Based on fi n a n c i a l need, stud e n ts who have a GPA n e a r 3 . 3 0 and do n o t q u al i fy fo r a u n i v ers i t y scholar hip b u t h ave high fi n a n c i a l need. PELL GRANT

.E.ligibility: Students t ak i ng at least one c re di t . Amount: $400-$ 2 , 4 70 yea r ly . Commen ts or Conditions: Based on fi na n cial need. SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTU NITY GRANT

-

Eligibil ity: At least pa rt - ti m e s t ud en ts . Amount: At least $ 1 0 0, v a r i e s with need. Comment or Conditions: B as ed on fi nancial n ee d, p ri o r i t y g i ven to s t ud e n ts with Pell G rant eligib i l i ty. WASHINGTON STATE NEED GRANT

Eligibility: At least half- t i m e s t u d e n ts . Amount: 2,250 yearly. Comments or Conditions: Based o n fi n ancial need. LO

.,.,

FEDERAL PLUS LOAN

l> 2 n

2

EligibiJity: Parents of de p en d e n t student. Amount: P a rent s may borrow up to the full cost of their student's co llege education m i n us the a m o u nt of any fin ancial

aid the

student is

l>

re cei vi n g .

Repayment: A variable i n t er e s t rate which ch a n ge s an n u al ly and can never exceed 9.00% and monthly principal a n d i n terest pay m e n t s begin wi t h i n 60 days after the final d is b urse m e n t of funds. ( I n terest begin s accr u in g from the date the funds are first

disb u rsed . )

NEED- BASED AWARDS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS must be full- time students

Student is respons ible for s u b m i t t i. n g the Loan A pp l ic at i o n and ote to a le nd e r (bank or cred i t un io n ) .

P rom isso ry

S

NON-N E ED BASED LOAN UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

Eligibility: At least half-time (6 cred i t h o u rs ) u n de r g raduat e or (4 credit h o u rs ) g ra d ua t e students who do not qua l i fy for aU o r part of t h e max i m u m S ub si d i z ed Federal Sta fford Lo an . Amount: Up t o $ 2 ,625 per year fo r freshmen, $ 3 ,500 for s o p h o­ more , . 5 ,50 0 for j u n i o r a n d seniors and $ 8 ,500 for gr a d uat e students. Repayment: varia bl e i nterest rate which c ha n ges a nn u al l y an d n n ev er exceed 8.25% and m o n th l y p r inc i p al payments begin six m o n ths after the st uden t grad u ate s, withd raws or drops to less than h al f- t i m e attendance. U nsubsid ized means the student is r es p o ns i bl e for t h e interest on t h e loan amount while i n scb oo l ; however, interest paym ent can b e p os tpo n ed . ( I n terest be gi ns a cruing from the date the fu nds are first d is b ur se d) . Comments or Conditions: Se p a r a t e Loan A ppl ic a ti o n an d P ro miss ory ote i ava ilable from S t udent Financial A i d Servic�,.

l> c

Comments or Conditions: S ep ara te Loan p p l i c at i o n a nd Pr o m i ss o ry Note is ava i l ab l e from Student Fi nancial Aid Ser­

vice s . Parent is r esp ons i bl e for s u bm itt in g the Loan A p p l ic ati on and Promissory ote to a lender (bank or credi t u n io n ) . ADOITIONAL UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

EligibiHty: I n de p e n d e nt s t udent or de p e n d e n t student whose parents are denied a P L US loan.

Amount: Up to $4,000iyear for freshmen and so p h o m ore s , $5,000 fo r j u n iors and s e n i o r s , and $ 1 0,000 fo r graduates. Repayment: A variable interest rate wh i c h c ha n ges a n n u a l l y and can nev r exceed 8 . 25% a n d monthly p r i n cipa l payments begin six mo n t hs after the student gr a d u a t es , withdraws or drops t o less than hal f- t i m e attendance. nsubsidized means t he student

is res p o n si b le fo r the int e r e st on the loan amount while in school; however, i n te res t payment can be p os t p o ne d . ( I nterest begins accruing fro m the d at e the fu n d s ar first disbursed. ) Comments or Conditions: Separate Loan application and P ro m i s so ry ote is a ai l abl e from Student Financial Aid Ser­ vices. Student is rc · ponsi ble for sub m i tt i ng the Loan Appl i ca t io n and Prom issory Note to a l e n de r ( ba n k or credit un io n) . EED BASED LOA

S

FEDERAl. NURSING LOAN

Eligibility: tudenb en rolled at l eas t half-time ( 6 credit h o u rs) in School of ur ·ing (except pre- nu rsi ng ) . P r efe ren ce give n to LPN students. Amount: Up to 4,000. Repayment: A fixed i n t er es t rate of 5% and p rin ci p al and in terest payments b e gi n 12 months aft.:r the student g ra d u a tes withdraws or d r o p s to l es s than half-ti me atte n d a nc e . Comments or Conditions: Limited fu nd i n g ava i la b le . Partial o r full c a nc el l a t i o n c o n d i t i o n s exi st . ,

FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN

EligibiJity: t le as t half-Lime (6 credit hours) un de rg raduate or (4 cred i t h o u r s ) graduate students. Amount: U p to $3 ,000 fo r each year of u n d er gra d u a t e s tu d y and up to $5,000 for each year of gra d u at e or p r o fes s i o n a l study. Repayment: A fixed i n t eres t rate of 5% an principal and i n terest p ay m e n ts b egi n 1 2 m on th s a fter the r ud e n t g rad ua te s, withdraws or d r ops to less tha n half-time a t t end ,lJ1 ce . Deferral available for student status, mil i ta ry servi e, Peace orps, Public Heal th Service officers, volun teers fo r n o n - pr o fi t org anizations and re qu i red

i nternships.

Comments or Conditions: P r i ori ty is gi v e n to u l1dergr adua te stud e n ts . Up to t o t a l loan forgiveness i s p os si bl e fo r te a ch i n g i n low i n c om e population ar eas , tea h i ng the disabl d o r t e ach i n g in a fed e ral Head Start program. A d d i t i o n a l loan cancellation c o n d i tion s exist. SUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN

Eligibility: At least half-time (6 redit h o u r s ) un de rg rad uat e or (4 credit ho u rs ) grad u ate s tude n t s . Amount: p to 2,625 per y e a r fo r freshmen, $3 ,500 fo r sopho­ mores, u p to 5,50 0 for j u n i o rs and eniors, and $8,500 fo r

gr ad ua te students.

Repayment: A variable interest rate which changes nnn ually an d can never exceed 8.25% and mo n t hl y p ri nc i pa l and i n te rest payP

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me nts b e g i n 'ix m o nt h s after t he s t u d e n t gra du ates, withdraws or d r ps to less t h a n h::t !f- ti ll1c alt ndnn (". Comments or Conditions: Se p arate Loan p pl ica tion and P r om is'or y ote is avail ahle from Student F i nancial A id Ser­ vices . Student i s responsib le fo r s u bm i t t i n g Loan A p p l ication and Pro m i ssory Note to a l e n der (bank or credit u n ion ) .

Bortell Endowed Sc h ol arsh i p Bradner Memorial Schola�ltip J o r u n n Breil�nd Scholarship Fund Agne s Brodahl Music �chol arsh i p Betty Brown S hoi, rsh i p Vanda

Havana

Bm'hanan Family En dowed Scholarsnip Erhardt a nd irginia Buchlinck En dowed S 110larsh ip in Education Cory Kenneth CJrison M ' I ll ori a l Scholarship

ALTERNATIVE LOAN PROGRAMS

Chester

Many reputable private len d i n g orga n izations provide fa m ilies

with

a

mea ns to finance

a

st udeJJ t's education. Most private

programs offer lOIN i nterest, no (Ollaleral loans t hat are based on

Pak

i n d iv id ual need , cred i t cap city, and school cnsts. Man y allow

Roger

Computer

andidatc Scholarship

Crane fllnd fo r Widows and �hiJdren Irene 0, Creso Merit ward E, John and Lorenc E. D a h l h e rg Jr. Endowed S ch o la r ' h i p Carl Dalk Memorial Sc h olarshi p Fund Geo rge L Dn"i /Lutheran Broth�rh()od Lnd()wcd SdlOl:mhip ). Walter Jnd C l u r � [)avis Sch o la rsh i p Harold B. anel Prances S , Daw,on/Lulherafl B rot he r hood En dOl

cd

Ida A.

least p G r t - t i rne students.

Amount: Va ries. Comments or Conditions: O n - campus

jobs; students

fo r indi vid u a l

Employment Office.

jobs through

the

St udent

can

apply

STATE WORK STUDY

Eligibility: At least p rHimc s t u d e n t s . Amount: H a s e d on need. Comments or Conditions: Off-campus job, ; students must apply for individual jobs through the Student ' m ployment

Lei r

Patricia Fisk Scholarship

C a r l ott J Flink Sc hol. .lI,h i p Phyl J i n c \I, a n d Ke n net h L Folson E.nd< )wed ScholJrsh t p LC Foss Memorial Sd1lliarship Frunk Russel l Company E n do we d Sch olars h ip ·uchs f'oundation 'chol arshi p Henrietta B u t ton Gaetz N u rsi ng Scho b rship f u nd G e o rge a n d

Registered Nu rsi n g Sc h o lar s h i p A l um ni Sc h ol a rs h i p Fund Amcr i m n Lu t h er a n hurch- orth Pacific Dist r i l-t Sc h o l J rs hi p r t h u r nderson Scholarship Florence Spinn r n de rs o n Memorial Schol a rship J-Iazd M. Anderson n do,"ed Music Scholarsh ip AUen more

Alan

i\Jl Ci c rson Scholarship Ruth Anenson 'cilO larsllip Ernest vI . A n k r i m/Lutheran B ro t he r h o od Endowed Schol,mhir'

William and Jean ie

Edna M , order/ Lut h e ra n Bro t h erhood Endowed Edu cat ion C l a rence A. and Olga rahn �,holarshlp James M, Gribbon Sd10la rsh i p fern R . G ri lllltl/ Lu lhcJ7L 11 fi rnlirerh ooci E l l doweci Scholarsh i p

Award

Jane Aram . cholarship Fund Arntson S c h o l a rsh i p Hcdvig A rt h u r Mcmnri:d AURA/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Schola rsh ip Awa rd of Excdlence (Pacific o ca - ala 130 t t l i n g Cool Marguerite J n d Wilmer Ban Scholarship Rangert Busines" Scholarship Don F Bayer Me morial Nursing Scholars h i p [I.E. R.C. M inority S holarship Peter and Lyd ia Beck m an Endowed Scholarship Paul , Bdlam) Music c ho la rs hip Ril brough Family Scho[arsh i p Al fred a nd Alice Bisho p/ Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship Richard J. and Oli c Lewel l e n Bl.lIldau ScholJLsh i p Jnll Loan Fund Luther & D i l l i e Quak Boc E d u ca t i o n Scholar h i p Erwin and Alice B o l d u nn Scholarship H

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Jnd Rertha Gib,e n Sdwbrsh i p

Bertha G i lbertson Sc holarsh ip John M , Jilbertson FOLlndlHion Scholarship

1ary

T

rts Scholarship

Filcu l t ) MClllori, I c h ol�l r5 h i p Fund Faith Lutheran Church of Portbnd Scholarsh i p Fund Farmers I n 'llJ'anC� Gmup S hQ l ars h i p I:irst I n terstate HanK Scholarship

fo r Lutherans chol a rs h i p

U

Evan o n Enclow"d Scho larsh ip

FJaren Famil '/ Lut heran Brotiwrhood Endowed Schulars h i p

NAMED ENDOWW/RESTRICTED SCHOLARSWPS

L

Jnd Linda

nthon y L Eyrinr; Liberal

Ackerley Commullications Merit Award

A n t h ropo logy A l u m n i

E rikson Scholarship

Gerry

fficc.

( canomies'

Deal Fa mily Endowed S h o l l rsh i p ill t h e Lib�ral A n s Davi Fund Doolittle MemO ri.,,1 Scholarship Earl E. and Martha L &k�trom �dowed . cholanh i p CapL W . Larry a n d Mrs. Janice I . Eichler Scholarsh i p Fund The Re ve re n d J n d M rs. E.E. E i d h Endow 'u Sdl OiJ rs h i p Endowment Challenge Gr:lnI Carl and Ethel Erickson/Lutheran Brotherhood 'ndowed Scholarsh i p '

COL1.EGE WORK STUOY

C

ursing

u rsing Sc h olars hi p

EM PLOYMENT

I

ScienCe Schularship £nllmll me llt B ro t h er h o o d Endowed

Counsel in g Master

t ion on A l ternative L()a ns.

F

( Descen d J l l t s of Class)

S holarship

edcral Stafford Loan u p to $ 5 , 500.

tudent is not eligible fo r Federal Stafford Loans clue to �·deral regulations. C o n t act tudent F i nancial A i d Services fo r inform a ­

I

h u tch/l.ut heran Brot her hood

Dorothy COl'" Me mo ria l/Lutheran

PRINCIPAl. CliR1TFICATE

C

in

Hulda Coea n < !wer !lch olars hi p E ndowment

$5, S OQ. [ f .1 st udent is i n depe n d e nt or i. a depen dent student whose parents are denied J PL ' loan, the �tlldent i s d igiblc for

A

Lutheran

CidSS o f 1 967 Endowed S h o lar s h ip

a

Federal Stafford Subsidized and/or Unsubs.idi2:ed Loan up to

Un ubsidized

laridge/Bethl.;hem

Enduwed Scholars h i p

St udents accepted into t h is prog ram a re eligible to receive

P

Pilgrim Endowed Sc h o lar h i p

Rel igion

TEACHER CERTIFICATE

12

h a n Endo\\ted Scholarship Fo undat ion Educational Scholarships

Kenneth Christop hers on/Wal t.:-r

list o f priyute l e nders.

Aid Association

Endowed oeal Music Scholarship

Che ro n Mnit Awa rds Walter H, Chri tensen Scholarship

enn)lImcnl. The " t u dent Serv i ce s Center ha ' <wail ab le a s a m ple

Eligibility: At

Joe

Cheney

deferment of principal u n t i l after the st udent ceases ful l - time

a11 ad d i t i o n a l

Buhl

Dr. and Mrs. W.B. Bul'l1s PU1.1ll BurzJuff Memo ria l S hnlars h i p

S

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'

c h o la

hip

Gulsrud FamiJy Scholarsh i p

1 I n a , Fo u nda t i o n rn(lld Hagen Education S hol .lrsh l p Frank H. and Nc.1l ie L. H al ey Endowed Schola rsh ip Olaf Hal vorsen S holdrship Johann" Mll r i � Hans�n E[JdO\�ed Memo r i a l 'cholarship els Marcus Hansen En dowe-tl kmorial Scl1<llarship Jenni Lee Hansun Endo\ 'd Prbiclent ;, S holarship Je. n n ie Lee l ianson 'chn\Jrship hind W. H . H .l rdtkc Seminary St udent Scholarshi p Fu nd Brian H ar < h lll a n

Memorwl S hobrsh ip

Erling and

Haugo c.holarship

Man a n d Dorothy Harshman ch" iarsh ip ( hurch Leaders hi p /Athle t; Rjug Harstad Endowed S holarship Jara

Wa.lter A. Heath Charitable Tru s l Y

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I

Lillian

ormJn u n d Vcronc Heinsen Endow�d Scholars h i p

Hr rla nd

Douglas

Memorial Rowing Scholarship (Crew)

Hopper Memorial

W. Huber Memo rial

Edward

Mark

IC

Phyllis

G.

Hunter

G.

and L-:.l1ore

jv [yers Scholars h i p

George and Alma N e l s o n Endowed Scholars h i p F u n d

Sc ho larship

H,H old a n d S y l v i a Nelson Endowed Scholars h i p

Comm u n i t , Scrvic� Scholar�hip

Lars

N c rla nd

Norwegian Scholarsl1 i p

M i l to n a n d Hazel Ncsvig I n t e rn a t ional Stude n t Schola rsh i p

.f. ldaho I n cen t i ve , choiarship Fund l n d rebo Musi

E.

R i c h a r d P. I 'eils Mem orial F u n d

H u m a n it i es Sch obr h i p Endowment

E. and

-"

i"'10rris iVlemoridl Scholarship

Murray-Da n i el s o n Manage m e n t Award Scholarsh i p

I rene H u lt g ren Nur�ing Scholarsh ip Clement

C.

Gladys iVlortvcdt Voluntary Service i\.w,ud

Sch o larsh ip

,...

lvlr. and M rs. G u s H . N i e m a n Memorial Sch o l J rs h i p

Sl1/.an ne I ngram Memorial Scholarship

Margaret N i s tad M e m o r i a l Scholarsh i p

Terry I rv i n Scho larshi p

Nan Noklebcrg Memorial/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

Kenneth a n d Stella Jacobs Scholarship

O r v i l le N u pen :'<Jur,i n g Scholars h i p

Lyle a n d

C l i fford O. and E l l a

Iris

Jacobson Endowed Scholarship

M i ke Jacobson Scholarship

Ole

Robert E. Olson Memorial

Iver Opstad

. j o h nson Scholarship

Johnson/Al fse n S chola rsh ip

l'vlemorial Scholarsh i p

Te rrence a n d SUS<1Il Parr SchoLarsh i p Katherine R. Parrish i'vlc- m o r i a l t\ursing Scholars h i p

John,onlLarson Scholarsh i p

Agnc ' S o l e m J o h nso n/Luthera n

o

Endowed A t hletic/Music Scholarsh i p

I .i n d a Olson/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Nursing Scho l a rs h i p

M. Jenncstad Memorial Scholarship

Judge Ber t i l

L. O l s o n

Brotherhood I ur i n g Endowment

Gordon Pearson Memorial

Lutha H . Johnson/Lutheran Brotherhood E ndowed Bnsine,s Schola rshi p

O. M . and Emilie R . Pedersen Endowed Scholarship

Pearl

Marvin

. J o h nson/Lut heran Brotherhood Endowed Nursing Scholarship

r.

and Ruby I.. Pen n i ngton Scholarsh i p

Co mpa n y Merit Scholarship l.. Perry-Haley and R u t h C.

TL. Johnson S r.il..lIl heran Brotherhood Endowed SchoLarsllip

Pepsi-Cola

Ted and Doreen Johnson/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholars h i p

The Barbara

I:.rna M. Jorgensen Presidents Scholarsh ip

G u s t a f Peterson Memorial Scholarship

The dore

Theodore

0. 1 1 .

and Betsy Karl Endowed Scho la rs h ip i n Forensics

B. Karlstn M usi c Scholars h i p P h i l i p G. a n d A l ice L. Kayser E ndowed

E. Bill

Scholarship

Elizabeth B. Kel ly Endowed Scholarship

W i l l i , un Ki lw(l r t h Foundation Gundar King

Lillian

L.

Peterson .Endowed Scholarship

and

Ll1lljse

P i h l Scholarship

PLU Wo men's Club S cholJrship P I .US Busi ness Schol'lI"ship

nne Kensrud Memorial Sch o l a rsh i p

Key B a n k o f Wash ington Endowed Rev. Karl Kilian Memorial F u n d

1. and

I3lanche Plla um Scholars h i p

Und

School of Busi ness Scholarship

cholars h i p Fund

ora J. Ponder Scholarship FlInd

Presser Fo u n d a t i o n Scholarship PriceCostco Scholarship

ndawed Scholarship

Pugd SOllnd Bank Scholarship

K l u t h Endowment for H igh Achievers i n AUlletics and Physical Education

The -dward Ramsdal c Presidents Scholars h i p Anders a n d E m llla Ramstad Award

Kn udsen Fam i l y Endowed Scholarship

Margaret L. Ras m us en

Gladys M . Knutzer\ Endowed Schobrship

Recreational Eq uipment, I nc.

H il d a

Kath ryn Ree e

S.

PerC)' Memorial Scholarship

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Peter Scho l a rship ( O regon stud e n t s )

( Phy"ics)

Kramer Musi a l Apprecia t i o n Scholarship

cholarship

Mem o ri a l

(REI)

cho l a rship

Dawndl La mb �cholarship

Simon and Marvel Re i n bold Scholarsh ip E n d owment

Loui� and Leona Lamp S c h o l a rship

Charlotte a n d Lucian Rice En dowed Scholar,hip

Harry

E.

and Irene

1.

Lang Endowed Scholars h i p

Dr. John

O.

ward

Ricke Lead er' hi p

Geo rge l.a n n i ng Memorial/ Lut hera n B rotherhood Endowed Scholarship

O.

William

Larsgaard/Lutheran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

Rieke En dowed Scholar h i p ( Student s from Ca.� h mere,

Leavenwo r t h , and Wenatchee)

D r. Charles Larson/Luth eran Brotherhood Endowed Scholarship

Sterling and 1,.,l a r j o r i

Ebba and

Mark Salz.man Memorial

E.

Arthur Larso n Nursing Scholarship

R, sc Sch olarsh ip

Ma ri e Scheele General E n clowed Scholarship

Ludvig and Clara Larson Scholars h i p

Johannes and Aleen Sch i l l er Endowment Fumj

h a rles Lau back Student Restarch F u n d Orl.lndo a n d Myrtle Lee/ Lu the ra n Brotherhood End owed Scholarship

Dr. '''',I l ler and Joan R . Schwindt Scholarship

Gu)' J . and Lo uis ' Leesman Scholar hip

SEAFIRST B a n k M i nority Scholarship

Seattle Mortgage Bankers A socia t i o n SchofJrsh i p

LHCll.utheran 13 ro thcThood Endowed Schoiar,;hip Paul Liebelt Scholarship ( M a thel11 a t i M r.

amI . I rs . W.

1

Dorothy

H i l d i n g Lindberg Endowed Scholarship

Isabe l Lindberg Trust

E.

and A n i t a H illesland Londgren/Lutheran Brotherhood

Endowed ' cholarsh ip Alfred and Althea Lund/Lutheran Brothtrhood Endowed

Gene and

cholarship

Marian LlI n d gaardfLutheran Bro th e rhood Endowed

Scholarsh i p Luther;m Brotherhood F u n d fo r Lutheran Students Lut h e r a n Brotherhood Sd10larship

Schnaible Endowed Scholarship

Dr.

M a u r i ce and

Pa tr i ci a

Skones Scholars h i p ( Vocal

James

Slater Biology - ROTC Scholarship

Smith Endowment Sch o la rsh i p

·1r. a nd M rs . Charles Sm ithson i\.nne E. Snow I'o u n d a t i o n P.

Ethel Sqwres Schola rsh i ps

james B.

M a l yon Scholarship

M a t h e m at ics S chola rs h i p

lind

Sch olars h i p

Southeast Ida h o Ince n t ive Scholarship F u n d Haldor

Joe Marchi nek Memorial Scholarship fo u n d

S p o n h e i m Schola rsh i p Fund

Wi l l i a m and Astrid Stancer Endowed Sch ol a rs hi p Steele -

Reese

SLho l a r > h i p Endowment

Dora S t rungland Mcm rial Schola

McKay S c h o larship

Esther

A l ma Meisne t Endowment Fund

S t u h l m i l le r Memorial Scholarship

K . Merton Prile i n Sociology

in

"Engi neering Science

Genevieve Stdberg E ndowed Scholarship

EdJllll.nd 1axwell Fou n dation Scho larsh i p

Roben

Mu. ic)

Frances Norton S m i t h Endowed Scholarship

Con . tance

J.yon Scholarship

i n Accou nting

James R . SIQter Endowed Scholarship

Luthaan Brotherhood Susraining Fund SdlOlars h i p

n.

Sc hola rs h i p

S h a r i ng i n St rength

Hildred Linder Endowment Richard

H.

Ma rgaret Shipley Endowed

M . and

Doris

G.

hip

S t ucke F ndowed Schola rsh i p in Nursing

Tacoma Rai n iers Co m m unity Fund Sch o larship

M i l it;}ry Order o f the P u rple Hearl Award

Ron and Eileen Tel lefso n/Lutheran Brol herh od Scholarship

Fred lIDd Carol)'n M il l s Memorial Scho la r h i p

H a rvey and Helen Tengesda l E ndowed

Lila Moe Endowment Scholarship KathJrine

E.

Monroe Scholarship

Eclvin and Ida Tingclstad Memoridl

cholarship

chohlrShip

Evelyn To[ve nd Memorial Education Scholars h ip

Forestinc Wi,,, M o n ., en Memorial Pin n o Scholarship

Cliff a n d Ro n n ie Tvedten Endowed Scholarship

Donald and Wanda Morken Family Endowed Scholarship

Tylcr Memorial Nursing Scholarship

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n.. i tion and Fees UND£RGL�UATE RATES

Fall / Spring

o z

Semesters

Credit Hr.

<

1 .. ........................... $45 - .00 2 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "9 1 0 .00 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ,365 .00 4 .. . . . . ........... . .. . . . . . $ 1 .820 .00 5 . . . ... . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . . $2,27 .00 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2, 730.00 7 . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 , 1 85.00 8 ...... . . . . . . . ............. 3 , 6 40.00 9 . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . $4.095 .00 1 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . $4,550.00 1 1 .. ..... . . . . . . . . .. ....... $5.005 .00 1 2 . . . . . . . . .......... ...... $5,460.00

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]c lIluary

Credit

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I'<OTE: HOll rs tokCll jilr /(I7IIIWY Term iT! excrH of 4 crerlil /rollrs lire ch arged III a 'ra t e of$22 7. no I''''' LT dit.

.

5 . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. $2,047.00 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. $2,274.00 .

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1 4 . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6,3 70.00 . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . $6,825.00 16 . . . . . . . .. . . . . 7 . 2 0 .00 .. ..

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VETERANS AFFAIRS & VOCATIONAL R.EHABrtITATION

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Ti tl e 10 U S c. Ve terans, widows, ;lIld c h i l d re n o f deceased veterans w h o wish to inquire a b ou t their eligibility fo r ben firs �hould contact t h e Regional Office of the Ve tera ns Adm i n istration, Federal Building, 9 1 5 Second Avenue. Seattle, Wa s h i ngton 98 j 74. Persons within the Stale of Was h i n gt o n may telephon e 1 - 800-827- 1 000. Stu de n ts sho u ld gain admis ion to the wllvers i r y and see the uni versity's Veterans A ffa i rs Coordinator before making applica tion for benefits. S t udents are required to register a t the u n iversity's Veterans Affairs O ffice before each term to in s ure con t i nuous r ece i pt of benefits. and

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$2.50 1 .00 2,728.00 $2/55.00 3, 1 82.00

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excess

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c""iit hOllrs lire

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GRADUATE RATES Fa/IISprilzg Semesters

Credit Hr. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. $455 .00 2 . . . . . . . . .. .. ....... . . .. ...... $9 1 0.00 3 . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . $ 1 .365.00 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ,820.00 5 .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.275.00 6 . . . . . ... . . . .. 2,730 .00 7 . . . ................ . . . . . . . $3, 1 85.00 8 . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... $3.640.00 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.095.00 10 .... ............... . . . . . $4 ,5 0 . 00 1 1 . .. ....... . . . . . . .. ..... $5,005.00 12 . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . $5,460.00 13 ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . $ , 1 5 .00 14 . . . . .. . . . . . (U70.00 I S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,825.00 16 . . .. .. . . . . . $7,280.00 .

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Hr.

!<lIl lwry Term

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I ... . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . . ....... $ 45 5 0 0 .

2 . . . ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 1 0 0 0 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 .365.00 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,820.00 5 . . . ..... .. ...... . . .. .. . . . . . . . 2, 275 .00 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,730.00 .

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7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . .. . $3, IS5.00 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . $3,640.00 .

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Credit

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Pacific Lutheran Un iversity's a c ade m i c programs of study arc approved by the Wash i n gton Sta t e H i g her Edu at i o n Coordinat­ ing Board's State A p pro vi n g Agen y (HE B/SAA) fo r enrollment o f persons e l igible to receive educational benefits under Title 38

.

1 7 . . . . . . . . . . .............. $7 .507.00 1 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,734 .00 19 . . . . . . . . . . . .. . �7,96 1 .00 20 . . . . . .. . . . .. .. .. . . . $8, 1 88.00 etc. ...

E

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.

NOTE: I-{ollrs taken eitllcr fa ll or spriIlg ill charged at a rate of $227.00 per rre.dit.

Karl fer Me mo r i al Scholarsh i p David lIeland Memorial Scholars h i p United Parcel Service Fo undat i o n Scholarship U WEST D iversi!)' Scholarship EHen Val l e Memorial S ' 1 oin r,h i p Arthur H. Vingerud Endowed Scholarship F u n d Wade/H inderlie Scholarship und I n a H . Wake Memorial Scholarship Was hi ngto n Mutual Minor iti es in d uc a t i o n Scholarship Was h i n gton State Autom obile Dealers Association Scholars h i p Was h i n gt on Soft"'a r ' A s oc i a t io n S ho la r shi p Doc a nd Lucille Wea t h e rs E ndowed . cholars h ip Weste rn Wash i ngton Fair f\ssociatk,n Scholar�hip Wi k Family/Lutheran Brothcrllood Endowed Scholarsl1 i p Mabel Wing . cholarship William P. and Carolyn O. Woods Scholar hip Ra ndall Yoakum Endowed Schol, r 'hip Ralph a n d Celestene Yoder Me m o ria l Scholarship Sh i r l ey Zurfluh/Lutheran Brotherhood E ndowed Schnlarsl"lip ( Busi ness )

.

7 . . . . .... ..................... 8 . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . ') . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . .... 10 .............. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13 ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.9 1 5.00

1

$45 5.00

.

4 . . ............ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 .820.00

...

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Hr.

.......... ............ . . . . . . . . . .

2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9 1 0.00 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,3 65 .00

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Term

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OjJ Call1pus Progralll s t udellts pay (] progralll fee (110t PL U cuitioll) specific tn the indi vidual progra lll sites. Contact the Cellter for In lema tiollal Progra llls for complete details. NOTE:

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Studen ts whv test o ut of a clas (Credit by Exa m inat io n) w i l l be ch a rged 25 percent o f re gula r t ui t i o n fo r that class ( $ 1 1 3 . 75 per credit h o ur ) . REGISTERING AFI'ER ADDI DROP S tude nts who regi ter after the Ia t day of AddfDrop will be ass es sed an administrative h a n d li n g fel? of $50 fo r each course added or d ropped. COU SE FEES Some c o u rses require a d d i t ional fees; they w i l l be a d ded to t he tuiti o n t o tal. The c1as sch ed ule available fWn1 the Regi. lrar's Office pro ide� i n formation bout , ny fees that may affect a n

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i n d ividual schedule. Mu.�ic and education st u d ents hould note: The Pril'nt Music Lesson Fee is $ 1 25 fo r o n e credi t or $200 fo r t wo or more credi ts per medium. A one-t ime Education Plncemetlt Fce of $40 i s ch a rge d in th e last semester of the B . A . E. program. MISCELLANEOUS FEES Health Services will charge a student's ac cou n t , or a s t ude n t may pay d i rectly, fo r i mmunizations, l a b work, and p res c r i ptio n s that are req uired. Unpaid Pines s u c h as parking viola tions and overdue l i b rary books will appear o n the mon t hly statement. S t udents are e n couraged to pay t hese rines as i n cu rred to avoid late fees and h a n dl j n g c harges . A one-time Graduation Fee of $30 is c h a rged to baccala ureate ' a nd mast er s degree candidate . A fee of $5 is c ha rge d to replace lost, dam aged, or stolen student ID's. T h is must be paid a t the St u den t Services Center. The fee fo r offic ial transC1'ipts is $5 fo r each transcript. SPECIAL INFORMATION Opti nal l udent h ea lth and acciden t i n s u ra n ce is available th rough an independent carrier. A brochure is ava i lable fro m the Stu de n t L i fe Office. Parhlng permits are free and required fo r all student ve h i cles . They can be obta i n ed in the Campus Safety Office. Fa i l ure to register rna)' res u l t i n a fm e. ROOM AND MEALS Studen ts who a re u nder 2 1 �lI1d arc t a k i n g 12 or more credi t hOllIS mllst livc and eat meals o n campus. There are exceptions:

1. If one l i ve at hom \ ith a parent, l eg a l gna rd i a n , or spouse 2. If one turn 21 before October 15 ( fall semester) or March 1 5 ( sp r i ng semester)

3. If one has attained sen ior status (90 cred it ho urs) be fo re the beginning of the semester

Ap pe als may be a dd ressed to the R es i de ntial Life Office. Room Double Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1, I SO .OO/semester in gl e/S i ngle Room . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 ,S OO.OO/semester S i ngld ouble Room . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. 1 ,500.00/semt'ster -

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A l i m i ted number of si ngle rooms are a v a i lable. Spec i a l hous i ng request may be addressed to the Residential L ife Office at 206/535-7200.

Co n t i n u i ng students (student� who live o n campus for fall, January term, and spring) are not charged fo r room d u r i n g the J a n uary term.

___ •

tudents who attend only the january term w i l l be cha rged

$255 .00 •

fo r room

(see 11

·t col u m N fo r llleal.').

hOLls i n g d epo $i t ( to be paid o n ly by c o n ti n u i ng students) of $200.00 will be credited to one's student account on the Se p t e m b e r bill ing r r fa l l , and the February b il l i ng fnr spring - links fo rfei ted by tht' Re s id e n t i a l Life Office.

L i m ited housing is ava ilable d u r i n g winter a n d spring b re ak s a t a co-t of $9.65 per day. Meal Plans • ResidenLial ( o n - ca m p u s ) students may t h ree meal plans l isted below:

$e\ect from t he first

Plan # 1 : 20 meal s/week . . . . . . . $ 1 ,063.00/$e01est<;,r Plan #2: 15 mcals/week . . . . . . $ I ,OOO.OO/semester Plan #3: 10 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . $86" .OO/semester ...

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ommutc r students may choose fr o l ll t he p lans above o r sele t o n e below. Co m m u ter st udents must c o n t a c t F ood Ser v i ce each semester to b eg i n their meal plan of choice.

Plan #4: 5 mea ls/week . .... . . . . . . . 54?" .OO/semester Plan #5 : 5 hl ilches/wcek . . . " :l SS.OO/semester ..

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If one lives on -campus during the j an u a r y cos t as follows:

T .rm, meals

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Plan # 1 : 20 meals/week ............. 5264.00 PLan #2: 1 5 meal s/week . . . . ... . . . . . . $250.00 Plan #3: 1 0 meals/week . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2 I 5.00

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Plans '1'4 and #5 are o n l y available to commuter studen ts: Plan #4: 5 meals/week . . ... . . . . . . . . $ 1 10.00 Plan #5: 5 l u n c h e s / w eek .............. $90.00 .

.

ADVANCE PAYM ENT Nnv studellts need to make a $200 advance payment to con fi r m their o f fe r o f a d mi s s i o n . The paym e n t is refundable u n t i l May 15 for fal l , December 15 for t h e J a n u a r y term, and j a n u a ry 15 fo r spring. Requ sts for a refund mu s t be made in w r it i ng to t h e A d m is s ion s O ffi ce.

l> z o .., m m VI

Returl1;'lg studenl · wa n t in g to reserve a room for t h e foll o w i n g year must make a $200 a dv a n ce pay ment. Thl: p ay me n t will be cre d i te d to the fo l l owi n g year's acco u n t u p o n occupancy. The advance payment i s 100% refu ndable by l11 a k l n g a written request to the Reside n tial L i Je O ffice by July I. A 50°1<) re fu n d will be g ran ted if the w r i t te n request is received after jul)' 1, but by August I . No refund wiJl be granted after August 1.

FINANCIAL AID S holarships, grants, talent awards, a n d loans awarded by PL S tude n t Financial Aid Services. and outside aid ( from fra ternal organ izatio ns. high sc hoo l s , churches, etc.) sent d i rec t l y to P L a r e credited to th st ude nt ' s acco u n t . Awards over $100 will b e eq u a l l y divided between fall and January term/spring seme5ters . Awa rds u n der $ [ 00 w i ll b e applied to o n e semeskr only. Outside aid \ ill not be a p p l i ed to the account un t i l the funds arc received by PLU. NOTE: Because financial aid

is equally divided between fall alld

Ja l/Uflry term/·pring semestl!rs, tI,e cost January

and eats

i5 generally higher for the

term/spring semester if one regisrers for II la""ary term course 0"

campus.

Perkins alld I ursillg S{l1dellt LOIlII re c i p i e nt s are required to sign fo r their loan i n the Student Serv ices _enler a t the begi n ning of t h e academic. year. Federal Family Ed li cal i o l1lll Loan Programs (FFELP) ( these are Federal Staffo rd, nsubsidizcd Fed�ral Stafford and Fede ral Pare n t Plus ) , o b t a ined t h rough ba n ks and other len d i n g institu­ t i ons, will be applied after the proper endorseillent by the s t u de n t or pare n t . Funds not endorsed w i t h i n 45 days o f receip t will be re t u rned to the lending insti tution as defined by fed e ra l re gulations. A 4 percent p ro c es s i n g fee is s u b t racted from the loan by the l en d i n g institution. State of A lask a Loans mu. t be endorOied in the Student Ser ices

C e n t e r before t he funds can be deposited in the s t ude n t s account. Recipien of the following funds m u s t go to the Student ervi es enter to pick up their check. The check i s made payable t o the student. T h o s e funds are: Wash i ngton State Need Grant, Wash ington S c ho la r ur ing Co n d i t ional, Paul Dougla� Scholarsh ip, Educational pportu n i ty G r a n t, and Fut ure '

.

Teachers.

Students who secure part-t.ime employment as p a r t of their financial ai d (work s t ud y) rece ive mo n t h l y paychecks based on work p er fo r m ed. Paychecks may be picked up at the cas h i er" winclow at t he BU,inc O ffice o n p a y d ay and may be appll d to u npai d student acco u n t balances. It is the s tu de nt 's respon ibility to i n form the Student ervices Cent r of any changes i n financial st atus. Add i t ional funds r benefits from any source (such as free or partial room a n d meals) re rived or prom ised, be fo re or after 3 )tudent is awarded aid from PLU, must be reported. Actu a l class registrat ion tll at pro-duces a l o wer tuition rate than anticipated may reduc a fi nancial aid awa rd. By l a w, Student Fi nancial Aid ervices is re q u i red to make a dj u s t m ents to pre ve n t over awards.

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PAYMENT OPTIONS/ FINANCING

Medical Hold

Students must pay at the time o f registration or be enrolled in an

A "medical hold" prevents

approved payment plan at the time of registration.

Health Services has not received the Medical History Form or

Option I

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a

student from registering because

because the student does not have the necessary immunizations.

Those who pay early may qualify for Lutebucks,

z

coupons redeemable at the PLU Bookstore. To receive Lute-bucks,

Rights and Responsibilities

payment is due in full by July 29 for fall semester and December

Upon registration, the student and his or her parents or legal

ct

22 for the January term/spring. O therwise, payment fo r Option 1

guardian, agree to accept the responsibility and legal obligation

is due in fu ll by the first day of each term.

to pay all tuition costs, room and meal fees, and other special fees

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Option 2

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incurred or to be incurred fo r the student's education. The

Payment Plans

university agrees to make available to the student certain

8 Month Plan: The definition of an 8 month plan is enrollment fo r one of the fo llowing term arrangements: •

Fall, J-Term, Spring

educational programs and the use of certain university fa cilities, as applicable and as described in this catalog. A fa ilure to pay

Fall, Spring

when due all un iversity bills shall release the university of any

A non- refunda ble set-up fee of $75.0.0. is required to start this plan. Payments fo r this plan begin September 15 and must be paid ill fu ll by April 1 5 .

obligation to continue to provide the applicable educational benefits and services, including, bUll not limited to, statements of honorable dismissal, grade reports, transcript of records,

Fall only or [-Term/Spring ollly: Students wishing to finance Fall

diplomas, or preregistrations. The student shal'l also be denied

only or J- Term/Spring only will be required to pay a non­

admittance to classes and the use of university fa cilities in the

refundable set-up fee of

event of a default.

$50..0.0. and will have payments due for

the following months: •

Fall: September, October, November, December

J-Term/Spring: January, February, March, April

Credit Balances If a credit balance occurs on

a

studen t's account, excess funds will

be disbursed within a period of time not to exceed fo urteen days.

Payments fo r this plan are due the 1 5 th of each month.

(Note: The student or the student's parent may elect in writing to

Summer on ly: Students wishing to finance Summer only will be

have the ,institution retain excess funds for future expenditures. This option may be changed at the discretion of the student or

required to pay a non- refundable set-up fee of $25.0.0. and will

the student's parent.) If additional expenditures occur a fter credit

have payments due for the fo llowing months: •

ba'lances have been disbursed, the student or the student's parent

J u ne, July, August

is financially responsible for any owing balance. Emergency

Payments fo r this plan are due the 1 5 th of each month.

checks requested as an exception t o normal procedures within

BOW TO MAKE PAYMENTS

the fo urteen-day period will have a $2 5.0.0. processing fee

Mail payments with statement remittance stub to PLU, Box

assessed.

2 1 167, Seattle, WA 98 1 1 1 - 3 167, or deliver payments to the P LU Business Office in the Administration Building, Room 1 1 0.. Checks should be made payable to Pacific Lutheran University. The student's name and acco un t number (social security

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO REFUND AND REPAYMENT Refund Pacific Lutheran Unive rsity ca'lculates and distributes Refund/

number) should be included with all payments. A $ 1 5 fee is

Repayment according to Federal Regulations 34 CFR parts 668,

charged on all returned checks.

682, 685 and the Federal Student Financial Aid Handbook,

V I SA and MasterCard are accepted. An automatic monthly

Chapter 3 . The Marko pro rata software is used to calculate the

payment may be arranged with the S tudent Services Center. An

pro-rata refund/repayment in accordance with the federal

automatic payment form will be mailed out at the stud ent's

regulations cited above.

request; this will eliminate calling each month to charge p ay­

"Refund" refers to money paid toward school charges that

ments. No additional fee is charged fo r this service when added

must be returned to financial aid sources and/or to the student.

to a payment plan. Please DO NOT mail cash. A periodically adjusted discount

Fair and Equitable Refund Policy of the Institution

rate will be charged against Canadian currency.

Pacific Lutheran University has a fair and equitable refund policy.

Interest and Late Fees

As required under Section 668.22(b) ( l ) of the federal regula­

PaYlllem Optioll 1

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tions, the Student Services Center will calculate and provide for a

For those not on a payment plan, a 1 . 5%

monthly default interest is charged on balances 30. days past due. PaYlI lent Plalls - Payments received after the 2Qth of the month

will be assessed a $25.0.0. per month late fee.

refund of at least the larger amount provided as follows:

1) requirements of State Law (not applicable to PLU) 2) specific refund standards established by the school's nationally recognized accrediting agency (not applicable to PLU)

Missed Payments Failure to make minimum monthly payments as agreed will result in removal from a payment plan and the account will be placed

3) pro rata refund calculation for any student attending the school for the first time whose withdrawal date is on or before the 60.% point in time in the period of enrollment for which

on financial hold. Student accounts 60. days delinquent may be turned over to an outside collection agency. A 40.% charge will be added to such an account to cover collection cost.

the student has been charged. When p ro rata does not app ly, the university will calculate and provide for a refund o f at least the larger o f the amount pro­ vided under:

Financial Hold If a student account is past due, it will be placed on "financial hold." Basic university p riv ileges will be denied until the acco u n t is settled, including t h e ability t o register, receive copies of a

1) Federal refund calculation; or 2) University's refund policy The university will apply its fair and equitable refund policy to

transcript or diploma, or cash checks.

Title IV recipients and all other students.

Academic Hold

Title IV Refund If any portion of an account was paid with TITLE IV Federal

The Registrar, Student Life Office, or Residential Life Office can

Financial Aid, a refund will be prorated to each of the Financial

place an account on "academic hold." Registration for classes is

Aid Programs in the fol lowing order:

precluded until any pending matter with those offices is settled.

1) Federal Family Educational Programs (FFELP), (Unsubsidized Federal Staffo rd Loan, Federal Staffo rd Loan, Federal Plus Lo an), Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Federal

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the student.

are

in their 6rst term of a ttendance at the un iver­

si ty, who withdraw d u ri n g the receiving Title I a s calcu lated

first 60% of the term and who are the greater o f a t uit ion refu n d

aid will re ce ive

above

time student" the

Reg i s t r a r 's O ftIce use the fo llowing criteri a and procedures: A "first time s t udent" is any student who has not pr e v i o u sly

at least one class a t the school or receives a refund the charges for tuition and fe es, less any allowable ad m i n i s trat i ve fee, for p revio us attendance at the school. attended

of 1 00% of

A student remains a "first time student" until the st udent ei ther withdraws, drops out, o r is expelled from the school

after attending at

least one c las s, or

enrollment for which he o r s h e has

completes the period o f

been

parking fi nes, and

C -I

Student Financial Aid Services will compare the pro rata refund a m o u n t with the refund a m o u n t ( s ) calculated using the

Refund Po l i cy,

University

o

whichever is larger.

z

Institut ional Refund Policy

o r a prorated refund.

a) To establish whet her the student is a " fi rst

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will n o t health insu rance, late fe es , l i b rary fines, health charges.

include fees for group

First-Time Student Federal Pro Rata Refund Policy Students who

-I

O t h e r cha rges assessed t h e student by t h e i ns t i t uti o n

SEOG, other TItle IV fu nds, other federal, state, private, i nst i tutional aid, and then

charged.

the same as

The university's institutional refund pol icy is

>

the

Z

Federal Refu n d Po li cy.

refund pol icy, Student Financial Aid Services will also calculate a fed eral refund a m o u n t a cco rd i n g to the regulatory r e q ui r e ments , and will For

students s u bj ect

to

the

institutional

C ... m

compare the results of the calculated fe deral refund amount to

m

the calcu lated institut ional refund a m o u n t . In all ca s e s ,

VI

u n iversity will re fu n d

at l e ast

the

the larger of the results o f these

two calculations.

Housing Refund

is established by u n iversity residences the studen t's housing contra ct. The refund cal c ulation is based on the actual n u mber of days a student resides i n uni ve rsit y r es id e n ce s . The housing refund policy

and is

part of

Policy Statement In o r din a r y c i rcumstances, a s t u dent who withd raws on or before t h e

first

full refund

two

weeks of instruction

in

a semester receives a

of "tuition and fe es."

Refund Policy Insitutional/Federal Refund Policy (Note excep tion: The Federal

Pro

Rata Refund Policy

will be used fo r first time s t l ldellts.)

DATE O F WITH ORAWA�

Before

firs t d a y of class

First day of class

-

-

Credit Hour Programs: In t h e case o f a n educational program measured in credit h o u rs, the school m u l tiplies the n u m be r of weeks in the p e r i o d o f enrollment for wh ich the st u de nt was ch a rged the 60%. T h e result is compared to the n u mb e r of weeks the student completed before withdrawing. If the n u m be r of we e ks the st ud e nt completed is l es s than or equal to this result, the student is considered to h a ve withdrawn on or before the 60% point in time. Fo r all fi rst t i me students who w i thdraw on or before the 60% p o i n t in time, Student financial Aid Services will calculate and provide a refund o f not l es s t han the p or ti o n o f the tui tion, fees , room, board, and o ther c ha rges assessed the student by the school that is equ a l to the po r t ion of the period of enroll ment for which the student has been charged that remains on the date that the student withd rew, less any unpaid amount o f a student's sched­ uled cash payment. Student Financial Aid Services will

co mpu t

e the

student's

"unpaid scheduled cash payment" a m o u n t hy s u b t r a ct in g the amount paid by the student fo r which he or she

WJS

the

period of enrollment fo r

charged from the scheduled cash p.l)'l11 cnt

fo r that enroll ment p e ri o d .

BOARD R E FU N D

100%

1 00% less

1 00%

deposit 1 00 %

1 00%

75%

75 %

75%

4 weeks

50%

50%

50%

5

period o f enrollment for which the student was charged.

ROOM REFUND

weeks

3

When the Registrar's Office establishes that a student is a "first t i m e student," the following calcu lations will be used to determine if the student with drew on or before the 60% point in time of the

TUITION REFUND

to 2 weeks

100%

weeks

25%

25%

25%

6 weeks

2 5%

25%

25%

7 weeks

25%

2 5%

25%

8 weeks

25%

25%

25%

9+ weeks

0

0

0

Housing deposits are not paid by fe d er a l fina nci,ll aid not r efu nda b le . Notice of withd rawal must

be

given in

w ritin g

and

are

to the

re gi s t r ar, Pacific Lu theran University and received

before the

d e a d l i n e above. Oral requests ale not a cceptabl e . Charges will remain on the account until wri tten notice

is

received.

Unofficial Withdrawal

In the cases of unofficial v!ithd rawal, the drop o u t date (defined as the last recorded day of class a ttend a n ce as docu mented bv. t h e institu t i o n ) will be used to c alcu l at e a refund. Medical Withdrawal S t ud e nt s rna)' also completely withdraw fro m a term for medical rcasoll';. The student m llst p r ovid e written evidence from a ph y s i ci a n to the vice presidmt and dean for student l i fe. The

grade of "WM" will appear on the student's gr ade

report and

transcript.

Repayment Calculation Student Financial Aid Services will determine the portion of the p er iod o f e n roll ment for which t h e st uden t w as cha r g e d that the

student

actually a t tended,

and

determine the reasonable

expenses associated with n o n - i n stitu tional costs fo r that portion of the enrollment period.

of any cash d isbursement to the student be determined. Reasonabk �xpenses as determined will b e subtracted from the cash d i s b u rsed for the enrollment period. If the cash disb ursement was greater than the student's incu rr e d The compos i t i o n

will

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non - i nst i tu t io l lal

e xp e nses,

the st u d e nt m u s t repay t h e excess

CAMPUS MINlSTRY niversit)' by its vcry n a tu re is a pl a ce fo r th e

am o u nt.

Pacific Lu theran

Repayment

interaction between studies and the Christian fa i t h . O p p o r t u n i ­

A "repaym ent" is the am o u nt of cash di sbursed to the s t ud en t w h i c h m ust be repaid t o the Title IV progrJms. A cash disburse­ mt:nt is paid to the l ud en t fo r non - i nst i t uti on al costs (ed ucati oal costs not payable direc t l y to the u nivers ity). A repay m en t is req uired if the student re c eive d more in cash di b u rsement than was ne e d ed to cover n o n - i ns t it utio nal xpt:n C '. Title IV Repayment R e pa yme n t of funds re c e ived from Title IV Fi n a n c i al Aid Pmgr, ms may be n l' essary in i nsta nces where funds were received from a n acco u n t after the char ges we re satisfied. The federal fo rmula will he us e d to d e te rmine the appropriate payment. Funds t h a t need to be r ep a id w i l l be r e t u rned to t heir ,our e i n the fol l o wing order:

a)

Federal Pe rkins Loa n , Pell fed era l Title IV fu n d s en

celebrates the Lo rd 's S u p p e r each Sund a y. Pas toral services o f t h e un ivers i t y pastors a r e available t o a l l students who desire them. Severa l deno m i n a ti o ns and rel i gi o us groups have organiza ­ c amp us,

and there arc n um e rous s t udent- i n it ia ted Bible

RESPONSmIUTIES OF COMMUNITY LIFE

G , ot her Title IV, non­ aid, st a t e aid, a n d ot her )

for the percen tage of t u ition a l lowed to be refu n ded fo r that time per iod d ur i ng tile tcrm (as deter m i n ed by the Reg i st ra r 's Offi e and the n ivers i ty Refu n d Pol icy) . F i nancial

The Univers i t y Congregation meets in regul a r wo r s h ip a n d

ties i n a sp i r it of openness a.nd m u tual respec t .

accow1t

W ith i n a ny com m un ity ce rt a i n re gul a tions a re n e c e ss a ry. Paci fi c Lut h e ran U n iversi ty ad op ts on l y those standards bel ieved to be reaso nably necessa r y and a d m i t s students with t h e expe c ta t io n that t h e y w i l l com pl y w i t h those st a ndards. All mem bers of the university c o m m u n i t y are expec t e d to resp e ct t h e rights and i n tegr i ty of o t h ers. Co nd uct which is detrimental to students, facu l ty, sta ff, or t he univers i t y, or which v i o l a t e s local , state, o r federal hl\vs, m a y be g ro unds fo r sa nctions o r fo r d i s m i ssa l . T h e u nive rs it y p ro h ibits t h e possess io n or co n s u m pt i on o f alcoholic beve rages on campus and l i m i ts the h o u rs when s t udents may have visitors of the The

o ppos i te

sex i n their re si d e n c e hall rooms. the Code of Conduct for a l l

Student Handbook con tai n s

students. NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION New student orientation e ndeavors to ass is t stud e n ts and thei r

f refu nd/repayment cal c u l a tion see S tu den t

ample

Ch a p e l worshi p is held M on da )', Wednesday, and himly mo rn i ngs d uri n g each semester for all who wish to par ticip a te.

elected student and facul ty cOlll m i ttee, cOQrdimltes these activi­

I ) Student requ est w i t hdraw'1Il approva l from the Regis t ra r 's O ffice, by a withd rawal fo rm. 2) S t ude n t Financial id S rv ices proc esses percentage refu n d calc ulation o n e a c h st ud e n t u ' i ng t he M a rko software. A i d is r e i ed according to the federal pro rata ca lcul at ion or the U n iver ' i t ylFedera l Refund Policy. 3) The Husi n es ' Office gives a t ui t i on a dj ust men t to the stude n t 's

a n e,

rich

study and fe ll ows h i p groups. T h e Ca m p us M i n i stry Counci l, an

PROCEDURES FOR OBTAINING A REFUND

4) For

are

and diverse.

ti ons on

ra n t , SE

titutio nal

t i es for the m u t ual celebration of t h a t fa i l h o n campus

fam i l ies w i t h the t ransi t i o n to PLU. The thre e -d ay fa l l program

id Serv ices .

