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Pacific Lutheran University Bulletin

Cataog 971


PACIRC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY BULLETIN VOL. LI

APRIL 1971

NUMBER 3

Published Sue Timn Annually by PacifIC Lutheran Unlyerslty PO. Box 2OS8 Tacoma. Wnhlng10n 98<4"7 Second Class Postage Paid at Tacoma. WashIngton


Pacific Lutheran University Bulletin: Announcements for 1971-72 Catalog for 1970-71

Table of Contents

School Calendar

The U n i versity

Admissions

Finances

Pages

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Academic Procedures

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Academic Organization

I nstru ction

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45

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207

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27

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The Regi ster

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Late Afternoon and Evening Classes_

I ndex

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Summer Session

Courses of

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23

F i n a n c i a l Aid

Student Life

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Objectives of the Univers ity Pacific Lutheran University, born of the Reformation spirit, maintains the privilege of exploration and learning in all areas of the arts, sciences, and religion. The basic concern of Martin Luther was religious, but his rejection of church tradition as primary authority, and his own free search for religious truth, served in effect to liberate the modern mind in its quest for all truth. The total impact of Luther's stand has permanently shaped the modern world and helped pro­ vide the modern university with its basic methodology. Pacific Lutheran University is a community of professing Christian scholars dedicated to a philosophy of liberal edu­ cation. The major goals of the institution are to inculcate a respect for learning and truth, to free the mind from con­ finements

of

ignorance

and

prejudice,

to

organize

the

powers of clear thought and expression, to preserve and extend knowledge, to help men achieve professional com­ petence, and to establish lifelong habits of study, reflection, and learning. Through an emphasis on the liberating arts, the

University seeks

to develop

creative,

reflective,

and

responsible persons. At the same time, the acquisition of specialized information and technical skill is recognized as a condition of successful involvement in the modern world. The University seeks to develop the evaluative and spiritual capacities of the student and to acquaint him honestly with rival claims of the true and the good. It encourages the pur­ suit of rich and ennobling experiences and the development of significant personhood through an appreciation of man's intellectual, artistic, cultural, and natural surroundings. The University

affirms

its

fundamental

obligation

to

confront

liberally educated men with the challenges of Christian faith and to instill in them a true sense of vocation.


By providing a rich variety of social experiences, Pacific Lutheran University seeks to develop in the student a joy in abundant living,

a

feeling

for the

welfare and

personal

integrity of others, good taste, and a sense of social propriety and adequacy. Distinguishing between personal

Christian

ethics and normal social controls, the University adopts only such rules as seem necessary for the welfare of the educa­ tional community. The physical development of the student is regarded as an integral part of his liberal education. Hence the University encourages participation in physical activities and respect for health and fitness. Professing a concern for the entire nature of man, the faculty of the University encourages wholesome develop­ ment of Christian faith and life by providing opportunities for worship and meditation, offering systematic studies of religion and encouraging free investigation and discussion of basic religious questions.

The

University believes the

essence of Christianity to be personal faith in God as Cre­ ator and Redeemer, and it believes that such faith born of the Holy Spirit generates integrative power capable of guid­ ing men to illuminating perspectives and worthy purposes. The University community confesses the faith that the ulti­ mate meaning and purpose of human life are to be discov­ ered in the person and work of Jesus Christ. As an educational arm of the Church, Pacific Lutheran University provides a locus for the fruitful interplay of Chris­ tian faith and all of human learning and culture, and as such holds it a responsibility to discover, explore, and develop new frontiers. Believing that all truth is God's truth, the Uni­ versity, in achieving its educational and spiritual goals, main­ tains the right and indeed the obligation of faculty and stu­ dents to engage in an unbiased search for truth in all realms.


1971 JAN.

FEB.

MAR.

APR.

S M TW TF S 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1516 1718192021 22 23 24 252627282930 31

MAY

S M TW TF S 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 15 161718192021 22 23 24 25262728 29 3031

SEP.

S M TW TF S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 1516 1718 192021 22 23 24 25 2627282930

1 2 3 45 6 JUNE 7 8 9 1011 n 13 14 151617181920 21 22 23 24 252627 28

1 2 3 45 OCT. 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 1516 17 1819 2021 22 23 24 2526 27282930

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 1516 1718192021 22 23 24 2526 27282930 31

JULY

1 2 3 NOV. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 151617 18192021 22 23 24 25262728293031

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 15161718 1920 21 22 23 24 252627 282930

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 151617181920 21 22 23 24 252627 28293031

AUG. 1 2 3 45 6 7 1 2 3 DEC. 1 2 3 4 8 9 1011 12 13 14 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 1011 151'61718192021 H 12 13 14 15 1617 12 13 14 15161718 22 23 24 25262728 18192021 22 23 24 19 2021 22 23 24 25 293031 252627282930 26 272829 3031

1972 JAN.

FEB.

S MT W TF S 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 15 16 17 1819 2021 22 23 24 252627 2829 3031

MAY

1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1516 171819 2021 22 23 24 2526 272829

S MT W TF S 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 1516171819 20 21 22 23 24 2526 27 282930

SEP.

S MT W TF S 1 2 3 45 6 7 8 9 1011 12 13 14 1516 17 18 192021 22 23 24 2526 27282930

1 2 3 OCT. 1 2 3 45 6 7 4 5 6 7 8 910 8 91011 12 13 14 11 12 13 14 151617 1516 1718192021 1819 2021 22 23 24 22 23 24 25262728 293031 2526 272829 30 MAR. 1 2 3 4 JULY 1 NOV. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 91011 2 3 45 6 7 8 5 6 7 8 91011 12 13 14 15161718 )2 13 1415161718 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 192021 22 23 24 25 16 1718 192021 22 192021 22 L3 24 25 262728293031 23 24 2526272829 2627282930 3031 APR. 1 AUG. 1 2 3 4 5 DEC. 1 2 2 3 45 6 7 8 6 7 8 91011 12 3 45 6 7 8 9 9 1011 12 13 14 15 13 14 151617 18 19 1011 12 13 14 1516 161718 192021 22 2021 22 23 24 2526 17 18192021 22 23 23 24 2526272829 2728293031 24 252627 2829 30 30 31 JUNE

I


School Calendar 1971-72 Summer Session, 1971

C lasses beg i n 7 :30 a. m ._ F i rst term e n d s _ C lasses beg i n-2nd term _ Su mme r Se ssion c l ose s Bacca lau rea te / C o m me n ce me n t

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Monday, June . Wednes day, Ju l y Thursday, J u l y _ ___ Friday, August ____ Friday, August

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14 14 15 13 13

Fall Semester, 1971-72

Orienta t i o n a n d Regis t ra t i on _ Monday, Se pte m be r 6-Wednesday, Se ptember 8 C lasses be g i n 7 :5 0 a . m. T h u rsday, Se ptember 9 __ _Thursday, Septe m ber 23 __ Last date l o r a d d i n g a course _ _ Las t date for d i scont i n u i n g a cou rse w it h o u t T h u rsday, Octobe r 7 re ce i v i n g a grade Date for g i v i n g de fic ien cy grades_ _ Friday, October 15 H o me c o m i n g Wee ke nd _ . November 5-7 Tha n ks g i v i n g Recess be g i ns 1 0 :00 p.m. __ _ _Wednesday, N ove m ber 24 Tha n ks g i v i n g Recess e n ds 7 :50 a . m _ Monday, N ove m be r 29 Exa m i na t i o ns__ __ __ _____ _ _ Tuesday, De ce m be r 1 4-Friday, Dece m ber 17 _ ___ ___ ___ . _______ _____ .. _ ___ F rid ay, Dece m ber 17 Se mester e n d s___ _ ______

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Interim Period 1972

Begins Ends

_Tuesday, January 4 ___ _ _ _ Friday, Ja n ua ry 2 8 _

Spring Semester, 1971-72

Re g i s t ra t i o n Classes be g i n 7:50 a . m . Last date f o r adding a cou rse Was h i n g t on's B i rthday H o l iday _ Last date for d i scont i nu i n g a cou rse w i t h o u t re ce i v i n g a g rade Date for g i v i n g deficie ncy g rades Easte r Recess be gins 1 0 :00 p . m. Easte r Recess e n ds 7:50 a . m . Exa m i na t i ons _ Se meste r e n ds Baccala u reate Se rvice, 11 :00 a . m . C o m me n ce me n t , 3:30 p . m . __

_

_

___ _ We dnesday, February 2 T h u rs day, Fe b ruary 3 Thurs day, Fe bruary 17 Monday, Fe bruary 2 1 _

_

T h u rs day, Ma rch 2 Friday, Mar c h 1 0 Tues day, Mar c h 28 Wednesday, Apri l 5 Tuesday, May 16 - F r i day, May 19 _ F r i day, May 19 Sunday, May 21 Sunday, May 2 1 _

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CALENDAR AND CURRICULUM Pacific L u theran U n i versity adopted a new calendar effective i n 1969. C o m 足 m o n l y called the 4-1-4, the calendar has two fourteen-week semesters separated by a four-week i n te ri m. Typica lly, a student e n ro l l s in three to fou r c o u rses each semester and one in each of at least two inte r i m s d u ring h i s u n dergraduate years .

Semesters

The n.ew c a l e n d a r has p rovided o p portu n i ty for m ost students to c o n ce n t rate thei r effo rts on a smal ler number of study areas in each semester, and for academic u nits of the University to offer instr u c t i o n in a smaller n u m be r of better integrated c o u rses. The c o u rses described in this catalog are the resu l t of Uni足 versity-wide review of instructional objectives and practice. In many instances they are markedly different from those they re placed and , in every c ase, are subject to possible fu rther revision as the possibilities of the new program a re observed. A new general e m phasis is given to the promotion of greater i nitiative on the part of the i n d i vi d u a l student. Courses have been p l a n ned and sched uled with less emp h asis upon clock h o u rs to a l low students greater f l exi b i l i ty and i n d i v i d 足 u al i ty in t h e conduct of their studies. I n t h e semesters, as we l l a s t h e i n te r i m, students are e n co u raged to take t h e f u l lest advantage of a l l learn i n g resou rces ava i l able to them under the g u i dance of the facu lty. In COUrses i n w h i ch there are fewer formal contact h o urs, the instructors provide for a greater a m o u n t of i n for m a l i n d ivid u a l o r small g roup contact. Interim The interi m provi des free do m-freedom for the student to develop h i s i n terests

by co ncen t rat i n g on a s i n g le course and freedom for the fac u l ty to teach in areas and ways not a l ways ava i l able d uring the reg u l a r semester. However, free d o m m e a n s respons i b i l i ty. T h e faculty has devel oped i m a g inative concepts a n d co urses and has accepted the c h a l lenge to keep them responsive and ope n-ended. S i n ce inter i m offer i n g s are experi m ental and p l astic, students are expected to approach these courses w i th open m inds and a w i l l i n gness to g i ve to the c o u rse more than is sim p l y required .


HISTORY Founded in 1890 by the

Rev. Bjug Harstad, Pacific Lutheran University has

occupied the same location since its beginning. Although named

Pacific

Lutheran

University, the

institution opened

as

an

academy on October 14, 1894 and became a junior college in 1921. Ten years later, it was organized into a three-year normal school, which became a college of education in 1939. In 1941, still a small and struggling institution, it assumed the role of a college of liberal arts. It was known as Pacific Lutheran College from 1920 until 1960, when, because of a restructuring of its organization, it again assumed its original name, Pacific Lutheran University. Two Lutheran institutions have merged with the University - Columbia College of Everett, Washington in 1920, and Spokane College of Spokane,

Washington

in 1930. Beginning about

1945,

the

University

experienced

great

growth,

benefiting

Irom dynamic leadership, as well as from factors which led to the expansion of higher education on a national scale. Today it operates with an academic structure embracing College School of

of Arts and Sciences,

Education,

School of Fine Arts,

School of Nursing. A Division of

School of

Business

School of Physical

Administration, Education,

and

Graduate Studies offers work leading to the

Master's degree in a number of areas. Eugene Wiegman, who took office August 1, 1969, is the ninth president of the University.

Robert

Mortvedt

(1962-69)

is president

emeritus.

Other presidents,

all deceased, were: Bj ug Harstad, 1890-95, 1897-98; Ole Gronsberg, 1895-97; Nils J. Hong, 1898-1918; John U. Xavier (acting), 1920-21; Ola J. Ordal, 1921-28; Oscar A. Tingelstad, 1928-43; Seth C. Eastvold, 1943-62.

LOCATION Tacoma, Washington, a metropolitan area with a population of over 250,000 persons, is located in the southern reaches of Puget Sound. The University is in Parkland, one of Tacoma's unincorporated suburbs. The campus is seven miles south of the city center and is adjacent to one of the main arterials, the

Mt.

Rainier highway. Towering mountain peaks flank the beautiful natural setting of the Puget Sound country. Hundreds of streams course down to Puget Sound through evergreen forest slopes of the Ofympic Mountains on the west and the Cascade Range on the east. Scores of fakes dot the area. Combined with its moderate year-round climale, the area is ideal for a judicious mixture of scholarly efforts and outdoor recreations such as boating, skiing, swimming, hiking, fishing and hunting.

OWNERSHIP AND SUPPORT The University is owned and operated by Pacific Lutheran University, Inc., a Washington corporation whose purpose is to maintain a Christian institution of higher learning. Membership of this corporation coincides with the membership of the North Pacific District of the American Lutheran Church and the membership of that portion of the ALC's Rocky Mountain District which is located in fdaho and Montana west of the Continental Divide. The annual meeting of the corporation is held in conjunction with the annual convention of the North Pacific District.


Voting members include the members of the Board of Regents, and the pastors and lay delegates of congregations in the constituent area. The University receives regular financial support from the American Lutheran Church, the Pacific Northwest Synod of the Lutheran Church in America and from the Pacific Lutheran University Alumni Association. In addition to Church assistance, the University receives considerable support from individuals, organizations and businesses throughout the nation and world.

GOVERNMENT The policy-making and governing body of the University is the Board of Regents. On the basis of recommendations made by the President, it charts a course for the development of the total program of the University and strives to provide essential funds. The University corporation's constitution provides for 29 regents elected for three-year terms. Fifteen regents represent the North Pacific and Rocky Mountain Districts of the American Lutheran Church, six are chosen by the Pacific Northwest Synod of the

Lutheran Church in

America,

three

represent

the

PLU

Alumni

Association, and three are chosen at large by the Board of Regents. The President of the University, the President of the North Pacific District (ALC), and the Presi足 dent of the Pacific Northwest Synod (LCA), are regents by virtue of their position. The student body and the faculty have representatives who meet with the Board.

ACCREDITATION AND INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS Pacific Lutheran University is fully accredited by the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools as a four-year institution of higher education and by the Washington State Board of Education for teacher education. The University is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education for the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers, principals and guidance counselors, with the Master's degree as the highest degree approved. The School of Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing. The University is approved by the American Association of University Women and by the American Chemical Society. The University is a member of the Association of American Colleges, the Amer足 ican Council on Education, the National Lutheran

Educational Conference. the

Northwest Association of Private Colleges and Universities, and the Independent Colleges of Washington, Incorporated.

STUDENT BODY Approximately 4,600 students will be served by the University durinr. the cur足 rent school year and summer session. FUll-time enrollment each semester

IS

about

2,450. While the majority of the students come from the State of Washington, over

30 states and several foreign countries are represented. Regarding religious affili足 20 other church groups are

ation, a majority are of the Lutheran faith, but some represented.

FACULTY The University has a full-time teaching faculty of

162. There are 50 part-time

teachers, most of whom teach in the late afternoon and evening program

and

the summer session. Qualities expected of faculty members include commitment


to the Objectives of the University, deep concern for the individual student, excel­ lent preparation in a recognized graduate school, and a desire and an ability to teach.

ALUMNI The Alumni Association numbers over 7,000 persons, living all over the worl'd. Members of the teaching profession comprise the largest segment of the alumni. Hundreds are engaged in the work of the Church as pastors, missionaries, parish workers and other specialties. PLU alumni serve their God, their fellow men and their countries in a host of other professions and vocations.

THE CAMPUS Beautiful natural

surroundings blended with

modern buildings and facilities

characterize the 126-acre campus of Pacific Lutheran. Stately Douglas fir trees, a variety of blooming and evergreen shrubs, lush green lawns and flower beds set off the buildings and make the campus attractive the year around. Majestic Mt. Rainier, rising to an altitude of 14,410 feet about 30 miles away, dominates the setting. Campus outdoor recreational

facilities

include a

nine-hole,

2,048-yard

golf

course, tennis courts, and athletic fields. Most of the University buildings are located on what is termed the

"upper

campus." The "lower campus," below a slight hill to the south, is the setting for the athletic facilities, residence halls for men, a dining hall and apartments for married students. The main campus is bounded by South 121st Street on the north and South 127th Street on the south, by Park Avenue on the east and South "I" Street on the west.

UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS Academic Tacoma-Pierce Administration ture, was completed in 1960.

Building, a two-story steel and concrete struc­

11 houses the administrative offices of the University,

21 classrooms, faculty offices, studios and master control for closed circuit tele­ vision, and a chapel-auditorium seating 175 persons. The Robert A. L. Mortvedt Library is a multi-media learning center containing over 140,000 published and recorded items and provides an optimum environment of comfort and privacy eventually capable of housing 1,000 persons at one time and 500,000 items. This two-story, plus basement, brick

structure

was

com­

pleted in 1966. Xavier Hall, built as a library in 1937 and remodeled in 1,966-67, houses class­ rooms, faculty offices and central services. Ramstad Hall. a three-story brick structure, was built in 1947 and added to in 1959.

11 contains laboratory, classroom, library, museum, research and office

facilities for the departments of biology, chemistry, and physics. Memorial Gymnasium, built in 1947, provides classrooms and activity areas for the department of health and physical education, and accommodations for intra­ mural and intercollegiate gymnasium.

athletics. There is seating for 2,200 spectators in the


East vold Cha pel, c o m pleted in 1 952, seats 1 ,238 pers ons and is used for s tudent congregat i on wors hi p , concerts, special events and p lays . The mU lt i-p urpose s tru cture also conta i ns classrooms, work areas , stage and a rad io studio for t h e depart m e n t o f co m m u nication arts; st ud i os , e ns e m b l e practice rooms and i n d i­ vidual practice rooms for the depart ment of mus i c; and a devot ional chapel. The A rt B u i l d i n g , a two-story frame building, contains classrooms, l a b o ratory and offi ces for the department of art. It w i l l be razed d ur i ng the 1971-72 school year. The Swimming Pool, c o m p leted in A p r i l, 1965, has a s w i m m i n g area 42 by 75 feet and a d i v i n g area 30 to 3 5 feet. S h ower, l oc k e r a n d dress i n g rooms are l ocated in t he 133 by 1 4 5 foot st ruct u re . T h e Ols on Phys i c a l Ed ucation Au d itori um is t h e center o f campus rec reati onal act ivities . Com pleted in 1 9 6 9 , the Uni-T u rfed aud i to r i u m and the As tro-Turfed field house provide opportu n ities for p l anned programs of physical activity and free-t i m e r e c reati on for all students. Handball, s qu as h , paddleball and s auna bath i n g are b u t a few o f t h e act ivities enjoyed b y PLU s tudents in t h is s pacious c o m p lex. A d d i t i o n a l phys i cal education fa cilit i es i nclude l i g hted t e n nis Cou rts , a n i n e-hOle golf cou rse an d n u me rous ath letic fields . T h e old Col lege U n i o n B u i l d i n g , comp leted i n 1 955 a n d added t o in 1959 , w i l l b e remodeled to h o use t h e School of N u rs i ng and the Department o f A r t du ring 1 9 71. Service Buildings

T h e Unive rs i ty Center opened i n September, 1970. F a c i l ities i n this c o m mu n i ty center i n c l ude food service, loun ges, meet i ng rooms , bookstore, bowl i n g al leys , mus ic liste n i n g rooms, game rooms , private d i n i n g r o oms , Ch ris Knutzen Fellow­ s h i p H a l l , stu dent govern m e n t offi ces, snack b a r, and st udent pub l i cation offices . C o l u m b i a C e n t e r, a two-story frame a n d masonry s t ructure comp leted i n 1 9 62 , contains a c afeteria, coffee s h o p , b a ke ry a n d pro s h o p for t h e U n i ve rs i ty g o l f course. T h e Student Health Center hous es offices for the University doctors and n u rses , out- p atient treatment areas, a n d beds f o r d a y pati e n ts . The Warehouse a n d Shops a r e used f o r t he st orage o f equipment a n d the m a i nte n ance of the phys i cal plant. T h e Schoenfeld G reenhouse is a recent addition to the campus . I t i n c l udes both cold a n d warm rooms and a potti n g area. Residence Halls for Men

H . L. Foss H a l l , a three-s to ry res i denc e for 1 88 students, has 1 6-men I i' ;nQ u n i ts and is d i vided i nt o N o r d i c H ouse (nort h h a l f) , and O l y m p i c House (south half). H i n d e rl i e H a l l , for 13 1 students , forms t h e south s i de of t h e hous i n g quad­ ran g l e on upper campus. T i ngelstad H a l l-, a n i ne-st ory res idence for 3 9 2 st udents , is made up of fou r d is ti n ct houses each having t wo f l oors and na med as fo l l o ws : Cascade H o us�·, floors 2 and 3; I vy H ouse, f l o o rs 4 and 5; Evergreen H o use, floors 6 and 7; and A l p i n e House, floors 8 a n d 9 . These th ree resi dence h a l ls are modern b u i l d i n gs havi ng lo unges , s tudy rooms , typ i n g rooms, s e l f-ser v i ce laundry and TV viewing rooms. T h e h a l ls a r e d i v ided


i n to ho uses. Each house is a cohesive u n i t designed to e n courage g reater participation in the i n t ra m u r a l , social, recrea t i o n a l , and acad e m i c prog rams . " Cascade House is ass igned o n a co-ed bas i s with women on t h i rd f l o o r a n d m e n o n second f l o o r . C o m m o n lounge and recreation faci l i t i e s are p rovided a n d a common student gover n ment o rgan izes t h e acti vities of t h e ho use. Residence Halts for Women

H a rstad H a l l , a si x-story so l i d br i c k bu i l d i ng comp letely refu rb i shed in recent years , accommod ates 250 s tud ents. I t has t h ree lounges, a recreation room, self足 service l au n d ry and k i t c h e n facil i ties. Hong H a l l , f o r 1 1 5 students, m a kes up the east s i d e o f the h ousing qu adrangle and i s closest to the heart o f the campus. Krei d l e r Hall, for 126 students, forms the west side of t h i s q ua d ra n g l e , a n d is on the west edge of the c a m p u s . O rd a l H a l l , for 1 8 4 s tu d e n ts, is adjace n t to Stuen H a l l and forms the north edge of the q u adran g l e . J . P . Pfluege r H a l l , for 1 9 4 s tu d e n ts , i s lo cated o n l o w e r campus. Stuen H a l l" f o r 1 09 s tudents, i s located d i rectly n o rt h of H o n g H a l l . T h e f ou r h a l l s i n t h e q u a d r a n g l e a n d Pflueger Ha\ll a re modern th ree-story bui ld足 i n g s each h av i n g l a rge lou n ges, stu d y lounges, ty p i n g rooms, kitchens, s e l f-service lau n d ries, and other fa c i l i ties used i n com mon. "Stuen Hall i s assig ned o n a co-ed bas i s with women occupying the n o r t h wings a n d men the sou t h w i ng s . Com mon l ou n g e and recreation faci l i ties are provided a n d a common student gove r n m e n t o rg a n i zes the activ i ties o f the house .. Other Living Units

The President's Res i d e n ce i s ,located on the c o r n e r of Park Aven u e a n d South 1 2 3 rej Street. U n i v e rsity apa rtme n ts a re two- a n d t h ree-bedr o o m one-story frame units for r e n ta l by marr ied s tuden ts.

SPECIAL UNIVERSITY PROGRA MS CHOICE-Center for Human Organization in Changing Environments

Early i n 1 96 9 PLU establi shed a research-edu cation-action a r m , Center for Hu man Orga n i zation in C h a n g i n g Envi ron ments . I ts a c ro n y m , C H O I C E, s i g n a l s i ts fu nc tion and s ty l e : to i n i tia te processes a n d p rograms w h i c h w i ll enable many segments of a n u rban iz i n g soci ety to p articipate i n m a k i n g choi ces which may lead to q u a l i ty of l i fe in the reg i o n. Fu nded by a t h ree-year g ra n t from the Board of Col lege Educati on of the Amer足 ican Lu t h e ran Chu rch, it se rves as the U n iversity's l i n k with c o m m u n i ty action prog rams and agencies a n d p l ays a major role in the Tacoma Area College Consortium (com prised o f Pacif i c Lu the ran U n i versity, U n i v e rs i ty of Puget Sou n d , F o rt Steilacoom Commu n i ty Coll ege a n d Tacoma Commu ni ty Col lege). C H O I CE provides cha n n e l s for i n c reas i n g in volvement by facu lty and students i n t h e com足 m u n i ty a n d a i ds i n i m p lementing the U n i versity's role as an agent o f social ch ange.


AMERICAN ECONOMY PROGRAM The purpose of the program is to raise the level of understanding of economic principles and procedures among teachers and students of the Pacific Northwest. The program is a Center for Economic Education recognized nationally by the Joint Council on Economic Education and by the Northwest Council on Economic Education. Its functions are: 1)

To offer special courses to non-economics majors at Pacific Lutheran, espe足 cially to future teachers and to current members of the teaching profession. These courses emphasize the role of economics among the social sciences generally and its importance in all areas of life.

2) To develop, in cooperation with the school systems of this region, teaching plans

and

aids

that

facilitate

incorporation

of

economics

into

existing

curricula.

3) To provide speaking and consulting services for community organizations interested in

promoting

public

understanding

of economic

principles

and

issues. 4)

To establish, in cooperation with the Mortvedt Library, a

special collection

devoted to the teaching of economics. For further information on the Program, please contact its Coordinator in our Department of Economics.

KPLU-FM For instructional purposes and as a community service, the University operates a non-commercial, frequency modulation radio station. It broadcasts on quency of

a

fre足

88.5 megacycles with a power of 10 watts under license from the Federal

Communications

Commission.

Programming

includes

materials

the campus and from various networks, primarily educational.

originating

on


Admissions Pa c i f i c Lu t h e ra n U n ive rs i ty a d m i ts q ua l i f i ed st udents wi thout res pect to ra ce, c reed, colo r. o r ethnic or i g i n. The U n i v e rs i ty a d h e res to the pra ct i ce that every s tu d e n t a c c epted s ha l l possess the aca d e m i c and personal t raits which ex perience has s h own will enable h i m to succeed in college work. I n j ud g i n g the qua l i f i ca t i o ns o f a p p l i ca n ts , the C o m m i ttee o n Ad m issions usua l l y a d h e res to the fol l owi ng requ i re m e n ts : 1)

G ra duat ion from a n a c c redited h i g h s c h o o l or evidence o f sa tisfa c tory work a t a n ot h e r college o f recognized s ta n d i n g .

2 ) Scholas t i c a c h i evement, a s i n d i cated b y h i g h s c h o o l g ra d e p o i n t avera g e a n d/ o r class ra n k , which predi cts a reas ona b l e c ha n c e for success a t Pa c i f i c Luthera n U n i versity. 3)

Sat isfac tory sco res on the C o l l ege Entrance Exa m i nation Board Scholas t i c Aptitude Test. Sco res on t h is test a re not requ i re d of students transf erring from ot her col leges .

4)

Evidence o f g o o d m oral cha rac t e r.

RECOMMENDED HIGH SCHOOL COURSE

It is reco m mended, b u t n o t requ i red, that t h e h i g h s ch oo l c ou rs e of an a p pli­ ca n t i n clu d e: English, 4 u n i ts; e lementary alg e b ra , 1 u n it; pla n e geometry, 1 u n i t; s o c ia l stud ies , 2 u n i ts; o n e foreign language, 2 u n its; one la boratory s ci ence, 1 u n i t; e lectives, S u n its , i n c lu d i n g typi n g . ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES F O R ENTERING FRESHMEN

H i g h s c h o o l s tudents may beg i n a pp l i ca ti o n p roceed i n gs any t i m e a ft e r com­ p l etion o f thei r j u n i o r yea r. Ad miss i ons decisi ons wi l l n o t be made until December 1 , u n l ess cons i d e ra t i o n under the Ea rly Decis i o n P o l i cy is requested. All ca n d i­ dates w i l l be noti fied as soon as the a p pl ication is completed a n d a d ec is i o n is ma de. The fol l o w i n g c redentials a re requi red : 1)

FOR MAL AP P L I CAT I O N . T h e s ta n da rd a ppl i ca t i o n form, designed for Was h ­ ington i nstitutions of h i g h e r lea rn i ng i s used by Pa c i f i c Lutheran U n i versity. I t may b e o b tai ned f r o m h i g h s c h o o l couns e l o rs (by Was h i n gton a p p l i ca n ts ) o r b y wri t i n g t h e D i rector of A d m issions. A fi fteen-d o l la r non- ref u n da b le a p plica ­ t i o n fee s h o u l d a c co m pany t h e a p p l i ca t i o n o r be ma i l ed separately. This is a s e rvice fee a n d is not a pplied to the s tu d e n t's a cc ou n t. Checks o r mo ney o rd e rs s hou l d b e made paya b l e t o Pa c i f i c Lut h e ra n U n iversity a n d sent to the Di rector of A d m issions.

2) TRANSC R I PT OF C R E D I TS. H i g h s c h o o l t ra ns cri pts must i nc lu de a l l w o r k pursued th rou gh t h e fina l semester o f t h e ju n i or yea r. Stu dents who h a v e been gra d uated prior to su b mi tt i n g their a p p l i cat i o ns a re req u i red to pres e n t c o m ­ plete a ca dem i c reco rds. 3)

R E F ERE N C E S. Two character a n d a ca d e m i c eva luat io ns , prepared by prin­ c i pa ls , couns e l o rs, pasto rs , o r other q ua l i fied pers ons , a re requi red. Forms for t h is purpose may be obta i ne d from t he Ad m iss i o ns Office.


4)

COLL EGE ENTRAN C E EXA M I NAT I O N BOARD SCHOLAST I C APTITUDE TEST. A II' entering fr esh men m ust su bmit scores fr o m the C o l lege Entr an c e Examina足 t i on Board Scholastic Aptit ude Test. Infor m at i on concerning t h i s examination may be obt a i n e d from h i g h s c h o o l counselors or fr o m the C o l lege Entr ance Exa m i nation Boar d , Box 1 02 5 , Ber kel ey, Cali forn i a 94701 .

If an offer of admi ssion is ten dered by t h e Un i versity, t h e fo l l o win g r e q u ire ments m ust be met before accept a n ce is f i n a l i zed: 1)

PHY S I CAL EX AMINAT I O N R EPORT. Pr i o r to r e g i stration, each stud ent enro l l 足 ing f o r two and one-half courses or m or e, mu st su bmit, at h i s own expense and on t h e f o r m provided, a physi cal examinat i on r e port acceptable t o t he Student Healt h Ser v i ce of the U n i ver sity. Until this report is approved, the student is not officially admitted. A l l for e i gn students are req uired t o r e p ort to t h e Healt h Center u pon arr ival at t h e University for i n str u ct i ons concerning var i ous tests which may be re q u ired.

2) ADVAN C E PAYM ENT ON T U I T I O N . A seventy-f i ve-dol l ar advance payment on tu ition i s due i m med i ately f o l lowing acceptance. This payment is credited to the student's account and i s appli cable at the beg i n ning of t h e t er m for which t h e student has been accept e d . If unf or eseen c ir cumst a n ces necessit ate can cel lat i o n of t h e enrol lment reservat i on, t he amount w i l l be refunded , if t h e Director of A d m i ssions is notif i e d i n wr iting prior t o M ay 1 . The f i n a l refund date for i nt er i m is Decem ber 1 5 , and for spring semester is January 1 5 . 3 ) STU D ENT PERSONNEL F O R M - I N F O R MAT I O N A N D H O U S I N G CAR D . Infor足 mation req uested on these for ms m u st be completed and returned with the advance t u ition payment . Early Decision Policy

H i g h school students who r an k in the u pper twenty-f i ve p er cent of t h e ir c l ass, based on credits earn ed through t h e j un i or year, and who have selected Pacif i c L ut h eran a s the i n st it u t i o n t he y wish t o att en d, may b e provi sion a l ly accepted for admission as ear l y as October 1 of t h e i r sen i or year. A p p l i cat ions m ay be s u b 足 mitt ed any t i m e after t h e junior year o f h i g h s c h o o l b u t must be co m p l eted b y N o v e m b e r 15. The S A T s h o u l d be t a k en t h e previous May or Ju ly. Early decision students are general l y g i ven preferent i al treatment relat i ve t o on-c a m p u s h o u s i n g and, if req uest e d , f i n a n c i a l assistan c e . A form f or requesting consi derat i o n under t h i s policy may be obtained f ro m the Admissions Off i c e. Early Admission Policy

Under t h i s p o l i cy, q ua l if ied st udents interested in accelerat i n g t heir edu cational pr ogram may begin wor k t oward a degree after c o m pl e t i on of the j u n i or year or f irst semest e r of t h e sen i or year of h i g h s c h o o l . Cases of e ar l y admission are infr equ ent a n d are eva l u ated on an i n d i v i d u a l basis. M i n i m u m r e q u ir e ments: 1)

Recommen d at i on fr o m t he secondary school, and assur ance t h at a h i g h s c h oo l d i p loma may b e obtained ( i n s o m e cases after su ccessf u l comp leti o n o f a speci f i e d amount of col lege work);

2)

Comp let i on of a l l graduat i on req u ire ments except f u l l residence;


3)

H i g h school c l ass ran k in the t o p quart e r ; an d

4)

C o m p l i ance wit h gen e ral adm issions procedu res and pol i c ies of t he Unive rsity.

TRANSFER STUDENT ADMISSION PROCEDURES

Stu dents who h ave attended ot h e r a c c re dited c o l leges may apply f o r a d m ission with advanced st a n d i n g . Can d i dates m u st be in good st a n d i n g , academi c a l l y a n d personal l y , a t t h e i n st i t ut i on f rom whic h transf e r is plan ned. U s u a l l y a g r a d e point average of " C" (2.0 on a 4 . 0 scale ) , or above, in a l l college work attempted is req u i red before reg u l a r acceptance is g rant e d . Evaluation o f Credits

1)

The reg i st rar w i l l evaluate a l l t ransf er rec o rds and create a degree-prog ress c h a rt indi cat in g comp l et i on of any c o re req ui rements and t otal h o u rs accept e d . I n d i v i d u a l s c h o o l s and departments within t h e University w i l l dete rmine to w h at extent c ou rses completed at ot h e r i nst itutions wil l satisfy re q u i rements in t h e m aj o r.

2)

Generally speaking, col lege-level c o u rses completed with g rades of not less t h an " C" at acc re dited inst it ut i o n s w i l l apply t oward t he 32 c ou rses ( 1 2 8 se mest e r h o u rs) req uired f o r g ra d u at i on. C redit f o r s u bjects i n w h i c h the st udent h as a grade of "0" will be withheld unt i l he has successf u l l y com足 p l et ed one semeste r ' s work at t he U n iversit y .

3 ) A c o m m u n i ty o r j un i o r col lege st udent may t ra n sf e r a max i m u m of 6 4 semester h o u rs (96 q u a rt e r h o u rs) of cre d i t f rom t he two-year instit ut i o n . 4)

In order t o be a can d i date f o r a degree, t h e student must t a ke t h e f i n a l seven cou rses (28 semest e r hours ) in residen ce.

Unaccredited Educational Experiences

1)

C redit s p reviously earned by t ransfer students in unaccredited schools are not t ransfe rable a t the t i m e of admission . An e val uat i on of suc h c o u rses, and a decision relative to t h e i r t ransfera b i l it y , wiH be made aft er t h e st udent con足 cerned has been i n att endance at P a c i f i c L ut h eran U n iversity f o r one semest e r .

2)

The University w i l l a l l ow u p t o 5 c o u rses of USAF I c redit and up t o 5 cou rses f o r m i l it a ry c redit, provi d ing t he t ot a l of the two d oes not exceed 7V2 c o u rses. The U n iversity uses the credit rec o m me n d at i ons of the American Counc i l on E d u c at i o n a s set forth in "A G u i d e t o the Eval u at i o n of Educat i on a l Experiences in t he A rmed Se rvices."

3)

Where it is diff i c u lt t o dete rmin e c redit value for educat ion a l ex periences, the Un i versity re c o m m ends t h at the st u d ent seek c re d it t h r ough the Col lege Level Examinat i on B o a rd (CL EP) sponsored by the C o l lege Entrance Ex aminat i on B o a r d . The test battery over f i ve ge n e ra l fields ca rries c redit as foll ows: A. Test s c o res m ust be over t h e 25th percent i l e as per USAFI reco m menda足 t i ons. B. C o u rses g ranted for each area exam s h o u l d be the same a m o unt n or m a l l y assi g ned f o r c o m p l et i on o f a s i m i l a r c o u rse a t PlU, but n ot t o ex ceed 1 V2 cou rses. C. Tot a l credit g rant ed for a l l f i ve test a reas is not to exceed 7V2 cou rses.


D. If th ere has been any p revious regu l a r c o l l eg e c redit acc epted in any one of the five areas, it wi l l be de d ucted f rom the 1 V2 courses n o rm a l l y granted for t h e test. 4) The University does not grant c re d i t for c o l l ege-level GED tests. Credentials Required

1)

A f i fteen- d o l lar n o n- ref u n d able a p p l ication fee and t h e formal application reque s t i n g advance stand i n g .

2)

Official t ransc ri pts f rom e a c h c o l l ege or u n iversity atte n d e d . These doc u m ents m u st be sent by the i n sti tution d i rectly to the Adm issions Off i ce.

3)

Off i c i a l tr anscri pt of high sch o o l c redits if they are n ot listed o n a col lege transfer transcr i pt.

4)

A Refere n c e F o rm must be c o m p leted by the O ff i c e of t h e Dean of St u d ents of the i nstitut i o n most rec ently attended as a f u l l-time student.

5) Two ch aracter and ac ademic evaluati ons, prepared by i n structors, c o u n s e l o rs , past o rs or other qu alif i ed p e rsons. F o rms a r e avai lable f rom t h e Admissions Off ice. If an off er of acc eptance i s tendered, it can be f i n a l i ze d by c o m p leting a physical exa m i n ation record, a st udent pe rsonnel fo rm, an i nformation and h o u s i n g c a rd , a n d b y payment of a $75.00 advanced payme n t o n t u it i o n . READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS

FU l l - t i m e stude nts who have not been i n attendance f o r one semes ter or more may see k read m ission by obtai n i ng an a p p l i cation for re-e n t rance f rom t he Admissions Offi ce. Students who have been dropped for academic or d i s c i p l i nary reasons must also s u b m i t a lette r of petition f o r re instateme nt. Those d ropped for academic reasons are also req u i red to f i n d a fac u lty m e m b e r w i l l i n g to act as a sponsor ana adviser if read m i tted. Re-ent er i n g students who have attended another c o l lege i n the i n ter im must request that a transcript be sent from t ha t i nstitution d i rectly t o t h e Director of Admissi ons a t Pacific Luh eran U n i versity. The res i d ency r e q uir ement as stated p revi ously for transf e r students is also applic ab l e for re-entries. ADMISSION OF NON-DEGREE STUDENTS

P e rsons e i g h teen years of age or older who desire to enr o l l i n two courses (8 semester hours) or less may be a d m i tted as non-degree students without s u b m i tt i n g applicati o n s for regular status. Credits earned i n this manner wi l l be evaluated as t o t h e ir acceptab i l i ty i f the s t u d e n t , as a resu lt of formal a p p l ic at i o n and acce ptance, becomes a r e g u l ar student; t h at is, a c a n d i date f o r a degree. Non-degree students w h o wish t o transf er credits t o anot h er institution wi l l be issue d transc ripts w h i c h c lear l y i n d i c ate t h e non-degree status. ADMISSION TO THE DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES

The procedure f o r a d m i ssi on to t he Di vision of G raduate Studies is o ut li ne d i n t h e section Academic Organization.


Honors at Entrance

The U n i versity c o n fers H o n o rs at Entrance in accord ance with the provIsions o f a coo rdinated p rogram form u l ated by col leges and unive rsities w h i c h a re members of the Col lege En trance Examination Board. Recognition is g i ve n f o r o u tsta n d i n g ach ievement i n h i g h s c h o o l and in anti c i pation o f superior perform足 ance a t the c o l lege leve l . The awards are not m ade in rec o g n i tion of fin a n c i a l need a n d c a r r y n o monetary value. Advanced Placement Opportunities 1}

V I A TH E ADVANCED PLACEM ENT PROGRAM OF THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAM I NATION BOARD. Students w h o have received scores of 3, 4, o r 5 on C . E . E . B . Advanced Placement Examin ations may be given both advance d place足 men t and c re d i t toward g ra d u atio n . Exact provisions are depe n dent on the su bject matte r fie l d , a n d inq uiries a re welcomed by the Ad missio ns Office.

2}

VIA LOCAL ADVANCED PLA C E M ENT EXAMINATIONS. A n u m be r of the departments and schools of the U n i versity offer their students the o p p o rtu nity of t a k i n g placement exam i n ations so that they m ay be a c c u rately advised as to the level at which they can most advantageously begin their college studies. When a student receives a s u perior score on such an examin ation, and when his study o f the su bject matter was not a necessary part o f the cou rse work which won him h i s h i g h sch ool d i p lo m a , c re d i t can be g ra n ted toward gradu足 ation. I n q u i ries a re welcomed by the academic deans from t hose students w h o mig h t b e eligible f o r such credit.

Finances It is the policy of the University to maintain h i g h educational standards at as low a cost as possible. The support of the cooperating Lutheran churches and friends w h o cont rib u te toward the operation of the school enables the Unive rsity to c h a rge a l o we r tuition rate than wou l d otherw i se be possible. TUITION

Sel1)ester C h a rges: FU l l -t i me d u ring either semester, 2V2 to 4V4 cou rses (1 0-1'7 semester $ 7 50.00 h o u rs _ _ 50.00" I n te r i m c h a rge, one cou rse (4 semester h o u rs)' Excess cou rses tuition, above 4 V. cou rses per semester, 40.00 per q u arte r cou rse (1 semester h o u r) _ Part-time, less t h a n 2V2 cou rses per semester (9 semester h o u rs o r fewer). per course ( a l s o c h a rged tor a n i n terim cou rse if not taken on conjunction w i t h a fu l l -time semester) 2 50.00 'The charge for an i n te ri m cou rse if not t a ke n in conjun ction with a full-time semester is $250.00. _______________

_

__

_

__

_____ .

________

_

.______________

______

GENERAL FEES (per semester)

General fee, per semester, c h a rged students en rolled in 2V2 c o u rses (10 h o u rs or more)" $ ____

___________________

75.00

'StUdents e n r o l led for less than 2V2 cou rses (1,0 hou rs) who have special permis足 s i on to reside o n cam pus are require d to pay the general fees. G raduate students whose c lasses a re primarily after 4:30 p. m . wil l not be subject to general fees.


(Includes support of the following services: Activities of the Associated Students of PLU, accident insurance, Health Service, Student Artist Series,

Saga

(yearbook),

Intercollegiate

Athletics,

and

Musical

Organizations). University

Center construction fee,

per semester,

charged students

enrolled in 2V2 courses (10 hours) or more (authorized by Associated Students, PLU)_

_

___

10.00

___

SPECIAL FEES Audit, if within a total of

4% courses for a full-time student

No charge

Audit, if beyond a total of 4V4 courses for a full-time student, per quarter course

S

Audit, for part-time students, per course

10.00 70.00

Credit by examination (credit will be recorded only for formally admitted, regular status students), per course unit of credit sought

75.00

Late registration (applicable on and after the first day of classes)

10.00

Change of registration

5.00

Breakage ticket (chemistry students only) Master's thesis binding charge, per copy

10.00 5.00

_

Placement

10.00

Graduate nurse examination_

8.00

Nursing, locker fee deposit to be paid in clinical area (refundable)

1.00

Bowling

_

___

_

_

10.00

_

Skiing (off-campus) Student parking, academic year permiL

30.00 _

10.00

_

Student parking, part-time or second car per semester

3.00

_

Student health and accident insurance (24 hour, 12 month coverage), 22.00

optional (fee subject to change by underwriter)

PRIVATE MUSIC FEES FUll-time students-Music Majors Private instruction fee including use of practice rooms, per semester

$

50.00

FUll-time students-Non Music Majors Private instruction, including use of practice room, per semester One thirtY-rninute period per week

70.00

One sixty-minute period per week

120.00

Part-time students Private instruction including use of practice room, per semester One thirty-minute period per week_.

95.00

One sixty-minute period per week_

145.00

BOARD AND ROOM Room with telephone and board are furnished to resident students, per semester, as follows:


F a l l semester Inte rim Sp ring semester

__ _ _ _ _ ________

Room

Board

$250 '

$260

_

_________

_

60

50" 1 50

260

' In d i v i d u a l s who g raduate in December (fall only) wi l l be ch arged $200 fo r room . â&#x20AC;˘

'The room fee of $50 is not c h a rged to students w h o resided on c a m p u s d u ri n g f a l l semester. Students roo m i n g off campus w i l l be furnished board i n the U n i versity d i n i ng

h a l l s at $300 per semester.

The above rates include t h ree meals per day. Monday th rough Satu rday, and b ru n c h and dinne r on Su nday. Meals a re not served d u ring Thanksgiving, Ch ristmas and Easter vacati ons, nor any other days when the residence h a l ls are c l osed. Sing l e room occu pancy, when avai l a b l e , i s by special a r rangement with the D i rector o f H o u sing. The add i ti o n a l c h a rg e w i l l be announced at t h e time o f reg istration. FAMILY APARTMENTS Two bedroom (1 0 units) includ ing water, per month _____ ___

$

T h ree bedroom (4 u n i ts) includ ing water, p e r month _ ________

_

40.00 50.00

Evergreen C o u rt ( 1 2 apts.) two bedroom, including all u t i l i t i es, per month

85.00

F a m i l y a partment deposit

40.00

A deposit of $40.00 must accompany a reservati o n fo r fami l y a p a rtments. This deposit w i l l be held by the U n i versity unti l the occupant vacates the apa rtment,

or cancels his reservation. One m o n t h 's advance rent fo r apartments is required. S U M MARY OF FIXED COSTS (typical student prog ram) Tu i t i o n _

B oard and room Req u i red fees _____ _ _ ____ T otal _ ___ _ _ _ _ __

F a l l and Sp ring only $ 1 ,500 920 1 70

$2,590 tTwo ,I nt e r i m s a re req u i red for g raduation .

F a l l , Inte rimt and S p r i n g $1 ,550 980 1 70 $2,700

PAYMENTS

Semester b i l ls are due and payable a t the time o f registration u n less the optional PLU Budget Plan described b e l o w i s selected. Students rece i v i ng scholarships, g rants or l oans must complete all necessary

a r rangements well In advance of registrat i o n . Students who ane sec u ri n g a l o a n from finan c i a l insti tutions or agencies (e.g. a federa lly insu red bank loan) w h i c h may s t i l l be pend i n g at t h e t i m e o f registrat i o n , m u st h a v e a letter of comm itment from t h e lender acceptable t o the U n i ve rs i ty . N e w students a r e req u i red to p a y a $75.00 d e posit o n tuition after acceptance and before May 1 . T h i s i s not refund able after M ay 1 f o r fal l , December 15 for


i nt e r i m , and J a n u a ry 15 f o r spring semeste r a p p l i catio n s . Retu r n i n g students are req u i red t o p a y a $75.00 deposit o n t u i t i o n w h i c h i s not re fundable after May 1 or J an u a ry 15 f o r s p ri n g semester appl ications except for those who e n t e r the armed services. The bal ance of the semester b i l l, after payment of the $75.00 deposit on tuition, less any sc holars h i ps , g rants o r loans, i s due and payable at the time of registratio n . An alternative method o f meeting t h e total e d u cationaf costs i s t h e P L U Budget Plan w h i c h may be elected by a l l fUll-time students. The PLU Budget Plan consists of twelve convenient equal monthly payments beg i n n i n g May 1 0 , 1 971 and con足 c lu d i n g A p r i l 1 0 , 1 972. S c h o l a rs h i ps, g rants and loans w i l l be deducted in arriving at the balance req u i red to be met i n t h e equal payment plan, but i n no case w i l l monthly payments be less t h an $ 1 00.00. Although payments begin M a y 1 0 , late starters can m a ke up back payments. Comp lete details, together with exampl es of h ow th e plan operates, are avai lable from the busi ness office. No other payment plan for fUl l-time students will be accepted in meet i n g the i r bi lls. Payment i n fu ll b y the day o f reg i s t ration or the PLU B u dget Plan p reviously a r ranged are t h e o n l y two methods of payment available. Part-t i m e students m ust pay at least one-half of the semester b i l l at the t i me of registration, and the b a l a n ce in two equal i nstallments on October 10 and November 10 in the fall semester, and March 10 and A p r i l 10 in the spring semester. A l ate c h a rge of 1 % w i l l be made i f any payme nt is not paid when due. The U n i ve rsity reserves the right to withhold state ment o f h on orable d i s m i ssal. transc ript of records, o r d i pl o m a , until a l l U n i ve rsity b i l ls have been paid, o r u n t i l satisfacto ry arrangements have b e e n made w i t h the Business Office. Students w i l l. not be permitted to register for a new semester unti l all b i l l s a re paid for the previous term. Cred i t fo r futu re services to be rendered t o the U n i ve rs i t y by the student cannot be used to meet the i n i ti al payment. Money due for work p erformed will be g i ven o n l y if the student's account i s cu rrent. REFUNDS

P a rtial tuition re fund may be made when w i t h d rawal from the U n i v e rs i ty results from sic kness o r causes occu r ring beyond the control of the student. In no case w i l l fees be re fund ed. Refund may be made in the following p ro p o rtions. 90% O n e week or less 80% Between one and two weeks _60% Between two and three weeks ._ 40% Between t h ree and four weeks 20% Between four and five weeks No refund after five weeks. Refunds on rooms w i l l not be a l l owed in cas h . However, i f t h e student returns w i t h i n the next two semesters, p ro-rata a l l owance w i l l be c redited in the following proportions o f occu pation d u ri n g the semester of withdrawa l : _ _ __ _ _ ___

__

__ _ _ _

__

_ _ _ _ _

_ _____ __

3-4 weeks_ 40% u p t o 2 weeks 80% 2-3 weeks 4-5 weeks _. 20% 60% No a l l o wance w i l l be c redited if w i t h d rawal occurs after the 5th week . If the student does not retu rn , the al lowance is forfeited. _

__

_

_

__ _ _ _

_

_ __

_______

_ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


Refunds on board w i l l n o t be made for continuous absences of less than one week and n o refund will be made for t h e f i rst week's absence. A pro-rata refund w i l l be made for necessary withd rawal from the U n i versity. No refund w i l l be made for any U n i versity t r i ps o f a n y ki n d , such as c h o i r , c h o rus, band, o rchestra, athletics, and so forth. DEPOSITORY FOR STU DENTS

Students desi ring to leave cash in t h e B usiness Office may do so. T h i s cash may be d rawn out at the request o f the student. PERSONAL PROPERTY

The U n iversity is not responsible for personal property of the students or the faculty m e m bers. T h e U niversity cannot be held accountable for any losses.

Financial Aid Paci fic Luth eran U n i versity provides finan c i a l aid in the form o f scholarships, g rants, o r talent awards, loans, and o p portunities for p a rt-time e m p loyment. Any student selected for a d m i ssion to the U n i versity is e l i g i b l e to receive f i n ancial assistance, provided that he demonstrates a need t h rough i n formation s u p p l i e d o n t h e C o l l eg e S c h o l a rs h i p Service (CSS) Parents' Confidential State m e n t (PCS), o r Student C on fi d e n t i a l State ment (SCS) . T h e a p p l icant s h o u l d c o m p l ete req u i re足 m e n ts for ad mission and s u b m i t a PCS o r SCS to the a p p ro p r i ate CSS office by Feb ruary 1 . C o p i es o f t h i s f o rm a re ava i l a b l e from h i g h school counselors, the CSS, o r U n i versity Fi n a n c i a l Aid Office. The a p p l i cation for renewal o f f i n a n c i a l assist足 ance (PCS o r SCS) m ust also be s u b m i tted each year to the appropriate CSS office, by Fe b ruary 1 , to i n s u re m ax, i m u m considerat i o n . I t i s assumed when requests for aid a r e received t h at t h e student's f i rst c h o i ce is a schol arsh i p or g rant. W i th t h i s in m i n d , the Com m i ttee decides the type o f assistance w h i c h w i l l be offered . I n t h e majority o f cases, a s t u d e n t w i l l be offered a package f i n a n c i a l aid p l a n , i n c l u d i n g two or m o re forms o f assistance.


Scholarships:

Annual scholarsh i ps range i n a m o u n t fro m $ 1 00 to f u l l t u i t i o n , and are granted, as fa r as funds will permit, t o potentially outstanding students who are dependent in large measure upon their own effo rts to secure a college educati o n . T h e a p p l i 足 c a n t must r a n k i n t h e u p p e r t e n per cent o f h i s class a n d have at least a 3.3 g rade point average. Scholastic abi l i ty must be further reflected i n the scores atttained o n the C o l lege Entrance Exami n ation Board Scholastic Aptitude Test,

which should

be taken in December or January. In addition to its own scholarsh i p fu n d , t h e U n i v e rs i ty has at i ts d i sposal the following restricted schol arsh i p funds which are awarded p r i m a r i l y to those stu足 dents w h o have compl eted thei r f i rst year:

Aid Associ ation for Lutherans S c h o l a rs h i p A l trusa C l u b , Tacoma C h a p te r , S c h o l a rs h i p A l u m n i S c h o l a rs h i p Fund American Association o f U n i v e rs i ty W o m e n S c h o l a rs h i p H e l e n C l i ft B e l l S c h o l a rs h i ps J o r u n n B r e i l a n d S c h o l a rs h i p Fund O . A. B rown F u n d D r . and M rs . W . B . B u rns Fund C a l i fo r n i a S c h o l a rs h i p FederationS c h o l a rs h i p for Seal bearers Carl D a l k M e m o r i a l S c h o l a rs h i p Chao-Liang C h ow S c h o l a rs h i p I d a A. Davis F u n d Faculty M e m o ri a l S c h o l a rs h i p F u n d Faith L u th e ran C h u r c h o f P o rtland S c h o l a rs h i p F u n d R e b e c c a Schoenfeld G a r d n e r a n d J o s e p h G a r d n e r S c h o l a rs h i p O l a f Halvorson Schol arsh i p W . H . H a rd t ke Sem i n a ry Student Schol arsh i p F u n d R e v . Karl Ki l i an M e m o ri a l F u n d K i n s m a n Awards Ladies o f Kiwan is Award D rs. Larson, Wi cks, Reberger and E l d e r S c h o l a rs h i p i n M e d i c a l Tech n o l o g y

L u d v i g a n d C l ara Larson S c h o l a rs h i p M r . a n d M rs. W . H i l d i ng L i n d berg End owed S c h o l a r s h i p L u t e C l ub S c h o l a rs h i p(s) L u t h e ra n B ro t h e rhood Legal Reserve L i fe I ns u ra n ce Co. S c h o l a rs h i p s Mu P h ! Epsi l o n , Tacoma P rofessi o n a l Chapter, S c h o l a rs h i p M a rg a ret N i stad M e m o r i a l S c h o l arsh i p Se l m a a n d M a g n u s N o d tved t Schol arsh i p P L U Facu lty W i ves S c h o l a r s h i p Walter R e e d N u rs i n g Sc h o l a rs h i p Women of Rotary Scho l a rsh i p S i q u e l a n d Youth S c h o l a rs h i p , sponsored b y N o rth P a c i f i c District Luthe r League Social Se rvice S c h o l a rs h i p F u n d of t h e D i v i s i o n o f C h a ri ti es, The American Lutheran C h u rch Tacoma L u m b e r m e n 's S c h o l a rs h i p Teagle Foundation Rev. a n d M rs. H a l v o r T h o r m odsgard S c h o l a rs h i p T u berculosis Association o f P i e rce C o u n ty Scholars h i p W o m e n 's A u x i l i a ry o f P i e rce C o u n ty M e d i c a l Society Scholars h i p

Talent Award s : A l i m ited n u m be r of awards a r e made each year to needy students i n t h e fields o f speech, drama, art, m u s i c and athletics. To be e l i g i b l e a p p l i cants m ust have satisfactory acad em i c records and unusual

pro f i c i e n cy i n one o r more of the

above f i e l ds, A u d i t i ons o r personal i nterviews are usually requ i red o f appli cants.


Gran ts:

Stude nts with exce ptional financial need, who do not q u a l i fy for s c h o l arsi'] i ps , may b e awarded g rants up t o fu l l t u i ti o n . Special Grants

Pastors and u n married c h i l d ren o f pastors are to be given g rants in the a m o u n t o f $ 1 0 0 f o r each s c h o o l y e a r . T h e s e g ra n ts a r e t o be awarded o n l y during t h e s e c o n d semeste r i n attendance and o n l y i f s u c h students receive the m a i n sup足 p o rt o f t h e i r u n i versity expenses from their parents and p rovided that the students are reg i stered for at least two and one- h a l f cou rses each semester d u ri n g the school year. Recognized d e p e n d e n ts (not i n c l u d i n g ma rried c h i l d re n ) of faculty/staff m e m 足 b e rs may receive s p e c i a l grants, the a m o u n t t o be a n n o u nced at the t i m e of registrat i o n . G rants i n t h e a m o u n t o f $25 p e r semester s h a l l be g i ven to e a c h o f two o r m o re s t udents from the same fam i l y atten d i n g school at t h e same time, provided t h at the main s u pport for both is given by thei r parents, and p rovided they have not received any other U n i versity grant o r award . Married stude nts are also e l i g i b l e to receive this g rant when both are e n ro l l ed as full-time students. A l l grants must be applied f o r i n the Business Office a t o r following registration and will be credited after eligibility has been established.

Student Employment :

Part-time w o r k i s avai l ab l e each year f o r a l i m ited n u m b e r o f students. J o b s a re awarded o n the b a s i s o f a p p l i cants' q u a l i ficati ons and the n u m b e r o f vacancies w h i ch develop on t h e campus and i n the adjacent areas. P r i o ri ty for on-campus w o r k i s given to students having financial need. It is possib l e for a student to earn $400 o r m o re during t h e reg u l a r school year. I'n most i n stances, students who are si ncere i n their desire to w o r k are given the o p p o rt u n ity to do so. Off-ca m p u s part-t i m e em ployment for students is hand led a t the P l acement Offi ce, U n i versity Center. Federal Programs:

In a d d i t i o n to t h e Financial Aid explained above, the U n i versity expects to have f u n d s to award from the followi n g Fed e r a l Progra m s : EDUCAT I O N A L O P PORTUN ITY G RANTS (EOG) - I n t h i s p ro g ra m o f d i rect grants the student receives a non-ob l i gating award o f f u n d s , based on excepti onal f i n a n c i a l need and evidence of acad e m i c o r creative p rom i se. Grants range from $200 to $ 1 000 a year, but n o more than one-half of the total f i n a n c i a l assistance received from a l l sources may be i n the form o f an EOG. E l i g i b i lity i s dete r m i n ed by Fe deral g u i d e l i nes. NAT I O N A L D EFENSE STUDENT LOAN ( N DSL)-The max i m u m l oan is $1 ,000 per year based on need and other awards granted. No i n terest accrues and n o payments are necessary u n t i l n i n e m o n t h s afte r rec i p i en t ceases t o be a student. Repayment period is 1 0 years at 3 % simple i n terest. A borrower w h o becomes a full-time teac h e r may request t h at 1 0 % of h i s loan be canc elled for each year he teaches, up to maxi m u m of 50 % . Teachers in sc h o ols with a high conce ntrAtion of p u p i ls from low-income .fam i l ies, or who teach h a n d i capped students, may


rec e i ve 1 00 % c a n c e l l a t i o n at t h e rate of 1 5 % p e r year. N U R S I N G STUDENT LOAN (NTA) - This l o an is s i m i l a r to N DS L except can足 c e l l ation i s for t h ose w h o e n t e r p rofess i o n a l n u rs i n g c a reers. Sop h o m o res accepted for t h e S c h o o l o f N u rs i n g a re e l i g i ble if f i n a n c i a l need e x i sts. N U R S I N G S C H O LAR S H I P S - S c h o l a rs h i ps with a maxi m u m o f $1 ,500 per year a re avai l a b l e to students i n t h e School o f N u rs i n g . LAW E N F O R C E M E N T E D U CAT I O N P R O G R A M - G rants a n d l o a n s a re avai l a b l e to p e rsons p rese n t l y e m p l oyed i n law e n f o r c e m e n t o r for t h ose p l a n n i n g to e n t e r t h i s a re a o f work. (A separate a p p l i cation for t h ese f u n d s i s avai l a b l e i n t h e Stude n t F i n an c i a l A i d Office.) COLLEGE WOR K-ST U DY (CWS) - Work-Study i s a p ro g ra m of e m p loyment in which t h e student, p a rticu l a r l y o n e from a low-income family, is c o m p e n sated for t h e n u m b e r o f h o u rs h e wo rks. G UARANTEED LOA N P R O G R A M (G LP)-The m a j o r objective o f t h i s p ro g r a m , esta b l ished by t h e H i g h e r Ed ucation Act o f 1 9 6 5 , i s to m a ke a fed e r a l l y i nsu red loan ava i l able to a n y col lege student w h o wants o n e . U n d e r t h i s p rog ram a student m ay borrow from a b a n k o r other f i n an c i a l i nstitution as m u c h as $ 1 ,500 a year a n d not be o b l i gated to begin re paying t h e loan until nine months after he l eaves s c h o o l . The a m o u n t of i n t e rest is determined by the l e n d i n g i nstitutions and t h e Fed e ra l G o v e r n m e n t . For many students t h e i n terest wi l l be p a i d by t h e Federal Government d u ri n g t h e i r c o l l e g e careers. (A PCS i s n o t req u i re d ; a p p l i cati ons are avai lable in t h e Student F i n a n c i a l Aid Office.) Student Loan Funds

The U n i v e rsity ad m i n istration can assist students who are in need o f f i n a n c i a l assistance t h r o u g h v a r i o u s s t u d e n t loan funds. I n ad d i t i o n to t h e l oan p l ans o u t足 l i n ed u n d e r " P ayments" in t h i s catalog, the U n iversity has t h e f o l l o w i n g restricted l oan funds from w h i c h assistance is avai l a b l e : M a rie Huth Loan Fund A i' u m n i Associ ation L o a n Fund GertJ ard K i r kebo M e m o r i a l Loan A m e ri can Lu t h e ra n C h u rch Fund Women Loan Fund Jeanette O l son-D i a n a Pau l - M i riam Anton A n d e rson Loan Fund Stoa M e m o ri a l S t u d e n t Loan Fund J o h n S . Baker Loan Fund J . P. Carlstro m Memorial Loan J. P . Pflueger Student Loan Fund Fund O . J . Stuen Alumni Loan Fund O . A . T i n g e lstad Loan Fund D e l t a Kappa Gamma Student W o m e n 's C l u b o f Tacoma Loan Fund Revolvi ng Loan F u n d Lily C . E ke r n Fund


Student Life Pacific Lutheran U n i versity provides extensive services to assist students i n making

t h e i r educational

experience a n d

personal

l ives

m o re

profitable

and

satisfy i ng . I n a d d i t i o n to provi d i n g a n i n te l lectual e n v i r o n m e n t , the U n iversity i s sensitive to the need o f provid i n g suffi c i e n t resources to a i d its students I n t h e i r total deve lopment. T h e U n i ve rsity cond ucts and s u p p o rts n u m e rous services a n d activities w h i c h s u p p l e m e n t t h e basic c o u rse of study. T h e services desc ribed below,

which

are

co-ord i n ated

by

the

Vice-President - Student Affairs,

have

developed over a period of time and exist for the sale purpose o f servi n g the studen t body.

OFFICE OF STU D ENT AFFAIRS The Office of Student Affairs is d i rectly responsible for the organization and programm i n g of the residence halls a n d other student living arrangements; new stu d e n t o r i e n tati o n ;

foreign

students;

student

gove r n m e n t ,

and

activities. I t also offers i nd i v i d ual atte n t i o n to p r o b l e ms which

other

student

arise in student

l i fe. Students are t h e refore e n c o u raged to c o n tact this office whenever they are concerned about aspects of U n i versity l i fe not s p e c i f i c a l l y related to c u rr i c u l a r p rograms.

ORIENTATION OF NEW STUDENTS An o r i e n tat i on program to i ntroduce students to U n i versity l ife is h e l d for a l l n e w students at t h e begi n n i n g o f t h e fall semester. Students take p l acement tests, fam i l i a ri ze

themselves with

U n iversity faci l i ti e s ,

and

become

acquai nted

with

fellow students and the tac u l ty. C o n ferences a r e arranged w i t h faculty advisers u n d e r whose g u idance registration is c o m p leted.

CLASS ATTENDANCE The U n i versity assumes that every student a d m i tted to its cou rse of i n struction h as freely accepted personal respon s i b i l ity for reg u la r c lass atte n d a n c e . W h i l e atte n d an c e itse l f i s n o measure of successful learn i n g , a n d course g rades are issued not o n the basis of attendance but of acad e m i c performance, such perform足 ance n o rm a l l y i nc l u d es reg u l a r part i c i pation i n the total c l ass exper i e n c e a n d i s eva l u ated

accord i n g l y .

In

the

event

of

u n av o i d a b l e

absence

the

student

is

e n cou raged as a matter o f cou rtesy t o i n form h is i nstructor. A n y arrangem e n ts for re m e d i a l work are discret i o n a ry between student a n d i nstructor.

POLIC IES GOVERNING COMM UNITY LIFE The U n i ve rsity a d m i ts students w i t h the express u n d e rstan d i n g that they w i l l c heerfu l l y c o m p l y w i t h i t s reg u l ations i n every respect a n d conduct t h e mselves as responsi b l e c i tizens. All students are expected to conform to normal standards o f b e h av i o r w h i c h i n c l u d e confo rm i n g to state and l o c a l laws. Any student whose behavior i s d ishonest, destructive, u n e t h i c a l , i m m o ra l , o r i n a n y way reflects u n favorably u p o n t h e s t u d e n t body, o r whose c o n d u c t is prej u d i 足 c i a l t o t h e good n a m e of t h e U n i versity, s h a l l be sub j ect t o d isci p l i nary action w h i c h may res u l t i n suspe n s i o n , d i sm issal o r e x p u l si o n f r o m the U n iversity.


A m o re com p rehe nsive state ment of p o l i ci es, ru les and re g u l ations is i n c l uded i n a separate p u b l ication concerned with c a m pus government and conduct. STUDENT HEALTH CENTER

The Stu d e n t Health Se rvice is estab l i s hed in the Health Center where it retains the serv i ces of physi c i a n s and n u rses to aid i n the preservation of the p h ysical welfare o f t h e students. The doctors are in attendance at regu l a r l y scheduled hours. Consulta t i o n , advice, and care of common a i lme nts are av a i l a b l e to a l l members of t h e stude n t b o d y c a r rying t w o and one-h a l f or m o re courses. The staff of the Health Center w i l l not make calls to residence halls o r to any residence off c a m pus. When c h ro n i c ail ments are d i scovered, parents or gu ardians w i l l be notified. The U n i versity c a n n o t assume f u r t h e r responsi b il i ty. The U n i versity does not p rovide for extended medical care by the U n i versity doctors o r exami nation o r treatment by spec i a l i sts. Every assistance wi ll be g i ven, however, i n making arrangements for special medical o r s u rgical care; when p ractical, t h e student i s urged to avail h i m self of the services of h i s fam i ly doctor. A l l new students and retu rning students or full-time g raduate students, c a rrying at least 2V2 c o u rses, who have not been i n attendance at this i nstitution for one year or more are re qui red t o have a com plete physical exa m i n at i o n by their home physician as a part of the adm ission req u i rement. (See Ad mi ssi o n . ) This examina­ tion report is kept by the Health Service and is ava i l a b l e for ready reference by the U n i ve r s i ty do cto r and n u rse. The gene ral fee, which i s req u i red of all students registered for 2 V2 cou rses or more, i n c l udes t reatment at the Health Center for m i n o r d i s o rders and i n cl udes l i m i ted accident i n s u rance coverage. The I n suror's liabi l i ty l i m i ts and benefits are set forth i n a b roc h u re explai n i ng t h e plan and is avai l a b l e on request or at t h e t i m e of registrat i o n . A l l athletes participating in rec o g nized i n tercollegi ate spo rts are also afforded accident i nsurance cove rage u p to $5,000 for i nj u ries susta i n e d , whether i n j u ry occurs d u ri n g p ractice o r du ring com peti t i o n . Students parti c i p ating in extramural a t h l e t i c act i v i t i es are req u i red to p u rchase t h e Stude n ts Sickness and Accident Optional Plan or furnish p roof of e q u i valent coverage. HEALTH I N S U RANCE. In addition to the accident in su rance described above, the U n i versity offers a vol untary Accident and Sickness Med i cal Expense Plan. The p u rchase o f t h i s plan extends the "on campus" accident coverage to a twenty­ four hour, twelve-month plan and in a d d i t i o n provides benefits for sickne ss. Par­ t i ci p ation i n this low cost plan i s volu ntary and av ai lable d u r i n g registration only. A broc h u re which outl ines t h e benefits o f the prog ram is sent to new students before reg istrati o n . Copi es are avai lable by wri t i ng to the Office of the Vi ce­ President - Busi ness and Finance. COUNSELING AND TESTING CENTER

The general pu rpose of the Counse l i n g Center is to assist stude nts i n coping with the normal deve l o p m e n ta l problems en countered by most col lege stude nts i n an i n creasi ngly c o n fusi ng, complex and c h a n g i n g world. Stude n ts typically see counse l o rs in making decisions related to adjustme nts to the Un ivers i ty, to thei r educati onal p l a n s and to other people. CAREER P LA N N I N G . Most students are understandably uncertai n of thei r asp i r­ ations and goals, and may benefit from an exploratory period plus the opportun ity


to engage in a p r ocess of realistic self-appraisal with a neutral party. Resou rces for career c o u n se l i n g i n clude tests o f vocational i n terests, acad e m i c aptitudes, pe rs o n a lity and a file of occupati o n a l i n formation. E D U CATIONAL ADJ U STM ENT. The c h ange from high school to the various demands of the U n ive rsity is sometimes a b r u pt and d i ff i c u l t to make. Counseling can assist students to i m p rove study habits, adjust cou rse loads, a n d overcome fears of tests. i n stru ctors and competition with other students. PERSONAL C O U N S E L I N G . From time to t i m e , students experience more per足 sonal con cerns and emotional confli cts w h i c h i n terfere with t h e i r academic and social responsibiHties. I n d ividual or s m a l l g ro u p counseling can h e l p the student understand these and to learn new ways in h a n d l i n g them m o re effectively. TEST I N G . The Cente r has a s u p p l y of various tests from w h i c h the student may ch oose in assisting with h i s educat i o n a l and vocati o n a l p l a n n i n g . In a d d i t i o n , the Center se rves as a n a tional testing center for several tests which are frequently requi red for graduate study, and carries i n formation regard ing tests for p rofes足 s i o n a l study. VETERANS AFFAIRS

The U n i ve rs i ty is ap proved by the Veterans Ad m i n i stration as an i n stitution of h i g h e r e j ucation for vete rans and i n vites vete rans to use its fac i l i ties in acqu i ri n g a n d c o m p l e t i n g thei r ed ucati o n . Forms are a va i l a b l e i n t h e Registrar's Office. Students, in c l u d i n g any n e w transfe r students, who will come under P u b l i c Law 634 (Orphans B i l l ) or the Veterans Readj ustment Benefit Act of 1 96 6 (New GI B i l l ) , must contact t h e Veterans Admin istration Heg ional Office fi rst for a certificate of e l i g i b i l i ty and be gu ided by them thereafter. T h i s s h o u l d be d o n e as soon as pos足 s i b l e after acceptance by the U n i versity and before arrival on campus. D u ring reg istration a l l reci pie nts o f aid th rough the Veterans Administration should fill out the questi o n n a i re p rovided b y the Registrar. I n orde r to o b ta i n fu l l s u bsistence, u n d ergraduate vete rans and e l i g i b le orphans of veterans must c a r ry th ree courses. G radu ate veterans s h o u l d consult the Regi strar concerning load for f u l l subsistence, as t h i s may vary. Orphans must ca rry a t least one and one-half cou rses to c l a i m s u bsistence. For i n fo rmati on regarding e val uation of cred i ts, see U n accredited E d u cational Experiences i n Admissions area of catalog. CHAPEL AND CONVOCATION RESPONSIBILITIES

C h a pe l servi ces have long been considered a vital part of the re l i g i ous l i fe and experience of the students and facu lty a t P a c i f i c L u t h e ran U n i versity. Atten d a n ce is on a vol u n tary basis. Chapel servi ces are held Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings a t 9 :50 a.m. There i s a convocation on Thursdays at the same t i m e and occasionally on Tuesdays. FOOD SERVICE

The students l i v i n g i n resi d e n c e h a l l s are requi red to take thei r meals i n o n e of the d i n i n g h a l l s l o c ated on campus. The fee established for food se rvice is based on the fact that not all students eat a l l m e a l s ; therefore, no deductions a re made for students who eat fewer t h a n t h ree meals p e r day at the U n i ve rsity, o r who are absent on wee kends. A c harge i s made for g u ests. Students room i n g off campus may board at the U n i versity cafeterias on a semester basis.


BOOKSTORE The U n i versity m a i n t a i n s a book store in

the U n i versity Center fo r the con­

veni ence o f students. The store, operated on a strictly cash basis, se l l s books, stationery, school supplies and a w i d e variety of notions.

PLACEMENT SERVICE The U n i ve rsity m a i n t ai n s placement services t h r o u g h the School of Education for those see k i n g teac h i n g posi tions, a n d a general p l acement office located in the U n i ve rsity Center. A fee of $10 i s made to cover the cost of c re d e n t i a l s , a n d / o r o t h e r records and correspondence d o n e spec i f i c a l ly t o a i d students. T h e r e i s n o c h a rge f o r m a k i n g appointments fo r i n terviews w i t h c o m panies i f t h i s i s the o n l y service prov i d e d . A n effort i s m a d e t o place a l l g raduates, but positions a re n o t g u a ranteed. T h e p lacement service w i l l update a n d renew credentials u p o n request. The fee for this i s $5. G raduates s h o u l d a l so c o n s u l t with t h e i r respective major professors and deans i n order to obtain a d d i t i onal help i n atta i n i n g positions.

STU DENT EM PLOYMENT The U niversity a i m s to assist worthy a n d needy students by h e l p i n g t h e m to fi n d employment. See F i n an c i a l Aids secti o n (page 23) for detai ls.

STUDENT GOVERNM ENT Students at P a c i f i c Lutheran U n i versity have an elected student gove r n m e n t kn own a s the Associated S t u d e n t s Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. ASPLU deals w i t h c o n c e r n s of s t u d e n t s , parti c i pates i n general U n i versity gove r n m e n t and acade m i c p o l i c y m a k i n g and sponsors a w i d e range of activities, enterta i n ment events and d i scussion programs.

STU DENT ACTIVITIES In a d d i t i o n to stressi n g successful acad e m i c performance, the U n i versity c h a l ­ len ges its students to p r o f i t by experience i n extrac u rr i c u l a r activities . H e re a l so the student develops h i s leaders h i p s k i l l s a n d l e a rn s how to work we l l w i t h h i s n e i g h bor. Students s h o u l d not permit t h i s type of activity t o i n terfere w i t h th e i r reg u l a r acade m i c p u rsuits. A L I ST I N G O F STUDENT ACT I V I T I ES FOLLOWS :

General ASPLU SOCIAL ACTIVITIES BOARD-coordinator of all activities. ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS-all f u l l -ti m e women students. GAVEL CLUB-affiliate of national c l u b . INTERNAT I O N A L STUDENT ORGAN I ZATION-for students from foreign c o u n ­ t r i e s and i n te rested A m e r i c a n students. MEN'S

HOUSE

PRESI D ENTS'

C O U N C I L-House

Presidents

of

Men's

Resi-

dence Hal ls. N O R S K-for students i n terested in N o rway. OFF CAMPUS STUDENTS-all students not l i v i n g in residence h a l l s . PROPELLER C L U B -for students i n t e rested i n m a r i t i me affairs . STU D ENT D E M O C RAT I C COALITION�for those conce rned w i t h soci a l i ssues.


STUDENT INTERNATIONAL M E D I TATION SOCI ETY-to help students develop creative i n telligence t o i ts max i mum. STU DENTS FOR BLACK P R O G R ESS-all st udents in terested i n re in forc i n g blac k conscio usness. Y O UNG DEM OCRATS, COLLEGE R E P U B LICANS, Y O UNG A M E R I CANS F O R FREEDOM-for those i nterested i n p o l itical educat i o n a n d part i san activit ies. Honorary and Service

ALPHA KAPPA PSI-national professional busin ess frat e rn i ty. ALPHA PHI OM EGA-nat i o n a l service frat e rn i ty for university men interested in Boy Scout s of America. ARETE SOCI ETY-an acad e m i c h::>nor society recog n i z i n g excellent scholarsh i p and interest i n the l i beral arts. BLUE KEY-National j u n ior and sen i o r men's service honorary. INDEPEN D ENT KN I G HTS-service honorary for sophomore m e n . P H I GAMMA M U -soci al science honorary. S P U RS-nati o n al service honorary for s o p h o m o re women. TASSELS-local honorary for senior women. USSAC-U n i ve rsity Student Social Act i o n C o m m ittee. Athletic

PAC I F I C NORTHWEST INTERCOLLEG IATE ATHLETIC CON F E R EN CE-area organ ization for i nt e rc o l l e g i ate ath leti c s . G I R LS' R O W I N G CLU B-crew rac i n g . JAMAIAKINS- h i k i n g c l u b . LETTERMEN'S CLU B-so c i al organ i zation f o r men w h o have w o n letters i n o n e or more maj o r sport s . L UTE VA RSITY ROWING CLU B-for m a l e students interested i n crew rac i n g . M EN ' S INTRA MU RALS-for students wi shing t o part i c i pate in l i mited b u t n o t int e rcol legiate sport s acti vities . S C U B A C LUB-fo r students i n terested i n scuba div i n g . SEASPR ITES-a c l u b for t h ose i nterested i n aquatic art. SKI CL U B -for students i nt erested i n in d ividual or com pet i tive s k ii n g . Departmental

A M E R I CAN C H E M I C AL SOCI ETY STU D ENT A F F ILIATE CHAPTER ART STUDENTS G U I LD D ELTA I OTA CH I-for nu rsing students. F R EN C H , GERMAN, N O RWEG IAN, SPAN I SH CLU B S MARKETING CLUB MATH EMAT I C S C L U B P H I CHI TH ETA-a national fraternity for women m aj o r i n g in busi ness. PHYSI CAL EDUCAT I ON CLU B P$YCH OLOGY, SOCIOLOGY AND H I STORY CL U B S STU D ENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION ( R h o Lambda Chi)-Iocal ch apt e r of St u 足 dent National Educat i o n Association. Musical

C H O I R OF T H E WEST-a cappe l l a choir i n terested especially i n sacred chora l music.