NOTE: Please lIe aware tlrat a refund dlle to withdrawal from the university can adversely affect what is o wed the university. A tu i tion adjrJstmellt is (Ipplied to the student account, but aid is also redrJced, somet imes creating a Inrger owing balance. Stu­ dents should check with Student Final/cial Aid Services to re­ search tire effe ct a withdrawal will Irave 01/ their student aCCO llllt.

i ntrod u ces s t u dents to many dimensi ons of PLU l i fe. Fall ori en ­

ta t io n i n c l udes meetin g with a fa c ul ty a dv iser, worki n g in s m all groups with o t h e r new students, beco m i ng a cquai nted w i t h c am p us services, and havillg s o m e re l a xe d t i m e wi th ot her students before classes b e g i n. New students are encouraged to attend a one - day academic orientation and course regist ra t io n event held in June. S pec ial a c t ivi ti e s are a l so pl a n ned wh ich

resp ond to concerns of fa mil ies of new studen ts. \"'h i l e January a n d sp ri ng o r i entations are more cond e ns e d , they also provide new students w i t h a n i n t roduction to a ca d c mi c l i fe and co­ c u rricular a c t ivities. Orie n tation p rograms are

Student Life

coord in a ted

t h ro ugh t h e S t u d en t Involvem e n t a n d Leadership Office, ( 2 0 6 )

The q u a l i ty of l i fe cu l t i vat e d and fostered wit hin the un ie rs it y is an 'sse n t i a l ompo n e n t of the academ ic commu­ nil y. The environment produced is conducive to a l i fe of vigorous and creat ive scholarship. It also recognizes t h a t l i be ral educat ion i s fo r the t o tal person a n d that a comple­ mentary relationship exists between students' intellectual development and the salLsfa tion of their o t h e r individual

5 3 5- 7 1 9 5. ACCESSIBILITY The u n ivers i t y comp l ies wi th Section 504 of the Re habi l i tatio n Act a n d provides reasonab l e accom modations to stu dents w i t h han d icaps a n d / o r disabilities.

oOl'dinarion o f eI'vices is

h an dIed by t h e Cou nseling a n d Tes ti ng Scr ices. The S t udent Needs A dvoca cy Pane.! provi d e s an avenue for student concerns.

needs. In teract i u n with pt:l'sons of d i ffering l i fe styles,

RESll)ENTIAL LIFE

of cla sroom knowledge to personal goals and a pi r ali o n , and co-curric ular experiences are all available and total com ponents of ed u ca t i on at PL . In a time when there is a nee d for meaningful co mm u n it y, the campus

Res iden tial livi ng is an i nte gra l part of the educatio nal process a t PLU, The u niversity requires t h a t all s i n g l e , fu l l -t ime ( 1 2 o r m o r

appl ication

facil i t ates genu ine relat io nship � among members of the

from d iverse religious, racial, and cultural back­ grounds. All of the services aDd fac i l i t ie provided are i n ten ded to c o m p l e me nt the academic p ro g ra m . The services p rov i d e d reflect changing student needs, and the oppo rtu n iti fo r s t u d e nt p a rticipation include v i rt u al ly all aspects of the univ rs i ty. I ndivi dual attention i� given to students ' con ce r ns, including a va r i et y of specific services u n iversity

o u tl ined here.

semester h o u r s ) students r o o m and b oard 0 1 1 ca m pu s u n less t h e student is l i v i n g at home w i t h parent( ) , lega l guard i a n ( s ) , spo use a n d /o r c h i l d , is 2 1 yea rs of age or o l der o n or before

O ct ob e r i 5 for the ,1 Ca d e m ic year and M a r h 1 5 for spri ng semester, or has senior st a t us (90 s e mest e r hours). All except i o n s t o this p o l i c y mllst be requested fro lll t h e Re s ide nt i a l Life O ffice regardi n g room and Din ing Services rega rd i ng

III

-als.

As a res ident ial camp us, Pacific Lutheran U n ive rs i t y offe rs studt:nts a val uable experie nc e in com mun i ty li v i ng . The univer­ sity recogni ze.s the i mporta n ce of n o n - cl ass roo m activities in prov iding

.tIl

ed u ca t ion. ThO' aim of resid-' n t i a l l i v i n g i s to help

students grow perso nally, social l y, cult u rally, and spirit ually. Cam p u s r esi d e n ce halls are sma l l . They a re organized i n to

co m m unities in wh ich each indiv i d u a l counts as a perso n . New

18

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knowledge shared w i t h friends i n the residence halls takes on a ver pe rso na l meaning. Men and women of many backg ru u nds .Iml c u l t u re s live 0 1 cam u . ; t h e refo re , students in res ide n ce h,we a u n ique opportun ity to b roa de n their cu l t u ral horizons. The u n i versi ty a n�� about lh quality of l i fe on c. a m p u s. The attracti e nd comfortable residence halls enrich t he quality o f life a n d enha nce the l e a rn i n g pr cess. The u n ive rs i t y offers s t u de nt s high- ual i t y h O USing opportun ities iJl duci i ng stu d e n t leadersh ip experience, fo rmal a n d i n formal programs, Jnd peer associa tions. The r udent go e r n in g bodies are strong a n d ac­ tively participat in cam pus life. A selec t ion of modem, a tt ra c t ive ha lls. each with it" 0\ n t ra d i t i o ns and un ique ad va n t n g , o ffer s students the oppo r t u­ nit to st ab l is h a comfortable living pa tte rn. All halls i nc l u de in forma l l o u nges , st udy rooms, rea ation ar as, and c o m m on k i tch n a n d laundry filc. il i l ies . ost of the halls are co-ed ucational. Al t h o u gh they are housed in Sf arate wiIlgs, m n a nd women LIl (0- d haJls share l o un ge and rec reation fac Hi tie a nd mOJon residence gove rn ­ ment, a n d part icip_ te j o i n t l y in all hall a t ivi ties. One all­ ' women s hall i s availahle fo r t h o s e women who desi re th is type o f living experience. An a l l single-roo m hall h as been e tabl ished for t h o se 2 j year. of age or older, or who have atta i ne d se n i o r or gra du a t e status. Th is in dependent Ii ing e n v i r o n m en t is des i ned to mee t th e need s of the ol d e r stud nt. Further infomlation regard i n g residence ha l ls can be obtained from the Reside n t ia l Life me .

STUDENT ACTIVITIES St ude nt acliviti s ar regarded J S essential ra tors in h i gher educa t i o n . "ome ar e related t o c o u rses of instruction such as drama , music, a nd physical t'du a t i o n ; others arc conn 'ct d more clo ely to r crca t ional and so c i a l l i fe , I nvo lvemen t i n st uden t activities pro v i des p ract i al exp erience and at the s a m e t i me deve l o ps an understanding o f self in re la t ion to others. Co­ c u r ri c u lru- proorams include s tude n t government (Associated t udents a n d Residence H a l l Coun i l ) , sport c t ivities (varsi ty, intram ural, and du b Sp(lrts), t u de n t media ( newspaper. yea r­ book, a rti s t i c m agaz. in e, radio, aJld tele \'i sio n l , s tud e nt lubs and organization s, 3nd c o m m u n i t y service program, o[[en:d t h ro u gh the o l u nteer enter. \' i t l, over 1 00 s t ude n t activities in wh ic h to become i n vo lv d, t h e re is sure to be at l eas t one which will enric h 11 per so n' college exp .ri 'nce.

III -4 C

I nvolvement and Leader h i p provide ad mi nistrati ve s upp r t and s rv i ce t o a sist adult students with orientation and g ui d ­ a n ce . The o m m u te r Lowlge, on th e lower level of t h e n iver­ si ty Center, serves a� a Glm p U headquarters for man)' adult st u d nt.s.

o m Z

MULTI-ETHNIC RESOURCES M Lu t i- l: t hn i c es ou rces serves stu dents , fac ult y, a n d staff of color. For s t u d en ts , sped I activ ities, peer m ent o r i ng and adv is ­ i ng, I a dershi p O pP(Htu nity, and o t h e r support services are avail, ble. For faculty ruld s ta ff, Mul t i - E t h n i c Resources ili a lo .:a ti )O fo r teaching and lea rn ing material on the subject of raci al and e t h n i c d ive rsi ty. Clerical assistance, small t ravel grants, and ot he r service:. ar also available to -uppor! ' pecial projects and r searc h focusing on national race- related is s u es . Multi­ Ethnic Reso u r ces is h ou se d i n Stude n t I nvolvem en t and Leader­ sh i p , located on the lower lewl of the ni e rs i ty Cen te r.

-4

.... m

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS The enter fo r I ntern at io nal Programs/I n te rnat ional tuden t ' erv ices prov i de assistance to internat ion a l �t uJ e n ts in 'ld j u st­ ing to the u ni ver i t y an d i n meet i ng both ed ucatio n (carecr) and pe rso n al needs. erviccs i nd ude u i rpo n p i c k - up . orientatiun, registratio n , and 0 0 - ampu ' liaison with other universi ty offices. ista nce with tmmigration and go crnment regulatiuns as well os i mm ig ra tio n p rocedu re s regard i n g t empo rary tr<lvd, work applications, a nd extensions of stay i available. COMMUTIlR STUDENT ERVlCES Many stude nts co m m u te t the PLLT campus. In addi ti o n to t-h e u ni versity services a n d p rograms avai.lable to uLi s t u de nt:> , the Student Involv me nt and Leade.rsllip o lli e supp ort. ommuLer students \\Tith a I unge are and message/emergency locator serv ice. Pro grams de igne d to add ress the spccwl needs of CO O1 mut 'rs a r . ponso red t h ro ugh student activitie.� and o mm u ter groups l i ke tbe Ad ult St u d e n t Organization . tudent� desi r i ng more i n form a t i on sho uld con t a c t 535-7 1 95.

VOLUNTEER CENTER PL 's Volunteer Ce n te r, run by st u de nts and housed in the 'e nt e r fo r P u b l ic Se rvice, seeks to give stude n t s o pp ortu n i t ies to put to work their d r ea ms fo r a better world. The Vol un t ee r Cen ter h a s l istings for over l Oa organizations wh need volu n ­ teers. S tu d ent can stop b>' and browse th ro u gh the placement l ists, or make an a p po int m en t with one of the Vol u n tee r e n t e r coordinat ors who help match s t u dents with organ i l a ions. Class projects, resid nee h a l l gTO U p activities, one da, or several, t he o l u nteer Cen ter can help you h el p ! Drop by o r p hone ( x83 1 8 ) and discover huw ea sy it is to make a big difference in life ! WOMEN'S CENTER The ,.vomen's �en ter pr vides serv ices, referrals. a n d s u pp o r t to

al l students, fa c u l ty, a n d staff or the un iversit y. The c l i m a te of the

center is such t h a t a l l persons ar valued and emp owered to p u r ue their i n d ividual and collec t i ve go als. The Ce n te r offers

peer-s upport gro u ps, ed u c a t i o n a l re 'ouree , and programs which celebrate the talents and cr ative expr ssions of women. The

omen's e nt e r also is the main s p o ns o r of Wo men's H i story Month a tiviLies h e ld e v e ry Marc h . The Wo men's Cent r i. loca te d at 754 S. I 20th.

ADutT STUDENT PROGRAMS fhe stude nt -ru n Ad u l t Student rga nizat ion see k to i den tify the spe iJI need ' of t u d c n t s over t he age of 25 and create the support n e t wo rk ' that will help adult students su cceed. tudent

ENVIRONS The university's geogra p hical sett in g afford5 st uden ts a wide variet), o f hoth rec rea t i onal a nd cult ural �n ter ta i n ment op t io n s . Recreationally, the grandeu r of the Pacific Northwest en c o urages p,lrticipatic lll in hiking, campi ng, cli mbing, k iing, b( Kl t i ng, and swi m m i n g. T h e most consp icuo us natura l monUJ]lent in the afl.�a is Mt. Rainier. ln addition t o Rain it'r, th t di t inctive re alms of the �ascad aud Iympic mo u ntni n ranges and fo re s ts of D ougl as Fir c.o mplete o ne of the m o t naturnlly tranqu i l environmenb i n the nited States. S t u de nts can also enjor the aest h etic offenngs of nearby Seuttle a nd Tacoma. These city cen t rs ho t a variety of perform­ ing and recording a rts a n d prov ide d )zen 0f g alle r ies ru ld m u eums as weU as u n ique sho pp i ng and di nin g e. pe rie n ces . P

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STUDENT SERVICES

is staffed with one nu rse pra t i t ioner and one physi ian assistant. A physician i a ailable [or consultation and refe ra!. Ser ices available include outpatient primary care, immu nizations, allergy shots, preven t ive health care, pap smears, testicular a.nd breast exams, bi rth contr I , pregnancy testing and couns ling. Also offered a re: sexually tran mitted d.isease infor­ mation, testing and treatment; consultations fo r travel guidelines and i m m u n izations, e ating di so rders, substance a b use, and tobacco usage; and health ed ucation on a wide variety of heal th ncerns. Health Services

is available to all students on a voluntary basis. The Health Service strongly u rges a l l students to ha e medical insuran e. The roup ccident and Sickn S 5 Plan offers caverag ' 24 hours a day, 12 months a year, anywhere in the world. Th is plan is �vaiJable throughout Lh year. A brochure outlining the program is available fro m the S t udent Li fe Office and from I-IealLh Services.

Sickness and Accident lnswance

states that all st udents are required to p rovide a u n iversity healtJ1 history fo r m with accurate i m m u n i­ zation rcc(Jrd� of measles, mumps, rubella, and teta nus-diphthe­ ria to Student Health services. Students born before January [ , [ 957, mllst p rovide documentation fo r tetanu:;-diphtheria (Td) boost r within the last ten years. Thb information must be on file before a student i: permitted to register. The Immu:nizadoD PoliC}

All illlernlltiOTlai sluden ts, faCIl ity, alld sch ola rs will be required have (I tubercu los is skill lest (purified proteill dcril'(Itil'e-ppd). Th is lest will be done at the Hellith Services lifter arrival at the university. The cost is $ 1 0 . 00.

to

Students with questions and concerns about t11 immun iza­ tion policy should contact Health Services at ( 206) 5 3 5 -7337. as s is ts students in c o p i n g w i t h developmental issues. Trained and experienced psych ol ogists a n d counselors offe r individual a s essments, and a cons ulting psy­ chiatrist is available for evaluatio ns and possible medications. A variety of personality/i nte rest inventories and psychological tests are ava i lable to assist students with career planni ng, ducational adj ustment., and personal problems. oord i nation 0 services for ludents w i t h disabilities i also available. •

Dining eTvices, owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran University, is available to all students, faculty, sta ff, and their guests. Students living o n campus are require<i to be on a meal plan. Meal card options are also available in the pizza restaurant and coffee s hops. "Grab and ;0" items are available d uring peak IUllch hours. No ded uctions are made fo r stu dcn eating fewer meals than previously cont ract d for unless granted by the associate director of D ining Services. Residential students arc o ffered 3 meal optio ns: Any 20, 1 5, or to meals per week. Students l iving o ff-campus are enco uraged to select one of the meal plans offered . St udents may sign up fo r a plan at the Residential Life O ffice. Students with special dietary requ irements, specifically ap­ proved in writing by ' phy-ician. can in most case be accom mo­ dated by canta t i ng the D i l l i ng Ser ices associate director. Thi ' ervice is provided at no extra cost. Di ning ervices operates two co ffee · hops. One is Il)cated on lower ampu ' in Columbia Center, and the other is located in the Univer� ity Center. Only the co ffee shop in olumbia Centt!r is open during the V3C- tion periods. Visitors may eat i n any of the facilities.

for meeting rooms are maintained in the Un ive rs i t y �enter. II u niversity activitie.> must be scheduled through this ffice. Sc h e du l i ng activit ies is a joint r ponsibility of the request.ing gro up, s heduling coordinator, and the Univer­ sity Center O ffi e . Scheduling Services

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( housed with Academic Advising for students' convenience) strives to provide a program of career development and l i fe planning. Students are assisted in in tegrat­ ing their personal values and aptitudes with career cboices through ind ividual coll nseling, workshops, residence hall presen­ tations, and a computerized career g u id a nce program. The o ffice staff assi:;t students and first-year alumni in developing job­ search techrliques by providing i n struc t i o n a l videos, company literature, all extensive career library of opport u nities in specific majors, i ndustry directories, and employment forecasts. Addi­ t ionally, the office coordinates a sched ul of recrui ter> from industry, business, government, and graduate schools. The enter coordi nates and promotes all pa rt-time and ful l ­ t i me employment opportunities for students, including listings of local jobs, nation-wide i nternships, and sum mer employment opportunitie . Specially selected forums througho ut the year als br ing students and employers togeth�r, i n order to help s t u d ents find work that is both fi nancially and personally rewarding.

Career Development

GRffiVANCE P ROCEDURES

Counseling and Testing Services

20

PlU Bookstore is owned a n d operated by Pacific Lutheran Universi t y for the benefit of st uden ts, faculry, and staff. The bookstore sells textbooks requ i red for classes. Supplie ', gifts, cards, and convenience store items are also available. Computer software at discounted pr ices is available or can be s p e c ial or­ dered. Apple compu ters at educational prices can be p u rchased through the bookstore. Special book orders are welcome. PiU Northwest is a u n ique gift shop located a.t 407 Garfield S t reet in h istoric Parkland. Featuring Northwest po ttery, cloth­ i ng, and foods, the store also offe rs b oo k s a n d gifts depicting North\'/ est themes and au thors.

Y

Poticie. and procedures at the u niversity are i n tended to main­ tain an orderly educat ional environ ment conducive to s tudent learning and development. I n order to fulfill i nstitutional re­ sponsib ility and at the same time follow procedures that are fai r, consistent, a n d protective of each person's rights, appropriate grievance procedures have been e tablished. If a student has reason to believe that an aead 'mic or admin istrative action is u njust, capricious, or d iscriminarory, the 'c procedures are aV'1tilable for the student to seek reclres� . The un iversit y has a team of grievance officers to fac i liLate the grievance process. The grievance officers are Cristina del Rosario (535-7 1 59 ) , Susan Mal1n (535-7 187), Patricia Roundy ( 5 35-8786), and Richard Seeger (535-8786 ) . Any of the grievance offie rs may be co ntacted to receive assistance. Jopies of grievance procedures are ava ilable for review at the office o f each grievance officer.


Academic Procedures Advising uruvemty ex pects that all st ud en ts, a t o n e time or a n ot he r, need as htnnct: in pl an n ing a�.,\dem ic progTams co ns isten t w i tb their needs and g a k Bot h t o h e l p s t u d ents ma e t h ei r i n itial a dj ust m e n t to the academic load at PL and to pr lVide cca ional counse! l h roughout tbeir academic careers, the univer ity bas esta b l i shed a network of facu lty adviser� a nd a n Acadt.:m i� AdV is i n g OffiLC. The

will

Fa cu1ry Advisers - All s t u den ts enro lled i n d eg ree programs

have

facuh �' ;1dvisers who e overall responsibility is to guide

ac:uiel11ic progre s. [n their work with i n d iVIdual st ud e n ts.

advisers h,lVe the assistance of personnel in a number of slLIdent �efYices offices: the Acad�mic Advising Office, the Acade mi c Assistance C en t er, the Career Devel o pmen t Office, Co un se l i ng and Te tillg er ires, the Multi-Ethnic Rt! ou ree enter. the Campu

li n istry. tJle in ter na liona l s t udent advi er, and

i

n

residence h a l l d rec tors and r esi d e t

assistants.

ielleral Advisers: At the time of enrry, each student is a�signed

a

gen era l adviser, u

ually hy malching stu de nt and .ldviser int er ­ ests. , tudents who wish to xplo re the genera! c u rr i c u l lllll before deciding on an i n terest rea a re as igned to exploratory advisers. During the fi rst semeste r, an ad v i s i ng li l for ach st udent is sent to the adviser, and an official record of acndemic progress i bsued to the studen t. Major AdVIsers; pon fu rm al decbrali n of a major, st ud e nts arc a s sig ne d major advisers to re p l ace t h e i r genera! advisers. Major advisers gtlide st u de nt s' progress toward their chtl e n degree goa l . .

cllange a d v is ers as appropri te or necessar y, 'imp l ad v iser ch, nge fo rm. tudent and advisers are expected t m�et regular!" th ugh t he actual n umb r of m ee t i ngs w i ll vary according t o mdividual needs. M i nimally, t h ree m ee t i n gs aTt� requi red d uri ng tile fre hman year and o n e each year thereafter, t hough aU st u dent s are enco uraged t o meet with tht:.ir advi�er� a uften as seem nece 'sary ()r usefu l. Students may

using

Registration

m

("\

o

Adding or Dropping A Course: A studcl1l may add or drop a c o u rse at a n y time d u r i n g the first two weeks of lass du ring a full -l ngth se me t r. ee the lalillary lerm clnd 5111111"1 1CI' ca ta logs for the add/drop periods for those sessio ns. D urincr the add/d ro p period , cOu rse · may be dropped and tu i t ion w i l ! b refunded in full. I n most cases, add i ng and d rop pi ng can be accomplished

m o c: ::a m '"

lI sing tele-regist rat ion. WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE 1£ a l ud en t do " no t w ish to co n t i n u e

a course a fter the addl drop period, the st ud en t must w i t hd ra w from the course. tudents who d es i re to withdraw re e n c o u ra ged to do so

o ffi ciJ. l l y. Tuition j. not refunded.

Offida] Withdrawal: ' T l) offici ally withd raw, the st udent net::ds to obtain a withdrawal fo rm from the S t udent S rv ices Center, fi l l in the fo r m , hJve r u e instructor sign t he fo rm, and submit the completed form to the Stud at Ser v i ces Cent r. ithdrawal forms must be submitted be fore the final examination week. ::,ee the /alil/([ry tenn ([nd Sl I /llI lier catalogs for the last da tes to lVit h d mlV du ring those sessions. " W" grade will appear on the s tud en t's grade report a nd transcript.

Unofficial Withdrawa]: A �tuJent who , to ps attending a course \ i l l receive an un olli ci al wi tbdr m aI. The will a ppear n the st udent', grade rep u rt ami transcript. !f it can be determined that a studen t never atten ded a cour�e, t. h e registration will be cancelled without not.llion o n

b u t does not w i t h d raw grade of"UWn

the transcript.

The Registrar' 0(5 e provides many se rvice� for st udents and a l u m n i.

he office serves a:; a focal poi n t for a l l mailers con e rn­ ing enrolli ng in urses. co nfi r- mi ng chedul s, rev iewing t ransfer crecUL�, JJid issuing tra nsc ripts . EARLY REGISTRATION FOR RETURNING STUDENTS

tudents who plan to ret ur n are encou raged to pre-register. Retu r n ing stlluents will rec e i v e rcgi tration tim ap p oi nt men ts to p re- reg is ter fo r fall and spring semesters a n d the January tcrlll . Reg i�trat io n dares and Umt! ar determined by t he number of huurs. i nc l u d i ng t ransfer hours, co m p leted by the student. �t u de n ts ma register o r each new semesta ur session on or after the designated d,lte a n d tim.:. EARLY REGISTRATION PROGRAM FOR ENTERlNG STUDENTS E�Ily reg.istrat ion for entering t u d e n ts occ u rs during j u n e or January, depending )n whdh<'r

st udent:; begin in the faJ! or

spring semester. Early registratio n is conducted by the A d m is ­

,IOns Office, Regi t Tdt ion material are nt to .til acce p te d en te r in g . tudents well in " dvance t)f their arrival on campus for

t heir tirst semester. o M 51 5tudents llave thl! oppor t un ity t o work peTS nal ly with an advi.5c r as they p l a n their sched ul es . A l im ited n u mber 0 students may registd by mail, and their

o

cou rse sel ections are

acces�ibl e from any tone-generating tciephone . In add i t ion to rcgist ring, te l e- r gi !ration also offers itudents the abiJ i t , to add or dro p a class, w i t h d raw from a class, o r check thei.r schedu les. The phone nu mbe r fo r tele- reg ist ra tio n is (206) 53 1 - 40 1 1 . Students are n t officially enrolled u n t i l t h e i r registration has been cJeared by t h e t u d en t counts Ofli e . o Students are I' s-pomiblc for eJecting their courses. Counselors a nd faculty ad v i sers a re available to a ssist w i t h planning and to make suggestion . Students sho u ld be thorcJughly acq ua i n ted with all registration materials, i nc l u d i n g the current c atalog and sp ec i a l info rmation selll by the Adm ission Office. S t ud nts are also enco u raged to s l lId), c are fu l ly the requirements of a l l academic programs in which t h ey may eventually d e cl a re a major.

' ri lled hI' a

coun�e1()r.

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

WlTHDRAWA L FROM THE UNIVERSITY St uden ts are e nt il l e d to withdraw honorably ii'om the ull i ersity if their rec rd is snti fac ory and all financial obligation are satisfied. P 3 rtial t u i t i o n refu nds are availahle. Refer fO t h e " TlIilioll and Fees" sectioll of this catalog for more ;lIj;mll atio/l.

Medical Withdrawal: Stude n ts may als completely withdraw from a term tllr med ica l r easo n s. The s t u de n t mllst provide w ri tten evidt:: n from a ph),sician tl th vie" pr sidelll and d e a n for s tuden t li (e. T h e grade of"WM" will appear 0 11 t b e stude n t 's

grade repo rt and t ran (ript. STUDENT COURSE LOADS

w u rse load fo r un dergraduate s t u d I l ts during fall and spri ng semesters i 1 3 t o 1 7 h o urs pe r semester, i ncl ud i n g physical education. The m i n i m u m ful l - t i m e o u rst:' load i twdve h o ur;,. The m i n i m u m Cull-time load fo r g ra d u at e st11dent is ei g ht hours. A n o rmal course load d u r i ng the January term is fou r hours with maximum of fi e hours. I n order for a student lo take a full wurse load, the stu dent Illust be formally admi tted t o the u n iversi t y. ee t he Adm ission ection of this catalog for applica t i o n p roc d u res. Stud ents who wish to register fo r 18 or more hOllrs in a semester are req u i red tll h ave at least a 3.00 g rade point average or consen t of the provo�t . St u d ents en gage d in considerable outside work may be re tricka to a re d uced academic load. The normal

o

o

ei ther in person at the St- udent Services Center or u e tht c o m p uteri z ed tele- regislr,lt ion sy tern �tlIden ts ma y register

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A

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1

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21


VI W cc :J Q w

u o cc �

CREDIT RESTRICTIONS

The Pass/Fail Option: The pass/fa i l option perm i ts students to

An und rgraduate tudent may repeat any course. The cu mula ­ tive grade p o i n t average is co m pu te d using the h ighest of the g ra d � earned . redit toward g r a d u ation is allowed o n l y once.

ex p lo re s u bj e ct areas o u t s id e their known abilities by experienc­ ing cours e s without co m p e ti ng d i rec t ly with students who are specializing in those areas o f s t u dy. Grades of A+ th ro ugh - are reg ard e d as "pass"; grades of D+ th r o ug h E a re regarded as "fail." Pass/fail g rade s do not affect the grade p o i nt ave rage . The pass / fa i l o ption is l i m ited to 8 c re di t hours ( reg ard l e ss of repeats, pass or fai l ) . O n l y one course may he taken p a ss/fai l i n fulfillment of genera l university or core r equ i rem e n ts OJ o f the language-related requ ire m en t of the College of Arts and Sc ie nc e s , i nc l u di ng degree s in t he Scho ol of Physical Education. The pa sslfa il option may not be a pp l i e d t o a co urs e taken for ful fillment of a major or minor p rogram. An exception to this i s al lo wed for o n e course i n the major o r minor field if i t was ta ke n before the m aj o r or m ino r was declared. Students m us t file t h e i r inte11tion to exercise the p a sslfail opt i on with the Stu cnt Services Ce nter no l a t er than the mid­ po i nt of t he c o u r s e. In a ful l-length semester, t h is is last d ay of the e ighth week. The pa ss /fa i l optio n is l i m ited to u nd e rg r ad ua te stu dent s on l y.

Credit is n ot allowed for a mathematics or a fo re i g n l ang ua ge OU Ise I i ted as a prerequ isite i f take n after a h ig he r - leve l course. for exam pl e, a s t u de n t who has com p l e t ed Sp a n i s h 20 1 cannot

later receive credit for panish 1 02 .

TH E GRADING SYSTEM tud nts are

u

grad d a co r d i n g to the following d es ignations:

Grade

Poi nts per Hour

Credit Awarded

4.00

Yes

4 . 00

Yes

3.67 3.33 3 .00 2.67 2.33 2.00 1 . 67

Yes Yes Yes es

1 .3 3

Yes Yes

+ w

A-

Q < U «

B+ B

BC+ CD+

Yes Yes

Yes

1 .00 0.67 0.00

D DE

Exclusive Pa 's/FaiJ Courses: Some courses only award p ass/ fa i l gra des. The g o al s of these courses are typically concerned with a pp re c i a t i on , value commitment, or c re a tive achievement. St udents wiJl be i nfo r m ed if a co ur s e is exc lu s i vel y p a ss / fa i l before t h ey reg' ter for the course. E.xc l u s i ve p a ss/ fa i l courses do n o t meet m ajor or university requ i re ment s w i thout fa cu l t y approval. If a student takes an excl usive p a s s/ fai l course, the s t u de nt ' s individua.l pa s s/fa i l o p t i o n is not affected.

Yes No

The gTades listed below art: not used i n c a l c u l at i n g grade p o i n t averages. I grade point are earned u nder these d es i gnat i o ns . Grade

De�aiptlon

Credit Awarded

p

Pass Fai l

Yes

I n co m p l et e I n Pro g ress

No No No

F

I

IP AU

No

udit \ i th d rawa l Medical Wi thdrawal

WM

CLASS ATTENDANCE assumes that all re g i s t e re d students have freely per ' on a l responsibi.lity for regular class atte n d a nce. Co u r s e gr a des reflec t t he q ua l i ty o f st ud en ts' a c a d emi c perfo r­ mance as a whole, which normally i ncludes regular p a rticipation i n the to ta l class elCpcrience and is eva luated a ccor ding ly. Absence, may lead tv a r e d u ct i o n of a st ude n t 's fi nal g r a d e. In the event of unavoidable absence, s t u dents are ' pec r ed to inform t h e i nstructor. As si g n m e n t of m a ke - up work, if any, is at t he discretion of the instructor. The university

a ccep t e d

0

No

PIISS (P) and Pail ( F ) gradt:;; ar e awarded to students who select the pas./ fail option or I.... ho are enrolled i n e xc l u si v pass/fail cou r es. These grades do not affec t a student's grade po i nt average.

Incomplete ( I )

grades i ndic a te t h a t students did n ot complete their work becal1se of ci rc u m s t ances be yon d their co ntrol. To receive credit, all i n com plete must be c on ve rte d to a p assi n g g rad e within the first six weeks of the fol l Ol-v i ng semester. I ncompl ete g ra d es ulal a r e not co nverted by removal a re hanged to t h e g ra d e indicated by the i n st r uc t o r when t h e i ncomplde was subm itted. An i n co m ple t e is not a permane n t grade. An inc omp l ete does n o t entitle a stud e n t to a t ten d class a gai n wi thou! re- registering.

ACADEMIC HONESTY Both the value a n d the success of any ac ad e m ic ac ti v i t y, as well as of the entire a cad e m i c enterprise, have depe nde d fo r centuries o n the fu ndamental p rinci p l e of a b s o l u t e hon es ty . The u n i ve r s ity expects all its fa cu l t y and students to honor th i s p rin ci p le scrupulous ly.

Medical Withdrawal ( v\ M ) is e ntered when

a co u rse is not completed due to m ed i c a l cause. A med i cal withdrawal do s not a ffe c t a student's g rade point , verage.

In-Progress OP)

Most students make normal academic progress; however, some may from time to t i me be notified that t h ey m ust improve their

The Regist rar's Offi e reserves se eral specia l grad e designations for exceptional c i rcumstances. These special Registrar's Office notatio n s are described below: Description o Grade Submitted n offi c i al Withdrawal

NG UW

Credit Awarded

no

grade ha '

average is be l ow 2 .0, but whose cumulative grade point average i s above 2.0, a re sent n o tices of academic wa rn i ng . No transcript notation is made.

Unofficial Withdrawal ( UW) is a g ra de

en tered by the R gi.st rar's ffice for a student who loes not o fticial ly withd raw from a course.

P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

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H

E

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A

N

U

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I

M idterm Advisory Letters: Warning gra d e lette r ' arc sent to

Academic Warning: Students whose last semester grad e point

been submitted by the established

deadline.

22

The fo l l o w ing terms are used at PLU to desc r i b e such circumstances. Advi ers make reg u l a r contact with academically m argi n a l students, and monitor t h e i r p rogress. g ra d c.s.

students d o i n g "C·," or lower work at mid-semester. Ad v i se r are sent cop ic ' o f the letters w ' d will c ontac t advisees who receive them. No t ra ns cript notation is made of t h is action.

I () o

No Grade e N G) is a t m p ora ry grade e nt e re d by the Re g istra r's O ffice when

student.

ACADEM IC STATUS

signifies progress in a course which normally runs more than one emester to com p letion. In Progress c a rr i es no cred i t u n ti l rep l ac ed by a permanent g r a de .

Grade

Since academ ic d i sho n esty is a serious breach of t h e u n i ve r­ sally recognized co d e of acadcmic ethics, it is every fa cu l ty member's ob l i g ation to i m p o se appropriate sa n ctio ns for any demo n s t r a bl e instance of such m i, co n d u c t on the part of a

V

E

R

S I

T

Probation: St ud en t s are p laced on academic p ro ba t i o n with tra ns c r i pt notation if t heir cu mulat ive grade p o i n t average falls b e l o w 2.0 or if they receive two consecutive semest e r g ra d e po i nt Y


averages b e l o w 2.0. Such students m ust meet w i t h the d i rector of ad ising i ll the fi rst 1 0 days of th�i r probationary semest r to dr, w up an agr ement s pe c i fy i n g actions they will take to im­ pro e t heir academic pe rfo r m a n ce. In the case of fust-semester fre h m a n stud TIts I ith no p r� v io u s college c re di t s , lhe proba­ tion n tat ion wiII be remo ved from the t r a n s c r i p t i f the sub equent . emesta's c u m u lative grade p o i n t a erag.. is , bove 2 .0_ Continued Probation: Pro b a t i o n a r y �t ude n t s whose probat ion ­ dry semeste r g r a d e p , i n t 0. erage is above 2.0, b u t whose cum u lative grade poin t average rem a i n s below 2.0, may be granted a n addit ional semester o f p ro b a t i o n a t the Jiscn:tion o r t h e -omm ittee on AdmIssion and

Retent io n

of S tudents.

Students on co nt i nued p ro b l , t i o n mU t p a r t icipate in the probaTiunary 'eme ·ter plan de c r i b ed :lbov under P robaL io n . Atademic Dismissal: A p robatio na ry tudent who fa i l s

fa

eMn a

cumulat ive g ra de p o i n t aver ge of 2.0 at the end of a p ro b a ti o n ­

ary se m es te r is dIsm issed.

Second. Academic Dismissal: The fails

em

l l m e n t of a s tu de n t who

a 2.0 cumu laLive grade. p o i n t aver age after reinstate­

to earn

m en t i, t e r m i n a t e d .

PROBATIONARY ADVISERS Proba ti o na ry advisers are

with the co n se nt students i n

a

0

a s s ig n e d

by t he d i rectnr of advis i n g

b o t h s t u den t and advise r. T h e y work w i t h

proba t ionary semI? tel", he l p i ng thcm to ide n t i fy the

Certificates Jre m a il ed i n early May t o h i g h sc\1ools fo r p res e n t a ­ t i o n to rec i pie n ts . Tbe g n l l l t i n g of H o n or s ,it E n t ra n ce recog n izes outs t a n d i ng high school achievement a n d a n t icipates s u p e rior performa nce at the u n ivers i t y level. The e a w a rd have no mOIletary v a l ue a n d do n ot co nsti tute acce pt a n ce i n to the H o nor s Program. Graduation Honors: D eg r.. 's w i lh h o n o rs of ctllIl laurie, lIIagna WIll lallcie, and iUlllma wm laude are g ra n te d . A s t u d e n t mlIST earn an J ve r a"f' of 3.40 for C11111 Ill ude, 3 . 70 for magl1a crt m l(lIuie, a nd 3 . 90 fu r s l I mma Cl/ III II/I /de. Physical e d u c a ti o n activities are not L llcluded in tbe determ i n ing of hon ors. Ronor Sodeties: Election to the

-

ta nce CerTler, Counsel i n g and Test ing, e t c . ) for h el p in mak i ng

necessa ry adjustments. Frequent m eet i ngs with s tude n ts are a n

e sen rial pa r t o f the probat ionary adviser's r Ie.

r

gularly enro l l ed, u l l - t i m e s t w 1 e n t ( rwelve h O Ll IS ) is e l i g i ­

ble ru r p a r t i c i p a t iull i n uIl.ivt:rs i t y act i v i t ies. L i m i t a t i o n s o n a st u den t's activities basecl llpoll acade m i c p e rfo r m a n ce may be s e t b y i n dividual sch o o ls, dep a r t ments,

or

llrganilati - n s .

A · t udent

o n acadcllli pro b a t ion i n o t eligib l e for (ertd;,., t io n i n inter­ co l l eg i a t e compt.:t i t i o n and m<1)' be advised to curtail p a r ti­ cipation in other ext ra-curricular activities. CLASSIFICATIONS OF STUDENTS Freshmen: s t udents

h

have mel elltran

requ i rements. opllOm orc$: sL u de nt s who have s a t i5fac tori l y com p l e ted 30 e

hours.

jll/l l o rs: s t u dents who h a v e fi.d filled l o we r division r y u i reillents a n e! h ave sati s fa c tor i l y co m p leted 60 h o u rs. Se niors: s tu d e n t s who have ,a t i s factn r i l )' co m p l eted 90 h o u rs . Gratiuate Sf uderlls: s t u d n t s who h a e m t entrance req u i re­ Illents and have been acc. e pted i n t o the [ iv ision o f Gra d ua te S t u d i es .

Non-Degree IIder mdua tes: undergraduate s tu de n t s who are a t ten d i ng pa r l - t i m e fo r a mJximum of 8 semester hour b u t are n o t o fflc. i a l ly admirted t o a degree program. NOli-Degree Gradllate Students: 'raduate students who are a ten d i ng p a r t - t i m e but are not offic i al l y admit ted to a degree p rogra m. HONORS Honors Program: PL

o ffers its u n iversity H o n o r Program to in chl s$es with equ a l l y cap· b l pee rs. I n c o m i n g fr shmcn may apply f o r J c.o u rse of st u d y t hat includes a m i n i m u m of 26 semester h o u rs o f ho no rs- leve l courses. T h e progranl c<: n ters o n t h e theme " 1 :1 ing Responsibil i t y : Matters of the Mind, Matters o f the He rt," a nd integrates ac a dem i c and experient ial lenr n i ng nppor t u n i t i , \ i t h the o b j c c t i v e of p re par i n g p a rt icip a n ts fo r l i ve s of er ice and sc rva n t leadership. See the HOllOrs Prngralll s ecti o n of this ata.log ror fu r t her detai ls. studenLs see k i n g

m

Arete SOciety is a special

m

toget her w i t h

to the l i b e r a l a rts cord of h igh achievem en t in re l e v a n t co ur e \ o rk. T h is a cade m i honors society was o rga n i ze d in 1 969 b )' Phi B e t a Kappa mem bers of t h e tacul ty. T h e society's fu ndanlen­ tal p u r pose is to e n co u ra g e and recognize e xce l le n t sc.holarsh i p in t h e l iberal arts. E l ec t io n s for m e m be rshi p in t h e society are co nducted by th� faculty fcllow of tlle s o c i e t y each s p r i n g . Both j u n io rs and s en i o rs afr e l i g i bl e for election, a l tho u g h the q u a l i lications fo r ele tion as a j u n io r are m o re s t r i n gen . t u d e. n h m ust have: • a t ta i n ed ,1 h i gh g r a d e point average (for seniors, n o r ma l l y ah we .70; for j u n i or , n o r m a lly above 3_90 ); • campi ted 1 1 0 cred i t h O llrs in l i beral s tudies; • demonst rated the equivalent o f two years o f college work I n

o

a r

C ::>0 m \1\

fo reign l a n guage; •

com p leted on

yea r of c liege mat hematics ( incl uding statist ics

or co m p u te r s ience) or fo u r years of college p re p a ra t or y math­

hool a n d une college mathem t ics c o ur e; and completed a J11 j n i m u m of t h re e sem e tel'S in res id nce at the Wli er · i ty. The u n iversity has c ha p ters l I f a n u m b e r of n ar io nal h o n o r socieLies on c a m p u s , i n c l u d i n g the fo l lowing: · Alpha Psi O m e ga ( I ramal • Bet J a m m <l 'igl11J (Business) • 1u P h i E ps i l o n ( M usic) • Pi Kappa D · l ta ( Fllrensics) • O m i c r o n Delta Epsilon ( l�o n o m i cs ) • Sigma T h e t a Tau ( u rs ing)

ematic in high

ELIGIBI LITY FOR STUDENT ACI' I V ITIES An,

l> o

recogn it ion of a st ud en t's comm i t ment

p roble m s whi c h con t r ibute to t h e i r poor 5ch Iar h i p . They are

encouraged to refer st u d e n ts to other offices (A a lemic ,. sis­

l> ,...

a spec i a l ac.ademic challengc

Honors at Entranc.e: Th ese honors are c o n fe rred aL Ope n i n g 0 1 1 the m0st h ighly qual i fieu e n t c r i n g fr s h m e n .

Undergraduate (1eUows: A l i m i ted number o f Undergraduate Fellows ar :lppointed a n n u a l l )'. These appointments are giveD to o u tsLanding - en io r students with a \Tjew To e n c o u rag i n g rec i p i ­ ents to on si der college t aching as a mrecr·. An u n dergradu;]tc fello\ is gilren a variety of oppo r t u l1 i tie_� to sam p le t h e profcs­ sional life and work of a fac u l t y member in his or her major discipline. A t u it i o n c r>u i t acc.o m pa nies r h e appoinlment. CREDIT B Y EXAMINATION (CHALLENGE)

St ucknls are

p e r m i t te d , w i t h u l L i m i ts, to o b t a i n cr(',i i t by exa m i­

n a t i o n Il1 l it:u of regu l a r enro l lment and class atte ndance. No

more l ha n 30 semt:ster h o u rs

m a , b e c o u n te d toward g rad ua­ t h e Co l l e ge Level E x a m i n a t ion Program o r any ha exam i nati on. Exceptioru. t o t h i s r u l e fo r ce r t a i n gTOUpS of stude n t� o r programs may be made, subject to recom menda­ tion by the Educational Po l i c i e s Commitke and approval b, t he ia cuI t y. Crc-J i L by e x, m i oil L ion i open to fo rmally admit ted, reg u l a r stat ll� s t u dents o n l y and Joel> not COLillt toward the

tion, wh e t he r fr

m

residency requ i remen t for grad ua t io n .

1() re,eiv c re di t by eXJ minal i

HI,

s t udent·

m u st·

co m p l e t e

a

Cred i t ST' EXJ m inati on Registrat i o n Form avai lable in the

Student Se rv ices

enter, o b ta i n t h e

ig na t u r t' of the resp ct ivt:

depart ment chair or dea n , and arra nge for the exa m in a t io n w i t h t h e a p p ropriate instructor. The completed fo rm must be

re t u rned to the 'It u d e n t Services n t e r before L he examinaLion i ' t aken. Grades for credit by exa m i na t io n w i l.l be submitted by the in. t ructur along \ i th all o t h e r grades at th end of the term. CL P general ex,) m i nat ion. are given el ec t i e credit only. T he va r i ou s schools, d ivisions, a n d departments determi ne the pee i-

Convoca t i o n

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Y

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VI W

w

v o a: D.. v

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Q ct V «

fic CLEP subject examinations which may fulfill requirements for majors, programs, or general u n iversity requirements in their respective academic areas. These exam inations are subject to recommendations by the Educat ional Policies Com m i ttee and approval by the fa culty. The m i n i m u m passing level for CLEP examinations taken at Pacific Lutheran University is the fiftieth percentile. CLEP red its granted by other universities, colleges, and community colleges, which are earned before entrance, are honored by Pacific Lutheran University. The application o f those credits toward majors, programs, and general university requirements is consistent with school, divisional, and depart­ ment policies and standards. The university does not grant credit for college level GED tests.

NON-CREDIT INFORMAL STUDY "[ 0 encourage liberal learning of all kinds, over and beyond enrollment in cou rses leading toward formal degrees, the wliversity offers a variety o� opportun ities for informal study: Guest of University Status: Teachers and officials of other institutions, visiting scholars and artists, and other professional p rsons who wish to use university facilities for independent study may apply to the provost fo r cards designating them as uests of the University. Such persons, in their use of facilities, will defer to the needs of stu dents and faculty members. Audlting Coorses: To audit a course i s to enroll, w i th the perm ission of the instructor, on a non -credit basis. An auditor is encouraged to participate fully in class activities but is not held accountable for examinations or other written work and docs not receive a grade. If the instructor approves, the course may be entered upon the transcript as "Audit." With the approval of the in tructor or the department, the student may gain credit for an audited course by passing an exa mination set by the instructor or the departmen t. Audit fees are the same as credit fees.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS In addition to meeting the entrance requirement in fo reign language (two years of high school language, one year of college language, or demonstrated equivalent proficiencyL candidates i n t h e College of Arts and Sciences (all B.A., B.S., B.A.Rec., B.A.P.E., and B.S.P.E. degrees) must meet option 1, 11, or III below: I. Completion of one foreign language through the second year of college level. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of fo ur years of high school study in one foreign language or by satisfactory scores on a proficiency examina­ tion adm i n istered by the PLU Department of Languages and Literatures. I I . Completion through the first year of college level of a foreign language other than that used to satisfy the fo reign language entrance requirement. This option may also be met by satisfactory scores on a proficiency examination administered by the PLU Department of Languages and Literatures. I I I . Four semester hours in history, literatu re, or language (at the 20 I level, or at any level in a language other than that used to satisfy the fo reign language entra nce requ i rement) in addition to courses applied to the general un iversity requ ire­ ments, and fo ur semester hours in logic, mathematics ( courses nu mbered 1 00 or above), computer science, or statistics in addition to cou rses applied to the general university requirements. High school languages used to satisfy any of the above options must have been completed with grades of C or higher. Courses used to satisfy either category of Option 1II of the College of Arts and Sciences requirement may not be used to satisfy general university requirements. Any college-level fo reign language course n u mbered 201 or above used to satisfy Option I

Visiting Classes: Members of the academic community are encou raged to isit classes which in terest them. No fee is charge for the p r ivilege. Because regularly enrolled students m ust be given first consideration, persons desiring to visit classes a re required to ask permission of the instructor. Visitors are guests of the classes and must conduct themselves accordingly. GRADUATION Students expecting to ful fi l l degree requirements WITHIN THE A DEMIC YEAR ( including ' ugust) are requi red to file an app lication for graduation with the Office of the Registrar according to the following: DEGREE COMPLETION

BACHELOR'S PEADLINE

MASTER'S DEADLINE

December 20, 1 996 January 3 1 , 1 997 May 23, 1997 August 22, 1 997

September 20, 1 996 September 20, 1 996 December 6 , 1 99 6 May 2, 1 997

October I I , 1 996 October 1 1 , 1 996 February 1 4 , 1 997 June 20, 1 997

There are fo ur degree-completion dates ( third summer session, end o f fal l semester, January, and spring semester) . Degrees are formally conferred a t August, December, and May commence­ ments. Students with January degree dates are expected to take part i n the December commencement. The actual date of grad uation will be recorded on the permanent records. Students who plan to transfer back to Pacific Lutheran University for a degree ( math, physics, engineering programs) must apply for graduation before or du ring the first semester of their j u nior year so that deficiencies may b e met before they lea e cam pus.

24

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and any completion of college-level language through 1 0 2 used to satisfy Op tion II may also be used to satisfy the Perspectives on Diversity requ i rement in Cros�-Cultural Perspectives. Candidates for the B. A. in English, for the B A i n Educatjon with concentration in English, for the B.A. in Global Studie , for the B . B .A. in International Business, and for election to the Arete Society mus t meet Option I above.

WRITING THROUGHOUT THE CURRICULUM Pacific Lutheran University is a commn n i ty of scholars, a comm unity of readers and writers. Reading informs the intellect and liberates the imagination. \,\/ri ting pervades our academic lives as teachers a.nd students, both as a way of ommunicating what we learn and J S a means of shaping thought and ideas. Our emphasis on literacy begins with courses designed to fulfill the un iversity writing requirement, courses in which students learn to use various kinds of academic and personal writing, to read different kinds of texts more effectively, and to organize the powers o f clear thought and expression. Y

_


The un ive r si y's commitment to excel l e nt writing is reflected in the Writing enter, where trained t udent consultants from a v ar i e ty of disciplines h el p students f varying abilities by reading and resp o u d i n g to papers still in draft. A l l faculty m e mb e rs share the r es p onsibi l it y for improving the l i t era c y o f their s t u d en t s . Fa c u lt y i n every department and school make writing an essential part of their cou rses and show students how to ask questions a p p rop r i a t e to the kinds of reading done in their fields. Students wr ite both fo r m al papers and reports and i n formal n o tes and essays i n order to master the content and methods of the various disciplines. They are en coura ged to prepare i m p o r t a nt papers in multiple drafts. Bec a use errors are a d i s t rac t i o n and a symptom of carelessness in all disciplin s, s t u d e n t s in all courses are ex p e cted to observe t h e conven tions of fo rmal E n g l i sh in their finished work. B u t l iteracy is m o r e than correctness. t Pacific Lutheran Un i ve rsi ty readi n g and writing are part of the process o f l i beral education.

2. One of Two Alternative Cores: Core l or Core n Co re I: The Dist ributive Core (32 h o u rs) a. A r ts/Literature (8 hours , 4 from each line) 1. Art, Music, o r T he atre 2. Literature ( English or Languages) b. Philosophy (4 hours) c. Re l i g i o u s S tudies (8 ho u rs, 4 from each o f 2 lines) 1. Biblical Studies 2. Christian Th o u gh t, H is tor y, and Experience 3 . I n te g r a t ive and Comparative Religious Studies NOTE: Transfer stlldcl7ts cmering as juniors or seniors are required to take 4 semester hOllrs of religioll (from lines ) or 2) unless prese nt i ng 8 tmllsfer hours of religioll frVIII other accredited colleges or uni versities.

d. Social Sciences (8 h o urs , 4 from each l ine) 1. A n t hrop o l ogy, H i sto r y, and Political Science 2. Economics, Ps ycholo gy, S oc io lo gy, and Social Wo rk e. Natural Sciences, Co m p u ter Science, Mathematics (4 ho u rs)

The university is com m i tted, in p r i n ciple as well as h i s to ri c al l y, to

p rograms. Accordingly, i n addition to fulfilling certain m i n i m u m requirements, all undergraduate students must satisfactorily complete all general u n iversity requirements.

Thi! Exmn ined Life: 1I1to Uncertainty and Beyond

-

-

-

n

o n

m

o c ;IC

m III

The Integrated Studies Program (28 h o u rs) a. INTG I l l , 1 1 2 The Idea o f Progress (8 hours) b. Fou r 200-level ISP c o u rse s ( 1 6 hours). N o rm a l ly taken i n the second and third years. M a y i nc lude a pp rove d p rogram of s tudy abroad. Students select fou r cou rses subject to approval of the [SP o m mittee. c. [NTG 3 5 1 : The Concluding Sem i n a r ( 4 hours)

p rovi d i ng a strong liberal arts b a se for all its baccalaureate d e gree

The freshm an year core p rovides a s u p p o r t ive l y c h all c ng i n g context in which to begin the quest for, and adventure of, a l a rge r vision or life. Univeri ity ed ucation is aboLlt m o re than ski l ls; at PLU i t i s Jbout l iberating students fo r critical and c o m m it t d l ivi ng, combining wel l - d e ve lop e d critical capacities with co m p as sio n a n d vision fo r service, in a multicultu ral, ideologically p l u ra .! wo rld . In add i t i on to orientation and advising programs, the fresbman year i s c o m p o sed of t h ree courses. One of the two se m i n a rs must be taken in the student's first semester. Fresh­ man year core req u i rements must be compl eted d u r i n g the s tudent's fre hman year. I A. Inquiry Seminar: Writillgfor Discovery (4 ho u rs ) These seminars focus o n w r i t i ng, thinking, speaking, a n d re ad i ng . They i nvolve writing as a way o f t h i n king , of learn­ ing, and of d iscovering and ordering idcas. Ta u gh t by fac u l t y in any d ep a r t m e n t or scho ol , these sem inars a re o rga n i ze d aro u nd topics that engage s t u d e n t s a nd fa cu l ty i n d i a l o gu e and p rovide th e o p portuni t y t o examine issues from a variety of perspectives. NOTE.' rredits ea r n e d by Adval/ccd Placement-English do I/ot ,ati5fy this req uirement, th o r/gh they may be used for elective credit. Students with officially transcripted c ollege writing courscs, ineludil1g those ill Washillgtol1 State'; R llnnil1g S ta r t progra ll1, a re nOllaheless eligible to enroll in the writil1g seminar for credit, or they may choose tn use their p re v ivlIs crcdit� tv satisfy the writil1g semil1ar reqllirement. 1 B. Inq u i ry Semin a r: Critical Convers a t ion (2 h o u rs ) These sem inars involve l e a rn i ng how to participate in the exchange of ideas through the ex p e rie n c e of a r t i c u l a t ing que tions, l i s ten i ng for meaning and nuance i n what others write and say, seeing ideas and p o s i t i o n s in context, arguing, moving to consensus, and living with conflict. Like the l A writing seminars, these seminars are taug h t b y faculty from variou s departments and schools. All are n u mbered 1 17119 i n their res pecti ve d e pa r tm e n ts . When taught in

:l> o m

Core II:

General University Requirements

SPECIFIC REQllREMENTS - All BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 1. The Freshma.n Year Program

:l> n

3. Mathematical ReasoniIlg (4 h o u rs) A c o u rs e in mathematics or a pplic a ti o n s o f math em a ti c s , with emphasis on n u merical and I.ogical reaso n i ng and o n using appropriate m e th ods to fo rmulatc and so lve p roblems. T h is requ irement may be satisfied b y any 4 ho ur s from mathemat­ ics (except Math 91 or M a t h 99) or b)' Com p u ter Science l I S or by Statistics 2 3 1 . This re q u i re m e n t may abo be satisfied by the completion ( w it h at least a B average) of the equ ivalent of 4 years of college preparatory m a t h em a ti cs ( thro u gh ma t h e ma t i ca l an a lys is or ca l c u l u s or e q ui va l e n t ) . ­

4. Science and the Scientific Metbod (4

hours)

A sc ie n ce co u rse t h a t teaches the methods of science, illus­ trates its a p p l i c a t i o ns and lim itations, and includes a labora­ tory component. At least one of the courses taken to meet l ine 4 o r 2 (Core I , e ) must b e a co u rse in which the s u bject is natural sciences, i.e., p hys i c a l o r biological sc i en ce . 5.

WritiIlg Requirement (4 hours) All s tudents must c o mp l e te an approved, 4-credit-hou r writing course. Freshmen satisfy this re q u i re m e n t through the Inquiry Seminar: Writing for Discovery.

6.

Perspectives On Diversity (6-8 h o u rs) A course i n each o f the following two lines. The o n ly 2-hour

courses that can satisfy ei ther of the foll owi n g l i nes c o m p l e te l y are the fresh man Critical Conversation seminars ( 1 B ) . a . AiteTIJotive Perspectives (2-4 h o u rs): A COllJse which creates an awareness and understanding o f diversity in t h e United States, d i re c t l y addressing i ssues such as et h n i c it y, gender, disability, racism, or poverty. b. Cross-CuLtural Perspectives (2-4 hours): A course that en­ hances cross-cultural u n derstandings through exam i nation o f other cultures. This requ iremen t may be satisfied in one o f three ways: (i) a course focusing on the cu l t u re of non-Euro-American soc ie t ies ; (ii) a 201 or h i g h e r- l eve l course in a language used to sa t isfy the admission r equi re ­ ment, or 8 credits in a l a n gua ge n o t previously studied; or ( i i i ) participation i n a n approved semester-long study abroad program.

NOTE: 2-4 hours of Perspectives on Diversity courses may be used to fulfill another core rCl]uireme1lt. The remaining 4 hOllrs must be a

Janua ry, these seminars are 4 hours.

I e. Freshman January Term (4 hours) A .Olll" s e that fulfills one of the other core requ ir e m e nts (lines 1-4 and 6), des i g ne d both for freshman students and

course that does not simultaneously fulfill any other core require­ ment. These 4 hours may, however, satisfy a requirement in tire

major. Junior and senior tra nsfer studetlts shall either take oue

to take advantage o f the format of the January term.

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Perspectives

on Diversity course (4 credit hOI4T5)

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at PLU that does

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VI w a:: :J C w

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u

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS AND LIMITATIONS - ALL

p 'rspectivlIs and cross-cultllTll l perspectives lillcs oftfle requlremellt.

listings o f r e q u i re me n t · are semeste r h o u rs. )

7. Pbysical Education (4 hours) Four d i fferent PF activity co u rses, i nclu di n g PE 1 00. ne l o u r o c red i t may b e e a rn e d rh ro ugh a p p ro ved sports partici pa­ tion. All act i v i l ic. are grad d o n tht' basis of • Pa ' 5, or Fa i l . 8 . Senior Seminar/Project ( 2- 4 ho u rs a s d e s ig na ted b y t h e a c a de m ic u n i t of the student'· ma'or) A substaJuial p r oj ec t , paper, practi c u m . or i n ternship t ha t c u l m i n a tes a n d adva nces t h e p rogram of an academic major. Th end prod u c t m ust be prese nted to a n open a udience ,l nd c r i t i c a l l )' e v a l u a ted b y faculty in the student's field. WiUl approval of the student's

c

s t on e co u rses such

m ajor department, i n terdiscipl i n ar y

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES: ( Al l c red i t ho u r. referred to i n

1 . Totlll Hours

(Jlld Climulative GPA. : A m i n i m u m of 1 28 seme ter hours must be co mple t ed wilh a grade p oint average of 2.0 ( 2.50 in the cho Is of B u s i ness and Ed ucat i n ) . 2. Upper Division COllrses: A m i n im u m of 40 semester h u u rs must be co mpleted from co u rses nu m b e red 300 or above.

Cou rses (rom two-year ins t i t u t. io n" are not con sidered upper d ivision regardless of s u bject matter p a rallels. At Ie, st 20 of

40 se m es te r hours o f u pp e r d ivi s i o n work m u s t at PLU. 3. Filla l Yea/' ill Residence: Tbe final 32 se meste r h o u rs o f a s rude n l's program mll t be co m pleted irl residence at P LU. the m m i rn ll m

b l;' taken

No t r a nsfer cred i t rna)' be appli e d d u ri ng a st u de n t's flllai 3 2

the I ntegra ted Stud ies "onclu d i n g Seminar, the G l obal S t ud ies Semin· r, or the !-lo- n o r s Progm llJ haJlenge e m i n a r ma)' fu Hi l 1 t'his req u i remen t.

ca

c{ v <t

nol simultaneously fulfi" ullotlter getleral ulliversity requirement, or

tlley shall sllow t/lOl riley lIave satisfied bC/rlJ tire alternalive

as

U"derslO/I(/j,,�s Re�lIrdil!gAll Requirements.

ho u r s i n

a n d srm

courses Iilal coUflt for tlrese requirements. (2) For " ,ose lil/es of ti,e corr IVf,;ch refer to act/Jem ie disciplilles or UI/its, selected CO/Jrses outside Ihose /J/lils II/ay COIIII' for the req1lirellle1l1 whell approved IIotil by 'he

II"its and by lire cOlI/mittee overseeing Ih" core requiremellts. III ..

. .....DP!

� �� -

\.

deg Tee progra m . (Special p rogr a m s su ch a s 3- 1 , 3 - 2 ter a n d January term exchange st udy a re excluded

from this l i m i tat i o n . )

(1) Com/Jlt particular

deparllllelltal secl;olls oflite catalog ior detailed specificatioJl of

:l

'

4. Academic tv[ajor: m a o r m u t be co mp l e t ed as detailed by each sc h oo l or depart ment. At ica;;t 8 semester h o urs m ust be lal<en in resi dence. 5. Grades Jor {ajar O l t r5 es : ALI cou rses counted toward major or minor must be completed w i t h g rad es o' - or higher a n d with a cu m u l at ive grade p o i n t average of 2 . 0 o r h igher i n those c urses. D partments, divisions, or schools may set h i g her g ra d e req u i rements . 6. ,)4 Hour Lilllit: ot more than 44 ho u rs e,lrned in one d pa rtme nt may be applied to the B.A., B., . , B.A.P.E., B.A. Rec., or B.S. P.E. deg ree . 7. Mllsic Ellsemble : on-muj m aj o r may co u n t toward gnlduation requirements not more than 8 semes re r h o u rs in m us i

.nsembles.

'orrespolJdencelExfi'l/sioll Cou rses: A ma: ' l11 u m of 24 h o u rs in accredited correspondence or extension st u d ies may be c red it e J toward degree r.:qui rement , con t i n g e n t on approval by the regisrrJ r. 9 . COlTl l1l u n i ty allege Cou rses: maxi m u m of 64 h O ll. r w i l l b e accepted b y transf, r (rom a n accr d i t e d com mun I t y college. IJ com m u n i ty col lege co u rses a re tra ns[ened as lower d iv ision c red i t. 10. Physical EilI/Ciltio l1 CO ll/,ses: No m o re thJ.n eight I - ho u r phy s i ca l t' d uca t i o n at.:t ivity cou rses may be coun ted toward 8.

grad uat io n .

1 1 . Foreign La nguage Requ irel1lel 1 t: All ca ndidates for B.A., B. S ., nA P. E . , B.A.Rec . • o r B.S. P. E. degrel!s m u t com p l dt� o ne of three o p t ions i nvolving a fo rei gn la nguage or specified a l t e rnative. Sel;! u n d e r College oJ Art�· al1d Scienc s.

IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE he fresh m a n writing se m i n a r requiremmt appl i es to a l l fresh­

man stll ents who

J

The freshm a n

man

ntered beg i n n i ng fa l l 1 994.

n ua r

t I'm requi remen t appl ies to aU fresh­

students who entered be g i n n i n g fal l

1 994 . on ersation r"qu i remelll who e n te re d begi nni ng Fall 1 995.

applies to all

The fresh ma n C r i t ical freshm a n student

The Natural

eienees, C om p u te r Science, and Ma h (4 hou rs) ,

Matht'm t ical Reaso n i ng S c ie n t i fic 1 et h od

(4 h our�) , Jnd C'ie nce and the

(4 hours)

re qu i rem e n ts apply to all freshmen who entered heg i n n i n g full 1 995, and h a l l be I m p leme n ted fo r

all tra.nsfa s t u d e nts who enter b egin ni n g fall 1 996.

The Pcr� p ec t i ve:. on Diversit req u i rement app l i es to a l l fresh man student. who entered beg i n n i ng fal l 1 994, to a l l j u nior

a nd se n i o r tra nsfer s t u de n ts who enter beg i n n m g fa ll 1 996. and to a l l o t h e r t ansfer .udents begi n n i n g fa l l J 995. The S ni

I'

Seminar/Project r quireme nt a pp l ie

to a l l

fres h m a n s t u de n t s who entered beginn i ng fal l j 994, to a l l J u nio r

anJ senior tram�'r s t u den ts who �nt r bq� i n n i ng fal l 1 996. a n d

t o a l l o t h e r transfer s t udents w h o entered beginning

26

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c '" CI � '" m

» z c n

o c � III '"

o

" " '" � z CI III

-

Degree & Course Offerings Degrees Offered

Academic Structure CoUege of Arts and Sciences Divis,oll

j Humanities

o

Division of Social Sciences

Bachelor's Degrees

Anthropology

Languages and Literatures

Ec nomic,

Ilachelor of Science

P h i l osophy

History

Bachelor of A r t s in

Religion

Marriage and Family Therapy

English

Division

of NalUrul Sciellces

Po l i tical

Sciene

Biology

Psychology

Chemistry

So c io l og y and Social Work

Computer Science

Master's Degrees

Bachelor of Art,

Bachelor of Arts in Edoca tio n

Ed ucation Education

w i t h l n i r iul Certific l ion

Physical

Master of A rts in S o cia l

Educa t i o n

Sciences

Master of Bl15i ness

Bachelor of A r t s i n Recrea t i o n Bachelor of Business

Ad m i n i s t r a t i o n

Ad m i n i s t T a t i o n

Ba chelo r o f ! ' i n c i\rts

E n g i n eering

Ba che l or

Geoscience�

Bachelor o f Music Education

Master o f Science i n

u rsing

A

R

o f Music

Mathematics

Bac h el o r of Musical

Physics

Bachelor of Science

School of the Arts

Master of rts in Master of rt- i n

Arts in ursing

Bac h el o r I f cience in Ph)" i al Education

Art Co m m unication and Theatre Music

School of Business School of Education School of Nursing School of Phy icaJ Education

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21


V\ a::

Majors

o Z

A n t hropo l o g y

Bache10r of Arts ( B.A.) .'\ rt

VI a::

o

Bus iness

E n v i ro n m l.:T 1 t a l S t u e t i e;..

Prench

Re lig i o n

Chemist ry

Geosciences

Gt.' oscie.Jlct,if,

Sca n d i n a v i a n A rea

C h i n cs e S t w l i c ,

German

Pol i t i c a l Sciencc

Ch c m i s t r y

C( }nl 111l!ll/C<] t i ()I}

CritiC/if COll1lflllllinH;ol1 Stlid,es Prill f IH rol/c/C(/-,( jOllr!I{! /;S111

Poli t i c a l Stil'nct

S o c i a l "Vo r k

I Io nors

Suc.i()i()gy

b..: o n o m ics

,,,J a t h e m a t i c s

Spanish

Educa t i o n

I n rn r n l a t iol1 Scil'llce

Tllel/trc

P h i losof,hy

P u b l i c i\ tTl i rs So c io l ogy

Cross J);gipliflary StIldie. English (/�, r/ S(:'(olld LongudSc J.?cudiflg Sp,'ulli LdIlCll t i( !ll

Bachelor of Science ( B.S.) P h ysi c s

F n gi n c e r i n g S c i e nce (3 - 2 )

Biology

G l' O S C i t.' Il Ct'S

C o rn p l i l c r E n g i n e e r i n g

P h ysics

COlll p u t c r S c i e n ce

Ps yc h ( ) l o g y

C h c l11 / S t r y

E n gl i sh Lirt"l/,a fl ln: f>lIh/is/'illg oud Priiltins /\rfi; \ \/rh ill5Z

IvI a t h e m a t ics

Bachelor of Arts in Education ( B.A.E.)

l':;yL i w l ogy

C u m p u te r Science

Music

No rw e g i a n

Hd i�i o n

l .a t l 1l

S I' ;] ll i ,h

Sp ecial Ed uca t ion

l egal <;t u d i ('\ :vb t h c ll1:l t i c

(No n- Teachin g )

N o rv,'· c gi a n I' h i l o , o p h )

S U l i.�l ics I hca w:

Physical Education

Wo men 's

AII , w lles COll/ iJm);

French

P h y sics

Art

(;crman

Pol i t i c.ll S c i t'nce

B i o klgy

Histury

Psye h ( ) \ ugy

Jo u rna l i s m l .at i n ivi a t h e lll a t i c s

Ch e m i s t r)'

D ra m a Ea r L h Sciences

Ec( ) n o m ic s

DlItlce

/:xcrL ;iC S'(fellCC Hell""

COURSE NUM BERlNGS ] 00-299 Lower Divisi" l l Cou rses:

S(jcial S t u d ie,

se n ior) u n l ess o t h erwise � pc c i fied. · A lso open to grad L l a t e

S p ew i s h

E n gl i s h

Non'\'cgian

Special Education

English / La.l1guagc /\rts

P h ys i ca l Educa t i o n

Spcech

s t ud e n t s ,

SOO-59Y GradU!1fe Cou rses: �orma l l y o p e n to grad l la t e students If, d u ri n g t h e l a s t �c.:: l11 t' s l cr o f t he sen i o r ),ea r, a ca n d i da te for a b"ccalaurca tl� degree fi n d s it pOSSib l e to co m plete a l i degree req u i r emen ts w i t h a reg i st r d t i o n of fcw� r t h a n 1 6 s�m.:s te r h ou r s o f u n dergrad ua t e cred i t , reg i s t ra t i o n for g rad uMt· c re d i t is p e r m i s s i b le. However, t h e t o t a l regist rat i,; n /{)[ u n dergra d u a t e req u i tTl11 e n t s a n d e l � c t ive g r a d u;l tt' '-t'ed i t sha l t n u t e'\ce�d 1 6 semester h o u rs d u r i ng the se mester. A mem orandu ill stJting thal all h,l Ccala u rcate rcq u.i reme n ls a re heing met d u r i n g the c u rre n t semester m ust b e i n e d by t h e appropriate department chair o r school deJ n a n d presen ted to t h e de,\!1 of gradmlte st udies a t the t i m t! o f such regis t ratio n . Tb i s [<::g i st r;lti.un dues nl )t apply toward a h igher degree u n less it is later ap proved by lhe stu d e n t's adviser a n dlo r ad vi sory comm i t tee, o n l y.

Bachelor of Business Administration ( B.B.A.)

COllccl1trtltions in.-

j\!l arkt, t i ng Rcsoun..:e :V I�! nagl' m c n t

New Venture Management Operatiun:, nnd I n iornlal ion

Accounting Human Resource Ma n agement I n tl'rn�1 t j ( ) n a l Busine.}.'>

I;:n l rcprenclirsh ip a n d

Tec h n u losy

Bache10r of FiDe Arts ( B.F.A.)

Art

Communicat ion ( B roadcas ti ng, Theatre)

BncheLor of Music ( B.M.) Cnmpos i t i o n

Org" n

( Band )

i(- 1 2 I n ,t r u lllen lal ( O rches t r a )

Bachelor of Musical Arts ( B.M.A.)

Mu�ic

EXPLANATION OF SYM BOLS

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)

Most cou rses hay the value of 4 sem ester ho urs. Pa ren t h t i cal n um bers i m m edia tely after the c o u rs e d e s c ri pt io ns i n d icate t he ,em ester h() u r cred i t given.

Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education (B.S. P.£') COllcnIt rt7tio-ns in: anJ

rit n(;SS

Other symbols a r expla i ned

I

Managemen t

II

Pre-therapy

[, II [ Il

Complementary Majors

J

,I oha l Studies

Wome n's S tu d ies

S

as

fo llows:

COllrse alTered first sel l/ ester Co u rse ojjenJd secolld semester Co urse offered first o n d second sCllt,,-, fer if I St:q ll�lIce Co u rse offered eitllt n semes ter Corme offered m the IOll lta ,-y [ u r n Calllw affl'rcd ill the SlImmer Course alTered in a itefnare years CO llfse offered i r l a/temate S U l1I lIlefS

aly als G Co u rse /rwy be u sed i/l gradudl c progra ms

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M ost l isted co u r·es are offered every yea r. A system of a J teTmti ng u pper d ivision courses is practiced in some uepa rtmen ts, thereby assu ri ng a broa der C Ll Iriculum. The u niversit)' reserves the rigllt to mod ify spe.c i fi( co u rs e r� q L l i r<:'me n lS , to u i scon li n ue classes i n w hich t h e regis rat ion i s regarded as insu lIicien l. and to w ith draw cour es .

Bachelor of Music Education ( B.M.E.)

Exercise S c i e n c e

COllr es

COURS.E OFFERINGS

VO Ice

K- 1 2 C horal K- 1 2 Instrumental

NOTffi Lower ,"'ivi�lolI stlld,,"ts may ellroll /" IIpper dil,i.iou

prereqllisit�5 Jllu'e beell met.

I n strllmcnt.al

P jilIlO

m ay b e consi dereu pnrt o f ,1. gra d u ate program

g r a d u a t e s t u d y.

RCl're'l t i o l1

Pro fessional

and

p rov i ded they a rc n ot specltI c rcq,l I fe me n ts i n p re p a r a t i o n for

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation ( B.A. Rec.)

l�i l l a n(i<.l! Rt'S(nlrc<.:� �vL.l nagt'rnt'Il t

to rr� s h ll1t'i1 a n d

JOO-iJYY Upper D i vtsiOII Cou rses: Gen e r a l l y o p e n til j u n i o rs and

Sociology

{usie

. pen

s o p h o m ores u n less u th er w i s e rest ricted.

Science

B chelor of Arts in Physical Education (B.A.P.E.) PhySical Ed u c a t l <1 n

28

Stu dies

ill:

A n t h ropology

Hea l t h

Phy"ics

l-J i s t o r y

C o rn nl u n i c a t i o ll

S t u d ies

Fllhli( Rell/ /iol/S

Majors

Fre n c h

C l uh,,1 Stu,b,'s l;r�ck I J i ,to r y

German

l-f..lIfl1l "'1.1 Fillies> MIIIUlgcmcnt J?f'ttt:'lItio ll !:i{l<Irls i\llntllli, / nll io l i

,1., a Seco nd

La nguage

i3 i o l o g y

Engl i, h

C h i n es e S t u d i e s CI.1.sics

I\ rl

i'sych.olo;;y

EC( ) I H) rn i c s

B i ol o g y

1\['[11 ied

Fngl i.,h

A n t h ro p o l ogy PhysICS

COIn p u l e r S c ie n ce

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Anthropology Anthropology as a d iscip l i n e tries to b ring all of the world's people: i n t o h u ma n focus. Though anthropology does look at s to n es and bones," it also exami nes the poli­ tics. medicines, fa m i l ies, arts, a nd re l igio ns of pe oples and cui l1res i n variou p l a c e s and t i m es This makes the s t ud y "

.

or anthropology a complex

task,

for

it

involves

aspects of

many disciplines, from geol ogy and biology to art and p syc h o l ogy.

Re ga rd less of the specific area that is studied, the es­ of a nthropology is the observation o f different p e oples and cult ures-s t u dying them as t h e y really are i n ­ tea d of how people think they are or s ho u l d b e . I t i s through t h is de ta ile d s t u dy of all people that we gain the fu ll p i c t ure of \ hat i t really m e a n s to be human. Anthropology is composed of four fields. Cultural o r se nce

social anthropology stud ies living human c ultures i n

orde r to create a cross- cultural understanding of human beha ior. A rchaeology has th s a me goal, but us es data from the p hys i c a l re mains of th e past c ul t ure to rea ch it. Li n g uis t i a n t h ropo lo g y studies h u man l a ngl.lage to d i sc ver what it can tell about the h u m an past and behav iors in the present. P hysical anthropology stud i e the emer­ gence and subsequent biological adapt ations of hum an i t y as a s pe CI es .

'--

FACULTY: Brusco. Chair; Ci JlnamOn, Guldin, Huelsbeck, Klein, assiste 1 by Gargano- Ray and Stoner.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester ho urs. Required: 1 0 2, 1 03 , 480, 490. Choose: 1 0 1 or 1 04; fo ur hours from 3 3 0-345 (peoples c o u rses ) ; fou r hours frol11 350-465 ( topics courses ) ; eight additional h o u rs

in an thropology, at least fo ur of which must be above 32 1 .

MINOR: 20 seme ter hours . Req uired: 1 02 . hoose: 1 0 1 o r 1 0 3 or 1 04; fou r hours from cou rses l isted 330-345; fou r hours from 3 5 0-490; and four additional hour i n

anthropology. DEPARTMENTAL HONORS: In recognition of outstanding wo rk, the designa tio n with Departmental HOllors m a y b e granted by vote of the ant h ropology faculty based on the student's per­ formance in the following areas: 1. An t h ropology course work: 3.5 m inimum g.p.a. 2. Demonstration of active interest in anthropological project� and activities outside o f class work. 3. Completion of a senior thesis. A paper describing indepen­ dent research must be conducted u n (ie"r the supervision of departmental faculty. A proposal must be approved by the faculty by the third week of class of the fal l semester for May and summer graduate , and the third week of class of the spri ng semester for December graduates.

Course Offerings 1 0 1 Exploring Anthropology: Monkeys, Apes, & Humans Introduction to hi logical anthropology with a special focus on human evolution, the fossil evidence fo r human development, the role of culture in human evolution, and a comparison with the development and social l i fe o f the non-h um an primate�. (4) 1 02 Exploring Anthropology: CultUl'e and Society I ntroduction to social-cultural anthropology and cultural lin­ guistics. concentrating OIl the exploration of the infinite variety o f human endeavor in all aspects o f . ul ture and all types of societies; from to ol- lI1J.king to la nguage, religion, politics, law,

warfare, fam ily, kinship and art; from h un ters and gatherers to industrialists. Fulfills cross- ultural line in the Perspectives on Diversity require m e n t . (4) 103 Exploring Anthropology: Archaeology and Prehistory Introduction to the ideas and practice of archaeology used to examine the sweep of human prehi tory from the earl iest stone tools to the devel opment of agricu lture and metallurgy and to enrich our u nderstanding of extinct societies. Local :lrchaeologi ­ ca l sites w i l l be exa m i ned. (4) 104 Exploring Anthropology: Language and Symbols I ntroduct i o n to anthropological l inguistic. ,md symbol ism. An overview o f the nature of h u man la nguage , i ncludi ng the origin of language; sound s)'stems, st ructure and meaning; language acquisition; the social context of spc(lking; language change; nonverbal commun ication; and s x d i fferen ces in la nguage us�. Exploration of the wider is ues of symbolic communicat ion: how symbols order the world and how tra nsactions i n m a n i ng can be seen as forms of social action. (4)

l> Z --t :J:

'" o

." o r-

o CI -<

192 Practicing Anthropology: Makah Culture Post and Present The Makah ation is located on the Northwest portion of the Olympic Pe ninsula in Was hington S l ate. The Tribe has <In a c t i ve culture research program and archaeological, h ist rical and an thropological resea rch also have shed light on the Makah way of l i fe over the last 3,000 years. This class will stud), Makah cul­ ture and contribute to a IVlakall Cul t ur and Research Center proj ect. Par t of the month-Io llg class will be spen t i n cah Bay on the Makah Reservation. Students \ i l l receiv i nstruction i n Makah ult ure fTom the Makah, w i l l contribute to the project, a nd w i ll see what l i fe in Neah Bay is like. Tn addit ion to ,tudying Makah cult ure, the class will examine the met hods of ant hropo­ logical rt?sc(lrch as wel l as the ethics and re p nsibilitics of such research. A fec i n addition to tuition will be charged to cover the cost of the trip. In tructor permission required. F u l fills fresh man January Term requirement and the alternati line in the Per­ spectives on Diversity req u i rement. ( 4 ) 2 1 0 Global Perspectives: The World i n Change A survey f g l obal issues a(fe t i ng th human condition in a rapidly changing a nd incr asingly i nterdependent worl : l11od� ern ization a nd development; e onomie h:m ge and international trade; diminishino resources; w a r and revolution; peace and justice; and cultural d i ersity. These issues are examined i n a m ultid.isciplin ary l ight using case studies d rawn from non-West ­ ern and Western nations. Emphasis on the development of a global per ' pective which rec gnizes h u man ommonalities as well as diversity in perceptions, val ues, and priorities. FLJ ftl b cross-cultured line i n the Perspectives on D iversity requiremellt. ( C ross · re feren ce with HI ST 2 1 0 and P LS _ 1 0 ) (4) 220 PeopJes of the World An exploration of the world's cultures throunh anthropological films, novels, and eyewitness accounts. Case studies chosen from Africa, Native merica, Asia, the Pacific, and uro-America p rovide a n i ns ider', view of ways of l ife different from our o w n .

(2)

225 Past CwtUl'es of Wasbington State Nati ve Americans have l ived in Wa. h ington State fo r at least the last 1 2,000 years. This course explores the cultures of the people in coastal and interior Washingto n beginning with the first northwesterners. An examina tion of th e ways that c u l t u res change through time u ntil the emergence f the distinctive cul­ tures {)bser ed by the earl iest European visitors t o the area . ( 2 ) 230 Peoples of the Northwest Coast A s u rvey of the way ' of l i fe o f the native peoples of coastal Was h ­ ington, British olnmbia, a n d Sou theastern Alaska from Euro­ pean contact to contemporary times. f special interest are the t raditional methods o f fishing, arts, potlatches, status systems, and wealth and their im pact on the modern l i fe of the region. (2) P A C I F I e

l U T H Eo II A N

U N I V E R 5 I T V

29


330 Cultures o.nd Peoples of Notive North America

>­ I.!) o

354 Geography o.nd World Cultures:

com parative stLldy of live urLll Ameri.:an cul tu re fro m their arrival o n the co n t in e n t t h rough t o da y. S Ires l1n t radi t i o n a l .ocieti ,S, their hi tory u nder ottl!l ilati�)n and their emergence as v i ta l contemporary societies. Exami nation of U . . a n d Canad ian laws, po l ieie , and contl ict. , i nc l ud i n g land ;mJ fishing claims, i. sue. of sovereign ty, and re l i g i ous r i g h ts. Fulfills c ross-cul tural l ine in th e Perspectives on Diversity requirement. ( 4 ) 332 Prehistory o f North America

archaeol gical recons t ruc t i o n of ('co nom ic, soci a l , poli tical, religious life i n orth America from tl1e t ime th e first settlers e n tered thl:: cont inent d uring th� lee Ages 1 the- M u n d guilders of later Limes and ultimately Lo t h e Irst c o n tac t with .uropt:,m settlers. (4) n

and

357 Primato!ogy

A

An i nvesti gation of Am e r i can s oc i a l patterns and probl em s de igned to gill' i nsights fro m a ross-cultural perspective; explorat ion 0 A m e r i ca n sol utions to common human p rob le m s; educat ion, religion, polnics, fa m i l y and con epts of justice; a determ ination of what i ' u n i q u e <l hout t h e "Am ricn o Wa ." hilfills a.lternative l i ne In the Perspectives on Diversity re uire­ menr. ( 4 )

336 Peoples of Latin America

M i l l ions of Americans h ave never been norlh of the eq uator. Who ,lre these "o tber" A merica .ns? Thi� urvey course fam i l ia r­ izes t h e studelll w i L h broad range of Lat i n Am erican peop les and p roGlems. What remains of lhe great I nca em pi re' What is l i fe l i ke in the A l<llu n ian rai o fort!sts and i n lhe high n Jes' Cise t udies and film.� as basis for d iscussion of th emes r J ngi n g from visions of tilt; supernatural to p ro b l e m 5 of eco n o m i c

rulfill� cross-cu l t ural l i n e in t he Perspe t ives o n

D i vers i ty re q u ire men t. ( 4 )

3 3 8 Jewish Culture

A.n e.'plorJtion ot American Icwish cu lture through i ts

roots

in

Eastern E u ro p ea n Ashkem17ic Jews and its t ransformation i n the Un ited States. Je-v i�h ethnicity and identity are rel3ted to q uesl ioll5 o f ;lss l m i la t ion, kwish- � e l lt i t e rel ations, <lnd (l1.J\ ura l persi�tence. Emph, sis on Jewish hj ·tory, religion , l itenlture m usic, and humor as renections of basic Jewi sh c u l t u ra l themes. F u lFiJ! s al ternative l i ne in the Perspect ives on Diversi ty requ i rement. (4) the l i feways of

343 EastAslo.n Culture' su rvey o f tbe cul tures an d peoples of astern Asi;:!, concentrat­ ing on China but with c mpara t iw referen -(' to Japan, Korea, and V i e t n am . Cultural imilarities a well as d i fhen ces b twee n these n a L io n .5 a.re stres�ed. Topics include re l i � i o n , art, p o l i t ic s , h isto r y, kinship, ilnd onomies. Fulfill cro�s-('u lt ura l l i n e in the Perspectives

on

iversity req u ire me n t .

(4)

345 Conlemporary Cb.ioa An i m mel'Si n i n to the cu l t Ll re a n d society of tJle P'ople's

Republic oj

hi na-gea.red to exposing tbe st u denl to the ways of l i fe of Ime-qua rter l)f h u ma n ity; on tempor:lry po l i t ics, k i n i I ip, fol k re l i g i o n , b uma! 1 rdations; problems <l Il J prosp cts of deVelopmen t and rapid ocial change; relations with Hong Kong, Ta i an, and other s cietie . F u l fi l l , aos -cultural l i ne i n the Per pec t i ves 0 1 1 Diversity req u. irement. (4) 350 Women and Men in World Cultures

An overvi�w of the variation or �ex ro l e� and be.havior th ro u gh ­ out the world ; evol lllion of sex roles; t h eo r i es 0[' matriar h , pat rinr hy, motht:r goddessI.' , innate i nequalities; i m p a c t of E u ro pea n pal tern$ i n t he world; m ar r i age patterns from poly­ gyny to po l ya n d ry; egali tarianism to fem i nism . u l fi l l s cross ­ c u l t llfal l ine in t h e Pe"Pccl' ives lm Diver s i t y req uiremen t' . (4)

30

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of the d i verse order of mammals, the primate, wh i c h ocus on a w i d e range of n o n - h u m a n prima tes a nd thei r evo l u t ionary t rends. social behavior, s o c i al organizatio n, ecol ogy, and a natomy. The i mp o r t ant l i g h t that they can sh i n e on human physical and s o c i a J characterist ics is i nvestigated as well as t h e i r pia e in an i n c reasingly h o s L i l e environm n l . Extcn ive observation of primate behavior at th zoo is a n i n te g r al part of t h e (Our e . ( 2 ) s u rvey

includes h u mans.

334 The Anthropology of Contemporary America

d�velopmenl.

People, Places o.nd Prospects

Explorations of how societies in North Am erica and around the world h ave a d a p ted to their varied h uman and phy�ical environ­ ment . _a 'es drawn from widely difference environments - from the desert tl) temperate woodlands to the reti t u rban n e i gh­ borilDods. Global patterns of va r i a t io n i n l i fe s t y l e s and so ial opportun i ties will be stressed a n d used for p r oj e ct i o n s of future world patterns. lC.t1O\ I doc of I c a t io n s a nd map reading w i l l be emphasized. P re re q uis i t e : 1 02 or c o n se n t of in st r uctor. (4)

Y

360 Ethnic Groups

nature of e t h n ic groups i.n America and of et h n ! C i t )' (culture, rel igion , tribe, "rnce," etc . ) ; problems o f gro u p idl:ntity and bou ndary m a i n lt'­ na n e; etl1ni - symbols; e t h n ic p o l i ti c s ; ethnic n e i g h b o r hoods; and ethnic humor. F u l fI l l s a!tnnJtive line in t h e Perspectives on Diversit re q u i re m ' n l . (4) An exa m i nation of th

abroad; t h e varying ba

e

361 Managing Cultural Diversity

PL , Tacoma, ashington State, the USA, the world - a l i are multi-cultural env i ronments and so no matt r w he re we go, l ive, or work, we wll l be dealing with peoples and cultures different from our own. This class aims at providing practical guiddine� o n hO\ to ap p roach people of other cultu re with sensitivit), and empathy and with a n eye toward m u t u al l y rewardi n g i n teraction. Learn how to , void n ega l i e attit udes toward c u l t u ral d iver s i t y a n d d e vel o p u p o si t i ve curiosi ty a b o u t t h e g loba l d i ve rsi t y

representeci in our workpl,lces. Sci 1()oh, ,lI1d neighborhoods. ises both i n and out of class sensi tire stu lents t o cultur a l d i versity and t\1 the un ique p erspectives o f those other than o u rselves. ( 2 ) Exer

365 Artifacts, Erofacts, and Archaeology Labllrator i n te r p retation of archaeologic31 materi als. Tech­ niques us d i n i n terpreting pa. t h u m a n e c log)', tec h n o l o gy, and economy. A n aly t i c al procedures fo r bone, sto n e, ceramic, and metal arLifa ts; a n a l ys i s ,f debri� from food p ro ce s s i n g activities. The class w i l l work on the analysis of ma te r i a l s from a reh3eo­ logical s i t es . (II ) 370 The First Civilizations

The o rigins of agriCll l t ll re , writing, c i t i es , and the state in many pan o f t he world, com p a r i n g and contra s t i n g the great ci iliza t i o n s of a n t i q u i ty, inc luding M o p o t a m i a , Egyp t, I n d i a , Asia, Mesoameri , H nd South A m ericJ. (4) 375 Law, Politics, o.nd Revolution

und law through the p o l i ti ca l s t r u ctures a nd processes of tr:lditi onal and contemporary s o c i et ies ; concepts of I adersh ip, factionalism and feuds, power, authority, rev o l u t i o n, and other reacti o n s to colonization; iJw and conflict resolution; conflicts of nat i o n a l and local-level legal �y5tem�. Examples from around the world: l3urma, Pakistan, the Pac i fic, (rica, Latin America, a nd Native meri a . Fu l fills c ross-c ultural l i ne in the Perspect ives o n Diversi t)1 req u i rement. ( 4 )

A s t udy of p�)liti s

380 Sickness, Madness, and Health

A cross-cu l t u ra l exami nation of systems 0 c u ring p rac t ices and c u l t ural views l,r p h),. ical a n d m e n t n l i l l ness and heal h; p r eve n t i o n and healing; the role of Te l ig i o u s views; nat u re and sk ills o f clIrers; defi n it ions o f d isease; variation i n d i se a s e s between classes and eth n i c groups; i mpact of m odern medical

_


a n d p sycholog ical p ractit ioners. Fulfills c ro ss - c u l t u r a l l i ne in t h e Pcrspect ive� on D iversity r e q u i re me n t. (4) 385

Marriage, Family, IIlld Kinship

The idea of fam i l y has

3 wide r a n g e of mea n i ng s a D d ex pr ess i o ns u l t u ra l l y, b u t everywht:rt? i t serves as a fu ndamental o rga n i L in g pr in c i p le and rat i o nale fo r the allocation o f valued re (lu rces, includino power and s t atu s within domestic groups, a n d person, I n n d '( cial ideD t i t ies. Sp c i a l attention to the ex­ pres ion of i nd ividual strategies and i nterests in various domes­ t i c contexts. O t he r topics include: t h e ways i n which rel i g i o n , myth , m ag i c and folklore serve to articulate and co n tro l domes­ tic life; how changing systems of p ro d u c t ion a ffect m ar ri a ge and d o mes t ic fo rms; how class an d ge nde r systems i n ter tw ine with kinship, domestic forms, Jnd the mea n i n g o f " fa m ily." (4) Cf(JSS-

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392

Gods, Magic, and Morals

Art In this t i me of f a pi el ly changing concepts and an a l m ost daily emergence of new media, emphasis must be placed on a v ar iety of experiences and

reative flexib i l i t y fo r t he

artist and the designer. Students with p ro� ssional con­ cerns must be prepared to meet the m dem world with both techn ical skills a nd the capacity fOf innovation. The department's program ther

fore

str sses i nd ividualized

development i J1 the use o f m i nd and ha nd . A h ighly p rofessional fac u l ty, wel l -equipped st ud i o s , and a compre­ hensive curriculum o ffer d iverse opporttUl i t ies

for study

in

the visual arts.

A n th rop o log y of religion; h umanity's concepts o f and re la t i o n ­ s h i ps to the su pe rna t ur a l ; ex a m i n a t i on of p e rs o na l a n d group fu nctions that re ligions fulfill; expl oration o f rituals, beliefs, and

systems or m o ra lity i n re l ig i o n s both "primitive" and h is to r i ca l ;

origin of rel igion ; science "versus" religion; the n a tur e of re a lity. ( Cross-referen cd with RELI 392) FulfiUs cross-cultural l i ne i n

the Per s p e c t i ve s o n D i ve rs i t y requirement. 465

(4)

Archaeology: The Field Experience

A field class involving lh eXalvat io n o f a h i s to ri c or p rehi s t o ric archaeological s i tc , w i t h emphasis on basic excava ti o n skiLls and record keeping, field m app i ng, d r a ft i ng , and p h o t ogra p hy. The laboratory covers ani act p rocessi n g a n d p re l i mina r y a n a l ys i s . Prerequisite: 1 0 1 , 1 02, or 1 03 , or co n s en t of instructo r. ( 1 -8) 480

Anthropologi al Inquiry

An h i st o r ic and themati c st udy of the t h e retical fo u n dations o f so iocultural a n thropology; research methods; h o w t h eo r y a n d m e thods a r e used to e s t a b l i s h a n t h ropological k now l edge . Req u ire d of majors in t he i r j u nior or senior year. a/y (4) 490

Students may c h o ose among a g neralized program lead ing to a Bachelor of Art degr e;

Examine anthropological methods and apply a n t h ropological

t he o ry to a n i nvestigation o f a s elected top i c in contemporary anthropology. R qu i re d of majors in t h e i r j u n i or or seuior year. P rereq u i s i te fo r other s t udents: departmental a p p rova l . a/y

(4)

a

m o re 'p c i a l i zed

rts, i n which each

p ro g r a m for the Bachelor o f Fine

Seminar in Anthropologr

cand idate develops some a rea o f competence; or

program in art educatio n for teachi ng on several

<

degree

levels.

Recent g r a du a tes are empl oyed in a variet y of fields. Several h ave become establ ished as painters, printmaker , or scul p to rs; sume aI S Llcces'flll s t u d io potters; others h a ve gone i n to commercia'! p h o togr, phy o r film a n i ma ­

Independent Study: Undergraduate Readings R ading in spe i ii c areas or issues of a n t hropol ogy u nder s u pervision o f a fa c ul ty member. P re req u isite: departmen tal

tio n-even the p r o d u c t io n of fea t u re fil ms. The telev i sio n

consent.

i nd us try e m p l oy s still

49 1

492

( 1 -4)

S tudy of specific a r ea s o r issues in a n t h ro p o l o g y through field

methods o f an a lysis a nd research s u p p o rt ed by a p p ropri a te

rc a d i n g under s u pervision of a fac u l t y member. P re req u i s i te : and de p a rtmen ta l consent. ( 1 -4 )

501

490

i n s tr u c t o r. ( 1 -4)

Directed Study ( 1 -4 )

595

Gradullte Readings

In d e p e I l d en t study card re q u i r ed . 598

Research Project (4)

599

Thesi ( 4 )

d esig ners, or a rt directors i n firms around t h e coul1 t r y, New Yo rk, Chicago, Los Angeles, a nd Seattle.

in

lumni have

been in vo lve d in muSeum work and ser � on the fe u l t i es

of various educational institutions, i nc l udi n g elcmen tclry, Some students go d i rectly from the u niv rs i t y i n to t he i r field of in terest. Others find it desi rable a n d appropriate to attend a g r a d u ;l te scho o l . Many alu m n i h ave been accepted

Graduate Seminar

Selected to p i cs as a n n o u Ilced. Prereq uisite: co n s en t of the 59 1

number ;l re working in the

secondary, community col lege, and un iver ity levels.

Graduate Workshops

Graduate workshops in spec ia l fields or areas fo r v a r yi n g perio ds o f t ime. ( 1 -4) 590

o thers.

design field as graphic designers, i l l ustrators, package

Independent Study: Undergraduate Pieldwork

i n to prestigioLls g r a d u a te

programs, both

a n d abroad.

i n this cou n t r y

a n d dtma n d i n g Nonetheless, there i s

The various fi elds of art are co mpetit ive in ter ms of comm i t m e n t a nd e ffo r t

(4)

al wa ys a place fo r t h o s who

a re

e. tremely ski l l fu l or

h i g h l y imaginative or, i de ally, both. The d partment's pro g r a m s t resses

both,

attempting

to

help each s t u de nt

reach that ideal. Il1structional resources, when cou p led with dedicated and energetic students, have res ulted in an

unusually h igh percentage

of graduates being

able to

satisfy the i r vocational objec tives.

FACULTY: Cox, Chair; C e l l e r, ,old, Halla m , Keyes. Tomsi

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.... e:

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The d ep a rt m en t has sought to minimize prer e qu i si t es , enabling students to elect courses relating to their i n terests as early as possible, bu t m aj o r s are urged to fo llow course sequences closely. It is re om mended that students i n terested in majoring in art declare their m aj o r c arly t o insure p rop e r a d v ising. Transfer students' status shall be determined at their time of entrance. The dep ar t m en t reserves the r i g h t to retain, exhibit, and r e prod u ce student work submitted for credit in any of its courses or programs, including the s e ni o r exhibition. A use or materials fee is required in certain cours es .

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 34 semester hours, including 1 60, 250, 230 or 350, 365, 370, 499, and the art history

sequ ence ( 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380); 1 1 6 o r courses i n t ea c h i n g methods

hours, includino 1 60; 226; ", i ther 230 or 2:0; the art hi s t o r y sequence ( 1 80, 1 8 1 , 380); 8 add iti o na l hours in 2 - d i m e n s i o n a l media, 8 addi tional hours in 3-dimensional media, and 4 hours i n art h i s t o r y or t h eory (390, or as ap p ro ve d by the d e p a r t men t faculty); requ i rements and electives in area of emphasis; and 499 (senior exhibition ) . 1 1 6 or courses in teachillg methods may not be included. Candidates are regi tered in the School of the Arts and must satisfy gen e r a l u niversity req u i rement s , including a core curriculum (Core I or Core If).

B.F.A. in 2-DbnensjonaJ Media m i nimum of three cours es required i n

one area.

Drawing/Pa in ting:

1 60 Drawing 365 P8 i n t ing I 260 I n termediate Dr aw i n g 465 P a i n t i ng II (R) 360 Life Draw i ng (R) Prilllmilking: 3 7 0 Pri ll t m a k i ng I 470 P ri n t ma ki n g I I (R) Film Arts: 226 Black and \'Vhite P h otogr a ph y 3 2 6 Color P h otogr a p h y 426 Electronic Imaging Il1dependent St u dy (may be applied to any area): 490 p ec i a l Projects (R) 492 'tudio Projects ( R) ( R ) -m ay be repeated for credit

B.F.A. in 3-DimenslonaJ Media o n e a re a .

Ceramics:

230 eramics I 330 eram ics I I 4 3 0 :eram ics I I I ( R)

1 16 Design in the Contemporary World

SCI/lptllre:

An e xam i n a t io n of contemporary d e si gn w it h a focus on trends in ad ve r t isi n g , fashion, automotive, product and i n terior de s ig n . Includes a section on color theory a n d p er ce p t i on a n d t h e basic elements of d esi gn . Re quires no a r t i s t i c/d e s i gn background. (4)

250 Sculpture I 350 Sculpture 1I (R)

(mllY be applied to any area):

490 Spe c i a l Projects ( R ) 492 Studio Proj e c t s ( R) ( R) - m ay be repe a t e d for credit

160 Drawing A course dea l i ng with the basic techniques and media of d rawi ng . ( 4 )

B.F.A. in Design

Required basic sequence:

180 History o f Western Art

1 96 D es ign I: Fundamentals 296 Des ig n II: Concept s

398 Drawing : I llu s t ration (R) 496 Design: Graphics I I (R)- may be repea ted for credit A

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A su rvey tracing the development of Western art and architec足 ture from pre hi s tory to the end of the Middle Ages. (4)

491 D es ig n : Workshop

A su rvC)' o f Western a r t and architecture from t h e Re n a iss a nce to

181 History of Western Art II the 20th century. (4)

A

I

396 Design: Gr a p h ics I

Elective cou rses:

P

STUDIO 1 60 Drawing 1 96 Design 1: Fundament.aJs 226 Black and White Photography 230 Ceramics I 250 Sculpture I 260 Intennediate Drawing 296 Design JJ: Concepts 326 Color Photography 330 Ceramics I I 3 4 1 Elementary Art Education 350 Sculpture n 360 Life Drawing 365 Painting I 370 Printmaking I 396 Design: Graphics I 398 Drawing: Illustration 426 Electronic Imaging 430 CerllDlics II I 465 Painting II 470 Printmaking Il 490 Special Projects/Independent Study 49 1 Design: Workshop 492 Studio Projects/Independent Study 496 Design: Graphics II 499 Senior Exhibition mSTORY AND THEORY 1 16 Design in the Contemporary World 180 History of Western Art I 181 H istory of Western Art I I 380 Modern Art 390 Studies in Art History 440 Seminar in Art Education 497 Research in Art History-Theory

Areas of e m p has i s : a m inimum of three courses r e qu ired i n

32

MINOR IN ART H ISTORY: 24 semester hours, i ncluding 1 80 and 1 8 1 , 1 2 hours in a rt hi s t or y/t h e o ry elec tives, a n d 4 hours i n studio electives. Non-concentration courses ( 1 1 6 ) , p r ac t i ca l design courses ( 1 96, 296, 396, 398, 49 1 , 496 ) , and courses in t e ac h i n g methods (34 1 ) 440) may not be applied t o the minor.

Course Offeri ngs

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR: Minimum of 60 semester

Indepwdwt Study

MINOR IN STUDIO ART: 20 semester hours , inclu di n g 380, 4 hours i n 2 - dimensional media, 4 hours in 3 - d imensional media, a nd 8 hours of studio art electives drawn from upper division courses. Courses in t ea ch ing methods (34 1 , 440) may not be a pp l i e d to the m i n o r.

a n d P r i n ting Arts minor is cross- referenced with the Department of Engl i s h . See the d e sc r i p t i o n of that minor under English.

,ollege of Arts and Sciences and must satisfy gen e r a l u n ive r sity re q u i rem e n t s, in clu d i ng a core curr i c u l u m (Core I or Core Il), a n d t h e o ptio n requ i reme n t .

a

See School of.E ducation.

PUBLISHING AND PRINTING ARTS MINOR: The Publishing

may not be appl ied to the major. A maximum of 40 hours may be a p pl i e d toward the degree . Candidates are registe red i n the

Areas of e m p ha s is:

BACHEWR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION:

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196 D es ign 1: Fundamentals An i n t rod u tion to d es i g n thr ugh the st u d y of basic t e c h n i q u es , color theory, a n d c o m pos i t i on . ( 4 ) 226 Black and White Photography A t u d io l ess in p h o t o r a p h y as an art fo r m . P r i m ary concentr<l­ tion i n basic CJmera and darkroom tech niques. Students p ro d u ce a p o rt fo li o of p r ints with an emphasis on creat ive expression and o

experi ment, t i o n .