MU P H I E P S I LON-local chapter of Nati o n a l M u s i c Sorority. ORGAN G U I LD-stu dent chapter o f American G U' i l d o f O rg a n i s ts . T H E A M BASSA D O R Q U A RTET -a q u a rtet from t h e m u s i c department. SAGA S I N G E RS-a t r i o from t h e music department. T H E MAD R I G A L S I N G ERS-an organization o f trained voi ces s i n g i n g both sac red and sec u l a r m u s i c . U N I V E R S I TY C HO RA L E-s i n g e rs i nt e rested i n s a c red c h o r a l m u s i c a n d o ra t o r i o . U N I V E R S I TY CON C E RT BAN D-a pe rfo rm i n g concert o rg a n i zati o n . Various m e m bers of t h i s g r o u p also parti c i pate i n t h e Pep Band which pe rforms a t a t h l e t i c c o n tests. U N I V E R S I TY O R C H ESTRA-for i n s t r u m e n ta l i s ts w h o a re i n te rested i n o rc h estral performance. Religious R E L I G I O U S L I F E COU N C I L-an organization c o m posed of stude nts, fac u l ty , and a d m i n istration w h i c h coord i n ates the v a ried aspects o f re l i g i ous l i fe on t h e campus. STUDENT C O N G R EGAT I ON-an organization to p ro m o te C h ristian L i fe a n d to t ra i n the students for i n formed and active leaders h i p in t h e c h u rc h . CALL-Co l l ege Affi l i ated Layme n ' s Leag ue f o r C h ri st i a n ou treac h . K O I N O N IA-students i n t e rested i n c h u rc h vocati o n s . Communication Arts ALPHA PSI O M EGA-nati o n a l h o n o rary d ra m a t i c frate r n i ty. C U RTA I N CALL CLUB-all students i n te rested i n a l l p h ases o f perfo rm i n g t h eater. F O R E N S I C SQUADS-local o rg a n i z a t i o n for area a n d n a t i o n a l c o m p e t i t i o n i n debate and i n d i v i d u a l speaking even ts. ASPLU S H O RTS, STU D ENT TA LENT P R O D U C T I O N S-wee k l y prog rams p re足 s e n ted over K P L U-TV ( c l osed c i rc u i t television) for U n i ve rs i ty c o m :n u n i ty i n formation a n d e n terta i n m e n t . Open to p a rt i ci pation by a l l students. K P L U - F M - U n i versity owned rad i o b roadcasti ng stat i o n . P a r t i c i pation o pen to all students . P H I B ETA- n a t i o n a l frate r n i ty for j u n i o r a n d sen i o r wom e n . P I KAPPA D ELTA-n a t i o n a l h o n o rmy forensic frate r n i ty . Student Publications M O O R I N G MAST-wee k l y student newspaper. SAGA- U n ivers i ty yearbook. AUTOMOBILES AND OTHER VEHICLES

A l l who use an automobi l e o r o t h e r m otor ve h i c l e w h i l e attend i n g the U n i versity m u s t reg ister in t h e S e c u r i ty Office, a n d p u rc h ase a p e r m i t w h i c h is to be p l aced o n t h e ve h i c l e as d i rected. Parking space is extremely l i m i ted a n d reg u l ations govern i n g parki n g , as we l l as o t h e r m atters, are s t r i c t l y enforced. SCHEDULING

A l l s o c i a l and u n i versity activi ties a r ranged by d e p a rt m e n ts, c a m p u s c l ubs, or g ro u ps o f students m u s t be s c hedu l ed t h ro u g h the U n i versity Center office.


Approved c h a perones are req u i red for a l l scheduled activities h e l d e i t h e r on o r off campus . The sche d u l i n g o f acti vities by students i s the j o i n t respon s i b i l i ty of the U n i ve rsity Center D i recto r and the Social Activities Board , PLACE OF RESI DENCE

Pacific L u t h e ra n is a residential u n i versi ty. A student n o t l i v i n g at h o m e with his p a rents, g u a rdian o r spouse is req u i red to l i ve i n a reside nce hall o n c a m p u s u n l ess h e i s at l e a s t 2 2 years o f age. Each n e w and re-ente ring student m u s t f i l l o u t t h e Student Perso n n e l F o r m a n d t h e I n formation a n d H o u s i n g A p p l i cation card received from the Office of Adm issions. A retu r n i n g student, o n e w h o conti n u es without i n te rr u p t i o n , a p p l ies for the next acade m i c year by paying the $75 deposit on tuition a n d by f i l l i ng o u t the a p p l i c ation card, I f he p l a n s to l i ve i n a res i d e nce hall h e w i l l be given a Residence H a l l Contract and Agree ment form . ROOM RESERVATIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Application for a residence h a l l room by the new o r re-e nteri ng s t u d e n t is made on the I n fo rmation and H o u s i n g A p p l i c ation card afte r a d m i s s i o n to t h e U n i versity has b e e n confi r m e d . P ri ority for c h o i ce o f h a l l is dete r m i n ed by the date t h e Student Perso n n e l Form and the a p p l i cation c a rd are rece ive d , and by the avai l a b i l i ty of space. After the middle of the s p ri n g semeste r, on days that will be designated, stu足 dents currently e n ro l l e d may apply for resi dence hall a c c o m m o d ations for the next academ i c year. P r i o rity will be g i ve n to th ose who apply at that time a n d accord i n g t o t h e avai l a b i l i ty o f s p a c e . Afte r t h at date, a l l r o o m reservations, i n c lud足 i n g those o f new stude nts, will be assigned i n t h e order of rec e i p t o f a p p l i cati o n . T h e r o o m reservation w i l l be cancelled a u to m a t i c a l l y i f a student h a s not a r r i ved by t h e day c l asses beg i n for that semester. All room ch anges must be app roved b y the O ffice of Student Affa i rs. H o u s i n g assignmen ts do n o t continue a u to m atically from year t o year; rath e r , re-a p p l i c ation is necessary each year. T h e U n i ve rsity reserves t h e ri g h t to c h ange a student's lo cation or to c l ose a h o u s i n g unit when ever necessary. RESIDENCE HALLS

The U n i versity m a i n t a i n s reside n ce h a l l s for students, over w h i c h the Office of Student Affa i rs has general su p e rvi s i o n , A l l students assigned rooms in any of the resi d e n ce h a l l s are req u i red to continue re side nce in a hall for the acad e m i c year. T h e residence h a l l s open on Sun day o f Orientation W e e k , and c l ose at 9 :00 a , m . the day following the l ast schedu led exam i n at i o n . Students are not a l l owed i n the h a l l s in advance of the o pen i n g date, except by advance a rrangements and payment o f a special fee. Ret u r n i n g students s h o u l d not ret u rn to the c a m p u s u n ti l the day they are to reg i ster, u n less they are asked to come early. The residence h a l l s have d o u b l e and triple rooms with a l i m ited n u m b e r of s i n g l e roo ms. All rooms are p rovide d with s i n g le beds, chests o f drawers, study desks, desk l a m ps, and c h a i rs. The beds a re 80"x36" in s i ze in Foss, Pflueger and T i n g e l stad Halls, and a re 74"x36" i n a l l other halls. Students furnish perso n a l i t e m s i n c l u d i n g sheets, p i l low cases, p i l l ows, b l a n kets and towe ls. Draperies are


p rovided in a l l d o r m i to ries except H a rstad, w h i c h has venetian b l i nds. Bedsp reads w i l l be furnished u po n request by the student t o his head resident. Optional e l e c t r i cal i t e m s s u p p l i e d by the student m ay i n c l u d e radios, record players, c l oc ks, typewriters, read i n g lamps, h a i r d ryers, sh avers, c l i ppers and heat i n g pads. I rons may be stored i n the rooms b u t must be used o n l y i n the i ro n i n g room. Items which are not a l l owed and may not be kept at school are : su n lamps, e l e c t r i c b l an ke t s , hot plates, e l e c t r i c h e a te rs and pe rson a l i ro n i n g b o a r d s . Any other electri cal items must have the app roval o f t h e Office of Student Affai rs. O c c u pa n ts are h e l d resp o n s i b l e for d amage to the rooms o r t h e i r f u r n i s h i ngs. Cost of damages o r cleaning beyond the n o r m a l wear to res i d e n c e halls, u n l ess such damage has been i d e n t i fi ed with an i n d i v i d u a l , wi l l be c h arged on a prorated basis among the o c c u pa n ts w i t h i n the h a l l . The rooms are s u bj e c t to inspection by re p rese n tati ves of the Office of Stu d e n t Affai rs. A f i n a l i n spection of each room must be made before a student may leave at the end of a semester o r at any t i m e that he w i t h d raws from the U n i v e rs i ty. F i n a l checkout f rom a residence h a l l i s c o m p l e te o n l y with t h i s i n spection and a f t e r t h e key has b e e n tu rned i n . I f t h e re has been any damage for w h i c h the student is responsi b l e , an assess m e n t w i l l b e made a n d t h e student w i l l b e cha rged t h i s a m o u n t .

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STU DENTS

T h e U n i versity m a i n ta i n s twenty-six apartments on c a m p u s for m a r ri ed studen ts. F o u r o f them are th ree-bed room u n i ts, the remai n d e r two-bed room u n i ts. Each is partially f u rn i s h ed with an e l e c t r i c stove and a heater. A p p l i c ations for fa m i l y apartments s h o u l d be made t h ro u g h the H o u s i n g Offi ce. A S40.00 deposit m u st accompany the a p p l i ca t i o n . T h ese a p p l ications are processed according to t h e d a t e t h e y are received .


Summer Session The S u m m e r Session consi sts of two f o u r and one-half week terms and beg i n s i n the m i d d l e of J u ne. T h e c o u rses c a r r y reg u l a r c o l lege c redit and are of the same standard as Ih ose given d u ri n g the regu lar academic year. The curri c u l u m is desi g n ed for u n d e rg radua les working toward a baccalau reate degree, g raduates working toward a master's deg ree, t eachers see k i n g cred e n t i a l s , school a d m i n istrators see king special c o u rses, freshmen desi ring to in itia te college study, and o t h e rs d e s i r i n g special s t u d i es offered by the schools and departm ents o f the U n i v e rs i ty . Transient students w h o e n ro l l f o r t h e s u m m e r session need o n l y t o s u b m i t a letter o f academic stan d i n g o r gi ve o t h e r evidence of being prepared f o r c o l l eg e study. A comp lete catalog for the s u m m e r sess i o n i s pri nted each spring. Write to the Dean o f the Summer Sess i o n for this p u b l i c a l i o n and o t h e r i n fo rm a t i o n desi re d .

Late Afternoon and Even ing Classes To provide for the p r o fessi onal' g rowth and cuttural e n r i c h m e n t of p e rsons unable to take a reg u l ar, f u l l-time c o l l ege c o u rse, t h e U n i v e rs i ty c o n d u cts a pro足 gram of late afternoon and eve n i n g classes. These c o u rses are gi ven o n campus o r i n a p prop riate off-ca m p u s fa c i l ities. A wide variety of courses i s offered i n the arts and scie nces and i n p rofes足 s i o n a l and graduate s t u d i e s. There a re specialized c o u rses for teachers and school ad m i n i s trators, and for persons i n b u s i n ess and i n d ustry. The cou rses are o f the same cali ber as th ose offered d u ring the reg u l a r sessi o n and are open t o a l l wh o a re e l i g i b l e to take c o l l eg e w o r k , as we ll as th ose w h o are not e l i g i b l e f o r regu l a r a d m i s s i o n b u t wh o w i s h t o take a c o u rse a s a n o n -deg ree student. A special b u l l e t i n is printe d each semeste r o u t l i n i n g the offerings, a n d i s avail足 able from T h e Registrar o f the U n i ve rsity.


Academic Procedu res REGISTRATION

In consultation with thei r faculty advise rs students w h ose a p p l ications f o r ad m ission h a v e been a p p roved are offered t h e o p p o r tu n i ty to reg ister by m a i I . O t h e r students m ust register On t h e days designated o n t h e sc h o o l c a l e n d a r as p r i n ted o n page seven o f t h i s catalog. Students who register afte r t h e d ays desi g n ated will be c h a rged a l a te registra足 tion fee . (See section o n F i n a n ce.) Students c u rrently i n attendance a t the U n i 足 versity s h o u l d reg i st e r i n advance o f e a c h n e w semester. In the s p r i n g semester, students w h o w i sh to ret u rn for t h e f o l l o w i n g academ i c year must pre-register b y m a k i n g a $75.00 deposit o n t u i t i o n . P r i o r i ty i n room ass i g n m e n ts a n d c i l o i c 8 o f c l ass offe r i n g s w i l l be given to stude n ts w h o pre足 reg i ster d u ri n g desig nated days w h i c h are a n n o u n ce d . Students who pre-register afte r the designated days wi l l b e accepted accord i n g to t h e space avai l a b le in residence halls a n d c l asses. A student is not offi c i a l l y e n ro l l e d u n t i l his registration has been c l eared by the Busi ness Office and h i s P l ace of Res i d e n c e form has been received b y the Office of Student Affairs.

ADVANCED PLACEMENTS

See page ( 1 8)

CREDIT BY EXAM INATION

Students are permi tte d , w i th i n l i m i ts, to sec u re c red i t by exam i n a t i o n in l i e u o f reg u l a r e n ro l l m e n t a n d c l ass attendance. The m ax i m u m a m o u n t o f cred i t w h i c h may be e a r n e d i n t h i s w a y a n d a p p l ied toward a b a c h e l o r's deg ree wi l l be deter足 m i ned by t h e provost in i n d i v i d u a l cases. T h e c h arge for a n e xa m i n at i o n for c red i t earned in t h i s m a n n e r i s 575.00 p e r c o u rse. A r rangements f o r such e xa m i n ati ons m ust be made by t h e s t u d e n t with t h e d e p a rt m e n t c h a i rman o r school dean o r d i rector and a p p roved by the office of t h e provost. Evidence of this a p p roval a n d o f the payment o f the fee s h o u l d be presented by the student to t h e professor w h o will ad m i n i ster the e xa m i n a t i o n . C re d i t by exa m i n a t i o n is open to fo rmal l y a d m i tted , reg u l a r status students o n l y .

COURSE LOAD The n o rmal c o u rse load f o r f u l l-time students is 3 V4 to 4 V4 c o u rses per semester i nc l u d i n g physical education activity. A n o rm a l stu d e n t load d u ri n g the I n teri m

is o n e c o u rse w i th a m axi m u m of 1 V. cou rses i n c l u d i n g p hysical education acti v i ty. The m i n i m u m l oad for a f u l l -t i m e student i s 2 V2 c o u rses. O n l y a student w i th a B (3.0) average or better may register for m o re than 4 V4 c o u rses p e r semester w i t h o u t t h e consent of the office of the p rovost. A student en gaged in much outside work for se l f-su p p o r t may be restricted to a red u ced academic load.


COURSE N U M BERING

C o u rses open to fres h m a n and s o p h o m ores a re n u m bered 1 0 1 -299 a n d are considered

lower d ivision

subjects. C o u rses open

to j u n iors

and sen i o rs are

n u m bered 300-499 and are regarded as upper d i v i sion s ubj e cts . Courses n u m bered

500 or above a re norma l ly o pe n to g ra d u ate students o n l y. U p p e r d i v i s i o n students may be e n ro l l e d i n a 500-level c o u rse i f , a t the time of reg i strat i o n , they provide wri tten permission from t h e c h a i r m a n , d i rector o r dean o f the acad e m i c u n i t that offers the c o u rse. I t is u n d e rstood that any s t u d e n t g i ven s u c h permission wi l l have met all ass umed o r s p ec i f i c a l l y i n d i cated p rerequisites and w i l l have a n above-average academ i c record. C o u rses n u m b e red i n t h e 300's and 400's are o p e n both to g ra d u ates a n d u p p e r d i vision u n d e rg ra d u ates. Such cou rses may be a part o f the g rad uate p rogram p rovided they are n o t sp ec ifi c req u i re m e n ts i n p reparation for g raduate study. Upon t h e a p p roval o f his adviser and with the consent of the i n structor, a lower d i v ision student may be assi g n ed to a n upper d i vi s i o n cou rse i f the prerequisites have been met. In such cases cou rses successfully completed may be counted toward the u n i versity upper d i vi s i o n cred i t req u i rements.

INFORMAL STUDY To promote a n d e n c o u rage l i be ra l learn i n g o f all k i n d s , over a n d beyond e n r o l l 足 m e n t i n c o u rses lead i n g toward f o r m a l deg rees, P a c i f i c L u t h e ra n U n i ve rs i ty offers a variety of o p p o r t u n i ties for i n forma l' study. Among these a re : Guest of the University Status

Teac h e rs and offi c i a l s o f other i n stitutions o f learn i n g , v i si t i n g s c h o l a rs and a rtists, and other p rofess i o n a l persons who wish to use the fac i l i ti e s o f the U n i 足 versity for i n de p e n d e n t study may a p p l y to the office of t h e p rovost for ca rds designating them as G u e sts of the U n i v e rs ity . I t is u n d e rstood that such persons, in t h e i r use o f U n i verSity fac i l i ties, w i l l defer to the needs o f students and fac足 ulty members.

Auditing of Courses

To a u d i t a c o u rse is to e n r o l l t h e re i n , with the permission of t h e i n structor, o n non-c re d i t b a s i s . T l h e a u d i to r i s expected to a t t e n d reg u l a rly, a n d i s e n c o u raged to parti c i pate fu l l y in c l ass activi ties. He i s not h e l d a c c o u n t a b l e for exam i n ations o r o t h e r w r i tten work, b u t is welcome to submit such fo r e v a l u ati o n . He does not receive a g rade, n o r may t h e c o u rse be counted toward any deg ree req u i rement, b u t i f t h e i n structor app roves at t h e e n d o f t h e course, i t may be e n t e red u p o n the transc ript as an "Audit." A student m ay, w i t h the a p proval of the i n structor o r the department, gain c re d i t for an audi ted c o u rse wh i c h he h as not p r ev iously taken for c re d i t, by passi n g a n exam i n a t i o n set by the i n structor o r department. The fee for s u c h exami na t i on i s the d i fference between the a u d i t i n g fee and the tuition the student wou ld normally pay for the c o urse . a

Visiting Classes Mem b e rs of t h e acade m i c c o m m u n i ty are e n c o u raged to v i s i t c l asses and other i n structional activities of t h e U n ivers i ty which i n terest t h e m , b u t i n which they are not offi c i a l ly e n ro l l e d , for wh ateve r length o f t i m e they desi re. Such v i s i t i n g is parti c u l a r l y reco m m ended a s a way to e x p l o r e fields with w h i c h the v i s i t o r is


u n fa m i l iar, b u t w h i c h he may want to study for credit at a later date. No fee i s charged f o r t h i s pr ivi lege-nor i s any cre d i t g i v e n , since the pu rpose is t h e e n c o u r足 agement of l e a r n i n g for its own sake. Because regularly e n r ol led students must be g i ven f i rst c o n s i d e rati o n , however, persons d e s i r i n g to visit c l asses or othe r activities are required to ask permission of the i n s tructor i n ch arge. Visitors are g u ests of the cl asses they attend, and wi l l of course c o n d u ct themselves accord足 ingly at all ti mes. Members o f the academic c o m m u n ity are defined as students, a u d i to rs, fac ul ty and staff perso n n e l , regents, a l u m n i , guests of the U n i versity, and spouses and mature c h i l d ren of these persons. Graduate Students

G raduate students who wish to a u d i t a cou rse which has al ready been taken for credit at PLU may do so with the permission o f the Dean of G raduate Studies. The fee for auditing is $30.00 per c o u rse. CHANGES IN REG I STRATION

Changes in registration due to confl i cts or errors i n registration may be made without charge d u ri n g the first week of the semester. To withdraw from a c l ass and/or add a c l ass, the following ,procedure is to be f o l l owed : 1)

Obtain the change of reg istration form from the registrar.

2)

Obtai n the necessary sig natures and, i f applicable, a withd rawal grade.

3)

If after the f i rst wee k , pay the $5.00 change of reg i stration fee at the b u s i n ess office.

4)

Return the c h a n g e o f reg i s t ration form to the reg istrar.

T h e stUdent is responsibl e for completing the above steps within o n e week after obtai n i n g the change card . Students withd rawi ng officially from a c lass after t h e fou rth week of a semeste r w i l l rece ive a WP (withd rawal with pass i n g ) , a WF (withd rawal with fai l u re), or a WM (medical withd rawal). N o n e of these grades wi l l be used in calculating grade point average, but will appear on the semeste r g rade report and be i n c l u ded in review of academic status. The grade 01 W will rep/ace WP, WF, and WM on the transcript.

An unofficial withd rawal from a cou rse will be recorded as E. No student may withd raw d u ri n g final examination week. Certain General U n i versity Req u i re m e n ts m u st be completed by specified t i m e s d u ri n g a n y stud ent's degree prog ra m , and with d rawal f r o m cou rses meeting such a req u i rement i s not a l l owed if this would preclude meeting the requi rem e n t on sched u l e . WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY

A student wishing to w i t h d raw from the U n i versity m u st obtai n a withdrawal card i n the office of the reg istrar, com plete a withd rawal questionnaire, and obtain the necessary s i g n at u res on them. T h e stUdent i s entitled to h o norable d i sm issal i f his record of cond uct I S sati sfactory and if he has satisfied all f i n a n c i a l o b l i g ations.


GRADES

The fol lowing t i n a l g rades are used in j u d g i n g the qual i ty of a student ' s work : A-Excellent _ 4 grade poi nts earned p e r c o u rse, cre d i t g i ve n _3 g rade p o i nts earned per c o u rse, credit g i ve n 8-Good C-Average 2 g rade poi nts earned per c o u rse, cre d i t g i ven D-Pass i n g 1 g rade points earned per c o u rse, credit g i ve n 0 g rade poi nts earne d per c o u rse, no credit g i ven E-Fai l u re T h e above course g rades are used in c a l c u l a t i n g g rade point average. Tile cou rse g rades belo w a re n ot used in calcu la ting grade point average. H - H o n o rs (Used for c o u rses u n i q u e t o I nte rim o n ly) n o g rade poi nts earned, c re d i t g i ven P-Passi n g no g rade p o i nts earned, cred i t g i ven F - Fa i l u re _no grade poi nts earned, no c re d i t g i ven I - I n c o m p l ete no grade points earned, no c red i t g i ven I P - I n P ro g ress _ _ no g rade p o i n ts earned , n o credit g i ven _ n o g rade poi nts earned, no c redit g iven AU-Audit 'W F-Wi thdrawal Fai l u re n o g rade p o i n ts earned, no c redit g i ven ' W P-Withdrawal Pass i n g _n o g r ade points earned, no credit given _

____

_

__ _

' wi l l appear as W on perm anent record. INCOMPLETE GRADE

Spec i a l ci rcu m stances m ay warrant the use of the temporary m ark " I " ( I ncom足 pl ete) to i n d i cate that the student i s doing passing work b u t has been u n a b l e to c o m p lete his work because of ci rcumstances beyond his contro l . An I n comp lete Report Form s howi ng cou rse title and the work that must be com pleted is fi led w i th the official g rade sheet for each i n c o m plete g i ven . In o rder to secu re cred i t , the student must convert the i nc o m p l ete i n to a passi ng g rade w i t h i n six weeks o f the following semester of residency, u n less he has received an offi c i a l extension of time from the office of the p rovost. I n no case can a n i n c o m p lete be converted to a passing g rade after a lapse of two yea rs, regardless of res i dency. I n c o m p lete g rades w h i c h are not converted by removal are n o t chan ged to " E" g rades and are not c o m p u ted in to the g rade point average. M EDICAL WITHDRAWAL

In the case of a student rendered i n capable of c o m p l e t i n g a c o u rse for medi cal cause , the offi ce of the provost i s a u t h o rized to i n struct the registrar to enter a "WM" (M edical Withdrawa l ) on t h e transc ript. The " W M " wi ll n o t affect the g rade p o i n t average. IN PROGRESS GRADE

The temporary g rade of " I P " ( I n Progress) m ay be used to s i g n i fy p rogress in a c o u rse in which the work no rmally is expected to take more than one semester for com pletion. The " I P " g rade w i l l carry n o credit until it is repl aced by a permanent g r ade u p o n completion of the work. GRADE POINT AVERAGE

The c u m u l ative g rade p o i n t average i n c l udes all cou rses for w h i c h cre d i t and g rades are given.


REPEATING OF COURSES

Any course may be repeated by an u n d e rg radua te student re gard less of the g rade re ceive d . T h e h i g he r o f the two grades earned w i l l be the g rade used i n com putin g the c u m u l ative g rade p o i n t average, but credit w i l l be allo wed o n l y o n c e toward g radu ati o n . PASS-FAIL OPTION F O R UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

The pass-fa i l option is offered to perm i t u n d e rg raduate students to e x p l o re subject a reas outside those of t h e i r k n own ab i l i ties in their lower d i v i s i o n years, or to add a broader range of c o u rses to thei r u p p e r d i v i s i o n prog ram w i t h o u t bei ng forced to com pete w i t h majors w h o a r e speci a l i z i n g i n t h ose areas of study. 1)

The pass-fail option is l i m i ted to a total o f four courses and to no m o re than two cou rses p e r calendar year.

2)

C o u rses req u i red for g raduation in any deg ree p rog ram of the U n i ve rs i ty wi l l not b e taken o n a pass-fail basis. S i m i l a rly, c o u rses needed i n the student's maj o r f i e l d , except when a f i rst cou rse has been taken prior to d e c l a ration o f a m a j o r , w i l l n ot be taken o n a pass-fail basis.

3)

Pass-fail g rades w i l l n o t alter the g rade p o i n t average, but c redits earned w i l l c o u n t towards g ra d u ati o n .

4)

T h e pass-fail o ption m u s t b e i n dicated on t h e reg istration card by t h e adviser. A cha nge in the decision regard i n g pass-fa i l will be subject to the esta b l i s hed reg u l ations c o n cerning change of reg istration.

5)

Pass-fa i l students w i l l be respon s i b l e for a l l cou rse work and exam in ations. O n l y " P " and " F " g rades will be i ssued a n d recorded o n the transcript.

6)

An entire c o u rse w i l l not be convarted to the pass-fail basis by student vote.

7)

The " P " (Pass) grade will be equivalent to a grade o f A, B , C , or D.

EXCLUSIVE PASS-FAIL COURSES

Departments or schools are a u t horiz ed to offe r cou rses e n t i re l y on a pass-fa i l basis under t h e following cond i t i o n s . 1)

Courses to be tau g h t enti rely on a pass-fa i l b a s i s s h o u l d p u rsue g o a l s p r i ­ m a r i l y conce rned w i t h a p p reciations, value c o m m i tments, c reative achi eve­ ments, or the l i ke, rather than the mastery o f read i l y quant i f i a b l e i n formati o n . Se mi n a r , l a b o ratory, practi c u m , studi o , activity, o r i n terim c o u rses m a y be exam ples of the kinds of cou rses h e re envisioned.

2)

Such departmental and school decisions are to be repo rted to the p rovost for approval. Deci s i o n s to otter excl u s i ve pass-fail c o u rses should be made kn own to students before they register for them.

3)

Excl u s i ve pass-Ia i l cou rses may be used to meet the maj o r or U n i v e rsity re­ q u i reme nts provided they have been approved by the fac u l t y. The taking o f exclusive pass-fai l cou rses s h a l l i n no way affect the student's personal pass­ fail option as described above for u n d e rgradu ate stude nts.

4)

The me a n i n g the " P " (Pass) and "F" ( Fa i l) grades and thei r use i n determ i n ­ i n g g rade p o i n t average w i l l h e r e i n be t h e same a s that s e t forth i n t h e a b ove section, Pass-fa i l option for undergraduate students.


MID-SEMESTER GRADES

W a rn i n g s l i ps are given to any student who is d o i n g " D " or " E " work at the end o f the sixth wee k. ACADEMIC PROBATION

A student i s p l a ced on academic p robation if he fai ls to keep h i s grade p o i n t average (both c u m u l atively a n d for the i m med iately preced i n g semester) at o r above 2 . 0 0 . B o t h the student and h i s p a rents ( i f the student i s u n d e r 2 1 ) will rece ive official n otice o f such action. Acad e m i c p robation is n o t a d i s c i p l i n a ry measure but an attempt to encou rage the student in the direction of i m p roved perfo rmance. The probat i on a ry student may be advised to reduce e i t h e r h i s acade m i c o r extra-c u rricular activities, o r both, u n t i l h i s average s h a l l meet t h e standard s i n d i cated above. Accord i n g to U n iversity policy, a student on probation who fa i l s to earn a c u m u l a t i ve average of 2 . 00 by the end of the next semester of atten dance w i l l no t be a l l owed to re -register. A student who has been d ropped for fai l u re to m ai n t a i n the re q u i re d grade p o i n t average m a y a p p l y for reinstatement t o the Academic Status C o m m i ttee througH the Office o f the Provost. To be considered for rei n 足 statement, a student must secure a faculty member w h o agrees t o sponsor h i m a n d a i d h i m i n estab l i s h i n g a sati sfactory record d u ri ng h i s fi rst s u bsequent semester. This agreement s h a l l be presented i n writing to the comm ittee . Any student d ropp ed from the U n i v e rs i ty may apply for read m i ssion afte r the expi ration of one semester unless i n formed otherwise. ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION IN STUDENT ACTNITIES

1)

Any reg ul arly e n ro l le d , f u l l-time student ( 2 Y2 cou rses) is e l i g i b le for participa 足 t i o n i n U n i versity activiti es. 2) L i mitation of a student's U n i v e rsity activities, based on academic p e rformance, may be set by in d i v i d u a l schools, d e p artments or organi zations. 3) It is the responsi b i l it y of the student o n acad e m i c probation to check with h i s adviser. At t h i s t i m e , a joint, re alistic, careful assessment of t h e student's a b i ii t y to p a rt i C i pate i n activities i s to be made so that the student may reason足 ably l i m i t h i s activities. CLASSIFICATION O F STUDENTS

Students are c l assified as follows: Freshm en: students who have met the entrance req u i rements. Sophomores: students who have completed six cou rses and have earned twelve g rade p o i n ts . Juniors: reg u l a r students who h a v e f u l fi l led lowe r d i vision req u i rements and have com pleted 1 4 cou rses a n d have earned 28 grade poi nts. Seniors: re g u l a r students who have com pleted 22 cou rses and have earne d 44 grade points . FOREIGN STUDY OPPORTUNITIES

The i n te rest in study ab road has r i se n conside rably d u ri n g the last decad e . T h e University rec o g n i zes that mature students can benefit from a well-plan ned a n d arti c u l ated experience i n another a c a d e m i c atm os p h e re. Foreign l a n g u a g e maj o rs i n part i c u l a r are urged to consider the poss i b i l ities of an experience abroad. T h e


U n ivers i ty m a kes ava i l ab l e foreign study opportuni ties t h ro u g h coopera t i ve ar­ rangements with e x i s t i n g p rog rams, and it i s poss i b l e for stud e n ts to pa rti c i p a te in a variety o f fore i g n study o p p o r t u n i ties. B roc h u res and other i n fo rm at i o n on study ab road may be obtained from t h e office o f t h e Foreign Study Ad viser. Stu­ dents c u r re n t l y studying ab road , o r who h ave been ab road in the recent past, are p u rs u i n g studies in G e rm any, Austria, F rance and M e x i c o u n d e r a vari ety of p ro­ g rams, some of w h i c h are t h e G o e t h e- I n stitut, Central Col lege P ro g ra m s in E u r o p e , and Le Frangais en France. As a f i rst step for t h e student contem p l at i n g study abroad, i t i s strongly rec­ om mended that a solid foundation i n the l ang u ag e o f the parti c u l a r coun try be a cq u i re d . The student is cauti oned aga i n s t beg i n n i n g a f o r e i g n s t u d y p rogram w i t h o u t fi rst sec u r i n g a d v a n c e a p p roval, f r o m the U n i ve rs i ty. Attend ance at a fo re i g n u n i ­ versity i n n o w a y waives t h e g raduation requi rements of P a c i f i c Lutheran U n i versity. P r i o r to embarking o n a fo re i g n venture the student s h o u l d file a letter of i n tent with t h e chai rman o f h i s major department and with the provost. T h i s letter should o u t l i ne in broad terms what the student proposes to study, where the studies w i l l be undertaken and the length of time o f the proposed studies, as we l l as how t h i s experience will f i t i nto his own acad e m i c p l a n s . O n the basis of this i n formati on, p l u s a record o f lectu res attended and e x a m i n a t i o n s com­ pleted,

acad e m i c

c red i t will b e a l lowed o n t h e student's tran script, b u t no

g rade p o i n t average will be computed . T h e U n i v e rs i ty reserves t h e ri g h t to req u i re

exami nations cove r i n g t h e materi a l studied ab road , i f It seems d es i rable o r necessary. Upon his re turn from studyi ng a b road, t h e student w i l l , with the assistance of the C h a i r m an of the Foreign Lan g u ag e Dep artment, p re p a re a written req uest f o r academiC c re d i t . If he has p u rsued h i s stud ies i n several acad e m i c areas, he will need t h e a p p roval of each department concerned. HONORS COURSES H o n o rs cou rses are offered by c e rtai n depart m e n ts for stud e n ts acade m i c a b i l i ty. Fres h m e n ran k i n g i n the u p p e r t e n p e r cent o f t h e i r c l asses and m a k i n g an accep tab l e s c o r e o n the c o l l eg e a p t i tu d e t e s t fo r consideration. Registration i n h o n o rs c o u rses is by i n vitation on ly. f o r superior students to do i n dependent study and research in t h e i r i s avai l a b l e d u ring t h e i r junior and sen i o r years.

of superior nigh school are e l i g i b l e O p portu n i ty m a j o r field

THE DEANS' LIST Recog n i tion i s g i ven by the U n iversity to f u l l - t i m e , u n d e rg ra d u ate students who attain h i g h s c h o l as t i c ach ievement. Thei r n a mes are p u b l i shed o n the Deans' List at the end o f each semeste r. To be e l i g i ble a student m u st h ave a g rade p o i n t

average o f 3 . 3 0 o r better for the previ o u s semester. GRADUATION HONORS Deg rees w i th h o n o rs of Cum Laude, M ag n a Cum Laude and S u m m a Cum Laude are granted to students receiving the requi red c u m u lative grade point average. To be e l i g i ble for these honors a student m ust have earned a n average o f 3.30 fo r C u m Laude, 3.60 for Magna Cum Laude, and 3.90 for Summa C u m Laude. Physical Ed ucation activities are not to be i ncluded i n the determ i n i n g of ho n o rs .


Academic O rgan ization The U n iversity i s c o m p rised of these m a j o r i nstructi o n a l u n i t s : t h e College of

S c i e n ces , School o f Busin ess A d m i n istrat i o n , School o f Educati o n , School o f F i n e A rts, School o f N u rsi n g , S c h o o l o f P h ysical Education, a n d D i v i s i o n o f G rad u ate Stud i es .

Arts and

B ACCALAU REATE DEGREE REQ U I REMENTS

T h e re are four d e g ree-com p l et i o n dates (end of fa l l semester, end of i n te r i m , end of s p r i n g semester, a n d end of the second s u m m e r sessi o n ) , b u t d eg rees a re for足 m a l l y con ferred only a t May and A u g u s t Com mencements. State m e n ts o f com p l etion will be i ss u ed u p o n req uest to students w h o q u a l i fy for g raduation a t t h e end o f fall semester a n d i n te r i m . T h e a c t u a l d a t e o f g raduation wi l l be rec o rded on t h e p e r m a n e n t records. A student who i s within one course o f meeting all req u i rements may participate i n May Commencement, provided a s p e c i f i c p l an for e a rn i ng t h e rem a i n i n g c r e d i t w i t h i n t e n w e e k s has b e e n ap proved by t h e p rovost. H i s s t a t u s w i l l be deSi g n a ted on t h e com mence m e n t program, a n d his d i p l o m a w i l l be d ated i n A u g u st. N o later than the second wee k o f the fa l l semester, any student expecting to f u l fi l l degree req u i rem e n ts within the calendar year i s req u i red to f i l e h i s a p p l i cation for g raduation with t h e reg i strar. Students who plan to transfer back to P a c i f i c Lutheran U n i ve r s i ty for a degree (3-2 p rogram o r 3-1 program) m ust apply for g raduation prior to o r d u r i n g the fi rst semester of t h e j u n i o r year so t h a t any d e f i c i e n c i es will be m e t before t h e student leaves c a m p u s . A s t u d e n t may work toward m o re t h an o n e bachelo r's deg ree si m u l tan e o u s l y , and may be awarded both deg rees s i m u l taneously, provided t h a t at least 7 a d d i 足 t i o n a l c o u rses a r e earned for the second degree. T h a t i s , a t o t a l o f 39 a c c e ptabl e c o u rses wou l d need to be earned before the second deg ree c o u l d be award e d . T h i s ass umes satisfactory c o m p l etion o f spec i f i c req u i rem e n ts for each degree. Attendance at commencement exercises is req u i red u n l ess the c a n d i d a te is exc used by t h e provost.

TOTAL REQ U IREMENTS-ALL BACCALAU REATE DEGREES Every student who i s a deg ree cand i d ate must h ave c o m p leted 32 a p p roved c o u rses ( 1 28 semester h o u rs) with a g rade p o i n t average of 2 .00 over-a l l . (School of E d u cation cand id ates m ust p resent a g rade p o i n t average o f 2 .25). 1.

Each c a n d i d ate m ust com plete a m ajor, detai led req u i rements for which are separately s pe c i fied by each s c h o o l a n d e a c h department. A m a j o r s h a l l i n C l u d e a m i n i m u m of s i x c o u rses. At l e a s t t h ree of t h e s e m ust be t a k e n i n the j u n i o r a n d sen i o r years and a m i n i m u m of t w o i n residence o n th i s c a m p u s .

2 . A m i n i m u m o f t e n cou rses (40 h o u rs) must be i n cou rses n u m b e red 300 o r above. 3 . Two cou rses m us t be i n terim c o u rses; at least one o f these m ust be o u tside the m aj o r area o f study. 4.

C a n d i d ates m u s t h ave spent a m i n i m u m of o n e year i n resi d e n c e on t h e campus a n d h ave c o m p l eted a t least seven c o u rses d u ri n g the senior year.


LI MITATIONS-A LL BACCA LAUREATE DEGREES

1.

The max i m u m n u mber of cou rses accepted from a j u n i o r c o l lege is 16 (64 semester h ours ) . No j u n i o r c o l l ege c r e d i t w i l l be accepted after a student has compl eted 1 6 c o u rses (64 h o u rs) from all in sti tutions attended.

2.

Non-music majors may count toward g raduation n o more than two c c u rse u n i ts (8 h o u rs) i n m u s i c ensem b les.

3 . A maxi m u m of six co u rses (24 h o u rs) of correspondenc e an d / o r extension work may be c o u n te d toward t h e deg ree. Any such c o u rses must be approved by the registrar. 4.

N o t m o re than 1 0 c o u rses earned i n o n e department may be appl ied toward t h e bachelo r's deg ree i n t h e College of Arts and Sciences.

BASIC CORE REQUIRE MENTS-ALL BACCALAUREATE DEGREES

1.

English Proficiency

A student may elect to meet the E n g l i s h p roficiency req u i rement in one of th ree ways: (a) by earning a score of 3 or better on the CEEB Advan ced Pl ace足 ment Exami nation in C o m pos i t i o n ; (b) b y e a r n i n g a passing grade in E n g l i s h 1 0 1 o r i ts equ ivalent; o r (c) b y passi n g t h e profi c i e n c y exam in ation ad m i n i stered each semester by the E n g l i s h Department. This exam i n ation tests the student's knowledge of grammar and usage as well as his abi l i ty to c o m m u n i cate effectively in a brief essay. Students entering with a CEEB Verbal s c o re of less than 500 are advised to take Eng l ish 1 0 1 d U ri n g the first semester of the freshman year. Other stud e n ts s h o u l d f u l f i l l the pro f i c i e n c y req u i re m e n t as soon after e n ro l l me n t as poss i b l e , and n o rm a l l y no later than the second semester of t h e sophomore year. A student who h a s n o t m e t t h e req u i rement by the t i m e he a c h i eves sen i o r status must re gi ste r fo r E n g l i s h 1 0 1 . A student who fails the Eng l i s h profi ciency exam i n ation a seco n d time must e n ro l l in E n g l i s h 1 0 1 . 2.

1 c o u rse May be met by a course i n art, m u s i c or c o m m u n i cation arts. Following are cou rses w h i c h do not meet this req u i rement: Fine Arts teac h i n g methods cou rses, CA 1 23, CA 380, and a l l j o u rn a l i sm c o u rses.

3.

_1 c o u rse May be met with a cou rse from these d e partments with the exception of IO n g l i s h 1 0 1 , 318, 400 and 403.

4.

Philosophy

Fine Arts

History and Literature ( i n c l uding foreign l i teratu re)

-- -

-

1 c o u rse

-- __

May be m e t by any c o u rse except Log i c . 5.

2 c o u rses R e l i g i o n 1 03 or 203 s h a l l be taken before the end of the sophom o re year. The second c o u rse may be c h ose n from lower o r up pe r-d ivision offe ri n g s , o r may b e t h e S e n i o r Seminar, a n i n te rd i s c i p l i n a ry offering that w i l l h e l p the student to see the relevance o f r e l i g i o u s issues a n d t h o u g h t to his m aj o r field o f study. Transfer students entering as j u n i o rs o r sen i o rs meet t h i s req u i reme nt with one c o u rse chosen from a l l offe rings in the department. Religion

__

_

__


College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sc ien ces is c o m m i tted to the relevancy of l i b eral ed uca足 tion , education that provides val ues, perspective, a n d preparation for e n c o u n ter with reality and c h ange. Its c ourses serve the central conce r n s o f a l l ed ucati o n a l prog rams o n the c a m p u s. In a d d i t i on to s u p p l y i n g most of the c o u rses that meet the General U n i versity Re q u i remen ts , t h e Co llege offers additional general education o p p o r t u n i tie s and m o re special i zed preparation for service i n many fields of study. The deg rees offered are B a c h e l o r of Arts and Bac h e l o r of Scien ce. Divisions and Departments

To coordinate the work of the C o l lege, i ts Departments are g rouped i n these Divisions: 1 ) D I V I S I O N O F H U M A N I T I ES, comp rised of t h e Departmen ts of E n g l i s h , Foreig n Languages, P h i l osophy, and R e l i g i o n . 2)

D I VI S I O N OF NAT U R A L S C I ENCES, c o m p rised o f the Departme n ts o f B i ology, Chem ist ry, Earth Scien ces, Mathemati cs, and Physics.

3)

D I V I S I O N O F SOC I A L S C I ENCES, comp rised o f the Departm e n ts of E c o n o m i cs , Histo ry, P o l i tical Scien ce, Psycho l ogy, a n d the Department o f Soc io logy, Anthropology and Social Welfare.

General Col/ege of Arts and Sciences Requirements Ail degree can d i d ates in the C o l lege of Arts and Sci ences must meet, in addition to the General University Req u i rements, the req u i rements of O ption I, I I , o r I I I a s desc ri bed below: I ) Four cou rses i n o n e foreign lan guage I I ) Two courses in one foreign lang uage (or two years i n high school a t 3 . 0 0 . See below.) One cou rse i n log i c , mathematics or statistics One course i n history, or one in E n g l i sh or language I I I) One course i n h i story, or one in E n g l ish or l a n g u age One cou rse i n social scien ce, i n cluding geography One course i n natu ra l science O n e c o u rse in logic, mathem atics, or statistics No c o u rse w i l l b e a l l owed to meet both University requirements and C o l lege o f A r t s and Scien ces req u i re m e n ts, and where poss i b l e c o u rses taken t o f u l f i l l req u i rements s h a l l b e i n d i fferent areas. F o r exam ple, a student f u l f i l l i n g h i s U n i 足 vers i ty h i story or l i terature requi rement w i t h a c o u rse i n h i story, mu st, i f h e elects O ption II', c h oose a course i n E n g l i sh o r l an g uage to meet the req u i re m e n t of the C o l lege of Arts and Scienc es. The foreign lang u age re q u i re m e n t i n Opt i on I may be satisfied by c o m p letion o f four years of h i g h school study i n one foreign lang uage. I f the student has less than f o u r years of suc cessful high school work, p l acemen t (and therefore c redit) would be on the basis of exam i n at i o n . A l l i n c o m i n g fresh men p l a n n i ng to c o n t i n u e study o f a foreign language begu n in h i g h school should take the C o l l eg e Board P l acement Test offered d u ring orientation days. T h i s test i s req u i red o f a l l


entering freshmen w h o plan to study German, F re n c h , or Spanish . Any c o n t i n uation of a foreign language should be done i m m e d i ately and not deferred. Students pres e n t i n g 2-3 years of cred i t from h i g h school a n d w i s h i n g to continue i n the same language sh ould register for the second -year course. A student may receive cred i t for any language c o u rse in w h i c h h e is pl aced without regard to h i g h s c h o o l cred i t . F i n a l dec ision of p l acement s h a l l be made by the De partment of Foreign Lang uages taking i n to consi deration placement test scores, h i g h s c h o o l g rades, and other rel evant inlo rmation avai l a b le . A s t u d e n t may not receive cred i t if he volu ntari ly elects to take a lower-level cou rse than the one in which the Department p l aced h i m . Can d i d ates f o r t h e B.A. i n Education w h o w i l l b e maj o r i n g i n E n g l ish are req u i red to f u l f i l l a two-year foreign lang uage req u i re m e n t o r dem onstrate equ i v足 a l e n t proficien cy. The loreign language req u i rement in Option I I may be satisfied by sati sfactory score on a p roficiency e x a m i n a t i o n , o r by m o re than two years o f h i g h school work i n a single la nguage. Two years of work in the l a n g u age wi l l meet the req u i re足 ment if the g rade poi n t average for the total un its in that l a n g uage is 3.00 o r above. Major Requirements

A m a j o r is a sequence of c o u rses i n some one area, usually in one depa rtment. The selection of the maj o r s h o u l d be made by the end of the soph o m o re year. The c h o i ce m ust be approved by the c h a i r man o f the department (or the coord i n ator in the case of an i n terdepartmental program l i ke C l assics). The n u m be r and n a tu re of re qui red c o u rses, i n c l u d i n g any in s u p p o rt i n g subjects, are speci fied in the se ction of this cata log devoted to each department or interdepartmen tal p rogram. The q u a l i ty 01 work must be "C" or better; a cou rse c o m p l eted with a g rade o f "0" may be c o u n ted toward grad uation but n ot toward the m aj o r . The recogni,zed majors are art , b i o l o gy, chemist ry, class ics, c o m m u n i c ation arts, economics, E n g l i s h , F rench, earth scien ces, Germ a n , p h ysical educati o n , h istory, mathematics, m u s i c , p h i l osophy, physics, pol itical s c i e n c e , psychology, re l i g i o n , socio logy, and S p a n i s h . Not more t h a n 1 0 c o u rses earned i n one d e p a r t m e n t may be a p p l i e d toward the bachelo r's degree i n the Col lege.


General Freshman Course Sche dule

Students should study care f u l l y the descriptions of any departmental or inte r­ departmental programs in which they may wish to major. If they find no m o re specific schedule suggestions, or if they have no tentative major preference, for each semester of the i r fre s h m a n year they s h o u l d select courses on the basis of the ge ne ra l guide below. Either before o r i m med i ate ly on arrival o n campus, a freshman s h o u l d meet with h i s advi se r and / o r m a j o r departme nt chai rman to re ce i ve spe c i f i c help in se lection of cou rse s . Health a n d Physical Ed ucation ( P . E . 1 00 s h o u l d b e com­ pleted d u ri n g the f reshman yea r but may be preceded by a 200-level acti v i ties cou rse-any of those n u m be red through 254)

1 / 4 cou rse

Foreign Language , second year cou rse (re c o m me n ded for those who c o u l d continue in the study of a language that they have a l ready successf u l l y studied for two or three ye ars in high schoo l ) or fi rst year cou rse (for those who have had less o r no study o f a fore i g n lan­ gu age in h i g h school but choose to meet either Option I o r 11)

1 cou rse

English C o m position (re c o m me nded if C E E S ve rbal, score is less than 500) (e ithe r semester)

o o r 1 cou rse

_

______

_

______

___ _

_______________ _

Additional suitable lower divi sion cou rses in re l i g i o n , f i n e arts, h istory, l i te rature , s o c i a l or natural scie n ces, or mathe matics. (Whe rever possible i t i s re com­ mended that a re l i g ion cou rse be i n c l uded i n a stu­ de nt's freshman year prog ram.)

x courses To 101a13-1 / 4 c o u rses o r , r a re l y , 4-1 / 4 c o u rses


PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS

Preparation for Engineering

In the b e l i e f that an e n g i neeri ng education s h o u l d i n these rap i d l y c h a n g i n g ti mes be of suffi c i e n t l y f u n d amental n at u re to p e r m i t rapid adaptation to n e w tec h n i cal p ro b l ems and opportuni ties and of suffic i en t l y l i beral nature to p rovide awareness of the b road social responsi b i l i ties i nvolved, t h e Un ivers i ty offers two p rog rams lead i ng to careers i n e n g i neeri n g . One, a f o u r-year p ro g ram, leads to a Bachelor of Science i n Engi neeri ng Physics; the other i s a p re-en g i neering p rog ram for students w h o will transfer to an engineering school. The p ro g ram i n Engineering Physics w i l l prepare students for e m p l oy m e n t after the baccalau reate degree or for g raduate studies in one of many areas of engi neer足 i n g . O pt i o n a l c o u rses at the j u n i o r o r s e n i o r level have been selected to fi l l the needs of students w i t h speci a l i nterest in Electrical Engi nee ring, En g i n ee ri n g Mechan i cs and N u cl'ear Engi neeri n g . A m o re c o m p l ete description o f t h e E n g i n eer足 i ng Physics p rogram is g i ven in the p h ysics section (page 1 85) of the catalog. The p ro g ram for t ransfer stude n ts, referred to as the 3-2 prog ra m , may also lead to a degree from Pacific 'lutheran. Students spend t h ree years o n this campus studying su bject matter basic to a l l e n g i neeri ng fields and then transfer t o the engi neeri n g s c h o o l of thei r c h o ice where thei r studies continue, concentrated in a spec i fi c a rea o f e n g i n e e r i n g . Two additional years of f u l l-time study are n o r m a l l y req u i red to fu lfi l l the req u i rements fo r an engi neering degree. At the end of one year of study at the e n g i n eering s c h o o l , and the com p letion of the equivalent of 32 c o u rses i n c l u d i n g a l l Un iversity and Col lege of Arts and Sciences General Course req u i re men ts, and the fi rst t h ree years o f "core" c o u rses (desc ri bed in physics sec t i o n ) , students are e l i g i b le for the B.A. or B .S. degree from Paci,fic Lutheran U n i ve rsity. Students a re u rged to form u late plans both w i th respect to the e n g i neering sch o o l they p l an to attend and the type of e n g i neer足 ing they w i l l study as early as poss i b l e in o rder that the prog ram at Pacific Lutheran can be coordi nated with the e n g i neering p rogram of the i r choice. Any student who i s ' i nterested i n e n g i nee ring and has been accepted for adm is足 s i o n to the U n i versity may reg ister i n the pre-en g i n ee ri n g c o u rses. To q u a l i fy fo r the 3-2 engineering p rogra m , however, he m ust meet certa i n specific req u i re ments. All pre-engi neeri n g students are screened during thei r s o p h o m o re year by a c o m m i ttee fro m the science facu l ty and o n l y t h ose w h o , by thei r sch o l astic record, character, and person a l i ty, i n d i c ate t h at they are capable of d o i n g satisfactory work i n the e n g i neering field are accepted fo r the 3-2 program. To q u a l ify for the 3-2 p rog ram students s h o u l d maintain a g rade p o i n t average of 2.5 or better. Prospective e n g i neeri n g students who h ave defi c i e n c i es from high school should either (1) make u p s u c h defi c i e n cies i n s u m m e r school before matri c u l at i o n at the U n i versity, or (2) plan to attend s u m m e r s c h o o l after th e i r freshman year, or (3) plan to take m o re than t h ree years to comp lete t h e i r p re-e n g i neering p rogram.


The p rogram for the fi rst two years is the same for a l l branches of engineering. Electives for the t h i rd year m ust be c h osen to meet the req u i rements for the par­ t i c u l a r eng inee r i n g school and the b ranch of enginee r i n g ch osen . Reference s h o u l d also be made to the physics section fo r m o re deta i l s on the e n g i neering p rogram. Suggested p re-e n g i neering p rogram : Freshman year

Eng. G raphics, E n g . 151 Basic Concepts, Phys. 101 Gen. Physics, Phys. 253 Chemistry 115 _ __ _ _ An al. Geometry & C a l c u l us, Math. 151-152Electives _ _ Sophomore year

Course 1/2

_

Junior year

Course

Thermodynamics, Eng. 351 __ .__ 1 Electricity & M a g . , P hys. 331 Advanced Lab., Phys. 321-322 _ 1/2 1 Mechanics, Phys. 336 Electives 4

2 2

Course

General P h ysics, Phys. 254 ___ 1 _ _1/2 Statics, E n g . 231 _ ____ S o l i d Mechanics, E·ng. 232 2 Math. 231-332 C i rc u i ts & Instr u . , P h ys. 272 __ .. 1 2 Electives Preparation for Law Most law schools require at least three years of liberal arts as a foundation fo r professional study; however, they regard four years of study i n l i beral arts and a Bachelor of Arts degree as a better preparation for the study of law. I n addition t o meeti n g t h e degree req u i re ments, the p rospective law stude n t i s advised t o comp lete a t least o n e year o f acco u n t i n g and t o include i n h i s prog ram at least one c o u rse In economics, h i story, p h i l osophy, pol i ti cal science, psychology, sociology, and speec h . The stude n t should plan h i s course according to the req u i rements of the l aw school in which he i s interested. The student interested in law as a vocation is u rged to reg ister at the Pre-Law Center i n the Department of P o l i ti cal Science. Usef u l information, such as material on the Law School Adm ission Test (L SAT) , is ava i l able. There i s a l so a ci rcul ating l i b rary of law school b u l letins. In a d d i t i on , the stude n t may wish to d i sc uss h i s career p lans with D r . Farmer, the pre-law adviser, o r w i t h one of t h e l a w school professors and deans who vi si t from t i m e to time. A newsletter, the Pre-Law Advo­ ca te, circulated by the Center is designed to keep the pre-law student fully informed. The attention of the student contemplating a caree r in law is also cal led to the c o u rse Law and Society w h i ch explores the p l ace of law in Ameri can society. Preparation for Medicine and Dentistry Students desi r i n g to e n te r the medical or dental p rofessions s h o u l d p l an to devote no t less t h an t h ree years and p referably four years of study to secu ring the b road edu cati ona l backg rou n d req u i red. The professional schools in these fields


req u i re a t h o r o u g h preparation in s c i e n ce . They also recom mend extensive study in other areas such as the social sciences and hum a n i ties. Students are asked to confer with the p re-medical advisers i n reg a rd to thei r p ro g rams. Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Curriculum

Freshman and sophomore years: 4' courses per semester B i ology 1 5 1 , 1 52 C h e m i stry 1 1 5 and 1 42 E n g l i s h C o m position Foreign Lang u age" Mathematics 1 33 o r equivale n t , 1 5 1 (and p referably 1 52) Begin University core requirements B i o logy 251 , F u n c t i on a l Morphology; B i o l ogy 252, Deve l o p m e n tal Biology C h e m i stry 331 , 332, 333, 334 or Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 Freshmen are advised to take 3V4 courses their first semester . 'Students who enter the University with two years of a modern language may elect to take a second year course in the same language during their freshman year. They should register for 201, 202.

• •

Junior and senior years: recommended courses listed below should be arranged and sch eduled with the aid of the adviser. B i o l o g y 361 , C o m parative Anatomy B i ology 4 1 1 , H i stology B i ology 4 4 1 , Verte b rate Physio l ogy Chem istry 321 , Quantitative Analysis C h e m istry electives Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology

Students who are p l a n n i n g a career as m e d i c a l technolog ists in hospi tals, physi c i a n 's offices, o r p u b l i c health b u reaus s h o u l d consider earning a bachelor's degree in chem istry or b i o l o gy. A student mu st then com p l ete a twelve-month i n t e rn s h i p in an Ameri can Medical Assoc iation accredited hospital l a b o ratory. U pon comp letion o f this i n te r n s h i p , the student w i l l be e l i g i b l e to take the exa m i n ­ a t i on gi ven by the Board of Regi stry o f M e d i c a l Tec h n o logis ts of t h e American Society of C l i n i c al Path o l ogists for certification as an MT (ASCP) and to receive a second deg ree, the B.S. in Me di cal Tec h n o l ogy. The following cou rses are req u i re d :

115 321 , 331 , 333,

Chemistry' and 1 4 2, General cou rses Q u a n t i tative Analysis 332, O rganic Lecture 334, O rg a n i c Laboratory

Bio logy' 1 5 1 , 1 52, General courses 20 1 , M i cr o b i o l og y 41 1 , Histology Mathematics 1 33, C o l lege Algebra and Trigonom etry

Refer to the particular department for the remaining courses and requirements for a major in the department.


The f o l l o w i n g cou rses are reco m m ended : Chem istry 404, Biochemistry P h ysics 101, 102, General c o u rse

B i o l ogy 331, Genetics 346, Cel l u l a r Phys i o l ogy 441, Vertebrate Phys i o l o g y

Preparation for Parish Work Students desi r i n g to enter parish w o r k a r e e n c o u raged to obtain the broad general edu cati on lead i n g to the Bach e l o r o f Arts degree. Experience reveal s that a parish wo rker i s requested to perform d uties in m o re than one f i e l d . The respo nsi b i l i ties may be centered in o n e or m o re of these majo r areas: t h e educational w o r k o f the c o n g regat i o n , the g u i dance of youth activi ties, h o me v i s i tat i o n , office and sec retarial w o r k, or conducting the m usical o rgani za足 t i o n s in the cong rega t i o n . Students expec t i n g to e n te r c h u rc h vocations are i n v i ted to c o n fe r with the Chai rman o f the Department o f R e l i g i o n . Social Welfare Program

Students p l a n n i ng to p u rsue gradu ate social w o r k study or to see k em ployment i n social work, social welfare o r other related human services u p o n completion o f the baccalau reate degree s h o u l d w o r k o u t their prog ram i n consu l tation with a social wo rker i n t h e Department o f Soc i o l ogy, Anth ro p o l ogy and Social Welfa re . The s o c i a l work sequence is open to any student. The social w o r k seq uence consists o f Social Welfare cou rses 271, 365, 472, 475 and 476. This sequence s h o u l d be p receded by foundation c o u rses i n the h u m ani,ties, natural sciences, and social sciences. This wi l l be f o l l owed by an app ropriate seq uence o f support足 ing cou rses in economi cs, p o l i t i c a l sCien ce, psychology and s o c i o l ogy. Founda足 t i o n c o u rses and supporting c o u rses shou ld be selected i n cons u l tation with a social w o r ke r in the departme n t . C h o ice of foundation and supporting co u rses is based on the g u i d e l i nes p rovided by the C o u n c i l on Social W o r k Educat i o n . Preparation for Theology As a b road c u l t u ral foundation for the study of t h e o l ogy and en trance i n to the m i n i stry, a pre-theo l o g i ca l student s h o u l d c o m p lete the req u i reme nts for a Bac h e l o r o f Arts degree . Besides the general degree req u i rements, the American Associ ati on of Theo l o g i cal Schools recom m ends the followi n g : E n g l i sh-l i te ratu re, compos i t i o n , speech and related studies. At least 6 semesters. History-ancient, modern Eu ropean , and American. At least 3 semesters. P h i losophy-orientation in history, content, and method. At least 3 semesters. Natu ral Scien ces-preferably physi cs, chem istry and b i o l ogy. At least 2 semesters. S o c i a l Sciences-psyc h o logy, soci o l ogy, economics, p o l i tical science and e d u 足 cat i o n . At least 6 semesters, i n c l u d i ng at l e a s t 1 semester o f psyc h o logy. Forei g n Languages-one or m o re o f the fo l l owing l i ng u istic avenues to man's t h o ug h t and t o o l s o f schol arllY research : Lat i n , G reek, Hebrew, German, Fren c h . Students w h o anticipate post-graduate stud ies are u rged to undertake these d isci p l i nes as early in t h e i r t ra i n i n g as opportun ity offers. (At least 4 semesters.)


R e l i g i o n-a thorough kn owledge of the content of the Bible is i n d ispensable, together with an i n troduction to the major rel igious trad i t i o n s and theological problems i n the context o f the pri n c i pal aspects of hUman c u l t u re outli ned above. The p re-seminary student m ay wel l seek counsel of the sem in ary of his ch oice i n order most profitably to use the resources o f h i s col lege. A t least 3 semesters. Of the various poss ible m a j o rs, E n g l i s h , p h i l osophy and h i story are regarded as the most d e s i rable. Other areas are, however, acceptable. P ractical experience m ay be obtained t h rough service as an undergraduate i ntern in a local congregat i o n . A faculty adviser w i l l assist t h e student i n t h e selection o f courses necessary to meet the req u i rements of the theo logical school of h is choice. Please consult the Chai rman of the Department o f Reli g i o n . Urban Affairs Program

Students wishing to prepare themselves for career poss i b i l i ties in state and local gove r n m e n t may wish to e n r o l l in the Urban Affa i rs P ro g ra m . This prog ram admin istered in the Department o f Pol itical Science consists o f an i nterdisc i p l i n a ry concentration of e l even cou rses. For f u rt h e r i n formation refer to t h e desc ription u n der P o l i t i cal Science.

School of Business Administration

The pro fess i o n a l School of Business A d m i n istration provides advice and i n struc­ tion related to b u s i ness careers and m anagement. The program lead i n g to the Bachelor of Business Administration degree i n c l u des concentration opportun ities i n acco unting and systems, finance, m a r keti n g , and perso n n e l and i n du strial man­ agement. The Master of Business Administration p ro g ram i s focused on the devel­ o p m e n t o f tec h n i q ues and p rofessional s k i l l s for general management. Selected courses are offered to students in ot he r fields, especia l l y those majoring in busi­ ness education and the c o m m u n i cations arts, and for g raduate students i n t h e Master o f Arts programs with approved supporting f i e l d i n b usi ness adm i n istrati on. Preparation f o r Business

W h i l e the majority of c o l l ege graduates are e m p loyed eventu a l l y in business or government, a d i versity of preparations may lead to successful careers. I n some cases, no backg round in b us i n e ss is e i t h e r req u i red or suggested; i n o t h e rs an u n d e rgraduate or g radua te support i ng f i e l d com posed of carefu l l y selected busi­ ness and other courses i s rec o m m ended. Students i n terested i n profess i o n a l undergrad ua te programs at Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i versity are first en rolled i n the C o l lege of Arts and Sciences for a t least one year of pre-bu siness studies, and may transfe r to the S c h o o l of Busi ness A d m i n ­ istration afte r a successfu l ly completed fres hman year. Students considering busi ness stud ies a t the g ra d u ate level, should seek e a r l y planning advice from the S c h o o l of Busi ness A d m i n istration facu lty fo r a p p ro p ri ate undergraduate c u rricula ava i l a b l e at Pacific Lutheran U n i versity and


other u n iversities. The recommen ded preparation may i n c l ude specific co u rses i n b u s i ness a d m i n i stration o r a n u n dergraduate m a j o r i n busi ness a d m i n istratio n . T h e S c h o o l o f Busi ness Ad m i n i stratio n 's prog rams a r e accredited by t h e N o rth足 west Association o f Second ary and H i g he r Schools. I t i s affi l i ated with the A m e ri can Associ at i o n o f C o l l e g i ate Schools of Busi ness as a member o f the Asse m b l y o f the A.A . C . S . B . ; the N orthwest U n i ve rs i ties' B u s i n ess Administration C o n ference, the Western Asso c i ation of G raduate Schools, and the Western Association of Colleg i ate Schools o f B usiness. For details regarding admission requ i re m ent s, deg ree programs, and curricula, see page 77.

School of Education

The School o f Educati o n , by u t i l i z i n g the resources of the U n i versity, offers both u n de rg raduate and g raduate work to p repare students for careers in the teac h i ng professi o n . The u n d e rg raduate c u r r i c u l a , lead i n g to the Bache l o r o f A r t s i n Education degree, m e e t the certification ,pattern i n t h e State of Wash i n gton. In addition to the accred i tation o f t h e e n t i re Uni versity by the Northwest Asso足 ciation o f Second ary and H i g h Schools, the School o f Edu cati on is accred ited by the Was h i ngton State Board o f Education and by the N at i o n a l Coun c i l for Acc red i t足 ation of Teac h e r Educati o n for the preparation of elementary and seco ndary teachers, p ri n c i p als and g u idance cou nselors, with the Master of Arts as the h i g hest d e g ree a p p ro ve d . T h i s accred i tation g i ves Pacific Lutheran g raduates reciprocity in twenty-eight states. Programs for the preparation of school librarians, school nurses, school coun足 selors, administrators and supervisor personnel are available. The School of Education also offers work toward the convers i o n , renewal, o r reinstateme n t o f tea c h i n g certificates. For details regard i n g admission requi remen ts, deg ree p ro g rams, and c u rr i c u l a , see p a g e 105.


School 01 Fine Arts

The School of Fine A rts com prises the Departments o f A rt, M u s i c and C o m ­ mun ication Arts, offering a b road c u l tural education i n the f i n e a r t s and special train ing in the fo l l owing areas o f study: sculpture, painti n g , ceramics, art history, g raphics, m usi c hi story and l i terature, t h e o ry and com position, sacred m u s i c , i n strumental o r v o c a l performance, dr ama, speech arts, and telecom m u n i catio ns. The objectives of t h is school are to p rovide t h e student spec i a l ized trai ning in one of the fine arts; to provide a c u l t u ral backg round through t h e study o f the relati o n s h i p of a l l the arts; a n d to pre pare t h e student for the profess i o n a l appli­ cation of his knowledge a n d trai n i n g . Degrees Offered

The School of Fine Arts offers the degrees Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music. Candi dates for t h e Bache l o r of Fine Arts degree must c o mplete both the General U n i versity Req u i rements and the specific requirements of the A rt o r C o m m u n i ca­ tion Arts Departments. Can didates for the Bachelor o f Music deg ree m ust complete both the specific courses in music and the Genera l U n iversity Requirements and m us t meet the approved standards of music i a n s h i p . For spe c i f i c i n fo rmation a n d c u r r i c u l a i n t h e Fine Arts , t u rn t o p a g e 67-71 fo r Art, pages 155 - 1 6 7 for M u s i c and pages 93-98 for C o m m u n i cation Arts. School 01 Nursing

The School of N u rs i n g is a pro fess i o n a l school which meets the University req u i reme nts for the degree of Bachelor of Science i n N u rs i n g . It is accredited by the Wash i ngton State Board o f N u rsing and by the National League for N u rs­ ing. G radua tes who successfu l l y c o m p lete the State Board Examinations (Reg­ istered N u rse) are q u a l i fied to f i l l f i rst level staff n u rsing positions in health agencies. For deta i l s regard i n g ad m i ssion require ments , degree programs, a n d c u rricula, see page 1 67 , School 0 1 Physical Education

The School of Physical Education comprises the vari ous programs designed to promote "ed u cation through the phys i c a l ." A divers i fied i nstructional p rogram­ I n tercol legiate ath l e t i c competit i o n (Pa c i f i c N orthwest C o n ference) for men in ten sports and women's ath let i c competition in six sports, an extensive intra m u ra l progra m , a n d a timely c u r r i c u l u m f o r p rofess i o n a l preparation i n ' Health, P h ysical Ed ucation, Recreation and Coac h i n g-all are v i ewed by the University as having educat i on a l merit a n d are cond ucted clearly within the framework of t h e obj ec­ tives of the u n ivers i ty , For more i n f o rmation regard i n g p rog ram and cu rric u l u m i n physical education see p a g e 1 78.


Division of Graduate Studies Purpose

The D i v is i on of G raduate Stud ies is an all-u n i versity division coordi nating and i n teg rating the work of the schools and departments which provide graduate level work. Its general objective is to furth er the basic objecti ves o f the University by prov i d i n g graduate level academic and professional work. I ts spe c i fic objectives are: (1) to i n c rease the breadth and depth of understa n d i n g of the graduate stu足 dent in the l i b e ra l arts; (2) to i n c rease the student's knowledge o f the research bein g done in his field of con centration and to i n c rease his ability to read the professional journals o f his area o f interest; (3) to develop the stu dent's abil ity to do i n d epe ndent study and resea rc h ; and (4) to prepare stu dents t h rough the upper division and g raduate d i v i s i o n , and t h ro u g h the U n i versity's profess i o n al schools, to enter into a vo cation d i rectly, or to enter o t h e r g raduate schools fo r further advanced study lead i n g to the docto ral degree. Admission

Students h o lding a Bachelo r's degree from an accredited col lege or u n i versity who attained an u n d e rg raduate s c h o l a rs h ip h on or-po i n t ratio o f 3.0 may be ad足 mi tted and granted regular status in the Division o f Graduate Studies. Stud e n ts a l ready h o l d i n g graduate degrees or students who have done satis facto ry graduate work at anoth e r institution may be admitted o n reg u l a r status. Th ose students with an average o f less than 3.0 wi l l not be considered fo r regu lar status until they have demonstrated the i r a b i l i ty to do g raduate work by a m i n i mum o f three cou rses (12 semester h o u rs) work w i th a g rade poi nt average o f 3.0. These stu足 dents may be granted provisional status. Students majoring in an area of professional ed ucation mu st have met all requi rements for tea c h i n g certificati o n . Appl i c ants for the Master o f Busin ess Ad m i n i stration degree w i l l b e required to take the Admission Test for G radu ate Study in B u s i n ess. Maste r of Arts in Educa足 tion appl icants will be req u i red to take the M i l l e r An alogies Test. Other test scores must be sub m i tted o n ly if they are specifically requested by the Dean of Grad u ate Studies. Fu rther supporting evidence i n the form of personal recom mendations will be requested trom those pe rso n s named by t h e applicant o n the appli cation form. Students appl y i n g for admission to g raduate study s h o u l d s u b m i t t h e completed application b l ank (avai la ble from the G raduate Office) plus two official copies of tran scripts of all previous college work. This s h ou l d be done before t h e fi rst semester 01 reg istration in graduate cou rses. Prior to registrat i o n , each student e n ro l l i n g for two and one-half courses or more, must submit, at h i s own expense and on the form provi ded, a physical exami nation report acceptable to the Student Health Service o f the University. Until this report is approved, the student is not officially admitted. A l l foreign students are req u i red to report to the Health Center upon arrival at t h e U n ivers i ty for i n structions con cern i n g various tests w h i c h may be req u i red. I n order to insure consideration f o r en trance i n a g i ven term applications s h o u l d be made by August 1 , December 15 and May 1 . A ten - d o l l a r non-re fu n d-


a b l e a p p l i c ation fee s ho u l d accom pa n y the appl i c ati o n . T h i s i s a service fee and i s n ot applied to the stude n t ' s account. Checks o r m oney orders should be mad e payable t o Pacific Lutheran U n iversity and sent to the Dean o f G raduate Studies. App roval o f adm ission to the D ivision of G raduate S t u d i es does n o t i m p ly a d mis足 s i o n to candidacy for the degree. F i n a l ad mission approval is dete r m i ned by the Dean of G raduate Studies in c o n s u l tati on with the appropri ate Grad uate Coun足 c i l C o m m i ttee. In s u m mary, the fol lowi ng i te m s m u st be o n file before an a p p l i c ant may be c o n s i d e red for admissi o n : 1)

T h e com pleted a p p l i cati o n form.

2)

The $10.00 n o n - refu n d a b l e a p p l i cation fee.

3)

Two off i c i a l cop ies o f transcripts of all p revi o us col lege work.

4) Test scores when spec i f i c a l l y requested. 5)

Ad m i ss i on Test for G raduate Study in B u s i n ess scores ( M aster of Bu si ness Ad m i n i s tration appli cants on ly).

6)

M i l l er Analog i es Test scores (Master of Arts in Education a p p l i ca n ts only).

Interviewing of Appli cants

Before adm ission to the g rad uate program, i t is advisab l e for an a p p l i c ant to seek an i n te rview with d p rofessor i n h i s subject area. The Division of G raduate Studies wi l l be h a p py to recommend the appropri ate person. Classification of Students

1 ) T h ose students approved for u n q u a l ified adm ission to graduate study by t hei r respective G raduate Coun c i l C o m m i ttees are g ranted regular status. Students w h o fai l to q u a l ify for reg u l a r status may be g ranted provisional status. 2)

Students who wish to p u rsue cou rse work with no i n tention of qual ifying for an advanced deg ree, and those who are transi ent registrants , wi l l be c l assified as non-degree students.

Change of S t a t u s f r o m Provisional to Regular

The c h a rge of status from provisional to regular s h a l l be dete rmi ned u n d e r t h e fol l owi n g p rovisions: 1)

Satisfactory fUl f i l l m e n t of cou rse deficienci es.

2)

Satisfactory comp letion of th ree c o u rses ( 1 2 semester h o u rs) of graduate work with a grade p o i n t average of 3.0 o r better. A letter in d i cating change of status wi l l be forwarded to the student, with a copy to h i s adviser. Master's Degrees Offered

MASTER OF AHTS 1)

EDUCATION a)

Elementary o r Secondary School Admin istrati o n o-The stud e;,t who wishes to q u a l ify for t h e provisional or standard p r i n c i p a l ' s credential (elementary o r secon d ary or general) w i l l take a major in t h i s field and comp lete


cou rses in a supporting academic area of the University. Students may major ill this field wit hout q u a l i fying for a principal's cre d e n t i a l . b)

School C o u n s e l o r Program'- F o r students w h o wish to qu alify a s pu b l i c s c h o o l counsel ors (elemen tary a n d secondary) or student personnel work足 e rs in h i g h e r e d u c ati o n .

c)

Eleme ntary C l assroom Teac h i ng'-This program i s designed for stu dents who desire advanced work in e lementary c lassroom tea c h i n g or who wish to q u a l i fy as e lemen tary school supervisors o r consultants. Along with the major i n this field the student is requ i red to complete cou rses in a sup足 porting academic area.

d)

Secondary C l assroom Teac h i n g'-This program i s for those students who wish to i n c rease t h e i r preparation for tea ching in an area of social s c i e n c e .

2)

HUMANITIES' -This degree program is designed fo r l i b rarians, c le rgymen, teac h e rs and others who wish to extend and b roaden thei r u n d e rstanding and appreciation of the various fie lds o f the h u man i ties.

3)

SOCIAL SCIENCES -Thi s d e g ree program i s designed for personnel workers in i n d ustry, welfare workers, l i b rarians, clergymen, teachers, and o t h e rs who wish to extend and b r oaden t h e i r un dersta n d i n g and appre ciation o f the various fields of the S o c i a l SCiences. '

MASTER OF B US I N ESS ADM I N ISTRAT I O N ' T h i s deg ree program i s designed t o provide a thorough foundation f o r respon足 si ble leaders h i p in b u s i n ess. MASTER OF NATURAL S C I E N C E S' This deg ree program is designed especially for teachers who need to extend and b roaden their knowledge in the fields of science and mathematics. 'Details

01

these programs are contained in the Graduate

obtained Irom the office

01

the Dean

01

Catalog

which may be

Graduate Studies.