(4)

230 Ceramics I Ceram ic materials and tec h n iques i n c l u d i n g hand-built and wheel-thrown m e t h o d s , c l a y and glaze formation . I n cl u d e s a

u rvey o f

ram ie

art. ( 4 )

250, 350 Sculpture I, II on d particular med i u m o f s c u l p t ure i n c l ud i ng metal ' , wo o d , or synthetics; p e c ia l s ec t io n s e m ph as i z i n g work from t h e human form as well as opport u n i t y for mold making nnd casting. 250 must be taken befor' ro; 350 ma )' be t, ken

Cone ntra ion

twice. (4,4)

260 Intermediate Drawing D rawi ng taken b y o n d the b a i of 1 60. Expansion of m e d i a forms, and solutions to com positional p rob l e ms . Po ss i b i l i ty of p u r uing . p c i a I ind i viduaL in terests, with permission. Prer qui­ site: 1 60 or consent of in s t r u c t o r. ( 4 ) 296 Design I I: Con<:epts n investigat ion of the pro ce s s o f creative problem s o l v i n g i n a methodical and o rga ni zed manner. I n c l u des projects in a va r i e ty of desi g n areas. Prerequisite: 1 96 or con' nt of i n s t r u ct o r. (4) 326 Color Photogrllphy Ex:plo rat ion of the issues of b o t h painters and photographers. IU e n l s learn to make col r p r i n ts and proces s color negatives. Inci udes ::I h i s to,ri c al $urvey n f c o l o r pho tographY ::ls we l l a pe rspectives of contemporary artists. ( 4 ) 330, 430 Ceramics II, lIt Tec h n iques in cer a m ic co nst ruction a n d experiments i n fo rm ation. 330 m u s t be

glaze

taken before 430 ; 430 may be taken twice. P rerequ i s i t e : 230. (4,4 )

331 The Art of the Book I See

Engl. ish 3 1 3 . ( 4 )

34 1 Elementary Art Education A study of creative g row t h and clevel p m e n t; Jrt as studio projects; history and th eT a py i n the classro o m . (2) 350 Sculpture I I (See 250) 360 Life Drawing An � l o ra t i () n of human form in d ra w i n g media. May be re p ea ted for credi t. Prerequisite: 1 60 or consent of i ns t r u cto r. ( 2) 365, 465 Painting 1 , 1 1 M dia and techniques of painting i n o i l or acrylics. 365 m ust be taken before 465; 465 may be t a ke n twice. Prerequisite: 1 60 . (4,4) 370, 470 Printmaking I, n Methods and media of fine art p ri n t m ak i n g ; both h a n d and ph ot o pro ce sse s i n v o l v i n g l ithograph ics, intagl io and screen pri n t i ng. 370 m u s t be taken be fo re 470; 470 may be taken twice. PI' requisi te : U iO or conscn t of i nstruct r. (4,4) 380 Modem Art

The development o f art from 1 900 to the p r e s en t, with a brief look at European and A merican antecedents as they apply to contemporar y d i rec t i o n s . (4) 390 Studies in Art History A elected , rea oE i n q u i r y, such as a hist o r y of Arneri an art, sian art, the work of Picasso, or similar t op i c s . May be repea te d for credit . (4)

396, 496 Design: Graphics I, II Design and exe ution of p r i n te d materials; emph., is on te ch n i ca l procedures and prob l ems in mass comm u nicat ion . 496 explores advanced tech n iq ues w i t h m u l t i p l e c o l o r t y p ogra p hy, and o th er comp le," problems. 396 m ust be taken befo re 496. P re re q u i s i t e : 1 60 and 296 or consent of instructor. (4,4) 398 Drawing: IUuslration

Advanced projects in drawi ng/i llustration . Expo u rI' to new con­ cepts a n d t e c h n i q ue s a d a pta b l e to fine art <lnd c o m m e r c i al appli­ cations. Prerequisites: 160 a n d 196. May be repeated once. (4) 426 Electronic Imaging A n i ntroducti n to com p u ter-as isted photography in w hich st u ­ dents l ea r n application ' , develop at:·thetic strategie , and engalle the ethical issue. o f this nevI te h nalog . E m pha. is o n creative ex p lo r a t i o n and problem solving \ ithin the Mac i n t osh environ­ ment. Pre requisit s: 226 and 326 o r conse n t of in t r Ll c lO r. May be t a ke n twice. (4)

430 Ceramics i l l (See 330) 440 Seminar .in Art Education A st udy of instruction in tbe se c o nd ar y school i nc l ud ing a p pro p r iat e media and curricu l U lll dey lopme n t. a/y (2) 465 Painting U

(See 365)

470 P r i ntmakin g U (See ' 70) 490

Special Projects/Independent Study

Explora t i o n of t h e po s i b i l i t ies nf se lec ted studi

,lreas. i n c l u d i n g e xp er i m e n t a l tcchniqu . Emphas is on dev lopment of indi­ vidual st )r l c s, media approach es, and pro b L em sol utions. May be

repeat d for c redit. Prereq u isites: j u n i o r tatu , m i n i m u m o r two

courses a t 200 level o r above i n affec ted me d i u m with minimum 2.5 G PA , consent of instruc tor a nd depa r tm e n t chair. 2 or 4)

49 1 Design: Workshop A t u t o r i a l course which may dea l with Jny of several as p ec ts of the d esi g n field with p n rticu l a r emphasi, on pract ical ex perience and b u il d i n g a p o r t fo li o. �'1ay be t a kt: n tw ice. ( 2 ) 492 Studio Projects/Independent Study

A tutorial program for � tu d en t s of exceptio nal talent. In-depth i n d i v i d u a l investigation of ,1 p a rt i cul a r medium or set of te c h n i · cal problems. Only OIl project per sernest r may be undertaken . May be rep :ated fo r cred i t . Prerequi i tes : declar d majo r in a r t , senior s ta t us, consent of i n s t r u c to r, written proposal, program app roval by d e p a r tmen t facu l t y. Students mee t i n g thl! abo e re q u i re m e n t s but with l es than a 3.0 GP in the m aj or may bt: requ i red to present a ddit i on a l evidence of eligil i 1 i ty. ( 1 -4 ) 496 D e ign: Graphic U ( ee 96) 497 Research in Art History-Theory t u t o ri a l co ur e fo r major students with research into a p ar t ic ul a r aspect of art hi5tOl')' or theory. May be repeated fo r credit. Prerequi ites: sen io r statu , consent of i nstructor, and p ro g ra m approval by d e p a r t m nt facult y. ( 1 -4) 499 Senior Exhibition Students work dosely wilh tbeir advisers in all phases of U1C preparation of t h e exh ibition . Must be ta ken i n t h e tudent's fi nal semester. P re req u is i te s : declared maj o r in ar t ( B . F.A . or B.A. ) , senior status, reasonabl e ex p e ct a t i on of c o m ple ti o n of all department and university req u i r ments for grad u a t i o n . Meets the seniQr

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School of the Arts The ars

o

..... o o :r u

of t h e

chool

Biology

Arts is a co m m u n i t y

of a r tis ts and

sc h o l ­

- st uden ts , facu lty, and staff - dedicated to the fu l ­

The De pa rt m en t of B i ol o gy i� ded i ca te d to t h e tea ching process, not merely to d l ive ry o f fac t s . Facts fo r m the

fi l l m ent o f the h u m a n spi rit th ro ugh c reat i e e x p ress ion

fo undation

and ca re fu l scholar hip.

m o re th a n acc u m u lating facts. The b io logy fa cu lty s t resses

The

School

of t h e Arts offers pro­

f scie nce, but to be

a

s c i en ce student re q u i re s

fess ional ed u cat io n to a r t i s t s and comm u n icators with i n

gathering i n fo rmation, p roces si ng new in fo r ma tio n in the

the framework

conte:\1: of that already ava i l able, re tr ie ving a pp ropr iat e

f

a

l iberal a rts educat ion.

co u rages all of its members t

The

I

Scho

en­

pursLle their artist ic and

scholarly work in a n ellviro n me n t t ha t challenges c o mp l a ­

infor m a t i o n , a nd i nter p reti ng observat ions. To learn science is more than to learn about science: it is

cency, n u r t u re personal growth . and mai ntains a s tro n g

to learn how t o ask quest ions, how to develop st rategies

II>

cult ure o f c lIeg i a l i ntegrity.

which m igh t be e m pl oyed to obtain an swers, and how t o

II>

and chol a rsh i p that acknowledges the past, defines the

Me m bers of th e Scho ol of the Arts st riv e to create art

re cog n ize and eval u a te an swers which eme rge. T h e department is the re for e dedicated t o enco u ragil1g st uden t s

pre ent, and a nti c i p a te the futLlre. Art, comm u n ication ,

to learn s c ie nce in the o nly way tha t it can be effectively

music, and t h e a t r e ar m d i um s of unde rsta n d i n g and

made

change whi h reward those who pa r t i c i p at e i n them,

probe i t, try i t out, experiment wi th i t , exp ri e n c e it.

a

part of their th i nki ng: to i ndepende nt ly que tion it,

Members o f t h e de part men t fac u l t y

whether as artist, scho l�u·, Ie r ner, o r a ud ien ce. Perfor­ ma nces by students, faculty, and gue ts of the ' c hool en­ hance the c u l tu ral p rosp er ity �hared by Pa cific Luth ran

J re

trai ned across

f modem b io l ogy, from population

the total pect ru m

bio logy through molecular bi ology, a n d have profeSSional

n iver ity and its sUfl"ollnding environs. The School pro­ motes ve nues for collaboration between arti sts and sc h ol­

t ea c h in g and research expertise Wilh a fu l l ra n ge of o rganisms: vi ruses, bacteria, fu n gi , plants, a n d a ni mal s .

ars, a m o n g a rtistic and intellectual m ed i a , a nd ben een the

The diversity of co urse s i n t h e c u r r iculum p ro vid e s broad

u n iversity and the co m m u n i ty.

coverage of contemp orary bio lo gy and allo\

FAC ULTY: S p i ce r, Dean; facu lty members of t he Departmt:nts of A rt, Communication a[ld Theatre, Jnd Musi . DEGREES OFFERED by t h e School of the Arts include the

sequenc

in t h e p r i n c ip l e s of b iolo gy. Plan n i n g

with

a

faculty adviser, the student chooses upper clivi ion b i ol o gy u u rses to meet i nd i i d ual needs and career objectives.

B.F.A. ( Bachelor of Fine Art�) i n art a n d co m m u n i ca t i o n and

theatre; the B. M . ( Bachelor of r-" I usic ) . t h e B.M.A. ( Ba chelo r of Musical Arts); the B.M .E. ( Bachelor of Mlisic Educa t i on ) . S t u ­ den ts may also earn t h e B . A . ( Bachelor o f A rts ), b u t t h i s degree i s awarded through the Co l lege o f Arts a n d Scicnce$. Ca ndida tes for �ll l degree m u s t m ee t general u n i ersiry r e q u i re m e n t s and the speci fi c requirements of the Departments of A rt, Com m u n i ­ c J t i o n and The:ttrt, o r M U ' i c F o r detai ls a b o u t t h e B.A.E. ( Bachelor o f A r ts i n Educatio n ) i n art, com m u n i c a t i o n and theaLTe, o r music, see the School of Educa tion. For cou rse offeri ngs, degree requirements, and p rogram s i n th o School of the Arts, see I\r/, CO lllllllllliwt ioll (I/ld Theatre, and Mllsic.

Exten sive facilities are available, including: herba r i u m , i nvertebrate a n d ve rte b r a te mLlseu ms. gree nho u se ,

research microscopy roo m , growt h cham bers , containment fac il i t ies for re combinant DNA r ese a rch , darkroom, walk­ in cold roo m fo r low-temperature e .x peri m e n ts , electro n i c i n strument room, v a r i o u s research laboratories, a field station located in Manchester S tale Pa rk, eq u i p p ed fo r studies

of Puget

a nd

a boat

So u nd . ' t udents are i n vited

to use these fa ilities for i n d ep en den t study aJld a re encouraged to partici pate ill ongo i ng fac u lt y research. Career aven u es for b i ology m ajors Facu l ty

members

are

n u merous.

a re committed to h el pi n g tudents

investigate c ar ee r opp rt u n i t i es and pursue ca reers whicb most clea rly m a t ch their in t e re s ts and ab ilit ies. The

Course Offering

department mai n t a i n s

341 Integrating Arts in the Classroom

file,

Methods

flexible

plann ing. Each biology maj o r c omp l t e � a three-cou rse

and p rocedures for inte g rating t h e arts ( m usic, visual,

drama, dao e ) in the c la s s ro o m and across the curri uhl m . Of­

fered for students preparing fo r elementary classroom teaching.

s

well

as a

til

a

comprehensive carecr i nforma tio n

devoted to g ra du ate t ra i n i ng in the

biological sciences.

FACUlIY:

l exa n de r,

17ail-;

Ca rls on , Crayto n, D ola n , Gee,

Meets state cer t i fication re quire m ents in bo t h m usic alld art. 1 1

1-10 llSen, Ler u m . Ma i n , DJ Ma. ti n , Matth ias. McGinnj , Meister.

(2 )

BACHELOR OF ARTS or BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR: The major in hiology is designed to be flex ible in m e e t i ng the needs aDd spec i a l i n terests of ,t udents. Several o p t i o n s fo r major pro gram s are available. In each p l a n tbe student m us t take the p r i ncipl o f b iology sequence ( 1 6 1 , 1 6 1 A. 1 62, 32.1 ) . Com p l t io n of this sequence (or an q u i valent general hi llagy 'equcnce at another in st i t u t io n ) is req uired before LIpper divis ion biology courses can be taken. I t is t:....-pecred .. that these courses will have been co m p leted with a grade of - or h igher. ' o urses not designed for biology major, ( I J 1 , 1 1 2 , 20 1 , 205, 20fl ) cannot be used to satis!,)' major requ i remen ts u n l 'ss th(lSC courses are tak n before completion o f Biology 1 6 1 ; LInder no circumstan ces CJn m o re th a n R hour from courses designed for non-maj or be

c o u n ted to\ ard com p letion or m a j o r req u i reme n ts. lndependcnt

study

(4 9 1 , 492, 495) and cooperative ed ucation may be used fo r of th upper d ivision biology ho u rs required

no more than six

34

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for t b e B. S. degree, and for no m o re than four of th e upper

- divi.sion biology h o u r req u ired for the B.A. degree . At least 1 2 h o u r s i n b i ology m us be earned i n res i d e n ce a t PLU. E a ch _

-

student must consult with a b iol o gy adviser to discuss selection of lect ives a p p r o p r i a te for ed u ca tio na l and ca reer goals. B as i c requirements under each plan for the major are l is t e d below.

Plan I-Bachelor of Arts: 34 s e m e s te r hours in b i ology, i n c l u d­ i n g 16 I , J 62, 3 2 3 , an d 497, p l u s 20 add.itional h o u rs . Req u i re d supporting c o u rses: Chemistry 1 0 5 or C h em i s t ry 1 20 an d Math 1 40 . Recommended s up po r tin g o u rs e s: P hysics 1 25 (with l ab o ra t o ry l 3S) and P hys i cs 1 26 (with l a bo r a t or y 1 36 ) .

Plan II-Bachelor of Arts-Comprehensive: 38 semester hou rs - in biolo , i n cl u din g 1 6 1 , 162, 323, and 497, p l u s 24 ad dit i o n al h o urs. Required su p p o rt i n g courses: C he mis try 1 20 and Math 1 40 . Recommended upporting co u rses: C h emi s try 23 1 (with laboratory 233); P hys i cs 1 2 5 (with laboratory 1 3 5 ) and Physics J 26 (with laboratory 1 3 6 ) . Plan Ill-BacheloT o f Arts-Chemistry Emphasis : 3 0 semester h o ur s i n b iolog , i ncl u d i ng 1 6 1 , 1 62 , 3 2 3 , and 497, p l u s 1 6 -- additional h o u rs . Req ui re d s u p p o r ti n g cou.rses: C h em ist ry 1 20, Chemi try 23 1 ( with l a bo rato r y 233), C h e m i str y 33 1 (with laboratory 3 3 3 ) , and either hem i s t ry 338 or Ch e m i s try 403; Math 140. Recommend�d s u pp o r t i n g co urses : Phys i c s 1 2 5 (with l a bo ra tor y 1 35 ) and P h ysi c s 1 26 (wit h laboratory 1 36 ) . _

Plan IV-Bachelor o f Science: 4 2 sem e ter h o u rs i n b i o lo g y, including 1 6 1 , 1 62, 3 2 3 , and 497 p lu s 28 add i t io na l hours. Required s u p p o rt i n g co u rse : h e m is t ry 1 20 and Ch e m is t ry 2 3 1 ( \ ilh la b o ra to ry 2 3 3 ) ; Math l S I ; Physics 1 2S (with lab o rato ry 1 35 ) a.nd P h ysi c s 1 26 (with bbor·atory 1 36 ) ' or P hy si c s 1 53 (with l a b o rato r y 1 6 3 ) and P hysics I S4 (with l a bor a t o r y 1 6 4 ) .

"-- Plan V-Bachelor o f Science-Research Emphasis: 42 se m est er h ollfS in b i o l o gy, inc l ud i n g 1 6 1 , 1 6 2 , 3 2 3 , 495, a n d 497, p l u s 26 ad d i ti o n a l hours. Required supporting co u rs es : Che m i st r y 1 20 , Chemistry 2 3 1 ( w i t h l a b o ra to r y 23 3 ) , a n d Chemistry 3 3 1 ( wi t h l a b o ra t o r y 3 3 3 ) ; M a t h l S I ; P hys i cs 1 25 (with la b o rato r y 1 3 5 ) ilnd P h ys i cs 1 26 (with l a bo ratory 1 3 6 ) , O T P hys i cs 1 53 (with laboratory 163) and P h y s i cs 154 (with laboratory 1 6 4 ) . 'BACH ELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: S t u d e nts i n terested in this degree deve l op th e i r b i ology p ro g ra m t h ro u gh th e Bi o lo gy e pa rt m ot in con j u nction with the chool of E d uca t io n . Such students hou ld have a b i o logy advi er. $ e th e School of Education section of the c a t a l o g for recom mended b i o lo gy cour e and othtr p e r t i n e n t i n fo rm a tion. �

MINOR: At l eas t 20 'c m es ter bour selected from any biology courses. grade of C or higher must be e ar ne d in each course. P rereq u is it es must be me t unless written perm i ss io n i g r a n t e d in advance by the i n str u c tor. App lic<J b iJ i t y of non-PLU bi o logy cred its will be det e r m i n ed by the depa r t m e nt chair. At least e igh t credit hours in bi ology must be earned in residence at PLU. Consult the d e p art m e n t chair fo r as sig nment of a minor adviser.

Course Offe rings I I I Biology and the Modem World

An in trod uc t io n to biology, designed p ri m a r ily for no n -bi ol o g y m ajor . Fundamental concept chosen from all areas of modern b i o logy i n c l u d in g the e nv i ron me n t , population, human anatomy and p hys i o l ogy, gen er i cs , evolution and biological controls. Lec t u res, laboratories, a n d d iscussion. I I I (4)

1 1 2 Humarustic Botany

An i ntroduct ion to t he b a sic p r i nc i p les of biology with an em­

p h a s is on plants and their i mpact on people. To p ics included are: basic plant structure a n d fu n ct io n ; poi s o n o us p l a n ts ; medicinal plan ts; {'(l o d plants; p ro p aga ti on of house plants; h o m e care of p l a n t s; plant identification. I ncl u de s laboratory. (4)

1 15 Conservation Biology An i ntroduction to the th eo r y a nd p r a c i t ce of conservation and management of bio d ive rs i t y. Ecological p rinc i p le s a n d p r a c t ic e s of wildli fe m a n a g e m e n t . D iscussions include decision processes in t h e theoretical and applied ecology of the s p a tial patterns o f species rich ness, fo res t fr a g me n t a t ion , extinction forces and processe s , maintenance of ge n et i c d ive rs i t y and the m a n age m e n t , conservation, and res t o r a t i o n of nature. Wo r l dwide ex a m p l es , wi t h sp e ci a l attention given to local co nse rva tion p rob l em" such as declining Pacific s al m on po p u l a t i o ns and overharvesting of

o

northwest temperate rain forest. (4)

161 Principles of Biology 1: CeU Biology ellular and molecular levels of b i olo g i cal orga n iza tio n ; cell ultra-structure and p hys i o l ogy, Mendelian and m ol e c ul a r g e ne tic s, energy transduction. I ncludes l a bo ra to ry. C o - reg i s tra t i on in C h e mi s t r y ( 1 04 or 1 20 ) reco mm e nd ed . I ( 4 ) 162 Principles o f Biology I I : Organismal Biology An introduction to animal an d p la n t tissues, anatomy, and p h ys io lo gy, with special emphasis on Hower i ng p la n t s and ve r t ebr ates as model systems, plus an in troduction to animal an d p l a n t d eve l o pmen t . Incl udes laboratory. P re re q u i sit e : 1 6 1 . 1I ( 4 ) 20 1 Introductory Microbiology The structure, metaboli,m, g row t h , and geneti s of m i c ro o rga n ­ isms, especially bacteria and viruses, w i t h empha is on their roles in human disease. Includes consideration of epidem iology an d immune responses. Laboratory fo c u ses on cultivation, ide ntifica ­ tion, and control of growth of bacteria. P rere q u is it e: CHEM 1 0 5 o r consent of instructor. I (4) 205, 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology First semester: ma tte r, cells and tissues; nervous, endocrine, skeletal, and muscular systems. La b or a t o r y includes cat dissec­ tion a n d ex p e r i m e nts i n m u s cl e p hysi olo g y and reHexes. S eco n d semester: ci.rculatory, res p i ratory, d iges tive, excretory, and repro d u ct i ve systems; metabolism, temperature regulation, and

stress. Laboratory includes cat dissection, physiology experi­ ments, an d st ud y of develo p i n g o rgan ism s . 205 ( 1 ) p rer eq u i s i te to 206 ( 1 I ) . (4,4) 323 Principles of Biology UJ:

Ecology, Evolution and Diver ity Evolution, ecology, b e hav io r, and a sy ste ma t i c survey o f LiEe on earth. I ncl u des l a b o ra t ory . Prere q uisite: 1 62 o r consent of d e p a r t m e n t chair. I ( 4 ) 324 Natural History of Vertebrates Cl ass i fi c a t i on , n a t u ral hi s t o ry, a n d ec on om i c i m p or ta nce of vertebrates with the exception of b i rds . Field trips and labora­ tory. P re requ i s i t e : 3 2 3 . I ( 4 )

326 Animal Behavior Description, c l ass i fica t i o n, cause, function, and development of the behavior of animals. Lectures emphaSize an e t h ol o gica l approach to the stu dy of behavior foc u s i n g on comparisons among s p ec i e s, as well as p h ysi o lo g ic a l , ecological, a n d evolu­ tionary aspects of behavior. L a b o r ato ry is not rigidly sch e d u l ed and w ill consist of a b eh avi or a l i nves t i gati o n of the st udents' choosing. Pre req u i sit e : 323 o r consent of instructor. II ( 4 ) 327 Ornithology The study of b irds i nclusive of their anatomy, p hys iol og y, behavior, ecol o gy and distribution. Special e m p h a si s on those attributes of b i rd s that are unique among the ve rte br a tes . La b o ­ rato ry e m ph a s i s on field id ntification, taxonomy, and anatomy/ topolo g y. P rereq u isi t e : 3 2 3 o r consent of i n s t ru c to r. II (4) 328 M ia-obiology The structure, p hy i o l o g y, gen e tics , and metabolism of m icroo r­ ga n i s m s with e mph a si s on the.ir d i ve rs i t y and ecology. The laboratory includes isolation of o rg a n is m s from natural sou rces, use of fu ndamental b a ct e r i o l o g i c a l t e ch niq u es, and e m p h a s i z es d e s ig n , i m pl e me n tation , and e va l u a t i o n of both d es cr i p tive and P

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qu ant i ta ti ve p roject...

Prere q ui s i te : 323 o r co nsent o f i nstructor; one semest r orga n i c chemistry r o m m e 11ded . I I (4)

403 Developmental Biology The development of m u l t i ce l l u l a r organisms, em phasizing cellular and molecular bases fo r deve l o pme n t. Major topics i n c l ud e fertilization, early em b ryo n i c development, the o r igi n of

331 G.:netics Basi

con epts i n d u d i IlU onsid eration of m o lecul ar basis o f

ge n e ex pres � i()n , rec o l11h i na ti on , gene t i c >­

I!l o ...J

o cc

cell d i fferences during early d eve lop m ent, genetic co n trol of de velo p me n t , cellular di ffere ntiation, m o r p h o ge n et i c processes,

a ri a b i li t y, and

consideratio n of cytogen eti cs and p o p u la t ion gen etics . In cl u d es

and the speci fication of pattern in d eve lop i ng systems. Labora­

la bo rato r y. P re r quis it : 323 I I ( 4 )

340 Plant Diversity and Distribution sys te ma tic i n trod uct ion to p la n t d i vers i t y. Interaction bet wee n pla n ts, then ri � of vege tat i o na l distrib utio n . Emphasis on h igher p la n t taxo nomy. Includes la b o rat o ry , nd field trips. Prerequisite: 323. II (4)

tory a dd resses biochemical a n d m olecular aspects of develop­ m en t. Prerequ isite: 323. I (4)

407 MoLecular Biology An in t roduction to molecular b io lo gy, em ph a s i z i ng the cc ntral role o f DNA i n e u ka r yo tic cells. Topics i n cl u d e:

fou ndations ( DNA st r u c t u re as genetic storehouse, ce n t ral d og ma of mo l ecu la r biology, reco m b i n a n t DNA t e ch n o l o g y ) ; fu n c t i o n ( regulat i o n of gene expressio n, genome o rg a n i za t i on a n d rea r ra ngem en t ) ; fr o n t ie rs ( ca n cer, d e velo pm e n t , evol u ti on , ge n et ic e ngi n ee r ing - m et h o do l o g y, applications, trends, i mplicat i o n �) . Lab o rat o ry feat ures a n i n t ro d ucti o n to basic reco m b i nant D NA techn iques. Prerequ isite: 323. I I (4)

4 1 1 Histology Microsc l p i c study of normal ce l ls , tiss ues, organs, an d o rga n

systems of vertebrates. The e m p h a s i s is mammalian. This s tu dy is both stru c t u ra l ly and phI' iologically o r iented.

Pre re q u i s i t e : 5 2 3 . I (4) 424 El:ology rga n i sm s in rela t ion to thei r environment, i ncl u d i ng orga n i sm a l adap ta t i o n s, p o p ul a ti o n growth and i n teractions, and ecosystem structure and fu n c tio n . P r e requ i s i te : 3 2 3 . I (4)

425 Biological Oceanography The ocean as environment fo r plant and 3 n i l11al life; an i n troduc­

tion to the st r u c t u r e , dynamics, and hist o ry of marine ecosys­ tems. Lab, field t rips, and term project in addition to l ec t u re . Prerequis ite: 3 2 3 . I I (4)

426 Ecological Methods An exa m i n a t ion of m et h o d o l o gy used fo r disce rn i ng st ruc.ture

and fu nc t io n of natural ecosystems. The course will cover an 346 Cellular Physiology eals with how cells arc fu nc t i o n a l l y or ga n i zed ; enzyme kinetics and regulatory mechanisms, b iochemistry of m ac r o m o l e cu les , energy meta bolism, membrane structu re and fu nction, u l t ra­ str ucture, ca n ce r cells as mndel syste m s . Prerequisites: 323 a n d one semester o f org:mic chem i s t ry or consent of i ns t r u ctor. I I ( 4 ) 347 CeUular Physiology Laboratory A laboratory exp erie n ce in t chniques a n d types of instrumenta­ ti n often enc o u ntered

in b i o hem ical and ellular resea rch i ncl u di n g an imal ce.1I cul ture, ce l l fractiona t ion, usc of ra d i otrac ­ ers, biochemical assays, m e m b ra ne p h en o mena , spectro p ho t o m try, re sp i r o m e t r y. M ay b d e cted o n l y b y students with a serious interest for t h is ty p e o f t ra i n i n g; n ot r equ i red w i t h 346. orcqu isite/ pr requ i s i te : 346 or CHEM 403 and c o nse n t of instructor. I I ( 1 ) 359 Plant Anatomy and Physiology Higher p lant s tructure and function fro m germina t i o n to

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hypotheses about ecosyst ms. Wr iting of scientific papers and acces ing t h e sci e n t i fic l i t e rature will b e a n u n der ly i n g focus of

the course. Lecture, labo ratory, and field work. P re r eq u i s it e : 3 2 3 o r consent o f instructor. I I

(4)

441 Mammalian Physiology Functions of p r i n c i p a l m am m a l i a n organ s)'stems, emphasizing control mecbanisms and homeostatic rel a t i o n s h i p s . H u m a n­ o r i en t ed la bo rator y i nc l udes work i n c i rcuiJtion, cardiography, psychophysiology, and other areas. Pre req u i s i tes: 323 and CHEM 33 1 . Anatomy and b ioc h e m i st r y recom mended. I ( 4 )

resp onses: speci fic i ty o f i m m u ne reactions, types and ro le s o f receptors, and complement, regu lation of the immune response, hypersensitivity reactions, and immu nodeficien y d isea s es . Incl udes the theoretical concepts supporting e. p er iment al stra t eg ies and i m m u nochemical app l ication . Prerequisites: Any two of t h e following cou rses i n Biol ogy: 3 2 8 , 33 1 , 346, 403, 407, 44 1 . ( 3 )

is inc luded. Kn o wledge or vertebrate · t r u c t u re is

L

me tho d s used ill ecological studies a n d how to

ly m p h a t k c I s , characteristics o f immu noglob u l ins, anti gen

Prerequ is ite: 323. I I ( 4 )

P

methodology d iscussed will serve as a sa m pl i ng o f types of

substances, either from the external enviro n ment or se l f­ induced. Considera tion of t he biology a n d che m i s t ry of i m m u n e

of pract ical value to workers i n many fields of biology.

36

co m mu n i ty structure t o m easu remen t of productivity. The

446 Immunology

36 1 Comparative Anatomy o f the Vertebrates After a h i sto ry of the vertebrate body ( t he evo l ut i o n a r y story of the erte brates is be t te r known than any u ther a n im al gro u p ) a n d a n int ro d uct ion t e mbryolog y, the structura l a n d func­ tional a na to my of the v rtebrates is presented. In cl udes lah ora ­ tory d isse cti on s fo ll ow i n g J systems approach. Ma m m a ls are feat u red plus s o m t' observational and co m p a rat iv study with a er

s t ud ies, a nd m et h o ds rang i n g from desc ription of the ph y s ic a l

enviro n m ent, est imation of po p u l a t i on size, q u a n t i fy i n g

The s t ud y of an a n i mal's respo nse to the pw;ence of fo reign

sen scence, i n d u d i ng b asic anatomy, seed germ i n at io n , water rel at io n s, res p i ration, mi neral nutrition, p h o to syn thes i s, growth regu l a t o r s, and reproductio n . I ncludes l ab o ra t ory. P re rcq u i . ites: 323 and one semester of organic chemistry. I (4)

human cada

i n trod uctio n to general stat i.s tical t ech n iq ues used i n eco l ogi c a l

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447 Applied Immunology L a b o r a to ry ex pe r i e n c es in co mm o nly used i mm u n o b i o l ogic a l and i m m u nochemical t echn i q ue s i n cl u d i n g but not l i m i ted to


pre i p i tat ion, agg l u t i na t i on , ELISA, irnm unoblotti ng, fluorescence- based p r oced u re s and ce l l u l a r met.hods. Also

in lude discu . ion of res arch and cl i n i cal a ppl ic at i o n:; o f immunote IUlology. 446 must be t a ke n concurrently or as a p rerequisit ; not re q u i re d w i t h 446. ( I ) Evolution as a process: sources of va r iat io n ; forces overcoming gene t ic i n ertia i n p opu lat i o ns; spec i at i o n . Evo l u t io n of genet ic systems and of l i fe in relation to ecol og i ca l theo r y and earth h i s t o r y. Lecture :l I1d discussion. Term paper and m i n i - s e m i n a r req u i red. P rc re q u i ,; i t e : 323. 1 (4)

490 Seminar

Selected topics in b i o l o g y based on l i terature a n d/ o r o r i gi n a l

rcsear h. Open to j un i o r and se n io r b i o log y m a j o rs .

(l )

Lndepeodeol Study [nvesti�atjons or research in are(ls of s p e ci a l i n t e rest not covered by regu lar courses. Open to q ua l i fi e d j u nio r a nd s e n i or m aj o r s ; students s ho ll i d not elect i n d e pe n d e n t study unless they know in advance the spe c i fi c area they w is h to i n ve s t i g a t e and can demon trate a erious interest i n p u r s u i n g that invest iga t i o n . [ t i s suggested that t h e s t u de n t sp e n d o ne semester s e a r h i n g pe r t i ­ nent l i te r a t u re nd writing a p r o p os al (for one credit hour) and a second s m es te r actually carrying out the p roj ect ( for one more credit bour). P re req u isi t e : wr i tte n p ro po s al for the project ap­ prov d by a facu l t y s po n s o r and the de pa r t men t chair. I [[ ( J -4)

49 1 , 492

Directed Study

Original exp r i men t a l d i v isi on

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s t ud e n ts

c e - Re sea rch

or

t h eo re tical research o pen to u p p e r

i n ten d i n g to g r ad u a t e w i th

a

Bachelor of

Emphasis. Requ i re s a w r i t t e n pro p o s a l

a p p roved by a fa cu l t y sponsor and the dep a r t m e n t

497

chair. (2)

Senior Seminar

The goal of th is course is to a s s is t st udents in the w r i t i n g a n d pre e n ta ti o n of

1 . Be o ffic ial l y a dmitted

d

paper c o n ce rn i n g a t o pic w it h i n b iol o g )! which

would i nte rate t h e various ele ments in the m aj o r p ro g r a m . A p ropo s a l for t h e topic m u s t be p resented to

t h e department ea r ly

in the spring term of the j u n i o r year. Cour�e adivities will

incl ude l i tera t ure search, s t ud e n t - l e d group d iscussions of th e naly'i� I.lf drafts ()f t h e paper by the and p ub lic presentation of lhe final p a pe r in eit h e r po ter or o r a l session. The sem i n a r may be linked to b u t not re p l a ced I y la b o r a t ry i ndependent s t u d y or i n te r n s h i p expe r i e n c e . Sa tisfies the senior semUlar re q u i re m e n t . ( 2 )

paper topics, c ritic(ll

3. H a ve a m i n i m u m cumulative grade po i n t a crage o f 2.50, and

4. Have completed and/or b e c u rre n t ly enrolled i n : MATH 1 28 ,

CSC[ 220, ECO

of B u s i n es ' i s to s t i m u l a t e tbe

developm n t and ongoing improvement of tbe

whole

per o n and co m m u n i t i es we serve by prov i d i n g relev a nt ,

in novative,

and qua l i ty bu

an d R U S A 20 1 ; a n d

u p pe r d ivision b u iness cou r es is l i m ited to st udents with a cumulative grad po i n t averag of 2.50 or above w h o h ave met the r equ i r ed p re req u i s i t e s .

z m \II \II

AFFILIATIONS: The School of Business of Pacific Lutheran U n ive r s ity is a me mber o f the American A sse m b l y o f ' olleg i a t e Schools of B u s i ness. The B . B.A., M . B . A . , and acco u n t ing p ro ­ grams are n a t i o n a l l y accredited by the Accreditation Co u n c i l of the AACSB. Th e School is pri v i l e ge d to have a s t u d e n t c h a p ter o f Beta G a m m a Sigma, the national b u s i ness h o n o r a ry s o c i e t y rec· o g n i z e d by t h e CSB. Pacific L ut h e r an LJniver ity i accred i ted reg i ona ll y b y the No r thwest Association of Schools and Colleges. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS: T h e

Bachelor o f B u s i n ess

dmi.nis­

tration degree p ro g r am consi. ts of a m i n i m u m of 128 se m e ster

h o urs completed with an over-all g r a d e

point a ve r ag e of 2 . 50 o r

a b ove as wel l as a 2 . 5 0 g ra d e p o i n t average separately i n bus iness courses. C- is the m i n imal acce p t ab l e grade fo r b us i ness cours s. At least on e - h a l f o f t he m i n i m u m tot al degree requ ire m en ts

are t aken in fields ou ts i de the School of Busi ness. At least 40 semester h o urs are t ake n i n re qui red and ekct ive busin ·s su bj e c t s . A m i n i m u m of 20 semester hours in b u s i n e s s must be takm in residence at PLU. B u sin es s d e g ree a.nd concent ration re q u i r e m e n t are estab­ lished a t t h e time of maj o r declaration. S t uden ts with , I declared maj o r in b u s i n e s who have not att nded the u n iversity for a p e r i o d of three years or 1110re w i n be held to t h e business degree requirements in e ffec t a t the time of re-entry to the u n iver ity.

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: Required foundation co u rses: MATH 1 2 8 Linear Modeb a n d Calculus, an I n t ro d uc t i o n or ( l S I a n d 230) C S I 220 Computerized Information ys t em s CON 1 5 1 - 1 5 2 Macro/Micro Economics STAT 2 3 1 I n tro du c t o r y Statistics P H I L 325 B u s i n e s Ethics (Prerequisite: P H I L 1 0 1 , 1 25 , or 225/226) COMA 336 Effective Busine s Presen ta ti o n ANTH/H I ST/POLS 2 1 0 GI ,bal Pe rs p e ct i e

4

4 4/4 4

2 4 4

28

Minimum semester hours in foundation courses:

Required business courses: BUSA 2 0 1 Tht: Bu s i nes s Enterpri e in Global Perspective

4

BUSA 204 The Fo u n d a t i o n s of Business Law

i ness education i n the liberal

2

4

BUSA 30 I .M a n ag i n g Careers and H u m a n Resources

arts s p i r i t . ......

231

Access to

School of Business of the c hool

1 5 I - 1 5 2, STAT

5. De cla re a maj o r or minor i n business.

e m i nar gr up,

The m is i n

to the university, and

2 . Have s u cces s fu l l y completed 24 semester hours, and

475 Evolution

495

ADMISSION: The pro fe s io n I B a che l o r of Business Adminis· tration degree pro g r a m i s co m p os e d o f an upper d i v i s ion b us iness c u r r i c u lu m w i t h a s t ro n g base i n l iberal a rts. To be a d m it t e d to th ' School of B u s i n e s s , a student must:

BUSA 303 Asse s s i n g and M a n a gi ng Financial Performance ( 6 )

students i n the Sch o o l of Business develop the esse n ti a l skills to hrough competency-based degree progra m s ,

BUSA 202 F in a n c ial Acco u n t i n g ( 4 ) and B U A 302 M ana g e r i a l F i na nce ( 4 ) 6 ( o r 8) BUSA 305 Cre at i ng a n d Lead i n g Effect ive Orga n izations 6 B SA 306/307 M a n a gi n g the Va lue hain [ I l l 8 B SA 405 Law o f the F i n an c i a l Marketplace or BUSt\ 4 0 6 La\\1 of the Workplace: E m p loyees, E m ployers, " hei r R i gh ts and Res ponsibili ties or

h e l p busi n ess meet the dem a nds of an ever-changing

environ ment. S t u d e n t . master the

funda men tals of problem-solving, leadership, m u l t i-cultu ral management, and h nge management to help t h e m bee m su cc sful leaders i n t ea m work , com mlUl ieatio ]], technology,

o r BUSA 407 Law o f the Marketplace: Con s u mers,

business organizations a n d i n the com m unity.

Co m pa n i e s , and P ro d uc t s or BLJSA 4 0 8 International B us i n e s. Law BUSA 409 S t ra tegi Management Upper division business or econom ics ele t ives

fACULTY: Me ann, J)ean; Ah na, B a n c ro ft , Barndt, Barnowe, Be r n iker, Fin nie, Gi.b o n, H g tad, Kibbe , ri a c Do n a l d , McNabb, . l i l ler, Moreland, Myers, Ramanlia, Sepic, T h ras h e r, Van yhe, Yager.

2

4 6 (or 4 ) 40

Minimum semester hours in business courses:

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CONCENTRATIONS: A s tu d e n t may elect t o c o m p le t e one o r m re concen trations w i t h i n the Ba ch elo r of Business Admi nistra­ tion program. (Courses taken to fulfill concentration re q u i re­ men ts will also meet general B.B.A. requirements . ) The c o n ce n ­ tration, which is not d on the s t u d e nt 's tr a n s c r i p t , must be com­ p l ete d w i th at lea s t a 3.00 grade point a e ra ge . C- is th e minimal acceptable grade for concentration courses. A minimum of ei g ht seme tel' hours or the total req u i red for a co nce n tr a t i o n must be taken i n residence at PLU. 20 sem. hrs.

Financial Resources Management I3 A 405 Ldw of the Fi nancial M a rketp lace B SA 32 ] Intermediate cco unting I

2 2

One of the fo llowing: 4 ECON J3 1 I n ternational : c o n o mics (4) £ O N 3 5 1 I n t e r m e d i a te Macro-Economic A na l y s is ( 4 ) ECO 352 I ntermediate M icro- Economic A n a .lysis ( 4 ) ·C 36 1 Money a n d B ank i ng ( 4 ) Twelve sell1ester hours from the iol/oll'illg: 12 au A 320 Financial I n fo rm a t i o n Systems (4) BUSA 322 Intermediate Ac c o u n t i n g II (2) BUSA 422 Consolidations a n d Equity Issues ( 2 ) B U SA 4 2 3 Accou n t i n g for nt-for-Profit and Governmen tal Entit ies ( 2 )

B SA 424 Audi t i ng (4) B A 323 o s t A cc ou nt in g a nd Co n tro l Sys te ms (4) B SA 327 Tax A c co u n t i ng I (2) BUSA 427 Tax Acco u n t ing II (2) BUSA 335 Financial I nvestments (4) BUSA 430 E n t repreneurial F i na nce ( 4 ) B US A 4 3 7 Fi. n a nc i al An a lys i s a n d S t r a teg y ( 4 ) BUSA 4 38 Financial Resea rch a nd A na lys is (4) Profe

26 sem. hrs.

ional Accounting

2 4 2 2 2

B 'SA 405 Law of the Financial M a rk et p l a ce B SA 3 20 Financial I n formation Systems B SA 32 [ I n te rm e d i a t e Acco unti n g I B S 322 Intermediate Ac coun t i n g U B SA 422 Con so li d a t i o n s and Equity Issues B SA 423 A cco u nt ing for Not-for-Pro fi t and overnmental E ntit ies B U SA 323 Cost Acc ou n t i n g and Control Sys te ms B SA 327 Tax Acco un t i n g [ BUSA 4 27 Tax Acc o unt i ng II BUSA 424 u d i t i n g

2 4 2 2 4

Ruman Resource Management 22 sem. hrs. BUSA 406 Law o f the Wotkplace: E m pl oy e es , E m p l oyers , 2 Their Rights a n d Responsi.b i l ities BUS 342 Managing Human Re source s 4 ECON 32 [ Lab r Economics 4

Three of the followillg (at least two from B USA) :

[2 BUSA 3 4 3 M a n a g i n g Reward Systems ( 4 ) B 'A 442 Leadership and O r ga n iza t i o na l D ev e l o p me n t ( 4 ) B U S A 445 Quality I mp rove m en t Strategies (4) B SA 449 u r re nt Issues in Human Resource M an a gem en t (4) BUSA 4 9 2 1 n terns h ip ( 4 ) C MA 435 Orga nizational ommunication (4) C MA 437 A dvanced I n te rpers o n a l Communication (4) PSY 46 1 Psyc ho l og y of Work ( 4 ) PSYC 4 50 Ps yc h o l o gi c al Te s t i ng ( 4 )

International Business 18-34 sem. hrs. 2 BUSA 408 I ntern a t i o n al Business Law ECON 33 [ International Econom ics 4 BUSA 352 Ma n ag i n g in the M ul t i n a t i o n al En iro nment 4 B SA 355 Global pe r a tio n s 4

Olle a the fo llowing:

4

An a p p ro ve d area course from POLS, A TH, or H I ST (4) ill: B US A 460 I nternational Marketing ( 4 ) Option [ o f the College of Arts a n d Sciences fo r e i g n l a n g uag e re q ui reme n t ill: on semester of st u d y abroad 0-16

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Marketing Resource Management BUSA 407 Law of the M ar ketpl a ce: Co n s u me rs, Co mp a nie s , and Products B USA 467 M a rke t i n g Research B USA 468 M a rke t i ng M a n a ge me n t

22 sem. hrs.

2 4 4

One of the followil1g: E 33 [ I n ternational E co no m i cs (4)

4

ECON 244 Eco no met rics ( 4 ) [2 Two of the follow il1g (at least one from BUSA): B US.A 363 Co n su m e r Behavior a n d Promo t i o n a l S trategy ( 4 ) B U S A 3 6 5 Sa l es and Sa les M a nag e m e n t (4 ) BUSA 367 B us i n es s to Business M a r ket i n g (4) B U S A 460 I nt ernat i on al Marketing ( 4 ) O M A 2 7 [ M as s Media ( 4 ) PSYC 462 Consumer Psychology (4) Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management 2 2 sem. hrs. B SA 405 w of t h e Financial Marketplace 2 B U S 358 En t re p r en e u rs h ip 4 B USA 430 Entrepreneurial Finance 4 4 B SA 492 I n ter n shi p l1vo of the followil1g (one must be

B USA):

8

BUSA 323 ost Accounting ( 4 ) B U S A 4 3 8 Financial Research a n d A na l y si s ( 4 ) B S A 3 6 5 Sales a n d Sales M an age me n t ( 4 ) B SA 3 7 1 O p e rat i o n s a n d I n for m at io n Te c h n o l o g y (4) BUSA 442 Le a de rsh i p a n d Organizational D e vel o p m e n t (4) B USA 467 Ma.rketi n g R esearch ( 4 ) ECOI 3 7 [ Industrial O rg an iza t i on and Public P o l i cy (4) ECO 3 6 [ Mo n ey and B an k i n g (4) Operations and Information Tecl mology B USA 405 Law of the Financial Marketplace

22 sem. hI'S.

2

ill:

B USA 406 Law of the Wo rkp la ce : Employees, Em p l oy ers , T he i r Righ t s and Responsibi.lities BUSA 3 7 [ O p era t io n ' and Information Te ch n o l o gy B U SA 374 Des i gn i ng a n d Ma n ag ing Operatio ns and Information Sy terns BUSA 479 I m p l e m e n ting Advanced Syst e m s BUSA 323 Cost Ac co un ti ng and Control Systems One of the following:

2 4 4 4

4 4

BUSA 3 20 Fina ncial I n formation Sys t e m s (4) B 445 Quality I m p ro ve m e n t St ra teg i es ( 4 ) CSCI 367 Data Base M an a ge me n t ( 4 ) � '(prerequisite: CSCI 1 44 )

MINOR I N BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: A minimum o f 20 se m e ste r hours in bus in e ss co urse", i n cl u d ing BUSA 2 0 1 - The Business E nt e r p r i s e i n Global Per pective. ALI co u r ses must be comp l e t e d with a g r ade of C- or h i ghe r. A cumulative grade point a ve ra ge of 2.50 for all courses in t h e m i nor is required. At least 1 2 s e m es ter h o u rs must b e upper division, an d a t least 8 sem e st e r hours must be c o m pl et ed i n residence. ACCOUNTING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: The ac co un t i n g certificate program is a va i la b l e for students who hold a baccalau­ reate d egre e ( a ny field) and wish to co mp l e t e the e d u ca t iona l requirements to sit for t h e C.P.A. ex a m i n a t ion . Co ntact the School of B u s i n es s fo r further i n formation. MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

See Graduate tudies.

Course Offerings

1 05 Personal Financial Planning and Consumer Law Basic financial and legal d ec i s ion making. I ncludes an introduc­ t i o n to el e m enta ry concepts in fi nance, economics, law, and con­ su mer p s yc h o l ogy. To p i cs include career planning, budgeting, th e use and mi s u se of cred it, ma jo r purchase d e c i s ion s, tax.es, insur­ a nc e, and i nvestments. ( 4 )


201 Tbe Business Enterprise in Global Per pective I nt r d uction to the tudy of how busi ness int racts with its environment. Designed for students who are taking a first look a t - the role of bus iness in society and who have not had extensive ·tudy in econ omics, busi ness law, or poli t ical science. I ntroduc­ tion of market and non-market control mechanisms. Thr ugh [he . tudy o f cases, stu c n ts s e e and discuss the means by which busin ess respollds external I)' a nd i n ternally to on g ing h,mge in domestic and global socie ty. Such changes cu rrently affect ing the evolution of b usines. inclllde the global­ i7-3tion o f competition, the expansion of the regu latory environ­ mCIlt, wo rkfo r e diversity, n w computer a n d com m u n ications technol ogies, and lhe informatio n explosion. Attent ion is g iven to the p rocesses by which business partici­ pate In the public policy process. Recurring concepts such as strategi issues managemen t and business social performance provide them<lti unity for the our ·e. ( 4 ) 202 Financial Accounting I ntroduction to accounting concepts and principles. Valuation theories i n lht: U. S. com pared to those i n other nations. Prepara­ tion and analy�is )f fi nancial reports. (4) 204 The Foundations of Business Law

Designed t J pr vide for all busi ness chool �tudents a shared f u ndation i n the legal environme n t of b usines ', the course meri an law, the structure of the U.S. court c >vers S urccs of syste m, altern,itives to litigation, and Constitutional guarantees appli able in a business con text. Also, in troduction to basic legal p rinciples of contracts, torts, intellectual property, agency, and business o rgan iza tio ns . ( 2)

301 Managing Careers and Human Resources An expl rat ion of individu al and organ iza tional practices and r spo nsibilities related to org311lZ;ttional ent ry, compet ncy developmmt, and performance i mprovement a s ca reers u n fold. Part I emphasize ne� areer developme n t paradigms, critical competen cie s required tor suc ess at work, self-assessment of tudents' abilit ies and stren gths, and development of career managemen t strategies and a S-ycar pcrsol1�li7.ed learn ing plan fo r competency development. Part 2 emphas ize be t practices fo r organization in acqu iring, developing, a l1d rewarding e m ­ ployees, a n d i n managing employee perform ance, diversity, and legal co ncerns in a global! ompetitive env i ronment. An e..x: peri­ ential approa h is used to develQP knowledge and :kills essential for managing careers and humJn resources i n the 2 1 st century. \) p rerequ isite, but 'uggest taking i multaneously with BUSA 305. ( 4 )

302 Managerial Finance l n tf()duction to the principal probkms, theories and p ro ce dur es of finan ial management; valuation, tlnancial plann ing, tlnancial statement analysis, capital asset , quisition, cost of cap i tal, fi­ nancing stratogies ( i ncluding capital SLru ture thear>' and d ivi­ dend policy) , management of working capiral accounts, and financial di men ions of intern a t i o nal trade. Prerequisi te : 'S 1 220. ( 4 ) 303 Assessing and Managing Financial Performance Study of th origins and llSes of financial i n format i o n . Logic, content, nd ormat of principal financial statements; natUJe of market values and their relationship to val ues derived from accowlling pro e es; princ iples and p rocedu.res pertaining to business I n estl11ent activity and fi nancing strategies, viewed from the standpoint of financial decision-m, king, i nvesting, and a e oun ling t h�ory and practice. Prerequisites: sophomore ·tand­ ing; eSC! 220. (6) 305 Crea ting and Leading Effective Organ.n.ation A st udy of how to organile and manage in today's context of

chan ging internal and external demands and expectations, with a trong emph a.s i s on co m petencies and practices which enha nce teamwork. Exp lo res how tasks, p rocesses, individuals, groups, and tructu re a re interrelated, and how they j(lintly im pact orga-

niza tional effectiveness. Topics include individua1 a.nd group behavior, motivation, work design, comm u n icat ion , de ision­ making, leadership, and organiza r ional cl imate and culture. Develops knowledge and kills essential for managing cont inu­ ous change using a team-based, experiential learning a pproach. No prerequ isite, but suggest taking simultaneously with BU, A 30 1 . ( 4 ) 306 Managing th e Value Chain J The co urse develops a n i ntegrated u n derstanding of value cre­ ation in b usin ess entities delivering goods and services. The focus of the first cou rse is on customer value and the processes that produce value using modern dpproaches to marke t l n g Jmi operat ions. I n addition, the integrating l i n kages bet\veen cus­ tomers, value, quality, and product and service o fferi ngs will be emphasized. P rerequisites: Sophomore standing; MATH 1 2 8 (or MATH 1 5 1 & MATH 230 ) ; ECON 1 5 1 / 152; computer spread­ sheet competency. Co-requisite: BUSA 303, STAT 2 3 1 . (4)

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307 Managing t h e Value Chain D This secon d course in the sequence contin ues to develop an in tegrated understanding of value creation. The focus will be o n measuring a n d ma naging economic performance using manage1 1 1 n t accou nt ing, concepts and practices, and on the r Ie of i ntegrated i n formation systems in sup porting business fu nctions. Emphasis on how these fu nctions deliver value to customers. Prerequ isite: B U S A 306. ( 4 ) 320 Financial Information Systems Study of the flow of i nformation through an enterprise, the sou rces and nature o f documents, and the control n ces ary to insure the accuracy and rel iability of information. Prerequisites: S [ 220, BUSA 303 (or BUSA 2 ( 2 ) . ( 4 ) 32 1 lnteImediate Accounting I Concentrated study of rhe conceptual framework or accounting, valuation theories, asset and i n come measurement, and financial statement disclosures i n the .S. a nd abroad . Prerequisites: CSCI 220; B SA 303 ( o r BU A 202 ). ( 2 ) 322 Intermediate Accou nting D Additional st u d y o f valuation theory. Advanced issues i n asset a nd income measurement and financial statement disclosure. Includes eva.luation of U.S. positions relative to those o f other nations and international agt'ncies. Prerequisites: !:leI 220; BUSA 303 (or 202), 3 2 1 . ( 2 ) 323 Cost Accounti n g and Control Systems A critical examination of systems for pro d u c t costing and mana­ gerial cont rol. Case analyses deal with the ability f a variety of traditional and n o n - t raditional product and service costing systems to ach ieve basic objecti es o f i nventory valuation, plan­ ning and operational contro l . E mph asis on developing the skills to critique cost systems and to understand the relationship be­ tween cost systems a nd production/service op e r at i o ns, organiza­ tional strateg y, and performance evaluation and control systcms. Prerequisites: MATH 1 28 ( o r MATH l S I and 2 3 0 ) ; SC1 220; STAT 23 1 ; ECON 1 5 1 / 1 52 ; BUSA 303, 306, 307. ( 4 ) 327 Tax Accounting I S tudy of i ncome tax conccpts, regulations and tax planning principl . Emphasis o n individual i n come taxation. (2) 335 Financial lnvesbnellt In-dep th exploration of fundamental principles gove rn i ng the valuation or particular securitie�, and knowledgeable construc­ tion, management, and evaluatio n of portfulios. Risk, return, bond and stock valuation, illterest rate determination and a p ital market efficiency are among the topics accorded particular em­ phasis. Prerequisites: ECO 1 5 1 / 1 5 2, eSCl 220, BUSA 303 ( or BUSA 302 ) . ( 4 ) 342 Managing Human Resowces D t ail ed coverage of pe rso n nel/human reso u rce proced ures in t h e U.S. and other co u n tries . . xamination of standard human P

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resOLL rCC ru nctions: l 1 u m a. n re"o urce pl;r n n ing, recru i t mentl d ec ru i t m e n t. selection and p lace me nt , trai n i n g Jnd career develprnen l , p e rfo f"m a n e a p p rai�al, compensation and b e ne t-its, and safery/weJlnes". Review of changing st ra tegies fo r full use of e m pl yees in light f ongoing legal. and global developments. Prer q u isite: BUS 305. (4)

The s t u d y of operational bu siness de isians

!ld the i n f() r m a t io n

systems and models re q u i red to su p p o r t s u c h decisions. The

examination of decision s u p p o rt syste m s , com put rized plan­

n i ng and ontrol systems and t ra n sa c t i o n systems as they func­ tion in produ rive orgal1.iz·ltion . . The i m p l i c a ti o ns fo r operations managemen t and i n formation systems de s i g n . P re re q u i s i t s: M AT H 1 28 (or MATH J 5 1 and 2 3 0 ) ; S [ 2 20 o r 1 44; EC N 1 5 1 / 1 5 2 ; STAT 2 3 1 ; BUS 303, 306, 307. (4 )

343 Managing Reward Systems Detailed examination of reward sys tem de e l o p m e n t and prac­ tice" in cl u d i n g job a nal ys i s and eva l u a t i on , design of pay s t ru tures, performance measurement, the use o f i nd i v id u a l , g ro u p and o rga n i zati on-wi de incentives, and the design and a d m i n i s ­

374 Designing and Managing OperatioD and

t rat i o n of employee benefi ts. Review of I gal r e q ll i rem e nts and

information Systems

o in nov. lions wh.ich integrat e reward sys tems wi th other h u ­ m a n resource practices. Prereq u isites:

BUSA

3 0 5 . (4)

S J 220, ECO

Advanced service deliv ry syst�ms, manufactu ring ystems, and

1 5 1 / 1 52,

t

anlwo rk;

h u man r e o a rce practi es for global operaL ions;

m a n agi n g ethnic d i t!rsity and con flic t i n oth e r c u l t ures. Applica­

t ion of the theQretical base o f i nterna tional eco n o m ics to rcal ase situation . Com petencies involved in com mu nicat i ng and negoti.ari.ng a c ross cultures, Pre re q u i s i t e: E ' N 3 3 1 . ( 4)

t i o n . Prereq u isi tes : ECON 33 1 ; B S A .. 5 2 .

(4)

358 Entrepreneur hlp Inte ns ive study of issues and challe nges associaled w i t h start - up,

growth, a n d maturation of a new enterprise. 1ssu s covered i nclude t o pics such a! characteristics of 'uccessful \!n h 'cpreneu rs, s ec ur ing ca p ital , managing rapid growth, leJdership SucCt:ssi{ln,

and realizing alue through the sa l e or m e rge r o f tbe b usiness . Incl udes exploration of ryp '5 of 8lll, II b usi nesses s Llch a fam i l y o w n ed alld closely h el d companies.

(4)

363 Consumer Behavior and Promotional Strategy Co n cep ts of con, umer b havior to h Ip explain hnw buyers gain awa reness, estab lish pu rchasi ng criteria, selectively S C I' en infor­ mation and deci Ie. 11 pi s i n promoti o n i n c l u d e tapet a udi en ce defin i t io n, message design, media sel e c t i o n \ ithin a b u dg e t a n d eval uatio n/co n t rol of t h e promo tional m ix. (4) 365 Sales and Sales Management Fundamentals of sell i ng-pro pe ting, a ct i ve listt'll i n g , benefit p res e n t at i o n , ohjective ha nd l in g, c l o sing and territory manage­ m i l t. Issues ' u r ro u nd i ng management of sales pe rsonnel , i n ­ cludi ng sales budgets; fo recas ting, t e rri t o r y design, e m pl o ym e nt of represen tilt ive , tra i n i n g , motivation, and valuation tech ­

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competi tive strategy, and m ea u rement and performance of costs

in perations. ase studie used to critique o p e r at i ons a.nd infor­ maLion sys tems in terms of thci I' su ppo r t of business objectives. ase s t u di es and real systems through c l ass projects provide thc basis for exploration of the impact o f i n for m< tion te hnology on b us iness processes . Projects involve the SKi l l s of systems devel op ­ m 'nt, with a fo c u s on teamwork, cha nge man a.Jemen t , a n d sys­ tems u sab i l i ty in the context of enlice and m a n u fa ct ur i n g op r­ alions. Prcreq uhtes: MATH 1 2 8 (or MATH 1 5 1 a n d 230); SCI 220 or 144; ECON 1 5 J / l 5 2; ST T 23 1 ; B SA 3 0 3 , 306, 307,

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405 Law o f the Financial Marketplace Designed fo r students whose i n te r e st s are in finance, ac('oLl n t l n g, pe r so nal fi nancial ma nagement, or s i_mila r fields which demand a n u ndersta nding of th ldws <lffecting fioan i a l transactions. oncen tratioLl on the sections of the Un iJon n .ommercial Cock which affect financial t ransact ions , lIch as nego tiable i n st r u ­ ments ( check , nott'S, a n d other fi n a n c i a l i n st nUllents ) , banking relationship5, a n d secu red loan transactions . Other topics in­ clude: debtor-creditor ri g h t s, the fe deral secu ri t ies laws, issues of p rofess ion al l i abi l i t y, as wel l as oth r contempora ry controv [sies rel evan l to t he field. ( 2 ) 406 Law of the Workplace: Employees. Employers, Their Rights and Responsibilities Ex p l o ra tion f legal issues whi h arise in t h e wo r kp l a c e . Empha­ sis on the em p loyer-empl oyee r l atio n s h i p and ti mely ClJntrover­ sies such as privacy in the wo rkplace. overage i n c l udes an h i s ­ torical persp ective o n labo r relations a n d government regulation o f the employment rel a t i o n s h i p. Other to p i cs i n clude an exam i­ n a tion f the e m p l oy m en t contract, a su rvey of the basic legal p r i n c ipb defi n i n g the r i g ht s and r es p on i b i l itie of emp loyers a nd employees, an over iew of all maj o r e mp l o ym e nt I "'S such as the iviJ I igh ts Act of 1 9 64 . (2) 407 Law o f the Marketplace: Con umers, Companies, and Products Legal issues found in marketing p ra c t ic es and the regulatory fra m work s urro un di ng them. Ex planation of the ba ic legal pr i n c i p l e � that a pply to intel lectual pro p e r ty , consumer p ro tec­ tion, a dve r t i s i n g, governmcnt regulaLion of new products, p r od ­ uct liabi lity, a n d unfair t r ade pract ices. overag al. o xtends to cont mporar contro ersie, in marketing, such a t he confl i ct b tween free speech and gove r n men t reg u lation of , dver ti s i n g . 408 International Business Law

367 Marketing o f Business Services Ma na gi ng the service expe r ie nce for business c u st o m ers . reat­ ing and retai ning b u s i n '55 re lationships in a cu stumer- focu sed organization t h ro ugh marketing strategies . Student s are enco u r ­ aged t o gain i n -field knowledge o r h ow IOLal service prov iders

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deal with i n d ustri a l ti rms, resellers, and g ove r n me n t agt:Jlcies.

co m pe t it iv e

econom . Study o f o p e r a t i o n s and ilLFormation technology as

3 7 1 ( o r concurre n t ) .

355 Managing Global Operations Study of pract ical issues in operati ng globally: Produ l and [ocarion d� is ions, make/b uy sou r ing decisions, analyzing fo r­ eign cou nt ry business environments ( i n frastructure, po l itical, legal, a n d econumic constrai nts) , i ncentives fo r fo rei g n direct investment, establishing j o i n t ll t u res/strategic a l lia.nces, develping const rueti e rel ationsh ips with fo reign partners and host co u n trie" tech nology tran fer, l og i sli s and materials manage­ ment, headq ua r ters-sub s idia r y com m u n ications, and gl o b a l di spers ion f productive and R&D assets. xp l o r a ti on of envi­ ro n men ta l a n d other host and home gov rn menL pol icy i m p l i c a ­

ni q u es.

i n formation sys t e m s as i m p ac te d by high ca p i tal i n tensity, t i m e ­ based competit ion , and the

352 Global Management I n tegrated s t u d y of d ec i s i ol l S and chilllenges faced hy manage rs in large and sma l l c om pa n i es as they do busincs..� glob, l Iy. A n a ly­ sis of t h e ha n g jn g e.nv ironment of gl obal busine $; stra t e g i c choices in b ui l d i n g gl ob a l comp t iLive a dva n t age ; ass ss i ng ma r ­ kets and country risk; alt mative entry modes for globalization; how c u l ture a £li t s leadersh i p, motivation, com mu nication a n d

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371 Operations and rnformation Technology: Concepts and Application

Y

An overview of t h e legal aspects of act i v i t ies involved in -on­ dueting a world business. Topics include selec t i ng a legal fo rm of busi ness org:l Ili2atinn; the i n ternat i o n a l �, Ies contract; exporting and i m p o rt i n g or goods an related activi ties su h as �hipping and in urance; direct invest men t ; use of n a t u ra l resources; the l ice n s i ng of pn.lcesses, patents or trademarks; e xp o r t i n g p e rs o nal s ervices such as ma rket ing. fi nanc ial , technological, t l'a nsport a -


tion or m an a ger ia l ex p er t ise ; a n d r es o l v ing i n ternational dis­ p u tes . Prerequisite: 13 SA 204. (2) 409 Strategic Management S t u dy of o rgan i za t i o na l adm i n is t ra t i o n from the per. pective of trategic d ec i si o n ma kers . For m ula ti o n and i m p l ementation of s trat egies and p ol i ie ' to i n teg ra t e a1t manag ment and business f U ll ions in sli pport of organizational objective�. Implicat ions of resou rce ava i l a b ility, tech nolo gy, and the eco n o m y; pe rso n a l allies, eth ics, and so ial responsibility; pllbli policy; i n t ern a ­ ti ? n, I rel at ion s; and compeLitive con d i ti o n s in " elec ting cou rses . oj actiOn. I n cludes c o mp re he ns i ve ca se a n a l y si . o m p l et i o n of this course atisfi ·s th Senior Seminar/ Proj ect requ irement. Prerequisites: MJTH I2Il ( o r M ATH 1 5 1 a n d 2 3 0 ) : SCI 220; ON 1 5 1 / 1 52; --rAT 23 1 ; SA 303, 305, 306, 307; enior stan d i n g. (4) 422 Consolidations and Equity Issues o n cent r a t ed stu d}' f equity m ea u r em nt inc l u d i n g the ac­ co u n t i ng a p ec t s of partnersh ips, c or po rat io ns , and con s o l ida­ tions. Iso includes a c c o u n t i n <T for m u l t i n a t i o n � J co rpo ra t i n n s . Pr ereq u i s i t e s : MATH 1 28 ( r M TH 1 5 1 and 230 ); 1 220; B SA 303 ( or B SA 202 ), 320, 3 2 1 , 322. ( 2 ) 423 Accounting for Not-for-Profit and Governmental Entities Study or fund account i ng, i nc l ud i n g its co n c ep t u al basis, its inst i t u t ional standard c t ting fra m e wo r k and current p r inciples and p ra c t i ce s . Prerequisite : S JI 220; BUS 303 (o r 202). ( 2 ) 424 Auditing Co m pr e hensiv e stu dy of a u d i t ing co nce p t s a nd p ro ced u res; a nal y si s of risk th ro ug h Lh study and c:valuation of internal con ­ t rols, and th ro ug h Lh s t u d y and c vo l uaL io n o f account balances; r porting of ri k; review of the de ve lo p me n t a n d m ea n i n g of prafe ional respon ibility and ethics; re iew of op r a t io nal aud itino. Prerequisites: 'SCI 220; B A 303 (or B USA 202), 3 20 , 32 1 , 2 2 . (4) 427 Tax Accounting U Concentrated tu dy of i n co me tax concepts, re g u l a t i o n s , and ta p l a n n i n g principles. E m ph asi s on b w; i n es � taxation. Prerequi'- site : CS 1 220; BUS 303 (or BUSA 202), 327. (2) 430 Entrepreneurial Finan(;e Fina nci'll strategies un i q ue to th creati n and/o r e: ansion of smaU, cl o sel y- hel d businesses. Topics include the de t r m i n ation o f c.' pi ta l re q u i re m en t s and mix, s ea rc h i ng for ca p i ta l from ource· ' u c h as venture capitalists, fi nancing ra p i d g ro w t h, and acquiring co m pa n ies . Prerequ i s i te ; S 1 220; BUSA 303 (or BUSA 30 2 ) . (4) 437 FioandoJ Analysis and Strategy I�termeJiate t rea t m e n t of managerial finance topics, incl uding rIsk, gl o ba l milrket · , capital i nvestme nt, fi na nc i a l p l a nn i n g, md fi nan i ng strategies. E mp h as is on devel o p me n t o f de isioll­ making ca p a bi l it y thro u gh exerci es that build res<::a r h a.nd teamwork skill . P re re qu is i tes: CO 1 5 1 / 1 52, CS 1 220, B SA 303 ( o r BUSA 302) . (4) 438 Finandal Research and AnoJysis S ' m i na r cou r 'e d i rected at current issues and dey I p me nt s . In co nsultation Wi t h the i ns t r uc t o r, advanced u n d ergr a duate stu­ den t · �elect appropriate, contempornr)' to p i � fo r reseMch, dis­ 1 5 1 1 1 52; S .I c u ss i on , . nd pr s e n t, t ion. Prerequ is ite·: E 220; BUSA 30 (or BUSA 302), a n d at least one u ppe r division BUSA p re fix elec t i e from t he list of Fi n a n c i al Resour es Man­ agement concen tration cours�s. (4) 442 Leadership and Organizational Development b(p erie nt ial course de igm:d to ex p l or the p r in c ip l e of orO',w " i­ z , t io na l dev el o p m e n t . Preparation of s t u d en ts to b e leaders i n effect ive, sys t e m a ti c planned change p r ogra m s. mphasi� on new orga n izational fo rms, cultural c h a nge , and t he inter ention proce . Prer q u i s it c : B SA 305. ( 4 )

445 Quality Improvement trategies Exa mi na t io n of h i s to r i c al develo p me n ts i n qu ali t), process un­ provement. in American busin sses. E m p h asi s on rece n t a pp l i a­ l ions of To ta] uality Manag ment an d C o n t i n u ou s Q ua l i t y I m p ro ve me n t ne e si tat e , llstomer focu� and us of p roces l m p ro v ment t h. n iq ue s. Exten ive application (J t he q u a l i ty tools, i nc l u d ing statisti at pr o cess control, that �uppo r t ontinu­ ous im provement in manufac.turin and service · e t t in gs . Prer 'q­ u i s i te: B SA OS. (4)

449 Current Issues in Homan Resource Management Sem i nar c o u rse fo cus ed on cur rent issu s and de e l o p m en t s in m a nagi n g human resources. Top i c a reas may include H RM's growi ng role in de vel op i n " orga n iza t iona.1 str, teg)" i nternational h u m a n resource managem nt, m an a gi ng the diver)e work fo rce, new paradigms in career d ev e lo p me n t , ma n a g i n g the down ide o downsizing, s tress m a nagement in the 90s, md trai nino strat gies for p repa rin g \ orkers for the 2 1 st entury. Ad va n ce busi­ n e s stu d en ts , in consultation with t he inst ructor, will �elect appropriate t o p i cs fo r r '� e ar c h and dis ussion. P re req u i ite: B SA " 5 . (4)

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460 International Marketing I n trod uctio n to marketing p roblems and op p o r t un i t i es in a.n i n ternati onal context. Topics i n cl u d e changes in m a rket i n a pro­ [( ra ms when b usi ness i, conducted acras i n te rnat i onal b o rder and the e con om i and cultural fo rces that re q u i r e these changes. Prerequ isite: j unior standing.

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467 Marketing Research Te hn iques and use of m arket i ng research in the busi ness d ec is i o n - m ak i n pro ces s . E m p h a s is Oil research design, VJIious s u r vey met hods, search in struments, and san1pling pl an s as they re la t e t ma rke t j ng consumer pro d u ct s i n do m e 'L i e and i n ternat ional en ironments. Prerequisites: ST T 23 1 , eSCI 220.

(4) 468 Marketing Management An i nteg r a ted appUcati n of ma r kdi n g mix concepts in a com­ petitive b u sin 55 s i m u la ti o n . Student teams apply m a rke ti n g stra t eg i e · to test thei r gro up skilb. devel p a bu ·iness plan, and construct an a n n ual repo rt. Prerequisites: B SA 306 a n d on upper divi i o n marketing c l ass . (4) 479 Implementing Advanced System i m p l mentation of I anc d manufacturing, i n fo r m a t i o n and service del ivery sy terns. Exami nation of proj ct m a n a g e m en t tt'�11l1ique · , o rg niza tional J n d tech nical chall 'nges and appro­ p n a tc dc sl. g n � fo r I m p l em en t i n g rga n iz.at i ons. Prere q u isite. : MATH 1 28 (or M TH 1 5 1 and 230) ; CSC! 220 or 1 44; E ON 1 5 t ! l 52; STAT 23 1 ; BUSA 303, 306, 307; B SA 37 1 . (4) 489 Study Abroad PLU - s p o ns ored academ ic or ex p e ri e n t i a l s t u dy in tries. P r r q u i i t e : j u n i r standing. ( 1 -32) 490 Special eminar Sem i n ar on specifica l ly se lec t e d

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in business.

49 1 Directed Study l ndividual ized studies in co n s u l t ati o n wi th a n inSLJllctor. P re req ui s i tes : ju n i o r standin g a n d i n stru Lor approval. ( 1 - 4) 492 Internship Applicati n of busi ness knowledge in field etli ng. r dit gr a n t e d determined by hours spc: n t in working en ir oment and d ep t h o f projt t associat d with th . course of . I udy. 503 Unde.rstanding and Managing Financial Resour(;es I nt eg r at ed stlldy or mancial deci io n- nul k i n g v,uiable, ( l o t h b oo k a n d ma rket ) , the r l a t i n h i p s am n g them, a n d r el e va n t deciSIOn theories/models. Pri m a r y perspe t ive is that of t he financial manager, rather than the aC CQ u n t a n t or the external i nve tor. (4)

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504 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business Backoro lln d for u nderstanding and acting upon t he legal and thical issue" decision mak r in the b u s i ness world face today. An overview of the American legal system and government regulati u, and how both impact bu 'iness decision making. S u bstdntive areas o f law such as contracts, torts, p roduct liability, i ntellectual property ( co pyrights, patents, trademarks and tnld cre t s ) , methods of organizing a busines , and em ploy­ ment law. Students relate legal theory to real l i fe business situa­ tions ;U1d to solving contemporary business p robl e ms , such as how to stTLlcture a start - u p business or how to develop, co n t rol and protect p roprietary i n fo rmation. Independent projects will bl:' assigned t o allow students to p u rsue individual areas of inter­ est . (4) 505 Managing Effective Organizations Exam ines h ow leaders ma nage fo ur set of factors to achieve organizational effectiveness: the organ_ization's i n t e rn a l environ­ ment, b)' developing competencies in setting direction, commu ­ n iCHing, motiva t i ng, resolving confli ts, clarifying goals an d work roles, and developing teams; the organilation's env i ron­ mental context, thro u ' h analyzing organ ization design contin­ gencies and crea ting approp riate responses; cult ural differences associated with international operations, as well as home co u n ­ t r y diversity; and change, through continuous diagnosis, t r a n s i ­ tion p lanning, and a c t i o n i mplementation a n d evaluation. (4) 506 Managing the Value Creation Process I Development of an integrated perspective on the value creation process i ll bu:iness entities. This first course in the sequence focuses prima rily on cu st omer value and the processes that produce that value. Contemporary approaches to marketing and operations a re emphasized including market segm entation, m a rketing mix variable, work design for teams, i nventory man­ agement, quality management, and advanced manufacturing systems. major segment of the cou rse will i n tegrate marketing, quality, and operations in manufacturing and the services. Pre­ requisites: E ON 500, ECON SO L , BUSA 503. (4) 507 Managing the Value Creation Process n De elopment of an i n t grated perspect ive on the value creation process i n business e n t ities. This second course in the sequence contin ues the in tegrated perspective o n value creation with a focus on t he strat gic and supporting roles of management acco u nting in measurement of economic performance and of information systems i n monitoring and del ivering value to customers. Prerequisites: ECON 500, EC N 50 I , BUSA 503, B 'S 506 . (4) 509 Business Strategy i n a Global Context An i ntegrated study of business s trategy formulation and imple­ mentation undt:r c nditions of co ntinuing econ mic, techno­ logical, and competit ive change. Em ph, sizes the differences, simila rit i s, opportunities, and threats across the global business environment. Explore " industry, competitive, and company analysis and i mportant considerati o ns in d e v elo p i n g and sus­ taining a competitive advanta c. Includes advanced readings, seminar di ·cussions, co mprehensive case stud ies, and a field consulting project. PrereqLlisites: BU A 503, 504, 505, 506, 507.

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5 1 0 Strategic Management of Tech.oology Con epts and methods for form u laLing and i mplementing com­ petitive strat gy In a global conte.'t are discussed. Emphasis o n strategi choices \ hieh create sustainable advantage under con ­ ditions o f rapid t e hnologi a ! , political, e.nvironmental, and economic cha nge. Addr es how to i n tegrate technology w ith t h firm's s trategy, J nd the key internal a n d external forces t h a t deLermi n ' the vo i li t io n of trategy. Also de, b with key issues and methods in implementing a technology s trategy. Explores com peti t ive technology st rategy of multinationals. Prerequisites: 503, 504, 5 0 5 , 306, 507. (4)

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535 Financial lnvestments

E mphasis on concepts, p r inciples, and issues relating to indi­ vidual sec u r i t ies: risk, return, and valuation of bond s, preferred stock, common stock, options, warrants, convertibles, and fu ­ t u res; determination and term Structure of market i nterest rates; ma rket transac tions structure, apital market efficiency. Prerequisites: E N 500; BUSA 503. (4) 537 Decision Models and Strategies for Financial MJl.Dagers In-depth examination of risk-re t u rn rel a t ionships in the con­ struction/revision of real a et portrolios and a . . oci, ted financ­ ing strategies. Focus is long-term. Primary perspective is that of the financial manager, rather than the accountant r the exte rnal investor. Prerequisite: EC N 500; BUS 503. (4) 54 1 M anaging Innovation and Technology Change Focus on the p l a n ning and implementation of m aj o r new tech­ nologies, processes. or systems which pose significant uncer­ tainty and the neces-ity for fundamental chan ge in the organization's de ign, culture, and industry structure. Condi­ tions that facilitate and i n h ibit innovation, typical pa tlem of innovation, devel opment, and pro e s rnethod� to enabL change. Prerequisite: B SA 505. (4) 542 Management of Change Detailed xamination of te hniques for diagnosing ppOrlUilitl requiring change. Planning, i m plement i.ng, i n ter elling, and evaluating changes. mphasis o n the problem a. essmcnt skills of i n ternal change agents. Prerequisite: BUSA 505. ( 2 ) 543 Designing Reward Systems Exploration of reward ystem p h i losophies and strategies in­ cluding consideration o f i n ternal consistency, external competi­ tivcnes . and allernatives to tradit ional reward systems. nder­ standing o f compen ation pra t ice . The role of m o t ivation in de vel o p i ng compensation sy · tems. Prerequisite: B USA 505. ( 2 ) 545 Continuous Improvement Strategies A study of continuous im provement stratcgi for orgnn i'l..<lI i om. Focus on managing for quality, inclu ding organizational analysis, process development, ;l nd selection of improvement tools. Strat­ egies fo r soliciting employee i nvolvement. Prerequisite: B SA 505. (2) 549 Contemporary Human Resource Management Seminar addres ing current issues in h u man resource manage­ m ent. Topics may include sta ffing, health care costs, training, team -buil di ng, e mployee involvement, workplace violence, substance abuse, ADA compl i�Ulce, harassment, and work pl ace diversity. Considerat ion of successful strategies f progressive companies. Prerequisite: B SA 505. ( 2 ) 553 Transnational Management Examinat ion of way in which t raditlonal approaches to globalizat ion-m ult inational adaptation, worldwide technology transfer, a nd global sta ndardiza t io n-may b e synLhesized into transnational s trategy and pradice. mpha i, on analyzing foreign env i ronments and poli tical r'sk, developillg ' n d manag ­ i n g global strategic alliances, integrating and controlling across borders, leveraging leadi ng-edge p radi es , negotiating across cultures. and developing global cornpetcnc ies for functio al. country, and top-lev I managers. Implicat ions for sma ll as well as fo r large organiza t i o n s . Prerequ isite: B SA " 0 5 . ( 2 ) 558 New Venture Management Examines the entrpreneurial skills and (ondit i o ns needed fo r effective new business start-up ". Specific issues su h a t he appropriate selec tion and cha racteristics of new venture leaders and staff, capital ization JIld financi ng, market ent ry, and m anagement o f transition challenges encoulltered across tht entlre life c)' Ie o f the venture are considered using case studies and prese.ntations. Prerequisite: BUSA 503. (4)

560 Global Marketing Management De ign ing and m anaging marketing activities across natio nal


bou.ndaries. To p i cs i n clude strategic marketing pl a n s , prod uct m o d i fication or c rea ti o n

for fore i g n m a r ke t s, i n te r a c t i ng w i t h po li t i c a l player a nd how culture, geo g rap hy, and economics affect marke ti n g planning. Pr er e q ui s i te : BUSA 506. (4) 566 Developing New Products and Services Study of t he pro ess re q uir ed fo r d evel op i n g a new

pr o d u c t o r

se rv ice . - o me areas addressed include the external e nvi ronment ( eco nomic condit io ns , competition, and intended market) and

s uch as res o u r ce s and company m issi o n . Small student t ea m s will c re ate a n e w product/service c on ce p t and es t a b li sh a t i m e l i ne fo r it d eve l o pm en t . P re req u i s i t e: BUSA 506. i n ternal var i ab l e s

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567 Assessing Marketing Opportunities Leaming to i de n t i fy a n d a nal yze ma r ke t i n g opportunities. n d ers ta nd i ng market seg m e n t a t io n , p rod u c t pos i t i o n i ng and include research design, su rvey mdhods, and stali.stical a n alys i s . Emph asis is placed on being able t o i d e n t i f y p ro ble ms , selec t a p p ropriate research tools, interpret resu lts and c o n vey the results to en d - u s e rs of t h e prici og t h ro ug h res ea rch a na l ys i s . To p i cs

research. Prerequ isite: BUSA

506. (4)

574 Advanced Service and Manufacturing Delivery Systems The ourse dea ls with th e ma n a ge ri a l a nd o p e ra t i o n al ch al l en ge s of a d va n ce d service and manufacturing s y s t e ms characterized by tight i n teg ra t io n short time cycles and considerable v a r i e ty and scope. [n pa rti cular, co m pu te r i zed adva n ced m an u fa c t u ri n g syste m , nT, syn c hr o n o u s m a n u facturing, and customer inte­ grated service -ystems will be d i sc us 'ed. Such s ys t em s will be reviewed as com p e titive s t ra teg i es al ng with the a t t e n da n t organ izational i mp l i ca t i o n s . Prerequisite: BUSA 506, 507. (2) 577 Project Management St u dy of the unique condit ions, c h a l len ge s , r eq u i re m e n t s , and tech n i ques associated with d es i g n i n g and managing lU aj o r non­ rep litive u n der t ak i n g s. To p i cs include the applicabil i t y o f project management, the r e l a ti o ns h i p of the p r oj ec t life cycle to the nat ure of act ivi t ie s and com p o s i t io n of the p roj e c t team, proj ct mana ger roles, l e a di n g the project t eam, d ea li ng with u ncert ai n ty and unfamiliarity, project management structures, m an agemen t i n for m a t io n needs a n d uses, a nd pl an n i n g and control techniques. Prerequisite: B SA 505. (2) 578 Management o f Information Technologies & Systems F cus on issues concern ing the im pa c t of i n formation te ch nol­ ogy nd i n fo r m a t i o n systems on c o m p e ti t iv e strategies and or ga nizationa l structure. Understanding the ra pi dl y progressing field f i.nformation t e chno l o gy. Th key decisions for planning bene ts, allocating re s o ur c es , and de s i g n i n g information tech no log ic a n d systems to up port st rategies fo r success. Coms p a rti ci pa n ts are prov id e d with ways to id e n t i fy and manage a p plica t ions of info r m a ti o n technology at va ri ous levels w i t h i n an o rga n i za t io n and use of the " In for m a t i o n S u p e r Highway." Prereq uisi tes: BUSA 503, 505. (4) 590 Seminar Selec ted advan ced t op ic s .

(2-4)

59 1 Independent Study Individualized re a d i n g and st udies. Minimum su p e r v is i o n after i n itial plannin g of st u d e nt 's work. ( 1 -4)

Chemistry The history of civilization is inseparable fro m the history of chemis try. Ev rything that occurs in nature is chemi­ cally based: mental p rocesses and behavior, the fmniture we live around, the tools we use for work or play, the prob­ lems of pollution. Chemistry seeks to understand the fu n­ damental nature o f matter, as well as how its composition and energy content change. Use of thi knowledge i n flu­ ences our lives i n many profound ways. Whether in terested in the chemical p rofession i tself, including biod1emist ry, polymer chemistry, rad iation chemistry, and o ther speci­ ali ties, or i n chemistry in conj unction with other fields such as business, the social ciencrs, and the h um a niti es, students will have su itable programs available to me t their interests at PLU, D iversity in car e r pla nning is a key con­ cept in the chemistry depar tment. Programs are available which are broadly applicable to the health, biological, physical, environmental behavioral, and fu ndamental chemical sciences. The chem istry department's our es, c urri culum , fa c­ ulty, and facilities are approved by the American Chemical Society. The staff of six p rsons with doc torates has com­ posite experti e in vi rtually every field of pure and applied chemistry. The faculty are very active in basic and applied research, and most are also significantly i nvolved in the community, applying tbeir expertise to enhance the quality of life o f the c itizens. The department uses n u mero us scientific in Lrwn nts in the laboratories. Such major research and teachi ng equipment includ : 300 MHz Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform i n fr ared , ultra­ violet, visible, emission, and electron spin resonance spec­ trometers; X-ray cry tallograpbic cameras; gas and liquid chroma tographs; gas chromatograph/ma ·s sp e ctro mete r; precision refractome ter; dipolometer; short path d istilla­ tion apparatus; scintillation cou nter; zone refiner; fluorometer, C-H-N analyzer, and I P-O S . Faculty resea rch projects involving student p articipation are in progress in mm1y important fields of chemistry. Some of the areas are: polymer s tructure and properties, laser spectroscopy, toxicology of tribulytin, synthesis of heterocyclic compou nds, chem ical cleavage o f ligni.n, envi­ ro nmenta l monitoring, structural and magnetic studies ()f i n o rganic complexes, organic kinetics, photochemical reactions, characterization of fun ga l enzymes, the role of n u trition in health, and the biochemistry of d rug actions.

"'

FACULTY: Swank, Chair; h yh le , Huestis, Nesset, To nn, Waldow,

D e g re e s in c h e m i stry are the Bachelor of Arts a n d the Ba ch e l o r of S ci en ce fo r s t u d e n ts wishing to structure their u ndergraduate ed u ca t i on around a full c h e mi s t r y major. The B . A . program is the m i n i m u m p re pa r a ti o n s u i table for fur t he r professional s t udies and is often combined w i th extensive study o r a second major in an allied fie ld. The B.S. p r ogr a m i nvolves additional chem i s t r y courses and serves both students g o i n g d i r· 'c dy into e m ployme nt on gra d u il t i o n �nd those going to gr a d u a t e programs. It is offe red with emphasis in hemis lry, b ioc hemist ry, or ch e m i ca l physics. The first option is :m American h mical Society certified program. The la tte r two op t i o n s are offered in c oo p e ra t io n w i th t h e b iology and physi c s departm nt. for stu­ dents wishin g to work at t h e i n terfaces bet, een ch e mis tr y and b io l o g y or physics. S tudents contemplating a major in cll mis t !")! are invited to P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R S I T Y

43


DEPARTM ENTAL HONORS: In recogn i ti o n of o u tstanding

d iscuss their i n terests a n d plans with members of the chemistry faculty at the. eartiest possible t i me. Opportun it ies fo r honors

work t h . designation

work in chemistry are described below.

to Bachelor of Science graduates by vote of the faculty o f the

S t udents deciding to major in chemistry should officially

> II:: I­ ....

:t u

chemistry department, based on the studen t' perfo r m a n ce i n t hese areas:

ha ing

1 . Course w o r k: The grade p o i n t average in chemistry co u rse must be at tcast- 3.50. 2. Wri t ten work: Prom t h timc a student declares a major i n

c

mple ted Chemistry 232 a nd after consultation with a

fa u l ty adviser in t h e chemistr)' depart men t . Transfer students desir i.ng to major in chemistry should cons u l t a departmental adviser no later than the begi n n i n g o f t h e i r junior year.

chemistry, copies o f o u t sta n d i ng work (e.g. , laboratory,

The o p ti o n req ui rement o f the Col tege of Arts and Scien ces

seminar, and resea rch reports) wilt be kept for later s u m mary

hOILld be met by Option I, preferably in G e r m a n . The chem istry departm e nt considers c o m p u ters to be

evalua tion.

3. Oml commllnicatiOIl: t u d e n ts must evidence ,lbi l it y to

i mportant tools in professional a n d personal activities. Labora­

co m m u n i cate effec ti

tory work in the department places considc'rable em phasis on

I y as indica t d b y the

Slim

of rh i r

participation i n class cii cuss i o l 1 , sem inars, help sess i o n

.::o mputer use. Therefore, the department strongly recommend s

leadership, a n d t ea c h i n g a s istants h i p work. 4. II/dependen t chemistry-related activitie·: Pos itive consider­ at ions include the extent and quality o f extrac u r r icu lar work

that a s t ud e n t plann ing to maj o r in chemis try tal e a l least o n e two-credit hour cou rse i n co m pu ter science.

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR; Chemistry 120 or 1 25 , 232, 234, 3 3 2, 334, 3 3 8 , 34 1 , 342, 343, 460. Re quired supporting courses: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; Physics 1 53, 154. 1 63, 1 64. BACHELOR OF SCI ENCE MAJOR ( t h ree a l ternat ives ) : 1 . GeIleml - leads t o American Chemica l Societ y certification; Chemistry 1 20 or 1 2 5, 232. 234, 332, 334, 338, 34 1 , 342, 3 4 3 , 344, 405 o r 4 5 0 or 456, 4 1 0, 4 3 5 , 460; tvI J t h 1 5 1 , 1 52 ; Physics 1 53, 1 54, 1 6 3 , 1 64. Fo r American hemical Society certifica­ tion, 450 and either 405, 440, or 456 are required.

done in backgrou Jld reading, in dependent s t u dy, and reseHrch;

a ss i s t i ng in laboratory p re paration , teach i n g, O r advising; any other chem ist ry- re lat ed em p loymen t, on ca m p u s or e lsewhere; and participation i n campus and professional c.hem istry­ related o rga n izations. The departmental honors designation wilt appear o n a graduat­ ing chem istry major's transcript.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: S t u dents i n tere ted in this degree de\relop their c h e m i stry program t h rough t he department in conjun tion w i t h the School of Educa t i o n . See

2. Biochemistry emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 338, 3 4 1 , 343, 403, 40S, 4 1 0, 435, 460; Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62, 323; fou r h o u rs selected from Bio logy 326, 328, 3 3 1 , 346, 359, 38S, 407, 4 4 1 o r h e m istry 342; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; Physics 1 53 , 1 54, 1 63 , 1 64. 3. Chelllicul-pllysics emphasis: Chemistry 1 20 or 1 25, 232, 234, 332, 334, 34 1 , 342 , 343, 344, 460; Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 253; Physics 1 53. 1 5 4 , 1 6 3 , 1 64, 3 3 1 , 332, 336, 356;

MINOR: 22 semester hours, i nduding 1 20 or 1 25 , 232, 234, 332, 334 o r 336, 33tl, and 4 h o u rs of additional 300 o r 400 level

Gene.ralized Chemistry Curriculum for the B.S. Degree

chemi t ry course (s) completed with grades of C or higher.

FALL

Prereq uisite and coreqlJisile re qllirements are st rictly enforced.

School of EdllCll l iol1 sec t io n . CHEMICAL ENGINEERING: S t u de u ts i n t e rested i n p u rsuing studies in chemical engineeri ng should see the c urse o ut l i ne in the Engilleerillg section o f this c a t a l og. T h department chai r should be consulted for assignment of a program adv iser.

SPRING

Fresh /1/(.1/1 ( l ) Chemistry 232, 234

hemis try 1 20 o r 1 25 Math 1 5 1

Math 152

Critical Conversation or

Physic:; 1 5 3 , 1 63 ( 2 )

Writing Seminar

Course Offe rings 1 04 Environmental Cbemist.ry Basic priociples of hem ical str u c t u re and rea tions, w i t h

Writing Seminar or

Core course

Cri tical

PE 1 00 or aClivity

app lications to h u m a n activit ies and t he na tural environment.

onversation

No prerequisit ; �tudents w i t ho u t h i g h school chemist ry are encouraged to take 1 04 berore t a k i n g 1 0 5 or 1 1 5 . Also s u i ta b le

PE 1 00 or a tivity

Sophomore Chemistry 332, 3 34

Chemistry 338

Physics 1 54, 1 64(2)

B i o lo gy 1 62(2)

Biology 1 6 1 ( 2 )

Core courses

fo r environmental stud ies, general science teachers B.A. in e a r t h sciences, and general un ivers ity core requirements or College o f Arts a n d Sciences OptiOll I l l . St udents must meet the LIlli ers i t )' entrance require men ts i n mathem a t i cs before enrol ling i n t h e

Core courses

cOllrse. I (4)

Junior hemistry 3 4 1 , 343 Core courses

Chemistry 342, 344

1 05 Chemist.ry of Life

Chemistry 4 1 0

Organic and b i ochem istry perti ne n t to chemical p rocesses in the

Chemistf)/ 460 C h e m is t ry 435

s t udents, and prospective teachers. St uden ts who have n o t

h u m a n organism; su itable fo r l iberal a r ts st ude nts, n u rs i n g

Sellior Chemistry

460

Elect ives

completed h i gh school chem istry r e en tly should t a k e

1 20 GeneraJ Chemistry

1. Refer to the D i v is ion of Natural Sciences section of t h i s

An i ntrod u c t i o n to the fu ndamental nature of chemis t!"),. To pics

catalog fo r o t h e r begi n n i ng c u r r i c u l u m op tions.

i n cl u d e energy and mat ter, atomic and molecular theo!' )r,

2. The department t-resscs the i m p o r tance o f t a k i ng physics d u ring either the fres h m a n or the sophomore year.

periodic p roperties, n o menclat ure, states of matt r, chemical

his

calculations, solution propert ies, acids and bases, e qu ili brium,

permits a better lU1dcrstand i n g o f c hemistry and enables a

and kinetics. The maj o r emphasis of the lecture a n d laboratory

sludent to complete degree requirements wit h no sc hedu ling di ffic u l tic' in the j u nior and se nior years. Students i nter

will be the a p p l i cation o f chemical p rinci pl es and theory on a

ted

in t.he Bachelor of Science with b iochemistry emphasis should

plan to take biology i n tht: alternate year.

the health sciences (e.g., premedical, prudential, prepharmacy)

ption I, or who desire

wou ld usually begin chemistry w i th this course. One year of high

to attain o r m a i n t a i n a language proficiency', . hould take a

school chemistry is requ i red. S tudents with no h igh school

lan guage cou rse as p a r t of their o p t io n a l selections. P

A

C

I

F

I

C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

need to k n ow basis . Designed p rimarily or · t udenls who want to major in chem ist ry, biology, engineering, env i ro n m enta l science, geol ogy, or physics . These and other majors who are i nterested in

3. S t u dents desiring to fu l filt the College of Arts and Scienccs fo reign language requi rement u n der

[ 04 before

taking 105. Il ( 4 )

Electives

44

may be granted

declare their intent as oon as possible and not la ter than after

. w

with Departmental Ho nOl's

T

Y


che m i st rr or a weak ma t h em a t i c a l backgro u n d should take C h e m i s t r y 1 04 before t h is course. C or e q u i s i te : M ATH 1 40 or matI placement in a course h i gh e r than 1 40. 1 ( 4 )

1 25 Advanced General Chemistry An advanced level i n troduction to c h e m is t ry. This co u r c w i l l - ex p lo r e general c h e m i st ry fro m a n advanced theoretical an d a p p lied perspective. To pics i n c l u d e t h c r m o d )' n a mi c s , a t o m ic - structure, valence bond a n d mo le c u l a r o rbi ta l t h e or i e s , co m p l ex equ il ib r i u m , kinet ics, macro m o lecules, a nd coordination _ c he mistr y. This co u r se is open to all students with an excellent h i gh sch 01 science b a ck g ro u n d and who desi re to pursue fu rther s tudies b ey o n d the bachelor's d e g re e . St udents w it h a n - o u tst a nd in g record i n a one year high school c h e m i s try co urse or advanced high school c h e m i s try should elect this co u rs t: . Co-

- re q u i s i t E': MATH 1 5 l . I (4) 210 Nutrition, Drugs, and the Individual - An i n t ro d u ction to basic metabolic interactions, general end c r i n olo g y, mind and body interactions, and roles o f d r u gs i n _

m o di fy i n g biological and behavioral fun c t io ns. N u t r i tion topics

i n clude food p re pa ra t io n , " t he ba lan ce d m e al p h i lo so ph y," n u t ri t i o na l m y t hs , the e ffects of stre s, env i ro nm en t a l and - societal i n fluences on d i e t . Prereq uisites: one year of h i gh school c h em i str y or e q uiva l en t s u ggest e d . Meets general un iversity core r e qui r eme n ts. I (4) _

_

L

232, 332 Organic Chemistry An i nt erp re ta t io n of pro p er t ies and reactions o f al i ph at i c and ar maric com p ( unds on the basis of c u r re n t chem iGll t h e o ry. Prereq u i i te : 120 or 1 25. Corequisites; 234, 334. J r , I (4, 4)

234, 334 Organic Chemistry Laboratory Rencti I1S a n d conventional and modern t e c h n i q u e. of sy n t h esi s , - �ep a ra t i o n, and analysis of o rg a n i c com po u n d s. Microscale tech niques. Must a cco m p a ny 232, 332. l l, I ( 1 , I ) '-336 OTganic Special Projects Laboratory I n d i vidual pr o je c t s e m p basizing cu r re nt pro fessional-le vel - met.hods of sy n t h 'sis and proper t y d e ler m i n a t i on of o rg a ni c compounds. This course is an alternati\re to 334 a n d typically '-- req u i res so mewhat more time c o m m i t m e n t . S t u d e n t who wish t o prepar for c a reers i n c he m i s t ry o r related a reas s h ou l d appl y fo r d part mental approval o f t h e ir admission t o t h is course. II 338 Analytical Chemistry

Chemical methods of quantitative a na l ys is , in cl u d i ng vol u m et r i c, Prerequisites:

g ra v i m e t r i c, a n d s e l e c t e d i n s t r u m e n tal methods.

1 20 o r 1 25 and MATH 140. II (4)

34 1 Physical Chemistry A s t u d y of the rel a t i o n s hi p between the e n er g y content of ystcm s, \. ork, and the physical and chemical p r o p e r t i es o f matter. Top ic s i ncl u d e classical and s ta ti s tic al thermodynamics, therm ochemistry, s ol u t io n properties, and phase e q u i l i b r i a . Prerequisite: CHEM 1 20 or 1 25, MATl-! 1 5 2 , PHYS 1 54. 1 (4)

342 Physical Che.mistry A study of the p hys i c a l p ro p e rt i e s of a t o ms , molecules and ions, and lhe i r correlation with s t r u c t u re . Topics i n cl ud e c l assical a n d modern quantum m e c han i c s , b o n d i ng t heo ry, atomic nd m o l e cul a r struct u re, spectrosco py, and chemical kin e ti cs. '-- Prerequis ites: CHEM 1 2 0 or 1 2 5, MATH 1 52, PHYS 1 54 . 1 1 (4) _

343, 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiments in thermod naIlli , s o l u t io n behavior, a n d m o l ec u l a r structure designed to ac q u a i n t s t udents wi th i n stru­ m enta ti o n , d a t a h a n d l i n g , correlations with t h eo ry, and data reliab i l i t y.

omputer usage is enco uraged. Corequisite or 34 1 , 342, 343 or consent of instructor req u i red for

prerequ isite:

344. I II ( I , l ) 403 BiochemiStry n overview, i n c l u d i n g bioc hemical structure, mechanisms of re a c t i o n s , metabolism, genetics, a n d the b iochemistry of the c e l l . Ma j o r s a re e n c o u ra g e d to take bo t h 403 and 405 fo r a more

co m p le t e underst anding of b i oc he m i s r r y. Also fo r B.A. and non- majors interested in biochemistry as a

of kn ow le dg e. Prerequisites;

maj or ·

su pp o rti n g field

2 , 334. I (4)

405 Biochemistry A s t u dy of c he m i cal reaction · and s t r uc tu re. in l i v i n g cells. To pics include e n zym e kinetics and mechanisms of catalysi , metabolism, and bioch emical gc net i s. Concepts i n t ro d u ce d i n P h ysi c a l C he mi s t ry a n d B i o ch e mistr y w i l l be a p p l ie d in this co u r s e . Lab ratory des ign e d to t i m u l ate c re a t i vi r y and problem­ sol vi ng ab i l i t ie s t h ro u gh the lise of m od ern b iochemical te ch n i que s . Designed for student s i nterested in g ra d u ate school o r research. Prereq u i s i t es : 3 3 2 , 334, 3 4 1 a n d/ o r 342 or p e rrllis ­

m

sion, 403. II ( 3 ) 4 1 0 Introduction t o Research A course d es ig n e d to i n t rod uce the stud nt to l abor ato ry rese a rc h tech n i qu es , use of the c h e m ical l i terature, i ncluding co mp uterized l i te ra t ur e sear h ing, research pr p )5al and r p o rt w r i t i n g . mphasis on the s t u de n t deve l op i n g a nd ma ki n g progres ' on an i n d e p e n d e n t chemical re search problem chose n in co nsu l t at i on with a memb r of the c h e m i s t ry facult y. S t u de n t w i l l a ttend s em i n a rs as pa r t of the course requirement. n ( 2 ) 435 Instrumental Analysis Theory and p ra c t i c of i nslr u mental methods along w i t h b as i c e l ec t r o n i c s . S p e ci a l e m pha s is p la c ed on electronic , spectropho­ t ome t ri c , radiochemical, and mass spectrometric methods. Pr ere qu i ites: 3 3 1) , 34 1 and/or 342, 343. II (4 ) 44.0 Advanced Organic Chemistry t u de n t s will develop a repertoire of �ynthetic meth odology and •

reaction example. sYllthet ic or" a nic strategi' a n d desi n, the a nalys is of cl assi and recent total syn t h eses fr( m th e literature, and a dvan ced applications of i n s t r u me n t a t i on in organ i c c h e m i str y. Prereqllisile; 332. a/y a general unders tand ing

of a

variety of organi

me ch a n i s m s . To p i cs ma)' i n c l u d e, for

1 994-95 I I (2) 450 Inorganic Chemistry Te ch n i q ue s of st r uct u ral determination (JR, UV, liS, M il. , X r a , E P R ) , b o n d i n g pr i n c i p les , n o n - me t al co mpo u n ds , coo r d i n a ­ tio n ch em i s t ry, organometa l l i cs, donor/acceptor on ce pts, reaction

pat hways and biochemical applicati ons are

co vered.

La bo r a to r y i n c l ud es syn t h e si s a nd an i n -d e p lh e c p l o ratiol1 of t h e physical properties of non- metal, coordin atio n a n d o rga n m e ­ tall ic com p o u n d s. Prerequisites: 332, 34 1 · orcq u i s i te 342. a/y LI (3) 456 Polymers and Biopolymers A cour. e pre sc n t i ng the fundam n ta ls of p o l Y lTl e r ynt h is, solution t he rmodyna mic pro perties, molecular ch arac ter iza tion, molecular wei g h t di 'tr ib u t i o n , and sol utiun k i n e t i cs . Free

radical, condensation, ionic, and b iopolym

r systems

are

c o ve re d , with i llustrated a p p l i c a t i o ns taken from the m ed i c a l , engineering, a nd c h e m ic a J fields. The one- red it l a bor a t o ry eXJminin" p o ly mer synLhesis t h ro u gh e:"'Pcriments i op t io n al . P rerequ is i te : 34 1 ; Co re q u i s i t e , 342. a/y I I ( 3 )

460 Seminar Se nior c a p st o n e experience. P re se n t a t i o n by s t u de n t s of k n owled g e gained by perso na l l i brary or l aboratory r searc h , su p p l e m e n te d w i t h seminars by p ra c t i c i n g scientists. Parti i p a ­ tion of a l l se n i o r chemi t r, majors is required and aU o t he r chemi s t ry- o riented st u d e n ts are en c o u ra ged to partitipale. Semi n a r program

will be

held

during tb

ent i re yea r b u t credit

will be awarded i n the spring semester. I [] ( 2 )

491 Independent Study Library and/or l ab o ra t ory s t u d y of topics no t included i n regularly offered co urses. Prop o s ed p roject I11U t b e approv d by d ep a r t m en t cha i r and supervisory re s p on s i bi l i t y accepted by a n i n s tr u c tor . Ma)' be taken m o r e than o n c c . I I I ( 1 ,2, o r 4 ) 497 Research E x p er ime n t a l or theoretical i n ves t i g at i o n open to u p per division P A C I F I C

L

U

T

H

E

R

A

N

U

N

I

V

E

R

S

I

T

Y

45


students with consent of departmcnt chair. May be taken more

Electives: ( 1 2 semester hours fro m at least two additiollal

than on e. Generally consists o f an expanded study o f the

departmen ts)

research project developed i n 490. I I I

( 1 ,2

or 4)

Ant h ropology 345 C hi n ese 371

597, 598 Graduate Research

-

Con temporary ChiJ1ese Culture

C h i n ese Literature in Translation

History 338 - Modern China

Open to m a ster's degree candidates o nly. Prcrequ isite: consent of II'

-

History 339 - Revolut ionary Chi.na

department chair. I I I (2-4)

Music

W

1 05 J - The Arts of China 233 - Religions of China· ....