Advisers and Advisory Committees

At the time of adm ission, both regular status stu dents and provisional status students are assi g n ed a major adv iser. The total gradu ate program of a reg ular status student, i n c l u d i n g approval of the student's research work, is supervised by an advisory c o m m i ttee composed o f a major adviser and two other faculty mem足 bers as determined by the c h a i r man, d i rector, or dean of the departments or s c h ools involved, and i n consultation wit h the Dean of G raduate Studies. A student may, if he wishe s, request a specific major adviser. Approval of Registration and Proposed Program

The adviser, in c o n s u ltation with h i s advisee, s h a l l determine a program of study and g ive final approval to his advis ee's initial registrati on. ( I f the student registers for only one c o u rse [4 semester hours] i n h i s i n i t i a l registration, the adviser shall g i ve final approval to the second reg i stration as w e l l . ) D u r i n g the semester in w h i c h the student i s taking the second c o u rse in h i s master's pro g ra m , the student, i n consultati on w i t h h i s adviser, s h a l l i nitiate a request f o r two


additional facu l ty mem bers to serve on h i s advisory c o m m i ttee . The newly-formed advisory c o m m i ttee, norm a l l y consist i n g of the adviser as c h a i r m a n a n d two fac u l ty mem bers, wi l l proceed to meet with the student as soon as is pos s i b l e to give f i n a l a p p rova l to t h e student's e n ti re p rog ram of s t u d i es. Minimum Hours Required for the Master's Degree

A m i n i m um of e i g h t c o u rses (32 semester h ours) is req u i re d . Transfer o f Credit

Two c o u rses (e i g h t semester hours) of g rad uate work may be taken at an other i n stitution and transferred, provided that approval has been g i ven by the student advisory c o m m i ttee, Standards of Work

The m i n i m u m sta ndard acceptable fo r regular sfatus students is a g rade point average of 3.0 in the major f i e l d and an overa l l average o f 3.0 i n all g radua te work. Research Requirements

As an i m portant part of his Maste r's prog ram, the student is req u i red to p rovide wri tten evidence that he can d o i n dependent research. The m a n n e r o f fulfi l l i n g thi s req u i rement w i l l b e determ i n ed b y each student's adviso ry c o m m i ttee i n conSUlt ation w i th the student, b u t i n a n y case, the m i n i m um. req u i re m e n t wi l l be at least t h e eq u i va l e n t of one cou rse. I f a thesis is written, the o r i g i n a l and one copy must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies for b i n d ing. One copy of any research papers s u b m i tted to meet the req u i rement m u st be deposited w i th the Dean of Graduate Studies. The student i s expected als o to p rovide a copy of a t h esis or research papers for h i s research supervisor. Req u i re m e nts for a d d i t i o n a l copies may be s e t by the advisory c o m m i ttee. Examinations

A written c o m p rehensive exa mi nation and / o r o r a l exa m i nation ove r the stu足 dent's prog ram of studies, as we l l as a n oral exami nation on the thesis o r research i papers, is req u i red. These exam i n ations ove r the stude r t ' s program of studies are under the d i rection of the major adviser and/ or the advisory c o m m i ttee and must be s u c cessfu l l y passed n o t later than six weeks p ri o r to c o m m e n cement. The o ral examination ove r the thesis o r research is under the d i rection of the advisory committee and m ust be comp leted not later than four weeks prior to commencement. Time Limit

All requirements for the Master's degree must be completed within seven years. The seven-year pe riod covers a l l w o r k s u b m itted for the c o m p l etion of the Mas足 ter's degree re gardles s o f whether the work was taken as pro visional status or regular status, as we l l as cre d i t transferre d from another i n stit u t i o n , c o m p rehensive exam i n at i o n , thesis, and f i n a l oral exam i n ation.


Residence Requirement

A l l cand i d ates for the Master's deg ree must complete a m i n i m u m of six c o u rses (24 semester h o u rs) in res i dence. This requ i re m e n t may be fulfi l led by either o n e full academic y e a r i n atten dance, t h ree f u l l s u m m e rs , or t h e completion of equiv足 ale n t part-time study. Degrees are awarded at the May and Aug ust Commen cements. A state m e n t of completion will be provi ded upon request following close o f the fal l semester or the in terim. Courses Acceptable for Graduate Credit

The courses of study are l isted i n the Gene ral Catalog. Selected cou rses num足 bered 300, 400, and 500, u n less otherwise designated, may be accepted f o r gradu ate cred i t . A l l courses accepted for the master's d e g ree are, however, sub足 ject to the approval of the student's adviser and/or advisory committee.


Advisory C o m m i ttee

A p p roval of deg ree prog ram and subm i ss i on of a copy of t h a t p rogram to the Graduate Office Not later than the semester before the com­ mencement in which student takes h i s degree P e r i o d i c eval uation and a p p roval

At the be g i n n i ng of t h e semeste r in which s t u d e n t expects t o earn h i s degree D u ri n g fin al year b u t not later than six weeks before c o mmencement

Maj o r adviser

Registrar's Office

Registrar's Office

M aj o r adviser a n d / o r Advisory C o m m i ttee

Advisory C o m m i ttee

Graduate Office

Dean of Graduate Studies

Selection and ap proval o f thesis

P rogress reports o n t h e s i s o r research papers

Regist ration for t h e s i s or research p a pe rs

A p p l ication for graduation

C o m p rehensive written a n d / o r o ral exam­ i n ation ove r student's program of studies

Fi n a l oral exami nat i o n o n t h e s i s o r re­ search papers

S u b m i s s i o n of thesis o r research

Recom m e n d at i o n t o the facu lty for the award i n g of t h e degree

N ot later than t h ree weeks pri or to com­ mencement

N o t l ater t h an two weeks before com mence­ ment

Du ring final year but not later t h a n four weeks before commencement

Not later than the l ast registration dates before the semester i n which s t u d e n t takes his d e g ree

D u ri n g the official regi strat i o n dates

Major adviser

Advisory C o m m i ttee

A p p roval of each re gi stration

Du ring the f i rs t semester o f reg istrati o n as a regular status student

Before the first semester o f reg i stration as a regular status student

Dean of G radu ate Studies and Graduate C o u n ci l C o m m i ttee

A p p roval o f a d m i ss i o n

Dat e: Before t h e f i rs t semester of reg i s t ration as a regular status student

Under the Direction of:

Dean of Grad uate Studies

A p p l i cation for a d m i s s i o n to the D i v i s i o n of G raduate S t u d i e s

Proc edures:

S U M MA R Y OF P R O C E D U R E S F O R MASTER'S D E G R E E S


Schools and Departments The course req u i reme nts fo r the Col lege of Arts and S c i e n ces; the School o f Busine ss A d m i n i stration; the School of E d u cation; the S c h o o l o f Fine Arts; the S c h ool of Physical Educati o n ; and the S c h o o l o f N ursing are l i sted in this sect i o n together w i t h t h e c o u rses of in structi on for each departme n t a n d s c h o o l . W h i l e most o f the courses li sted a r e g i ven every year, a system o f a l t e r n a t i n g u p per d i v i 足 sion s u bj e c ts i s p racti ced i n s o m e departments, thereby assu ring a b roader offe r i n g . The U n i versity reserves the rig h t t o m od i fy s p e c i fi c c o u rse req u i rements , to discont i n u e cl asses in which the reg istration i s regarded as i n suffi c i e n t , a n d t o withdraw courses. EXP LANATION O F SYMBO LS N u m be r after c o u rse ti tle indi cates course c re d i t given. U n less specified other足 wise, each u n i t has the value of one cou rse credi t (4 semester h o u rs ) . Symbols are explai ned as follows: I Course offered first semester /I Course offered second semester I, /I Course offered first and second sem ester in sequence II/ Course offerad either semester S Course offered in the summer a/y Course offered alternate years beginning with year listed a/ S Course offered alternate sum mers beginning with year listed (G) Course may be used on graduate programs as major


ART

Mr. Schwidder, Chairman, Mr. Achepohl, Mr. Elwell, Mr. Keyes, Mr. Kittleson, Mr. Roskos, Mr. Tomsic The c o u rses of i n s t r u ction offered by this department are designed t o : 1)

Provide an o p p o rt u n ity for creative e x p ress i o n .

2)

Offer a gene ral prog ram f o r the s t u d y of art within the framewo r k of the Liberal Arts.

3)

O ffer spe c i a l i zed study in s t u d i o and art h i story areas f o r profess i o n a l l y orien ted students.

4)

Provide a program o f i n struction in preparation f o r the tea c h i n g of a rt on the elementary a n d secondary levels.

The Department reserves the right t o retai n , exhi b i t, and reproduce student work s u b m i tted f o r c re d i t i n any o f Hs cou rses o r progra ms. BACHELOR OF ARTS Deg ree Requi rements for a major i n Art are a m i n i m u m o f seven courses i n A r t i n c l u d i n g : A r t 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 235, 230 or 350, 365, 370 a n d a n a d d i tio nal co urse i n art history. A max i m u m o f t e n cou rses m a y be a p p l i e d toward this degree. Can d i d ates f o r this degree a r e registered i n t h e Col lege o f A rts and Sci ences a n d m us t c o m p l ete a l l req u i re m e n ts of t h a t col lege. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ED UCATION major req u i re m e n ts are l isted below. Can d i d ates for this deg ree must also meet speci a l req u i rements desc ribed in t h e School of Education section i n this catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 1 4 V4 courses. Teachi ng M a j o r : 1 4V4 cou rses. Required: Art 1 1 0, 1 60 , 235, 260, 230 or 350, 365, 370, 440, two a d d i t i o n a l courses i n a r t history, and electives t o c o m p lete req u i rements . JUnior High School Preparation: Teachi n g Maj o r : 7 V2 c o u rses. Required: Art 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 235, 230 o r 350, 365, 440, and elective s t o c o m p lete req u i rements. Teachi ng Minor: 5 c o u rses. Required: Art 1 1 0 , 160, 235, 230 or 350, and 365 . Elem enrary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Majo r : 6 c o u rses. Required: 11 0, 1 60, 235, 341 and two c o u rses f ro m the fo l l o w i n g : Art 230, 350, 365 o r 370. Teaching M i n o r : 3 courses i n the area as dete r m i ned by the S c h ool o f Edu足 cation.


BACHELOR OF F I N E ARTS Degree R e q u i re ments, for a major in Art, are f o u r足 teen courses i n Art, i n c l ud i n g : Art 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 235, 260, 230 or 350, 365, 370, th ree a d d i tional c o u rses in art h i story, one of whi ch may be A rt 380, and elective s in area o f emp h asis to complete req u i reme n ts . Cand i d ates may elect an emphasis i n P i c t orial Desi g n ( D rawing, Painting and P r i n t maki ng), Materials Design (S c u l pt u r e , Ceramics, Glass a n d Metals), Multi-Med i a , o r A r t History. One-man or Group Exh i b i tions will be requi red of a l l c a n d i dates in studio areas. All graduates are expected t o be represented i n t h e d e partmental collection. W o r k will b e selected b y the Art Fa c u l ty , usually from the ca n d i d acy exh i b i t i o n . Can d i d ates for this deg ree a r e registered i n t h e S c h o o l o f F i n e Arts and must c o m p l ete all req u i re m e nts o f that school. Studio C o u rse Sched u l e : Art 1 1 0 , 160, and 235 should be taken du ring t h e freshman y e a r ; o n e semeste r of Art 2 6 0 i n the freshman or sophomore yea r ; and the art history sequence started no later than the f i rs t semester of the j u n i o r year. Area o f em phasis should b e chosen early so that each student may work out an i nd i v i d u a l program of studies with his adviser. Foreign language i s not req ui red in p rogra m s with a s t u d i o e m phasis. Art H i story Course Sche d u l e : Art 110 s h o u l d be taken the fi rst semeste r of the freshman year; period cou rse sequ ence should be started d u r i n g the sophomore year. Ge rman a n d l o r Fre n ch i s req u i red in this p ro g r a m , as dete r m i n e d by the s tudent's adviser. 300 level cou rses may be taken at any time d u ri n g Ihe four-year p rog ra m , p rovid i n g p rere q u isites are met where a p p ropriate. STU D I O : 1 60 P I CT O R I A L DES I GN I n troduction to the me d i a of drawing w i t h e m p h asis on design and composi足 tion. A systematic series of exerci ses structured to develop observati o n , pe rception a n d d raftsmansh i p , w i l l be c o m b i n ed with a study o f h i storical a n d current tec hniq ues. I I I 230 C ER A M I C S I An i n trod u c t i o n to ceramic materials and {e c h n i q ues. Study i n c l udes hand足 b u i l t and wheel thrown methods of constructio n , c l ay and g l aze formati o n , as w e l l a s t h e history o f cerami c art. I I I 235 MAT E R I ALS D E S I G N I n trod u c t i o n to various mate rials a n d tec h n i q u es and their i n f l ue n ce on three足 di mensional fo rm. P a rt i c u l a r e m phasis on deve l o p m e n t of visual awareness through experimental use of cl ay, wood , plastics and other me d i a . I I I 260 L I F E D RAW I N G A n expl oration i n multi-med i a of studied h uman f o r m . A student m ay register f o r this course for two semesters. Prereq u i s i t e : Art 1 6 0 o r consent' o f i n structor. I I 3 2 6 F I LM MAKING A s tu d i o c o u rse i n t h e theory a n d practice of photography as an art form.


A brief i ntroduction t o Avant-Garde, experimental, u n d erg ro u n d and abstract f i l m s with a concentration on stude n t p ro d u ct i on o f s h o r t f i l m s. I 330 C E RA M I C S I I C o n t i n ua t i o n o f Cera m i cs I w i t h advanced te c h n iq ues i n cera m i c construction a n d experi ments in g l aze f o rmati on. A student may register for this cou rse for th ree semesters. P rereq u i site: Art 230. I I I 338 G LASS BLOW I N G A n i n vestigati on i n to t h e a r t o f b l own glass. Study i n c l u des furnace design, g l ass c h e m i stry and history. Em phasis wi l l be o n the deve l o p m ent o f working tech niqu es and i n d i v i d ual e x p ress i o n in this me d i u m . P re requisite : One semester of cera m i cs a n d consent o f i n structor. II 341 E L E M E NTARY A R T E D U C AT I O N (V2 ) A c o u rse p l a nned for t h ose who inte n d to teach i n the e l e m e n ta ry schoo l. A p p ro p riate projects in d ra w i n g , desig n, a n d construction are developed i n v a r i o u s med ia to i l l u strate the t y p e of w o r k s u i ta b l e for this level of i nstruc足 t i o n . P a r t i c u l a r em phasis wi l l be given the deve l o p m ental theory f o r art i n the cl assro o m . I I I 350 SCULPTU R E A study of visual expression i n th ree d i mensional forms w i th t h e several s c u l ptural m e d i a and tech n i ques of mode l i n g , carvi ng and constructio n . A student may reg i ster for this cou rse f o r three semesters. I I I 365 P A I NT I N G A study o f painting m e d i a a n d te chn iques w i t h em phasis o n devel opment of an i n d iv i d u a l ized a p p roach to visual expressio n . A student may reg i s te r for t h i s cou rse f o r th ree semesters. P re requisite: Art 1 60 . I I I 370 P R I NT M A K I N G A study i n g r a p h i c art with the several media o f p r i n tm a k i ng i n cluding wood足 cut, seriog ra p h , etc h i n g and i n tag l i o . I n c l uded wi l l be an exa m i n ation of the techniques of the old masters a n d c o n te m p o rary pri n t m a ke rs. A student may reg ister for thi s course for three semesters. P rerequ i s i te : A rt 1 60 . I I I 492 STU D I O P ROJECTS A tutorial course with i n d i vi d ual investigation i n the area of e m p h as i s for m a j o r students only. Students must s u b m i t an acce p table wri tten o u t l i n e of p roposed work to the i n structor and the chai rman of the department w i thi n o n e week of the start of the semeste r to receive credit f o r t h i s work. A s t u d e n t m a y reg i s te r for this course for t w o semesters. P rere q u i s i t e : Senior stan d i n g and conse n t o f the i n s tructor a n d c h a i rman o f the department. I I I 494 G RA P H I C S W O R K S H O P ( V4 t o 1 ) A practical experience working w i t h the u n i versity g raphics coordi nator in the design a n d execu tion o f printed materials. Spec i a l em phasis wi l l be p l aced on tec h n i cal proced ures a n d p ro b lems i n mass c o m m u n i cation. P r e req u i s i te : Portfo l i o of p revious work a n d conse n t o f instructor. I I I


H I STORY A N D THEORY: 1 1 0 THE VISUAL ARTS An in troductory cou rse in the study of man's expression i n the several med ia o f the visual arts, from the perspective of historical deve l op m e n t . I I I 280 T H E ARTS O F T H E TWEN T I ET H C E N T U RY An examination of twentieth century art forms, i n cluding film making and other conte m p o rary m e d i a . E m phasis w i l l be p l a ced on the visual arts, but with reference to c u r rent devel opment in theater, mu sic, and literature. I 380 I MA G E R Y A N D SYM B O L I S M A s t u d y of t h e symb o l i c , pic torial and p l astic expressions o f man f r o m t h e perspective o f thei r p h i losophical and theological i m p l ications. Emphasis o n the ori g i n and development of forms and thei r i n fluence o n mod ern c h u rch and society. I I 382 A N C I E NT ART T h e study of pre h istoric and primitive art; the art and arch itecture of Egypt, the Near East and Aegean a reas; the deve l o pment of the c l assical style in G reece and the Roman Emp i re . I a / y 1 9 7 1 -72 383 MEDI EVAL ART The study o f Early Christian , Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic deve l o p m e n t i n the a r t and arc h i tecture o f t h e Midd l e Ages. I I a / y 1 97 1 -72 384 R E N A I SSANCE A R T T h e s t u d y o f t h e art a n d arch itecture of the fi fteenth and sixteenth centuries in I taly, Flanders, France and Germany. I a/y 1 972-73 385 BAROQUE AND ROC OCO ART Deve lopment of the Baroque style in Eu ropean art and architecture from the end of the sixteenth cen tury th rough the Rococo period . II a/y 1 9 72-73 440 S E M I N A R IN SECONDARY ART EDUCAT I O N ( V. ) A study o f the a p p roach t o teac h i n g in the secondary school with p resenta足 tions and discussions on various approp riate med i a . I I 487 N I N ETEENTH C E N TU RY ART A study o f the art and arc h i tecture of the Romantic, Realist and I mp ressionist periods with movements in the twentieth century such as, Fauvis m , C u b i sm, Exp ressi onism, Surrealism and other styles of major conseq uence. I I 490 S E M I N A R ( % to '12 ) A special cou rse fo r outstanding j u n i o r and sen i o r students, considering some aspect o f the visual arts o f a topical nature. Prerequ isite: Recomme n d a足 tion by a membe r of the fac u l ty and consent of the i n structor. I I 497 R ESEARCH I N ART H I STORY A tutorial c o u rse with individual research in to a particu l a r period o r area of art h istory for m a j o r students only. A wri tten o u tl i ne of p roposed thesis must


be s u b m i tted for app roval to the instructor and the c h a i rman of the d e part­ ment within one week of the start of the semeste r to receive credit for t h i s work. C o p i es 0 1 f i n a l papers s h a l l b e f i l e d w i t h the de p a rtment. A student m ay reg ister for this course for two semesters. Prereq u i S i te : Sen i o ,r sta n d i n g a n d conse n t of the i n structor a n d cha i r m a n o f the department. I I I 597 R ESEARCH F o r those Master of Arts can d i dates who elect t o write a research paper in Art. Candi dates wi l l be req u i red to review the i r research papers before the G raduate C o m m i ttee. I I I I n terim courses offered i n 1 971 :

302 305 310 311 314 492 497

HABI TAT A N D E N V I R O N M ENT L I G HT D E S I G N WORKSHOP RAKU W O R KSHOP PLATO TO POP-A P H I LOSOPHY OF ART WORKSHOP I N B R O N Z E CAST I N G STU D I O P R OJ E CTS R ESEARCH I N ART H I STORY

BI OLOGY

Mr. Knudsen, Chairman, Mr. Bohannon, Mrs. Creso, Mr. Gee, Mr. Heyer, Mrs. Jensen, Mr. Leraas, Mr. Ostenson, Mrs. Sorenson The c o re of instructi o n in b i ology g i ves each student a well-roun ded back­ ground i n the p r i n c i p les and o b j ective s ot modern b i o l ogy and a deeper ap p reci­ ation of t h e mean i ng and ram i fic ations o f l i fe. Programs are designed to p rovide the stude n t w i th t h e foundation necessary to enter a variety of careers, i n c l u d i n g those stem m i n g from graduate studies , teachi ng, med ici ne, d e n t i s try, veteri nary medici ne, m e d i ca l techn ol ogy, p u b l i c h e a l t h , m i crob i o l ogy, e n t o m o l ogy, forestry, fisheries, wild l i fe b i o logy a n d related lields. The heart of the bio logy p rogram consists o f a c o r e of seven courses: Fresh­ man year-O rg anismal B i ology. Cell B i ology; Sophom ore year-Functional M o r p h ­ o l ogy, Deve l opmental B i o logy; J u n i o r year-Genetics, C e l l u l a r Phys i ology; Se n i o r year-Ecology. THE BAC H E L O R OF ARTS D E G R E E c o n s ists 01 the seve n -cou rse bi ology core, but a student may s u bs t i t u te an approved b i o l ogy elective for one core c o u rse i n both the sophomore a n d j u n i o r years. Req u i red s u p p o rting cou rses a re English Composition, foreign language (Option I or I I ) , a year of chemis try and Mathe­ matics 1 33 or i ts e q u i valent. Strongly recommended are Chemistry 331 , 332 and P h ysics 1 0 1 , 1 02. THE BAC H E L O R OF SC I EN C E D E G R E E consi sts of ten cou rses in b i o l o gy : the core p l u s th ree e l ectives. Req u i red s u p p o rt i n g courses are E n g l i s h Composi­ t i o n , foreign l anguage (Option I o r II o n ly) , chemistry through at least 332, a year of physics, and mathematics through 151. A m ax i m u m of ten cou rses in b i o l ogy may be c o u n ted for grad uati on .


B I O LOGY C U R R I C ULU M FOR T H E BACHELOR OF S C I E N C E D E G R E E The fo l l owing i s a model program w h i c h can b e altered t o m e e t the needs of each stude n t : FR ESH MAN YEA R : Organismal B i o logy, Cell B i ology; C h e m i stry 1 1 5 a n d 1 4 2 . Students entering w i t h two years o f a m o d e rn foreign lang uage may e l e c t to c o n t i n u e that lang uage using O p t i o n I or I I , see page 48. A new language sho u l d b e d e ferred unti l the sopho more o r j u n i o r year. Students w i t h o u t t h e equivalent of Math 1 33 s h o u l d take this d u ri n g the freshman year. (Math 1 5 1 may be deferred to t h e sophomore or j u n i o r year.) C o m p lete sche d u l e with English C o m posi t i on or Un ivers i ty core courses, see page 4 6 ; and o n e P . E . activit y ( '/4 ) . Fa l l semester, 3V4 c o u rses; spr i n g , 4 c o u rses. S O P H O M O R E YEA R : Functional M o rpho logy and Developm e n tat B i o l ogy; Che m ­ istry 331 , 3 3 2 , 333, 334 or Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 ; U n i v ersity core c o u rses, a n d / o r m athematics o r foreign l a n g uage t o r o u n d o u t progra m ; P . E . V• . Four courses each semester. J U N I O R YEA R : Genetics and C e l l ular Physiology; Chemistry 331 , 332, 333, 334 or P hysics 1 01 , 1 02. Math 1 51 should be c ompleted by this time. Un ivers i ty core courses a n d / o r a b i o l ogy elective; P.E. V• . SEN I OR YEA R : Ecology a n d 2 o r 3 biol og y e l ecti ves, other science el ectives; U n i versity core courses or electives; P.E. v. . BACHELOR O F ARTS I N EDUCAT I O N major req u i rements are listed below. Candid ates for this deg ree mu st also meet spec i a l requ i rem ents d es c r i be d i n the School of Education section in t h i s catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses. Teach i n g Major: 7 courses Required: B i o l o gy 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 a n d 5 courses in b i o l ogy of which at least 3 m ust be upper d iv i s i o n . Required supporting courses: Chemis try 1 1 5 , 1 42 , Mathe­ matics 1 33 . Electi ves from the f o l l o w i n g : Earth Scien ces 1 3 1 , 1 32 ; Chem istry 331 , 332, 333, 334 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02, 21 1 . Junior High School Preparation: Teach i n g Majo r : 6-7 c o u rses. Required: B i o logy 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 and 5 courses i n biology approved by the de­ part m e n t . Required supporting courses : Che m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 42, Mathematics 1 33. Recommen ded : Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 o r Earth Scien ces 1 3 1 , 1 32 . Teachi ng M i n o r : 5 courses. ReqUired: 5 cou rses chosen i n b i o l ogy; Earth Sciences 1 3 1 . Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g majo r : 6 c o u rses. Required: B i o logy 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Required supporting courses: C h e m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 42 . Teachi ng M i n o r : 3 c o u rses. ReqUired: 3 c o u rses in the area, t o be d e te r m i ned i n cons u l tation with the School o f Education.


1 1 1 B I O LOGY A N D M O D E R N MAN An i n -depth coverage o f selected topics that relate to modern man's h i story and future , his art and his well- bei n g : the environment, reprod u ction a n d p o p u l ations, h e red ity, evo:ution and bio logical controls. This course i s designed f o r l i beral arts, n o n - b i ology majors. Five meeti ngs p e r week, con sist­ ing of lectu res, l a b oratories a n d / or d i scuss i o n s . I I I 1 4 1 , 1 42 G E N ERAL BOTANY ( 1 , 1 ) A su rvey o f the plant k i ng d o m a n d structu res, a n d a study o f l i fe h i story a n d e c o l o g y of pl ants. Lectures, laboratory a n d f i e l d t r i p s . S 1 5 1 O R GA N I S M A L B I OLOGY An introduction to the h i g h e r levels of b i o logical organiz ation i n which organ­ isms are d i scussed in relation to their ecology, adaptat i o n , evo l u ti o n , physi­ o l ogy, reprod uctive patterns a n d c l assificati o n . R e q u i red o f all b i o l ogy m a j o rs. Th ree h o u rs of lecture, one 3-h o u r l a b o ratory and one 1 - h o u r d i scuss i o n / lab­ i n troduction period per week. Prereq u i s ites: H i gh school c h e m i stry o r consent of departmental chai rman. Co-registration in chemi stry recom mended. I 1 5 2 CELL B I O LOGY An i n t roduction to the ce l l u l a r and molecular levels o f b i o l og i cal o rgani za­ tion i n c l u d i ng discussions o f c e l l u l tra-struct u re and p h ys i o l ogy, energ y trans­ d u c t i o n , m o lecu l a r genetics and b i oc h e m i c a l development. Re q u i re d of all b i o l ogy majo rs. Th ree h o u rs of lectu re, one 3-hour laboratory and o n e 1 -h o u r d i s cussion/ lab-introduction period per wee k . Pre req u i s i tes: B i o l ogy 1 5 1 or consent of d e partment chai rman . Co-reg istration in c h e m i stry reco m m e n d e d . I I 1 6 1 , 1 62 H U MAN ANATOMY A N D PHYS I O LOGY ( 1 , 1 ) A study of the structure and funct i on o f the h u man body. I n t h e fall semester, w h i c h deals p r i m a r i l y with anatomy, the l a b o ratory i n c l u des an extensive dis section of the Cal, and other m a m m a l i a n organs; the s p r i n g semester is pri m a r i l y physiolo gy a n d its l a b o rato ries i n clude extensive experimental work. Must be taken in seq uence. Th ree lectu res, two l a b o ratories and one d i scussion per week. I , I I 201 M I CR O B I O LOGY I n troduction t o g rowth, control, physi o l ogy, isolation, a n d identi fication of m i c roorganisms. Two lectures and one l a b o ratory per wee k . Prereq ui sites: Two courses i n b i o logy and one cou rse i n chemistry, or by consent of the i n structor. I 222 C O N SERVAT I O N OF NATURAL R E SOURCES (V2 ) A su rvey o f the pri nciples a n d problems o f p u b l i c a n d private steward s h i p of our resou rces w i th spec i a l reference to the Pacific N o rthwest. 235 B I OLOGY O F T H E SEASH O R E A s t u d y of the natu ral h i story o f the marine fauna of Puget So u n d . T h e cou rse is especia l ly useful for teac h e rs of science at e l ementary and j u n i o r h i g h level s . N o t to be counted toward a m ajor i n biology. Lectures, laboratory, and f i e l d trips. S


251 F U N CT I ONAL MORPHOLOGY The study 01 selected plant and a n i m a l morph o-types to emphasize the vital role 01 their structure i n m a i n ta i n i n g the l iving state; and, to provide a bas i c b o d y 0 1 knowledge t o support the biology c o r e . Th ree lectures a n d t w o 2-hour l a b o ratories per week. Prerequ i s i t e : B i ology 1 52. I 252 DEVELOPMENTAL B I O LOGY Developmental systems i n plant s and an i m a l s and an i nvestigation of the i n teracti ng systems that lorm the d i ff e re n t i ated o rg a n i s m Irom the fert i l i z ed ovu m . Th ree lectures and two labs per week. Prerequ i s i te : B i o l ogy 1 52 . I I 321 ORN ITHO LOGY (V2 ) A study 0 1 the bi rds, with emph asis o n l o c a l kinds. Designed lor students with a hobb y i n terest i n b i rds as well as for advanced students in b i o logy. Two lectures and one labo ratory pe rio d or lield trip per week. P re requi site : Bi ology 1 52 or consent of i n structor. 324 NATURAL H I STORY OF VERTEB RATES Cl assilicati o n , n atural 11istory and economic i mportance of the verteb rates w i t h the exce pti o n of b i rds. Lect u res, laboratory studies and field col lecti o n s . Three lectures and t w o labo ratory pe r i o d s p e r week. Pre requ isite : Biol ogy 1 52 . a/y 1 9 72-73 331 G E N E T I C S A study 0 1 the c h e m i ca l nature o f the g e n e , m e c llan i sms and reg u l a tion 0 1 genetic express i o n , variations i n c h ro m osomal structure a n d n u m b e r , a n d population gen etics. Th ree lectures and one 3-hou r laboratory per week. Pre requ isite: B i ology 1 52 . Organic C h e m i s try rec ommended. I 340 SYSTE MAT I C BOTANY Hi storical su rvey of c l assification syste ms; the use 0 1 taxonom i c keys in the identification 0 1 plants. Two lectu res and two laborat o ry pe riods pe r wee k. P rerequisite: B i o l ogy 1 52 . I I 346 C E LLU LAR PHYSIO LOGY Fun cti o n a l o rganization and physicoc hemical properties 01 c e l l s . Topics i n 足 c l ude ul trastructure, m e m b rane pe rmeabi li ty a n d transport pheno mena, bio足 electric phenomena, mechanic s o f cell division and the cell in relati on to its i m m ed i ate environment. Th ree lectures, one 4-h o u r l a boratory, and one d i s足 cussion pe r week. P re req u isite: Bi ology 1 52 and C h e m i stry 331 , 333. I I 351 NATU RAL H I STORY O F THE PAC I F I C NORT H WEST ( 1 V2 ) An extensive field and laboratory course cove r i n g major phases of the n atural h i story 0 1 the regi o n . Designed as a wo rkshop i n outdoor education especially lor teachers of scienc e at eleme ntary and j u n i o r high l evels. Lectures, labora足 tory stu dies, and field work. Not to be counted toward a major or graduate credit in biology. Prerequis ite: Consent of instructor. S


361 C O MPARAT I V E ANAT O M Y A compara t i ve s t u d y of the f o r m a n d structure 01 verteb rates with d i ssection of represen tative forms. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per wee k. Prerequisite: Biology 1 52 . I I 371 PARA S ITOLOGY A study of the morph o logy, l i fe hist o ries a n d host-parasite re lationships of the c o m m o n varieties of parasites o f vertebrates with e m phasis on those of man. Th ree lectures a n d two laboratory periods per wee k. P re requisite: B i o l ogy 1 52 . I a / y 1 972-73 372 G E N E RAL ENTOMOLOGY C l assi fication and n atural h i story o f i nsects with a strong e m p h asis on l a b o ratory and field stu d i es and col lections. Th ree lectu res a n d two labo ra足 tory periods per week. P rereq u i s i te : B i o logy 1 52 . I I a/y 1 971 -72 380 B I OLOGY TEA C H I N G RESOUR CES Methods, materials a n d resou rces for p re p a r i n g lectu res, l abo ratories, spec i a l studies, a n d f i e l d work i n m a j o r fields o f b i o l ogy. Designed for a l l levels o f teac h i n g . Lectu res, l abs a n d special p re parati ons req u i red. Prereq u i s i t e : B i o l ogy 1 52 o r c o n s e n t o f i nstru ctor. 384 B I O LO G II CA L LITERAT U R E AND R ESEARCH (V. ) Designed to teach the use of l i brary resou rces for l i te ra t u re searc h i n g , i n c l ud 足 i n g i n d ices, j o u rnals, abstracts, and reviews; to prepare a research prospectus and w r i te an acce ptable j o u r n a l article in an area o f student i n terest. 41 1 H I STOLOGY A m i c ros copic study of the normal tissues and organs of verteb rates. Th ree lectu res and two l a b o ratory periods per wee k. Prere q u i s i te : B i o l ogy 1 52 . 424 ECOLOGY A study o f p l a n ts a n d a n i ma ls i n rel ation to thei r envi ronment. Th ree lectures a n d two l aboratory periods per week. Prereq u i s i t e : B i o l og y 1 52 . 4 2 5 B I OLOG I CA L O C EA N O GRAPHY The study o f the ocean as an environment for plant and a n i m a l l i fe. The cou rse i n cludes stud ies of waves, currents, t i d es and other physi c a l factors of the ocea n , and stud i es o f n atural l ife zones of the ocean along w i th their physical and b i o l og i ca l aspects, t he i r fauna and flora, and adaptations of the b i o ta to the zone. Lectures, laboratory, and field t ri ps. P rereq u i site: One year of b iology. 441 VERTEB RATE PHYSIOLOGY Study o f the functions o f p r i n c i p a l vertebrate o rgan systems with em phasis o n ho meostatic relati o n s h i p s . Labo ratory work i s done e n t i rely by student parti c i pation a n d i n c l udes experiments i n c i r c u l a t i o n , e l ectrocard i o g raphy, endocri ne fun cti o n , res p i ra t i o n , sensory mechanisms, body fluid c h em istry, tem peratu re regu lation and an i n trod uction t o animal su rgery. F o u r lectu res and one 4-hour laboratory per week. Prereq u i sites: B i o l ogy 1 52 and C h e m i st ry 331 , 332. Ce l l u la r P h ys i o l ogy is strongly reco m mended .


444 PLANT PHYSI OLOGY A study o f p l an t g rowth from seed to flo wer. Topics i n c l u d e : seed germi n足 a t i o n , water relations, respirati o n , growth, g rowth reg u l ators, ph otosynthesis and other l i g h t effects on plant l i fe cyc les. Fou r lectu res and one 4-ho u r laboratory p e r week. Prereq u i s i te s : B i o l ogy 1 5 2 a n d Chem istry 33 1 , 332. C e l l u l a r Physiology is re commended. 490 SEMINAR ( V4 - V2 ) Selected topics i n b i o l ogy based on l i t e rature and/ or original research. Open to j u n i o rs and seni o rs majori ng in b i o logy. I I I 491 , 492 I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY ( V4 - 1 ) I n vestigati ons or research in a reas of special i n t e rest not covered by reg u l a r c o u rses. O p e n to qualified students majo ring i n biology. Prereq ui sit e : A b r i e f written proposa l , and conse n t of a faculty l e a d e r a n d the chairman. Students should obtain forms from the scie nce secretary well in advance of registrati o n . 597, 598 GRAD UATE RESEARCH (V2

-

1)

In terim courses offered in 1 97 1 :

304 306 309 313 497

TH E DESERT B l O M E PLANTS A N D MAN E M B RYO, FETUS AND MAN H O R M O N ES , ALCOHOL A N D DRUGS ( B I OLOGY/ C H E M I STRY) I N DEPEN D ENT STUDY


B U S I N ESS A D M I N ISTRATI O N M r . King, D e a n , M r , Baty, Mr. Bearse, M r . Graham, M r , Hutcheon, Mr. Lauer, Mr. Martilla, Mr. McMaster, Mr. Peterson, Mr. Stintzi, Mr. Watkinson, tv/r. Zulauf, assisted by Mr. Hildahl, Mrs. Nicholson, Mr. Utzinger

P U RPO SES AND EDUCAT I O N A L P O L I C I ES The m a i n p u rpose of the School of B usi ness Ad m i n i stration is to provide profess i o n a l b u si ness c u r ri c u l a of high q u a l i ty to help the Sc h o o l 's g raduates to become e n l i g h tened leaders in res p o n s i b l e positions i n busi ness, educati o n , and government. C o m b i ned with studies to meet the general U n i versity req u i rements and well chosen selections of elective courses from other discipli nes, these cu rricula are designed t o g i ve a modern background for the competent executive or staff specialist. This background i n c l udes a fundamental base of values, and a deep a p preciation of the service o pport u n i t ies and obligations in a changing soci a l , political and economic e n v i ro n m e n t for busi ness, In addition to analytical tec h n i q u es and knowledge of i n formation systems, t h o ro u g h u n dersta n d i n g o f decisive and sensitive dec i s i o n -maki n g i n c o m p lex b u s i n ess o rg a n i zations i s i n c l uded. To serve t h i s pu rpose as wel l as possi ble, the School o f Business Ad m i n istration has ch osen to serve the campus and the b u s i ness c o m m u n i t ies with com pact and d e l i berately l i m ited i n structi onal programs. They are i n ten ded for capable young men and women and seasoned exec u tives with practical experience. To s u p p le足 ment t h i s u n u s u a l l y rich educational envi ronment, the rising competence of the busines s faculty i s ,further strengthened by research and cons u l t i n g acti vities l i m i ted to t h i s p u rpose . C l asses a re s m a l l e n o u g h to meet the educati o n a l objecti ves of both the reg u l a r and the special or I n teri m cou rses, The educati o n a l p o l i cies e m ph asize re latively i n dependent l i brary and field s t u d i es to s u p p l e m e n t the reg u l a r assi g n 足 m e n ts i n read i n gs and exercises; active exchange o f d iverse views i n s m a l l g ro u p s and i n c l ass d i scussions i s enco u raged to deve l o p an i n c reasi n g l y effective a n d s o p h i st i cated analysis o f business cases and p ro b l e m s i n the f i e l d . B U S I N ESS ADVI SORY BOARD Edwi n S. Coombs, Jr., P resident, Rai n i e r B rewing C o m pany, Seattle, Wash i n gton Kenneth W . H u ltgren, Treasurer, Weyerhaeuser Com pany, Tacoma, Washington Stanley M . Little, J r. , D i rector of I ndustrial and Public Relations, Boeing C o m pany, Seattle, Washi n g ton A.E. Saunders , President, Puget Sound N at i o n a l Bank, Taco ma, Was h i ngton George Wade, P resident, Brady I n ternational Lumber C o m pany, Seattle, Was h i ngton B U S I N ESS CAREERS The maj ority of col lege g radu ates are event u a l l y emp loyed in b u s i n ess or gov足 ernment, and a d i vers i ty of p re parations may lead to successful c a reers, In some cases, n o backg ro und i n busi n ess i s either req u i red o r suggested . I n others , an u n d ergraduate o r g raduate s u p p o rt i n g f i e l d com posed of caref u l l y selected busi足 ness and other courses i s reco mmended.


Students i n t e rested in u n d e rg raduate busi ness administrati o n programs at Paci fi c Lutheran University are e n rofled in the Col lege of Arts and Sciences for at feast one year of p re-busi ness studies and may then transfer to the School o f Business Administration after a successf u l l y c o m p l e ted fres h m an year. Students conside ring business studies at the g raduate fevel s h o u l d seek early p l a n n i n g ad v i ce from the School of Business Admin istration fac u l ty for appro足 priate u n d e rgrad ua te curr i c u l a . The recommended prepara tion may i n c l u d e s p e c i f i c cou rses i n busin ess admin istration o r a n u n d e rg raduate m a j o r i n busi ness ad m i n i strati o n . A D M I S SION Students are admi tted to the School of Busi ness A d m i n i strati on by e i t h e r o f two basic processes: Gradu ate students are ad m i t ted when they meet the re q u i rements specified i n the p rocedu res of t h e Division of G raduate Studies. U n dergraduate students a re a d m i tted upon su ccess f u l completion of at least six cou rses in arts and scien ces with a c u m U l a tive grade point average of 2.0 or above, and declaration o f busi n ess ad m i n istration as a m a j o r in the registration p rocess. Transfer students are expected to have m a i n t ained the g rade p o i n t aver足 age of 2.0 m i n i m u m separately in both bu siness and non-busi ness cou rses. Assi g n ment of a business facu l ty advise r is req u i red. D E G R E E R E Q U I R E M ENTS The degree req u i re m e n ts for t h e MASTER OF B U S I N ESS A D M I N I STRAT I O N degree a r e spec ified in t h e proced u res of t h e Division of G raduate Studies. The BACH ELOR OF B U S I N ESS A D M I N I STRAT I O N degree req u i res the c o m p l e足 tion of at least t h i rty-two c o u rses (or eq u i valent) with an over-a l l g rade p o i n t average of 2.0 o r above. 1)

Specific req u i rements i n c l uded are: a. At least sixteen courses outside the School of Busin ess Ad m i n istration fields; b.

Cou rses taken to meet a l l g e n e ral U niversity req u i rements;

c. At least ten cou rses (at least five m ust be taken at P a c i fi c Lutheran U n i 足 versity) in b u s i n ess ad m i n i s tration (equivalen c i es t o be determined by the student's adviser in the Sc h o o l o f Busi n ess Ad m i n istrat i o n ) with a g rade point average of 2.0 m i n i m u m : (1 ) B A 281 , Finan c i a l Accounting; (2) BA 282, Acco u n t i n g I n formation Syste m s ; ( 3 ) B A 290, L a w a n d Society;

(4) BA 350, I n d ustrial Management; (5) BA 364, Managerial Finance; (6) BA 370, Marketi ng Systems; (7) BA 455, Busi ness P o l i c y (8) Th ree upper di vision c o u rses.


d . Th ree cou rses i n eco n o m i cs, i n c l u d i n g the f o l l o w i n g or equivalent: (1) Econ . 1 50 , P r i n c i ples o f Economics; (2) Eco n . 481 , Statisti cal Methods; (3) One u p pe r division econ o m i cs c o u rse . e. At least one cou rse in mathem ati cs i n c l u d i n g the following or eq u i va l e n t : Math. 1 27 , F i n i te Mathematics, or Math. 1 5 1 , C a l c u l us. f. At least one co u rse i n human relations to ,i n c l u d e the fo l l owi n g o r other appropriate elective i n h u m an re l ations : BA 453, Perso n a l and I ndustrial Relations, is the course designed to meet this req u i rement. Students with substantial background i n the h u m a n re lations a r e a may req uest t h e i r adviser t o approve appropriate substi t ut e courses to m e e t t h e req u i rement. BA 4 5 3 , Perso n n e l and I n dustrial Relations, when taken, does meet the req u i re m e n t o f o n e o f the th ree req u i re d u p p e r d i v i s i o n e l ective BA courses. 2 ) A g r o u p o f selected cou rses o u tside the School o f B u si ness A d m i nistration as part of the t h i rty-two course m i n i m l l m for the deg ree descri bed above. I n select i n g these s u p p o rt i n g cou rses the student s h o u l d consider career p l ans a n d objectives, a n d : a. Rev iew ski l l s i n o ral and written rheto ric and c o m m u n ications. Consider足 ation s h o u l d be g i ven to such c o u rses as CA 1 23, F u n damentals of Oral C o m m u n i cation. b . Because b usi ness activities can i n c rease o r m i n i m i ze social and economic p r o b l ems, ccnsider taki ng such cou rses as P h i los. 324, Soc i a l P h i l osophy, o r Econ. 434, Govern m e n t and the Economy. T h e degree req u i rements for the B A C H E L O R O F ARTS I N E D U CAT I O N are speci足 fied i n the School o f Education section of the catalog. However, advis i n g fo r busi 足 ness teach i n g careers in secondary schools is performed in the School of Business A d m i n istrat i o n . Students who wish to p repare to teach busi n ess subjects should con s u l t w i t h the Coordinator of the Bus iness Education curri c u l u m i n the School o f B u s i n ess Ad m i n istration before completing the reg istration p rocess.


F u n d . of Oral C o m m u n i cation Composition Soci ology J u daeo Christian L i fe a n d Thought

Financial Accounting Law a n d Society Statisti c a l Methods Elective

N on - B u s i n e ss I nterim Elective

N on - B u s i n e ss I nteri m Elective

Interim

B u si ness P o l i cy E l ective Elective

I n d ustrial Management M a r keting Systems B u s i n ess Elective Elect ive

I nterim Elective

Religion

BA 364

BA 282 E n g l . 230 Phi I . 201

Eco n . 1 50 Math. 1 27 CA 241

I nt e rd i s c i p l i n ary S e m i n a r BA 4 5 3 , Personnel a n d I n d u s t r i a l Relations Elective

Managerial Fi n a n ce U p p e r d i vi si o n Eco n o m i cs Elective B u s i n ess Elective

A c c o u n t i n g I n fo. Systems I n tro. to C o n t e m p . L i t . P r i n c i p les o f P h i l osophy Elective

P ri n c i p l es o f Economics F i n ite Mathematics O ra l I n terp retation of Literat u re

Spring Semester

O n l y l o wer d i vision busi ness cou rses may be taken b y lower d i vision students; s i m i l a r l y , lowe r d i vi s i o n t ransfer c o u rses from other instituti ons c a n n ot be used to meet b u s i n e ss req u i rements if they are offered as u p p e r d i v i s i o n busi ness c o u rses by the Sch ool of B u s i ness Ad m i n istrat i o n .

SA 455

Senior Year

BA 350 BA 370

Junior Year

Students s h o u l d s c h e d u l e f o u r % cou rses in PE activiti es d u ring fi rst two years.

BA 281 BA 290 Econ . 48 1

Soph omore Year

CA 1 23 English 1 01 Soc. 1 1 1 R e I . 1 03

Freshman Year

Fall Semester

S A M P L E M I N I M U M PROGRAM F O R T H E B A C H E L O R OF B U S INESS AD M I N I ST R AT I O N D E G R E E


SC H O O L OF BUSI NESS A D M I N ISTRATION COU RSES

Lower d i v i s i o n cou rses ( n u m be red 1 00 - 299) a re avai l a b l e to all students. U p p e r division c o u rses ( n u mbered 300 - 499) are open p r i m a r i l y to students who have been admi tted to the School of B u s i n ess Ad m i n i st ra t i o n . G raduate l e v e l c o u rses ( n u m bered 5 0 0 - 5 9 9 ) a re reserved for stude n ts i n the Master of Busi ness Ad m i nistration prog ram and t h ose students i n other g raduate p rog rams who have an a p p roved s u p p o rt i n g field in busi ness. Consent of the Dean of the School of B u s i n ess Ad m i n i stration i s req u i red fo r other students. The m i d d le d i g i t of t h e c o u rse n u m be r i nd i cates field of concentrat i o n : 4-Cou rses for b u s i n ess e d u cation and general service 5-Co u rses in personnel and i n d ustrial management 6-C o u rses i n fi n an ce and related su bjects 7-Cou rses i n marketing and d i stri b u t i o n 8-Cou rses i n a c c o u n t i n g and i n formation systems 9-Spe cial ized and p red o m i nantly i n dependent studies 241 B U S I N ESS C O M M U N I CA T I O N S Deve l o p m e n t of a p p l i e d w r i t i n g s k i l ls and te c h n i q u es i n b u s i n ess c o m m u n i c a足 t i o n s . I n c l u ded are letters of i n q u i ry, o rders and a c knOWledg m e n ts, sales and p romotional c o m m u n i cations, c l ai m s and adjustments correspondence, c re d i t and col lections letters, b ri ef i n g and b usi ness repo rts, resumes, and a p p l i cation letters. Req u i red for busi ness education majors. 243 FAM I LY F I NAN C I A L P LAN N I N G Consumer sav i n g a n d spe n d i n g p ro b l e m analysis a n d p l a n n i n g tech n i ques w i t h em phas i s on i n te l l i g e n t b u y i n g and budgeting, estate and tax p l a n n i n g , i n s u ra n ce and i n vestm e n t p rog rams, and ret i re m e n t p l a n n i n g . C o n s i d e ration of e t h i cal issues i n gove r n m e n t and b u s i ness from the point of v i e w of the consumer. Consumer o rgan i zation and i n fl ue n ce in the areas of finance, ma rketi n g , and prod ucti o n . Req u i red for b usiness education majors. 281 F I N A N C I A L ACCOUNT I N G A n i n troduction t o acco u n ti n g concepts p r i n c i p les. P reparation a n d analysis of f i n a n c i a l re ports. Req u i red for b usi ness a n d b u s i ness e d u cation m aj o rs. 282 ACCOUNT I N G I N FO R MAT I O N SYSTEMS I n troduction to management i n formati on syste ms. E m p h asis o n t h e a n a lysis and i n te rpretation of acco u n t i n g a n d econ o m i c data and their use in p l a n n i n g a n d control. Requ i red f o r busi ness majors. P re req u i s i te : BA 281 , o r a com足 p l ete c o u rse i n acco u n t i n g p r i n c i ples. 290 LAW A N D SOCI ETY A study of the legal system in the U n i ted States, and the reg u l ation of relation足 s h i ps between i n d i vi d ual c i tizens, g ro u ps, and the governmental agencies a n d b ran ches. Review of the rig hts a n d o b l igations of i n d i v i d u a l c i tizens and corporati ons, ad m i n i st rative law, a n d the procedu res and p racti ces of the cou rts i n a modern soci ety. Requi red for busi ness majors.


340 B U S I N ESS E D UCAT I O N Fi rst p a r t i n c l udes t h e objectives o f h i g h s c h o o l busi ness p rograms, t h e busine ss c u r ri c u l u m , l a y o u t a n d faci li ties p l an n i n g, the evaluation o f busi n ess teachers and com petence for busi ness occupations. Also i n c l u ded i s the examination of i n fo rmation resources and c u rrent t h o u g h t i n busi ness edu足 cati o n . The second part of the course con cen trates on the appl ication of research fin d i n gs and psyc hological pri n c i p l e s to the teac h i n g of typewrit i n g and bookkee p i n g in secondary schools. Requi red f o r b u s i n ess education majors. P rerequisites: Advanced Typing and BA 2 8 1 or eq u i valent. 350 I N DUSTRIAL MANAG E M E N T A c r i t i c a l ex ami nation of the p r i n c i p l es and p rocesses of admi n i s t ration i n i n dustrial a n d o t h e r organizations. Management te c h n i q ues a n d the fun ctions of plan n i n g , o rg a n i z i n g , d i rection, and con trol are dis cussed from both the classical and the behavioral p o i n ts o f view. I n t roduction to case an alysis and problem-solvi ng tec hniq ues. Requi red for busi ness majors. 364 MANAG E R I A L F I N A N C E Concentrated study of the to o l s of finan c i a l analy sis: Funds a n d cash flows, c r i t i c al analysis of f i n a n c i a l statements and other f i nancial i n fo rmat i o n , tec h n i q u e s a n d financial p l a n n i n g and budgeti n g , and t h e conce pts related to capital expend i t u re budgeti n g , and the cost of capital. An introduction to f i n a n c i a l strategies and decis ion-making for f i n a nc i n g , expan s i o n , and d i vidend poli c i es. Req ui red f o r b usi ness majors. P re r equisites: Eco n o m i c s 1 50 and 481 , and BA 282 , o r equivalent. 365 R EAL ESTATE Study of land use planning and commercial deve l o p m e n t o f land. The focus is on demand factors, govern ment control i n z o n i n g and regu l a t i o n , and real estate inves tment analysis. 366 RISK A N D I N SURANCE MAN A G E M E NT An i n trod uction to the p r i n c i ples of risk and i n s u rance management. Analytical review of main functions and i nstitutions of t h e i n s u rance b usine ss. 370 MARKE T I N G SYST E M S The f l o w s of g c o d s and services in the e c o n o m y ; e c o n o m i c a n d behavi o ral app roaches to the analysis of deman d ; the role of the marketi ng function in a busi ness f i r m ; determ i n a tion of the marke t i n g mi x-pro d u c t p o l i cy, p r i c i n g , c h annels o f d i s t r i b u t i o n , a n d marketing c o m m u n i c ations. Requi red for b us i ness majors. 381 I NT E R M ED IATE ACCO U N T I N G Conc entrated s t u d y o f t h e valuatio n theories f o r assets a n d l i a b i l i ti e s . Analysis o f related effects on income determ i nation . P re req u i site: B A 2 8 1 , o r a comp lete c o u rse i n ac c o u n t i n g p r i nci ples. 383 I N CO M E TAXAT I O N Compreh ensive s t u d y of i n come t a x con cepts, regulati o n s , a n d t a x p l a n n i n g


p r i n c i p les. E m p h as i s on i n d i v i d u a l and corporate i n come taxati on. Prereq u i 足 site: BA 281 , o r eq u i valent. 385 COST ACC O U N T I N G Basic a n d advan ced c o n cepts of costs i n deve l o p i ng i n fo rmation f o r manage足 ment use i n the determ i n ati on of i n come, evaluation of c a p i tal i n vestment a l te rnatives, and the measurement of performance. Prereq u i s i te : BA 282 . 387 DATA PRO CESSI N G SYST EMS A c o m p u ter l a b o rato ry oriented c o u rse w h i c h i n c l udes basic p rogram and system analys i s and flow c h a rt i n g , i n t ensive study of p rogramming lang uages with emp hasis on FORTRA N , and the development of a working knowledge with c o m p ute r ha rdware and software systems. P rereq u i s i t e : BA 282, or permission 0 1 the i n s tructor. 441 TEAC H I NG S E C R ETA R I A L S U BJ ECTS ( V2 ) The appli cati on of research f i n ding s a n d ps ych ological p r i n c i ple s to the teac h i n g of s h o rt h a n d , office practice, and related subjects in second ary s c h o o l s . I n tended for b u s i ness education majors. P rerequ i s i tes: Advanced S h o rthan d , Advanced Typewr i t i n g , BA 241 , and BA 340 o r equivalent. 442 TEACH I N G G E N ERAL B U S I N ESS S U BJ ECTS ( V2 ) The a p p l i cation o f research f i n d i ngs a n d psych o l ogical p r i n c i p les to the teaching of general busi ness, c o n s u m e r econo m i c s , e c o n o m i cs, busi ness law, business m athemat i c s , and b u s i ness com m u n i cations su bjects in sec足 on d a ry schools. P rereq u i s i tes: BA 241 , 243, 290 or 495, 340, E c o n o m i c s 1 50, or consent of the i n structor. 443 I N FOR MATION P R OC ES S I N G I n trod u c t i o n t o i nform ati on a n d data processing systems, a n d related u s e o f i n fo rmation process i n g eq ui p m e n t : d u p l i cati ng, copying a n d a u d io-vi s u a l processes, m e c h a n i c a l c a l c u l at i n g e q u i p m e n t , electronic d a t a p rocess i n g eq u i p m e n t , and d i ctati ng a n d transcribing e q u i p ment. N o rm a l l y offered d u r i n g the I n terim sessi o n . Designed for busi ness ed ucation maj o rs and students w i th an i n te rest in office functions. 450 M A N U FACTU R I N G M A N A G E M ENT P r i n c i p les o f s c i e n t i f i c manage ment; p l a n n i n g produc ts, physical fac i l i ties, eq u i pment and m ate r i a l s for prod ucti o n ; methods a n d tech n i q ues of super足 v i s i o n and control of perso n n e l ; prod uction c o n t ro l ; purchasing and i nventory m anagement. The c o u rse i n c l udes supervi sed student projects and major case studies. P rereq u i s i te : BA 350, or equivalent. 453 P ERSON N E L A N D I N D USTR I A L R ELATI O N S Detai led ex a m i nation of behavi ora l p rocesses of i n d i v i d u a l s and g ro u p s i n b u s i n ess organizations. E m p h as i s on pol i cy issues a n d spec i f i c p ro b l e m s i n managing h u m a n resources w i th focus o n modern practi ces o f i n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s and personnel management i n i n d ustrial a n d other organizati ons. Prereq uisite: BA 350, or eq uivalent.


455 B U S I N ESS P O L I CY Formulation of p o l i cies to i n tegrate a l l functions of busi ness. Social, e t h i c a l , re l i g i o us, eco n o m i c , e d u cational and i n ternati onal i m p l i ca t i o n s i n the formu足 lation of b u siness p O l i c i e s and objectives. I n c l udes comprehensive case analyses. Req u i red fo r b u s i ness majors. Prereq u i s i t e : Sen i o r stan d i n g with t h orough knowle dge of b u siness f u n c t i o n s , o r the consent of the i n structor. 456 HONORS S E M I N A R Advan ced rea d i n g s a n d di scuss i o n s in management theory a n d related subjects to meet objectives s i m i l a r to t h ose of SA 455 , Busi ness P o l i c y . O p e n t o busi ness students w h o h a v e m a i n tained a c u m U l ative g rade p o i n t average of 3 . 0 in at l e a s t f o u r busi ness cou rses, i n c l ud i n g BA 281 , Finan ci a l Acco u n t i n g : SA 282, Acco u n t i n g I n formation Systems; BA 2 9 0 , L a w a n d Society; and S A 3 5 0 , Industrial Management. O t h e r selected students may be a d m i tted to the s e m i n a r by fac u l ty i n v i tation o n l y . Students who have comp leted this cou rse may be excused by the Dean from BA 455, Busi ness Pol i cy. 46 1 F I N A N C IAL A N A LYS I S Study of financial p o l i cies a n d t h e analytical framework f o r s u p p l i e rs and users of private i n d u s trial c a p i t a l . I n tensive stud ies of selected com pan ies and i n d u st ries. P re requ i si te : SA 364, o r permission of the instructor. 464 F I N A N C I A L M A N A G E M E N T Problems o f working capi tal management, p l a n n i n g the financial structure, issue of new securities, a n d major financial p o l i c i e s . I n te n s i ve and extensive use of cases and advanced read in gs. P rereq u i site: BA 364, o r e q u i valent. 470 MARKET I N G MANAGEMENT Analyt i c a l approaches for the so l u ti o n o f marketing problems ; deve l o p i n g marketing strategies: p l a n n i n g a n d a d m i n i stering c o m p re h ensive marketi ng p rog rams: ev al uation a n d control of mar keting opera t i o n s . Prereq uisite: BA 370, o r equivalent. 4 7 1 MARKET I N G RESEARCH AND C O N S U M E R BEHAV I O R Tec h n i q ues a n d uses o f marketing research in t h e b u s i n e ss decisio n-making process. Emphasis is p l aced on research des i g n , various su rvey m e t h od s , research i n strum ents, a n d sa m p l i ng p l a n s as t h e y relate t o marketing con足 sumer p rod ucts a n d services i n a changing e n v i ron m e n t . Conte m p o rary behavioral science concepts to b e exa m i n e d and i n c o rporated in selected m a r ke t i n g p rojects. Prereq ui s i t e : BA 370, and Economics 481 , o r equ ivalent. 472 A D V E RT I S I N G AND SALES MANAGEMENT Role of adverti s i n g a n d personal se l l i n g i n t h e ma rket i n g progra m ; ana lysis of ma rket targets; developing m a r ket poten t i a l s ; media selec t i o n ; des i g n i n g the p romotional message; eval uation a n d c o n t r o l o f the p r o m o t i o n a l m i x . Prereq u i s i te : BA 3 7 0 , o r e q u i va l e n t , o r permission o f the i n structor. 473 I N D U ST R I A L M A R K ET I N G AND P U R C H A S I N G Analys i s of the i n d u strial b u ying and se l l i n g process, p u rchasing p o l i cies


and proced u res; selection of sou rces of s u p p l y ; contract analysis and negotiat i o n ; market i n g problems of manu facturers of i n d ustrial goods; deve l o p i ng and i m p lemen t i n g i n d ustrial marke t i n g strategies. Prereq u i site: BA 350 and 370, o r equivalent. 482 ADVA N C E D ACCO U N T I N G C o m p rehensive st�dy of acco u n t i ng for corporati ons, i n c l u d i n g the accou n t­ i n g aspects of consoli dations and m e rgers, and partners h i ps, treatment of i n c o m p l ete data; special ized acco u n t i n g con cepts related to funds a n d cash fl ows, statement analysis, and acco u n t i n g for estate and trusts. Prereq u i s i t e : BA 381 , o r equivalent 484 A U D I T I N G T h e p r i n c i p l es and p roced u res o f a u d i t i n g a s they a p p l y t o t h e m a j o r balance sheet and i n c o m e acco u n ts, genera l l y accepted a u d i t i n g standards used by CPA ' S ; p rofess i o n a l ethics. P rereq u i s i t e : BA 482, o r equivalent. 488 SYSTEMS ANALYS I S A N D D ES I G N Computer oriented lab oratory study of system design and analysis. Emphasis on systems documentat i o n , t h e auditing of computerized systems, the use of mathemati cal models i n systems and s i m u lation techniques. Prereq u i s i te : BA 387, or equ ivalent. 490 S E M I NAR Se m i n ar on spec i f i c a l l y selected topics i n b us i n ess. Offered on deman d . P re requ isite: Consent of t h e i nstructor. 491 D I RECTED STUDY I n d i v i d u a l stud ies, rea d i n g s on selected topics a p p roved and supervised by the i n structor. P rereq u i site: Consent of the i nstructor. 495 B U S I N ESS LAW Proce d u res, con tracts, agency, negotiable i n struments, b u s i n ess o rg a n i zations, p roperty, trusts and w i l ls, transportat i o n , i n s u rance and e m p l oyment. 550 O R GA N I ZATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T The s c i e n c e and art of m a nagement is expl o red with s p e c i a l e m p h asis on the contributions from i n d ustrial psyc h o l ogy and sociology. T h i s c o u rse is centered on external and i n te rnal social a n d eco n o m i c e n v i ro n me n t changes as related to p l ann i n g , and o n the study of g ro u ps and work teams as related to the f u n ctions of d i recting and contro l l i n g . Major case studies are i nc l uded. Requi red fcr a l l M . B .A. cand i d ates. Prereq u i s i te : BA 350, o r equivalent. 551 S E M I NA R I N I N D USTR tAL MANAGI'OMENT I n tensive analysis and deve l opment of sol utions for operat i o n a l m a n agement. E m p h asis is on the relati ons h i p of p roduction to other functions and external factors. Case studies of m odern tech n i q ues and meth o d o l ogies as a p p l ied i n selectee sit uations and i n d ustries, i n c l u d i n g the use of quantitative models, systems design and the use of c o m p uters. Req u i red for a l l M . B .A . cand i d ates. P rereq u i s i tes : BA 350, 550, and a working k n owledge of q u a n ti tative methods.


555

B U S I N E SS STRATEGY AND P O L I CY Advanced re adings a n d case studies i n managem e n t functions of p l a n n i n g . o rganization a n d contro l . Required f o r all M . B.A. ca n d i d ates. Prerequisite: Thorough graduate level knowledge of analytical methods and function al fie lds of busi ness management, last semester stand i n g in the M.B.A. program.

564

S E M I NAR IN F I NANCIAL MANAGEM ENT Managemen t's role in fra m i n g the f i n a n c i a l poli cies of the fi r m . Case studies i n the determination of needs, sou rces a n d uses of funds; t h e deve lo p m e n t of f i n a n c i a l structures, evaluat i o n of alternative f i n a n c i a l p l a n s and alloca足 tion of funds w i t h i n the firm, and t h e control of financial resources. Required for all M . B .A . candidates. Prerequisite: BA 364, 550, 582, o r eq uivalent.

570

S E M I NAR I N MARKETING MANAG EMENT Study and an alysis of marketi ng man agement policies and p rograms. Emphasis i s o n t h e i nterrelated elements of t h e ma rketing mix and t h e relat i o nsh i p o f m arketing wit h other intern al functions; a s well as the c h a n g i n g social e n v i r onmen t, i n novati o n , and modern marketing p h i losophies. Required for all M.B .A. cand i d ates. P rereq uisites: Strong backgro u n d i n econo m i cs and BA 370 o r e q u ivalent.

581

S E M I NAR I N F I N ANCIAL AC C O U N T I N G THEO RY A critical exam i n ation of advanced acco u n ting conce p ts and standards. I n tensive study o f the c u r rent problems and contemporary trends reflected in acc o u n t i n g l i terature. Course designed for p rofess i o n a l acco u n tants. Prerequisite: BA 482, o r equivalent, or conse n t of the i nstructor.

582

AC COU NTI NG I N FOR MAT I O N AND CONTROL A study of the appl ications o f acc ounting i n formati o n , services, and systems in the so l u t i o n of management problems in busi ness. Requ i red for all M . B .A . ca n d i d ates. Students excused f r o m t h i s course a r e expected to complete BA 581 o r some other advanced acco u n ting stud ies. Prerequisite: BA 281 , or equivalent.

590

SPECIAL S E M I N A R Sem i n a r o n spec i f ic ally selected advanced t o p i cs in busi ness. Offered on d e m an d . Prerequisite: Conse n t of the inslru ctor.

591

I N D E P E N D ENT STUDY I n d i v i d u a l read ing and stud ies of selected topics. M i n i m u m s u pervision after i n i ti a l p l a n n i n g of stude nt's work. Pre req u i site: Consent of the instructor.

596

R ESEARCH COLLOQ U I U M Supervised i n d i v i d u a l intensive study of e i t h e r t h e case c o l lect i o n process and problem so lving approaches (co m p letion o f case rese a r c h , i n c l u d i n g a c o m prehen sive commentary and l i terature s u m mary, acceptable for i n c l u sion in t h e I n tercollegi ate Case Clearing House B i b l i o g raphy), or a formal re search study for a thesis. Reg istration for a m i n i m u rn of one semester is require d f o r a l l M . B.A. stu d e n ts. Prereq u i site: Last semester stan d i n g i n t h e M . B .A. p rogram.


Interi m courses offered in 1 971 :

243 314 315 443 490 499 596

FA M I LY F I N A N C I A L PLAN N I N G B U S I N ESS, POLITICS A N D T H E C O M M O N MARKET (BUS A D M / P O L SCI) LAW A N D SOCI ETY I N FO R MATION P R O C ES S I N G S E M I N A R : I N ST I TUTIONAL ACCOUNT I N G D I RECTED STUDY RESEA R C H C O LLO Q U I U M


C H E M I STRY

Mr. Huestis, Chairman, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Giddings, Mr. Nesset, Mr. Olsen, Mr. Swank, Mr. Tobiason The cou rses offered by the Departme nt of C h e m i s try are based on fundamental p r i n c i p l es of chemistry, mathematics, and physics, s i n ce modern c h em i ca l train足 ing a n d p ractic e is marke d l y dependent on knowle dge o f these other areas also. The c o u rses, cu rri c u l u m , fac u l ty, a n d fac i l i ties of the department are a p proved by the American C he m i c a l Society. G radu ates c o m p l e t i n g the prescribed p rogram wi l l b e certified as havi ng met req u i rements of t h e American Chemical Soc iety for entry i n to the c h e m i cal profess i o n . A m a j o r f u l f i l l i n g t h e req ui rements of the BACHELOR O F ARTS degree consists of Chemistry 1 1 5 ; 1 42 ; 321 ; 331 , 332, 333, 334 ; 341 , 342, 343. Prereq u isites for these c o u rses i n c l u d e a m i n i m u m of two c o u rses i n physics, a n d mathematics through 1 52 (second semester c a l c u l us). Students completing t h i s p rogram may c o n t i n u e i n to g raduate study in c h e m i stry, but p referab l y should com plete addi足 tional c o u rses from the B a c h e l o r o f SCience c u rr i c u l u m . Additional c o u rses in m athematics, phys i cs, and in some cases b iology are also recommended. The fore i g n l a n g u a ge req u i rements of the Coillege o f A rts and Sciences should be f u l f i l led u n d e r O p t i o n I by the study of G e rman, req u i red for Ameri can C h emical Soci ely certi fic ati o n . Russian o r F re n c h are acceptable s u bstitutes fo r the Bach e l o r of Science deg ree; wi th permission o f t h e department, Option I I may be acce pted for the B a c h e l o r of Arts degree. SUG GE STED PROGRAM FOR BACHELOR O F S C I E N C E IN C H E M I STRY' Freshman Year C h e m i stry 1 1 5 Chem istry 1 4 2 English 1 01 German 1 0 1 , 1 02 Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52 Phys i cal Education Elective'

Courses 1

Courses Sophomore Year Chemis try 331 , 333; 332, 334 2 '12 Physics 1 01 1 PhysiCS 253 1 German 201 , 202 2 R e l i g i o n 1 03 or 203 1 Y2 Physical Education _

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2 2

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'14

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1 8 8'14

Courses Junior Year 1 Chemi stry 3 2 1 2 '12 Chemistry 341 , 343 ; 342, 344 1 P h ysics 254 P h ys i cal Education '14 3 Elective' . _ _

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Senior Year C h e m i stry 497 Chemistry Elective (401 , 404, 422, or 432)3 Elective'

Courses 1

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1 6 8

7% ' Opportunities for exemption or advanced placement may be available in English, German, Mathematics, and Physics. In many cases courses may be taken in years other than those indicated.


'Elective courses m ust include those needed to complete the General University requirements in Fine Arts, History or Literature, Philosophy, Social Science, and the second course in Religion, as well as required Interim experiences. 3To receive American Chemical Society certification, a student m ust complete Chemistry 422, 432, and an additional upper division c o urse in chem istry, mathe足 matics, or physics. Afthough no more than 1 0 courses in chemistry may be applied toward the 32 course graduation requirement, the research requirement may be met with a half course during the academic year or by a summer experience with足 out ac ademic credit. In some cases students earning American Chemical Society certification will need more than a total of 32 courses to the extent tl1at chemistry course credit exceeds 10 c o urses. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION major req u i rements are l i sted below. Candid ates for this d e g ree m u st also meet spec i a l re q u i rements d es c r i bed in the School of Education section in t h i s catalog. Senior /-Jigh Sch ool Preparation: 1 13;. courses Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7'/4 courses c o n s i s ti n g of C h e m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 42 , 3 2 1 , 33 1 , 332, 333, 334 , 341 , 342, and 343. P rereq u i s i tes : Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 o r 253 ; Mathe足 matics 1 5 1 , 1 52. J unior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: same as for se n i o r level above. Teach i n g M i nor: 5V2 cou rses consi sti n g of C h e m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 42, 321 , 331 , 3 3 2 , 333, 334. P rerequ i si t e : Mathematics 1 33 or e q u i v a l e n t . Elementary S c h o o l Preparation: Teac h i ng M a j o r : 6 cou rses. Req u i red : 4 app roved cou rses i n c h e m i stry a n d two a d d i t i o n a l cou rses t o b e determi ned i n c o n s u l tation with t h e S c h o o l o f Educat i o n . Teac h i n g M i n o r : Th ree c o u rses t o be determi ned i n consultation w i th the S c h o o l o f Educati o n . 1 03 I NTRODUCTION T O B I OCH EM ISTRY A s u rvey of general, organ i c , and b iochem istry pertinent to C h e m i c a l processes in the h u m an organ i s m . S u i t able for l i be ral arts students, n u rsing students, and prospective teac hers. N o p rereq u i s i tes. I 1 04 G E N ERAL I N ORGA N I C C H E M I STRY Basic aspects of c h e m i c a l b o n d i n g and desc ri pti've i norgan i c c h e m i st ry; c h e m i c a l aspects of environmental poll u t i o n . N o prereq u i si tes; may fO l l ow Chemi stry 1 03 or 1 1 5 for students des i ri n g a sec ond cou rse i n c h e m istry. I I 1 1 5 G E N E RAL C H E M I STRY The structure of matter, atom i c and m o l e c u l a r theory, q u anti tative relation足 ships. S uitable for s c i e n c e majors and others. Prereq u i si te o r core q u i s i te : Mathematics 1 33 . I 1 3 2 PR ESENTAT I O N OF EXP E R I M ENTAL W O R K (V4 , V2 , or 1 ) A n h o n ors c o u rse i n chemical laboratory p racti ces involving i n d i v i d ual p rojects s u p e rvised by fac u l ty me mbers, oral and wri tten reports. P rereq u i s i te : One c o u rse i n c o l l eg e c h e m i st r y and i n vi tation of the department.


1 42 SYSTEMAT I C I N OR GAN I C C H E M I STRY Study o f the elements g rou ped according to the periodic table, c h e m i c a l equ i l i b ri u m . rad iochem istry a n d i n orga n i c qual itative analysis. Prereq uisite: C h e m i stry 1 03 a n d 1 04 , o r 1 1 5 . " 1 52 SYST EMA'l' I C I N O RGAN IC C H E M I STRY H ON O R S An honors l e v e l stu dy o f the c h e m i s try of the elements i n c l u d i n g chemi cal eq u i l i b ria and ki netics, c o o rd i nation c o m p o u n ds , electro and n u c lear chem足 istry, q ual itative analysis, and an i n dividual p roject. Repl aces Chemistry 1 42 for selected students. Prereq uisite: Chemistry 1 1 5. Core q u i s i te : Mathematics 1 52. " 321 QUANTI TAT I V E ANALYS I S C he m i c al meth o d s of quantitative analysis, i n clud i n g volumetric, gra v i m e t r i c , and selected i n strumen tal m e t h o d s . Prereq uisite: C h e m i stry 1 42 ; Mathematics 1 33. I 33 1 , 332 ORGA N I C C H E M I STRY ( 1 , 1 ) An i n terpretation o f properties and reactions o f a l i p h at i c and aromatic c o m 足 p o u n d s on t h e basis o f c u rrent c h e m i ca l theo ry. Prereq u i s i t e : Chemistry 1 03 and 1 04 , or 1 15 . C o requisite : C h e m i stry 333, 334. I , " 333. 334 ORGA N I C C H E M I STRY LABORATORY ( V. , V. ) Conven t i o n a l and m odern tec h n i q u es o f synthesis, separat i o n , reactions, and analysis o f organ i c compoun ds. Must accompany Chem istry 331 , 332, I, " 34 1 , 342 PHYSICA L C H E M ISTRY ( 1 , 1 ) Study o f relati onsh i p between structure, energy c o n tent, and physical and c h e m i ca l properties o f c h e m i ca l systems. Prerequ isite: C h e m i stry 1 1 5 ; Mathe足 matics 1 5 2 ; Physics 1 0 2 or 253. I , " 343. 344 PHYSI CAL C H E M ISTRY LA B O RATORY ( V. , V. ) Methods and i n te r p retation o f measurement and c a l c u l ation o f physi c a l and c h e m i cal properties. O n e semester o f labo ratory is req u i red for the B.A. degree; both semesters for the B.S. d e g ree. C o requ i site or prereq ui site: Chemis try 34 1 , 342. I , I I 4 0 1 ORGAN I C Q U A L I TATIVE ANALYS I S Study o f methods f o r the i so l ati o n and i d e n t i f i c ation o f org a n i c c o m p o u n d s , i n c l u d i n g m o d e r n spectrophotometric and c h ro m atog raphic tec h n iques; systematic procedu res for searc h i ng the ch e m i c al l i terature. Prereq u i s i te : Chemistry 332 and' 334. I 404 B I O C H E M I STRY Study of the c h e m i stry o f b i o l og i cal systems, i n c l ud i ng laboratory methods. Prereq u i s i te : Chem i stry 332 a n d 334. " 422 ADVANCED I N O R G A N I C C H E M I ST R Y A study o f m O d' e r n i n o rgan i c theory i n c luding ato m i c and molec u l a r structure , period i c trends, a n d coordi nation compounds; advanced laboratory tech 足 n i q u es for i norga n i c synthesis. Prerequ isite or coreq u isite: C h e m i stry 342 and 344. "


432 I N STRUM ENTAL ANALYS IS Theory and practice o f i n stru mental meth ods for c h e m i cal analysis and molecular structu re dete r m i n a t i o n . P re re q u i s i t e : C h e m istry 32 1 , 341 , 343 ; C h e m i st ry 342 a n d 344 are e i t h e r p re req u i s i te o r c o req u i s i te. I I 49 1 I N DEPEN DENT ST UDY ('14 , '12 o r 1 ) L i b rary a n d / o r l a b o ratory study o f topics not i n cl u ded i n reg u l arly offered cou rses. Proposed p roject must be app roved by the chai rman of the d e part足 m e n t and su pervisory responsi b i l i ty accepted by an i n structor. May be taken m o re than once. I' I I 497 RESEAR C H ( V2 o r 1 ) Experimental o r theoretical i nvestigation com prising previously u n publ ished work. O pen to upper division students with the consent of the chai rman of the department. May be taken m o re than once. I I I 597, 598 G RADUATE RESEA R C H ( V2 t o 1 ) O pen t o master's degree candidates only. Prere q u i s i t e : Consent o f the c h a i r足 man of the department. Interim courses offered in 1 971 :

301 303 310 313 441 451

TEC H N I Q UES OF ST R U C T U RA L D ET E R M I NAT I O N ALCH EMY A N D AST ROLOGY D E MO N ST RAT I O N O F SCI ENTI F I C C O N C EPTS (EARTH SC I EN CES) H O R M O N ES, ALC O H O L AND D R U G S ( B I OLOGY/ C H E M I ST RY) I N DEPEN DENT STUDY RESEA R C H


CLASSICS

Mr. Carleton, assisted by various members of the Departments of Foreign Languages, History, Philosophy, and Religion The above d e partments cooperate in offering a c l a ssics area major. This i n ter足 de partmental major req u i res completion of twelve co u rses selected from the l i s t below in con s u l tation w i t h t h e program c o o rd i nator, M r . Carleton. For adm i n i s 足 tra t i ve pu rposes the c l assics a rea major is a prog ram of the Department of F o re i g n Languages, but the p rofessors w h o teach the cou rses below share i n the c o n d u c t o f a l l aspects of the program such as p l a n n i n g , eva l u a t i n g , a n d advis i n g . The foundation o f a l l majors is a lang uage program i n L a t i n a n d / o r G re e k : Lat i n Lat i n G reek G reek Greek

101 , 201 , 1 01 , 20 1 , 421 ,

1 02 202 1 02 202 422

Elemen tary I n te rme d i ate Elementary I n termedi ate Masterpieces o f G reek Literature

The b a l a n ce of a major is derived from these c o u rses : Hi story 321 , 322 P h i losophy 331 Heligion 203 Religion 327 R e l i g i o n 421 R e l i g i o n 422

H i story o f t h e Ancient World Hellen i c P h i l osophy B i b l i c a l L i te ratu re An cient C h u rc h H i story O l d Testament Studies New Testament Studies

I n dependent Study c o u rses Selected I nte r i m cou rses Furt h e r descri ption of the above cou rses may be found in the parts of the catalog devoted to each d e p a rtment.