Religion

Business 352 alld In tegrated Stu dies 351 may count fo r program credits only when the studwt 's co u rs e project isfocused on

Chinese Studies The W II' W

z J: U

China and is approved by the program cha.ir.

hinese ' tudies p rogram is an i nterdisciplinary

*'

History 496 may be cou nted toward program re q uirements

... �

Religion 132 may be substituted with the permission of the

when it fowsf!5 spec(fica lly UpOIl China.

p rog ra m which is designed t o provide s t u de n ts i n terested in China

a broad fo unda tion in

hi nese langu age, c u l t u re,

progra m chair.

and h i s tory, a n d an oppo r t u n i ty to fo cus on the rel igious­ ph.i1o ophical world view and the economic structure of

With the approval of the p rogram cha ir, selected January-term,

China. The program requires that major and m i no r

summer, st udy abro<ld, a nd experimental course may also be

stud

included in the major or mi nor.

nls complete cOLl[sework in a t least three diffe rent

d iscipline : Ch i nese language, h isto ry, and a n th ropology,

with opt ional work in the arts, religion, business, and, fo r appl icable students, integrated studies. St udents wh

Classics

parti cipate in the university's China

exchange pro grams (cu rrently a t Sichuan Union University and Zhongshan University) may request t h a t credits earned th ro ugh these

Depar tments of Languages, History, Philosophy, Religion,

programs be co u n ted toward the

and Art. I ts goal i s to un i t e the "heart of the liberal a rts"

major or mi nor. With the approval of the p rogram d irector, selected January- term, s u m m e r, and experi men tal courses may be included

in the major o r m i n o r.

Guldin, Chair; Barnowe, Benson, Ingram, McG i n n is, Vinje,

of 40 semester hours, includ in g a t least

one

year o f one of

the class ical langu ages and two of the other (

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 36 semester h o u rs

(24 required,

elective); s t udents must take a t least one C h i nese h istory

CLASSICS COMMITTEE: S nee, Coordinator; Jansen, Oakman,

Required Cou rses: (24 semester hours)

A n thropology 343

-

P i lgrim.

East Asian Cultures

Chi nese 1 0 1 - Elementary ,hinese Ch i nese \ 0 2

El ementary

-

Latin

h i ncse

Chinese 20 1 - I n termediate

1 0 1 -202 - Elementary

Latin 20 1 -202 - Intermediate

h i nese

Greek 1 0 1 - 1 0 2

C h inese 202 - Intermediak C hinese C h i nese Studies 400 - The Senior Project

-

Elementary

Greek 20 1 - 202 - I n termediate

(4)

Art 1 1 0 - i n trod uction to Art

A project, thesis, or internship whi c h demonstrates compe­

Art 1 80 - History of Western Art [

tence i n m u l tiple dimensions of C h i ne�t: Stud ies. Must b e

Art 386

approved by c h a i r o f the Chinese Studies Program; taUy card

Classics 23 1 - Masterpieces of European Literature

-

ontemporary

-

P h i losophy 3 3 1 - Ancient P h i losophy

h inese 3 5 1 - Compos i t ion a n d Conve rsation Chinese 3 7 1 - Chi nese Literature in Translat i o n History 338

-

Modern China

H i sto ry 3 3 9

-

Revo l u t ionary China

History 496

-

Seminar: The Third Wo rld (A/Y on C h i n a » '

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MINOR:

I n tegrated Studies Seminar>

Chinese 1 0 2

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EI ment ar),

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Ancient

Religion 330

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Old Testament Stud ies

Religion

-

N

ew Testament S t u d i es

The program i s designed to be flexible. I n consultat ion with not o n the classics course list. All core class ics courses are taught out of the Depa rtment of LanguJges.

A

'hurch History

the Classics Comm ittee, a student may elect a course or courses

h i nese

E

-

re ligion) in which their i n t erest lies.

,hinese language)

approval of the program chair)

C

ReLigion and Literature of the New Testament

Religion 2 2 1

331

Religion and Literature of the Old Te tament

that part of the program (art, l i terature, history, p h ilosophy, or

( o r o n e equ ivalent year of u n iversity level Chinese, upon

A

-

Students are expected to become fa miliar with the read ing list for

20 semester hours (8 required, 1 2 elec tive)

Requi red Cou rses: (8 semester hours in Chinese 1 0 1 - Elementary C h i nese

-

Selected January-term Courses

Religions of China»H -

Religion 2 1 1 Religion 2 ! 2

I ndependent Study Courses

Music 1 05 J - The Arts of C h i n a Religion 233

Classical Mythology

Natural Sciences 204 - History of , cience

h i nese Culture

Managing Global Bus i n ess'

Integrated S t udjes 3 5 1

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Classics 322 - Roman Civ ilization

Electives: (12 semester hours) B usiness 352

Imagery a n d Symbolism

Classics 3 2 1 - Gre.ek Civilization

departmen ts or programs may subst i t u te for this course. Anthropology 345

-

lassies 250

pon ap plication of the student, sem i nars in ot her

required.

reek and

Latin). The rema inin g cou rses are selected from the l i s t below i n consultation w i t h t h e program coord i nator.

course.

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soul, through rel i gion, and to embe l lish this trinity o f Thi in terdepartmental m a j o r requ i r es t h e completion

u,

Youtz.

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with the mind, through history a n d philosophy, and the themes w i t h t h e visual experience of a r t .

FACULTY: A commi ttee of fa culty admin is ters this program:

12

The Classics Program i s a cooperative effort among the

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College of Arts and Sciences

ompletioll t h rou g h the first year

II.

of college level of a fo reign sat isf)1 the for ign language

entrance requirement. This o p ti on may a1

Division o/ Hu manities

be met by

0

sat isfac tory scores on a p roficien cy examination a d m i nis­

En gL i h

Ill.

Languages and Li teratures

tered by t h e PLU Department of Languag Fo u r semester

hours

a n d L i tera t u res.

s

i n histo ry, l i tera t u re, or language (at the

20 I level. or at any level i n a language

other thall that used to satisfy the foreign l a n g u age entre nee requ i r ment) in addition to co urses a pp l ie d to t h e general univers i t y requ i re­

Phil osophy Re l i g i o n

Division of Natural Sciences

ment5. d n d

Bi ol og y

Chemistr

ther than t h'lt u!ied to

langu, ge

Fo ur

r

Compute r Sc ien ce

,

c: z

req u i remclJ!S.

E ngi neeri n g

Geos icnces

High school

Math.ematjcs

l a ngu age s used to sati 'fy any of th above o p t ion�

m u st have been completed with

Phy. i s

gr des o f C

or

h igh

r.

Courses used to satisfy either l i ne of O p t i o n I I [ of the Col lege

of Arts a nd Sciene

Division a/Social Sciellces

s

[equir ment may

not b

used

lO

sat isfy

general u n iversity requi rem ents. Any college- l evel foreign

Anth ropology

o z

or above used to s d t is fy Option [ and dl1y completion of col legel -Ievel la ng uage through 1 0 2 used to satisfy O p t ion I I may also be used to s a t isfy the Pers p ect ives

langu age c o urse nu mbered 2 0 1

Econ omi History

Ma r r i a ge and Family Therapy

on Diversity req u i rement in

Polit ical Scien ce

'andidates for the

Psyc ho logy Soci ol ogy

3: 3:

hours in lo g i c mathematics (courses num­ bered l OO or abov ) , computer science, or statis�ic$ i n add i t io n to c o u r e s a p p l ied to t h e gener.ll u n iversity semester

n o

r oss -

ultural Per pecti ves .

English,

n gl i s h

with con centration in

and Social Wo rk

. in

B.

,

or the

IT!

. in Education

B.

tudies. fo r

for tbe B. A . i n Global

in I n tem a t i onal Bu 'i ness. a n d for ele ct i o n to the Arete Society must meet O ption I above. the B . B . A .

DEGREES OFFERED: Bachelor of Arts, I3 achelor of Science

IT!

MAJOR REQUIREMENT: A major i s , se qu e n c e of co urses i n o ne are a . usually in one department. major s h o u l d b e sele te d by t h e end of t he soph o m o re year. The choice must he approved by the dep ar t m ..: n t cha i r (or in c e of s pec i a l academic p ro­ grams, th� program coordinator). Major req u i rements are pedfi.ed in t h is c at al o g. The quality of work must be 2 . 00 or be tte r. D grades may be counted toward graduation but nor toward

a

major.

RECOGNIZED MAJORS:

Anthropolog, p p li ed Physics Art

Hi tory

Chemistry Chinese S t u d ies

Norw gian P h i lo s op hy

Classics

Physics

C o m m u nication

P olitical

Computer Engineering

Psychology

Computer Science

Rel igion

Individual ized ' t udy

Mathematics

B i o l o gy

Music

c i e n ce

Scandinavian Area Stud ies

Earth Sciences

Social Wor k

Eco nomics

Socio logy

Communication and Theatre

English

Sp nish

rench

Theatre

The faculty of the Department

Pngi neering S c i e n ce

(3-2)

e rma n

Not m o rE' than 44 semester hours ear ned i n one department may b appl ied t owa rd the b a c. h el o r s degree in the ,ol lege. '

COllEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS: In addition language

lan g ua ge,

to

meeting the en trance r eq ui rement in foreign

( two y

<irS

of high school 13 nguage,

ne

year of college

equ ivalent proficiency), candidates in the CoL lege f Art and Sciences (all B.A., B . S. , B, A . Rec. , BA P.E . a nd B.S .P.E. degr e ) I11 U t meet o p tio n I, I I , or I I I bel ow : I. ,ompletion of o n e foreign language c hrough the secon d year of college l evel. This req uirem n t may abo be 'a t i s fied by com p l rion o f four year. of high school �t udy in one fo rei g n or

demonstrated

l a nguage or by satisfactory scores on

a

profici ency exam in a­

t i o n a d m i n ister d by th<:' PLU Departm Il t of [ a ng uu ges and Literatures.

of Commu nication

and

Theatre is committed to a ph jlosoph ical perspect ive

n

com m u n ication as the p roces by which s hared under­ st a nding ar created between a ud i e n ce s t h rough the

of symbol

use

. Im pl ici t within this un de rs ta n ding is agree ­

ment u pon the assum ption th�lt people i o t ract w i t h o ne a n o th r fo r the p u rp e o f a c h i ving out ornes, alld tbat this i n teract ion i s accomplished t h r ugh a var iety of In

dia.

balance th.e n cd to prepare students com munic ators with the need 1'0 locate the learning of tho skill ' to the b roader context of the Liberal art t rad iti o n. We strive t.o produc tnden ts w h o have m astered the com petencies dema nded in their fi ld of co m m unication study. We al 0 endea or to i nsure Teach i ng m ust

with spec ific skills as

t ha t OLl r stlldents have an J pprec ia tion of all aspects of the

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I roader understand­ of the process by which shared m ea n i ngs are crcated.

communication spectrum as well as in�

With in the

epartment of Communication a n d

Theatre, five dist iJ1C\ , yet i n t e rrel ated areas of h u ma n co m m u n ication may b explored: broadca ting, c r i ti cal communication t ud i s , journalis m , p ub l i c relations, and theatre. Students majoring in any of t h ese areas a rticulate and test th ei r ideas, dev lop their individ ual abili ties, and w

by an adviser.

gain competence in various st rategies fo r i m proving

h e y acq u i re know l e dge a nd

e ffective comm u n i ation.

skills t h at apply to n ea r l y every aspect

of their p r i va te and

p ublic l ive .

for ·tudents trained i n communication elle nt A per on's ca�ree r may ultimately to be qu ite different (ro m what was origi nally

Career pro s p e c ts z o � < u

and theatre turn out

are ex<

a nt ic i pat ed , of cow-se, but in

a

rapicl l

hanging world,

fo r

ce r ta i n fundamental skills and resources are necessary

ada p ta t i on and success . As the work environment in the

bee mes i ncreasi ngly oriented toward com m u nication , it will be crit ically import nt for s tu d nts to hay (h e abil ity to com m u n icate dearly and effec ti vely, both orally n d in w r i t i n g . Those who m aj o r or m i n o r in o n e of the c o mmu n ica tion arts will be fa r ahead of their contemporaries who negl ec t to prepare fo r the wo rl d of tomor row. com i n g decades

FACULTY: fnch, Chili I'; B a r ta n e n , Becvar,

Harney, Lisosky,

Parker, Rowe, Spicer, Weber. CORE REQUJREMl!NT: Only

the following cou rses from Ollll11unication and Theatre may be used to meet the general university core requirement in the a r ts: [5 [, [ 60, [ 6 2, [ 63 , 2 4 [ , 358, 359, 363, 364, 458.

DECLARATION OF MAJOR: S tu d e n ts who want to declare a commu nication major with an t'lnphasis i ll pr i n t/b ro ad as t .j ) u r n a l i s m, cri tical c o m m u n i c a t i o n studies, or public relations:

of declara tion, have a c u m u l a t i ve grade point

2 . W i l l have successfully co m pl ete d t h e Co m m unication Core ( 1 23 , 27 1 , and 283) with a grade point average o f 2 . 5 or higher. Tr an s fe r students will be giv n the opport uni ty to pa:;s a pre -tes t o n mater ial taught i n 1 2 3 , 27 1 , and 283. Maximum of 44 se m es te r

1 . Crit icill Con'lll I lJl1iCrllioll Studies - req uired courses: 1 2 3 , 27 1 ,

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See School of Educatioll. MINORS: tudies: 20 semester h ours, i n c luding 1 23 , 283 , 330, 333 or 433, 328 or 436. 2. Public Rela tions: 20 semester hours, including 1 2 3 , 2 7 [ , 2 8 3 , 385, p l u s 4 hours from 00-400 level commu nication courses l. Crit icill Com m u n ication

selected in co n�ultation w i th adviser.

Physical Education.

5. The Publ ishing Ilnd Prin ting Ar ts Millor is cross-referenced with the Department of En gl i h. ee the description of that m in or under English.

Course Offerings: Communication

F

All candidates for the B.F.A. degree m us t satisfactorily co m p l ete a fo rmal i n te rn s hip of I to 8 semester ho urs under the supervi­ sion of a faculty member. S tuden ts may regi ster for Com m u n ica­ tion or Thea t r e 225 or 425 or may register fo r Cooperative Educa t i o n 376 or 476 . t n the l atter case, regular Cooper a tive Educat ion guidelines must be fo llowed.

4 . The Da nce Minor is cco s- referenced with the School of Physical Educat iun. See the descr iptiun of that m i n o r under

2. Prin t/Broadcast j0 1 4 malism - required [()u rses: 1 23, 27 1 , 2 8 3 , 3 84, 480, p l u s 2 4 addil lonal hours rom 00 and 400 level co m m u nication courses selected a ter con ulta tion wilh adviser. Required s u p p o rt i n g areas: 3-4 h o u rs in eco n o m ic s, " hOllrs in stat ist ics or research metho and 1 2 ho urs i n social science Q[ a minm ap proved b )' an 1ldvi ser. S t u de n t s must earn a grade of B in 28 or have the in t ructor's permi sion in order to advance in the sequence.

I

1 . Broadcastillg - requ ired courses: 1 23, 2 7 1 , 2 8 3 , _ 7 3 , 3 74, 378, and 3 8 1 , plus 26 hours selected i n consultation with adviser. 2. Th ea tre - Act i/ l g/Direct ing Emphllsis - required courses: 15 [ , [ 60, 24 [ , 250, 352, 357, 363, 364, 454 , plus [ 8 ho urs selec ted

consultation with adviser.

283, 328, 330, 333, 433 plus [ 2- [ a d d i t io n a l hours fro m 300 and 400 level co m m u nica t i o n courses selected a ft er consulta­ tion with advi er. Required supporting areas: 3-4 hour ' in cc nomics, 4 h o urs i n statistics or research methods, and [ 2 hours i n social sci nee o r a mi n or a p p ro ve d by a n adviser.

C

t least 54 semester h o u rs

in any of the two areas of concen tration:

3. Thea tre: 20 semester hours, i ncl uding 1 5 1 , 100, 24 1 , 250, plus 4 h o urs from com m u n ication and theatre course selected in

ho urs in any of the areas of concentrat i o n :

A

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJOR:

BACHELOR OF ARTS JN EDUCATION:

average of a t least 2 . 5 .

P

Arts and Scien es .

hours selected in consultation with adviser.

They cannot he taken concurrently.

48

>

i n consultation with a d viser.

journalism, c r i t ic a l com m u n i cation studies, and p ubb c relation� m, jors must take a ll in i t i a l core of courses as fo llows: [ 23, 27 [ , 283. . TE: [ 23 and 2 7 [ m us t h e takeIl i n rhe sequence l isted .

BACHELOR Of ARTS MAJORS:

4. Thea tre - Acting/Directing Emphasis - req uired collnes: 1 5 [ , [ 60, 225, 250, 352, 357, 363, 364, 425, plus 6 h o u rs from co m­ m unication and theatre course in consultation with adviser. 5. Thea tre - Design/Techll ical Emp hasis - Teli ll i red cou rses: 1 5 1 , [ 60 , 2 2 5 , 250 o r 454, 352, 356, 363, 364, 425, 452 or 453, plus 6 hours fro m c o m m u n i c a t i o n and theatre courses i n co n s u l ta­ tion with ad iser. All cand idates fo r th e B.A. degree must sa ti s fa cto ri l y complete a fo rmal i n ternsh ip of [ to 8 semest r hours under the supervision uf a faculty member. Students may register for Co mm unicat i o n o r Theatre 225 or 4 2 5 or may regi t e r for ,ooperative Education 376 or 476 . In the latter case, regular Cooperat ive Education gu idelines must be fo l l owed. Internships d o not co u n t part o f t h e 44-hour maxi mum in a n y of th e areas o f concen tration. In a dd i t i o n to requirements l isted above, cand idates fo r the B . A. degree m us t meet the op t i on requirements in the Colle ge of

3. Theil l re - Design/Tech niCCII Emphasis - req uired courses: 1 5 1 , 225, 2S0 or 454, 3 5 2 , 356, 3 6 3 , 364, 425, 452 o r 453, plus [ 8

COMMUNICATION CORE SEQUE.."lCE: Print/broadcast

I . \-Vi l l , at the time

3. Public Reill tions - req u i red cou rses: 1 2 3, 2 7 1 , 283, 385, 435, 378 o r 384 or an a pproved writing cour e, plu 1 6-20 ad di t i o nal hour. from 300 and 400 level communication co urs es sele cted after consu l t a tion with adviser. Required s U pportj11 g areas: 3-4 hours in economics, 4 hours in statistics or research me t h o ds , and [2 h o ur s i n social sciences or a m i n o r ap p ro ved

1 23 Communication and heatre: A Way of Seeing, A Way of Sharing

I n t roduces the - tudy of c o m m un ic at i o n and theatre. An over­ vi ' w of the na t u re of h u m a n co m m u n ication; theatre as a distinct com m u n ication for m ; the systematic analysis of c o m ­ m u n icdt ion by scholars. Use of a critic;}l perspective rather than a h i storical on e. Students learn how to lise criti cal tools to

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examine communication in various forms, indud'ing i n te rp e r ­ sonal ont ·ts, theat re, tde ision, film, and p r i n t . Introduction of the research and r e a s o n in g tools neces ary for p eo pl e seeking a

car er i n

a

communication fidd. (4)

225, 425 Communication Practicum One sem' ler hour credit may be earn d each semester. but only 4 sem tel' ho urs may be used [0 meet un iver s i t ), requirements. tudents pur clas roo m theof)' to pra t i c al app l i ation by individually completing a project rel a t i ng to n Jspe t o f comrn unication. A n i n s t ru c t o r i n t h e area o f interest must app rove th e project and agree to pr vide gu i d ance . 234 Introduction to Research in Communication The s tudy of methods of gathe r l n g. in terpreting. and evaluating data i n t he study of human commu nicatio n. Both q u ant i ta t i ve - a n d q u a li t a ti ve research m e t h o ds . (�) 271 Media Uteracy Introduces the LTitical study of m e d i a and their effects by discus ing three elements of m ed i a literacy: un derstanding the technical nature of mediJ and p r ov iding rudimentary kn wledge of !.heir ope rat io n ; u nderstanding the media as an i ndustry and how the profit motive affect s production, p re sent a t i o n and consumption of media; and understanding the effects of mediated messages on i,ndividual and collective behavior. (4) 283 Communication as Process: Speaking a n d Writing I n trod ll c s w r i t i n g and s p e ak i ng a s d i s t i n ct yet i n terrelated parts of the communi ation process. lass divided i n to two groups; eac h gro up will spend half the se m ester in the writing seminar a nd the other half i n the sp eaki n g seminar. Writing sem inar int rod uces copy formats and style r ules fo r writing in com m uni­ cation · related careers. S tudents complete a number of diverse writing assignments to appreciate the mechanics or wri t i ng and the role of audiences. S pe a k i ng seminar i ntrod uces t h e basic re h n i q u e s of public spea k i n g . S tudents campi 'te several types of speeches to I f'ar n basic skills such as t op ic select io n . research, organization, aud i e n ce an alysis, and de li ve r y. (4) 32 ) The Book in Society Se EngIi h 3 1 1 . (4) 322 Publishing Procedures See Engl ish 3 l2 . (4) 324 Nonverbal Communication Focus on the nonverbal aspects of com m un ic a t ion within the framework of interpersonal i nteraction. Prerequisite: C om m u n i ­ (a t-ion core o r consent of i nstr u c tor. ( 2 ) 326 Group Communication Su rvey nd analysi of small gro u p communica tion t h eo r y and research. (4) 328 Argnmentation The study of rea s o n - �,'-j v ing in social decision-making. An a l ysi s of the gen res . forms. a nd t ech niques 6f a rg ue rs. Particular mphasi is giwn [0 st u dy i n g a ademic, legal, and punl ic po licy d bales. (4) 330 PllbUc Speaking Focus on a vari�ty of sp ea ki ng si t u ations and presentational methods. To p ics vary according to the skill level of c ou rse parti c i pants. Potential to pics i ncl ude audience amdysis, te ch n i c al reporting. us in g visual aid . . and persua�ion. Open to both majors a nd n on - maj o r . (4) 333 Foundations of Communication Theory An i n t ro d u ct i o n to the thcoreti I c o ncepts nd research to o l s of i nt erpe rs on al and mass commun ication research. P rereq u isites : 'ommu n ication core or onsent of instructor. (4) 334 Gender and Communication Attempts to analyz and u n d e r st a n d the relationship between gen de r and com m u n ication behavior. Comparison Jnd contrast

of male and fe male co m m u n ica t i on styles. s i m i Ia ri t i es and di ffe r nces in language usage, in terpersonal d i a l0 3u es , group discus ions and l i s t e n i n g in personal and professio nal arenas. Analysis of the impact of gender-based co mm u n i ca t i on i:sue ' s u c h as assertiveness and aggression, power and (onflict reso lution, dominance and int e r r u p t i on. (4)

335 IUlercnltural Communication Workshop esigned to acquai n t stud�nts with the influence of cultural backgrounds, perceptual systems, s o c ia l )rga n ization, language, and non erbal messa 'es in in tercu ltu ra l c om m u n ic a t i on . Interc u ltura l experiences outside the c1assr o m are arranged and will be required. Intended for those whose work or l ifestyle is l ikely to intensely involve them with s o m e o ne from a no t he r culture. (2)

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Communicating i n Busine s and the Profess ion

Business "o mmunicator must p resent their ideas cl e a r l y and pers uasively; c ondu c t effective informa tion gat he ri n g and info rmation giving interviews; and understand the s i g n i fica n c� of com mun ication in the organizat ional c on te xt . Fo cus on the nature of communication processes i n orgalllzational settings and opportunity to devel()p specific comm u nication skills. Through reading . discussion, ob ervat io n, exper ience, and evaluation, studen t will be i n t rod u ced to public peaking tech­ n i qu e s used in i n formative a n d p e r� u as iv c contexts, i nterviewing strategies, and the role of listen i ng. (4) 373 Audio Production Elements of a u d io pr o d u c t io n , analysis of p rogram des ig n , scrip t i ng, a nd pr od u c ti o n tools and techniques. Lecture and laborat o r y. Pre requ is i te : Commun i cation core or consent of instructor. (4)

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374 Video Production Analysis and a p p llc a t i n of p rogram design, wr i t- i ng and production tools and te h n i q ues. Lecture and laborato r y. Prerequisi.te: Communication core or consent of i n s tr uc tor . (4) 378 Broadca t Journalism Technique f b r oa dca ,t journalism. A p p l i ca t i o n s of news g at he ri n g , writing, and rep o r ti n g in a broadcast context. News and fe a t ure a ig n me n t s using b roadcast equipment in the tield and studio. Prerequ isite: Com munication core or co n se n t of in. truct f . (4) 380 Newspaper Editing, Layout, and Design Selection and editing of news copy and headline w r it i n g . S Ie tion, sizing, and cropping of photos. Function, of layo u t . Pr i nc i p les o f newspaper design nd the i r p r act i ca l applications, Prerequisite: C o m m un ica t io n core or con s e n t o f i n s t r u c tor . (4) 381 Media Law and Prindples The theory and ap p li ca tion of law in news gathering. publishi ng, and broadcasting. ( 4 ) 384 Advanced News Reporting Repo rt ing of POlilics and police . courts and oth er governmmtal fu nctions, i nvestiga t i ve rep orti n c and writing. Blend f fi el d trips and wr i ti ng exercises. Prerequisite: C o m m u n icat i o n core or consent of i n s t r u c t o r. (4) 385 Introduction to Public Relations I ntroduction to !.he the ry. p ar h, and p ractical aspects of public relations. P rob lem-solving toward creating -hared u llderta n d i ng;, between profit < nel n on- profit o rga n i z a ti o ns and their \' [ious consti tuencies. Strong emphasis on wri t ing. Prerequisite: Com munication core or con ent o f i n s t ru ct o r. ( 4 ) 388 Editorial Writing Research and writing of editoriaL- and commentaries for newspapers and broadcast. F unc t i on of the edi torial and ed itorial pages in the news media. Prerequisite: C o m m u n i c a t i on core or c nsen t of instructor. ( 2)

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390 Ethics in Communication Start ing from basic principles of moral philosophy, students exp lo re eth ical issues involving those engaged in communica­ t ions profess ions, such as j o urnalism, p ublic relations, broadcast­ i ng and advertis ing, both from the st'1 l1dpoint of the individual and from that of the profession. Clas d iscussion centers on case studies as tudents learn to recognize ethical dilemmas and create strategies for dealing with them. (4) 433 Rhetorical Theory urvey of the rhetorical dimension of commu nication. Investiga­ t i o n of domi nant theorists and critical methods from a rhetori­ cal perspective. Particular emphasis on how messages cao be understood and evaluated using a rhetorical framework. Prer�quisite: Com m u n ication core or consent of instructor.( 4)

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435 Organizational Communication

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ommu nication systems and studies within formal organi/Al­ tions. Focus on theory and research of i n formational and d i rective com m unication as related to channels, structures, status , i nvolvements, mora:e, and leadership. Prerequ isite: Communication core or consent of i nstructor. ( 4 )

480 In-Depth and Investigative Reporting Group reporting in depth on a s ingle issue. tudents select th e subject, organi7.e the staff, resear h and i n terview, provide illustrations, edit copy, a nd lay o u t the completed work. Sub­ mission of the students' work to The Mast fo r po sible p Llblica­ tion. Prerequisites: 380, 384. (4) 485 Intradisciplinary PeTspectives in Communication A seminar to a quaint senior level om munication major with the relationship of com munication theory, maS5 communication, and theatre as parts of the discipline o f lwman communication. Lim ited to 16 students who have completed the bulk of their major requirements. Discussion of research and philosophical issues common to the three areas. St udents complete a research paper covering some application of the i ntradisciplinary nature of com m u n ication. Prerequ isite: Communication core or consent of i nstructor. (4) 49 1 , 492, 493 SpeciaJ Studies in Communication Investigations or research in area of special i nterest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified junior or senior students. A student should not begin registration for i ndependent stud)' until the specitic area fo r investigatio n has b en approved by a departmental sponsor. ( 1 -4)

436 Persuasion Analysis and evaluation o f the dimensions of persua ion i n communication emphasizing contemporary theoretical models and research. Investiga tion of how research and models may be applied in contemporary settings . Prerequisite: Communication core o r co ment of instructor. (4) 437 Advanced Interpersonal Communication The study of the theories, concep ts, and applications of commu­ nication at the dyadic \evel. How people interact at this level and h ow the quaEties of those interactions influence their comm u n i ­ c a t i o n competence a n d success. Prerequ isite: Communication core o r consent of i nstructor. (4)

500 Effective Communications A look at commu nicat ion processes in organ izations with development of pecific communication skills; incl udes pubEc speaking techn iques, i nfor ma tive and persuasi ve communica­ tion, interviewing strategies, dnd the role of Ii tening. ( 2 ) 596-598 Research in Communication For graduate students only. ( 1 -4 )

Course Offerings: Theatre 1 5 1 Stage Technology Basic theory and procedure of all bac' tage elements in the t h eatre, costumes, scenery, props, lights, makeup, and manage­ ment. (4)

438 Advanced Public Relations Through case studies, students exami ne current issues in public relations research and practice. Emphasis on research models, issues management, intluence of organizational culture on the public relations fu nction, and public relations m a nagement. Prerequisite: 385 or consent of instructor. (4) 439 Intercultural Communication Analysis of contemporary theory and research on the effects of a variety of cultural variables on communication a mong people. The intluence of cultural backgrounds, perception, social organ i ­ zation, language, a n d nonverbal aspects of me ages in intercul­ tural setti ngs. Interc ultural experiences outside the classroom required. Prerequisite: Communication core or consent of i nstructor. (4)

440 Conflict and Communication Understandiog of the role played by com m unication in the creation, management, and resolution o f h u m a n conflict. se of the theories of prominent conflict and peace 'cholars and signi­ ficant case studies to develop a method for better understanding the nature and resol ution of conflict. Prerequisite: Communica­ tion core or consent of instructor. ( 4) 450 Workshop in Effective Public Speaking Audience al1Clly is, topic select ion, organization of idea for various ud iences, types of speeches, use of visual aid. , and delivery. Designed fo r both novices and those who have had some experience as speakers. A week-long series of lectures, di ·cussions, reading , exercises, and practical appl ications to help participants become more comfortable and effective as speakers. <

(2)

475 Advanced Media Production Prod ucing, scripting, d i recting, performlng and evaluating so­ phisticated audio and video p rogram mi ng. Prercqui ite: 3 74 . (4)

1 60 Introduction to Theatre Study of both practical and theoretical aspects of theatre. Exposure to theatre and its numerou, offshoots ( e.g., 51m, television, rock concerts) through audience participation and personal contact. Development of hei"htened awareness and appreciation o f what makes for good thea tre. ( 4 ) 162 H istory of American F ilm oncentrates on the develop ment a n d growth of t h e motion picture in the United States from 1 895 to the present. Emphasis on the fil m director, whose i m p lementation of fi l m tech nique and theo ry serves as th fo rmative artistic force i n t he cinema . Societal i n fl uences such as economic factors, p ublic attit udes and mores, and p o l itical positions reflected in the nited States thro ugho ut the past 75 years, which provide the fil m media with shape Jnd themat ic focus, w t ll provide parallel points of reference. (4) 163 History of the Foreig:n Film Concentrates 0 0 t h e develo pment and growth of internationa l fil m. Societal infl uenc s such a s e onomic factor . public attitudes and mores, a nd politica l positions reflected i n tl1"' world throughout the past 75 years. (4) 225, 425 Theatre Practicum ne semester hour cred i t may be earned each semester, b u t only 4 semester hours may be Llsed to meet university requ i rements. St udents p u t classroom theory t p ract ical a p p lication by individually com pleting a p roje t relating to an asp ct of theatre. An instructor in the area of interest must approve the project and agree to provide guidance. 241 Oral Interpretation of Literature The art of com m un icating the essence of a p iece of literature to

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an a ud ience; i n terp ret ing i t experientially, logical ly, and emo­ tionally. fndividual and group performance . ( 4 )

in working with childre n . S ( 4 )

250 Fundamentals o f Acting An

'1{

m i nation of th work of actors and actresses, their natural

and learned skills; exercises in memory, imagination, and obs rvation; i mp rovisat ion and scenes from modern pla)'s. ( 4 )

351 Stage Makeup Specialized work i n planning and a p pl ication of techniques from straight make u p t h r ugh aging, t h ree d i mensional, and special ef� ets. ( 4 )

--

352 Stage Management Al l of the facets of managing a theatrical production: planning, scheduling, rehea rsal process, documentation, and i n terpersonal relationships. (4) Stage lighting from lhe development of electricity and l i gh ting i n struments to the complete design of lighting a show. ( 4 ) Study of the actor on today's stage. Work on the a n alysis and performanc e of the modern realistic play. Practical experience i n the art of the actor through perfo rmance of scene from p lays of tb e modern theatre , emphasis on the i mportance of play analysis by the actor, dnci exa m ination o f current acting theory.

(4)

Study of the work of an actor; character analysis and e m b o d i ­ m e n t , using scenes from p l ays; includes styles of acting as defined by h istori al period. P rerequ isite: 357. ( 4 )

359 Acting for the Non-Actor S t u dy of the actor's c raft and the i mp lementation of theory. Specifically designed fo r tho e who have nourished 11 cu riosity to explore the art o f acting but have been i n t i m idated by a la k of knowl ed ge or p rior experience. Introduction of act ing theory to those who have never part icipated in any theatrical endeavor. Emphasis o n individual awareness and i n terest. Not open to

(4)

363 History of the Theatre: Aeschylus Through Turgeniev Theat re as it evo lved from its pri m i t ive origin throu gh represen­ tative societ ies; Ancient Greece, Rome, Renaissance, Modern uro pean, and America n . mphasis on re ligious, philosophical,

and p o l itical thought as reflected in the drama o f each peri o d .

( ) 364 Hi tory of the Theatre: Ibsen Through to the Present (See descri ption fo r

student sh o u ld not begin registration for i ndependent study un til the speci fic area fo r inves t igation has been app roved by a

363.) (4)

452 Sc:enic Design Developm nt of arti lic and technical abili t ies in the field of scenic design incorporating many periods and styles as well as preparation of models, rendering, and draftings. (4)

:!:

departmen tal sp nsor. ( 1 -4)

Computer Science Computer science deals w i t h the theo r y, design , and appl i­ cation o f computing systems and the study o f the storing o f computer science broadly divides i n to six general a reas:

m Z n m

software d es ign , p r ogra mm ing language concepts, algo­ rithms, data structures, computer elements and architec­ t u re, and th eoretical foundations. The pro-!,'Tam at Pacific Lutheran Univer ity provideS

a

broad

base core of funda­

stresses a nalysis an d design experi en ce s with substantial laboratory work, i ncluding software development. In addi­ tion, students are exp osed to a variety of programming languages and systems. Students can ch oose from

ber o f uppe r level

evelopment of artistic and technical abiliti

s

in the field

f co t u m e design incorpo rating histo f)', p a t terns, and render­ i ngs. ( 4 )

454 Play Di.Tection Thl! rol of the d irec tor, historically und cri tically; an i n tensive study that i s both practical and theoretical in its approach to the art of the p l ay d i rector. S t u dy o f many d i fferent directing p h i lo­ soph ic . Ea h student is required to direct scenes from plays

Prerequisites: 1 5 1 , 250, and junior statuS. ( 4 )

458 Creative Dramatics D · ign d to acquaint the student w i t h material , technique , and lh eo ri e _ of creative dramatics. Students participate in creative dra mat ics. Intended for elementary and j u n i o r high school

teach r or prospective teachers, theatre majors, religious leaders,

num­

as

an underst anding o f

current developments in t h e fi ld. The Bachelor of Science degree in compu ter science has been accredited by the Compute r Science Accredi tation Commission o f the Computing Sciences Accred itation Bo ard , Inc.

FACULTY: Hauser, Chair; Blaha, Brink, Ediso n, Garvey, Rosenfeld, Spillman.

BEGlNNlNG CLASSES: There are se veral begi n n ing level classes in computer science designed for students with va rio u� ne ds: Compllter Sciellce 1 1 5: Solve it with the Comp uter' Especially fo r students with l i llIe or no backgro u n d i n com­ p uter science who wish an i ntroduction to the use of the co m­ p u te r fo r problem solving. Not recommended for students with strong mathemat ics backgro u nd s . This course also satisfies the Mathematical Reasoning requirement.

Co mp u ter Science 220: Compu terized Irlformatioll Systems Espe­

cially appropriate for businc$S majors and other st udents wishi ng a n i ntroduction to the computer and a p p lications of software packages.

Computer c;ence 1 44: Introduction to Comp llter cience (Pascnl) For students major i ng in computer science, engineering, m a thematic , most cience majors, and the M I S concentration i n busi ness as well as others wishing a strong experience in com p u ter progran1 m ing.

Comp uter Science 270: Data Structures This i s the second course in the major. Vlith departmental approval, students with a st rong progra m m i n g background may receive advanced pl ace m en t i n to this course.

re presen tative of all periods of theatre his tory. A

final p roj ect, contemporary scene, will c u l m inate the course.

a

courses wh ich insure a depth of know l ­

edge in the core material a s well

453 Costume Desjgn

consisting o f a

n

o

mental material in each of these areas. The program

358 Advanced Acting

theatre majors or m i nors.

Investigations or research in area of pecial interest not covered by regular courses; open to qualified j u n i o r or senior t udents. A

and manipula tion of data and i n formation. The core study

- 357 Intermediate Acting, The Actor A t Work

P r erequis i te : 250.

49 1, 492, 493 Special Studies in Theatre

596-598 Research in Theatre For graduate ·t udents only. ( 1 -4)

356 Stage Lighting

-

youth and camp counselors, day care workers, social and psychological workers, and co m m u n i t y theatre leaders i nterested

COMPUTER EQUI PMENT: Ail students have unlim ited access to the u n iversity

o m p u ter Center's lIser- room fa cilit ies. These include 52 IBM P _ , 2 5 Macinto he.'>, and 20 terminal all o f w h i h arc networked t i1 AX4700 and an AX. P 3400S. Stud ents also have access to th se t ime- shared computers from their resi­ dence hall rooms via the campus fi ber optic network. The DeP

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partm�nt uf u m puter S ience a bo m aj n l ai n s two l(lbora tories of its uwn . The fi r�t n e is t-he upper level lab whi h con t ains eXT, M a c i n t o sh , S ll , and Windows workstations. T h e o ther

M INOR IN INFORMATION SClENCE: Com p u ter Science 144, 270, 367, B u s i ne.ss 202, 320, plus 4 h o u rs from Busines� 37 1 , 74. S t ro ngly reco mmended: C u m p u t er Science 242 or 243. _

lab is used as a teaching laboratory and ope n lab; i t has fiftc n

Windows NT worksta t i o ns ,!ld comp uter p roj ect i o n e q u i p m e n t . w U Z w

u

All machines are on t h e etbernet and a re accessible t h rough the

ca m pu s netwo rk and have ae esS t o I

o u

Schoo/ oj" Educa tion.

COMl'UTER CAREERS: G raduates \ i t h c o m p u te r sci nee dt:gr't" have a w ide range of c a ree r opportuni ties open t th m, i n c l uding suftware d velopment, S)'. t n1. analYSIS, h a rdware develo pmen t, database manage men t, com p u te r product Sl l P­ port, education, and applications progra m m ing.

STATE ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS: Sec descr i ption u n der School

of Education.

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMPUTER APPUCATIONS: ee Gril dllate St udies.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE:

See Gradllate Silldies.

study and is often combined w i th cxtcnsiv study or a second

Course Offerings

major in a n aUied neld. The Bachelor of cience is J st ro n g , sc i enti fi c d 'g r e e wh i c h conrains addi tional COlJ l"ses i ll co m pu te r

A grade of C o r h igher is st rongly reco mmended i n a l l

scienc , m a t h e m a t ics, a n d science and serves both st ude nts goillg

di rect l y into e mp lo y m en t on graduatiun and t h o se go i n g i n to g ra d uat e program . R o t h d g rees are based on the ame core n u rses: Cc) m p u t er Scie nce 1 44, 270, 380, 486, En gi nee ring 346, M a t hematics 1 5 1 , 1 52, 245, 2 3 0 (or 3 3 1 ) . S t u d e n t s should begin C o m p u ter Science 1 44- 270 and Mathemat ics 1 5 1- 1 52 possible. o m p ute r Science

The

as e <1 r ly i n

their program as

486 cou rse sat isfi es the co re

co u n t as co mputer science co u r ses .

p to 4 hours may be subst i ­

can be

co m bin c

I with m a t h ­

d uced to a spread$heet pa ckage and other computer to o l s used in the p r oble m s ol v i n g process. Topics from e l e m e n t a ry statistics,

financial tral15actions, dnd u t h er areas where mathem a t ic. <md

data 3re used in every day l i fe. Prerequisite : fu lfi l lment of the entran e rel[uirelT1 � n t i n mathemat iCs. ( 4 )

1 44 Introduction t o Computer Science An introd uct ion to comp u t er science including algo r i t h m d sign, s t r u c t u red progra m m i ng, n umerical/non-numerical appl i­

BACHEWR OF SCmNCE MAJOR: 40 semester hours i n com­ puter s ci e nc e p l u s 3 0 ho urs o f suppurting courses in m a t hem a t ­ ics a n d sci ence. The 4 0 semes ter hours of computer science must i n cl u de 1 44 , 270, 343, 375, 380, 486, Engineering 346 , and 1 4

add i t io na l c re d i ts of approved elective (O u rse�, une of which m llst be from 367, 4 .2 0, 436, 444. E lective c o u rses submitted for appr v a l are to be se.lectcd from the co mpuLer science courses numbered above 329 ( exce pt 449 and 50 1 - - 0 9 ) , E n gi nee r i n g 446,

480, 48 1 , or hours fro m I l a t h 356 not co n n t ed to\ Jrcl the 30 h o u rs of r q l J i red s u pp o r t i n g courses. The 30 h o urs of s u pp o r t ­ ing co u rs es in m at he m a t ic s and science m us t incl ude:

cations and use of data fi l es . Ethical and sucial i m pacts of com­ p uting will be discu sed. Re q u i r e d fo r computer science majors a nd m i n o rs . Prerequ isite: 4 yea rs of h i gh � hool m athematics o r

M a t h 1 40 or equivale n t . I I I ( 4 )

1 9 9 Directed Reading Supervised st udy of to p i c s selected to meet the i n d i v idual's needs o r i n terests, p r i marily for students awarded a dv a nce d pldc men! in co m p u t e r scie nce, d m i ,,, i o n only by d ep art ment i nvita t i o n . ( 1 -2 )

1. Math 1 5 1 , ] 52 , 245, 230 (or 3 3 1 ), 345 (or 3 4 1 ) . m i n i m u m of J h o u rs of app rove d science (o urses which i ncludes a year's seq u en ce of a l a b o ratory science \ Physi s 1 53- 1 54 with 1 63 - 1 64, h e m i st ry J 1 5 - 1 16, B i ology 1 6 1 - 1 62, Earth Sciences 1 3 1 - 13 2, 1 3 1 - 325, 1 3 1 -3 3 5 ) and two add i t i o na l _

a p proved science course s. 3. The r e m a i ning h o u rs , if a ny, may be cho en from <my math course nu mbered above 329 ( cept 446) or any approved science c( j L1 r� e .

2 1 0 Introduction to Computerized Information Systems I n t ro d u c t io n to o l11 pu ter� includjng op era ti ng sy tems, word

processing, spread shee ts, and database manag m e n ! . E x a m p l '5 on I BM PC's. S t u d e n t s cannot take both 2 1 0 a n d 220 for cre d i t .

Prerequisite: MATH 1 2 8 or 1 4 0 or equ ivalent.

(2)

220 Computerized Information Systems I n t roduction to computers and the ir usc i ncluding ma n age m ent i n for mation syst ms dev l o p men t , teleco m m u n ications, operat­

i n g systems, spreadsheets, gral h ies, and Exa m ples on I B M P proce.

A pp ro ve d scienc s courses are: a n )' Bi o l og y except j 1 I , I J 2 ;

sor.

'�.

database manage- m en ! .

St u de n t s wil l d e m o nst rate u s e o f a word

( Additional c la . s sessions on word processing arc

a n)' Chemistry exce p t 1 04, 1 05, 2 1 0; any Eart h Scie nces exce pt 222; any Physics ex ept 205; Engineeri ng 234, 333, 334,

available, i n eeded. ) Stude n ts cannot take both 220 a n d 2 1 0 for

345, 434.

240 FORTRAN Programming An ac celerated introd u ctjon to the F RTRAN p ro g r a m m i n g lan­ guage. S t u d y of t he rules o f statement format i o n . Top i s i n clu de

The Bachel o r of Scie nce degree i n

" om

p ut e r Science has been

d i t e cl b the omputer c i enee Ac c re d I t a tio n Co m mjssion of the C()ll1 p u t i n g Sciences Ac red i t u t i o n Board, Inc.

ac r

M I NO R IN COMPUTER SCIENCE: omputcr Science 1 4 4 , 270, 380, and En g i n ee r i n g 346 plus a seco nd co m p uter l a nguage. Req uired supporting: Math 1 :- 1 or 1 28 .

P

co m p u ter

ematical re a s o n i n g t o solve problems. St udents w i l l be i n t r o ­

tuted from M a t h 34 1 , 345, a n d 346. Required su pport i n g : Math 1 - 1 , 1 52, 230 o r 3 3 1 , 245.

4.

1 10 BASIC l n t r ti u ct i o n to i n t e rac t i e co m p u t i n g, branchi ng, loop i n g, subscr i p ts, fu ncti ons, i n p u t / o u t p u t , subroutines and s L m p le file techniques in the cont Xl of the BAS I C langu age a n d system development. at n o r m a l ly taken by com p u t e r science majors. Prerequisite: hig h school algebra. (2) Teaches how u se of the

BACBEWR Of ARTS MAJOR: t l east 26 semester hours o f c m puter science i n cl u d i n g 1 44 , 2 70 , 3 80, 4 8 6 , Engi neeri Jlg 346, a second omp uter l a n g u a ge (240, 242, 2<13 or 343 are suggested ) . The re ma i n i n g h o u rs are from com p u t r science c urses n u m ­ bered abo e 329 (exclu d i ng 449 ) . Engineeri ng 446, 4 8 J nd 48 l

2.

prerequisite cou rses .

1 15 Solve It With the Computer rt:q u i r� ­

men! for a s n i o r sem i na r/ project .

52

Scho ol of Edllwlion.

ELEMENTARY TEACBING MAJOR: Sec descri ption u nder

TERNET.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR: Students majoring in c:o m p u e r science may choose to earn e it h er a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Ba chelor of Sc i en ce degree. The Bachelor of Arts program is the m i n imu lll preparation s u i t a ble fo r fu rther p rofessional :E

SECONDARY TEACHING MINOR: See descript ion under

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credit. Prcr q u i s i te:

MATH 1 28 o r 1 40

or equivalent. l ll

(4)

i np u t / o u t p u t , comp utation, branch ing, lo o p i n g , data t y pes, and · u bprograms. N u m e r i c and non- n ll meric problems will be solv cl. Some pr ious x p rience with progra m m i ng is reC0111mended. Prereq uisi te: M ATH J 28 o r 1 40 o r equ ivalent. a/y ( 2 )


242 COBOL Programmin g

Prese n ta t ion and a p pl ica t i o n of t h e C0 13 0 L p ro g r am m i ng lan­ gu age to busi ness p rob lems. P re requ i si te : 1 44 , 1 1 0. 220, o r con�<!n t of i ru.t I U tor. aly I I ( 2 ) -

-

243 C Programming

A wor ' hop in th C pro g ra m m i n g language fo r ex p e r i en c e d progra m mer of otht:r h ig h - I e el langu< ges. Prerequisite: 270 or eq uivale n t knowle ge of a high l evel progra m m i n g langu'lge.

243 a.nd 343 ca n n o t both be taken fo r c red i t . �

II ( I )

270 Data Structures

Study of object-orien ted progra m m i ng t e c h n i q u e s a n d fundamental data s t r u c t u re abstractions a n d i m plementations i n c l u d ­ i n g l ist, s tack, qu LI , t re e , and someti mes graphs. A plications of t hese fo rm to s o r t i ng , sea rc h i ng , and da t a sto rage will be made. P re req u isi t e: a gr a d e of � - or h i g he r in 1 44 . r II (4) 322 Microcomputers i n the Classroom

- L,troduClion to the use of m icrocom p uters in e d u c a t i on al set­ t ings. Ti pics: I ) The com p uter as a teacher too l using word - proce sing. spreadsheet, and grad i ng p r o gra m s . 2 ) o mp u ter assisted i n stru c t ion , 3) oftware eva l u a t i o n , 4) l n t eg r at j ng s o ft ­

wart' into the cu rricul u m , _ ) opyright laws ilnd p u b l ic domain software. and 6 ) Software cu rrenLly u se d i n ed ucation se ttin gs . Pre or co- requisi te : ED C 2 5 3 or 262. Does n o t co u n t toward - degrees i o co m p ut er science. ( 2 ) _

330 Introduction t o Artificial lnJelligen<:e

- An i ntro d uc t i o n to c neepIs of art ifi c i a l i n t e l l i gen c e , i ncl u d ing expert y tems. na t u ral l a n g u a ge processing, image understand­ L i ng, and problem s o l vi n g tech niq u es . Consideration given to the e t h i c al and social d i l e m m a ' p o ed by A!. The AI p ro g r a mm i ng la nguage L IS P will be ta u g h t and used in several p roj ect s . Prereq­ - u i s r te: 270, Math 245. a/y 1 996-97 I (4) 343 Programming Language Concepts s t udy

and c(

mpa rison o [ fea t u res fO l1 l1d in d i ffe re n t co m p u ter languages . I mpC[, tive ( in l u d i n g C ) , objec t - o r ie nted, fu n c t i o n a l , - and d.-darntiv l a ngua ges w i l l be s t ud i ·d. Pr og r a m s w i l l be writ­ ten i n several of t h e languages. P rere q u i sit e : 270 . [l (4) - 348 Modeling and Simulation _

386 Computer Networks

An i n t r o d u c t i o n to o mpu t e r networks and c o m p u t e r COlll m u ­ nica tion. To p i c s i n c l ud e sy s t e m to p o logy, m essa ge a n d packe t switching. bus st ru c t u re s a n d d a ta - l i n k transmission. Pr requ i ­

o

3 9 1 Problem Solving a n d Programming Seminar

e p r ob l e m s o l vi ng a nd p rogra m m i n g skLUs, i nc l u d i n g ad anced data tructures. A goal of the c o u rse is participation in the r e g i o n a l ACM p rogra m ­ m ing competi t i o n . Pass/F,l i l o n l y. Students m a y t a k e t h i s C O ll fse m o re than o n ce . Pre req u isi te : 270 o r consent of instructor. I ( 1 )

This cour

e

is des i g n e d to improve ad

4 1 2 Computer Graphics

A st u d y of t h e te c h n i que , m d t h e o r y used to generate c om p u t e r g r a p h ics . Both two-and t h ree-dirue n ' ional representation. w i l l be covered including ge o m e t ri c transformations, windowing, h i d d e n surfaces. and r n dc r i n g tec h n i q ue s . Coune work includes se ve ral p ro g ram m i n g .1S ' i gn me n p l us a p roje ct . Prerequisites: 270 a n d MATH 230 or 3 3 1 . aly 1 996-97 ( 4 )

mal path .

,

tudy o f t h e com plexity a nd storage re q u i re m en t s o f

t he algo ri thms . Use of top- doVJI1 a nd struct u red program ming. Prerequisite: 270, MATH 245. I ( 4 ) 380 Assembly Language and Computer Organization

Co m p u t r assembly lan guage a p p l i e d to various p robkms. Top ­

i cs i ncl ude data fo r m s. inst ruction forma ts, addressing, l i n k - i n g , m a c ro defi nition, a n d compu ter architecture. P re r e q u i si te : 270. ..- Strongly recom mended: EN R 346 . (4) 385 Compnter Architecture

An engineering

a p p roa c h

m

z n

m

to t h e development of la rge software

struct ured programming, s o ftwa r e desig'n, sp ecifi c a t ions, a n d

software t es t i ng . Consideration g i ve n to s o c iet a l and ethical issues su rro u n d i n g software e n gi n ee r i ng . This ou rse i ncludes m aj o r s m a l l - gro u p p ro j e c t . Prerequisite: 270, M TH 245. aly

a

1 996-97 II (4)

436 Pattern Recognition

The use of the c om p u te r to recognize pat terns in data. Topics i n cl ude a rtificial i ntelligence, luster a n a l ys i algorithms, I arnjn g

algori t h ms, an d pattern processing. The course w i l l d iscuss is ues associated w i t h mak i n g d e c i s i ons fro m dara a na lyz ed by ma c h i n es and the s o c i e t a l and p ri v a c y i mpl icat i o ns and e t h i c a l con ems invo lved in th o s e ki nds of decisions. The co u r s e i nc l u de s a m aj o r sm a i l - gTo u p pl"l1ject. Prerequi ites: 270. M T H 245. a l y IT (4)

The de

e lo p me n t

of Al s ys t e m s which o p e ra te

t the level of a

h u m a n expert. S t udents will ex p lore the structure of ex:pert sys­ tems and usc an expert system de ve l op m e n t too l su c h as OPS 5 .