C O M M U NICATION ARTS

Mr. Karl, Chairm an, Mr. Capp, Mr. Doughty, Mr. Nordholm, Mr. Parker, Mrs. Revis; assisfed by Mrs. Capp, Mr. Eyres Candidates for the BACHELOR OF ARTS D E G R E E may c o m p lete a major with 8 cou rses i n p u b l i c add ress, or 8 c o u rses in d rama, or 8 c o u rses c o m b i n i n g t h e th ree areas of t h e department- p u b l i c add ress, d rama a n d broadcast i n g . A l l stu dents majoring i n t h e f i e l d w i l l parti c i pate i n s o m e p h ase o f d ramatic, forensic, a n d broadcasting co-c u r r i c u l a r activities. P u b l i c Add ress m a j o r : Eight cou rses, of which C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23 is req u i red. The rem a i n d e r of the c o u rses will be selected i n cons u l tation with t h e a d v i s e r . Sug gested c o u rse schedUle: 227, 3 2 7 , 333, 3 3 5 , 3 4 4 , and at l e a s t two additional c o u rses i n the department. Drama major: E i g h t cou rses, o f which Comm u n i cation Arts 1 23 i s req u i red. The rema i n d e r of t h e c o u rses wi l l be selected in cons u ltation with t h e adviser. Sug-


gested cou rse sched u l e : 241 , 250, 351 , 354, 363, and th ree a d d i t i o n a l cou rses i n the d rama area. Students i n te rested i n broadcasti ng Sll o u l d , i n a d d i t i o n to C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23, take 241 , 275, 374, and f o u r a d d i ti onal C o m m u n ic ation Arts c o u rses, to be selected i n consulta:ion with the adviser. S u p p o rting work i n related d e p a rtments is reco m m ended. C a n d i d ates for the BAC H E L O R O F F I N E A RTS D EG R E E will b e req u i red to take 13 c o u rses in the d e p a rtment, i n c l' u d i n g F u n d a mentals of O ral C o m m u n i cation 1 23. The re m ai n i n g 12 cou rses wi l l be selected in consu ltation with the ad viser. The se足 lected cou rse structu re w i l l vary with the area of the department to be emp hasized. Suggested cou rses for d ra m a e m ph asis (should be taken as clo se to seq uence as poss i b l e ) : 241 , 250, 344, 351 , 352, 354, 363 , 374 p l us two dramatic l i teratu re courses and two e l ective c o u rses. Suggested c o u rses for p u b l i c add ress e m p h a s i s : 227, 232, 327, 333, 335, 336, 344. The balanc e of the cou rses wi l l be selected tog ether with the adviser. Suggested courses for broad casting e m p h asi s : 24 1 , 271', 275, 344, 374. The bal足 a n ce o f the cou rses wi l l b e selected together with the adviser. These sho u l d i n c l ude s o m e c o u rses i n rel ated departments. BACHELOR O F A RTS IN EDUCAT I O N m aj o r req u i re ments are l i sted b e l ow. C a n d i d ates for t h i s deg ree must also meet spec ial req u i rements desc ribed in the School of Educ ation section in t h i s catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 11 co urses Teac h i n g Major: 6 to 8 c o u rses. Required: 4 c o u rses: C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23, 227 or 250, 241 and 404, p l us 3 to 5 c o u rses i n consu ltation with the m a j o r adviser. Suggested supporting co urses: One o f the f o l l o w i n g : 1 ) 4 to 5 courses i n E n g l i sh a p p roved by the major advise r ; o r 2 ) 4 to 5 cou rses i n a modern or c l assi ca l language. Junior High S ch o ol Preparation: Teac h i n g M a j o r : 6 to 7 c o u rses. Required: 3 courses: C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23 , 227 or 250 and 241 , p l us 2 a d d i t i o n a l courses in C o m m u n i cation Arts. A d d i t i o n a l 2 to 3 c o u rses to be d ete r m i n e d i n consu ltation with the d e p a rtment a n d the School of E d u c ation. Te a c h i n g M i n o r : 4 to 5 cou rses. Required: C o m m u n i cati on Arts 1 23 a n d 241 , p l us 2 to 3 c o u rses of electives. Elementary School Preparation: Teach i n g M aj o r . 6 courses. Required: C o m m u n i cati on Arts 1 23 and 402, p l u s 2 c o u rses in C o m m u n ica足 tion Arts a n d 2 cou rses i n E n g l i s h . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses t o b e determ i n e d i n consultation w i t h the School of Education. 1 23 F U N DAMENTALS O F ORAL COMM U N I CA T I O N Foundation c o u rse d ea l i n g w i t h basic ele ments of the s p e e c h s i t u a t i o n , i n v o l v足 i n g skills of the visi b l e and a u d i b l e a p p roaches, as wel l as con centrati on on content. Extensive p l atform work. I I I


1 2 5, 225, 325, 425 C O M M U N I C ATION ARTS PRACT I C U M (% ) V4 c o u rse cred i t i n Fore n s i c c o m p e t i t i o n , D rama P ract i c u m or Broadcasting Pract i c u m may be gai ned each semester, but only 1 course total may be used to meet re q u i reme nts for g raduati o n . All m aj o rs w i l l be req u i red to take at least two practi c u ms in the major area o f i n te rest. Departmental conse n t req u i red. I I I 1 6 1 I N T R O D U CT I O N T O T H E TH EATRE An i n trod u ction to the theatre as a f i n e art and i ts contribution to the cu l t u re of a peo ple. T h e correlation between the p l aywri g h t , designer, actor, d i rector, and t h e i r i n f lu ence i n relation to o n e another. I 226 PA R L I A M E NTARY LAW (V2 ) A study o f p a r l i amentary law based upon Robert's Ru les of O rder. Prac tical wo rk p redomi nates. Desi g n ed p r i m a ri ly to a i d t h ose w h o d o o r will belong to org a n i zations. I I 227 A R G U M ENTAT I O N A N D D EBATE A r g u m e n tation, evidence, proof and the adaptation and a p p l i c ation of argu足 ment to various types o f oral c o m m u n i c a t i o n . T h e forms of debate and t h e i r p rep aration fi n d prese ntation a r e i m portant c o u rse c o n s i derat i o n s . I 232 CONTE MPOR ARY ORAL D I S C O U R S E A study of t h e s i g n i f i c a nce of r h e t o r i c ( i . e . , "the p rocess of a d j u sting id eas to people and people t o i d eas") d u r i n g various stages of Western c u l tu re from the classical period to t h e p resent. Spec i a l attention is g i ven to the rhetoric of such c o n te m porary issues as war, poverty, re l i g i o n , and c i v i l rights. I n dependent investigation, a l o n g w i t h classroom re ports a n d discus足 s i o n , i s em phasized. I I 241 ORAL I N T ER P R ETAT I O N O F L I TERATU R E A n i n troduction to the a rt of read i n g l i teratu re aloud to a n audi ence, t o i n terp reting i t expe r i e n ti a l l y , logically a n d e m o t i o n a l l y . I n d i vi d u a l a n d g ro u p read i n gs. I I I 250 F U N D A M ENTALS O F ACT I N G An in trod uction t o t h e work o f t h e actor, h i s natural a n d learned s k i l ls, with exe rcises i n m emory, i m a g i n at i o n and observation, using i m provisations and scenes from modern p l ays. To i n c l u d e the theory and p ractice of stage make-u p. I 271 BROAD CAST MED IA-MAN A N D SOC I ETY A study of t h e historical, p h i losoph i c a l , a n d soc i o l o g i c a l aspects of the media and i ts i m pact on man a n d society. Lect u re and laboratory. I 272 T H E BR OADCASTER A N D A study o f the t h e o ry and i nstruction and practice in i n rad i o , TV, and record i n g

S O U N D ( V2 ) structure of sound for the broadcaster i n c l u d i ng the use of typical a u d i o control equi pment found studios. I I


275 RAD I O P R O D U CT I O N A study o f t h e elements o f rad i o prod uction i n c l u d i n g analysis of program design, w ri t i n g for rad i o , and p roduction tools and tec h n iq ues. Lecture and l a b o ratory. Exte n s i ve use o f KPUJ-FM studio faci' l i ties and e q u i p m e n t . I 283 J O U R N A L I S M ( V2 l Theory and tec h n i q ues of news c o m m u n i cation for p r i n t and e l ectron i c m e d i a . An alysis o f j ou rn a l i st's audience, represe n tative med i a , j o u r n a l i st i c vocati o n s . Social and legal res ponsi b i l i ty o f the n e w s w r i t e r . I 284 J O U R NALI SM-N EWS W R I T I N G ( Vo l T o em phas i ze the role o f the j ournal ist i n re porting c o m m u n i ty a n d state affairs. I n teraction of the news m e d i a and govern ment. Copy e d i t i n g , head足 l i n e writing, news d i splay, i l l ustration, typography, printing processes. P re足 req u i s i te : CA 283. I I 327 EXT E M P O R A N E O U S SPEAK I N G P l atform work p red o m i n ates. Special e m p h asis g i ven t o the study o f gath足 ering m ateri a l , methods o f p reparati o n , and d e l i ve ry. P re req u i s i te : 1 23 or conse n t o f d e p a rtment. I 333 R H ETO R I C A N D R H ET O R I CAL C R I T I C I S M A study o f t h e deve l o p m e n t o f rheto r i c a l theory f r o m C o r a x t o m o d e r n ti mes with an emphas i s on G reek and Roman contri b utions. A su rvey of the theories o f trad i ti onal and contemporary c ri tics with particular e m phasis on the ap足 proach to, methods of, and standards for evaluation o f rhetori cal d i sc o u rse. I 335 A M E R I CAN P U B L I C A D D RESS A c ri t i c a l study of selected A m e ri ca n speeches, speakers, a n d c o n t roversy from Jonathan Edwards to the p resent. E m p hasis on methods and styles for effectiveness studied a g a i n s t a background of the speake rs a n d the issues of thei r ti mes. I 336 P E RSUAS I O N A s t u d y of t h e d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g p rocess i n c o n te m p o rary society. Em phasis o n a n alysis of m ethods i n a p p ea l i n g to h u m an motivation s a n d thei r a p p l i cation i n actual p latform experience. I I 344 ADVANCED I NT E R P R ETAT I O N O F LITERAT U R E Spe c i a l p rojects a n d c l ass exerci ses d i rected toward p rog ram p l a n n i n g . Deve l o p m e n t of s ki l l and c o m m u n i cative n ess i n read i n g a l o u d . Deve l o p m e n t o f the art o f m a k i n g l i te ratu re l i ve. P re re q u i s i te : 241 . I I 351 STAGE T E C H N O LOGY Basic theory and p roced u re o f tec h n i c a l aspects in set b u i l d i n g , costume constructi o n , make-up, basic d rafti n g , scenery, the asse m b l i n g , h a n d l i n g and m anagement of the stage. I 352 S C E N r C D ES I G N T h e development of artistic a n d tech n i cal abi l i ties i n t h e c o m plete deS i g n i n g o f scenery and costumes for p l ays of a l l periods . Ass i g n m e n ts c o v e r va rious


stytes and periods as well as the p re p a ration of models, re nderings, working d rawings a n d scen i c painting. P re re q u i s i t e : CA 3 5 1 . I I 354 PLAY D I R ECTION A study of the role o f the d i rector, h i sto r i c a l l y and c r i t i c a l l y , a n d an i ntro­ d u c t i o n to the art of play d i recting. Each student wi l l d i rect and p roduce a one-act p lay, accompanied by an ann otated d i rector's s c ri pt, and a theoret i c a l ! p ra c t i c a l a n a l ysis. Prereq u i sites: C A 250, 351 , a n d J r. c l ass sta n d i n g . I I 356 STAGE L I G H T I N G Theory and practice o f stage l i g h t i n g from t h e b a s i c deve l opment of electri c i ty and l i g h t i n g i ns t r u ments to the c o m plete design of l i ghting the show. Pre­ req u i s i t e : CA 351 . I I 358 ADVANCED ACT I N G An i n tensive study o f the w o r k of t h e actor, w i t h e m p h asis on character a n a lysis and embo d i me n t , using i m p rovisati ons a n d scenes from p l ays. To i n c l u d e styles of acting. Prereq u isite CA 250. II a / y 1 9 7 1 -72 363 H I STORY OF THE T H E ATRE A study of the theatre and d rama i n representative societies, i n c l u d i n g early G reece and Rome, As i a , Renaissance and modern E u rope, America, and others, with e m p h asis on i n d i v i d u a l research and part i c i p a t i o n . I a/y 1 9 71 -72. 374 T E L E V I S I O N P R O D U C T I O N A s t u d y o f t h e ele ments of television p ro d u c t i o n , i n c l u d i n g an a n a l ysis of pro­ g ra m design, writing for television, and p roduction tools and te c h n i q ues. Lecture and l a b o ratory. Extensive use o f KPL U-TV studio fac i l ities and equip­ ment. I I 380 SPEECH S C I E N C E AND PATHOLOGY P ractical study o f anatomy. physi olo gy and physics i n v o l ved i n the speech process. The study of ph onetics and the p roduction of all sounds In the Eng­ lish l a nguage. Basic p r i n ci ples and the rapy of speech correcti o n . Remedial proced u res designed for articulation, voice, stuttering, and lang uage d i s­ o rders. T h e rehabi litation of the brain damaged a n d c l eft palate h a n d i ­ capped. I I 385 J O U R N A L I S M - E D I T O R I A L TECHN I Q U E S (112 ) I n d i v i d u a l workshops t o i n c l ude the f o l l o w i n g : advanced newswr i t i n g , wri ting o f public relations mate r i a l , magazine writing a n d desi g n . P re requisite or coreq u i s i te : 283 or 284. I I I 402 S P E E C H I N T H E ELEM ENTARY C LASSROOM (V2 ) A survey of speech p roblems and opportunities w h i c h con front the teac her in the c l assroom, grades one t h rough ei ght. I I 404 SPEECH I N T H E SECON DARY S C H O O L (112 ) C u r r i c u l u m constructi on , speech p h i l osophy for the tea c h e r . C o - c u rricular activities: a d m i n istration of d rama, radi o a n d f o re n s i c activities. I I


450 C H I L D R E N'S T H EATR E WORKSHOP Practical formal d ramatics for teachers from k i n d e rgarten t h ro u g h high school. A comp lete th ree-act p l ay o r its equiva l e n t w i l l b e p roduced. The students wi l l be i n volved i n d i recti n g , stage management, l i g h t i n g and a l l o t h e r ph ases o f p ro d u cti o n . S 459 S U M M ER D RA M A W O R K S H O P (1 V. ) The s u m m e r d ra m a workshop w i l l consis t o f one session of i n tensive work in d rama. Acti n g , stage m a n agement, l i g h t i n g in structi o n , and a l l other phases of p ro d u ction a re i n c l uded. S 474 I N ST R U CT I O N A L TECHNOLOGY A N D T H E CLASS R O O M TEAC H E R ( V2 ) A cou rse designed to acq u a i n t the c l assroom te a c h e r with televi sion as a tech n o l o g i c a l tool for teach i n g . I n c l u ded w i l l be the general criteria for tec h 足 n o l ogy i n teach i n g a n d t h e s p e c i f i c criteria for t h e u s e o f te levi sion a s a tea c h i n g tool. I I 4 7 8 S U M M E R TELEV I S I O N W O R KSHOP A p ractical and i n tensive study o f the c reative and prod uction tec h n i ques of television prog ram m i n g . The cou rse i s desig ned for t h e mature student. I t wi l l feature extensive use of KP LU-TV stud i o fac i l ities a n d e q u i pment. S 491 S P EC I A L ST U D I ES I N CO M M U N I CATI O N A RTS (V4 ) 492 S P EC I A L S T U D I ES I N C O M M U N I CATION A RTS ( V2 ) 493 SPEC I A L STU D I ES I N C O M M U N ICAT I O N A RTS (1 ) 596 RESEARCH IN C O M M U N I CATI O N A RTS (V4 ) 597 R ESEARCH I N C O M M U N I' CAT I O N A RTS ( V2 ) 598 R ESEARCH I N C O M M U N I CATI O N ARTS (1') Interim courses offered in 1 971 :

309 313 314 31 7

S T U D E N T P R OTEST-THE R H ET O R I C OF C O N FR ONTATI ON ACT I N G FOR T H E N O N -ACT O R W O R K SH O P I N I N T E R P R ETER'S T H EAT R E M A N A N D H I S E N V I R O N M EN T : A S SEEN THROUGH T H E M E D I A

MOBILI


EARTH SCIENCES

Mr. Ostenson , Chairman, Mr. Fisk, Mr. Huestis, Mr. Lowes Studies in Earth S c i e n c es deat with the nat u rat physical envi ronm ent, ra n g i n g f r o m p l anetary science a n d t h e un iverse to consideration o f t h e earth's c rust, the c o n t i n ents and ocean bas i n s and t he i r m u t u a l i n t er-relati onsh i ps. Cou rses i n clude s t u d i es in geology, oce anogra p h y , astronomy, meteorology and geog raphy w i t h emphasis on the relations h i p between mankind and the natural envi ronment. Cou rses o f study may be arranged to p repare students for careers i n any of the basic f i e l d s . In add i t i o n , i n ter-departmental p rograms can provide more spe c i a l i zed b a c k g ro u n d for g raduate work in s u c h fields as geophysics o r geo c h e m i s t ry. The offerings a re p a rti cu larly s u i ted to students p l a n n i n g teac h i n g careers in earth science at the various school leve ls. BACH ELOR O F ARTS degree major req u i rements consist o f a m i n i m u m of s i x c o u rses s u p p o rted by t w o c o u rses i n each of t w o other natural science fields. BAC HELOR O F ARTS IN E D U C AT I O N m aj o r re q u i reme n ts i n Earth Scie n ces are l i sted below. C a n d i d ates for this d eg ree m u st also meet spec i a l req u i re m e n ts des c ri bed in the School of Ed ucation section in t h i s catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 c o urses Teach i n g Maj o r : 1 1 cou rses Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 324, 360 or 365, 491 , 492. Required supporting courses: Mathematics 1 5 1 ; Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 42 , Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 . Suggested supporting courses: B i o logy 1 5 1 , 1 52 a n d ad d i t i o nal c o u rses in chem istry and physics. Junior High School Prep aration: Teac h i ng Maj o r : 7 courses Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 324, 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: C h e m i s try 1 1 5, 1 42. Suggested supporting courses. Mathematics 1 5 1 ; Biology 1 51 , 1 52. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 cou rses i n earth and ph ysical scienc es. Elementary School Preparation : Teac h i ng M a j o r : 6 cou rses Prerequisite: Trigonometry and h i g h school b i o l o gy. Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 324, 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: Chemis try 1 1 5 , 1 4 2. Teac h i ng Minor: 3 cou rses in earth a n d physical sci ences. 1 0 1 WORLD G EOGRAPHY Patterns of p h ys i c a l , c l i matic and ecological features on the earth and t h e i r re l a t i o n s to m a n . T h i s c o u rse does n o t meet the U n i versity natu ra l science req u i rement. I


1 2 2 I NT R O D UCTION TO PHYSICAL S C I E N C E A c o u rse which considers t h e physical nature of the earth by i ntegrating the sCiences o f chemistry, geol ogy, meteorology and physics to a study of the earth, i ts materials, processes, h i story and environment. The cou rse is p ri m a r i ly i n tended f o r students with no previous backg round in chemistry, geology or p hys i cs . Th ree lect u res and one l a b o ratory period per week. I 1 3 1 P H YSICAL G EO LOGY A study o f rocks, m i nerals, and the p hysiograph i c features of the su rface o f the earth. T h ree lectu res and one t h ree- h o u r labo ratory period (or field t r i p ) a wee k. Formerly Geology 1 0 1 . 1 32 H I ST O R I C A L G EOLOGY A n at u ra l sequel to Geology 1 3 1 . A study of sed i m e n tary rocks, foss i l s , and earth h i story. Th ree lectu res and one th ree-h o u r l a b o ratory ( o r field t r i p ) a wee k. F o r m e r l y Geology 1 02. I I 1 36 DES C R I PT I V E AST R O N O M Y T o p i c s covered i n c l ude the m o o n , the s o l a r syste m , coo rd i n ate systems for locating ste l l a r objects, c h aracteri stics of stars. 202 G EN E RAL OCEAN OGRAPHY A desc riptive c o u rse desig ned to g i ve a b road backg ro u n d . Em p h a s i s is on relations h i ps between oceanography and other fields, cove r i n g physi c a l , c h e m i c a l , b i o l og i c a l , c l i m atic and geo l o g i c a l aspects o f the s e a . Le ctu res, l a b o ratory and f i e l d trips. I I 222 CONSERVAT I O N O F NAT U R A L RESOU RCES ( V2 ) See B i o l og y 222. 323 M I N ERALOGY Fundamental p r i n c i ples of crystal l ography and m i neralogy, studying both o re and rock form i n g m i nerals. Two lectu res and one two-hour laboratory period a wee k. Prereq u i s i tes: ES 1 3 1 and h i g h school chemi stry or per足 m i ssi o n . T h i s c o u rse wi l l b e offered II 1 972-73. 324 PETROLOGY Occu rrence and classification of the common rocks, emphasizing the pro足 cesses by which they were formed . Lectures and laboratories are i n tegrated. Prerequisites : ES 1 31 or perm issi o n . I I 351 NATURAL H I STORY O F T H E PAC.I F I C N O RTHWEST ( 1 V2 ) See B i o l ogy 3 5 1 . 3 6 0 GEOLOGY OF W EST ERN WAS H I N GTON A study of the m i nerals, rocks and geological h i story of the area between the C O l u m b i a P l ateau and the Paci f i c Ocea n . Lectures, laboratory sessi o n s and field trips. Prereq u i s i t e : O n e y e a r of c o l l ege l a b o ratory science o r permission. S


365

G LACIAL G EOLOGY A sludy o f g l a c i a l ice, gl acial de posits, and land forms re sulti ng from the Ple istocene glac i ation i n North Ameri ca. Lectures, l a b o ratory sessi ons, and field t r i p s . P re req u i s i l e : one y e a r of col lege labo ratory science o r permission. S

425

B I O L OGICAL OCEANOG RAPHY See B i o l o gy 425.

490

S E M I NAR ( V4 o r V2 )

4 9 1 , 492

I N D EP E N D E N T ST U DY (V4 - 1 )

,Interim courses offered i n 1 971 : 305 310

P R O B L E M S I N A I R P O L L U T I O N (EC O N / EARTH SC I E N C ES) D E M O N STRAT I O N OF SC I E N T I FIC C O N C EPTS

ECON O M I CS Mr. Miller, Chairman, Mr. Enderby, Mr. Genda, Mr. Jensen, Mr. Vinje

The cou rses in economics are designed ( 1 ) to offer to a l l students an oppor足 t u n i ty to acqu i re a g e n e ral u n d e rstan d i n g of the pri vate a n d p u b l i c sectors of the U n i ted States economy so that they may be more e n l i g h tened c i ti zens, ( 2 ) to provide the necessary general backg round for stu dents p l a n n i n g to teach in t h e S o c i a l Scienc es and f o r students m a j o r i n g in Bu si ness A d m i n i s tration o r i n the other Soc i a l Sciences, and (3) to provide the necessary backg rou n d for stude nts p l a n n i n g g raduate study in econ o m i c s . A BACH ELO R OF ARTS m a j o r i n economics s h a l l c o n s i s t of a m i n i m u m of e i g h t cou rses i n c l u d i n g Econom i c s 1 50 , 351 , 3 5 2 , 481 , a n d 486, a n d Busin ess A d m i n i stration 2 8 1 . The rema i n i n g two courses in economics s h o u l d be ch osen in consu ltation with the department. Students conte m p l at i n g g rad uate sludy i n econ o m i cs are strongly advised (though n o t req u i red) t o i n c lude Mathemati cs 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 231 , and 332 in t h e i r total program of study. BAC H E LOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N major req u i rements are l isted below. Candid ates for t h i s degree m u st a l so meet special req u i rements described i n School o f Ed ucation section i n t h i s catalog.

1 1 courses Teach i n g M a j o r : 8 cou rses Required: Eco n o m i c s 1 50 , 3 5 1 , 352, 486; plus th ree a d d i t i o n a l cou rses from the fo l l owi n g : E c o n o m i cs 3 2 1 , 331 , 361 , 3 6 2 , 434, 4 8 1 ; p l u s H i s tory 255; p l us th ree cou rses distrib uted over the areas of so c i o l o gy, political science, or a n t h ropology.

S e n i o r High School Preparation:

Junior High School Preparation:

Teac h i n g Major: 7 c o u rses


Required: Ec o n o m i cs 1 50 , 434, 486 ; p l us 1 cou rse from the fo l l ow i n g : Eco足

n o m i cs 32 1 , 331 , 351 , 352, 361 , 432, 481 : p l us H i story 255 ; plus 2 cou rses d i stri b uted over the areas of s o c i o l o g y and p o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e . Teac h i ng M i n o r : 4 cou rses Required: Economics 1 50 p l us 3 u p p e r d i v i s i o n cou rses in econom i cs. Elementary School Preparation:

Teac h i ng Maj o r : 6 cou rses Required: Economics 1 50 , 434, 486; p l u s o n e c o u rse from the fol lowi n g : Economics 32 1 , 331 , 351 , 352, 361 , 362, 432 ; p l us H i story 2 5 5 , and one cou rse from the a reas of sociology or p o l i t i c a l science. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses Required: Economics 1 50 and 2 upper d i v i s i o n cou rses in e c o n o m i c s . 1 50 P R I N C I P L ES O F EC O N O M ICS A cou rse designed to i n troduce the student to the scope of economics, deal ing d u ri ng the semester with both Mac ro- and M i c ro-Ec o n o m i cs, the p u rpose being to a n a l yze the U .S. e c o n o m i c syste m , with special e m phasis on c u rrent econom i c p o l i c y . N o p re re q u i s i te . I I I 290 S E M I N A R ( V4 to 1 ) Se m i n ars o n spe c i f i c a l l y selected t o p i cs i n economics w i l l be offered as c i rcu mstances warrant. P rereq u i site: Consent o f i n stru ctor. 321 LABOR P R O BLEMS A study o f the h i story, natu re and treatment o f l a b o r p rob lems i n the U n i ted States. Among the topics d i scussed are e m p l oyment and wage p ro b l e m s ; c o l l e ctive bargai n i n g ; poverty and d i s c r i m i nati o n ; and man power p rograms. N o p re req u i s i te . I 331 I N TERNAT I O N A L ECO N O M I C S Reg i o n a l a n d i n ternati o n a l specialization, com parative costs, i n ternati o n a l payments, and exchange rates. N ational pol i c ies to p ro m ote o r rest rict trade. P rereq u i site : Economics 1 50. I 351 I NTERMED IATE MAC R O EC O N O M I C ANALYS I S N ational i n come determ i n ation i n c l ud i n g p o l i c y i m p l ications with i n t h e i n sti足 tutional f ramework o f the U.S. economy. P rereq u i site: Econom i cs 1 50 . I 352 I N TERMED IATE M I C R O ECO N O M I C ANALYS IS The theory o f consumer behavior. P ro d u c t and factor p ri ces u n d e r c o n d i t i o n s o f m o n o p o l y , competiti o n , and i n te rm e d i ate ma rkets. Welfare e c o n o m i c s . P re re q u i s i t e : Econom i cs 1 50 . I I 361 M O N EY A N D BAN K I N G T h e natu re a n d functions of m o n e y and c redit i n sti tutions. T h e relati o n s h i p o f m o n e y a n d ban k deposits t o the national e c o n o m y . P re req u i s i t e : Economics 1 50. I I 362 P U B L I C F I NA N C E P u b l i c taxation a n d expend i t u re at the fed e r a l , state and l o c a l leve l s . Among the topics d i s cussed are the i n cidence o f taxes, the p u b l i c debt, and the


provision of p u b l i c goods such as national defense, ed u c a t i o n , p u re a i r and water. Prereq u i site: Economics 1 50. I 432 DEVELO P MENT ECO N O M I C S An ex p l o ration of t h e e c o n o m i c growth p rocess i n l e s s deve l oped regi o ns of the w o r l d . Parti c u l a r atten t i o n w i l l be given to the i n ter-rel ationsh i p in the growth p rocess of political, economic, c u l tu ral a n d i n stitutional factors. Pre足 req u i s i t e : Economics 1 50. " 434 GOVER N M E NT AND T H E ECO N O M Y A study of the relati onsh i p between t h e p u b l i c and private sector of the U . S . e c o n o m y w i t h special atten t i o n given to government reg u l ations. No pre足 req u i s i te . I 481 STAT I ST I C A L METHODS Desc r i ptive stati stics: meas u res of position, d ispers i o n , and proportions. I n ferential statist i c s : estimation a n d the testing of hypotheses b y paramet ric and n onparametric techniques. Regression a n d correlation analysis. I " 486 REA D I N G S I N THE EVOLUT I O N OF ECON O M I C THOUGHT A su rvey ot the deve l o p m e n t of econ o m i c thought from a n c i e n t to modern ti mes with emphasis on t h e period from Adam S m i t h to J. M. Keynes. This period i n c l u d es: the c l assi c a l econom i sts, t h e soc i a l i s ts, the marg i n a l i sts, the neo-c lassical economists, a n d the Keynesians. No p rereq u is i te . " 490 S E M I N A R ( V4 to 1 ) Sem i n ars o n spe c i f i c a l l y selected topics i n economics w i l l b e offered as ci r c u m stances warrant. P rereq u i s i te : Consent of t h e i nstructor. 491 , 492, 493 I N D EP E N DENT STUDY ( V. t o 1 ) Consent o f the i n structor req u i red. 504 MANA G E R I A L E C O N O MICS Develops the abi l i ty to apply basic economic c o n cepts to policy formation and operati n g decisions w i th special reference to such prob l e m s as cost, d e m a n d , p r i c i n g , a n d i n vestment. P rere q u i si te 1 50. I " 543 Q UANTITAT I V E METH ODS Develops the abi l i ty to apply t h e concepts of p robabi l i t y , sam p l i n g , a n d sta tistical decision t h e o r y t o p ro b l ems faced b y management. Prereq u i s i t e : Permission o f the instructor, E c o n o m i c s 481 . I " 591 , 592, 593 I N DEPENDENT STUDY (V. to 1 ) 599 T H E S I S ( '14 t o 1 ) Interim courses offered i n 1 97 1 :

305 306 307 31 1

P R O B L E M S IN A I R POLLUT I O N T H E PSYCHO LOGY O F E C O N O M I C C H A N G E U R BAN ECONO M I C S FOR ECASTI N G I N B U S I N E SS A N D E C O N O M I C S


E D U CATI O N Mr. Johnston, Dean, Mrs. Baughman, Mr. DeBower, Miss Fletcher, Mr. Hagen, Mr. Jorgenson, Mrs. Mathers, Mrs. Napjus, Miss Orvik, Mr. Pederson, Mr. Petty, Mr. Stein, Miss Williamson; assisted by Mr. Adachi, Mr. Beal, Mr. Bertness, Mr. Breckenridge, Mr. Ehlers, Mr. Gray, Mr. Holden, Mrs. Keblbek, Mrs. Lauer, Mr. Leasure, Mr. Minetti, Mr. Moe, Mr. Nelson, Mrs. Nokleberg, Mr. Warren

Purpose The general p u rpose o f the S c h o o l o f Education is to contri b u te to the devel­ o p m e n t o f profess i o n a l e l ementary and seco n d a ry s c h o o l person n e l with l i beral and s c i e n t i f i c education i n tegrated w i t h i n a C h ristian frame o f reference. The School regards ,i tse l f as s h a r i n g this p u rpose, as well as the means and respons i b i l ­ i ty fo r attai n i n g it, w i t h the U n i ve rs i ty a s a w h o l e and with e a c h activity o f t h e U n i ve rs i ty a s s e t f o r t h i n t h e statement o f i ts p h i losophy. Desi ra b l e u n d e rstand­ i n gs, a b i l i t i es, and attitudes are as fo l l ows:

U n d e rstand i n g s o f the o b l igations o f H 18 teac h i ng p rofession to g u i d e c h i l d re n and youth i n the p u rs u i t o f kn owledge and ski l l s , to h e l p t h e m to b e c o m e h a p py , usefu ll, and s e l f-supporting c i t i zens, and to p repare them i n the ways o f d e m o c racy. U n derstand i ngs o f the eco n o m i c , p o l i t i c a l , soc i a l , psyc h o l o g i c a l , and p h i loso p h i ca l aspects of educati o n . U n derstan d i ngs of a n d abi l i ty t o f u n c t i o n i n t h e roles of t h e teac h e r a s a d i rector of learn i n g , a c o u n s e l o r and g u idance wo rker, a mediator of the c u l t u re, a l i n k w l t � the c o m m u n i ty , a m e m b e r o f a s c h o o l staff, and a m e m b e r of t h e profess i o n . U n d ersta n d i ngs of research tec h n i q u es a n d a b i l i ty t o u s e t h e m . Attitu des c o n d u c i ve to c o n s c i e n t i o u s p rofess i o n a l w o r k and carefu l ly p l a n ned experi mentati o n . Attitudes c o n d u c i ve to c o n t i n u o u s evaluation a n d rev i s i o n o f means and e n d s . Admission Students antici pating c a reers in education take two years o f basic general e d u ­ cation i n the C o l l ege o f A rts and Sciences. I n the s o p h o m o re year the student i s e l i g i b l e to register fo r Ed uca t i o n 2 0 1 a n d w i l l at IIlat t i m e make a p p l i c at i o n f o r adm ission to t h e S c h o o l o f Educati o n . Students wi l l b e c o m e candidates fo r the Bac h e l o r o f A rts i n E d u c a t i o n degree when they have met the fo l lowing req u i rements:

1) Have earned a c u m u l at i ve g rade point average o f 2.25 after c o m pletion o f Education 2 0 1 and p r i o r to adm ission to t h e professi o n a l seq u e n ce c o u rses. Students m ust have C o r bette r g rades i n E n g l i s h 1 0 1 and in Psy c h o logy 1 0 1 o r S o c i o l ogy 1 1 1 . 2) Have c o m pleted C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23 o r demonstrated proficiency.


3)

Have i d eals and perso n a l i ty q ua l ities w h i c h make for suc cessful teac h i n g .

4)

Have a c l e a r l y defined p u rpose o r goal .

5)

Have selected a preferred level of p reparation and the area or areas of con­ cen tration to be f o l l o we d .

6)

Have c o m p leted satisfacto r i ly the scree n i n g program.

7) Have received approval d u r i n g an i nd i v i d u a l c o n ference with representative(s) o f the S c h o o l o f E d u cati o n . The cand i d ate is req u i red t o maintai n these standards i n o r d e r to reta i n h i s stan d i n g i n t h e S c h o o l o f Education. S t u d e n ts w h o have taken the Bachelo r's deg ree at Paci f i c Lutheran o r at another i nsti tution who contemplate meeti n g certifi cation req u i rements are expected to meet the same req u i reme nts for a d m i s s i o n . These stu d e n ts are advised to begin with the summer session. The certification seq uence w i l l norm a l ly req u i re a sum­ m e r session a n d two semesters, o r th ree semesters. Curricu lum Requirements

I n a d d i t i o n to the general U n i . ers i ty c o u rses req u i red in a l l cu rricu la, certain speci fic req u i rements i n general edu cation m u s t be met. 1 ) H istory 255, Pacific N o rthwest, requ i red o f all e l emen tary teac her c o n d i d ates, and all seco n d a ry cand i d ates with a major or m i n o r in a social s c i e n c e . 2)

Geography 1 0 1 is re q u i red o f a l l element ary teacher c a n d i d ates.

3)

P rospective elementary teachers u s u a l ly meet the science general education req u i re m e n t b y c o m p leti n g B i o l ogy 1 1 1 , o r other l i fe science, a n d Earth Sci­ en ces 1 22. A year cou rse in one laboratory science may b e s u bsti tuted by those w h o have adeq uate h i g h s c h o o l background in the other sc iences.

4)

A student must demon strate competence i n speech by a c h i ev i n g a satisfactory score o n a profic iency test g i ven by the C o m m u n i c ation Arts Department, or by c o m p l e t i n g C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23 .

5)

P h ysical Educ ation 2 9 5 , School Health, is req u i re d of a l l tea c h e r candi dates.

CERTIF ICATIO N

G u i d e l i nes f o r the preparati o n a n d certification of teachers have been estab­ l i shed by the State Board o f Educati o n . The rec o m m e n d ed p rogram pattern i n c l u d es : b road l i b e ral edu cati on, 35 per cent; subject matter speciali zati o n , 35 per cent; professional study, 20 per cent; a n d electives, 10 per c e n t . The fou r-year c u rr i c u l u m leads t o t h e B a c h e l o r of A r t s i n Education deg ree and to the p rovisional certifi cate, an i n i ti a l l icense to teaC h , issued for a peri o d o f th ree years. The beg i n n i n g teacher h a s had preparat i o n a n d s u pervised experi­ ences with students on the various levels. Each teacher p repares specifical ly to teac h at one leve l . Pac i f i c L u t h e ran U n iversity recommends t h e c a n d i date f o r the fi rst te a � h i n g position on t h e basis of h i s preparat i o n . Authorization for elem entary teaching req u i res student teach i n g i n the ele­ mentary school, t h ree c o u rses of p rofess i o n a l ized subject matter, a n d nine c o u rses of s u bject matter speCialization.


Authorization tor secondary teaching requires student teaching in the second ary school and e l even to twelve cou rses o f s u bject matter special ization i n app roved teac h i n g areas. Authorization tor elementary and secondary teaching req u i res student teaching

at both o f these levels. Students who elect to change levels w i l l be expected to meet the m i n i m um requirements as given above for the n ew leve l . Any teach e r may com plete his p reparation f o r a n e w level du ri n g the fifth yea r of c o l lege. Fifth Year and Standard Certification The fifth year of teacher education is to follow a period o f one year o f i n i ti a l teac h i n g experience. The s t u d e n t m u s t c o m p lete a m i n i m u m o f t w o cou rses a p p l i c a b l e toward the fi fth year, before the beg i n n i n g of t h e fourth year o f teac h i n g . Seven a n d one-half cou rses m ust be c o m p leted before beg i n n i n g the seventh year o f teach i n g . T h e student m ay ch oose the i nstitution i n w h i c h h e wis hes t o t a k e h i s advanced work as fo l l ows :

1)

If he ch ooses to work at Pacific Lutheran U n ivers ity, or any other of the teacher e d u cation i nstitutions i n t h i s state, that i n stitution shall be responsible for recom mend i n g h i m for the Stan d a rd Certifi cate u p o n successful c o m p letion of the fi fth year program.

2)

I f the Paci fic Lutheran Unive rsity g raduate wishes to unde rtake the fifth year in an out-of-state i nsti tution, Pacific Lutheran University w i l l be responsible for reco m me n d i ng h i m for the Stan dard Cert i fi c ate. The student m u st secure general a p p roval of his plan from the U n ivers i ty in advance.

T h e re are fou r p rovisi ons govern i n g the fi fth year pattern of work, accord i n g to State Board reg u l at i o n s : 1 ) The f i f t h col l ege yea r m u s t i n c l u de a m i n i m u m o f 3 0 semester h o u rs (seven and one- h a l f courses) o f w h i c h at least fi fty per cent m ust be u p p e r d i vision and/or g radu ate cou rses. 2) No m o re than e i g h t semester h o u rs o f extension a n d / o r c o r respondence study may be a p p roved as a part of the 30 semester h o u rs (seven and o ne-haH c o u rses) i n the student's fifth year prog ram . 3)

Pacific L u t h e ran U n i ve rsity g raduates m ust take sixteen semester h o u rs ( fo u r cou rses) of t h e fifth col lege year i n residence. A tran sfer student w h o wishes to be reco m m ended by P a c i f i c Lutheran U n i vers i ty m us t take a m i n i m u m of 20 semester h ou rs (five cou rses) in residence.

4) The student may take 20 of the req u i red 30 semester h o u rs prior to o r d u ring the first year o f teach i n g experience w i th prior permission o f the School of Education. Following are req u i rements and p roced u res for the ap proval o f fi fth year pro足 grams o f work at Paci fic Lutheran U n iversity: 1)

Specific c o u rse req u i rements are: (a) Education 467, Eva l u ation o r i ts equivalent. (Ed ucation 473, Paren t-Teacher C o n ference may be used by elementary teachers . ) (b) Ed ucation 463, G u i dance i n the E l eme ntary S c h o o l o r Ed ucation 465 , G u i d 足 ance i n t h e Secondary Schoo l .


I

2)

Any courses re com m e nded for the individual student p r i o r to the g ranting of the Ba c h e lo r's degree m ust be taken . These may be rec o m m e nded by e i ther the area adviser or the School of Educati on.

3)

Courses taken s h o u l d strengthen areas of conce ntration and b u i l d stronger general education background as well as fill needs in t h e professional field. This program o f studies i s to be selected by the student with the guid ance of thos e w h o have worked with him d u r i n g h i s period o f initial teac h i n g and the advisers at t h e reco m m e n d i n g i nstitut i ons.

4)

The student secu res approval of the reco m m ending i n stitution for work taken e l sewhere before the work is beg u n .

S o m e of t h e work taken d u ri n g the fifth y e a r m a y also apply toward t h e Master of Arts deg ree. G raduate students may undertake a prog ram coordi nating req ui re­ ments for standard certi fication and the Master of Arts deg ree under the app rova l of thei r c o m m i ttee chai rman and t h e d i rector of certificati o n . Princi pal' s Credentials·

The candi date for the p r i n c i p a l ' s credentials wi l l be guided by the fol lowi n g : I)

H e m u st meet graduate stan d a rds for the Master's degree.

2)

He m ust work toward the provisional pri ncipal's creden t i a l s at h i s chosen le vel. To receive t h i s it i s req u i red that he have comp leted work for his Stand­ ard Teach i n g Certi ficate plus six semester hours (one and one-half courses.)

3)

He m u st c o m p l et e experience and study req u i re m e n ts for the Standard P r i n ­ c i p a l 's Credential a t h i s c h o s e n lev e l . To receive this he needs to have ( 1 ) had admin istrative experience (2) earned a m i n i m u m of e i g h t m o re semester h o u rs, and (3) earned his Master of Arts degree.

Students who i n tend to work toward t h e Maste r of Arts degree i n the field of education must apply for admission to the G raduate Di vision and meet the req u i re­ ments o u t l i n e d by that Division. Candida tes should see the course req u i rements as set forth i n the Master o f Arts broc h u re . " Certification Requirements for School Nurses

Provi s i o n a l Certi ficate: 1)

Registered n u rse li censed in t h e State of Was h i n g t o n , and

2)

Bache l o r ' s deg ree in a program accredited (or approved) for first-level posi­ tions i n p u b l i c health n u rsing, or Certificate in P u b l i c Health N u rs i n g (or e q u i valent) w i th t h ree years of suc­ cessful sup e rvised experience i n a p u b l i c health program w h i c h i n c l udes experience in school n u rsi n g .

3)

Com pletion of a m i n i m u m o f ten semester hours (two a n d one-half courses) o f professional education courses i n c l u d i n g practice teac h i n g o r d i rected labora­ tory experiences i n a school situation .

Details of the program are available at the School of Education upon request . Available at the office 01 the Dean of Graduate Studies upon request.

• •


Stan dard Certificate: 1)

Two years o f s u c cessful experience i n school n u rsing as a school n u rse u n d e r the P rovi s i o n a l Certifi cate, a n d

2)

Master's degree with a m a j o r i n s c h o o l n u rs i n g o r I t s e q u i valent i n P u b l i C Health N u rs i n g .

Professional Education Courses for School N u rse Certificate P rofess i o n a l education cou rses rec o m m e n ded fo r meeti ng the req u i re men t of a minimum o f 1 0 semeste r h o u rs (two and one-h a l f cou rses) a re as fo l l ows:

Education 201 - Learner and Soci ety o r _

course

_

_

Education 3 2 1 - H u man Deve l o p m e n t ( m ust i n c l u de p u b l i c s c h o o l observatio ns)__

c o u rse V2 course

Education 463- G u i d a n ce in the Eleme ntary S c h o o l o r Sociology 422-Social I n stitutions o r

_

cou rse

_

Educati o n 465-G ui dance in the Secondary School __________

__

V2 course

E d u cation 5 52 - P u b l i c School A d m i n i stration

3;4 course

Education 575-Mental Health or

V2 course

Educati on 585-Comparative Education

V2 course

Laboratory experi ences i n a school situation wi l l b e provided on an i nd i v i d ual bas i s . Preparation o f School librarians (Learning Resources Specialist) Students i n terested in p reparing for the respon s i b i l i ty of a d m i n istration o f a school l i b rary may meet suggested stan dards t h ro u g h the following p rogram :

1)

Book and media selection Education 455-l nstructional Materials Education 456-Storyte l l i n g (Offered in s u m m e r s c h o o l )_ E n g l i s h 323-Ch i l d re n 's Li terature

_

V2 cou rse

_ _____

Y2 cou rse . 1 cou rse

__ _ __

2)

Catalog i n g Education 453-Process i n g Schoo l L i b rary Mate r i a l s_

3)

Reference Education 452-Basic Reference Mate r i a l s

4)

Media uti l i zation and prod u c t i o n Education 454-Selection o f Lea r n i n g Reso u rce Mate r i a l s __

V2 course _

Y2 Course

____

V2 course

_ ______ _ _

_

E d u cation 457-Wo rkshop in P reparation and U t i l ization o f __ I n structi o n a l' Materials 5)

Curriculum Education 580-C u r r i c u l u m Deve l o p ment

____________

6) A d m i n istration Education 4 5 1 -Ad m i nistration o f the Sch o o l L i b rary

___ _

3f4 cou rse

__ _

V2 c o u rse

_ _

V2 course


P ROFESSIO NAL C O U RSES-Bachelor of Arts in Education Requirements

1)

Education 201 -Learner and Society c o u rse T h i s c o u rse may be taken d u ri n g the s o p h o m o re year or later. 2) Professional Core Curriculum: The fo l l o w i n g cou rses are to be com pleted after a d m ission to the S c h ool : Education 322-General Methods ( P r i m ary Level) o r 1 cou rse c o u rse Ed ucation 323-Gene ral Methods ( U p p e r E l e mentary Leve l ) or Ed u cation 423-General Methods (Seco n d ary Level) c o u rse E d u cation 325-Tea c h i n g of Read i ng (Element ary Level) or E d u cation 420-Tea c h i n g o f Rea ding (Se condary Level) E d u cation 430-Studen t Teac h i n g ( P ri m a ry Level) or Educa t i o n 432-Stud ent Teac h i ng (Upper Elementary Level) or E d ucation 434-Student Teac h i n g (Secondary Level) Education 435-Professional Sem i n a r (Req u i red fo r students enrol led i n Ed ucation 4 3 0 o r 432)

course

'/2 c o u rse 2 V2 cou rses 2 V2 c o u rses 2 c o u rses V2 cou rse

3)

Prolessional Electives (Secondary) 1 to 1 V2 cou rses Subje ct area m e t h o d s Guidance S t u d e n t teac h i n g (alternate level) Students w i s h i n g to q u a l i fy for certi fi catio n on both the elementary a n d sec足 ond ary levels s h o u l d meet the maj o r and m i n o r req u i rements for the other leve l . Stu dents m u s t have C , o r better, g rades i n E n g l i s h 1 01 a n d Psyc h o l ogy 1 0 1 , o r S o c i o l og y 1 1 1 . T h e s t u d e n t m ay count o n l y C o r better grades toward a major, mi n o r , o r p rofess i o n a l edu cation cou rses.

4)

Laboratory Experience Students have the opport u n i ty to study the s o c i a l , e m o tiona l , p h ysi c a l , and inte l lectual g rowth patterns o f school-age c h i l d re n and youth thro u g h o u t t h e i r pre-service years. An understa n d i n g of t h e l ea r n i n g process a s related to growth and deve l o p m e n t is em p h asi zed . This i s done through regular cou rse work, demonstration, observati o n , and' partici pation with c h i l d ren in t h e i r activities b o t h i n a n d o u t o f sch o o l . T h e followi ng are spec i f i c req u i rements in the area of labo ratory experience: (a) September Experience D u r i n g at least one September f o l l owi n g the su ccessful c o m p l e t i o n of Educ ation 201 , Learner and Soc iety, and p r i o r to Student Teach i n g, t h e studen t I S req u i red to observe and to parti ci pate i n activities d u ring t h e ope n i n g d a y s ( p referably t w o weeks) o f s c h o o l . T h i s Septemb er Expe rience m a y be either i n his home town o r i n the local a rea. P l ans a n d defi n i te assignments m ust be app roved by the S c h o o l of E d u cation before the end o f the prece d i ng s p r i n g semester. (b) Student Teaching A successful experi ence in student tea c h i n g is vital to the student's career. It is therefore recommended that the student carry not m o re than f o u r c o u rses d u r i n g h i s s t u d e n t tea c h i n g semester. I t i s a l s o expected that outside work or college activity will be kept to a minimum. Except i o n s to t h ese recom mendations are al lowed o n l y by spec i a l perm issi o n .


PR OFESSI ONALIZED SUBJ ECT MATTER E l e mentary School Teaching In the area o f Professionalized Subject Matter a m i n i m u m o f 3 courses is re­ q u i red from the following courses : Art ' 34 1 Elementary A rt Education ( V2 c o u rse)

C o m m u n i cation A rts 402 Speech in the Elementary C l assroom ( V2 ) Education '325 The Teac h i n g o f Read i n g ( 1 ) ' 326 T h e Teach i n g of A r i t h m etic ( V, ) (Prereq u i s i te : Math 323) , ' 408 Language Arts i n the Elementary School ( V2 ) 4 1 0 Science i n the Elementary School ( V2 ) , • 41 2 Social Studies i n the Elemen tary School ( V, ) 455 I n struct i o n a l Mate rials ( V, ) 457 P reparati on a n d Uti lization of I n struct i o n a l Materials (314 ) " 483 P r i m ary Read i n g ( V2 ) 579 Diagn osis o f Read i n g P roblems ( V2 ) Eng l ish 323 C h i l d re n 's Li terature ( 1 ) Music ' 340 M u s i c i n t h e Elementary Sc hool ( 'Iz ) Physical Education 322 Physical Education i n the Elementary School ( V2 ) ACA D E M I C PRE PARAT I O N Teaching Areas 1) B us i ness Education.

2)

Fine Arts-art or m u s i c .

3)

Physical Educati o n .

4)

Lan g u age Arts-i n c l u d i n g En g l ish (com posi t i o n , l i te ratu re), fore i g n language, com m u n i cation arts ( i n c l u d i n g d rama), and j o u r n a l i s m .

5)

Science and Mathemati cs-i n c l u d i n g b i o l o g i cal a n d physical scien ces a n d mathematics.

6)

Social Sciences- i n c l u d i n g h i story, sociology, p o l i ti ca l science, economics, geography, and psyc h o l ogy.

Preparation for Senior High School Teach i n g : 11 to 12 Courses A student p reparing for sen i o r h i g h school teach i n g m u st complete a pp roxi­ mately 1 1 courses in the academic area i n which he plans to tea c h . This n o r m a l l y consists o f a teac h i n g m a j o r of 6 to 8 courses o f s t u d y i n o n e department, s u p ­ ported by 4 t o 5 courses i n related departments. A student, with t h e a p p roval o f h i s acade m i c adviser, may elect t o c o m p l ete a departmental m i n or o f 4 to 5

• Required of all elementary teacher candidates. , • Open to student teachers or experienced teachers only.


courses i n another area a p p l i c able to teac h i n g in t h e s e n i o r h i g h schoo l . I n e i t h e r case, the a d v i s e r from t h e m a j o r area will assist t h e student i n p l a n n i ng h i s prog ram. Teac h i ng m a j o rs are offered in the fo l l owing f i e l d s : art, b i ology, b u s i n ess edu足 cati o n , c h e m i stry, c o m m u n i cation arts, e c o n o m i c s , Eng l i s h , F re n c h , German, physical e d u cation, his tory, mathe matics, music, p h ys i cs , political science, science (general a n d earlh scien ces) , social sci ences, socio logy, and Span i s h . Preparation for J u n ior H i g h School Teach i n g : 1 1 t o 1 2 Courses

A student p re pa r i n g for j u n i o r h i g h school teac h i n g n o r m a l l y m u st comp lete a teac h i n g major of 6 to 8 cou rses a n d a m i no r of 4 to 5 cou rses i n another area. Students pla n n i n g to teach on the j u n i o r h i g h school level s h o u l d confer with the School o f Education reg arding c o m b i nations of teac h i n g fields w h i c h wo u l d be m o s t appropriate. An adviser f r o m t h e major a rea will assist t h e student i n p la n n i n g his p rogram. Teachi n g maj o rs and mi nors are offered in the g e n e ral areas of fine arts, physical educat i o n , lang uage arts ( i n c l u d i n g English, j o u r n a l i s m , com m u n i c ation arts, German, F re n c h , and Spanish), science ( i n c l u d i n g b i ology, c h e m i stry, physics, g e n e ra l science, and earth s c i e n c es) and mathematics , and social s c i e n ce s . Preparation f o r Elementary School Teaching: 12 Courses

A student p re p a r i n g for e l e m e n tary school tea ch i n g n o rmally must c o m p l e te 6 courses i n a m aj o r teac h i n g area, a n d two a rea m i n o rs consisting of 3 c o u rses e a c h . One of the m i n o rs must be in p rofess i o nalized subject matte r ; and one i n a teac h i n g f i e l d other than t h at covered i n the 6-cou rse concentrat i o n . I n g e n e ra l , the teac h i n g m a j o r ( 6 co u rses) for e l e m e ntary school teac h e rs fol足 l o ws the tea c h i ng m a j o r req u i red for j u n i o r high tea c h i n g . The c o u rses i n c l uded in the two m i n o rs are to b e determined i n consultation with the School of Educat i o n .

Art Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 V2 courses' Tea c h i n g Majo r : 1 1 '12 courses Required: A rt 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 235, 260, 230 or 350, 365, 370, 440, two add i ti o nal cou rses i n art h i story, a n d e lectives to c o m p lete req u i rements. Junior High School Preparation: Teach i n g Maj o r : 7 '12 cou rses Required: Art 1 1 0 , 1 60, 235, 230 or 350, 365, 440, a n d e l e c t i ves to com p l e te re q u i re m e n ts. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 5 cou rses Required: Art 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 235, 230 o r 350, a n d 365. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g M a j o r : 6 c o u rses Required: 1 1 0 , 1 60 , 235, 341 and two c o u rses from the fo l l o w i n g : Art 230 , 350, 365 or 370. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses in the area as determ i ne d by the School of E d u cati o n . ' Up t o three supporting courses m a y b e recommended.


Biology Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teach i n g Major: 7 cou rses Required: Biology 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 and 5 courses in b i o logy of w h i c h at least 3 must be u pper d i v i s i o n . Required supporting courses: Ch emistry 1 1 5 , 1 42 , Mathematics 1 33 . Electives from the f o l l ow i n g : Earth Scien ces 1 3 1 , 1 32; C h e mi stry 331 , 332 , 333, 334 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02, 21 1 . Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g M a j o r : 6-7 cou rses Required: B i o l ogy 1 5 1 , 1 52 and 5 courses i n b i o logy approved by the de­ partmen t. Required supporting courses: Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 42, Mathematics 1 33. Recomm ended: Phys i cs 1 01 , 1 02 or Earth Sciences 1 3 1 , 1 3 2. Tea c h i n g M i no r : 5 cou rses Required: 3-4 cou rses chosen in b i o l o gy; Earth Scien ces 1 3 1 . Elementary School Preparation: Teach i n g M a j o r : 6 c o u rses Required: B i o l o gy 1 5 1 , 1 52. Required supporting courses: C h e m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 4 2 . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: 3 courses in the area, to be determi ned in consulta t i o n with the School of Educati o n . Business Education Senior High School Preparation: 12 courses Required: Eco n o m i c s 1 50 ; B u s i ness A d m i n istration 241 , 243, 281 , 290 or 495, 340, 387 or 488, 441 o r 442, 443 and V2 c o u rse in Advan ced Typewriting. Also elect one c o u rse from Busi ness A d m i n istration 350, 364 o r 370. Choose o n e area of e m p h asis f r o m Accou n t i n g : Bu siness A d m i n i stration 3 8 1 p l u s o n e u pper d i vi s i o n a c c o u n t i n g c o u rse; or Eco n o m i c s : Eco n o m i c s 351 p l us o n e upper d i vision e c o n o m i c s course; or Shortha n d! : One year of advanced shorthan d . I t i s stron g ly recommende d that a n y o f the f o l l o w i n g cou rses n o t taken d u r­ i n g the fou r-year program be i n cl uded in the f i fth year progra m : Busi ness A d m i n istration 350, 364, 370, 387 and 488. Typewri ting and shorthand cou rses are not offered on the c a m p us; how­ eve r, these cou rses may be taken to meet deg ree req u i rements at Fort Stei la­ coom C o m m u n i ty Col lege for transfer cred i t any time d u ri n g the four-year deg ree p rog ram . Chemistry Senior High School Preparation: 1 n. courses Teac h i � g Major: 7:v., cou rses consisting of Chem istry 1 1 5, 1 42 , 32 1 , 331 , 332, 333, 334, 341 , 342, and 343. Prerequisites: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02 or 253 ; Mathematics 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Junior Hig/J School Preparation: Te a c h i n g Major: same as for senior level above.


Teach i n g M i n o r : 5'/2 courses consisting of C h e m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 42 , 321 , 331 , 332, 333, 334. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 33 or equiv alent. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Majo r : 6 c o u rses Required; 4 approved c o u rses in chemistry and two addi t i o n a l c o u rses to be determi ned i n c o n s u l tation with the School of Educati o n . Tea c h i n g M i n o r : Three cou rses t o be dete r m i ned i n c o n s u l tation with t h e S c h o o l of Educati o n . Communication Arts

Senior High School Preparation : 1 1 co urses Teach i n g M a j o r : 6 to 8 courses Required: 4 c o u rses: Communi cati on Arts 1 23, 227 or 250, 241 and 404, p l u s 3 to 5 c o u rses i n consultation with t h e m a j o r advise r. Suggested supporting courses: One of the follow i n g : 4 to 5 c o u rses in E n g l i s h approved by the major advise r; or 4 to 5 c o u rses i n a modern or c l as s i cal language. Junior High School Preparation: Teach i n g M aj o r : 6 to 7 courses Required: 3 courses; C o m m u n i c a t i o n Arts 1 23 , 227 or 250, and 24 1 , p l u s 2 add itional courses in C o m m u n i cation A rts. Additional 2 to 3 courses to be determi ned in consu l tati o n w i th the Departm e n t and the School of Education. Teac h i n g M i no r : 4 to 5 c o u rses Required; C o m m u n ication Arts 1 23 and 241 , plus 2 to 3 courses of el ectives. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g M aj o r : 6 courses Required: C o m m u n ication A rts 1 23 and 402, p l us 2 c o u rses in Com mun i cation A rts and 2 courses in E n g l i s h . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses t o be determined i n consu l tation with t h e School of Education and the Department of C om m u n i ca t i o n Arts. Earth Sciences

Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses General S c i e n ce Tea c h i n g M a j o r : 1 1 c o u rses Required: B i o l o gy 1 5 1 , 1 5 2; Chemistry 1 1 5 , 1 4 2 ; Physics 1 01 , 1 02 ; ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 ; Mathematics 1 33, 1 51 . Earth S c i e n ces Teach i n g Major: 1 1 c o u rses Required: ES 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 324, 360 or 365, 491 , 492. Required supporting courses: Mathematics 1 5 1 , Chemistry 1 1 5, 1 42 ; Physics 1 0 1 , 1 02. Suggested supporting courses; B i o l og y 1 51 , 1 52 and add i ti o n a l c o u rses in chemistry and physics.


Junior High School Preparation:

General S c i e n ce Teac h i ng Major: 6 - 7 cou rses Required: B i ology 1 51 and 1 52 or B i ology 1 1 1 ; C h e m i st ry 1 1 5. 1 42 ; Physics 1 0 1 . 1 0 2 ; Mathe matics 1 33 ; ES 1 3 1 . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 4-5 courses Cou rses selected and tolal cou rses subje ct to a p p roval of science depa rtme n ts and w i l l vary depending upon h i g h school background of the individual student. Earth Sciences Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 cou rses Required: ES 1 3 1 . 1 32 . 324. 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: C h e m i stry 1 1 5 , 1 42 . Suggested supporting courses: Malhematics 1 51 ; B i o logy 1 51 . 1 52. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 4 to 5 cou rses in earth and physical scien ces. Elementary School Preparation :

General Science Teaching Major: 6 courses I n d i v i d u a l programs to be p l anned by the Science Department in consu l ta足 tion with the School of Educ ati o n . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: Th ree c o u rses in the area. cou rses to be dete rm i n ed in consu l tation with Ihe School of Educati o n . Earth Scien ces Teac h i n g Major: 6 c o u rses Prerequisite: Trigonometry and h i g h school biology. Required: ES 1 3 1 . 1 3 2 . 324, 360 or 365. Required supporting courses: C h e m i stry 1 1 5 . 1 42 . Teac h i n g Mi n o r : 3 c o u rses i n earth a n d physical scien ces. Economics Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 co urses

Teaching Major: 8 courses Required: Economics 1 50 . 351 . 352. 486 ; plus th ree additional courses from

the fol lowi n g : Economics 321 . 331 . 361 . 362. 434, 481 ; plus H i story 255; p l u s th ree cou rses d i strib uted ove r the areas of sociology, p o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e . or anth ropology. Junior High School Preparation:

Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses Required: Economics 1 50 , 434. 486; p l us 1 c o u rse from the followi n g : Eco足 nomics 321 . 33 1 . 351 . 352. 361 , 432. 481 ; p l u s H istory 255; p l u s 2 c o u rses d istri b u ted over the a reas of sociology and political science. Teac h i ng Minor: 4 c o u rses Required: Econ omics 1 50 p l u s 3 upper d i v i s i o n c o u rses in economics. Elementary School Prepara tion:

Teac h i n g Maj o r : 6 c o u rses Required: Econ omics 1 50 , 434, 486; p l u s one cou rse from the fol lowi n g :


Economics 321 , 331 , 351 , 352, 361 , 362, 432; p l u s H istory 255, and one c o u rse from the areas of socio logy or political science. Te aching M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: Econ o m i cs 1 50 and 2 u p p e r d i vision courses in e c o n o m i cs.

English Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac h i n g Maj o r : 8 c o u rses Required: E n g l i s h 24 1 , 251 , 252 and 383. Electi ves t o total 8 c o u rses i n add i足 t i o n to English 1 0 1 ; at least four c o u rses must be u p per d ivision. Distribution requirem ent: one c o u rse in the nature and development o f l a n 足 guage (382, 400 o r 403 ) ; a n d Advanced C o m position 3 1 8, o r p roficiency as determi ned by the E n g l i s h Department. A l l majors must p resent two years of one foreign lang uage at the c o l lege leve l , o r s h ow equivalent p rofici ency. Junior High School Preparation: Te a c h i n g Major: 8 c o u rses Required: E i g h t c o u rses i n the department as l i s ted under sen i o r h i g h prepar足 ation above, i n c l u d i n g di stri buti o n req u i rement and two years of foreign l a n guage or equivalent p roficie ncy. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Conc en trati o n : 6 c o u rses Required: 4 c o u rses in the depa rtm e n t as l isted u n d e r sen i o r h i g h preparation above, and two add i ti o nal cou rses to be selected i n c o n s u l tation with the School o f Educati o n . Teac h in g M i n o r : 3 courses Required: Three c o u rses i n the area, to be determi ned i n c o n s u l tation with the School of Education.

French Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac h i n g Major: 8 cou rses Required: Fren c h 201 , 202, 32 1 , 35 1 , 352, 445 and th ree add i t i o n a l c o u rses. 445 may c o u n t in either education or Fre n c h , but not in both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 cou rses i n c o m m u n i cation arts, E n g l i s h o r another foreign lang uage. Junior High SchOOl Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses Required: As l i sted above for se n i o r h i g h p reparati o n . Su pporting courses c h osen i n consu l ta t i o n with major adviser. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 app roved courses in Fre n C h . Elementary School Preparation: Tea c h i n g Major: 6 courses Required: Five app roved c o u rses in French and one additional c o u rse to be selected in consultation with the departm e n t and the School of Educati on. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: Th ree approved cou rses i n French to be determined i n consu l tation with the School of Educati on.


German Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses

Teac h i ng Majo r : 8 cou rses Required: German 201 , 202, 32 1 , 351 , 352, 445 and three additional courses. 445 may count i n e i ther education or Fre n c h , but not in both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 c o u rses in c o m m un i c at i o n arts, E n g l i s h o r another fore i g n lang uage. Junior High School Preparation:

Teac h i n g M a j o r : 7 cou rses Required: As l i sted above, for se n i o r h i g h p reparati o n . Supporting c o u rses c h osen in cons u l tation with major adviser. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 4-5 app roved c o u rses in German. Elementary School Preparation:

Teac h i n g Maj o r : 6 cou rses Required: Five app roved c o u rses in Ge rman and one additional c o u rse to be selected in consu l tation with the depart m e n t and the School of Educat i o n . Teac h i ng M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: Th ree a p p roved c o u rses in German to be determi ned in con s u l tation with the School of Educati o n .

History Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses

Teac h i n g Maj o r : 8 cou rses Required: H i story 1 07 , 1 08, two of 251 , 252 and 253, 255 p l u s 3 c o u rses i n h i story i n c l u d i n g a se n i o r s e m i n a r . Suggested supporting courses: 3 cou rses selected from economics, geography, p o l i t i c a l sCience, psyc h o l ogy and soci o l ogy. Language Arts Junior High School Prepara tion:

Teach i n g Concentration (Major) : 8 cou rses Required: Engl ish 3 1 8 ; e i t h e r E n g l i s h 403 or L i n g uistics 400; one u p p e r-divi足 sion l i te rature course i n addition to t h e cou rse taken to meet the general edu足 cation req u i re m e n t ; C o m m u n i cation A rts 241 o r 327 or 336 and 404 ; Education 444 a n d t h ree other courses i n English, journalism, communicati on arts o r foreign language beyond t h e freshman leve l . At least two o f these three courses must be i n the same disci p l i ne, and one o f the t h ree must be upper division. Teach i n g Concentration ( M i n o r) : 4 courses Required: Fo u r cou rses selected from offe r i n g s in English, journal ism , com足 m u n i cation arts, o r foreign language beyond t h e fresh man leve l . E n g l i s h 3 1 8 i s req u i re d . Elementary Preparation:

Teac h i n g Concentration ( Ma j o r) : 6 c o u rses Required. E n g l i s h 3 1 8 , e i t h e r English 403 o r L i n g uistics 400, E n g l i s h 323, either C o m m u n ication A rts 241 o r C o m m u n i cation Arts 327 o r 336 and 402;


and two other cou rses selected from one of the f o l l o w i n g d is c i p l i n es: E n g l i s h , c o m m u n i cation arts, o r foreign lang uage beyond t h e fres h m a n leve l . O n e of these cou rses m ust be u p p e r d i v i s i o n . Teac h i ng Concentration ( M i n o r) : 3 cou rses Required: Th ree c o u rses selected from offe rings in E n g l i s h , j o u r n a l i s m , com足 m u n i cation arts, o r fo reig n lang uage beyo nd the fresh man leve l . E n g l i sh 3 1 B i s req u i red, Mathematics Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses

Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses in ac' d i t i o n to Math 446. Prerequisites: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 231 , 433, 446 ; 321 o r 434 o r 455; one additional u pper d ivision c o u rse. Suggested supporting courses: 2 cou rses i n c h e m i stry o r p h ys i cs and two additional s c i e n ce cou rses. Junior High School Preparation:

Tea c h i n g Maj o r : 6 cou rses Prerequisites: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 23 1 , 433, 446. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 4 c o u rses in addition to Math 446. Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 51 , 1 52 ; 1 27 o r 231 ; 446, 433 o r 321 . Elementary School Preparation:

Teac h i ng Majo r: 4 c o u rses in addition to Math 323 and Math 324 or 321 . Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ; 1 27 o r 321 o r 433; p l u s mathematics electives. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 2 mathematics cou rses in addition to Math 323, and Math 324 or 321 , t o b e determi ned i n cons u l tation with t h e School o f Education and the Department o f Mathematics. Music Senior High School Preparation:

" Em p h asis on C h o ral M usi c-Teac h i n g Major: 1 4 V2 c o u rses. Prerequisite: M us i c Theory 1 23, o r equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 325, 339 ' , 340 ' , 442, 445 ' , 447 ' . Two cou rses o f p r i vate voice lessons, one-h a l f cou rse o f p r i vate piano lessons and two c o u rses of L i terature and Perfo rmance. One cou rse of m u s i c electi ves i s also req u i red. " Em p hasis on Sacred C h o ra l M usi c-Teac h i n g Maj o r : 1 4 V2 cou rses. Prerequisite: M u s i c Theory 1 23, o r equ ivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323, 339 ' , 340 ' , 367, 368, 445 ' , 447 ' . Two c o u rses o f p r i vate i n stru c t i o n m ust b e earned i n the m aj o r perform足 ance med i u m (voice o r piano a n d / o r o rgan) and one-h a l f cou rse m ust be earned i n the m i n o r performance m ed i u m (voice o r piano a n d / o r o rgan ) . Two c o u rses of Literature and Perfo rm a n ce are a l so req u i red.


" E m p h asis on I n strumental Musi c-Teaching Major: 1 4 V2 cou rses. Prere quisite: M us i c Theory 1 23, or equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 2 4, 1 4 1 , 1 4 2 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 323, 325, 326, 339 ' , 445 ' , 447 ' . Two courses of private i n struction mu st be earned on the student's maj o r i nstrument p l us o n e - h a l f cou rse of piano. Two cou rses of c redit m u st be earned in Li tera t u re and Performance. Junior High School Preparation: Teach i n g Major: 7 c o u rses Prerequisite: M u s i c 1 23 , o r equivalent. Required: M usic 50, 1 24, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 339 * , 340 * , 445 * . One-half c o u rse of private p i a n o , one-half c o u rse o f a secondary i n strument or voi ce , one c o u rse of Lit. and Perfo rm. and one-half course of m u s i c electives are also req u i red. Teach i n g Mi n o r : 5 courses Required: M u s i c 1 20, 339, 341 p l us one-half c o u rse of p rivate piano and one­ half c o u rse of p rivate i nstructi o n in voice o r secondary i n strument. One c o u rse of Lit. and Perform. and V2 course of electives in music are also req u i red. Elementary School Preparation: Tea c h i n g Major: 6 c o u rses Required: M us i c 1 20 , 339, 341 plus one-h a l f cou rse of private piano and one­ half course of private voice. One course of m u s i c ensem ble and one and one-h a l f c o u rses o f elec tives i n m usic are also req u i red. Teach i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses Required: 3 cou rses in the M u sic Department, to be dete rmi ned in c o n s u l ta­ tion with the Department of Music and the S c h o o l o f Educa t io n . Physical Education

Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Tea c h i n g Major: 1 1 c o u rses Five and one-half req u i red courses: PE 277; two professional activities c o u rses; 481 ; 482; and e i t h e r 322 or 328. Th ree and on e-half courses elected from among c o u rses n u mbered 300-400 offered in the S c h o o l of P h ysical Ed ucation . Biology 1 6 1 and 1 62. Parti c i p ation i n at least one i n terco l legiate or extra m u ra l sport. One activity elective ( V. c o u rse) in Aq uatics. Junior High School Preparation: Tea c h i n g Major: 7 courses Required: 6 courses as l i sted for sen i o r high major plus one elective from •

• •

Applies toward prolessional education requirements . Students desiring certilication as a secondary teacher will do th eir student teach­ ing on the secondary level. Students desiring certification as an elementary teacher will do their student teaching on the elementary tevef. Students desiring certification as a K-12 teacher will do their student teaching on both elementary and secon dary levels.


among physical education c o u rses n u m be red 300 - 400. Te a c h i n g M i n o r : Four c o u rses are req u i re d : P E 277, 286, 284 o r 388, and 481 o r 482. Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj o r : 6 c o u rses are req u i re d : P E 277, 286, 284 or 288, 322, and

two cou rses selected trom among the physical e d u cation c o u rses n u m be red 300-400.

Tea c h i n g M i n o r : The fo l l o w i n g c o u rses are req u i re d : P E 277, 286, 284 o r 288 and 322. Special Secondary Programs :

Athletic Coac h i n g M i n o r : T h ree req u i red c o u rses: PE 2 7 7 , 4 8 1 a n d 482 ; a n d three elective '/2 courses f r o m among the f o l l o w i n g : PE 370, 371 , 3 7 2 , 3 7 3 , 374 and 36 1 ; and partici pation i n at least one i n tercolleg iate or extra m u ra l s po rt . H e a l t h M i n o r : The following c o u rses are req u i red : P E 295, 324 , 326 ; a n d Bi ology 161 and 1 62. Physics Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 1/2 c o u rses Required: P h ysics 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 " , 253, 254, 272, 321 , 322 and 355. Required supporting courses: O ne a d d i t i o n a l c o u rse i n chem istry; Mathe足 matics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 . Additional suggested c o u rses: Physics 331 , 336. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g M aj o r : 6 '/2 c o u rses. Required: P h ys i cs 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 1 1 , 253, 254, 272, 321 and 322. Political Science Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 co urses Tea c h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses ( i n P o l i ti cal Scien ce) Required. P o l i ti cal Science 1 0 1 , 251 , 331 , p l us four ad d i t i o n a l e l e ctive courses . Suggested supporting courses: Eco n o m ics 1 50 ; Geography 1 0 1 ; H i sto ry 2 5 1 , 252, 253, 255; Psyc h o l ogy 1 0 1 ; Soc i o l ogy 1 1 1 . Science ( G eneral)

See Earth Scien ces Social Science Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Teac h i n g Maj o r : 1 1 cou rses Required: One c o u rse selected from H i story 251 , 252 and 253; H i story 255;

o n e c o u rse from each of t h e following d i s c i p l i n es: a n t h ropology, e c o n o m i c s , geography, p o l itical sCience, psych o l ogy, and sociology: and t h ree u p p e r division courses f r o m t w o o f t h e d i scipli nes of econom i cs, p o l i t i cal science, and sociology.


Junior High School Preparation: Teaching Maj o r : 7 courses Required: One cou rse selected from History 251 , 252, and 253; Hi story 255; one course from t h ree o f the fo l l owing d i sci p l i ne s : anth ropol ogy, econ o m i c s, geography, p o l i t i c al science, psych ol ogy, a n d so cio logy; and two u p p e r d i vi s i o n courses f r o m t w o of t h e d i s c i p l i n es o f econ om ics, p o l i t i cal science and soci o l ogy. Teac h e r Minor: 4 cou rses Required: O n e c o u rse sel ected from H i story 251 , 252, and 253; H i s to ry 255; and two cou rses selected from e c o n o m i cs , p o l i t i c a l s c i e n ce, and socio logy. Elementary School Preparation: Teaching Major: 6 cou rses Required: O n e cou rse selected from H i story 251 , 252, and 253 ; H i story 255 and fou r cou rses s e l ected Irom t h ree of the fol l ow i n g areas: anth ropology, e c o n o m i cs, political science and s oc i o l ogy. Teach i ng M i n o r : T h ree c o u rses t o be deter m i n ed in c o n s u l tation with the S c h o o l o f Education. Sociology Senior High School Preparation : 1 1 courses Teac h i n g M a j o r : 7 cou rses Required: Soci o l og y 1 1 1 , 423 a n d 494, four el ectives in soci o l ogy; and l o u r c o u rses d i s t r i b uted over t h ree areas 01 other social sciences. Spanish Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Teac h i n g M a j o r : 8 c o u rses Required: Spanish 201 , 202, 321 , 351 , 352, 445 and t h ree a d d i tional c o u rses. 445 may count in e i th e r educ ation or fore i g n languages, but not in b o t h . Suggested supporting courses: 3 courses i n c o m m u n i cation a r t s , E n g l i s h o r anoth e r foreign language. Junior High School Preparation: Teach i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses as l i sted above for se n i o r h i g h preparati o n . S u p p o rt i n g cou rses to be ch ose n i n c o n s u l tation with major adviser. Teach i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 approved c o u rses i n Span i s h . Elementary School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 6 cou rses Required: Five app roved courses in Span i s h and one a d d i t i o n a l c o u rs e t o be s elected in conSUltation with t h e d e partment and t h e S c h o o l of Education. Tea c h i n g Minor: 3 approved c o u rses in Spanish to be d e termi ned in con足 s u l tation with t h e School o f Education.


Elementary Education Program Courses Required

General Education (Includes Core) Requirements ___

___ P h i losophy _____ Religion (one may be the S e n i o r S e m i n a r i n Re l igion)_ _ Fine Arts C o mm u n i cation Arts 1 23 H i story or Literature Science (one l i fe, one p h ysical) __

_

____

_

1 2 1 1

_

___

___

__

_

__

___ ___

_

_

__

__

__

_

_

_

2

___

1

Math 323

__

Physical Educ ation (four % -course activities)

__ _

___

School Health 295

__

_

_

__ _

.Social Science (Geog. 1 0 1 , H ist. 255, Psyc h . 1 0 1 or Soc. 1 1 1 ._

3

Eng lish 1 0 1 ( P rofi ciency exam for no cred i t o r c o u rse for credit) ( 1 ) 1 3 V2 ( 1 4 V2 )

___

Teaching Major-6 courses

Teaching Min or-3 crses. possible Electives

Professional Subject Matter Minor-3 full courses

'/2

___

Education 326, Teac h i n g of Math _____ _

___

Ed ucation 325, Teach i n g o f Read i n g , Elementary

___

Art 341, Ele ment ary Art Educati on _ _

_

'/2 V2 '/2

_

_Music 340, Mu sic i n the Elemen tary School ___

Education Electives: Select from the f ollowing _ Co m m u n i cation Arts 402, E d u cation 408, 4 1 0, 4 1 2 , 457, 483, 579, English 323, P . E . 322 _

Professional Sequence

Education 201 , Learner and Soci ety __ _ ___

Education 322 o r 323, General Methods___

September Experience

___

___

Student Teac h i ng, Education 430 o r 432

___

_

_

_ _________._ _

____

_

_P rofess i o n a l Seminar, E d u cati on 435 (with student teac h i n g)

___

A l ternate Level Student T c h n g . , Ed. 437 (opti o n a l 路 l nteri m) _

o 2 V2 V2 (1) 5 (6)


Secondary Education Progra m Courses General University Core Requirements Phi losophy

__

___

Required

__

. R e l i g i o n (one of these may be the Sen i o r Sem i n a r)

_ _

_

2

__

_Fine Arts (Art, M u sic, Speech, D rama) ___

H i s t o ry o r Literature

( I n c l ud i n g

Foreign

N atural Science or Mathematics

Literature)

______ _ _ _ _

___

S o c . Sc i e n ces (Psychology 1 0 1 or Soci o logy

___

P h ys i c a l Edu cation ( fo u r

'/4 -cou rse

_

_ _ ..