Prerequisite: 330 or onsent of i n st r u c t o r. aly I I ( 4 )

449 Computer Sden<:e in the Secondary School

Method a n d maleri,lls in sec n d a r s h o o l computer science t e a ch ing . L J O, P I LOT, etc., may be co n s i d e l·cd. Does n o t co unt tOI a rd a major in compute r sc ience. P re requ isi te: 1 44. aly 1994-95 I I ( 2 ) 455 Compilers An introduction to t h e organ iza tioll, >peci fica t i o n , and analysis

of p ro gr a m m i n g l a n g u ages . Top ics i nd u di n g sca. n n i ng, p, rsing, ohjcct code, run-time machi ne structures and op t i m izat io l l . P rerequ isite: 3 8 0 , M TH 245. a/y 1 996·97 ( 2 )

An i n t roduc t ion to the ,tructure and opera ti .llg of l a r ge com­

475 Theory o f Computing

puter systems. Top ics i n c l u d e d a t a representation, mem ory

theory of com p u t a t i on . Tu mi n g mach ines. fo rmal l ang ua g -, reclHsive t h eo ry, co m p l ex i ty, P-complctenes$, an [ the h a l t i n g problem m il)' be co ns ide r ed . Prereq uisi tes: 270, Nt TH 245. air (4)

s t r ucture, I /O processing, m u l t i -p ro c s s i n g sy,� tems s u c h as pa ral l el , p ip el i ne , and stack mac h i nes. Examples of the a r ch i te c -

II"> n

packages. Topic� in lude Sll ftwa re requ irements d e fi n i t i o n ,

444 Operating Systems An i n trod u lion to compu ter op er a t i o n i n clu d i n g batch p r o cess i n g ystems , i n terac ting sy · 'ems, m u l t i- prog ra m mi ng s)'stems, sto rage m a n agem en t t ec h n i q ues and re o urcr co n t ro l . I n addition, t h e co urse i n cl u de� an n a i , j s of t h e deacllock p ro b l em and basic file �yst ill S . Issue. of ccurity, pri vacy, a n d p ro p erty rights as t h e y relate to op e ra t i n g system fun [ i o ns w i l l be d i sc u ssed. T h e course i n cl u des a maj r m al l - g ro u p proj ec t . P re re q u isite : 380, M TH 245. I ( 4 )

Ba i d,l t, tr u c t u r s r viewed <lnd applie I to the a n a lysis of

m

420 Software Engineering

367 Data Base Management

problems assoc i a t e d I"ith searcbing, so r t i n g, s t r i ngs , and m i n i ­

:!:

an

438 Expert Systems

375 Design and Analysis of Algorithms

n

site: ENGR 3 4 6 . a l y 1995-96 ( 4 )

An a p p l ica t i o ns structured p rog ra m m i n g co u rse so l v i ng va r i o u s problerns. Statist ics. data struc t u re s, m ath e m a t ica l m od e l i n g , simulation, ocuru ntation, a n d I am p ro gra m ming t e c h n i qu es wil l be applied . Prereq u i ites: MATH 245, C CJ 270 a nd ei t h e r MATH 45 or M TH 34 1 . aly ( 4 )

- An i n t r o d uc t i o n to ttl fu ndam en ta l conce ts n ecessary fo r t h e p design, use, and i rn plementati()n of data base sy s t 1115. The -: n t i t y­ - relations h i p a n d re l a t io n al models are s t u d ied in deta i l . I rrJi­ vidual. o rgan iz<l tio n , a n d s o cietal concerns related to accu racy � a nd privacy o f ddta will be d iscussed. The cou.rsc i ncludes a major mal l-grou p project. P re re q u i s i te : _70. II ( 4 ) _

t ur e of several l a r ge sys te ms are a n al y zed i n c l u d i ng TI " C, Cr a}, and I n tel Hypercube. Prereq ui.site: 380, MATH 245 . ( 2 )

Study of the

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t io n a l setting Does n o t co u nt towa rd degrees i n co mp u t e r

486 Senior Seminar Wrillen and oral presentat i o n of a topic o f

science. ( 1 -4 )

interest by the

student under the superv i s i o n o f a facu l t >, rnell1ber. D i scussion

o f the skilb need d. [or good tech n ical com m u n i c a t i o n . Study of t he socia l i m p l ica ti o n s of c m p u t i n g .

w

U Z

w U III

o m p l e t i o n of t h i s course

satisfies the core req u i r ment for a senior seminar/projec t .

Prere q uisites: Senior compu ter science major o r consent of

d e p a rtm e nt c h a i r. II ( 2 )

538 Expert Systems

490 Seminar in Computer Science Sell' red t p ic (rom t h e l is t below or topic of cu r r e n t interest i n t h e disci pline. ( 1 -4 )

Requi res s t l l de n ts to generate an expert sys te m , in ad d i t i on to cove r i n g top i cs of 438. Pre requisite: 3 3 0 or consent o f i n s t r u c tor. a/)'

a. }Q uit To/erallt Computillg: An introduction to t he methods o f fa u l l delt:ctiun dnd l o c t i o n in digital system s a nd to t e c h ­ n i4ues for the reliable design of comp u t i n g 'y st e m s .

p rogr J m acces t o

u

study o f the protecrion of data and

o mp u t e r s}'stcm. To p ics include data en cr ypt i on . code b reak i n g t e cl m i q u es . access c on t r o l s and i n ferenc co n t ro l s. Prere'luisite: 270. MATH 245.

:iE o

Compllter Security: The

c.

tech n i ques userl i l1 the desi g n of p a ra l l el p \'ogram� including

570 Mathematics of Computer Science The tec h n iqu es of proof commonly employed i n o mp ut e r science ( constructive, induct io n , and re c u r re n e reb t i o n s ) , s c h e d uling problems, ers, relations, posets, gra m ma rs, c o m p u t ­

MATH 245 .

b i j jstic

Parallel Programm ing:

n i n t roduction to the theory and

a b il i t y. selec ted topics fr om a l go r i t h m j c graph t heory. proba­

implemenLatic n on several machines. Prerequisites: 270. d.

Obje ct - a / jellied D('sigl/

and Prog/lI Il1 ming: The ry, methods, and a pp l i cation of techniq ues fo r using objects and obj e c t­ oriented la ngu a ge fo r solv i l lg pro g r <t m m i ng problems. Prer quisite:

survc, of seve ra l of the archil'ctur s i n clu d i n g s h u ffle­ excha nge, b u t terfly, n-cube, a nd Moebiu s. Prerequisites: 270. MATH 245. f. Gelletic Algo ri thms: A survey of the field o f g e n e t i c a l gor i t h m . the cour,e explores their gen e ra l st ruc t u re , t h e i r m a thematical fOl i ndaL i o m . I heir implementa t ions and app l i c a t i o n s . r

Prereq u is ite: 2 7 0 . g . Robotics: An i n t wd u c t i o n to t h � desi an, operation, a n d application o f robots, coveri ng issues i n robot c i n e ma t i c � and robot vision . Prereq uisi tes: 27U and ENGR 346. in the t heory and opera t ion of h. Nellral c two rks: A cour neural omputing systems covering the neural structures in t h e bralu, model. )f n eu ral system', i m p lement a t i on of associat ive memories u s i n g arti ficia l neurons a n d t h e design of neuron-based learning syst e m s . Prerequisi te: 270. t. ProiJleln So/villg Seminar: Develop i ng the necessary s k i U s to use computers fo r solv i n g c o m p k x problems. Ide nt i fy i n g lusses of p roblems; l ea rn i ng ho\v to di,sec t p roblems i n to sma l l , easily m a n a ge a h l e u n i t s ; a n d lhen p u t t i ng toge t her t h c:se u n its to io rm a com plex sol u tion. P rob lem s modeled a fter tho e a p pearing in the ACM p r o gr a m m i n g co mpeti t ion. F oc ll s on b u i l d i ng a la rge vocabulary of dato structures and on com­ b i n i.ng data s t r uctures and algo r i t h ms to form a c om p l et e progra m . Prerequisite: 2 70 or c qu i va l o n t . j. Graph icn l ser lurcrjiJCc Developmcllt: Tech niques fo r wr i t i ng programs using graph ical u er i n te r fa ces for M iLro o ft Windows. I n c l ude object )riented i n terface p JCkagcs and a s t udy of in h t'rita nce a n d p o lymorph ism of objects. S t udents use ava ilable visual c.o l1l p i ler tools and com p l e t e. a p roject commensurate with the i r abihtles and backgroun d . Prerequisites: 2 7 0 a n d

an i n t roduction to objects.

491, 492 Independent Study Prereq u isite: consent of depa rt m e nt

chair. ( I

495 Computer Science Research Th s t u tlent becomes in 'olved in an o ngo i ng research proj ct i n com puter science un de r the supervision of :l fac u l ty membe r. Prereq u isi te : conse n t o f instru tor. ( 1 -4) 503 Work hops i n EdoQltional Technology o r ks hops designed to expand teach el-s ' knowl edge a b o u l th"

in ed uca-

JPpli .ation of new computer a n d related l cchn o lo g P

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cryptography).

and N P-

o m p l eteness. Prereq u i s i t e : 3 7 5 . II (4)

270.

sta ndard superco m p u t

a nd a p p roxi mation al g o n thm s. gro u p s and fi n i te fields

( appl icat i o n. to coding theory and

e. Parallel Pro essillg Topologies:

54

(4 )

544 Advanced Operating Systems ·o n t i n uat iOl1 of topics in 444 I atl i n g to the development o f an o p e r a t i n g system. Empil<lsis o n the i n teraction benveen the hard­ ware str ucture a nd the opera t i l1' �ystem; opera t i n g data struc­ tures; and op e ra ti ng system security. Pre re q u i : ite : 444. II ( 2)

Prerequisite: E N G R 346.

b.

520 Advanced Digital Design o n t i n ll<l t i o n of topi s from Enoineering 346. The design o f digital control systems, asynchronous ircuits; d i gi tal igna l pro­ cessors; digit a l fi l ters; t im i ng con s i derations; use o f computer­ aided design tools. P re re qu i s i te : E GR 346, , 1ATB 1 52 . (4)

Y

580 M icroprocessor Development Systems Development of software on 8 a n d 16 b i t microp rocessors; m i croprocessor applica t ions; i n terfacing; m icroprocessor o r ga n i ­

z a t i o n ; i n terr u pt structu res. Prerequisi tes: 3 8 0 . E

JR 3 4 6 . ( 2)

586 Graduate Design SemiJlar Written anti oral p re s e n t a t i o n of a to p ic of i n tere s t to the s t u d e n t under the s u p e r is ion of a fac u l t y member. D i s c u ss i o n o f meLhods a n d te c h n i qu e s a propriate to t h e d i s c i p l i n e a nd st u d y of the so ci a l i m p l ications of' c o mp u t i n g . Students may not receive redit fo r t h is o u rse if they re ce i v e cred i t fo r 593. Thesis. Prerequisite: Full grad uat standing and the completion o f at least o n e graduate l eve l cou rse. 590 Graduate Seminar elected t o p ic or' current i nterest. Possible topi include Modeling and i m u l a t i o n . Com pu ter Arch i tec t ure, o mp uler Network . ComputC'r , raph i . Software Eng i neer i n g , Pattern Recogni tion, C om p il e r I mplemen t a l i n, Theory of Co m p u ting, Fa u l t To l e ra n t C o mp u t i ng. Computer Sec u r i ty, ParaUeI Program­ m ing, Object- Ori ente d De�ign and ProgrJl11ming, ParaLIel Proce s s i n g To p o l o g ies , Genetic Al gori thl1ls, Robo tics, Neural Networks, Pro b l e m S o l v i n g Seminar, raphical scr Interface Development. A re earch project is req u i red. Prerequisite: ,raduate stand.ing. ( 1 -4)

591 Independent Reading and Research I ndivid ual re a ding and reseJ.r h on select topic. I nt e n ded for ad anced graduate s t uden ts . M i n i m u m s u p e \,\ i s i o n after i n i t i al pla n n i n g o [ s t u dent's pr j e t . Prereq uisite: co n s e nt of depart­ ment. ( 1 - 6 ) T

593 Thesis

Re 'carch st udy to meet thesis op tion re q u i re m e nt f()r M.A. or M.S. degree. ( 1 -6)


for helping to establish the learning agreement, and fo r deter­

Cooperative Education Internships

mining a grade.

Lea rn i ng is facil itated through:( I ) use of a " Learning

Agre ment"; ( 2 ) completing an academic project; ( 3 ) periodic

Cooperat ive education assumes that expe rient ial

learning

can be an appropriate compo nent o f any quality educa­ tional p r ogra m .

and p rac t ica , it

measurable indicators of lea rning, and also incorporates

lea rn i n g th ro ugho u t

their u n dergraduate programs, rather than concen trating

on p r a c t i ca l cou rse work a t the end. As the n ame suggests,

bet:\veen

the

university a n d a

a

system, t ic co op era t i on

variety of employers in the

Contact between the faculty sponsor and the student m ust be

sufticient to allow the sponsor to serve as a re source and provide academic supervision. TypicaUy, this can be

a cco m plis h

e d d ur i ng

the progTam's ca reer-related advan tages are

ed ucat io n provide ' t i mely and extended oppo r t u n i t i es fo r developi ng co m mu n ication skills o rally and in writing. A cooperati e e d u c a t i o n program

become aware of oppo r t u n i ties

can

enCl ble s t udents

to

to co n tr ibute c rea tive l y to

the changing d i m en s i o n s o f work in p rese n t-day society.

T he u n iversity and employers benefi as wel l . The

u n i ve rs ity

d eve lop s stronger and more c rea ti ve connec­ tions with its c om m u n i ty. Employers d eri ve a more effici en t device for t ra i n i n g and recruiting. More i m p o r­ ta ntly. the pa rt ner h i p p rov id e a un i q u e oppo rtu nity for emp l oyers to participate in an important educational ervice to the community. FACULTY: Mar ti ns on ,

m

n

campus may maintain co ntact through periodic phone confer­

l> -i

ences, when site vis its are i m p ractical. Employers are r e sponsible to: ( I ) provide opportunities fo r

students to achieve the i r learning objec t ives w i thin the limits of

o z

their work 'ettings; ( 2 ) help students d e velop skills related to

the contextual aspects of the work world (such as relations hips with co-workers); and ( 3 ) facilitate sl-udents' integration into their work 'etting so that their employment proves valuable and productive. Students are required to register for at least one credit hour a fter accepting a Co-op position. Throughout an undergraduate academic

areer a student may receive a maximum of

1 6 seme

-

ter hours of credit in cooperative education.

Course Offerings 376 Work llxperience I A supervised educational experience in a work setting. Requires

Chair, Cooperative Educa tion Council;

Phelps, Genernl Mml age r

TWO MODELS: Thl? Cooperative Education Progra m accom­ modates both pa rt- tim e and full-time work modes. Part-time work which allows ,tudents the opportunity to tal<. on-campus

c o u rses COnCtHr ntly is labeled t he "Para l lel Model." A fu ll-time work experience fits under the " Iternati ng Model." In most

ca.e t , ludcnts will follow one

< m o c

tion program may arrange to meet with the sponsor on campus.

b e nefi t s are educa tional. Stu d en ts gain a n appreciatio n of th e re l a t i o ns h ip b e t wee n t heory and application, and may l ea r n , both ea r l y and firs t - ha n d , about new d e ve l o p m nts in a particulClr fi e l d . Coo p erative

s

is signed by the stude nt, the faculty sponS O l', the program director, and the work supervisor, each of whom receives a copy.

Those involved in "al ternating" programs some di:;tance from

obvioLl , i t s main

ments or

pa tion i n work-related training sessions. T h e learning agreement

one or two site visits. Students in a "parallel" cooperative educa­

com m un ity.

Although

m

supplementary resources such as reading materials and part ici ­

tio nal work exp e ri e n c e e arl y in th e i r academic careers a n d

cooperative education rep re s e n t s

o

assistance of a faculty sponsor, lists learning objectives with

di ffe rs in se veral respects.

work and

o

The learning agreement, d ev eloped by each student with the

C op rat Jve education i n t roduces studen ' to a n e d u c a ­ weave. opportun ities fo r

n

who accepts the responsib ility to function in a resou rce role.

ho u g h it shares this assumption wi t h

Mher experiential learning strate gi e s such as fieldwork p l a cem en t s

contact with the faculty sponsor; (4) attendance at one work­ shop during the work experience; and ( 5 ) an on-site supervisor

or

the other, but some depart­

hools may develop sequences that combine b o t h

p < rallel and alternating work llwde .

Ful l - t i me , u m m e l' work, or e ample, would be classified as a l ternating coo perative ed uc a t i on experience, and many s u m mer jobs provide fo r learning that relates to st ud e nts ' aca­ demic objectives. an

THE PROCESS FOR STUDENTS: In order to be eligible fo r ad mission i n to the Coo p' rative Educati o n Progra m

a

student

must have completed 30 semester hours and be i n good standing. S t udents who w ish to parLicipate apply to either the , o · op Office i n Ramstad Hall or to a Co-op faculty coordinator or s p o ns o r erving thi s function in s p ecified d p a r tments, divisions, o r sc h�) () ls . BOLh w r it te n applica tion and personal inter-view are req u i red in order to dctermin eligibil ity, te r m s for placemen t, areas of i n terest, , cade m i c requirements, and kinds of pos itions

the completion of a Cooperative Education Learn ing Agreement in consultation with a faculty sponsor. ( 1 -8 )

476 Work Experience n

A sup rvised educational experience in a work setting providing fo r advanced level of responsibility. Requires the completion of a

Cooperative Education LearnLng Agreement in consultation with a fa cul ty sp onsor.

( !-il )

477 International Work Experience A super vised educational experience in a fo reign se l l ing. Requires co m pl e t ion of the International Coope rative Education Agreement, comple t i o n of a clearance checklist, and an approved plan of r po rtin g in cons ultation with a faculty sponsor.

( 1 - 1 2)

576 Work Experience ill

A super ised educational experience a t the graduate level. Requ i res completion o f a C oop e r a tive Education Agreement in co nsul t a t i o n with a faculty sponsor and the student's gradua te p rogram adviser. ( 1 -4)

available, Studenti> Me res ponsible fo r their learning activ ities during

their coopcrati ' education p sitlon. Each student must se�k out and arrange fo r a ademic supe rvis ion from a faculty co ordi n ato r or sponsor. Faculty are responsible for insuring that the work experience pro

ides appropriate learning opportunities

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1 5 1 Principles of Macroeconomics Th is cou rse introduces ·tudent.. to the eco nomv as a whole and m aj o r issues such as i n thtion, u nemployment, � cono t11 ic gro w t h , and international t r a de . These and other is s u e s dre <lJ1 .d)'Zed by study i n g the ho usehold, busi ness, government, nd i n t e rn �l t i o n al sectors. Marl)' a l t rnative c 'planations for the economy's p e rform an ce wil l be exam ined. ( 4 )

Economics " Wan t is a growing giant whom the coat of Hav large enough to cover. " - RALPH WALDO EMERSON V\ U

:E o z o u w

was never

Econom ic ' is the study of how people establ ish social f, r producing a nd d istributing go o ds a nd servi ces to su -tain .. nd enha nce human life. Its main objective i ' t o d te r mi n a wise use of li mited economic resourc s so that people receive the maximum po ible benefit a t the lowes t cost. arrangements

Th economics discipline embraces

a

1 52 Principles of Microeconomics The cou rse introduces tudents to the s t u d y of economic decis io n making b y firm� a n d i n d ividuals. Econom i c tools and concepts s u c h as markeLS, suppl)' and de m an d , and efficiency are

applied to contemporary i sues including wage and price detcmlination, i nco m e distribution, environ mental protection, a n d global p ro du c t i o n. (4)

body of tech­

niques and conceptual tools that are useful

for

under­

standing and analyzing our com plex economic system.

244 Econometrics I n t roduct"ion to the methods a nd too l s of e co n o m e tr i cs as the b as i s for applied research in economics. Speci fication, est im a t io n and te_ ling i n the cl a ss ic a l I in ar re g re ss i o n model. Extensions of the model and applications to the analysis of e ollomic data. P re req u is i l : STAT 23 1 or equi valent. (4)

n u m rou , s i nce their understanding Df the economy and their p roblem - l i n g and t h i n king abilities are ap pl i cable t o a wide ran g e of activities in busine s anC/or gO Y rn ment. Career avenues for graduates a re

FACULTY: ugent, Cha ir; Erue, R. Jensen, N. Peterso n, Reiman, Vinje, Went\ orth. BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: ( A) M i n i mu m of 40 semester hours, i n c l u d i ng 1 5 1 1 52, 3 I , 352, 4 6, 1 2 h o u rs of electives in ec on om i cs, 4 ho u rs selected from Statistics 23 1 o r , 1 a t he m at ics 3 4 1 , and 4 hours selected frolll Economic 244, 343 ( i f n o t used as ec o n omi cs electives), Bus i n es s 202 or 303, Mathematics 348, or up to 4 hours i n computer s c ie n c e . (B) A grade point average of 2 .50 in aU classes included in the 40 semester hours toward t11c major. With dep a rt m enta l approval, Economics 1 3 0 may be substituted for Ecollomics 1 5 2 fo r purposes of m aj o r �nd mi.nor re qu i re men t s. Economics 486 meets the senior sem i n ar/project requirement. For s t u d en ts p l a n n i ng gra du a t e work in e co n om i cs o r b u sin es s, additional lll:l!h preparation w i l l be neces ary. For spe ific courses, co n s u l t you r m ajor adviser. HONORS MAJOR.: O utstanding s t u de n t s may ch oose to pursue graduating i n economics with h o n o rs . I n addition to meeting .tli ther major reCjuirements, in ord r to be granted dep a r t me n tal honors a student must: (A) have an ovt:: r a l l u n ivcrsity grade p o i nt aveTage o f 3.:5 or better; ( B) take fo u r h ours beyond the standa rd major i n 49 5, Honors hesis (S tudenLS apply for adm iss io n to this course in the eWlld semester of th e i r junior year. The dep a rt m e n t gra n ts admission to 495, Honor Thesis, based o n the s t u de n t's p ri o r work i n economics and the qual it of the ge n er a l research propo a l . ) ; (C) present the results of th work completed i n 495, H o n o r s Th e si; , at a meeting of Om i c ro n Delta Epsilon ( the economics honorary ) . MINOR: 2 4 semester hours, including l S I , 1 52, 35 1 or 352, a n d J 2 ad d i t i o n a l hOUfS o r electivcs, 4 o f w h i c h ma y b e in statist ics. ECONOMICS HONORARY SOCIETY: The d ep a r t m en t offers members h i p in Omicron Delta psilon, the International Econo m ics Honorary Society, to q ualified majors. For s pecific cr i t c ria , �ce an)' department:t1 fac u l t y member. BACHEWR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION: See School of

130 GlobaJ and EnvironmentaJ Economic Principles What is the "correct" amount 0 pol l u t ion? What is the va l u e f an ancient ed ar t ree? What does pop music have in common with .S. auto p ro d u c t i o n ? Micro-economic p ri n c i pl es are used

to analyze t hese J nd o t her env ironm n ta l and global issues. A n a l ysi s of p u b l i c policy a nd private behavior; appropriate pricing, resource valu t i o n , taxes and ubsid ies, t ra d e po licies, sustainable development, ancl i n c o m e gro w t h and d i s t ribution. S tude n ts cannot take b o th 130 and 1 5 2 for credit. (4) A

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33 1 International Economics Re g i on a l and i n ternational special ization, com parative costs, i nternat io nal payments and exch ange ra tes; n a t i o n a l policies which promote o r restrict t rade. Prerequisites: 1 3 0 o r 1 52, or co n sem of i nstructor. (4) 3 4 1 &onomic Development: Comparative Third World Suategies A nalysis of the theoretical fram ework fo r development with applications to alternative eco n o m ic development slrategies used in th e newly mer gi ng d ve l o p i n g countries. Emphasis on comp:Jrison between countries, asse.s menlS of the relat iw i mp o r ta n ce of c u l t u ral a l u es, historical cJt perien , and govern­ mental p o l i c ie s in the development process. Pr req ui s i t es : 1 30 or 1 5 1 , or consent of in structor. (4)

345 Mathematical Topics i n &onomics An introduction to b a ic a p pl i ca n o n s of mathemat ical tools us ed i n economic analysis. l eJ p i cs i nclude · i mp l e l inear models of s upply an d d mand, single Jnd multivariable ma.ximization model , and linear dif� rence and differential equation models of economic growth. Prerequisites: 1 30 or 1 5 1 or 1 5 2 , or consent of instructor. (4)

Course Offe rings

P

330 Environmental and NaturaJ Resource Economics The first half of the cou rse examines the theory of external i t ies, c onges t i o n and the common-pro p ert y basis for environmental d e gra dati on , and the val ua t ion of enfironme nta l a m en i t i es . ase s tud.i es in Iud air and water P l l lu t i o n , "green" trade pol icy, wildemess pre ervation , and o u tdoor recreation. Consideration g i ve n to e nv iro n me ntal problems in developing nations. The s ec on d pa n of tbe cour t' develops analy tical models fo r t h e use of re n ew a b le and exbaustibie resources over time. ,:\se studies include the fishery, forestry, land, m in er a l s , and energy. Empha­ sizl's the Pacific North\ est where p os s ib l e. Prert'Cj u isit : 130 or 1 5 2 , o r c o n se n t of i nstructor. (4)

343 Operation Re earth Quantitative methods for decision problems. Emphasis on l i n e a r programming and other determ i n istic models. Prerequisite: TAT 2 3 1 or equivalent. ( 2 )

lidtlcatioll.

S6

32 1 Labor Economics A n a l ysi s of Jabor markets and labor market issues; wage deter­ m i nation; investment in h u man capital, u n i o n i s m and collo:ctive b a rga i n i n g; law �lnd public policy; di. c r i mina t i o n ; labor mob ility; ear n i n gs inequality, unemployment, and wages a.nd i n flation. P rere q uisites : 1 30 or 1 5 2, or c nsent of instructor. (4)

Y


35 1 lntermedjale Macro Econ omi c Analy is

economists, �nd the Keynesians. Prerequisite: 35 1 or 35_ ( may

wi t h i n

requirement.

be taken conc u r rently). Meets the seni r sem i nar/project

a Lio nal income detcrmin.ation i n c l u d i ng p o l i cy i m p l icat i o ns

the i nsti t ut i o n a l fra mework of the . . economy. Pr requi i tes: 1 30 or 1 5 1 , a n d MATH 1 28 0r 1 40 or I 1 . ( 4 )

490 Seminar Seminar in e onomie probl e m s an d p o lic i e s w ith emphasis on

3 5 2 Intermemate M icro EconomJc Analysis Theory oC consumer behavior; p ro d uct and actor p r ices under

encouragino the studen t to i n tegrate problem-solving met ho d ­

conditions o f monopoly. comp tition. and intermediate m arke ts; _

(4)

1 30 or 1 52. or consent o f 1 28, 140, o r 1 5 1 . (4)

welfare eco n omic . Prereq u i s i t e s :

parti ipants and instructor.

instructo r a n d M Anl

(

361 Money and Banking

The n a t u re a n d ro le of m o ney; m a n tary theory; to ols :U1d I ITIp lCmentalion o f monetary pol icy; reg u l a t i o n o f i n termediar- ies; banking ac t-ivity in financi;t\ markets; i n t e rn a t i o n a l conse­ quences or and co n s tra i n ts on m o n e t a ry p o l i c y. Prerequisites: 1 5 1 o r consent o f in tructor. ( 4 )

m

ology with tools of ec o n o m i c a n alysis. Top ic( s ) se l ected by class

n

P rerequ i s i te : consent o f inslrll tor.

o z

1 -4)

491, 492, 493 lndependent Study

o

P rere q u iS i t e : consent of the d�p a r t l1lent a n d completion of e i th e r·

:!:

495 HORors Thesis

n VI

35 1 or 3 5 2 . ( 1 -4 )

I nd pend 11 1 research su per i ed by one or m o re facult y

m e m b ers . Research proposal and topic developed b

the s t udent

in the j u nior year. App l i cation to enro l l i s made in the second

semester of the j u nior year. P rereqllis i t ; economics major and

co nsen t of the d e p a rtme n t . (4)

500 Applied Statistical Analysis An intensive intr duction to stat istical methods. Emp h a sis o n t h e application o f i nferent i a l statistics t o concrete s i t Llatio ns.

To p i cs i n c l ud e measure of Joe a t ion a nd va r i a tio n, probabili ty, es t i m ation , hypothesi ' testS , a nd regression . (4)

501 Analytical M ethods for Decision-Making The c o ncep ts uf prob G b i l ity, sa mpl i ng , statistical decision theory, l i near p rogram mi n g , and

other d et e rminist ic mo d e l s a pplied to

m anagerial pr blems. P rereq u i s i te: 500. (4)

520 Economic Policy Analysis An intensi e i n t roduct ion to the c o n cep ts of macroeco nomics and microeconomic '" i t h a n emphasis o n pol ic), for mat i o n w i t hi n a

global framework.

(4)

53 1 l nter nat i onal Economics and Finance Pas t . prese n t. and future trade pattern�

global economy on 362

i nci den

e

-

......-

t he

tions; econ om ic rel a tionships between bala n ce , ) [ paymen t ,

i nternat. i o nal value o f a c u r rency, a n d a (J u n tris do mes t ic Ll ne m p lo y me n t , a n d the d i st r ibutibn o f income. (4)

of taxes, t he p Ll b l ic deb t and the provision of p u b l ic

goods such as nat ional defense. ed ucation . p u re a i r, and water. Prerequisites; 1 3 0 or 1 52, or consent of i nstructo r. ( 4 )

e c o n o m i c pe r fo rman c e rda ting to i n t1 a t i on ,

37 1 Indu trial Organization and Public .Policy An a naly is of t h e �tructure. conduct, aod perfor mance of merican in dustry a n d p ubl ic po l i cies that foster and alter in u tri al structure a n d hehavior. Topics i ncl u d e th econom ics of firm size, motivations of the firm. concentration, m rge r s ,

590 Graduate Seminar Selected t o p i cs as :m nounced. Prerequisitc: c nsent of i n structor.

( 1 -4) 59 1 Directed Study ( 1 -4 )

p a t en ts , a n t i trust , p u b l ic uti lit), regu l a t io n . publ i c ent r p rise,

595 Graduate Readings

i nstruc tor. ( 4 )

598 Research Project ( 4 )

38 1 Comparative Economic Systems An an:tlysis and comparison of contemp o ra ry economic systems.

599 Th esis (4)

Ind pende n t s t udy card required. ( 4 )

- anll sll bsidiz.1 Jioll. Prerequisites; 1 30 or 1 52. o r conSent of -

of co u n t ries witllin

theoretical and ca e study basis; trade

policy issue.'> foc u sing on t a ri ff,. q LIotas, and free trade associa­

Public Finance

Public ta; a t i o n al1d expen d i t u re at all governmental lcve l s ; th e

-

a

The course i.ncl udes e ' a m i u G tion of the capita list, m i xcd and centrally p l a n ne d models, inclu d i ng a n histo r i al per pe tive . The eco n om ic systems of sel ected countrie.s w i l l also b' studied, Prerequ isi tes:

151

r

1 52, or consent of i ns t m ·tor.

cll l t u ra l l i ne in the P rspe c tives on Di cr�ity

r

Fulfill cross­

quireme n t .

(4)

3 99 lnternship A rt: earch and writing pr jeet in connection with a studen t's

- approved off-campus ac t iv it y. The primary

goal

is to gain i ns ig h t

i n to applications of the ideas and methodologies of econorui s.

_

Prerequi s it es : sophomore -tand ing p l us one co u rse ill eeo no m i

a n d consent of the departmenL _

486 Evol u tion

,

( 1-4)

of EconomJc Tbought

tho ught from a n c i e n t to modern t i me ; emphasis on L he p e r i o d from Adam S m i t h to I.M . Key nes; the clas kal econom iSIS, the soc ial i sts the ma rginalists, tht: neoc la sieal Econo m i c

,

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The School of Education offers programs of st udy leading

to cer t i ficat io n fo r elementary, seco nda ry, and spec i al education teachers, administrators, reading s p eci ali s ts, a n d school librarians. The curriculum is designed to pro vi de grad u ates with a blending of tbe Liberal arts a nd a var iety of p r act i c a l exposures to guided field experiences begin­ ni ng arly in the educational sequenc . The faculty i$ co m m itted to the d e ve lo p me nt of educational personnel sensitive to the va ri ed individual needs o f learners. MISSION S'IATEMENT: The School of Educatioll is

a

COlllll1 ll11ity

offawlty, administra to rs, staff, and student whose m ission is to educate responsible decision m akers-teachers and admil1istrators - who

a re

i llformed by current research alld who are thollghtfu l

about the m o ral, eth ical, social, and political implicatiolls of their work. Therefore, we model and practice tile qualit ies, skills, and

sensibilities necessary for professional leadership and ser v ic e

in

schools. Witllill the co l1 text of a liberal arts education, we believe that edllclltors IIn derstand, reflec t 011,

nnd respond to diverse nlld

complex value systems ill school and society. In service to the ulliversity a n d regional K- 1 2 educational communit ies, we ['ngage in scholarly activi ties about reflective teaching and learning practices that contrib ute to educational excellence at local, state, and national levels.

FACULTY: Brickell, Dean; Reisberg, Associate Dean; Baughman, Churney, Ford, Gerlach, Glasgow, Lamoreaux, Leitz, Lewis, Mc "ra\ , . 1inetti, Mosher, Mulder, G. elson, F. Olson, Owens, Ric.kabaugh, Wentworth, G . Williams, Yerian, Yetter.

The School of Ed ucation is accredited by the ational Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educatton (N ATE) , the ort hwest Association of Schools and Colleges, Jnd the Washington State Board of Education fo r the preparation o f elementary and secondary teachers, principals, program a d m i n istrators, and special educat.ion teachers, with the Master of Arts i n Education the h ighest degree approved. The accreditation gives PLU graduates reciprocity with many other states. Programs for the preparation of schoo l administrators and school l ibrarians are availabl . The School o ffers coursework toward the conversion, renewal, or reinstatement of teaching certificates. For preparation o f school nurses, see School o f Nursing section o f this catalog. The School of Educa tion offers graduate degrees in Class­ room Teaching, Educational Administration, Educational Psycho logy, Li teracy Education, Special ' du cation, and the master's degree with Initial Teaching Certification. I n formation regarding these programs is available from the director of graduate programs in the School o f Education (535-7272). ELIGIBI LITY REQUIREMENTS FOR PROFESSIO NAL STUDIES (Undergraduate or Certification Only): Students seeking to register for Education 302 or for Educational Psychology 2 6 l !Education 262 must apply t o the School of Education, in order to receive a registmtion num ber. Official transcripts o f all coUege/university work, writing samples, and official documentation of college a dmission test scores must be submitted to the School of Education by the first Friday in ctober or March before being admitted to the School of Education and allowed to enroll in education co urses the following term. Requirements include:

I. Evidence of verbal and quantitat ive ability as illustrated by one of the following test scores : ' a . Sch o lastic Aptitudt: Tc:,l ( SAT) Verbal 425 or above; To tal 9 J O or above**

58

b. 'vVashi ngton Pr -CoUege Test ( \Al P T) or (TETEP) erbal 48 o r abov(,; Total 1 03 o r abo e" c. American C o ll e g e Tes t Assessment ( T) Verbal 20 o r above; Composite 23 o r above"·

School of Education

P A C I F I C

L U T H E R A N

U N I V E R S I T Y

*

All elernetL wry applicants between tlze ages of2 1 (I/ld 25 arId all seco ndary app lica n ts over the age of2 1 , who have not tokell

ACT,

WPCT o r TETEP must silb/n i t

a

SAT,

TETEP sco re.

"" 'fest score " equ irelllents nrc set by the State of \l\'asll illgtoll mId are mbject to change.

2. Sopho more standing (30 or more semester hours) 3 . Cumulative grade point averag (GPA ) o f 2.50 4 . Psychology 1 0 1 : grade of C or h igher 5. English 1 0 1 : grade of

or higher

Applicatio n forms and procedures for admission to profes­ sional st udies in education are available from the School of Education. Students who do not meet all the requirements may exercise the a ppeal process tl)[ admission to Education 302 o r Educational Psychology 26 1 /Education 2 6 2 . Admission appeal process forms are available from an adviser in the School of Education. AU students admitted to Education 302 or Educa t ional Psychology 26 1 1Education 262 are admitted provis ionally to a program of p ro fessional studies, subj ect to conditions and p rocedures iden t i fied i n the Elementary/Secondary Initial Level Certification Handbooks, available in the School of Education. Continuation in the program of pro fessional studies is subject to continuous assessment of student development and performance. BAE and/or CERTlFICATlON REQUlREMENTS: Students become candidates fo r certification when they have success fully completed the following: 1 . All course work with a cumula tive grade point average of 2.50 or above. 2. Pro fessional Education Sequence fo r dcmentary or secondary teaching. 3 . An approved teaching majores) or c.oncentration(s) (see requirements as list d under Academic P reparation ) . 4 . All courses in educati n and i .n major and m inor fi el d s with grades o f o r h igher ( for secondary edu ation, B-or higher required in education cou rses). 5 . Achievement of profi iency in writing and math skills. 6. Anthropology 2 1 0/H istory 2 1 0 or Anthropology 1 02 fo r secondary teaching Jnd Anthropology 1 0 2 for elementary teaching. 7. Coursework or courses on the issues o f abuse, as approved by the School of ducation (SPED 480). 8. A student teaching experience. S tudents must co mplete ,Ill necessary p rocedures by the last Friday in October fo r fall student teaching or the last Friday i n November for spring s tuden t teaching. 9 . A vali d first aid card. TEACHER CERTIFICATION Initial Teaching Certificate: S t u dents who successfully complete a program of professional studies in the Scho ol of Education, and \ ho meet all related academic requ irements for a d grcc or a cert i ficate, will be recommended by the School of Education for a Wash ington initial teaching certificate. Addi tidnal state re­ quirements for the certificate indud . a Washington State Palrol check, an FBI fingerprint check, and a passing �core on state ent ry- to - practice test . Informat ion regarding aU st a t e require­ ments and procedures for cert i fication is available in the School of Ed ucatio n . Stare req uiremellts are subject to immedia t e challge. Stude llts should stay in close coutllcr with their School of Education advisers for updates i n program or applica t ioll requirements.

Initial Teaching Certi.fi.cate Renewal: Under star reg u la t io ns in effect at the publication of t his catalog, the Initial CertifIcate is


valid for fo ur years, and may be re n ewed for an a dd it i o n al t h ree years by m et in g the fo l l ow i n g requirements:

ART 34 1

1. In order to be eli g ibl e to renew or have ao i n i t ial ce rtificate reis lled, an i nd i vi d u a l must have completed all cou rsework re quirements for c on ti n u i n g certificltion or have c om p le t ed 1 0 semI' ter ( 1 5 q u ar ter ) h o u rs of stud )' ince the i suance of T i n i t ial .ertificate in the role for which the MOST R ' r� n ewa l or rci s s ua n ce is b ing s ough t (W 1 0-79-065 ) ( 1 ) ( a ) . The i n d i v id u a l m u s t also meet t h e recency requirement described b e l o w. I n som e cases the s a m e cre d i ts may apply io b th t be r newallreissuance require ment and t he recency

M U 1 34 l

req u i rement . 2 . I n o rder

t o b e eEgible t o obta i n , ren ew, or ha e 3n in itial

c e r t i fic a t e reissued, t h e individual must have co mp l et ed 1 0

semester ( 1 5 q u a rter ) h o u rs within the seven years p rece d ing appiJcation fo r the in itial certificate. The recency requirement do 5 not ap p l y t o ind ividuals w h o are seeking h e con t i n u i n g certificate. ( W C 1 80-79-065) (3) 3. An i n d i v i d u al must complete t h e renewal appl ication form and send it to the School of Educa t i o n , w i t h the $ 1 5 renewal tee

(ch eck / 1 /ade payable to

Pacific Lutheran Univcrsity).

4, An i n divid ual mus t have a copy of h i s or her I ni t ial C :ertificate o n me in tbe ch o ol of Educarion.

Converting to the CoDtinuing CertiJkat� At t he t i m e of publication of this c talog, st3te req u i r ments in I ud : I . 30 seme�ter h ours of up pe r divi ion or grad u a te IeI'd post­ ba calaur ate study. - 2. 1 80 d a ys of lIJI-time teach ing, of which 30 da ) s m u s t be with t h e " , lI n e empluyer. _

'

_

3. Two

4.

-

ndorsement .

our ewo r k in issues of abuse,

Altho ugh the mast r's degree is no lon ge r req uired , an)' School of E d ll ca t i fl M AE degree can be Lls<.:d to meet the acade.mic re­ q u i r ments r the continuing certificate, Other means by which the hool of Ed uca t i on can he l p persons mect c o n ti n u in g cert i ­ fica ti o n I' q u i reme n t s w i l l b e consider ' d a s they bccome known.

-

Professional Education: IDementary Program SPED 200 I nd iv i d ua ls w i t h Special [ eeds ( 2) 'D 302 Human Lea r n i n g: Grol t h a n d D evelo p m e nt ( 3 ) - ED C 30 3 Field Ob ser v a t io n ( 1 ) E D U 357 M e di a and Technology in K-Il l as s ro o ms (2)

3

EDV EDVC

Practicum I 00

(I)

To pics i n El ementa r y Edu a t ion: Classroom I ss u es and i nstructio nal S t ra te ,ies

Practicum I I

-E

(3)

Mathematics in K-8 Education ( .:»

ED ED EDU

(1)

410

ED

C 4 12

ED

430

- ·DV ' 435

Literacy i n K-8 Ed u at ion ( 3 ) Scicnce/Health in the Elem e n t a r y School ( 3 ) Soci�l S t u d ies i n t h e Elemcn tari' School ( 3 ) S tu d e n t Teach i n g in K-8 Educati n ( 9 ) ( o r EDV 4 3 4 for d u a l student te a c h i n g ) To pics i n Elementary E d u ca ti o n: lass room P rac ­ tice in the Con text of Educa tional Foundations ( 3 ) ( EDUC 430 and 435 llleet t h e sen ior e m i n a r / project requiremen t ) Te ach in g for Individual Differences - E le mentary ( 2 ) '

P D 499

( eqt/ireri

only for n01/ ,pe

Music in the Elementary School ( 2 )

or

SOTA 3 4 1 PI-I E D 322

l a ss roo m (2)

I n tegr a t i ng Arts in the

Physical Educa t i o n in Elementi1l')' S hoals

inl edt/Cr1tioll majors ,lIId

1II;II01'S)

(2)

m

o C f"\

ELEMENTARY SEQUENCE (Regular and certification only): Cou rses m Ll t be taken in Lhis sequence: Term I:

ED

302

EDUC 3 0 3 S P E D 200

:to --I

H u m an Learning: Crowth and De e lop m<'n t ( 3 ) Field Observa t iun ( I ) pec i a l eed, Lea r ne rs (2)

o

The followitlg collrses IIlZLst b e takc/( after Term I: PJ-lED 3 2 2 P in Elemt'n tary Scho 1 ( 1-2) A RT 34 1 El em e n t a ry A r t Edu ation ( 2 ) MU

las room Tea hers

Musi fo r

1 34 1

z

( 1-2)

Child Abuse ( I )

SPED 48 0

(req!flremCflt by Stale 0

T erm IT: EDU 357 DVC 358

EDU ' 406 E V 408

Washillgtoll)

MediaiTech nology in the Cbs. room ( 2 )

(I ) Elementary Math Methods ( 3 ) Li teracy III K - 8 Educatiun (3)

Prac ticu111 I

Te rm III: ED

Topics: Issues/ Strategies ( 3 )

ED

P r ac t ic um I I 0 )

C 400 40 1 410 ED 4ll D SPED 499

Elem ntary Science Me t h o d

'

(3)

EIt:mentary Social 'tu dit:� Methods Teaching fo r I n d iv i du a l

'Jimn I V: ED 4 0 E D ' C 435

(3)

£1 m. ( 2 ) major ,md minors)

i f h nccs -

(re'juireri o llly/o r 110/1 special ecIrrcatio/l

ELEMENTARY PREPARATION General requirements: In addition to thc ge n er a l un iversity and core re q u i r ments in all curricula, cer t ai n �pccific rcquirem nts i n gener.1i ed ucation must be met, - 1. A n t h r pology 1 02 , E xp lo r i n g Anth TUpol gy; Culture a n d ociety (r com mended) or n thropology 2 1 O/H istory 2 1 0, ,Iobal Perspe ct i es, or the equiva lent must be taken. 2. Mathemat ics 2 2 3 or eq uivalent m us t be t � k e n .

_

Elem ntary Art E d uca t i o n ( 2 )

atld

Student Teac h i ng ( 9 ) ( EDVC 434 fo r dual stuuent teach ing) Topics i n Elemen t a ry Edu a l i o n : r ; u l1 darions (3)

ELEM. ENTARY EDUCATION MINOR: S t udents pr ep ar i ng for lementaf )' las room t aching hould ch osc one of t he following fo u r options: I.

Cross-Disciplinary Studies ( 1 2 hours required)

Sell'cl J 2 hOllrs fro Ill:

h i l d ren's Literature

o m p u ters in Education

Speech

hild J)evelopment

eography

peciaI E lucation

2. Special Education ( I8 hour required) (see listing under Special Education K - 1 2 ) 3. Reading Endorsement ( 16 hour required) ED 408 L i teracy i n K-R Edu ca t i on ( 3 ) EDUC 490/ 5 1 0 T h e Acqu isition a n d Devel op ment of Language and L i t er a cy (2) E D U 4 1 1/ 5 1 1 S t rategies fo r Language/Lit.:racy Develop­ ment ( 2 ) E D C 4 1 3/5 1 3 La nguage/Literacy Dev lopm n t : As e s smrn t and I ns t r uction ( 4 ) E D U C 438/538 Strategies fo r Whok Li ter;\C)' Inst ruction K- 1 2 ( 2 ) Irildr(,/( 's Li te ra/li re COll rses

EDU

426/52()

Spe ial To pic

DU

427/527 42 8/528

M u l r icultural Childrcn' Li terat u re ( 2 )

EDU

EDUC

Children's

in

it rature ( 2 )

' h i ldr'n's

i terat u r e i n th

K·8 Curriculum

(2)

429/529

Ad o l scen t Literature i n t h e Secondary Curriculum ( 2 )

·May slIlmiwte ENGL 333

or 334 or eqlli1'll/crr/

4-hour

children's iicem trrre course for ·DU , 4281528 a/ld tile chilJren's

literature electives.

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59


4.. Teaching English as a Second Language ( 1 6 hours required)

z o l­ e:( U ::I C loLl

TH 102

Exploring A n t h ropology: Culture and Society (4) LA G/EDU 445 Methods for Tea hing Foreign Languages nguage and E ngl ish as a Second LANG 446 Theories 0 Language Acq u isitio n ( 4 ) LANG/EDUC 475 Practicum i n Teaching English as a Second Language ( 1 ) LANG/ EDU 470 Curri ulum, Materials and I nstruction for Teaching English as a Second La nguage (4) A

SECONDARY PREPARATION Genera) requiremenls: In additio n to th general univers ity requirements i n all c u rr icula, certain specific req uiremen t s for general edu al ion must be met. J . Anthropology/History 2 1 0, ,1 )bal Perspectives ( recom­ mended) or Anthropulogy 102, Culture and Society, must be take n . 2. Co m pu te r Socnce 3 2 2 , Microcomputers in the Classroom, m ust be taken (Physical "Education a nd Music Ed ucation degree m ajors excepted ) . 3. M i n i m u m grade requ i rements includ a cum ulatiw grade poi n t average of 2.50 for the following: <l. Entrance to professiunal sequence. b. Enrollment in any course in professional educa t ion. c . Jraduation and/or ert itication. 4. Grades of C or higher in t h e following: a. All courses in majors and m i n ors. b. Engl ish 1 0 1 , Psy hology 1 0 1 , nthropology/History 2 10 o r An th ropology 1 02. c. Com p u ter 'cien e 322.

ED C

262)

req u i rement)

Ulldergradrwte SllIdel l ts

EPSY 26 1 , D 262, 263 . . ... .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .... .. . 7 honrs .PSY 31) I , SPED 362 . . . . . . ........ . . ... . . .. . .. . . . .. ................. ......... 7 hour:; EDUe 46 1 , 462, 44X . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours EDUe 468 9 h o u rs .

.....

.

. . . .. . .

.

..

...

. .

.

.............

...

.

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. ......

Gradllate SlIIdell/s (with B.A.lB.S. degrees) E PS Y 2 6 1 , EDUC 262, 263 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 hours

P

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.

...

. .

. .

.

......

.

ACADEMIC PREPARATION: A major from those listed must be completed . Completion of a leaching major/minor in a seco nd academic area is strongly recom men ded . (Students do not major i.n educati o n ) . �'aching m jors a r e offered in the fol lowing a reas: an thropoIOb,),' art, biology, chem istry, drama, earth s ciences, economics, English, French, erman, history, jo urnalis m , language arts, mathematics, m usic, rwegian, p hysical educa t i o n , physics, political science, psychology, science, social studies, sociolog)', Spanish, and speech. Minors only , re available in Chinese, computer science, health, ami La L i n . T h e majors a n d minor i n t h e elementar ' and seco ndary education progra ms have been revised because of changes in the Washington Administrative ode . Except in the areas of English/ language arts, science, social studies, physical educa tion, and fo reign languag s, the elementar)' major ful fil l s areas of study requ ired by the State fo r endorsement. See an education ad iser for cu rren t informat i o n .

SPECIAL EDUCATION (K- 12): The 31 semester hour teaching major and 18 semester hour minur must be taken i n co nju nction with an academic tea hing major. Studen ts co mpleting thi major along with the required professional educaiion �equ nc > for elementary or secondar teac hers will be recommended for an endorsement in spe ial education. Stucit-nts n o l majoring in educa t i o n may he excused from the requirem nts of taking Education 302 o r Educational Psychology 2) l I Edu cation 262. Major (32 hours minimum)

Required ou rses (minimum or 21 hours): SPED 200 SPED 292

S P E D 390 SPED

391

SPED 393

SPED 394 SPED 396

SPED 4 0 1 S P E D 402

Recommended Sequences: .

......

Psycholog

. .

.

PREPARATION FOR K- 1 2 TEACHING: t lld nt� prepa.ring fo r K - 1 2 teachi n g in art, m usic, foreign language, or physical education must have student teachjn<T �perience and course­ work i n methodology on both the delllentary nd secondary levels. Detailed i ntormation r('gardin K- 1 2 cert i fica t io n is available in the · ch oo l of Education oHic . A S hool o{ Educa­ tion adv'iser is required i n addition to a n adviser ill art, m usic, or physical education.

for Teaching ( 3 ) ( Prerequisite: EPSY 26 1 ) Teachi n g (o r I ndividual Differences - Secondary (4) SPED 362 ( P rerequisites: ED C 262/263, EPSY 26 1 ) ( o t requ i red for special edmcat io n m a j r s o r minors) ED UC 44X Subject Area lethods ( 3 ) (Prereq ui. ites: EDU 262/263, EPSY 26 1 , 36 1 , SPED 362) C 4() 1 General Teachi ng Methods - Se ondary ( 3 ) E ( Prerequ isites: . 'SY 2 6 1 . EDUe 2 2 , concu rrent enrollment i n EDUC 462) E D U 4 6 2 Teacher Assisting - Secondary ( I ) ( Prerequisill:s: EPSY 26 1 , E D UC 262, concurr e n t e n rollment in ED C 46 1 ) E UC 468 Student Teachi ng - Secon d ary ( 9 ) ( Prerequ isites: EPSY 2. 1 , 36 1 , EDU . 262 , 263, 46 1 , 462, SPED 362, enior ta nding, cum ulati e CPA of 2.50 or higher; a valid first aid card m ust be on file before student leaching placement ca n be finalized ) ( EDUC 468 me ts t h e senior seminar/project

60

.

.

PREPARATION FOR SENIOR ruGH SCHOOL TEACHING: St udents preparing fur sen ior high lea hin ' must complete approximately 32-69 semes!t:r hours in the academic area i n which t h e y plan t o teach. A minor i n a s e o n d teaching area i 5 recommended. tudents may also fi nd it adva ntageous to their career goals to 1 ) develop skills in o ne or more coaching areas i n response to Title IX legislation, 2 ) develop competencies i n special education i n res ponse to federal speci a l education legisla tion, and 3 ) develop pro ficiency in one or more langua"es, particularly Spanish a n d Asian languages. I n aU cases, st udents must discuss their program with an advi er from t be School of ducation.