_ _ _

______

_

111)

activities)

_

E n g l i s h C a m p . ( P rofi c i e n c y exam for no c re d i t o r

_

c o u rse f o r credit)

(1 )

_

G e neral Education Requirements-Secondary Program Academic Requirements: ___

School Health 295

___

C o m m u n i cation Arts 1 23

_

Professional Requirem ents: New Program-6 c o urses Lear n e r and

__

Soci ety 201

(or

have had I n t ra. to Ed.) _____ . _ _

Hu man

Dev. 321

for those who

_____ _ _

Professi o n a l Semester: 420, 423, 434

_

___

______

September Experience ( P r i o r to Professional Semester)____

___

__

3Y2 0

_

1 Y2

Education Elective: Alternate Level 436 ( I n terim) (1 ) I n terim Other Senior High School

Teaching Concenfration-I I Courses

Junior High SchoOl Teaching Con cenfrafion

7

courses

Teaching Minor

4

c ourses

I

-

U p p e r Divi sion 10 c o u rses M i n i m u m

_ _ _

_ _ _


201 LEA R N E R AND SOCIETY : G R OWTH A N D D EV E L O P M ENT ( 1 ) Orie ntati on t o schools i n c o n tem porary society . I n tegrated study o f h u m a n developm ent i n relati o n s h i p t o i nd i vid uals and g r o u p s i n ed ucati o n a l setti n g . T w o lectures and one seminar e a c h week. P u b l i c school obse rvation req u i red wee kly. Students w i l l be respo n s i b l e for thei r own transportation to the p u b l i c schools. P re re q u i s i t e : Psyc h o l ogy 1 0 1 o r Sociology 1 1 1 . 321 H U MAN D EVELOPMENT ( 1 ) A study o f the e m o t i o n a l , s o c i a l , i n te l lectual, and phys i o l og i cal deve l o p m e n t of t h e h u m an o rg a n i s m f r o m i n fancy t h ro u g h adolescence. T w o lectu res a n d one sem i n a r e a c h wee k. Two-h o u r p u b l i c school observat i o n req ui red wee kly, to be i n d i v i d u a l l y assigned. Students will be responsi b l e f o r t he i r own trans足 p o rtation t o the p u b l i c schools. Prere q u i s i t e : Psyc h o l ogy 1 0 1 o r Sociology 1 1 1 , and offi cial a d m ittance to the School o f Educati o n . T h i s c o u rse i s designed for u pper d i vision transfer students who have had I n t ro d u c tion to Ed ucati o n . 322 G E N ERAL M ETHODS- P R I MARY ( 1 ) A study o f the p rocess a n d content o f tea c h i n g i n grades K t h ro u g h 3 with o bservation and part i cipation i n p u b l i c schools. P rereq u i s i te : Education 201 o r Education 3 2 1 . 323 G EN ERAL METHODS- U P P E R ELEM ENTARY (1 ) A study of the p rocess and content of teaching in grades 4 through 6 w i th observation a n d parti cipation in p u b l i c schools. P re requisite: Educati on 201 o r Education 3 2 1 . 325 TH E TEAC H I N G OF R EAD I N G-ELEMENTARY ( 1 ) A s u rvey o f teac h i n g read i n g i n the e lemen tary g rades, i n c l u d i n g t h e p rograms i n the newe r approaches. Mate ri al s , methods, te ch n i ques, proced u res and some d i ag n osis o f read i n g d i fficulties. P re req u i s i t e : EdUcation 201 . I /I S 326 T H E TEAC H I N G OF A R I T H M E T I C ( 1/2 - 1 ) An ove r-a l l study of the bas i c mathematical ski l l s and a b i l i ties needed by the teac her i n t h e e l e men tary schoo l . Rece n t deve l opments and materi als are consid ered. P re req u i s i t e : Math 323 o r consent of i ns t ru c tor. I II S 401 W O R KSHOPS ('14 - 1 ) Workshops i n special f i e l d s for vary i n g periods of t i m e . (G) 408 LA N G U A G E ARTS IN THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) A c o u rse designed t o g i ve the e le m e n tary te acher, kinde rgarten t h rough s i x , an u n d e rstan d i n g of how to teach the co m m u n i cation s ki l ls i n a functional m a n n e r . The areas i n c l uded will be i n the fields of o ral and w r i tten expressi o n . l i sten i n g , read i n g , l i terature, d ramatizati o n , s pe l l i n g , gram m a r , hand wri t i n g , c h i l d re n 's l a n g u age and lan g u age study, voca b u l a r y deve l o p m e n t , and lexi足 cograp hy. Open to experien ced teachers o r those who have c o m p leted student teach i n g . 4 1 0 S C I E N C E I N THE ELEM ENTARY S C H O O L ( V2 ) A course designed t o acq u a i n t the student with the objectives, materials, and methods o f teaching science i n an i n teg rated progra m .


4 1 2 SOCIAL ST U D I ES I N T H E ELEMENTARY S C H O O L (V2 ) A course designed to acquai n t the student with objectives, mate r i a l s , and methods of teac h i n g the social s t u d i es in an i n tegrated p rogram. Open to experienc ed teac h e rs or student teachers o n ly. 420 THE TEAC H I N G OF R EAD I N G-SECON DARY (V2 ) A s u rvey of tea c h i n g read i n g i n t h e seco ndary s c h o o l , i n c l ud i n g attention t o the deve l opmental read i n g p rograms. Materials, methods, tec h n iques , p ro ­ cedu res a n d s o m e observation a n d d iagnosis of read i n g d i ffi c u lties. Pre ­ req u i s i t e : Education 2 0 1 . Coreq uisite: Education 423 a n d 434. 423 GEN ERAL METHO DS-SECONDARY ( 1 ) A study o f c u rri c u l u m , materials, a n d methods o f teac h i n g a t t h e h i g h s c h oo l leve l . O bservat ions in actual school situations fo l l owed b y d iscuss i o n . Pre­ re quisite : Education 201 o r Education 321 . Coreq u isite: Education 420 a n d 434. 430 STUDENT TEAC H I N G - P R I MARY (2V2 ) Teac h i n g i n t h e p u b l i c s c h o o l s u n d e r the d i rection a n d supervision of c l ass­ room teac h e rs and u n i versity tea c h e rs. Prereq u i s ite : E d u cation 201 or Ed u ca­ tion 321 , Education 322 a n d Education 325. 432 STUDENT TEAC H I N G - U P P E R E L E M ENTARY (2V2 ) (Same as above except Education 323 for Educ ation 322). 434 STU DENT TEACH I N G-SECONDARY (2) Teac h i n g i n the p u b l i c schools under the d i re c t i o n and s u pe rv I s i o n of c l ass­ room teachers and u n i ve rs i ty teachers. Pr·ereq u i s i t e : Edu cation 201 or 321 , Corequisite: Education 420, a n d Education 423. 435 PRO FESSIONAL SEM I N A R (V2 ) (To b e taken concurrently w i t h E d u cati on 430 o r Education 432) . Desi gned to p rovide o p p o rtu n i ties for students to sh are experiences with an exchange of ideas o n p u p i l behavi o r a n d c u rriculum practi ces ; and t o project ways and means o f i m provi ng teac h i n g perfo rman ce. 436 ALTERNATE LEVEL STU D E N T TEAC H I N G- E L E M E N TARY (1 ) A course desi g ne d to g i ve some k n owledge, understa n d i n g , a n d study o f c h i l ­ d re n , subject matter f i e l d s , and materials i n the stude n t 's a l ternate te ach i n g level p l us student teac h i n g o n t h a t leve l . Students w h o have c o m p l eted sec­ ondary preferred level stud e n t teac h i n g shou l d e n r o l l i n this c o u rse. 437 ALT E RNATE LEVEL STU D ENT TEAC H I N G-SECONDARY ( 1 ) A cou rse designed t o g i ve some knowledge, u n d e rstan d i n g , a n d study o f c h i l d re n , subj ect matter fields, a n d materials i n t h e student's a l te rn a te teach­ i n g level plus student teac h i n g on that level . Students w h o h ave c o m p l e ted elementary preferred level stud e n t teac h i n g should en roll in t h i s cou rse. 440-448 SPEC I F I C M ET H O D S IN TEAC H I N G SECON DARY SCHOOL S U BJ ECTS Stud i es o f the c u rricu l u m , methods, and m ateri als o f i nstructi o n in the variou s fields of the secondary school c u r r i c u l u m . These c o u rses are offered by de­ partments of the U n iversity as i n d i c ated and may be taken for gradua te c re d i t .


440 ART I N T H E SECON DARY S C H O O L (V4 ) See Art 440 . 441 BUSI N ESS EDUCATION IN T H E SECONDARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) (SEC R ETA RIAL SUBJECTS) See Busi ness Administration 441 . 442 B U S I N ESS E D U CAT ION IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL ( Y2 ) (GEN ERAL B U S I N ESS & ECON O M I CS) See揃 B u s i n ess A d m i n i strat i o n 442. 443 C H E M ISTRY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ( Y2 ) 444 E N G L I S H I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ( 1 ) A course designed t o assist futu re teachers o f English t o learn t o use thei r experie nces and educational t ra i n i n g as a basis for deve l o p i n g teac h i n g aids and methods. They will also observe dem onstrations of method a n d strategy by maste r teac h e rs in sec ond ary educat i o n . 4 4 5 M ETHODS I N TEAC H I N G FO R E I G N LANGUAGES ( V2 ) A study o f the theory and tec h n i q ues o f fo re ign lan g u age teac h i n g , w i t h special p roblems a p p l i cable to the student's major l a n g u a g e . Spec ial e m p h asis on a u d i o - l i n g u a l tec h n i q ues. (G) 446 MATHEMATICS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) 447 S C I E N C E I N TH E SECON DARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) 448 SOCIAL STU D I ES I N T H E SECON DARY SCHOOL ( y, ) 451 A D M I N I STRAT I O N O F T H E S C H O O L L I B RARY ( Y2 ) O rganization and ad m i nistrat i o n o f the s c h o o l l i b rary i n the eleme ntary s c h o o l . (G) 452 BAS I C REFERENCE MATER I A LS (V, ) A n i n troduction t o those services 0 1 a school l i brarian related t o the p resenta足 tion o f the materials, book and nonbook, w h i ch lorm the sources of reference for the i n formational function o f the l i b rary. (G) 453 P R O C ESS I N G SCHOOL L I BRARY MATE R I ALS ( y, ) S i m p l i fied proced u res for the c l assifi cati o n , cata l o g i n g , and tec h n i cal p rocess足 ing of s c h o o l l i b rary mate ri a ls. (G) 454 SELECT I O N O F LEA R N I N G RESOURCE MATE R I ALS ( V, ) Criteria, p rofess i o n a l l i te rature, and tec h n i q ues o f eva l u a t i o n of l i b rary mate足 rials are stressed ( p r i n t and non-p r i n t mate ri a ls). The i n d i vi d ual l i b ra ri a n ' s responsibi l i ty to facu l ty , to stude n t, and to the general p u b l i c is defined in the i mportant role o f materials selection officer. (G) 455 I N STR U CT I O N A L MATERIALS ( y, ) A su rvey o f a u d i o and visual materials and aids, thei r use, o rganizat i o n , and a d m i n i strat i o n i n the s c h o o l . (G)


457 P REPARAT I O N A N D UTI L I ZAT I O N OF I N ST R U CT I O NAL MATER IALS ( 314 ) A c o u rse designed t o h e l p the i n d i v i d u a l parti c i pa n t become fam i l i a r w i t h the prod u c t i o n a n d use of a variety o f i nstructional materials, flat p i c t u res, charts, maps, a n d the 35mm camera . P a rticipants will produce items usefu l in i n st ruc­ tion. A $1 0.00 lab fee w i l l be ch arge d . (G) 461

GROUP P RO C ESS AND THE I N D I V I DUAL (V2 ) A h u man i n teract i o n laboratory t o fac i l itate the exploration o f the self con cept th rough the mechanisms of i n terperson a l i n teractions and feedback. Em phasis w i l l be p l aced o n the a c q u i s i t i o n of ski l l i n self-ex p l orati o n , role i d e n t i fi c a t i o n , and c l i mate making. (G)

463 G U I DANCE I N T H E ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (V2 ) A n i n troduction t o some o f t h e maj o r orientations to gu id ance a n d how they can be translated into an operational program i n the school set ting. (G) 465 G U I DANCE I N THE SECON DARY SCHOOL (V2 ) An i ntrod u c t i o n to some o f the major orientations to g u i dance a n d how they can be translated i n to an operati onal prog ram in the school sett i n g . (G) 466 IN T R O DU C T I O N TO STUDENT PERSO N N EL S E R V I C E S ( V2 ) An overview of student p e rs o n n e l services offered by c o l lege a n d u n i ver­ s i ties; fam i l i a rization with l i te rature in the f ie l d ; exposure to local service agencies a fl d student g ove rnment. (G) 467 EVALUAT I O N (V2 ) Eval uation o f the outcomes o f school experiences. Problems that arise i n con nection with devel opment, orga n i z ation, a n d a d m i n i s t ration o f tests (both standardiz ed and teac h e r made) w i l l be stu d i e d . Req u i red of a l l f i fth year students. Prere q u i s i t e : Student teac h i n g or tea c h i n g experi e n c e . (G) 468 EDUCAT I O N AL PSYCHO LOGY ( 1 ) Princ i p l es a n d research in human learn i n g a n d the i r i m plications f o r c u r­ riculum a n d i n stru c t i o n . (G) 469 VOCATIONAL AND EDU CATIONAL G U I DA N C E (V2 ) This course i s for M . A . students i n Counse l i n g a n d G u i dance t o study voca­ t i o n a l theories and occu pat i o n a l choices. (G) 473 PARENT-TEA C H E R C O N F E R E N C E ( V2 ) A study o f the pri n c i ples a n d te c h n i q ues o f parent-teac h e r c o n ferences. P ro ­ ced u res f o r i n t rod u c i n g a parent-teacher c o n fe rence program to t h e school and c o m m u n i ty. Evaluation of various g rad i n g systems. Open only to experi­ en ced teachers and students who have completed o r are taking s tu d e n t teac h i n g . ( G ) 481 STAT I ST I CAL M ETHODS (1 ) See Psy c h o logy 481 . (G)


482 K I ND E R GARTEN (V, ) A study o f the kinderg a rten c h i l d and h i s adj ustment pro b l e m s . Special emphas i s on activities a n d p rocedu res fo r h i s deve l opme nt. (G) 483 P R I MARY R EA D I N G ( 112 ) A study of the mat e r i a l s a n d methods of the modern p r i m a ry read i n g program and i ts relaiion to other activi ties. Open to experi enced te ac hers o n l y . ( G ) 4 8 5 THE G I FTED C H I LD ( V2 ) A study of the g i fted c h i l d , h i s c h aracter i s t i cs a n d problems, and school pro足 ced u res designed to further devel opment. (G) 488 REA D I N G CENTER W O R KSHOP (V2 ) C l i n i cal study o f read i n g p roblems and suggested co rrective meas u res. To be taken conc u r rently with Education 489. Open to experienced teachers o n l y . S (G) 489 D I R ECTED TEA C H I N G I N R EA D I N G CENTERS ( 1 ) Di rected observation and teac h i ng i n s u m m e r re m e d i a l, cl asses i n p u b l i c schools. T o b e taken concurrently with Education 4 8 8 . O p e n t o experien ced teachers o n l y . S (G) 496 LABORATORY WORKSHOP ( 1 ) A pra c t i c a l c o u rse u s i n g c h i l d ren of elementary age i n a classroom situ ation working o u t a spec i fi c problem. Provision w i l l be made for some active par足 t i c i pation of the un i versity students. A c o n ference with t h e i n structor or the Dean of the School of Education w i l l be req u i red before reg istration c a n be c o m pleted. (G) 497 SPECIAL PROJ ECT (V. - 1 ) Students w h o w i s h to do i n d i v i d u a l study and rese arch on educational prob足 lems o r a d d i t i o n a l laboratory experience i n p u b l i c school classrooms may d o so with spec ial permission o f the Dean of the School of Educat i o n . (G) 501 W O R KSHOPS ( V4 1 ) G rad uate workshops i n spec i a l fields f o r vary i ng lengths o f t i m e . -

545 M ETHODS A N D TE C H N I Q U ES O F RESEARCH ( V2 ) Seminar i n soc i a l science research methods and tech n i q ues w i t h i l l ustrations d rawn p r i m a r i l y from the fields of education and psyc h o l o g y ; secon d a ri l y f r o m such f i e l d s a s soci ology, h i story, a n d p o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e . Practi ce in design足 i n g a feasi b l e research proj ect i n the student's area o f i n terest. Req u i red for Master of Arts candi dates, and should be taken early i n the degree program to p rovide background for f u l f i l l i n g the research req u i rement. Prerequisite: Admi ttance to the g raduate p rog ram . 550 SCHOOL F I N A N C E (V2 ) Loca l , state, a n d fed eral contributions to school finance, i ts p h i losophy and development. S pe c i a l emphasis on t h e devel opment and a d m i n i stration of a school bud get. I I a / y 1 9 72-19 73


552 P U B L I C S C H O O L A D M I N I STRAT I O N (3/4 ) A d m i n istration a n d superv i s i o n of school personne l , plant, a n d program; the structure a n d o rg a n izati o n of the school system. Pre requisite: Teac hing expe r i ­ e n c e o r by special permission o f the D e a n o f School o f Educati o n . 554 H I G H S C H O O L O R GAN I ZATION A N D A D M I N I STRAT I O N ( V2 ) C u rrent viewpoi n t and issues i n p l a n n i n g and organ i z i n g the h i g h school c u r­ ric u l u m , sched u l e m a k i n g , extra-cu r r i c u l a r activities, teachers' meetings, p u p i l acco u n t i n g a n d control, finance and reports. P re req u i s i te : Educa­ t i o n 552. 555 A D M I N ISTRAT I O N A N D S U P E R V I S I O N WORKSHOP ( 1 ) T h e projects d i sc ussed w i l l b e derived c h i ef l y from the i nterests a n d needs of the studen ts. Typical p rojects are cu rri c u l u m p l a n n i n g and adjustment i n line w i t h p resent needs, public re l at i o n s p rog rams, pers o n n e l e m p l oyment and i n -service trai n i n g , a n d financing b u i l d i n g and e d ucational programs. Prerequisite: One course in a d m i n istration a n d / o r supervision. 558 A D M I N I STRAT I VE I NTER NSH I P (V2 - 1 ) I n tern s h i p i n school a d m i n istration p l a n ned w i th the School o f Education i n cooperation w i t h selected school adm i n istrators. P rereq u is i te : Cou rse work i n school ad m i n i st ration a n d adm issi on t o g raduate p ro g ram. 560 C O N T I N U I N G P RACT I C U M ( 1 ) A p racticum expe ri e n ce conduc ted in a s m a l l g ro u p sett i n g to h e l p the stu­ dent in the school counse l i n g and student perso n n e l p rograms i n tegrate the cogni tive and affective learn i ngs from other courses and counse l i n g experi­ en ces i n to an i n d i v i d u a l i zed counse l i n g model. Students e n ro l led in the School Counse l o r and Student Perso n n e l p rog rams are req u i red to register for this course when they have bee n a d m i tted to the Division of G ra d u ate Studies for the Master o f Arts degree i n Education w i th major i n School Coun­ s e l i n g o r Student Person nel Work. A student will register only once, but will be requi red to parti ci pate each semester he i s e n ro l led for one o r m o re c l asses u n t i l completion of h i s p rogram. Studen ts e n r o l l e d in P ra c t i c u m and F i e l d Work (Education 570, 572) w i l l n o t be req u i red to partici pate. 561 C O U N S E L I N G THEORY ( 1 ) A cou rse des i g n ed to acqua i n t the student with the various theories a n d tec h ­ n i q u es of counse l i n g . 563 P RACT I C U M I N G R O U P P R OC ESS AND LEADERSH I P ( V2 ) A h u m a n i n te raction (se n s i t i v i ty) laboratory designed to exp l o re i n te rpersonal operations i n g roups and to fac i l i tate the deve l o p m e n t of self insight. E m p h asis i s given to leadership and the development o f ski l l i n d i agnosing i n d iv i d u a l , g r o u p , and organizati o n a l behavior patterns and i n f l u e n c e s . Prerequ isite : Edu cation 461 . 565 S E M I N A R . N O N -TEST APP RAISA L ( V2 ) The assess men t o f personal ch aracteri sti cs and behavio ral patterns i n o rder to u n d e rstand better the i n d i v i d u a l . N o n -test d ata wi l l be u t i l ized (i.e., soc i o­ metric scales, case studies, autobiograp h i es, i n te rviews, etc.)


570 PRACT I C U M A N D F I ELD W O R K IN CO U N SELI N G AN D G U I DA N C E ( 1 ) This culm inating practicum experience u t i l i zes the theory, s k i l l s , and tech­ n i q ues previously learned i n counseling and guidance. This lield experience cond ucted i n the p u b l i c schools g i ves the student a variety o f experi­ ences working with i nd i v i d u a l students and, where possi ble, w i th several g roups of students. The practicum wi l l , i n many cases, b e one semester l o n g but m ay be extended th roug h two semesters. 571 H I ST O R Y AND P H I LO S O P H Y O F H I G H E R E D U CA T I O N ( 1 ) H i storical p e rspective a n d c u r rent status ; development of functions a n d struc­ t u res ; issues in c u rri c u l u m ; p h i l osophy of ad m i n istrati o n ; case studies of adm i n istrative p roblems. 572 P RACT I C U M I N ST U D ENT P E R SO N N E L W O R K ( 1 ) S u p e rvised c o l legi ate experience i n residence h a l l s , ad m i n istrative offices. service age n c i es, research o n project associ ated with p racti c u m . 573 STUDENT P E R SO N N E L W O R K I N H I G H E R E D U CAT I O N ( 1 ) A n ana lysis o f student perso n n e l services i n h i g h e r edu cati o n ; use o f per­ s o n n e l d ata; c o - c u r ri c u l a r activities; student we l fare ; c o ntempo rary trends in counse l i n g p ro b l e m s related to student l i fe. 575 M E N TAL H EALTH ( V2 ) A study o f Ihe bas i c p ri n c i p les o f mental health a s they re l ate t o i n terper­ sonal relati o n s h i ps. 578 B E HAV I O R A N D LEAR N I N G P R O B LEMS O F STtJ D E N TS ( V2 ) A c o u rse designed t o ex p l o re e m o t i o n a l p ro b l e m s w h i c h affect the l ea r n i n g of students. T h e s c o p e w i l l c o v e r p roblems faced by e lementa ry and sec­ o n d a ry p u p i ls, taki n g i n to a c c o u n t factors outside the s c h o o l w h i c h i n f l uence motivat i o n towards learn i n g . 5 7 9 D I A G N O S I S AND R E M E D I A T I O N I N R EA D I N G ( V2 ) A study o f causative factors relating t o reading d i fficulties, with some oppor­ t un i ty t o apply remed iation tech n i q ues. Open t o teachers cu rre n t l y i n tho c lassroom, o r with teach ing experi e n ce . 580 C U R R I C U L U M D EVELOPM ENT ( V2 ) A study of types of c u rri c u l u m o rganization and programs and tech n i q ues o f c u r r i c u l u m deve l o p m e n t wit h a view of p re p a ri ng t h e student f o r h i s own work on c u rri c u l u m p ro b lems. I 583 R EA D I NGS I N E D U CAT I O NAL ISSUES A N D P R O B LEMS ( 1/4 - 1 ) Students whO desire to p u rsue a special l i n e o f i n d i v i d u a l read i n g , i n vesti­ g a t i o n , o r rese arch may do so fo r c redit. rece i v i n g help and g u i d ance from the fac u l ty member best q u a l i fied to assist in the part i c u lar p r o b l e m . C red i t w i l l vary w i t h t h e a m o u n t o f w o r k done. 585 COMPARAT I V E EDUCAT I O N ( h ) C o m parison and i n ves tigation o f certai n material and c u l t u r a l systems o f education t h ro u g h o u t the w o r l d .


587 H I STORY OF E D UCAT I O N ( V2 ) G reat educators, educ ational theories, antiqu i ty to the present.

and

ed ucational

systems

from

589 P H I LOSOPHY OF E D U CAT I O N ( % ) P h i l osophical a n d the o retical foundations o f educa t i o n . 590 G RAD UATE S E M INAR (0) A workshop for all Master of Arts c a n d i d ates in the School of Education, t h i s s e m i n a r prov i d es a forum f o r exc h ange o f rese arch ideas a n d problems. C an d i d ates s h o u l d register for t h i s seminar for assistance i n f u l f i l l i n g the research req u i rement. N o c o u rse c re d i t i s g iven , n o r i s t u i tion assessed. 596 R ESEARCH STU D I ES I N ED UCAT I O N (V. ) For th ose Master o f A rts candidates w h o elect to write two research papers i n stead of writing a thesis. (One research paper m ay be i n the c a n d i d ate's m i n o r field under the s u pe r v i s i on of the m i n o r adviser.) The candi date w i l l be req u i red t o review h i s research papers before h i s G raduate C o m m i ttee. 597 R ESEARCH ST U D I ES IN EDUCAT I O N ( V2 ) (See Education 596) 599 T H E S I S (lj4 1 ) F o r those Master o f Arts candidates who el ect t o write a thesis i n stead of w r i t i n g two research papers. The thesis pro b l e m will b e c h osen from the cand idate's major area of concen trat i o n and m ust be approved b y his Graduate C o m m i ttee. The c a n d i d ate wi l l b e expected to defend h is thes i s i n a final o ral ex a m i n a t i on c o n d ucted b y h i s Commi ttee. -

Interim courses offered in 1 971 :

305 306 310 31 1 319 436 437 497 583

E DU CATIONAL I S S U E S AND I N N OVAT I O N S TEAC H I N G EXP E R I E N C E S I N T H E U R BAN CLASSROOM I NV O L V E M E N T I N A T H E RAPEUTIC C O M M U N ITY ( E D U C / PSYCH) H U MAN R E LAT I O N S WORKSHOP ( E D U C / SO C I OlOGY) D R U G E D U CAT I ON WORKSHOP ( ED U C / SO C I O L/ P H YS E D U C) ALTERNATE LEVEL STUD ENT TEAC H I N G ( E L E M ENTARY) ALTER NATE LEVEL S T U D E N T TEAC H I N G ( S EC O N DARY) S P E C I A L P R OJ ECT R EA D I N G S -EDUCAT I O N A L I S S UES AND P R O B L E M S


E N GLISH Mr. Reigstad, Chairman (and Chairman, Division of Humanities), Mr. Benton, Miss Blomquist, Mrs. Johnson, Mr. Jones, Mr. Klops ch, Mr. Van Tassel; assisted by Mrs. Monroe, Mr. Riemer and Mrs. Williams

Objectives

The c o u rses in E n g l i s h are designed to h e l p students ach ieve competence i n wri t i n g , d i scernment i n rea d i n g , a p p reciation o f h u man experience and aesth e t i c v a l u e s , and u n de rstan d i n g o f t h e p rocesses o f b o t h critical and creative e x pres­ s i o n . Students e n ro l led i n the E n g l ish p rogram represe n t widely vary i n g p rofes­ s i o n a l i n te rests, i n c l u d i n g the social services, the m i n i stry, law, gove r n m e n t , and teac h i n g o n all l evels f ro m the e l e m e n tary s c h o o l to the u n i ve rsity. T h e p r i m a ry objective of the department, however, is to h e l p the student i n c rease h i s knowl­ e d g e o f our l i t e rary heritage, sharpen h i s awareness o f the competing lang uage patterns o f our c u l t u re , and develop fully h i s pe rsonal power o f thought and written e x p ression as a unique a n d h u mane i n d i v i d u a l . The gene ral U n i versity req u i re m e n t i n l i te rature or h i story can b e met b y t a k i n g any cou rse e x c e p l 1 0 1 , 3 1 8 , 400, and 403. Requirements for Major For the major in E n g l i s h , e i g h t c o u rses a re re q u i re d , not i n c l u d i n g Com pos i ­ t i o n 1 0 1 . O f these e i g h l , at least four must be u p p e r-d i v i s i o n . A l l majors, i n c l u d ­ i n g those e n ro l led i n t h e School of Educat i o n , m u st p resent two years o f o n e foreign l a n g u age at tile col lege l e v e l , o r s h o w e q u i va l e n t p roficiency. The foll owi ng cou rses are req u i red o f all English majors : I n t rod uction to A m e r i c an Lite ra t u re (24 1 ) ; I n troduction to E n g l ish Lite ratu re : Beg i n n i ngs to 1 750 (25 1 ) ; I n trod uction to E n g l i s h L i te rature : After 1 750 (252) ; and S h a kespeare (383 ) .

B A C H E L O R O F A R T S I N E D UCAT I O N m a j o r req u i re m e n ts a r e l isted be low. C a n d i d ates for this degree must also meet special req u i rements described i n t h e S c h o o l o f Ed u ca t i on section i n t h i s catalog. Senior High School Prepara tion: 11 courses

Teac h i n g Maj o r : 8 c o u rses Required: E n g l i s h 24 1 , 251 , 252 and 383. E l e c t i ves to total 8 c o u rses i n a d d i t i o n t o En g l i s h 1 0 1 ; at least fou r c o u rses m u s t b e u p p e r d i vi s i o n . D istribution requirement: one cou rse i n t h e n at u re a n d deve l o p m e n t ot l a n ­ g u age (382, 4 0 0 o r 403) ; a n d Advanced C o m po s i t i o n 3 1 8 , o r profi cie ncy as determined by the E n g l i s h Depart m e n t . A l l m aj o rs m u st p rese n t two years of o n e toreign l a n g uage at the col lege leve l , or s h ow e q u i valent profi ci ency. Junior High S c h o ol Preparation:

Teac h i n g M a j o r : 8 cou rses Required: E i g h t cou rses in t h e department as l i sted u n d e r s e n i o r h i g h p re p a ra­ tion above, i n c l u d i n g d i stri b u t i o n req u i rement and two years of tore i g n l an­ g u age o r equivalent profici ency.


Elementary School Preparation: Tea c h i n g Concentrati o n : 6 courses Required: 4 cou rses in the depart m e n t as l i sted u nder sen i o r h i g h preparation above, and two ad d i ti o n a l cou rses t o be selected i n cons u l tation with the School 0 1 Edu cati o n . Teac h i ng M i n o r : 3 courses Required: T h ree courses in the area, to be determ i ned i n c o n s u ltation with the School of E d u c ati o n .

101 COMPOSITION A cou rse i n tended to h e l p students deve lop t h e a b i l i ty to t h i n k a n d w r i te accu rate l y a n d effectively. I n c l udes the reading a n d a n a l ys i s of i m a g i n a tive l i terature or essays and the w r i t i n g 01 c o m positions. I I I

2 1 7 SHORT STORY A study o f themes and te c h n i q ues in short f i c t i o n . I I 230 I N T R O D U C T I O N T O CONTEMP O RARY LIT ERATU RE A study o f seiected contempo rary works-chiefly A m e r i c a n , E n g l i s h , o r Con足 t i n e n tal-since W o r l d War II. I I I

231 MASTE R P I E C ES O F E U R O P EAN LITERAT U R E Representative works o f t h e l i tera t u re o f Western E u rope, especi a l l y c l assi cal, m e d i eva l , and Renaissance. I 241 I N T R O D U C T I O N TO A M E R I CAN L I TERATURE Req u i red of a I / E n g l ish majors . A su rvey of major a u t h o rs from Edward Tay l o r to Stephen Crane. I

251 I N T R O D U CT I O N TO E N G L I S H L I TE R ATU R E : B EG I N N I NGS TO 1 750 Req u i red 01 a l l English majors . An i n troductory c o u rse in English l i te r足 ature. I 252 I N T R O D U CTION TO E N G L I S H LITERAT U R E : A FT E R 1 750 Req u i red 01 a l l E n g l i s h majors. A survey m a i n l y of the ni netee n t h a n d twen足 tieth centuries. I I

3 1 8 ADVA N C E D C O M P O S I T I O N R e q u i red 01 E n g l i s h majors e n ro l led i n the S c h o o l of E d u c a t i o n (un less e x 足 empted by E n g l i s h Departm e n t ) . A s t u d y of rhelori ca l p r i n c i ples. I I 323 C H I L D R E N 'S L I T ERATU R E A study o f c h i l d ren's literatu re a s a r i c h c o l l ec t i o n i n i ls e l f a n d a s a g u i d e t o b o o k selection in t h e p u b l i c schools. H

349 M O D E R N POETRY Poetry, especi a l l y A m e ri ca n a n d English, since World War I. "

351 MODERN DRAMA Selected pl ays representing t h e development o f d ra m a I r o m rea lism t o the theatre of the absu rd.


358 E N G L I S H L ITERAT U R E : T H E N O V E L A s t u d y 01 m a j o r novels selected t o represent m a i n developments f r o m t h e e i g h teenth century to t h e present. 382 E N G L I SH L I TERAT U R E : C H A U C E R Espec i a l l y T h e Cant erbury Tales. I n c l udes s t u d y 0 1 the dev e l o p ment 0 1 the E n g l i s h l a n g u age. P re req u i site: 25 1 . I 383 E N G L I SH L I TERAT U R E : SHAKESPEARE Req u i red of all E n g l i s h majors. Study of ten to twe lve rep rese n t ative p l ays. P re req u i site: 251 . I 388 E N G L I S H LIT ERAT U R E : M I LTON A N D H I S AGE D o n n e , Milton, and their conte m p o raries. P re req u i s i t e : 25 1 . I I 389 E N G L I S H LI TERAT U R E : SAT I R E A N D SEN S I B I LITY Swift, Pope, J o h n s o n , and thei r c o n te m p o ra ries. P re req u i s i te : 251 . I I a / y 1 972-73. 390 E N G L I SH L I TERATU R E : THE RO MAN T I C S A s t u d y of representative works from the R o m an ti c p e r i o d . Pre req u i site : 252. I 391 E N G L I SH LITERAT U R E : T H E V I CT O R I A N S Poetry of Tennyson, B rowning, Arnold, t h e Pre-R aphaelite s , and o t h e r s ; prose of Macaul ay, Carlyle, Newman , M i l l , R u s k i n , and others; and several repre足 sentative n ove ls , P re req u i site: 252. I I 400 L I N G U I STICS See fore i g n lang uages . 403 M O D E R N E N G L I S H GRAMMAR A study of modern E n g l i sh grammar utilizing the approaches of the three major theories: trad itional, structura l , and transfo rmational. I 441 THE A M E R ICAN R ENAISSANCE, 1 830-1 870 Transce ndentalists, Emerson, Thoreau, Wh i tm a n , D i c k i nson; Poe, Hawthorne, Melvi l le . P rereq u isite : 241 . I I 442 A M ER I CAN L ITERAT U R E : R EA L I S M A N D NAT U RAL I S M , 1 870-1 920 H owells, Mark Twa i n , James; C rane, N o rris, London, Dreiser; R o b i n s o n , Frost. Prerequisite: 241 , I 443 A M E R I CAN LIT ERAT U R E S I N C E 1 920 E m phasis on the novel up to 1 950. I I 491 , 492 I N DEPEN D ENT R EAD I N G AND R ESEARCH (y2 ) Desi gned to enable s e n i o r majors who p lan to do g raduate work i n English to round out thei r backg round with an i n tensive, p l a n ned cou rse of read足 ing. I I I 597 G RADUAT E R ESEARCH (V2 t o 1 ) I II


Interim courses offered in 1 971 : 305 C O M M O N W EALTH L I TERAT U R E 307 M A N AND R EV O L UT I O N I N T H E M O D E R N N OVEL 3 0 8 T H E FILM ART O F I N G MAR BERG MAN 309 M ED I EVAL E N G L I S H R O MANCES: K I N G ARTH U R AND F R I EN D S

3 1 0 T H E SATAN I C I N LITERAT U R E 3 1 7 T H E TH EATER SC EN E O F LONDON 31 8 FOLK-R O C K : LY R I C S AND S O U N D ( M U S I C / EN G L I S H ) 4 9 1 I N D EP E N D ENT ST UDY


FOR E I G N LANG U AG E S

M r . S w e n s o n , Chairman, M r . Blubaugh, M r . Carleton, ivTrs. Faye, Mrs. ivT o n ro e , M r . Petersen, Mr. Robinson, M r . Spangler, M r . T o v e n , M r . Webster, M r s . Wolter; assisted b y Mrs. Carleton, Mrs. Payne, Mr. While, Mrs. Wilhelm

Objectives

The study of foreign lan g u ages h as become a necess i ty i n tile present-day world. One of the most u rgenlly needed el ements in o u r c h a n g i n g society is the a b i l i t y to c o m m u n i cate effec t i ve l y and p u rpose f u l l y with other peoples; the i n volve足 ment in fore ; g n l a ng uage learn i n g is a key t o prov i d i n g that u n d e rstan d i n g . Til fough the med i u m of a foreign l anguage, the stude n t augments his u n d e rsta n d i n g of past and p resent contributions of other peoples in the areas of civi lization, h i story, li ter足 ature, and the arts and s c i e n ces. Student s prepa r i n g to e n ter g raduate school are advised t o p repare themselves in at least two fore i g n l a n g uages. Placement

A l l new s t u d e n ts who wish to conti n ue a language i n w h i c h they have had p revious experience wi l l be req ui red to take a lan g u age placement test. T h i s pl a c e m e n t test w i l l b e adm i n i stered by t h e D i re ctor o f Testing and wi l l no rmally be g i ven d u ri n g the new student orientation days. O n the basis of t h i s test , the student w i l l be p l aced i n the lan g u age cou rse w h i c h will corres p o n d to h i s pro足 ficiency. N o cred i t w i l l be a l l owed i f a student elects to e n ro l l i n a lang uage cou rse which is at a level below that i n w h i cll he i s p l aced. Students who h ave taken the "Wash i n g ton Fore i g n Lan g u age P lacement Test" or the CEEB need n o t take the l a n guage p l acement test at Paci f i c Lutheran U n i versity. The Language Laboratory

The lan g u age l a b o ratory provi des regu l a r practice in l i ste n i n g to good models of fore i g n speech and a large amount of i m itation and repetitive d r i l l . L i ste n i n g p ractic e is i n tended t o l e a d progressively toward t h e abi l i ty t o exp ress o n e's tho u g h ts in conversation with p ro n u n c i at i o n , i n tonatio n , and use of grammatical forms acceptable to the educated n at i ve speaker. Labo ratory e x perience i s req u i re d a s a reg u l ar part of a l l l a n g uage cou rses at t h e elementary a n d i n ter足 mediate leve l s . Requirements f o r a Major

A m aj o r in any l a n g u age w i l l consist of e i g h t cou rses, i n c l ud i n g the 20 1 , 202 sequence of the i ntermediate lan g u age cou rse. The elementary seq u e n c e 1 0 1 , 1 02 w i l l n o t count in d e termi n i n g the major. The major req u i rements in all languages will be 3 2 1 ( C i v i l i zation and C u l t u re) a n d 351 , 352 (Compos i t i o n a n d Convers ati o n ) . BAC H E L O R O F ARTS I N EDUCATION major req u i re m e n ts are li sted b e l ow. Candidates for t h i s degree must also meet spec ial re q u i reme nts descri bed i n t h e S c h o o l of Education sect i o n i n t h i s catalog.


French

1 1 courses Teach i n g Major: 8 courses Required: French 201 , 202, 3 2 1 , 351 , 352, 445 and th ree a d d i t i o n a l c o u rses. 445 may c o u n t in e i t h e r e d u cation o r Frenc h , but not in both. Suggested supporting courses: 3 cou rses i n spe ech, English or an oti1er for足 eign l a n g u age.

Senior High School Preparation:

Junior High School Preparation:

Teac h i n g M a j o r : 7 courses Required: As li sted above tor s e n i o r h i g l1 preparat i o n . Supporting courses ch osen i n c o n s u l tation w i th maj o r adviser. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 app roved c o u rses i n F re n c h . Element ary School Preparation:

Teaching Major: 6 courses Five approved courses i n French and one a d d i t i o nal c o u rse to be selected in consult ation with the department and the School of E d u c a t i o n . Tea c h i n g M i n o r : 3 cou rses Required: Th ree app roved c o u rses in F re n c h to be de termined i n consultation with the School ot Educa ti o n . Required:

German

1 1 courses Te a c h i n g Major: 8 courses Required: G e rm a n 2 0 1 , 202, 321 , 351 , 352, 445 and th ree a d d i t i o n a l cou rses. 445 may c o u n t in either education o r G e r m a n , but not in b o t h . Suggested supporting courses: 3 c o u rses i n spee c h , E n g l i s h or another tor足 eign l a n g u age.

Senior High School Preparation:

Junior High School Preparation:

Teach i n g Major: 7 courses Required: As li sted above for se n i o r h i gh preparati o n . Supporting courses ch osen in consultation with m a j o r adviser. Tea c h i n g M i n o r: 4-5 a p p roved courses i n German Element ary School Preparation:

Tea c h i n g Major: 6 c o u rses F i ve approved cou rses in German and one a d d i t i o n a l course to be selected i n consu ltation with the dep artment and the School o f Educa tion. Teach i n g Mi nor: 3 c o u rses Requ;,ed: Th ree app roved c o u rses in German to be determi ned in consultation with t h e School of E d u cati o n . Required:

Spanish

11 courses Teac h i n g Major: 8 cou rses Required: Spanish 201 , 202, 321 , 351 , 352, 445 and t h ree additional cou rses. 445 may count i n e i t h e r e d u cation or foreign tanguages, but not in both . Suggested supporting courses: 3 c o u rse in spee C h , English or another for足 e i g n l a n guage.

Senior High School Preparation:


Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses as l i sted above fo r se n i o r high p repara t i o n . Supporting courses to b e c h osen i n consultation with m a j o r adviser. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 4 - 5 a p p roved c o u rses i n Span i s h . Elementary School Preparation:

Teac h i n g M aj o r : 6 cou rses Required: F i ve a p p roved c o u rses in Spanish and one a d d i t i o n a l c o u rse to be selected in consultation w i t h the department a n d the S c h o o l of Educati o n . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 a p p roved cou rses i n Spanish to be dete r m i n e d i n con足 sU l tation with the School o f Educat i o n . Linguistics 400 ST R U CT U R A L L I N G U I STICS

An i n t ro d u ction to the study o f the n a t u re o f l a n g u age. Bas i c p r i n c i p l es a n d tec h n i q ues of desc ri ptive l a n g uage a n a lysis. P ractice i n the eleme ntary a p p l i c ation of l i n g u istic a n a lysis to selected materials. No p re req u i s i tes. I I French 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M ENTARY F R E N C H ( 1 , 1 ) Essen tials o f p ro n u nciation , i n tonation, and structure. Deve l o pment o f basic

s k i l l s i n l istening, speaking, read i n g , and writing. O ral a n d written exercises. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I, I I 20 1 , 202 I N T E R M E D IATE F R E N C H ( 1 , 1 )

Contin ued practice i n l istening and speaking. Readings based o n selections that reflect the c u l t u ral heritage as wel l as contemporary materials that a re of i n terest to the college student. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I , I I 321 C I V I L I ZATION A N D C U LT U R E

A c o n t rastive study o f l i fe a n d attitu des i n p resent-day F rance as reflected i n cu rren t l i terature, periodicals, televi s i o n , and f i l ms. W ri tten com positi ons a n d o r a l reports. C o n d ucted i n Fre n c h . P rereq u i s i te : F rench 202. I 35 1 , 352 C O M P O S I T I O N A N D CONVE RSAT I O N ( 1 , 1 )

Advan ced g ra m m a r , styl istics, c o m positi o n , c o n ve rsati o n , and p h o netics. Wri tten c o m po s i t i o n s based on the c u l tu re a n d c i v i l ization o f F rance. Conver足 sat i o n based on topics of c u rrent i n terest. C o n d ucted i n F ren c h . P re req u i s i te : French 202. I , I I 42 1 , 422 MASTERP I ECES O F F R E N CH LITERATU R E (1 , 1 )

Read i n g a n d a n a lysis o f wo rks o f representative a u t h o rs o f the m aj o r periods from the Middle Ages t h ro u g h the n i neteenth centu ry. A study of the style and structure and of the m o ra l and artistic i n tentions of such a u t h o rs as Rabelais, Montaigne, M o l i ere, Corne i l l e , Pasc a l , Volta i re , Rousseau, H u g o , a n d Baude l a i re. C o n d u cted i n F rench. A l tern ates w i t h F rench 431 , 432 . P re足 req ui site : F re n c h 202. I, I I


431 , 432 TWENTIETH CENTU RY F R E N C H LIT ERATU R E ( 1 , 1 ) A s u rvey of major wrile rs o f t h e twentieth c e n t u ry, e m phasizing the period since World War I I . Cond ucted i n F re n c h . Alternates w i th F rench 4 2 1 , 422. Pre足 req u i s i t e : F rench 202. I , I I 442 H I STORY O F R O M A N C E LAN G UAGES An exam i n ation of I h e hi stori cal deve lopme nt of the Romance Languages with reference t o the languages of today . Same as Spanish 442. G i ven i n alternate years. I I 445 M ET H O D O LOGY OF T E AC H I N G F O R E I G N LANGUAGE S ( V2 ) A study o f the theory and tech n i q ues o f foreign language te a c h i n g , with special p ro b l e ms a p p l i cable to the stud ent's major language. Parti c u l a r em phasis o n a u d i o - l ingual tech ni ques. 491 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY ( V2 - 1 ) 597, 598 GRADUATE RE SEARCH (V2

-

1)

German 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M ENTARY G ERMAN ( 1 , 1 ) Esse n t i a l s o f pron u n c i a t i o n , i n tonat i o n , a n d structure . Deve l o p m e n t of basic s k i l l s in l i st e n i n g , speaki n g , read i n g , and writi ng. Ora l and written exercises. Laboratory attend ance req u i r e d . I , I I 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE G E R M A N ( 1 , 1 ) C o n t i n u ed practice i n l i s tening and spe a k i n g . Readings based o n selections that reflect the c u l tura l heri tage as well as contemporary m ateri a l s that are of i n terest t o the col lege student. Laboratory atten d a n ce required. I, I I 321 C I VI L I ZATION A N D C U LT U R E A n exam i na t i o n o f t h e hi storical a n d artistic efements t h a t h a v e shaped G e r足 man c u l t u re from the begi n n i ngs to the p resent. Special emphasis on those forces w h i c h have i n f l uenc ed American l i fe a n d c u l ture. Conducted in G e r足 man. Prereq u i s i te : German 202. I 351 , 352 C O M P O S I T I O N A N D C O N VERSAT I O N ( 1 , 1 ) A d d i t i o n a l practice i n the development o f the basic lang uage ski l l s with emphasis on t h e finer points of s l ructu re , style, and good laste. Composi t i o n s a n d convers ations based on t o p i c s of cu rrent in terest. C o n d ucted i n G e r足 man. Prerequi s i t p : German 202. I , I I 421 , 422 MASTERP I E CE S O F G E R M AN LITERATU R E ( 1 , 1 ) Survey o f the major l i te rary works, i n a l l gen res, from the early period t o about 1 900. A n exami n ation o f the forces w h i c h have p roduced the l i te rature. How to u n d e rstand and appreci ate l i te rature as a work o f art. Conducted in German. A l t u m ates with German 431 , 432. Prereq u i s i t e : German 202. I , I I


431 , 432 TWENTI ETH C E N T U R Y GE RM AN LITERAT U R E ( 1 , 1 ) S u r vey o f the major l i te rary works o f the p resent time with e m phasis on the last decade. All l iterary forms considere d . C o n d u cted in German. Alternates with Ger man 421 , 422. P rereq uisite : German 202. I , I I 442 H I STO RY O F THE G ERMAN LAN G U AGE An ex a m i n 8 tion of the historical deve lopment of the German language with reference to the lan guage of today. C o n d u cted i n German. G i ven in a l te rnate years. Prerequ isite: German 202. I I 445 M ETHODO LOGY O F T E AC H I N G FO R E I G N LAN G UAGES ('/2 ) A study o f the theory and tec h n i q ues o f foreign language teac h i n g , with spe足 C i a l problems appl i cable to the studen t's major language. Parti c u l a r em phasis o n a u d i o - l i n g u a l te c h n i q ues. 49 1 , 492 IN DEPENDE NT STUDY ( V2 - 1 ) 597 , 598 GRADUATE RESEARCH (V2 - 1 ) Greek C u r rently offered coope ratively with t h e U n i versity of Puget S o u n d on o u r campus. 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M ENTARY G R E E K ( 1 , 1 ) A s pe c i a l c o u rse designed to enable the student to read Greek as soon as possi b l e . Choice of read ing in each term i s determ i n e d by a particular theme. I, II 20 1 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE G R E E K ( 1 , 1 ) Selected koine re a d i ngs from H e l le n i s t i c Greek l iterature, with major e m phasis o n the New Testament. I , I I 421 , 422 MASTER P I ECES O F G R E E K L I T E RATU R E ( 1 , 1 ) Avai lable through consulta tion with t h e department. P rereq uisite: Greek 1 0 1 , 1 02. I , I I 491 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY (V2

-

1

)

Japanese C u rrently offered coope ratively with the U n i versity of Puget Sound on their c a m p u s. 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E M E NTARY JAPA N ES E (1 , 1 ) I n troduction i n t o p ro n u n c i a t i o n , conversation, construction patterns, gramm ar, a n d kana syllaba ries. I , I I 2 0 1 , 202 I NT E R M EDfATE JAPAN ESE (1 , 1 ) I n trod uction t o c h a racter w r i t i n g . Reading, writing, and t ranslation o f mod足 ern J a panese. I , I I


Latin 1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY LAT I N (1 , 1 ) A special c o u rse designed t o e n a b l e the student t o read Latin as soon as poss i b le . The basic read i n g text is the Vulgate of SI. Jerome, with excursions i n to Roman h i story and mytholo gy. I, I I 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE LAT I N ( 1 , 1 ) C o n t i n u i n g emphasis on readi n g Lati n . C h o i c e o f read i n g in each term is deter m i ned b y a part i c u l a r theme. I , I I 49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D E NT STU DY (V2 - 1 )

Norwegian 1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY NO RWEG ! A N ( 1 , 1 ) Essentials of p ro n u n c i a tion, in tonat i o n , and structure. Deve lopm ent o f basic ski l l s in l i sten i n g , spe aking , readi n g, and writing. Oral and wri tten exercises. Labo ratory attendance req u i red. I , I I 20 1 , 202 I N T E R M E D I ATE NO RWEG I A N (1 , 1 ) C o n t i n ued practice in l i ste n i n g a n d speak ing. Re ading s based o n selecti ons that reflect the c u l t u ral he ritage as we l l as contemp orary material s that a re o f i nterest to the c o l lege student. Laboratory attendance req u i red . I, I I 321 C I V I L I ZATI O N A N D C U LT U R E An examination of the h i storical and a r t i s t i c e l ements that h a v e shaped Sca n d i navian c u l t u re from the beg i n n i n g s to the p resent. Special e m p h asis o n th ose forces w h i c h have i n fluenced American l i fe and c u l t u re . No pre足 req u i s i tes. I 491 , 492 I N D EPEN DENT STU D Y (V2

-

1)

Russian C u rrently offered cooperatively with the U .n i versity of Puget Sound on their campus. 1 01 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY RUSSIAN (1 , 1 ) Esse n t i a l s o f R u ssian g ramma r , o ral and written practi ce, and teac h i n g of g raded texts. I, I I 201 , 202 I NT E R M E D IATE R U SSIAN ( 1 , 1 ) Read i n g of s u i table texts, review of g ramma r, o ral and written c o m position. I , I I

Spanish 1 01 , 1 02 ELEM ENTARY SPAN I S H ( 1 , 1 ) Esse n t i a l s o f pro n u n c i a t i o n , i ntonation, and structure. Deve l o p m e n t o f basic ski l l s in l i ste n i n g , spe a k i n g , read ing, and writing. O ral and written exerc i ses. Laboratory atte nda nce req u i re d . I, I I


201 , 202 I NT E R M E D I AT E SPA N I S H ( 1 , 1 ) C o n t i n ued practice i n l i ste n i n g and speaki n g . Read i n g s based o n selections that reflect the c u l t u ral h e r i tage as we l l as contem p o rary mate r i a l s t h a t are o f i n terest to the col lege student. Laboratory attendance req u i red. I , I I 3 2 1 C I VI LIZAT I O N A N D C U LH J R E An examination o f the h i storical and a r t i s t i c elements that h a v e sh aped Span ish thought and behavior from the beg i n n i ngs to the pres ent. Special e m p h as i s on those forces w h i c h have in fl uenced American l i fe and cu l t u re. Cond ucted i n Spanish. P re req u i si t e : Spanish 202. I 351 , 352 C O M P O S I T I O N AND CONVERSAT I O N (1 , 1 ) T o p i c s o f c u rren t i n terest are used as a basis for the i m p rovement o f oral and wri tten expressi on . C o n d u cted in Span i s h . Prereq u i si te : Spanish 202. I, I I 4 2 1 , 422 MASTERPI ECES O F SPANISH LITERAT U R E (1 , 1 ) Su rvey o f the major l i terary works, in ali genres, from t h e early pe rio d t o about 1 900. An exa m i nation o f the forces that have produced the l i terature. H ow to u n d erstand a n d a p p reci ate l i teratu re as a work of art. Cond ucted i n Span i s h . A l te r n a tes w i t h Span i sh 431 , 4 3 2 . P re requisite S p a n i s h 2 0 2 . I , I I 431 , 432 TW E N T I ETH C E N T U R Y SPAN I S H L I T E RATU R E (1 , 1 ) Survey o f the m a j o r l i terary works o f the present t i m e w i t h e m p h asis on the last decade. Both Spanish and Latin American auth ors w i l l be considere d . Conducted i n Span i s h . Allernates w i t h Spanish 421 , 422 . 'P rereq u i site : Span足 i s h 202. I, I I 442 H I STORY O F R O M A N C E LANGUAGES An exam i n ation of the h i storical develo p m e n t of t h e Romance lang uages wi th reference t o the languages o f today. Same as French 442. Given in a l tern ate years. 'I I 445 METHODO LOGY O F TEAC H I N G F O R E I G N LA N G UAGES ( V2 ) A study o f the theory a n d techniques of fore i g n lang uage teac h i n g , with spec i a l problems a p p l i ca b l e to t h e student's major language. Particular e m p h as i s on audio-l i n g u a l tec h n iques. 491 , 492 I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY ( V2 - 1 )

Interim courses offered in 1 971 :

316 317 31 8 319 497

T H E SP A N I S H A M E R I CAN N O VEL OF THE 20TH CENTURY G ER M AN AT T H E G O ETHE-I NSTITUTE P R O B LEMS I N TH E CONTE MPORARY GERMAN N OVEL RUSSIAN THOUGHT I I I N D E P E N D EN T STUDY


G E N E RAL E N G I N E E R I N G

Mr. Yang 51

For c o m p lete details concern i n g the Engineering Physics p rogram, see pages and 1 87 of this catalog.

1 44

I N TRODUCT I O N TO CO M P U T E R S C I E N C E See Mathematics 1 44 .

1 5 1 E N G I N E E R I N G G R A P H I C S (112) P r i mary e m p hasis on desc r i p t i ve geometry, i n c l u d i n g auxi l i ary vi ews, true size view, revo l u t ions and deve l o pments , strikes and d i ps. 231

STAT I CS (V2 ) Fun damenta l s o f e n g i n eeri n g statics using ve ctor algebra. Covers conditi ons f o r e q u i l i b r i u m , re s u l t a n t force systems. centroid and center o f g ra v i ty, method o f v i rt u a l work, friction and k i nematics of particles and rigid b o d i e s . Prereq u i s i t e : Physics 2 5 3 .

232

M ECHAN ICS O F SO L I D S I n t ro d u c t i o n to t h e mechanics of deformable s o l i d bodies. T o p i cs w i l l be deform a t i o n , stress, c o n s t i t u t i ve equations for elastic mate rials, thermo足 elasticity, tens i o n , flexure, t o rsi o n , stabi l i ty of eq u i l i b r i u m . Prereq u i s i t e : Engi neering 2 3 1 .

344

SYSTEMS ANALY S I S A N D SI M U LAT I O N See M a t h e m atics 344.

346

N U M E R I C AL A N ALYSIS See Mathematics 346.

351

T H E R MODYNAM I C S I n trod u c t i o n t o t h e concepts and equations of c l ass i c a l , macrosco p i c thermo足 dyn a m i cs. I n c l u d es therm odyn a m i c cycles, flow a n d n o n-flow systems, p rop足 erties and mathematical relat i ons o f p u re s ubsta nces, m i xtur es and s o l u t i o n s , phase transition and c h e m i c a l reac t i o n s ; and an e le m e n t a r y treatment o f stati stical thermodynam i cs. P re re q u i s i te : P h ysics 253, 254.

441

N ETW O R K AN ALYS IS An analysis of e l ectri cal c i rc u r ts con tai n i n g active and passive e l e m e n ts for tra n sients and steady state cond i t i o n s . I n c l u des the form u l ation o f netwo rk equations, network theore m s , i m pedance matc h i n g and the f u n d a m e n tals o f network topology. Prere q u i s i t e : Physics 2 7 2 , 3 3 1 . I I aly 1 972-73

442

TRANSPORT P H E N O M ENA The u n ifying concept of the transport of mass, heat a n d momentum. The genera l aspects of fluid mechanics and transport coe f f i c i e n ts. P rerequisite: Engineering 3 5 1 . II a l y 1 9 7 1 -72

Interim courses offered i n 1 9 71 : 300 315

T H E CAR FOCUS ON THE FUT U R E : SPACE E X P LORAT I O N


H I STORY Mr. Schna ckenberg, Chairm a n , Mr. Halseth, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Martinson, Mr. Nordquist, Mr. Sch arnweber; assisted by Mr. Akre, Mr. Carleton and Mr. McLaughlin T h e p u rpose o f tCie s t u d y o f h i story is t o b r i n g t o l i g h t t h ose events t h a t have seemed s i g n i f i c a n t in s h a p i n g t h e w o r l d ' s c u l t ures a n d c i v i l i za t i o n s . In d o i n g so, t h e study t e n d s to focus u pon the use f u l ness o f c a r e f u l c ri t i c i s m o f m e t h o d s a n d m at e r i a l s , o f a f u n d o f p e r t i n e n t i n fo r m a t i o n a n d o f a n awareness o f t h e i m po r t a n c e of val ues.

8 and a maxi m u m o f 1 0 1 07 , 1 08 ; two o f H i s t o ry 251 , 252, a n d 253; a n d a S e n i o r

A B A C H E L O R O F A R T S m a j o r c o m p r i ses a m i n i m u m o f c o u rses i n c l u d i n g H i s t o ry

S e m i n a r. (See s a m p l e f o u r-year p ro g r a m b e l ow) A B A C H E L O R OF ARTS

IN E D U C A T I O N ( H i s t o ry) m a j o r c o m p r i s e s a m i n i m u m

8 a n d a m a x i.m u m o f 1 0 c o u rses i n c l u d i n g H i s t o ry 1 07 , 1 08 ; t w o o f H i s t o ry 251 , 252, a n d 253 ; H i st o ry 255 ; a n d a S e n i o r S e m i n a r . I n a d d i t i o n , c a n d i d a t e s f o r t h i s of

d e g ree m us t a l s o m e e t s p e c i a l req u i re m e n ts d e s c ri bed i n t h e S c h o o l o f E d u c a t i o n s e c t i o n i n t h i s cata l o g . ( S e e s a m p l e f o u r路 y e a r p rog ram bel ow) Both B A C H E L O R OF A R T S and BAC H E L O R OF A RTS IN E D LlCAT I O N ( H i story) m a j o rs must meet the fo l l o w i n g re q u i re m e n t s : ADM ISSION :

During

t h e s e c o n d semester o f t h e s o p h o m o re year, a

student

i n te n d i n g to m aj o r i n h i s t o ry lead i n g t o e i t h e r d e g ree s h o u l d f i l l o u t a n a p p l i ca t i o n which

is

ava i l a b l e

in

tce

department

offi ce.

If

a c c e pted ,

the

student

will

be

ass i g n ed to a m e m b e r o f t h e h i s t o ry fac u l ty w h o w i l l serve as his adviser. F O R E I G N LA N G U A G E : A h i s t o ry major s h o u l d m e e t t h e f o re i g n l a n g u a g e req u i re颅 ment u n d e r e i t h e r O p t i o n I o r O p t i o n

II

as req u i red by t h e C o l l e g e o f Arts a n d

S c i e n ce s . E N G L I S H P R O F I C I E N C Y : P r i o r to t h e T h a n ks g i v i n g recess o f t h e j u n i o r year a h i story m a j o r w i l l t a k e an exam i n a t i o n

in

English

p ro f i c i e n c y . A r r a n g e m e n t s f o r

t a k i n g t h e exam i n a t i o n s h o u l d be m a d e i n t h e o f f i c e o f t h e D i r e c t o r o f Test i n g . S E N I O R S E M I N A R : I n e i t h e r t h e fi rst o r s e c o n d s e m e s t e r o f t h e s e n i o r y e a r, a h i story

major

wi l l

e n ro l l

in

one of t h e fo l l ow i n g t h ree s e m i n a r s : Se m i n a r i n

A m e ri ca n H i s t o ry, S e m i n a r i n E u ro p e a n H i st o r y , Se m i n a r i n H i s t o r i o g ra p h y . S E N I O R O R A L EXA M I N A T I O N . I n S e p te m b e r o f t h e s e n i o r y e a r , a h i st o ry m a j o r wi l l t a k e a n o ra l e x a m i n a t i o n , b a s e d u p o n t h e s t u d e n t ' s w o r k i n t h e f i e l d o f h i s t o r y . G ra d u ate s t u d e n t s d e s i r i n g t o p u rs u e t h e Maste r's d e g ree w i t h f i e l d o f Il i s tory s h o u l d c o n s u l t t h e G ra d u a t e C a t a l o g .

studies

i n the


SAMPLE FOUR-YEAR PROGRAMS B . A. i n H i story Freshman Year

H i story 1 07 , 1 08 n g l i sh 1 0 1 Language R e l i g i o n 1 03 or 203 S c i e n ce So cial Science P . E . Acti v i t i es __

__

Sophomore Year

2 1 2

H istory 251 , 252 or 253 Language Fine Arts P h i losophy 201 , 331 o r 335 Social Science P . E . Activities

2 2

Senior Year Junior Year

Hi story e l ectives Electives

3 5

H i story 494, 495 or 496 H istory e l ectives Electives

8

1 2 5 8

B.A. i n Education i n H i story Freshman Year

H i s tory 1 07 , 1 08 . English 1 0 1 . . Language R e l i g i o n 1 03 or 203 C o m m . Arts 1 23 Science P.E. Activities

Sophomore Year

2 1 2

Hi story 251 , 252 o r 253 H i story 255 Logic English H e a l t h 295 P h i l o so p h y Educati on 201 P.E. Activities

2

8 Junior Year

Senior Year

Hi stor y e l e ctive Religion F i n e Arts Electives Education electives

September Experience His tory 494, 495 or 496 H i story e l ective Social Science Profess i o nal Semester

3Yz 1 '/2 8

o 1

3 3Y2 8 Y,

See general un i vers i ty requirements .

"The Department requires foreign lang uage proficiency. Students may elect to estab l i s h o r i m p rove l ang uage capabi l i ty by p u r s u i n g Option 1 or 2, cited i n the C o l l ege o f Arts and Sciences re q u i rements.


1 07, 1 08 H I STORY OF C I V I L I ZATION An i n trod u c t i o n to h i story e m p h asizing u n d e rsta n d i n g and ana lysis o f t h e i ns t i t u t i o n s and ideas of selected c i v i l izations. Mesopotamia, Egypt, t h e H e b rews, G reece, Rome, t h e r i s e o f C h ri s t i a n i ty, and E u rope i n t h e M i d d l e Ages a re d e a l t with i n t h e f i rs t sem este r ; E u r o p e from the R e n aissance t o the p rese n t i n the seco n d . Lectu res, d i scuss i o n s and sel ected rese arch and w r i t i n g . I I I 251 C O LO N I A L A M E R I CAN H I STORY The origin and deve l o p m e n t of A m e rican i n stitutions from c o l o n i a l times to t h e 1 790's. Em phasis upon the g rowth of the c o l o n i e s and thei r relati o ns h i p to t h e B ri t i s h i m pe r i a l system. 252 N I N ET E ENTH CENTU RY A M E R I CAN H I STORY A study of the U n i ted States from the early n at i o n a l period to the 1 890's. E m p hasis upon t h e i n terplay between c h a n g i n g h i sto rical c o n d i ti ons and various g roups in soci ety, i n c l u d i n g m i n o r i t ies. 253 TWENT I ETH C E N T U R Y A M E R ICAN H I STORY A study o f t h e major trends and events i n domestic and fore i g n affairs si nce 1 900. Such i m po rtant themes as affl u e n ce , u rban g rowt h , and social contrasts wi l l be d i scussed. 255 THE PAC I F I C N O RTHW EST An i n terpretative h i story of the Pac i f i c Northwest w i t h i n t h e context of the A m e r i can West: social, economic, a n d pol i tical deve l o p me n ts w h i c h reflect both reg i o n a l and national c h aracte ristics. 321 , 322 H I STORY O F T H E A N C I ENT W O R LD A study of t h e ancient M e d i te r ranean world. T h e c i v i l izat i o n s of G reece and Rome. P re req u i s i t e : C o n s e n t of i n structor. I I I 323 M E D I EVAL H I STORY A study of the h i story of E u rope f rom the d i s i n te g ration of the R o m an E m p i re to 1 300. Exte n s i ve read i n g and research in selected m e d i e val materials. P re req u i s i t e : H i s t o ry 1 07, 1 08 . 324 R E N A I SSAN C E A syste matic study of E u ro pe i n an age o f transition ( 1 300 t o 1 500) . Readi ngs and research i n s e l ected topics. P re re q u i s i t e : H i story 1 07, 1 08 . 3 2 5 TH E R E FO R MAT I O N An i n te n s i ve study of t h e sixteenth c e n t u ry . P o l i t i ca l and re l i g i ous c r i s i s ; Lutheranism, Zwi n g l i an i s m , A n g l i ca n i s m , A n a b a p t i s m , C a l v i n i s m , Roman Cath o l i c refo r m . T h e Weber thesis, the beg i n n i n g of Baroq u e art. Readi ngs and research i n selected sixteenth centu ry materia l s . P r e req u i s i t e : H i story 1 07, 1 08 . 3 2 6 E U R O P EAN H I STORY F R O M 1 648 to 1 789 An advanced study of men and movements d u ri n g the early deve l o p m e n t of


t h e mode rn, scientific age. The e n l i g h ten ment, the Old Regime. Read i n gs and rese a r c h . Prereq u i s i te : History 1 0 7 , 1 0 B. 327 THE F R E N C H RE VOLUTION AND NAPOLEON An advanced course of lectures, read i n g and research in the revo lu tionary events in Europe from 1 7B9 to the Cong ress of Vienna. Prereq uisite: Hi story 1 0 7 , 1 08 . 3 2 B N I N ETEENTH CENTU RY E U R O P E A s t u d y of the development and expansion o f Eu ropean c i v i l i zation from 1 B 1 5 to 1 9 1 4 . Lectures, d i scuss i o n s , read i n g s , resea rch . Prere q u i s i t e : History 1 0 7 , 1 0 B. 329 TW ENTIET H C ENTURY EUROPE A cou rse o f read i n gs and d i scussions concern ing the events and trends s i n c e 1 9 1 4 . Pre requisite: H i story 1 0 7, 1 0B. 331 , 332 E N G LA N D A study of t h e p o l i t i ca l , soci a l , econ o m i c , l e g a l a n d cultural developments in the British I s les. Prerequisite: 1 0 7 , 1 0B or consent of i n structor. I I I 333 RUSSIA A survey o f the growth of Ru ssi a from the earl i e st times. The c o l l a pse of Czarism, the rise o f com m u n i s m , prese n t world relati ons. P rereq uisite: 1 0 7 , 1 0B o r consent o f i n str uctor. 336 COLON I A L LAT I N A M E R I CA The con quest, setllement, and deve l o p m en t of Latin Ame rica. Emp hasis upon Spanish and Portug uese p o l i ti c al, e c o n o m i c , and religious i n slitutions. Pre足 req ui s i t e : Any two cou rses from 1 0 7 , 1 0 8 , 251 , 252 or consent of i n structor. 337 R E P U B L ICAN LATIN A M E R I C A T h e hi story of Latin America f r o m t h e i n dependence pe riod to the prese n t . E m p h as i s u p o n Mexico, Argentina, a n d Brazi l. Prereq u i s i t e : 336 o r conse n t of instructor. 340 FAR EASTERN H I STORY A s u rvey o f Far Eastern l i fe and thought from ancient times. E m p h asis upon China, Japan and India. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 356 A M E R I CAN D I PLO MATIC H I STORY A study of the factors and po l i cies of American d i p l o macy; isolation, neutra l i ty, the Mon roe Doctrine, world powe r . Prere q u i s i te : Two co urses from 251 , 252, 253 o r consen t of instructor. 421 H I STORY O F I D EAS: EU ROPEAN C I V ILIZAT I O N A n advanced study o f lead ing i d e a s developed i n western civilization since the d i s i n tegration of R o m e . Prereq u isite : Consent of instructo r. 451 A M E R ICAN CONSTITUTIONAL H I STORY The develo pment of the constitution from colonial times. P rereq u i s i t e : Consent of i n s t r uctor.


461 H I STORY OF T H E AMER I CAN F R O N T I E R A s t u d y o f the principal types of " f ronti ers" that c h a racterized the westward movement, esp e c i a l l y i n the ni neteenth century. Prerequisite : Any two c o u rses from 251 , 252, 253 or consent of in structor. 471 H I STORY OF A M E R I C AN T H O U G HT AND CU LT U R E A study o f t h e various d i mensions of American social a n d intel lectual h i story. E m p h asis u pon i d e as as they relate t o h i stori c a l periods, and ethnic g roups. Prereq u i s i t e : Any two courses from 251 , 252, 253 or consent of i n structor. 492 I N D EPEN DENT ST U D Y 494 SEM I N AR I N AMER ICAN H I STO R Y 4 9 5 SEM I N AR I N E U R O P EAN H I ST O R Y 4 9 6 S E M I N A R I N H I STOR I OG RAPHY 596 GRADUATE RESEA R C H 5 9 9 THE S I S Interim courses offered in 1 9 71 :

306 308 310 315

U R B AN B IOGRAPH I E S: D I RECTED RESEARCH REFORM AND R EVOLUT I ON IN A M E R I CA T H E C I TY I N EU R O P EAN H I ST ORY; M I D D LE AGES AND RENA ISSANCE I B ER IAN P E N I N S U LA (STU D Y T O U R )

J O U R NALISM

See Communi cation Arts.


MATHEMATICS

Mr. Herzog, Chairman, Mr. Batker, Mr. Brink, Mr. Coats, Mr. Fisk, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Liebelt, Mr. Meyer, Mr. Peterson Mathematics has p e rm e ated a lm ost every aspect of o u r m o d e r n society. This i s reflected n o t only t h rough the recent s c i e n t i f i c a n d technolog i c a l i n fo rma tion expl o s i o n , but also th ro u g h i ts ever i n cre as i n g use i n such areas as business, econo m i c s, gove rn m ent and the s o c i a l sciences. The Mathematics Depa rtme n t i s therefore c o m m i tted a n d its c u rric u l u m i s designed t o ( 1 ) offer a l l students an o pp o r t u n i ty to study mathematics, (2) p rovide the mathematics f o r those st udents who n eed it as a tool in busi ness o r t h e natu ral or social s c i ences, (3) i n s truct the prospective teac her i n t h ose su bjects which h e will need to master i n o rd e r to be able to te ach mathematics adeq uately h i m s e l f , (4) 揃 p repare the student for a career in mathe matics, and (5) provi d e the stud e n t w i t h t h e backg r o u n d n ecessary f o r graduate study i n mathematics. D U ri n g the sophom o re year. a stu d e n t i n te n d i ng to earn a Bac h e lor o f A rts or a B a c h e l o r of Science deg ree with a major i n mathematics s h o u l d c o m plete an app l i cation form w h i c h i s ava i l a b l e from the d e p a rtmental secretary. If accepted by the department. the s t u d e n t w i l l be assi g n e d to an adviser on the mathematics facu l ty . Requi remen ts f o r t h e BACH ELOR O F ARTS deg ree w i t h a m aj o r i n mathematics s h a l l consist of a m i n i m u m of 7 c o u rses in mathematics n u m b e red above 1 50 i n c l u d i n g Math 332 a n d at least 3 u p p e r d i v i s i o n mathematics courses selected from Math 433. 434. 455, 456. (Students p l a n n i n g to d o g ra d u ate work in mathe足 matics should defi n i tely c o m p l ete all four of t h ese courses.) Two cou rses in physics are s t ro n g l y rec o m m e n d e d . Requ j r e m e n ts f o r the BA C H ELOR OF S C I E N C E deg ree with a major i n mathe足 matics sh a l l c o n s i s t o f 1 0 c o u rses in mathematics i n c l u d i n g Math 332 and at least 5 u p p e r division mathematics c o u rses. At l e ast 3 of the u p p e r d i vi s i o n courses must c o me from Math 433, 434. 455. 456 . (Stu d e n ts p l an n i n g to d o g ra d u ate w o r k in mathematics should d e f i n i tely com plete a l l f o u r of these c o u rses.) Two c o u rses in physics are req u i re d . Mathe mati cal Physics 456 may be substituted for one cours e o f u p p e r d i vi s i o n mathematics. BACH ELOR O F ARTS I N E D U CATION major req u i rem ents are l i sted be l ow . Can足 d i d ates for t h i s deg ree must also meet special req u i re me n ts described i n the Schoo l of Education section in this cata l o g . Senior High School Prepara tion: Tea c h i n g Major: 7 co u rses i n addition to Math 446 Prerequisite: Math 1 3 3 or equivalent. Required: Math 1 5 1 . 1 52 . 23 1 , 433. 446 ; 321 o r 434 or 455; one a d d i ti o n a l uppe r d i vi s i o n course. Suggested supporting courses: 2 c o u rses in chemistry o r p h y s i cs and two a d d i t i o n a l science courses. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Major: 6 co u rses


Prerequisite: Math 1 33 or equ i valent . Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 231 , 433, 446.

Teac h i n g Minor' 4 courses i n addition to Math 446. Prere q u is i te : Math 1 33 o r eq u i valent . Re q uire d: Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 ; 1 2 7 or 23 1 ; 446, 433 or 321 . Elementary School Preparation:

Teac h i n g Major: 4 c o u rses in a d d i t i o n to Math 323 and Math 324 o r 32 1 . Prerequisite: Math 1 33 o r e q u i v a l e n t . Required: Math 1 5 1 , 1 52 , 1 27 o r 321 o r 433 ; p l us mathematics e l ectives. Teac h i ng M i n o r : 2 mathematics cou rses i n ad d i ti o n to Math 323, and Math 324 o r 32 1 , to be determi ned i n consu l tation with the School o f Ed ucation a n d the Departme n t o f Mathemati cs. G rad uate Students desiring to p u rsue a cou rse o f study lead i n g to a MAST E R OF NATURAL S C I E N C E degree w i th a major in mathematics s h o u l d consult The G radu足 ate B u l letin, Division o f G raduate Studies. A Typical Curriculum in Mathematics Freshman Year

Courses

E n g l i s h 1 0 1 , C o m position . ' Math e m atics 1 5 1 , 1 52 Analytic Geometry and Calcu l u s Re l i g i o n r e q u i re ment P E Activity P h ysics 1 0 1 , 253 Electives (Social Science, F i n e Arts o r H i story and Literature)

1

I

Sophomore Year

? Foreign La ngu age Mathematics 23 1 , 332

Junior Year

Language P h i l os o p h y req u i rement Mathemati cs Electives

2 2

2 I

'12 2

1

-

2

Re l i g i o n req u i rement P E Acti vity Electives (So c i a l Science, Fine A rts o r H i st o ry and Literature) Electives

7 '12 -8 '12

'! Fore i g n

Courses

7 '/2 -8'12 Senior Year

Courses

2 1 2-3 2-3 7

-

1 -2 1 -2

Mathematics Electives

8

Courses

2 -3 5-6

7-8

I See Page 45 for General University requirements. 'See Page 48 for College of Arts and Sciences requirements. JStudents n o t qualifying for Math 151 upon entrance shoufd register lor Math 9 1 and/ or 133 a n d then take both Mathematics 152 a n d 2 3 1 i n t h e first semester o f t h e sophomore year.

091 I N T E R M E D I ATE A L G E B RA-(no c redit) A thorough review o f fi rst year high school algebra a n d c o n ti n uation beyond q uad ratics, I


1 2 7 F I N I TE MATHEMAT I C S T r u th tables. m o d u l o systems, elementary pro b a b i l i ty, B o o l e a n Algebra, matrices, lin ear progra m m i n g . Prerequisite: H i g h school algebra and geometry. I II S 1 33

COLLEGE ALGEBRA A N D T R I G O N O M ET R Y S e t s , p rogressi ons, bi n o m i a l t h e o r e m , c o m p l ex n u m bers, dete r m i n an t s , radian m e as u re . solution o f acute and o b l i q ue triangles, i nverse f u n c t i o n s , graphing, i d e n t i t i es. Prerequ i s i t e : 2 years of high school a l g e b ra or permission of i n structor. I I I

1 4 4 I NT R O D UCT I O N T O C O M P UTER S C I E N C E An i n t roduction t o c o m p u ter science a n d a worki n g as appl i e d to s c i e n t i f i c p ro b l e m s . Topics i n c l ude o rg a n i z a t i o n , d ata structure, algorithms, f l o w charts req u i s i te : Mathematics 1 27 o r 1 33 o r c o nsent o f the 1 51

knowledge o f FO RTRAN c o m p u ter c l assi fication, and FORTRAN I V , Pre­ i n structor. I l i S

ANALYT IC G E O M ETRY AND CALC U L U S An i ntroduction t o analytic geometry, f u n ctions, l i m its, derivatives and i n ­ teg rals w i th a p p l i cations. P rereq u i s i t e : T w o years of h i g h s c h o o l a l g e b ra, t r i g o n o m e t ry, O r Mathematics 1 33 Or the equivalent. I I I

1 5 2 ANALYT IC G E O M ETRY AND CALCULUS I n tegrati o n , a p p l ic ations and tech n i q ues of i n teg rat i o n , transcendental func­ t i o n s , p o l a r c oo r d i n a tes, im proper i n t egrals, L'Hospital 's R u l e, e l ementary d i ffere ntial equations. P rereq u i s i te : Mathematics 1 5 1 , I I I 1 99

D I RECTED R EA D I N G ( Y4 V2 ) Su pervised study o f topics selected to meet the i n d i v i d u a l ' s needs o r i nter­ ests. I n te n d ed p r i m a r i l y for students awarded advanced p l acement. Admission o n l y b y departmental i n vitati o n ,

231

L I N EAR ALGEBRA A N D CALCULUS An i n t roduction to l i near a l g e b ra, vectors, matri ces a:1d determinants; d i ffer­ ential equations, s o l i d analytic geometry . I n trod u c t i o n t o m u l t i variable cal­ c u l u s . Prereq u i s i te : Math 1 52 or consent o f c h a i rman o f the department. I I I

321

G E O M ET R Y A s u rvey o f the f o u n d a t i o n s of geometry and o f b a s i c theory i n the areas o f Euc lidea n , p r ojective, and n o n - E u c l id ean g e o m e t r y . P rereq uisite : Mathematics 2 3 1 o r consent o f i n s t ru c t o r. I a / y 1 9 72-73

323

M O D E R N ELEM ENTARY MATH EMAT I C S An i n trodu ction to the m a t hematical conce pts underlying the t raditional com­ putational techniques, and offering a systematic a n a l ys i s of arithmetic and an i n t u i tive a p p roach to a l ge b ra and geometry. I n tended for element ary teach i n g majors. M u s t be taken before Education 3 2 6 . P re req u i s i te : Consent o f i n structor. I I I S

324

G E O M ETRY F O R T H E E L E M E NTARY S C H O O L TEAC HER (Yo ) Designed t o h e l p students review elementary geometry from a m a t u re point

-


of view using modern vocabu l ary and notation, and to understand the i mp o r­ tance of measurement, observat i o n , i n t u i t i o n , and i n d uctive reason i n g , as useful tech n i q ues in d i scove r i n g , learn i n g , and teac h i n g e l e m e n tary geome try. I n tended for ele mentary te ac h i n g m aj o rs. P rereq u i s i t e : Math 323. I I 332 M U LTI D I M E N S I ONAL CALC U L U S A conti n uation of the m u ltivariable c a l c u l u s c o n ce pts i n t rod u ced i n M a t h 23 1 . Partial d i ffere n t i ation and d i fferen t i a l equations, l i n e i n tegrals, G reen's the­ orem, i n f i n i te series. P rereq u i s i te : Math 23 1 . I I 341 MATH EMAT I CA L STAT I ST I C S Elem en tary p robab i l i ty t h e o r y , dis c rete and co n t i n u o u s d i s t r i b u t i o n functions, i n troduction to sam p l i n g theory and hypothesis tes t i n g . Prereq u i si t e : Math 1 52 . II a/y 1 9 72-73 344 SYST EMS ANALYS I S AND S I M U LAT I O N An a p p l i cation of matrix algebra, p robabi l i ty theory, statistics a n d c o m p u te r scienc3 to p roblems of science, i n dustry a n d society. T o p i cs i n c l u d e mathe­ matical m od e l i n g , Monte Carlo tech n i q ues, error analysis, stochas t i c p ro­ cesses and computer s i m u lati o n . P rereq u i s i te : Math 1 44 and 1 52. I 346 N U M E R I CA L ANALYS I S Study of n u m e ri cal theory and a p p l i c ations i n t h e areas of s o l u t i o n of equations and l i n ear systems, d i fferen tiation, i n tegrat i o n , app roxi mation, matrix theory, and solution of o r d i n a ry d i ffere n t i a l equations. P re re q u i s i t e : Math 231 (or c o n c u rrent reg istration) and l i m ited kn owledge of c o m p uter p rogra m m i n g . I I 351 A P P L I E D MAT H E MATICS Topics i n c l u d e o r d i n ary d i ffe re n t i a l equat i o n s ( i n c l u d i n g series s o l u t i o n s ) , the Laplace transfo r m , partial d i ffere n t i a l equations, o r t h o g o n a l functions. P rereq u i s i te : Math 332. I 433, 434 M O D E R N ALGEBRA ( 1 , 1 ) Topics i n c l u d e l i near algebra, grou ps, rings, m o d u les, fields, field exten s i o n s . P re re q u i s i te : M a t h 231 . 433 offered f i r s t semester e v e r y year; 4 3 4 offered II a/y 1 97 1 -72. 446 MATHE MAT I CS I N T H E SECON DARY S C H O O L ( V2 ) Em phasis on the basic conce pts o f mathematics, i n c l u d i n g the p r i n c i p l es of n u mber, operati o n , relation and proof, postulati o n a l systems of E u c l i d ean geometry, and p resent methods and materials in teac h i n g secondary s c h o o l mathematics. P rereq u i s i t e : Math 231 o r e q u i va l e n t and c o n s e n t of i n structor. I 455, 456 MATH EMAT I CA L AN ALYS I S ( 1 , 1 ) A r i g o rous and exten d ed treatment o f t o p i cs i n troduced i n e l e m e ntary cal­ c u l u s . P re re q u i s i t e : Math 332, 455 offered fi rst semester every ye a r ; 456 offered II a/y 1 972-73 460 E L E M ENTARY TOPO LOGY A n i n trod uction to p o i n t- set topology. Prerequisite: Consent o f i nstructor. I I a/y 1 97 1 -72


490 S E M I N AR (% - 1 ) Open to advanced students with consen t of the chai rman of t h e department. 491 , 492 I N DEPENDE NT STUDY ( '14 - 1 ) Open to advan ced students with consent of the chai rman of the depart足 ment. I I I 5 97 , 598 GRAD UATE R ESEA R C H (V4 1 ) Open to Master's degree c a n d i d ates on l y . Prere q u i s i t e : Consent o f the c h a i r足 man of the department. I I I -

Interim cou rses offered i n 1 971 :

307 I NTRODUCT I O N TO T H E STYLE A N D SUBSTANCE O F M O DERN MAT H E MATICS 308 I NT E R D I SC I P L I N A R Y MATH E MAT I C S 3 1 0 MATH EMAT I CA L P U Z Z L ES A N D PARADOX ES 31 1 SYST E M S, S I M U LATION A N D ANALYSIS

MUSIC

Mr. Skones, Chairman, Mr. Dahl, Mr. Gilbertson, Miss King, Mr. Knapp, Mr. Kracht, Mr. Meyer, Mr. Robbins, Mr. Sare; assisted by Mrs. Brown, Mr. Crockett, Mrs. Evans, Mr. Harmic, Mrs. Hopp, Mrs. Knapp, Mr. Locke, Mr. Newnham, Mrs. Swisher, Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. Tremaine Requi rements for a major in m us i c to r the BACHELOR O F ARTS d e g ree s h a l l c o n s i s t of M u s i c 50, 1 23 , 1 24 , 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224, 323 p l u s o n e c o u rse o f Li terature and Perform ance and two cou rses of p rivate lessons i n c l u d i n g one-half c o u rse of p rivate p i a n o A l l m u s i c m aj o rs a re req u i red to reg ister for Music 50, Student R e c i ta l , e a c h s e m e s t e r i n atten dance. BAC H E L O R O F ARTS IN EDUCATION major req u i re m e n ts are l i sted below. C a n 足 d i d ates f o r this degree m u s t a l s o m e e t special req u i re m e n ts descri bed i n t h e S c h o o l o f E d u c a t i o n secti o n i n t h i s catalog. M o re com plete detai l s c o n ce rn i n g all m u s i c cu r r i c u l a may be found i n the Depart m e n t of Music Handbook. Senior High School Preparation , ' Em p h asis on C h o ra l M u s i c Teac h i ng Maj o r : 1 4 '/2 courses. Prerequisite: M u s i c T h e o ry 1 23 , or equivalent. Required: Music 50, 1 24 , 21 1 , 2 1 2, 223, 224 , 323, 325, 339 ' , 340' , 442, 445 ' , 447 ' . Two c o u rses of p r i vate v o i ce lessons, one-h a l f cou rse of private p i a n o l e s s o n s and t w o c o u rses of Literature and Performance. One course of m u s i c e l ectives is also req u i red.


" E m p h asis on Sacred Ch oral M u s i c Teach ing M a j o r : 1 4 V2 cou rses. Prerequisite: M us i c Theory 1 23 , or equivalent. Required: M u s i c 50, 1 24, 21 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224 , 323, 339 ' , 340 ' , 367, 368, 44 5 ' , 447 " . Two cou rses of pr ivate in struction m u s t b e earned i n the maj o r per­ formance med i u m (voice or p i a n o and l o r organ) and one-ha l f cou rse must be earned i n the minor performance med i u m (voice o r p i an o and l o r o rg a n ) . T w o c o u rses o f L i terature and Performance a r e a l s o req u i red. " Emphasis on I n strumental M u s i c Teac hing Maj o r : 1 4 V2 c o u rses. Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 23 , or equivalent. Required: MusiC 50, 1 24, 1 4 1 , 1 4 2 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 223, 224 , 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 323, 325, 326, 339 ' , 44 5 ' , 447 ' . Two courses of private i n struction m ust be earned on the student's major instrument p l u s one-h a l f cou rse o f p i ano. Two cou rses o f c redit must be earned in L i terature and Perfo rmance. Junior High School Preparation Te a c h i n g Maj o r : 7 cou rses. Prerequisite: M u s i c 1 23 , or eq u i valent. Required: Music 50, 1 24 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 339 ' , 340 ' , 445 ' . One-half cou rse of private p i a n o , one-h a l f cou rse of a sec o n d ary instrument or voice, one cou rse of Literature and Performance and one-half c o u rse of m u s i c electives are a l so req u i red. Teac hing M i n o r : 5 courses. Required: M u s i c 1 20 , 339, 34 1 p l us one-half c o u rse of pri vate piano and one­ h a l f cours e o f p r i vate i n struction in voi ce or secondary instr um e n t . One c o u rse of L i terature and Performance and one-h a l f c o u rse of ele cti ves i n m usic are also req uir ed. Elementary School Preparation Teac h i n g Major: 6 cou rses. Required: Music 1 20 , 339, 341 plus one-h a l f c o u rse of private p i a n o and one­ h a l f c o u rse of private voice. One cou rse of m u s i c e n semble and one and one­ half c o u rse o f electives i n music are also req u i red . Teac h i n g M i n o r : 3 c o u rses. Required: 3 courses in the M u si c Department, t o be dete r m i ned in consu lta­ tion with the Department of M u s i c and the School o f Ed ucati on. 'Appl ies toward profess i o n a l education req u i rements. " St u d e n ts desiring certi f i cation as a secondary music teacher w i l l do their student teaching on the secon dary level. Students desiring certification as an elementary music teacher will do their stu­ dent teaching on the elemen tary level. Students desiring certllication as a K - 12 music teacher will do their student teaching on both elem entary and secondary levels.


The BACHELOR OF M U S I C c u r r i c u l u m is des i g ned f o r the student who in tends to become a p rofessional m u s i c i a n a n d / o r to enter g radua te school. The degree is offered with a maj o r in (a) o rch estra l i nstrument performance, (b) organ p e rf o r m ­ ance, (c) p i a n o pe rformance, (d) vocal pe rformance, ( e ) c h u rch m us i c , ( f ) t h e o ry and compos i t i o n . REOU I R E MENTS F O R T H E BACHELOR OF M U S I C D E G R E E A . O R C H ESTRAL I N ST R U M ENT P E R F O R M A N C E Freshman Year M us i c 50, Student Recital Music 1 23 , 1 24 , The ory P r i vate Lessons-major i nstrument L i terature and Performance (ensemb le) Soc i a l Science requ ire m e n t R e l i g i o n req u i re m e n t E n g l i sh Composition req u i re m e n t o r proficiency P.E. req u i re m e n t ' I nterim elective

a __

2 V2

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1

- -

V2

1 8

Sophomore Year, Musi c 5 0 , Student Recital M u s i c 223, 224 , T h e o ry_ P r ivate Lessons- m a j o r i nstrument P r i vate Lessons-piano Literature and Performance Science o r Mathematics requ i re m e n t English Literature o r H i story req u i re m e n t P . E . req u i rement ' E l ective ' I n t e r i m elective

_ _

a 2 1 V2 V2 1 V2 V2 1 8

Junior Year Music 50, Stud e n t Reci tal M u s i c 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , H i story of Music Music 323, C o n tem porary Tec h n i q ues Music 324 , C o n trapuntal Writing P r i vate Less o n s-maj o r i nstrument Li terat u re and Performance M u s i c 325, 326, Orchestration ' E lective ' I nteri m el ective

_

a 2 1 1 1 V2 1 V2

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1 8

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2 Y2 courses of music electives are required.


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Senior Year

M usic 50, Student Reci tal M us i c 339, Basic C o n d ucting Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis • • P r i vate Lessons-maj o r instrumenL Li terature and Performance P h i l osophy req u i rement Religion req u i rement ' Elective __ ___ _ ' I nterim elective • 2 1' 2 courses of music electives are required.

o Y2 1 Y2 _

1

2 1

" Full senior recital required.

8

B. ORGAN P E R FO R MA N C E Freshman Year

M usic 50, Student Reci tal M us i c 1 23, 1 24, Theory __ ___ ____ ______ ___ __ P rivate Lessons-organ Literature and Performance (ensemble) _ Social Science req u i rement _ _ _ _ __ _ R e l i g i o n requi rem e n t E n g l i sh Composition req u i re m e n t o r p roficie ncy P . E. req u i rement _ ' I n terim e l ective

o 2 Y2 1 1 V2 1 8

Sophom ore Year

Music 50, Student Recital_ M us i c 223, 224, Theory P ri vate Lessons-organ Lite ratu re and Performance Science and Mathematics req u i re m e n t English Literature o r Hi story req u i rement P.E. req u i rement • Elective ' I nterim e l ective

o 2 Y2

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1 Y2 1

8 Junior Year

Music 50, Student Recital Music 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , H i story o f Music Music 323, Contemporary Tec h n iques Music 324, Con trapuntal Writing Music 367, Hymnology and Sacred literature _ _ P rivate Lessons-organ ' I nterim e lective . • 1'2 course of music elective is required.

o 2 1

2 1 8


Senior Year Music 50, Student Recital M u s i c 339, Basic Conducting Music 364, History of Organ Bui lding o r Music 4 4 3 , Organ Repertoi re and I m provisation Music 368, Wors h i p and Litu rgy Music 423, Advanced Form a n d A n a lysis " Private Lessons-organ ' I nterim elective Phi losophy req u i rement Religion requirement V2 course 0 1 music elective is required. , ' Full senior recital required. ___

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1 2

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1

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1

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8

C. PIANO P E R F OR MANCE Freshman Year Music 50, Student Recital Music 1 23, 1 24, Theory P ri vate Lessons-piano Literature and Perfo rmance (ensemble) Soc i a l S c i en c e requirement R e l i g i o n req u i re m e n t E n g l i s h C o m position requirement o r p rofici ency P . E . requirement ' I nterim elective

_

o 2

_

8 Sophomore Year M u s i c 50, Student Recital Music 223, 224, Tt eory Pri vate Lesso ns-piano Li terature and Performance S c i e n ce or Mathematics req u i rement English Literature or H i story req u i rement P.E. req u i rement ' Elective ' I nterim elective

_

a 2 Y? 1 1

_

8 Junior Year Music Music M usic M u sic

5 0 , Student Recital 21 1 , 2 1 2, History of M u s i c 323, Contemporary Tec h n i q ues 324, Con trapunta l Wri t i n g

' 2 V4 courses 0 1 Music Electives are required.

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a 2


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M u s i c 336, Two Piano Ensemble or Music 337, Accompany i n g _ Private Lessons-piano ' Elective ' I n te r i m elective

V4 2 3/4 1 8

Senior Year

Music 50, Stude n t Recital _ _ _ _ M usic 363, H i story of P i a n o L i terature ____ Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis M usic 441 , Keyboard Pedag ogy _ " P r i vate Lessons-piano __ _______ P h i l osoplW req u i rement Rel i gion req u i reme n t . ' Elective ' I nterim elective ' 2 'l'4 courses of music electives are required. , â&#x20AC;˘

D.

o V2 1

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_

Full senior recital required.

V2 2 1

1 8

VOCAL P E R FO R M A N C E Freshman Year

M usic 50, Student Recital. Music 1 23 , 1 24, Theory _ _ __ Pri vate Lessons-voice _ ďż˝ ___ Literature and Performance (ense m b l e) _ Social Science req u i rement Religion req u i rement English Composition req u i rement o r profi c i ency P.E. req u i rement ' I n terim elective _

_

_

a 2

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V2 1

V2 1 8

Sophomore Year

Music 50, Stude n t Recital M usic 223, 224, Theory _____ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ __ P r i vate Lessons-voice Pri vate Lessons-p i a n o Li terature and Performance_ Science o r Matilematics req u i rement English Literature o r History req u i rement P.E. req u i rement ' Elective __ _ ' I nterim elective ____ _ ' 1 c ourse of music elective is required.

o 2 1 V2 V2 1 1 V2 V2 1 8


Junior Year Music 50, Student RecitaL __ _ _ _ _ M us i c 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , History o f M u sic __ _ _ _ _ M u s i c 323, C o n temporary Tech n i q ues___ M u s i c 324, Contrapuntal W ri t i n g M u sic 339, Basic Conducting _ M u sic 365, Vocal Literature Pri vate Less ons-vo ice _ Pri vate Lessons-piano Literature and Performance ' I n te r i m elective _ ___

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8 Senior Year M u s i c 50, Student RecitaL M u s i c 423, Advanced Form and Analysis _ M u s i c 401 , O p e ra Workshop _ _ M us i c 442, Vocal Pedagogy ______ _ , ' Pri vate Lessons-vo ice Literature and Performance _ _ ____ P h i losophy req u i rement __ R e l i g i o n req u i rement ' Elective __ ________ _ ' I nter i m elective _ ' I course of music elective is required. , ' Full senior recital required. _

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Freshman Year

E. C H U RC H M U S I C

M u s i c 50, Student RecitaL _ M us i c 1 23, 1 24 , Theory Private Lessons-organ Pri vate Lessons-voice L i terature and Performance (ensemb le) _ _ _ _ Social Science req u i rement _ R e l i g i on req u i re m e n t _ Engl ish Composition req u i rement or profi c i e n c y_ P.E. req u i rement . ' I nterim elective

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8 Sophomore Year Music 50, Student Reci taL M us i c 223, 224, Theory Private Lessons-organ P rivate Lessons-voice Literature and Performance

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'I V2 courses of music electives are required.

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Science or Mathematics req u i rement English L i terature o r H i story requirement P.E. req u i rement _ _�_ ' Elective ' I n teri m elective

V2 1

8

Junior Year

Music 50, Student Recital Music 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , H i story of Music Music 323, C o n te m porary Tec h n i q ues Music 324 , Con trap u n tal Writing Music 3 3 9 , Basic Conducting Music 3 6 7 , Hymno logy and Sacred L i terature Private Lessons-organ or voice _ _ _ Literature and Performance _ ' I nterim elective _

o 2

V2 1

V2 1 8

Senior Year

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Music 50, Student Reci tal M usic 368, W o rs h i p and Liturgy Music 423, Advanced Form and Analysis_ M usic 445, Advanced Cond ucti n g _ , ' P ri vate Lessons-organ o r voice Literature and Performance P h i l osophy req u i rement _ Religion req u i rement _ _ , Elective ' I nterim elective '1 V2 courses 01 music electives are required.

o

, Full senior recital required.

8

V2 1

V2 1

F. THEORY A N D C O M P O S I T I O N Freshman Year

M usic 50, Student Recital _ Music 1 23 , 1 24 , Theory Private Lesso ns-major i nstrument Private Lessons- p i a n o Literature and Performance (ense m b le) Social Science requ i rement_ Religion req u i rement English Composition req u i rement o r p roficienc y P.E. req u i rement ' I nterim e lective _ _

o 2

V2 V2 V2 1

V2 1 8


Sopnomore Year

Music 50. Student Recital _ Music 223. 224. Theory _ Music 227. Com posi t i o n _ P rivate Lesso ns-maj o r i nstrumenL . P ri vate Lessons-piano Literatu re and Performance Science o r Mathematics req u i rement English Literat u re o r H istory req u i rement P . E . req u i rement ' E lective _ ' I nterim e lective

o 2

V2 V2 _

1

8 Junior Year

Music 50. Student Recital _ M u s i c 2 1 1 . 2 1 2 . H istory of M usic_ _______ Music 323. Conte m p o rary Tec h n i q ues _ _ _ Music 324. Contra p u n tal Writing M u s i c 325. 326 . O rchestrati o n _ Music 327. Com positi o n ____ _ Music 339. Basic Conducting P rivate Lessons-major i nstrument ' I n terim elective

a 2 1

V2 V2 1

8 Senior Year

Music 50. Student Recital_ Music 423. Advanced Form and Anal ysi s ___ M usic 427, Com posi t i o n _ P ri vate Lessons-major i nstrument P h i losophy req u l re ment R e l i g i o n req u i rement ' E lective ._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ __ _ _ _ ___ ______ ______ ' I nterim elective . _ __ _ _ ______

a 2

V2 1 1 V2 1

8 50 STU D ENT R E C ITAL (no cred i t)

Wee kly student recitals. Reg i stration and attendance req u i red of a l l m u s i c maj o rs regard less of c u r r i c u l u m . Music majors expected to perform i n recital o n ce each semester. I " 1 20 M U S I C SUR VEY ( 1 )

A n i n t roduction t o t h e m usic literature of Western C i vi l i z ation through the study of the form and mea n i n g of musical masterpieces. A cou rse designed to enhance the enjoyment of m us i c . Not open to music m aj o rs . I " ' 1 \12 courses of music electives are required.


1 23 THEORY ( 1 ) A study o f t h e f u n damentals and n o tation o f m us i c t h rough elementary part writing. Practical a p p l i cation t h rough keyboard, s i g h ts i n g i n g . and ear trai n 足 ing. I 1 24 THEORY ( 1 ) Conti nued study o f part writing, m o d u l ation, a n d e a r trai n i n g. I ntrod uctory work in analysis. I I Literature and Performance

1 30, 430 C H O I R O F THE WEST ('I. ) Aud i tions are h e l d at the beg i n n i n g of each fall semester. S i n g i n g of both sacred and secular m us i c , w i th and without accompa n i m e n t . I I I 1 3 1 , 431 U N I VE R SITY C HORALE ( '14 ) A u d i t i o ns ar!l h e l d a t the beg i n n i ng o f each fall semester. S i n g i n g o f both sacred and sec u l a r mu s i c , w i th and without accom paniment. I I I 1 32, 432 MAD R I GAL S I N GERS A N D VOCAL E N S EMBLE ('I. ) Members h i p dete r m i ned by a u d i t i o n s . S i n g i n g of both sacred and sec ular music. I I I 1 33, 433 U N I VERS ITY BA N D ( V. ) Members h i p determi ned by auditions. I I I 1 34 , 434 U N I VERS ITY ORCH ESTRA ( 114 ) Membership dete r m i n ed by audit ions.

II

1 35 , 435 C H A M B E R E N S E M B L E ( V. ) Prereq u isite: Consent o f I nstructor. I I I 1 36, 436 TWO PIANO E N S E M B L E ( V. ) Two p i a n o and piano duet l i t e rature from a l l periods w i l l be studied. Open to pian ists who are mu sic majors and non-music majors. 1 37, 437 ACCOMPAN Y I N G (V. ) A course designed t o assist the pian i st i n ga i n i n g experience and kn owledge in accompanying. The l i terature w i l l be taken from all periods of music h i story. 1 38 , 438 CONTEMPO RARY D I R ECT I O N S E N S E M B L E (V4 ) Performance experience ( p u b l i c a n d labo rato ry) i n contemporary m u s i c . Membersh i p determined by a u d i t i o n . 1 41 , 1 4 2 ST R I N G S ( V4 , V4 ) Instrumental laboratory. Two h o u rs per week. I I I a / y 1 971 -72 Privale I nslruclion

1 50, 450 1 5 1 , 451 1 5 2, 452 1 53 , 453

PIANO (V4 - 1 ) O R GAN ('14 - 1 ) VO I C E ( '14 - 1 ) V I O L I N , V I O LA ('I. - 1 )

1 54, 1 55, 1 56, 1 5 7,

454 455 456 457

C E LLO (V4 - 1 ) WOODW I NDS ( V. - 1 ) B RASS ('I. - 1 ) P E R C U S S I O N ( 11. - 1 )


2 1 1 , 2 1 2 H ISTORY O F M U S I C ( 1 , 1 ) A study of t h e develo pment o f m u s i c from ancient civilizations t o m o dern t i mes. Prereq u i site: M usic 1 24 , o r consent o f instructor. I , " 223, 224 THEORY (1 , 1 ) C o m p l eted study i n trad i t i o n a l harmony and ear trai n i n g . I nt roduction to counterpoint a n d composition. Practical a p p l ication o f harmonic practices t h ro u g h analysis, w r i t i n g , keyboard and ear tra i n i n g . I, I I 227, 427 C O M PO S I T I O N (V. - 1 ) A syste matic a p p roach to t h e c raft of conte m p o rary m us i cal c o m po s i t i o n . Create, notate, and perform wo rks for solo, s m a l l and large ensembles. M a y be repeated for a d d i t i o n a l cred i t . 243 , 244 WOODW I N DS I N STR U M ENTAL LABORATORY ( V4 , V. ) Practical experience i n the metlnods and problems o f teac h i ng and p laying woodwind i n struments. I, " a/y 1 972-73 245 , 246 BRASS I N ST R U M ENTAL LABO RATORY ( V. , V4 ) Practical experience in the methods and problems of teac h i ng and p layi n g brass instru ments. I , " a/y 1 97 1 -72 247 PERCUSSION LABORATORY (V. ) Practical experience in t h e methods and probl'ems of teac h i n g and playing percuss i o n i nstruments . I a / y 1 972-73 323 CONTEMPORARY T EC H N I Q U ES, ANALYS I S AND L ITERAT U R E (1 ) Study of twe n t i e t h -c e n t u ry m u s i c t h ro u g h analysis, l i terature, and w r i ti n g . E m p h asis o n compositional tech n i q ues, early deve l o p m e n ts and c u rrent tren ds. I 324 CONTRAPU NTAL W R IT I N G , FO R M , ANALYS I S A N D L I TERAT U R E ( 1 ) Review o f n o n-harm o n i c tones; melody writing; species cou nterpo i n t ; two and three-part i n ven t i o n ; fugue; forms; l i sten i n g ; m e l o d i c and harm o n i c di ctation. " 325 , 326 O R C H ESTRAT I O N ( V2 , V2 ) Study of i nstru m e n ts as to t h e i r range, transposition, s o u n d , tech n i cal abi l i ties, l i m itati ons, and n o tat i o n . Scor,i ng and arran g i n g fo r i nstrume nts i n conven足 t ional and u n i q u e g ro u pings. I , " a/y 1 972-73 339 BAS I C C O N DUCT I N G (V2 ) A basic c o u rse i n t h e tech n i q u e o f reading and cond ucting sco res; practice i n c o n d u cting, both instrumental and vocal. I " 340 M U S I C IN T H E Tec h n iq ues and rote song, c h i l d requ is i te : M u s i c

ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL (V. ) proce d u res for the m u s i c p ro g ram o f the f i rst six grades. T h e v o i c e , r h y t h m activities, Kodaly m e t h o d , a n d the l i ke. P r e 足 1 23 o r equivalent background m usic. I "

341 M U S I C S K I LLS A N D M ETHODS FOR E L E M ENTARY TEA C H E R S (1 ) A study of the r u d i ments of m us i c , i nc l u d i n g rhythms, s i g h t read i n g , ele mentary keyboard experience and c reative m u s i c , together with tec h n i q ues and pro足 ced u res for the music p rog ram o f the fi rst s i x g rades. I "


363 H I STORY OF P I A N O LITERAT U R E A N D PERFORMANCE (V2 ) Hepresentative compositions from a l l periods o f piano l it e rature w i l l be stud i e d . O pen to music majors and non -m usic majors. a / y 1 972-73 364 HISTORY OF O R GAN BU I L D I N G (112 ) A study o f the p r i m a ry h istoric and contemporary trad i t ions o f o rgan b u i l d i n g a s these relate t o a rationale f o r tonal des i g n , acoustics , arc h i tecture and playing mechanisms. Basic tech n iq ues for t u n i n g and m a i ntenance are to be considered together w i th examinations o f several organs and two organ b u i ld­ i n g shops. A d m i ssion by permission of i n s tructor. a / y I n terim 1 9 72 365 VOCAL LITERAT U R E ( V, ) A study o f solo vocal literature from antiqu ity t h rough t h e p resent. I n - c l ass performance w i l l be e m p h as i z e d . I a/y 1 972-73 367 H Y M N O LOGY AND SACRED M U S I C LITERATU RE ( 1 ) An h i stori cal study o f C h ristian hymnody with a n analysis o f its poetry and music. An analysis of the p ri n c ip l es und erlying effective wors h i p music and a su rvey of o u tstan d i n g anthem, cantata, and o ratorio literature. I I 368 WOR S H I P AND L I T U RGY (1 ) The nature and scope of Ch ristian wors h i p . The h i story of t h e main l i t u rgies beg i n n i n g with temple and synagog u e, Eastern O rthodox, Roman Cat h o l i c , Lutheran, C a l v i n i s t a n d Angl ican. S p e c i a l reference t o the Lu theran l i t u rgy. I 401 O P ERA W O R KSHOP ( V4 1 ) Stage prod uction o f operas. P rerequisite: Consent o f I n s tructor. -

423 ADVA N CED FORM AND A N ALYS I S ( 1 ) Harmon ic a n d structu ral analysis o f li terature from Classical through Con­ temporary p e riods. P rerequisite: Music 224. I 441 KEYBOARD PEDAGOGY (112 - :¥4 ) A course designed for those d e s i r i n g t o teach beg i n n ing and advanced piano and organ students. Lectures, read ings and d i scussion on teac h i n g tec h n i q ues w i l l be covered . I n addition there w i l l be the ch ance for p ractical a p p l i cati o n . 4 4 2 VOCAL P EDAGOGY (112 ) Discussion o f h o w t o approach t h e teaching of vocal tech n i q u e clearly a n d concisely a n d h ow best t o c o m m u n icate w i t h the student, basing t h e approach u po n t h e physi ologica l and acoustical laws that govern s i n g i n g . Read i n g and comparing texts on vocal p roduction. I n -class d e monstrations and a p roject in student te a c h i n g . Dis cussion of d i ction, ph onetics, i n terpretation, etc. I I 443 O R GAN REPERTO I R E A N D I M PROVISATION ( V, ) A survey o f organ l i te rature and its relationship t o traditions o f organ design and sty l i st i c performance. Basi c techn i q u es i n p ractical im p rovisation at the keyboard, with special e m p h asis o n l i turgi cal hymn t u n e i m provisation for i n trod uctio ns, i n t e r l udes and free accompanim ents. Adm ission by perm ission of instructor. (Li m i t 1 0) . a/y 1 971 -72 445 ADVANCED CON DUCTI N G , TECHN IQUES A N D MAT ER IALS ( 112 ) A study o f l iterat u re with emphasis upon i ts teac h i n g and conducting p roblems. P rereq u i site: Music 339. I


447 M U S I C I N T H E SECON DARY SCHOOL ( V2 ) The org a n i zation and admi n i strati o n o f the se c o n d a ry s c h o o l music p ro足 g ram. I 491 , 492 I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY ( V4 - 1 ) 590 G RADUATE S E M I NAR (V4 - 1 ) Offered on d e m a n d . Interim courses offered in 1 97 1 :

303 304 305 306 31 7 318 363 401

BEG I N N E RS I N P I A N O CHAMBER MUSIC CLAS S I CA L G U ITAR BAS I C TEC H N I Q U ES IN ORGAN I M P R OV ISAT I O N EXT E N S I V E P E R F O R M A N C E ST U D I ES FOLK-R O C K : LYR I C S A N D S O U N D ( M U S I C / E N G L I SH) H I STORY O F PIANO L I TERAT U R E A N D P E R FO R M AN C E O P ERA WORKSHOP

N U RSING Miss Stucke, Director, Mrs. Bergerson, Mrs. C o n e , Mrs. Coutu, Mrs. Jacobson, Mrs. Jewell, Mrs. Lavik, Mrs. Leake, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Lemieux, Mrs . Ling, Mrs. Olson, Miss Peterson, Mrs. Royce; assisted by Miss Fletcher, Mrs. Haughee, Mrs. Hemmen, Mrs. Miller

Phi losophy and Purpose The School of N ursing suppo rts the philosophy of Pacific Lutheran U n iversity and within this C h ristian frame o f reference accepts the challenge of e d u cating for professional n u rsing, i n d ividuals who recognize a n d partici pate i n the responsi足 b i l i ti es and o p p o rt u n i ti es for service i n n u rsi ng. The School re cogni zes that its primary function i s teach i n g , with a conco m m i tt a n t respo nsi b i l i ty for service and resea rch. The Sch o o l of N u rsing faculty accepts the fo l l o w i n g p r i n c i p les:

1) Education i s a n o n g o i n g process. I n t h i s p rocess, the i n d i v i d u a l acq u i res kn owledge, deve l o ps s k i l ls, exami nes attitudes, refines his values, i n c reases h i s capacity t o relate to m a n k i n d , and f i n d s express i o n for his u n i q u e pote n t i a l . T h i s e n ab l es h i m to p rogress toward self-realization i n becom足 ing a res p o n s i b l e m e m be r of society. 2) Lea r n i n g o c c u rs when t h e re are c o n ti n u i n g behavioral changes res u l t i n g f r o m experience. E a c h person a p p roaches l e a r n i n g tasks i n h i s o w n way and res ponds to the total s i tuation as a w h o l e perso n . 3 ) N u rs i n g as a p r o fess i o n i s concerned w i t h total health needs of the i n d i vidual and sees m a n as a p h ys i c a l , emoti o n a l , i n tel lectua l , social and s p i ri t u a l being. The S c h o o l strives to guide its students in deve l o p i n g a sense of res po n s i b i l i ty for acq u i ri n g the attitudes, kn owledge and s k i l l s necessary to h e l p m e e t h e a l t h needs o f the i n d i v i d u a l and t h e c o m m u n i ty .


4) N u rs i n g educ ation provides o p p o rt u n ities for i n d i vi d u a l g rowth t h r o u g h n u rsing and the vari ous d i sci p l i nes o f t h e University. 5) The School of N u rs i n g faculty , as a p a rt of a C h ristian u n i versity, believe t h a t emotional, i n tel lectua l , socia l , c u l t u ral and s p i r i t u a l g rowth are essent i a l to the e n r i c h m e n t of one's own l i fe and to the o p t i m u m deve l o p ­ ment o f o n e 's ability t o h e l p o t h e rs , and t h a t t h e S c h o o l h a s a re s ponsi b i l i ty to prepare i n d i viduals i n terested in serving God a n d fel lowman t h ro u g h t h e p ractic e o f profess i o n a l n u rs i n g . The aim of the S c h o o l i s t o fac i l itate the deve l opment of n u rses who are a b l e to parti c i pate i n t h e c h a l l e nges arising in thei r c o m m u n i t ies. Necessary t o o l s are p rovided for functi o n i n g as staff nurses, for deve l o p i ng com pete n c i es basic to advan c i n g to positi ons req u i ri n g leaders h i p s k i l l s , and for acq u i ri n g a foun dation for graduate study. Objectives

I n kee p i n g with the p h i l osophy of m i n isteri ng to the total n u rs i n g needs of the i n d ivid ual, the S c h o o l o f N u rsing assists the student: 1) To acq u i re knowledge essential t o function as a p rofess i o n a l n u rse. 2) To deve l o p an a b i l i t y t o f u n ction effectively as a p rofess i o n a l n u rse. 3) To deve l o p altitudes w h i c h w i l l foster con t i n u i n g p rofessi onal and p e rsonal g rowth . 4) T o u t i l ize a l i be ra l educati o n i n p ro v i d i n g d i m ension t o personal a n d p rofes­ sional experi e n ce as a foundation for p rofessi onal' courses. Health

The n u rs i n g stud e n t is responsible for mai ntai n i n g her own health and is a teacher of h ealth. Physical exam i n at i o n s , X-rays a n d i m m u n i za ti ons are req u i re d p r i o r to adm i ss i on to the c l i n i c a l areas and period i ca l ly t h e reafter, a n d a r e the res pons i b i l i ty of the students. S t u d e n ts s h o u l d carry personal health i n s u rance. Special Fees

I n addition to re g u l a r U n i versity costs, students are to p rovide t h e i r own trans­ p o rtation between the Un i ve rs i ty campus and the c l i n i ca l l a b o ratory areas. Stu­ den ts are usually a b l e t o estab l i sh car pools i n the sophom ore and j u n i o r years. D u r i n g the sen i o r year each student must h ave access to a car for i n d i vi d ual use. Students are req u i red to carry p rofessi onal l i a b i l i ty i ns u rance d u ri n g thei r sopho­ more, j u n i o r and sen i o r years. T h i s is avai lable u n d e r a g roup plan at n o m i n a l cost t o the student. Health exa m i n at i o n fees a n d student u n i,forms (approxima tely $70.00) are also the responsi b i l i ty of t h e student. T h e N u rsing Program

T h i s p rog ram is p l a n n ed for h i g h school gra d u ates and may be c o m p leted i n f o u r acad e m i c years b y students w h o meet t h e School re quirements. Through "th i s program o f genera l and p rofessi o n a l educati o n , stude n ts p repare themselves for beg i n n i n g po sitions in p rofess i o n al n u rsing and for conti n u i n g thei r educa t i o n at t h e gra d u ate levei.


Admission and Curricu lum Req u i rements In a d d i t i o n to the req u i rements for adm ission to the U n i ve rsity, the School of N u rsing req u i res a one u n i t course i n b i o logy and a one unit course i n chem足 istry. Deficiencies m ust be removed prior t o enrolling i n the professional n u rsing progra m . To be a pproved by the fac u lty of the School of N u rsing for en rollment i n t h e c l i n i cal n u rsing c o u rses w h i c h b e g i n i n t h e sophomore year, t h e student m ust g i ve evidence o f phys i c a l , emotion al and i n tel lectual aptitude for n u rsing, and m ust h ave a c u m U lative g rade p o i n t average of 2 .0 for h e r college c o u rse. She m ust a l so have a m i n i m u m g rade of 2 .0 i n each c o u rse req u i red for the program as i n d i cated i n the cou rse o u t l i ne . Stan d a rds req u i red for adm ission m ust be m a i n tained t h ro u g h o u t the p rog ram if the candi date is to reta i n her stan d i n g in the Schoo l . I f a student recei ves a g rade p o i n t o f less than 2 . 0 i n a n y course w h i c h i s p rereq u i s i te f o r a n u rs i n g cou rse, s h e may n o t con t i n u e i n that n u rs i n g cou rse u n t i l the prereq uisi te course is repeated with a g rade poi n t of 2 . 0 or above. A candi date who has atte nded some other i n stitu t i o n , i n C l u d i n g g raduation from an app roved school o f n u rs i n g , may receive c re d i t toward a d e g ree in n u rsing p rovided she meets the general req u i reme nts for adm ission to the School o f N u rs i n g . Transfe rable cred i ts from another institution of higher learn足 ing Will be evaluated o n an i ndivi dual basis. The graduate n u rse a p p l i c an t may receive credit for her earlier education by examination of selected n u rsing and re足 lated c o u rses in accordance w i th the Advanced P lacement policy of the U n iversity. She w i l l follow the c u r r i c u l u m o ut l i ned for the Bachelor of Science i n N u rs i n g i n regard to course req u i rements, sequence o f c o u rses, and prereq uisites. The School o f N u rs i n g facu l ty reserves the r i g h t to request the w i t h d rawal of a n u rs i n g student who fai ls to demon strate com petency, or who fails t o m a i n 足 tai n professional cond uct.

Resou rces, Faci lities and Services U n d e r the d i rect supe rvision o f i ts faculty members the School uti l i zes faci l i ties o f h ospitals and health agen cies in the c o m m u n ity i n an effort to p rovide opti m u m c l i n i ca l learn i n g experien ce. L i b raries and classroo ms a r e avai lable i n these fac i l i ties as we l l as o n campus. C l i n i cal laboratory learn i n g i s d i rected by reg u l a r U n i ve rs i ty fa cu l ty m e m b e rs i n the followi n g h e a l t h agencies:

DOCTOR'S H O S P I TAL, Tacoma, Wash i ngton (70 beds) C. B . Ritchie, M . D ., Admin istrator Harriet H uffman, R.N., D i rector o f N u rsing GOOD SAMAR ITAN HOS PITAL, Puyal l u p , Wash i n gton (96 beds) David K . H a m ry, M . H .A . , A d m i n istrator V i r g i n i a Peterson, R . N . , D i rector o f N u rsing Service LAKEWOOD GEN ERAL H O S P ITAL ( 1 00 beds) H a r ry San islo, A d m i n i strator W a l ter W i l h e l m , B.A., Assistant Ad m i n i strator Orpha J. Lucas, R . N " D i rector of N u rsi n g


MADI GAN G EN E RAL HOSPITAL (536 beds) B r i g . General John Boyd Coates, J r . , M . D . , Hospital Commander C o l o n e l M a rgaret E . H ugh es, R . N . , M .A . , A . N . C . , C h i e f N u rse MAPLE LA N E SCHOOL FOR G I R LS, Central ia, Wash i n gton ( 1 50 beds) R i c h ard Barrett, Superinte n d e n t M A R Y B R I DG E C H I LDREN'S HOSP ITAL ( 6 8 beds) Fred A . Pritc h a r d , M.B.A., Adm i n istrator Karen Lyn ch, R.N., B . S . N . , D i rector of N u rsing Service P U G ET S O U N D G EN ERAL H O S P I TAL (287 beds) Robert H uesers, M .S.H.A . , Adm i n istrator H e l en C o l l i n s , R . N . , B.S., M . S . , D i rector of N u rsing ST. JO SEPH'S H OSP I TA L (250 beds) Sister Margaret H u d o n , O.S.S., A d m i n i strator F l o re n ce Reidinger, D i rector of N u rsi n g Service TACOMA G EN ERAL HOSP ITAL (263 beds) Robert L. F l y n n , M .H.A., J . D . , Ad m i n i strator Betty H o ffm a n , R . N . , B . S . N . , D i rector of N u rsing Service TACOMA-P I E R C E COU NTY HEALTH DEPARTM ENT P a u l M c N utt, M . D . , M . P . H . , D i rector of Health E d i th Mitchell, R.N., B . S . , C h i ef of N u rs i n g Division VETERANS A D M I N I STRAT I O N HO SPITAL, American Lake, Wash. (904 beds) Thomas M a r c h , M . D . , Hosp i ta l D i recto r F l orence M. Naske, R . N . , B . S . , C h i e f, N u rsing Service Anna Heinze l m a n n , R . N . , B . S . , Associate C h ief, N u rsi ng Servi ce for Education C U R R I C U LU M FOR BAC HELOR OF SC I E NCE I N N U R S I N G First Year B i o I . 1 6 1 (Human Anatomy) Chem. 1 03 (Org a n i c C h e m i stry) · Pysc h . 1 0 1 ( I n troduction to Psyc h ology) 1 ' Optional Elective 0-1 P.E. Activity %

I n terim Course Elective _1

3-4V4

• • •

May be taken either semester of the year. May be taken any time

• • •

ReI. 1 03 (J u d aeo­ C h ristian L i fe a n d Thought) o r 203 ( B i b l i cal Litera t u re) 1 B i o I . 1 62 ( H u m an P h ys i o l ogy) Fine Arts e l ectlve _ Soc. 1 1 1 (Socio logy) P.E. Activity V4 _

__

4%


Second Year B i o I . 201 ( M i c robiology) Nsg. 251 (Mental Health) Nsg. 252 (Nsg. Techniq ues) N s g . 253 ( D i sease Enti ties) " Eng. Lit. or Hi story Elective P.E. Activity __

V2

' Eng. 1 0 1 ( C o m p o­ sition)-(studen t may be exempt on basis of p ro f i ciency) Soc. 425 (Family) or 325 ( M i n orities) Nsg. 255 (Surg. I n tervention) Nsg. 256 (Rehab. Nsg.) P.E. Activity

I n terim C o u rse Nsg. 254 (pa­ tient Health Teac h i n g

____

_

_

0-1

_____ _

1

____

1

__ _ _ _ _

1

_____ _

4% Third Year ' N s g . 371 , 372 (Ps ych. Nsg.) " P h i losophy elective Psyc h . 335 (Child hood and A d o l escence)

2

V4

3-4V4 I n terim Optional Elective

' N sg. 361 , 362, 363 (MCN)

3 ' Re I . elective ( U . D . or Senior Seminar) 1 _ . _ ._ _ _ _ _

. _

0-1

.. __

4 Fourth Year Neg. 4 1 0A (Trends) V2 ' N s g . 450, 451 (Selected 2 Cl in ical Problems) ' Ns g . 452 (Lead e rs h i p ) 1

0-1 I n terim C o u rse . 1 Elective

4 Nsg. 4 1 0B (Trends) V2 ' Nsg. 445 (Comm u n ity Health) ___ V2 ' N sg. 446 (Communi t y N u rsing) . , ' Elective 1 _ 0-1 ' O pti onal elective _

_

3-4 • • •

May be taken either semester of the year. May be taken any time.

251 ME NTAL H EALTH (Va ) A study of major conce pts of mentat health. Emphasis is placed on formation of the self concept and other concepts related to effective i nterpersonal rela­ t i o n s h i p s . Two h o urs of c lass per week, p l u s assig n m e n ts i n re lation s h i p to clin ical practice. Pre req uisites: Soc i o l ogy 1 1 1 and Psych o l ogy 1 0 1 . I 252 N U R S I N G TEC H N I Q U ES ( V2 ) An introductory course t o p ractical aspects o f n u rsing. The the practice of basic n u rs i n g techniq ues and the scientific l y i n g these tech n i q ues. Two hours of c l as s and one c l i n i c a l per week. Prereq u i s i te or concurrent regist ration i n B i o l ogy

course combi nes pr i n c i ples under­ laboratory period 201 . I


253 D I SEASE ENTI T I ES ( 1 ) A study o f c o m m o n diseases affecti n g a d u l ts. The cou rse e m p h asis i s o n etiological, pathophysiological and t h e rapeutic reg i mes. F i ve h o u rs per wee k. Prereq u i s i tes : B i o l ogy 1 6 1 , 1 62 and C h e m istry 1 03. I 254 PAT I ENT H EALTH TEAC H I N G ( 1 ) A study o f t h e p r i n c i ples o f tea c h i n g and learn i n g a s related t o health needs of the patient. In concu rre n t g u i ded learn i n g experiences, the p r i n c i p l es of tea c h i n g and learn i n g are u t i l i zed by the student along with p roblem s o l v i n g and c r i t i c a l t h i n k i n g i n assessment, j ud g m e n t and p l a n n i n g for p a t i e n t teach­ ing. Laboratory and C l i n i c a l experien ces i n a variety of setti ngs p rovide oppor­ t u n i ties for student a p p l ication of p r i n c i p les and deve l o p m e n t 01 basic teac h i n g s k i l ls. Prerequisite: N u rs i n g 251 , 252, 253. I n terim I I' 255 S U R G I CA L I NTERVENT I ON ( 1 ) A patient-centered study o f the n u rsing care requi red for patients underg o i n g surgical interven t i o n . C l i n ical experience i nc l udes a l l areas o f s u r g i c a l care, pre-operative preparation, n u rsing tech n i q ues i n the operating and recovery rooms, and post-operative care. Th ree h o u rs of class and two c l i n i cal lab ora­ tory periods per week. Pre req uisite: N u rsing 254. I'n te ri m 1 '1 256 R E H A B I LITAT I O N N U R S I N G ( 1 ) A patient-centered study o f various types 0 1 n u rs i n g p roblems c o m m o n to patients i n need o f re habi l i ta t i o n . Students a re g i ven an opportun ity to ana lyze t h ese problems, develop a b i l i ty to make decisions about n u rs i n g care and gain some experience i n a d m i n i stering the n u rs i n g care i n volved. Th ree h o u rs of class and two c l i n i ca l l a b o ratory periods per week. Prereq u i s i t e : N u rsing 254. I n te r i m I I 361 , 362, 363 MATERNAL-C H I LD N U R S I N G (3) A study o f the esse ntial knowl edge and u n d e rsta n d i n g w h i c h w i l l enable the student t o give i n t e l l i g e n t care to fa m i l ies d u ri n g the c h i l d -bearing and c h i ld­ rea ring p rocesses. Aspects of health p ro m o t i o n and care of the s i c k are i n c l u ded . Expe rience i n C l u des observation and care o f m o thers and Chi l d ren i n h os p i tal wards, c l i nics and related c o m m u n i ty agencies. Six c l i nical labo ratory periods a n d nine h o u rs o f c lass per week. Prereq uisites : N u rsi n g 254, 2 5 5 , 256, and p revious o r concurrent registration i n Psych. 335 o r Educa­ tion 201 o r 321 and Soc. 425 o r 325. I I I 371 , 372 P SYCH I AT R I C N U R S I N G (2) A study o f major concepts of psych iatric n u rs i n g as they relate to the n u rse in the psyc h i atric setti n g . G ui d ance is g i ve n in u n d e rstan d i n g the dynam ics o f behavi o r , patte rns of adj ustment, and health needs of psyc h i at r i c patients. F o u r h o u rs o f c l ass and six c l i n i cal l a b o ratory peri ods per wee k. P rereq u i s i tes : N u rsing 254, 255, 256. I I I 41 0 T R E N D S I N N U R S I N G ( 1 ) A study o f t h e forces and issues w h i ch i n f l ue n ce n u rs i n g today, i n c l u d i n g i ts p rofess i o n a l h e ri tage, n u rs i n g organ izations, emp loyment o p p o r t u n i ties, and p ro b l e m s and responsi b i l i ties in p rofess i o n a l n u rsing. Among the p rob-


lems d i sc ussed are preparation for n u rsing, economic sec u r i ty, legislat i o n , o rganizational structu re, roles of t h e p rofessional n u rse, c o n t i n ued education and p rofessional g rowth , a n d the future o f n u rsing. Prereq u i s i t e : Sen i o r stan d ­ i n g . H a l f o f t h e cou rse w i l l be offered each semester. 445 F U N D A M ENTALS OF C O M M U N ITY H EALTH (V2 ) A study o f t h e com m u n ity f o r t h e pu rpose o f i d e n t i fy i n g d e ve l o p m en t , t rends, organi zati on and ad m i n is t ration of health se rvices. I n cl u des a p p roac h es used t o prom ote health and p revent d i sease, and methods u t i l i zed to i de n t i fy, analyze a n d cope with c o m m u n i ty h e a l t h needs. P rereq u i s i t e : Senior stan d ­ i n g , N u rs i n g 363, 372, a n d concu rrent registration i n N u rsing 446. I I I 446 C O M M U N ITY N U R S I N G ( 1 ) G u i ded experiences i n g i v i n g n u rsing care i n t h e h o m e a n d c o m m u n i t y with emp hasis on the role of the n u rse i n working with patients and fam i l ies, and the u t i l ization 01 health and we l fare resources. P re requisite: Sen i o r sta n d i n g , N u rs i n g 3 6 3 , 3 7 2 and c o n c u rrent registration i n N u rsing 445. I I I 450 SELECTED C L I N IC AL P R O B L E M S I ( 1 ) A study o f selected c t i n i cal p roblems i n t h e n u rsing c a re of m e d i cal-s u rg i ca l patients. A m o n g t h e p roblems d isc ussed are n u rsing assess ment, c r i teria for determ i n i n g p r i o r ity of patient needs, p r i n c i ples for plan n i n g n u rs i n g care f o r g roups 01 patients, emergency and resusci tative n u rsing measu res, a n d c u r­ rent trends in c o m m u n i ty a n d hospita l p l a n n i n g lor emergency n u rsing activ­ it ies. Th ree h o u rs of c l ass and two laboratory periods each week as i n d iv i d u a l l y arranged. P rereq u isites : Sen i o r sta n d i n g and N u rs i n g 3 6 3 a n d 3 7 2 . I I I 451 SELECTED C L I N I CAL P R O B L E M S I I ( 1 ) A study o f selected c l i n i cal p ro b l e m s i n t h e nursing care 0 1 med i cal-su rgical patients, i n c l u d i n g acutely ill patients and patients with c o m p l e x n ursi n g needs. Student s wi l l be i n troduced t o some o f t h e n e w parameters in n u rs i n g . Fou r h o u rs of cl ass and one laboratory p e r i o d e a c h week a s i n d i vi d u a l l y arranged. P rereq u isites: Sen i o r stan d i n g , N u rsing 3 6 3 and 372, a n d p r i o r o r c o n c u rrent registration i n N u rsing 4 5 0 . I I I 452 N U R S I N G LEAD E R S H I P ( 1 ) A stud y o f n u rsing team leadersh i p with em phasis on i d e n t i fy i n g princi p les o f leaders h i p i n n u rs i n g . Discussion w i l l also i n clude u t i l ization o f n u rsing person­ nel, i n -se rvice e d u c a t i o n , the i n te rd i sc i p l i n a ry health te a m , and the bas i c con cepts a n d p r i n ci ple s o f n u rsing manage m e n t . Two hours o f c l ass a n d three c l i n i c a l laboratory periods per week as i n d i v i d u a l l y arran ged . S u c cessful completion of laboratory expe riences for N u rsing 450 m ust p receed the la bo ratory experience for this cou rse. Prereq u i s i tes: S e n i o r stand i n g , N u rs i n g 363 a n d 372, and concu r re n t reg istrati on i n N u rs i n g 451 . I I I 4 9 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D E N T STU DY ( V4 - 1 ) Prerequ isite: P e r m i s sion of the D i rector. Interim cou rses offered i n 1 971 :

254 PAT I ENT H EALTH TEAC H I N G 255 S U R G I C A L I N TERVENT I O N

256 R E H A B I LITAT I O N N U R S I N G


PHILOSO PHY

Mr. Arbaugh, Chairman, Mr. Huber, Mr. Myrb o , Mr. Simmonds; assisted by Mr. Saibei P h i l osophy is the o l dest of a l l acad e m i c d i s c i p l ines a n d the parent su bject from w h i c h today's variety of arts and scien ces has emerge d . Characteristic t o p i c s o f concern are t h e exte nt a n d l i m i ts o f knowledge ; m o ra l , esthetic a n d rel i g i o u s v a l u e s ; m a n ' s nature a n d p l ace i n t h e un iverse; a n d the ulti mate n at u re o f reality. More genera l l y p h i l osophy seeks a cri tical a n d systematic analysis of b as i c issues in a l l fie l d s , and an objective and u n i fied view of the total i ty of experience. A study of the field is i n ten ded t o acqua i n t the student with major rival world views and value systems, past a n d p resent, t o en cou rage in h i m the habit of analytic and systematic t h ought, and to h e l p him "to see l i fe c ritically, ap prec i a t i v e l y and w l1 o l e . " C o u rses i n the department a r e designed to meet t h e n e e d s of a variety o f stu足 d e n ts : (1) those w h o desire some kno wledge o f p h i l o s o p h y as a basic e l e m e n t in a l i beral educati on ; (2) t h ose who wish t o pu rsue some spec i a l i n te rest i n , for exa m p l e , e t h i cs, s c i e n c e , re l i g i o n , the h i story o f t h o ught, o r t h e i deas o f par足 t i c u l a r men or peoples; (3) th ose who wish t o develop an understan d i n g of p h i lo足 sophy to support t h ei r work i n other f i e l d s , e.g. l i te rature, h i story, or t h e sciences; (4) those who p l a n t o use a major i n p h i l osophy as a p reparation for graduate study i n a n other field, e.g. theology or law; (5) th ose who p l a n to do graduate work i n p h i losophy i tself, usu a l l y with the i n tent i o n of teac h i n g i n the f i e l d . Students i ntend i n g t o m a j o r i n p h i losophy m u st a n n o unce t h e i r i n tention t o d o s o to t h e department. A maj o r i n t h e departm e n t c o n sists o f a m i n i m u m o f s i x c o u rses i n c l u d i n g P h i losophy 233 , and a n y t h ree of t h e f o l l owi n g : 331 , 3 3 2 , 333, 334, 335. In addition to c o u rse req ui re ments, a l l majors m u st (1) compl ete a p rescribed read i n g program (described in a special b ro c h u re avai l a b l e from t h e d e p a rtment), and ( 2 ) take a departmental exa m i nation before beg i n n i n g t h e i r f i n a l semester in re sidence. Consu l tation with d e p a r t m e n t a l faculty i s i m portant i n planning a m e a n i n g f u l m aj o r p ro g ra m a n d s h o u l d b e s o u g h t a t a s early a t i m e as poss i b l e . T h e U n i ve r si ty req u i rement of one c o u rse i n p h i l osophy m a y be satisfied by a n y c o u rse offered by the department except P h i losophy 233. The i n i t i a l course in t h e s u bj e c t for l o wer d iv i s i o n students i s custom a r i l y P h i losophy 201 . However, t h i s i s not a p rereq u i s i te f o r o t h e r c o u rses, and students with speci a l i n terests o r p reparation a r e encouraged to c o n s i d e r others a n d , i f desi re d , to c o u n s e l with m e m b e rs of the depart m e n t . 201 P R I N C I P LE S O F P H I LO SOPHY An i n trod uction to a variety of pere n n i a l p h i l os o p h i c a l issues, i n tel lectual systems and t h i n kers. Such topics as the nature of knowledge, the function of science, esthetic values, the good l i fe, re l i g i o n a n d knowledge of God, and h u man n a t u re and i ts social i m p l i c ations are d i scussed. The course is designed to i n troduce t o the student the habit of c ri t i c al and systematic p h i l o s o p h i c a l t h i n k i n g about a l l issues. I I I


221 ETH ICAL T H EORY A study o f the maj o r m o ral systems o f Western c i v i l izati o n . I n tensive exam­ i n ation o f some conte m p o rary m o ral theories and the p r i n c i ples of C h ris­ tian eth ics. I 233 LOG I C An exa m i nation o f t h e p r i n c i ples o f a rg u m e n t a n d proof, i n c l u d i n g t h e fund a­ mentals o f deductive, i n d uctive, and sym b o l i c l o g i c . Study of the natu re and functions o f lang uage, of prob lems i n se man tics, and o f the p h i l osophy of l o g i c . I I 324 SO C I AL P H I LOSOPHY An exami nation o f the p h i loso p h i cal issues associated with the vario us types o f human i n teracti o n . Subjects d iscussed i n c l u d e the n at u re o f m a n , the natu re of the good l i fe , eth i ca l theories, and the p h i l os o p h i cal fo u n dations and p ro b ­ lems o f po l i ti c a l , lega l , eco n o m i c a n d other s o c i a l i n stitutions. I I 331 H E L LE N I C P H I LOSO p Hy A study of the nature a n d dev e l o p m e n t of p h i loso p h i c t h o u g h t and method i n the G reek a n d Roman world from the P resoc ratic period to the end o f the t h i rd century A . D . Spec i a l e m p h asis i s g i ven to the p h i loso p h i es o f P l ato and Aristotle. I 332 C H R ISTIAN P H I LOSOPHY I N T H E M I D D L E AGES A su rvey o f the deve l o p m e n t o f p h i losophy from Augusti ne to Ockham . Scrutiny of the sou rces and n at u re of the T h o m i st i c synthesis, and the reaction to i t in the work of Duns Scotus and W i l l i a m Ockham. I 333 RAT I O N A L I S M A N D T H E EN L I G HTEN M ENT The n a t u re and deve l o p ment o f p h i l os o p h i c t h o u g h t a n d method from the seventeenth t h ro u g h the e i g h teenth c e n tu ries. Parti c u l a r e m p hasis i s placed on the p h i l os o p h i cal systems o f Descartes, Spi noza, Lei b n i z, Locke, Berkeley, H u me and Kent. I I 334 N I N ET E ENTH C ENTU RY T H O U G HT-THE AGE O F I D E O LOGY A study o f n i neteenth century p h i losophy with atten t i o n to t h e deve l o p m e n t o f such recent i deolog ies a s ideal ism , p o s i t i v i s m , l i beralism, d i a lectical mate­ ri a l i s m , and existen t i a l i s m . P ro m i nent th i n kers dealt with i n c l u d e Heg e l , Schopen hauer, N ietzsche, Marx, Kierkegaard , M i l l and Ja mes. T i m e is spent i n read i n g and d i scuss i o n o f selected classic works o f the period. I I 335 CONTEMP ORARY P H I LOSOPHY A systematic exa m i n at i o n o f the major p h i l os o p h i cal issues and methods in the twentieth centu ry. Topics treated may i n c l ud e e m p i ri c i s m , i n strumenta l i s m , process p h i losophy, existen t i a l i s m , and an alysis, a s develo ped by Ayer, Rus­ sel l , Dewey, W h i tehead, Sartre, and Wi ttgenste i n . I I 361 O R I ENTAL , H O U G H T An i n t ro d uction to the m aj o r p h i l os o p h i c systems of I nd i a, C h i n a, and J apan . Some atten t i o n is also paid to the c l osely related l i terature, re l i g i o n , and general c u l t u re o f the O rient. Offered o n occasion d u ri n g the i n te r i m .


41 1 P H I LOSOPHY OF R E L l G' l O N An exam i n ation and evaluati on o f c l assical and conte m p o rary views o f tradi足 t i o n a l p roblems in rel i g i o n : the existe n ce of God, religi ous experi e n ce, reve la足 t i o n , i m mortality a n d others. An a c q u a i n tance with the p r i n c i p a l tenets a n d the world view o f the Ch ristian rel i g i o n is assumed . I I I 4 1 4 K I E R :< E GAARD A N D EX I ST E N T I A L I S M An i n tensive s t u d y of t h e t h o u g h ts, writi n gs, a n d l i fe o f o n e o f the m odern world's most i n fl u ential theologians a n d p h i losophers. Some d iscussion of later deve l opments i n p h i l oso p h i c al existen t i a l i s m . I a / y 1 971 -72 422 TH EORY OF VAL U E An i n vestigat i o n o f the nature o f h u m an val ues with special atte n ti o n given to con tem porary d i scussions conce r n i n g the su bjective o r objective , absol ute o r relative character of such values as the good and the r i g h t , the beautifu l , a n d t h e h o l y . T h e o r i g i n of v a l ues, t h e i r p l ace i n a world o f fact, m a n 's knowledge of them, a n d the c h a racter and use of the lan guage of eva l u ation are t o p i cs for considerat i o n . Offered on occasion d u r i n g the i [l ter i m . 424 P H I LOSOPHY O F S C I EN C E A N D THE ORY OF KNOWLEDGE A major portion o f the c o u rse is devoted to a c a reful exam i n at i on o f the gene ral character. fun damental conc epts, methods, and s i g n i f i cance of mod足 e rn science. Some atte n t i o n is devoted to specific areas of science-physi cal, b i o l o g i c a l , social, to the i m p l i cations of scienc e for ethical, estheti c, and rel i g i o u s v a l ues, and to a m o re general di scussion o f the nature a n d l i m i ts of h u man kno wledge. I a / y 1 972-73 427 BOOKS, I D EAS A N D M E N : S E M I NAR IN P H I LOSOPHY A read i n g a n d d i scussion cou rse c o n d u cted by one o r m o re fac u lty mem bers. Designed to provide the s t u d e n t with the o p p o r t u n i ty t o read im portant selected w o r ks in p h i losophy, to hear a n d reflect on d i fferent i n te rpretations of the i deas in v o l ved , and t o partici pate actively in analysis and argument. Wo rks studied may be on a n y of a n u m b e r of announ ced topi cs-ethics, esthetics, religion, knowledge, science, h i st o ry o f ideas, etc. Offered on occasion d u ri n g the i n t e ri m . 49 1 , 492 I N D E P E N D ENT READ I N G A N D -R E S EARCH ( V4 - '12 ) Perm ission of department req u i re d . I I I

Interim cou rses offered in 1 97 1 :

30l T H E I B E R I A N P E N I N S U LA ( H I STORY/ P H I LOSO P H Y STUDY TOUR) 309 LI F E , L O V .E A N D THE P U R S U I T O F HAPP I N E SS 3 1 2 THEORY OF GAMES A N D RAT I O N A L C H O I C E


PHYSICAL ED U CATI ON M r . Olson, Director, M r . Broeker, M r . Carlson, M r . Chase, M r . Hoseth, Mr. Lundgaard, Miss Officer, Mrs. Phil/ips; assisted by Mr. Benson, Mr. Kitti/sby, Mrs. LeRoy, Mr. Malmin, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Seaman, Mr. Souza, Mrs. Sterling, Mrs. Templin, Mr. Thieman

The S c h o o l of Physical Education seeks to ( 1 ) p rovide students w i t h an u n d e r足 sta n d i n g of the role of physical activity as an essential e l e m e n t of modern l i vi n g , (2) e n c o u rage a sel f-eval uation of present a n d poten t i a l p h ysical fi tness needs and status, (3) p rovide o p p o r t u n i ties fo r t h e a c q u i s i t i o n o f s k i l ls and kn owledge in a vari ety o f l e i s u re-time physical activities, (4) p rovide an o u t l e t for deve l o p m e n t a n d mai ntenance o f perso n a l f u n c t i o n a l fi tness, and (5) to p repare prospective leaders fo r the professions of Physical Ed ucati o n , Hea l t h , Rec rea tion and Athletics. The School of Physical E d u cation offers p rograms ( 1 ) for students p l a n n i n g teach i ng careers i n eleme ntary o r second ary p h ysical ed u cation a n d health, (2) fo r students planning to coach i n tersch o l as t i c athletics, (3) for students p l an足 n i n g c a reers in recrea t i o n , physical therapy and corrective therapy and (4) for stu足 d ents who s i m p l y desi re to p u rsue physical education as an avocation. Students are e n co u raged t o complete the graduation req u i rement i n physical e d ucation (4 one-quarter c o u rses) d u ri n g the freshmen and sophomore years. Eight o n e-quarter activHy c o u rses may b e c o u n ted toward grad u a t i o n . Students are e n c o u raged to select a variety of acti vities at a ppropriate ski l l levels (beg i n ner, i n termediate and advanced). Most physical e ducation activities are offered on a co-ed u cati onal basi s. A l l physical education ac t i v i ty c o u rses a r e g raded o n a n " ' A , Pass o r Fai l " ' basis. BACHELOR O F ARTS IN E D U CATION m a j o r req u i rements are l i sted bel ow. Candid ates for this deg ree m ust also meet special req u i rements descri bed i n the School of Educ ati o n secti o n in Ihis cata l o g . Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 cou rses Teac h i n g M a j o r : 1 1 cou rses 1.

2.

Five and one-half requi red c o u rses: P E 277, S c i e n t i f i c F o u n dations of Physical Ed u cat i o n ; two p rofess i o n a l activities c o u rses ; P E 481 , P h Y S i o l o g i c a l B a s i s for Motor Performance; 4 8 2 , B i omechanics of H u m a n Motion; and e i t h e r 322, Physical E d u cation i n the E l e m e n ta ry S c h o o l ; o r 3 2 8 , Curri c u l u m Deve l o p m e n t and A d m i n is足 t ra t i o n . Th ree and o n e-hal f c o u rses elected from among c o u rses n u mb ered offered in the S c h o o l of Physical Ed ucati o n .

300-

400 3.

B i o l ogy

4.

Part i c i pation i n at least one i n terc o l l eg i ate o r extra m u ra l s p o rt .

1 61

( H u m a n Anatomy) and Bi ology

1 62

( H u m a n Physi o l ogy).

5 . One activity e lective ( Yo cou rse) i n Aquatics. Junior High S c h o o l Preparation

Teac h i ng Maj o r : 7 c o u rses ReqUired: The six cou rses req u i red for the sen i o r h i g h maj o r p l us one e l ective


from among physical education cou rses n u m b ered 300-400. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : Four cou rses a re req u i red : PE 277, ScientifiC Foundations of Physical Educati o n ; PE 286 P rofessional Activities-Gymnastics and Dance; 284 or 288, P rofessi onal Activi ties-Team Sports; and 48 1 , Physi o l o g i c a l Basis for Motor Performance, or 482, Biomechanics of H u m an Motion. Elementary School Preparation Teac h i n g M a j o r : S i x c o u rses are req u i red : PE 277, S c i e n t i fi c Foundations of Physical Educ ati o n ; PE 286, P rofess i o n al Activi ties-Gym nastics and Dance; 284 o r 288, P rofes s i o n a l Activit ies-Team Sports ; 322, Physical Education i n the Elementary S c h o o l ; a n d t w o c o u rses selected f r o m among the physical education cou rses n u m bered 300-400. Tea c h i n g M i n o r : The fol lowing courses are req u i red : P E 277, Found ations of P h ysical Educa t i o n ; 286 , P rofessional Activi ties-Gymnastics and Dance ; 284 o r 288, Profess i o n a l Activities-Team Sports; and 322, Physical Education in the Elementary S c h o o l . Special Secondary Programs Athl etic Coaching M i n o r : T h e req u i rements f o r the Ath letic Coac h i n g M i no r i n c l u d e : 1 . Th ree req ui red cou rses: PE 277, Scienti f i c Foundations of Physical Edu cati o n ; 481 , P h ys i o l o g i c a l B a s i s for Motor Performance; 482, Biomec h a n i c s o f H u man Moti o n ; a n d 2 . Three elective ' 路 o ne-half" courses f r o m a m o n g the fo l l ow i n g : PE 3 7 0 , Coac h i n g T h e o ry-Basketba l l ; 3 71 , Coac h i n g Theory-Foot b al l ; 372, Coaching T h e o ry-Track and Fi e l d ; 373, Coaching Theory-Basebal l ; 374, Coaching T h e o ry-Wrest l i n g ; 361 , Coa c h i n g P r acti c u m ; and 3.

Parti c i pation i n at least one i n te rcol legiate o r extra m u ral spo rt.

Health M i n o r : The following c o u rses are req u i red : PE 295, School He a l t h ; PE 324, Personal He a l t h ; PE 326, C o m m u n i ty Health ; B i o l ogy 1 6 1 , H u man Anatomy; B io logy 1 6 2, H u man Physiology. BA CH ELOR O F ARTS ( C o r re c t i ve Therapy Con centrat i o n ) degree req ui rements are l i sted below. Candi dates for this degree must also meet the req u i rements of the C o l lege of A rts and Sciences. A p p l i ed Sci ence s (3 cou rses) B i ology 1 6 1 -Hu man Anatomy B i o l og y 1 62-Human Physiology P E 482-Bi omechanics o f H u m a n Motion Psychology (2 cou rses) 1 0 1 -lntrodu ction to Psychology 221 -Psycho logy of Adj ustment (1 12 ) O n e elective i n Psyc h o logy (V2 )


Physical E d u cation (4 cou rses) 277-Scientific Foundati ons of Physical E d ucation 292- F i rst Aid (Vo ) 360-Tea c h i n g Pract i c u m ( V2 ) 481 -P hysi o l o g i c a l Basis for Motor Perfo rmance (V2 ) 484-Meas u rement a n d Eva l u ation i n P h ysical Education El ective i n Physical Education C o rrective Therapy (3 c o u rses) 391 , 392 and 497, I n dependent Study BAC H E L O R O F ARTS (Recreation C o n centration) degree req u i rements a re l i sted below, C a n d i d ates for this degree m ust also meet the req u i rements of the Col lege o f Arts and S c i e n ces, Requi red (six cou rses) : P E 277-Scientific Foundations of P h ysical Education Psycho logy 335-C h i l d h ood and Adolescence PE 330-Recreation Progra m m i ng PE 483- Recreation Ad m i n i strati o n P E 497- ( l n teri m ) -Recreation I n ternsh i p C h oose o n e : P E 481 - Physi o l o g i c a l B a s i s for M o t o r Perfo rmance ( p l u s an a d d i t i o n a l h a l f足 cou rse a p p roved by adviser) P E 482-B i o m e c h a n i cs o f H u man Motion O n e profess i o n a l activity course (284, 285, 286 o r 288) El ectives-Two c o u rses (8 semester h o u rs) from among the f o l l o w i n g : A r t 230-Cera m i cs I or Art 330, Ceramics I I Art 235-Materials Design o r 350 S c u l p tu re ( o n l y one o f these wi l l c o u n t towa rd the maj o r) Art 326- F i l m Maki n g A r t 341 -Art Educati on-Elementary ( V2 ) Art 365-Pai n t i n g A r t 370- P r i n t m a k i n g CA 450-Ch i l d re n 's Theatre Works h o p (su m m e r offe r i n g ) Music 340- M u s i c i n the E l e m e n ta ry School (V2 ) M u s i c 34 1 - Music S k i l l s and Methods for E l e m e n ta ry Teach ers PE 292-Fi rst Aid ( V2 ) P E 322-Physical Education i n the Elemen tary S c h o o l P E 365- C h u rc h C a m p C o u nsel i n g (su m m er offe r i n g ) Electi ves-Two cou rses (8 semester hou rs) f r o m the f o l l owi n g : BA 28 1 -F i n a n c i a l Accounting B A 290-Law and Society BA 350- l n d ustri a l Management Pol Sci 356- P roblems in Local Government Pol Sci 457- P r i n c i p l es of P u b l i c A d m i n i stration Psy 243-Sc i e n t i f i c Methods


PSy Psy Soc Soc Soc Soc Soc Soc

340- B i o logy of Behavi o r 4 1 0-Emotion a n d Motivation 2 1 1 - G ro u p Behavior 325- M i n orities 328-Dev i a n t Behavior 365-Social I n tervention 425-The F a m i l y 432-Co m m u n i ty a n d Strat i fi cation

PHYSICAL ED UCATION ACTIVITIES PROGRAM

The p h ysical e d u cation g raduation req u i rement may be satisfied by successfu l l y c o m p l eti ng ( A ) Physical E d u cation 1 00 - O ri e n tation to Physical Educat i o n , a n d ( B ) th ree a d d i t i onal activity cou rses ( o n e-q uarter cou rses) c h osen f ro m t h e sub足 seq uent l i s t (200-260) . U n less specifically design ated (M-Men o r W-W o m e n ) , each cou rse i s avai lable to men and wome n . C l asses meet twice weekly. 1 00 O R I ENTAT I O N TO PHYS I CA L E D UCAT I O N ( V. ) Designed t o i n form students o f the need for a f u n ct i o n a l and personally足 designed prog ram of p h ysical activity. Atte m p ts are made to assess physical c o n d i t i on a n d s ki l ls a n d to recommend specific p ro g rams for m a i n tai n i n g and i m proving physical health. S h o u l d be taken as a fres h m a n . I I I 200-229 I N D I V I D UA L A N D D U A L ACT I V I T I ES ( V. ) 201 ( Beg i n n i n g G o l f ) , 202 ( I n te rmedi ate and Advanced G o l f ) , 203 (Archery ) , 204 ( B ow l i n g ) , 207 (Gym nasti cs) , 208 (Sk i i n g ) , 2 0 9 ( I n te rmed i ate Gymnastics), 2 1 0W (Sl i m n astics) , 2 1 1 (Beg i n n i n g Bad m i n t o n ) , 2 1 2 ( I n te rm e d i ate Bad m i nton ) , 2 1 4 (Beg i n n i ng Ten n i s ) , 2 1 5 ( I n te rmedi ate Ten n i s ) , 2 1 8 (Backpac k i n g ) , 2 1 9 (Canoe i n g ) , 2 2 2 M ( H an d b a l l , Squash a n d Paddleba l l ) , 223W (Sq uash a n d Pad足 d lebal l ) , 2 2 7 M (We i g h t Trai n i n g ) , 228 ( Basic Mou ntainee r i n g ) , 229 ( Eq u i tati o n ) . 230-239 AQUAT I C S ( V. ) 230 (Beg i n n i n g Swi m m i n g ) , 231 ( I ntermedi ate Swi m m i n g ) , 232 (Advanced Swi m m i n g ) , 234 (Se n i o r L i fe Sav i n g ) , 236 (Synch ron ized Swi m m i n g ) , 237 (Skin and Scuba D i v i n g ) . 240-249 R H YTHMS ( V4 ) 240 ( F o l k and Social Dance ) , 241 ( Modern Dance) , 242 ( I n termed iate Modern Dance) . 250-259 ATHLET I C G A M ES ( V. ) 2 5 1 W ( Vo l l eyba l l and F i e l d H ockey), 252W ( Basketb a l l and Softbal l ) , 253M (Speed b a l l and V o l leyba l l ) , 254 M (Basketball and Soft b a l l ) . PROFESSI ONAL PHYSICAL E D U CATION PROGRAM

275 WATER SAFETY I N STRUCTION (V2 ) The American Red Cross Water Safety I nstru ctor's C o u rse. P o o l management and operation is i n c l u d e d . P re req uisite: P E 234.