Professional Education: Secondary Program (mini.mlUD of 30 semester hours); H u ma n Relations Developmen t ( 3 ) (Prerequ isite: E PSY 20 I Ad mission to the sequence) EDU 262 Fo u ndalio ns o f Edu a t i o n ( 3 ) ( P rerequisites: Ad m ission to the sequence and oncurrcnl en.rull­ men t in E PSY 26 1 ) EDU 263 School Ob�crvation ( i ) ( P rerequisites: Adm ission to the . equencc and concurrent en rolm ent i n EPSY 30 1

PSY 36 1 , ED e 46 1 , 462, S P E D 362 .. ... . . . .. .. . . . . . . 1 1 hours EDU 44X, 468 . . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . .. . .... .. . . ... . . . . 1 2 ho urs

Y

SPED 404 SPED 407 SPED 480 Olle

i n d ividuals with Special N eds (2) or equivalent Assessmen t tl1 Special Education ( 2) Tea ch i ng Life and Vocat ional Skill ( 2 ) Pracl icum in L i fe Skill, ( 1 ) Teaching tudents with Behavior Problems (2) Practicum in Behavior Problem ( I ) Instructional Management ( 2 ) Academic In structional Strategie� for Learners w i t h Special eeds ( 3 ) Practicul1l i n I nstructional Strategies ( 1 ) Com m u n ica tion and Collaboration ( 3 ) Curriculum . Tnstruction, a n d Technology ( 4 ) C h i l d Abuse ( 1 )

of the following cou rses:

SPED 2% S P E D 408 SPED 49 2

Medicall Fragile ( 2 ) Tra ns i t io ns from School to ommunity ( 2) Methods of Tea ching Young Chi] ren ( 2 )


Phi Srudent T ach il /g: SPED 4 8 " tu d en t Teachmg - Elementary ( 5 ) . PED 439 Student Teach ing - Secondary (5)

E D U C 555

Minor ( 1 8 hoW' minimum) SPED 200 I nd i vi d ua ls \ ith Special Needs (2) or etjU iVClient S P E D 292 s 'es:;ment in peciul Edll at ion ( 2 ) SPED 390 Teaching L i fe and Vocational Skill ( 2 ) SPED 3 9 1 Practicum i n Life Skills ( I ) or

{ SPED 393 �

Teachi ng Students with Behavior P ro b l e ms ( 2 ) Prac tic u m i n B e ha v io r Problems ( I ) In tructional Ma nag ment ( 2 ) Academic Instructional 'trategies fo r Learners with S p e c ia l eed..., ( ). ) S P J) 402 Pr ac l i llm i n Instructional Stratcgi ' S ( I ) SPi:. 07 urriculLlm, I n s t r u c t i o n , ami Technology (4) ' h i l cl Abuse ( I ) SP D 480 Please not e: Special Education 200 IS a p rereq uisite /0 ALL special

P D 394 SPED 396 SP D 40 1

edllcation cullrsework. 261lEduC{l tion 262 is pecial Edllcatio/l

Il

Educa t ion 302 or Educa t ion al

Psychology

prerequisite fo r Al.L 300 or 400-/evel

cou rses.

Stlldellts

/lot

l1Iajoring in

educatio/l

may

be excmed from t h is requirement.

Non-Teaching Minor ( 1 8 hours minimum)

-

Required

Courses (12 hours):

SI:' 1 95 SPED 2 0 I SPED 404 SP 480 SPE 399

SPED 4 0 8

I ndividuaJs with D i sa bil i t i es ( 4 ) Ob ervation i n Special Education Programs ( 1 ) omrnu nication and Collaboration ( 3 ) Issu e s in C hild Abuse and Neglect ( l ) Practim rn in Special Education ( 1 ) Transitions from School to c,omrn u n it y ( 2 )

,0rlcentration,S (choose 6

PED 390

SPill 3 9 1 SPED 393 SP D 394 P D 490 SPED 292 SPED 296

SPED 3 9 5 S P D 475

SPED 485 SP D 494 P -D 497

hOLlrs ji'o ll1 the fo llowillg ) :

Teachi ng Life ancl Voca t i o n a l k i l ls ( 2 ) Practicum in Life , kills ( 1 ) 'leaching Students with Behav i o r Disorders (2) Pra ticum for Be.havior Pr ob le ms ( I ) Early Lea rn i n g Experiences fo r Special e ds Ch i ld ren ( 2 ) Assess me n t in Speci, I Education ( 2 ) Educating the Physically Challenged and Medically Fragile ( 2 ) Introduction t o Langua ge D e ve l op m e nt a n d Di,orders ( 2 ) Su p e r v i s in g Par a- P rofession als and Vol u n tcer�( I ) The ifted Child ( 2 ) omputer Ap plication in Special E d uc a t i o n (2) I n d ependent Sludy ( \ -2 )

EARLY CHILDHOOD - SPECIAL EDUCATION See radl/ate Stl/dies. LIBRARY LEARNING RESOURCE SPECIALIST: Preparation of School Ubrarians ( 1 6 semester hoW's) Students in terested in preparing for the responsibil ity of a d m i n istering a . chool library may meet suggcsted standards thr ugh the followlng progra m : Prrrequisite:

EDU

2 5 3 o r EPSY 2 6 1/£D C 262, o r teacher ce rt i fication .

Reqllired:

ED too-

ED C EDUC

P D lI EDlIC

EDUC

Media enter Ma nagement ( 2 ) 507 Principles o f Information Organ ization, Retrieval, and Ser ice ( 2 ) 508 Principles o f Bibliographic n a lys is and Co nt ro l ( 2 ) 509 Foundations o f Collection Development ( 2 ) 53 7 Media and Technol g y for School L i b r ary Media S pe c ia l ists ( 2 ) 5 3 8 Strategies for Whole Literacy I nstruction C - 1 2) (2) 506

Foundat ions o[ School L ib rary

528 ED C 529

Chiklrcn's Literature in K-8 Curriculum ( 2 ) dolescent Literature in the Secondary Curricul u m

EDlIC 456

St o ry te l l ing (2)

ED

Student Teaching eminar ( I ) ( S P D 4 3 8 , 439, a n d 440 meet rhe enior s e m ina r/ p roje t r quirement)

SPED 440

{

Curriculum Development ( 2)

Electives - one of tile following:

(2)

m

PRINCIPAL'S AND PROGRAM ADM INISTRATOR'S CERTIFICATE: Pr paration programs l e adi ng to certification at tbe initi I I and cun t i n u i ng kvcls [or school and d ist riel-wide program admin istrators a r e available through t he School of EducaLion. Sp cific requi rements fo r th c c r t i fic.lte. drt' iden t i fied in handbooks a ailable upon request. Master' degrees in educa t ional admini tration are described in t he raduCl te St u dies section of this catalog.

o c: n » -l o z

CERTlFlCATION REQUIREMl!NTS fOR SCHOOL NURSES: Educa tional Staff s�ociate cer t i fication for school n u rsc� is i n d i iduaJ ly designed Lh ro ugh the chool o f u rs i ng . F r i n D rmation regarding school n urse cert i fi cation, on tact the School of u rsi n g (535-8872 ) . Teaching Major/Minor Requirements

ANTHROPOLOGY State elldorsemellt req llirements: ( I )

ulturaJ Anthropol og)', ( I I ) Physical Anthropology, ( I l l ) rc haeo log )l. Seconda ry teach ing lilt/jar: 32 semester hOLlr re q u i re d . Antll 1 0 1 ( I l ) ; 102 ( 0 ; 354 ( I I ) ; 4S0 ( I ); hours [rom Anth 220, 2 2 5 ( I ) , 23 0 , 330, 336, 345 , 343; 4 hours from A n th 2 1 0, 350, 360, 3 75, 3 0 , 392, 490 ( I ) ; 8 h o u rs fr )m: A nth 1 03 , 332, 365, 70, 465, ( 3 3 1 + 370) (II, 1 l I ) . S eco n dary teaching millor: 20 semest r hours req u i red. AntlL 101 ( I I ); 102 ( I ); 8 hOUL rom A nth 2 1 0, 220, 2 2 5 , 2 3 0, 330, 336, 343, 345, 354, 490 ( 1 ) ; 4 h urs f rom Anth 1 03, 332, 365, 370, 465, ( 33 1 + 370 ) ( Jl, 1 l I ) . Elementary teaclzilzg major: 24 semester hour required. Anth 1 0 1 ( I I ) ; 1 0 2 ( I ); 354 ( I I ) ; 8 h o u rs from A n t h 2 1 0, 220, 330, 6, 345, 3 54 , (343/225 + 490) ( 1 ) ; 4 hours from A n t h 1 03 , 3 2, 365, 70, 465 (33 1 + 370) ( I I , I I I l . ART rt history, ( I I ) Aesthetics or ( 1 l I ) Drawing, ( IV) Pa i n tinu, (V) Sculptu re, ( V l) lnstructio[};]l me th o d s in a rt. K- 1 2 reaching major: 34 s c m c tel' h o u rs r quired. A rt 1 60 ( l I J ) ; 1 96 ( 1 1 ; 226 ( V ); 230 ( V ) ; 250 ( IV ) ; 3 5 ( I I ) ; 3 4 1 ( VI ) ; 4 hours from : Art 296, 32 6, 3 70; 4 hours from A r t 1 80 , I I , 80 ( I) Art minor: 26 semester hours required. Art 1 60 ( i ll); ] 96 I I ) ; 2S0 ( V ) ; 365 ( IV ) ; 34 1 ( 1 1 ) ; 4 hours from Art 230, 326, 370 (V); 4 hours fr01l1 Art 1 80, l X I , 380 (1). Elementary Art m'Jjor: Same a s art m i nor. Sta te elll/orselllt'11I

requirements: ( I )

philo 'ophy o f art,

BIOLOGY ttlellrs: ( I ) cm'tics, ( I I ) E ology or evolution theory, ( Ill ) Bota ny, i ncl u d ing laboratory e:<peri­ ence, ( T V ) Zoolog" inclu d ing laboratory cxperien e, (V) Laborat ry management a n d saG t y, ( V I ) c i cnce te hnology and society o r bioethics. Secondary teachillg major: 40 semester hours req u i red . B io logy 1 6 1 ( I ) ; 1 6 2 ( I , m, IV ); 323 ( I I , I V, I ); 340 or 359 ( 1 1 1 ) ; 20 1 or 328 ( 1 ) ; 424 0r 47 ( 1 1 l ; . 24 r 3 26 0r 3 6 1 ( IV); 33 1 o r 407 ( I , V I ) ; 4 hours of electi es I I ' 111 Biology 205 or above. Required supporting: Chemistry 1 05 or 11 5 . Secon da ry teaching lIIil1or: 25 semester h o u rs required. Biology 1 6 1 (I ) ; 162 ( I, III, i ) ; 323 ( I I, IV, V I ) ; 8 ho u r of e l e ct ive from Biology 20 I or above. R 'quired s upporting; h emistry 1 05 or I I . Elementary teaclJing major: 2 se mester hours required. Same as secondary It'aching minor.

tote endorsemellt reqllir

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CHEMISTRY

z o I­ � U ::J o w

above.

semester hours required . Chemistry 1 04 ( I and l l ) ; 1 05 ( 1 ) ; 1 2 0 ( l I l ; or 1 25 ( 1 1 ) ; 2 1 0; 8 hours of electives from one or more of the following: Chemistry 232 or above; Biology; Geosciences; or Natu ral Science.

Elementary tea ching major: 24

ENGLISH/ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS State endor-emen t req u i re m en ts :

State endorselllellt requirem

nts: ( I ) Writing/co m position in the designated foreign languagt', ( I I ) Conversation in the designated fo re ign language, ( I l l ) Reading in the designated foreign language, ( I V ) History and culture of the designated foreign language. Secondary tea c h i ng minor: 24 semester hours required. hinese 1 0 1 , 1 02, 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 3 7 1 . Also r quired: LA N G/ 445. ED Elementary tea ching major: 24 semester hours required. Same as secondary teaching m inor.

and Communications 1 23, 328, 330, 436, 450: Theatre 24 1 ( V I ! ) ; 8 hours drama from Theatre 1 5 1 , 250, 352, 45S ( V I ) ; R hours in journalism from Communication 2 8 3 , 3 8 0 , 3 8 1 , 3 88 , ( VI I I ) .

Elemen tary teaching major: 2 4 seme ter hours required. Engli�h 241 ( I I ) ; 2 5 1 ( I I I ) ; 327 o r 328 ( I ) ; 4 hOllrs from English 4 03; L nguages 200 ( I V ) ; 4 hour from English 333, 3 3 5 ( I II ) ; 4 hours from ommunication 1 23 ( V ) , 330 ( VI ) , 4 5 0 ( V l ) , Theatre 24 1 ( V I ) , 4 5 8 (V).

DRAMA

ting skills, ( I ! ) Theatre production, ( I II ) Theatre history or history of drama, ( I V ) Creative d rama, (V) Theatre directi.ng. Secondary teachillg major: 3 2 semester hours required. Theatre l S I ( I I ) ; 1 60; 24 1 ( I & I V ) ; 250 (I & I V ) ; 352 ( I I & V) ; 3 5 7 ( I & I V ) ; 3 6 3 o r 364 ( I V ) ; 4 5 4 ( I l l ) . Secondary teaching m i n o r: 20 emester hours required. Theatre 1 5 1 ( 1 1 ) ; 250 ( I & I V ) ; 4 hours from Theatre 1 60, 363, 364 ( I ll); 8 hours from Theatre 3 5 1 ( I I ) , 3 5 2 (II & V ) , 454

State endorsell1ent req uirements: ( I ) A

( 1 1 1 ) , 458 (IT & I V ) .

Elementary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Theatre l S I ( I I ) ; 1 60 ( I l l ) ; 250 (I & I V ) ; 8 hours from Theatre 3 5 1 ( I I ) , 3 5 2 ( I I & V ) , 454 ( I I I ) , 458 ( 1 1 & I V ) ; 4 hours of electives. ECONOMICS State endorsement

ENGLISH

( I ) VVriti ng/composition, (m American l i teratu re, (m) World literature representing a variety of d iverse cultures, including British Literat ure,

State endorsement req u iremen ts:

C

I

f

i

e

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A

N

U

N

'

V

E

R

State endorsement req uirements: ( I )

Writing/composition in the designated foreign language, ( I I ) .onversation in the designated foreign language, ( I I I ) Reading in the de ignated foreign language, ( I V ) H istory and c u l t u re of t.he designa ted foreign language. Secondary teaching major: 34 ,emester hours required beyond French ! O 1 - 1 02. French 20 1 ( U , OJ, I V ) ; 202 ( n , I II, I V ) ; 3 2 1 ( IV ) ; 3 0 I ( I & I T ) ; 3 0 2 ( I & II ); 42 1 ( I I I ) ; 422 ( m l ; 43 1 or 432 ( 1I I ) ; 495. Als o required: LANG/EDUC 445. Secondary teaching minor: 20 semester hours beyond 1 0 1 - 1 02. French 2 0 1 ( II, I l l , [V); 202 ( II, III, I V ) ; 32 1 (1V); 30 I ( I & I I ) ; 302 ( I & I I ) .

Eleme ll tary teaching major: 24 semester hours b eyo nd 1 0 1 - 1 02.

5

I

T

GEOSCI ENCES

Physical geology, ( I I ) Historical geology, ( T I l ) Environmental geology, ( I V ) o .eanograph , ( ) Astronomy, ( V I ) Meteorol gy Seconda ry teaching l1Iajor: 4 -46 semester hours required. Earth Sciences 1 3 1 ( I ) ; 1 3 2 ( I I ) ; 1 0 3 or 1 04 ( I I I ) ; 1 0 2 ( IV ) ; Natural Sciences 206 ( V ) ; 1 0 5 ( V I ) ; 1 2- 1 3 hour from E rth Scienc 323, 324, 325, J26, 3 27, 328, 3 3 0 , 334, 34 1 , 350. Chemistry 1 04 o r 1 20 . Physi s 1 25, 1 35. 4 h o u rs from Math 1 4 0 o r higher o r one course from Computer Science l i S, 1 4 4 o r 220. Seco nda ry teaching minor: 20 semester hour� requi red. Earth Sciences 1 3 1 ( I ) ; 1 3 2 ( II ) ; 1 03 ( I l l); 1 02 ( I V ) ; 1 04 ( l l l ) ; Natural ciences 2 0 6 ( V ) ; 1 05 ( VI ) . Ele mell tary teachillg II/ajor: 2 4 s mester hours required. Same as secondary teaching m inor with 4 additional hours of earth sciences electi e at the 300 level or higher. Select from 32 3 ,

State endorsement req IJ irement,: ( I )

324, 325, 3 26, 3 2 7 , 3 28, 329, 334, 3 3 5 , 350.

( IV) Linguistics or structure of language. A

FRENCH

Same as secondary minor plus 4 ho urs from upper division electives.

requirements: (. ! ) Macroeconomics, ( I I )

i\1. icroeco nomics, ( I I I ) History and/or development o f economic thought. Secondary teaching major: 32 semester hours required. Eco nomics 130 ( I I ) or 1 5 1 - 1 5 2 ( I ) ; 3 5 1 ( I ) ; 352 ( l l ) ; 4.86 ( I l l ) ; 8 hours from Economics 3 4 3 , Statistics 23 1 , Math 34 1 , Business 202, o r a n elective i n computer science; 8 hours of electives in economics, 4 hours of which may be statistics and/or including Economics 399, 490, 492, 493 for variable credit. Secondary teaching minor: 20 semester hours required. Economics [ 30 ( I l l ; 35 1 ( I ) ; 352 ( f I ) ; 486 ( 1 I l ) ; 4 hours of electives in economic which may include statistics. Elem n tmy teaching major: 24 semester hours req u i red. Same as secondary teaching minor with 4 additional hours of electives in economics or statist ics.

P

( I ) Wri ting/composition,

( I I ) American l iterature, ( I L l) World literature, ( I V ) Linguis­ tics or structure of language, (V) Drama, ( V I ) Speech, ( V l l ) Journalism. Secondary teaching major: 44 semester hours reqUired. English 24 1 ( l l ) ; 2 S 1 ( 1 1 1 ) ; 327 0 1' 328 ( I ) ; 403 ( I V ) ; 4 hours from English 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 23 1 , 334 ( 1 1 1 ) ; 8 hours in Speech

CHINESE

62

Language requirement: Secondar English majors must complete at least two years of a foreign language at the university level. Secolldary tea ch ing Inaj or: 36-44 semester hours required beyond English 1 0 1 . English 24 1 ( I I ) ; 2 5 1 ( 1 1 1 ) ; 0 1 ; 328 ( I ) ; 403 ( I V ) ; 4 hours from English 2 1 6, 233, 3 4 3 ( I I ! ) ; Educltion 429; ( J 2 hours from periods and surveys ) ; 4 hours from Senior Seminar. Secone/ary teaching m i nor: 1 8 semester hours req u i red beyond English 1 0 1 . EngLish 24 1 ( I I ) , 2S 1 ( I [ l ) , 328 ( 1) , 403 ( I V ) ; 4 hours from English 2 1 6 , 233. 343 or Education 429 ( I I I ) . Elementary teaching major: 2 4 semester hours required beyond English 10 I . English 2 4 1 , 2 5 1 , 328, 403; 4 hours from nglish 333, 334 o r Education 428 o r 429; 4 hours from Communica­ tion 1 23, 330, 450, Theatre 24 1 , o r 458.

Foreign

Organic chemi�try, including laboratory experience, ( I I ) Inorganic hemi�tTy, includlng laboratory experience, ( I I I ) Analytic chemistry, including laboratory experience, ( I V ) Physical chemistry, ( V ) Labora­ tory manGgement and safety. eco lldary teaching major: 50 semester hours requ ired. Chemistry 1 20 ( II ) ; or [ 25 ( I l l ; 232 ( I ) ; 234 ( I ) ; 332 ( I ) ; 334 ( I ) ; 338 ( I I I ) : 3 4 1 ( I V ) ; 342 ( IV ) ; 343 ( N ) ; 344 ( I V ) ; 40) ( 1 ) . Required supporti ng: Math l S I , 1 52; Physics 1 53, 1 54 , 1 63, 164. Secondary teaching minor: 2 2 semester hours required. Chemistry 1 20 ( I I); o r 1 2 5 ( I I ) ; 232 ( I ) ; 234 ( I); 332 ( I ); 334 ( I ) ; 338 ( I I I ) ; 4 ho urs of electives from Chemistry 34 1 o r Sta te endorsement requirements: ( I )

Y


GERMAN Sta te elldorsement requi rellients: ( I ) Writ i n g/composition i n the de i nat d f(l rcign language,

( i 1)

foreign language, ( I V ) Hi tory and c u lture of the dcsignated fo rei gn l a n g u age.

Secondary reachllg maJor: 34 semester hours required bcyond 1 0 1 - 1 02 . German 2 0 1 ( I & I I ) ; 2 0 2 ( I & I I ) ; 3 2 1 ( I V ) ; "30 I ( I & I I ); 3 0 2 ( I 8< I I ) ; 4� I ( 1 I l ) ; 4 2 2 ( I I I ) ; 495. Also req ui red : LANG/ED C 445 . Secondary teachillg millor: 2 0 s mestcr h o u rs r q u i red beyond erman 1 0 1 - 1 02. German 20 1 0, 1 1 ) ; 202 (I & I I ) ; 3 2 1 or 322 ( I V); 301 ( I ' l l ) ; 02 (I & ll). - Elemen tary teaching major: 24 se m est er h o ur s required beyond German 1 0 I - I 02. arne a s secondary m inor p l u s 4 hours from ___

,erman elective.

HEALTH - State endor ement req Lliremellts: ( I ) Su bstance use and abuse, ( I I ) We l l ness a n d il lnes , ( I I I ) N u t rition, ( I

) H u m an physiology,

( 5 ) S a � t y education. Secolldary tea ch ing mil1or: 1 6 semester h o u rs required. H e a l t h 260 ( I I I ) ; 270 ( I I ) ; 292 ( V ) ; 295 ( I I ) ; 3 2 1 ( I V ) ; 3 2 3 ( 1 l ) ; 3 2 5 ( l l & I l l ) ; 3 2 7 ( I ); 2 h o u rs o f elect ives ap proved by health coordinator. _

Elemelltary teac hi l lg major: 24 ernest r ho urs required. Same as secondary teaching m i nor, and 1 0 hours o f elec tives in health eduCc1ti o n .

H lSTORY Sta te enclorsemellt requirelllents: ( I ) Washington State or Pacific No rt hwes l h i story and gOY r n rn e n t , ( I I ) United States h i s tory,

( 10 ) V Qrld,

e s t e rn , or Pacific Rim h istory or civilizati ons.

- Se olldary tcm:hing l/1(ljor: 3 2 semester hours required. 8 h o u rs form H istory 25 1 , 252, 253 ( I I ) ; 1 07 or 108 ( I I I ) ; 460 or 4 6 1 ( I ); Senior Seminar; 4 hours of electives from non­ West rn history ( 205, 3 3 , 338, 340, 380) ( I I I ) ; and 8 h o u rs of upper division electives i n history.

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Secondary teaching minor: 20 em es ter h o u rs required. 4 h o u rs from History 25 1 , 252, 2 5 3 ( l I ) ; 107 or 1 08 ( I I I ) ; 460 or 4 6 1 ( I ) ; 4 hours of lectivcs from non -Western history ( 205, 3 6, 3 8, 340, 380) ( I I ! ) ; and 4 hours of upper division ekct ives in hi 'tory.

Elemen tury teaching major: 24 semester h o urs requ ired. Same as secondary teaching m i n o r. A n t h ropology 354. INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (Computer Science) Stil iI' elltlorsement requirements: ( I ) Te chn ology and society, i . e . , e t h i · 1 use, ( I I Com p u ter netwo rks and teleco m m u n i cation systems, e.g., I n ternet, ( I I I ) I nstructional hardware usage and classroom appli ations, ( I V ) I nstruct ional software, in l u ding word processing, data base m a nagement systems, spreadsheets and use of m u l t i media tools, e.g., ound, video, hypertext, and graphi

s,

IV), o r 4136.

.......

ary teaching m i n o r, plus

2 ho urs from Special Education 494.

JOURNALISM State endorsemellt requirements: ( I ) News and feature wri t ing, ( I I ) Copy editi ng, ( I I I ) New� production, (IV) Copy makeup Jnd dcsi"l1, ( V ) Legal rights a n d liab il ities of th press. Secondary teaching major: 32 sem es ter h o u rs req u i red. Communication 1 2 3; 2 7 1 ; 283; 333; 380 ( 1 [ , III, I V ) ; 3 8 1 ( V ) ; 384 ( I); 3 88 ( I ) ; 4 h o u rs of elect ives. Seconda ry l ea chi ng minor: 2 0 sem ester h o u rs req u i red. >

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o c n > -i

designated fo reign language, ( I I I ) Re a d i n g i n the designated foreign language, ( r V ) H istory and c u l t u re o f the designated fo reign language.

Secondary teaching minor: 24 semester hours required. Lat i n 1 0 1 ( I I I ) ; 1 02 ( I l l ) ; 2 0 1 (I, I I ) ; 202 ( I , I I ) . Classics 250 or 322 ( I V ) ; 4 h o u rs from upper division Latin electives. Elementary tea cil ing major: 24 semester hours required. La tin 1 0 1 ( I l l ) ; 1 0 2 ( I l l ) ; 2 0 1 ( I , I I ) ; 202 ( I , l l ) ; lassics 250 ( I V ) ; 322 (IV).

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MATHEMATICS State ellnorsement requiremen ts: ( I ) uclidean geometry, ( I I ) Non-Eucl idean geometry, ( I l l ) D i fferential calculus, ( I V ) I n tegral c a l c u lus, ( V ) Discrete mathematics (a co mbination o f at l e a s t two o f t h e fol lowing: probabi lity, statist ics, combina­ tories, busi ness a p p lications, logic, set theory, fu n c t i o ns ) .

Secondary teacilillg major: 4 1 semester h o u rs required. Math 1 5 1 ( I l l & IV); 1 5 2 ( I II & IV); 203; 245 ( V ) ; 3 2 1 (I & I I ) ; 3 3 1 ( ) ; 4 h o u rs from Math 34 1 or 433; 4 h o u r of elec­ tives from upper division Mathemati

or Comp uter Science

( excluding MaLh

446 and Co mp uter Science 322). Required supporting: Com p uter Sciene 1 44; Ph)'Sics 1 5 3 ; 1 6 3. Secondary teaching mi llo r: 22-24 semester hours required. Math 1 5 1 ( III & I V ) ; 1 5 2 ( I I I & IV); 32 1 (I & I I ) ; Computer Science 1 44 ; 2-4 hours from Math 230 or 33 1 (V); 4 h o u rs M a t h 245, 34 1 , 433. ElemclLtary teaching major: 24 se mester h o u rs req u i red. S a m e as secondary teaching m inor.

MUSIC State ndorsemen t requirements: ( I ) Score read i ng , ( I I ) Music theo ry, ( I I I ) M u s ic history and/or c u l t u re, ( IV ) onducting, ( V ) I n structional m u sic, ( V I ) Inst ructional methods in general m u sic.

K- 12 Teaching Major (musi.c specialist): See the requirements for the degree Bachelor of Music Education ( B. M . E . ) as listed under Music in t h is catalog:

B.M.E. - K- 1 2 Chnral R. M.E. - K- 1 2 Instrumental ( Band E m p h asis) R.M.E. - K- 1 2 I nstr u menta l ( O rchestra E m p hasis) Elemelltary teachillg major: 2 4 semester hours req u i red. See music minor ( general) req u i re ments listed under Music in t h is catalog, plus M u s i c

34 1 .

NORWEGIAN State endorsemell t requirements: ( I ) Writing/composition i n the designated fo reign language, ( I I ) Conversa t i o n in the

( V ) Development o f student learning activities

Elelllell t(lry teachillg m a jor: 26 sem ester hours. Same as second­

a

384 ( I ) ; 388 ( I ) .

LATIN State endorsement reqLliremellts: ( I ) ""riting/composition in the designa ted foreign langu age, ( I I ) Conversation in the

designated fo reign lan guage, ( n I ) Rea ding in the designated

which i ntegrate technology tools and telecom m u n ications.

Secolldary teachillg rIIinor: 2 4 semester h o u rs req u i red . �omputer Science 1 44 ( I ) ; 270 ( I V ) ; 3 2 2 ( I l , I l l , I V, V ) ; 3 80 (l I , I I I ) ; 449 ( I I , r I I r , V ). Req u i red su pporting: Math 1 28 or 1 5 1 . 4 hours from C S 1 1 1 0 ( IV ), 2 1 0 ( 1 1 , I V ) , 220 ( I , l I , I I I ,

1 23; 27 1 ; 283; 380 ( I I , I I [ , I V ) ; 3 8 1 ( V ) .

secondary teaching minor plus

Conversa t i o n in the

de ignated foreign language, ( I l l ) Rea ding i n t he designated

uppe r division

Commu nication

Elemerllary teachillg major: 24 semester h o u r s required. Same

foreign language, ( I V ) History and c u l t u re of the design ated fo reign language.

Seco ndary teachilLg major: 34 semester hours required. Norwegian 1 0 1 (I, 1 I , 1 I I ) ; 1 02 ( I , IT, r I l ) ; 20 I ( I I ) ; 202 ( I I ) ; 30 1 ( I & I I ) ; 3 0 2 ( I & I I ) ; 4 h o u rs from u p p er divis i o n electives in candi navian culture and 4 hours from u p per division elective in Scandinavian literature ( r V ) ; 495. Also req uired: LAN /ED 445 . Se co ndary teaching minor: 24 semester hours required. Norwegian 1 0 1 ( I , I I , I I I ) ; 1 02 (I, 1 I , 1 I I ) ; 2 0 1 ( 1 1 ) ; 202 ( I I ) ; 3 0 I ( l or I I ) ; 4 h o u rs from u pper division dcctives i n Scandinavian cu l t ure ( IV ) . Elementa ry teaching major: 2 4 semester h o urs req u i red. Same as secondary teaching m i nor.

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State endo rsement req uiremen ts: ( I ) Care :lnd prevention of

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student i nj u r , i nduding first a i d , ( I I ) Kinesiology, ( I I I ) Exercis' physiology, ( rV) School p hysical education, sports, or athletic 1<11 , (V) Sociolo gy and/or psychology of sports, ( V I ) Instruct ional n e th od s in physi.cal education for t h e handi­ capped, ( V n ) Tnstructional meth ds in physical education. K - 1 2 tcaching major: 5 3 seme ter hours required. Biology 2 0 5 ; 206; H ea l t h Education 28 1 ( I ) ; Physical Educa­ ti o n 277 (V); 279 ( V I l ) ; 2 93 ( V [1 ); 294 (VII); 296 (V U ) ; 2 9 7 ( V I I ) ; 298 ( V T ! ) ; 3 2 2 ( V I I ) ; 3 2 6 ( V ! ) ; 3 4 4 (IV); 3 8 9 V); 478 (V); 4 8 0 ( I l l ) ; 4 8 6 (il); 4 9 0 ( VH). K- I 2 tl'(lchillg minor: 1 7 semester hours re qu i re d . HeaIth Education 28 1 ( I ) ; Physical Education 279 ( V 1 I ) ; 322 ( VI ! ) ; 326 ( \11 ) ; 334 (II & I T I ) ; 344 (IV); 3 8 9 ( V ) ; 2 hours from Physical Education 293, 294, 296, 297, 298 ( Vl l ) . Elementa ry academic major: 25 semester hours requ ired. Health Education 28 [ ( l l ; P h y s i cal Education 283 ( V n ) : 288 ( V I ! ) ; 322 ( Vil); 328 ( IV ) ; 334 ( I I ) ; 345 ( I I l ; si m i lar to K - [ 2 m inor x ept 8 hours from Physical Education 293, 294, 296, 297, 298.

en do rsemen t

( 1 ) Mechanics, including lahoratory experience, ( 1 I J Electricity and magnetism, including laboratory experience, ( I I I ) Light and sound, including laboratory experience, ( I V ) Thermodynamics, mo dern physics, or astrono my. Secorulary teachillg mnjor: 4 2 semester h o u rs req ui re cL Physics 1 5 3 ( I, n, I T I ) ; 1 54 ( I , n, ! I l l ; 1 6 ( I ) ; 1 64 ( 1 1 , r I l ) ; 223 (IV); 33 J (In; 333 (IV); 336 ( I ) ; 3 54; Math 1 5 1 ; 1 52; 253. SCCOtlriary teaching minor: 2 5 - 26 semester h o urs required. 10 hours from P hy s i c s [ 2 5 ( I ) ; 1 26 ( U , UI ) ; 1 3 5 ( I ) ; 1 36 o r 1 53 ( II , I I I ) ; 1 54 (T, n . l I I ); [63, 164 ( I I ) ; Chemistry 34 [ ; Physics 354; Natural Sciences 206 ( IV ) . Requ i red supporting: 1 5 1 , 1 5 2. Elell lellt(lry teachillg majo r: 25-26 semester hours required. S a me as secondary tea hing m inor. reqll irelilents:

POLITICAL SCIENCE

State endorse mell t req uirements: ( I ) American government, ( 1 I )

International relations o r tudies, ( I l l ) Comparative govern­ ment or political 'y�lems, (IV) Political theo ry. Secondary teaching major: 32 s me ter hours require d . Pol itical 'cience 1 0 1 , 1 5 J ( I ) ; 4 hours from Political Science 23 [ , 3 3 1 , 338; 4 hours from Pol i tical Science 2 J O, 3 8 1 , 84, 3 - , 386. 387 ( 1 II ) ; 4 hours from Political Science 3 2 5 , 3 2 6 ( r v ) ; 8 hours from Political Science 3 4 5 , 3 5 4 , 3 5 7 , 3 6 1 , 363, 364, 368, 37 1 , 372. 373; 4 hours o f electives i n political s ienee. Secollliary teachillg m inor: 24 semester hours required. Political 'c ience 1 0 [ ' l S I ( I ); 4 ho urs from 345, 354, 357, 3 6 1 , 363. 364, 3 8 , .3 7 1 , 372, 3 73; 4 h o u rs from Political Science 23 [ , 33 1 , 338 ( [ I ) ; 4 h o u rs from Pol i tical Scie nce 2 1 0, 3 8 1 , 3 8 4 , 3 8 5 , 3 8 6 , 3 8 7 ( I l l ); 4 hours from Political Sc ience 325, 3 26 (IV). Elemclltary teachillg major: 24 semester hours requi red. Same as se o nda r y teaching mjnor. PSYCHOWGY State e ndorse ll lent requiremen t,;:

( I ) Human behavior, ( I I ) Learning theories. ( Ill) Developmental p s ych o l ogy, (IV) I n terpersonal psychology.

Secondary teaching major: 32 sel1l e�t ··r hours requi red. Psych ology 1 0 1 ( 1 ) , 242, Statistics 23 1 ; 4 h o u rs from Psychol­ ogy 342, 343, 348, 349 ( [ I) ; 4 hours from 3 5 2 . 442, 444, 446 ( I I I ) ; 4 hour� from 22 [ , 325, 354, 454, 456, 46 1 , 462, 47 1 ( fV ) ; 8 hours o f ('lecti e s i n psychology. Secorldar), teu ch i llg fII inor: 24 semester hours required. Psy holog), 1 0 1 ( 1 ) , 242, S ta tistics 23 [ ; 4 hours from 342, 348 ( I I ) ; 4 hours from 3 5 2 or 444 ( I I ! ) ; 4 h o u rs from 325, 462, 471 (rV).

64

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endorsement requ i rements: ( l ) Chemistry, ( I l) Physics, ( I I I) Biology, (I ) Earth Sci nce. Secol/dary tea ch i ng major: 63 -69 s rnester ho u r: required. Biology 1 6 1 ( I II ) , [ 6 2 ( II I ) , 323 ( I I I ) , ";he.mis tf)' 1 04 ( 1 ) . [ 0 5 ( [) . Earth Science 1 33 o r 222 r v ) , P hys j 1 25 ( t I) , [ 26 (II), 1 35 ( ll ) , 1 3 6 o r 1 53 (1I), 1 54 (II), [ 63 (II), 1 64 ( 1 1 ) ; 8 h ou rs from Geosciences 1 3 1 ( f V ) , 1 3 2 ( I V ) ; 4 h ou rs from 300 o r h igher. A m i n o r i' required in onc of the foUowing: biologv, ' chemi ·try, geosciences, or physics. Ele m e nta ry teaching m a jo r: 24 semester ho urs required, i nc lu d i n g 8 h o u rs in l i fe science, 8 hours in p h ysic a I science, and 8 hours of electives. State

SOCIAL STUDIES State e1ldorsemellt reqll irenrellls:

PHYSICS

State

semester h O Li rs required. Psychology 1 0 1 ( I ) , Statistics 23 [, Psychology 3 52, 444 ( I l l ) , a n d 8 hours of clectivc� determined i n consultation with el mentary ed ucation advise.r ( 'uggestions i nclude Psychol­ og)' 342, 348, 350, 440, 450, 45 3, and s p e c i a lty courses offered through the depart m e n t ) .

Elementary teaching major: 24

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

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( I ) Economics, ( I I) Antbropol­

ogy, sociology, or psychology, ( r I l ) Geography, (IV) PoLitical

science, ( V) History - A.) Washington State, B.) United States, C.) World, Western or Pacific Rim, ( V I ) American govern­ ment.

em ester hours requ i red. 1 30 ( I), History [07 or 1 08 (V-C), 2 5 1 o r 252 or 253 ( V-B), 460 (V-A), Pol itical Science l S I ( V T ) , So iol gy [ 0 1 ( I I ); 4 hours i n non-Western history ( V-C); 4 hours of upper division political science ( IV); 8 hours of upper division electives chosen from n>,1O of the following disciplines: anthropology, conom ics, psychol­ ogy, or sociology. Elementary feaching major: 2 4 semes!t:r he urs required. Anthropology 354 ( I l l ) , History 25 1 o r 252 o r 2 5 3 ( V- B ) , 4 6 0 ( V-A); 4 h ou r s from History 1 0 7 or 1 08 or n o n - Western ( V-C); 8 hoUl's of electives £rol11 anthro pology, econom ics, political science, psychology, o r sociology (I, II, I V ) . Secondary teaching major: 44

Anthropology

354 ( I I ! ) , Economics

SOCIOWGY

State endorsement req u i re m en ts: ( I ) Group behavior, ( I I ) Social institutions, ( I I I ) Social p rocess, ( I V ) Th ory and h is t o r y of

sociology.

se mes ter hours required. Sociology 1 0 1 ( 1 ) , 2 6 0 ( T ) , 396 ( IV), 397 ( IV ) ; 8 hours from 240, 326, 334, 336, 386. 440, 473 ( H I ) ; 8 hours from 324, 330, 35 1 , 380, 9 1 , 434( I l ) . Secolldary teaching millor: 20 h o u rs req u ired . Sociology [ 0 1 ( 1 ) , 396 ( 1 V ) , 397 ( I V ) ; 4 hours from ociology 330, 3 5 J, 3 80, 39 [; 4 hours from Sociology 240, 336, 386, 440. Elem entary teaching major: 24 semester hours required. Same a s secondary teaching minor with 4 <ldditional h o u rs of electives in sociology.

Secondary teaching major: 32

SPANISH

State e ndorsement requircmen (s: ( I ) Writi ng/composit ion in Lhe desi gnated fo re i g n language, ( I I ) Conversat ion in the designated foreign l a n gu a ge , ( II I ) Reading in the designated fo reio n language, ( IV ) History and cult ure of the designated fo reign langu�ge. Seco ndary tellcilillg major: 34 semest er hours required beyond Sp a n ish to 1 - I 02. Spanish 202 ( I J 1 & IV), 32 1 ( [V ) , 322 ( I V ) , 3 0 1 ( I & 1 1 ), 302 ( 1 & II); 12 h our s from 42 1 , 4 2 2 , 43 1 , 432,

495. Also required: LANG/EDUC 445. 20 s mester h urs req uired beyond 1 0 1 - [ 02 . pan ish 20 1 ( l J l & I V ) , 202 (HI & IV ) , 3 2 1 or :)22 (IV), 30[ ( I & I!), 3 0 2 ( I & I I ) . Elemel1 tczry te a ch i ng major: 24 serne.st·er hours required beyond Spanish 10 I - 1 0 2 . pan ish 2 0 1 ( I I [ & IV) , 202 (rn & f V ) , 3 2 1 ( IV ) , 3 2 2 ( I V ) , 3 0 [ ( l & 1 1 ) . 302 ( I & I l) .

Seco11dary teaching minor:


342 Methods o f Teaching Typing

SPECIAL EDUCATION

State endorsement req uirements: ( I ) Excep t i ona l i ty, ( I I ) Alterna­

t i ve delivery system and strategies for special education, ( I l l )

S tudent ass

smen! a n d evaluation. ( I V ) Procedural and

subst antive legal issues i n special education, ( V ) Instructional m et hods in special education.

K- 1 2 teaching major: 32 se me ster ho urs required. Speci a l Ed ucation 200 ( I , I l , I V ) , 292 ( I l l ) , 390 ( V ) , 3 9 1 ( V ) , 393 ( l V, V ) , 3 9 4 ( V ) , 3 9 6 ( V ) , 4 0 1 ( V ) . 402 ( V ) , 4 0 4 ( I I ) , 407 ( I I I , I V, V), 480 ( I V ) , one of the fol lowing: 296, 408, 492, 438 or 439, 440. K- 1 2 teach ing minor: 1 8 semester hours required. Special Education 200 (I, I I , IV), 292 ( 1 1 1 ) , 390/39 1 or 393/394 ( V ) , 396 ( V ) , 40 1 ( V ) , 402 ( V ) , 407 ( I l l , IV, V ) , 480 ( I V ) . State endorsement requirements: ( I ) Public speaki ng, ( I I ) Debate ( I l l ) Group p roc

s

( I V ) I n te r p ers onal com m u n icat ion.

Secondary reaching major: 34 semester h o u rs required.

offiffi u n ication 1 23 ( IV ) , 283 ( 1 ) , 326 ( I I I ) , 328 ( I I ) , 330 ( I ) ,

3 3 3 ( I V ) , 4 3 5 (III) , 4 3 6 ( I l ) . Secondary teaching minor: 1 8 semester hours req u i red. Com m u ­ n i c at i o n 1 23 ( I V), 326 ( I l l ) , 3 2 8 ( I l ) , 330 ( I ) , 3 3 3 ( I V ) . Elementary teaching major: 24 semester h o u rs required. Same

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s e co n d ar y tea c h i ng m inor with 6 additional h o urs

of e.lecti es.

t h e teach ing of bookkeep ing. Prerequisite; BUSA 28 1 .

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344 Methods of Teaching General Business Subjects Application of research fi ndi ngs a n d psychological principles to the teaching o f ge ne r al busi ness, con um r e conomics,

»

economics, busi neso law, l us iness mathematics, a n d business com m u n ications s u bj ects. Prerequisites: ECON 1 5 1 - 1 5 2 and BUSA 28 I .

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345 Methods of Teaching Secretarial Subjects the teach i n g o f shorthand, o ffice p r ac t i ce, s i m u l a t i o n , word

pr o cess i ng, and related s ubj e c ts. P rereq u isite s : adva n ced typing

and advanced s ho r t h an d . ( 2 )

357 Media and Technology in K-8 Classrooms Consideration of the role of media in t od ay's society and its

potential in the learning p ro ce ss as a way of fac il i t at i ng learner empowerment. Opport u n ities to practice the o p erat i o n ,

application, and integration of a var i ety of current tech n o l og i e s in dassrooms will be provided. Prerequisit s: EDUC

302 , 303.

358 Practicum I Extended experience a n d participa t i on in an assigned p ublic school classroom. Prerequisites: ED

262 Foundations of Education I nt rod ucti o n to teac hi n g ; histo r i c al , p h il o s op h ical , social, poli­ t ical, ethi al and legal fo undations. Federal a n d state legislation fo r special populations. Prerequisites : E

G L 1 0 1 . PSYC 1 0 1 , test

scores, so p ho m o re s tand i n g , cumulat ive GPA of 2.50.

(3)

263 School Observation b ervation in schools. Concurrent w i t h 262. ( 1 )

302 Buman Learning: Growth and Development

with 357, 406, 408.)

(I)

C 3 0 2 , 303. (Concurrent

400 Topics in Elementary Education: Classroom Issues and

Instructional Strategies Considera t i o n of c u rre n t theory into prac tice as p e r t i nent to effective teaching and learni ng, i ncluding classroom man age­ ment, organ ization of classroom environments, and meeting the needs o f diverse learners. Synthesis and ap pl i ca tion of cont n t from previous a n d curre n t methods cou rses including lesson

O verview of theories of h u m a n develop men t emphasizing the

p l a n n ing, role of reflective practice, pedagogical philosophy and

individual cognitive, linguistic, socio - c u l t u ral, emotional, a n d

belief systems, and evolving defi n itions o f t e ach i ng and lea rn i n g .

p hysical development of children and adolescents in and o u t of

school. Course expe rie n c e s p rov ide opportunities to connect

develo p m e ntal theory with current practice and to consider age­ a p p r op riat e and pedagogically ound approach es to foster learner's con tinued grow th. I n itial cou r se i n Elementary

Education certification program; permission required. (Concur­ ren t with 303.) ( 3 )

Observation of the d ev elo pm e n tal nature of gr ow t h in learners in various set t i ngs i ncluding

K-8 schools. Emphasis on the

d eve l o pmen t o f the skills of o b se r va t i o n and i n formal assess­ m e n t. (Con u rrent with

Emphasis o n self-evaluat ion, analysis, and c ri tique o f t h e development o f p er sona l teaching t rengt h s. Prerequisites: 302,

303, 357, 358, 406, 408. (Concurrent with 4 0 1 , 4 1 0, 4 1 2 . ) ( 3 ) 40 I

Practicum II

Extended expe rie nce and participation in an assigned public school classroom foc u sing on a pp l i ca t i o n of co nt nt methods courses. Includes collection of video lessons. P rereq u i s i tes : 302,

303 Field Observation

302.) ( I )

303, 357, 358, 406, 408. (Concu rrent with 400, 410, 4 1 2.) ( 1 ) 406

Mathematics in K-8 Education

Exploration of mathematical principles and practices consistent

CTM curriculum standards.

with

mphasis on de m onst ra t i n g

the usefulness of math in a variety of real-world settings a n d

322 M icrocomputers in the Classroom

across curriculum areas. Practice i n methodology, pl a nni ng , a n d

I n troduction to the use of m i c roco mp ut e rs in educational set­

assessment as developmen tally a p propriate fo r learners.

t ings. To pics:

Prerequ isites: 302, 303. ( Concurrent w i th 357, 358, 408.) ( 3 )

I)

The comp uter as a teacher tool using word

processing, spreadsheet, and grad i ng programs, 2) Com p uter assisted i nstruction, 3) Software evaluation, 4 ) I n tegr at i n g soft­

ware i n to the curriculum, 5) Copyright laws and p u blic domain software, and

6 ) Software cu rrently used i n education setti ngs.

Pre o r co-requisite: EDUC 253 or 262. Does not count toward

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A ppl ication of research findi ngs and psychological principles to

(Concurrent w i t h 358, 406, 408 . ) ( 2 )

Course Offerings

raded

the teach ing of typ ing. P re req ui s ite: advanced typing. ( 2 )

343 Methods o f Teaching Bookkeeping

Application of research find i ng s a n d psyc h ologica l principles t o

SPEECH

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A pp lica tion o f research findings and psychological p r i n ciples to

degrees i n co mpu ter science. ( 2 )

34 1 Philosophy o f Vocational Education

Objec t ive of h igh school b u s i ness educa t i o n p rograms, th e

busi ness c u r riculum, layout a.nd fa cili ties planning, the evalua­ tion of b u s i n ess teachers and competence for b usiness occupa­ tions. Exam ination of information resources and current thought i n busine� education, cooperative education, a n d d is t rib u t ive education. ( 2 )

408 Literacy in K-8 Education Participation in t h e development of appropriate curricu lar stra tegies and i n s t r u c tional methods for supporting the diversity of learners' languagelliteracy growth. Daily and long range lesson

planning and eva l u a t ion tec h n iques w i J .! be p ra ct i c e d

as

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relate to li teracy educa tion. Prerequi ites: 302, 303. (Concurrent

w i th 357, 358, 406. )

(3)

410 Science/Health i n K-8 Education S t rategies for teaching science by using i nquiry methods a n d p roblem-solving techniques will b e employed to explore i nteractive c u .rricula from

a.I1

environmental po i n t of iew. Issues

of n u t rition a n d health will also be addres ed. Da.ily and long range lesson planning and evaluation t e c h n i q u es will be

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p ract iced as they relate to science/health education. Prerequisites: 302 , .3 03, 3 5 7 , 358, 406, 408. (Concurrent with 400, 40 1 , 3 1 2.) ( 3 )

and of tel ling stories. Some off-campus practice. Demonstrations and joint storytelling by and with instructor. ( 2 )

4 1 2 Socia] Studies in K-8 Education Focus on drawing connections between the content of social snldies curricula and the lived experiences of human lives. ourse con tent incl udes investigation of issues related to democratic values and beliefs active citizenry, multicu.lt uralism, global perspectives, and the environ ment. Daily and long range lesson planning and eval uation techn iques will be practiced as they re1Jte to social studies education. Prerequ isites: 302, 303 , 3 5 7, 3 5 8 , 406, 408. (Concurrent with 400, 40 1 , 4 1 0.) ( 3 )

457 The Arts, Media, and Technology Students use a variety of techniques, equ ipment, and materials to explore ways of seeing and expressing how they see and experi­ ence their environment. Exploration of ways to i n corporate these techniques i nto the classro om. Comp uters, video cameras, book­ production, models, a n i mation, cartoons, photography, and posters, along with the standard fa re o f tape recorders, slide shows, movies, film strips, and overheads are manipulated as media to express a view of the world creatively. ( 2 )

430 Student Teaching in K-8 Education Teaching i n c lassrooms of local public schools under the direct supervision of School of Education faculty a nd classroom teachers. Prerequi ites: EDU 302, 3D}, 3 5 7, 358, 406, 408, a rt, music, and physical education methods. 2.50 GPA. Concurrent enrollment in 435. (Meets senior semi n a r/project requirement.) (9)

461 General Teaching Methods - Secondary Skills and understandings related to decision-making, instruc­ tional techniques, evaluation and testing, classroom manage­ ment, and discipline. Prerequisites: 262, 263; concu rrent with 462. ( 3 )

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434 Student Teaching - Elementary (Dual) Designed for persons who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks of teach ing in cla srooms of local p ublic schools u n der the direct supervision of School of Education t�lculty and classroom teachers. Prerequisites: EDU . 3 02, 303, 3 57, 358, 406, 408, art, music, and physical education methods. 2 . 50 GPA. Concurrent enroll ment in 435. ( Meets senior seminar/project requirement.) (9) 435 Topics in Elementary Education Classroom: Practice in

the Context of Educational Foundations School-based experiences w i ll be explored in the context of the historical, socio-cultural, polit ical, legaJ, fi nancial, ethical, and philosophical fo undations o f education. Student teaching experience will be shared and a n al yzed to encourage the u nder­ s tanding of broader educational issues. Prerequisites: 302, 303, 3 5 7 , 3 5 8 , 406, 408. (Concurre n t with 430.) ( 3)

English as a Second Language

44X Subject Area Methods

Instructional strategies, long and short range planning, curricu­ lum and other considerations specific to the disciplines. Pr requisites: 262, 263, E PS Y 2 6 1 , 3 6 1 , SPED 362

(3)

445 Methods o f Teaching FOTeign Languages and English a s a Second Language (Required for foreign language endorsement and ESL m inor.) (3) 446 Mathematics in the Secondary School ( 3 ) 447 Science in the Secondary School ( 3 ) 448 Social Studies i n the Secondary School ( 3 )

449 Computer Science i n the Secondary School ( 2 ) 456 Storytelling A combination of discovery and practicul11 i n the art of story­ telling. I nvestigates the val u e s and backgro u J1d of storytelling, the various types of and forms of stories, techniques o f choosing

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Application of language teaching methodology to various i nstructional situations. Design and implementation o f teaching materials and lessons i ncluding adaptation o f exist ing texts to specific teaching goals and educational environ m ents; special emphasis on language arts and reading