277 S C I E NT I F I C F O U N DAT I O N S OF PHYSICAL E D U CATION The a i m s and objectives o f modern physical education, the relati o n s h i p of physical e d u cation to e d u c ati o n , and the b i o l o g i c a l , soci o l og i c a l , psyc h o l og­ ical and mechanical p r i n c i p l es u'nderlying physical education a n d ath l etics. I 281 I NJ U RY P R EVENTION A N D T H ERAPEUT I C CARE (\12 ) I n c l udes preven t i o n , treatment and re habi l i tation of a l l c o m m o n i n j u ries sus­ tained i n ath letics. D i scuss i o n o f physical therapy by e m p l oyment o f electri c i ty, massage, exe rcise, l i g h t, ice and mechanical devices is i n c l u d e d . I I 284 P R O F ESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I ES. TEAM S P O RTS FOR MEN Practical expe riences i n p l a n n i n g , teach i n g , and eval uating the fol lowing activities: basketbal l , vol l eyba l l , soccer, speed bal l , track and f i e l d , wrest l i n g . t o u c h footb a l l , softb a l l . a / y I I 285 P RO F ESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I ES, I N D I V I D UAL A N D D UAL SPORTS Practical experien ces i n p l a n n i � g , teach i n g , and eva l u ating the fo l l owing activities: te n n is, bad m i n to n , a rch ery, g o l f and b o w l i n g . I 286 P RO F ESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I ES, GYMNAST I C S A N D DANCE P ractical experi ences i n p l a n n i n g , teac h i n g and evaluating gymnastics and d ance. I I 288 P R O FESS I O N A L ACT I V I T I ES, TEAM SPO RTS FOR W O M E N P r a c t i c a l experien ces i n p l a n n i n g , teach i n g and eva l u ati n g the fol l o w i n g a c t i v i t i e s : basketb a l l , f i e l d hoc key, s o c c e r , speed bal l , vol leyba l l , softbal l , and track a n d fi e l d . a/y I I 292 F I RST A I D ( V2 ) T h i s c o u rse meets the req ui rements for the American Red C ross Sta n d a rd a n d Advanced Cards. a/y 295 SCHOOL H EALTH ( V2 ) P rese n tation a n d d i scussi o n o f health con cepts that relate t o the total s c h o o l h ea l t h p rogram, i n c l u d i n g i n structi o n , services, and envi ronment. Designed to i d e n t i fy the relati onsh i p between health and all levels o f e d u cati o n . Req u i re­ men t for students e n ro l led in the teac h e r education curri c u l u m . I I I 322 P H YS I CAL EDU CAT I O N I N T H E E L E M ENTARY SCHOOL ( V2 - 1 ) The organization a n d adm i n istration of a deve l opmental physical education prog ram fo r g rades K-6. A l a rge reperto i re of act i vi ties is p resented . Seq u e n ­ tial and prog ressive p ro g ram m i n g is e m p hasized. P re requisite: P E 2 7 7 . I 324 P ERSONAL H EALTH Em phasis o n the p ractical a p p l ication of perso n a l health knowledge to d a i ly l i vi n g and a foundation for u n d e rstan d i n g the "why" of health behavi or. a/.y I I 326 C O M M U N ITY H EALTH A study o f the o rganizations associated with p u b l i c health and t h e i r i m p l i ca­ t i o n s to the health p ro b l e m s in a c o m m u n i ty.


328 C U R R I C U L U M DEVELOPMENT A N D A D M I N I STRAT I O N P ro b lems related t o organization and a d m i n i stration of s c h o o l (grades 7 - 1 2 ) phys i ca l edu cati o n a n d athletics. P r i n c i p l es of curricu l u m development a n d i m p lementation a r e e m p h asize d . Prereq u i s i te : P E 277. a/y I I 330 RECREATION P R O G RA M M I N G A cou rse designed t o deve l op s k i l l s i n cond ucti n g , su pervis i n g , a n d a d m i n ­ istering recreation pro g ra m s for the s c h o o l o r c o m m u n i ty. I 331 THE WOMAN AS A C O M P ET I T O R (Y2 ) T h i s c o u rse w i l l consider t h e woman a s an athletic competitor. I t w i l l i n c l u d e t h e psychology of coac h i n g , coac h i n g tec h n i que a n d methodology, the relation o f training, care a n d prevention o f selected athletic i n j u r ies a n d the soc io­ l ogical i mp l i cations o f athletic competition for women. I t is desig ned fo r women physical educa t i o n majors and m i n o rs who are i n te rested in coaching com peti t i ve teams. I 332 O F F I C I AT I N G FOR W O M E N ( Y2 ) This c o u rse w i l l consider the rules and officiating tec h n i q ues o f the c o m m o n t e a m s p o rts. Team sports c o n s i de red i n clude soccer, field hockey, vol ley b a l l , basketba l l a n d softba l l . I t i s designed to train qual i fied women officials f o r school o r c o m m u n ity service . a s w e l l a s cl ass u s e . Open t o a l l women­ reco mme nded as an e lective for physical education maj o rs a n d m i n o rs. It 362 R HY T H M S AND DAN CE I n c l u des the h istorical b a c kg ro u n d , estab l i sh m e n t and conduct of a dance p rogram, teaching tec h n ique and accompan i ment, p l a n n i n g and p rese n tation of various dances. Emphasis on m o d e r n dance tech n iq ues. a / y I 360, 361 PRACT I C U M IN TEAC H I N G A N D COACH I N G (y2 , Y2 ) I n volves student-assistant coac h i n g tea c h i n g expe riences in p l anning and c o n d u ctin g i n terco l legiate athletics and physical education in struction. Stu­ dents will work under d i rect supervision of the head coach o r physical educa­ tion i n stru ctor. Prereq ui s i t e : Departm ental approval, one course professional activi ties. I II 370-375 COAC H I N G T H EO RY-(Each theory cou rse Y2 cre d i t ) A s t u d y o f the techniques, systems, trai ning methods, strategy a n d psyc h o l ogy of coa c h i n g . Each theory co u rse car ries V2 cou rse c re d i t . 370 (Coac h i n g Theory-Basketbal l ) , 371 (Coa c h i n g Theory-Footbal l ) , 3 7 2 (Coaching The ory ­ T r a c k and Field) , 3 7 3 (Coach ing T h e o ry-Baseba l l ) , 3 7 4 (Coach i n g Theory­ W restl i n g ) . I I I 391 , 392 C O R R ECT I V E TH ERAPY ( 1 , 1 ) A corrective therapy c l i n ical trai n i n g prog ram i n c l u d i n g lectu re, labo ratory, experien ces and c l i n i c al practi ces. Prereq uisite: Departmental approval. (M axi­ m u m e n ro l l men t-5). I I I 480 HISTORY A N D P H I LOSOPHY O F PHYS I CAL EDUCAT I O N T h e devel o p m e n t of physical e d u cation from ancient cu l t u res t h rough m o dern times. In terpre tation and application o f h istori cal, p h i l o s o p h i c a l , and psy-


c h o l o g i ca l bases of p h ysical education. Speci a l attention to present trends i n physi cal education. Pre req uisite: P E 277. a/y I I 481 P H Y S I O LOG I CAL BAS I S FOR MOTOR P E R F O R M A N C E ( V2 ) I n c l u des a n i n vestigation o f the s c i e n t i f i c basis for trai n i n g a n d the physiolog足 ical effects o f exe rcise o n the h u man body. P re req u i s i te : PE 277. Also rec o m 足 men ded : Bi o l ogy 1 62 . I 482 B I O M EC HA N I C S OF H U MAN MOTION A study o f the kinesiological and mechanical aspects of h u m an m ovement. Ana lysis of various physical e d u cation and ath letic activities are made. Pre足 req u i s i t e : PE 2 7 7 . Also recom mended : Bi ology 1 6 1 . I I 483 R E C R EA T I O N ADM I N I STRAT I O N I n l roduction t o t h e o rganization, m a n agement a n d d i rection o f rec reati o n a l servi ces i n c l u d i n g t h e legal b a s i s , a d m i n i strative procedu res, f i n a n c i a l aspects, personnel m anagement, faci l i ties, and i n ternal o rganization. I I 484 M EA S U R E M EN T A N D EVALUATI O N I N PHYSICAL EDUCAT I O N ( V2 ) A study o f selec t i o n , construc t i o n , and i n te r p retat i o n of e v a l uatory tec h n i q ues related to the physical education p rogram. I I 491 I N DEPEN D ENT STUDY (V4 - 1 ) P e r m i ssion of the d i rector is req u i red I I I S 597 G RADUATE R ESEARCH ( VZ - 1 ) Open t o g raduate students whose m i n o r i s i n the field of physical educati o n ; with a p p roval o f school d i rector. I I I S Interim courses offered in 1 97 1 :

301 PLANN I N G A R EAS A N D FAC I Ll T l fS F O R PHYS I CAL EDUCAT I O N , R E C R EAT I O N AND ATHLET I C S 3 2 6 C O M M U N ITY H EALTH R ES O U R C ES 497 I N D EP E N D ENT STUDY- I NT E R N P RO G RAMS a. Recreation I n ternship b . Co rrec tive T h e rapy I n tern s h i p c. O r i e n tation t o T h e rapy Programs

PHYSICS Mr. Nomes, Chairman, Mr. Adams, Mr. Jacobs, Mr. Tang

Physics is the f u n d a mental n a t u ra l science because i t deals with the basic features o f the world such as energy, time, space, m o t i o n , matter, and ch arge. Some of these featu res can be found i n every event occu rri ng i n nature and a l l science i n terprets i ts observations i n terms of them. Modern physics i s a part


of the p h i losophical revo l u t i o n that is slowly pe rmeating o u r c u l ture, a c u l tu re that is reshaping the relat i o n s h i p between man and the universe t h a t surrounds him. T h e beg i n n i n g c o u rses i n physics are a contributing part o f t h e l i b e ral arts em phasis of the C o l lege o f Arts and S c i e n ces. They e m p hasize the basic con足 cepts of science i n order t o g i ve a g reater appreciat i o n o f t h e nature a n d behavior o f space and matter i n which h u man beings are tota l l y i m mersed . These c o u rses have a p rereq u i s i te of o n l y h i g h school algebra. C o u rses in physics are designed to meet the needs of a variety o f stud e n t s : (1 ) th ose desiring to meet t h e unive rs i ty science r eq u i re m e n t ; (2) t h o s e desiring to suppo rt majors in mathematics, c h e m i s try and bi ology; (3) th ose i n the 3-2 e n g ineeri ng p ro g ram (see page 5 1 ) : (4) those prepari ng for careers in teac h i n g ; and (5) th ose maj o r i n g i n physics a n d engineering physics. Students w i t h a major i n physics o r engineering physics may choose to d o g raduate study i n p h ysics, astro n o m y , astrophysics, applied mathematics, chemical physics, b i o physics, oceanography, geophys i c s , a n d a l l branches of e n g i neering. T h e Department o f Physics offers an h o n o rs course at the f resh man level pro足 viding a spec i a l c h a l l enge to students o f superior acad e m i c a b i l i ty. Selection for p a rti c i pa t i o n i s made on the basis o f high school records, schol astic aptitude tests, a n d an e x a m i n ation a d m i n istered to a l l students who e n ro l l i n P hysics 1 0 1 . After c o m p l etion o f the h o n ors c o u rse, students g o d i re c t l y t o the j u n i o r seq uen ce of c o u rses. This seq uence g i ves students many o p portu n i t i es for e n ri c hment i n c l u d i ng p a rt i c i pation in the u n dergraduate research program o n e year earl i e r. A major in physics f u l f i l l i n g the BAC H E L O R OF S C I E N C E deg ree consists of ten courses i n c l u d i n g Bas i c Concepts ( 1 0 1 ) , G e n e ral Physics (253-254), C i rc u i ts and I nstrumentation (272), Electromagnetic Theory (33 1 ) , Mec h a n i cs (336) . I n tro足 d uc t i on to Q u a n t u m M e c h a n i c s (40 1 ) , Advanced Modern Phys i cs (406) , Mathe足 matical Physics (456), and o n e c o u rse i n advanced l a b o rato ry and/ o r research. P h ysi cs m aj o rs ( B .S.) are req u i red to take o n e c o u rse i n chemistry ( C h e m i s try 1 1 5) , p l u s e i t h e r Physical Chem istry (Chem. 34 1 ) o r Ther modyna m i cs ( E n g . 351 ) . Partici pation i n one o f t h e ongoing research projects i s e n c o u raged. When a student shows the a b i l i ty to profit from i n d ependent research h e may be i n vited to part i c i pate. Student s in this prog ram are not req u i red to fulfi l l the reg u l a r laboratory req ui rements, and w i l l earn the s a m e n um ber of academic cred i ts. R E C O M M E N D E D C O U R SE SCHEDULE FOR B .S. D E G R E E I N PHYSICS Freshman Year 1 st semeste r Basic Con cepts (Phy. 1 0 1 ) Math. 1 51

C o u rse _1

2nd semester General Physics (Phy. 253) Math. 1 52 _

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Sophom ore Year 1 st semester G e n e ral Physics ( P h y . 254) Math. 231

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2 n d semester C i rcu its and I n strumentation (Phy. 272) _ Math. 332 _

Course 1 _ _1 _

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Junior Year 1 st semester C o u rse Electromagnetic T h e o ry (Phy. 331 ) Math. 351 _ Physi cal C h e m i stry (Chem 341 ) or Thermodynam ics (Eng. 35 1 ) 1 Advanced laboratory (Phy. 321 ) ___ _

2nd semester C o u rse Mechanics (Phy. 336) 1 Advanced laboratory (Phy. 322)

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Senior Year 1 st semester I n tro. to Quantum Mechanics (Phy. 401 ) _ Advanced lab. (Phy. 42 1 ) o r Research (Phy. 497) _

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2nd semester Advanced Modern Physics (Phy. 406) Mathematic a l P h ys i cs (Phy. 456) _ Advanced lab. (Phy. 422) or Research (Phy. 498)

Cou rse

A major in p h ysics fulfi l l i n g the BAC H ELOR OF ARTS deg ree consists of a m i n i 足 m u m of 7 % c o u rses i n cluding V2 c o u rse i n advanced laboratory and / o r researc h . A m a j o r i n e n g i n e e r i n g physics f u l fi l l i n g t h e BAC H ELO R O F S C I E N C E degree consists o f a ten-cou rse "core " p l u s two a d d i t i o n a l cou rses selected o n the basis of the area of i n terest in engi nee r i n g . The core i n c l u des: Physics 1 0 1 -Basic Concepts Physics 253-254-Gene ral Physics Physics 272 - C i rcui ts and I n strumentation Physics 331 - E lectricity a n d Magnetism Ph ysics 336-Mec h a n i cs Physics 321 -322-421 -422-Advanced Laboratory Engineering 1 5 1 - En g i n eering G raphics Engi nee ring 23 1 - Statics E n g i neering 232-So lid Mechanics E n g i n eering 35 1 -Ther modynamics Two ad dit ional courses are c h osen from a m o n g the fol lowi n g : Engi nee ring 441 -Network Ana lysis Engineering 442-Tran sport Phenomena Physics 4 0 1 -Quantum Mechan i c s Physics 406-Advanced M odern Physics P h ys i cs 456-Mathematical P h ysics These two courses will be c h osen on the basis of the student's career objectives. For exam ple, students preparing themsel ves for careers or graduate study i n electrical engi neering would ch oose Network Analysis and Mathematical Physics; students prepa ring in eng ineering mech a n i cs would choose Transport Phenomena and Mathematical Physics; and, students p reparing i n nuclear engi neering would ch oose Quantum Mechanics and Advanced Modern Physics. Students must have programs i n engineering physics ap proved prior to register-


i n g for the j u n i o r year. Any subseq uent ch anges m ust be a p p roved by the depart足 ment. I n addi tio n, one cou rse i n chemistry, and math ematics t h r o u g h Math 332 are r8q u i red. RECO M M EN D E D COURSE S C H E D U L E FOR B.S. D E G R E E I N E N G I N E E R I N G PHYSICS Freshman Year 1 st semester Basic C o n cepts (Phy. 1 0 1 ) E n g . G ra p h i cs (Eng. 1 5 1 ) Sophom ore Year 1 st semester General P h ysi cs (Phy. 254) Sta t i cs (Eng. 231 ) Junior Year 1 s t semeste r Electri c i ty & Mag. (Phy. 33 1 ) Thermodynamics ( E n g . 3 5 1 ) Advan ced lab. ( P h y . 321 )

C o u rse 1

2nd semester General Physics (Phy. 253)

V2 2 n d semester C i rc u i ts & I n st. (Phy. 272) S o l i d Mechanics (Eng. 232) _ _

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_

2nd semester M e c h a n i c s ( p h ys. 336) Transport Phen. ( E n g . 442) o r Network Analysis ( E n g . 441 ) _ Advanced l ab. ( P h y. 322) _

Senior Year 1 s t semester Quantum M e c h a n i c s ( P h y . 40 1 ) Advanced l a b . ( P h y . 421 )

Cou rse _1

_

_

1

V.

2nd semester Advan ced Modern P h y s i c s (Phy. 406) Math. P h ysics (Phy. 456) Advanced l a b . (Phy. 422) _ _ _

__

The prog ram for engine ers in the 3-2 prog ram (see page 5 1 ) will normal ly follow the p rog ram for majors i n Engineering Physics t h rough the j u n i o r year. Any courses necessary to meet speci a l req u i rements of certain eng ineering schools will be offe red as i n depen d e n t study. BAC H ELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N maj o r req u i rements are l i s ted below. Candi dates for this deg ree m ust also meet special req u i rements described i n the School of Education sectio n in t h i s catalog. The Depa rtment of P h ysics offers a special c o u rse sequence for student s p re足 paring for careers i n teach i n g. I t is recogn i zed that the needs of p h ysics and s c i e n ce t eachers have become s i g n i fi cantly d i fferent from those of physics maj ors p reparing for gradu ate studies . Students need no extensive p rior work in science o r mathematics. This program w i l l' p repare a te a c h e r in the two related fields of p hysics a n d mathemati cs. T h i s combination g ives a teach e r the best p reparation for professional growth a n d hopefu lly a l i fe-long career i n teach i n g . Students may take add i t i o n a l upper d i vision cou rses i n physics and mathematics to f u l f i l l the Was h i ngton State f i fth year req u i reme n ts and may apply these cou rses towards an advanced degree in teac h i n g .


Senior High School Preparation: 11 courses Te aching M a j o r : 7 V2 courses Required: P h ysics 1 0 1 , 1 02, 21 1 , 253, 254, 272, 32 1 , 322 and 355. Required supporting courses: One add i t i o n a l cou rse in c h e m i stry; Mathe足 matics 1 5 1 , 1 52 . Add i t i o n a l suggested courses: Physics 331 , 336. Junior High School Preparation: Teac h i n g Maj o r : 6 V2 c o u rses Required: Physics 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 , 2 1 1 , 253, 254, 272, 321 and 322. C U R R I C U L U M IN PHYSICS FOR TEAC H E R PR EPARAT I O N Freshman Year 1 s t semester Basic Concepts (Phy. 1 0 1 ) _ Math. 1 33

Course 1

2nd semester Discovery P hysics ( P h y . 1 02) Math. 1 51

C o u rse 1

C o u rse 1 1

2nd semester General P hysics (Phy. 253)

Course 1

Course 1

C i rcu its and Instrumentation (Phy. 272)

C o u rse 1

2nd semester Mechan i cs (Phy. 336) e l e c t i ve Advanced lab. (Phy. 322)

Sophomore Year

1 s t semester Modern Physics (Phy. 2 1 1 ) Math. 1 52 Junior Year 1 st semester General P h ys i c s (Phy. 254)

2nd semester

C o u rse

_

Senior Year 1 st semester Teac h i n g of Physics (Phy. 355) E & M (Phy. 331 ) elective Advanced lab. Phy. 32 1 )

Cou rse 1

1 0 1 BASIC C O N CEPTS OF P HYSICS A cou rse i l l ustrating the i n tel lectual i m portance and excitement of physics for both n o n -science maj o rs and aspi ring physicists. The c o u rse wi l l deal w i th c h aracter of p h ysical laws; relati o n s h i p between physics and other lie I d s ; conservation p r i n c i p l es, mathemati cal p h i losophy; ato m i c p i c t u re 01 nature; c o n cepts of re lativity, and 01 quantum mechanics. The materi al will be descri bed in general terms; no mathematics other than elemen tary algebra w i l l be used . No laboratory. Pre requ i s i te : N one. 1 0 2 D I SCOVERY P H YSICS This is a laboratory-orien tated course lor non -majors. A selection 01 experi足 ments in mechanics, heat, sound, electri c i ty, optics and modern physics w i l l b e performed. These expe riments are desig ned to em phasize fundamental p r i n c i p l es which are discussed i n the lecture perio d prior to the laboratory. Each student is expected to formu late his own c o n c l usions from the data obtained in t h e laboratory. Th ese c o n c l u si o ns are then di scussed in the rec i tation period. Prerequisite : Physics 1 0 1 .


1 1 1 , 1 1 2 HON ORS PHYS I C S ( 1 , 1' ) A study of tran s l a t i o n a l a n d rotat i o n a l m o t i o n , p a r t i c l e d y n a m i cs , w o r k , energy, the conservation l aws, c o l l i s i o n theory, s i m p l e h a r m o n i c moti o n , t h e rm o 足 d y n a m i c s and kinetic theory of gases, e l ectrical fields, Gauss's law, electric pote n t i a l , circuit com ponents and a n a l ysis, magnetic fi e l d , i n d uctance, m ag足 netic properties o f m atter. electromagnetic waves, geometric and physical optics, d i f f racti o n , spectra, a n d quantum p h ysics. I n c l udes laboratory on a n i n dependent s t u d y basis. 1 51 E N G I N E E R I N G G RA P H f C S ( V2 ) See General Engi neering 1 5 1 . 2 1 1 DESC R I PT I V E M O D E R N PHYSICS A cou rse i n elementa ry modern p h ysics. I ntended primarily for the h i g h school teacher p r o g r a m s , b u t d e s i g n e d also for b i o l ogy, c h e m istry and geology majors who want to know m o re about atomic a n d n u c lear physics. Topi cs i n c l u d e rad i at i o n laws, rad iation effects on l i vi n g orga n i sms, natural a n d artificial rad i oactivity , structure of solids, B o h r a n d R u th e rf o rd theory of the atom, X-rays, gamma rays, beta e m i ss i o n , a l p h a e m i ss i o n . e l ementary particles , cos m i C rays, particle accelerators, lasers, em ission a n d absorption spectra. I n c l udes l a b o ratory. Prereq u i s i te : Col lege a l g e b ra and P h ysics 1 01 a n d 1 02 or equivalent. 231 STATICS ( V2 ) See General Engi neering 231 . 232 M EC HAN ICS OF S O L I D S S e e Gene ral E n g i neering 2 3 2 . 253, 254 G EN E RAL PHYS I C S ( 1 , 1 ) A cou rse p rese n t i n g a u n i fied view o f physics, i n c l u d i n g topics i n mechan i cs , m o l e c u l a r phys i cs, wave m o t i o n , l i g ht, e lectromag netism. The u s e o f the d i g i tal c o m p u te r w i l l be taug h t c o n c u rren tly and used i n the lecture and the acco m p a n y i n g l a b o ratory. Prereq u i si te : Math 1 51 o r c o n se n t of i nstructor. 272 ELECTR I C A L C I RC U ITS A N D I N ST R U M ENTAT I O N An i n trod u c t i o n to electro n i c devices and thei r a p p l i cation starting w i t h basic A-C and D-C c i r c u i t anafysis. I t i n c l udes the physics of transistors and vac u u m tubes a n d t h e analysis o f c i rc u i ts conta i n i n g these devices. A p p l ications i n 足 c l ude A - C and D-C a m p l i fi e rs , power s u p p l i es , a n a l o g a n d d i g i ta l computers. I n c l udes laboratory. Prereq u i s i te: Physics 253, 254 o r consent o f instructor. 321 , 322 ADVANCED LABORATORY ( V. - Y2 ) A cou rse demonstra t i n g f u n d amental p r i n c i p l es of p h ys i cs by experi mental tec h n i q ues. Stude n ts perform expe ri ments i n modern a n d c l assi cal p h ys i cs fam i l i a r i z i n g themse l ves with the modern meas u r i n g tools of the scientist. T h i s cou rse req u i res knowledge o f the use of the d i g i ta l com p u te r . 331 ELECTROMAG N ET I C T H E O R Y A c o u rse i n e lectrostat i cs , d i p o l e f i e l d s , f i e l d s i n d ie le c t ri c mate r i a l s ,


el ectromagnetic

i n d u c ti o n ,

m ag n e t i c

p r o p e rties

of

matter,

generation

and

p ro p ag a t i o n o f e l ec t ro m a g n e t i c waves w i th an e m p hasis on the r e l a t i o n s h i p w i th p h y s i c a l o p t i c s . Coreq u i s i t e : M a t h .

332. Prereq u i s i t e : P h y s i cs 253, 254.

336 M E C H A N I C S A s t u d y o f t h e f u n d a m e n t a l p r i n c i p l e s of mechan i cs, e m p h asi zes t h e mathe足 m a t i c a l f o r m u l a t i o n of p h ys i c a l p r o b l e m s , motion o f partic les in one, two or th ree d i me n s i o n s , m o t i ons r i g i d bod ies, tonian Math.

of systems of p a rt i c l e s , dynamics a n d s t a t i c s of

moving c o o r d i nate systems, Lagrange's

formu l a t i o n

of

m e c h a n i cs .

Prereq u i si t e :

e q u ati ons

Con c u r rent

and

Hamil足

r e g i s t r a t i on

in

332.

351 T H E R M O DYNAM I C S See General Engi neering

351 .

355 TEACH I N G OF P H Y S I C S A cou rse fo r t h e s t u d y of new d e v e l o p m e n ts i n h i g h s c h o o l a n d j u n i o r h i g h s c h o o l c u r ri cu l u m , teac h i n g t e c h n i q u e s a n d tea c h i n g m e d i a i n

the p h y s i c a l

s c i e n c e s . May be c o u n t e d t o w a r d s a deg ree o n l y f o r stu dents recei v i n g c e rt i fi 足 c a t i o n as t e ac h e rs.

382 RA D I O I SOT O P E T E C H N O LOGY This cou rse deals with the c h a racte r i s t i cs of n u c l e a r rad i at i o n detection and measurement m e t h o d s a n d e q u i p m e n t, t h e o ry o f n u c l e a r d i s i n te g ra t i o n s and a p p l i ca t i o n to problems i n p h y s i cs a n d c h e m i s t r y . P re req u i site : P h y s i c s

102

o r equ ivalent.

401 I NT R O D U C T I O N TO Q U A N T U M M E C HA N I CS A stu d y of the f u n d a m e n t a l p ri n c i p l es of q u a n t u m m e c h a n i c s i n c l u d i n g the o r i g i n o f q u a n tu m theory, part i c l es a n d waves, S c h r ii d i n g e r eq u a t i o n , m ot i on of p a rt i c l es i n

one d i me n s i o n , u n c e rtai n ty p r i n c i p l e , wave m e c h an i c a l treat足

ment of t h e h a r m o n i c osc i l l a t o r , p roperties of wave f u n ct i on s ,

perturbation

t h e o ry of n o n -d e g e n e rate a n d d e g e n erate systems, t h e excl usion

p ri n c i p l e ,

m a n y e l e c t ron systems, c o l l i s i o n p ro b l e m s , a n g u l a r m o m e n t u m a n d e l e c t r o n s p i n , Zee m a n e f f e c t and S t a r k e f f e c t , h y d rogen fine s t r u c t u re and hyperfi n e s t r u c t u re, and q u a n t u m n u m b e r a n d t h e p e r i o d i c t a b l e .

406 ADVANCED M O D E R N P H YS I CS A s t u d y of t h e a p pl i c a t i o n molecular

binding ,

of q u a n t u m m e c h anics

molecular

rotation

and

i n c l u d i n g X-ray

v i b rati o n ,

specific

d i a t o m i c gas, s p e c i f i c h e at of s o l i d s , the free-e l e c tron t h e o ry

s p e c tra,

heat

of

a

of m e t a l s , t h e

band theory of s o l i d s , n u c l e a r r e a c t i o n s , r a d i o a c t i vity, n u cl e a r m o d e l s , n u c l e a r forces,

n e u tron

n u c l e a r reactors,

production

and

n u c l ear

fissi o n ,

part i c l e

a c c e l e rators

and

h i g h e n e rgy p h y s i c s , s t r o n g and w e a k i n te r a c t i o n s , p i o n s ,

m u ons, l e pto n s and h a d r o n s .

421 , 422 ADVANCED LABORATORY ( V4 - V2 ) 441 NETW O R K ANALYSIS See G e n e ral E n g inee r i n g

44 1 .


442 TRAN SPORT P H E N O M ENA See General Engi n e e r i n g 442. 456 MAT H E M AT I CAL PHY S I C S A s t u d y o f boundary value p r o b l e m s , spec i a l f u n c t i ons, matrices and tenso rs, probab l i l i ty the ory, eigenvalue p roblems, c o m p l e x va riables, c o n t o u r i n tegra足 tion and t h e i r a p p l i cations i n phys i c s . 491 , 492 I N D E P E N D E N T STUDY ( V4 - 1 ) By consent of chai rman of department. 497, 498 R E SEARCH (V4 - 1 ) By consent of c h a i r m a n o f d e partment. 597, 598 GRA DUATE RE SEARCH ( V4 - 1 ) Open to master's degree candi dates only. Interim course offered i n 1 97 1 :

301 MATHEMAT ICS F O R S C I E N T I STS

PO LITICAL SCIENCE

Mr. Farmer, Chairm a n , Mr. Collinge, Mr. Culver, Mr. Ulbricht; assisted by Mr. Bricker, Mr. Crockett, Mr. Mork The study of p o l i t i c a l science trains the student for the exercise of h i s rights a n d d u t i e s as a C i tizen by g i v i n g h i m a bette r u n derstand i ng of o u r d e m o c ratic p o l i t i c a l processes and o f c o n f l i c t i n g syste ms. A B A C H E LO R O F ARTS major i n p o l i ti c a l science s h a l l consist of a m i n i m u m of 7 cou rses i n c l u d i n g P o l i t i c a l S c i e n ce 1 0 1 , 251 , 325, and 326 . Students majo ring in p o l i ti c a l science mus t h ave thei r reg i s t ration app roved by the c h ai rman of the dep artment each semester. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN E D U CAT I O N m aj o r req u i rements are l i sted below. Can足 d i d a tes for t h i s deg ree m ust also meet special req u i rements described i n the SChool o f E d ucation sec tion in t h i s catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses (in the Social Sciences) Teac h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses (in P o l i t i cal S c i e n ce) Required: P o l i t i c a l S c i e nce 1 0 1 , 251 , 3 31 , plus fo u r ad d i ti o n a l elective c o u rses. Suggested supporting courses: Economics 1 50 ; Geography 1 0 1 ; H istory 251 , 252, 253, 255; Psycho logy 1 01 ; Soc i o l ogy 1 1 1 . Students w i s h i n g to p repare themselves speci f i c a l l y for career possi b i l i t i es i n state a n d local gove r n m e n t may e n ro l l i n t h e UR BAN AFFA I R S P R O GRAM. F o r certification, s u c cess ful c o m p letion o f t h e fol lo wing c o u rses is req u i red : P o l i t i c a l Science 1 0 1 , 251 , 325, 326, 354 o r 356 , 457 and 4 5 8 ; Econ o m i cs 1 50 a n d 3 6 2 ; a n d Soc io logy 1 1 1 and 325. P o l i t i ca l S c i e n ce 1 0 1 is the p rereq u i site for a l l other courses i n the department.


1 0 1 I N T R O D U CT I O N TO P O L I T I C A L S C I E N C E T h i s cou rse d e a l s with I h e scope a n d method and the vocabulary of p o l i t i ca l science, politi cal behavior, a n d govern mental o rganiz ation. I t is also desig ned to i n troduce the student to prob lems of pol itical theory and t o fam i l i a rize h i m with t h e c o m parative method o f studying p o l i t i c al in stitutions. I I I 251 A M E R I CA N NAT I O N A L GOVER N M ENT A study of the A m e r i can national government i n c l u d i n g the federal constitution and the d i s t r i b u t i o n o f govern mental powers. Su rvey of stru c t u re a n d pro­ ce d u re of n a t i o n a l government with spe c i a l attention t o practi cal operation and contemporary re forms. I I I 325 H I STO RY O F P O L I T I CA L THOUGHT This cou rse traces t h e development of t h o u g h t concern ing t h e nature and ro le of the state from a n c i en t to modern ti mes. I 326 R EC E N T POLITICAL T H O U G H T A c r i ti cal examination of the m a j o r phi losop h i es of t h e m o d e r n world ; Democ­ racy, conservatism, capita l i sm , socialism, anarch o-syn d i c a l i s m , c o m m u n i s m , r a c i a l and p o l i t i cal e l i t i s m , nationalism, l i be ra l i s m , Ch ristianity. Contem porary problems. I I 331 I NT E R NAT I O N A L R ELAT I O N S T h i s i n troductory course d e a l s w i t h t h e scope a n d methods, concepts, a n d the voca b u l a r y of i n ternati o n a l r e l a t i o n s . S u rvey o f the foreign po l i cy of the m aj o r world powers a n d contemporary i n ternational problems. I 336 I N T E R N AT I O N A L ORGAN I ZATION A N D LAW A study o f the U n i te d Nations a n d its agencies, and other i n ternational o rgan­ izations w h i ch attempt to deal effectively with the problems o f the world com­ m u n i ty. The nature, h i stori c a l development, and pri n c i ples of i n ternational law. I I 354 A M E R I CAN STATE A N D LOCAL GOVER N M ENT A comparative study o f state and l o c a l government in the U n i ted States with spe c i a l attention to the Pacifi c N o rthwest area. I I a/y 1 9 72-73 356 P R O B L E M S IN LOCAL G OVER N M E N T A detai led study of the p roblems created b y u rban i zation and reg i o n a l g rowth a n d the atte m p ts of government to solve them. II a/y 1 9 7 1 -72 361 AMER ICAN P O L I T I CAL PART I ES Party h i story a n d o rganizat i o n s ; n o m i nations and elections; campaigns and conventions; ele cto ral problems and a d m i n i strat i o n ; bossism in local p o l i t i c s ; pressure g r o u p s ; platforms. I a / y 1 9 72-73 364 THE LEGfSLAT IVE PRO CESS A study o f the theory, organ ization, a n d p ro c e d u re o f leg i s lative bodies in the U n ited States with speci a l attention to t h e c o n tem porary Congress and Wash­ in gton state legisl ature. I I a / y 1 972-73


421 T R E N D S I N C O N T E M PORARY P O L I T I CA L THEORY Examination of c o n te mporary t rends in p o l i tical theory . I n terd i s c i p l i n a ry devel opments, partic u l a rly theories of p o l i ti cal and c u l t u ral c o n f l i ct, soc i a l i za­ tion, and c o m m u n i cation. Models and explanati ons in Social Science. I I I 434 GOVERN M E N T AND THE E C O N O M Y S e e Econ o m i cs 434. 451 A M E R I CAN CO NSTITU T I O NAL H I STORY See History 451 . 454 AMER ICAN CONST I TU TI O N A L LAW An examination of s i g n i f i cant constitutional issues in the light of the con­ temporary i n terpretations of the Constitution of the Un i te d States: C h u rch­ state re lati ons, c i v i l rights , free spee c h , d u e process of law, re apportion­ ment. I I 457 P R I N C I P LES O F P U B L I C A D M I N I STRAT I O N T h e a r t and science of manage m e n t a p p l ied to the affa i rs o f state; n at u re o f human behavi o r i n organizat i o n s ; ad m i n i strative law and q uasi-j u d i c i a l prac­ tices; c i v i l service; bu dget and fiscal c o n t ro l ; central izati o n ; coord i nati o n ; i n teg ration i n adm i n istrative areas. I 458 I NT E R N S H I P IN P U B L I C A D M I N I STRATION An i n terns h i p with a d epartment o f l oc a l o r state gove r n m e n t p l an ned and supervised jOintly by the supervising govern m e n t offi c i a l and a facu rty member of the department of pol i ti c a l science. P rereq u i s i te: Consent o f instructor. I I I 4 6 4 I NTERN S H I P I N T H E LEGI SLATI V E PROCESS An i n ternship with a member of the Wash in gton State Leg i slatu re p l anned and s u pervised j o i ntly by the legislator and a political s c i e n ce lac u l ty mem­ ber. Prere q u i site: Consent of i n structor. I nterim II a/y 1 972-73 481 STAT I S T I CA L M ETHODS See Eco n o m i C S 481 483 POLITI CAL SYST EMS OF THE B R IT I S H C O M M O NWEALTH A comparative analysis of contempo rary governmental and p o l i ti c a l i n stitu­ tions of the Un ited K i n g d o m , Canada and other states of the Br i tish Com­ monwealth . I a/y 1 971 -72 484 S O V I ET P O L I T I CAL SYSTEM An an a l ysis o f the pol i t i c a l system of the U n i o n of Soviet Soc i a l i st Republ ics w i th spec ial attention to i d e o l ogy, the ro le of the C o m m u n i s t P a rty, the nature of the constituti o n , a d m i n i strative agencies, and nationality policy. II a / y 1 97 1 -72 491 , 492 IN D E PENDE NT R EA D I N G A N D RESEARCH ( V4 - 1 ) Prere q u i s i t e : Consent o f c h a i rman o f department. I I I


597, 598 G RAD UATE RESEARCH (V4 - 1 ) I nd i v i d u a l research proj ect i n p o l i tical science for an M ,A , c a n d i date, Pre­ req u i s i t e : Consent of depart m e n t . I I I Interim cou rses offered in 1 971 :

301 314 31 7 464

U R B A N P R O BLEM S W O R KSHOP B US I N ESS, POLITICS AND THE C O M M O N MARKET (BUS A D M I P O L S C I ) P U B L I C P O L I C Y AND THE U R BAN C R I S IS I NTERNSH I P I N THE LEG I S LATI V E PROCESS

PSYCHOLOGY

Mr, Bexton, Chairman, Mr, Adachi, Mr, Larsgaard, Mr, Nolph , Mr, Severtson, Mrs, Webster; assisted by Mr, Gilbert and Mr, Minetti Co u rses in this department aim at provi d i n g the student w i t h an un derstan d­ ing o f psyc h o l ogy as a s c i e n t i f i c study of behav i o r and experience, The m aj o r provides a background p re p a ration f o r a p rofess i o n a l career i n psyc h o l ogy o r for a related vocatio n , Professi o n a l c a reers in psy c h o l ogy i n c l ud e : c o l lege teac h i n g , research, c l i n ic al psychology, e m p loyment i n p u b l i c s c h o o l systems, b u s i n ess, i n d ustry and gov­ ernment agen c ies, These careers usua l ly req u i re at least the Master's degree; some req u i re the P h , D , d e g ree, In preparation for this graduate work the student s h o u l d take su pport i n g c o u rses i n areas such as b i o logy, m athematics, p h i los­ ophy and socio logy, Profi cienc y s h o u ld also be acqu i red in a modern lang uage such as Fren ch or German, Related vocati ons in which a psycho l'ogy major is useful a re : social work, the m i n i stry, parish w o r k , m e d i c i n e , n u rs i n g , busi ness a d m i n i s t ration and tea c h i n g , A m aj o r i n psyc h o l ogy wi l l i n c l u d e : Psy c h o l ogy 1 01 a n d 2 4 3 , p referably i n t h e fres h m a n year; t w o of 3 4 0 , 4 1 0 , 460 ; one o f 330, 335, 4 2 0 or 4 2 1 ; Psychology 490 ; and two a d d i t i on a l f u l l c o u rses taken from th ose offered below the 500 level ; a c o u rse i n Statistical Methods i s also req u i re d , P h y c h o l ogy 1 1 0 and 221 may n o t be c o u n ted i n t h e major. A l l majors m ust have thei r p rog rams a p p roved each semester by the de­ partment. Majors in the Department o f Psyc h o l ogy will write a c o m p re h e n s i ve exam­ i n ation d u r i n g the f i rst semester of their s e n i o r year. Read i n g o r o t h e r work d u r i n g the se n i o r year i n terim wi l l be d i rected toward maki ng u p for any defici­ encies a n d in p reparation for a c o m p rehensive exam i n ation during the f i n a l semester. 1 0 1 I NTRODUCTION TO PSYCHO LOGY A general i ntroduction to the s c i e n t i fic study of behavi o r, Topics covered w i l l i n c l u d e scien tifi c methods for stu d y i n g the behavior of l i vi n g org a n i sms, p roblems such as motivati on , learn i n g , e m o t i o n , i n tel ligence, personal ity and adjustment. I II S


1 1 0 STUDY S K I L L S (112 ) Designed to ass ist the student to i m prove h i s read i n g ski l l s and deve l o p o t h e r tech n i q ues for m o re effective s t u d y . C l ass w o r k i s s u p p l emented by i n d i v i d u a l counse l i ng and special training i n rea d i n g skills. No prereq u i s i te . I II 2 2 1 T H E PSYCHOLOGY O F ADJ U ST M ENT ( V2 ) The p roblems o f perso n a l adjustment i n Psych o l ogy 1 0 1, . I I I

everyday

l i vi n g .

P rereq u i s i t e :

243 SC I ENT I F I C M ETHODS ( V2 - 1 ) Basic experi mental' and research design w i t h spec i f i c a p p l i c ations to sensory and percep tual p rocesses. Lecture and laboratory sessions. P rereq u i s i t e : Psyc h o logy 1 0 1 . 330 SOC I AL PSYC H OLOGY A study of research f i n d i ngs concern i n g the i nteraction between groups and the i n d iv i d u a l . Atti tudes, val ues, role behav i o r , and related topics w i l l be examined i n the l i g h t o f i nterpersonal re lations and g ro u p processes. Pre足 req ui s i te : Psyc h o l og y 1 0 1 . 335 C H I LD H O O D A N D A D O L ESCENCE ( V2 - 1 ) The deve l opment of the i n d i vi d ual from con cept i o n t h ro u g h adolescence with e m p h as i s on the genesis o f beh avi o r and its deve l o p m e n t t h rough factors s u c h as learn i n g and social i n f l ue n ce . Lecture and labo ratory sessions. (Lec t u re part may be taken as a h a l f-cou rse.) P rereq u i s i t e : Psyc h o logy 1 01 . 340 T H E B I OLOGY O F BEHAV I O R ( lI2 - 1 ) A study o f the re lation s h i p between anatomy and physiology and behavior. Lecture and laboratory sessions. ( Lecture part may be taken as a h a l f足 c o u rse.) P rereq u i si t e : Psyc h o logy 243. 403 TH E PSYC H O LOGY O F I N FANCY AND C H I LD H OO D (lI2 ) An advanced study of the physical, i n te l lectual, emotional and social devel足 opment of the i nd ividual from pre-natal period u p to adolescence. Special atten t i o n W i l l be g i ve n to p ro b l e m s of behavi o r and adjustm e n t . Prereq u i si t e : T w o o r m o re cou rses i n psyc h o l ogy b e y o n d 1 0 1 . 40" ADO LESC ENT PSYCH O LOGY (lI2 ) An advanced course d e a l i n g w i t h physical devel opment, mental trai ts, social c h a racte rist i cs and i n t e rests of a d o lescents. Adjustments i n h o m e , school and c o m m u n i ty . P re req u i s i te : Psychology 1 0 1 and one o f Education 321 , Psyc h o logy 335 or 403. 4 1 0 EMOTION AND MOTI VAT I O N (lI2 - 1 ) The general c h aracteristics of emotion and motivation and thei r role i n determ i n i n g behav i o r. Lecture a n d laboratory sessions. (Lecture p a r t m a y be taken as a hal,f-course ) . Prereq u i site : Psychology 1 01 and 243. 420 PSYCHOLOGY OF P ER SONALITY A s u rvey of the app roaches to the study o f personality, cu rrent theories of


the d y n a m ics and the development of perso n a l i ty, research on the causes of i n d i v i d u a l d i fferences in personal ity, pers o n a l i ty chan ge and te c h n i q ues of meas u ri n g person ality. Prere q u i s ites: Psy c h o l o gy 1 01 and at least one full course in psychol ogy bey o n d the 200 level. 421 B EHAV I O R D I SORD ERS A study of the etiolo gy and treatment of behavi or d i sorders. Prereq uisite: Psycho logy 420 or conse n t of d e partmenl. 450 PSYC H O LOGI CAL TEST I N G A su rvey o f t h e f i e l d of standard ized tests. E m p h asis w i l l be g i ven t o meth­ ods of deve l o p ment, sta ndard i zation, the l i m i t a t i o n s , a n d interpretati ons o f tests. Prereq u i s i tes: Psychol ogy 2 4 3 o r a cou rse i n statistics, a n d one c o u rse in psycho l o gy beyo nd t h e 200 leve l . 4 6 0 THE EXPER I M ENTAL PSYCHOLOGY O F LEAR N I N G Ex peri m e n ta l studies a n d theories of learn i n g . Lecture a n d laboratory sess i o n s . Prere q u i s i te : A t l e a s t three fu l l c o u rses in psych o l ogy i n c l u d i n g 243. 481 STATI ST I CAL M ETHODS The use a n d i n terp re tation of elementary statistical techni ques; g ra p h i c repre­ sentat i o n ; measures of central tendency; si m p l e co rrelation analysis, s a m p l i n g theory, i n feren t i a l and non-parametric statistics. 490 H I STORY AND SYSTEMS I N PSYCHOLOGY A s e m i n a r i n the h istorical devel o p m e n t of psyc h o l ogy with spec i a l consi der­ ation of cu rren t trends. For majors in t h e i r f i n a l year or graduate students; others by consent o f department. 491 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY (V. - 1 ) These cred i ts are designed to p rovi de the s e n i o r or graduate student with an opportu n i ty to carry out, u n d e r superv i s i o n , a rea d i n g program or research project of spec i a l i n terest. P rere qu i s i te: Consent of the department. I I I 492 See 49 1 . 493 See 491 . 5 1 5 PSYC H O LOG I CA L ASSESSMENT The theory and practice of i n te l lectual and personality assessment. F o r the former part, tests such as the Stan ford-Bi net, the Wech s l e r Preschool and P r i m a ry Scale o f I n te l l i gence, the Wech s l e r I n te l l i gence Scale for C h i l d ren, and the Wechsler Ad u l t I n tell igence Scale will be studied ; for the latter, self­ report, tests such as the M M P I and p rojective methods. P rerequisite: Psychol­ ogy 450 and 420. 561 COUN SELI N G T H EO RY A course designed to acq u a i n t the student with theories and tech n i q ues of counsel i n g . P rereq uisite: Psycho logy 450. 570 PRACT I C U M IN C O U NS E L I N G AND TEST I N G Su pervised practice using t h e tec h n i q ues of eval u ation and counse l i n g . This


cou rse is not to be taken as p a rt of the reg u l a r master's p rog ram with a major i n psych o l o g y , u n l ess the student has c o m p l eted at least eleven cou rses c re d i ts in psy c h o l ogy, four of w h i c h are for g raduate cred it. Prerequisite: Psyc h o l o g y 450 and 56 1 . 577 S U P E R V I SED FI ELD WORK The student i s p laced i n a job situation to work under the s u pervision o f a qualified counselor or psychologist. Prerequisite: P racti c u m 570. 590 S E M I N A R : PSYCHOLOGY OF L EA R N I N G A sem i n a r i n p r i nci ples and a p p l i cations o f learning w i t h e m p h asis o n c u rrent deve l o p m e nts. Prerequ i s i tes: Th ree o r m o re c o u rses i n psychology above the 200 leve l , o r permission o f the department. 596 I N D E P E N D ENT R ESEARCH ( V4 - 1) S u p e rvised i n dependent study to cover i m po rt a n t areas of psy c h o l ogy w h i c h a re n o t otherw i se provided f o r . P re req u i s i te : C o n se n t o f t h e department. 597 See 596. 599 T H E S I S AND T H E S I S SEM I N A R The thesis p roblem w i l l be c h o sen f r o m t h e c a n d i d ate's major area o f con足 cent ration and must be a p p roved b y his g raduate c o m m i ttee. The candidate w i l l be expected to defend h i s thes is in a final o ral examination cond ucted by h i s c o m m i ttee. While registered for the thesis and unti l it i s c o m p leted, the student i s req u i red to attend the thesis seminar. I II S Interim courses offered in 1 9 7 1 :

304 306 307 310

T H E EXCEPTIONAL C H I LD T H E PSY C H O LOGY OF ECON O M I C C H A N G E ( EC O N / PSYC H ) WHO SHALL SURVIVE I N VOLVEM ENT I N A TH ERAPEUT I C C O M M U N ITY ( E D U CATI O N ! PSYC H O LOGY)

RELIGION Mr.

Govig,

Chairm an, M r . Christopherson, Mr. Eklund, M r . Knutson,

Mr. Petersen; assisted by Mr. Mathre and Mr. Mills

The department offers a curriculum designed to introduce the student to the phenomena of re l i g i o n with parti c u l a r emphasis upon the Judaeo-C h r i stian trad i 足 tions. Study of re l i g i on i s a part o f t h e General U n i versity R e q u i remen ts . Two courses are req ui red for g raduation for students enteri n g as freshmen or sopho足 m o res. R e l i g i o n 1 03 o r 203 s h a l l be taken before the end o f the s o p h o m o re year. The sec ond cou rse may be the other lower- d i v i s i o n c o u rse, an u p pe r d i vision cou rse, o r the se n i o r sem i n ar. Transfer students entering as j u n i o rs o r se n i o rs are req u i red to take one cou rse. R e l i g i o n 1 03 or 203 (or e q u i valents for t ransfer students) are the assumed preparat i o n f o r al l other cou rses i n re l i g i o n .


Major: 6 courses. Majors should plan the i r program early with faculty members of the department. C l osely related courses taught in other departments may be considered to apply toward the major in consu ltation with the staff. 1 03 J U DAEO-C H R I STIAN UFE AND THOUGHT ' A study o f B i b l i c a i . h i sto rical. and theological foundations with reference to contemporary rel i gious issues, 203 B I B L I CAL LITERAT U R E A study o f l i te rary. h i storical. and re l i g i o u s d i mensions o f t h e B i b l e i n c l uding perspective on contemporary religious problems. 325 C H R ISTIAN EDUCAT I O N Theological. psychological a n d phi losophical foundations for the educational m i n i stry o f the Church, and to meet the needs o f students who wish to relate the study of religion to the d i sciplines o f psychol ogy and education. Pre足 req uisite: Psych ology 1 0 1 . 327 A N C I EN T C H U R C H H I STORY The origins, thought and expansion o f the C h risti a n C h u rc h , rise of the Papacy, expansion i n Eu rope and growth of C h ristian i nvo l vement i n c u l t u re , to the end of t h e Papacy o f G regory I (604). I a/y 1 9 7 1 -72 328 M O D ERN C H U R C H H I STORY Beg i n n i ng w i t h the Peace of Westphalia ( 1 648), i n te raction o f the C h ristian faith with m odern p o l i t ics, science and p h i losophy, expansion in the world, modern movemen ts, 331 WORLD R E L I G I ONS H i story, beliefs and practices of living rel i g i ons of the worl d : H i n d u i s m , B u d d h i s m , C h i nese rel i g i o n , J u d a i s m , I slam , w i t h references to C h ri stiani ty. Lectures, class reports and d i scussions. I I I 34 1 A M E R I CAN C H U RC H ES A study of the deve l opment and trends of C h ristianity in the U n i ted States o f America, I 421 O L D TESTA M ENT STU D I ES Major areas of Old Testament i n q u i ry. such as Archaeology and the B i b l e . the Prophets, o r the W i sdom Li terature. Prerequisite: R e l i g i o n 2 0 3 o r i ts equivalent. 422 N EW TESTAM ENT STU D I ES Major areas of New Testament i nq u i ry , s u c h as the I ntertestamenta l , Synoptic, J o h a n n i n e, o r Pa U l i n e l i terature, P rereq u i site: Religion 203 o r its equivalent. 423 THE L I F E OF J ESUS A study o f the four gospels with e mphasis upon the l i fe and teachings o f Jesus and with a consid eration o f the l i terary a n d h i storical aspects of these writi ngs. 430 C H R ISTIAN T H O U G HT AND T H E M O D ERN CONSC I O U S N ESS A consi deration of pere n n i a l theological problems such as m a n . fai t h , world, h i story. God. C h rist, Spirit, C h u rc h . with a focus upon contemporary theology and its responses to recent u n derstan d i ngs of man and his world.


432 C H R I STIAN CLA S S I CS Read i n gs a n d d i scussion of great C h risti an l i terature-devoti o n , b i ograp h y, the­ o l ogy, poetry ; Au gu stine, Thomas a Kem pis, Dante, Luther, Calvi n , Pascal, Wes­ ley, Kierkegaard, and others; gro u p c o re p l u s sem i n a r repo rts, II a / y 1 972-73 436 C H R I STIAN ITY AND THE ARTS An i n vestigation of the relati onship between theology and contem porary trends in l i terature and the fine arts, 490 SEN I O R SEM I NAR A variety of subj ects s u c h as human sexuality, s c i e n ce and rel i g i o n , psyc ho l ogy a n d r e l i g i o n a re planned by the department o f rel i g i o n, together with other departments a n d schools o f the U n i versity, 491 , 492 I N DEPEN DENT STUDY Permission of the department is req u i red, I n t e r i m courses offered in 1 9 71 :

300 I N T E R I M I S RA E L 1 97 1 309 T H E NAVAJO RESERVATION (RELI S O C I O LOGY) 3 1 3 U N D ERSTA N D I N G S OF MAN

Reserve Officer Training Corps Program (Air Force) (Aerospace Studies)

Mr, Phillips, Mr, Hargrove, Mr, Mitchell Students enrol led at P a c i f i c Lutheran Un iversity who have been, selected for the Air Force ROTC Two-Year C o mm i ss i o n P rog ram, and transferees quali fied for entry i n to the Air Force ROTC Professional Offi cers Course may e n ro l l i n A i r Force ROTC Aerospace Stud ies courses a t t h e Un iversity o f Puget S o u n d , Appli­ cations for this program are normally accepted from sophomore students d u ri n g the Fa l l Semester p rece d i ng the expected d a t e o f e n t ry i n t o the P rofessional Offi­ cers Cou rse, Selection for the co u rse i s o n a competitive best-q u a l i fied basis, Pu rpose

The pu rpose of the A i r Force ROTC-Aerospace Studies Prog ram is to select a n d e d u c ate y o u n g c o l lege m e n a s futu re officers of the U , S , A i r Force, T h e p rog ram p repares pote n t i a l c a reer officers for m i l i tary service in the U, S, Ai r Force, Suc­ cessful comp letion of t h i s program leads to a c o m m ission as a seco n d l i eutenant i n the U. S . Air Force u p o n g raduation from Pacific Lutheran U n i versity. Curriculum

1)

The c u r r i c u l u m is di vided i n to two c o u rses : The s i x-week Field Trai n i n g Course, and the P rofessional Off i c e rs Cou rse. The six-week Field T ra i n i n g Course is c o n d u cted d u ri ng the s u m m e r o n l y at an Ai r F o rce Base. The Professional Officers C o u rse is a study of subjects related to development o f aerospace power, management o f Air Force resources, and m i l i tary service. Classes are condu cted four h o u rs per week each semester of the j u n i o r and sen i o r years


on the campus of the U n i versity of Puget Sou n d , Tacoma, Was h i n g to n . Suc足 cessful completion of the six-week Field Tra i n i nr; C o u rse is a prere q u i s i te to e n ro l l m e n t i n the P rofessional Officers C o u rse. 2) Two-year c o m m iss i o n i n g p rogram a. Summer befo re j u n i o r yea r : AS 3 2 5 Six-Week Field Tra i n i n g b . J u n i o r year (Professi o n a l Officers C o u rse) : AS 330 G rowth a n d Deve l o p m e n t of Aerospace Power AS 335 G rowth and Deve l o p m e n t of Aerospace Power Sen i o r year (P rofess i o n a l Offi cers C o u rse) : AS 430 A i r Force Lead e rs h i p a n d Management AS 435 A i r Force Leaders h i p a n d M a n agement

c o u rse c o u rse c o u rse c o u rse cou rse

Admissions and Procedures 1 ) Each student accepted i n to the P rofess i o n a l Offi cers C o u rse m u s t : a. Have satisfacto r i l y com p l e ted the prereq u i s i te field trai n i n g or general m i l i tary c o u rses. b. Have two acad e m i c years remai n i n g of either u n d ergraduate or g radu ate study. c . Successfu l l y com plete Air Force officer q u a l i fications testi ng a n d medical eva l u a t i o n . d . H a v e a g raduation date p r i o r t o reac h i n g 26V2 years of a g e i f q ua l i fied f o r f l i g h t trai n i n g o r 30 years o f a g e i f q u a l i fied for o t h e r than f l i g h t t ra i n i n g . e. E n l ist i n t h e A i r Force Reserve a n d ag ree t o attend a n d f a i t h f u l l y p u rsue the p rescri bed course of i nstructi o n .

2)

Students accepted i n t o t h e P rofess i o n a l Offi cers C o u rse receive $50.00 each month in n o n -taxa b l e s u bsistence a l l owance for the two years o f thei r t ra i n i n g .

3)

Students are furnished u n i fo rms a n d textbooks f o r Aerospace Studies Co u rses.

4) A free f l i g h t i nstruction program is ava i l a b l e for students q u a l i fied for p i l o t trai n i n g . T h i s tra i n i n g m a y lead t o FAA p r i vate p i l o t certi fi cati o n . 5) Add i ti on a l i n form ati on a b o u t t h e A i r Force ROTC-Aerospace Studies prog ram may be obtained b y w ri ti n g the Professor o f Aerospace Stud i es, U n i versity of Puget Soun d , Tacoma, Wash i n g to n 984 1 6 . Course Descriptions 325 FI ELD T RA I N I N G ( S U M M E R O N LY) (1 ) A six week t ra i n i n g p rogram condu cted at an A i r Force Base . C o u rse i n c l udes A i r Force officer orientation, A i r Force organ ization and function, m i l i tary tra i n i n g , and flying i ndoctrination. This course i s a prereq u i site for entry i n to PrOfess i o n a l Officer Cou rses (300 and 400 series).

330, 335 G R OWTH A N D D EVELOPMENT O F AE ROSPACE POWER ( 1 , 1 ) A s u rvey course concern i n g the deve l opment o f a i rpower, em ployment concepts of ai rpower, a n d the f u t u re o f m a n n e d ai rcraft. C o u rse i n c l udes the study of astro n a u t i cs, space operations, and operating p r i n c i p l es a n d c h a racteristics o f space veh i c l es. Cou rse a lso i n c l udes development a n d exec ution o f t r a i n i n g activities f o r the cadet corps. ( I , I I )


430, 435 A I R FORCE L EA D E RSH I P A N D MANAGEMENT ( 1 , 1 ) A s t udy o f pro fess i o n a l i s m , leadersh i p a n d m a nagement at the j u ni o r officer level in the U.S. Air Force. Cadets in this c o u rse p l a n , organize, d i rect, and control the m i l i tary training program of the Cadet C o rps. I , I I

SOCI OLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY, A N D SOCIAL WELFARE Mr. Sch iller, Chairm a n , (and Chairman, Division

of

S o ci a l Sciences),

Mr. W. Gilbertson, Mr. Hanson, Mr. Jobst, Mr. Menzel, Mr. N. Nelson, ivir. Oberholtzer, Mr. Walter; assisted by Mr. Adams, Mr. Griggs, Mr. Johns and Mr. Winklebleck

The department offers a major in Sociology and h o uses c o u rses in two other a reas: A n t h ropology and Soc i a l Welfare. A m aj o r i n the department of So c i o l ogy, Anth ropology and Soc i a l Welfare p rovides backgro u n d for ac ti vities i n the follow­ i n g fields : ( 1 ) advan ced research and teac h i ng i n soci o l o g y ; (2) social work, welfare adm i n i strat i o n , n u rs i n g , c o m m u n ity organization and c o m m u n ity p l a n n i n g ; ( 3 ) the m i n i stry, p a r i s h w o r k and related re ligi ous activities; ( 4 ) t h e tea c h i n g o f s o c i a l stud ies; ( 5 ) crimino logy, probation and p a r o l e , corrections, m i n o rity rela­ tions, i n te rnati o n a l re lationships, p u b l i c admi nistratio n , law and grour leaders h i p ; (6) a n d other fields concerned w i th p l u ra l relati onships. Sociology

Sociology studies the development, o rg a n i zation and behav i o r o f h u m an g ro u p s . I t seeks to understand and explai n the u n i fo r m i ties and processes of social behavior a n d the nature and relati o n sh i p o f g ro u ps a n d i n stitutions; to help stu­ d e n ts u n de rstand thei r own and other c u l t u res; to s ti m u l ate c ri t i c a l and const ruc­ tive attitudes toward soc i a l change ; and to provide a sound basis fo r i n te l l i ge n t c i tizensh i p . C R I M I N A L J U ST I C E C O U R S ES The d e p a rtment a lso offers g raduate cou rses related spec i f i c a l ly to the field o f c o r recti ons and l aw e n fo rcement The sequence of c o u rses i n C r i m i n a l J ustice i n c l udes: Se m i n ar i n the C r i m i n a l Justice System (5g0a), Seminar i n C o rrections (590b) , Sem i n a r in Probation and Parole (590c), G ro u p Process (590d), a n d S e m i n a r i n Sociological Theory and the Criminal J ustice System (590e). I ndepend­ dent studies a re also avai l ab l e . Supportive cou rses i n sociology and other fields s h o u l d be c h osen in consu ltati on with faculty m e m bers. Anthropology

C o u rses i n A n t h ro p o l ogy are designed to fam i l i a rize the student with the evolu­ tion of man, the p re h istoric deve l o p m e n t o f c u l t u re, and the patte rn s of c u l t u ra l b e h a v i o r i n contem porary native and fo l k societies. Offerings i n c l u de : C u l tu r a l A n t h ro po l ogy (231 ) , P h y s i c a l Anth ro pology (242), t: t h n o l ogy o f A m e r i c a n I n d i an s (34 1 ) . Eth n o l ogy o f A f r i c a (352 ) . a n d o pp o r t u n i ties for sem i n a rs and i n dependent s t u d i es .


Social Welfare

The department holds co nsti tuent m e m bership in the C o u n c i l on Social W o rk Ed ucati o n , which i n d i cates The C o u n c i l 's a p p roval of the d e partment's p rogram. Students p l a n n i ng t o p u rsue g rad uate study o r to seek e m p loyment i n social work o r other related h u man services upon the c o m p letion of the baccalau reate deg ree s h o u l d work out the i r p rog ram in consu ltation with a social worker in the department. The social work sequence i s open to any student. Maj o rs in sociol ogy, psy足 c h o logy, o r p o l i ti c a 'i science are most appropri ate. Tlhe soc i a l work seq uence consists o f I n troduction to Social Work (271 ) , Social I n terve n t i o n (365) , Sociology o f Social Wel fare (463), Social Work P ractice (472) , F i e l d Experience (475, 476). I nterviewing (473) and i n dependent studies are a l so offered b u t are not a req u i red part of the sequence. BAC H E LOR OF ARTS IN EDUCAT I O N major req u i rements are l i sted below. Can足 d i dates for t h i s deg ree m ust a lso meet special req u i rements described i n the School of Ed ucation sect ion i n this catalog. Senior High School Preparation: 1 1 courses

Tea c h i n g Maj o r : 7 c o u rses Required: Soc i o l ogy 1 1 1 , 423, 494, and four e lecti ves i n soc iology; and f o u r cou rses d i s t r i b uted o v e r t h ree areas o f the other s o c i a l sciences. BAC H E LOR O F ARTS MAJ O R : Major: A m i n i m u m o f 7 courses, i n c l u d i n g Socio logy 1 1 1 , 423 a n d 494. The remai n i ng 4 c o u rses s h o u l d be ch osen in consultation with the department. C o u rses i n a n t h ropology and social work, though ho used i n the department, d o n o t count toward a major i n soc i o l ogy u n less oth erwise stated i n the i n d i v i d u a l cou rse des c ri ptions. U n l ess otherwise state d , 1 1 1 (or perm i ssion o f the i nstructor) i s a p re req u i s i te for a l l cou rses w i t h i n the department. Cou rses are open to c h a l lenge by examination. Sociology

1 1 1 SO C I OLOGY An i n q u i ry i n to the basic p r i n c i ples for understan d i n g social re lati o n s h i ps. T h i s cou rse i s designed to acquaint the student with the basic processes and structures existing i n h u man relati o n sh i ps . I, I I 2 1 1 G R O U P BEHAV I O R Study o f t h e effects o f social i n teraction u pon individ ual behavior; c o l lective attitudes and behavi o r as p rod ucts o f g ro u p experi e n ce ; analysis of fashion, fads, crowds, mobs, p u blics, social movements; the signi ficance of social control i n society and the various methods used by i n d i vi d uals a n d g roups t o control others. N o p rerequisite. I 325 M I NO R IT I ES The h i s tory and c u l t u re of m i no ri ty g r o u ps in American society are examined within the context o f the i n terac tion between m i n o ri ty-majority g ro u p s and population com position and movem ent o f those groups. I I


328 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR The process o f deviance and social control wi l l be exami ned w i th attention being g i ven to specific forms o f youth and adult behavi or such as juveni l e delinque ncy, w h i te-collar cri me, d r u g addict i o n , h omosex uality , mental i l l ness, and abortion. I I 422 SOC I A L I N ST IT UT I ONS An analysis o f the o rigins and development o f major institutions (economic, edu cational, fam i l i a l , p o l i tical and re ligious); a n i n vestigation o f i n st i tutional change both evolutionary and revolutionary. I I 423 SOC I O LO G I C A L THOUGHT The development o f sociological thought from C omte to the present. 425 THE FAM I LY A conceptual analysis of the family as an i nstitution. Cross-cu l t u ral exam i n 足 ation o f family l i fe, historical treatment o f the Western family and a con足 te m p o rary analysis o f the American fam i ly as a social system in its develop足 merltal stages and in its relatiorl s h i p to other i n stituti ons form the matrix of analysis. I 432 C O M M U N ITY AND STRAT I F I CAT I O N A s t u d y 0 1 ru ral-urban i n terperletrat iorl t h ro u g h an exami natiorl of systems o f s o c i a l ran k i rlg, theories of strati ficat i o rl , power, prestige, c ulture and styles of l i fe of various social classes; social mobil ity and its consequences for social structure . I I 481 STATI STICAL M ETHODS See Psychology 481 . N o p rereq u i si te. I , " 490 SEM I NAR (% - 1 ) P rereq u isite: Permissiorl of the department. 491 I N D EP E N D ENT STUDY ( 1/4 - 1 ) P re re q u i s i t e : Perm ission of the departme n t . 494 R ESEARCH M ETHODS An i n t roduction to SOCiological research methods. Type of research and the i r basic methodology are examined and i l l u strated . I I 590 G RADUATE S E M I N A R ( V. - 1 ) Prereq u isite: Permission o f the department. 595 G RADUATE REA D I N G S Prereq uisite : Permission o f t h e department. 597 G RA D UATE RESEARCH Spec i f i c research is c h oserl with the app roval o f the student's g raduate c o m m i ttee. P rereq u i s i t e : P e r m i ssion of the department.


Anthropology

231 C U LT U R A L A N T H R O PO LOGY An i n trod u c t i o n to the f i e l d o f c u l t u ral anth ropology. The pre h i storic deve l o p ­ m e n t o f c u l t u re. A com p a rative s t u d y of contemporary s m a l l -scale societies. Desc r i b i n g , i n terpreti ng and exp lai n i n g h u m an behavi o r with reference to envi ronmental sett i n g , c u l t u ra l trad i t i o n s a n d outside ( n o n -trad i t i o n a l ) i n f l u ­ e n ces. May be a p p l ied toward socio l ogy major req u i rements. No p re req u i s i t e . I 242 P H Y S I CA L ANTHROPOLOGY Human biology i n evolutionary perspective. Topics of discussion i n c l ude evolutionary theory, the fossil evidence o f human deve lopment, the living non-h u man pri mates, and the present-day h u m an as a biological creature. N o prerequ isite. I I 341 ET H N OLOGY O F A M E R I CAN I N D I ANS A com parative study o f American I n d i an c u l t u res at the time of E u ropean c o n tact. The effects of w h i te contact upon trad i ti o n a l American I nd i an c u l t u res. The posi t i o n o f I n d i a n s i n contemporary N o rth America. P rereq u i s i t e : 231 or permission of i n structor. I 352 ETHNOLOGY OF AF R I CA The peoples of Africa south of the Sahara. An ana lysis of native African c u l t u re areas. The position of traditional c u l l u res in the modern world. P re­ req uisi te : 231 o r permission of i n structor. I I 490 S E M I NAR ( V4 - 1 ) Prereq u i s i te : Permission of the department. 491 I N D E P E N D ENT ST U DY ( V4 - 1 ) P re req u i s i te : Permission of the department. Social Welfare

2 7 1 I NT R O D U C T I O N TO SOC IAL W O R K A su rvey of p ractice methods, p h i l os o p h i c a l roots, deve l o p m e ntal h i story, and "setti n g s , " i . e . , adoptions, p u b l i c schools, ,p u b l i c assistance, co rrec tions, psych iatric h osp i tals and c l i n i cs , etc. of p rofess i o n a l social work. O p p o r­ t u n i ties w i l l be p rovided t h ro u g h o u t the semeste r for o bservati o n a l experi­ en ces i n var i o u s age n c i es and i nstitutions i n which social workers p ractice. N o p rereq u is i te . I I I 365 SOC I AL I N T ERVENTION A su rvey of the p rocesses of social change, i n c l ud i n g an examination of social c o n d i t i o n s which c reate the need for i n te rve n t i o n , t h e dyn amics of change i n i n d i v i d u a l s and g ro u ps , the function o f social m ovements i n effect­ i n g c h ange, and i n terve n t i o n methods, tactics and strateg ies. May be a p p l i ed toward s o c i o l ogy major req u i re m e n ts . I I I


463 SOC I O LOGY OF SOCIAL WELFA R E T h e history o f h o w societies have defined social a n d personal needs and have sought solutions is p resented. Conc epts of culture and social i nstitutions form the basis of theoretical anal ysis. A m o re i n tensive analysis of contem po足 rary wel fare stru c t u res is provided. May be a p p l i e d toward sociolo gy major req u i rements. I 472 S O C I A L WORK PRACT I C E An understan d i n g and appreciation o f t h e p rofession o f s o c i a l work w i th i n the g ro u p o f h e l p i n g p rofessions a n d t h e general f i e l d o f social wel fare i s p rovided. T h e knowledge base, p r i n c i ple s, methods, and values generic to social work p ractice will be prese nted. Parti ci pant observation of problem足 solving stru ctures and p rocesses w i l l be p rovi ded. Prereq u i s i tes : 271 and permission of i nstructor. I I 473 I N T E R V I EW I N G ( V2 ) A cou rse designed to acquai n t students with the con cepts, p r i n c i p les, and tec h n i q ues i n t r i n s i c to su ccessful i n terview i n g ; " h e l p i n g , " proble m-so l v i n g , o r " c l i n i c a l " i n n a t u re. Desi gned p ri m a r i l y for persons i n o r planning to enter one of the h e l p i n g professions-social work/social w e l fare, clergy, n u rs i n g , phys i c i ans, p a r i s h workers, perso n n e l officers, e t c . O p e n t o j u n iors a n d se n i o rs on ly. N o p re requ isite . 4 7 5 , 4 7 6 F I ELD EX P E R I EN C E Students a r e given an o p p o r t u n i ty t o f u n c ti o n , w i th adeq uate superv i s i o n , w i th i n an agency o r i n stituti o n . D u r i n g a structured f i e l d experience, students w i l l i n tegrate and apply knowledge, theory and understan d i n g from c o n te n t areas i n t h e i r f o u n d a tion cou rses a n d the soci al w o r k sequen ce, a n d deve l o p s o m e o f the tech niqu es a n d s k i l l s c o m m o n t o practice i n t h e social wel fare fie l d . Prerequisite : Perm i ssion of i n structor. I I I 491 I N D E P EN DENT STU D Y ( V4 1 ) Prereq u i s i te : Permission of the depart m e n t . -

Interim cou rses offered in 1 971 :

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THE H U M AN SERVICES P R I M ATE SOCIAL BEHA V I O R THE NAVAJO RESERVAT I O N ( R E L I G I O N / SOC) H U MAN RELAT I O N S WORKSHOP (EDUC/ SOC) C O R R E CT I O N AND REHAB I L ITAT I O N P R EPARAT I O N F O R MARRIAGE


The Reg ister The Board of Regents

EX-O F F I C I O : Represents Dr, C l a rence Solberg, 2007 T h i rd Ave" Seattle, Was h , 981 2 1 _ALC D r . A, G, Fje l l man, 551 9 P h i n n ey Ave, N" Seattle, Was h , 981 03 . _ _ _LCA Dr. Eugene Wie gman, P a c i f i c Lut�eran Un iversity, Tacoma, Wash, 98447____ PLU TERM E X P I R ES 1 97 1 : M rs, Alfred A u s , 500 S.w, Fifth Ave., Po rtl and, Oregon 97204_ _ _ __ _ A l u m n i Rev, Theodore p , Br ueckner, 2 0 0 7 T h i rd Ave., Seattle, Was h . 981 2 L ____ _ A LC M r , J o h n R. Busta d , 1 020 R i ve rside D r., MI. Verno n , Wash. 98273 _ __ ____ LCA ___ __ ALC Mr. Cheste r Hansen, 1 25 N i e m i Road, Longvi ew, Wash, 98632 Rev. G l e n n H u sby, 8 1 2 N orth Fifth, Coeur D'Alene, I d a h o 8381 4 __ _ _ _ ALC Mr. N o r man Lo rentzsen, 675 I vy Falls C o u rt, SI. Pau ll , M i n n , 551 1 8 _ Regent-at-large ALC D r . Eric P a u l so n , S. 371 2 Gandy, Spokane, Was h . 99203 _ _ ____ __ LCA M r . Conrad Peterso n , 31 1 0 Olympic B l vd, West, Tacoma, Was h . 98466 M r , Gerald E. S c h i m ke , 2247 Prescott Ave nue S.w., Seattle, Was h . 981 26 _ALC _

TERM EXP I R E S 1 9 72 : D r , Carl Ben nett, 3 1 1 5 W. Canal D rive, Ke n n ewi c k , Wash . 99336 _ _ ____ A L C Dr. K e n n e t h Eri ckson, 1 9 75 P o t t e r , Eugene, O regon 97403 LCA M r. Ga lven I rby, 6025 N .E . Garfield Ave., Portlan d , O regon 9721 1 ___ _ALC Mr. Melv i n Knudso n , 6928-1 00th SI. S.w., Tacoma, Was h . 98499 . ______ ALC Mr. Vi ctor Kn utzen, 2649 South 304th, Fede ral Way, Wash. 98002 .Alumni Rev. P h i l i p Natw i c k , 1 857 Potter, Eugene, O regon 97403_ __ ALC _____ M r. John Ne lson, 2227 West Raye Street, Seattle, Wash. 981 99 ___ __ _ LCA M r . Howard Scott, 1 1 61 1 Wood bine Lane S.W., Tacoma, Was h , 98499 ____ Regent-at-Iarge ALC Rev. E, Duane T o l lefson, 1 5 01 Jefferson, Wenatchee, Was h . 9880L _

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TERM EXP I R ES 1 97 3 : M r . T h o m as W. An derson, 7525 Hegra R d " Tacoma, Wash . 98465Vice Chairman _ _ __ Regent-at-Iarge D r. P a u l B o n d o , 1 1 723 E, B i n g ham Ave" Tacoma, Wash. 98446 ___ ALC Mr. Good wi n C h ase, P . O . Box 1 9 97, Taco ma, Wash . 98401 _ Regent-at-Iarge M r. D o n a l d C o rnel l , 1 0 1 9 E. 9th Street, Port Angeles, Wash. 98362Secretary _ _ __ ALC ___ _ _ M r , M i c hael Dederer, 1 008 Western Avenue, Seattle, Wash , 981 04Chairman ____ _ ___ Regent-at-Iarge LCA Mr, Ronald E, D o u g l ass, 1 2 1 2 F Street S.E" A u b u r n , Wash. 98002 Rev. Fran k L . Eri ckse n , P . O , Box 1 1 0, Issaq u a h , Was h . 98027 __ _____ ALC M r. Carl T, Fyn boe, 1 1 0 23 G rave l l y Lake Dr. S.w., Tacoma, Wash . 98499 A l u m n i Mrs. Jesse E , He rbert, 3924 N , E . 34th Avenue, P o rt l a n d , O regon 972 1 2 ___ _ ALC D r . Jesse P f l ueger, 608 West Divisi o n , E p h rata, Was h , 98823 __ _ ____ ALC D r . Alfred Stone, 1 604 N , E. 50th, Seattle, Wash. 981 05 _ _ _ LCA Facu lty Representative to the Board : W, p, G i d d i ngs; Alte r n ate-J , A. S c h i l l e r Student R e p resentative to the B oard : B i l l Ch ristense n ; Altern ate-Tom G u m prech t _

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ADVI SORY: C H AI RMAN, C O M M ITTEE ON H I G H E R EDUC ATION Rev. P . Ivar Pihl, 435 N .W. 2 1 st, Corva l l i s , O regon 97330 Rev. Walton F. Berton, 255 Maxwe l l Road, Eugene, Oreg o n 97402

LCA ALC

ADVI SORY: BOARDS O F CO LLEG E E D U CAT I O N M r . N o rman F i n te l , Exec. D i r . , 4 2 2 S. Fi fth St., M i n n eapolis, M i n n . 554 1 5 D r . Louis T. A l m e n , Exec. Sec ., 231 M a d i son Ave . , New York, N . Y. 1 0 001 6

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Church Officials

American Lutheran Church General Dr. Kent S. Kn utson, Presi dent, 422 S. Fifth St., M in n e a p o l i s , M i n n . 554 1 5 Rev. David W . P re u s , Vi ce-Pres i d ent, 422 S . Fifth S t . , Mi nneapol is, M i n n . 554 1 5 Mr. N. B u rdette Nelson, Treas u rer, 4 2 2 S . Fifth St., M i n neapolis, M i n n . 554 1 5 M r . Arnold Mi cke lson , Secretary, 4 2 2 S . Fifth St., M i n neapo l i s , M i n n . 554 1 5 North Pacific District

Dr. C l a rence Sol b e rg, Presi d e n t ( B i s h o p ) , 2007 T h i rd Ave . , Seattle, W a s h . 98 1 2 1 Rev. Theo. P. B rueckner, Executive Assistant t o the D i strict Pres i d e n t (Bishop) , 2007 T h i rd Ave n u e , Seattle, Washi ngton 981 2 1 D r. L . V . R i eke, C h u rch C o u n c i l Representative, 5525 60th Ave n ue N . E . , Seatt le, Washin gton 98105 Board ot College Education

M r . C h a rles B r u n i n g, 2500 Seabury Ave ., M i nn eapolis, M i n n . Rev. Marcus G ravd al, 2525 S . Mai n , Sioux F a l l s , S. Oak. D r. Leo n a rd Haas, 1 23 Rooseve lt Ave . , Eau Claire, W i s. Rev. H a rold B. Ki l d a h l , 5 1 5 Walders St., M i n o t , N . D. Rev. Roald A. Kindem, 918 Garfi e l d , A l be rt Lea , M i n n . M r . P a u l C. Larse n , 8 1 3 2 n d Ave. W . , D i c k i n s o n , N . D. Rev. John N . Parbst, 3741 1 7th Ave. S . , M i n n eapolis, M i n n . M r . Edward A . Sagebi e l , Seg u i n , Tex. Rev. Erling H . Wold, 723 Reeves Dr., Grand Forks, N. D. Lutheran Church in America, Pacific North west Synod

Dr. A. G. F j e l l rna n , Pres i d e n t , 5 5 1 9 P h i nney Ave. N o . , Seattle, Was h . 98103 Mr. Gordon J. Storaas l i , Ass i stant to the President, 55 1 9 P h i nney Ave . N o . , Seattle, Wash. 981 03 The Pacific N o rthwest Synod of the Lutheran C h u rc h i n America has accepted Pacific Lutheran U ni v e rs i ty as o n e of the i n s t i tutions of h i g h e r ed ucation w h i c h it endorses and su pports. T h e S y n o d h as re p rese ntation on the Univers i ty's Board o f Regents, but does not share owners h i p o f the i n stituti o n . Represe nting Boards 0 1 Co l lege Education

Mr. N o rman Fi n te l , Executive D i rector, Board of Col lege Education, The American Lutheran Ch urch Dr. Louis T. A l m e n , Executive Secretary, Board of Col lege Education and C h u rc h Vocations, Lutheran C h u rc h i n America


Alumni Board

D r. J. Ray m o n d Tobiason, J r. '51 , P u y a l l u p , Washi ngton ( 1 972) D r. Roy V i ra k '52, Tacoma ( 1 973) Second Vice President, Betty R i ggers Keith '53, Seattle, Washi ngton ( 1 973) Secretary-Treasurer and Director of Alumni Relations, Vaca n t President,

First Vice President,

T E R M EXP I R ES SEPT . , 1 971 D u a n e Berentson '51 B u rl i ngton, Was h i ngton D r. Ronald Lerch '61 Kennewick, Wash i n gton Suzie S k u b i n n a Nelson '55 Tacoma, Wash i ngton Malcolm L. S o i n e '52 Tacoma, Washi ngton TERM EXP I R ES SEPT . , 1 972 Rev. P h i l i p Fa l k '50 Reardan, Wash i n gton C u rtis H ov l a n d '57 Seatt l e , Was h i ngton Rev. Robert Ke l l e r '55 O l y m p i a , Was h i n g to n

T E R M EXP I R ES SEPT., 1 973 Je rry Dodgen '64 Modesto, C a l i fo r n i a C h u c k G e l d a k e r '58 West L i n n , O regon

TERM EXP I R ES SEPT., 1 974 Robe rt E . J o h nson �3 P l easant H i l l , C a l i fo r n i a R e v . Wi l l iam H . Ray '59 B u rn aby, B r i t i s h C o l u m b i a Dean W. Sandvi k '65 Denver C o l o rado Ed roy W o l d seth '47 Tacoma, Wash i ngton

R E P R ES ENTAT I V ES TO THE U N I V ERS ITY BOARD O F R E G ENTS Esther Aus '32, Portlan d , O regon ( 1 97 1 ) Ex Offi c i o V i c t o r F . Kn utzen '36, Fed e ra l Way, Wash i n gton ( 1 972) J o h n M c Laug h l i n ' 7 1 Carl T . Fyn boe '49, Tacoma, Wash i n gton (1 973) Student R e p resentative M E M B E R -AT-LA R G E D r. M. Roy Sc hwarz '58 D r. D a v i d T . Nesvig ' 5 7 , LaMesa, C a l i fo r n i a Seatt l e , Wash i n gton P resi dent, S a n D i ego C h a p t e r ( 1 97 1 ) Past P resi d e n t ( 1 97 1 )

Ad ministrative and Other Officers - 1 970-71 Office of the President

P resi dent Assistant to the P resident for C h u rc h Relations Ad i m l n i strative Assistant A l u m n i D i rector Coo rd i nator for M i n o ri ty Students D i rector of Ath letics News B u reau C h i e f Photographer P ress Secretary to the P resident

Eugene W. Wiegman _ Mi lton L. Nesvig _ Luci l l e G . G i ro u x Vacant Lawrence G ri g gs David M. Olson _ _ J ames Peterson Ken neth D u n m i re Roger G russ

Office of the Provost

P rovost _ A d m i n i strative Assistant

R i c h ard J u n g ku n t z __ �Sue C l arke

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Dean o f G raduate and Summer Studies_ Col lege of Arts and Sciences C h a i rman, Division of Human i t i es__ _____ C h a i rm a n , D i vision of Natu ral Sciences C h ai rman, Division of Social Sc;iences Dean o f the School of Busi ness Ad m i n i stration Dean of the School of Education__ Di rector, Te acher Corps P l acement Di rector and Fifth Year Coordinator D i rector, School of Fine Arts_ ______________ Director, School of Nu rsi ng ___ __ D i rector, School of Physical Education .. A d m i n i strative Assistant _ _

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_ Paul M. Reigstad W i l l iam P. G i d d i n gs Joh annes A . Sc h i ller _G u n d a r J . King Kenneth A. Johnston .. A rne K. Pederson _John S . Hanson R i c hard D. Moe Doris G . Stucke David M. O lson James K i tt i lsby

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D i recto r of Admissions James Van Beek Associate D i rector of Admissions and Financial Aids Officer _ _ Ronald C. Coltom Assistant D i rector of A d m issions_ A l bert W . Perry Adm issions Counselor _ ____________ _ _ Bruce A lexa nder Anthony L. Liste r Admissi ons Cou nselor D i rector of B roadcast Services and I nstructional Materi als Production Judd C. Doug hty Radio/TV Engineer David Ch ristian Victor Nelson Stud io Operations Su pervisor _ __ _______ __ __ Robert K. Menzel D i rector of C H O I C E __ _ Frank H . Haley L i b rarian _______ ____ M i riam Beckman Reference L i b rarian __ Reg istrar ____ Charles T. Nelson Assistant Registrar__ Loleta G. Espeseth Office of Business and Finance Vice President-Business and Finance A. Dean Buc hanan Chief Accountant Betty Gju rash __________ Howard L. Vedell Busi ness Manager Plant Manager ____ James B. P h i l l i p s Dwig h t Zulauf D i rector of Data Processing __ ____ _____ O perations Manager__ _ N o rman Nesting _

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Office of Development Vice President for Deve l o p m e nL_ Director of Deve l o p m en t . Director of Estate Planning Office of Student Affairs Vice President-Student Affairs _ Dean of Men Dean of Women___ D i rector of Counse l i n g and Testing Center Counselor

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D i rector, Health Center _______ D i rector of Housing ______ D i rector of U n i ve rsity Center __ _ Bookstore Manager___ __ D i rector of Food Service _ _ ____ Assistant Dietician U n i v e rsity M i n ister___ _ __ ___

_

_. _

_

_

_ ___

___

_

_

_

G ladys Bergum ______ Leig h t and J o h nson Marvin Swenson _ __ Doris McCa rty Robert M. Torrens M a ry Hegtvedt _D o n a l d W. Tay l o r __ _ _ _ _ _ _

_

_

_

__

Faculty' - 1 970-71

E U G E N E W. W I E G M A N , 1 969President B . S . , C o n c o rd i a C o l l ege, River Forest, I I I . , 1 953 ; M .S., E d . D . , U n i versity o f Kansas, 1 9 56, 1 9 62. KEITH A C H EPOHL, 1 969Artist-in-Residence, Assistant Professor of Arr B.A., Knox C o l l ege, 1 956 ; M . F.A., U n iversity of I owa, 1 960. S E I I C H I ADA C H I , 1 967Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education, Director of Counseling and Testing Center B . A . , Jamestown C o l l ege, 1 946; B . D . , M c C o rm i c k Sem i n a ry , 1 95 1 ; M.A., Ed.D., Teach e rs C o l l ege, Columbia U n i ve rsity, 1 957, 1 960. HARRY S. ADAMS, 1 947-51 , 1 962Associate Professor of Physics B . S . , M. S" Kansas State U n i versity, 1 945, 1 947; P h . D . , U n i v e rs i ty of M i nn e足 sota, 1 962. tCHAR LES DEAN A N D E R S O N , 1 959Professor of Chemistry B .A . , St. O l af C o l lege, 1 95 2 ; A . M . , P h . D . , Harvard Un ivers i ty, 1 954 , 1 959. G EO R G E EVA N S A R BA U G H , 1 959Professor of Philosophy B .A., Augusta na Col lege ( R o c k I s l a n d ) , 1 95 5 ; M.A., P h . D . , Un ivers i ty of I owa 1 958, 1 959.

,

KEN N ETH EDWA R D BAT K E R , 1 966Assistant Professor of Mathematics B .A., Wartb u rg C o l l ege, 1 957; M .A . , U n i versity of C o l o rado, 1 961 ; further g radu足 ate study, U n i versity of Oreg o n and U n i versity o f C o l o rad o . tDA N I E L R . BATY, 1 968Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Accounting & Business Law) B.A., Un iversity o f Was h i ng t o n , 1 96 5 ; J . D . , H a rvard U n i versity, 1 96 8 ; C . P . A . , State of Was h i n g t o n . f O n leave, 1970-71 . ' D ate after name i n d i cates beg i n n i n g 01 term of servi ce.


MYRA J. B A U G H M A N , 1 970Assistant Professor of Education

B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i ve rsity, 1 96 2 ; M . E d . , Western Was h i ngton State Col lege. 1 969. P H I L I P E. BEAL, 1 968Assistant Professor of Education, Dean of Men

A . B . , Corne l l U n i versity, 1 957; M.A., N o rthwestern U n i versity, 1 96 1 ; P h . D . , U n i 足 versity o f O regon, 1 965. ART H U R W. BEARSE, 1 97 1 Instructor i n Business Administration

A . B . , H a rvard U n i versi ty, 1 959; M . B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n iversity, 1 97 1 . P A U L F . B ENTON, 1 969Assistant Professor of English

B.A., Whi tworth Col lege, 1 965 ; P h .D . , P r i n ceton U n i versity, 1 970. LO I S M . B E R G E R S O N , 1 970Assistant Professor of Nursing

B . S . N . , Loyo l a U n i versi ty, 1 946; M . N . , U n i versity of Was h i n gt o n , 1 952. W. HAROLD B EXTO N , 1 965Professor of Psychology

B.A., Mc Master U n iversi ty, 1 935; M .A . , U n i versity o f Sas katchewan, 1 950; P h . D . . McGi l l U n i ve rsi ty, 1 953. GRACE ELEANOR B L O M Q U IST, 1 939Associate Professor of English

B.A., Concord i a College (Moorhead, M i n n . ) , 1 934; M A , Syracuse U n i versity, 1 939 ; further graduate study, U n i ve rs i ty of M i nnesota, Goethe Un iversity. G LEN N L. BLUBA U G H , 1 969Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages (German)

B .A " Wash i n gton State U n i versity, 1 9 53; M.A., U n i ve rsity o f Con necticut, 1 963. RANDOLPH F. BOHAN N O N , 1 969Assistant Professor of Biology

BA, SI. O l a f C o l l ege, 1 965; P h . D . , P u rdue U n iversity, 1 969. JAMES E . B R I N K, 1 970Assistant Professor of Mathematics

A . B . , Hope C o l lege, 1 96 5 ; M.S., P h . D . , towa State Un ivers i ty , 1 967, 1 9 70. t H ER MAN JOSEPH BROEKER, 1 966Assistant Professor of Physical Education

B.A., M .S., Wash i ngton State U n iversity, 1 965, 1 967. G . R I CHARD CAPP, 1 970Assistant Professor of Communication Arts

B.A., M.A., Baylor U n i versity, 1 966, 1 967. fOn feave, 1970-71 .


SAMUEL B. B. CARLETO N ,

1 969-

Instructor in Foreign Languages (Greek)

B.A., U n i versity of the South, 1 959 ; M . A . , Johns Hopkins University, g raduate study, U n i versity o f Texas. ROY E . CARLSON,

1 96 1 ;

further

1 96 2 -

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, C o a c h of Football and Wrestling

B.S., U n iversity of Was h i n gton , GARY A . CHASE,

1 94 8 ;

M.S., Was h i n g to n State U n iversity,

1 962.

1 970-

Assistant Professor of Physicaf Education

B.S., M.S., Was h i ngton State U n iversity, t KENNETH E U G E N E C H R ISTO P H ERSON ,

1 962, 1 964. 1 958-

Assistant Professor of Religion

B.A., Aug ustana Col lege, 1 94 6 ; B.Th . , L u th e r Theological Se minary, a t e study, U n iversity o f Oslo, U n iversity o f M i n nesota. GARY L. COATS,

1 95 0 ;

g ra d u 足

1 965 ;

further

1 968-

Instructor in Mathematics

B .S., P o rt land State Col lege, 1 963; M .A . , U n i versity o f New Mexico, g raduate study, U n iversity of New Mexico. FRA N K B. C O L L I N G E ,

1 97 1 -

Associate Professor o f Political Science

B.A., M .A . , U n iversity of Cal i fo rn i a ,

1 959, 1 96 0 ;

P h . D . , U n i versity of Was h i ngton,

1 964.

DO ROTHY TOLLEFSON C O N E ,

1 96 1 -

Assistant Professor o f Nursing

B . S . N . , M . E d . , U n iversity of M i n n esota, MARGARET M . COUTU,

1 956, 1 959.

1 969-

Instructor in Nursing

B.S., Col lege of G reat Falls, I R E N E 0 , C R ESO ,

M . E d . , C o l o rado State U n i ve rsi ty,

1 96 1 ;

1 966.

1 955-56, 1 968-

Associate Professor of Biology

B.S., M .S., U n i versity of Puget Sound, LOW E L L WATSON C U LV E R ,

1 94 2 , 1 94 7 .

1 964-

Associate Professor of Political Science

B.A., San Diego State C o l l ege, 1 95 4 ; M . A . , U n i ve rsity of C a l i fornia, U n iversity of Southern C a l i fo r n i a , 1 967. DAV I D P . DAHL,

1 95 7 ;

Ph.D.,

1 969-

Assistant Professor of Music

B.A., PaCi fic Luthera n U n i ve rsity, CAR R O L ELVIN DEBOWER,

1 96 0 ;

M.A., U n iversity of Washington,

1 96 2 .

1 964-1968; 1 970-

Associate Professor of Education

B.S., M i d land C o l lege, tOn leave,

1 970-71.

1 95 2 ;

M . Ed . , Ed.D., U n i versity of Nebraska,

1 959, 1 964.


J U D D C. DOUG HTY,

1 962-

Assistant Professor of Communication Arts, Director of Broadcast Services and Instructional Materials Production

B.A., M.A., Pacific Luthera n Uni versity, E M M ET E. E K L U N D ,

1 955, 1 964.

1 964-

Professor of Religion

B.A., Bethany C o l lege, 1 94 1 ; B . D . , Aug ustana Se m i nary, of C h i cago, 1 958 ; P h . D . , Boston U n iversity, 1 964. G E O R G E R O B E RT ELWELL,

1 94 5 ;

M A , Un iversity

1 959-

Assistant Professor of Art

B.A., Youngstown U n i ve rsity, MARSHALL B . E N D E R BY,

1 94 9 ;

M .A . , New York U n i ve rs i ty,

1 955.

1 969-

Instructor in Economics

B.A., Reed C o l lege,

1.967;

M .A., U n i ve rsity o f Was h i ngton,

DONALD RAYMOND FAR M E R ,

1 96 9 .

1 955-

Professor of Political Science

B.S. Ed . , P h . D . , U n ivers i ty of M i n nesota, L O U I S E S. FAYE,

1 944, 1 954.

1 969-

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages (Spanish)

B A , M .A . , F l o r i d a State U n i versity, l i n a , 1 958. t ROB ERT S. F I SK ,

1 949, 1 951 ;

P h . D . , U n i versity of N o rth Ca ro足

1 968-

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

B.S., U n i versity of Wyo m i n g, 1 960 ; M . S . , U n i versity of Wyom i n g , gradu ate study, U n i ve rs i ty o f Arizona. M . JOSEP H I N E FLET C H E R ,

1 96 2 ;

further

1 963-

Assistant Professor of Nursing/ Education

B.S.N., N o rth Park C o l lege, 1 960 ; M . S . , DePaul U n i versity, study, U n i ve rsity of Was h ington. A RT H U R G E E ,

1 963 ;

f u rther graduate

1 968-

Assistant Professor of Biology

B.S., P u rdue U n i versity, RONALD W. G EN DA ,

1 96 2 ;

M.S., P h . D " P u rd ue U n i ve rsi ty,

1 964, 1 969.

1 967-

Assistant Professor of Economics, Coordinator, American Economy Program

B.S.Ed., B a l l State U n i versity, W I LLIAM P . G I D D I N G S ,

1 96 5 ;

M A , P u rdue U n i versity,

1 96 7 .

1 962-

Professor of Ch emistry, Chairman of the Division of Natural Sciences

BA, DePauw U n i ve rs i ty,

1 95 4 ;

GORDON O. G I LBERTSON,

A . M . , P h . D . , H a rvard U n i ve rsity,

1 956, 1 95 9 .

1 954-

Associate Professor of Music

B A , Concordia Co llege (Moo rhead, M i n n . ) , 1 93 7 ; M . M . , N o rthwestern U n i ve rsity, f u rt h e r g rad uate study, U n i versity o f C o l o rado, U n iversity o f Was h i ngton.

1 94 2 ;

f O n leave, 1970-7 1 .


W I LLIAM G I L B E RTSO N , 1 968Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., U n i v e rsity of Puget Sou n d , 1 9 54; M . S .W., U n i ve rs i ty of Washi ng to n , 1 956. STEWART D. GOVIG, 1 9 58-60, 1 96 1 Associate Professor of Religion B.A., St. O l a f Col lege, 1 948; B .T h . , Luther Theological Se mi n a ry, 1 95 2 ; M.T h . , Pri nceton Theological Se m i nary, 1 9 54; Ph .D., N e w Y o r k U n i ve rsity, 1 966. JAMES E. G RAHAM, 1 970Assistant Professor of Business Administration B . A . , U n i vers i ty of Mi nn esota, 1 94 9 ; M.A., U n i versity of No rth Dakota, 1 965. ARNOLD JASPER HAGEN, 1 9 55Professor of Education B . A., C o n co r d i a Col lege ( M oorhead, M i n n.). 1 931 ; M . E d . , U n iversity of Montan a , 1 941 ; E d . D . , U n i versity of Oreg o n , 1 9 55. J A M ES A, HALSETH, 1 966-1 968, 1 9 70Assistant Professor of History B .A., Concordia C o l l ege, Moorhead, Mi nnesota. 1 96 2 ; M.A .. Eastern New Mexico Unive rsity. 1 963; further graduate study, Texas Te c h n o l o g i c a l C o l lege. VERNON R . HANSON, 1 970Assistant Professor of Sociology B.A., P ac i fi c Lutheran U n i versity, 1 955; B.D., Luther Seminary, 1 96 2 ; A . M . , Un iversity of Chicago, 1 9 70. J O H N O . H ERZO G , 1 967Associate Professor of Mathematics B.A., Conco rd i a Col lege ( M oorhead, M i n n .) . 1 9 57; M.A., P h . D . , U n i versity o f Nebraska, 1 9 59, 1 963. W I L L I A M RONALD HEYER, 1 970Assistant Professor of Biology B.A., Pacific Luthe ran U n i versity, 1 9 63; M .S . , Ph.D., University of Southern C a l i 足 forn i a , 1 965, 1 968. PAUL E. HOSETH, 1 968Assistant Professor of Physical Education B.A., Concord i a C o llege ( M o o rhead, M i n n . ) . 1 96 6 ; M . S . , South Dakota State U n i 足 versity, 1 967. tCURTIS E. HUBER, 1 964Professor of Philosophy B.A., B . D . , C o n c o r d i a Semi nary, 1 950, 1 953; M.A., P h . D . , U n i versity o f Wiscon足 s i n , 1 9 58, 1 962. LA U R E N C E D . H U EST I S , 1 96 1 Asso ciate Professor of Ch emistry B.S., Ph.D., U n i v e rsity of Cal i fo rnia, 1 956, 1 9 60. tOn leave, 1970-71 .


W I LLIAM R . HUTC H EO N , J R . , 1 967Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Marketing & fndustriaf Management)

B.S., U n iversity of R h ode Island, 1 953; M . B.A., D . B.A., U niversity of Washing足 ton, 1 963, 1 969. C LA R E N C E G . JACOBS, 1 969Assistant Professor of Physics

B .A . , C o n c o r d i a C o l lege (Moo rhead, M i n n . ) , 1 964; M.S" sota, 1 968 ; P h , D " Un ive rsity of I owa, 1 969.

U n iversi ty of Mi nne足

LOIS ELAM JACOBSON, 1 966Instructor in Nursing

B . S . , U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 959; M , S . N " U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 969. J O A N N J EN S E N , 1 967Associate Professor of Biology

A . B . , Pacific Lutheran University, 1 954; M.A., U n i versity of Southern Cal i fornia, 1 957; Ph,D., I owa State Un iversity, 1 96 1 . ROBERT J . J E N S E N , 1 968Assistant Professor of Economics

B.A., Dana Col lege, 1 964; M A , Un i ve rs i t y of N e b raska, 1 967; further g rad uate study, Un iversity o f Nebraska, J OANN A . J EW ElL, 1 969Instructor in Nursing

B.S.N., South Dakota State U n i versity, 1 967; M,S., U n iversity of California, 1 968. R I CHARD J , J O BST, 1 967Assistant Professor of Sociology

B.A., U n i versity o f San Fran cisco, 1 96 4 ; M.A., U n i ve rs i ty of C a l i f o r n i a , 1 967. DAV I D W . J O H N S O N , 1 970Instructor in History

B.A., H a m l i n e U n i ve r S i ty , 1 96 1 ; M' A , Stan ford U n i versity, 1 963 ; further g raduate study, Un ivers i ty of Kansas. L U C I LLE MAR G U E R I T E JOH N S O N , 1 953Professor of English

B.A., Concordia C o l l ege (Moorhead, M i n n . ) , 1 940; M A , Was h i n gton State U n i 足 versity, 1 943; Ed,D. (Rhetoric), U n i versity of Montana, 1 967. W I L LIAM L. J O H N S O N , 1 969Associate Professor of Mathematics

B.A., Reed Col lege, 1 960; M .A., P h . D " U n ivers i ty o f C a l i fo r n i a at Los Angeles, 1 963, 1 964. K EN N ETH A. J OH N STON , 1 964Professor of Education, Dean of the Schoof of Education

B.A., Western Was h i n gton State Col lege, 1 947; M ,A . , Stanford U n i versity, 1 953 ; Ed . D . , Wash i n g ton State U n ivers i ty , 1 964.


R I C HARD P. J O N ES, 1 969Instructor in English

B.A., Harvard, 1 964 ; M .A . , M . F . A . , Un iversity of Massachusetts, 1 969 . RONALD D. J O R G E N SO N , 1 9 68Assistant Professor of Education

B.A., Gustavus A d o l p h u s College, 1 960; M . E d . , South Dakota State Un iversi ty, 1 965; Ed . D . , Ball State Univers i ty, 1 968. R I CHARD P . J U N G K U N TZ, 1 9 70Professor of Religion, Provost

B . A . , N o rthwestern Col lege, 1 939; B.D., W i sconsin L utheran Semi nary, 1 942; M A , Ph.D., U n i versity of Wisconsin, 1 955, 1 961 . T H E O D O R E OSCAR H E N RY KARL, 1 940-42, 1 948Professor of Comm unication Arts

B.A., M.A., G u stavus Adolphus Col lege, 1 934, 1 936 ; f u rther g raduate study, U n i 足 versity of Sout hern C a l i fo r n i a , Stan l o r d University. DAV I D T. KEYES, 1 969Instructor in Art

B.F.A , U n i versity of Arizo na, 1 964 ; M .A . , O h i o State U n iversity, 1 966; further study at Arizona State U n i versity. G U N D AR J U LI A N K I N G , 1 960Professor of

Business

Administration

(Marketing

&

Industrial

Management),

Dean of the School of Business Administration

B . B . A . , U n i versity of O regon, 1 956; M . B .A . , P h . D . , Stanford Un iversity, 1 958, 1 9 63. VIVIAN C . K I N G , 1 969Instructor in Music

B . M . , U n i ve rsity of O regon, 1 9 66; M . M . , U n iversity of Southern C a l i fo r n i a , 1 969. LA RS EVER ETT KITTLES O N , 1 9 56Assistant Professor of Art

B.S., Uni vers i ty o f Wisconsin i n M i lwaukee, 1 9 50; M . S . , U n i versity of Wisconsi n , 1 95 1 ; M . F.A., Un iversity o f Southern C a l i f o r n i a , 1 9 5 5 . RAYM O N D A . K L O P S C H , 1 953Associate Professor of English

B,S., I l l i n ois I n s titute o f Tec h n o l ogy, 1 949; M .A., P h . D . , U n iversity of I l l i n o i s, 1 950, 1 96 2 . tCALV I N H . KNAPP, 1 960Associate Professor of Music

B.S., M . S., J u i l l i a rd School of M us i c , 1 949, 1 9 50; g radu ate study, Columbia U n i versity, Pacific Lu the ran U n i versity, Un iversity of Puget Sound, University of W ashingto n . t O n leave spring semester,

1971 .


J E N S W E R N E R K N U D S E N , 1 9 57Professor of Biology

B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i ve rsity, 1 9 5 2 ; M .S., P h . D . , California, 1 954, 1 9 5 7 .

U n i versity of Southern

DAV I D R . KNUTSO N , 1 9 69Assistant Professor of Religion

B.A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 9 58; B . D . , Luther Theolog i c al Sem i n a ry, 1 962; M.A., U n i ve rsit y of Ch icago D i v i n i ty Schoo l , 1 966; fu rther study, U n i ve rs i ty of Ch icago. J E RRY D . KRACHT, 1 967-68, 1 969Assistant Professor of Music

B . M . , M .A., M . F.A., University of I o wa, 1 963, 1 965, 1 96 7 ; f u rther g raduate study, U n iversity o f I owa. J O H N O . LARSGAA R D , 1 9 70Assistant Professor of Psychology

B.A., Pacific Lutheran C o l lege, 1 9 44; B.Th., Luth eran Theological Seminary, 1 947 ; S.T. M . , Pac i f i c School of R e l i g i o n , 1 965; further graduate study, U n i versity o f Wash i n g t o n . ANTHO NY J . LA U E R , 1 969Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Business Law

&

Indus triaf Management)

J . D . , Loyo l a U n i versi ty, 1 9 55; M.B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 969. DIANN H I L L LAVIK, 1 9 70Instructor in Nursing

B . S . N . , Pacific Luth eran U n i versity, 1 969. PENNY Y. LEAKE, 1 969Instructor in Nursing

B.S . N . , Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 968. DA N I EL R . LEASU R E , 1 9 66Professor of Education, Vice President - Student Affairs

B.A., Westmi nster College, 1 9 58; M . E d . , Ed.D., Pennsylva n i a State Un iversity, 1 960, 1 9 61 . A N N D. LEE, 1 969Instructor in Nursing

B .S.N., Montana State University, 1 95 8 ; M.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 969. N O N A C. LEMI EUX, 1 9 70Instructor in Nursing

B.S. N . , Montana State U n i versity, 1 966; further graduate study, U n i versity of Washington.


HAROLD J. LERAAS, 1 935-42, 1 947Professor o f Biofogy A.B., Luther C o l lege, 1 930; M.S., Ph.D., D.D.S., U n i ve rsity of M i c h i g a n , 1 932, 1 935, 1 946. PAUL B . L I E B E LT, 1 9 70Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.A., C o n c o rd i a C o l lege ( M o orhead, M i n nesota), Nebraska, 1 957.

1 95 5 ;

M.A.,

U n i ve rsity of

NANCY H. L I N G , 1 970Instructor in Nursing B . S . N . , M.A., U n i ve rs i ty of Wa s h i n g t o n , 1 9 67; 1 969. B R I A N E. LOWES, 1 968Assistant Professor o f Geology B.S., Un iversity of Lond o n , 1 95 7 ; M.S . , Queens U n i versity, 1 96 3 ; further g raduate study, U n i ve rs i ty of Wash i n g t o n . G E N E C A R R O L L LUN DGAA R D , 1 958Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Coach of Basketball B A E d . , Pac i f i c Luthe ran U n i versity, 1 9 51 ; M.S., U n i versity of Was h i ngton, 19 64. JOHN A . MARTI LLA, 1 969Associate Professor of Business Administration (Marketing and Industrial Management) B . B . A . , Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 96 3 ; M .B .A., D.B.A., U n i versity of O regon, 1 966 , 1 969. ARTH U R DAVID MART I N S O N , 1 966Assistant Professor of History B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versi ty, 195 7 ; M.A., Ph.D., Wash i n gton State U n i versity, 1 96 1 , 1 966. MARJ O R I E MATHERS, 1 964-1 966 ; 1 968Assistant Professor o f Education B.A., M.A., Central Was h i n g ton State College, 1 953, 1 96 1 . THO MAS MAYS, 1 970Instructor in Physical Education B.S., Wash i ngton State University, 1 962; M.A., Western Was h i n g to n State C o l lege, 19 70. KEITH W E N DELL McMASTER, 1 967Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Marketing and Industrial Management) B.B.A., U n i versity of Washi ngton, 1 964 ; M . B.A., D . B . A., U n i versity of O regon, 1 9 65, 1 970.


R O B E R T K. M E N Z E L , 1 969Assistant Professor of Sociology, Director of CHOICE (Center for Human Organ足 ization in a Changing Environment) B . A . , B . D . , C o n c o r d i a Semi n ary, 1 94 1 , 1 954 ; M.S.T., Paci fic Luth eran Theo l og i c al Semi nary, 1 96 3 ; further g raduate study at Concordia Se m i n a ry, 51. Lou i s and O regon State System o f H i g her Educati o n . LAW R EN C E J . M EYER, 1 969Associate Professor of Music B . A . , C o l orado State C o l lege, 1 954; M . M . , U n i versity of O regon, 1 955; Ed.D . , C o l o rado State C o l lege, 1 964. N. C H R ISTIAN M EY E R , 1 970Assistant Professor of Mathematics B . A . , Reed C o l lege, 1 966; M .A., Ph .D., U n i versity of Oregon, 1 967, 1 97 0 . MARLEN M I LLER, 1 970Associate Professor of Economics B . S . , M . S . , Ph .D., U n iversity of M i nnesota, 1 962, 1 9 65, 1 967. GARY L. M I N ETT I , 1 970Assistant Professor of Education B . S . , U n i ve rsity of Washington, 1 960; M .A . , Pac i f i c Lu theran Un iversity, 1 96 7 ; f u rther g raduate study, U n iversity of Was h i ngton. R I C HARD D . MOE, 1 965Professor of Education, Dean of Graduate and Summer Studies; Director, Schoof of Fine Arts B . A . , Concordia C o l lege ( M oo rhead, Mi n n .), 1 951 ; M.Ed . , E d . D . , U n i ve rsity of Colorado, 1 953, 1 962. KATHAR I N E ED BROOKE M O N R O E , 1 967Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages (French) B .A., London U n i ve rsity, 1 932 ; M.A., M i d d l e b u ry C o llege, Vermont, French 1 942, E n g l i s h 1 95 1 ; further graduate study, C o l u m b i a U n i versity and O h i o State U n i versity. G U N N U L F MYBRO, 1 970Assistant Professor of Philosophy B .A . , U n i versity of British C o l u m b ia, 1 96 2 ; further grad uate study, Cambri dge U n i versity. A L I C E J A M ES NAPJUS, 1 963Assistant Professor of Education B.A., M.A., U n i versity of Wash i ngton, 1 956, 1 965. CHAR LES T. NE LSON , 1 967Assistant Professor of Education, Registrar B.S., General Beadle State C o l l ege, 1 963; M.A., Adams State Cotlege, 1 964.


N EALE E. N ELS O N , 1 970Assistant Professor of Sociology B .A . , Gustavus Ad o l p h us Coll ege, 1 940 ; B . D . , Lutheran School of Theology, 1 94 5 ; M . S W . , Un iversity of Ul ah, 1 967; P h . D . , U n i versity o f Uta h , 1 9 70. B U RTON L . N ESSET , 1 967Assistant Profess or of Chemistry B . A . , SI. Olaf Col lege, 1 9 57; M .S . , P h . D . , Purdue U n i v e rs i ty, 1 960, 1 962. ' M I LT O N L U T H E R N ES V I G , 1 947-51 , 1 953Assistant Professor of English; Assistant to the President for Church Relations G raduate, Pacific Lut heran U n i versity, 1 93 5 ; B.A., S I . O l a f C o l l ege, 1 93 7 ; C a n d o T h e o l . , Luther T h e o l o g i c a l Sem i n ary, 1 94 2 ; M .A., Un iversity of Min nesota, 1 947. J E SSE D. N O L P H , 1 968Assistant Professor 01 Psychology B.A George Was h i n g ton U n i versity, 1 964; P h . D . , Corn e l l University, 1 97 1 . .•

E R I C N O R D H O L M , 1 955Associate Professor o f Communication Arts B . F.A., A rt I n stitute of C h i c ago, 1 95 1 ; g raduate stu dy, I n d i a na Un iversity. t P H I L I P AKERSON N O R D Q U I ST, 1 963Associate Professor of History B A , Paci f i c Lutheran Un ive rsity, 1 95 6 ; M.A., P h . D . , U n i versity of Wash ing­ to n , 1 960, 1 964. SH ERMAN B ER D EEN NO R N ES , 1 959-61 , 1 965Associate Professor of Physics B.A., Concordia Col lege (M oorhead, M i n n . ) , 1 9 51 ; M .S . , U n i ve rsity of N o rth Dakota, 1 9 56; P h . D . , Wash i n g ton State U n i v e rsity, 1 965. W. DW I G H T O B E R H O LTZER, 1 969Assistant Professor of Sociology A.B., Wittenberg Un i v e rsity, 1 9 61 ; B . D . , Lutheran S c h o o l of Theology at C h i ­ cago, 1 96 5 ; P h . D . , G rad uate Theological U n i on , Berkeley , Cal ifornia, 1969. SARA A . O F F I C E R , 1 967Assistant Professor of Physical Education B.S., Oregon State U n i versity, 1 958; M .S., I n d i an a Un iverSity, 1 965. R O B ERT CARL OLSEN , 1 947Professor of Chemistry B.S., P h . D . , M i c h igan State U n i versity, 1 93 1 , 1 936. ' On leave, fall semester, 1 970. t On leave, 1 9 70-71 .


DAVI D M. O L S O N , 1 968Associate Professor of Physical Education, Director o f the School of Physical Education and Athletic Director B.A., Concordia Col lege ( M oorhead, M i n n . ) , 1 956 ; M.A., U n i versity of M i n nesota, 1 95 7 ; P h . D . , U n i versity o f Iowa, 1 966. LI N DA N ELSON O L S O N , 1 967Assistant Professor of Nursing R . N . , B.S.N., M . N . , U n i versity of Wa s h i ngton, 1 958, 1 959, 1 964. F L O R E N C E A. O R V I K , 1 967Assistant Professor of Education B.S., Moorhead State C o l lege, 1 95 3 ; M.A., Eastern Was hi ngton leg e, 1 961 .

State Col足

B U RTON THOMAS O STEN S O N , 1 947Professor o f Biology and Earth Sciences B.A., Luther College, 1 93 2 ; M.S., Ph.D., University of M i chigan, 1 934, 1 947. W I LL I A M E. PARKER, 1 970Assistant Professor of Communication Arts B.S., M e m p h i s State Unive rs i ty , 1 966; M.S., Southern I l l i n o i s U n i versity, 1 968; further g radu ate study, Southern I l l i n o i s U n i versity. ARNE K E N N ETH P EDERSO N , 1 956Associate Professor o f Education, Director of Teacher Corps BAEd., B . E d . , M .A . , Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 949, 1 953, 1 956; further g radu足 ate study, U n i versity o f Washingto n . J O H N E. P ETERSEN, 1 967Assistant Professor of Religion B.A., SI. Olaf C o l l ege, 1 95 8 ; B.D., Luther Semi nary, SI. P a u l , 1 963; M .A., P h . D . , New Y o r k U n i versity, 1 965; 1 970. C HARLES ARTH U R PETERSO N , 1 959Professor 01 Business A dministration (Accounting and Business Education) B.S., Kansas State Teac h e rs College, 1 951 ; M.S., University of Tenn essee, 1 95 2 ; P h . D . , U n i versity of M i n nesota, 1 966. tGARY D. PETERSON, 1 967Instructor in Mathematics B.S., I owa State University, 1 96 0 ; M.S . , Western Was h i ngton State College, 1 967. WI LMA E. P ETERSON, 1 965Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S., University of Saskatchewa n , 1 94 7 ; M.S., Boston U n i versity, 1 953. RODN EY W. PETTY, 1 969Assistant Professor of Education B.S., M.S., Oregon C o l lege of Education, 1 9 55, 1 95 7 ; D . E d . , Un iversity of Ore足 gon, 1 964. tOn lea ve , 1970-7 1 .


CAROLYN M. P H I LLI PS,

1 968-

Instructor in Physical Education

A.B., H u m bo l d t State C o l lege,

1 96 1 ;

M . S . , U n i versity of Washington,

PAUL MATT H EW R E I G STAD, 1 947-48, 1 958Professor 0/ English, Chairman 0/ th e Division 0/ Humanities B.A., SI. O l af C o l lege, 1 94 3 ; M.A., P h . D . , U n i versity of New Mexi co, M I CKEY R . R EV I S,

1 964.

1 956, 1 958.

1 968-

Instructor in Communication A rts

B.A., Austin State Col lege, M I LTON H . R I E M E R ,

1 96 5 ;

M .A., Kansas U n i versity,

1 966.

1 970-

Visiting Associate Professor 0/ English

B.A., B . D . , Concord i a Sem i n ary, P h . D . , U n i versity of Texas, 1 965. DAV I D P . R O B B I N S,

1 955, 1 958 ;

M .A., Wash i n g ton U n i versity,

1 958 ;

1 969-

Instructor in Music

B . M . , U n iversity of M i c h i g a n ,

1 968.

G E O R G E A . ST. J O H N R O B I N S O N ,

1 970-

Instructor in Spanish

B.A., M . A . , Louisiana State U n i ve rsity, G E O R G E R O SKOS,

1 966, 1 970.

1 950-

Associate Professor 0/ Art

B.S. A rt Ed . , Youngstown U n i versity, J OAN G . ROYCE,

1 94 9 ;

M.A. Un iversity of Iowa,

1 950.

1 970-

Instructor in Nursing

B . S . N . , Boston Col lege, W I LLIAM B . SA RE,

1 954 ;

M.S., U n i versity of Pen nsylva n i a ,

1 96 0 .

1 968-

Instructor in Music

B . M . , I n d i a n a Un iversity,

1 96 7 ;

W I LL I A M H . SCHARNWEBER,

M . M . , I n d ia n a U n i versity,

1 969.

1 970-

Instructor in History

B.A., Pacific L u theran Un iversity, 1 96 5 ; M.A., Wash ington State U n i versity, further graduate study, Un iversity o f M i chigan.

1 96 8 ;

J O HA N N E S A U G U ST SC H I LLER, 1 958Professor 0/ Sociology, Chairman 0/ the Division 0/ Social Sciences B.A., Capi tal Un iversity, 1 94 5 ; C a n d o Theol., Evan g e l i c a l Lutheran Theological Sem i n ary, 1 94 7 ; M .A . , U n i versity o f Kansas, 1 95 9 ; P h . D . , U n i versity of Wash足 i n g t o n , 1 96 7 . WALTER C HARLES SCHNACKEN B E R G , 1 942-44, 1 952Professor 01 History Graduate, Pacific Lulheran College, 1 937; A.B., SI. Olaf Col lege, 1 939 ; A . M . , Gonzaga University, 1 94 7 ; P h . D . , Washington State U n i versity, 1 950.


E R N ST C. SCHW I D D E R , 1 9 67Associate Professor of Art

B.A., M . F .A., U n i ve rsity ot Wash i n gton, 1 953, 1 9 55. S. E R V I N G SEVE RTSON , 1 966Associate Professor of Psychology

B.A., Pacific Luthe ran Un ive rs ity, 1 955 ; B . D . , Lut h e r Theo log ical Seminary , 1 9 59 ; M . A., U n i versity of Wyo m i n g , 1 960; P h . D . , U n i versity of Utah, 1 966. KENT C. S I M M O N DS, 1968Assistant Professor of Phifosophy

B.A., Lewis and C l a r k C o llege, 1 961 ; P h . D . , O h i o State U n i versity, 1 969. MA U R I C E H. SKON ES, 1 9 64Associafe Professor of Music, Director of Choral Music

(Moorhead, M i n n . ) , 1 94 8 ; M . M . Ed., M o n tana State Uni足 versity, 1 9 57; furt her g raduate study, Un iversity of Arizona and Un iversity of Was h i n gto n . B . A . , Concordia Col/ege

R UT H M . SOREN S O N , 1 968Instructor in Biology

B .A., U n i ve rsity of Colo rado, 1 962; M . A., Un iversity of Colorado, 1 967 ; fu rther g raduate stud y, Un iversity o f Was h i n g ton. tCARL D . SPANG L E R , 1 96 1 -62, 1 963Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages (French)

A . B . , Grove C i ty Col lege, 1 958; M . A., Pen nsylvan i a State U n i versity, 1 961 ; further g raduate study, Pen nsylvania State U n i versity and U n i versity of M i n nesota. LY N N S . STE I N , 1 96 1 Professor of Education

B . A., N o rth Dakota State Teachers C o l lege, 1 9 37; M . A . , Univers i ty ot Montana, 1 9 5 2 ; Ed.D., Montana State University, 1 961 . VERNON L. ST I N T Z I , 1 964Associate Professor of Business A dministration (Marketing and Indus trial Management)

B.A., Coe Col lege, 1 937; M . B.A., Ar izona State Un iversity, 1 964; D. B.A., U n i 足 versity o f Wash i ng t o n , 1 970. D O R I S G. STUCKE, 1 967Professor of Nursing; Director of the Schoof of Nursing

B.S., American U n i versity, D . C . , 1 94 9 ; M . E d . , U n i versity of Mi nnesota, 1 956 ; E d . D ., Teac hers Col lege, C o l u m b ia U n iversity, 1 967. DUANE SWANK, 1 970Assistant Professor of Chemistry

B.S., Wash i n gton State U n i versity, 1 964 ; P h . D . , Montana State U n i v e rsi ty, 1 969. tOn leave,

19 70-71 .


R O D N EY SWENS O N , 1 9 68Associate Professor of i-oreign Languages (German) B . S . , Bemidji State C o l lege, 1 952; M . A., U n i versity o f M i n n esota, 1 956; P h . D . , U n i versity of M i n n esota, 1 967. KWO N G -T I N TAN G, 1 967Associate Professor of Physics B.S., M . A . , U n iversity of Was h i n g t o n , 1 958, 1 95 9 ; P h . D . , Colu mbia U n iversity, 1 965. F R E D E R I C K L. TOB IASO N , 1 966Associate Professor of Chemistry B.A., Pacific Luthera n Un iversity, 1 958; P h . D . , M i c h i g an State U n i versity, 1 963. WALTER L . TO M S I C , 1 970Assistant Professor of Arf and University Graphics Coordinator B.S.E., Arkansas State U n iversity, 1 965; M. F.A., Un iversity of Colorado, 1 967. AUDUN TRYGGE TOVEN , 1 967Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages (Norwegian) U niversity of Oslo, 1 964; M.A . , Un iversity of Wash i n g to n , 1 967. PAU L WOL FGAN G U LB R I C HT , 1 967Assistant Professor of Political Science B.A., M .A., P h . D . , Un iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 959, 1 960, 1 9 65. DAN I E L E. VAN TASSEL, 1 970Assistant Professor of English A.B., SI. O l a f C o l lege, 1 962; M .A . , Un iversity of Iowa, 1 964; Ph.D., U n iversity o f I owa, 1 9 70. DAV I D LEE V I NJ E, 1 970Assistant Professor of Economics B.S., N orth Dakota State U n i versity, 1 96 2 ; M. S., U n i versity of Wiscons i n , 1 964; further graduate study, U n i versity o f Wisconsin. GEORGE F. WALT E R , 1 970Instructor in Sociology (Anthropology) B.A., M .A . , O h i o State U n i ve rs i ty, 1 967, 1 970. W . G RA N T WATK I N SO N , 1 9 70Assistant Professor o f Business Administration B.S., Oregon State Un ivers i ty, 1 964; M .B.A., U n ivers i ty of O regon, 1 966; further gr ad uate study, U n i vers i ty o f Orego n . M A R Y M . W EBSTER, 1 970Instructor in Psych ology B . A., Carleton C o l lege, 1 963; M .A . , Un ivers i ty of California, 1 965. PAUL M. WEB STE R , 1 9 69Instructor in Foreign Languages (German) B.A., M . A . , U n iversity o f C a l i forn i a , 1 964, 1 967.


MARGARET D. W I C KST ROM, 1 951 Assistant Professor of Religion, Dean of Women B.A., Augustana Col lege, 1 937; M . R.E., The B i b lical Seminary of New York, 1 951 . JAN E WI L L I A M S O N , 1 964Professor of Education B.S.

in

Ed .,

University of

Maryland,

1 943;

M.A.,

New York

University,

1 947 ;

Ed.D., Colorado State College, 1 959. MARY J . WOLTER, 1 969Instructor in Foreign Languages (French) B.A., Mon terey I n sti tute of Foreign St ud ies, 1 967. J E F F ERSON YUAN - S H E N G YA N G , 1 970Assistant Professor of Engineering B.S., University of Wash i n gton, 1 960; M .S . , C o l u m b i a University, 1 964;

Ph.D.,

U n i versity o f U t a h , 1 970. DWIGHT J UDSON ZULAUF, 1 949-53, 1959Professor of Business Administration (Accounting and Finance) B . S . , U n i versity of Oregon, 1 948; M.S., C o l u m b i a U n i versity, 1 94 9 ; P h . D . , U n i 足 versity of M i n nesota, 1 965.

Lecturers, Associate and Assistant Lecturers E L V I N M. AKRE B.A., Concordia College

(Moorhead,

M i nn.)

1 928;

M .A.,

Un iversity of Wash足

i ngton, 1 941 . Associate Professor Emeritus and Lecturer in H istory. M I C HAEL L. B E N S O N B . A . , Pacific Lutheran University, 1 969. Assistant Lecturer i n P h y s i c a l Education. H E N RY J. B E RT N E S S B . A . , Augsburg Col lege, 1 947; M .A., U n i versity of M i n n esota, 1 948 ; P h . D . , U n i 足 versity of M i n n esota, 1 955. Lecturer i n Education and Psychology. EUGEN E H. B R EC K EN R I D G E B.S., West V i rg i n i a State Col lege, 1 934 ; M.E., W h i tworth, 1 949; D . H.L., W h i t足 worth, 1 969. Associate Lecturer in Education. ARNOLD J . B R I CKER B.A., Pac i f i c Luth eran University, 1 956; M .A., U n i versity 01 Wash i n g t o n , 1 96 2 . Lecturer in P o l i ti c a l Science. JOAN BROWN B.S., M .S., Jui l liard School 01 M u s i c , 1 952, 1 954. Assistant Lecturer i n M u s i c . C A R O L C. CAPP B.A., Un iversity 0 1 Texas, 1 966 ; M.A., Baylor U n iversity, 1 968. Assistant Lecturer in Speech. ELA I N E CARLETON B.A., Sweet Briar Lecturer i n Lati n .

College,

1 95 7 ;

M.A.,

U n i versity

of Texas,

1 969 .

Assistant


R I CHARD C R O C KETT A . M . , University of I l l i n o i s , 1 965. Lectu re r in Pol i t i cal Science. RUSSELL W. CROCKETT B.A., M . Mus., Unive rsity of Id aho, 1 96 1 , 1 966. Assistant Lecturer i n M us i c . WAYNE H . E H L E R S B.A.A.S., a n d BAEd" Western Wash i n gton State Co llege, 1 960; M . L . , U n i ve rsity of Denver, 1 967. Assistant Lecturer in Edu cati on. J O H N G . EYRES B,A., M.A., Central Was h i ngton State C o l lege, 1 95 2 , 1 959. Associate Lecturer in J ou rn a l i s m , G RANT O. G I L B E RT B,A., Pacific Lutheran University, 1 969, Assistant Lecturer in Psychology. H A ROLD F. G RAY B.A., Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i versity, 1 944; B . Ed . , M.A., University of Puget Sound, 1 946, 1 9 50. Lecturer in Education. R O B ERT GR EEN B . S . , M.S.W., Un iversity of Utah, 1 9 58, 1 969. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Sociology. LAW R E N C E G R I G GS B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 969, Assistant Lecturer i n Socio logy. EDWARD H A R M I C B . A . , Paci f i c Lutheran University, 1 962; M.Mus., U n i versity o f Arizona, 1 969. Assistant Lecturer in M usic. NANCY HAUG H E E B,S,N " P a c i f i c Lutheran University, 1 969. Assistant C l i nical I n structor i n N urs i n g . T H ER ESA E . H E M M EN B . S . , U n i versity of M i n n esota, 1 945. Assistant C l i n i cal I nstructor i n N u rsing, R I C H A R D N. H I LDAHL B . B . A . , Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i versity, 1 965; M .B .A . , U n i versity of Orego n , 1 966; C . P.A., State of Was h i ngton. Associate Lecturer in B usi ness Administration (Accounting and Finance) . LEONARD W. H O LDEN B . S . , M.A., U n i ve rsity of M i n n esota, 1 944, 1 947, Ed.D., Stanford University, 1 959, Lecturer i n Education. I R E N E HOPP B.A., Un iversity of Puget Sound, 1 947. Assistant Lecturer in Music. R UTH LYN C H J E FFR I ES B . S " Fayetteville State Teacher's C o l lege, 1 94 2 ; M.S.P.H., N o rth Carolina Col足 lege at D u rha m, 1 949. Associate D i rector o f Teacher Corps.


DONALD JOHNS B . S . , Lewis and Cl ark C o l l e ge, 1 9 54; M .A . , Ph.D., Denver Un iversity, 1 9 59, 1 9 6 1 . Lecturer in Soci o l o gy. MARGARET A. KEBLBEK B.A., Western Wash i n gton Col lege o f Educ ati o n ; M . A . , Central Wa shi ngton Col足 lege of Educati o n . Associate Lec turer in Educati on. SA N D RA B . KNAPP B . S . M . , M . S . M . , J u i l l i a rd School of Music. Assistant Le cturer i n M u s i c . L I LLIAN W . LA U E R B .A . , M . J . , University of C a l i fo r nia, 1 9 54, 1 9 59; P h . D . , Stanford Un ivers i ly, 1 966. Associate Lecturer i n Education. D EA N N E LeROY, 1 969B.A., Un iversity o f Puget S o u n d , 1 964. Assistant Lectur0r in P h ysical Educat i o n . D A V I D W. LOCKE B . M ., St. Olaf Col lege. 1 965; M . M . , N o rthwestern U n i ve rs i ty, 1 96 7 ; Teach i n g Cer足 tificate, U n iversity of Was h i n gton, 1 9 68. Assistant Lecturer i n Musi c . JON E R L I N G MALM I N B.A., Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, 1 964; P h . D . , Col u m b i a U n i ve rs i ty, 1 969. Assist足 ant Coach i n P h ysical Educati o n . LAW R E N C E G. MATHRE B.A., St. Olaf Col lege, 1 948; B.T h . , Luther Theolog i c a l Sem in ary (St. P a u l ) , 1 952; M.A., P h i l li ps U n i versity . 1 962. Associate Lec turer i n R e l i g i o n . C H R I ST I N E M I LLER B . S . N . , Pacific Lutheran U n i ve rs i ty, 1970. Assistant C l i n i c a l I n structor i n N u rs i n g . ROB ERT A . M I LLS BA, W h i tworth Coll ege, 1 949; B . D . , San Francisco T h e o l o g i cal Semi nary. 1 952. Lec turer i n R e l i g i o n . ERLING O. MORK B . S . , Wash i n gton State Unive rs i ty, 1 957 . Lecturer in Po liti cal Scien ce. .

FRED E R I C K L. N EW N H A M G raduate, Royal Academy of M u sic, L o n d o n , 1 925; Teacher's Trai n i n g Ce rtificate. U n i versity o f Lond o n . 1 92 5 ; Ass ociate, Royal Col lege of M u s i c , Lond o n , 1 9 28; Licen tiate, Associate, Fe l l o w, Royal Academy of Musi c , L o n d o n , 1 929, 1 934, 1 9 62. P rofess o r Emeritus and Lecture r i n M u sic. ATHYLEEN F . N I C H O LSON B.A., Un iversity of Was h i ng to n , 1 928; M.E., University of Puget S o u n d , 1 963. Associ ate Lecturer in Busine ss Education ( Se c retarial Sciences). NAN G. N O KLEBERG B.A., U n i versity of Wash ington, 1 953. Assistant Lectu rer i n Educatio n . 1 0 N A H . O L D E N KA M P B . A . i n Educati o n , Pac i f i c Lutheran Ed ucati o n .

Un iversity,

1 959. Assistant Lecture r i n


B EVERLY JAN E PAY N E B . A . , M.A., Un iversity o f Wash in gton, 1 963, 1 966. Assistant Lecturer i n Frenc h . J I M P H I LL I P S S u m m i t Alpine C I'u b . Assistant Lecturer in P h ysi cal Educati on. E L M ER R O B I N SO N B.A., Un iversity of C a l i fo r n i a , 1 9 47; M .A., U n i versity of Califo r n i a (Los Ange les), 1 948. Lecturer in Earth Sciences. B E R N A R D L. SA I B E L B . A . , Un iversity o f Mi nnesota, 1 9 3 1 ; M.A., P h . D . , Harvard U n i versity, 1 934, 1 935. Adj u n c t P rofessor o f P h i l osophy. AL FRED SEAMEN B.S., V i rgi n i a Polytec h n i c I n stitute, 1 933. Assistant Lecturer i n PhYsi cal Educati o n . B . S . , M . S . , Spri ngfield C o l lege. Assistant Lecturer i n P h y s i c a l Ed ucatio n . L O U I S J . SOUZA B.S., M.S., Springfield Col l ege Assistant Lecturer i n Physical Educati o n . K I M ST E R L I N G B . A . , S a n Francisco State C o l lege, 1 965. Assistant Lecturer i n Physical Educati o n . PHYLLIS TEMPLIN B . A . , Pacific Lutheran U n iversity, 1 95 9 ; M .S . , Oregon State U n i versity, 1 968. Associate Lecturer in Physical Educati o n . J O H N T H I EMAN B.A., Wartburg C o l l eg e , 1 96 8 . Assistant Lecturer in Physical Education. MARY H E LEN T H O M PS O N B . M . , Oberl i n Col lege, 1 940. Assistant Lecturer i n Musi c . A N N E. T R E M A I N E B . M . , University o f Oreg o n , 1 95 1 . Assistant Lec ture r i n Music. VERNON ALFRED UTZ I N G E R B . A . , N o rth Centra l Col lege 1 9 22; M.A., N o rthwestern U n i versity, 1 9 29; P h . D . , U n i versity of Southern C a l i fo rn i a, 1 952. Professor Emeri tus o f C o m m u n i cation Arts and Lect u r e r in Business Adm i n i strati o n . RAY WARREN B .A . , Un iversity of Puget S o u n d , 1 9 30; M .A . , Un iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 937. Lecturer i n Education. J O H N WH ITE B.A., Augsburg C o l lege, 1 97 0 . Assistant Lecturer in N o rweg i a n . W E RA W I LH EL M B . A . , U n i versity o f Puget Sound, 1 96 7 ; M . A . , University of Was h i ngton, 1 968. Assistant Lecturer i n Ge rman. BARBARA W I L L I A M S B.A. , Pac i f i c Lufhera n U n i ve rs i ty, 1 96 1 ; M. A., U n i versity of Neb raska, Assistant Lecturer i n Eng l i s h .

1 963.


LAY N E W I N KLEBLECK B.S., Portland State U n i versity, 1 96 4 ; M.S.w . , U n i versity of Denver, Assistant Professor of Sociology.

1 968.

Adj u nct

Library FRAN K HAM I LTON HALEY, 1 95 1 Librarian

B.A., W i l lamette U n i versity, 1 93 5 ; B . D . , Drew University, 1 94 5 ; A.B.L.S" U n i 足 versity o f W as h i n g to n , 1 950. Further g raduate study, Drew University, U n i versity of Cambridge, U n iversity of Zurich. M I R I A M RUTH B E C KMAN,

1 964-

Natural and Social Sciences Librarian

B.A., University of Puget Sound, U n i versity o t Was h i ng to n , 1 964.

1 92 8 ;

M.A., Boston U n i versity,

1 93 3 ;

M . Libr.,

Teacher Corps Team Leaders KATHLEEN CARTER B.S., Johnson C . S m i t h Un iversity, 1 95 0 ; f u rther study at Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i versity.

R I C H A R D OTIS D I S N EY B.A. Ed., Eastern Was h i ngton State C o l l ege, 1 958; further study at Western Washi n g ton State Col lege, Seattle Paci fic Col lege, Central, Was h i ngton State Col lege, U n i ve rs i ty o f Puget Sound. DAV I D A L L EN G A B R I ELSON B.A., Paci fi c Lutheran U n i ve rs i ty, 1 96 0 ; further study at San F rancisco State Col lege, Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, Portland State Col lege. R U BY T . HARRIS B . S . , Southern U n iversity, 1 94 0 ; fu rther study at Pacific Luthe ran U n i versity, U n i versity o f Puget Sound, Central Was h i ngton State Col lege, Western Wash足 i ngton State Col lege. G E RA L D DOYLE M U R R Y B A Ed . , M.A.Ed., Central Wash i n g ton State C o l lege, at Western Was h i n g ton State Col lege.

1 96 1 , 1 96 3 ;

fu rther study

TERESA MARJ O R I E TUEL B.A., M .A.Ed., U n i ve rs i ty o f Puget Sound, 1 953, 1 95 7 ; further study at Pac i f i c Lutheran U n i versi ty, C a l i fo r n i a State C o l l ege at L o s A n g e l es . EMER ITI ELV I N MARTIN AKRE, 1 937, Associate Professor Emeritus o f History, 1 970 B.A., Concord i a C o l l ege (Moorhead, M i n n . ) . 1 92 8 ; MA, U n i versity of Was h i n g 足 ton, 1 941 ; furthe r graduate study, University o f Wash i n gton, U n i versity o f Oslo, Exeter C o l lege, Oxford University.


J . E. DAN I E LSO N , 1 960, Director Emeritus 0/ Admissions, 1 969 B.S.E., M.S.E., U n i versity of N o rt h Dakota, 1 929, 1 937. P H I L I P E N OC H HAUGE, 1 920, Professor Emeritus 0/ Education, 1 96 8 B.A., SI. O l af, 1 92 0 ; M.A . , P h . D . , U n i ve rsity of Was h i ngton, 1 924, 1 942; L.L.D., Pac ific Lutheran U n i ve rsity, 1 960. OLAF MELV I N J O R D A H L , 1 940, Professor Emeritus 0/ Physics, 1 969 A . B . , Luther C o l lege, 1 92 5 ; M. S., Un iversity of P i tts b u rg h , 1 92 7 ; P h . D . , Un iversity o f Wiscons i n , 1 93 3 . E R I C H C A R L K N O R R , 1 949 , Professor Emeritus of Sociology, 1 969 G raduate, SI. P a u l Luther C o l lege, 1 9 2 1 ; Cando The o l . , SI. Paul Luther Se m i n a ry, 1 924; B.A., M. A . . Wash i n gton State U n iversity, 1 9 29 , 1 93 0 ; P h . D . , U n i versity o f Was h i n g to n , 1 946. A N N E ELISE K N U D S O N , 1 9 46, Associate Professor Emeritus 0/ English, 1 97 0 B . A . , A u g ustana C o l lege, 1 928; M.A., Wash i ngton State U n i versity, 1 93 6 ; further g radu ate study, U n i ve rs i ty of Was h i n g t o n , Wash i ngton State U n i versity , Uni­ versity of Cali fornia, Un i v e rsity of Lond o n . B read l o a f School o f E n g l i s h . OTT I L I E E L I S E LITTLE, 1 946-51 , 1 952, Professor 0 / Emeritus o f German, 1 966 A.B., U n iversity of I l l i nois, 1 9 2 3 ; M.A., University of Was h i ngton, 1 926; P h . D . , Hanseatic Un iversity, Hamb u rg, G e rmany, 1 937. G U N NAR J O HAN N ES MAL M I N , 1 937, Professor Emeritus of Music, Latin and Nor­ wegian, 1 969 B.A., Luther Col lege, 1 92 3 ; B . M . , SI. Olaf C o l lege, 1 92 5 ; M . Mus., U n iversity of MiChigan, 1940; f u rther graduate study, U n i versity o f Southern Cal ifornia, U n i ­ versity of Oslo. E L I N E KRAABEL MORKEN, 1 953, Associate Professor Emeritus of Nursing, 1 96 7 B.A., S I . Olaf C o l lege, 1 92 8 ; R . N . , Eman u e l H ospital School o f N u rs i n g , 1 931 ; M . N . , U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 962. R O B E RT A. L. MO RTVEDT, 1 962, President Emeritus, 1 969 A.B., S I . O l a f C o l l ege, 1 924; A . M . , P h . D . , Harvard U n ivers i ty, 1 930, 1 934 ; L L . D . , Pacific Lutheran U n i versity, Augustana C o l lege, 1 96 1 ; L i t I . D . , Wagner Col ­ lege, 1 962. F R E D E R I C K LAU R E N C E N EW N H A M , 1 9 50, Professor Emeritus of Music, 1 969 Graduate, Royal Academy o f M u s i c , London , 1 92 5 ; Tea cher's Trai n i n g Certi fi cate, U n i versity of L o n d o n , 1 9 25; Associate, Royal Col lege of M u s i c , Lond o n , 1 92 8 ; Licentiate, Associ ate, Fe l l ow , R o y a l Academy of Music, London, 1 929, 1 9 34, 1 962. A N DERS W I LLIAM RAMSTAD, 1 925, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, 1 9 61 B.A., SI. O l a f Col lege, 1 9 1 4 ; Ca n d o Theol., Luthe r Theologi cal Semi nary, 1 9 1 8 ; M.S., U n i versity o f Washington, 1 93 6 ; further graduate study, U n i versity o f Wash­ t i n g to n ; L . H . D . , Luther C o l lege, 1 960. H E R BERT R O B ERT RANSO N , 1 940, Professor Emeritus of English, 1 968 B .A . , M.A., Un iversity of Kansas, 1 9 24, 1 926; Ph.D., U n iversity o f Wash i ng­ ton , 1 936.


KELMER N ELSON ROE, 1 947, Associate Professor Emeritus of Religion, Greek, 1 96 7 B.A., Luther Col lege, 1 925; B.Th., Luther Theologi cal, Sem i n ary, 1 928; M .T h . , Pri nceton Theological Seminary, 1 929. J OSEF EMIL R U N N I N G , 1 948, Assistant Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, 1 96 1 B.A., S l . O l a f C o l lege, 1 9 1 6 ; M .A., Un iversity o f M i n nesota, 1 941 . VERNON ALFRED UTZ I N G ER, 1 950-53, 1 957, Professor Emeritus of Speech, 1 969 B.A., Nort h Central Co llege, 1 92 2 ; M.A., N o rthwestern Un iversity, 1 929 ; P h . D . , U n i ve rsity of Southern Cal i fornia, 1 952. PAUL G . V I G N ESS, 1 956, Associate Professor Emeritus of Religion and His足 tory, 1 965 B.A . , Sl. O laf C o l lege, 1 9 1 8 ; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University, 1 924, 1 930.

Faculty Standing Committees - 1970-71

The first-named member of each committee is the chairman. The President i s an ex-off i c i o member o f a l l commi ttees. Advisory members a r e l i sted i n the Faculty Hand book. A D M I SS I O N S : Tobiason, Stucke, W i l l i amson, 2 students ARTIST S E R I E S : Karl, Dah l , Roskos, 5 students (one o f whom is c h a i rman) ATHLET I C S : Doughty, Marti l l a, Toven C O M M ITTEE ON C O M M I TTEES: Klopsch, Lowes, O fficer EDUCAT I O N A L P O L I C I ES : Adams, Cone, Farmer, Kn utso n , D . Olson, Zulauf FACU LTY WELFAR E : Lowes, Jorgenson, Ostenson F I NANCIAL ASS I STA N C E : Nesset, Jensen, Lauer C O M M I TTEE O N GEN ERAL U N I VERSITY REQU I R E M E NTS: Jones, E k l u n d , J o h n sto n , 2 students C O M M ITTEE TO P R O MOTE G RADUATE STUDY: G . King, Schn ackenberg, Tang I NTER I M C O M M ITTEE: Nesset, Govig, Jorgenson, Petersen, 2 students LECT U R E AND C O N VOCATI O N : B l o m q u i st, G . G i l be rtso n , L. Meyer, 3 students (one of whom is chai rman) L I B RARY: Schwidder, L. Johnson, Webster P U B L I C AT I O N S : S i m monds, Hoseth, Monroe RAN K AND TEN U R E : Joh nston, Arbaug h , Farmer, Huestis, Knapp, C. Peterson R E L I G I O US ACTI V I T I E S : J. Petersen, Adac h i , O berholtzer SOCIAL: L. O lson, Carlson, Revis, Toven, 3 students STA N DARDS: Eklund, Marti l l a, Schwi dder, Severtson, W i l l i amson, 3 students


STU D ENT ACA DEM I C STAT US: G i d d i ngs, W. G i l be rtso n , Jacobson, M i netti, Sorenson STU DE NT ACTIVITI ES AND WELFAR E : Hu tcheon, Offi cer, R. Olsen, 3 students ST U D ENT P U B L I CA T I O N S : Hal seth, Napjus, S i m monds, 4 students (one of whom is c ha i rman)

O t h e r University Comm issions, Boards

-

1 970-71

ALL- U N I V E R SITY C O M M I SS I O N : Klopsch, Adams, Johnston, Lowes, Peterse n , F a r m e r , J u ng kuntz, Leasure, A S P L U P resident ( B i l l Ch ristensen), 5 students a n d 4 s t a f f members U N I VE R S I TY CENTER BOARD: Leasure, Buchanan, H utcheon , Olsen, and 4 students. Advisory: M. Swenson


Statistical Summary ENR OLLME NT - 1 969-70 Men

G raduates Seniors Juniors Sophomores Freshmen Specials Auditors _ _ _ _ _

700 477 437 495 718 101 8

1 ,436 585

1 , 500 905

2,936 1 ,490

ďż˝,021

2,405

4 ,426

Men

Women

Total

______________ _________

________________________

__________________ _

____________ __

_

________

_

Total Regu lar School Year S u m mer Session Enroll ment, 1 970 Net Total

___________________ _ _ _ _ _ _

..

Total

315 221 218 268 424 50 4

__________________________

_

Women

385 256 219 227 294 51 4

_______ ______ ______ _

ENROLLM ENT -Fal l 1 970 G raduates Seniors J u n i o rs Sop homores Freshmen Specials

______

___

____

_

__

______

Total Fall 1 970

_

_

__

__________________

353 266 273 253 318 0

1 63 282 270 356 463 4

516 548 543 609 781 4

1 ,463

1 ,538

3,001


RELIGIOUS AFFILIATIONS -Fall 1 970

Lutheran

LC-MS

The ALC LCA

_1 , 138 293

_

__

1 99 41

_

U n c lassified

__

Total Lutherans

___

1 ,671

Other Denominations Presbyterian Methodist Cat h o l i c

-

---------

___

Episcopalian Baptist

---

_

----

-----

--- -- -

-

1 25 111 128 79 86 32 147 622

-------

-

-

._ - - -

--

Con9regational Oth e r affi liations No affi li ation

___

--------

Total

__

_

_ _ _________

GRAND TOTAL

__1 ,330

_ _ _ _ _ ___

3,001

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDE NTS Washington Oregon

__

_

Califo rn i a Montana Alaska Idaho M i n nesota Hawaii C o l o rado

_

_ ______

N o rth Dakota

__

_ _ __

I l l i no i s M i chigan Texas Utah

_

_

Arizo n a New Jersey

____

_ __

New Mexico

_

Ohio

_ __ _ _

_

_

South Dakota Virg i n i a Florida

2,01 5 292 262 102 52 47 37 24 18 17 16 8 8 7 6 6 6 4 4 4 3

_

_ __ _

_

Iowa

__

Louisiana New York

_

__

_____ _

Wisconsin I n d i an a Kansas

__

Massachusetts Oklahoma

______

_

_

_ ___

P e n n sylva n i a Wyoming

_ __ _

ConnecU cut

_

3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

_ ____ _

D i st r i c t of Columbia

_

Maryland Missouri Nebraska Nevada

_

Tennessee

_

_ _

__ _

_

_ __

Foreign

Total

32

______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

3,001


I

J


I ndex

Acade m i c Organization Acad e m i c Probation

45 42

Acade m i c P roced u res Accreditati o n

37 10

Activities Ath letic _ _ Com m u n i c ation Arts Departmental General Honorary M usical P u b l i cations Religi ous Ad m i n i strative Officers

30 31 32 31 30 _ 31 31 32 32 _209

Adm issions Advanced P l acement Prog ram Early Decision P o l i c y_ Early Admissions P o l i c y G raduate Stud ies Proced u res Re-ad m i ss i o n o f Former Students N on-deg ree Students Transfer Students

15 18 16 16 59 15 18 18 17

Advanced Placement P rogra m A i r Force Rese rve Officers Trai n i ng P rogram

18

A l u m n i Association American Economy P rogram A rt B u i l d i n g Arts and Sciences, Col lege o f Ath letics A u d i t i n g of C o u rses A u to m o b i les and other Motor Vehic les

. 1 99 _1 1 , 209 14 12 48 31 38 32

Board and Room _ 20 __ 208 Board of Col lege Education Board of Regents_ _ _ 207 Book Store _____ 3 0 __ 1 1 -1 3 B u i ld i ngs, U n i ve rsity Busi ness A d m i n i strat i o n , S c h o o l of

Calendar 6, 7 , 8 Campus 11 Center, U n i versity _ 12 Certification _ 1 06 C h anges i n Reg i strat i o n 39 Chapel Responsi b i l i ties 29 C H O I C E-Center for H u m a n O rg a n i za13 tion in C h an g i ng E n v i ro n me n ts 208 C h u rch Offi c i a l s 42 C l assi fication of Stude n ts Co ffee S h o ps 29 Col lege Entrance Exam i n a t i o n 16 Board Tests 48 Col lege of Arts and Scien ces 12 Col lege U n i on B u i l d i n g 12 C o l u m b i a Cen ter C o m m u n i ty Life 27 46 Core Req u i re m e n ts 28 Counse l i ng and Testing Services 37, 46 C o u rse Load 65, 205 C o u rses o f I nstruction 67 Art __ _ 71 Biology _ 77 Busi ness A d m i n i stration 89 Chemistry 93 C lassics C o m m u n i ca t i o n Arts 93 99 Earth Scien ces Eco n o m ics 1 01 Educati o n 1 05 1 32 E n g l i sh Fore i g n Lang uages 1 37 French .. 1 39 German 1 40 G reek 141 J apanese 141 Lat i n 1 42 Linq u i stics 1 39 N o rwegian _ 1 42 _1 4 2 R ussian Spanish _1 42 General Engi neeri n g _ _ 1 44 Geog ra p h y (see Earth Sciences) 99


Geology (see Earth Sciences) 99 Hi story _ 145 93 J o u r n a l i s m ( s e e C o m m . Arts) 1 51 Mathematics 1 55 Music 1 67 N u rsing 1 75 P h i losophy Physical Ed ucation 1 78 1 84 Physics . 191 Pol itical Science Psyc h o l ogy 1 94 197 Religion reserve Officer Tra i n i n g Corps . 1 99 99 Science (see Earth Sci ences) Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Welfare 201 Credit by Exam i n ation 37 _

_ 43 Dean's List Deg rees 45, 5 1 -54 , 61 De pository for Students 23 59 Division o f G raduate Studies 48 D i vi s i o n of H u r:. a n i ties 48 D i v i s i o n of Natural Sciences 48 Division o f Social Sciences Eastvold C hapel Edu cati o n , School o f E l i g i b i l i ty E m p l oyment, Student E n r o l l ment Entrance Req u i rements Eve n i n g C l asses

12 .. 56, 1 0 5 42 25, 30 . _ 234 1 5, 1 6 35

23 57 29 48 42

Fi nancial Aid Fine Arts, School of Food Service Forei gn Language Options Foreign Study Opport u n ities

235 Geographical D i stribution 10 Government of the U n i versity 40 Grade Poi nts 40 Grades G raduate Studies, Division of 59 43 Grad uation Honors 45 G raduation Requireme nts Al so, see the Col lege and Schools G ffi n ďż˝ 25 38 Guest of the University Status _ Gymnasium 12 __

._

I nc o m p letes I n formal Study I nterim

40 38 8

Late Afte rnoon and Eve n i n g C l asses Li brary, M o rtvedt Loan Funds Locati on 0' U n i versity

35 '1 1 26 9

_

_

_

. 1 0, 2 1 1 Facu l ty 232 Faculty Committees 25 Federal Programs, F i n a n c i a l A i d 19 Fees 19 General 20 Music Special 20 1 07 Fifth Year Requi rements 19 Fi n a n ces

1 2 , 28 28 1 9 , 28 9 43 19 33 48

Health Cente r Health and Medica l Service _ Health I n s u rance His tory of the U n i versity Hon ors Courses H o n o rs at En trance Housing H u man i t i e s , Division o f

Majors Master's Degrees Offered Medical Tec h n ology C o u rse Mooring Mast __

__ _

National Defense Education Act Natu ral Sciences, Division of_ N u m be ri n g System N u rS i n g , School oL _ __ __ _

__

_

45, 49 60 53 32 25 48 38 57 , 1 67 _


Objectives of the U n i versity _ O rientation Ownership and Support _

________

_

27

_

9

_

_____

Pacific N o rthwest I n tercollegi ate Athletic Confe rence Parish Work Pass-Fail Option Payments _ Physical Educat i o n , S c h o o l oL _57, P h ysical Examination P l ace of Resi dence _ Pl acement Service P re-P rofessional Programs P re-Dental P re-Engineering P re-Law P re-Med icine P re-Theology P ri n ci pa l 's C reden tials P rog rams f o r C a reers _

_

__

____

31 54

______

41 21

__

_ _ __

1 78 16

_________

33

___ _ _ _ _

30

_ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_

_

52

__ __

51 52

____________

_ _ _ _ _____

52

______________

54 1 08

_________

51

___ _ ______

Radio Station 14 11 R amstad H a l l 17 Re-Ad miss i o n o f F o r m e r Students Refunds 21 Register, The . 207 Registration 37 R e l i g ious Aff i l ia t i o n 235 Repeating of C o u rses 41 15, 1 6 Req u i rements , E n t rance 45 Req u i rements, G raduation 1 99 Reserve Officer Trai ning Corps 1 2 , 1 3, 33 Residence H a l l s Room Reservations and Asign ments 33 __

_

_____

_

_ __ ___ __ _

_____

_

_

_

_

______ _

__

__

__

__

__

_ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_

56, 1 05

__ _ _

__

_

__

57, 1 7 8

__

___

_

57

_

_57, 1 67

___ _

11

_

54

_

_

_ _

48

_

_

_ 234

__

1 0 , 30

27

_______

____

__

___

________

_

_

____

_

32

_

26

30-32

_ ___ _

_

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . _

____

School of Education School of F i n e Arts School of N u rs i n g School of Physical Education Science H a l l Social Welfare Program Social Scien ces, D i vision o f _ Standard Certifi cation Statistical S u m m a ry Student Affa i rs Student Body Student Congregation Student Loan Funds Student O rganizations Student P u b l i cations Student Teach ing S u m m e r Session Swi m m i n g Pool Symbols _ _

___

_

_

4

____

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

32

______________

_ _ __ _ _____

___

_

111 35

_ _ _ ____ _ ______

12

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_____

65

______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

T a b l e of Contents Tacoma-Pierce Admin istration Building Talent Awards Teac h e r Education Testing Service Transfer Students T u i ti on ___ ___ _

__

3

_

11

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

24

____ ___________

_

__________

__

1 05

_ _____________

_

__ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

University, T h e University Bui l d i ngs Un iversity Center U n i versity Req ui rements Urban Affai rs P rogram _ _

__

_

_

_

19 9

__ _ ___ __ _

_____

28

1 7, 46

11, 12

___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_______

___________

12 45 55

_

Saga Sched u l i n g . __ Scholarsh i p Req u i rements Scholars h i ps School of B usi ness A d m i nistration _

__

_

___

_

__

_

_

_

_

_

__

__

__

_

32 32 24 24

_55, 77

Veterans Affairs Visiting C lasses

_1 7, 29 38

Warehouse and Shops W ' t h d rawal from C o rses _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ _

12

__ _ _ _ __

39

Xavier H a l l

11

u

___

__ _ _______ __ __ _


-


1971-1972 Catalog